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The Apalachicola times
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100380/00200
 Material Information
Title: The Apalachicola times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: H.W. Johnston
Place of Publication: Apalachicola Fla
Apalachicola Fla
Publication Date: 01-24-2013
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1885.
General Note: Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 32911693
lccn - sn 95026907
System ID: UF00100380:00206
 Related Items
Preceded by: Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by: Apalachicola herald

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xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx 50 WWW.APALACHTIMES.COM Phone: 850-653-8868 Web: apalachtimes.com E-mail: dadlerstein@star .com Fax: 850-653-8036 Circulation: 800-345-8688 DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK: School News & Society: 11 a.m. Friday Real Estate Ads: 11 a.m. Thursday Legal Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Display Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Line Ads: 5 p.m. Monday xxxxx Contact Us xxxxx Out to see Index By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com Organizers of the third annual Oyster Cook-off said they are delighted at how well Saturdays event went and with the large amount of funds raised for the Apalachicola Volunteer Fire Department. Marisa Getter, who helped coordinate the event, said the affair, held under sunny skies and drawing a surprisingly robust number of visitors, deposited more than $25,000 in the day of the event and drew more than $7,000 in sponsors. In addition, credit card charges for the silent auction and additional sponsors still are coming in. I can safely say we drew over $33,000 for the gross, Getter said. Happiest of all the attendees at Saturdays cook-off had to be members of the Eastpoint Volunteer Fire Department, who walked away with top honors for their Lazy Lester, a deep dish oysters Rockefeller, garnished with romaine lettuce and lemon wedges. The team, overseen by Capt Jim Joyner, took pains to improve on their presentation this year, serving up their culinary delight on an antique sea motif platter. Dr. King legacy celebrated in song, speech By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com The meaning of the annual Dr. Martin Luther King federal holiday was not ignored in Apalachicola on Monday. It was brought home at the Armory in the speaking of words and in the laying on of hands, the dramatic retelling of a story about freedom given birth, through religious oratory, political persuasion and other nonviolent means. The legal and social aspects of these pages in the nations history, particularly in the southern states within that nation, were brought forth in a historical overview delivered in the keynote speech by Dr. Isaac Neal of Columbus, Ga., a former Franklin County School principal in the early days of the countys consolidation effort. Its good to be home. This is home for me, Neal said after he and his wife were introduced by Rosa Tolliver. Hospital seeks Miniats of ces By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com After almost 24 years practicing medicine in Franklin County, Apalachicola family practitioner Dr. Miniat appears to have closed up shop. Franklin County commissioners learned Jan. 15 that Miniat is past due on his rent of a county-owned building and had a notice on his of ce door that he had relocated his practice to Blountstown. If Dr. Miniat is not going to see patients in the countyowned building, then Weems Hospital would like to right to inspect the property and make a proposal to the county to relocate its new Weems West Clinic into the building, Alan Pierce, the countys director of administrative services, told county commissioners. Currently the Weems West Clinic is housed in the hospital, and there are not enough exam rooms to serve the patient load. Beginning Jan. 29, 2001, Miniat began seeing patients at the former county health department building, at 137 12th St. He did this under the terms of a rental agreement that called for him to pay $1,200 per By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com Individual re districts within the county now may set their own Municipal Service Bene t Units (MSBU) for re prevention and mitigation. On Jan. 15, the county commission held a public hearing to discuss setting MSBU rates for the seven re districts. Currently, all property owners within the county must pay a fee beginning at $10 for undeveloped land and increasing according to use. Single-family residences pay $50 annually. Jay Abbott, president of the countywide reghters association, requested commissioners pass an ordinance creating seven independent re districts with the same boundaries as existing re service districts, and stipulating that each could request changes in MSBU based on need. According to County Attorney Michael Shuler, the existing districts are Apalachicola with borders de ned by the Apalachicola River and the western county line; Eastpoint from the eastern bank of the Apalachicola River to Yents Bayou; St. George Island; Carrabelle with boundaries at Yents Bayou and Lake Morality Road; Lanark Village/St. James with boundaries at Lake Morality Road and State Route 319; and Alligator Point/St. Teresa from State Road 319 to the eastern county line. Abbott told commissioners the re ghters association discussed the ordinance at both their August and September meetings and twice voted unanimously to request independent status for the MSBU districts. Abbott, chief of the St. George Island re department, told commissioners St. George Island needs an increase because they must have two re stations to cover the district because of requirements set by the International Organization for Standardization, the worlds largest developer of voluntary international standards for such things as re protection. Alligator Point has the same thing, he said. St. Teresa and Alligator Point both need re stations. Our current MSBU does not cover our budget. We have to rely on donations and charitable events. We feel the MSBU should cover our budget. JAY ABBOTT STEPHEN MINIAT County re districts to govern own MSBU rates Fire ghters win oyster cook-off PHOTOS BY DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times Capt, Jim Joyner, who led the Eastpoint re ghters to victory, center, is anked by runner-up Rusty Hamlin, left, and third place Kevin Maxwell. MARTIN LUTHER KING JR. DAY A movement for citizenship Dr. King was out front. He forced America to confront herself. Isaac Neal former Franklin County School principal A movement for citizenship PHOTOS BY DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times Pastor David Walker, left, leads the prayer in the blessing of Apalachicola Mayor Van Johnson during a celebration of Martin Luther King Jr. Day. Below Isaac Neal delivers the keynote speech See KING A7 See OFFICES A5 See MSBU A3 See OYSTER A5 Thursday, January 24, 2013 VOL. 127 ISSUE 39 Opinion . . . . . . A4 Society . . . . . . A8 Faith . . . . . . . A9 Outdoors . . . . . A10 Tide Chart . . . . A10 Sports . . . . . . A11 Classi eds . . . . A15 District champs! A11 Elvis does the Dixie this weekend Tribute artist Todd Alan Herendeen & his Follow That Dream Band have become one of the Dixie Theatres most popular shows, performing hits from Johnny Cash, Roy Orbison and join Elvis, among others. They will perform at 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday, Jan. 25-26 at the Dixie. Tickets are $25. For more info, call 653-3200. Prof to speak on military religious life The subject of Religious Life Above and Below Decks During World War II will be the topic of a lecture at 7 p.m. Saturday at the Apalachicola Maritime Museum. Dr. Kurt Piehler directs the Institute on World War II and the Human Experience at Florida State University. He will discuss the topic of his forthcoming book, which examines religious life aboard Navy ships during World War II. $5 includes low-country boil reception. For more info call 653-2500. FSU professor to perform Sunday Retired Florida State University music professor Thomas Tommie Wright, who wrote the FSU Fight Song, will provide at 4 p.m. Sunday at Trinity Episcopal Church. This concert is one of the programs of the 25th season of the Ilse Newell Fund for the Performing Arts, under the auspices of the Apalachicola Area Historical Society. General admission is a $5 donation, with students admitted free. Mardi Gras going to the dogs The Mystic Krewe of Salty Barkers, a parade unit of dogs and their people, invites you to join in the Apalachicola Mardi Gras parade Feb. 1. You may walk, ride in golf carts, pull wagons, push strollers or come up with any other unique form of transportation. The parade, sponsored by Franklin County Habitat for Humanity, begins at 5 p.m. at the Bowery and continues to Riverfront Park, where the party will continue with live music, dancing, Cajun food and other festivities for the whole family. For information or to preregister, call 670-5064 or 653-2025. Laissez les BONE temps roulez!

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Local A2 | The Times Thursday, January 24, 2013 By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com Three years after the debate started over the existence of large black cats in and around Tates Hell, an island woman says she has spotted one in residential Eastpoint. Mary Lou Short was returning to her St. George Island home after a church meeting at 7:45 p.m. Jan. 16 when she encountered something totally unexpected. The night was overcast and South Bayshore was very dark, but Short said she noticed movement on the north side of the road and stopped by the entrance of the Las Brisas development to avoid hitting what she thought was a bear. Short said it was a very large, very black cat. She said the cat came out of Las Brisas headed toward the bay and disappeared between two houses while she watched. Its snout was not as pointed as a dogs, but not as short as a domestic cat, she said. It was far enough away from my lights that I got to see the whole body. I saw it snout to tail. I am absolutely positive I saw what I saw. I was so in awe I was not afraid. Ive never seen an animal like this. This was absolutely not a bear. No housecat that I know is as large as this animal, but it moved like a cat. Short said the animal did not appear panicked as it loped across the road with a very smooth gait and she did not believe it was pursuing prey. It showed no fear or interest in her car and didnt speed up when it entered the light. She described the cat as larger than a German shepherd and very glossy with short fur. Short said the animal was not a coyote. There is a black coyote on the island, Short said. I have seen that black coyote. This was larger than any coyote. This animal was certainly heavier than most large dogs Ive seen. Cryptobiologist and author Scott Marlowe, who has visited the area on more than one occasion searching for evidence of big cats, said Short might have overestimated the size. Its the shock factor, he said. When you see something so unexpected, it tends to impress you as bigger than it really is. Short said the body of the cat was about as long as her car was wide and the tail was about threequarters of the length of the body and held out straight. After viewing pictures of differing cats online, Short said, What I saw had the characteristics of puma, panther or jaguar. She emphasized the head was large and boxy, the ears roundish but tipped with a point and the body heavy and muscular. Carrabelles Cal Allen has theorized that Central American jaguarondis, also known as otter cats, might be the mystery cats living in Tates Hell. Short said the cat she saw was much larger than an otter cat, which tops the scales at 20 pounds. She also said the cat did not have a jaguarondis rounded ears. The original debate over big cats in the swamp was sparked by two videos posted in March 2010 on YouTube by Larry Miller of Carrabelle. After viewing the videos, Short said the animal depicted was not the animal she saw cross in front of her car, which she said was much larger and heavier. Elaine Kozlowsky, who lives less than a quarter mile from Las Brisas, said she sighted a tawny-colored panther about six months ago. I often get up in the middle of the night, Kozlowsky said. I looked out the back window toward the bay. Our yard is lighted and I caught sight of a huge tawny cat coming down out of one of the trees. I saw the rear of it. It had a long tail that was quivering like in a movie. It came out of the tree and went straight down the bank so I only got a glimpse. It was enormous. Wildlife biologist Adam Warwick who works for the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission has stated he believes there are Florida panther in Tates Hell but biologists say the native pumas are always tawny and never black. When wet, a tawny panther can appear much darker than when dry. Short said the cats coat was very shiny and it could have been wet. The jaguar is the only big black cat known to inhabit North America, the only member of the panther family found in the New World and the third largest cat after lions and tigers. Jaguars are normally spotted but there is a rare black form that is an expansion of the dark spots so they cover the whole pelt. In the 1880s, a few jaguar still remained in south Louisiana but they have not inhabited Florida for thousands of years. Currently the nearest suspected breeding population is in Arizona. Marlowe said he believes the animal spotted by Short is a black Florida panther. Just because the biologists have not caught one and put it in a cage doesnt mean it doesnt exist, he said. They are out there. I have seen one. TOBACCO C ESSA T ION C LASS S CHEDULE LOCATION: George E. Weems Memorial Hospital A ll classes begin at 5:30 P.M. Free nicotine patches and gum will be provided to participants who complete each class Each class is a 2 hour (one time) session. Please visit the following websites to view a current schedule of tobacco cessation classes that are being held in Franklin County at www.bigbendahec.org/quit-now and www.ahectobacco.com For additional information, please contact Big Bend A HE C at 850-224-1177. THERE IS NO COS T T O A TT END! Needing Financial Assistance for Medical Care? Weems Memorial Hospitals Financial Assistance Counselor is state trained and certied to assist people of ALL ages obtain low or no cost healthcare. Weems Hospital in Apalachicola is a Florida ACCESS center and can assist those who may need help buying food or who may need emergency cash assistance. For those who do not qualify for state assistance, Weems also oers sliding fee prices at its hospital and both medical centers. Call 850-653-8853 ext. 115 Today to Schedule an Appointment. HOW TO HANDLE A PANTHER A Florida panther is a subspecies of mountain lion or puma. During the 1880s, a $5 bounty on the panthers encouraged their eradication, but the war on these cats failed, barely. In 1958 the panther was protected by law, and in 1967 was listed as endangered by the US Fish and Wildlife Service. In 1973, when the cat population had shrunk to 60, it was added to the Florida endangered list. There are about 150 Florida panthers, most tted with radio transmitter collars. The panthers diet consists of small animals such as rabbits, rodents, waterfowl and sometimes larger animals such as storks, white-tailed deer and wild boar. They also will attack small farm animals such as chickens and goats and companion animals such as dogs and cats. Never leave an animal tied in an area where you suspect there might be a panther. There never has been a fatal attack on a human being by a Florida panther. Since 1909, just 20 people have died as a result of puma attacks anywhere in North America, while there have been more than 60,000 fatal attacks on pumas by humans. About 62 people die each year from lightning strikes Woman: Mystery cat stalking Eastpoint LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Mary Lou Short said a large black cat emerged from Las Brisas on Jan. 16. See CAT A3 See PANTHER A3

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Local The Times | A3 Thursday, January 24, 2013 In 2012, a contractor working at St. James Bay Golf Resort east of Lanark Village reported seeing a large black cat cross the main road in broad daylight heading towards a pond. Could this be the same cat? The resort is only 20 miles from Eastpoint. Both Florida panthers and jaguars typically range much further looking for food or mates. Marlowe said he believes more than one of the black mystery cats is roaming the Florida peninsula, and said he and his son observed one near Chie and last February. Allen claims to have seen both tawny and black panthers in Tates Hell. Jim Broaddus who operates Bear Creek Feline Center in Panama City also reportedly has seen a large black cat in the swamp. Last February, a group of cryptobiologists including Marlowe and his son, Robert, as well as experienced monster hunters Lee Hales and Ken Gerhardt, spent several days in Tates Hell searching for the Carrabelle Cat. Gerhard and Hales created a cutout of a black cat to photograph at the site of the original video captured by Miller. The pair hoped to get an idea of the size of the animal in the original footage. After study, Hales and Gerhardt said the shape of the cat in Millers lm was characteristic of a domestic cat rather than a wild species and that the cat in the lm was too small to be a Florida panther. Hales said the cat in the lm was a large house cat. Scott Marlowe and Allen disagreed with their ndings. Warwick spoke with Short over the telephone on Jan. 17. If there is a big cat in that neighborhood, there will be other sightings, he said. In a telephone interview last week, Hales said he will try to arrange a visit to the area sometime in the next two weeks and hopes to use night vision equipment to survey an area near Shorts sighting. in the U.S. so youre more than 300 times more likely to be killed by lightning than by a cat. According to animal behavior experts, cats, including puma, are intimidated by any animal that is larger and especially taller, than themselves, and by things that approach rapidly. If you encounter a big cat, try to make it see you as a dominant predator. Showing aggression often will cause a cat to ee. Big cats are intelligent and very shy of humans. Make eye contact; stare down the animal. Make loud noises and try to look bigger by waving your arms. Do not crouch to pick up a weapon placing your head lower than the cats. The showing of teeth, which people interpret as smiling, is seen as a threat by many animals. Grin at the cat. Prey-sized items, such as dogs or children that move rapidly across a cats eld of vision, stimulate it to attack. Tossing a backpack or other item in front of an approaching cat often will distract it. One cougar attack on a child ended when the boy lost a shoe and the cougar focused its attention on that. Do not run, as nothing triggers this predators re ex like eeing. Pick up small children or animals. Placing a child on your shoulders makes you appear taller and more dangerous to a cat. If you see a big cat feeding, slowly withdraw from the area, while watching it. Dont turn your back on it. If a cat attacks you, ght back. Kick it, hit it with branches or rocks and punch it. Entertainment FRIDAY Feb 1 5:30pm Golf Cart & Pet Parade from the Bowery to Riverfront Park for a concert SATURDAY Feb 2 6:30-10:30pm Reserved table & dinner for 6 $300 or $50 pp Show only 7:30-10:30 General Admission $25 Entertainment Entertainment Marilyn & Mason Bean Brian Bowen Band CAT from page A2 PANTHER from page A2 USFWS | Special to The Times A Florida panther County Commissioner William Massey said he in favor of allowing St. George Islanders to vote on their MSBU rates independently but questioned how the money was being spent. Abbott said the island re department responds to calls every day. He said there are sometimes 10,000 visitors on the island. We are required by insurance to have a ladder truck, he said. If we dont have a ladder truck, our (ISO) rating goes from six to nine. When we went from a nine to a seven, some beach homes saved as much as $5,000. Abbott said the re department has polled homeowners about the increase in MSBU on the island and got 475 yes votes and only 17 nos. Commissioner Noah Lockley suggested putting the MSBU fee on the property tax bill. Abbott said the amount collected still would be insuf cient. Commissioner Smokey Parrish said as of July 2012, 262 island homeowners hadnt paid their MSBU assessment, for a total of $15,675 in uncollected funds. Speaking for the St. George Island Civic Club, Mason Bean said an MSBU is the only way for to pay these rural re departments. The increase is only two cases of beer a year. Were held hostage by Mother Nature, said Island re department board member Steve Kearney. There was a thunderstorm (last year), and the take from the chili cook-off was down 50 percent. In an election, they will vote overwhelmingly to raise the MSBU. Chili cookoff money can be used to recapitalize. Alligator Point Fire Chief Steve Fling said the requirement for taller houses to meet new ood requirements is forcing the Alligator Point/St. Teresa district to purchase a ladder truck and build a new station to house it. We need funds to be able to continue level of service to our residents, he said. Fortunately, we have three acres thats been donated to us, so we have a step up. Weve had committees meet, and it looks like, with this increase and other funding avenues, we have enough to go forward. He said the new truck would cost $500,000 to $600,000, and $10,000 annually for recerti cation. I understand the need, but is there a mechanism where you do a mail-in ballot? Parrish asked. If the people come back and say they want it, Ill vote for it. County Attorney Michael Shuler said the change of MSBU rate did not require a vote because the county commission has discretionary authority because the MSBU is a fee, not a tax. He recommended the board leave the ordinance, as written. He warned that requiring a ballot would force a vote on all future changes, and if a mandatory ballot is written into the ordinance, then the commission would be bound by the results of any election. I want it in there in the ordinance that they cannot raise the rates arbitrarily, Commissioner Cheryl Sanders said. The commissioners instructed Shuler to make the change and voted unanimously to pass the ordinance to create the independent districts. Kearney then formally requested the board schedule an election for Tuesday, May 14, to raise the MSBU rate for the St. George Island District from $50 to $95 annually. Fling asked an election be scheduled on the same day for the Alligator Point/St. James District, also whether to increase the annual fee to $95. The board voted unanimously to order the mail-out ballots contingent on there being suf cient time for constitutional of cers to make the necessary arrangements. Is there anything that would prevent the board from having this put on the tax bill (for next year)? asked Clerk of Courts Marcia Johnson. I would like the property appraiser and tax collector to be here to get their input at the next meeting about putting it on the tax bill, Commissioner Pinki Jackel said. They have indicated to me that they are willing, Johnson said. MSBU from page A1 Were held hostage by Mother Nature. There was a thunderstorm (last year), and the take from the chili cook-off was down 50 percent. In an election, they will vote overwhelmingly to raise the MSBU. Steve Kearney St. George Island re department board member

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USPS 027-600 Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 Publisher: Roger Quinn Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola Times OPINION www.apalachtimes.com A Section Page 4 Thursday, January 24, 2013 By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com Franklin County saw a tiny rise in its unemployment rate for December, as it ticked up to the 6.4 percent level. According to preliminary numbers released Friday by the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity, the countys jobless rate last month rose 0.1 percent to 6.4 percent, as ve people were added to the unemployment rolls, growing them from 346 to 351 people in search of work. The workforce also shrank by 82 workers, from 5,536 to 5,454, but remained larger than one year ago, when it comprised 5,398 workers and when the jobless rate was sharply higher, at 8.1 percent. Because of improvement in other Florida counties, Franklin Countys jobless picture tied it for eighth best in the state, along with Union, Jackson and Sumter counties. Monroe County, at 4.5 percent, had the states lowest unemployment rate, followed by Walton County (5.7 percent), Okaloosa County (5.8 percent), Alachua (6.1 percent), Wakulla and St. Johns counties (6.2 percent) and Leon County (6.3 percent). Many of the counties with the lowest unemployment rates were those with relatively high proportions of government employment. The unemployment rate in the Gulf Coast Workforce region (Bay, Franklin and Gulf counties) was 8.3 percent in December, up 0.2 percentage point from November. The December 2012 rate was 0.4 percentage point above the state rate of 7.9 percent, and 1.8 percentage points lower than the regions year ago rate of 10.1 percent. Out of a labor force of 98,981, there were 8,228 unemployed Gulf Coast residents. While Bay Countys jobless rose to 8.5 from 8.3 percent, Gulf Countys unemployment fell to 7.7 from 8.0 percent. Unemployment typically peaks in December or January for our local area due to the number of seasonal jobs. Our area is doing much better than this same time last year, and in the last couple of weeks weve noticed an increase in the number of local job opportunities coming available, said Kim Bodine, executive director for Gulf Coast Workforce Board. In December 2012, there were 70,900 nonagricultural jobs in the Panama City-Lynn HavenPanama City Beach metro area (Bay County), down 1,000 jobs over the year. This metro area experienced an annual rate of job change of minus-1.4 percent, while the state gained jobs at a rate of 0.9 percent. Three out of 10 industries gained jobs over the year and seven industries lost jobs over the year. Leisure and hospitality (+200 jobs); and manufacturing and government (+100 jobs each) gained jobs over the year. The industries losing jobs were professional and business services and education and health services (-300 jobs each); trade, transportation, and utilities, nancial activities, and other services (-200 jobs each); and mining, logging, and construction, and information (-100 jobs each). The metro area had the second fastest growth rate (+3.4 percent) in manufacturing employment for all metro areas in Florida. Government employment increased (+0.7 percent) in the metro area, while declining (-0.8 percent) statewide. Peers select Southerland 1st sophomore class rep Special to the Times Rep. Steve Southerland II has been elected by the members of the Republican class of 2010 to serve as sophomore class representative to the House Republican leadership. Southerland will occupy an important seat at the leadership table, helping shape the partys agenda and acting as a conduit between leadership and the historic sophomore class. It is a great honor to serve as sophomore class representative to the House Republican leadership, Southerland said. There is no more humbling feeling than to have your friends and peers invest their trust in you to advance a shared cause. I believe that people support that which they help create, and for that reason I will continue to build upon these relationships and seek my colleagues counsel on the issues the American people care about most. I also look forward to working closely with the entire House Republican leadership team to advance freedom, shrink government, and empower hardworking families and job creators. Southerland is the rst member of Congress elected to the newly-created sophomore class representative role. He succeeds Reps. Tim Scott, R-S.C., and Kristi Noem, R-S.D., who were appointed freshman class representatives for the now expired 112th Congress. Editors note: The following was submitted Jan. 17 as an open letter to the people of the cities of Apalachicola and Carrabelle, regarding a fair method of RESTORE Act distribution. The real question regarding the RESTORE Act ne funds is how the monies will be allocated among the quali ed projects in the area designated as being disproportionately impacted by the RESTORE Act. There is nothing in the RESTORE Act that gives this answer or speci es how this is to be done. The county commissions that lie within this area of disproportionate impact with the help of the Florida Association of Counties got together to come up with a plan to fairly, simply and without controversy or con ict distribute among themselves the 75 percent of the ne funds directed by the RESTORE Act to the entire area (from Escambia County to Wakulla County) of designated disproportionate impact. After carefully considering the question and with the expressed goals of fairness, simplicity and avoidance of con ict, these county commissions came up with a distribution plan that would eliminate the presence of political bias or in uence and incorporate an objective mathematical formula that would be agreed to in the distribution of this overall amount proportionately to each county area within the entire area of disproportionate impact and do it simply, consistently and to avoid con ict and even the appearance of unfairness among their peers. This distribution plan that utilizes a mathematical formula to allocate the ne monies to each county area within the entire area of disproportionate impact arrived at by all of the county commissions has been tweaked recently to provide and better ensure fairness in the proportional objective distribution of the disproportionate impact RESTORE Act funds being divided among them. However, when faced with the same decision on how the proportionate shares of the monies are to be fairly distributed among the cities and communities within Franklin County, county commissioners have decided instead to hoard the monies and get the bene t of political favors by appointing a committee to review all the project applications coming from both within the cities and the communities in the unincorporated area and then reserving to themselves the right and authority to give nal approval of those projects the county commission chooses to be submitted for funding to the U.S. Department of Treasury. The request by both cities and other citizens to likewise fairly, simply and without con ict or controversy allocate proportionate amounts by using a similar mathematical formula among the cities and the unincorporated communities for each to evaluate and approve their own projects within their jurisdiction and their proportionate allocation of funds by their elected commissions was rejected and ignored in large part by Franklin County commissioners. If the method of rightly dividing using a mathematical formula is the simplest, best and fairest plan in the considered judgment of all of the county commissions for the counties to use with respect to one other in dividing up the monies to the area of disproportionate impact, then the cities within the area of Franklin County should be given the bene t of that same simple, objective and fairest method of division by mathematical formula. If it is good enough for Franklin County commissioners to use in treating and dealing with and dividing up the monies with these other counties like Gulf and Bay and Escambia when facing the peer pressure of ensuring that the allocation is fair and objective, why is it not good enough for the cities and communities within Franklin County? Are we to be treated worse and differently than the county commission treats these other counties? Why are the citizens of the cities of Apalachicola and Carrabelle being subjected to this double standard? I think everyone knows this answer! I have posted a petition to be signed by those persons supporting the cities plan to fairly, objectively and simply distribute these monies among the cities and unincorporated communities within Franklin County based on mathematical formula as already adopted and proposed by both the City of Apalachicola and Carrabelle and request each of you to consider supporting this. The petitions can be found at the City Hall of the City of Apalachicola, 1 Avenue E, Apalachicola, Florida. Thank you for your consideration and support on this. Van W. Johnson Sr. is the mayor of Apalachicola. County unemployment nudges up a tad STEVE SOUTHERLAND An open letter from Mayor Van Johnson VAN W. JOHNSON SR. DEMOCRATS CELEBRATE WITH INAUGURAL BALL LOIS SWOBODA | The Times About 85 Franklin County Democrats celebrated President Barack Obamas second inauguration Monday evening with a festive ball at A.J. Restaurant. Organizer Caroline Ilardi said the event was listed by the national Democratic Party among its many inaugural balls throughout the nation. Among the culinary delights were Hawaiian beverages and coconut shrimp, offered in keeping with the presidents home state. Shown above, from left, are Ilardi, Adele Colston and Glynda Ratliff.

