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The Apalachicola times
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100380/00200
 Material Information
Title: The Apalachicola times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: H.W. Johnston
Place of Publication: Apalachicola Fla
Apalachicola Fla
Publication Date: 02-07-2013
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1885.
General Note: Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 32911693
lccn - sn 95026907
System ID: UF00100380:00208
 Related Items
Preceded by: Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by: Apalachicola herald

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xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx 50 WWW.APALACHTIMES.COM Phone: 850-653-8868 Web: apalachtimes.com E-mail: dadlerstein@star .com Fax: 850-653-8036 Circulation: 800-345-8688 DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK: School News & Society: 11 a.m. Friday Real Estate Ads: 11 a.m. Thursday Legal Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Display Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Line Ads: 5 p.m. Monday xxxxx Contact Us xxxxx Out to see Index By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com Contract talks between the Franklin County school district and its employees went to impasse last week, but both sides are continuing to talk as time ebbs away to reach a deal to shore up the districts shaky nances. The school boards chief negotiator, Tallahassee attorney Leonard Dietzen, served notice Feb. 1 to the states Public Employees Relations Commission that the district had declared an impasse in the talks. This was because of the inability of both sides to make progress within a 14-day window created when the district rst noti ed the Florida Department of Education that it faced nancial urgency because of a more than half-million-dollar shortfall in revenue to meet its obligations. Both sides could not reach a mutual conclusion, and we had extended beyond the 14day requirement to do a speed-up negotiation process because the district declared a nancial urgency, said Rik McNeill, executive director of the Florida Education Associations Central Panhandle Service unit, who is a key negotiator on behalf of the county teachers and education support personnel. When we got together and we could not agree on everything, the district declared impasse. Though an impasse could lead to the appointment of a special magistrate to intervene in the talks, that does not appear to be a priority for either side. We are still working on a variety of solutions to the impasse, rather than going through a costly administrative law judge, a Last weekends Mardi Gras festivities, from dancing down Commerce Street to rocking out at the Armory, were good fun and a big help to Habitat for Humanity. The Mystic Krewe of Salty Barkers, a parade unit of dogs and their people, led the Apalachicola Mardi Gras parade as a long queue of marchers weaved their way through downtown, led by Pam Nobles in re ghter gear and trailed by pull wagons, push strollers and golf carts brightly decorated. Afterward, the party continued at Riverfront Park with live music, dancing, Cajun food and other festivities. Organizer Carolina Ilardi said the days events raised about $2,000, and she saw a large number of visitors from out of town who had come down to indulge their party spirit. The fundraising strength continued Saturday at the Armory, with another $15,000 coming in, all earmarked to help in the county chapter of Habitat for Humanitys effort to complete its fourth house and start a fth house. We are just encouraged; the fundraising was up, said Don Ashley, who worked closely with his wife, Pam, to organize the banquet. Beads were thrown from the balconies, food and beverages abounded, and the reign of King and Queen Mason and Marilyn Bean gave way to the crowning of the new one, Ken and Kim Fish. Threats delay attorney decision By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com On Tuesday, county commissioners decided not to decide who will be the county attorney. After interviews with ve candidates for the job, Commissioner William Massey announced he would not vote to appoint a candidate. About three days ago, I had my decision made about who I was going to vote for. I had 186 phone calls yesterday; 33 of them was threats to burn me out (or damage my truck and boats.) Today I am not making a decision on the threats I got yesterday, he said. I was told I was the middleman and stood in between the two. I am not. Commissioner Cheryl Sanders said she had been threatened as well and didnt want to vote to choose the new attorney either. I have sat on this board for 15 years and made a lot of decisions in this county, some of them good and some of them bad. Some of them I didnt want to make but I had to, Sanders said. I have never been so disappointed as I am in this procedure. She said the decision over the county attorneys job had pitted relatives against each other. Sanders said she was threatened with ethics violations and investigation under the Sunshine Act if she did not support Michael Shuler for county attorney. Thats carrying it a little too far, she said. Every time before I come in here, I pray and ask God to guide me on the decisions that I make. Youre telling me that if God puts it on my heart to pick someone other than Michael Shuler for county attorney that Im doing wrong? I have not said I was supporting this one against that one. I and the rest of the board said we wanted to look at what is what. Mr. Massey is a new commissioner. He has the right to do that, Sanders said. I have not done anything to bring shame to Franklin County, but it has brought shame to me that someone would do this. Im like Mr. Massey. I choose not to vote. Commissioner Smokey Parrish said under the law, any commissioner present was required to cast School nance talks at impasse Thursday, February 7, 2013 VOL. 127 ISSUE 41 RIK M c NEILL Florida Education Association We are just encouraged; the Ashley, who worked closely with Beads were thrown from the Apalachicola Mardi Gras parade out of town who had come down Habitat for Humanitys effort to Habitat for Humanitys effort to See IMPASSE A6 See ATTORNEY A7 COUNTY COMMISSIONERS: COUNTY CELEBRATES MARDI GRAS From top, Mardi Gras King and Queen Ken and Kim Fish toss beads during the parade. Skylar Layne, left, and a friend join in the parade. Clarice Powell, left, tosses beads. Trumpeter Don Juan serenades the Mardi Gras banquet crowd. DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times ED TILEY | Habitat For Humanity See MARDI GRAS A5 Opinion . . . . . . A4 Society . . . . . . A8 Faith . . . . . . . A9 Outdoors . . . . . A10 Sports . . . . . . A11 Tide Chart . . . . A10 Classi eds . . . A14-A15 A KO by Mayo, A11 Ragtime piano returns to Dixie The Dixie Theatre this weekend will present ragtime/boogie-woogie pianist Bob Milne at 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday and 3 p.m. Sunday. Milne delights audiences with his pianoplaying pyrotechnics and his enthusiasm. All seats $25. For tickets, call the box of ce at 653-3200. Last weekend for Cat sh Moon Four people who have known each other all their lives come to grips with knowing each other all their lives on an overnight shing trip. The Panhandle Players present Cat sh Moon, a Southern Comedy, at 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday at Benedict Hall at Trinity Church. Tickets, including dessert, are $20 and by reservations only. Call John Inzetta at 734-0260 or 404326-7791. Nephina duo to perform Sunday Violin and guitar duo Nephina will be featured at 4 p.m. Sunday at Trinity Episcopal Church as part of the annual Ilse Newell Fund for the Performing Arts concert series. Nephina brings together two distinguished music professors from Valdosta State University. Nephtali Santiago, an instructor in the universitys Department of Music, will perform on guitar, together with Nina Lutz on violin and piano. General admission is $5, with students admitted free. Forgotten Coast Chefs Sampler Sunday The Apalachicola Bay Chamber of Commerce will host the 17th annual Forgotten Coast Chefs Sampler from 6-9 p.m. Sundaym. Area chefs will prepare their most creative dishes at the historic Fort Coombs Armory. Tickets are $45-$50. For more information, call the Apalachicola Bay Chamber of Commerce at 653-9419 or email info@ apalachicolabay.org.

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Local A2 | The Times Thursday, February 7, 2013 On Saturday, St. George Islanders will open their doors for the second annual St. George Island Tour of Homes, featuring eight distinctive and beautiful homes. The tour lasts from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m. Saturday and bene ts the St. George Lighthouse Association (SGLA). Tickets are $15 in advance and $20 on Saturday. On Friday evening, Erik Lovestrand, education coordinator at the Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve in Eastpoint, will kick off the weekend with a presentation on the ecology and importance of the Apalachicola River, Bay and estuary and its impact on St. George Island. This lecture is free and will be from 6 to 8 p.m. at the St. George Island Fire Station, 324 East Pine Avenue. The tour will put our island lifestyles on display once again as seen through the diversity of our homes from the beach to the bay and modern to traditional, said Dany Ray, tour spokesperson. Tour goers loved the event last year, and this year will be every bit as fun and interesting as people get a rare, inside look at our beautiful homes. The 2013 tour will feature one home on the islands East End, four homes in the rst-platted area of Gulf Beaches, and three homes in the gated community St. George Plantation. There will be shuttle service to homes in the St. George Plantation. Also open for tour participants will be the Lighthouse and the Lighthouse Keepers House at the center of the island. The St. George Plantation Clubhouse will once again be a stopping point in the Plantation. The residence Amen Corner, belonging to Bob and Marian Hankinson is a two-story, ve-bedroom dream with wrap around porches. Bay Manor, the beach home of Joe and Allison Altic is a Will Solberg creation, featuring antique xtures and stained glass. John and Joyce Caddell have furnished C-Haven with quirky art and the sixbedroom house maintains a cozy feel with built-in hideaways. Joseph and Mary Kaplers Cedar Wing, on a delightfully preserved wooded lot, has modern air inside with cathedral ceilings and industrial xtures and materials. John and Linda Hockmans home is designed for entertaining and has an open feel with lots of light. Kings Court, the refuge of George Plymel, is the rst Skinny Minnie to appear on a tour and the elegant furnishings and view will not disappoint. David and Suzy Crenshaws Seaview is conservation aware with low water-use plumbing and its own solar array. The Crenshaws have put as much thought into the beauty of the dcor as the environment. Bob and Mary Jean Heide will open Stealth House for the tour. Noted island architect Larry Burke designed the house to resemble the stark, clean geometry of a Stealth aircraft for its rst owner, a pilot. The aviation theme continues in the living room where a 180-degree view of the Gulf is like that from an airplanes cockpit. Stop number nine on this years tour is the Cape St. George Lighthouse, recreated in its new location by volunteers and outstanding craftsmen. Tour tickets are available at the St. George Lighthouse Museum and Gift Shop. To order tickets in advance, telephone 927-7745. SGLA is a nonpro t Florida corporation organized to preserve, maintain and promote the Cape St. George Lighthouse. The lighthouse was restored in 2008 after collapsing in 2005 Funds raised by SGLA are used for the on-going maintenance of the lighthouse, the keepers house and Lighthouse Park. For more information call 927-7744. By LOIS SWOBODA Mark Brannan and Karah Busby, and Madilynn Brannan are delighted to announce the birth of their daughter/ Little sister, Kayten Grace Brannan. She weighed 6 lbs 13 oz and was 19 inches long, and was born on Dec. 30th, 2012 at 6:44 p.m. Her maternal grandparents are the late Ricky Busby of Eastpoint and the late Tammy Yon of Apalachicola. Her Paternal grandparents are Gail Brannan of Eastpoint, and Terry Brannan of Carrabelle. NO HIDDEN CHARGES: It is our policy that the patient and any other person responsible for payments has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed by payment or any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment. www.mulliseye.com "WE WELCOME NE W PATIE N TS, C ALL T ODAY FOR YOUR P RIORITY APP OI N TME N T" FOR NEW PATIENTS 59 AND OLDER This certificate is good for a complete Medical Eye Exam with Todd Robinson, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Surgeon. The exam includes a prescription for eye glasses and tests for Glaucoma, Cataracts and other eye diseases FOR YOUR APPOINTMENT CALL: 850-763-6666 ELIGIBILITY: U.S. Citizens living in the Florida Panhandle, 59 years and older, not presently under our care. Coupon Expires: 2-28-13 FREE EYE EXAM CODE: AP00 Darren Payne, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon In Memory of Lee Mullis, M.D. Todd Robinson, M.D Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon Smart Lenses SM St. George Island readies for Saturday tour Right: Cedar Wing combines a natural setting with contemporary interiors. Far right: Stealth House features aerodynamic lines. Bottom left: Bay Manor is the beach home of Joe and Allison Altic. Bottom right: Seaview was designed with the Earth in mind. PHOTOS BY BETH WHITE | Special to the Times

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The Times | A3 Thursday, February 7, 2013 Special to The Times An encounter late last month with the head of the Carrabelle ofce of the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commis sions Division of Law Enforce ment led to trouble for an errant hunter in Tates Hell. Capt. Craig Duval was off duty hunting in the Crooked River tract of Tates Hell Wildlife Man agement Area. He heard a shot toward Highway 67, about 100 yards away from his location. As he was traveling toward Highway 67, he came upon a white Toyota Camry stopped in the middle of the roadway with the drivers door open, blocking the road. No one was in the vehi cle. Another vehicle approached and pulled alongside of the parked Camry. An individual ex ited the woods and spoke briey to the driver of the second ve hicle, and then both subjects and vehicles left the area. Duval noticed neither of the subjects spoke to him and said it was obvious they did not want to. He made contact with dispatch ers, who directed Ofcers Woody Cook and Matt Gore to his loca tion. While waiting for the of cers to arrive, the driver of the Camry came back to Duvals lo cation and stopped. Duval asked him, What did you shoot? The subject said nothing and said he shot at a buck and missed. The driver left the area for a second time. About 10 minutes later, the subject came back, stopped his vehicle, got out and asked him if he was the game warden. Duval replied, Yes, why? He asked what he was doing, and Duval said he was waiting on two of cers to arrive so he could go out and look around because of shots being red and no one wanting to stick around afterwards. The subject said he did not kill any thing but would stay to see if anything was found. After Gore and Cook arrived, Duval explained the scenario, and they went into the woods. After a brief search, a freshly killed doe was located about 60 yards away from the road in di rect line with where the Camry originally was parked. During a subsequent discussion with the subject, he accepted responsibil ity for the deer. The doe and a 30.06 rie were seized as evidence. The bullet was retrieved from the doe for examination and forensic match ing to the subjects rie. The sub ject was cited and released. The following report is provided by the Franklin County Sheriffs Ofce. Arrests in this weeks report were made by ofcers from the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC), Carrabelle Police Department (CPD) and Franklin County Sheriffs Ofce (FCSO). All defendants are to be considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law. JAN. 29 Dwain R. Weston, 42, Seminole, violation of probation (FCSO) JAN. 30 Alfred O. Wallace, 26, Jacksonville, burglary of a dwelling person assaulted, armed robbery with a deadly weapon, possession of a rearm by a convicted fellow and grand theft of a rearm (FCSO) JAN. 31 Brandon D. Polous, 27, Eastpoint, criminal mischief (FCSO) Donna J. Brandon, 48, Carrabelle, seven counts of petit theft (FCSO) Travis D. Millender, 35, Carrabelle, violation of probation (FCSO) Gretta A. Prevette, 27, Eastpoint, disorderly conduct and resisting ofcer without violence (FCSO) FEB. 1 Larry S. Burch, 61, Hosford, DUI, possession of less than 20 grams of cannabis and possession of paraphernalia (FCSO) Patrick O. Eckert, 43, Eastpoint, domestic battery (FCSO) FEB. 2 Jana R. Walker, 34, Jacksonville, two counts of retail theft (CPD) FEB. 4 Christin Everett, 39, Eastpoint, reckless driving (FCSO) Alvin Marks, 41, Eastpoint, trespass on leased beds, and harvesting oysters between sunset and sunrise (FWC) Henry A. Shiver, 30, Sumatra, trespass on leased beds, and harvesting oysters between sunset and sunrise (FWC) Jacinto Negron, 47, Eastpoint, public affray and resisting ofcer without violence (FCSO) Bobby J. Bullock, Jr., 44, Eastpoint, public affray and disorderly intoxication (FCSO) Tony Sadler, 51, Apalachicola, driving while license suspended or revoked (FCSO) Dana D. Aponte, 37, Eastpoint, public affray and disorderly intoxication (FCSO) Special to The Times Robert Ramos was among 18 new Florida Fish and Wild life Conservation Commission ofcers to graduate Feb. 1. He will spend the next three months with a eldtraining ofcer and then be assigned to Franklin County. At a ceremony at the Flor ida Public Safety Institute near Tallahassee, members of FWCs 19th ofcer class pledged their efforts to patrol Floridas lands and waters, protect its people and pre serve its resources. Each year, more than 7 million residents and visi tors participate in resourcerelated outdoor activities in Florida, and they contribute over 30 billion dollars into the economy, said FWC Execu tive Director Nick Wiley. We want these people to be able to enjoy Floridas beautiful natural resources safely and for years to come. FWC ofcers are respon sible for patrolling all of Floridas woods and waters, including its state forests and state parks. Because of their jurisdiction and specialized training and equipment, they are often the rst to be able to respond to boating accidents, missing boaters and lost campers, hikers and hunters. Each year, FWC ofcers save about 1,000 people during search-and-rescue missions. Our ofcers are often the rst point of contact people have with the agency, said Col. Jim Brown, director of the FWCs Division of Law Enforcement. This privilege carries great responsibility, and I know these new ofcers will uphold our values: integ rity, professionalism, dedica tion and adaptability. They began their training in July 2012. The beginning part of each FWC academy teaches recruits basic law enforcement techniques and skills. The specialized training involves rearms prociency, wildlife identication, vessel operation, defensive tactics, all-terrain vehicle operation, detection for boating and driv ing under the inuence and a focus on state and federal wildlife, sheries and environ mental laws. These 18 individuals will now join an exceptional group as they face the challenging and rewarding path ahead, Brown said. Arrest REPOR T 18 new FWC ofcers graduate Law Enforcement FWC REPOR T

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USPS 027-600 Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 Publisher: Roger Quinn Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola Times OPINION www.apalachtimes.com A Section Around the middle of the last century Franklin County was represented in the Florida House of Representatives by Apalachicola native Bryant Patton. The State of Florida would later recognize Representative Patton for his service by naming the bridge from Eastpoint to St. George Island in his honor. Representative Patton was a great debater and when he would rise to present his position on a pending issue, a sudden quietness would prevail in the House Chamber. His colleges wanted to hear what Representative Patton had to say. He would usually begin with a humorous comment. His favorite would remind his opponent that he was confused as the little boy that dropped his chewing gum in the chicken yard. I was reminded of Representative Pattons debating skills when I read the letter by Mr. John Hedrick that was published in a recent issue of the Apalachicola/Carrabelle Times. I submit that Mr. Hedrick is that confused little boy in the chicken yard. It appears that Mr. Hedrick is not satis ed that the good citizens of Floridas Second Congressional District have re-elected Congressman Steve Southerland. In his letter to the Times he proceeds to advise us of our mistake. By the way, I dont know where Mr. Hedrick is from. He is not listed in the Franklin County property records nor in the local telephone directory. I would bet my Romney yard sign that he is not a subscriber to the Times. I thought it strange that he is writing to the Times. Mr. Hedrick would lead you to believe that Congressman Southerlands victory was by a slim margin. Congressman Southerland received 52.7 percent of the vote to Al Larsons 47.2 percent. Considering that Democrats outnumber Republicans by a twoto-one count in the 2nd District, you could argue that Southerland won by a landslide. Now get this, Hedrick offers that people in the 2nd. District didnt know that Southerland would oppose Obamas position on most issues. Where has Mr. Hedrick been? Congressman Southerlands campaign slogan was have you had enough? Citizens of the 2nd District responded with their vote by acknowledging that they too were tired of big government, waste, inef ciency and de cit spending. Mr. Hedrick criticized Congressman Southerland for his no vote on the scal cliff deal. Why should that surprise anyone? Heck, thats why the voters sent the congressman back to Washington. In the end the majority just kicked the can down the alley to be acted upon on another day. What has been overlooked is that Congressman Southerland by his vote differed from the Republican leadership. It appears that at long last we have a representative in Congress that talks, acts and votes the same in Washington as he does while soliciting voters in his home district. Mr. Hedrick was critical of Congressman Southerlands vote on the Hurricane Sandy Relief bill. What Mr. Hedrick didnt tell you was that there were two Sandy Relief bills. The rst one for $9.7 billion was to fund the Federal Flood Insurance Fund. Southerland voted for this bill. He, as most of his colleagues, thought that people that had purchased and paid for ood protection were entitled to a speedy settlement. The second Sandy Relief Bill for $50.3 billion contained enough pork that you could hear the oinks all the way to Arkansas. Southerland voted against this bill. Mr. Hedricks letter suggests that Congressman Southerland is not cooperative and opposes bipartisanship. Its not that way at all. He would have to compromise his principles to agree with House liberals. In any event, bipartisanship is a two-way street and when the Senate democrats offer a little bipartisanship, maybe some will ow over to the House. I do agree with Mr. Hedrick to contact your congressman and let him know how you feel on issues. May I suggest that you ask Congressman Southerland to STAY THE COURSE: 1. Keep ghting to repeal Obamacare; 2. Keep ghting to protect the Second Amendment. 3. Keep ghting the liberals trying to take our guns away; 4. Keep ghting to reduce the size of government; 5. Keep ghting to cut the de cit; 6. Keep ghting to balance the budget. Willie Norred St. George Island Special to The Times The Florida Senate Committee on Agriculture last month met to hear testimony on the oyster shortage in Apalachicola Bay. There is clearly a problem we need to solve, said Senator Bill Montford (DTallahassee), chair of the committee. The bay is no longer producing the volume of oysters that keeps the local economy alive. We need to identify solutions or we risk losing a Florida and national treasure. Dr. Karl Havens, head of the University of Florida Oyster Recovery Team, presented a number of issues plaguing the Bay at the Jan. 15 hearing.. Havens explained how low river ow and drought conditions in recent years have led to a high number of oyster predators such as snails, conchs and sponges. These predators would normally be washed out to the Gulf of Mexico but the drought has prevented this from occurring. The committee also heard from a number of residents of the affected counties. They have been working with the Gulf Coast Workforce Board to put affected oystermen back to work. The Workforce Board hopes that anticipated federal funds will be able to provide employment for residents while also helping to restore the oyster population. We need to help our Floridians nd work, said Montford. The members of my committee and I look forward to helping those currently in need while also nding ways to prevent such a drastic situation from happening again in the future. Montford also committed that the Florida Senate Committee on Agriculture will review the on-going litigation over sharing the waters within the basin of the Apalachicola, Chattahoochee and Flint (ACF) Rivers. Montford also recognized the work of Senator Charlie Dean (RInverness) as chair of the Senate Committee on Environmental Preservation and Conservation. I am eager to hear the suggestions of Senator Deans committee after they examine this issue, Montford said. I commit to working with Senate President Don Gaetz (R-Niceville) and members of the Senate and House of Representatives to provide real relief to the many affected Floridians. Gaetz said that restoring our oyster industry is vital to Floridas economy and ecosystem, not only in our Northwest region but also throughout our state. I commend Senator Montford for his steadfast dedication and leadership in identifying sustainable solutions to this issue. I am con dent that through his efforts, Floridas oystermen and their families will once again prosper. Montford represents the Florida Senates Third District, which includes the following counties: Calhoun, Franklin, Gadsden, Gulf, Hamilton, Jefferson, Leon, Liberty, Madison, Taylor, and Wakulla. Montford was rst elected to the Senate in 2010 and served as Minority Whip from 2010 to 2012. He chairs the Senate Committee on Agriculture, Vice Chair of the K20 Appropriations Subcommittee on Education and Vice Chair of the K-20 Education Committee. The Apalachicola Municipal Library in 2013? Things just keep getting busier is all we can really say. As I wrote before, the library got a huge donation of fabulous Junior Fiction books. The winner was announced on Monday, with Katherine Applegates The One and Only Ivan winning the award. Its about a friendship between a gorilla and a baby elephant. As mentioned before, this collection is going on loan, for a while, to the Franklin County School in Eastpoint, but will remain a part of the librarys permanent collection. The library has again received a grant from the Libri Foundation in Oregon, which will be used to make our Junior Nonction collection more robust. Their grant offers deep discounts on very good quality books. Donations of books, both suitable for the collection or for our book sales, come in the door almost every day. Usually just one or two, but sometimes by the box loads. A few go into the collection, some are stored for the twice a year book sales (put on by PALS in May and November), and some go right into our free boxes outside. Sorting and processing all these books is an ongoing task. What does this have to do with you? The library functions with very few staff, and our hands are always full. The bottom line is that we need to cultivate more volunteers who can work on designated projects or just watch the front desk so other tasks can be performed without being interrupted. Right now we are lucky enough to have two retired librarians, Patty from Vermont, and Cordelia from Michigan, who are snowbirds who have rolled up their sleeves and pitched in. But we need more. The tasks are varied and some require almost no skills at all. There are things to do in the library, and ones off-site. Just being a friendly face, like Jane Callaham is on Thursday afternoons, would be of help. Celia Winterringer wins the most consistent award for coming in like clockwork on Tuesday and Thursday afternoons and entering books into the automation system. Thankfully this task will be ending soon, but then there will always be the corrections to make the system accurate. Our task list would not be complete without mentioning the upcoming Summer Reading Program, which will start on June 10, spanning over seven weeks. Volunteers make that program possible and there are a number of repeat participants each year. We read aloud to kids from pre-K to 5th grade, and do small simple craft activities. Julie OMalley, who helped coordinate the program as a Project Impact staffer, will hopefully be back again, but local adult participation is essential. There are Monday and Tuesday mornings during the program that we see more than 100 kids. We cant do it without you, so come by and talk to us about how you can offer some time to support your hometown library. Caty Greene is the librarian for the Apalachicola Municipal Library. To reach her, call 653-8436. @ THE LIBRARY Caty Greene Volunteers make library programs possible Thursday, February 7, 2013 Page 4 LETTER TO THE EDITOR Stay the course, Mr. Southerland DON GAETZ BILL MONTFORD Senate tackles efforts to restore Apalachicola Bay Its an unusual thing to meet a thoroughly honest man. I cant say for certain Ive ever met one, and thats not for want of searching. I am aware, however, that in addition to houses of worship and 12-Step Programs, one place you can nd truly honest people is on stage. Especially the volunteer actor stage, where there is absolutely no temptation to be corrupted by money. Actors in such productions do their best to bring out the emotions, the varied tones of voice, the emphatic movements of feet and hand, the thoughtful life vibrating through a plays chiseled words. They make it true to life or at least to the situation being depicted, for better or worse, for the time being. These actors, if they are good, employ several different ways of bringing this honesty about, such as how they stand, how they walk, how they dress, the manner in which they say their lines. Lots of different ways. Take, for example, since there is one week left to go in its performance, the Panhandle Players comedy Cat sh Moon and the four actors who last weekend enacted this Southern comedy about four lifelong friends who have returned to the shing pier, on a lake in lower Alabama, where they grew up and later strayed from the innocence of that youth. Take the elder statesman of the group, Curley, played by Gary Niblack. Hes older and wiser than the other three, not in the best of health, but clear in his head that the time has come for him to get er done when it comes to putting an end to the bickering between Gordon, played by Vince Bishop, and Frog, played by Frederic Kahler. Now the way Niblack does it is to deliver a superb performance of the part, written by Laddy Sartin, that is moving in its calmness, in the soft, deliberate manner Curley makes his case to his best buddies.It shows the strength that comes out when one tries to be a peacemaker, to be eventempered in the face of ery passions. Tranquil dispositions are not pulsing through the personalities of either Frog, the ex-husband of Betty, played by Donna McCoy, who is now being courted by Gordon. There is also no mistaking who is who: Frog, a hot-tempered hair-triggered country boy who has dif culty facing his own angers and frustrations; and Gordon, a goofy, almost oblivious, guy with a problem that might be addressed in one of those 12-Step programs. The two go out at each other from dusk to dawn, and the negative energy is palpable and the acting vivid all the way up to a masterfully handled shing battle that sprays it around in comic chaos. Director Dan Wheeler, assistants Margy Oehlert and Bob Inguagiato, stage manager Laura Baney, set designer Ed Aguiar all the tech people deserve special recognition for nding a way to make the entire production come alive on a simple stage, in a small space. Not only do the technical details bring the show alive, but so, especially, do the performers, most notably McCoy, whose luminous gaze and soft delivery have you believing the sky is strewn with stars, each carrying a tiny hope. Cat sh Moon is a delight, with an honest message we all need to hear. And that is a rare nd. Cat sh Moon The show runs Friday and Saturday, Feb. 8-9 at 7:30 p.m. at Benedict Hall at Trinity Church. Tickets, including dessert, are $20 and by reservations only. Please contact John Inzetta at (850) 734-0260 or (404) 326-7791. DAVID ADLERSTEIN Frankly Franklin Cat sh Moon sets its hooks in you

