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The Apalachicola times
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100380/00200
 Material Information
Title: The Apalachicola times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: H.W. Johnston
Place of Publication: Apalachicola Fla
Apalachicola Fla
Publication Date: 01-31-2013
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1885.
General Note: Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 32911693
lccn - sn 95026907
System ID: UF00100380:00207
 Related Items
Preceded by: Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by: Apalachicola herald

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xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx 50 WWW.APALACHTIMES.COM Phone: 850-653-8868 Web: apalachtimes.com E-mail: dadlerstein@star .com Fax: 850-653-8036 Circulation: 800-345-8688 DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK: School News & Society: 11 a.m. Friday Real Estate Ads: 11 a.m. Thursday Legal Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Display Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Line Ads: 5 p.m. Monday xxxxx Contact Us xxxxx Out to see Index School employees speak out against pay cuts By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com The Franklin County school board said very little about a lot last Thursday. Because negotiations, open to the public, are to resume this afternoon on the campus of the former Brown Elementary School, board members offered scant insight into how they think the district will nd about $750,000 in savings between now and the spring. District employees were on the opposite end of the speaking out spectrum, lling all available chairs in the Willie Speed board room, spilling into the aisles. Many of them, as well as students, wore placards around their necks that declared their role in the school system, such as By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com In the wake of a pair of weekend res, two families are struggling to get by. A Carrabelle re Friday totally destroyed a trailer belonging to Blanche Wheeler, and an Eastpoint re Sunday morning did the same to the home of Martha Ann and Joseph Putnal. On Friday afternoon, Wheeler, 72, was in the kitchen of her home at 160 Woodill Road when her 4-year-old grandson, Jaden Bryce, rushed in and told her to leave the trailer because it was on re. Wheeler and the boy barely managed to escape the blaze, which killed two pet birds caged inside. The single-wide trailer was a total loss. Deborah Jamison, with the State Fire Marshalls Of ce, said the re originated on the porch and has been ruled Work begins for new RESTORE Council By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com Ideas are beginning to percolate among the newly appointed members of the RESTORE Council, with the remaining half to be named next month. Under the RESTORE Act of 2012 (Resources and Ecosystems Sustainability, Tourism Opportunities and Revived Economies) passed in December, the Gulf Coast is entitled to 80 percent of the penalties BP is expected to pay under Clean Water Act for the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill. The money is expected to come directly to the affected counties, bypassing state oversight. After a prolonged debate since last fall, county commissioners voted unanimously Jan. 15 to create a RESTORE Council to vet requests for funding of possible RESTORE projects, with county commissioners having the ultimate say in who receives nancial support. The composition of the council was altered from the original 15-member proposal initially proposed by Commission Chair Pinki Jackel, who represents District 1. The new board, structured on a proposal by Director of Administrative Services Alan Pierce, converted four at-large members into ve single-district representatives and eliminated the Weems hospital board rep, as well as representatives from the unincorporated areas of Alligator Point, Lanark Village, St. George Island and Eastpoint. It added representatives from the realtors association and an environmental group. The board now consists of 13 Special to the Times Members of the Joint Legislative Budget Commission have approved two mid-year budget amendments to provide critical funding needed to restore Floridas seafood industry in the wake of Tropical Storm Debby and the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. The impact of these disasters has reverberated throughout the Northwest Florida region and across our state, said Senate President Don Gaetz, RNiceville. I commend Sen. (Bill) Montford (DTallahassee) for his leadership in ensuring that the Legislature maintains our commitment to making the people and communities of Northwest Florida whole as they continue to recover from these devastating events. During the Jan. 17 meeting in the Knott Buildings Webster Hall, seven House members and seven senators considered budget amendments from 11 agencies, 22 of which were approved. Amendment B0320 will provide an additional $3.2 million in spending authority to the Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services in the Agriculture Emergency Eradication Trust Fund. The funds will come from a Memorandum of Understanding with BP negotiated after the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. The MOU allotted $20 million from October 2010 through October 2013, half for seafood testing and half to marketing safe seafood. The additional spending authority will go to anticipated expenditures related to the 201213 scal year, with the remaining funds being distributed during We have dark days ahead SEN. BILL MONTFORD State OKs funding for seafood industry Liz Frye speaks out at the school board meeting. Many attendees wore signs declaring their roles in the school system. DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Blanche Wheelers trailer, above was a total loss after it caught re on Friday. At top are the remains of the Putnal familys trailer after a re on Sunday. FIRES DESTROY 2 HOMES SANDI HENGEL | Special to the Times 2 families homeless after res See SCHOOL A12 See RESTORE A3 See FIRES A2 See SEAFOOD A2 Opinion . . . . . . A4 Society . . . . . . A6 Faith . . . . . . . A7 Outdoors . . . . . A8 Sports . . . . . . A9 Tide Chart . . . . . A8 Classi eds . . . . A11 Thursday, January 31, 2013 VOL. 127 ISSUE 40 Mardi Gras revelry this weekend The Mystic Krewe of Salty Barkers, a unit of pets and their people, will kick off Apalachicolas Mardi Gras weekend with a 5 p.m. Friday parade from the Bowery to Riverfront Park, where the party continues. Saturday is the dinner and ball at the Fort Coombs Armory at 6:30 p.m., with music by the Brian Bowen Band, dancing and a oor show, plus the crowning of the king and queen. Dinner tickets are $50; general admission $25 at 7:30 p.m. For information, call 670-5064, 653-3113 or 653-2025. Cat sh Moon at Eastpoint rehouse Four people who have known each other all their lives come to grips with knowing each other all their lives on an overnight shing trip. The Panhandle Players present Cat sh Moon, a Southern Comedy at 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday and 3 p.m. Sunday. Tickets for the shows at the Eastpoint Firehouse are $15. Call John Inzetta at 7340260 or 404-326-7791. Dixie theatre presents Patsy Cline Patsy: A Tribute by Margo Anderson & the Encore Band is back at the Dixie Theatre. Margo tells the story of Patsys early days, joined by a group of six classic country musicians, led by the Purvis Brothers. Shows are at 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday and 3 p.m. Sunday. All seats $25. Call box of ce at 653-3200. Forgotten Coast Chefs Sampler Feb. 10 The Apalachicola Bay Chamber of Commerce will host the 17th annual Forgotten Coast Chefs Sampler from 6-9 p.m. Feb. 10. Area chefs will prepare their most creative dishes at the historic Fort Coombs Armory. Tickets are $45-$50. For more information, contact the Apalachicola Bay Chamber of Commerce at 653-9419 or info@apalachicolabay.org. FCSWA to meet Feb. 11 The Franklin County Seafood Workers Association will meet at 6 p.m. Feb. 11 at the Eastpoint rehouse. Any questions, contact Jennifer Millender at 597-0787 or jenjenreeves@yahoo.com. Wright heads west, A9

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, January 31, 2013 The Times | A11 ManySelling ABSOLUTE! AUCTIONS AuctionFDIC.com AL-GA-FL-SCFebruary23-March2RESIDENTIAL-COMMERCIAL DEVELOPERLOTS-LANDNoBuyersPremium|5%DownPayment $2,500CashiersChecktoBid BrokersProtected H&MCQ1035357,AB110;B.G.Hudson,Jr.,BK3006464,AU230 866.509.44733532994 RENTALS3 BR 3 BA UNFURNISHED CONDO LONG TERM, POOL ............................$850 2 BR 1 BA UNFURNISHED HOUSEFL ROOM, FENCED YARD, GARAGE ...$775 2 BR 1 BA UNFURNISHED APT NEW PAINT, SMALL PORCH .............$375 3 BR 1 BA FURNISHED APT WEEKLY OR MONTHLY, INC UTILITIES 3 BR 1 BA UNFURNISHED DUPLEX DOWNTOWN CARRABELLE ..............$600 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322850-697-9604 850-323-0444 www.seacrestre.comwww. rst tness.com/carrabellePROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND RENTALS DIRECTOR, CONTINUING EDUCATIONTo direct & manage the Continuing Education department at GCSC. Initiate & maintain working relationships with area Chambers of Commerce, agencies & businesses to meet the areas training needs. Requires BS degree & 5 yrs. related experience, MS degree & 3 yrs. related experience preferred; strong verbal & written skills; 3 yrs. supervisory experience; valid FL drivers license and the ability to work exible hours. Position Open Until Filled with a review starting 2/4/13. Salary commensurate with education & experience. Only those who provide all requested items, GCSC Application (must be completed), legible transcripts & resume will be considered. Additional info: www.gulfcoast.edu/hr. Women & minorities are strongly encouraged to apply. GCSC is an EA/EO/M/F/Vet employer. GCSC Equity O ce 850.873.3516 Nestled in more than 200 miles of Award-Winning Pet-Friendly Beaches, World Famous seafood and Maritime History and Culture Lies Apalachicola, Florida. Known as the Forgotten Coast, Franklin County, Florida is a wonderfully Historic community. Apalachicola, which is the county seat, has a population of approximately 3500 residents, The Apalachicola housing authority, is a public housing complex with 54 units and is located within the city of Apalachicola, the AHA is currently accepting applications for the following Position:EXECUTIVE DIRECTORJob Requirements include Bachelors Degree; a minimum of 5 years management and/or supervisory experience and excellent communications skills.Anyone interested in this position should submit an application to:PAUL E. MILLS, INTERIM DIRECTOR141 15TH STREET APALACHICOLA, FL 32320(850)653-9304 PHONE(850)653-2473 FAXapalha@fairpoint.net(APPLICATIONS FOR EMPLOYEMENT ARE AVAILABLE AT THE AHA OFFICE) REPRESENTATIVES will be at the GULF COUNTY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE on Tuesdays & Thursdays from 9 am – 1 pm EST accepting applications for numerous open positions.We offer competitive wages and a comprehensive bene t package including Company paid health, dental, and life insurance, 401(k), attendance & safety bonuses.EOE/Drug Free WorkplaceEASTERN SHIPBUILDING GROUP MORE THAN A JOB… A FUTURE! 89988T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.: 19-2012-CA-000447 U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR STRUCTURED ASSET SECURITIES CORPORATION MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-BC4, Plaintiff vs. STEPHEN BERNARD BRYANT A/K/A STEPHEN B BRYANT AKA STEPHEN BRYANT, et al., Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF JANIE LEE JOHNSON Last Known Address Unknown Also Attempted At: 196 5TH STREET, APALACHICOLA, FL 32320 AND P.O. BOX 841, APALACHICOLA, FL 32320 Current Residence Unknown YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Foreclosure of Mortgage on the following described property: LOT 4, BLOCK 180, THE CITY OF APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA, AS PER MAP ON PLAT OF SAID CITY IN COMMON USE, LYING AND BEING IN FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it, on Choice Legal Group, Attorney for Plaintiff, whose address is 1800 NW 49th STREET, SUITE 120, FT. LAUDERDALE, FL 33309 within thirty (30) days after the first publication of this Notice in THE APALACHICOLA TIMES and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiff’s attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator, 301 South Monroe Street Tallahassee, FL 32301, 850.577.4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court this 17th day of January, 2013. MARCIA JOHNSON As Clerk of the Court By Terry E Creamer As Deputy Clerk Jan 31, Feb 7, 2013 89906T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY CASE NO. 2011-417CA EMERALD COAST FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, Plaintiff, vs. ANTHONY J. CROOM, SR. and wife, TAMMIE D. CROOM, Defendants. AMENDED NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that pursuant to an Amended Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated November 2, 2012, and entered in Civil Case No. 2011-417-CA of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit of the State of Florida, in and for FRANKLIN County, wherein EMERALD COAST FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, is Plaintiff and ANTHONY J. CROOM, SR. and TAMMIE D. CROOM, are Defendants, I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at the front door of the Franklin County Courthouse in Apalachicola, Florida, at 11:00 A.M., ET on the 13th day of February, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: Lots 11 and 12, Block 216 City of Apalachicola, according to the plat thereof of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. DATED this 10th day of January, 2013. MARCIA JOHNSON CIRCUIT COURT CLERK By: Terry E. Creamer DEPUTY CLERK January 24, 31, 2013 91963T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION Case No.: 11000505CA FLAGSTAR BANK, FSB, Plaintiff, vs. NORBERT JOSEPH KAMINSKI A/K/A NORBERT J. KAMINSKI A/K/A NORBERT KAMINSKI AND NANCY ANNE KAMINSKI A/K/A NANCY A. KAMINSKI A/K/A NANCY KAMINSKI, et al. Defendant. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated December 27, 2012 and entered in 11000505CA of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein FLAG-STAR BANK FSB, is the Plaintiff and NORBERT JOSEPH KAMINSKI A/K/A NORBERT J. KAMINSKI A/K/A NORBERT KAMINSKI AND NANCY ANNE KAMINSKI A/K/A NANCY A. KAMINSKI A/K/A NANCY KAMINSKI; UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2 are the Defendant(s). Marcia M. Johnson as the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Front Steps of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320, at 11:00 AM on February 14, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 28, BLOCK 10 EAST OF ST. GEORGE ISLAND GULF BEACHES UNIT NO. 1, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE(S) 7, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 28th day of December, 2012. Marcia M. Johnson As Clerk of the Court Michele Maxwell As Deputy Clerk IMPORTANT If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301. 850.577.4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Submitted by: Robertson, Anschutz & Schneid, P.L. Attorneys for Plaintiff 3010 N. Military Trail, Suite 300 Boca Raton, FL 33431 561-241-6901 Fax: 561-241-9181 January 24, 31, 2013 *Adopt*:Doting dad, stay at home mom (&puppies) excited to give your baby everything! *Expenses Paid* *Bob & Maria* FKBar42311 1800-522-0045 $$ WANTED OLD CAR TAGS $$ I am buying old car tags in good condition from the 1950’s down from the following counties: Franklin, Gulf, Liberty, Calhoun, Bay, Jackson, Wakulla, Taylor, Madison, Jefferson, Gadsden, Hamilton, Lafayette. Kirk 850-545-3677 $Wanted Old Bottles$I am looking for old coca-cola bottles, Medicine bottles, Orange Crush bottles, Rice Bottling Works bottles, Gorrie Bottling Works bottles, Neele Bottling Works bottles, John Cook Fine Whiskey flask bottles from Apalachicola also commissary tokes, seafood tokens, lumber tokens, general merchandise tokens, turpentine tokens & old signs. Kirk 850-545-3677 Apalachacola 233 12th ST, Saturday, February 2nd, 8am to 11pmYard/ Porch SaleCleaning out Shed! Everything must Go! Clothes, shoes, framed pictures, jewelry, armour, luggage set and much, much more! Text FL39884 to 56654 Carrabelle : 208 1st St. NE, Saturday Feb 2nd, 9am-??HUGE YARD SALECoca-Cola and other collectibles, tools, misc Text FL39786 to 56654 Bargain’sNew Merchandise Liquidation Store, In Hickory Plaza, Prices 25-75% Below Retail! Mention Ad for Additional 10% OFF! 414 S. Tyndall Pkwy850-215-2755 Bldg/Skilled TradeSiteSuperintendentSuperintendent for Government Project Govern. Exper. OnlyRequired, Fax Resume & Salary Requirements, 813-281-9596 Web ID# 34237529 Text FL37529 to 56654 Customer Support MEDIACOM Join us Friday Feb 1st 9a-2p 239 W Hwy 98 to discuss Career Opportunities with our growing SALES & INSTALLATION Teams. Excellent pay/benefits. Visit our career site at www .mediacomcable.com/car eers to apply prior to the event. EOE m/f/v/d Text FL39539 to 56654 Food Svs/Hospitality*Servers *Cooks Dishwashers *Bartenders *BussersBLUE PARROT Now HIRINGPlease apply in person between 9a-5pm 7 days a week@ Blue Parrot St. George’s Island HospitalityHousekeepingPart Time weekend help needed for all positions, apply in person, 4693 Cape San Blas Rd or 1200 Hwy 98 Mexico Beach HospitalityRESORT VACATION PROPERTIESAccepting applications for aFT Check-In ClerkExperience handling money helpful. Must have reliable transportation. Quick learnerFT ReservationistPrior sales exp preferred. Attentive to details & follow-up.Maint Office Asst4 days/wk. Team player, attentive to detail & good follow-up skills. These great jobs on SGI require excellent customer service & computer skills, good spelling & grammar, and weekend work. Prior office exp preferred. Great benefits pkg. Apply in person 9-5 weekdays at 123 W Gulf Beach Dr St. George Island Install/Maint/RepairMaintenanceFull time maintenance person needed at the Bucaneer Inn on St. George Island, Fl. Experience is helpful and must be able to work weekends. Applications can be pick up at 228 Franklin Blvd, St. George Island or call 850-927-2163 for more information Apalachicola 1Br/1Ba quiet, 2 blks from boat ramp, $600mo + first & last dep. 850-570-9167 Apalachicola: 1 br, 1 ba efficiency Call for information 850-653-6103 Text FL39318 to 56654 Carrabelle Cove ApartmentsTaking Applications Now Available: 1, 2 and 3 br, Handicap Apts. Laundry facilities on site, W/S included in rent, CH&A and window coverings provided. On site management Office. Rental assistance available. Income restrictions apply, reasonable accommodation. Carrabelle Cove Apartments 807 Gray Ave #33 Carrabelle, Fl 32322 850-697-2017 TDD711 This institution is an equal opportunity provider & employerText FL29928 to 56654 St. GeorgeIsland $175/wk, elec, satellite, garbage incl. Pool tbl. 12’ X 65’ deck. Beautiful view! 850-653-5319 1 BR, CottageCH/A in Apalachicola, Florida. 850-643-7740 East Point Carrabelle 900 sq ft Designer, 1Br, Open Plan, Jacuzzi, Washer & Dryer, Satellite, Wi-Fi Avail, Secluded, 1/2 mile from Beach. $420 month. Call 954-816-7004 Text FL22547 to 56654 Apalachicola: 3 br, 2 Bath. Newly Remodeled Call for details!! 850-653-6103 Text FL39317 to 56654 For Sale St. George Island, 2Br/1Ba, 90 x 170 Lot, 1730 sq ft home, CH/A, $185,000; Call 864-356-5949 1 acre, 120 x 380 ft., 736 Buck Rd, Eastpoint, FL, has septic, electric, well, $25,000; 864-356-5949 Total Down Pmt $675‘01 Toyota Corolla T otal Price $4,2000% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! Total Down Pmt $9752002 Dodge Ram -X/Cab T otal Price $6,5000% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! Buy it! Classified. Make your move to the medium that’s your number one source of information about homes for sale! For all your housing needs consult Classified when it’s time to buy, it’s the resource on which to rely. The s e tin y a ds s ell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you. E m eral d Coa s t Mar k etpla c e 747-5020 If you’re ready to move and overflowing with stuff Classified can help you store it or sell it!

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Local A12 | The Times Thursday, January 31, 2013 in I am a teacher, in large print letters with red and black magic marker. Many rose to speak to give the school board much to consider during the current nancial crunch, which contains proposals as drastic as a 20 percent acrossthe-board pay cut and reducing the school year. Were going to hear from you, but were not going to be able to really respond, said board chairman Jimmy Gander, in his welcome to the energized audience. First to speak was Elinor Mount-Simmons, a teacher for 32 years in the district. She asked that the resolution of the crisis be a fair one and that steps be taken to not repeat the budgeting mistakes that gave rise to the problem, that the districts general fund balance is projected to fall below the state minimum of 2 percent of general fund revenue. We know we have dark days ahead, she said. We are willing to work with you. Mount-Simmons said it would be unfair to ask school employees to bear all the cost of the cutbacks. We didnt cause the problems. We should all share equitably, all of us, she said. I want to feel assured that once we get through this and we will; we shall recover I want some assurances in place, that these dark days wont resurface. Donna Barber, also a longtime elementary school teacher, spoke of the nancial demands on her family, including putting a son through college. When youre talking about taking back a fth of someones salary, youre talking about someone not being able to make their (bills), she said, making a point to include Ganders payment in her list of nancial obligations, referring to the cost of fuel. Weve already taken such a hit from the bay, an economic hit, Barber said. Can we envision a Franklin County where people cant make their payments? How can people stay and work and thrive and teach and learn in a community where they cant make a living? A lot of people dont want to leave, but they have to go where they can make a living. This is my primary source of income; this is what feeds my family, she said. These are the real things that I work very, very hard for. Thats what that pay represents. I just want you to see a personal story and see the real impact of the normal, average people, and to nd a way other than have the teacher and other staff shoulder this nancial crisis. Liz Frye, who drives a school bus, was clear and succinct. We cannot afford a pay cut. As drivers, we cant afford this. Thats our concern, she said. They say our jobs are important; were the rst face they see in the afternoon and morning. Patty Kulick, a voluntary pre-K teacher and paraprofessional, said she spoke for her fellow staffers in saying a pay cut would mean more people leaving for better jobs. A pay cut and I have to relocate, she said. I have family here, and Ive grown to love this place. Kulicks daughter, freshman Jalynn Liston, spoke next, not about her family but about whats on the mind of students. You all are thinking about making a pay cut to the staff, she said. Youre thinking about making a cut to my and every other students education here. Gander commended Liston for her remarks, and then Cathy Wood, the union representative, said she taught Liston in her pre-K classroom several years ago. She is one of those 14year-old freshmen that are wise beyond their years, Wood said. She told the board all school employees have been asked to wear a pink heart. Its a non-spoken symbol to say We love our jobs, Wood said. She spoke in vague terms about the progress of the talks, noting the union had reciprocated in a very kind and generous way, I believe. Part of our job as educators is to listen, and your side is also listening. Wood stressed a common theme found within the teaching ranks, that the nancial problems are the burdens of somebodys blunder. They (the teachers) did not create the problems, she said. (Consider the) staff you have that have been diehard faithful. We are here, and we have a job title, and we are not just a dollar gure in a budget. We need to work together to look at the big picture and not do a quick x. Abigail Shiver, who said she and her husband, owners of the Big Top grocery, were both products of the local school system. We have some wonderful schoolteachers in the system who will be hurt by this, Shiver said. To me they should not be punished for someone elses mistake. As a business owner, its not going to only affect me with my sales. These school teachers arent going to be able to pay their house payments. Im not going to say anything about the situation were in, she said. I dont know how we got to this situation, and I pray to God that we dont ever get to this situation again. As a business owner, I understand were in a hard economic time. My husband and I took a pay cut so we didnt have to lay off any of our people, Shiver said. For our system to stay in existence, we have to take care of our people. The teachers are what makes this school system. We need to make a better job of taking care of our teachers. Her professional viewpoint turned to the personal. I had teachers that didnt care that I was a poor white child. They pushed me, and theres a lot of people like me that have become successful because of the caringness these teachers have given all of us, Shiver said. Apalachicolas Bobby Miller closed the audience participation part of the meeting. This is not an acceptable standard, he said. It seems like every time I turn around, I hear somethings got to be done, weve got to gather up some money from somewhere. You as board members are ultimately responsible for this, Miller said. You are a policymaking committee. You can get the situation under control. Miller, married to a veteran elementary school teacher, said the crisis is having a negative effect. You want them to make you an A school, and the morale is at an all-time low, he said. That is the closest link you have to education. If it werent for the students, we wouldnt be here tonight. Board response Gander sounded hopeful. I hope we can work this out; I still believe we can, he said. If I could push a button and make it happen, I would. The school district is the second-largest employer in the county, Gander said, noting that with cutbacks, Youre not just taking it away from the employees. Youre taking it away from the community. It has a long-lasting effect. Ive never seen the situation in Apalachicola bay oysters like it is now. Ive never seen anything close, he said. We have catastrophe after catastrophe, and we have to gure out a way to work this out. After the board handled its typical business issues, with no further announced staff retirements, Shannon Venable, the districts director of nance, reported that as of the latest phase of state funding, the district would lose about $559,000 this scal year. She said last months staff resignations would net about $38,000 in overall savings. With half the year over, the district is on track to show a negative balance of more than 5 percent and would have to cut expenses by at least $750,000 to move out of the red zone. Venable said declining enrollment would cost the district about $128,000 this year, with the district now at 1,148 total students at all its schools. Weve had more come in but lost another dozen since Christmas, Superintendent Nina Marks said. Marks, who said shed met with Florida Department of Education of cials six times in the past two weeks, reiterated what she has told the school board for several weeks: The DOE is not going to swoop down on Franklin County and kick people to the curb, she said. They expect us to x ourselves. In a telephone interview this week, Tiffany Cowie, public information of ce for DOE, underscored Marks perspective. We know action will have to be taken pretty quickly to help the district recover. Our whole philosophy is anything we can allow the district to control we do. Thats how residents here in the state feel. Heres one of those sides of having so much power: You are responsible for your budget, Cowie said. Its in all of our best interests that they get out of this situation and are prospering. Cowie said Franklin is one of four Florida counties, the others Columbia, Martin, and Manatee, to have noti ed Tony Bennett, the states new commissioner of education, that their projected fund balance is below 3 percent. The department is waiting to receive further details of the districts scal recovery plan. she said. He will decide if they need extra resources to get back on their feet. When I say resources, I do not mean money. Bennett will have the option of putting together a nancial emergency board, advisers who can help guide the district through the situation. Its not that we dont want to help them and give them money, Cowie said. The legislature didnt appropriate any. We dont have a pot to pull from to help them in that way. Real Estate Picks Our local real estate experts have identied what they feel are the best values around and are oering them to you in Real Estate Picks! (In this section), Discover the best real estate values in Mexico Beach, Port St. Joe, Apalachicola, Cape San Blas, St. George Island, Carrabelle and surrounding areas. Best Values on the Forgotten Coast SELL YOUR LI S TING S HERE! Only $35 per week per listing Minimum 2 ads per week or 1 ad for 2 weeks Contact Joel or Kari for details: (850)814-7377 or (850)227-7847 SOLD John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.com MLS# 248301 $12,500 Eastpoint LAKES ON THE B L UFF Foreclosure in gated subdivision off North Bayshore Drive, ideal location for a secluded home in this new subdivision with community pool, wooded lot with mature native vegetation; lot is irregular shaped, Bank owned. Listing agent Michael Billings John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.com MLS# 248585 $1,199,000 St George Island PLANTATION BEACHFRONT Gorgeous, 4 BR, 3.5 BA, Great kitchen, granite counter kitchen with pool table & bath. Owner Financing, Income Producer, Nautilus Drive NOTICE OF LEGIS L ATIO N To whom it may concern: notice is hereby given of intent to apply to the 2013 Legislature for passage of an act relating to the Eastpoint Water and Sewer District, Franklin County, Amending Chapter 67-1399, Law of Florida, Acts of 1967 relating to charter amendments as recommended in chapter 189, Florida Statues Special Districts, The Incorporation of Liens and Foreclosure of Liens, and the districts status as an Independent Special Taxing District. Information concerning this mat ter is available at the Eastpoint Water and Sewer District oce, 40 Island Drive Eastpoint, FL 32328 850-670-8177 Robert C. Bruner Attorney Personal & Business Bankruptcy Over 30 Years Legal Experience 850-670-3030 bankruptcy relief under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon advertisements. Before you decide, ask us to send you free written information Pet Wellness Program Dr. Hobson Fulmer | Dr. John Duncan 187 Highway 98 Eastpoint, FL Open Monday Friday 8-6 PM We are a full service Veterinary Clinic offering small animal medicine and surgery: Laser Surgery Low cost spay and neuter Monthly heartworm injections (no need for pills) Dentistry with digital x rays Ophthalmology (including glaucoma screening) Dermatology including allergy testing Nutritional counseling and diets Sonograms for internal organ evaluation and cancer screening Complete laboratory facilities Boarding After hours emergency care Highly trained, compassionate, professional sta FREE VACCINATIONS WITH EACH WELLNESS EXAM CALL 8506708306 FOR A N A PPOINTMENT APALA CH I C OLA B A Y ANIMAL C LINI C YOUR OT H ER FAMIL Y DO C TOR SCHOOL from page A1