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Local The Times | A5 Thursday, January 24, 2013 A second-place nish was the prize for Rusty Hamlin, who created a half-shell oyster, topped with smoked mullet stoneground grits, Bradley sausage and parmesan crumble. Hamlin is the executive chef for the Zac Brown Band, an Atlanta-based country/folk band. Third place went to Kevin Maxwell for his oyster mushroom crostini, a toasted crostini with white cheddar, topped with an oyster roasted in garlic butter, with sliced mushroom and julienne orange bell pepper, scallion, rosemary and thyme. Maxwell credited his success in part to the fresh oysters supplied by RDs Oysters in Eastpoint. Eight other competitors also took part, including last years winner, Jeff Ilardi, who served up Mardi Gras oysters that featured kumquat liqueur and jam, tupelo honey, rice vinegar, Tabasco, chopped andouille sausage, chopped roasted sweet red pepper and shallots. Ilardi also won FCTVs inaugural award for best booth exhibit. Christine Smith served up oysters diavalo, with an oyster shooter in a Bloody Mary. She described the dish as a little bit of Italian and a little bit of Latin, made from shocking the oyster in olive oil and Italian seasoning, and avoring with a jalapeno aioli. They melt in your mouth with a lot of heat, she said. Richard Radford created the orange blossom special, with an oyster in the middle on a Ritz cracker, with a couple of little pieces of orange, peeled and ready to eat, and a spot of Nanas pepper sauce. Just a spot, he stressed. Allen Mathis took part with succulent oysters on the half shell, while Up the Creeks Brett Gormley did his a la Caesar. Joel Norred cooked up roasted garlic oysters and grits, the Weems Hospital Foundation made gray oyster stew, and John Solomon created two entries Bacon BBQ and Expensive oysters, the latter topped with caviar. Judging again this year were Oyster Radio news director Michael Allen and St. George Island real estate agent Jerry Thompson. In the place of State Sen. Bill Montford was Ron Sewell, a Ford dealer in Odessa, Texas, who likes to visit. We eat oysters every day were here, he said. Sewell later donated a $500 check to the re department, Apalachicola Mayor Van Johnson said in his remarks following a spirited dance performance by city re ghters, led by Pam Nobles and some of her young dancers. The many booths, from Capital Area Health Plan giving away fresh fruit, to the St. George Island Civic Club making funnel cakes, to the Chamber of Commerce and area volunteers serving up lots of varieties of oysters, were busy all day long. DI S S I ) Children and Adults No Fee or Cost If No Recovery G AYLE PEED IN G O A TTO NEY AT L AW Apalachicola, FL (850) 292-7059 | (850) 944-6020 FAX gsrlaw@bellsouth.net BILL MILLER REALTY 850-697-3751 (3310) 570-0658 400 + COMM. U.S. 98 & GULF ADJ. TO LANARK MARINA 850K $29,500 $2,500 D O W N B UYS 2 B ED AP T 2 6 OR RENT $500/MTH 2 B/R 1 BTH GULF VIE W HOME W/ F AMILY R OOM $70,000 C/B-3-1 2 COR LOTS CITY $49,500 3/2 D /W 2 COR LOTS CITY $42,500 MIH 2 C RNR LOTS BLK. $ S TORE REDUCED $49,500 2 AC-AT RIVER UTIL. IN -$39,500 month, the equivalent of $1,121.50 per month plus sales tax. That lease expired Jan. 28, 2002, and since that time, Miniat had paid the county month-tomonth under the terms of the expired lease. About two years ago, when the county struck a deal to lease the former Chapman Schools building to Apalachicola cardiologist Dr. Shezad Sanaullah, the county decided to have Miniat also pay for utilities at the leased of ce space. Erin Grif th, assistant nance of cer, said Miniats last rental payment was in September 2012 for the month of August. She said it was not unusual for Miniat to pay his rent in portions that covered past months or groups of several months. Weems CEO Ray Brownsworth said the current Weems West clinic, which has only one exam room, only can see about 10 to 20 patients per day and needs to be seeing 20 to 25. Also showing interest in the vacant property was Ida Elliot, superintendent of elections, who emailed county commissioners to say she would be willing to move into Dr. Miniats of ce as well. The building she is in is not county-owned and could be sold at any time. Dr. Stephen Miniat never noti ed the department of the closing of his practice, said Aaron Keller, public information specialist for the Florida Department of Health. However, we do encourage patients seeking their medical records to send a certied letter to their doctor and follow the appropriate complaint process if necessary. According to rules governing the state medical profession, when a physician terminates or relocates his practice, or when it is no longer available to patients, these patients are to be noti ed via local newspaper. A copy of this notice also is to be submitted to the Board of Medicine. Miniat, a 1986 graduate of the University of Texas Southwestern medical school, completed his family medicine residency at the University of Alabama at Huntsville. He is certi ed by the American Board of Family Medicine. OFFICES from page A1 THE APALACHICOLA TIMES FIND US ON FACEBOOK OYSTER from page A1 PHOTOS BY DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times LEFT: John Kerley of Ocala, a regular visitor to St. George Island, prepares oysters for his children, Arden and Adyla Kerley, and their friends, Ava and Jackson Pizzuti. ABOVE: John Solomons expensive oyster entry was topped with caviar. BELOW: Apalachicola re ghters perform for the crowd at Saturdays oyster cook-off.

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Local A6 | The Times Thursday, January 24, 2013 Full moon climb Saturday at lighthouse The first Full Moon Climb of the new year will be held at the Cape St. George Lighthouse on St. George Island on Saturday, Jan. 26. The Sunset/Full Moon Climb will take place from 5:30 to 7 p.m. and will include light hors doeuvres and a sparkling cider toast to the full moon. Cost is $15 for the general public and $10 for members of the St. George Lighthouse Association. The sun will set at 6:12 p.m. and the moon will rise at 6:03 p.m. After sunset, people are invited to climb to the top of the lighthouse for a breathtaking view of the full moon, as space and time permit. Cost is $10 for the general public and $5 for SGLA members. The Cape St. George Light is located in St. George Lighthouse Park at the center of St. George Island, where Island Drive (the road off the bridge) ends at Gulf Beach Drive. Parking is available in lots at either side of the park. Because space is limited, reservations are recommended. For reservations or more information, please contact the Lighthouse Gift Shop at 927-7745. Homeownership seminar on Tuesday The TIGERS program along with other providers in Franklin County will be hosting Home is where the heart is, a seminar on home ownership, at 3 p.m. on Tuesday, Jan. 29 at the offices of the REALTOR Association of Franklin & Gulf Counties, 78 Eleventh Street, Apalachicola Free and open to the public. All are welcomed. Confirmed guests include Cadence Bank, Centennial Bank, Franklin County Community Development & Land Trust Corp., title company, and the Realtors Association of Franklin and Gulf Counties. For further information please contact Carol Barfield, at 653-2784 or Gloria Salinard at 653-3322. Boldt granted exception on Alligator Point At their Jan. 15 meeting, county commissioners voted unanimously to approve an exception recommended by the advisory Board of Adjustment and allow Bert Boldt to encroach on the Critical Habitat Zone. Boldt may construct a house 12 feet into the front setback and 29 feet into the CHZ on his property at 25 Gulf Shore Boulevard, Alligator Point. He also received permission to construct a seawall five feet from both side lot lines and seaward of the house. Boldt lost his last home during Hurricane Dennis. The new construction is based on his own design. The most important thing about the project is the address. Its a part of the road thats going to be subject to erosion and wash away, County Planner Alan Pierce said. Mr. Boldt is trying to do two things. Hes trying to protect his own property and, from a public standpoint, he will be protecting the road. Beyond Mr. Boldt the lots are unbuildable and only a few hundred feet up, the road has washed away. Mr. Boldt is going to be serving as an anchor essentially. A point where we hope the erosion will stop. It serves as a public bene t by having somebody out there hoping to stabilize the shoreline, said Pierce, who also recommended the exceptions be granted. State will not maintain CR 67 On Nov. 6, 2012, Commissioner Cheryl Sanders asked County Planner Alan Pierce to contact the Apalachee Regional Planning Council and the Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) and request they accept maintenance of CR 67. This month, FDOT District 3 Secretary Tommy Barfield responded via electronic letter that FDOT has determined that CR 67 does not meet the functional classification as a state road. Sanders said her original request was in response to a request from Liberty County that FDOT assume maintenance of Highway 67 there. Sanders instructed Pierce to nd out if FDOT is now maintaining Highway 67 there. National School Choice Week Apalachicola Bay Charter School cordially invites you to an Open House on Thursday, January 31, 2013 from 9:00 11:00 a.m. Guided tours will be provided. A palachicola B ay C harter S chool A Florida High Performing Charter School 98 12th Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320 Tel: 850-653-1222 | Fax: 850-653-1857 | abceagles.org Competitive Yields on FDIC Insured CDs NO HIDDEN CHARGES: It is our policy that the patient and any other person responsible for payments has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed by payment or any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment. www.mulliseye.com "WE WELCOME NE W PATIE N TS, C ALL T ODAY FOR YOUR P RIORITY APP OI N TME N T" FOR NEW PATIENTS 59 AND OLDER This certificate is good for a complete Medical Eye Exam with Todd Robinson, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Surgeon. The exam includes a prescription for eye glasses and tests for Glaucoma, Cataracts and other eye diseases FOR YOUR APPOINTMENT CALL: 850-763-6666 ELIGIBILITY: U.S. Citizens living in the Florida Panhandle, 59 years and older, not presently under our care. Coupon Expires: 1-31-13 FREE EYE EXAM CODE: AP00 Darren Payne, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon In Memory of Lee Mullis, M.D. Todd Robinson, M.D Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon Smart Lenses SM February 5 TH 2013 Register at any St. George Island vacation rental company. For more information, contact Sometimes its Hotter at (850)927-5039 or visit www.sgisnowbirds.com Rafe Run Education Center State Park Nature Walk Lighthouse Climb Lighthouse Museum Info Sessions Happy Hour & Dinner Bingo The following report is provided by the Franklin County Sheriffs Of ce. Arrests in this weeks report were made by of cers from the Florida Highway Patrol (FHP), Apalachicola Police Department (APD) and Franklin County Sheriffs Of ce (FCSO). All defendants are to be considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law. JAN. 14 Justin R. Griggs, 24, Apalachicola, violation of probation (FCSO) David R. Smith, 25, Fountain, introduction of contraband into a correctional facility (FCSO) JAN. 15 Kenneth R. Rucker, 55, Eastpoint, possession of a controlled substance (FCSO) JAN. 16 Marjorie L. Boozer, 51, Carrabelle, violation of probation (FCSO) JAN. 17 John Kaczmarek, Jr., 48, Apalachicola, DUI with property damage/personal injury, driving while license suspended or revoked, and refusal to submit to breath test (APD) JAN. 18 Ashley C. Thompson, 23, Carrabelle, violation of probation (FCSO) JAN. 19 Andy W. Dyer, 47, Carrabelle, forgery and uttering (FCSO) Timothy J. Carpenter, 20, Eastpoint, criminal mischief and battery (FCSO) Paul J. Moser, 50, Panama City, boating under the in uence (FWC) Duane E. Barnett, 48, Carrabelle, DUI and no motorcycle endorsement (FHP) JAN. 21 Thomas A. Parker, 27, Apalachicola, violation of probation (FCSO) Arrest REPORT News BRIEFS

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Local The Times | A7 Thursday, January 24, 2013 She described him as a compassionate and sincere man, an educator who not only earned bachelor, master and doctoral degrees and worked for 37 years in various positions in education from custodian to district administrator, but retired as a master sergeant in the Air Force. Neal offered a historical perspective on what he called a movement for citizenship for black Americans. Dr. King came from a culture of being denied, he said. At the time the Constitution was passed, it did not address African-American people. Neal went on to outline the roles of the 13th Amendment, which outlawed slavery; the 14th Amendment, which ensured citizenship, due process and equal protection under the law; and the 15th Amendment, which said all people, including those held previously in slavery, had the right to vote. Neal said though the will of the Union had been victorious in the legal realm, the other area fought in was the political arena, which the Confederacy won. He said Reconstruction in the South had led to separate but equal, and a prevailing philosophy that you stay in your place. It was here that Neal interjected a comment on his babies, those children whose education he in uenced during his tenure as principal. Keep your head up, he said. No matter what they say, you are somebody. Neal recounted details of Kings early childhood and how after studying at Morehouse College, and later earning a doctorate from Boston University, the 26year-old Baptist preacher in Atlanta was called to assist a church in Montgomery, Ala., struggling with issues surrounding a bus boycott. All of a sudden this woman named Rosa Parks decided her feet hurt, he said. Martin Luther King had leadership thrust upon him. Neal chronicled Kings career from 1955 to 1963, joking that being refused seating at whites-only restaurants had given rise to the invention of the drive-thru. Neal wrapped up his remarks by noting that economic freedom, highlighted by a Poor Peoples March on the nations capital, had been Kings rallying cry. Dr. King was out front. He forced America to confront herself, Neal said. The more-than-two-hour program concluded with a dramatic laying on of hands as part of a closing ceremony to honor Apalachicola Mayor Van Johnson. Bishop Robert Davis introduced that mayoral honor ceremony by saying that on the 27th anniversary of the King holidays observance and the second inauguration of President Barack Obama, it was tting to honor Johnson, Apalachicolas rst black elected mayor. Almost a dozen clergy, from throughout the city, came forward to offer praise of the mayor. First of the pastors to speak was Horace Solomon of New Life Tabernacle By the Sea, followed by Barry Hand from Mount Zion Baptist Church, Clifford Williams from Apalachicola First Born Church of The Living God, Rene Williams from Fellowship Church of Praise Ministries and Martha Harris from Trinity Episcopal Church. Each praised the broad and generous service of the mayor and his dedication to the city, just as did the last four pastors to speak: L.D. Martin of the Love & Worship Center, Themo Patriotis of the Apalachicola United Methodist Church, Dr. John Sink, former pastor of Atlantas largest Methodist church, and David Walker from Covenant Word, who invoked the direct prayer for Gods guidance to grace the actions of Johnson, now and in the future. The celebration began with a processional of the clergy ling into the Armory. Also entering formally were city and county of cials, who included Johnson, Superintendent Nina Marks, County Commissioner Noah Lockley, School Board Member Teresa Ann Martin, Apalachicola City Commissioners Frank Cook and Brenda Ash, City Administrator Betty Taylor-Webb, City Attorney Pat Floyd and Police Chief Bobby Varnes. The opening prayer came from Elder James Pugh, dressed in his sheriffs of ce uniform, followed by a Scripture reading from Elder Roderick Robinson, from Isaiah 60: Arise, shine, for your light has come, and the glory of the Lord rises upon you. See, darkness covers the earth and thick darkness is over the peoples, but the Lord rises upon you and his glory appears over you. Nations will come to your light, and kings to the brightness of your dawn. Greetings and gratitude came from event organizer Dolores Hayward Croom, who then introduced three black Florida Highway Patrolman, who were seated in places of honor at the front. Sheila White-Martin, from Love & Worship Center, was mistress of ceremony. Were living Kings legacy, making a career of humanity, she said. SWAT (Students Working Against Tobacco) students led the pledge to the American ag and to the Christian ag. Life Every Voice and Sing, often called the Negro National Anthem, was sung by Angeline Stanley. As Kings I Have A Dream speech sounded through the speakers, R. Damien Davis portrayed the words in mime. Covenant Word Christian Center provided an interview with retired Apalachicola school teacher Lorine Banks on her memories of taking part in a march with Dr. King in 1965, when she was a senior at Alabama State University, a historically black university in Montgomery. Interviewed by her daughter, Harolyn Walker, on the ctional Fathers Heart television show, Banks began by noting that black people didnt always have the right to vote. She described the excitement St. Jude Historic District of Montgomery on March 24, 1965, when voting rights marchers camped for their last night on their path to the capital. That night a Stars for Freedom rally was held, with singers Harry Belafonte, Tony Bennett, Frankie Laine, Peter, Paul and Mary, and Sammy Davis Jr. all performing. Banks said a judge had said only 300 people could be on a two-lane highway, but when it widened to four lanes, the crowd had gathered to 25,000 people. She described a mixed, often hostile reaction from onlookers. To me it took everything not to say anything at the words used, she said. Dr. King was a man of nonviolence; he practiced what he preached. After a performance of My God is Awesome by singers from Mount Zion Missionary Baptist, Stella Bryant, speaking on behalf of Sheriff Mike Mock, then read an impassioned statement and announced that she had been promoted as the rst African-American to become professional standards investigator for the sheriffs of ce. Jathan Martin and Company, and Robert and Jacqulyn Davis all performed leading up to Neals remarks. The event closed with expressions from Apostle Shirley White, who has stepped down after organizing the King event for several years, and the singing of Stevie Wonders birthday song that helped give rise to the holiday. After a celebration motorcade, dinner from A.J.s Restaurant was served. Robert C. Bruner Attorney Personal & Business Bankruptcy Over 30 Years Legal Experience 850-670-3030 bankruptcy relief under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon advertisements. Before you decide, ask us to send you free written information Top Notch Service at a Reasonable Price Tired of Driving to Panama City or Tallahassee to have your tax return done? Tired of sending your payroll out of town to an impersonal payroll agency? Tired of spending your hard earned prots on exorbitant book keeping services? Save your gas money and their pricey fees and have your tax return led locally by a 15 year tax return veteran. Specializing in 1040s, 1065s, 1120s, as well as all payroll tax returns, W-2s and 1099s. Dont throw your hard earned money away because I will meet or beat anyones prices and that is a guarantee. For an appointment, call Chet Timmons today at 850-323-1082 HOME OF T H E $50 T AX RETU R N* Special exclusions do apply and only guaranteed for simple 1040s or 1040EZs. KING from page A1 PHOTOS BY DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times LEFT: R. Damien Davis narrates the I Have A Dream speech in mime. CENTER: Stella Bryant speaks at the event. RIGHT: Retired Apalachicola teacher Lorine Banks, left, is interview by her daughter, Harolyn Walker.

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A8 | The Times Thursday, January 24, 2013 OF THE WEEK PET St. Joseph Bay Humane Society ELSIE! ELSIE is a beautiful 2 year old tortoiseshell cat. She came to us last summer with very young kittens she was still nursing. On several occasions during the summer we received kittens that were too young to be weaned and this sweet girl would accept them as one of her own and care for them until they were ready for solid food. She is very loving and affectionate and so deserves a home of her own especially since she has served the kittens of the Adoption Center so well. The Humane Society will waive her adoption fee. She has earned it! VOLUNTEERS ARE DESPERATELY NEEDED TO SOCIALIZE WITH ALL OF OUR DOGS AND CATS. We are always looking for people willing to bring one of our animals into their home to be fostered for various needs. Anytime you can spare would be greatly appreciated. Call Karen at 670-8417 for more details or visit the Franklin County Humane Society at 244 State Road 65 in Eastpoint. You may logon to the website at www.forgottenpets.org to see more of our adoptable pets. 2nd Annual 2nd Annual Society By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com Retired Florida State University music professor Thomas Tommie Wright, the scholar and school patriot who wrote the FSU Fight Song, will provide a memorable concert Sunday, Jan. 27. The concert, part of the annual Ilse Newell Fund for the Performing Arts, will be at 4 p.m. at Trinity Episcopal Church. In addition to Wright on piano, the concert will feature performances by tenor Larry Gerber and soprano Jessica Applegate. The audience will be treated to several of the songs Wright composed over his lengthy career, including the FSU Fight Song, and George Gershwin songs. The annual reception for donors follows in Benedict Hall. Arlene Wingate, who oversees the Ilse Newell concert series, said Wright, the father of Apalachicolas Candace Springer, has recovered from the u and is set to perform on Sunday. Wright, who holds a bachelors in music magna cum laude from Butler University and a masters of music from Indiana University, did graduate work in music at Columbia University. Wright, a longtime music professor who joined the Florida State University faculty in 1949 and has performed concerts with symphony orchestras around the world, delivered a uniquely lyrical graduation address this past summer at the TallahasseeLeon County Civic Center, through a combination of piano music, sentimental recollections and song. Graduates, youll be happy to know that Im not going to give you a long speech this morning, Wright said. Instead, I thought you might enjoy a couple of songs out of the many songs that I have written and especially the songs for FSU. Gerber, an accomplished and talented tenor soloist and professor of voice at Florida State, accompanied Wright, who played the piano onstage. The pair performed Wrights exquisite Florida State Victory March as well as the raucous Fight Song, which Wright wrote in his early years at the university. President Eric J. Barron, who presided over the ceremony, presented Wright with an honorary doctorate of music degree. Your most important legacy is intangible: The love and admiration of tens of thousands of Florida State alumni, said Provost and Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs Garnett S. Stokes, who read a citation before Barron draped a doctoral hood over Wrights gown. Your dedication to Florida State University for 60 years is without equal. About 1,314 Florida State graduates participated in the ceremony, of which 919 received bachelors degrees, 323 masters degrees and 72 doctorates. This concert is one of the programs of the 25th season of the Ilse Newell Fund for the Performing Arts, under the auspices of the Apalachicola Area Historical Society. General admission is a $5 donation, with students admitted free. Oscar Medley birthday celebration Saturday A birthday celebration for Oscar Medley will be 2-4 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 26, at the First Baptist Church, 46 Ninth St. Oscar will be 80. All friends are invited to attend. Tommie Wright to perform on piano Sunday SPECIAL TO THE TIMES Tommie Wright will play his own compositions and music by George Gershwin at 4 p.m. Sunday at Trinity Episcopal Church. Three local women will compete in the Region Two Arts and Crafts competition of the Florida Federation of Womens Clubs to be held in Apalachicola in next month. On Jan. 17, the Philaco Womans Club held its annual arts and crafts competition, judged by Cass Allen and Caty Greene. Three entries took blue ribbons. Barb Paget took rst place for a pine needle basket ornamented with shells and a second for her Ukrainian Easter egg. Sally Crown received a rst for hand-knit socks. Dawn Radford took a blue ribbon and three second-place ribbons for photographs taken in Eastern Europe. Judy Cook took a second-place ribbon for a machine-made baby quilt in shades of pink. By Lois Swoboda SPECIAL TO THE TIMES Dawn Radfords prize winning photo of Magyar horsemen was taken during a tour of Hungary. Three Philaco women win blue ribbons Happy BIRTHDAY DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times

