<%BANNER%>
The Apalachicola times
ALL ISSUES CITATION PDF VIEWER
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100380/00196
 Material Information
Title: The Apalachicola times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: H.W. Johnston
Place of Publication: Apalachicola Fla
Apalachicola Fla
Publication Date: 11-15-2012
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1885.
General Note: Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 32911693
lccn - sn 95026907
System ID: UF00100380:00196
 Related Items
Preceded by: Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by: Apalachicola herald

Downloads

This item is only available as the following downloads:

( PDF )


Full Text

PAGE 1

xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx 50 WWW.APALACHTIMES.COM Phone: 850-653-8868 Web: apalachtimes.com E-mail: dadlerstein@star .com Fax: 850-653-8036 Circulation: 800-345-8688 DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK: School News & Society: 11 a.m. Friday Real Estate Ads: 11 a.m. Thursday Legal Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Display Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Line Ads: 5 p.m. Monday xxxxx Contact Us xxxxx Out to see Index Thursday, November 15, 2012 VOL. 127 ISSUE 29 Opinion . . . . . . A4 Society . . . . . . A8 Faith . . . . . . . A9 Outdoors . . . . . A10 Tide Chart . . . . A10 Sports . . . . . . A11 Classi eds . . . A12-A13 By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com The cities of Carrabelle and Apalachicola want direct oversight of a portion of the expected RESTORE Act funds headed for Franklin County, but the county commissioners dont see it that way. The county has been promised as much as $66 million, a portion of the nes levied against BP for environmental and economic damage caused by the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. None of the money has arrived, and there is no concrete indication on when the rst checks will be cut, if ever. But organizations and individuals across the county are scrambling to identify projects to spend it, and the county commissioners have proposed a 14-member advisory council that would recommend projects over which the county commissioners would have nal say. The county must hold a public workshop to discuss the ordinance to create the RESTORE council before it can be enacted into law. But already, the county is soliciting citizens to serve on the proposed council. Pam Shiver, the newly elected school board member set to be sworn in Tuesday, was appointed the schools representative to the RESTORE council at the Nov. 8 meeting. The cities, though, see things differently, and have invited the county to a Monday meeting to start a legal process to resolve the con ict. The county, based on the opinion of its attorney Michael Shuler, has opted not to become involved in the cities plan. In September, Apalachicola proposed distributing RESTORE funds between the cities and unincorporated areas of the county. By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com From the youngest members of the nations military now patrolling the Persian Gulf to the most venerable members of the Greatest Generation who freed Europe in World II, Franklin County marked Veterans Day with a resounding salute to Americas nearly 25 million living, wounded and handicapped veterans. It began Friday evening at the Mikel Clark Sports Complex in Eastpoint, as three recent graduates of Franklin County High School the Navys Jacob Lee, Class of 2009, and Chris Chumney, Class of 2010, and the Armys Chance Buffkin, Class of 2012 led the Seahawks with ag held By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com On Nov. 6, the county bid farewell to a loyal servant, County Commissioner Bevin Putnal, who attended his last meeting, Putnal, who rst took of ce on Nov. 16, 1992, took time to personally thank each department head for their help and service over the years. Its been a pleasure serving with this board, he said. Its kind of like family. Youre gonna fuss and ght, but you come together to solve other peoples problems. I didnt run for county commissioner for my own ambitions. I ran for peoples problems. I always gured myself as a servant, and not as a ruler. The greatest and strongest person that ever lived on this Earth could have ruled over anything that come against him he wanted, but he became a servant of all the people out there that needed him, and that was Jesus Christ. He went to the cross for peoples sake. His only ambition, from the time he was born until he was put to death, was to do his fathers will. I gure that Im kind of like that in doing the peoples will, Putnal said. If they wanted something, I tried my level best to do it. I felt privileged to be there when somebody needed my help. Ill still be there if they need me; I just wont have the authority I had before. Putnal told County Planner Alan Pierce, I want to thank you for being there all those years for me cause I had somebody I could dump problems on that I couldnt solve. You always seemed to take them without regret. Commissioner I appreciate that, Pierce replied. Im not sure we solved all of them, but we made our best effort. We appreciate you. You were here a long time, and you were always very stable, and we knew we could count on you to do the right thing. School board, teachers meet By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com When the school board met with teachers last week, it was a friendlier session than last year, but the issue was much the same how to nd ways to cut costs without cutting into morale. The Nov. 8 afternoon workshop ran more smoothly than a year ago, when school board members felt on the defensive from a barrage of questions, many of them pointedly hostile. Instead, after consultation with the school board, the Franklin County Education Association solicited questions from teachers and drew them up into a prepared list. Beginning with Cathy Wood, the union president, representatives of the teaching staff each took a portion of the 35 questions and asked them to the school board. The mood was cordial, at times testy, but overall a mood of support and reassurance prevailed. It even grew comic at one point, after the question was posed by teachers what the school district could do to improve parents involvement in their childrens education. If we could answer that question, we would probably solve a lot of these other problems, said Chairman Jimmy Gander. If it would help, I would dress up in a clown uniform. The school board workshop Cities push for RESTORE Act voice County bids farewell to Commissioner Putnal VETERANS DAY 2012 See TEACHERS A14 WE NEVER FORGET PHOTOS BY DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times From left, First Baptist Christian School kindergartners Lilah Millender, Noah Cannon and Kenzie Hicks sing at Mondays program. Below from left, active-duty military members Chance Buffkin, Chris Chumney and Jacob Lee lead the Seahawks march on the eld Friday night. See RESTORE A6 See VETERANS A7 See PUTNAL A14 BEVIN PUTNAL Honoring Seahawk seniors A11 Come Back to Jersey at Crooked River Friday through Sunday, Nov. 16-18, the Panhandle Players will present Coming Back to Jersey at the Crooked River Grille at the St. James Bay Golf Resort. Friday and Saturday Dinner Theatre is $40; Sunday Brunch Theatre $35. Reservations needed; Call Crooked River Grill 697-5050. Dry Bones Ministry to host Saturday lunch The Dry Bones Ministry invites you to come out for a day of fun, praise worship and lunch at 2 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 17, at the Sixth Street Recreation Center in Apalachicola. Evangelist Annie Austin Pierce will host. Autreys to sign new book Saturday Author Gil Autrey and his wife, photographer Lane Autrey, will sign their new book, Gone with the Tides and Other Southern Stories, from 1-3 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 17, at Downtown Books in Apalachicola. Take Stock offers free Thanksgiving meal The Take Stock in Children mentoring program and the Youth Advisory Council invite you to a free Thanksgiving Meal and Fellowship from 4-7 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 20 at the Apalachicola City Hall Community Center at Battery Park. The meal will be prepared by TSIC students and the Youth Advisory Council of the Franklin County Education Foundation. Apalachicola Christmas celebration Nov. 23 The Apalachicola Christmas Celebration will light up Apalachicola from 4-8 p.m. Nov. 23. Santa arrives on a shrimp boat at 4 p.m. at the City Dock on Water Street. The Orman House Museum will be trimmed in holiday nery and docents dressed in period costumes welcome visitors. The Raney House Museum will also be decorated in holiday greenery and open for tours. On Nov. 25, support the Franklin County Humane Society and have your pets picture taken with Santa for a donation. There will be a pet costume contest at 3 p.m., plus stocking stuffers for your non-furry friends.

PAGE 2

Local A2 | The Times Thursday, November 15, 2012 Check out our Grand Opening Loan Promotion! Emerald Coast FCU will lower your existing rate by at least 1% to as low as 1.99% APR*; Emerald Coast FCU will cover the costs of recording the lien, AND; Each member that a over $7,500 with that by Dec. 15th will be a for a to of two $250.00 VISA Membership eligibility required. Rates are based on credit score and are subject to change without notice. apply to auto already with Emerald FCU. will be held December 17th time for Your Community Credit Union By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com The Apalachicola Volunteer Fire Department is the reigning champion in the fourth annual Lanark Village Gumbo Cook-off. On Saturday, four teams squared off at the Lanark Boat Club to compete for the right to represent the county at the World Championship Gumbo Cook-Off on Oct. 11-13, 2013, in New Iberia, La. The offerings ranged from a classic chicken gumbo with a red stock to a complex offering with seafood, okra and sausage. Two entries contained okra, and two were sans the gluey Southern treat. The winning team, spearheaded by father and son K.C. and Keith Gibson, was competing in the gumbo arena for the rst time. Second place went to the Eastpoint Fire Department and third to Carrabelles volunteer re ghters, captained by William Massey. The winning entry featured shrimp, crab and oysters as well as sausage, but no okra. Apalachicola was rated tops by three of the ve judges. It was not the rst victory this year for the Apalachicola reghters. The team also took rst place in the St. George Island Chili Cook-off in March. Keith Gibson said it was their third year in that competition. The rst year, we were in 37th place, and last year we were No. 9, he said. Judging the cook-off this year were Ryan Morris and Jen Hatton, both of Indiana, who were visiting grandparents Donna and George Briesbacker in Lanark. Villager Richard McKlean and R.C. Pippin of Carrabelle acted as judges, and this reporter was called into service as a gumbo judge for the third time. As the judging was about to begin, an ambulance arrived at the boat club door. This caused a slight disturbance among the judges until it became clear the EMTs had only dropped by for lunch. JoEllen Chandler, a spokesperson for the cook-off, said attendance was down a little from last year, but she believes after expenses, the event once again will clear $3,000. During the cook-off, a silent and live auction also raised funds for the re department. One memorable offering was a days work from Lanark re ghter Chris Moates, but numerous businesses and private individuals contributed to the fundraiser. Visitors could sample competing gumbos throughout the afternoon and gumbo meals were available in the boat club all day. For a photo gallery of the cook-off visit www.apalachtimes. com. Special to the Times The Franklin County Toy Project gets under way Saturday with the annual Toy Run. All motorcycles meet at 11:30 a.m. at the Carrabelle IGA. A police escort will guide and all will ride together at approximately 45-50 mph to Apalachicola, ending at the Riverfront Park Cost for ride is $10 each or bring an unwrapped toy. A quick lunch will be served for the riders at the park. The Toy Project volunteers also will be bagging for bucks from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 21, at the local grocery stores. The Toy Project is eager to get people willing to volunteer your time to sort and pack toys, give toys out, Adopt-A-Family or post a donation via www.franklintoyproject.com. Tickets are being sold for a raf e of a playhouse (at right) built by inmates at the Bay City Work Camp, and the committee will use funds collected through the raf e to shop for toys for Franklin County boys and girls. Tickets are $5 each, three for $10 or seven for $20. Tickets can be purchased at Franklins Promise of ce (the former Apalachicola High School), the Resort Vacation Properties administration of ce or anywhere you see a yer in the window. The drawing will be Jan. 11. Please make checks payable to Franklins Promise, and specify that it is for Toy Project. If you know of a family that needs help during Christmas, please refer them to sign up at the county health department. PHOTOS BY LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Top left father and son K.C. and Keith Gibson are the heart of the Apalachicola Volunteer Fire Department cooking team. Above the Daddona family served up savory chicken gumbo. At left is Richard McKlean, gumbo judge. Franklin County Toy Project roars into life Saturday Apalachicola re ghters grab gumbo gold

PAGE 3

Adults $19.95 11:00 am until 3:30 pm Kids 12 & Under $10.95 WEEMS MEDICAL CENTER EAST 110 NE 5 TH STREET, CARRABELLE Urgent Care and Family Care Services Monday through Friday 8AM 6PM Saturday 8AM 4 PM Appointments Available Walk-Ins Welcome Most Insurances Accepted FInancial Assistance Available 850-697-2345 COMING SOON WEEMS MEDICAL WEST IN APALACHICOLA! Appetizers Crab & Artichoke Dip with Crostinis Boiled Shrimp w/cocktail sauce Soups Lobster Bisque & Seafood Gumbo Entrees Honey Herb Roasted Turkey w/cranberry sauce Honey Glazed Ham Prime Rib of Beef w/Cabernet glaze Smokey Shrimp and Grits Side Dishes ree Onion Corn Bread Dressing Wild Rice Dressing Mashed Maple Butternut Squash Loaded Mashed Potatoes Green Beans w/toasted pecans in ginger butter Corn and Oyster Casserole Variety of Dinner Rolls and Desserts including all of our regulars. $27 per person $24 for Seniors (65+) $12 for Children 5-10 years under 5-free NOW BOOKING HOLIDAY PARTIES Entrees Honey Herb Roasted Turkey Appetizers Crab & Artichoke Dip with Crostinis Boiled Shrimp w/cocktail sauce Soups Lobster Bisque & Seafood Gumbo Entrees November 22, 2012 11 am 4 pm est WITH A VIEW OF THE BAY FROM EVERY TABLE! Alcoholic Beverages not included but available MAKE YOUR RESERVATIONS BY CALLING: Sunset Coastal Grill 850.227.7900 Open Daily See you at the Sunset! Competitive Yields on FDIC Insured CDs Special to the Times Cutting off a big truck could cost you a ne, if you survive. In fatal crashes involving cars and commercial trucks, driver error is the cause of 88 percent of the crashes. The Florida Highway Patrol has launched Ticketing Aggressive Cars and Trucks to reduce commercial motor vehicle-related crashes, injuries and fatalities by combining outreach and education with targeted enforcement activities to raise awareness among car and truck drivers about safe-driving behaviors. The Florida Highway Patrol is committed to reducing the number of commercial vehicle related crashes, said Col. David Brierton, director of the Florida Highway Patrol. Crash reduction can be achieved if we all share the highway with each other and avoid aggressive driving behaviors. Troopers will be on the lookout for violations attributed to aggressive driving such as: following too closely, unsafe lane change and speeding. The campaign will consist of four enforcement and education phases, the rst of which will be in north Florida between Pensacola and Ocala through Friday. Three additional phases will take place in other areas of the state through July 2013. Safety on Floridas roadways is a cooperative effort by cars and trucks alike. As an industry, safety is at the top of our minds, it matters above all else, said Florida Trucking Association President and CEO, Mary Lou Rajchel. We are pleased with the opportunity to take our No Zone message about safe driving behaviors around big rigs on the road with the Florida Highway Patrol. Pairing the big trucks equal big blind spots message with the opportunity to see what our drivers see through community education is a unique approach that we believe will promote responsible driving for everyone. In addition to targeted enforcement, the campaign will use billboard messaging to increase awareness among car and truck drivers of safe driving behaviors around one another and of the heightened risk of receiving a ticket for a violation. FHP also will collaborate with the Florida Trucking Association to conduct activities at schools and community centers around the state to educate drivers on how to share the road safely with trucks. The following report is provided by the Franklin County Sheriffs Of ce. Arrests in this weeks report were made by of cers from the Apalachicola Police Department (APD), Carrabelle Police Department (CPD) and the Franklin County Sheriffs Of ce (FCSO). All defendants are to be considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law. Nov. 3 James R. Glanvill, 23, Parker, disorderly intoxication and resisting of cer without violence (FCSO) Nov. 4 Jeffrey S. Paine, 47, Panama City, driving while license suspended or revoked, and reckless driving (APD) Tiffany S. ONeal, 28, Eastpoint, public affray and disorderly intoxication (APD) Amber E. Adkison, 20, Apalachicola, public affray and disorderly intoxication (APD) David G. Layton, 41, Eastpoint, public affray (FCSO) Bobby J. Bullock, Jr., 44, Eastpoint, trespass on property after warning (FCSO) Nov. 5 Lataska V. Harris, 31, Eastpoint, trespass on property after warning (FCSO) Mike Smitherman, 59, Carrabelle, DUI with property damage, resisting of cer without violence and refusal to submit to breath test (CPD) Nov. 6 George V. Vause, 61, Eastpoint, public affray and aggravated battery with a deadly weapon (FCSO) Nov. 7 Amber N. Vinson, 25, Eastpoint, domestic battery (FCSO) Nov. 8 Andrew L. Butler, 41, Apalachicola, withholding child support (FCSO) Phillip S. Creamer, 36, Apalachicola, violation of probation (FCSO) Nov. 10 Charles L. Fasbenner, 43, Apalachicola, criminal mischief, battery and violation of probation (FCSO) Law Enforcement The Times | A3 Thursday, November 15, 2012 Arrest REPORT FHP to target aggressive drivers

PAGE 4

Opinion A4 | The Times USPS 027-600 Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 Publisher: Roger Quinn Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola Times Thursday, November 15, 2012 Experienced By Richard J. Bowne Special to the Times Thats quite a boat. Yup. Sure is. Guy and his wife been all over the world on her. All over the world, huh? Yup. South America, round the horn, South Pacic, clean up to Alaska and back. All over. Very tricky goin around the horn, you know. So Ive heard. Yup. Horns plenty tricky. Gotta be real experienced. Whats the boat doing here on the Ohio? Came from Chicago. Thats where they live, Chicago. Just stoppin over. Where they headed? Nowheres. Not now. How come? Guy died. Drowned. Cast his bow line before his stern line. Bow caught the current. Tried to pull her back in. Boat rail gave way. Guy went right in. Been draggin the river for three days. Cant nd him. Where was his wife? On the boat. Threw him a line. Had hold of it, too, for a while. Rivers awful strong here. Swept him away. Life jacket? Nope. Like I said, he was experienced. Forgot to cast his stern line, you say? Yup. Terrible thing. Yup. Been all over the world. Thirty years of experience. You got a boat? Over there. Nice lookin boat. Thanks. How long you been sailin? About ve weeks. Why son youre green. Got a long ways to go. Youre not even close to this guys experience. Yes, a long way to go. Richard J. Bowne is a resident of Carrabelle. As someone who advocates for thousands of small businesses, I know they want fact, not spin. Unfortunately, too often we hear inaccuracies and misinformation about how government policies affect small businesses. Ending the Bush-era tax cuts for the richest 2 percent of Americans is one policy where small business has been caught up in a whirlwind of spin. So how would allowing the two top tax rates to return to their pre-2001 levels affect small business owners, most of whom pay income taxes on their business income through their personal tax returns? Everyone seems to agree that fewer than 3 percent of small-business owners with pass-through business income (i.e. income from partnerships, S corporations and sole proprietorships) would be affected should these tax cuts end. But supporters of extending the high-income tax cuts then argue the top tax rates cannot be allowed to return to their pre-Bush levels because, they say, these 3 percent of small businesses employ about half of the workers in small businesses and account for about half of all passthrough business income. The assumption is then made that changing the tax code for these small-business owners might lead to fewer jobs. None of this is true. The report that leads to this false information appears to be a 2010 Congressional Joint Committee on Taxation report. That report estimated that in 2011, there would be about 750,000 taxpayers with net positive business income who would be in the upper two tax brackets, and these 750,000 taxpayers would account for 50 percent of all passthrough business income reported to the IRS. But the report does not say these 750,000 taxpayers are small-business owners. In fact the report tries very hard to stop this equating of these wealthy taxpayers with small business owners. These gures for net positive business income do not imply that all of the income is from entities that might be considered small, reported the JCT. To emphasize this point, the JCT report says that in 2005 there were 19,520 S corporations and partnerships that reported pass-through business income of over $50 million each. Who are these high-income companies and taxpayers who are misconstrued as small businesses and small-business owners? Theyre pass-through entities like Bechtel, the Tribune Company, Ernst & Young and PricewaterhouseCoopers certainly not small businesses in most Americans eyes. Neither are other pass-through revenue recipients such as K Street Lobbyists, hedge fund managers, corporate law practices, accounting rms and wealthy people who invest in nancial and real estate partnerships. Those in favor of continuing tax cuts for the nations wealthiest know there would be little public support for their position if the face of those extensions were professional partnerships of lawyers, accountants, big businesses and billionaire owners of enormous family enterprises. Thats why it is attractive to instead spin a story about Americas small-business owners as victims should the tax cuts at the top expire. Small businesses are tired of being told how much theyre admired while being abused in the political process. While a few of us small-business owners might be considered wealthy, the vast majority of us will not be negatively affected by allowing the tax cuts on the top two income tax brackets to expire. And, by the way, all of us will continue making hiring decisions based on consumer demand, not our personal income tax rates. Frank Knapp is president and CEO of the South Carolina Small Business Chamber of Commerce and Vice Chair of the American Sustainable Business Council. This op-ed column is printed courtesy of American Forum. Now that the election is over, Washington is nally beginning to focus on the scal cliff. First, we face the threat of higher tax rates for some or all taxpayers on Jan. 1. Second, theres also a possibility of a sequester, automatic budget cuts also are scheduled to take place Jan. 1. And politicians have been spending so much money that were about to bump up against the nations debt limit. So its likely all these issues will get joined as President Obama and congressional leaders attempt to negotiate a deal. The higher tax rate portion of the scal cliff exists because 2001 and 2003 tax cuts are scheduled to expire at the end of the year. All taxpayers would see more of their earnings conscated by the IRS beginning in January if Washington fails to act. All tax brackets would increase, taxes on dividends and capital gains would rise and families would see their child tax credits slashed. The total yearly hike would be in the range of $400 billion. This could have profound implications, both because of immediate reductions in take-home pay and the negative longrun effects of economic stagnation. The sequester portion of the scal cliff exists because of last years debt limit ght. It was a mechanism to ensure something was done to restrain the growing burden of government spending. If allowed to occur, the sequester would trim next years federal budget by about $100 billion, with half from military spending and half from nondefense spending. This would be small compared to the potential tax hike, but denitely would be felt by program beneciaries. Many are worried about these potential changes, with Congressional Budget Director Doug Elmendorf warning that Americans should expect a signicant recession and the loss of some 2 million jobs. From my point of view, all the tax cuts should be made permanent. The bad news, to me, is that Obama wants to raise rates on investors, entrepreneurs, small business owners and other rich taxpayers. The sequester should be replaced by a more targeted set of scal reforms to restrain the growth of the entitlement state. Finally, the debt limit should be raised in exchange for a workable and enforceable cap on government spending. Daniel J. Mitchell is a senior fellow at the Cato Institute. In recent months, the Apalachicola Municipal Library has been gradually increasing its book purchases because of new funding sources, rst from Patrons of the Apalachicola Library Society and then with a city budget line, the rst I believe the library has ever had. As you can imagine, this is fun! No longer does the librarian put books in the cart only to defer their purchase for another month or two or longer. Adult ction is still our principal purchasing area, and with increased knowledge of genres gleaned from my fall Florida State University course, the library is catching up on crime, romance and political ction, with authors like Jance, Deaver, Hooper, Coulter, Reichs and Thor. Kate Mortons new title, The Secret Keeper, will be going on my list. Her languid British tales are great bedtime reading. We are keeping up with Ken Follett, who has just put out the second of his Century Trilogy, Winter of the World. We have the rst book, Fall of Giants, in hardcopy and audiobook (donated). We went off the deep end with Tom Wolfes new book, Back to Blood, set in Miami; his 1986 Bonre of the Vanities left a lasting impression of New York. The library also has bought J. K. Rowlings rst adult book, A Casual Vacancy. The reviews seem good for this author who brought us Harry Potter. New historical ction authors include two by Ariana Franklin, tales of an Italian-trained female forensic doctor in the 1100s; one by Yale law professor Jed Rubenfeld, set when Sigmund Freud visited New York in 1909; and the rst for the library by Louis Bayard, set in 1818 Paris. In young adult ction, the library has just purchased ve of the Artemis Fowl Series by Irish author Eoin Colfer. The sixth was donated, and seven will be coming soon. This very popular series is the story of a devious teenager by the same name. In the rst book he captures a fairy for a large gold ransom, but by the second book he is allied with the fairies. By the last book he is willing to but I dont want to ruin the plot for young readers. Come in and check them out. Finally we have gotten The Mark of Athena by Rick Riordan. His Percy Jackson series, starting with the The Lightning Thief, is equally beloved by kids and educators. This title is the third of his Heroes of Olympus Series. The library is so pleased to be able to offer such a wide selection, and we take suggestions and requests from patrons too. Caty Greene is the librarian for the Apalachicola Municipal Library. To reach her, call 653-8436. Special to the Times The University of Florida is launching a statewide effort to bolster teaching and learning in science and mathematics in the middle school and high school grades. Ofcials with the university and the Florida Department of Education jointly announced this month that UFs College of Education has been awarded a two-year, $2 million grant to create a research-based, professional development support system for new science and math teachers. The projects most noteworthy feature is the creation of prototype teacher induction programs to support teachers in their rst two years on the job. Induction will involve online and face-toface mentoring, professional development and networking opportunities with their peers. Center faculty and staff also will assist partnering school districts in creating coaching programs for novice science and math teachers. To coordinate the project, UF has established a program called Florida STEM-Teacher Induction and Professional Support, also known as Florida STEM-TIPS Center. Grifth Jones, a UF science education professor and principal investigator of the project, will oversee development of statewide teacher induction activities. Jones said they will start in Dade, Duval and Palm Beach counties, where UF has existing partnerships with the local school districts, and then scale up to other interested districts throughout the state. The induction support activities will ensure that the training and collegial support of teachers in training wont end at graduation, but will continue into their rst two years of teaching, Jones said. We aim to work with districts to reverse the lack of teacher induction support that historically drives nearly onethird of new teachers from the classroom by their third year of teaching. Jones said induction activities for new math and science teachers will include professional-development training in new curriculum standards and high-engagement instructional practices, on-thejob training programs and gradespecic mentoring. UF professors with the center also will lead Webinars and create a Web-based gateway for collaborating and sharing information so science and math educators can network with peers across the state. Supported by the DOE grant, UF professors also will travel to state universities to share information on a highly touted STEM teacher preparation program called UTeach, which is the model for the University of Floridas own UFTeach program. The UTeach model, created by University of TexasAustin professors in 1997, recruits top science and math majors into teaching by offering a creative curriculum with progressively complex eld experiences teaching those subjects in area schools. For more information, visit http://education.u. edu/stem-tips. DANIEL J. MITCHELL FRANK KNAPP JR. @ THE LIBRARY Caty Greene Stop the spin on small business Obama, Congress must tackle scal cliff Library steps up new book purchases UF awarded $2 million to boost science, math teaching