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Local A2 | The Times Thursday, January 31, 2013 accidental. The Wheelers said they believe Jaden might have started the blaze while playing. At least my little grandson didnt get burned up, Wheeler said. Wheeler shared her home with Jaden and his older brother and sister, John Michael Neel, 14, and Ashley Jo Neel 10, children of Blanches son Bodie, who lives in Carrabelle. Wheelers younger son Trent, 24, also lived in her trailer. After the blaze, Wheeler found herself with no purse, no identi cation and no medication. Her prescriptions were lled on Saturday. The Wheeler family lives with a granddaughter for the short haul. I have no insurance and no money, Wheeler said in a telephone interview. She said she has received interim aid from the American Red Cross. I need everything, she said. If somebody would like to donate a trailer, I would be happy with anything. I need all kinds of furniture and household things. She said the family lost all their clothing. If you can help, call Blanches sister, Connie James, at 697-3339 or 697-4123. Putnal home re An Eastpoint family is also homeless after a Sunday blaze. Martha Ann Putnal, 47, said she believes a frayed power chord caused the electrical re that destroyed her double-wide trailer at 677 Wilderness Road. The State Fire Marshalls Of ce said the re stemmed from some sort of electrical problem. Martha Ann believes a bad dream earlier in the week warned of the events of Sunday morning. She had not slept for three days after dreaming that a sinister dark man with ames in his eyes told her to kiss him. Her blind son Cody also was awake most of Saturday night, keeping her company. The rest of the family was asleep when Cody began to experience trouble breathing. He blamed a trash re in a neighbors yard, but when the fumes grew thicker, he shouted to his mother that the stove was on re. They ran to the kitchen to check and found no re. Then Martha Ann noticed smoke pouring from the end of the hall. Cody ran and put his hands on the bedroom door. It was hot. He yelled, Call 911. Cody retrieved a small safe from his room before escaping. His mother took only photos of her grandmother and mother, believing the re department would extinguish the blaze. Cody woke his brothers Joey and Mason, and Masons girlfriend Ashley, who all were asleep in their travel trailers in the yard. Joey began pouring water on the ames; the garden hose was too short to use. We had been doing a lot of work on the house, Martha Ann said. They had recently replaced the homes roof, damaged in Tropical Storm Debby, and their bedroom oor. We had an electrician lined up to redo all the wiring, she said. Eastpoint volunteer re ghters were not able to save the Putnals home. Martha, who was able to save her wheelchair, said the family home also was shared with husband, Joseph, who was seriously injured in an automobile accident last year and is seeking disability. On Monday, with a broken arm and hip still on the mend, Joseph had metal staples removed from his arm and shoulder. Mason and Joey have returned home to their trailers. The rest of the family lost everything. Except for Martha Ann, whose shoes were in her car, the family lost most of their clothing including shoes and coats. Mason has taken responsibility for a miniature horse and three dogs belonging to the family. Food and supplies are needed for the animals. An elderly veteran, Eddie Marshall, 65, occupies a trailer across the road with no electricity. Mason had brought his blankets and clothing home to wash, so Marshall lost all his household linens and clothing other than what he wore at the time of the re. A car battery also was destroyed in the re. The Red Cross housed the Putnals at the Rancho Inn through Tuesday night. Martha said she has no idea what they will do after that. She said she contacted Salvation Army and Capitol Area Community Services and was provided a $600 food voucher and other coupons for used clothes and other goods at Goodwill. On Tuesday, she said the family had received all the clothing they needed for now. Like the Wheelers, the Putnals need a new trailer or other residence, housewares and furniture as well as nancial help. If you can assist them, call 227-4504 or 524-7424. REVISED PUBLIC NOTICE FCTDC 2012-2013 Fiscal Year MEETING SCHEDULE REVISIONS AS OF JANUARY 2, 2013, ALL TDC BOARD MEETINGS ARE HELD ON THE FIRST WEDNESDAY OF EACH MONTH, BEGINNING AT 3:00 P.M. UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTICED. Board Meetings ON FIRST WEDNESDAY February 6, 2013 Franklin County Courthouse Annex, 3:00 p.m. Carrabelle 3:00 p.m. April 3, 2013, Franklin County Courthouse Annex, 3:00 p.m. May 1, 2013, Franklin County Courthouse Annex, 3:00 p.m. Carrabelle 3:00 pm July 3, 2013, Franklin County Courthouse Annex, 3:00 p.m. August 7, 2013, Franklin County Courthouse Annex, 3:00 p.m. Carrabelle 3:00 p.m. AS OF JANUARY 2, 2013, ALL TDC COMMITTEE MEETINGS ARE HELD ON THE THIRD WEDNESDAY OF EACH MONTH UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTICED, AT THE CITY OF APALACHICOLA COMMUNITY ROOM, 1 BAY AVENUE, APALACHICOLA, BEGINNING AT 1:30 PM FOR GRANTS (IF SCHEDULED) AND AT 2:30 PM FOR MARKETING (IF SCHEDULED). Committee Meetings ON THIRD WEDNESDAY January 16, 2013, Grants and Marketing Committees, beginning at 1:30 pm February 20, 2013, Grants and Marketing Committees, beginning at 1:30 pm March 20, 2013, Grants and Marketing Committees, beginning at 1:30 pm April 17, 2013, Grants and Marketing Committees, beginning at 1:30 pm May 15, 2013, Grants and Marketing Committees, beginning at 1:30 pm June 19, 2013 Grants and Marketing Committees, beginning at 1:30 pm July 17, 2013, Grants and Marketing Committees, beginning at 1:30 pm August 21, 2013, Grants and Marketing Committees, beginning at 1:30 pm September 18, 2013, Grants and Marketing Committees, beginning at 1:30 pm 17-1/2 Avenue E, Apalachicola, 653-8678, or visit our website: www.anaturalescape.com/administration. THIS IS A PUBLIC MEETING AND TWO OR MORE FRANKLIN COUNTY COMMISSIONERS MAY ATTEND. BE PART OF THIS ONE-OF-A-KIND EVENT IN THIS AREA! For Health Expo Package Information Call (850) 747-5009 OR fax your questions to (850) 763-4636 Vendor Space Is Going Fast... So Call Now! $10,000 3,000 PLUS MANY OTHER WAYS TO PROMOTE YOUR BUSINESS. I NSTANTLY MA K E IT YOUR EX PO GAIN THE EXPOSURE YOU NEED FOR SUCCESS! BOARDWAL K BEACH RESORT F EBRUARY 19, 2013 9 AM 2 PM S o n s o r e y T e N e w s H e r a Calling All Businesses To The 2013 Bay County Health Expo Top Notch Service at a Reasonable Price Tired of Driving to Panama City or Tallahassee to have your tax return done? Tired of sending your payroll out of town to an impersonal payroll agency? Tired of spending your hard earned prots on exorbitant book keeping services? Save your gas money and their pricey fees and have your tax return led locally by a 15 year tax return veteran. Specializing in 1040s, 1065s, 1120s, as well as all payroll tax returns, W-2s and 1099s. Dont throw your hard earned money away because I will meet or beat anyones prices and that is a guarantee. For an appointment, call Chet Timmons today at 850-323-1082 HOME OF T H E $50 T AX RETU R N* Special exclusions do apply and only guaranteed for simple 1040s or 1040EZs. HOW TO HELP The following are sizes for clothing and shoes for some of the people affected by the weekend res. Name Shirt Pants Shoes Blanche Wheeler 1-2X 18-20 10 Trent Wheeler Medium 30-32 10 John Michael Wheeler Medium 16 9 Ashley Jo Wheeler 10-12 10 5 Jaden Bryce Wheeler 5 4 12 Eddie Marshall Medium 30 W, 32 L 9 the 2013-14 scal year. The second amendment, B0385, will address the effect of Tropical Storm Debby on Apalachicola Bays oyster beds. Since the storm, the oyster population has signi cantly diminished, displacing many workers. The request, received from the Department of Economic Opportunity, for $2.7 million would provide 215 of those workers from the oyster industry with jobs restoring and replenishing the oyster population with funding from a National Emergency Grant which the department was awarded. Northwest Floridas seafood industry is vital to both our regions economic structure and individual identity, and sustaining that unique industry is in the best interest of all those who live and work in our region, state and even nation, Montford said. This funding will help create jobs, fund research and protect our coasts and the surrounding ecosystems and economies. SEAFOOD from page A1 FIRES from page A1 To help the Wheeler family, call Connie James at 697-3339 or 697-4123. To help the Putnal family, call 227-4504 or 524-7424. THE APALACHICOLA TIMES FIND US ON FACEBOOK @A palachTimes FOLLOW US ON TWITTER

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Local The Times | A3 Thursday, January 31, 2013 members plus a nonvoting chairman appointed by the county commission. It continues to include representatives from the cities of Apalachicola and Carrabelle, the school board, the seafood dealers and seafood workers associations, and Tourist Development Council. The RESTORE Act does not outline a process for what happens after money reaches Floridas affected counties, but the Florida Association of Counties has suggested creating these RESTORE councils to decide where to spend the local funds. Five of the eight most heavily impacted counties have created one. To date, eight of the 13 members of Franklin Countys council have been named. Jackel told members of the hospital board Thursday she intends to consider Weems when she announces her District 1 appointment on Feb. 5. I may have a way to have Weems at that table, she said. The RESTORE Council members are evenly split along party lines with four registered Democrats, three Republicans and one independent. Apalachicola, which is pushing an alternative plan for addressing distribution of RESTORE Act monies, has said it does not plan to name a rep to the council. Carrabelle City Administrator Courtney Millender said a representative will be chosen at the city meeting Feb. 7. Of the eight representatives already named, four reside in District 1, which encompasses St. George Island and western Eastpoint: Shannon Harts eld, Lynn Martina, Dan Tonsmeire and Rick Watson. Harts eld, 43, who represents seafood workers, is president of the Franklin County Seafood Workers Association and represents gill net shermen on the Seafood Management Assistance Resource and Recovery Team. He is a lifelong resident of Franklin County and a fourth-generation seafood worker. Martina, 48, also a lifelong county resident, owns Lynns Quality Oysters and represents the seafood dealers. Tonsmeire, 62, representing environmental groups, is executive director and Riverkeeper of the Apalachicola Riverkeeper group. He has lived in the county for 15 years. Because Tonsmeire is frequently away from the county representing local interests in water wars litigation, the commissioners appointed Robin Vroegop as a non-voting alternate, but Tonsmeire said he intends to attend all meetings of the RESTORE Council, either in person or by conference call. Watson, 65, who represents the realtors, is employed by Century 21 Collins Realty and has lived on St. George Island for 21 years. He is a past president of the Realtors Association of Gulf and Franklin Counties and the St. George Plantation Owners Association. District 2, which extends east from Carrabelle to the county line, is home to two RESTORE Council members, Cal Allen and Paul Parker. Allen, 74, tapped by Commissioner William Massey for District 5, is a Carrabelle city commissioner and has resided in the county for 14 years. District 2 Commissioner Cheryl Sanders may announce her apportionment as early as the Feb. 5 county meeting. Parker, 46, who represents the TDC as vicechair, is a real estate broker and owner of Harbor Point Realty and Vacation Rentals. He has lived in the county for 22 years. District 3 Commissioner Noah Lockley, whose district encompasses Apalachicola north of U.S. 98, appointed Carol Bar eld, 45, a social worker born in the county, who left for 18 years and returned in 2004. Bar eld works for both Refuge House and the TIGERS after-school program. None of the representatives so far appointed to the RESTORE Council reside in District 4, which takes in portions of the Apalachicola area south of U.S. 98 and west to the county line. Commissioner Smokey Parrish is expected to appoint a rep on Feb. 5. Pam Shiver, 42, who represents the school board, resides in District 5, from western Carrabelle to eastern Eastpoint. A lifelong resident of Franklin County, she is employed as a postal clerk. All the newly chosen council members expressed a desire to make the best use of whatever funding comes to the county and several named projects they would like to see proposed. Id like to see a lock at the cut, and when we lack freshwater we can close it or open it when theres too much freshwater, said Harts eld, who also said hed like to see the waterfronts cleared of unusable buildings. Allen said he would like to end the use of septic tanks in coastal areas and on barrier islands. Tonsmeire agreed that environmental issues were a high priority. I think were looking at the environment projects to restore water quality, habitat and the productivity of Apalachicola Bay and the eastern Gulf. For example, stormwater and wastewater treatment will help promote the health of oyster habitat and other natural habitats. We want to be looking at those types of projects that would be an economic bene t as well. Bar eld said she hopes the council will ascertain the needs of the district and to try to use RESTORE money to draw tourists to the area, creating trickledown economics. She said she would like to see recreation facilities made more community-friendly. Martina said she would like to see the Eastpoint Channel dredged. I would put jobs rst, she said. Other council member said they had no particular projects in mind. I dont have any predetermined ideas, Parker said. Im going to take input from the TDC. Were just starting to talk about this. I believe it is more important to establish priorities and then projects. Everything is on the table. Watson said he hoped the council would consider projects on a grander scale because the pot of money available could be the largest the county has seen or will see. We havent even had a meeting yet, Shiver said. Everybody is going to have their personal stake. I think it should be an equal opportunity. Entertainment FRIDAY Feb 1 5:30pm Golf Cart & Pet Parade from the Bowery to Riverfront Park for a concert SATURDAY Feb 2 6:30-10:30pm Reserved table & dinner for 6 $300 or $50 pp Show only 7:30-10:30 General Admission $25 Entertainment Entertainment Marilyn & Mason Bean Brian Bowen Band BILL MILLER REALTY 850-697-3751 (3310) 570-0658 400 + COMM. U.S. 98 & GULF ADJ. TO LANARK MARINA 850K $29,500 $2,500 D O W N B UYS 2 B ED AP T 2 6 OR RENT $500/MTH 2 B/R 1 BTH GULF VIE W HOME W/ F AMILY R OOM $70,000 C/B-3-1 2 COR LOTS CITY $49,500 3/2 D /W 2 COR LOTS CITY $42,500 MIH 2 C RNR LOTS BLK. $ S TORE REDUCED $49,500 2 AC-AT RIVER UTIL. IN -$39,500 DI S S I ) Children and Adults No Fee or Cost If No Recovery G AYLE PEED IN G O A TTO NEY AT L AW Apalachicola, FL (850) 292-7059 | (850) 944-6020 FAX gsrlaw@bellsouth.net RESTORE from page A1 ON THE BOARD Eight of the 13 members of Franklin Countys RESTORE board have been named. Shannon Harts eld, District 1: President of the Franklin County Seafood Workers Association, representative on the Seafood Management Assistance Resource and Recovery Team Lynn Martina, District 1: Owner, Lynns Quality Oysters Dan Tonsmeire, District 1: Executive director, riverkeeper of the Apalachicola Riverkeeper group Rick Watson, District 1: Century 21 Collins Realty, past president of the Realtors Association of Gulf and Franklin Counties and the St. George Plantation Owners Association Cal Allen, District 2: Carrabelle city commissioner Paul Parker, District 2: Vice chairman, Tourism Development Council; broker/owner, Harbor Point Realty and Vacation Rentals Carol Bar eld, District 3: Social worker Pam Shiver: School board

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USPS 027-600 Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 Publisher: Roger Quinn Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola Times OPINION www.apalachtimes.com A Section Congressman Southerland was re-elected in November by a narrow margin by voters in our 2nd Congressional District. What many people didnt know, Im sure, was that he intends to oppose virtually every proposal of President Obama. Dont take my word for it: from the Jan. 5, 2013 Orlando Sentinel: Steve Southerland of Panama City, rst elected in 2010 with Tea Party backing, offered a de ant message full of biblical references, hostility toward President Barack Obamas agenda, avowed opposition to any gun-control proposals, and the observation that he himself is part of a very thin line that stands between freedom and tyranny. As if to validate these statements: One, Mr. Southerland voted against the so-called scal cliff deal, meaning he would have raised income taxes on everyone and not just the top 1-2 percent who ended up having to pay more. Two, he also appears to be against the comprehensive and reasonable school safety/mental health/gun control package the President unveiled this month, which was prompted by the horri c Sandy Hook massacre of innocent children in Connecticut. Three, from the Congressmans own website from Jan. 10: I believe we should be focused nationally on repealing the Presidents deeply awed health care law, meaning not only is he against any cost-effective expansion of Medicaid in Florida that would save monies but he is still re ghting what has already been settled in Congress, the courts and in the election, that Obamacare is the law of the land. Americans, including those in this district, voted to have bipartisan government and its accompanying anticipated cooperation, not dug-in opposition to everything. That wasnt the desired outcome. But it gets worse: Southerland just voted against Hurricane Sandy relief! Now everyone in this area knows weve had a number of major storms through here in the last 10-20 years. How much credibility is he going to have with the rest of the Congress and the Administration when inevitably there will be another storm here which will require disaster assistance? I think you know the answer to that already. I would urge you to let your congressman know how you feel about whatever issues you are concerned about; let him know you are watching his actions closely. Then do pay attention to how he actually votes and when 2014 comes around, you will be well-armed with the information necessary to make a truly informed decision as to whether he deserves to have his lease renewed on the peoples of ce for another term or not. John Hedrick LETTER TO THE EDITOR By ALLAN FEIFER Special to the Times Last Thursday, the Franklin County School Board held a tense board meeting, even by Franklin County standards. A governmental agency that spends about $15 million a year announced they would not be able to make payroll in April after they run out of money if spending continues at the current pace. It was no one bolt out of the blue that is responsible for the creation of this emergency. In fact, the excuse of basing the current budget on a terribly in ated projection of the number of students to attend the consolidated school is only just one more issue steadily eroding the districts nances. And, to make matters worse, Concerned Citizens of Franklin County (CCFC) shared its concerns with school authorities last July on this very issue. Thursday, the school nance of cer stated the district is $750,000 in the hole. This is not about Concerned Citizens, its not about xing blame, and its not about the anguish this has caused school employees and parents, although these are all true and must be addressed. Theres a bigger story here; its about the ight of students out of our school system. Its about the current students who are losing educational opportunities like foreign language classes required to get into college. It is about what happens when management loses control and patches over problems by trying to satisfy everyone, instead of doing the hard things that are required to educate our children. Figures stated at the board meeting put the current student head count at the consolidated K-12 school somewhere between 750 and 800, out of a countywide total of 1,148, which includes the Apalachicola Bay Charter School and Franklin Academy. That number has been steadily going down since the new school was built, as more families either move away or simply take their children out of school. During that time, the head count of teachers and support personnel has remained relatively static. The only conclusion we can come to is that the embedded cost of a large physical plant and the many employees that staff it are colliding with a declining student enrollment that is not forecasted to improve. Wonderful teachers and support personnel still need butts in seats. We are missing a great many of those! The next issue is accountability and competency. Outraged individuals made their point well at the meeting while at the same time missing the obvious issue; 80 percent of school costs are personnel related. All the low hanging fruit has been picked clean. Leadership must ensure two primary objectives are met: First, we must educate our children. Past all the hyperbole, the fact that we are a C rated school, have a state evaluated high dropout rate, FCATs ranked in the bottom 20 percent in the state and that we spend more per student than most other schools in the state, does not exactly have us doing high ves. This is the truth and that alone should have all of us concerned. Our consolidated school system operates under a complex set of rules created by multiple governmental agencies that can make local control more dif cult. BUT every other school system statewide manages their operations except for ours. We have run out of money. We must understand what it is that we are doing wrong that brought us to this. Remember, there are multiple issues that have transpired and its not just about the in ation of the student roster this year. We have issues to deal with. The school board must af rmatively take control of the immediate situation. Teachers, students, support employees and the general public need to understand that management is stepping up to the plate. Let the emotions subside and tell the truth, backed up by the facts of the situation. Nothing less will suf ce. Reasonable economic sacri ce from all involved will be required to solve the dangerous emergency at hand. It is simply too late to make more minor adjustments in hopes of solving the $750,000 crisis. Whatever solution is found must be done quickly and completely. We owe that much to the individuals and families affected by previous miscalculations. The conversation must start now. The immediate problem must be solved at once and with the knowledge and experience that the board and superintendent possess. There is no easy out to the problem of the moment. As to the future; multiple answers can be found. The CCFC has shared many helpful suggestions at many previous meetings that can and will save hundreds of thousands of dollars each year. These suggestions include the need to have employees contribute a nancial percentage to their bene t packages. CCFC suggested that changes to the districts health insurance plan should be made to more accurately re ect what is truly reasonable and affordable. Costly so-called double dipping of bene ts by employees and board members who may have other additional coverage should be eliminated. Staff should be right-sized to better and more accurately re ect the real number of students and plans for projected student enrollment should be better formulated. As everyone recognizes, the rst step toward recovery from this devastating shortfall is to recognize and acknowledge the real problem. Then, we must all work together to nd a way to solve this emergency as well as always keeping the childrens needs rst in priority. The CCFC believes that a volunteer task force should be created quickly. It should include educators, school nance experts, knowledgeable area resources and others to help create realistic constructive nancial solutions for the long-term betterment and nancial health of our school district. We must be brutally honest to achieve better scal responsibility and a sound nancial future. Every taxpayer and resident of Franklin County has an important stake in this crisis. For some, the easy answer may seem to be Levy more taxes. We dont need another temporary bandage on our hemorrhaging nancial school wounds; it only delays the inevitable scal cliff and makes Franklin County a poor choice for business, personal and recreational investments and hastens the ight from our county. The problems and reasons behind declining enrollment, better use and management of an expensive and extensive physical plant, and educational achievement levels which have been rated substandard by state standards must all be addressed as part of this very real emergency. I encourage every citizen to visit the Department of Education website to see the facts for yourself. Go to the School Public Accountability Report for Franklin County Schools, which contains several types of data (indicators) designed to inform parents and the general public about the progress of Floridas public schools. We will also put a link to that website on the Concerned Citizens website, www. ABetterFranklin.com This immediate $750,000 crisis affects us all, whether you are a parent, have children in Franklin County schools or simply pay your taxes to fund the education of Franklin County students. The use and management of your tax monies have led us to this nancial emergency. It must be solved and corrected now. Concerned Citizens of Franklin County is willing and able to help. Allan J. Feifer is president of the Concerned Citizens of Franklin County, Inc. The car wash and the spaghetti dinner were well supported. Thank you all very much. The numbers of the Catholic Youth Organization were 20 cars/trucks. The hall was full after Mass for the covered dish dinner. Sundays spaghetti dinner was steady. The members of the Knights of Columbus did a great job and all had a good time visiting and enjoying the meal OK folks, get ready for a funlled February! Every Friday night will be hamburger night at Camp Gordon Johnston American Legion Post 82, 2316 Oak St., here in the Village, and pizza night is every Sunday, serving for both nights from 5-7 p.m. And, dont forget bingo every Wednesday at Chillas Hall. Doors open at 6 p.m., bingo at 6:30 p.m. Cookies, coffee and soft drinks will be available. The more who play, the more we can pay. Lets start with Saturday, Feb. 2. Members of the Lanark Village Golf Club will prepare the full breakfast at Chillas Hall from 8:30-11 a.m. Pancakes, French toast casserole, bacon, eggs coffee or tea still only $5. And Saturday evening, members of the Ladies Auxiliary will have a spaghetti dinner at the Legion. Serving is from 5-7 p.m. and your donation of $8 will ll your plate. Come and enjoy the evening with us. On Saturday, Feb 9, there will be a Valentines Dinner at American Legion Post 82 from 5-7 p.m. Lady members of the American Legion and the Ladies Auxiliary will be treated to the dinner. All men members of the Legion and Sons of Legionnaires and other guests will make a donation of $15. Call and reserve your place at 697-9998 any day after 4 p.m. Hope you will join us. Mass on Ash Wednesday, Feb. 13, will be at 9:30 a.m. at Sacred Heart of Jesus Church. Friday Masses during Lent will be at the church at 9:30 a.m. followed by Stations of the Cross. On Saturday, Feb. 16, its off to the Lanark Village Boat Club for our monthly sugar fest. Enjoy your full breakfast and the company from 9-11 a.m. Your donation of $5 will collected at the door. We will round out the month with our 20th annual Community Breakfast at Chillas Hall, from 8:3011 a.m. Come have breakfast with us! Great food, great service and great friends and neighbors. See you there! All of the above mentioned fundraisers are open to the public. Be kind to one another. Check in on the sick, housebound. Got Jesus? Until next time, God bless America, our troops, the poor, homeless and the hungry. LANARK NEWS Jim Welsh A funlled February awaits villagers Page 4 District voters deserve cooperative government Thursday, January 31, 2013 ALLAN FEIFER The countys very own scal cliff