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Local The Times | A5 Thursday, February 7, 2013 March 9,10,11, 2012 CALL TO ALL VENDORS March 8, 9, 10, 2013 The Bay County Fairgrounds Register now for booth space at the 2013 Home & Garden Expo in Panama City, FL. All vendors receive a FREE quarter-page ad in the ocial 2013 Home & Garden Expo special section, reaching more than 80,000 adults in Bay and seven surrounding counties. For vendor application or information on the show: Call: 850-248-3976 or E-mail: expostradeshows@aol.com For sponsorship information call: 850-763-6587 For additional advertising information in the ocial program of the 2013 Home & Garden Expo contact The News Herald at 850-747-5000 SPONSORS THERE IS S T ILL SPACE FOR YOU A T T HE Friday: Noon 5 PM Saturday: 9 AM 5 PM Sunday: 10 AM 3 PM A HOST OF SHABBY CHIC VENDORS ALREADY SIGNED UP! BE PART OF THIS ONE-OF-A-KIND EVENT IN THIS AREA! For Health Expo Package Information Call (850) 747-5009 OR fax your questions to (850) 763-4636 Vendor Space Is Going Fast... So Call Now! $10,000 3,000 PLUS MANY OTHER WAYS TO PROMOTE YOUR BUSINESS. I NSTANTLY MA K E IT YOUR EX PO GAIN THE EXPOSURE YOU NEED FOR SUCCESS! Calling All Businesses To The 2013 Bay County Health Expo BOARDWAL K BEACH RESORT F EBRUARY 19, 2013 9 AM 2 PM S o n s o r e y T e N e w s H e r a Ashley said the Habitat board chose the new royalty in large part because of the longstanding support the Fishes business, Taylors Building Supply, has had for Habitat for more than the past decade. Theyve been involved one way or another in every single Habitat build, he said. The event lled the Armory with about 120 people, based on 20 tables of six persons each. We had more gross than the previous year, and more sponsors, Ashley said. We had never had so many items in our silent auction, over 50 items. David Butler emceed the evening, and performing were the Brian Bowen Band, the Dirty T-shirt Band, Smokey Parrish, Candi Robertson and the Hot Flashes dancers, with their redhot number ending when re ghter Ashley Teat walked out and spread the oor with a mock extinguisher. Habitat has completed three homes in the county and is about to nish its fourth on a lot in Eastpoint donated by Cadence Bank. Centennial Bank has donated the lot for a fth house, also in Eastpoints Magnolia Ridge neighborhood. Centennial banker Donnie Gay told the audience there was enough Habitat money to complete the fourth house, but the question was How much will be left to put towards the fth? DAVID ADLERSTEIN each. We had more gross than the previous performing were the Brian Bowen Band, the hot number ending when re ghter Ashley Teat walked the Fishes business, Taylors Building New state Democratic chairwoman talks shop Allison Tant speaks to the county Democratic leadership in January. DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com In the run-up to her victory in last months election as the new leader of the Florida Democratic Party, Allison Tant paid a visit to Franklin County to shore up support. At a Jan. 11 lunch at Stage Left Pizza in Apalachicola, Tant told members of the Franklin Democratic Executive Committee she wanted to turn her longtime work as a Tallahassee lobbyist and recent fundraiser for President Barack Obamas re-election campaign toward broadening and strengthening the state party. She cited improving high-tech infrastructure and fundraising as priorities. I dont want what happened to Alex Sink to ever happen again, she said, referring to Gov. Rick Scotts come-frombehind victory against who many saw as a strong Democratic candidate. We need to have something to start with, a better support system, Tant said. Im loathe to see that same loss of momentum. Two weeks after her visit, Tant won a narrow victory over Hillsborough County State Committeeman Alan Clendenin to win the party chairmanship at the state party organizational meeting at Lake Mary on Jan. 26. The win followed a contentious twomonth campaign that featured lobbying on Tants behalf by Democratic National Committee Chairwoman Debbie Wasserman Schultz and U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson. Tant, 51, now leads a Florida party of 4.8 million eager to take on Scott in 2014. We are going to have to work to out-raise, out-organize and outwork the GOP, Tant told the convention. Weve done it before, and were going to do it again. Tant sounded some of the likely themes in the upcoming off-year elections. She long has been an advocate for special needs children after her own son needed open heart surgery while still a young child, and she said she wanted to broaden that concern to others who are struggling. Its not my child you need to be worried about. Its oystermen, she said. Tant criticized the GOP for what she said was an unprecedented war on women and our bodies and for its sometimes subtle use of hateful talk, which she called a racial code, a new brand of racism. She said gay rights will be an issue for Floridians. They want to punish us because of who we love, Tant said, calling the Republican agenda extreme and radical and reckless. It wasnt just Romney. Its how the Republican Party has de ned itself, she told the luncheon gathering. Were going to see more and more people go our way. MARDI GRAS from page A1 From top left, Nehemiah Robinson watches the parade with him mom, Talitha Lowery Robinson. Candi Robertson entertains the crowd. Smokey Parrish sings a Blake Shelton tune Saturday night. Olivia Barineau sets the dancing standard at the parade. ED TILEY | Habitat For Humanity DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times ED TILEY | Habitat For Humanity DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times

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Local A6 | The Times Thursday, February 7, 2013 special magistrate, to make a determination, McNeill said. Both sides are talking; its not like were in an absolute stalemate where it really requires a third party to come in and try to mediate some other kind of settlement. Both sides have worked extensively outside of the box, dealing with a multitude of things that caused the nal situation, he said. I dont know that a mediator would come up with anything more novel than either side has come up with. It seems foolhardy to go that course, McNeill said, noting that the cost could be several thousand dollars. It costs us more money and delays the time to recoup any sort of savings. Were trying to do that in as expeditious manner as we can. Based on discussion with administrators, and from material disseminated by the union, both sides are working on ways to prevent or minimize job losses, perhaps by shifting bene t costs to employees or be implementing a tiered-system of salary reductions. Superintendent Nina Marks recent proposal, an across-the-board pay cut for all employees of 19.5 percent from February to June 30, the end of the scal year, remains on the table. This would have an estimated revenue bene t of $512,000. The school board members and the districts key administrators each took a 5 percent pay cut beginning in July, so each now would have to absorb a 14.5 percent pay cut for the remainder of the scal year. Marks said in October 2012, the union was noti ed of budget de cits and offered a similar administrative recommendation of a 5 percent across-the-board salary reduction for all district employees, retroactive to July 1, 2012. The union did not act upon this recommendation, but board members and administrators did, she said. An additional proposal of 19.5 percent for all other staff, not just teachers, was proposed as one single item to balance the budget by the end of the scal year June 30, 2013. As expected, this single proposal exposed the seriousness of what the district was experiencing. Finance Director Shannon Venable said further slimmed-down proposals, such as a 15 percent cut for all employees, would save $390,000, while a 10 percent cut would recoup about $255,000. A furlough of up to seven days also has been talked about, with each day saving the district about $28,000. The union has countered with a sliding scale reduction of 1, 2 or 3 percent, depending on salary level, but the administration has said it would not save nearly enough money. We have gone back a few times on reduction in salaries, Venable said. Were so late in the year, it has to be something high. McNeill defended the unions stance that everything must be done to prevent cuts that would harm both individual employees and the overall economy. All of the recommendations that came down dealt with hurting employees, either by taking back salaries or cutting bene ts, he said. The employees really live paycheck to paycheck like most citizens in Franklin County. Were trying to come through with solutions, without it devastating the employees. Any cut like that will impact the economy of Franklin County, McNeill said. With citizens not being able to make their bills, it will have a terri c domino effect on what is already a fragile economy. An elimination of the districts Health Reimbursement Account card, which can cover the annual cost of a recently implemented higher deductible, would save about $44,000, but the union has said this would be unfair because some employees wait until the end of the year to take advantage of the bene t. Also on the table is a plan to ask employees to pay $44 a month toward their health insurance premium, a move that would save $34,000. Currently, the district covers the entire cost of insurance premiums for individual coverage. Another suggestion has been to eliminate boardpaid life insurance for employees and retirees, and to stop supplementing retiree health insurance, which would save $21,000. Anything to do with insurance is still in negotiations, Venable said. One suggestion that has been explored extensively in the talks and in scrutiny by the state, has been to defer two summer 2013 checks to next 2013-14 scal year, when the district will be able to recoup about $400,000 in lost property tax revenue during the current year. Venable said this prior period millage adjustment enables a district to assess additional millage the following year if there are changes between July and October of the scal year. Were going to see that on our tax revenues that come in next year, she said. In the unions original counterproposal to the district, the teachers led by Cathy Wood and the support staff, led by Tammy Sasnett, offered several other suggestions, including a reduction in the days of the year, expenses and vendor accounts such as lawn, cellphones, etc. and even a short-term bank loan. Weve done everything we can do, Venable said, noting that 90 percent of cellphone costs are reimbursable through a federal technology assistance program. As it stands now, if no agreement is reached, it will be up to Florida Commissioner of Education Tony Bennett to help by bringing to bear state expertise, and up to the school board to make the nal decisions on what to do. The school board ultimately makes the nal decision. They can say, This is the way its going to be, and there is no court of appeal to that, McNeill said. They have to make that decision, and they have to make the best decision for the whole community. McNeill said all sides have appealed to the DOE and to Gov. Rick Scott for help. The DOE and the governor are very concerned about Franklin County, McNeill said. They all will offer advice and expertise, but none of that is hard, cold cash. The union rep sounded a trustful note in sizing up the state of affairs between the employees and the district. Nobodys hiding any money or squirreling it away or being deceitful, he said. Theres not a quick x for this. Marks said for the rst time since the 2006-7 school year, Franklin County has experienced declining enrollment in its student population, contributing to the revenue decline. Various reasons have contributed to this decline, but economic opportunities may be the primary motivation for leaving the area; fewer students signify a need for fewer instructional/non-instructional staff, she said. The district leaderships primary objective is to safeguard and promote the educational prosperity for all the children of Franklin County, and sometimes in doing so, leadership has to make the very dif cult choices, Marks said. I do not want to see anyone lose jobs or bene ts and would have preferred that all staff share equally in the reduction process; yet here we are. The two sides must come to an understanding for the bene t of the children. As educators, it is our job to help all students succeed at learning, she said. 2012-13 FISCAL YEAR YTD BUDGET REDUCTIONS Pre-K reorganization $200,000 Eliminate summer programs not required by DOE $90,000 Discontinue activity buses $15,000 Discontinue middle school sports including transportation $40,000 Administrators/school board 5 percent salary reduction $110,000 Amended federal grants to cover more salaries $182,560 Delay in lling vacant Accounting I position $15,000 Proposed savings with change in insurance plans $100,000 Minor reduction in contract services expense $1,450 Christmas holiday energy savings $7,500 Reduction in printing costs by using website $3,000 Absorption of 8 positions because of resignation/retirement $137,500 Restructure copying machine leasing contracts $25,000 Un lled ninth custodial position $35,000 Elimination of foreign language program $48,200 Elimination of General Fund funded eld trips $10,000 Reorganization of Carrabelle bus route $35,000 Elimination of SRO (school resource of cer) $42,000 TOTAL $1.16 million 6012790 Carrabelle Dental Clinic Caring, Friendly Sta Times of Operation: Monday-Thursday 7:30am 6:00pm Located At: 106 N.E. 5th Street Carrabelle, FL 32322 850-697-4121 Renee Parrish, D.M.D ACCEP T ING: Eligible children from the ages of 6 months to 20 years who have Medicaid and/or uninsured. SERVICE S FOR CHILDREN: E arly H ead Start / H ead Start All services for our children are free with no cost to the parent. **Emergency services for Adults are also available (Please call for details).** Exams X-rays Cleanings Fluoride Pulp Treatments Stainless-Steel Crowns Sealant Fillings Extractions Top Notch Service at a Reasonable Price Tired of Driving to Panama City or Tallahassee to have your tax return done? Tired of sending your payroll out of town to an impersonal payroll agency? Tired of spending your hard earned prots on exorbitant book keeping services? Save your gas money and their pricey fees and have your tax return led locally by a 15 year tax return veteran. Specializing in 1040s, 1065s, 1120s, as well as all payroll tax returns, W-2s and 1099s. Dont throw your hard earned money away because I will meet or beat anyones prices and that is a guarantee. For an appointment, call Chet Timmons today at 850-323-1082 HOME OF T H E $50 T AX RETU R N* Special exclusions do apply and only guaranteed for simple 1040s or 1040EZs. IMPASSE from page A1

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Local The Times | A7 Thursday, February 7, 2013 a vote. Commissioner Noah Lockley moved to retain Shuler in of ce, and Parrish seconded the motion. Jackel, Massey and Sanders each voted no. After the motion failed, Massey moved to table the decision until the next meeting. He suggested the county vote on who would be the attorney. I was told I was the split of the county, he said. Put it on the ballot and let the people vote on it, just like we run. Ive received calls but not to this level, Jackel said. I think a cooling-off period is in order. The public will have the bene t of seeing the interviews when they are televised. St. George Islands Walter Armistead commented from the audience that if elected of cials were being threatened, there should be an investigation. This is the rst of a lot to come, Sanders predicted. Shuler said the threats were totally unacceptable behavior. Four attorneys, in addition to Shuler, interviewed for the contested post. First was Ethan Way. He said he has of ces in both Tallahassee and Jacksonville and would rent a space here if he is appointed county attorney. He said he currently visits the county three or four times monthly. Way said his partner in the Jacksonville of ce, Tim Gillis, is well versed in tax law and would act as a consulting attorney for the same fee, $95 hourly, that Way proposes to charge. Way said his of ce in Tallahassee would be an asset because so much litigation on county matters actually takes place there. He said he had formerly served as an assistant state attorney in Franklin County. The best way to save money is to avoid litigation, he said. Every dollar spent on playground equipment is better than a dollar spent on a lawyer. Jackel asked if he had experience in federal court and what expertise he could bring to litigation related to the RESTORE Act. I have an active bankruptcy practice, he said. Ive handled two cases in the Western District of Arkansas and have two pending in the Northern District in Florida. He said the RESTORE Act was new legislation. I dont believe it provides for a citizen suit, he said. (But a suit might be possible) under certain environmental protection acts already on the books. He said he believed a county attorney would play an important role in preparing the report to be led with the US Department of the Treasury after money is granted. My partner recommends all reports be yspecked to ultimate level, he said. Way was followed to the podium by Kristy BranchBanks, who thanked commissioners for the opportunity to apply. Its the rst time in my lifetime I am aware county has opened this position up for bidding, she said. Banks spoke of her love for the county and of governmental processes. She told the commission she has been a resident of the county for most of her life. I have a unique perspective and connection with some local industries, she said, explaining her father was a shrimper and she has worked with the real estate industry in recent years. Banks said she is not admitted to practice in federal court but was willing and anxious to become quali ed. I have application in hand and must simply complete an online quali cation course and pay a $196 fee and I will be admitted, she said. I am not at all uncomfortable or intimidated. She promised to provide support, advice and counsel in a well-prepared and diligent manner, with follow-up before and after with commissioners. She volunteered that she will resign her leadership role in the county Republican Party if chosen. Banks said she would make the county her rst priority in her legal practice, and her bid would save the county $20,000 per 1,000 hours of time. The interview with Daniel Cox, former Carrabelle city attorney was brief. He said he has spent most of his life in northwest Florida, became a lawyer at 38 and boasts great life experience. My practice has focused almost entirely on local governments and on people having problems with local government, he said. Cox said he had tried two bankruptcy trials in federal court. I could have served the county as well as outside counsel and charged considerably less, he said. Fourth to speak was Shalene Grover, who told commissioners she has been county attorney in Liberty County for 12 years and thoroughly enjoys the job. I want to focus my practice on representing county governments, she said, noting that she had not tried a case in federal court over the last ve years. Shuler was interviewed last. Its been my pleasure to serve for last 11 years, he said. And that was a high honor and distinguished privilege. I think Ive done a good job for the people of Franklin County. He said all of his employees are Franklin County residents and that he already has of ces here. We provide own staf ng at no cost to the county, so theres no overhead or upkeep, Shuler said. He told commissioners he was born and raised here and that he has family ties to county government dating back to World War II. We spend our tax dollars here, Shuler said. He said he had successfully tried a case in federal court for the county involving redistricting and had several cases pending on which he was not the lead. 2084417 2084477 Entry Form www.newsherald.com BENEFITTING To enter go online at the Panama City News Herald website at www.newsherald.com or by mail or enter in-person To enter by mail or in person, complete an Of cial Entry Form printed in The Panama City News Herald, and return or mail to: Beautiful Baby Contest, 501 W. 11th St., Panama City, FL 32401. FOR QUESTIONS CALL MISHA 747-5047. For a complete set of rules, go to www.newsherald.com To Enter Rules $5 entry fee shall accompany each entry. Categories. The contest shall consist of four categories: 0-6 months, 6-12 months, 13-24 months, and 25-36 months Photographs must be submitted by the parents or guardians entrant. No third-party entries will be accepted. Hardcopy photos must be at least 3 inches on one side and no more than 10 inches. Poor quality photos will not be accepted. All photos featured in a special section in the newspaper : _____________________________________ : _____________________________________________ : _______________________________________ ____________________________________ ____________________________________ ________________________________________ ____________________________________________ __________________ __________ ____ Return hand written forms to the at 501 W. 11th St., Panama City, FL or go to WEEMS MEDICAL CENTER EAST 110 NE 5TH Street, Carrabelle Family Care and Rotating Specialty Care Services Monday through Friday 8am-6pm, Saturday 8am-4pm Appointments Available, Walk-ins Welcome Most Insurances Accepted, Financial Assistance Available 850-697-2345 NOW OPEN WEEMS MEDICAL CENTER WEST 135 Avenue G, Apalachicola Quick Care and Family Care Services Monday through Thursday 8:30am-4pm Appointments Available, Walk-ins Welcome Most Insurances Accepted, Financial Assistance Available 850-653-8853 ext. 118 ARE YOU BEING SEEN? ARE YOU BEING SEEN? ARE YOU BEING SEEN? ADVERTISING WORKS! PRINT AND D IGITAL PACKAGES Starting at $ 234 per month Starting at $ 199 per month TO SCHEDULE A MEDIA C ON S UL T A T ION T O FI T YOUR BU S INE SS C ALL TODA Y ATTORNEY from page A1 ETHAN WAY DAN COX KRISTY BANKS SHALENE GROVER MICHAEL SHULER

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OF THE WEEK PET Franklin County Humane Society PAND A Panda is a gorgeous 5 year old female Aussie/Border Collie cross. She is house trained, great with kids and other dogs, smart and lovable. What more could you ask for? She is spayed and ready for her new family. We invite you to come meet her and all the other perfectly wonderful dogs and cats being housed at the Adoption Center! VOLUNTEERS A RE DES P ER A TELY NEEDED TO SOCI A LIZE WITH A LL OF OUR DOGS A ND C A TS. We are always looking for people willing to bring one of our animals into their home to be fostered for various needs. Anytime you can spare would be greatly appreciated. Call Karen at 670-8417 for more details or visit the Franklin County Humane Society at 244 State Road 65 in Eastpoint. You may logon to the website at www.forgottenpets.org to see more of our adoptable pets. 2084420 PROCEEDS BENEFIT Vote Between: Feb. 4th at 9 a.m.Feb 25th, at 4 p.m. To vote go online at www.newsherald.com Round 1 Voting: Narrows to 50 Entrants: Feb. 4th-Feb.11th Round 2 Voting: Narrows to 25 Entrants: Feb. 11th-18th Round 3 Voting: Narrows to 10 Entrants and Winner: Feb. 18th-25th $1 Per Vote Voting Bundles: 6 Votes:$10 | 12 Votes for $20 50 Votes for $40 | 100 Votes for $75 FOR QUESTIONS CALL MISHA 747-5047. For a complete set of rules, go to www.newsherald.com Second Place :$250, Third Place: $100. all participants will be featured in the Panama City News Herald special section FIRST PLACE WINS $500! Your Name : _______________________________________ Street Address: ____________________________________ City, State, Zip: ____________________________________ Telephone: ________________________________________ Email: ____________________________________________ Number of Votes Purchased: _________________________ Vote for Contestant: _________________________________ CC Number: __________________ exp: __________ cvv: ____ Return hand written forms to the Panama City News Herald at 501 W 11th St, Panama City, FL or go to www.newsherald.com Vote for the Top 50! Voting Rules Voting Prices 2nd Annual 2nd Annual Pet Wellness Program Dr. Hobson Fulmer | Dr. John Duncan 187 Highway 98 Eastpoint, FL Open Monday Friday 8-6 PM We are a full service Veterinary Clinic offering small animal medicine and surgery: Laser Surgery Low cost spay and neuter Monthly heartworm injections (no need for pills) Dentistry with digital x rays Ophthalmology (including glaucoma screening) Dermatology including allergy testing Nutritional counseling and diets Sonograms for internal organ evaluation and cancer screening Complete laboratory facilities Boarding After hours emergency care Highly trained, compassionate, professional sta FREE VACCINATIONS WITH EACH WELLNESS EXAM CALL 8506708306 FOR A N A PPOINTMENT APALA CH I C OLA B A Y ANIMAL C LINI C YOUR OT H ER FAMIL Y DO C TOR Society A8 | The Times Thursday, February 7, 2013 Andray Cooper turns 1 Andray Leonidas Cooper will celebrate his rst birthday on Saturday at a party for family and friends. His parents are Anna and Ray Cooper, of Eastpoint. Chamber to host Chefs Sampler Sunday at Armory The Apalachicola Bay Chamber of Commerce will host the 17th Annual Forgotten Coast Chefs Sampler from 6-9 p.m. Sunday. Chefs from all over the Forgotten Coast will prepare their most creative dishes at the historic Fort Coombs Armory on Fourth Street and Avenue D in Apalachicola. Sample an array from our area restaurants. Our talented shopkeepers and local designers give the event an extraordinary touch and add creative air by decorating each table individually. The tables range from elegant to artistic and funky. Tickets are $45-50. For more information, call the Apalachicola Bay Chamber at 653-9419 or email info@apalachicolabay.org. Participating restaurants include and exciting array of chefs and area food purveyors: Apalachicola Seafood Grill, Blue Parrot Oceanfront Caf, the chef from The Bridge At Bay St Joe, Caf con Leche, Carolines Dining on the River, Crooked River Grill, the culinary program at the Franklin County Schools, Eddy Teachs Raw Bar, Food Network Chopped Champion Joe Rego with The Front Porch Restaurant, Iras at the Gibson Inn, Owl Caf, Tamaras Caf Floridita, The Tap Room, and Up the Creek Raw Bar. Beverages will be provided by Lewis Bear Company, Southern Wine & Spirits and Republic National Distributing Company. Tables will be decorated by Oystercatcher, Andrea Duval, The Funky Fiddler, The Green Door, Bayside Gallery and Florist, Panache Tent & Events, Karen Andrews, Mandy Andrews, Bonnie Fulmer, Party Rental Company, Butler Insurance Agency, Pro Steel Buildings, At Your Service Concierge, Apalachicola Library, Petunias and Anna Carmichael. Special to the Times George E. Weems Memorial Hospital has announced the appointment of Becky Gibson, RN, to the director of nursing position. Gibson has 31 years of experience as a registered nurse. She graduated from Tift College in Forsyth, Ga., with a Bachelor of Arts degree in behavioral science. She went on to pursue a nursing career after obtaining her associates degree in nursing from Macon State College in Macon, Ga. Her career highlights include 10 years at the Medical Center of Central Georgia as a charge nurse and senior staff nurse followed by nine years as the hospital nurse for a Georgia-based cardiothoracic and vascular surgeon physician group. She was instrumental in the establishment of a new cardiovascular surgery practice and worked as the practice manager and hospital nurse for an additional ve years. Since joining Weems Memorial Hospital in 2006, she has served as the emergency room charge nurse, house supervisor, interim nurse manager and interim chief nursing of cer. We are con dent that Mrs. Gibson will continue to be an instrumental force in promoting Weems dedication to excellence in health care delivery for our community, Weems CEO Ray Brownsworth said. Legion post to treat ladies for Valentines Thanks to everyone who supported the breakfast Saturday at Chillas Hall and the spaghetti dinner at Camp Gordon Johnston American Legion Post 82. You can have soup and salad this Saturday at Chillas Hall. Chow line starts at 11 a.m. Donation of $6 is required. Lady members of Camp Gordon Johnston American Legion Post 82 and members of the Ladies Auxiliary will be treated to a Valentines Day dinner Saturday. Male members of Post 82 and Sons of the Legionnaires will make a donation of $15. Steak and all the trimmings will be on the menu. Hope you can join us for a great evening. Serving is from 5-7 p.m. Ash Wednesday is Feb. 13. Mass will be at 9:30 a.m. at Sacred Heart of Jesus Church, 2653 U.S. 98, Lanark Village. You can join us at Chillas Hall for bingo Wednesday evenings. Members of the Lanark Travelers Inc. and Lanark Village Golf Club will be on hand to work the bingo and help you. Cookies, coffee and soft drinks will be available. Doors open at 6 p.m.; bingo at 6:30 p.m. Pray for Richard Red Murrays eternal rest, and for strength and comfort for Nancy and their family. Richard, Nancy and I go way back. We also need to pray for Helen Prophaters eternal rest and strength and comfort for her family. Ive known Helen since joining the Panhandle Players, and I am a charter member. She was a great person and will be missed. Be kind to one another. Check in on the sick and housebound and ASAP also stands for Always Say A Prayer. Until next time, God bless America, our troops, the poor, homeless and the hungry. DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times LANARK NEWS Jim Welsh DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times Weems names Gibson nursing director Birthday By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@starfl.com A violin and guitar duo will be featured at 4 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 10, as part of the Ilse Newell Fund for the Performing Arts concert series. The concert, at Trinity Episcopal Church, will feature the duo Nephina. Nephtali Santiago, an instructor in Valdosta State Universitys Department of Music, will perform on guitar, with Nina Lutz on violin and piano. Lutz chairs the music departments string area and has been concertmaster of the Valdosta Symphony Orchestra and first violinist of Valdosta States Faculty String Quartet since 1992. Weve been playing together as a duo for 15 years, Santiago said. We love the audience reaction to each of our performances. That is whats most rewarding to be able to communicate through our music. This concert is one of the programs of the 25th season of the Ilse Newell Fund for the Performing Arts, under the auspices of the Apalachicola Area Historical Society. Admission is a $5 donation, with students admitted free. Nephina duet to perform Sunday

