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The Apalachicola times
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100380/00198
 Material Information
Title: The Apalachicola times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: H.W. Johnston
Place of Publication: Apalachicola Fla
Apalachicola Fla
Publication Date: 11-29-2012
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1885.
General Note: Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 32911693
lccn - sn 95026907
System ID: UF00100380:00198
 Related Items
Preceded by: Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by: Apalachicola herald

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xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx 50 WWW.APALACHTIMES.COM Phone: 850-653-8868 Web: apalachtimes.com E-mail: dadlerstein@star .com Fax: 850-653-8036 Circulation: 800-345-8688 DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK: School News & Society: 11 a.m. Friday Real Estate Ads: 11 a.m. Thursday Legal Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Display Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Line Ads: 5 p.m. Monday xxxxx Contact Us xxxxx Out to see Index Thursday, November 29, 2012 VOL. 127 ISSUE 31 By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com No sooner had the Franklin County School Board welcomed a new member and organized itself for the new year when the ve members faced the stark reality of an extremely tight budget situation not even halfway through the 2012-13 scal year. After detailing a drop of hundreds of thousands of dollars in anticipated revenue and an unsustainable fund balance down to a mere $114,000 in unrestricted funds, Finance Director Shannon Venable made it clear at the Nov. 20 meeting the situation was serious. Making these adjustments, we have a negative fund balance, she said. We wont have enough to pay our bills this year. Venable said the district will have to respond to a $563,000 loss in property tax revenues, the result of a 6 percent drop in July at the rst certi cation, and another 7 percent decline after the nal certi cation in October. She said another adjustment she has had to make is in miscellaneous state revenue, which was budgeted at $95,000 for the 2012-13 scal year, even though the district last year received only $3,000 in this category. Gone is $95,945 in discretionary operating funds, as well as $80,000 in BP funds the district received after the April 2010 oil spill, Venable said. One of the only bright spots in the revenue picture was that the district now will be able to recoup from the food service program about $30,000 in utility costs, she said. An ongoing preliminary audit is showing $36,000 in disallowed Business booms after holiday weekend By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com Shops and eateries in downtown Apalachicola say Santa delivered robust sales on his shrimp boat this year. Apalachicola never looked better with musicians and strolling carolers enlivening the busy street and luminaries everywhere. During the afternoon, glorious blue skies were tickled by wispy white clouds. It was perfect November weather, even if it was a little too warm to feel like Christmas, since Black Friday came a week early this year. In keeping with tradition, Mr. Claus arrived aboard the shrimp boat Buddys Boys and mounted his glittering throne. At dusk, Apalachicola Mayor Pro Tem Frank Cook ipped the big red switch to light the city Christmas tree. The Orman House and Raney House historic sites, both beautifully decorated, stayed open late and served refreshments to visitors. Members of Tom Daly remains chairman of commission By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com A special meeting of the Apalachicola city commission Tuesday night gave rise to a stormy confrontation between Apalachicola Mayor Van Johnson and Planning and Zoning Chairman Tom Daly after the mayor called for Dalys ouster from P&Z. After a lengthy discussion, in which several audience members rose in defense of Daly, city commissioners split down the middle and thus took no action on the issue of Dalys removal from P&Z. The mayor had asked commissioners to con rm his recommendation, rst made in an Oct. 16 letter to Daly, in which he requested Daly immediately resign from P&Z. Instead, Commissioner Brenda Ash moved, and Frank Cook seconded, that Daly be stripped of his chairmanship of P&Z. That vote was 2-2, with Mitchell Bartley and Johnson each voting no. Commissioner Jimmy Elliott was absent, so his vote likely will be the tiebreaker should the matter be addressed at the Dec. 4 regular meeting or a subsequent meeting. Instead of complying, Tom Daly has chosen to challenge my directive in the court of public opinion, Johnson said at the outset of his prepared remarks. Its a pattern, a continued disregard for established process, procedures and protocol, and an affront to the mayor, staff and residents of this great city. He basically does what he wants, Johnson charged, as he outlined allegations Daly had acted beyond the scope of his authority in several instances. Its about transparency, the Work on Eastpoint library resumes By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com More than two years after it rst received federal funding, work was expected to resume this week on nishing the new Eastpoint Library. The announcement construction would resume was well received at the Friends of the Franklin County Public Librarys Nov. 14 annual meeting at the Eastpoint rehouse. Ellen Ashdown, secretary for the Friends, said PSBI Inc. of Tallahassee had been chosen to complete work on the project. The architect remains Ivan Johnson of Johnson Peterson Architects, Tallahassee. The complex process and plethora of paperwork are over, Ashdown said. The USDA-funded completion of the library is beginning! Ashdown said the U.S. Department of Agriculture Rural Development initially awarded the Eastpoint library project a $200,000 grant and $177,850 low-interest loan in September 2010, to be matched by $342,000 from the Friends group from a previous grant, business and community support encompassing donations and volunteer labor. Ashdown said the $342,000 funded the land purchase, permitting, surveying, clearing and site preparation, access driveTOM DALY District grapples with budget City stalemates on Planning and Zoning ouster BLACK FRIDAY DELIVERS HOLIDAY CROWDS PHOTOS BY LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Dexter and Trenton Teat pose for papa with Santa Claus. On Friday morning, they got a special treat, a new baby brother named Drake. Below Fairy Princess Amber Kaczmarek gets a hug from the jolly old elf on Black Friday. IN THE BL ACK Santas pets, A16 See BUDGET A7 See LIBRARY A6 See BLACK A6 See PLANNING A5 Opinion . . . . . . A4 Society . . . . . . A8 Faith . . . . . . . A9 Outdoors . . . . . A10 Tide Chart . . . . A10 Sports . . . . . . A11 Classi eds . . . A14-A15 Santa to visit Hill Saturday Join HCOLA, AJs Neighborhood Bar & Grill and the Elves to welcome Santa to the Hill from 10 a.m. to noon Saturday, Dec. 1 at AJs. Look for Santa moving around the neighborhood aboard the re truck as he heads to the AJs parking lot to pass out goody bags and take photos with the children. Holiday Fresh Market Saturday in Apalach Saturday in downtown Apalachicola is the Holiday Fresh Market. Shop in a relaxed atmosphere and pick up seasonal specialties. For information, call 653-9419 or visit info@apalachicolabay. org. Cinematic remembrance at WWII museum At 10 a.m. Dec. 7, the Camp Gordon Johnston World War II Museum will dedicate two agpoles donated by Woodmen of the World at the new front entrance, and a small commemorative plaque will be placed between them. Afterward, there will be a short ceremony to remember Pearl Harbor. The ag will be placed at half mast as Taps is played, followed by a recording of President Roosevelts Day of Infamy speech, the original heard by the nation over radio. At 11:30 a.m., Tora Tora Tora will be shown. All are invited. Admission is by donation. Lighting of lights on island Dec. 7 Come to the island Dec. 7 for the annual lighting of the holiday lights at island center. Santa will arrive on a re engine for the kids. The lighting will take place at dark. Lighthouse tours will be available. For more information, call 927-7744. Carrabelles Holiday on the Harbor Dec. 8 On Dec. 8, Marine Street in Carrabelle will be glowing with lights, and the River Walk is the place to be at dark thirty for watching the decked-out boat regatta, the Parade of Lights. Stroll with old friends, make some new ones, sip cider, see Santa and ll your eyes with enchantment. Fireworks are the grand nale for the parade. For more information, call 697-2585.

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Local A2 | The Times Thursday, November 29, 2012 F RANKLIN OUNTY H EALT H EPARTMENT 139 12 th Street Apalachicola, Florida 32320 Contact Person: David Walker Phone: 850-653-2111, ext. 119 E-mail: david_walker@doh.state..us The Franklin County Health Department will be having its Grand Opening of our new Dental Clinic located at 106 NE 5th Street in Carrabelle, FL. The Blue Foundation Dental Grant Presenta tion will also take place at the new dental facility. Please make plans to attend this much awaited occasion for the oral health of the residents of Franklin County! Please Join Us! DATE: Wednesday, December 5, 2012 TIME: 10:00 A.M. LOCATION: Carrabelle Clinic 106 NE 5th Street Carrabelle, FL 32322 Contact Person: Please make plans to attend this much awaited occasion for the oral health of the residents of Please Join Us! Wednesday, December 5, 2012 Please make plans to attend this much awaited occasion for the oral health of the residents of Please Join Us! Wednesday, December 5, 2012 SAVE THE DATE! By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com Members of the Gulf Coast State College board of trustees had a chance this month to see rsthand the Eastpoint campus where a nice-sized chunk of the colleges student body is receiving their high school education. The tour of the Franklin County Schools kindergarten through 12th grade campus, conducted by Principal George Oehlert, was the postscript to the monthly meeting held the morning of Nov. 8 in the high school media center. The trustees meetings are frequently rotated among the three counties Bay, Gulf and Franklin served by the state college. This months meeting was the farthest east the trustees have to travel, prompting several of them to remark they now had a newfound appreciation for the travel demands of Franklin County trustees. And our service area goes another 25 miles to the east, Board Chairman Denise Butler reminded her colleagues. Butler, a former teacher, principal and school board member in the Franklin County School District, opened the meeting with an overview of the two decadelong history of the consolidation process. Its a testimony to folks here who understand how important combining the two high schools has been she said. Its not an easy task for two communities with such different traditions. One theme woven through the three-page agenda and bundle of paperwork associated with the many agenda items was the excitement building for the estimated June 2013 completion of the 93,000-square-foot, $32 million Advanced Technology Center (ATC). Included, and approved, was change order 16, which called for the construction manager, GAC Contractors Inc. of Panama City, and the contractor, HJ High Construction Co. of Orlando, to revise the contract down to $27.1 million. This was because of a $4.8 million reduction in the rst 15 change orders and a $55,210 drop in change order 16. This last drop came about as a result of about $400,000 in savings for having the owner direct purchase ATC building materials and $345,000 in additional costs for having to buy culinary kitchen equipment. The ATC is going to make a difference. Its going to be a staple for providing jobs, Trustee Dan Estes said. During the portion of the meeting where trustees re ected on the recent election, he said America is going to do well. Were part of that. The world may go through a recession but we dont have to participate. Trustee Ralph Roberson noted the dozen or so students enrolled in a new welding class at the GulfFranklin Center. Thats a tremendous help, and it shows you what the college can do in assisting with job creation at the county level, he said. Roberson later presented a giant check to GCSC to represent the $5,000 the Port St. Joe certied public accountant and his wife, Margaret, donated to the ATC Excellence Fund. We have a lot of needs, he said. This is going to be a great thing, and were glad to play a small part in that. Dr. Jim Kerley, president of Gulf Coast, later in the meeting presented Butler with a cap with the letter MIT across the brow, representative of talks now under way with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology regarding a potential partnership in connection with the ATC. Butler commented on Gulf Coast of cials recent trip to Boston, to a conference intended to boost academic performance at community colleges. Kids here are not prepared for the rigor of the next level of education, she said. This is about changing a culture (and educating) for jobs we dont even know what they look like today. This is a very diverse region, she said. Dont underestimate the power and strength of the retirees who are here. Both she and Trustee Jim McKnight said they would reach out to Halsey Beshears, the newly elected state representative. Lets get him in our camp, McKnight said. I know hes a friend of community colleges. The college agreed to approve hiring Panama City attorney Timothy Warner, at an hourly rate of $250 in case he is needed to defend the school in a lawsuit, and Raymond Jackson by Susan Hernandez. Details of the case were shared in an executive session conducted after the regular meeting. The trustees received a report from Loretta Costin, in which she outlined details of a threeyear strategic plan for the Gulf Franklin Center, over which she is director. My goal is we continue to grow, she said. Im getting out to Gulf and Franklin counties, and meeting with employers. Well capture what cities want and need. Were implementing as we go. One example that both she and Roberson cited was a recently created welding class for about a dozen students. Clearly that was something that we heard, she said. She said the campus is also working on a correctional of cer program that might serve Franklin County residents closer than the Port St. Joe campus. Costin also noted the certi ed nursing assistant program being offered at St. James Bay Rehab Center outside Carrabelle. As much as possible, Kerley stressed. We want to partnership, partnership, partnership. Oehlert outlined for trustees the math and English courses Gulf Coast is involved in teaching at the Eastpoint campus. Its easier to get here than drive to Port St. Joe, he said. Our students need more to be getting ready for careers. Our students need to see some hope. Family traditions may not be counted on any longer. DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times At top, Gulf Coast State College President Dr. Jim Kerley, left, and Trustee Board Chair Denise Butler receive a $5,000 donation from Ralph Roberson. Above, Gulf Coast State College Trustee Karen Durden, center, hugs Chair Denise Butler after being told she has been selected by the Florida Association of Colleges as Trustee of the Year. Gulf Coast President Dr. Jim Kerley is at left. FCHS greets as Gulf Coast board meets LORETTA COSTIN

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Local The Times | A3 Thursday, November 29, 2012 To the People of Floridas Second Congressional District, I would like to express my heartfelt gratitude for your support and prayers, placed in me to continue our work in represent you. change the culture in Washington, D.C. as a lifelong resident of North and 2nd District, Florida Paid for by Southerland For Congress $ 159 .95 $ 149 .95 $ 179 .95 St. Joe Rent-All 706 1 st Street Port St. Joe (850)227-2112 GIFT CERTIFI C ATES & LAY-A-WAY A VAI L AB L E By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star.com Restrictions including mandatory drug testing are limiting participation in programs to nd jobs for oystermen. Workforce Florida Inc. created in 2000, was conceived to develop the states business climate by designing and implementing strategies that help Floridians enter, remain and advance in the workforce. In recent months, in response to the failure of seafood har vesting in the bay, the Gulf Coast Work force Board has stepped up efforts to train Franklin County seafood workers for alternative employment. Although Workforce Florida is at tacking local unemployment on mul tiple fronts, several hurdles remain to be crossed. Kim Bodine, executive director of the Gulf Coast Workforce Board, ap peared before the county commis sion on Nov. 20 to update them on the progress of training and placement programs and to present Workforces newest ve-year plan. The commission approved the plan, with Commissioner Noah Lockley opposed. Lockley questioned Bodine about a proposed oyster relay program for which the county has requested fed eral funding. He asked who made the bylaws for the program and noted that they varied considerably from previ ous oyster relay and shelling initiatives funded by the state. He asked why drug testing would be required. Bodine said funding for the relay has been requested through a national emergency grant from the U.S. Depart ment of Labor and the rules are based on federal requirements. Its federal money, so drug testing is required, said Commissioner Wil liam Massey. In the past, the county ran shelling, and Workforce wasnt involved in it, Di rector of Administrative Services Alan Pierce said. Last year, we just subbed it out to the (Franklin County Seafood Workers Association) and they ran the plan. In this case, the seafood workers association is not involved. Theres a leasing agency, and they have require ments like drug testing. It isnt really a change in state law; its a change in whos doing the program. Commissioner Cheryl Sanders asked if oystermen would be respon sible for providing their own drug tests. Bodine told her they would be tested by the leasing agency. Pierce outlined three signicant changes in the proposed program: Required drug testing, participants receiving a W-2 form from the leasing agency and paid hourly wage as op posed to payment per boatload. Massey said only two workers will be allowed on a boat. Each will receive $25 per hour for three hours of travel time to and from the bars and ve hours of work time on the bar. Pierce said he believed that in the past, relayers were paid $125 per work er for each boatload of shells delivered. Bodine told commissioners fund ing for the shelling program has not yet been approved. She said special approval was received from the labor departments regional ofce in Atlanta before the grant request was sent on to Washington. We were initially concerned that they would allow us to use these dol lars for temporary job creation of this nature, she said. They havent given us approval yet. Our proposal is still with US Department of Labor. We dont know what additional requirements they may have. Bodine said approval has taken lon ger than expected and blamed the de lay on the impact of Hurricane Sandy. Because the storm is so close to DC, I feel like people are focused on that, she said. Bodine said she is calling Washing ton and the countys regional partners regularly and urged commissioners to push for approval as well. Ive been told the oysters we are trying to use are dying off, she said. Time really is of the essence and thats what Im telling them now. They dont really understand a lot about the industry. Commissioner Pinki Jackel sug gested letters be sent to Congressman Steve Southerland, Senator Bill Nelson and the state legislative delegation. The state has told us they dont have any money, Jackel said. This is our best shot. Sanders said the county will contact Leslie Palmer, director of the states Di vision of Aquaculture, and ask if money will soon be available for a shelling pro gram proposed in addition to the oyster relay. Lockley was critical of Workforce. Youve got money to put people to work but the positions arent getting lled, he said. Bodine told commissioners that other programs are in place to provide employment for displaced oystermen but it has been difcult to get seafood workers to participate. People are still trying to harvest what they can from the bay, she said. Im hearing from my case managers people are waiting for the shelling proj ect but shelling is not ve days a week. If they are selected for the shelling, Im sure we can work something out with the county (to allow them to continue training). Bodine said Workforce now has 105 seafood workers signed up for training or on-the-job work experience. Anoth er 275 workers who are not saltwater product license holders have also ap plied for services. Workforce is currently van pooling 11 trainees to Gulf County four days a week for welding certication. Seven workers have qualied for correctional ofcer training and three of them have already been hired by a correctional fa cility. Testing and recruitment of certi ed nursing assistant trainees is now in progress in conjunction with Gulf Coast State College. Bodine said 12 work sites in addition to county work sites have been identi ed for the on-the-job training experi ence program. Im a little concerned that more people arent stepping into those work experience (positions), she said. Workforce also recently signed a contract with the countys literacy pro gram to hire additional tutors and pro vide a larger facility where people can work on their GEDs which may even tually allow them to seek training for medical or correctional employment. GULF COAST WORKFORCE BOARD HOLDS ANNUAL LUNCHEON On Nov. 13, the Gulf Coast Workforce Board celebrated 16 years of providing workforce services to the region at its annual meeting and luncheon at Florida State Universitys Panama City Campus Holley Center. At the meeting, Executive Director Kim Bodine reviewed the local workforce system performance over the last year which included: Assisting 1,096 employers recruit and hire workers Serving 60,336 walk ins at the Workforce Center Connecting a total of 4,659 individuals to employment Providing in-demand training and/ or employment services to 1,121 adults, dislocated workers, and youth under the Workforce Investment Act Helping 103 families transition from welfare to self sufciency We owe our great performance to our hardworking staff, our dedicated volunteer board members and our service providers, said Bodine. Service providers for the Gulf Coast board include Bay District Schools, Bay STARS; Haney Workforce Training Center; Friends of the Franklin County Library, TIGERS Program; Gulf Coast State College, Workforce Center; and Royal American Management. Individuals from each of the service providers along with their case manager were recognized for successfully completing their workforce program. At the meeting the board welcomed new board member Patti Blaylock from Gulf County and also voted on a new slate of ofcers for 2012-13. Tommy Ward, with Dave Pybus Electric from Bay County, was appointed to serve as chairman of the board. Other board members elected as 20122013 ofcers include Vice-Chair Bob Swenk (Bay County); Past Chair Ted Mosteller (Franklin County); and executive committee members Ruth Phillips (Gulf County) and Betty Croom (Franklin County) The Gulf Coast Workforce Board is a public/private partnership chartered by the State of Florida to administer workforce development programs in Bay, Gulf, and Franklin counties. Their mission is to provide leadership, oversight, guidance, and assistance to institutions and agencies delivering training and workforce services in order to meet the economic development and employment needs of Bay, Gulf, and Franklin counties.LO I S SWOBODA | The Times Kim Bodine Relay program to require mandatory drug testing

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Opinion A4 | The Times USPS 027-600 Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 Publisher: Roger Quinn Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola Times In a single week, we have seen four cases of canine parvovirus. This is a serious disease that mostly affects puppies and unvaccinated dogs. Parvo, if untreated, is often fatal. Even with treatment, survival is not assured. Because treatment for parvo is costly, we stress that prevention is the best medicine. Vaccination at a cost of just a few dollars can prevent a disease that costs $500-$2,000 to treat and will save your puppy a lot of suffering. Canine parvovirus was rst recognized in 1978. It is a virus that can last a very long time in the environment. Puppies get infected from walking, playing or rooting and ingesting the virus particles from contaminated soil. Vaccinated dogs still get infected and shed the virus, but they do not develop symptoms. Because so many dogs can be carriers, we cannot control the presence of the virus in the environment. When a puppy gets infected, the virus spreads through the blood and attacks the cells of the gut and the immune system. By killing these cells, the virus causes destruction of the natural barrier to infection in the gut. The gut has bacteria living on the surface that normally do not cause disease. When the barrier is compromised, however, those bacteria can enter the bloodstream and wreak havoc. To add insult to injury, parvo destroys the immune cells that would ght these bacterial infections. Finally, because the gut wall is compromised, the poor puppy cannot absorb nutrients and water. He or she will often bleed into the gut, risking catastrophic blood loss. Most parvo puppies are also infected with parasites, which can make matters even worse. The signs of parvovirus infection are vomiting, bloody diarrhea, dehydration and extreme lethargy. Sometimes there is a fever. These signs come on rapidly. A puppy can be playful in the morning and very sick by the evening. If this disease were happening to you, you would be placed in an isolation ward in intensive care, with intravenous (IV) uids, antibiotics and nutrition. Your blood values would be closely monitored to make sure that you were not developing sepsis (infection in the blood) and to ensure all of your organ systems were as healthy as possible. You would probably be hospitalized for ve days or more, and even then you may not recover. For puppies, the best treatment is IV uids, injectable and oral antibiotics, anti-nausea medication and special foods. Treatment may be needed for several days. Vaccination for parvovirus is one of the most important things you can do for a new puppy. The same shot also includes vaccines for distemper and hepatitis, which are rare diseases but just as serious. It is important that all puppies get the whole series in two-to-three-week intervals until 16 weeks; otherwise they may not be protected. Some breeds, like Rottweilers, need another shot after 16 weeks. Once a dog has had his or her booster at 1 year old, the vaccine provides at least three years of protection each time. If we never saw another case of this sad disease, we would be very happy veterinarians! John Duncan, DVM is a veterinarian at the Apalachicola Bay Animal Clinic in Eastpoint. A couple of months ago on CBSs program This Morning, they were talking about regional dialects across the United States. They were lamenting the loss or the consolidation of micro-dialects, which identied folks from one of the North Carolinas Outer Banks from another. Wow! In March 2012, the publishers of the Dictionary of American Regional English (DARE, http://dare. wisc.edu/) put out the fth volume. The work was begun in 1965 with interviews of 2,777 people across the country in towns and neighborhoods in cities and out in the countryside. It documents regional and sometimes a small populations use of language. Variations include pronunciation and spelling as well as phrasing. The dictionary also uses as reference sources diaries, letters, novels, histories, biographies, newspapers, government documents, etc. that cover our history from the colonial period to the present. In this seemingly more and more homogeneous 21st century population, local dialects still survive as Southerners may have noticed as camera crews fanned out across the New York boroughs and the coast of New Jersey after Hurricane Sandy. Library friend Jack Freeman, from Havana, dropped in about that time and told us that two white males from Apalachicola were interviewed in 1965. He sent me photocopies of the pertinent pages. The rst was born in 1886, had a grade school education and his occupation was listed as nautical, shing. The other was born in 1905, with a high school education and occupation listed in the category of skilled trades. The library will probably never own the volumes known as DARE, but we do have a funny book called Southern Talk, a Disappearing Language by Ray Cunningham. It contains phrases as well as pronunciations, adding quotations to make the point, as in the word nairn: A bunch of the boys at school has got yoyos, but I aint got nairn. Southern literature and studies on Southern writing are a special collection area for the Apalachicola Municipal Library with funding help from the Tapper Foundation of Port St Joe. Come by and see what we have. Attention: Until further notice, all faxes sent to the Department of Children and Families will be free. We know this service is available at Franklins Promise, but the library is open hours when they are closed. Caty Greene is the librarian for the Apalachicola Municipal Library. To reach her, call 653-8436. @ THE LIBRARY Caty Greene The FWC takes a lot of hits from local shermen and Big Bend coastal businesses for their perceived restrictive shing rules that dont always seem to pass the local common sense test. An FWC decision made last February during a meeting at the Pat Thomas Law Enforcement Academy got it right! The commissioners decision to have a spring gag grouper season in four Big Bend counties received rave reviews from kids and business owners alike. Now everyone hopes they will add an early fall season in Big Bend state waters. Ronald Fred Crum, owner of Crums Mini Mall in Panacea, has been coordinating Kids Fishing Tournaments for years, and he explained it this way: The commission helped to ensure another generation of gag grouper shers. If young shermen can experience the exhilaration and thrill of catching a shallow water gag grouper when they are 10 to 15 years old, they are hooked for life. They will eventually buy shing licenses and become the next generation of offshore shers. I agree with Crums assessment. I volunteer at the Beau Turner Youth Conservation Center and introduce a lot of youngsters to shallow water gag grouper shing. Its been my experience that you cant take kids at this young age 40-50 miles offshore on an eight-to-10 hour grouper shing trip, because they dont hold up and a bad experience can ruin them for life. These youngsters have a two-to-three hour attention span when it comes to gag grouper shing. You need calm seas and lots of snacks, and you have to get them out there quickly, make sure they can still see land and put them on a shallow water gag grouper to seal the deal. Once they feel the brute power of that grouper as it digs for the bottom, these kids become our next generation of offshore shermen and women. We cant give kids this experience in the Big Bend state waters because all of our gag grouper leave by Thanksgiving and they come back just before Easter. By July 4, they are gone again until late September. The ideal kids gag season here is March-June and September-November. FWC uses Regional Management practices for redsh, trout and even deer to ensure optimal recreational opportunities for shareholders. There is no reason why the commission shouldnt apply this same local management style to our grouper and snapper. After all, Florida state waters vary tremendously in habitat, depth and shing pressure from one end to the other, just like they vary from the East coast to the Gulf Coast. Last year, NOAA Fisheries had asked FWC in the name of consistency to open the recreational season for gag grouper in all state waters, from July 1, 2012 through Oct. 31, 2012. The problem was that there are no legal grouper in state waters of the Florida Big Bend counties of Franklin, Wakulla, Jefferson and Taylor during the hot summer months of July, August and September and the cold winter months of December-February. The economies of these four counties are heavily dependent on tourism and shing during the spring and fall months, and NOAAs proposed dates would further depress a struggling economy. During oral presentations to the commission, many knowledgeable locals stated, There are no legal grouper in the shallow Big Bend state waters during the hot summer months when NOAA wants you to open the gag grouper season. During my presentation, I told the commissioners, If you approve the proposed federal gag grouper season as requested by NOAA Fisheries, it would be akin to opening duck hunting season in the Big Bend from July through October when all of our ducks are in Canada! You cant introduce kids to duck hunting if there are no ducks for them to shoot at. During that FWC meeting, local shermen, coastal business owners and a county commissioner testied that eliminating the historic spring gag grouper season would devastate the coastal economy. Traditionally, small boaters from Georgia, Alabama and north Florida who pursue gags in shallow Big Bend waters during the spring and fall months help keep marinas, bait shops, guides, restaurants, motels, campgrounds and other coastal enterprises aoat. I am pleased to say that the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission hit a grand slam with our kids and our Big Bend businesses last winter when they stood up to NOAA Fisheries and a host of special interests to make a decision based on sound biological principles as well as doing what was the right thing for the folks, for the Big Bend coastal economy and for the gag grouper. In its nal decision, FWC made an exemption in the gag grouper season for the Big Bend counties of Franklin, Wakulla, Jefferson and Taylor. They did, however, reduce the season in these counties from four months to three months with April, May and June 2012, being open season for gag grouper in state waters. Federal waters statewide opened on July 1, 2012, and state waters of these four Big Bend counties were closed to gag grouper shing on June 30, 2012. The FWC decision last year was a win-win for everybody, and with gag grouper populations rebounding, everyone in the Big Bend is hoping that FWC will make a similar decision at its upcoming Dec. 5 and 6 meeting in Apalachicola when the commissioners set the gag grouper seasons for 2013. This time, coastal business owners, shers and especially the kids hope that they will be fair and add the fall months, SeptemberNovember, when our gags (ducks) come back to the Big Bend shallow state waters. If you agree, please send a note to the commissioners at Commissioners@ MyFWC.com and respectfully ask them to do it for the kids and for the economy! Alan Lamarche is a retired assistant chief of law enforcement for the former Florida Game & Fish Commission. I am writing in response to the article in the Nov. 20 issue of The Times (Planning, Zoning to review day care trafc) regarding operation of the Apalachicola/St. George Island Methodist Church (ASGI) Cooperative Parishs day care on the grounds of the Methodist church in Apalachicola. I do not feel that a faith-based ministry of a church can be denied by the Apalachicola P&Z. Christ Community Academy is a ministry of the Apalachicola/St. George Island United Methodist Church. It is in no way operating separate from the church as was suggested in the article. Although the Academy has adopted the State of Florida guidelines, the state has deemed this to be a faith-based ministry and it does not fall under the state and does not need a special exception to operate. This also applies to local governmental agencies such as the Apalachicola P&Z. While the operation of the day care as a ministry of the church does not come under governmental controls, if neighbors are concerned about parking on the street then that should be an issue for the city. Perhaps the neighbors could agree to an alternative to the existing parking on Fifth Street and could possibly look into head-in parking and making the street a one-way street. I will add that Christ Community Academy does not place a trafc burden on Fifth Street. The maximum number of children that can be accepted is 13 and at this time is not operating at full capacity. Parents drop off and pick up in a designated area during the week. The trafc generated is minimal. Fifth Street is made up of single-family residences, the church, a commercial establishment (bed & breakfast) and a commercial wedding venue, all using the parking on Fifth Street. First United Methodist Church has served this community for over a century. As with many rst churches in small towns, the community has built up around the church. FUMC was a good neighbor in the 1800s and strives to be just that today. A healthy church is one that reaches out in ministry to its community. FUMC does just that, not only with Christ Community Academy but through Bible studies, a dynamic youth group and a 12-step program to name a few. Indeed there is activity around this church. Christ Community Academy serves Franklin County in a much-needed way. It is a day care for infants and toddlers allowing for a safe and nurturing Christian environment for children. It employs three Franklin County residents. Finding good, affordable day care is a challenge for many families. Every effort has gone into making Christ Community Academy an exceptional day care facility and every effort has been made to see to it that this ministry continues to serve families in Franklin County. The Apalachicola P&Z does not have the authority to hinder or stop the ministry of a church but does have the authority and responsibility to address the parking issue raised by concerned citizens and hopefully the parking issue will be resolved. Mary Lou Short ALLAN LAMARCHE FWC needs another gag grouper grand slam Preserving the dialect of Franklin County DR. JOHN DUNCAN Prevention would quell parvo outbreakChurchs day care ministry much-needed Thursday, November 29, 2012

