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The Apalachicola times
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100380/00197
 Material Information
Title: The Apalachicola times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: H.W. Johnston
Place of Publication: Apalachicola Fla
Apalachicola Fla
Publication Date: 11-22-2012
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1885.
General Note: Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 32911693
lccn - sn 95026907
System ID: UF00100380:00197
 Related Items
Preceded by: Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by: Apalachicola herald

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xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx 50 WWW.APALACHTIMES.COM Phone: 850-653-8868 Web: apalachtimes.com E-mail: dadlerstein@star .com Fax: 850-653-8036 Circulation: 800-345-8688 DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK: School News & Society: 11 a.m. Friday Real Estate Ads: 11 a.m. Thursday Legal Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Display Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Line Ads: 5 p.m. Monday xxxxx Contact Us xxxxx Out to see Index By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com With August posting its best revenues in the eight years since the two-cent bed tax was implemented, Franklin County is headed toward a record-breaking tourist season. With just one month left in scal year 2011-12, Tourist Development Council collections through Aug. 31 have raised $853,021, almost $50,000 ahead of last years total and the best so far for any year in the bed taxs history. The numbers show August 2012 collections of almost $94,000 were about 55 percent better than one year ago, a full $33,000 increase. The year-to-date total is more than $105,000 better than where it stood at this point last year, running about 14 percent ahead of last year. And if September proves to be even an average month, the 2011-12 scal year total should, for the rst time, eclipse the $900,000 mark. Up 14 percent, thats a pretty signi cant number, said Curt Blair, TDC administrator. I think were encouraged by the numbers, and I think we think its indicative of the success of the BP Were Salty campaign. Clearly, a lot of money went in to developing a new brand and promoting it over the 12 months. Were encouraged we used the right methods Planning, Zoning to review day care traf c By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com Concerned about parking and traf c issues raised by neighbors, the Apalachicola Planning and Zoning Board has granted a 30day extension for the operation of Apalachicola United Methodist Churchs new day care center. By unanimous vote, P&Z on Nov. 12 granted the extension to the Christ Community Academy, at 75 Fifth St., after the board split down the middle on whether to grant the special exception outright. Whether the church even needed a special exception to operate its program, which has been in place for several weeks, was an issue itself. The Rev. Themo Patriotis said the day care program was another ministry of the church and thus is covered under the churchs right to operate over its more than century-long tenure at the corner of Fifth Street and Avenue E. Apalach man gets 3 life terms for sexual battery By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com After a two-day trial, a 49-yearold Apalachicola man was sentenced Friday to three life terms for his having committed, more than 20 years ago, sexual battery on a 6-year-old. Circuit Judge Angela Dempsey sentenced John Stan Grant to serve the terms concurrently. The crime of sexual battery on a child under age 12 by an adult over age 18 does not allow for the possibility of parole. The jury of four men and two women reached their verdict after deliberating for less than 30 minutes. Grant still has a 2010 sexual JOHN STAN GRANT TDC revenue passes 2011 total Opry music echoed across the bay in the 1940s, 50s By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com Some famous musical visitors made Franklin County their personal playground 60 years ago. In spite of its remote location, there has never been a shortage of musical talent in the county. In the earliest days, folks made their own music. The Brown family, early settlers in Eastpoint, taught their children to play musical instruments. A photo in the collection of the Florida Archives memorializes Eastpoints Pretenders, the Brown family band. Preshia Crum of Eastpoint, who recently celebrated her 100th birthday, said there were frequent dances in Eastpoint when she was a girl. She met her husband, Lucius Crum, a square dance caller, at one of these. Lucius once told his granddaughter he remembered traveling up the river to dance all night long in the old Hathcock house near the Liberty County line. Carrabelles Mary Westberg recalled her father telling her about dances in Eastpoint and Greenpoint, east of Eastpoint. Daddy met my mother at one of those dances, she said. Her parents told her after the FRANKLIN COUNTY DREW BIG ACTS IN s s has never been dance all night long in the old Hathcock house near the Liberty County line. called her father telling her about dances in Eastpoint and Greenpoint, east of Eastpoint. Daddy met my mother at one of those dances, she said. Her parents told her after the Moonlit music PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE TIMES Top left: Ernest Tubb and his Texas Troubadours stand in front of their bus in the early 1960s. Pictured from left are Buddy Emmons, Jan Kurtis, Johnny Johnson, Jack Drake, Leon Rhodes and Ernest Tubb. Top right: Sarah Ophelia Colley Cannon, known to fans as Cousin Minnie Pearl. Center left: Floyd Cramer circa 1960. Center right: Eastpoint Pretenders Herbert Brown, William Tabor and Reba and Elizabeth Brown circa 1912, courtesy of the Florida Memory Project. Above left: String Bean Akeman. Above right: Little Jimmy Dickens. See TDC A12 See TRAFFIC A12 See BATTERY A14 See MOONLIT A13 Thursday, November 22, 2012 VOL. 127 ISSUE 30 Opinion . . . . . . A4 Society . . . . . . A8 Faith . . . . . . . A9 Outdoors . . . . . A10 Tide Chart . . . . A10 Sports . . . . . . A11 Classi eds . . . . A15 Apalach Christmas celebration Friday The Apalachicola Christmas Celebration will light up Apalachicola from 4-8 p.m. Friday, Nov. 23. Santa arrives on a shrimp boat at 4 p.m. at the City Dock on Water Street, to hear childrens Christmas wishes. The Orman House Museum will be trimmed in holiday nery and docents dressed in period costumes. The Raney House Museum will be decorated in holiday greenery and open for tours. At noon Saturday, Nov. 25, the fun continues as Santa has a special day devoted to hearing wishes from his furry friends. Support the Franklin County Humane Society and have your pets picture taken with Santa for a donation. There will be a pet costume contest at 3 p.m., plus stocking stuffers for non-furry friends. Full Moon Climb Nov. 28 at lighthouse The November Full Moon Climb at the Cape St. George Lighthouse on St. George Island will be Wednesday, Nov. 28. The sun will set at 5:40 p.m., and the moon will rise at 5:55 p.m. Reservations are recommended. For reservations or information, call contact the Lighthouse Gift Shop at 927-7745. Homebuyers seminar Nov. 29 in Apalach The Juvenile Justice Executive Council will meet from 1011:15 a.m. Nov. 29 at the TIGERS site in Apalachicola, Also, the Home is where the Heart is seminar for rst-time homeowners will be 3-5 p.m at the TIGERS site in Apalachicola. This seminar is free and open to the public. All are welcome. For more information, please call Carol Bar eld at 653-2784 Eastpoint Christmas celebration Dec. 14 Eastpoint will celebrate Christmas with a parade, holiday caroling, a Christmas tree lighting and Santa Claus on Dec. 14. The parade starts at 4 p.m. and will travel from Gillespie Street, west of Sellers Plaza, to Bay Street, then south to Patton Drive, then east to the pavilion. Santa will arrive on an oyster boat and will visit with the kids. Well have caroling and lots of fun. For information contact the Apalachicola Bay Chamber of Commerce at 653-9419.

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Local A2 | The Times Thursday, November 22, 2012 F RANKLIN OUNTY H EALT H EPARTMENT 139 12 th Street Apalachicola, Florida 32320 Contact Person: David Walker Phone: 850-653-2111, ext. 119 E-mail: david_walker@doh.state..us The Franklin County Health Department will be having its Grand Opening of our new Dental Clinic located at 106 NE 5th Street in Carrabelle, FL. The Blue Foundation Dental Grant Presenta tion will also take place at the new dental facility. Please make plans to attend this much awaited occasion for the oral health of the residents of Franklin County! Please Join Us! DATE: Wednesday, December 5, 2012 TIME: 10:00 A.M. LOCATION: Carrabelle Clinic 106 NE 5th Street Carrabelle, FL 32322 Contact Person: Please make plans to attend this much awaited occasion for the oral health of the residents of Please Join Us! Wednesday, December 5, 2012 Please make plans to attend this much awaited occasion for the oral health of the residents of Please Join Us! Wednesday, December 5, 2012 SAVE THE DATE! A good teacher is a great blessing to any child. Students at the Eastpoint Nest showed some love to the Franklin County School and Franklin County Learning Center teachers, thanking them for their kindness, attentiveness and lets not forget, candy. Dear Mrs. Ham, I am so thankful you are my teacher again. You are special to me. You have a soft voice. I love it when you give us free time. Love, Cole Polous Dear Mrs. Gibson, I am so thankful youre my teacher. Youre special to me because you make math playful. We get cookies and drinks in math. We use fake money to pay for them. I love when we do limbo to get the wiggles out. You are very sweet and you are the best teacher. Sincerely, Emily Smith Mrs. Sasnett, I am thankful for you. Love, Sy Bartlett Dear Mrs. Demsey, I am thankful you are my teacher. Love, Malichi Rivera Mrs. King, I am thankful you are my teacher. You are special to me because you are nice and helpful. You help me with reading because you want me to do my best. You give me supplies that I need. Love, Audry Yowell Dear Mrs. Dykes, I am so thankful you are my teacher. You are nice and reward us with candy when we are good. You make learning fun. I love when we play fact or opinion. Love, Gage Boone Dear Mr. Boyd, I am so thankful you are my teacher. You are funny and I love your silly style. Math is hard but you help me through it. You make science fun too! Every morning you say good morning to me when I come in. Love, Shasta Whitnauer Dear Ms. Shaffer, I am so thankful you are my teacher. You always help me with my math work, give good instructions for what we will be doing next. You tell everyone to do their best. You are special to me. Love, Jocelyn Webb Dear Mrs. Inzetta, I am so thankful that youre my math teacher. Im amazed that you still teach even though some students are disrespectful to you. You make math easy for me to understand. And you care to help me succeed and pas the FCAT. Im glad youre my teacher! Love, Morgan Anderson Dear Mrs. Cumbie, I am so thankful you are my teacher. You are so nice. Thank you for teaching us adding. You give us candy when we are good. Youre the best teacher. Thanks, Cloey Malone Dear Mrs. Baney, I am so thankful that you are my teacher. You make the writing process easier. I understand you and you understand me. Thanks again, youre the best. Love, Brittani Bouzemann By DESPINA WILLIAMS Special to the Times On the eve of her performance in the Carrabelle Nest Thanksgiving play, Layla Chisolm was having an identity crisis. Like her fellow actors in The Meal Must Go On, Chisolm was decked out head to toe as a favorite Thanksgiving side dish. Crinkled white paper expertly fastened to her torso mimicked a heaping pile of luscious mashed potatoes, nestled atop an unassuming brown bowl fashioned from craft paper. On her head, a pile of uffy cotton balls topped by a buttery square of yellow foam completed the look. But even in all her spud-like splendor, Chisolm could not stop her classmates from calling her a dish that would never grace even the humblest Thanksgiving table. She was not, By Squanto, a bowl of popcorn! Chisolm could not trouble herself with these taunts. At show time, she joined classmates Kayleigh Revell, Charlee Winchester, Trinity Barron and Destanie Proctor. Sure, they were dolled up like cranberry sauce, turkey, pumpkin pie and stuf ng, but she was the star of this show. When the actors began the play by each boasting to be the best Thanksgiving dish, Chisolm seized her moment. Thanksgiving just wouldnt be the same without me! Mashed potatoes are always everyones favorite! Chisolms prideful performance was just one of the many highlights of The Nests two-day Thanksgiving celebration. The Nest, a Franklin County School District 21st Century after-school program, staged back-toback parent nights on Nov. 15-16 that combined food, fun and family. Carrabelle Nest students performed a medley of song and dance numbers, including the Turkey Pokey, for parents and classmates. Patrick Tipton narrated The Meal Must Go On!, a readers theatre play that featured Cheyenne Lawson, Haiden Parks, Brianna Sanders, Larry Winchester, September Ferrell, Alexis Parks, Jada Allen and Jorden Carnes as Thanksgiving dinner hosts and houseguests. The Eastpoint Nest staged an ambitious Thanksgiving dinner, with students cooking and sharing their meal with their families. Students traveled from room to room, cooking cranberry sauce, vegetable stirfry, turkey and ham sandwiches and pumpkin pie in a cup. At each cooking station, led by Nest staff members, the students earned a stamp featuring their dish, which they colored and glued to their Thanksgiving brochures empty place setting. By the end of the program, each student and their family members assembled a complete meal and rated each dish using a score of Yummy, Just Okay and Gross. The pumpkin pie in a cup scored the most Yummies. If you want to make it at home, just layer in a cup crushed graham crackers and vanilla pudding mixed with pumpkin, cinnamon and nutmeg, and top with a scoop of Cool Whip. Delicious! The families all enjoyed the interactive meal. The Nest would like to thank all the families who donated ingredients for the Eastpoint meal and snacks for the Carrabelle play. To read more about the Nests Thanksgiving activities, visit the program website, www. franklincountynest.org. Students in grades prekindergarten to eighth grade are eligible to attend The Nest, and applications are available from the website, Franklin County School and Franklin County Learning Center. Despina Williams is project coordinator for The Nest, a 21st Century Community Learning Center administered by the Franklin County School District. LETTERS OF THANKS PHOTOS BY DESPINA WILLIAMS | Special to the Times At top, the performers in The Meal Must Go On wear costumes depicting Thanksgiving dishes. From left are Carrabelle Nest students Destanie Proctor (stuf ng), Kayleigh Revell (cranberry sauce), Layla Chisolm (mashed potatoes), Trinity Barron (pumpkin pie) and Charlee Winchester (turkey). Above left, Shelby Rotella lls her plate with homemade succotash and a side of pumpkin pie. Above right, Christopher Creek showcases his pumpkin pie in a cup dessert. The Nest students give thanks

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Local The Times | A3 Thursday, November 22, 2012

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By BEVERLY MOUNT-DOUDS Contributing Writer Editors note: This is one in an occasional series about the beginnings, the building specications, for lighthouses in the area. These next few weeks, Ill be sharing some letters about our local lighthouses. This could not have been completed without giving thanks rst to Mark Curenton and the Apalachicola Area Historical Society. Several years ago, Mark let Marlene Womack and me go through boxes of old papers found in the cottage at the Raney House in Apalachicola. These boxes covered many areas of local history (one folder covering our lighthouses), and I was lucky enough to get the chance to copy these les. Since we have been so concerned about saving Cape San Blas Lighthouse lately, I thought that this would be the perfect time to share this past history of another time the lighthouse had to be saved. This rst story starts with Dog Island Lighthouse. Most of the papers cover proposals of bids for rebuilding the lighthouses between the Treasury Department and the Superintendent of Lights; what I like is that the papers tell you how they want them built. Here are the letters for Dog Island. NOTICE.C USTO M H OUSE B OSTON MA SS November 18, 1851 PROPOSALS will be at this Ofce until the 8th day of December, proximo, at 12 oclock M, for furnishing materials and erecting, on Dog Island, in Florida, a LIGHT HOUSE 49 feet in height, of the following materials, dimensions and descriptions, viz: TOWER Foundations: The earth to be excavated to a depth of 2 feet below the surface, at which depth it is to be carefully leveled off and to be 22 feet in diameter. Pilings: Within the pit excavated as above. There are to be driven two rows of piles disposed in circles; diameter of outside row, from center to center, 16 feet; diameter of inside row, from centre to centre, 11 1/2 feet; outside row to be composed of 22 piles; inside row to be composed of 16 piles; the piles to be so driven that the inner piles shall come opposite the openings between the outer piles. The original surface of the ground. The piles to be of sound seasoned oak, not less than 9 nor more than 16 inches _____. The piles to be driven 7 feet below the bottom of the excavated pit. Grillage: A grillage, composed of sound, well-seasoned yellow pine timber, 8 by 12 inches, to be pinned with oak treenails, 2 inches diameter, on the heads of the piles. The timbers to be notched 1 1/2 inch each over the other. The timbers to be laid with the 12 inches horizontally, and to have 12 inches space between them. The space between the timbers to be lled with clean gravel, hard rammed.-Upon the tops of the timbers, and at right angles to them, there is to be a ooring of plank 4 inches thick, of sound, well-seasoned yellow pine, laid edge to edge, and well treenailed to the grillage timbers, by oak treenails 1 1/2 in diameter and 9 inches long. All the treenails to have their heads wedged after being driven. The diameter of the grillage, from outside to outside to be 19 feet. Walls: The walls of the tower to be composed of the rst quality hard bummed brick, laid in the best hydraulic Rosendale cement, every fourth course of brick to be headers through the wall. The mortar to be composed of equal parts of cement and sharp clean sand. No mortar to be used after it has been mixed 8 hours. The wall to be circular in plan, outside diameter at the base on the grillage, 17 feet; thickness at base 3 feet. Outside diameter at the top under the copings, 12 feet. Thickness under coping 2 foot. Height of wall from the top of grillage to under side copings, 40 feet. Doors: The tower to have one door 6 feet by 3 feet broad in clear. Sill to be out of cut granite or compact limestone, 8 inches thick; Lintel of the same material 10 inches thick; Jambs of the same material, 7 inches thick. Sill, Lintel and Jambs to have a rebate of 1/2 inches cut in for wooden door. The wooden door to be composed of wellseasoned white pine, to be 3 inches thick, double battened and well nailed, to be provided with two composition hinges, lock and bolt; hinge pintals to be well leaded in the jambs. The sills, lintel and jambs to extend through the wall, the sill and lintel lapping on the jambs. Flooring: The interior of the tower to be led up to the bottom of the door sill with clean pebbles and fragments of rock, and carefully leveled off; on this to be laid 6 inches of concrete, composed of part stone, broken to egg size, one part Rosendale cement, and two parts sand. On this concrete a brick ooring is to be laid in cement, 3 inches thick, with its upper side on a level with the top of the sill. Windows: The tower to have four windows, the top of the top window to be on a level with the springing line of the dome. The sashes and frames to be of clear, sound, wellseasoned white pine. Each window to be glazed with 8 panes of 12x12 inches best quality German glass. The frames to be rebated in a cut granite or compost limestone sill, lintel and jambs, the sill and lintel to lap on the jambs, rebate 1 1/2 inch deep. Thickness of sill, lintel and rebate, 6 inches, all to extend through the wall. Dome: Immediately beneath the coping, the underside of which is touched by the extrados of the dome, is to be sprung a brick dome, 8 inches thick, radius of extrados, 5 feet. Height of inside dome, from springing line, 3 feet 9 feet inches. Coping: The tower to be coped with soapstone 4 inches thick, the pieces composing the outer circle to extend 4 inches within the lantern posts. Exterior diameter of coping 13 1/2 feet. The spandrels between copings and dome to be lled with brick, carefully laid in mortar. Stairs: The stairs to be of the best quality of white pine, 2 inches thick, to be sound, well-seasoned and free of knots; to have 8 inches rise and 15 inches tread at the walls; the tread to project 1 1/2 inch over the riser; thread and riser to be let 4 inches into the wall at one end and fastened to a hollow newel 8 inches square, of the same material, at the other end. The newel to have a hinge door at top and bottom 5x24 inches. The newel to rise through the tower coping to receive the descending weight. Upper Floor: An upper oor to be laid in the top of the tower, top of oor 7 1/2 feet below crown of same. Floor to be composed of white pine timbers 6x8 inches, covered with two thicknesses of 1 inch pine board, well nailed, planned, tongued and grooved at right angles to each other. Floor to ll 2/3 of the circle. Stairs to reach from brick paving at bottom of tower, to top of upper oor. Material all of best quality. A scuttle 22 inches square in clear to be made in coping and dome of cast iron 1 inch thick with 1 inch ange let into coping ush on top and with bottom curved to shape of dome. Scuttle rebated at top for door 1 1/2 inch thick, white pine covered with sheet copper and tted with ____ and fastenings. Ladder: A wrought iron ladder to extend from top of upper oor to scuttle, sides of 3 by 1/4 inch, steps 1 1/2 inch diameter shouldered against sides and riveted over, steps 9 inches apart, ladder 22 inches wide from outside of sides. All wood work of the tower to be well painted in 3 coats of yellow ochre and oil. All brick work, without and within to be white washed with two coats of lime. Lantern: The lantern is to be 16 feet diameter, from outside to outside of angle posts, to be 8 sided. Angle Posts: 8 in number, to be wrought iron, 1 1/2 by 3 inches, set with the 3 inches pointing to the centre, to be 9 1/2 feet long above the copings and to be let in the walls of the tower 3 feet below copings, making total length 12 1/2 feet to be rebated 1 1/4 inch deep and 5-16 inch broad for glass. Lower Panels: Of cast iron lling, the space between angle posts to be made 3/4 inch thick, with anges at top, bottom and sides, 3 inches wide all over, ush side to be placed outside. Panels to be 21 inches high, each with a 3 inches diameter ventilator in centre, and to be secured with 2 one inch blots and nuts at top and bottom, passing through one single post and two panels. All the joints between coping and panels, and between panel and single posts, to be made of white and red lead mixed with oil to be rebated like single posts on tops to receive glass. Upper Panels: In all respects to be like the lower panels, excepting only in height, which is to be 9 inches, and in having a gutter 5 inches deep and broad cast on it. Top of upper panel to be on same level with top of posts, to be rebated like angle post on bottom to receive glass. Rafters: 8 wrought iron rafters, to be 2 inches deep by 1 1/2 broad, to extend from top of angle posts to a wrought iron circle 20 inches diameter, 2 by 2/4 inches thick. Rafter to be secured to angle post by T heads, 2/4 inch blots, and to circle in same manner. Roong: To be covered with copper, 32 oz. to the square foot, double capped, and to be made water tight; to be bent down into gutter and well riveted there, and also to be well riveted to bottom of ventilator. Ventilator: One of Emersons patent Ventilator, 20 inches diameter, 4 1/2 feet high, to be well secured on top of wrought iron circle. Sash Bars: 8 wrought iron Sash Bars, 1 1/4 inches deep by 2 inches wide, to be placed midway between top of lower panel and bottom of upper panel, so as to divide each side into equal panes of glass; sash bar to be secured to angle posts by T and 2/4 inch bolts and nuts, to be rebated on upper and under side, like angle posts for glass. Door: One of the lower panes of glass to be set in a wrought iron frame, tted with hinges and fastenings, and hung for a door. Railing: The lantern to be surrounded by a wrought iron railing, composed of 8 post, 1 inch by 3 inch, set opposite to angle post with three inches pointing centre. The lower end of railing post to be well leaded in coping, 2 inches deep and 4 inches from edge, thence curving sharply out to a diameter of 13 1/4 feet; thence perpendicular for a height of 5 1/2 feet above coping; thence curving in on a radius of 1 3/4 feet to the angle post, to which it is to be secured by a T head and blot. There is to be two railing bars of 1 1/3 inch diameter extending around the lantern, the top of the lower one to be 21 inches above coping, the upper one to be placed directly in front of each sash bar. All the iron and copper work to be painted on the outside, with one coat of red lead and oil and two coats of chrome green and oil and all the iron and copper work to be painted on the inside with three coats white lead and oil. Glazing: The lantern to be glazed with 16 panes (2 to each side) of the best quality French plate glass of such size as will ll the before specied sides, and to be 1/4 inch thick. The glass to be secured by putty and lead pins, 1/4 inch diameter, 6 lead pins to a pane. Conductor: A copper electrical rod, 2/4 inch diameter, to extend 3 feet above the ventilator of lantern, with forked tops and to reach four feet below surface of ground, turning off from tower obliquely when within 10 feet of bottom. Gutters: A copper gutter oval form, 1 2/4 by 2 inches to descend from the cast iron gutter, along one angle post to the coping. The entire work is to be completed on or before the rst day of May, 1852, to the satisfaction and approval of the Superintendents of Lights at Apalachicola, Florida or of such person as may be appointed for the purpose of examining the same. No payment to be made to the contractor until the work shall be completed in a faithful and workman like manner, in accordance with the terms of the contract, Separate proposals will be received during and approved as above the same period, for furnishing materials and erecting at Cape St. George, Florida, a lighthouse, 65 feet in height, singular to the one above described, subject to the same conditions and the work being approved also by the Superintendent of Lights at Apalachicola. Opinion A4 | The Times Thursday, November 22, 2012 USPS 027-600 Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 Publisher: Roger Quinn Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola Times S PECIAL TO TH E T I M ES A historic photo of the Dog Island Lighthouse. Dog Island Lighthouse built 162 years ago

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The Times | A5 Thursday, November 22, 2012 LIMITED STOCK! F I R ST COME F I R ST SE RV E Sale Starts at 7:00 AM EST F riday, 11-23-12 Sale Ends at 4:00 PM EST Sunday, 11-25-12 STORE OPENS AT 7 AM *WHILE SUPPLIES LAST DEALS www.BWOsh.com Moultrie 6.5 Hanging F eeder Kits WAS $69.99 NOW $ 39.98 Simmons 10x50 Binoculars WAS $59.99 NOW $ 29.98 NOW $ 34.99 Otis .556 Cleaning Kits NOW $ 79.98 R inehart 18-N-1 Targets WAS $99.99 NOW $ 29.98 F lambeau Duck Decoys WAS $39.99 Parker Bushwaker Crossbows WAS $329.99 Simmons 10x50 Binoculars Simmons 10x50 Binoculars Parker Bushwaker Crossbows Parker Bushwaker Crossbows NOW $ 299.99 Abu Garcia V eritas R ods IN STOCK! NOW $ 59.99 Ameristep Doghouse Blind WAS $79.99 NOW $ 54.98 Ameristep Grizzly G-30 Blind WAS $119.99 NOW $ 74.98 Ameristep Wing Shooter Blind WAS $169.99 NOW $ 109.98 U P TO 50% O FF SELECT NAME B R AND APPA R EL AND ACCESSO R IES CLOTHING CLEA R ANCE R ACKS WITH ITEMS $5 &$10! F R IDA Y S UNDA Y ONL Y! All hats 50% o, $5 Swimwear Pieces, Up to 50% o select sweaters, dresses, and more! Open F riday & Saturday A LL ITEMS SUB J ECT TO CHANGE NO R E O R DE R S NO R AIN CHECKS LIMITED STOCK! RV E Sale Starts at 7:00 AM EST Sale Starts at 7:00 AM EST Sale Starts at 7:00 AM EST F riday, 11-23-12 riday, 11-23-12 Sale Ends at 4:00 PM EST Sunday, 11-25-12 Sale Ends at 4:00 PM EST Sunday, 11-25-12 Sale Ends at 4:00 PM EST Sunday, 11-25-12 DEALS DEALS DEALS DEALS DEALS DEALS DEALS DEALS DEALS DEALS DEALS DEALS LIMITED STOCK! F I R ST SE RV E Sale Starts at 7:00 AM EST Sale Starts at 7:00 AM EST Sale Starts at 7:00 AM EST F riday, 11-23-12 A A LL LL ITEMS ITEMS ITEMS ITEMS SUB SUB J J ECT ECT TO TO CHANGE CHANGE NO R E O R R DE R S NO R AIN CHECKS Bring the kids (Young & Old) to see our live Train Display! SPEND $ 100 + & GET A $ 20 COUPON BLA C K FRIDAY O NLY SPEND $ 200 + & GET A $ 40 COUPON BLA C K FRIDAY O NLY SPEND $ 300 + & GET A $ 60 COUPON BLA C K FRIDAY O NLY SPEND $ 400 + & GET A $ 80 COUPON BLA C K FRIDAY O NLY NOW $ 149.99 Minn Kota Endura Trolling Motors 38# Thrust WAS $199.99 Ameristep Backpack Blind WAS $109.99 NOW $ 89.98 Otis .556 Cleaning Kits Allen Durango Gun Cases FR EE w/ any Long Gun Purchase! $ 149 .99 Heritage Rough Rider combo .22 and .22WSM $ 669 .99 DPMS Oracle .223/.556 AR15 Rie Rossi Circuit Court Judge Blued Rie $ 459 .99 Sig Sauer Two-Sum Pistol Kits .9mm $ 369 .99 Taurus G2 Pistols .9mm/.40 cal. $ 10 .49 Blazer Brass .9mm 50 rd Box $ 7 .99 Remington UMC .223 ammo 20rds box Springeld XD Sub Compact .40 lambeau Duck Decoys WAS $39.99 WAS $39.99 WAS $39.99 WAS $39.99 WAS $39.99 WAS $39.99 SPEND & GET A COUPON BLA www.BWOsh.com F lambeau Duck Decoys lambeau Duck Decoys Moultrie I R 55 Trial Camera WAS $119.99 Ameristep Backpack Blind Ameristep Backpack Blind NOW $ 74.99 Based on before tax totals. Springeld XD Sub Compact .40 Springeld XD Sub Compact .40 $ 469 .99 Ruger American Ries .243/.308/30-06/.270 Ruger American Ries Ruger American Ries $ 329 .99 Rossi Circuit Court Judge Blued Rie Rossi Circuit Court Judge Blued Rie $ 469 .99 Uniden Atlantis Hand Held V H F R adio WAS $119.99 NOW $ 89.98 Law Enforcement The following report is provided by the Franklin County Sheriffs Office. Arrests in this weeks report were made by officers from the Apalachicola Police Department (APD), Carrabelle Police Department (CPD), Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) and the Franklin County Sheriffs Office (FCSO). All defendants are to be considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law. Nov. 9 Jonathan G. Carmichael, 26, Apalachicola, failure to appear (FCSO) Nov. 12 Carlos E. Russell, Jr., 40, Eastpoint, violation of probation (FCSO) June M. Davis, 29, Eastpoint, DUI and driving while license suspended or revoked (FWC) Ottis E. Russell II, 47, Carrabelle, DUI and driving while license suspended or revoked (FWC) Nov. 13 Robert L. Thompson, 18, Apalachicola, principal in the first degree to attempted armed robbery (FCSO) Gary M. Barineau, 39, Apalachicola, trespass after warning and violation of probation (FCSO) Patrick J. McGovern, 62, Minneapolis, Minn., battery (APD) Nov. 14 Savannah K. Shiver, 18, Apalachicola, violation of probation (FCSO) Sean D. Richart, 38, Tallahassee, DUI and refusal to submit to breath test (CPD) Courtney L. Brownell, 23, Eastpoint, principal in the first degree to attempted armed robbery (FCSO) Nov. 15 Michael G. Hicks, 31, Eastpoint, violation of probation (FCSO) Patrick J. McGovern, 62, Minneapolis, Minn., 10 counts of possession of child pornography (APD) Robert C. Maples, 18, Apalachicola, battery (APD) Nov. 16 Daniel McKenzie, 34, Eastpoint, violation of a domestic violence injunction (FCSO) Jennifer L. Smith, 32, Eastpoint, principal in the first degree to attempted armed robbery (FCSO) Eric A. Tatum, 32, Carrabelle, indecent exposure (FCSO) Arrest REPORT By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com A 62-year-old drifters violent reaction to having photographs taken of his unusual bicycle has led to the man being jailed on child pornography charges. The story began around 10:16 a.m. on Nov. 13, when Apalachicola police of cer Timothy Davis was dispatched to Avenue D to follow-up on the complaint of an Indian Pass man, Brian Bowen, 47. Bowen said he had been doused with pepper spray after he tried to photograph an unusuallooking, bearded man on a tall bicycle. Bowen told the of cer that when he pulled over to photograph the man, he was sprayed, and the culprit could be found at the library. Bowen said he had a photo of the man spraying him. Davis went to investigate, and talked to the man, who admitted what he had done. He stated that he knew why I was there, Davis wrote in his report. He stated that he sprayed the man out of reaction to seeing him with a camera. Davis then arrested Patrick J. McGovern, 62, of Minneapolis, Minn., on a battery charge. The matter likely would have ended there had McGovern not offered Davis and Apalachicola Chief Bobby Varnes a plan to pay his $1,000 bond. According to Brett Johnson, investigator with the sheriffs of ce, McGovern told the of cers that he had bail money in his RV, and that if he could bond out, he would leave town. Varnes told McGovern that police of cials would have to accompany McGovern on a return visit to his RV. Johnson said McGovern responded by saying that it was OK with him if they followed him inside his vehicle, but cautioned them not to be alarmed when they entered the recreational vehicle because he was a naturalist, a term often used to describe nudists. He also advised the of cers that the camper contained several nude photographs, Johnson said. When the of cers escorted McGovern to his camper, parked near 10 Foot Hole, they observed an extensive collection of photographs of nude minor children. They were everywhere, every cabinet, every wall, every ceiling, everywhere, Johnson said. There was not an inch of that camper that did not have a nude photograph on it. The vehicle was later towed to the sheriffs of ce where two search warrants were executed. After the execution of the warrants, McGovern was charged Friday with 10 counts of child pornography, which is a second degree felony. Because they are felonies, investigators are empowered to obtain a DNA sample that could be used to determine if McGovern is connected with any unsolved crimes. Johnson took steps Monday to pursue the DNA sampling. We are still getting information about his past, said Assistant State Attorney Robin Myers, noting that it appeared the man had traveled extensively throughout the United States and Central America. Johnson said evidence was obtained in the searches that indicated McGovern had used aliases in the past, including Patricio Juan Pedro, the name he used to sign in at the library to use the computers. Myers said that while it was not clear whether the photographs depict children engaged in sexual acts, they are suggestive of sexual behaviors. We are still trying to determine whether the images meet the de nition of child pornography, he said. AMBER HENNING | Special to the Times Patrick McGoverns unusual bicycle parked in front of the Apalachicola Municipal Library PATRICK J MCGOVERN Mysterious drifter jailed for child pornography