PAGE 5

Local The Times | A5 Thursday, November 15, 2012 Autreys to sign new book Saturday Author Gill Autrey and his wife, photographer Lane Autrey, will sign their new book, Gone with the Tides and Other Southern Stories, from 1-3 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 17, at Downtown Books in Apalachicola. Apalachicola annual Christmas celebration to be Nov. 23 The Apalachicola Christmas Celebration will light up Apalachicola from 4-8 p.m. Nov. 23. The streets will be lined with luminaries and filled with holiday spirit. Merchants will be open late, and the sounds of carolers will echo through the streets, filling the evening with the Christmas spirit. Santa arrives on a shrimp boat at 4 p.m. at the City Dock on Water Street. He will hear childrens Christmas wishes and carolers will sing. The Orman House Museum will be trimmed in holiday finery, and docents dressed in period costumes will lead visitors through the early history of Franklin County. The Raney House Museum also will be decorated in holiday greenery and open for tours. At noon Nov. 25, the fun continues as Santa has a special day devoted to hearing wishes from his furry friends. Support the Franklin County Humane Society and have your pets picture taken with Santa for a donation. There will be a pet costume contest at 3 p.m., plus stocking stuffers for your non-furry friends. Need holiday gifts? Saturday is also Small Business Saturday. Support local merchants and restaurants by spending your money in town. Youll find usual, one-of-a-kind gifts, art work, outstanding food and gift certificates for nearly everything. Holiday Fresh Market to be Dec. 1 Mark Dec. 1 in downtown Apalachicola as your day not to fight the crowds and traffic at the malls. Come for the day to the Holiday Fresh Market and shop in a relaxed, hasslefree environment. Buy handcrafted Apalachicola specialties from seasonal wreaths to vintage European glass bead jewelry and specialty food delights. Your shopping has never been easier. For information, call 653-9419 or visit info@ apalachicolabay.org Holiday closures for 2012 and 2013 Clerk of Court Marcia Johnson announced the of cial courthouse holiday for 2013 at the Nov. 5 county meeting. This holiday season, the county courthouse will be closed Nov. 22-23 for Thanksgiving, and Dec. 24-26 for Christmas. Apalachicola City Hall will close at noon Nov. 21 and remain closed through Nov. 23 for Thanksgiving and will be closed Dec. 24-26 for Christmas. Carrabelle City Hall will be closed Nov. 22-23 for Thanksgiving and Dec. 24-25 for Christmas and will close at noon on Dec. 31 for New Years Eve. The Apalachicola Municipal Library will close on Thanksgiving Day and will close at 2 p.m. Christmas Eve and remain closed on Christmas Day. County libraries will be closed for Thanksgiving Nov. 22-24 and Dec. 24-26 for Christmas. In 2013, New Years Day will be observed on Jan. 1. Martin Luther King Jr.s Birthday (King Day) will be celebrated Jan. 21. Good Friday is March 29. Memorial Day will be observed May 27. Independence Day is July 4 and Labor Day is Sept. 2. Veterans Day will be observed Nov. 11. Thanksgiving Day will be Nov. 28, and the courthouse also will be closed Nov. 29 in observance of the holiday. The courthouse will be closed Dec. 24-Dec. 26 for Christmas. Tobacco-Free Partnership to meet Dec. 5 There will be a Tobacco-Free Franklin Partnership Coalition Meeting from 5:306:30 p.m. Dec. 5 at the Franklin County Health Department, 139 12th St., in the second oor conference room. NO HIDDEN CHARGES: It is our policy that the patient and any other person responsible for payments has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed by payment or any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment. www.mulliseye.com "WE WELCOME NE W PATIE N TS, C ALL T ODAY FOR YOUR P RIORITY APP OI N TME N T" FOR NEW PATIENTS 59 AND OLDER This certificate is good for a complete Medical Eye Exam with Todd Robinson, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Surgeon. The exam includes a prescription for eye glasses and tests for Glaucoma, Cataracts and other eye diseases FOR YOUR APPOINTMENT CALL: 850-763-6666 ELIGIBILITY: U.S. Citizens living in the Florida Panhandle, 59 years and older, not presently under our care. Coupon Expires: 11-30-12 FREE EYE EXAM CODE: AP00 Darren Payne, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon Lee Mullis, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon Todd Robinson, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon "Freedom from Eye Glasses, Now a reality for many." Smart Lenses SM News BRIEFS THE APALACHICOLA TIMES FIND US ON FACEBOOK @A palachTimes FOLLOW US ON TWITTER

PAGE 6

Local A6 | The Times Thursday, November 15, 2012 When the county failed to respond to the proposal, Apalachicola City Attorney Pat Floyd wrote to the county in October asking to enter into negotiations based on Chapter 164 of the Florida Statutes, which provides for creating a governmental con ict resolution procedure to provide an equitable, expeditious, effective, and inexpensive method to avoid courtroom squabbles between government entities. Shuler replied with a letter stating that no con ict existed between the cities and county because the distribution of RESTORE funds is mandated by federal law. Floyd said local distribution is the root of the con ict between cities and county. It is true that the distribution of the ne funds to the eight disproportionately impacted county areas is mandated, he said. But there is no speci cation from that point forward of how the money will be dealt with locally. The problem of who will allocate RESTORE funds within the counties is the subject of an ongoing debate. At the Oct. 16 county meeting, Commissioner Smokey Parrish, who acted as county liaison in matters related to the oil spill, said he no longer would represent the county in that capacity, after the commission voted 3-2 not to join the Gulf Consortium, a board proposed by the Florida Association of Counties to vet and approve local projects funded by BP nes. Any future involvement by the county in the consortium could affect the decisionmaking powers of a local council. At the same meeting, commissioners voted to form the local council that would vet projects within the county, but under this plan, the county commission has the ultimate say in who receives funding. The RESTORE Act does not outline a process for what happens after money reaches Floridas affected counties, but the FAC has suggested the creation of these RESTORE councils to decide where to spend the local funds, a suggestion echoed by Rep. Steve Southerland during a recent private meeting with some local of cials. FAC spokeswoman Cragin Mosteller said although counties are not required to form RESTORE committees, the FAC has recommended it to invoke transparency in the process. We have certainly encouraged (the counties) to develop those committees transparency is going to be critical in this process, Mosteller said. From the time of the spill, our cities and counties have worked very well together, and I believe that will continue. Carrabelle joins with Apalachicola At their Nov. 1 meeting, Carrabelle commissioners voted unanimously to join Apalachicola in seeking talks with Franklin County over distribution of RESTORE Act funds. In a letter to the county commission sent by Mayor Van Johnson on Oct. 15, the mayor wrote that the obvious con ict that has developed between the county commission and the city commissions of Apalachicola and Carrabelle is that the county commission has refused and failed to agree to the local distribution plan adopted by all the cities and has failed to include the cities in a plan or even the discussion of a plan. Johnson said because of the countys refusal to even to discuss a plan that gives an equal voice to the people of these communities through their elected mayors and city commissions, we were forced to take a step further to attempt to deal with this conict by participating in an intergovernmental con ict resolution procedure. Both Apalachicola and Carrabelle have expressed displeasure with the countys unwillingness to discuss the RESTORE Act. We submitted something to the county a month ago asking them to meet with us about RESTORE Act funding, and we havent received an answer, Commissioner Cal Allen said at Carrabelles Nov. 1 meeting. With so much money at stake, we want to be sure everybody has a seat at the table. He said he believed the cities and the county have equal standing before the state as local entities eligible to receive RESTORE funds as coastal political subdivisions, a term used in the RESTORE Act. Floyd and Carrabelle City Attorney Dan Hartman agree. Hartman said the Florida League of Cities also maintains that municipalities are on equal footing with counties under RESTORE. Hartman wants the county to open a dialogue with the cities on the RESTORE Act Council proposed at the countys Oct. 16 meeting. I agree that the cities have a seat at the table, but it is an equal seat with the county commission regarding this important distribution that is to be attained, Floyd said. In the original proposal from the FAC, the city with the greatest population or suffering the greatest impact from the oil spill had equal representation with the county commission on the proposed council. This just points up how council conguration is not part of the RESTORE Act and continues to be changed by the county. He said he would like to see the county show its independence from the other counties and the FAC that are trying to pressure them into the mold of another level appointed government both locally and regionally. Floyd said county commissioners should agree to a fair and clear plan for distribution of the monies with its two cities. That way the elected of cials of the cities who know the needs within their jurisdiction will have the responsibility for approval of their projects for the RESTORE Act within their city limits. At the Nov. 1 meeting, Carrabelle commissioner Brenda La Paz questioned whether demanding a dialogue would exclude the cities from participation in the proposed county RESTORE council. She asked if it would be possible to negotiate without going to court. Hartman told her Carrabelle could not be excluded from participation in the council and that statute 164 is designed to keep government disputes out of court. In a later interview, he said the cities could consider suing the county to force them to the table. You cannot underestimate the importance of this amount of money, Hartman said. The countys got way ahead of us on this. None of this is in the RESTORE Act. Theres nothing about these county-level councils. Floyd said, Whenever a Florida statute requires a government entity to participate in a con ict resolution, it means what it says. County governments have to comply with the law just like everybody else. Why wouldnt the county want to sit down and discuss this? Hartman asked in a telephone interview. Its going to have to talk with the local governments. This will save everyone time and money. He said his letter to the county supports Apalachicolas initial request for negotiation. We will resort to legal remedies which may include seeking a determination by the court that a con ict exists and any remedies available under statute. Hartman said the case would be tried in the circuit court, and the county could only avoid a court appearance by defaulting. Robert C. Bruner Attorney Personal & Business Bankruptcy Over 30 Years Legal Experience 850-670-3030 bankruptcy relief under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon advertisements. Before you decide, ask us to send you free written information Animal Hospital of Port St. Joe 24-Emergency Service For Our Current Clients Quality Internal Medicine Soft Tissue/Orthopedic Surgery Dentistry Clean and Spacious Facility Mon, Tues, Thurs & Fri 8:00 AM 5:30 PM 300 Long Ave PSJ, FL 32456 850-229-6009 ATTENTION!!! PR I MARY CAR E 4 ALL located on 1001 Gray Avenue, in Carrabelle, FL 32322 will be relocating to 680 Maple Street, Chattahoochee, FL 32324, (850) 663-2355 effective November 30 th 2012. All For further information you can continue to contact (850) 697-2550. Thank You, H.C. Hercule, M.D. TANNING, WAXING, EAR PI E RCING, F E A T H E RS, FASHION EX TE NSIONS & U P DOS. Walk-ins Welcome With Mani/Pedi Combo 10% O FF Polish EXPIRES: 11/14/12 TANNING, WAXING, EAR PI E RCING, F E A T A T A H E RS, FASHION EX TE NSIONS & U P DOS. RESTORE from page A1

PAGE 7

Local The Times | A7 Thursday, November 15, 2012 high as they charged onto to the eld. It concluded on a solemn note Monday morning, as the First Baptist Christian School held its annual program to honor all who served. Guest speaker for the service was Army Sgt. 1st Class Paul Plazarin of Blountstown, son of the churchs pastor, the Rev. Bill Plazarin, who introduced his son, a career military man born Dec. 22, 1969. His mother said he was brought home in a Christmas stocking as a Christmas present, Bill Plazarin said. The Plazarins three sons all have served, with Paul going on 19 years in the Army, including two overseas tours, one for the Gulf invasion and the second for 14 months in Kuwait. Were proud to say he came back safe and whole, his father said. Not all did. The younger Plazarin, dressed in Army camouage, focused his remarks as a pointed reminder of the meaning of the day. Why is it we put so much emphasis on Veterans Day? Why do we care? Why should we care? he asked. The answer is found in a simple phrase: All gave some, and some gave all. For 230 years, Americans have kept the wolf at bay and our freedoms safe, Paul Plazarin said. In an unstable world, our military has been called to keep the terrorist and tyrants at bay. We take the ght to the enemy. Heroes ght and die so we can sit in our homes with our families and enjoy a normal life. To elaborate on his point, Plazarin focused on two true-life stories, one he read about while doing research on the Internet and the other which he knew of rst-hand. He told of a Vietnam-era story he read about by Vietnam veteran Colby Dunn concerning a Capt. Little, a physician who, despite suffering battle wounds, tended to men in his unit and saved many of their lives. The second story took place nine years ago in Baghdad, just after its liberation by American troops, when an Iraqi insurgent approached two soldiers and shot them, seriously wounding each of them, protected only by ak jackets. One of them, a National Guardsman named Willie, was fortunate to survive. That is how prayer works, said Paul Plazarin. The bullet did not go through that jacket, but he had a bruise over his heart. He is still in the National Guard, and he is still a good friend of mine, he said. I wanted to put names and events in your heart, Plazarin said. These two people answered the call to stand up and ght, no matter the hardships they face. Sometimes we can forget where we come from and who gave us these rights. We need to be reminded we owe a debt that cannot be repaid. We can never forget. Thats what we do, we never forget. The active-duty soldier opened his remarks by offering a belated thank-you to those members of the local community who had, in 2003, sent him a box full of Bibles to distribute to his fellow service men and women on their overseas deployment. The community support is awesome, he said. That makes me proud, to stand up tall in this uniform. Its a humbling experience. Paul Plazarin closed by challenging attendees to make a difference in your own lives, including taking the time to show respect and honor for the nations military and its veterans. Not everybody addresses these things as they should, he said. Whats going through their minds as the National Anthem is being played? Maybe Dr. Little will come to your mind, or Willie. Its a simple act of respect we can do to pay honor. Its not about the politics, by no means. Its not about how much you have or how much land you own. Its about how you live your life as an American. Thank God for your salvation, and thank a veteran for your freedom, Plazarin said in closing. Mondays service was hosted by Carline Kembro, the schools director, and opened with a procession of ags by the schools juniors and seniors. Students as young as the kindergartners took turns offering the singing of patriotic songs, as well as the reading of poems, including an original acrostic poem written by the thirdand fourth-graders. The program closed with a hushed reading of the names of the countys war dead, dating back to World War I. Senior Sarah Strickland read the names, as senior Anna Harris stood in front, holding a basket in which her fellow students came forward to plant a small ag reading God bless America with each name. The service closed with the folding of the ag, as Bill Plazarin narrated while the duty was performed by World War II vets Oscar Medley and Red Sizemore, who were joined by Louis Van Vleet, in honor of his older brother, who died in the Paci c near the end of the war. HUGE GUN SALE! 11/15/12 11/25/12 GUN SALE! GUN SALE! GUN SALE! HUGE GUN SALE! GUN SALE! GUN SALE! HUGE $ 469 .99 CALL FOR A GUN QUOTE! 850-229-1100 $ 149 .99 Heritage Rough Rider combo .22 and .22WSM $ 359 .99 Mossberg J.I.C. Shotgun Survival Kits $ 669 .99 DPMS Oracle .223/.556 AR15 Rie CALL FOR A GUN QUOTE! 850-229-1100 $ 149 .99 CALL FOR A GUN QUOTE! 850-229-1100 $ 329 .99 Ruger American Ries .243/.308/30-06/.270 $ 469 .99 Rossi Circuit Court Judge Blued Rie $ 459 .99 Sig Sauer Two-Sum Pistol Kits .9mm CALL FOR A CALL FOR A CALL FOR A Largest Hunting Selection on The Coast! Selection on Selection on Selection on Largest Hunting Largest Hunting Largest Hunting Largest Hunting Largest Hunting Largest Hunting Selection on Selection on Selection on Largest Hunting Selection on Largest Hunting Largest Hunting Selection on Largest Hunting Largest Hunting Selection on Largest Hunting GREAT GIFT IDEAS! $ 369 .99 Taurus G2 Pistols .9mm/.40 cal. $ 10 .49 Blazer Brass .9mm 50 rd Box HUGE HUGE HUGE Bring the children to see our one of a kind TRAIN DISPLAY SEPERATE S S TARTING AT $9.79 NO Re-Orders | All Sales Final | First Come, First Serve | No Rain Checks All Sales Final NO Re-Orders | All Sales Final Select Hunting Camo A pparel 25% OFF ORIGINAL All Sales Final | First Come, First Serve All Sales Final All Sales Final $18.99 $ 19 .99 Magtech First defence .40 cal 20 rd boxes $ 7 .99 Remington UMC .223 ammo 20rds box Springeld XD Sub Compact .40 Selection on Selection on Selection on The Coast! The Coast! The Coast! Selection on Selection on Selection on Largest Hunting Largest Hunting Selection on Largest Hunting Selection on Largest Hunting While Supplies Last COLLINS CONSTRU C TION OF ST. GEOR G E I S LAND, INC & S EWA G E TREATMENT S ERV I CE S O VER 30 YEARS EXPERIEN C E OUR S ERV I CE S I NCLUDE: AFTER HOURS & EMERGEN C Y SERVI C E PROVIDED 850.670.5790 MA I NTENANCE@JCOLL I N S CON S TRUCT I ON.COM dbutler@coastalcoverage.com Locally owned and operated Home Business Auto Health Workers Comp VETERANS from page A1 DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times Paul Plazarin addresses the Veterans Day program while his father, the Rev. Bill Plazarin, listens at left.

PAGE 8

A8 | The Times Thursday, November 15, 2012 With its opening a success at the Dixie Theatre last weekend, the Panhandle Players will present the comedy Coming Back to Jersey by Carl Williams this weekend as part of dinner theater at the Crooked River Grille just east of Carrabelle. The hilarious show, full of clever sarcasm and sharp wit, focuses on the middle-aged marital challenges of Norma and Howard Karchmer (Liz Sisung and Henry Kozlowsky), who sparkle in their roles, second and third from right. Both manage to capture the energy and clash of longtime married couples who confront their fears. To snap her husband out of his comic self-pity, Norma asks friend Dorothy Arn eld, portrayed with pizzazz by Judy Loftus, far right, to shake up his fantasies. The widow Dorothy has her own admirer, Sydney Hersch, played by Apalachicola resident Bob Inguagiato, far left. The Karchmers grown daughter Louise, local sheries biologist Katie Maxwell, brings home her new boyfriend Frederic Kahler, further complicating matters. Both add a youthful excitement that is a pleasure to watch. The show will be performed Friday and Saturday evenings, with dinner and the show available for $40. Dinner begins at 6:30 p.m. On Sunday, brunch and a show is $32, with a 2:30 p.m. performance preceded by brunch served from 10:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. Making reservations in advance is strongly recommended for dinner theater. Call the Crooked River Grille at 697-5050. Check the rest of the Panhandle Players season out at www. panhandleplayers.com, or Like them on Facebook. Stan Trappe ATTORNEY AT LAW Foreclosure Defense Bankruptcy Asset Protection Real Estate Probate ~ Wills Admitted to Practice Law in Florida Since 1974 Let Me Help You 850-769-6139 236 McKenzie Avenue Panama City, FL PET OF THE WEEK Franklin County Humane Society This is ZANDER! Zander is a 1 yr old Rotti/Lab mix. Hes a great looking dog, playful and loves the water. He and 5 other beautiful dogs at the adoption center are part of the BIG DOG STIMULUS PACKAGE. We have reduced the adoption fee for these dogs to only $20.00 in hopes they will be adopted before the holidays. Please consider giving one of these wonderful, big dogs the home they have been waiting for! V OLUNTEERS ARE DESPERATEL Y NEEDED TO SOCIALIZE WITH ALL O F OUR DOGS AND CATS We are always looking for people willing to bring one of our animals into their home to be fostered for various needs. Anytime you can spare would be greatly appreciated. Call Karen at 670-8417 for more details or visit the F ranklin County Humane Society at 244 State Road 65 in Eastpoint. Y ou may logon to the website at www.forgottenpets.org to see more of our adoptable pets. NIP RODENTS I N T H E BU D CALL L OIS AT 653-5857 Franklin Countys ONLY LOC AL Pest Control Company RODENTS RODENTS RODENTS I I N N T T LIVE TAB L ETOP TREES $ 18 .00 T o O rder, Contact Lois at 653-5857 Proceeds benet the Florida Wild Mammal Association New Location this Year!! Hwy 98, beside Gulf Side IGA in Apalachicola. See You There! Margaret (850) 653.3764 or (850) 323.1937 Margarets Christmas Trees Coming Fraser Fur 5 to 10 ft Arriving Thanksgiving Week! FRESH WREATHS BILL MILLER REALTY 850-697-3751 (3310) 570-0658 400 + COMM. U.S. 98 & GULF ADJ. TO LANARK MARINA 850K $29,500 $2,500 D O W N B UYS 2 B ED AP T 2 6 OR RENT $500/MTH 2 B/R 1 BTH GULF VIE W HOME W/ F AMILY R OOM $70,000 GULFVIE W & ACCESS 3 BDR 2 BA 2006 M/H 89K 2 LG. SHADY LOTS 3 SHEDS 400 TO MARINA-CITY W ATER49K MIH 2 C RNR LOTS BLK. $ S TORE REDUCED $49,500 2 AC-AT RIVER UTIL. IN -$39,500 Society Nichols brothers celebrate birthdays Jayden turned 7, and Jole turned 4 during their recent birthdays. Proud parents are Cole and Glynis Nichols of Apalachicola. Grandparents are Charles and Debbie Nichols of Eastpoint and Morgan and Julie Simmons of Cottondale. Happy birthday, boys, and we all love you very much. Love you guys, too, Uncle Clay. John Talon Mathes turns 3 John Talon Mathes celebrated his 3rd birthday on Sunday, Oct. 14, with family and friends. His party had a Western theme. Guests enjoyed hamburgers, hot dogs and a cowboy-themed cake. Toddler guests had fun smashing a candylled boot pinata and took home Western goodies. John Talon is the son of Parrish Johnson and Justin Mathes. Grandparents are Darren and Chimene Johnson and Riley and Joyce Mathes. Happy Birthday, Clay Look who is turning 16 Clay Nowling. Love, Mama, Daddy, and Samuel KEY CHOSEN AS EMPLOYEE OF THE MONTH Coming Back to Jersey at Crooked River Grille JOHN INZETTA | Special to the Times LOIS SWOBODA | The Times At the Nov. 6 county commission meeting, Fonda Davis, director of the solid waste and animal control departments, presented William Key, left, with the departments rst Employee of the Month award. Davis, who said he plans to honor outstanding employees in the future, read portions of a letter to the editor, written by Fran Giknis, that appeared in the Times praising Key for his service above and beyond the call of duty when investigating a dog bite on St. George Island. I was most impressed with the help and expressions of interest from William, perhaps because they were sincere and unexpected, Giknis wrote. Happy BIRTHDAY Its almost Christmas and once again the Philaco Womans Club conservation committee is offering decorated, tabletop, red cedar, Christmas trees to bene t the Florida Wild Mammal Association (FWMA). The trees are native and do well on the island or the mainland. Suggested donation is $18. Trees are available now and will soon be on display at Centennial Bank in Apalachicola. You can preorder by calling Lois at 653-5857. Donations to FWMA are tax deductible. LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Adele Colston presents Shirley Taylor, right, with a Philaco tree. ORDER YOUR CHRISTMAS TREE

PAGE 9

The Times | A9 Thursday, November 15, 2012 Special to The Times As Franklin County Public Library moves into its 20th year, we are thrilled to offer e-Books to all our patrons. Anyone owning a Kindle, iPhone or iPad is able to download books. The go-to website is http://fcpl.wildernesscoast. org, which offers e-Books, and the library catalog for Franklin, Wakulla, and Jefferson County libraries, all part of Wilderness Coast Public Libraries. The patron will need his or her library card number for the user ID and the password, which is the last four numbers of their library card. If anyone has questions regarding this process, the staff at either branch will be happy to assist them. A new service at the library in Eastpoint is the Teen Underground, which just celebrated its grand opening. After school, teens who wish to access a computer either for homework or searches have that opportunity. This area is designed so that teens have computer accessibility, snacks and a place to read and quietly The United Methodist Churches of Franklin County Welcome You First United Methodist Church of Apalachicola Worship Service 11:00 a.m. every Sunday Sunday School 10:00 a.m. 75 5 th St. Apalachicola 653-9530 fumcapalach@gtcom.net Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis Carrabelle United Methodist Church Worship Services 10:45 a.m. Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Celebrate Recovery Mondays 7-9 p.m. 102 NE Ave. B Carrabelle 697-3672 Pastor: Julie Stephens Eastpoint United Methodist Church Worship Service 10:00 a.m. every Sunday Healing service every fourth Monday at 7:00 p.m. 317 Patton Dr. (corner of David St.) 670-8825 Pastor: Rev. Beth White St. George Island United Methodist Church 9:00 a.m. Worship Service 10:00 a.m. Fellowship Hour 201 E. Gulf Beach Dr. 9274635 www.sgiumc.org Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis Nursery now provided for Sunday Church Service First Pentecostal Holiness Church 379 Brownsville Road Apalachicola Were excited about what Gods doing!!! Sunday School 9:45 am Sunday Morning Worship 10:45 am Sunday Evening Service 6:00 pm Monday, Youth Group 6:30 pm Wednesday, Royal Rangers, G.A.P. 7:00 pm Wednesday Worship & Word 7:30 pm Nursery Provided during regular church services 7:00 7:00 First Baptist Church St. George Island 501 E. Bayshore Drive 927-2257 R. Michael Waley, Pastor Join us as we praise and worship the living Christ. Great is the Lord and most worthy of praise. Psalm 145:3 Sunday Bible Study ................................................ 10:00am Worship Praise ........................................................ 11:00am Sunday Night ............................................................ 7:00pm Wednesday Power Hour ...................................... 7:00pm Wednesday Youth at S.P.L.A.S.H ....................... 7:00pm Walking in Christ R. Michael Whaley, Pastor WELCOMES YOU Church of the Ascension 101 NE First Street Carrabelle SUNDAY 10:00 AM WELCOMES YOU Church THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH (850) 274-4490 (850) 545-2578 WELCOMES YOU Trinity Trinity Episcopal Church est. 1836 Welcomes You Hwy. 98 & 6th St. Apalachicola 850-653-9550 Sunday Worship Services 8 & 10:30 a.m. Wednesdays Healing Service 11 a.m. Centering Prayer 4 p.m. Sunday Worship Services 8 & 10:30 a.m. Wednesdays Healing Service 11 a.m. Centering Prayer 4 p.m. Another busy weekend coming up! Hope to see you at lunch this afternoon. We will have our annual Thanksgiving dinner at the Senior Center in Carrabelle. Serving begins at noon. We will have hamburgers and chips on Friday, Nov. 16. Orders will be taken after 5 p.m. Your donation of $6 will x you right up. The Camp Gordon Johnston American Legion Post 82 will open the doors to everyone! Your sugar x will be ready at the Lanark Village Boat Club this Saturday morning from 9-11 a.m. A donation of $5 is required. There will be pancakes, French toast, eggs, bacon, juice and coffee. Be looking for you! The Fall Bazaar at the Lanark Village Community Church will be 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. this Saturday, Nov. 17. Lots of Christmas items, chili to go, hot dogs, chips and soda. Members of the Womens Christian Fellowship Circle will be there to serve you. Its Birthday Bash time already! Camp Gordon Johnston American Legion Post 82 will be rocking Saturday night from 6-10 p.m. Come on over and enjoy the evening. Wed love to see you! There will be no covered dish on Sunday, Nov. 18, at Chillas Hall. Be sure to stop in at Chillas Hall, though, and sign up for the Thanksgiving Dinner to be held Thursday, Nov. 22. There is a signup sheet for your name, number in your party and what you will bring. Serving begins at 1 p.m. See ya there, pilgrim! We had many faithful, and one black bear visitor, at Mass Saturday. Nov. 10. We went into the church hall for a potluck supper. Bishop Parkes tablehopped and had his picture taken many times. Fuzzy Wuzzy wanted to join in the Mass but had trouble with the kneeling and sitting. Be kind to one another, check in on the sick and housebound and ASAP Always Say A Prayer. Until next time, God bless America, our troops, the poor, homeless and hungry. Dry Bones Ministry to host Saturday lunch The Dry Bones Ministry invites you to come out for a day of fun, praise worship and lunch at 2 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 17, at the Sixth Street Recreation Center in Apalachicola. Evangelist Annie Austin Pierce is hosting the event and said she is thankful for each of you and our relationship that God has blessed us with. We have so much, and I look forward to the many more blessings God has in store for us, she said. Take Stock offers free Thanksgiving meal The Take Stock in Children mentoring program and the Youth Advisory Council invite you to a free Thanksgiving Meal and Fellowship from 4-7 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 20, at the Apalachicola City Hall Community Center at Battery Park. The meal will be prepared by TSIC students and the Youth Advisory Council of the Franklin County Education Foundation as part of their civic responsibility to the less fortunate than themselves. We welcome all to our table to have a meal and laugh with us. Please show our students that their time does matter. Also, you can help with making the meal a success by adding your name to our donors. Contribute a food or paper item from your restaurant or business. To become a donor, email Betty Stephen at boogiebetty23@yahoo. com or Shirley Bar eld at sbar eld@aol.com Family Portrait DVDs now available A DVD of Barry Hands The Family Portrait, which was performed at the Dixie Theatre in August, is now available. The hour-long DVD includes the entire production of the show and costs $15. For more information, call 276-2550 or email barrylh20@yahoo. com. Sacred Heart hospital guild to host Dec. 2-7 holiday sale The spirit of the holidays will come alive in the main hallway of Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf as the hospitals Volunteer Guild hosts its third annual Christmas Spectacular on Dec. 2-7. Guests will discover holiday decorations, tree ornaments, manger scenes, angels, gift items, holiday games, festive toys and table dcor. The event hours will be 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sunday, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Monday through Thursday and 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Friday. We even hope to have a visit from Santa on Friday. said Paulina Pendarvis, volunteer coordinator. Santa is scheduled to arrive at 5 p.m. Friday for milk and cookies. Santa did mention that hed love for parents to bring their cameras to take pictures of him with their children, Pendarvis said. Proceeds generated from the Sacred Heart Gift Shop and this sale will support services at Sacred Heart. For more information, call the volunteer desk at 229-5788. Display booths are not available for the public. At the core of Sacred Hearts long tradition of caring for the sick, the poor and the vulnerable stands a group of volunteers whose willing hearts and helping hands have served generations of families during their time of need. More than 90 volunteers freely give of their time, talents and energy. Collectively, the volunteers have given 18,000 hours of service since the hospital has been opened. Through membership dues, fundraising activities and gift shop sales, the Volunteer Guild will provide donations for the hospital and our community. For more information about Sacred Heart Volunteer Guild, call Paula Pickett, guild membership chair, at 227-7535 or visit www.sacredheartonthegulf. org. Special to the Times Members of the Delta Kappa Chapter of the Delta Kappa Gamma Society International met at The Red Pirate Restaurant in Eastpoint on Nov. 5. President Karen Ward brought the meeting to order and introduced the guest of honor, Jack Spiers. Jack, who is the brother of member Babs Bailey, reported on his mission work in Bolivia. He shared that he is working to improve the El Faro mission on the banks of the Beni River in Bolivia. Delta Kappa Chapter members are longtime supporters of his missionary work and were happy to give him a check at the meeting. Members also will be taking school supplies to the Taunton Childrens home in Wewahitchka, another community service project of the organization. Members also shared stories connected to items they brought that were old and dear to them for various reasons. Others in attendance were Laura Baney, Cathy Creamer, Beverly Kelley, Laura King, Lydia Countryman, Missy Cumbie and Arlene Oehler. DKG is an international organization of more than 100,000 educators dedicated to promote professional and personal development of women educators and excellence in education. LANARK NEWS Jim Welsh Faith Black bear pays a visit to Mass socialize. Interest and attendance is increasing each day. The county library had more than 32,000 items circulated last year. Our volunteers are the heart of our success and allow us to offer programs to the children, teens and adults who frequent our doors. Services such as providing assistance for food stamps, unemployment, job searches, faxing to the Department of Children and Families, as well as business development and job skills are offered daily. Basic computer skills instruction is offered weekly by appointment. The library staff is proud to be such an active part of Franklin County and look ahead with anticipated success and excitement for another remarkable 20 years of serving the citizens of Franklin County. For information about our programs or services, call Eastpoint at 670-8151 or Carrabelle at 697-2366. Your County LIBRARY E-Books, Teen Underground mark 20th year ARLENE OEHLER | Special to the Times Jack Spiers, pictured with sister Babs Bailey, has been doing mission work in Bolivia. Delta Kappa hears from Bolivian missionary Faith BRIEFS