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Local The Times | A5 Thursday, November 29, 2012 dbutler@coastalcoverage.com Locally owned and operated Home Business Auto Health Workers Comp PUBLIC NOTICE THE FRANKLIN COUNTY ADVISORY BOARD OF ADJUST MENT WILL HOLD A PUBLIC HEARING ON WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 5, 2012, AT 10:00 A.M., IN THE COUNTY COMMISSION MEETING ROOM OF THE COURTHOUSE ANNEX TO CONSIDER THE FOLLOWING VARIANCES, APPEALS AND SPECIAL EXCEPTIONS: RECONSIDERATION OF A REQUEST FOR A VARIANCE 1. TO CONSTRUCT A SINGLE FAMILY DWELLING 5 FEET INTO THE SIDE SETBACK LINE ON PROPERTY DE SCRIBED AS A 1.10 ACRE PARCEL LYING IN SECTION 18, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 4 WEST, 578 RIVER ROAD, CARRABELLE, FL. REQUEST SUBMITTED BY GARLICK ENVIRONMENTAL ASSOCIATES, INC., AGENT FOR WILLIAM LAWLOR, OWNER. THE BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS, ACTING AS THE BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT WILL CONSIDER THIS REQUEST AT THEIR REGULAR MEETING ON DECEMBER 18, 2012. *Persons wishing to comment may do so in person or in writing to the Franklin County Planning & Zoning Department, 34 Forbes Street, Suite 1, Apalachicola, FL 32320. Transactions of this hearing will not be recorded, persons whish to record the proceedings must make the necessary arrangements for recording. NOTICE OF INTENT IS GIVEN THAT FRANKLIN COUNTY WILL HOLD A PUBLIC HEARING TO CONSIDER ADOPTING AN ORDINANCE REGULATING THE EASTPOINT PAVILION BY PROHIBITING THE CONSUMPTION OF ALCOHOL, LOITERING AND PUBLIC NUISANCES. Notice is hereby given that on December 4, 2012 at 10:00 a.m. (ET) at 34 Forbes Street, Apalachicola, Florida at the Courthouse Annex, the Franklin County Board of County Commissioners will hold a public hearing to consider adopting an ordinance captioned as follows: AN ORDINANCE PROVIDING THAT ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES SHALL NOT BE CONSUMED AT THE EASTPOINT PAVILION, FORBIDDING LOITERING; FORBIDDING PUBLIC NUISANCES; PROVIDING FOR PENALTIES; PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY AND AN EFFECTIVE DATE. Street, Apala chicola, Florida and may be viewed there. Interested Persons may appear at the meeting and be heard with respect to the proposed ordinance. Any party who may wish to appeal the decision made at this public hear ing is responsible for making a verbatim transcript of the hearing. Those persons requiring assistance to attend the meeting must call depu ty at 850-653-8861 x100 at least three business days before the meeting to make arrangements. CITY OF CARRABELLE PROPOSED ENACTMENT OF CITY ORDINANCE The City Commission of the City of Carrabelle, Florida, proposes to enact the following ordinance: CITY OF CARRABELLE ORDINANCE 453 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF CARRABELLE, FLORIDA, PROVIDING FOR AMENDMENT OF ORDINANCE 115, PERTAINING TO THE LEVY OF LICENSE AND OCCUPATIONAL TAXES ON PERSONS AND ENTITIES ENGAGED IN OR CARRYING ON CERTAIN TYPES OF BUSINESS, PROFESSIONS, PRIVILEGES OR OCCUPATIONS IN THE CITY OF CARRABELLE; AND ESTABLISHING AN EFFECTIVE DATE. The proposed Ordinance may be inspected during regular hours at Carrabelle City Hall between 8 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., 1001 Gray Ave., Carrabelle, FL Monday through Friday, or call 850-697-2727. The proposed Ordinance will be considered for enactment during a public hearing to Interested parties may appear at the hearing and be heard with respect to the proposed Ordinance. If an individual decides to appeal any decision made by the City Commission with respect to this meeting, a verbatim transcript may be required. If so, the individual should make Pursuant to the provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act, any person requiring special accommodation to participate in this meeting is asked to advise the city at least 48 hours before the meeting by contacting Keisha Smith at the above address or phone number. Wilburn Messer, Mayor Attest: Keisha Smith, City Clerk Publication Date: November 29, 2012 PLANNING from page A1 mayor said. I guarantee if I did something like this you would run me out of town. Its not right. Reading from the statement that further detailed the contents of his Oct. 16 letter, Johnson accused Daly of entering into an unauthorized agreement in his capacity as president of the Apalachicola Area Historical Society to sublet the Raney House Carriage House to city consultant Bill McCartney, a private, for-pro t entity. Johnson said Daly had independently set the rental rate for that space and publicly voiced his intent to establish an ofce in that house out of which he could discuss projects with developers to create a City Planning Department. Pressed by members of the audience to detail this allegation, the mayor said I got it from a reliable source. Apalachicola resident Susan Clementson, an active member of the historical society, rose in anger. As far as Im concerned, thats slanderous language, she said. That is total hearsay. That is an absolute absurdity. I cant believe you, mayor, if you are so concerned about ethics. Johnson also said Daly has been involved in a range of troubling activities that have included not following proper procedures for canceling P&Z meetings or holding them improperly. Before leaving midway through the discussion, Daly defended actions he had taken on behalf of the historical society, although his version of events differed from that of City Administrator Betty TaylorWebb, with whom he had met to discuss the possible sublease of space at the Carriage House. Betty said, I dont have a problem with that, Daly said, prompting a swift reply from Taylor-Webb. That is not correct, she said, stressing that she advised Daly to go before the city commission to secure approval for the deal. Taylor-Webb said McCartney works as an independent contractor for the city, to pursue matters of state funding, but is not a registered lobbyist. She said he is paid a percentage of monies he brings in to the city and carries a business card with the citys seal on it to assist him in his efforts in Tallahassee. She also noted that terms of the historical societys lease of the Raney House from the city, which has expired and is being reviewed on behalf of the society by attorney Barbara Sanders, are explicit that no subleasing is allowed. Daly said he was not made aware he needed approval of the city commissioners, but the mayor was adamant that he had. You were at the October meeting, when the issue came up about allowing Franklins Promise to use the re station as a thrift store. You knew that, Johnson said, pointing directly at Daly. You never came to this board. We werent given the opportunity to review it in a public setting. You know you were wrong. Daly rose in his defense. I dont believe Ive done anything wrong. I have the best intentions for this community, he said. This is an absolute insult to me. Half of what he said is untrue, if not all of it. Im not going to stand up here and confront things that arent true. The mayor stressed that P&Z volunteers serve at the pleasure of the elected city commissioners. He declined to address Dalys performance as P&Z chair. Im trying not to discuss that, Johnson said. Hes eventually going to have the city in a lawsuit sooner than you can imagine. Apalachicola resident Gene Smith spoke on Dalys behalf, noting he has done an exemplary job of being head of P&Z. Did you ever make a mistake? Smith asked of the mayor. I try not to make them over and over again, Johnson said. Smith said Daly briefed the historical society board a few months ago regarding the lease, and the executive board had approved the idea contingent on city approval. At last months meeting, city commissioners made clear the sublease was not permitted. Ed Springer, who sits on the historical society board, stressed that none of it was done with malicious intent. Apalachicola resident Bobby Miller suggested there was more to the matter than issues of public ethics. Sounds like a witch hunt to me, he said. It almost sounds like hes in the way of something in P&Z. Apalachicola resident Carrie Kienzle pleaded for commissioners to consider carefully whether such a harsh step as removal from P&Z was necessary. This is a person, a human being, she said. Is he a careless person? Perhaps. Overenthusiastic? Yes. Toms got his tail caught. But was there malicious intent? Was there criminal intent? This would be such a humiliation, Kienzle said. Think with your heart.

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Local A6 | The Times Thursday, November 29, 2012 NO HIDDEN CHARGES: It is our policy that the patient and any other person responsible for payments has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed by payment or any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment. www.mulliseye.com "WE WELCOME NE W PATIE N TS, C ALL T ODAY FOR YOUR P RIORITY APP OI N TME N T" FOR NEW PATIENTS 59 AND OLDER This certificate is good for a complete Medical Eye Exam with Todd Robinson, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Surgeon. The exam includes a prescription for eye glasses and tests for Glaucoma, Cataracts and other eye diseases FOR YOUR APPOINTMENT CALL: 850-763-6666 ELIGIBILITY: U.S. Citizens living in the Florida Panhandle, 59 years and older, not presently under our care. Coupon Expires: 11-30-12 FREE EYE EXAM CODE: AP00 Darren Payne, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon Lee Mullis, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon Todd Robinson, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon "Freedom from Eye Glasses, Now a reality for many." Smart Lenses SM Competitive Yields on FDIC Insured CDs ANNOUNCES THE OPENING OF WEEMS MEDICAL CENTER WEST Tuesday, December 4, 2012 Appointments Available and Walk-Ins Welcome!!! Appointments can be made by calling 653-8853 ext 118 and Walk-Ins may enter the front lobby of the hospital and inquire at the front registration desk. Weems Medical Center West will be providing Urgent and Family Care Services Tuesday through Thursday 8am 4pm 135 Ave G, Apalachicola, FL 850-653-8853 www.weemsmemorial.com ARE YOU IN NEED OF A MEDICAL PROVIDER?? BILL MILLER REALTY 850-697-3751 (3310) 570-0658 400 + COMM. U.S. 98 & GULF ADJ. TO LANARK MARINA 850K $29,500 $2,500 D O W N B UYS 2 B ED AP T 2 6 OR RENT $500/MTH 2 B/R 1 BTH GULF VIE W HOME W/ F AMILY R OOM $70,000 C/B-3-1 2 COR LOTS CITY $49,500 3/2 D /W 2 COR LOTS CITY $42,500 MIH 2 C RNR LOTS BLK. $ S TORE REDUCED $49,500 2 AC-AT RIVER UTIL. IN -$39,500 TANNING, WAXING, EAR PI E RCING, F E A T H E RS, FASHION EX TE NSIONS & U P DOS. Walk-ins Welcome With Mani/Pedi Combo 10% O FF Polish EXPIRES: 11/14/12 TANNING, WAXING, EAR PI E RCING, F E A T A T A H E RS, FASHION EX TE NSIONS & U P DOS. Philaco Womans Club pitched in to help park staff adorn the Orman House and to work with Lynn Wilson in decorating the Raney House on behalf of the Apalachicola Area Historical Society. The Apalachicola Municipal Library and Franklin Needs Inc. each decorated one of the four trees Wilson provided for the Raney House. Wilson adorned the other two trees, one with a coastal theme and a second arrayed with Russian dolls. George and Pam Mahr contributed a magni cent nine-foot cedar to the Orman House, where it is on display in the parlor adorned with antique ornaments. Dale Julian, owner of Downtown Books and Purl and a veteran of many holiday seasons, said this Black Friday seemed a little different to her. It had a different feel to it, she said. We started with strong sales rst thing in the morning, and it went on all day. Most years we spend the whole day gift wrapping. This year, people seemed to be buying for themselves. Christine Knight, a sales person at Artemis Gallery, which specializes in art and clothing, said even with three people on the oor, it was nonstop on Friday. Susan Wolfe, proprietor of Forgotten Coast Used and Out-of-Print Books, said business was good on both Friday and Saturday. She said many of her customers were in the market for history books about Apalachicola and the Panhandle. Karen Martinoff, owner of Charming Comforts, an upscale gift and furnishing shop said, This is our rst year at our main street location, so we have nothing to compare it to. We were busy from the minute we opened, even with extra help. We planned to close at 8, but we were here until 8:30 p.m. I can say its the rst time weve had a line to check out with two registers open, she said. We did a lot of gift wrapping. I had one person just to do that. It was a record day for us. Saturday was good, too. The Stuffed Owl, a specialty kitchen shop, reported sales in line with last year and remained strong from opening on Friday until about 4 p.m. Saturday. Many restaurants reported waits for seating and, with downtown diners full, the wealth spread out to encompass Papa Joes, Captain Snooks restaurant in Eastpoint and other outlying eateries. At 8 a.m. Saturday, Curt and Beth Blair, owners of Stage Left Pizza, were already in Panama City stocking up on restaurant supplies. We pretty much sold out of everything last night, Curt Blair said. Apalachicola Bay Chamber of Commerce Director Anita Grove said all the downtown businesses she polled reported strong sales that started early and continued until the stores closed on Friday evening, often after 9 p.m. Santa made landfall a few minutes early. Dance studio owner Pam Nobles and company staged a dazzling review in their hot pink attire. Philaco and Franklin Needs both raised funds for their organizations at booths and called the crowd extremely generous. The Bay Area Choral Society made the rounds passing the bucket to support the Franklin County food pantry. The line to see Santa seemed endless, and organizers regretfully closed up shop at 8:30 p.m. with a promise that the man in red would be back Saturday afternoon for a photo op with kids and dogs. Darlene Pearce of Cairo, Ga., said her family came to stay at their Lanark Village getaway for the holiday. On Friday, she brought daughter Ashton to see Santa but also came to Apalachicola speci cally to shop. I decided this year, with the economy the way it is, I was going to patronize small businesses and shop locally, Pearce said. Ive already been to Two Gulls and Beach Traders this afternoon. Late Saturday afternoon, Julian said her business had nally started to drop off. As a small business owner, I can say it was great, but Im happy thats over for this year, she said. way, drainage ponds, purchase and erection of the 5,000-square-foot Vulcan steel building, including exterior doors and windows, plumbing and an electricalready setup. But when completion of the project was bid in December 2011, the winning bid for the build-out work exceeded the USDA award amount, Ashdown said. The build-out encompassed nishing grading, topsoil, sod and landscaping, limestone base and asphalt paving, partitions, drywall, cabinetry and millwork, acoustical ceilings, insulation, carpet, vinyl tile, painting, book drop, heating and air conditioning, plumbing, electrical outlets and lighting. She said PSBIs eventual winning bid was $530,689, which included furniture. By value engineering, which included revising speci cations to cut costs, primarily replacing asphalt paving with limerock and reducing two large doors, the shortfall was reduced to $102,500, she said. After reapplication to USDA for that amount, the Friends received a supplemental award of $65,000 in an outright grant and $37,500 in a loan, Ashdown said. The total award from USDA now is $480,350, comprising a $265,000 grant and $215,350 loan, she said. The Friends also have received support from the Apalachicola Riverkeeper and the Northwest Florida Water Management District to restore the wetlands on the 13-acre site and to create a nature walk. Ashdown said completion is expected in three to six months. Three new board members, Anna Carmichael, Marabeth Farmer and Christine Hinton, were elected at the annual meeting for three-year terms running 2013-2015. Celeste Wall is retiring as a board member. Current Friends of cers include President Joyce Estes, Vice President Carmichael, Secretary Ashdown and Treasurer Uta Hardy, as well as directors Hinton, Bert Hicks, John Sink Barbara Yonclas and County Librarian Glenda Ondracek. LIBRARY from page A1 BLACK from page A1 DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times The outside of the proposed Eastpoint Library.

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Local The Times | A7 Thursday, November 29, 2012 capital project money, which are monies that had been allocated from the 1.5-mill capital outlay funds for maintenance but which never were spent. This is the rst year its happened, Venable said. Its because we didnt spend enough on our main tenance allocation in our general fund. The nance director also told the board retire ment corrections need to be made on payments for two board members, one previ ous and one current, as well as a reimbursement to Tax Collector Jimmy Harris for property tax adjustments for over assessments. These two items total $65,000. Lastly, Venable said ex penditures for the operation of the schools physical plant likely will run about $110,000 over what is currently set aside in the budget. I estimate about $1 mil lion that for one reason or another has gone away, Board Chairman Jimmy Gander said. To cope with the situa tion, Marks said she wrote an Aug. 29 letter to the state, and together with Venable, she has met with state edu cation ofcials who work with school nance. They gave us some suggestions, Marks said. They want us in close contact. They are willing to work with us. They want us to do what we can; this is go ing to be an ongoing process for Franklin County. They were very recep tive about helping Franklin County, she said. Marks shared with the school board a list of $411,000 in possible budget reductions for the second semester, plus an estimated $211,000 in additional rev enue if a plan to develop af fordable housing next to the former Apalachicola High School goes through. The plan, proposed by Leon Bloodworth, requires approval by both the school board and Apalachicola city commission, as well as funding support next year by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Devel opment. If it comes to frui tion and agreement can be reached on the sale price for the land, the northwest cor ner of the high school tract could see the creation of 44 moderate priced units in the months to come. The largest chunk of Marks cost-saving rec ommendations is $213,000 through the reduction of eight staff positions at the Franklin County Schools main campus and $86,000 through the cutback of ve positions at the branch cam pus in Eastpoint where the pre-kindergarten, Learning Academy and Alternative School are housed. Marks did not outline details of the proposed cuts but said they would not all be teachers. Were trying real hard to hang on to the instructional part, she said. It would not take out totally any programs, it would take out pieces of programs. Venable told the school board labor costs take out about $5.2 million from the general fund, and benets take another $1.5 million. Teachers were expected today to consider a plan that has emerged from contract negotiations that would see staffers, depending on sal ary, take between a 1 and 3 percent pay cut. Marks other recom mended cuts would be $35,000 for reorganizing bus transportation to Carrabelle locations, $33,000 by remov ing the district-funded den tal coverage and $14,000 by reducing the transporta tion foreman to a part-time position. Marks also announced plans to shut down district facilities during Christmas week to realize savings to utility costs. Al London, director of auxiliary services, told the school board he met with bus drivers last week and worked out a way to eliminate the driving of empty buses to and from Carrabelle. We nally came up with a plan that will eliminate completely any empty bus ies, he said, noting the plan would involve having drivers who live in Eastpoint to car pool to the school and then ride together on a school ve hicle to and from Carrabelle to the buses they drive. Now theyre going to have to drive their own ve hicles to school, London said. Just in this instance with these ve buses, by do ing this we will save $4.23 a mile, or about $70,000 a year by making this change. Everybody was on board; they like the chang es, he said. It wasnt a gripe session, it was a very constructive work session. Even if it saves half that money, were ahead of the game. School Board Member Pam Shiver said she would like to see more school em ployees brought into the cost-saving discussions. They may see something we dont, she said. Some times you can see things at the working level. Gander selected chairmanThe Nov. 20 organiza tional meeting began on an upbeat note, as County Judge Van Russell swore in Superintendent Nina Marks, who was re-elected to a four-year term without opposition. He then swore in the three school board members elected to fouryear terms: Teresa Ann Martin and George Thomp son, who returned to ofce without opposition, and newcomer Pam Shiver, who replaces Carl Whaley. Board Member David Hinton he moved to elect Gander to another term as school board chairman. Were in a really bad budget situation, Hinton said. It would not be ap propriate to nominate an other person. By unanimous vote, Gander was elected chair man and Thompson vicechairman. Hinton once again was appointed as the boards liaison to the Flori da legislature. Id like to thank ev eryone for the condence placed in me, Gander said after Marks handed him the gavel. Ill do my best. The board voted unani mously to retain Barbara Sanders as school board at torney. She will be paid $125 an hour for her services, and her associate Donna Duncan $95 per hour. One change that appears to be in the ofng is the scheduling of two regular school board meetings per month, as opposed to one on the rst Thursday of the month. I noticed last year we had a lot of special meetings, and my concern is does the board feel we should have two meetings a month and take off the special meet ings? Martin said. Gander noted that as the year goes on, we can try to conduct certain types of business at one meeting and other types at the other. Were going to be here twice anyway. The board agreed to set its regular meetings on rst Thursdays and tasked Marks with coming up with a schedule for a second reg ular meeting on the third week of each month. The school board mem bers also unanimously agreed to continue funding the four $1,000 scholarships they present each year to graduating Franklin County High School seniors. Ven able advised them that this scholarship account had in it, as of June 30, $6,824, and that it would be properly funded if each board mem ber contributed $33.34 each pay period. The school board also agreed to continue the for estry scholarship they set up last year as a forgive ness loan to a local student who enrolls in the Uni versity of Florida forestry program, which is the only Florida school to offer such a program.. Marks said no local stu dents have yet applied for the scholarship, which is funded through $20,000 set aside each year from funds contributed to the school district, in lieu of taxes, by the state forests. I dont think we need to keep adding money to it if nobodys using it, Hinton said. L CHRIS T M Z R T St. Joesph Bay Golf Club LE ELL T T Saturday, December 8, 2012 ~ 12:00 EST Tournament Format: Individual play with handicap from your normal tee $10.00 o Tournament Entry Fee if you bring a NEW TOY MEMBERS: $45 NON-MEMBERS: $55 C H RIS T M S Z R Do your Christmas shopping for unique handmade gifts made by local artists. Spruce up your home or oce with great decorations: Everything is Handmade Saturday, December 8: 9:00-4:00 For more information, call St. Joseph Bay Country Club: or Barb Van Treese: 1st Place: ............. $200 2nd Place: ........... $100 3rd Place: .............. $50 W IT H M INI MUM OF 28 PLA YE R S GPM GPM Financial, LLC Sponsored By: Penelopes Pet Shop, GP M Financial, LL C, Gulf County Sheris Department, Gulf 2 Bay Development & Construction, and Gulf County Tourist Development Council FRANKLIN COUNTY TOURIST DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING SCHEDULE CHANGE THE FOLLOWING MEETINGS HAVE BEEN CANCELED DUE TO THE HOLIDAYS: November 27, 2012 1:30 PM Committee Meeting December 11, 2012 3:00 PM Board Meeting December 25, 2012 1:30 PM Committee Meeting HAVE BEEN CANCELLED REGULAR SCHEDULED MEETINGS WILL RESUME IN JANUARY, 2013 These are OPEN public meetings and two or more County Commissioners may attend. ATTENTION!!! PR I MARY CAR E 4 ALL located on 1001 Gray Avenue, in Carrabelle, FL 32322 will be relocating to 680 Maple Street, Chattahoochee, FL 32324, (850) 663-2355 effective November 30 th 2012. All For further information you can continue to contact (850) 697-2550. Thank You, H.C. Hercule, M.D. BUDGET from page A1 DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times Sworn in last week to four-year terms on the school board are, from left, Teresa Ann Martin, Pam Shiver and George Thompson.

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OF THE WEEK PET St. Joseph Bay Humane Society MEET LEO! Just look at those ears and that adorable under bite! How can you resist? Leo is a one year old Chiwienee and he is even cuter in person than in the picture. He is a happy, social dog and will make a great pet for someone looking for a small breed dog. Come meet him and all the other small breed dogs we are housing at the shelter right now. Lets give them all a home for the holidays! VO L UNTEERS ARE DESPERATE L Y NEEDED TO SO C IA L IZE WIT H A LL OF OUR DOGS AND C ATS. W e are always looking for people willing to bring one of our animals into their home to be fostered for various needs. A nytime you can spare would be greatly appreciated. Call Karen at 670-8417 for more details or visit the F ranklin County Humane S ociety at 244 S tate R oad 65 in E astpoint. Y ou may logon to the website at www.forgottenpets.org to see more of our adoptable pets. NIP RODENTS I N T H E BU D CALL L OIS AT 653-5857 Franklin Countys ONLY LOC AL Pest Control Company RODENTS RODENTS RODENTS I I N N T T Stan Trappe ATTORNEY AT LAW Foreclosure Defense Bankruptcy Asset Protection Real Estate Probate ~ Wills Admitted to Practice Law in Florida Since 1974 Let Me Help You 850-769-6139 236 McKenzie Avenue Panama City, FL New Location this Year!! Hwy 98, beside Gulf Side IGA in Apalachicola. See You There! Margaret (850) 653.3764 or (850) 323.1937 Margarets Christmas Trees Coming Fraser Fir 5 to 10 ft Arriving Thanksgiving Week! FRESH WREATHS Animal Hospital of Port St. Joe 24-Emergency Service For Our Current Clients Quality Internal Medicine Soft Tissue/Orthopedic Surgery Dentistry Clean and Spacious Facility Mon, Tues, Thurs & Fri 8:00 AM 5:30 PM 300 Long Ave PSJ, FL 32456 850-229-6009 Society A8 | The Times Thursday, November 29, 2012 LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Cassie Gary slices turkey with help from mom Susan while Sally Williamson, right, prepares gravy for Thanksgiving dinner. On Thanksgiving, with the help of volunteers, the Owl Caf prepared 50 dinners for delivery to shut-ins by Meals on Wheels. Dinner was turkey with all the trimmings and pumpkin pie. The Meals on Wheels offering was the same as the Thanksgiving dinner served that afternoon to the Owls regular clientele. Some of these people may not have more food delivered over the holiday weekend, and we want them to have enough for several meals, Susan Gary said. Photos by LOIS SWOBODA | The Times TOP: This Christmas tree decked with pink bows and pictures of the Franklin Needs Calendar Girls is one of four themed trees on display at the Raney House through New Years Day. The 2013 calendar to bene t womens breast health in Franklin County is now available at many locations. For a donation of $25, these calendars make great stocking stuffers and support a great cause. ABOVE: This tree decorated with oyster shells and cotton bolls at the Orman House captures the simplicity of Christmas long ago. By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com Indian Pass resident Pete Burgher has been ying airplanes since he was a child. So steering with his knees and legs to capture a gorgeous photograph hundreds of feet in the air is, Burgher said, like duck soup, though maybe you shouldnt say that. Burgher has turned a love of ying and a passion for aerial photography to new heights in an effort to raise funds for the Apalachicola Maritime Museum. Those funds, he said, will help keep a legacy a history alive. The rst product of Burghers work is a calendar titled Patterns in the Water which features 13 of the more than 50 photographs from a coffee-table style book to be published by Christmas 2013. The calendar and book were outcomes from Burghers frequent ights around the area. I had thought a long time about the idea of a book of photos showing the unusual features you could see from the air, he said. So I began collecting those photos. I y every chance I get and every chance the weather gives me the opportunity. The more I ew around here the more I started noticing the striking images from the water. There is so much to see and it is so beautiful. You end up with hundreds of (photo) candidates and it is hard to whittle that down. George Kirvin Floyd owns and operates the Apalachicola Maritime Museum, for which Burgher is a volunteer on boating trips up the Apalachicola River and oodplain. His family goes way back in Franklin County and owns quite a bit of shoreline in Apalachicola and the area, Burgher said of Floyd. He established that museum to maintain that heritage. One day Floyd and Burgher were perusing Burghers work and talked about Burghers idea for a book when Floyd offered a proposition. Floyd would ensure the book was published if the museum could be the bene ciary of the pro ts. The book will be on photographic paper and have a nice layout, Burgher said. The book is done but probably wont be printed until sometime next year, probably in time for Christmas. The book will be a re ection on the beauty of our area. The calendar came about by happenstance. Floyds company had contracted with the Franklin County Tourism Development Council to provide welcome center services on St. George Island and elsewhere. His rst thought was getting some of those striking Burgher images to the public to sell the area and thought a calendar the perfect vehicle. He wanted me to take out some of the photos to make a calendar, Burgher said. I agree to forfeit any royalties and Ramseys (Printing and Of ce Supply) worked hard on getting them printed quickly and looking good. The calendar is available at a variety of outlets in Franklin and Gulf counties for $10. I can go y anytime I want and I always carry my camera with me, Burgher said. I get to see those patterns, that beauty, every day. Isnt it nice to be able to share it with other people? We really have a remarkable place. Special to The Times County Commissioners William Massey, left, Pinki Jackel and director of Administrative Services Alan Pierce pose with three of the 27 new power pole ornaments debuting in Eastpoint this holiday season. Jackel proposed the ornaments and found funding for their creation. Massey oversaw their placement along U.S. 98 in the Eastpoint business district. Inmates at the Franklin Correctional Institution built the ornaments from rebar. Employees of the county parks and recreation department painted them and wrapped them in lights and tinsel. Pierce said the ornaments weigh about 10 pounds each and are attached to the poles with a metal mount slightly modi ed from the design used to mount the ornaments hung along U.S. 98 in Apalachicola. The ornaments were a bargain at $2,100, with money rst allocated by the county commission in 2010. Eastpoint will celebrate Christmas on Dec. 14 with a celebration and a visit from Santa. The parade starts at 4 p.m. and will travel from Gillespie Street west of Sellers Plaza to Bay Street, then south to Patton Drive and east to the pavilion. Santa will be arriving on an oyster boat. For information, call the Apalachicola Area Chamber of Commerce at 653-9419. LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Christmas comes to Eastpoint TREES REFLECT BOTH OLD AND NEW OWL CAF HOLIDAY TRADITION Photos by PETE BURGHER | Special to the Times At left, oyster bars are seen in Apalachicola Bay. Right, a winter wind brings a sparkle to the waters of Apalachicola Bay. Resident raising money by snapping patterns in the water

