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The Apalachicola times
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100380/00193
 Material Information
Title: The Apalachicola times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: H.W. Johnston
Place of Publication: Apalachicola Fla
Apalachicola Fla
Publication Date: 10-25-2012
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1885.
General Note: Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 32911693
lccn - sn 95026907
System ID: UF00100380:00193
 Related Items
Preceded by: Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by: Apalachicola herald

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xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx 50 WWW.APALACHTIMES.COM Phone: 850-653-8868 Web: apalachtimes.com E-mail: dadlerstein@star .com Fax: 850-653-8036 Circulation: 800-345-8688 DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK: School News & Society: 11 a.m. Friday Real Estate Ads: 11 a.m. Thursday Legal Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Display Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Line Ads: 5 p.m. Monday xxxxx Contact Us xxxxx Out to see Index Thursday, October 25, 2012 VOL. 127 ISSUE 26 Ghosts to walk at cemetery Saturday Hauntings will abound Apalachicola on Saturday at the historic Chestnut Street Cemetery. From 7-9 p.m., history enthusiasts will don the garb and take on the persona of several of the cemeterys notable inhabitants to tell their tales. All monies raised go to preserve the cemetery. LanternFest to light up lighthouse Saturday Crooked River Lighthouse will host an evening of maritime enchantment from 6-10 p.m. Saturday for the 117th birthday of the lighthouse. The park will be lled with 117 glowing lanterns, musicians and dancers, story tellers and masters of traditional crafts. Be sure to climb the tower Saturday night, $5 for adults and $3 for children, as the moon will be nearly full and the lanterns are a lovely site to see. A lantern making workshop will be Friday afternoon. For more info call 697-2732 or visit www. crookedriverlighthouse.org. Month of Blues wraps up Saturday A Month of Blues wraps up from 8-10 p.m. Saturday with Blues on the Dock of the Apalachicola Maritime Museum. For more info, call 653-3930 or visit www. historicapalachicola.com. Gulf County Bow Wow Bash Saturday The St. Joe Bay Humane Society presents the seventh annual Bow Wow Bash, an annual bene t for both the DAWGS in Prison program and the homeless animals of Gulf County, on Saturday. The bashs Masquerade Party will be 6-10 p.m. at the Centennial Building in Port St. Joe. Tickets $30 each are available in Port St Joe at Bow Wow Beach Shop or at St. Joseph Bay Humane Society, or by visiting www.bowwowbash.org. Trick or Treat Wednesday night Dont forget that all sorts of little ghouls and goblins will be out for Beggars Night in Apalachicola, Carrabelle and the rest of the county on Oct. 31. Be sure to have plenty of treats on hand, and be sure to drive carefully. Parrish steps down as Deepwater Horizon liaison By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com A divided county commission took steps last week to create a local RESTORE Act council and to reject taking part in a consortium of 23 Florida counties bordering the Gulf of Mexico. After the 3-2 vote, Commissioner Smokey Parrish asked to be relieved of his duties dating back to the April 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill, when he acted as liaison to BP and federal and state authorities. He will be succeeded in his role as liaison by the seated chairman of the county commission. It sounded like the board had no con dence in what Ive been doing the last three years, Parrish said afterward. I gured it was time for me to step aside and let someone else take a shot. At the Oct. 16 meeting, commissioners voted 3-2 to establish a new RESTORE Act Council, based on an outline distributed by Chairman Pinki Jackel consisting of a one-page summary of the councils purpose and function and a six-page ordinance de ning it, modeled on one passed by Wakulla County. Jackel pushed for immediate approval of creating the council, saying urgency for it arose from discussions conducted Oct. 11 at a meeting in By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com A couple of colonels from the Army Corps of Engineers tonged for oysters Monday, ate them fresh on the boat and later at an evening reception, and then talked as best they could about the key question at hand: How can we prevent the Apalachicola estuary from becoming the late, great bay? Monday afternoons trip, sponsored by the Apalachicola Riverkeeper and the Tri-Rivers Water Way Development Association, brought Cols. Donald Ed Jackson and Steven Roemhildt, commanders of the Corps South Atlantic and Mobile, Ala., districts respectively, out on the water to see rst-hand the challenges facing oystermen. With Franklin County Seafood Workers Association leadership Devin Barber, Chris Millender and Ricky Banks manning the wheelhouses of the three watercraft in the otilla, FCSWA President Shannon Harts eld offered a tonging lesson to Jackson, who seemed a natural at it. A former chief of staff of Army forces in South Korea, Jackson has been on the job just three months with the Corps and made Apalachicola Bay his rst stop on a factnding trip upstream. Its the opposite of a post hole digger, Harts eld advised, as Jackson got the hang of handling the enormous tongs, raking the bottom and then lifting to the culling board a small pile of oysters. We used to get 50-60 oysters off two tong licks, Harts eld said as he picked through the pile, separating the empty or undersized shells from the few that were good. That there was about seven-eight tong licks, he told the colonel. This half of board should have a pile like that, to be able to make a living. Harts eld said over the past seven to 10 years, an oystermans daily catch has gone from 20 down to 15 or 16 bags per day, to this year barely catching three bags. Even with local dealers paying as much as $30 a bag, the economic reality can be a tough one, a subject Harts eld provided the colonel some insight on. These tongs right there youre standing over, thats 350 bucks right By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com There isnt any excitement brewing for countywide of ces this year. In fact, there arent even any on the upcoming ballot, but the Nov. 6 general election is upon us, and its a big one. Early voting opens Saturday and runs through Nov. 3 in Apalachicola and in Carrabelle, with the choice of president highlighting the ballot. Those who want to vote early can do so at the Supervisor of Elections of ce in Apalachicola or the Carrabelle annex from 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. weekdays and 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Supervisor of Elections Ida Elliott said the county could see upwards of an 80 to 85 percent turnout, bettering the 79.3 percent turnout four years ago. You always want a wonderful turnout, she said. In addition to deciding between Democratic incumbent President Barack Obama and Republican challenger Mitt Romney, Franklin County voters will decide whether to re-elect Democratic incumbent Florida Sen. Bill Nelson or put in Republican challenger Connie Mack. In Congressional District 2, incumbent Steve Southerland, R-Panama City, is facing a challenge from Al Lawson, D-Tallahassee. In the race to ll the Florida House District 7 seat vacated by Leonard Bembry, Liberty County Clerk of Court Robert By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com A 30-year-old seafood worker and mother of two who suffered a life-threatening aneurism now struggles to pay the price for her survival. Everyone who depends on the bay for a living is experiencing hard times right now, but Zella Smiths problems are far worse than most. About a year ago, she began to experience bad headaches. On Sept. 17, her husband, oysterman Robbie Baxley, stopped by the home of Zellas mother, Carol Smith, on his way to work the bay and asked her to check in on Zella, who was ill during the night. About 5:30 a.m., Zella awakened and went into the bathroom, where she collapsed. Smith found her in the bathtub semiconscious. She took her daughter to Weems Memorial Hospital. In my opinion, Dr. (Joda) Lynn done a wonderful job, Smith said. He seen that my child got out of there and got help. The nurses were real good, too. Nurse Jean Powers stayed with Zella most of the time, and you can tell she was really concerned. Zella had suffered a stroke and a ruptured aneurism. The staff at Weems recognized Zella needed emergency surgery, but windy conditions made an airlift by helicopter impossible, so Shands Hospital at the University SMOKEY PARRISH Commission split on RESTORE plans DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times Army Corps of Engineers Col. Ed Jackson tongs for oysters Monday, as FCSWA President Shannon Harts eld, left, and Florida DEP Secretary Herschel Vinyard look on. Corps surveys bay CORPS STUDIES BAY CONDITIONS Walking miracle in need after aneurism LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Zella Smith suffered a stroke and a ruptured aneurism Sept. 17. ELECTION 2012 Early voting begins Saturday See RESTORE A5 See VOTING A18 See MIRACLE A18 See CORPS A8 Opinion . . . . . . A4 Society . . . . . A10 Faith . . . . . . A11 Outdoors . . . . . A12 Tide Chart . . . . A12 Sports . . . . . . A13 Classi eds . . . A15-A17 A Homecoming victory A13

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Local A2 | The Times Thursday, October 25, 2012 (Pd.Pol.Ad.) Toilers on the bay rest in Eastpoint Cemetery This is the third in the series At Eternal Rest. By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com Eastpoint Cemetery is, in many ways, the resting place most representative of the working waterfront and the followers of the maritime trades. Many headstones record the title of captain and one monument to a married couple celebrates their relationship as captain and rst mate. There are at least a half-dozen stones adorned with oyster boats. Others display ships wheels, shrimp boats and y shermen. Many boats are accurate to the point of bearing a state registration number. There is a marker for John Colson Goodson, buried at sea in 1959. Another bears the nickname River-Rat. The oldest marked burial is little Theodora Vrooman 1903-1905. Although there is no record of her life, she was born and lived between the censuses of 1900 and 1910; she was probably the child of Harry and Louise Vrooman who came to Eastpoint from Mackinaw Island, Michigan by way of Georgia. Vrooman was a Harvard graduate and social reformer. The Vroomans joined the Christian Commonwealth, a religious colony that founded Eastpoint. The colonists came down the river from Georgia on a otilla of three barges, two of them homemade. They carried with them household and farm equipment, chickens, horses, ducks and a pair of turkeys. The barges arrived April 5, 1898, and later were disassembled to build the rst houses. Vrooman followed a year after the rst pioneers. The Vroomans son, Lee, is widely believed to have donated the land for the Eastpoint Cemetery, but it is unclear when that occurred. The land must have been donated before 1930, because the earliest burials of people not named Vrooman occurred in the 1920s. There are a scattering of stones dated between 1920 and 1950 but burials dont become common until the late 50s. It is unclear why the cemetery was located at the junction of Avenue A and Otter Slide Road. The Vrooman home was on