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Local A6 | The Times Thursday, November 22, 2012 $ 159 .95 $ 149 .95 $ 179 .95 St. Joe Rent-All 706 1 st Street Port St. Joe (850)227-2112 GIFT CERTIFI C ATES & LAY-A-WAY A VAI L AB L E THE ST. JOSEPH BAY GOLF CLUB & THE CAMP GORDON WWII MUSEUM WISHES TO THANK OUR WONDERFUL SPONSORS OF OUR RECENT SILENT AUCTION AND GOLF TOURNAMENT BILL & JANE MORRISSEY, IN MEMORY O F D ONALD C. T AYLOR A RMY JOHN C. GAINOUS V F W POST 10069 AMERICAN LEGION POST 116 AMERICAN LEGION SAUL-BRIDGES POST 13 TALLAHASSEE DALYS WATER SPORTS CAMP GORDON JOHNSTON ASSOCIATION PORT ST. JOE MARINA THE THIRSTY GOAT GUL F TO BAY CONST. MATHEWS LAW F IRM HANNON INS. AGCY. M C DANIEL CONSULTING TONY MINICHIELLO, IN MEMORY O F J OHN X. M INICHIELLO N AVY CAPITAL CITY BANK OLIVIER MONOD (ST GEORGE INN) SJBGC KENNY WOOD SUNSET COASTAL GRILL LINDA MINICHIELLO, IN MEMORY O F W ILLIE S. H OGUE A RMY CULBRETH F INANCIAL GROUP MARK MINICHIELLO, IN HONOR O F ARTHUR J MINICHIELLO NAVY APALACHICOLA ACE HARDWARE HOG WILD BBQ HOMETOWN BP & GRILL CITY O F CARRABELLE KERIGAN MARKETING ASSOCIATES BOYER SIGNS BAY CITY LODGE & RESTAURANT BARB & DAN VAN TREESE D UREN S P IGGLY W IGGLY BLUEWATER OUTRIGGERS CENTENNIAL BANK THE F RAME SHOP-TALLAHASSEE ANN & MARTY JARDSZ JAY J. PULLI, IN MEMORY O F JOSEPH A. PULLI, ARMY L&B ENTERPRIZES, IN MEMORY O F LOUIS M. KIRBY, USA F GEORGE & DANA BOYER CUR F EW LODGE 73 F & AM CARRABELLE MAINSTAY SUITES ALTERNATIVE ELECTRIC CO. PEPPERS RESTAURANT ST JOE ACE HARDWARE BEACH TIME VACATION RENTALS MUST SEE MAGAZINE ST. JOE AUTO PARTS CO. SISTERS RESTAURANT LYNNS JEWELRY, YARN & MORE OWL CA F MASON DIXON THE BOYER BAND (GEORGE, CLETUS & TOM) ADVANCE AUTO BAYSIDE F LORIST & GI F TS RAMSEYS PRINTING PICTURE PER F ECT F RAME SHOP MARGE PARKER DANNY WARRUCK KELLEY F OODS EDWIN WATTS GOL F DAVE CASH AND THE GULF COUNTY TOURIST DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL & FRANKLIN COUNTY TOURIST DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL AND, A BIG TH A NK YOU TO: M IKE A LLDIS L AURIE J UNE B ARB V AN T REESE M ARY K ELLY B ILL M ORRISSEY L INDA M INICHIELLO K EN T UCKER J ACK K ERIGAN FATHER P HIL FORTIN THE PSJHS NROTC, M AJOR L T C OL (R ET .) D AVID B UTLER BOBBI WINCHESTER, JANE MORRISSEY, MAUREEN ALLDIS, DICK DAVIS, CMST WANDA WARRUCK AND THE ENTIRE S T J OSEPH B AY G OL F C LUB S TA FF BILL MILLER REALTY 850-697-3751 (3310) 570-0658 400 + COMM. U.S. 98 & GULF ADJ. TO LANARK MARINA 850K $29,500 $2,500 D O W N B UYS 2 B ED AP T 2 6 OR RENT $500/MTH 2 B/R 1 BTH GULF VIE W HOME W/ F AMILY R OOM $70,000 GULFVIE W & ACCESS 3 BDR 2 BA 2006 M/H 89K 2 LG. SHADY LOTS 3 SHEDS 400 TO MARINA-CITY W ATER49K MIH 2 C RNR LOTS BLK. $ S TORE REDUCED $49,500 2 AC-AT RIVER UTIL. IN -$39,500 TANNING, WAXING, EAR PI E RCING, F E A T H E RS, FASHION EX TE NSIONS & U P DOS. Walk-ins Welcome With Mani/Pedi Combo 10% O FF Polish EXPIRES: 11/14/12 TANNING, WAXING, EAR PI E RCING, F E A T A T A H E RS, FASHION EX TE NSIONS & U P DOS. By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star .com A Nashville insider plans to bring a group of songwriters to experience the Forgotten Coast. Karen Brooks arrived in Carrabelle by boat and liked what she saw. She is still a resident of the waterfront and plans to bring some friends to town to share her new home. Brooks, born in Dallas, Texas, worked in the music industry for more than a decade, as a background singer with Jerry Jeff Walker, David Allan Coe and Townes Van Zandt, to name a few. Faking Love, a duet she recorded with T. G. Sheppard, topped the chart in 1983.She has also recorded duets with Johnny Cash and Randy Sharp. Now she has a new project. Brooks wants to help Nashville songwriters reconnect with their working class roots by experiencing the working world rst-hand. As part of her project, Brooks said she will bring six songwriters to Carrabelle in April. On the agenda for the group is an old-fashioned barber shop shave, a historic tour of Carrabelle, a talk on the city by Carrabelle Mayor Curley Messer and other Carrabelle elders, a writers workshop at the Carrabelle library and two days on Jim Lycettes working shrimp boat, Pirates Sons. Brooks said the visitors will also perform at the Dixie Theatre one evening during their stay. The visit will be the beginning of a tour that will expose the songwriters to other rural activities including cattle ranching, mountain climbing and prospecting. These guys are bubbas, and they are going to be so funny, she said. Brooks said Pete Winter of Winterstone Productions of Tallahassee plans to document the experiment on lm. In a proposal for the project, she wrote, There was a time when history was passed down to the population for the purpose of preserving their heritage. This was done by storytelling. That is what we do in Nashville, we tell stories in song. We want to give our melodic writers a chance to be a part of this heritage by inviting them to participate in this rst-hand experience of the career, humor and life stories that make America the amazing place we live and work everyday. Brooks said she has about 10 applicants for the program but can only accept six and that Carlene Carter and Chas Sandford are expected to attend. We hope to include a couple of young writers and a local writer, she said. Messer and Commissioner Charlotte Schneider are working directly with Brooks on the project. Schneider said she believes the visit will be an eye-opener for the participating artists. This coastal area is a way of life that doesnt exist anywhere else, Schneider said. Brooks agreed. Where else can you walk on the beach and see a bear playing in the surf? LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Karen Brooks, right, poses with Carrabelle Mayor Curley Messer. Songwriters retreat planned for Carrabelle ANNOUNCES THE OPENING OF WEEMS MEDICAL CENTER WEST Tuesday, December 4, 2012 Appointments Available and Walk-Ins Welcome!!! Appointments can be made by calling 653-8853 ext 118 and Walk-Ins may enter the front lobby of the hospital and inquire at the front registration desk. Weems Medical Center West will be providing Urgent and Family Care Services Tuesday through Thursday 8am 4pm 135 Ave G, Apalachicola, FL 850-653-8853 www.weemsmemorial.com ARE YOU IN NEED OF A MEDICAL PROVIDER??

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Local The Times | A7 Thursday, November 22, 2012 Stan Trappe ATTORNEY AT LAW Foreclosure Defense Bankruptcy Asset Protection Real Estate Probate ~ Wills Admitted to Practice Law in Florida Since 1974 Let Me Help You 850-769-6139 236 McKenzie Avenue Panama City, FL FREE NICOTINE PATCHES AVAILABLE TO PROGRAM PARTICIPANTS End Your Dependence On Tobacco! Let Us Help You on Your Quit Journey! Tools to Quit When: Thursday, December 13, 2012 Time: 5:30 P.M. 7:30 P.M. Where: George E. Weems Memorial Hospital, 135 Avenue G, Apalachicola, FL 32320 For more information, please contact Calandra Portalatin at (850) 224-1177 or cportalatin@bigbendahec.org dbutler@coastalcoverage.com Locally owned and operated Home Business Auto Health Workers Comp New Location this Year!! Hwy 98, beside Gulf Side IGA in Apalachicola. See You There! Margaret (850) 653.3764 or (850) 323.1937 Margarets Christmas Trees Coming Fraser Fir 5 to 10 ft Arriving Thanksgiving Week! FRESH WREATHS Apalachicola annual Christmas celebration Friday: The Apalachicola Christmas Celebration will light up Apalachicola from 4-8 p.m. on Friday. The streets will be lined with luminaries. Merchants will be open late and the sounds of carolers will echo through the streets, lling the evening with the Christmas spirit. Santa arrives on a shrimp boat at 4 p.m. at the City Dock on Water Street. He will hear childrens Christmas wishes, and carolers will sing. The Orman House Museum will be trimmed in holiday nery, and docents dressed in period costumes will lead visitors through the early history of Franklin County. The Raney House Museum also will be decorated in greenery and open for tours. On Saturday at noon, the fun continues as Santa has a special day devoted to hearing wishes from his furry friends. Support the Franklin County Humane Society and have your pets picture taken with Santa for a donation. There will be a pet costume contest at 3 p.m. plus stocking stuffers for your non-furry friends. Saturday is also Small Business Saturday. Support local merchants and restaurants by spending money in our little town. Youll nd unusual, oneof-a-kind gifts, art work, outstanding food and gift certi cates for nearly everything. Holiday Fresh Market Dec. 1: Mark Saturday, Dec. 1 in downtown Apalachicola as your day not to ght the crowds and traf c at the malls. Come for the day to the Holiday Fresh Market and shop in a relaxed, hassle-free environment. Buy handcrafted Apalachicola specialties from seasonal wreaths to vintage European glass bead jewelry and specialty food delights. For information, call 653-9419 or visit info@apalachicolabay. org. Middle-aged sought for Cat sh Moon auditions: Panhandle Players are holding auditions for their next production Cat sh Moon at 4 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 2, and at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 4, at the Raney Carriage House. Cat sh Moon, a comedy, written by Mississippi native Laddy Sartin, is set on a shing pier on a lake somewhere in LA (lower Alabama). Four people that have known each other all their lives come to grips with knowing each other all their lives. Cast will be three men and one woman, all middle-aged or thereabouts. Readings will be from the script. The show is directed by Dan Wheeler. For more info, call 370-0957. Mitigation strategy meeting Dec. 3: Franklin County Emergency Management would like to invite the public to participate in a meeting to discuss and update the Franklin County Local Mitigation Strategy. Hazard mitigation is any action taken to permanently reduce or eliminate long-term risk to people and their property from the effects of hazards. Hurricanes, tornadoes, oods, hazardous material spills, res and sinkholes are some of the hazards experienced by Florida communities. The goal of the mitigation strategy is to identify local hazards and establish a framework to reduce the risk. The next meeting is at 10 a.m. Monday, Dec. 3, in the Franklin County Emergency Operations Center, 28 Airport Road in Apalachicola. All parties can voice their concerns, review the status of old projects and add new ones to the list. For more information, contact Mike Rundel, Franklin County Emergency Management coordinator at 653-8977 or Em2frank@gtcom.net. News BRIEFS

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A8 | The Times Thursday, November 22, 2012 OF THE WEEK PET St. Joseph Bay Humane Society Meet DONOVAN! Donovan is an 8 month old Rhodesian Ridgeback mix. He is a little shy but has the sweetest and gentlest temperament. He and 5 other dogs being housed at the adoption center are part of this months BIG DOG STIMULUS PACKAGE. We have reduced our adoption fee for our large dogs to only $20.00 in the hope that they will all be adopted before the holidays. Please consider giving one of our large breed dogs a home in time for the holidays! Volunteers are desperately needed to socialize all of our dogs and cats. We are always looking for people willing to bring one of our animals into their home to be fostered for various needs. Anytime you can spare would be greatly appreciated. Call Karen at 670-8417 for more details or visit the Franklin County Humane Society at 244 State Road 65 in Eastpoint. You may logon to the website at www.forgottenpets.org to see more of our adoptable pets. LIVE TAB L ETOP TREES $ 18 .00 T o O rder, Contact Lois at 653-5857 Proceeds benet the Florida Wild Mammal Association NIP RODENTS I N T H E BU D CALL L OIS AT 653-5857 Franklin Countys ONLY LOC AL Pest Control Company RODENTS RODENTS RODENTS I I N N T T R o d n e y s Oyster Tongs Laminated Handles! CONTACT: (850) 653.3764 or (850) 323.1937 Apalachicola, FL I would like to Thank You the voters of District 5 for your support and donations during my candidacy in the 2012 Franklin County Commission Election. I am humbled by your faith and trust in me. Visiting and talking with voters and residents in the past eight months, I have seen what a truly wonderful county we live in. As your Commissioner, I am excited and looking forward to serving you the people of this wonderful county we call home. Together we can make things better. Thank you! William Massey ATTENTION!!! PR I MARY CAR E 4 ALL located on 1001 Gray Avenue, in Carrabelle, FL 32322 will be relocating to 680 Maple Street, Chattahoochee, FL 32324, (850) 663-2355 effective November 30 th 2012. All For further information you can continue to contact (850) 697-2550. Thank You, H.C. Hercule, M.D. MEDICARE PLANS EX CELLEN T COV ERA G E A N YO NE C AN AFFO RD TOP QUALITY COMPANY TUCKER LIFE-HEALTH INSURANCE, INC. RATED A+ BY BETTER BUSINESS BUREAU Ross E. T ucker, Agent since 1981 Chartered Life Underwriter Registered Health Underwriter 850-926-2200 or 800-226-7005 www.tuckerlifehealth.com Navy Airman Jacob A. Lee, son of Melissa Shiver Lee of Eastpoint and Timothy O. Lee of Eastpoint, along with the 5,500 sailors and Marines assigned to the Enterprise Carrier Strike Group, recently arrived in Norfolk, Va., after a 7-month deployment supporting operations in the Mediterranean and the Arabian Seas. The USS Enterprises return to Norfolk will be the 25th and nal homecoming in her 51 years of distinguished service. The aircraft carrier is scheduled to be inactivated Dec. 1 in a ceremony at Norfolk Naval Station. While deployed, Enterprise CSG served in the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet areas of responsibility, conducting maritime security operations, theater security cooperation efforts and missions in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. During her 238 days away from Norfolk, Big E, as Enterprise is affectionately known, safely steamed 80,968 miles, and Carrier Air Wing 1 ew more than 8,000 sorties in support of Operation Enduring Freedom and exercises in the 5th and 6th Fleet AORs. Enterprise was commissioned Nov. 25, 1961, as the eighth ship to bear the name Enterprise. Big E was the worlds rst nuclear-powered aircraft carrier. During her 51 years of service, Enterprise deployed 25 times and participated in every major con ict since the Cuban Missile Crisis. Enterprise has been homeported in both Alameda, Calif., and Norfolk and conducted operations in every region of the world. The December inactivation ceremony will be the last of cial public event for Enterprise and will serve as a celebration of life for the ship and the more than 100,000 sailors who have served aboard the ship. Enterprise CSG comprises Commander, Carrier Strike Group 12, the aircraft carrier USS Enterprise (CVN 65), CVW 1, Destroyer Squadron 2, guided-missile destroyers USS Porter (DDG 78), USS Nitze (DDG 94) and USS James E. Williams (DDG 95). The squadrons of CVW 1 embarked aboard Enterprise are Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 11 Red Rippers, VFA-136 Knighthawks, VFA-211 Fighting Checkmates, Marine Fighter Attack Squadron 251 Thunderbolts, Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron 123 Screwtops, Carrier Tactical Electronic Warfare Squadron 137 Rooks, Fleet Logistics Support Squadron 40 Rawhides and Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron 11 Dragonslayers. Lee is a 2009 graduate of Franklin County High School of Eastpoint and joined the Navy in April 2010. For more information on USS Enterprise, her legendary history and Inactivation Week events, visit www.enterprise.navy. mil. The St. James Health and Rehabilitation Center kicked off the holidays Saturday with an open house. The holiday season already is looming large there, with a turkey dinner planned for Thanksgiving. Residents families may reserve a private dining room and bring their own holiday meal. There are also trees to be decorated and crafty activities in the works. Admissions Director and Medicaid Specialist Theresa Mickens led a tour of the facility. The home was clean and cheerful decorated with residents art. Smiling residents interacted with the staff and engaged them in conversation. Administrator Brenda Smith said the rehabilitation center employs more than 150 workers, many of whom are county residents. In addition to assisted living, St. James offers outpatient occupational, speech and physical therapy services. Smith said the center is partnering with Gulf Coast State College to offer training for certi ed nursing assistants. Familiar names among the 71 residents of St. James include Crooms, Faircloth, Floyd and Braxton. For the rst time in years, the center provides assisted living within Franklin County. Mickens said many residents have strong family support locally. Peggy Woodruff, whose son is a resident of St. James Bay, had high praise for the rehabilitation center, My son Michael was in a motorcycle accident two years ago. We have some experience with health care centers. This is the nicest facility I have seen. The staff is very caring, compassionate and sincere. After lunch, a number of residents met in the dining room for a game of bingo. Players win currency they can spend in the bingo store after the game. You can help the residents and spread a little holiday cheer by donating small gifts and prizes for the bingo store. Regifted items are welcome. Possible prizes include combs, brushes, scented soaps and grooming supplies other than aerosols. Hand sanitizers and other products containing alcohol cannot be distributed. Sugar free candy or cookies are welcomed. Jigsaw puzzles, coloring books, crossword, Sudoku and word search books crayons and other art supplies are popular. Socks, slippers, T-shirts, hats, jewelry, picture frames and knick knacks are all treasured prizes. If you would like to contribute, contact Lois at 653-5857. By LOIS SWOBODA Jescelyn Brannen born At 4:41 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 16, 2012, Cierra Russell and Cody Brannen of Eastpoint welcomed their little angel into the world, Jescelyn Arnetta Brannen. Maternal grandparents are Sarah Sanders of Eastpoint and Gene Russell of Eastpoint. Maternal great-grandparents are Cathi and Walter Gallion of Eastpoint, Christine Russell of Eastpoint and Carlos Russell of Eastpoint. Paternal grandparents are Arnetta and Charles Brannen of Eastpoint. Paternal great-grandparents are Donald R. McSweeney and the late Doris McSweeney of Hawthorne; Hazel and John Gill of Panama City; and Chester and Lenora Brannen of Woodville. Also welcoming Jescelyn into the world were numerous aunts, uncles, cousins and extended family. McPhersons to mark 60th wedding anniversary A special reception will be held Sunday afternoon in honor of Leonard and Arlene McPherson, of Carrabelle, on the occasion of their 60th wedding anniversary. The McPhersons were married Nov. 27, 1952, in Fort Dodge, Iowa. The McPhersons have ve children, Connie McPherson of Tallahassee, Chris McPherson of Carrabelle, Shawn McPherson of Panama City and Mishelle McPherson of Mexico Beach. A son, Craig McPherson, passed away in 2008. The reception at the Carrabelle Boat Club will be 2-6 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 25. All family and friends are invited. RSVP and get for more information by calling 363-2694. SPECIAL TO THE TIMES Navy Airman Jacob A. Lee, anked by his parents, Melissa and Timothy Lee, earlier this month at the Mikel Clark Sports Complex. Jacob Lee completes Middle East deployment Society St. James Bay Rehab Center holds open house LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Chasity Wardwell looked Christmassy in her red pajamas and striped red shoes. Happy ANNIVERSARY Birth

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The Times | A9 Thursday, November 22, 2012 The United Methodist Churches of Franklin County Welcome You First United Methodist Church of Apalachicola Worship Service 11:00 a.m. every Sunday Sunday School 10:00 a.m. 75 5 th St. Apalachicola 653-9530 fumcapalach@gtcom.net Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis Carrabelle United Methodist Church Worship Services 10:45 a.m. Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Celebrate Recovery Mondays 7-9 p.m. 102 NE Ave. B Carrabelle 697-3672 Pastor: Julie Stephens Eastpoint United Methodist Church Worship Service 10:00 a.m. every Sunday Healing service every fourth Monday at 7:00 p.m. 317 Patton Dr. (corner of David St.) 670-8825 Pastor: Rev. Beth White St. George Island United Methodist Church 9:00 a.m. Worship Service 10:00 a.m. Fellowship Hour 201 E. Gulf Beach Dr. 9274635 www.sgiumc.org Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis Nursery now provided for Sunday Church Service First Pentecostal Holiness Church 379 Brownsville Road Apalachicola Were excited about what Gods doing!!! Sunday School 9:45 am Sunday Morning Worship 10:45 am Sunday Evening Service 6:00 pm Monday, Youth Group 6:30 pm Wednesday, Royal Rangers, G.A.P. 7:00 pm Wednesday Worship & Word 7:30 pm Nursery Provided during regular church services 7:00 7:00 First Baptist Church St. George Island 501 E. Bayshore Drive 927-2257 R. Michael Waley, Pastor Join us as we praise and worship the living Christ. Great is the Lord and most worthy of praise. Psalm 145:3 Sunday Bible Study ................................................ 10:00am Worship Praise ........................................................ 11:00am Sunday Night ............................................................ 7:00pm Wednesday Power Hour ...................................... 7:00pm Wednesday Youth at S.P.L.A.S.H ....................... 7:00pm Walking in Christ R. Michael Whaley, Pastor Sacred Heart of Jesus Catholic Church -Your Church on the Coast2653 Highway 98 East P.O. Box 729, Lanark Village, Fl 32323 Pastor: Father Eddie Jones Mass Schedule: Saturday: (Vigil) 5:00 PM Sunday: 7:30 AM (850)697-3669 WELCOMES YOU Church of the Ascension 101 NE First Street Carrabelle SUNDAY 10:00 AM WELCOMES YOU Church THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH (850) 274-4490 (850) 545-2578 WELCOMES YOU Trinity Trinity Episcopal Church est. 1836 Welcomes You Hwy. 98 & 6th St. Apalachicola 850-653-9550 Sunday Worship Services 8 & 10:30 a.m. Wednesdays Healing Service 11 a.m. Centering Prayer 4 p.m. Sunday Worship Services 8 & 10:30 a.m. Wednesdays Healing Service 11 a.m. Centering Prayer 4 p.m. Faith Island Methodists host Thanksgiving Day dinner The St. George Island United Methodist Church will host its annual Thanksgiving Day Community Dinner at 12:30 p.m. Bring a covered dish to share. Turkey and ham are provided. The church is at 201 E. Gulf Beach Drive, St. George Island. For further information, call the church of ce 927-2088. Family Portrait DVDs now available A DVD of Barry Hands The Family Portrait, which was performed at the Dixie Theatre in August, is now available. The hour-long DVD includes the entire production of the show and costs $15. For more information, call 2762550 or email barrylh20@yahoo. com. Sacred Heart hospital guild holds Dec. 2-7 holiday sale The spirit of the holidays will come alive in the main hallway of Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf as the hospitals Volunteer Guild hosts its third annual Christmas Spectacular Sunday through Friday, Dec. 2-7. Guests of the spectacular will discover unique holiday decorations, tree ornaments, manger scenes, angels, gift items, holiday games, festive toys and table dcor. The event hours will be 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sunday, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Monday through Thursday and 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Friday. Santa is scheduled to arrive at 5 p.m. Friday for milk and cookies. The Sacred Heart Gift Shop is a non-pro t fundraising program operated by the Sacred Heart Hospital Volunteer Guild. Proceeds generated from the Gift Shop and this sale will support services at Sacred Heart. For more information about the volunteer guild, contact Paula Pickett, Guild membership chair, at 227-7535 or visit www. sacredheartonthegulf.org. For more information about the Gift Shop or the holiday sale, please call the volunteer desk at 229-5788. What a Thanksgiving dinner we had at the Senior Center last Thursday. It was a very good meal, thanks to Sue and the crew, and a big slice of Merles famous coconut cream pie topped it off. The table centerpieces were made by our director, Sue Reed. I started off Saturday with my sugar x at the Lanark Village Boat Club. Had a good breakfast and did a lot tablehopping. Then it was off to the Lanark Village Community Church yard sale. I had lunch and had a look around and ran into Sharon, daughter of the late Frank and Betty Ferlin, and Joan and Jeff, two of Mary Ann Boves children, and Jeffs wife, Sue. It was great seeing them. Hope you picked up one of Claudettes famous chocolate clairs! The Birthday Bash was well-attended. The Camp Gordon Johnston American Legion Post 82 was rockin. Decembers Birthday Bash will be Saturday, Dec. 15. See ya there! Attention Bingo players! Wednesday night bingo at Chillas Hall will be coming soon. Members of the Lanark Village Golf Club will be in charge. More on this later. Ill be watching for you at our annual Thanksgiving Dinner at Chillas Hall. Serving begins at 1 p.m. Members of Camp Gordon Johnston will gather at the post for their annual Thanksgiving dinner. This is for members only. John and Loretta were joined in holy matrimony on Saturday by Mr. Bill. They came to the Legion to celebrate. Be kind to one another, check in on the sick and housebound and have a very Happy Thanksgiving Day! Until next time, God bless America, our troops, the poor, homeless and hungry. Cynthia Ann Cindy Smith was born Aug. 13, 1957, in Englewood to Ava Jean and Ernest Corky Smith. She passed away Sunday, Nov. 11. She was graduated from Carrabelle High School and later became a certi ed nursing assistant. Cindy is survived by one brother, Brent Barber; aunts, Miki Peddie, Edwina Paul, Margie Langley and Estelle Register; uncle, Manuel James; niece, Stephanie Gragg; nephews, Cody Barber, Caden Barber and Cale Barber; two great-nephews; four great-nieces and dear friend, Renee Howell. A memorial service was held Nov. 16 at the Carrabelle Christian Center. Cynthia Ann Smith CYNTHIA ANN SMITH Meacham Services for Gordon Frederick (Kelly) Meacham, 90, of Apalachicola, were held at 10 a.m. on Nov. 21 at Allen & Allen Funeral Home Chapel in Thomasville, Ga. Pastor Terry Bernard of ciated. Interment was to be held at 3 p.m. Wednesday at Magnolia Cemetery in Apalachicola. Mr. Meacham passed away Sunday, Nov. 18, at Southern Pines in Thomasville, Ga. Born Nov. 9, 1922, in Port Allegany, Penn., he was the son of the late Victor Meacham and Frances Cady Meacham. For 59 years, he was married to Jewel Cooley Meacham of Beaumont, Texas, who survives. He was a retired veteran of the United States Marine Corps and the United States Army with 23 years of service including World War II, the Korean War and the Vietnam War. As an Army of cer, he directed aircraft operations of up to 120 military personnel. Chief Warrant Of cer (CWO) Meacham began ying for the Army Air Corps in xed wing aircraft before training on every rotary aircraft the U.S. Army ew. He was decorated with the Korean Service Medal, the United Nations Service Medal, the Armed Forces Reserve Medal, the National Defense Service Medal and the Army Aviator Badge. CWO Meacham was given the second highest Army Aviation Honor for ying more than 25 combat missions in Vietnam. He continued to work for the government as a ight instructor with the Civil Service and later with the Department of Veterans Service. He received a bachelors degree in social studies and business administration in 1976. Other survivors include his children, Larry Cady and, wife, Vickie of Missouri; Marylou Erway and husband, Gordon, of Pennsylvania; Barry James Meacham and wife, Marty, of Kentucky; (Ron) Ronald F. Meacham and Monica Buengener of Germany; Kathleen Meacham Perdue and, husband, Tommy of Georgia; and Faye Meacham Gibson and, husband, Murray of Massachusetts; 18 grandchildren, 22 greatgrandchildren and ve great-great-grandchildren. He was preceded in death by his brothers, Leonard Meacham, Eugene Meacham, (Bill) William Meacham, Barry Meacham and Dale Meacham. Friends and family may sign the online guest register at www.allenfh. com Gordon Frederick Meacham GORDON FREDERICK MEACHAM Nixon Lee Nick Shiver, age 73, of Eastpoint, passed Sunday, Nov. 11, in Tallahassee after a brief battle with cancer. Nixon was born on Aug. 31, 1939, in Calhoun County, and lived in Eastpoint for most of his life. He worked in construction with C.W. Roberts for about 20 years, owned a seafood house for 20 years in Eastpoint and then went back to work for C.W. Roberts for four years before retiring back to Eastpoint. He is preceded in death by a son, Ricky Shiver; his mother and father, Toy and Leroy Shiver; a brother, Jamie Shiver; and a sister, Thelma Gragg. Survivors include his wife of 56 years, Ethel Shiver; a son, Rocky Shiver and his wife, Rachel; and two daughters, Venitia Watford and her husband, Thomy, and Tina Brown and her husband, Buddy. He has nine grandchildren: Lisa, Heather, Daniel, Katie, Leigh, Ashley, Richard, Sandy and Jada; and 19 great-grandchildren, Clayton, Lynzi, James, Kristen, Ashlynn, Tyler, Josh, Troy, Noah, Jacob, Kristianna, Christian, Rebecca, Jordan, Ethan, Korbyn, Olivia, Laelah and one on the way. Nixon has three sisters, Sherill Carroll (Tiny); Betty Braxton (Buddy) and Barbara Jean Shiver; a brother, Bill Shiver (Audrey), and one sister-in-law, Jeannette Shiver; and lots of nieces, nephews, friends and extended family. Funeral services were held Thursday, Nov. 15, at United Baptist Church, with the Rev. Bobby Shiver of ciating. Burial was in Eastpoint Cemetery. Kelley Funeral Home handled all arrangements. Nixon Shiver Obituaries Faith BRIEFS DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times Amy Goodwin shows off her candy trees at Saturdays sale at the Lanark Village Community Church. Chillas Hall hosts todays Thanksgiving dinner BIKERS KICK OFF TOY PROJECT BETH BRINKLEY | Special to the Times The Franklin County Toy Project got a roaring start Saturday with the annual Toy Run, as a host of motorcyclists rode from the Carrabelle IGA to Apalachicolas Riverfront Park. Many brought unwrapped toys, and all contributed $10 each, helping raise almost $300 for the annual project. The committee will use these funds as well as the monies collected through a raf e to shop for toys for Franklin County boys and girls. Tickets are being sold for the Jan. 11, 2013, raf e of a playhouse built by Bay City Work Camp inmates. Tickets are $5 each, three for $10 or seven for $20. Tickets can be purchased at Franklins Promise of ce (the former Apalachicola High School), Resort Vacation Properties administration of ce or anywhere you see a yer in the window. Make checks payable to Franklins Promise, and specify that it is for Toy Project. To volunteer to sort and pack toys and give toys out, Adopt-A-Family or post a donation, visit www. franklintoyproject.com LANARK NEWS Jim Welsh