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Nick Shiver Family We would like to thank all the loving and caring people for their prayers, food and owers during our time of loss. We appreciate them very much. Thanks to pastors Bobby Shiver and Craig Hicks for a great service. We have a special thank-you to Steve Boatwright for singing the song our dad loved to hear. Also a big thank you to David Kelley and his staff for a great job. Our Husband, Father, GrandFather, GreatGrandFather, and Brother will be greatly missed. The Family of Nixon Nick Shiver WELCOMES YOU Church of the Ascension 101 NE First Street Carrabelle SUNDAY 10:00 AM WELCOMES YOU Church THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH (850) 274-4490 (850) 545-2578 WELCOMES YOU Trinity Trinity Episcopal Church est. 1836 Welcomes You Hwy. 98 & 6th St. Apalachicola 850-653-9550 Sunday Worship Services 8 & 10:30 a.m. Wednesdays Healing Service 11 a.m. Centering Prayer 4 p.m. Sunday Worship Services 8 & 10:30 a.m. Wednesdays Healing Service 11 a.m. Centering Prayer 4 p.m. First Pentecostal Holiness Church 379 Brownsville Road Apalachicola Were excited about what Gods doing!!! Sunday School 9:45 am Sunday Morning Worship 10:45 am Sunday Evening Service 6:00 pm Monday, Youth Group 6:30 pm Wednesday, Royal Rangers, G.A.P. 7:00 pm Wednesday Worship & Word 7:30 pm Nursery Provided during regular church services 7:00 7:00 First Baptist Church St. George Island 501 E. Bayshore Drive 927-2257 R. Michael Waley, Pastor Join us as we praise and worship the living Christ. Great is the Lord and most worthy of praise. Psalm 145:3 Sunday Bible Study ................................................ 10:00am Worship Praise ........................................................ 11:00am Sunday Night ............................................................ 7:00pm Wednesday Power Hour ...................................... 7:00pm Wednesday Youth at S.P.L.A.S.H ....................... 7:00pm Walking in Christ R. Michael Whaley, Pastor The United Methodist Churches of Franklin County Welcome You First United Methodist Church of Apalachicola Worship Service 11:00 a.m. every Sunday Sunday School 10:00 a.m. 75 5 th St. Apalachicola 653-9530 fumcapalach@gtcom.net Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis Carrabelle United Methodist Church Worship Services 10:45 a.m. Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Celebrate Recovery Mondays 7-9 p.m. 102 NE Ave. B Carrabelle 697-3672 Pastor: Julie Stephens Eastpoint United Methodist Church Worship Service 10:00 a.m. every Sunday Healing service every fourth Monday at 7:00 p.m. 317 Patton Dr. (corner of David St.) 670-8825 Pastor: Rev. Beth White St. George Island United Methodist Church 9:00 a.m. Worship Service 10:00 a.m. Fellowship Hour 201 E. Gulf Beach Dr. 9274635 www.sgiumc.org Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis Nursery now provided for Sunday Church Service Faith The Times | A9 Thursday, November 29, 2012 Patricia (Pat) Billingsley Miller, 61, of Apalachicola, passed away Friday, Oct. 26, 2012, at her home in Apalachicola. Pat was born Sept. 29, 1951, in Atlanta, Ga., to Ira Alvin Billingsley and Martha Thelma Billingsley. She is survived by her husband, Delbert (Del) Miller; son, Daniel Scott Garrett; daughter-inlaw, Dannibeth Garrett; granddaughter, Daniella Garrett; and sister, Mary Jennings. Pat was a member of Fellowship Baptist Church, Apalachicola, and will be missed by many. Her family would like to thank everyone for all your prayers and support. Patricia Miller Earl Jerry Scott, 77, passed away Saturday, Nov. 24, 2012, in Gainesville. Born Dec. 24, 1934, in Apalachicola, he was a son of the late Billy and Mary Branch Scott. He served in the United States Air Force and had retired from the State of Florida as a utilities engineer. Following retirement, he became a security ofcer with various security agencies in Tallahassee. He loved hunting and shing, the Three Stooges, telling stories, was a people person, and daily talked with the Lord and read his Bible. He is survived by his wife, Mary Scott; son, Rick (Kathy) Scott, grandson, David Lindsay; great-granddaughter, Mercedez Lindsay; brother, Fred Scott; stepchildren, Mike (Margaret) Ritter, Champ (Lisa) Ritter, and Rebecca (Michael) Vause; six stepgrandchildren and four step-great-grandchildren. He was preceded in death by a daughter, Josette Scott; granddaughter, Jennifer Scott; and Janet, the mother of his son. The family will receive friends from 1-2 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 29, at Abbey Funeral Home in Tallahassee. A memorial service will follow at 2 p.m. at Abbey Funeral Home. In lieu of owers, donations may be made to your favorite charity. Online condolences at www. abbeyfh.com. Earl Jerry Scott Obituaries Bingo previews to start Tuesdays at Chillas Hall Holy cow! Chillas Hall was decorated for the Thanksgiving dinner, and there were tables of families and friends. We all enjoyed all of that glorious food. Thanks to all who brought dishes, baked the turkeys and the desserts. Your full breakfast will be waiting at Chillas Hall on Saturday. Members of the Lanark Village Golf Club will be on hand to prepare and serve it for you. Your donation of $5 will ll a plate for you. Come over and start the morning off with your friends and neighbors. There will be previews of Bingo at Chillas Hall the rst three Tuesdays of next month, Dec. 4, 11 and 18. Doors open at 6 p.m., and bingo will start at 7 p.m. There will be free coffee and cookies, door prizes and bingo. We will have a good time, so plan to try and join us. The bingo will be sponsored by the Lanark Village Golf Club. Mark your calendars for Dec. 8, and join us at the Lanark Village Boat Club for your sugar x. Members of the boat club will prepare and serve pancakes/French toast, eggs, bacon, juice and coffee for your donation of only $5. See you there! Of course, the breakfasts and bingo are open to the public. Then, Saturday night, Dec. 8, enjoy the Parade of Lights on the Carrabelle River. Holiday on the Harbor will begin at dark-thirty, and reworks too! Be kind to one another, check in on the sick and housebound and remember to get a grip, tie a knot, hang on to Jesus. Until next time, God bless America, our troops, the poor, homeless and hungry. LANARK NEWS Jim Welsh Card of THANKS Times staff reports Santa to visit Hill on Saturday Join HCOLA, AJs Neighborhood Bar & Grill and the Elves as we welcome Santa to the Hill from 10 a.m. to noon Saturda y. Look for Santa moving around the neighborhood aboard the re truck as he heads to the AJs parking lot to pass out goody bags and take photos with the children. Holiday Fresh Market Saturday in A palach Mark Saturday in downtown Apalachicola as your day not to ght the crowds and trafc at the malls. Come for the day to the Holiday Fresh Market and shop in a relaxed, hassle-free environment. Buy handcrafted Apalachicola specialties from seasonal wreaths to vintage European glass bead jewelry, and specialty food delights. Your shopping has never been easier. For information, call 653-9419 or visit info@apalachicolabay.org. Family Portrait DVDs available A DVD of Barry Hands The Family Portrait, performed at the Dixie Theatre in August, is now available. The hour-long DVD includes the entire production of the show, and costs $15. For more information, call 850-276-2550 or email barrylh20@yahoo.com. Sacred Heart hospital guild holds holiday sale The spirit of the holidays will come alive in the main hallway of Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf as the hospitals Volunteer Guild hosts its third annual Christmas Spectacular Sunday through Friday, Dec. 2-7. Guests of the spectacular will discover unique holiday decorations, tree ornaments, manger scenes, angels, gift items, holiday games, festive toys, and table dcor. Event hours will be from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sunday, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Monday through Thursday and 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Friday. Santa is scheduled to arrive at 5 p.m. Friday for milk and cookies. The Sacred Heart Gift Shop is a non-prot fundraising program operated by the hospitals Volunteer Guild. Proceeds generated from the shop and this sale will support services at Sacred Heart. For more information about the volunteer guild, contact Paula Pickett, Guild membership chair, at 227-7535 or visit www.sacredheartonthegulf.org. For more information about the gift shop or holiday sale, call the volunteer desk at 229-5788. Faith BRIEFS Times staff reports Students in the Take Stock in Children mentoring program, together with the Youth Advisory Council of the Franklin County Education Foundation, provided a free meal and fellowship Nov. 20 at the Apalachicola Community Center in honor of Thanksgiving. Lois Catlin, chairwoman of the foundation, said the students cooked macaroni and cheese, stufng, greens, and chicken corn chowder, all the food except for the salmon, which was handled by Phoenix Family Health Care Center. Other donations included cakes by Rhetta Strange at Strange Creations, turkey and cornbread by RMS Construction, dinner rolls by the Carrabelle IGA, salad by Hog Wild, deviled eggs and green beans by Patty Dempsey, bottled water by the Tucker Family, and cole slaw by The Fishermans Wife. The mentees, who worked from 11 a.m. and then served through the evening, included, above from left, freshman Jessica Schmidt, junior James Bailey, senior Yvonne Mitchell, freshman Chance Bareld and freshman Amber Henning. Also taking part in the event, which enabled the participants to earn their the community service hours required by Take Stock in Children were sophomores Aaliyah West and Morgan Martin; juniors Deborah Dempsey, Jathan Martin and Andrea Cupid; senior Cheyenne Martin; and Apalachicola Bay Charter School eighth-grader Marshall Sweet. Photos by D A V I D A DLE R STE I N | The Times Students in the Take Stock in Children mentoring program, together with the Youth Advisory Council of the Franklin County Education Foundation, provided a free meal and fellowship Nov. 20 at the Apalachicola Community Center in honor of Thanksgiving. Take Stock students give back Amber Henning ladles out chowder.

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By TOM MACKENZIE Special to the Times Five endangered whooping cranes arrived Friday on their wintering grounds at St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge in Wakulla County. These cranes are the 12th group to be guided by ultralight aircraft from central Wisconsin to the Gulf Coast. The Whooping Crane Eastern Partnership, an international coalition of public and private organizations, is conducting the reintroduction project in an effort to restore this endangered species to part of its historic range in eastern North America. There are now 115 whooping cranes in the wild in eastern North America thanks to WCEPs efforts. This is the earliest the birds have arrived at St. Marks, and we are thrilled to have them here so soon, said Terry Peacock, refuge manager at St. Marks NWR. I was in the blind at the pen site to watch the birds arrive. I just have to say that it never gets old watching the birds come to the refuge. It was as touching this time as it was the rst time. In addition to the ve birds led south by WCEP partner Operation Migrations ultralights, six cranes are making their rst southward migration as part of WCEPs Direct Autumn Release program. The DAR cranes were hatched and raised by biologists with project partner International Crane Foundation. The six birds were released in the company of older cranes from whom the young birds learn the migration route south. Five of the DAR cranes have completed their migration and are located in Hendry County. The sixth bird is at Jasper-Pulaski Fish and Wildlife Area in Pulaski County, Ind. The ultralight-led and DAR cranes this year are joining two wild-hatched chicks in the 2012 cohort. Whooping cranes were on the verge of extinction in the 1940s. Today, there are only about 600 birds in existence, approximately 445 of them in the wild. Aside from the WCEP birds, the only other migratory population of whooping cranes nests at Wood Buffalo National Park in northern Alberta, Canada, and winters at Aransas NWR on the Texas Gulf Coast. A non-migratory ock of approximately 20 birds lives year-round in the central Florida Kissimmee region, and an additional 14 non-migratory cranes live in southern Louisiana. WCEP asks anyone who encounters a whooping crane in the wild to please give them the respect and distance they need. Do not approach birds on foot within 200 yards; remain in your vehicle; do not approach in a vehicle any closer than 100 yards. Also, please remain concealed and do not speak loudly enough that the birds can hear you. Finally, do not trespass on private property in an attempt to view or photograph whooping cranes. Whooping Crane Eastern Partnership founding members are the International Crane Foundation, Operation Migration, Inc., Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the U.S. Geological Surveys Patuxent Wildlife Research Center and National Wildlife Health Center, the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation, the Natural Resources Foundation of Wisconsin, and the International Whooping Crane Recovery Team. Many other yway states, provinces, private individuals and conservation groups have joined forces with and support WCEP by donating resources, funding and personnel. More than 60 percent of the projects budget comes from private sources in the form of grants, public donations and corporate sponsors. To report whooping crane sightings, visit www. fws.gov/midwest/whoopingcrane. For more information, visit www.bringbackthecranes.org. Tom MacKenzie can be reached at tom_mackenzie@fws.gov Special to The Times Beekeepers Field Day Saturday There will be a Beekeepers Field Day and Trade Show on Saturday at the Washington County Extension Of ce in Chipley. Registration begins at 9 a.m. CT. Class rotations begin at 10 a.m. and continue until noon. There will be a smoker lighting contest, lunch and judging, before a general session at 1:15 p.m. CT on Pollen and Nectar Producing Plants, presented by Lawrence Cutts and Elmore Herman. Topics in the class rotations included hive assembly by Doug Corbin and Elmore Herman; open hive demonstration by Jeff Pippin, Jamie Ellis and David Westervelt; and winter hive management by Lawrence Cutts. Beekeeper advanced training classes will be offered by interactive videoconference to selected counties on the evenings of Feb. 18 and 25, and March 4 and 11. More details to follow. Cost of the Field Day and Trade Show is $15 per person, $10 for additional family members. For more information call the Gulf County Extension Of ce at 639-3200 or the Franklin County Extension Of ce at 653-9337. Turtle, shorebird funding to assist county While Franklin County did not receive any direct funding in the second round of BP grants awarded through the Natural Resource Damage Assessment process, two projects submitted by the US Fish and Wildlife Service will affect the county. The two projects funded, at a cost of $6.3 million, are nesting shorebird habitat improvement, and reduction of arti cial lighting for nesting sea turtles. One of the projects proposes to protect nesting habitat for beach nesting birds from disturbance, by restoring nesting habitats that were disturbed from oil spill response activities. The second project plans to reduce arti cial lighting impacts on nesting habitat for sea turtles, speci cally loggerhead turtles, which will begin to restore nesting habitat impaired by disturbances from the increased lighting and machinery on the beaches from oil spill response activities. In Florida, both of the proposed projects are planned to take place in Escambia, Santa Rosa, Okaloosa, Walton, Bay, Gulf and Franklin counties. The projects in this plan are being addressed separately from other early restoration projects in order to derive more natural resource bene ts by implementing them in time for the 2013 nesting season. Visit www.gulfspill restoration.noaa.gov to access public meeting information, to view additional details of the proposed early restoration projects, and ways to submit public comment. Public comment will be accepted until Dec. 10. For more information on the Natural Resource Damage Assessment process and projects being submitted visit http://www.dep.state. .us/deepwaterhorizon. New ways to help Florida Wild Mammal Association With 2013 just beginning, the Florida Wild Mammal Association has lots to be thankful for. The Batchelor Foundation, which supports projects bene ting the environment, has offered Florida Wild Mammal Association a $10,000 Challenge Grant. The shelter will receive up to $10,000 in matching funds for donations received by June 2013. The staff and volunteers have been hard at work on Edgar Poole Road this summer and fall. All of the chain link runs were given new galvanized roo ng and refurbished inside with funding from the Earth and Animal Foundation and the Batchelor Foundation. The front deer pen was brought up to standard by adding 2 feet to the top of the existing fence and a new deer house was added. Rob Olin of St. George Island is putting together a team and funding to repair the ight aviary used in hawk, owl and eagle rehabilitation. The aviary was damaged during Tropical Storm Debby. If you can help with funding, materials or volunteer labor, contact him at rob@ olinandassociates.com. Because FWMA is a licensed wildlife rehabilitation facility visitors are not allowed except on special occasions. FWMA receives injured wildlife from US Fish and Wildlife Service, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission and other government agencies but no government compensation for their work or supplies. FWMA is totally funded by grants and donations. You can send a taxdeductible donation to Florida Wild Mammal Association, 198 Edgar Poole Road, Crawfordville, FL 32327, or visit http:// www.wakullawildlife. org/ and use the Paypal button to make an instant donation. If you nd an injured animal, bring it to 198 Edgar Poole Road. Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL (next to Piggly Wiggly) www.BWOsh.com (next to Piggly Wiggly) www.BWOsh.com Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL EV E RYTHING FOR YOUR O UTDOOR ADV E NTUR E EV E EV E EV RYTHING FOR YOUR E RYTHING FOR YOUR E O UTDOOR ADV E UTDOOR ADV E UTDOOR ADV NTUR E NTUR E E EV E EV E EV RYTHING FOR YOUR E RYTHING FOR YOUR E O UTDOOR ADV E UTDOOR ADV E UTDOOR ADV NTUR E NTUR E E N O VEM B ER FEATURE FISH: LAST MONTH TO ENTER! Stop in and register or go online at www. B WO sh.com S PEC T ROU T S PEC T ROU T $29 00 FREE! $55 00 WEEKLY ALMANAC APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE TIDE TABLES MONTHLY AVERAGES To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from these given for APALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW Cat Point Minus 0:40 Minus 1:17 East Pass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27 To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from those given for CARRABELLE: HIGH LOW Bald Point Minus 9:16 Minus 0:03 Sponsor the WEEKLY ALMANAC Call Today! 653-8868 Date High Low % Precip Thu, Nov. 29 67 52 0 % Fri, Nov. 30 71 54 10 % Sat, Dec. 01 71 54 0 % Sun, Dec. 02 72 51 20 % Mon, Dec. 03 70 50 30 % Tues, Dec. 04 69 50 30 % Wed, Dec. 05 69 49 30 % 28 We 1211am 2.4 414pm 2.1 800am -0.5 720pm 1.8 29 Th 1246am 2.4 444pm 2.1 831am -0.5 754pm 1.8 30 Fr 125am 2.4 513pm 2.1 900am -0.5 831pm 1.8 Date Day High Tide High Tide Low Tide Low Tide 1 Th 250am 2.7 622pm 2.4 1010am 0.0 939pm 2.1 2 Fr 325am 2.7 703pm 2.4 1042am 0.0 1018pm 2.1 3 Sa 405am 2.7 747pm 2.4 1117am 0.2 1108pm 1.9 4 Su 350am 2.6 732pm 2.4 1059am 0.2 1112pm 1.9 5 Mo 442am 2.4 816pm 2.4 1148am 0.3 6 Tu 548am 2.2 856pm 2.4 1233am 1.8 1244pm 0.5 7 We 712am 2.1 932pm 2.4 159am 1.6 145pm 0.6 8 Th 851am 1.9 1003pm 2.4 311am 1.3 246pm 0.8 9 Fr 1032am 1.9 1031pm 2.4 409am 1.0 344pm 1.1 10 Sa 1202pm 2.1 1058pm 2.6 459am 0.5 437pm 1.3 11 Su 119pm 2.2 1127pm 2.7 545am 0.2 526pm 1.6 28 We 136am 1.5 539pm 1.3 1013am -0.3 933pm 1.1 29 Th 211am 1.5 609pm 1.3 1044am -0.3 1007pm 1.1 30 Fr 250am 1.5 638pm 1.3 1113am -0.3 1044pm 1.1 FreeTideTables.com For comparison only Times are local Tides in feet from MLLW Email outdoors news to timesoutdoors @star .com Page 10 Thursday, November 29, 2012 O UTDOORS www.apalachtimes.com Section Section A Outdoors BRIEFS Whooping cranes follow their ultralight guide to St. Marks SPONSORED BY Freshwater Inshore/Bay We are seeing an improvement in our fall inshore fisheries lately. Better weather conditions and sunny skies have the redfish still biting around area docks and in the I.C.W. canal. Trout are starting to show up in better numbers this week, but they are still elusive in St. Joe Bay. Good reports of sheepshead and the occasional black snapper are coming in from the Brothers. Sherry at the Fishermans Landing at Howard Creek is reporting catfish, crappie and bream in the Fingers. WCEP | Special to the Times Whooping cranes follow their ultralight guide to St. Marks. At right is a whooping crane in the wild.

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CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA SP O RTS www.apalachtimes.com A Section By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@starfl.com The Lady Seahawks, fresh from their seasonopening district win over Rocky Bayou, traveled to district rival Port St Joe Tuesday night and made it two in a row. The Lady Seahawks found themselves trailing 1-0 at the rst water break, but that changed quickly when sophomore forward Katie Seger served up a great ball to junior midelder Gracyn Kirvin to bring the game to a 1-1 tie at halftime. The Lady Seahawks, under the direction of coach Kelli Wright, came out with a charge in the second half. Junior forward Jessica Shields shot a beautiful shot 20 yards from the goal that rebounded off the crossbar, and Kirvin netted her second goal of the game off the rebound to give the Lady Seahawks a 2-1 lead. They continued their tenacious play all over the eld, Wright said. Five minutes later, the Lady Seahawks struck again with another goal, when Shields assisted Kirvin for her third goal of the game to extend the lead to 3-1. She now has ve goals in district play with a total of six on the season. With 10 minutes left in the game, eighth-grade forward Allie Kirvin scored her rst goal of the season off a cross from junior mid elder Adriana Reeder. That gave the Lady Seahawks a 4-1 lead, which they never relinquished. Wright said a strong defensive effort, anchored by rst-year player junior sweeper Ally Millender along with junior halfback Deborah Dempsey, junior Adriana Reeder and Seger, shut out the Lady Tiger Sharks in the second half. Sophomore goalkeeper Macey Hunt had another great performance with 11 saves. I thought we responded well in the second half after being down 1-0, Wright said. They passed the ball well in the rst half and had us on our heels. Jessica Shields continues to create scoring opportunities for our team with her excellent play. Gracyn Kirvin keeps making the most of her scoring opportunities, the coach said. Our defense is beginning to communicate better and play well together. The younger players are also stepping up and contributing. Its been a whole team effort. Other members of the team include senior midelders Karli Tucker and Stephanie Marxsen, junior mid elder Brook Pittman, junior fullback Laura Gallegos, sophomore mid elder Erin Riley, freshman mid elder Jessica Schmidt, freshman forward Kitana Peralta, eighth-grade forward Allie Zingarelli and seventhgrade mid elder Sophie Kirvin. The Lady Seahawks now face a grueling stretch in their schedule, as they travel to West Gadsden today and are at home Friday night against Baker. On Saturday, Dec. 1, the Lady Seahawks travel to Freeport, and then on Tuesday, Dec. 4, they host John Paul II. On Wednesday, Dec. 5, the girls host Rickards. Gulfside IGA PL A YER OF THE WEEK S P ON S OR Junior forward Jessica Shields had two assists in the Lady Seahawks 4-1 win over Port St. Joe Tuesday night, for a total of four assists on the year. Jessica has stepped up her game, and keeps creating scoring opportunities for our team, said Coach Kelli Wright. Congratulations, Jessica! Hometown Proud (850)653-9695 CITY OF CARRABELLE PROPOSED ENACTMENT OF CITY ORDINANCE The City Commission of the City of Carrabelle, Florida, proposes to enact the following ordinance: CITY OF CARRABELLE ORDINANCE NO. 454 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF CARRABELLE, FLORIDA AMENDING ARTICLE IV OF THE LAND DEVELOPMENT REGULATIONS, TO CREATE PART 4.03.00 ENTITLED WATER EFFICIENT LANDSCAPE PRACTICES PROVIDING FOR WATER EFFICIENT LANDSCAPING PRACTICES, PROVIDING FOR DEFINITIONS, PROVIDING FOR PLANNING AND DESIGN REQUIREMENTS, PROVIDING FOR WATER USE, PROVIDING FOR IRRIGATION SYSTEM MAINTENANCE, REPEALING ALL ORDINANCES IN CONFLICT HEREWITH, PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY AND PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE. The proposed Ordinance may be inspected during regular hours at Carrabelle City Hall between 8 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., 1001 Gray Ave., Carrabelle, FL Monday through Friday, or call 850-697-2727. The proposed Ordinance will be considered for enactment during a public hearing to be held 6:00p.m., the Carrabelle City Hall located at1001 Gray Ave, Carrabelle, FL. Interested parties may appear at the hearing and be heard with respect to the proposed Ordinance. If an individual decides to appeal any decision made by the City Commission with respect to this meeting, a verbatim transcript may be required. If so, the individual should make provision for a transcript to be made at the meeting, requiring special accommodation to participate in this meeting is asked to advise the city at least 48 hours before t he meeting by contacting Keisha Smith at the above address or phone number. Wilburn Messer, Mayor Attest: Keisha Smith, City Clerk Publication Date: November 29, 2012 Page 11 Thursday, November 29, 2012 By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com The Franklin County High School boys soccer team evened their district record at 1-1 as they fell 5-1 to district archrival Port St. Joe in Gulf County Tuesday night. The Seahawks controlled the ball for the rst part of the match but allowed the Tiger Sharks sophomore striker Marcel Duarte to net four goals before the end of the rst half. The Hawks got on the board early in the second half with a quick strike goal from junior Graham Kirvin off of junior Stefan DeVaughns assist. Duarte added his fth score moments after for the nal goal of the night. Graham Kirvin, our player of the week, is an amazing player and teammate, Coach Ramon Valenzuela said. Tuesday night he never gave up, was running all over the eld. He took his prize, an awesome unstoppable goal. Valenzuela said he and assistant Coach Stacy Kirvin were proud of the team effort and thought the game gave their squad a better idea of what they need to do against St. Joe in two weeks when they meet again. We give credit to Coach Henleys Port St Joe team and the impressive individual performance of Duarte, Valenzuela said. It seems that we took this loss hard, but we never gave up the entire night. The Seahawk head coach said captains senior Zach Howze and junior Alex Causey showed positive leadership under the nights conditions and are aiming at evening the series at the Seahawks home eld Dec. 11. Once again, I told the boys, Lets learn from this, and lets make sure that next time, at home, we x these mistakes, Valenzuela said. Obviously, we were not prepared for this game, after a week off, but physically we persisted. We had our own shots to the St. Joe net, and our great strategies, but we were mentally down. I know now how our boys feel, and the amazing thing for me is the our captains: Alex Causey and Zack Howze spoke for the rst time, supporting what Coach Stacy and I have been talking since the beginning of the season, Valenzuela said. Play any position, be ready when coach calls you, communicate and support each other. The team also includes seniors Julio Ramirez, Elisha Patriotis and Casey Sapp; juniors James Harris, Lenny Ward and James Bailey; sophomores Austin Carter, Logan Allen and Dalyn Parrish; freshmen Joshua Patriotis, Jacob Montgomery and Walker DeVaughn; and eighthgrader Tyler Pendleton. Both boys and girls are in action again in the home opener at 5 and 7 p.m. Friday against district opponent Baker High School. Tickets are $5 for adults and $3 for students. All area youth soccer players are invited to attend free of charge provided they wear their team jersey. The Seahawks face a tough stretch in their schedule, as they travel to West Gadsden today. On Saturday, Dec. 1, the boys travel to Freeport, and then on Wednesday, Dec. 5, they host Rickards. From Staff Reports UF, FSU TIE AT ST. JOE BAY GOLF TOURNEY The annual University of Florida Gators vs. Florida State Seminoles Golf Tournament was Nov. 18 at the St. Joseph Bay Golf Club. This tournament is a longstanding one out at the club and traditionally is played just before the two football teams hit the gridiron for bragging rights. In the history of the tournament, usually the team that wins the golf tournament has led to the other side winning the football game. That proved a false prediction this year because the golf tournament brought about a 48-48 tie. The overall winners of the golf tournament were Dan Van Treese and Bobby Bunn for UF and Bennie Sherrill and Kenny Weimorts for FSU. In second place for the Gators were Mike Alldis and Bill Morrissey, and in second for the Seminoles were Marvin Shimfessel and Dick Davis. The Closest to the Pin on Hole 12 winner was Penelope Evanoff, and the longest drive winners were George Skinner and Andy Smith. MACEY HUNT ALLY MILLENDER ADRIANA REEDER ALLIE KIRVIN KATIE SEGER GRACYN KIRVIN JESSICA SHIELDS Lady Seahawks trounce St. Joe for district lead Sports SHORT Seahawk boys soccer falls to St. Joe ALEX CAUSEY ZACH HOWZE GRAHAM KIRVIN FIND MORE PREP SPORTS AT PANHANDLEVARSITY.COM

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Local A12 | The Times Thursday, November 29, 2012 THE PANAMA CITY PICTORIAL BOOK IS HERE! $ 39 .95 + TAX BUY NOW! THE NEWS HERALD M AKES THE PER F ECT G I F T F OR F AMILY AN D F RIEN D S ______Copies at $39.95 plus $3.00 tax per book and pick up my order at The News Herald oce. Name ___________________________________________________________________________________________ Address __________________________________________________________________________________________ City ______________________________________________________ State _______________ Zip ________________ Phone (_____) ______________________ E-mail _________________________________________________________ Signature ________________________________________________________________________________ Charge Card Number_____________________________________ Security Code______________Exp. Date_____________________ Payable to: The News Herald VISA THE NEWS HERALD THE NEWS HERALD GET YOUR COPY TODAY $ 39 .95 AKES THE PER F ECT $ .95 JUST IN TIME FOR THE HOLIDAYS! PANAMACITY.PICTORIALBOOK.COM MAIL IN FORM OR ORDER ONLINE AT: I wish to order: ____ Copies at $39.95 plus $2.60 tax per book and pick up my order ( mail in form only ) at The News Herald oce. Total $42.55/book ____ Copies at $39.95 plus $5.95 shipping and handling and $2.60 tax per book and have my order shipped to the address below. Total $48.50/book TOTAL AMOUNT ENCLOSED:__________ Name ________________________________________________ Address _______________________________________________ City _________________________ State ______ ZIP ____________ Phone ( )_____________ E-mail __________________________ ____________________________________________________ Signature ____________________________________________________ Charge Card Number Security Code Exp. Date PAYM E NT M E T H O D C HE CK / MON E YOR DE R Payable to: The News Herald V I S A AM EX MA S T E RCAR D D I S CO VE R Thousands of families & individuals in our area are at risk of going to bed hungry and empty-handed on Christmas. WANT TO MAKE A DIFFERENCE? Mail in the Empty Stocking Fund envelope inserted in todays paper to the Salvation Army or The News Herald with your contribution! The Empty Stocking Fund provides food and toy baskets to thousands of families in Bay, Gulf, Franklin, Holmes, and Washington Counties. is proud to announce the is now underway. Help those in need! Its time to go through your closets for those unwanted pairs of shoes, in reasonable condition. Bring the shoes to Coastal Foot and Ankle Clinic located at 221 HWY 98, Apalachicola, FL 32320. Donations will go to Franklins Promise and will be distributed at The community service center (old Apalachicola high school) at 192 14th street in Apalachicola. Distribution will be November 27, December 4th and 18th from 9:30-12:00. DOWNTOWN BOOKS WELCOMES TWO SPECIAL FRIEN D S on S aturday, December 1 St. George Islands Dee Grinenko weaves hand-pounded brown ash baskets and sells miniature Shaker-style Christmas ornaments outside the store from 10 to 4 Inside, New York Times best-selling author Terri DuLong signs copies of her new knitting-themed novel Postcards from Cedar Key from 1 to 3 Join Us! DOWNTOWN BOOKS 67 COMMER C E STREET AP A L AC HI C OL A The following report is provided by the Franklin County Sheriffs Of ce. Arrests in this weeks report were made by of cers from the Apalachicola Police Department (APD), Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC), Florida Highway Patrol (FHP) and the Franklin County Sheriffs Of ce (FCSO). All defendants are to be considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law. Nov. 19 Jacquelyn K. Warner, 52, Eastpoint, driving while license suspended or revoked (FHP) Darin W. Cruson II, 24, Carrabelle, possession of paraphernalia, possession of cannabis and driving while license suspended or revoked (FCSO) Nov. 20 Jacquelyn K. Warner, 52, Eastpoint, violation of probation (FCSO) Robert L. Thompson, 18, Apalachicola, burglary of a dwelling (FCSO) Alice A. Amerson, 22, Carrabelle, violation of probation (FCSO) Stephen D. Bartley, 62, Apalachicola, aggravated assault with a deadly weapon (FCSO) Nov. 21 Jennifer L. Smith, 32, Eastpoint, petit theft (FCSO) Steven Shiver, 35, Eastpoint, DUI (FCSO) Nov. 22 Erik A. Tatum, 32, Carrabelle, trespass in an occupied structure (FCSO) Ben Turrell III, 35, Apalachicola, DUI (APD) James D. Creamer, 30, Apalachicola, violation of probation (APD) Nov. 24 Curtis E. Nowling, 44, Eastpoint, trespass on property after warning (FCSO) Christopher K. Franzen, 36, Land OLakes, failure to appear (FWC) Nov. 25 Anna Staples, 45, Apalachicola, domestic battery (APD) Nov. 26 Kimberly D. Harrington, 45, Lanark Village, criminal mischief, trespass on property and grand theft (FCSO) Arrest REPORT LOIS SWOBODA | The Times William Massey, newly elected county commissioner for District 5, left, was sworn in Nov. 20 together with incumbents Pinki Jackel and Noah Lockley, who were both reelected to four-year terms. County Judge Van Russell handled the honors. Elected by her colleagues as chair was Cheryl Sanders, who last served in that capacity in 2006. Massey was appointed the vice chairman, as well as the countys representative to the Apalachee Regional Planning Commission. Jackel will serve as the commissioners representative to the Tourist Development Council and as alternate to Floridas Small County Coalition. SWEARING TO SERVE