South Bayshore and is still standing. Whittier Brown surveyed the cemetery, along with most of Eastpoint, according to Charles Moore of Eastpoint, who served as the cemeterys caretaker for several years up until recently. He said Brown also was school bus driver in Eastpoint. Brown was the son of David and Rebecca Brown, a Quaker couple who had arrived with the rst group of Eastpoint settlers. Dolores Roux of Apalachicola remembered Whittier Brown also was the grave digger at the cemetery, a duty she said he carried out until he was more than 80 years old. Lee Vrooman died in 1954 at age 57 and is buried in Eastpoint Cemetery along with his wife and daughter, Theodora. Vroomans parents, Harry and Louise, do not appear to rest there. It is possible their graves were marked with cypress gravestones that have deteriorated. A few cypress markers remain in the cemetery, although all mark graves that now also have stone memorials. Veterans of both world wars and Vietnam are buried there. The earliest birth date shown on a headstone is James A. Williams, born in 1827. Although there is no shortage of youthful inhabitants in the cemetery, a survey of the almost 600 interments reveals something a little surprising. Four of the people resting there lived to be more than 100 years old: Herbert Egg Brown, Dec. 25, 1883 Aug. 1, 1984; Nettie S. Smith 1903-2004; Lenora Dennis Gilbert, 1900-2002; and Virginia McQuagge Barton, 1902-2006. This is well above the national average. In the general population of the United States, one person in 6,000 reaches 100 years of age. In 2010, there were 53,364 centenarians in the U.S. A 2008 study of elderly Americans of Japanese descent showed a gene called FOXO3A, was related to long life. Could it be since Eastpoint was founded by a small group of settlers and many current residents are related to those pioneers, that FOXO3A or a similar gene is common among Eastpoint residents? Moore created most of the concrete coping seen in the burial sites, and although he is retired as caretaker, signs at the cemetery continue to advertise his coping talents. The cemetery is under the care of Mr. and Mrs. Tommy Summerhill. LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Above Queen Esther Evans and Prince Albert Bryant are occupants of Eastpoint Cemetery. At left this wooden cross bears the nickname River-Rat. Below left James T. Creamers headstone displays this poem about an oystermans life. Below Whittier Brown was the grave digger at Eastpoint Cemetery for many years. STATE ARCHIVES OF FLORIDA | Florida Memory Project LOIS SWOBODA | The Times

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Local The Times | A3 Thursday, October 25, 2012 for will top of ballot. a 28 for April, it for to a a a BA a MBA a law of He 20 of to of of 100 of of for for of 2003, to a 40 of $6 of of 95%. to of law to a of of of to of to low All of low too to of of of will $800,000, for 30 for to allow Mr. to $150,000 $100,000 a to act to I fair to of NRA PBA, law Political advertisement paid for and approved by Pete Williams, Republican, for State Attorney, 2nd Judicial Circuit. (Pd.Pol.Ad.) The 49th Annual Florida Seafood Festival Board of Directors would like to take this opportunity to thank all of the 2012 Festival Commodores. Thank you for being part of this great tradition in Franklin County and celebrating with us or beloved Seafood Industry. Resort Vacation Properties Oyster Radio WOCY Fishermans Choice J.V. Gander Distributors, Inc. WMBB TVChannel 13 Gulf Safe Florida Progress Energy Centennial Bank Apalachicola Ace Hardware Castaway Liquors & Buccaneer Inn Collins Vacation Rentals City of Carrabelle Franklin County Tobacco Free Fickling & Company WPAP Clear Channel Panama City Weems Memorial Halifax Media Group Northwest Florida ERICA RENAE Graphics, Media & Photography WTNTClear Channel Tallahassee Air Con Of Wakulla BP Claims 653-6948 The Management Experts Apalachicola Seafood Grill Cadence Bank Je Galloway Real Estate 13 Mile Seafood Market Marks Insurance SunCoast Vacation Rentals Coastal Foot & Ankle Main Stay Suites SunCoast Realty Journeys of SGI Tallahassee Regional Airport Gulf Coast Vacation Rentals Prudential Shimmering Sands Realty Sacred Heart Hospital Cates Electric Sacred Heart Pediatrics Apalachicola Bay Animal Clinic Homestead T-shirts Northridge Appraisal Coastal Glass and Screen WECP-TV Barbers Seafood 98 Liquors Eastpoint Dollar General Store 2K Webgroup Tony Shiver paid ad for Tony Shiver for Co. Commissioner District 1 (D) Five Star Home Repair Big Fish SGI LLC Apalachicola Bay Chamber of Commerce Tamaras Tapas bar Long Dream Gallery Island Adventures Gary Ulrich Construction House Of Tartts Dodd Title Stage Left Pizza Boss Charters 653-8055 Carrabelle Beach RVC Outdoors Millenders and Sons Seafood Preble-Rish, Inc Aloha Bugs Pest Management BJS Pizza Water Street Seafood East Bay Oyster Company Thank You! NO HIDDEN CHARGES: It is our policy that the patient and any other person responsible for payments has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed by payment or any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment. www.mulliseye.com "WE WELCOME NE W PATIE N TS, C ALL T ODAY FOR YOUR P RIORITY APP OI N TME N T" FOR NEW PATIENTS 59 AND OLDER This certificate is good for a complete Medical Eye Exam with Todd Robinson, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Surgeon. The exam includes a prescription for eye glasses and tests for Glaucoma, Cataracts and other eye diseases FOR YOUR APPOINTMENT CALL: 850-763-6666 ELIGIBILITY: U.S. Citizens living in the Florida Panhandle, 59 years and older, not presently under our care. Coupon Expires: 10-31-12 FREE EYE EXAM CODE: AP00 Darren Payne, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon Lee Mullis, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon Todd Robinson, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon "Freedom from Eye Glasses, Now a reality for many." Smart Lenses SM The following report is provided by the Franklin County Sheriffs Of ce. Arrests in this weeks report were made by of cers from the Carrabelle Police Department (CPD) and the Franklin County Sheriffs Of ce (FCSO). All defendants are to be considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law. Oct. 18 Rocky J. Keene Jr., 27, Satsuma, two counts of violation of a domestic violence injunction (FCSO) Larry M. Cummings, II, 25, Apalachicola, violation of probation (FCSO) Oct. 20 Kimberly E. Avery, 28, Crawfordville, organized fraud (FCSO) Oct. 21 Michael S. Langley, 26, Bristol, trespass in an occupied strucure (FCSO) Jessica L. Davis,, 25, Bristol, trespass in an occupied strucure (FCSO) Clifton R. Galloway, 24, Carrabelle, domestic battery and possession of less than 20 grams of cannabis (CPD) Oct. 22 Brenda K. Pilkinton, 60, Carrabelle, disorderly intoxication and resisting of cer without violence (CPD) Johnny C. Jones, 39, Apalachicola, violation of probation (FCSO) By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com Franklin Countys unemployment rate improved in September, and again emerged as the fourth best for joblessness in the state. According to preliminary numbers released Friday by the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity, the countys jobless rate dropped 0.1 percentage point, from 6.4 to 6.3 percent, Last month, seven people were dropped from the unemployment rolls, lessening them from 368 to 361 people in search of work. The workforce also grew by 20 workers, from 5,719 to 5,739, and remained considerably larger than one year ago, when it comprised 5,556 workers, and when the jobless rate was sharply higher, at 7.8 percent. Franklin Countys jobless picture continued to put it at fourth best in Florida. Monroe County, at 5.0 percent, had the states lowest unemployment rate, followed by Walton County (5.5 percent) and Okaloosa County (5.9 percent). Many of the counties with the lowest unemployment rates were those with relatively high proportions of government employment. The unemployment rate in the Gulf Coast Workforce region was 7.9 percent in September, unchanged from August. The September rate was 1.9 percentage points lower than the regions year ago rate of 9.8 percent and below the state rate of 8.6 percent. Out of a labor force of 102,625, there were 8,129 unemployed Gulf Coast residents. The countys unemployment numbers continue to run better than the two nearby counties, Bay and Gulf, which also are part of the Gulf Coast Workforce Region. Bay increased from 7.9 to 8.3 percent, and Gulf declined, from 8.5 to 8.3 percent. We continue to monitor the local employment situation in our region so that we can quickly respond to the needs of our residents and employers, said Kim Bodine, executive director of the Gulf Coast Workforce board. We are especially proud of the innovative partnerships and programs weve been able to put together to assist the displaced seafood workers in Franklin County. Ultimately were building a stronger workforce to support the economic vitality of our community. Floridas seasonally adjusted unemployment rate dropped to 8.7 percent in September, down 0.1 percentage point from August and 1.7 percentage points lower than the year-ago rate of 10.4 percent. There were 808,000 jobless Floridians out of a labor force of 9.3 million. The U.S. unemployment rate was 7.8 percent in September. Arrest REPORT County jobless picture continues to improve We are especially proud of the innovative partnerships and programs weve been able to put together to assist the displaced seafood workers in Franklin County Kim Bodine executive director of the Gulf Coast Workforce board

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Opinion A4 | The Times USPS 027-600 Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 Publisher: Roger Quinn Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola Times By Mary Claire Lovell Special to the Times Im not a generally superstitious person, mind you, but I do have a healthy respect for the possibilities of the supernatural. A few years back on a Halloween night as I drove to my home on the Wakulla River around 10:30 p.m., I relived the fun and magic of the evening. I had assisted my daughter at her home in Tallahassee with the witches brew and the trickor-treaters. I had always enjoyed the excitement and wonder of Halloween. My house was dark and empty as other family members were still out for the evening at a football game. I turned on lights and settled down into the loneliness of the house. Finally retiring to bed, I turned on the television by remote control and contented myself by watching Saturday Night Live. It concluded, and I felt myself growing very sleepy, so I pushed the off button on the TV remote control and saw the screen shut down. I turned off the bedside lamp and snuggled into my covers. As I was falling asleep, I was suddenly frightened awake with the TV blaring away! Startled and unbelieving, I bolted upright in bed with quick visions of Jason racing through my head. Push as I might, the television would not turn off by remote control, nor would the channel or volume change! Gathering my courage, I slipped from my bed and attempted the manual controls. The television would not turn off! There was the Comedy Club, demanding that I watch it. Without thinking, I reached for the electric plug with the intention of pulling it from the wall outlet. I hesitated and then withdrew my hand. Oh, oh, I thought. What if I pull that plug and the TV still doesnt go off? I could nd myself Poltergeisted away into nevernever Land forever! Unwilling to sacrice my last possibility for control, I telephoned