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Local The Times | A5 Thursday, January 31, 2013 PUBLIC NOTICE THE FRANKLIN COUNTY ADVISORY BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT WILL HOLD A PUBLIC HEARING ON MONDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2013, AT 10:00 A.M., IN THE COUNTY COMMISSION MEETING ROOM OF THE FRANKLIN COUNTY COURTHOUSE ANNEX TO CONSIDER THE FOLLOWING VARIANCES, APPEALS AND SPECIAL EXCEPTIONS: RECONSIDERATION OF A REQUEST FOR A VARIANCE TO CON 1. STRUCT A ROCK REVETMENT WITHIN THE CRITICAL HABITAT ZONE ON PROPERTY DESCRIBED AS LOT 6, SAVANNAH COVE, ST. GEORGE ISLAND, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. REQUEST SUB MITTED BY RICKY MOSELEY, AGENT FOR ROBERT AND JULIET BARBER, OWNERS. THE BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS ACTING AS THE BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT WILL ADDRESS THIS REQUEST AT THEIR REGU LAR MEETING ON FEBRUARY 19, 2013, WHICH STARTS AT 9:00 A.M. IN THE COUNTY COMMISSION MEETING ROOM OF THE FRANK LIN COUNTY COURTHOUSE ANNEX. Persons wishing to comment may do so in person or in writing to the Frank lin County Planning & Zoning Department, 34 Forbes Street, Suite 1, Apala chicola, FL 32320. Transactions of this hearing will not be recorded, persons wishing to record the proceedings must make the necessary arrangements for recording. Needing Financial Assistance for Medical Care? Weems Memorial Hospitals Financial Assistance Counselor is state trained and certied to assist people of ALL ages obtain low or no cost healthcare. Weems Hospital in Apalachicola is a Florida ACCESS center and can assist those who may need help buying food or who may need emergency cash assistance. For those who do not qualify for state assistance, Weems also oers sliding fee prices at its hospital and both medical centers. Call 850-653-8853 ext. 115 Today to Schedule an Appointment. NO HIDDEN CHARGES: It is our policy that the patient and any other person responsible for payments has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed by payment or any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment. www.mulliseye.com "WE WELCOME NE W PATIE N TS, C ALL T ODAY FOR YOUR P RIORITY APP OI N TME N T" FOR NEW PATIENTS 59 AND OLDER This certificate is good for a complete Medical Eye Exam with Todd Robinson, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Surgeon. The exam includes a prescription for eye glasses and tests for Glaucoma, Cataracts and other eye diseases FOR YOUR APPOINTMENT CALL: 850-763-6666 ELIGIBILITY: U.S. Citizens living in the Florida Panhandle, 59 years and older, not presently under our care. Coupon Expires: 1-31-13 FREE EYE EXAM CODE: AP00 Darren Payne, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon In Memory of Lee Mullis, M.D. Todd Robinson, M.D Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon Smart Lenses SM Carrabelle seniors host dance Saturday: A dance will be Saturday evening at the Carrabelle Senior Center, 201 NW Avenue F on the corner of 1st Street and NW Avenue. The dance starts at 7 p.m., and admission is free. Music will be provided by local disc jockey Ron Vice, serving up a lively mix of Big Band dance tunes and mellow pop hits. For more information on the dance and other activities at the Senior Center, visit www. CarrabelleSeniorCenter. com. Lane closures on Apalachicola Bay Bridge: Drivers traveling the U.S. 98 Apalachicola Bay Bridge between Eastpoint and Apalachicola will encounter lane closures Monday, Feb. 4, and Tuesday, Feb. 5, because of routine bridge maintenance work. Lane closures will remain in effect from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily. Motorists are reminded to use caution and obey traf c aggers. Maintenance activities are weather-dependent and may be delayed or rescheduled in the event of inclement weather. Drivers are reminded to pay attention to the speed limit when traveling through the work zone. For more Florida Department of Transportation District 3 information, follow us on twitter @MyFDOT_NWFL. Lose your keys on Sawyer Lane? A large set of keys was found Saturday on Sawyer Lane in Apalachicola while the Tamara Marsh family was riding their golf cart down the alley. If theyre yours, you can claim them at Coastal Foot & Ankle Clinic, 221 Avenue E, or call 653-3338. Tobacco ghters to meet Feb. 7: There will be a TobaccoFree Franklin Partnership Coalition Meeting on Feb. 7. The meeting will be held 5:30-6:30 p.m. at the Franklin County Health Department, 139 12th St., in the second oor conference room. Disadvantaged transportation board to meet Feb. 13: The Apalachee Regional Planning Council announces a public meeting to which all persons are invited. The Franklin County Transportation Disadvantaged Coordinating Board will meet at 10 a.m. on Feb. 13 at the Franklin County Courthouse Annex Courtroom, 33 Market St., Apalachicola. In addition to its regular business, the agenda will include approval of rates and grant applications. If any person decides to appeal any decision made by the board with respect to any matter considered at this meeting, he/she will need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceeding is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence from which the appeal is to be issued. For more information, a copy of the agenda or if you require special accommodations at the meeting because of a disability or physical impairment, contact Vanita Anderson at the Apalachee Regional Planning Council, 20776 Central Ave. East, Suite 1, Blountstown, FL 32424 at least ve working days prior to the meeting date. Island home tour returns Feb. 8-9: A second tour of St. George Island homes is planned for Feb. 9 and will feature eight beautiful island homes, along with the Lighthouse, Keepers House and Plantation Club House. Tour proceeds bene t the upkeep of the Lighthouse, Keepers House Museum and Lighthouse Park. The tour will showcase homes from beach to bay from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tickets will be available for $15 in advance at the Lighthouse Gift Shop and for $20 on tour day in Lighthouse Park or by phone with a credit card payment. There will be shuttle service to homes in the St. George Plantation. Tour weekend will kick off Friday evening, Feb. 8, with a free opening event from 6 to 8 p.m. at the Jay Abbott Firehouse, 324 East Pine Ave. Featured speaker will be Erik Lovestrand from the Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve, who will talk about the ecology of the Apalachicola River, Bay and Estuary and its impact on St. George Island. Refreshments will be served, and participants will be eligible for a number of festive door prizes. The following report is provided by the Franklin County Sheriffs Of ce. Arrests in this weeks report were made by of cers from the Franklin County Sheriffs Of ce (FCSO). All defendants are to be considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law. Jan. 22 Lennon Raulerson, 26, Carrabelle, Escambia County warrant (FCSO) Savannah K. Shiver, 18, Apalachicola, battery by an inmate (FCSO) Lacey C. Maples, 21, Apalachicola, battery by an inmate (FCSO) Jan. 23 Elton J. Garcia, 37, Winters, Texas, battery (FCSO) Donnie L. Wright, 40, Eastpoint, battery (FCSO) Floyd B. Parramore, 52, Eastpoint, disorderly intoxication and criminal mischief (FCSO) Jan. 24 Dennis L. Beebe, 33, Carrabelle, disorderly intoxication (FCSO) Jan. 25 Earl R. Hughes, 29, Apalachicola, violation of probation (FCSO) Christopher K. Bradham, 34, Tallahassee, grand theft and burglary of a structure (FCSO) Xavier D. Parks, 19, Quincy, burglary of a dwelling and grand retail theft (FCSO) Jan. 26 Joseph C. Ward, 21, Apalachicola, violation of pre-trial release (FCSO) Darin W. Cruson II, 24, Carrabelle, attempted burglary of a dwelling (FCSO) Jan. 27 Ronnie J. Strops, 43, Apalachicola, violation of probation (FCSO) Chasity R. Richards, 37, Apalachicola, violation of probation (FCSO) Carlos E. Russell, Jr., 40, Eastpoint, violation of probation (FCSO) James E. West, 51, Apalachicola, violation of probation (FCSO) Arrest REPORT News BRIEFS

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A6 | The Times Thursday, January 31, 2013 Times Staff Report Dr. Frank D. May of Port St. Joe has a unique Valentines Day present for the needy of this area. May, who has provided free dental treatment for Valentines Day for the last 12 years, will provide this valuable service on Wednesday, Feb. 13. This year the office will schedule appointments with those in need of treatment. To schedule an appointment, send or bring by a letter to Mays office giving a brief description of your dental needs, and please describe your situation that makes you a good candidate for this benefit. Send the letter to Mays office at 319 Williams Ave. in Port St. Joe, FL 32456. Please, no telephone calls. Be sure to include your telephone number so you can be contacted to schedule an appointment. May will see 20 patients in need of dental treatment; hygienists Anealia Bush and Linda Wright will see eight to 10 patients each who wish to have their teeth cleaned. The office hopes to serve as many as 40 patients. Patients must be at least 12 years of age and accompanied by a parent or guardian if under age 18. Treatments provided will include cleaning, Xrays, fillings, extractions, diagnostics and pain control. May and his staff participate in Dentist With a Heart because they wish to impact people who otherwise could not afford to see a dentist, and help those people save their teeth, as well as relieve them of any discomfort they may be having. Our office cares about this community and would like to give those in need of our services, their smiles back! OF THE WEEK PET Franklin County Humane Society PATCHES! Patches is a 4-5 year old Pekingese who was abused and suffered a back and jaw injury. She has recovered from her surgery and amazingly, remains gentle, social and trusting. She is a beautiful little girl and we want her to find a home where she will be loved and cared for without fear of further pain or injury. VOLUN TEE R S A R E D ESPE R ATE LY N EE D E D T O S O C I A LIZ E WI TH A LL OF OUR DOG S A ND CATS We are always looking for people willing to bring one of our animals into their home to be fostered for various needs. Anytime you can spare would be greatly appreciated. Call Karen at 670-8417 for more details or visit the Franklin County Humane Society at 244 State Road 65 in Eastpoint. You may logon to the website at www.forgottenpets.org to see more of our adoptable pets. 6012790 Tickets are $45 $50 Reserve tables are also available. Call the Apalachicola Bay Chamber at or email Happy 3rd Birthday, Brody Johnson! Brody Drake Johnson celebrated his 3rd birthday Friday, Jan. 25, with his family and friends. He is the son of Brock and Kim Johnson of Apalachicola. Maternal grandparents are Tom and Nedy Leavins of Delta, Colo. Paternal grandparents are Robbie and Marcia Johnson of Apalachicola. Maternal great-grandmother is Ada Leavins of Panama City. Paternal great-grandparents are Burnell and Bill Martina of Apalachicola and the late Paul and Inez Johnson. Kayden Drake turns 3 Kayden Amari Drake celebrates his 3rd birthday today, Jan. 31. Kayden is the son of Jasmine Lewis of Apalachicola and Frederick Drake of Columbus, Ga. Maternal grandparents are Trina Ford of Apalachicola and Freddie Lewis of Port St. Joe. Maternal great-grandparents are Rose Tolliver and Marion Green, both of Apalachicola. Godparents are Barbara and Raymond Lockley of Apalachicola. A birthday party will be held at 4 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 2, at The Game Room. Layla Burke turns 4 Layla Burke will celebrate her fourth birthday on Friday, Feb. 1. Burke, daughter of Jeremy Burke of Apalachicola and Tina Bellew of Thomasville, Ga., will join in the celebration with her older sister, Iolana. Maternal grandparents are John and Sonya Bellew of Apalachicola. Paternal grandparents are David and Beverly Burke of Apalachicola. Paternal great-grandparents are Belvin and Johnnie Bryant of Apalachicola. Congratulations to Jathan Martin, Sunshine State Scholar The Sunshine State Scholar Program chooses Floridas top STEMS (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) students and introduces them to the vast postsecondary and career opportunities available in their home state. The Florida Education Foundation asks each of Floridas 67 school districts to identify its top 11th grade students in the STEM areas. One student with junior class status, with a minimum 3.9 grade point average or higher, is selected from each school district. Jathan Martin, a junior among the Franklin County High School Seahawks, was selected to represent the Franklin County School District at the 2013 Sunshine State Scholar Program, to be held in Orlando on Feb. 21-22. On Monday, Feb. 4, Jathan will celebrate his 16th birthday. Dentist with a Heart treatments to be Feb. 13 Academic HONORS Happy BIRTHDAY Society

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The Times | A7 Thursday, January 31, 2013 Card of THANKS The United Methodist Churches of Franklin County Welcome You First United Methodist Church of Apalachicola Worship Service 11:00 a.m. every Sunday Sunday School 10:00 a.m. 75 5 th St. Apalachicola 653-9530 fumcapalach@gtcom.net Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis Carrabelle United Methodist Church Worship Services 10:45 a.m. Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Celebrate Recovery Mondays 7-9 p.m. 102 NE Ave. B Carrabelle 697-3672 Pastor: Julie Stephens Eastpoint United Methodist Church Worship Service 10:00 a.m. every Sunday Healing service every fourth Monday at 7:00 p.m. 317 Patton Dr. (corner of David St.) 670-8825 Pastor: Rev. Beth White St. George Island United Methodist Church 9:00 a.m. Worship Service 10:00 a.m. Fellowship Hour 201 E. Gulf Beach Dr. 9274635 www.sgiumc.org Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis Nursery now provided for Sunday Church Service First Pentecostal Holiness Church 379 Brownsville Road Apalachicola Were excited about what Gods doing!!! Sunday School 9:45 am Sunday Morning Worship 10:45 am Sunday Evening Service 6:00 pm Monday, Youth Group 6:30 pm Wednesday, Royal Rangers, G.A.P. 7:00 pm Wednesday Worship & Word 7:30 pm Nursery Provided during regular church services 7:00 7:00 First Baptist Church St. George Island 501 E. Bayshore Drive 927-2257 R. Michael Waley, Pastor Join us as we praise and worship the living Christ. Great is the Lord and most worthy of praise. Psalm 145:3 Sunday Bible Study ................................................ 10:00am Worship Praise ........................................................ 11:00am Sunday Night ............................................................ 7:00pm Wednesday Power Hour ...................................... 7:00pm Wednesday Youth at S.P.L.A.S.H ....................... 7:00pm Walking in Christ R. Michael Whaley, Pastor WELCOMES YOU Church of the Ascension 101 NE First Street Carrabelle SUNDAY 10:00 AM WELCOMES YOU Church THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH (850) 274-4490 (850) 545-2578 WELCOMES YOU Trinity Trinity Episcopal Church est. 1836 Welcomes You Hwy. 98 & 6th St. Apalachicola 850-653-9550 Sunday Worship Services 8 & 10:30 a.m. Wednesdays Healing Service 11 a.m. Centering Prayer 4 p.m. Sunday Worship Services 8 & 10:30 a.m. Wednesdays Healing Service 11 a.m. Centering Prayer 4 p.m. King Holiday ObservanceWe have been involved in the background helping to organize the annual Dr. Martin Luther King Observance that has been held in Apalachicola for many years and have been both proud and appreciative of the growing involvement of many of our community members throughout Franklin County. To our Apalachicola Police Chief Bobby Varnes, who attends and allows his ofcers to be involved each year, Mayor Van Johnson, City Commissioners Brenda Ash and Frank Cook ... thank you. Franklin County School Superintendent Nina Marks, who has attended every year since being elected, School Board Member Teresa Ann Martin, City Administrator Betty Taylor-Webb, County Commissioner Noah Lockley, Jr., Franklin County Sheriff Mike Mock for allowing Deputy (Investigator) Stella Sanders and Deputy James Pugh to represent his department, Gulf County Sheriff Department for allowing Sgt Williams to attend, Director of Franklin County Solid Waste Department and Animal Control Fonda Davis, Apalachicola Volunteer Fire Department, St. George Island Volunteer Fire Department, the clergy of the city, SWAT (Students Working Against Tobacco), Lt. Brown of the Florida Highway Patrol who allows his troopers to represent his squad each year, to each resident of Franklin County who attended ... Thank you. Those who attended from Valdosta, Ga., Tallahassee, Port St Joe, Wewahitchka, Panama City, Milton ... Thank you. Last but certainly not least, to the person who believed because Dr. King had struggled, was beaten, jailed, was an activist for poverty and the Vietnam War, received the Nobel Peace Prize and was ultimately killed because of his efforts to bring about change so that all men and women could be treated equally. She believed our Franklin County community should have the opportunity to come together collectively and celebrate as well as commemorate Dr. King and his accomplishments, along with millions of others throughout America on the Dr. Martin Luther King National Holiday, Dr./Apostle Shirley C. White ... Thank you. We look forward to next year, Dolores Hayward-Croom Robert L. Davis To our heavenly angel, Eva Mae Coatney Jan. 31, 2013 We little knew that morning that God Was going to call your name. In life we loved you dearly, In death we do the same. I broke our hearts to lose you, You did not go alone; For part of us went with you, The day God called you home. You left us peaceful memories, Your love is still our guide; And though we cannot see you, You are always at our side. Our family chain is broken, And nothing seems the same; But as God calls us one by one, The chain will link again. Love and miss you, Ronnie, Cindy, Scott and Bailey Bug Blanch Cameron benetA benet for Mrs. Blanch Cameron will be held Saturday, Feb. 2, at Riverfront Park in Apalachicola. Serving begins at 11 a.m. until all gone. Grilled chicken or sh, baked beans, cole slaw, potato salad, dessert and drink for $8. Call 653-6955 with questions. Spread the word, and show some love for Mrs. Blanch.Ann Key fundraiserThere will be a fundraiser for Ann Key, the wife of Robert Key, this Saturday, Feb. 2, across from the AmeriGas ofce, 101 Ave. E, Apalachicola. Fish and chicken dinners will be available beginning at about 11:30 a.m. Donations will be accepted. Josh Phipps benetJosh Phipps, son of Rex and Sabrina Phipps, is a true son of the shing and oyster industry and is in need of a heart transplant. A benet of love and treasurer will be at 8 p.m. Feb. 8 at the Roseate Spoonbill Lounge on Water Street. Wear your white boots or bare feet or oxfords, but be there. All proceeds go to Josh. Come one, come all.Trinity hosts Shrove Tuesday pancake supperTrinity Episcopal Church will hold its annual Shrove Tuesday Pancake Supper from 5-7 p.m. Feb. 12. All tickets are $5 and can be purchased at the door or by calling the church ofce at 653-9550. Eat in or take out. Trinity Church is off U.S. 98 and Sixth Street, across from the Apalachicola Municipal Library. Millender family reunionThe Millender family reunion will be Feb. 16 at the old Carrabelle School, 1001 Gray Ave. The Millender extended family includes Mock, McKnight, Walden and Barwick. Time is from 11 a.m. until. Please bring a covered dish or two. Eastpoint Baptist Church celebrates recoveryUnder the leadership of Ms. Rose Grifn, the First Baptist Church of Eastpoint has initiated a Celebrate Recovery program, designed to help those struggling with hurts, hang-ups and habits by showing them the loving power of Jesus Christ through the recovery process. All are invited to participate in this free program. Sessions start at 5 p.m. Saturdays at the church, 447 Ave. A in Eastpoint. Richard Red Franklin Murray was born May 30, 1936, and died Saturday, Jan. 26, 2013. Red was the son of Frank and Edna Murray. He was the loving husband of Nancy Akers Murray, and the father to four sons, Richard Ricky Murray, Franklin Gene Murray, Timothy Tim Murray, and George Tony Murray; and one daughter Susan Murray Barnes. He has 13 grandchildren, Monica, Celeste, Erica, Patrick, Christopher, Joshua, Timothy, Randall, Breanna, Michael, C.J., Brandon, and Nicholas. He also has seven greatgrandchildren, Dalton, Tiara, Alexis, Dakoda, Elijah, Caden, and Ayden. All are left to mourn his passing, and will forever miss him. Red worked as a Florida Highway Patrolman for 10 years; a reman at Olin Gunpowder plant; and then on to the oilelds in Mississippi and Louisiana. He loved the outdoors, and spent many years camping and hunting with his family in the Apalachicola National Forest. He loved this area so much, and the memories he held in his heart were forever attached to his campsite at Magnolia Landing, which is where his ashes will be scattered and joined with his son Ricky. We will have a memorial service for Red on Friday, Feb. 1 from 5 to 7 p.m. at the Carrabelle Christian Center in Carrabelle. Richard Red Murray RICHARD MURRAY Apalachicola resident William Bafn Dodd II, Bill, was born April 10, 1968. He died at age 44 on Sunday, Jan. 13, 2013. Bill left us to join his mother, Erma Jane McClain. He is survived by his son, William Destin Cole Dodd, of Eastpoint; his father, William Bafn Dodd and his wife Marylin Dodd, of Modesto, Calif.; a sister Kelly Thompson, of Knoxville, Tenn.; and longtime friend, and mother of William Destin, Belinda Kelliher, of Eastpoint. Bill was loved by his many family and friends. Funeral services were held Friday afternoon, Jan. 25, at First United Methodist Church in Apalachicola. Burial was in Magnolia Cemetery.William Bill Dodd IICelena E. Hevner, 66, of Panacea passed away unexpectedly on Saturday, Jan. 26, 2013, in Tallahassee. She was born in Lexington, Ky., and loved working on arts and crafts. Memorial services were held Tuesday afternoon, Jan. 29 at the Panacea Full Gospel Church. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel, Crawfordville, is assisting the family with arrangements. She is survived by three sons, Lonnie Engle, Adam Hevner and Lee Hevner; three daughters: Helena Porter (Don), Sheri Lee Engle and Stacy Rush; three sisters: Sharron Taylor; Marcella Alday (Vance) and Melinda Kelly (Randy); and signicant other, Edward V. Hevner. She had six grandchildren and 11 nieces and nephews who were her life; and her faithful companion, Wrigley, her dog of 12 years. She is predeceased by her parents, Walter S. and Thelma M. Mulkey; and brother, David P. Mulkey.Celena E. HevnerMemorial services for Helen Prophater, 89, were held Saturday morning, Jan. 26, 2013, at Saint Thomas Episcopal Church in Thomasville, Ga. The Rev. Judith Ann Jones-Keith ofciated. Interment was at the new Saint Thomas Memorial Gardens. Mrs. Prophater passed away at The Suites of Woodleaf on Wednesday, Jan. 23, after a brief illness. She was born Nov. 9, 1923, in Philadelphia, Penn., to the late Helen and George Fox. Her six siblings predeceased her. In 1956, she married Joseph Amisson, and they had two daughters, Rita Amisson and Helen Bunki Arline. The family moved to Thomasville in 1966, where Mr. Amisson died suddenly in 1972. She married Jack Prophater in 1974, and became a member of Saint Thomas. Mrs. Prophater was employed by Archbold Memorial Hospital as personnel director until her retirement in 1985. They then moved to Carrabelle, where Mr. Prophater started a charter shing service and became a realtor with Prudential Resort Realty on St. George Island. Mrs. Prophater was an avid golfer, an accomplished bridge player and was a charter performer with the Panhandle Players in little theater. They returned to Thomasville, where Mr. Prophater preceded her in death in 2005. Survivors include her daughters Rita Amisson and Bunki DeLoach Arline (Ron); stepdaughter Mary Amisson Kolaski (John); stepson Steve Prophater (Alice); sistersin-law Rita Fox, Sheila Cofn (Chip) and Martha Reneau (Charles); and grandchildren Joseph DeLoach, George Arline, John Kolaski, Robert Kolaski, and several great-grandchildren. In lieu of owers, memorial donations may be made to St. Thomas Episcopal Church, P.O. Box 33, Thomasville, GA 31799 or the Archbold Foundation, 910 S. Broad St., Thomasville, GA 31792.Helen Fox Amisson ProphaterHollis J. Fleeman, age 83, of Clarksville, was born Sept. 12, 1929, and went home to be with the Lord Saturday, Jan. 26, 2013. Mr. Fleeman served in the United States Air Force from 1947 to 1965 and was of the Baptist faith. Preceding him in death were his parents, Hollis Benjamin and Pearly Mae (Marr) Fleeman; and a sister, Betty Matthews. Hollis was a loving husband and father. He leaves behind his wife of 65 years, Katherine Walters Fleeman; daughters, Patty Fleeman, Karen Bryant and her husband Belvin, and Becky Shuler, all of Clarksville, Donna Golden and her husband Jerry, of Bremen, Ga.; nine grandchildren and 10 great-grandchildren; a brother, Randall Fleeman of Kennesaw, Ga.; and a sister, Doris Barrett of Acworth, Ga. Memorialization will be by cremation. Adams Funeral Home is in charge of the arrangements. Online condolences may be made at adamsfh.com.Hollis J. FleemanSharon Kahler Hawkins Mangham, of Apalachicola, died Tuesday, Dec. 25, 2012 at Bay Medical Center in Panama City. A service was held in Tifton, Ga., on Saturday afternoon, Jan. 19. Mrs. Mangham was born on Feb. 28, 1965 in Rome, New York, and was the daughter of Robert and Ann Kahler, of Port Charlotte. She was a 1983 graduate of Rome Free Academy. She served in United States Air Force from 1985 to 1991. In addition to her parents, Mrs. Mangham is survived by her husband, Pete of Florida; one son, Joseph (Ashley) Hawkins of Lenox, Ga.; three sisters, Heather Martin of Rome, N.Y., Tracy (Gil) Pearsol of Pittsburgh, Penn., Jody Kahler of Atlanta, Ga.; and two nieces, Haley and Krista Pearsol.Sharon Mangham Obituaries Faith Faith BRIEFS In MEMOR Y