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Benet Friday for Josh Phipps Josh Phipps, son of Rex and Sabrina Phipps, is a true son of the shing and oyster industry and is in need of a heart transplant. A benet of love and treasure will be held on Friday, Feb. 8 beginning at 8 p.m. at the Roseate Spoonbill Lounge on Water Street. Wear your white boots or bare feet or oxfords but be there. All proceeds go to Josh. Come one, come all. Valentines dinner set for Saturday at island church The St. George Island United Methodist Church will hold its annual Valentines dinner at 6:30 p.m. this Saturday, Feb. 9. Delicious spaghetti, bread, salad, and homemade desserts will be served and great door prizes will be given away. The cost is $10 and all proceeds go towards the Apalachicola-St. George Island Cooperative Parish Nicaragua Mission trip in June. For more info call Mary Lou Short 927-2569 Trinity to host Shrove Tuesday pancake supper Trinity Episcopal Church will hold its annual Shrove Tuesday Pancake Supper from 5 to 7 p.m. on Tuesday, Feb. 12. All tickets are $5 and can be purchased at the door or by calling the church ofce at 653-9550. Eat in or take out! Trinity Church is located off US 98 and Sixth Street, across from the Apalachicola Municipal Library. Dentist with a Heart on Feb. 13 Dr. Frank D. May of Port St. Joe has a unique Valentines Day present for the needy of this area. May, who has provided free dental treatment for Valentines Day for the last 12 years, will provide this valuable service on Wednesday, Feb. 13. This year the ofce will schedule appointments with those in need of treatment. To schedule an appointment, send or bring by a letter to Mays ofce giving a brief description of your dental needs, and please describe your situation that makes you a good candidate for this benet. Send the letter to Mays ofce at 319 Williams Ave. in Port St. Joe, FL 32456. Please, no telephone calls; be sure to include your telephone number so you can be contacted to schedule an appointment. May will see 20 patients in need of dental treatment; hygienists Anealia Bush and Linda Wright will see eight to 10 patients for teeth cleaning. The ofce hopes to serve as many as 40 patients. Patients must be at least age 12, and accompanied by a parent or guardian if under age 18. Treatments provided will include cleaning, x-rays, fillings, extractions, diagnostics, and pain control. May and his staff participate in Dentist With a Heart because they wish to impact people who otherwise could not afford to see a dentist, and help those people save their teeth, as well as relieve them of any discomfort they may be having. Millender family reunion Feb. 16 The Millender family reunion will be held Saturday, Feb. 16 at the old Carrabelle School, 1001 Gray Ave., Carrabelle. The Millender extended family includes Mock, McKnight, Walden and Barwick. Time is from 11 a.m. until. Please bring a covered dish or two. Family and Friends Day at Friendship Friendship Missionary Baptist Church, 233 9th Street, welcomes the community to enjoy its Family and Friends Day beginning at 3 p.m. on Sunday, Feb. 24. Chairperson Eula Rochelle said everybody is welcome, and for more information, to call 370-0841. The United Methodist Churches of Franklin County Welcome You First United Methodist Church of Apalachicola Worship Service 11:00 a.m. every Sunday Sunday School 10:00 a.m. 75 5 th St. Apalachicola 653-9530 fumcapalach@gtcom.net Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis Carrabelle United Methodist Church Worship Services 10:45 a.m. Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Celebrate Recovery Mondays 7-9 p.m. 102 NE Ave. B Carrabelle 697-3672 Pastor: Julie Stephens Eastpoint United Methodist Church Worship Service 10:00 a.m. every Sunday Healing service every fourth Monday at 7:00 p.m. 317 Patton Dr. (corner of David St.) 670-8825 Pastor: Rev. Beth White St. George Island United Methodist Church 9:00 a.m. Worship Service 10:00 a.m. Fellowship Hour 201 E. Gulf Beach Dr. 9274635 www.sgiumc.org Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis Nursery now provided for Sunday Church Service First Baptist Church St. George Island 501 E. Bayshore Drive 927-2257 R. Michael Waley, Pastor Join us as we praise and worship the living Christ. Great is the Lord and most worthy of praise. Psalm 145:3 Sunday Bible Study ................................................ 10:00am Worship Praise ........................................................ 11:00am Sunday Night ............................................................ 7:00pm Wednesday Power Hour ...................................... 7:00pm Wednesday Youth at S.P.L.A.S.H ....................... 7:00pm Walking in Christ R. Michael Whaley, Pastor First Pentecostal Holiness Church 379 Brownsville Road Apalachicola Were excited about what Gods doing!!! Sunday School 9:45 am Sunday Morning Worship 10:45 am Sunday Evening Service 6:00 pm Monday, Youth Group 6:30 pm Wednesday, Royal Rangers, G.A.P. 7:00 pm Wednesday Worship & Word 7:30 pm Nursery Provided during regular church services 7:00 7:00 WELCOMES YOU Trinity Trinity Episcopal Church est. 1836 Welcomes You Hwy. 98 & 6th St. Apalachicola 850-653-9550 Sunday Worship Services 8 & 10:30 a.m. Wednesdays Healing Service 11 a.m. Centering Prayer 4 p.m. Sunday Worship Services 8 & 10:30 a.m. Shrove Tuesday Pancake Supper, Feb. 12 5-7PM Ash Wednesday Services Feb. 13 Noon & 6PM WELCOMES YOU Church of the Ascension 101 NE First Street Carrabelle SUNDAY 10:00 AM WELCOMES YOU Church THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH (850) 274-4490 (850) 545-2578 Faith The Times | A9 Thursday, February 7, 2013 Marion Edward Millender was born Nov. 11, 1920, one of 10 children born to Marion Francis and Willie Mae Millender, in Carrabelle. Marion left this world for a Heavenly world on Tuesday, Jan. 29, 2013 at his home surrounded by his family and friends. Marion is preceded in death by his loving and faithful wife OnaMae Mary and one daughter Patricia Lynn. He is also preceded in death by his parents Marion Francis and Willie Mae, and six brothers Hollis, J.C., Earnest, Otis, Bert, Will, and one sister Edna. Marion is survived by two sons, Michael Edward and Patrick Kirby (Era Mae) and three daughters Mary Theresa Crosby (Frankie Paul), Karen Marie Richard (James Howard), and Melissa Josephine Creamer (George Buckley); 13 grandchildren; eight greatgrandchildren; numerous nieces and nephews; and two brothers Fred Charles Millender, Eastpoint, and Howard Francis Millender, Crystal Beach, Texas. When Marion was a young man he grew up during the Depression era and it took all of the young children to work to help his parents make ends meet. At an early age he and his brothers began mullet shing and crabbing. They helped out in any way to survive through those tough years. Marion served in World War II from Nov. 1942 to Dec. 1945 in the 793rd Field Artillery Battalion. He was a Heavy Artillery Gun Crewman 845. He served time in France and Germany. He was discharged with honors and received the Medal of Good Conduct and the World War II Victory Medal. During the war he sent money home to his family and they purchased land in Eastpoint in 1942. When he returned home from the war, he held some jobs, but he then concentrated on being an oysterman and sherman. His brothers were great musicians and they played at all of the local juke joints. Marion went along and called the square dances. It was during that time that he met the love of his life. He fell deeply in love with a beautiful and petite angel. He liked to say that she swept him off of his feet and he told her that she was going to be his wife. They had a strong loving relationship and made a big family and were strong, loving, and caring parents. Marion and his wife, OnaMae, together were hard workers. They are known as the Greatest Oystermen/Woman that has ever lived. They worked from daylight to dark catching oysters. Some of those days after unloading the oysters Marion and his brothers would then go out mullet shing all night to come in and go oystering again in the morning. Marion was a hardworking man, there is no denying that fact. Over the years Marion taught others how to oyster and how to respect the bay and the oyster bars. His teachings and knowledge has been carried on through many people. Marion sold his beachfront property in Eastpoint, to the state of Florida instead of a large condo development. It is the site of the Millender Tract off of Patton Drive. He sold it to the state to remain as an area where anyone could go and view the beautiful bay. It has been the site of many weddings, birthday parties, and family reunions. Marion was a kind, loving, generous person. He helped many people throughout his life, when they were unable to get by on their own. Services were held at the United Baptist Church, with the Rev. Bobby Shiver ofciating, on Saturday afternoon, Feb. 2. Southerland Funeral Home, Panama City is in charge of arrangements. The family would like to give special thanks to the Veterans Home-based Care Unit of Tallahassee; Big Bend Hospice, and NHC of Carrabelle. We thank all of you for taking wonderful care of our Daddy. A very special thank you to Theresa Spurlock, Kathy Tauton, Vivian Hitt, Cythinia Laughlyn, and Amanda Hall. With your care and devotion it made it easier these last few months. Thank you for taking care of our Daddy. Marion Edward Millender MARION MILLENDER Yvonne Money, 86, of Conway, Arkansas went to be with her Lord and Savior on Wednesday, Jan. 30, 2013, in Sherwood, Ark. Mrs. Money was born April 16, 1926, in Gastonia, North Carolina to the late Rev. W.H. Bouington and Minnie Marie Connor Bouington. She married her childhood friend, Edward Money, on Nov. 25, 1944. They recently celebrated their 68th wedding anniversary. She was a pastors wife and longtime member in the Church of the Nazarene. Preceding her in death were her parents, six siblings, and her husband of 68 years, Dr. W.E. Money. She is survived by one sister, Barbara Hudspeth, of Port St. Joe; one brother, Oma Bouington, of Port St. Joe; six children, Butch Money (Julie), of Vilonia, Ark., Dr. Wandal Money (Glenda), of Sherwood, Ark., Tanya McClendon (Bobby) of Apalachicola, Karen Caldwell (Donald) of Conway, Ark., Eddie Money (Lanay) of Enola, Ark., and Donna Gail Webb (Steve); 23 grandchildren, 13 greatgrandchildren and a host of nieces, nephews, and in-laws. She died like she lived with grace and dignity, trusting God, and with her children by her side. Funeral services were Saturday, Feb. 2, at 10 a.m. at Sherwood First Church of the Nazarene with a visitation Friday night from 6-8 p.m. also at the church. Immediately following the funeral, burial was in Beryl Cemetery in Vilonia. Arrangements by North Little Rock Funeral Home, a Smith Family Funeral Home. Yvonne Money YVONNE MONEY Connie Marie Flowers, 68, of Apalachicola, passed away Friday, Feb. 2, 2013 at the Big Bend Hospice House, in Tallahassee. She was born in Franklin County and lived there her entire life. Connie was a Missionette Leader at the Living Waters Assembly of God in Apalachicola. She was also involved in Womens Ministry. Her family was her life. She is survived by her three children, Teresa Dean (Rufus), of Apalachicola; Kathy Rafeld (Ronnie), of Apalachicola; and Michael Flowers (Brenda) of Eastpoint; sisters, Earlene Dempsey of Tallahassee; Diane Douglas (Clint) of Bruceton, Tenn.; Christine Brown of Sneads; and Joyce Wells (Greg) of Sneads; sistersin-law, Jean Chason of Chattahoochee; Faye Vaccaro of Sneads; Patricia Walden of Tallahassee; and Brenda Gill of Blackshear, GA; seven grandchildren, Maranda Coatney; Rocky Butler; Jessica Hunnings; Jason Gaskill; Denise Burkett; Tana Kendrick; and Tiffany Flowers; 11 great-grandchildren; and many nieces and nephews. She was preceded in death in July 2008 by her husband, Rodger Flowers. The funeral service was held at the Living Waters Assembly of God Church in Apalachicola, Monday afternoon, Feb. 4. The family received friends one hour prior at the church. The committal followed at Magnolia Cemetery in Apalachicola. Bevis Funeral Home of Crawfordville, Harvey Young Chapel is handling arrangements. Connie Marie Flowers Obituaries Faith BRIEFS To our heavenly angel, Eva Mae Coatney Jan. 31, 2012 We little knew that morning that God Was going to call your name. In life we loved you dearly, In death we do the same. It broke our hearts to lose you, You did not go alone; For part of us went with you, The day God called you home. You left us peaceful memories, Your love is still our guide; And though we cannot see you, You are always at our side. Our family chain is broken, And nothing seems the same; But as God calls us one by one, The chain will link again. Love and miss you, Ronnie, Cindy, Scott and Bailey Bug Blanche Cameron Family A big thank-you from the Cameron family for the benet dinner held for Blanche Cameron on Feb. 2. We would like to thank all the churches, merchants and businesses, the schools, our local re department and all the community that helped make this happen. A special thank-you to Ashley Teat for organizing and having the benet. This was a true act of kindness from our community. Thank you for our love. I ask for your continued prayers. We have a great physician. Our God is awesome. Thank you again, Blanche Cameron and family King Day Celebration The Martin Luther King Jr. Celebration Committee would like to also acknowledge and thank the following churches and pastors who were active participants in the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Celebration on Monday, Jan. 21. Pastors David & Harolyn Walker and Covenant Word Ministries, Pastor Barry Hand and Mount Zion Missionary Baptist Church, Pastor Clifford Williams, Pastor Themo Patriotis, Pastor Martha Harris, Pastor L. D. Martin, Bishop Horace Solomon, Pastor Rene Williams, Dr. John Sink Bishop Sheila White Martin and Love Center Ministries Thank you for your presence and contributions. Putnal Family Ann Putnal and the entire Putnal family wish to thank everyone who helped them during and after their house re. Special thanks to Timmy Register, who got everything started with the Red Cross to tell us where to go and what to do, and to Bill Banks, who was the rst on the scene when the re broke out. Hes always the rst responder at every scene Ive been at and he rides a bicycle. He is Johnny on the spot. In MEMOR Y Cards of THANKS

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Email outdoors news to timesoutdoors @star .com OUTDOORS www.apalachtimes.com Section Section A NEW FISHI N G TACKLE ARRIVI N G DAILY! S HOP N EW ITEMS FROM P E NN S HIMA N O, A N D A BU G ARCIA. Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL (next to Piggly Wiggly) www.BWOsh.com Your Hunting Headquarters FULL LINE O F THE NEW PENN S P IN F I S HER V REEL S S TARTING AT Corner of Marina Drive, Corner of Marina Drive, (next to Piggly Wiggly) Corner of Marina Drive, (next to Piggly Wiggly) $ 139.99 WEEKLY ALMANAC APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE TIDE TABLES MONTHLY AVERAGES To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from these given for APALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW Cat Point Minus 0:40 Minus 1:17 East Pass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27 To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from those given for CARRABELLE: HIGH LOW Bald Point Minus 9:16 Minus 0:03 Sponsor the WEEKLY ALMANAC Call Today! 653-8868 Date High Low % Precip Thu, Feb. 07 72 62 50 % Fri, Feb. 08 73 57 20 % Sat, Feb. 09 72 59 0 % Sun, Feb. 10 73 61 20 % Mon, Feb. 11 71 56 10 % Tues, Feb. 12 67 56 30 % Wed, Feb. 13 65 47 60 % 1 Fr 546am 1.4 534pm 2.1 1023am 0.5 1158pm 0.0 2 Sa 710am 1.3 607pm 2.1 1051am 0.8 3 Su 907am 1.1 647pm 2.2 122am -0.2 1115am 1.0 4 Mo 738pm 2.2 256am -0.3 5 Tu 843pm 2.2 416am -0.6 6 We 213pm 1.6 959pm 2.2 521am -0.8 408pm 1.4 7 Th 233pm 1.8 1116pm 2.2 616am -1.0 528pm 1.4 8 Fr 256pm 1.8 703am -1.0 626pm 1.3 9 Sa 1225am 2.2 316pm 1.8 744am -0.8 715pm 1.0 10 Su 126am 2.2 333pm 1.8 820am -0.6 801pm 0.8 11 Mo 221am 2.1 349pm 1.8 850am -0.3 845pm 0.5 12 Tu 314am 2.1 405pm 1.8 916am 0.0 929pm 0.3 13 We 405am 1.9 423pm 1.9 939am 0.2 1015pm 0.2 14 Th 500am 1.6 444pm 2.1 1000am 0.5 1105pm 0.0 1 Fr 546am 1.4 534pm 2.1 1023am 0.5 1158pm 0.0 2 Sa 710am 1.3 607pm 2.1 1051am 0.8 3 Su 907am 1.1 647pm 2.2 122am -0.2 1115am 1.0 4 Mo 738pm 2.2 256am -0.3 5 Tu 843pm 2.2 416am -0.6 6 We 213pm 1.6 959pm 2.2 521am -0.8 408pm 1.4 7 Th 233pm 1.8 1116pm 2.2 616am -1.0 528pm 1.4 8 Fr 256pm 1.8 703am -1.0 626pm 1.3 9 Sa 1225am 2.2 316pm 1.8 744am -0.8 715pm 1.0 10 Su 126am 2.2 333pm 1.8 820am -0.6 801pm 0.8 11 Mo 221am 2.1 349pm 1.8 850am -0.3 845pm 0.5 12 Tu 314am 2.1 405pm 1.8 916am 0.0 929pm 0.3 13 We 405am 1.9 423pm 1.9 939am 0.2 1015pm 0.2 14 Th Gun Show February 9th & 10th Panama City Panama City Fairgrounds Fairgrounds 2077809 Sat 9 -5 Sun 10-4 C o n c e a l e d W e a p o n s C l a s s S a t / S u n 1 1 a m o r 2 p m Floridagunshows.com FREE PARKING Special to The Times The new year looks like it will be another busy one on St. Vincent Island. February brings the annual meeting for the supporters group of the refuge, and then in March the open house on the island takes place. The winter hunts are over, and the focus shifts to turtle monitoring, wolf tracking and island maintenance. This year we hope to have more local faces joining the activities on St. Vincent Island. In addition to the upcoming annual meeting on Feb. 17, another date to put on your calendar is March 22. That is the day when the St. Vincent Island Supporters Group will welcome visitors to the island to explore and learn more about this beautiful island wildlife refuge. Free transportation to and from the island will be provided. Hear more about this special event next month. The three hunts that took place on St. Vincent Island this winter had mild weather and dry conditions that produced three very successful hunts. The white-tailed Deer Archery Hunt was Nov. 15-17 and had 57 hunters participate. Thirteen deer were harvested: four bucks and nine does. Five feral hogs also were harvested: four females and one male that weighed 103 pounds, the heaviest animal harvested in that hunt. The Sambar Deer Hunt took place Nov. 29 to Dec. 1. The Sambar deer, an elk from India, was brought to the island in the early 1900s by Dr. Pierce, who was using the island as a private exotic hunting preserve. This imported deer was the only nonnative animal permitted to remain on the island after the island became part of the National Wildlife Refuge system. The Sambar deer, which can measure up to 6 feet tall weigh up to 700 pounds, acclimated to the island terrain and does not interfere with the natural habitat of the island. There were 128 hunters at this hunt, who harvested 12 Sambar deer. The deer included eight stags and four hinds with dressed weight ranging from 191 to 368 pounds and two to six points. Three feral hogs also were harvested weighing 30 to 60 pounds. The Primitive Weapon Hunt took place Jan. 2426, as 118 hunters harvested 28 white-tailed deer, seven feral hogs and one raccoon. The January hunt concluded the 2012-13 winter hunting season on St. Vincent Island. Volunteers still are needed by the St. Vincent Island NWR. Both outdoor and of ce-based volunteer work is available. At our Apalachicola of ce, you can help with visitor services, assist with administrative tasks or help write grant proposals. On the island, you can help track the red wolves, join the sea turtle patrol, participate in bird counts, clean up trash on the islands beautiful beaches, remove invasive plants or assist with maintenance projects. To volunteer or learn more about how you can help, email supportstvin@ hotmail.com. The monthly island tours have several more months before the summer heat and bugs arrive. All tours are on second Wednesdays: Feb. 13, March 13, April 10 and May 8. Our enhanced website will give you details about the tours plus a convenient place to sign up. Just click on Island Tour Sign Up. The tour is free, but participants must make a reservation on the web at www. stvincentfriends.com. Seats are lled on a rst-come, rst-served basis. There is a small charge for boat transportation to and from the island. You can also visit the island on your own. Do remember that the island is primitive: Bring everything you need, including drinking water, and leave only your footprints behind. This monthly column is provided by the Supporters of St. Vincent Island National Wildlife Refuge. Visit www.stvincentfriends.com more information and volunteer opportunities, and never miss an opportunity to visit St. Vincent Island. Franklin County seems to be the new in resort for exotic hummingbirds. About this time last year, a broadbilled hummer traveled along the coast, causing a stir from Magnolia Bluff to St. James. Last month, a buff-bellied hummer was the hit of the Christmas Bird Count, and now another celebrity has turned up at the same local feeder in Apalachicola frequented by the buff belly. We cant give you the address because these Alist hummingbirds demand their privacy when they visit the Forgotten Coast. The Calliope hummingbird is the smallest bird that breeds in North America. The genus name, Selasphorus, means little star. An adult Calliope hummingbird is 3 to 4 inches long with a 4-inch wingspan and weighs no more than one-tenth of an ounce, These birds are glossy green on the back and crown with a white breast. Their bill and tail are relatively short. The adult male has winered streaks on the throat, green anks and a dark tail. Females and immatures have a pinkish wash on the anks, dark streaks on the throat and a dark tail with white tips. Like most hummingbirds, they lay their eggs low in shrubs. Nesting usually occurs at high altitudes in the Rocky Mountains. The winter range is small, which renders the Calliope vulnerable to disease outbreaks, landscape changes and severe weather. These birds feed on nectar from owers and sap from holes created by sapsuckers. They also might catch and feed on small insects and spiders. They are important pollinators for some plants including columbine, Indian paintbrush and other tubular owers. The Calliope hummingbird is the smallest long-distance migratory bird in the world. They travel more than 5,000 miles from the northwestern U.S. and southwestern Canada to south-central Mexico every year. The Calliope is normally a mountain bird, but like other rare hummers spotted in the area, this little traveler might be seeking a new home in response to landscape and climate change in its normal range. On Feb. 1, Mary Wilson, a member of the Hummingbird Study Group, traveled from Alabama to Apalachicola to band the little visitor. She said the Calliope was a male born this past summer. It weighed 2 grams. The bird is not a state record. About 30 banded in Florida. She said she banded a rufous hummingbird in Eastpoint and a ruby-throat in Apalachicola during December. Were trying to get the word out to people to leave feeders out during the winter, she said, And to warn them that cats are a danger to hummingbirds. Wilson believes sighting of unusual hummingbirds in the area has increased because more people are looking, more people recognize unusual birds and more people leaving feeders out during the cold months. Information on where Calliope hummingbirds occur and in what numbers is vital to conserving the species. Help in monitoring this and other species by reporting your sightings to eBird, a project of Audubon and the Cornell Lab of Ornithology at www. audubon.org/bird/ebird. Special to The Times The annual Panhandle Sportsmans Banquet has been set for Feb. 21 at the Port St. Joe Centennial Building. Socializing with area sportsmen and enjoying appetizers of Apalachicola oysters, boiled shrimp and all the trimmings begins at 5 p.m. At 6:30 p.m. the serious eating begins with Chef Charlie Nortons famous, no-man-left hungry ribeye steaks and Sisters almost equally famous banana pudding. At 7:30 p.m., more than $20,000 worth of contributions and prizes will be distributed to the guests through live auctions and raf es. A few of the items offered will include at least 24 shotguns, hunting ri es and pistols, along with numerous other outdoor products. There also will be items available for women and children. This will mark the third year of the $8,000 cash drawing held during the event. Tickets are $50 in advance and $60 at the door. They can be purchased at Hannon Insurance and Ramseys Printing and Of ce Products in Port St. Joe and from any Lions Club member. Additional information or ticket purchases can be made by calling 227-1133, 227-7767 or 527-1338. Little star hummingbird visits Franklin County Page 10 Thursday, February 7, 2013 BUDS N BUGS Lois Swoboda SPONSORED BY Freshwater Inshore Most action around town is still in the I.C.W. Canal in St. Joe. Try starting out under the powerlines and moving your way up towards the t.. Live shrimp has been the bait of choice; however, Gulp shrimp and D.O.A. are good alternatives this week. Unusually warm weather has the fish confused again in our area this week. With a cold front predicted to be moving our way, now is the time to be out on the water. Lake Wimico and parts of the Apalachicola River are seeing good sheepshead and a few striped bass still this week. JOHN SPOHRER | Special to the Times A Calliope hummingbird was spotted in Franklin County. Sixth annual Sportsmans banquet to be Feb. 21 SUPPORTERS OF ST. VINCENT ISLAND TO MEET FEB. 17 The sixth annual meeting of the Supporters of St. Vincent National Wildlife Refuge will be 1-4 p.m. Feb. 17 at the St. Joseph Bay Buffer Preserve, 3915 State Road 30A, 4.5 miles south of the junction of U.S. 98 and County 30-A (Port St. Joe) and 5 miles north of the Indian Pass Raw Bar. Eric Lovestrand, education coordinator of the Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve, will be the guest speaker. He plans to educate the group on The Snakes of Florida. Food will be catered by Paul Gants Bar-B-Q. Memberships will be sold at the door, and you must be a member to attend. Annual memberships are $15 for individuals and $20 per family. For more information call 229-6735. BIRDS-EYE VIEW FROM ST. VINCENT ISLAND A new year on St. Vincent Island

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By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com The Franklin County boys soccer team ended their season Jan. 31, as they fell 5-0 at Lafayette Mayo Jan. 31 in the Class 1A Region 2 quarter nals. As we knew Lafayette was going to be a very fast and skilled team, said Coach Ramon Valenzuela. Since they were number one in their district with a solid 14-5 record throughout their season, we were there to do our best. The Seahawks held on the for the rst 32 minutes, 0-0, despite being pinned by the Hornets minutes deep in their defensive third and enduring a 14-1 shot advantage. A goal by Hornet sophomore striker Jose Diaz gave the home team a 1-0 lead going into the intermission. At the starting of the second half, we knew they were coming stronger and they scored the second goal, said Valenzuela. Leading the mid elds resurgent second half were junior Ismeal Moreno who, in the 46th minute, stared down the right post from the corner of the Seahawks box before drilling a 25-yard free kick to give the Hornets a 2-0 lead. Mayo was poised to add more goals, and with 15 minutes remaining for the game to be over, the team sensed it was going to be a loss. Suddenly, our center mid elder Zack Howze got a red card for unsportsmanlike behavior, said Valenzuela. I think it was mishandled by the referee and could have had more control, but it is soccer and sometimes it can get out of control. Especially when you know you are playing a better team. Unfortunately, we let our emotions lead the game and we cannot do that. Playing with 10 men wasnt easy and they got three more goals on us, said the Seahawks coach. We tried hard and never gave up. I told the boys these type of games are the ones that we can learn from. He said that he will continue to stress conditioning, since the players know they are capable of running 80 minutes without getting tired. It is just because of their conditioning previous to the season, and we need to learn that conditioning is very important in any sport, but in soccer more, said Valenzuela. Also, I told our boys that the one thing I admired about them is that they never gave up through the season, their love of the sport and their openness to learn how to play soccer, he said. By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com The Franklin County Seahawks varsity boys basketball team made the most of their Senior Night last week, honoring seven of their standouts before hometown fans and then ending the night with a 72-69 win over John Paul II. With their mothers receiving roses, and each of them getting a basketball signed by their teammates, the seniors honored included Skyler Hutchinson, Seth Rogers, Rahkeim Pierce, Ladarius Rhodes, Direek Farmer, David Butler and Chase Golden. Coach Mike Sweatt said the team plans to present the seniors with signed jerseys at the season-ending banquet. Sweatts team delighted fans with the Senior Night win, especially since the players led from start to nish, and made sure the fourth quarter was their best of the game. We actually closed the ballgame out, he said. We closed the game up in the last couple of minutes. Weve lost at least six games this season that were in the last two minutes. We came out every quarter like we wanted to win, Sweatt said. Thats the difference. The coach said John Paul was coming off a 22-point blow-out of Liberty County, a team that has dominated the Seahawks this year, so the win was especially satisfying. Rhodes led the team with 17 points (7-of-11 from the eld) and 10 rebounds, followed by Butler, who went 7-of-14 from the eld for 15 points and ve rebounds. Hutchinson tallied 11 points, and Carza Harvey 10 points, including 2-of-3 treys. Pierce scored eight points, Golden seven and Kelsey Jones four. In all, the Seahawks shot 24-of-52 (46 percent) from the eld, 4-of-12 from behind the three-point arc (33 percent), and 12-of-23 from the free throw line (52 percent). The win followed consecutive losses, including a 66-26 loss at league-leading West Gadsden Jan. 25. Jones led the team with eight points, with Butler scoring six, Cameron White ve, Farmer four and Golden three. In all the team shot only 9-of-33 from the eld, or just 27 percent. On Jan. 24 the Seahawks fell 94-71 at home to Wewahitchka. Rhodes scored 22 points to lead the team, going 10-of20 from the eld. Rogers added a dozen points, with eight from Wesley Norred. Pierce scored six points, with Logan McLeod and Hutchinson each contributing ve, White four, and Tyler Howard, Harvey and Golden each two. The teams string of losses also included a 70-33 loss at Port St. Joe on Jan. 19, and a 60-31 loss at home to Bozeman on Jan. 18. We were averaging 35 points per game during that stretch, said Sweatt. Our three leading scorers averaged seven points a game. The coach said the team was losing by ve, 27-22, at the half against the Tiger Sharks but had a bad second half effort. We just couldnt put the ball in the basket. We were so frustrated we stopped playing defense, said Sweatt. White led the team with eight points, with four points each from Harvey, Farmer, Rhodes and Golden. With a 1-11 district record, and 6-17 overall, the Seahawks are seeded at the bottom for this weeks district tourney. The opening game was Tuesday against Port St. Joe at South Walton, with the victor going Friday night against the winner of the BozemanLiberty County game. Its not too late though; We still have districts, said Sweatt. Its possible if you can get hot at the right moments. Hopefully we can come in and execute our game plan. We do that well win. I have all the con dence in the world. Gulfside IGA PL A YER OF THE WEEK S P ON S OR Franklin County High School senior Ladarius Rhodes scored 17 points and pulled down 10 rebounds in the Seahawks 72-69 win Jan. 31 over John Paul II on Senior Night. Rhodes went 7-for-11 from the oor, including nailing his one three-point attempt. Hes worked really hard in practice the last couple weeks, said Coach Mike Sweatt. With each game his condence has gotten better. Congratulations, Ladarius! Hometown Proud (850)653-9695 Valentines Sweetheart Special February 14 Cup of Lobster Bisque Sunset Rainbow Garden Salad Filet of Beef and Bahamian Lobster Tail Sugar Snap Peas Choice of Baked Potato, Sweet Potato Souf Steak Fries or Wild Rice Dinner Rolls Special Dessert Plate Seahawk seniors take honors and a win CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA SPORTS www.apalachtimes.com Thursday, February 7, 2013 A Page 11 Section SKYLER HUTCHINSON DAVID BUTLER DIREEK FARMER CHASE GOLDEN RAHKEIM PIERCE LADARIUS RHODES SETH ROGERS DAVID ADLERSTEIN | the Times Seahawks soccer players march in the Mardi Gras parade. Seahawk soccer boys bow out in regionals Franklin County Dixie Youth baseball and softball leagues will have registration from 5:30-7 p.m. today, Feb. 7, at your local county park. Apalachicola will have one more registration from 10 a.m. to noon Saturday, Feb. 9, at the D.W. Wilson Sports Complex. Deadline for signups is Feb. 24. Registration is $50, which covers the cost of the uniforms. Please encourage your child to participate in a great season with the Franklin County Dixie Youth. If you want to coach or volunteer, a meeting will be at 6 p.m. Feb. 21 at the Armory. Lanier Baseball Camp will be Feb. 23-24 at the D.W. Wilson Sports Complex in Apalachicola. The camp will show the kids and coaches the latest techniques. Coaches and players are encouraged to attend. The cost is $25, which includes lunch. Dixie Youth registrations continue Sports BRIEF

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Local A12 | The Times Thursday, February 7, 2013 Franklin County was visited by a troop of Samaritan warriors Monday. Four teams of four soldiers made their way along U.S. 98 between 9 p.m. and sunrise carrying 40-pound packs. The Air Commandos are rucking to raise money for the Special Operations Warrior Foundation and to honor ve Air Commandos who fell last year in the of line of duty. On Saturday, 16 Air Commandos began their journey from Hurlburt Field in Okaloosa County and will arrive at MacDill Air Force Base near Tampa on Friday. Also, two Air Commandos are climbing Mt. Kilimanjaro in Tanzania as part of the fundraiser. The ruckers teams walked 24 hours a day, trading every 12 miles. Those honored this year include Lt. Col. J.D. Loftis, shot and killed by an assailant on Feb. 25, 2012 inside the Interior Ministry building in Kabul during nationwide unrest sparked by the burning of Korans at a NATO military base. He was working with AfPak Hands, a program of specially trained U.S. service members skilled in Afghan and Pakistani culture and language. Posthumously, he was awarded the Air Force Combat Action Medal and Purple Heart. Capt. Ryan P Hall, Capt. Nicholas Whitlock, Lt. Justin Wilkens and Senior Airman Julian Scholten all died Feb. 18, 2012 when their U-28A surveillance plane was involved in an accident near Camp Lemonnier, Djibouti, located in the Horn of Africa. The U-28 was returning from a mission in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. In addition to honoring their comrades, the volunteers have donned their rucksacks to raise money to help provide a college education for the children of warriors killed during an operational or training mission under the U.S. Special Operations Command. According to the foundation website, 900 children of the approximately 800 Special Operations personnel are currently eligible for support. With help from the program, 190 children of fallen military personnel have graduated from college. The Special Operations Warrior Foundation was founded in 1980. In 2005, it began providing grants to fallen servicemen and women and their families. In addition to scholarships, it provides $3,000 grants to personnel seriously wounded in the line of duty so family members can immediately travel to be at their loved ones bedside. Since the program began, the foundation has provided more than $1 million to wounded special operations personnel. The ruckers raise money through donations by supporters both of ine and through the Firstgiving. com website. Details of this years march are posted on both Facebook and Twitter. This is the fourth year for the march from Hurlburt to McDill but the rst time the ruckers followed us 98. Last year, the foundation raided $30,000. This years goal is $50,000. Sergeant Deon McGowan, organizer of the march said, This is just a little part of what we can do, just to feel some of the pain that they went through. I think its worth it; well worth the blisters, the hot spots and the aching back. By Lois Swoboda Special to The Times The Franklin County Public Library Eastpoint Teen Game Day was a hit with the Franklin County teens who thoroughly loved the games provided. Because of testing, Franklin County students had early dismissal from school, and were happy to spend the rest of their day at the library. A group of Wilderness Coast Public Library staff joined our staff and the teens playing board games like Zombie Dice, Yahtzee, Trivial Pursuit, Mankala, Battleship, and Forbidden Island. Many of the teens had not played some of the games, but were eager to learn and play. The afternoon passed by quickly as they took turns playing different games with their friends enjoyed pizza, soda, and cupcakes provided to them at no charge. Door prizes were won by each teen and added more fun as they swapped prizes. They were asking immediately when the library would be holding another event like this. Staff is looking at future dates and will publicize the next date. Libraries throughout Florida have been taking snapshots of some of the activities that each library offers to their patrons. Franklin County is participating in this project by sending photos of the patrons, children, and families that enjoy the programs and services that our library provides. The Mommy and Me program participants in Eastpoint continue to learn more about art in its different forms and look forward to February when they learn about music. Some of the plans include creating their own Kitchen Band. Children love to experience music in every form and harpist, Deb Bachman, will also be visiting story time next month. For more information about programs and services, call 670-8151 or 697-2366. NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING TO CONSIDER ADOPTING A RESOLUTION THAT WILL REQUIRE THE COLLECTION OF ALL OF THE FIRE AND RESCUE SPECIAL ASSESSMENTS ON THE AD VALOREM TAX BILL USING THE UNIFORM METHOD OF COLLECTION PROVIDED BY SECTION 197.3632, FLORIDA STATUTES Notice is given that on February 28, 2013, at 1:30 p.m. (ET), at the Courthouse Annex located at 34 Forbes Street, Apalachicola, Florida 32320, the Franklin County Board of County Commissioners shall hold a public hearing to consider adopting a resolution of intent to rescue special assessments from the seven municipal service units, as provided by section 197.3632, Florida Statutes (2012) beginning with the ad valorem tax bills mailed November 2013. Interested Persons may appear at the meeting and be heard with respect to the proposed resolution. Any party who may wish to appeal the decision made at this public hearing is responsible for making a verbatim transcript of the hearing. Those persons requiring assistance to attend the meeting must call deputy clerk Michael Moron at 850-653-8861 x100 at least three business days before the meeting to make arrangements. Competitive Yields on FDIC Insured CDs For All Your Valentine & Floral Needs A Country Place Gift & Florist (850)670-1073 or (850)228-2220 Monday Saturday 9:00am ? Call for Special Hours For All Your BILL MILLER REALTY 850-697-3751 (3310) 570-0658 400 + COMM. U.S. 98 & GULF ADJ. TO LANARK MARINA 850K $29,500 $2,500 D O W N B UYS 2 B ED AP T 2 6 OR RENT $500/MTH 2 B/R 1 BTH GULF VIE W HOME W/ F AMILY R OOM $70,000 C/B-3-1 2 COR LOTS CITY $49,500 3/2 D /W 2 COR LOTS CITY $42,500 MIH 2 C RNR LOTS BLK. $ S TORE REDUCED $49,500 2 AC-AT RIVER UTIL. IN -$39,500 SPECIAL TO THE TIMES Jennifer Stratton, left, and Abigail Harris are seen at the Wilderness Coast Public Librarys recent Teen Game Day. Teen Game Day a success at library Air Commando ruckers visit Franklin County COURTESY OF BILL FAUTH One team of Special Ops airmen on their way from to Mexico Beach and Port St. Joe on Monday night.