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The United Methodist Churches of Franklin County Welcome You First United Methodist Church of Apalachicola Worship Service 11:00 a.m. every Sunday Sunday School 10:00 a.m. 75 5 th St. Apalachicola 653-9530 fumcapalach@gtcom.net Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis Carrabelle United Methodist Church Worship Services 10:45 a.m. Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Celebrate Recovery Mondays 7-9 p.m. 102 NE Ave. B Carrabelle 697-3672 Pastor: Julie Stephens Eastpoint United Methodist Church Worship Service 10:00 a.m. every Sunday Healing service every fourth Monday at 7:00 p.m. 317 Patton Dr. (corner of David St.) 670-8825 Pastor: Rev. Beth White St. George Island United Methodist Church 9:00 a.m. Worship Service 10:00 a.m. Fellowship Hour 201 E. Gulf Beach Dr. 9274635 www.sgiumc.org Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis Nursery now provided for Sunday Church Service First Pentecostal Holiness Church 379 Brownsville Road Apalachicola Were excited about what Gods doing!!! Sunday School 9:45 am Sunday Morning Worship 10:45 am Sunday Evening Service 6:00 pm Monday, Youth Group 6:30 pm Wednesday, Royal Rangers, G.A.P. 7:00 pm Wednesday Worship & Word 7:30 pm Nursery Provided during regular church services 7:00 7:00 First Baptist Church St. George Island 501 E. Bayshore Drive 927-2257 R. Michael Waley, Pastor Join us as we praise and worship the living Christ. Great is the Lord and most worthy of praise. Psalm 145:3 Sunday Bible Study ................................................ 10:00am Worship Praise ........................................................ 11:00am Sunday Night ............................................................ 7:00pm Wednesday Power Hour ...................................... 7:00pm Wednesday Youth at S.P.L.A.S.H ....................... 7:00pm Walking in Christ R. Michael Whaley, Pastor WELCOMES YOU Church of the Ascension 101 NE First Street Carrabelle SUNDAY 10:00 AM WELCOMES YOU Church THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH (850) 274-4490 (850) 545-2578 WELCOMES YOU Trinity Trinity Episcopal Church est. 1836 Welcomes You Hwy. 98 & 6th St. Apalachicola 850-653-9550 Sunday Worship Services 8 & 10:30 a.m. Wednesdays Healing Service 11 a.m. Centering Prayer 4 p.m. Sunday Worship Services 8 & 10:30 a.m. Wednesdays Healing Service 11 a.m. Centering Prayer 4 p.m. Faith The Times | A9 Thursday, January 24, 2013 Hope you can meet us at the Franklin County Senior Citizens Center for lunch today. Sue and our faithful volunteers will be ready to serve at noon. Dont forget about the car wash Saturday, Jan. 26. Members of St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Catholic Church Catholic Youth Organization will clean your car from 3:30-7 p.m. They will hold the car wash at Sacred Heart of Jesus Catholic Church, 2653 U.S. 98, Lanark Village. Donation is $10. We will also have a covered dish dinner in the church hall following 5 p.m. Mass. Members of Bishop OSullivan Knights of Columbus Council 1638 will hold the annual spaghetti dinner from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Sunday. You can get your dinner in St. Patricks Church Hall, Sixth Street, Apalachicola. Time is running out for you to get your chance on the $100 merchandise certicate at the Lanark Market. You can obtain your tickets from any member of the Sons of the Legionnaires or at the Village Market for $2 each or three for $5. The winning ticket will be drawn on Feb. 3, Super Bowl Sunday, at Camp Gordon Johnston American Legion Post 82. Right before Super Bowl Sunday, members of the Lanark Village Golf Club will prepare and serve your full breakfast at Chillas Hall Saturday, Feb. 2. Serving is from 8:30 to 11 a.m. Your donation of $5 will get you started. Be kind to one another. Check in on the sick and housebound. God grant us the strength to hang in there. Until next time God bless America, out troops the poor, homeless and hungry. From staff reports Knights host spaghetti dinner Sunday The Knights of Columbus cordially invite all St. Patrick church parishioners, visitors and neighbors to enjoy a spaghetti dinner, complete with garlic bread, cole slaw, tea or coffee, from 11 a.m. through 1 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 27, at St. Patrick Parish Hall. Donation $8 per plate; take-out available. Weekly Bible course on Genesis begins Apostle David Rosier, Fellowship Church of Praise, of Panama City is conducting a weekly workshop/ Bible study in the book of Genesis. The class The Genesis of It All began 6:30-8:30 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 15, at the church, at Avenue G and 14th Street. This is an eight-week course offered by Dayspring Theological Seminary. If interested there is a small fee. For further information, call Pastor Andy or Renee Williams at 227-6624 Eastpoint Baptist Church celebrates recovery On Saturday, the First Baptist Church of Eastpoint initiated a Celebrate Recovery program under the leadership of Rose Grifn. This program is designed to help those struggling with hurts, hang-ups and habits by showing them the loving power of Jesus Christ through the recovery process. All are invited to participate in this free program. Sessions start at 5 p.m. Saturdays at the church, 447 Ave. A in Eastpoint. High Calling Church completes month of celebration January will be a month of celebration at the High Calling Church. Come celebrate with us at 10:45 a.m. Sundays. Pastor Phil Edwards will minister on Sunday, Jan. 27. He is the assistant superintendent and senior pastor at Panama City Assembly of God. He played a vital part in planting High Calling Church. High Calling Church is at 21 Island Drive in Eastpoint. Visit the website at HighCallingChurch. org, call 323-0409 or email to highcallingchurch@gmail.com Benet Feb. 8 for Josh Phipps Josh Phipps, son of Rex and Sabrina Phipps, is a true son of the shing and oyster industry and is in need of a heart transplant. A benet of love and treasures will be held on Friday, Feb. 8 beginning at 8 p.m. at the Roseate Spoonbill Lounge on Water Street. Wear your white boots or bare feet or oxfords but be there. All proceeds go to Josh. Come one, come all. DAVID ADLERSTEIN | the Times Representatives from the St. George Island Civic Club earlier this month presented a $1,000 check to the food pantry. Taking part in the check presentation are, above, from left, Civic Club Director Terry Kemp, club members Rita OConnell and Fran Giknis, and Lori Switzer, food pantry coordinator. Mrs. Margie Marshall Keith, 93, of Tallahassee, died Tuesday, Jan. 15, 2013. A native of Apalachicola, Mrs. Keith had lived at Westminster Oaks for the past six years, moving there from Lynn Haven. Margie was a homemaker. She was member of St. Michael Anglican Catholic Church in Panama City and a member of the Daughters of the American Revolution, Caroline Brevard Chapter. She served as chaplain and history committee chairman of the St. Andrews Bay Chapter. She was preceded in death by her husband of 63 years, Mr. George Allen Keith; her brother, Earl R. Marshall of Pensacola; and one daughter, Frances L. Keith of Crawfordville. She is survived by her other daughter, Annelle K. Blanchett (Herschell) of Tallahassee; four grandchildren, Margie L. Quillman and Anne Marie Thompson, of Tallahassee, George Keith Thompson of Springhill, and Scott Blanchett of Baldwin; eight greatgrandchildren; and four great-greatgrandchildren. The family will receive friends from noon until 1 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 19, at Trinity Episcopal Church in Apalachicola. The service will follow at the church at 1 p.m. Bevis Funeral Home of Tallahassee is assisting the family with their arrangements. Margie Marshall Keith Jeanette Beatrice Meyer was born in Newville, Ala., to Dollie and Shelly Turner. Jeanette passed away at the age of 82 on Monday, Jan. 21, 2013, surrounded by her family in Apalachicola. Jeanette was a long time resident of Apalachicola. She worked for more than 30 years for the Franklin County School District as an attendance ofcer. She is survived by her children, Donna Ingle and David Meyer; grandchildren, Charles Ingle, John Ingle, Kendall Meyer and Jackson Meyer; sister, Maria Jane Turner; niece, Stacy Vause; and nephew, Kelly Butler. She was preceded in death by her husband, David Conrad Meyer; and daughter, Connie Meyer. Funeral services will be held at 10 a.m. Wednesday, Jan. 23, graveside at Magnolia Cemetery. Kelley Funeral Home is handling all arrangements. Jeanette Meyer Obituaries Get your car washed at Sacred Heart church LANARK NEWS Jim Welsh Faith BRIEFS ISLAND CIVIC CLUB BENEFITS FOOD PANTR Y Special to the Times Snowbird Appreciation Day will be Feb. 5, sponsored by the St. George Island Business Association which invites the areas winter visitors to spend the day on the island. Events include a rafe run to lo cal businesses, lighthouse climb, state park entry and hike, the Apala chicola Estuary nature center, small group information sessions, the Cape St. George lighthouse museum, bin go and dinner with a cash bar. Registration is $9 per person at any St. George Island vacation man agement company or inn. It entails lling out a short questionnaire, ob taining a name tag and mug, getting a list of businesses participating in the rafe run, and paying the registration fee., which entitles you to take part in all the days activities (including din ner) at no additional cost, except for a reduced rate to climb the lighthouse ($3 instead of $5) and drinks from the cash bar before dinner. Youll also receive your rst rafe ticket. You may register any day be ginning Feb. 1 or from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Snowbird Day. Each location will have a Snowbird Registration sign out front. Theres no limit to the num ber of snowbirds who can participate. Registration sites include Bucca neer Inn, 160 W. Gorrie Drive; Collins Vacation Rentals, 60 E. Gulf Beach Drive; Fickling & Company, 112 Frank lin Blvd.; Resort Vacation Properties, 61 W. Gulf Beach Drive; St. George Inn, 135 Franklin Blvd.; St. George Is land Vacation Properties, 235 W. Gulf Beach Drive; and Suncoast Realty & Property Management, 224 Franklin Blvd., If youre a nature lover, youll enjoy the short hike along the state parks East Slough Trail at 10 a.m. and noon. The ADA accessible trail is linear, you return to the starting place via the same path you took in, and will be led by a park ranger. Admission into the State Park is free all day for visitors sporting a Snowbird Day nametag. For those who like to shop (or just browse), registrants will be introduced to the islands retail establishments by way of a rafe run. Begin any time after 10 a.m.; participating business es will be designated with a Rafe Run sign. You will receive a rafe ticket, with your registration num ber on it, at each of the participating businesses that you visit. At the end of the run, before 3 p.m., stop at the Visitor Center and place your tickets in the big bottle. Winners numbers will be displayed with their prizes during the dinner. The new Apalachicola National Estuarine Education Center in East point will again be included. The edu cation center is loaded with interest ing exhibits and the staff will be hold ing some special short sessions dur ing the day. The center is open from 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., but be sure to deposit your tickets at the island visi tor center by 3 p.m. Another building youre sure to want to see is the Lighthouse Keep ers Cottage next to the lighthouse. Snowbird registrants may climb the islands lighthouse for a reduced rate ($3 instead of the usual $5) anytime between noon and 5 p.m. Happy Hour, with a wine and beer cash bar, starts at 4 p.m. It, and the dinner, will be held under tents in the parking lot of Sometimes Its Hotter (112 E. Gulf Beach Drive). Dinner will be a low country boil, served 5-6 p.m. A special pot which will include sau sage but no shrimp, will be prepared for anyone who doesnt want seafood. Walk-ups who didnt previously regis ter are welcome to attend the Happy Hour and dinner for $9. The last event of the day is Bingo at the Firehouse (324 E. Pine Ave.), be ginning at 7 p.m. Bingo is sponsored by the local Civic Club. Island preps for snowbird appreciation

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NEW FISHI N G TACKLE ARRIVI N G DAILY! S HOP N EW ITEMS FROM P E NN S HIMA N O, A N D A BU G ARCIA. Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL (next to Piggly Wiggly) www.BWOsh.com Your Hunting Headquarters FULL LINE O F THE NEW PENN S P IN F I S HER V REEL S S TARTING AT Corner of Marina Drive, Corner of Marina Drive, (next to Piggly Wiggly) Corner of Marina Drive, (next to Piggly Wiggly) $ 139.99 WEEKLY ALMANAC APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE TIDE TABLES MONTHLY AVERAGES To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from these given for APALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW Cat Point Minus 0:40 Minus 1:17 East Pass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27 To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from those given for CARRABELLE: HIGH LOW Bald Point Minus 9:16 Minus 0:03 Sponsor the WEEKLY ALMANAC Call Today! 653-8868 Date High Low % Precip Thu, Jan. 24 66 54 0 % Fri, Jan. 25 70 44 30 % Sat, Jan. 26 58 39 0 % Sun, Jan. 27 61 53 0 % Mon, Jan. 28 69 57 10 % Tues, Jan. 29 69 60 10 % Wed, Jan. 30 68 53 10 % 24 Th 252pm 1.6 1147pm 1.9 651am -0.8 609pm 1.3 25 Fr 314pm 1.8 726am -0.8 653pm 1.1 26 Sa 1236am 2.1 334pm 1.8 756am -0.8 731pm 1.1 27 Su 123am 2.1 351pm 1.8 822am -0.6 807pm 1.0 28 Mo 208am 1.9 407pm 1.8 844am -0.5 842pm 0.8 29 Tu 254am 1.9 424pm 1.8 906am -0.3 920pm 0.6 30 We 344am 1.8 444pm 1.9 929am -0.2 1003pm 0.3 31 Th 440am 1.6 507pm 1.9 955am 0.2 1054pm 0.2 24 Th 252pm 1.6 1147pm 1.9 651am -0.8 609pm 1.3 25 Fr 314pm 1.8 726am -0.8 653pm 1.1 26 Sa 1236am 2.1 334pm 1.8 756am -0.8 731pm 1.1 27 Su 123am 2.1 351pm 1.8 822am -0.6 807pm 1.0 28 Mo 208am 1.9 407pm 1.8 844am -0.5 842pm 0.8 29 Tu 254am 1.9 424pm 1.8 906am -0.3 920pm 0.6 30 We 344am 1.8 444pm 1.9 929am -0.2 1003pm 0.3 31 Th 440am 1.6 507pm 1.9 955am 0.2 1054pm 0.2 FreeTideTables.com For comparison only Times are local Tides in feet from MLLW Date Day High Tide High Tide Low Tide Low Tide Sunrise 1 Fr 546am 1.4 534pm 2.1 1023am 0.5 1158pm 0.0 2 Sa 710am 1.3 607pm 2.1 1051am 0.8 3 Su 907am 1.1 647pm 2.2 122am -0.2 1115am 1.0 4 Mo 738pm 2.2 256am -0.3 5 Tu 843pm 2.2 416am -0.6 6 We 213pm 1.6 959pm 2.2 521am -0.8 408pm 1.4 Date Day High Tide High Tide Low Tide Low Tide 1 Fr 546am 1.4 534pm 2.1 1023am 0.5 1158pm 0.0 2 Sa 710am 1.3 607pm 2.1 1051am 0.8 3 Su 907am 1.1 647pm 2.2 122am -0.2 1115am 1.0 4 Mo 738pm 2.2 256am -0.3 5 Tu 843pm 2.2 416am -0.6 By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com Alaina Wilson plans to plant hers in her front yard, while with Logan Waller it will be a couple feet away from his house. Jnecia Penamon will keep hers away from her backyard, where the dogs might get it. For Hollie Larkin it will go right beside some Japanese plum trees. Austin Shiver has elaborate plans for his, precisely how he will landscape around it. Olivia Monods will be rooted at her fathers house, and Bradley Lees at his grandmothers sprawling acreage. The planting of these sabal palm seedlings comes about in the lives of these 125 Franklin County fourth graders thanks to an Arbor Day 2013 planting outreach sponsored and funded locally by the Franklin County Soil and Water Conservation District. On Friday morning, fourth graders at the Franklin County School, Apalachicola Bay Charter School and First Baptist Christian School were all treated to a ceremonial planting on their campus of the sabal palm (Sabal palmetto), rst designated in 1953 as Floridas of cial state tree and since 1970 a part of Floridas ofcial seal. Designated as of cial Fourth Grade Foresters, students from the three schools were each given a seedling to take home and plant in their neighborhood. The Arbor Day planting is a part of a nationwide Drive to Revive Arbor Day organized by the Fourth Grade Foresters USA. It was also held in conjunction with Viva Florida 500, which marks the 500th anniversary of the Spanish exploration of the state. It is a great opportunity to support the countys various elementary education programs, and involve a new generation in becoming responsible stewards of our environment here in paradise, said Dr. John Sink, who made a personal visit to all three campuses to tout the program. The rst Arbor Day on April 10, 1872 in Nebraska is attributed to the work of Julius Sterling Morton, a member of the Nebraska State Board of Agriculture. In 1970, President Richard Nixon proclaimed the last Friday in April as National Arbor Day. Today, all 50 states celebrate Arbor Day although the date may vary in keeping with local climate and planting recommendations, such as in Florida on the third Friday in January. Email outdoors news to timesoutdoors @star .com Page 10 Thursday, January 24, 2013 OUTDOORS www.apalachtimes.com Section Section A SPONSORED BY Inshore Freshwater Lake Wimico and under the White City Bridge, a few luck anglers are reporting on stripped bass and hybrid bass this week. White grubs and jig heads will entice them, but a live shrimp will work well also. With warmer weather and mild air temps, The Forgotten Coast is seeing great fish cathces latley. most action is in the canal with trout being the top spot Most fish are bieng caught on D.O.A. lures or live shrimp. Students receive Sabal palms Hunters good at depositing carcasses Since October 2012, the countys department of animal control has collected 117 deer carcasses and 50 hog carcasses around the county. Director Fonda Davis said hunters have been exceptionally good about depositing carcasses in designated disposal containers this season. Carcass disposal containers can be found on Airport Road west of Apalachicola, near the land ll on State Route 65 north of Eastpoint and on County Road 67 north of Carrabelle. Workshop tonight for butter y count Do you live, work or play within a mile of the northern coast of the Gulf of Mexico? Are you interested in contributing to solving one of the mysteries about monarch butter ies? Volunteers are needed to participate in the Northern Gulf Coast Monarch Over-Wintering Count along the northern coast of the Gulf of Mexico during the months of January and February. Participants should reside or spend part of most weeks within a mile of the Gulf Coast. Attend a free workshop on Thursday, Jan. 24 from 6 to 7:30 p.m. at the Apalachicola Reserve Nature Center, 108 Island Drive, Eastpoint. For questions about workshop call 670-7700. The count is designed to begin to gather data to answer the question of Do monarch butter ies overwinter along the northern Gulf Coast? Many people have said they have seen monarchs along this coast in January or February, but currently there is little or no data to verify whether this is a rare or consistent happening. The project is directed by Richard Rubino, who will be working closely with David Cook, current director of the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge Fall Monarch Migration Tagging Project, and Ron Nelson, who manages the Eden Spring Monarch Migration Augmentation Project in Tallahassee. Special to The Times Nationally recognized writer and photographer John Spohrer has donated the framed original of a photograph of a cat at St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge. The photo is displayed at the Apalachicola Area Chamber of Commerce where raf e tickets can be purchased for $3 or two for $5. Monies raised go to support the Franklin County Humane Society. Only 500 tickets will be sold. The more tickets you buy the better your chances of winning. For information call 653-9419. The FCHS is a 501c3 non pro t organization. County funding was cut 10 percent this year and contributions are down by 30 percent. The FCHS is in need of donations from animal lovers who want to make a difference in the lives of the homeless companion animals at the facility. Donations are tax deductible and all go to bene t the animals being housed. Send donations to FCHS, P.O. Box 417, Eastpoint, FL 32328 The shelter always needs dog treats, collars, leashes, hard rubber chew toys, tennis balls, braided chew rope, cat litter, bleach, hand soap, laundry detergent, utility water and food bowls (all sizes), kitchen trash bags and 39-gallon yard bags. Bring donations to the shelter or to the Apalachicola Times, 129 Commerce Street, Apalachicola. The shelter frequently has special needs pets that require more than routine medical care. Make a difference by sponsoring an animal with medical problems. To learn about these special need animals or make a donation, visit www. forgottenpets.org The shelter also is in need of volunteers to socialize animals in its care. For information, call 670-8417. Outdoor BRIEFS Raf e to bene t humane society JOHN SPOHRER | Special to the Times This original photograph will be auctioned off to bene t the Franklin County Humane Society. DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times Logan Waller, Alaina Wilson and Hollie Larkin plant a sabal palm at the Franklin County School, Genesis Jones, left, and Darius Johnson hold up the Vive Florida 500 banner as Dr. John Sink explains its meaning.

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Gulfside IGA PL A YER OF THE WEEK S P ON S OR Lady Seahawks junior midelder Gracyn Kirvin (#8) has performed exceptionally well in the district tournament, scoring three goals and two assists in the opener against Baker, and then one goal and one assist in the championship win over Port St. Joe. Coach Kelli Maggio said Kirvin stepped up big time on defense against Port St. Joe, after an injury sidelined teammate Katie Seger. Congratulations, Gracyn! Hometown Proud (850)653-9695 BAY DAY F EST IVAL F EST S AT F EB RU A R Y 2 nd 11:00 T O 2:00 EST* St. Joseph Bay Preserves Center 3915 HWY 30-A, Port St. Joe $ 10 DON ATI ON P E R M EAL DON ATI ON 3915 HWY 30-A, Port St. Joe ATI ATI ON ON All proceeds benet The Friends of St. Joseph Bay Preserves Sausage Beverages Sausage Sausage M E NU MU S I C E X H I B I TS R AFF LE IT E MS VI S I T stjosephbaypreserves.org F O R DE TA IL S C A LL 8502291787 F O R M O R E IN F O CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA SPORTS www.apalachtimes.com Thursday, January 24, 2013 A Page 11 Section By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com The Franklin County Lady Seahawks took on the Port St. Joe Lady Tiger Sharks for the Class 1A District championship Friday night in Port St. Joe and it promised to be another storied affair. The Lady Seahawks got off to a good start, when 10 minutes into the game sophomore Katie Seger was fouled just outside the penalty box. She served up the direct free kick into the box and junior Gracyn Kirvin put the ball in the net to give the Lady Seahawks a 1-0 lead. Just before the rst water break the Lady Seahawks struck again. The attack started with eighth grader Allie Kirvin passing the ball towards the center to Gracyn Kirvin, who laid the ball off to junior Jessica Shields who struck a shot from 20 yards out that went under Port St. Joe goalkeeper Christian Lain. The Lady Seahawks took a 2-0 lead going into the rst water break. The Lady Hawks endured a major setback as Seger, a standout young player, suffered a serious knee injury on the rst play after the water break. We know that these unfortunate things are part of the competitive sports world, but it does not soften the blow. Katie has been a large part of our team success and was playing the best soccer of her young career, said Coach Kelli Wright. The Lady Seahawks stayed strong throughout the game after Seger went down and the defensive effort was a seasons best. In the last 20 minutes of the game, Port St. Joe put their goalkeeper, one of their stronger eld players, on the eld. With six minutes left in the game she cranked a shot from 20 yards out that skipped off and over sophomore goalkeeper Macy Hunts gloves. That Lady Tiger Sharks goal closed the gap to 2-1. The Lady Seahawks held on to the lead to capture their second straight district title, marking the second title in only three years of state series play. Junior Gracyn Kirvin stepped up big on defense in the absence of Seger, taking her out of her normal forward position, said Wright. The last six minutes of the game seemed like an eternity, but our defense kept ghting and Macy Hunt came up with some tremendous saves. The defensive play of Ally Millender, Adriana Reeder, Laura Gallegos and Deborah Dempsey was tremendous. They responded to the momentum shift and ampli ed Port St. Joe pressure with great poise and tenacity, added the coach. We were extremely proud of how this team handled tonights adversity, said Josh Wright, athletic director and assistant girls soccer coach. After Katie went down, our girls made it clear that they were not going to let this game get away from them no matter what. Seger remained on the bench for the entire game in pain to support her teammates. Following the nal championship photo, Seger went directly to Sacred Heart for evaluation. She is expected to make a full recovery prior to her junior season. The Lady Seahawks, 11-2-2 on the season, squared off Wednesday night at home in the regional quarter nals against John Paul II, 11-9-1 on the season. DAVID ADLERSTEIN | the Times Lady Seahawk senior girls basketball players Anna Lee, and Shelby Myers were honored before Friday game against Bozeman for Senior Night. The two standout players for Carlos Hills squad then went on to key their team to a victory over the Lady Bucks. Shown above, from left, are Melissa Lee and her daughter, Anna, and Shelby and her mom, Michelle Myers. Lady Seahawks seniors honored Lady Seahawks win second district title in a row SWEET REPEAT CHRISTEY KIRVIN | Special to the Times The Lady Seahawks signal they are district soccer champs for the second year in a row. DAVID ADLERSTEIN | the Times Lady Seahawks soccer players Erin Riley, left, and Jessica Shields, hold up Robert Grif n III (RG3) football jerseys the team is raf ing off to raise money. Tickets are $2 each, and three for $5, with the winner drawn at the Jan. 31 boys basketball senior night. THE APALACHICOLA TIMES FIND US ON FACEBOOK

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Local A12 | The Times Thursday, January 24, 2013 2084408 Enter Starting January 27th www.nwfdail y news.com BENEFITTING Enter Now To win $500! 2nd Annual 2nd Annual 2084409 : _______________________________________ ____________________________________ ____________________________________ ________________________________________ ____________________________________________ __________________ __________ ____ By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star.com Two dogs that have lost their loving caregiver need a safe home. Selsh acts of violence send out ripples in every direction. On Dec. 12, the body of Cynthia Green of Apalachicola was discovered on a beach west of the city. Her daughter later confessed to the killing. Green left behind family members devastated by the senseless vio lence. She also left a different kind of family that needs help now. At the time of her death, Green was feeding and caring for at least eight cats and three dogs. Four of the cats have been trapped, treated for a respiratory infection and were adopted by a caring friend of Greens. One of the three dogs was elderly and ill and had to be put down. Two remaining dogs are in need of a home where they can adjust to their sad loss. The dogs are Dennis, a seven-year-old black lab mix and Ralph, a ve-year-old yellow lab mix. Shelter Director Karen Martin said the dogs have not adjusted well because they have come from a quiet sheltered background and are ter ried. She would like to see them remain together. Technician Warren Van Bramer has been working with the dogs and said they have made progress. This week, they ventured outside for the rst time since they were impounded Both dogs are neutered and heartworm negative. They are ready for adoption but need a new family that understands the trauma they have suffered. Ralph and Dennis are currently at the Franklin County Humane So ciety Animal Shelter. If you can help, call 670-8417 or visit the shelter on CR 65 north of Eastpoint. Martin said the Humane Society will waive all adoption fees to help quickly nd a good home for these deserving dogs. Victims dogs need homePHOTOS S P ECIAL TO T HE T IMES Left: Dennis, 7 years old, weighs 59 pounds. Right: Ralph is 5 years old and weighs 63 pounds. O rion bids on bridge repairs its barge caused At their regular Jan. 15 meeting, county commissioners opened bids to remove debris from beneath and make repairs to the St. George Island shing pier. A section of the pier was destroyed when a barge belonging to Orion Marine Contractors, of Houston, Texas, broke its moorings during Tropical Storm Debby. Orion, who was in the area as a subcontractor for Progress Energy, is denying liability for the damage, calling the storm an act of God. The company maintains the barge was properly moored. Orion Marine Group led an action in the Federal Northern District Court under the Shipowners Limitation of Liability Act, seeking to limit liability for the damage its barge did to the countys shing pier to $105,000, the value of the vessel that did the damage. That action was placed in abeyance this month. County Attorney Michael Shuler said attorney Robert Dees, an expert in marine law is now ling suit against Orion in circuit court on behalf of the county. Orion was one of the four companies to bid this month on the repair work, requesting $884,600 in fees. Gulf Group, out of Southport, offered the lowest bid, $566,200; HG Harders of Panama City listed charges totaling $953,900 and McCormick Contractors of Lynn Haven bid $832,200. Commissioners instructed staff and Clay Kennedy of Preble Rish, the countys engineering consultant, to review the bids and return with a recommendation.C ounty contributes to S econd C ircuit computers Grant Slayden, trial court administrator, addressed county commissioners at their Jan. 15 meeting seeking approval of a cost-sharing agreement on an integrated computer system between the courts, Franklin County and the other ve counties within the Second Judicial Circuit. The system is aiSmartBench, a product of Mentis Technology Solutions, LLC, and will be compatible with Franklin Countys case management system. This is the only existing system that meets the requirements of the circuit. Under the law, the Franklin County must fund court-related communications services which include computer systems. Under the agreement, Leon County serves as the scal agent and the other counties reimburse Leon County upon being invoiced. Payment will be made from dedicated and available funds from the Court lnnovations account under a county ordinance. The funds come from fees assessed on certain criminal cases for uses approved by the chief judge of the Circuit. Franklin Countys cost for the rst year is $12,000. Maintenance fees in the amount of $1,600 are paid annually for the rst three years and increase by 5 percent the fourth year. Were not asking for any money, the money is sitting there, Slayden said. Its already in the account. The Court lnnovations account has over $80,000 in it currently, so the funding is available. He said the county can opt out of the program at a later date,if it wishes, and no further fees would be assessed.Board O Ks resolution for more BP funding On Jan. 2, county commissioners voted unanimously to accept a joint resolution of disproportionately affected counties that will increase the funding allocation to Franklin County in compensation for the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Even though Franklin County is not a member of the Gulf consortium, I think it is appropriate that the board support the resolution as it does provide more funds to Franklin County than the previous formula, said Director of Administrative Services Alan Pierce The exact amount of funding provided under the resolution is not clear.T obacco ghters group to meet Feb. 7 There will be a TobaccoFree Franklin Partnership Coalition Meeting on Thursday, Feb. 7. The meeting will be held at the Franklin County Health Department, at 139 12th Street, from 5:30 until 6:30 p.m. in the second oor conference room. Roadside debris and recyclables add up Between Dec. 12 and 21 the Franklin County Waste Management collected 258 tons of roadside debris. Eastpoint was by far the greatest contributor, with almost 79 tons followed by Carrabelle with 70 tons. Apalachicola produced 57 tons and St. George Island produced almost 35 tons. Lanark Village contributed over 17 tons. The county produced more than 14 tons of recyclable materials. Five-and-one-half tons came from Apalachicola, and three tons from Eastpoint. St. George Island produced almost three tons. Carrabelle recycled two-andone-half tons of material and Lanark Village and Alligator Point each recycled about one-half ton. News BRIEFS

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Local The Times | A13 Thursday, January 24, 2013 CALL TOD A Y! 653-8868 GE T YOUR A D IN Trades & Services Laban Bontrager, DMD Monica Bontrager, DMD 12761 Pea Ridge Road Bristol, Florida 32321 TELEPHONE (850) 643-5417 Bristol Dental Clinic DENTURE LAB ON PREMISES Same Day Service on Repairs and Relines Don Lively General Contractors L ICENSED AND I NSURED 20 Y EARS E XPERIENCE P .O. Box 439 C arrabelle, FL 32322 697-2783 or Mobile 566-2603 RC 0066499 R G0065255 Carrabelle Visa, Discover, and American Express Honored at Participating Ace Stores JACKSONS Building Supplies Building Supplies & Auto Repair Carrabelle 697-3333 We Deliver Anywhere Hardware and Paint Center GE T YOUR A D IN Trades & Services CALL TODAY! 653-8868 J.J.s Tree Service, LLC Stump Grinder Licensed & Insured Call John : (850) 899-8432 ROBERTS APPLIANCE REPAIR ALL MAJOR BRANDS 18 Shadow Lane Apalachicola, FL 32320 Phone: (850) 653-8122 Cell: (850) 653-7654 Pet Wellness Program Dr. Hobson Fulmer | Dr. John Duncan 187 Highway 98 Eastpoint, FL Open Monday Friday 8-6 PM We are a full service Veterinary Clinic offering small animal medicine and surgery: Laser Surgery Low cost spay and neuter Monthly heartworm injections (no need for pills) Dentistry with digital x rays Ophthalmology (including glaucoma screening) Dermatology including allergy testing Nutritional counseling and diets Sonograms for internal organ evaluation and cancer screening Complete laboratory facilities Boarding After hours emergency care Highly trained, compassionate, professional sta FREE VACCINATIONS WITH EACH WELLNESS EXAM CALL 8506708306 FOR A N A PPOINTMENT APALA CH I C OLA B A Y ANIMAL C LINI C YOUR OT H ER FAMIL Y DO C TOR Special to The Times The Mommy and Me Friday afternoon Storytime at the Franklin County Public Library in Eastpoint represented the work of some budding artists. The theme for the month of January is The Arts and its many faces as the children are exposed to multiple forms of art and artists. The rst week included a study of Vincent Van Gogh, his life and the art he created. The children thoroughly enjoyed the opportunity to see the results of acrylic paints and watercolors on the easel. Each was proud to display their own creation and relive the excitement of the masters. One of the directives with early education is to expose even the smallest child to expression through creativity. This free weekly program offers numerous opportunities and ways for children aged birth to nine to explore library materials, learn new skills, and enjoy the library with new friends. The Carrabelle branch offers bi-weekly opportunities to hear stories from Ms. Tonia along with Wii games for children of all ages up to 12. Franklin County Public Library offers programs for children of all ages, teens, and adults at the Eastpoint and Carrabelle sites. For more information about programs and services, call 850-670-8151 or 850-697-2366. YOUR COUNTY LIBRARY Mommy and Me creates young artists Children and their moms take part in Mommy and Me Storytime at the library. PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE TIMES