my son and asked him to come home quickly. After hearing the circumstances, he would not tell me to pull the plug either. Within 15 minutes, several family members were there. Braced with human fortication, someone (not I) pulled the plug. The TV went black! Happenstance? Possibly. Prankster ghost? Maybe. The television set has worked ne since then as it always had before. Its fun to think that some friendly ghost realized he had a likely target for his folly and had a big laugh off of me. Regardless, I dont spend Halloween by myself anymore. Mary Claire Lovell is a resident of Carrabelle. Please keep longer gag grouper season Editors note: The following is a letter presented to the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission by a Wakulla County Commissioner at the FWCs Oct. 11 public workshop in Perry. On behalf of the citizens of Wakulla County, I want to thank you for your courageous vote on the Spring 2012 gag grouper season in state waters of the Big Bend. It is not always easy to stand up to Big Brother, but you did so, and the people commend you and thank you. Wakulla Countys coastal economy is directly or indirectly dependent on our shing industry for jobs. More than 80 percent of our land mass is off of the tax rolls because it is either national forest or federal refuge. We are blessed to have a bountiful population of gag grouper in our state waters, but they are only there during the cooler months of March through June and October and November. Our marinas, guides, bait and tackle shops, motels, restaurants, campgrounds, grocery stores and related coastal businesses have historically counted on this six-month window for small boaters, who trailer boats under 20 feet from Tallahassee, Quincy, Marianna, South Georgia, Alabama and beyond to pursue our shallow water gag grouper. During July and August, these same boaters catch scallops and sh our inshore waters for trout, reds and ounder. Our coastal businesses must get every possible customer during this 10-month period to carry them over during December and January when our coastal communities become ghost towns. The number of people grouper shing from big boats capable of shing federal waters has decreased in our area by more than 60 percent from what it was just ve years ago. Most people have sold or given away their big boats, because they can no longer afford to sh them or are discouraged with the enhanced restrictions and limited bag limits. Last springs gag grouper season was an absolute success in that it allowed small boaters to access gags for a threemonth period. Although reports from our local guides and visiting sport shers indicate that we have more gag grouper in Big Bend waters now than we have had in years, there is still, by historic standards, very little shing pressure coming from our boat landings and marinas. Taking these factors into consideration, I would urge the commission to increase the season dates in state waters of the Big Bend to include March through June as well as October and November. In addition, I would recommend that the federal season remain as it was last year. This will help maintain our coastal economy and give the relatively few people with larger boats an opportunity to pursue gags in deeper water. Your favorable consideration of these recommendations is appreciated. Sincerely, Jerry Moore Wakulla County Commissioner, District 3 Train kept a-rollin all night long I would like to congratulate Lois Swoboda on her excellent articles on early travel in Franklin County. I would like to share with you one of several trips my parents took us on during that period. In 1925 when I was mere 5 years of age, Mom took the family to Jacksonville for several days to attend worship services during Easter. We would leave Apalachicola at about 5 in the morning on the Jessie May and arrive in Carrabelle several hours later to catch the train, which was waiting, to Tallahassee. There we changed trains and arrived in Jacksonville at about 8 p.m. On the return trip, we would leave Jacksonville at about 8 p.m. and arrive in Tallahassee sometime in the middle of the night and spend the rest of the night there. Early the next morning, we would board the train to Carrabelle and catch the Jessie May on its return trip to Apalachicola several hours later. The alternative way to get to Jacksonville was to catch the 7 p.m. train from Apalachicola to River Junction (Chattahoochee) and transfer to another train to Jacksonville, arriving at eight in the morning. Travel was not easy in those days, but exciting. By comparison with todays travel by auto, the journey is about four hours. Today we have paved highways, whereas in 1928 there were no paved roads traveling east and west from Apalachicola, and no bridge to Eastpoint. Sincerely, Photis Nichols School board member gives back This is a letter to the editor concerning a letter in the Oct. 18 Times headlined School board should lead by example, which referred to other school board members of Panama City. I want to bring to your remembrance one of Franklin Countys school board members, Ms. Teresa Ann Martin, who has been giving a scholarship to a student, and giving of herself to the community, ever since she has been an elected official. Thank you, Shirley Walker Why not just bear-proof garbage? In response to the recent shooting of a black bear I would like to say: Dear Mr. Smythe (and others who have problems with bears), wouldnt it be easier and a lot less expensive to simply spend the time and/ or money to bear-proof your garbage? Even if you dont value the wildlife, it sure can cost a lot to clean up this mess, literally and nancially. Caroline Weiler Apalachicola Death has come too often to Franklin County of late. As life happens, some deaths could be anticipated in the elderly, some were feared in the ill and some were horrible surprises as the result of unexpected tragedy. But for each of those losses, the outcome was the same. Husbands and lovers were gone, brothers, sisters, aunts and uncles, neighbors, grandmas and great-grandfathers were taken from within the midst of our communities, leaving us with only our memories and our sorrows. A long-ago promise, reportedly made by St Augustine, reminds us all that None of us will get out of this life alive! And how we live our life, day to day, can make an important difference to all those around us while we are here, as well as after we have been taken away under whatever circumstances. Each of the Franklin County people who inspired these thoughts made a positive difference for others over their many years here. William Hubert Bill Lindsey was born in nearby Sumatra, played football for the Mullets, graduated as salutatorian from Carrabelle High School and then served his career in the Army Air Corps (which became the Air Force), including time in Vietnam. At his retirement, he returned to Franklin County to make a nal home with his beautiful wife, Anne. They lived in the house across from the waterfront, which they purchased from her well-known and successful father, Judge Raymond Witherspoon. Their active service to both community and church served to distinguish them. They quietly celebrated their marriage of 60 years in July 2012 with family. I never knew Mr. Bill in earlier days, but when I did meet him, I recognized that he was a true Southern gentleman. The hat he wore to protect his fair skin from the hot sun as he walked through his town completing his errands identied him even at a distance. As Ms. Anne struggled with increasing limitations of hearing and sight, he provided both for her in their aging lives together. His recent sudden death caused by recurring heart problems left her alone, necessitating a move away from Franklin County to be with family. But their ashes will be returned to the family plot here when the time comes, Anne promised. Although Bill was 83 and ailing, and his death from ill health might have been anticipated by friends and family, nevertheless we all shared the loss with Ms. Anne, and Franklin County is poorer for his passing. Randy Harrison was at the peak of his middle years; he lived with and loved his longtime artistic partner wife, Joan Matey. Although he had his own interests, career and life, his personal investments of time and talents for her creative efforts, on her behalf, as well as for the community of Lanark and Franklin County made a positive difference to all of us who met and learned to care about him. Randy was a bear hug of a man with a smile and a helping hand for so many causes that made our lives better. Dedicated to a peaceful and healthy life, the cancer that stole his years was especially fearsome and unwarranted. His death was held at bay as long as possible even as his remission ended and the blood disease took over, and yet it was almost impossible to believe this strong, hearty man could ght bravely and yet fade into death much too soon. His passing reminded us all that life brings no guarantees or promises and that the tragedy of disease can end it for any of us sooner than later. Sharon Thoman, a vigorous and vivacious blond businesswoman whose creative enterprises and heartfelt promotional efforts on behalf of her adopted Carrabelle, who gave denition and recognition to downtown business and marketing, was unexpectedly lost to us, her partner Jerry and her family as the result of a tragic auto accident that happened as she was returning home to Franklin County. Sharons professional work at the marine lab and her volunteer hours and expertise dedicated to the Carrabelle Chamber, community and friends were noteworthy and commendable. Now she is gone, too soon, too suddenly and too tragically. Another important and beloved life has been taken from our community. Of course, others have recently died in our county too; each touching other lives. All have left their mark on those who remain. All these deaths should give us each pause as we consider our own places in the community, within our family, among our friends and in our relationships. As St. Augustine reminds, None of us will get out of this life alive! There are no hidden secrets to avoid the ultimate end we must all face at some time, which will occur under circumstances unknown as yet. Whether that ending will come unexpectedly too soon, or as a welcome end to pain or suffering, or even at the end of an old life well-lived is not ours to know. What we do know for sure is how we live our life in the days and years we are given. Mel Kelly is a frequent contributor to the Apalachicola and Carrabelle Times. A communitys love is stronger than death THOUGHTS FOR THE TIMES Mel Kelly Thursday, October 25, 2012 There is nothing wrong with your television set Letters to the EDITOR