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Email outdoors news to timesoutdoors @star .com OUTDOORS www.apalachtimes.com Section Section A By S TAN KIRKLAND Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission Over the next several days, wildlife biologists will be busy with several large prescribed burns north of Apalachicola in the sawgrass marsh. Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission Wildlife Biologist Derek Fussell said the prescribed or controlled burns will be done in several phases on marshlands in the Apalachicola River Wildlife and Environmental Area. An estimated 10,000 acres will be burned in the next seven to 10 days. Our purpose in doing the burn is really twofold, Fussell said. Its about hazard reduction or removing as much combustible material as possible to prevent a more serious wild re. Additionally, burns like this help stop the encroachment of hardwoods into the marsh. Before settlement in Florida, Native Americans sometimes used wild re to burn signi cant areas of the state. They recognized that re not only kept forests and elds open, but was good for wildlife such as white-tailed deer. To burn as much as 10,000 acres quickly, Fussell said the FWC would be using a helicopter and aerial ignition system called Delayed Aerial Ignition Device. Pilots using the DAID system y along, dropping pingpong-like balls lled with a chemical mixture. When the balls hit the ground, they ignite. Under the old burning methods, biologists on the ground with re pots could burn and maintain control of a prescribed burn of usually not more than several hundred acres. Using a helicopter and a modern DAID system, they can safely burn thousands of acres in a day. Fussell said another important reason biologists and foresters like to burn in January and February is because of predictable weather. We have to keep the smoke away from people and highways, and this time of year fronts and wind direction are much more predictable, he said. Fussell said the FWC works closely with the Florida Forest Service and obtains a burn permit before beginning any prescribed burn. To keep it safe, the burn permit takes into account relevant burning conditions. NEW FISHI N G TACKLE ARRIVI N G DAILY! S HOP N EW ITEMS FROM P E NN S HIMA N O, A N D A BU G ARCIA. Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL (next to Piggly Wiggly) www.BWOsh.com Your Hunting Headquarters FULL LINE O F THE NEW PENN S P IN F I S HER V REEL S S TARTING AT Corner of Marina Drive, Corner of Marina Drive, (next to Piggly Wiggly) Corner of Marina Drive, (next to Piggly Wiggly) $ 139.99 WEEKLY ALMANAC APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE TIDE TABLES MONTHLY AVERAGES To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from these given for APALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW Cat Point Minus 0:40 Minus 1:17 East Pass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27 To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from those given for CARRABELLE: HIGH LOW Bald Point Minus 9:16 Minus 0:03 Sponsor the WEEKLY ALMANAC Call Today! 653-8868 Date High Low % Precip Thu, Jan. 31 62 41 0 % Fri, Feb. 01 65 43 0 % Sat, Feb. 02 64 46 0 % Sun, Feb. 03 66 48 0 % Mon, Feb. 04 65 49 0 % Tues, Feb. 05 68 51 10 % Wed, Feb. 06 66 51 0 % 30 We 344am 1.8 444pm 1.9 929am -0.2 1003pm 0.3 31 Th 440am 1.6 507pm 1.9 955am 0.2 1054pm 0.2 31 Th 440am 1.6 507pm 1.9 955am 0.2 1054pm 0.2 FreeTideTables.com For comparison only Times are local Tides in feet from MLLW Date Day High Tide High Tide Low Tide Low Tide Sunrise 1 Fr 546am 1.4 534pm 2.1 1023am 0.5 1158pm 0.0 2 Sa 710am 1.3 607pm 2.1 1051am 0.8 3 Su 907am 1.1 647pm 2.2 122am -0.2 1115am 1.0 4 Mo 738pm 2.2 256am -0.3 5 Tu 843pm 2.2 416am -0.6 6 We 213pm 1.6 959pm 2.2 521am -0.8 408pm 1.4 7 Th 233pm 1.8 1116pm 2.2 616am -1.0 528pm 1.4 8 Fr 256pm 1.8 703am -1.0 626pm 1.3 9 Sa 1225am 2.2 316pm 1.8 744am -0.8 715pm 1.0 10 Su 126am 2.2 333pm 1.8 820am -0.6 801pm 0.8 11 Mo 221am 2.1 349pm 1.8 850am -0.3 845pm 0.5 12 Tu 314am 2.1 405pm 1.8 916am 0.0 929pm 0.3 1 Fr 546am 1.4 534pm 2.1 1023am 0.5 1158pm 0.0 2 Sa 710am 1.3 607pm 2.1 1051am 0.8 3 Su 907am 1.1 647pm 2.2 122am -0.2 1115am 1.0 4 Mo 738pm 2.2 256am -0.3 5 Tu 843pm 2.2 416am -0.6 6 We 213pm 1.6 959pm 2.2 521am -0.8 408pm 1.4 7 Th 233pm 1.8 1116pm 2.2 616am -1.0 528pm 1.4 8 Fr 256pm 1.8 703am -1.0 626pm 1.3 9 Sa 1225am 2.2 316pm 1.8 744am -0.8 715pm 1.0 10 Su 126am 2.2 333pm 1.8 820am -0.6 801pm 0.8 11 Mo 221am 2.1 349pm 1.8 850am -0.3 845pm 0.5 12 Tu 314am 2.1 405pm 1.8 916am 0.0 929pm 0.3 Controlled res planned for area sawgrass marsh COURTESY OF FWC Page 8 Thursday, January 31, 2013 By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com Justin Riney was searching for a unique way to raise awareness of the natural beauty found in Floridas waterways. He found it in a man who ventured to Florida some 500 years ago. Riney paid visits to Apalachicola and Carrabelle over the past week and was in Port St. Joe before that as part of his yearlong quest to paddleboard the states waters, spending the rst six months navigating the entire perimeter of the states coastline before embarking on six months of exploration of the states major interior waterways. Rineys travels, called Expedition Florida 500, coincide with the 500th anniversary of Ponce de Leons arrival somewhere on Floridas beaches. We are focused on the conservation aspect and anything we can do to raise that pro le, Riney said. The whole goal of the project is conservation based. We want to drive home the point how beautiful we have it in Florida and how precious the natural environment in Florida is. Riney embarked on his journey from Pensacola on New Years Day. His visits, at Ten-Foot-Hole Jan. 26 and at the Carrabelle Public Beach Wednesday, were among the opening days of a journey he expects to span 365 days. He also visited 2Als at The Beach Caf, Up The Creek Raw Bar and the Apalachicola Maritime Museum during his visit here. I should be nished with the coastline and be in Jacksonville on July 4, and then I will move inland, he said. Along the way, Riney and fellow paddlers put on events, particularly at schools, trying to plant the seeds as early as we can. There are cleanups, such as the ones during both visits here in the county. The goal: Engage the public along the way, and create in them the passion Riney feels about his native state and its waters. Literally, hundreds of people have joined me along the way, he said. Weve had a lot of events, a lot of interaction along the way. Everywhere we go we do cleanups. One of the unique aspects is we do engage the community to come out. A native of Vero Beach, Riney said he grew up an outdoorsman, loving time on the water and in nature. He was also raised by entrepreneurial parents and that diverse background helped create his own nonpro t as well as Expedition Florida 500. His passion for the water fed his scienti c search and after studying business at the University of Florida he cut his teeth in business before returning to his passion for the water. Riney said he was in a unique situation scientists have dif culty with the business end of marine life; those on the business end, creating products from the marine world for example, could not speak expertly to the science. Im wearing both hats, he said. I know the science side and I know the business side. I was something of an intermediary. After spending some time in the Bahamas, his love of the water once again became his mistress. He moved back to Vero Beach, sold his belongings and, as he put it, jumped off the cliff and established his nonprofit Mother Ocean. The mission of the non-pro t is to create, inspire and empower ocean advocates worldwide, Riney said. I hope, with the years worth of paddling, we can raise a mass amount of awareness so people can learn to respect and appreciate these waterways. We want to make sure these waterways are here 500 years from now. Riney, though, notes he is one among many. A greater goal is to use the latest technology and social media to create a network of ocean advocates around the globe, both engaging a younger generation and broadening awareness. The two unique elements of the project are one this is happening in real time, Riney said. It is tangible, people can connect to it. The second, we really want people to come out and paddle with us. We welcome paddlers of all shapes and sizes. They can see our passion, feel the passion and take that passion home with them. My goal is to engage as many people as possible. Franklin County Schools students last week planted 500 bald cypress seedlings around the retention ponds on school grounds to celebrate this year Arbor Day celebration. They were assisted by the Florida Forest Services Wakulla/Franklin County Forester Daniel Stevens and Tates Hell State Forests Foresters Kimberly Linette, David Findley and Brian Williams. On April 10, 1872, the rst Arbor Day was held in Nebraska City, Neb., through the efforts of J. Sterling Morton. More than 1 million trees were planted in Nebraska during that Arbor Day. Each states Arbor Day celebration date differs and was established depending on climate and suitable planting times. In Florida Arbor Day is celebrated on the third Friday in January each year. For more information call the Wakulla/ Franklin County Forester at 421-3101 or to nd more information on Arbor Day you can visit www.arborday.org. Paddleboarder travels state waterways SPONSORED BY Freshwater Inshore Most action around town is still in the I.C.W. canal in St. Joe. Try starting out under the power lines and moving your way up toward the t. Live shrimp has been the bait of choice, but Gulp shrimp and D.O.A. are good alternatives this week. Unusually warm weather has the fish confused again in our area this week. With a cold front predicted to be moving our way, now is the time to be out on the water. Lake Wimico and parts of the Apalachicola River are seeing good sheepshead and a few striped bass still this week. JUSTIN RINEY | Special to the Times Above, Justin Riney paddleboards through Bay County. While in Port St. Joe, Justin Riney, some Boy Scouts and local residents helped clean the beaches at Frank Pate Park. TIM CROFT | The Star Franklin students celebrate Arbor Day DANIEL STEVENS | Special to the Times

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CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA SPORTS www.apalachtimes.com A Section BAY DAY F EST IVAL F EST S AT F EB RU A R Y 2 nd 11:00 T O 2:00 EST* St. Joseph Bay Preserves Center 3915 HWY 30-A, Port St. Joe $ 10 DON ATI ON P E R M EAL DON ATI ON 3915 HWY 30-A, Port St. Joe ATI ATI ON ON All proceeds benet The Friends of St. Joseph Bay Preserves Sausage Beverages Sausage Sausage M E NU MU S I C E X H I B I TS R AFF LE IT E MS VI S I T stjosephbaypreserves.org F O R DE TA IL S C A LL 8502291787 F O R M O R E IN F O Gulfside IGA PL A YER OF THE WEEK S P ON S OR Seahawk senior Julio Ramirez continued to perform well on defense, as Franklin County defeated Rocky Bayou in the district opener before nishing as district runner-up. Julio has been the wall, which is how everybody on our team calls him., said Coach Ramon Valenzuela. I am glad that I had the opportunity of having him for his last year at the high school. Hes a great student and a great personality. We will miss you, Julio, the wall. Congratulations, Julio! Hometown Proud (850)653-9695 Special to the Times The Franklin County Lady Seahawks faced John Paul II in a regional quarter nal game at home Jan. 23. Franklin County tried to move on without sophomore Katie Seger, injured in the district nals. Early in last weeks regional opener, junior Gracyn Kirvin sprained her ankle on a breakaway which was certain to be a goal. Nonetheless Franklin County was down 0-1 on a direct kick rocket shot from John Pauls leading scorer. Sophomore goalkeeper Macy Hunt got both hands on the ball but the velocity and spin on it carried it into the net. Midway through the rst half, junior Adriana Reeder served up a pass to eighth grader Allie Kirvin, which she put in the net to tie the match at 1-1. The score remained unchanged into the second half, but the team suffered another setback when sixth grader Sophie Kirvin was injured when she took a shot to the face. John Paul scored its second goal of the match off a corner kick to take a 2-1 lead. John Pauls leading scorer scored two more goals in the match to give John Paul a 4-1 lead. Late in the match the Lady Seahawks kept ghting. With three minutes left in the game junior Jessica Shields crossed the ball and Allie Kirvin was able to convert it into her second goal of the match. She nished with a total of 14 goals for the season; Shields nished the season with nine goals and 16 assists. Gracyn Kirvin nished the season with 20 goals and eight assists. Hunt nished with 144 saves and seven shutouts. She only allowed 17 goals throughout the season. Our defense played a big part of keeping the ball away from Macy Hunt, said Coach Kelli Wright, whose Lady Seahawks nished the season with a record of 12-32. With three impact players on the bench, it would have been a daunting task to go face Maclay. We feel we took our season as far as we could take it. It was lled with a great set of positives. I think our team and coaches did a wonderful job representing the community, she said. Next season we will return seven seniors and all the young players that made an impact this season. Lady Seahawks fall in regional opener Page 9 Special to The Times Registration for Apalachicola Dixie Youth baseball and softball continues this weekend. Sign up at the D.W. Wilson Sports Complex from 10 a.m. to noon on Saturday. Sign-up will also be available from 5:30-7 p.m. on Tuesday and Thursday, Feb. 7, at the complex. There will be a coaches meeting on Tuesday, Feb. 12, at 6 p.m. at the Fort Coombs Armory. Anyone interested in volunteering is asked to attend. Dixie Youth registration continues By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes -Dadlerstein@star .com The Seahawks boys soccer team was set to take on Lafayette Mayo at 7 p.m. Wednesday night in the regional opener, after Franklin County proved itself district runner-up. Franklin County advanced to the district nals after earning its way into the championship game by defeating second-seeded Rocky Bayou, and then nishing second to Port St. Joe, which won its secondstraight District 1-1A soccer title, the third in four years, on Friday night in Freeport. The Seahawks, which posted an 8-5-1 overall record, shocked the secondseeded Rocky Bayou 2-1 Jan. 22 at Freeport in the district opener. It was a great victory for us, coach Ramon Valenzuela said. We de nitely upset them with this win. Both teams played well on that night, but unfortunately only one is the winner. We were excited on going back to face Port St. Joe for the district nal. Goals were scored by Alex Causey and Casey Sapp, with goalkeeper Billy Harris recording 11 saves. On Friday at Port St. Joe, the Seahawks lost 4-2 to a determined Tiger Shark defense. The game was pretty much equal except that we lowered our guard and let them pass through our great wall, Julio Ramirez, said Valenzuela. It was what we expected and obviously we went to Freeport to win. I cannot be more happy how the boys nished the game. If I can call it a great loss, I would, because they left their hearts on the eld, non-stop trying to score, but their defense was strong too and it was obvious that they dominated on the eld. Lets be realistic, Port St. Joe has more years with their soccer program, and we are still young, but we competed against them and we will continue to do so in the future, said the coach. Our boys showed their style and improvement, and I know they are much better now than they were before. Graham Kirvin and Casey Sapp each scored goals, while Harris had 13 saves behind the net. Wednesday nights game pit the Seahawks against District 2-1A champion Lafayette Mayo, which defeated Maclay 5-2 to advance. Seahawks advance in post-season play CASEY SAPP GRAHAM KIRVIN ALEX CAUSEY By BRAD MILNER 747-5065 | @PCNHBradMilner bmilner@pcnh.com Josh Wright stood at a podium inside Arnold High Schools media center and spoke passionately about what it would take to create the Blue Army. He equated building a football program with that of creating an army, one that can be formidable while also churning out respectable young men. Some of those building blocks in the mission include more focus on academics and behavior on and off the football eld, community service and work ethic. Arnold Principal Keith Bland believes all of those traits and more can be instilled by Wright, who was introduced as Arnolds new football coach on Tuesday. Wright was the choice out of more than 70 applicants for the position, which came open when James Hale resigned after 13 seasons. Wright spent the past four seasons as head coach at Franklin County, where he tried to change a culture of losing and inferiority in the region at the Eastpoint school, a consolidated campus of Carrabelle and Apalachicola. Wright made strides with 13 victories, which may not seem like much to an outsider, but was a good indicator of growth given how the program was winless for two seasons before he took over. Carrabelle and Apalachicola also had a history of prolonged losing where 13 wins over four seasons would have been considered a breakthrough. Im thrilled and excited, this is a career opportunity, Wright said. I thank the interview committee for their endorsement and they will not be disappointed as to how we go about the business of building a rst-class program here. Wright, 44, also spent 10 years as an assistant coach at Mosley from 1999-2009 and made frequent trips to the area while at Franklin County. His knowledge and ties with Bay County were only two reasons why he was chosen among three nalists. The other two in the running were former Pearl River Community College coach Tim Hatton and Bratt Northview offensive coordinator Ty Wise. Bland, a former Apalachicola High School football coach, and Wright became friends while Bland was employed at Mosley. Wrights name immediately surfaced after Hales resignation and the murmurs grew louder that he was the favorite for the position. Bland insisted the search was fair and said his friendship with the coach had little to do with the nal decision. I have a lot of friends in coaching, but if they werent quali ed for the job I wouldnt hire them, Bland said. We wanted to take this program in a different direction. Its whats best for the kids regardless of friendship. Bland said he was not involved in ranking the nalists. The remaining ve members of a six-person committee provided the nal list and Bland made his choice based on what he was looking for in a new coach. Wright spent a few moments of his press conference meeting his new team. The only contact currently was a few handshakes, but Wright said he was anxious to get to work on forming a coaching staff. He is still under contract with Franklin County, but he said he should be released from it soon and hopes to be fully on board at Arnold by March 1. Wright was hired to an administrative position at Arnold. His salary will be between $58,565-58,622 based on his previous headcoaching experience. In a brief telephone interview Tuesday, Wright said the move west is a bittersweet situation. Its a career move for me. Its better for me but it takes me away from the Seahawk family. Its been a tremendous experience in Franklin County. Wright and his new wife, FCHS physical education teacher Kelli Maggio Wright, continue to own a house in Eastpoint. Kelli Wright, who has coached the girls soccer team to back-to-back district titles, said she plans to look for a position in Bay County, but has not ruled out returning to FCHS next year. Wright to head west to coach Arnold ANDREW WARDLOW | Halifax Media Group Josh Wright addresses Arnold students after being named their new head football coach. DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times Junior Adriana Reeder, left, advances on a John Paul defender. Thursday, January 31, 2013

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Local A10 | The Times Thursday, January 31, 2013 CALL TOD A Y! 653-8868 GE T YOUR A D IN Trades & Services Laban Bontrager, DMD Monica Bontrager, DMD 12761 Pea Ridge Road Bristol, Florida 32321 TELEPHONE (850) 643-5417 Bristol Dental Clinic DENTURE LAB ON PREMISES Same Day Service on Repairs and Relines Don Lively General Contractors L ICENSED AND I NSURED 20 Y EARS E XPERIENCE P .O. Box 439 C arrabelle, FL 32322 697-2783 or Mobile 566-2603 RC 0066499 R G0065255 Carrabelle Visa, Discover, and American Express Honored at Participating Ace Stores JACKSONS Building Supplies Building Supplies & Auto Repair Carrabelle 697-3333 We Deliver Anywhere Hardware and Paint Center GE T YOUR A D IN Trades & Services CALL TODAY! 653-8868 J.J.s Tree Service, LLC Stump Grinder Licensed & Insured Call John : (850) 899-8432 ROBERTS APPLIANCE REPAIR ALL MAJOR BRANDS 18 Shadow Lane Apalachicola, FL 32320 Phone: (850) 653-8122 Cell: (850) 653-7654 February 5 TH 2013 Register at any St. George Island vacation rental company. For more information, contact Sometimes its Hotter at (850)927-5039 or visit www.sgisnowbirds.com Rafe Run Education Center State Park Nature Walk Lighthouse Climb Lighthouse Museum Info Sessions Happy Hour & Dinner Bingo Special to The Times Set on a shing pier on a lake somewhere in LA (lower Alabama), the old shing pier on the end of Cypress Lake, favorite hangout for three best friends when they were kids, has fallen under the glow of another Cat sh Moon. Three best friends: Curley (Gary Niblack), Gordon (Vince Bishop) and Frog (Fredrick Kahler), and Curleys younger sister Betty (Donna MCoy), who Gordon is dating now after she was married and divorced from Frog. Four people who have known each other all their lives come to grips with knowing each other all their lives. An overnight shing trip brings back a painful reality, but the biggest sh of all, time, does not get away. Midlife pressures and the weight of adulthood are lifted by what matters most. The Panhandle Players present Cat sh Moon, a Southern Comedy, by Laddy Sartin and directed by Dan Wheeler this Friday and Saturday evenings, Feb. 1 and 2, and Sunday afternoon, Feb. 3. Shows at the Eastpoint Firehouse are 7:30 p.m. Friday-Saturday and 3 p.m. Sunday. Tickets $15. Show also runs Friday and Saturday, Feb. 8-9 at 7:30 p.m. at Benedict Hall at Trinity Church. Tickets, including dessert, $20 by reservations only. Contact John Inzetta at (850) 734-0260 or (404) 326-7791. Special to The Times The Historic Apalachicola Foundations Apalachicola Museum of Art is pleased to invite the public to an opening of an exhibit of the latest work of local artist Beth Appleton, on Friday, Feb. 8 at the Museum, 96 Fifth Street in Apalachicola. The opening will also feature vocal music by Velma Frye, a friend of the artist. Following the opening, the museum will be open Wednesday through Sunday from 1 to 4 p.m. The exhibit runs through March 15. Appletons work is composed of watercolor and cut paper assemblages, in which she uses thousands of small pieces of handpainted and hand-cut paper to create her designs. A viewer at one of her recent exhibits is quoted as saying that upon viewing her work, I felt my shoes glued to the oor. Inspiration for Appletons newest work followed the 2010 oil spill which threatened Floridas Gulf Coast and the waters of the Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve. In the days following the spill, skimming the waters of Apalachicolas estuary with her husband, charter boat captain and eco-tour guide David Harbaugh, Appleton took photos and collected water samples. She then used her digital microscope to look at the water samples and was inspired to create her latest artwork which has a strong environmental focus. Inspired by that experience, Appleton has also created a video and a childrens book, Gently Down the Stream, with the books rst publication a result of the generosity of David and Michaelin Watts for the young children of Franklin County Schools. Mrs. Watts is also a board member of the Early Learning Coalition of Northwest Florida, headquartered in Panama City. Assisted by friends in the local environmental community, Appleton will share this aspect of her work in a Gallery Talk at the museum Saturday, Feb. 23 from 6-8 p.m. During the week of Feb. 12, Marie Marshall, president of the foundation, will again welcome the pre-K and Kindergarten children to the museum for a visit with the artist and a viewing of her work. Since the museum considers itself a Museum Without Walls, during the week of Feb. 19 a collaboration with Appleton and Bring Me A Book Franklin, under the leadership of the Watts, will bring exhibit-related art and music programs to 300 pre-K and kindergarten students in 12 classrooms of the Franklin County School and the Apalachicola Bay Charter School. Parent programs at each site will again be part of the Bring Me a Book activity, and each child will receive a copy of the new book, thanks to the Watts generosity. Using her skills as a former art teacher, Appleton will collaborate on an art experience for the children with teachers at each of the three sites, and retired music teacher Pat Harrington will teach them music related to the theme. Bring Me A Book Franklin volunteers will also be in classrooms reading to the children. All pre-K and Kindergarten school activities, organized and funded by Bring Me a Book Franklin, will culminate in a program shared with parents. SPECIAL TO THE TIMES An underwater scene by Beth Appleton Appleton exhibit to open at art museum VOLUNTEER READERS NEEDED Bring Me a Book Franklin needs volunteers to read to the children and give out copies of Appletons new childrens book Gently Down the Stream during a series of programs throughout the countys schools next month. All the programs will be in the morning, and would be nished by 11:30 a.m. Programs will take place on Tuesday, Feb. 19 at the Franklin County School in Eastpoint; Wednesday, Feb. 20 at the ABC School in Apalachicola; and Thursday, Feb. 21 at The Learning Center in Eastpoint. If you can help, call Michaelin Watts at (650) 464-7833. Cat sh Moon opens Friday MARGEY OEHLERT | Special to the Times Gordon (Vince Bishop), left, Frog (Fredrick Kahler), center, and Curley (Gary Niblack) star in Cat sh Moon. FREDERICK KAHLER | Special to The Times Gordon (Vince Bishop), left, and Betty (Donna McCoy) in Cat sh Moon.