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Local The Times | A13 Thursday, November 29, 2012 COLLINS CONSTRU C TION OF ST. GEOR G E I S LAND, INC & S EWA G E TREATMENT S ERV I CE S O VER 30 YEARS EXPERIEN C E OUR S ERV I CE S I NCLUDE: AFTER HOURS & EMERGEN C Y SERVI C E PROVIDED 850.670.5790 MA I NTENANCE@JCOLL I N S CON S TRUCT I ON.COM Dance in Carrabelle this Saturday evening: The Carrabelle Senior Center will hold a dance at 7 p.m. this Saturday. Admission is free. Music will be provided by local disc jockey Ron Vice, serving up a lively mix of Big Band dance tunes and mellow pop hits. Come down to the Senior Center this Saturday night to dance... or just to listen to the music! The Senior Center is at 201 NW Avenue F, on the corner of First Street and NW Avenue F in downtown Carrabelle. For more information on the dance and other activities at the Senior Center, visit www. CarrabelleSeniorCenter. com Middle-aged sought for Cat sh Moon auditions: Panhandle Players are holding auditions for their next production, Cat sh Moon, at 4 p.m. on Sunday and at 7 p.m. Tuesday 4 at the Raney Carriage House. Cat sh Moon, a comedy written by Mississippi native Laddy Sartin, is set on a shing pier on a lake somewhere in LA (lower Alabama). Four people that have known each other all their lives come to grips with knowing each other all their lives. Cast will be three men and one woman, all middle-aged or thereabouts. Readings will be from the script. The show is directed by Dan Wheeler. For more information, call 370-0957. Mitigation strategy meeting Monday: Franklin County Emergency Management would like to invite the public to participate in a meeting to discuss and update the Franklin County Local Mitigation Strategy. Hazard mitigation is any action taken to permanently reduce or eliminate longterm risk to people and their property from the effects of hazards. Every community is exposed to some level of risk from hazards. Hurricanes, tornadoes, oods, hazardous material spills, res and sinkholes are some of the hazards experienced by Florida communities. It is the goal of the local mitigation strategy to identify local hazards and establish a local framework to reduce the risk of those hazards. Our next meeting will be Monday at 10 a.m. in the Franklin County Emergency Operations Center, 28 Airport Road in Apalachicola. This will be an opportunity for all parties to voice their concerns; review the status of old projects and add new ones to the list. For more info, contact Mike Rundel, Franklin County Emergency Management coordinator at 653-8977 or Em2frank@ gtcom.net. Tobacco-free Partnership to meet Wednesday: There will be a Tobacco-Free Franklin Partnership Coalition Meeting on Wednesday at the Franklin County Health Department, 139 12th Street, from 5:30-6:30 p.m. in the second oor conference room. Oyster recovery roundtable Dec. 6: The Seafood Management Assistance and Recovery Team (SMART) and the University of Florida Oyster Recovery Team will host a roundtable discussion on Thursday, Dec. 6, at the Apalachicola Community Center from 1:30-4:30 p.m. to hear updates from the recovery team committees and to learn more about the developing SMART Initiative. The roundtable is open to the public and folks are encouraged to attend and participate. From 2:402:55 p.m. there will be an update on the schedule of planned oyster restoration activities by the Gulf Coast Workforce Board. This will be an informal roundtable meeting to exchange information on progress made to date and activities under way by researchers evaluating existing and collecting new data, an update by the SMART Team and the Healthy Gulf Healthy Community Team, followed by a discussion about next steps and an opportunity for questions and answers from any interested person who wants to attend. We will have time for open discussion after 3 p.m. Expert speakers Andy Kane (contaminants, pathogens); Bill Pine (water ow, salinity); Karl Havens (nutrient inputs); David Kimbro (food web, predation, oyster population dynamics); and Ed Camp ( sheries modeling, management model development) will be on hand to join the discussion. For more information, call 653-9337. ABC School to host community book fair: The Apalachicola Bay Charter School will host a Scholastic Book Fair, Dec. 3-6, to help raise funds for purchasing books and media for the school. The fair will feature specially priced books and educational products, including newly released works, award-winning titles, childrens classics, interactive software and current bestsellers from more than 150 publishers. The Fair will be open from 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m in the ABC School Library. Parents, children, teachers and the community are invited. On Tuesday, Dec. 4, from 5:30-7:30 p.m., the Book Fair will feature a special family event. All members of the community are welcome to visit and shop. Fair attendees can help build classroom libraries by purchasing books for teachers through the Classroom Wish List program. Fair proceeds also will be used to purchase essential classroom resources and support school projects at the ABC School. Sponsorships are available. Area businesses interested in making a donation are asked to contact Heather Friedman at 653-1222 or via e-mail at friedmanabc@gmail.com FCSWA to meet Dec. 10: The Franklin County Seafood Workers Associations regularly scheduled monthly meeting will be on Monday, Dec. 10, in Eastpoint at the rehouse starting at 6 p.m. We will be sharing updated information regarding solutions for the bay issue and possible further outreach to displaced workers. Please continue to follow us on Facebook for any updates, new information or details. Please contact FCSWA Secretary Jennifer Millender at 597-0787. County Commission acknowledges hospice and diabetes: At their Nov. 20 meeting, in response to a request by Sandi Hengel, a spokesperson for Big Bend Hospice, the county commission recognized November as National Hospice Month. At the request of Commissioner Cheryl Sanders, the board also recognized November as National Diabetes Month. County commission to meet in Carrabelle: On Tuesday, Dec. 18, the second December meeting of the county commission will be held in Carrabelle at the municipal center on Gray Ave. at 10 a.m. Sixteen apply to serve on RESTORE Council: At the Nov. 20 county meeting, Director of Administrative Services Alan Pierce read a list of applicants for seats on the proposed RESTORE Council. Under the ordinance presented by Commissioner Pinki Jackel at the Nov. 6 meeting, there are 15 seats on the council. The cities of Apalachicola and Carrabelle were each given a seat, although both cities are disputing the validity of the RESTORE board and neither has chosen a representative. Jim Cummins and Marvin Heymann have both applied for the Alligator Point seat. No one from Lanark Village has applied to represent that community. Both Sandra Allen and James (Tom) Durham seek to represent Eastpoint. Larry Kinzer has stepped forward for St. George Island. All of the ve councils and boards in the county who were asked to choose a representative have named their choices. Paul Parker has been chosen to represent the Tourist Development Council. Newly elected school board member Pam Shiver will represent the schools. Vice President Ricky Banks will speak for the Franklin County Seafood Workers Association. Jim Bachrach will represent the board of Weems Memorial Hospital. The Seafood Dealers Association has chosen Lynn Martina. So far, ve people have thrown in their hats for the four at-large seats. They are Valentina Webb and Robin Vroegop, both of Apalachicola; Vance Millender and Leslie Cox, both of Carrabelle; and Dan Tonsmeire of Magnolia Bluff and Eastpoints Durham, who has also applied under this category. The commission voted to extend the application period to Dec. 3 with Smokey Parrish opposed. Jackel said she no longer feels it is necessary to pass an ordinance to create the RESTORE council. We dont have to operate by ordinance, she said. We will operate by bylaws. She said she would bring proposed rules to the next meeting. Commissioner Noah Lockley moved that an ordinance be passed but the motion died for lack of a second. Robert C. Bruner Attorney Personal & Business Bankruptcy Over 30 Years Legal Experience 850-670-3030 bankruptcy relief under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon advertisements. Before you decide, ask us to send you free written information R o d n e y s Oyster Tongs Laminated Handles! CONTACT: (850) 653.3764 or (850) 323.1937 Apalachicola, FL News BRIEFS

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A14| The Times Thursday, November 29, 2012 CLASSIFIEDS RENTALS3 BEDROOM, 2 BATH FURNISHED APT W/D, CARPORT, ST PARKING .............................$600 3 BEDROOM, 3 BATH CONDO FURNISHED, POOL .............................................$850 3 BEDROOM, 1 BATH UNFURNISHED DUPLEX .................................................................$600 1 BEDROOM, 1 BATH UNFURNISHED APT LANARK, REMODELED, INC WATER .................$425 2 BEDROOM 1 BATH UNFURNISHED APT W/D HOOKUP, SMALL PORCH ..........................$375 2 BEDROOM 1-1/2 BATH UNFURNISHED, FL ROOM, GARAGE, FENCED YARD, W/D .......$800 2 OFFICE SPACES US 98 CARRABELLE ...............................................$300 BOTH 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322850-697-9604 850-323-0444 www.seacrestre.comwww. rst tness.com/carrabellePROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND RENTALS 89412T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.: 2011-CA000270 WELLS FARGO BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, a national banking institution, as successor by merger to WACHOVIA BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, Plaintiff, vs. DONNA C. SOUTHWICK, et. al., Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE Pursuant to Chapter 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated October 22, 2012, entered in Case No. 2011-CA000270 of the Circuit Court of the 2ND Judicial Circuit, in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein WELLS FARGO BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, a national banking institution, as successor by merger to WACHOVIA BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, is the Plaintiff and DONNA C. SOUTHWICK, et al. are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, in the lobby on the second floor of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida 32320 at 11:00 a.m. EST. on the 4th day of December, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure, to wit: START AT THE INTERSECTION OF SECTIONS 2 AND 3, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, AND SECTIONS 35 AND 36, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, AND TRAVEL EASTERLY ALONG THE SECTION LINE A DISTANCE OF 1086.1 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT ON THE SOUTHERN BOUNDARY LINE OF STATE ROAD NO. 30 (U.S. HIGHWAY #319) RIGHT OF WAY. NOW TURN AND ANGLE OF 146 DEGREES 56 MINUTES TO THE RIGHTAND GO A DISTANCE OF 625 FEET TO A STAKE, THENCE TURN AND ANGLE OF 90 DEGREES TO THE LEFT AND GO A DISTANCE OF 90.7 FEET TO AN IRON STAKE ON THE SOUTHERN BOUNDARY LINE OF ABOVE MENTIONED STATE ROAD RIGHT OF WAY. CALL THIS PLACE OF BEGINNING. NOW TRAVEL IN THE SAME DIRECTION AND GO A DISTANCE OF 119 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE WATER LINE OF ST. GEORGE SOUND. CALL THIS LINE THE EASTERLY BOUNDARY OF HEREIN DESCRIBED PROPERTY, NOW TURN TO THE RIGHT AND TRAVEL WESTERLY ALONG THE WATERS EDGE TO A POINT WHICH IS ON A LINE 75 FEET DISTANCE FROM AND PARALLEL TO THE EASTERLY BOUNDARY LINE, NOW TURN TO THE RIGHT AND TRAVEL NORTHERLY A DISTANCE OF 105 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO AN IRON STAKE ON THE SOUTHERN BOUNDARY LINE OF SAID ROAD RIGHT, THENCE TURN TO THE RIGHT AND TRAVEL ALONG THE BOUNDARY OF SAID ROAD RIGHT OF WAY A DISTANCE OF 75 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE POB. SAID PROPERTY BEING AND LYING IN FRACTIONAL SECTION 2, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY. FLORIDA. SUBJECT PROPERTY MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED BY A RECENT SURVEY FROM EDWIN G. BROWN & ASSOCIATES, INC., DATED JULY 19, 1996, BEARING JOB NO. 96-405 (PSC-13419) AS FOLLOWS, COMMENCE AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 2, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA AND THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 29 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE SECTION LINE 1088.03 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT ON THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 98, THENCE RUN SOUTH 56 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 31 SECONDS WEST 624.45 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 33 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 29 SECONDS EAST 72.08 FEET TO THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF SAID U.S. HIGHWAY 98 FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE SOUTH 33 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 29 SECONDS EAST 171.57 FEET TO THE APPROXIMATE MEAN HIGHWATER LINE OF ST. GEORGE SOUND, THENCE RUN SOUTH 42 DEGREES 47 MINUTES 46 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID MEAN HIGHWATER LINE 78.14 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 33 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 29 SECONDS WEST 169.65 FEET TO THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF SAID U.S.HIGHWAY NO. 98, SAID POINT LYING ON A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE SOUTHEASTERLY, THENCE RUN NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID RIGHTOF-WAY BOUNDARY AND ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 2258.83 FEET THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 01 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 41 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 78.64 FEET THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING NORTH 41 DEGREES 26 MINUTES 10 SECONDS EAST 78.64 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SITUATE, LYING AND BEING IN SECTION 2, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS, MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN SIXTY (60) DAYS AFTER THE SALE. Dated this 23rd day of October, 2012. Marcia M. Johnson CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk November 22, 29, 2012 89346T PUBLIC NOTICE DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY Proposed Flood Hazard Determinations for Franklin County, Florida and Incorporated Areas The Department of Homeland Security’s Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) has issued a preliminary Flood Insurance Rate Map (FIRM), and where applicable, Flood Insurance Study (FIS) report, reflecting proposed flood hazard determinations within Franklin County, Florida and Incorporated Areas. These flood hazard determinations may include the addition or modification of Base Flood Elevations, base flood depths, Special Flood Hazard Area boundaries or zone designations, or the regulatory floodway. Technical information or comments are solicited on the proposed flood hazard determinations shown on the preliminary FIRM and/or FIS report for Franklin County, Florida and Incorporated Areas. The preliminary FIRM and FIS report can be viewed at http://portal.nwfwmdfloodmaps.com. These flood hazard determinations are the basis for the floodplain management measures that your community is required to either adopt or show evidence of being already in effect in order to qualify or remain qualified for participation in the National Flood Insurance Program. However, before these determinations are effective for floodplain management purposes, you will be provided an opportunity to appeal the proposed information. For information on the statutory 90-day period provided for appeals, as well as a complete listing of the communities affected and the locations where copies of the FIRM are available for review, please visit FEMA’s website at www.fema.gov/plan/prevent/fh m/bfe, or call the FEMA Map Information eXchange (FMIX) toll free at 1-877-FEMA MAP (1-877-336-2627). Nov 29, Dec 6, 2012 89442T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 12-000250CA VANDERBILT MORTGAGE AND FINANCE, INC. P.O. Box 9800 Maryville, TN 37802 Plaintiff, v. DONALD RANDOLPH LAWSON, RHONDA MICHELLE LAWSON, THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF KARLENE E. SPENCER, THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF TINA M. HILL, THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF ROBERT H. CAPSACK, JR., and FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, through its State Housing Initiative a/k/a SHIP Program, Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: DONALD RANDOLPH LAWSON, RHONDA MICHELLE LAWSON, THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF KARLENE E. SPENCER, THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF TINA M. HILL, THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF ROBERT H. CAPSACK, JR.: YOU ARE NOTIFIED that a civil action has been filed against you in the Circuit Court, County of Franklin, State of Florida, to foreclose certain real property described as follows: EXHIBIT “A” LEGAL DESCRIPTION Legal Description of a 1.16 Acre Tract Certified To: Donald Lawson and Rhonda Lawson, Vanderbuilt Mortgage, Wakulla Title Company, Inc., Chicago Title Insurance Co. I hereby certify that this is a true and correct representation of the following described property and that this description meets the minimum technical standards for land surveying (Chapter 61G17-6, Florida Administrative Code). A portion of Lot 1 of Willow Acres Estates, a subdivision as per map or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 7, Page 27 of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida and being more particularly described as follows: Begin at an iron rod and cap (marked #7160) marking the Southeast comer of Lot 1 of Willow Acres Estates, a subdivision as per map or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 7, Page 27 of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. From said POINT OF BEGINNING run North 01 degrees 17 minutes 22 seconds West along the Westerly right-ofway boundary of Baywood Drive a distance of 77.50 feet to an iron rod and cap (marked #7160), thence leaving said right-of-way boundary run South 88 degrees 55 minutes 22. seconds West 665.06 feet, thence run South 21 degrees 04 minutes 42 seconds East 82_45 feet, thence run North 88 degrees 55 minutes 29 seconds East 637.15 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING containing 1.16 acres, more or less. The undersigned surveyor has not been provided a current title opinion or abstract of matters affecting title or boundary to the subject property. It is possible there are deeds of records, unrecorded deeds, easements or other instruments which could affect the boundaries James T. Roddenberry Surveyor and Mapper Florida Certificate No: 4261 TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN 2008 CMH 52 X 28 CYPRESS PO MOBILE HOME SERIAL NUMBER WCH017588GAAB. Commonly known as: 271 BAYWOOD DRIVE, CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322. You are required to file a written response with the Court and serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Timothy D. Padgett, Plaintiffs attorney, whose address is 2878 Remington Green Circle, Tallahassee, Florida 32308, at least thirty (30) days from the date of first publication, and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise, a default will be entered ag ainst you for the relief demanded in the complaint. Dated this 9th day of October, 2012. Marcia M. Johnson CLERK OF COURT Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk Attorney for Plaintiff: Timothy D. Padgett, Esq. Timothy D. Padgett, P.A. 2878 Remington Green Circle Tallahassee, FL 32308 (850) 422-2520 (phone) (850) 422-2567 (fax) Nov 29, Dec 6, 2012 91137T PUBLIC NOTICE ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS Notice is hereby given that SEALED BIDS will be received by THE SCHOOL BOARD OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, (hereafter referred to as Board) at the School Board Administrative Offices located at 85 School Road, Eastpoint, Florida 32328, up to 4:00 p.m. on the 6th day of December, 2012, and will be opened at the regular School Board meeting to be held at 6:00 p.m. on the 6th day of December, 2012., in the Willie B. Speed Conference Room, in Eastpoint, Florida, for the purchase of the following real property: A parcel of land described as all of Block 126 and approximately the West 40 feet of Lots 6 through 10 of Block 131, according to the City Map of the City of Apalachicola in general use, Franklin County, Florida. The parcel of land will be subject to a deed restriction that the land mast be used for affordable housing approved by the Florida Housing Finance Corporation and other restrictions as contained in Resolution 2012-025 adopted by the Board on November 20, 2012. The Board will consider a minimum bid of $211,000.00. All closing costs shall be paid by the bidder, including title insurance and costs of advertising. The Board will select the closing agent and title insurance company. Each bid shall be accompanied by a certified check payable to the School Board of Franklin County, Florida, in the amount of $5000.00, to be placed with an escrow agent acceptable to the Board. No other forms will be acceptable. Upon the acceptance of he bid, the successful bidder will be required to enter a contract for sale and purchase using the contract form provided by the Board. The Board reserves the right to reject any and all bids, and to waive any informalities. Dated this 20th day of November, 2012. The School Board of Franklin County, Florida By: Jimmy Gander, Chairman ATTEST: Nina Marks, Superintendent Nov. 29, Dec. 6, 2012 89462T PUBLIC NOTICE FRANKLIN COUNTY HUMANE SOCIETY ANNUAL MEETING The Franklin County Humane Society would like to invite the pubic to our annual general meeting on Saturday, December 8, 2012. It will be held at the Lighthouse Park on St. George Island at 10:00 AM. The Humane Society is proud to serve the Franklin County community with the help of caring, concerned citizens like yourselves. It would not be possible to continue to help our less fortunate, 4 legged citizens without you. Come join us and show your support for the Franklin County Humane Society! Thank you. Nov 29, Dec 6, 2012 Coin & Stamp ShowDecember 1st & 2nd Bay Co. Fairgrounds Sat 9-5, Sun 9-4 Free Admission GUN SHOWDec. 1st & 2nd Nat’l Peanut Fest. Bldg. 5622 US Hwy 231 S Dothan, Alabama OVER 275 TABLES Saturday 9-5pm Sunday 10-4pm Info: 334-279-9895 Text FL24233 to 56654 Food Svs/HospitalityPapa Joe’s Oyster Bar & GrillNow HiringExperienced Line Cook Apply in person only Install/Maint/RepairHandymanNeeded Elec, Plumb, Construction. Experience & References Required. (850) 653-5319 Apalachicola: 1 br, 1 ba efficiency Call for information 850-653-6103 Text FL32343 to 56654 Carrabelle Cove ApartmentsTaking Applications Now Available: 1, 2 and 3 br, Handicap Apts. Laundry facilities on site, W/S included in rent, CH&A and window coverings provided. On site management Office. Rental assistance available. Income restrictions apply, reasonable accommodation. Carrabelle Cove Apartments 807 Gray Ave #33 Carrabelle, Fl 32322 850-697-2017 TDD711 This institution is an equal opportunity provider & employerText FL29928 to 56654 St. GeorgeIsland $175/wk, elec, satellite, garbage incl. Pool tbl. 12’ X 65’ deck. Beautiful view! 850-653-5319 Apalachicola Condo. 2 br, 2 bath, with newer paint, tile, carpet $750 per month with 700 + credit score or $800 per month below 700 credit score. *References Checked* Quint 865-693-3232 Carrabelle Condo Riverfront 2 bedroom/ 1 bath, with queen Sofa sleeper long term rental $1,200 monthly. nice 850-545-0784 Historic Appalachacola Charming Cottage2br/ 1ba. In prime historic Appalachacola location. Short walk to water. Wood floors, new wash/dryer, ceiling fans, new cent. heat/ac, w/nice size yard. Pets allowed upon aproval/ deposit. $1,200/ mo. Call 850-832-2275 for appointment. Text FL32793 to 56654 Lanark Village3br 2ba home, near water, lg fence yard, $600 mo. 850-545-8813 Price Reduced! 3 Bedroom Home for RentNice 3/2 home in Apalachicola. Fenced yard, Bonus Room. $800 per month. 1 month security deposit. No Pets. Call Kathy Robinson, Robinson Real Estate Company 850-653-7196 Txt FL333087 to 56654 Apalachicola: 3 br, 2 Bath. Newly Remodeled Call for details!! 850-653-6103 Text FL32340 to 56654 Carrabelle House with 4bdr/2baths,large family room, LR, dining room /kitchen,/ utility room/ office and/or play room/ screened porch, recent efficient air and metal roof., two storage buildings, fenced yard, on two large lots, extra lot available $139.000 (850-545-0784) Text FL30879 to 56654 Chrisovich, 38 ft., Charter Boat, Twin Perkns Engines rebuilt, bottom job just completed, been operating as a charter boat for 12 yrs, High traffic slip paid for untill May ‘13, Intrested in Sale/Joint Venture or Sale Operate for you. Part of 3 boat company same location 28 yrs Good River/Gulf/Bay Boat, $18K, Some possible finiancing Call Bobby 850-234-9409 or 877-Fla-Boat or email boatlaydee@yahoo.com Classifiedcan!If you’re ready to move up or are just starting out Classified can help you open the door to home ownership. We’ve got properties at every price, with locations all over town! And if you’re planning to sell, Classified can introduce you to the market’s best prospects.

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, November 29, 2012 The Times | A15 REPRESENTATIVES will be at the PORT ST. JOE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE on Tuesdays & Thursdays from 9 am – 1 pm EST accepting applications for numerous open positions.We offer competitive wages and a comprehensive bene t package including Company paid health, dental, and life insurance, 401(k), attendance & safety bonuses.EOE/Drug Free WorkplaceEASTERN SHIPBUILDING GROUP MORE THAN A JOB… A FUTURE! ToPlace Your Classified ad inCall Our New Numbers Now!Call:850-747-5020 Toll Free:800-345-8688 Fax:850-747-5044 Email:thestar@pcnh.com Email:thetimes@pcnh.com theAPALACHICOLA & CARRABELLETIMES CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW SELL ALL YOUR ITEMS through classified.CALL 747-5020 FRANKLIN COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS JOB ANNNOUNCEMENT Position Title: Library Assistant/Permanent Part timeSalary: $10.00 hour/26 hours per week Applications and Job Description available: at Franklin County Public Library … Eastpoint 29 Island Drive, Eastpoint, FL 32328 850-670-8151, Position open until “ lled.The Franklin County Board of commissioners is an Equal Opportunity/Af“ rmative Action/Drug Free Workplace Employer Knowledge, Skills and Abilities: High level of computer usage and skills required; Ability to operate library equipment, i.e. copiers, faxes, scanning; Customer service, sequencing skills (Dewey decimal system) and the ability to work in a fast paced environment are necessary; willingness to learn new skills and attend training is imperative; preparing reports and lifting required. Skills in organizing, planning, and record keeping are essential. Minimum Quali“ cations: High School Diploma. Associates or Bachelors preferred. At least 2 years experience working in a library is required. Any equivalent combination of training and experience that provide the required knowledge, skills and abilities may be considered. Must relate well with the general public, other library staff, volunteers, children and young adults, be adaptable and ” exible. Ability to make decisions, to implement policies and procedures, and maintain quality standards is necessary.

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Local A16 | The Times Thursday, November 29, 2012 Real Estate Picks Our local real estate experts have identied what they feel are the best values around and are oering them to you in Real Estate Picks! (In this section), Discover the best real estate values in Mexico Beach, Port St. Joe, Apalachicola, Cape San Blas, St. George Island, Carrabelle and surrounding areas. Best Values on the Forgotten Coast SELL YOUR LI S TING S HERE! Only $35 per week per listing Minimum 2 ads per week or 1 ad for 2 weeks Contact Joel or Kari for details: (850)814-7377 or (850)227-7847 SOLD John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.com MLS# 248326 $65,000 St. George Island CORNER LOT ON WEST BAYSHORE Possible bay and sunset views from a newly constructed home, a short distance over to the Gulf and world famous beaches, mature pines & native vegetation enhance the privacy of this lot, 1/3 acre, 100 ft x 160 ft, short sale, listed by Michael Billings John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.com MLS#242245 $409,000 St George Island GULF VIEW FROM WEST PINE 4 bedrooms (2 are masters), 3-1/2 bath, extra living area or 5th BR, large open Living/ Dining/ Kitchen area entry. CALL TOD A Y! 653-8868 GE T YOUR A D IN Trades & Services Laban Bontrager, DMD Monica Bontrager, DMD 12761 Pea Ridge Road Bristol, Florida 32321 TELEPHONE (850) 643-5417 Bristol Dental Clinic DENTURE LAB ON PREMISES Same Day Service on Repairs and Relines Don Lively General Contractors L ICENSED AND I NSURED 20 Y EARS E XPERIENCE P .O. Box 439 C arrabelle, FL 32322 697-2783 or Mobile 566-2603 RC 0066499 R G0065255 Carrabelle Visa, Discover, and American Express Honored at Participating Ace Stores JACKSONS Building Supplies Building Supplies & Auto Repair Carrabelle 697-3333 We Deliver Anywhere Hardware and Paint Center J.J.s Tree Service, LLC Stump Grinder Licensed & Insured Call John : (850) 899-8432 ROBERTS APPLIANCE REPAIR ALL MAJOR BRANDS 18 Shadow Lane Apalachicola, FL 32320 Phone: (850) 653-8122 Cell: (850) 653-7654 JOES LAWN CARE IF I TS I N YOUR YARD LET JOE TAKE CARE OF I T FULL L AWN SERVICE S TREE TRIMMING AND REMOVAL AL S O CLEAN GUTTER S AND IRRIGATION IN S TILLATION, PLANTING AND BEDDING AVAILABLE CALL JOE@ 850-323-0741 OR EMAIL J OE S_ LA WN @Y A H OO COM By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star .com On Saturday, a dozen pups and their companion humans turned out to vie for best of show at a canine costume party. The contest was part of a Christmas celebration held from 1 to 4 p.m. to bene t the Franklin County Humane Society. Pups and people had a chance to tell Santa their holiday wishes and check out some of the animals available for adoption at the local shelter. The costume contest was held at 3 p.m. and for those who did not have a costume at home, there were some loaners on hand. More than a dozen entrants came prepared; many wore holiday regalia. Reindeer were the most popular entry, there were six, and a pair of reindeer, Electrifying Elijah and Alabama Abigail took rst place. The winners belong to Heath and Patricia Usry, of Gadsden, Ala. Second place went to Kali and Lili, a pair of terriers dressed as Santa and a red-booted reindeer and shown by Danny Spear and Susan Hudson. Bringing in their place was Oliver, a rescued pit-bull dressed as a Kong dog toy complete with milk bones. Owners Gene and Susan Pinnock said the suit was handcrafted from two tee-shirts, stuf ng and felt. Cheryl Whaleys dog also appeared as a reindeer. Lucky Dog, of Apalachicola, was shown off leash by owner Ed Tiley. Melissa Brooks of Eastpoint brought her Italian greyhound Daphne in a sparkling mermaid costume. Her friend, Mason Pace, showed her dachshund Weenie, dressed as a weenie in a bun. Taffy the dog, dressed as a bunny, came with Raquel Nugent of Roswell, Ga. Ray and Moxie Steiger and Jackson Gray, all of Apalachicola, brought Santa Paws and two Chihuahua helpers. A late arrival was Frankie, a blue-eyed pit bull with matching necktie. Ricky Ray Ruddy of Rockwell, described by owner Larry Kiley as a naked redneck dog, refused to wear a costume but barked instructions to the contestants. Shelter Director Karen Martin was pleased with the turn-out and the day. People were very generous, she said, displaying a jar full of money. And we found a home for a puppy. Reindeer rule at canine costume party Top left: Electrifying Elijah, left, and Alabama Abigail, shown by Heath and Patricia Usry, took best of show as Reindeer in Transition. Top right: Daphne the Italian greyhound, shown by Melissa Brooks of Eastpoint, was beautiful in her mermaid costume. Far left: Undoubtedly the best trained dog in the line up was Apalachicolas own Lucky Dog, shown by Ed Tiley. Left: Oliver, a rescued pit bull with a heart of saltwater taffy, was festive in a Kong toy costume hand crafted by Sarah Pinnock. PHOTOS BY LOIS SWOBODA | The Times