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Local The Times | A5 Thursday, October 25, 2012 Apalachicola called by Congressman Steve Southerland. Commissioners Noah Lockley and Parrish were the lone no votes. One of the things that came out of the Southerland meeting is that we need to form a RESTORE Act Council, she said. Some of the other counties have already formed them. Congressman Southerland said there is not an allocation formula attached to the bill. Its going to be on a request basis. Under Jackels proposal, the council would comprise four atlarge members appointed by the county commission; a representative of Apalachicola and Carrabelle to be chosen by their respective city commissions; one representative each from the Tourist Development Council, Weems Memorial Hospital board, Franklin County School Board, Franklin County Seafood Workers Association and Franklin County Seafood Dealers Association; and one representative each from Alligator Point, Lanark Village, St. George Island and Eastpoint, each to be recommended to the board by the District Commissioner. Under these terms, the commissioners for Districts 1 and 2, Jackel and Sanders, each will recommend two members of the 15member board. Jackel said the council would sift through and analyze projects proposed for funding, with county commissioners having the ultimate say-so. Commissioner Bevin Putnal expressed concern with the councils diverse makeup. Youre putting this committee together to tell us how were going to spend this money, he said. You take ve or six of these people, a majority, that say we dont want to spend that money in the bay, we want to spend it somewhere else. I was under the impression the next pot of money would be for restoring our bay, not for everybody that wants some of it. Commissioners Cheryl Sanders and Jackel said the health and restoration of the bay was, has been and is the countys top priority and that commissioners would have the nal say in how RESTORE money was spent. If we dont form a council, this board is going to have to accept all the applications, Jackel said. Were going to have to vet all the projects that come forward. This council will stand between us and the community and be an arm of this board to vet applications and to make sure that the system is transparent. I believe the community would rather see folks of diverse backgrounds, she said. This is a community effort. This is not a time for us to divide the county up. The county needs to spread its resources and allocate wisely. In her comments, Sanders addressed the recent push by the countys two municipalities to create a council divided equally between representatives of the two city commissions and the unincorporated areas of the county, represented by county commissioners. Over the last few weeks, the city of Apalachicola is asking or telling us that they want to be a part of this RESTORE. This way, the cities of Carrabelle and Apalachicola would be there, Sanders said, ticking off a list of the many other interests also represented. Lockley said he supported the overall concept, but asked for more time to review the plan to make sure we aint leaving nobody out. I dont see any business people. Jackel said business people could ll the at-large posts or come forward from the communities. Director of Administrative Services Alan Pierce said federal law requires some money be spent on projects other than bay restoration. Thats one reason we have to have a council, he said. Lockley pointed out Parrish had said bay restoration funding would come from the state pot of money, not the county funding. What we need is a better understanding of what can be spent where, he said. Its as clear as mud, Jackel said. One thing I know we need to move forward with establishing this council. Other counties have done that. They already have their criteria posted; they have their application process going. I dont want us to be slow on the uptake on this. If we table this, well be by the end of the year getting this together. Jackel said the Wakulla County ordinance could be changed as needed. She said the cities and the respective boards would choose their representatives, and county commissioners would choose the at-large and the other representatives. Council members will submit a nancial disclosure as the ethics commission requires. Sanders moved to form the council, and Putnal seconded it. Alligator Point resident Alan Feiffer asked that a public meeting be held before the council is formed. Jackel gave Pierce a copy of the application to serve on the board and asked that he bring back recommendations to the Nov. 20 meeting. At this point, Parrish asked to be replaced on all oil spill matters other than the Governors Commission on Oil Spill Response. In an interview Tuesday, Parrish said he was disappointed the council proposal was presented and passed without a public workshop or any prior input from the other commissioners. He also said he felt the council appeared to be weighted to the east end of the county, and though it was good to include the oyster industry, there was no accommodation made for the other sheries. What about these other industries? Theres no representation on that. This was set up by one commissioner; thats my problem with it. There was no input from the board whatsoever. We operate as a board, supposedly, he said. The resolution actually come from Wakulla County. Franklin is supposed to be so good and so great, but we have to adopt a resolution from another county? He said he would have preferred to see the matter handled after the upcoming general election, when at least one, and perhaps two, new commissioners might be sworn in. There is no money yet, so what is the hurry? he said. Commissioners question consortiums structure Parrish said the more urgent item was to decide whether Franklin would join the Gulf Consortium, a joint public entity formed by interlocal agreement among 22 of the 23 Florida counties bordering the Gulf. Each county is entitled to appoint one member on the consortiums board of directors. The consortium would oversee distribution of the 35 percent portion of RESTORE Act funds awarded directly to affected counties, money that can be spent on environmental projects, job creation and training, ood protection, tourism promotion and infrastructure such as ports. Unlike the other Gulf states plans, in Florida, three-quarters of the county money will go directly to the eight impacted counties, including Franklin, with 25 percent divided among all other Florida counties. The eight directly impacted counties have been ranked by the Florida Association of Counties and funds to be awarded based on a formula factoring such things as amount of damage, population and length of coastline. Escambia would receive 26.94 percent of funds, Okaloosa 15.57, Bay 15.43, Walton 13.86, Santa Rosa 10.25, Franklin 7.93, Gulf 6.02 and Wakulla 4 percent. I think we are the only county that has not signed the interlocal agreement, Parrish said. I think thats what we need to do. Without a seat at the table, we wont have a voice there to recommend and to quantify why were submitting a project. Id like to have the boards support to do that. Parrish said the other seven Panhandle counties agreed money to repair damage to sheries should come from a separate pot of money to be allocated by the state, leaving funds coming to the county available for other projects. I have commitment from seven counties in Panhandle, Parrish said, that they will vote with us as far as any problem we have with our sheries to get that money out of that state pot, not out of our local money. Parrish said of the fees associated with the consortium, Franklin County would have to contribute $3,800 to participate through Dec. 1. The money would be used to hire an executive director and an attorney and maintain an of ce in Tallahassee, he said. He described the investment as miniscule compared to the potential bene ts for the county, noting that if the county decided it was not happy with actions of the consortium, it could withdraw within 30 days of joining. Sanders, who attended a recent FAC meeting with Jackel, raised questions about the consortium. Little did we know we were expected to vote on a RESTORE Act measure, she said. I think we have to discuss this before we do any motions. Theres more to the story than just this. Sanders said when she and Jackel tried to ask questions about the consortium, they were rebuffed. One of the lobbyists did not like myself and Ms. Jackels objections, she said. Hes supposed to be representing us. He used some very awful terms. When he said what he did to me and Commissioner Jackel, he stepped over the line. That made me wonder what is this all up to. Sanders said cost of maintaining staff and an of ce for the consortium in Tallahassee could amount to $200,000 over a year. She expressed concern that large south Florida counties would seize control of RESTORE funds. As it reads in these papers, there will be a board made up of ve people from these 23 counties, she said. That tells me that somebody wont have a seat at the table. Parrish said creation of a consortium was mandated by law in Florida. With regards to the consortium, we can sit back and the state will come in and set up a consortium, and who knows who will be a part of that governing body? he said. As most of the money comes to the counties here in Florida, we (FAC) wanted to be in control of the consortium. Sanders replied that it may be that we will not have a seat at this table, but were going to have a seat. I thought this was a democracy where you can ask questions, but apparently not. To want to be part of this group just because they want us on it, I dont get it. We aint got but one time to get this right. I do appreciate the work that RESTORE from page A1 See RESTORE A18

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Local A6 | The Times Thursday, October 25, 2012

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Local The Times | A7 Thursday, October 25, 2012 (Pd.Pol.Ad.) Paid for by a Concerned Citizen of Franklin County This means you. THE FLU ENDS WITH U E BILL MILLER REALTY 850-697-3751 (3310) 570-0658 400 + COMM. U.S. 98 & GULF ADJ. TO LANARK MARINA 850K $29,500 $2,500 D O W N B UYS 2 B ED AP T 2 6 OR RENT $500/MTH 2 B/R 1 BTH GULF VIE W HOME W/ F AMILY R OOM $70,000 GULFVIE W & ACCESS 3 BDR 2 BA 2006 M/H 89K 2 LG. SHADY LOTS 3 SHEDS 400 TO MARINA-CITY W ATER49K MIH 2 C RNR LOTS BLK. $ S TORE REDUCED $49,500 2 AC-AT RIVER UTIL. IN -$39,500 By MEL KELLY Special to the Times Every good cause deserves a celebration party, and the Breast Cancer Calendar Girls, on behalf of the Franklin Needs non-pro t fundraising organization, are hosting their second big event on Saturday from 8-11 p.m. at the Franklin County Armory This 2012 Cabaret is an additional major moneyraising effort for the eyecatching women who sell their calendars in order to help provide information and mammograms on behalf of early breast cancer diagnosis. The funds raised are used exclusively for local Franklin County women. The original Calendar Girls concept a British idea featured women discretely baring their good looks to raise funds for leukemia research in memory of a deceased husband. In 2009, the rst Franklin County calendar was designed to help ght breast cancer at the local level with the funds raised. Franklin Needs, Inc. board member Liz Sisung is spearheading this 2012 party, important for community education as well as for the funds raised. Light snacks will be on the complimentary menu; beer and soft drinks are available for an additional donation. A raf e with items provided by local supporters will be ongoing as part of the entertainment. Local singers and dancer talents will perform, and social dancing by the public will be encouraged during the festive celebration. As an additional ceremonial highlight, personalized lumenarias may be purchased from any Centennial Bank branch for $5. Those donations may be made in honor or in memory of a cancer survivor or casualty. Tickets for this Cabaret Party are $10 and may be purchased at the door. As a special feature, many of the Calendar Girls from the latest second edition, as well as the rst, will be on hand to personally customize autographs on their distinctive pictures. The 2013 calendars may be purchased at the Cabaret and are available at www.forgottencoastclassics.com In this latest calendar edition, local photographer Susan Bull again beautifully photographs more local leading women, presenting them in soft sepia tones. Clerk of Courts Marcia Johnson is shown discretely seated in a courthouse setting; Eastpoint beauty shop owner Debbie Flowers shows off her own beauty at the Apalachicola National Estuary Research Reserve. Carol Zurawka is featured in a World War II Jeep at Carrabelle Beach, a local historic amphibious training site. Dixie Partington beautifully decorates her theaters piano, Tamara Allen demonstrates her waterfront shing skills, Carol Bar eld poses siren-like atop a boat at Riverfront Park and Terry Kemp showcases the St George Lighthouse with her fabulous smile of welcome. Five others also star. The December page combines the calendar women of 2009 and 2012 who remind all purchasers that Every Day is a Gift. October commemorates Breast Cancer Month. Breast cancer is the most common cancer found in Florida women. For 2012, the American Cancer Society predicts 226,870 new cases of invasive breast cancer will be diagnosed, and 39,510 patients will die from the disease. National statistics prove that 50 percent of women over 40 have not had a mammogram in the last year. In Florida in 2012, 2600 women will die of breast cancer. Calendar Girls cabaret to rock Armory Saturday MAGNOLIA BLUFF Bay living at its best, you have to see the sunsets from this home to believe them. 3BR/3BA Custom home with great water depth for year round access to the Apalachicola Bay. M L S #246689...........