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By MICKIE ANDERSON Special to the Times Invasive lion sh might never be eradicated from Floridas coastal waters, but its possible to keep them under control in speci c, targeted areas and using plenty of manpower, a new University of Florida study shows. Efforts have been made in some areas to control lion sh by holding derbies, where divers and snorkelers spear or net as many sh as possible in a given time period. The UF study, led by Tom Frazer, a professor and interim director of the School of Natural Resources and Environment, attempted to determine how intense and consistent such efforts would need to be to effectively curb a lionsh population. How far do we have to knock them down in order to prevent a potential problem? This was really the rst time that researchers have gone out and said were going to quantify and characterize how many sh we can pull off these reefs, how much effort that requires and ultimately, then, how much money it might cost to continue that effort, said Frazer, a faculty member with UFs Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences. The teams work is outlined in the current issue of Reviews in Fisheries Science. The UF team spent much of 2011 working with the Central Caribbean Marine Institute, local dive masters and scuba volunteers who removed lion sh weekly from several sites off Little Cayman Island, in the Caribbean Sea. The team asked the divers not to remove lion sh from an area called Rock Bottom Wall, so it could be used as a control site. At the lion sh removal sites, lion sh density decreased over time, and the size of the sh that remained were smaller on average. In comparison, lion sh numbers increased markedly at the control site. When the study began, it wasnt unusual to capture lion sh that measured about 400 millimeters long. But by June 2011, at one dive site called Blacktip Boulevard, the removed sh ranged from 140 to 295 millimeters in length, with 83 percent of the sh smaller than 220 millimeters. The size of the sh has food chain implications, as the larger lion sh are more likely to consume bigger prey, such as grouper or snapper, while smaller lion sh prefer to nibble on shrimp, he said. The appearance of lionsh recently near the Big Bend area of Florida has scientists concerned, he said, because that areas large seagrass beds provide critical nursery-ground area for gag grouper, an important sport and food sh. Mickie Anderson is a writer for the University of Florida News Desk. She can be reached at (352) 273-3566 or mickiea@u .edu. Special to the Times St. George Island residents recently pitched in to clean up and landscape the islands entrance. We had some money left from bingo proceeds, and that, together with a lot of volunteer hours, talent and effort allowed us to make the island even more welcoming to our residents and guests, said Newt Colston, who chaired the SGI Civic Club committee that decided on the project. The committee also included Pat OConnell, Fred Stanley, Terry Kemp and Ann Giknis. We contacted Burkett & Son Well Services, who were able to get an old well near the site working again. This provided water for irrigation and made the rest of the project possible, said Giknis, a Master Gardener and island resident who designed and supervised the project. Then, working with The Garden Shop in Apalachicola, we ordered plants that we knew would do well under tough island conditions, Giknis said. Once we got going, the actual physical project took about two weeks to clean up and prepare the area, repaint the welcome sign, lay out the irrigation and install about 200 plants. Many islanders come out and worked hard to make this happen. We are really proud of the outcome, she said. This project compliments the clean up and beauti cation efforts in the Lighthouse park and elsewhere on St. George Island. Corner of Marina Drive Port St. Joe, FL (next to Piggly Wiggly) www.BWOsh. Port St. Joe, FL Corner of Marina Drive EV E RYTHING FOR YOUR O UTDOOR ADV E NTUR E RYTHING FOR YOUR O UTDOOR ADV E UTDOOR ADV E UTDOOR ADV NTUR E NTUR E E RYTHING FOR YOUR O UTDOOR ADV E UTDOOR ADV E UTDOOR ADV NTUR E NTUR E E (next to Piggly Wiggly) Corner of Marina Drive EV E EV E EV RYTHING FOR YOUR E RYTHING FOR YOUR E EV E EV E EV RYTHING FOR YOUR E RYTHING FOR YOUR E EV EV HUGE GUN SALE! (next to Piggly Wiggly) (next to Piggly Wiggly) GUN SALE! $29 00 FREE! $55 00 WEEKLY ALMANAC APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE TIDE TABLES MONTHLY AVERAGES To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from these given for APALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW Cat Point Minus 0:40 Minus 1:17 East Pass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27 To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from those given for CARRABELLE: HIGH LOW Bald Point Minus 9:16 Minus 0:03 Sponsor the WEEKLY ALMANAC Call Today! 653-8868 Date High Low % Precip Thu, Nov. 22 70 46 0 % Fri, Nov. 23 72 48 0 % Sat, Nov. 24 71 44 0 % Sun, Nov. 25 65 48 0 % Mon, Nov. 26 69 50 0 % Tues, Nov. 27 71 53 0 % Wed, Nov. 28 71 52 20 % 21 We 759am 1.8 916pm 2.1 213am 1.1 215pm 0.8 22 Th 1005am 1.6 945pm 2.2 328am 0.8 308pm 1.1 23 Fr 1159am 1.8 1012pm 2.2 429am 0.3 358pm 1.3 24 Sa 119pm 1.9 1040pm 2.4 520am 0.0 445pm 1.6 25 Su 217pm 1.9 1108pm 2.4 606am -0.2 529pm 1.6 26 Mo 303pm 2.1 1138pm 2.4 647am -0.3 609pm 1.8 27 Tu 341pm 2.1 725am -0.5 645pm 1.8 28 We 1211am 2.4 414pm 2.1 800am -0.5 720pm 1.8 29 Th 1246am 2.4 444pm 2.1 831am -0.5 754pm 1.8 30 Fr 125am 2.4 513pm 2.1 900am -0.5 831pm 1.8 FreeTideTables.com For comparison only Times are local Tides in feet from MLLW Date Day High Tide High Tide Low Tide Low Tide 1 Th 250am 2.7 622pm 2.4 1010am 0.0 939pm 2.1 2 Fr 325am 2.7 703pm 2.4 1042am 0.0 1018pm 2.1 3 Sa 405am 2.7 747pm 2.4 1117am 0.2 1108pm 1.9 4 Su 350am 2.6 732pm 2.4 1059am 0.2 1112pm 1.9 5 Mo 21 We 924am 1.1 1041pm 1.3 426am 0.7 428pm 0.5 22 Th 1130am 1.0 1110pm 1.4 541am 0.5 521pm 0.7 23 Fr 124pm 1.1 1137pm 1.4 642am 0.2 611pm 0.8 24 Sa 244pm 1.2 733am 0.0 658pm 1.0 25 Su 1205am 1.5 342pm 1.2 819am -0.1 742pm 1.0 26 Mo 1233am 1.5 428pm 1.3 900am -0.2 822pm 1.1 27 Tu 103am 1.5 506pm 1.3 938am -0.3 858pm 1.1 28 We 136am 1.5 539pm 1.3 1013am -0.3 933pm 1.1 29 Th 211am 1.5 609pm 1.3 1044am -0.3 1007pm 1.1 30 Fr 250am 1.5 638pm 1.3 1113am -0.3 1044pm 1.1 FreeTideTables.com For comparison only Times are local Tides in feet from MLLW Thursday, November 22, 2012 Page 10 Beekeepers Field Day to be Dec. 1 There will be a Beekeepers Field Day and Trade Show on Dec. 1 at the Washington County Extension Of ce in Chipley. Registration begins at 9 a.m. CT. Class rotations begin at 10 a.m. and continue until noon. There will be a smoker lighting contest, lunch and judging before a general session at 1:15 p.m. on Pollen and Nectar Producing Plants, presented by Laurence Cutts and Elmore Herman. Topics in the rotations include hive assembly by Doug Corbin and Herman; open hive demonstration by Jeff Pippin, Jamie Ellis and David Westervelt; and winter hive management by Cutts. Beekeeper advanced training classes will be offered by interactive videoconference to selected counties Feb. 18 and 25, and March 4 and 11. More details to follow. Cost of the Field Day and Trade Show is $15 per person, $10 for additional family members. For more information, call the Gulf County Extension Of ce at 6393200 or the Franklin County Extension Of ce at 653-9337. I got this picture of a jumping spider, or Salticid, feeding on a dragon y on the fence surrounding the airport. Even if you dont like spiders, you have to admire the hunting skill of this amazing animal. Have you ever tried to catch a dragon y? I have, and it isnt easy. This little guy probably nabbed this dragon y that looks to be about twice his size while it was perched on the fence. The jumping spiders are the largest spider family with more than 5,000 species. The chief identifying characteristic of jumping spiders is a single pair of eyes that are greatly enlarged and face straight ahead. This pair of eyes gives them excellent vision that they use to track prey. In fact, they are believed to have the best vision of any spider and possibly of any arthropod. Jumping spiders have color vision and are capable of learning, recognizing and remembering colors, and of adapting their hunting behavior based on what they have learned. Jumping spiders hunt during the day. They have a hydraulic system that allows them to jump great distances by altering the internal pressure of their body uid. Most jumping spiders can jump several times the length of their body. When a jumping spider is moving from place to place, and especially just before it jumps, it tethers a lament of silk, or dragline, to whatever it is standing on in order to break the fall if its jump should fail. Like many other spiders that leave a practically continuous silk trail, jumping spiders impregnate the silk line with pheromones that play a role in reproduction, and possibly in navigation. Jumping spiders use their vision in complex courtship displays. Males are often quite different in appearance from females and might have bushy, colored or iridescent hairs, front leg fringes and other, often bizarre, modi cations. These are displayed with complex sideling or zigzag movements as part of a courtship dance. BUDS N BUGS Lois Swoboda Residents make St. George Island more beautiful St. George Island workers pose in front of their newly painted and landscaped sign. Kneeling, from left, are Ann Giknis, Rita Culbertson and Pat OConnell. Standing from left are Candy Howington, Cindy Tyminski, Barb Paget, Fred Stanley, Glynda Ratliff, Tom Slocum, Tom Siculiano, Chris Jensen, Bill Rogers, Ed Barnell and Dany and Marty Ray. Not pictured are Newt Colston, Fran Giknis, Jane Nipps, Susan Kearney, Pinki Jackel, Terry Kemp, Dave and Sharon Hutchinson and Jim Troyan. SPECIAL TO THE TIMES Outdoors BRIEF Jumping spiders also excellent hunters LOIS SWOBODA | The Times UF: Controlling lion sh best done in targeted areas Email outdoors news to timesoutdoors @star .com O UTDOORS www.apalachtimes.com Section Section A SPONSORED BY Freshwater Inshore Trout fishing continues to be hit-or-miss in St. Joe bay and around the Forgotten Coast. Weather and wind are the main factors in poor fishing conditions lately. Red fish arestill being caught on most area beaches and on the piers and docks in and around St. Joe Bay. Good action can be found on cut bait such as mullet or big shrimp. A few pompano and whiting are showing up, but not in string numbers yet. Crapppie are starting to show up in deeper creeks and in the main rivers and soem area lakes. Live crappie minnows work the best, however, small grubs may find the fish faster. Lake Wimico has reported on a few bass and bream catches this week, but nothing to bragg about.

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CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA SP O RTS www.apalachtimes.com A Section Gulfside IGA PL A YER OF THE WEEK S P ON S OR Player of the Week Seahawk senior Zach Howze chosen by his soccer teammates to be captain this year, scored two goals against Rocky Bayou. He is taking his role very seriously and we are proud of his eorts and the leadership he is providing to his peers, said Coach Ramon Valenzuela. Congratulations, Zach! Hometown Proud (850)653-9695 By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com It was a good start for the Franklin County High School soccer teams last week, as both the girls and boys squads picked up their rst season wins in their matchups against district foe Rocky Bayou in Niceville. The girls squad, under the direction of coach Kelli Wright, notched a 2-1 triumph, while the boys squad, under coach Luis Ramon Valenzuela, tallied a 5-2 victory. In the girls opener, the Lady Knights struck rst with a goal with 10 minutes left in the rst half to establish a 1-0 lead that carried through the end of the rst half. But strong second-half offensive play and counterattacks by the Lady Seahawks led to two exciting goals and many other scoring opportunities. Five minutes into the second half, junior Jessica Shields served up one of her two great direct kicks into the box that resulted in a score. The rst kick bounced to eighth grader Ali Zingarelli, who then assisted junior Gracyn Kirvin for the rst Lady Seahawk goal of the match. Roughly ve minutes before the rst water break, Shields served up her second free kick in the penalty box which Kirvin found a way to put it in the net for the second goal of the match. Kirvin totaled ve shots on goal. That would be all the Lady Seahawks needed to secure their rst district win. Sophomore Macey Hunt played another excellent game at goalkeeper with 12 saves, said Wright. She just keeps making great saves to keep our team in the game. The coach said sophomore Katie Segers goal line to goal line play kept the Lady Seahawks in the game. She also produced three shots on goal. I knew when she came off the eld she was exhausted by the way she went to the ground to try to recover her energy, said Wright. Overall we are still developing our defensive backs and will get better each game. Both teams included a handful of young players. Zingarelli got her foot on a lot of balls in the middle of the eld, and eighth grader Ali Kirvin contributed at forward to team success. The win evened the Lady Seahawks record at 1-1, after the Franklin County varsity girls dropped a 4-1 match at John Paul II on Nov. 8. In that match, in which John Paul senior Beatrice Menjor nailed a trio of goals, the Lady Seahawks trailed 1-0 at the half before John Paul exploded in the second half with three goals. Franklin County managed its lone goal when Gracyn Kirvin sent it through the net on an assist from Shields. Junior Adrianna Reeder and Seger each managed two shots on goal. The Lady Seahawks next match will be another district road test against rival Port St. Joe on Tuesday, Nov. 27 at 6 p.m. Page 11 Thursday, November 22, 2012 Soccer teams sweep against Rocky Bayou The Seahawks rst district game was an exciting one, as they established they would be a force to be reckoned with this season. We went into the game with Rocky Bayou not knowing what to expect from their team, said Valenzuela. Obviously, we decided to play hard and smart and I could not be more pleased with the way our boys played. They demonstrated great ball control, ongoing communication, and performed equally as well both defensively and offensively. The squad amassed ve goals, two from Graham Kirvin, two from Zack Howze and one from Josh Reeder. Two of the goals were from two penalty kicks against Rocky Bayou. Franklin County produced eight shots on goal and a save and 19 shots from Casey Sapp Stacy Kirvin and I told the boys if they won, we would cook pasta for them. We are pleased to do this for the team they de nitely gave it their all on the eld, said Valenzuela. Each one of them played the way we wanted them to play, intensely and using the skills they learned at practice. The boys are noticeably becoming stronger players and they needed to win their rst district game to build their con dence in their skills. The boys square off against archrival Port St. Joe in an away game Tuesday, Nov. 27 at 8 p.m. We would like to invite our community to support both our boys and girls teams, said Valenzuela. This is going to be our second district game and the boys are excited to get out there and attempt a win again. Boys earn pasta meal with win SOCCER SCHEDULE TUESDAY, NOV. 27 @ Port St. Joe 6 p.m./ 8 p.m. THURSDAY, NOV. 29 @ West Gadsden 5 p.m./7 p.m. FRIDAY, NOV. 30 vs. Baker 5 p.m./7 p.m. SATURDAY, DEC. 1 @ Freeport Noon/2 p.m. TUESDAY, DEC. 4 vs. John Paul II 5 p.m. (Girls only) FRIDAY, DEC. 7 vs. Rocky Bayou 4 p.m./6 p.m. TUESDAY, DEC. 11 vs. Port St. Joe 6 p.m./ 8 p.m. THURSDAY, DEC. 13 @ Rutherford 7 p.m. (Girls only) FRIDAY, DEC. 14 vs. Freeport 5 p.m./7 p.m. MONDAY, DEC. 17 @ Baker 5 p.m./7 p.m. WEDNESDAY, JAN. 9 vs. Rutherford 7 p.m. (Girls only) THURSDAY, JAN. 10 vs. West Gadsden 5 p.m./7 p.m. JAN. 15-18 GIRLS DISTRICT @ Port St. Joe JAN. 22-25 BOYS DISTRICT @ Freeport TUESDAY, NOV. 27 @ Hosford 6 p.m. THURSDAY, NOV. 29 Blountstown 5 p.m. TUESDAY, DEC. 4 @ Wewa 6 p.m. FRIDAY, DEC. 7 @ Riversprings 5 p.m. TUESDAY, NOV. 27 @ John Paul II 6/7:30 p.m. THURSDAY, NOV. 29 @ Wewahitchka 5:30/7 p.m. SATURDAY, DEC. 1 @ West Gadsden* 6/7:30 p.m. FRIDAY, DEC. 7 @ Bozeman* 6:30/8 p.m. SATURDAY, DEC. 8 vs. West Gadsden* 6/7:30 p.m. MONDAY, DEC. 10 vs. Tallavana Christian 6/7:30 p.m. THURSDAY, DEC. 13 vs. Liberty County* 5:30/7 p.m. FRIDAY, DEC. 14 @ South Walton* 6:30/8 p.m. MONDAY, DEC. 17 @ Tallavana Christian 6/7:30 p.m. TUESDAY, DEC. 18 @ Blountstown* 5:30/7 p.m. FRIDAY, DEC. 21 vs. Port St. Joe* 6/7:30 p.m. DEC. 27-29 Franklin County Hoops Battle on the Gulf FRIDAY, JAN. 4 @ Wakulla 2 p.m. (Girls only) TUESDAY, JAN. 8 @ Liberty County* 6/7:30 p.m. THURSDAY, JAN. 10 vs. South Walton* 5:30/7 p.m. FRIDAY, JAN. 11 vs. John Paul II 6 p.m. (Girls only) TUESDAY, JAN. 15 vs. Blountstown* 5:30/7 p.m. FRIDAY, JAN. 18 vs. Bozeman* 6:30/8 p.m. SATURDAY, JAN. 19 @ Port St. Joe* 6/7:30 p.m. TUESDAY, JAN. 22 @ Aucilla Christian 5:30/7 p.m. WEDNESDAY, JAN. 23 vs. Wakulla 6:30 p.m. (Girls only) THURSDAY, JAN. 24 vs. Wewahitchka 5:30 p.m. (Girls only) FRIDAY, JAN. 25 vs. Wewahitchka 12:30 pm (Boys only) JAN. 29 FEB. 2 Girls District Tourney @ South Walton THURSDAY, JAN. 31 vs. John Paul II (Senior Night) 7 p.m. (Boys Only) FEB. 5 9 Boys District Tourney @ South Walton District games All times are Eastern Standard Time 2012-13 FCHS Varsity 2012 Youth Basketball BASKETBALL SCHEDULES

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Local A12 | The Times Thursday, November 22, 2012 THE PANAMA CITY PICTORIAL BOOK IS HERE! $ 39 .95 + TAX BUY NOW! THE NEWS HERALD M AKES THE PER F ECT G I F T F OR F AMILY AN D F RIEN D S ______Copies at $39.95 plus $3.00 tax per book and pick up my order at The News Herald oce. Name ___________________________________________________________________________________________ Address __________________________________________________________________________________________ City ______________________________________________________ State _______________ Zip ________________ Phone (_____) ______________________ E-mail _________________________________________________________ Signature ________________________________________________________________________________ Charge Card Number_____________________________________ Security Code______________Exp. Date_____________________ Payable to: The News Herald VISA THE NEWS HERALD THE NEWS HERALD GET YOUR COPY TODAY $ 39 .95 AKES THE PER F ECT $ .95 JUST IN TIME FOR THE HOLIDAYS! PANAMACITY.PICTORIALBOOK.COM MAIL IN FORM OR ORDER ONLINE AT: I wish to order: ____ Copies at $39.95 plus $2.60 tax per book and pick up my order ( mail in form only ) at The News Herald oce. Total $42.55/book ____ Copies at $39.95 plus $5.95 shipping and handling and $2.60 tax per book and have my order shipped to the address below. Total $48.50/book TOTAL AMOUNT ENCLOSED:__________ Name ________________________________________________ Address _______________________________________________ City _________________________ State ______ ZIP ____________ Phone ( )_____________ E-mail __________________________ ____________________________________________________ Signature ____________________________________________________ Charge Card Number Security Code Exp. Date PAYM E NT M E T H O D C HE CK / MON E YOR DE R Payable to: The News Herald V I S A AM EX MA S T E RCAR D D I S CO VE R NOTICE OF INTENT IS GIVEN THAT FRANKLIN COUNTY WILL HOLD A PUBLIC HEARING TO CONSIDER ADOPTING AN ORDINANCE REGULATING THE EASTPOINT PAVILION BY PROHIBITING THE CONSUMPTION OF ALCOHOL, LOITERING AND PUBLIC NUISANCES. Notice is hereby given that on December 4, 2012 at 10:00 a.m. (ET) at 34 Forbes Street, Apalachicola, Florida at the Courthouse Annex, the Franklin County Board of County Commissioners will hold a public hearing to consider adopting an ordinance captioned as follows: AN ORDINANCE PROVIDING THAT ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES SHALL NOT BE CONSUMED AT THE EASTPOINT PAVILION, FORBIDDING LOITERING; FORBIDDING PUBLIC NUISANCES; PROVIDING FOR PENALTIES; PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY AND AN EFFECTIVE DATE. Street, Apala chicola, Florida and may be viewed there. Interested Persons may appear at the meeting and be heard with respect to the proposed ordinance. Any party who may wish to appeal the decision made at this public hear ing is responsible for making a verbatim transcript of the hearing. Those persons requiring assistance to attend the meeting must call depu ty at 850-653-8861 x100 at least three business days before the meeting to make arrangements. and used the right vehicles in promoting that right. Its a positive message and one that seems to be working. Blair said though the overall numbers are strong, the fact that August was so strong after two consecutive months of declines was less signi cant as an indicator of speci c programming success. The only thing we can interpret from it is the collectors of the tax have different schedules, he said. August is a not a big month normally compared to June and July. The different reporting periods throw it off. If its low one month, it tends to get picked up the next. We were concerned we would see a drop in the summer, Blair said. This tells us our tourism community has some staying power. It remains to be seen what happens when the effect of the BP money begins wearing off. As good as the August numbers were, the TDC received disappointing news earlier this month, when the county was not among more than 100 nonpro t groups and government entities, including several in the Florida Panhandle, picked to get shares of $43.7 million in BP funds to promote the Gulf Coasts tourism and seafood industries after the companys 2010 oil spill. The rst round of grants announced Nov. 7 by court-supervised claims administrator Patrick Juneau is part of a proposed class-action settlement between BP and a team of private plaintiffs attorneys. The deal calls for BP to fund a total of $57 million in tourism and seafood promotion grants. The 110 grant recipients were picked from a pool of more than 350 applicants. In Florida, 33 organizations will receive $13.4 million, while in Alabama, 21 groups will get $8.3 million. In Mississippi, 13 organizations will share $6 million, and in Louisiana, 43 recipients will get $15.9 million. The amount each organization received has not yet been announced. The grants should go a long way toward bolstering the Gulfs tourism and seafood industries and help revitalize the regions economy, lead plaintiffs attorneys Steve Herman and Jim Roy said in a statement. Blair said Franklin County applied for a grant to cover the cost of a moveable kiosk and informational campaign. The whole emphasis was seafood and promotions, so we combined some of the stuff from the original grant and expanded on it, he said. This is money that came out of a class action lawsuit and portions set aside to four states to do something they envision for seafood and marketing. That was about all they told us, to put together your own proposal, no guidelines on it, Blair said. We dont really know what they used for criteria. About $15 million was not funded, and I dont know whether theyre planning another round or what. They havent responded to anybody; its a little like shooting in the dark. Blair said the TDC has been pleased to learn that, after completing a screening process, it has been approved by the Florida Humanities Council to be eligible to submit grants and is putting an application together for these humanities funds. GRANT RECIPIENTS IN FLORIDA Perdido Key Chamber of Commerce Ding Darling National Wildlife Refuge Collier County Department of Natural Resources Naval Aviation Museum Foundation Pensacola Beach Chamber of Commerce PASCO Of ce of Tourism Development City of Naples City of Marco Island Pensacola Math, Engineering, Science & Stuff Pensacola State College Sacred Heart Health System Mexico Beach Lee County Visitors & Convention Bureau Pensacola Veterans Memorial Park Port St. Joe Redevelopment Agency Santa Rosa Island Authority St. Johns Cemetery National Flight Academy West Florida Preservation Inc. Latino Media Gulf Coast Baytowne Wharf Neighborhood Association Horizons of Okaloosa County City and Port of St. Joe Visit Pensacola Okaloosa County Board of Commissioners Gulf Coast Marine Life Center Santa Rosa County Tourism Development Council Visit St. Petersburg/Clearwater Basilica of St. Michael the Archangel Panama City Beach Chamber of Commerce Wakulla County Tourist Development Council Navarre Beach Chamber of Commerce Downtown Improvement BoardPanama City Source: AP TDC from page A1 But questions were raised as to whether the academy had a separate nancial identity, and the discussion continued regarding the special exception. At the heart of the issue were traf c and parking issues raised by several neighbors, including Gene Smith and Will and Jodi Rosenbaum. They said problems had been exacerbated by the new academy, as well as other church activities such as 12-Step meetings it sponsors. In addition, questions were raised about whether the alley behind the church is being used appropriately. P&Z member Lynn Wilson raised parking issues on behalf of her business, the Coombs House Inn, which is across from the church. She stressed that though she supports the work of the many churches in the area, she felt obliged to speak out whenever hers or neighboring businesses are affected. After P&Z member Geoffrey Hewell moved to grant the academy a special exception, Wilson cast one of the four nay votes. Only Hewell, Bachrach and new member Robin Vroegop voted to grant the special exception outright, with P&Z Chairman Tom Daly, Sally Williamson, newly appointed member Atul Patel and Wilson voting no. Daly and Williamson stressed they supported the academy but wanted to see a 30-day extension to give all parties a chance to work out dif culties with parking and traf c that persist in the area at various times in the week. Patriotis said he had been working out details of the issue with the neighbors, including placement of a clearly marked stopping, but not parking, area in front of the church. He said he had con dence matters could be worked out to satisfy the concerns of the neighbors and the needs of the church. The church issue was not the only matter to stir heated discussion at the meeting. P&Z members reviewed plans for a new Family Dollar store to be placed at the corner of U.S. 98 and Clairmont Avenue, in the wooded lot adjacent to the Best Western. In April, the board had moved unanimously to con rm that the new store, slightly larger than the existing facility adjacent to the Gulfside IGA, was consistent with the C-3 zoning district. But after lengthy discussion at this months meeting, developer Brett Woodward was told the store would require a special exception, which will require a public hearing. In addition, Hewell told the developers there still needed to be a review of both signage and tree removal proposed for the site. TRAFFIC from page A1 ... Its indicative of the success of the BP Were Salty campaign. ... Were encouraged we used the right methods and used the right vehicles in promoting that right. Its a positive message and one that seems to be working. Curt Blair, TDC administrator DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times Lynn Wilson, left, and Atul Patel review plans for the new Family Dollar proposed for Apalachicola.