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xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx 50 WWW.APALACHTIMES.COMPhone: 850-653-8868 Web: apalachtimes.com E-mail: dadlerstein@star .com Fax: 850-653-8036 Circulation: 800-345-8688 DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK: School News & Society: 11 a.m. Friday Real Estate Ads: 11 a.m. Thursday Legal Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Display Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Line Ads: 5 p.m. Monday xxxxx Contact Us xxxxx Out to see Index Thursday, November 29, 2012 VOL. 127 ISSUE 31 By DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com No sooner had the Franklin County School Board welcomed a new member and organized itself for the new year when the ve members faced the stark reality of an extremely tight budget situation not even halfway through the 2012-13 scal year. After detailing a drop of hundreds of thousands of dollars in anticipated revenue and an unsustainable fund balance down to a mere $114,000 in unrestricted funds, Finance Director Shannon Venable made it clear at the Nov. 20 meeting the situation was serious. Making these adjustments, we have a negative fund balance, she said. We wont have enough to pay our bills this year. Venable said the district will have to respond to a $563,000 loss in property tax revenues, the result of a 6 percent drop in July at the rst certi cation, and another 7 percent decline after the nal certi cation in October. She said another adjustment she has had to make is in miscellaneous state revenue, which was budgeted at $95,000 for the 2012-13 scal year, even though the district last year received only $3,000 in this category. Gone is $95,945 in discretionary operating funds, as well as $80,000 in BP funds the district received after the April 2010 oil spill, Venable said. One of the only bright spots in the revenue picture was that the district now will be able to recoup from the food service program about $30,000 in utility costs, she said. An ongoing preliminary audit is showing $36,000 in disallowed Business booms after holiday weekendBy LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com Shops and eateries in downtown Apalachicola say Santa delivered robust sales on his shrimp boat this year. Apalachicola never looked better with musicians and strolling carolers enlivening the busy street and luminaries everywhere. During the afternoon, glorious blue skies were tickled by wispy white clouds. It was perfect November weather, even if it was a little too warm to feel like Christmas, since Black Friday came a week early this year. In keeping with tradition, Mr. Claus arrived aboard the shrimp boat Buddys Boys and mounted his glittering throne. At dusk, Apalachicola Mayor Pro Tem Frank Cook ipped the big red switch to light the city Christmas tree. The Orman House and Raney House historic sites, both beautifully decorated, stayed open late and served refreshments to visitors. Members of Tom Daly remains chairman of commissionBy DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com A special meeting of the Apalachicola city commission Tuesday night gave rise to a stormy confrontation between Apalachicola Mayor Van Johnson and Planning and Zoning Chairman Tom Daly after the mayor called for Dalys ouster from P&Z. After a lengthy discussion, in which several audience members rose in defense of Daly, city commissioners split down the middle and thus took no action on the issue of Dalys removal from P&Z. The mayor had asked commissioners to con rm his recommendation, rst made in an Oct. 16 letter to Daly, in which he requested Daly immediately resign from P&Z. Instead, Commissioner Brenda Ash moved, and Frank Cook seconded, that Daly be stripped of his chairmanship of P&Z. That vote was 2-2, with Mitchell Bartley and Johnson each voting no. Commissioner Jimmy Elliott was absent, so his vote likely will be the tiebreaker should the matter be addressed at the Dec. 4 regular meeting or a subsequent meeting. Instead of complying, Tom Daly has chosen to challenge my directive in the court of public opinion, Johnson said at the outset of his prepared remarks. Its a pattern, a continued disregard for established process, procedures and protocol, and an affront to the mayor, staff and residents of this great city. He basically does what he wants, Johnson charged, as he outlined allegations Daly had acted beyond the scope of his authority in several instances. Its about transparency, the Work on Eastpoint library resumesBy DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com More than two years after it rst received federal funding, work was expected to resume this week on nishing the new Eastpoint Library. The announcement construction would resume was well received at the Friends of the Franklin County Public Librarys Nov. 14 annual meeting at the Eastpoint rehouse. Ellen Ashdown, secretary for the Friends, said PSBI Inc. of Tallahassee had been chosen to complete work on the project. The architect remains Ivan Johnson of Johnson Peterson Architects, Tallahassee. The complex process and plethora of paperwork are over, Ashdown said. The USDA-funded completion of the library is beginning! Ashdown said the U.S. Department of Agriculture Rural Development initially awarded the Eastpoint library project a $200,000 grant and $177,850 low-interest loan in September 2010, to be matched by $342,000 from the Friends group from a previous grant, business and community support encompassing donations and volunteer labor. Ashdown said the $342,000 funded the land purchase, permitting, surveying, clearing and site preparation, access driveTOM DALY District grapples with budgetCity stalemates on Planning and Zoning ouster BLACK FRIDAY DELIVERS HOLIDAY CROWDSPHOTOS BY LOIS SWOBODA | The TimesDexter and Trenton Teat pose for papa with Santa Claus. On Friday morning, they got a special treat, a new baby brother named Drake. Below, Fairy Princess Amber Kaczmarek gets a hug from the jolly old elf on Black Friday.IN THE BL ACKSantas pets, A16See BUDGET A7 See LIBRARY A6 See BLACK A6 See PLANNING A5Opinion . . . . . . A4 Society . . . . . . A8 Faith . . . . . . . A9 Outdoors . . . . . A10 Tide Chart . . . . A10 Sports . . . . . . A11 Classi eds . . . A14-A15Santa to visit Hill SaturdayJoin HCOLA, AJs Neighborhood Bar & Grill and the Elves to welcome Santa to the Hill from 10 a.m. to noon Saturday, Dec. 1 at AJs. Look for Santa moving around the neighborhood aboard the re truck as he heads to the AJs parking lot to pass out goody bags and take photos with the children.Holiday Fresh Market Saturday in ApalachSaturday in downtown Apalachicola is the Holiday Fresh Market. Shop in a relaxed atmosphere and pick up seasonal specialties. For information, call 653-9419 or visit info@apalachicolabay. org.Cinematic remembrance at WWII museumAt 10 a.m. Dec. 7, the Camp Gordon Johnston World War II Museum will dedicate two agpoles donated by Woodmen of the World at the new front entrance, and a small commemorative plaque will be placed between them. Afterward, there will be a short ceremony to remember Pearl Harbor. The ag will be placed at half mast as Taps is played, followed by a recording of President Roosevelts Day of Infamy speech, the original heard by the nation over radio. At 11:30 a.m., Tora Tora Tora will be shown. All are invited. Admission is by donation.Lighting of lights on island Dec. 7Come to the island Dec. 7 for the annual lighting of the holiday lights at island center. Santa will arrive on a re engine for the kids. The lighting will take place at dark. Lighthouse tours will be available. For more information, call 927-7744.Carrabelles Holiday on the Harbor Dec. 8On Dec. 8, Marine Street in Carrabelle will be glowing with lights, and the River Walk is the place to be at dark thirty for watching the decked-out boat regatta, the Parade of Lights. Stroll with old friends, make some new ones, sip cider, see Santa and ll your eyes with enchantment. Fireworks are the grand nale for the parade. For more information, call 697-2585.

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LocalA2 | The Times Thursday, November 29, 2012 FRANKLINOUNTYHEALTHEPARTMENT 139 12th Street Apalachicola, Florida 32320Contact Person: David Walker Phone: 850-653-2111, ext. 119 E-mail: david_walker@doh.state..us The Franklin County Health Department will be having its Grand Opening of our new DentalClinic located at 106 NE 5th Street in Carrabelle, FL.The Blue Foundation Dental Grant Presentationwill also take place at the new dental facility. Please make plans to attend this much awaitedoccasion for the oral health of the residents of Franklin County!Please Join Us! -DATE: Wednesday, December 5, 2012 TIME: 10:00 A.M. LOCATION: Carrabelle Clinic 106 NE 5th Street Carrabelle, FL 32322 Contact Person: Please make plans to attend this much awaited occasion for the oral health of the residents of Please Join Us! Wednesday, December 5, 2012 Please make plans to attend this much awaited occasion for the oral health of the residents of Please Join Us! Wednesday, December 5, 2012 SAVE THE DATE! By DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com Members of the Gulf Coast State College board of trustees had a chance this month to see rsthand the Eastpoint campus where a nice-sized chunk of the colleges student body is receiving their high school education. The tour of the Franklin County Schools kindergarten through 12th grade campus, conducted by Principal George Oehlert, was the postscript to the monthly meeting held the morning of Nov. 8 in the high school media center. The trustees meetings are frequently rotated among the three counties Bay, Gulf and Franklin served by the state college. This months meeting was the farthest east the trustees have to travel, prompting several of them to remark they now had a newfound appreciation for the travel demands of Franklin County trustees. And our service area goes another 25 miles to the east, Board Chairman Denise Butler reminded her colleagues. Butler, a former teacher, principal and school board member in the Franklin County School District, opened the meeting with an overview of the two decadelong history of the consolidation process. Its a testimony to folks here who understand how important combining the two high schools has been she said. Its not an easy task for two communities with such different traditions. One theme woven through the three-page agenda and bundle of paperwork associated with the many agenda items was the excitement building for the estimated June 2013 completion of the 93,000-square-foot, $32 million Advanced Technology Center (ATC). Included, and approved, was change order 16, which called for the construction manager, GAC Contractors Inc. of Panama City, and the contractor, HJ High Construction Co. of Orlando, to revise the contract down to $27.1 million. This was because of a $4.8 million reduction in the rst 15 change orders and a $55,210 drop in change order 16. This last drop came about as a result of about $400,000 in savings for having the owner direct purchase ATC building materials and $345,000 in additional costs for having to buy culinary kitchen equipment. The ATC is going to make a difference. Its going to be a staple for providing jobs, Trustee Dan Estes said. During the portion of the meeting where trustees re ected on the recent election, he said America is going to do well. Were part of that. The world may go through a recession but we dont have to participate. Trustee Ralph Roberson noted the dozen or so students enrolled in a new welding class at the GulfFranklin Center. Thats a tremendous help, and it shows you what the college can do in assisting with job creation at the county level, he said. Roberson later presented a giant check to GCSC to represent the $5,000 the Port St. Joe certied public accountant and his wife, Margaret, donated to the ATC Excellence Fund. We have a lot of needs, he said. This is going to be a great thing, and were glad to play a small part in that. Dr. Jim Kerley, president of Gulf Coast, later in the meeting presented Butler with a cap with the letter MIT across the brow, representative of talks now under way with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology regarding a potential partnership in connection with the ATC. Butler commented on Gulf Coast of cials recent trip to Boston, to a conference intended to boost academic performance at community colleges. Kids here are not prepared for the rigor of the next level of education, she said. This is about changing a culture (and educating) for jobs we dont even know what they look like today. This is a very diverse region, she said. Dont underestimate the power and strength of the retirees who are here. Both she and Trustee Jim McKnight said they would reach out to Halsey Beshears, the newly elected state representative. Lets get him in our camp, McKnight said. I know hes a friend of community colleges. The college agreed to approve hiring Panama City attorney Timothy Warner, at an hourly rate of $250 in case he is needed to defend the school in a lawsuit, and Raymond Jackson by Susan Hernandez. Details of the case were shared in an executive session conducted after the regular meeting. The trustees received a report from Loretta Costin, in which she outlined details of a threeyear strategic plan for the Gulf Franklin Center, over which she is director. My goal is we continue to grow, she said. Im getting out to Gulf and Franklin counties, and meeting with employers. Well capture what cities want and need. Were implementing as we go. One example that both she and Roberson cited was a recently created welding class for about a dozen students. Clearly that was something that we heard, she said. She said the campus is also working on a correctional of cer program that might serve Franklin County residents closer than the Port St. Joe campus. Costin also noted the certi ed nursing assistant program being offered at St. James Bay Rehab Center outside Carrabelle. As much as possible, Kerley stressed. We want to partnership, partnership, partnership. Oehlert outlined for trustees the math and English courses Gulf Coast is involved in teaching at the Eastpoint campus. Its easier to get here than drive to Port St. Joe, he said. Our students need more to be getting ready for careers. Our students need to see some hope. Family traditions may not be counted on any longer. DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The TimesAt top, Gulf Coast State College President Dr. Jim Kerley, left, and Trustee Board Chair Denise Butler receive a $5,000 donation from Ralph Roberson. Above, Gulf Coast State College Trustee Karen Durden, center, hugs Chair Denise Butler after being told she has been selected by the Florida Association of Colleges as Trustee of the Year. Gulf Coast President Dr. Jim Kerley is at left.FCHS greets as Gulf Coast board meetsLORETTA COSTIN

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LocalThe Times | A3Thursday, November 29, 2012 To the People of Floridas Second Congressional District, I would like to express my heartfelt gratitude for your support and prayers, placed in me to continue our work in represent you. change the culture in Washington, D.C. as a lifelong resident of North and 2nd District, FloridaPaid for by Southerland For Congress $159.95 $149.95 $179.95St. Joe Rent-All 706 1st Street Port St. Joe (850)227-2112GIFT CERTIFICATES & LAY-A-WAY AVAILABLE By LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star.com Restrictions including mandatory drug testing are limiting participation in programs to nd jobs for oystermen. Workforce Florida Inc. created in 2000, was conceived to develop the states business climate by designing and implementing strategies that help Floridians enter, remain and advance in the workforce. In recent months, in response to the failure of seafood harvesting in the bay, the Gulf Coast Workforce Board has stepped up efforts to train Franklin County seafood workers for alternative employment. Although Workforce Florida is attacking local unemployment on multiple fronts, several hurdles remain to be crossed. Kim Bodine, executive director of the Gulf Coast Workforce Board, appeared before the county commission on Nov. 20 to update them on the progress of training and placement programs and to present Workforces newest ve-year plan. The commission approved the plan, with Commissioner Noah Lockley opposed. Lockley questioned Bodine about a proposed oyster relay program for which the county has requested federal funding. He asked who made the bylaws for the program and noted that they varied considerably from previous oyster relay and shelling initiatives funded by the state. He asked why drug testing would be required. Bodine said funding for the relay has been requested through a national emergency grant from the U.S. Department of Labor and the rules are based on federal requirements. Its federal money, so drug testing is required, said Commissioner William Massey. In the past, the county ran shelling, and Workforce wasnt involved in it, Director of Administrative Services Alan Pierce said. Last year, we just subbed it out to the (Franklin County Seafood Workers Association) and they ran the plan. In this case, the seafood workers association is not involved. Theres a leasing agency, and they have requirements like drug testing. It isnt really a change in state law; its a change in whos doing the program. Commissioner Cheryl Sanders asked if oystermen would be responsible for providing their own drug tests. Bodine told her they would be tested by the leasing agency. Pierce outlined three signicant changes in the proposed program: Required drug testing, participants receiving a W-2 form from the leasing agency and paid hourly wage as opposed to payment per boatload. Massey said only two workers will be allowed on a boat. Each will receive $25 per hour for three hours of travel time to and from the bars and ve hours of work time on the bar. Pierce said he believed that in the past, relayers were paid $125 per worker for each boatload of shells delivered. Bodine told commissioners funding for the shelling program has not yet been approved. She said special approval was received from the labor departments regional ofce in Atlanta before the grant request was sent on to Washington. We were initially concerned that they would allow us to use these dollars for temporary job creation of this nature, she said. They havent given us approval yet. Our proposal is still with US Department of Labor. We dont know what additional requirements they may have. Bodine said approval has taken longer than expected and blamed the delay on the impact of Hurricane Sandy. Because the storm is so close to DC, I feel like people are focused on that, she said. Bodine said she is calling Washington and the countys regional partners regularly and urged commissioners to push for approval as well. Ive been told the oysters we are trying to use are dying off, she said. Time really is of the essence and thats what Im telling them now. They dont really understand a lot about the industry. Commissioner Pinki Jackel suggested letters be sent to Congressman Steve Southerland, Senator Bill Nelson and the state legislative delegation. The state has told us they dont have any money, Jackel said. This is our best shot. Sanders said the county will contact Leslie Palmer, director of the states Division of Aquaculture, and ask if money will soon be available for a shelling program proposed in addition to the oyster relay. Lockley was critical of Workforce. Youve got money to put people to work but the positions arent getting lled, he said. Bodine told commissioners that other programs are in place to provide employment for displaced oystermen but it has been difcult to get seafood workers to participate. People are still trying to harvest what they can from the bay, she said. Im hearing from my case managers people are waiting for the shelling project but shelling is not ve days a week. If they are selected for the shelling, Im sure we can work something out with the county (to allow them to continue training). Bodine said Workforce now has 105 seafood workers signed up for training or on-the-job work experience. Another 275 workers who are not saltwater product license holders have also applied for services. Workforce is currently van pooling 11 trainees to Gulf County four days a week for welding certication. Seven workers have qualied for correctional ofcer training and three of them have already been hired by a correctional facility. Testing and recruitment of certied nursing assistant trainees is now in progress in conjunction with Gulf Coast State College. Bodine said 12 work sites in addition to county work sites have been identied for the on-the-job training experience program. Im a little concerned that more people arent stepping into those work experience (positions), she said. Workforce also recently signed a contract with the countys literacy program to hire additional tutors and provide a larger facility where people can work on their GEDs which may eventually allow them to seek training for medical or correctional employment. GULF COAST WORKFORcCE BOARD HOLDS ANNUAL LUNcCHEONOn Nov. 13, the Gulf Coast Workforce Board celebrated 16 years of providing workforce services to the region at its annual meeting and luncheon at Florida State Universitys Panama City Campus Holley Center. At the meeting, Executive Director Kim Bodine reviewed the local workforce system performance over the last year which included: Assisting 1,096 employers recruit and hire workers Serving 60,336 walk ins at the Workforce Center Connecting a total of 4,659 individuals to employment Providing in-demand training and/ or employment services to 1,121 adults, dislocated workers, and youth under the Workforce Investment Act Helping 103 families transition from welfare to self sufciency We owe our great performance to our hardworking staff, our dedicated volunteer board members and our service providers, said Bodine. Service providers for the Gulf Coast board include Bay District Schools, Bay STARS; Haney Workforce Training Center; Friends of the Franklin County Library, TIGERS Program; Gulf Coast State College, Workforce Center; and Royal American Management. Individuals from each of the service providers along with their case manager were recognized for successfully completing their workforce program. At the meeting the board welcomed new board member Patti Blaylock from Gulf County and also voted on a new slate of ofcers for 2012-13. Tommy Ward, with Dave Pybus Electric from Bay County, was appointed to serve as chairman of the board. Other board members elected as 20122013 ofcers include Vice-Chair Bob Swenk (Bay County); Past Chair Ted Mosteller (Franklin County); and executive committee members Ruth Phillips (Gulf County) and Betty Croom (Franklin County) The Gulf Coast Workforce Board is a public/private partnership chartered by the State of Florida to administer workforce development programs in Bay, Gulf, and Franklin counties. Their mission is to provide leadership, oversight, guidance, and assistance to institutions and agencies delivering training and workforce services in order to meet the economic development and employment needs of Bay, Gulf, and Franklin counties.LOLO IS S SWOBODASWOBODA | The TimesKim BodineRelay program to require mandatory drug testing

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OpinionA4 | The Times USPS 027-600Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 Publisher: Roger Quinn Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six monthsHome delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERSIn case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola TimesIn a single week, we have seen four cases of canine parvovirus. This is a serious disease that mostly affects puppies and unvaccinated dogs. Parvo, if untreated, is often fatal. Even with treatment, survival is not assured. Because treatment for parvo is costly, we stress that prevention is the best medicine. Vaccination at a cost of just a few dollars can prevent a disease that costs $500-$2,000 to treat and will save your puppy a lot of suffering. Canine parvovirus was rst recognized in 1978. It is a virus that can last a very long time in the environment. Puppies get infected from walking, playing or rooting and ingesting the virus particles from contaminated soil. Vaccinated dogs still get infected and shed the virus, but they do not develop symptoms. Because so many dogs can be carriers, we cannot control the presence of the virus in the environment. When a puppy gets infected, the virus spreads through the blood and attacks the cells of the gut and the immune system. By killing these cells, the virus causes destruction of the natural barrier to infection in the gut. The gut has bacteria living on the surface that normally do not cause disease. When the barrier is compromised, however, those bacteria can enter the bloodstream and wreak havoc. To add insult to injury, parvo destroys the immune cells that would ght these bacterial infections. Finally, because the gut wall is compromised, the poor puppy cannot absorb nutrients and water. He or she will often bleed into the gut, risking catastrophic blood loss. Most parvo puppies are also infected with parasites, which can make matters even worse. The signs of parvovirus infection are vomiting, bloody diarrhea, dehydration and extreme lethargy. Sometimes there is a fever. These signs come on rapidly. A puppy can be playful in the morning and very sick by the evening. If this disease were happening to you, you would be placed in an isolation ward in intensive care, with intravenous (IV) uids, antibiotics and nutrition. Your blood values would be closely monitored to make sure that you were not developing sepsis (infection in the blood) and to ensure all of your organ systems were as healthy as possible. You would probably be hospitalized for ve days or more, and even then you may not recover. For puppies, the best treatment is IV uids, injectable and oral antibiotics, anti-nausea medication and special foods. Treatment may be needed for several days. Vaccination for parvovirus is one of the most important things you can do for a new puppy. The same shot also includes vaccines for distemper and hepatitis, which are rare diseases but just as serious. It is important that all puppies get the whole series in two-to-three-week intervals until 16 weeks; otherwise they may not be protected. Some breeds, like Rottweilers, need another shot after 16 weeks. Once a dog has had his or her booster at 1 year old, the vaccine provides at least three years of protection each time. If we never saw another case of this sad disease, we would be very happy veterinarians! John Duncan, DVM is a veterinarian at the Apalachicola Bay Animal Clinic in Eastpoint. A couple of months ago on CBSs program This Morning, they were talking about regional dialects across the United States. They were lamenting the loss or the consolidation of micro-dialects, which identied folks from one of the North Carolinas Outer Banks from another. Wow! In March 2012, the publishers of the Dictionary of American Regional English (DARE, http://dare. wisc.edu/) put out the fth volume. The work was begun in 1965 with interviews of 2,777 people across the country in towns and neighborhoods in cities and out in the countryside. It documents regional and sometimes a small populations use of language. Variations include pronunciation and spelling as well as phrasing. The dictionary also uses as reference sources diaries, letters, novels, histories, biographies, newspapers, government documents, etc. that cover our history from the colonial period to the present. In this seemingly more and more homogeneous 21st century population, local dialects still survive as Southerners may have noticed as camera crews fanned out across the New York boroughs and the coast of New Jersey after Hurricane Sandy. Library friend Jack Freeman, from Havana, dropped in about that time and told us that two white males from Apalachicola were interviewed in 1965. He sent me photocopies of the pertinent pages. The rst was born in 1886, had a grade school education and his occupation was listed as nautical, shing. The other was born in 1905, with a high school education and occupation listed in the category of skilled trades. The library will probably never own the volumes known as DARE, but we do have a funny book called Southern Talk, a Disappearing Language by Ray Cunningham. It contains phrases as well as pronunciations, adding quotations to make the point, as in the word nairn: A bunch of the boys at school has got yoyos, but I aint got nairn. Southern literature and studies on Southern writing are a special collection area for the Apalachicola Municipal Library with funding help from the Tapper Foundation of Port St Joe. Come by and see what we have. Attention: Until further notice, all faxes sent to the Department of Children and Families will be free. We know this service is available at Franklins Promise, but the library is open hours when they are closed. Caty Greene is the librarian for the Apalachicola Municipal Library. To reach her, call 653-8436.@THE LIBRaARY Caty Greene The FWC takes a lot of hits from local shermen and Big Bend coastal businesses for their perceived restrictive shing rules that dont always seem to pass the local common sense test. An FWC decision made last February during a meeting at the Pat Thomas Law Enforcement Academy got it right! The commissioners decision to have a spring gag grouper season in four Big Bend counties received rave reviews from kids and business owners alike. Now everyone hopes they will add an early fall season in Big Bend state waters. Ronald Fred Crum, owner of Crums Mini Mall in Panacea, has been coordinating Kids Fishing Tournaments for years, and he explained it this way: The commission helped to ensure another generation of gag grouper shers. If young shermen can experience the exhilaration and thrill of catching a shallow water gag grouper when they are 10 to 15 years old, they are hooked for life. They will eventually buy shing licenses and become the next generation of offshore shers. I agree with Crums assessment. I volunteer at the Beau Turner Youth Conservation Center and introduce a lot of youngsters to shallow water gag grouper shing. Its been my experience that you cant take kids at this young age 40-50 miles offshore on an eight-to-10 hour grouper shing trip, because they dont hold up and a bad experience can ruin them for life. These youngsters have a two-to-three hour attention span when it comes to gag grouper shing. You need calm seas and lots of snacks, and you have to get them out there quickly, make sure they can still see land and put them on a shallow water gag grouper to seal the deal. Once they feel the brute power of that grouper as it digs for the bottom, these kids become our next generation of offshore shermen and women. We cant give kids this experience in the Big Bend state waters because all of our gag grouper leave by Thanksgiving and they come back just before Easter. By July 4, they are gone again until late September. The ideal kids gag season here is March-June and September-November. FWC uses Regional Management practices for redsh, trout and even deer to ensure optimal recreational opportunities for shareholders. There is no reason why the commission shouldnt apply this same local management style to our grouper and snapper. After all, Florida state waters vary tremendously in habitat, depth and shing pressure from one end to the other, just like they vary from the East coast to the Gulf Coast. Last year, NOAA Fisheries had asked FWC in the name of consistency to open the recreational season for gag grouper in all state waters, from July 1, 2012 through Oct. 31, 2012. The problem was that there are no legal grouper in state waters of the Florida Big Bend counties of Franklin, Wakulla, Jefferson and Taylor during the hot summer months of July, August and September and the cold winter months of December-February. The economies of these four counties are heavily dependent on tourism and shing during the spring and fall months, and NOAAs proposed dates would further depress a struggling economy. During oral presentations to the commission, many knowledgeable locals stated, There are no legal grouper in the shallow Big Bend state waters during the hot summer months when NOAA wants you to open the gag grouper season. During my presentation, I told the commissioners, If you approve the proposed federal gag grouper season as requested by NOAA Fisheries, it would be akin to opening duck hunting season in the Big Bend from July through October when all of our ducks are in Canada! You cant introduce kids to duck hunting if there are no ducks for them to shoot at. During that FWC meeting, local shermen, coastal business owners and a county commissioner testied that eliminating the historic spring gag grouper season would devastate the coastal economy. Traditionally, small boaters from Georgia, Alabama and north Florida who pursue gags in shallow Big Bend waters during the spring and fall months help keep marinas, bait shops, guides, restaurants, motels, campgrounds and other coastal enterprises aoat. I am pleased to say that the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission hit a grand slam with our kids and our Big Bend businesses last winter when they stood up to NOAA Fisheries and a host of special interests to make a decision based on sound biological principles as well as doing what was the right thing for the folks, for the Big Bend coastal economy and for the gag grouper. In its nal decision, FWC made an exemption in the gag grouper season for the Big Bend counties of Franklin, Wakulla, Jefferson and Taylor. They did, however, reduce the season in these counties from four months to three months with April, May and June 2012, being open season for gag grouper in state waters. Federal waters statewide opened on July 1, 2012, and state waters of these four Big Bend counties were closed to gag grouper shing on June 30, 2012. The FWC decision last year was a win-win for everybody, and with gag grouper populations rebounding, everyone in the Big Bend is hoping that FWC will make a similar decision at its upcoming Dec. 5 and 6 meeting in Apalachicola when the commissioners set the gag grouper seasons for 2013. This time, coastal business owners, shers and especially the kids hope that they will be fair and add the fall months, SeptemberNovember, when our gags (ducks) come back to the Big Bend shallow state waters. If you agree, please send a note to the commissioners at Commissioners@ MyFWC.com and respectfully ask them to do it for the kids and for the economy! Alan Lamarche is a retired assistant chief of law enforcement for the former Florida Game & Fish Commission. I am writing in response to the article in the Nov. 20 issue of The Times (Planning, Zoning to review day care trafc) regarding operation of the Apalachicola/St. George Island Methodist Church (ASGI) Cooperative Parishs day care on the grounds of the Methodist church in Apalachicola. I do not feel that a faith-based ministry of a church can be denied by the Apalachicola P&Z. Christ Community Academy is a ministry of the Apalachicola/St. George Island United Methodist Church. It is in no way operating separate from the church as was suggested in the article. Although the Academy has adopted the State of Florida guidelines, the state has deemed this to be a faith-based ministry and it does not fall under the state and does not need a special exception to operate. This also applies to local governmental agencies such as the Apalachicola P&Z. While the operation of the day care as a ministry of the church does not come under governmental controls, if neighbors are concerned about parking on the street then that should be an issue for the city. Perhaps the neighbors could agree to an alternative to the existing parking on Fifth Street and could possibly look into head-in parking and making the street a one-way street. I will add that Christ Community Academy does not place a trafc burden on Fifth Street. The maximum number of children that can be accepted is 13 and at this time is not operating at full capacity. Parents drop off and pick up in a designated area during the week. The trafc generated is minimal. Fifth Street is made up of single-family residences, the church, a commercial establishment (bed & breakfast) and a commercial wedding venue, all using the parking on Fifth Street. First United Methodist Church has served this community for over a century. As with many rst churches in small towns, the community has built up around the church. FUMC was a good neighbor in the 1800s and strives to be just that today. A healthy church is one that reaches out in ministry to its community. FUMC does just that, not only with Christ Community Academy but through Bible studies, a dynamic youth group and a 12-step program to name a few. Indeed there is activity around this church. Christ Community Academy serves Franklin County in a much-needed way. It is a day care for infants and toddlers allowing for a safe and nurturing Christian environment for children. It employs three Franklin County residents. Finding good, affordable day care is a challenge for many families. Every effort has gone into making Christ Community Academy an exceptional day care facility and every effort has been made to see to it that this ministry continues to serve families in Franklin County. The Apalachicola P&Z does not have the authority to hinder or stop the ministry of a church but does have the authority and responsibility to address the parking issue raised by concerned citizens and hopefully the parking issue will be resolved.Mary Lou Short ALLaAN LaAMaARCHEFWC needs another gag grouper grand slamPreserving the dialect of Franklin County DR. JOHN DUNCaANPrevention would quell parvo outbreakCChurchs day care ministry much-needed Thursday, November 29, 2012