$699,000 Travis Stanley 850.653.6477 Leon Teat 850.653.5656 Sandy Mitchem 850.899.8300 BEACHFRONT C ONDO ST. G EORGE IS LAND 2BR/2BA with two balconies in Villas of St. George. Established rental history! Community pool, beach boardwalk, 2 blocks to lighthouse! M L S# 246110 ............... $319,500 B A Y FRONT CONDO Must see this 2 BR/2.1 BA townhouse next to the desirable Southside Historic District overlooking Apalachicola Bay. Property has community dock! M L S #247900 ...................... $275,000 B A Y FRONT HO M E Enjoy amazing sunsets everyday from this bay front home in prestigious St. George Plantation. 2BR/3BA home with unobstructed 180 degree bay views and 122 of bay front footage with white sandy beach. Dock your boat at the private pier with M L S #247962..... .......... $599,000 GULF FRONT HO M E This remarkable Gulf Front home provides the best of everything for laid back Island living. 5BR/4.1BA custom built home complete with a gourmet kitchen, granite countertops, elevator, a wet bar and upscale furnishings. Enjoy the inground 18X 36 pool and your private boardwalk. Call today to view this spectacular property. M L S #247998 ............... $995,000 N EW C ON S TRUCTION Great opportunity to buy a gulf view home. This quality constructed home has driven pilings, hardiboard siding and a metal roof for a low maintenance exterior. Inside you have 3 bedrooms with two baths and a great room opening to the front porch. New construction means low insurance cost. M L S #247359..............$289,000 N EW C ON S TRUCTION N EW C ON S TRUCTION

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Local A8 | The Times Thursday, October 25, 2012 Come Watch The Carrabelle Speed Festival Florida 1/2 Mile Shootout!! A 1/2 Mile Drag Racing Event featuring Exotic, American, and Import Cars! Located at the Carrabelle-Thompson Airport in Carrabelle, FL When: October 27th, 2012 Where: 296 Airport Rd., Carrabelle, FL 32322 Spectator tickets are only $10 Kids 12 and under only $5 MEDICARE OPEN ENROLLMENT OCTOBER 15 DECEMBER 7 THIS IS THE TIME TO: Find us on Facebook 180096ELDER SHINE is a Florida Department of Elder Aairs program operated in partnership with the Area Agency on Aging for North Florida, Inc. to provide information and assistance with Medicare. All services are free, objective and condential. WE DO NOT SELL INSURANCE OR REPRESENT ANY INSURANCE ENTITY. PLEASE COME JOIN US FOR Christmas Open House SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2012 10 OCLOCK UNTIL 5 OCLOCK EST LOTS OF PRIZES AND IN-HOUSE SPECIALS SERVING LUNCH FROM 12 TILL 2PM EST C o m e H e l p U s K i c k O f f t h e H o l i d a y S e a s o n 328 Reid Ave., Port St. Joe, FL 850-227-1950 PLEASE COME JOIN US FOR Christmas Open House 15% OFF ALL CHRISTMAS ITEMS! SERVING LUNCH FROM 12 TILL 2PM EST *EXCLUDES WILLOW TREE ITEMS dbutler@coastalcoverage.com Locally owned and operated Home Business Auto Health Workers Comp Robert C. Bruner Attorney Personal & Business Bankruptcy Over 30 Years Legal Experience 850-670-3030 bankruptcy relief under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon advertisements. Before you decide, ask us to send you free written information there, he said. You go through a pair of tongs, if youre working em regular, six, seven months. You get a year out of the heads but you dont get much out of (the rest),Harts eld said. Theyre wood; they dont last very long. After collecting the goodsized oysters Jackson tonged, Harts eld shucked them on the boat, and both Jackson and Herschel Vinyard, secretary of the Florida Department of Environmental Protection, enjoyed a few. Also on the lead boat were the Riverkeepers Don Ashley and Jon Steverson, executive director of the Northwest Florida Water Management District. On the second boat, Roemhildts party included Nick Wiley, executive director of the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission. A third boat carried Leslie Palmer, director of the division of aquaculture, and other of cials from the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. Back at the Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve, at a status brie ng featuring presentations by scienti c experts on the bay, the colonels thanked the oystermen for their hospitality. This was great opportunity today to get out on the water with the folks who work there, Jackson said. I understand the challenges that you have. Ashley made clear from the outset of the brie ng the stakes facing the Corps. The Apalachicola is a very thirsty river, and the Apalachicola Bay is dying of thirst, he said. This is not new, its a process taking place over the last two decades, but the drought may have magni ed the effect of the lack of freshwater of these systems. Working waterfront communities are just as endangered as many other species we try to protect, he said. If we move from crisis to collapse, it will be a sad day. We would have lost a national treasure. In his opening presentation on the ow needs of the river and oodplain, Ted Hoehn, an FWC biologist, stressed that seasonal variation in freshwater ows is needed to keep these waters healthy and productive. Seasonal oodplain inundation is essential for sh access for feeding, spawning and nursery habitats, as well as nutrient transport to the bay, he said. River ows moderate bay salinity and provide nutrients for the bays food web that are essential for oyster survival and growth. He pointed to studies documenting the effect on channel erosion and habitat loss, not only on oysters but on sport sh and wetland forest, including tupelo trees, as a result of drops in the ows from Woodruff Dam. The river bed has gone down anywhere from 2 to 5 feet of stage decline, Hoehn said. Were not getting recruitment of these trees, he said. We are losing the forest. Reduced ows from upstream have made the problem much worse. Hoehn said when ows drop below 10,000 cubic feet per second, dissolved oxygen goes to zero and there is a loss of habitat, as shown in studies of largemouth and striped bass and other sh species.. Operations have had an effect on our sport sh, he said. It doesnt take much to essentially dry out a bed. An hour and theyre gone. The biologists conclusion was that extreme low river ows in the summertime, once very rare, are now common, as lake levels in federal reservoirs have risen. The reservoirs and the river ow are out of balance, and weve got to nd that balance, Hoehn said. Lee Edmiston, ANERRs manager, talked of Floridas investment in its waters, pointing out that the state has spent more than $170 million buying property along the river and bay, with more than a half-million acres of watershed bought by state and federal interests. This system has every designation known to man, he said. The commercial shery, in 2007, produced $134 million in economic output, plus $71 million in value added bene ts, Edmiston said. We grow an oyster faster than anywhere else in the country, he said. The oyster industry supplies $30 million in economic bene ts annually. Its the lifeblood of the economy. He said seasonal variation in river ows are essential for a healthy river and bay, in terms of determining species distribution and density, in uencing predators, encouraging spawning and controlling disease. If you lose the estuaries, youre going to lose most of the offshore species, Edmiston said. Felicia Coleman, who directs the Florida State Universitys Coastal and Marine Laboratory, linked the coastal watershed to the dynamics of ows through the Gulf of Mexico. She said several factors, including ows of fertilizer residue down the Mississippi River, have contributed to the problems that beset the bay. Weve lost so much wetlands, were not retaining any of the sediment, she said. Coleman said the overall picture must be considered when considering remediation of problems. The bene ts extend beyond the boundaries of the bay; we have to think much further than that, she said. The river doesnt know those boundaries. Neither does the plume, neither does the life system of these animals. Chad Taylor, with the Riparian County Stakeholder Coalition, and Bill McCartney, with the Apalachicola-ChattahoocheeFlint Stakeholders, outlined the work of their respective groups. McCartney said the ACFS, a private, not-for-pro t coalition of water users up and down the entire system, has raised $1.2 million to do private studies, to be completed by December 2013. We hope that when this planning program is nished, the Corps and the three states will seriously consider some of the recommendations, he said. Were really trying to make a difference and provide state and federal government some alternatives. Though the Corps is pursuing public comments on changes to its water control manual, the document governing how much water is released down the river, it is unclear how long it might take to effect any changes. The scoping process for the ACF River Basin has been reopened until Dec. 11 to account for a June 28, 2011, decision of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 11th Circuit that concluded water supply is an authorized purpose for Lake Lanier. Vinyard, who did not address the gathering, said Florida had appealed that decision to the U.S. Supreme Court but was rebuffed. Still, he said, he remains optimistic. Gov. Scott is not a fan of litigation, he said. I think its important to work with our colleagues in Georgia. There are ongoing talks; its important to establish a relationship. If there is a silver lining, this crisis has brought attention to this region, Vinyard said. In their remarks, both Jackson and Roemhildt cautioned that the Corps had limited latitude to affect changes to river ow, in the absence of a clear directive from Congress or the courts. I was out there two years ago, and just in two years I have seen a difference in the health of the bay, Roemhildt said. No one entity that can resolve this; its about a way of life. How do we come together and collaborate and create the best environment out there for everyone? We have a playbook thats associated with drought conditions, he said. Nobody likes that; everybody thinks were not meeting their demands. Were trying to get the minimal amount of requirements for everybody. We dont make these things on the y, Roemhildt said. We operate under authorities; we operate under regulations. Its all very transparent. Right now theres very little we can do on a day-to-day, week-to-week basis. What were looking for is a tropical depression. Thats the only way were going to see higher ows in the near term. I would encourage the three state governors to come to some sort of agreement that gives us an environment to operate free of litigation, he said. Were soldiers; we follow directions very, very well. We dont make that box, Congress de nes that box. We have very little leeway in terms of how to operate that. Ashley closed by calling the situation a predictable tragedy. If this system reaches the tipping point, if we go from crisis to collapse, the impact is going to be irreversible. We have a chance to reverse it, he said. This system needs a freshwater transfusion as fast as possible. CORPS from page A1