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Local The Times | A13 Thursday, November 22, 2012 dance, the young folk often bunked down on the oor and slept before departing by the light of day. A memorable local band was the Paradise Pals, headed by Carol McLeod, who frequently played dances at the Coombs Armory and private homes in Apalachicola in the late 1940s and early 1950s. During the late 1920s, as traf c through the area increased and automobiles became more common, public venues with dance oors began to appear. In 1928, the dances in Carrabelle were so popular that Wings Ferry added a 2 a.m. crossing on Saturday nights to transport revelers returning home to Apalachicola. When Camp Gordon Johnston was home to 10,000 servicemen and women, Carrabelle boasted two dance halls. There was a large building near Carrabelle Beach some people refer to as the skating rink. It occupied what is now a vacant lot across Gulf Beach Road from 2 Als at the Beach Caf. Westberg said she does not remember it being called or being used as a skating rink. She said she referred to it as the Pavilion. Both she and Delores Roux of Apalachicola agree it had a beautiful dance oor and was the scene of weekly parties and dances with live music. In Eastpoint, the Gorrie Service Station was the site of much revelry. This was a large wooden building covered with green shingles near the Eastpoint end of the Gorrie Bridge on the north side of the highway. The compound originally boasted gas pumps, but these later were removed. The main building housed a restaurant, bar and excellent dance oor. It was surrounded by several small cabins for travelers. Roux said Altha and Art Parvis ran the roadhouse that frequently presented live bands. There was also a juke box. There was another juke in Eastpoint. Elmer Smith ran a bar in a big old house at the end of Old Ferrydock Road by the ferry landing. When interviewed on the occasion of his 100th birthday, Spiro Buzier of Apalachicola remembered dancing and brawling in Smiths bar before the bridge was built. Westberg remembers touring bands, including famous artists like Ernest Tubb, the Texas Troubadour, whose compositions included Blue Christmas and Walking the Floor. Tubb toured widely in the South and made numerous recordings including duets with Loretta Lynn. Bands like the Troubadours, traveling by private bus, would stop in the small towns along the coast and play wherever there was a stage. In Carrabelle, they performed in the school auditorium. Westberg said she believes they gave a portion of their earnings to the school for use of the room. Such concerts cost a dollar or less. Sue Chronkite of Apalachicola said Hank Williams was a frequent visitor to the Panhandle and played all around the area. We used to go see him wherever he played, she said. His music had a really good beat to dance or jitterbug to. Gulf Coast Opryland During the 1940s and 50s, the county had some distinguished visitors who used the undeveloped coast as their private playground. A few folks still remember members of the Grand Ole Opry making regular trips here. Most frequently mentioned among these is Sarah Ophelia Colley Cannon, also known as Cousin Minnie Pearl. Other Opry stars known to have visited include comic musicians String Bean Akeman and Little Jimmy Dickens. Westburg said Cannons husband, Henry, a pilot, often brought performers down by private plane and landed at Carrabelles Thompson Field. Cannon became the Oprys personal charter service after he married his famous wife. Curley Messer, a police of cer at the time, said on other occasions, Opry stars and their friends ew into Tallahassee and he fetched them back to town in his squad car. Westberg said a group from the Opry came at least once a year for many years. They stayed at the Grice Hotel next to the current Chamber of Commerce of ce and went shing during the day on commercial shing boats belonging to the Jackson brothers, Earl, Seburn and Cat sh. Messer said he believes these pleasure trips kicked off the popularity of the snapper boats that took parties offshore in the 1950s and 60s. Everything they got was free, Westberg said. The hotel was free, and the boat was free. I think the restaurants probably fed them for free, too. In the evenings, in a bandstand at the corner of U.S. 98 and Tallahassee Street, the visitors repaid their hosts by performing. Carrabelle residents and an occasional tourist would gather round and enjoy the show. In the days before television, it was a remarkable opportunity. Westberg said Cannon was good to Carrabelle, too, frequently taking residents for airplane rides when he was in town. Lillian Smith said like the touring bands, the Opry stars played in the old school. She remembers that Minnie Pearl wore her trademark hat with the dangling label. She said restaurateur Greek Mike Thermos, owner of Mikes Greasy Spoon, and his wife, Emmy Lou, were close friends with all of the musicians, and she believes this friendship was the reason the performers rst visited Carrabelle. Messer said the show folk loved to party and drink. Grandpa Jones was my buddy, he said. And Minnie Pearl was crazy. Grandpa was yodeler, banjo player and comedian Louis Marshall Jones, a proli c recording artist and charter member of the cast of Hee Haw. Perhaps his best remembered hits are Mountain Dew and Night Train to Memphis. Another frequent visitor to Carrabelle was American Hall of Fame pianist Floyd Cramer, at the time one of the most soughtafter studio musicians in the U.S. Cramer was the pianist on Elvis Presleys recording of Heartbreak Hotel and recorded with artists as famed as Brenda Lee, Patsy Cline, Jim Reeves, Eddy Arnold, Roy Orbison and the Everly Brothers. Messer said one night, the piano from the Baptist church was loaded into the bed of a pickup truck along with Cramer. A group of merrymakers, perhaps under the in uence, carried the musician and his instrument to Pine Log in Tates Hell, where he played all night long. On another occasion, Messer said a group of Nashville visitors came down to go duck hunting. A hunting party including him and Greek Mike went to Cash Creek and launched in duck boats. The hunters were already a little the worse for wear. Greek Mike, reportedly a large man, rolled overboard. We thought wed need a crane to lift him. He must have weighed 500 pounds, Messer said. Eventually, he was rescued with the help of some ropes supplied by Herbert Mock. It was freezing cold, and I thought hed be mad, Messer said. But when we got him out, he laughed till he cried. Minnie Pearl and some of her friends spent time on St. George Island, too. Joe Barber said long before there was a ferry and when there were very few structures, she and some other Opry performers would visit the island during the summer. Walter Yearty, a big stout old fellow lived in a little cottage called Blisss and looked after cattle for the Kirvin brothers. Minnie Pearl and her entourage would hire a boat and go to stay with Yearty in his tiny home. They swam and fished and he netted mullet and cooked for them. They continued to come for quite a while, Barber said. I dont know how they met up with him. I think they liked the idea of having the island all to themselves. There was nothing out there then. They could enjoy the beach, and there was nobody to bother them. is proud to announce the is now underway. Help those in need! Its time to go through your closets for those unwanted pairs of shoes, in reasonable condition. Bring the shoes to Coastal Foot and Ankle Clinic located at 221 HWY 98, Apalachicola, FL 32320. Donations will go to Franklins Promise and will be distributed at The community service center (old Apalachicola high school) at 192 14th street in Apalachicola. Distribution will be November 27, December 4th and 18th from 9:30-12:00. NO HIDDEN CHARGES: It is our policy that the patient and any other person responsible for payments has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed by payment or any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment. www.mulliseye.com "WE WELCOME NE W PATIE N TS, C ALL T ODAY FOR YOUR P RIORITY APP OI N TME N T" FOR NEW PATIENTS 59 AND OLDER This certificate is good for a complete Medical Eye Exam with Todd Robinson, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Surgeon. The exam includes a prescription for eye glasses and tests for Glaucoma, Cataracts and other eye diseases FOR YOUR APPOINTMENT CALL: 850-763-6666 ELIGIBILITY: U.S. Citizens living in the Florida Panhandle, 59 years and older, not presently under our care. Coupon Expires: 11-30-12 FREE EYE EXAM CODE: AP00 Darren Payne, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon Lee Mullis, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon Todd Robinson, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon "Freedom from Eye Glasses, Now a reality for many." Smart Lenses SM WEEMS MEDICAL CENTER EAST 110 NE 5 TH STREET, CARRABELLE Urgent Care and Family Care Services Monday through Friday 8AM 6PM Saturday 8AM 4 PM Appointments Available Walk-Ins Welcome Most Insurances Accepted FInancial Assistance Available 850-697-2345 COMING SOON WEEMS MEDICAL WEST IN APALACHICOLA! MOONLIT from page A1

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Local A14 | The Times Thursday, November 22, 2012 CALL TOD A Y! 653-8868 GE T YOUR A D IN Trades & Services Laban Bontrager, DMD Monica Bontrager, DMD 12761 Pea Ridge Road Bristol, Florida 32321 TELEPHONE (850) 643-5417 Bristol Dental Clinic DENTURE LAB ON PREMISES Same Day Service on Repairs and Relines Don Lively General Contractors L ICENSED AND I NSURED 20 Y EARS E XPERIENCE P .O. Box 439 C arrabelle, FL 32322 697-2783 or Mobile 566-2603 RC 0066499 R G0065255 Carrabelle Visa, Discover, and American Express Honored at Participating Ace Stores JACKSONS Building Supplies Building Supplies & Auto Repair Carrabelle 697-3333 We Deliver Anywhere Hardware and Paint Center J.J.s Tree Service, LLC Stump Grinder Licensed & Insured Call John : (850) 899-8432 ROBERTS APPLIANCE REPAIR ALL MAJOR BRANDS 18 Shadow Lane Apalachicola, FL 32320 Phone: (850) 653-8122 Cell: (850) 653-7654 JOES LAWN CARE IF I TS I N YOUR YARD LET JOE TAKE CARE OF I T FULL L AWN SERVICE S TREE TRIMMING AND REMOVAL AL S O CLEAN GUTTER S AND IRRIGATION IN S TILLATION, PLANTING AND BEDDING AVAILABLE CALL JOE@ 850-323-0741 OR EMAIL J OE S_ LA WN @Y A H OO COM Animal Hospital of Port St. Joe 24-Emergency Service For Our Current Clients Quality Internal Medicine Soft Tissue/Orthopedic Surgery Dentistry Clean and Spacious Facility Mon, Tues, Thurs & Fri 8:00 AM 5:30 PM 300 Long Ave PSJ, FL 32456 850-229-6009 Robert C. Bruner Attorney Personal & Business Bankruptcy Over 30 Years Legal Experience 850-670-3030 bankruptcy relief under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon advertisements. Before you decide, ask us to send you free written information COLLINS CONSTRU C TION OF ST. GEOR G E I S LAND, INC & S EWA G E TREATMENT S ERV I CE S O VER 30 YEARS EXPERIEN C E OUR S ERV I CE S I NCLUDE: AFTER HOURS & EMERGEN C Y SERVI C E PROVIDED 850.670.5790 MA I NTENANCE@JCOLL I N S CON S TRUCT I ON.COM battery charge pending involving a girl who was 13 at the time. The case for which he was sentenced Friday stems from a Sept. 22, 2010 arrest and involved acts committed sometime in 1991 against a victim who is now 27 and married. Assistant State Attorney Robin Myers said his of ce is discussing a possible resolution to the second case, which has not yet gone to trial. But details surfaced in last weeks trial after the victim was allowed to testify. Florida law makes allowances for testimony from victims of crimes that have not gone to trial when it is successfully argued that it shows a pattern of misconduct by the defendant. Grant rst was tried for the crimes against the rst victim on Sept. 12, but that trial ended in a mistrial. Myers said he was in the process of arguing before Dempsey, outside the presence of the jury, that the second girls testimony should be allowed, when the girl broke down in tears. A juror who was seated with the others, in a separate room adjacent to the courtroom, heard the commotion and opened the door. Defense attorney Gregory Cummings moved for, and was granted, a mistrial. The focus of this retrial was on whether Grant, on three separate occasions in 1991, inappropriately touched the victim. The victim testi ed in a closed courtroom before the jury. With children so young, it is impossible to remember the exact dates, Myers said. Its based on what grade they were in. Myers said evidence showed the girl had told her mother of the incidents in 1997, when she was 12. He said the mother decided at that time not to put her daughter through the pain of a public trial, and the matter was not disclosed to law enforcement of cials. The issue of what had happened in 1991 resurfaced in July 2010, after the second victim came forward to say Grant had tried to have sex with her. The girl was examined with a sexual assault kit at Weems Memorial Hospital, and testimony was provided by health of cials, including Dr. Joda Lynn, that revealed a presumptive positive to the presence of blood, Myers said. It was after this incident allegedly occurred to the second girl that the rst girl came forward to tell law enforcement of cials what she said happened to her 19 years earlier. Also guring into the trial was the testimony of Grants mother, who appeared on behalf of both the prosecution and defense. She said that she had become aware of a problem with one of the victims at the time, but took her at her word that the commotion had been because of a nightmare. The defense made an attempt to punch holes in Grants mothers recollections, and challenged the credibility of both of the female victims. Myers said the trial had been a dif cult one, and noted that that there is no statute of limitations in capital cases such as this. It was a hard case for everybody, for the victims, for the family, for the jury, he said. Were not here to determine the content of somebodys character. Were here to determine whether the actions constitute a crime. Cummings has 30 days to decide whether to appeal the verdict. BATTERY from page A1 Full Moon Climb at island lighthouse The November Full Moon Climb at the Cape St. George Lighthouse on St. George Island will be held on Wednesday, Nov. 28. The Sunset/Full Moon Climb will take place from 5 to 6:30 p.m. and will include light hors doeuvres and a sparkling cider toast to the full moon. Cost is $15 for the general public and $10 for members of the St. George Lighthouse Association (SGLA). The sun will set at 5:40 p.m. and the moon will rise at 5:55 p.m. After sunset, people are invited to climb to the top of the lighthouse for a breathtaking view of the full moon, as space and time permit. Cost is $10 for the general public and $5 for SGLA members. The Cape St. George Light is located in St. George Lighthouse Park at the center of St. George Island, where Island Drive ends at Gulf Beach Drive. Parking is available in lots at either side of the park. Because space is limited, reservations are recommended. For reservations or more information, please contact the Lighthouse Gift Shop at 927-7745. Homebuyers seminar at TIGERS site The Juvenile Justice Executive Council will meet Thursday, Nov. 29 at the TIGERS site in Apalachicola, from 10 until 11:15 a.m. The Home is where the Heart is seminar for rst time homeowners will be at the site from 3 until 5 p.m. This seminar is free and open to the public. All are welcome. For further information please call Carol Bar eld at 653-2784 Tobacco-free Partnership to meet There will be a Tobacco-Free Franklin Partnership Coalition Meeting on Wednesday, Dec. 5 at the Franklin County Health Department, 139 12th Street, from 5:30 until 6:30 p.m. in the second oor conference room. Community EVENTS Special to the Times Nationally recognized writer and photographer John Spohrer has donated the framed original of a photograph of a beautiful cat photographed at St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge. The photo is on display at the Apalachicola Area Chamber of Commerce where raf e tickets can be purchased for $3 or two for $5. Monies raised go to support the Franklin County Humane Society. Only 500 tickets will be sold so dont procrastinate. The more tickets you buy the better your chances of winning. For information call 653-9419. The FCHS is a 501c3 non pro t organization. County funding was cut 10 percent this year and contributions are down by 30 percent. The FCHS is in desperate need of donations from animal lovers who want to make a difference in the lives of the homeless companion animals at our facility. Donations are tax deductible and all donations will bene t the animals we are housing. Send donations to FCHS, P.O. Box 417, Eastpoint, FL. 32328 The shelter always needs dog treats, collars, leashes, hard rubber chew toys, tennis balls, braided chew rope, cat litter, bleach, hand soap, laundry detergent, utility water and food bowls (all sizes), kitchen trash bags and 39-gallon yard bags. Bring donations to the shelter or to the Apalachicola Times, at 129 Commerce Street, Apalachicola. The shelter frequently has special needs pets that require more than routine medical care. You can make a difference by sponsoring an animal with medical problems. To learn about these special need animals or make a donation, visit www.forgottenpets.org The shelter is also in constant need of volunteers to socialize animals in their care. For information call 670-8417. Raf e to bene t humane society

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, November 22, 2012 The Times | A15 RENTALS3 BEDROOM, 2 BATH FURNISHED APT W/D, CARPORT, ST PARKING .............................$600 3 BEDROOM, 3 BATH CONDO FURNISHED, POOL .............................................$850 3 BEDROOM, 1 BATH UNFURNISHED DUPLEX .................................................................$600 1 BEDROOM, 1 BATH UNFURNISHED APT LANARK, REMODELED, INC WATER .................$425 2 BEDROOM 1 BATH UNFURNISHED APT W/D HOOKUP, SMALL PORCH ..........................$375 2 BEDROOM 1-1/2 BATH UNFURNISHED, FL ROOM, GARAGE, FENCED YARD, W/D .......$800 2 OFFICE SPACES US 98 CARRABELLE ...............................................$300 BOTH 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322850-697-9604 850-323-0444 www.seacrestre.comwww. rst tness.com/carrabellePROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND RENTALS REPRESENTATIVES will be at the PORT ST. JOE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE on Tuesdays & Thursdays from 9 am – 1 pm EST accepting applications for numerous open positions.We offer competitive wages and a comprehensive bene t package including Company paid health, dental, and life insurance, 401(k), attendance & safety bonuses.EOE/Drug Free WorkplaceEASTERN SHIPBUILDING GROUP MORE THAN A JOB… A FUTURE! ToPlace Your Classified ad inCall Our New Numbers Now!Call:850-747-5020 Toll Free:800-345-8688 Fax:850-747-5044 Email:thestar@pcnh.com Email:thetimes@pcnh.com theAPALACHICOLA & CARRABELLETIMES CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you. EmeraldCoast Marketplace 747-5020 Total Down Pmt $5752001 Toyota Camry T ot al Price $4,2000% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! Total Down Pmt $7752002 Chevy Blazer / 4 Door T ot al Price $4,5000% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! Total Down Pmt $8751999 Ford F-150 / X-Cab T ot al Price $5,2000% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! Chrisovich, 38 ft., Charter Boat, Twin Perkns Engines rebuilt, bottom job just completed, been operating as a charter boat for 12 yrs, High traffic slip paid for untill May ‘13, Intrested in Sale/Joint Venture or Sale Operate for you. Part of 3 boat company same location 28 yrs Good River/Gulf/Bay Boat, $18K, Some possible finiancing Call Bobby 850-234-9409 or 877-Fla-Boat or email boatlaydee@yahoo.com St. GeorgeIsland $175/wk, elec, satellite, garbage incl. Pool tbl. 12’ X 65’ deck. Beautiful view! 850-653-5319 Apalachicola Condo. 2 br, 2 bath, with newer paint, tile, carpet $750 per month with 700 + credit score or $800 per month below 700 credit score. *References Checked* Quint 865-693-3232 Carrabelle Condo Riverfront 2 bedroom/ 1 bath, with queen Sofa sleeper long term rental $1,200 monthly. nice 850-545-0784 3 Bedroom Home for RentNice 3/2 home in Apalachicola. Fenced yard, Bonus Room. $850 per month. 1 month security deposit. No Pets. Call Kathy Robinson, Robinson Real Estate Company 850-653-7196 Text FL30282 to 56654 Lanark Village3br 2ba home, near water, lg fence yard, $600 mo. 850-545-8813 Apalachicola: 3 br, 2 Bath. Newly Remodeled Call for details!! 850-653-6103 Text FL32340 to 56654 Carrabelle House with 4bdr/2baths,large family room, LR, dining room /kitchen,/ utility room/ office and/or play room/ screened porch, recent efficient air and metal roof., two storage buildings, fenced yard, on two large lots, extra lot available $139.000 (850-545-0784) Text FL30879 to 56654 Apalachicola: 1 br, 1 ba efficiency Call for information 850-653-6103 Text FL32343 to 56654 Carrabelle Cove ApartmentsTaking Applications Now Available: 1, 2 and 3 br, Handicap Apts. Laundry facilities on site, W/S included in rent, CH&A and window coverings provided. On site management Office. Rental assistance available. Income restrictions apply, reasonable accommodation. Carrabelle Cove Apartments 807 Gray Ave #33 Carrabelle, Fl 32322 850-697-2017 TDD711 This institution is an equal opportunity provider & employerText FL29928 to 56654 89412T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.: 2011-CA000270 WELLS FARGO BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, a national banking institution, as successor by merger to WACHOVIA BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, Plaintiff, vs. DONNA C. SOUTHWICK, et. al., Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE Pursuant to Chapter 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated October 22, 2012, entered in Case No. 2011-CA000270 of the Circuit Court of the 2ND Judicial Circuit, in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein WELLS FARGO BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, a national banking institution, as successor by merger to WACHOVIA BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, is the Plaintiff and DONNA C. SOUTHWICK, et al. are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, in the lobby on the second floor of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida 32320 at 11:00 a.m. EST. on the 4th day of December, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure, to wit: START AT THE INTERSECTION OF SECTIONS 2 AND 3, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, AND SECTIONS 35 AND 36, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, AND TRAVEL EASTERLY ALONG THE SECTION LINE A DISTANCE OF 1086.1 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT ON THE SOUTHERN BOUNDARY LINE OF STATE ROAD NO. 30 (U.S. HIGHWAY #319) RIGHT OF WAY. NOW TURN AND ANGLE OF 146 DEGREES 56 MINUTES TO THE RIGHTAND GO A DISTANCE OF 625 FEET TO A STAKE, THENCE TURN AND ANGLE OF 90 DEGREES TO THE LEFT AND GO A DISTANCE OF 90.7 FEET TO AN IRON STAKE ON THE SOUTHERN BOUNDARY LINE OF ABOVE MENTIONED STATE ROAD RIGHT OF WAY. CALL THIS PLACE OF BEGINNING. NOW TRAVEL IN THE SAME DIRECTION AND GO A DISTANCE OF 119 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE WATER LINE OF ST. GEORGE SOUND. CALL THIS LINE THE EASTERLY BOUNDARY OF HEREIN DESCRIBED PROPERTY, NOW TURN TO THE RIGHT AND TRAVEL WESTERLY ALONG THE WATERS EDGE TO A POINT WHICH IS ON A LINE 75 FEET DISTANCE FROM AND PARALLEL TO THE EASTERLY BOUNDARY LINE, NOW TURN TO THE RIGHT AND TRAVEL NORTHERLY A DISTANCE OF 105 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO AN IRON STAKE ON THE SOUTHERN BOUNDARY LINE OF SAID ROAD RIGHT, THENCE TURN TO THE RIGHT AND TRAVEL ALONG THE BOUNDARY OF SAID ROAD RIGHT OF WAY A DISTANCE OF 75 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE POB. SAID PROPERTY BEING AND LYING IN FRACTIONAL SECTION 2, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY. FLORIDA. SUBJECT PROPERTY MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED BY A RECENT SURVEY FROM EDWIN G. BROWN & ASSOCIATES, INC., DATED JULY 19, 1996, BEARING JOB NO. 96-405 (PSC-13419) AS FOLLOWS, COMMENCE AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 2, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA AND THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 29 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE SECTION LINE 1088.03 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT ON THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 98, THENCE RUN SOUTH 56 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 31 SECONDS WEST 624.45 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 33 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 29 SECONDS EAST 72.08 FEET TO THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF SAID U.S. HIGHWAY 98 FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE SOUTH 33 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 29 SECONDS EAST 171.57 FEET TO THE APPROXIMATE MEAN HIGHWATER LINE OF ST. GEORGE SOUND, THENCE RUN SOUTH 42 DEGREES 47 MINUTES 46 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID MEAN HIGHWATER LINE 78.14 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 33 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 29 SECONDS WEST 169.65 FEET TO THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF SAID U.S.HIGHWAY NO. 98, SAID POINT LYING ON A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE SOUTHEASTERLY, THENCE RUN NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID RIGHTOF-WAY BOUNDARY AND ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 2258.83 FEET THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 01 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 41 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 78.64 FEET THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING NORTH 41 DEGREES 26 MINUTES 10 SECONDS EAST 78.64 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SITUATE, LYING AND BEING IN SECTION 2, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS, MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN SIXTY (60) DAYS AFTER THE SALE. Dated this 23rd day of October, 2012. Marcia M. Johnson CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk November 22, 29, 2012 90831T PUBLIC NOTICE Weems Memorial Hospital in Apalachicola, FL is seeking Request for Proposals (RFP) for the hospital’s Electronic Health Record (EHR) system. The successful EHR company must be familiar with the Meaningful Use Criteria and compliance regulations of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 as well as have the ability to provide licensed software, hardware, and services of an EHR program. RFP applications may be requested through the Weems Memorial Hospital website at www.weems memorial.com. Deadline for submissions is Dec. 2, 2012 and should be mailed to: Weems Memorial Hospital, 135 Avenue G, Apalachicola, FL 32320, Attn: Charles Edwards November 15, 22, 2012 90801T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 12-185-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, a foreign banking corporation, Plaintiff, vs. DEBORA G. COLLINS; et al. Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: WENDELL HARRELSON YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action on a promissory note and to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in Franklin County, Florida: Lot 3, Block K of Lanark Beach, Unit No. 1, according to the plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 2, Page 13 of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. Together with all improvements located thereon and a 1968 Fleetwood Mobile Home, ID# DK71268277. has been filed against you, Debora G. Collins; Larry D. Everett and all unknown parties claiming by, through, under, and against the herein named individual defendants who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said unknown parties may claim an interest as spouses, heirs, grantees or other claimants, and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Rick A. Savage, Esq., of the Savage Law Office, PLLC, plaintiff’s attorney, whose address is Post Office Box 385, Tallahassee, Florida 32302 on or before 30 days from the date of the first publication of this notice and file the original with the clerk of court of this Court either before service on plaintiff’s attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. DATED on November 1, 2012. Marcia Johnson Clerk of Court By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk November 15, 22, 2012 91009T PUBLIC NOTICE Northwest Florida Transportation Corridor Authority (NWFTCA) Meeting Notice. The NWFTCA recently commissioned HDR Engineering, Inc. to prepare a major update to their regional Master Plan, originally adopted in 2007. As part of the initial phase of the update, HDR is working with key stakeholders (Florida DOT, FHWA, city and county reps., etc.) and the Authority to help analyze future transportation projects by assessing their respective economic benefits, developing an investment plan and proposing viable funding strategies. As part of this process, workshops were held in March & July 2012. A third series of workshops will be held at two alternate locations: December 6, 2012, 9:00 am to 12:00 pm Central Time at the Days Inn & Suites, Navarre Conference Center, Room A, located at 8700 Navarre Parkway, Navarre, Florida and December 7, 2012, 9:00 am to 12:00 pm Central Time at the Florida State University Holley Academic Center, Panama City Campus, Room A213 (Faculty Conference Room) located at 4750 Collegiate Drive, Panama City, Florida. Any person requiring special accommodations to participate in this meeting is asked to advise the Corridor Authority at least 48 hours prior to the meeting by contacting Alicia Stephen at (850) 429-8905 or by email: Alicia.Stephen@ hdrinc.com mail to: Alicia.Stephen@ hdrinc.com. Please RSVP by November 30, 2012 if you plan to attend. November 22, 2012 90833T PUBLIC NOTICE Weems Memorial Hospital is seeking proposals to replace 8 pair of fire rated doors within the hospital. Fire doors must meet all specifications under NFPA 101-2006 LSC Fire Doors. Contractors must provide proof of commercial license and insurance. Please contact Craig Gibson/ Plant Operations Director at cgibson@ weemsmemorial.com for information and requirements. Bids are due by Dec. 3, 2012 at 4:00pm. Bids will be opened at the Franklin Co. Board of Co. Commissioners meeting on Dec. 4, 2012. Please send all bids addressed to: Mr. Michael Moron, Weems Fire Door Bid, 33 Market St., Suite 203, Apalachicola, FL 32320. November 15, 22, 2012 Food Svs/HospitalityPapa Joe’s Oyster Bar & GrillNow HiringExperienced Line Cook Apply in person only Logistics/TransportDrivers:All Miles PAID (Loaded & Empty)! Home on the weekends! Running Class-A CDL Flatbed. Lease to Own-No Money Down CALL: 888-880-5911 Medical/HealthCaring Peopleand CNAs needed. Join a team of people who make a difference in the lives of the elderly. Provide non medical companionship, in home help & personal care for the elderly. Must be flexible. PT leading to FT-positions in the Port St. Joe and Apalachicola areas.Home Instead Senior CareCall Mon-Thur 9-3pm 850-640-1223 or toll free 1-866-301-1919 Web ID#: 34228849 Text FL28849 to 56654 Classified Advertising works hard ... filling the employment needs of area business firms, helping people to meet their prospective employers, helping people buy and sell all kinds of goods and services, and much more! Nothing works harder than the Classifieds! 747-5020

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Local A16 | The Times Thursday, November 22, 2012 By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com On Nov. 9, Franklin County Girl Scout Troop 200 visited the Apalachicola rehouse and police station to learn about safety and the folks who keep us all safe. About 20 scouts from Apalachicola, Eastpoint, Carrabelle and St. George Island attended the meet and greet. Fire Chief George Watkins told the scouts the new station is in a good spot because it is centrally located in the city and near a food store and the hospital. The old station on Water Street lasted about 30 years, he said, But after every hurricane, it was an awful mess, full of mud and without electricity. That old station caused a lot of headaches. Watkins said the Apalachicola volunteer re ghters meet twice a month and respond, on average, to 11 res monthly. He said the re ghters all carry pagers to alert them to emergencies and tell them where to go, what to do and what kind of problem to expect. We are a small-town group, he said. We try to help each other out and have fellowship whenever we can. Watkins said the station houses four re trucks. The oldest was manufactured in 1988, and the newest truck is a 2000 model. Ginger Creamer, a reghter and police of cer, quizzed the girls about safety. What number do you dial to get help? she asked. The girls answered 911 in unison. But we dont play on 911, Watkins reminded them. Watkins told them the police are an important part of the re ghting team. The police usually get there before the volunteer re department, he said. Emergency Medical Technician Heather Hunter cautioned the Scouts to always wear a seat belt and sit in the back seat until the age of 12. Creamer discussed re safety and reminded the scouts to crawl and roll to get out of a burning building and avoid inhaling smoke. The girls then toured the truck barn and checked out various emergency vehicles. Watkins told them the new truck, Number 2, is the fastest and that it responds rst on most calls. He said to save fuel, the department only deploys the big truck, Number 1, when needed. The girls got a taste of the siren on Number 1. That is the sure enough sound of an oldtime re truck, Watkins said. When you hear that sound, be sure to get out of the way. EMTs Hunter and Travis Osburn explained the features of an ambulance to the Scouts and asked for a volunteer to help with the demonstration. Mahaley Shuler stepped forward and was given the full treatment. She was tted with a neck brace and strapped to a backboard giggling while the fascinated girls observed. Next, re ghter Keith Gibson donned re ghting safety gear, starting with suspendered trousers and nishing with a protective mask. He told the girls the re ghters are trained to don their gear in one minute and 34 seconds. He looks like a horse, shouted one of the Scouts. Gibson said he couldnt smile at the Scouts because they couldnt see his face. Never be afraid of a reman, he told them. He said the gear could make a re ghter seem strange, but it was needed to protect him or her from the dangers of a blaze. The girls posed for pictures with Gibson and the EMTs and then adjourned to the re ghters meeting room where Camille Williams, the most senior member of Troop 200, drew a ticket to choose the winner of a 12-gauge Remington Express shotgun raf ed to raise money to support the re department. Jennifer Allen was the lucky winner. The girls also toured the new police station with Ofcer Tim Davis on hand to answer questions. Then it was back to the truck barn, where the troop presented the re department with a check for $100 raised through the sale of cookies. Troop Leader Heather Friedman said the girls sold more than 5,000 boxes of cookies this year. She said they decided to add the re department to the list of causes they support. Watkins presented Friedman with a plaque thanking the scouts for their gift. The girls then sang Make New Friends for the rescue workers and received goodie bags, juice boxes and cupcakes prepared by Gibson. For a gallery of Troop 200s visit to the rehouse, visit www.apalachtimes. com. The Apalachicola VFD is seeking to furnish a kitchen at the station and is in need of appliances etc. Real Estate Picks Our local real estate experts have identied what they feel are the best values around and are oering them to you in Real Estate Picks! (In this section), Discover the best real estate values in Mexico Beach, Port St. Joe, Apalachicola, Cape San Blas, St. George Island, Carrabelle and surrounding areas. Best Values on the Forgotten Coast SELL YOUR LI S TING S HERE! Only $35 per week per listing Minimum 2 ads per week or 1 ad for 2 weeks Contact Joel or Kari for details: (850)814-7377 or (850)227-7847 SOLD John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.com MLS# 248242 $279,900 St. George Island 1ST TIER PLANTATION Great Gulf Views! Panoramic views to the east & north, Attention pilots! near the Plantation airport; One acre lot, Adjacent to boardwalk to Gulf, One of the highest lots on the Island, Amenities include New Club house & Pool. Seaside Drive, Nicks Hole John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.com MLS# 247601 $639,000 St. George Island HIDDEN TREASURE Enter into partially covered Courtyard with Waterfall, Your Community Credit Union 502 Woodward Avenue, Port Saint Joe, Ph: (850) 227-1156 101 East River Road, Wewahitchka, Ph: (850) 639-5024 248 US Highway 98, Eastpoint, Ph: (850) 670-1199 Toll-free: 1-877-874-0007 Email: emeraldcoast@fairpoint.net www.emeraldcoastfcu.com Troop 200 Girls Scouts tour new rehouse PHOTOS BY LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Above left, Troop 200 poses with the re ghters and emergency response technicians who led their tour of the re house and rescue vehicles. Above Troop Leader Heather Friedman accepts a plaque from Fire Chief George Watkins thanking Troop 200 for their $100 donation to Apalachicolas volunteer re ghters. EMTs Heather Hunter and Travis Osborne t Mahaley Shuler with a collar to demonstrate what can happen if you are in an accident.



