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The Apalachicola times
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100380/00200
 Material Information
Title: The Apalachicola times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: H.W. Johnston
Place of Publication: Apalachicola Fla
Apalachicola Fla
Publication Date: 12-13-2012
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola
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Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1885.
General Note: Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 32911693
lccn - sn 95026907
System ID: UF00100380:00200
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Preceded by: Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by: Apalachicola herald

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xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx 50 WWW.APALACHTIMES.COM Phone: 850-653-8868 Web: apalachtimes.com E-mail: dadlerstein@star .com Fax: 850-653-8036 Circulation: 800-345-8688 DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK: School News & Society: 11 a.m. Friday Real Estate Ads: 11 a.m. Thursday Legal Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Display Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Line Ads: 5 p.m. Monday xxxxx Contact Us xxxxx Out to see Index Board confronts budget crisis By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com The Franklin County School Board voted last week to negotiate a reduction of $258,000 from this scal years budget with its teacher and support personnel unions. At the Dec. 6 regular meeting, the board voted unanimously to press for what Superintendent Nina Marks estimated would be the equivalent of reducing payroll by about eight teaching positions, or roughly $190,000, and four support personnel, or about $68,000. The board made it clear that though they seek this volume of cost reductions in the second semester, they are not on the record advocating for any speci c cuts in personnel, or even precisely how many would be needed to eliminate what Finance Director Shannon Venable estimated could be a negative balance of almost $325,000 by the end of the scal year. Venable provided a report that underscored many of the conclusions she has shared with the board over the past six weeks, that a decline in actual property tax proceeds since Julys initial estimate has signi cantly eroded the fund balance. Venable said the unrestricted fund cushion of about $581,000, available in Julys budgeting, dropped away almost entirely by Oct. 1. This depleted the 5.6 percent of the budget available in the fund balance, which clearly met state standards, to about 0.2 percent, or merely $18,000, well below what the state considers acceptable. Venable said the district will be able to recoup about threequarters of this drop of $563,000 in property tax proceeds in the By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com Every year since February 2010, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission has held one of its statewide meetings in Apalachicola, with commissioners each year raving about the shing paradise found in Tallahassees backyard. On Dec. 5, they learned about the serious trouble that backyard is facing. By appealing directly for FWC support, Franklin Countys beleaguered oyster industry, bolstered by support from environmental and recreational shing interests, opened up a new front in the battle to secure more freshwater coming down the ApalachicolaChattahoochee-Flint river system into Apalachicola Bay. If we dont get something done in the next 1 years, were not going to have a bay, said Shannon Harts eld, a fourth-generation oysterman and president of the Franklin County Seafood Workers Association. Were losing our livelihood, and were going to lose our community, he said. Were already struggling. The disasters coming. Harts eld said oystermen are lucky to pluck three or four bags of oysters a day out of the bay when By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com Everyone was smiling Dec. 5 when the Franklin County Health Department Dental Clinic opened its doors. This is a wonderful day, said Carrabelle Mayor Curley Messer. Ive fought many a day for this building to stay open. A dental program is a wonderful thing for the people and kids of Franklin County. As a crowd of about 40 people assembled in front of the newly renovated clinic, the staff lined up behind a red ribbon for a photo opportunity. Dental Program Manager David Walker introduced Dr. Renee Parrish and her staff. A dream has come to a reality, he said. Our heart is children; we serve the poorest of the poor. Interim Franklin County Health Department Administrator Marsha Lindeman welcomed visitors to the grand opening of the clinic. She praised the staff of the county health department for making the clinic a reality. They took all of the pieces and breathed life into it, she said. Lindeman was followed on the podium by Floridas Department of Health Chief of Staff Kim Barnhill, a former director of the county health department, who expressed amazement at how rapidly the clinic had come together. Im just the idea person, she said. New dental clinic brings big smiles to county LOIS SWOBODA | The Times From left, David Walker, dental program manager, stands with clinic staff interview clerk Rhonda Butler; dental assistants Amy Dickerson and Susan Hoffritz; hygienist Shewanna Bethea; eligibility specialist DeErma McMillan; and Dr. Renee Parrish. FRANKLIN COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD The last great bay is somewhere between crisis and collapse. The impacts will be way beyond oysters. This affects many habitats. Thats the type of urgency were trying to convey to you today. Don Ashley, past president of the Apalachicola Riverkeeper The disasters coming PHOTOS BY DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times FWC Chairman Kenneth Wright, center, talks with FWC Executive Director Nick Wiley, left, and FWC Vice Chairman Kathy Barco. Opinion . . . . . . A4 Society . . . . . . A8 Faith . . . . . . . A9 Outdoors . . . . . A10 Tide Chart . . . . A10 Sports . . . . . . A11 Classi eds . . . A14-A15 Area oystermen appeal for FWC support FCSWA embarks on two-pronged mission By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com The Franklin County Seafood Workers Association has been busy, moving forward last week on a proposal to address environmental problems plaguing Apalachicola Bay while also working to organize the upcoming $2.7 million program to re-shell the oyster bars. At a Dec. 6 meeting, the FCSWA eshed out details of the structure of a new community based collaborative effort, the Seafood Management Assistance Resource and Recovery Team, which is designed to build a local capacity consensus to develop a sustainable and resilient resource management plan to ensure the future of Franklin Countys seafood heritage. See SCHOOL BOARD A5 See FCSWA A11 See DISASTER A5 See DENTAL CLINIC A5 SHANNON VENABLE Franklin County schools nance director Thursday, December 13, 2012 VOL. 127 ISSUE 33 High school band in concert tonight The Franklin County School band will present its annual winter concert at 7 p.m. today, Dec. 13 in the cafeteria. Eastpoint Christmas celebration Friday Eastpoint will celebrate Christmas with a parade, holiday caroling, a Christmas tree lighting and Santa Claus on Friday, Dec. 14. The parade starts at 4 p.m. and will travel from Gillespie Street, west of Sellers Plaza, to Bay Street, then south to Patton Drive, then east to the pavilion. Santa will arrive on an oyster boat and will visit with the kids. For information, call the Apalachicola Bay Chamber of Commerce at 653-9419. Students to present Christmas program Monday Elementary school students at the Franklin County School will present their annual Christmas program, Let It Be Christmas at 6 p.m. Monday, Dec. 17, in the cafeteria. Nobles dancers to perform Tuesday Pam Nobles Studios will present Happy Holidays, its annual Christmas program showcasing the talents of its students, at 7:07 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 18, at the Dixie Theatre in downtown Apalachicola. Advance tickets are $10, $12 at the door. For more info, call 653 -8078. Christmas shop at the senior center Got some last-minute Christmas shopping to do? Come to the Holy Family Senior Center at 203 Dr. Frederick S. Humphries St. in Apalachicola. The seniors have created a variety of gifts available for a donation. Proceeds go to support the seniors program. Items include earrings, knick-knacks, picture frames and more. For more information, call Donna Thompson at 653-6909 or 323-0168. An island Christmas, A6

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Local A2 | The Times Thursday, December 13, 2012 NOTICE OF JOINT PUBLIC MEETING FOR CITY OF APALACHICOLA CITY OF CARRABELLE FRANKLIN COUNTY COMMISSION UNDER F.S..1053 (3), 1055 The City of Apalachicola and City of Carrabelle pursuant to F.S. .1053(3) and 1055, hereby provide public notice of the Joint Public Meeting among the City Commissions of the City of Apalachicola and the City of Carrabelle and the County Commission of Franklin County at the Apalachicola City Hall, 1 Bay Avenue, Apalachicola, Florida 32320 at 6:00 P.M., E.T., By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star.com Moving day arrived Dec. 4 at the Cape San Blas Lighthouse. The U.S. Air Force began the move of the keepers quarters and oil house on the lighthouse grounds in the ght to save the lighthouse and buildings from encroaching erosion. The Air Force out of Eglin Air Force Base, which owns the property on which the lighthouse and buildings sit, contracted with CCI Contractors out of Shalimar, which in turn subcontracted the work of moving the keepers quarters and oil house to Stones House Movers out of Sneads. The keepers quarters were moved back about 100 feet, leav ing them essentially the same distance from the coast as the lighthouse which is not consid ered in imminent danger. This was an Air Force initia tive to move these buildings, public information ofcer Mike Spaits said. We contracted to have the buildings moved and secured the $50,000 to fund the move. We had a partner in the (Army Corps of Engineers) but this was an Air Force initiative. On Dec. 4, the rst of the two keepers quarters was moved, with plans to move the second and the oil house later in the week. The moves are being made to buy time. The Air Force already has rendered the lighthouse and buildings surplus and the appli cation for applying to take pos session of them expired the last week of November. The National Parks Ser vice is reviewing the applica tions for a nal award. The Gulf County commissioners and city of Port St. Joe both submitted applications. We are responsible for pro tecting our historic resources, said Maria Rodriguez, chief ad ministrator for historic resourc es with Eglin AFB. Thats why we are moving them back, to get them out of harms way. Hurricane Isaac this year was effectively the nal straw in the protection of the lighthouse, which has long sat in an area of Cape San Blas that is rapidly eroding. Isaac took an additional 27 feet of shoreline, rendering the one entrance road into the lighthouse grounds impassable. A new entrance road was con structed to facilitate the move of the lighthouse and buildings once a nal destination has been determined. The keepers quarters and oil house will remain on temporary moorings to facilitate the move to a new location. The county is pro posing Salinas Park; a city bay front area which would be part of George Core Park. After the buildings are moved, the Air Force will begin to clear debris from the shoreline sur rounding the grounds. The National Oceanic and At mospheric Administration pro vided a grant to the University of Florida to facilitate the debris removal. The hope is that once clean, what is left of the beach may once again become a nest ing area for sea turtles. By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star.com A Carrabelle man claims to own several downtown properties. At the Dec. 6 Carra belle city meeting, Johnnie Crum told commissioners he has documents proving he owns the Fourth Street boat ramp. At the meeting, he initially request ed to speak to City Attorney Dan Hart man in private, but when told the meet ing was public and he was on the agen da, he addressed the commission. Crum arrived late, ac companied by about a doz en family members who caused a minor disturbance by talking loudly as they en tered until reprimanded by Mayor Curley Messer. Hartman and the com missioners expressed con fusion about Crums claims and said the matter would have to be settled in court. The city claims that property and has improved the property, Hartman said. You need a judge to say which of the two chains of ownership is valid. The city cannot give you that property. Hartman later referred to the paperwork Crum had presented as a wild deed, a claim where there are multiple chains of pos session for the same land. Crum asserted to city com missioners that his family had paid taxes on the land in the past; Hartman said it had been in the 1930s. The city attorney said the city purchased the boat ramp from Jimmy Crowder in 1999. It is not unusual. Ive seen it happen, he said. Its a common misconcep tion that paying taxes on a piece of property gives you ownership. It does not. Ive been through the paper work (Crum) provided, and Ive seen the city deed. Its unclear. Weve obviously got a bunch of deeds applying to this property. We need a court of law to tell us where we stand. Hartman said Crum has paperwork claiming owner ship of other properties as well. As your commissioner if that is your property I want you to have it, Com missioner Charlotte Sch neider told Crum. You really should seek the guidance of an attorney. The city cant just say were going to turn over the property. Crum main tained that early transactions involv ing the land had been written up wrong. Hartman told him, The way to get to the bottom of this is to le suit. Crum said he had an attorney and complained about the cost of represen tation. He charges me ev ery time he does something. We are trying to work this out with the city as least a possible, he said. My fam ilys poor with younguns to raise. My grandparents have died off. I can show you in 30 minutes. Schneider said, You can show me, but Im not an attorney. Messer told Crum this will have to be fought out in court. We could sit up here and give the property away and that would set us up for a liability suit. Im not going to be put in jail for nobody. Commissioner Frank Mathes told Crum: We cant give it to you. It be longs to the people of Car rabelle. Its got to go before a judge. Its not ours to give. That belongs to the people. Crum said he would pre fer to reach a settlement with the city. You dont get clear title until youve had it for 30 years and a day. I think its in the best interest to handle it out of court, he said. This has obviously been going on in your family for a long time, Commissioner Cal Allen told Crum. The best way to get closure is to get it over with. Crum lays claim to Carrabelle property JOHNNIE CRUM TIM CROF T | The Star A truck and trailer revved, the move of one of the keepers quarters is under way on the grounds of the Cape San Blas Lighthouse. Cape San Blas lighthouse quarters moved

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Local The Times | A3 Thursday, December 13, 2012 Holiday Christmas Issue December 20th, 2012 DEADLINE TO RESERVE SPACE: December 14th, 2012 3pm Now accepting Christmas Greetings to be placed alongside the Childrens Letters to Santa. December 27th, 2012 DEADLINE TO RESERVE SPACE: December 19th, 2012 **ALL AD COPY MUST BE APPROVED BY December 21st, 2012 4:30pm** January 3rd, 2012 DEADLINE TO RESERVE SPACE: December 27th, 2012 **ALL AD COPY MUST BE APPROVED BY December 31st 3pm** Contact: Joel Reed (850) 814-7377 Kari Fortune (850) 227-7847 -ORThousands of families & individuals in our area are at risk of going to bed hungry and empty-handed on Christmas. WANT TO MAKE A DIFFERENCE? Mail in the Empty Stocking Fund envelope inserted in todays paper to the Salvation Army or The News Herald with your contribution! The Empty Stocking Fund provides food and toy baskets to thousands of families in Bay, Gulf, Franklin, Holmes, and Washington Counties. NO HIDDEN CHARGES: It is our policy that the patient and any other person responsible for payments has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed by payment or any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment. www.mulliseye.com "WE WELCOME NE W PATIE N TS, C ALL T ODAY FOR YOUR P RIORITY APP OI N TME N T" FOR NEW PATIENTS 59 AND OLDER This certificate is good for a complete Medical Eye Exam with Todd Robinson, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Surgeon. The exam includes a prescription for eye glasses and tests for Glaucoma, Cataracts and other eye diseases FOR YOUR APPOINTMENT CALL: 850-763-6666 ELIGIBILITY: U.S. Citizens living in the Florida Panhandle, 59 years and older, not presently under our care. Coupon Expires: 12-31-12 FREE EYE EXAM CODE: AP00 Darren Payne, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon Lee Mullis, M.D. Emeritus Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon Todd Robinson, M.D Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon "Freedom from Eye Glasses, Now a reality for many." Smart Lenses SM Carrabelles annual Holiday on the Harbor and Boat Parade of Lights was dazzling as usual. The night was clear and warm as happy people mingled in the street to celebrate the holidays. This year, the city did not supply a free supper to celebrants but instead encouraged local merchants to stay open late and welcomed not-for-pro ts to sell snacks in support of a good cause. Shops and the Carrabelle History Museum remained open along with local cafes. About 20 vendors sold raf e tickets and tasty treats, from popcorn to pumpkin rolls, to the several hundred people strolling the merry streets under dancing Christmas dolphins. There was an open microphone in the riverside pavilion where local talent could make itself heard. Santa was on hand to hear the wishes of excited youngsters. A dozen beautifully decorated boats arrayed in twinkling lights motored or paddled down the river before judges Mary Ann Shields, Diana Strickland, Jeff and Sid McOmie and Jack Fonner. Winners were Pontoon Division (Capt. Clyde Clark); Kayak Division (Tom Herzog;); Commercial Division Over 24 feet (Capt. Chester Reese with Natural World Charters); Commercial Division Under 24 feet (Moorings Marina); Recreational Division Under 24 feet (1st Capt. Charlie Painter, 2nd Capt. Read Westcott); Recreational Division 24 to 30 feet (1st Capt. Barney Crutch eld, 2nd Capt. Scott and Jenny Holloway, and 3rd Capt. Millard Collins); Recreational Division 30 to 40 Feet (Capt. Scott and Rachel Lawley); Recreational Division Over 40 Feet (Capt. David Bellamy); Best of Show (Capt. Barney Crutch eld). The Marina Challenge was won by Moorings Marina. Every one of the participants was amazing and creative. Thanks to the boat owners who took the trouble to entertain their neighbors. The evening ended with a breathtaking reworks display. By LOIS SWOBODA "Freedom from Eye Glasses, Now a reality for many." Herzog;); Commercial Division Over 24 feet reworks display. By LOIS SWOBODA PHOTOS BY LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Above: Cayden Cruse, just 10 months old, meets Santa Claus for the very rst time. Left: Caulin Sheridan performed on the open mike at the Carrabelle Pavilion. Carrabelle sports a buoyant holiday glow The First Baptist Church, among the vendor booths at Carrabelles Christmas celebration, distributed free cookies and a reminder of traditional Christmas spirit.

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Opinion A4 | The Times Thursday, December 13, 2012 USPS 027-600 Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 Publisher: Roger Quinn Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola Times Special to the Times People at risk for Type 1 diabetes may have fewer insulinproducing beta cells than people not at risk, a nding that could help researchers shed light on what causes the disease, a new University of Florida study shows. The study, published Wednesday in the Journal of the American Medical Association, revealed that people at risk for Type 1 diabetes had smaller pancreases than people who were not at risk. This is the rst time this has been noted, said Martha Campbell-Thompson, a professor in the UF College of Medicine department of pathology, immunology and laboratory medicine. We still dont know what causes Type 1 diabetes, but if people have fewer beta cells to begin with, other confounding factors such as a virus or genetics could help push them over into having clinical diabetes. There are a lot of possibilities. Type 1 diabetes occurs when the bodys immune system begins attacking its own beta cells in the pancreas, which are responsible for producing insulin the body needs to convert sugar into energy. The beta cells stop producing insulin, often beginning in childhood. Because of this, patients must take insulin for the rest of their lives. This differs from the more common Type 2 diabetes, which often can be prevented and treated through lifestyle changes, such as improved diet and increased exercise. Although genetics plays a big role, researchers still dont know what triggers this autoimmune attack, and after it begins, there is no going back, said Campbell-Thompson, director of the pathology core for the Network for Pancreatic Organ Donors with Diabetes, or nPOD, a human pancreas biorepository housed within the UF Diabetes Center of Excellence. In the current study, Campbell-Thompson and colleagues at the City of Hope National Medical Center examined 164 pancreases from adult organ donors, including those with auto-antibodies linked to an increased risk for Type 1 diabetes. After examining the organs and comparing them with control samples, the researchers discovered that the people at risk for Type 1 diabetes had pancreases roughly three-fourths the size of those of patients not at risk for the disease. In addition, patients already diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes had pancreases about half the size of control samples, Campbell-Thompson said. Had they not become organ donors, these people might have eventually developed Type 1 diabetes, so we were trying to carefully characterize their pancreases and their insulinproducing cells to see what was going on. A simple part of that was just weighing the pancreas when we got it, she said. As we got more and more of these donors, a trend started showing up that these pancreases weighed less. They weighed lower than normal controls. The ultimate goal of the research, and nPOD, which provides pancreas samples to researchers across the country, is to rst understand how the pancreas works and then uncover new and better ways to not only treat Type 1 diabetes, but also to prevent it. Thanks to nPODs valuable and rapidly growing collection of pancreas samples and other tissues, its team of researchers was able to examine, for the rst time, the pancreas weight of those at risk for developing Type 1 diabetes, said Teodora Staeva, program director for immune therapies at JDRF, the leading foundation focused on advancing Type 1 diabetes research, which funded the study. The ndings raise signicant questions about the development and progression of Type 1 diabetes. Obtaining and analyzing human pancreas samples has proved crucial for researchers because mouse models used to uncover new treatments for Type 1 diabetes are no longer considered good examples of the disease in humans. There are major differences between human Type 1 diabetes and the animal models, Campbell-Thompson said. Its really changing some of our ideas about when this autoimmune attack might occur, and we still dont know all the players. The researchers now hope to take the study a step further by using noninvasive methods such as magnetic resonance imaging, or MRI, to gauge pancreas size in live patients. This could really change some of the ideas we have about Type 1 diabetes, Campbell-Thompson said. By understanding how it develops we can think of new ways to treat it. Special to the Times Tired of the stubbornly high unemployment rate in Florida, Senate Democratic Leader Chris Smith (D-Fort Lauderdale) announced Dec. 6 that he has reled his American Jobs legislation for the 2013 legislative session. American tax dollars, along with Floridians tax dollars should be going to rebuild our own economies, not Chinas or Indias or some other foreign countrys, said Smith. This is an effective way to put the power of our money to work creating American jobs on American soil. Similar to legislation (SB 678) he led last year, SB 90 would require that any new state contracts involving call center services and exceeding $35,000 be staffed by employees located within the United States. The restrictions would apply not only to the contractor, but any subcontractors as well. The legislation would also be a welcome relief to customers in the United States struggling to understand call center operators with limited English-speaking abilities and growing concern about the commitment of state dollars to companies that move jobs offshore. Many businesses already operate domestic call centers and would not incur signicant extra costs as a result of the change. Florida in particular has a strong call center market, and in a state struggling with an above-average unemployment rate, would be well-positioned to take advantage of the new requirement should the bill become law. During the 2012 legislative session, SB 678 unanimously passed the Senate. The House refused to take it up. Special to the Times The holidays can be a joyous, but hectic time of year. Being eco-friendly is often the least of a busy familys concerns, but you may be surprised by the benets that your family can enjoy from greening your holiday season. The Florida Department of Environmental Protection recommends these 10 easy tips that can help make your holidays not only more cost-efcient and eco-friendly, but fun and stress-free as well. Use green cleaners. When preparing for holiday guests, trade in harsh household cleaners for cleaners that are safer for family health and the environment. Purchase LED light strands, which require less energy. Instead of buying holiday treats with paper wrappers, try making fun, homemade treats that do not require wrapping or that can be placed in reusable containers. Use cloth napkins and reusable utensils in place of disposable paper and plastic alternatives these may require washing, but they will save you money, conserve water and reduce waste. Make your holiday meal sustainable and boost your local economy by shopping for ingredients locally. Create nutrient-rich compost for your windowsill or backyard garden from your holiday meal leftovers. Buy recycled wrapping paper and holiday cards, and be sure to recycle again after use. Use old newspapers or butcher paper and let the kids draw their own holiday designs for an eco-friendly holiday craft. Or instead of wrapping gifts, set up the toys so that the kids can play with them right away rather than unwrapping and setting them up. Create holiday decorations such as ornaments with old greeting cards, garlands made from strung popcorn or cranberries, and potpourri made from spices such as cinnamon and cloves. And remember: dont throw decorations away; store them for use during next years festivities! Visit your local Florida State Park and enjoy the holiday lights or seasonal festivals; its an affordable alternative to more costly weekend outings. The holidays are a great time of year to start implementing easy and sustainable ways to decorate and celebrate. For more green tips, visit the Departments website at www. dep.state..us. LOIS SWOBODA | The Times At their Dec. 4 meeting, county commissioners hon ored Doris Pendleton with a plaque commemorating her 36 years of service with the property appraisers ofce, and a proclamation citing her invaluable service on behalf of the citizens of Franklin County. Pendleton, shown above accepting the plaque from County Planner Alan Pierce, thanked the board for in viting her to the meeting. She thanked God for allow ing her to fulll her duties and her family, staff and the whole county for supporting her. The rst 24 years working under somebody else wasnt so hard, but the last 12 were tough, she said. You dont know who your real boss is until you sit in that ofce, on election night, with those votes coming in. Then you know who your real bosses are. Rhonda Skipper, the deputy property appraised who was elected this year to take the in the appraisers of ce said it has been an honor and a privilege working for Doris and training with her. In the Nov. 15 issue of The Times, it was incorrectly reported that the Apalachicola Volunteer Fire Department Team, winner of this years fourth annual Lanark Village Gumbo Cook-off, had been spearheaded by father and son K.C. and Keith Gibson. In fact, the team was headed by Craig Gibson, and he will attend the World Championship Gumbo Cook-off from Oct. 11-13, 2013 in New Iberia, La. In photo at left, he is shown at right, with his son and gumbo teammate K.C. Gibson. LOIS SWOBODA | The Times UF study: Pancreas size may be clue to diabetes MARTHA CAMPBELL-THOMPSON, DVM, PH.D. CORRECTION COMMISSIONERS HONOR DORIS PENDLETON Senate Democratic leader les American Jobs bill Easy ways to green your holidays

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Local The Times | A5 Thursday, December 13, 2012 Robert C. Bruner Attorney Personal & Business Bankruptcy Over 30 Years Legal Experience 850-670-3030 bankruptcy relief under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon advertisements. Before you decide, ask us to send you free written information they should be tonging 20, provid ing a rst-hand perspective that t with the bleak scientic data presented in a report to FWC by Dr. David Heil, with the FWCs Division of Marine Fisheries Management. Heil said before the opening of winter harvesting season, pro duction estimates for two of the bays more fertile oyster bars, East Hole and Cat Point, were the lowest reported in the past 20 years. Prolonged drought and con tinuing low river discharge rates from dams upriver have lad to high salinity, which has contrib uted to increased predation and dermo diseases plaguing the oys ters, he said. Worsening the situation has been increased shing of this stressed oyster population, Heil said, noting the problem of high oyster mortality extends through out the Gulf coast from Escambia to Wakulla counties. He told how Bay County issued an executive order in October cutting in half the daily bag limit, from 20 to 10, available to their commercial oystermen. Backing the oystermens call for help was Don Ashley, past president of the Apalachicola Riverkeeper, a nonprot environ mental advocacy group for the Apalachicola river and bay. The last great bay is some where between crisis and col lapse, he said. The impacts will be way beyond oysters. This affects many habitats. Thats the type of urgency were trying to convey to you today. What were hoping is to encourage you to help us move this issue forward. Its not just a bay thats threat ened, its a way of life, Ashley said. All the money in the world is not going to restore a working wa terfront, and a natural heritage. We need the leadership, the ownership, of this industry. Were going to look to you for that lead ership, he told FWC. Ashley outlined several re quests of the FWC, topped by hav ing the commission press Gov. Rick Scott to continue dialogue with Alabama and Georgia to ad dress upstream freshwater issues and agree to a shared sacrice distribution plan among the three states. Ashley urged FWC to help in shaping a strategic plan for the ACF, a point later echoed by Ted Forsgren, executive director of the Florida Coastal Conservation Association, who noted that Flor ida has a plan of its own to regu late waters within the state. Ashley appealed for FWC to support efforts by the Florida con gressional delegation, led by Sen. Bill Nelson, to gain passage of a Water Resource Development Act that would guide the Army Corps of Engineers decision-making in releasing water downstream. The Corps must consider all sh and wildlife impacts under an EIS (Environmental Impact Statement), not just endangered species, he said. Authorized uses shall not exceed freshwa ter ows required to sustain riv ers, bays and working waterfront communities. Ashley also asked FWC to con tribute to the collection of data and documentation required to justify a sheries disaster decla ration. In September, Gov. Scott asked the U.S. Department of Commerce for such a declaration, which remains pending. FWC Chairman Ken Wright said Florida State Sen. Charlie Dean had pledged his support on legislative issues when he and the FWC commissioners were briefed on Apalachicola Bay issues during a Dec. 4 tour of the Apalachicola National Research Reserve head quarters in Eastpoint. Lets everybody get one voice, in one direction, Wright said. It doesnt take much to mess up some of these systems, and you cant then throw enough money at it. FWC Executive Nick Wiley said he would keep the commis sioners abreast of developments regarding the Apalachicola Bay, but that there were limits to what effect FWC could have on a sh ery declaration. The key is economic loss, and we cant document that un til it happens, he said. And its happening right now. We need all hands on deck to address this crisis. FWC Vice Chair Kathy Barco said more needs to be done to convince Atlantas 4.2 million resi dents of the problems that over consumption at the rivers source waters create for the estuary. Those are the people we have to convince of the impact, and theres such a disconnect, she said. This area is so special for so many reasons, FWC Member Brian Yablonski said. This is one of the few places in all the world where men and women harvest wild oysters. This is what were about, preserving the wild, native heritage of Florida. We got this done in record time. It doesnt matter how many balls we throw at Da vid Walker, he keeps them all in the air. She called Kimberly Al britton, who found funding for the clinic, a grant writer extrordinaire. The main funding for the facility comes from two grants. The Florida Low Income Pool, a government funding source established to support health care ser vices to Medicaid, underin sured and uninsured popu lations, will provide $400,000 per year for two years. The Blue Foundation, the philanthropic afliate of Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Florida, will provide $100,000 per year for three years. Walker said 115 ap plications were received for the funding in 2011, and the top 15 were funded. Franklin Countys dental clinic was in the top three. This shows what can happen with government entities working together, Commissioner Cheryl Sand ers said. Even though we cant have primary care here, we have dental care. Barnhill said Commis sioner Pinki Jackel was pivotal in the creation of the clinic. When the primary care clinic went away, I went to Tallahassee to see what we could get, Jackel said af ter the ceremony. Franklin County had no low-income dental care facility. Folks west of the river had to go to Gulf County and on the east side all the way to Tay lor County. It wasnt fair, and transportation was a prob lem for some of those folks. After the ribbon cutting, everyone took a tour of the new clinic and enjoyed a fes tive holiday buffet prepared by the clinic staff. The new facility boasts two examination rooms. Five of the six employees of the clinic are county resi dents. The new dentist, Dr. Renee Parrish, is a resident of Thomasville, Ga., and has been a frequent visitor to the county in the past. Ofce hours will be 7:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Thursday. The clinics will serve uninsured children from 6 months to 20 years old and Medicaid-eli gible pregnant women and will provide emergency care for adults whose income is at 200 percent of the poverty level or less. For more information or an appointment, call 697-4121. 2013-14 scal year, but it is lost for the current year. In an interview earlier this week, Rhonda Skipper, the prop erty appraiser-elect, said the countys computer vendor failed to properly factor in a required re port on those properties valued in excess of a million dollars. There was an error that was on the school taxable values that did not kick out, she said. It was a $6 million data entry error. We were going to do whatever we could (to remedy the problem), but the school districts millage rate had already maxed out. Skipper noted the diminished property tax proceeds did not stem from any actions made by the Value Adjustment Board, which considers property owners challenges to their appraisals. Of the two dozen or so petitions sub mitted to the board, all ended up being withdrawn before the board had to decide on their merits, she said. Forecasts miss enrollment decline Compounding the districts budget woes was a decline in the number of students enrolled in the district compared to initial forecasts. Funding for each fulltime student (FTE) is provided by the state at between about $3,500 and $4,000, depending on a variety of weighted factors. Chairman Jimmy Gander said the 2012-13 budget was built on an estimate of 1,298 students, but the certied enrollment is now at 1,142, a difference of 156 students, worth in the neighborhood of $600,000. How do you miss it by 156 stu dents? Thats over 10 percent, Board Member George Thomp son said. I commend you on bring ing the facts, as horrible as they may be, if we have to do things as drastic as what were talking about now and if theres a possi bility of losing over 100 students with FTE, Gander told Venable. Whats the next step? Are we go ing to do this again? Gander also said he was sur prised to learn the district recent ly found almost $400,000 in addi tional savings, mainly based on about $300,000 that Nick OGrady, the districts director of curricu lum and vocational education, was able to save by amending the budgets of federal grants to cover salaries. If its there today, why wasnt it there when we built this bud get? Gander said. Why cant it be done on July 1? Was it easier to do in December than it was in June? That really bothers me. Marks said OGrady found the savings by paying salaries out of these grants. Those grants are not intended initially to pay for all these salaries, she said. Thats what he did; he shifted it. Hes had to amend his grants and go to the state and get permission to switch them to salaries. Gander continued his criticism. I dont understand why all the procrastination, he told Marks. I dont think theres been any procrastination, she said. Marks presented the school board with an outline that de tailed several of the factors that contributed to what Venable said would be an almost $325,000 de cit by years end if $1.1 million in cost savings wasnt found. These included lowering budget esti mates for anticipated state rev enue and raising the cost of plant operations to bring the district, as Venable put it, in line with reality. Marks outlined several op tions for nding about $800,000 in savings, including the person nel reductions and federal grant adjustments, as well as $35,000 for reorganizing Carrabelle transportation routes, $14,000 for reducing the transportation foreman to part-time status and $14,000 in energy savings by shut ting down school buildings for two weeks over Christmas and Easter breaks. Marks said she intended to ask school employees, through the collective bargaining pro cess, to consider taking ve fur lough days, which likely would be scheduled on paid holidays so as not to disrupt school, as well as a 5 percent pay decrease and end ing district coverage of the cost of dental insurance. The superintendent initially wanted the board to specify the number of teaching and support personnel positions they intended to cut, based on average salaries, but School Board Attorney Bar bara Sanders cautioned against dening the process that way. Those items by themselves have to be negotiated, she said. They were not advertised on the agenda, and this takes out items that have to be negotiated. We would have to negotiate a system for RIFs (Reduction in Force). Its a lot more delicate than stating were going to re (people). Who ever that eight and four (people are), it will involve the union con tract. There are steps that have to be followed. Union reps speak out The meeting began with re marks by both Tammy Sasnett, president of the support workers union, and Cathy Wood, who leads the teachers union. We have talked to our mem bers, and we are really supportive of trying to help us through this crisis, said Sasnett, a paraprofes sional who works as a teacher in the voluntary pre-kindergarten program. We would just like to be involved in that process. This is our rst job; this is where we want to be. We are the least paid employ ees, in the lunchroom, custodians, bus drivers, she said. We are willing to work to get through this crisis, but we need to keep our positions. Wood said warning signs had emerged at a faculty meeting ear lier in the week. Some catch phrases are used whenever we gather, like Were in this for the kids and We have our jobs because of the kids, and yet the morale is low, low, low, she said. I know the economy has dev astated our property values and that you have promised to lead us through this crisis. We need to work together every day, Wood said. We need more stakehold ers that are being part of the process. Wood made mention of the pending union talks, which must work out a deal regarding any po tential salary, benet or personnel cuts. We are still at the negotiation table, and we must use collective bargaining when we make any de cisions, she said. Collective bar gaining has to be used so we dont have to consider any unfair labor practices. Both union representatives said their rank-and-le were concerned about the rumors cir culating regarding job cuts. Its all hearsay, and its frightening, Wood said. We need a clearer line of communication. Marks said the administration has been on a tight timeline with state ofcials, who want to know what steps the district plans to take. They want an answer, the superintendent said. They want the board to approve some type of action. Shannon came up with an average income (for positions), and thats how we put those num bers together, to try to satisfy the decit. We asked (Franklin County School Principal George Oehlert) to take the dollar amount of sav ings for eight positions. It doesnt matter where he pulls that from. Neither Marks nor the board member went into details as to what might be cut. But board member Pam Shiver and Gander indicated some of their reasoning. If we continue to eliminate programs and the morales down, the FTEs going to continue to go down, Shiver said. Gander suggested he was op posed to any pay cut being ret roactive to the start of the scal year. I dont think we ought to ask people to give back money that theyve already received, he said. Gander also requested, and the board approved, a portion of the motion that asked the Florida Department of Education to be come more directly involved with them on the process. Id like to have DOE be a part of that. I want to get to the bottom, if we built this budget on the prop erty values that we turned in, he said. Theres water coming in the boat, and were bailing it out. The meeting concluded with an item that underscored the schools budget woes, when the board voted down a request by the sheriffs ofce to have them waive fees for an upcoming staff program. Only Shiver and Thompson voted to waive the $400 fee, with the other three opposed. Marks noted that was for a social event for the department. Board member Teresa Ann Martin said she supported the waiver when its a hardship. But when were in hard times, I dont feel we should. DISASTER from page A1 SCHOOL BOARD from page A1 DENTAL CLINIC from page A1 FIND IT ONLINE: www.apalachtimes.com