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Local The Times | A9 Thursday, October 25, 2012 a two-day event to honor camp gordon johnston world war ii museum Info & Registration at www.campgordonjohnstongolf.com or by calling 850-227-1751 Saturday, Nov 10, 2012 Ceremony begins eastern Shotgun Start eastern 4-player, scramble format; $60 per player Meal & Awards Ceremony to follow $400: First Place team $350: Second Place team $200: Third Place team Hole-in-One Challenge: Cash prizes include: ST. JOSEPH BAY GOLF CLUB, PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDA GOLF TOURNA MENT CAMP GORDON JOHN STON Friday, Nov 9, 2012 eastern Silent Auction and Hors Doeuvres Reception with cash bar at St. Joseph Bay Golf Club Clubhouse. Cost of admittance $10.00 (includes beer & wine) Some auction items can be viewed at www.campgordonjohnston.com/golf.htm A Salute to Ameri ca s Veterans TANNING, WAXING, EAR PI E RCING, F E A T H E RS, FASHION EX TE NSIONS & U P DOS. NO W O FFE RING Manis & Pedis! N o A ppointment N ecessary Walk-ins Welcome CO ME T O T H E FALL F E S T IVAL A T DU R E NS PIGGLY WIGGLY, S aturday O ctober 27 th STOP BY AND GET FR EE COLO R GEL IN YOU R HAI R ** G LO W IN T H E D ARK N AIL POLISH** ** C ANDY** With Mani/Pedi Combo EXPIRES: 11/14/12 NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT CITY OF APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA The Apalachicola Board of Adjustment will hold a Public Hearing on Tuesday, October 30th, 2012 at 5:30 PM at City Hall, Community Center Meeting Room, 1 Bay Avenue, Apalachicola, Florida to address the following variance requests and receive citizen comments relating to proposed changes on the parcels listed below. A Special Meeting will immediately follow. The following variance request items will be discussed and considered: 1. Installation of elevator shaft above the 35 height limit on the proposed new structure described as Wharf Lot 10. 2. Proposal to approve continued use of Suite B, an apartment unit partially located as Block 2 Lot 5 for transient lodging. St. The Apalachicola Land Development Code allows for variance when spe cial circumstances, conditions and/or undue hardships are determined. All interested parties are encouraged to attend and be heard with respect to this request. For further information, contact the Dozens of businesses, churches and private citizens worked together to stage a Domestic Violence Community Event. On Oct 12 Refuge House hosted an event in Battery Park to raise awareness about domestic violence. October is Domestic Violence Awareness Month, and the theme for 2012 is, This battle is not yours alone! The occasion opened with an invocation led by Carol Bar eld, who represents Refuge House in Franklin County. Also in attendance were Refuge House Director Meg Baldwin and Regional Director Hilda Little. Zachary Jones read a poem he composed, This Battle is not Yours Alone, and members of the TIGERS after-school program performed domestic violence skits created under the direction of Barry Hand. Speakers were Dawn Radford, Laura Baney and Linda Gibson. Gina Allen read a county resolution supporting domestic violence awareness, and City Commissioner Cal Allen read a resolution from Carrabelle. Finally, everyone enjoyed a meal prepared by 10-4 BBQ, the sheriffs of ce cooking team. The next Domestic Violence Task Force meeting will be 3:30-5 p.m. Nov. 7 at the Carrabelle Library Conference room. All are welcome. By Lois Swoboda CHIMENE JOHNSON | Special to the Times The Apalachicola Bay Charter School united to collect 1,370 canned and nonperishable food items to bene t Eastpoints Food Bank last week. The ABCs Student Council was told the local food bank was empty and decided to take action. They created a contest to see which homeroom could bring in the most items. Ms. Bockelmans fourth-grade class won, bringing in 341 cans. Many thanks to all who sent in cans and nonperishables to bene t our local community! ABC SCHOOL UNITES FOR FOOD BANK Refuge House draws attention to domestic violence LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Carol Bar eld, the countys domestic violence advocate, welcomes participants to the Domestic Violence Community Event.

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A10 | The Times Thursday, October 25, 2012 CHAMP! Champ is an 8 month old Chocolate Lab. He is an energetic boy with a big personality. This boy needs his own boy to run and play with. He will do well in an active home where he will receive a lot of attention and direction. He has all the potential in the world, just needs some home training. VO L UN T EERS A RE DES P ER AT E L Y NEEDED T O SO C I AL IZE WI TH ALL OF OUR DOGS A ND CAT S. W e are always looking for people willing to bring one of our animals into their home to be fostered for various needs. Anytime you can spare would be greatly appreciated. Call Karen at 670-8417 for more details or visit the F ranklin County Humane S ociety at 244 S tate R oad 65 in E astpoint. Y ou may logon to the website at www.forgottenpets.org to see more of our adoptable pets. PET OF THE WEEK Franklin County Humane Society NIP FIRE A N TS I N THE BUD! CALL L OIS AT 653-5857 Franklin Countys ONLY LOC AL Pest Control Company James F. Stokes and Margaret Anne Stokes will celebrate 50 years of marriage on Saturday, Nov. 3. They were wed at St. Patricks Catholic Church in 1962 and have since lived in Apalachicola and raised four children. Jim is retired from Fairpoint Communications and the Florida National Guard, Margaret Anne was part-owner of the Seahorse Gift and Florist until selling in 1995. Love and congratulations from your children, Nancy Stokes Shuler, Sharon Stokes Anthony, James F. Stokes Jr. and Robert John Stokes, your eight grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. More than 200 people attended a gala show of lamps and lighted sculpture Friday evening at the Bowery Gallery on Commerce Street in Apalachicola. The 15 Franklin County artists displaying lighted creations included Olivia Monod, Leslie Wentzel, Judy Leutin, Ann Seaton, Fred Aman, Leslie Wallace-Coon, Phillip and Marti Campbell, Clarice Powell, David Pickering, Barb Ward, Jamie Llewellyn, Sharron Totter, Sherry Cook, Faye Johnson and Ann Eason. Wallace-Coon, Powell, Monod and Llewellyn all produced lighted ceramic towers. Eason entered a ligree tea set lighted with tea lights. Aman, a former taxidermist, created lamps out of bone. Johnson displayed a fairyland lamp with tiny woodland creatures. Most of the works were for sale. The themes ranged from whimsical to dramatic. For a gallery of the event visit www.Apalachtimes. com By LOIS SWOBODA Alina Marie Pelt, one of Gods little angels, turned 3 years old on Tuesday, Oct. 23. Alina is the sweet daughter of Mary Rae Nowling, of Eastpoint, and Willie Pelt, of Port St. Joe. She has a brother, Obie Lee Pelt, 1, and a sister, Shirah. Grandparents are Steve Pelt and the late Mary Pelt of Port. St. Joe and Kendell Shiver and the late Wayne Nowling of Eastpoint. Great-grandparents are Charles and Mary Lou King, the late Ottis E. Russell II and the late Obie Dalton, Nancy Dalton Moses, Kenneth Shiver and Johnny and Jean Shiver of Eastpoint. God bless you my love, and happy birthday. From your greatgranny Mary Lou and paw-paw Charles King, and your Mama, Mary Nowling and family. Scooter Braswell and Amanda Smith are happy to announce the birth of their son, Waylon Tripp Braswell. Waylon was born at 6:44 p.m. on Sept. 25, weighing 8 pounds, 15.2 ounces and was 21 inches long. His paternal grandparents are Wallace and Betty Mae Braswell. His maternal grandparents are Arthur and Janice Smith. We had a nice crowd of fellow Democrats at the Crooked River Grille Oct. 17. There was a lot of discussion on the candidates and the constitutional amendments, coffee and homemade goodies. The monthly Birthday Bash and the Halloween party were a howling success. Camp Gordon Johnston American Legion Post 82 was rocking last Saturday night. It looked like there was a lot of friends and neighbors at Chillas Hall for our monthly covered dish and memorial for Randy Harrison and Sharon Thoman. Randy was with the FBI. He would come to our rehouse on Tuesdays and make sure everyone got to their car safely after bingo. Sharon and I go way back, also. She and Jerry were members of the Moose Lodge #2603. I waited on them when I tended bar. Sharon had the movie rental store in Carrabelle and was a top-notch realtor. May Randy and Sharon rest in peace. I had lunch and visited with our friends and neighbors at St. James Bay Rehab last Sunday. Thats where I spend most Sundays. Everybody was doing as well as could be expected. There was a meeting of the Ladies Guild of Sacred Heart Church on Tuesday. They were putting together the nal plans for the Fall Festival. There will be a baked sale, yard sale, 50-50 drawing, plants for sale, coffee and goodies in the morning, and there will be brats and hot dogs with all the toppings for lunch. They need help setting up and manning the booths. If you can help, please call Arlene Oehler at 697-9790, or Pat Hilliard at 850-9845021. There is also a signup sheet in the church hall. This fundraiser event will be held on Saturday, Nov. 3, starting at 9 a.m. Thank you for your help. Be kind to one another, check on the sick and housebound and remember, contrary to popular opinion, Gods last name is not damn. Until next time, God bless America, our troops, the poor, homeless and hungry. LANARK NEWS Jim Welsh Volunteers sought for Nov. 3 Fall Festival Waylon Braswell born Top: Olivia Monod was the youngest showing artist at the event. Bottom: Phillip and Marti Campbell stand next to a fountain they collaborated to create. Marti does pottery and Phillip does wood and metal work. The lighted turtle shell on the right was created by Fred Aman. LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Inspired by the light Society Stokes mark golden wedding anniversary BIRTH INSPIRED BY THE LIGHT Alina Pelt turns 3