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LocalThe Times | A5Thursday, November 29, 2012 dbutler@coastalcoverage.com Locally owned and operated Home Business Auto Health Workers Comp PUBLIC NOTICETHE FRANKLIN COUNTY ADVISORY BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT WILL HOLD A PUBLIC HEARING ON WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 5, 2012, AT 10:00 A.M., IN THE COUNTY COMMISSION MEETINGROOM OF THE COURTHOUSE ANNEX TO CONSIDER THE FOLLOWING VARIANCES, APPEALS AND SPECIAL EXCEPTIONS:RECONSIDERATION OF A REQUEST FOR A VARIANCE 1. TO CONSTRUCT A SINGLE FAMILY DWELLING 5 FEET INTO THE SIDE SETBACK LINE ON PROPERTY DESCRIBED AS A 1.10 ACRE PARCEL LYING IN SECTION 18, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 4 WEST, 578 RIVER ROAD, CARRABELLE, FL. REQUEST SUBMITTED BY GARLICK ENVIRONMENTAL ASSOCIATES, INC., AGENT FOR WILLIAM LAWLOR, OWNER. THE BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS, ACTING AS THE BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT WILL CONSIDER THIS REQUEST AT THEIR REGULAR MEETING ON DECEMBER 18, 2012. *Persons wishing to comment may do so in person or in writing to the Franklin County Planning & Zoning Department, 34 Forbes Street, Suite 1, Apalachicola, FL 32320. Transactions of this hearing will not be recorded, persons whish to record the proceedings must make the necessary arrangements for recording. NOTICE OF INTENT IS GIVEN THAT FRANKLIN COUNTY WILL HOLD A PUBLICHEARING TO CONSIDER ADOPTING AN ORDINANCE REGULATING THE EASTPOINTPAVILION BY PROHIBITING THE CONSUMPTIONOF ALCOHOL, LOITERING AND PUBLICNUISANCES.Notice is hereby given that on December 4, 2012 at 10:00 a.m. (ET) at 34 Forbes Street, Apalachicola, Florida at the Courthouse Annex, the Franklin CountyBoard of County Commissioners will hold a public hearing to consider adopting an ordinance captioned as follows:AN ORDINANCE PROVIDING THAT ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGESSHALL NOT BE CONSUMED AT THE EASTPOINT PAVILION, FORBIDDING LOITERING; FORBIDDING PUBLIC NUISANCES; PROVIDING FOR PENALTIES;PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY AND AN EFFECTIVE DATE. Street, Apalachicola,Florida and may be viewed there.Interested Persons may appear at the meeting and be heard with respect to the proposed ordinance. Any party who may wish to appeal the decision made at this public hearingis responsible for making a verbatim transcript of the hearing.Those persons requiring assistance to attend the meeting must call deputy at 850-653-8861 x100 at least three business days before the meeting to make arrangements. CITY OF CARRABELLE PROPOSED ENACTMENT OF CITY ORDINANCEThe City Commission of the City of Carrabelle, Florida, proposes to enact the following ordinance: CITY OF CARRABELLE ORDINANCE 453AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF CARRABELLE, FLORIDA, PROVIDING FOR AMENDMENT OF ORDINANCE 115, PERTAINING TO THE LEVY OF LICENSE AND OCCUPATIONAL TAXES ON PERSONS AND ENTITIES ENGAGED IN OR CARRYING ON CERTAIN TYPES OF BUSINESS, PROFESSIONS, PRIVILEGES OR OCCUPATIONS IN THE CITY OF CARRABELLE; AND ESTABLISHING AN EFFECTIVE DATE.The proposed Ordinance may be inspected during regular hours at Carrabelle City Hall between 8 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., 1001 Gray Ave., Carrabelle, FL Monday through Friday, or call 850-697-2727. The proposed Ordinance will be considered for enactment during a public hearing to Interested parties may appear at the hearing and be heard with respect to the proposed Ordinance. If an individual decides to appeal any decision made by the City Commission with respect to this meeting, a verbatim transcript may be required. If so, the individual should make Pursuant to the provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act, any person requiring special accommodation to participate in this meeting is asked to advise the city at least 48 hours before the meeting by contacting Keisha Smith at the above address or phone number. Wilburn Messer, Mayor Attest: Keisha Smith, City Clerk Publication Date: November 29, 2012 PLANNING from page A1mayor said. I guarantee if I did something like this you would run me out of town. Its not right. Reading from the statement that further detailed the contents of his Oct. 16 letter, Johnson accused Daly of entering into an unauthorized agreement in his capacity as president of the Apalachicola Area Historical Society to sublet the Raney House Carriage House to city consultant Bill McCartney, a private, for-pro t entity. Johnson said Daly had independently set the rental rate for that space and publicly voiced his intent to establish an ofce in that house out of which he could discuss projects with developers to create a City Planning Department. Pressed by members of the audience to detail this allegation, the mayor said I got it from a reliable source. Apalachicola resident Susan Clementson, an active member of the historical society, rose in anger. As far as Im concerned, thats slanderous language, she said. That is total hearsay. That is an absolute absurdity. I cant believe you, mayor, if you are so concerned about ethics. Johnson also said Daly has been involved in a range of troubling activities that have included not following proper procedures for canceling P&Z meetings or holding them improperly. Before leaving midway through the discussion, Daly defended actions he had taken on behalf of the historical society, although his version of events differed from that of City Administrator Betty TaylorWebb, with whom he had met to discuss the possible sublease of space at the Carriage House. Betty said, I dont have a problem with that, Daly said, prompting a swift reply from Taylor-Webb. That is not correct, she said, stressing that she advised Daly to go before the city commission to secure approval for the deal. Taylor-Webb said McCartney works as an independent contractor for the city, to pursue matters of state funding, but is not a registered lobbyist. She said he is paid a percentage of monies he brings in to the city and carries a business card with the citys seal on it to assist him in his efforts in Tallahassee. She also noted that terms of the historical societys lease of the Raney House from the city, which has expired and is being reviewed on behalf of the society by attorney Barbara Sanders, are explicit that no subleasing is allowed. Daly said he was not made aware he needed approval of the city commissioners, but the mayor was adamant that he had. You were at the October meeting, when the issue came up about allowing Franklins Promise to use the re station as a thrift store. You knew that, Johnson said, pointing directly at Daly. You never came to this board. We werent given the opportunity to review it in a public setting. You know you were wrong. Daly rose in his defense. I dont believe Ive done anything wrong. I have the best intentions for this community, he said. This is an absolute insult to me. Half of what he said is untrue, if not all of it. Im not going to stand up here and confront things that arent true. The mayor stressed that P&Z volunteers serve at the pleasure of the elected city commissioners. He declined to address Dalys performance as P&Z chair. Im trying not to discuss that, Johnson said. Hes eventually going to have the city in a lawsuit sooner than you can imagine. Apalachicola resident Gene Smith spoke on Dalys behalf, noting he has done an exemplary job of being head of P&Z. Did you ever make a mistake? Smith asked of the mayor. I try not to make them over and over again, Johnson said. Smith said Daly briefed the historical society board a few months ago regarding the lease, and the executive board had approved the idea contingent on city approval. At last months meeting, city commissioners made clear the sublease was not permitted. Ed Springer, who sits on the historical society board, stressed that none of it was done with malicious intent. Apalachicola resident Bobby Miller suggested there was more to the matter than issues of public ethics. Sounds like a witch hunt to me, he said. It almost sounds like hes in the way of something in P&Z. Apalachicola resident Carrie Kienzle pleaded for commissioners to consider carefully whether such a harsh step as removal from P&Z was necessary. This is a person, a human being, she said. Is he a careless person? Perhaps. Overenthusiastic? Yes. Toms got his tail caught. But was there malicious intent? Was there criminal intent? This would be such a humiliation, Kienzle said. Think with your heart.

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LocalA6 | The Times Thursday, November 29, 2012 NO HIDDEN CHARGES: It is our policy that the patient and any other person responsible for payments has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed by payment or any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment. www.mulliseye.com"WE WELCOME NEW PATIENTS, CALLTODAY FOR YOUR PRIORITY APPOINTMENT" FOR NEW PATIENTS 59 AND OLDERThis certificate is good for a complete Medical Eye Exam withTodd Robinson, M.D.Board Certified Eye Physician and Surgeon.The exam includes a prescription for eye glasses and tests for Glaucoma, Cataracts and other eye diseases.FOR YOUR APPOINTMENT CALL: 850-763-6666 ELIGIBILITY: U.S. Citizens living in the Florida Panhandle, 59 years and older, not presently under our care. Coupon Expires: 11-30-12 FREEEYE EXAMCODE: AP00Darren Payne, M.D.Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract SurgeonLee Mullis, M.D.Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract SurgeonTodd Robinson, M.D.Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon "Freedom from Eye Glasses, Now a reality for many."Smart LensesSM Competitive Yields on FDIC Insured CDs ANNOUNCES THE OPENING OF WEEMS MEDICAL CENTER WEST Tuesday, December 4, 2012Appointments Available and Walk-Ins Welcome!!! Appointments can be made by calling 653-8853 ext 118 and Walk-Ins may enter the front lobby of the hospital and inquire at the front registration desk.Weems Medical Center West will be providing Urgent and Family Care Services Tuesday through Thursday 8am 4pm135 Ave G, Apalachicola, FL 850-653-8853www.weemsmemorial.com ARE YOU IN NEED OF A MEDICAL PROVIDER?? BILL MILLER REALTY850-697-3751 (3310) 570-0658400 + COMM. U.S. 98 & GULFADJ. TO LANARK MARINA 850K$29,500 $2,500 DOWN BUYS 2 BED APT. 2 6 ORRENT $500/MTH 2 B/R 1 BTH GULF VIEW HOME W/ FAMILY ROOM $70,000 C/B-3-1 2 COR. LOTS CITY $49,500 3/2D/W 2 COR. LOTS -CITY $42,500MIH 2 CRNRLOTS BLK. $ STORE REDUCED $49,500 2 AC-AT RIVER UTIL. IN -$39,500 TANNING, WAXING, EAR PIERCING, FEATHERS, FASHION EXTENSIONS & UP DOS.Walk-ins Welcome With Mani/Pedi Combo10%OFF PolishEXPIRES: 11/14/12 TANNING, WAXING, EAR PI E RCING, F E A T A T A H E RS, FASHION EX TE NSIONS & U P DOS. Philaco Womans Club pitched in to help park staff adorn the Orman House and to work with Lynn Wilson in decorating the Raney House on behalf of the Apalachicola Area Historical Society. The Apalachicola Municipal Library and Franklin Needs Inc. each decorated one of the four trees Wilson provided for the Raney House. Wilson adorned the other two trees, one with a coastal theme and a second arrayed with Russian dolls. George and Pam Mahr contributed a magni cent nine-foot cedar to the Orman House, where it is on display in the parlor adorned with antique ornaments. Dale Julian, owner of Downtown Books and Purl and a veteran of many holiday seasons, said this Black Friday seemed a little different to her. It had a different feel to it, she said. We started with strong sales rst thing in the morning, and it went on all day. Most years we spend the whole day gift wrapping. This year, people seemed to be buying for themselves. Christine Knight, a sales person at Artemis Gallery, which specializes in art and clothing, said even with three people on the oor, it was nonstop on Friday. Susan Wolfe, proprietor of Forgotten Coast Used and Out-of-Print Books, said business was good on both Friday and Saturday. She said many of her customers were in the market for history books about Apalachicola and the Panhandle. Karen Martinoff, owner of Charming Comforts, an upscale gift and furnishing shop said, This is our rst year at our main street location, so we have nothing to compare it to. We were busy from the minute we opened, even with extra help. We planned to close at 8, but we were here until 8:30 p.m. I can say its the rst time weve had a line to check out with two registers open, she said. We did a lot of gift wrapping. I had one person just to do that. It was a record day for us. Saturday was good, too. The Stuffed Owl, a specialty kitchen shop, reported sales in line with last year and remained strong from opening on Friday until about 4 p.m. Saturday. Many restaurants reported waits for seating and, with downtown diners full, the wealth spread out to encompass Papa Joes, Captain Snooks restaurant in Eastpoint and other outlying eateries. At 8 a.m. Saturday, Curt and Beth Blair, owners of Stage Left Pizza, were already in Panama City stocking up on restaurant supplies. We pretty much sold out of everything last night, Curt Blair said. Apalachicola Bay Chamber of Commerce Director Anita Grove said all the downtown businesses she polled reported strong sales that started early and continued until the stores closed on Friday evening, often after 9 p.m. Santa made landfall a few minutes early. Dance studio owner Pam Nobles and company staged a dazzling review in their hot pink attire. Philaco and Franklin Needs both raised funds for their organizations at booths and called the crowd extremely generous. The Bay Area Choral Society made the rounds passing the bucket to support the Franklin County food pantry. The line to see Santa seemed endless, and organizers regretfully closed up shop at 8:30 p.m. with a promise that the man in red would be back Saturday afternoon for a photo op with kids and dogs. Darlene Pearce of Cairo, Ga., said her family came to stay at their Lanark Village getaway for the holiday. On Friday, she brought daughter Ashton to see Santa but also came to Apalachicola speci cally to shop. I decided this year, with the economy the way it is, I was going to patronize small businesses and shop locally, Pearce said. Ive already been to Two Gulls and Beach Traders this afternoon. Late Saturday afternoon, Julian said her business had nally started to drop off. As a small business owner, I can say it was great, but Im happy thats over for this year, she said. way, drainage ponds, purchase and erection of the 5,000-square-foot Vulcan steel building, including exterior doors and windows, plumbing and an electricalready setup. But when completion of the project was bid in December 2011, the winning bid for the build-out work exceeded the USDA award amount, Ashdown said. The build-out encompassed nishing grading, topsoil, sod and landscaping, limestone base and asphalt paving, partitions, drywall, cabinetry and millwork, acoustical ceilings, insulation, carpet, vinyl tile, painting, book drop, heating and air conditioning, plumbing, electrical outlets and lighting. She said PSBIs eventual winning bid was $530,689, which included furniture. By value engineering, which included revising speci cations to cut costs, primarily replacing asphalt paving with limerock and reducing two large doors, the shortfall was reduced to $102,500, she said. After reapplication to USDA for that amount, the Friends received a supplemental award of $65,000 in an outright grant and $37,500 in a loan, Ashdown said. The total award from USDA now is $480,350, comprising a $265,000 grant and $215,350 loan, she said. The Friends also have received support from the Apalachicola Riverkeeper and the Northwest Florida Water Management District to restore the wetlands on the 13-acre site and to create a nature walk. Ashdown said completion is expected in three to six months. Three new board members, Anna Carmichael, Marabeth Farmer and Christine Hinton, were elected at the annual meeting for three-year terms running 2013-2015. Celeste Wall is retiring as a board member. Current Friends of cers include President Joyce Estes, Vice President Carmichael, Secretary Ashdown and Treasurer Uta Hardy, as well as directors Hinton, Bert Hicks, John Sink Barbara Yonclas and County Librarian Glenda Ondracek. LIBRARY from page A1 BLACK from page A1 DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The TimesThe outside of the proposed Eastpoint Library.

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LocalThe Times | A7Thursday, November 29, 2012 capital project money, which are monies that had been allocated from the 1.5-mill capital outlay funds for maintenance but which never were spent. This is the rst year its happened, Venable said. Its because we didnt spend enough on our main t enance allocation in our general fund. The nance director also told the board retire m ent corrections need to be made on payments for two board members, one previ o us and one current, as well as a reimbursement to Tax Collector Jimmy Harris for property tax adjustments for over assessments. These two items total $65,000. Lastly, Venable said ex p enditures for the operation of the schools physical p lant likely will run about $110,000 over what is currently set aside in the budget. I estimate about $1 mil l ion that for one reason or another has gone away, Board Chairman Jimmy Gander said. To cope with the situa t ion, Marks said she wrote an Aug. 29 letter to the state, and together with Venable, she has met with state edu c ation ofcials who work with school nance. They gave us some suggestions, Marks said. They want us in close contact. They are willing to work with us. They want us to do what we can; this is go i ng to be an ongoing process for F ranklin County. They were very recep t ive about helping Franklin County, she said. Marks shared with the school board a list of $411,000 in possible budget reductions for the second semester, plus an estimated $211,000 in additional rev e nue if a plan to develop af f ordable housing next to the former Apalachicola High School goes through. The plan, proposed by Leon Bloodworth, requires approval by both the school board and Apalachicola city commission, as well as funding support next year by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Devel o pment. If it comes to frui t ion and agreement can be reached on the sale price for the land, t he northwest cor n er of the high school tract could see the creation of 44 moderate priced units in the months to come. The largest chunk of Marks cost-saving rec o mmendations is $213,000 through the reduction of eight staff positions at the Franklin County Schools main campus and $86,000 through the cutback of ve positions at the branch cam p us in Eastpoint where the pre-kindergarten, Learning Academy and Alternative School are housed. Marks did not outline details of the proposed cuts but said they would not all be teachers. Were trying real hard to hang on to the instructional part, she said. It would n ot take out totally any programs, it would take out pieces of programs. Venable told the school board labor costs take out about $5.2 million from the general fund, and benets take another $1.5 million. Teachers were expected today to consider a plan that has emerged from contract negotiations that would see staffers, depending on sal a ry, take between a 1 and 3 percent pay cut. Marks other recom m ended cuts would be $35,000 for reorganizing bus transportation to Carrabelle locations, $33,000 by remov i ng the district-funded den t al coverage and $14,000 by reducing the transporta t ion foreman to a part-time position. M arks also announced plans to shut down d istrict facilities during Christmas week to realize savings to utility costs. Al London, director of auxiliary services, told the school board he met with bus drivers last week and worked out a way to eliminate the driving of empty buses to and from Carrabelle. We nally came up with a plan that will eliminate completely any empty bus i es, he said, noting the plan would involve having drivers who live in Eastpoint to car p ool to the school and then ride together on a school ve h icle to and from Carrabelle to the buses they drive. Now theyre going to have to drive their own ve h icles t o school, London said. Just in this instance with these ve buses, by do i ng this we will save $4.23 a mile, or about $70,000 a year by making this change. Everybody was on board; they like the chang e s, he said. It wasnt a gripe session, it was a very constructive work session. Even if it saves half that money, were ahead of the game. S chool Board Member Pam Shiver said she would like to see more school em p loyees brought into the cost-saving discussions. They may see something we dont, she said. Some t imes you can see things at the working level.Gander selected chairmanThe Nov. 2 0 organizat ional meeting began on an upbeat note, as County Judge Van Russell swore in Superintendent Nina Marks, who was re-elected to a four-year term without opposition. He then swore in the three school board members elected to fouryear terms: Teresa Ann Martin and George Thomp s on, who returned to ofce without opposition, and newcomer Pam Shiver, who replaces Carl Whaley. Board Member David Hinton he moved to elect Gander to another term as school board chairman. Were in a really bad budget situation, Hinton said. It would not be ap propriate to nominate an other person. By unanimous vote, Gander was elected chair m an and Thompson v icechairman. Hinton once again was appointed as the boards liaison to the Flori d a legislature. Id like to thank ev e ryone for the condence placed in me, Gander said after Marks handed him the gavel. Ill do my best. The board voted unani m ously to retain Barbara Sanders as school board at t orney. She will be paid $125 an hour for her services, and her associate Donna Duncan $95 per hour. One change that appears to be in the ofng is the scheduling of two regular school board meetings per month, as opposed to one on the rst Thursday of the month. I noticed last year we h ad a lot of special meetings, and my concern is does the board feel we should have two meetings a month and take off the special meet i ngs? Martin said. Gander noted that as the year goes on, we can try to conduct certain types of business at one meeting and other types at the other. Were going to be here twice anyway. T he board agreed to set its regular meetings on rst Thursdays and tasked Marks with coming up with a schedule for a second reg u lar meeting on the third week of each month. The school board mem b ers also unanimously agreed to c ontinue funding the four $1,000 scholarships they present each year to graduating Franklin County High School seniors. Ven a ble advised them that this scholarship account had in it, as of June 30, $6,824, and that it would be properly funded if each board mem b er contributed $33.34 each pay period. The school board also agreed to continue the for e stry scholarship they set up last year as a forgive n ess loan to a local student who enrolls in the Uni v ersity of Florida forestry program, which is the only Florida school to offer such a program.. Marks said no local stu d ents have yet applied for the scholarship, w hich is funded through $20,000 set aside each year from funds contributed to the school district, in lieu of taxes, by the state forests. I dont think we need to keep adding money to it if nobodys using it, Hinton said. LCHRISTMZR TSt. Joesph Bay Golf ClubLE ELL TTSaturday, December 8, 2012 ~ 12:00 ESTTournament Format: Individual play with handicap from your normal tee $10.00 o Tournament Entry Fee if you bring a NEW TOY MEMBERS: $45 NON-MEMBERS: $55 CHRISTMS ZRDo your Christmas shopping for unique handmade gifts made by local artists. Spruce up your home or oce with great decorations: Everything is Handmade Saturday, December 8: 9:00-4:00 For more information, call St. Joseph Bay Country Club: or Barb Van Treese: 1st Place: ............. $200 2nd Place: ...........$100 3rd Place: ..............$50WITH MINIMUM OF 28 PLAYERS GPMGPM Financial, LLC Sponsored By: Penelopes Pet Shop, GPM Financial, LLC, Gulf County Sheris Department, Gulf 2 Bay Development & Construction, and Gulf County Tourist Development Council FRANKLIN COUNTY TOURIST DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING SCHEDULE CHANGETHE FOLLOWING MEETINGS HAVE BEEN CANCELED DUE TO THE HOLIDAYS: November 27, 2012 1:30 PM Committee Meeting December 11, 2012 3:00 PM Board Meeting December 25, 2012 1:30 PM Committee MeetingHAVE BEEN CANCELLEDREGULAR SCHEDULED MEETINGS WILL RESUME IN JANUARY, 2013 These are OPEN public meetings and two or more County Commissioners may attend. ATTENTION!!! PRIMARY CARE 4 ALL located on 1001 Gray Avenue, in Carrabelle, FL 32322 will be relocating to 680 Maple Street, Chattahoochee, FL 32324, (850) 663-2355 effective November 30th, 2012. All For further information you can continue to contact (850) 697-2550. Thank You, H.C. Hercule, M.D. BUDGET from page A1 DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The TimesSworn in last week to four-year terms on the school board are, from left, Teresa Ann Martin, Pam Shiver and George Thompson.

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OFTHEWEEKPET St. Joseph Bay Humane SocietyMEET LEO!Just look at those ears and that adorable under bite! How can you resist? Leo is a one year old Chiwienee and he is even cuter in person than in the picture. He is a happy, social dog and will make a great pet for someone looking for a small breed dog. Come meet him and all the other small breed dogs we are housing at the shelter right now. Lets give them all a home for the holidays!VOLUNTEERS ARE DESPERATELY NEEDED TO SOCIALIZE WITH ALL OF OUR DOGS AND CATS.We are always looking for people willing to bring one of our animals into their home to be fostered for various needs. Anytime you can spare would be greatly appreciated. Call Karen at 670-8417 for more details or visit the Franklin County Humane Society at 244 State Road 65 in Eastpoint. You may logon to the website at www.forgottenpets.org to see more of our adoptable pets. NIP RODENTS INTHE BUD!CALLLOIS AT 653-5857Franklin Countys ONLY LOCALPest Control Company RODENTS RODENTS RODENTS I I N N T T Stan TrappeATTORNEY AT LAW Foreclosure Defense Bankruptcy Asset Protection Real Estate Probate ~ WillsAdmitted to Practice Law in Florida Since 1974Let Me Help You 850-769-6139236 McKenzie Avenue Panama City, FL New Location this Year!!Hwy 98, beside Gulf Side IGA in Apalachicola. See You There! Margaret(850) 653.3764 or (850) 323.1937 Margarets Christmas TreesComing Fraser Fir 5 to 10 ftArriving Thanksgiving Week! FRESH WREATHS Animal Hospital of Port St. Joe24-Emergency Service For Our Current Clients Quality Internal Medicine Soft Tissue/Orthopedic Surgery Dentistry Clean and Spacious Facility Mon, Tues, Thurs & Fri 8:00 AM 5:30 PM300 Long Ave PSJ, FL 32456 850-229-6009 SocietyA8 | The Times Thursday, November 29, 2012 LOIS SWOBODA | The TimesCassie Gary slices turkey with help from mom Susan while Sally Williamson, right, prepares gravy for Thanksgiving dinner. On Thanksgiving, with the help of volunteers, the Owl Caf prepared 50 dinners for delivery to shut-ins by Meals on Wheels. Dinner was turkey with all the trimmings and pumpkin pie. The Meals on Wheels offering was the same as the Thanksgiving dinner served that afternoon to the Owls regular clientele. Some of these people may not have more food delivered over the holiday weekend, and we want them to have enough for several meals, Susan Gary said.Photos by LOIS SWOBODA | The TimesTOP: This Christmas tree decked with pink bows and pictures of the Franklin Needs Calendar Girls is one of four themed trees on display at the Raney House through New Years Day. The 2013 calendar to bene t womens breast health in Franklin County is now available at many locations. For a donation of $25, these calendars make great stocking stuffers and support a great cause. ABOVE: This tree decorated with oyster shells and cotton bolls at the Orman House captures the simplicity of Christmas long ago.By TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com Indian Pass resident Pete Burgher has been ying airplanes since he was a child. So steering with his knees and legs to capture a gorgeous photograph hundreds of feet in the air is, Burgher said, like duck soup, though maybe you shouldnt say that. Burgher has turned a love of ying and a passion for aerial photography to new heights in an effort to raise funds for the Apalachicola Maritime Museum. Those funds, he said, will help keep a legacy a history alive. The rst product of Burghers work is a calendar titled Patterns in the Water which features 13 of the more than 50 photographs from a coffee-table style book to be published by Christmas 2013. The calendar and book were outcomes from Burghers frequent ights around the area. I had thought a long time about the idea of a book of photos showing the unusual features you could see from the air, he said. So I began collecting those photos. I y every chance I get and every chance the weather gives me the opportunity. The more I ew around here the more I started noticing the striking images from the water. There is so much to see and it is so beautiful. You end up with hundreds of (photo) candidates and it is hard to whittle that down. George Kirvin Floyd owns and operates the Apalachicola Maritime Museum, for which Burgher is a volunteer on boating trips up the Apalachicola River and oodplain. His family goes way back in Franklin County and owns quite a bit of shoreline in Apalachicola and the area, Burgher said of Floyd. He established that museum to maintain that heritage. One day Floyd and Burgher were perusing Burghers work and talked about Burghers idea for a book when Floyd offered a proposition. Floyd would ensure the book was published if the museum could be the bene ciary of the pro ts. The book will be on photographic paper and have a nice layout, Burgher said. The book is done but probably wont be printed until sometime next year, probably in time for Christmas. The book will be a re ection on the beauty of our area. The calendar came about by happenstance. Floyds company had contracted with the Franklin County Tourism Development Council to provide welcome center services on St. George Island and elsewhere. His rst thought was getting some of those striking Burgher images to the public to sell the area and thought a calendar the perfect vehicle. He wanted me to take out some of the photos to make a calendar, Burgher said. I agree to forfeit any royalties and Ramseys (Printing and Of ce Supply) worked hard on getting them printed quickly and looking good. The calendar is available at a variety of outlets in Franklin and Gulf counties for $10. I can go y anytime I want and I always carry my camera with me, Burgher said. I get to see those patterns, that beauty, every day. Isnt it nice to be able to share it with other people? We really have a remarkable place.Special to The TimesCounty Commissioners William Massey, left, Pinki Jackel and director of Administrative Services Alan Pierce pose with three of the 27 new power pole ornaments debuting in Eastpoint this holiday season. Jackel proposed the ornaments and found funding for their creation. Massey oversaw their placement along U.S. 98 in the Eastpoint business district. Inmates at the Franklin Correctional Institution built the ornaments from rebar. Employees of the county parks and recreation department painted them and wrapped them in lights and tinsel. Pierce said the ornaments weigh about 10 pounds each and are attached to the poles with a metal mount slightly modi ed from the design used to mount the ornaments hung along U.S. 98 in Apalachicola. The ornaments were a bargain at $2,100, with money rst allocated by the county commission in 2010. Eastpoint will celebrate Christmas on Dec. 14 with a celebration and a visit from Santa. The parade starts at 4 p.m. and will travel from Gillespie Street west of Sellers Plaza to Bay Street, then south to Patton Drive and east to the pavilion. Santa will be arriving on an oyster boat. For information, call the Apalachicola Area Chamber of Commerce at 653-9419.LOIS SWOBODA | The TimesChristmas comes to Eastpoint TREES REFLECT BOTH OLD AND NEW OWL CAF HOLIDAY TRADITION Photos by PETE BURGHER | Special to the TimesAt left, oyster bars are seen in Apalachicola Bay. Right, a winter wind brings a sparkle to the waters of Apalachicola Bay.Resident raising money by snapping patterns in the water