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Local A6 | The Times Thursday, December 13, 2012 BE PART OF THIS ONE-OF-A-KIND EVENT IN THIS AREA! For Health Expo Package Information Call (850) 747-5009 OR fax your questions to (850) 763-4636 Sign Up Now & Get The Early Bird Rate $10,000 3,000 PLUS MANY OTHER WAYS TO PROMOTE YOUR BUSINESS. I NSTANTLY MA K E IT YOUR EX PO GAIN THE EXPOSURE YOU NEED FOR SUCCESS! Vendors, Exhibitors, Non-Prot Organizations The 2013 Health Expo is Calling Your Business BOARDWAL K BEACH RESORT F EBRUARY 19, 2013 9 AM 2 PM S o n s o r e y T e N e w s H e r a NOTICE TO BIDDERS The Franklin County Board of County Commissioners will be accepting separate sealed Request for Proposals for the following: SOLID WASTE TRANSFER STATION OPERATIONS Specications are on le in the oce of the Franklin County Board of County Commissioners, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, FL. 32320. Proposals must be received in the oce of the Franklin County Clerk of the Courts, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, Florida 32320 by 4:30 P.M., EST, on December 31, 2012. Proposals must be clearly labeled for each separate proposal. The sealed proposals will be publicly open and read aloud at 10:00 A.M. EST, on January 02, 2013, in the County Commission Meeting Room located in the Franklin County Courthouse Annex. For further information contact Fonda D. Davis Sr., Director, Franklin County Solid Waste Department at (850) 670-8167. An original and one copy of each proposal shall be furnished in a sealed en velope or container, plainly marked SOLID WASTE TRANSFER STATION OPERATIONS. The owner reserves the right to waive any informality or to reject any or all pro posals. ATTENTION BIDDERS: Franklin County is an equal opportunity employer and encourages participation with certied minority enterprises and womens business enterprises. BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA FRANKLIN COUNTY REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS TO SALVAGE METAL FROM TWO FISHING PIERS The Franklin County Board of County Commissioners hereby requests proposals for salvaging metal wire inside a conduit attached to the Eastpoint Fishing Pier and the St. George Island Fishing Pier. Each person responding to this proposal (the proposer) shall, at a minimum, in a safe manner, the equipment and personnel that the person intends to use in the salvage, together with information describing how that person intends to perform the salvage operation, such as, without limitation, reeling the wire onto a spool from the mainland, or salvaging from the water or the bridge, or some combination thereof. Furthermore, the proposer shall state the amount to be paid to Franklin County for the salvage rights. The winning proposer shall be responsible for all permits, costs of salvage and insurance requirements. They also shall be required to repair any damage to from the salvaging operation shall be cleaned up and removed by the winning proposer before they complete the salvage operations. Franklin County reserves the right to reject any and all proposals, or withdraw the bid at anytime, and to waive technical defects. Franklin County reserves the from the winning proposer. Salvage Proposal and shall be delivered to the Franklin County Clerk of Court, There was a nip in the air and everyone was smiling as Santa arrived on his traditional island transport a bright red re truck to match his suit. Numbers were down for this years St. George Island visit from St. Nick. Fewer than 150 children came to share their wishes with the old elf and each received a goodie bag full of candy and fruit courtesy of island merchants. Cookies and cocoa were available for a small contribution and a bevy of calendar girls was on hand to autograph Franklin Needs latest fundraising effort. In what has become a charming tradition, the girls of Scout Troop 200 serenaded the crowd with Christmas carols before joining the scramble to sit on Santas knee. Everyone was in high spirits when the lights popped on at dark-thirty illuminating the palms and the stately lighthouse keeping watch over the island. By LOIS SWOBODA LOIS SWOBODA | The Times About 20 runners and several dogs took part in the annual Jingle Jog on Friday night to celebrate Santas annual visit to St. George Island. Winners, from left, are Lanay Pritcherd and Heather Rickerl, who tied for third; Matthew Turner who took rst place; and Brandon Loy who came in second. In the back is George Kirvin Floyd, who was fourth to nish. Each participant received a holiday hat and a jingle bell. Island lights twinkle for Santa LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Girl Scout Troop 200 made the holidays sparkle with traditional carols. Santa arrives by ladder truck on St. George Island. Joggers jingle down the lane

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The Times | A7 Thursday, December 13, 2012 is proud to announce the is now underway. Help those in need! Its time to go through your closets for those unwanted pairs of shoes, in reasonable condition. Bring the shoes to Coastal Foot and Ankle Clinic located at 221 HWY 98, Apalachicola, FL 32320. Donations will go to Franklins Promise and will be distributed at The community service center (old Apalachicola high school) at 192 14th street in Apalachicola. Distribution will be November 27, December 4th and 18th from 9:30-12:00. Competitive Yields on FDIC Insured CDs Weems Medical Centers Family and Quick Care Services Weems Medical Center West 135 Avenue G Apalachicola, FL 850-653-8853 ext. 118 Weems Medical Center East 110 NE 5th Street Carrabelle, FL 850-697-2345 Family and Quick Care Services provided by Eugene Charbonneau, D.O. Susan Hardin, A.R.N.P. Dana Whaley, A.R.N.P. Weems Medical Center East Rotating Specialty Care Services provided by Jean-Paul Tran, M.D. from Southeastern Urological Center David Dixon, M.D. from North FL Womens Care Dermatology Associates of Tallahassee Jeffrey W. Crooms, M.D. General Surgeon Our mission is to improve the health status of the residents and visitors to Franklin County, By providing quality, compassionate, cost eective and convenient health care Through community leadership and in collaboration with other healthcare organizations Which serve our communities. ADVERTISEMENT TO BID CITY OF CARRABELLE, FLORIDA General and Building Contractors with Electrical Subcontractors are invited to bid on a General Contract for the Historic Carrabelle City Hall in Carrabelle, Florida in accordance with Contract Documents. All bids must be a lump sum basis; segregated Bids will not be accepted. PROJECT: Historic Carrabelle City Hall Renovations and Repairs BID DATE: January 3, 2013 TIME: 2:00 p.m. local time The City of Carrabelle, Florida will receive sealed bids until 2:00 p.m. local time on January 3, 2013. Bids will be opened publicly and read aloud at the following location: Carrabelle City Hall 1001 Gray Avenue Carrabelle, FL 32322 deposit per set. All materials furnished and all work performed shall be in accordance with Drawings and Courtney Dempsey City Administrator 1001 Gray Avenue Carrabelle, FL 32322 and be marked: 1. Bids for Historic Carrabelle City Hall Renovations and Repairs 2. (Name of Bidder) 3. (Address of Bidder) 4. (City, State, Zip Code) All bids shall be delivered by a representative of the Bidder or by registered mail with return receipt best interest of the City of Carrabelle, Florida. CARRABELLE CITY HALL 1001 GRAY AVENUE CARRABELLE, FL 32322 COURTNEY DEMPSEY, CITY ADMINISTRATOR Special to the Times The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission recognized Franklin County Assistant State Attorneys Jarred Paterson and Robin Myers on Dec. 6 at its commission meeting in Apalachicola. Paterson and Myers, who work in Floridas Second Judicial Court with of ces in Apalachicola, were selected as co-recipients of the Prosecutor of the Year award by the FWCs Division of Law Enforcement. Commissioners praised the attorneys, thanking them for standing up for Floridas sh and wildlife and the local community. We are fortunate to have these two working closely with our of cers, said Col. Jim Brown, director of the FWCs Division of Law Enforcement. They consistently strive to communicate with our staff and better understand managing sh and wildlife. Paterson and Myers have been instrumental on a wide range of cases. They have sought fair and impartial prosecutions for felony drug, driving and boating under the in uence and misdemeanor wildlife cases. They have also worked diligently on recreational and commercial sheries violations. Their efforts include the prosecution of oyster poachers who threaten the legal oyster industry and the quality of products for which the area is known, Brown said. The FWC says Patersons and Myers proactive efforts are making the communities in northwest Florida a better place. The following report is provided by the Franklin County Sheriffs Of ce. Arrests in this weeks report were made by of cers from the Franklin County Sheriffs Of ce (FCSO) and Florida Highway Patrol (FHP). All defendants are to be considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law. Dec. 4 Dana M. Taylor, 33, Apalachicola, violation of probation and Wakulla County warrant for failure to appear (FHP) Joseph B. Stevens, 26, Eastpoint, violation of probation (FCSO) Robert Creamer, 63, Eastpoint, two counts of manslaughter by driving under the in uence, and two counts of DUI with property damage (FHP) Dec. 5 David B. Charlton, 32, Carrabelle, withholding child support (FCSO) Dec. 6 Gary D. Caples, 48, Apalachicola, failure to appear (FCSO) Dec. 7 Mary Nowling, 24, Eastpoint, robbery (FCSO) Charley S. Petty, 41, Eastpoint, domestic battery and violation of probation (FCSO) Joseph S. Haynes, 25, Eastpoint, grand theft of a motor vehicle, criminal mischief, aggravated battery-pregnant victim and violation of probation (FCSO) Ray L. Cooper, 43, Eastpoint, Brevard County non-support and Leon County non-support (FCSO) Dec. 9 Joseph A. Arroyo, 44, Lanark Village, Collier County non-support (FHP) Richard J. Hodge, 45, Alligator Point, DUI, driving while license suspended or revoked, refusal to submit to breath test (FHP) Dec. 10 James D. Creamer, 31, Apalachicola, grand theft of a motor vehicle and criminal mischief (FCSO) Stephen R. Pearson, 42, Carrabelle, violation of probation (FCSO) TIM DONOVAN | FWC Presenting the Prosecutor of the Year award are, from left, FWC Commissioner Richard Corbett, Col. Jim Brown, FWC General Counsel Bud Vielhauer, Commissioner Liesa Priddy, Robin Myers, Jared Paterson, Chairman Kenneth Wright, Commissioner Kathy Barco, Commissioner Charles Roberts and Commissioner Ronald Bergeron. State attorneys honored at FWC meeting Arrest REPORT Law Enforcement

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A8 | The Times Thursday, December 13, 2012 NIP RODENTS I N T H E BU D CALL L OIS AT 653-5857 Franklin Countys ONLY LOC AL Pest Control Company RODENTS RODENTS RODENTS I I N N T T OF THE WEEK PET St. Joseph Bay Humane Society DANDY DUFFY! Duffy came to us as a stray and what a cutie he is! He is only about a year old and is just as happy and social as he can be. He is a wire haired terrier mix and has the cutest whiskers and brightest eyes you will ever see. He is a real people pleaser and will make a wonderful pet as will any of the dogs being housed at the adoption center! VOLUNTEERS ARE D ESPERATELY NEE D E D TO SOCIALIZE WIT H ALL OF OUR D OGS AN D CATS. W e are always looking for people willing to bring one of our animals into their home to be fostered for various needs. A nytime you can spare would be greatly appreciated. C all Karen at 670-8417 for more details or visit the F ranklin C ounty Humane S ociety at 244 S tate R oad 65 in E astpoint. Y ou may logon to the website at www.forgottenpets.org to see more of our adoptable pets. NIP RODENTS I N T H E BU D CALL L OIS AT 653-5857 Franklin Countys ONLY LOC AL Pest Control Company RODENTS RODENTS RODENTS I I N N T T Locally owned and operated Home Business Auto Health Workers Comp NEW LOCATION: dbutler@coastalcoverage.com Knowledge NuWisdom Richards will celebrate his rst birthday on Thursday, Dec. 13, 2012. He is the son of Ann and Allen ONeal, of Apalachicola. Maternal grandparents are Charlie Mae Richards, of Apalachicola, and John Hughes, of Apalachicola. Paternal grandparents are Sharon Hall, of Apalachicola, and Harry Hall, of Apalachicola. Godparents are Anna Staples and Reggie James. Happy rst birthday! On Wednesday, Dec. 12, Jessie Mae Harris celebrated her 66th birthday. With love, have a blessed day, now and always, GiGis great-grandkids Kyera and Donate, Love always, The Family LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Prominent Apalachicola resident Christo Poloronis, injured in a fall in October, is home in time for the holidays. Cristo said he is on the mend and happy to be back in Apalachicola. No doubt the many cats in town are also pleased at his return. CHRISTO HOME FOR CHRISTMAS Births Society KINSLEIGH EVANS BORN Birthdays KNOWLEDGE RICHARDS TURNS 1 HAPPY BIRTHDAY, AUNTIE DRAKE TEAT BORN Jessica Locklear and John Edmond Evans III would like to announce the birth of their beautiful daughter, Kinsleigh Nichole Evans. She was born Monday, Nov. 19, 2012 at Tallahassee Memorial Hospital, weighing six pounds, 12 ounces, and was 20 inches long. Maternal grandparents are Beth Shiver and Michael Holton, of Carrabelle. Paternal grandparents are Shiela Evans, of Carrabelle, and John Evans, currently of Milton. Maternal great-grandparents are Aleta and Kenny Baker, and Charlene and Reedy Holton, all of Carrabelle; and the late Ramen Shiver. Paternal great-grandparents are Hoyt and Brenda Bailey, of Douglasville, Ga.; the late Sharon and Charles Ray Tucker, and the late John Edmond Evans and the late George and Dalsie (Boots) Evans. We are pleased to announce our newest arrival, Drake Rider Teat. Proud parents Adam and Alecia Teat welcomed him on Friday, Nov. 23, 2012 at Gulf Coast Medical Center in Panama City. He weighed ve pounds, 14 ounces, and was 19 inches long. He joins older brothers Dex, 5, and Trenton, 4, in the Teat household. Paternal grandparents are Eric and Wanda Teat, of Apalachicola. Maternal grandparents are Gloria Ward, of Wakulla County, and the late Roger Ward.

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The Times | A9 Thursday, December 13, 2012 WELCOMES YOU Church of the Ascension 101 NE First Street Carrabelle SUNDAY 10:00 AM WELCOMES YOU Church THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH (850) 274-4490 (850) 545-2578 WELCOMES YOU Trinity Trinity Episcopal Church est. 1836 Welcomes You Hwy. 98 & 6th St. Apalachicola 850-653-9550 Sunday Worship Services 8 & 10:30 a.m. Wednesdays Healing Service 11 a.m. Centering Prayer 4 p.m. Sunday Worship Services 8 & 10:30 a.m. Wednesdays Healing Service 11 a.m. Centering Prayer 4 p.m. First Pentecostal Holiness Church 379 Brownsville Road Apalachicola Were excited about what Gods doing!!! Sunday School 9:45 am Sunday Morning Worship 10:45 am Sunday Evening Service 6:00 pm Monday, Youth Group 6:30 pm Wednesday, Royal Rangers, G.A.P. 7:00 pm Wednesday Worship & Word 7:30 pm Nursery Provided during regular church services 7:00 7:00 First Baptist Church St. George Island 501 E. Bayshore Drive 927-2257 R. Michael Waley, Pastor Join us as we praise and worship the living Christ. Great is the Lord and most worthy of praise. Psalm 145:3 Sunday Bible Study ................................................ 10:00am Worship Praise ........................................................ 11:00am Sunday Night ............................................................ 7:00pm Wednesday Power Hour ...................................... 7:00pm Wednesday Youth at S.P.L.A.S.H ....................... 7:00pm Walking in Christ R. Michael Whaley, Pastor The United Methodist Churches of Franklin County Welcome You First United Methodist Church of Apalachicola Worship Service 11:00 a.m. every Sunday Sunday School 10:00 a.m. 75 5 th St. Apalachicola 653-9530 fumcapalach@gtcom.net Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis Carrabelle United Methodist Church Worship Services 10:45 a.m. Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Celebrate Recovery Mondays 7-9 p.m. 102 NE Ave. B Carrabelle 697-3672 Pastor: Julie Stephens Eastpoint United Methodist Church Worship Service 10:00 a.m. every Sunday Healing service every fourth Monday at 7:00 p.m. 317 Patton Dr. (corner of David St.) 670-8825 Pastor: Rev. Beth White St. George Island United Methodist Church 9:00 a.m. Worship Service 10:00 a.m. Fellowship Hour 201 E. Gulf Beach Dr. 9274635 www.sgiumc.org Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis Nursery now provided for Sunday Church Service Faith Eastpoint Christmas celebration Friday: Eastpoint will celebrate Christmas with a parade, holiday caroling, a Christmas tree lighting and Santa Claus on the second Saturday of December, Friday, Dec. 14. The parade starts at 4 p.m., and will travel from Gillespie Street, west of Sellers Plaza, to Bay Street, then south to Patton Drive, then east to the pavilion. Santa will arrive on an oyster boat and will visit with the kids. Well have caroling and lots of fun. For information, contact the Apalachicola Bay Chamber of Commerce at 653-9419. Candlelight Christmas Choir opens rehearsal: The Candlelight Christmas Choir will perform at 5 p.m. on Saturday, Dec. 22 in downtown Apalachicola. If you are interested in singing, rehearsal dates are Monday, Dec. 17 and Friday, Dec. 21 at 6 p.m. at Mount Zion Baptist Church, 98 Avenue E, Apalachicola. For more information, call Pastor B. Hand at 276-2550. Christ Community Academy accepting children: Christ Community Academy is accepting children, from 6-weeks-old to age 3. Afterschool care and drop-in care is also available. The academy is located in the Sunday school building of the First United Methodist Church, 75 Fifth Street, Apalachicola. Contact information is 653-1416 or www.fumcapalach. com Christmas shop at the senior center: Got some last-minute Christmas shopping to do? Come to the Holy Family Senior Center, at 203 Dr. Frederick S. Humphries Street in Apalachicola. The seniors have created a variety of gifts available for a donation. Proceeds go to support the seniors program. Items include earrings, knickknacks, picture frames and more. For more information, call Donna Thompson at 653-6909 or 323-0168. Hope you can join us for our annual Christmas dinner at the Franklin County Senior Citizens Center. Serving begins at noon today, Thursday, Dec. 13. Sister wants a Hula Hoop! Got your list made out? World peace and tranquility is what Im wishing for. The rst Tuesday night Bingo was well-supported. Jim Bove called the rst half, and I called the second half. Next Tuesday, Dec. 18, will be the last game until after new years. Come join us and have some fun! There was a nice, steady crowd for the pancake breakfast at the Lanark Village Boat Club last Saturday, Dec. 8. Thanks to the volunteers who made it happen, and thanks to those who supported it and who enjoyed the breakfast. Didnt get to the Parade of Lights. I am sure it was beautiful. Maybe next year! The December Birthday Bash will be this Saturday, Dec. 15, at Camp Gordon Johnston American Legion Post 82. They were also have their Christmas party. Be sure to try to join us. Party starts at 7 p.m. Fun starts when you walk in the door. The songbird Evelyn McAnally will be on hand to sing your favorites songs, along with many others. See ya there! Members only of the Lanark Village Boat Club will have their Christmas Party also on Saturday, Dec. 15. Party hardy! I really miss Ralph Dietz this time of year. He was Santa Claus at all the Christmas parties. Be kind to one another, check in on the sick and housebound. Keep Christ in Christmas. Until next time, God bless America, our troops, the poor, homeless and hungry. We would like to say a big thank-you to all who responded and helped with the motorcycle accident this week. We would probably leave out someone if we tried to name them all. We live in a great community and are very blessed to have such a wonderful support system in time of emergency or need. Billy and Serita Gay Charles and I would like to thank everyone, especially the sheriffs department, the churches, and all our friends and family in Franklin County. You were all there for us in our time of need. Charles and Alicia Odom Special to the Times The Franklin County senior class will sponsor their rst ever Tonyas Hope Walk at the school on Tuesday, Dec. 18. The Tonyas Hope Cancer Foundation Corporation is a nonprot organization started ve years ago to help Tonya Bridges with expenses incurred during her bout with multiple cancers. With her blessing after her death, Camp Gordon Johnston American Legion Post 82 in Lanark Village continued to raise money at an annual pig roast to help residents of Franklin County being treated for cancer. The elementary and middle school students will walk during their physical education class and the seniors will start their walk during sixth period, which starts about 1:10 p.m. The community is invited to join them. If you plan to attend, make sure you bring ID. There is no charge to participate in the walk, but donations will be appreciated. Please be generous with your pledges as the goal is $10 per student. If you are being treated for cancer with radiation, surgery or chemotherapy and need help with nonmedical expenses such as gas, babysitting, utilities, rent, groceries, etc., call Tonyas Hope at 625-0382, and we will mail you an application. We are here to help relieve some of the stress of everyday expenses. Tonyas Hope Cancer Foundation Corporation would like to thank the Franklin County School senior class and Mrs. Stephanie Howze Jones for helping the Franklin County residents with this wonderful idea. Vicky Ann Carnes, 52, passed away Saturday, Dec. 8, 2012, in Carrabelle. She was born February 29, 1960, in St. Petersburg and had lived here 36 years. She worked in the seafood industry and was a Baptist. She was very much loved and will be missed by her family. She is survived by two grandchildren, Jordan and Alissa Carnes; one brother, Victor Carnes, Carrabelle; and four sisters, Loretta Westbrook (John), Carrabelle, Tina Ryals, Panama City, Diane Reid, Zephyr Hills, and Crystal Ratliff (Terrell Chisholm), Carrabelle. She is predeceased by her parents and son, Lathaniel Jordan Carnes. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel, Crawfordville, in charge of arrangements. Vicky Ann Carnes Harry Papadopoulos Jr., 81, of Carrabelle, passed away Sunday, Dec. 9, 2012, in Lynn Haven. Mr. Papadopoulos was born Sept. 30, 1931 to the late Harry and Katherine Papadopoulos in Tallahassee. He was the owner of Harrys Georgian Restaurant. He loved playing golf at the Wildwood Country Club, shing, hunting and going to casinos. Mr. Papadopoulos listened to talk radio and was a huge Florida State University fan. Above all, he loved spending time with his grandchildren and his great-grandchild. Mr. Papadopoulos is survived by a daughter, Lucile Tindell and husband, Tony, of Lynn Haven; grandchildren, Katherine, Tiffany and Samantha; his great-grandchild, Tristan; and two sisters, Eva Papadopoulos and Julia P. Thompson, both of Carrabelle. Graveside funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon, Dec. 12, at Evergreen Cemetery in Carrabelle. Condolences may be submitted or viewed at www.southerlandfamily. com. Southerland Family Funeral Home, Panama City, in charge of arrangements. Harry Papadopoulos Jr. Ruth Elizabeth Cameron Northcutt, 65, of Anahuac, Texas, passed away on Saturday, Dec. 8, 2012, at San Jacinto Methodist Hospital in Baytown, Texas with her family by her side. She was a loving wife, mother, grandmother, greatgrandmother, sister, aunt and friend. Funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon, Dec. 12, in the chapel of Sterling Funeral Home in Anahuac. Interment will follow in Anahuac Cemetery. A gathering of Lizs family and friends was held Tuesday evening, Dec. 11, at the funeral home. Liz was preceded in death by her parents, William and Ruth Cameron, and brother, Gary Cameron. She was a champion oyster shucker in Apalachicola in 1977. Liz is survived by her husband of 30 years, Bobby Ray Northcutt; sons, Troy Williams and wife, Denise, Lenny Williams, and David Williams; daughter Marilyn Moore and husband, Bobby; eight grandchildren, two great-grandchildren; sisters Mary Williams and husband, Coy, and Carol Samford; brother Jimmy Cameron and wife, Blanch; several nieces and nephews and a host of other family and friends. Please view, sign and share memories of Liz in her guestbook at www. sterlingfuneralhome.com. Ruth Elizabeth Cameron Northcutt RUTH ELIZABETH CAMERON NOR THCUTT Atkinson Edwin (Ed) Pooser III passed away peacefully at home in Winter Garden on Thursday, Dec. 6, 2012, at the age of 96. He was born in Wauchula on Nov. 24, 1916, to Atkinson Edwin Pooser II and Adelaide McEwen. Both parents came from pioneer Florida families. His paternal grandfather was a captain in the Confederate Army, serving in the Florida Brigade, which surrendered his company at Appomattox. His maternal great-grandfather, William Penn McEwen, was one of the early Methodist circuit riders in Florida. Educated in Florida public schools, Ed attended the University of Florida. On his birthday and Thanksgiving Day in 1938, he married the love of his life, Janette Jenkins of Bartow. They were happily married for 74 years. For the rst 10 years of his married life, Ed sold life insurance in Bartow and then Jacksonville. In 1948, he began working for the state of Florida as an investigator with the transportation department of the Florida Railroad and Public Utilities Commission (now the Public Service Commission). After appointment as district supervisor, he became assistant director. In 1959, he became director and remained in that position until 1980 when trucking was deregulated. In an article in Florida Truck News in April 1973, it was stated, Pooser has organized a transportation law enforcement force which is second to none. It has gained national recognition for its efforts in eliminating illegal transportation. Other states have patterned their enforcement procedures after the Florida Commissions operation. Enforcement personnel from many other states have been sent to Florida for training in these procedures. After 32 years in transportation, following deregulation Ed retired. Within two months he was back at work with the Florida Trucking Association. Ed became known as Mr. Transportation and was FTAs Man of the Year for 1989. Many of the transportation laws now on the books in Florida began as legislation drafted by Ed Pooser. He was a past president of the National Conference of State Transportation Specialists and served as chairman of that organizations Conference Committee Joint Board. He was on the Reciprocal and International Relations committee of the American Association of Motor Vehicle Administrators. He saved Floridas trucking industry untold millions of dollars through the various reciprocal agreements he negotiated with other states and Canada. Ed was an excellent administrator. His two pet requirements were you always answer your correspondence and you make a report on everything that happens. Years after he left state government, questions on past procedures were easy to answer because of Eds policies. One major accomplishment of Eds was setting up the rst rearms training for transportation enforcement ofcers. When legislators questioned why the DOT ofcers needed guns, Ed replied Have you ever tried to arrest somebody with a pencil? Ed is survived by his wife of 74 years, Janette Pooser; son, Atkinson Edwin (Ned) Pooser IV (Polly) of Franklin County; and daughter, Mary Janette (Jenny) Brown (John Paul) of Winter Garden; grandchildren, Atkinson Edwin (Ted) Pooser V, Barbara Janette Olson, Holly Baulier, John Pooser, David Pooser, Daniel Pooser and P.J. Brown; greatgrandchildren, Ashley and Kimberly, and great-greatgrandchild Levi. He was preceded in death by his son, Robert James (Jim) Pooser. Visitation and funeral services were held Sunday afternoon, Dec. 9 at Robarts Garden Chapel, Wauchula. Interment is in Wauchula Cemetery. Arrangements by Robarts Family Funeral Home, Wauchula.Atkinson Edwin Pooser III A TKINSON EDWIN POOSER III Obituaries Cards of THANKS Senior class to sponsor Tonyas Hope Walk LANARK NEWS Jim Welsh Faith BRIEFSTONY A BRIDGES Legions Birthday Bash, Christmas party Saturday THE ODOM FAMILY THE GA Y FAMILY