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The Times | A11 Thursday, October 25, 2012 SGI Methodist church holds Saturday yard sale St. George Island Methodist Church, 201 E. Gulf Beach Drive, will havea yard sale and barbecue from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m Saturday, Oct. 27. Pre-sale will be 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesday through Friday. We have a huge selection of clothes, kitchen items, linens and furniture. Stop by for some of Art Littles famous barbecue. For more info, call Judi Little at 927-2088. Covenant Word hosts Joy Night Wednesday Covenant Word Christian Center will hold its annual Joy Night, a safe alternative to Halloween, from 6-9 p.m. Oct. 31 in front of the old Apalachicola High School gym on 14th Street. The event is free and open to the entire community; kids and adults are invited. The event will feature deejay Big Holy, from Panama City, bounce houses and superslide, games, contests with prizes, drawings, cake/prize walk for adults and kids with cakes as prizes and gift bags, grilled hot dogs, hamburgers, chips and drinks and plenty of free candy. Call Joy Night coordinator Misty DeCourcey 850-247-8524 for info or if you would like to donate candy/prizes, etc. Tax-deductible. Big Bend Hospice remembrance service Big Bend Hospice invites everyone to the annual Service of Remembrance at 10:30 a.m. Nov. 10 at the Three Servicemen Statue, 230 Market St., Apalachicola. The nondenominational service brings together those in the community to honor the memories of loved ones at this very special time of the year. Many times people become overwhelmed with emotions during the holiday season. This service provides a wonderful opportunity to pause to remember, pay honor and nd support. This is a time for remembrance open to everyone in the community, said Cathy Adkison, Big Bend Hospices president and CEO. Services include music by music therapists and words of encouragement from chaplains, all part of the Big Bend Hospice staff. Hospice grief and loss counselors will be available. Services conclude with a special candle lighting ceremony and passing of the candlelight in memory of loved ones. A reception follows. Everyone who attends shares a common purpose: to honor and to remember a loved one who has died, to be surrounded by others who are on a similar journey and to connect with loved ones. The service is proof that death ends a life and not a relationship, that holidays can still be a time of hope and of family, of love and of connection to all the things and all the people who have ever been important to us. For additional information about Big Bend Hospices bereavement services, please contact Pam Mezzina at 878-5310, ext. 799 or pam@bigbendhospice. org. Registration information is also available at www. bigbendhospice.org. Big Bend Hospice has been serving this community since 1983 with compassionate end of life care along with grief and loss counselors available to provide information and support. Sacred Heart of Jesus Catholic Church -Your Church on the Coast2653 Highway 98 East P.O. Box 729, Lanark Village, Fl 32323 Pastor: Father Eddie Jones Mass Schedule: Saturday: (Vigil) 5:00 PM Sunday: 7:30 AM (850)697-3669 The United Methodist Churches of Franklin County Welcome You First United Methodist Church of Apalachicola Worship Service 11:00 a.m. every Sunday Sunday School 10:00 a.m. 75 5 th St. Apalachicola 653-9530 fumcapalach@gtcom.net Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis Carrabelle United Methodist Church Worship Services 10:45 a.m. Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Celebrate Recovery Mondays 7-9 p.m. 102 NE Ave. B Carrabelle 697-3672 Pastor: Julie Stephens Eastpoint United Methodist Church Worship Service 10:00 a.m. every Sunday Healing service every fourth Monday at 7:00 p.m. 317 Patton Dr. (corner of David St.) 670-8825 Pastor: Rev. Beth White St. George Island United Methodist Church 9:00 a.m. Worship Service 10:00 a.m. Fellowship Hour 201 E. Gulf Beach Dr. 9274635 www.sgiumc.org Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis Nursery now provided for Sunday Church Service First Baptist Church St. George Island 501 E. Bayshore Drive 927-2257 R. Michael Waley, Pastor Join us as we praise and worship the living Christ. Great is the Lord and most worthy of praise. Psalm 145:3 Sunday Bible Study ................................................ 10:00am Worship Praise ........................................................ 11:00am Sunday Night ............................................................ 7:00pm Wednesday Power Hour ...................................... 7:00pm Wednesday Youth at S.P.L.A.S.H ....................... 7:00pm Walking in Christ R. Michael Whaley, Pastor First Pentecostal Holiness Church 379 Brownsville Road Apalachicola Were excited about what Gods doing!!! Sunday School 9:45 am Sunday Morning Worship 10:45 am Sunday Evening Service 6:00 pm Monday, Youth Group 6:30 pm Wednesday, Royal Rangers, G.A.P. 7:00 pm Wednesday Worship & Word 7:30 pm Nursery Provided during regular church services 7:00 7:00 WELCOMES YOU Trinity Trinity Episcopal Church est. 1836 Welcomes You Hwy. 98 & 6th St. Apalachicola 850-653-9550 Sunday Worship Services 8 & 10:30 a.m. Wednesdays Healing Service 11 a.m. Centering Prayer 4 p.m. Sunday Worship Services 8 & 10:30 a.m. Wednesdays Healing Service 11 a.m. Centering Prayer 4 p.m. WELCOMES YOU Church of the Ascension 101 NE First Street Carrabelle SUNDAY 10:00 AM WELCOMES YOU Church THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH (850) 274-4490 (850) 545-2578 Faith Heaven has wel comed home an angel. On Tuesday, Oct. 16, our precious mother went to meet her Lord and Savior. Betty Mae Paul Braswell was born Oct. 11, 1942 to Hilburn and Lizzie Paul in Lynn Haven. She is survived by her husband, Wallace Braswell; daugh ters Deborah Bell (Tommy), Becky King (Franklin). and Jen nifer Allen (Jimmy); sons Scooter Braswell (Amanda) and Chris Braswell (Maria); grandchildren Eric Bell, Russell King, Kirstie King, Jenna Allen, Caden Allen and Waylon Braswell; great-grandchild Kai lyn Bell; and brothers Buddy Paul and Allen Paul (Sallie). She was welcomed into heaven by her parents Hilburn and Lizzie Paul, sister Lorraine Fleener and brother James Paul. Her love was work ing for the Lord. She was our foundation and although it has been shaken, it has not been compromised. Visitation was held Friday Oct. 19 at First Pentecostal Holiness Church, Brownsville Road, Apalachicola. Services were held Saturday morning, Oct. 21 at the church as well. Pallbearers were Ricky Aber crombie, Chase Crum, Dennis Gay, Trey Mil lender, Lonnie Moses and Eddie Joe Moses Jr., Tyler Sizemore and Wesley Wilson. Funeral arrange ments through Holly Hills Funeral Home, Port St Joe. Betty Mae Paul Braswell Earel Hardy, 75 of Apalachicola, passed away Thursday, Sept. 6, 2012 at his daughters residence in Eastpoint. Mr. Hardy was born March 18, 1937 in Holmes County to the late Shepard and Mary Lue Hardy. He retired as a foreman at the Port St. Joe Paper Company after 35 years of service and was a member of the union. He was a member of the Church of God in Eastpoint. Mr. Hardy loved to hunt and sh especially loggerheads, squirrels and catsh. He is preceded in death by his parents; a brother, Monroe Hardy; a sister, Mary J. Bean; and a grandchild, Brandon Segree. He is survived by his beloved wife of 54 years, Wynette D. Hardy; a son, Ronnie E. Hardy and Angelina, of Eastpoint; daughters, Earlene Segree and Donnie, of Eastpoint, and Doralene Rickards of Apalachicola; grandchil dren, Tabitha Dawn Hardy, Eric Garst and Lee Segree; one great-grandchild, Austin Segree; brothers, Leo Hardy and Nancy, of Bain bridge, Ga., Ecra Hardy and Judy, of Deland, and Charles Shorty Hardy and Linda, of Apalachicola; a sister, Rosette Calhoun and Herbert, of Milton; a sister-in-law, Rebecca Hardy of Milton; and other extended family. Visitation and funeral services were held Mon day afternoon, Sept. 10 at Church of God in East point with Brother Ronnie Segree ofciating. Inter ment followed immediate ly in Eastpoint Cemetery. Southerland Family Funeral Homes was in charge of arrangements. Earel Hardy Randy Harrison of Lanark Village was much loved by all who knew him and projected a positive nature that impressed even those who met him only once. When asked What do you do? at a party, he would say I try to be a better person. He was dedicated to a peaceful and healthy life, working as a tness trainer for the Tallahassee YMCA and other workout facilities. Many appreci ated his calm and clear demeanor as the First Friday bicycle security at Railroad Square in Tal lahassee. He was also known for his automotive expertise, and many recall getting their rst car via Randys advice. Randy was dedicated to the Lanark commu nity, volunteering for the Lanark Patrol and the Lanark Village re department. He was also instrumental in providing tness training opportu nities for the Carrabelle Police Department. Strength and clarity, kindness and spiritual awareness were Randys outstanding virtues. He would have embraced the world if he could have and no one gave better hugs. He sure will be missed. Randy Harrison passed away on Tuesday, Oct. 2, 2012 due to chronic lymphocytic leukemia. His local family in cludes his wife, Joan Matey of Lanark Village, and his mother Harriet Fairchild, of Tallahassee. His out-of-state rela tives include his brother, sister-in-law and two nieces, Vic, Sue, Dana and Julie Harrison, and his sister and her husband, Nina and Eric Peterson. A memorial luncheon was held Sunday, Oct. 21 at Chillas Hall in Lanark Village. Randy Harrison Obituaries EAREL HARDY Faith BRIEFS Cards of THANKS Domestic violence awareness Thank you to all those who helped make the Domestic Violence Awareness Event happen. This years theme for the event organized by Refuge House and the Franklin County Domestic Violence Task Force was The battle is not yours alon. Thanks to Gulfside IGA, Ace Hardware, Hi-Fi Entertainment, 10-4 BBQ, HogWild BBQ, Gants BBQ, Franklin Correctional Institution, Grannys Love Shack, Friendship Missionary Baptist Church, Living Waters Assembly of God, Apalachicola Church of God in Christ, St. Paul African Methodist Episcopal Church, Tabernacle of Faith Ministries Inc., Pastor Barry Hand, Anointed Word Ministry, Freddie and Mary Brown, Antriniqua Richards, Allan ONeal II, Irestine Bouie, LaTresa and Teresa Carr, Dixie Partington, Zachary Jones, Bob and Tiffany Shattuck, Take Two, Cadence Bank, Centennial Bank and members of the Franklin County Domestic Violence Task Force Gladys Gatlin, Calvin and Tamara Allen, Donna McCoy, Judy Duggan, John and Gina Allen, Clarice Powell, Richard and Dawn Radford, Liz Sisung, Lisa Guzda, Stella Bryant and Bill Mahan. Sincerely, Carol Bareld Domestic violence advocate Earel Hardy family We want to say a special thank you to Ronnie Segree rst and foremost for conducting the service for us and all he did. For the cards that Mama received, thank you for your thoughtful and kind cards of condolences. It was thoughtful and kind of you to take time to share your memories of Earel with me. Your words were not only a comfort but a source of strength for my family and me in this difcult time. For the food and help that was provided, thank you for your thoughtfulness in helping us with the food and guests at the services. I am so grateful for your helping hand in our time of need. Thanks again. We also wish to thank those for serving as pallbearers. You all are reliable and dear friends. Your contribution to the services were a tremendous comfort. I will be eternally grateful. Thank you For everyone who attended the service or sent the lovely owers of closer friends, thank you. I appreciate you taking the time to come and share in the remembrance of Earel Hardy. Although this is a sad time for all of us, I nd comfort in knowing how fortunate Earel and I have been to know you. Authors in Apalach PALS, the Patrons of the Apalachicola Library Society, would like to thank all those who made Authors in Apalach possible this year. THANK YOU Events like this are not possible without the help of a lot of people. We would also like to thank all the patrons and book enthusiasts who attended. See you next year!