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xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx 50 WWW.APALACHTIMES.COMPhone: 850-653-8868 Web: apalachtimes.com E-mail: dadlerstein@star .com Fax: 850-653-8036 Circulation: 800-345-8688 DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK: School News & Society: 11 a.m. Friday Real Estate Ads: 11 a.m. Thursday Legal Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Display Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Line Ads: 5 p.m. Monday xxxxx Contact Us xxxxx Out to see Index By DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com With August posting its best revenues in the eight years since the two-cent bed tax was implemented, Franklin County is headed toward a record-breaking tourist season. With just one month left in scal year 2011-12, Tourist Development Council collections through Aug. 31 have raised $853,021, almost $50,000 ahead of last years total and the best so far for any year in the bed taxs history. The numbers show August 2012 collections of almost $94,000 were about 55 percent better than one year ago, a full $33,000 increase. The year-to-date total is more than $105,000 better than where it stood at this point last year, running about 14 percent ahead of last year. And if September proves to be even an average month, the 2011-12 scal year total should, for the rst time, eclipse the $900,000 mark. Up 14 percent, thats a pretty signi cant number, said Curt Blair, TDC administrator. I think were encouraged by the numbers, and I think we think its indicative of the success of the BP Were Salty campaign. Clearly, a lot of money went in to developing a new brand and promoting it over the 12 months. Were encouraged we used the right methods Planning, Zoning to review day care traf cBy DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com Concerned about parking and traf c issues raised by neighbors, the Apalachicola Planning and Zoning Board has granted a 30day extension for the operation of Apalachicola United Methodist Churchs new day care center. By unanimous vote, P&Z on Nov. 12 granted the extension to the Christ Community Academy, at 75 Fifth St., after the board split down the middle on whether to grant the special exception outright. Whether the church even needed a special exception to operate its program, which has been in place for several weeks, was an issue itself. The Rev. Themo Patriotis said the day care program was another ministry of the church and thus is covered under the churchs right to operate over its more than century-long tenure at the corner of Fifth Street and Avenue E.Apalach man gets 3 life terms for sexual batteryBy DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com After a two-day trial, a 49-yearold Apalachicola man was sentenced Friday to three life terms for his having committed, more than 20 years ago, sexual battery on a 6-year-old. Circuit Judge Angela Dempsey sentenced John Stan Grant to serve the terms concurrently. The crime of sexual battery on a child under age 12 by an adult over age 18 does not allow for the possibility of parole. The jury of four men and two women reached their verdict after deliberating for less than 30 minutes. Grant still has a 2010 sexual JOHN STAN GRANT TDC revenue passes 2011 total Opry music echoed across the bay in the 1940s, 50sBy LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com Some famous musical visitors made Franklin County their personal playground 60 years ago. In spite of its remote location, there has never been a shortage of musical talent in the county. In the earliest days, folks made their own music. The Brown family, early settlers in Eastpoint, taught their children to play musical instruments. A photo in the collection of the Florida Archives memorializes Eastpoints Pretenders, the Brown family band. Preshia Crum of Eastpoint, who recently celebrated her 100th birthday, said there were frequent dances in Eastpoint when she was a girl. She met her husband, Lucius Crum, a square dance caller, at one of these. Lucius once told his granddaughter he remembered traveling up the river to dance all night long in the old Hathcock house near the Liberty County line. Carrabelles Mary Westberg recalled her father telling her about dances in Eastpoint and Greenpoint, east of Eastpoint. Daddy met my mother at one of those dances, she said. Her parents told her after the FRANKLIN COUNTY DREW BIG ACTS IN s, s has never been dance all night long in the old Hathcock house near the Liberty County line. called her father telling her about dances in Eastpoint and Greenpoint, east of Eastpoint. Daddy met my mother at one of those dances, she said. Her parents told her after the Moonlit music PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE TIMESTop left: Ernest Tubb and his Texas Troubadours stand in front of their bus in the early 1960s. Pictured from left are Buddy Emmons, Jan Kurtis, Johnny Johnson, Jack Drake, Leon Rhodes and Ernest Tubb. Top right: Sarah Ophelia Colley Cannon, known to fans as Cousin Minnie Pearl. Center left: Floyd Cramer circa 1960. Center right: Eastpoint Pretenders Herbert Brown, William Tabor and Reba and Elizabeth Brown circa 1912, courtesy of the Florida Memory Project. Above left: String Bean Akeman. Above right: Little Jimmy Dickens. See TDC A12 See TRAFFIC A12 See BATTERY A14 See MOONLIT A13Thursday, November 22, 2012 VOL. 127 ISSUE 30 Opinion . . . . . . A4 Society . . . . . . A8 Faith . . . . . . . A9 Outdoors . . . . . A10 Tide Chart . . . . A10 Sports . . . . . . A11 Classi eds . . . . A15Apalach Christmas celebration FridayThe Apalachicola Christmas Celebration will light up Apalachicola from 4-8 p.m. Friday, Nov. 23. Santa arrives on a shrimp boat at 4 p.m. at the City Dock on Water Street, to hear childrens Christmas wishes. The Orman House Museum will be trimmed in holiday nery and docents dressed in period costumes. The Raney House Museum will be decorated in holiday greenery and open for tours. At noon Saturday, Nov. 25, the fun continues as Santa has a special day devoted to hearing wishes from his furry friends. Support the Franklin County Humane Society and have your pets picture taken with Santa for a donation. There will be a pet costume contest at 3 p.m., plus stocking stuffers for non-furry friends. Full Moon Climb Nov. 28 at lighthouseThe November Full Moon Climb at the Cape St. George Lighthouse on St. George Island will be Wednesday, Nov. 28. The sun will set at 5:40 p.m., and the moon will rise at 5:55 p.m. Reservations are recommended. For reservations or information, call contact the Lighthouse Gift Shop at 927-7745.Homebuyers seminar Nov. 29 in ApalachThe Juvenile Justice Executive Council will meet from 1011:15 a.m. Nov. 29 at the TIGERS site in Apalachicola, Also, the Home is where the Heart is seminar for rst-time homeowners will be 3-5 p.m at the TIGERS site in Apalachicola. This seminar is free and open to the public. All are welcome. For more information, please call Carol Bar eld at 653-2784 Eastpoint Christmas celebration Dec. 14Eastpoint will celebrate Christmas with a parade, holiday caroling, a Christmas tree lighting and Santa Claus on Dec. 14. The parade starts at 4 p.m. and will travel from Gillespie Street, west of Sellers Plaza, to Bay Street, then south to Patton Drive, then east to the pavilion. Santa will arrive on an oyster boat and will visit with the kids. Well have caroling and lots of fun. For information contact the Apalachicola Bay Chamber of Commerce at 653-9419.

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LocalA2 | The Times Thursday, November 22, 2012 FRANKLINOUNTYHEALTHEPARTMENT 139 12th Street Apalachicola, Florida 32320Contact Person: David Walker Phone: 850-653-2111, ext. 119 E-mail: david_walker@doh.state..us The Franklin County Health Department will be having its Grand Opening of our new DentalClinic located at 106 NE 5th Street in Carrabelle, FL.The Blue Foundation Dental Grant Presentationwill also take place at the new dental facility. Please make plans to attend this much awaitedoccasion for the oral health of the residents of Franklin County!Please Join Us! -DATE: Wednesday, December 5, 2012 TIME: 10:00 A.M. LOCATION: Carrabelle Clinic 106 NE 5th Street Carrabelle, FL 32322 Contact Person: Please make plans to attend this much awaited occasion for the oral health of the residents of Please Join Us! Wednesday, December 5, 2012 Please make plans to attend this much awaited occasion for the oral health of the residents of Please Join Us! Wednesday, December 5, 2012 SAVE THE DATE! A good teacher is a great blessing to any child. Students at the Eastpoint Nest showed some love to the Franklin County School and Franklin County Learning Center teachers, thanking them for their kindness, attentiveness and lets not forget, candy. Dear Mrs. Ham, I am so thankful you are my teacher again. You are special to me. You have a soft voice. I love it when you give us free time.Love, Cole PolousDear Mrs. Gibson, I am so thankful youre my teacher. Youre special to me because you make math playful. We get cookies and drinks in math. We use fake money to pay for them. I love when we do limbo to get the wiggles out. You are very sweet and you are the best teacher.Sincerely, Emily SmithMrs. Sasnett, I am thankful for you.Love, Sy BartlettDear Mrs. Demsey, I am thankful you are my teacher.Love, Malichi RiveraMrs. King, I am thankful you are my teacher. You are special to me because you are nice and helpful. You help me with reading because you want me to do my best. You give me supplies that I need.Love, Audry YowellDear Mrs. Dykes, I am so thankful you are my teacher. You are nice and reward us with candy when we are good. You make learning fun. I love when we play fact or opinion.Love, Gage BooneDear Mr. Boyd, I am so thankful you are my teacher. You are funny and I love your silly style. Math is hard but you help me through it. You make science fun too! Every morning you say good morning to me when I come in.Love, Shasta WhitnauerDear Ms. Shaffer, I am so thankful you are my teacher. You always help me with my math work, give good instructions for what we will be doing next. You tell everyone to do their best. You are special to me.Love, Jocelyn WebbDear Mrs. Inzetta, I am so thankful that youre my math teacher. Im amazed that you still teach even though some students are disrespectful to you. You make math easy for me to understand. And you care to help me succeed and pas the FCAT. Im glad youre my teacher!Love, Morgan AndersonDear Mrs. Cumbie, I am so thankful you are my teacher. You are so nice. Thank you for teaching us adding. You give us candy when we are good. Youre the best teacher.Thanks, Cloey MaloneDear Mrs. Baney, I am so thankful that you are my teacher. You make the writing process easier. I understand you and you understand me. Thanks again, youre the best.Love, Brittani Bouzemann By DESPINA WILLIAMSSpecial to the Times On the eve of her performance in the Carrabelle Nest Thanksgiving play, Layla Chisolm was having an identity crisis. Like her fellow actors in The Meal Must Go On, Chisolm was decked out head to toe as a favorite Thanksgiving side dish. Crinkled white paper expertly fastened to her torso mimicked a heaping pile of luscious mashed potatoes, nestled atop an unassuming brown bowl fashioned from craft paper. On her head, a pile of uffy cotton balls topped by a buttery square of yellow foam completed the look. But even in all her spud-like splendor, Chisolm could not stop her classmates from calling her a dish that would never grace even the humblest Thanksgiving table. She was not, By Squanto, a bowl of popcorn! Chisolm could not trouble herself with these taunts. At show time, she joined classmates Kayleigh Revell, Charlee Winchester, Trinity Barron and Destanie Proctor. Sure, they were dolled up like cranberry sauce, turkey, pumpkin pie and stuf ng, but she was the star of this show. When the actors began the play by each boasting to be the best Thanksgiving dish, Chisolm seized her moment. Thanksgiving just wouldnt be the same without me! Mashed potatoes are always everyones favorite! Chisolms prideful performance was just one of the many highlights of The Nests two-day Thanksgiving celebration. The Nest, a Franklin County School District 21st Century after-school program, staged back-toback parent nights on Nov. 15-16 that combined food, fun and family. Carrabelle Nest students performed a medley of song and dance numbers, including the Turkey Pokey, for parents and classmates. Patrick Tipton narrated The Meal Must Go On!, a readers theatre play that featured Cheyenne Lawson, Haiden Parks, Brianna Sanders, Larry Winchester, September Ferrell, Alexis Parks, Jada Allen and Jorden Carnes as Thanksgiving dinner hosts and houseguests. The Eastpoint Nest staged an ambitious Thanksgiving dinner, with students cooking and sharing their meal with their families. Students traveled from room to room, cooking cranberry sauce, vegetable stirfry, turkey and ham sandwiches and pumpkin pie in a cup. At each cooking station, led by Nest staff members, the students earned a stamp featuring their dish, which they colored and glued to their Thanksgiving brochures empty place setting. By the end of the program, each student and their family members assembled a complete meal and rated each dish using a score of Yummy, Just Okay and Gross. The pumpkin pie in a cup scored the most Yummies. If you want to make it at home, just layer in a cup crushed graham crackers and vanilla pudding mixed with pumpkin, cinnamon and nutmeg, and top with a scoop of Cool Whip. Delicious! The families all enjoyed the interactive meal. The Nest would like to thank all the families who donated ingredients for the Eastpoint meal and snacks for the Carrabelle play. To read more about the Nests Thanksgiving activities, visit the program website, www. franklincountynest.org. Students in grades prekindergarten to eighth grade are eligible to attend The Nest, and applications are available from the website, Franklin County School and Franklin County Learning Center. Despina Williams is project coordinator for The Nest, a 21st Century Community Learning Center administered by the Franklin County School District. LETTERS OF THANKSPHOTOS BY DESPINA WILLIAMS | Special to the TimesAt top, the performers in The Meal Must Go On wear costumes depicting Thanksgiving dishes. From left are Carrabelle Nest students Destanie Proctor (stuf ng), Kayleigh Revell (cranberry sauce), Layla Chisolm (mashed potatoes), Trinity Barron (pumpkin pie) and Charlee Winchester (turkey). Above left, Shelby Rotella lls her plate with homemade succotash and a side of pumpkin pie. Above right, Christopher Creek showcases his pumpkin pie in a cup dessert.The Nest students give thanks

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LocalThe Times | A3Thursday, November 22, 2012

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By BEVERLY MOUNT-DOUdDSContributing Writer Editors note: This is one in an occasional series about the beginnings, the building specications, for lighthouses in the area. These next few weeks, Ill be sharing some letters about our local lighthouses. This could not have been completed without giving thanks rst to Mark Curenton and the Apalachicola Area Historical Society. Several years ago, Mark let Marlene Womack and me go through boxes of old papers found in the cottage at the Raney House in Apalachicola. These boxes covered many areas of local history (one folder covering our lighthouses), and I was lucky enough to get the chance to copy these les. Since we have been so concerned about saving Cape San Blas Lighthouse lately, I thought that this would be the perfect time to share this past history of another time the lighthouse had to be saved. This rst story starts with Dog Island Lighthouse. Most of the papers cover proposals of bids for rebuilding the lighthouses between the Treasury Department and the Superintendent of Lights; what I like is that the papers tell you how they want them built. Here are the letters for Dog Island.NOTICE.CUSTO USTO M HOUSE OUSE BOSTON OSTON MASS SS .November 18, 1851 PROPOSALS will be at this Ofce until the 8th day of December, proximo, at 12 oclock M, for furnishing materials and erecting, on Dog Island, in Florida, a LIGHT HOUSE 49 feet in height, of the following materials, dimensions and descriptions, viz:TOWERFoundations: The earth to be excavated to a depth of 2 feet below the surface, at which depth it is to be carefully leveled off and to be 22 feet in diameter. Pilings: Within the pit excavated as above. There are to be driven two rows of piles disposed in circles; diameter of outside row, from center to center, 16 feet; diameter of inside row, from centre to centre, 11 1/2 feet; outside row to be composed of 22 piles; inside row to be composed of 16 piles; the piles to be so driven that the inner piles shall come opposite the openings between the outer piles. The original surface of the ground. The piles to be of sound seasoned oak, not less than 9 nor more than 16 inches _____. The piles to be driven 7 feet below the bottom of the excavated pit. Grillage: A grillage, composed of sound, well-seasoned yellow pine timber, 8 by 12 inches, to be pinned with oak treenails, 2 inches diameter, on the heads of the piles. The timbers to be notched 1 1/2 inch each over the other. The timbers to be laid with the 12 inches horizontally, and to have 12 inches space between them. The space between the timbers to be lled with clean gravel, hard rammed.-Upon the tops of the timbers, and at right angles to them, there is to be a ooring of plank 4 inches thick, of sound, well-seasoned yellow pine, laid edge to edge, and well treenailed to the grillage timbers, by oak treenails 1 1/2 in diameter and 9 inches long. All the treenails to have their heads wedged after being driven. The diameter of the grillage, from outside to outside to be 19 feet. Walls: The walls of the tower to be composed of the rst quality hard bummed brick, laid in the best hydraulic Rosendale cement, every fourth course of brick to be headers through the wall. The mortar to be composed of equal parts of cement and sharp clean sand. No mortar to be used after it has been mixed 8 hours. The wall to be circular in plan, outside diameter at the base on the grillage, 17 feet; thickness at base 3 feet. Outside diameter at the top under the copings, 12 feet. Thickness under coping 2 foot. Height of wall from the top of grillage to under side copings, 40 feet. Doors: The tower to have one door 6 feet by 3 feet broad in clear. Sill to be out of cut granite or compact limestone, 8 inches thick; Lintel of the same material 10 inches thick; Jambs of the same material, 7 inches thick. Sill, Lintel and Jambs to have a rebate of 1/2 inches cut in for wooden door. The wooden door to be composed of wellseasoned white pine, to be 3 inches thick, double battened and well nailed, to be provided with two composition hinges, lock and bolt; hinge pintals to be well leaded in the jambs. The sills, lintel and jambs to extend through the wall, the sill and lintel lapping on the jambs. Flooring: The interior of the tower to be led up to the bottom of the door sill with clean pebbles and fragments of rock, and carefully leveled off; on this to be laid 6 inches of concrete, composed of part stone, broken to egg size, one part Rosendale cement, and two parts sand. On this concrete a brick ooring is to be laid in cement, 3 inches thick, with its upper side on a level with the top of the sill. Windows: The tower to have four windows, the top of the top window to be on a level with the springing line of the dome. The sashes and frames to be of clear, sound, wellseasoned white pine. Each window to be glazed with 8 panes of 12x12 inches best quality German glass. The frames to be rebated in a cut granite or compost limestone sill, lintel and jambs, the sill and lintel to lap on the jambs, rebate 1 1/2 inch deep. Thickness of sill, lintel and rebate, 6 inches, all to extend through the wall. Dome: Immediately beneath the coping, the underside of which is touched by the extrados of the dome, is to be sprung a brick dome, 8 inches thick, radius of extrados, 5 feet. Height of inside dome, from springing line, 3 feet 9 feet inches. Coping: The tower to be coped with soapstone 4 inches thick, the pieces composing the outer circle to extend 4 inches within the lantern posts. Exterior diameter of coping 13 1/2 feet. The spandrels between copings and dome to be lled with brick, carefully laid in mortar. Stairs: The stairs to be of the best quality of white pine, 2 inches thick, to be sound, well-seasoned and free of knots; to have 8 inches rise and 15 inches tread at the walls; the tread to project 1 1/2 inch over the riser; thread and riser to be let 4 inches into the wall at one end and fastened to a hollow newel 8 inches square, of the same material, at the other end. The newel to have a hinge door at top and bottom 5x24 inches. The newel to rise through the tower coping to receive the descending weight. Upper Floor: An upper oor to be laid in the top of the tower, top of oor 7 1/2 feet below crown of same. Floor to be composed of white pine timbers 6x8 inches, covered with two thicknesses of 1 inch pine board, well nailed, planned, tongued and grooved at right angles to each other. Floor to ll 2/3 of the circle. Stairs to reach from brick paving at bottom of tower, to top of upper oor. Material all of best quality. A scuttle 22 inches square in clear to be made in coping and dome of cast iron 1 inch thick with 1 inch ange let into coping ush on top and with bottom curved to shape of dome. Scuttle rebated at top for door 1 1/2 inch thick, white pine covered with sheet copper and tted with ____ and fastenings. Ladder: A wrought iron ladder to extend from top of upper oor to scuttle, sides of 3 by 1/4 inch, steps 1 1/2 inch diameter shouldered against sides and riveted over, steps 9 inches apart, ladder 22 inches wide from outside of sides. All wood work of the tower to be well painted in 3 coats of yellow ochre and oil. All brick work, without and within to be white washed with two coats of lime. Lantern: The lantern is to be 16 feet diameter, from outside to outside of angle posts, to be 8 sided. Angle Posts: 8 in number, to be wrought iron, 1 1/2 by 3 inches, set with the 3 inches pointing to the centre, to be 9 1/2 feet long above the copings and to be let in the walls of the tower 3 feet below copings, making total length 12 1/2 feet to be rebated 1 1/4 inch deep and 5-16 inch broad for glass. Lower Panels: Of cast iron lling, the space between angle posts to be made 3/4 inch thick, with anges at top, bottom and sides, 3 inches wide all over, ush side to be placed outside. Panels to be 21 inches high, each with a 3 inches diameter ventilator in centre, and to be secured with 2 one inch blots and nuts at top and bottom, passing through one single post and two panels. All the joints between coping and panels, and between panel and single posts, to be made of white and red lead mixed with oil to be rebated like single posts on tops to receive glass. Upper Panels: In all respects to be like the lower panels, excepting only in height, which is to be 9 inches, and in having a gutter 5 inches deep and broad cast on it. Top of upper panel to be on same level with top of posts, to be rebated like angle post on bottom to receive glass. Rafters: 8 wrought iron rafters, to be 2 inches deep by 1 1/2 broad, to extend from top of angle posts to a wrought iron circle 20 inches diameter, 2 by 2/4 inches thick. Rafter to be secured to angle post by T heads, 2/4 inch blots, and to circle in same manner. Roong: To be covered with copper, 32 oz. to the square foot, double capped, and to be made water tight; to be bent down into gutter and well riveted there, and also to be well riveted to bottom of ventilator. Ventilator: One of Emersons patent Ventilator, 20 inches diameter, 4 1/2 feet high, to be well secured on top of wrought iron circle. Sash Bars: 8 wrought iron Sash Bars, 1 1/4 inches deep by 2 inches wide, to be placed midway between top of lower panel and bottom of upper panel, so as to divide each side into equal panes of glass; sash bar to be secured to angle posts by T and 2/4 inch bolts and nuts, to be rebated on upper and under side, like angle posts for glass. Door: One of the lower panes of glass to be set in a wrought iron frame, tted with hinges and fastenings, and hung for a door. Railing: The lantern to be surrounded by a wrought iron railing, composed of 8 post, 1 inch by 3 inch, set opposite to angle post with three inches pointing centre. The lower end of railing post to be well leaded in coping, 2 inches deep and 4 inches from edge, thence curving sharply out to a diameter of 13 1/4 feet; thence perpendicular for a height of 5 1/2 feet above coping; thence curving in on a radius of 1 3/4 feet to the angle post, to which it is to be secured by a T head and blot. There is to be two railing bars of 1 1/3 inch diameter extending around the lantern, the top of the lower one to be 21 inches above coping, the upper one to be placed directly in front of each sash bar. All the iron and copper work to be painted on the outside, with one coat of red lead and oil and two coats of chrome green and oil and all the iron and copper work to be painted on the inside with three coats white lead and oil. Glazing: The lantern to be glazed with 16 panes (2 to each side) of the best quality French plate glass of such size as will ll the before specied sides, and to be 1/4 inch thick. The glass to be secured by putty and lead pins, 1/4 inch diameter, 6 lead pins to a pane. Conductor: A copper electrical rod, 2/4 inch diameter, to extend 3 feet above the ventilator of lantern, with forked tops and to reach four feet below surface of ground, turning off from tower obliquely when within 10 feet of bottom. Gutters: A copper gutter oval form, 1 2/4 by 2 inches to descend from the cast iron gutter, along one angle post to the coping. The entire work is to be completed on or before the rst day of May, 1852, to the satisfaction and approval of the Superintendents of Lights at Apalachicola, Florida or of such person as may be appointed for the purpose of examining the same. No payment to be made to the contractor until the work shall be completed in a faithful and workman like manner, in accordance with the terms of the contract, Separate proposals will be received during and approved as above the same period, for furnishing materials and erecting at Cape St. George, Florida, a lighthouse, 65 feet in height, singular to the one above described, subject to the same conditions and the work being approved also by the Superintendent of Lights at Apalachicola. OpinionA4 | The Times Thursday, November 22, 2012 USPS 027-600Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 Publisher: Roger Quinn Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six monthsHome delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERSIn case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola Times Special PECIAL toTO THe E Ti I Mes ESA historic photo of the Dog Island Lighthouse.Dog Island Lighthouse built 162 years ago

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The Times | A5Thursday, November 22, 2012 LIMITED STOCK! FIRSTCOME, FIRSTSERVE!Sale Starts at 7:00 AM EST Friday, 11-23-12 Sale Ends at 4:00 PM EST Sunday, 11-25-12STORE OPENS AT 7 AM*WHILE SUPPLIES LAST DEALSwww.BWOsh.com Moultrie 6.5 Hanging Feeder KitsWAS $69.99 NOW$39.98 Simmons 10x50 Binoculars WAS $59.99 NOW$29.98 NOW$34.99Otis .556 Cleaning Kits NOW$79.98Rinehart 18-N-1 TargetsWAS $99.99 NOW$29.98Flambeau Duck Decoys WAS $39.99 Parker Bushwaker CrossbowsWAS $329.99 Simmons 10x50 Binoculars Simmons 10x50 Binoculars Parker Bushwaker Crossbows Parker Bushwaker Crossbows NOW$299.99 Abu Garcia VeritasRodsIN STOCK! NOW$59.99 Ameristep Doghouse Blind WAS $79.99 NOW$54.98 Ameristep Grizzly G-30 Blind WAS $119.99 NOW$74.98 Ameristep Wing Shooter BlindWAS $169.99 NOW$109.98 UPTO 50% OFF SELECTNAME BRAND APPARELANDACCESSORIES! CLOTHING CLEARANCE RACKS WITHITEMS $5 &$10! FRIDAY SUNDAY ONLY! 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Springeld XD Sub Compact .40 Springeld XD Sub Compact .40 $469.99 Ruger American Ries .243/.308/30-06/.270 Ruger American Ries Ruger American Ries $329.99 Rossi Circuit Court Judge Blued Rie Rossi Circuit Court Judge Blued Rie $469.99 Uniden Atlantis Hand HeldVHFRadioWAS $119.99 NOW$89.98 Law EnforcementThe following report is provided by the Franklin County Sheriffs Office. Arrests in this weeks report were made by officers from the Apalachicola Police Department (APD), Carrabelle Police Department (CPD), Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) and the Franklin County Sheriffs Office (FCSO). All defendants are to be considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law.Nov. 9Jonathan G. Carmichael, 26, Apalachicola, failure to appear (FCSO)Nov. 12Carlos E. Russell, Jr., 40, Eastpoint, violation of probation (FCSO) June M. Davis, 29, Eastpoint, DUI and driving while license suspended or revoked (FWC) Ottis E. Russell II, 47, Carrabelle, DUI and driving while license suspended or revoked (FWC)Nov. 13Robert L. Thompson, 18, Apalachicola, principal in the first degree to attempted armed robbery (FCSO) Gary M. Barineau, 39, Apalachicola, trespass after warning and violation of probation (FCSO) Patrick J. McGovern, 62, Minneapolis, Minn., battery (APD)Nov. 14Savannah K. Shiver, 18, Apalachicola, violation of probation (FCSO) Sean D. Richart, 38, Tallahassee, DUI and refusal to submit to breath test (CPD) Courtney L. Brownell, 23, Eastpoint, principal in the first degree to attempted armed robbery (FCSO)Nov. 15Michael G. Hicks, 31, Eastpoint, violation of probation (FCSO) Patrick J. McGovern, 62, Minneapolis, Minn., 10 counts of possession of child pornography (APD) Robert C. Maples, 18, Apalachicola, battery (APD)Nov. 16Daniel McKenzie, 34, Eastpoint, violation of a domestic violence injunction (FCSO) Jennifer L. Smith, 32, Eastpoint, principal in the first degree to attempted armed robbery (FCSO) Eric A. Tatum, 32, Carrabelle, indecent exposure (FCSO) Arrest REPORT By DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com A 62-year-old drifters violent reaction to having photographs taken of his unusual bicycle has led to the man being jailed on child pornography charges. The story began around 10:16 a.m. on Nov. 13, when Apalachicola police of cer Timothy Davis was dispatched to Avenue D to follow-up on the complaint of an Indian Pass man, Brian Bowen, 47. Bowen said he had been doused with pepper spray after he tried to photograph an unusuallooking, bearded man on a tall bicycle. Bowen told the of cer that when he pulled over to photograph the man, he was sprayed, and the culprit could be found at the library. Bowen said he had a photo of the man spraying him. Davis went to investigate, and talked to the man, who admitted what he had done. He stated that he knew why I was there, Davis wrote in his report. He stated that he sprayed the man out of reaction to seeing him with a camera. Davis then arrested Patrick J. McGovern, 62, of Minneapolis, Minn., on a battery charge. The matter likely would have ended there had McGovern not offered Davis and Apalachicola Chief Bobby Varnes a plan to pay his $1,000 bond. According to Brett Johnson, investigator with the sheriffs of ce, McGovern told the of cers that he had bail money in his RV, and that if he could bond out, he would leave town. Varnes told McGovern that police of cials would have to accompany McGovern on a return visit to his RV. Johnson said McGovern responded by saying that it was OK with him if they followed him inside his vehicle, but cautioned them not to be alarmed when they entered the recreational vehicle because he was a naturalist, a term often used to describe nudists. He also advised the of cers that the camper contained several nude photographs, Johnson said. When the of cers escorted McGovern to his camper, parked near 10 Foot Hole, they observed an extensive collection of photographs of nude minor children. They were everywhere, every cabinet, every wall, every ceiling, everywhere, Johnson said. There was not an inch of that camper that did not have a nude photograph on it. The vehicle was later towed to the sheriffs of ce where two search warrants were executed. After the execution of the warrants, McGovern was charged Friday with 10 counts of child pornography, which is a second degree felony. Because they are felonies, investigators are empowered to obtain a DNA sample that could be used to determine if McGovern is connected with any unsolved crimes. Johnson took steps Monday to pursue the DNA sampling. We are still getting information about his past, said Assistant State Attorney Robin Myers, noting that it appeared the man had traveled extensively throughout the United States and Central America. Johnson said evidence was obtained in the searches that indicated McGovern had used aliases in the past, including Patricio Juan Pedro, the name he used to sign in at the library to use the computers. Myers said that while it was not clear whether the photographs depict children engaged in sexual acts, they are suggestive of sexual behaviors. We are still trying to determine whether the images meet the de nition of child pornography, he said.AMBER HENNING | Special to the TimesPatrick McGoverns unusual bicycle parked in front of the Apalachicola Municipal Library PATRICK J MCGOVERNMysterious drifter jailed for child pornography