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Local The Times | A13 Thursday, February 7, 2013 Tobacco ghters to meet today There will be a TobaccoFree Franklin Partnership Coalition Meeting from 5:30-6:30 p.m. today, Feb. 7, in the secondoor conference room at the Franklin County Health Department, 139 12th St. Lose your keys on Sawyer Lane? A large set of keys was found Saturday on Sawyer Lane in Apalachicola while the Tamara Marsh family was riding its golf cart down the alley. If theyre yours, you can claim them at Coastal Foot & Ankle Clinic, 221 Ave. E., or call 653-3338. Panhandle Players casting call The Panhandle Players have called you for jury duty. Please report to auditions at 6:30 p.m. Feb. 11-12 at the Raney Carriage House. The show, to be April 19-21 at the Dixie Theatre, is Jury Room, written by C. B. Gilford and directed by Margy Oehlert. Twelve jurors will be chosen: seven females, ve males. For questions, call 670-8874. FCSWA to meet Monday The Franklin County Seafood Workers Association February meeting will be at 6 p.m. Monday, Feb. 11, at the Eastpoint rehouse. The association will have board member discussions and voting on who they might be. We are trying to get four additional board members to join us, she said. They will be voted upon just as the of cers are and will serve oneyear terms and then also as of cers will have to be re-elected. Any member is eligible to be voted on, but they must be in attendance at the meeting. We need members who will be available when meetings, functions and decisions need to be made, and that will dedicate their best efforts toward all of the members of the association. Please see Shannon, Devin, or Chris at the Franklins Promise of ces in Apalachicola Community Building at the former high school ASAP to let them know you would like to be on the list for the agenda. For more information, contact Jennifer Millender at 597-0787 or email jenjenreeves@yahoo.com. Disadvantaged transportation board to meet Feb. 13 The Franklin County Transportation Disadvantaged Coordinating Board will meet at 10 a.m. Wednesday, Feb. 13, at the Franklin County Courthouse Annex Courtroom, 33 Market St., Apalachicola. In addition to its regular business, the agenda will include approval of rates and grant applications. If any person decides to appeal any decision made by the board with respect to any matter considered at this meeting, he or she will need to ensure a verbatim record of the proceeding is made, which includes the testimony and evidence from which the appeal is to be issued. For additional information, a copy of the agenda or if you require special accommodations at the meeting, contact Vanita Anderson at the Apalachee Regional Planning Council, 20776 Central Ave. E., Suite 1, Blountstown, FL 32424 at least ve working days before the meeting date. Putnal family still needs help The Putnal family, who lost their home on Feb. 3, still is in need of a place to stay. On Monday, Ann Putnal said she had paid for a hotel room for that night but was completely out of money. She said Franklins Promise has offered to help with rent if the family has been unable to nd a suitable rental. She would appreciate all cash donations and any information about possible rental properties for herself, son Cody and husband Joseph. If you can help, call 524 7424. Library needs used books On Feb. 16, three good things are coming together: homemade soup, from-scratch bread and cheap books. The Friends of the Franklin County Public Library will hold a sale at Sea Oats Gallery on the island. The friends are seeking used books for the sale especially recent ction, cookbooks and childrens and young adult books. Take donations to the Eastpoint Library, 29 Island Drive; open Tuesday through Friday, or Sea Oats Gallery, 128 E. Pine Drive, St. George Island during regular business hours. Questions? Call Anna Carmichael at 370-6763. Legislative delegation meeting Feb. 26 State Sen. Bill Montford, D-Tallahassee, has announced the countys legislative delegation meeting will be at 7 p.m. Feb. 26 in the county commission chambers. The delegation is rst meeting in Gulf County on the same day, starting at 5 p.m., then coming to Franklin. Elder care workshop planned At 1:30 p.m. March 5, there will be a meeting to discuss services provided to the elderly in Franklin County. The purpose of the workshop will investigate duplication of services and costs in preparation for preparing the upcoming county budget. Director of Administrative Services Alan Pierce said the Franklin County Senior Center; the Wakulla County Senior Center, which provides Meals on Wheels in the eastern part of the county; the Apalachicola Senior Center; the Gulf County Senior Center, which provides meals on wheels for the western part of the county; the Carrabelle food pantry and Franklins Promise will be invited to attend. Other organizations wishing to attend or those wishing to suggest other participants should contact Pierce at 653-9783. Trades & Services GET YOUR AD IN 653-8868 Trades & Services Laban Bontrager, DMD Monica Bontrager, DMD 12761 Pea Ridge Road Bristol, Florida 32321 TELEPHONE (850) 643-5417 Bristol Dental Clinic DENTURE LAB ON PREMISES Same Day Service on Repairs and Relines Don Lively General Contractors L ICENSED AND I NSURED 20 Y EARS E XPERIENCE P .O. Box 439 C arrabelle, FL 32322 697-2783 or Mobile 566-2603 RC 0066499 R G0065255 Carrabelle Visa, Discover, and American Express Honored at Participating Ace Stores JACKSONS Building Supplies Building Supplies & Auto Repair Carrabelle 697-3333 We Deliver Anywhere Hardware and Paint Center ROBERTS APPLIANCE REPAIR ALL MAJOR BRANDS 18 Shadow Lane Apalachicola, FL 32320 Phone: (850) 653-8122 Cell: (850) 653-7654 J.J.s Tree Service, LLC Stump Grinder Licensed & Insured Call John : (850) 899-8432 JOES LAWN CARE IF I TS I N YOUR YARD LET JOE TAKE CARE OF I T FULL L AWN SERVICE S TREE TRIMMING AND REMOVAL AL S O CLEAN GUTTER S AND IRRIGATION IN S TILLATION, PLANTING AND BEDDING AVAILABLE CALL JOE@ 850-323-0741 OR EMAIL J OE S_ LA WN @Y A H OO COM News BRIEFS

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A14| The Times Thursday, February 7, 2013 CLASSIFIEDS 89988T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.: 19-2012-CA-000447 U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR STRUCTURED ASSET SECURITIES CORPORATION MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-BC4, Plaintiff vs. STEPHEN BERNARD BRYANT A/K/A STEPHEN B BRYANT AKA STEPHEN BRYANT, et al., Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF JANIE LEE JOHNSON Last Known Address Unknown Also Attempted At: 196 5TH STREET, APALACHICOLA, FL 32320 AND P.O. BOX 841, APALACHICOLA, FL 32320 Current Residence Unknown YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Foreclosure of Mortgage on the following described property: LOT 4, BLOCK 180, THE CITY OF APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA, AS PER MAP ON PLAT OF SAID CITY IN COMMON USE, LYING AND BEING IN FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it, on Choice Legal Group, Attorney for Plaintiff, whose address is 1800 NW 49th STREET, SUITE 120, FT. LAUDERDALE, FL 33309 within thirty (30) days after the first publication of this Notice in THE APALACHICOLA TIMES and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiff’s attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator, 301 South Monroe Street Tallahassee, FL 32301, 850.577.4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court this 17th day of January, 2013. MARCIA JOHNSON As Clerk of the Court By Terry E Creamer As Deputy Clerk Jan 31, Feb 7, 2013 90086T IN THE COUNTY COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 2012 CC 000112 ST. GEORGE PLANTATION OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., a Florida not for profit corporation, Plaintiff, vs. JOHN H. NICHOLS A/K/A JOHN N. NICHOLS, UNKNOWN TENANT 1 and UNKNOWN TENANT 2, Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: John H. Nichols a/k/a John N. Nichols 600 S. 3rd St. Gadsden, AL 35901 and any unknown parties who are or may be interested in the subject matter of this action whose names and residences, after diligent search and inquiry, are unknown to Plaintiff and which said unknown parties may claim as heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, lienors, creditors, trustees or other claimants claiming by, through, under or against the Said Defendant, who are not known to be dead or alive. YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to enforce and foreclose a Claim of Lien for assessments and to foreclose any claims which are inferior to the right, title and interest of the Plaintiff herein in the following described property: Lot 42 of Pebble Beach Village, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 4, Page(s) 34 and 35, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Plaintiff’s attorney, Raymond F. Newman, Jr., Becker & Poliakoff, P.A., 348 Miracle Strip Pkwy, Suite 7, Ft. Walton Beach, FL 32548, on or before thirty (30) days from the date of first publication and to file the original of the defenses with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiff’s attorney or immediately thereafter. If a Defendant fails to do so, a default will be entered against that Defendant for the relief demanded in the Complaint. WITNESS my hand and the seal of said Court January 25, 2013. MARCIA M. JOHNSON as Clerk of said Court By: Terry E. Creamer As Deputy Clerk Becker & Poliakiff, P.A. Attorneys for Plaintiff 348 Miracle Strip Pkwy SW, Suite 7 Ft. Walton Beach, FL 32548-5253 (850)664-2229 (850)664-7882 Fax February 7, 14, 2013 92015T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 19-2012-CA-000438 THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLOW FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK SUCCESSOR TRUSTEE TO JPMORGAN CHASE BANK N.A., AS TRUSTEE FOR THE HOLDERS OF THE SARM 2004-8 TRUST, Plaintiff vs. JANE B. PALMIER, et al, Defendant(s) NOTICE OF ACTION FORECLOSURE PROCEEDINGPROPERTY TO: JANE B. PALMIER: ADDRESS UNKNOWN BUT WHOSE LAST KNOWN ADDRESS IS: 430 BALD POINT RD., ALLIGATOR POINT, FL 32346 Residence unknown and if living, including any unknown spouse of the Defendant, if remarried and if said Defendant is dead, his/her respective unknown heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, creditors, lienors, and trustees, and all other persons claiming by, through, under or against the named Defendant; and the aforementioned named Defendant and such of the aforementioned unknown Defendant and such of the unknown name Defendant as may be infants, incompetents or otherwise not sui juris. YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclosure a mortgage on the following described described property to-wit: LOT 2, BLOCK “B”, BALD POINT ESTATES, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 5 AT PAGES 43, 44 AND 45 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. more commonly known as: 430 BALD POINT ROAD, ALLIGATOR POINT, FL 32346 This action has been filed against you, and you are required to serve a copy of your written defense, if any, to it on the Plaintiff’s attorney, FLORIDA FORECLOSURE ATTORNEYS, PLLC, whose address is 601 Cleveland Street, Suite 690, Clearwater, FL 33755, on or before 30 days after date of first publication, response due 30 days from the first day of publication, and file the original with the Clerk of the Circuit Court either before service on Plaintiff’s attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. WITNESS my hand and seal of this of this Court on the 11th day of January, 2013. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of the Court Franklin County, FL By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk February 7, 14, 2013 92117T PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF INTENDED ACTION FRANKLIN COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD Purpose and Effect: The Franklin County School Board proposes to update and adopt policies, as provided in the Administrative Procedures Act for the purpose of maintaining compliance with Florida Statutes and State Board of Education Rules. Summary: The following is a brief description of the proposed changes: Franklin County School District School Board Policy Manual updates to improve formatting and to address recent legislative changes. Statutory Authority: Section 1001.41, Florida Statutes These proposed rules will be considered by the Franklin County School Board at a meeting publicly advertised and held in the Willie Speed School Board Room at 85 School Road, Eastpoint, Florida, no earlier than 28 days after the original date of this notice. Policies may be reviewed during the period of February 7, 2013 through March 7, 2013 at the Franklin County School Board Administrative Offices, 85 School Road, Eastpoint, Florida during the hours of 8:00 AM until 4:00 PM, Monday -Friday. Feb. 7, 14, 21, 28, 2013 92147T NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED Notice if hereby given that, TC 10L LLC., the holders of the following certificate have filed said certificate for tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property and the name in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No: 221 Year of issuance: 2010 Description of property: LOT 16 BLOCK S ST JAMES BAY SUBDIVISION, PHASE II PARCEL NO: 05-07S-03W-1001-000S-01 60 Name is which assessed: REFLECTIONS HOUSE, LLC All of said property being in the State of Florida, Franklin County. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the Courthouse door on the second (1st) Monday in the month of February 2013, which is the 4th day of MARCH 2013 at 11:00 a.m. Dated this 29th day of JANUARY, 2013. MARCIA M. JOHNSON CLERK OF COURTS FRANKLIN COUNTY, Cassie B. Sapp Deputy Clerk Feb. 7, 14, 21, 28, 2013 92149T NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED Notice if hereby given that, TC 10L LLC., the holders of the following certificate have filed said certificate for tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property and the name in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No: 190 Year of issuance: 2010 Description of property: LOT 12 BLOCK D ST JAMES BAY SUBDIVI-

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, February 7, 2013 The Times | A15 SHINE VOLUNTEERS NEEDED Help seniors in your community: Make informed choices about their health insurance Answer Medicare questions and resolve problems Save money on their prescription medications Learn about programs they may be eligible forBilingual volunteers are encouraged to call1-800-96-ELDER (1-800-963-5337) Nestled in more than 200 miles of Award-Winning Pet-Friendly Beaches, World Famous seafood and Maritime History and Culture Lies Apalachicola, Florida. Known as the Forgotten Coast, Franklin County, Florida is a wonderfully Historic community. Apalachicola, which is the county seat, has a population of approximately 3500 residents, The Apalachicola housing authority, is a public housing complex with 54 units and is located within the city of Apalachicola, the AHA is currently accepting applications for the following Position:EXECUTIVE DIRECTORJob Requirements include Bachelors Degree; a minimum of 5 years management and/or supervisory experience and excellent communications skills.Anyone interested in this position should submit an application to:PAUL E. MILLS, INTERIM DIRECTOR141 15TH STREET APALACHICOLA, FL 32320(850)653-9304 PHONE(850)653-2473 FAXapalha@fairpoint.net(APPLICATIONS FOR EMPLOYEMENT ARE AVAILABLE AT THE AHA OFFICE) REPRESENTATIVES will be at the GULF COUNTY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE on Tuesdays & Thursdays from 9 am – 1 pm EST accepting applications for numerous open positions.We offer competitive wages and a comprehensive bene t package including Company paid health, dental, and life insurance, 401(k), attendance & safety bonuses.EOE/Drug Free WorkplaceEASTERN SHIPBUILDING GROUP MORE THAN A JOB… A FUTURE! ManySelling ABSOLUTE! AUCTIONS AuctionFDIC.com AL-GA-FL-SCFebruary23-March2RESIDENTIAL-COMMERCIAL DEVELOPERLOTS-LANDNoBuyersPremium|5%DownPayment $2,500CashiersChecktoBid BrokersProtected H&MCQ1035357,AB110;B.G.Hudson,Jr.,BK3006464,AU230 866.509.44733532994 MUSIC FACULTYTeach music courses including but not limited to Music Theory, Sight Singing/Ear Training, direct performing groups, and maintain o ce hours & recruit students. Requires MS degree in Music with 18 graduate hours outside of music education, ability to drive 15-passenger van & valid FL drivers license. Position Open Until Filled with a review starting 3/22/13. Salary commensurate with education & experience. Only those who provide all requested items, GCSC Application (must be completed), legible transcripts & resume will be considered. Additional info: www. gulfcoast.edu/hr. Women & minorities are strongly encouraged to apply. GCSC is an EA/EO/M/F/Vet employer. GCSC Equity O ce 850.873.3516 TECHNICAL COORDINATORServe as the technical coordinator for all events in the Amelia Tapper Center for the Arts, and supervise set, sound and lighting construction for the theatre program. Requires BS degree (MS preferred) in technical theatre eld; minimum two years experience working in a technical theatre capacity; ability to drive 15-passenger van + trailer and valid FL drivers license. Open Until Filled with review starting 3/22/13. Salary range starts at $30,600/yr. Only those who provide all requested items, GCSC Application (must be completed), legible transcripts & resume will be considered. Additional info: www.gulfcoast.edu/ hr. Women & minorities are strongly encouraged to apply.GCSC is an EA/EO/M/F/Vet employer. GCSC Equity O ce 850.873.3516 The Apalachicola Bay Charter School is accepting applications for the following positions for 2012-13 school year:TWO FULLTIME TEACHERS ASSISTANTS AND ONE BUS MONITORABC School is an Equal Opportunity EmployerPlease send resumes to: Chimene Johnson, ABC School 98 12th Street Apalachicola, FL 32320 Fax: 850-653-1857 CITY OF APALACHICOLA OFFICE STAFF POSITION OPENThe City of Apalachicola is now accepting applications for one full-time of“ ce staff position. Minimum education requires a high school diploma or equivalent. Applicant must be able to pass pre-employment and drug testing requirements. Experience in related “ eld or similar job duties will be given consideration. Employment applications can be obtained from City Hall, 1 Avenue E, Apalachicola, Florida or downloaded from our website at www.cityofapalachicola.com. Completed applications must be returned to City Hall by February 15, 2012. For further information contact Lee Mathes, City Clerk, at City Hall, telephone 850-653-9319, or email at leemathes@cityofapalachicola.com.THE CITY OF APALACHICOLA IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY, DRUG-FREE, FAIR HOUSING EMPLOYER. For the Apalachicola City CommissionBetty Webb, City Administrator Fickling Vacation Rentals St. George IslandEXPERIENCED CLEANERS NEEDED Must be thorough and meticulous. Weekends are mandatory! Please apply in person at: 112 Franklin Blvd., St. George Island, FL. Apalachicola 1Br/1Ba quiet, 2 blks from boat ramp, $600mo + first & last dep. 850-570-9167 Apalachicola: 1 br, 1 ba efficiency Call for information 850-653-6103 Text FL39318 to 56654 St. GeorgeIsland $175/wk, elec, satellite, garbage incl. Pool tbl. 12’ X 65’ deck. Beautiful view! 850-653-5319 1 BR, Cottage& 3bd 2ba House, CH/A in Apalachicola, 850-643-7740 2BR 2BASWMH on wooded acre lot. Dead end road near state forest.1 mile walk to bay, CHA, well, septic. $550/month, $550 deposit. References, rental history and background required 813-546-6987 Available mid February. Text FL40431 to 56654 Apalachicola: 3 br, 2 Bath. Newly Remodeled Call for details!! 850-653-6103 Text FL39317 to 56654 For Sale St. George Island, 2Br/1Ba, 90 x 170 Lot, 1730 sq ft home, CH/A, $185,000; Call 864-356-5949 1 acre, 120 x 380 ft., 736 Buck Rd, Eastpoint, FL, has septic, electric, well, $25,000; 864-356-5949 Total Down Pmt $675‘02 Pontiac Grand Prix T otal Price $4,9000% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! Total Down Pmt $16752002 Dodge Ram 4 Door -Crew Cab T otal Price $8,5000% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! Apalachicola Rentals: Office & Residential Apartments: -Utilities included (ex phone/ cable) -$700 & $800/mth Office Space: -No Retail -1 to 3 offices available; approx. 10 X 20 each -Utilities included + wifi; (ex phone) -Shared common areas: reception, conference room, kitchen & bathrooms. -Some office furniture available. -$350 -$450/mth Call: 850-323-1053 Carrabelle Cove ApartmentsTaking Applications Now Available: 1, 2 and 3 br, Handicap Apts. Laundry facilities on site, W/S included in rent, CH&A and window coverings provided. On site management Office. Rental assistance available. Income restrictions apply, reasonable accommodation. Carrabelle Cove Apartments 807 Gray Ave #33 Carrabelle, Fl 32322 850-697-2017 TDD711 This institution is an equal opportunity provider & employerText FL29928 to 56654 ToPlace Your Classified ad inCall Our New Numbers Now!Call: 850-747-5020 Toll Free: 800-345-8688 Fax: 850-747-5044 Email: thestar@pcnh.com thetimes@pcnh.com theAPALACHICOLA & CARRABELLETIMES CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW Bldg/Skilled TradeSiteSuperintendentSuperintendent for Government Project Govern. Exper. OnlyRequired, Fax Resume & Salary Requirements, 813-281-9596 Web ID# 34237529 Text FL37529 to 56654 Food Srvc/HospitalityRestraunt HelpAll shifts. Please apply in person at Apalachicola Seafood Grill 100 Market St, Apalachicola, FL Food Svs/Hospitality*Servers *Cooks Dishwashers *Bartenders *BussersBLUE PARROT Now HIRINGPlease apply in person between 9a-5pm 7 days a week@ Blue Parrot St. George’s Island HospitalityHousekeepingPart Time weekend help needed for all positions, apply in person, 4693 Cape San Blas Rd or 1200 Hwy 98 Mexico Beach Install/Maint/RepairMaintenanceFull time maintenance person needed at the Bucaneer Inn on St. George Island, Fl. Experience is helpful and must be able to work weekends. Applications can be pick up at 228 Franklin Blvd, St. George Island or call 850-927-2163 for more information Bargain’sNew Merchandise Liquidation Store, In Hickory Plaza, Prices 25-75% Below Retail! Mention Ad for Additional 10% OFF! 414 S. Tyndall Pkwy850-215-2755 $$ WANTED OLD CAR TAGS $$ I am buying old car tags in good condition from the 1950’s down from the following counties: Franklin, Gulf, Liberty, Calhoun, Bay, Jackson, Wakulla, Taylor, Madison, Jefferson, Gadsden, Hamilton, Lafayette. Kirk 850-545-3677 $Wanted Old Bottles$I am looking for old coca-cola bottles, Medicine bottles, Orange Crush bottles, Rice Bottling Works bottles, Gorrie Bottling Works bottles, Neele Bottling Works bottles, John Cook Fine Whiskey flask bottles from Apalachicola also commissary tokes, seafood tokens, lumber tokens, general merchandise tokens, turpentine tokens & old signs. Kirk 850-545-3677 Eastpoint: 379 Ave A Church of God parking lot; Feb 9th, 8-12; Lots of household items, clothes & bedding SION PARCEL NO: 05-07S-03W-1000-000D-0 120 Name is which assessed: REFLECTIONS HOUSE, LLC All of said property being in the State of Florida, Franklin County. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the Courthouse door on the second (1st) Monday in the month of February 2013, which is the 4th day of MARCH 2013 at 11:00 a.m. Dated this 29th day of JANUARY, 2013. MARCIA M. JOHNSON CLERK OF COURTS FRANKLIN COUNTY, Cassie B. Sapp Deputy Clerk Feb. 7, 14, 21, 28, 2013 *Adopt*:Active educated couple yearn to share LOVE of outdoors, music, each other w/baby *Dirk & Claudia* Expenses Paid FKBar42311 1800-522-0045 RENTALS3 BR 3 BA UNFURNISHED CONDO LONG TERM, POOL .......................$850 2 BR 1 BA UNFURNISHED HOUSEFL ROOM, FENCED YARD, GARAGE ...$775 3 BR 1 BA FURNISHED APT WEEKLY OR MONTHLY, INC UTILITIES 3 BR 1 BA UNFURNISHED DUPLEX DOWNTOWN CARRABELLE ............$600 3 BR 2 BA CONDO W/ 10X15 STORAGE AND POOL ...................................$950 3 BR 2 BA CONDO W/ POOL $150/ NIGHTLY OR $700/WEEKLY 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322Contact Randi Dempsey (850) 697-5300 or (850) 653-7282 www.seacrestre.com www. rst tness.com/carrabelle PROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND RENTALS SEACREST REAL ESTATE, INC. IS NOW The s e tin y a ds s ell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you. E m eral d Coa s t Mar k etpla c e 747-5020 Buy it! Classified. Make your move to the medium that’s your number one source of information about homes for sale! For all your housing needs consult Classified when it’s time to buy, it’s the resource on which to rely.

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Local A16 | The Times Thursday, February 7, 2013 By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star .com The Philaco Education Committee is pleased to announce the winners of the third annual fourth grade essay contest. The topic for this years contest was If you had to move away from this area, what would you miss most about Franklin County? The students wrote their essays in class as part of their work to develop writing skills for fourth grade writing FCAT assessment. Taking rst place and the $50 top prize was Brycin McCray Huckeba, a student in Donna Barbers class at Franklin County School. Second place, and a $30 prize, went to Tina Granger, a student of Lynn Clarks at the Franklin County School. Third place, and $20, went to Hollie Larkin, a student in Laura Kings class at the Franklin County School. Honorable Mention went to Franklin County Schools Ashton Topham, in Barbers class; Katie Cox, in Clarks class; and Camille Davis, in Kings class; the First Baptist Christian Schools Daylyn Creamer, in Danielle Laynes class; and the ABC Schools Alex Joanos, in Lindsay Bockelmans class. The essays were good and fun to read, and many focused on the love the students have for the natural wonders and wildlife of our area and on the excellent shing, hunting, beaches on the Gulf and the rivers, and seafood they enjoy, said Education Chairman Susan Antekeier. This years judges for this contest were education committee members Antekeier, Ginny Griner, Heather Guidry, Dawn Radford and Judy Stokowski. More than 60 essays were submitted for review. Thanks to the Philaco Board for sponsoring the contest and raising the prize money, to the teachers and school administrators for their help, and most of all, thanks to the enthusiastic students who wrote the essays, Antekeier said. Real Estate Picks Our local real estate experts have identied what they feel are the best values around and are oering them to you in Real Estate Picks! (In this section), Discover the best real estate values in Mexico Beach, Port St. Joe, Apalachicola, Cape San Blas, St. George Island, Carrabelle and surrounding areas. Best Values on the Forgotten Coast SELL YOUR LI S TING S HERE! Only $35 per week per listing Minimum 2 ads per week or 1 ad for 2 weeks Contact Joel or Kari for details: (850)814-7377 or (850)227-7847 SOLD John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.com MLS# 248363 $59,900 St. George Island CORNER LOT NEAR CANAL & BAY Located at the corner of Bayshore Drive (paved) and Gibson Street. Bayshore Drive deadends into a canal just past this John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.com MLS#248582 $699,000 St. George Island EAST END BEACHFRONT Major Interior Renovations! Upscale Kitchen, top quality appliances, Granite countertops, Tile Floors, Flat Screen TVs, Pool Table, 3 BR, 2.5 BA, HOT TUB, Furnished, Screened beachfront Porch, Owner Financing, Income Producer! Hey Fellas! Dont Forget To Order the Roses! 850-653-8174 Give your valentine the most beautiful Roses or Flower Arrangement available! Mary Ann-tiques Floral Arrangements, Weddings, Funerals, Gi Baskets,Antiques and More... DI S S I ) Children and Adults No Fee or Cost If No Recovery G AYLE PEED IN G O A TTO NEY AT L AW Apalachicola, FL (850) 292-7059 | (850) 944-6020 FAX gsrlaw@bellsouth.net Robert C. Bruner Attorney Personal & Business Bankruptcy Over 30 Years Legal Experience 850-670-3030 bankruptcy relief under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon advertisements. Before you decide, ask us to send you free written information Left: The First Baptist Christian Schools Daylyn Creamer, who won an honorable mention at poses with Susan Antekeier, chair of Philacos education committee. Right: ABC School honorable mention Alex Joanos with teacher Lindsey Bockelman, left, and Philacos Heather Guidry. Huckeba takes top honors in essay contest If I had to leave Franklin County Brycin McCray Huckeba, a student with Mrs. Barbers fourth grade class, wrote the following rst-place essay. If I had to leave Franklin County, Florida, I would be horri ed. The three things I would miss most would be the wildlife, my wonderful helping community, last but not least my family. The beautiful, wonderful wildlife is the rst thing I want to talk about. Man, have you seen it? The deer, bear, and tiny tweeting birds I love so much. Dont forget the lemony yellow sun owers, and the snow white daisies. All of those wonderful things about the wild life of Franklin County, Florida are true. The next thing is that there is a courteous, helping community. They help you out when theres a power outage, or a tree might have fallen on your house and people would come, and when youre in a pickle they would come. I would not leave that behind. I feel relaxed around them. My face would be pepper red if I had to go away from Franklin County. We are at the last thing that I would miss about Franklin County... my family, my Mom, Dad, brother, sister, PaPa, and Grandma. I cant leave them behind-theyre so kind. My Mom cooks, takes care of us, and my Dad works. My brother supports me. My sister does nothing for me. But I dont care, I wont ever trade Franklin County. Thats all I have to say. Those are the three things I would miss. Bam! The wild life. Zap! The community. Kapow! My family! But if I had to move away, yeah I would miss Franklin County. But you get what you get and dont pitch a t. WINNING ESSAY PHOTOS BY DAWN RADFORD | Special to the Times Teacher Laura King, left, third place Hollie Larkin, second place Tina Granger, winner Brycin Huckaba, and teacher Donna Barber. Below: Teacher Lynn Clark, with Ashton Topham, Camille Davis, Katie Cox, all runners up from the Franklin County School. THE APALACHICOLA TIMES FIND US ON FACEBOOK