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WEEKLY ALMANAC APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE TIDE TABLES MONTHLY AVERAGES To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from these given for APALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW Cat Point Minus 0:40 Minus 1:17 East Pass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27 To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from those given for CARRABELLE: HIGH LOW Bald Point Minus 9:16 Minus 0:03 Sponsor the WEEKLY ALMANAC Call Today! 653-8868 Date High Low % Precip Thu, Dec. 13 59 44 20 % Fri, Dec. 14 69 51 10 % Sat, Dec. 15 70 58 10 % Sun, Dec. 16 73 50 30 % Mon, Dec. 17 68 51 20 % Tues, Dec. 18 67 48 40 % Wed, Dec. 19 64 44 0 % 13 Tu 327pm 2.4 717am -0.5 651pm 1.9 14 We 1235am 2.9 424pm 2.4 804am -0.6 730pm 2.1 15 Th 117am 2.9 518pm 2.4 853am -0.8 811pm 2.1 16 Fr 202am 2.9 608pm 2.2 945am -0.6 858pm 1.9 17 Sa 253am 2.9 655pm 2.2 1037am -0.5 958pm 1.9 18 Su 349am 2.6 736pm 2.1 1132am -0.2 1114pm 1.8 19 Mo 455am 2.4 813pm 2.1 1226pm 0.2 20 Tu 615am 2.1 846pm 2.1 1244am 1.4 121pm 0.5 21 We 759am 1.8 916pm 2.1 213am 1.1 215pm 0.8 22 Th 1005am 1.6 945pm 2.2 328am 0.8 308pm 1.1 23 Fr 1159am 1.8 1012pm 2.2 429am 0.3 358pm 1.3 24 Sa 119pm 1.9 1040pm 2.4 520am 0.0 445pm 1.6 25 Su 217pm 1.9 1108pm 2.4 606am -0.2 529pm 1.6 26 Mo 303pm 2.1 1138pm 2.4 647am -0.3 609pm 1.8 Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL (next to Piggly Wiggly) www.BWOsh.com Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL Your Hunting Headquarters Your Hunting Headquarters Your Hunting Headquarters RED TAG GUN SALE! P R ICES G OO D TH RO UGH 12-24-12 Corner of Marina Drive, (next to Piggly Wiggly) Corner of Marina Drive, Corner of Marina Drive, CALL FOR A QUOTE 1-877-216-9600 Corner of Marina Drive, Corner of Marina Drive, CALL FOR A QUOTE CALL FOR A QUOTE T AU R US 709 S LIM 9MM P IST O LS REG $ 299 .99 S ALE $ 269 .99 By F RANK SARGEANT franksargeant@charter.net A crystal ball would help. Forecasting Panhandle shing for December is a bit like forecasting the BCS champion in September lots of prognostications, but nobody really knows whats going to happen. A whole lot depends on the weather; recent winters have been mild, basically extending November shing all the way through Christmas; reds and trout both on the ats on sunny afternoons and in the creeks and holes on cool mornings. With night temperatures at least through December 10 forecast to drop no lower than the mid-50s, it looks like the winter of 2012 will be a lot like 2011without a burst of severe cold, sh on the ats remain on or near their fall haunts. The water is clear due to less algae, the new and full moon tides are at their lowest, and its sight shing for reds at its nest so long as the water temperatures cooperatecurrently around 65 degrees afternoons in the bays from Fort Walton to Apalach. Thats prime temperature for reds and trout as well as ounder. Poling the ats and looking for the sh on slough edges, around oyster bars and in potholes does the job and a good hand with a y rod can even connect with streamer ies, though long casts with a live shrimp or a Gulp! crab are a much easier way to go. The same sh that come up to sun on the afternoon ats on bright days are likely to be in tidal creeks and potholes in Apalachicolas East Bay, around the back of St. Vincents Island, in lower St. Joe Bay, in West Bay and upper North Bay, and in the east end of Choctawhatchee Bay. Many of the tidal creeks that feed into the above-named bayous have oystery potholes in them average creek depth might be two feet, but a couple hundred yards in you nd 3 to 5 feet and lots of sh on chilly mornings. The bottoms are black mud which probably acts as a heat sink to warm the waters and attract the sh. It takes some chart study and some low-speed probing in a shallow draft boat or a kayak to nd these spots or hire a guide who already knows where all of them are but when you get on one of these spots on low water, it can literally be sh-in-a-barrel they wont leave on low tide, and so long as you stay well back and dont spook them, you can wear them out by simply casting live shrimp into the hole. It can be a potpourri, with sheepshead, black drum, lady sh and jacks in the mix along with the trout and reds. Finding the sh is a matter of easing along on the trolling motor and casting a live shrimp on a size 1 or 1/0 hook via spinning gear with 10-pound-test braid, weighted with a BB-shot, into every observable hole. (A piece of cut shrimp on a 3/16 ounce jig head is easier to cast and also works pretty well. Use only fresh-cut shrimp frozen shrimp draws few bites.) Most anglers use 18 inches of 20-pound-test uorocarbon between running line and hook the added stiffness of this leader helps prevent tangles, and the uoro is more durable around oyster shells than straight braid. Tie it in with a double-line doubled uniknot, that is doubling both the leader and the running line before you tie the two uniknots. The doubled line prevents the braid from cutting through the leader when you put on the pressure to land a chunky red. WINTER WANDERING IN PANHANDLE WATERS PHOTO COURTESY OF YAMAHA MARINE Red sh continue to prowl Northwest Florida marshes so long as water temperature remains in the 60s. Currently, it is about 64 degrees. Email outdoors news to timesoutdoors @star .com Page 10 Thursday, December 13, 2012 O UTDOORS www.apalachtimes.com Section Section A SPONSORED BY Freshwater Inshore Most inshore action has turned to the I.C.W. in our area. Good reports of sheepshead and small trout at the T and under the powerlines. Live shrimp will also entice mangrove snapper in the deeper holes and around structure here as well. Red fish are still moving through our area and can be caught along side whiting and pompano in the surf. Increasing saltwater has slowed down freshwater fishing in the back waters of our county. Most anglers are reporting on sheepshead and blackdrums well into the Howard Creek and The Brothers right now. Good reports of crappie and bream are the norm at Depot Creek this week. By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com This is a bumper year for acorns, and with acorns come hungry bears. Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission bear biologist Adam Warwick said it is by far the busiest season he has experienced. He said several of the FWC commissioners heading back to Tallahassee after last weeks Apalachicola meeting got to see several bears when passing through Lanark Village. In Carrabelle, Eastpoint and Lanark Village conversation is abuzz with bear stories. One woman reported seeing six bears in a single oak tree. Warwick said he saw 13 bears on one day while working around Hinton Road in Lanark. Most comments have been positive, with people telling how beautiful and healthy the bear population has become. Lots of folks are scrambling for their cameras. Cal Allen managed to get photos of a male bear that followed in a path blazed by a mama and three cubs in the Allens front yard. The bear seemed quite unconcerned of my presence except for an occasional glance, most likely happy he could feed in peace without the yapping little Jack Russell, wrote Allen. This is the eighth day in a row we have observed these beautiful creatures in our neighborhood. Even though its warm, bears are stocking up on calories for winter, one reason they are so visible right now. Bears here dont hibernate but they do become less active in cold weather, especially pregnant females, so they fatten up in preparation. Problems arise when bears have access to food sources such as pet foods, garbage, barbecue grills, bird seed or even livestock feed. Bears are adaptable and learn quickly to associate people with food. Even though black bears are normally too shy to risk contact with humans, their powerful need to nd food can overwhelm this fear. Bears can smell food from more than a mile away and will travel great distances to track down these tasty smells, often crossing roadways and bridges to do so, which creates risk to both themselves and motorists. Drive carefully, especially at night, and keep alert for bears on the move. Bears are driven by their need to eat, so anything edible and easily accessible is a potential bear attractant. Presently, garbage is by far the biggest bear attractant in Florida. A fed bear is a dead bear; dont leave food sources around you home to entice them. LOIS SWOBODA | The Times The Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve hosted the monthly meeting of the Apalachicola Bay Chamber of Commerce on Dec. 5. Director Lee Edmiston welcomed the group and told them the beautiful state of the art research and outreach facility has been visited by 29,000 people since January. Some of the refuge centers have to close for part of the year because there isnt enough traf c, he said. We havent found a time when we can close. The chamber collected gifts for the Franklin Toy Project. Keynote speaker was Melissa Strawser of Gulf Coast State College who explained continuing education opportunities. Luncheon was a low country boil prepared by Roy Ogles and members of the ANERR staff. ANERR HOSTS CHAMBER MEETING ROD GASCHE | Special to the Times These two bears were spotted near the frog pond on the Carrabelle waterfront. Number of bears in the area on the rise

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CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA SP O RTS www.apalachtimes.com A Section Hometown Proud (850)653-9695 Gulfside IGA PL A YER OF THE WEEK S P ON S OR Lady Seahawk sophomore Myesha Campbell has regularly scored in double-digits, as well as proved herself a star performer in the classroom with a better than 3.0 grade point average. Shes been consistent with her play, said coach Carlos Hill. Shes been playing good defense, moving her feet, helping spread out our oense more so we get better looks at the basket. Congratulations, Myesha! Congratulations, Myesha! Hometown Proud (850)653-9695 FCSWA President Shannon Hartsfield told the audience of about 40 attendees that seafood workers were considering research received from experts to see which suggestions were feasible. When we went and asked for help, we started receiving ample opportunities with the county commission and Workforce, he said. FCSWA Vice President Chris Millender outlined his proposal to bring together 15 experts from government and academic institutions, together with local know-how. Millender proposed SMARRT should consist of 15 workers from the seafood industry: three oystermen, a crabber, two shrimpers, two fishing guides, two seafood dealers, one FCSWA representative, one Franklin County Seafood Dealers Association representative, two commercial fishermen and one clammer. According to a flyer, these 15 stake holders have full voting rights. It lists the cut-off date for nominations to the SMARRT as Dec. 13. Joe Shields, environmental administrator for the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services at the Apalachicola Shellfish Center, said the proposed committee is, similar to the Oyster Task Force, which went away. This seems to be something similar. Its a good thing. Obviously you want as many people as possible involved to make decisions. Maybe with severity of this problem, the answers will be forthcoming. Shields serves on the University of Florida Oyster Recovery Team, a group of researchers seeking to explore the problems with the fishery. Millenders proposed SMARRT board would communicate with the task force and other organizations. Any decision would have to receive unanimous support from team members. There must be complete consensus, Hartsfield said. Its scary on the bay as it is with the lack of fresh water. Without this SMARRT team, I dont see whats going to happen. If we had good communication, you have the possibility to make changes. County Extension Agent Bill Mahan, a member of the ad hoc committee, said it is uncertain who will tap members of SMARRT. Its very fluid, he said. Workforce Florida will pay a facilitator to help establish SMARRT. Were planning a January meeting to kick this off. Along with Millender, the chairman and Hartsfield, ad hoc committee members include Tommy Ward, who represents the seafood dealers association; Jennifer German, deputy director of Workforce; Angie Lindsey, community outreach coordinator for Healthy Gulf, Healthy Communities, an academic advisory group; Joe Taylor, director of Franklins Promise; and Shannon Lease, deputy director of the Apalachicola Riverkeeper. Lindsey said the ad hoc committee will choose the SMARRT representatives. The main thing the ad hoc is looking for is to have that equal representation of the different parts of the industry, she said. Everybodys here together to address this particular emergency. Seafood workers have been incredible partners about keeping us on task. Taylor said the ad hoc committee will not actually choose the board members. I think thats going to work itself out at the Jan. 9 meeting, he said. Thats why we have hired an independent facilitator to lead that and bring the group to consensus. On Monday night, Hartsfield detailed plans for the upcoming oyster relay program, which will pay oystermen $25 an hour for an eighthour day, for up to six months. He outlined that workers must be fully licensed and enrolled in Workforce, which is overseeing the program, funded by a $2.7 million federal grant. In addition, they must pass a drug test, available free at the county health department, and must pass an eight-hour occupational health and safety course, available online and for which they will be paid. The oystermen will use their own boats, which must be at least 22 feet long. If you do not have a boat, you will have to find another person with a boat, he told the audience at the Eastpoint firehouse. Both County Commissioner William Massey and Marcia Mathis, a representative of Sen. Bill Montfords office, were in attendance but did not address the gathering. Hartsfield said initial plans beginning the first week of January are to relay oysters, tonged from permanently closed areas near the river channel, and to relocate them to the west near Green Point Beacon. After two weeks there, the oysters will be suitable for harvest. Hartsfield also told oystermen there are paid opportunities to take out researchers on their boats. Taylor told the gathering about help available through Franklins Promise. Providing a chili dinner on the cold night were representatives of Carrabelles United Methodist Church, accompanied by Pastor Aaron Beaty, and Eastpoints First UMC. Homer McMillan, from Fellowship Baptist Church, was there to distribute 75 blankets, on behalf of the Foundations of Justice, which has received support from ministerial groups in Carrabelle and Apalachicola. FCSWA from page A1 Page 11 Thursday, December 13, 2012 By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com The Lady Seahawks girls varsity basketball team has opened with a strong start, emerging with a 4-2 record, 2-1 in the district. The team, under the direction of coach Carlos Hill, delighted hometown fans Saturday night with a 38-29 win over West Gadsden. The team was paced by 17 points from sophomore Dyshereah Key, with seven points each from senior Shelby Myers, and sophomore Myesha Campbell. Senior Anna Lee added ve points, and eighth-grader Tyanna Townsend kicked in three. The victory followed a 56-21 away game win Dec. 7 against Bozeman, where Key was again the most potent offensive force, nailing 16 points. Campbell scored 10, and Myers six, with seven points from freshman Clarina Langineeo. The back-to-back wins followed a .500 start for the Lady Seahawks. The team lost their Nov. 20 home opener 49-29 against Aucilla Christian, as Campbell poured in 11 points. The Franklin County girls evened their record a week later, with a 44-34 win at John Paul II. Campbell was again the leading scorer, with 15. The Lady Seahawks downed Wewahitchka in a Nov. 29 away game, winning 34-26 behind Campbells 10 points. The girls then lost in a district game at West Gadsden Dec. 1, falling 21-10. Hill said West Gadsden was coming off a game the night before against Blountstown, marred by ghting, so the referee made it clear in the Seahawks game that there would no intimidation allowed. The girls played a shell defense. They didnt want to get thrown out, Hill said, and then added after Saturdays win We de nitely made up for that tonight. Rocky Bayou tops Seahawk boys soccer By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com The Seahawks boys soccer team posted a tie and a loss last week, as they continue to re ne their passing game. On Dec. 5 at Greensboro, the team tied the West Gadsden Panthers 2-2, with goals by Graham Kirvin and Zack Howze on a penalty kick. Goalkeeper Casey Sapp posted 18 saves. We played a skillful team; they had more touches on the ball than us, Coach Luis Ramon Valenzuela said. It was a very interesting game, very even on both parts, rough and a lots of shots on both ways. We could have done much better that night, but this is the way soccer is. I told the boys, It takes one second to change the entire game. On Friday night at home, the team fell 3-1 to district rival Rocky Bayou. The teams lone score was by Christian Jones, assisted by Howze on a corner kick. Sapp posted 17 saves. We started the game with a lot of con dence, since we won the rst district match-up, but they came out harder this time, Valenzuela said. They knew where to mark and how to play against us. Our key players were attacked by either two or three of them, stopping us from getting to their goal. Once again, we cannot lower our guard against our district counterparts. Even though we will see them again, we have to play a little bit smarter than them, with more passing, and making those passes shorter to make for open situations to be able to get to their goal. We cannot shoot from 30 or 40 yards away from the goal, not in our district matches. Short passes are the key to break their defensive barrier. The boys face district rival Freeport at home Friday night, and then travel to Baker Monday for a non-league match-up. By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com A tough 2-1 loss at home Friday night to district rival Rocky Bayou marred an otherwise upbeat week for the Lady Seahawks girls soccer team. The Rocky Bayou Lady Knights struck rst with a goal midway through the rst half. Then, just before the water break in the second half, the Lady Knights put another goal in the net, giving them a 2-0 lead. Minutes later, Franklin County junior Gracyn Kirvin threw the ball in to sophomore Katie Seger for a 25-yard shot that made it a 2-1 game. We had multiple scoring opportunities, including ve great corner kicks right in front of the goal, said Coach Kelli Wright, whose record fell to 6-2 on the year. We just couldnt put the ball in the back of the net. With ve minutes left in the game, junior Jessica Shields dribbled around two defenders and struck a shot that their goalkeeper made a great save on. That team has certainly improved, and they took advantage of our mistakes. Sophomore goalkeeper Macy Hunt had 10 saves for the match. Kirvin managed ve shots on goal and Seger four, for the game. On Dec. 5, the Lady Seahawks defeated the West Gadsden Lady Panthers 6-0 in Greenboro. The goals were distributed among four Lady Seahawks players. Kirvin and eighthgrader Allie Zingarelli each had a pair of goals. Seger and eighth-grader Ali Kirvin also contributed with one goal each. Shields had three assists in the game, and Seger had one assist. Macy Hunt had ve saves in the match. This game gave some of our inexperienced players valuable eld time, Wright said. The team opened the week on Dec. 4 with a thrilling 1-0 win over John Paul II, after Gracyn Kirvins assist led to a Shields goal in the rst half. Our defense played a great game against John Paul II, shutting down their leading goal scorer, Wright said. Macy Hunt made some tremendous saves in the second half of the match. She had nine saves and also recorded her second shutout of the season. When junior Adriana Reeder was injured in the second half, Jessica Shields really stepped up and helped our team defensively. GRAHAM KIRVIN CASEY SAPP ZACH HOWZE PHOTOS BY DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times Lady Seahawks Coach Carlos Hill diagrams a play for his squad. Lady Seahawk hoopsters open with wins Rocky Bayou loss mars Lady Seahawks week CHRISTEY KIRVIN | Special to the Times Junior Deborah Dempsey drives against John Paul II.

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Local A12 | The Times Thursday, December 13, 2012 FDOT public meeting today on U.S. 98 roadwork: The Florida Department of Transportation will host a public information meeting concerning the resurfacing of U.S. 98 from 12th Street to the Apalachicola River Bridge from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. today, Dec. 13. The meeting at the Apalachicola Community Center, 1 Bay Ave, will cover FDOTs proposal to resurface existing travel, auxiliary and parking lanes, and perform minor drainage improvements. Additionally, Americans with Disability Act (ADA) improvements, which may consist of repairing de cient sidewalk, replacing/retro tting noncompliant curb ramps, and constructing an access ramp are included in this project, as are modi cations to on-street parking. High school band in concert tonight: The Franklin County School band will present their annual winter concert at 7 p.m. tonight, Dec. 13 in the cafeteria. Food pantries to host food program: The Gulf, Franklin and Wakulla county health departments, extension programs and Workforce Board are developing an educational food, nutrition, cooking, budgeting and container gardening program. The program will be conducted at the food pantry sites in the three counties. The next planning meeting is scheduled for Friday, Dec. 14 at 2 p.m. at the Franklin County Health Department, in Apalachicola. For information call 653-2111. Students present Christmas program Monday: Elementary school students at the Franklin County School will present their annual Christmas program Let It Be Christmas at 6 p.m. on Monday, Dec. 17 in the cafeteria. Nobles dancers to perform Tuesday: Pam Nobles Studios will present Happy Holidays, its annual Christmas program showcasing the talents of its students, on Tuesday, Dec. 18 at 7:07 p.m. at the Dixie Theatre, in downtown Apalachicola. Advance tickets are $10, and $12 at the door. For more info, call 653 -8078. Traf c Safety Team to meet Wednesday: The next meeting of the Community Traf c Safety Team is scheduled for Wednesday, Dec. 19 at noon at the Carrabelle City Complex. Health department to provide drug screening: Interim Franklin County Health Department Administrator Marsha Lindeman said the department is working with Quest Labs to provide drug screening. Lindeman said the DOH is working to make the tests available before the end of the month to help individuals seeking alternative employment. For information call 653-2111. Free u shots for seafood workers: The Franklin County Health Department will provide a free u shot to persons who present a valid saltwater harvesting license, as well as their spouse and children. The shots normally cost $25. For persons 65 and older, a high dose vaccination is $35.60. Shots are available MondayFriday 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. The health department has vaccinated more than 500 people this u season and urges everyone to get protected. For information call 653-2111. Bids for St. George Island shing pier: The county commission will open bids for repairs to the St. George Island Fishing Pier on Jan. 15. Preble-Rish, the county engineering consultant for the project, has received the permits from the Florida Department of Environmental Protection and the Army Corps of Engineers to make the repairs, at an estimated cost of $700,000. In October, county commissioners voted to take funds for the repairs from the bridge fund while pursuing damages from the owners of the barge that caused the damage during Tropical Storm Debby. The county hopes to reopen the entire pier for public use by June 2013. Butts and Clucks set for Jan. 5: The Weems Memorial Healthcare Foundation will hold its annual Butts and Clucks by the Bay cookoff on Saturday, Jan. 5 from noon until 5 p.m. at Riverfront Park in downtown Apalachicola. The foundation is sponsoring a pork butt and chicken cooking contest. Local, state and out-ofstate teams can participate in this contest. Awards are given for cooking, presentation of booth, presentation of food, etc. Dinner is served to the public and an auction will be held with Harry Arnold as auctioneer. For more information or to enter call 670-8261. Apalachicola Oyster Cook-off Jan. 19: The third annual Oyster Cook-Off to bene t the Apalachicola Volunteer Fire Department will be held Saturday, Jan. 19. On Friday evening will be a preview of the oysterrelated silent auction items, along with a sampling of Apalachicola Bays tasty bivalves. The cook-off on Saturday will start at 11 a.m. Contestants are encouraged to enter with their favorite recipe. All forms of oysters will be available to taste raw, steamed, fried. Other food items and refreshments will be available for purchase. The days activities will include live music and dancing performances. More information will be posted soon at www. oystercookoff.com, and the event can be followed on Facebook. Arts in Medicine plans Holy Family garden: On Dec. 11, Arts in Medicine volunteers met to plan for 2014. A group of 24 specialists, including 12 Florida State University students, will visit Franklin County in March for an intensive program including creation of a garden at the Holy Family Senior Center and performance art for health education, in which the group plans to educate high school students about reproductive health and self esteem. A program dealing with hygiene and nutrition is also planned for younger students. In addition, teams of health workers plan to focus on problems of seafood workers and inform them of services available. Holiday hours for St. George Lighthouse: The Lighthouse and the Keepers House Museum and gift shop will be closed Dec. 24-26 and Jan. 1. From Dec. 27-29 the facilities will be open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. On Dec. 30 the lighthouse and keepers house will open noon to 5 p.m. On Dec. 31 the facilities will be open10 a.m. to 5 p.m. After the holidays, winter hours from noon to 5 p.m. daily, closed Thursdays resume through March 1. THE PANAMA CITY PICTORIAL BOOK IS HERE! $ 39 .95 + TAX BUY NOW! THE NEWS HERALD M AKES THE PER F ECT G I F T F OR F AMILY AN D F RIEN D S ______Copies at $39.95 plus $3.00 tax per book and pick up my order at The News Herald oce. Name ___________________________________________________________________________________________ Address __________________________________________________________________________________________ City ______________________________________________________ State _______________ Zip ________________ Phone (_____) ______________________ E-mail _________________________________________________________ Signature ________________________________________________________________________________ Charge Card Number_____________________________________ Security Code______________Exp. Date_____________________ Payable to: The News Herald VISA THE NEWS HERALD THE NEWS HERALD GET YOUR COPY TODAY $ 39 .95 AKES THE PER F ECT $ .95 JUST IN TIME FOR THE HOLIDAYS! PANAMACITY.PICTORIALBOOK.COM MAIL IN FORM OR ORDER ONLINE AT: I wish to order: ____ Copies at $39.95 plus $2.60 tax per book and pick up my order ( mail in form only ) at The News Herald oce. Total $42.55/book ____ Copies at $39.95 plus $5.95 shipping and handling and $2.60 tax per book and have my order shipped to the address below. Total $48.50/book TOTAL AMOUNT ENCLOSED:__________ Name ________________________________________________ Address _______________________________________________ City _________________________ State ______ ZIP ____________ Phone ( )_____________ E-mail __________________________ ____________________________________________________ Signature ____________________________________________________ Charge Card Number Security Code Exp. Date PAYM E NT M E T H O D C HE CK / MON E YOR DE R Payable to: The News Herald V I S A AM EX MA S T E RCAR D D I S CO VE R GO TO FACEB OO K.C O M/P C DEAL OFT HE D AY A ND E NT E R NOW! Add a $ 50 gift card to your Wish List! to local restaurants DECEMBER 9 TH 28 TH D A ILY DE A L F A CEBOOK L IKE C ONTEST NEED A LITTLE EXTRA SPARKLE ADDED TO YOUR HOLIDAY? Enter our Facebook contest to W IN A $50 G I F T C A R D! Just Like our Facebook Daily Deal page and register for a chance to W IN A $50 G I F T C A R D TO LOC A L REST AU R A NTS Contest runs from Dec. 9 thru Dec. 28. gift card $ 50 to local restaurants L ike Us N ow! DI S S I ) Children and Adults No Fee or Cost If No Recovery G AYLE PEED IN G O A TTO NEY AT L AW Apalachicola, FL (850) 292-7059 | (850) 944-6020 FAX gsrlaw@bellsouth.net DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times The TIGERS program in Apalachicola hosted on Nov. 29 a Home is where the heart is free seminar for rst-time homeowners. Attendees got a chance to learn details about buying a home from such participants as attorney Kristy Branch Banks, right, and Cadence Banks Stephnia Turrell, left. Also taking part were Cadence Banks Shelly Burns; Centennial Banks Joan Buckner and Amber Lowry; Randall Webster representing the Franklin County Land and Trust Development; and Gloria Salinard, on behalf of the Realtor Association of Franklin and Gulf counties. TIGERS host homebuyers seminar News BRIEFS BILL MILLER REALTY 850-697-3751 (3310) 570-0658 400 + COMM. U.S. 98 & GULF ADJ. TO LANARK MARINA 850K $29,500 $2,500 D O W N B UYS 2 B ED AP T 2 6 OR RENT $500/MTH 2 B/R 1 BTH GULF VIE W HOME W/ F AMILY R OOM $70,000 C/B-3-1 2 COR LOTS CITY $49,500 3/2 D /W 2 COR LOTS CITY $42,500 MIH 2 C RNR LOTS BLK. $ S TORE REDUCED $49,500 2 AC-AT RIVER UTIL. IN -$39,500

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The Times | A13 Thursday, December 13, 2012 CALL TOD A Y! 653-8868 GE T YOUR A D IN Trades & Services Laban Bontrager, DMD Monica Bontrager, DMD 12761 Pea Ridge Road Bristol, Florida 32321 TELEPHONE (850) 643-5417 Bristol Dental Clinic DENTURE LAB ON PREMISES Same Day Service on Repairs and Relines Don Lively General Contractors L ICENSED AND I NSURED 20 Y EARS E XPERIENCE P .O. Box 439 C arrabelle, FL 32322 697-2783 or Mobile 566-2603 RC 0066499 R G0065255 Carrabelle Visa, Discover, and American Express Honored at Participating Ace Stores JACKSONS Building Supplies & Auto Repair Carrabelle 697-3333 We Deliver Anywhere Hardware and Paint Center J.J.s Tree Service, LLC Stump Grinder Licensed & Insured Call John : (850) 899-8432 ROBERTS APPLIANCE REPAIR ALL MAJOR BRANDS 18 Shadow Lane Apalachicola, FL 32320 Phone: (850) 653-8122 Cell: (850) 653-7654 JOES LAWN CARE IF I TS I N YOUR YARD LET JOE TAKE CARE OF I T FULL L AWN SERVICE S TREE TRIMMING AND REMOVAL AL S O CLEAN GUTTER S AND IRRIGATION IN S TILLATION, PLANTING AND BEDDING AVAILABLE CALL JOE@ 850-323-0741 OR EMAIL J OE S_ LA WN @Y A H OO COM The following is the honor roll for the rst nine-week grading period at the Apalachicola Bay Chart School. All As FIRST GRADE A. Carlton: Hannah Grace Abel, Amontaye Austin, Peyton Blackburn, CJ Conway, Reece Juno, William Luberto, Taylor Pendleton, Jostyn Tipton, Kiana Weeks L. Allen: Cody Abercrombie, Caelyn Constantine, Trinty Creamer, Andie Hutchins, Maya Itzkovitz, Esteban Bernabe, Conner Lolley, Jolie Mallon, Lucy Neill, Malic ONeal, Emma Rowland, Wes Taranto, Jordan Yon SECOND GRADE J. Mallon: Eric Lau, River Sheridan, Trinity Taylor, John Michael Thompson, Colin We ng S. Herrington: Alisha Arroyo, Kendall Hill, Arav Patel, Jabara Pearson, Owen Poloronis, Kylah Ross, Mark Willis THIRD GRADE W. Martina: Andrew Monod, Alex Itzkovitz, Sophia Salman, Nic Valenzuela T. Moses: Weston Bockelman FOURTH GRADE M. Lee: Livia Monod L. Bockelman: Alex Joanos, Abby Johnson FIFTH GRADE B. Linane: Cade Juno, Camille Williams SIXTH GRADE B. Banks: Kevin Flores, Alexus Johnson, Bryce Kent, Adria Valenzuela K. Ward: Scout McLemore, Grayson Constantine, Chloe Davis, Jan-Michael Lowe, Conner Messer, Becca Willis SEVENTH GRADE A. Keel: Savannah Montgomery T. Joanos: Faith Sapp EIGHTH GRADE T. Ward: Jayla Alley, Corie Cates, Holly Chambers, Allie Kirvin, Mikayla Lloyd, Alexis ONeal, Astrid Ramirez, Alexis Segree, Mallorie Shiver, Alina Valenzuela M. Copeland: Emily Gay A/B FIRST GRADE A. Carlton: Isabella Price, Landon Schoelles, Aubrie Thompson, Jayla White L. Allen: Charles McClain SECOND GRADE J. Mallon: Laithan Kent, Jayden Nichols, Nathan Richards, Rainey Smith, Leah Wren S. Herrington: Wyatt Abercrombie, Miranda Diaz, Faline Everitt, Mason Moses, Jackson Segree, Mahaley Shuler THIRD GRADE W. Martina: Caleb Abel, Nadia Etheridge, Sevryn Everritt, Ella Friedman, Eulalia Gregorio, Gavin Lashley, Genevieve Montgomery T. Moses: Meredith Alford, Lanie Allen, Carson Davis, Jasmine Richards, Gracie Smith, Wil Varnes FOURTH GRADE M. Lee: Arryonna Cargill, Kaylee Hicks, Ava Neill, Avery Scott, Austin Shiver L. Bockelman: Cecil Gay, Skye Huber, Jadyn Luberto, Elizabeth McAnally, Clint Rester, Caden Turrell, Gregory Wilson FIFTH GRADE B. Linane: Janacia Bunyon, Matthew Gay, Bailey Herrington, Jayden Justice, Kalahn Kent, Alyssa Martina, Allison Register, Alyssa Robinson SIXTH GRADE B. Banks: Madison Coulter, Hailey Gay, Sophia Kirvin K. Ward: Karolynn Myers, Daijon Penamon, Haley Scott SEVENTH GRADE A. Keel: Christian Amison, Brooke Martina, Andrew Nguyen, Lucas Sasnett T. Joanos: Michaela Cassidy, Nick Joanos, Ethan Moses, Georjanna Myers, Kobe Myers, Alyssia Shirah, Madison Smith EIGHTH GRADE T. Ward: Eve Bond, Cash Creamer, Logan Crosby, Jaylon Gainer, Bianca Huber M. Copeland: Emily Crosby, Tia Cummings, Juliana Gay, Kacey Howard, Bobby Kilgore, Austin McKee, Alyssa Shiver, Katy Spann, Marshall Sweet, Xuripha Tiller, K.K. Wilson, Emily Zingarelli ABC School Honor Roll SIXTH GRADE SCIENTISTS The Apalachicola Bay Charter School held its annual Middle School Science Fair Nov. 28. Students were required to write a research paper with information about their proposed project, to follow the scienti c method to complete their experiments and to display results on backboard presentations. The sixth grade winners, from left, are rst place, Rainbow Cheese, Karolyn Myers and Scout McLemore, second place Shake Like an Earthquake, Kevin Flores, Bryce Kent and Hailey Gay; and second place Milk or Plastic? Becca Willis, Haley Scott, and Sean Williams. ABC School holds annual Middle School Science Fair SEVENTH GRADE SCIENTISTS The seventh grade winners, from left, were rst place, Which Soil is Best? Savannah Montgomery and Brooke Martina; second place The Frightened Grasshopper, Michaela Cassidy; and third place Penny Transformation, Faith Sapp. Schools