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Nick Shiver FamilyWe would like to thank all the loving and caring people for their prayers, food and owers during our time of loss. We appreciate them very much. Thanks to pastors Bobby Shiver and Craig Hicks for a great service. We have a special thank-you to Steve Boatwright for singing the song our dad loved to hear. Also a big thank you to David Kelley and his staff for a great job. Our Husband, Father, GrandFather, GreatGrandFather, and Brother will be greatly missed.The Family of Nixon Nick Shiver WELCOMES YOUChurch of the Ascension101 NE First Street CarrabelleSUNDAY10:00 AM WELCOMES YOUChurch THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH (850) 274-4490 (850) 545-2578 WELCOMES YOU Trinity Trinity Episcopal Churchest. 1836Welcomes YouHwy. 98 & 6th St. Apalachicola 850-653-9550Sunday Worship Services 8 & 10:30 a.m. Wednesdays Healing Service 11 a.m. Centering Prayer 4 p.m. Sunday Worship Services 8 & 10:30 a.m. Wednesdays Healing Service 11 a.m. Centering Prayer 4 p.m. First Pentecostal Holiness Church379 Brownsville Road Apalachicola Were excited about what Gods doing!!!Sunday School 9:45 am Sunday Morning Worship 10:45 am Sunday Evening Service 6:00 pm Monday, Youth Group 6:30 pm Wednesday, Royal Rangers, G.A.P.7:00 pm Wednesday Worship & Word 7:30 pmNursery Provided during regular church services 7:00 7:00 First Baptist ChurchSt. George Island 501 E. Bayshore Drive 927-2257 R. Michael Waley, Pastor Join us as we praise and worship the living Christ. Great is the Lord and most worthy of praise. Psalm 145:3 Sunday Bible Study................................................10:00am Worship Praise........................................................11:00am Sunday Night............................................................7:00pm Wednesday Power Hour......................................7:00pm Wednesday Youth at S.P.L.A.S.H.......................7:00pm Walking in Christ R. Michael Whaley, Pastor The United Methodist Churches of Franklin County Welcome You First United Methodist Church of ApalachicolaWorship Service 11:00 a.m. every Sunday Sunday School 10:00 a.m. 75 5th St. Apalachicola 653-9530 fumcapalach@gtcom.net Pastor: Rev. Themo PatriotisCarrabelle United Methodist ChurchWorship Services 10:45 a.m. Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Celebrate Recovery Mondays 7-9 p.m. 102 NE Ave. B Carrabelle 697-3672 Pastor: Julie StephensEastpoint United Methodist ChurchWorship Service 10:00 a.m. every Sunday Healing service every fourth Monday at 7:00 p.m. 317 Patton Dr. (corner of David St.) 670-8825 Pastor: Rev. Beth WhiteSt. George Island United Methodist Church9:00 a.m. Worship Service 10:00 a.m. Fellowship Hour 201 E. Gulf Beach Dr. 9274635 www.sgiumc.org Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis Nursery now provided for Sunday Church Service FaithThe Times | A9Thursday, November 29, 2012Patricia (Pat) Billingsley Miller, 61, of Apalachicola, passed away Friday, Oct. 26, 2012, at her home in Apalachicola. Pat was born Sept. 29, 1951, in Atlanta, Ga., to Ira Alvin Billingsley and Martha Thelma Billingsley. She is survived by her husband, Delbert (Del) Miller; son, Daniel Scott Garrett; daughter-inlaw, Dannibeth Garrett; granddaughter, Daniella Garrett; and sister, Mary Jennings. Pat was a member of Fellowship Baptist Church, Apalachicola, and will be missed by many. Her family would like to thank everyone for all your prayers and support.Patricia MillerEarl Jerry Scott, 77, passed away Saturday, Nov. 24, 2012, in Gainesville. Born Dec. 24, 1934, in Apalachicola, he was a son of the late Billy and Mary Branch Scott. He served in the United States Air Force and had retired from the State of Florida as a utilities engineer. Following retirement, he became a security ofcer with various security agencies in Tallahassee. He loved hunting and shing, the Three Stooges, telling stories, was a people person, and daily talked with the Lord and read his Bible. He is survived by his wife, Mary Scott; son, Rick (Kathy) Scott, grandson, David Lindsay; great-granddaughter, Mercedez Lindsay; brother, Fred Scott; stepchildren, Mike (Margaret) Ritter, Champ (Lisa) Ritter, and Rebecca (Michael) Vause; six stepgrandchildren and four step-great-grandchildren. He was preceded in death by a daughter, Josette Scott; granddaughter, Jennifer Scott; and Janet, the mother of his son. The family will receive friends from 1-2 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 29, at Abbey Funeral Home in Tallahassee. A memorial service will follow at 2 p.m. at Abbey Funeral Home. In lieu of owers, donations may be made to your favorite charity. Online condolences at www. abbeyfh.com.Earl Jerry Scott Obituaries Bingo previews to start Tuesdays at Chillas HallHoly cow! Chillas Hall was decorated for the Thanksgiving dinner, and there were tables of families and friends. We all enjoyed all of that glorious food. Thanks to all who brought dishes, baked the turkeys and the desserts. Your full breakfast will be waiting at Chillas Hall on Saturday. Members of the Lanark Village Golf Club will be on hand to prepare and serve it for you. Your donation of $5 will ll a plate for you. Come over and start the morning off with your friends and neighbors. There will be previews of Bingo at Chillas Hall the rst three Tuesdays of next month, Dec. 4, 11 and 18. Doors open at 6 p.m., and bingo will start at 7 p.m. There will be free coffee and cookies, door prizes and bingo. We will have a good time, so plan to try and join us. The bingo will be sponsored by the Lanark Village Golf Club. Mark your calendars for Dec. 8, and join us at the Lanark Village Boat Club for your sugar x. Members of the boat club will prepare and serve pancakes/French toast, eggs, bacon, juice and coffee for your donation of only $5. See you there! Of course, the breakfasts and bingo are open to the public. Then, Saturday night, Dec. 8, enjoy the Parade of Lights on the Carrabelle River. Holiday on the Harbor will begin at dark-thirty, and reworks too! Be kind to one another, check in on the sick and housebound and remember to get a grip, tie a knot, hang on to Jesus. Until next time, God bless America, our troops, the poor, homeless and hungry. LAnNARK neNEWsSJim Welsh Card of THAANKKS Times staff reportsSanta to visit Hill on SaturdayJoin HCOLA, AJs Neighborhood Bar & Grill and the Elves as we welcome Santa to the Hill from 10 a.m. to noon Saturday. Look for Santa moving around the neighborhood aboard the re truck as he heads to the AJs parking lot to pass out goody bags and take photos with the children.Holiday Fresh Market Saturday in A A palachMark Saturday in downtown Apalachicola as your day not to ght the crowds and trafc at the malls. Come for the day to the Holiday Fresh Market and shop in a relaxed, hassle-free environment. Buy handcrafted Apalachicola specialties from seasonal wreaths to vintage European glass bead jewelry, and specialty food delights. Your shopping has never been easier. For information, call 653-9419 or visit info@apalachicolabay.org.Family Portrait DVDs availableA DVD of Barry Hands The Family Portrait, performed at the Dixie Theatre in August, is now available. The hour-long DVD includes the entire production of the show, and costs $15. For more information, call 850-276-2550 or email barrylh20@yahoo.com.Sacred Heart hospital guild holds holiday saleThe spirit of the holidays will come alive in the main hallway of Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf as the hospitals Volunteer Guild hosts its third annual Christmas Spectacular Sunday through Friday, Dec. 2-7. Guests of the spectacular will discover unique holiday decorations, tree ornaments, manger scenes, angels, gift items, holiday games, festive toys, and table dcor. Event hours will be from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sunday, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Monday through Thursday and 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Friday. Santa is scheduled to arrive at 5 p.m. Friday for milk and cookies. The Sacred Heart Gift Shop is a non-prot fundraising program operated by the hospitals Volunteer Guild. Proceeds generated from the shop and this sale will support services at Sacred Heart. For more information about the volunteer guild, contact Paula Pickett, Guild membership chair, at 227-7535 or visit www.sacredheartonthegulf.org. For more information about the gift shop or holiday sale, call the volunteer desk at 229-5788. Faith BRIefsEFSTimes staff reportsStudents in the Take Stock in Children mentoring program, together with the Youth Advisory Council of the Franklin County Education Foundation, provided a free meal and fellowship Nov. 20 at the Apalachicola Community Center in honor of Thanksgiving. Lois Catlin, chairwoman of the foundation, said the students cooked macaroni and cheese, stufng, greens, and chicken corn chowder, all the food except for the salmon, which was handled by Phoenix Family Health Care Center. Other donations included cakes by Rhetta Strange at Strange Creations, turkey and cornbread by RMS Construction, dinner rolls by the Carrabelle IGA, salad by Hog Wild, deviled eggs and green beans by Patty Dempsey, bottled water by the Tucker Family, and cole slaw by The Fishermans Wife. The mentees, who worked from 11 a.m. and then served through the evening, included, above from left, freshman Jessica Schmidt, junior James Bailey, senior Yvonne Mitchell, freshman Chance Bareld and freshman Amber Henning. Also taking part in the event, which enabled the participants to earn their the community service hours required by Take Stock in Children were sophomores Aaliyah West and Morgan Martin; juniors Deborah Dempsey, Jathan Martin and Andrea Cupid; senior Cheyenne Martin; and Apalachicola Bay Charter School eighth-grader Marshall Sweet.Photos by DA A VI I D AA DLER R STEI I N | The TimesStudents in the Take Stock in Children mentoring program, together with the Youth Advisory Council of the Franklin County Education Foundation, provided a free meal and fellowship Nov. 20 at the Apalachicola Community Center in honor of Thanksgiving. Take Stock students give back Amber Henning ladles out chowder.

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By TOM MACKENZIESpecial to the Times Five endangered whooping cranes arrived Friday on their wintering grounds at St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge in Wakulla County. These cranes are the 12th group to be guided by ultralight aircraft from central Wisconsin to the Gulf Coast. The Whooping Crane Eastern Partnership, an international coalition of public and private organizations, is conducting the reintroduction project in an effort to restore this endangered species to part of its historic range in eastern North America. There are now 115 whooping cranes in the wild in eastern North America thanks to WCEPs efforts. This is the earliest the birds have arrived at St. Marks, and we are thrilled to have them here so soon, said Terry Peacock, refuge manager at St. Marks NWR. I was in the blind at the pen site to watch the birds arrive. I just have to say that it never gets old watching the birds come to the refuge. It was as touching this time as it was the rst time. In addition to the ve birds led south by WCEP partner Operation Migrations ultralights, six cranes are making their rst southward migration as part of WCEPs Direct Autumn Release program. The DAR cranes were hatched and raised by biologists with project partner International Crane Foundation. The six birds were released in the company of older cranes from whom the young birds learn the migration route south. Five of the DAR cranes have completed their migration and are located in Hendry County. The sixth bird is at Jasper-Pulaski Fish and Wildlife Area in Pulaski County, Ind. The ultralight-led and DAR cranes this year are joining two wild-hatched chicks in the 2012 cohort. Whooping cranes were on the verge of extinction in the 1940s. Today, there are only about 600 birds in existence, approximately 445 of them in the wild. Aside from the WCEP birds, the only other migratory population of whooping cranes nests at Wood Buffalo National Park in northern Alberta, Canada, and winters at Aransas NWR on the Texas Gulf Coast. A non-migratory ock of approximately 20 birds lives year-round in the central Florida Kissimmee region, and an additional 14 non-migratory cranes live in southern Louisiana. WCEP asks anyone who encounters a whooping crane in the wild to please give them the respect and distance they need. Do not approach birds on foot within 200 yards; remain in your vehicle; do not approach in a vehicle any closer than 100 yards. Also, please remain concealed and do not speak loudly enough that the birds can hear you. Finally, do not trespass on private property in an attempt to view or photograph whooping cranes. Whooping Crane Eastern Partnership founding members are the International Crane Foundation, Operation Migration, Inc., Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the U.S. Geological Surveys Patuxent Wildlife Research Center and National Wildlife Health Center, the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation, the Natural Resources Foundation of Wisconsin, and the International Whooping Crane Recovery Team. Many other yway states, provinces, private individuals and conservation groups have joined forces with and support WCEP by donating resources, funding and personnel. More than 60 percent of the projects budget comes from private sources in the form of grants, public donations and corporate sponsors. To report whooping crane sightings, visit www. fws.gov/midwest/whoopingcrane. For more information, visit www.bringbackthecranes.org. Tom MacKenzie can be reached at tom_mackenzie@fws.govSpecial to The TimesBeekeepers Field Day SaturdayThere will be a Beekeepers Field Day and Trade Show on Saturday at the Washington County Extension Of ce in Chipley. Registration begins at 9 a.m. CT. Class rotations begin at 10 a.m. and continue until noon. There will be a smoker lighting contest, lunch and judging, before a general session at 1:15 p.m. CT on Pollen and Nectar Producing Plants, presented by Lawrence Cutts and Elmore Herman. Topics in the class rotations included hive assembly by Doug Corbin and Elmore Herman; open hive demonstration by Jeff Pippin, Jamie Ellis and David Westervelt; and winter hive management by Lawrence Cutts. Beekeeper advanced training classes will be offered by interactive videoconference to selected counties on the evenings of Feb. 18 and 25, and March 4 and 11. More details to follow. Cost of the Field Day and Trade Show is $15 per person, $10 for additional family members. For more information call the Gulf County Extension Of ce at 639-3200 or the Franklin County Extension Of ce at 653-9337. Turtle, shorebird funding to assist countyWhile Franklin County did not receive any direct funding in the second round of BP grants awarded through the Natural Resource Damage Assessment process, two projects submitted by the US Fish and Wildlife Service will affect the county. The two projects funded, at a cost of $6.3 million, are nesting shorebird habitat improvement, and reduction of arti cial lighting for nesting sea turtles. One of the projects proposes to protect nesting habitat for beach nesting birds from disturbance, by restoring nesting habitats that were disturbed from oil spill response activities. The second project plans to reduce arti cial lighting impacts on nesting habitat for sea turtles, speci cally loggerhead turtles, which will begin to restore nesting habitat impaired by disturbances from the increased lighting and machinery on the beaches from oil spill response activities. In Florida, both of the proposed projects are planned to take place in Escambia, Santa Rosa, Okaloosa, Walton, Bay, Gulf and Franklin counties. The projects in this plan are being addressed separately from other early restoration projects in order to derive more natural resource bene ts by implementing them in time for the 2013 nesting season. Visit www.gulfspill restoration.noaa.gov to access public meeting information, to view additional details of the proposed early restoration projects, and ways to submit public comment. Public comment will be accepted until Dec. 10. For more information on the Natural Resource Damage Assessment process and projects being submitted visit http://www.dep.state. .us/deepwaterhorizon.New ways to help Florida Wild Mammal AssociationWith 2013 just beginning, the Florida Wild Mammal Association has lots to be thankful for. The Batchelor Foundation, which supports projects bene ting the environment, has offered Florida Wild Mammal Association a $10,000 Challenge Grant. The shelter will receive up to $10,000 in matching funds for donations received by June 2013. The staff and volunteers have been hard at work on Edgar Poole Road this summer and fall. All of the chain link runs were given new galvanized roo ng and refurbished inside with funding from the Earth and Animal Foundation and the Batchelor Foundation. The front deer pen was brought up to standard by adding 2 feet to the top of the existing fence and a new deer house was added. Rob Olin of St. George Island is putting together a team and funding to repair the ight aviary used in hawk, owl and eagle rehabilitation. The aviary was damaged during Tropical Storm Debby. If you can help with funding, materials or volunteer labor, contact him at rob@ olinandassociates.com. Because FWMA is a licensed wildlife rehabilitation facility visitors are not allowed except on special occasions. FWMA receives injured wildlife from US Fish and Wildlife Service, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission and other government agencies but no government compensation for their work or supplies. FWMA is totally funded by grants and donations. You can send a taxdeductible donation to Florida Wild Mammal Association, 198 Edgar Poole Road, Crawfordville, FL 32327, or visit http:// www.wakullawildlife. org/ and use the Paypal button to make an instant donation. If you nd an injured animal, bring it to 198 Edgar Poole Road. Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL(next to Piggly Wiggly) www.BWOsh.com (next to Piggly Wiggly) www.BWOsh.com Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL EVERYTHING FOR YOUR OUTDOOR ADVENTURE EV E EV E EV RYTHING FOR YOUR E RYTHING FOR YOUR E O UTDOOR ADV E UTDOOR ADV E UTDOOR ADV NTUR E NTUR E E EV E EV E EV RYTHING FOR YOUR E RYTHING FOR YOUR E O UTDOOR ADV E UTDOOR ADV E UTDOOR ADV NTUR E NTUR E E NOVEMBER FEATURE FISH: LAST MONTH TO ENTER!Stop in and register or go online at www.BWOsh.comSPEC TROUT S PEC T ROU T $2900 FREE!$5500 WEEKLY ALMANAC APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE TIDE TABLES MONTHLY AVERAGESTo nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from these given for APALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW Cat Point Minus 0:40 Minus 1:17 East Pass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27 To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from those given for CARRABELLE: HIGH LOW Bald Point Minus 9:16 Minus 0:03 Sponsor the WEEKLY ALMANACCall Today!653-8868 Date HighLow% Precip Thu, Nov. 2967 52 0% Fri, Nov. 3071 5410% Sat, Dec. 0171 54 0% Sun, Dec. 0272 5120% Mon, Dec. 0370 5030% Tues, Dec. 0469 5030% Wed, Dec. 0569 4930% 28 We 1211am 2.4 414pm 2.1 800am -0.5 720pm 1.8 29 Th 1246am 2.4 444pm 2.1 831am -0.5 754pm 1.8 30 Fr 125am 2.4 513pm 2.1 900am -0.5 831pm 1.8 Date Day High Tide High Tide Low Tide Low Tide 1 Th 250am 2.7 622pm 2.4 1010am 0.0 939pm 2.1 2 Fr 325am 2.7 703pm 2.4 1042am 0.0 1018pm 2.1 3 Sa 405am 2.7 747pm 2.4 1117am 0.2 1108pm 1.9 4 Su 350am 2.6 732pm 2.4 1059am 0.2 1112pm 1.9 5 Mo 442am 2.4 816pm 2.4 1148am 0.3 6 Tu 548am 2.2 856pm 2.4 1233am 1.8 1244pm 0.5 7 We 712am 2.1 932pm 2.4 159am 1.6 145pm 0.6 8 Th 851am 1.9 1003pm 2.4 311am 1.3 246pm 0.8 9 Fr 1032am 1.9 1031pm 2.4 409am 1.0 344pm 1.1 10 Sa 1202pm 2.1 1058pm 2.6 459am 0.5 437pm 1.3 11 Su 119pm 2.2 1127pm 2.7 545am 0.2 526pm 1.6 28 We 136am 1.5 539pm 1.3 1013am -0.3 933pm 1.1 29 Th 211am 1.5 609pm 1.3 1044am -0.3 1007pm 1.1 30 Fr 250am 1.5 638pm 1.3 1113am -0.3 1044pm 1.1 FreeTideTables.com For comparison only Times are local Tides in feet from MLLW Email outdoors news to timesoutdoors @star .com Page 10 Thursday, November 29, 2012 OUTDOORSwww.apalachtimes.comSection Section A Outdoors BRIEFSWhooping cranes follow their ultralight guide to St. Marks SPONSORED BY Freshwater Inshore/BayWe are seeing an improvement in our fall inshore fisheries lately. Better weather conditions and sunny skies have the redfish still biting around area docks and in the I.C.W. canal. Trout are starting to show up in better numbers this week, but they are still elusive in St. Joe Bay. Good reports of sheepshead and the occasional black snapper are coming in from the Brothers. Sherry at the Fishermans Landing at Howard Creek is reporting catfish, crappie and bream in the Fingers. WCEP | Special to the TimesWhooping cranes follow their ultralight guide to St. Marks. At right is a whooping crane in the wild.

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CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA SP O RTS www.apalachtimes.com ASectionBy DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@starfl.com The Lady Seahawks, fresh from their seasonopening district win over Rocky Bayou, traveled to district rival Port St Joe Tuesday night and made it two in a row. The Lady Seahawks found themselves trailing 1-0 at the rst water break, but that changed quickly when sophomore forward Katie Seger served up a great ball to junior midelder Gracyn Kirvin to bring the game to a 1-1 tie at halftime. The Lady Seahawks, under the direction of coach Kelli Wright, came out with a charge in the second half. Junior forward Jessica Shields shot a beautiful shot 20 yards from the goal that rebounded off the crossbar, and Kirvin netted her second goal of the game off the rebound to give the Lady Seahawks a 2-1 lead. They continued their tenacious play all over the eld, Wright said. Five minutes later, the Lady Seahawks struck again with another goal, when Shields assisted Kirvin for her third goal of the game to extend the lead to 3-1. She now has ve goals in district play with a total of six on the season. With 10 minutes left in the game, eighth-grade forward Allie Kirvin scored her rst goal of the season off a cross from junior mid elder Adriana Reeder. That gave the Lady Seahawks a 4-1 lead, which they never relinquished. Wright said a strong defensive effort, anchored by rst-year player junior sweeper Ally Millender along with junior halfback Deborah Dempsey, junior Adriana Reeder and Seger, shut out the Lady Tiger Sharks in the second half. Sophomore goalkeeper Macey Hunt had another great performance with 11 saves. I thought we responded well in the second half after being down 1-0, Wright said. They passed the ball well in the rst half and had us on our heels. Jessica Shields continues to create scoring opportunities for our team with her excellent play. Gracyn Kirvin keeps making the most of her scoring opportunities, the coach said. Our defense is beginning to communicate better and play well together. The younger players are also stepping up and contributing. Its been a whole team effort. Other members of the team include senior midelders Karli Tucker and Stephanie Marxsen, junior mid elder Brook Pittman, junior fullback Laura Gallegos, sophomore mid elder Erin Riley, freshman mid elder Jessica Schmidt, freshman forward Kitana Peralta, eighth-grade forward Allie Zingarelli and seventhgrade mid elder Sophie Kirvin. The Lady Seahawks now face a grueling stretch in their schedule, as they travel to West Gadsden today and are at home Friday night against Baker. On Saturday, Dec. 1, the Lady Seahawks travel to Freeport, and then on Tuesday, Dec. 4, they host John Paul II. On Wednesday, Dec. 5, the girls host Rickards. Gulfside IGA PLAYER OF THE WEEK SPONSORJunior forward Jessica Shields had two assists in the Lady Seahawks 4-1 win over Port St. Joe Tuesday night, for a total of four assists on the year. Jessica has stepped up her game, and keeps creating scoring opportunities for our team, said Coach Kelli Wright. Congratulations, Jessica! Hometown Proud (850)653-9695 CITY OF CARRABELLE PROPOSED ENACTMENT OF CITY ORDINANCEThe City Commission of the City of Carrabelle, Florida, proposes to enact the following ordinance:CITY OF CARRABELLE ORDINANCE NO. 454AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF CARRABELLE, FLORIDA AMENDING ARTICLE IV OF THE LAND DEVELOPMENT REGULATIONS, TO CREATE PART 4.03.00 ENTITLED WATER EFFICIENT LANDSCAPE PRACTICES PROVIDING FOR WATER EFFICIENT LANDSCAPINGPRACTICES, PROVIDING FOR DEFINITIONS, PROVIDING FOR PLANNING AND DESIGN REQUIREMENTS, PROVIDING FOR WATER USE, PROVIDING FOR IRRIGATION SYSTEM MAINTENANCE, REPEALING ALL ORDINANCES IN CONFLICT HEREWITH,PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY AND PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE.The proposed Ordinance may be inspected during regular hours at Carrabelle City Hall between 8 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., 1001 Gray Ave., Carrabelle, FL Monday through Friday, or call 850-697-2727. The proposed Ordinance will be considered for enactment during a public hearing to be held 6:00p.m., the Carrabelle City Hall located at1001 Gray Ave, Carrabelle, FL. Interested parties may appear at the hearing and be heard with respect to the proposed Ordinance. If an individual decides to appeal any decision made by the City Commission with respect to this meeting, a verbatim transcript may be required. If so, the individual should make provision for a transcript to be made at the meeting, requiring special accommodation to participate in this meeting is asked to advise the city at least 48 hours before t he meeting by contacting Keisha Smith at the above address or phone number.Wilburn Messer, Mayor Attest: Keisha Smith, City Clerk Publication Date: November 29, 2012 Page 11 Thursday, November 29, 2012By DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com The Franklin County High School boys soccer team evened their district record at 1-1 as they fell 5-1 to district archrival Port St. Joe in Gulf County Tuesday night. The Seahawks controlled the ball for the rst part of the match but allowed the Tiger Sharks sophomore striker Marcel Duarte to net four goals before the end of the rst half. The Hawks got on the board early in the second half with a quick strike goal from junior Graham Kirvin off of junior Stefan DeVaughns assist. Duarte added his fth score moments after for the nal goal of the night. Graham Kirvin, our player of the week, is an amazing player and teammate, Coach Ramon Valenzuela said. Tuesday night he never gave up, was running all over the eld. He took his prize, an awesome unstoppable goal. Valenzuela said he and assistant Coach Stacy Kirvin were proud of the team effort and thought the game gave their squad a better idea of what they need to do against St. Joe in two weeks when they meet again. We give credit to Coach Henleys Port St Joe team and the impressive individual performance of Duarte, Valenzuela said. It seems that we took this loss hard, but we never gave up the entire night. The Seahawk head coach said captains senior Zach Howze and junior Alex Causey showed positive leadership under the nights conditions and are aiming at evening the series at the Seahawks home eld Dec. 11. Once again, I told the boys, Lets learn from this, and lets make sure that next time, at home, we x these mistakes, Valenzuela said. Obviously, we were not prepared for this game, after a week off, but physically we persisted. We had our own shots to the St. Joe net, and our great strategies, but we were mentally down. I know now how our boys feel, and the amazing thing for me is the our captains: Alex Causey and Zack Howze spoke for the rst time, supporting what Coach Stacy and I have been talking since the beginning of the season, Valenzuela said. Play any position, be ready when coach calls you, communicate and support each other. The team also includes seniors Julio Ramirez, Elisha Patriotis and Casey Sapp; juniors James Harris, Lenny Ward and James Bailey; sophomores Austin Carter, Logan Allen and Dalyn Parrish; freshmen Joshua Patriotis, Jacob Montgomery and Walker DeVaughn; and eighthgrader Tyler Pendleton. Both boys and girls are in action again in the home opener at 5 and 7 p.m. Friday against district opponent Baker High School. Tickets are $5 for adults and $3 for students. All area youth soccer players are invited to attend free of charge provided they wear their team jersey. The Seahawks face a tough stretch in their schedule, as they travel to West Gadsden today. On Saturday, Dec. 1, the boys travel to Freeport, and then on Wednesday, Dec. 5, they host Rickards. From Staff ReportsUF, FSU TIE AT ST. JOE BAY GOLF TOURNEYThe annual University of Florida Gators vs. Florida State Seminoles Golf Tournament was Nov. 18 at the St. Joseph Bay Golf Club. This tournament is a longstanding one out at the club and traditionally is played just before the two football teams hit the gridiron for bragging rights. In the history of the tournament, usually the team that wins the golf tournament has led to the other side winning the football game. That proved a false prediction this year because the golf tournament brought about a 48-48 tie. The overall winners of the golf tournament were Dan Van Treese and Bobby Bunn for UF and Bennie Sherrill and Kenny Weimorts for FSU. In second place for the Gators were Mike Alldis and Bill Morrissey, and in second for the Seminoles were Marvin Shimfessel and Dick Davis. The Closest to the Pin on Hole 12 winner was Penelope Evanoff, and the longest drive winners were George Skinner and Andy Smith. MACEY HUNT ALLY MILLENDER ADRIANA REEDER ALLIE KIRVIN KATIE SEGER GRACYN KIRVIN JESSICA SHIELDSLady Seahawks trounce St. Joe for district lead Sports SHORTSeahawk boys soccer falls to St. Joe ALEX CAUSEY ZACH HOWZE GRAHAM KIRVIN FIND MORE PREP SPORTS AT PANHANDLEVARSITY.COM

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LocalA12 | The Times Thursday, November 29, 2012 THE PANAMA CITY PICTORIAL BOOK IS HERE! $39.95+ TAX BUY NOW! THE NEWS HERALDMAKESTHEPERFECTGIFT FOR FAMILYAND FRIENDS! ______Copies at $39.95 plus $3.00 tax per book and pick up my order at The News Herald oce. Name ___________________________________________________________________________________________ Address __________________________________________________________________________________________ City ______________________________________________________ State _______________ Zip ________________ Phone (_____) ______________________ E-mail _________________________________________________________Signature ________________________________________________________________________________ Charge Card Number_____________________________________ Security Code______________Exp. Date_____________________ Payable to: The News Herald VISA THE NEWS HERALD THE NEWS HERALD GET YOUR COPY TODAY $ 39 .95 AKES THE PER F ECT $ .95 JUST IN TIME FOR THE HOLIDAYS! PANAMACITY.PICTORIALBOOK.COMMAIL IN FORM OR ORDER ONLINE AT:I wish to order: ____ Copies at $39.95 plus $2.60 tax per book and pick up my order (mail in form only) at The News Herald oce. Total $42.55/book ____Copies at $39.95 plus $5.95 shipping and handling and $2.60 tax per book and have my order shipped to the address below. Total $48.50/bookTOTAL AMOUNT ENCLOSED:__________ Name ________________________________________________ Address _______________________________________________ City _________________________ State ______ ZIP ____________ Phone ( )_____________ E-mail __________________________ ____________________________________________________ Signature ____________________________________________________ Charge Card Number Security Code Exp. Date PAYMENTMETHOD CHECK/MONEYORDER Payable to: The News Herald VISA AMEX MASTERCARD DISCOVER Thousands of families & individuals in our area are at risk of going to bed hungry and empty-handed on Christmas.WANT TO MAKE A DIFFERENCE?Mail in the Empty Stocking Fund envelope inserted in todays paper to the Salvation Army or The News Herald with your contribution!The Empty Stocking Fund provides food and toy baskets to thousands of families in Bay, Gulf, Franklin, Holmes, and Washington Counties. is proud to announce the is now underway.Help those in need! Its time to go through your closets for those unwanted pairs of shoes, in reasonable condition. Bring the shoes to Coastal Foot and Ankle Clinic located at 221 HWY 98, Apalachicola, FL 32320. Donations will go to Franklins Promise and will be distributed at The community service center (old Apalachicola high school) at 192 14th street in Apalachicola. Distribution will be November 27, December 4th and 18th from 9:30-12:00. DOWNTOWN BOOKS WELCOMES TWO SPECIAL FRIENDS onSaturday, December 1 St. George Islands Dee Grinenko weaves hand-pounded brown ash baskets and sells miniature Shaker-style Christmas ornaments outside the store from 10 to 4 Inside, New York Times best-selling author Terri DuLong signs copies of her new knitting-themed novel Postcards from Cedar Key from 1 to 3Join Us! DOWNTOWN BOOKS 67 COMMERCE STREET APALACHICOLA The following report is provided by the Franklin County Sheriffs Of ce. Arrests in this weeks report were made by of cers from the Apalachicola Police Department (APD), Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC), Florida Highway Patrol (FHP) and the Franklin County Sheriffs Of ce (FCSO). All defendants are to be considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law. Nov. 19 Jacquelyn K. Warner, 52, Eastpoint, driving while license suspended or revoked (FHP) Darin W. Cruson II, 24, Carrabelle, possession of paraphernalia, possession of cannabis and driving while license suspended or revoked (FCSO) Nov. 20 Jacquelyn K. Warner, 52, Eastpoint, violation of probation (FCSO) Robert L. Thompson, 18, Apalachicola, burglary of a dwelling (FCSO) Alice A. Amerson, 22, Carrabelle, violation of probation (FCSO) Stephen D. Bartley, 62, Apalachicola, aggravated assault with a deadly weapon (FCSO) Nov. 21 Jennifer L. Smith, 32, Eastpoint, petit theft (FCSO) Steven Shiver, 35, Eastpoint, DUI (FCSO) Nov. 22 Erik A. Tatum, 32, Carrabelle, trespass in an occupied structure (FCSO) Ben Turrell III, 35, Apalachicola, DUI (APD) James D. Creamer, 30, Apalachicola, violation of probation (APD) Nov. 24 Curtis E. Nowling, 44, Eastpoint, trespass on property after warning (FCSO) Christopher K. Franzen, 36, Land OLakes, failure to appear (FWC) Nov. 25 Anna Staples, 45, Apalachicola, domestic battery (APD) Nov. 26 Kimberly D. Harrington, 45, Lanark Village, criminal mischief, trespass on property and grand theft (FCSO) Arrest REPORT LOIS SWOBODA | The TimesWilliam Massey, newly elected county commissioner for District 5, left, was sworn in Nov. 20 together with incumbents Pinki Jackel and Noah Lockley, who were both reelected to four-year terms. County Judge Van Russell handled the honors. Elected by her colleagues as chair was Cheryl Sanders, who last served in that capacity in 2006. Massey was appointed the vice chairman, as well as the countys representative to the Apalachee Regional Planning Commission. Jackel will serve as the commissioners representative to the Tourist Development Council and as alternate to Floridas Small County Coalition. SWEARING TO SERVE