PAGE 10

Special to the Times The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission honored Floridas heroes on Veterans Day by implementing changes to commercial licensing requirements. The changes make it easier for Florida veterans and veterans with disabilities to enter the commercial shing industry. We have a tremendous opportunity not only to give thanks to the men and women that served our nation so courageously, but also to provide them with more support so they can pursue careers in shing here in Florida, Gov. Rick Scott said. This initiative will expand job opportunities for our veterans and get more folks involved in the commercial shing industry, which is a win-win for Florida. The FWC adopted these changes at its September meeting and made a formal announcement of the changes in a media event on Nov. 9. I am excited to be extending this opportunity to the men and women who so bravely served our country, Commissioner Charles W. Roberts III said. Job creation and Floridas economy are priorities for everyone, including the FWC. Our hope is that more of Floridas veterans and veterans with disabilities, especially those who have recently returned from active duty, will be able to partake in the commercial seafood industry and bene t from this opportunity. The changes will modify income requirements for many of Florida veterans seeking a commercial restricted species endorsement, which allows commercial harvesters to sh for and sell species that are designated as restricted. Spanish and king mackerel, ounder, shrimp, mahi mahi and several reef sh are among the list of species that require a restricted species endorsement. Commercial harvesters attempting to qualify for a restricted species endorsement must have a Florida Saltwater Products License, which is Floridas commercial saltwater shing license, and be able to attribute $5,000 or 25 percent of their total annual income during one of the past three years to sales of saltwater products. With the new changes in place, restricted species endorsement income requirements will be waived for one license year (July 1 to June 30) for Florida veterans who were honorably discharged between Sept. 11, 2001, and June 30, 2014. After June 30, 2014, this income-requirement waiver will continue to extend to Florida veterans as long as they apply within four years of an honorable discharge. The one-license-year waiver also extends to all honorably discharged veterans with service-connected disabilities, regardless of when they were discharged. After the one-year waiver expires, veterans with service-connected disabilities will also have a reduced income requirement of $2,500 instead of $5,000. All other veterans must meet the $5,000 income requirement after the one-year waiver expires. To qualify for these exemptions, veterans must be certi ed by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs or the U.S. Armed Forces to have at least a 10-percent disability that is service-connected. I salute the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission for making it easier for Floridas veterans to become commercial shermen, said Mike Prendergast, executive director of the Florida Department of Veterans Affairs. With more than 1.6 million veterans in Florida, including nearly 260,000 with service-connected disabilities, this new opportunity provides an avenue to help them achieve their dreams after honorable military service. Applicants should visit MyFWC.com/License and click on Commercial Saltwater Products or call 487-3122. To learn more about commercial saltwater shing in Florida, visit MyFWC.com/Fishing; click on Saltwater Fishing and Commercial. Corner of Marina Drive Port St. Joe, FL (next to Piggly Wiggly) www.BWOsh. Port St. Joe, FL Corner of Marina Drive EV E RYTHING FOR YOUR O UTDOOR ADV E NTUR E RYTHING FOR YOUR O UTDOOR ADV E UTDOOR ADV E UTDOOR ADV NTUR E NTUR E E RYTHING FOR YOUR O UTDOOR ADV E UTDOOR ADV E UTDOOR ADV NTUR E NTUR E E (next to Piggly Wiggly) Corner of Marina Drive EV E EV E EV RYTHING FOR YOUR E RYTHING FOR YOUR E EV E EV E EV RYTHING FOR YOUR E RYTHING FOR YOUR E EV EV HUGE GUN SALE! (next to Piggly Wiggly) (next to Piggly Wiggly) GUN SALE! $29 00 FREE! $55 00 WEEKLY ALMANAC APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE TIDE TABLES MONTHLY AVERAGES To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from these given for APALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW Cat Point Minus 0:40 Minus 1:17 East Pass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27 To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from those given for CARRABELLE: HIGH LOW Bald Point Minus 9:16 Minus 0:03 Sponsor the WEEKLY ALMANAC Call Today! 653-8868 Date High Low % Precip Thu, Nov. 15 73 49 20 % Fri, Nov. 16 70 48 10 % Sat, Nov. 17 69 44 20 % Sun, Nov. 18 69 47 0 % Mon, Nov. 19 70 45 0 % Tues, Nov. 20 69 49 0 % Wed, Nov. 21 71 50 0 % 14 We 1235am 2.9 424pm 2.4 804am -0.6 730pm 2.1 15 Th 117am 2.9 518pm 2.4 853am -0.8 811pm 2.1 16 Fr 202am 2.9 608pm 2.2 945am -0.6 858pm 1.9 17 Sa 253am 2.9 655pm 2.2 1037am -0.5 958pm 1.9 18 Su 349am 2.6 736pm 2.1 1132am -0.2 1114pm 1.8 19 Mo 455am 2.4 813pm 2.1 1226pm 0.2 20 Tu 615am 2.1 846pm 2.1 1244am 1.4 121pm 0.5 21 We 759am 1.8 916pm 2.1 213am 1.1 215pm 0.8 22 Th 1005am 1.6 945pm 2.2 328am 0.8 308pm 1.1 23 Fr 1159am 1.8 1012pm 2.2 429am 0.3 358pm 1.3 24 Sa 119pm 1.9 1040pm 2.4 520am 0.0 445pm 1.6 25 Su 217pm 1.9 1108pm 2.4 606am -0.2 529pm 1.6 26 Mo 303pm 2.1 1138pm 2.4 647am -0.3 609pm 1.8 27 Tu 341pm 2.1 725am -0.5 645pm 1.8 28 We 1211am 2.4 414pm 2.1 800am -0.5 720pm 1.8 15 Th 242am 1.8 643pm 1.5 1106am -0.5 1024pm 1.3 16 Fr 327am 1.8 733pm 1.4 1158am -0.4 1111pm 1.2 17 Sa 418am 1.8 820pm 1.4 1250pm -0.3 18 Su 514am 1.6 901pm 1.3 1211am 1.2 145pm -0.1 19 Mo 620am 1.5 938pm 1.3 127am 1.1 239pm 0.1 20 Tu 740am 1.3 1011pm 1.3 257am 0.9 334pm 0.3 21 We 924am 1.1 1041pm 1.3 426am 0.7 428pm 0.5 22 Th 1130am 1.0 1110pm 1.4 541am 0.5 521pm 0.7 23 Fr 124pm 1.1 1137pm 1.4 642am 0.2 611pm 0.8 24 Sa 244pm 1.2 733am 0.0 658pm 1.0 25 Su 1205am 1.5 342pm 1.2 819am -0.1 742pm 1.0 26 Mo 1233am 1.5 428pm 1.3 900am -0.2 822pm 1.1 27 Tu 103am 1.5 506pm 1.3 938am -0.3 858pm 1.1 28 We 136am 1.5 539pm 1.3 1013am -0.3 933pm 1.1 Thursday, November 15, 2012 Email outdoors news to timesoutdoors @star .com Page 10 O UTDOORS www.apalachtimes.com Section Section A SPONSORED BY Freshwater Inshore Red fish continue to be the best bet in and around the St. Joe area. Good reports of huge bull reds are common right now from Mexico Beach to Indian Pass. Most anglers are using cut baits, and good artificial bait colors are glow, gold, and rootbeer right now. Surf fishing or pier fishing is the best way to land a big red fish this week. Winter weather is on the way for 2012. November is usually a good crappie month for freshwater fishing in our area. Crappie reports are steady now, with most action in the Depot and Howard Creek. Some bass are on the move however, most are in the 2to 3-pound range. ROD GASCHE | Special to the Times Dr. John Hitron and Rod Gasche attempted Monday to release to the wild a young male peregrine falcon on the eastern end of Dr. Julian Bruce St. George Island State Park, where it was found last month by a park ranger. He had been injured, was weak from lack of food and parasites. Chris Beatty and her staff at the Florida Wild Mammal Association cared for it and believed he should be allowed to attempt to return to the wild. Although he quickly headed out into the sand dunes the door was opened, he was unable to y well enough to survive. He strived several times to rise above the tops of the grasses and bushes but was unable to get up. Because of coyotes on the island, the men were afraid the falcon never would survive, let alone be able to feed himself as he could not continue to soar for his food. After a few attempts to recapture him, the bird tired and Gasche was able to toss a tablecloth over him and return him to the safety of his shelter. Beatty and her volunteer staff will do further tests and continue to work on the falcons health until he can take care of himself. Commercial shing gets easier for Florida vets FALCON AWAITS RETURN Brice band reels in the red sh By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com It isnt every day that you get to sh with a country singing sensation, and when that day comes along, you sure hope the sh are biting. In the case of Capt. J. B. Layne, it got about as good as it gets. Layne, along with Florida Seafood Festival President John Solomon, had a chance Nov. 4 to go shing with Lee Brice and members of his band. After a fantastic concert Saturday night to close out the 49th annual festival, Brice and his boys were ready for the shing adventure. Brices tour manager had called Layne late Saturday night to arrange the trip. All we want to catch is redsh, he told Layne. I can take them where theyre at, Layne told him. Its your job to reel them in. Leaving out of Ten Foot Hole about 11:30 a.m. the following Sunday, Brice brought along a high school buddy, his personal trainer, drummer and lead guitarist. Layne found them a spot over near Dry Bar, and the boys went to work, reeling out with 10-pound test line to prove their mettle against the erce ghter. Everyone was real knowledgeable, but they grew up mostly on bass shing, Layne said. This was the rst red sh any of them ever caught. And caught they did, each of them snaring at least one, and some of them two, for more than a dozen on the day, most all of them deemed oversized and thrown back. Every one of them was over 27 inches except three of them, Layne said. Size limits call for not less than 18 inches and no more than 27 inches total length. The biggest one of the day, 38 inches long and 22 pounds with the Boga grips, was caught by lead guitarist Travis Bettis. Layne coached him how to let out the line, and then get the sh to turn his head as he heads to the bottom. The charter captain had Solomon hoist the anchor to ensure against losing the bull red, and they didnt, nally landing him after Bettis proved as able with the rod as he is with his guitar. Layne said the shing trip was a wholesome affair, with Brices personal trainer nixing the alcohol and having them drink coconut water instead. (Brice) is really big into football, he monitors it 24/7. Every 30 minutes or less he has to check his phone and the scores, said Layne of the former Clemson football player, who he said made the large-framed Layne look tiny. It was a blast, theyre just regular guys, down to earth, Layne said. Every one of them caught one, and that was the best part. With three keeper reds in tow, Layne dropped them back off at Sikes Cut, near where the band was staying in the Plantation at a unit provided by Resort Vacation Properties. Layne beached the boat and then cleaned them right there, asking only that Brice autograph his shirt and hat. The singing star was more than happy to oblige. Its the least I can do for you, he told Layne. They were real nice people, Layne said. Everyone was super nice. JOHN SOLOMON | Special to the Times Lee Brice, second from right, shares in his bands red sh catch. Charter Capt. J. B. Layne, is standing at left.

PAGE 11

CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA SP O RTS www.apalachtimes.com A Section By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com South Walton was the better of a pair of Seahawks Friday night, as they snapped a seasonlong losing streak with a 37-10 win over Franklin County. Sophomore quarterback Johnathan Ortner punctured the pass defense with a 19-for-26 performance for 219 yards and three touchdowns, handing Phil Tisa his rst win after nine losses in his inaugural season as South Walton head coach. Those were a hard 10 weeks, he said. It was a rough schedule. Seven of the 10 teams on our schedule are in the playoffs, but we stayed together and got better each week. During those nine losses, I never lost those kids wanting to play for me, and that lets me sleep at night. The visiting Seahawks spotted the hometown ones a eld goal early on, when senior Zach Howze nailed a 29-yarder with 5:16 left in the rst quarter. Franklin County sophomore Cameron White managed an interception in the rst half, and a 15-yard runback, but no scoring resulted. South Walton added 16 unanswered points before halftime, including successfully completing the teams rst eld goal attempt of the year with no time left on the clock, when freshman Joe LedoMassey split the uprights from 27 yards out. With 2:15 left in the rst quarter, Ortner threw a 15-yard touchdown strike to senior wide receiver Drew Pheiffer for South Waltons rst touchdown. Pheiffer nished the night with eight receptions for 132 yards. Pheiffer also snared an interception that set up a 39-yard scoring scamper by senior running back Brandon Whalen with 6:36 left in the third quarter. Whalen, who led the team with 10 carries on 59 yards, also put himself into position to nish tops among Walton County ball carriers for the year, with more than 700 yards on the ground. South Waltons second score came in the rst minute of the second quarter, when Ortner connected with junior running back Sage Roberts on a fouryard pass for the score. Ledo-Massey failed on the extra point try when the snap went awry. With 8:18 left in the third quarter, Ortner lofted a high 15-yard heave to senior wide receiver Bishop Waldrop for his third touchdown pass, with Ledo-Massey booting his second of four extra points of the night. South Walton wrapped up its scoring with 10:43 left in the game, when senior wide receiver Hampton Schaffer ran it in from the one-yard-line for a 37-3 lead. Franklin County, who fell to 2-7, 1-3, on the year, offered fans some excitement late in the game, when senior lineman Mason Ray recovered a fumble on the teams own 30yard line. On the opening play of their next possession, Franklin County junior quarterback Logan McLeod, lling in for the injured starter Dwayne Griggs, threw to junior tailback Mercury Wynn for an 80-yard touchdown play, with 1:07 left in the game. McLeod completed 4 of 13 passes for 97 yards and one touchdown and was intercepted twice. Senior Ladarius Rhodes led the team with 12 rushes for 79 yards, while senior Skyler Hutchinson ran a dozen times for 35 yards. Hutchinson caught three passes for 13 yards and Rhodes one for four yards. McLeod and Rhodes led the team with six tackles each. In addition to Rhodes, Howze and Hutchinson, seniors honored in the pre-game ceremonies were David Butler, Chase Golden, Karl Sanford, Tevin Jones, Jeff Murray and Daniel Carrino. Senior drum major Stephanie Marxsen also was honored as were cheerleaders Roxana Barahona, Cheyenne Diorio and Cheyenne Martin, who also performs with the band. Franklin County Coach Josh Wright named Rhodes and Wynn Offensive Players of the Game, and tackle Buddy Jones was Defensive Player of the Week. By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com The Franklin County varsity boys soccer team dropped its opener 3-1 at John Paul II Nov. 8, but new coach Luis Ramon Valenzuela is con dent the boys will rebound from this. We have talent, and we are going to pursue the best this season, he said. With an injury to starting goalie Dan Carrino, the team relied on senior Casey Sapp, who had 19 saves. The teams lone score came from the leg of Graham Kirvin, who was closest ghting to score near the goal after several rebounds by the Seahawks. Zach Howze had two shots on goal, James Newell had four and Kirvin and Josh Reeder had one each. We played the entire time very hard, until the last minutes when they scored two goals against us, said Valenzuela, who is assisted by Stacy Kirvin. Defensively, we were strong the entire time. I told the boys to take this as a positive experience and lets learn from our mistakes. We have a long season ahead to play our best, since we have been practicing for three weeks, trying to nd the chemistry between players and coaches, said the rstyear head coach, who has 15 years of experience coaching Little League and high school soccer. I think they gave all they had on the game, Valenzuela said. We will need to brush up our foot skills and focus on accurate passing; in other words, ball controlling. The Seahawks travel to Rocky Bayou today for the rst district game. I am sure Coach Kirvin and I will try our best to win this game, but once again, it will take practicing hard, Valenzuela said. Mexican-born, Valenzuela has played soccer since age 7. He holds a bachelors degree from the College of Philosophy of Missionaries of the Holy Spirit and a another in Spanish translation from Kent State University. Seahawks varsity players this year include Sapp, Howze, Newell, Reeder, Kirvin, Elisha Patriotis, Julio Ramirez, brothers James and Billy Harris, Alex Causey, James Bailey, Joshua Patriotis, Jacob Montgomery, brothers Stefan and Walker DeVaughn, Dalyn Parrish, Austin Carter, Logan Allen and Tyler Pendleton. Special to the Times The St. Joseph Bay Golf Club hosted a fundraising silent auction on Friday and a golf tourney on Saturday. The auction and the golf tournament raised funds for the Camp Gordon Johnston museum in Carrabelle, dedicated to preserving and protecting the heritage of the soldiers of World War II, especially those who trained at Camp Gordon Johnston after the camp opened in 1942 to prepare amphibious soldiers and their support groups. A quarter of a million men were trained at CGJ before it closed in April 1946. On Friday, entertainment was provided by The Boyer Band, made up of George, Cletus and Tom Boyer. The tournament on Saturday was preceded by an Honoring Americas Veterans ceremony. Two World War II veterans were special guests: Jim Sealey and Fred Fitzgerald. Dan Van Treese, golf club president, and Tony Minichiello, president of the museum association, were co-emcees; the invocation was delivered by Father Phil Fortin of the St. Joseph Catholic Church; the Port St Joe High School junior ROTC presented the colors; and retired Chief Master Sgt. Wanda Warruck, from the Connecticut Air National Guard, was principal speaker. The team of Guerry Magidson, Mel Magidson, Rex Buzzett and Mark Eden eld came in rst place; Danny Warruck, Buddy Renfro, Kenny Wood and Dan Anderson came in second; Paul Penn, B.J. Richards, Mish Fuller and David Warriner were third; and Tom Adams, Hershell Neel, Penelope Evanoff and Gary Howze took fourth. All teams winning cash prizes generously donated the funds back to the museum and the club. The events were supported by the Gulf County Tourist Development Council and the Franklin County Tourist Development Council. Gulfside IGA PL A YER OF THE WEEK S P ON S OR Lady Seahawk junior middle elder Gracyn Kirvin nailed one of her two shots on the net to score the teams lone goal in Franklin Countys opening season 4-1 loss to John Paul II in the non-league bout Nov. 8. Congratulations, Gracyn! Hometown Proud (850)653-9695 Thursday, November 15, 2012 Page 11 Seahawks boys drop soccer opener St. Joe Bay golfers raise funds for CGJ South Walton spoils Seahawk Senior Night DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times Flanked by his granddad, Paul Orr, and his mom, Cindi Brackin, Seahawk senior Karl Sanford salutes during Senior Night ceremonies.