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A14| The Times Thursday, December 13, 2012 CLASSIFIEDS 89522T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. CASE No. 19-2012-CA000278 JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, Plaintiff vs. LEON E. O’NEAL II, et al., Defendants NOTICE OF ACTION TO: LEON E. O’NEAL, II, 226 14TH STREET, APALACHICOLA, FL 32320 LEON E. O’NEAL, II, 3820 NW HUNTSBORO ST, APT 103, LAKE CITY, FL 32055 LEON E. O’NEAL, II, 175 SW BIRCH GLEN, LAKE CITY, FL 32024 FELICIA N. O’NEAL, 226 14TH STREET, APALACHICOLA, FL 32320 FELICIA N. O’NEAL, 3820 NW HUNTSBORO ST, APT 103, LAKE CITY, FL 32055 FELICIA N. O’NEAL, 175 SW BIRCH GLEN, LAKE CITY, FL 32024 UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF LEON E. O’NEAL, II, 226 14TH STREET, APALACHICOLA, FL 32320 UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF FELICIA N. O’NEAL, 226 14TH STREET, APALACHICOLA, FL 32320 AND TO: All persons claiming an interest by, through, under, or against the aforesaid Defendant(s). YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following described property located in Franklin County, Florida: LOT 3, BLOCK 134 OF CITY OF APALACHICOLA, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS ON FILE AT THE OFFICE OF THE CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT IN FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. has been filed against you, an you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to this action, on Greenspoon Marder, P.A., Default Department, Attorneys for Plaintiff, whose address is Trade Centre South, Suite 700, 100 West Cypress Creek Road, Fort Lauderdale, FL 33309, and the file original with the Clerk within 30 days after the first publication of this notice otherwise a default and a judgment may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. WITNESS MY HAND AND SEAL OF SAID COURT on this 27th day of November, 2012. Marcia M. Johnson As Clerk of said Court Michele Maxwell As Deputy Clerk IMPORTANT In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons needing a reasonable accommodation to participate in this proceeding should, no later than seven (7) days prior, contact the Clerk of the Court’s disability coordinator at 301 S MONROE STREET ROOM 225, TALLAHASSEE, FL 32301, 850-577-4401. If hearing or voice impaired, contact (TDD) (800)955-8771 via Florida Relay System. December 6, 13, 2012 89576T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION Case No. 11-000120CA TIB BANK, Plaintiff, v. APALACH CLASSIC SYSTEMS, INC., a Florida corporation; SALLY A. LEACH; GREGORY E. LEACH a/k/a GREGORY E. LEACH, M.D.; ADVANCED MEDICAL CENTER, LLC, a Florida limited liability company; LOGICAL INVESTMENTS, LLC, a Florida limited liability company; and ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANTS, WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; and UNKNOWN TENANTS IN POSSESSION, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS GIVEN that, pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure, dated September 25, 2012, and the Order Granting Plaintiff’s Motion to Cancel and Reschedule Foreclosure Sale in the above-styled case in the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, I will, on January 9, 2013, at 11:00 a.m., sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the front door of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, in the city of Apalachicola, Florida, the following described real property: Parcel 1: Lots 1, 2 and the Southeast 30 feet of Lot 3, Block 52, of the City of Apalachicola, according to the map or plat thereof now in common use at the Clerk of the Circuit Court in Franklin County, Florida. Parcel 2: Northwest 30 feet of Lot 4, Northwest 46 feet of Lot 8, and all of Lots 5, 6 and 7, all in Block “52”, of the City of Apalachicola, as per map or plat In common use on file at the Clerk of the Circuit Court in Franklin County, Florida. Parcel 3: The Southeast 30 feet of Lot 4 and the Northwest 30 feet of Lot 3, in Block 52, of the City of Apalachicola, as per map or plat in common use on file at the Clerk of the Circuit Court in Franklin County, Florida. IF YOU ARE A PERSON CLAIMING A RIGHT TO FUNDS REMAINING AFTER THE SALE, YOU MUST FILE A CLAIM WITH THE CLERK NO LATER THAN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU FAIL TO FILE A CLAIM, YOU WILL NOT BE ENTITLED TO ANY REMAINING FUNDS. AFTER 60 DAYS, ONLY THE OWNER OF RECORD AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MAY CLAIM THE SURPLUS. Dated on this 6th day of December, 2012. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of the Circuit Court Franklin County, Florida Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk December 13, 20, 2012 89574T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.. 19-2012CA-000119 DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE OF INDYMAC LOAN TRUST MORTGAGE BACKED CERTIFICATES SERIES 2005-L1 UNDER THE POOLING AND SERVICING AGREEMENT DATED JUNE 1, 2005, Plaintiff, v. IBRAHIM QUINONES; MARIANA PEREZ; JOEL QUINONES; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; MARINERS LANDING HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION PHASE II, LLC. Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order of Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure dated November 27, 2012, entered in Civil Case No. 19-2012-CA-000119 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest bidder for cash on 16th day of January, 2013, at 11:00 a.m. on the Front Lobby of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida 32320, relative to the following described property as set forth in the Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 10, MARINERS LANDING, PHASE II ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 8, PAGES 19, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY FLORIDA Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. ATTENTION: PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Court Administrator Phone: (850) 577-4401 DATED AT APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA THIS 28TH DAY OF NOVEMBER, 2012. Marcia M. Johnson CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk December 13, 20, 2012 91227T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 12-162-CA CAPITAL CITY BANK Plaintiff, vs. LYDIA BURNS, DREAM MERCHANT, L.L.C., FAIRWAY PARK SUBDIVISION PROPERTY OWNERS ASSOCIATION, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, and UNKNOWN TENANT(S), Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE is given pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated November 27, 2012, in Case No. 12-162-CA, of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit, in and for Franklin County, Florida, in which CAPITAL CITY BANK is the Plaintiff and LYDIA BURNS, DREAM MERCHANT, L.L.C., FAIRWAY PARK SUBDIVISION PROPERTY OWNERS ASSOCIATION, and FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the front door of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Franklin County, Florida at 11:00 a.m., Eastern Time, on January 9, 2013, the property set forth in the Final Judgment of Foreclosure and more particularly described as follows: LOT 8 OF FAIRWAY PARK SUBDIVISION, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 8, PAGE 15, PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. DATED: November 27, 2012 MARCIA M. JOHNSON Clerk of the Circuit Court BY: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk Attorney for Plaintiff: Garvin B Bowden, Esq. Gardner, Bist, Wiener, Wadsworth, Bowden, Bush, Dee, LaVia, & Wright, P.A. 1300 Thomaswood Dr. Tallahassee, FL 32308 December 6, 13, 2012 91237T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 12-108 CA CENTENNIAL BANK, an Arkansas banking corporation P.O. Box 610 Crawfordville, Florida 32327, Plaintiff, vs. RONALD D. BOOZER, MARJORIE L. BOOZER a/k/a MARJORIE LOUISE BOOZER, CLERK OF COURT, FRANKLIN COUNTY, STATE OF FLORIDA, and DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE on behalf of SCDSS Foster Care, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE Notice is hereby given that pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure, the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Franklin County, Florida, will on January 9, 2013, at 11:00 a.m. (Eastern Time) at the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida 32320, in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes offer for sale, and sell to the highest and best bidder, the following described real and property situated in Franklin County, Florida: LOT 1, BLOCK 48 (211), KEOUGH’S SECOND ADDITION TO THE CITY OF CARRABELLE, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 20, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA; TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN 1977 AMHE MOBILE HOME, IDENTIFICATION NO. 21G6842D. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim with the clerk of the court within 60 days after the sale. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Franklin County Clerk of Court, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL (850) 653-8861 at least 7 days before the scheduled foreclosure sale, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. WITNESS my hand and the official seal of this Honorable Court this 28th day of November 2012. MARCIA JOHNSON Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk December 6, 13, 2012 91243T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2012 CA 000030 SYNOVUS BANK, FORMERLY KNOWN AS COLUMBUS BANK AND TRUST COMPANY, AS SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST THROUGH NAME CHANGE AND BY MERGER WITH COASTAL BANK AND TRUST OF FLORIDA f/k/a VANGUARD BANK AND TRUST COMPANY, Plaintiff, vs. DIRT ROADS DEVELOPMENT, L.L.C., a Florida limited liability company, et al., Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE Notice is hereby given that the undersigned, Marcia Johnson, Clerk Circuit Court of Franklin County, Florida, will on the 9th day of January, 2013 at 11:00 o’clock A.M. at the steps of the Franklin County Courthouse, 22 Market Street, Apalachicola, Franklin County, Florida, offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash, the following described property situated in Franklin County, Florida: Lots 19 and 33, LAKES ON THE BLUFF, according to plat thereof recorded in the public records of Franklin County, Florida in Plat Book 8, Pages 33, 34 and 35. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN SIXTY (60) DAYS AFTER THE SALE. WITNESS my hand and official seal of this the 28th day of November, 2012. MARCIA JOHNSON Clerk of the Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk In accordance with the AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT, persons needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the ADA Coordinator not later than seven days prior to the proceeding at (850) 577-4430. December 6, 13, 2012 91239T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 2012 -135 CA CENTENNIAL BANK, an Arkansas banking corporation P.O. Box 610 Crawfordville, Florida 32327, Plaintiff, vs. BOBBY A. WINTONS, TEMOLYNNE W. WINTONS, THE UNKNOWN #1 TENANT IN POSSESSION OF 178 22ND AVE, APALACHICOLA, FL 32320, and THE UNKNOWN #2 TENANT IN POSSESSION OF 178 22ND AVE, APALACHICOLA, FL 32320, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE Notice is hereby given that pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure, the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Franklin County, Florida, will on January 9, 2013, at 11:00 a.m. (Eastern Time) at the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida 32320, in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes offer for sale, and sell to the highest and best bidder, the following described real and property situated in Franklin County, Florida: LOTS 6, 7, 24, AND 25, BLOCK 237, GREATER APALACHICOLA, A SUBDIVISION OF THE CITY OF APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF IN MOST COMMON USE IN THE OFFICE OF THE CLERK OF COURT, APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim with the clerk of the court within 60 days after the sale. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Franklin County Clerk of Court, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL (850) 653-8861 at least 7 days before the scheduled foreclosure sale, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. WITNESS my hand and the official seal of this Honorable Court this 28th day of November, 2012. MARCIA JOHNSON Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk December 6, 13, 2012 91245T IN THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 10-454-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, as successor in interest to COASTAL COMMUNITY BANK, Plaintiff, vs. JAMES W.SMITH, JR., and SISBRO INVESTMENT CORPORATION, a Georgia corporation, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated November 27, 2012, and entered in Civil Action No. 2010-000454-CA of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and CENTENNIAL BANK, as successor in interest to Coastal Community Bank, and the Defendants, JAMES W. SMITH, JR., and SISBRO INVESTMENT CORPORATION, a Georgia corporation, I will sell to the highest and best bidder, for cash, at 11:00 a.m. (Eastern Time) on the 9th day of January, 2013 at the front door foyer on the second floor of the Franklin County Courthouse, Apalachicola, Florida, the following-described real property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: Lot 12, Block 74, of ST. GEORGE ISLAND GULF BEACHES UNIT NO. 5, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 3 at page 17 of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. The successful bidder at the sale will be required to place the requisite state documentary stamps on the Certificate of Title. DATED this 28th day of November, 2012 Honorable Marcia Johnson Clerk of the Court Franklin County, FL By: Michele Maxwell As Deputy Clerk December 6, 13, 2012 91271T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA PREMIER BANK, a Florida banking corporation Plaintiff, vs. JAMES F. WEATHERLY, JR. Defendant. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the Final Default Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-captioned action, The Franklin County Clerk of Court will sell the property situated in Franklin County, Florida, described as follows, to-wit: Lot 2, Block 275, RIVERSIDE HEIGHTS, UNIT ONE, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 2, Page(s) 21, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, Front Door of the Clerk’s office in the Courthouse of Franklin County, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on the 16th day of January, 2013. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNERS AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. Dated this 28th day of November, 2012. Marcia M. Johnson Franklin County Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk December 13, 20, 2012 91265T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 19-2011-CA-000411 SEC.:_________ BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. DAVID STUDY A/K/A DAVID L. STUDY; KIMBERLEE L. STUDY; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; BLUEWATER-BAY PROPERTY OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC. Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order of Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure dated November 28, 2012, en tered in Civil Case No. 19-2011-CA-000411 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest bidder for cash on the 16th day of January, 2013, at 11:00 a.m. on the Front steps of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida 32320, relative to the following described property as set forth in the Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 27, BLUE WATER BAY, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 7, PAGE 31 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Court Administrator FL Phone: (850)577-4401 If you are hearing or voice impaired, call Florida Relay Service, hearing 800-955-8771, voice 800-955-8770. DATED AT APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA THIS 28TH DAY OF NOVEMBER, 2012. MARCIA M. JOHNSON CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk December 13, 20, 2012 91297T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 19-2009-CA-000627 DIVISION: SUNTRUST BANK, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. MELANIE JANE TURNER, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated November 27, 2012 and entered in Case NO. 19-2009-CA000627 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for FRANKLIN County, Florida wherein SUNTRUST BANK, N.A., is the Plaintiff and ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSE, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; STANLEY W. BENECKI; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the FRONT DOOR of the FRANKLIN COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 33 MARKET STREET, APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA at 11:00AM, on the 9th day of January, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: A PARCEL OF LAND IN THE NORTH 1/2 OF FRACTIONAL SECTION 11, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 4 WEST, ON DOG ISLAND, IN FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 36, IN DOG ISLAND SUBDIVISION UNIT NO. 4, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGES 23-24, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND FROM SAID POINT RUN NORTH 48 DEGREES 21 MINUTES WEST 298.70 FEET TO THE MEAN HIGH WATER LINE OF ST. GEORGE SOUND, THENCE FOLLOWING SAID MEAN HIGH WATER LINE NORTH 32 DEGREES 24 MINUTES EAST 269.28 FEET, THENCE FOLLOWING SAID MEAN HIGH WATER LINE NORTH 57 DEGREES 59 MINUTES EAST 403.56 FEET, THENCE FOLLOWING SAID MEAN HIGH WATER LINE NORTH 40 DEGREES 33 MINUTES EAST A DISTANCE OF 499.80 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING OF THE LANDS TO BE DESCRIBED: FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN THENCE NORTH 40 DEGREES 33 MINUTES EAST ALONG SAID MEAN HIGH WATER LINE 99.96 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 45 DEGREES 40 MINUTES EAST A DISTANCE OF 423.70 FEET TO THE NORTHERLY LINE OF A PROPOSED 66 FOOT STREET, THENCE RUN 48 DEGREES 30 MINUTES WEST ALONG SAID ROAD A DISTANCE OF 100 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 45 DEGREES 40 MINUTES WEST A DISTANCE OF 409.83 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; BEING SHOWN AS LOT 12 IN BLOCK A ON AN UNRECORDED PLAT PREPARED BY R.C. BANNERMAN, JR., REGISTERED SURVEYOR, AND DESIGNATED AS DOG ISLAND, ADDITION TO UNIT 4. A/K/A LOT 12 BAY DRIVE, DOG ISLAND, FL 32322 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on November 28, 2012. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Mr. Doug Smith, Office of Court Administration, Leon County Courthouse, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301, Phone: 850577-4401, Fax: 850487-7947 F09105924 December 13, 20, 2012 91331T PUBLIC NOTICE STATE OF FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION NOTICE OF PERMIT ISSUANCE The Department of Environmental Protection gives notice of permit issuance for a single family boardwalk and dock, permit number 19-0283133-002-EI, to Mr. Donald Hansard, at 9420 Centerville Road, Tallahassee, FL 32309, c/o Garlick Environmental Associates, Inc. Post Office Box 385, Apalachicola, FL 32329. The purpose of the permit has authorize construction of a 4’ x 162’ boardwalk, a 4’ x 458’ access pier, and a 5’ x 20’ terminal platform that includes two (2) 10’ x 20’ boat lifts within the extent of Apalachicola Bay, a Class II, Outstanding Florida Waterbody, Aquatic Preserve. Decking will be of Bay Decking or similar maximum light penetrating material. The project will be located at 2015 Sand Dollar Trail, Lot 1, Bay Cove Village, Parcel ID 29-09S-06W-7338-0000-0010, Latitude 29.625789 degrees North, Longitude 84.941908 degrees, Apalachicola Bay, Class II, Approved Shellfish Harvesting, Outstanding Florida Waters, on St George Island, Florida. Based on all the above, and with the application of general and lim-

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, December 13, 2012 The Times | A15 EASTERN SHIPBUILDING GROUP MORE THAN A JOB… A FUTURE! LONG TERM WORK an aggressive leader in the Marine Industry, located in Panama City, FL has the following opportunities for skilled craftsmen:PIPEFITTERS  PIPE WELDERS SHIPFITTERS  STRUCTURAL WELDERS X-RAY WELDERS  ELECTRICIANSCompetitive wages DOE, and a comprehensive bene ts package including: Company paid health, dental, and life insurance, 401(k), attendance & safety bonuses. Normal work week to include overtime. Quali ed craftsmen should apply in person: Mon-Fri, 8am-12pm 1pm4:30 pmHUMAN RESOURCES (2 Locations): 13300 Allanton Rd., Panama City, FL 32404 and 134 S. East Ave., Panama City, FL 32401Applications are also accepted at our East Ave Of ce Saturdays, 8am-12pm.(850) 522-7400, ext. 2285, 2322, or 2302 Fax: (850) 874-0208EOE/Drug Free Workplace The Apalachicola Bay Charter School is accepting applications for a full-time instructional position. Applicants must hold current teaching certi cate and have experience in the primary grades. The position will begin January 2, 2012. ABC School is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Please send resumes to: Chimene Johnson, ABC School, 98 12th Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320, fax: 850-653-1857 or email: elizabethkirvin@aol.com RENTALS3 BR 3 BA UNFURNISHED CONDO LONG TERM, POOL .............................................$850 2 BR 1 BA UNFURNISHED HOUSE FL ROOM, FENCED YARD, GARAGE ..................$800 3 BR 2 BA FURNISHED APT W/D, CARPORT, ST PARKING ............................$600 2 BR 1 BA UNFURNISHED APT NEW PAINT, SMALL PORCH ...............................$375 1 BR 1 BA UNFURNISHED APT ST PARKING, REMODELED, INC WATER ..........$425 3 BR 1 BA FURNISHED APT WEEKLY OR MONTHLY, INC UTILITIES 3 BR 1 BA UNFURNISHED DUPLEX DOWNTOWN CARRABELLE ...............................$600 2 OFFICE SPACES US 98 CARRABELLE ...............................................$300 BOTH 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322850-697-9604 850-323-0444 www.seacrestre.comwww. rst tness.com/carrabellePROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND RENTALS ToPlace Your Classified ad inCall Our New Numbers Now!Call:850-747-5020 Toll Free:800-345-8688 Fax:850-747-5044 Email:thestar@pcnh.com Email:thetimes@pcnh.com theAPALACHICOLA & CARRABELLETIMES CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW iting specific conditions of the permit, the Department has reasonable assurance the project, as proposed, fully meets the environmental resources permitting requirements of Chapter 62-346, Florida Administrative Code, and will not harm the environment. A person whose substantial interests are affected by the Department’s action may petition for an administrative proceeding (hearing) under Sections 120.569 and 120.57 of the Florida Statute. The petition must contain the information set forth below and must be filed (received by the clerk) in the Office of General Counsel of the Department at 3900 Commonwealth Boulevard, Mail Station 35, Tallahassee, Florida 323993000. Because the administrative hearing process is designed to re-determine final agency action on the application, the filing of a petition for an administrative hearing may result in a modification of the permit, or even a denial of the application. Accordingly, the applicant will not commence construction or other activities under this permit until the deadlines below for filing a petition for an administrative hearing, or request for an extension of time, have expired. Under subsection 62-110.106(4) of the Florida Administrative Code, a person whose substantial interests are affected by the Department’s action may also request an extension of time to file a petition for an administrative hearing. The Department may, for good cause shown, grant the request for an extension of time. Requests for extension of time must be filed with the Office of General Counsel of the Department at 3900 Commonwealth Boulevard, Mail Station 35, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-3000, before the applicable deadline. A timely request for extension of time shall toll the running time period for filing a petition until the request is acted upon. If a request is filed late, the Department may still grant it upon a motion by the requesting party showing that the failure to file a request for an extension of time before the deadline was the result of excusable neglect. In the event that a timely and sufficient petition for an administrative hearing is filed, other persons whose substantial interests will be affected by the outcome of the administrative process have the right to petition to intervene in the proceeding. Intervention will be only at the discretion of the presiding officer upon the filing of a motion in compliance with Rule 28-106.205 of the Florida Administrative Code. In accordance with subsection 28-106.111 (2) and subparagraph 62-110.106(3)(a).4, Florida Administrative Code, petitions for an administrative hearing by the applicant must be filed within 14 days of receipt of written notice. Petitions filed by any persons other than the applicant, and other than those entitled to written notice under Section 120.60 (3) of the Florida Statutes, must be filed within 14 days of publication of the notice. Under Section 120.60 (3) of the Florida Statute, however, any person who has asked the Department for notice of agency action may file a petition within 14 days of such notice, regardless of the date of publication. The petitioner shall mail a copy of the petition to the applicant at the address indicated above at the time of filing. The failure of any person to file a petition for an administrative hearing within the appropriate time period shall constitute a waiver of those rights. A petition that disputes the material facts on which the Department’s action is based must contain the following information: (a) The name and address of each agency affected and each agency’s file or identification number, if known; (b) The name, address, and telephone number of the petitioner; the name, address, and telephone number of the petitioner’s representative, if any, which shall be the address for service purposes during the course of the proceeding; and an explanation of how the petitioner’s substantial interests are or will be affected by the agency determination; (c) A statement of when and how the petitioner received notice of the agency decision; (d) A statement of all disputed issues of material fact. If there are none, the petition must so indicate; (e) A concise statement of the ultimate facts alleged, including the specific facts that the petitioner contends warrant reversal or modification of the agency’s proposed action; (f) A statement of the specific rules or statutes that the petitioner contends require reversal or modification of the agency’s proposed action; and (g) A statement of the relief sought by the petitioner, stating precisely the action that the petitioner wishes the agency to take with respect to the agency’s proposed action. A petition that does not dispute the material facts on which the Department’s action is based shall state that no such facts are in dispute and otherwise shall contain the same information as set forth above, as required by Rule 28-106.301, Florida Administrative Code. Under Sections 120.569(2)(c) and (d) of the Florida Statute, a petition for administrative hearing must be dismissed by the agency if the petition does not substantially comply with the above requirements or is untimely filed. This action is final and effective on the date filed with the Clerk of the Department unless a petition is filed in accordance with the above. Upon the timely filing of petition this order will not be effective until further order of the Department. This permit, when issued, constitutes an order of the Department. The applicant has the right to seek judicial review of the order under Section 120.68 of the Florida Statute, by the filing of a notice of appeal under Rule 9.110 of the Florida Rules of Appellate Procedure with the Clerk of the Department in the Office of General Counsel, 3900 Commonwealth Boulevard, Mail Station 35, Tallahassee, Florida, 323993000; and by filing a copy of the notice of the appeal accompanied by the applicable filing fees with the appropriate district court of appeal. The notice of appeal must be filed within 30 days from the date when the final order is filed with the Clerk of the Department. Requests for review before the Land and Water Adjudicatory Commission must be filed with the Secretary of the Commission and served on the Department within 20 days from the date when the final order is filed with the Clerk of the Department. The application for this permit is available for public inspection during normal business hours, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, except for legal holidays, at the Northwest District office, 3900 Commonwealth Blvd MS 55, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-3000. December 13, 2012 91403T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 192009CA 000612CAXXXX SUNTRUST MORTGAGE, INC. Plaintiff, vs. DANIEL D. GRIFFIN; SARAH A. MACMILLAN; UNKNOWN TENANT(S); AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANT(S), WHO (IS/ARE) NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIM AS HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, SPOUSES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INCORPORATED AS NOMINEE FOR SUNTRUST MORTGAGE, INC.; PICKETT’S LANDING HOMEOWNER’S ASSOCIATION, INC. Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered on April 24, 2012, and the Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale entered on November 27, 2012, in this cause, in the Circuit Court of Franklin County, Florida, I will sell the property situated in Franklin County, Florida, described as: UNIT 3, BLOCK “D” OF PICKETT’S LANDING, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 9, PAGE 7, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA a/k/a 1302 PICKETTS LANDING COURT, CARRABELLE, FL 32322 at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, at the front door of the courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320, Franklin County, Florida, at eleven o’clock a.m., on February 6, 2013 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 50 days after the sale. Dated at Apalachicola, Florida, this 27th day of November, 2012. Marcia Johnson Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk December 13, 20, 2012 91355T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF SECOND THE JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 11-000440-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, an Arkansas banking corporation, successor in interest to Wakulla Bank, Plaintiff, vs. Archon Construction Co. LLC, a Florida limited liability company, and James F. Weatherly, Jr., Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure dated November 27, 2012, in the abovestyled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Front Door of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market St., Apalachicola, FL 32320 at 11:00 a.m. on January 9, 2013, the following described property: LOTS 1 & 2, BLOCK 52 (9) OF KELLY’S ADDITION TO THE CITY OF CARRABELLE, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE(S) 20, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. Dated: November 28, 2012. Marcia Johnson Clerk of Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk December 13, 20, 2012 91417T IN THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 10-454-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, as successor in interest to COASTAL COMMUNITY BANK, Plaintiff, vs. JAMES W. SMITH, JR., and SISBRO INVESTMENT CORPORATION, a Georgia corporation, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated November 27, 2012, and entered in Civil Action No. 2010-000454-CA of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and CENTENNIAL BANK, as successor in interest to Coastal Community Bank, and the Defendants, JAMES W. SMITH, JR., and SISBRO INVESTMENT CORPORATION, a Georgia corporation, I will sell to the highest and best bidder, for cash, at 11:00 a.m. (Eastern Time) on the 9th day of January, 2013, at the front door foyer on the second floor of the Franklin County Courthouse, Apalachicola, Florida, the following-described real property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: Lot 12, Block 74, of ST. GEORGE ISLAND GULF BEACHES UNIT NO. 5, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 3 at page 17 of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. The successful bidder at the sale will be required to place the requisite state documentary stamps on the Certificate of Title. DATED this 28th day of November, 2012. Honorable MARCIA JOHNSON Clerk of the Court Franklin County, Florida By: /s Michele Maxwell As Deputy Clerk December 13, 20, 2012 Carrabelle : 208 1st St. NE, Saturday December 15th, 9am til ??HUGE YARD SALE Mexico Beach 701 Nautilus Dr St Joe Beach -98 E to Sea Shores side of Express lane follow signs Saturday. Dec. 15th 8:00 am -3:00 pm EST5 Family Yard/Moving saleDining room table, Boy baby clothes newborn 4T, men’s XL, 2008 Yamaha V Star 250 motorcycle, Wii with games & acces., Play station 2, lots of books, so much other stuff to many to mention. Getting rid of years of stuff! Text FL35060 to 56654 EstateBicycle, Mongoose 26in, 21 speed, spring suspension, comfortable seat,$45; 2002 Ford Focus station wagon, 75K miles $2,000; 36 inch telescope stand $25; 850-294-9664 Drivers: All Miles PAID (Loaded & Empty)! Home on the weekends! Running Class-A CDL Flatbed. Lease to Own-No Money Down. CALL: 866-823-0264 Apalachicola: 1 br, 1 ba efficiency Call for information 850-653-6103 Text FL32343 to 56654 Heritage V illas of Apalachicola Apartments Now accepting applications for 2BR Some rental assistance may be available. Call 850-653-9277. TDD/ TTY 711. This institution is an equal opportunity provider & employer. Heritage V illas of Apalachicola Apartments Now accepting applications for 2BR Handicap accessible unit. Some rental assistance may be available. Call 850-653-9277. TDD/ TTY 711. This institution is an equal opportunity provider & employer. Carrabelle Cove ApartmentsTaking Applications Now Available: 1, 2 and 3 br, Handicap Apts. Laundry facilities on site, W/S included in rent, CH&A and window coverings provided. On site management Office. Rental assistance available. Income restrictions apply, reasonable accommodation. Carrabelle Cove Apartments 807 Gray Ave #33 Carrabelle, Fl 32322 850-697-2017 TDD711 This institution is an equal opportunity provider & employerText FL29928 to 56654 East Point Carrabelle 900 Square ft designer 1bedroom, open plan, Jacuzzi, washer & dryer, satellite, secluded, 1/2 mile from beach. $440/month. Call 954-816-7004 Text FL22547 to 56654 Historic Apalachicola Charming Cottage2br/1ba. In prime historic Apalachicola location. Short walk to water. Wood floors, new washer/dryer, ceiling fans, new cent. heat/ac, w/nice size yard. Pets allowed upon aproval/ deposit. $1,000mo. Call 850-832-2275 for appointment. Text FL34213 to 56654 Apalachicola: 3 br, 2 Bath. Newly Remodeled Call for details!! 850-653-6103 Text FL32340 to 56654 5 Acres located on Patty Lane, in Eastpoint, for more information Call 850-653-5939 Total Down Pmt $5752001 Chevy Monte Carlo T otal Price $3,9000% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! Total Down Pmt $7752002 Ford Explorer -4 Door T ot al Price $4,5000% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! Total Down Pmt $9752004 Dodge Durango -3 Rows T ot al Price $5,3000% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! Pontiac,Montana 2004, Heated Seats, Sliding Doors, DVD Player, AM/FM CD Player, A/C, 99K Miles, $6,500; Call 850-653-6781/370-6034 These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you. EmeraldCoast Marketplace 747-5020 These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you. EmeraldCoast Marketplace 747-5020

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Local A16 | The Times Thursday, December 13, 2012 Special to The Times Wewahitchka author Michael Lister is known mostly for his gritty mysteries set in the North Florida Panhandle, but this Christmas hes publishing his rst romance. I actually started writing love stories rst, Lister said, but my crime ction was the rst to get published and what I became known for. Carries Gift is a Christmas love story involving two former high school classmates from the s reuniting at the funeral of a friend. Its about what might have been and what can still be and the connection that nothing can sever, not time or space or even the grave. Everything I write ts within the school of romantic literature, Lister noted. The movement that started in Europe that involves a heightened interest in nature, an emphasis on the individuals expression and a rebellion against established social rules and conventions. Even Listers crime novels have romance in them. I see The Big Goodbye as much a romance as anything else, and I think of Double Exposure as a meditation on love. The Blood series is, among other things, about Johns love life and Burnt Offerings features a couple falling in love. Listers longtime readers and fans of his mysteries will recognize many familiar elements. Carries Gift is similar to my other books in style and theme and worldview, Lister said, adding with a smile, minus the murder. When asked why his love story is set at Christmas, Lister responded, Christmas, like love, is magic. To me, the feeling of falling in love and the feeling surrounding the Christmas season are not dissimilar. Some of my favorite romantic movies are set at Christmas Its a Wonderful Life, Love Actually, The Holiday, Love Affair and The Family Stone. The two main characters of Carries Gift were in high school together in the s, and the book includes a lot of s elements. Im a child of the s, Lister said. Carries Gift gave me a chance to revisit my teens: the music (Lionel Richie love songs), the fashion (parachute pants), the events (the Challenger space shuttle disaster) that shaped our lives. It was so much fun. The book also gave me the opportunity to re ect on love and loss, life and death, meaning and what really matters in life. Lister will be signing and discussing Carries Gift from 1-3 p.m. ET Saturday, Dec. 15, at Downtown Books in Apalachicola and later from 4-8 p.m. CT at a Carries Gift Christmas Party at CityArts Coop in downtown Panama City. In a solemn ceremony Friday at the Camp Gordon Johnson World War II Museum, memories of the day President Franklin Roosevelt said would live in infamy rippled through the air. The attendees who gathered outside the wall were there not only to remember Pearl Harbor 71 years ago, but to dedicate two agpoles presented the museum by the Woodmen of the World. Jesse Goodson, a eld representative from Tallahassee for the life insurance society, addressed the gathering. Also on hand was Lance Mayers, an area manager for Woodmens central Panhandle unit. We believe in our ag, said Woodson. I wasnt even born, but I still know what this day represents. Maybe we wont have to do this anymore. Museum board member Tony Minichiello, husband of museum curator Linda Minichiello, emceed the ceremony, which opened with Carrabelle Mayor Curley Messer leading everyone in the Pledge of Allegiance. Sid Winchester, chaplain of the museum association, conducted the raising of the ag, which was initially at full staff and then lowered to half-staff just before a recording of President Roosevelts original Day of Infamy speech was played. A showing of the movie Tora Tora Tora followed. Among the World War II veterans on hand was Lanark Villages Robert L. Franklin, 89, who served with the Armys 122nd medical department, 386th emergency battalion, 29th infantry during the war, seeing action in England, France and Germany, including the Battle of the Bulge in summer 1945, the last great battle of the European front. As a backdrop to the agraising was a newly painted image on the museums outside wall of Allied soldiers storming the beach at Normandy. The design was painted earlier in the week by a crew of Carrabelle artists led by Joe Kotzman and Fred Aman. David Adlerstein Real Estate Picks Our local real estate experts have identied what they feel are the best values around and are oering them to you in Real Estate Picks! (In this section), Discover the best real estate values in Mexico Beach, Port St. Joe, Apalachicola, Cape San Blas, St. George Island, Carrabelle and surrounding areas. Best Values on the Forgotten Coast SELL YOUR LI S TING S HERE! Only $35 per week per listing Minimum 2 ads per week or 1 ad for 2 weeks Contact Joel or Kari for details: (850)814-7377 or (850)227-7847 SOLD John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.com MLS# 245369 $999,000 St. George Island PLANTATION BEACHFRONT 5 BR, 5 BA home across the street from the new John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.com MLS# 248363 $59,900 St. George Island CORNER LOT NEAR CANAL & BAY Located at the corner of Bayshore Drive (paved) and Gibson Street. Bayshore Drive deadends into a canal R o d n e y s Oyster Tongs Laminated Handles! CONTACT: (850) 653.3764 or (850) 323.1937 Apalachicola, FL Notice of Vacancy Franklin County Tourist Development Council Board Member The Franklin County Tourist Development Council is composed of nine members appoint ed by the Franklin County Board of Commissioners. Anyone interested in being considered for this volunteer position is encouraged to send a letter of interest and qualifying resume to the FCTDC at the address below. This is a volunteer position with no nancial compensation. Board members are re quired to attend regular board meetings and are expected to participate in the Committee activities of the Board. Prospective applicants must be engaged in a tourist-related business and must be a resident of Franklin County. All members of the council shall be electors of the county. Interested persons should reply no later than February 1, 2013. A recommendation will be forwarded to the Franklin County Commission for their consideration. Applications may be submitted to: Franklin County Tourist Development Council P O Box 819 Apalachicola, Florida 32329 or via email attachment to fran@anaturalescape.com For further information, please call Fran Edwards at the FCTDC oce at 850-653-8678 MICHAEL LISTER DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times Above: World War II vet Robert Franklin listens to the national anthem. Right: Museum chaplain Sid Winchester raises the ag on the new agpole. Museum remembers day of infamy Local author writes Christmas love story