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A14 | The Times Thursday, January 24, 2013 By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes lswoboda@star.com On Jan. 3, Carrabelles City Commission passed an ordinance to promote water conservation measures in landscape design. Although the basics of Ordi nance 454 was mandated by the North Florida Water Management District, city commissioners had some discretion in writing the law. City Attorney Dan Hartman said Carrabelles newest ordinance was modeled on an ordinance passed in Port St. Joe. The planning and zoning board reviewed the new law before the Jan. 3 meeting and suggested sev eral changes to the original draft The purpose of these regu lations is to establish minimum standards for the development, installation and maintenance of landscaped areas without inhibit ing creative landscape design, reads the new ordinance. The goal of the newly created standards is water conservation. Water usage is reduced by pre serving existing plant communi ties, or re-establishing native plant communities, using water for ir rigation efciently and growing site specic plant materials. Na tive plant materials are preferred because they require little or no supplemental water to survive. Eastpoints Joyce Estes, vice chair of the NWFWMD, said she supports the new landscape ordi nances. We do need to be more aware of our environment, she said. We all want pretty lawns, but we do need to be more aware of what God gave us. Estes said she and her husband, Jim, have tried to maintain much of their own waterfront property in a natural state to benet wild life and preserve the health of the estuary. The new law mandates specic water conservation measures in cluding installing a rain sensor device in all automatic lawn irri gation systems to minimize runoff and wastewater. Property can be inspected for compliance by the city code enforcement ofcer with 24 hours notice to the owner. Landscape design for develop ments larger than a duplex must be done by a person knowledge able of Florida plant materials, plant communities, and landscape and irrigation principles. Own ers of duplexes and single-fam ily dwellings may create their own plan. Landscape plans are to be presented for approval within 180 days of issuance of a certicate of occupancy for a new property. The ordinance mandates the use of 75 percent native plants in all landscape designs and As much native vegetation as possible is to be preserved during develop ment. Resources to identify na tive plants include the University of Florida Cooperative Extension Service publications: Native Flor ida Plants for Home Landscapes, Conserving Water in the Home Landscape and Drought Toler ant Plants for North and Central Florida. Only 5 percent of the land scaped area can be covered by ma terials impervious to water, such as concrete, plastic or asphalt. Driveways are considered part of the landscape and fall under this section of the ordinance. Ordinance 454 bans the use of certain invasive plants including water-hyacinth; hydrilla; green hygro; cogon grass, also known as Japanese blood grass; waterspinach; catclaw and silk tree mi mosa; water-lettuce; popcorn tree also known as Chinese tallow tree; turkey berry; tropical soda apple; Ardisia, also known as Marlberry and Spiceberry; Para grass; cam phor-tree; taro; lather leaf; Suri nam cherry; West Indian marsh grass; Gold Coast, Brazilian and day jasmine; non-native lantanas including all of the ornamental forms commonly sold by nurser ies; hedge privet aka Ligustrum; Japanese honeysuckle; Lygodium or Japanese climbing fern; cats claw; sword fern; Burma reed or cane grass; ground orchid; skunk vine; Napier grass also known as elephant grass; kudzu; downy rose myrtle; oyster plant; scaevola also known as half-ower or beach nau paka; incised halberd fern; whiteowered wandering Jew and, hor ror of horrors, chinaberry. The chinaberry is considered by some to be Carrabelles city tree but dont fear, Carrabelles beloved Police Tree, an ancient chinaberry located next to the Worlds Smallest Police Station is grandfathered in as an existing, mature tree. Although a few of the native grasses are suitable for lawns, the use of turf grass is discouraged un der the new ordinance. This type of grass is limited to, those areas on the site that receive pedestrian trafc, provide for recreation use, or provide soil erosion control such as on slopes or in swales; and where turf grass is used as a de sign unier, or other similar practi cal use. Carrabelle is charged with sponsoring regular workshops or short courses to educate the public on good landscaping and irrigation practices. Under Ordinance 454, City Manager Courtney Millender or City Clerk Keisha Smith must re view and approve all landscape plans for new developments or revisions of more than 50 percent of any landscape design. Specialized athletic elds such as baseball elds are exempt, but the landscape surrounding ath letic elds must comply. Non-ir rigated areas and areas that are irrigated with shallow well water are exempt from the requirements of 454. Existing landscape designs are grandfathered in, but if the owner of a property revises more than 50 percent of the landscape, the en tire property must be brought into compliance. The city commission can grant variances and special exceptions to the rules. New landscaping law promotes conservation LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Native plants can be beautiful and support the environment. A14 | The Times Thursday, January 24, 2013 CLASSIFIEDS 89868T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY CASE NO.: 12-00091CA CENTENNIAL BANK, an Arkansas banking corporation, as Assignee of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, as Receiver for Coastal Community Bank, a Florida banking corporation, Plaintiff, v. RUTH J. FLETCHER, individually, DAVID WALKER, individually, KARMIN WILSON, individually, UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF RUTH J. FLETCHER a/k/a RUTH FLETCHER, UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF DAVID WALKER, UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF KARMIN WILSON, LAKE PRISTINE PROPERTY OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., a Florida Non Profit Corporation, UNKNOWN PARTIES IN POSSESSION, and FIRST TENNESSEE BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the undersigned Clerk of the Circuit Court of Franklin County, Florida, pursuant to the Final Summary Judgment of foreclosure, entered in this case, will sell the property at public sale to the highest bidder for cash, except as set forth hereinafter, on February 20, 2013, at 11:00 am Eastern Time at the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida, in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes, the following described real property lying and being in Franklin County, Florida, to-wit: Lots 7 and 8 of LAKE PRISTINE, PHASE I, according to the plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 8, Page 2, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. This Notice dated this 4th day of January, 2013. Marcia M. Johnson Franklin County Clerk of Circuit Court By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk Jan 17, 24, 2013 89906T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY CASE NO. 2011-417CA EMERALD COAST FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, Plaintiff, vs. ANTHONY J. CROOM, SR. and wife, TAMMIE D. CROOM, Defendants. AMENDED NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that pursuant to an Amended Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated November 2, 2012, and entered in Civil Case No. 2011-417-CA of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit of the State of Florida, in and for FRANKLIN County, wherein EMERALD COAST FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, is Plaintiff and ANTHONY J. CROOM, SR. and TAMMIE D. CROOM, are Defendants, I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at the front door of the Franklin County Courthouse in Apalachicola, Florida, at 11:00 A.M., ET on the 13th day of February, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: Lots 11 and 12, Block 216 City of Apalachicola, according to the plat thereof of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. DATED this 10th day of January, 2013. MARCIA JOHNSON CIRCUIT COURT CLERK By: Terry E. Creamer DEPUTY CLERK January 24, 31, 2013 91691T NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED Notice if hereby given that, REEL PROPERTIES, LLC., the holders of the following certificate have filed said certificate for tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property and the name in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No: 27 Year of issuance: 2009 Description of property: Lots 21,22,23, & 24 Block 3, Sun `n Sand Beaches Unit #2, PARCEL NO: 32-06S-01W-1061-0003-02 10 Name is which assessed: NANCY JO EDWARDS All of said property being in the State of Florida, Franklin County. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the Courthouse door on the second (1st) Monday in the month of February 2013, which is the 4th day of February 2013 at 11:00 a.m. Dated this 17th day of December 2012. MARCIA M. JOHNSON CLERK OF COURTS FRANKLIN COUNTY, Cassie B. Sapp Deputy Clerk Jan. 3, 10, 17, 24, 2013 91821T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 12-000055-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, as successor in interest to APALACHICOLA STATE BANK, Plaintiff, vs. SHEZAD SANAULLAH; JEANNE M. WRAY BONDS n/k/a JEANNE M. DAIL; THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS, TRUSTEES AND ALL OTHER PARTIES CLAIMING AN INTEREST BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THE ESTATE OF ROBERT E. CONNELL, DECEASED; KAREN C. BIDDY; ALBERT A. SIMPLER, III; and CEDAR BLVD. LEASE FUNDING LLC, INC., UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Defendant(s) NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE is hereby given that, pursuant to the Order of Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure in this cause, in the Circuit Court of Franklin County, Florida, I will sell the property situated in Franklin County, Florida described as: Lots Number Four (4) and Five (5) of Block One Hundred Seven (107) of the City of Apalachicola, County of Franklin, State of Florida, according to the map or plat of said City in general use. at Public Sale, to the highest bidder, for cash, at the steps of the Franklin County Courthouse, Apalachicola, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on February 6, 2013. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court this 1st day of October, 2012. MARCIA M. JOHNSON Clerk of Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk January 17, 24, 2013 91883T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, STATE OF FLORIDA CASE NO.: 11-499-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, successor in interest to COASTAL COMMUNITY BANK, Plaintiff, vs. ROBERT B. RAMSEY and wife, KELLY A RAMSEY, Defendants. CLERKS NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO F.S. CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Partial Summary Judgment of Foreclosure dated January 4, 2013, in Case No.: 11-499-CA of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at public sale on the front steps of the Court House at 11:00 a.m. EST on February 20, 2013 the following described property: Lot 6, Block 93 274, KEOUGHS SECOND ADDITION, to the City of Carrabelle, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. DATED: January 4, 2013. MARCIA JOHNSON Clerk of the Court Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk January 17, 24, 2013 91907T PUBLIC NOTICE Notice is hereby given The Northwest Florida Transportation Corridor Authority will hold a meeting on January 24, 2013. The meeting will be held at 10:00 a.m. Central Time at the City Hall, Commission Meeting Room, 9 Harrison Avenue, Panama City, Florida. Any person requiring special accommodations to participate in this meeting is asked to advise the Corridor Authority at least 48 hours prior to the meeting by contacting Amy Paulk at (850) 415-1040 or apaulk@gc-inc.com. January 24, 2013 91963T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION Case No.: 11000505CA FLAGSTAR BANK, FSB, Plaintiff, vs. NORBERT JOSEPH KAMINSKI A/K/A NORBERT J. KAMINSKI A/K/A NORBERT KAMINSKI AND NANCY ANNE KAMINSKI A/K/A NANCY A. KAMINSKI A/K/A NANCY KAMINSKI, et al. Defendant. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated December 27, 2012 and entered in 11000505CA of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein FLAG-STAR BANK FSB, is the Plaintiff and NORBERT JOSEPH KAMINSKI A/K/A NORBERT J. KAMINSKI A/K/A NORBERT KAMINSKI AND NANCY ANNE KAMINSKI A/K/A NANCY A. KAMINSKI A/K/A NANCY KAMINSKI; UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2 are the Defendant(s). Marcia M. Johnson as the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Front Steps of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320, at 11:00 AM on February 14, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 28, BLOCK 10 EAST OF ST. GEORGE ISLAND GULF BEACHES UNIT NO. 1, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE(S) 7, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 28th day of December, 2012. Marcia M. Johnson As Clerk of the Court Michele Maxwell As Deputy Clerk IMPORTANT If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301. 850.577.4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Submitted by: Robertson, Anschutz & Schneid, P.L. Attorneys for Plaintiff 3010 N. Military Trail, Suite 300 Boca Raton, FL 33431 561-241-6901 Fax: 561-241-9181 January 24, 31, 2013 91987T PUBLIC NOTICE STATE OF FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION NOTICE OF INTENT TO ISSUE PERMIT The Department of Environmental Protection gives notice of its intent to issue an environmental resource permit for dredging a mooring basin, file number 19-0305735-002-EI, to the Martin Frazier, at 570 Mountain Park Trail, Stone Mountain, Georgia 30087. The purpose of the permit is to authorize dredging approximately 193.3 cubic yards of sediment in Postum Bayou to allow mooring of recreational vessels. Dredge spoil will be deposited in a self-contained upland spoil cell on Timber Island. The project will be located at lots 6 and 7 of Carraway Bay Subdivision, Carrabelle, Franklin County, Florida. Based on all the above, and with the application of general and limiting specific conditions of the permit, the Department has reasonable assurance the project, as proposed, fully meets the environmental resources permitting requirements of Chapter 62-346, Florida Administrative Code, and will not harm the environment. A person whose substantial interests are affected by the Departments action may petition for an administrative proceeding (hearing) under Sections 120.569 and 120.57 of the Florida Statute. The petition must contain the information set forth below and must be filed (received by the clerk) in the Office of General Local | Classieds

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, January 24, 2013 The Times | A15 ToPlace Your Classified ad inCall Our New Numbers Now!Call:850-747-5020 Toll Free:800-345-8688 Fax:850-747-5044 Email:thestar@pcnh.com Email:thetimes@pcnh.com theAPALACHICOLA & CARRABELLETIMES CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW ManySelling ABSOLUTE! AUCTIONS AuctionFDIC.com AL-GA-FL-SCFebruary23-March2RESIDENTIAL-COMMERCIAL DEVELOPERLOTS-LANDNoBuyersPremium|5%DownPayment $2,500CashiersChecktoBid BrokersProtected H&MCQ1035357,AB110;B.G.Hudson,Jr.,BK3006464,AU230 866.509.4473 3532994 RENTALS3 BR 3 BA UNFURNISHED CONDO LONG TERM, POOL ............................$850 2 BR 1 BA UNFURNISHED HOUSEFL ROOM, FENCED YARD, GARAGE ...$775 2 BR 1 BA UNFURNISHED APT NEW PAINT, SMALL PORCH .............$375 3 BR 1 BA FURNISHED APT WEEKLY OR MONTHLY, INC UTILITIES 3 BR 1 BA UNFURNISHED DUPLEX DOWNTOWN CARRABELLE ..............$600 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322850-697-9604 850-323-0444 www.seacrestre.comwww. rst tness.com/carrabellePROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND RENTALS Apalachicola 1Br/1Ba quiet, 2 blks from boat ramp, $600mo + first & last dep. 850-570-9167 St. GeorgeIsland $175/wk, elec, satellite, garbage incl. Pool tbl. 12’ X 65’ deck. Beautiful view! 850-653-5319 East Point Carrabelle 900 sq ft Designer, 1Br, Open Plan, Jacuzzi, Washer & Dryer, Satellite, Wi-Fi Avail, Secluded, 1/2 mile from Beach. $420 month. Call 954-816-7004 Text FL22547 to 56654 Carrabelle Cove ApartmentsTaking Applications Now Available: 1, 2 and 3 br, Handicap Apts. Laundry facilities on site, W/S included in rent, CH&A and window coverings provided. On site management Office. Rental assistance available. Income restrictions apply, reasonable accommodation. Carrabelle Cove Apartments 807 Gray Ave #33 Carrabelle, Fl 32322 850-697-2017 TDD711 This institution is an equal opportunity provider & employerText FL29928 to 56654 HospitalityRESORT VACATION PROPERTIESAccepting applications for aFull-time Front Desk ClerkOffice experience, computer skills & good customer service skills required. Great benefits, weekend work required. Apply in person 9-5 weekdays at 123 W Gulf Beach Dr, St. George Island Install/Maint/RepairMaintenanceFull time maintenance person needed at the Bucaneer Inn on St. George Island, Fl. Experience is helpful and must be able to work weekends. Applications can be pick up at 228 Franklin Blvd, St. George Island or call 850-927-2163 for more information OFFICE CLEANER NEEDED for The Star & Apalachicola/Carrabelle Times Newspaper. Every other week after 5:00 p.m. JOB DUTIES INCLUDE: Sweep & Mop oor € Clean Bathroom € Empty & Take out Trash € Light Dusting € For The Star, Call Kari: 227.7847 For The Times, Call Gail: 653.6853 Counsel of the Department at 3900 Commonwealth Boulevard, Mail Station 35, Tallahassee, Florida 323993000. Because the administrative hearing process is designed to re-determine final agency action on the application, the filing of a petition for an administrative hearing may result in a modification of the permit, or even a denial of the application. Accordingly, the applicant will not commence construction or other activities under this permit until the deadlines below for filing a petition for an administrative hearing, or request for an extension of time, have expired. Under subsection 62-110.106(4) of the Florida Administrative Code, a person whose substantial interests are affected by the Department’s action may also request an extension of time to file a petition for an administrative hearing. The Department may, for good cause shown, grant the request for an extension of time. Requests for extension of time must be filed with the Office of General Counsel of the Department at 3900 Commonwealth Boulevard, Mail Station 35, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-3000, before the applicable deadline. A timely request for extension of time shall toll the running time period for filing a petition until the request is acted upon. If a request is filed late, the Department may still grant it upon a motion by the requesting party showing that the failure to file a request for an extension of time before the deadline was the result of excusable neglect. In the event that a timely and sufficient petition for an administrative hearing is filed, other persons whose substantial interests will be affected by the outcome of the administrative process have the right to petition to intervene in the proceeding. Intervention will be only at the discretion of the presiding officer upon the filing of a motion in compliance with Rule 28-106.205 of the Florida Administrative Code. In accordance with subsection 28-106.111 (2) and subparagraph 62-110.106(3)(a).4, Florida Administrative Code, petitions for an administrative hearing by the applicant must be filed within 14 days of receipt of written notice. Petitions filed by any persons other than the applicant, and other than those entitled to written notice under Section 120.60 (3) of the Florida Statutes, must be filed within 14 days of publication of the notice. Under Section 120.60 (3) of the Florida Statute, however, any person who has asked the Department for notice of agency action may file a petition within 14 days of such notice, regardless of the date of publication. The petitioner shall mail a copy of the petition to the applicant at the address indicated above at the time of filing. The failure of any person to file a petition for an administrative hearing within the appropriate time period shall constitute a waiver of those rights. A petition that disputes the material facts on which the Department’s action is based must contain the following information: (a) The name and address of each agency affected and each agency’s file or identification number, if known; (b) The name, address, and telephone number of the petitioner; the name, address, and telephone number of the petitioner’s representative, if any, which shall be the address for service purposes during the course of the proceeding; and an explanation of how the petitioner’s substantial interests are or will be affected by the agency determination; (c) A statement of when and how the petitioner received notice of the agency decision; (d) A statement of all disputed issues of material fact. If there are none, the petition must so indicate; (e) A concise statement of the ultimate facts alleged, including the specific facts that the petitioner contends warrant reversal or modification of the agency’s proposed action; (f) A statement of the specific rules or statutes that the petitioner contends require reversal or modification of the agency’s proposed action; and (g) A statement of the relief sought by the petitioner, stating precisely the action that the petitioner wishes the agency to take with respect to the agency’s proposed action. A petition that does not dispute the material facts on which the Department’s action is based shall state that no such facts are in dispute and otherwise shall contain the same information as set forth above, as required by Rule 28-106.301, Florida Administrative Code. Under Sections 120.569(2)(c) and (d) of the Florida Statute, a petition for administrative hearing must be dismissed by the agency if the petition does not substantially comply with the above requirements or is untimely filed. This action is final and effective on the date filed with the Clerk of the Department unless a petition is filed in accordance with the above. Upon the timely filing of petition this order will not be effective until further order of the Department. This permit, when issued, constitutes an order of the Department. The applicant has the right to seek judicial review of the order under Section 120.68 of the Florida Statute, by the filing of a notice of appeal under Rule 9.110 of the Florida Rules of Appellate Procedure with the Clerk of the Department in the Office of General Counsel, 3900 Commonwealth Boulevard, Mail Station 35, Tallahassee, Florida, 323993000; and by filing a copy of the notice of the appeal accompanied by the applicable filing fees with the appropriate district court of appeal. The notice of appeal must be filed within 30 days from the date when the final order is filed with the Clerk of the Department. Requests for review before the Land and Water Adjudicatory Commission must be filed with the Secretary of the Commission and served on the Department within 20 days from the date when the final order is filed with the Clerk of the Department. The application for this permit is available for public inspection during normal business hours, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, except for legal holidays, at the Northwest District office, 160 W. Government Street, Pensacola, Florida. January 24, 2013 *Adopt*:Doting dad, stay at home mom (&puppies) excited to give your baby everything! *Expenses Paid* *Bob & Maria* FKBar42311 1800-522-0045 $$ WANTED OLD CAR TAGS $$ I am buying old car tags in good condition from the 1950’s from the following counties: Franklin, Gulf, Liberty, Calhoun, Bay, Jackson, Wakulla, Taylor, Madison, Jefferson, Gadsden, Hamilton, Lafayette. Kirk 850-585-3677 $Wanted Old Bottles$I am looking for old coca-cola bottles, Medicine bottles, Orange Crush bottles, Rice Bottling Works bottles, Gorrie Bottling Works bottles, Neele Bottling Works bottles, John Cook Fine Whiskey flask bottles from Apalachicola also commissary tokes, seafood tokens, lumber tokens, general merchandise tokens, turpentine tokens & old signs. Kirk 850-545-3677 Bargain’sNew Merchandise Liquidation Store, In Hickory Plaza, Prices 25-75% Below Retail! Mention Ad for Additional 10% OFF! 414 S. Tyndall Pkwy850-215-2755 Bldg Const/Skill TradeProject Manager/ EstimatorExperienced Commercial Construction PM /Estimator in Tallahassee area. Salary & benefits. Submit resume or application to tallahassee construction.o pportunity@hotmail.com or mail to: OPPORTUNITY 1400 Village Square Blvd. Ste 3-179 Tallahassee, FL 32312 Web ID# 34238895 Text FL38895 to 56654 Bldg/Skilled TradeSiteSuperintendentSuperintendent for Government Project Govern. Exper. OnlyRequired, Fax Resume & Salary Requirements, 813-281-9596 Web ID# 34237529 Text FL37529 to 56654 DriversDriversAll Miles PAID (Loaded & Empty)! Home on the weekends! Running Class-A CDL Flatbed. Lease to Own-No Money Down CALL: 888-880-5911 Food Svs/Hospitality*Servers *Cooks Dishwashers *Bartenders *BussersBLUE PARROT Now HIRINGPlease apply in person between 9a-5pm 7 days a week@ Blue Parrot St. George’s Island Food Svs/HospitalityBest WesternAll PositionsPlease apply in Person 9am-3pm 249 Hwy 98 Apalachicola, FL. No phone calls!!! HospitalityRESORT VACATION PROPERTIESAccepting applications for aFT Check-In ClerkExperience handling money helpful. Must have reliable transportation. Quick learnerFT ReservationistPrior sales exp preferred. Attentive to details & follow-up.Maint Office Asst4 days/wk. Team player, attentive to detail & good follow-up skills. These great jobs on SGI require excellent customer service & computer skills, good spelling & grammar, and weekend work. Prior office exp preferred. Great benefits pkg. Apply in person 9-5 weekdays at 123 W Gulf Beach Dr St. George Island These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you. EmeraldCoast Marketplace 747-5020 Need a helping hand? Advertise in the Help Wanted Section in the Classifieds! 747-5020 REPRESENTATIVES will be at the GULF COUNTY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE on Tuesdays & Thursdays from 9 am – 1 pm EST accepting applications for numerous open positions.We offer competitive wages and a comprehensive bene t package including Company paid health, dental, and life insurance, 401(k), attendance & safety bonuses.EOE/Drug Free WorkplaceEASTERN SHIPBUILDING GROUP MORE THAN A JOB… A FUTURE!

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A16 | The Times Thursday, January 24, 2013 Real Estate Picks Our local real estate experts have identied what they feel are the best values around and are oering them to you in Real Estate Picks! (In this section), Discover the best real estate values in Mexico Beach, Port St. Joe, Apalachicola, Cape San Blas, St. George Island, Carrabelle and surrounding areas. Best Values on the Forgotten Coast SELL YOUR LI S TING S HERE! Only $35 per week per listing Minimum 2 ads per week or 1 ad for 2 weeks Contact Joel or Kari for details: (850)814-7377 or (850)227-7847 SOLD John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.com MLS# 248579 $649,900 St. George Island SHELL HARBOR BAYFRONT 4 BR, 4.5 BA, Guest Cottage, boat/RV garage, Gulf beautiful sunsets! John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.com MLS# 248242 $279,900 St. George Island 1ST TIER PLANTATION Great Gulf Views! Panoramic views to the east & north, Attention pilots! near the Plantation airport; One acre lot, Adjacent to boardwalk to Gulf, One of the highest lots on the Island, Amenities include New Club house & Pool. Seaside Drive, Nicks Hole 6012790 Locally owned and operated Home Business Auto Health Workers Comp NEW LOCATION: dbutler@coastalcoverage.com Local The world on a string By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star .co m Erik Bendl has already saved the world and now hes got it on a string and on a mission to raise awareness about diabetes. On Monday, Bendl and his dog, Nice found people waiting for them all along their route as the made their way from One Mile, where Bendl spent Sunday resting and repainting the ve-foot, canvas globe he has pushed over 5,000 miles and through 39 states since 2007. Bendl said he needed to spruce up the world because it got a salty soaking during the rst leg of his trip, which began Jan. 2, 2013, when he walked through sloppy snow in Tennessee. Bendl, who is headed towards Tampa, said this is his ninth walk. As he eases down the road, surrounded by curious, friendly faces, he tells everyone he meets about the importance of exercise and the hidden dangers of diabetes, the disease that took his mother at only 56 years of age in 1987. Born Gerta Koperek, she lived in Pennsylvania until 1962, when she and husband Richard Bendl moved to Louisville, Ky, where Gerta Bendl organized a group of neighborhood women to challenge the school board and to work on the problem of ood control. In Nov. 1972, she ran and won as the Democratic nominee for third district alderman, known for her outspoken humanitarianism. Bendl won a seat in the Kentucky General Assembly in 1976 and focused her attention on issues affecting the poor and elderly. In 1980 she became the rst woman to chair a standing committee in the state legislature. In 1987 she died of a heart attack brought on by complications of diabetes. Her son, Erik, saved the world, when he rescued his globe from the waste bin in the 1980s. When his son turned 7, he in ated it for the birthday party. He began taking the boy and the ball to the park and got lots of attention. Thats when he hit on his plan to spread the word about exercise and health. Bendl and Nice average about 10 miles a day on their excursions, which last from one to ve months. They sleep in a van that he leaves parked at the start of his daily walk, relying on some good-natured soul he meets during the day to ferry him back to pick it up each evening. He camps at re stations and in Wal-Mart parking lots. In Apalachicola he camped in an RV site offered to him by Capt. Tony Phillips. He has created a foundation to accept and disburse funds. He donates to the American Diabetes Association and maintains a blog at www.worldguy.org I get lots of coverage, Bendl said. But I started the regular blog because my brother got tired of trying to Google me every morning. LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Erik Bendl, his dog Nice and the canvas globe.