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xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx 50 WWW.APALACHTIMES.COMPhone: 850-653-8868 Web: apalachtimes.com E-mail: dadlerstein@star .com Fax: 850-653-8036 Circulation: 800-345-8688 DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK: School News & Society: 11 a.m. Friday Real Estate Ads: 11 a.m. Thursday Legal Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Display Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Line Ads: 5 p.m. Monday xxxxx Contact Us xxxxx Out to see Index By DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com Contract talks between the Franklin County school district and its employees went to impasse last week, but both sides are continuing to talk as time ebbs away to reach a deal to shore up the districts shaky nances. The school boards chief negotiator, Tallahassee attorney Leonard Dietzen, served notice Feb. 1 to the states Public Employees Relations Commission that the district had declared an impasse in the talks. This was because of the inability of both sides to make progress within a 14-day window created when the district rst noti ed the Florida Department of Education that it faced nancial urgency because of a more than half-million-dollar shortfall in revenue to meet its obligations. Both sides could not reach a mutual conclusion, and we had extended beyond the 14day requirement to do a speed-up negotiation process because the district declared a nancial urgency, said Rik McNeill, executive director of the Florida Education Associations Central Panhandle Service unit, who is a key negotiator on behalf of the county teachers and education support personnel. When we got together and we could not agree on everything, the district declared impasse. Though an impasse could lead to the appointment of a special magistrate to intervene in the talks, that does not appear to be a priority for either side. We are still working on a variety of solutions to the impasse, rather than going through a costly administrative law judge, a Last weekends Mardi Gras festivities, from dancing down Commerce Street to rocking out at the Armory, were good fun and a big help to Habitat for Humanity. The Mystic Krewe of Salty Barkers, a parade unit of dogs and their people, led the Apalachicola Mardi Gras parade as a long queue of marchers weaved their way through downtown, led by Pam Nobles in re ghter gear and trailed by pull wagons, push strollers and golf carts brightly decorated. Afterward, the party continued at Riverfront Park with live music, dancing, Cajun food and other festivities. Organizer Carolina Ilardi said the days events raised about $2,000, and she saw a large number of visitors from out of town who had come down to indulge their party spirit. The fundraising strength continued Saturday at the Armory, with another $15,000 coming in, all earmarked to help in the county chapter of Habitat for Humanitys effort to complete its fourth house and start a fth house. We are just encouraged; the fundraising was up, said Don Ashley, who worked closely with his wife, Pam, to organize the banquet. Beads were thrown from the balconies, food and beverages abounded, and the reign of King and Queen Mason and Marilyn Bean gave way to the crowning of the new one, Ken and Kim Fish.Threats delay attorney decisionBy LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com On Tuesday, county commissioners decided not to decide who will be the county attorney. After interviews with ve candidates for the job, Commissioner William Massey announced he would not vote to appoint a candidate. About three days ago, I had my decision made about who I was going to vote for. I had 186 phone calls yesterday; 33 of them was threats to burn me out (or damage my truck and boats.) Today I am not making a decision on the threats I got yesterday, he said. I was told I was the middleman and stood in between the two. I am not. Commissioner Cheryl Sanders said she had been threatened as well and didnt want to vote to choose the new attorney either. I have sat on this board for 15 years and made a lot of decisions in this county, some of them good and some of them bad. Some of them I didnt want to make but I had to, Sanders said. I have never been so disappointed as I am in this procedure. She said the decision over the county attorneys job had pitted relatives against each other. Sanders said she was threatened with ethics violations and investigation under the Sunshine Act if she did not support Michael Shuler for county attorney. Thats carrying it a little too far, she said. Every time before I come in here, I pray and ask God to guide me on the decisions that I make. Youre telling me that if God puts it on my heart to pick someone other than Michael Shuler for county attorney that Im doing wrong? I have not said I was supporting this one against that one. I and the rest of the board said we wanted to look at what is what. Mr. Massey is a new commissioner. He has the right to do that, Sanders said. I have not done anything to bring shame to Franklin County, but it has brought shame to me that someone would do this. Im like Mr. Massey. I choose not to vote. Commissioner Smokey Parrish said under the law, any commissioner present was required to cast School nance talks at impasse Thursday, February 7, 2013 VOL. 127 ISSUE 41 RIK McNEILLFlorida Education Association We are just encouraged; the Ashley, who worked closely with Beads were thrown from the Apalachicola Mardi Gras parade out of town who had come down Habitat for Humanitys effort to Habitat for Humanitys effort to See IMPASSE A6 See ATTORNEY A7COUNTY COMMISSIONERS: COUNTY CELEBRATES MARDI GRASFrom top, Mardi Gras King and Queen Ken and Kim Fish toss beads during the parade. Skylar Layne, left, and a friend join in the parade. Clarice Powell, left, tosses beads. Trumpeter Don Juan serenades the Mardi Gras banquet crowd.DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times ED TILEY | Habitat For HumanitySee MARDI GRAS A5Opinion . . . . . . A4 Society . . . . . . A8 Faith . . . . . . . A9 Outdoors . . . . . A10 Sports . . . . . . A11 Tide Chart . . . . A10 Classi eds . . . A14-A15A KO by Mayo, A11 Ragtime piano returns to DixieThe Dixie Theatre this weekend will present ragtime/boogie-woogie pianist Bob Milne at 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday and 3 p.m. Sunday. Milne delights audiences with his pianoplaying pyrotechnics and his enthusiasm. All seats $25. For tickets, call the box of ce at 653-3200.Last weekend for Cat sh Moon Four people who have known each other all their lives come to grips with knowing each other all their lives on an overnight shing trip. The Panhandle Players present Cat sh Moon, a Southern Comedy, at 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday at Benedict Hall at Trinity Church. Tickets, including dessert, are $20 and by reservations only. Call John Inzetta at 734-0260 or 404326-7791.Nephina duo to perform SundayViolin and guitar duo Nephina will be featured at 4 p.m. Sunday at Trinity Episcopal Church as part of the annual Ilse Newell Fund for the Performing Arts concert series. Nephina brings together two distinguished music professors from Valdosta State University. Nephtali Santiago, an instructor in the universitys Department of Music, will perform on guitar, together with Nina Lutz on violin and piano. General admission is $5, with students admitted free. Forgotten Coast Chefs Sampler SundayThe Apalachicola Bay Chamber of Commerce will host the 17th annual Forgotten Coast Chefs Sampler from 6-9 p.m. Sundaym. Area chefs will prepare their most creative dishes at the historic Fort Coombs Armory. Tickets are $45-$50. For more information, call the Apalachicola Bay Chamber of Commerce at 653-9419 or email info@ apalachicolabay.org.

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LocalA2 | The Times Thursday, February 7, 2013On Saturday, St. George Islanders will open their doors for the second annual St. George Island Tour of Homes, featuring eight distinctive and beautiful homes. The tour lasts from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m. Saturday and bene ts the St. George Lighthouse Association (SGLA). Tickets are $15 in advance and $20 on Saturday. On Friday evening, Erik Lovestrand, education coordinator at the Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve in Eastpoint, will kick off the weekend with a presentation on the ecology and importance of the Apalachicola River, Bay and estuary and its impact on St. George Island. This lecture is free and will be from 6 to 8 p.m. at the St. George Island Fire Station, 324 East Pine Avenue. The tour will put our island lifestyles on display once again as seen through the diversity of our homes from the beach to the bay and modern to traditional, said Dany Ray, tour spokesperson. Tour goers loved the event last year, and this year will be every bit as fun and interesting as people get a rare, inside look at our beautiful homes. The 2013 tour will feature one home on the islands East End, four homes in the rst-platted area of Gulf Beaches, and three homes in the gated community St. George Plantation. There will be shuttle service to homes in the St. George Plantation. Also open for tour participants will be the Lighthouse and the Lighthouse Keepers House at the center of the island. The St. George Plantation Clubhouse will once again be a stopping point in the Plantation. The residence Amen Corner, belonging to Bob and Marian Hankinson is a two-story, ve-bedroom dream with wrap around porches. Bay Manor, the beach home of Joe and Allison Altic is a Will Solberg creation, featuring antique xtures and stained glass. John and Joyce Caddell have furnished C-Haven with quirky art and the sixbedroom house maintains a cozy feel with built-in hideaways. Joseph and Mary Kaplers Cedar Wing, on a delightfully preserved wooded lot, has modern air inside with cathedral ceilings and industrial xtures and materials. John and Linda Hockmans home is designed for entertaining and has an open feel with lots of light. Kings Court, the refuge of George Plymel, is the rst Skinny Minnie to appear on a tour and the elegant furnishings and view will not disappoint. David and Suzy Crenshaws Seaview is conservation aware with low water-use plumbing and its own solar array. The Crenshaws have put as much thought into the beauty of the dcor as the environment. Bob and Mary Jean Heide will open Stealth House for the tour. Noted island architect Larry Burke designed the house to resemble the stark, clean geometry of a Stealth aircraft for its rst owner, a pilot. The aviation theme continues in the living room where a 180-degree view of the Gulf is like that from an airplanes cockpit. Stop number nine on this years tour is the Cape St. George Lighthouse, recreated in its new location by volunteers and outstanding craftsmen. Tour tickets are available at the St. George Lighthouse Museum and Gift Shop. To order tickets in advance, telephone 927-7745. SGLA is a nonpro t Florida corporation organized to preserve, maintain and promote the Cape St. George Lighthouse. The lighthouse was restored in 2008 after collapsing in 2005 Funds raised by SGLA are used for the on-going maintenance of the lighthouse, the keepers house and Lighthouse Park. For more information call 927-7744. By LOIS SWOBODA Mark Brannan and Karah Busby, and Madilynn Brannan are delighted to announce the birth of their daughter/ Little sister, Kayten Grace Brannan. She weighed 6 lbs 13 oz and was 19 inches long, and was born on Dec. 30th, 2012 at 6:44 p.m. Her maternal grandparents are the late Ricky Busby of Eastpoint and the late Tammy Yon of Apalachicola. Her Paternal grandparents are Gail Brannan of Eastpoint, and Terry Brannan of Carrabelle. NO HIDDEN CHARGES: It is our policy that the patient and any other person responsible for payments has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed by payment or any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment. www.mulliseye.com"WE WELCOME NEW PATIENTS, CALLTODAY FOR YOUR PRIORITY APPOINTMENT" FOR NEW PATIENTS 59 AND OLDERThis certificate is good for a complete Medical Eye Exam withTodd Robinson, M.D.Board Certified Eye Physician and Surgeon.The exam includes a prescription for eye glasses and tests for Glaucoma, Cataracts and other eye diseases.FOR YOUR APPOINTMENT CALL: 850-763-6666 ELIGIBILITY: U.S. Citizens living in the Florida Panhandle, 59 years and older, not presently under our care. Coupon Expires: 2-28-13 FREEEYE EXAMCODE: AP00Darren Payne, M.D.Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract SurgeonIn Memory of Lee Mullis, M.D.Todd Robinson, M.D.Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon Smart LensesSM St. George Island readies for Saturday tour Right: Cedar Wing combines a natural setting with contemporary interiors. Far right: Stealth House features aerodynamic lines. Bottom left: Bay Manor is the beach home of Joe and Allison Altic. Bottom right: Seaview was designed with the Earth in mind.PHOTOS BY BETH WHITE | Special to the Times

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The Times | A3 Thursday, February 7, 2013Special to The Times An encounter late last month with the head of the Carrabelle ofce of the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commissions Division of Law Enforcement led to trouble for an errant hunter in Tates Hell. Capt. Craig Duval was off duty hunting in the Crooked River tract of Tates Hell Wildlife Management Area. He heard a shot toward Highway 67, about 100 yards away from his location. As he was traveling toward Highway 67, he came upon a white Toyota Camry stopped in the middle of the roadway with the drivers door open, blocking the road. No one was in the vehicle. Another vehicle approached and pulled alongside of the parked Camry. An individual exited the woods and spoke briey to the driver of the second vehicle, and then both subjects and vehicles left the area. Duval noticed neither of the subjects spoke to him and said it was obvious they did not want to. He made contact with dispatchers, who directed Ofcers Woody Cook and Matt Gore to his location. While waiting for the ofcers to arrive, the driver of the Camry came back to Duvals location and stopped. Duval asked him, What did you shoot? The subject said nothing and said he shot at a buck and missed. The driver left the area for a second time. About 10 minutes later, the subject came back, stopped his vehicle, got out and asked him if he was the game warden. Duval replied, Yes, why? He asked what he was doing, and Duval said he was waiting on two ofcers to arrive so he could go out and look around because of shots being red and no one wanting to stick around afterwards. The subject said he did not kill anything but would stay to see if anything was found. After Gore and Cook arrived, Duval explained the scenario, and they went into the woods. After a brief search, a freshly killed doe was located about 60 yards away from the road in direct line with where the Camry originally was parked. During a subsequent discussion with the subject, he accepted responsibility for the deer. The doe and a 30.06 rie were seized as evidence. The bullet was retrieved from the doe for examination and forensic matching to the subjects rie. The subject was cited and released. The following report is provided by the Franklin County Sheriffs Ofce. Arrests in this weeks report were made by ofcers from the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC), Carrabelle Police Department (CPD) and Franklin County Sheriffs Ofce (FCSO). All defendants are to be considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law.JAN. 29Dwain R. Weston, 42, Seminole, violation of probation (FCSO)JAN. 30Alfred O. Wallace, 26, Jacksonville, burglary of a dwelling person assaulted, armed robbery with a deadly weapon, possession of a rearm by a convicted fellow and grand theft of a rearm (FCSO)JAN. 31Brandon D. Polous, 27, Eastpoint, criminal mischief (FCSO) Donna J. Brandon, 48, Carrabelle, seven counts of petit theft (FCSO) Travis D. Millender, 35, Carrabelle, violation of probation (FCSO) Gretta A. Prevette, 27, Eastpoint, disorderly conduct and resisting ofcer without violence (FCSO)FEB. 1Larry S. Burch, 61, Hosford, DUI, possession of less than 20 grams of cannabis and possession of paraphernalia (FCSO) Patrick O. Eckert, 43, Eastpoint, domestic battery (FCSO)FEB. 2Jana R. Walker, 34, Jacksonville, two counts of retail theft (CPD)FEB. 4Christin Everett, 39, Eastpoint, reckless driving (FCSO) Alvin Marks, 41, Eastpoint, trespass on leased beds, and harvesting oysters between sunset and sunrise (FWC) Henry A. Shiver, 30, Sumatra, trespass on leased beds, and harvesting oysters between sunset and sunrise (FWC) Jacinto Negron, 47, Eastpoint, public affray and resisting ofcer without violence (FCSO) Bobby J. Bullock, Jr., 44, Eastpoint, public affray and disorderly intoxication (FCSO) Tony Sadler, 51, Apalachicola, driving while license suspended or revoked (FCSO) Dana D. Aponte, 37, Eastpoint, public affray and disorderly intoxication (FCSO)Special to The TimesRobert Ramos was among 18 new Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission ofcers to graduate Feb. 1. He will spend the next three months with a eldtraining ofcer and then be assigned to Franklin County. At a ceremony at the Florida Public Safety Institute near Tallahassee, members of FWCs 19th ofcer class pledged their efforts to patrol Floridas lands and waters, protect its people and preserve its resources. Each year, more than 7 million residents and visitors participate in resourcerelated outdoor activities in Florida, and they contribute over 30 billion dollars into the economy, said FWC Executive Director Nick Wiley. We want these people to be able to enjoy Floridas beautiful natural resources safely and for years to come. FWC ofcers are responsible for patrolling all of Floridas woods and waters, including its state forests and state parks. Because of their jurisdiction and specialized training and equipment, they are often the rst to be able to respond to boating accidents, missing boaters and lost campers, hikers and hunters. Each year, FWC ofcers save about 1,000 people during search-and-rescue missions. Our ofcers are often the rst point of contact people have with the agency, said Col. Jim Brown, director of the FWCs Division of Law Enforcement. This privilege carries great responsibility, and I know these new ofcers will uphold our values: integrity, professionalism, dedication and adaptability. They began their training in July 2012. The beginning part of each FWC academy teaches recruits basic law enforcement techniques and skills. The specialized training involves rearms prociency, wildlife identication, vessel operation, defensive tactics, all-terrain vehicle operation, detection for boating and driving under the inuence and a focus on state and federal wildlife, sheries and environmental laws. These 18 individuals will now join an exceptional group as they face the challenging and rewarding path ahead, Brown said. Arrest REPOrR T18 new FWC ofcers graduate Law Enforcement FWC REPOrR T

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USPS 027-600Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 Publisher: Roger Quinn Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six monthsHome delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERSIn case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola Times OPINION www.apalachtimes.com ASectionAround the middle of the last century Franklin County was represented in the Florida House of Representatives by Apalachicola native Bryant Patton. The State of Florida would later recognize Representative Patton for his service by naming the bridge from Eastpoint to St. George Island in his honor. Representative Patton was a great debater and when he would rise to present his position on a pending issue, a sudden quietness would prevail in the House Chamber. His colleges wanted to hear what Representative Patton had to say. He would usually begin with a humorous comment. His favorite would remind his opponent that he was confused as the little boy that dropped his chewing gum in the chicken yard. I was reminded of Representative Pattons debating skills when I read the letter by Mr. John Hedrick that was published in a recent issue of the Apalachicola/Carrabelle Times. I submit that Mr. Hedrick is that confused little boy in the chicken yard. It appears that Mr. Hedrick is not satis ed that the good citizens of Floridas Second Congressional District have re-elected Congressman Steve Southerland. In his letter to the Times he proceeds to advise us of our mistake. By the way, I dont know where Mr. Hedrick is from. He is not listed in the Franklin County property records nor in the local telephone directory. I would bet my Romney yard sign that he is not a subscriber to the Times. I thought it strange that he is writing to the Times. Mr. Hedrick would lead you to believe that Congressman Southerlands victory was by a slim margin. Congressman Southerland received 52.7 percent of the vote to Al Larsons 47.2 percent. Considering that Democrats outnumber Republicans by a twoto-one count in the 2nd District, you could argue that Southerland won by a landslide. Now get this, Hedrick offers that people in the 2nd. District didnt know that Southerland would oppose Obamas position on most issues. Where has Mr. Hedrick been? Congressman Southerlands campaign slogan was have you had enough? Citizens of the 2nd District responded with their vote by acknowledging that they too were tired of big government, waste, inef ciency and de cit spending. Mr. Hedrick criticized Congressman Southerland for his no vote on the scal cliff deal. Why should that surprise anyone? Heck, thats why the voters sent the congressman back to Washington. In the end the majority just kicked the can down the alley to be acted upon on another day. What has been overlooked is that Congressman Southerland by his vote differed from the Republican leadership. It appears that at long last we have a representative in Congress that talks, acts and votes the same in Washington as he does while soliciting voters in his home district. Mr. Hedrick was critical of Congressman Southerlands vote on the Hurricane Sandy Relief bill. What Mr. Hedrick didnt tell you was that there were two Sandy Relief bills. The rst one for $9.7 billion was to fund the Federal Flood Insurance Fund. Southerland voted for this bill. He, as most of his colleagues, thought that people that had purchased and paid for ood protection were entitled to a speedy settlement. The second Sandy Relief Bill for $50.3 billion contained enough pork that you could hear the oinks all the way to Arkansas. Southerland voted against this bill. Mr. Hedricks letter suggests that Congressman Southerland is not cooperative and opposes bipartisanship. Its not that way at all. He would have to compromise his principles to agree with House liberals. In any event, bipartisanship is a two-way street and when the Senate democrats offer a little bipartisanship, maybe some will ow over to the House. I do agree with Mr. Hedrick to contact your congressman and let him know how you feel on issues. May I suggest that you ask Congressman Southerland to STAY THE COURSE: 1. Keep ghting to repeal Obamacare; 2. Keep ghting to protect the Second Amendment. 3. Keep ghting the liberals trying to take our guns away; 4. Keep ghting to reduce the size of government; 5. Keep ghting to cut the de cit; 6. Keep ghting to balance the budget.Willie NorredSt. George IslandSpecial to The TimesThe Florida Senate Committee on Agriculture last month met to hear testimony on the oyster shortage in Apalachicola Bay. There is clearly a problem we need to solve, said Senator Bill Montford (DTallahassee), chair of the committee. The bay is no longer producing the volume of oysters that keeps the local economy alive. We need to identify solutions or we risk losing a Florida and national treasure. Dr. Karl Havens, head of the University of Florida Oyster Recovery Team, presented a number of issues plaguing the Bay at the Jan. 15 hearing.. Havens explained how low river ow and drought conditions in recent years have led to a high number of oyster predators such as snails, conchs and sponges. These predators would normally be washed out to the Gulf of Mexico but the drought has prevented this from occurring. The committee also heard from a number of residents of the affected counties. They have been working with the Gulf Coast Workforce Board to put affected oystermen back to work. The Workforce Board hopes that anticipated federal funds will be able to provide employment for residents while also helping to restore the oyster population. We need to help our Floridians nd work, said Montford. The members of my committee and I look forward to helping those currently in need while also nding ways to prevent such a drastic situation from happening again in the future. Montford also committed that the Florida Senate Committee on Agriculture will review the on-going litigation over sharing the waters within the basin of the Apalachicola, Chattahoochee and Flint (ACF) Rivers. Montford also recognized the work of Senator Charlie Dean (RInverness) as chair of the Senate Committee on Environmental Preservation and Conservation. I am eager to hear the suggestions of Senator Deans committee after they examine this issue, Montford said. I commit to working with Senate President Don Gaetz (R-Niceville) and members of the Senate and House of Representatives to provide real relief to the many affected Floridians. Gaetz said that restoring our oyster industry is vital to Floridas economy and ecosystem, not only in our Northwest region but also throughout our state. I commend Senator Montford for his steadfast dedication and leadership in identifying sustainable solutions to this issue. I am con dent that through his efforts, Floridas oystermen and their families will once again prosper. Montford represents the Florida Senates Third District, which includes the following counties: Calhoun, Franklin, Gadsden, Gulf, Hamilton, Jefferson, Leon, Liberty, Madison, Taylor, and Wakulla. Montford was rst elected to the Senate in 2010 and served as Minority Whip from 2010 to 2012. He chairs the Senate Committee on Agriculture, Vice Chair of the K20 Appropriations Subcommittee on Education and Vice Chair of the K-20 Education Committee. The Apalachicola Municipal Library in 2013? Things just keep getting busier is all we can really say. As I wrote before, the library got a huge donation of fabulous Junior Fiction books. The winner was announced on Monday, with Katherine Applegates The One and Only Ivan winning the award. Its about a friendship between a gorilla and a baby elephant. As mentioned before, this collection is going on loan, for a while, to the Franklin County School in Eastpoint, but will remain a part of the librarys permanent collection. The library has again received a grant from the Libri Foundation in Oregon, which will be used to make our Junior Nonction collection more robust. Their grant offers deep discounts on very good quality books. Donations of books, both suitable for the collection or for our book sales, come in the door almost every day. Usually just one or two, but sometimes by the box loads. A few go into the collection, some are stored for the twice a year book sales (put on by PALS in May and November), and some go right into our free boxes outside. Sorting and processing all these books is an ongoing task. What does this have to do with you? The library functions with very few staff, and our hands are always full. The bottom line is that we need to cultivate more volunteers who can work on designated projects or just watch the front desk so other tasks can be performed without being interrupted. Right now we are lucky enough to have two retired librarians, Patty from Vermont, and Cordelia from Michigan, who are snowbirds who have rolled up their sleeves and pitched in. But we need more. The tasks are varied and some require almost no skills at all. There are things to do in the library, and ones off-site. Just being a friendly face, like Jane Callaham is on Thursday afternoons, would be of help. Celia Winterringer wins the most consistent award for coming in like clockwork on Tuesday and Thursday afternoons and entering books into the automation system. Thankfully this task will be ending soon, but then there will always be the corrections to make the system accurate. Our task list would not be complete without mentioning the upcoming Summer Reading Program, which will start on June 10, spanning over seven weeks. Volunteers make that program possible and there are a number of repeat participants each year. We read aloud to kids from pre-K to 5th grade, and do small simple craft activities. Julie OMalley, who helped coordinate the program as a Project Impact staffer, will hopefully be back again, but local adult participation is essential. There are Monday and Tuesday mornings during the program that we see more than 100 kids. We cant do it without you, so come by and talk to us about how you can offer some time to support your hometown library. Caty Greene is the librarian for the Apalachicola Municipal Library. To reach her, call 653-8436.@THE LIBRARY Caty GreeneVolunteers make library programs possibleThursday, February 7, 2013 Page 4 LETTER TO THE EDITORStay the course, Mr. Southerland DON GAETZ BILL MONTFORDSenate tackles efforts to restore Apalachicola BayIts an unusual thing to meet a thoroughly honest man. I cant say for certain Ive ever met one, and thats not for want of searching. I am aware, however, that in addition to houses of worship and 12-Step Programs, one place you can nd truly honest people is on stage. Especially the volunteer actor stage, where there is absolutely no temptation to be corrupted by money. Actors in such productions do their best to bring out the emotions, the varied tones of voice, the emphatic movements of feet and hand, the thoughtful life vibrating through a plays chiseled words. They make it true to life or at least to the situation being depicted, for better or worse, for the time being. These actors, if they are good, employ several different ways of bringing this honesty about, such as how they stand, how they walk, how they dress, the manner in which they say their lines. Lots of different ways. Take, for example, since there is one week left to go in its performance, the Panhandle Players comedy Cat sh Moon and the four actors who last weekend enacted this Southern comedy about four lifelong friends who have returned to the shing pier, on a lake in lower Alabama, where they grew up and later strayed from the innocence of that youth. Take the elder statesman of the group, Curley, played by Gary Niblack. Hes older and wiser than the other three, not in the best of health, but clear in his head that the time has come for him to get er done when it comes to putting an end to the bickering between Gordon, played by Vince Bishop, and Frog, played by Frederic Kahler. Now the way Niblack does it is to deliver a superb performance of the part, written by Laddy Sartin, that is moving in its calmness, in the soft, deliberate manner Curley makes his case to his best buddies.It shows the strength that comes out when one tries to be a peacemaker, to be eventempered in the face of ery passions. Tranquil dispositions are not pulsing through the personalities of either Frog, the ex-husband of Betty, played by Donna McCoy, who is now being courted by Gordon. There is also no mistaking who is who: Frog, a hot-tempered hair-triggered country boy who has dif culty facing his own angers and frustrations; and Gordon, a goofy, almost oblivious, guy with a problem that might be addressed in one of those 12-Step programs. The two go out at each other from dusk to dawn, and the negative energy is palpable and the acting vivid all the way up to a masterfully handled shing battle that sprays it around in comic chaos. Director Dan Wheeler, assistants Margy Oehlert and Bob Inguagiato, stage manager Laura Baney, set designer Ed Aguiar all the tech people deserve special recognition for nding a way to make the entire production come alive on a simple stage, in a small space. Not only do the technical details bring the show alive, but so, especially, do the performers, most notably McCoy, whose luminous gaze and soft delivery have you believing the sky is strewn with stars, each carrying a tiny hope. Cat sh Moon is a delight, with an honest message we all need to hear. And that is a rare nd.Cat sh MoonThe show runs Friday and Saturday, Feb. 8-9 at 7:30 p.m. at Benedict Hall at Trinity Church. Tickets, including dessert, are $20 and by reservations only. Please contact John Inzetta at (850) 734-0260 or (404) 326-7791. DAVID ADLERSTEINFrankly FranklinCat sh Moon sets its hooks in you