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xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx 50 WWW.APALACHTIMES.COMPhone: 850-653-8868 Web: apalachtimes.com E-mail: dadlerstein@star .com Fax: 850-653-8036 Circulation: 800-345-8688 DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK: School News & Society: 11 a.m. Friday Real Estate Ads: 11 a.m. Thursday Legal Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Display Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Line Ads: 5 p.m. Monday xxxxx Contact Us xxxxx Out to see Index School employees speak out against pay cutsBy DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com The Franklin County school board said very little about a lot last Thursday. Because negotiations, open to the public, are to resume this afternoon on the campus of the former Brown Elementary School, board members offered scant insight into how they think the district will nd about $750,000 in savings between now and the spring. District employees were on the opposite end of the speaking out spectrum, lling all available chairs in the Willie Speed board room, spilling into the aisles. Many of them, as well as students, wore placards around their necks that declared their role in the school system, such as By LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com In the wake of a pair of weekend res, two families are struggling to get by. A Carrabelle re Friday totally destroyed a trailer belonging to Blanche Wheeler, and an Eastpoint re Sunday morning did the same to the home of Martha Ann and Joseph Putnal. On Friday afternoon, Wheeler, 72, was in the kitchen of her home at 160 Woodill Road when her 4-year-old grandson, Jaden Bryce, rushed in and told her to leave the trailer because it was on re. Wheeler and the boy barely managed to escape the blaze, which killed two pet birds caged inside. The single-wide trailer was a total loss. Deborah Jamison, with the State Fire Marshalls Of ce, said the re originated on the porch and has been ruled Work begins for new RESTORE CouncilBy LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com Ideas are beginning to percolate among the newly appointed members of the RESTORE Council, with the remaining half to be named next month. Under the RESTORE Act of 2012 (Resources and Ecosystems Sustainability, Tourism Opportunities and Revived Economies) passed in December, the Gulf Coast is entitled to 80 percent of the penalties BP is expected to pay under Clean Water Act for the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill. The money is expected to come directly to the affected counties, bypassing state oversight. After a prolonged debate since last fall, county commissioners voted unanimously Jan. 15 to create a RESTORE Council to vet requests for funding of possible RESTORE projects, with county commissioners having the ultimate say in who receives nancial support. The composition of the council was altered from the original 15-member proposal initially proposed by Commission Chair Pinki Jackel, who represents District 1. The new board, structured on a proposal by Director of Administrative Services Alan Pierce, converted four at-large members into ve single-district representatives and eliminated the Weems hospital board rep, as well as representatives from the unincorporated areas of Alligator Point, Lanark Village, St. George Island and Eastpoint. It added representatives from the realtors association and an environmental group. The board now consists of 13 Special to the TimesMembers of the Joint Legislative Budget Commission have approved two mid-year budget amendments to provide critical funding needed to restore Floridas seafood industry in the wake of Tropical Storm Debby and the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. The impact of these disasters has reverberated throughout the Northwest Florida region and across our state, said Senate President Don Gaetz, RNiceville. I commend Sen. (Bill) Montford (DTallahassee) for his leadership in ensuring that the Legislature maintains our commitment to making the people and communities of Northwest Florida whole as they continue to recover from these devastating events. During the Jan. 17 meeting in the Knott Buildings Webster Hall, seven House members and seven senators considered budget amendments from 11 agencies, 22 of which were approved. Amendment B0320 will provide an additional $3.2 million in spending authority to the Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services in the Agriculture Emergency Eradication Trust Fund. The funds will come from a Memorandum of Understanding with BP negotiated after the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. The MOU allotted $20 million from October 2010 through October 2013, half for seafood testing and half to marketing safe seafood. The additional spending authority will go to anticipated expenditures related to the 201213 scal year, with the remaining funds being distributed during We have dark days ahead SEN. BILL MONTFORDState OKs funding for seafood industry Liz Frye speaks out at the school board meeting. Many attendees wore signs declaring their roles in the school system.DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times LOIS SWOBODA | The TimesBlanche Wheelers trailer, above, was a total loss after it caught re on Friday. At top are the remains of the Putnal familys trailer after a re on Sunday. FIRES DESTROY 2 HOMESSANDI HENGEL | Special to the Times2 families homeless after resSee SCHOOL A12 See RESTORE A3 See FIRES A2 See SEAFOOD A2Opinion . . . . . . A4 Society . . . . . . A6 Faith . . . . . . . A7 Outdoors . . . . . A8 Sports . . . . . . A9 Tide Chart . . . . . A8 Classi eds . . . . A11Thursday, January 31, 2013 VOL. 127 ISSUE 40Mardi Gras revelry this weekendThe Mystic Krewe of Salty Barkers, a unit of pets and their people, will kick off Apalachicolas Mardi Gras weekend with a 5 p.m. Friday parade from the Bowery to Riverfront Park, where the party continues. Saturday is the dinner and ball at the Fort Coombs Armory at 6:30 p.m., with music by the Brian Bowen Band, dancing and a oor show, plus the crowning of the king and queen. Dinner tickets are $50; general admission $25 at 7:30 p.m. For information, call 670-5064, 653-3113 or 653-2025. Cat sh Moon at Eastpoint rehouseFour people who have known each other all their lives come to grips with knowing each other all their lives on an overnight shing trip. The Panhandle Players present Cat sh Moon, a Southern Comedy at 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday and 3 p.m. Sunday. Tickets for the shows at the Eastpoint Firehouse are $15. Call John Inzetta at 7340260 or 404-326-7791.Dixie theatre presents Patsy ClinePatsy: A Tribute by Margo Anderson & the Encore Band is back at the Dixie Theatre. Margo tells the story of Patsys early days, joined by a group of six classic country musicians, led by the Purvis Brothers. Shows are at 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday and 3 p.m. Sunday. All seats $25. Call box of ce at 653-3200.Forgotten Coast Chefs Sampler Feb. 10The Apalachicola Bay Chamber of Commerce will host the 17th annual Forgotten Coast Chefs Sampler from 6-9 p.m. Feb. 10. Area chefs will prepare their most creative dishes at the historic Fort Coombs Armory. Tickets are $45-$50. For more information, contact the Apalachicola Bay Chamber of Commerce at 653-9419 or info@apalachicolabay.org.FCSWA to meet Feb. 11The Franklin County Seafood Workers Association will meet at 6 p.m. Feb. 11 at the Eastpoint rehouse. Any questions, contact Jennifer Millender at 597-0787 or jenjenreeves@yahoo.com.Wright heads west, A9

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, January 31, 2013 The Times | A11 ManySelling ABSOLUTE! AUCTIONS AuctionFDIC.com AL-GA-FL-SCFebruary23-March2RESIDENTIAL-COMMERCIAL DEVELOPERLOTS-LANDNoBuyersPremium|5%DownPayment $2,500CashiersChecktoBid BrokersProtectedH&MCQ1035357,AB110;B.G.Hudson,Jr.,BK3006464,AU230 866.509.44733532994 RENTALS3 BR 3 BA UNFURNISHED CONDO LONG TERM, POOL............................$850 2 BR 1 BA UNFURNISHED HOUSEFL ROOM, FENCED YARD, GARAGE ...$775 2 BR 1 BA UNFURNISHED APT NEW PAINT, SMALL PORCH .............$375 3 BR 1 BA FURNISHED APT WEEKLY OR MONTHLY, INC UTILITIES 3 BR 1 BA UNFURNISHED DUPLEX DOWNTOWN CARRABELLE ..............$600 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322850-697-9604 850-323-0444 www.seacrestre.comwww. rst tness.com/carrabellePROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND RENTALS DIRECTOR, CONTINUING EDUCATIONTo direct & manage the Continuing Education department at GCSC. Initiate & maintain working relationships with area Chambers of Commerce, agencies & businesses to meet the areas training needs. Requires BS degree & 5 yrs. related experience, MS degree & 3 yrs. related experience preferred; strong verbal & written skills; 3 yrs. supervisory experience; valid FL drivers license and the ability to work exible hours. Position Open Until Filled with a review starting 2/4/13. Salary commensurate with education & experience. Only those who provide all requested items, GCSC Application (must be completed), legible transcripts & resume will be considered. Additional info: www.gulfcoast.edu/hr. Women & minorities are strongly encouraged to apply. GCSC is an EA/EO/M/F/Vet employer. GCSC Equity O ce 850.873.3516 Nestled in more than 200 miles of Award-Winning Pet-Friendly Beaches, World Famous seafood and Maritime History and Culture Lies Apalachicola, Florida. Known as the Forgotten Coast, Franklin County, Florida is a wonderfully Historic community. Apalachicola, which is the county seat, has a population of approximately 3500 residents, The Apalachicola housing authority, is a public housing complex with 54 units and is located within the city of Apalachicola, the AHA is currently accepting applications for the following Position:EXECUTIVE DIRECTORJob Requirements include Bachelors Degree; a minimum of 5 years management and/or supervisory experience and excellent communications skills.Anyone interested in this position should submit an application to:PAUL E. MILLS, INTERIM DIRECTOR141 15TH STREET APALACHICOLA, FL 32320(850)653-9304 PHONE(850)653-2473 FAXapalha@fairpoint.net(APPLICATIONS FOR EMPLOYEMENT ARE AVAILABLE AT THE AHA OFFICE) REPRESENTATIVES will be at the GULF COUNTY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE on Tuesdays & Thursdays from 9 am 1 pm EST accepting applications for numerous open positions.We offer competitive wages and a comprehensive bene t package including Company paid health, dental, and life insurance, 401(k), attendance & safety bonuses.EOE/Drug Free WorkplaceEASTERN SHIPBUILDING GROUP MORE THAN A JOB A FUTURE! 89988T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.: 19-2012-CA-000447 U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR STRUCTURED ASSET SECURITIES CORPORATION MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-BC4, Plaintiff vs. STEPHEN BERNARD BRYANT A/K/A STEPHEN B BRYANT AKA STEPHEN BRYANT, et al., Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF JANIE LEE JOHNSON Last Known Address Unknown Also Attempted At: 196 5TH STREET, APALACHICOLA, FL 32320 AND P.O. BOX 841, APALACHICOLA, FL 32320 Current Residence Unknown YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Foreclosure of Mortgage on the following described property: LOT 4, BLOCK 180, THE CITY OF APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA, AS PER MAP ON PLAT OF SAID CITY IN COMMON USE, LYING AND BEING IN FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it, on Choice Legal Group, Attorney for Plaintiff, whose address is 1800 NW 49th STREET, SUITE 120, FT. LAUDERDALE, FL 33309 within thirty (30) days after the first publication of this Notice in THE APALACHICOLA TIMES and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator, 301 South Monroe Street Tallahassee, FL 32301, 850.577.4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court this 17th day of January, 2013. MARCIA JOHNSON As Clerk of the Court By Terry E Creamer As Deputy Clerk Jan 31, Feb 7, 2013 89906T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY CASE NO. 2011-417CA EMERALD COAST FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, Plaintiff, vs. ANTHONY J. CROOM, SR. and wife, TAMMIE D. CROOM, Defendants. AMENDED NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that pursuant to an Amended Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated November 2, 2012, and entered in Civil Case No. 2011-417-CA of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit of the State of Florida, in and for FRANKLIN County, wherein EMERALD COAST FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, is Plaintiff and ANTHONY J. CROOM, SR. and TAMMIE D. CROOM, are Defendants, I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at the front door of the Franklin County Courthouse in Apalachicola, Florida, at 11:00 A.M., ET on the 13th day of February, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: Lots 11 and 12, Block 216 City of Apalachicola, according to the plat thereof of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. DATED this 10th day of January, 2013. MARCIA JOHNSON CIRCUIT COURT CLERK By: Terry E. Creamer DEPUTY CLERK January 24, 31, 2013 91963T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION Case No.: 11000505CA FLAGSTAR BANK, FSB, Plaintiff, vs. NORBERT JOSEPH KAMINSKI A/K/A NORBERT J. KAMINSKI A/K/A NORBERT KAMINSKI AND NANCY ANNE KAMINSKI A/K/A NANCY A. KAMINSKI A/K/A NANCY KAMINSKI, et al. Defendant. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated December 27, 2012 and entered in 11000505CA of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein FLAG-STAR BANK FSB, is the Plaintiff and NORBERT JOSEPH KAMINSKI A/K/A NORBERT J. KAMINSKI A/K/A NORBERT KAMINSKI AND NANCY ANNE KAMINSKI A/K/A NANCY A. KAMINSKI A/K/A NANCY KAMINSKI; UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2 are the Defendant(s). Marcia M. Johnson as the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Front Steps of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320, at 11:00 AM on February 14, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 28, BLOCK 10 EAST OF ST. GEORGE ISLAND GULF BEACHES UNIT NO. 1, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE(S) 7, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 28th day of December, 2012. Marcia M. Johnson As Clerk of the Court Michele Maxwell As Deputy Clerk IMPORTANT If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301. 850.577.4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Submitted by: Robertson, Anschutz & Schneid, P.L. Attorneys for Plaintiff 3010 N. Military Trail, Suite 300 Boca Raton, FL 33431 561-241-6901 Fax: 561-241-9181 January 24, 31, 2013 *Adopt*:Doting dad, stay at home mom (&puppies) excited to give your baby everything! *Expenses Paid* *Bob & Maria* FKBar42311 1800-522-0045 $$ WANTED OLD CAR TAGS $$ I am buying old car tags in good condition from the 1950s down from the following counties: Franklin, Gulf, Liberty, Calhoun, Bay, Jackson, Wakulla, Taylor, Madison, Jefferson, Gadsden, Hamilton, Lafayette. Kirk 850-545-3677 $Wanted Old Bottles$I am looking for old coca-cola bottles, Medicine bottles, Orange Crush bottles, Rice Bottling Works bottles, Gorrie Bottling Works bottles, Neele Bottling Works bottles, John Cook Fine Whiskey flask bottles from Apalachicola also commissary tokes, seafood tokens, lumber tokens, general merchandise tokens, turpentine tokens & old signs. Kirk 850-545-3677 Apalachacola, 233 12th ST, Saturday, February 2nd, 8am to 11pmYard/ Porch SaleCleaning out Shed! Everything must Go! Clothes, shoes, framed pictures, jewelry, armour, luggage set and much, much more! Text FL39884 to 56654 Carrabelle : 208 1st St. NE, Saturday Feb 2nd, 9am-??HUGE YARD SALECoca-Cola and other collectibles, tools, misc Text FL39786 to 56654 BargainsNew Merchandise Liquidation Store, In Hickory Plaza, Prices 25-75% Below Retail! Mention Ad for Additional 10% OFF! 414 S. Tyndall Pkwy850-215-2755 Bldg/Skilled TradeSiteSuperintendentSuperintendent for Government Project Govern. Exper. OnlyRequired, Fax Resume & Salary Requirements, 813-281-9596 Web ID# 34237529 Text FL37529 to 56654 Customer Support MEDIACOM Join us Friday Feb 1st 9a-2p 239 W Hwy 98 to discuss Career Opportunities with our growing SALES & INSTALLATION Teams. Excellent pay/benefits. Visit our career site at www .mediacomcable.com/car eers to apply prior to the event. EOE m/f/v/d Text FL39539 to 56654 Food Svs/Hospitality*Servers *Cooks Dishwashers *Bartenders *BussersBLUE PARROT Now HIRINGPlease apply in person between 9a-5pm 7 days a week@ Blue Parrot St. Georges Island HospitalityHousekeepingPart Time weekend help needed for all positions, apply in person, 4693 Cape San Blas Rd or 1200 Hwy 98 Mexico Beach HospitalityRESORT VACATION PROPERTIESAccepting applications for aFT Check-In ClerkExperience handling money helpful. Must have reliable transportation. Quick learnerFT ReservationistPrior sales exp preferred. Attentive to details & follow-up.Maint Office Asst4 days/wk. Team player, attentive to detail & good follow-up skills. These great jobs on SGI require excellent customer service & computer skills, good spelling & grammar, and weekend work. Prior office exp preferred. Great benefits pkg. Apply in person 9-5 weekdays at 123 W Gulf Beach Dr St. George Island Install/Maint/RepairMaintenanceFull time maintenance person needed at the Bucaneer Inn on St. George Island, Fl. Experience is helpful and must be able to work weekends. Applications can be pick up at 228 Franklin Blvd, St. George Island or call 850-927-2163 for more information Apalachicola 1Br/1Ba quiet, 2 blks from boat ramp, $600mo + first & last dep. 850-570-9167 Apalachicola: 1 br, 1 ba efficiency Call for information 850-653-6103 Text FL39318 to 56654 Carrabelle Cove ApartmentsTaking Applications Now Available: 1, 2 and 3 br, Handicap Apts. Laundry facilities on site, W/S included in rent, CH&A and window coverings provided. On site management Office. Rental assistance available. Income restrictions apply, reasonable accommodation. Carrabelle Cove Apartments 807 Gray Ave #33 Carrabelle, Fl 32322 850-697-2017 TDD711 This institution is an equal opportunity provider & employerText FL29928 to 56654 St. GeorgeIsland $175/wk, elec, satellite, garbage incl. Pool tbl. 12 X 65 deck. Beautiful view! 850-653-5319 1 BR, CottageCH/A in Apalachicola, Florida. 850-643-7740 East Point Carrabelle 900 sq ft Designer, 1Br, Open Plan, Jacuzzi, Washer & Dryer, Satellite, Wi-Fi Avail, Secluded, 1/2 mile from Beach. $420 month. Call 954-816-7004 Text FL22547 to 56654 Apalachicola: 3 br, 2 Bath. Newly Remodeled Call for details!! 850-653-6103 Text FL39317 to 56654 For Sale St. George Island, 2Br/1Ba, 90 x 170 Lot, 1730 sq ft home, CH/A, $185,000; Call 864-356-5949 1 acre, 120 x 380 ft., 736 Buck Rd, Eastpoint, FL, has septic, electric, well, $25,000; 864-356-5949 Total Down Pmt $675 Toyota Corolla T otal Price $4,2000% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! Total Down Pmt $9752002 Dodge Ram -X/Cab T otal Price $6,5000% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! Buy it! Classified. Make your move to the medium thats your number one source of information about homes for sale! For all your housing needs consult Classified when its time to buy, its the resource on which to rely. These tin y ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you. Emerald Coast Marketplace 747-5020 If youre ready to move and overflowing with stuff Classified can help you store it or sell it!

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LocalA12 | The Times Thursday, January 31, 2013in I am a teacher, in large print letters with red and black magic marker. Many rose to speak to give the school board much to consider during the current nancial crunch, which contains proposals as drastic as a 20 percent acrossthe-board pay cut and reducing the school year. Were going to hear from you, but were not going to be able to really respond, said board chairman Jimmy Gander, in his welcome to the energized audience. First to speak was Elinor Mount-Simmons, a teacher for 32 years in the district. She asked that the resolution of the crisis be a fair one and that steps be taken to not repeat the budgeting mistakes that gave rise to the problem, that the districts general fund balance is projected to fall below the state minimum of 2 percent of general fund revenue. We know we have dark days ahead, she said. We are willing to work with you. Mount-Simmons said it would be unfair to ask school employees to bear all the cost of the cutbacks. We didnt cause the problems. We should all share equitably, all of us, she said. I want to feel assured that once we get through this and we will; we shall recover I want some assurances in place, that these dark days wont resurface. Donna Barber, also a longtime elementary school teacher, spoke of the nancial demands on her family, including putting a son through college. When youre talking about taking back a fth of someones salary, youre talking about someone not being able to make their (bills), she said, making a point to include Ganders payment in her list of nancial obligations, referring to the cost of fuel. Weve already taken such a hit from the bay, an economic hit, Barber said. Can we envision a Franklin County where people cant make their payments? How can people stay and work and thrive and teach and learn in a community where they cant make a living? A lot of people dont want to leave, but they have to go where they can make a living. This is my primary source of income; this is what feeds my family, she said. These are the real things that I work very, very hard for. Thats what that pay represents. I just want you to see a personal story and see the real impact of the normal, average people, and to nd a way other than have the teacher and other staff shoulder this nancial crisis. Liz Frye, who drives a school bus, was clear and succinct. We cannot afford a pay cut. As drivers, we cant afford this. Thats our concern, she said. They say our jobs are important; were the rst face they see in the afternoon and morning. Patty Kulick, a voluntary pre-K teacher and paraprofessional, said she spoke for her fellow staffers in saying a pay cut would mean more people leaving for better jobs. A pay cut and I have to relocate, she said. I have family here, and Ive grown to love this place. Kulicks daughter, freshman Jalynn Liston, spoke next, not about her family but about whats on the mind of students. You all are thinking about making a pay cut to the staff, she said. Youre thinking about making a cut to my and every other students education here. Gander commended Liston for her remarks, and then Cathy Wood, the union representative, said she taught Liston in her pre-K classroom several years ago. She is one of those 14year-old freshmen that are wise beyond their years, Wood said. She told the board all school employees have been asked to wear a pink heart. Its a non-spoken symbol to say We love our jobs, Wood said. She spoke in vague terms about the progress of the talks, noting the union had reciprocated in a very kind and generous way, I believe. Part of our job as educators is to listen, and your side is also listening. Wood stressed a common theme found within the teaching ranks, that the nancial problems are the burdens of somebodys blunder. They (the teachers) did not create the problems, she said. (Consider the) staff you have that have been diehard faithful. We are here, and we have a job title, and we are not just a dollar gure in a budget. We need to work together to look at the big picture and not do a quick x. Abigail Shiver, who said she and her husband, owners of the Big Top grocery, were both products of the local school system. We have some wonderful schoolteachers in the system who will be hurt by this, Shiver said. To me they should not be punished for someone elses mistake. As a business owner, its not going to only affect me with my sales. These school teachers arent going to be able to pay their house payments. Im not going to say anything about the situation were in, she said. I dont know how we got to this situation, and I pray to God that we dont ever get to this situation again. As a business owner, I understand were in a hard economic time. My husband and I took a pay cut so we didnt have to lay off any of our people, Shiver said. For our system to stay in existence, we have to take care of our people. The teachers are what makes this school system. We need to make a better job of taking care of our teachers. Her professional viewpoint turned to the personal. I had teachers that didnt care that I was a poor white child. They pushed me, and theres a lot of people like me that have become successful because of the caringness these teachers have given all of us, Shiver said. Apalachicolas Bobby Miller closed the audience participation part of the meeting. This is not an acceptable standard, he said. It seems like every time I turn around, I hear somethings got to be done, weve got to gather up some money from somewhere. You as board members are ultimately responsible for this, Miller said. You are a policymaking committee. You can get the situation under control. Miller, married to a veteran elementary school teacher, said the crisis is having a negative effect. You want them to make you an A school, and the morale is at an all-time low, he said. That is the closest link you have to education. If it werent for the students, we wouldnt be here tonight.Board responseGander sounded hopeful. I hope we can work this out; I still believe we can, he said. If I could push a button and make it happen, I would. The school district is the second-largest employer in the county, Gander said, noting that with cutbacks, Youre not just taking it away from the employees. Youre taking it away from the community. It has a long-lasting effect. Ive never seen the situation in Apalachicola bay oysters like it is now. Ive never seen anything close, he said. We have catastrophe after catastrophe, and we have to gure out a way to work this out. After the board handled its typical business issues, with no further announced staff retirements, Shannon Venable, the districts director of nance, reported that as of the latest phase of state funding, the district would lose about $559,000 this scal year. She said last months staff resignations would net about $38,000 in overall savings. With half the year over, the district is on track to show a negative balance of more than 5 percent and would have to cut expenses by at least $750,000 to move out of the red zone. Venable said declining enrollment would cost the district about $128,000 this year, with the district now at 1,148 total students at all its schools. Weve had more come in but lost another dozen since Christmas, Superintendent Nina Marks said. Marks, who said shed met with Florida Department of Education of cials six times in the past two weeks, reiterated what she has told the school board for several weeks: The DOE is not going to swoop down on Franklin County and kick people to the curb, she said. They expect us to x ourselves. In a telephone interview this week, Tiffany Cowie, public information of ce for DOE, underscored Marks perspective. We know action will have to be taken pretty quickly to help the district recover. Our whole philosophy is anything we can allow the district to control we do. Thats how residents here in the state feel. Heres one of those sides of having so much power: You are responsible for your budget, Cowie said. Its in all of our best interests that they get out of this situation and are prospering. Cowie said Franklin is one of four Florida counties, the others Columbia, Martin, and Manatee, to have noti ed Tony Bennett, the states new commissioner of education, that their projected fund balance is below 3 percent. The department is waiting to receive further details of the districts scal recovery plan. she said. He will decide if they need extra resources to get back on their feet. When I say resources, I do not mean money. Bennett will have the option of putting together a nancial emergency board, advisers who can help guide the district through the situation. Its not that we dont want to help them and give them money, Cowie said. The legislature didnt appropriate any. We dont have a pot to pull from to help them in that way. Real Estate PicksOur local real estate experts have identied what they feel are the best values around and are oering them to you in Real Estate Picks! (In this section), Discover the best real estate values in Mexico Beach, Port St. Joe, Apalachicola, Cape San Blas, St. George Island, Carrabelle and surrounding areas. Best Values on the Forgotten Coast SELL YOUR LISTINGS HERE! Only $35 per week per listing Minimum 2 ads per week or 1 ad for 2 weeks Contact Joel or Kari for details: (850)814-7377 or (850)227-7847SOLD John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.comMLS# 248301$12,500 EastpointLAKES ON THE BLUFF Foreclosure in gated subdivision off North Bayshore Drive, ideal location for a secluded home in this new subdivision with community pool, wooded lot with mature native vegetation; lot is irregular shaped, Bank owned. Listing agent Michael Billings John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.comMLS# 248585$1,199,000St George IslandPLANTATION BEACHFRONTGorgeous, 4 BR, 3.5 BA, Great kitchen, granite counter kitchen with pool table & bath. Owner Financing, Income Producer, Nautilus Drive NOTICE OF LEGISLATIONTo whom it may concern: notice is hereby given of intent to apply to the 2013 Legislaturefor passage of an act relating to the Eastpoint Water and Sewer District, Franklin County, AmendingChapter 67-1399, Law of Florida, Acts of 1967 relating to charter amendments as recommended in chapter 189, Florida Statues Special Districts, The Incorporation of Liens and Foreclosure of Liens, and the districts status as an Independent Special Taxing District. Information concerning this matter is available at the Eastpoint Water and Sewer District oce, 40 Island Drive Eastpoint,FL 32328 850-670-8177 Robert C. Bruner Attorney Personal & Business BankruptcyOver 30 Years Legal Experience850-670-3030 bankruptcy relief under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon advertisements. Before you decide, ask us to send you free written information Pet Wellness ProgramDr. Hobson Fulmer | Dr. John Duncan187 Highway 98 Eastpoint, FL Open Monday Friday 8-6 PMWe are a full service Veterinary Clinic offering small animal medicine and surgery:Laser Surgery Low cost spay and neuter Monthly heartworm injections (no need for pills) Dentistry with digital x rays Ophthalmology (including glaucoma screening) Dermatology including allergy testing Nutritional counseling and diets Sonograms for internal organ evaluation and cancer screening Complete laboratory facilities Boarding After hours emergency care Highly trained, compassionate, professional sta FREE VACCINATIONS WITH EACH WELLNESS EXAM CALL 8506708306 FOR AN APPOINTMENT APALACHICOLA BAYANIMAL CLINIC YOUR OTHER FAMILY DOCTOR SCHOOL from page A1