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xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx 50 WWW.APALACHTIMES.COMPhone: 850-653-8868 Web: apalachtimes.com E-mail: dadlerstein@star .com Fax: 850-653-8036 Circulation: 800-345-8688 DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK: School News & Society: 11 a.m. Friday Real Estate Ads: 11 a.m. Thursday Legal Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Display Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Line Ads: 5 p.m. Monday xxxxx Contact Us xxxxx Out to see Index By DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com Organizers of the third annual Oyster Cook-off said they are delighted at how well Saturdays event went and with the large amount of funds raised for the Apalachicola Volunteer Fire Department. Marisa Getter, who helped coordinate the event, said the affair, held under sunny skies and drawing a surprisingly robust number of visitors, deposited more than $25,000 in the day of the event and drew more than $7,000 in sponsors. In addition, credit card charges for the silent auction and additional sponsors still are coming in. I can safely say we drew over $33,000 for the gross, Getter said. Happiest of all the attendees at Saturdays cook-off had to be members of the Eastpoint Volunteer Fire Department, who walked away with top honors for their Lazy Lester, a deep dish oysters Rockefeller, garnished with romaine lettuce and lemon wedges. The team, overseen by Capt Jim Joyner, took pains to improve on their presentation this year, serving up their culinary delight on an antique sea motif platter.Dr. King legacy celebrated in song, speechBy DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com The meaning of the annual Dr. Martin Luther King federal holiday was not ignored in Apalachicola on Monday. It was brought home at the Armory in the speaking of words and in the laying on of hands, the dramatic retelling of a story about freedom given birth, through religious oratory, political persuasion and other nonviolent means. The legal and social aspects of these pages in the nations history, particularly in the southern states within that nation, were brought forth in a historical overview delivered in the keynote speech by Dr. Isaac Neal of Columbus, Ga., a former Franklin County School principal in the early days of the countys consolidation effort. Its good to be home. This is home for me, Neal said after he and his wife were introduced by Rosa Tolliver.Hospital seeks Miniats of cesBy DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com After almost 24 years practicing medicine in Franklin County, Apalachicola family practitioner Dr. Miniat appears to have closed up shop. Franklin County commissioners learned Jan. 15 that Miniat is past due on his rent of a county-owned building and had a notice on his of ce door that he had relocated his practice to Blountstown. If Dr. Miniat is not going to see patients in the countyowned building, then Weems Hospital would like to right to inspect the property and make a proposal to the county to relocate its new Weems West Clinic into the building, Alan Pierce, the countys director of administrative services, told county commissioners. Currently the Weems West Clinic is housed in the hospital, and there are not enough exam rooms to serve the patient load. Beginning Jan. 29, 2001, Miniat began seeing patients at the former county health department building, at 137 12th St. He did this under the terms of a rental agreement that called for him to pay $1,200 per By LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com Individual re districts within the county now may set their own Municipal Service Bene t Units (MSBU) for re prevention and mitigation. On Jan. 15, the county commission held a public hearing to discuss setting MSBU rates for the seven re districts. Currently, all property owners within the county must pay a fee beginning at $10 for undeveloped land and increasing according to use. Single-family residences pay $50 annually. Jay Abbott, president of the countywide reghters association, requested commissioners pass an ordinance creating seven independent re districts with the same boundaries as existing re service districts, and stipulating that each could request changes in MSBU based on need. According to County Attorney Michael Shuler, the existing districts are Apalachicola with borders de ned by the Apalachicola River and the western county line; Eastpoint from the eastern bank of the Apalachicola River to Yents Bayou; St. George Island; Carrabelle with boundaries at Yents Bayou and Lake Morality Road; Lanark Village/St. James with boundaries at Lake Morality Road and State Route 319; and Alligator Point/St. Teresa from State Road 319 to the eastern county line. Abbott told commissioners the re ghters association discussed the ordinance at both their August and September meetings and twice voted unanimously to request independent status for the MSBU districts. Abbott, chief of the St. George Island re department, told commissioners St. George Island needs an increase because they must have two re stations to cover the district because of requirements set by the International Organization for Standardization, the worlds largest developer of voluntary international standards for such things as re protection. Alligator Point has the same thing, he said. St. Teresa and Alligator Point both need re stations. Our current MSBU does not cover our budget. We have to rely on donations and charitable events. We feel the MSBU should cover our budget. JAY ABBOTT STEPHEN MINIATCounty re districts to govern own MSBU rates Fire ghters win oyster cook-offPHOTOS BY DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The TimesCapt, Jim Joyner, who led the Eastpoint re ghters to victory, center, is anked by runner-up Rusty Hamlin, left, and third place Kevin Maxwell. MARTIN LUTHER KING JR. DAYA movement for citizenshipDr. King was out front. He forced America to confront herself. Isaac Neal former Franklin County School principal A movement for citizenship PHOTOS BY DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The TimesPastor David Walker, left, leads the prayer in the blessing of Apalachicola Mayor Van Johnson during a celebration of Martin Luther King Jr. Day. Below, Isaac Neal delivers the keynote speechSee KING A7 See OFFICES A5 See MSBU A3 See OYSTER A5Thursday, January 24, 2013 VOL. 127 ISSUE 39Opinion . . . . . . A4 Society . . . . . . A8 Faith . . . . . . . A9 Outdoors . . . . . A10 Tide Chart . . . . A10 Sports . . . . . . A11 Classi eds . . . . A15District champs! A11Elvis does the Dixie this weekendTribute artist Todd Alan Herendeen & his Follow That Dream Band have become one of the Dixie Theatres most popular shows, performing hits from Johnny Cash, Roy Orbison and join Elvis, among others. They will perform at 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday, Jan. 25-26 at the Dixie. Tickets are $25. For more info, call 653-3200.Prof to speak on military religious lifeThe subject of Religious Life Above and Below Decks During World War II will be the topic of a lecture at 7 p.m. Saturday at the Apalachicola Maritime Museum. Dr. Kurt Piehler directs the Institute on World War II and the Human Experience at Florida State University. He will discuss the topic of his forthcoming book, which examines religious life aboard Navy ships during World War II. $5 includes low-country boil reception. For more info call 653-2500.FSU professor to perform SundayRetired Florida State University music professor Thomas Tommie Wright, who wrote the FSU Fight Song, will provide at 4 p.m. Sunday at Trinity Episcopal Church. This concert is one of the programs of the 25th season of the Ilse Newell Fund for the Performing Arts, under the auspices of the Apalachicola Area Historical Society. General admission is a $5 donation, with students admitted free. Mardi Gras going to the dogsThe Mystic Krewe of Salty Barkers, a parade unit of dogs and their people, invites you to join in the Apalachicola Mardi Gras parade Feb. 1. You may walk, ride in golf carts, pull wagons, push strollers or come up with any other unique form of transportation. The parade, sponsored by Franklin County Habitat for Humanity, begins at 5 p.m. at the Bowery and continues to Riverfront Park, where the party will continue with live music, dancing, Cajun food and other festivities for the whole family. For information or to preregister, call 670-5064 or 653-2025. Laissez les BONE temps roulez!

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LocalA2 | The Times Thursday, January 24, 2013 By LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com Three years after the debate started over the existence of large black cats in and around Tates Hell, an island woman says she has spotted one in residential Eastpoint. Mary Lou Short was returning to her St. George Island home after a church meeting at 7:45 p.m. Jan. 16 when she encountered something totally unexpected. The night was overcast and South Bayshore was very dark, but Short said she noticed movement on the north side of the road and stopped by the entrance of the Las Brisas development to avoid hitting what she thought was a bear. Short said it was a very large, very black cat. She said the cat came out of Las Brisas headed toward the bay and disappeared between two houses while she watched. Its snout was not as pointed as a dogs, but not as short as a domestic cat, she said. It was far enough away from my lights that I got to see the whole body. I saw it snout to tail. I am absolutely positive I saw what I saw. I was so in awe I was not afraid. Ive never seen an animal like this. This was absolutely not a bear. No housecat that I know is as large as this animal, but it moved like a cat. Short said the animal did not appear panicked as it loped across the road with a very smooth gait and she did not believe it was pursuing prey. It showed no fear or interest in her car and didnt speed up when it entered the light. She described the cat as larger than a German shepherd and very glossy with short fur. Short said the animal was not a coyote. There is a black coyote on the island, Short said. I have seen that black coyote. This was larger than any coyote. This animal was certainly heavier than most large dogs Ive seen. Cryptobiologist and author Scott Marlowe, who has visited the area on more than one occasion searching for evidence of big cats, said Short might have overestimated the size. Its the shock factor, he said. When you see something so unexpected, it tends to impress you as bigger than it really is. Short said the body of the cat was about as long as her car was wide and the tail was about threequarters of the length of the body and held out straight. After viewing pictures of differing cats online, Short said, What I saw had the characteristics of puma, panther or jaguar. She emphasized the head was large and boxy, the ears roundish but tipped with a point and the body heavy and muscular. Carrabelles Cal Allen has theorized that Central American jaguarondis, also known as otter cats, might be the mystery cats living in Tates Hell. Short said the cat she saw was much larger than an otter cat, which tops the scales at 20 pounds. She also said the cat did not have a jaguarondis rounded ears. The original debate over big cats in the swamp was sparked by two videos posted in March 2010 on YouTube by Larry Miller of Carrabelle. After viewing the videos, Short said the animal depicted was not the animal she saw cross in front of her car, which she said was much larger and heavier. Elaine Kozlowsky, who lives less than a quarter mile from Las Brisas, said she sighted a tawny-colored panther about six months ago. I often get up in the middle of the night, Kozlowsky said. I looked out the back window toward the bay. Our yard is lighted and I caught sight of a huge tawny cat coming down out of one of the trees. I saw the rear of it. It had a long tail that was quivering like in a movie. It came out of the tree and went straight down the bank so I only got a glimpse. It was enormous. Wildlife biologist Adam Warwick who works for the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission has stated he believes there are Florida panther in Tates Hell but biologists say the native pumas are always tawny and never black. When wet, a tawny panther can appear much darker than when dry. Short said the cats coat was very shiny and it could have been wet. The jaguar is the only big black cat known to inhabit North America, the only member of the panther family found in the New World and the third largest cat after lions and tigers. Jaguars are normally spotted but there is a rare black form that is an expansion of the dark spots so they cover the whole pelt. In the 1880s, a few jaguar still remained in south Louisiana but they have not inhabited Florida for thousands of years. Currently the nearest suspected breeding population is in Arizona. Marlowe said he believes the animal spotted by Short is a black Florida panther. Just because the biologists have not caught one and put it in a cage doesnt mean it doesnt exist, he said. They are out there. I have seen one. TOBACCO CESSATIONCLASSSCHEDULELOCATION: George E. Weems Memorial Hospital All classes begin at 5:30 P.M. Free nicotine patches and gum will be provided to participants who complete each class Each class is a 2 hour (one time) session. Please visit the following websites to view a current schedule of tobacco cessation classes that are being held in Franklin County at www.bigbendahec.org/quit-now and www.ahectobacco.com For additional information, please contact Big Bend AHEC at 850-224-1177.THERE IS NO COSTTO ATTEND! Needing Financial Assistance for Medical Care?Weems Memorial Hospitals Financial Assistance Counselor is state trained and certied to assist people of ALL ages obtain low or no cost healthcare. Weems Hospital in Apalachicola is a Florida ACCESS center and can assist those who may need help buying food or who may need emergency cash assistance. For those who do not qualify for state assistance, Weems also oers sliding fee prices at its hospital and both medical centers. Call 850-653-8853 ext. 115 Today to Schedule an Appointment. HOW TO HANDLE A PANTHERA Florida panther is a subspecies of mountain lion or puma. During the 1880s, a $5 bounty on the panthers encouraged their eradication, but the war on these cats failed, barely. In 1958 the panther was protected by law, and in 1967 was listed as endangered by the US Fish and Wildlife Service. In 1973, when the cat population had shrunk to 60, it was added to the Florida endangered list. There are about 150 Florida panthers, most tted with radio transmitter collars. The panthers diet consists of small animals such as rabbits, rodents, waterfowl and sometimes larger animals such as storks, white-tailed deer and wild boar. They also will attack small farm animals such as chickens and goats and companion animals such as dogs and cats. Never leave an animal tied in an area where you suspect there might be a panther. There never has been a fatal attack on a human being by a Florida panther. Since 1909, just 20 people have died as a result of puma attacks anywhere in North America, while there have been more than 60,000 fatal attacks on pumas by humans. About 62 people die each year from lightning strikes Woman: Mystery cat stalking EastpointLOIS SWOBODA | The TimesMary Lou Short said a large black cat emerged from Las Brisas on Jan. 16.See CAT A3 See PANTHER A3

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LocalThe Times | A3Thursday, January 24, 2013 In 2012, a contractor working at St. James Bay Golf Resort east of Lanark Village reported seeing a large black cat cross the main road in broad daylight heading towards a pond. Could this be the same cat? The resort is only 20 miles from Eastpoint. Both Florida panthers and jaguars typically range much further looking for food or mates. Marlowe said he believes more than one of the black mystery cats is roaming the Florida peninsula, and said he and his son observed one near Chie and last February. Allen claims to have seen both tawny and black panthers in Tates Hell. Jim Broaddus who operates Bear Creek Feline Center in Panama City also reportedly has seen a large black cat in the swamp. Last February, a group of cryptobiologists including Marlowe and his son, Robert, as well as experienced monster hunters Lee Hales and Ken Gerhardt, spent several days in Tates Hell searching for the Carrabelle Cat. Gerhard and Hales created a cutout of a black cat to photograph at the site of the original video captured by Miller. The pair hoped to get an idea of the size of the animal in the original footage. After study, Hales and Gerhardt said the shape of the cat in Millers lm was characteristic of a domestic cat rather than a wild species and that the cat in the lm was too small to be a Florida panther. Hales said the cat in the lm was a large house cat. Scott Marlowe and Allen disagreed with their ndings. Warwick spoke with Short over the telephone on Jan. 17. If there is a big cat in that neighborhood, there will be other sightings, he said. In a telephone interview last week, Hales said he will try to arrange a visit to the area sometime in the next two weeks and hopes to use night vision equipment to survey an area near Shorts sighting.in the U.S. so youre more than 300 times more likely to be killed by lightning than by a cat. According to animal behavior experts, cats, including puma, are intimidated by any animal that is larger and especially taller, than themselves, and by things that approach rapidly. If you encounter a big cat, try to make it see you as a dominant predator. Showing aggression often will cause a cat to ee. Big cats are intelligent and very shy of humans. Make eye contact; stare down the animal. Make loud noises and try to look bigger by waving your arms. Do not crouch to pick up a weapon placing your head lower than the cats. The showing of teeth, which people interpret as smiling, is seen as a threat by many animals. Grin at the cat. Prey-sized items, such as dogs or children that move rapidly across a cats eld of vision, stimulate it to attack. Tossing a backpack or other item in front of an approaching cat often will distract it. One cougar attack on a child ended when the boy lost a shoe and the cougar focused its attention on that. Do not run, as nothing triggers this predators re ex like eeing. Pick up small children or animals. Placing a child on your shoulders makes you appear taller and more dangerous to a cat. If you see a big cat feeding, slowly withdraw from the area, while watching it. Dont turn your back on it. If a cat attacks you, ght back. Kick it, hit it with branches or rocks and punch it. Entertainment FRIDAY Feb 1 5:30pmGolf Cart & Pet Paradefrom the Bowery to Riverfront Park for a concertSATURDAY Feb 2 6:30-10:30pmReserved table & dinner for 6 $300 or $50 ppShow only 7:30-10:30 General Admission $25 Entertainment Entertainment Marilyn & Mason Bean Brian Bowen Band CAT from page A2 PANTHER from page A2 USFWS | Special to The TimesA Florida panther County Commissioner William Massey said he in favor of allowing St. George Islanders to vote on their MSBU rates independently but questioned how the money was being spent. Abbott said the island re department responds to calls every day. He said there are sometimes 10,000 visitors on the island. We are required by insurance to have a ladder truck, he said. If we dont have a ladder truck, our (ISO) rating goes from six to nine. When we went from a nine to a seven, some beach homes saved as much as $5,000. Abbott said the re department has polled homeowners about the increase in MSBU on the island and got 475 yes votes and only 17 nos. Commissioner Noah Lockley suggested putting the MSBU fee on the property tax bill. Abbott said the amount collected still would be insuf cient. Commissioner Smokey Parrish said as of July 2012, 262 island homeowners hadnt paid their MSBU assessment, for a total of $15,675 in uncollected funds. Speaking for the St. George Island Civic Club, Mason Bean said an MSBU is the only way for to pay these rural re departments. The increase is only two cases of beer a year. Were held hostage by Mother Nature, said Island re department board member Steve Kearney. There was a thunderstorm (last year), and the take from the chili cook-off was down 50 percent. In an election, they will vote overwhelmingly to raise the MSBU. Chili cookoff money can be used to recapitalize. Alligator Point Fire Chief Steve Fling said the requirement for taller houses to meet new ood requirements is forcing the Alligator Point/St. Teresa district to purchase a ladder truck and build a new station to house it. We need funds to be able to continue level of service to our residents, he said. Fortunately, we have three acres thats been donated to us, so we have a step up. Weve had committees meet, and it looks like, with this increase and other funding avenues, we have enough to go forward. He said the new truck would cost $500,000 to $600,000, and $10,000 annually for recerti cation. I understand the need, but is there a mechanism where you do a mail-in ballot? Parrish asked. If the people come back and say they want it, Ill vote for it. County Attorney Michael Shuler said the change of MSBU rate did not require a vote because the county commission has discretionary authority because the MSBU is a fee, not a tax. He recommended the board leave the ordinance, as written. He warned that requiring a ballot would force a vote on all future changes, and if a mandatory ballot is written into the ordinance, then the commission would be bound by the results of any election. I want it in there in the ordinance that they cannot raise the rates arbitrarily, Commissioner Cheryl Sanders said. The commissioners instructed Shuler to make the change and voted unanimously to pass the ordinance to create the independent districts. Kearney then formally requested the board schedule an election for Tuesday, May 14, to raise the MSBU rate for the St. George Island District from $50 to $95 annually. Fling asked an election be scheduled on the same day for the Alligator Point/St. James District, also whether to increase the annual fee to $95. The board voted unanimously to order the mail-out ballots contingent on there being suf cient time for constitutional of cers to make the necessary arrangements. Is there anything that would prevent the board from having this put on the tax bill (for next year)? asked Clerk of Courts Marcia Johnson. I would like the property appraiser and tax collector to be here to get their input at the next meeting about putting it on the tax bill, Commissioner Pinki Jackel said. They have indicated to me that they are willing, Johnson said. MSBU from page A1Were held hostage by Mother Nature. There was a thunderstorm (last year), and the take from the chili cook-off was down 50 percent. In an election, they will vote overwhelmingly to raise the MSBU.Steve Kearney St. George Island re department board member

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USPS 027-600Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 Publisher: Roger Quinn Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six monthsHome delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERSIn case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola Times OPINION www.apalachtimes.com ASection Page 4 Thursday, January 24, 2013By DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com Franklin County saw a tiny rise in its unemployment rate for December, as it ticked up to the 6.4 percent level. According to preliminary numbers released Friday by the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity, the countys jobless rate last month rose 0.1 percent to 6.4 percent, as ve people were added to the unemployment rolls, growing them from 346 to 351 people in search of work. The workforce also shrank by 82 workers, from 5,536 to 5,454, but remained larger than one year ago, when it comprised 5,398 workers and when the jobless rate was sharply higher, at 8.1 percent. Because of improvement in other Florida counties, Franklin Countys jobless picture tied it for eighth best in the state, along with Union, Jackson and Sumter counties. Monroe County, at 4.5 percent, had the states lowest unemployment rate, followed by Walton County (5.7 percent), Okaloosa County (5.8 percent), Alachua (6.1 percent), Wakulla and St. Johns counties (6.2 percent) and Leon County (6.3 percent). Many of the counties with the lowest unemployment rates were those with relatively high proportions of government employment. The unemployment rate in the Gulf Coast Workforce region (Bay, Franklin and Gulf counties) was 8.3 percent in December, up 0.2 percentage point from November. The December 2012 rate was 0.4 percentage point above the state rate of 7.9 percent, and 1.8 percentage points lower than the regions year ago rate of 10.1 percent. Out of a labor force of 98,981, there were 8,228 unemployed Gulf Coast residents. While Bay Countys jobless rose to 8.5 from 8.3 percent, Gulf Countys unemployment fell to 7.7 from 8.0 percent. Unemployment typically peaks in December or January for our local area due to the number of seasonal jobs. Our area is doing much better than this same time last year, and in the last couple of weeks weve noticed an increase in the number of local job opportunities coming available, said Kim Bodine, executive director for Gulf Coast Workforce Board. In December 2012, there were 70,900 nonagricultural jobs in the Panama City-Lynn HavenPanama City Beach metro area (Bay County), down 1,000 jobs over the year. This metro area experienced an annual rate of job change of minus-1.4 percent, while the state gained jobs at a rate of 0.9 percent. Three out of 10 industries gained jobs over the year and seven industries lost jobs over the year. Leisure and hospitality (+200 jobs); and manufacturing and government (+100 jobs each) gained jobs over the year. The industries losing jobs were professional and business services and education and health services (-300 jobs each); trade, transportation, and utilities, nancial activities, and other services (-200 jobs each); and mining, logging, and construction, and information (-100 jobs each). The metro area had the second fastest growth rate (+3.4 percent) in manufacturing employment for all metro areas in Florida. Government employment increased (+0.7 percent) in the metro area, while declining (-0.8 percent) statewide. Peers select Southerland 1st sophomore class repSpecial to the TimesRep. Steve Southerland II has been elected by the members of the Republican class of 2010 to serve as sophomore class representative to the House Republican leadership. Southerland will occupy an important seat at the leadership table, helping shape the partys agenda and acting as a conduit between leadership and the historic sophomore class. It is a great honor to serve as sophomore class representative to the House Republican leadership, Southerland said. There is no more humbling feeling than to have your friends and peers invest their trust in you to advance a shared cause. I believe that people support that which they help create, and for that reason I will continue to build upon these relationships and seek my colleagues counsel on the issues the American people care about most. I also look forward to working closely with the entire House Republican leadership team to advance freedom, shrink government, and empower hardworking families and job creators. Southerland is the rst member of Congress elected to the newly-created sophomore class representative role. He succeeds Reps. Tim Scott, R-S.C., and Kristi Noem, R-S.D., who were appointed freshman class representatives for the now expired 112th Congress. Editors note: The following was submitted Jan. 17 as an open letter to the people of the cities of Apalachicola and Carrabelle, regarding a fair method of RESTORE Act distribution. The real question regarding the RESTORE Act ne funds is how the monies will be allocated among the quali ed projects in the area designated as being disproportionately impacted by the RESTORE Act. There is nothing in the RESTORE Act that gives this answer or speci es how this is to be done. The county commissions that lie within this area of disproportionate impact with the help of the Florida Association of Counties got together to come up with a plan to fairly, simply and without controversy or con ict distribute among themselves the 75 percent of the ne funds directed by the RESTORE Act to the entire area (from Escambia County to Wakulla County) of designated disproportionate impact. After carefully considering the question and with the expressed goals of fairness, simplicity and avoidance of con ict, these county commissions came up with a distribution plan that would eliminate the presence of political bias or in uence and incorporate an objective mathematical formula that would be agreed to in the distribution of this overall amount proportionately to each county area within the entire area of disproportionate impact and do it simply, consistently and to avoid con ict and even the appearance of unfairness among their peers. This distribution plan that utilizes a mathematical formula to allocate the ne monies to each county area within the entire area of disproportionate impact arrived at by all of the county commissions has been tweaked recently to provide and better ensure fairness in the proportional objective distribution of the disproportionate impact RESTORE Act funds being divided among them. However, when faced with the same decision on how the proportionate shares of the monies are to be fairly distributed among the cities and communities within Franklin County, county commissioners have decided instead to hoard the monies and get the bene t of political favors by appointing a committee to review all the project applications coming from both within the cities and the communities in the unincorporated area and then reserving to themselves the right and authority to give nal approval of those projects the county commission chooses to be submitted for funding to the U.S. Department of Treasury. The request by both cities and other citizens to likewise fairly, simply and without con ict or controversy allocate proportionate amounts by using a similar mathematical formula among the cities and the unincorporated communities for each to evaluate and approve their own projects within their jurisdiction and their proportionate allocation of funds by their elected commissions was rejected and ignored in large part by Franklin County commissioners. If the method of rightly dividing using a mathematical formula is the simplest, best and fairest plan in the considered judgment of all of the county commissions for the counties to use with respect to one other in dividing up the monies to the area of disproportionate impact, then the cities within the area of Franklin County should be given the bene t of that same simple, objective and fairest method of division by mathematical formula. If it is good enough for Franklin County commissioners to use in treating and dealing with and dividing up the monies with these other counties like Gulf and Bay and Escambia when facing the peer pressure of ensuring that the allocation is fair and objective, why is it not good enough for the cities and communities within Franklin County? Are we to be treated worse and differently than the county commission treats these other counties? Why are the citizens of the cities of Apalachicola and Carrabelle being subjected to this double standard? I think everyone knows this answer! I have posted a petition to be signed by those persons supporting the cities plan to fairly, objectively and simply distribute these monies among the cities and unincorporated communities within Franklin County based on mathematical formula as already adopted and proposed by both the City of Apalachicola and Carrabelle and request each of you to consider supporting this. The petitions can be found at the City Hall of the City of Apalachicola, 1 Avenue E, Apalachicola, Florida. Thank you for your consideration and support on this. Van W. Johnson Sr. is the mayor of Apalachicola.County unemployment nudges up a tad STEVE SOUTHERLAND An open letter from Mayor Van Johnson VAN W. JOHNSON SR. DEMOCRATS CELEBRATE WITH INAUGURAL BALL LOIS SWOBODA | The TimesAbout 85 Franklin County Democrats celebrated President Barack Obamas second inauguration Monday evening with a festive ball at A.J. Restaurant. Organizer Caroline Ilardi said the event was listed by the national Democratic Party among its many inaugural balls throughout the nation. Among the culinary delights were Hawaiian beverages and coconut shrimp, offered in keeping with the presidents home state. Shown above, from left, are Ilardi, Adele Colston and Glynda Ratliff.