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xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx 50 WWW.APALACHTIMES.COMPhone: 850-653-8868 Web: apalachtimes.com E-mail: dadlerstein@star .com Fax: 850-653-8036 Circulation: 800-345-8688 DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK: School News & Society: 11 a.m. Friday Real Estate Ads: 11 a.m. Thursday Legal Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Display Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Line Ads: 5 p.m. Monday xxxxx Contact Us xxxxx Out to see Index Board confronts budget crisisBy DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com The Franklin County School Board voted last week to negotiate a reduction of $258,000 from this scal years budget with its teacher and support personnel unions. At the Dec. 6 regular meeting, the board voted unanimously to press for what Superintendent Nina Marks estimated would be the equivalent of reducing payroll by about eight teaching positions, or roughly $190,000, and four support personnel, or about $68,000. The board made it clear that though they seek this volume of cost reductions in the second semester, they are not on the record advocating for any speci c cuts in personnel, or even precisely how many would be needed to eliminate what Finance Director Shannon Venable estimated could be a negative balance of almost $325,000 by the end of the scal year. Venable provided a report that underscored many of the conclusions she has shared with the board over the past six weeks, that a decline in actual property tax proceeds since Julys initial estimate has signi cantly eroded the fund balance. Venable said the unrestricted fund cushion of about $581,000, available in Julys budgeting, dropped away almost entirely by Oct. 1. This depleted the 5.6 percent of the budget available in the fund balance, which clearly met state standards, to about 0.2 percent, or merely $18,000, well below what the state considers acceptable. Venable said the district will be able to recoup about threequarters of this drop of $563,000 in property tax proceeds in the By DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com Every year since February 2010, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission has held one of its statewide meetings in Apalachicola, with commissioners each year raving about the shing paradise found in Tallahassees backyard. On Dec. 5, they learned about the serious trouble that backyard is facing. By appealing directly for FWC support, Franklin Countys beleaguered oyster industry, bolstered by support from environmental and recreational shing interests, opened up a new front in the battle to secure more freshwater coming down the ApalachicolaChattahoochee-Flint river system into Apalachicola Bay. If we dont get something done in the next 1 years, were not going to have a bay, said Shannon Harts eld, a fourth-generation oysterman and president of the Franklin County Seafood Workers Association. Were losing our livelihood, and were going to lose our community, he said. Were already struggling. The disasters coming. Harts eld said oystermen are lucky to pluck three or four bags of oysters a day out of the bay when By LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com Everyone was smiling Dec. 5 when the Franklin County Health Department Dental Clinic opened its doors. This is a wonderful day, said Carrabelle Mayor Curley Messer. Ive fought many a day for this building to stay open. A dental program is a wonderful thing for the people and kids of Franklin County. As a crowd of about 40 people assembled in front of the newly renovated clinic, the staff lined up behind a red ribbon for a photo opportunity. Dental Program Manager David Walker introduced Dr. Renee Parrish and her staff. A dream has come to a reality, he said. Our heart is children; we serve the poorest of the poor. Interim Franklin County Health Department Administrator Marsha Lindeman welcomed visitors to the grand opening of the clinic. She praised the staff of the county health department for making the clinic a reality. They took all of the pieces and breathed life into it, she said. Lindeman was followed on the podium by Floridas Department of Health Chief of Staff Kim Barnhill, a former director of the county health department, who expressed amazement at how rapidly the clinic had come together. Im just the idea person, she said. New dental clinic brings big smiles to countyLOIS SWOBODA | The TimesFrom left, David Walker, dental program manager, stands with clinic staff interview clerk Rhonda Butler; dental assistants Amy Dickerson and Susan Hoffritz; hygienist Shewanna Bethea; eligibility specialist DeErma McMillan; and Dr. Renee Parrish. FRANKLIN COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD The last great bay is somewhere between crisis and collapse. The impacts will be way beyond oysters. This affects many habitats. Thats the type of urgency were trying to convey to you today. Don Ashley, past president of the Apalachicola RiverkeeperThe disasters comingPHOTOS BY DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The TimesFWC Chairman Kenneth Wright, center, talks with FWC Executive Director Nick Wiley, left, and FWC Vice Chairman Kathy Barco. Opinion . . . . . . A4 Society . . . . . . A8 Faith . . . . . . . A9 Outdoors . . . . . A10 Tide Chart . . . . A10 Sports . . . . . . A11 Classi eds . . . A14-A15Area oystermen appeal for FWC support FCSWA embarks on two-pronged missionBy LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com The Franklin County Seafood Workers Association has been busy, moving forward last week on a proposal to address environmental problems plaguing Apalachicola Bay while also working to organize the upcoming $2.7 million program to re-shell the oyster bars. At a Dec. 6 meeting, the FCSWA eshed out details of the structure of a new community based collaborative effort, the Seafood Management Assistance Resource and Recovery Team, which is designed to build a local capacity consensus to develop a sustainable and resilient resource management plan to ensure the future of Franklin Countys seafood heritage.See SCHOOL BOARD A5 See FCSWA A11 See DISASTER A5 See DENTAL CLINIC A5 SHANNON VENABLEFranklin County schools nance directorThursday, December 13, 2012 VOL. 127 ISSUE 33High school band in concert tonightThe Franklin County School band will present its annual winter concert at 7 p.m. today, Dec. 13 in the cafeteria.Eastpoint Christmas celebration FridayEastpoint will celebrate Christmas with a parade, holiday caroling, a Christmas tree lighting and Santa Claus on Friday, Dec. 14. The parade starts at 4 p.m. and will travel from Gillespie Street, west of Sellers Plaza, to Bay Street, then south to Patton Drive, then east to the pavilion. Santa will arrive on an oyster boat and will visit with the kids. For information, call the Apalachicola Bay Chamber of Commerce at 653-9419. Students to present Christmas program MondayElementary school students at the Franklin County School will present their annual Christmas program, Let It Be Christmas at 6 p.m. Monday, Dec. 17, in the cafeteria.Nobles dancers to perform TuesdayPam Nobles Studios will present Happy Holidays, its annual Christmas program showcasing the talents of its students, at 7:07 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 18, at the Dixie Theatre in downtown Apalachicola. Advance tickets are $10, $12 at the door. For more info, call 653 -8078.Christmas shop at the senior centerGot some last-minute Christmas shopping to do? Come to the Holy Family Senior Center at 203 Dr. Frederick S. Humphries St. in Apalachicola. The seniors have created a variety of gifts available for a donation. Proceeds go to support the seniors program. Items include earrings, knick-knacks, picture frames and more. For more information, call Donna Thompson at 653-6909 or 323-0168. An island Christmas, A6

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LocalA2 | The Times Thursday, December 13, 2012 NOTICE OF JOINT PUBLIC MEETING FOR CITY OF APALACHICOLA CITY OF CARRABELLE FRANKLIN COUNTY COMMISSION UNDER F.S..1053 (3), 1055The City of Apalachicola and City of Carrabelle pursuant to F.S. .1053(3) and 1055, hereby provide public notice of the Joint Public Meeting among the City Commissions of the City of Apalachicola and the City of Carrabelle and the County Commission of Franklin County at the Apalachicola City Hall, 1 Bay Avenue, Apalachicola, Florida 32320 at 6:00 P.M., E.T., By TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star.com Moving day arrived Dec. 4 at the Cape San Blas Lighthouse. The U.S. Air Force began the move of the keepers quarters and oil house on the lighthouse grounds in the ght to save the lighthouse and buildings from encroaching erosion. The Air Force out of Eglin Air Force Base, which owns the property on which the lighthouse and buildings sit, contracted with CCI Contractors out of Shalimar, which in turn subcontracted the work of moving the keepers quarters and oil house to Stones House Movers out of Sneads. The keepers quarters were moved back about 100 feet, leaving them essentially the same distance from the coast as the lighthouse which is not considered in imminent danger. This was an Air Force initiative to move these buildings, public information ofcer Mike Spaits said. We contracted to have the buildings moved and secured the $50,000 to fund the move. We had a partner in the (Army Corps of Engineers) but this was an Air Force initiative. On Dec. 4, the rst of the two keepers quarters was moved, with plans to move the second and the oil house later in the week. The moves are being made to buy time. The Air Force already has rendered the lighthouse and buildings surplus and the application for applying to take possession of them expired the last week of November. The National Parks Service is reviewing the applications for a nal award. The Gulf County commissioners and city of Port St. Joe both submitted applications. We are responsible for protecting our historic resources, said Maria Rodriguez, chief administrator for historic resources with Eglin AFB. Thats why we are moving them back, to get them out of harms way. Hurricane Isaac this year was effectively the nal straw in the protection of the lighthouse, which has long sat in an area of Cape San Blas that is rapidly eroding. Isaac took an additional 27 feet of shoreline, rendering the one entrance road into the lighthouse grounds impassable. A new entrance road was constructed to facilitate the move of the lighthouse and buildings once a nal destination has been determined. The keepers quarters and oil house will remain on temporary moorings to facilitate the move to a new location. The county is proposing Salinas Park; a city bayfront area which would be part of George Core Park. After the buildings are moved, the Air Force will begin to clear debris from the shoreline surrounding the grounds. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration provided a grant to the University of Florida to facilitate the debris removal. The hope is that once clean, what is left of the beach may once again become a nesting area for sea turtles. By LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star.com A Carrabelle man claims to own several downtown properties. At the Dec. 6 Carrabelle city meeting, Johnnie Crum told commissioners he has documents proving he owns the Fourth Street boat ramp. At the meeting, he initially requested to speak to City Attorney Dan Hartman in private, but when told the meeting was public and he was on the agenda, he addressed the commission. Crum arrived late, accompanied by about a dozen family members who caused a minor disturbance by talking loudly as they entered until reprimanded by Mayor Curley Messer. Hartman and the commissioners expressed confusion about Crums claims and said the matter would have to be settled in court. The city claims that property and has improved the property, Hartman said. You need a judge to say which of the two chains of ownership is valid. The city cannot give you that property. Hartman later referred to the paperwork Crum had presented as a wild deed, a claim where there are multiple chains of possession for the same land. Crum asserted to city commissioners that his family had paid taxes on the land in the past; Hartman said it had been in the 1930s. The city attorney said the city purchased the boat ramp from Jimmy Crowder in 1999. It is not unusual. Ive seen it happen, he said. Its a common misconception that paying taxes on a piece of property gives you ownership. It does not. Ive been through the paperwork (Crum) provided, and Ive seen the city deed. Its unclear. Weve obviously got a bunch of deeds applying to this property. We need a court of law to tell us where we stand. Hartman said Crum has paperwork claiming ownership of other properties as well. As your commissioner if that is your property I want you to have it, Commissioner Charlotte Schneider told Crum. You really should seek the guidance of an attorney. The city cant just say were going to turn over the property. Crum maintained that early transactions involving the land had been written up wrong. Hartman told him, The way to get to the bottom of this is to le suit. Crum said he had an attorney and complained about the cost of representation. He charges me every time he does something. We are trying to work this out with the city as least a possible, he said. My familys poor with younguns to raise. My grandparents have died off. I can show you in 30 minutes. Schneider said, You can show me, but Im not an attorney. Messer told Crum this will have to be fought out in court. We could sit up here and give the property away and that would set us up for a liability suit. Im not going to be put in jail for nobody. Commissioner Frank Mathes told Crum: We cant give it to you. It belongs to the people of Carrabelle. Its got to go before a judge. Its not ours to give. That belongs to the people. Crum said he would prefer to reach a settlement with the city. You dont get clear title until youve had it for 30 years and a day. I think its in the best interest to handle it out of court, he said. This has obviously been going on in your family for a long time, Commissioner Cal Allen told Crum. The best way to get closure is to get it over with.Crum lays claim to Carrabelle property JOHNNIE CRUM TIM CROFt T | The StarA truck and trailer revved, the move of one of the keepers quarters is under way on the grounds of the Cape San Blas Lighthouse.Cape San Blas lighthouse quarters moved

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LocalThe Times | A3Thursday, December 13, 2012 Holiday Christmas Issue December 20th, 2012 DEADLINE TO RESERVE SPACE: December 14th, 2012 3pmNow accepting Christmas Greetings to be placed alongside the Childrens Letters to Santa. December 27th, 2012 DEADLINE TO RESERVE SPACE: December 19th, 2012**ALL AD COPY MUST BE APPROVED BY December 21st, 2012 4:30pm**January 3rd, 2012 DEADLINE TO RESERVE SPACE: December 27th, 2012**ALL AD COPY MUST BE APPROVED BY December 31st 3pm** Contact:Joel Reed (850) 814-7377 Kari Fortune (850) 227-7847 -ORThousands of families & individuals in our area are at risk of going to bed hungry and empty-handed on Christmas.WANT TO MAKE A DIFFERENCE?Mail in the Empty Stocking Fund envelope inserted in todays paper to the Salvation Army or The News Herald with your contribution!The Empty Stocking Fund provides food and toy baskets to thousands of families in Bay, Gulf, Franklin, Holmes, and Washington Counties. NO HIDDEN CHARGES: It is our policy that the patient and any other person responsible for payments has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed by payment or any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment. www.mulliseye.com"WE WELCOME NEW PATIENTS, CALLTODAY FOR YOUR PRIORITY APPOINTMENT" FOR NEW PATIENTS 59 AND OLDERThis certificate is good for a complete Medical Eye Exam withTodd Robinson, M.D.Board Certified Eye Physician and Surgeon.The exam includes a prescription for eye glasses and tests for Glaucoma, Cataracts and other eye diseases.FOR YOUR APPOINTMENT CALL: 850-763-6666 ELIGIBILITY: U.S. Citizens living in the Florida Panhandle, 59 years and older, not presently under our care. Coupon Expires: 12-31-12 FREEEYE EXAMCODE: AP00Darren Payne, M.D.Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract SurgeonLee Mullis, M.D. EmeritusBoard Certified Eye Physician and Cataract SurgeonTodd Robinson, M.D.Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon "Freedom from Eye Glasses, Now a reality for many."Smart LensesSM Carrabelles annual Holiday on the Harbor and Boat Parade of Lights was dazzling as usual. The night was clear and warm as happy people mingled in the street to celebrate the holidays. This year, the city did not supply a free supper to celebrants but instead encouraged local merchants to stay open late and welcomed not-for-pro ts to sell snacks in support of a good cause. Shops and the Carrabelle History Museum remained open along with local cafes. About 20 vendors sold raf e tickets and tasty treats, from popcorn to pumpkin rolls, to the several hundred people strolling the merry streets under dancing Christmas dolphins. There was an open microphone in the riverside pavilion where local talent could make itself heard. Santa was on hand to hear the wishes of excited youngsters. A dozen beautifully decorated boats arrayed in twinkling lights motored or paddled down the river before judges Mary Ann Shields, Diana Strickland, Jeff and Sid McOmie and Jack Fonner. Winners were Pontoon Division (Capt. Clyde Clark); Kayak Division (Tom Herzog;); Commercial Division Over 24 feet (Capt. Chester Reese with Natural World Charters); Commercial Division Under 24 feet (Moorings Marina); Recreational Division Under 24 feet (1st Capt. Charlie Painter, 2nd Capt. Read Westcott); Recreational Division 24 to 30 feet (1st Capt. Barney Crutch eld, 2nd Capt. Scott and Jenny Holloway, and 3rd Capt. Millard Collins); Recreational Division 30 to 40 Feet (Capt. Scott and Rachel Lawley); Recreational Division Over 40 Feet (Capt. David Bellamy); Best of Show (Capt. Barney Crutch eld). The Marina Challenge was won by Moorings Marina. Every one of the participants was amazing and creative. Thanks to the boat owners who took the trouble to entertain their neighbors. The evening ended with a breathtaking reworks display. By LOIS SWOBODA "Freedom from Eye Glasses, Now a reality for many." Herzog;); Commercial Division Over 24 feet reworks display. By LOIS SWOBODA PHOTOS BY LOIS SWOBODA | The TimesAbove: Cayden Cruse, just 10 months old, meets Santa Claus for the very rst time. Left: Caulin Sheridan performed on the open mike at the Carrabelle Pavilion.Carrabelle sports a buoyant holiday glowThe First Baptist Church, among the vendor booths at Carrabelles Christmas celebration, distributed free cookies and a reminder of traditional Christmas spirit.

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OpinionA4 | The Times Thursday, December 13, 2012 USPS 027-600Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 Publisher: Roger Quinn Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six monthsHome delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERSIn case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola TimesSpecial to the TimesPeople at risk for Type 1 diabetes may have fewer insulinproducing beta cells than people not at risk, a nding that could help researchers shed light on what causes the disease, a new University of Florida study shows. The study, published Wednesday in the Journal of the American Medical Association, revealed that people at risk for Type 1 diabetes had smaller pancreases than people who were not at risk. This is the rst time this has been noted, said Martha Campbell-Thompson, a professor in the UF College of Medicine department of pathology, immunology and laboratory medicine. We still dont know what causes Type 1 diabetes, but if people have fewer beta cells to begin with, other confounding factors such as a virus or genetics could help push them over into having clinical diabetes. There are a lot of possibilities. Type 1 diabetes occurs when the bodys immune system begins attacking its own beta cells in the pancreas, which are responsible for producing insulin the body needs to convert sugar into energy. The beta cells stop producing insulin, often beginning in childhood. Because of this, patients must take insulin for the rest of their lives. This differs from the more common Type 2 diabetes, which often can be prevented and treated through lifestyle changes, such as improved diet and increased exercise. Although genetics plays a big role, researchers still dont know what triggers this autoimmune attack, and after it begins, there is no going back, said Campbell-Thompson, director of the pathology core for the Network for Pancreatic Organ Donors with Diabetes, or nPOD, a human pancreas biorepository housed within the UF Diabetes Center of Excellence. In the current study, Campbell-Thompson and colleagues at the City of Hope National Medical Center examined 164 pancreases from adult organ donors, including those with auto-antibodies linked to an increased risk for Type 1 diabetes. After examining the organs and comparing them with control samples, the researchers discovered that the people at risk for Type 1 diabetes had pancreases roughly three-fourths the size of those of patients not at risk for the disease. In addition, patients already diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes had pancreases about half the size of control samples, Campbell-Thompson said. Had they not become organ donors, these people might have eventually developed Type 1 diabetes, so we were trying to carefully characterize their pancreases and their insulinproducing cells to see what was going on. A simple part of that was just weighing the pancreas when we got it, she said. As we got more and more of these donors, a trend started showing up that these pancreases weighed less. They weighed lower than normal controls. The ultimate goal of the research, and nPOD, which provides pancreas samples to researchers across the country, is to rst understand how the pancreas works and then uncover new and better ways to not only treat Type 1 diabetes, but also to prevent it. Thanks to nPODs valuable and rapidly growing collection of pancreas samples and other tissues, its team of researchers was able to examine, for the rst time, the pancreas weight of those at risk for developing Type 1 diabetes, said Teodora Staeva, program director for immune therapies at JDRF, the leading foundation focused on advancing Type 1 diabetes research, which funded the study. The ndings raise signicant questions about the development and progression of Type 1 diabetes. Obtaining and analyzing human pancreas samples has proved crucial for researchers because mouse models used to uncover new treatments for Type 1 diabetes are no longer considered good examples of the disease in humans. There are major differences between human Type 1 diabetes and the animal models, Campbell-Thompson said. Its really changing some of our ideas about when this autoimmune attack might occur, and we still dont know all the players. The researchers now hope to take the study a step further by using noninvasive methods such as magnetic resonance imaging, or MRI, to gauge pancreas size in live patients. This could really change some of the ideas we have about Type 1 diabetes, Campbell-Thompson said. By understanding how it develops we can think of new ways to treat it.Special to the TimesTired of the stubbornly high unemployment rate in Florida, Senate Democratic Leader Chris Smith (D-Fort Lauderdale) announced Dec. 6 that he has reled his American Jobs legislation for the 2013 legislative session. American tax dollars, along with Floridians tax dollars should be going to rebuild our own economies, not Chinas or Indias or some other foreign countrys, said Smith. This is an effective way to put the power of our money to work creating American jobs on American soil. Similar to legislation (SB 678) he led last year, SB 90 would require that any new state contracts involving call center services and exceeding $35,000 be staffed by employees located within the United States. The restrictions would apply not only to the contractor, but any subcontractors as well. The legislation would also be a welcome relief to customers in the United States struggling to understand call center operators with limited English-speaking abilities and growing concern about the commitment of state dollars to companies that move jobs offshore. Many businesses already operate domestic call centers and would not incur signicant extra costs as a result of the change. Florida in particular has a strong call center market, and in a state struggling with an above-average unemployment rate, would be well-positioned to take advantage of the new requirement should the bill become law. During the 2012 legislative session, SB 678 unanimously passed the Senate. The House refused to take it up.Special to the TimesThe holidays can be a joyous, but hectic time of year. Being eco-friendly is often the least of a busy familys concerns, but you may be surprised by the benets that your family can enjoy from greening your holiday season. The Florida Department of Environmental Protection recommends these 10 easy tips that can help make your holidays not only more cost-efcient and eco-friendly, but fun and stress-free as well. Use green cleaners. When preparing for holiday guests, trade in harsh household cleaners for cleaners that are safer for family health and the environment. Purchase LED light strands, which require less energy. Instead of buying holiday treats with paper wrappers, try making fun, homemade treats that do not require wrapping or that can be placed in reusable containers. Use cloth napkins and reusable utensils in place of disposable paper and plastic alternatives these may require washing, but they will save you money, conserve water and reduce waste. Make your holiday meal sustainable and boost your local economy by shopping for ingredients locally. Create nutrient-rich compost for your windowsill or backyard garden from your holiday meal leftovers. Buy recycled wrapping paper and holiday cards, and be sure to recycle again after use. Use old newspapers or butcher paper and let the kids draw their own holiday designs for an eco-friendly holiday craft. Or instead of wrapping gifts, set up the toys so that the kids can play with them right away rather than unwrapping and setting them up. Create holiday decorations such as ornaments with old greeting cards, garlands made from strung popcorn or cranberries, and potpourri made from spices such as cinnamon and cloves. And remember: dont throw decorations away; store them for use during next years festivities! Visit your local Florida State Park and enjoy the holiday lights or seasonal festivals; its an affordable alternative to more costly weekend outings. The holidays are a great time of year to start implementing easy and sustainable ways to decorate and celebrate. For more green tips, visit the Departments website at www. dep.state..us. LOIS SWOBODA | The TimesAt their Dec. 4 meeting, county commissioners honored Doris Pendleton with a plaque commemorating her 36 years of service with the property appraisers ofce, and a proclamation citing her invaluable service on behalf of the citizens of Franklin County. Pendleton, shown above accepting the plaque from County Planner Alan Pierce, thanked the board for inviting her to the meeting. She thanked God for allowing her to fulll her duties and her family, staff and the whole county for supporting her. The rst 24 years working under somebody else wasnt so hard, but the last 12 were tough, she said. You dont know who your real boss is until you sit in that ofce, on election night, with those votes coming in. Then you know who your real bosses are. Rhonda Skipper, the deputy property appraised who was elected this year to take the in the appraisers ofce said it has been an honor and a privilege working for Doris and training with her. In the Nov. 15 issue of The Times, it was incorrectly reported that the Apalachicola Volunteer Fire Department Team, winner of this years fourth annual Lanark Village Gumbo Cook-off, had been spearheaded by father and son K.C. and Keith Gibson. In fact, the team was headed by Craig Gibson, and he will attend the World Championship Gumbo Cook-off from Oct. 11-13, 2013 in New Iberia, La. In photo at left, he is shown at right, with his son and gumbo teammate K.C. Gibson.LOIS SWOBODA | The TimesUF study: Pancreas size may be clue to diabetes MaARTHaA CamAMPbBEllLL-TTHomOMPsoSON, DVM, PPH.D. coCORREcCTioION CommissioOMMISSIONERsS HoONoOR Do ORisIS PPENdlDLEToON Senate Democratic leader les American Jobs billEasy ways to green your holidays

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LocalThe Times | A5Thursday, December 13, 2012 Robert C. Bruner Attorney Personal & Business BankruptcyOver 30 Years Legal Experience850-670-3030 bankruptcy relief under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon advertisements. Before you decide, ask us to send you free written information they should be tonging 20, providing a rst-hand perspective that t with the bleak scientic data presented in a report to FWC by Dr. David Heil, with the FWCs Division of Marine Fisheries Management. Heil said before the opening of winter harvesting season, production estimates for two of the bays more fertile oyster bars, East Hole and Cat Point, were the lowest reported in the past 20 years. Prolonged drought and continuing low river discharge rates from dams upriver have lad to high salinity, which has contributed to increased predation and dermo diseases plaguing the oysters, he said. Worsening the situation has been increased shing of this stressed oyster population, Heil said, noting the problem of high oyster mortality extends throughout the Gulf coast from Escambia to Wakulla counties. He told how Bay County issued an executive order in October cutting in half the daily bag limit, from 20 to 10, available to their commercial oystermen. Backing the oystermens call for help was Don Ashley, past president of the Apalachicola Riverkeeper, a nonprot environmental advocacy group for the Apalachicola river and bay. The last great bay is somewhere between crisis and collapse, he said. The impacts will be way beyond oysters. This affects many habitats. Thats the type of urgency were trying to convey to you today. What were hoping is to encourage you to help us move this issue forward. Its not just a bay thats threatened, its a way of life, Ashley said. All the money in the world is not going to restore a working waterfront, and a natural heritage. We need the leadership, the ownership, of this industry. Were going to look to you for that leadership, he told FWC. Ashley outlined several requests of the FWC, topped by having the commission press Gov. Rick Scott to continue dialogue with Alabama and Georgia to address upstream freshwater issues and agree to a shared sacrice distribution plan among the three states. Ashley urged FWC to help in shaping a strategic plan for the ACF, a point later echoed by Ted Forsgren, executive director of the Florida Coastal Conservation Association, who noted that Florida has a plan of its own to regulate waters within the state. Ashley appealed for FWC to support efforts by the Florida congressional delegation, led by Sen. Bill Nelson, to gain passage of a Water Resource Development Act that would guide the Army Corps of Engineers decision-making in releasing water downstream. The Corps must consider all sh and wildlife impacts under an EIS (Environmental Impact Statement), not just endangered species, he said. Authorized uses shall not exceed freshwater ows required to sustain rivers, bays and working waterfront communities. Ashley also asked FWC to contribute to the collection of data and documentation required to justify a sheries disaster declaration. In September, Gov. Scott asked the U.S. Department of Commerce for such a declaration, which remains pending. FWC Chairman Ken Wright said Florida State Sen. Charlie Dean had pledged his support on legislative issues when he and the FWC commissioners were briefed on Apalachicola Bay issues during a Dec. 4 tour of the Apalachicola National Research Reserve headquarters in Eastpoint. Lets everybody get one voice, in one direction, Wright said. It doesnt take much to mess up some of these systems, and you cant then throw enough money at it. FWC Executive Nick Wiley said he would keep the commissioners abreast of developments regarding the Apalachicola Bay, but that there were limits to what effect FWC could have on a shery declaration. The key is economic loss, and we cant document that until it happens, he said. And its happening right now. We need all hands on deck to address this crisis. FWC Vice Chair Kathy Barco said more needs to be done to convince Atlantas 4.2 million residents of the problems that overconsumption at the rivers source waters create for the estuary. Those are the people we have to convince of the impact, and theres such a disconnect, she said. This area is so special for so many reasons, FWC Member Brian Yablonski said. This is one of the few places in all the world where men and women harvest wild oysters. This is what were about, preserving the wild, native heritage of Florida. We got this done in record time. It doesnt matter how many balls we throw at David Walker, he keeps them all in the air. She called Kimberly Albritton, who found funding for the clinic, a grant writer extrordinaire. The main funding for the facility comes from two grants. The Florida Low Income Pool, a government funding source established to support health care services to Medicaid, underinsured and uninsured populations, will provide $400,000 per year for two years. The Blue Foundation, the philanthropic afliate of Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Florida, will provide $100,000 per year for three years. Walker said 115 applications were received for the funding in 2011, and the top 15 were funded. Franklin Countys dental clinic was in the top three. This shows what can happen with government entities working together, Commissioner Cheryl Sanders said. Even though we cant have primary care here, we have dental care. Barnhill said Commissioner Pinki Jackel was pivotal in the creation of the clinic. When the primary care clinic went away, I went to Tallahassee to see what we could get, Jackel said after the ceremony. Franklin County had no low-income dental care facility. Folks west of the river had to go to Gulf County and on the east side all the way to Taylor County. It wasnt fair, and transportation was a problem for some of those folks. After the ribbon cutting, everyone took a tour of the new clinic and enjoyed a festive holiday buffet prepared by the clinic staff. The new facility boasts two examination rooms. Five of the six employees of the clinic are county residents. The new dentist, Dr. Renee Parrish, is a resident of Thomasville, Ga., and has been a frequent visitor to the county in the past. Ofce hours will be 7:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Thursday. The clinics will serve uninsured children from 6 months to 20 years old and Medicaid-eligible pregnant women and will provide emergency care for adults whose income is at 200 percent of the poverty level or less. For more information or an appointment, call 697-4121. 2013-14 scal year, but it is lost for the current year. In an interview earlier this week, Rhonda Skipper, the property appraiser-elect, said the countys computer vendor failed to properly factor in a required report on those properties valued in excess of a million dollars. There was an error that was on the school taxable values that did not kick out, she said. It was a $6 million data entry error. We were going to do whatever we could (to remedy the problem), but the school districts millage rate had already maxed out. Skipper noted the diminished property tax proceeds did not stem from any actions made by the Value Adjustment Board, which considers property owners challenges to their appraisals. Of the two dozen or so petitions submitted to the board, all ended up being withdrawn before the board had to decide on their merits, she said.Forecasts miss enrollment decline Compounding the districts budget woes was a decline in the number of students enrolled in the district compared to initial forecasts. Funding for each fulltime student (FTE) is provided by the state at between about $3,500 and $4,000, depending on a variety of weighted factors. Chairman Jimmy Gander said the 2012-13 budget was built on an estimate of 1,298 students, but the certied enrollment is now at 1,142, a difference of 156 students, worth in the neighborhood of $600,000. How do you miss it by 156 students? Thats over 10 percent, Board Member George Thompson said. I commend you on bringing the facts, as horrible as they may be, if we have to do things as drastic as what were talking about now and if theres a possibility of losing over 100 students with FTE, Gander told Venable. Whats the next step? Are we going to do this again? Gander also said he was surprised to learn the district recently found almost $400,000 in additional savings, mainly based on about $300,000 that Nick OGrady, the districts director of curriculum and vocational education, was able to save by amending the budgets of federal grants to cover salaries. If its there today, why wasnt it there when we built this budget? Gander said. Why cant it be done on July 1? Was it easier to do in December than it was in June? That really bothers me. Marks said OGrady found the savings by paying salaries out of these grants. Those grants are not intended initially to pay for all these salaries, she said. Thats what he did; he shifted it. Hes had to amend his grants and go to the state and get permission to switch them to salaries. Gander continued his criticism. I dont understand why all the procrastination, he told Marks. I dont think theres been any procrastination, she said. Marks presented the school board with an outline that detailed several of the factors that contributed to what Venable said would be an almost $325,000 decit by years end if $1.1 million in cost savings wasnt found. These included lowering budget estimates for anticipated state revenue and raising the cost of plant operations to bring the district, as Venable put it, in line with reality. Marks outlined several options for nding about $800,000 in savings, including the personnel reductions and federal grant adjustments, as well as $35,000 for reorganizing Carrabelle transportation routes, $14,000 for reducing the transportation foreman to part-time status and $14,000 in energy savings by shutting down school buildings for two weeks over Christmas and Easter breaks. Marks said she intended to ask school employees, through the collective bargaining process, to consider taking ve furlough days, which likely would be scheduled on paid holidays so as not to disrupt school, as well as a 5 percent pay decrease and ending district coverage of the cost of dental insurance. The superintendent initially wanted the board to specify the number of teaching and support personnel positions they intended to cut, based on average salaries, but School Board Attorney Barbara Sanders cautioned against dening the process that way. Those items by themselves have to be negotiated, she said. They were not advertised on the agenda, and this takes out items that have to be negotiated. We would have to negotiate a system for RIFs (Reduction in Force). Its a lot more delicate than stating were going to re (people). Whoever that eight and four (people are), it will involve the union contract. There are steps that have to be followed.Union reps speak outThe meeting began with remarks by both Tammy Sasnett, president of the support workers union, and Cathy Wood, who leads the teachers union. We have talked to our members, and we are really supportive of trying to help us through this crisis, said Sasnett, a paraprofessional who works as a teacher in the voluntary pre-kindergarten program. We would just like to be involved in that process. This is our rst job; this is where we want to be. We are the least paid employees, in the lunchroom, custodians, bus drivers, she said. We are willing to work to get through this crisis, but we need to keep our positions. Wood said warning signs had emerged at a faculty meeting earlier in the week. Some catch phrases are used whenever we gather, like Were in this for the kids and We have our jobs because of the kids, and yet the morale is low, low, low, she said. I know the economy has devastated our property values and that you have promised to lead us through this crisis. We need to work together every day, Wood said. We need more stakeholders that are being part of the process. Wood made mention of the pending union talks, which must work out a deal regarding any potential salary, benet or personnel cuts. We are still at the negotiation table, and we must use collective bargaining when we make any decisions, she said. Collective bargaining has to be used so we dont have to consider any unfair labor practices. Both union representatives said their rank-and-le were concerned about the rumors circulating regarding job cuts. Its all hearsay, and its frightening, Wood said. We need a clearer line of communication. Marks said the administration has been on a tight timeline with state ofcials, who want to know what steps the district plans to take. They want an answer, the superintendent said. They want the board to approve some type of action. Shannon came up with an average income (for positions), and thats how we put those numbers together, to try to satisfy the decit. We asked (Franklin County School Principal George Oehlert) to take the dollar amount of savings for eight positions. It doesnt matter where he pulls that from. Neither Marks nor the board member went into details as to what might be cut. But board member Pam Shiver and Gander indicated some of their reasoning. If we continue to eliminate programs and the morales down, the FTEs going to continue to go down, Shiver said. Gander suggested he was opposed to any pay cut being retroactive to the start of the scal year. I dont think we ought to ask people to give back money that theyve already received, he said. Gander also requested, and the board approved, a portion of the motion that asked the Florida Department of Education to become more directly involved with them on the process. Id like to have DOE be a part of that. I want to get to the bottom, if we built this budget on the property values that we turned in, he said. Theres water coming in the boat, and were bailing it out. The meeting concluded with an item that underscored the schools budget woes, when the board voted down a request by the sheriffs ofce to have them waive fees for an upcoming staff program. Only Shiver and Thompson voted to waive the $400 fee, with the other three opposed. Marks noted that was for a social event for the department. Board member Teresa Ann Martin said she supported the waiver when its a hardship. But when were in hard times, I dont feel we should. DISASTER from page A1 SSCHOOL BOARdD from page A1 DENTAL CLINIC from page A1 FIND IT ONLINE: www.apalachtimes.com