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LocalA2 | The Times Thursday, January 31, 2013 accidental. The Wheelers said they believe Jaden might have started the blaze while playing. At least my little grandson didnt get burned up, Wheeler said. Wheeler shared her home with Jaden and his older brother and sister, John Michael Neel, 14, and Ashley Jo Neel 10, children of Blanches son Bodie, who lives in Carrabelle. Wheelers younger son Trent, 24, also lived in her trailer. After the blaze, Wheeler found herself with no purse, no identi cation and no medication. Her prescriptions were lled on Saturday. The Wheeler family lives with a granddaughter for the short haul. I have no insurance and no money, Wheeler said in a telephone interview. She said she has received interim aid from the American Red Cross. I need everything, she said. If somebody would like to donate a trailer, I would be happy with anything. I need all kinds of furniture and household things. She said the family lost all their clothing. If you can help, call Blanches sister, Connie James, at 697-3339 or 697-4123.Putnal home reAn Eastpoint family is also homeless after a Sunday blaze. Martha Ann Putnal, 47, said she believes a frayed power chord caused the electrical re that destroyed her double-wide trailer at 677 Wilderness Road. The State Fire Marshalls Of ce said the re stemmed from some sort of electrical problem. Martha Ann believes a bad dream earlier in the week warned of the events of Sunday morning. She had not slept for three days after dreaming that a sinister dark man with ames in his eyes told her to kiss him. Her blind son Cody also was awake most of Saturday night, keeping her company. The rest of the family was asleep when Cody began to experience trouble breathing. He blamed a trash re in a neighbors yard, but when the fumes grew thicker, he shouted to his mother that the stove was on re. They ran to the kitchen to check and found no re. Then Martha Ann noticed smoke pouring from the end of the hall. Cody ran and put his hands on the bedroom door. It was hot. He yelled, Call 911. Cody retrieved a small safe from his room before escaping. His mother took only photos of her grandmother and mother, believing the re department would extinguish the blaze. Cody woke his brothers Joey and Mason, and Masons girlfriend Ashley, who all were asleep in their travel trailers in the yard. Joey began pouring water on the ames; the garden hose was too short to use. We had been doing a lot of work on the house, Martha Ann said. They had recently replaced the homes roof, damaged in Tropical Storm Debby, and their bedroom oor. We had an electrician lined up to redo all the wiring, she said. Eastpoint volunteer re ghters were not able to save the Putnals home. Martha, who was able to save her wheelchair, said the family home also was shared with husband, Joseph, who was seriously injured in an automobile accident last year and is seeking disability. On Monday, with a broken arm and hip still on the mend, Joseph had metal staples removed from his arm and shoulder. Mason and Joey have returned home to their trailers. The rest of the family lost everything. Except for Martha Ann, whose shoes were in her car, the family lost most of their clothing including shoes and coats. Mason has taken responsibility for a miniature horse and three dogs belonging to the family. Food and supplies are needed for the animals. An elderly veteran, Eddie Marshall, 65, occupies a trailer across the road with no electricity. Mason had brought his blankets and clothing home to wash, so Marshall lost all his household linens and clothing other than what he wore at the time of the re. A car battery also was destroyed in the re. The Red Cross housed the Putnals at the Rancho Inn through Tuesday night. Martha said she has no idea what they will do after that. She said she contacted Salvation Army and Capitol Area Community Services and was provided a $600 food voucher and other coupons for used clothes and other goods at Goodwill. On Tuesday, she said the family had received all the clothing they needed for now. Like the Wheelers, the Putnals need a new trailer or other residence, housewares and furniture as well as nancial help. If you can assist them, call 227-4504 or 524-7424. REVISED PUBLIC NOTICE FCTDC 2012-2013 Fiscal Year MEETING SCHEDULE REVISIONSAS OF JANUARY 2, 2013, ALL TDC BOARD MEETINGS ARE HELD ON THEFIRST WEDNESDAY OF EACH MONTH, BEGINNING AT 3:00 P.M. UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTICED. Board Meetings ON FIRST WEDNESDAY February 6, 2013 Franklin County Courthouse Annex, 3:00 p.m. Carrabelle, 3:00 p.m. April 3, 2013, Franklin County Courthouse Annex, 3:00 p.m. May 1, 2013, Franklin County Courthouse Annex, 3:00 p.m. Carrabelle, 3:00 pm July 3, 2013, Franklin County Courthouse Annex, 3:00 p.m. August 7, 2013, Franklin County Courthouse Annex, 3:00 p.m. Carrabelle, 3:00 p.m. AS OF JANUARY 2, 2013, ALL TDC COMMITTEE MEETINGS ARE HELD ON THE THIRD WEDNESDAY OF EACH MONTH UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTICED, AT THE CITY OF APALACHICOLA COMMUNITY ROOM, 1 BAY AVENUE, APALACHICOLA, BEGINNING AT 1:30 PM FOR GRANTS (IF SCHEDULED) AND AT 2:30 PM FOR MARKETING (IF SCHEDULED). Committee Meetings ON THIRD WEDNESDAY January 16, 2013, Grants and Marketing Committees, beginning at 1:30 pm February 20, 2013, Grants and Marketing Committees, beginning at 1:30 pm March 20, 2013, Grants and Marketing Committees, beginning at 1:30 pm April 17, 2013, Grants and Marketing Committees, beginning at 1:30 pm May 15, 2013, Grants and Marketing Committees, beginning at 1:30 pm June 19, 2013 Grants and Marketing Committees, beginning at 1:30 pm July 17, 2013, Grants and Marketing Committees, beginning at 1:30 pm August 21, 2013, Grants and Marketing Committees, beginning at 1:30 pm September 18, 2013, Grants and Marketing Committees, beginning at 1:30 pm 17-1/2 Avenue E, Apalachicola, 653-8678, or visit our website: www.anaturalescape.com/administration. THIS IS A PUBLIC MEETING AND TWO OR MORE FRANKLIN COUNTY COMMISSIONERS MAY ATTEND. BE PART OF THIS ONE-OF-A-KIND EVENT IN THIS AREA! For Health Expo Package Information Call (850) 747-5009 OR fax your questions to (850) 763-4636 Vendor Space Is Going Fast... So Call Now! $10,000 3,000 PLUS MANY OTHER WAYS TO PROMOTE YOUR BUSINESS. INSTANTLYMAKEIT YOUR EXPO!GAIN THEEXPOSURE YOU NEED FOR SUCCESS! BOARDWALK BEACH RESORT FEBRUARY 19, 2013 9AM 2 PMSonsoreyTeNewsHera Calling All Businesses To The 2013 Bay County Health Expo Top Notch Service at a Reasonable Price Tired of Driving to Panama City or Tallahassee to have your tax return done? Tired of sending your payroll out of town to an impersonal payroll agency? Tired of spending your hard earned prots on exorbitant bookkeeping services? Save your gas money and their pricey fees and have your tax return led locally by a 15 year tax return veteran. Specializing in 1040s, 1065s, 1120s, as well as all payroll tax returns, W-2s and 1099s. Dont throw your hard earned money away because I will meet or beat anyones prices and that is a guarantee. For an appointment, call Chet Timmons today at 850-323-1082HOME OF THE $50 TAX RETURN** Special exclusions do apply and only guaranteed for simple 1040s or 1040EZs. HOW TO HELPThe following are sizes for clothing and shoes for some of the people affected by the weekend res. Name Shir t Pants Shoes Blanche Wheeler 1-2X 18-20 10 Trent Wheeler Medium 30-32 10 John Michael Wheeler Medium 16 9 Ashley Jo Wheeler 10-12 10 5 Jaden Bryce Wheeler 5 4 12 Eddie Marshall Medium 30 W, 32 L 9the 2013-14 scal year. The second amendment, B0385, will address the effect of Tropical Storm Debby on Apalachicola Bays oyster beds. Since the storm, the oyster population has signi cantly diminished, displacing many workers. The request, received from the Department of Economic Opportunity, for $2.7 million would provide 215 of those workers from the oyster industry with jobs restoring and replenishing the oyster population with funding from a National Emergency Grant which the department was awarded. Northwest Floridas seafood industry is vital to both our regions economic structure and individual identity, and sustaining that unique industry is in the best interest of all those who live and work in our region, state and even nation, Montford said. This funding will help create jobs, fund research and protect our coasts and the surrounding ecosystems and economies. SEAFOOD from page A1 FIRES from page A1To help the Wheeler family, call Connie James at 697-3339 or 697-4123. To help the Putnal family, call 227-4504 or 524-7424. THE APALACHICOLA TIMESFIND US ON FACEBOOK @ApalachTimesFOLLOW US ON TWITTER

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LocalThe Times | A3Thursday, January 31, 2013 members plus a nonvoting chairman appointed by the county commission. It continues to include representatives from the cities of Apalachicola and Carrabelle, the school board, the seafood dealers and seafood workers associations, and Tourist Development Council. The RESTORE Act does not outline a process for what happens after money reaches Floridas affected counties, but the Florida Association of Counties has suggested creating these RESTORE councils to decide where to spend the local funds. Five of the eight most heavily impacted counties have created one. To date, eight of the 13 members of Franklin Countys council have been named. Jackel told members of the hospital board Thursday she intends to consider Weems when she announces her District 1 appointment on Feb. 5. I may have a way to have Weems at that table, she said. The RESTORE Council members are evenly split along party lines with four registered Democrats, three Republicans and one independent. Apalachicola, which is pushing an alternative plan for addressing distribution of RESTORE Act monies, has said it does not plan to name a rep to the council. Carrabelle City Administrator Courtney Millender said a representative will be chosen at the city meeting Feb. 7. Of the eight representatives already named, four reside in District 1, which encompasses St. George Island and western Eastpoint: Shannon Harts eld, Lynn Martina, Dan Tonsmeire and Rick Watson. Harts eld, 43, who represents seafood workers, is president of the Franklin County Seafood Workers Association and represents gill net shermen on the Seafood Management Assistance Resource and Recovery Team. He is a lifelong resident of Franklin County and a fourth-generation seafood worker. Martina, 48, also a lifelong county resident, owns Lynns Quality Oysters and represents the seafood dealers. Tonsmeire, 62, representing environmental groups, is executive director and Riverkeeper of the Apalachicola Riverkeeper group. He has lived in the county for 15 years. Because Tonsmeire is frequently away from the county representing local interests in water wars litigation, the commissioners appointed Robin Vroegop as a non-voting alternate, but Tonsmeire said he intends to attend all meetings of the RESTORE Council, either in person or by conference call. Watson, 65, who represents the realtors, is employed by Century 21 Collins Realty and has lived on St. George Island for 21 years. He is a past president of the Realtors Association of Gulf and Franklin Counties and the St. George Plantation Owners Association. District 2, which extends east from Carrabelle to the county line, is home to two RESTORE Council members, Cal Allen and Paul Parker. Allen, 74, tapped by Commissioner William Massey for District 5, is a Carrabelle city commissioner and has resided in the county for 14 years. District 2 Commissioner Cheryl Sanders may announce her apportionment as early as the Feb. 5 county meeting. Parker, 46, who represents the TDC as vicechair, is a real estate broker and owner of Harbor Point Realty and Vacation Rentals. He has lived in the county for 22 years. District 3 Commissioner Noah Lockley, whose district encompasses Apalachicola north of U.S. 98, appointed Carol Bar eld, 45, a social worker born in the county, who left for 18 years and returned in 2004. Bar eld works for both Refuge House and the TIGERS after-school program. None of the representatives so far appointed to the RESTORE Council reside in District 4, which takes in portions of the Apalachicola area south of U.S. 98 and west to the county line. Commissioner Smokey Parrish is expected to appoint a rep on Feb. 5. Pam Shiver, 42, who represents the school board, resides in District 5, from western Carrabelle to eastern Eastpoint. A lifelong resident of Franklin County, she is employed as a postal clerk. All the newly chosen council members expressed a desire to make the best use of whatever funding comes to the county and several named projects they would like to see proposed. Id like to see a lock at the cut, and when we lack freshwater we can close it or open it when theres too much freshwater, said Harts eld, who also said hed like to see the waterfronts cleared of unusable buildings. Allen said he would like to end the use of septic tanks in coastal areas and on barrier islands. Tonsmeire agreed that environmental issues were a high priority. I think were looking at the environment projects to restore water quality, habitat and the productivity of Apalachicola Bay and the eastern Gulf. For example, stormwater and wastewater treatment will help promote the health of oyster habitat and other natural habitats. We want to be looking at those types of projects that would be an economic bene t as well. Bar eld said she hopes the council will ascertain the needs of the district and to try to use RESTORE money to draw tourists to the area, creating trickledown economics. She said she would like to see recreation facilities made more community-friendly. Martina said she would like to see the Eastpoint Channel dredged. I would put jobs rst, she said. Other council member said they had no particular projects in mind. I dont have any predetermined ideas, Parker said. Im going to take input from the TDC. Were just starting to talk about this. I believe it is more important to establish priorities and then projects. Everything is on the table. Watson said he hoped the council would consider projects on a grander scale because the pot of money available could be the largest the county has seen or will see. We havent even had a meeting yet, Shiver said. Everybody is going to have their personal stake. I think it should be an equal opportunity. Entertainment FRIDAY Feb 1 5:30pmGolf Cart & Pet Paradefrom the Bowery to Riverfront Park for a concertSATURDAY Feb 2 6:30-10:30pmReserved table & dinner for 6 $300 or $50 ppShow only 7:30-10:30 General Admission $25 Entertainment Entertainment Marilyn & Mason Bean Brian Bowen Band BILL MILLER REALTY850-697-3751 (3310) 570-0658400 + COMM. U.S. 98 & GULFADJ. TO LANARK MARINA 850K$29,500 $2,500 DOWN BUYS 2 BED APT. 2 6 ORRENT $500/MTH 2 B/R 1 BTH GULF VIEW HOME W/ FAMILY ROOM $70,000 C/B-3-1 2 COR. LOTS CITY $49,500 3/2D/W 2 COR. LOTS -CITY $42,500MIH 2 CRNRLOTS BLK. $ STORE REDUCED $49,500 2 AC-AT RIVER UTIL. IN -$39,500 DISS I)Children and Adults No Fee or Cost If No RecoveryGAYLEPEEDINGOATTONEYATLAWApalachicola, FL (850) 292-7059 | (850) 944-6020 FAXgsrlaw@bellsouth.net RESTORE from page A1 ON THE BOARDEight of the 13 members of Franklin Countys RESTORE board have been named. Shannon Harts eld, District 1: President of the Franklin County Seafood Workers Association, representative on the Seafood Management Assistance Resource and Recovery Team Lynn Martina, District 1: Owner, Lynns Quality Oysters Dan Tonsmeire, District 1: Executive director, riverkeeper of the Apalachicola Riverkeeper group Rick Watson, District 1: Century 21 Collins Realty, past president of the Realtors Association of Gulf and Franklin Counties and the St. George Plantation Owners Association Cal Allen, District 2: Carrabelle city commissioner Paul Parker, District 2: Vice chairman, Tourism Development Council; broker/owner, Harbor Point Realty and Vacation Rentals Carol Bar eld, District 3: Social worker Pam Shiver: School board

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USPS 027-600Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 Publisher: Roger Quinn Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six monthsHome delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERSIn case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola Times OPINION www.apalachtimes.com ASectionCongressman Southerland was re-elected in November by a narrow margin by voters in our 2nd Congressional District. What many people didnt know, Im sure, was that he intends to oppose virtually every proposal of President Obama. Dont take my word for it: from the Jan. 5, 2013 Orlando Sentinel: Steve Southerland of Panama City, rst elected in 2010 with Tea Party backing, offered a de ant message full of biblical references, hostility toward President Barack Obamas agenda, avowed opposition to any gun-control proposals, and the observation that he himself is part of a very thin line that stands between freedom and tyranny. As if to validate these statements: One, Mr. Southerland voted against the so-called scal cliff deal, meaning he would have raised income taxes on everyone and not just the top 1-2 percent who ended up having to pay more. Two, he also appears to be against the comprehensive and reasonable school safety/mental health/gun control package the President unveiled this month, which was prompted by the horri c Sandy Hook massacre of innocent children in Connecticut. Three, from the Congressmans own website from Jan. 10: I believe we should be focused nationally on repealing the Presidents deeply awed health care law, meaning not only is he against any cost-effective expansion of Medicaid in Florida that would save monies but he is still re ghting what has already been settled in Congress, the courts and in the election, that Obamacare is the law of the land. Americans, including those in this district, voted to have bipartisan government and its accompanying anticipated cooperation, not dug-in opposition to everything. That wasnt the desired outcome. But it gets worse: Southerland just voted against Hurricane Sandy relief! Now everyone in this area knows weve had a number of major storms through here in the last 10-20 years. How much credibility is he going to have with the rest of the Congress and the Administration when inevitably there will be another storm here which will require disaster assistance? I think you know the answer to that already. I would urge you to let your congressman know how you feel about whatever issues you are concerned about; let him know you are watching his actions closely. Then do pay attention to how he actually votes and when 2014 comes around, you will be well-armed with the information necessary to make a truly informed decision as to whether he deserves to have his lease renewed on the peoples of ce for another term or not.John Hedrick LETTER TO THE EDITORBy ALLAN FEIFERSpecial to the Times Last Thursday, the Franklin County School Board held a tense board meeting, even by Franklin County standards. A governmental agency that spends about $15 million a year announced they would not be able to make payroll in April after they run out of money if spending continues at the current pace. It was no one bolt out of the blue that is responsible for the creation of this emergency. In fact, the excuse of basing the current budget on a terribly in ated projection of the number of students to attend the consolidated school is only just one more issue steadily eroding the districts nances. And, to make matters worse, Concerned Citizens of Franklin County (CCFC) shared its concerns with school authorities last July on this very issue. Thursday, the school nance of cer stated the district is $750,000 in the hole. This is not about Concerned Citizens, its not about xing blame, and its not about the anguish this has caused school employees and parents, although these are all true and must be addressed. Theres a bigger story here; its about the ight of students out of our school system. Its about the current students who are losing educational opportunities like foreign language classes required to get into college. It is about what happens when management loses control and patches over problems by trying to satisfy everyone, instead of doing the hard things that are required to educate our children. Figures stated at the board meeting put the current student head count at the consolidated K-12 school somewhere between 750 and 800, out of a countywide total of 1,148, which includes the Apalachicola Bay Charter School and Franklin Academy. That number has been steadily going down since the new school was built, as more families either move away or simply take their children out of school. During that time, the head count of teachers and support personnel has remained relatively static. The only conclusion we can come to is that the embedded cost of a large physical plant and the many employees that staff it are colliding with a declining student enrollment that is not forecasted to improve. Wonderful teachers and support personnel still need butts in seats. We are missing a great many of those! The next issue is accountability and competency. Outraged individuals made their point well at the meeting while at the same time missing the obvious issue; 80 percent of school costs are personnel related. All the low hanging fruit has been picked clean. Leadership must ensure two primary objectives are met: First, we must educate our children. Past all the hyperbole, the fact that we are a C rated school, have a state evaluated high dropout rate, FCATs ranked in the bottom 20 percent in the state and that we spend more per student than most other schools in the state, does not exactly have us doing high ves. This is the truth and that alone should have all of us concerned. Our consolidated school system operates under a complex set of rules created by multiple governmental agencies that can make local control more dif cult. BUT every other school system statewide manages their operations except for ours. We have run out of money. We must understand what it is that we are doing wrong that brought us to this. Remember, there are multiple issues that have transpired and its not just about the in ation of the student roster this year. We have issues to deal with. The school board must af rmatively take control of the immediate situation. Teachers, students, support employees and the general public need to understand that management is stepping up to the plate. Let the emotions subside and tell the truth, backed up by the facts of the situation. Nothing less will suf ce. Reasonable economic sacri ce from all involved will be required to solve the dangerous emergency at hand. It is simply too late to make more minor adjustments in hopes of solving the $750,000 crisis. Whatever solution is found must be done quickly and completely. We owe that much to the individuals and families affected by previous miscalculations. The conversation must start now. The immediate problem must be solved at once and with the knowledge and experience that the board and superintendent possess. There is no easy out to the problem of the moment. As to the future; multiple answers can be found. The CCFC has shared many helpful suggestions at many previous meetings that can and will save hundreds of thousands of dollars each year. These suggestions include the need to have employees contribute a nancial percentage to their bene t packages. CCFC suggested that changes to the districts health insurance plan should be made to more accurately re ect what is truly reasonable and affordable. Costly so-called double dipping of bene ts by employees and board members who may have other additional coverage should be eliminated. Staff should be right-sized to better and more accurately re ect the real number of students and plans for projected student enrollment should be better formulated. As everyone recognizes, the rst step toward recovery from this devastating shortfall is to recognize and acknowledge the real problem. Then, we must all work together to nd a way to solve this emergency as well as always keeping the childrens needs rst in priority. The CCFC believes that a volunteer task force should be created quickly. It should include educators, school nance experts, knowledgeable area resources and others to help create realistic constructive nancial solutions for the long-term betterment and nancial health of our school district. We must be brutally honest to achieve better scal responsibility and a sound nancial future. Every taxpayer and resident of Franklin County has an important stake in this crisis. For some, the easy answer may seem to be Levy more taxes. We dont need another temporary bandage on our hemorrhaging nancial school wounds; it only delays the inevitable scal cliff and makes Franklin County a poor choice for business, personal and recreational investments and hastens the ight from our county. The problems and reasons behind declining enrollment, better use and management of an expensive and extensive physical plant, and educational achievement levels which have been rated substandard by state standards must all be addressed as part of this very real emergency. I encourage every citizen to visit the Department of Education website to see the facts for yourself. Go to the School Public Accountability Report for Franklin County Schools, which contains several types of data (indicators) designed to inform parents and the general public about the progress of Floridas public schools. We will also put a link to that website on the Concerned Citizens website, www. ABetterFranklin.com This immediate $750,000 crisis affects us all, whether you are a parent, have children in Franklin County schools or simply pay your taxes to fund the education of Franklin County students. The use and management of your tax monies have led us to this nancial emergency. It must be solved and corrected now. Concerned Citizens of Franklin County is willing and able to help. Allan J. Feifer is president of the Concerned Citizens of Franklin County, Inc. The car wash and the spaghetti dinner were well supported. Thank you all very much. The numbers of the Catholic Youth Organization were 20 cars/trucks. The hall was full after Mass for the covered dish dinner. Sundays spaghetti dinner was steady. The members of the Knights of Columbus did a great job and all had a good time visiting and enjoying the meal OK folks, get ready for a funlled February! Every Friday night will be hamburger night at Camp Gordon Johnston American Legion Post 82, 2316 Oak St., here in the Village, and pizza night is every Sunday, serving for both nights from 5-7 p.m. And, dont forget bingo every Wednesday at Chillas Hall. Doors open at 6 p.m., bingo at 6:30 p.m. Cookies, coffee and soft drinks will be available. The more who play, the more we can pay. Lets start with Saturday, Feb. 2. Members of the Lanark Village Golf Club will prepare the full breakfast at Chillas Hall from 8:30-11 a.m. Pancakes, French toast casserole, bacon, eggs coffee or tea still only $5. And Saturday evening, members of the Ladies Auxiliary will have a spaghetti dinner at the Legion. Serving is from 5-7 p.m. and your donation of $8 will ll your plate. Come and enjoy the evening with us. On Saturday, Feb 9, there will be a Valentines Dinner at American Legion Post 82 from 5-7 p.m. Lady members of the American Legion and the Ladies Auxiliary will be treated to the dinner. All men members of the Legion and Sons of Legionnaires and other guests will make a donation of $15. Call and reserve your place at 697-9998 any day after 4 p.m. Hope you will join us. Mass on Ash Wednesday, Feb. 13, will be at 9:30 a.m. at Sacred Heart of Jesus Church. Friday Masses during Lent will be at the church at 9:30 a.m. followed by Stations of the Cross. On Saturday, Feb. 16, its off to the Lanark Village Boat Club for our monthly sugar fest. Enjoy your full breakfast and the company from 9-11 a.m. Your donation of $5 will collected at the door. We will round out the month with our 20th annual Community Breakfast at Chillas Hall, from 8:3011 a.m. Come have breakfast with us! Great food, great service and great friends and neighbors. See you there! All of the above mentioned fundraisers are open to the public. Be kind to one another. Check in on the sick, housebound. Got Jesus? Until next time, God bless America, our troops, the poor, homeless and the hungry. LANARK NEWSJim WelshA funlled February awaits villagersPage 4District voters deserve cooperative governmentThursday, January 31, 2013 ALLAN FEIFERThe countys very own scal cliff