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LocalThe Times | A5Thursday, January 24, 2013A second-place nish was the prize for Rusty Hamlin, who created a half-shell oyster, topped with smoked mullet stoneground grits, Bradley sausage and parmesan crumble. Hamlin is the executive chef for the Zac Brown Band, an Atlanta-based country/folk band. Third place went to Kevin Maxwell for his oyster mushroom crostini, a toasted crostini with white cheddar, topped with an oyster roasted in garlic butter, with sliced mushroom and julienne orange bell pepper, scallion, rosemary and thyme. Maxwell credited his success in part to the fresh oysters supplied by RDs Oysters in Eastpoint. Eight other competitors also took part, including last years winner, Jeff Ilardi, who served up Mardi Gras oysters that featured kumquat liqueur and jam, tupelo honey, rice vinegar, Tabasco, chopped andouille sausage, chopped roasted sweet red pepper and shallots. Ilardi also won FCTVs inaugural award for best booth exhibit. Christine Smith served up oysters diavalo, with an oyster shooter in a Bloody Mary. She described the dish as a little bit of Italian and a little bit of Latin, made from shocking the oyster in olive oil and Italian seasoning, and avoring with a jalapeno aioli. They melt in your mouth with a lot of heat, she said. Richard Radford created the orange blossom special, with an oyster in the middle on a Ritz cracker, with a couple of little pieces of orange, peeled and ready to eat, and a spot of Nanas pepper sauce. Just a spot, he stressed. Allen Mathis took part with succulent oysters on the half shell, while Up the Creeks Brett Gormley did his a la Caesar. Joel Norred cooked up roasted garlic oysters and grits, the Weems Hospital Foundation made gray oyster stew, and John Solomon created two entries Bacon BBQ and Expensive oysters, the latter topped with caviar. Judging again this year were Oyster Radio news director Michael Allen and St. George Island real estate agent Jerry Thompson. In the place of State Sen. Bill Montford was Ron Sewell, a Ford dealer in Odessa, Texas, who likes to visit. We eat oysters every day were here, he said. Sewell later donated a $500 check to the re department, Apalachicola Mayor Van Johnson said in his remarks following a spirited dance performance by city re ghters, led by Pam Nobles and some of her young dancers. The many booths, from Capital Area Health Plan giving away fresh fruit, to the St. George Island Civic Club making funnel cakes, to the Chamber of Commerce and area volunteers serving up lots of varieties of oysters, were busy all day long. DISS I)Children and Adults No Fee or Cost If No RecoveryGAYLEPEEDINGOATTONEYATLAWApalachicola, FL (850) 292-7059 | (850) 944-6020 FAXgsrlaw@bellsouth.net BILL MILLER REALTY850-697-3751 (3310) 570-0658400 + COMM. U.S. 98 & GULFADJ. TO LANARK MARINA 850K$29,500 $2,500 DOWN BUYS 2 BED APT. 2 6 ORRENT $500/MTH 2 B/R 1 BTH GULF VIEW HOME W/ FAMILY ROOM $70,000 C/B-3-1 2 COR. LOTS CITY $49,500 3/2D/W 2 COR. LOTS -CITY $42,500MIH 2 CRNRLOTS BLK. $ STORE REDUCED $49,500 2 AC-AT RIVER UTIL. IN -$39,500 month, the equivalent of $1,121.50 per month plus sales tax. That lease expired Jan. 28, 2002, and since that time, Miniat had paid the county month-tomonth under the terms of the expired lease. About two years ago, when the county struck a deal to lease the former Chapman Schools building to Apalachicola cardiologist Dr. Shezad Sanaullah, the county decided to have Miniat also pay for utilities at the leased of ce space. Erin Grif th, assistant nance of cer, said Miniats last rental payment was in September 2012 for the month of August. She said it was not unusual for Miniat to pay his rent in portions that covered past months or groups of several months. Weems CEO Ray Brownsworth said the current Weems West clinic, which has only one exam room, only can see about 10 to 20 patients per day and needs to be seeing 20 to 25. Also showing interest in the vacant property was Ida Elliot, superintendent of elections, who emailed county commissioners to say she would be willing to move into Dr. Miniats of ce as well. The building she is in is not county-owned and could be sold at any time. Dr. Stephen Miniat never noti ed the department of the closing of his practice, said Aaron Keller, public information specialist for the Florida Department of Health. However, we do encourage patients seeking their medical records to send a certied letter to their doctor and follow the appropriate complaint process if necessary. According to rules governing the state medical profession, when a physician terminates or relocates his practice, or when it is no longer available to patients, these patients are to be noti ed via local newspaper. A copy of this notice also is to be submitted to the Board of Medicine. Miniat, a 1986 graduate of the University of Texas Southwestern medical school, completed his family medicine residency at the University of Alabama at Huntsville. He is certi ed by the American Board of Family Medicine. OFFICES from page A1 THE APALACHICOLA TIMESFIND US ON FACEBOOK OYSTER from page A1PHOTOS BY DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times LEFT: John Kerley of Ocala, a regular visitor to St. George Island, prepares oysters for his children, Arden and Adyla Kerley, and their friends, Ava and Jackson Pizzuti. ABOVE: John Solomons expensive oyster entry was topped with caviar. BELOW: Apalachicola re ghters perform for the crowd at Saturdays oyster cook-off.

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LocalA6 | The Times Thursday, January 24, 2013Full moon climb Saturday at lighthouseThe first Full Moon Climb of the new year will be held at the Cape St. George Lighthouse on St. George Island on Saturday, Jan. 26. The Sunset/Full Moon Climb will take place from 5:30 to 7 p.m. and will include light hors doeuvres and a sparkling cider toast to the full moon. Cost is $15 for the general public and $10 for members of the St. George Lighthouse Association. The sun will set at 6:12 p.m. and the moon will rise at 6:03 p.m. After sunset, people are invited to climb to the top of the lighthouse for a breathtaking view of the full moon, as space and time permit. Cost is $10 for the general public and $5 for SGLA members. The Cape St. George Light is located in St. George Lighthouse Park at the center of St. George Island, where Island Drive (the road off the bridge) ends at Gulf Beach Drive. Parking is available in lots at either side of the park. Because space is limited, reservations are recommended. For reservations or more information, please contact the Lighthouse Gift Shop at 927-7745.Homeownership seminar on TuesdayThe TIGERS program along with other providers in Franklin County will be hosting Home is where the heart is, a seminar on home ownership, at 3 p.m. on Tuesday, Jan. 29 at the offices of the REALTOR Association of Franklin & Gulf Counties, 78 Eleventh Street, Apalachicola Free and open to the public. All are welcomed. Confirmed guests include Cadence Bank, Centennial Bank, Franklin County Community Development & Land Trust Corp., title company, and the Realtors Association of Franklin and Gulf Counties. For further information please contact Carol Barfield, at 653-2784 or Gloria Salinard at 653-3322.Boldt granted exception on Alligator PointAt their Jan. 15 meeting, county commissioners voted unanimously to approve an exception recommended by the advisory Board of Adjustment and allow Bert Boldt to encroach on the Critical Habitat Zone. Boldt may construct a house 12 feet into the front setback and 29 feet into the CHZ on his property at 25 Gulf Shore Boulevard, Alligator Point. He also received permission to construct a seawall five feet from both side lot lines and seaward of the house. Boldt lost his last home during Hurricane Dennis. The new construction is based on his own design. The most important thing about the project is the address. Its a part of the road thats going to be subject to erosion and wash away, County Planner Alan Pierce said. Mr. Boldt is trying to do two things. Hes trying to protect his own property and, from a public standpoint, he will be protecting the road. Beyond Mr. Boldt the lots are unbuildable and only a few hundred feet up, the road has washed away. Mr. Boldt is going to be serving as an anchor essentially. A point where we hope the erosion will stop. It serves as a public bene t by having somebody out there hoping to stabilize the shoreline, said Pierce, who also recommended the exceptions be granted.State will not maintain CR 67On Nov. 6, 2012, Commissioner Cheryl Sanders asked County Planner Alan Pierce to contact the Apalachee Regional Planning Council and the Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) and request they accept maintenance of CR 67. This month, FDOT District 3 Secretary Tommy Barfield responded via electronic letter that FDOT has determined that CR 67 does not meet the functional classification as a state road. Sanders said her original request was in response to a request from Liberty County that FDOT assume maintenance of Highway 67 there. Sanders instructed Pierce to nd out if FDOT is now maintaining Highway 67 there. National School Choice WeekApalachicola Bay Charter School cordially invites you to an Open House on Thursday, January 31, 2013 from 9:00 11:00 a.m. Guided tours will be provided.ApalachicolaBayCharterSchoolA Florida High Performing Charter School98 12th Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320 Tel: 850-653-1222 | Fax: 850-653-1857 | abceagles.org Competitive Yields on FDIC Insured CDs NO HIDDEN CHARGES: It is our policy that the patient and any other person responsible for payments has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed by payment or any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment. www.mulliseye.com"WE WELCOME NEW PATIENTS, CALLTODAY FOR YOUR PRIORITY APPOINTMENT" FOR NEW PATIENTS 59 AND OLDERThis certificate is good for a complete Medical Eye Exam withTodd Robinson, M.D.Board Certified Eye Physician and Surgeon.The exam includes a prescription for eye glasses and tests for Glaucoma, Cataracts and other eye diseases.FOR YOUR APPOINTMENT CALL: 850-763-6666 ELIGIBILITY: U.S. Citizens living in the Florida Panhandle, 59 years and older, not presently under our care. Coupon Expires: 1-31-13 FREEEYE EXAMCODE: AP00Darren Payne, M.D.Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract SurgeonIn Memory of Lee Mullis, M.D.Todd Robinson, M.D.Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon Smart LensesSM February 5TH, 2013Register at any St. George Island vacation rental company. For more information, contact Sometimes its Hotter at (850)927-5039 or visit www.sgisnowbirds.com Rafe Run Education Center State Park Nature Walk Lighthouse Climb Lighthouse Museum Info Sessions Happy Hour & Dinner Bingo The following report is provided by the Franklin County Sheriffs Of ce. Arrests in this weeks report were made by of cers from the Florida Highway Patrol (FHP), Apalachicola Police Department (APD) and Franklin County Sheriffs Of ce (FCSO). All defendants are to be considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law.JAN. 14Justin R. Griggs, 24, Apalachicola, violation of probation (FCSO) David R. Smith, 25, Fountain, introduction of contraband into a correctional facility (FCSO)JAN. 15Kenneth R. Rucker, 55, Eastpoint, possession of a controlled substance (FCSO)JAN. 16Marjorie L. Boozer, 51, Carrabelle, violation of probation (FCSO)JAN. 17John Kaczmarek, Jr., 48, Apalachicola, DUI with property damage/personal injury, driving while license suspended or revoked, and refusal to submit to breath test (APD)JAN. 18Ashley C. Thompson, 23, Carrabelle, violation of probation (FCSO)JAN. 19Andy W. Dyer, 47, Carrabelle, forgery and uttering (FCSO) Timothy J. Carpenter, 20, Eastpoint, criminal mischief and battery (FCSO) Paul J. Moser, 50, Panama City, boating under the in uence (FWC) Duane E. Barnett, 48, Carrabelle, DUI and no motorcycle endorsement (FHP)JAN. 21Thomas A. Parker, 27, Apalachicola, violation of probation (FCSO) Arrest REPORT News BRIEFS

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LocalThe Times | A7Thursday, January 24, 2013She described him as a compassionate and sincere man, an educator who not only earned bachelor, master and doctoral degrees and worked for 37 years in various positions in education from custodian to district administrator, but retired as a master sergeant in the Air Force. Neal offered a historical perspective on what he called a movement for citizenship for black Americans. Dr. King came from a culture of being denied, he said. At the time the Constitution was passed, it did not address African-American people. Neal went on to outline the roles of the 13th Amendment, which outlawed slavery; the 14th Amendment, which ensured citizenship, due process and equal protection under the law; and the 15th Amendment, which said all people, including those held previously in slavery, had the right to vote. Neal said though the will of the Union had been victorious in the legal realm, the other area fought in was the political arena, which the Confederacy won. He said Reconstruction in the South had led to separate but equal, and a prevailing philosophy that you stay in your place. It was here that Neal interjected a comment on his babies, those children whose education he in uenced during his tenure as principal. Keep your head up, he said. No matter what they say, you are somebody. Neal recounted details of Kings early childhood and how after studying at Morehouse College, and later earning a doctorate from Boston University, the 26year-old Baptist preacher in Atlanta was called to assist a church in Montgomery, Ala., struggling with issues surrounding a bus boycott. All of a sudden this woman named Rosa Parks decided her feet hurt, he said. Martin Luther King had leadership thrust upon him. Neal chronicled Kings career from 1955 to 1963, joking that being refused seating at whites-only restaurants had given rise to the invention of the drive-thru. Neal wrapped up his remarks by noting that economic freedom, highlighted by a Poor Peoples March on the nations capital, had been Kings rallying cry. Dr. King was out front. He forced America to confront herself, Neal said. The more-than-two-hour program concluded with a dramatic laying on of hands as part of a closing ceremony to honor Apalachicola Mayor Van Johnson. Bishop Robert Davis introduced that mayoral honor ceremony by saying that on the 27th anniversary of the King holidays observance and the second inauguration of President Barack Obama, it was tting to honor Johnson, Apalachicolas rst black elected mayor. Almost a dozen clergy, from throughout the city, came forward to offer praise of the mayor. First of the pastors to speak was Horace Solomon of New Life Tabernacle By the Sea, followed by Barry Hand from Mount Zion Baptist Church, Clifford Williams from Apalachicola First Born Church of The Living God, Rene Williams from Fellowship Church of Praise Ministries and Martha Harris from Trinity Episcopal Church. Each praised the broad and generous service of the mayor and his dedication to the city, just as did the last four pastors to speak: L.D. Martin of the Love & Worship Center, Themo Patriotis of the Apalachicola United Methodist Church, Dr. John Sink, former pastor of Atlantas largest Methodist church, and David Walker from Covenant Word, who invoked the direct prayer for Gods guidance to grace the actions of Johnson, now and in the future. The celebration began with a processional of the clergy ling into the Armory. Also entering formally were city and county of cials, who included Johnson, Superintendent Nina Marks, County Commissioner Noah Lockley, School Board Member Teresa Ann Martin, Apalachicola City Commissioners Frank Cook and Brenda Ash, City Administrator Betty Taylor-Webb, City Attorney Pat Floyd and Police Chief Bobby Varnes. The opening prayer came from Elder James Pugh, dressed in his sheriffs of ce uniform, followed by a Scripture reading from Elder Roderick Robinson, from Isaiah 60: Arise, shine, for your light has come, and the glory of the Lord rises upon you. See, darkness covers the earth and thick darkness is over the peoples, but the Lord rises upon you and his glory appears over you. Nations will come to your light, and kings to the brightness of your dawn. Greetings and gratitude came from event organizer Dolores Hayward Croom, who then introduced three black Florida Highway Patrolman, who were seated in places of honor at the front. Sheila White-Martin, from Love & Worship Center, was mistress of ceremony. Were living Kings legacy, making a career of humanity, she said. SWAT (Students Working Against Tobacco) students led the pledge to the American ag and to the Christian ag. Life Every Voice and Sing, often called the Negro National Anthem, was sung by Angeline Stanley. As Kings I Have A Dream speech sounded through the speakers, R. Damien Davis portrayed the words in mime. Covenant Word Christian Center provided an interview with retired Apalachicola school teacher Lorine Banks on her memories of taking part in a march with Dr. King in 1965, when she was a senior at Alabama State University, a historically black university in Montgomery. Interviewed by her daughter, Harolyn Walker, on the ctional Fathers Heart television show, Banks began by noting that black people didnt always have the right to vote. She described the excitement St. Jude Historic District of Montgomery on March 24, 1965, when voting rights marchers camped for their last night on their path to the capital. That night a Stars for Freedom rally was held, with singers Harry Belafonte, Tony Bennett, Frankie Laine, Peter, Paul and Mary, and Sammy Davis Jr. all performing. Banks said a judge had said only 300 people could be on a two-lane highway, but when it widened to four lanes, the crowd had gathered to 25,000 people. She described a mixed, often hostile reaction from onlookers. To me it took everything not to say anything at the words used, she said. Dr. King was a man of nonviolence; he practiced what he preached. After a performance of My God is Awesome by singers from Mount Zion Missionary Baptist, Stella Bryant, speaking on behalf of Sheriff Mike Mock, then read an impassioned statement and announced that she had been promoted as the rst African-American to become professional standards investigator for the sheriffs of ce. Jathan Martin and Company, and Robert and Jacqulyn Davis all performed leading up to Neals remarks. The event closed with expressions from Apostle Shirley White, who has stepped down after organizing the King event for several years, and the singing of Stevie Wonders birthday song that helped give rise to the holiday. After a celebration motorcade, dinner from A.J.s Restaurant was served. Robert C. Bruner Attorney Personal & Business BankruptcyOver 30 Years Legal Experience850-670-3030 bankruptcy relief under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon advertisements. Before you decide, ask us to send you free written information Top Notch Service at a Reasonable Price Tired of Driving to Panama City or Tallahassee to have your tax return done? Tired of sending your payroll out of town to an impersonal payroll agency? Tired of spending your hard earned prots on exorbitant bookkeeping services? Save your gas money and their pricey fees and have your tax return led locally by a 15 year tax return veteran. Specializing in 1040s, 1065s, 1120s, as well as all payroll tax returns, W-2s and 1099s. Dont throw your hard earned money away because I will meet or beat anyones prices and that is a guarantee. For an appointment, call Chet Timmons today at 850-323-1082HOME OF THE $50 TAX RETURN** Special exclusions do apply and only guaranteed for simple 1040s or 1040EZs. KING from page A1PHOTOS BY DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The TimesLEFT: R. Damien Davis narrates the I Have A Dream speech in mime. CENTER: Stella Bryant speaks at the event. RIGHT: Retired Apalachicola teacher Lorine Banks, left, is interview by her daughter, Harolyn Walker.

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A8 | The Times Thursday, January 24, 2013 OFTHEWEEKPET St. Joseph Bay Humane SocietyELSIE!ELSIE is a beautiful 2 year old tortoiseshell cat. She came to us last summer with very young kittens she was still nursing. On several occasions during the summer we received kittens that were too young to be weaned and this sweet girl would accept them as one of her own and care for them until they were ready for solid food. She is very loving and affectionate and so deserves a home of her own especially since she has served the kittens of the Adoption Center so well. The Humane Society will waive her adoption fee. She has earned it!VOLUNTEERS ARE DESPERATELY NEEDED TO SOCIALIZE WITH ALL OF OUR DOGS AND CATS.We are always looking for people willing to bring one of our animals into their home to be fostered for various needs. Anytime you can spare would be greatly appreciated. Call Karen at 670-8417 for more details or visit the Franklin County Humane Society at 244 State Road 65 in Eastpoint. You may logon to the website at www.forgottenpets.org to see more of our adoptable pets. 2nd Annual 2nd Annual SocietyBy DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com Retired Florida State University music professor Thomas Tommie Wright, the scholar and school patriot who wrote the FSU Fight Song, will provide a memorable concert Sunday, Jan. 27. The concert, part of the annual Ilse Newell Fund for the Performing Arts, will be at 4 p.m. at Trinity Episcopal Church. In addition to Wright on piano, the concert will feature performances by tenor Larry Gerber and soprano Jessica Applegate. The audience will be treated to several of the songs Wright composed over his lengthy career, including the FSU Fight Song, and George Gershwin songs. The annual reception for donors follows in Benedict Hall. Arlene Wingate, who oversees the Ilse Newell concert series, said Wright, the father of Apalachicolas Candace Springer, has recovered from the u and is set to perform on Sunday. Wright, who holds a bachelors in music magna cum laude from Butler University and a masters of music from Indiana University, did graduate work in music at Columbia University. Wright, a longtime music professor who joined the Florida State University faculty in 1949 and has performed concerts with symphony orchestras around the world, delivered a uniquely lyrical graduation address this past summer at the TallahasseeLeon County Civic Center, through a combination of piano music, sentimental recollections and song. Graduates, youll be happy to know that Im not going to give you a long speech this morning, Wright said. Instead, I thought you might enjoy a couple of songs out of the many songs that I have written and especially the songs for FSU. Gerber, an accomplished and talented tenor soloist and professor of voice at Florida State, accompanied Wright, who played the piano onstage. The pair performed Wrights exquisite Florida State Victory March as well as the raucous Fight Song, which Wright wrote in his early years at the university. President Eric J. Barron, who presided over the ceremony, presented Wright with an honorary doctorate of music degree. Your most important legacy is intangible: The love and admiration of tens of thousands of Florida State alumni, said Provost and Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs Garnett S. Stokes, who read a citation before Barron draped a doctoral hood over Wrights gown. Your dedication to Florida State University for 60 years is without equal. About 1,314 Florida State graduates participated in the ceremony, of which 919 received bachelors degrees, 323 masters degrees and 72 doctorates. This concert is one of the programs of the 25th season of the Ilse Newell Fund for the Performing Arts, under the auspices of the Apalachicola Area Historical Society. General admission is a $5 donation, with students admitted free. Oscar Medley birthday celebration SaturdayA birthday celebration for Oscar Medley will be 2-4 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 26, at the First Baptist Church, 46 Ninth St. Oscar will be 80. All friends are invited to attend. Tommie Wright to perform on piano SundaySPECIAL TO THE TIMESTommie Wright will play his own compositions and music by George Gershwin at 4 p.m. Sunday at Trinity Episcopal Church. Three local women will compete in the Region Two Arts and Crafts competition of the Florida Federation of Womens Clubs to be held in Apalachicola in next month. On Jan. 17, the Philaco Womans Club held its annual arts and crafts competition, judged by Cass Allen and Caty Greene. Three entries took blue ribbons. Barb Paget took rst place for a pine needle basket ornamented with shells and a second for her Ukrainian Easter egg. Sally Crown received a rst for hand-knit socks. Dawn Radford took a blue ribbon and three second-place ribbons for photographs taken in Eastern Europe. Judy Cook took a second-place ribbon for a machine-made baby quilt in shades of pink. By Lois SwobodaSPECIAL TO THE TIMESDawn Radfords prize winning photo of Magyar horsemen was taken during a tour of Hungary.Three Philaco women win blue ribbons Happy BIRTHDAYDAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times