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LocalA6 | The Times Thursday, December 13, 2012 BE PART OF THIS ONE-OF-A-KIND EVENT IN THIS AREA! For Health Expo Package Information Call (850) 747-5009 OR fax your questions to (850) 763-4636 Sign Up Now & Get The Early Bird Rate $10,000 3,000 PLUS MANY OTHER WAYS TO PROMOTE YOUR BUSINESS. INSTANTLYMAKEIT YOUR EXPO!GAIN THEEXPOSURE YOU NEED FOR SUCCESS! Vendors, Exhibitors, Non-Prot Organizations The 2013 Health Expo is Calling Your Business BOARDWALK BEACH RESORT FEBRUARY 19, 2013 9AM 2 PMSonsoreyTeNewsHera NOTICE TO BIDDERS The Franklin County Board of County Commissioners will be accepting separate sealed Request for Proposals for the following:SOLID WASTE TRANSFER STATION OPERATIONSSpecications are on le in the oce of the Franklin County Board of County Commissioners, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, FL. 32320. Proposals must be received in the oce of the Franklin County Clerk of the Courts, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, Florida 32320 by 4:30 P.M., EST, on December 31, 2012. Proposals must be clearly labeled for each separate proposal. The sealed proposals will be publicly open and read aloud at 10:00 A.M. EST, on January 02, 2013, in the County Commission Meeting Room located in the Franklin County Courthouse Annex. For further information contact Fonda D. Davis Sr., Director, Franklin County Solid Waste Department at (850) 670-8167. An original and one copy of each proposal shall be furnished in a sealed envelope or container, plainly marked SOLID WASTE TRANSFER STATION OPERATIONS. The owner reserves the right to waive any informality or to reject any or all proposals.ATTENTION BIDDERS: Franklin County is an equal opportunity employer and encourages participation with certied minority enterprises and womens businessenterprises. BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA FRANKLIN COUNTY REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS TO SALVAGE METAL FROM TWO FISHING PIERSThe Franklin County Board of County Commissioners hereby requests proposalsfor salvaging metal wire inside a conduit attached to the Eastpoint Fishing Pier and the St. George Island Fishing Pier. Each person responding to this proposal (the proposer) shall, at a minimum, in a safe manner, the equipment and personnel that the person intends to use in the salvage, together with information describing how that person intends to perform the salvage operation, such as, without limitation, reeling the wire onto a spool from the mainland, or salvaging from the water or the bridge, or some combinationthereof. Furthermore, the proposer shall state the amount to be paid to Franklin County for the salvage rights. The winning proposer shall be responsible for all permits, costs of salvage and insurance requirements. They also shall be required to repair any damage to from the salvaging operation shall be cleaned up and removed by the winning proposer before they complete the salvage operations.Franklin County reserves the right to reject any and all proposals, or withdrawthe bid at anytime, and to waive technical defects. Franklin County reserves the from the winning proposer. Salvage Proposal and shall be delivered to the Franklin County Clerk of Court, There was a nip in the air and everyone was smiling as Santa arrived on his traditional island transport a bright red re truck to match his suit. Numbers were down for this years St. George Island visit from St. Nick. Fewer than 150 children came to share their wishes with the old elf and each received a goodie bag full of candy and fruit courtesy of island merchants. Cookies and cocoa were available for a small contribution and a bevy of calendar girls was on hand to autograph Franklin Needs latest fundraising effort. In what has become a charming tradition, the girls of Scout Troop 200 serenaded the crowd with Christmas carols before joining the scramble to sit on Santas knee. Everyone was in high spirits when the lights popped on at dark-thirty illuminating the palms and the stately lighthouse keeping watch over the island. By LOIS SWOBODALOIS SWOBODA | The TimesAbout 20 runners and several dogs took part in the annual Jingle Jog on Friday night to celebrate Santas annual visit to St. George Island. Winners, from left, are Lanay Pritcherd and Heather Rickerl, who tied for third; Matthew Turner who took rst place; and Brandon Loy who came in second. In the back is George Kirvin Floyd, who was fourth to nish. Each participant received a holiday hat and a jingle bell. Island lights twinkle for Santa LOIS SWOBODA | The TimesGirl Scout Troop 200 made the holidays sparkle with traditional carols. Santa arrives by ladder truck on St. George Island.Joggers jingle down the lane

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The Times | A7Thursday, December 13, 2012 is proud to announce the is now underway.Help those in need! Its time to go through your closets for those unwanted pairs of shoes, in reasonable condition. Bring the shoes to Coastal Foot and Ankle Clinic located at 221 HWY 98, Apalachicola, FL 32320. Donations will go to Franklins Promise and will be distributed at The community service center (old Apalachicola high school) at 192 14th street in Apalachicola. Distribution will be November 27, December 4th and 18th from 9:30-12:00. Competitive Yields on FDIC Insured CDs Weems Medical Centers Family and Quick Care ServicesWeems Medical Center West 135 Avenue G Apalachicola, FL 850-653-8853 ext. 118 Weems Medical Center East 110 NE 5th Street Carrabelle, FL 850-697-2345 Family and Quick Care Services provided byEugene Charbonneau, D.O. Susan Hardin, A.R.N.P. Dana Whaley, A.R.N.P.Weems Medical Center East Rotating Specialty Care Services provided byJean-Paul Tran, M.D. from Southeastern Urological Center David Dixon, M.D. from North FL Womens Care Dermatology Associates of Tallahassee Jeffrey W. Crooms, M.D. General SurgeonOur mission is to improve the health status of the residents and visitors to Franklin County, By providing quality, compassionate, cost eective and convenient health care Through community leadership and in collaboration with other healthcare organizations Which serve our communities. ADVERTISEMENT TO BID CITY OF CARRABELLE, FLORIDAGeneral and Building Contractors with Electrical Subcontractors are invited to bid on a General Contract for the Historic Carrabelle City Hall in Carrabelle, Florida in accordance with Contract Documents. All bids must be a lump sum basis; segregated Bids will not be accepted. PROJECT:Historic Carrabelle City Hall Renovations and Repairs BID DATE:January 3, 2013 TIME: 2:00 p.m. local time The City of Carrabelle, Florida will receive sealed bids until 2:00 p.m. local time on January 3, 2013. Bids will be opened publicly and read aloud at the following location: Carrabelle City Hall 1001 Gray Avenue Carrabelle, FL 32322 deposit per set. All materials furnished and all work performed shall be in accordance with Drawings and Courtney Dempsey City Administrator 1001 Gray Avenue Carrabelle, FL 32322 and be marked: 1.Bids for Historic Carrabelle City Hall Renovations and Repairs 2.(Name of Bidder) 3.(Address of Bidder) 4.(City, State, Zip Code) All bids shall be delivered by a representative of the Bidder or by registered mail with return receipt best interest of the City of Carrabelle, Florida. CARRABELLE CITY HALL 1001 GRAY AVENUE CARRABELLE, FL 32322 COURTNEY DEMPSEY, CITY ADMINISTRATOR Special to the TimesThe Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission recognized Franklin County Assistant State Attorneys Jarred Paterson and Robin Myers on Dec. 6 at its commission meeting in Apalachicola. Paterson and Myers, who work in Floridas Second Judicial Court with of ces in Apalachicola, were selected as co-recipients of the Prosecutor of the Year award by the FWCs Division of Law Enforcement. Commissioners praised the attorneys, thanking them for standing up for Floridas sh and wildlife and the local community. We are fortunate to have these two working closely with our of cers, said Col. Jim Brown, director of the FWCs Division of Law Enforcement. They consistently strive to communicate with our staff and better understand managing sh and wildlife. Paterson and Myers have been instrumental on a wide range of cases. They have sought fair and impartial prosecutions for felony drug, driving and boating under the in uence and misdemeanor wildlife cases. They have also worked diligently on recreational and commercial sheries violations. Their efforts include the prosecution of oyster poachers who threaten the legal oyster industry and the quality of products for which the area is known, Brown said. The FWC says Patersons and Myers proactive efforts are making the communities in northwest Florida a better place. The following report is provided by the Franklin County Sheriffs Of ce. Arrests in this weeks report were made by of cers from the Franklin County Sheriffs Of ce (FCSO) and Florida Highway Patrol (FHP). All defendants are to be considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law.Dec. 4Dana M. Taylor, 33, Apalachicola, violation of probation and Wakulla County warrant for failure to appear (FHP) Joseph B. Stevens, 26, Eastpoint, violation of probation (FCSO) Robert Creamer, 63, Eastpoint, two counts of manslaughter by driving under the in uence, and two counts of DUI with property damage (FHP)Dec. 5David B. Charlton, 32, Carrabelle, withholding child support (FCSO)Dec. 6Gary D. Caples, 48, Apalachicola, failure to appear (FCSO)Dec. 7Mary Nowling, 24, Eastpoint, robbery (FCSO) Charley S. Petty, 41, Eastpoint, domestic battery and violation of probation (FCSO) Joseph S. Haynes, 25, Eastpoint, grand theft of a motor vehicle, criminal mischief, aggravated battery-pregnant victim and violation of probation (FCSO) Ray L. Cooper, 43, Eastpoint, Brevard County non-support and Leon County non-support (FCSO)Dec. 9Joseph A. Arroyo, 44, Lanark Village, Collier County non-support (FHP) Richard J. Hodge, 45, Alligator Point, DUI, driving while license suspended or revoked, refusal to submit to breath test (FHP)Dec. 10James D. Creamer, 31, Apalachicola, grand theft of a motor vehicle and criminal mischief (FCSO) Stephen R. Pearson, 42, Carrabelle, violation of probation (FCSO)TIM DONOVAN | FWCPresenting the Prosecutor of the Year award are, from left, FWC Commissioner Richard Corbett, Col. Jim Brown, FWC General Counsel Bud Vielhauer, Commissioner Liesa Priddy, Robin Myers, Jared Paterson, Chairman Kenneth Wright, Commissioner Kathy Barco, Commissioner Charles Roberts and Commissioner Ronald Bergeron.State attorneys honored at FWC meeting Arrest REPORT Law Enforcement

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A8 | The Times Thursday, December 13, 2012 NIP RODENTS INTHE BUD!CALLLOIS AT 653-5857Franklin Countys ONLY LOCALPest Control Company RODENTS RODENTS RODENTS I I N N T T OFTHEWEEKPET St. Joseph Bay Humane SocietyDANDY DUFFY!Duffy came to us as a stray and what a cutie he is! He is only about a year old and is just as happy and social as he can be. He is a wire haired terrier mix and has the cutest whiskers and brightest eyes you will ever see. He is a real people pleaser and will make a wonderful pet as will any of the dogs being housed at the adoption center!VOLUNTEERS ARE DESPERATELY NEEDED TO SOCIALIZE WITH ALL OF OUR DOGS AND CATS.We are always looking for people willing to bring one of our animals into their home to be fostered for various needs. Anytime you can spare would be greatly appreciated. Call Karen at 670-8417 for more details or visit the Franklin County Humane Society at 244 State Road 65 in Eastpoint. You may logon to the website at www.forgottenpets.org to see more of our adoptable pets. NIP RODENTS INTHE BUD!CALLLOIS AT 653-5857Franklin Countys ONLY LOCALPest Control Company RODENTS RODENTS RODENTS I I N N T T Locally owned and operated Home Business Auto Health Workers Comp NEW LOCATION:dbutler@coastalcoverage.com Knowledge NuWisdom Richards will celebrate his rst birthday on Thursday, Dec. 13, 2012. He is the son of Ann and Allen ONeal, of Apalachicola. Maternal grandparents are Charlie Mae Richards, of Apalachicola, and John Hughes, of Apalachicola. Paternal grandparents are Sharon Hall, of Apalachicola, and Harry Hall, of Apalachicola. Godparents are Anna Staples and Reggie James. Happy rst birthday! On Wednesday, Dec. 12, Jessie Mae Harris celebrated her 66th birthday. With love, have a blessed day, now and always, GiGis great-grandkids Kyera and Donate, Love always, The FamilyLOIS SWOBODA | The TimesProminent Apalachicola resident Christo Poloronis, injured in a fall in October, is home in time for the holidays. Cristo said he is on the mend and happy to be back in Apalachicola. No doubt the many cats in town are also pleased at his return. CHRISTO HOME FOR CHRISTMAS Births Society KINSLEIGH EVANS BORN Birthdays KNOWLEDGE RICHARDS TURNS 1 HAPPY BIRTHDAY, AUNTIE DRAKE TEAT BORN Jessica Locklear and John Edmond Evans III would like to announce the birth of their beautiful daughter, Kinsleigh Nichole Evans. She was born Monday, Nov. 19, 2012 at Tallahassee Memorial Hospital, weighing six pounds, 12 ounces, and was 20 inches long. Maternal grandparents are Beth Shiver and Michael Holton, of Carrabelle. Paternal grandparents are Shiela Evans, of Carrabelle, and John Evans, currently of Milton. Maternal great-grandparents are Aleta and Kenny Baker, and Charlene and Reedy Holton, all of Carrabelle; and the late Ramen Shiver. Paternal great-grandparents are Hoyt and Brenda Bailey, of Douglasville, Ga.; the late Sharon and Charles Ray Tucker, and the late John Edmond Evans and the late George and Dalsie (Boots) Evans. We are pleased to announce our newest arrival, Drake Rider Teat. Proud parents Adam and Alecia Teat welcomed him on Friday, Nov. 23, 2012 at Gulf Coast Medical Center in Panama City. He weighed ve pounds, 14 ounces, and was 19 inches long. He joins older brothers Dex, 5, and Trenton, 4, in the Teat household. Paternal grandparents are Eric and Wanda Teat, of Apalachicola. Maternal grandparents are Gloria Ward, of Wakulla County, and the late Roger Ward.

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The Times | A9Thursday, December 13, 2012 WELCOMES YOUChurch of the Ascension101 NE First Street CarrabelleSUNDAY10:00 AM WELCOMES YOUChurch THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH (850) 274-4490 (850) 545-2578 WELCOMES YOU Trinity Trinity Episcopal Churchest. 1836Welcomes YouHwy. 98 & 6th St. Apalachicola 850-653-9550Sunday Worship Services 8 & 10:30 a.m. Wednesdays Healing Service 11 a.m. Centering Prayer 4 p.m. Sunday Worship Services 8 & 10:30 a.m. Wednesdays Healing Service 11 a.m. Centering Prayer 4 p.m. First Pentecostal Holiness Church379 Brownsville Road Apalachicola Were excited about what Gods doing!!!Sunday School 9:45 am Sunday Morning Worship 10:45 am Sunday Evening Service 6:00 pm Monday, Youth Group 6:30 pm Wednesday, Royal Rangers, G.A.P.7:00 pm Wednesday Worship & Word 7:30 pmNursery Provided during regular church services 7:00 7:00 First Baptist ChurchSt. George Island 501 E. Bayshore Drive 927-2257 R. Michael Waley, Pastor Join us as we praise and worship the living Christ. Great is the Lord and most worthy of praise. Psalm 145:3 Sunday Bible Study................................................10:00am Worship Praise........................................................11:00am Sunday Night............................................................7:00pm Wednesday Power Hour......................................7:00pm Wednesday Youth at S.P.L.A.S.H.......................7:00pm Walking in Christ R. Michael Whaley, Pastor The United Methodist Churches of Franklin County Welcome You First United Methodist Church of ApalachicolaWorship Service 11:00 a.m. every Sunday Sunday School 10:00 a.m. 75 5th St. Apalachicola 653-9530 fumcapalach@gtcom.net Pastor: Rev. Themo PatriotisCarrabelle United Methodist ChurchWorship Services 10:45 a.m. Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Celebrate Recovery Mondays 7-9 p.m. 102 NE Ave. B Carrabelle 697-3672 Pastor: Julie StephensEastpoint United Methodist ChurchWorship Service 10:00 a.m. every Sunday Healing service every fourth Monday at 7:00 p.m. 317 Patton Dr. (corner of David St.) 670-8825 Pastor: Rev. Beth WhiteSt. George Island United Methodist Church9:00 a.m. Worship Service 10:00 a.m. Fellowship Hour 201 E. Gulf Beach Dr. 9274635 www.sgiumc.org Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis Nursery now provided for Sunday Church Service FaithEastpoint Christmas celebration Friday: Eastpoint will celebrate Christmas with a parade, holiday caroling, a Christmas tree lighting and Santa Claus on the second Saturday of December, Friday, Dec. 14. The parade starts at 4 p.m., and will travel from Gillespie Street, west of Sellers Plaza, to Bay Street, then south to Patton Drive, then east to the pavilion. Santa will arrive on an oyster boat and will visit with the kids. Well have caroling and lots of fun. For information, contact the Apalachicola Bay Chamber of Commerce at 653-9419. Candlelight Christmas Choir opens rehearsal: The Candlelight Christmas Choir will perform at 5 p.m. on Saturday, Dec. 22 in downtown Apalachicola. If you are interested in singing, rehearsal dates are Monday, Dec. 17 and Friday, Dec. 21 at 6 p.m. at Mount Zion Baptist Church, 98 Avenue E, Apalachicola. For more information, call Pastor B. Hand at 276-2550. Christ Community Academy accepting children: Christ Community Academy is accepting children, from 6-weeks-old to age 3. Afterschool care and drop-in care is also available. The academy is located in the Sunday school building of the First United Methodist Church, 75 Fifth Street, Apalachicola. Contact information is 653-1416 or www.fumcapalach. com Christmas shop at the senior center: Got some last-minute Christmas shopping to do? Come to the Holy Family Senior Center, at 203 Dr. Frederick S. Humphries Street in Apalachicola. The seniors have created a variety of gifts available for a donation. Proceeds go to support the seniors program. Items include earrings, knickknacks, picture frames and more. For more information, call Donna Thompson at 653-6909 or 323-0168. Hope you can join us for our annual Christmas dinner at the Franklin County Senior Citizens Center. Serving begins at noon today, Thursday, Dec. 13. Sister wants a Hula Hoop! Got your list made out? World peace and tranquility is what Im wishing for. The rst Tuesday night Bingo was well-supported. Jim Bove called the rst half, and I called the second half. Next Tuesday, Dec. 18, will be the last game until after new years. Come join us and have some fun! There was a nice, steady crowd for the pancake breakfast at the Lanark Village Boat Club last Saturday, Dec. 8. Thanks to the volunteers who made it happen, and thanks to those who supported it and who enjoyed the breakfast. Didnt get to the Parade of Lights. I am sure it was beautiful. Maybe next year! The December Birthday Bash will be this Saturday, Dec. 15, at Camp Gordon Johnston American Legion Post 82. They were also have their Christmas party. Be sure to try to join us. Party starts at 7 p.m. Fun starts when you walk in the door. The songbird Evelyn McAnally will be on hand to sing your favorites songs, along with many others. See ya there! Members only of the Lanark Village Boat Club will have their Christmas Party also on Saturday, Dec. 15. Party hardy! I really miss Ralph Dietz this time of year. He was Santa Claus at all the Christmas parties. Be kind to one another, check in on the sick and housebound. Keep Christ in Christmas. Until next time, God bless America, our troops, the poor, homeless and hungry. We would like to say a big thank-you to all who responded and helped with the motorcycle accident this week. We would probably leave out someone if we tried to name them all. We live in a great community and are very blessed to have such a wonderful support system in time of emergency or need. Billy and Serita Gay Charles and I would like to thank everyone, especially the sheriffs department, the churches, and all our friends and family in Franklin County. You were all there for us in our time of need. Charles and Alicia OdomSpecial to the TimesThe Franklin County senior class will sponsor their rst ever Tonyas Hope Walk at the school on Tuesday, Dec. 18. The Tonyas Hope Cancer Foundation Corporation is a nonprot organization started ve years ago to help Tonya Bridges with expenses incurred during her bout with multiple cancers. With her blessing after her death, Camp Gordon Johnston American Legion Post 82 in Lanark Village continued to raise money at an annual pig roast to help residents of Franklin County being treated for cancer. The elementary and middle school students will walk during their physical education class and the seniors will start their walk during sixth period, which starts about 1:10 p.m. The community is invited to join them. If you plan to attend, make sure you bring ID. There is no charge to participate in the walk, but donations will be appreciated. Please be generous with your pledges as the goal is $10 per student. If you are being treated for cancer with radiation, surgery or chemotherapy and need help with nonmedical expenses such as gas, babysitting, utilities, rent, groceries, etc., call Tonyas Hope at 625-0382, and we will mail you an application. We are here to help relieve some of the stress of everyday expenses. Tonyas Hope Cancer Foundation Corporation would like to thank the Franklin County School senior class and Mrs. Stephanie Howze Jones for helping the Franklin County residents with this wonderful idea. Vicky Ann Carnes, 52, passed away Saturday, Dec. 8, 2012, in Carrabelle. She was born February 29, 1960, in St. Petersburg and had lived here 36 years. She worked in the seafood industry and was a Baptist. She was very much loved and will be missed by her family. She is survived by two grandchildren, Jordan and Alissa Carnes; one brother, Victor Carnes, Carrabelle; and four sisters, Loretta Westbrook (John), Carrabelle, Tina Ryals, Panama City, Diane Reid, Zephyr Hills, and Crystal Ratliff (Terrell Chisholm), Carrabelle. She is predeceased by her parents and son, Lathaniel Jordan Carnes. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel, Crawfordville, in charge of arrangements.Vicky Ann CarnesHarry Papadopoulos Jr., 81, of Carrabelle, passed away Sunday, Dec. 9, 2012, in Lynn Haven. Mr. Papadopoulos was born Sept. 30, 1931 to the late Harry and Katherine Papadopoulos in Tallahassee. He was the owner of Harrys Georgian Restaurant. He loved playing golf at the Wildwood Country Club, shing, hunting and going to casinos. Mr. Papadopoulos listened to talk radio and was a huge Florida State University fan. Above all, he loved spending time with his grandchildren and his great-grandchild. Mr. Papadopoulos is survived by a daughter, Lucile Tindell and husband, Tony, of Lynn Haven; grandchildren, Katherine, Tiffany and Samantha; his great-grandchild, Tristan; and two sisters, Eva Papadopoulos and Julia P. Thompson, both of Carrabelle. Graveside funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon, Dec. 12, at Evergreen Cemetery in Carrabelle. Condolences may be submitted or viewed at www.southerlandfamily. com. Southerland Family Funeral Home, Panama City, in charge of arrangements.Harry Papadopoulos Jr.Ruth Elizabeth Cameron Northcutt, 65, of Anahuac, Texas, passed away on Saturday, Dec. 8, 2012, at San Jacinto Methodist Hospital in Baytown, Texas with her family by her side. She was a loving wife, mother, grandmother, greatgrandmother, sister, aunt and friend. Funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon, Dec. 12, in the chapel of Sterling Funeral Home in Anahuac. Interment will follow in Anahuac Cemetery. A gathering of Lizs family and friends was held Tuesday evening, Dec. 11, at the funeral home. Liz was preceded in death by her parents, William and Ruth Cameron, and brother, Gary Cameron. She was a champion oyster shucker in Apalachicola in 1977. Liz is survived by her husband of 30 years, Bobby Ray Northcutt; sons, Troy Williams and wife, Denise, Lenny Williams, and David Williams; daughter Marilyn Moore and husband, Bobby; eight grandchildren, two great-grandchildren; sisters Mary Williams and husband, Coy, and Carol Samford; brother Jimmy Cameron and wife, Blanch; several nieces and nephews and a host of other family and friends. Please view, sign and share memories of Liz in her guestbook at www. sterlingfuneralhome.com.Ruth Elizabeth Cameron Northcutt RUThH e ELIZabeABEThH ca CAMeronERON nor NOR ThcHCUTTAtkinson Edwin (Ed) Pooser III passed away peacefully at home in Winter Garden on Thursday, Dec. 6, 2012, at the age of 96. He was born in Wauchula on Nov. 24, 1916, to Atkinson Edwin Pooser II and Adelaide McEwen. Both parents came from pioneer Florida families. His paternal grandfather was a captain in the Confederate Army, serving in the Florida Brigade, which surrendered his company at Appomattox. His maternal great-grandfather, William Penn McEwen, was one of the early Methodist circuit riders in Florida. Educated in Florida public schools, Ed attended the University of Florida. On his birthday and Thanksgiving Day in 1938, he married the love of his life, Janette Jenkins of Bartow. They were happily married for 74 years. For the rst 10 years of his married life, Ed sold life insurance in Bartow and then Jacksonville. In 1948, he began working for the state of Florida as an investigator with the transportation department of the Florida Railroad and Public Utilities Commission (now the Public Service Commission). After appointment as district supervisor, he became assistant director. In 1959, he became director and remained in that position until 1980 when trucking was deregulated. In an article in Florida Truck News in April 1973, it was stated, Pooser has organized a transportation law enforcement force which is second to none. It has gained national recognition for its efforts in eliminating illegal transportation. Other states have patterned their enforcement procedures after the Florida Commissions operation. Enforcement personnel from many other states have been sent to Florida for training in these procedures. After 32 years in transportation, following deregulation Ed retired. Within two months he was back at work with the Florida Trucking Association. Ed became known as Mr. Transportation and was FTAs Man of the Year for 1989. Many of the transportation laws now on the books in Florida began as legislation drafted by Ed Pooser. He was a past president of the National Conference of State Transportation Specialists and served as chairman of that organizations Conference Committee Joint Board. He was on the Reciprocal and International Relations committee of the American Association of Motor Vehicle Administrators. He saved Floridas trucking industry untold millions of dollars through the various reciprocal agreements he negotiated with other states and Canada. Ed was an excellent administrator. His two pet requirements were you always answer your correspondence and you make a report on everything that happens. Years after he left state government, questions on past procedures were easy to answer because of Eds policies. One major accomplishment of Eds was setting up the rst rearms training for transportation enforcement ofcers. When legislators questioned why the DOT ofcers needed guns, Ed replied Have you ever tried to arrest somebody with a pencil? Ed is survived by his wife of 74 years, Janette Pooser; son, Atkinson Edwin (Ned) Pooser IV (Polly) of Franklin County; and daughter, Mary Janette (Jenny) Brown (John Paul) of Winter Garden; grandchildren, Atkinson Edwin (Ted) Pooser V, Barbara Janette Olson, Holly Baulier, John Pooser, David Pooser, Daniel Pooser and P.J. Brown; greatgrandchildren, Ashley and Kimberly, and great-greatgrandchild Levi. He was preceded in death by his son, Robert James (Jim) Pooser. Visitation and funeral services were held Sunday afternoon, Dec. 9 at Robarts Garden Chapel, Wauchula. Interment is in Wauchula Cemetery. Arrangements by Robarts Family Funeral Home, Wauchula.Atkinson Edwin Pooser IIIIII aA TKInsonNSON e EDWInN pooser POOSER IIIIII Obituaries Cards of ThanHANKsSSenior class to sponsor Tonyas Hope Walk LanarLANARK neNEWsSJim Welsh Faith brBRIefsEFSTonTONYa A BrRIDgesGESLegions Birthday Bash, Christmas party Saturday TheHE oODoOM faFAMILY TheHE GaA Y faFAMILY