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LocalThe Times | A5Thursday, January 31, 2013 PUBLIC NOTICETHE FRANKLIN COUNTY ADVISORY BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT WILL HOLD A PUBLIC HEARING ON MONDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2013, AT 10:00 A.M., IN THE COUNTY COMMISSION MEETING ROOM OF THE FRANKLIN COUNTY COURTHOUSE ANNEX TO CONSIDER THE FOLLOWING VARIANCES, APPEALS AND SPECIAL EXCEPTIONS: RECONSIDERATION OF A REQUEST FOR A VARIANCE TO CON1. STRUCT A ROCK REVETMENT WITHIN THE CRITICAL HABITAT ZONE ON PROPERTY DESCRIBED AS LOT 6, SAVANNAH COVE, ST. GEORGE ISLAND, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. REQUEST SUBMITTED BY RICKY MOSELEY, AGENT FOR ROBERT AND JULIET BARBER, OWNERS. THE BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS ACTING AS THE BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT WILL ADDRESS THIS REQUEST AT THEIR REGULAR MEETING ON FEBRUARY 19, 2013, WHICH STARTS AT 9:00 A.M. IN THE COUNTY COMMISSION MEETING ROOM OF THE FRANKLIN COUNTY COURTHOUSE ANNEX. Persons wishing to comment may do so in person or in writing to the Frank lin County Planning & Zoning Department, 34 Forbes Street, Suite 1, Apalachicola, FL 32320. Transactions of this hearing will not be recorded, persons wishing to record the proceedings must make the necessary arrangements for recording. Needing Financial Assistance for Medical Care?Weems Memorial Hospitals Financial Assistance Counselor is state trained and certied to assist people of ALL ages obtain low or no cost healthcare. Weems Hospital in Apalachicola is a Florida ACCESS center and can assist those who may need help buying food or who may need emergency cash assistance. For those who do not qualify for state assistance, Weems also oers sliding fee prices at its hospital and both medical centers. Call 850-653-8853 ext. 115 Today to Schedule an Appointment. NO HIDDEN CHARGES: It is our policy that the patient and any other person responsible for payments has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed by payment or any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment. www.mulliseye.com"WE WELCOME NEW PATIENTS, CALLTODAY FOR YOUR PRIORITY APPOINTMENT" FOR NEW PATIENTS 59 AND OLDERThis certificate is good for a complete Medical Eye Exam withTodd Robinson, M.D.Board Certified Eye Physician and Surgeon.The exam includes a prescription for eye glasses and tests for Glaucoma, Cataracts and other eye diseases.FOR YOUR APPOINTMENT CALL: 850-763-6666 ELIGIBILITY: U.S. Citizens living in the Florida Panhandle, 59 years and older, not presently under our care. Coupon Expires: 1-31-13 FREEEYE EXAMCODE: AP00Darren Payne, M.D.Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract SurgeonIn Memory of Lee Mullis, M.D.Todd Robinson, M.D.Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon Smart LensesSM Carrabelle seniors host dance Saturday: A dance will be Saturday evening at the Carrabelle Senior Center, 201 NW Avenue F on the corner of 1st Street and NW Avenue. The dance starts at 7 p.m., and admission is free. Music will be provided by local disc jockey Ron Vice, serving up a lively mix of Big Band dance tunes and mellow pop hits. For more information on the dance and other activities at the Senior Center, visit www. CarrabelleSeniorCenter. com. Lane closures on Apalachicola Bay Bridge: Drivers traveling the U.S. 98 Apalachicola Bay Bridge between Eastpoint and Apalachicola will encounter lane closures Monday, Feb. 4, and Tuesday, Feb. 5, because of routine bridge maintenance work. Lane closures will remain in effect from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily. Motorists are reminded to use caution and obey traf c aggers. Maintenance activities are weather-dependent and may be delayed or rescheduled in the event of inclement weather. Drivers are reminded to pay attention to the speed limit when traveling through the work zone. For more Florida Department of Transportation District 3 information, follow us on twitter @MyFDOT_NWFL. Lose your keys on Sawyer Lane? A large set of keys was found Saturday on Sawyer Lane in Apalachicola while the Tamara Marsh family was riding their golf cart down the alley. If theyre yours, you can claim them at Coastal Foot & Ankle Clinic, 221 Avenue E, or call 653-3338. Tobacco ghters to meet Feb. 7: There will be a TobaccoFree Franklin Partnership Coalition Meeting on Feb. 7. The meeting will be held 5:30-6:30 p.m. at the Franklin County Health Department, 139 12th St., in the second oor conference room. Disadvantaged transportation board to meet Feb. 13: The Apalachee Regional Planning Council announces a public meeting to which all persons are invited. The Franklin County Transportation Disadvantaged Coordinating Board will meet at 10 a.m. on Feb. 13 at the Franklin County Courthouse Annex Courtroom, 33 Market St., Apalachicola. In addition to its regular business, the agenda will include approval of rates and grant applications. If any person decides to appeal any decision made by the board with respect to any matter considered at this meeting, he/she will need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceeding is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence from which the appeal is to be issued. For more information, a copy of the agenda or if you require special accommodations at the meeting because of a disability or physical impairment, contact Vanita Anderson at the Apalachee Regional Planning Council, 20776 Central Ave. East, Suite 1, Blountstown, FL 32424 at least ve working days prior to the meeting date. Island home tour returns Feb. 8-9: A second tour of St. George Island homes is planned for Feb. 9 and will feature eight beautiful island homes, along with the Lighthouse, Keepers House and Plantation Club House. Tour proceeds bene t the upkeep of the Lighthouse, Keepers House Museum and Lighthouse Park. The tour will showcase homes from beach to bay from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tickets will be available for $15 in advance at the Lighthouse Gift Shop and for $20 on tour day in Lighthouse Park or by phone with a credit card payment. There will be shuttle service to homes in the St. George Plantation. Tour weekend will kick off Friday evening, Feb. 8, with a free opening event from 6 to 8 p.m. at the Jay Abbott Firehouse, 324 East Pine Ave. Featured speaker will be Erik Lovestrand from the Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve, who will talk about the ecology of the Apalachicola River, Bay and Estuary and its impact on St. George Island. Refreshments will be served, and participants will be eligible for a number of festive door prizes. The following report is provided by the Franklin County Sheriffs Of ce. Arrests in this weeks report were made by of cers from the Franklin County Sheriffs Of ce (FCSO). All defendants are to be considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law.Jan. 22Lennon Raulerson, 26, Carrabelle, Escambia County warrant (FCSO) Savannah K. Shiver, 18, Apalachicola, battery by an inmate (FCSO) Lacey C. Maples, 21, Apalachicola, battery by an inmate (FCSO)Jan. 23Elton J. Garcia, 37, Winters, Texas, battery (FCSO) Donnie L. Wright, 40, Eastpoint, battery (FCSO) Floyd B. Parramore, 52, Eastpoint, disorderly intoxication and criminal mischief (FCSO)Jan. 24Dennis L. Beebe, 33, Carrabelle, disorderly intoxication (FCSO)Jan. 25Earl R. Hughes, 29, Apalachicola, violation of probation (FCSO) Christopher K. Bradham, 34, Tallahassee, grand theft and burglary of a structure (FCSO) Xavier D. Parks, 19, Quincy, burglary of a dwelling and grand retail theft (FCSO)Jan. 26Joseph C. Ward, 21, Apalachicola, violation of pre-trial release (FCSO) Darin W. Cruson II, 24, Carrabelle, attempted burglary of a dwelling (FCSO)Jan. 27Ronnie J. Strops, 43, Apalachicola, violation of probation (FCSO) Chasity R. Richards, 37, Apalachicola, violation of probation (FCSO) Carlos E. Russell, Jr., 40, Eastpoint, violation of probation (FCSO) James E. West, 51, Apalachicola, violation of probation (FCSO) Arrest REPORT News BRIEFS

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A6 | The Times Thursday, January 31, 2013Times Staff ReportDr. Frank D. May of Port St. Joe has a unique Valentines Day present for the needy of this area. May, who has provided free dental treatment for Valentines Day for the last 12 years, will provide this valuable service on Wednesday, Feb. 13. This year the office will schedule appointments with those in need of treatment. To schedule an appointment, send or bring by a letter to Mays office giving a brief description of your dental needs, and please describe your situation that makes you a good candidate for this benefit. Send the letter to Mays office at 319 Williams Ave. in Port St. Joe, FL 32456. Please, no telephone calls. Be sure to include your telephone number so you can be contacted to schedule an appointment. May will see 20 patients in need of dental treatment; hygienists Anealia Bush and Linda Wright will see eight to 10 patients each who wish to have their teeth cleaned. The office hopes to serve as many as 40 patients. Patients must be at least 12 years of age and accompanied by a parent or guardian if under age 18. Treatments provided will include cleaning, Xrays, fillings, extractions, diagnostics and pain control. May and his staff participate in Dentist With a Heart because they wish to impact people who otherwise could not afford to see a dentist, and help those people save their teeth, as well as relieve them of any discomfort they may be having. Our office cares about this community and would like to give those in need of our services, their smiles back! OFTHEWEEKPET Franklin County Humane SocietyPATCHES!Patches is a 4-5 year old Pekingese who was abused and suffered a back and jaw injury. She has recovered from her surgery and amazingly, remains gentle, social and trusting. She is a beautiful little girl and we want her to find a home where she will be loved and cared for without fear of further pain or injury. VOLUNTEERSARE DESPERATELY NEEDEDTOSOCIALIZE WITHALL OF OUR DOGSAND CATS.We are always looking for people willing to bring one of our animals into their home to be fostered for various needs. Anytime you can spare would be greatly appreciated. Call Karen at 670-8417 for more details or visit the Franklin County Humane Society at 244 State Road 65 in Eastpoint. You may logon to the website at www.forgottenpets.org to see more of our adoptable pets. 6012790 Tickets are $45 $50 Reserve tables are also available. Call the Apalachicola Bay Chamber at or email Happy 3rd Birthday, Brody Johnson!Brody Drake Johnson celebrated his 3rd birthday Friday, Jan. 25, with his family and friends. He is the son of Brock and Kim Johnson of Apalachicola. Maternal grandparents are Tom and Nedy Leavins of Delta, Colo. Paternal grandparents are Robbie and Marcia Johnson of Apalachicola. Maternal great-grandmother is Ada Leavins of Panama City. Paternal great-grandparents are Burnell and Bill Martina of Apalachicola and the late Paul and Inez Johnson.Kayden Drake turns 3Kayden Amari Drake celebrates his 3rd birthday today, Jan. 31. Kayden is the son of Jasmine Lewis of Apalachicola and Frederick Drake of Columbus, Ga. Maternal grandparents are Trina Ford of Apalachicola and Freddie Lewis of Port St. Joe. Maternal great-grandparents are Rose Tolliver and Marion Green, both of Apalachicola. Godparents are Barbara and Raymond Lockley of Apalachicola. A birthday party will be held at 4 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 2, at The Game Room.Layla Burke turns 4Layla Burke will celebrate her fourth birthday on Friday, Feb. 1. Burke, daughter of Jeremy Burke of Apalachicola and Tina Bellew of Thomasville, Ga., will join in the celebration with her older sister, Iolana. Maternal grandparents are John and Sonya Bellew of Apalachicola. Paternal grandparents are David and Beverly Burke of Apalachicola. Paternal great-grandparents are Belvin and Johnnie Bryant of Apalachicola.Congratulations to Jathan Martin, Sunshine State ScholarThe Sunshine State Scholar Program chooses Floridas top STEMS (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) students and introduces them to the vast postsecondary and career opportunities available in their home state. The Florida Education Foundation asks each of Floridas 67 school districts to identify its top 11th grade students in the STEM areas. One student with junior class status, with a minimum 3.9 grade point average or higher, is selected from each school district. Jathan Martin, a junior among the Franklin County High School Seahawks, was selected to represent the Franklin County School District at the 2013 Sunshine State Scholar Program, to be held in Orlando on Feb. 21-22. On Monday, Feb. 4, Jathan will celebrate his 16th birthday. Dentist with a Heart treatments to be Feb. 13 Academic HONORS Happy BIRTHDAY Society

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The Times | A7Thursday, January 31, 2013 Card of THANKS The United Methodist Churches of Franklin County Welcome You First United Methodist Church of ApalachicolaWorship Service 11:00 a.m. every Sunday Sunday School 10:00 a.m. 75 5th St. Apalachicola 653-9530 fumcapalach@gtcom.net Pastor: Rev. Themo PatriotisCarrabelle United Methodist ChurchWorship Services 10:45 a.m. Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Celebrate Recovery Mondays 7-9 p.m. 102 NE Ave. B Carrabelle 697-3672 Pastor: Julie StephensEastpoint United Methodist ChurchWorship Service 10:00 a.m. every Sunday Healing service every fourth Monday at 7:00 p.m. 317 Patton Dr. (corner of David St.) 670-8825 Pastor: Rev. Beth WhiteSt. George Island United Methodist Church9:00 a.m. Worship Service 10:00 a.m. Fellowship Hour 201 E. Gulf Beach Dr. 9274635 www.sgiumc.org Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis Nursery now provided for Sunday Church Service First Pentecostal Holiness Church379 Brownsville Road Apalachicola Were excited about what Gods doing!!!Sunday School 9:45 am Sunday Morning Worship 10:45 am Sunday Evening Service 6:00 pm Monday, Youth Group 6:30 pm Wednesday, Royal Rangers, G.A.P.7:00 pm Wednesday Worship & Word 7:30 pmNursery Provided during regular church services 7:00 7:00 First Baptist ChurchSt. George Island 501 E. Bayshore Drive 927-2257 R. Michael Waley, Pastor Join us as we praise and worship the living Christ. Great is the Lord and most worthy of praise. Psalm 145:3 Sunday Bible Study................................................10:00am Worship Praise........................................................11:00am Sunday Night............................................................7:00pm Wednesday Power Hour......................................7:00pm Wednesday Youth at S.P.L.A.S.H.......................7:00pm Walking in Christ R. Michael Whaley, Pastor WELCOMES YOUChurch of the Ascension101 NE First Street CarrabelleSUNDAY10:00 AM WELCOMES YOUChurch THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH (850) 274-4490 (850) 545-2578 WELCOMES YOU Trinity Trinity Episcopal Churchest. 1836Welcomes YouHwy. 98 & 6th St. Apalachicola 850-653-9550Sunday Worship Services 8 & 10:30 a.m. Wednesdays Healing Service 11 a.m. Centering Prayer 4 p.m. Sunday Worship Services 8 & 10:30 a.m. Wednesdays Healing Service 11 a.m. Centering Prayer 4 p.m. KKing HHoliday ObservanceWe have been involved in the background helping to organize the annual Dr. Martin Luther King Observance that has been held in Apalachicola for many years and have been both proud and appreciative of the growing involvement of many of our community members throughout Franklin County. To our Apalachicola Police Chief Bobby Varnes, who attends and allows his ofcers to be involved each year, Mayor Van Johnson, City Commissioners Brenda Ash and Frank Cook ... thank you. Franklin County School Superintendent Nina Marks, who has attended every year since being elected, School Board Member Teresa Ann Martin, City Administrator Betty Taylor-Webb, County Commissioner Noah Lockley, Jr., Franklin C ounty Sheriff Mike Mock for allowing Deputy (Investigator) Stella Sanders and Deputy James Pugh to represent his department, Gulf County Sheriff Department for allowing Sgt Williams to attend, Director of Franklin County Solid Waste Department and Animal Control Fonda Davis, Apalachicola Volunteer Fire Department, St. George Island Volunteer Fire Department, the clergy of the city, SWAT (Students Working Against Tobacco), Lt. Brown of the Florida Highway Patrol who allows his troopers to represent his squad each year, to each resident of Franklin County who attended ... Thank you. Those who attended from Valdosta, Ga., Tallahassee, Port St Joe, Wewahitchka, Panama City, Milton .. Thank you. Last but certainly not least, to the person who believed because Dr. King had struggled, was beaten, jailed, was an activist for poverty and the Vietnam War, received the Nobel Peace Prize and was ultimately killed because of his efforts to bring about change so that all men and women could be treated equally. She believed our Franklin County community should have the opportunity to come together collectively and celebrate as well as commemorate Dr. King and his accomplishments, along with millions of others throughout America on the Dr. Martin Luther King National Holiday, Dr./Apostle Shirley C. White ... Thank you. We look forward to next year,Dolores Hayward-Croom Robert L. DavisTo our heavenly angel, Eva Mae CoatneyJan. 31, 2013 We little knew that morning that God Was going to call your name. In life we loved you dearly, In death we do the same. I broke our hearts to lose you, You did not go alone; For part of us went with you, The day God called you home. You left us peaceful memories, Your love is still our guide; And though we cannot see you, You are always at our side. Our family chain is broken, And nothing seems the same; But as God calls us one by one, The chain will link again. Love and miss you,Ronnie, Cindy, Scott and Bailey BugBlanch Cameron benetA benet for Mrs. Blanch Cameron will be held Saturday, Feb. 2, at Riverfront Park in Apalachicola. Serving begins at 11 a.m. u ntil all gone. Grilled chicken or sh, baked beans, cole slaw, potato salad, dessert and drink for $8. Call 653-6955 with questions. Spread the word, and show some love for Mrs. Blanch.AAnn KKey fundraiserThere will be a fundraiser for Ann Key, the wife of Robert Key, this Saturday, Feb. 2, across from the AmeriGas ofce, 101 Ave. E, Apalachicola. Fish and chicken dinners will be available beginning at about 11:30 a.m. Donations will be accepted.Josh Phipps benetJosh Phipps, son of Rex and Sabrina Phipps, is a true son of the shing and oyster industry and is in need of a heart transplant. A benet of love and treasurer will be at 8 p.m. Feb. 8 at the Roseate Spoonbill Lounge on Water Street. Wear your white boots or bare feet or oxfords, but be there. All proceeds go to Josh. Come one, come all.Trinity hosts SShrove Tuesday pancake supperTrinity Episcopal Church will hold its annual Shrove Tuesday Pancake Supper from 5-7 p.m. Feb. 12. All tickets are $5 and can be purchased at the door or by calling the church ofce at 653-9550. Eat in or take out. Trinity Church is off U.S. 98 and Sixth Street, across from the Apalachicola Municipal Library.Millender family reunionThe Millender family reunion will be Feb. 16 at t he old Carrabelle School, 1001 Gray Ave. The Millender extended family includes Mock, McKnight, Walden and Barwick. Time is from 11 a.m. until. Please bring a covered dish or two.Eastpoint Baptist Church celebrates recoveryUnder the leadership of Ms. Rose Grifn, the First Baptist Church of Eastpoint has initiated a Celebrate Recovery program, designed to help those struggling with hurts, hang-ups and habits by showing them the loving power of Jesus Christ through the recovery process. All are invited to participate in this free program. Sessions start at 5 p.m. Saturdays at the church, 447 Ave. A in Eastpoint. Richard Red Franklin Murray was born May 30, 1936, and died Saturday, Jan. 26, 2013. Red was the son of Frank and Edna Murray. He was the loving husband of Nancy Akers Murray, and the father to four sons, Richard Ricky Murray, Franklin Gene Murray, Timothy Tim Murray, and George Tony Murray; and one daughter Susan Murray Barnes. He has 13 grandchildren, Monica, Celeste, Erica, Patrick, Christopher, Joshua, Timothy, Randall, Breanna, Michael, C.J., Brandon, and Nicholas. He also has seven greatgrandchildren, Dalton, Tiara, Alexis, Dakoda, Elijah, Caden, and Ayden. All are left to mourn his passing, and will forever miss him. Red worked as a Florida Highway Patrolman for 10 years; a reman at Olin Gunpowder plant; and then on to the oilelds in Mississippi and Louisiana. He loved the outdoors, and spent many years camping and hunting with his family in the Apalachicola National Forest. He loved this area so much, and the memories he held in his heart were forever attached to his campsite at Magnolia Landing, which is where his ashes will be scattered and joined with his son Ricky. We will have a memorial service for Red on Friday, Feb. 1 from 5 to 7 p.m. at the Carrabelle Christian Center in Carrabelle.Richard Red Murray RIcCHArRD MUrrRRAY Apalachicola resident William Bafn Dodd II, Bill, was born April 10, 1968. He died at age 44 on Sunday, Jan. 13, 2013. Bill left us to join his mother, Erma Jane McClain. He is survived by his son, William Destin Cole Dodd, of Eastpoint; his father, William Bafn Dodd and his wife Marylin Dodd, of Modesto, Calif.; a sister Kelly Thompson, of Knoxville, Tenn.; and longtime friend, and mother of William Destin, Belinda Kelliher, of Eastpoint. Bill was loved by his many family and friends. Funeral services were held Friday afternoon, Jan. 25, at First United Methodist Church in Apalachicola. Burial was in Magnolia Cemetery.William Bill DDodd IIIICelena E. Hevner, 66, of Panacea passed away unexpectedly on Saturday, Jan. 26, 2013, in Tallahassee. S he was born in Lexington, Ky., and loved working on arts and crafts. Memorial services were held Tuesday afternoon, Jan. 29 at the Panacea Full Gospel Church. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel, Crawfordville, is assisting the family with arrangements. She is survived by three sons, Lonnie Engle, Adam Hevner and Lee Hevner; three daughters: Helena Porter (Don), Sheri Lee Engle and Stacy Rush; three sisters: Sharron Taylor; Marcella Alday (Vance) and Melinda Kelly (Randy); and signicant other, Edward V. Hevner. S he had six grandchildren and 11 nieces and nephews who were her life; and her faithful companion, Wrigley, her dog of 12 years. S he is predeceased by her parents, Walter S. and Thelma M. Mulkey; and brother, David P. Mulkey.Celena E. HHevnerMemorial services for Helen Prophater, 89, were held Saturday morning, Jan. 26, 2013, at Saint Thomas Episcopal Church in Thomasville, Ga. The Rev. Judith Ann Jones-Keith ofciated. Interment was at the new Saint Thomas Memorial Gardens. M rs. Prophater passed away at The Suites of Woodleaf on Wednesday, Jan. 23, after a brief illness. She was born Nov. 9, 1923, in Philadelphia, Penn., t o the late Helen and George Fox. Her six siblings predeceased her. In 1956, she married Joseph Amisson, and they had two daughters, Rita Amisson and Helen Bunki Arline. The family moved to Thomasville in 1966, where Mr. Amisson died suddenly in 1972. She married Jack Prophater in 1974, and became a member of Saint Thomas. Mrs. Prophater was employed by Archbold Memorial Hospital as personnel director until her retirement in 1985. They then moved to Carrabelle, where Mr. Prophater started a charter shing service and became a realtor with Prudential Resort Realty on St. George Island. Mrs. Prophater was an a vid golfer, an accomplished bridge player and was a charter performer with the Panhandle Players in little theater. They returned to Thomasville, where Mr. Prophater preceded her in death in 2005. S urvivors include her daughters Rita Amisson and Bunki DeLoach Arline (Ron); stepdaughter Mary Amisson Kolaski (John); stepson Steve Prophater (Alice); sistersin-law Rita Fox, Sheila Cofn (Chip) and Martha Reneau (Charles); and grandchildren Joseph DeLoach, George Arline, John Kolaski, Robert Kolaski, and several great-grandchildren. I n lieu of owers, memorial donations may be made to St. Thomas Episcopal Church, P.O. Box 33, Thomasville, GA 31799 or the Archbold Foundation, 910 S. Broad St., Thomasville, GA 31792.HHelen Fox AAmisson ProphaterHollis J. Fleeman, age 83, of Clarksville, was born Sept. 12, 1929, and went home to be with the Lord Saturday, Jan. 26, 2013. Mr. Fleeman served in the United States Air Force from 1947 to 1965 and was of the Baptist faith. Preceding him in death were his parents, Hollis Benjamin and Pearly Mae (Marr) Fleeman; and a sister, Betty Matthews. Hollis was a loving husband and father. He leaves behind his wife of 65 years, Katherine Walters Fleeman; daughters, Patty Fleeman, Karen Bryant and her husband Belvin, and Becky Shuler, all of Clarksville, Donna Golden and her h usband Jerry, of Bremen, Ga.; nine grandchildren and 10 great-grandchildren; a brother, Randall Fleeman of Kennesaw, Ga.; and a sister, Doris Barrett of Acworth, Ga. Memorialization will be by cremation. Adams Funeral Home is in charge of the arrangements. Online condolences may be made at adamsfh.com.HHollis J. FleemanSharon Kahler Hawkins Mangham, of Apalachicola, died Tuesday, Dec. 25, 2012 at Bay Medical Center in Panama City. A service was held in Tifton, Ga., on Saturday afternoon, Jan. 19. Mrs. Mangham was born on Feb. 28, 1965 in Rome, New York, and was the daughter of Robert and Ann Kahler, of Port Charlotte. She was a 1983 graduate of Rome Free Academy. She served in United States Air Force from 1985 to 1991. In addition to her parents, Mrs. Mangham is survived by her husband, Pete of Florida; one son, Joseph (Ashley) Hawkins of Lenox, Ga.; three sisters, Heather Martin of Rome, N.Y., Tracy (Gil) Pearsol of Pittsburgh, Penn., Jody Kahler of Atlanta, Ga.; and two nieces, Haley and Krista Pearsol.SSharon Mangham Obituaries Faith Faith brBRIefEFS In MEMORY Y