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LocalThe Times | A5Thursday, February 7, 2013 March 9,10,11, 2012 CALL TO ALL VENDORS March 8, 9, 10, 2013The Bay County FairgroundsRegister now for booth space at the 2013 Home & Garden Expo in Panama City, FL. All vendors receive a FREE quarter-page ad in the ocial 2013 Home & Garden Expo special section, reaching more than 80,000 adults in Bay and seven surrounding counties. For vendor application or information on the show:Call: 850-248-3976 orE-mail: expostradeshows@aol.comFor sponsorship information call:850-763-6587For additional advertising information in the ocial program of the 2013 Home & Garden Expo, contact The News Herald at 850-747-5000 SPONSORSTHERE IS STILL SPACE FOR YOU ATTHE Friday: Noon 5 PM Saturday: 9 AM 5 PM Sunday: 10 AM 3 PM A HOST OF SHABBY CHIC VENDORS ALREADY SIGNED UP! BE PART OF THIS ONE-OF-A-KIND EVENT IN THIS AREA! For Health Expo Package Information Call (850) 747-5009 OR fax your questions to (850) 763-4636 Vendor Space Is Going Fast... So Call Now! $10,000 3,000 PLUS MANY OTHER WAYS TO PROMOTE YOUR BUSINESS. INSTANTLYMAKEIT YOUR EXPO!GAIN THEEXPOSURE YOU NEED FOR SUCCESS! Calling All Businesses To The 2013 Bay County Health Expo BOARDWALK BEACH RESORT FEBRUARY 19, 2013 9AM 2 PMSonsoreyTeNewsHera Ashley said the Habitat board chose the new royalty in large part because of the longstanding support the Fishes business, Taylors Building Supply, has had for Habitat for more than the past decade. Theyve been involved one way or another in every single Habitat build, he said. The event lled the Armory with about 120 people, based on 20 tables of six persons each. We had more gross than the previous year, and more sponsors, Ashley said. We had never had so many items in our silent auction, over 50 items. David Butler emceed the evening, and performing were the Brian Bowen Band, the Dirty T-shirt Band, Smokey Parrish, Candi Robertson and the Hot Flashes dancers, with their redhot number ending when re ghter Ashley Teat walked out and spread the oor with a mock extinguisher. Habitat has completed three homes in the county and is about to nish its fourth on a lot in Eastpoint donated by Cadence Bank. Centennial Bank has donated the lot for a fth house, also in Eastpoints Magnolia Ridge neighborhood. Centennial banker Donnie Gay told the audience there was enough Habitat money to complete the fourth house, but the question was How much will be left to put towards the fth? DAVID ADLERSTEIN each. We had more gross than the previous performing were the Brian Bowen Band, the hot number ending when re ghter Ashley Teat walked the Fishes business, Taylors Building New state Democratic chairwoman talks shopAllison Tant speaks to the county Democratic leadership in January.DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times By DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com In the run-up to her victory in last months election as the new leader of the Florida Democratic Party, Allison Tant paid a visit to Franklin County to shore up support. At a Jan. 11 lunch at Stage Left Pizza in Apalachicola, Tant told members of the Franklin Democratic Executive Committee she wanted to turn her longtime work as a Tallahassee lobbyist and recent fundraiser for President Barack Obamas re-election campaign toward broadening and strengthening the state party. She cited improving high-tech infrastructure and fundraising as priorities. I dont want what happened to Alex Sink to ever happen again, she said, referring to Gov. Rick Scotts come-frombehind victory against who many saw as a strong Democratic candidate. We need to have something to start with, a better support system, Tant said. Im loathe to see that same loss of momentum. Two weeks after her visit, Tant won a narrow victory over Hillsborough County State Committeeman Alan Clendenin to win the party chairmanship at the state party organizational meeting at Lake Mary on Jan. 26. The win followed a contentious twomonth campaign that featured lobbying on Tants behalf by Democratic National Committee Chairwoman Debbie Wasserman Schultz and U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson. Tant, 51, now leads a Florida party of 4.8 million eager to take on Scott in 2014. We are going to have to work to out-raise, out-organize and outwork the GOP, Tant told the convention. Weve done it before, and were going to do it again. Tant sounded some of the likely themes in the upcoming off-year elections. She long has been an advocate for special needs children after her own son needed open heart surgery while still a young child, and she said she wanted to broaden that concern to others who are struggling. Its not my child you need to be worried about. Its oystermen, she said. Tant criticized the GOP for what she said was an unprecedented war on women and our bodies and for its sometimes subtle use of hateful talk, which she called a racial code, a new brand of racism. She said gay rights will be an issue for Floridians. They want to punish us because of who we love, Tant said, calling the Republican agenda extreme and radical and reckless. It wasnt just Romney. Its how the Republican Party has de ned itself, she told the luncheon gathering. Were going to see more and more people go our way. MARDI GRAS from page A1From top left, Nehemiah Robinson watches the parade with him mom, Talitha Lowery Robinson. Candi Robertson entertains the crowd. Smokey Parrish sings a Blake Shelton tune Saturday night. Olivia Barineau sets the dancing standard at the parade. ED TILEY | Habitat For Humanity DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times ED TILEY | Habitat For Humanity DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times

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LocalA6 | The Times Thursday, February 7, 2013 special magistrate, to make a determination, McNeill said. Both sides are talking; its not like were in an absolute stalemate where it really requires a third party to come in and try to mediate some other kind of settlement. Both sides have worked extensively outside of the box, dealing with a multitude of things that caused the nal situation, he said. I dont know that a mediator would come up with anything more novel than either side has come up with. It seems foolhardy to go that course, McNeill said, noting that the cost could be several thousand dollars. It costs us more money and delays the time to recoup any sort of savings. Were trying to do that in as expeditious manner as we can. Based on discussion with administrators, and from material disseminated by the union, both sides are working on ways to prevent or minimize job losses, perhaps by shifting bene t costs to employees or be implementing a tiered-system of salary reductions. Superintendent Nina Marks recent proposal, an across-the-board pay cut for all employees of 19.5 percent from February to June 30, the end of the scal year, remains on the table. This would have an estimated revenue bene t of $512,000. The school board members and the districts key administrators each took a 5 percent pay cut beginning in July, so each now would have to absorb a 14.5 percent pay cut for the remainder of the scal year. Marks said in October 2012, the union was noti ed of budget de cits and offered a similar administrative recommendation of a 5 percent across-the-board salary reduction for all district employees, retroactive to July 1, 2012. The union did not act upon this recommendation, but board members and administrators did, she said. An additional proposal of 19.5 percent for all other staff, not just teachers, was proposed as one single item to balance the budget by the end of the scal year June 30, 2013. As expected, this single proposal exposed the seriousness of what the district was experiencing. Finance Director Shannon Venable said further slimmed-down proposals, such as a 15 percent cut for all employees, would save $390,000, while a 10 percent cut would recoup about $255,000. A furlough of up to seven days also has been talked about, with each day saving the district about $28,000. The union has countered with a sliding scale reduction of 1, 2 or 3 percent, depending on salary level, but the administration has said it would not save nearly enough money. We have gone back a few times on reduction in salaries, Venable said. Were so late in the year, it has to be something high. McNeill defended the unions stance that everything must be done to prevent cuts that would harm both individual employees and the overall economy. All of the recommendations that came down dealt with hurting employees, either by taking back salaries or cutting bene ts, he said. The employees really live paycheck to paycheck like most citizens in Franklin County. Were trying to come through with solutions, without it devastating the employees. Any cut like that will impact the economy of Franklin County, McNeill said. With citizens not being able to make their bills, it will have a terri c domino effect on what is already a fragile economy. An elimination of the districts Health Reimbursement Account card, which can cover the annual cost of a recently implemented higher deductible, would save about $44,000, but the union has said this would be unfair because some employees wait until the end of the year to take advantage of the bene t. Also on the table is a plan to ask employees to pay $44 a month toward their health insurance premium, a move that would save $34,000. Currently, the district covers the entire cost of insurance premiums for individual coverage. Another suggestion has been to eliminate boardpaid life insurance for employees and retirees, and to stop supplementing retiree health insurance, which would save $21,000. Anything to do with insurance is still in negotiations, Venable said. One suggestion that has been explored extensively in the talks and in scrutiny by the state, has been to defer two summer 2013 checks to next 2013-14 scal year, when the district will be able to recoup about $400,000 in lost property tax revenue during the current year. Venable said this prior period millage adjustment enables a district to assess additional millage the following year if there are changes between July and October of the scal year. Were going to see that on our tax revenues that come in next year, she said. In the unions original counterproposal to the district, the teachers led by Cathy Wood and the support staff, led by Tammy Sasnett, offered several other suggestions, including a reduction in the days of the year, expenses and vendor accounts such as lawn, cellphones, etc. and even a short-term bank loan. Weve done everything we can do, Venable said, noting that 90 percent of cellphone costs are reimbursable through a federal technology assistance program. As it stands now, if no agreement is reached, it will be up to Florida Commissioner of Education Tony Bennett to help by bringing to bear state expertise, and up to the school board to make the nal decisions on what to do. The school board ultimately makes the nal decision. They can say, This is the way its going to be, and there is no court of appeal to that, McNeill said. They have to make that decision, and they have to make the best decision for the whole community. McNeill said all sides have appealed to the DOE and to Gov. Rick Scott for help. The DOE and the governor are very concerned about Franklin County, McNeill said. They all will offer advice and expertise, but none of that is hard, cold cash. The union rep sounded a trustful note in sizing up the state of affairs between the employees and the district. Nobodys hiding any money or squirreling it away or being deceitful, he said. Theres not a quick x for this. Marks said for the rst time since the 2006-7 school year, Franklin County has experienced declining enrollment in its student population, contributing to the revenue decline. Various reasons have contributed to this decline, but economic opportunities may be the primary motivation for leaving the area; fewer students signify a need for fewer instructional/non-instructional staff, she said. The district leaderships primary objective is to safeguard and promote the educational prosperity for all the children of Franklin County, and sometimes in doing so, leadership has to make the very dif cult choices, Marks said. I do not want to see anyone lose jobs or bene ts and would have preferred that all staff share equally in the reduction process; yet here we are. The two sides must come to an understanding for the bene t of the children. As educators, it is our job to help all students succeed at learning, she said. 2012-13 FISCAL YEAR YTD BUDGET REDUCTIONSPre-K reorganization $200,000 Eliminate summer programs not required by DOE $90,000 Discontinue activity buses $15,000 Discontinue middle school sports including transportation $40,000 Administrators/school board 5 percent salary reduction $110,000 Amended federal grants to cover more salaries $182,560 Delay in lling vacant Accounting I position $15,000 Proposed savings with change in insurance plans $100,000 Minor reduction in contract services expense $1,450 Christmas holiday energy savings $7,500 Reduction in printing costs by using website $3,000 Absorption of 8 positions because of resignation/retirement $137,500 Restructure copying machine leasing contracts $25,000 Un lled ninth custodial position $35,000 Elimination of foreign language program $48,200 Elimination of General Fund funded eld trips $10,000 Reorganization of Carrabelle bus route $35,000 Elimination of SRO (school resource of cer) $42,000 TOTAL $1.16 million 6012790 Carrabelle Dental Clinic Caring, Friendly StaTimes of Operation: Monday-Thursday 7:30am 6:00pm Located At:106 N.E. 5th Street Carrabelle, FL 32322850-697-4121Renee Parrish, D.M.DACCEPTING: Eligible children from the ages of 6 months to 20 years who have Medicaid and/or uninsured. SERVICES FOR CHILDREN: Early Head Start / Head StartAll services for our children are free with no cost to the parent.**Emergency services for Adults are also available (Please call for details).**Exams X-rays Cleanings Fluoride Pulp Treatments Stainless-Steel Crowns Sealant Fillings Extractions Top Notch Service at a Reasonable Price Tired of Driving to Panama City or Tallahassee to have your tax return done? Tired of sending your payroll out of town to an impersonal payroll agency? Tired of spending your hard earned prots on exorbitant bookkeeping services? Save your gas money and their pricey fees and have your tax return led locally by a 15 year tax return veteran. Specializing in 1040s, 1065s, 1120s, as well as all payroll tax returns, W-2s and 1099s. Dont throw your hard earned money away because I will meet or beat anyones prices and that is a guarantee. For an appointment, call Chet Timmons today at 850-323-1082HOME OF THE $50 TAX RETURN** Special exclusions do apply and only guaranteed for simple 1040s or 1040EZs. IMPASSE from page A1

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LocalThe Times | A7Thursday, February 7, 2013 a vote. Commissioner Noah Lockley moved to retain Shuler in of ce, and Parrish seconded the motion. Jackel, Massey and Sanders each voted no. After the motion failed, Massey moved to table the decision until the next meeting. He suggested the county vote on who would be the attorney. I was told I was the split of the county, he said. Put it on the ballot and let the people vote on it, just like we run. Ive received calls but not to this level, Jackel said. I think a cooling-off period is in order. The public will have the bene t of seeing the interviews when they are televised. St. George Islands Walter Armistead commented from the audience that if elected of cials were being threatened, there should be an investigation. This is the rst of a lot to come, Sanders predicted. Shuler said the threats were totally unacceptable behavior. Four attorneys, in addition to Shuler, interviewed for the contested post. First was Ethan Way. He said he has of ces in both Tallahassee and Jacksonville and would rent a space here if he is appointed county attorney. He said he currently visits the county three or four times monthly. Way said his partner in the Jacksonville of ce, Tim Gillis, is well versed in tax law and would act as a consulting attorney for the same fee, $95 hourly, that Way proposes to charge. Way said his of ce in Tallahassee would be an asset because so much litigation on county matters actually takes place there. He said he had formerly served as an assistant state attorney in Franklin County. The best way to save money is to avoid litigation, he said. Every dollar spent on playground equipment is better than a dollar spent on a lawyer. Jackel asked if he had experience in federal court and what expertise he could bring to litigation related to the RESTORE Act. I have an active bankruptcy practice, he said. Ive handled two cases in the Western District of Arkansas and have two pending in the Northern District in Florida. He said the RESTORE Act was new legislation. I dont believe it provides for a citizen suit, he said. (But a suit might be possible) under certain environmental protection acts already on the books. He said he believed a county attorney would play an important role in preparing the report to be led with the US Department of the Treasury after money is granted. My partner recommends all reports be yspecked to ultimate level, he said. Way was followed to the podium by Kristy BranchBanks, who thanked commissioners for the opportunity to apply. Its the rst time in my lifetime I am aware county has opened this position up for bidding, she said. Banks spoke of her love for the county and of governmental processes. She told the commission she has been a resident of the county for most of her life. I have a unique perspective and connection with some local industries, she said, explaining her father was a shrimper and she has worked with the real estate industry in recent years. Banks said she is not admitted to practice in federal court but was willing and anxious to become quali ed. I have application in hand and must simply complete an online quali cation course and pay a $196 fee and I will be admitted, she said. I am not at all uncomfortable or intimidated. She promised to provide support, advice and counsel in a well-prepared and diligent manner, with follow-up before and after with commissioners. She volunteered that she will resign her leadership role in the county Republican Party if chosen. Banks said she would make the county her rst priority in her legal practice, and her bid would save the county $20,000 per 1,000 hours of time. The interview with Daniel Cox, former Carrabelle city attorney was brief. He said he has spent most of his life in northwest Florida, became a lawyer at 38 and boasts great life experience. My practice has focused almost entirely on local governments and on people having problems with local government, he said. Cox said he had tried two bankruptcy trials in federal court. I could have served the county as well as outside counsel and charged considerably less, he said. Fourth to speak was Shalene Grover, who told commissioners she has been county attorney in Liberty County for 12 years and thoroughly enjoys the job. I want to focus my practice on representing county governments, she said, noting that she had not tried a case in federal court over the last ve years. Shuler was interviewed last. Its been my pleasure to serve for last 11 years, he said. And that was a high honor and distinguished privilege. I think Ive done a good job for the people of Franklin County. He said all of his employees are Franklin County residents and that he already has of ces here. We provide own staf ng at no cost to the county, so theres no overhead or upkeep, Shuler said. He told commissioners he was born and raised here and that he has family ties to county government dating back to World War II. We spend our tax dollars here, Shuler said. He said he had successfully tried a case in federal court for the county involving redistricting and had several cases pending on which he was not the lead. 2084417 2084477 Entry Form www.newsherald.com BENEFITTING To enter go online at the Panama City News Herald website at www.newsherald.com or by mail or enter in-person To enter by mail or in person, complete an Of cial Entry Form printed in The Panama City News Herald, and return or mail to: Beautiful Baby Contest, 501 W. 11th St., Panama City, FL 32401. FOR QUESTIONS CALL MISHA 747-5047. For a complete set of rules, go to www.newsherald.comTo Enter Rules $5 entry fee shall accompany each entry. Categories. The contest shall consist of four categories: 0-6 months, 6-12 months, 13-24 months, and 25-36 months. Photographs must be submitted by the parents or guardians entrant. No third-party entries will be accepted. Hardcopy photos must be at least 3 inches on one side and no more than 10 inches. Poor quality photos will not be accepted. All photos featured in a special section in the newspaper :_____________________________________:_____________________________________________:___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________Return hand written forms to theat 501 W. 11th St., Panama City, FL or go to WEEMS MEDICAL CENTER EAST110 NE 5TH Street, Carrabelle Family Care and Rotating Specialty Care Services Monday through Friday 8am-6pm, Saturday 8am-4pm Appointments Available, Walk-ins Welcome Most Insurances Accepted, Financial Assistance Available850-697-2345 NOW OPEN WEEMS MEDICAL CENTER WEST135 Avenue G, ApalachicolaQuick Care and Family Care Services Monday through Thursday 8:30am-4pm Appointments Available, Walk-ins Welcome Most Insurances Accepted, Financial Assistance Available850-653-8853 ext. 118 ARE YOU BEING SEEN? ARE YOU BEING SEEN? ARE YOU BEING SEEN? ADVERTISING WORKS! PRINT AND DIGITAL PACKAGESStarting at $234 per month -Starting at $199 per month TO SCHEDULE A MEDIA CONSULTATION TO FIT YOUR BUSINESS, CALL TODAY! ATTORNEY from page A1ETHAN WAY DAN COX KRISTY BANKS SHALENE GROVER MICHAEL SHULER

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OFTHEWEEKPET Franklin County Humane SocietyPANDA!Panda is a gorgeous 5 year old female Aussie/Border Collie cross. She is house trained, great with kids and other dogs, smart and lovable. What more could you ask for? She is spayed and ready for her new family. We invite you to come meet her and all the other perfectly wonderful dogs and cats being housed at the Adoption Center!VOLUNTEERS ARE DESPERATELY NEEDED TO SOCIALIZE WITH ALL OF OUR DOGS AND CATS.We are always looking for people willing to bring one of our animals into their home to be fostered for various needs. Anytime you can spare would be greatly appreciated. Call Karen at 670-8417 for more details or visit the Franklin County Humane Society at 244 State Road 65 in Eastpoint. You may logon to the website at www.forgottenpets.org to see more of our adoptable pets. 2084420 PROCEEDS BENEFIT Vote Between: Feb. 4th at 9 a.m.Feb 25th, at 4 p.m.To vote go online at www.newsherald.com Round 1 Voting: Narrows to 50 Entrants: Feb. 4th-Feb.11th Round 2 Voting: Narrows to 25 Entrants: Feb. 11th-18th Round 3 Voting: Narrows to 10 Entrants and Winner: Feb. 18th-25th $1 Per Vote Voting Bundles:6 Votes:$10 | 12 Votes for $20 50 Votes for $40 | 100 Votes for $75FOR QUESTIONS CALL MISHA 747-5047. For a complete set of rules, go to www.newsherald.comSecond Place :$250, Third Place: $100. all participants will be featured in the Panama City News Herald special sectionFIRST PLACE WINS $500! Your Name:_______________________________________Street Address:____________________________________City, State, Zip:____________________________________Telephone:________________________________________Email:____________________________________________Number of Votes Purchased:_________________________Vote for Contestant:_________________________________CC Number:__________________exp:__________cvv:____Return hand written forms to the Panama City News Herald at 501 W 11th St, Panama City, FL or go to www.newsherald.com Vote for the Top 50!Voting Rules Voting Prices 2nd Annual 2nd Annual Pet Wellness ProgramDr. Hobson Fulmer | Dr. John Duncan187 Highway 98 Eastpoint, FL Open Monday Friday 8-6 PMWe are a full service Veterinary Clinic offering small animal medicine and surgery:Laser Surgery Low cost spay and neuter Monthly heartworm injections (no need for pills) Dentistry with digital x rays Ophthalmology (including glaucoma screening) Dermatology including allergy testing Nutritional counseling and diets Sonograms for internal organ evaluation and cancer screening Complete laboratory facilities Boarding After hours emergency care Highly trained, compassionate, professional sta FREE VACCINATIONS WITH EACH WELLNESS EXAM CALL 8506708306 FOR AN APPOINTMENT APALACHICOLA BAYANIMAL CLINIC YOUR OTHER FAMILY DOCTOR SocietyA8 | The Times Thursday, February 7, 2013Andray Cooper turns 1Andray Leonidas Cooper will celebrate his rst birthday on Saturday at a party for family and friends. His parents are Anna and Ray Cooper, of Eastpoint. Chamber to host Chefs Sampler Sunday at ArmoryThe Apalachicola Bay Chamber of Commerce will host the 17th Annual Forgotten Coast Chefs Sampler from 6-9 p.m. Sunday. Chefs from all over the Forgotten Coast will prepare their most creative dishes at the historic Fort Coombs Armory on Fourth Street and Avenue D in Apalachicola. Sample an array from our area restaurants. Our talented shopkeepers and local designers give the event an extraordinary touch and add creative air by decorating each table individually. The tables range from elegant to artistic and funky. Tickets are $45-50. For more information, call the Apalachicola Bay Chamber at 653-9419 or email info@apalachicolabay.org. Participating restaurants include and exciting array of chefs and area food purveyors: Apalachicola Seafood Grill, Blue Parrot Oceanfront Caf, the chef from The Bridge At Bay St Joe, Caf con Leche, Carolines Dining on the River, Crooked River Grill, the culinary program at the Franklin County Schools, Eddy Teachs Raw Bar, Food Network Chopped Champion Joe Rego with The Front Porch Restaurant, Iras at the Gibson Inn, Owl Caf, Tamaras Caf Floridita, The Tap Room, and Up the Creek Raw Bar. Beverages will be provided by Lewis Bear Company, Southern Wine & Spirits and Republic National Distributing Company. Tables will be decorated by Oystercatcher, Andrea Duval, The Funky Fiddler, The Green Door, Bayside Gallery and Florist, Panache Tent & Events, Karen Andrews, Mandy Andrews, Bonnie Fulmer, Party Rental Company, Butler Insurance Agency, Pro Steel Buildings, At Your Service Concierge, Apalachicola Library, Petunias and Anna Carmichael.Special to the TimesGeorge E. Weems Memorial Hospital has announced the appointment of Becky Gibson, RN, to the director of nursing position. Gibson has 31 years of experience as a registered nurse. She graduated from Tift College in Forsyth, Ga., with a Bachelor of Arts degree in behavioral science. She went on to pursue a nursing career after obtaining her associates degree in nursing from Macon State College in Macon, Ga. Her career highlights include 10 years at the Medical Center of Central Georgia as a charge nurse and senior staff nurse followed by nine years as the hospital nurse for a Georgia-based cardiothoracic and vascular surgeon physician group. She was instrumental in the establishment of a new cardiovascular surgery practice and worked as the practice manager and hospital nurse for an additional ve years. Since joining Weems Memorial Hospital in 2006, she has served as the emergency room charge nurse, house supervisor, interim nurse manager and interim chief nursing of cer. We are con dent that Mrs. Gibson will continue to be an instrumental force in promoting Weems dedication to excellence in health care delivery for our community, Weems CEO Ray Brownsworth said.Legion post to treat ladies for ValentinesThanks to everyone who supported the breakfast Saturday at Chillas Hall and the spaghetti dinner at Camp Gordon Johnston American Legion Post 82. You can have soup and salad this Saturday at Chillas Hall. Chow line starts at 11 a.m. Donation of $6 is required. Lady members of Camp Gordon Johnston American Legion Post 82 and members of the Ladies Auxiliary will be treated to a Valentines Day dinner Saturday. Male members of Post 82 and Sons of the Legionnaires will make a donation of $15. Steak and all the trimmings will be on the menu. Hope you can join us for a great evening. Serving is from 5-7 p.m. Ash Wednesday is Feb. 13. Mass will be at 9:30 a.m. at Sacred Heart of Jesus Church, 2653 U.S. 98, Lanark Village. You can join us at Chillas Hall for bingo Wednesday evenings. Members of the Lanark Travelers Inc. and Lanark Village Golf Club will be on hand to work the bingo and help you. Cookies, coffee and soft drinks will be available. Doors open at 6 p.m.; bingo at 6:30 p.m. Pray for Richard Red Murrays eternal rest, and for strength and comfort for Nancy and their family. Richard, Nancy and I go way back. We also need to pray for Helen Prophaters eternal rest and strength and comfort for her family. Ive known Helen since joining the Panhandle Players, and I am a charter member. She was a great person and will be missed. Be kind to one another. Check in on the sick and housebound and ASAP also stands for Always Say A Prayer. Until next time, God bless America, our troops, the poor, homeless and the hungry. DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times LANARK NEWSJim WelshDAVID ADLERSTEIN | The TimesWeems names Gibson nursing director Birthday By DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@starfl.com A violin and guitar duo will be featured at 4 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 10, as part of the Ilse Newell Fund for the Performing Arts concert series. The concert, at Trinity Episcopal Church, will feature the duo Nephina. Nephtali Santiago, an instructor in Valdosta State Universitys Department of Music, will perform on guitar, with Nina Lutz on violin and piano. Lutz chairs the music departments string area and has been concertmaster of the Valdosta Symphony Orchestra and first violinist of Valdosta States Faculty String Quartet since 1992. Weve been playing together as a duo for 15 years, Santiago said. We love the audience reaction to each of our performances. That is whats most rewarding to be able to communicate through our music. This concert is one of the programs of the 25th season of the Ilse Newell Fund for the Performing Arts, under the auspices of the Apalachicola Area Historical Society. Admission is a $5 donation, with students admitted free. Nephina duet to perform Sunday