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The United Methodist Churches of Franklin County Welcome You First United Methodist Church of ApalachicolaWorship Service 11:00 a.m. every Sunday Sunday School 10:00 a.m. 75 5th St. Apalachicola 653-9530 fumcapalach@gtcom.net Pastor: Rev. Themo PatriotisCarrabelle United Methodist ChurchWorship Services 10:45 a.m. Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Celebrate Recovery Mondays 7-9 p.m. 102 NE Ave. B Carrabelle 697-3672 Pastor: Julie StephensEastpoint United Methodist ChurchWorship Service 10:00 a.m. every Sunday Healing service every fourth Monday at 7:00 p.m. 317 Patton Dr. (corner of David St.) 670-8825 Pastor: Rev. Beth WhiteSt. George Island United Methodist Church9:00 a.m. Worship Service 10:00 a.m. Fellowship Hour 201 E. Gulf Beach Dr. 9274635 www.sgiumc.org Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis Nursery now provided for Sunday Church Service First Pentecostal Holiness Church379 Brownsville Road Apalachicola Were excited about what Gods doing!!!Sunday School 9:45 am Sunday Morning Worship 10:45 am Sunday Evening Service 6:00 pm Monday, Youth Group 6:30 pm Wednesday, Royal Rangers, G.A.P.7:00 pm Wednesday Worship & Word 7:30 pmNursery Provided during regular church services 7:00 7:00 First Baptist ChurchSt. George Island 501 E. Bayshore Drive 927-2257 R. Michael Waley, Pastor Join us as we praise and worship the living Christ. Great is the Lord and most worthy of praise. Psalm 145:3 Sunday Bible Study................................................10:00am Worship Praise........................................................11:00am Sunday Night............................................................7:00pm Wednesday Power Hour......................................7:00pm Wednesday Youth at S.P.L.A.S.H.......................7:00pm Walking in Christ R. Michael Whaley, Pastor WELCOMES YOUChurch of the Ascension101 NE First Street CarrabelleSUNDAY10:00 AM WELCOMES YOUChurch THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH (850) 274-4490 (850) 545-2578 WELCOMES YOU Trinity Trinity Episcopal Churchest. 1836Welcomes YouHwy. 98 & 6th St. Apalachicola 850-653-9550Sunday Worship Services 8 & 10:30 a.m. Wednesdays Healing Service 11 a.m. Centering Prayer 4 p.m. Sunday Worship Services 8 & 10:30 a.m. Wednesdays Healing Service 11 a.m. Centering Prayer 4 p.m. FaithThe Times | A9Thursday, January 24, 2013Hope you can meet us at the Franklin County Senior Citizens Center for lunch today. Sue and our faithful volunteers will be ready to serve at noon. Dont forget about the car wash Saturday, Jan. 26. Members of St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Catholic Church Catholic Youth Organization will clean your car from 3:30-7 p.m. They will hold the car wash at Sacred Heart of Jesus Catholic Church, 2653 U.S. 98, Lanark Village. Donation is $10. We will also have a covered dish dinner in the church hall following 5 p.m. Mass. Members of Bishop OSullivan Knights of Columbus Council 1638 will hold the annual spaghetti dinner from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Sunday. You can get your dinner in St. Patricks Church Hall, Sixth Street, Apalachicola. Time is running out for you to get your chance on the $100 merchandise certicate at the Lanark Market. You can obtain your tickets from any member of the Sons of the Legionnaires or at the Village Market for $2 each or three for $5. The winning ticket will be drawn on Feb. 3, Super Bowl Sunday, at Camp Gordon Johnston American Legion Post 82. Right before Super Bowl Sunday, members of the Lanark Village Golf Club will prepare and serve your full breakfast at Chillas Hall Saturday, Feb. 2. Serving is from 8:30 to 11 a.m. Your donation of $5 will get you started. Be kind to one another. Check in on the sick and housebound. God grant us the strength to hang in there. Until next time God bless America, out troops the poor, homeless and hungry.From staff reportsKnights host spaghetti dinner SundayThe Knights of Columbus cordially invite all St. Patrick church parishioners, visitors and neighbors to enjoy a spaghetti dinner, complete with garlic bread, cole slaw, tea or coffee, from 11 a.m. through 1 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 27, at St. Patrick Parish Hall. Donation $8 per plate; take-out available.Weekly Bible course on Genesis begins Apostle David Rosier, Fellowship Church of Praise, of Panama City is conducting a weekly workshop/ Bible study in the book of Genesis. The class The Genesis of It All began 6:30-8:30 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 15, at the church, at Avenue G and 14th Street. This is an eight-week course offered by Dayspring Theological Seminary. If interested there is a small fee. For further information, call Pastor Andy or Renee Williams at 227-6624Eastpoint Baptist Church celebrates recoveryOn Saturday, the First Baptist Church of Eastpoint initiated a Celebrate Recovery program under the leadership of Rose Grifn. This program is designed to help those struggling with hurts, hang-ups and habits by showing them the loving power of Jesus Christ through the recovery process. All are invited to participate in this free program. Sessions start at 5 p.m. Saturdays at the church, 447 Ave. A in Eastpoint.High Calling Church completes month of celebrationJanuary will be a month of celebration at the High Calling Church. Come celebrate with us at 10:45 a.m. Sundays. Pastor Phil Edwards will minister on Sunday, Jan. 27. He is the assistant superintendent and senior pastor at Panama City Assembly of God. He played a vital part in planting High Calling Church. High Calling Church is at 21 Island Drive in Eastpoint. Visit the website at HighCallingChurch. org, call 323-0409 or email to highcallingchurch@gmail.comBenet Feb. 8 for Josh PhippsJosh Phipps, son of Rex and Sabrina Phipps, is a true son of the shing and oyster industry and is in need of a heart transplant. A benet of love and treasures will be held on Friday, Feb. 8 beginning at 8 p.m. at the Roseate Spoonbill Lounge on Water Street. Wear your white boots or bare feet or oxfords but be there. All proceeds go to Josh. Come one, come all.DAVID ADLERSTEIN | the TimesRepresentatives from the St. George Island Civic Club earlier this month presented a $1,000 check to the food pantry. Taking part in the check presentation are, above, from left, Civic Club Director Terry Kemp, club members Rita OConnell and Fran Giknis, and Lori Switzer, food pantry coordinator.Mrs. Margie Marshall Keith, 93, of Tallahassee, died Tuesday, Jan. 15, 2013. A native of Apalachicola, Mrs. Keith had lived at Westminster Oaks for the past six years, moving there from Lynn Haven. Margie was a homemaker. She was member of St. Michael Anglican Catholic Church in Panama City and a member of the Daughters of the American Revolution, Caroline Brevard Chapter. She served as chaplain and history committee chairman of the St. Andrews Bay Chapter. She was preceded in death by her husband of 63 years, Mr. George Allen Keith; her brother, Earl R. Marshall of Pensacola; and one daughter, Frances L. Keith of Crawfordville. She is survived by her other daughter, Annelle K. Blanchett (Herschell) of Tallahassee; four grandchildren, Margie L. Quillman and Anne Marie Thompson, of Tallahassee, George Keith Thompson of Springhill, and Scott Blanchett of Baldwin; eight greatgrandchildren; and four great-greatgrandchildren. The family will receive friends from noon until 1 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 19, at Trinity Episcopal Church in Apalachicola. The service will follow at the church at 1 p.m. Bevis Funeral Home of Tallahassee is assisting the family with their arrangements.Margie Marshall KeithJeanette Beatrice Meyer was born in Newville, Ala., to Dollie and Shelly Turner. Jeanette passed away at the age of 82 on Monday, Jan. 21, 2013, surrounded by her family in Apalachicola. Jeanette was a long time resident of Apalachicola. She worked for more than 30 years for the Franklin County School District as an attendance ofcer. She is survived by her children, Donna Ingle and David Meyer; grandchildren, Charles Ingle, John Ingle, Kendall Meyer and Jackson Meyer; sister, Maria Jane Turner; niece, Stacy Vause; and nephew, Kelly Butler. She was preceded in death by her husband, David Conrad Meyer; and daughter, Connie Meyer. Funeral services will be held at 10 a.m. Wednesday, Jan. 23, graveside at Magnolia Cemetery. Kelley Funeral Home is handling all arrangements.Jeanette Meyer ObituariesGet your car washed at Sacred Heart church LanarkANARK newsNEWSJim Welsh Faith briefsBRIEFS IslandSLAND CivicIVIC ClLUbB benefitsBENEFITS fFOOdD pantrPANTR Y Special to the TimesSnowbird Appreciation Day will be Feb. 5, sponsored by the St. George Island Business Association which i nvites the areas winter visitors  to spend the day on the island. Events include a rafe run to local businesses, lighthouse climb, s tate park entry and hike,  the Apala c hicola Estuary nature center,  small group information sessions, the Cape St. George lighthouse museum, bing o  and dinner with a cash bar. Registration is $9 per person at any St. George Island vacation management company or inn. It entails lling out a short questionnaire, obt aining a name tag and  mug, getting a list of businesses participating in the rafe run, and paying the registration f ee., which entitles you  to take part in all the days activities (including dinner) at no additional cost, except for a reduced rate to climb the lighthouse ($3 instead of $5) and drinks from the c ash bar before dinner.  Youll also receive your rst rafe t icket.  You may register any day be g inning Feb. 1 or from  9 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Snowbird Day. Each location will have a Snowbird Registration sign out front. Theres no limit to the number of snowbirds who can participate. Registration sites include Buccaneer Inn, 160 W. Gorrie Drive; Collins Vacation Rentals, 60 E. Gulf Beach Drive; Fickling & Company, 112 Franklin Blvd.; Resort Vacation Properties, 6 1 W. Gulf Beach  Drive; St. George Inn, 135 Franklin Blvd.; St. George Island Vacation Properties, 235 W. Gulf Beach Drive; and Suncoast Realty & Property Management, 224 Franklin Blvd., If youre a nature lover, youll enjoy t he  short hike  along the state parks East Slough Trail  at 10 a.m. and noon. The ADA accessible trail is linear, you return to the starting place via the same path you took in, and will be led by a park ranger. Admission into the State Park is free all day for visitors s porting a Snowbird Day nametag.  For those who like to shop (or just browse), registrants will be introduced to the islands retail establishments b y way of a  rafe run. Begin any time after 10 a.m.; participating  business e s will be  designated with a Rafe Run sign.  You will receive a rafe ticket, with your registration numb er on it,  at each of the participating businesses that you visit. At the end o f the run, before 3 p.m.,  stop at the Visitor Center and place your tickets in the big bottle. Winners numbers will be displayed with their prizes d uring  the dinner. The new Apalachicola National E stuarine  Education Center  in East point will again be included. The educ ation center is  loaded with interest ing exhibits and the staff will be holding some special short sessions duri ng the  day. The center is open from 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., but be sure to deposit your tickets at the island visitor center by 3 p.m. A nother  building youre  sure to want to see is the Lighthouse Keepers Cottage next to the lighthouse. S nowbird registrants may  climb the islands lighthouse  for a reduced rate ($3 instead of the usual $5) anytime between noon and 5 p.m. H appy Hour,  with a wine and beer cash bar, starts at 4 p.m. It, and  the dinner,  will be held under tents in the parking lot of Sometimes Its Hotter ( 112 E. Gulf Beach Drive). Dinner  will be a low country boil, served 5-6 p.m. A special pot which will include saus age but no shrimp, will be  prepared for anyone  who doesnt want seafood. Walk-ups who didnt previously register are welcome to attend the Happy Hour and dinner for $9. T he last event of the day is  Bingo  at the Firehouse (324 E. Pine Ave.), beginning at 7 p.m. Bingo is sponsored by the local Civic Club.Island preps for snowbird appreciation

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NEW FISHING TACKLE ARRIVING DAILY!SHOPNEW ITEMS FROM PENN,SHIMANO, AND ABUGARCIA. Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL(next to Piggly Wiggly)www.BWOsh.comYour Hunting Headquarters FULL LINE OF THE NEW PENN SPINFISHER V REELSSTARTING AT Corner of Marina Drive, Corner of Marina Drive, (next to Piggly Wiggly) Corner of Marina Drive, (next to Piggly Wiggly) $139.99 WEEKLY ALMANAC APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE TIDE TABLES MONTHLY AVERAGESTo nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from these given for APALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW Cat Point Minus 0:40 Minus 1:17 East Pass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27 To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from those given for CARRABELLE: HIGH LOW Bald Point Minus 9:16 Minus 0:03 Sponsor the WEEKLY ALMANACCall Today!653-8868 Date HighLow% Precip Thu, Jan. 2466 54 0% Fri, Jan. 2570 4430% Sat, Jan. 2658 39 0% Sun, Jan. 2761 53 0% Mon, Jan. 2869 5710% Tues, Jan. 2969 6010% Wed, Jan. 3068 5310% 24 Th 252pm 1.6 1147pm 1.9 651am -0.8 609pm 1.3 25 Fr 314pm 1.8 726am -0.8 653pm 1.1 26 Sa 1236am 2.1 334pm 1.8 756am -0.8 731pm 1.1 27 Su 123am 2.1 351pm 1.8 822am -0.6 807pm 1.0 28 Mo 208am 1.9 407pm 1.8 844am -0.5 842pm 0.8 29 Tu 254am 1.9 424pm 1.8 906am -0.3 920pm 0.6 30 We 344am 1.8 444pm 1.9 929am -0.2 1003pm 0.3 31 Th 440am 1.6 507pm 1.9 955am 0.2 1054pm 0.2 24 Th 252pm 1.6 1147pm 1.9 651am -0.8 609pm 1.3 25 Fr 314pm 1.8 726am -0.8 653pm 1.1 26 Sa 1236am 2.1 334pm 1.8 756am -0.8 731pm 1.1 27 Su 123am 2.1 351pm 1.8 822am -0.6 807pm 1.0 28 Mo 208am 1.9 407pm 1.8 844am -0.5 842pm 0.8 29 Tu 254am 1.9 424pm 1.8 906am -0.3 920pm 0.6 30 We 344am 1.8 444pm 1.9 929am -0.2 1003pm 0.3 31 Th 440am 1.6 507pm 1.9 955am 0.2 1054pm 0.2 FreeTideTables.com For comparison only Times are local Tides in feet from MLLW Date Day High Tide High Tide Low Tide Low Tide Sunrise 1 Fr 546am 1.4 534pm 2.1 1023am 0.5 1158pm 0.0 2 Sa 710am 1.3 607pm 2.1 1051am 0.8 3 Su 907am 1.1 647pm 2.2 122am -0.2 1115am 1.0 4 Mo 738pm 2.2 256am -0.3 5 Tu 843pm 2.2 416am -0.6 6 We 213pm 1.6 959pm 2.2 521am -0.8 408pm 1.4 Date Day High Tide High Tide Low Tide Low Tide 1 Fr 546am 1.4 534pm 2.1 1023am 0.5 1158pm 0.0 2 Sa 710am 1.3 607pm 2.1 1051am 0.8 3 Su 907am 1.1 647pm 2.2 122am -0.2 1115am 1.0 4 Mo 738pm 2.2 256am -0.3 5 Tu 843pm 2.2 416am -0.6 By DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com Alaina Wilson plans to plant hers in her front yard, while with Logan Waller it will be a couple feet away from his house. Jnecia Penamon will keep hers away from her backyard, where the dogs might get it. For Hollie Larkin it will go right beside some Japanese plum trees. Austin Shiver has elaborate plans for his, precisely how he will landscape around it. Olivia Monods will be rooted at her fathers house, and Bradley Lees at his grandmothers sprawling acreage. The planting of these sabal palm seedlings comes about in the lives of these 125 Franklin County fourth graders thanks to an Arbor Day 2013 planting outreach sponsored and funded locally by the Franklin County Soil and Water Conservation District. On Friday morning, fourth graders at the Franklin County School, Apalachicola Bay Charter School and First Baptist Christian School were all treated to a ceremonial planting on their campus of the sabal palm (Sabal palmetto), rst designated in 1953 as Floridas of cial state tree and since 1970 a part of Floridas ofcial seal. Designated as of cial Fourth Grade Foresters, students from the three schools were each given a seedling to take home and plant in their neighborhood. The Arbor Day planting is a part of a nationwide Drive to Revive Arbor Day organized by the Fourth Grade Foresters USA. It was also held in conjunction with Viva Florida 500, which marks the 500th anniversary of the Spanish exploration of the state. It is a great opportunity to support the countys various elementary education programs, and involve a new generation in becoming responsible stewards of our environment here in paradise, said Dr. John Sink, who made a personal visit to all three campuses to tout the program. The rst Arbor Day on April 10, 1872 in Nebraska is attributed to the work of Julius Sterling Morton, a member of the Nebraska State Board of Agriculture. In 1970, President Richard Nixon proclaimed the last Friday in April as National Arbor Day. Today, all 50 states celebrate Arbor Day although the date may vary in keeping with local climate and planting recommendations, such as in Florida on the third Friday in January. Email outdoors news to timesoutdoors @star .com Page 10 Thursday, January 24, 2013 OUTDOORSwww.apalachtimes.comSection Section A SPONSORED BY Inshore FreshwaterLake Wimico and under the White City Bridge, a few luck anglers are reporting on stripped bass and hybrid bass this week. White grubs and jig heads will entice them, but a live shrimp will work well also. With warmer weather and mild air temps, The Forgotten Coast is seeing great fish cathces latley. most action is in the canal with trout being the top spot Most fish are bieng caught on D.O.A. lures or live shrimp.Students receive Sabal palmsHunters good at depositing carcassesSince October 2012, the countys department of animal control has collected 117 deer carcasses and 50 hog carcasses around the county. Director Fonda Davis said hunters have been exceptionally good about depositing carcasses in designated disposal containers this season. Carcass disposal containers can be found on Airport Road west of Apalachicola, near the land ll on State Route 65 north of Eastpoint and on County Road 67 north of Carrabelle.Workshop tonight for butter y countDo you live, work or play within a mile of the northern coast of the Gulf of Mexico? Are you interested in contributing to solving one of the mysteries about monarch butter ies? Volunteers are needed to participate in the Northern Gulf Coast Monarch Over-Wintering Count along the northern coast of the Gulf of Mexico during the months of January and February. Participants should reside or spend part of most weeks within a mile of the Gulf Coast. Attend a free workshop on Thursday, Jan. 24 from 6 to 7:30 p.m. at the Apalachicola Reserve Nature Center, 108 Island Drive, Eastpoint. For questions about workshop call 670-7700. The count is designed to begin to gather data to answer the question of Do monarch butter ies overwinter along the northern Gulf Coast? Many people have said they have seen monarchs along this coast in January or February, but currently there is little or no data to verify whether this is a rare or consistent happening. The project is directed by Richard Rubino, who will be working closely with David Cook, current director of the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge Fall Monarch Migration Tagging Project, and Ron Nelson, who manages the Eden Spring Monarch Migration Augmentation Project in Tallahassee. Special to The TimesNationally recognized writer and photographer John Spohrer has donated the framed original of a photograph of a cat at St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge. The photo is displayed at the Apalachicola Area Chamber of Commerce where raf e tickets can be purchased for $3 or two for $5. Monies raised go to support the Franklin County Humane Society. Only 500 tickets will be sold. The more tickets you buy the better your chances of winning. For information call 653-9419. The FCHS is a 501c3 non pro t organization. County funding was cut 10 percent this year and contributions are down by 30 percent. The FCHS is in need of donations from animal lovers who want to make a difference in the lives of the homeless companion animals at the facility. Donations are tax deductible and all go to bene t the animals being housed. Send donations to FCHS, P.O. Box 417, Eastpoint, FL 32328 The shelter always needs dog treats, collars, leashes, hard rubber chew toys, tennis balls, braided chew rope, cat litter, bleach, hand soap, laundry detergent, utility water and food bowls (all sizes), kitchen trash bags and 39-gallon yard bags. Bring donations to the shelter or to the Apalachicola Times, 129 Commerce Street, Apalachicola. The shelter frequently has special needs pets that require more than routine medical care. Make a difference by sponsoring an animal with medical problems. To learn about these special need animals or make a donation, visit www. forgottenpets.org The shelter also is in need of volunteers to socialize animals in its care. For information, call 670-8417. Outdoor BRIEFS Raf e to bene t humane societyJOHN SPOHRER | Special to the TimesThis original photograph will be auctioned off to bene t the Franklin County Humane Society. DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The TimesLogan Waller, Alaina Wilson and Hollie Larkin plant a sabal palm at the Franklin County School, Genesis Jones, left, and Darius Johnson hold up the Vive Florida 500 banner as Dr. John Sink explains its meaning.

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Gulfside IGA PLAYER OF THE WEEK SPONSORLady Seahawks junior midelder Gracyn Kirvin (#8) has performed exceptionally well in the district tournament, scoring three goals and two assists in the opener against Baker, and then one goal and one assist in the championship win over Port St. Joe. Coach Kelli Maggio said Kirvin stepped up big time on defense against Port St. Joe, after an injury sidelined teammate Katie Seger.Congratulations, Gracyn! Hometown Proud (850)653-9695 BAY DAY FESTIVAL F EST SAT. FEBRUARY 2nd 11:00 TO 2:00 EST*St. Joseph Bay Preserves Center 3915 HWY 30-A, Port St. Joe $10DONATION PER MEAL DON ATI ON 3915 HWY 30-A, Port St. Joe ATI ATI ON ON All proceeds benet The Friends of St. Joseph Bay PreservesSausage Beverages Sausage Sausage MENU MUSIC EXHIBITS RAFFLE ITEMS VISIT stjosephbaypreserves.org FOR DETAILS CALL 8502291787 FORMORE INFO CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA SPORTS www.apalachtimes.comThursday, January 24, 2013 APage 11SectionBy DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com The Franklin County Lady Seahawks took on the Port St. Joe Lady Tiger Sharks for the Class 1A District championship Friday night in Port St. Joe and it promised to be another storied affair. The Lady Seahawks got off to a good start, when 10 minutes into the game sophomore Katie Seger was fouled just outside the penalty box. She served up the direct free kick into the box and junior Gracyn Kirvin put the ball in the net to give the Lady Seahawks a 1-0 lead. Just before the rst water break the Lady Seahawks struck again. The attack started with eighth grader Allie Kirvin passing the ball towards the center to Gracyn Kirvin, who laid the ball off to junior Jessica Shields who struck a shot from 20 yards out that went under Port St. Joe goalkeeper Christian Lain. The Lady Seahawks took a 2-0 lead going into the rst water break. The Lady Hawks endured a major setback as Seger, a standout young player, suffered a serious knee injury on the rst play after the water break. We know that these unfortunate things are part of the competitive sports world, but it does not soften the blow. Katie has been a large part of our team success and was playing the best soccer of her young career, said Coach Kelli Wright. The Lady Seahawks stayed strong throughout the game after Seger went down and the defensive effort was a seasons best. In the last 20 minutes of the game, Port St. Joe put their goalkeeper, one of their stronger eld players, on the eld. With six minutes left in the game she cranked a shot from 20 yards out that skipped off and over sophomore goalkeeper Macy Hunts gloves. That Lady Tiger Sharks goal closed the gap to 2-1. The Lady Seahawks held on to the lead to capture their second straight district title, marking the second title in only three years of state series play. Junior Gracyn Kirvin stepped up big on defense in the absence of Seger, taking her out of her normal forward position, said Wright. The last six minutes of the game seemed like an eternity, but our defense kept ghting and Macy Hunt came up with some tremendous saves. The defensive play of Ally Millender, Adriana Reeder, Laura Gallegos and Deborah Dempsey was tremendous. They responded to the momentum shift and ampli ed Port St. Joe pressure with great poise and tenacity, added the coach. We were extremely proud of how this team handled tonights adversity, said Josh Wright, athletic director and assistant girls soccer coach. After Katie went down, our girls made it clear that they were not going to let this game get away from them no matter what. Seger remained on the bench for the entire game in pain to support her teammates. Following the nal championship photo, Seger went directly to Sacred Heart for evaluation. She is expected to make a full recovery prior to her junior season. The Lady Seahawks, 11-2-2 on the season, squared off Wednesday night at home in the regional quarter nals against John Paul II, 11-9-1 on the season.DAVID ADLERSTEIN | the TimesLady Seahawk senior girls basketball players Anna Lee, and Shelby Myers were honored before Friday game against Bozeman for Senior Night. The two standout players for Carlos Hills squad then went on to key their team to a victory over the Lady Bucks. Shown above, from left, are Melissa Lee and her daughter, Anna, and Shelby and her mom, Michelle Myers. Lady Seahawks seniors honored Lady Seahawks win second district title in a row SWEET REPEATCHRISTEY KIRVIN | Special to the TimesThe Lady Seahawks signal they are district soccer champs for the second year in a row.DAVID ADLERSTEIN | the TimesLady Seahawks soccer players Erin Riley, left, and Jessica Shields, hold up Robert Grif n III (RG3) football jerseys the team is raf ing off to raise money. Tickets are $2 each, and three for $5, with the winner drawn at the Jan. 31 boys basketball senior night. THE APALACHICOLA TIMESFIND US ON FACEBOOK

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LocalA12 | The Times Thursday, January 24, 2013 2084408 Enter Starting January 27th www.nwfdail y news.com BENEFITTING Enter NowTo win $500! 2nd Annual 2nd Annual 2084409 :___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ By LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star.com Two dogs that have lost their loving caregiver need a safe home. Selsh acts of violence send out ripples in every direction. On Dec. 12, the body of Cynthia Green of Apalachicola was discovered on a beach west of the city. Her daughter later confessed to the killing. Green left behind family members devastated by the senseless violence. She also left a different kind of family that needs help now. At the time of her death, Green was feeding and caring for at least eight cats and three dogs. Four of the cats have been trapped, treated for a respiratory infection and were adopted by a caring friend of Greens. One of the three dogs was elderly and ill and had to be put down. Two remaining dogs are in need of a home where they can adjust to their sad loss. The dogs are Dennis, a seven-year-old black lab mix and Ralph, a ve-year-old yellow lab mix. Shelter Director Karen Martin said the dogs have not adjusted well because they have come from a quiet sheltered background and are terried. She would like to see them remain together. Technician Warren Van Bramer has been working with the dogs and said they have made progress. This week, they ventured outside for the rst time since they were impounded Both dogs are neutered and heartworm negative. They are ready for adoption but need a new family that understands the trauma they have suffered. Ralph and Dennis are currently at the Franklin County Humane Society Animal Shelter. If you can help, call 670-8417 or visit the shelter on CR 65 north of Eastpoint. Martin said the Humane Society will waive all adoption fees to help quickly nd a good home for these deserving dogs. Victims dogs need homePHOTOS Sp P ECIAL TO TT HE TT IMESLeft: Dennis, 7 years old, weighs 59 pounds. Right: Ralph is 5 years old and weighs 63 pounds. OO rion bids on bridge repairs its barge causedAt their regular Jan. 15 meeting, county commissioners opened bids to remove debris from beneath and make repairs to the St. George Island shing pier. A section of the pier was destroyed when a barge belonging to Orion Marine Contractors, of Houston, Texas, broke its moorings during Tropical Storm Debby. Orion, who was in the area as a subcontractor for Progress Energy, is denying liability for the damage, calling the storm an act of God. The company maintains the barge was properly moored. Orion Marine Group led an action in the Federal Northern District Court under the Shipowners Limitation of Liability Act, seeking to limit liability for the damage its barge did to the countys shing pier to $105,000, the value of the vessel that did the damage. That action was placed in abeyance this month. County Attorney Michael Shuler said attorney Robert Dees, an expert in marine law is now ling suit against Orion in circuit court on behalf of the county. Orion was one of the four companies to bid this month on the repair work, requesting $884,600 in fees. Gulf Group, out of Southport, offered the lowest bid, $566,200; HG Harders of Panama City listed charges totaling $953,900 and McCormick Contractors of Lynn Haven bid $832,200. Commissioners instructed staff and Clay Kennedy of Preble Rish, the countys engineering consultant, to review the bids and return with a recommendation.CC ounty contributes to S S econd C C ircuit computersGrant Slayden, trial court administrator, addressed county commissioners at their Jan. 15 meeting seeking approval of a cost-sharing agreement on an integrated computer system between the courts, Franklin County and the other ve counties within the Second Judicial Circuit. The system is aiSmartBench, a product of Mentis Technology Solutions, LLC, and will be compatible with Franklin Countys case management system. This is the only existing system that meets the requirements of the circuit. Under the law, the Franklin County must fund court-related communications services which include computer systems. Under the agreement, Leon County serves as the scal agent and the other counties reimburse Leon County upon being invoiced. Payment will be made from dedicated and available funds from the Court lnnovations account under a county ordinance. The funds come from fees assessed on certain criminal cases for uses approved by the chief judge of the Circuit. Franklin Countys cost for the rst year is $12,000. Maintenance fees in the amount of $1,600 are paid annually for the rst three years and increase by 5 percent the fourth year. Were not asking for any money, the money is sitting there, Slayden said. Its already in the account. The Court lnnovations account has over $80,000 in it currently, so the funding is available. He said the county can opt out of the program at a later date,if it wishes, and no further fees would be assessed.Board O O Ks resolution for more BP fundingOn Jan. 2, county commissioners voted unanimously to accept a joint resolution of disproportionately affected counties that will increase the funding allocation to Franklin County in compensation for the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Even though Franklin County is not a member of the Gulf consortium, I think it is appropriate that the board support the resolution as it does provide more funds to Franklin County than the previous formula, said Director of Administrative Services Alan Pierce The exact amount of funding provided under the resolution is not clear.TT obacco ghters group to meet Feb. 7There will be a TobaccoFree Franklin Partnership Coalition Meeting on Thursday, Feb. 7. The meeting will be held at the Franklin County Health Department, at 139 12th Street, from 5:30 until 6:30 p.m. in the second oor conference room.Roadside debris and recyclables add upBetween Dec. 12 and 21 the Franklin County Waste Management collected 258 tons of roadside debris. Eastpoint was by far the greatest contributor, with almost 79 tons followed by Carrabelle with 70 tons. Apalachicola produced 57 tons and St. George Island produced almost 35 tons. Lanark Village contributed over 17 tons. The county produced more than 14 tons of recyclable materials. Five-and-one-half tons came from Apalachicola, and three tons from Eastpoint. St. George Island produced almost three tons. Carrabelle recycled two-andone-half tons of material and Lanark Village and Alligator Point each recycled about one-half ton. News brBRIEfFS

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LocalThe Times | A13Thursday, January 24, 2013 CALL TODAY!653-8868 GET YOUR AD IN Trades & Services Laban Bontrager, DMD Monica Bontrager, DMD 12761 Pea Ridge Road Bristol, Florida 32321TELEPHONE (850) 643-5417 Bristol Dental ClinicDENTURE LAB ON PREMISESSame Day Service on Repairs and Relines Don Lively General Contractors LICENSED ANDINSURED 20 YEARSEXPERIENCE P.O. Box 439 Carrabelle, FL 32322 697-2783 or Mobile 566-2603RC0066499RG0065255 Carrabelle Visa, Discover, and American Express Honored at Participating Ace Stores JACKSONSBuilding Supplies Building Supplies & Auto Repair Carrabelle 697-3333 We Deliver AnywhereHardware and Paint Center GET YOUR AD IN Trades & ServicesCALL TODAY!653-8868 J.J.s Tree Service, LLC Stump Grinder Licensed & Insured Call John : (850) 899-8432 ROBERTS APPLIANCE REPAIR ALL MAJOR BRANDS 18 Shadow Lane Apalachicola, FL 32320 Phone: (850) 653-8122 Cell: (850) 653-7654 Pet Wellness ProgramDr. Hobson Fulmer | Dr. John Duncan187 Highway 98 Eastpoint, FL Open Monday Friday 8-6 PMWe are a full service Veterinary Clinic offering small animal medicine and surgery:Laser Surgery Low cost spay and neuter Monthly heartworm injections (no need for pills) Dentistry with digital x rays Ophthalmology (including glaucoma screening) Dermatology including allergy testing Nutritional counseling and diets Sonograms for internal organ evaluation and cancer screening Complete laboratory facilities Boarding After hours emergency care Highly trained, compassionate, professional sta FREE VACCINATIONS WITH EACH WELLNESS EXAM CALL 8506708306 FOR AN APPOINTMENT APALACHICOLA BAYANIMAL CLINIC YOUR OTHER FAMILY DOCTOR Special to The TimesThe Mommy and Me Friday afternoon Storytime at the Franklin County Public Library in Eastpoint represented the work of some budding artists. The theme for the month of January is The Arts and its many faces as the children are exposed to multiple forms of art and artists. The rst week included a study of Vincent Van Gogh, his life and the art he created. The children thoroughly enjoyed the opportunity to see the results of acrylic paints and watercolors on the easel. Each was proud to display their own creation and relive the excitement of the masters. One of the directives with early education is to expose even the smallest child to expression through creativity. This free weekly program offers numerous opportunities and ways for children aged birth to nine to explore library materials, learn new skills, and enjoy the library with new friends. The Carrabelle branch offers bi-weekly opportunities to hear stories from Ms. Tonia along with Wii games for children of all ages up to 12. Franklin County Public Library offers programs for children of all ages, teens, and adults at the Eastpoint and Carrabelle sites. For more information about programs and services, call 850-670-8151 or 850-697-2366. YOUR COUNTY LIBRARYMommy and Me creates young artistsChildren and their moms take part in Mommy and Me Storytime at the library.PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE TIMES