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LocalA6 | The Times Thursday, November 22, 2012 $159.95 $149.95 $179.95St. Joe Rent-All 706 1st Street Port St. Joe (850)227-2112GIFT CERTIFICATES & LAY-A-WAY AVAILABLE THE ST. JOSEPH BAY GOLF CLUB & THE CAMP GORDON WWII MUSEUM WISHES TO THANK OUR WONDERFUL SPONSORS OF OUR RECENT SILENT AUCTION AND GOLF TOURNAMENT BILL & JANE MORRISSEY, INMEMORYOF DONALD C. TAYLOR, ARMYJOHN C. GAINOUS VFW POST 10069 AMERICAN LEGION POST 116 AMERICAN LEGION SAUL-BRIDGES POST 13 TALLAHASSEE DALYS WATER SPORTS CAMP GORDON JOHNSTON ASSOCIATION PORT ST. JOE MARINA THETHIRSTYGOAT GULF TO BAY CONST. MATHEWS LAW FIRM HANNON INS. AGCY. MCDANIEL CONSULTING TONY MINICHIELLO, INMEMORYOF JOHN X. MINICHIELLO, NAVYCAPITAL CITY BANK OLIVIER MONOD (ST GEORGE INN) SJBGC KENNY WOOD SUNSET COASTAL GRILL LINDA MINICHIELLO, INMEMORYOF WILLIE S. HOGUE, ARMY CULBRETHFINANCIAL GROUP MARK MINICHIELLO, INHONOROFARTHURJ.MINICHIELLO,NAVY APALACHICOLA ACE HARDWARE HOG WILD BBQ HOMETOWN BP & GRILL CITY OF CARRABELLE KERIGAN MARKETING ASSOCIATES BOYER SIGNS BAY CITY LODGE & RESTAURANT BARB & DAN VAN TREESE DURENS PIGGLY WIGGLY BLUEWATER OUTRIGGERS CENTENNIAL BANK THEFRAME SHOP-TALLAHASSEE ANN & MARTY JARDSZ JAY J. PULLI, IN MEMORY OF JOSEPH A. PULLI, ARMY L&B ENTERPRIZES, IN MEMORY OF LOUIS M. KIRBY, USAF GEORGE & DANA BOYER CURFEW LODGE 73 F & AM CARRABELLE MAINSTAY SUITES ALTERNATIVE ELECTRIC CO. PEPPERS RESTAURANT ST JOE ACE HARDWARE BEACH TIME VACATION RENTALS MUST SEE MAGAZINE ST. JOE AUTO PARTS CO. SISTERS RESTAURANT LYNNS JEWELRY, YARN & MORE OWL CAF MASON DIXON THE BOYER BAND (GEORGE, CLETUS & TOM) ADVANCE AUTO BAYSIDE FLORIST & GIFTS RAMSEYS PRINTING PICTURE PERFECTFRAME SHOP MARGE PARKER DANNY WARRUCK KELLEYFOODS EDWIN WATTS GOLF DAVE CASH AND THEGULF COUNTY TOURIST DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL & FRANKLIN COUNTY TOURIST DEVELOPMENT COUNCILAND,A BIG THANK YOU TO:MIKE ALLDIS, LAURIE JUNE, BARB VAN TREESE, MARY KELLY, BILL MORRISSEY, LINDA MINICHIELLO, KEN TUCKER, JACK KERIGAN,FATHER PHILFORTIN,THE PSJHS NROTC, MAJOR LT. COL (RET.) DAVID BUTLER, BOBBI WINCHESTER, JANE MORRISSEY, MAUREEN ALLDIS, DICK DAVIS, CMST WANDA WARRUCK ANDTHEENTIRE ST. JOSEPH BAY GOLF CLUB STAFF BILL MILLER REALTY850-697-3751 (3310) 570-0658400 + COMM. U.S. 98 & GULFADJ. TO LANARK MARINA 850K$29,500 $2,500 DOWN BUYS 2 BED APT. 2 6 ORRENT $500/MTH 2 B/R 1 BTH GULF VIEW HOME W/ FAMILY ROOM $70,000 GULFVIEW & ACCESS 3 BDR 2 BA 2006 M/H 89K2 LG. SHADY LOTS 3 SHEDS400 TO MARINA-CITY WATER49KMIH 2 CRNRLOTS BLK. $ STORE REDUCED $49,500 2 AC-AT RIVER UTIL. IN -$39,500 TANNING, WAXING, EAR PIERCING, FEATHERS, FASHION EXTENSIONS & UP DOS.Walk-ins Welcome With Mani/Pedi Combo10%OFF PolishEXPIRES: 11/14/12 TANNING, WAXING, EAR PI E RCING, F E A T A T A H E RS, FASHION EX TE NSIONS & U P DOS. By LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star .com A Nashville insider plans to bring a group of songwriters to experience the Forgotten Coast. Karen Brooks arrived in Carrabelle by boat and liked what she saw. She is still a resident of the waterfront and plans to bring some friends to town to share her new home. Brooks, born in Dallas, Texas, worked in the music industry for more than a decade, as a background singer with Jerry Jeff Walker, David Allan Coe and Townes Van Zandt, to name a few. Faking Love, a duet she recorded with T. G. Sheppard, topped the chart in 1983.She has also recorded duets with Johnny Cash and Randy Sharp. Now she has a new project. Brooks wants to help Nashville songwriters reconnect with their working class roots by experiencing the working world rst-hand. As part of her project, Brooks said she will bring six songwriters to Carrabelle in April. On the agenda for the group is an old-fashioned barber shop shave, a historic tour of Carrabelle, a talk on the city by Carrabelle Mayor Curley Messer and other Carrabelle elders, a writers workshop at the Carrabelle library and two days on Jim Lycettes working shrimp boat, Pirates Sons. Brooks said the visitors will also perform at the Dixie Theatre one evening during their stay. The visit will be the beginning of a tour that will expose the songwriters to other rural activities including cattle ranching, mountain climbing and prospecting. These guys are bubbas, and they are going to be so funny, she said. Brooks said Pete Winter of Winterstone Productions of Tallahassee plans to document the experiment on lm. In a proposal for the project, she wrote, There was a time when history was passed down to the population for the purpose of preserving their heritage. This was done by storytelling. That is what we do in Nashville, we tell stories in song. We want to give our melodic writers a chance to be a part of this heritage by inviting them to participate in this rst-hand experience of the career, humor and life stories that make America the amazing place we live and work everyday. Brooks said she has about 10 applicants for the program but can only accept six and that Carlene Carter and Chas Sandford are expected to attend. We hope to include a couple of young writers and a local writer, she said. Messer and Commissioner Charlotte Schneider are working directly with Brooks on the project. Schneider said she believes the visit will be an eye-opener for the participating artists. This coastal area is a way of life that doesnt exist anywhere else, Schneider said. Brooks agreed. Where else can you walk on the beach and see a bear playing in the surf? LOIS SWOBODA | The TimesKaren Brooks, right, poses with Carrabelle Mayor Curley Messer.Songwriters retreat planned for Carrabelle ANNOUNCES THE OPENING OF WEEMS MEDICAL CENTER WEST Tuesday, December 4, 2012Appointments Available and Walk-Ins Welcome!!! Appointments can be made by calling 653-8853 ext 118 and Walk-Ins may enter the front lobby of the hospital and inquire at the front registration desk.Weems Medical Center West will be providing Urgent and Family Care Services Tuesday through Thursday 8am 4pm135 Ave G, Apalachicola, FL 850-653-8853www.weemsmemorial.com ARE YOU IN NEED OF A MEDICAL PROVIDER??

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LocalThe Times | A7Thursday, November 22, 2012 Stan TrappeATTORNEY AT LAW Foreclosure Defense Bankruptcy Asset Protection Real Estate Probate ~ WillsAdmitted to Practice Law in Florida Since 1974Let Me Help You 850-769-6139236 McKenzie Avenue Panama City, FL FREENICOTINE PATCHES AVAILABLE TO PROGRAM PARTICIPANTSEnd Your Dependence On Tobacco! Let Us Help You on Your Quit Journey! Tools to Quit When: Thursday, December 13, 2012 Time: 5:30 P.M. 7:30 P.M. Where: George E. Weems Memorial Hospital, 135 Avenue G, Apalachicola, FL 32320For more information, please contact Calandra Portalatin at (850) 224-1177 or cportalatin@bigbendahec.org dbutler@coastalcoverage.com Locally owned and operated Home Business Auto Health Workers Comp New Location this Year!!Hwy 98, beside Gulf Side IGA in Apalachicola. See You There! Margaret(850) 653.3764 or (850) 323.1937 Margarets Christmas TreesComing Fraser Fir 5 to 10 ftArriving Thanksgiving Week! FRESH WREATHS Apalachicola annual Christmas celebration Friday: The Apalachicola Christmas Celebration will light up Apalachicola from 4-8 p.m. on Friday. The streets will be lined with luminaries. Merchants will be open late and the sounds of carolers will echo through the streets, lling the evening with the Christmas spirit. Santa arrives on a shrimp boat at 4 p.m. at the City Dock on Water Street. He will hear childrens Christmas wishes, and carolers will sing. The Orman House Museum will be trimmed in holiday nery, and docents dressed in period costumes will lead visitors through the early history of Franklin County. The Raney House Museum also will be decorated in greenery and open for tours. On Saturday at noon, the fun continues as Santa has a special day devoted to hearing wishes from his furry friends. Support the Franklin County Humane Society and have your pets picture taken with Santa for a donation. There will be a pet costume contest at 3 p.m. plus stocking stuffers for your non-furry friends. Saturday is also Small Business Saturday. Support local merchants and restaurants by spending money in our little town. Youll nd unusual, oneof-a-kind gifts, art work, outstanding food and gift certi cates for nearly everything. Holiday Fresh Market Dec. 1: Mark Saturday, Dec. 1 in downtown Apalachicola as your day not to ght the crowds and traf c at the malls. Come for the day to the Holiday Fresh Market and shop in a relaxed, hassle-free environment. Buy handcrafted Apalachicola specialties from seasonal wreaths to vintage European glass bead jewelry and specialty food delights. For information, call 653-9419 or visit info@apalachicolabay. org. Middle-aged sought for Cat sh Moon auditions: Panhandle Players are holding auditions for their next production Cat sh Moon at 4 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 2, and at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 4, at the Raney Carriage House. Cat sh Moon, a comedy, written by Mississippi native Laddy Sartin, is set on a shing pier on a lake somewhere in LA (lower Alabama). Four people that have known each other all their lives come to grips with knowing each other all their lives. Cast will be three men and one woman, all middle-aged or thereabouts. Readings will be from the script. The show is directed by Dan Wheeler. For more info, call 370-0957. Mitigation strategy meeting Dec. 3: Franklin County Emergency Management would like to invite the public to participate in a meeting to discuss and update the Franklin County Local Mitigation Strategy. Hazard mitigation is any action taken to permanently reduce or eliminate long-term risk to people and their property from the effects of hazards. Hurricanes, tornadoes, oods, hazardous material spills, res and sinkholes are some of the hazards experienced by Florida communities. The goal of the mitigation strategy is to identify local hazards and establish a framework to reduce the risk. The next meeting is at 10 a.m. Monday, Dec. 3, in the Franklin County Emergency Operations Center, 28 Airport Road in Apalachicola. All parties can voice their concerns, review the status of old projects and add new ones to the list. For more information, contact Mike Rundel, Franklin County Emergency Management coordinator at 653-8977 or Em2frank@gtcom.net. News BRIEFS

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A8 | The Times Thursday, November 22, 2012 OFTHEWEEKPET St. Joseph Bay Humane SocietyMeet DONOVAN!Donovan is an 8 month old Rhodesian Ridgeback mix. He is a little shy but has the sweetest and gentlest temperament. He and 5 other dogs being housed at the adoption center are part of this months BIG DOG STIMULUS PACKAGE. We have reduced our adoption fee for our large dogs to only $20.00 in the hope that they will all be adopted before the holidays. Please consider giving one of our large breed dogs a home in time for the holidays!Volunteers are desperately needed to socialize all of our dogs and cats. We are always looking for people willing to bring one of our animals into their home to be fostered for various needs. Anytime you can spare would be greatly appreciated.Call Karen at 670-8417 for more details or visit the Franklin County Humane Society at 244 State Road 65 in Eastpoint. You may logon to the website at www.forgottenpets.org to see more of our adoptable pets. LIVE TABLETOP TREES$18.00ToOrder, Contact Lois at 653-5857 Proceeds benet the Florida Wild Mammal Association NIP RODENTS INTHE BUD!CALLLOIS AT 653-5857Franklin Countys ONLY LOCALPest Control Company RODENTS RODENTS RODENTS I I N N T T Rodney'sOyster Tongs Laminated Handles!CONTACT: (850) 653.3764 or (850) 323.1937 Apalachicola, FL I would like to Thank You the voters of District 5 for your support and donations during my candidacy in the 2012 Franklin County Commission Election. I am humbled by your faith and trust in me. Visiting and talking with voters and residents in the past eight months, I have seen what a truly wonderful county we live in. As your Commissioner, I am excited and looking forward to serving you the people of this wonderful county we call home. Together we can make things better. Thank you! William Massey ATTENTION!!! PRIMARY CARE 4 ALL located on 1001 Gray Avenue, in Carrabelle, FL 32322 will be relocating to 680 Maple Street, Chattahoochee, FL 32324, (850) 663-2355 effective November 30th, 2012. All For further information you can continue to contact (850) 697-2550. Thank You, H.C. Hercule, M.D. MEDICARE PLANSEXCELLENT COVERAGE ANYONE CAN AFFORDTOP QUALITY COMPANY TUCKER LIFE-HEALTH INSURANCE, INC. RATED A+ BY BETTER BUSINESS BUREAURoss E. Tucker, Agentsince 1981Chartered Life Underwriter Registered Health Underwriter850-926-2200 or 800-226-7005www.tuckerlifehealth.com Navy Airman Jacob A. Lee, son of Melissa Shiver Lee of Eastpoint and Timothy O. Lee of Eastpoint, along with the 5,500 sailors and Marines assigned to the Enterprise Carrier Strike Group, recently arrived in Norfolk, Va., after a 7-month deployment supporting operations in the Mediterranean and the Arabian Seas. The USS Enterprises return to Norfolk will be the 25th and nal homecoming in her 51 years of distinguished service. The aircraft carrier is scheduled to be inactivated Dec. 1 in a ceremony at Norfolk Naval Station. While deployed, Enterprise CSG served in the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet areas of responsibility, conducting maritime security operations, theater security cooperation efforts and missions in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. During her 238 days away from Norfolk, Big E, as Enterprise is affectionately known, safely steamed 80,968 miles, and Carrier Air Wing 1 ew more than 8,000 sorties in support of Operation Enduring Freedom and exercises in the 5th and 6th Fleet AORs. Enterprise was commissioned Nov. 25, 1961, as the eighth ship to bear the name Enterprise. Big E was the worlds rst nuclear-powered aircraft carrier. During her 51 years of service, Enterprise deployed 25 times and participated in every major con ict since the Cuban Missile Crisis. Enterprise has been homeported in both Alameda, Calif., and Norfolk and conducted operations in every region of the world. The December inactivation ceremony will be the last of cial public event for Enterprise and will serve as a celebration of life for the ship and the more than 100,000 sailors who have served aboard the ship. Enterprise CSG comprises Commander, Carrier Strike Group 12, the aircraft carrier USS Enterprise (CVN 65), CVW 1, Destroyer Squadron 2, guided-missile destroyers USS Porter (DDG 78), USS Nitze (DDG 94) and USS James E. Williams (DDG 95). The squadrons of CVW 1 embarked aboard Enterprise are Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 11 Red Rippers, VFA-136 Knighthawks, VFA-211 Fighting Checkmates, Marine Fighter Attack Squadron 251 Thunderbolts, Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron 123 Screwtops, Carrier Tactical Electronic Warfare Squadron 137 Rooks, Fleet Logistics Support Squadron 40 Rawhides and Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron 11 Dragonslayers. Lee is a 2009 graduate of Franklin County High School of Eastpoint and joined the Navy in April 2010. For more information on USS Enterprise, her legendary history and Inactivation Week events, visit www.enterprise.navy. mil. The St. James Health and Rehabilitation Center kicked off the holidays Saturday with an open house. The holiday season already is looming large there, with a turkey dinner planned for Thanksgiving. Residents families may reserve a private dining room and bring their own holiday meal. There are also trees to be decorated and crafty activities in the works. Admissions Director and Medicaid Specialist Theresa Mickens led a tour of the facility. The home was clean and cheerful decorated with residents art. Smiling residents interacted with the staff and engaged them in conversation. Administrator Brenda Smith said the rehabilitation center employs more than 150 workers, many of whom are county residents. In addition to assisted living, St. James offers outpatient occupational, speech and physical therapy services. Smith said the center is partnering with Gulf Coast State College to offer training for certi ed nursing assistants. Familiar names among the 71 residents of St. James include Crooms, Faircloth, Floyd and Braxton. For the rst time in years, the center provides assisted living within Franklin County. Mickens said many residents have strong family support locally. Peggy Woodruff, whose son is a resident of St. James Bay, had high praise for the rehabilitation center, My son Michael was in a motorcycle accident two years ago. We have some experience with health care centers. This is the nicest facility I have seen. The staff is very caring, compassionate and sincere. After lunch, a number of residents met in the dining room for a game of bingo. Players win currency they can spend in the bingo store after the game. You can help the residents and spread a little holiday cheer by donating small gifts and prizes for the bingo store. Regifted items are welcome. Possible prizes include combs, brushes, scented soaps and grooming supplies other than aerosols. Hand sanitizers and other products containing alcohol cannot be distributed. Sugar free candy or cookies are welcomed. Jigsaw puzzles, coloring books, crossword, Sudoku and word search books crayons and other art supplies are popular. Socks, slippers, T-shirts, hats, jewelry, picture frames and knick knacks are all treasured prizes. If you would like to contribute, contact Lois at 653-5857. By LOIS SWOBODAJescelyn Brannen bornAt 4:41 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 16, 2012, Cierra Russell and Cody Brannen of Eastpoint welcomed their little angel into the world, Jescelyn Arnetta Brannen. Maternal grandparents are Sarah Sanders of Eastpoint and Gene Russell of Eastpoint. Maternal great-grandparents are Cathi and Walter Gallion of Eastpoint, Christine Russell of Eastpoint and Carlos Russell of Eastpoint. Paternal grandparents are Arnetta and Charles Brannen of Eastpoint. Paternal great-grandparents are Donald R. McSweeney and the late Doris McSweeney of Hawthorne; Hazel and John Gill of Panama City; and Chester and Lenora Brannen of Woodville. Also welcoming Jescelyn into the world were numerous aunts, uncles, cousins and extended family.McPhersons to mark 60th wedding anniversaryA special reception will be held Sunday afternoon in honor of Leonard and Arlene McPherson, of Carrabelle, on the occasion of their 60th wedding anniversary. The McPhersons were married Nov. 27, 1952, in Fort Dodge, Iowa. The McPhersons have ve children, Connie McPherson of Tallahassee, Chris McPherson of Carrabelle, Shawn McPherson of Panama City and Mishelle McPherson of Mexico Beach. A son, Craig McPherson, passed away in 2008. The reception at the Carrabelle Boat Club will be 2-6 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 25. All family and friends are invited. RSVP and get for more information by calling 363-2694. SPECIAL TO THE TIMESNavy Airman Jacob A. Lee, anked by his parents, Melissa and Timothy Lee, earlier this month at the Mikel Clark Sports Complex.Jacob Lee completes Middle East deployment SocietySt. James Bay Rehab Center holds open houseLOIS SWOBODA | The TimesChasity Wardwell looked Christmassy in her red pajamas and striped red shoes. Happy ANNIVERSARY Birth

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The Times | A9Thursday, November 22, 2012 The United Methodist Churches of Franklin County Welcome You First United Methodist Church of ApalachicolaWorship Service 11:00 a.m. every Sunday Sunday School 10:00 a.m. 75 5th St. Apalachicola 653-9530 fumcapalach@gtcom.net Pastor: Rev. Themo PatriotisCarrabelle United Methodist ChurchWorship Services 10:45 a.m. Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Celebrate Recovery Mondays 7-9 p.m. 102 NE Ave. B Carrabelle 697-3672 Pastor: Julie StephensEastpoint United Methodist ChurchWorship Service 10:00 a.m. every Sunday Healing service every fourth Monday at 7:00 p.m. 317 Patton Dr. (corner of David St.) 670-8825 Pastor: Rev. Beth WhiteSt. George Island United Methodist Church9:00 a.m. Worship Service 10:00 a.m. Fellowship Hour 201 E. Gulf Beach Dr. 9274635 www.sgiumc.org Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis Nursery now provided for Sunday Church Service First Pentecostal Holiness Church379 Brownsville Road Apalachicola Were excited about what Gods doing!!!Sunday School 9:45 am Sunday Morning Worship 10:45 am Sunday Evening Service 6:00 pm Monday, Youth Group 6:30 pm Wednesday, Royal Rangers, G.A.P.7:00 pm Wednesday Worship & Word 7:30 pmNursery Provided during regular church services 7:00 7:00 First Baptist ChurchSt. George Island 501 E. Bayshore Drive 927-2257 R. Michael Waley, Pastor Join us as we praise and worship the living Christ. Great is the Lord and most worthy of praise. Psalm 145:3 Sunday Bible Study................................................10:00am Worship Praise........................................................11:00am Sunday Night............................................................7:00pm Wednesday Power Hour......................................7:00pm Wednesday Youth at S.P.L.A.S.H.......................7:00pm Walking in Christ R. Michael Whaley, Pastor Sacred Heart of Jesus Catholic Church-Your Church on the Coast-2653 Highway 98 East P.O. Box 729, Lanark Village, Fl 32323Pastor: Father Eddie Jones Mass Schedule: Saturday: (Vigil) 5:00 PM Sunday: 7:30 AM (850)697-3669 WELCOMES YOUChurch of the Ascension101 NE First Street CarrabelleSUNDAY10:00 AM WELCOMES YOUChurch THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH (850) 274-4490 (850) 545-2578 WELCOMES YOU Trinity Trinity Episcopal Churchest. 1836Welcomes YouHwy. 98 & 6th St. Apalachicola 850-653-9550Sunday Worship Services 8 & 10:30 a.m. Wednesdays Healing Service 11 a.m. Centering Prayer 4 p.m. Sunday Worship Services 8 & 10:30 a.m. Wednesdays Healing Service 11 a.m. Centering Prayer 4 p.m. FaithIsland Methodists host Thanksgiving Day dinnerThe St. George Island United Methodist Church will host its annual Thanksgiving Day Community Dinner at 12:30 p.m. Bring a covered dish to share. Turkey and ham are provided. The church is at 201 E. Gulf Beach Drive, St. George Island. For further information, call the church of ce 927-2088.Family Portrait DVDs now availableA DVD of Barry Hands The Family Portrait, which was performed at the Dixie Theatre in August, is now available. The hour-long DVD includes the entire production of the show and costs $15. For more information, call 2762550 or email barrylh20@yahoo. com.Sacred Heart hospital guild holds Dec. 2-7 holiday saleThe spirit of the holidays will come alive in the main hallway of Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf as the hospitals Volunteer Guild hosts its third annual Christmas Spectacular Sunday through Friday, Dec. 2-7. Guests of the spectacular will discover unique holiday decorations, tree ornaments, manger scenes, angels, gift items, holiday games, festive toys and table dcor. The event hours will be 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sunday, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Monday through Thursday and 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Friday. Santa is scheduled to arrive at 5 p.m. Friday for milk and cookies. The Sacred Heart Gift Shop is a non-pro t fundraising program operated by the Sacred Heart Hospital Volunteer Guild. Proceeds generated from the Gift Shop and this sale will support services at Sacred Heart. For more information about the volunteer guild, contact Paula Pickett, Guild membership chair, at 227-7535 or visit www. sacredheartonthegulf.org. For more information about the Gift Shop or the holiday sale, please call the volunteer desk at 229-5788. What a Thanksgiving dinner we had at the Senior Center last Thursday. It was a very good meal, thanks to Sue and the crew, and a big slice of Merles famous coconut cream pie topped it off. The table centerpieces were made by our director, Sue Reed. I started off Saturday with my sugar x at the Lanark Village Boat Club. Had a good breakfast and did a lot tablehopping. Then it was off to the Lanark Village Community Church yard sale. I had lunch and had a look around and ran into Sharon, daughter of the late Frank and Betty Ferlin, and Joan and Jeff, two of Mary Ann Boves children, and Jeffs wife, Sue. It was great seeing them. Hope you picked up one of Claudettes famous chocolate clairs! The Birthday Bash was well-attended. The Camp Gordon Johnston American Legion Post 82 was rockin. Decembers Birthday Bash will be Saturday, Dec. 15. See ya there! Attention Bingo players! Wednesday night bingo at Chillas Hall will be coming soon. Members of the Lanark Village Golf Club will be in charge. More on this later. Ill be watching for you at our annual Thanksgiving Dinner at Chillas Hall. Serving begins at 1 p.m. Members of Camp Gordon Johnston will gather at the post for their annual Thanksgiving dinner. This is for members only. John and Loretta were joined in holy matrimony on Saturday by Mr. Bill. They came to the Legion to celebrate. Be kind to one another, check in on the sick and housebound and have a very Happy Thanksgiving Day! Until next time, God bless America, our troops, the poor, homeless and hungry. Cynthia Ann Cindy Smith was born Aug. 13, 1957, in Englewood to Ava Jean and Ernest Corky Smith. She passed away Sunday, Nov. 11. She was graduated from Carrabelle High School and later became a certi ed nursing assistant. Cindy is survived by one brother, Brent Barber; aunts, Miki Peddie, Edwina Paul, Margie Langley and Estelle Register; uncle, Manuel James; niece, Stephanie Gragg; nephews, Cody Barber, Caden Barber and Cale Barber; two great-nephews; four great-nieces and dear friend, Renee Howell. A memorial service was held Nov. 16 at the Carrabelle Christian Center.Cynthia Ann Smith CYNTHIA ANN SMITHMeacham Services for Gordon Frederick (Kelly) Meacham, 90, of Apalachicola, were held at 10 a.m. on Nov. 21 at Allen & Allen Funeral Home Chapel in Thomasville, Ga. Pastor Terry Bernard of ciated. Interment was to be held at 3 p.m. Wednesday at Magnolia Cemetery in Apalachicola. Mr. Meacham passed away Sunday, Nov. 18, at Southern Pines in Thomasville, Ga. Born Nov. 9, 1922, in Port Allegany, Penn., he was the son of the late Victor Meacham and Frances Cady Meacham. For 59 years, he was married to Jewel Cooley Meacham of Beaumont, Texas, who survives. He was a retired veteran of the United States Marine Corps and the United States Army with 23 years of service including World War II, the Korean War and the Vietnam War. As an Army of cer, he directed aircraft operations of up to 120 military personnel. Chief Warrant Of cer (CWO) Meacham began ying for the Army Air Corps in xed wing aircraft before training on every rotary aircraft the U.S. Army ew. He was decorated with the Korean Service Medal, the United Nations Service Medal, the Armed Forces Reserve Medal, the National Defense Service Medal and the Army Aviator Badge. CWO Meacham was given the second highest Army Aviation Honor for ying more than 25 combat missions in Vietnam. He continued to work for the government as a ight instructor with the Civil Service and later with the Department of Veterans Service. He received a bachelors degree in social studies and business administration in 1976. Other survivors include his children, Larry Cady and, wife, Vickie of Missouri; Marylou Erway and husband, Gordon, of Pennsylvania; Barry James Meacham and wife, Marty, of Kentucky; (Ron) Ronald F. Meacham and Monica Buengener of Germany; Kathleen Meacham Perdue and, husband, Tommy of Georgia; and Faye Meacham Gibson and, husband, Murray of Massachusetts; 18 grandchildren, 22 greatgrandchildren and ve great-great-grandchildren. He was preceded in death by his brothers, Leonard Meacham, Eugene Meacham, (Bill) William Meacham, Barry Meacham and Dale Meacham. Friends and family may sign the online guest register at www.allenfh. comGordon Frederick Meacham GORDON FREDERICK MEACHAMNixon Lee Nick Shiver, age 73, of Eastpoint, passed Sunday, Nov. 11, in Tallahassee after a brief battle with cancer. Nixon was born on Aug. 31, 1939, in Calhoun County, and lived in Eastpoint for most of his life. He worked in construction with C.W. Roberts for about 20 years, owned a seafood house for 20 years in Eastpoint and then went back to work for C.W. Roberts for four years before retiring back to Eastpoint. He is preceded in death by a son, Ricky Shiver; his mother and father, Toy and Leroy Shiver; a brother, Jamie Shiver; and a sister, Thelma Gragg. Survivors include his wife of 56 years, Ethel Shiver; a son, Rocky Shiver and his wife, Rachel; and two daughters, Venitia Watford and her husband, Thomy, and Tina Brown and her husband, Buddy. He has nine grandchildren: Lisa, Heather, Daniel, Katie, Leigh, Ashley, Richard, Sandy and Jada; and 19 great-grandchildren, Clayton, Lynzi, James, Kristen, Ashlynn, Tyler, Josh, Troy, Noah, Jacob, Kristianna, Christian, Rebecca, Jordan, Ethan, Korbyn, Olivia, Laelah and one on the way. Nixon has three sisters, Sherill Carroll (Tiny); Betty Braxton (Buddy) and Barbara Jean Shiver; a brother, Bill Shiver (Audrey), and one sister-in-law, Jeannette Shiver; and lots of nieces, nephews, friends and extended family. Funeral services were held Thursday, Nov. 15, at United Baptist Church, with the Rev. Bobby Shiver of ciating. Burial was in Eastpoint Cemetery. Kelley Funeral Home handled all arrangements.Nixon Shiver Obituaries Faith BRIEFS DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The TimesAmy Goodwin shows off her candy trees at Saturdays sale at the Lanark Village Community Church.Chillas Hall hosts todays Thanksgiving dinner BIKERS KICK OFF TOY PROJECTBETH BRINKLEY | Special to the TimesThe Franklin County Toy Project got a roaring start Saturday with the annual Toy Run, as a host of motorcyclists rode from the Carrabelle IGA to Apalachicolas Riverfront Park. Many brought unwrapped toys, and all contributed $10 each, helping raise almost $300 for the annual project. The committee will use these funds as well as the monies collected through a raf e to shop for toys for Franklin County boys and girls. Tickets are being sold for the Jan. 11, 2013, raf e of a playhouse built by Bay City Work Camp inmates. Tickets are $5 each, three for $10 or seven for $20. Tickets can be purchased at Franklins Promise of ce (the former Apalachicola High School), Resort Vacation Properties administration of ce or anywhere you see a yer in the window. Make checks payable to Franklins Promise, and specify that it is for Toy Project. To volunteer to sort and pack toys and give toys out, Adopt-A-Family or post a donation, visit www. franklintoyproject.com. LANARK NEWSJim Welsh