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Benet Friday for Josh PhippsJosh Phipps, son of Rex and Sabrina Phipps, is a true son of the shing and oyster industry and is in need of a heart transplant. A benet of love and treasure will be held on Friday, Feb. 8 beginning at 8 p.m. at the Roseate Spoonbill Lounge on Water Street. Wear your white boots or bare feet or oxfords but be there. All proceeds go to Josh. Come one, come all.Valentines dinner set for Saturday at island churchThe St. George Island United Methodist Church will hold its annual Valentines dinner at 6:30 p.m. this Saturday, Feb. 9. Delicious spaghetti, bread, salad, and homemade desserts will be served and great door prizes will be given away. The cost is $10 and all proceeds go towards the Apalachicola-St. George Island Cooperative Parish Nicaragua Mission trip in June. For more info call Mary Lou Short 927-2569Trinity to host Shrove Tuesday pancake supperTrinity Episcopal Church will hold its annual Shrove Tuesday Pancake Supper from 5 to 7 p.m. on Tuesday, Feb. 12. All tickets are $5 and can be purchased at the door or by calling the church ofce at 653-9550. Eat in or take out! Trinity Church is located off US 98 and Sixth Street, across from the Apalachicola Municipal Library.Dentist with a Heart on Feb. 13Dr. Frank D. May of Port St. Joe has a unique Valentines Day present for the needy of this area. May, who has provided free dental treatment for Valentines Day for the last 12 years, will provide this valuable service on Wednesday, Feb. 13. This year the ofce will schedule appointments with those in need of treatment. To schedule an appointment, send or bring by a letter to Mays ofce giving a brief description of your dental needs, and please describe your situation that makes you a good candidate for this benet. Send the letter to Mays ofce at 319 Williams Ave. in Port St. Joe, FL 32456. Please, no telephone calls; be sure to include your telephone number so you can be contacted to schedule an appointment. May will see 20 patients in need of dental treatment; hygienists Anealia Bush and Linda Wright will see eight to 10 patients for teeth cleaning. The ofce hopes to serve as many as 40 patients. Patients must be at least age 12, and accompanied by a parent or guardian if under age 18. Treatments provided will include cleaning, x-rays, fillings, extractions, diagnostics, and pain control. May and his staff participate in Dentist With a Heart because they wish to impact people who otherwise could not afford to see a dentist, and help those people save their teeth, as well as relieve them of any discomfort they may be having.Millender family reunion Feb. 16The Millender family reunion will be held Saturday, Feb. 16 at the old Carrabelle School, 1001 Gray Ave., Carrabelle. The Millender extended family includes Mock, McKnight, Walden and Barwick. Time is from 11 a.m. until. Please bring a covered dish or two.Family and Friends Day at FriendshipFriendship Missionary Baptist Church, 233 9th Street, welcomes the community to enjoy its Family and Friends Day beginning at 3 p.m. on Sunday, Feb. 24. Chairperson Eula Rochelle said everybody is welcome, and for more information, to call 370-0841. The United Methodist Churches of Franklin County Welcome You First United Methodist Church of ApalachicolaWorship Service 11:00 a.m. every Sunday Sunday School 10:00 a.m. 75 5th St. Apalachicola 653-9530 fumcapalach@gtcom.net Pastor: Rev. Themo PatriotisCarrabelle United Methodist ChurchWorship Services 10:45 a.m. Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Celebrate Recovery Mondays 7-9 p.m. 102 NE Ave. B Carrabelle 697-3672 Pastor: Julie StephensEastpoint United Methodist ChurchWorship Service 10:00 a.m. every Sunday Healing service every fourth Monday at 7:00 p.m. 317 Patton Dr. (corner of David St.) 670-8825 Pastor: Rev. Beth WhiteSt. George Island United Methodist Church9:00 a.m. Worship Service 10:00 a.m. Fellowship Hour 201 E. Gulf Beach Dr. 9274635 www.sgiumc.org Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis Nursery now provided for Sunday Church Service First Baptist ChurchSt. George Island 501 E. Bayshore Drive 927-2257 R. Michael Waley, Pastor Join us as we praise and worship the living Christ. Great is the Lord and most worthy of praise. Psalm 145:3 Sunday Bible Study................................................10:00am Worship Praise........................................................11:00am Sunday Night............................................................7:00pm Wednesday Power Hour......................................7:00pm Wednesday Youth at S.P.L.A.S.H.......................7:00pm Walking in Christ R. Michael Whaley, Pastor First Pentecostal Holiness Church379 Brownsville Road Apalachicola Were excited about what Gods doing!!!Sunday School 9:45 am Sunday Morning Worship 10:45 am Sunday Evening Service 6:00 pm Monday, Youth Group 6:30 pm Wednesday, Royal Rangers, G.A.P.7:00 pm Wednesday Worship & Word 7:30 pmNursery Provided during regular church services 7:00 7:00 WELCOMES YOU Trinity Trinity Episcopal Churchest. 1836Welcomes YouHwy. 98 & 6th St. Apalachicola 850-653-9550Sunday Worship Services 8 & 10:30 a.m. Wednesdays Healing Service 11 a.m. Centering Prayer 4 p.m. Sunday Worship Services 8 & 10:30 a.m. Shrove TuesdayPancake Supper, Feb. 12 5-7PMAsh Wednesday ServicesFeb. 13 Noon & 6PM WELCOMES YOUChurch of the Ascension101 NE First Street CarrabelleSUNDAY10:00 AM WELCOMES YOUChurch THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH (850) 274-4490 (850) 545-2578 FaithThe Times | A9Thursday, February 7, 2013Marion Edward Millender was born Nov. 11, 1920, one of 10 children born to Marion Francis and Willie Mae Millender, in Carrabelle. Marion left this world for a Heavenly world on Tuesday, Jan. 29, 2013 at his home surrounded by his family and friends. Marion is preceded in death by his loving and faithful wife OnaMae Mary and one daughter Patricia Lynn. He is also preceded in death by his parents Marion Francis and Willie Mae, and six brothers Hollis, J.C., Earnest, Otis, Bert, Will, and one sister Edna. Marion is survived by two sons, Michael Edward and Patrick Kirby (Era Mae) and three daughters Mary Theresa Crosby (Frankie Paul), Karen Marie Richard (James Howard), and Melissa Josephine Creamer (George Buckley); 13 grandchildren; eight greatgrandchildren; numerous nieces and nephews; and two brothers Fred Charles Millender, Eastpoint, and Howard Francis Millender, Crystal Beach, Texas. When Marion was a young man he grew up during the Depression era and it took all of the young children to work to help his parents make ends meet. At an early age he and his brothers began mullet shing and crabbing. They helped out in any way to survive through those tough years. Marion served in World War II from Nov. 1942 to Dec. 1945 in the 793rd Field Artillery Battalion. He was a Heavy Artillery Gun Crewman 845. He served time in France and Germany. He was discharged with honors and received the Medal of Good Conduct and the World War II Victory Medal. During the war he sent money home to his family and they purchased land in Eastpoint in 1942. When he returned home from the war, he held some jobs, but he then concentrated on being an oysterman and sherman. His brothers were great musicians and they played at all of the local juke joints. Marion went along and called the square dances. It was during that time that he met the love of his life. He fell deeply in love with a beautiful and petite angel. He liked to say that she swept him off of his feet and he told her that she was going to be his wife. They had a strong loving relationship and made a big family and were strong, loving, and caring parents. Marion and his wife, OnaMae, together were hard workers. They are known as the Greatest Oystermen/Woman that has ever lived. They worked from daylight to dark catching oysters. Some of those days after unloading the oysters Marion and his brothers would then go out mullet shing all night to come in and go oystering again in the morning. Marion was a hardworking man, there is no denying that fact. Over the years Marion taught others how to oyster and how to respect the bay and the oyster bars. His teachings and knowledge has been carried on through many people. Marion sold his beachfront property in Eastpoint, to the state of Florida instead of a large condo development. It is the site of the Millender Tract off of Patton Drive. He sold it to the state to remain as an area where anyone could go and view the beautiful bay. It has been the site of many weddings, birthday parties, and family reunions. Marion was a kind, loving, generous person. He helped many people throughout his life, when they were unable to get by on their own. Services were held at the United Baptist Church, with the Rev. Bobby Shiver ofciating, on Saturday afternoon, Feb. 2. Southerland Funeral Home, Panama City is in charge of arrangements. The family would like to give special thanks to the Veterans Home-based Care Unit of Tallahassee; Big Bend Hospice, and NHC of Carrabelle. We thank all of you for taking wonderful care of our Daddy. A very special thank you to Theresa Spurlock, Kathy Tauton, Vivian Hitt, Cythinia Laughlyn, and Amanda Hall. With your care and devotion it made it easier these last few months. Thank you for taking care of our Daddy.Marion Edward Millender MARION MILLeENdeDERYvonne Money, 86, of Conway, Arkansas went to be with her Lord and Savior on Wednesday, Jan. 30, 2013, in Sherwood, Ark. Mrs. Money was born April 16, 1926, in Gastonia, North Carolina to the late Rev. W.H. Bouington and Minnie Marie Connor Bouington. She married her childhood friend, Edward Money, on Nov. 25, 1944. They recently celebrated their 68th wedding anniversary. She was a pastors wife and longtime member in the Church of the Nazarene. Preceding her in death were her parents, six siblings, and her husband of 68 years, Dr. W.E. Money. She is survived by one sister, Barbara Hudspeth, of Port St. Joe; one brother, Oma Bouington, of Port St. Joe; six children, Butch Money (Julie), of Vilonia, Ark., Dr. Wandal Money (Glenda), of Sherwood, Ark., Tanya McClendon (Bobby) of Apalachicola, Karen Caldwell (Donald) of Conway, Ark., Eddie Money (Lanay) of Enola, Ark., and Donna Gail Webb (Steve); 23 grandchildren, 13 greatgrandchildren and a host of nieces, nephews, and in-laws. She died like she lived with grace and dignity, trusting God, and with her children by her side. Funeral services were Saturday, Feb. 2, at 10 a.m. at Sherwood First Church of the Nazarene with a visitation Friday night from 6-8 p.m. also at the church. Immediately following the funeral, burial was in Beryl Cemetery in Vilonia. Arrangements by North Little Rock Funeral Home, a Smith Family Funeral Home.Yvonne Money YvVONNeE MONeyEYConnie Marie Flowers, 68, of Apalachicola, passed away Friday, Feb. 2, 2013 at the Big Bend Hospice House, in Tallahassee. She was born in Franklin County and lived there her entire life. Connie was a Missionette Leader at the Living Waters Assembly of God in Apalachicola. She was also involved in Womens Ministry. Her family was her life. She is survived by her three children, Teresa Dean (Rufus), of Apalachicola; Kathy Rafeld (Ronnie), of Apalachicola; and Michael Flowers (Brenda) of Eastpoint; sisters, Earlene Dempsey of Tallahassee; Diane Douglas (Clint) of Bruceton, Tenn.; Christine Brown of Sneads; and Joyce Wells (Greg) of Sneads; sistersin-law, Jean Chason of Chattahoochee; Faye Vaccaro of Sneads; Patricia Walden of Tallahassee; and Brenda Gill of Blackshear, GA; seven grandchildren, Maranda Coatney; Rocky Butler; Jessica Hunnings; Jason Gaskill; Denise Burkett; Tana Kendrick; and Tiffany Flowers; 11 great-grandchildren; and many nieces and nephews. She was preceded in death in July 2008 by her husband, Rodger Flowers. The funeral service was held at the Living Waters Assembly of God Church in Apalachicola, Monday afternoon, Feb. 4. The family received friends one hour prior at the church. The committal followed at Magnolia Cemetery in Apalachicola. Bevis Funeral Home of Crawfordville, Harvey Young Chapel is handling arrangements.Connie Marie Flowers Obituaries Faith bBRIefsEFSTo our heavenly angel, Eva Mae CoatneyJan. 31, 2012 We little knew that morning that God Was going to call your name. In life we loved you dearly, In death we do the same. It broke our hearts to lose you, You did not go alone; For part of us went with you, The day God called you home. You left us peaceful memories, Your love is still our guide; And though we cannot see you, You are always at our side. Our family chain is broken, And nothing seems the same; But as God calls us one by one, The chain will link again.Love and miss you,Ronnie, Cindy, Scott and Bailey BugBlanche Cameron FamilyA big thank-you from the Cameron family for the benet dinner held for Blanche Cameron on Feb. 2. We would like to thank all the churches, merchants and businesses, the schools, our local re department and all the community that helped make this happen. A special thank-you to Ashley Teat for organizing and having the benet. This was a true act of kindness from our community. Thank you for our love. I ask for your continued prayers. We have a great physician. Our God is awesome.Thank you again,Blanche Cameron and familyKing Day CelebrationThe Martin Luther King Jr. Celebration Committee would like to also acknowledge and thank the following churches and pastors who were active participants in the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Celebration on Monday, Jan. 21. Pastors David & Harolyn Walker and Covenant Word Ministries, Pastor Barry Hand and Mount Zion Missionary Baptist Church, Pastor Clifford Williams, Pastor Themo Patriotis, Pastor Martha Harris, Pastor L. D. Martin, Bishop Horace Solomon, Pastor Rene Williams, Dr. John Sink Bishop Sheila White Martin and Love Center Ministries Thank you for your presence and contributions.Putnal FamilyAnn Putnal and the entire Putnal family wish to thank everyone who helped them during and after their house re. Special thanks to Timmy Register, who got everything started with the Red Cross to tell us where to go and what to do, and to Bill Banks, who was the rst on the scene when the re broke out. Hes always the rst responder at every scene Ive been at and he rides a bicycle. He is Johnny on the spot. In MemEMORy Y Cards of thTHANksKS

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Email outdoors news to timesoutdoors @star .com OUTDOORSwww.apalachtimes.comSection Section A NEW FISHING TACKLE ARRIVING DAILY!SHOPNEW ITEMS FROM PENN,SHIMANO, AND ABUGARCIA. Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL(next to Piggly Wiggly)www.BWOsh.comYour Hunting Headquarters FULL LINE OF THE NEW PENN SPINFISHER V REELSSTARTING AT Corner of Marina Drive, Corner of Marina Drive, (next to Piggly Wiggly) Corner of Marina Drive, (next to Piggly Wiggly) $139.99 WEEKLY ALMANAC APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE TIDE TABLES MONTHLY AVERAGESTo nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from these given for APALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW Cat Point Minus 0:40 Minus 1:17 East Pass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27 To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from those given for CARRABELLE: HIGH LOW Bald Point Minus 9:16 Minus 0:03 Sponsor the WEEKLY ALMANACCall Today!653-8868 Date HighLow% Precip Thu, Feb. 0772 6250% Fri, Feb. 0873 5720% Sat, Feb. 0972 59 0% Sun, Feb. 1073 6120% Mon, Feb. 1171 5610% Tues, Feb. 1267 5630% Wed, Feb. 1365 4760% 1 Fr 546am 1.4 534pm 2.1 1023am 0.5 1158pm 0.0 2 Sa 710am 1.3 607pm 2.1 1051am 0.8 3 Su 907am 1.1 647pm 2.2 122am -0.2 1115am 1.0 4 Mo 738pm 2.2 256am -0.3 5 Tu 843pm 2.2 416am -0.6 6 We 213pm 1.6 959pm 2.2 521am -0.8 408pm 1.4 7 Th 233pm 1.8 1116pm 2.2 616am -1.0 528pm 1.4 8 Fr 256pm 1.8 703am -1.0 626pm 1.3 9 Sa 1225am 2.2 316pm 1.8 744am -0.8 715pm 1.0 10 Su 126am 2.2 333pm 1.8 820am -0.6 801pm 0.8 11 Mo 221am 2.1 349pm 1.8 850am -0.3 845pm 0.5 12 Tu 314am 2.1 405pm 1.8 916am 0.0 929pm 0.3 13 We 405am 1.9 423pm 1.9 939am 0.2 1015pm 0.2 14 Th 500am 1.6 444pm 2.1 1000am 0.5 1105pm 0.0 1 Fr 546am 1.4 534pm 2.1 1023am 0.5 1158pm 0.0 2 Sa 710am 1.3 607pm 2.1 1051am 0.8 3 Su 907am 1.1 647pm 2.2 122am -0.2 1115am 1.0 4 Mo 738pm 2.2 256am -0.3 5 Tu 843pm 2.2 416am -0.6 6 We 213pm 1.6 959pm 2.2 521am -0.8 408pm 1.4 7 Th 233pm 1.8 1116pm 2.2 616am -1.0 528pm 1.4 8 Fr 256pm 1.8 703am -1.0 626pm 1.3 9 Sa 1225am 2.2 316pm 1.8 744am -0.8 715pm 1.0 10 Su 126am 2.2 333pm 1.8 820am -0.6 801pm 0.8 11 Mo 221am 2.1 349pm 1.8 850am -0.3 845pm 0.5 12 Tu 314am 2.1 405pm 1.8 916am 0.0 929pm 0.3 13 We 405am 1.9 423pm 1.9 939am 0.2 1015pm 0.2 14Th Gun ShowFebruary9th & 10thPanama City Panama City Fairgrounds Fairgrounds2077809Sat 9 -5 Sun 10-4C o n c e a l e d W e a p o n s C l a s s S a t / S u n 1 1 a m o r 2 p m Floridagunshows.com FREE PARKING Special to The TimesThe new year looks like it will be another busy one on St. Vincent Island. February brings the annual meeting for the supporters group of the refuge, and then in March the open house on the island takes place. The winter hunts are over, and the focus shifts to turtle monitoring, wolf tracking and island maintenance. This year we hope to have more local faces joining the activities on St. Vincent Island. In addition to the upcoming annual meeting on Feb. 17, another date to put on your calendar is March 22. That is the day when the St. Vincent Island Supporters Group will welcome visitors to the island to explore and learn more about this beautiful island wildlife refuge. Free transportation to and from the island will be provided. Hear more about this special event next month. The three hunts that took place on St. Vincent Island this winter had mild weather and dry conditions that produced three very successful hunts. The white-tailed Deer Archery Hunt was Nov. 15-17 and had 57 hunters participate. Thirteen deer were harvested: four bucks and nine does. Five feral hogs also were harvested: four females and one male that weighed 103 pounds, the heaviest animal harvested in that hunt. The Sambar Deer Hunt took place Nov. 29 to Dec. 1. The Sambar deer, an elk from India, was brought to the island in the early 1900s by Dr. Pierce, who was using the island as a private exotic hunting preserve. This imported deer was the only nonnative animal permitted to remain on the island after the island became part of the National Wildlife Refuge system. The Sambar deer, which can measure up to 6 feet tall weigh up to 700 pounds, acclimated to the island terrain and does not interfere with the natural habitat of the island. There were 128 hunters at this hunt, who harvested 12 Sambar deer. The deer included eight stags and four hinds with dressed weight ranging from 191 to 368 pounds and two to six points. Three feral hogs also were harvested weighing 30 to 60 pounds. The Primitive Weapon Hunt took place Jan. 2426, as 118 hunters harvested 28 white-tailed deer, seven feral hogs and one raccoon. The January hunt concluded the 2012-13 winter hunting season on St. Vincent Island. Volunteers still are needed by the St. Vincent Island NWR. Both outdoor and of ce-based volunteer work is available. At our Apalachicola of ce, you can help with visitor services, assist with administrative tasks or help write grant proposals. On the island, you can help track the red wolves, join the sea turtle patrol, participate in bird counts, clean up trash on the islands beautiful beaches, remove invasive plants or assist with maintenance projects. To volunteer or learn more about how you can help, email supportstvin@ hotmail.com. The monthly island tours have several more months before the summer heat and bugs arrive. All tours are on second Wednesdays: Feb. 13, March 13, April 10 and May 8. Our enhanced website will give you details about the tours plus a convenient place to sign up. Just click on Island Tour Sign Up. The tour is free, but participants must make a reservation on the web at www. stvincentfriends.com. Seats are lled on a rst-come, rst-served basis. There is a small charge for boat transportation to and from the island. You can also visit the island on your own. Do remember that the island is primitive: Bring everything you need, including drinking water, and leave only your footprints behind. This monthly column is provided by the Supporters of St. Vincent Island National Wildlife Refuge. Visit www.stvincentfriends.com more information and volunteer opportunities, and never miss an opportunity to visit St. Vincent Island. Franklin County seems to be the new in resort for exotic hummingbirds. About this time last year, a broadbilled hummer traveled along the coast, causing a stir from Magnolia Bluff to St. James. Last month, a buff-bellied hummer was the hit of the Christmas Bird Count, and now another celebrity has turned up at the same local feeder in Apalachicola frequented by the buff belly. We cant give you the address because these Alist hummingbirds demand their privacy when they visit the Forgotten Coast. The Calliope hummingbird is the smallest bird that breeds in North America. The genus name, Selasphorus, means little star. An adult Calliope hummingbird is 3 to 4 inches long with a 4-inch wingspan and weighs no more than one-tenth of an ounce, These birds are glossy green on the back and crown with a white breast. Their bill and tail are relatively short. The adult male has winered streaks on the throat, green anks and a dark tail. Females and immatures have a pinkish wash on the anks, dark streaks on the throat and a dark tail with white tips. Like most hummingbirds, they lay their eggs low in shrubs. Nesting usually occurs at high altitudes in the Rocky Mountains. The winter range is small, which renders the Calliope vulnerable to disease outbreaks, landscape changes and severe weather. These birds feed on nectar from owers and sap from holes created by sapsuckers. They also might catch and feed on small insects and spiders. They are important pollinators for some plants including columbine, Indian paintbrush and other tubular owers. The Calliope hummingbird is the smallest long-distance migratory bird in the world. They travel more than 5,000 miles from the northwestern U.S. and southwestern Canada to south-central Mexico every year. The Calliope is normally a mountain bird, but like other rare hummers spotted in the area, this little traveler might be seeking a new home in response to landscape and climate change in its normal range. On Feb. 1, Mary Wilson, a member of the Hummingbird Study Group, traveled from Alabama to Apalachicola to band the little visitor. She said the Calliope was a male born this past summer. It weighed 2 grams. The bird is not a state record. About 30 banded in Florida. She said she banded a rufous hummingbird in Eastpoint and a ruby-throat in Apalachicola during December. Were trying to get the word out to people to leave feeders out during the winter, she said, And to warn them that cats are a danger to hummingbirds. Wilson believes sighting of unusual hummingbirds in the area has increased because more people are looking, more people recognize unusual birds and more people leaving feeders out during the cold months. Information on where Calliope hummingbirds occur and in what numbers is vital to conserving the species. Help in monitoring this and other species by reporting your sightings to eBird, a project of Audubon and the Cornell Lab of Ornithology at www. audubon.org/bird/ebird.Special to The Times The annual Panhandle Sportsmans Banquet has been set for Feb. 21 at the Port St. Joe Centennial Building. Socializing with area sportsmen and enjoying appetizers of Apalachicola oysters, boiled shrimp and all the trimmings begins at 5 p.m. At 6:30 p.m. the serious eating begins with Chef Charlie Nortons famous, no-man-left hungry ribeye steaks and Sisters almost equally famous banana pudding. At 7:30 p.m., more than $20,000 worth of contributions and prizes will be distributed to the guests through live auctions and raf es. A few of the items offered will include at least 24 shotguns, hunting ri es and pistols, along with numerous other outdoor products. There also will be items available for women and children. This will mark the third year of the $8,000 cash drawing held during the event. Tickets are $50 in advance and $60 at the door. They can be purchased at Hannon Insurance and Ramseys Printing and Of ce Products in Port St. Joe and from any Lions Club member. Additional information or ticket purchases can be made by calling 227-1133, 227-7767 or 527-1338. Little star hummingbird visits Franklin CountyPage 10 Thursday, February 7, 2013 BUDS N BUGSLois Swoboda SPONSORED BY Freshwater InshoreMost action around town is still in the I.C.W. Canal in St. Joe. Try starting out under the powerlines and moving your way up towards the t.. Live shrimp has been the bait of choice; however, Gulp shrimp and D.O.A. are good alternatives this week. Unusually warm weather has the fish confused again in our area this week. With a cold front predicted to be moving our way, now is the time to be out on the water. Lake Wimico and parts of the Apalachicola River are seeing good sheepshead and a few striped bass still this week. JOHN SPOHRER | Special to the TimesA Calliope hummingbird was spotted in Franklin County. Sixth annual Sportsmans banquet to be Feb. 21 SUPPORTERS OF ST. VINCENT ISLAND TO MEET FEB. 17The sixth annual meeting of the Supporters of St. Vincent National Wildlife Refuge will be 1-4 p.m. Feb. 17 at the St. Joseph Bay Buffer Preserve, 3915 State Road 30A, 4.5 miles south of the junction of U.S. 98 and County 30-A (Port St. Joe) and 5 miles north of the Indian Pass Raw Bar. Eric Lovestrand, education coordinator of the Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve, will be the guest speaker. He plans to educate the group on The Snakes of Florida. Food will be catered by Paul Gants Bar-B-Q. Memberships will be sold at the door, and you must be a member to attend. Annual memberships are $15 for individuals and $20 per family. For more information call 229-6735. BIRDS-EYE VIEWFROM ST. VINCENT ISLAND A new year on St. Vincent Island

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By DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com The Franklin County boys soccer team ended their season Jan. 31, as they fell 5-0 at Lafayette Mayo Jan. 31 in the Class 1A Region 2 quarter nals. As we knew Lafayette was going to be a very fast and skilled team, said Coach Ramon Valenzuela. Since they were number one in their district with a solid 14-5 record throughout their season, we were there to do our best. The Seahawks held on the for the rst 32 minutes, 0-0, despite being pinned by the Hornets minutes deep in their defensive third and enduring a 14-1 shot advantage. A goal by Hornet sophomore striker Jose Diaz gave the home team a 1-0 lead going into the intermission. At the starting of the second half, we knew they were coming stronger and they scored the second goal, said Valenzuela. Leading the mid elds resurgent second half were junior Ismeal Moreno who, in the 46th minute, stared down the right post from the corner of the Seahawks box before drilling a 25-yard free kick to give the Hornets a 2-0 lead. Mayo was poised to add more goals, and with 15 minutes remaining for the game to be over, the team sensed it was going to be a loss. Suddenly, our center mid elder Zack Howze got a red card for unsportsmanlike behavior, said Valenzuela. I think it was mishandled by the referee and could have had more control, but it is soccer and sometimes it can get out of control. Especially when you know you are playing a better team. Unfortunately, we let our emotions lead the game and we cannot do that. Playing with 10 men wasnt easy and they got three more goals on us, said the Seahawks coach. We tried hard and never gave up. I told the boys these type of games are the ones that we can learn from. He said that he will continue to stress conditioning, since the players know they are capable of running 80 minutes without getting tired. It is just because of their conditioning previous to the season, and we need to learn that conditioning is very important in any sport, but in soccer more, said Valenzuela. Also, I told our boys that the one thing I admired about them is that they never gave up through the season, their love of the sport and their openness to learn how to play soccer, he said. By DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com The Franklin County Seahawks varsity boys basketball team made the most of their Senior Night last week, honoring seven of their standouts before hometown fans and then ending the night with a 72-69 win over John Paul II. With their mothers receiving roses, and each of them getting a basketball signed by their teammates, the seniors honored included Skyler Hutchinson, Seth Rogers, Rahkeim Pierce, Ladarius Rhodes, Direek Farmer, David Butler and Chase Golden. Coach Mike Sweatt said the team plans to present the seniors with signed jerseys at the season-ending banquet. Sweatts team delighted fans with the Senior Night win, especially since the players led from start to nish, and made sure the fourth quarter was their best of the game. We actually closed the ballgame out, he said. We closed the game up in the last couple of minutes. Weve lost at least six games this season that were in the last two minutes. We came out every quarter like we wanted to win, Sweatt said. Thats the difference. The coach said John Paul was coming off a 22-point blow-out of Liberty County, a team that has dominated the Seahawks this year, so the win was especially satisfying. Rhodes led the team with 17 points (7-of-11 from the eld) and 10 rebounds, followed by Butler, who went 7-of-14 from the eld for 15 points and ve rebounds. Hutchinson tallied 11 points, and Carza Harvey 10 points, including 2-of-3 treys. Pierce scored eight points, Golden seven and Kelsey Jones four. In all, the Seahawks shot 24-of-52 (46 percent) from the eld, 4-of-12 from behind the three-point arc (33 percent), and 12-of-23 from the free throw line (52 percent). The win followed consecutive losses, including a 66-26 loss at league-leading West Gadsden Jan. 25. Jones led the team with eight points, with Butler scoring six, Cameron White ve, Farmer four and Golden three. In all the team shot only 9-of-33 from the eld, or just 27 percent. On Jan. 24 the Seahawks fell 94-71 at home to Wewahitchka. Rhodes scored 22 points to lead the team, going 10-of20 from the eld. Rogers added a dozen points, with eight from Wesley Norred. Pierce scored six points, with Logan McLeod and Hutchinson each contributing ve, White four, and Tyler Howard, Harvey and Golden each two. The teams string of losses also included a 70-33 loss at Port St. Joe on Jan. 19, and a 60-31 loss at home to Bozeman on Jan. 18. We were averaging 35 points per game during that stretch, said Sweatt. Our three leading scorers averaged seven points a game. The coach said the team was losing by ve, 27-22, at the half against the Tiger Sharks but had a bad second half effort. We just couldnt put the ball in the basket. We were so frustrated we stopped playing defense, said Sweatt. White led the team with eight points, with four points each from Harvey, Farmer, Rhodes and Golden. With a 1-11 district record, and 6-17 overall, the Seahawks are seeded at the bottom for this weeks district tourney. The opening game was Tuesday against Port St. Joe at South Walton, with the victor going Friday night against the winner of the BozemanLiberty County game. Its not too late though; We still have districts, said Sweatt. Its possible if you can get hot at the right moments. Hopefully we can come in and execute our game plan. We do that well win. I have all the con dence in the world. Gulfside IGA PLAYER OF THE WEEK SPONSORFranklin County High School senior Ladarius Rhodes scored 17 points and pulled down 10 rebounds in the Seahawks 72-69 win Jan. 31 over John Paul II on Senior Night. Rhodes went 7-for-11 from the oor, including nailing his one three-point attempt. Hes worked really hard in practice the last couple weeks, said Coach Mike Sweatt. With each game his condence has gotten better. Congratulations, Ladarius! Hometown Proud (850)653-9695 Valentines Sweetheart SpecialFebruary 14 Cup of Lobster Bisque Sunset Rainbow Garden Salad Filet of Beef and Bahamian Lobster Tail Sugar Snap Peas Choice of Baked Potato, Sweet Potato Souf Steak Fries or Wild Rice Dinner Rolls Special Dessert Plate Seahawk seniors take honors and a winCARRABELLE APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA SPORTS www.apalachtimes.comThursday, February 7, 2013 APage 11Section SKYLER HUTCHINSON DAVID BUTLERDIREEK FARMERCHASE GOLDEN RAHKEIM PIERCELADARIUS RHODESSETH ROGERS DAVID ADLERSTEIN | the TimesSeahawks soccer players march in the Mardi Gras parade.Seahawk soccer boys bow out in regionalsFranklin County Dixie Youth baseball and softball leagues will have registration from 5:30-7 p.m. today, Feb. 7, at your local county park. Apalachicola will have one more registration from 10 a.m. to noon Saturday, Feb. 9, at the D.W. Wilson Sports Complex. Deadline for signups is Feb. 24. Registration is $50, which covers the cost of the uniforms. Please encourage your child to participate in a great season with the Franklin County Dixie Youth. If you want to coach or volunteer, a meeting will be at 6 p.m. Feb. 21 at the Armory. Lanier Baseball Camp will be Feb. 23-24 at the D.W. Wilson Sports Complex in Apalachicola. The camp will show the kids and coaches the latest techniques. Coaches and players are encouraged to attend. The cost is $25, which includes lunch.Dixie Youth registrations continue Sports BRIEF

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LocalA12 | The Times Thursday, February 7, 2013Franklin County was visited by a troop of Samaritan warriors Monday. Four teams of four soldiers made their way along U.S. 98 between 9 p.m. and sunrise carrying 40-pound packs. The Air Commandos are rucking to raise money for the Special Operations Warrior Foundation and to honor ve Air Commandos who fell last year in the of line of duty. On Saturday, 16 Air Commandos began their journey from Hurlburt Field in Okaloosa County and will arrive at MacDill Air Force Base near Tampa on Friday. Also, two Air Commandos are climbing Mt. Kilimanjaro in Tanzania as part of the fundraiser. The ruckers teams walked 24 hours a day, trading every 12 miles. Those honored this year include Lt. Col. J.D. Loftis, shot and killed by an assailant on Feb. 25, 2012 inside the Interior Ministry building in Kabul during nationwide unrest sparked by the burning of Korans at a NATO military base. He was working with AfPak Hands, a program of specially trained U.S. service members skilled in Afghan and Pakistani culture and language. Posthumously, he was awarded the Air Force Combat Action Medal and Purple Heart. Capt. Ryan P Hall, Capt. Nicholas Whitlock, Lt. Justin Wilkens and Senior Airman Julian Scholten all died Feb. 18, 2012 when their U-28A surveillance plane was involved in an accident near Camp Lemonnier, Djibouti, located in the Horn of Africa. The U-28 was returning from a mission in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. In addition to honoring their comrades, the volunteers have donned their rucksacks to raise money to help provide a college education for the children of warriors killed during an operational or training mission under the U.S. Special Operations Command. According to the foundation website, 900 children of the approximately 800 Special Operations personnel are currently eligible for support. With help from the program, 190 children of fallen military personnel have graduated from college. The Special Operations Warrior Foundation was founded in 1980. In 2005, it began providing grants to fallen servicemen and women and their families. In addition to scholarships, it provides $3,000 grants to personnel seriously wounded in the line of duty so family members can immediately travel to be at their loved ones bedside. Since the program began, the foundation has provided more than $1 million to wounded special operations personnel. The ruckers raise money through donations by supporters both of ine and through the Firstgiving. com website. Details of this years march are posted on both Facebook and Twitter. This is the fourth year for the march from Hurlburt to McDill but the rst time the ruckers followed us 98. Last year, the foundation raided $30,000. This years goal is $50,000. Sergeant Deon McGowan, organizer of the march said, This is just a little part of what we can do, just to feel some of the pain that they went through. I think its worth it; well worth the blisters, the hot spots and the aching back. By Lois Swoboda Special to The TimesThe Franklin County Public Library Eastpoint Teen Game Day was a hit with the Franklin County teens who thoroughly loved the games provided. Because of testing, Franklin County students had early dismissal from school, and were happy to spend the rest of their day at the library. A group of Wilderness Coast Public Library staff joined our staff and the teens playing board games like Zombie Dice, Yahtzee, Trivial Pursuit, Mankala, Battleship, and Forbidden Island. Many of the teens had not played some of the games, but were eager to learn and play. The afternoon passed by quickly as they took turns playing different games with their friends enjoyed pizza, soda, and cupcakes provided to them at no charge. Door prizes were won by each teen and added more fun as they swapped prizes. They were asking immediately when the library would be holding another event like this. Staff is looking at future dates and will publicize the next date. Libraries throughout Florida have been taking snapshots of some of the activities that each library offers to their patrons. Franklin County is participating in this project by sending photos of the patrons, children, and families that enjoy the programs and services that our library provides. The Mommy and Me program participants in Eastpoint continue to learn more about art in its different forms and look forward to February when they learn about music. Some of the plans include creating their own Kitchen Band. Children love to experience music in every form and harpist, Deb Bachman, will also be visiting story time next month. For more information about programs and services, call 670-8151 or 697-2366. NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARINGTO CONSIDER ADOPTING A RESOLUTION THAT WILL REQUIRE THE COLLECTION OF ALL OF THE FIRE AND RESCUE SPECIAL ASSESSMENTS ON THE AD VALOREM TAX BILL USING THE UNIFORM METHOD OF COLLECTION PROVIDED BY SECTION 197.3632, FLORIDA STATUTESNotice is given that on February 28, 2013, at 1:30 p.m. (ET), at the Courthouse Annex located at 34 Forbes Street, Apalachicola, Florida 32320, the FranklinCounty Board of County Commissioners shall hold a public hearing to consider adopting a resolution of intent to rescue special assessments from the seven municipal service units, as provided by section 197.3632, Florida Statutes (2012) beginning with the ad valorem tax bills mailed November 2013. Interested Persons may appear at the meeting and be heard with respect to the proposed resolution. Any party who may wish to appeal the decision made at this public hearing is responsible for making a verbatim transcript of the hearing. Those persons requiring assistance to attend the meeting must call deputy clerk Michael Moron at 850-653-8861 x100 at least three business days before the meeting to make arrangements. Competitive Yields on FDIC Insured CDs For All Your Valentine & Floral NeedsA Country Place Gift & Florist(850)670-1073 or (850)228-2220Monday Saturday 9:00am ? Call for Special Hours For All Your BILL MILLER REALTY850-697-3751 (3310) 570-0658400 + COMM. U.S. 98 & GULFADJ. TO LANARK MARINA 850K$29,500 $2,500 DOWN BUYS 2 BED APT. 2 6 ORRENT $500/MTH 2 B/R 1 BTH GULF VIEW HOME W/ FAMILY ROOM $70,000 C/B-3-1 2 COR. LOTS CITY $49,500 3/2D/W 2 COR. LOTS -CITY $42,500MIH 2 CRNRLOTS BLK. $ STORE REDUCED $49,500 2 AC-AT RIVER UTIL. IN -$39,500 SPECIAL TO THE TIMESJennifer Stratton, left, and Abigail Harris are seen at the Wilderness Coast Public Librarys recent Teen Game Day.Teen Game Day a success at library Air Commando ruckers visit Franklin County COURTESY OF BILL FAUTHOne team of Special Ops airmen on their way from to Mexico Beach and Port St. Joe on Monday night.