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LocalThe Times | A13Thursday, November 29, 2012 COLLINSCONSTRUCTIONOF ST. GEORGE ISLAND, INC &SEWAGE TREATMENT SERVICESOVER 30 YEARS EXPERIENCE OURSERVICESINCLUDE: AFTER HOURS & EMERGENCY SERVICE PROVIDED 850.670.5790MAINTENANCE@JCOLLINSCONSTRUCTION.COM Dance in Carrabelle this Saturday evening: The Carrabelle Senior Center will hold a dance at 7 p.m. this Saturday. Admission is free. Music will be provided by local disc jockey Ron Vice, serving up a lively mix of Big Band dance tunes and mellow pop hits. Come down to the Senior Center this Saturday night to dance... or just to listen to the music! The Senior Center is at 201 NW Avenue F, on the corner of First Street and NW Avenue F in downtown Carrabelle. For more information on the dance and other activities at the Senior Center, visit www. CarrabelleSeniorCenter. com Middle-aged sought for Cat sh Moon auditions: Panhandle Players are holding auditions for their next production, Cat sh Moon, at 4 p.m. on Sunday and at 7 p.m. Tuesday 4 at the Raney Carriage House. Cat sh Moon, a comedy written by Mississippi native Laddy Sartin, is set on a shing pier on a lake somewhere in LA (lower Alabama). Four people that have known each other all their lives come to grips with knowing each other all their lives. Cast will be three men and one woman, all middle-aged or thereabouts. Readings will be from the script. The show is directed by Dan Wheeler. For more information, call 370-0957. Mitigation strategy meeting Monday: Franklin County Emergency Management would like to invite the public to participate in a meeting to discuss and update the Franklin County Local Mitigation Strategy. Hazard mitigation is any action taken to permanently reduce or eliminate longterm risk to people and their property from the effects of hazards. Every community is exposed to some level of risk from hazards. Hurricanes, tornadoes, oods, hazardous material spills, res and sinkholes are some of the hazards experienced by Florida communities. It is the goal of the local mitigation strategy to identify local hazards and establish a local framework to reduce the risk of those hazards. Our next meeting will be Monday at 10 a.m. in the Franklin County Emergency Operations Center, 28 Airport Road in Apalachicola. This will be an opportunity for all parties to voice their concerns; review the status of old projects and add new ones to the list. For more info, contact Mike Rundel, Franklin County Emergency Management coordinator at 653-8977 or Em2frank@ gtcom.net. Tobacco-free Partnership to meet Wednesday: There will be a Tobacco-Free Franklin Partnership Coalition Meeting on Wednesday at the Franklin County Health Department, 139 12th Street, from 5:30-6:30 p.m. in the second oor conference room. Oyster recovery roundtable Dec. 6: The Seafood Management Assistance and Recovery Team (SMART) and the University of Florida Oyster Recovery Team will host a roundtable discussion on Thursday, Dec. 6, at the Apalachicola Community Center from 1:30-4:30 p.m. to hear updates from the recovery team committees and to learn more about the developing SMART Initiative. The roundtable is open to the public and folks are encouraged to attend and participate. From 2:402:55 p.m. there will be an update on the schedule of planned oyster restoration activities by the Gulf Coast Workforce Board. This will be an informal roundtable meeting to exchange information on progress made to date and activities under way by researchers evaluating existing and collecting new data, an update by the SMART Team and the Healthy Gulf Healthy Community Team, followed by a discussion about next steps and an opportunity for questions and answers from any interested person who wants to attend. We will have time for open discussion after 3 p.m. Expert speakers Andy Kane (contaminants, pathogens); Bill Pine (water ow, salinity); Karl Havens (nutrient inputs); David Kimbro (food web, predation, oyster population dynamics); and Ed Camp ( sheries modeling, management model development) will be on hand to join the discussion. For more information, call 653-9337. ABC School to host community book fair: The Apalachicola Bay Charter School will host a Scholastic Book Fair, Dec. 3-6, to help raise funds for purchasing books and media for the school. The fair will feature specially priced books and educational products, including newly released works, award-winning titles, childrens classics, interactive software and current bestsellers from more than 150 publishers. The Fair will be open from 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m in the ABC School Library. Parents, children, teachers and the community are invited. On Tuesday, Dec. 4, from 5:30-7:30 p.m., the Book Fair will feature a special family event. All members of the community are welcome to visit and shop. Fair attendees can help build classroom libraries by purchasing books for teachers through the Classroom Wish List program. Fair proceeds also will be used to purchase essential classroom resources and support school projects at the ABC School. Sponsorships are available. Area businesses interested in making a donation are asked to contact Heather Friedman at 653-1222 or via e-mail at friedmanabc@gmail.com FCSWA to meet Dec. 10: The Franklin County Seafood Workers Associations regularly scheduled monthly meeting will be on Monday, Dec. 10, in Eastpoint at the rehouse starting at 6 p.m. We will be sharing updated information regarding solutions for the bay issue and possible further outreach to displaced workers. Please continue to follow us on Facebook for any updates, new information or details. Please contact FCSWA Secretary Jennifer Millender at 597-0787. County Commission acknowledges hospice and diabetes: At their Nov. 20 meeting, in response to a request by Sandi Hengel, a spokesperson for Big Bend Hospice, the county commission recognized November as National Hospice Month. At the request of Commissioner Cheryl Sanders, the board also recognized November as National Diabetes Month. County commission to meet in Carrabelle: On Tuesday, Dec. 18, the second December meeting of the county commission will be held in Carrabelle at the municipal center on Gray Ave. at 10 a.m. Sixteen apply to serve on RESTORE Council: At the Nov. 20 county meeting, Director of Administrative Services Alan Pierce read a list of applicants for seats on the proposed RESTORE Council. Under the ordinance presented by Commissioner Pinki Jackel at the Nov. 6 meeting, there are 15 seats on the council. The cities of Apalachicola and Carrabelle were each given a seat, although both cities are disputing the validity of the RESTORE board and neither has chosen a representative. Jim Cummins and Marvin Heymann have both applied for the Alligator Point seat. No one from Lanark Village has applied to represent that community. Both Sandra Allen and James (Tom) Durham seek to represent Eastpoint. Larry Kinzer has stepped forward for St. George Island. All of the ve councils and boards in the county who were asked to choose a representative have named their choices. Paul Parker has been chosen to represent the Tourist Development Council. Newly elected school board member Pam Shiver will represent the schools. Vice President Ricky Banks will speak for the Franklin County Seafood Workers Association. Jim Bachrach will represent the board of Weems Memorial Hospital. The Seafood Dealers Association has chosen Lynn Martina. So far, ve people have thrown in their hats for the four at-large seats. They are Valentina Webb and Robin Vroegop, both of Apalachicola; Vance Millender and Leslie Cox, both of Carrabelle; and Dan Tonsmeire of Magnolia Bluff and Eastpoints Durham, who has also applied under this category. The commission voted to extend the application period to Dec. 3 with Smokey Parrish opposed. Jackel said she no longer feels it is necessary to pass an ordinance to create the RESTORE council. We dont have to operate by ordinance, she said. We will operate by bylaws. She said she would bring proposed rules to the next meeting. Commissioner Noah Lockley moved that an ordinance be passed but the motion died for lack of a second. Robert C. Bruner Attorney Personal & Business BankruptcyOver 30 Years Legal Experience850-670-3030 bankruptcy relief under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon advertisements. Before you decide, ask us to send you free written information Rodney'sOyster Tongs Laminated Handles!CONTACT: (850) 653.3764 or (850) 323.1937 Apalachicola, FL News BRIEFS

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A14| The Times Thursday, November 29, 2012 CLASSIFIEDS RENTALS3 BEDROOM, 2 BATH FURNISHED APT W/D, CARPORT, ST PARKING.............................$600 3 BEDROOM, 3 BATH CONDO FURNISHED, POOL .............................................$850 3 BEDROOM, 1 BATH UNFURNISHED DUPLEX .................................................................$600 1 BEDROOM, 1 BATH UNFURNISHED APT LANARK, REMODELED, INC WATER .................$425 2 BEDROOM 1 BATH UNFURNISHED APT W/D HOOKUP, SMALL PORCH ..........................$375 2 BEDROOM 1-1/2 BATH UNFURNISHED, FL ROOM, GARAGE, FENCED YARD, W/D .......$800 2 OFFICE SPACES US 98 CARRABELLE ...............................................$300 BOTH 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322850-697-9604 850-323-0444 www.seacrestre.comwww. rst tness.com/carrabellePROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND RENTALS 89412T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.: 2011-CA000270 WELLS FARGO BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, a national banking institution, as successor by merger to WACHOVIA BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, Plaintiff, vs. DONNA C. SOUTHWICK, et. al., Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE Pursuant to Chapter 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated October 22, 2012, entered in Case No. 2011-CA000270 of the Circuit Court of the 2ND Judicial Circuit, in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein WELLS FARGO BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, a national banking institution, as successor by merger to WACHOVIA BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, is the Plaintiff and DONNA C. SOUTHWICK, et al. are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, in the lobby on the second floor of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida 32320 at 11:00 a.m. EST. on the 4th day of December, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure, to wit: START AT THE INTERSECTION OF SECTIONS 2 AND 3, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, AND SECTIONS 35 AND 36, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, AND TRAVEL EASTERLY ALONG THE SECTION LINE A DISTANCE OF 1086.1 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT ON THE SOUTHERN BOUNDARY LINE OF STATE ROAD NO. 30 (U.S. HIGHWAY #319) RIGHT OF WAY. NOW TURN AND ANGLE OF 146 DEGREES 56 MINUTES TO THE RIGHTAND GO A DISTANCE OF 625 FEET TO A STAKE, THENCE TURN AND ANGLE OF 90 DEGREES TO THE LEFT AND GO A DISTANCE OF 90.7 FEET TO AN IRON STAKE ON THE SOUTHERN BOUNDARY LINE OF ABOVE MENTIONED STATE ROAD RIGHT OF WAY. CALL THIS PLACE OF BEGINNING. NOW TRAVEL IN THE SAME DIRECTION AND GO A DISTANCE OF 119 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE WATER LINE OF ST. GEORGE SOUND. CALL THIS LINE THE EASTERLY BOUNDARY OF HEREIN DESCRIBED PROPERTY, NOW TURN TO THE RIGHT AND TRAVEL WESTERLY ALONG THE WATERS EDGE TO A POINT WHICH IS ON A LINE 75 FEET DISTANCE FROM AND PARALLEL TO THE EASTERLY BOUNDARY LINE, NOW TURN TO THE RIGHT AND TRAVEL NORTHERLY A DISTANCE OF 105 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO AN IRON STAKE ON THE SOUTHERN BOUNDARY LINE OF SAID ROAD RIGHT, THENCE TURN TO THE RIGHT AND TRAVEL ALONG THE BOUNDARY OF SAID ROAD RIGHT OF WAY A DISTANCE OF 75 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE POB. SAID PROPERTY BEING AND LYING IN FRACTIONAL SECTION 2, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY. FLORIDA. SUBJECT PROPERTY MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED BY A RECENT SURVEY FROM EDWIN G. BROWN & ASSOCIATES, INC., DATED JULY 19, 1996, BEARING JOB NO. 96-405 (PSC-13419) AS FOLLOWS, COMMENCE AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 2, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA AND THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 29 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE SECTION LINE 1088.03 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT ON THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 98, THENCE RUN SOUTH 56 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 31 SECONDS WEST 624.45 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 33 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 29 SECONDS EAST 72.08 FEET TO THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF SAID U.S. HIGHWAY 98 FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE SOUTH 33 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 29 SECONDS EAST 171.57 FEET TO THE APPROXIMATE MEAN HIGHWATER LINE OF ST. GEORGE SOUND, THENCE RUN SOUTH 42 DEGREES 47 MINUTES 46 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID MEAN HIGHWATER LINE 78.14 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 33 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 29 SECONDS WEST 169.65 FEET TO THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF SAID U.S.HIGHWAY NO. 98, SAID POINT LYING ON A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE SOUTHEASTERLY, THENCE RUN NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID RIGHTOF-WAY BOUNDARY AND ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 2258.83 FEET THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 01 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 41 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 78.64 FEET THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING NORTH 41 DEGREES 26 MINUTES 10 SECONDS EAST 78.64 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SITUATE, LYING AND BEING IN SECTION 2, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS, MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN SIXTY (60) DAYS AFTER THE SALE. Dated this 23rd day of October, 2012. Marcia M. Johnson CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk November 22, 29, 2012 89346T PUBLIC NOTICE DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY Proposed Flood Hazard Determinations for Franklin County, Florida and Incorporated Areas The Department of Homeland Securitys Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) has issued a preliminary Flood Insurance Rate Map (FIRM), and where applicable, Flood Insurance Study (FIS) report, reflecting proposed flood hazard determinations within Franklin County, Florida and Incorporated Areas. These flood hazard determinations may include the addition or modification of Base Flood Elevations, base flood depths, Special Flood Hazard Area boundaries or zone designations, or the regulatory floodway. Technical information or comments are solicited on the proposed flood hazard determinations shown on the preliminary FIRM and/or FIS report for Franklin County, Florida and Incorporated Areas. The preliminary FIRM and FIS report can be viewed at http://portal.nwfwmdfloodmaps.com. These flood hazard determinations are the basis for the floodplain management measures that your community is required to either adopt or show evidence of being already in effect in order to qualify or remain qualified for participation in the National Flood Insurance Program. However, before these determinations are effective for floodplain management purposes, you will be provided an opportunity to appeal the proposed information. For information on the statutory 90-day period provided for appeals, as well as a complete listing of the communities affected and the locations where copies of the FIRM are available for review, please visit FEMAs website at www.fema.gov/plan/prevent/fh m/bfe, or call the FEMA Map Information eXchange (FMIX) toll free at 1-877-FEMA MAP (1-877-336-2627). Nov 29, Dec 6, 2012 89442T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 12-000250CA VANDERBILT MORTGAGE AND FINANCE, INC. P.O. Box 9800 Maryville, TN 37802 Plaintiff, v. DONALD RANDOLPH LAWSON, RHONDA MICHELLE LAWSON, THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF KARLENE E. SPENCER, THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF TINA M. HILL, THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF ROBERT H. CAPSACK, JR., and FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, through its State Housing Initiative a/k/a SHIP Program, Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: DONALD RANDOLPH LAWSON, RHONDA MICHELLE LAWSON, THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF KARLENE E. SPENCER, THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF TINA M. HILL, THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF ROBERT H. CAPSACK, JR.: YOU ARE NOTIFIED that a civil action has been filed against you in the Circuit Court, County of Franklin, State of Florida, to foreclose certain real property described as follows: EXHIBIT A LEGAL DESCRIPTION Legal Description of a 1.16 Acre Tract Certified To: Donald Lawson and Rhonda Lawson, Vanderbuilt Mortgage, Wakulla Title Company, Inc., Chicago Title Insurance Co. I hereby certify that this is a true and correct representation of the following described property and that this description meets the minimum technical standards for land surveying (Chapter 61G17-6, Florida Administrative Code). A portion of Lot 1 of Willow Acres Estates, a subdivision as per map or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 7, Page 27 of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida and being more particularly described as follows: Begin at an iron rod and cap (marked #7160) marking the Southeast comer of Lot 1 of Willow Acres Estates, a subdivision as per map or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 7, Page 27 of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. From said POINT OF BEGINNING run North 01 degrees 17 minutes 22 seconds West along the Westerly right-ofway boundary of Baywood Drive a distance of 77.50 feet to an iron rod and cap (marked #7160), thence leaving said right-of-way boundary run South 88 degrees 55 minutes 22. seconds West 665.06 feet, thence run South 21 degrees 04 minutes 42 seconds East 82_45 feet, thence run North 88 degrees 55 minutes 29 seconds East 637.15 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING containing 1.16 acres, more or less. The undersigned surveyor has not been provided a current title opinion or abstract of matters affecting title or boundary to the subject property. It is possible there are deeds of records, unrecorded deeds, easements or other instruments which could affect the boundaries James T. Roddenberry Surveyor and Mapper Florida Certificate No: 4261 TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN 2008 CMH 52 X 28 CYPRESS PO MOBILE HOME SERIAL NUMBER WCH017588GAAB. Commonly known as: 271 BAYWOOD DRIVE, CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322. You are required to file a written response with the Court and serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Timothy D. Padgett, Plaintiffs attorney, whose address is 2878 Remington Green Circle, Tallahassee, Florida 32308, at least thirty (30) days from the date of first publication, and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise, a default will be entered ag ainst you for the relief demanded in the complaint. Dated this 9th day of October, 2012. Marcia M. Johnson CLERK OF COURT Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk Attorney for Plaintiff: Timothy D. Padgett, Esq. Timothy D. Padgett, P.A. 2878 Remington Green Circle Tallahassee, FL 32308 (850) 422-2520 (phone) (850) 422-2567 (fax) Nov 29, Dec 6, 2012 91137T PUBLIC NOTICE ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS Notice is hereby given that SEALED BIDS will be received by THE SCHOOL BOARD OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, (hereafter referred to as Board) at the School Board Administrative Offices located at 85 School Road, Eastpoint, Florida 32328, up to 4:00 p.m. on the 6th day of December, 2012, and will be opened at the regular School Board meeting to be held at 6:00 p.m. on the 6th day of December, 2012., in the Willie B. Speed Conference Room, in Eastpoint, Florida, for the purchase of the following real property: A parcel of land described as all of Block 126 and approximately the West 40 feet of Lots 6 through 10 of Block 131, according to the City Map of the City of Apalachicola in general use, Franklin County, Florida. The parcel of land will be subject to a deed restriction that the land mast be used for affordable housing approved by the Florida Housing Finance Corporation and other restrictions as contained in Resolution 2012-025 adopted by the Board on November 20, 2012. The Board will consider a minimum bid of $211,000.00. All closing costs shall be paid by the bidder, including title insurance and costs of advertising. The Board will select the closing agent and title insurance company. Each bid shall be accompanied by a certified check payable to the School Board of Franklin County, Florida, in the amount of $5000.00, to be placed with an escrow agent acceptable to the Board. No other forms will be acceptable. Upon the acceptance of he bid, the successful bidder will be required to enter a contract for sale and purchase using the contract form provided by the Board. The Board reserves the right to reject any and all bids, and to waive any informalities. Dated this 20th day of November, 2012. The School Board of Franklin County, Florida By: Jimmy Gander, Chairman ATTEST: Nina Marks, Superintendent Nov. 29, Dec. 6, 2012 89462T PUBLIC NOTICE FRANKLIN COUNTY HUMANE SOCIETY ANNUAL MEETING The Franklin County Humane Society would like to invite the pubic to our annual general meeting on Saturday, December 8, 2012. It will be held at the Lighthouse Park on St. George Island at 10:00 AM. The Humane Society is proud to serve the Franklin County community with the help of caring, concerned citizens like yourselves. It would not be possible to continue to help our less fortunate, 4 legged citizens without you. Come join us and show your support for the Franklin County Humane Society! Thank you. Nov 29, Dec 6, 2012 Coin & Stamp ShowDecember 1st & 2nd Bay Co. Fairgrounds Sat 9-5, Sun 9-4 Free Admission GUN SHOWDec. 1st & 2nd Natl Peanut Fest. Bldg. 5622 US Hwy 231 S Dothan, Alabama OVER 275 TABLES Saturday 9-5pm Sunday 10-4pm Info: 334-279-9895 Text FL24233 to 56654 Food Svs/HospitalityPapa Joes Oyster Bar & GrillNow HiringExperienced Line Cook Apply in person only Install/Maint/RepairHandymanNeeded Elec, Plumb, Construction. Experience & References Required. (850) 653-5319 Apalachicola: 1 br, 1 ba efficiency Call for information 850-653-6103 Text FL32343 to 56654 Carrabelle Cove ApartmentsTaking Applications Now Available: 1, 2 and 3 br, Handicap Apts. Laundry facilities on site, W/S included in rent, CH&A and window coverings provided. On site management Office. Rental assistance available. Income restrictions apply, reasonable accommodation. Carrabelle Cove Apartments 807 Gray Ave #33 Carrabelle, Fl 32322 850-697-2017 TDD711 This institution is an equal opportunity provider & employerText FL29928 to 56654 St. GeorgeIsland $175/wk, elec, satellite, garbage incl. Pool tbl. 12 X 65 deck. Beautiful view! 850-653-5319 Apalachicola Condo. 2 br, 2 bath, with newer paint, tile, carpet $750 per month with 700 + credit score or $800 per month below 700 credit score. *References Checked* Quint 865-693-3232 Carrabelle Condo Riverfront 2 bedroom/ 1 bath, with queen Sofa sleeper long term rental $1,200 monthly. nice 850-545-0784 Historic Appalachacola Charming Cottage2br/ 1ba. In prime historic Appalachacola location. Short walk to water. Wood floors, new wash/dryer, ceiling fans, new cent. heat/ac, w/nice size yard. Pets allowed upon aproval/ deposit. $1,200/ mo. Call 850-832-2275 for appointment. Text FL32793 to 56654 Lanark Village3br 2ba home, near water, lg fence yard, $600 mo. 850-545-8813 Price Reduced! 3 Bedroom Home for RentNice 3/2 home in Apalachicola. Fenced yard, Bonus Room. $800 per month. 1 month security deposit. No Pets. Call Kathy Robinson, Robinson Real Estate Company 850-653-7196 Txt FL333087 to 56654 Apalachicola: 3 br, 2 Bath. Newly Remodeled Call for details!! 850-653-6103 Text FL32340 to 56654 Carrabelle House with 4bdr/2baths,large family room, LR, dining room /kitchen,/ utility room/ office and/or play room/ screened porch, recent efficient air and metal roof., two storage buildings, fenced yard, on two large lots, extra lot available $139.000 (850-545-0784) Text FL30879 to 56654 Chrisovich, 38 ft., Charter Boat, Twin Perkns Engines rebuilt, bottom job just completed, been operating as a charter boat for 12 yrs, High traffic slip paid for untill May Intrested in Sale/Joint Venture or Sale Operate for you. Part of 3 boat company same location 28 yrs Good River/Gulf/Bay Boat, $18K, Some possible finiancing Call Bobby 850-234-9409 or 877-Fla-Boat or email boatlaydee@yahoo.com Classifiedcan!If youre ready to move up or are just starting out Classified can help you open the door to home ownership. Weve got properties at every price, with locations all over town! And if youre planning to sell, Classified can introduce you to the markets best prospects.

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, November 29, 2012 The Times | A15 REPRESENTATIVES will be at the PORT ST. JOE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE on Tuesdays & Thursdays from 9 am 1 pm EST accepting applications for numerous open positions.We offer competitive wages and a comprehensive bene t package including Company paid health, dental, and life insurance, 401(k), attendance & safety bonuses.EOE/Drug Free WorkplaceEASTERN SHIPBUILDING GROUP MORE THAN A JOB A FUTURE! ToPlace Your Classified ad inCall Our New Numbers Now!Call: 850-747-5020 Toll Free:800-345-8688 Fax: 850-747-5044 Email: thestar@pcnh.com Email: thetimes@pcnh.com theAPALACHICOLA & CARRABELLETIMES CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW SELL ALL YOUR ITEMS through classified.CALL 747-5020 FRANKLIN COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS JOB ANNNOUNCEMENT Position Title: Library Assistant/Permanent Part timeSalary: $10.00 hour/26 hours per week Applications and Job Description available: at Franklin County Public Library Eastpoint 29 Island Drive, Eastpoint, FL 32328 850-670-8151, Position open until lled.The Franklin County Board of commissioners is an Equal Opportunity/Af rmative Action/Drug Free Workplace Employer Knowledge, Skills and Abilities: High level of computer usage and skills required; Ability to operate library equipment, i.e. copiers, faxes, scanning; Customer service, sequencing skills (Dewey decimal system) and the ability to work in a fast paced environment are necessary; willingness to learn new skills and attend training is imperative; preparing reports and lifting required. Skills in organizing, planning, and record keeping are essential. Minimum Quali cations: High School Diploma. Associates or Bachelors preferred. At least 2 years experience working in a library is required. Any equivalent combination of training and experience that provide the required knowledge, skills and abilities may be considered. Must relate well with the general public, other library staff, volunteers, children and young adults, be adaptable and exible. Ability to make decisions, to implement policies and procedures, and maintain quality standards is necessary.

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LocalA16 | The Times Thursday, November 29, 2012 Real Estate PicksOur local real estate experts have identied what they feel are the best values around and are oering them to you in Real Estate Picks! (In this section), Discover the best real estate values in Mexico Beach, Port St. Joe, Apalachicola, Cape San Blas, St. George Island, Carrabelle and surrounding areas. Best Values on the Forgotten Coast SELL YOUR LISTINGS HERE! Only $35 per week per listing Minimum 2 ads per week or 1 ad for 2 weeks Contact Joel or Kari for details: (850)814-7377 or (850)227-7847SOLD John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.comMLS# 248326$65,000St. George IslandCORNER LOT ON WEST BAYSHOREPossible bay and sunset views from a newly constructed home, a short distance over to the Gulf and world famous beaches, mature pines & native vegetation enhance the privacy of this lot, 1/3 acre, 100 ft x 160 ft, short sale, listed by Michael Billings John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.comMLS#242245$409,000St George IslandGULF VIEW FROM WEST PINE4 bedrooms (2 are masters), 3-1/2 bath, extra living area or 5th BR, large open Living/ Dining/ Kitchen area entry. CALL TODAY!653-8868 GET YOUR AD IN Trades & Services Laban Bontrager, DMD Monica Bontrager, DMD 12761 Pea Ridge Road Bristol, Florida 32321TELEPHONE (850) 643-5417 Bristol Dental ClinicDENTURE LAB ON PREMISESSame Day Service on Repairs and Relines Don Lively General Contractors LICENSED ANDINSURED 20 YEARSEXPERIENCE P.O. Box 439 Carrabelle, FL 32322 697-2783 or Mobile 566-2603RC0066499RG0065255 Carrabelle Visa, Discover, and American Express Honored at Participating Ace Stores JACKSONSBuilding Supplies Building Supplies & Auto Repair Carrabelle 697-3333 We Deliver AnywhereHardware and Paint Center J.J.s Tree Service, LLC Stump Grinder Licensed & Insured Call John : (850) 899-8432 ROBERTS APPLIANCE REPAIR ALL MAJOR BRANDS 18 Shadow Lane Apalachicola, FL 32320 Phone: (850) 653-8122 Cell: (850) 653-7654 JOES LAWN CARE IF ITS IN YOUR YARD LET JOE TAKE CARE OF IT FULL LAWN SERVICES, TREE TRIMMING AND REMOVALALSO CLEAN GUTTERS AND IRRIGATION INSTILLATION, PLANTING AND BEDDING AVAILABLE CALL JOE@ 850-323-0741 OR EMAIL JOES_LAWN @YAHOO.COM By LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star .com On Saturday, a dozen pups and their companion humans turned out to vie for best of show at a canine costume party. The contest was part of a Christmas celebration held from 1 to 4 p.m. to bene t the Franklin County Humane Society. Pups and people had a chance to tell Santa their holiday wishes and check out some of the animals available for adoption at the local shelter. The costume contest was held at 3 p.m. and for those who did not have a costume at home, there were some loaners on hand. More than a dozen entrants came prepared; many wore holiday regalia. Reindeer were the most popular entry, there were six, and a pair of reindeer, Electrifying Elijah and Alabama Abigail took rst place. The winners belong to Heath and Patricia Usry, of Gadsden, Ala. Second place went to Kali and Lili, a pair of terriers dressed as Santa and a red-booted reindeer and shown by Danny Spear and Susan Hudson. Bringing in their place was Oliver, a rescued pit-bull dressed as a Kong dog toy complete with milk bones. Owners Gene and Susan Pinnock said the suit was handcrafted from two tee-shirts, stuf ng and felt. Cheryl Whaleys dog also appeared as a reindeer. Lucky Dog, of Apalachicola, was shown off leash by owner Ed Tiley. Melissa Brooks of Eastpoint brought her Italian greyhound Daphne in a sparkling mermaid costume. Her friend, Mason Pace, showed her dachshund Weenie, dressed as a weenie in a bun. Taffy the dog, dressed as a bunny, came with Raquel Nugent of Roswell, Ga. Ray and Moxie Steiger and Jackson Gray, all of Apalachicola, brought Santa Paws and two Chihuahua helpers. A late arrival was Frankie, a blue-eyed pit bull with matching necktie. Ricky Ray Ruddy of Rockwell, described by owner Larry Kiley as a naked redneck dog, refused to wear a costume but barked instructions to the contestants. Shelter Director Karen Martin was pleased with the turn-out and the day. People were very generous, she said, displaying a jar full of money. And we found a home for a puppy.Reindeer rule at canine costume party Top left: Electrifying Elijah, left, and Alabama Abigail, shown by Heath and Patricia Usry, took best of show as Reindeer in Transition. Top right: Daphne the Italian greyhound, shown by Melissa Brooks of Eastpoint, was beautiful in her mermaid costume. Far left: Undoubtedly the best trained dog in the line up was Apalachicolas own Lucky Dog, shown by Ed Tiley. Left: Oliver, a rescued pit bull with a heart of saltwater taffy, was festive in a Kong toy costume hand crafted by Sarah Pinnock.PHOTOS BY LOIS SWOBODA | The Times