PAGE 12

A12| The Times Thursday, November 15, 2012 CLASSIFIEDS Thanksgiving Holiday WeekendClassified In-column D E AD LI N E SThe Port St. Joe Star and The Apalachicola/Carrabelle TimesTo Run Thursday, November 22 Due Friday, November 16, 5:00 pm Call (850) 747-5020 or 1-800-345-8688 or visit us online at emeraldcoastmarketplace.com The classified department will be closed Thursday, November 22. We will open Friday, November 23, at 8 a.m. 89294T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 2012CA 000060 NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLC, Plaintiff, vs. ROBERTA J. SNYDER A/K/A ROBERTA SNYDER, et.al. Defendant. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated October 24, 2012, and entered in 2012CA000060 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLC, is the Plaintiff and ROBERTA J. SNYDER A/K/A ROBERTA SNYDER; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF ROBERTA J. SNYDER A/K/A ROBERTA SNYDER; TOAD HOLLOW CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION, INC.; THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK, AS SUCCESSOR TRUSTEE TO JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A., AS TRUSTEE ON BEHALF OF THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS OF THE CWHEQ INC., CWHEQ REVOLVING HOME EQUITY LOAN TRUST, SERIES 2006-1; UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2 are the Defendant(s). Gail Wadsworth as the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash 2nd Floor, Civil Dept, Kim C. Hammond Justice Cntr 1769 E. Moody Blvd. BLG 1, Bunnell, FL 32110, at 11:00 AM on December 12, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: THAT CERTAIN CONDOMINIUM UNIT COMPOSED OF UNIT NUMBER 207, BUILDING B, AND THE UNDIVIDED 1/7 INTEREST IN THE COMMON ELEMENTS APPURTNANT THERETO, IN ACCORDANCE WITH AND SUBJECT TO THE COVENANTS, RESTRICTIONS, RESERVATIONS, LIMITATIONS, CONDITIONS, LIENS, EASEMENTS, TERMS, AND OTHER PROVISIONS OF THE DECLARATION OF CONDOMINIUM OF TOAD HOLLOW, RECORDED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 793, PAGE(S) 169-250, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 25th day of October, 2012. Marcia Johnson As Clerk of the Court Terry E. Creamer As Deputy Clerk Submitted by: Robertson, Anschutz & Schneid, P.L. Attorneys for Plaintiff 3010 N. Military Trail, Suite 300 Boca Raton, FL 33431 Phone: 561-241-6901 Fax: 561-241-9181 November 8, 15, 2012 89314T PUBLIC NOTICE STATE OF FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION NOTICE OF INTENDS TO ISSUE PERMIT The Department of Environmental Protection gives notice of intends to issue an environmental resources permit for a Single Family Dock, Permit Number 19-0268670-003-EM to Phillip & Barbara Gillaspy, at 113 North Bayshore Drive, Eastpoint, FL 32328, c/o Garlick Environmental Associates, Inc., Post Office Box 385, Apalachicola, FL The purpose of the permit is to authorize construction of a Single Family Residential Dock, 407 ft. in Length and 4 ft. in Width, with a Terminal Platform 26 ft. in Length and 6 ft. in Width. The project also consists of an uncovered boat lift 20 ft. in Length and 12 ft. in Width. The project site is located at 113 North Bayshore Drive in the Eastpoint, Franklin County, Florida. Based on all the above, and with the application of general and limiting specific conditions of the permit, the Department has reasonable assurance the project, as proposed, fully meets the environmental resources permitting requirements of Chapter 62-346, Florida Administrative Code, and will not harm the environment. A person whose substantial interests are affected by the Department’s action may petition for an administrative proceeding (hearing) under Sections 120.569 and 120.57 of the Florida Statute. The petition must contain the information set forth below and must be filed (received by the clerk) in the Office of General Counsel of the Department at 3900 Commonwealth Boulevard, Mail Station 35, Tallahassee, Florida 323993000. Because the administrative hearing process is designed to re-determine final agency action on the application, the filing of a petition for an administrative hearing may result in a modification of the permit, or even a denial of the application. Accordingly, the applicant will not commence construction or other activities under this permit until the deadlines below for filing a petition for an administrative hearing, or request for an extension of time, have expired. Under subsection 62-110.106(4) of the Florida Administrative Code, a person whose substantial interests are affected by the Department’s action may also request an extension of time to file a petition for an administrative hearing. The Department may, for good cause shown, grant the request for an extension of time. Requests for extension of time must be filed with the Office of General Counsel of the Department at 3900 Commonwealth Boulevard, Mail Station 35, Tallahassee, Florida 323993000, before the applicable deadline. A timely request for extension of time shall toll the running time period for filing a petition until the request is acted upon. If a request is filed late, the Department may still grant it upon a motion by the requesting party showing that the failure to file a request for an extension of time before the deadline was the result of excusable neglect. In the event that a timely and sufficient petition for an administrative hearing is filed, other persons whose substantial interests will be affected by the outcome of the administrative process have the right to petition to intervene in the proceeding. Intervention will be only at the discretion of the presiding officer upon the filing of a motion in compliance with Rule 28-106.205 of the Florida Administrative Code. In accordance with subsection 28-106.111 (2) and subparagraph 62-110.106(3)(a).4, Florida Administrative Code, petitions for an administrative hearing by the applicant must be filed within 14 days of receipt of written notice. Petitions filed by any persons other than the applicant, and other than those entitled to written notice under Section 120.60 (3) of the Florida Statutes, must be filed within 14 days of publication of the notice. Under Section 120.60 (3) of the Florida Statute, however, any person who has asked the Department for notice of agency action may file a petition within 14 days of such notice, regardless of the date of publication. The petitioner shall mail a copy of the petition to the applicant at the address indicated above at the time of filing. The failure of any person to file a petition for an administrative hearing within the appropriate time period shall constitute a waiver of those rights. A petition that disputes the material facts on which the Department’s action is based must contain the following information: (a) The name and address of each agency affected and each agency’s file or identification number, if known, (b) The name, address, and telephone number of the petitioner; the name, address, and telephone number of the petitioner’s representative, if any, which shall be the address for service purposes during the course of the proceeding; and an explanation of how the petitioner’s substantial interests are or will be affected by the agency determination; (c) A statement of when and how the petitioner received notice of the agency decision; (d) A statement of all disputed issues of material fact. If there are none, the petition must so indicate; (e) A concise statement of the ultimate facts alleged, including the specific facts that the petitioner contends warrant reversal or modification of the agency’s proposed action; (f) A statement of the specific rules or statutes that the petitioner contends require reversal or modification of the agency s proposed action; and (g) A statement of the relief sought by the petitioner, stating precisely the action that the petitioner wishes the agency to take with respect to the agency’s proposed action. A petition that does not dispute the material facts on which the Department’s action is based shall state that no such facts are in dispute and otherwise shall contain the same information as set forth above, as required by Rule 28-106.301, Florida Administrative Code. Under Sections 120.569(2)(c) and (d) of the Florida Statute, a petition for administrative hearing must be dismissed by the agency if the petition does not substantially comply with the above requirements or is untimely filed. This action is final and effective on the date filed with the Clerk of the Department unless a petition is filed in accordance with the above. Upon the timely filing of petition this order will not be effective until further order of the Department. This permit, when issued, constitutes an order of the Department. The applicant has the right to seek judicial review of the order under Section 120.68 of the Florida Statute, by the filing of a notice of appeal under Rule 9.110 of the Florida Rules of Appellate Procedure with the Clerk of the Department in the Office of General Counsel, 3900 Commonwealth Boulevard, Mail Station 35, Tallahassee, Florida, 323993000; and by filing a copy of the notice of the appeal accompanied by the applicable filing fees with the appropriate district court of appeal. The notice of appeal must be filed within 30 days from the date when the final order is filed with the Clerk of the Department. The application for this permit is available for public inspection during normal business hours, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, except for legal holidays, at the Northwest District office, 160 W. Government Sheet, Pensacola, Florida. November 15, 2012 90705T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT COURT FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 12-00007-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, as Successor in Interest to Coastal Community Bank, Plaintiff, vs. CHRISTOPHER T. GIAMETTA, ET AL., Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: CHRISTOPHER T. GIAMETTA, JAMI GIAMETTA, CHRISTINA GIAMETTA:, and THE UNKNOWN SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES OR OTHER PERSONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THEM, OR ANY OF THEM, AND ALL UNKNO WN PERSONS, IF ALIVE, AND IF DEAD, OR NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, THEIR UNKNOWN SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES OR OTHER PERSONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THE UNKNOWN PERSONS. YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to reform and foreclose a mortgage, or alternatively, establish and foreclose an equitable lien, on the following property located in Franklin County, Florida LOT 39 OF TARPON SHORES UNIT NO. 2: COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 20, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 6 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN NORTH 02 DEGREES 20 MINUTES EAST 1914.27 FEET ALONG THE EAST BOUNDARY OF SECTION 20 TO A POINT ON THE SOUTHERLY BOUNDARY OF RIDGE ROAD, THENCE SOUTH 63 DEGREES 44 MINUTES WEST 2620.31 FEET ALONG SAID ROAD TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, THENCE LEAVING SAID ROAD RUN SOUTH 26 DEGREES 16 MINUTES EAST 380.0 FEET TO A POINT, THENCE SOUTH 63 DEGREES 44 MINUTES WEST 114.63 FEET TO A POINT, THENCE NORTH 26 DEGREES 16 MINUTES WEST 380.0 FEET TO A POINT ON THE SOUTHERLY BOUNDARY OF RIDGE ROAD, THENCE NORTH 63 DEGREES 44 MINUTES EAST 114.63 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, A/K/A LOT 94 OF RIDGE ROAD. TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN 1994 PLAN DOUBLE WIDE MOBILE HOME ( VIN# HMST8922AGA and HMST8922BGA) PERMANENTLY AFFIXED TO THE REAL PROPERTY. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Edward W. Wood, the plaintiffs attorney, whose address is KING & WOOD, P.A., 1701 Hermitage Blvd., Suite 104, Tallahassee, FL 2308 within 30 days of first publication of this notice, and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on the plaintiff s attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. DATED: October 22, 2012 HONORABLE MARCIA JOHNSON Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk November 8, 15, 2012 90695T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY CASE NO.: 12-000038-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, an Arkansas banking corporation, as Assignee of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, as Receiver for Bayside Savings Bank, organized under the laws of the United States of America. Plaintiff, vs. KARMIN L. WILSON f/k/a KARMIN L. WALKER, a/k/a KARMEN L. WILSON, RUTH J. FLETCHER, DAVID WALKER, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the undersigned Clerk of the Circuit Court of Franklin County, Florida, pursuant to the Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure, entered in this case, will sell the property at public sale to the highest bidder for cash, except as set forth hereinafter, on December 4, 2012 at 11:00 am Eastern Time on the 2nd floor lobby at the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida, in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes, the following described real property lying and being in Franklin County, Florida, to-wit: Lot 5, Block 74, St. George Island Gulf Beaches Unit 5, according to the Plat recorded in Plat Book 3, Page 16, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. This Notice dated this 23rd day of October, 2012. MARCIA M. JOHNSON Franklin County Clerk of Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk November 8, 15, 2012 90765T IN THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 10-185-CA CADENCE BANK, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. JTB, LLC, a Florida limited liability company, and BENJAMIN T. BLOODWORTH and JOHN P. DAY Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated October 23, 2012, and entered in Civil Action No. 10-185-CA of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein the parties were the plaintiff, CADENCE BANK, and the Defendants, JTB, LLC, a Florida limited liability company, BENJAMIN T. BLOODWORTH, and JOHN P. DAY, I will sell to the highest and best bidder, for cash, at 11:00 a.m. (Eastern Time) on the 11th day of December, 2012, at the front door foyer on the second floor of the Franklin County Courthouse, Apalachicola, Florida, the followingdescribed real property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: Lot 9, Block 35, St. George Island Gulf Beaches, Unit No. 4, a subdivision as per map or plat thereof, recorded in Plat Book 3, pages 14 and 15, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. The successful bidder at the sale will be required to place the requisite state documentary stamps on the Certificate of Title. DATED this 25th day of October, 2012. Honorable MARCIA JOHNSON Clerk of the Court Franklin County, Florida By: Michele Maxwell As Deputy Clerk November 8, 15, 2012 90801T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 12-185-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, a foreign banking corporation, Plaintiff, vs. DEBORA G. COLLINS; et al. Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: WENDELL HARRELSON YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action on a promissory note and to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in Franklin County, Florida: Lot 3, Block K of Lanark Beach, Unit No. 1, according to the plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 2, Page 13 of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. Together with all improvements located thereon and a 1968 Fleetwood Mobile Home, ID# DK71268277. has been filed against you, Debora G. Collins; Larry D. Everett and all unknown parties claiming by, through, under, and against the herein named individual defendants who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said unknown parties may claim an interest as spouses, heirs, grantees or other claimants, and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Rick A. Savage, Esq., of the Savage Law Office, PLLC, plaintiff’s attorney, whose address is Post Office Box 385, Tallahassee, Florida 32302 on or before 30 days from the date of the first publication of this notice and file the original with the clerk of court of this Court either before service on plaintiff’s attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petiATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home Medical, Business, Criminal Justice Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 866-203-3179 www.CenturaOnline.com These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you. EmeraldCoast Marketplace 747-5020

PAGE 13

CLASSIFIEDSThursday, November 15, 2012 The Times | A13 RENTALS3 BEDROOM, 2 BATH FURNISHED APT W/D, CARPORT, ST PARKING .............................$600 3 BEDROOM, 3 BATH CONDO FURNISHED, POOL .............................................$850 3 BEDROOM, 1 BATH UNFURNISHED DUPLEX .................................................................$600 1 BEDROOM, 1 BATH UNFURNISHED APT LANARK, REMODELED, INC WATER .................$425 2 BEDROOM 1 BATH UNFURNISHED APT W/D HOOKUP, SMALL PORCH ..........................$375 2 BEDROOM 1-1/2 BATH UNFURNISHED, FL ROOM, GARAGE, FENCED YARD, W/D .......$800 2 OFFICE SPACES US 98 CARRABELLE ...............................................$300 BOTH 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322850-697-9604 850-323-0444 www.seacrestre.comwww. rst tness.com/carrabellePROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND RENTALS FRANKLIN COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISIONERS JOB ANNOUNCEMENT Position Title: Inmate Supervisor NON-DC /Equipment Operator I Closing Date: November 22, 2012 Annual Salary: $25,000 Contact Person: Hubert W. Chipman Road Department 376 State Road 65 Eastpoint, FL 32328 Phone: (850) 670-8640 The Franklin County Board of Commissioners is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action/Drug Free Workplace Employer Knowledge, Skills and Abilities: AN EMPLOYEE IN THIS POSITION WILL SUPERVISE THE WORK OF STATE INMATES. OPERATE VARIOUS SPECIAL HEAVY EQUIPMENT, PERFORMING TASKS ASSOCIATED WITH THE ROAD DEPARTMENT OPERATIONS, OPERATES FRONT END LOADER TO LOAD ROAD MATERIAL OR DEBRIS FOR DUMP TRUCKS, BACK HOE TO DIG OUT DITCHES AND A VARIETY OF TRACTORS. OPERATES VARIOUS EQUIPMENT SUCH AS CHAINSAWS, BLOWERS, WEED EATERS, PUSH MOWERS, AND ETC. OTHER DUTIES AS REQUIRED. BACKGROUND INVESTIGATION AND DRUG SCREENING WILL BE COMPLETED ON SELECTED APPLICANT. Minimum Qualifications: Requires a high school diploma or an equivalent. Requires knowledge of Florida traffic laws. Requires basic understanding of safety procedures; the ability to drive and operate the above mentioned equipment. Must possess a valid Florida Commercial Class A Driver's License with a favorable driving record. Must have the ability to meet the Department of Corrections criteria for a certification as an NON-DC Supervisor of State Inmates. Newly hired employees shall obtain such certification within 90 days of hiring. Print Dates: Nov 8, 2012 Nov 15, 2012 REPRESENTATIVES will be at the PORT ST. JOE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE on Tuesdays & Thursdays from 9 am – 1 pm EST accepting applications for numerous open positions.We offer competitive wages and a comprehensive bene t package including Company paid health, dental, and life insurance, 401(k), attendance & safety bonuses.EOE/Drug Free WorkplaceEASTERN SHIPBUILDING GROUP MORE THAN A JOB… A FUTURE! Earn While You Learn with the On the Job Training Program If you are unemployed you may be eligible for the Workforce Centers OJT program. On the job training gives you hands on experience in a new job … and employers, OJT helps you save money! For more informaon call (850) 370-0726 An equal opportunity employer/program. Aux iliary aids and services are available upon request to individuals with disabilies. All voice telephone numbers on this document may be reached by persons using TTY/TDD equipment via the Florida Relay Service at 711. ToPlace Your Classified ad inCall Our New Numbers Now!Call: 850-747-5020 Toll Free: 800-345-8688 Fax: 850-747-5044 Email: thestar@pcnh.com thetimes@pcnh.com theAPALACHICOLA & CARRABELLETIMES CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW tion. DATED on November 1, 2012. Marcia Johnson Clerk of Court By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk November 15, 22, 2012 90833T PUBLIC NOTICE Weems Memorial Hospital is seeking proposals to replace 8 pair of fire rated doors within the hospital. Fire doors must meet all specifications under NFPA 101-2006 LSC Fire Doors. Contractors must provide proof of commercial license and insurance. Please contact Craig Gibson/ Plant Operations Director at cgibson@ weemsmemorial.com for information and requirements. Bids are due by Dec. 3, 2012 at 4:00pm. Bids will be opened at the Franklin Co. Board of Co. Commissioners meeting on Dec. 4, 2012. Please send all bids addressed to: Mr. Michael Moron, Weems Fire Door Bid, 33 Market St., Suite 203, Apalachicola, FL 32320. November 15, 22, 2012 90829T NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW PURSUANT TO SECTION 865.09, FLORIDA STATUTES NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of Laura’s Cleaning located at 141 Patty Lane in the County of FRANKLIN, in the City of Eastpoint, Florida, 32328 intends to register the said name with the Divisions of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, Florida. Dated at Eastpoint, Florida, this 5th day of November, 2012. Laura Ward November 15, 2012 90831T PUBLIC NOTICE Weems Memorial Hospital in Apalachicola, FL is seeking Request for Proposals (RFP) for the hospital’s Electronic Health Record (EHR) system. The successful EHR company must be familiar with the Meaningful Use Criteria and compliance regulations of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 as well as have the ability to provide licensed software, hardware, and services of an EHR program. RFP applications may be requested through the Weems Memorial Hospital website at www.weems memorial.com. Deadline for submissions is Dec. 2, 2012 and should be mailed to: Weems Memorial Hospital, 135 Avenue G, Apalachicola, FL 32320, Attn: Charles Edwards November 15, 22, 2012 *Adopt*:Athletic Prof. couple, at home Mom, Gracious Home awaits baby *Expenses paid* *FLBar42311* *800-552-0045* *Larry & Mary* Bichon Frise Puppies for Sale 3 Male 3 Female 8 Weeks Old De-wormed and have 1st shots. Healthy Happy and Good Dispositions $450 850-731-1201 BIG YARD SALERestaurant/Kitchen equipment and accessories, some new, two Panini Griddles, new 6’ pizza prep refrigerator, numerous other items, supplies, new counters 4’, 6’, 8’ lengths, and lots more, $3-5k in values. (plus 32’ Fully Equipped Newly Renovated Mobile Diner) WHEN : Saturday 9:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m. WHERE : East Point US 98/South Bayshore. Next to Vegetable/Fruit Stand. Port St. Joe 1205 Constitution Dr (Hwy 98) Saturday 17th 8am-?Multi Family Yard SaleText FL31785 to 56654 PSJ 122 Barbara Dr Fri & Sat Nov, 16th & 17th 8am-1pmMulti Family Back Yard SaleNew RCA Dual Screen Travel DVD System, Large upright freezer, 25ft Camper in good condition, Casio Keyboard, crafts, gifts, New Cookbooks, Angels, what-nots, linens, glassware, dishes, jewelry, xl ladies clothes, video tapes, books, vacuum, lots of misc items priced to sell. Rain or Shine!!! Text FL31779 to 56654 SJB 341Selma St Sat. 17th 8am-2pmMulti Family SaleBaby items, Household, appliances, And More! Text FL31838 to 56654 Food Svs/HospitalityPapa Joe’s Oyster Bar & GrillNow HiringExperienced Line Cook Apply in person only Medical/HealthCaring Peopleand CNAs needed. Join a team of people who make a difference in the lives of the elderly. Provide non medical companionship, in home help & personal care for the elderly. Must be flexible. PT leading to FT-positions in the Port St. Joe and Apalachicola areas.Home Instead Senior CareCall Mon-Thur 9-3pm 850-640-1223 or toll free 1-866-301-1919 Web ID#: 34228849 Text FL28849 to 56654 IT/Software DevWEB DEVELOPERSHalifax Media Group is seeking Web Developers for its corporate office, located in Daytona Beach, FL to craft solutions to insure development and integrations conform to requirements. In addition, the Developers will be responsible for administering systems and environments as necessary to support custom solutions. Candidates must have good working knowledge and a proven track record in the following areas. *HTML/ DOM/ CSS, JavaScript, PHP/ Perl/ Python, .NET/C# or related scripting language *MySQL/MSSQL or equivalent SQL and database management experience *Familiarity with feed manipulation in a variety of standard and non-standard formats *Project and process management skills *Practical knowledge of CMS publishing *Proven ability to adapt to new development environments and programming languages *Portfolio of live, working Web samples *Media experience preferred *Excellent written and verbal communication skills Education and/or Experience: min. of Bachelor’s degree in Computer Science or related IT field and 2+ years’ experience in web development and/or web programming highly preferred. Halifax Media Group offers a competitive compensation and robust benefit package. If you are interested in joining our dynamic and growing organization, please send your resume to thomas.sylvester@halifaxmediagroup.com EOE/DFWP Web ID#: 34230723 Apalachicola: 1 br, 1 ba efficiency Call for information 850-653-6103 Text FL5175 to 56654 St. GeorgeIsland $175/wk, elec, satellite, garbage incl. Pool tbl. 12’ X 65’ deck. Beautiful view! 850-653-5319 Apalachicola Condo. 2 br, 2 bath, with newer paint, tile, carpet $750 per month with 700 + credit score or $800 per month below 700 credit score. *References Checked* Quint 865-693-3232 Carrabelle Condo Riverfront 2 bedroom/ 1 bath, with queen Sofa sleeper long term rental $1,200 monthly. nice 850-545-0784 2 br house in Eastpoint with washer & dryer and jacuzzi bathtub, $550 mo + $550 dep. Call (940) 389-8631 3 Bedroom Home for RentNice 3/2 home in Apalachicola. Fenced yard, Bonus Room. $850 per month. 1 month security deposit. No Pets. Call Kathy Robinson, Robinson Real Estate Company 850-653-7196 Text FL30282 to 56654 Apalachicola: 3 br, 2 Bath. Newly Remodeled Call for details!! 850-653-6103 Text FL28701 to 56654 Carrabelle House with 4bdr/2baths,large family room, LR, dining room /kitchen,/ utility room/ office and/or play room/ screened porch, recent efficient air and metal roof., two storage buildings, fenced yard, on two large lots, extra lot available $139.000 (850-545-0784) Text FL30879 to 56654 Chrisovich, 30 ft., Charter Boat, Twin Perks Engines rebuilt, bottom job now being done, been operating as a charter boat for 12 yrs, High traffic slip paid till May ‘13, Intrested in Sale/Joint Venture or Sale Operate for you. Part of 3 boat company same location 28 yrs. $25K, Some possible finiancing Call Bobby 850-234-9409 How To Make Your Car Disappear... Advertise it for sale in the Auto section of Classifieds! That’s where auto buyers and sellers meet to get the best deals on wheels! Emerald Coast Marketplace 747-5020 Spot Advertising works!

PAGE 14

Local A14 | The Times Thursday, November 15, 2012 Real Estate Picks Our local real estate experts have identied what they feel are the best values around and are oering them to you in Real Estate Picks! (In this section), Discover the best real estate values in Mexico Beach, Port St. Joe, Apalachicola, Cape San Blas, St. George Island, Carrabelle and surrounding areas. Best Values on the Forgotten Coast SELL YOUR LI S TING S HERE! Only $35 per week per listing Minimum 2 ads per week or 1 ad for 2 weeks Contact Joel or Kari for details: (850)814-7377 or (850)227-7847 SOLD John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.com MLS#247518 $698,500 St. George Island PLANTATION BAYFRONT HOME Open Living area, Elevator, Fireplace, 5 BR, 5 BA, Extra BR or Den, Kitchen designed for great cooks, 2 dishwashers, gas stove, island with sink, Screened Pool & Spa, louvered garage, Dock with Slips for 4 owners, Great Bay views, near The Cut! John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.com MLS# 247279 $369,000 St. George Island 2ND TIER GULF VIEW Dawg Daze 4 BR, 3 BA, Heated Pool, Florida room off living room opens to decks overlooking CALL TOD A Y! 653-8868 GE T YOUR A D IN Trades & Services Laban Bontrager, DMD Monica Bontrager, DMD 12761 Pea Ridge Road Bristol, Florida 32321 TELEPHONE (850) 643-5417 Bristol Dental Clinic DENTURE LAB ON PREMISES Same Day Service on Repairs and Relines Don Lively General Contractors L ICENSED AND I NSURED 20 Y EARS E XPERIENCE P .O. Box 439 C arrabelle, FL 32322 697-2783 or Mobile 566-2603 RC 0066499 R G0065255 Carrabelle Visa, Discover, and American Express Honored at Participating Ace Stores JACKSONS Building Supplies Building Supplies & Auto Repair Carrabelle 697-3333 We Deliver Anywhere Hardware and Paint Center From A to Z PO Box 364 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 850-340-0756 Gregs Handyman Service & Lawn Maintenance J.J.s Tree Service, LLC Stump Grinder Licensed & Insured Call John : (850) 899-8432 ROBERTS APPLIANCE REPAIR ALL MAJOR BRANDS 18 Shadow Lane Apalachicola, FL 32320 Phone: (850) 653-8122 Cell: (850) 653-7654 JOES LAWN CARE IF I TS I N YOUR YARD LET JOE TAKE CARE OF I T FULL L AWN SERVICE S TREE TRIMMING AND REMOVAL AL S O CLEAN GUTTER S AND IRRIGATION IN S TILLATION, PLANTING AND BEDDING AVAILABLE CALL JOE@ 850-323-0741 OR EMAIL J OE S_ LA WN @Y A H OO COM TEACHERS from page A1 Putnal praised County Attorney Michael Shulers work on the countys behalf. I want to make sure I appreciate you keeping us out of the courtroom, he said. Its hard to make decisions up here legally when youre trying to help people, and sometimes you cant because its against the law. You always kept me on the straight and narrow path. Mr. Putnal, we appreciate you, Shuler said. Youve always led us by example and by prayer, and its an example I intend following myself in the future. Chairman Pinki Jackel said, Commissioner Putnal, its been my honor and privilege to serve with you as county commissioner. This county loves you. This board loves you, and all the county workers admire and respect you. You began an era here. Youve had a helpmate all these years, and we want to recognize Miss Patsy this morning as well because you dont go these roads alone. Jackel asked Patsy Putnal and other family members to come forward. Putnal said his wife had been really my mentor and my secretary. She always kept me on the ball. Patsy and son Rusty came to the podium along with several younger members of the Putnal clan. Bevin Putnal indicated a great-grandson and told the commission, Me and hims going hunting. Jackel presented Putnal with a plaque praising his service to the people. It read, Your leadership and loyalty will always be remembered and looked forward to new beginnings and happy memories. Commissioner Noah Lockley said, Its been an honor and a privilege to serve with you for these last eight years. Commissioner Smokey Parrish told Putnal, There aint much to say but whats on that plaque. I wish you the best and a successful hunting season. Jackel commented she had saved the best for last when she turned the oor over to Commissioner Cheryl Sanders. A tearful Sanders said, Hes been my left-hand man for 15 years. Im happy for them, but at the same time, Im sad. When I rst came on the board, he was here with Jimmy Mosconis, and they broke me in well. Hes been at my left hand for at the next board meeting it will be 15 years. My favorite quote that hes always made is this: In the beginning God made a perfect environment to grow oysters here in Apalachicola Bay. While its sad, Im happy hes living and he can take care of his grandchildren and they wont have to wait on answering the phone 15 or 20 times a day. This man has been my left hand, and Im gonna really, really miss him. took place amid ongoing talks with the teachers union which, because it is a lean year, are not expected to result in pay hikes. Signi cant changes to the health insurance offerings, however, will be made, after both the school board and the teachers have agreed to a new blended plan that enables employees to enroll in either the Capital Health Plan HMO or the traditional Blue Cross Blue Shield plan. This move is expected to save the district $150 a month for each teacher that it insures. This could save the district $328,000 a year, according to Scott Fenstermaker, the owner of Strategic Bene ts Group, the districts health insurance consultant. The issue of cost cutting loomed large over the workshop, beginning with a report by Shannon Venable, the new nance director, who told school board members the district was about $780,000 over budget and facing declining revenues. Venable said property values had declined 7.3 percent, leading to a $563,000 drop in property tax revenue, which makes up about three-quarters of all the monies received from local sources. She then ticked off a list of budgetary items that would pose challenges, including $80,000 already budgeted in BPrelated funds that Venable had doubts the district would ever get. In addition, there are an additional $30,000 in property tax refunds placed in the 2012-13 budget, and about $106,000 in expenses that were under-budgeted in the $216,000 set aside for plant operations, such as infrastructure needs and including investment in computer equipment, she said. This total de cit of $779,000, Venable said, could balloon to $1.19 million, if the district is saddled with another $407,000 in expenses. Of this, $300,000 would be for resuming funding teachers entire pension contributions, rather than bene tting from a 3 percent shift to employee, as the Florida legislature has passed. The remaining $107,000 could come if the possible sequestration of federal monies comes to pass early next year. Superintendent Nina Marks said the district had so far made $313,000 in cuts, prompting Gander to suggest more needed to be done. All these things are good ideas, maybe theyre not, he said. But when you look at the budget and some 90 percent are salaries and bene ts, everything else is really immaterial. We shouldnt go back to our employees and ask them to give any more up. The only thing you can do is have fewer employees and the way to do that is through attrition. I think that would probably be as fast as anything we can do; people leave the systems all through the year. If three people leave and three people arent rehired, it could be $200,000, he said. To me thats the only way. The only way youre going to save is to make cuts in personnel. Elementary school teacher Paula Dykes said, Were talking about teachers, again cutting teachers, but then we turn around and we make up new positions thats not teachers and we ll those positions. Teachers are working with kids; theyre the ones that are needed. Gander granted that you got to attrition everybody. We thought that (consolidation) was going to be the end of our problem, Dykes said, but since weve moved here, nothings been roses. Its the same problem we had at all three schools. I havent seen anything different; the same problems weve had for the longest, Dykes said. I dont see yall being able to balance the budget on the backs of the teachers. The teacher is the most important thing in that childs life, and yall need to think of some of the way to balance the budget other than teachers, she said. Gander said he did not believe in rif ng, meaning enacting a Reduction in Force procedure. Dykes said more than one-third of the districts 73 teachers were on hand for the session and represented a broad spectrum of views. One issue the teachers pressed was the issue of how digital information is handled at the administration level. Al London, who oversees infrastructure demands on the district, said a decision has been made to cut ties with Blue Manta regarding their contract to handle E-Rate lings that recoup reimbursements for implementing telecommunication and Internet access. We have tried doing E-Rate inhouse and on top of the normal jobs people were doing. E-Rate is complicated, time-consuming and exacting, and we were not successful. We were down to a deadline where we had to le E-Rate, we were coming up against a deadline, so we hired Blue Manta, he said, noting the deal was $225 a month plus a percentage. We received $22,000, and we have since then noti ed Blue Manta the agreement has been terminated, London said. Teachers also raised the issue of comp time for such things as doctors appointments, and Board Attorney Barbara Sanders made it clear that such comp time was available only for hourly employees and not for professional workers. This has been the biggest morale killer of all, Dykes said. Anything yall could have done when they started taking our time like that? In my heart I know Im wrong, because Im supposed to be doing it for kids, but if you dont care, why should I? she said. Marks said there is no evidence that any teachers have been docked time, but Gander appeared to disagree, noting that he had seen evidence in a teachers paycheck. Weve checked in nance, and theres not been one penny taken from anybody, Marks said. I would like to see it. School Board Member George Thompson, a postal service employee, said he has to use leave time, or go without pay, when he does not complete his scheduled time. Wood sounded a conciliatory note, saying it should be left up to the administration to nd the abusers who constantly come in late and sign out early. The consequences are offensive and insulting to people, she said. We need to go back to that unwritten policy. PUTNAL from page A1