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By MICKIE ANDERSONSpecial to the Times Invasive lion sh might never be eradicated from Floridas coastal waters, but its possible to keep them under control in speci c, targeted areas and using plenty of manpower, a new University of Florida study shows. Efforts have been made in some areas to control lion sh by holding derbies, where divers and snorkelers spear or net as many sh as possible in a given time period. The UF study, led by Tom Frazer, a professor and interim director of the School of Natural Resources and Environment, attempted to determine how intense and consistent such efforts would need to be to effectively curb a lionsh population. How far do we have to knock them down in order to prevent a potential problem? This was really the rst time that researchers have gone out and said were going to quantify and characterize how many sh we can pull off these reefs, how much effort that requires and ultimately, then, how much money it might cost to continue that effort, said Frazer, a faculty member with UFs Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences. The teams work is outlined in the current issue of Reviews in Fisheries Science. The UF team spent much of 2011 working with the Central Caribbean Marine Institute, local dive masters and scuba volunteers who removed lion sh weekly from several sites off Little Cayman Island, in the Caribbean Sea. The team asked the divers not to remove lion sh from an area called Rock Bottom Wall, so it could be used as a control site. At the lion sh removal sites, lion sh density decreased over time, and the size of the sh that remained were smaller on average. In comparison, lion sh numbers increased markedly at the control site. When the study began, it wasnt unusual to capture lion sh that measured about 400 millimeters long. But by June 2011, at one dive site called Blacktip Boulevard, the removed sh ranged from 140 to 295 millimeters in length, with 83 percent of the sh smaller than 220 millimeters. The size of the sh has food chain implications, as the larger lion sh are more likely to consume bigger prey, such as grouper or snapper, while smaller lion sh prefer to nibble on shrimp, he said. The appearance of lionsh recently near the Big Bend area of Florida has scientists concerned, he said, because that areas large seagrass beds provide critical nursery-ground area for gag grouper, an important sport and food sh. Mickie Anderson is a writer for the University of Florida News Desk. She can be reached at (352) 273-3566 or mickiea@u .edu.Special to the TimesSt. George Island residents recently pitched in to clean up and landscape the islands entrance. We had some money left from bingo proceeds, and that, together with a lot of volunteer hours, talent and effort allowed us to make the island even more welcoming to our residents and guests, said Newt Colston, who chaired the SGI Civic Club committee that decided on the project. The committee also included Pat OConnell, Fred Stanley, Terry Kemp and Ann Giknis. We contacted Burkett & Son Well Services, who were able to get an old well near the site working again. This provided water for irrigation and made the rest of the project possible, said Giknis, a Master Gardener and island resident who designed and supervised the project. Then, working with The Garden Shop in Apalachicola, we ordered plants that we knew would do well under tough island conditions, Giknis said. Once we got going, the actual physical project took about two weeks to clean up and prepare the area, repaint the welcome sign, lay out the irrigation and install about 200 plants. Many islanders come out and worked hard to make this happen. We are really proud of the outcome, she said. This project compliments the clean up and beauti cation efforts in the Lighthouse park and elsewhere on St. George Island. Corner of Marina Drive Port St. Joe, FL(next to Piggly Wiggly) www.BWOsh. Port St. Joe, FL Corner of Marina Drive EVERYTHING FOR YOUR OUTDOOR ADVENTURE RYTHING FOR YOUR O UTDOOR ADV E UTDOOR ADV E UTDOOR ADV NTUR E NTUR E E RYTHING FOR YOUR O UTDOOR ADV E UTDOOR ADV E UTDOOR ADV NTUR E NTUR E E (next to Piggly Wiggly) Corner of Marina Drive EV E EV E EV RYTHING FOR YOUR E RYTHING FOR YOUR E EV E EV E EV RYTHING FOR YOUR E RYTHING FOR YOUR E EV EV HUGEGUN SALE! (next to Piggly Wiggly) (next to Piggly Wiggly) GUN SALE! $2900 FREE!$5500 WEEKLY ALMANAC APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE TIDE TABLES MONTHLY AVERAGESTo nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from these given for APALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW Cat Point Minus 0:40 Minus 1:17 East Pass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27 To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from those given for CARRABELLE: HIGH LOW Bald Point Minus 9:16 Minus 0:03 Sponsor the WEEKLY ALMANACCall Today!653-8868 Date HighLow% Precip Thu, Nov. 2270 46 0% Fri, Nov. 2372 48 0% Sat, Nov. 2471 44 0% Sun, Nov. 2565 48 0% Mon, Nov. 2669 50 0% Tues, Nov. 2771 53 0% Wed, Nov. 2871 5220% 21 We 759am 1.8 916pm 2.1 213am 1.1 215pm 0.8 22 Th 1005am 1.6 945pm 2.2 328am 0.8 308pm 1.1 23 Fr 1159am 1.8 1012pm 2.2 429am 0.3 358pm 1.3 24 Sa 119pm 1.9 1040pm 2.4 520am 0.0 445pm 1.6 25 Su 217pm 1.9 1108pm 2.4 606am -0.2 529pm 1.6 26 Mo 303pm 2.1 1138pm 2.4 647am -0.3 609pm 1.8 27 Tu 341pm 2.1 725am -0.5 645pm 1.8 28 We 1211am 2.4 414pm 2.1 800am -0.5 720pm 1.8 29 Th 1246am 2.4 444pm 2.1 831am -0.5 754pm 1.8 30 Fr 125am 2.4 513pm 2.1 900am -0.5 831pm 1.8 FreeTideTables.com For comparison only Times are local Tides in feet from MLLW Date Day High Tide High Tide Low Tide Low Tide 1 Th 250am 2.7 622pm 2.4 1010am 0.0 939pm 2.1 2 Fr 325am 2.7 703pm 2.4 1042am 0.0 1018pm 2.1 3 Sa 405am 2.7 747pm 2.4 1117am 0.2 1108pm 1.9 4 Su 350am 2.6 732pm 2.4 1059am 0.2 1112pm 1.9 5 Mo 21 We 924am 1.1 1041pm 1.3 426am 0.7 428pm 0.5 22 Th 1130am 1.0 1110pm 1.4 541am 0.5 521pm 0.7 23 Fr 124pm 1.1 1137pm 1.4 642am 0.2 611pm 0.8 24 Sa 244pm 1.2 733am 0.0 658pm 1.0 25 Su 1205am 1.5 342pm 1.2 819am -0.1 742pm 1.0 26 Mo 1233am 1.5 428pm 1.3 900am -0.2 822pm 1.1 27 Tu 103am 1.5 506pm 1.3 938am -0.3 858pm 1.1 28 We 136am 1.5 539pm 1.3 1013am -0.3 933pm 1.1 29 Th 211am 1.5 609pm 1.3 1044am -0.3 1007pm 1.1 30 Fr 250am 1.5 638pm 1.3 1113am -0.3 1044pm 1.1 FreeTideTables.com For comparison only Times are local Tides in feet from MLLW Thursday, November 22, 2012 Page 10Beekeepers Field Day to be Dec. 1There will be a Beekeepers Field Day and Trade Show on Dec. 1 at the Washington County Extension Of ce in Chipley. Registration begins at 9 a.m. CT. Class rotations begin at 10 a.m. and continue until noon. There will be a smoker lighting contest, lunch and judging before a general session at 1:15 p.m. on Pollen and Nectar Producing Plants, presented by Laurence Cutts and Elmore Herman. Topics in the rotations include hive assembly by Doug Corbin and Herman; open hive demonstration by Jeff Pippin, Jamie Ellis and David Westervelt; and winter hive management by Cutts. Beekeeper advanced training classes will be offered by interactive videoconference to selected counties Feb. 18 and 25, and March 4 and 11. More details to follow. Cost of the Field Day and Trade Show is $15 per person, $10 for additional family members. For more information, call the Gulf County Extension Of ce at 6393200 or the Franklin County Extension Of ce at 653-9337. I got this picture of a jumping spider, or Salticid, feeding on a dragon y on the fence surrounding the airport. Even if you dont like spiders, you have to admire the hunting skill of this amazing animal. Have you ever tried to catch a dragon y? I have, and it isnt easy. This little guy probably nabbed this dragon y that looks to be about twice his size while it was perched on the fence. The jumping spiders are the largest spider family with more than 5,000 species. The chief identifying characteristic of jumping spiders is a single pair of eyes that are greatly enlarged and face straight ahead. This pair of eyes gives them excellent vision that they use to track prey. In fact, they are believed to have the best vision of any spider and possibly of any arthropod. Jumping spiders have color vision and are capable of learning, recognizing and remembering colors, and of adapting their hunting behavior based on what they have learned. Jumping spiders hunt during the day. They have a hydraulic system that allows them to jump great distances by altering the internal pressure of their body uid. Most jumping spiders can jump several times the length of their body. When a jumping spider is moving from place to place, and especially just before it jumps, it tethers a lament of silk, or dragline, to whatever it is standing on in order to break the fall if its jump should fail. Like many other spiders that leave a practically continuous silk trail, jumping spiders impregnate the silk line with pheromones that play a role in reproduction, and possibly in navigation. Jumping spiders use their vision in complex courtship displays. Males are often quite different in appearance from females and might have bushy, colored or iridescent hairs, front leg fringes and other, often bizarre, modi cations. These are displayed with complex sideling or zigzag movements as part of a courtship dance. BUDS N BUGSLois Swoboda Residents make St. George Island more beautifulSt. George Island workers pose in front of their newly painted and landscaped sign. Kneeling, from left, are Ann Giknis, Rita Culbertson and Pat OConnell. Standing from left are Candy Howington, Cindy Tyminski, Barb Paget, Fred Stanley, Glynda Ratliff, Tom Slocum, Tom Siculiano, Chris Jensen, Bill Rogers, Ed Barnell and Dany and Marty Ray. Not pictured are Newt Colston, Fran Giknis, Jane Nipps, Susan Kearney, Pinki Jackel, Terry Kemp, Dave and Sharon Hutchinson and Jim Troyan.SPECIAL TO THE TIMES Outdoors BRIEF Jumping spiders also excellent huntersLOIS SWOBODA | The TimesUF: Controlling lion sh best done in targeted areas Email outdoors news to timesoutdoors @star .com OUTDOORSwww.apalachtimes.comSection Section A SPONSORED BY Freshwater InshoreTrout fishing continues to be hit-or-miss in St. Joe bay and around the Forgotten Coast. Weather and wind are the main factors in poor fishing conditions lately. Red fish arestill being caught on most area beaches and on the piers and docks in and around St. Joe Bay. Good action can be found on cut bait such as mullet or big shrimp. A few pompano and whiting are showing up, but not in string numbers yet. Crapppie are starting to show up in deeper creeks and in the main rivers and soem area lakes. Live crappie minnows work the best, however, small grubs may find the fish faster. Lake Wimico has reported on a few bass and bream catches this week, but nothing to bragg about.

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CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA SP O RTS www.apalachtimes.com ASection Gulfside IGA PLAYER OF THE WEEK SPONSORPlayer of the Week Seahawk senior Zach Howze, chosen by his soccer teammates to be captain this year, scored two goals against Rocky Bayou. He is taking his role very seriously and we are proud of his eorts and the leadership he is providing to his peers, said Coach Ramon Valenzuela.Congratulations, Zach! Hometown Proud (850)653-9695 By DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com It was a good start for the Franklin County High School soccer teams last week, as both the girls and boys squads picked up their rst season wins in their matchups against district foe Rocky Bayou in Niceville. The girls squad, under the direction of coach Kelli Wright, notched a 2-1 triumph, while the boys squad, under coach Luis Ramon Valenzuela, tallied a 5-2 victory. In the girls opener, the Lady Knights struck rst with a goal with 10 minutes left in the rst half to establish a 1-0 lead that carried through the end of the rst half. But strong second-half offensive play and counterattacks by the Lady Seahawks led to two exciting goals and many other scoring opportunities. Five minutes into the second half, junior Jessica Shields served up one of her two great direct kicks into the box that resulted in a score. The rst kick bounced to eighth grader Ali Zingarelli, who then assisted junior Gracyn Kirvin for the rst Lady Seahawk goal of the match. Roughly ve minutes before the rst water break, Shields served up her second free kick in the penalty box which Kirvin found a way to put it in the net for the second goal of the match. Kirvin totaled ve shots on goal. That would be all the Lady Seahawks needed to secure their rst district win. Sophomore Macey Hunt played another excellent game at goalkeeper with 12 saves, said Wright. She just keeps making great saves to keep our team in the game. The coach said sophomore Katie Segers goal line to goal line play kept the Lady Seahawks in the game. She also produced three shots on goal. I knew when she came off the eld she was exhausted by the way she went to the ground to try to recover her energy, said Wright. Overall we are still developing our defensive backs and will get better each game. Both teams included a handful of young players. Zingarelli got her foot on a lot of balls in the middle of the eld, and eighth grader Ali Kirvin contributed at forward to team success. The win evened the Lady Seahawks record at 1-1, after the Franklin County varsity girls dropped a 4-1 match at John Paul II on Nov. 8. In that match, in which John Paul senior Beatrice Menjor nailed a trio of goals, the Lady Seahawks trailed 1-0 at the half before John Paul exploded in the second half with three goals. Franklin County managed its lone goal when Gracyn Kirvin sent it through the net on an assist from Shields. Junior Adrianna Reeder and Seger each managed two shots on goal. The Lady Seahawks next match will be another district road test against rival Port St. Joe on Tuesday, Nov. 27 at 6 p.m.Page 11 Thursday, November 22, 2012Soccer teams sweep against Rocky BayouThe Seahawks rst district game was an exciting one, as they established they would be a force to be reckoned with this season. We went into the game with Rocky Bayou not knowing what to expect from their team, said Valenzuela. Obviously, we decided to play hard and smart and I could not be more pleased with the way our boys played. They demonstrated great ball control, ongoing communication, and performed equally as well both defensively and offensively. The squad amassed ve goals, two from Graham Kirvin, two from Zack Howze and one from Josh Reeder. Two of the goals were from two penalty kicks against Rocky Bayou. Franklin County produced eight shots on goal and a save and 19 shots from Casey Sapp Stacy Kirvin and I told the boys if they won, we would cook pasta for them. We are pleased to do this for the team they de nitely gave it their all on the eld, said Valenzuela. Each one of them played the way we wanted them to play, intensely and using the skills they learned at practice. The boys are noticeably becoming stronger players and they needed to win their rst district game to build their con dence in their skills. The boys square off against archrival Port St. Joe in an away game Tuesday, Nov. 27 at 8 p.m. We would like to invite our community to support both our boys and girls teams, said Valenzuela. This is going to be our second district game and the boys are excited to get out there and attempt a win again. Boys earn pasta meal with win SOCCER SCHEDULETUESDAY, NOV. 27 @ Port St. Joe 6 p.m./ 8 p.m. THURSDAY, NOV. 29 @ West Gadsden 5 p.m./7 p.m. FRIDAY, NOV. 30 vs. Baker 5 p.m./7 p.m. SATURDAY, DEC. 1 @ Freeport Noon/2 p.m. TUESDAY, DEC. 4 vs. John Paul II 5 p.m. (Girls only) FRIDAY, DEC. 7 vs. Rocky Bayou 4 p.m./6 p.m. TUESDAY, DEC. 11 vs. Port St. Joe 6 p.m./ 8 p.m. THURSDAY, DEC. 13 @ Rutherford 7 p.m. (Girls only) FRIDAY, DEC. 14 vs. Freeport 5 p.m./7 p.m. MONDAY, DEC. 17 @ Baker 5 p.m./7 p.m. WEDNESDAY, JAN. 9 vs. Rutherford 7 p.m. (Girls only) THURSDAY, JAN. 10 vs. West Gadsden 5 p.m./7 p.m. JAN. 15-18 GIRLS DISTRICT @ Port St. Joe JAN. 22-25 BOYS DISTRICT @ Freeport TUESDAY, NOV. 27 @ Hosford 6 p.m. THURSDAY, NOV. 29 Blountstown 5 p.m. TUESDAY, DEC. 4 @ Wewa 6 p.m. FRIDAY, DEC. 7 @ Riversprings 5 p.m. TUESDAY, NOV. 27 @ John Paul II 6/7:30 p.m. THURSDAY, NOV. 29 @ Wewahitchka 5:30/7 p.m. SATURDAY, DEC. 1 @ West Gadsden* 6/7:30 p.m. FRIDAY, DEC. 7 @ Bozeman* 6:30/8 p.m. SATURDAY, DEC. 8 vs. West Gadsden* 6/7:30 p.m. MONDAY, DEC. 10 vs. Tallavana Christian 6/7:30 p.m. THURSDAY, DEC. 13 vs. Liberty County* 5:30/7 p.m. FRIDAY, DEC. 14 @ South Walton* 6:30/8 p.m. MONDAY, DEC. 17 @ Tallavana Christian 6/7:30 p.m. TUESDAY, DEC. 18 @ Blountstown* 5:30/7 p.m. FRIDAY, DEC. 21 vs. Port St. Joe* 6/7:30 p.m. DEC. 27-29 Franklin County Hoops Battle on the Gulf FRIDAY, JAN. 4 @ Wakulla 2 p.m. (Girls only) TUESDAY, JAN. 8 @ Liberty County* 6/7:30 p.m. THURSDAY, JAN. 10 vs. South Walton* 5:30/7 p.m. FRIDAY, JAN. 11 vs. John Paul II 6 p.m. (Girls only) TUESDAY, JAN. 15 vs. Blountstown* 5:30/7 p.m. FRIDAY, JAN. 18 vs. Bozeman* 6:30/8 p.m. SATURDAY, JAN. 19 @ Port St. Joe* 6/7:30 p.m. TUESDAY, JAN. 22 @ Aucilla Christian 5:30/7 p.m. WEDNESDAY, JAN. 23 vs. Wakulla 6:30 p.m. (Girls only) THURSDAY, JAN. 24 vs. Wewahitchka 5:30 p.m. (Girls only) FRIDAY, JAN. 25 vs. Wewahitchka 12:30 pm (Boys only) JAN. 29 FEB. 2 Girls District Tourney @ South Walton THURSDAY, JAN. 31 vs. John Paul II (Senior Night) 7 p.m. (Boys Only) FEB. 5 9 Boys District Tourney @ South Walton District games All times are Eastern Standard Time 2012-13 FCHS Varsity 2012 Youth Basketball BASKETBALL SCHEDULES

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LocalA12 | The Times Thursday, November 22, 2012 THE PANAMA CITY PICTORIAL BOOK IS HERE! $39.95+ TAX BUY NOW! THE NEWS HERALDMAKESTHEPERFECTGIFT FOR FAMILYAND FRIENDS! ______Copies at $39.95 plus $3.00 tax per book and pick up my order at The News Herald oce. Name ___________________________________________________________________________________________ Address __________________________________________________________________________________________ City ______________________________________________________ State _______________ Zip ________________ Phone (_____) ______________________ E-mail _________________________________________________________Signature ________________________________________________________________________________ Charge Card Number_____________________________________ Security Code______________Exp. Date_____________________ Payable to: The News Herald VISA THE NEWS HERALD THE NEWS HERALD GET YOUR COPY TODAY $ 39 .95 AKES THE PER F ECT $ .95 JUST IN TIME FOR THE HOLIDAYS! PANAMACITY.PICTORIALBOOK.COMMAIL IN FORM OR ORDER ONLINE AT:I wish to order: ____ Copies at $39.95 plus $2.60 tax per book and pick up my order (mail in form only) at The News Herald oce. Total $42.55/book ____Copies at $39.95 plus $5.95 shipping and handling and $2.60 tax per book and have my order shipped to the address below. Total $48.50/bookTOTAL AMOUNT ENCLOSED:__________ Name ________________________________________________ Address _______________________________________________ City _________________________ State ______ ZIP ____________ Phone ( )_____________ E-mail __________________________ ____________________________________________________ Signature ____________________________________________________ Charge Card Number Security Code Exp. Date PAYMENTMETHOD CHECK/MONEYORDER Payable to: The News Herald VISA AMEX MASTERCARD DISCOVER NOTICE OF INTENT IS GIVEN THAT FRANKLIN COUNTY WILL HOLD A PUBLICHEARING TO CONSIDER ADOPTING AN ORDINANCE REGULATING THE EASTPOINTPAVILION BY PROHIBITING THE CONSUMPTIONOF ALCOHOL, LOITERING AND PUBLICNUISANCES.Notice is hereby given that on December 4, 2012 at 10:00 a.m. (ET) at 34 Forbes Street, Apalachicola, Florida at the Courthouse Annex, the Franklin CountyBoard of County Commissioners will hold a public hearing to consider adopting an ordinance captioned as follows:AN ORDINANCE PROVIDING THAT ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGESSHALL NOT BE CONSUMED AT THE EASTPOINT PAVILION, FORBIDDING LOITERING; FORBIDDING PUBLIC NUISANCES; PROVIDING FOR PENALTIES;PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY AND AN EFFECTIVE DATE. Street, Apalachicola,Florida and may be viewed there.Interested Persons may appear at the meeting and be heard with respect to the proposed ordinance. Any party who may wish to appeal the decision made at this public hearingis responsible for making a verbatim transcript of the hearing.Those persons requiring assistance to attend the meeting must call deputy at 850-653-8861 x100 at least three business days before the meeting to make arrangements. and used the right vehicles in promoting that right. Its a positive message and one that seems to be working. Blair said though the overall numbers are strong, the fact that August was so strong after two consecutive months of declines was less signi cant as an indicator of speci c programming success. The only thing we can interpret from it is the collectors of the tax have different schedules, he said. August is a not a big month normally compared to June and July. The different reporting periods throw it off. If its low one month, it tends to get picked up the next. We were concerned we would see a drop in the summer, Blair said. This tells us our tourism community has some staying power. It remains to be seen what happens when the effect of the BP money begins wearing off. As good as the August numbers were, the TDC received disappointing news earlier this month, when the county was not among more than 100 nonpro t groups and government entities, including several in the Florida Panhandle, picked to get shares of $43.7 million in BP funds to promote the Gulf Coasts tourism and seafood industries after the companys 2010 oil spill. The rst round of grants announced Nov. 7 by court-supervised claims administrator Patrick Juneau is part of a proposed class-action settlement between BP and a team of private plaintiffs attorneys. The deal calls for BP to fund a total of $57 million in tourism and seafood promotion grants. The 110 grant recipients were picked from a pool of more than 350 applicants. In Florida, 33 organizations will receive $13.4 million, while in Alabama, 21 groups will get $8.3 million. In Mississippi, 13 organizations will share $6 million, and in Louisiana, 43 recipients will get $15.9 million. The amount each organization received has not yet been announced. The grants should go a long way toward bolstering the Gulfs tourism and seafood industries and help revitalize the regions economy, lead plaintiffs attorneys Steve Herman and Jim Roy said in a statement. Blair said Franklin County applied for a grant to cover the cost of a moveable kiosk and informational campaign. The whole emphasis was seafood and promotions, so we combined some of the stuff from the original grant and expanded on it, he said. This is money that came out of a class action lawsuit and portions set aside to four states to do something they envision for seafood and marketing. That was about all they told us, to put together your own proposal, no guidelines on it, Blair said. We dont really know what they used for criteria. About $15 million was not funded, and I dont know whether theyre planning another round or what. They havent responded to anybody; its a little like shooting in the dark. Blair said the TDC has been pleased to learn that, after completing a screening process, it has been approved by the Florida Humanities Council to be eligible to submit grants and is putting an application together for these humanities funds. GRANT RECIPIENTS IN FLORIDAPerdido Key Chamber of Commerce Ding Darling National Wildlife Refuge Collier County Department of Natural Resources Naval Aviation Museum Foundation Pensacola Beach Chamber of Commerce PASCO Of ce of Tourism Development City of Naples City of Marco Island Pensacola Math, Engineering, Science & Stuff Pensacola State College Sacred Heart Health System Mexico Beach Lee County Visitors & Convention Bureau Pensacola Veterans Memorial Park Port St. Joe Redevelopment Agency Santa Rosa Island Authority St. Johns Cemetery National Flight Academy West Florida Preservation Inc. Latino Media Gulf Coast Baytowne Wharf Neighborhood Association Horizons of Okaloosa County City and Port of St. Joe Visit Pensacola Okaloosa County Board of Commissioners Gulf Coast Marine Life Center Santa Rosa County Tourism Development Council Visit St. Petersburg/Clearwater Basilica of St. Michael the Archangel Panama City Beach Chamber of Commerce Wakulla County Tourist Development Council Navarre Beach Chamber of Commerce Downtown Improvement BoardPanama City Source: AP TDC from page A1But questions were raised as to whether the academy had a separate nancial identity, and the discussion continued regarding the special exception. At the heart of the issue were traf c and parking issues raised by several neighbors, including Gene Smith and Will and Jodi Rosenbaum. They said problems had been exacerbated by the new academy, as well as other church activities such as 12-Step meetings it sponsors. In addition, questions were raised about whether the alley behind the church is being used appropriately. P&Z member Lynn Wilson raised parking issues on behalf of her business, the Coombs House Inn, which is across from the church. She stressed that though she supports the work of the many churches in the area, she felt obliged to speak out whenever hers or neighboring businesses are affected. After P&Z member Geoffrey Hewell moved to grant the academy a special exception, Wilson cast one of the four nay votes. Only Hewell, Bachrach and new member Robin Vroegop voted to grant the special exception outright, with P&Z Chairman Tom Daly, Sally Williamson, newly appointed member Atul Patel and Wilson voting no. Daly and Williamson stressed they supported the academy but wanted to see a 30-day extension to give all parties a chance to work out dif culties with parking and traf c that persist in the area at various times in the week. Patriotis said he had been working out details of the issue with the neighbors, including placement of a clearly marked stopping, but not parking, area in front of the church. He said he had con dence matters could be worked out to satisfy the concerns of the neighbors and the needs of the church. The church issue was not the only matter to stir heated discussion at the meeting. P&Z members reviewed plans for a new Family Dollar store to be placed at the corner of U.S. 98 and Clairmont Avenue, in the wooded lot adjacent to the Best Western. In April, the board had moved unanimously to con rm that the new store, slightly larger than the existing facility adjacent to the Gulfside IGA, was consistent with the C-3 zoning district. But after lengthy discussion at this months meeting, developer Brett Woodward was told the store would require a special exception, which will require a public hearing. In addition, Hewell told the developers there still needed to be a review of both signage and tree removal proposed for the site. TRAFFIC from page A1 ... Its indicative of the success of the BP Were Salty campaign. ... Were encouraged we used the right methods and used the right vehicles in promoting that right. Its a positive message and one that seems to be working. Curt Blair, TDC administrator DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The TimesLynn Wilson, left, and Atul Patel review plans for the new Family Dollar proposed for Apalachicola.