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A14 | The Times Thursday, January 24, 2013By LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ApalachTimes lswoboda@star.com On Jan. 3, Carrabelles City Commission passed an ordinance to promote water conservation measures in landscape design. Although the basics of Ordinance 454 was mandated by the North Florida Water Management District, city commissioners had some discretion in writing the law. City Attorney Dan Hartman said Carrabelles newest ordinance was modeled on an ordinance passed in Port St. Joe. The planning and zoning board reviewed the new law before the Jan. 3 meeting and suggested several changes to the original draft The purpose of these regulations is to establish minimum standards for the development, installation and maintenance of landscaped areas without inhibiting creative landscape design, reads the new ordinance. The goal of the newly created standards is water conservation. Water usage is reduced by preserving existing plant communities, or re-establishing native plant communities, using water for irrigation efciently and growing site specic plant materials. Native plant materials are preferred because they require little or no supplemental water to survive. Eastpoints Joyce Estes, vice chair of the NWFWMD, said she supports the new landscape ordinances. We do need to be more aware of our environment, she said. We all want pretty lawns, but we do need to be more aware of what God gave us. Estes said she and her husband, Jim, have tried to maintain much of their own waterfront property in a natural state to benet wildlife and preserve the health of the estuary. The new law mandates specic water conservation measures including installing a rain sensor device in all automatic lawn irrigation systems to minimize runoff and wastewater. Property can be inspected for compliance by the city code enforcement ofcer with 24 hours notice to the owner. Landscape design for developments larger than a duplex must be done by a person knowledgeable of Florida plant materials, plant communities, and landscape and irrigation principles. Owners of duplexes and single-family dwellings may create their own plan. Landscape plans are to be presented for approval within 180 days of issuance of a certicate of occupancy for a new property. The ordinance mandates the use of 75 percent native plants in all landscape designs and As much native vegetation as possible is to be preserved during development. Resources to identify native plants include the University of Florida Cooperative Extension Service publications: Native Florida Plants for Home Landscapes, Conserving Water in the Home Landscape and Drought Tolerant Plants for North and Central Florida. Only 5 percent of the landscaped area can be covered by materials impervious to water, such as concrete, plastic or asphalt. Driveways are considered part of the landscape and fall under this section of the ordinance. Ordinance 454 bans the use of certain invasive plants including water-hyacinth; hydrilla; green hygro; cogon grass, also known as Japanese blood grass; waterspinach; catclaw and silk tree mimosa; water-lettuce; popcorn tree also known as Chinese tallow tree; turkey berry; tropical soda apple; Ardisia, also known as Marlberry and Spiceberry; Para grass; camphor-tree; taro; lather leaf; Surinam cherry; West Indian marsh grass; Gold Coast, Brazilian and day jasmine; non-native lantanas including all of the ornamental forms commonly sold by nurseries; hedge privet aka Ligustrum; Japanese honeysuckle; Lygodium or Japanese climbing fern; cats claw; sword fern; Burma reed or cane grass; ground orchid; skunk vine; Napier grass also known as elephant grass; kudzu; downy rose myrtle; oyster plant; scaevola also known as half-ower or beach naupaka; incised halberd fern; whiteowered wandering Jew and, horror of horrors, chinaberry. The chinaberry is considered by some to be Carrabelles city tree but dont fear, Carrabelles beloved Police Tree, an ancient chinaberry located next to the Worlds Smallest Police Station is grandfathered in as an existing, mature tree. Although a few of the native grasses are suitable for lawns, the use of turf grass is discouraged under the new ordinance. This type of grass is limited to, those areas on the site that receive pedestrian trafc, provide for recreation use, or provide soil erosion control such as on slopes or in swales; and where turf grass is used as a design unier, or other similar practical use. Carrabelle is charged with sponsoring regular workshops or short courses to educate the public on good landscaping and irrigation practices. Under Ordinance 454, City Manager Courtney Millender or City Clerk Keisha Smith must review and approve all landscape plans for new developments or revisions of more than 50 percent of any landscape design. Specialized athletic elds such as baseball elds are exempt, but the landscape surrounding athletic elds must comply. Non-irrigated areas and areas that are irrigated with shallow well water are exempt from the requirements of 454. Existing landscape designs are grandfathered in, but if the owner of a property revises more than 50 percent of the landscape, the entire property must be brought into compliance. The city commission can grant variances and special exceptions to the rules. New landscaping law promotes conservation LOIS SWOBODA | The TimesNative plants can be beautiful and support the environment. A14| The Times Thursday, January 24, 2013 CLASSIFIEDS 89868T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY CASE NO.: 12-00091CA CENTENNIAL BANK, an Arkansas banking corporation, as Assignee of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, as Receiver for Coastal Community Bank, a Florida banking corporation, Plaintiff, v. RUTH J. FLETCHER, individually, DAVID WALKER, individually, KARMIN WILSON, individually, UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF RUTH J. FLETCHER a/k/a RUTH FLETCHER, UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF DAVID WALKER, UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF KARMIN WILSON, LAKE PRISTINE PROPERTY OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., a Florida Non Profit Corporation, UNKNOWN PARTIES IN POSSESSION, and FIRST TENNESSEE BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the undersigned Clerk of the Circuit Court of Franklin County, Florida, pursuant to the Final Summary Judgment of foreclosure, entered in this case, will sell the property at public sale to the highest bidder for cash, except as set forth hereinafter, on February 20, 2013, at 11:00 am Eastern Time at the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida, in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes, the following described real property lying and being in Franklin County, Florida, to-wit: Lots 7 and 8 of LAKE PRISTINE, PHASE I, according to the plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 8, Page 2, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. This Notice dated this 4th day of January, 2013. Marcia M. Johnson Franklin County Clerk of Circuit Court By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk Jan 17, 24, 2013 89906T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY CASE NO. 2011-417CA EMERALD COAST FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, Plaintiff, vs. ANTHONY J. CROOM, SR. and wife, TAMMIE D. CROOM, Defendants. AMENDED NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that pursuant to an Amended Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated November 2, 2012, and entered in Civil Case No. 2011-417-CA of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit of the State of Florida, in and for FRANKLIN County, wherein EMERALD COAST FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, is Plaintiff and ANTHONY J. CROOM, SR. and TAMMIE D. CROOM, are Defendants, I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at the front door of the Franklin County Courthouse in Apalachicola, Florida, at 11:00 A.M., ET on the 13th day of February, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: Lots 11 and 12, Block 216 City of Apalachicola, according to the plat thereof of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. DATED this 10th day of January, 2013. MARCIA JOHNSON CIRCUIT COURT CLERK By: Terry E. Creamer DEPUTY CLERK January 24, 31, 2013 91691T NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED Notice if hereby given that, REEL PROPERTIES, LLC., the holders of the following certificate have filed said certificate for tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property and the name in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No: 27 Year of issuance: 2009 Description of property: Lots 21,22,23, & 24 Block 3, Sun `n Sand Beaches Unit #2, PARCEL NO: 32-06S-01W-1061-0003-02 10 Name is which assessed: NANCY JO EDWARDS All of said property being in the State of Florida, Franklin County. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the Courthouse door on the second (1st) Monday in the month of February 2013, which is the 4th day of February 2013 at 11:00 a.m. Dated this 17th day of December 2012. MARCIA M. JOHNSON CLERK OF COURTS FRANKLIN COUNTY, Cassie B. Sapp Deputy Clerk Jan. 3, 10, 17, 24, 2013 91821T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 12-000055-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, as successor in interest to APALACHICOLA STATE BANK, Plaintiff, vs. SHEZAD SANAULLAH; JEANNE M. WRAY BONDS n/k/a JEANNE M. DAIL; THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS, TRUSTEES AND ALL OTHER PARTIES CLAIMING AN INTEREST BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THE ESTATE OF ROBERT E. CONNELL, DECEASED; KAREN C. BIDDY; ALBERT A. SIMPLER, III; and CEDAR BLVD. LEASE FUNDING LLC, INC., UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Defendant(s) NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE is hereby given that, pursuant to the Order of Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure in this cause, in the Circuit Court of Franklin County, Florida, I will sell the property situated in Franklin County, Florida described as: Lots Number Four (4) and Five (5) of Block One Hundred Seven (107) of the City of Apalachicola, County of Franklin, State of Florida, according to the map or plat of said City in general use. at Public Sale, to the highest bidder, for cash, at the steps of the Franklin County Courthouse, Apalachicola, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on February 6, 2013. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court this 1st day of October, 2012. MARCIA M. JOHNSON Clerk of Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk January 17, 24, 2013 91883T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, STATE OF FLORIDA CASE NO.: 11-499-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, successor in interest to COASTAL COMMUNITY BANK, Plaintiff, vs. ROBERT B. RAMSEY and wife, KELLY A RAMSEY, Defendants. CLERKS NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO F.S. CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Partial Summary Judgment of Foreclosure dated January 4, 2013, in Case No.: 11-499-CA of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at public sale on the front steps of the Court House at 11:00 a.m. EST on February 20, 2013 the following described property: Lot 6, Block 93 274, KEOUGHS SECOND ADDITION, to the City of Carrabelle, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. DATED: January 4, 2013. MARCIA JOHNSON Clerk of the Court Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk January 17, 24, 2013 91907T PUBLIC NOTICE Notice is hereby given The Northwest Florida Transportation Corridor Authority will hold a meeting on January 24, 2013. The meeting will be held at 10:00 a.m. Central Time at the City Hall, Commission Meeting Room, 9 Harrison Avenue, Panama City, Florida. Any person requiring special accommodations to participate in this meeting is asked to advise the Corridor Authority at least 48 hours prior to the meeting by contacting Amy Paulk at (850) 415-1040 or apaulk@gc-inc.com. January 24, 2013 91963T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION Case No.: 11000505CA FLAGSTAR BANK, FSB, Plaintiff, vs. NORBERT JOSEPH KAMINSKI A/K/A NORBERT J. KAMINSKI A/K/A NORBERT KAMINSKI AND NANCY A NNE KAMINSKI A/K/A NANCY A. KAMINSKI A/K/A N ANCY KAMINSKI, et al. Defendant. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated December 27, 2012 and entered in 11000505CA of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein FLAG-STAR BANK FSB, is the Plaintiff and NORBERT JOSEPH KAMINSKI A/K/A NORBERT J KAMINSKI A/K/A NORBERT KAMINSKI AND NANCY ANNE KAMINSKI A/K/A NANCY A. KAMINSKI A/K/A NANCY KAMINSKI; UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2 are the Defendant(s). Marcia M. Johnson as the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Front Steps of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320, at 11:00 AM on February 14, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 28, BLOCK 10 EAST OF ST. GEORGE ISLAND G ULF BEACHES UNIT NO. 1, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE(S) 7, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 28th day of December, 2012. Marcia M. Johnson As Clerk of the Court Michele Maxwell As Deputy Clerk IMPORTANT If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301. 850.577.4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Submitted by: Robertson, Anschutz & Schneid, P.L. Attorneys for Plaintiff 3010 N. Military Trail, Suite 300 Boca Raton, FL 33431 561-241-6901 Fax: 561-241-9181 January 24, 31, 2013 91987T PUBLIC NOTICE STATE OF FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION NOTICE OF INTENT TO ISSUE PERMIT The Department of Environmental Protection gives notice of its intent to issue an environmental resource permit for dredging a mooring basin, file number 19-0305735-002-EI, to the Martin Frazier, at 570 Mountain Park Trail, Stone Mountain, Georgia 30087. The purpose of the permit is to authorize dredging approximately 193.3 cubic yards of sediment in Postum Bayou to allow mooring of recreational vessels. Dredge spoil will be deposited in a self-contained upland spoil cell on Timber Island. The project will be located at lots 6 and 7 of Carraway Bay Subdivision, Carrabelle, Franklin County, Florida. Based on all the above, and with the application of general and limiting specific conditions of the permit, the Department has reasonable assurance the project, as proposed, fully meets the environmental resources permitting requirements of Chapter 62-346, Florida Administrative Code, and will not harm the environment. A person whose substantial interests are affected by the Departments action may petition for an administrative proceeding (hearing) under Sections 120.569 and 120.57 of the Florida Statute. The petition must contain the information set forth below and must be filed (received by the clerk) in the Office of General Local | Classieds

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, January 24, 2013 The Times | A15 ToPlace Your Classified ad inCall Our New Numbers Now!Call: 850-747-5020 Toll Free:800-345-8688 Fax: 850-747-5044 Email: thestar@pcnh.com Email: thetimes@pcnh.com theAPALACHICOLA & CARRABELLETIMES CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW ManySelling ABSOLUTE! AUCTIONS AuctionFDIC.com AL-GA-FL-SCFebruary23-March2RESIDENTIAL-COMMERCIAL DEVELOPERLOTS-LANDNoBuyersPremium|5%DownPayment $2,500CashiersChecktoBid BrokersProtectedH&MCQ1035357,AB110;B.G.Hudson,Jr.,BK3006464,AU230 866.509.4473 3532994 RENTALS3 BR 3 BA UNFURNISHED CONDO LONG TERM, POOL............................$850 2 BR 1 BA UNFURNISHED HOUSEFL ROOM, FENCED YARD, GARAGE ...$775 2 BR 1 BA UNFURNISHED APT NEW PAINT, SMALL PORCH .............$375 3 BR 1 BA FURNISHED APT WEEKLY OR MONTHLY, INC UTILITIES 3 BR 1 BA UNFURNISHED DUPLEX DOWNTOWN CARRABELLE ..............$600 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322850-697-9604 850-323-0444 www.seacrestre.comwww. rst tness.com/carrabellePROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND RENTALS Apalachicola 1Br/1Ba quiet, 2 blks from boat ramp, $600mo + first & last dep. 850-570-9167 St. GeorgeIsland $175/wk, elec, satellite, garbage incl. Pool tbl. 12 X 65 deck. Beautiful view! 850-653-5319 East Point Carrabelle 900 sq ft Designer, 1Br, Open Plan, Jacuzzi, Washer & Dryer, Satellite, Wi-Fi Avail, Secluded, 1/2 mile from Beach. $420 month. Call 954-816-7004 Text FL22547 to 56654 Carrabelle Cove ApartmentsTaking Applications Now Available: 1, 2 and 3 br, Handicap Apts. Laundry facilities on site, W/S included in rent, CH&A and window coverings provided. On site management Office. Rental assistance available. Income restrictions apply, reasonable accommodation. Carrabelle Cove Apartments 807 Gray Ave #33 Carrabelle, Fl 32322 850-697-2017 TDD711 This institution is an equal opportunity provider & employerText FL29928 to 56654 HospitalityRESORT VACATION PROPERTIESAccepting applications for aFull-time Front Desk ClerkOffice experience, computer skills & good customer service skills required. Great benefits, weekend work required. Apply in person 9-5 weekdays at 123 W Gulf Beach Dr, St. George Island Install/Maint/RepairMaintenanceFull time maintenance person needed at the Bucaneer Inn on St. George Island, Fl. Experience is helpful and must be able to work weekends. Applications can be pick up at 228 Franklin Blvd, St. George Island or call 850-927-2163 for more information OFFICE CLEANER NEEDED for The Star & Apalachicola/Carrabelle Times Newspaper. Every other week after 5:00 p.m. JOB DUTIES INCLUDE: Sweep & Mop oor Clean Bathroom Empty & Take out Trash Light Dusting For The Star, Call Kari: 227.7847 For The Times, Call Gail: 653.6853 Counsel of the Department at 3900 Commonwealth Boulevard, Mail Station 35, Tallahassee, Florida 323993000. Because the administrative hearing process is designed to re-determine final agency action on the application, the filing of a petition for an administrative hearing may result in a modification of the permit, or even a denial of the application. Accordingly, the applicant will not commence construction or other activities under this permit until the deadlines below for filing a petition for an administrative hearing, or request for an extension of time, have expired. Under subsection 62-110.106(4) of the Florida Administrative Code, a person whose substantial interests are affected by the Departments action may also request an extension of time to file a petition for an administrative hearing. The Department may, for good cause shown, grant the request for an extension of time. Requests for extension of time must be filed with the Office of General Counsel of the Department at 3900 Commonwealth Boulevard, Mail Station 35, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-3000, before the applicable deadline. A timely request for extension of time shall toll the running time period for filing a petition until the request is acted upon. If a request is filed late, the Department may still grant it upon a motion by the requesting party showing that the failure to file a request for an extension of time before the deadline was the result of excusable neglect. In the event that a timely and sufficient petition for an administrative hearing is filed, other persons whose substantial interests will be affected by the outcome of the administrative process have the right to petition to intervene in the proceeding. Intervention will be only at the discretion of the presiding officer upon the filing of a motion in compliance with Rule 28-106.205 of the Florida Administrative Code. In accordance with subsection 28-106.111 (2) and subparagraph 62-110.106(3)(a).4, Florida Administrative Code, petitions for an administrative hearing by the applicant must be filed within 14 days of receipt of written notice. Petitions filed by any persons other than the applicant, and other than those entitled to written notice under Section 120.60 (3) of the Florida Statutes, must be filed within 14 days of publication of the notice. Under Section 120.60 (3) of the Florida Statute, however, any person who has asked the Department for notice of agency action may file a petition within 14 days of such notice, regardless of the date of publication. The petitioner shall mail a copy of the petition to the applicant at the address indicated above at the time of filing. The failure of any person to file a petition for an administrative hearing within the appropriate time period shall constitute a waiver of those rights. A petition that disputes the material facts on which the Departments action is based must contain the following information: (a) The name and address of each agency affected and each agencys file or identification number, if known; (b) The name, address, and telephone number of the petitioner; the name, address, and telephone number of the petitioners representative, if any, which shall be the address for service purposes during the course of the proceeding; and an explanation of how the petitioners substantial interests are or will be affected by the agency determination; (c) A statement of when and how the petitioner received notice of the agency decision; (d) A statement of all disputed issues of material fact. If there are none, the petition must so indicate; (e) A concise statement of the ultimate facts alleged, including the specific facts that the petitioner contends warrant reversal or modification of the agencys proposed action; (f) A statement of the specific rules or statutes that the petitioner contends require reversal or modification of the agencys proposed action; and (g) A statement of the relief sought by the petitioner, stating precisely the action that the petitioner wishes the agency to take with respect to the agencys proposed action. A petition that does not dispute the material facts on which the Departments action is based shall state that no such facts are in dispute and otherwise shall contain the same information as set forth above, as required by Rule 28-106.301, Florida Administrative Code. Under Sections 120.569(2)(c) and (d) of the Florida Statute, a petition for administrative hearing must be dismissed by the agency if the petition does not substantially comply with the above requirements or is untimely filed. This action is final and effective on the date filed with the Clerk of the Department unless a petition is filed in accordance with the above. Upon the timely filing of petition this order will not be effective until further order of the Department. This permit, when issued, constitutes an order of the Department. The applicant has the right to seek judicial review of the order under Section 120.68 of the Florida Statute, by the filing of a notice of appeal under Rule 9.110 of the Florida Rules of Appellate Procedure with the Clerk of the Department in the Office of General Counsel, 3900 Commonwealth Boulevard, Mail Station 35, Tallahassee, Florida, 323993000; and by filing a copy of the notice of the appeal accompanied by the applicable filing fees with the appropriate district court of appeal. The notice of appeal must be filed within 30 days from the date when the final order is filed with the Clerk of the Department. Requests for review before the Land and Water Adjudicatory Commission must be filed with the Secretary of the Commission and served on the Department within 20 days from the date when the final order is filed with the Clerk of the Department. The application for this permit is available for public inspection during normal business hours, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, except for legal holidays, at the Northwest District office, 160 W. Government Street, Pensacola, Florida. January 24, 2013 *Adopt*:Doting dad, stay at home mom (&puppies) excited to give your baby everything! *Expenses Paid* *Bob & Maria* FKBar42311 1800-522-0045 $$ WANTED OLD CAR TAGS $$ I am buying old car tags in good condition from the 1950s from the following counties: Franklin, Gulf, Liberty, Calhoun, Bay, Jackson, Wakulla, Taylor, Madison, Jefferson, Gadsden, Hamilton, Lafayette. Kirk 850-585-3677 $Wanted Old Bottles$I am looking for old coca-cola bottles, Medicine bottles, Orange Crush bottles, Rice Bottling Works bottles, Gorrie Bottling Works bottles, Neele Bottling Works bottles, John Cook Fine Whiskey flask bottles from Apalachicola also commissary tokes, seafood tokens, lumber tokens, general merchandise tokens, turpentine tokens & old signs. Kirk 850-545-3677 BargainsNew Merchandise Liquidation Store, In Hickory Plaza, Prices 25-75% Below Retail! Mention Ad for Additional 10% OFF! 414 S. Tyndall Pkwy850-215-2755 Bldg Const/Skill TradeProject Manager/ EstimatorExperienced Commercial Construction PM /Estimator in Tallahassee area. Salary & benefits. Submit resume or application to tallahassee construction.o pportunity@hotmail.com or mail to: OPPORTUNITY 1400 Village Square Blvd. Ste 3-179 Tallahassee, FL 32312 Web ID# 34238895 Text FL38895 to 56654 Bldg/Skilled TradeSiteSuperintendentSuperintendent for Government Project Govern. Exper. OnlyRequired, Fax Resume & Salary Requirements, 813-281-9596 Web ID# 34237529 Text FL37529 to 56654 DriversDriversAll Miles PAID (Loaded & Empty)! Home on the weekends! Running Class-A CDL Flatbed. Lease to Own-No Money Down CALL: 888-880-5911 Food Svs/Hospitality*Servers *Cooks Dishwashers *Bartenders *BussersBLUE PARROT Now HIRINGPlease apply in person between 9a-5pm 7 days a week@ Blue Parrot St. Georges Island Food Svs/HospitalityBest WesternAll PositionsPlease apply in Person 9am-3pm 249 Hwy 98 Apalachicola, FL. No phone calls!!! HospitalityRESORT VACATION PROPERTIESAccepting applications for aFT Check-In ClerkExperience handling money helpful. Must have reliable transportation. Quick learnerFT ReservationistPrior sales exp preferred. Attentive to details & follow-up.Maint Office Asst4 days/wk. Team player, attentive to detail & good follow-up skills. These great jobs on SGI require excellent customer service & computer skills, good spelling & grammar, and weekend work. Prior office exp preferred. Great benefits pkg. Apply in person 9-5 weekdays at 123 W Gulf Beach Dr St. George Island These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you. EmeraldCoast Marketplace 747-5020 Need a helping hand? Advertise in the Help Wanted Section in the Classifieds! 747-5020 REPRESENTATIVES will be at the GULF COUNTY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE on Tuesdays & Thursdays from 9 am 1 pm EST accepting applications for numerous open positions.We offer competitive wages and a comprehensive bene t package including Company paid health, dental, and life insurance, 401(k), attendance & safety bonuses.EOE/Drug Free WorkplaceEASTERN SHIPBUILDING GROUP MORE THAN A JOB A FUTURE!

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A16 | The Times Thursday, January 24, 2013 Real Estate PicksOur local real estate experts have identied what they feel are the best values around and are oering them to you in Real Estate Picks! (In this section), Discover the best real estate values in Mexico Beach, Port St. Joe, Apalachicola, Cape San Blas, St. George Island, Carrabelle and surrounding areas. Best Values on the Forgotten Coast SELL YOUR LISTINGS HERE! Only $35 per week per listing Minimum 2 ads per week or 1 ad for 2 weeks Contact Joel or Kari for details: (850)814-7377 or (850)227-7847SOLD John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.comMLS# 248579$649,900St. George IslandSHELL HARBOR BAYFRONT 4 BR, 4.5 BA, Guest Cottage, boat/RV garage, Gulf beautiful sunsets! John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.comMLS# 248242$279,900St. George Island1ST TIER PLANTATIONGreat Gulf Views! Panoramic views to the east & north, Attention pilots! near the Plantation airport; One acre lot, Adjacent to boardwalk to Gulf, One of the highest lots on the Island, Amenities include New Club house & Pool. Seaside Drive, Nicks Hole 6012790 Locally owned and operated Home Business Auto Health Workers Comp NEW LOCATION:dbutler@coastalcoverage.com LocalThe world on a stringBy LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star .com Erik Bendl has already saved the world and now hes got it on a string and on a mission to raise awareness about diabetes. On Monday, Bendl and his dog, Nice found people waiting for them all along their route as the made their way from One Mile, where Bendl spent Sunday resting and repainting the ve-foot, canvas globe he has pushed over 5,000 miles and through 39 states since 2007. Bendl said he needed to spruce up the world because it got a salty soaking during the rst leg of his trip, which began Jan. 2, 2013, when he walked through sloppy snow in Tennessee. Bendl, who is headed towards Tampa, said this is his ninth walk. As he eases down the road, surrounded by curious, friendly faces, he tells everyone he meets about the importance of exercise and the hidden dangers of diabetes, the disease that took his mother at only 56 years of age in 1987. Born Gerta Koperek, she lived in Pennsylvania until 1962, when she and husband Richard Bendl moved to Louisville, Ky, where Gerta Bendl organized a group of neighborhood women to challenge the school board and to work on the problem of ood control. In Nov. 1972, she ran and won as the Democratic nominee for third district alderman, known for her outspoken humanitarianism. Bendl won a seat in the Kentucky General Assembly in 1976 and focused her attention on issues affecting the poor and elderly. In 1980 she became the rst woman to chair a standing committee in the state legislature. In 1987 she died of a heart attack brought on by complications of diabetes. Her son, Erik, saved the world, when he rescued his globe from the waste bin in the 1980s. When his son turned 7, he in ated it for the birthday party. He began taking the boy and the ball to the park and got lots of attention. Thats when he hit on his plan to spread the word about exercise and health. Bendl and Nice average about 10 miles a day on their excursions, which last from one to ve months. They sleep in a van that he leaves parked at the start of his daily walk, relying on some good-natured soul he meets during the day to ferry him back to pick it up each evening. He camps at re stations and in Wal-Mart parking lots. In Apalachicola he camped in an RV site offered to him by Capt. Tony Phillips. He has created a foundation to accept and disburse funds. He donates to the American Diabetes Association and maintains a blog at www.worldguy.org. I get lots of coverage, Bendl said. But I started the regular blog because my brother got tired of trying to Google me every morning.LOIS SWOBODA | The TimesErik Bendl, his dog Nice and the canvas globe.