PAGE 1

xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx 50 WWW.APALACHTIMES.COMPhone: 850-653-8868 Web: apalachtimes.com E-mail: dadlerstein@star .com Fax: 850-653-8036 Circulation: 800-345-8688 DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK: School News & Society: 11 a.m. Friday Real Estate Ads: 11 a.m. Thursday Legal Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Display Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Line Ads: 5 p.m. Monday xxxxx Contact Us xxxxx Out to see Index Thursday, November 15, 2012 VOL. 127 ISSUE 29Opinion . . . . . . A4 Society . . . . . . A8 Faith . . . . . . . A9 Outdoors . . . . . A10 Tide Chart . . . . A10 Sports . . . . . . A11 Classi eds . . . A12-A13By LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com The cities of Carrabelle and Apalachicola want direct oversight of a portion of the expected RESTORE Act funds headed for Franklin County, but the county commissioners dont see it that way. The county has been promised as much as $66 million, a portion of the nes levied against BP for environmental and economic damage caused by the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. None of the money has arrived, and there is no concrete indication on when the rst checks will be cut, if ever. But organizations and individuals across the county are scrambling to identify projects to spend it, and the county commissioners have proposed a 14-member advisory council that would recommend projects over which the county commissioners would have nal say. The county must hold a public workshop to discuss the ordinance to create the RESTORE council before it can be enacted into law. But already, the county is soliciting citizens to serve on the proposed council. Pam Shiver, the newly elected school board member set to be sworn in Tuesday, was appointed the schools representative to the RESTORE council at the Nov. 8 meeting. The cities, though, see things differently, and have invited the county to a Monday meeting to start a legal process to resolve the con ict. The county, based on the opinion of its attorney Michael Shuler, has opted not to become involved in the cities plan. In September, Apalachicola proposed distributing RESTORE funds between the cities and unincorporated areas of the county.By DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com From the youngest members of the nations military now patrolling the Persian Gulf to the most venerable members of the Greatest Generation who freed Europe in World II, Franklin County marked Veterans Day with a resounding salute to Americas nearly 25 million living, wounded and handicapped veterans. It began Friday evening at the Mikel Clark Sports Complex in Eastpoint, as three recent graduates of Franklin County High School the Navys Jacob Lee, Class of 2009, and Chris Chumney, Class of 2010, and the Armys Chance Buffkin, Class of 2012 led the Seahawks with ag held By LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com On Nov. 6, the county bid farewell to a loyal servant, County Commissioner Bevin Putnal, who attended his last meeting, Putnal, who rst took of ce on Nov. 16, 1992, took time to personally thank each department head for their help and service over the years. Its been a pleasure serving with this board, he said. Its kind of like family. Youre gonna fuss and ght, but you come together to solve other peoples problems. I didnt run for county commissioner for my own ambitions. I ran for peoples problems. I always gured myself as a servant, and not as a ruler. The greatest and strongest person that ever lived on this Earth could have ruled over anything that come against him he wanted, but he became a servant of all the people out there that needed him, and that was Jesus Christ. He went to the cross for peoples sake. His only ambition, from the time he was born until he was put to death, was to do his fathers will. I gure that Im kind of like that in doing the peoples will, Putnal said. If they wanted something, I tried my level best to do it. I felt privileged to be there when somebody needed my help. Ill still be there if they need me; I just wont have the authority I had before. Putnal told County Planner Alan Pierce, I want to thank you for being there all those years for me cause I had somebody I could dump problems on that I couldnt solve. You always seemed to take them without regret. Commissioner I appreciate that, Pierce replied. Im not sure we solved all of them, but we made our best effort. We appreciate you. You were here a long time, and you were always very stable, and we knew we could count on you to do the right thing.School board, teachers meetBy DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com When the school board met with teachers last week, it was a friendlier session than last year, but the issue was much the same how to nd ways to cut costs without cutting into morale. The Nov. 8 afternoon workshop ran more smoothly than a year ago, when school board members felt on the defensive from a barrage of questions, many of them pointedly hostile. Instead, after consultation with the school board, the Franklin County Education Association solicited questions from teachers and drew them up into a prepared list. Beginning with Cathy Wood, the union president, representatives of the teaching staff each took a portion of the 35 questions and asked them to the school board. The mood was cordial, at times testy, but overall a mood of support and reassurance prevailed. It even grew comic at one point, after the question was posed by teachers what the school district could do to improve parents involvement in their childrens education. If we could answer that question, we would probably solve a lot of these other problems, said Chairman Jimmy Gander. If it would help, I would dress up in a clown uniform. The school board workshop Cities push for RESTORE Act voice County bids farewell to Commissioner PutnalVETERANS DAY 2012 See TEACHERS A14WE NEVER FORGETPHOTOS BY DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The TimesFrom left, First Baptist Christian School kindergartners Lilah Millender, Noah Cannon and Kenzie Hicks sing at Mondays program. Below, from left, active-duty military members Chance Buffkin, Chris Chumney and Jacob Lee lead the Seahawks march on the eld Friday night. See RESTORE A6 See VETERANS A7 See PUTNAL A14BEVIN PUTNAL Honoring Seahawk seniors A11Come Back to Jersey at Crooked RiverFriday through Sunday, Nov. 16-18, the Panhandle Players will present Coming Back to Jersey at the Crooked River Grille at the St. James Bay Golf Resort. Friday and Saturday Dinner Theatre is $40; Sunday Brunch Theatre $35. Reservations needed; Call Crooked River Grill 697-5050. Dry Bones Ministry to host Saturday lunchThe Dry Bones Ministry invites you to come out for a day of fun, praise worship and lunch at 2 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 17, at the Sixth Street Recreation Center in Apalachicola. Evangelist Annie Austin Pierce will host.Autreys to sign new book SaturdayAuthor Gil Autrey and his wife, photographer Lane Autrey, will sign their new book, Gone with the Tides and Other Southern Stories, from 1-3 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 17, at Downtown Books in Apalachicola.Take Stock offers free Thanksgiving mealThe Take Stock in Children mentoring program and the Youth Advisory Council invite you to a free Thanksgiving Meal and Fellowship from 4-7 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 20 at the Apalachicola City Hall Community Center at Battery Park. The meal will be prepared by TSIC students and the Youth Advisory Council of the Franklin County Education Foundation. Apalachicola Christmas celebration Nov. 23The Apalachicola Christmas Celebration will light up Apalachicola from 4-8 p.m. Nov. 23. Santa arrives on a shrimp boat at 4 p.m. at the City Dock on Water Street. The Orman House Museum will be trimmed in holiday nery and docents dressed in period costumes welcome visitors. The Raney House Museum will also be decorated in holiday greenery and open for tours. On Nov. 25, support the Franklin County Humane Society and have your pets picture taken with Santa for a donation. There will be a pet costume contest at 3 p.m., plus stocking stuffers for your non-furry friends.

PAGE 2

LocalA2 | The Times Thursday, November 15, 2012 Check out our Grand Opening Loan Promotion! Emerald Coast FCU will lower your existing rate by at least 1% to as low as 1.99% APR*; Emerald Coast FCU will cover the costs of recording the lien, AND; Eachmemberthat a over$7,500with that byDec.15thwillbe a fora to oftwo$250.00VISA Membership eligibility required. Rates are based on credit score and are subject to change without notice. apply to auto already with Emerald FCU. willbeheldDecember17th timefor Your Community Credit Union By LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com The Apalachicola Volunteer Fire Department is the reigning champion in the fourth annual Lanark Village Gumbo Cook-off. On Saturday, four teams squared off at the Lanark Boat Club to compete for the right to represent the county at the World Championship Gumbo Cook-Off on Oct. 11-13, 2013, in New Iberia, La. The offerings ranged from a classic chicken gumbo with a red stock to a complex offering with seafood, okra and sausage. Two entries contained okra, and two were sans the gluey Southern treat. The winning team, spearheaded by father and son K.C. and Keith Gibson, was competing in the gumbo arena for the rst time. Second place went to the Eastpoint Fire Department and third to Carrabelles volunteer re ghters, captained by William Massey. The winning entry featured shrimp, crab and oysters as well as sausage, but no okra. Apalachicola was rated tops by three of the ve judges. It was not the rst victory this year for the Apalachicola reghters. The team also took rst place in the St. George Island Chili Cook-off in March. Keith Gibson said it was their third year in that competition. The rst year, we were in 37th place, and last year we were No. 9, he said. Judging the cook-off this year were Ryan Morris and Jen Hatton, both of Indiana, who were visiting grandparents Donna and George Briesbacker in Lanark. Villager Richard McKlean and R.C. Pippin of Carrabelle acted as judges, and this reporter was called into service as a gumbo judge for the third time. As the judging was about to begin, an ambulance arrived at the boat club door. This caused a slight disturbance among the judges until it became clear the EMTs had only dropped by for lunch. JoEllen Chandler, a spokesperson for the cook-off, said attendance was down a little from last year, but she believes after expenses, the event once again will clear $3,000. During the cook-off, a silent and live auction also raised funds for the re department. One memorable offering was a days work from Lanark re ghter Chris Moates, but numerous businesses and private individuals contributed to the fundraiser. Visitors could sample competing gumbos throughout the afternoon and gumbo meals were available in the boat club all day. For a photo gallery of the cook-off visit www.apalachtimes. com.Special to the TimesThe Franklin County Toy Project gets under way Saturday with the annual Toy Run. All motorcycles meet at 11:30 a.m. at the Carrabelle IGA. A police escort will guide and all will ride together at approximately 45-50 mph to Apalachicola, ending at the Riverfront Park Cost for ride is $10 each or bring an unwrapped toy. A quick lunch will be served for the riders at the park. The Toy Project volunteers also will be bagging for bucks from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 21, at the local grocery stores. The Toy Project is eager to get people willing to volunteer your time to sort and pack toys, give toys out, Adopt-A-Family or post a donation via www.franklintoyproject.com. Tickets are being sold for a raf e of a playhouse (at right) built by inmates at the Bay City Work Camp, and the committee will use funds collected through the raf e to shop for toys for Franklin County boys and girls. Tickets are $5 each, three for $10 or seven for $20. Tickets can be purchased at Franklins Promise of ce (the former Apalachicola High School), the Resort Vacation Properties administration of ce or anywhere you see a yer in the window. The drawing will be Jan. 11. Please make checks payable to Franklins Promise, and specify that it is for Toy Project. If you know of a family that needs help during Christmas, please refer them to sign up at the county health department. PHOTOS BY LOIS SWOBODA | The TimesTop left, father and son K.C. and Keith Gibson are the heart of the Apalachicola Volunteer Fire Department cooking team. Above, the Daddona family served up savory chicken gumbo. At left is Richard McKlean, gumbo judge. Franklin County Toy Project roars into life Saturday Apalachicola re ghters grab gumbo gold

PAGE 3

Adults $19.95 11:00 am until 3:30 pmKids 12 & Under $10.95 WEEMS MEDICAL CENTER EAST110 NE 5TH STREET, CARRABELLEUrgent Care and Family Care Services Monday through Friday 8AM 6PM Saturday 8AM 4 PMAppointments Available Walk-Ins WelcomeMost Insurances Accepted FInancial Assistance Available850-697-2345 COMING SOONWEEMS MEDICAL WEST IN APALACHICOLA! AppetizersCrab & Artichoke Dip with Crostinis Boiled Shrimp w/cocktail sauceSoupsLobster Bisque & Seafood GumboEntreesHoney Herb Roasted Turkey w/cranberry sauce Honey Glazed Ham Prime Rib of Beef w/Cabernet glaze Smokey Shrimp and Grits Side Dishesree Onion Corn Bread Dressing Wild Rice Dressing Mashed Maple Butternut Squash Loaded Mashed Potatoes Green Beans w/toasted pecans in ginger butter Corn and Oyster Casserole Variety of Dinner Rollsand Desserts including all of our regulars.$27 per person $24 for Seniors (65+) $12 for Children 5-10 years under 5-free NOW BOOKING HOLIDAY PARTIES Entrees Honey Herb Roasted Turkey Appetizers Crab & Artichoke Dip with Crostinis Boiled Shrimp w/cocktail sauce Soups Lobster Bisque & Seafood Gumbo Entrees November 22, 201211 am 4 pm estWITH A VIEW OF THE BAY FROM EVERY TABLE!Alcoholic Beverages not included but availableMAKE YOUR RESERVATIONS BY CALLING:Sunset Coastal Grill 850.227.7900Open Daily See you at the Sunset! Competitive Yields on FDIC Insured CDs Special to the TimesCutting off a big truck could cost you a ne, if you survive. In fatal crashes involving cars and commercial trucks, driver error is the cause of 88 percent of the crashes. The Florida Highway Patrol has launched Ticketing Aggressive Cars and Trucks to reduce commercial motor vehicle-related crashes, injuries and fatalities by combining outreach and education with targeted enforcement activities to raise awareness among car and truck drivers about safe-driving behaviors. The Florida Highway Patrol is committed to reducing the number of commercial vehicle related crashes, said Col. David Brierton, director of the Florida Highway Patrol. Crash reduction can be achieved if we all share the highway with each other and avoid aggressive driving behaviors. Troopers will be on the lookout for violations attributed to aggressive driving such as: following too closely, unsafe lane change and speeding. The campaign will consist of four enforcement and education phases, the rst of which will be in north Florida between Pensacola and Ocala through Friday. Three additional phases will take place in other areas of the state through July 2013. Safety on Floridas roadways is a cooperative effort by cars and trucks alike. As an industry, safety is at the top of our minds, it matters above all else, said Florida Trucking Association President and CEO, Mary Lou Rajchel. We are pleased with the opportunity to take our No Zone message about safe driving behaviors around big rigs on the road with the Florida Highway Patrol. Pairing the big trucks equal big blind spots message with the opportunity to see what our drivers see through community education is a unique approach that we believe will promote responsible driving for everyone. In addition to targeted enforcement, the campaign will use billboard messaging to increase awareness among car and truck drivers of safe driving behaviors around one another and of the heightened risk of receiving a ticket for a violation. FHP also will collaborate with the Florida Trucking Association to conduct activities at schools and community centers around the state to educate drivers on how to share the road safely with trucks. The following report is provided by the Franklin County Sheriffs Of ce. Arrests in this weeks report were made by of cers from the Apalachicola Police Department (APD), Carrabelle Police Department (CPD) and the Franklin County Sheriffs Of ce (FCSO). All defendants are to be considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law.Nov. 3James R. Glanvill, 23, Parker, disorderly intoxication and resisting of cer without violence (FCSO)Nov. 4Jeffrey S. Paine, 47, Panama City, driving while license suspended or revoked, and reckless driving (APD) Tiffany S. ONeal, 28, Eastpoint, public affray and disorderly intoxication (APD) Amber E. Adkison, 20, Apalachicola, public affray and disorderly intoxication (APD) David G. Layton, 41, Eastpoint, public affray (FCSO) Bobby J. Bullock, Jr., 44, Eastpoint, trespass on property after warning (FCSO)Nov. 5Lataska V. Harris, 31, Eastpoint, trespass on property after warning (FCSO) Mike Smitherman, 59, Carrabelle, DUI with property damage, resisting of cer without violence and refusal to submit to breath test (CPD)Nov. 6George V. Vause, 61, Eastpoint, public affray and aggravated battery with a deadly weapon (FCSO)Nov. 7Amber N. Vinson, 25, Eastpoint, domestic battery (FCSO)Nov. 8Andrew L. Butler, 41, Apalachicola, withholding child support (FCSO) Phillip S. Creamer, 36, Apalachicola, violation of probation (FCSO)Nov. 10Charles L. Fasbenner, 43, Apalachicola, criminal mischief, battery and violation of probation (FCSO) Law EnforcementThe Times | A3Thursday, November 15, 2012 Arrest REPORT FHP to target aggressive drivers

PAGE 4

OpinionA4 | The Times USPS 027-600Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 Publisher: Roger Quinn Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six monthsHome delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERSIn case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola TimesThursday, November 15, 2012ExperiencedBy Richard J. BowneSpecial to the Times Thats quite a boat. Yup. Sure is. Guy and his wife been all over the world on her. All over the world, huh? Yup. South America, round the horn, South Pacic, clean up to Alaska and back. All over. Very tricky goin around the horn, you know. So Ive heard. Yup. Horns plenty tricky. Gotta be real experienced. Whats the boat doing here on the Ohio? Came from Chicago. Thats where they live, Chicago. Just stoppin over. Where they headed? Nowheres. Not now. How come? Guy died. Drowned. Cast his bow line before his stern line. Bow caught the current. Tried to pull her back in. Boat rail gave way. Guy went right in. Been draggin the river for three days. Cant nd him. Where was his wife? On the boat. Threw him a line. Had hold of it, too, for a while. Rivers awful strong here. Swept him away. Life jacket? Nope. Like I said, he was experienced. Forgot to cast his stern line, you say? Yup. Terrible thing. Yup. Been all over the world. Thirty years of experience. You got a boat? Over there. Nice lookin boat. Thanks. How long you been sailin? About ve weeks. Why son youre green. Got a long ways to go. Youre not even close to this guys experience. Yes, a long way to go. Richard J. Bowne is a resident of Carrabelle. As someone who advocates for thousands of small businesses, I know they want fact, not spin. Unfortunately, too often we hear inaccuracies and misinformation about how government policies affect small businesses. Ending the Bush-era tax cuts for the richest 2 percent of Americans is one policy where small business has been caught up in a whirlwind of spin. So how would allowing the two top tax rates to return to their pre-2001 levels affect small business owners, most of whom pay income taxes on their business income through their personal tax returns? Everyone seems to agree that fewer than 3 percent of small-business owners with pass-through business income (i.e. income from partnerships, S corporations and sole proprietorships) would be affected should these tax cuts end. But supporters of extending the high-income tax cuts then argue the top tax rates cannot be allowed to return to their pre-Bush levels because, they say, these 3 percent of small businesses employ about half of the workers in small businesses and account for about half of all passthrough business income. The assumption is then made that changing the tax code for these small-business owners might lead to fewer jobs. None of this is true. The report that leads to this false information appears to be a 2010 Congressional Joint Committee on Taxation report. That report estimated that in 2011, there would be about 750,000 taxpayers with net positive business income who would be in the upper two tax brackets, and these 750,000 taxpayers would account for 50 percent of all passthrough business income reported to the IRS. But the report does not say these 750,000 taxpayers are small-business owners. In fact the report tries very hard to stop this equating of these wealthy taxpayers with small business owners. These gures for net positive business income do not imply that all of the income is from entities that might be considered small, reported the JCT. To emphasize this point, the JCT report says that in 2005 there were 19,520 S corporations and partnerships that reported pass-through business income of over $50 million each. Who are these high-income companies and taxpayers who are misconstrued as small businesses and small-business owners? Theyre pass-through entities like Bechtel, the Tribune Company, Ernst & Young and PricewaterhouseCoopers certainly not small businesses in most Americans eyes. Neither are other pass-through revenue recipients such as K Street Lobbyists, hedge fund managers, corporate law practices, accounting rms and wealthy people who invest in nancial and real estate partnerships. Those in favor of continuing tax cuts for the nations wealthiest know there would be little public support for their position if the face of those extensions were professional partnerships of lawyers, accountants, big businesses and billionaire owners of enormous family enterprises. Thats why it is attractive to instead spin a story about Americas small-business owners as victims should the tax cuts at the top expire. Small businesses are tired of being told how much theyre admired while being abused in the political process. While a few of us small-business owners might be considered wealthy, the vast majority of us will not be negatively affected by allowing the tax cuts on the top two income tax brackets to expire. And, by the way, all of us will continue making hiring decisions based on consumer demand, not our personal income tax rates. Frank Knapp is president and CEO of the South Carolina Small Business Chamber of Commerce and Vice Chair of the American Sustainable Business Council. This op-ed column is printed courtesy of American Forum. Now that the election is over, Washington is nally beginning to focus on the scal cliff. First, we face the threat of higher tax rates for some or all taxpayers on Jan. 1. Second, theres also a possibility of a sequester, automatic budget cuts also are scheduled to take place Jan. 1. And politicians have been spending so much money that were about to bump up against the nations debt limit. So its likely all these issues will get joined as President Obama and congressional leaders attempt to negotiate a deal. The higher tax rate portion of the scal cliff exists because 2001 and 2003 tax cuts are scheduled to expire at the end of the year. All taxpayers would see more of their earnings conscated by the IRS beginning in January if Washington fails to act. All tax brackets would increase, taxes on dividends and capital gains would rise and families would see their child tax credits slashed. The total yearly hike would be in the range of $400 billion. This could have profound implications, both because of immediate reductions in take-home pay and the negative longrun effects of economic stagnation. The sequester portion of the scal cliff exists because of last years debt limit ght. It was a mechanism to ensure something was done to restrain the growing burden of government spending. If allowed to occur, the sequester would trim next years federal budget by about $100 billion, with half from military spending and half from nondefense spending. This would be small compared to the potential tax hike, but denitely would be felt by program beneciaries. Many are worried about these potential changes, with Congressional Budget Director Doug Elmendorf warning that Americans should expect a signicant recession and the loss of some 2 million jobs. From my point of view, all the tax cuts should be made permanent. The bad news, to me, is that Obama wants to raise rates on investors, entrepreneurs, small business owners and other rich taxpayers. The sequester should be replaced by a more targeted set of scal reforms to restrain the growth of the entitlement state. Finally, the debt limit should be raised in exchange for a workable and enforceable cap on government spending. Daniel J. Mitchell is a senior fellow at the Cato Institute. In recent months, the Apalachicola Municipal Library has been gradually increasing its book purchases because of new funding sources, rst from Patrons of the Apalachicola Library Society and then with a city budget line, the rst I believe the library has ever had. As you can imagine, this is fun! No longer does the librarian put books in the cart only to defer their purchase for another month or two or longer. Adult ction is still our principal purchasing area, and with increased knowledge of genres gleaned from my fall Florida State University course, the library is catching up on crime, romance and political ction, with authors like Jance, Deaver, Hooper, Coulter, Reichs and Thor. Kate Mortons new title, The Secret Keeper, will be going on my list. Her languid British tales are great bedtime reading. We are keeping up with Ken Follett, who has just put out the second of his Century Trilogy, Winter of the World. We have the rst book, Fall of Giants, in hardcopy and audiobook (donated). We went off the deep end with Tom Wolfes new book, Back to Blood, set in Miami; his 1986 Bonre of the Vanities left a lasting impression of New York. The library also has bought J. K. Rowlings rst adult book, A Casual Vacancy. The reviews seem good for this author who brought us Harry Potter. New historical ction authors include two by Ariana Franklin, tales of an Italian-trained female forensic doctor in the 1100s; one by Yale law professor Jed Rubenfeld, set when Sigmund Freud visited New York in 1909; and the rst for the library by Louis Bayard, set in 1818 Paris. In young adult ction, the library has just purchased ve of the Artemis Fowl Series by Irish author Eoin Colfer. The sixth was donated, and seven will be coming soon. This very popular series is the story of a devious teenager by the same name. In the rst book he captures a fairy for a large gold ransom, but by the second book he is allied with the fairies. By the last book he is willing to but I dont want to ruin the plot for young readers. Come in and check them out. Finally we have gotten The Mark of Athena by Rick Riordan. His Percy Jackson series, starting with the The Lightning Thief, is equally beloved by kids and educators. This title is the third of his Heroes of Olympus Series. The library is so pleased to be able to offer such a wide selection, and we take suggestions and requests from patrons too. Caty Greene is the librarian for the Apalachicola Municipal Library. To reach her, call 653-8436.Special to the TimesThe University of Florida is launching a statewide effort to bolster teaching and learning in science and mathematics in the middle school and high school grades. Ofcials with the university and the Florida Department of Education jointly announced this month that UFs College of Education has been awarded a two-year, $2 million grant to create a research-based, professional development support system for new science and math teachers. The projects most noteworthy feature is the creation of prototype teacher induction programs to support teachers in their rst two years on the job. Induction will involve online and face-toface mentoring, professional development and networking opportunities with their p eers.  Center faculty and staff also will assist partnering school districts in creating coaching programs for novice science and math teachers. To coordinate the project, UF has established a program called Florida STEM-Teacher Induction and Professional Support, also known as Florida STEM-TIPS Center. Grifth Jones, a UF science education professor and principal investigator of the project, will oversee development of statewide teacher induction activities. Jones said they will start in Dade, Duval and Palm Beach counties, where UF has existing partnerships with the local school districts, and then scale up to other interested districts throughout the state. The induction support activities will ensure that the training and collegial support of teachers in training wont end at graduation, but will continue into their rst two years of teaching, Jones said. We aim to work with districts to reverse the lack of teacher induction support that historically drives nearly onethird of new teachers from the classroom by their third year of teaching. Jones said induction activities for new math and science teachers will include professional-development training in new curriculum standards and high-engagement instructional practices, on-thejob training programs and gradespecic mentoring. UF professors with the center also will lead Webinars and create a Web-based gateway for collaborating and sharing information so science and math educators can network with peers across the state. Supported by the DOE grant, UF professors also will travel to state universities to share information on a highly touted STEM teacher preparation program called UTeach, which is the model for the University of Floridas own UFTeach program. The UTeach model, created by University of TexasAustin professors in 1997, recruits top science and math majors into teaching by offering a creative curriculum with progressively complex eld experiences teaching those subjects in area schools. For more information, visit http://education.u. edu/stem-tips. DaANIEL J. MITCHELL FRaANK K K NaAPP JR. @THE LIBRaARY Caty GreeneStop the spin on small businessObama, Congress must tackle scal cliff Library steps up new book purchases UF awarded $2 million to boost science, math teaching