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LocalThe Times | A13Thursday, November 22, 2012 dance, the young folk often bunked down on the oor and slept before departing by the light of day. A memorable local band was the Paradise Pals, headed by Carol McLeod, who frequently played dances at the Coombs Armory and private homes in Apalachicola in the late 1940s and early 1950s. During the late 1920s, as traf c through the area increased and automobiles became more common, public venues with dance oors began to appear. In 1928, the dances in Carrabelle were so popular that Wings Ferry added a 2 a.m. crossing on Saturday nights to transport revelers returning home to Apalachicola. When Camp Gordon Johnston was home to 10,000 servicemen and women, Carrabelle boasted two dance halls. There was a large building near Carrabelle Beach some people refer to as the skating rink. It occupied what is now a vacant lot across Gulf Beach Road from 2 Als at the Beach Caf. Westberg said she does not remember it being called or being used as a skating rink. She said she referred to it as the Pavilion. Both she and Delores Roux of Apalachicola agree it had a beautiful dance oor and was the scene of weekly parties and dances with live music. In Eastpoint, the Gorrie Service Station was the site of much revelry. This was a large wooden building covered with green shingles near the Eastpoint end of the Gorrie Bridge on the north side of the highway. The compound originally boasted gas pumps, but these later were removed. The main building housed a restaurant, bar and excellent dance oor. It was surrounded by several small cabins for travelers. Roux said Altha and Art Parvis ran the roadhouse that frequently presented live bands. There was also a juke box. There was another juke in Eastpoint. Elmer Smith ran a bar in a big old house at the end of Old Ferrydock Road by the ferry landing. When interviewed on the occasion of his 100th birthday, Spiro Buzier of Apalachicola remembered dancing and brawling in Smiths bar before the bridge was built. Westberg remembers touring bands, including famous artists like Ernest Tubb, the Texas Troubadour, whose compositions included Blue Christmas and Walking the Floor. Tubb toured widely in the South and made numerous recordings including duets with Loretta Lynn. Bands like the Troubadours, traveling by private bus, would stop in the small towns along the coast and play wherever there was a stage. In Carrabelle, they performed in the school auditorium. Westberg said she believes they gave a portion of their earnings to the school for use of the room. Such concerts cost a dollar or less. Sue Chronkite of Apalachicola said Hank Williams was a frequent visitor to the Panhandle and played all around the area. We used to go see him wherever he played, she said. His music had a really good beat to dance or jitterbug to.Gulf Coast OprylandDuring the 1940s and 50s, the county had some distinguished visitors who used the undeveloped coast as their private playground. A few folks still remember members of the Grand Ole Opry making regular trips here. Most frequently mentioned among these is Sarah Ophelia Colley Cannon, also known as Cousin Minnie Pearl. Other Opry stars known to have visited include comic musicians String Bean Akeman and Little Jimmy Dickens. Westburg said Cannons husband, Henry, a pilot, often brought performers down by private plane and landed at Carrabelles Thompson Field. Cannon became the Oprys personal charter service after he married his famous wife. Curley Messer, a police of cer at the time, said on other occasions, Opry stars and their friends ew into Tallahassee and he fetched them back to town in his squad car. Westberg said a group from the Opry came at least once a year for many years. They stayed at the Grice Hotel next to the current Chamber of Commerce of ce and went shing during the day on commercial shing boats belonging to the Jackson brothers, Earl, Seburn and Cat sh. Messer said he believes these pleasure trips kicked off the popularity of the snapper boats that took parties offshore in the 1950s and 60s. Everything they got was free, Westberg said. The hotel was free, and the boat was free. I think the restaurants probably fed them for free, too. In the evenings, in a bandstand at the corner of U.S. 98 and Tallahassee Street, the visitors repaid their hosts by performing. Carrabelle residents and an occasional tourist would gather round and enjoy the show. In the days before television, it was a remarkable opportunity. Westberg said Cannon was good to Carrabelle, too, frequently taking residents for airplane rides when he was in town. Lillian Smith said like the touring bands, the Opry stars played in the old school. She remembers that Minnie Pearl wore her trademark hat with the dangling label. She said restaurateur Greek Mike Thermos, owner of Mikes Greasy Spoon, and his wife, Emmy Lou, were close friends with all of the musicians, and she believes this friendship was the reason the performers rst visited Carrabelle. Messer said the show folk loved to party and drink. Grandpa Jones was my buddy, he said. And Minnie Pearl was crazy. Grandpa was yodeler, banjo player and comedian Louis Marshall Jones, a proli c recording artist and charter member of the cast of Hee Haw. Perhaps his best remembered hits are Mountain Dew and Night Train to Memphis. Another frequent visitor to Carrabelle was American Hall of Fame pianist Floyd Cramer, at the time one of the most soughtafter studio musicians in the U.S. Cramer was the pianist on Elvis Presleys recording of Heartbreak Hotel and recorded with artists as famed as Brenda Lee, Patsy Cline, Jim Reeves, Eddy Arnold, Roy Orbison and the Everly Brothers. Messer said one night, the piano from the Baptist church was loaded into the bed of a pickup truck along with Cramer. A group of merrymakers, perhaps under the in uence, carried the musician and his instrument to Pine Log in Tates Hell, where he played all night long. On another occasion, Messer said a group of Nashville visitors came down to go duck hunting. A hunting party including him and Greek Mike went to Cash Creek and launched in duck boats. The hunters were already a little the worse for wear. Greek Mike, reportedly a large man, rolled overboard. We thought wed need a crane to lift him. He must have weighed 500 pounds, Messer said. Eventually, he was rescued with the help of some ropes supplied by Herbert Mock. It was freezing cold, and I thought hed be mad, Messer said. But when we got him out, he laughed till he cried. Minnie Pearl and some of her friends spent time on St. George Island, too. Joe Barber said long before there was a ferry and when there were very few structures, she and some other Opry performers would visit the island during the summer. Walter Yearty, a big stout old fellow lived in a little cottage called Blisss and looked after cattle for the Kirvin brothers. Minnie Pearl and her entourage would hire a boat and go to stay with Yearty in his tiny home. They swam and fished and he netted mullet and cooked for them. They continued to come for quite a while, Barber said. I dont know how they met up with him. I think they liked the idea of having the island all to themselves. There was nothing out there then. They could enjoy the beach, and there was nobody to bother them. is proud to announce the is now underway.Help those in need! Its time to go through your closets for those unwanted pairs of shoes, in reasonable condition. Bring the shoes to Coastal Foot and Ankle Clinic located at 221 HWY 98, Apalachicola, FL 32320. Donations will go to Franklins Promise and will be distributed at The community service center (old Apalachicola high school) at 192 14th street in Apalachicola. Distribution will be November 27, December 4th and 18th from 9:30-12:00. NO HIDDEN CHARGES: It is our policy that the patient and any other person responsible for payments has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed by payment or any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment. www.mulliseye.com"WE WELCOME NEW PATIENTS, CALLTODAY FOR YOUR PRIORITY APPOINTMENT" FOR NEW PATIENTS 59 AND OLDERThis certificate is good for a complete Medical Eye Exam withTodd Robinson, M.D.Board Certified Eye Physician and Surgeon.The exam includes a prescription for eye glasses and tests for Glaucoma, Cataracts and other eye diseases.FOR YOUR APPOINTMENT CALL: 850-763-6666 ELIGIBILITY: U.S. Citizens living in the Florida Panhandle, 59 years and older, not presently under our care. Coupon Expires: 11-30-12 FREEEYE EXAMCODE: AP00Darren Payne, M.D.Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract SurgeonLee Mullis, M.D.Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract SurgeonTodd Robinson, M.D.Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon "Freedom from Eye Glasses, Now a reality for many."Smart LensesSM WEEMS MEDICAL CENTER EAST110 NE 5TH STREET, CARRABELLEUrgent Care and Family Care Services Monday through Friday 8AM 6PM Saturday 8AM 4 PMAppointments Available Walk-Ins WelcomeMost Insurances Accepted FInancial Assistance Available850-697-2345 COMING SOONWEEMS MEDICAL WEST IN APALACHICOLA! MOONLIT from page A1

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LocalA14 | The Times Thursday, November 22, 2012 CALL TODAY!653-8868 GET YOUR AD IN Trades & Services Laban Bontrager, DMD Monica Bontrager, DMD 12761 Pea Ridge Road Bristol, Florida 32321TELEPHONE (850) 643-5417 Bristol Dental ClinicDENTURE LAB ON PREMISESSame Day Service on Repairs and Relines Don Lively General Contractors LICENSED ANDINSURED 20 YEARSEXPERIENCE P.O. Box 439 Carrabelle, FL 32322 697-2783 or Mobile 566-2603RC0066499RG0065255 Carrabelle Visa, Discover, and American Express Honored at Participating Ace Stores JACKSONSBuilding Supplies Building Supplies & Auto Repair Carrabelle 697-3333 We Deliver AnywhereHardware and Paint Center J.J.s Tree Service, LLC Stump Grinder Licensed & Insured Call John : (850) 899-8432 ROBERTS APPLIANCE REPAIR ALL MAJOR BRANDS 18 Shadow Lane Apalachicola, FL 32320 Phone: (850) 653-8122 Cell: (850) 653-7654 JOES LAWN CARE IF ITS IN YOUR YARD LET JOE TAKE CARE OF IT FULL LAWN SERVICES, TREE TRIMMING AND REMOVALALSO CLEAN GUTTERS AND IRRIGATION INSTILLATION, PLANTING AND BEDDING AVAILABLE CALL JOE@ 850-323-0741 OR EMAIL JOES_LAWN @YAHOO.COM Animal Hospital of Port St. Joe24-Emergency Service For Our Current Clients Quality Internal Medicine Soft Tissue/Orthopedic Surgery Dentistry Clean and Spacious Facility Mon, Tues, Thurs & Fri 8:00 AM 5:30 PM300 Long Ave PSJ, FL 32456 850-229-6009 Robert C. Bruner Attorney Personal & Business BankruptcyOver 30 Years Legal Experience850-670-3030 bankruptcy relief under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon advertisements. Before you decide, ask us to send you free written information COLLINSCONSTRUCTIONOF ST. GEORGE ISLAND, INC &SEWAGE TREATMENT SERVICESOVER 30 YEARS EXPERIENCE OURSERVICESINCLUDE: AFTER HOURS & EMERGENCY SERVICE PROVIDED 850.670.5790MAINTENANCE@JCOLLINSCONSTRUCTION.COM battery charge pending involving a girl who was 13 at the time. The case for which he was sentenced Friday stems from a Sept. 22, 2010 arrest and involved acts committed sometime in 1991 against a victim who is now 27 and married. Assistant State Attorney Robin Myers said his of ce is discussing a possible resolution to the second case, which has not yet gone to trial. But details surfaced in last weeks trial after the victim was allowed to testify. Florida law makes allowances for testimony from victims of crimes that have not gone to trial when it is successfully argued that it shows a pattern of misconduct by the defendant. Grant rst was tried for the crimes against the rst victim on Sept. 12, but that trial ended in a mistrial. Myers said he was in the process of arguing before Dempsey, outside the presence of the jury, that the second girls testimony should be allowed, when the girl broke down in tears. A juror who was seated with the others, in a separate room adjacent to the courtroom, heard the commotion and opened the door. Defense attorney Gregory Cummings moved for, and was granted, a mistrial. The focus of this retrial was on whether Grant, on three separate occasions in 1991, inappropriately touched the victim. The victim testi ed in a closed courtroom before the jury. With children so young, it is impossible to remember the exact dates, Myers said. Its based on what grade they were in. Myers said evidence showed the girl had told her mother of the incidents in 1997, when she was 12. He said the mother decided at that time not to put her daughter through the pain of a public trial, and the matter was not disclosed to law enforcement of cials. The issue of what had happened in 1991 resurfaced in July 2010, after the second victim came forward to say Grant had tried to have sex with her. The girl was examined with a sexual assault kit at Weems Memorial Hospital, and testimony was provided by health of cials, including Dr. Joda Lynn, that revealed a presumptive positive to the presence of blood, Myers said. It was after this incident allegedly occurred to the second girl that the rst girl came forward to tell law enforcement of cials what she said happened to her 19 years earlier. Also guring into the trial was the testimony of Grants mother, who appeared on behalf of both the prosecution and defense. She said that she had become aware of a problem with one of the victims at the time, but took her at her word that the commotion had been because of a nightmare. The defense made an attempt to punch holes in Grants mothers recollections, and challenged the credibility of both of the female victims. Myers said the trial had been a dif cult one, and noted that that there is no statute of limitations in capital cases such as this. It was a hard case for everybody, for the victims, for the family, for the jury, he said. Were not here to determine the content of somebodys character. Were here to determine whether the actions constitute a crime. Cummings has 30 days to decide whether to appeal the verdict. BATTERY from page A1 Full Moon Climb at island lighthouseThe November Full Moon Climb at the Cape St. George Lighthouse on St. George Island will be held on Wednesday, Nov. 28. The Sunset/Full Moon Climb will take place from 5 to 6:30 p.m. and will include light hors doeuvres and a sparkling cider toast to the full moon. Cost is $15 for the general public and $10 for members of the St. George Lighthouse Association (SGLA). The sun will set at 5:40 p.m. and the moon will rise at 5:55 p.m. After sunset, people are invited to climb to the top of the lighthouse for a breathtaking view of the full moon, as space and time permit. Cost is $10 for the general public and $5 for SGLA members. The Cape St. George Light is located in St. George Lighthouse Park at the center of St. George Island, where Island Drive ends at Gulf Beach Drive. Parking is available in lots at either side of the park. Because space is limited, reservations are recommended. For reservations or more information, please contact the Lighthouse Gift Shop at 927-7745.Homebuyers seminar at TIGERS siteThe Juvenile Justice Executive Council will meet Thursday, Nov. 29 at the TIGERS site in Apalachicola, from 10 until 11:15 a.m. The Home is where the Heart is seminar for rst time homeowners will be at the site from 3 until 5 p.m. This seminar is free and open to the public. All are welcome. For further information please call Carol Bar eld at 653-2784 Tobacco-free Partnership to meetThere will be a Tobacco-Free Franklin Partnership Coalition Meeting on Wednesday, Dec. 5 at the Franklin County Health Department, 139 12th Street, from 5:30 until 6:30 p.m. in the second oor conference room. Community EVENTSSpecial to the TimesNationally recognized writer and photographer John Spohrer has donated the framed original of a photograph of a beautiful cat photographed at St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge. The photo is on display at the Apalachicola Area Chamber of Commerce where raf e tickets can be purchased for $3 or two for $5. Monies raised go to support the Franklin County Humane Society. Only 500 tickets will be sold so dont procrastinate. The more tickets you buy the better your chances of winning. For information call 653-9419. The FCHS is a 501c3 non pro t organization. County funding was cut 10 percent this year and contributions are down by 30 percent. The FCHS is in desperate need of donations from animal lovers who want to make a difference in the lives of the homeless companion animals at our facility. Donations are tax deductible and all donations will bene t the animals we are housing. Send donations to FCHS, P.O. Box 417, Eastpoint, FL. 32328 The shelter always needs dog treats, collars, leashes, hard rubber chew toys, tennis balls, braided chew rope, cat litter, bleach, hand soap, laundry detergent, utility water and food bowls (all sizes), kitchen trash bags and 39-gallon yard bags. Bring donations to the shelter or to the Apalachicola Times, at 129 Commerce Street, Apalachicola. The shelter frequently has special needs pets that require more than routine medical care. You can make a difference by sponsoring an animal with medical problems. To learn about these special need animals or make a donation, visit www.forgottenpets.org The shelter is also in constant need of volunteers to socialize animals in their care. For information call 670-8417. Raf e to bene t humane society

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, November 22, 2012 The Times | A15 RENTALS3 BEDROOM, 2 BATH FURNISHED APT W/D, CARPORT, ST PARKING.............................$600 3 BEDROOM, 3 BATH CONDO FURNISHED, POOL .............................................$850 3 BEDROOM, 1 BATH UNFURNISHED DUPLEX .................................................................$600 1 BEDROOM, 1 BATH UNFURNISHED APT LANARK, REMODELED, INC WATER .................$425 2 BEDROOM 1 BATH UNFURNISHED APT W/D HOOKUP, SMALL PORCH ..........................$375 2 BEDROOM 1-1/2 BATH UNFURNISHED, FL ROOM, GARAGE, FENCED YARD, W/D .......$800 2 OFFICE SPACES US 98 CARRABELLE ...............................................$300 BOTH 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322850-697-9604 850-323-0444 www.seacrestre.comwww. rst tness.com/carrabellePROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND RENTALS REPRESENTATIVES will be at the PORT ST. JOE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE on Tuesdays & Thursdays from 9 am 1 pm EST accepting applications for numerous open positions.We offer competitive wages and a comprehensive bene t package including Company paid health, dental, and life insurance, 401(k), attendance & safety bonuses.EOE/Drug Free WorkplaceEASTERN SHIPBUILDING GROUP MORE THAN A JOB A FUTURE! ToPlace Your Classified ad inCall Our New Numbers Now!Call: 850-747-5020 Toll Free:800-345-8688 Fax: 850-747-5044 Email: thestar@pcnh.com Email: thetimes@pcnh.com theAPALACHICOLA & CARRABELLETIMES CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you. EmeraldCoast Marketplace 747-5020 Total Down Pmt $5752001 Toyota Camry T ot al Price $4,2000% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! Total Down Pmt $7752002 Chevy Blazer / 4 Door T ot al Price $4,5000% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! Total Down Pmt $8751999 Ford F-150 / X-Cab T ot al Price $5,2000% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! Chrisovich, 38 ft., Charter Boat, Twin Perkns Engines rebuilt, bottom job just completed, been operating as a charter boat for 12 yrs, High traffic slip paid for untill May Intrested in Sale/Joint Venture or Sale Operate for you. Part of 3 boat company same location 28 yrs Good River/Gulf/Bay Boat, $18K, Some possible finiancing Call Bobby 850-234-9409 or 877-Fla-Boat or email boatlaydee@yahoo.com St. GeorgeIsland $175/wk, elec, satellite, garbage incl. Pool tbl. 12 X 65 deck. Beautiful view! 850-653-5319 Apalachicola Condo. 2 br, 2 bath, with newer paint, tile, carpet $750 per month with 700 + credit score or $800 per month below 700 credit score. *References Checked* Quint 865-693-3232 Carrabelle Condo Riverfront 2 bedroom/ 1 bath, with queen Sofa sleeper long term rental $1,200 monthly. nice 850-545-0784 3 Bedroom Home for RentNice 3/2 home in Apalachicola. Fenced yard, Bonus Room. $850 per month. 1 month security deposit. No Pets. Call Kathy Robinson, Robinson Real Estate Company 850-653-7196 Text FL30282 to 56654 Lanark Village3br 2ba home, near water, lg fence yard, $600 mo. 850-545-8813 Apalachicola: 3 br, 2 Bath. Newly Remodeled Call for details!! 850-653-6103 Text FL32340 to 56654 Carrabelle House with 4bdr/2baths,large family room, LR, dining room /kitchen,/ utility room/ office and/or play room/ screened porch, recent efficient air and metal roof., two storage buildings, fenced yard, on two large lots, extra lot available $139.000 (850-545-0784) Text FL30879 to 56654 Apalachicola: 1 br, 1 ba efficiency Call for information 850-653-6103 Text FL32343 to 56654 Carrabelle Cove ApartmentsTaking Applications Now Available: 1, 2 and 3 br, Handicap Apts. Laundry facilities on site, W/S included in rent, CH&A and window coverings provided. On site management Office. Rental assistance available. Income restrictions apply, reasonable accommodation. Carrabelle Cove Apartments 807 Gray Ave #33 Carrabelle, Fl 32322 850-697-2017 TDD711 This institution is an equal opportunity provider & employerText FL29928 to 56654 89412T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.: 2011-CA000270 WELLS FARGO BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, a national banking institution, as successor by merger to WACHOVIA BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, Plaintiff, vs. DONNA C. SOUTHWICK, et. al., Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE Pursuant to Chapter 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated October 22, 2012, entered in Case No. 2011-CA000270 of the Circuit Court of the 2ND Judicial Circuit, in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein WELLS FARGO BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, a national banking institution, as successor by merger to WACHOVIA BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, is the Plaintiff and DONNA C. SOUTHWICK, et al. are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, in the lobby on the second floor of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida 32320 at 11:00 a.m. EST. on the 4th day of December, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure, to wit: START AT THE INTERSECTION OF SECTIONS 2 AND 3, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, AND SECTIONS 35 AND 36, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, AND TRAVEL EASTERLY ALONG THE SECTION LINE A DISTANCE OF 1086.1 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT ON THE SOUTHERN BOUNDARY LINE OF STATE ROAD NO. 30 (U.S. HIGHWAY #319) RIGHT OF WAY. NOW TURN AND ANGLE OF 146 DEGREES 56 MINUTES TO THE RIGHTAND GO A DISTANCE OF 625 FEET TO A STAKE, THENCE TURN AND ANGLE OF 90 DEGREES TO THE LEFT AND GO A DISTANCE OF 90.7 FEET TO AN IRON STAKE ON THE SOUTHERN BOUNDARY LINE OF ABOVE MENTIONED STATE ROAD RIGHT OF WAY. CALL THIS PLACE OF BEGINNING. NOW TRAVEL IN THE SAME DIRECTION AND GO A DISTANCE OF 119 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE WATER LINE OF ST. GEORGE SOUND. CALL THIS LINE THE EASTERLY BOUNDARY OF HEREIN DESCRIBED PROPERTY, NOW TURN TO THE RIGHT AND TRAVEL WESTERLY ALONG THE WATERS EDGE TO A POINT WHICH IS ON A LINE 75 FEET DISTANCE FROM AND PARALLEL TO THE EASTERLY BOUNDARY LINE, NOW TURN TO THE RIGHT AND TRAVEL NORTHERLY A DISTANCE OF 105 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO AN IRON STAKE ON THE SOUTHERN BOUNDARY LINE OF SAID ROAD RIGHT, THENCE TURN TO THE RIGHT AND TRAVEL ALONG THE BOUNDARY OF SAID ROAD RIGHT OF WAY A DISTANCE OF 75 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE POB. SAID PROPERTY BEING AND LYING IN FRACTIONAL SECTION 2, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY. FLORIDA. SUBJECT PROPERTY MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED BY A RECENT SURVEY FROM EDWIN G. BROWN & ASSOCIATES, INC., DATED JULY 19, 1996, BEARING JOB NO. 96-405 (PSC-13419) AS FOLLOWS, COMMENCE AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 2, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA AND THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 29 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE SECTION LINE 1088.03 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT ON THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 98, THENCE RUN SOUTH 56 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 31 SECONDS WEST 624.45 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 33 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 29 SECONDS EAST 72.08 FEET TO THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF SAID U.S. HIGHWAY 98 FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE SOUTH 33 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 29 SECONDS EAST 171.57 FEET TO THE APPROXIMATE MEAN HIGHWATER LINE OF ST. GEORGE SOUND, THENCE RUN SOUTH 42 DEGREES 47 MINUTES 46 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID MEAN HIGHWATER LINE 78.14 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 33 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 29 SECONDS WEST 169.65 FEET TO THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF SAID U.S.HIGHWAY NO. 98, SAID POINT LYING ON A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE SOUTHEASTERLY, THENCE RUN NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID RIGHTOF-WAY BOUNDARY AND ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 2258.83 FEET THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 01 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 41 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 78.64 FEET THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING NORTH 41 DEGREES 26 MINUTES 10 SECONDS EAST 78.64 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SITUATE, LYING AND BEING IN SECTION 2, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS, MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN SIXTY (60) DAYS AFTER THE SALE. Dated this 23rd day of October, 2012. Marcia M. Johnson CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk November 22, 29, 2012 90831T PUBLIC NOTICE Weems Memorial Hospital in Apalachicola, FL is seeking Request for Proposals (RFP) for the hospitals Electronic Health Record (EHR) system. The successful EHR company must be familiar with the Meaningful Use Criteria and compliance regulations of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 as well as have the ability to provide licensed software, hardware, and services of an EHR program. RFP applications may be requested through the Weems Memorial Hospital website at www.weems memorial.com. Deadline for submissions is Dec. 2, 2012 and should be mailed to: Weems Memorial Hospital, 135 Avenue G, Apalachicola, FL 32320, Attn: Charles Edwards November 15, 22, 2012 90801T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 12-185-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, a foreign banking corporation, Plaintiff, vs. DEBORA G. COLLINS; et al. Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: WENDELL HARRELSON YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action on a promissory note and to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in Franklin County, Florida: Lot 3, Block K of Lanark Beach, Unit No. 1, according to the plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 2, Page 13 of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. Together with all improvements located thereon and a 1968 Fleetwood Mobile Home, ID# DK71268277. has been filed against you, Debora G. Collins; Larry D. Everett and all unknown parties claiming by, through, under, and against the herein named individual defendants who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said unknown parties may claim an interest as spouses, heirs, grantees or other claimants, and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Rick A. Savage, Esq., of the Savage Law Office, PLLC, plaintiffs attorney, whose address is Post Office Box 385, Tallahassee, Florida 32302 on or before 30 days from the date of the first publication of this notice and file the original with the clerk of court of this Court either before service on plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. DATED on November 1, 2012. Marcia Johnson Clerk of Court By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk November 15, 22, 2012 91009T PUBLIC NOTICE Northwest Florida Transportation Corridor Authority (NWFTCA) Meeting Notice. The NWFTCA recently commissioned HDR Engineering, Inc. to prepare a major update to their regional Master Plan, originally adopted in 2007. As part of the initial phase of the update, HDR is working with key stakeholders (Florida DOT, FHWA, city and county reps., etc.) and the Authority to help analyze future transportation projects by assessing their respective economic benefits, developing an investment plan and proposing viable funding strategies. As part of this process, workshops were held in March & July 2012. A third series of workshops will be held at two alternate locations: December 6, 2012, 9:00 am to 12:00 pm Central Time at the Days Inn & Suites, Navarre Conference Center, Room A, located at 8700 Navarre Parkway, Navarre, Florida and December 7, 2012, 9:00 am to 12:00 pm Central Time at the Florida State University Holley Academic Center, Panama City Campus, Room A213 (Faculty Conference Room) located at 4750 Collegiate Drive, Panama City, Florida. Any person requiring special accommodations to participate in this meeting is asked to advise the Corridor Authority at least 48 hours prior to the meeting by contacting Alicia Stephen at (850) 429-8905 or by email: Alicia.Stephen@ hdrinc.com mail to: Alicia.Stephen@ hdrinc.com. Please RSVP by November 30, 2012 if you plan to attend. November 22, 2012 90833T PUBLIC NOTICE Weems Memorial Hospital is seeking proposals to replace 8 pair of fire rated doors within the hospital. Fire doors must meet all specifications under NFPA 101-2006 LSC Fire Doors. Contractors must provide proof of commercial license and insurance. Please contact Craig Gibson/ Plant Operations Director at cgibson@ weemsmemorial.com for information and requirements. Bids are due by Dec. 3, 2012 at 4:00pm. Bids will be opened at the Franklin Co. Board of Co. Commissioners meeting on Dec. 4, 2012. Please send all bids addressed to: Mr. Michael Moron, Weems Fire Door Bid, 33 Market St., Suite 203, Apalachicola, FL 32320. November 15, 22, 2012 Food Svs/HospitalityPapa Joes Oyster Bar & GrillNow HiringExperienced Line Cook Apply in person only Logistics/TransportDrivers:All Miles PAID (Loaded & Empty)! Home on the weekends! Running Class-A CDL Flatbed. Lease to Own-No Money Down CALL: 888-880-5911 Medical/HealthCaring Peopleand CNAs needed. Join a team of people who make a difference in the lives of the elderly. Provide non medical companionship, in home help & personal care for the elderly. Must be flexible. PT leading to FT-positions in the Port St. Joe and Apalachicola areas.Home Instead Senior CareCall Mon-Thur 9-3pm 850-640-1223 or toll free 1-866-301-1919 Web ID#: 34228849 Text FL28849 to 56654 Classified Advertising works hard ... filling the employment needs of area business firms, helping people to meet their prospective employers, helping people buy and sell all kinds of goods and services, and much more! Nothing works harder than the Classifieds! 747-5020

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LocalA16 | The Times Thursday, November 22, 2012By LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com On Nov. 9, Franklin County Girl Scout Troop 200 visited the Apalachicola rehouse and police station to learn about safety and the folks who keep us all safe. About 20 scouts from Apalachicola, Eastpoint, Carrabelle and St. George Island attended the meet and greet. Fire Chief George Watkins told the scouts the new station is in a good spot because it is centrally located in the city and near a food store and the hospital. The old station on Water Street lasted about 30 years, he said, But after every hurricane, it was an awful mess, full of mud and without electricity. That old station caused a lot of headaches. Watkins said the Apalachicola volunteer re ghters meet twice a month and respond, on average, to 11 res monthly. He said the re ghters all carry pagers to alert them to emergencies and tell them where to go, what to do and what kind of problem to expect. We are a small-town group, he said. We try to help each other out and have fellowship whenever we can. Watkins said the station houses four re trucks. The oldest was manufactured in 1988, and the newest truck is a 2000 model. Ginger Creamer, a reghter and police of cer, quizzed the girls about safety. What number do you dial to get help? she asked. The girls answered 911 in unison. But we dont play on 911, Watkins reminded them. Watkins told them the police are an important part of the re ghting team. The police usually get there before the volunteer re department, he said. Emergency Medical Technician Heather Hunter cautioned the Scouts to always wear a seat belt and sit in the back seat until the age of 12. Creamer discussed re safety and reminded the scouts to crawl and roll to get out of a burning building and avoid inhaling smoke. The girls then toured the truck barn and checked out various emergency vehicles. Watkins told them the new truck, Number 2, is the fastest and that it responds rst on most calls. He said to save fuel, the department only deploys the big truck, Number 1, when needed. The girls got a taste of the siren on Number 1. That is the sure enough sound of an oldtime re truck, Watkins said. When you hear that sound, be sure to get out of the way. EMTs Hunter and Travis Osburn explained the features of an ambulance to the Scouts and asked for a volunteer to help with the demonstration. Mahaley Shuler stepped forward and was given the full treatment. She was tted with a neck brace and strapped to a backboard giggling while the fascinated girls observed. Next, re ghter Keith Gibson donned re ghting safety gear, starting with suspendered trousers and nishing with a protective mask. He told the girls the re ghters are trained to don their gear in one minute and 34 seconds. He looks like a horse, shouted one of the Scouts. Gibson said he couldnt smile at the Scouts because they couldnt see his face. Never be afraid of a reman, he told them. He said the gear could make a re ghter seem strange, but it was needed to protect him or her from the dangers of a blaze. The girls posed for pictures with Gibson and the EMTs and then adjourned to the re ghters meeting room where Camille Williams, the most senior member of Troop 200, drew a ticket to choose the winner of a 12-gauge Remington Express shotgun raf ed to raise money to support the re department. Jennifer Allen was the lucky winner. The girls also toured the new police station with Ofcer Tim Davis on hand to answer questions. Then it was back to the truck barn, where the troop presented the re department with a check for $100 raised through the sale of cookies. Troop Leader Heather Friedman said the girls sold more than 5,000 boxes of cookies this year. She said they decided to add the re department to the list of causes they support. Watkins presented Friedman with a plaque thanking the scouts for their gift. The girls then sang Make New Friends for the rescue workers and received goodie bags, juice boxes and cupcakes prepared by Gibson. For a gallery of Troop 200s visit to the rehouse, visit www.apalachtimes. com. The Apalachicola VFD is seeking to furnish a kitchen at the station and is in need of appliances etc. Real Estate PicksOur local real estate experts have identied what they feel are the best values around and are oering them to you in Real Estate Picks! (In this section), Discover the best real estate values in Mexico Beach, Port St. Joe, Apalachicola, Cape San Blas, St. George Island, Carrabelle and surrounding areas. Best Values on the Forgotten Coast SELL YOUR LISTINGS HERE! Only $35 per week per listing Minimum 2 ads per week or 1 ad for 2 weeks Contact Joel or Kari for details: (850)814-7377 or (850)227-7847SOLD John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.comMLS# 248242$279,900St. George Island1ST TIER PLANTATIONGreat Gulf Views! Panoramic views to the east & north, Attention pilots! near the Plantation airport; One acre lot, Adjacent to boardwalk to Gulf, One of the highest lots on the Island, Amenities include New Club house & Pool. Seaside Drive, Nicks Hole John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.comMLS# 247601$639,000St. George IslandHIDDEN TREASUREEnter into partially covered Courtyard with Waterfall, Your Community Credit Union502 Woodward Avenue, Port Saint Joe, Ph: (850) 227-1156 101 East River Road, Wewahitchka, Ph: (850) 639-5024 248 US Highway 98, Eastpoint, Ph: (850) 670-1199 Toll-free: 1-877-874-0007 Email: emeraldcoast@fairpoint.net www.emeraldcoastfcu.com Troop 200 Girls Scouts tour new rehouse PHOTOS BY LOIS SWOBODA | The TimesAbove left, Troop 200 poses with the re ghters and emergency response technicians who led their tour of the re house and rescue vehicles. Above, Troop Leader Heather Friedman accepts a plaque from Fire Chief George Watkins thanking Troop 200 for their $100 donation to Apalachicolas volunteer re ghters. EMTs Heather Hunter and Travis Osborne t Mahaley Shuler with a collar to demonstrate what can happen if you are in an accident.