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Email outdoors news to timesoutdoors @star .com OUTDOORSwww.apalachtimes.comSection Section A By STAN KIRKLANDFlorida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission Over the next several days, wildlife biologists will be busy with several large prescribed burns north of Apalachicola in the sawgrass marsh. Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission Wildlife Biologist Derek Fussell said the prescribed or controlled burns will be done in several phases on marshlands in the Apalachicola River Wildlife and Environmental Area. An estimated 10,000 acres will be burned in the next seven to 10 days. Our purpose in doing the burn is really twofold, Fussell said. Its about hazard reduction or removing as much combustible material as possible to prevent a more serious wild re. Additionally, burns like this help stop the encroachment of hardwoods into the marsh. Before settlement in Florida, Native Americans sometimes used wild re to burn signi cant areas of the state. They recognized that re not only kept forests and elds open, but was good for wildlife such as white-tailed deer. To burn as much as 10,000 acres quickly, Fussell said the FWC would be using a helicopter and aerial ignition system called Delayed Aerial Ignition Device. Pilots using the DAID system y along, dropping pingpong-like balls lled with a chemical mixture. When the balls hit the ground, they ignite. Under the old burning methods, biologists on the ground with re pots could burn and maintain control of a prescribed burn of usually not more than several hundred acres. Using a helicopter and a modern DAID system, they can safely burn thousands of acres in a day. Fussell said another important reason biologists and foresters like to burn in January and February is because of predictable weather. We have to keep the smoke away from people and highways, and this time of year fronts and wind direction are much more predictable, he said. Fussell said the FWC works closely with the Florida Forest Service and obtains a burn permit before beginning any prescribed burn. To keep it safe, the burn permit takes into account relevant burning conditions. NEW FISHING TACKLE ARRIVING DAILY!SHOPNEW ITEMS FROM PENN,SHIMANO, AND ABUGARCIA. Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL(next to Piggly Wiggly)www.BWOsh.comYour Hunting Headquarters FULL LINE OF THE NEW PENN SPINFISHER V REELSSTARTING AT Corner of Marina Drive, Corner of Marina Drive, (next to Piggly Wiggly) Corner of Marina Drive, (next to Piggly Wiggly) $139.99 WEEKLY ALMANAC APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE TIDE TABLES MONTHLY AVERAGESTo nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from these given for APALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW Cat Point Minus 0:40 Minus 1:17 East Pass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27 To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from those given for CARRABELLE: HIGH LOW Bald Point Minus 9:16 Minus 0:03 Sponsor the WEEKLY ALMANACCall Today!653-8868 Date HighLow% Precip Thu, Jan. 3162 41 0% Fri, Feb. 0165 43 0% Sat, Feb. 0264 46 0% Sun, Feb. 0366 48 0% Mon, Feb. 0465 49 0% Tues, Feb. 0568 5110% Wed, Feb. 0666 51 0% 30 We 344am 1.8 444pm 1.9 929am -0.2 1003pm 0.3 31 Th 440am 1.6 507pm 1.9 955am 0.2 1054pm 0.2 31 Th 440am 1.6 507pm 1.9 955am 0.2 1054pm 0.2 FreeTideTables.com For comparison only Times are local Tides in feet from MLLW Date Day High Tide High Tide Low Tide Low Tide Sunrise 1 Fr 546am 1.4 534pm 2.1 1023am 0.5 1158pm 0.0 2 Sa 710am 1.3 607pm 2.1 1051am 0.8 3 Su 907am 1.1 647pm 2.2 122am -0.2 1115am 1.0 4 Mo 738pm 2.2 256am -0.3 5 Tu 843pm 2.2 416am -0.6 6 We 213pm 1.6 959pm 2.2 521am -0.8 408pm 1.4 7 Th 233pm 1.8 1116pm 2.2 616am -1.0 528pm 1.4 8 Fr 256pm 1.8 703am -1.0 626pm 1.3 9 Sa 1225am 2.2 316pm 1.8 744am -0.8 715pm 1.0 10 Su 126am 2.2 333pm 1.8 820am -0.6 801pm 0.8 11 Mo 221am 2.1 349pm 1.8 850am -0.3 845pm 0.5 12 Tu 314am 2.1 405pm 1.8 916am 0.0 929pm 0.3 1 Fr 546am 1.4 534pm 2.1 1023am 0.5 1158pm 0.0 2 Sa 710am 1.3 607pm 2.1 1051am 0.8 3 Su 907am 1.1 647pm 2.2 122am -0.2 1115am 1.0 4 Mo 738pm 2.2 256am -0.3 5 Tu 843pm 2.2 416am -0.6 6 We 213pm 1.6 959pm 2.2 521am -0.8 408pm 1.4 7 Th 233pm 1.8 1116pm 2.2 616am -1.0 528pm 1.4 8 Fr 256pm 1.8 703am -1.0 626pm 1.3 9 Sa 1225am 2.2 316pm 1.8 744am -0.8 715pm 1.0 10 Su 126am 2.2 333pm 1.8 820am -0.6 801pm 0.8 11 Mo 221am 2.1 349pm 1.8 850am -0.3 845pm 0.5 12 Tu 314am 2.1 405pm 1.8 916am 0.0 929pm 0.3 Controlled res planned for area sawgrass marsh COURTESY OF FWCPage 8 Thursday, January 31, 2013By TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com Justin Riney was searching for a unique way to raise awareness of the natural beauty found in Floridas waterways. He found it in a man who ventured to Florida some 500 years ago. Riney paid visits to Apalachicola and Carrabelle over the past week and was in Port St. Joe before that as part of his yearlong quest to paddleboard the states waters, spending the rst six months navigating the entire perimeter of the states coastline before embarking on six months of exploration of the states major interior waterways. Rineys travels, called Expedition Florida 500, coincide with the 500th anniversary of Ponce de Leons arrival somewhere on Floridas beaches. We are focused on the conservation aspect and anything we can do to raise that pro le, Riney said. The whole goal of the project is conservation based. We want to drive home the point how beautiful we have it in Florida and how precious the natural environment in Florida is. Riney embarked on his journey from Pensacola on New Years Day. His visits, at Ten-Foot-Hole Jan. 26 and at the Carrabelle Public Beach Wednesday, were among the opening days of a journey he expects to span 365 days. He also visited 2Als at The Beach Caf, Up The Creek Raw Bar and the Apalachicola Maritime Museum during his visit here. I should be nished with the coastline and be in Jacksonville on July 4, and then I will move inland, he said. Along the way, Riney and fellow paddlers put on events, particularly at schools, trying to plant the seeds as early as we can. There are cleanups, such as the ones during both visits here in the county. The goal: Engage the public along the way, and create in them the passion Riney feels about his native state and its waters. Literally, hundreds of people have joined me along the way, he said. Weve had a lot of events, a lot of interaction along the way. Everywhere we go we do cleanups. One of the unique aspects is we do engage the community to come out. A native of Vero Beach, Riney said he grew up an outdoorsman, loving time on the water and in nature. He was also raised by entrepreneurial parents and that diverse background helped create his own nonpro t as well as Expedition Florida 500. His passion for the water fed his scienti c search and after studying business at the University of Florida he cut his teeth in business before returning to his passion for the water. Riney said he was in a unique situation scientists have dif culty with the business end of marine life; those on the business end, creating products from the marine world for example, could not speak expertly to the science. Im wearing both hats, he said. I know the science side and I know the business side. I was something of an intermediary. After spending some time in the Bahamas, his love of the water once again became his mistress. He moved back to Vero Beach, sold his belongings and, as he put it, jumped off the cliff and established his nonprofit Mother Ocean. The mission of the non-pro t is to create, inspire and empower ocean advocates worldwide, Riney said. I hope, with the years worth of paddling, we can raise a mass amount of awareness so people can learn to respect and appreciate these waterways. We want to make sure these waterways are here 500 years from now. Riney, though, notes he is one among many. A greater goal is to use the latest technology and social media to create a network of ocean advocates around the globe, both engaging a younger generation and broadening awareness. The two unique elements of the project are one this is happening in real time, Riney said. It is tangible, people can connect to it. The second, we really want people to come out and paddle with us. We welcome paddlers of all shapes and sizes. They can see our passion, feel the passion and take that passion home with them. My goal is to engage as many people as possible. Franklin County Schools students last week planted 500 bald cypress seedlings around the retention ponds on school grounds to celebrate this year Arbor Day celebration. They were assisted by the Florida Forest Services Wakulla/Franklin County Forester Daniel Stevens and Tates Hell State Forests Foresters Kimberly Linette, David Findley and Brian Williams. On April 10, 1872, the rst Arbor Day was held in Nebraska City, Neb., through the efforts of J. Sterling Morton. More than 1 million trees were planted in Nebraska during that Arbor Day. Each states Arbor Day celebration date differs and was established depending on climate and suitable planting times. In Florida Arbor Day is celebrated on the third Friday in January each year. For more information call the Wakulla/ Franklin County Forester at 421-3101 or to nd more information on Arbor Day you can visit www.arborday.org.Paddleboarder travels state waterways SPONSORED BY Freshwater InshoreMost action around town is still in the I.C.W. canal in St. Joe. Try starting out under the power lines and moving your way up toward the t. Live shrimp has been the bait of choice, but Gulp shrimp and D.O.A. are good alternatives this week. Unusually warm weather has the fish confused again in our area this week. With a cold front predicted to be moving our way, now is the time to be out on the water. Lake Wimico and parts of the Apalachicola River are seeing good sheepshead and a few striped bass still this week. JUSTIN RINEY | Special to the TimesAbove, Justin Riney paddleboards through Bay County. While in Port St. Joe, Justin Riney, some Boy Scouts and local residents helped clean the beaches at Frank Pate Park.TIM CROFT | The Star Franklin students celebrate Arbor DayDANIEL STEVENS | Special to the Times

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CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA SPORTS www.apalachtimes.com ASection BAY DAY FESTIVAL F EST SAT. FEBRUARY 2nd 11:00 TO 2:00 EST*St. Joseph Bay Preserves Center 3915 HWY 30-A, Port St. Joe $10DONATION PER MEAL DON ATI ON 3915 HWY 30-A, Port St. Joe ATI ATI ON ON All proceeds benet The Friends of St. Joseph Bay PreservesSausage Beverages Sausage Sausage MENU MUSIC EXHIBITS RAFFLE ITEMS VISIT stjosephbaypreserves.org FOR DETAILS CALL 8502291787 FORMORE INFO Gulfside IGA PLAYER OF THE WEEK SPONSORSeahawk senior Julio Ramirez continued to perform well on defense, as Franklin County defeated Rocky Bayou in the district opener before nishing as district runner-up. Julio has been the wall, which is how everybody on our team calls him., said Coach Ramon Valenzuela. I am glad that I had the opportunity of having him for his last year at the high school. Hes a great student and a great personality. We will miss you, Julio, the wall.Congratulations, Julio! Hometown Proud (850)653-9695 Special to the TimesThe Franklin County Lady Seahawks faced John Paul II in a regional quarter nal game at home Jan. 23. Franklin County tried to move on without sophomore Katie Seger, injured in the district nals. Early in last weeks regional opener, junior Gracyn Kirvin sprained her ankle on a breakaway which was certain to be a goal. Nonetheless Franklin County was down 0-1 on a direct kick rocket shot from John Pauls leading scorer. Sophomore goalkeeper Macy Hunt got both hands on the ball but the velocity and spin on it carried it into the net. Midway through the rst half, junior Adriana Reeder served up a pass to eighth grader Allie Kirvin, which she put in the net to tie the match at 1-1. The score remained unchanged into the second half, but the team suffered another setback when sixth grader Sophie Kirvin was injured when she took a shot to the face. John Paul scored its second goal of the match off a corner kick to take a 2-1 lead. John Pauls leading scorer scored two more goals in the match to give John Paul a 4-1 lead. Late in the match the Lady Seahawks kept ghting. With three minutes left in the game junior Jessica Shields crossed the ball and Allie Kirvin was able to convert it into her second goal of the match. She nished with a total of 14 goals for the season; Shields nished the season with nine goals and 16 assists. Gracyn Kirvin nished the season with 20 goals and eight assists. Hunt nished with 144 saves and seven shutouts. She only allowed 17 goals throughout the season. Our defense played a big part of keeping the ball away from Macy Hunt, said Coach Kelli Wright, whose Lady Seahawks nished the season with a record of 12-32. With three impact players on the bench, it would have been a daunting task to go face Maclay. We feel we took our season as far as we could take it. It was lled with a great set of positives. I think our team and coaches did a wonderful job representing the community, she said. Next season we will return seven seniors and all the young players that made an impact this season.Lady Seahawks fall in regional openerPage 9 Special to The TimesRegistration for Apalachicola Dixie Youth baseball and softball continues this weekend. Sign up at the D.W. Wilson Sports Complex from 10 a.m. to noon on Saturday. Sign-up will also be available from 5:30-7 p.m. on Tuesday and Thursday, Feb. 7, at the complex. There will be a coaches meeting on Tuesday, Feb. 12, at 6 p.m. at the Fort Coombs Armory. Anyone interested in volunteering is asked to attend.Dixie Youth registration continuesBy DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes -Dadlerstein@star .com The Seahawks boys soccer team was set to take on Lafayette Mayo at 7 p.m. Wednesday night in the regional opener, after Franklin County proved itself district runner-up. Franklin County advanced to the district nals after earning its way into the championship game by defeating second-seeded Rocky Bayou, and then nishing second to Port St. Joe, which won its secondstraight District 1-1A soccer title, the third in four years, on Friday night in Freeport. The Seahawks, which posted an 8-5-1 overall record, shocked the secondseeded Rocky Bayou 2-1 Jan. 22 at Freeport in the district opener. It was a great victory for us, coach Ramon Valenzuela said. We de nitely upset them with this win. Both teams played well on that night, but unfortunately only one is the winner. We were excited on going back to face Port St. Joe for the district nal. Goals were scored by Alex Causey and Casey Sapp, with goalkeeper Billy Harris recording 11 saves. On Friday at Port St. Joe, the Seahawks lost 4-2 to a determined Tiger Shark defense. The game was pretty much equal except that we lowered our guard and let them pass through our great wall, Julio Ramirez, said Valenzuela. It was what we expected and obviously we went to Freeport to win. I cannot be more happy how the boys nished the game. If I can call it a great loss, I would, because they left their hearts on the eld, non-stop trying to score, but their defense was strong too and it was obvious that they dominated on the eld. Lets be realistic, Port St. Joe has more years with their soccer program, and we are still young, but we competed against them and we will continue to do so in the future, said the coach. Our boys showed their style and improvement, and I know they are much better now than they were before. Graham Kirvin and Casey Sapp each scored goals, while Harris had 13 saves behind the net. Wednesday nights game pit the Seahawks against District 2-1A champion Lafayette Mayo, which defeated Maclay 5-2 to advance.Seahawks advance in post-season play CASEY SAPP GRAHAM KIRVIN ALEX CAUSEYBy BRAD MILNER747-5065 | @PCNHBradMilner bmilner@pcnh.com Josh Wright stood at a podium inside Arnold High Schools media center and spoke passionately about what it would take to create the Blue Army. He equated building a football program with that of creating an army, one that can be formidable while also churning out respectable young men. Some of those building blocks in the mission include more focus on academics and behavior on and off the football eld, community service and work ethic. Arnold Principal Keith Bland believes all of those traits and more can be instilled by Wright, who was introduced as Arnolds new football coach on Tuesday. Wright was the choice out of more than 70 applicants for the position, which came open when James Hale resigned after 13 seasons. Wright spent the past four seasons as head coach at Franklin County, where he tried to change a culture of losing and inferiority in the region at the Eastpoint school, a consolidated campus of Carrabelle and Apalachicola. Wright made strides with 13 victories, which may not seem like much to an outsider, but was a good indicator of growth given how the program was winless for two seasons before he took over. Carrabelle and Apalachicola also had a history of prolonged losing where 13 wins over four seasons would have been considered a breakthrough. Im thrilled and excited, this is a career opportunity, Wright said. I thank the interview committee for their endorsement and they will not be disappointed as to how we go about the business of building a rst-class program here. Wright, 44, also spent 10 years as an assistant coach at Mosley from 1999-2009 and made frequent trips to the area while at Franklin County. His knowledge and ties with Bay County were only two reasons why he was chosen among three nalists. The other two in the running were former Pearl River Community College coach Tim Hatton and Bratt Northview offensive coordinator Ty Wise. Bland, a former Apalachicola High School football coach, and Wright became friends while Bland was employed at Mosley. Wrights name immediately surfaced after Hales resignation and the murmurs grew louder that he was the favorite for the position. Bland insisted the search was fair and said his friendship with the coach had little to do with the nal decision. I have a lot of friends in coaching, but if they werent quali ed for the job I wouldnt hire them, Bland said. We wanted to take this program in a different direction. Its whats best for the kids regardless of friendship. Bland said he was not involved in ranking the nalists. The remaining ve members of a six-person committee provided the nal list and Bland made his choice based on what he was looking for in a new coach. Wright spent a few moments of his press conference meeting his new team. The only contact currently was a few handshakes, but Wright said he was anxious to get to work on forming a coaching staff. He is still under contract with Franklin County, but he said he should be released from it soon and hopes to be fully on board at Arnold by March 1. Wright was hired to an administrative position at Arnold. His salary will be between $58,565-58,622 based on his previous headcoaching experience. In a brief telephone interview Tuesday, Wright said the move west is a bittersweet situation. Its a career move for me. Its better for me but it takes me away from the Seahawk family. Its been a tremendous experience in Franklin County. Wright and his new wife, FCHS physical education teacher Kelli Maggio Wright, continue to own a house in Eastpoint. Kelli Wright, who has coached the girls soccer team to back-to-back district titles, said she plans to look for a position in Bay County, but has not ruled out returning to FCHS next year.Wright to head west to coach Arnold ANDREW WARDLOW | Halifax Media GroupJosh Wright addresses Arnold students after being named their new head football coach.DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The TimesJunior Adriana Reeder, left, advances on a John Paul defender. Thursday, January 31, 2013

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LocalA10 | The Times Thursday, January 31, 2013 CALL TODAY!653-8868 GET YOUR AD IN Trades & Services Laban Bontrager, DMD Monica Bontrager, DMD 12761 Pea Ridge Road Bristol, Florida 32321TELEPHONE (850) 643-5417 Bristol Dental ClinicDENTURE LAB ON PREMISESSame Day Service on Repairs and Relines Don Lively General Contractors LICENSED ANDINSURED 20 YEARSEXPERIENCE P.O. Box 439 Carrabelle, FL 32322 697-2783 or Mobile 566-2603RC0066499RG0065255 Carrabelle Visa, Discover, and American Express Honored at Participating Ace Stores JACKSONSBuilding Supplies Building Supplies & Auto Repair Carrabelle 697-3333 We Deliver AnywhereHardware and Paint Center GET YOUR AD IN Trades & ServicesCALL TODAY!653-8868 J.J.s Tree Service, LLC Stump Grinder Licensed & Insured Call John : (850) 899-8432 ROBERTS APPLIANCE REPAIR ALL MAJOR BRANDS 18 Shadow Lane Apalachicola, FL 32320 Phone: (850) 653-8122 Cell: (850) 653-7654 February 5TH, 2013Register at any St. George Island vacation rental company. For more information, contact Sometimes its Hotter at (850)927-5039 or visit www.sgisnowbirds.com Rafe Run Education Center State Park Nature Walk Lighthouse Climb Lighthouse Museum Info Sessions Happy Hour & Dinner Bingo Special to The TimesSet on a shing pier on a lake somewhere in LA (lower Alabama), the old shing pier on the end of Cypress Lake, favorite hangout for three best friends when they were kids, has fallen under the glow of another Cat sh Moon. Three best friends: Curley (Gary Niblack), Gordon (Vince Bishop) and Frog (Fredrick Kahler), and Curleys younger sister Betty (Donna MCoy), who Gordon is dating now after she was married and divorced from Frog. Four people who have known each other all their lives come to grips with knowing each other all their lives. An overnight shing trip brings back a painful reality, but the biggest sh of all, time, does not get away. Midlife pressures and the weight of adulthood are lifted by what matters most. The Panhandle Players present Cat sh Moon, a Southern Comedy, by Laddy Sartin and directed by Dan Wheeler this Friday and Saturday evenings, Feb. 1 and 2, and Sunday afternoon, Feb. 3. Shows at the Eastpoint Firehouse are 7:30 p.m. Friday-Saturday and 3 p.m. Sunday. Tickets $15. Show also runs Friday and Saturday, Feb. 8-9 at 7:30 p.m. at Benedict Hall at Trinity Church. Tickets, including dessert, $20 by reservations only. Contact John Inzetta at (850) 734-0260 or (404) 326-7791.Special to The TimesThe Historic Apalachicola Foundations Apalachicola Museum of Art is pleased to invite the public to an opening of an exhibit of the latest work of local artist Beth Appleton, on Friday, Feb. 8 at the Museum, 96 Fifth Street in Apalachicola. The opening will also feature vocal music by Velma Frye, a friend of the artist. Following the opening, the museum will be open Wednesday through Sunday from 1 to 4 p.m. The exhibit runs through March 15. Appletons work is composed of watercolor and cut paper assemblages, in which she uses thousands of small pieces of handpainted and hand-cut paper to create her designs. A viewer at one of her recent exhibits is quoted as saying that upon viewing her work, I felt my shoes glued to the oor. Inspiration for Appletons newest work followed the 2010 oil spill which threatened Floridas Gulf Coast and the waters of the Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve. In the days following the spill, skimming the waters of Apalachicolas estuary with her husband, charter boat captain and eco-tour guide David Harbaugh, Appleton took photos and collected water samples. She then used her digital microscope to look at the water samples and was inspired to create her latest artwork which has a strong environmental focus. Inspired by that experience, Appleton has also created a video and a childrens book, Gently Down the Stream, with the books rst publication a result of the generosity of David and Michaelin Watts for the young children of Franklin County Schools. Mrs. Watts is also a board member of the Early Learning Coalition of Northwest Florida, headquartered in Panama City. Assisted by friends in the local environmental community, Appleton will share this aspect of her work in a Gallery Talk at the museum Saturday, Feb. 23 from 6-8 p.m. During the week of Feb. 12, Marie Marshall, president of the foundation, will again welcome the pre-K and Kindergarten children to the museum for a visit with the artist and a viewing of her work. Since the museum considers itself a Museum Without Walls, during the week of Feb. 19 a collaboration with Appleton and Bring Me A Book Franklin, under the leadership of the Watts, will bring exhibit-related art and music programs to 300 pre-K and kindergarten students in 12 classrooms of the Franklin County School and the Apalachicola Bay Charter School. Parent programs at each site will again be part of the Bring Me a Book activity, and each child will receive a copy of the new book, thanks to the Watts generosity. Using her skills as a former art teacher, Appleton will collaborate on an art experience for the children with teachers at each of the three sites, and retired music teacher Pat Harrington will teach them music related to the theme. Bring Me A Book Franklin volunteers will also be in classrooms reading to the children. All pre-K and Kindergarten school activities, organized and funded by Bring Me a Book Franklin, will culminate in a program shared with parents.SPECIAL TO THE TIMESAn underwater scene by Beth AppletonAppleton exhibit to open at art museum VOLUNTEER READERS NEEDEDBring Me a Book Franklin needs volunteers to read to the children and give out copies of Appletons new childrens book Gently Down the Stream during a series of programs throughout the countys schools next month. All the programs will be in the morning, and would be nished by 11:30 a.m. Programs will take place on Tuesday, Feb. 19 at the Franklin County School in Eastpoint; Wednesday, Feb. 20 at the ABC School in Apalachicola; and Thursday, Feb. 21 at The Learning Center in Eastpoint. If you can help, call Michaelin Watts at (650) 464-7833.Cat sh Moon opens Friday MARGEY OEHLERT | Special to the TimesGordon (Vince Bishop), left, Frog (Fredrick Kahler), center, and Curley (Gary Niblack) star in Cat sh Moon.FREDERICK KAHLER | Special to The TimesGordon (Vince Bishop), left, and Betty (Donna McCoy) in Cat sh Moon.