PAGE 5

LocalThe Times | A5Thursday, November 15, 2012 Autreys to sign new book SaturdayAuthor Gill Autrey and his wife, photographer Lane Autrey, will sign their new book, Gone with the Tides and Other Southern Stories, from 1-3 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 17, at Downtown Books in Apalachicola.Apalachicola annual Christmas celebration to be Nov. 23The Apalachicola Christmas Celebration will light up Apalachicola from 4-8 p.m. Nov. 23. The streets will be lined with luminaries and filled with holiday spirit. Merchants will be open late, and the sounds of carolers will echo through the streets, filling the evening with the Christmas spirit. Santa arrives on a shrimp boat at 4 p.m. at the City Dock on Water Street. He will hear childrens Christmas wishes and carolers will sing. The Orman House Museum will be trimmed in holiday finery, and docents dressed in period costumes will lead visitors through the early history of Franklin County. The Raney House Museum also will be decorated in holiday greenery and open for tours. At noon Nov. 25, the fun continues as Santa has a special day devoted to hearing wishes from his furry friends. Support the Franklin County Humane Society and have your pets picture taken with Santa for a donation. There will be a pet costume contest at 3 p.m., plus stocking stuffers for your non-furry friends. Need holiday gifts? Saturday is also Small Business Saturday. Support local merchants and restaurants by spending your money in town. Youll find usual, one-of-a-kind gifts, art work, outstanding food and gift certificates for nearly everything.Holiday Fresh Market to be Dec. 1Mark Dec. 1 in downtown Apalachicola as your day not to fight the crowds and traffic at the malls. Come for the day to the Holiday Fresh Market and shop in a relaxed, hasslefree environment. Buy handcrafted Apalachicola specialties from seasonal wreaths to vintage European glass bead jewelry and specialty food delights. Your shopping has never been easier. For information, call 653-9419 or visit info@ apalachicolabay.orgHoliday closures for 2012 and 2013Clerk of Court Marcia Johnson announced the of cial courthouse holiday for 2013 at the Nov. 5 county meeting. This holiday season, the county courthouse will be closed Nov. 22-23 for Thanksgiving, and Dec. 24-26 for Christmas. Apalachicola City Hall will close at noon Nov. 21 and remain closed through Nov. 23 for Thanksgiving and will be closed Dec. 24-26 for Christmas. Carrabelle City Hall will be closed Nov. 22-23 for Thanksgiving and Dec. 24-25 for Christmas and will close at noon on Dec. 31 for New Years Eve. The Apalachicola Municipal Library will close on Thanksgiving Day and will close at 2 p.m. Christmas Eve and remain closed on Christmas Day. County libraries will be closed for Thanksgiving Nov. 22-24 and Dec. 24-26 for Christmas. In 2013, New Years Day will be observed on Jan. 1. Martin Luther King Jr.s Birthday (King Day) will be celebrated Jan. 21. Good Friday is March 29. Memorial Day will be observed May 27. Independence Day is July 4 and Labor Day is Sept. 2. Veterans Day will be observed Nov. 11. Thanksgiving Day will be Nov. 28, and the courthouse also will be closed Nov. 29 in observance of the holiday. The courthouse will be closed Dec. 24-Dec. 26 for Christmas. Tobacco-Free Partnership to meet Dec. 5There will be a Tobacco-Free Franklin Partnership Coalition Meeting from 5:306:30 p.m. Dec. 5 at the Franklin County Health Department, 139 12th St., in the second oor conference room. NO HIDDEN CHARGES: It is our policy that the patient and any other person responsible for payments has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed by payment or any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment. www.mulliseye.com"WE WELCOME NEW PATIENTS, CALLTODAY FOR YOUR PRIORITY APPOINTMENT" FOR NEW PATIENTS 59 AND OLDERThis certificate is good for a complete Medical Eye Exam withTodd Robinson, M.D.Board Certified Eye Physician and Surgeon.The exam includes a prescription for eye glasses and tests for Glaucoma, Cataracts and other eye diseases.FOR YOUR APPOINTMENT CALL: 850-763-6666 ELIGIBILITY: U.S. Citizens living in the Florida Panhandle, 59 years and older, not presently under our care. Coupon Expires: 11-30-12 FREEEYE EXAMCODE: AP00Darren Payne, M.D.Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract SurgeonLee Mullis, M.D.Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract SurgeonTodd Robinson, M.D.Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon "Freedom from Eye Glasses, Now a reality for many."Smart LensesSM News BRIEFS THE APALACHICOLA TIMESFIND US ON FACEBOOK @ApalachTimesFOLLOW US ON TWITTER

PAGE 6

LocalA6 | The Times Thursday, November 15, 2012 When the county failed to respond to the proposal, Apalachicola City Attorney Pat Floyd wrote to the county in October asking to enter into negotiations based on Chapter 164 of the Florida Statutes, which provides for creating a governmental con ict resolution procedure to provide an equitable, expeditious, effective, and inexpensive method to avoid courtroom squabbles between government entities. Shuler replied with a letter stating that no con ict existed between the cities and county because the distribution of RESTORE funds is mandated by federal law. Floyd said local distribution is the root of the con ict between cities and county. It is true that the distribution of the ne funds to the eight disproportionately impacted county areas is mandated, he said. But there is no speci cation from that point forward of how the money will be dealt with locally. The problem of who will allocate RESTORE funds within the counties is the subject of an ongoing debate. At the Oct. 16 county meeting, Commissioner Smokey Parrish, who acted as county liaison in matters related to the oil spill, said he no longer would represent the county in that capacity, after the commission voted 3-2 not to join the Gulf Consortium, a board proposed by the Florida Association of Counties to vet and approve local projects funded by BP nes. Any future involvement by the county in the consortium could affect the decisionmaking powers of a local council. At the same meeting, commissioners voted to form the local council that would vet projects within the county, but under this plan, the county commission has the ultimate say in who receives funding. The RESTORE Act does not outline a process for what happens after money reaches Floridas affected counties, but the FAC has suggested the creation of these RESTORE councils to decide where to spend the local funds, a suggestion echoed by Rep. Steve Southerland during a recent private meeting with some local of cials. FAC spokeswoman Cragin Mosteller said although counties are not required to form RESTORE committees, the FAC has recommended it to invoke transparency in the process. We have certainly encouraged (the counties) to develop those committees transparency is going to be critical in this process, Mosteller said. From the time of the spill, our cities and counties have worked very well together, and I believe that will continue.Carrabelle joins with ApalachicolaAt their Nov. 1 meeting, Carrabelle commissioners voted unanimously to join Apalachicola in seeking talks with Franklin County over distribution of RESTORE Act funds. In a letter to the county commission sent by Mayor Van Johnson on Oct. 15, the mayor wrote that the obvious con ict that has developed between the county commission and the city commissions of Apalachicola and Carrabelle is that the county commission has refused and failed to agree to the local distribution plan adopted by all the cities and has failed to include the cities in a plan or even the discussion of a plan. Johnson said because of the countys refusal to even to discuss a plan that gives an equal voice to the people of these communities through their elected mayors and city commissions, we were forced to take a step further to attempt to deal with this conict by participating in an intergovernmental con ict resolution procedure. Both Apalachicola and Carrabelle have expressed displeasure with the countys unwillingness to discuss the RESTORE Act. We submitted something to the county a month ago asking them to meet with us about RESTORE Act funding, and we havent received an answer, Commissioner Cal Allen said at Carrabelles Nov. 1 meeting. With so much money at stake, we want to be sure everybody has a seat at the table. He said he believed the cities and the county have equal standing before the state as local entities eligible to receive RESTORE funds as coastal political subdivisions, a term used in the RESTORE Act. Floyd and Carrabelle City Attorney Dan Hartman agree. Hartman said the Florida League of Cities also maintains that municipalities are on equal footing with counties under RESTORE. Hartman wants the county to open a dialogue with the cities on the RESTORE Act Council proposed at the countys Oct. 16 meeting. I agree that the cities have a seat at the table, but it is an equal seat with the county commission regarding this important distribution that is to be attained, Floyd said. In the original proposal from the FAC, the city with the greatest population or suffering the greatest impact from the oil spill had equal representation with the county commission on the proposed council. This just points up how council conguration is not part of the RESTORE Act and continues to be changed by the county. He said he would like to see the county show its independence from the other counties and the FAC that are trying to pressure them into the mold of another level appointed government both locally and regionally. Floyd said county commissioners should agree to a fair and clear plan for distribution of the monies with its two cities. That way the elected of cials of the cities who know the needs within their jurisdiction will have the responsibility for approval of their projects for the RESTORE Act within their city limits. At the Nov. 1 meeting, Carrabelle commissioner Brenda La Paz questioned whether demanding a dialogue would exclude the cities from participation in the proposed county RESTORE council. She asked if it would be possible to negotiate without going to court. Hartman told her Carrabelle could not be excluded from participation in the council and that statute 164 is designed to keep government disputes out of court. In a later interview, he said the cities could consider suing the county to force them to the table. You cannot underestimate the importance of this amount of money, Hartman said. The countys got way ahead of us on this. None of this is in the RESTORE Act. Theres nothing about these county-level councils. Floyd said, Whenever a Florida statute requires a government entity to participate in a con ict resolution, it means what it says. County governments have to comply with the law just like everybody else. Why wouldnt the county want to sit down and discuss this? Hartman asked in a telephone interview. Its going to have to talk with the local governments. This will save everyone time and money. He said his letter to the county supports Apalachicolas initial request for negotiation. We will resort to legal remedies which may include seeking a determination by the court that a con ict exists and any remedies available under statute. Hartman said the case would be tried in the circuit court, and the county could only avoid a court appearance by defaulting. Robert C. Bruner Attorney Personal & Business BankruptcyOver 30 Years Legal Experience850-670-3030 bankruptcy relief under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon advertisements. Before you decide, ask us to send you free written information Animal Hospital of Port St. Joe24-Emergency Service For Our Current Clients Quality Internal Medicine Soft Tissue/Orthopedic Surgery Dentistry Clean and Spacious Facility Mon, Tues, Thurs & Fri 8:00 AM 5:30 PM300 Long Ave PSJ, FL 32456 850-229-6009 ATTENTION!!! PRIMARY CARE 4 ALL located on 1001 Gray Avenue, in Carrabelle, FL 32322 will be relocating to 680 Maple Street, Chattahoochee, FL 32324, (850) 663-2355 effective November 30th, 2012. All For further information you can continue to contact (850) 697-2550. Thank You, H.C. Hercule, M.D. TANNING, WAXING, EAR PIERCING, FEATHERS, FASHION EXTENSIONS & UP DOS.Walk-ins Welcome With Mani/Pedi Combo10%OFF PolishEXPIRES: 11/14/12 TANNING, WAXING, EAR PI E RCING, F E A T A T A H E RS, FASHION EX TE NSIONS & U P DOS. RESTORE from page A1

PAGE 7

LocalThe Times | A7Thursday, November 15, 2012 high as they charged onto to the eld. It concluded on a solemn note Monday morning, as the First Baptist Christian School held its annual program to honor all who served. Guest speaker for the service was Army Sgt. 1st Class Paul Plazarin of Blountstown, son of the churchs pastor, the Rev. Bill Plazarin, who introduced his son, a career military man born Dec. 22, 1969. His mother said he was brought home in a Christmas stocking as a Christmas present, Bill Plazarin said. The Plazarins three sons all have served, with Paul going on 19 years in the Army, including two overseas tours, one for the Gulf invasion and the second for 14 months in Kuwait. Were proud to say he came back safe and whole, his father said. Not all did. The younger Plazarin, dressed in Army camouage, focused his remarks as a pointed reminder of the meaning of the day. Why is it we put so much emphasis on Veterans Day? Why do we care? Why should we care? he asked. The answer is found in a simple phrase: All gave some, and some gave all. For 230 years, Americans have kept the wolf at bay and our freedoms safe, Paul Plazarin said. In an unstable world, our military has been called to keep the terrorist and tyrants at bay. We take the ght to the enemy. Heroes ght and die so we can sit in our homes with our families and enjoy a normal life. To elaborate on his point, Plazarin focused on two true-life stories, one he read about while doing research on the Internet and the other which he knew of rst-hand. He told of a Vietnam-era story he read about by Vietnam veteran Colby Dunn concerning a Capt. Little, a physician who, despite suffering battle wounds, tended to men in his unit and saved many of their lives. The second story took place nine years ago in Baghdad, just after its liberation by American troops, when an Iraqi insurgent approached two soldiers and shot them, seriously wounding each of them, protected only by ak jackets. One of them, a National Guardsman named Willie, was fortunate to survive. That is how prayer works, said Paul Plazarin. The bullet did not go through that jacket, but he had a bruise over his heart. He is still in the National Guard, and he is still a good friend of mine, he said. I wanted to put names and events in your heart, Plazarin said. These two people answered the call to stand up and ght, no matter the hardships they face. Sometimes we can forget where we come from and who gave us these rights. We need to be reminded we owe a debt that cannot be repaid. We can never forget. Thats what we do, we never forget. The active-duty soldier opened his remarks by offering a belated thank-you to those members of the local community who had, in 2003, sent him a box full of Bibles to distribute to his fellow service men and women on their overseas deployment. The community support is awesome, he said. That makes me proud, to stand up tall in this uniform. Its a humbling experience. Paul Plazarin closed by challenging attendees to make a difference in your own lives, including taking the time to show respect and honor for the nations military and its veterans. Not everybody addresses these things as they should, he said. Whats going through their minds as the National Anthem is being played? Maybe Dr. Little will come to your mind, or Willie. Its a simple act of respect we can do to pay honor. Its not about the politics, by no means. Its not about how much you have or how much land you own. Its about how you live your life as an American. Thank God for your salvation, and thank a veteran for your freedom, Plazarin said in closing. Mondays service was hosted by Carline Kembro, the schools director, and opened with a procession of ags by the schools juniors and seniors. Students as young as the kindergartners took turns offering the singing of patriotic songs, as well as the reading of poems, including an original acrostic poem written by the thirdand fourth-graders. The program closed with a hushed reading of the names of the countys war dead, dating back to World War I. Senior Sarah Strickland read the names, as senior Anna Harris stood in front, holding a basket in which her fellow students came forward to plant a small ag reading God bless America with each name. The service closed with the folding of the ag, as Bill Plazarin narrated while the duty was performed by World War II vets Oscar Medley and Red Sizemore, who were joined by Louis Van Vleet, in honor of his older brother, who died in the Paci c near the end of the war. HUGE GUN SALE!11/15/12 11/25/12 GUN SALE! GUN SALE! GUN SALE! HUGE GUN SALE! GUN SALE! GUN SALE! HUGE $469.99 CALL FOR A GUN QUOTE! 850-229-1100 $149.99Heritage Rough Rider combo .22 and .22WSM $359.99Mossberg J.I.C. Shotgun Survival Kits $669.99DPMS Oracle .223/.556 AR15 Rie CALL FOR A GUN QUOTE! 850-229-1100 $ 149 .99 CALL FOR A GUN QUOTE! 850-229-1100 $329.99Ruger American Ries .243/.308/30-06/.270 $469.99 Rossi Circuit Court Judge Blued Rie $459.99Sig Sauer Two-Sum Pistol Kits .9mm CALL FOR A CALL FOR A CALL FOR A Largest HuntingSelection on The Coast! Selection on Selection on Selection on Largest Hunting Largest Hunting Largest Hunting Largest Hunting Largest Hunting Largest Hunting Selection on Selection on Selection on Largest Hunting Selection on Largest Hunting Largest Hunting Selection on Largest Hunting Largest Hunting Selection on Largest Hunting GREAT GIFT IDEAS! $369.99Taurus G2 Pistols .9mm/.40 cal. $10.49Blazer Brass .9mm 50 rd Box HUGE HUGE HUGE Bring the children to see our one of a kind TRAIN DISPLAY SEPERATES STARTING AT$9.79NO Re-Orders | All Sales Final | First Come, First Serve | No Rain Checks All Sales Final NO Re-Orders | All Sales Final Select Hunting Camo Apparel 25% OFF ORIGINAL All Sales Final | First Come, First Serve All Sales Final All Sales Final $18.99 $19.99Magtech First defence .40 cal 20 rd boxes $7.99Remington UMC .223 ammo 20rds box Springeld XD Sub Compact .40 Selection on Selection on Selection on The Coast! The Coast! The Coast! Selection on Selection on Selection on Largest Hunting Largest Hunting Selection on Largest Hunting Selection on Largest Hunting While Supplies Last COLLINSCONSTRUCTIONOF ST. GEORGE ISLAND, INC &SEWAGE TREATMENT SERVICESOVER 30 YEARS EXPERIENCE OURSERVICESINCLUDE: AFTER HOURS & EMERGENCY SERVICE PROVIDED 850.670.5790MAINTENANCE@JCOLLINSCONSTRUCTION.COM dbutler@coastalcoverage.com Locally owned and operated Home Business Auto Health Workers Comp VETERANS from page A1 DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The TimesPaul Plazarin addresses the Veterans Day program while his father, the Rev. Bill Plazarin, listens at left.

PAGE 8

A8 | The Times Thursday, November 15, 2012 With its opening a success at the Dixie Theatre last weekend, the Panhandle Players will present the comedy Coming Back to Jersey by Carl Williams this weekend as part of dinner theater at the Crooked River Grille just east of Carrabelle. The hilarious show, full of clever sarcasm and sharp wit, focuses on the middle-aged marital challenges of Norma and Howard Karchmer (Liz Sisung and Henry Kozlowsky), who sparkle in their roles, second and third from right. Both manage to capture the energy and clash of longtime married couples who confront their fears. To snap her husband out of his comic self-pity, Norma asks friend Dorothy Arn eld, portrayed with pizzazz by Judy Loftus, far right, to shake up his fantasies. The widow Dorothy has her own admirer, Sydney Hersch, played by Apalachicola resident Bob Inguagiato, far left. The Karchmers grown daughter Louise, local sheries biologist Katie Maxwell, brings home her new boyfriend Frederic Kahler, further complicating matters. Both add a youthful excitement that is a pleasure to watch. The show will be performed Friday and Saturday evenings, with dinner and the show available for $40. Dinner begins at 6:30 p.m. On Sunday, brunch and a show is $32, with a 2:30 p.m. performance preceded by brunch served from 10:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. Making reservations in advance is strongly recommended for dinner theater. Call the Crooked River Grille at 697-5050. Check the rest of the Panhandle Players season out at www. panhandleplayers.com, or Like them on Facebook. Stan TrappeATTORNEY AT LAW Foreclosure Defense Bankruptcy Asset Protection Real Estate Probate ~ WillsAdmitted to Practice Law in Florida Since 1974Let Me Help You 850-769-6139236 McKenzie Avenue Panama City, FL PETOFTHEWEEK Franklin County Humane SocietyThis is ZANDER!Zander is a 1 yr old Rotti/Lab mix. Hes a great looking dog, playful and loves the water. He and 5 other beautiful dogs at the adoption center are part of the BIG DOG STIMULUS PACKAGE. We have reduced the adoption fee for these dogs to only $20.00 in hopes they will be adopted before the holidays. Please consider giving one of these wonderful, big dogs the home they have been waiting for!VOLUNTEERSAREDESPERATELYNEEDED TOSOCIALIZEWITHALLOFOURDOGSANDCATS.We are always looking for people willing to bring one of our animals into their home to be fostered for various needs. Anytime you can spare would be greatly appreciated.Call Karen at 670-8417 for more details or visit the Franklin County Humane Society at 244 State Road 65 in Eastpoint. You may logon to the website at www.forgottenpets.org to see more of our adoptable pets. NIP RODENTS INTHE BUD!CALLLOIS AT 653-5857Franklin Countys ONLY LOCALPest Control Company RODENTS RODENTS RODENTS I I N N T T LIVE TABLETOP TREES$18.00ToOrder, Contact Lois at 653-5857 Proceeds benet the Florida Wild Mammal Association New Location this Year!!Hwy 98, beside Gulf Side IGA in Apalachicola. See You There! Margaret(850) 653.3764 or (850) 323.1937 Margarets Christmas TreesComing Fraser Fur 5 to 10 ftArriving Thanksgiving Week! FRESH WREATHS BILL MILLER REALTY850-697-3751 (3310) 570-0658400 + COMM. U.S. 98 & GULFADJ. TO LANARK MARINA 850K$29,500 $2,500 DOWN BUYS 2 BED APT. 2 6 ORRENT $500/MTH 2 B/R 1 BTH GULF VIEW HOME W/ FAMILY ROOM $70,000 GULFVIEW & ACCESS 3 BDR 2 BA 2006 M/H 89K2 LG. SHADY LOTS 3 SHEDS400 TO MARINA-CITY WATER49KMIH 2 CRNRLOTS BLK. $ STORE REDUCED $49,500 2 AC-AT RIVER UTIL. IN -$39,500 SocietyNichols brothers celebrate birthdaysJayden turned 7, and Jole turned 4 during their recent birthdays. Proud parents are Cole and Glynis Nichols of Apalachicola. Grandparents are Charles and Debbie Nichols of Eastpoint and Morgan and Julie Simmons of Cottondale. Happy birthday, boys, and we all love you very much. Love you guys, too, Uncle Clay.John Talon Mathes turns 3John Talon Mathes celebrated his 3rd birthday on Sunday, Oct. 14, with family and friends. His party had a Western theme. Guests enjoyed hamburgers, hot dogs and a cowboy-themed cake. Toddler guests had fun smashing a candylled boot pinata and took home Western goodies. John Talon is the son of Parrish Johnson and Justin Mathes. Grandparents are Darren and Chimene Johnson and Riley and Joyce Mathes.Happy Birthday, ClayLook who is turning 16 Clay Nowling. Love,Mama, Daddy, and Samuel KEY CHOSEN AS EMPLOYEE OF THE MONTH Coming Back to Jersey at Crooked River GrilleJOHN INZETTA | Special to the Times LOIS SWOBODA | The TimesAt the Nov. 6 county commission meeting, Fonda Davis, director of the solid waste and animal control departments, presented William Key, left, with the departments rst Employee of the Month award. Davis, who said he plans to honor outstanding employees in the future, read portions of a letter to the editor, written by Fran Giknis, that appeared in the Times praising Key for his service above and beyond the call of duty when investigating a dog bite on St. George Island. I was most impressed with the help and expressions of interest from William, perhaps because they were sincere and unexpected, Giknis wrote. Happy BIRTHDAYIts almost Christmas and once again the Philaco Womans Club conservation committee is offering decorated, tabletop, red cedar, Christmas trees to bene t the Florida Wild Mammal Association (FWMA). The trees are native and do well on the island or the mainland. Suggested donation is $18. Trees are available now and will soon be on display at Centennial Bank in Apalachicola. You can preorder by calling Lois at 653-5857. Donations to FWMA are tax deductible.LOIS SWOBODA | The TimesAdele Colston presents Shirley Taylor, right, with a Philaco tree. ORDER YOUR CHRISTMAS TREE

PAGE 9

The Times | A9Thursday, November 15, 2012Special to The TimesAs Franklin County Public Library moves into its 20th year, we are thrilled to offer e-Books to all our patrons. Anyone owning a Kindle, iPhone or iPad is able to download books. The go-to website is http://fcpl.wildernesscoast. org, which offers e-Books, and the library catalog for Franklin, Wakulla, and Jefferson County libraries, all part of Wilderness Coast Public Libraries. The patron will need his or her library card number for the user ID and the password, which is the last four numbers of their library card. If anyone has questions regarding this process, the staff at either branch will be happy to assist them. A new service at the library in Eastpoint is the Teen Underground, which just celebrated its grand opening. After school, teens who wish to access a computer either for homework or searches have that opportunity. This area is designed so that teens have computer accessibility, snacks and a place to read and quietly The United Methodist Churches of Franklin County Welcome You First United Methodist Church of ApalachicolaWorship Service 11:00 a.m. every Sunday Sunday School 10:00 a.m. 75 5th St. Apalachicola 653-9530 fumcapalach@gtcom.net Pastor: Rev. Themo PatriotisCarrabelle United Methodist ChurchWorship Services 10:45 a.m. Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Celebrate Recovery Mondays 7-9 p.m. 102 NE Ave. B Carrabelle 697-3672 Pastor: Julie StephensEastpoint United Methodist ChurchWorship Service 10:00 a.m. every Sunday Healing service every fourth Monday at 7:00 p.m. 317 Patton Dr. (corner of David St.) 670-8825 Pastor: Rev. Beth WhiteSt. George Island United Methodist Church9:00 a.m. Worship Service 10:00 a.m. Fellowship Hour 201 E. Gulf Beach Dr. 9274635 www.sgiumc.org Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis Nursery now provided for Sunday Church Service First Pentecostal Holiness Church379 Brownsville Road Apalachicola Were excited about what Gods doing!!!Sunday School 9:45 am Sunday Morning Worship 10:45 am Sunday Evening Service 6:00 pm Monday, Youth Group 6:30 pm Wednesday, Royal Rangers, G.A.P.7:00 pm Wednesday Worship & Word 7:30 pmNursery Provided during regular church services 7:00 7:00 First Baptist ChurchSt. George Island 501 E. Bayshore Drive 927-2257 R. Michael Waley, Pastor Join us as we praise and worship the living Christ. Great is the Lord and most worthy of praise. Psalm 145:3 Sunday Bible Study................................................10:00am Worship Praise........................................................11:00am Sunday Night............................................................7:00pm Wednesday Power Hour......................................7:00pm Wednesday Youth at S.P.L.A.S.H.......................7:00pm Walking in Christ R. Michael Whaley, Pastor WELCOMES YOUChurch of the Ascension101 NE First Street CarrabelleSUNDAY10:00 AM WELCOMES YOUChurch THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH (850) 274-4490 (850) 545-2578 WELCOMES YOU Trinity Trinity Episcopal Churchest. 1836Welcomes YouHwy. 98 & 6th St. Apalachicola 850-653-9550Sunday Worship Services 8 & 10:30 a.m. Wednesdays Healing Service 11 a.m. Centering Prayer 4 p.m. Sunday Worship Services 8 & 10:30 a.m. Wednesdays Healing Service 11 a.m. Centering Prayer 4 p.m. Another busy weekend coming up! Hope to see you at lunch this afternoon. We will have our annual Thanksgiving dinner at the Senior Center in Carrabelle. Serving begins at noon. We will have hamburgers and chips on Friday, Nov. 16. Orders will be taken after 5 p.m. Your donation of $6 will x you right up. The Camp Gordon Johnston American Legion Post 82 will open the doors to everyone! Your sugar x will be ready at the Lanark Village Boat Club this Saturday morning from 9-11 a.m. A donation of $5 is required. There will be pancakes, French toast, eggs, bacon, juice and coffee. Be looking for you! The Fall Bazaar at the Lanark Village Community Church will be 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. this Saturday, Nov. 17. Lots of Christmas items, chili to go, hot dogs, chips and soda. Members of the Womens Christian Fellowship Circle will be there to serve you. Its Birthday Bash time already! Camp Gordon Johnston American Legion Post 82 will be rocking Saturday night from 6-10 p.m. Come on over and enjoy the evening. Wed love to see you! There will be no covered dish on Sunday, Nov. 18, at Chillas Hall. Be sure to stop in at Chillas Hall, though, and sign up for the Thanksgiving Dinner to be held Thursday, Nov. 22. There is a signup sheet for your name, number in your party and what you will bring. Serving begins at 1 p.m. See ya there, pilgrim! We had many faithful, and one black bear visitor, at Mass Saturday. Nov. 10. We went into the church hall for a potluck supper. Bishop Parkes tablehopped and had his picture taken many times. Fuzzy Wuzzy wanted to join in the Mass but had trouble with the kneeling and sitting. Be kind to one another, check in on the sick and housebound and ASAP Always Say A Prayer. Until next time, God bless America, our troops, the poor, homeless and hungry.Dry Bones Ministry to host Saturday lunchThe Dry Bones Ministry invites you to come out for a day of fun, praise worship and lunch at 2 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 17, at the Sixth Street Recreation Center in Apalachicola. Evangelist Annie Austin Pierce is hosting the event and said she is thankful for each of you and our relationship that God has blessed us with. We have so much, and I look forward to the many more blessings God has in store for us, she said.Take Stock offers free Thanksgiving mealThe Take Stock in Children mentoring program and the Youth Advisory Council invite you to a free Thanksgiving Meal and Fellowship from 4-7 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 20, at the Apalachicola City Hall Community Center at Battery Park. The meal will be prepared by TSIC students and the Youth Advisory Council of the Franklin County Education Foundation as part of their civic responsibility to the less fortunate than themselves. We welcome all to our table to have a meal and laugh with us. Please show our students that their time does matter. Also, you can help with making the meal a success by adding your name to our donors. Contribute a food or paper item from your restaurant or business. To become a donor, email Betty Stephen at boogiebetty23@yahoo. com or Shirley Bar eld at sbar eld@aol.comFamily Portrait DVDs now availableA DVD of Barry Hands The Family Portrait, which was performed at the Dixie Theatre in August, is now available. The hour-long DVD includes the entire production of the show and costs $15. For more information, call 276-2550 or email barrylh20@yahoo. com.Sacred Heart hospital guild to host Dec. 2-7 holiday saleThe spirit of the holidays will come alive in the main hallway of Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf as the hospitals Volunteer Guild hosts its third annual Christmas Spectacular on Dec. 2-7. Guests will discover holiday decorations, tree ornaments, manger scenes, angels, gift items, holiday games, festive toys and table dcor. The event hours will be 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sunday, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Monday through Thursday and 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Friday. We even hope to have a visit from Santa on Friday. said Paulina Pendarvis, volunteer coordinator. Santa is scheduled to arrive at 5 p.m. Friday for milk and cookies. Santa did mention that hed love for parents to bring their cameras to take pictures of him with their children, Pendarvis said. Proceeds generated from the Sacred Heart Gift Shop and this sale will support services at Sacred Heart. For more information, call the volunteer desk at 229-5788. Display booths are not available for the public. At the core of Sacred Hearts long tradition of caring for the sick, the poor and the vulnerable stands a group of volunteers whose willing hearts and helping hands have served generations of families during their time of need. More than 90 volunteers freely give of their time, talents and energy. Collectively, the volunteers have given 18,000 hours of service since the hospital has been opened. Through membership dues, fundraising activities and gift shop sales, the Volunteer Guild will provide donations for the hospital and our community. For more information about Sacred Heart Volunteer Guild, call Paula Pickett, guild membership chair, at 227-7535 or visit www.sacredheartonthegulf. org. Special to the TimesMembers of the Delta Kappa Chapter of the Delta Kappa Gamma Society International met at The Red Pirate Restaurant in Eastpoint on Nov. 5. President Karen Ward brought the meeting to order and introduced the guest of honor, Jack Spiers. Jack, who is the brother of member Babs Bailey, reported on his mission work in Bolivia. He shared that he is working to improve the El Faro mission on the banks of the Beni River in Bolivia. Delta Kappa Chapter members are longtime supporters of his missionary work and were happy to give him a check at the meeting. Members also will be taking school supplies to the Taunton Childrens home in Wewahitchka, another community service project of the organization. Members also shared stories connected to items they brought that were old and dear to them for various reasons. Others in attendance were Laura Baney, Cathy Creamer, Beverly Kelley, Laura King, Lydia Countryman, Missy Cumbie and Arlene Oehler. DKG is an international organization of more than 100,000 educators dedicated to promote professional and personal development of women educators and excellence in education. LANARK NEWSJim Welsh FaithBlack bear pays a visit to Masssocialize. Interest and attendance is increasing each day. The county library had more than 32,000 items circulated last year. Our volunteers are the heart of our success and allow us to offer programs to the children, teens and adults who frequent our doors. Services such as providing assistance for food stamps, unemployment, job searches, faxing to the Department of Children and Families, as well as business development and job skills are offered daily. Basic computer skills instruction is offered weekly by appointment. The library staff is proud to be such an active part of Franklin County and look ahead with anticipated success and excitement for another remarkable 20 years of serving the citizens of Franklin County. For information about our programs or services, call Eastpoint at 670-8151 or Carrabelle at 697-2366. Your County LIBRARYE-Books, Teen Underground mark 20th year ARLENE OEHLER | Special to the TimesJack Spiers, pictured with sister Babs Bailey, has been doing mission work in Bolivia.Delta Kappa hears from Bolivian missionary Faith BRIEFS