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WEEKLY ALMANAC APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE TIDE TABLES MONTHLY AVERAGESTo nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from these given for APALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW Cat Point Minus 0:40 Minus 1:17 East Pass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27 To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from those given for CARRABELLE: HIGH LOW Bald Point Minus 9:16 Minus 0:03 Sponsor the WEEKLY ALMANACCall Today!653-8868 Date HighLow% Precip Thu, Dec. 1359 4420% Fri, Dec. 1469 5110% Sat, Dec. 1570 5810% Sun, Dec. 1673 5030% Mon, Dec. 1768 5120% Tues, Dec. 1867 4840% Wed, Dec. 1964 44 0% 13 Tu 327pm 2.4 717am -0.5 651pm 1.9 14 We 1235am 2.9 424pm 2.4 804am -0.6 730pm 2.1 15 Th 117am 2.9 518pm 2.4 853am -0.8 811pm 2.1 16 Fr 202am 2.9 608pm 2.2 945am -0.6 858pm 1.9 17 Sa 253am 2.9 655pm 2.2 1037am -0.5 958pm 1.9 18 Su 349am 2.6 736pm 2.1 1132am -0.2 1114pm 1.8 19 Mo 455am 2.4 813pm 2.1 1226pm 0.2 20 Tu 615am 2.1 846pm 2.1 1244am 1.4 121pm 0.5 21 We 759am 1.8 916pm 2.1 213am 1.1 215pm 0.8 22 Th 1005am 1.6 945pm 2.2 328am 0.8 308pm 1.1 23 Fr 1159am 1.8 1012pm 2.2 429am 0.3 358pm 1.3 24 Sa 119pm 1.9 1040pm 2.4 520am 0.0 445pm 1.6 25 Su 217pm 1.9 1108pm 2.4 606am -0.2 529pm 1.6 26 Mo 303pm 2.1 1138pm 2.4 647am -0.3 609pm 1.8 Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL(next to Piggly Wiggly)www.BWOsh.com Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL Your Hunting Headquarters Your Hunting Headquarters Your Hunting Headquarters RED TAG GUN SALE!PRICES GOOD THROUGH 12-24-12 Corner of Marina Drive, (next to Piggly Wiggly) Corner of Marina Drive, Corner of Marina Drive, CALL FOR A QUOTE1-877-216-9600 Corner of Marina Drive, Corner of Marina Drive, CALL FOR A QUOTE CALL FOR A QUOTE TAURUS 709 SLIM 9MM PISTOLSREG $ 299 .99 SALE $ 269 .99 By FRANK SARGEANTfranksargeant@charter.net A crystal ball would help. Forecasting Panhandle shing for December is a bit like forecasting the BCS champion in September lots of prognostications, but nobody really knows whats going to happen. A whole lot depends on the weather; recent winters have been mild, basically extending November shing all the way through Christmas; reds and trout both on the ats on sunny afternoons and in the creeks and holes on cool mornings. With night temperatures at least through December 10 forecast to drop no lower than the mid-50s, it looks like the winter of 2012 will be a lot like 2011without a burst of severe cold, sh on the ats remain on or near their fall haunts. The water is clear due to less algae, the new and full moon tides are at their lowest, and its sight shing for reds at its nest so long as the water temperatures cooperatecurrently around 65 degrees afternoons in the bays from Fort Walton to Apalach. Thats prime temperature for reds and trout as well as ounder. Poling the ats and looking for the sh on slough edges, around oyster bars and in potholes does the job and a good hand with a y rod can even connect with streamer ies, though long casts with a live shrimp or a Gulp! crab are a much easier way to go. The same sh that come up to sun on the afternoon ats on bright days are likely to be in tidal creeks and potholes in Apalachicolas East Bay, around the back of St. Vincents Island, in lower St. Joe Bay, in West Bay and upper North Bay, and in the east end of Choctawhatchee Bay. Many of the tidal creeks that feed into the above-named bayous have oystery potholes in them average creek depth might be two feet, but a couple hundred yards in you nd 3 to 5 feet and lots of sh on chilly mornings. The bottoms are black mud which probably acts as a heat sink to warm the waters and attract the sh. It takes some chart study and some low-speed probing in a shallow draft boat or a kayak to nd these spots or hire a guide who already knows where all of them are but when you get on one of these spots on low water, it can literally be sh-in-a-barrel they wont leave on low tide, and so long as you stay well back and dont spook them, you can wear them out by simply casting live shrimp into the hole. It can be a potpourri, with sheepshead, black drum, lady sh and jacks in the mix along with the trout and reds. Finding the sh is a matter of easing along on the trolling motor and casting a live shrimp on a size 1 or 1/0 hook via spinning gear with 10-pound-test braid, weighted with a BB-shot, into every observable hole. (A piece of cut shrimp on a 3/16 ounce jig head is easier to cast and also works pretty well. Use only fresh-cut shrimp frozen shrimp draws few bites.) Most anglers use 18 inches of 20-pound-test uorocarbon between running line and hook the added stiffness of this leader helps prevent tangles, and the uoro is more durable around oyster shells than straight braid. Tie it in with a double-line doubled uniknot, that is doubling both the leader and the running line before you tie the two uniknots. The doubled line prevents the braid from cutting through the leader when you put on the pressure to land a chunky red. WINTER WANDERINGIN PANHANDLE WATERSPHOTO COURTESY OF YAMAHA MARINERed sh continue to prowl Northwest Florida marshes so long as water temperature remains in the 60s. Currently, it is about 64 degrees.Email outdoors news to timesoutdoors @star .com Page 10 Thursday, December 13, 2012 OUTDOORSwww.apalachtimes.comSection Section A SPONSORED BY Freshwater InshoreMost inshore action has turned to the I.C.W. in our area. Good reports of sheepshead and small trout at the T and under the powerlines. Live shrimp will also entice mangrove snapper in the deeper holes and around structure here as well. Red fish are still moving through our area and can be caught along side whiting and pompano in the surf. Increasing saltwater has slowed down freshwater fishing in the back waters of our county. Most anglers are reporting on sheepshead and blackdrums well into the Howard Creek and The Brothers right now. Good reports of crappie and bream are the norm at Depot Creek this week.By LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com This is a bumper year for acorns, and with acorns come hungry bears. Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission bear biologist Adam Warwick said it is by far the busiest season he has experienced. He said several of the FWC commissioners heading back to Tallahassee after last weeks Apalachicola meeting got to see several bears when passing through Lanark Village. In Carrabelle, Eastpoint and Lanark Village conversation is abuzz with bear stories. One woman reported seeing six bears in a single oak tree. Warwick said he saw 13 bears on one day while working around Hinton Road in Lanark. Most comments have been positive, with people telling how beautiful and healthy the bear population has become. Lots of folks are scrambling for their cameras. Cal Allen managed to get photos of a male bear that followed in a path blazed by a mama and three cubs in the Allens front yard. The bear seemed quite unconcerned of my presence except for an occasional glance, most likely happy he could feed in peace without the yapping little Jack Russell, wrote Allen. This is the eighth day in a row we have observed these beautiful creatures in our neighborhood. Even though its warm, bears are stocking up on calories for winter, one reason they are so visible right now. Bears here dont hibernate but they do become less active in cold weather, especially pregnant females, so they fatten up in preparation. Problems arise when bears have access to food sources such as pet foods, garbage, barbecue grills, bird seed or even livestock feed. Bears are adaptable and learn quickly to associate people with food. Even though black bears are normally too shy to risk contact with humans, their powerful need to nd food can overwhelm this fear. Bears can smell food from more than a mile away and will travel great distances to track down these tasty smells, often crossing roadways and bridges to do so, which creates risk to both themselves and motorists. Drive carefully, especially at night, and keep alert for bears on the move. Bears are driven by their need to eat, so anything edible and easily accessible is a potential bear attractant. Presently, garbage is by far the biggest bear attractant in Florida. A fed bear is a dead bear; dont leave food sources around you home to entice them.LOIS SWOBODA | The TimesThe Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve hosted the monthly meeting of the Apalachicola Bay Chamber of Commerce on Dec. 5. Director Lee Edmiston welcomed the group and told them the beautiful state of the art research and outreach facility has been visited by 29,000 people since January. Some of the refuge centers have to close for part of the year because there isnt enough traf c, he said. We havent found a time when we can close. The chamber collected gifts for the Franklin Toy Project. Keynote speaker was Melissa Strawser of Gulf Coast State College who explained continuing education opportunities. Luncheon was a low country boil prepared by Roy Ogles and members of the ANERR staff. ANERR HOSTS CHAMBER MEETINGROD GASCHE | Special to the TimesThese two bears were spotted near the frog pond on the Carrabelle waterfront.Number of bears in the area on the rise

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CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA SP O RTS www.apalachtimes.com ASection Hometown Proud (850)653-9695 Gulfside IGA PLAYER OF THE WEEK SPONSORLady Seahawk sophomore Myesha Campbell has regularly scored in double-digits, as well as proved herself a star performer in the classroom with a better than 3.0 grade point average. Shes been consistent with her play, said coach Carlos Hill. Shes been playing good defense, moving her feet, helping spread out our oense more so we get better looks at the basket. Congratulations, Myesha! Congratulations, Myesha! Hometown Proud (850)653-9695 FCSWA President Shannon Hartsfield told the audience of about 40 attendees that seafood workers were considering research received from experts to see which suggestions were feasible. When we went and asked for help, we started receiving ample opportunities with the county commission and Workforce, he said. FCSWA Vice President Chris Millender outlined his proposal to bring together 15 experts from government and academic institutions, together with local know-how. Millender proposed SMARRT should consist of 15 workers from the seafood industry: three oystermen, a crabber, two shrimpers, two fishing guides, two seafood dealers, one FCSWA representative, one Franklin County Seafood Dealers Association representative, two commercial fishermen and one clammer. According to a flyer, these 15 stake holders have full voting rights. It lists the cut-off date for nominations to the SMARRT as Dec. 13. Joe Shields, environmental administrator for the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services at the Apalachicola Shellfish Center, said the proposed committee is, similar to the Oyster Task Force, which went away. This seems to be something similar. Its a good thing. Obviously you want as many people as possible involved to make decisions. Maybe with severity of this problem, the answers will be forthcoming. Shields serves on the University of Florida Oyster Recovery Team, a group of researchers seeking to explore the problems with the fishery. Millenders proposed SMARRT board would communicate with the task force and other organizations. Any decision would have to receive unanimous support from team members. There must be complete consensus, Hartsfield said. Its scary on the bay as it is with the lack of fresh water. Without this SMARRT team, I dont see whats going to happen. If we had good communication, you have the possibility to make changes. County Extension Agent Bill Mahan, a member of the ad hoc committee, said it is uncertain who will tap members of SMARRT. Its very fluid, he said. Workforce Florida will pay a facilitator to help establish SMARRT. Were planning a January meeting to kick this off. Along with Millender, the chairman and Hartsfield, ad hoc committee members include Tommy Ward, who represents the seafood dealers association; Jennifer German, deputy director of Workforce; Angie Lindsey, community outreach coordinator for Healthy Gulf, Healthy Communities, an academic advisory group; Joe Taylor, director of Franklins Promise; and Shannon Lease, deputy director of the Apalachicola Riverkeeper. Lindsey said the ad hoc committee will choose the SMARRT representatives. The main thing the ad hoc is looking for is to have that equal representation of the different parts of the industry, she said. Everybodys here together to address this particular emergency. Seafood workers have been incredible partners about keeping us on task. Taylor said the ad hoc committee will not actually choose the board members. I think thats going to work itself out at the Jan. 9 meeting, he said. Thats why we have hired an independent facilitator to lead that and bring the group to consensus. On Monday night, Hartsfield detailed plans for the upcoming oyster relay program, which will pay oystermen $25 an hour for an eighthour day, for up to six months. He outlined that workers must be fully licensed and enrolled in Workforce, which is overseeing the program, funded by a $2.7 million federal grant. In addition, they must pass a drug test, available free at the county health department, and must pass an eight-hour occupational health and safety course, available online and for which they will be paid. The oystermen will use their own boats, which must be at least 22 feet long. If you do not have a boat, you will have to find another person with a boat, he told the audience at the Eastpoint firehouse. Both County Commissioner William Massey and Marcia Mathis, a representative of Sen. Bill Montfords office, were in attendance but did not address the gathering. Hartsfield said initial plans beginning the first week of January are to relay oysters, tonged from permanently closed areas near the river channel, and to relocate them to the west near Green Point Beacon. After two weeks there, the oysters will be suitable for harvest. Hartsfield also told oystermen there are paid opportunities to take out researchers on their boats. Taylor told the gathering about help available through Franklins Promise. Providing a chili dinner on the cold night were representatives of Carrabelles United Methodist Church, accompanied by Pastor Aaron Beaty, and Eastpoints First UMC. Homer McMillan, from Fellowship Baptist Church, was there to distribute 75 blankets, on behalf of the Foundations of Justice, which has received support from ministerial groups in Carrabelle and Apalachicola. FCSWA from page A1 Page 11 Thursday, December 13, 2012By DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com The Lady Seahawks girls varsity basketball team has opened with a strong start, emerging with a 4-2 record, 2-1 in the district. The team, under the direction of coach Carlos Hill, delighted hometown fans Saturday night with a 38-29 win over West Gadsden. The team was paced by 17 points from sophomore Dyshereah Key, with seven points each from senior Shelby Myers, and sophomore Myesha Campbell. Senior Anna Lee added ve points, and eighth-grader Tyanna Townsend kicked in three. The victory followed a 56-21 away game win Dec. 7 against Bozeman, where Key was again the most potent offensive force, nailing 16 points. Campbell scored 10, and Myers six, with seven points from freshman Clarina Langineeo. The back-to-back wins followed a .500 start for the Lady Seahawks. The team lost their Nov. 20 home opener 49-29 against Aucilla Christian, as Campbell poured in 11 points. The Franklin County girls evened their record a week later, with a 44-34 win at John Paul II. Campbell was again the leading scorer, with 15. The Lady Seahawks downed Wewahitchka in a Nov. 29 away game, winning 34-26 behind Campbells 10 points. The girls then lost in a district game at West Gadsden Dec. 1, falling 21-10. Hill said West Gadsden was coming off a game the night before against Blountstown, marred by ghting, so the referee made it clear in the Seahawks game that there would no intimidation allowed. The girls played a shell defense. They didnt want to get thrown out, Hill said, and then added after Saturdays win We de nitely made up for that tonight.Rocky Bayou tops Seahawk boys soccerBy DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com The Seahawks boys soccer team posted a tie and a loss last week, as they continue to re ne their passing game. On Dec. 5 at Greensboro, the team tied the West Gadsden Panthers 2-2, with goals by Graham Kirvin and Zack Howze on a penalty kick. Goalkeeper Casey Sapp posted 18 saves. We played a skillful team; they had more touches on the ball than us, Coach Luis Ramon Valenzuela said. It was a very interesting game, very even on both parts, rough and a lots of shots on both ways. We could have done much better that night, but this is the way soccer is. I told the boys, It takes one second to change the entire game. On Friday night at home, the team fell 3-1 to district rival Rocky Bayou. The teams lone score was by Christian Jones, assisted by Howze on a corner kick. Sapp posted 17 saves. We started the game with a lot of con dence, since we won the rst district match-up, but they came out harder this time, Valenzuela said. They knew where to mark and how to play against us. Our key players were attacked by either two or three of them, stopping us from getting to their goal. Once again, we cannot lower our guard against our district counterparts. Even though we will see them again, we have to play a little bit smarter than them, with more passing, and making those passes shorter to make for open situations to be able to get to their goal. We cannot shoot from 30 or 40 yards away from the goal, not in our district matches. Short passes are the key to break their defensive barrier. The boys face district rival Freeport at home Friday night, and then travel to Baker Monday for a non-league match-up. By DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com A tough 2-1 loss at home Friday night to district rival Rocky Bayou marred an otherwise upbeat week for the Lady Seahawks girls soccer team. The Rocky Bayou Lady Knights struck rst with a goal midway through the rst half. Then, just before the water break in the second half, the Lady Knights put another goal in the net, giving them a 2-0 lead. Minutes later, Franklin County junior Gracyn Kirvin threw the ball in to sophomore Katie Seger for a 25-yard shot that made it a 2-1 game. We had multiple scoring opportunities, including ve great corner kicks right in front of the goal, said Coach Kelli Wright, whose record fell to 6-2 on the year. We just couldnt put the ball in the back of the net. With ve minutes left in the game, junior Jessica Shields dribbled around two defenders and struck a shot that their goalkeeper made a great save on. That team has certainly improved, and they took advantage of our mistakes. Sophomore goalkeeper Macy Hunt had 10 saves for the match. Kirvin managed ve shots on goal and Seger four, for the game. On Dec. 5, the Lady Seahawks defeated the West Gadsden Lady Panthers 6-0 in Greenboro. The goals were distributed among four Lady Seahawks players. Kirvin and eighthgrader Allie Zingarelli each had a pair of goals. Seger and eighth-grader Ali Kirvin also contributed with one goal each. Shields had three assists in the game, and Seger had one assist. Macy Hunt had ve saves in the match. This game gave some of our inexperienced players valuable eld time, Wright said. The team opened the week on Dec. 4 with a thrilling 1-0 win over John Paul II, after Gracyn Kirvins assist led to a Shields goal in the rst half. Our defense played a great game against John Paul II, shutting down their leading goal scorer, Wright said. Macy Hunt made some tremendous saves in the second half of the match. She had nine saves and also recorded her second shutout of the season. When junior Adriana Reeder was injured in the second half, Jessica Shields really stepped up and helped our team defensively. GRAHAM KIRVIN CASEY SAPP ZACH HOWZE PHOTOS BY DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The TimesLady Seahawks Coach Carlos Hill diagrams a play for his squad. Lady Seahawk hoopsters open with winsRocky Bayou loss mars Lady Seahawks week CHRISTEY KIRVIN | Special to the Times Junior Deborah Dempsey drives against John Paul II.

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LocalA12 | The Times Thursday, December 13, 2012FDOT public meeting today on U.S. 98 roadwork: The Florida Department of Transportation will host a public information meeting concerning the resurfacing of U.S. 98 from 12th Street to the Apalachicola River Bridge from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. today, Dec. 13. The meeting at the Apalachicola Community Center, 1 Bay Ave, will cover FDOTs proposal to resurface existing travel, auxiliary and parking lanes, and perform minor drainage improvements. Additionally, Americans with Disability Act (ADA) improvements, which may consist of repairing de cient sidewalk, replacing/retro tting noncompliant curb ramps, and constructing an access ramp are included in this project, as are modi cations to on-street parking. High school band in concert tonight: The Franklin County School band will present their annual winter concert at 7 p.m. tonight, Dec. 13 in the cafeteria. Food pantries to host food program: The Gulf, Franklin and Wakulla county health departments, extension programs and Workforce Board are developing an educational food, nutrition, cooking, budgeting and container gardening program. The program will be conducted at the food pantry sites in the three counties. The next planning meeting is scheduled for Friday, Dec. 14 at 2 p.m. at the Franklin County Health Department, in Apalachicola. For information call 653-2111. Students present Christmas program Monday: Elementary school students at the Franklin County School will present their annual Christmas program Let It Be Christmas at 6 p.m. on Monday, Dec. 17 in the cafeteria. Nobles dancers to perform Tuesday: Pam Nobles Studios will present Happy Holidays, its annual Christmas program showcasing the talents of its students, on Tuesday, Dec. 18 at 7:07 p.m. at the Dixie Theatre, in downtown Apalachicola. Advance tickets are $10, and $12 at the door. For more info, call 653 -8078. Traf c Safety Team to meet Wednesday: The next meeting of the Community Traf c Safety Team is scheduled for Wednesday, Dec. 19 at noon at the Carrabelle City Complex. Health department to provide drug screening: Interim Franklin County Health Department Administrator Marsha Lindeman said the department is working with Quest Labs to provide drug screening. Lindeman said the DOH is working to make the tests available before the end of the month to help individuals seeking alternative employment. For information call 653-2111. Free u shots for seafood workers: The Franklin County Health Department will provide a free u shot to persons who present a valid saltwater harvesting license, as well as their spouse and children. The shots normally cost $25. For persons 65 and older, a high dose vaccination is $35.60. Shots are available MondayFriday 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. The health department has vaccinated more than 500 people this u season and urges everyone to get protected. For information call 653-2111. Bids for St. George Island shing pier: The county commission will open bids for repairs to the St. George Island Fishing Pier on Jan. 15. Preble-Rish, the county engineering consultant for the project, has received the permits from the Florida Department of Environmental Protection and the Army Corps of Engineers to make the repairs, at an estimated cost of $700,000. In October, county commissioners voted to take funds for the repairs from the bridge fund while pursuing damages from the owners of the barge that caused the damage during Tropical Storm Debby. The county hopes to reopen the entire pier for public use by June 2013. Butts and Clucks set for Jan. 5: The Weems Memorial Healthcare Foundation will hold its annual Butts and Clucks by the Bay cookoff on Saturday, Jan. 5 from noon until 5 p.m. at Riverfront Park in downtown Apalachicola. The foundation is sponsoring a pork butt and chicken cooking contest. Local, state and out-ofstate teams can participate in this contest. Awards are given for cooking, presentation of booth, presentation of food, etc. Dinner is served to the public and an auction will be held with Harry Arnold as auctioneer. For more information or to enter call 670-8261. Apalachicola Oyster Cook-off Jan. 19: The third annual Oyster Cook-Off to bene t the Apalachicola Volunteer Fire Department will be held Saturday, Jan. 19. On Friday evening will be a preview of the oysterrelated silent auction items, along with a sampling of Apalachicola Bays tasty bivalves. The cook-off on Saturday will start at 11 a.m. Contestants are encouraged to enter with their favorite recipe. All forms of oysters will be available to taste raw, steamed, fried. Other food items and refreshments will be available for purchase. The days activities will include live music and dancing performances. More information will be posted soon at www. oystercookoff.com, and the event can be followed on Facebook. Arts in Medicine plans Holy Family garden: On Dec. 11, Arts in Medicine volunteers met to plan for 2014. A group of 24 specialists, including 12 Florida State University students, will visit Franklin County in March for an intensive program including creation of a garden at the Holy Family Senior Center and performance art for health education, in which the group plans to educate high school students about reproductive health and self esteem. A program dealing with hygiene and nutrition is also planned for younger students. In addition, teams of health workers plan to focus on problems of seafood workers and inform them of services available. Holiday hours for St. George Lighthouse: The Lighthouse and the Keepers House Museum and gift shop will be closed Dec. 24-26 and Jan. 1. From Dec. 27-29 the facilities will be open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. On Dec. 30 the lighthouse and keepers house will open noon to 5 p.m. On Dec. 31 the facilities will be open10 a.m. to 5 p.m. After the holidays, winter hours from noon to 5 p.m. daily, closed Thursdays resume through March 1. THE PANAMA CITY PICTORIAL BOOK IS HERE! $39.95+ TAX BUY NOW! THE NEWS HERALDMAKESTHEPERFECTGIFT FOR FAMILYAND FRIENDS! ______Copies at $39.95 plus $3.00 tax per book and pick up my order at The News Herald oce. Name ___________________________________________________________________________________________ Address __________________________________________________________________________________________ City ______________________________________________________ State _______________ Zip ________________ Phone (_____) ______________________ E-mail _________________________________________________________Signature ________________________________________________________________________________ Charge Card Number_____________________________________ Security Code______________Exp. Date_____________________ Payable to: The News Herald VISA THE NEWS HERALD THE NEWS HERALD GET YOUR COPY TODAY $ 39 .95 AKES THE PER F ECT $ .95 JUST IN TIME FOR THE HOLIDAYS! PANAMACITY.PICTORIALBOOK.COMMAIL IN FORM OR ORDER ONLINE AT:I wish to order: ____ Copies at $39.95 plus $2.60 tax per book and pick up my order (mail in form only) at The News Herald oce. Total $42.55/book ____Copies at $39.95 plus $5.95 shipping and handling and $2.60 tax per book and have my order shipped to the address below. Total $48.50/bookTOTAL AMOUNT ENCLOSED:__________ Name ________________________________________________ Address _______________________________________________ City _________________________ State ______ ZIP ____________ Phone ( )_____________ E-mail __________________________ ____________________________________________________ Signature ____________________________________________________ Charge Card Number Security Code Exp. Date PAYMENTMETHOD CHECK/MONEYORDER Payable to: The News Herald VISA AMEX MASTERCARD DISCOVER GO TO FACEBOOK.COM/PCDEALOFTHEDAY ANDENTER NOW!Add a$50gift card to yourWish List!to local restaurantsDECEMBER 9TH 28THDAILY DEAL FACEBOOK LIKE CONTESTNEED A LITTLE EXTRA SPARKLE ADDED TO YOUR HOLIDAY?Enter our Facebook contest to WIN A $50 GIFTCARD! Just Like our Facebook Daily Deal page and register for a chance to WIN A $50 GIFT CARDTOLOCALRESTAURANTS. Contest runs from Dec. 9 thru Dec. 28. giftcard$50to local restaurants Like Us Now! DISS I)Children and Adults No Fee or Cost If No RecoveryGAYLEPEEDINGOATTONEYATLAWApalachicola, FL (850) 292-7059 | (850) 944-6020 FAXgsrlaw@bellsouth.net DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The TimesThe TIGERS program in Apalachicola hosted on Nov. 29 a Home is where the heart is free seminar for rst-time homeowners. Attendees got a chance to learn details about buying a home from such participants as attorney Kristy Branch Banks, right, and Cadence Banks Stephnia Turrell, left. Also taking part were Cadence Banks Shelly Burns; Centennial Banks Joan Buckner and Amber Lowry; Randall Webster representing the Franklin County Land and Trust Development; and Gloria Salinard, on behalf of the Realtor Association of Franklin and Gulf counties.TIGERS host homebuyers seminar News BRIEFS BILL MILLER REALTY850-697-3751 (3310) 570-0658400 + COMM. U.S. 98 & GULFADJ. TO LANARK MARINA 850K$29,500 $2,500 DOWN BUYS 2 BED APT. 2 6 ORRENT $500/MTH 2 B/R 1 BTH GULF VIEW HOME W/ FAMILY ROOM $70,000 C/B-3-1 2 COR. LOTS CITY $49,500 3/2D/W 2 COR. LOTS -CITY $42,500MIH 2 CRNRLOTS BLK. $ STORE REDUCED $49,500 2 AC-AT RIVER UTIL. IN -$39,500

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The Times | A13Thursday, December 13, 2012 CALL TODAY!653-8868 GET YOUR AD IN Trades & Services Laban Bontrager, DMD Monica Bontrager, DMD 12761 Pea Ridge Road Bristol, Florida 32321TELEPHONE (850) 643-5417 Bristol Dental ClinicDENTURE LAB ON PREMISESSame Day Service on Repairs and Relines Don Lively General Contractors LICENSED ANDINSURED 20 YEARSEXPERIENCE P.O. Box 439 Carrabelle, FL 32322 697-2783 or Mobile 566-2603RC0066499RG0065255 Carrabelle Visa, Discover, and American Express Honored at Participating Ace Stores JACKSONS Building Supplies & Auto Repair Carrabelle 697-3333 We Deliver AnywhereHardware and Paint Center J.J.s Tree Service, LLC Stump Grinder Licensed & Insured Call John : (850) 899-8432 ROBERTS APPLIANCE REPAIR ALL MAJOR BRANDS 18 Shadow Lane Apalachicola, FL 32320 Phone: (850) 653-8122 Cell: (850) 653-7654 JOES LAWN CARE IF ITS IN YOUR YARD LET JOE TAKE CARE OF IT FULL LAWN SERVICES, TREE TRIMMING AND REMOVALALSO CLEAN GUTTERS AND IRRIGATION INSTILLATION, PLANTING AND BEDDING AVAILABLE CALL JOE@ 850-323-0741 OR EMAIL JOES_LAWN @YAHOO.COM The following is the honor roll for the rst nine-week grading period at the Apalachicola Bay Chart School.All AsFIRST GRADEA. Carlton: Hannah Grace Abel, Amontaye Austin, Peyton Blackburn, CJ Conway, Reece Juno, William Luberto, Taylor Pendleton, Jostyn Tipton, Kiana Weeks L. Allen: Cody Abercrombie, Caelyn Constantine, Trinty Creamer, Andie Hutchins, Maya Itzkovitz, Esteban Bernabe, Conner Lolley, Jolie Mallon, Lucy Neill, Malic ONeal, Emma Rowland, Wes Taranto, Jordan YonSECOND GRADEJ. Mallon: Eric Lau, River Sheridan, Trinity Taylor, John Michael Thompson, Colin We ng S. Herrington: Alisha Arroyo, Kendall Hill, Arav Patel, Jabara Pearson, Owen Poloronis, Kylah Ross, Mark WillisTHIRD GRADEW. Martina: Andrew Monod, Alex Itzkovitz, Sophia Salman, Nic Valenzuela T. Moses: Weston BockelmanFOURTH GRADEM. Lee: Livia Monod L. Bockelman: Alex Joanos, Abby JohnsonFIFTH GRADEB. Linane: Cade Juno, Camille WilliamsSIXTH GRADEB. Banks: Kevin Flores, Alexus Johnson, Bryce Kent, Adria Valenzuela K. Ward: Scout McLemore, Grayson Constantine, Chloe Davis, Jan-Michael Lowe, Conner Messer, Becca WillisSEVENTH GRADEA. Keel: Savannah Montgomery T. Joanos: Faith SappEIGHTH GRADET. Ward: Jayla Alley, Corie Cates, Holly Chambers, Allie Kirvin, Mikayla Lloyd, Alexis ONeal, Astrid Ramirez, Alexis Segree, Mallorie Shiver, Alina Valenzuela M. Copeland: Emily GayA/BFIRST GRADEA. Carlton: Isabella Price, Landon Schoelles, Aubrie Thompson, Jayla White L. Allen: Charles McClainSECOND GRADEJ. Mallon: Laithan Kent, Jayden Nichols, Nathan Richards, Rainey Smith, Leah Wren S. Herrington: Wyatt Abercrombie, Miranda Diaz, Faline Everitt, Mason Moses, Jackson Segree, Mahaley ShulerTHIRD GRADEW. Martina: Caleb Abel, Nadia Etheridge, Sevryn Everritt, Ella Friedman, Eulalia Gregorio, Gavin Lashley, Genevieve Montgomery T. Moses: Meredith Alford, Lanie Allen, Carson Davis, Jasmine Richards, Gracie Smith, Wil VarnesFOURTH GRADEM. Lee: Arryonna Cargill, Kaylee Hicks, Ava Neill, Avery Scott, Austin Shiver L. Bockelman: Cecil Gay, Skye Huber, Jadyn Luberto, Elizabeth McAnally, Clint Rester, Caden Turrell, Gregory WilsonFIFTH GRADEB. Linane: Janacia Bunyon, Matthew Gay, Bailey Herrington, Jayden Justice, Kalahn Kent, Alyssa Martina, Allison Register, Alyssa RobinsonSIXTH GRADEB. Banks: Madison Coulter, Hailey Gay, Sophia Kirvin K. Ward: Karolynn Myers, Daijon Penamon, Haley ScottSEVENTH GRADEA. Keel: Christian Amison, Brooke Martina, Andrew Nguyen, Lucas Sasnett T. Joanos: Michaela Cassidy, Nick Joanos, Ethan Moses, Georjanna Myers, Kobe Myers, Alyssia Shirah, Madison SmithEIGHTH GRADET. Ward: Eve Bond, Cash Creamer, Logan Crosby, Jaylon Gainer, Bianca Huber M. Copeland: Emily Crosby, Tia Cummings, Juliana Gay, Kacey Howard, Bobby Kilgore, Austin McKee, Alyssa Shiver, Katy Spann, Marshall Sweet, Xuripha Tiller, K.K. Wilson, Emily ZingarelliABC School Honor Roll SIXTH GRADE SCIENTISTSThe Apalachicola Bay Charter School held its annual Middle School Science Fair Nov. 28. Students were required to write a research paper with information about their proposed project, to follow the scienti c method to complete their experiments and to display results on backboard presentations. The sixth grade winners, from left, are rst place, Rainbow Cheese, Karolyn Myers and Scout McLemore, second place Shake Like an Earthquake, Kevin Flores, Bryce Kent and Hailey Gay; and second place Milk or Plastic? Becca Willis, Haley Scott, and Sean Williams.ABC School holds annual Middle School Science Fair SEVENTH GRADE SCIENTISTSThe seventh grade winners, from left, were rst place, Which Soil is Best? Savannah Montgomery and Brooke Martina; second place The Frightened Grasshopper, Michaela Cassidy; and third place Penny Transformation, Faith Sapp. Schools