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LocalThe Times | A13Thursday, February 7, 2013Tobacco ghters to meet todayThere will be a TobaccoFree Franklin Partnership Coalition Meeting from 5:30-6:30 p.m. today, Feb. 7, in the secondoor conference room at the Franklin County Health Department, 139 12th St. Lose your keys on Sawyer Lane?A large set of keys was found Saturday on Sawyer Lane in Apalachicola while the Tamara Marsh family was riding its golf cart down the alley. If theyre yours, you can claim them at Coastal Foot & Ankle Clinic, 221 Ave. E., or call 653-3338.Panhandle Players casting callThe Panhandle Players have called you for jury duty. Please report to auditions at 6:30 p.m. Feb. 11-12 at the Raney Carriage House. The show, to be April 19-21 at the Dixie Theatre, is Jury Room, written by C. B. Gilford and directed by Margy Oehlert. Twelve jurors will be chosen: seven females, ve males. For questions, call 670-8874.FCSWA to meet MondayThe Franklin County Seafood Workers Association February meeting will be at 6 p.m. Monday, Feb. 11, at the Eastpoint rehouse. The association will have board member discussions and voting on who they might be. We are trying to get four additional board members to join us, she said. They will be voted upon just as the of cers are and will serve oneyear terms and then also as of cers will have to be re-elected. Any member is eligible to be voted on, but they must be in attendance at the meeting. We need members who will be available when meetings, functions and decisions need to be made, and that will dedicate their best efforts toward all of the members of the association. Please see Shannon, Devin, or Chris at the Franklins Promise of ces in Apalachicola Community Building at the former high school ASAP to let them know you would like to be on the list for the agenda. For more information, contact Jennifer Millender at 597-0787 or email jenjenreeves@yahoo.com.Disadvantaged transportation board to meet Feb. 13The Franklin County Transportation Disadvantaged Coordinating Board will meet at 10 a.m. Wednesday, Feb. 13, at the Franklin County Courthouse Annex Courtroom, 33 Market St., Apalachicola. In addition to its regular business, the agenda will include approval of rates and grant applications. If any person decides to appeal any decision made by the board with respect to any matter considered at this meeting, he or she will need to ensure a verbatim record of the proceeding is made, which includes the testimony and evidence from which the appeal is to be issued. For additional information, a copy of the agenda or if you require special accommodations at the meeting, contact Vanita Anderson at the Apalachee Regional Planning Council, 20776 Central Ave. E., Suite 1, Blountstown, FL 32424 at least ve working days before the meeting date.Putnal family still needs helpThe Putnal family, who lost their home on Feb. 3, still is in need of a place to stay. On Monday, Ann Putnal said she had paid for a hotel room for that night but was completely out of money. She said Franklins Promise has offered to help with rent if the family has been unable to nd a suitable rental. She would appreciate all cash donations and any information about possible rental properties for herself, son Cody and husband Joseph. If you can help, call 524 7424.Library needs used booksOn Feb. 16, three good things are coming together: homemade soup, from-scratch bread and cheap books. The Friends of the Franklin County Public Library will hold a sale at Sea Oats Gallery on the island. The friends are seeking used books for the sale especially recent ction, cookbooks and childrens and young adult books. Take donations to the Eastpoint Library, 29 Island Drive; open Tuesday through Friday, or Sea Oats Gallery, 128 E. Pine Drive, St. George Island during regular business hours. Questions? Call Anna Carmichael at 370-6763.Legislative delegation meeting Feb. 26State Sen. Bill Montford, D-Tallahassee, has announced the countys legislative delegation meeting will be at 7 p.m. Feb. 26 in the county commission chambers. The delegation is rst meeting in Gulf County on the same day, starting at 5 p.m., then coming to Franklin. Elder care workshop plannedAt 1:30 p.m. March 5, there will be a meeting to discuss services provided to the elderly in Franklin County. The purpose of the workshop will investigate duplication of services and costs in preparation for preparing the upcoming county budget. Director of Administrative Services Alan Pierce said the Franklin County Senior Center; the Wakulla County Senior Center, which provides Meals on Wheels in the eastern part of the county; the Apalachicola Senior Center; the Gulf County Senior Center, which provides meals on wheels for the western part of the county; the Carrabelle food pantry and Franklins Promise will be invited to attend. Other organizations wishing to attend or those wishing to suggest other participants should contact Pierce at 653-9783. Trades & Services GET YOUR AD IN 653-8868Trades & Services Laban Bontrager, DMD Monica Bontrager, DMD 12761 Pea Ridge Road Bristol, Florida 32321TELEPHONE (850) 643-5417 Bristol Dental ClinicDENTURE LAB ON PREMISESSame Day Service on Repairs and Relines Don Lively General Contractors LICENSED ANDINSURED 20 YEARSEXPERIENCE P.O. Box 439 Carrabelle, FL 32322 697-2783 or Mobile 566-2603RC0066499RG0065255 Carrabelle Visa, Discover, and American Express Honored at Participating Ace Stores JACKSONSBuilding Supplies Building Supplies & Auto Repair Carrabelle 697-3333 We Deliver AnywhereHardware and Paint Center ROBERTS APPLIANCE REPAIR ALL MAJOR BRANDS 18 Shadow Lane Apalachicola, FL 32320 Phone: (850) 653-8122 Cell: (850) 653-7654 J.J.s Tree Service, LLC Stump Grinder Licensed & Insured Call John : (850) 899-8432 JOES LAWN CARE IF ITS IN YOUR YARD LET JOE TAKE CARE OF IT FULL LAWN SERVICES, TREE TRIMMING AND REMOVALALSO CLEAN GUTTERS AND IRRIGATION INSTILLATION, PLANTING AND BEDDING AVAILABLE CALL JOE@ 850-323-0741 OR EMAIL JOES_LAWN @YAHOO.COM News BRIEFS

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A14| The Times Thursday, February 7, 2013 CLASSIFIEDS 89988T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.: 19-2012-CA-000447 U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR STRUCTURED ASSET SECURITIES CORPORATION MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-BC4, Plaintiff vs. STEPHEN BERNARD BRYANT A/K/A STEPHEN B BRYANT AKA STEPHEN BRYANT, et al., Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF JANIE LEE JOHNSON Last Known Address Unknown Also Attempted At: 196 5TH STREET, APALACHICOLA, FL 32320 AND P.O. BOX 841, APALACHICOLA, FL 32320 Current Residence Unknown YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Foreclosure of Mortgage on the following described property: LOT 4, BLOCK 180, THE CITY OF APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA, AS PER MAP ON PLAT OF SAID CITY IN COMMON USE, LYING AND BEING IN FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it, on Choice Legal Group, Attorney for Plaintiff, whose address is 1800 NW 49th STREET, SUITE 120, FT. LAUDERDALE, FL 33309 within thirty (30) days after the first publication of this Notice in THE APALACHICOLA TIMES and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator, 301 South Monroe Street Tallahassee, FL 32301, 850.577.4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court this 17th day of January, 2013. MARCIA JOHNSON As Clerk of the Court By Terry E Creamer As Deputy Clerk Jan 31, Feb 7, 2013 90086T IN THE COUNTY COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 2012 CC 000112 ST. GEORGE PLANTATION OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., a Florida not for profit corporation, Plaintiff, vs. JOHN H. NICHOLS A/K/A JOHN N. NICHOLS, UNKNOWN TENANT 1 and UNKNOWN TENANT 2, Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: John H. Nichols a/k/a John N. Nichols 600 S. 3rd St. Gadsden, AL 35901 and any unknown parties who are or may be interested in the subject matter of this action whose names and residences, after diligent search and inquiry, are unknown to Plaintiff and which said unknown parties may claim as heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, lienors, creditors, trustees or other claimants claiming by, through, under or against the Said Defendant, who are not known to be dead or alive. YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to enforce and foreclose a Claim of Lien for assessments and to foreclose any claims which are inferior to the right, title and interest of the Plaintiff herein in the following described property: Lot 42 of Pebble Beach Village, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 4, Page(s) 34 and 35, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Plaintiffs attorney, Raymond F. Newman, Jr., Becker & Poliakoff, P.A., 348 Miracle Strip Pkwy, Suite 7, Ft. Walton Beach, FL 32548, on or before thirty (30) days from the date of first publication and to file the original of the defenses with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter. If a Defendant fails to do so, a default will be entered against that Defendant for the relief demanded in the Complaint. WITNESS my hand and the seal of said Court January 25, 2013. MARCIA M. JOHNSON as Clerk of said Court By: Terry E. Creamer As Deputy Clerk Becker & Poliakiff, P.A. Attorneys for Plaintiff 348 Miracle Strip Pkwy SW, Suite 7 Ft. Walton Beach, FL 32548-5253 (850)664-2229 (850)664-7882 Fax February 7, 14, 2013 92015T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 19-2012-CA-000438 THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLOW FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK SUCCESSOR TRUSTEE TO JPMORGAN CHASE BANK N.A., AS TRUSTEE FOR THE HOLDERS OF THE SARM 2004-8 TRUST, Plaintiff vs. JANE B. PALMIER, et al, Defendant(s) NOTICE OF ACTION FORECLOSURE PROCEEDINGPROPERTY TO: JANE B. PALMIER: ADDRESS UNKNOWN BUT WHOSE LAST KNOWN ADDRESS IS: 430 BALD POINT RD., ALLIGATOR POINT, FL 32346 Residence unknown and if living, including any unknown spouse of the Defendant, if remarried and if said Defendant is dead, his/her respective unknown heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, creditors, lienors, and trustees, and all other persons claiming by, through, under or against the named Defendant; and the aforementioned named Defendant and such of the aforementioned unknown Defendant and such of the unknown name Defendant as may be infants, incompetents or otherwise not sui juris. YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclosure a mortgage on the following described described property to-wit: LOT 2, BLOCK B, BALD POINT ESTATES, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 5 AT PAGES 43, 44 AND 45 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. more commonly known as: 430 BALD POINT ROAD, ALLIGATOR POINT, FL 32346 This action has been filed against you, and you are required to serve a copy of your written defense, if any, to it on the Plaintiffs attorney, FLORIDA FORECLOSURE ATTORNEYS, PLLC, whose address is 601 Cleveland Street, Suite 690, Clearwater, FL 33755, on or before 30 days after date of first publication, response due 30 days from the first day of publication, and file the original with the Clerk of the Circuit Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. WITNESS my hand and seal of this of this Court on the 11th day of January, 2013. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of the Court Franklin County, FL By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk February 7, 14, 2013 92117T PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF INTENDED ACTION FRANKLIN COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD Purpose and Effect: The Franklin County School Board proposes to update and adopt policies, as provided in the Administrative Procedures Act for the purpose of maintaining compliance with Florida Statutes and State Board of Education Rules. Summary: The following is a brief description of the proposed changes: Franklin County School District School Board Policy Manual updates to improve formatting and to address recent legislative changes. Statutory Authority: Section 1001.41, Florida Statutes These proposed rules will be considered by the Franklin County School Board at a meeting publicly advertised and held in the Willie Speed School Board Room at 85 School Road, Eastpoint, Florida, no earlier than 28 days after the original date of this notice. Policies may be reviewed during the period of February 7, 2013 through March 7, 2013 at the Franklin County School Board Administrative Offices, 85 School Road, Eastpoint, Florida during the hours of 8:00 AM until 4:00 PM, Monday -Friday. Feb. 7, 14, 21, 28, 2013 92147T NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED Notice if hereby given that, TC 10L LLC., the holders of the following certificate have filed said certificate for tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property and the name in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No: 221 Year of issuance: 2010 Description of property: LOT 16 BLOCK S ST JAMES BAY SUBDIVISION, PHASE II PARCEL NO: 05-07S-03W-1001-000S-01 60 Name is which assessed: REFLECTIONS HOUSE, LLC All of said property being in the State of Florida, Franklin County. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the Courthouse door on the second (1st) Monday in the month of February 2013, which is the 4th day of MARCH 2013 at 11:00 a.m. Dated this 29th day of JANUARY, 2013. MARCIA M. JOHNSON CLERK OF COURTS FRANKLIN COUNTY, Cassie B. Sapp Deputy Clerk Feb. 7, 14, 21, 28, 2013 92149T NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED Notice if hereby given that, TC 10L LLC., the holders of the following certificate have filed said certificate for tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property and the name in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No: 190 Year of issuance: 2010 Description of property: LOT 12 BLOCK D ST JAMES BAY SUBDIVI-

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, February 7, 2013 The Times | A15 SHINE VOLUNTEERS NEEDED Help seniors in your community: Make informed choices about their health insurance Answer Medicare questions and resolve problems Save money on their prescription medications Learn about programs they may be eligible forBilingual volunteers are encouraged to call1-800-96-ELDER (1-800-963-5337) Nestled in more than 200 miles of Award-Winning Pet-Friendly Beaches, World Famous seafood and Maritime History and Culture Lies Apalachicola, Florida. Known as the Forgotten Coast, Franklin County, Florida is a wonderfully Historic community. Apalachicola, which is the county seat, has a population of approximately 3500 residents, The Apalachicola housing authority, is a public housing complex with 54 units and is located within the city of Apalachicola, the AHA is currently accepting applications for the following Position:EXECUTIVE DIRECTORJob Requirements include Bachelors Degree; a minimum of 5 years management and/or supervisory experience and excellent communications skills.Anyone interested in this position should submit an application to:PAUL E. MILLS, INTERIM DIRECTOR141 15TH STREET APALACHICOLA, FL 32320(850)653-9304 PHONE(850)653-2473 FAXapalha@fairpoint.net(APPLICATIONS FOR EMPLOYEMENT ARE AVAILABLE AT THE AHA OFFICE) REPRESENTATIVES will be at the GULF COUNTY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE on Tuesdays & Thursdays from 9 am 1 pm EST accepting applications for numerous open positions.We offer competitive wages and a comprehensive bene t package including Company paid health, dental, and life insurance, 401(k), attendance & safety bonuses.EOE/Drug Free WorkplaceEASTERN SHIPBUILDING GROUP MORE THAN A JOB A FUTURE! ManySelling ABSOLUTE! AUCTIONS AuctionFDIC.com AL-GA-FL-SCFebruary23-March2RESIDENTIAL-COMMERCIAL DEVELOPERLOTS-LANDNoBuyersPremium|5%DownPayment $2,500CashiersChecktoBid BrokersProtectedH&MCQ1035357,AB110;B.G.Hudson,Jr.,BK3006464,AU230 866.509.44733532994 MUSIC FACULTYTeach music courses including but not limited to Music Theory, Sight Singing/Ear Training, direct performing groups, and maintain o ce hours & recruit students. Requires MS degree in Music with 18 graduate hours outside of music education, ability to drive 15-passenger van & valid FL drivers license. Position Open Until Filled with a review starting 3/22/13. Salary commensurate with education & experience. Only those who provide all requested items, GCSC Application (must be completed), legible transcripts & resume will be considered. Additional info: www. gulfcoast.edu/hr. Women & minorities are strongly encouraged to apply. GCSC is an EA/EO/M/F/Vet employer. GCSC Equity O ce 850.873.3516 TECHNICAL COORDINATORServe as the technical coordinator for all events in the Amelia Tapper Center for the Arts, and supervise set, sound and lighting construction for the theatre program. Requires BS degree (MS preferred) in technical theatre eld; minimum two years experience working in a technical theatre capacity; ability to drive 15-passenger van + trailer and valid FL drivers license. Open Until Filled with review starting 3/22/13. Salary range starts at $30,600/yr. Only those who provide all requested items, GCSC Application (must be completed), legible transcripts & resume will be considered. Additional info: www.gulfcoast.edu/ hr. Women & minorities are strongly encouraged to apply.GCSC is an EA/EO/M/F/Vet employer. GCSC Equity O ce 850.873.3516 The Apalachicola Bay Charter School is accepting applications for the following positions for 2012-13 school year:TWO FULLTIME TEACHERS ASSISTANTS AND ONE BUS MONITORABC School is an Equal Opportunity EmployerPlease send resumes to: Chimene Johnson, ABC School 98 12th Street Apalachicola, FL 32320 Fax: 850-653-1857 CITY OF APALACHICOLA OFFICE STAFF POSITION OPENThe City of Apalachicola is now accepting applications for one full-time of ce staff position. Minimum education requires a high school diploma or equivalent. Applicant must be able to pass pre-employment and drug testing requirements. Experience in related eld or similar job duties will be given consideration. Employment applications can be obtained from City Hall, 1 Avenue E, Apalachicola, Florida or downloaded from our website at www.cityofapalachicola.com. Completed applications must be returned to City Hall by February 15, 2012. For further information contact Lee Mathes, City Clerk, at City Hall, telephone 850-653-9319, or email at leemathes@cityofapalachicola.com.THE CITY OF APALACHICOLA IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY, DRUG-FREE, FAIR HOUSING EMPLOYER. For the Apalachicola City CommissionBetty Webb, City Administrator Fickling Vacation Rentals St. George IslandEXPERIENCED CLEANERS NEEDED Must be thorough and meticulous. Weekends are mandatory! Please apply in person at: 112 Franklin Blvd., St. George Island, FL. Apalachicola 1Br/1Ba quiet, 2 blks from boat ramp, $600mo + first & last dep. 850-570-9167 Apalachicola: 1 br, 1 ba efficiency Call for information 850-653-6103 Text FL39318 to 56654 St. GeorgeIsland $175/wk, elec, satellite, garbage incl. Pool tbl. 12 X 65 deck. Beautiful view! 850-653-5319 1 BR, Cottage& 3bd 2ba House, CH/A in Apalachicola, 850-643-7740 2BR 2BASWMH on wooded acre lot. Dead end road near state forest.1 mile walk to bay, CHA, well, septic. $550/month, $550 deposit. References, rental history and background required 813-546-6987 Available mid February. Text FL40431 to 56654 Apalachicola: 3 br, 2 Bath. Newly Remodeled Call for details!! 850-653-6103 Text FL39317 to 56654 For Sale St. George Island, 2Br/1Ba, 90 x 170 Lot, 1730 sq ft home, CH/A, $185,000; Call 864-356-5949 1 acre, 120 x 380 ft., 736 Buck Rd, Eastpoint, FL, has septic, electric, well, $25,000; 864-356-5949 Total Down Pmt $675 Pontiac Grand Prix T otal Price $4,9000% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! Total Down Pmt $16752002 Dodge Ram 4 Door -Crew Cab T otal Price $8,5000% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! Apalachicola Rentals: Office & Residential Apartments: -Utilities included (ex phone/ cable) -$700 & $800/mth Office Space: -No Retail -1 to 3 offices available; approx. 10 X 20 each -Utilities included + wifi; (ex phone) -Shared common areas: reception, conference room, kitchen & bathrooms. -Some office furniture available. -$350 -$450/mth Call: 850-323-1053 Carrabelle Cove ApartmentsTaking Applications Now Available: 1, 2 and 3 br, Handicap Apts. Laundry facilities on site, W/S included in rent, CH&A and window coverings provided. On site management Office. Rental assistance available. Income restrictions apply, reasonable accommodation. Carrabelle Cove Apartments 807 Gray Ave #33 Carrabelle, Fl 32322 850-697-2017 TDD711 This institution is an equal opportunity provider & employerText FL29928 to 56654 ToPlace Your Classified ad inCall Our New Numbers Now!Call: 850-747-5020 Toll Free: 800-345-8688 Fax: 850-747-5044 Email: thestar@pcnh.com thetimes@pcnh.com theAPALACHICOLA & CARRABELLETIMES CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW Bldg/Skilled TradeSiteSuperintendentSuperintendent for Government Project Govern. Exper. OnlyRequired, Fax Resume & Salary Requirements, 813-281-9596 Web ID# 34237529 Text FL37529 to 56654 Food Srvc/HospitalityRestraunt HelpAll shifts. Please apply in person at Apalachicola Seafood Grill 100 Market St, Apalachicola, FL Food Svs/Hospitality*Servers *Cooks Dishwashers *Bartenders *BussersBLUE PARROT Now HIRINGPlease apply in person between 9a-5pm 7 days a week@ Blue Parrot St. Georges Island HospitalityHousekeepingPart Time weekend help needed for all positions, apply in person, 4693 Cape San Blas Rd or 1200 Hwy 98 Mexico Beach Install/Maint/RepairMaintenanceFull time maintenance person needed at the Bucaneer Inn on St. George Island, Fl. Experience is helpful and must be able to work weekends. Applications can be pick up at 228 Franklin Blvd, St. George Island or call 850-927-2163 for more information BargainsNew Merchandise Liquidation Store, In Hickory Plaza, Prices 25-75% Below Retail! Mention Ad for Additional 10% OFF! 414 S. Tyndall Pkwy850-215-2755 $$ WANTED OLD CAR TAGS $$ I am buying old car tags in good condition from the 1950s down from the following counties: Franklin, Gulf, Liberty, Calhoun, Bay, Jackson, Wakulla, Taylor, Madison, Jefferson, Gadsden, Hamilton, Lafayette. Kirk 850-545-3677 $Wanted Old Bottles$I am looking for old coca-cola bottles, Medicine bottles, Orange Crush bottles, Rice Bottling Works bottles, Gorrie Bottling Works bottles, Neele Bottling Works bottles, John Cook Fine Whiskey flask bottles from Apalachicola also commissary tokes, seafood tokens, lumber tokens, general merchandise tokens, turpentine tokens & old signs. Kirk 850-545-3677 Eastpoint: 379 Ave A Church of God parking lot; Feb 9th, 8-12; Lots of household items, clothes & bedding SION PARCEL NO: 05-07S-03W-1000-000D-0 120 Name is which assessed: REFLECTIONS HOUSE, LLC All of said property being in the State of Florida, Franklin County. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the Courthouse door on the second (1st) Monday in the month of February 2013, which is the 4th day of MARCH 2013 at 11:00 a.m. Dated this 29th day of JANUARY, 2013. MARCIA M. JOHNSON CLERK OF COURTS FRANKLIN COUNTY, Cassie B. Sapp Deputy Clerk Feb. 7, 14, 21, 28, 2013 *Adopt*:Active educated couple yearn to share LOVE of outdoors, music, each other w/baby *Dirk & Claudia* Expenses Paid FKBar42311 1800-522-0045 RENTALS3 BR 3 BA UNFURNISHED CONDO LONG TERM, POOL .......................$850 2 BR 1 BA UNFURNISHED HOUSEFL ROOM, FENCED YARD, GARAGE ...$775 3 BR 1 BA FURNISHED APT WEEKLY OR MONTHLY, INC UTILITIES 3 BR 1 BA UNFURNISHED DUPLEX DOWNTOWN CARRABELLE ............$600 3 BR 2 BA CONDO W/ 10X15 STORAGE AND POOL ...................................$950 3 BR 2 BA CONDO W/ POOL $150/ NIGHTLY OR $700/WEEKLY 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322Contact Randi Dempsey (850) 697-5300 or (850) 653-7282 www.seacrestre.com www. rst tness.com/carrabelle PROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND RENTALS SEACREST REAL ESTATE, INC. IS NOW These tin y ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you. Emerald Coast Marketplace 747-5020 Buy it! Classified. Make your move to the medium thats your number one source of information about homes for sale! For all your housing needs consult Classified when its time to buy, its the resource on which to rely.

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LocalA16 | The Times Thursday, February 7, 2013By LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star .com The Philaco Education Committee is pleased to announce the winners of the third annual fourth grade essay contest. The topic for this years contest was If you had to move away from this area, what would you miss most about Franklin County? The students wrote their essays in class as part of their work to develop writing skills for fourth grade writing FCAT assessment. Taking rst place and the $50 top prize was Brycin McCray Huckeba, a student in Donna Barbers class at Franklin County School. Second place, and a $30 prize, went to Tina Granger, a student of Lynn Clarks at the Franklin County School. Third place, and $20, went to Hollie Larkin, a student in Laura Kings class at the Franklin County School. Honorable Mention went to Franklin County Schools Ashton Topham, in Barbers class; Katie Cox, in Clarks class; and Camille Davis, in Kings class; the First Baptist Christian Schools Daylyn Creamer, in Danielle Laynes class; and the ABC Schools Alex Joanos, in Lindsay Bockelmans class. The essays were good and fun to read, and many focused on the love the students have for the natural wonders and wildlife of our area and on the excellent shing, hunting, beaches on the Gulf and the rivers, and seafood they enjoy, said Education Chairman Susan Antekeier. This years judges for this contest were education committee members Antekeier, Ginny Griner, Heather Guidry, Dawn Radford and Judy Stokowski. More than 60 essays were submitted for review. Thanks to the Philaco Board for sponsoring the contest and raising the prize money, to the teachers and school administrators for their help, and most of all, thanks to the enthusiastic students who wrote the essays, Antekeier said. Real Estate PicksOur local real estate experts have identied what they feel are the best values around and are oering them to you in Real Estate Picks! (In this section), Discover the best real estate values in Mexico Beach, Port St. Joe, Apalachicola, Cape San Blas, St. George Island, Carrabelle and surrounding areas. Best Values on the Forgotten Coast SELL YOUR LISTINGS HERE! Only $35 per week per listing Minimum 2 ads per week or 1 ad for 2 weeks Contact Joel or Kari for details: (850)814-7377 or (850)227-7847SOLD John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.comMLS# 248363$59,900St. George IslandCORNER LOT NEAR CANAL & BAY Located at the corner of Bayshore Drive (paved) and Gibson Street. Bayshore Drive deadends into a canal just past this John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.comMLS#248582$699,000St. George IslandEAST END BEACHFRONTMajor Interior Renovations! Upscale Kitchen, top quality appliances, Granite countertops, Tile Floors, Flat Screen TVs, Pool Table, 3 BR, 2.5 BA, HOT TUB, Furnished, Screened beachfront Porch, Owner Financing, Income Producer! Hey Fellas! Dont Forget To Order the Roses! 850-653-8174 Give your valentine the most beautiful Roses or Flower Arrangement available! Mary Ann-tiquesFloral Arrangements, Weddings, Funerals, Gi Baskets,Antiques and More... DISS I)Children and Adults No Fee or Cost If No RecoveryGAYLEPEEDINGOATTONEYATLAWApalachicola, FL (850) 292-7059 | (850) 944-6020 FAXgsrlaw@bellsouth.net Robert C. Bruner Attorney Personal & Business BankruptcyOver 30 Years Legal Experience850-670-3030 bankruptcy relief under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon advertisements. Before you decide, ask us to send you free written information Left: The First Baptist Christian Schools Daylyn Creamer, who won an honorable mention at poses with Susan Antekeier, chair of Philacos education committee. Right: ABC School honorable mention Alex Joanos with teacher Lindsey Bockelman, left, and Philacos Heather Guidry.Huckeba takes top honors in essay contest If I had to leave Franklin County Brycin McCray Huckeba, a student with Mrs. Barbers fourth grade class, wrote the following rst-place essay. If I had to leave Franklin County, Florida, I would be horri ed. The three things I would miss most would be the wildlife, my wonderful helping community, last but not least my family. The beautiful, wonderful wildlife is the rst thing I want to talk about. Man, have you seen it? The deer, bear, and tiny tweeting birds I love so much. Dont forget the lemony yellow sun owers, and the snow white daisies. All of those wonderful things about the wild life of Franklin County, Florida are true. The next thing is that there is a courteous, helping community. They help you out when theres a power outage, or a tree might have fallen on your house and people would come, and when youre in a pickle they would come. I would not leave that behind. I feel relaxed around them. My face would be pepper red if I had to go away from Franklin County. We are at the last thing that I would miss about Franklin County... my family, my Mom, Dad, brother, sister, PaPa, and Grandma. I cant leave them behind-theyre so kind. My Mom cooks, takes care of us, and my Dad works. My brother supports me. My sister does nothing for me. But I dont care, I wont ever trade Franklin County. Thats all I have to say. Those are the three things I would miss. Bam! The wild life. Zap! The community. Kapow! My family! But if I had to move away, yeah I would miss Franklin County. But you get what you get and dont pitch a t. WINNING ESSAY PHOTOS BY DAWN RADFORD | Special to the TimesTeacher Laura King, left, third place Hollie Larkin, second place Tina Granger, winner Brycin Huckaba, and teacher Donna Barber. Below: Teacher Lynn Clark, with Ashton Topham, Camille Davis, Katie Cox, all runners up from the Franklin County School. THE APALACHICOLA TIMESFIND US ON FACEBOOK