PAGE 10

Special to the TimesThe Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission honored Floridas heroes on Veterans Day by implementing changes to commercial licensing requirements. The changes make it easier for Florida veterans and veterans with disabilities to enter the commercial shing industry. We have a tremendous opportunity not only to give thanks to the men and women that served our nation so courageously, but also to provide them with more support so they can pursue careers in shing here in Florida, Gov. Rick Scott said. This initiative will expand job opportunities for our veterans and get more folks involved in the commercial shing industry, which is a win-win for Florida. The FWC adopted these changes at its September meeting and made a formal announcement of the changes in a media event on Nov. 9. I am excited to be extending this opportunity to the men and women who so bravely served our country, Commissioner Charles W. Roberts III said. Job creation and Floridas economy are priorities for everyone, including the FWC. Our hope is that more of Floridas veterans and veterans with disabilities, especially those who have recently returned from active duty, will be able to partake in the commercial seafood industry and bene t from this opportunity. The changes will modify income requirements for many of Florida veterans seeking a commercial restricted species endorsement, which allows commercial harvesters to sh for and sell species that are designated as restricted. Spanish and king mackerel, ounder, shrimp, mahi mahi and several reef sh are among the list of species that require a restricted species endorsement. Commercial harvesters attempting to qualify for a restricted species endorsement must have a Florida Saltwater Products License, which is Floridas commercial saltwater shing license, and be able to attribute $5,000 or 25 percent of their total annual income during one of the past three years to sales of saltwater products. With the new changes in place, restricted species endorsement income requirements will be waived for one license year (July 1 to June 30) for Florida veterans who were honorably discharged between Sept. 11, 2001, and June 30, 2014. After June 30, 2014, this income-requirement waiver will continue to extend to Florida veterans as long as they apply within four years of an honorable discharge. The one-license-year waiver also extends to all honorably discharged veterans with service-connected disabilities, regardless of when they were discharged. After the one-year waiver expires, veterans with service-connected disabilities will also have a reduced income requirement of $2,500 instead of $5,000. All other veterans must meet the $5,000 income requirement after the one-year waiver expires. To qualify for these exemptions, veterans must be certi ed by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs or the U.S. Armed Forces to have at least a 10-percent disability that is service-connected. I salute the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission for making it easier for Floridas veterans to become commercial shermen, said Mike Prendergast, executive director of the Florida Department of Veterans Affairs. With more than 1.6 million veterans in Florida, including nearly 260,000 with service-connected disabilities, this new opportunity provides an avenue to help them achieve their dreams after honorable military service. Applicants should visit MyFWC.com/License and click on Commercial Saltwater Products or call 487-3122. To learn more about commercial saltwater shing in Florida, visit MyFWC.com/Fishing; click on Saltwater Fishing and Commercial. Corner of Marina Drive Port St. Joe, FL(next to Piggly Wiggly) www.BWOsh. Port St. Joe, FL Corner of Marina Drive EVERYTHING FOR YOUR OUTDOOR ADVENTURE RYTHING FOR YOUR O UTDOOR ADV E UTDOOR ADV E UTDOOR ADV NTUR E NTUR E E RYTHING FOR YOUR O UTDOOR ADV E UTDOOR ADV E UTDOOR ADV NTUR E NTUR E E (next to Piggly Wiggly) Corner of Marina Drive EV E EV E EV RYTHING FOR YOUR E RYTHING FOR YOUR E EV E EV E EV RYTHING FOR YOUR E RYTHING FOR YOUR E EV EV HUGEGUN SALE! (next to Piggly Wiggly) (next to Piggly Wiggly) GUN SALE! $2900 FREE!$5500 WEEKLY ALMANAC APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE TIDE TABLES MONTHLY AVERAGESTo nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from these given for APALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW Cat Point Minus 0:40 Minus 1:17 East Pass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27 To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from those given for CARRABELLE: HIGH LOW Bald Point Minus 9:16 Minus 0:03 Sponsor the WEEKLY ALMANACCall Today!653-8868 Date HighLow% Precip Thu, Nov. 1573 4920% Fri, Nov. 1670 4810% Sat, Nov. 1769 4420% Sun, Nov. 1869 47 0% Mon, Nov. 1970 45 0% Tues, Nov. 2069 49 0% Wed, Nov. 2171 50 0% 14 We 1235am 2.9 424pm 2.4 804am -0.6 730pm 2.1 15 Th 117am 2.9 518pm 2.4 853am -0.8 811pm 2.1 16 Fr 202am 2.9 608pm 2.2 945am -0.6 858pm 1.9 17 Sa 253am 2.9 655pm 2.2 1037am -0.5 958pm 1.9 18 Su 349am 2.6 736pm 2.1 1132am -0.2 1114pm 1.8 19 Mo 455am 2.4 813pm 2.1 1226pm 0.2 20 Tu 615am 2.1 846pm 2.1 1244am 1.4 121pm 0.5 21 We 759am 1.8 916pm 2.1 213am 1.1 215pm 0.8 22 Th 1005am 1.6 945pm 2.2 328am 0.8 308pm 1.1 23 Fr 1159am 1.8 1012pm 2.2 429am 0.3 358pm 1.3 24 Sa 119pm 1.9 1040pm 2.4 520am 0.0 445pm 1.6 25 Su 217pm 1.9 1108pm 2.4 606am -0.2 529pm 1.6 26 Mo 303pm 2.1 1138pm 2.4 647am -0.3 609pm 1.8 27 Tu 341pm 2.1 725am -0.5 645pm 1.8 28 We 1211am 2.4 414pm 2.1 800am -0.5 720pm 1.8 15 Th 242am 1.8 643pm 1.5 1106am -0.5 1024pm 1.3 16 Fr 327am 1.8 733pm 1.4 1158am -0.4 1111pm 1.2 17 Sa 418am 1.8 820pm 1.4 1250pm -0.3 18 Su 514am 1.6 901pm 1.3 1211am 1.2 145pm -0.1 19 Mo 620am 1.5 938pm 1.3 127am 1.1 239pm 0.1 20 Tu 740am 1.3 1011pm 1.3 257am 0.9 334pm 0.3 21 We 924am 1.1 1041pm 1.3 426am 0.7 428pm 0.5 22 Th 1130am 1.0 1110pm 1.4 541am 0.5 521pm 0.7 23 Fr 124pm 1.1 1137pm 1.4 642am 0.2 611pm 0.8 24 Sa 244pm 1.2 733am 0.0 658pm 1.0 25 Su 1205am 1.5 342pm 1.2 819am -0.1 742pm 1.0 26 Mo 1233am 1.5 428pm 1.3 900am -0.2 822pm 1.1 27 Tu 103am 1.5 506pm 1.3 938am -0.3 858pm 1.1 28 We 136am 1.5 539pm 1.3 1013am -0.3 933pm 1.1 Thursday, November 15, 2012 Email outdoors news to timesoutdoors @star .com Page 10 OUTDOORSwww.apalachtimes.comSection Section A SPONSORED BY Freshwater InshoreRed fish continue to be the best bet in and around the St. Joe area. Good reports of huge bull reds are common right now from Mexico Beach to Indian Pass. Most anglers are using cut baits, and good artificial bait colors are glow, gold, and rootbeer right now. Surf fishing or pier fishing is the best way to land a big red fish this week. Winter weather is on the way for 2012. November is usually a good crappie month for freshwater fishing in our area. Crappie reports are steady now, with most action in the Depot and Howard Creek. Some bass are on the move however, most are in the 2to 3-pound range. ROD GASCHE | Special to the TimesDr. John Hitron and Rod Gasche attempted Monday to release to the wild a young male peregrine falcon on the eastern end of Dr. Julian Bruce St. George Island State Park, where it was found last month by a park ranger. He had been injured, was weak from lack of food and parasites. Chris Beatty and her staff at the Florida Wild Mammal Association cared for it and believed he should be allowed to attempt to return to the wild. Although he quickly headed out into the sand dunes the door was opened, he was unable to y well enough to survive. He strived several times to rise above the tops of the grasses and bushes but was unable to get up. Because of coyotes on the island, the men were afraid the falcon never would survive, let alone be able to feed himself as he could not continue to soar for his food. After a few attempts to recapture him, the bird tired and Gasche was able to toss a tablecloth over him and return him to the safety of his shelter. Beatty and her volunteer staff will do further tests and continue to work on the falcons health until he can take care of himself.Commercial shing gets easier for Florida vets FALCON AWAITS RETURN Brice band reels in the red shBy DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com It isnt every day that you get to sh with a country singing sensation, and when that day comes along, you sure hope the sh are biting. In the case of Capt. J. B. Layne, it got about as good as it gets. Layne, along with Florida Seafood Festival President John Solomon, had a chance Nov. 4 to go shing with Lee Brice and members of his band. After a fantastic concert Saturday night to close out the 49th annual festival, Brice and his boys were ready for the shing adventure. Brices tour manager had called Layne late Saturday night to arrange the trip. All we want to catch is redsh, he told Layne. I can take them where theyre at, Layne told him. Its your job to reel them in. Leaving out of Ten Foot Hole about 11:30 a.m. the following Sunday, Brice brought along a high school buddy, his personal trainer, drummer and lead guitarist. Layne found them a spot over near Dry Bar, and the boys went to work, reeling out with 10-pound test line to prove their mettle against the erce ghter. Everyone was real knowledgeable, but they grew up mostly on bass shing, Layne said. This was the rst red sh any of them ever caught. And caught they did, each of them snaring at least one, and some of them two, for more than a dozen on the day, most all of them deemed oversized and thrown back. Every one of them was over 27 inches except three of them, Layne said. Size limits call for not less than 18 inches and no more than 27 inches total length. The biggest one of the day, 38 inches long and 22 pounds with the Boga grips, was caught by lead guitarist Travis Bettis. Layne coached him how to let out the line, and then get the sh to turn his head as he heads to the bottom. The charter captain had Solomon hoist the anchor to ensure against losing the bull red, and they didnt, nally landing him after Bettis proved as able with the rod as he is with his guitar. Layne said the shing trip was a wholesome affair, with Brices personal trainer nixing the alcohol and having them drink coconut water instead. (Brice) is really big into football, he monitors it 24/7. Every 30 minutes or less he has to check his phone and the scores, said Layne of the former Clemson football player, who he said made the large-framed Layne look tiny. It was a blast, theyre just regular guys, down to earth, Layne said. Every one of them caught one, and that was the best part. With three keeper reds in tow, Layne dropped them back off at Sikes Cut, near where the band was staying in the Plantation at a unit provided by Resort Vacation Properties. Layne beached the boat and then cleaned them right there, asking only that Brice autograph his shirt and hat. The singing star was more than happy to oblige. Its the least I can do for you, he told Layne. They were real nice people, Layne said. Everyone was super nice. JOHN SOLOMON | Special to the TimesLee Brice, second from right, shares in his bands red sh catch. Charter Capt. J. B. Layne, is standing at left.

PAGE 11

CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA SP O RTS www.apalachtimes.com ASectionBy DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com South Walton was the better of a pair of Seahawks Friday night, as they snapped a seasonlong losing streak with a 37-10 win over Franklin County. Sophomore quarterback Johnathan Ortner punctured the pass defense with a 19-for-26 performance for 219 yards and three touchdowns, handing Phil Tisa his rst win after nine losses in his inaugural season as South Walton head coach. Those were a hard 10 weeks, he said. It was a rough schedule. Seven of the 10 teams on our schedule are in the playoffs, but we stayed together and got better each week. During those nine losses, I never lost those kids wanting to play for me, and that lets me sleep at night. The visiting Seahawks spotted the hometown ones a eld goal early on, when senior Zach Howze nailed a 29-yarder with 5:16 left in the rst quarter. Franklin County sophomore Cameron White managed an interception in the rst half, and a 15-yard runback, but no scoring resulted. South Walton added 16 unanswered points before halftime, including successfully completing the teams rst eld goal attempt of the year with no time left on the clock, when freshman Joe LedoMassey split the uprights from 27 yards out. With 2:15 left in the rst quarter, Ortner threw a 15-yard touchdown strike to senior wide receiver Drew Pheiffer for South Waltons rst touchdown. Pheiffer nished the night with eight receptions for 132 yards. Pheiffer also snared an interception that set up a 39-yard scoring scamper by senior running back Brandon Whalen with 6:36 left in the third quarter. Whalen, who led the team with 10 carries on 59 yards, also put himself into position to nish tops among Walton County ball carriers for the year, with more than 700 yards on the ground. South Waltons second score came in the rst minute of the second quarter, when Ortner connected with junior running back Sage Roberts on a fouryard pass for the score. Ledo-Massey failed on the extra point try when the snap went awry. With 8:18 left in the third quarter, Ortner lofted a high 15-yard heave to senior wide receiver Bishop Waldrop for his third touchdown pass, with Ledo-Massey booting his second of four extra points of the night. South Walton wrapped up its scoring with 10:43 left in the game, when senior wide receiver Hampton Schaffer ran it in from the one-yard-line for a 37-3 lead. Franklin County, who fell to 2-7, 1-3, on the year, offered fans some excitement late in the game, when senior lineman Mason Ray recovered a fumble on the teams own 30yard line. On the opening play of their next possession, Franklin County junior quarterback Logan McLeod, lling in for the injured starter Dwayne Griggs, threw to junior tailback Mercury Wynn for an 80-yard touchdown play, with 1:07 left in the game. McLeod completed 4 of 13 passes for 97 yards and one touchdown and was intercepted twice. Senior Ladarius Rhodes led the team with 12 rushes for 79 yards, while senior Skyler Hutchinson ran a dozen times for 35 yards. Hutchinson caught three passes for 13 yards and Rhodes one for four yards. McLeod and Rhodes led the team with six tackles each. In addition to Rhodes, Howze and Hutchinson, seniors honored in the pre-game ceremonies were David Butler, Chase Golden, Karl Sanford, Tevin Jones, Jeff Murray and Daniel Carrino. Senior drum major Stephanie Marxsen also was honored as were cheerleaders Roxana Barahona, Cheyenne Diorio and Cheyenne Martin, who also performs with the band. Franklin County Coach Josh Wright named Rhodes and Wynn Offensive Players of the Game, and tackle Buddy Jones was Defensive Player of the Week.By DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com The Franklin County varsity boys soccer team dropped its opener 3-1 at John Paul II Nov. 8, but new coach Luis Ramon Valenzuela is con dent the boys will rebound from this. We have talent, and we are going to pursue the best this season, he said. With an injury to starting goalie Dan Carrino, the team relied on senior Casey Sapp, who had 19 saves. The teams lone score came from the leg of Graham Kirvin, who was closest ghting to score near the goal after several rebounds by the Seahawks. Zach Howze had two shots on goal, James Newell had four and Kirvin and Josh Reeder had one each. We played the entire time very hard, until the last minutes when they scored two goals against us, said Valenzuela, who is assisted by Stacy Kirvin. Defensively, we were strong the entire time. I told the boys to take this as a positive experience and lets learn from our mistakes. We have a long season ahead to play our best, since we have been practicing for three weeks, trying to nd the chemistry between players and coaches, said the rstyear head coach, who has 15 years of experience coaching Little League and high school soccer. I think they gave all they had on the game, Valenzuela said. We will need to brush up our foot skills and focus on accurate passing; in other words, ball controlling. The Seahawks travel to Rocky Bayou today for the rst district game. I am sure Coach Kirvin and I will try our best to win this game, but once again, it will take practicing hard, Valenzuela said. Mexican-born, Valenzuela has played soccer since age 7. He holds a bachelors degree from the College of Philosophy of Missionaries of the Holy Spirit and a another in Spanish translation from Kent State University. Seahawks varsity players this year include Sapp, Howze, Newell, Reeder, Kirvin, Elisha Patriotis, Julio Ramirez, brothers James and Billy Harris, Alex Causey, James Bailey, Joshua Patriotis, Jacob Montgomery, brothers Stefan and Walker DeVaughn, Dalyn Parrish, Austin Carter, Logan Allen and Tyler Pendleton.Special to the Times The St. Joseph Bay Golf Club hosted a fundraising silent auction on Friday and a golf tourney on Saturday. The auction and the golf tournament raised funds for the Camp Gordon Johnston museum in Carrabelle, dedicated to preserving and protecting the heritage of the soldiers of World War II, especially those who trained at Camp Gordon Johnston after the camp opened in 1942 to prepare amphibious soldiers and their support groups. A quarter of a million men were trained at CGJ before it closed in April 1946. On Friday, entertainment was provided by The Boyer Band, made up of George, Cletus and Tom Boyer. The tournament on Saturday was preceded by an Honoring Americas Veterans ceremony. Two World War II veterans were special guests: Jim Sealey and Fred Fitzgerald. Dan Van Treese, golf club president, and Tony Minichiello, president of the museum association, were co-emcees; the invocation was delivered by Father Phil Fortin of the St. Joseph Catholic Church; the Port St Joe High School junior ROTC presented the colors; and retired Chief Master Sgt. Wanda Warruck, from the Connecticut Air National Guard, was principal speaker. The team of Guerry Magidson, Mel Magidson, Rex Buzzett and Mark Eden eld came in rst place; Danny Warruck, Buddy Renfro, Kenny Wood and Dan Anderson came in second; Paul Penn, B.J. Richards, Mish Fuller and David Warriner were third; and Tom Adams, Hershell Neel, Penelope Evanoff and Gary Howze took fourth. All teams winning cash prizes generously donated the funds back to the museum and the club. The events were supported by the Gulf County Tourist Development Council and the Franklin County Tourist Development Council. Gulfside IGA PLAYER OF THE WEEK SPONSORLady Seahawk junior middle elder Gracyn Kirvin nailed one of her two shots on the net to score the teams lone goal in Franklin Countys opening season 4-1 loss to John Paul II in the non-league bout Nov. 8.Congratulations, Gracyn! Hometown Proud (850)653-9695 Thursday, November 15, 2012 Page 11Seahawks boys drop soccer openerSt. Joe Bay golfers raise funds for CGJ South Walton spoils Seahawk Senior Night DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The TimesFlanked by his granddad, Paul Orr, and his mom, Cindi Brackin, Seahawk senior Karl Sanford salutes during Senior Night ceremonies.