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A14| The Times Thursday, December 13, 2012 CLASSIFIEDS 89522T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. CASE No. 19-2012-CA000278 JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, Plaintiff vs. LEON E. ONEAL II, et al., Defendants NOTICE OF ACTION TO: LEON E. ONEAL, II, 226 14TH STREET, APALACHICOLA, FL 32320 LEON E. ONEAL, II, 3820 NW HUNTSBORO ST, APT 103, LAKE CITY, FL 32055 LEON E. ONEAL, II, 175 SW BIRCH GLEN, LAKE CITY, FL 32024 FELICIA N. ONEAL, 226 14TH STREET, APALACHICOLA, FL 32320 FELICIA N. ONEAL, 3820 NW HUNTSBORO ST, APT 103, LAKE CITY, FL 32055 FELICIA N. ONEAL, 175 SW BIRCH GLEN, LAKE CITY, FL 32024 UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF LEON E. ONEAL, II, 226 14TH STREET, APALACHICOLA, FL 32320 UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF FELICIA N. ONEAL, 226 14TH STREET, APALACHICOLA, FL 32320 AND TO: All persons claiming an interest by, through, under, or against the aforesaid Defendant(s). YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following described property located in Franklin County, Florida: LOT 3, BLOCK 134 OF CITY OF APALACHICOLA, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS ON FILE AT THE OFFICE OF THE CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT IN FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. has been filed against you, an you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to this action, on Greenspoon Marder, P.A., Default Department, Attorneys for Plaintiff, whose address is Trade Centre South, Suite 700, 100 West Cypress Creek Road, Fort Lauderdale, FL 33309, and the file original with the Clerk within 30 days after the first publication of this notice otherwise a default and a judgment may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. WITNESS MY HAND AND SEAL OF SAID COURT on this 27th day of November, 2012. Marcia M. Johnson As Clerk of said Court Michele Maxwell As Deputy Clerk IMPORTANT In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons needing a reasonable accommodation to participate in this proceeding should, no later than seven (7) days prior, contact the Clerk of the Courts disability coordinator at 301 S MONROE STREET ROOM 225, TALLAHASSEE, FL 32301, 850-577-4401. If hearing or voice impaired, contact (TDD) (800)955-8771 via Florida Relay System. December 6, 13, 2012 89576T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION Case No. 11-000120CA TIB BANK, Plaintiff, v. APALACH CLASSIC SYSTEMS, INC., a Florida corporation; SALLY A. LEACH; GREGORY E. LEACH a/k/a GREGORY E. LEACH, M.D.; ADVANCED MEDICAL CENTER, LLC, a Florida limited liability company; LOGICAL INVESTMENTS, LLC, a Florida limited liability company; and ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANTS, WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; and UNKNOWN TENANTS IN POSSESSION, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS GIVEN that, pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure, dated September 25, 2012, and the Order Granting Plaintiffs Motion to Cancel and Reschedule Foreclosure Sale in the above-styled case in the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, I will, on January 9, 2013, at 11:00 a.m., sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the front door of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, in the city of Apalachicola, Florida, the following described real property: Parcel 1: Lots 1, 2 and the Southeast 30 feet of Lot 3, Block 52, of the City of Apalachicola, according to the map or plat thereof now in common use at the Clerk of the Circuit Court in Franklin County, Florida. Parcel 2: Northwest 30 feet of Lot 4, Northwest 46 feet of Lot 8, and all of Lots 5, 6 and 7, all in Block , of the City of Apalachicola, as per map or plat In common use on file at the Clerk of the Circuit Court in Franklin County, Florida. Parcel 3: The Southeast 30 feet of Lot 4 and the Northwest 30 feet of Lot 3, in Block 52, of the City of Apalachicola, as per map or plat in common use on file at the Clerk of the Circuit Court in Franklin County, Florida. IF YOU ARE A PERSON CLAIMING A RIGHT TO FUNDS REMAINING AFTER THE SALE, YOU MUST FILE A CLAIM WITH THE CLERK NO LATER THAN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU FAIL TO FILE A CLAIM, YOU WILL NOT BE ENTITLED TO ANY REMAINING FUNDS. AFTER 60 DAYS, ONLY THE OWNER OF RECORD AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MAY CLAIM THE SURPLUS. Dated on this 6th day of December, 2012. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of the Circuit Court Franklin County, Florida Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk December 13, 20, 2012 89574T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.. 19-2012CA-000119 DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE OF INDYMAC LOAN TRUST MORTGAGE BACKED CERTIFICATES SERIES 2005-L1 UNDER THE POOLING AND SERVICING AGREEMENT DATED JUNE 1, 2005, Plaintiff, v. IBRAHIM QUINONES; MARIANA PEREZ; JOEL QUINONES; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; MARINERS LANDING HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION PHASE II, LLC. Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order of Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure dated November 27, 2012, entered in Civil Case No. 19-2012-CA-000119 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest bidder for cash on 16th day of January, 2013, at 11:00 a.m. on the Front Lobby of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida 32320, relative to the following described property as set forth in the Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 10, MARINERS LANDING, PHASE II ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 8, PAGES 19, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY FLORIDA Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. ATTENTION: PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Court Administrator Phone: (850) 577-4401 DATED AT APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA THIS 28TH DAY OF NOVEMBER, 2012. Marcia M. Johnson CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk December 13, 20, 2012 91227T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 12-162-CA CAPITAL CITY BANK Plaintiff, vs. LYDIA BURNS, DREAM MERCHANT, L.L.C., FAIRWAY PARK SUBDIVISION PROPERTY OWNERS ASSOCIATION, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, and UNKNOWN TENANT(S), Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE is given pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated November 27, 2012, in Case No. 12-162-CA, of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit, in and for Franklin County, Florida, in which CAPITAL CITY BANK is the Plaintiff and LYDIA BURNS, DREAM MERCHANT, L.L.C., FAIRWAY PARK SUBDIVISION PROPERTY OWNERS ASSOCIATION, and FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the front door of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Franklin County, Florida at 11:00 a.m., Eastern Time, on January 9, 2013, the property set forth in the Final Judgment of Foreclosure and more particularly described as follows: LOT 8 OF FAIRWAY PARK SUBDIVISION, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 8, PAGE 15, PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. DATED: November 27, 2012 MARCIA M. JOHNSON Clerk of the Circuit Court BY: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk Attorney for Plaintiff: Garvin B Bowden, Esq. Gardner, Bist, Wiener, Wadsworth, Bowden, Bush, Dee, LaVia, & Wright, P.A. 1300 Thomaswood Dr. Tallahassee, FL 32308 December 6, 13, 2012 91237T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 12-108 CA CENTENNIAL BANK, an Arkansas banking corporation P.O. Box 610 Crawfordville, Florida 32327, Plaintiff, vs. RONALD D. BOOZER, MARJORIE L. BOOZER a/k/a MARJORIE LOUISE BOOZER, CLERK OF COURT, FRANKLIN COUNTY, STATE OF FLORIDA, and DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE on behalf of SCDSS Foster Care, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE Notice is hereby given that pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure, the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Franklin County, Florida, will on January 9, 2013, at 11:00 a.m. (Eastern Time) at the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida 32320, in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes offer for sale, and sell to the highest and best bidder, the following described real and property situated in Franklin County, Florida: LOT 1, BLOCK 48 (211), KEOUGHS SECOND ADDITION TO THE CITY OF CARRABELLE, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 20, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA; TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN 1977 AMHE MOBILE HOME, IDENTIFICATION NO. 21G6842D. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim with the clerk of the court within 60 days after the sale. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Franklin County Clerk of Court, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL (850) 653-8861 at least 7 days before the scheduled foreclosure sale, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. WITNESS my hand and the official seal of this Honorable Court this 28th day of November 2012. MARCIA JOHNSON Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk December 6, 13, 2012 91243T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2012 CA 000030 SYNOVUS BANK, FORMERLY KNOWN AS COLUMBUS BANK AND TRUST COMPANY, AS SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST THROUGH NAME CHANGE AND BY MERGER WITH COASTAL BANK AND TRUST OF FLORIDA f/k/a VANGUARD BANK AND TRUST COMPANY, Plaintiff, vs. DIRT ROADS DEVELOPMENT, L.L.C., a Florida limited liability company, et al., Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE Notice is hereby given that the undersigned, Marcia Johnson, Clerk Circuit Court of Franklin County, Florida, will on the 9th day of January, 2013 at 11:00 oclock A.M. at the steps of the Franklin County Courthouse, 22 Market Street, Apalachicola, Franklin County, Florida, offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash, the following described property situated in Franklin County, Florida: Lots 19 and 33, LAKES ON THE BLUFF, according to plat thereof recorded in the public records of Franklin County, Florida in Plat Book 8, Pages 33, 34 and 35. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN SIXTY (60) DAYS AFTER THE SALE. WITNESS my hand and official seal of this the 28th day of November, 2012. MARCIA JOHNSON Clerk of the Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk In accordance with the AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT, persons needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the ADA Coordinator not later than seven days prior to the proceeding at (850) 577-4430. December 6, 13, 2012 91239T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 2012 -135 CA CENTENNIAL BANK, an Arkansas banking corporation P.O. Box 610 Crawfordville, Florida 32327, Plaintiff, vs. BOBBY A. WINTONS, TEMOLYNNE W. WINTONS, THE UNKNOWN #1 TENANT IN POSSESSION OF 178 22ND AVE, APALACHICOLA, FL 32320, and THE UNKNOWN #2 TENANT IN POSSESSION OF 178 22ND AVE, APALACHICOLA, FL 32320, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE Notice is hereby given that pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure, the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Franklin County, Florida, will on January 9, 2013, at 11:00 a.m. (Eastern Time) at the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida 32320, in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes offer for sale, and sell to the highest and best bidder, the following described real and property situated in Franklin County, Florida: LOTS 6, 7, 24, AND 25, BLOCK 237, GREATER APALACHICOLA, A SUBDIVISION OF THE CITY OF APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF IN MOST COMMON USE IN THE OFFICE OF THE CLERK OF COURT, APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim with the clerk of the court within 60 days after the sale. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Franklin County Clerk of Court, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL (850) 653-8861 at least 7 days before the scheduled foreclosure sale, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. WITNESS my hand and the official seal of this Honorable Court this 28th day of November, 2012. MARCIA JOHNSON Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk December 6, 13, 2012 91245T IN THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 10-454-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, as successor in interest to COASTAL COMMUNITY BANK, Plaintiff, vs. JAMES W.SMITH, JR., and SISBRO INVESTMENT CORPORATION, a Georgia corporation, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated November 27, 2012, and entered in Civil Action No. 2010-000454-CA of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and CENTENNIAL BANK, as successor in interest to Coastal Community Bank, and the Defendants, JAMES W. SMITH, JR., and SISBRO INVESTMENT CORPORATION, a Georgia corporation, I will sell to the highest and best bidder, for cash, at 11:00 a.m. (Eastern Time) on the 9th day of January, 2013 at the front door foyer on the second floor of the Franklin County Courthouse, Apalachicola, Florida, the following-described real property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: Lot 12, Block 74, of ST. GEORGE ISLAND GULF BEACHES UNIT NO. 5, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 3 at page 17 of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. The successful bidder at the sale will be required to place the requisite state documentary stamps on the Certificate of Title. DATED this 28th day of November, 2012 Honorable Marcia Johnson Clerk of the Court Franklin County, FL By: Michele Maxwell As Deputy Clerk December 6, 13, 2012 91271T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA PREMIER BANK, a Florida banking corporation Plaintiff, vs. JAMES F. WEATHERLY, JR. Defendant. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the Final Default Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-captioned action, The Franklin County Clerk of Court will sell the property situated in Franklin County, Florida, described as follows, to-wit: Lot 2, Block 275, RIVERSIDE HEIGHTS, UNIT ONE, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 2, Page(s) 21, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, Front Door of the Clerks office in the Courthouse of Franklin County, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on the 16th day of January, 2013. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNERS AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. Dated this 28th day of November, 2012. Marcia M. Johnson Franklin County Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk December 13, 20, 2012 91265T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 19-2011-CA-000411 SEC.:_________ BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. DAVID STUDY A/K/A DAVID L. STUDY; KIMBERLEE L. STUDY; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; BLUEWATER-BAY PROPERTY OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC. Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order of Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure dated November 28, 2012, en tered in Civil Case No. 19-2011-CA-000411 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest bidder for cash on the 16th day of January, 2013, at 11:00 a.m. on the Front steps of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida 32320, relative to the following described property as set forth in the Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 27, BLUE WATER BAY, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 7, PAGE 31 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Court Administrator FL Phone: (850)577-4401 If you are hearing or voice impaired, call Florida Relay Service, hearing 800-955-8771, voice 800-955-8770. DATED AT APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA THIS 28TH DAY OF NOVEMBER, 2012. MARCIA M. JOHNSON CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk December 13, 20, 2012 91297T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 19-2009-CA-000627 DIVISION: SUNTRUST BANK, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. MELANIE JANE TURNER, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated November 27, 2012 and entered in Case NO. 19-2009-CA000627 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for FRANKLIN County, Florida wherein SUNTRUST BANK, N.A., is the Plaintiff and ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSE, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; STANLEY W. BENECKI; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the FRONT DOOR of the FRANKLIN COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 33 MARKET STREET, APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA at 11:00AM, on the 9th day of January, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: A PARCEL OF LAND IN THE NORTH 1/2 OF FRACTIONAL SECTION 11, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 4 WEST, ON DOG ISLAND, IN FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 36, IN DOG ISLAND SUBDIVISION UNIT NO. 4, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGES 23-24, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND FROM SAID POINT RUN NORTH 48 DEGREES 21 MINUTES WEST 298.70 FEET TO THE MEAN HIGH WATER LINE OF ST. GEORGE SOUND, THENCE FOLLOWING SAID MEAN HIGH WATER LINE NORTH 32 DEGREES 24 MINUTES EAST 269.28 FEET, THENCE FOLLOWING SAID MEAN HIGH WATER LINE NORTH 57 DEGREES 59 MINUTES EAST 403.56 FEET, THENCE FOLLOWING SAID MEAN HIGH WATER LINE NORTH 40 DEGREES 33 MINUTES EAST A DISTANCE OF 499.80 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING OF THE LANDS TO BE DESCRIBED: FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN THENCE NORTH 40 DEGREES 33 MINUTES EAST ALONG SAID MEAN HIGH WATER LINE 99.96 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 45 DEGREES 40 MINUTES EAST A DISTANCE OF 423.70 FEET TO THE NORTHERLY LINE OF A PROPOSED 66 FOOT STREET, THENCE RUN 48 DEGREES 30 MINUTES WEST ALONG SAID ROAD A DISTANCE OF 100 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 45 DEGREES 40 MINUTES WEST A DISTANCE OF 409.83 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; BEING SHOWN AS LOT 12 IN BLOCK A ON AN UNRECORDED PLAT PREPARED BY R.C. BANNERMAN, JR., REGISTERED SURVEYOR, AND DESIGNATED AS DOG ISLAND, ADDITION TO UNIT 4. A/K/A LOT 12 BAY DRIVE, DOG ISLAND, FL 32322 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on November 28, 2012. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Mr. Doug Smith, Office of Court Administration, Leon County Courthouse, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301, Phone: 850577-4401, Fax: 850487-7947 F09105924 December 13, 20, 2012 91331T PUBLIC NOTICE STATE OF FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION NOTICE OF PERMIT ISSUANCE The Department of Environmental Protection gives notice of permit issuance for a single family boardwalk and dock, permit number 19-0283133-002-EI, to Mr. Donald Hansard, at 9420 Centerville Road, Tallahassee, FL 32309, c/o Garlick Environmental Associates, Inc. Post Office Box 385, Apalachicola, FL 32329. The purpose of the permit has authorize construction of a 4 x 162 boardwalk, a 4 x 458 access pier, and a 5 x 20 terminal platform that includes two (2) 10 x 20 boat lifts within the extent of Apalachicola Bay, a Class II, Outstanding Florida Waterbody, Aquatic Preserve. Decking will be of Bay Decking or similar maximum light penetrating material. The project will be located at 2015 Sand Dollar Trail, Lot 1, Bay Cove Village, Parcel ID 29-09S-06W-7338-0000-0010, Latitude 29.625789 degrees North, Longitude 84.941908 degrees, Apalachicola Bay, Class II, Approved Shellfish Harvesting, Outstanding Florida Waters, on St George Island, Florida. Based on all the above, and with the application of general and lim-

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, December 13, 2012 The Times | A15 EASTERN SHIPBUILDING GROUP MORE THAN A JOB A FUTURE!LONG TERM WORKan aggressive leader in the Marine Industry, located in Panama City, FL has the following opportunities for skilled craftsmen:PIPEFITTERS PIPE WELDERS SHIPFITTERS STRUCTURAL WELDERS X-RAY WELDERS ELECTRICIANSCompetitive wages DOE, and a comprehensive bene ts package including: Company paid health, dental, and life insurance, 401(k), attendance & safety bonuses. Normal work week to include overtime. Quali ed craftsmen should apply in person: Mon-Fri, 8am-12pm 1pm4:30 pmHUMAN RESOURCES (2 Locations): 13300 Allanton Rd., Panama City, FL 32404 and 134 S. East Ave., Panama City, FL 32401Applications are also accepted at our East Ave Of ce Saturdays, 8am-12pm.(850) 522-7400, ext. 2285, 2322, or 2302 Fax: (850) 874-0208EOE/Drug Free Workplace The Apalachicola Bay Charter School is accepting applications for a full-time instructional position. Applicants must hold current teaching certi cate and have experience in the primary grades. The position will begin January 2, 2012. ABC School is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Please send resumes to: Chimene Johnson, ABC School, 98 12th Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320, fax: 850-653-1857 or email: elizabethkirvin@aol.com RENTALS3 BR 3 BA UNFURNISHED CONDO LONG TERM, POOL.............................................$850 2 BR 1 BA UNFURNISHED HOUSE FL ROOM, FENCED YARD, GARAGE ..................$800 3 BR 2 BA FURNISHED APT W/D, CARPORT, ST PARKING ............................$600 2 BR 1 BA UNFURNISHED APT NEW PAINT, SMALL PORCH ...............................$375 1 BR 1 BA UNFURNISHED APT ST PARKING, REMODELED, INC WATER ..........$425 3 BR 1 BA FURNISHED APT WEEKLY OR MONTHLY, INC UTILITIES 3 BR 1 BA UNFURNISHED DUPLEX DOWNTOWN CARRABELLE ...............................$600 2 OFFICE SPACES US 98 CARRABELLE ...............................................$300 BOTH 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322850-697-9604 850-323-0444 www.seacrestre.comwww. rst tness.com/carrabellePROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND RENTALS ToPlace Your Classified ad inCall Our New Numbers Now!Call: 850-747-5020 Toll Free:800-345-8688 Fax: 850-747-5044 Email: thestar@pcnh.com Email: thetimes@pcnh.com theAPALACHICOLA & CARRABELLETIMES CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW iting specific conditions of the permit, the Department has reasonable assurance the project, as proposed, fully meets the environmental resources permitting requirements of Chapter 62-346, Florida Administrative Code, and will not harm the environment. A person whose substantial interests are affected by the Departments action may petition for an administrative proceeding (hearing) under Sections 120.569 and 120.57 of the Florida Statute. The petition must contain the information set forth below and must be filed (received by the clerk) in the Office of General Counsel of the Department at 3900 Commonwealth Boulevard, Mail Station 35, Tallahassee, Florida 323993000. Because the administrative hearing process is designed to re-determine final agency action on the application, the filing of a petition for an administrative hearing may result in a modification of the permit, or even a denial of the application. Accordingly, the applicant will not commence construction or other activities under this permit until the deadlines below for filing a petition for an administrative hearing, or request for an extension of time, have expired. Under subsection 62-110.106(4) of the Florida Administrative Code, a person whose substantial interests are affected by the Departments action may also request an extension of time to file a petition for an administrative hearing. The Department may, for good cause shown, grant the request for an extension of time. Requests for extension of time must be filed with the Office of General Counsel of the Department at 3900 Commonwealth Boulevard, Mail Station 35, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-3000, before the applicable deadline. A timely request for extension of time shall toll the running time period for filing a petition until the request is acted upon. If a request is filed late, the Department may still grant it upon a motion by the requesting party showing that the failure to file a request for an extension of time before the deadline was the result of excusable neglect. In the event that a timely and sufficient petition for an administrative hearing is filed, other persons whose substantial interests will be affected by the outcome of the administrative process have the right to petition to intervene in the proceeding. Intervention will be only at the discretion of the presiding officer upon the filing of a motion in compliance with Rule 28-106.205 of the Florida Administrative Code. In accordance with subsection 28-106.111 (2) and subparagraph 62-110.106(3)(a).4, Florida Administrative Code, petitions for an administrative hearing by the applicant must be filed within 14 days of receipt of written notice. Petitions filed by any persons other than the applicant, and other than those entitled to written notice under Section 120.60 (3) of the Florida Statutes, must be filed within 14 days of publication of the notice. Under Section 120.60 (3) of the Florida Statute, however, any person who has asked the Department for notice of agency action may file a petition within 14 days of such notice, regardless of the date of publication. The petitioner shall mail a copy of the petition to the applicant at the address indicated above at the time of filing. The failure of any person to file a petition for an administrative hearing within the appropriate time period shall constitute a waiver of those rights. A petition that disputes the material facts on which the Departments action is based must contain the following information: (a) The name and address of each agency affected and each agencys file or identification number, if known; (b) The name, address, and telephone number of the petitioner; the name, address, and telephone number of the petitioners representative, if any, which shall be the address for service purposes during the course of the proceeding; and an explanation of how the petitioners substantial interests are or will be affected by the agency determination; (c) A statement of when and how the petitioner received notice of the agency decision; (d) A statement of all disputed issues of material fact. If there are none, the petition must so indicate; (e) A concise statement of the ultimate facts alleged, including the specific facts that the petitioner contends warrant reversal or modification of the agencys proposed action; (f) A statement of the specific rules or statutes that the petitioner contends require reversal or modification of the agencys proposed action; and (g) A statement of the relief sought by the petitioner, stating precisely the action that the petitioner wishes the agency to take with respect to the agencys proposed action. A petition that does not dispute the material facts on which the Departments action is based shall state that no such facts are in dispute and otherwise shall contain the same information as set forth above, as required by Rule 28-106.301, Florida Administrative Code. Under Sections 120.569(2)(c) and (d) of the Florida Statute, a petition for administrative hearing must be dismissed by the agency if the petition does not substantially comply with the above requirements or is untimely filed. This action is final and effective on the date filed with the Clerk of the Department unless a petition is filed in accordance with the above. Upon the timely filing of petition this order will not be effective until further order of the Department. This permit, when issued, constitutes an order of the Department. The applicant has the right to seek judicial review of the order under Section 120.68 of the Florida Statute, by the filing of a notice of appeal under Rule 9.110 of the Florida Rules of Appellate Procedure with the Clerk of the Department in the Office of General Counsel, 3900 Commonwealth Boulevard, Mail Station 35, Tallahassee, Florida, 323993000; and by filing a copy of the notice of the appeal accompanied by the applicable filing fees with the appropriate district court of appeal. The notice of appeal must be filed within 30 days from the date when the final order is filed with the Clerk of the Department. Requests for review before the Land and Water Adjudicatory Commission must be filed with the Secretary of the Commission and served on the Department within 20 days from the date when the final order is filed with the Clerk of the Department. The application for this permit is available for public inspection during normal business hours, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, except for legal holidays, at the Northwest District office, 3900 Commonwealth Blvd MS 55, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-3000. December 13, 2012 91403T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 192009CA 000612CAXXXX SUNTRUST MORTGAGE, INC. Plaintiff, vs. DANIEL D. GRIFFIN; SARAH A. MACMILLAN; UNKNOWN TENANT(S); AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANT(S), WHO (IS/ARE) NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIM AS HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, SPOUSES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INCORPORATED AS NOMINEE FOR SUNTRUST MORTGAGE, INC.; PICKETTS LANDING HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC. Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered on April 24, 2012, and the Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale entered on November 27, 2012, in this cause, in the Circuit Court of Franklin County, Florida, I will sell the property situated in Franklin County, Florida, described as: UNIT 3, BLOCK D OF PICKETTS LANDING, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 9, PAGE 7, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA a/k/a 1302 PICKETTS LANDING COURT, CARRABELLE, FL 32322 at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, at the front door of the courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320, Franklin County, Florida, at eleven oclock a.m., on February 6, 2013 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 50 days after the sale. Dated at Apalachicola, Florida, this 27th day of November, 2012. Marcia Johnson Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk December 13, 20, 2012 91355T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF SECOND THE JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 11-000440-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, an Arkansas banking corporation, successor in interest to Wakulla Bank, Plaintiff, vs. Archon Construction Co. LLC, a Florida limited liability company, and James F. Weatherly, Jr., Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure dated November 27, 2012, in the abovestyled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Front Door of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market St., Apalachicola, FL 32320 at 11:00 a.m. on January 9, 2013, the following described property: LOTS 1 & 2, BLOCK 52 (9) OF KELLYS ADDITION TO THE CITY OF CARRABELLE, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE(S) 20, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. Dated: November 28, 2012. Marcia Johnson Clerk of Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk December 13, 20, 2012 91417T IN THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 10-454-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, as successor in interest to COASTAL COMMUNITY BANK, Plaintiff, vs. JAMES W. SMITH, JR., and SISBRO INVESTMENT CORPORATION, a Georgia corporation, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated November 27, 2012, and entered in Civil Action No. 2010-000454-CA of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and CENTENNIAL BANK, as successor in interest to Coastal Community Bank, and the Defendants, JAMES W. SMITH, JR., and SISBRO INVESTMENT CORPORATION, a Georgia corporation, I will sell to the highest and best bidder, for cash, at 11:00 a.m. (Eastern Time) on the 9th day of January, 2013, at the front door foyer on the second floor of the Franklin County Courthouse, Apalachicola, Florida, the following-described real property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: Lot 12, Block 74, of ST. GEORGE ISLAND GULF BEACHES UNIT NO. 5, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 3 at page 17 of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. The successful bidder at the sale will be required to place the requisite state documentary stamps on the Certificate of Title. DATED this 28th day of November, 2012. Honorable MARCIA JOHNSON Clerk of the Court Franklin County, Florida By: /s Michele Maxwell As Deputy Clerk December 13, 20, 2012 Carrabelle : 208 1st St. NE, Saturday December 15th, 9am til ??HUGE YARD SALE Mexico Beach 701 Nautilus Dr St Joe Beach -98 E to Sea Shores side of Express lane follow signs Saturday. Dec. 15th 8:00 am -3:00 pm EST5 Family Yard/Moving saleDining room table, Boy baby clothes newborn 4T, mens XL, 2008 Yamaha V Star 250 motorcycle, Wii with games & acces., Play station 2, lots of books, so much other stuff to many to mention. Getting rid of years of stuff! Text FL35060 to 56654 EstateBicycle, Mongoose 26in, 21 speed, spring suspension, comfortable seat,$45; 2002 Ford Focus station wagon, 75K miles $2,000; 36 inch telescope stand $25; 850-294-9664 Drivers: All Miles PAID (Loaded & Empty)! Home on the weekends! Running Class-A CDL Flatbed. Lease to Own-No Money Down. CALL: 866-823-0264 Apalachicola: 1 br, 1 ba efficiency Call for information 850-653-6103 Text FL32343 to 56654 Heritage V illas of Apalachicola Apartments Now accepting applications for 2BR Some rental assistance may be available. Call 850-653-9277. TDD/ TTY 711. This institution is an equal opportunity provider & employer. Heritage V illas of Apalachicola Apartments Now accepting applications for 2BR Handicap accessible unit. Some rental assistance may be available. Call 850-653-9277. TDD/ TTY 711. This institution is an equal opportunity provider & employer. Carrabelle Cove ApartmentsTaking Applications Now Available: 1, 2 and 3 br, Handicap Apts. Laundry facilities on site, W/S included in rent, CH&A and window coverings provided. On site management Office. Rental assistance available. Income restrictions apply, reasonable accommodation. Carrabelle Cove Apartments 807 Gray Ave #33 Carrabelle, Fl 32322 850-697-2017 TDD711 This institution is an equal opportunity provider & employerText FL29928 to 56654 East Point Carrabelle 900 Square ft designer 1bedroom, open plan, Jacuzzi, washer & dryer, satellite, secluded, 1/2 mile from beach. $440/month. Call 954-816-7004 Text FL22547 to 56654 Historic Apalachicola Charming Cottage2br/1ba. In prime historic Apalachicola location. Short walk to water. Wood floors, new washer/dryer, ceiling fans, new cent. heat/ac, w/nice size yard. Pets allowed upon aproval/ deposit. $1,000mo. Call 850-832-2275 for appointment. Text FL34213 to 56654 Apalachicola: 3 br, 2 Bath. Newly Remodeled Call for details!! 850-653-6103 Text FL32340 to 56654 5 Acres located on Patty Lane, in Eastpoint, for more information Call 850-653-5939 Total Down Pmt $5752001 Chevy Monte Carlo T otal Price $3,9000% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! Total Down Pmt $7752002 Ford Explorer -4 Door T ot al Price $4,5000% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! Total Down Pmt $9752004 Dodge Durango -3 Rows T ot al Price $5,3000% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! Pontiac,Montana, 2004, Heated Seats, Sliding Doors, DVD Player, AM/FM CD Player, A/C, 99K Miles, $6,500; Call 850-653-6781/370-6034 These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you. EmeraldCoast Marketplace 747-5020 These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you. EmeraldCoast Marketplace 747-5020

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LocalA16 | The Times Thursday, December 13, 2012Special to The TimesWewahitchka author Michael Lister is known mostly for his gritty mysteries set in the North Florida Panhandle, but this Christmas hes publishing his rst romance. I actually started writing love stories rst, Lister said, but my crime ction was the rst to get published and what I became known for. Carries Gift is a Christmas love story involving two former high school classmates from the s reuniting at the funeral of a friend. Its about what might have been and what can still be and the connection that nothing can sever, not time or space or even the grave. Everything I write ts within the school of romantic literature, Lister noted. The movement that started in Europe that involves a heightened interest in nature, an emphasis on the individuals expression and a rebellion against established social rules and conventions. Even Listers crime novels have romance in them. I see The Big Goodbye as much a romance as anything else, and I think of Double Exposure as a meditation on love. The Blood series is, among other things, about Johns love life and Burnt Offerings features a couple falling in love. Listers longtime readers and fans of his mysteries will recognize many familiar elements. Carries Gift is similar to my other books in style and theme and worldview, Lister said, adding with a smile, minus the murder. When asked why his love story is set at Christmas, Lister responded, Christmas, like love, is magic. To me, the feeling of falling in love and the feeling surrounding the Christmas season are not dissimilar. Some of my favorite romantic movies are set at Christmas Its a Wonderful Life, Love Actually, The Holiday, Love Affair and The Family Stone. The two main characters of Carries Gift were in high school together in the s, and the book includes a lot of s elements. Im a child of the s, Lister said. Carries Gift gave me a chance to revisit my teens: the music (Lionel Richie love songs), the fashion (parachute pants), the events (the Challenger space shuttle disaster) that shaped our lives. It was so much fun. The book also gave me the opportunity to re ect on love and loss, life and death, meaning and what really matters in life. Lister will be signing and discussing Carries Gift from 1-3 p.m. ET Saturday, Dec. 15, at Downtown Books in Apalachicola and later from 4-8 p.m. CT at a Carries Gift Christmas Party at CityArts Coop in downtown Panama City. In a solemn ceremony Friday at the Camp Gordon Johnson World War II Museum, memories of the day President Franklin Roosevelt said would live in infamy rippled through the air. The attendees who gathered outside the wall were there not only to remember Pearl Harbor 71 years ago, but to dedicate two agpoles presented the museum by the Woodmen of the World. Jesse Goodson, a eld representative from Tallahassee for the life insurance society, addressed the gathering. Also on hand was Lance Mayers, an area manager for Woodmens central Panhandle unit. We believe in our ag, said Woodson. I wasnt even born, but I still know what this day represents. Maybe we wont have to do this anymore. Museum board member Tony Minichiello, husband of museum curator Linda Minichiello, emceed the ceremony, which opened with Carrabelle Mayor Curley Messer leading everyone in the Pledge of Allegiance. Sid Winchester, chaplain of the museum association, conducted the raising of the ag, which was initially at full staff and then lowered to half-staff just before a recording of President Roosevelts original Day of Infamy speech was played. A showing of the movie Tora Tora Tora followed. Among the World War II veterans on hand was Lanark Villages Robert L. Franklin, 89, who served with the Armys 122nd medical department, 386th emergency battalion, 29th infantry during the war, seeing action in England, France and Germany, including the Battle of the Bulge in summer 1945, the last great battle of the European front. As a backdrop to the agraising was a newly painted image on the museums outside wall of Allied soldiers storming the beach at Normandy. The design was painted earlier in the week by a crew of Carrabelle artists led by Joe Kotzman and Fred Aman. David Adlerstein Real Estate PicksOur local real estate experts have identied what they feel are the best values around and are oering them to you in Real Estate Picks! (In this section), Discover the best real estate values in Mexico Beach, Port St. Joe, Apalachicola, Cape San Blas, St. George Island, Carrabelle and surrounding areas. Best Values on the Forgotten Coast SELL YOUR LISTINGS HERE! Only $35 per week per listing Minimum 2 ads per week or 1 ad for 2 weeks Contact Joel or Kari for details: (850)814-7377 or (850)227-7847SOLD John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.comMLS# 245369$999,000St. George IslandPLANTATION BEACHFRONT5 BR, 5 BA home across the street from the new John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.comMLS# 248363$59,900St. George IslandCORNER LOT NEAR CANAL & BAYLocated at the corner of Bayshore Drive (paved) and Gibson Street. Bayshore Drive deadends into a canal Rodney'sOyster Tongs Laminated Handles!CONTACT: (850) 653.3764 or (850) 323.1937 Apalachicola, FL Notice of VacancyFranklin County Tourist Development Council Board Member The Franklin County Tourist Development Council is composed of nine members appointed by the Franklin County Board of Commissioners. Anyone interested in being considered for this volunteer position is encouraged to send a letter of interest and qualifying resume to the FCTDC at the address below. This is a volunteer position with no nancial compensation. Board members are required to attend regular board meetings and are expected to participate in the Committee activities of the Board. Prospective applicants must be engaged in a tourist-related business and must be a resident of Franklin County. All members of the council shall be electors of the county. Interested persons should reply no later than February 1, 2013. A recommendation will be forwarded to the Franklin County Commission for their consideration. Applications may be submitted to: Franklin County Tourist Development Council P O Box 819 Apalachicola, Florida 32329 or via email attachment to fran@anaturalescape.com For further information, please call Fran Edwards at the FCTDC oce at 850-653-8678. MICHAEL LISTER DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The TimesAbove: World War II vet Robert Franklin listens to the national anthem. Right: Museum chaplain Sid Winchester raises the ag on the new agpole.Museum remembers day of infamyLocal author writes Christmas love story