PAGE 12

A12| The Times Thursday, November 15, 2012 CLASSIFIEDS Thanksgiving Holiday WeekendClassified In-column D E AD LI N E SThe Port St. Joe Star and The Apalachicola/Carrabelle TimesTo Run Thursday, November 22 Due Friday, November 16, 5:00 pm Call (850) 747-5020 or 1-800-345-8688 or visit us online at emeraldcoastmarketplace.com The classified department will be closed Thursday, November 22. We will open Friday, November 23, at 8 a.m. 89294T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 2012CA 000060 NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLC, Plaintiff, vs. ROBERTA J. SNYDER A/K/A ROBERTA SNYDER, et.al. Defendant. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated October 24, 2012, and entered in 2012CA000060 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLC, is the Plaintiff and ROBERTA J. SNYDER A/K/A ROBERTA SNYDER; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF ROBERTA J. SNYDER A/K/A ROBERTA SNYDER; TOAD HOLLOW CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION, INC.; THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK, AS SUCCESSOR TRUSTEE TO JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A., AS TRUSTEE ON BEHALF OF THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS OF THE CWHEQ INC., CWHEQ REVOLVING HOME EQUITY LOAN TRUST, SERIES 2006-1; UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2 are the Defendant(s). Gail Wadsworth as the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash 2nd Floor, Civil Dept, Kim C. Hammond Justice Cntr 1769 E. Moody Blvd. BLG 1, Bunnell, FL 32110, at 11:00 AM on December 12, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: THAT CERTAIN CONDOMINIUM UNIT COMPOSED OF UNIT NUMBER 207, BUILDING B, AND THE UNDIVIDED 1/7 INTEREST IN THE COMMON ELEMENTS APPURTNANT THERETO, IN ACCORDANCE WITH AND SUBJECT TO THE COVENANTS, RESTRICTIONS, RESERVATIONS, LIMITATIONS, CONDITIONS, LIENS, EASEMENTS, TERMS, AND OTHER PROVISIONS OF THE DECLARATION OF CONDOMINIUM OF TOAD HOLLOW, RECORDED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 793, PAGE(S) 169-250, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 25th day of October, 2012. Marcia Johnson As Clerk of the Court Terry E. Creamer As Deputy Clerk Submitted by: Robertson, Anschutz & Schneid, P.L. Attorneys for Plaintiff 3010 N. Military Trail, Suite 300 Boca Raton, FL 33431 Phone: 561-241-6901 Fax: 561-241-9181 November 8, 15, 2012 89314T PUBLIC NOTICE STATE OF FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION NOTICE OF INTENDS TO ISSUE PERMIT The Department of Environmental Protection gives notice of intends to issue an environmental resources permit for a Single Family Dock, Permit Number 19-0268670-003-EM to Phillip & Barbara Gillaspy, at 113 North Bayshore Drive, Eastpoint, FL 32328, c/o Garlick Environmental Associates, Inc., Post Office Box 385, Apalachicola, FL The purpose of the permit is to authorize construction of a Single Family Residential Dock, 407 ft. in Length and 4 ft. in Width, with a Terminal Platform 26 ft. in Length and 6 ft. in Width. The project also consists of an uncovered boat lift 20 ft. in Length and 12 ft. in Width. The project site is located at 113 North Bayshore Drive in the Eastpoint, Franklin County, Florida. Based on all the above, and with the application of general and limiting specific conditions of the permit, the Department has reasonable assurance the project, as proposed, fully meets the environmental resources permitting requirements of Chapter 62-346, Florida Administrative Code, and will not harm the environment. A person whose substantial interests are affected by the Departments action may petition for an administrative proceeding (hearing) under Sections 120.569 and 120.57 of the Florida Statute. The petition must contain the information set forth below and must be filed (received by the clerk) in the Office of General Counsel of the Department at 3900 Commonwealth Boulevard, Mail Station 35, Tallahassee, Florida 323993000. Because the administrative hearing process is designed to re-determine final agency action on the application, the filing of a petition for an administrative hearing may result in a modification of the permit, or even a denial of the application. Accordingly, the applicant will not commence construction or other activities under this permit until the deadlines below for filing a petition for an administrative hearing, or request for an extension of time, have expired. Under subsection 62-110.106(4) of the Florida Administrative Code, a person whose substantial interests are affected by the Departments action may also request an extension of time to file a petition for an administrative hearing. The Department may, for good cause shown, grant the request for an extension of time. Requests for extension of time must be filed with the Office of General Counsel of the Department at 3900 Commonwealth Boulevard, Mail Station 35, Tallahassee, Florida 323993000, before the applicable deadline. A timely request for extension of time shall toll the running time period for filing a petition until the request is acted upon. If a request is filed late, the Department may still grant it upon a motion by the requesting party showing that the failure to file a request for an extension of time before the deadline was the result of excusable neglect. In the event that a timely and sufficient petition for an administrative hearing is filed, other persons whose substantial interests will be affected by the outcome of the administrative process have the right to petition to intervene in the proceeding. Intervention will be only at the discretion of the presiding officer upon the filing of a motion in compliance with Rule 28-106.205 of the Florida Administrative Code. In accordance with subsection 28-106.111 (2) and subparagraph 62-110.106(3)(a).4, Florida Administrative Code, petitions for an administrative hearing by the applicant must be filed within 14 days of receipt of written notice. Petitions filed by any persons other than the applicant, and other than those entitled to written notice under Section 120.60 (3) of the Florida Statutes, must be filed within 14 days of publication of the notice. Under Section 120.60 (3) of the Florida Statute, however, any person who has asked the Department for notice of agency action may file a petition within 14 days of such notice, regardless of the date of publication. The petitioner shall mail a copy of the petition to the applicant at the address indicated above at the time of filing. The failure of any person to file a petition for an administrative hearing within the appropriate time period shall constitute a waiver of those rights. A petition that disputes the material facts on which the Departments action is based must contain the following information: (a) The name and address of each agency affected and each agencys file or identification number, if known, (b) The name, address, and telephone number of the petitioner; the name, address, and telephone number of the petitioners representative, if any, which shall be the address for service purposes during the course of the proceeding; and an explanation of how the petitioners substantial interests are or will be affected by the agency determination; (c) A statement of when and how the petitioner received notice of the agency decision; (d) A statement of all disputed issues of material fact. If there are none, the petition must so indicate; (e) A concise statement of the ultimate facts alleged, including the specific facts that the petitioner contends warrant reversal or modification of the agencys proposed action; (f) A statement of the specific rules or statutes that the petitioner contends require reversal or modification of the agency s proposed action; and (g) A statement of the relief sought by the petitioner, stating precisely the action that the petitioner wishes the agency to take with respect to the agencys proposed action. A petition that does not dispute the material facts on which the Departments action is based shall state that no such facts are in dispute and otherwise shall contain the same information as set forth above, as required by Rule 28-106.301, Florida Administrative Code. Under Sections 120.569(2)(c) and (d) of the Florida Statute, a petition for administrative hearing must be dismissed by the agency if the petition does not substantially comply with the above requirements or is untimely filed. This action is final and effective on the date filed with the Clerk of the Department unless a petition is filed in accordance with the above. Upon the timely filing of petition this order will not be effective until further order of the Department. This permit, when issued, constitutes an order of the Department. The applicant has the right to seek judicial review of the order under Section 120.68 of the Florida Statute, by the filing of a notice of appeal under Rule 9.110 of the Florida Rules of Appellate Procedure with the Clerk of the Department in the Office of General Counsel, 3900 Commonwealth Boulevard, Mail Station 35, Tallahassee, Florida, 323993000; and by filing a copy of the notice of the appeal accompanied by the applicable filing fees with the appropriate district court of appeal. The notice of appeal must be filed within 30 days from the date when the final order is filed with the Clerk of the Department. The application for this permit is available for public inspection during normal business hours, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, except for legal holidays, at the Northwest District office, 160 W. Government Sheet, Pensacola, Florida. November 15, 2012 90705T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT COURT FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 12-00007-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, as Successor in Interest to Coastal Community Bank, Plaintiff, vs. CHRISTOPHER T. GIAMETTA, ET AL., Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: CHRISTOPHER T. GIAMETTA, JAMI GIAMETTA, CHRISTINA GIAMETTA:, and THE UNKNOWN SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES OR OTHER PERSONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THEM, OR ANY OF THEM, AND ALL UNKNO WN PERSONS, IF ALIVE, AND IF DEAD, OR NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, THEIR UNKNOWN SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES OR OTHER PERSONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THE UNKNOWN PERSONS. YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to reform and foreclose a mortgage, or alternatively, establish and foreclose an equitable lien, on the following property located in Franklin County, Florida LOT 39 OF TARPON SHORES UNIT NO. 2: COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 20, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 6 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN NORTH 02 DEGREES 20 MINUTES EAST 1914.27 FEET ALONG THE EAST BOUNDARY OF SECTION 20 TO A POINT ON THE SOUTHERLY BOUNDARY OF RIDGE ROAD, THENCE SOUTH 63 DEGREES 44 MINUTES WEST 2620.31 FEET ALONG SAID ROAD TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, THENCE LEAVING SAID ROAD RUN SOUTH 26 DEGREES 16 MINUTES EAST 380.0 FEET TO A POINT, THENCE SOUTH 63 DEGREES 44 MINUTES WEST 114.63 FEET TO A POINT, THENCE NORTH 26 DEGREES 16 MINUTES WEST 380.0 FEET TO A POINT ON THE SOUTHERLY BOUNDARY OF RIDGE ROAD, THENCE NORTH 63 DEGREES 44 MINUTES EAST 114.63 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, A/K/A LOT 94 OF RIDGE ROAD. TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN 1994 PLAN DOUBLE WIDE MOBILE HOME ( VIN# HMST8922AGA and HMST8922BGA) PERMANENTLY AFFIXED TO THE REAL PROPERTY. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Edward W. Wood, the plaintiffs attorney, whose address is KING & WOOD, P.A., 1701 Hermitage Blvd., Suite 104, Tallahassee, FL 2308 within 30 days of first publication of this notice, and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on the plaintiff s attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. DATED: October 22, 2012 HONORABLE MARCIA JOHNSON Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk November 8, 15, 2012 90695T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY CASE NO.: 12-000038-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, an Arkansas banking corporation, as Assignee of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, as Receiver for Bayside Savings Bank, organized under the laws of the United States of America. Plaintiff, vs. KARMIN L. WILSON f/k/a KARMIN L. WALKER, a/k/a KARMEN L. WILSON, RUTH J. FLETCHER, DAVID WALKER, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the undersigned Clerk of the Circuit Court of Franklin County, Florida, pursuant to the Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure, entered in this case, will sell the property at public sale to the highest bidder for cash, except as set forth hereinafter, on December 4, 2012 at 11:00 am Eastern Time on the 2nd floor lobby at the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida, in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes, the following described real property lying and being in Franklin County, Florida, to-wit: Lot 5, Block 74, St. George Island Gulf Beaches Unit 5, according to the Plat recorded in Plat Book 3, Page 16, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. This Notice dated this 23rd day of October, 2012. MARCIA M. JOHNSON Franklin County Clerk of Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk November 8, 15, 2012 90765T IN THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 10-185-CA CADENCE BANK, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. JTB, LLC, a Florida limited liability company, and BENJAMIN T. BLOODWORTH and JOHN P. DAY Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated October 23, 2012, and entered in Civil Action No. 10-185-CA of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein the parties were the plaintiff, CADENCE BANK, and the Defendants, JTB, LLC, a Florida limited liability company, BENJAMIN T. BLOODWORTH, and JOHN P. DAY, I will sell to the highest and best bidder, for cash, at 11:00 a.m. (Eastern Time) on the 11th day of December, 2012, at the front door foyer on the second floor of the Franklin County Courthouse, Apalachicola, Florida, the followingdescribed real property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: Lot 9, Block 35, St. George Island Gulf Beaches, Unit No. 4, a subdivision as per map or plat thereof, recorded in Plat Book 3, pages 14 and 15, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. The successful bidder at the sale will be required to place the requisite state documentary stamps on the Certificate of Title. DATED this 25th day of October, 2012. Honorable MARCIA JOHNSON Clerk of the Court Franklin County, Florida By: Michele Maxwell As Deputy Clerk November 8, 15, 2012 90801T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 12-185-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, a foreign banking corporation, Plaintiff, vs. DEBORA G. COLLINS; et al. Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: WENDELL HARRELSON YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action on a promissory note and to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in Franklin County, Florida: Lot 3, Block K of Lanark Beach, Unit No. 1, according to the plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 2, Page 13 of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. Together with all improvements located thereon and a 1968 Fleetwood Mobile Home, ID# DK71268277. has been filed against you, Debora G. Collins; Larry D. Everett and all unknown parties claiming by, through, under, and against the herein named individual defendants who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said unknown parties may claim an interest as spouses, heirs, grantees or other claimants, and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Rick A. Savage, Esq., of the Savage Law Office, PLLC, plaintiffs attorney, whose address is Post Office Box 385, Tallahassee, Florida 32302 on or before 30 days from the date of the first publication of this notice and file the original with the clerk of court of this Court either before service on plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petiATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home Medical, Business, Criminal Justice Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 866-203-3179 www.CenturaOnline.com These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you. EmeraldCoast Marketplace 747-5020

PAGE 13

CLASSIFIEDSThursday, November 15, 2012 The Times | A13 RENTALS3 BEDROOM, 2 BATH FURNISHED APT W/D, CARPORT, ST PARKING.............................$600 3 BEDROOM, 3 BATH CONDO FURNISHED, POOL .............................................$850 3 BEDROOM, 1 BATH UNFURNISHED DUPLEX .................................................................$600 1 BEDROOM, 1 BATH UNFURNISHED APT LANARK, REMODELED, INC WATER .................$425 2 BEDROOM 1 BATH UNFURNISHED APT W/D HOOKUP, SMALL PORCH ..........................$375 2 BEDROOM 1-1/2 BATH UNFURNISHED, FL ROOM, GARAGE, FENCED YARD, W/D .......$800 2 OFFICE SPACES US 98 CARRABELLE ...............................................$300 BOTH 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322850-697-9604 850-323-0444 www.seacrestre.comwww. rst tness.com/carrabellePROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND RENTALS FRANKLIN COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISIONERS JOB ANNOUNCEMENT Position Title: Inmate Supervisor NON-DC /Equipment Operator I Closing Date: November 22, 2012 Annual Salary: $25,000 Contact Person: Hubert W. Chipman Road Department 376 State Road 65 Eastpoint, FL 32328 Phone: (850) 670-8640 The Franklin County Board of Commissioners is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action/Drug Free Workplace Employer Knowledge, Skills and Abilities: AN EMPLOYEE IN THIS POSITION WILL SUPERVISE THE WORK OF STATE INMATES. OPERATE VARIOUS SPECIAL HEAVY EQUIPMENT, PERFORMING TASKS ASSOCIATED WITH THE ROAD DEPARTMENT OPERATIONS, OPERATES FRONT END LOADER TO LOAD ROAD MATERIAL OR DEBRIS FOR DUMP TRUCKS, BACK HOE TO DIG OUT DITCHES AND A VARIETY OF TRACTORS. OPERATES VARIOUS EQUIPMENT SUCH AS CHAINSAWS, BLOWERS, WEED EATERS, PUSH MOWERS, AND ETC. OTHER DUTIES AS REQUIRED. BACKGROUND INVESTIGATION AND DRUG SCREENING WILL BE COMPLETED ON SELECTED APPLICANT. Minimum Qualifications: Requires a high school diploma or an equivalent. Requires knowledge of Florida traffic laws. Requires basic understanding of safety procedures; the ability to drive and operate the above mentioned equipment. Must possess a valid Florida Commercial Class A Drivers License with a favorable driving record. Must have the ability to meet the Department of Corrections criteria for a certification as an NON-DC Supervisor of State Inmates. Newly hired employees shall obtain such certification within 90 days of hiring. Print Dates: Nov 8, 2012 Nov 15, 2012 REPRESENTATIVES will be at the PORT ST. JOE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE on Tuesdays & Thursdays from 9 am 1 pm EST accepting applications for numerous open positions.We offer competitive wages and a comprehensive bene t package including Company paid health, dental, and life insurance, 401(k), attendance & safety bonuses.EOE/Drug Free WorkplaceEASTERN SHIPBUILDING GROUP MORE THAN A JOB A FUTURE! Earn While You Learn with the On the Job Training Program If you are unemployed you may be eligible for the Workforce Centers OJT program. On the job training gives you hands on experience in a new job and employers, OJT helps you save money! For more informaon call (850) 370-0726 An equal opportunity employer/program. Aux iliary aids and services are available upon request to individuals with disabilies. All voice telephone numbers on this document may be reached by persons using TTY/TDD equipment via the Florida Relay Service at 711. ToPlace Your Classified ad inCall Our New Numbers Now!Call: 850-747-5020 Toll Free: 800-345-8688 Fax: 850-747-5044 Email: thestar@pcnh.com thetimes@pcnh.com theAPALACHICOLA & CARRABELLETIMES CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW tion. DATED on November 1, 2012. Marcia Johnson Clerk of Court By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk November 15, 22, 2012 90833T PUBLIC NOTICE Weems Memorial Hospital is seeking proposals to replace 8 pair of fire rated doors within the hospital. Fire doors must meet all specifications under NFPA 101-2006 LSC Fire Doors. Contractors must provide proof of commercial license and insurance. Please contact Craig Gibson/ Plant Operations Director at cgibson@ weemsmemorial.com for information and requirements. Bids are due by Dec. 3, 2012 at 4:00pm. Bids will be opened at the Franklin Co. Board of Co. Commissioners meeting on Dec. 4, 2012. Please send all bids addressed to: Mr. Michael Moron, Weems Fire Door Bid, 33 Market St., Suite 203, Apalachicola, FL 32320. November 15, 22, 2012 90829T NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW PURSUANT TO SECTION 865.09, FLORIDA STATUTES NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of Lauras Cleaning located at 141 Patty Lane in the County of FRANKLIN, in the City of Eastpoint, Florida, 32328 intends to register the said name with the Divisions of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, Florida. Dated at Eastpoint, Florida, this 5th day of November, 2012. Laura Ward November 15, 2012 90831T PUBLIC NOTICE Weems Memorial Hospital in Apalachicola, FL is seeking Request for Proposals (RFP) for the hospitals Electronic Health Record (EHR) system. The successful EHR company must be familiar with the Meaningful Use Criteria and compliance regulations of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 as well as have the ability to provide licensed software, hardware, and services of an EHR program. RFP applications may be requested through the Weems Memorial Hospital website at www.weems memorial.com. Deadline for submissions is Dec. 2, 2012 and should be mailed to: Weems Memorial Hospital, 135 Avenue G, Apalachicola, FL 32320, Attn: Charles Edwards November 15, 22, 2012 *Adopt*:Athletic Prof. couple, at home Mom, Gracious Home awaits baby *Expenses paid* *FLBar42311* *800-552-0045* *Larry & Mary* Bichon Frise Puppies for Sale 3 Male 3 Female 8 Weeks Old De-wormed and have 1st shots. Healthy Happy and Good Dispositions $450 850-731-1201 BIG YARD SALERestaurant/Kitchen equipment and accessories, some new, two Panini Griddles, new 6 pizza prep refrigerator, numerous other items, supplies, new counters 4, 6, 8 lengths, and lots more, $3-5k in values. (plus 32 Fully Equipped Newly Renovated Mobile Diner) WHEN: Saturday 9:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m. WHERE: East Point US 98/South Bayshore. Next to Vegetable/Fruit Stand. Port St. Joe 1205 Constitution Dr (Hwy 98) Saturday 17th 8am-?Multi Family Yard SaleText FL31785 to 56654 PSJ 122 Barbara Dr Fri & Sat Nov, 16th & 17th 8am-1pmMulti Family Back Yard SaleNew RCA Dual Screen Travel DVD System, Large upright freezer, 25ft Camper in good condition, Casio Keyboard, crafts, gifts, New Cookbooks, Angels, what-nots, linens, glassware, dishes, jewelry, xl ladies clothes, video tapes, books, vacuum, lots of misc items priced to sell. Rain or Shine!!! Text FL31779 to 56654 SJB 341Selma St Sat. 17th 8am-2pmMulti Family SaleBaby items, Household, appliances, And More! Text FL31838 to 56654 Food Svs/HospitalityPapa Joes Oyster Bar & GrillNow HiringExperienced Line Cook Apply in person only Medical/HealthCaring Peopleand CNAs needed. Join a team of people who make a difference in the lives of the elderly. Provide non medical companionship, in home help & personal care for the elderly. Must be flexible. PT leading to FT-positions in the Port St. Joe and Apalachicola areas.Home Instead Senior CareCall Mon-Thur 9-3pm 850-640-1223 or toll free 1-866-301-1919 Web ID#: 34228849 Text FL28849 to 56654 IT/Software DevWEB DEVELOPERSHalifax Media Group is seeking Web Developers for its corporate office, located in Daytona Beach, FL to craft solutions to insure development and integrations conform to requirements. In addition, the Developers will be responsible for administering systems and environments as necessary to support custom solutions. Candidates must have good working knowledge and a proven track record in the following areas. *HTML/ DOM/ CSS, JavaScript, PHP/ Perl/ Python, .NET/C# or related scripting language *MySQL/MSSQL or equivalent SQL and database management experience *Familiarity with feed manipulation in a variety of standard and non-standard formats *Project and process management skills *Practical knowledge of CMS publishing *Proven ability to adapt to new development environments and programming languages *Portfolio of live, working Web samples *Media experience preferred *Excellent written and verbal communication skills Education and/or Experience: min. of Bachelors degree in Computer Science or related IT field and 2+ years experience in web development and/or web programming highly preferred. Halifax Media Group offers a competitive compensation and robust benefit package. If you are interested in joining our dynamic and growing organization, please send your resume to thomas.sylvester@halifaxmediagroup.com EOE/DFWP Web ID#: 34230723 Apalachicola: 1 br, 1 ba efficiency Call for information 850-653-6103 Text FL5175 to 56654 St. GeorgeIsland $175/wk, elec, satellite, garbage incl. Pool tbl. 12 X 65 deck. Beautiful view! 850-653-5319 Apalachicola Condo. 2 br, 2 bath, with newer paint, tile, carpet $750 per month with 700 + credit score or $800 per month below 700 credit score. *References Checked* Quint 865-693-3232 Carrabelle Condo Riverfront 2 bedroom/ 1 bath, with queen Sofa sleeper long term rental $1,200 monthly. nice 850-545-0784 2 br house in Eastpoint with washer & dryer and jacuzzi bathtub, $550 mo + $550 dep. Call (940) 389-8631 3 Bedroom Home for RentNice 3/2 home in Apalachicola. Fenced yard, Bonus Room. $850 per month. 1 month security deposit. No Pets. Call Kathy Robinson, Robinson Real Estate Company 850-653-7196 Text FL30282 to 56654 Apalachicola: 3 br, 2 Bath. Newly Remodeled Call for details!! 850-653-6103 Text FL28701 to 56654 Carrabelle House with 4bdr/2baths,large family room, LR, dining room /kitchen,/ utility room/ office and/or play room/ screened porch, recent efficient air and metal roof., two storage buildings, fenced yard, on two large lots, extra lot available $139.000 (850-545-0784) Text FL30879 to 56654 Chrisovich, 30 ft., Charter Boat, Twin Perks Engines rebuilt, bottom job now being done, been operating as a charter boat for 12 yrs, High traffic slip paid till May Intrested in Sale/Joint Venture or Sale Operate for you. Part of 3 boat company same location 28 yrs. $25K, Some possible finiancing Call Bobby 850-234-9409 How To Make Your Car Disappear... Advertise it for sale in the Auto section of Classifieds! Thats where auto buyers and sellers meet to get the best deals on wheels! Emerald Coast Marketplace 747-5020 Spot Advertising works!

PAGE 14

LocalA14 | The Times Thursday, November 15, 2012 Real Estate PicksOur local real estate experts have identied what they feel are the best values around and are oering them to you in Real Estate Picks! (In this section), Discover the best real estate values in Mexico Beach, Port St. Joe, Apalachicola, Cape San Blas, St. George Island, Carrabelle and surrounding areas. Best Values on the Forgotten Coast SELL YOUR LISTINGS HERE! Only $35 per week per listing Minimum 2 ads per week or 1 ad for 2 weeks Contact Joel or Kari for details: (850)814-7377 or (850)227-7847SOLD John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.comMLS#247518$698,500St. George IslandPLANTATION BAYFRONT HOMEOpen Living area, Elevator, Fireplace, 5 BR, 5 BA, Extra BR or Den, Kitchen designed for great cooks, 2 dishwashers, gas stove, island with sink, Screened Pool & Spa, louvered garage, Dock with Slips for 4 owners, Great Bay views, near The Cut! John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.comMLS# 247279$369,000St. George Island2ND TIER GULF VIEW Dawg Daze 4 BR, 3 BA, Heated Pool, Florida room off living room opens to decks overlooking CALL TODAY!653-8868 GET YOUR AD IN Trades & Services Laban Bontrager, DMD Monica Bontrager, DMD 12761 Pea Ridge Road Bristol, Florida 32321TELEPHONE (850) 643-5417 Bristol Dental ClinicDENTURE LAB ON PREMISESSame Day Service on Repairs and Relines Don Lively General Contractors LICENSED ANDINSURED 20 YEARSEXPERIENCE P.O. Box 439 Carrabelle, FL 32322 697-2783 or Mobile 566-2603RC0066499RG0065255 Carrabelle Visa, Discover, and American Express Honored at Participating Ace Stores JACKSONSBuilding Supplies Building Supplies & Auto Repair Carrabelle 697-3333 We Deliver AnywhereHardware and Paint Center From A to ZPO Box 364Port St. Joe, FL 32457850-340-0756 Gregs Handyman Service & Lawn Maintenance J.J.s Tree Service, LLC Stump Grinder Licensed & Insured Call John : (850) 899-8432 ROBERTS APPLIANCE REPAIR ALL MAJOR BRANDS 18 Shadow Lane Apalachicola, FL 32320 Phone: (850) 653-8122 Cell: (850) 653-7654 JOES LAWN CARE IF ITS IN YOUR YARD LET JOE TAKE CARE OF IT FULL LAWN SERVICES, TREE TRIMMING AND REMOVALALSO CLEAN GUTTERS AND IRRIGATION INSTILLATION, PLANTING AND BEDDING AVAILABLE CALL JOE@ 850-323-0741 OR EMAIL JOES_LAWN @YAHOO.COM TEACHERS from page A1Putnal praised County Attorney Michael Shulers work on the countys behalf. I want to make sure I appreciate you keeping us out of the courtroom, he said. Its hard to make decisions up here legally when youre trying to help people, and sometimes you cant because its against the law. You always kept me on the straight and narrow path. Mr. Putnal, we appreciate you, Shuler said. Youve always led us by example and by prayer, and its an example I intend following myself in the future. Chairman Pinki Jackel said, Commissioner Putnal, its been my honor and privilege to serve with you as county commissioner. This county loves you. This board loves you, and all the county workers admire and respect you. You began an era here. Youve had a helpmate all these years, and we want to recognize Miss Patsy this morning as well because you dont go these roads alone. Jackel asked Patsy Putnal and other family members to come forward. Putnal said his wife had been really my mentor and my secretary. She always kept me on the ball. Patsy and son Rusty came to the podium along with several younger members of the Putnal clan. Bevin Putnal indicated a great-grandson and told the commission, Me and hims going hunting. Jackel presented Putnal with a plaque praising his service to the people. It read, Your leadership and loyalty will always be remembered and looked forward to new beginnings and happy memories. Commissioner Noah Lockley said, Its been an honor and a privilege to serve with you for these last eight years. Commissioner Smokey Parrish told Putnal, There aint much to say but whats on that plaque. I wish you the best and a successful hunting season. Jackel commented she had saved the best for last when she turned the oor over to Commissioner Cheryl Sanders. A tearful Sanders said, Hes been my left-hand man for 15 years. Im happy for them, but at the same time, Im sad. When I rst came on the board, he was here with Jimmy Mosconis, and they broke me in well. Hes been at my left hand for at the next board meeting it will be 15 years. My favorite quote that hes always made is this: In the beginning God made a perfect environment to grow oysters here in Apalachicola Bay. While its sad, Im happy hes living and he can take care of his grandchildren and they wont have to wait on answering the phone 15 or 20 times a day. This man has been my left hand, and Im gonna really, really miss him. took place amid ongoing talks with the teachers union which, because it is a lean year, are not expected to result in pay hikes. Signi cant changes to the health insurance offerings, however, will be made, after both the school board and the teachers have agreed to a new blended plan that enables employees to enroll in either the Capital Health Plan HMO or the traditional Blue Cross Blue Shield plan. This move is expected to save the district $150 a month for each teacher that it insures. This could save the district $328,000 a year, according to Scott Fenstermaker, the owner of Strategic Bene ts Group, the districts health insurance consultant. The issue of cost cutting loomed large over the workshop, beginning with a report by Shannon Venable, the new nance director, who told school board members the district was about $780,000 over budget and facing declining revenues. Venable said property values had declined 7.3 percent, leading to a $563,000 drop in property tax revenue, which makes up about three-quarters of all the monies received from local sources. She then ticked off a list of budgetary items that would pose challenges, including $80,000 already budgeted in BPrelated funds that Venable had doubts the district would ever get. In addition, there are an additional $30,000 in property tax refunds placed in the 2012-13 budget, and about $106,000 in expenses that were under-budgeted in the $216,000 set aside for plant operations, such as infrastructure needs and including investment in computer equipment, she said. This total de cit of $779,000, Venable said, could balloon to $1.19 million, if the district is saddled with another $407,000 in expenses. Of this, $300,000 would be for resuming funding teachers entire pension contributions, rather than bene tting from a 3 percent shift to employee, as the Florida legislature has passed. The remaining $107,000 could come if the possible sequestration of federal monies comes to pass early next year. Superintendent Nina Marks said the district had so far made $313,000 in cuts, prompting Gander to suggest more needed to be done. All these things are good ideas, maybe theyre not, he said. But when you look at the budget and some 90 percent are salaries and bene ts, everything else is really immaterial. We shouldnt go back to our employees and ask them to give any more up. The only thing you can do is have fewer employees and the way to do that is through attrition. I think that would probably be as fast as anything we can do; people leave the systems all through the year. If three people leave and three people arent rehired, it could be $200,000, he said. To me thats the only way. The only way youre going to save is to make cuts in personnel. Elementary school teacher Paula Dykes said, Were talking about teachers, again cutting teachers, but then we turn around and we make up new positions thats not teachers and we ll those positions. Teachers are working with kids; theyre the ones that are needed. Gander granted that you got to attrition everybody. We thought that (consolidation) was going to be the end of our problem, Dykes said, but since weve moved here, nothings been roses. Its the same problem we had at all three schools. I havent seen anything different; the same problems weve had for the longest, Dykes said. I dont see yall being able to balance the budget on the backs of the teachers. The teacher is the most important thing in that childs life, and yall need to think of some of the way to balance the budget other than teachers, she said. Gander said he did not believe in rif ng, meaning enacting a Reduction in Force procedure. Dykes said more than one-third of the districts 73 teachers were on hand for the session and represented a broad spectrum of views. One issue the teachers pressed was the issue of how digital information is handled at the administration level. Al London, who oversees infrastructure demands on the district, said a decision has been made to cut ties with Blue Manta regarding their contract to handle E-Rate lings that recoup reimbursements for implementing telecommunication and Internet access. We have tried doing E-Rate inhouse and on top of the normal jobs people were doing. E-Rate is complicated, time-consuming and exacting, and we were not successful. We were down to a deadline where we had to le E-Rate, we were coming up against a deadline, so we hired Blue Manta, he said, noting the deal was $225 a month plus a percentage. We received $22,000, and we have since then noti ed Blue Manta the agreement has been terminated, London said. Teachers also raised the issue of comp time for such things as doctors appointments, and Board Attorney Barbara Sanders made it clear that such comp time was available only for hourly employees and not for professional workers. This has been the biggest morale killer of all, Dykes said. Anything yall could have done when they started taking our time like that? In my heart I know Im wrong, because Im supposed to be doing it for kids, but if you dont care, why should I? she said. Marks said there is no evidence that any teachers have been docked time, but Gander appeared to disagree, noting that he had seen evidence in a teachers paycheck. Weve checked in nance, and theres not been one penny taken from anybody, Marks said. I would like to see it. School Board Member George Thompson, a postal service employee, said he has to use leave time, or go without pay, when he does not complete his scheduled time. Wood sounded a conciliatory note, saying it should be left up to the administration to nd the abusers who constantly come in late and sign out early. The consequences are offensive and insulting to people, she said. We need to go back to that unwritten policy. PUTNAL from page A1