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Email outdoors news to timesoutdoors @star .com O UTDOORS www.apalachtimes.com Section Section A Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL (next to Piggly Wiggly) www.BWOsh.com (next to Piggly Wiggly) www.BWOsh.com Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL EV E RYTHING FOR YOUR O UTDOOR ADV E NTUR E EV E EV E EV RYTHING FOR YOUR E RYTHING FOR YOUR E O UTDOOR ADV E UTDOOR ADV E UTDOOR ADV NTUR E NTUR E E EV E EV E EV RYTHING FOR YOUR E RYTHING FOR YOUR E O UTDOOR ADV E UTDOOR ADV E UTDOOR ADV NTUR E NTUR E E OCT OB ER FEATURE FISH: Stop in and register or go online at www. B W O sh.com RED FISH ER FEATURE FISH: WEEKLY ALMANAC APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE TIDE TABLES MONTHLY AVERAGES To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from these given for APALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW Cat Point Minus 0:40 Minus 1:17 East Pass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27 To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from those given for CARRABELLE: HIGH LOW Bald Point Minus 9:16 Minus 0:03 Sponsor the WEEKLY ALMANAC Call Today! 653-8868 Date High Low % Precip Thu, Oct. 25 82 66 0 % Fri, Oct. 26 83 63 10 % Sat, Oct. 27 83 62 0 % Sun, Oct. 28 80 56 20 % Mon, Oct. 29 73 57 0 % Tues, Oct. 30 72 58 0 % Wed, Oct. 31 75 58 0 % 24 We 108am 1.5 1222pm 1.4 658am 0.9 732pm 0.6 25 Th 135am 1.5 203pm 1.4 759am 0.7 818pm 0.7 26 Fr 158am 1.5 317pm 1.5 849am 0.5 858pm 0.9 27 Sa 218am 1.6 416pm 1.5 933am 0.3 932pm 1.0 28 Su 236am 1.6 506pm 1.5 1013am 0.1 1001pm 1.1 29 Mo 256am 1.7 549pm 1.5 1049am 0.1 1027pm 1.2 30 Tu 318am 1.7 629pm 1.5 1122am 0.0 1052pm 1.2 31 We 344am 1.7 708pm 1.5 1153am 0.0 1120pm 1.3 FreeTideTables.com For comparison only Times are local Tides in feet from MLLW 25 Th 1210am 2.4 1238pm 2.2 546am 1.1 605pm 1.1 26 Fr 1233am 2.4 152pm 2.4 636am 0.8 645pm 1.4 27 Sa 1253am 2.6 251pm 2.4 720am 0.5 719pm 1.6 28 Su 111am 2.6 341pm 2.4 800am 0.2 748pm 1.8 29 Mo 131am 2.7 424pm 2.4 836am 0.2 814pm 1.9 30 Tu 153am 2.7 504pm 2.4 909am 0.0 839pm 1.9 31 We 219am 2.7 543pm 2.4 940am 0.0 907pm 2.1 FreeTideTables.com For comparison only Times are local Tides in feet from MLLW 1 Th 250am 2.7 622pm 2.4 1010am 0.0 939pm 2.1 2 Fr 325am 2.7 703pm 2.4 1042am 0.0 1018pm 2.1 3 Sa 405am 2.7 747pm 2.4 1117am 0.2 1108pm 1.9 4 Su 350am 2.6 732pm 2.4 1059am 0.2 1112pm 1.9 5 Mo 442am 2.4 816pm 2.4 1148am 0.3 6 Tu 548am 2.2 856pm 2.4 1233am 1.8 1244pm 0.5 7 We 712am 2.1 932pm 2.4 159am 1.6 145pm 0.6 1 Th 415am 1.7 747pm 1.5 1223pm 0.0 1152pm 1.3 2 Fr 450am 1.7 828pm 1.5 1255pm 0.0 3 Sa 530am 1.7 912pm 1.5 1231am 1.3 130pm 0.1 4 Su 515am 1.6 857pm 1.5 121am 1.2 112pm 0.1 5 Mo 607am 1.5 941pm 1.5 125am 1.2 201pm 0.2 6 Tu 713am 1.4 1021pm 1.5 246am 1.1 257pm 0.3 7 We 837am 1.3 1057pm 1.5 412am 1.0 358pm 0.4 TURTLE TOTALS UP By KEVIN BAXTER Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission Loggerhead sea turtle nesting was near a 24-year high along Florida beaches this year, according to data compiled by Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission researchers. The loggerhead is listed federally as a threatened species. Trained surveyors from partners across the state count nests on almost 250 miles of beaches as part of the Index Beach Nesting Survey. Surveyors follow rm counting guidelines, making it possible for FWC researchers to use the data from these beaches to identify trends. Index beach surveyors counted 58,172 loggerhead nests this year, one of the highest counts since monitoring began in 1989. Nesting on these beaches peaked at 59,918 nests in 1998, and hit a low of 28,074 in 2007. After a steep decline in Florida loggerhead nesting between 1998 and 2007, nesting has risen over the past ve years, said Dr. Blair Witherington, FWC research scientist. Were pleased to see this increase, but we recognize that loggerheads and other sea turtle species still face many challenges. As hatchlings will continue to emerge from nests through November, people are asked to stay at a distance if they spot sea turtles on the beach. People are also asked to remove beach furniture and other objects from the beach at night so there is a clear path for hatchlings to make it to the water. In the U.S., 90 percent of all loggerhead nesting occurs in Florida, the majority of which takes place along the states east coast. The loggerhead is the most common sea turtle species to nest in Florida. Green turtles and leatherbacks, federally endangered species, also nest on Florida beaches, primarily on the east coast, and their nesting numbers have been increasing over time. Since tracking began in 1989, green turtle nesting in Florida has increased about tenfold. This year, surveyors found 6,054 green turtle nests on index beaches, down from last year, but consistent with normal variation. Leatherback nesting in Florida also has been on the rise since monitoring began. For the 2012 season, surveyors counted 515 leatherback nests on index beaches. Only 45 leatherback nests were counted on the same beaches in 1989. The extensive data collection is made possible with the help of hundreds of surveyors from conservation organizations, universities and federal, state and local governments along with private volunteers. These and other partners also provide data to FWC researchers through the Statewide Nesting Beach Survey, which documents all sea turtle nesting in Florida. The FWCs role in coordinating Floridas sea turtle nest counts, training surveyors and compiling data is funded by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and sales of the states sea turtle license plate. For more information about trends in sea turtle nest counts, visit MyFWC.com/Research, click on Wildlife, then click on Nesting under the Sea Turtle heading. Report sick or injured sea turtles to the FWCs Wildlife Alert Hotline at 888-404-FWCC (3922). Nesting on these beaches peaked at 59,918 nests in 1998, and hit a low of coast. The loggerhead is the most common sea turtle species to nest in Florida. Green turtles and leatherbacks, federally endangered species, also nest on Florida beaches, primarily on the east coast, and their nesting numbers have been increasing over time. 1989, green turtle nesting in Strong 2012 nesting season for Florida loggerheads SPONSORED BY Inshore/Bay Offshore/Bottom Gag grouper season will close Oct. 31, so now is the time for your last offshore bottom trips for gag grouper. Reports have been good on the live or hard bottom 2040 miles offshore. Large schools of Spanish mackerel are close to shore over the past few days in and around St. Joe Bay. Good reports of large kingfish are being caught at the oil docks or sea wall in St. Joe Marina. As the cooler air settles in this week, St. Joe Bay should respond with good redfish and trout catches. This month has been great for the inshore angler so far, and we hope that trend will last throughout the month. Good reports from Towns Beach and Eagle Harbor are the talk of the town. Daniel Boyd of Havana caught this 20-pound red drum with Capt. Chris Robinson on Oct. 15. Red drum is a fast growing sh reaching 6-8 pounds in three years. The record red drum was 94 pounds and was caught on the east coast. CHRIS ROBINSON | Special to the Times Fall is an active time for Florida black bears as they stock up on calories for the coming winter. Though they dont need to put on pounds to survive the states usually mild winters, they behave as if they do, eating about three times as much as usual. In autumn, bears begin a natural process called hyperphagia, putting on fat for the winter. They will consume around 25,000 calories a day and eat almost anything thats convenient. The easier a food item is to get, the more likely it is that a bear will take advantage of it and a bears sense of smell is so keen it can detect food more than a mile away. To keep bears away from your home and neighborhood, follow these tips: Feed your pets indoors or bring in dishes after feeding. Secure household garbage in a shed, garage or a wildlife-resistant container. Put household garbage out on the morning of pickup, not the night before. Secure commercial garbage in bear-resistant Dumpsters consisting of metal lids or metal-reinforced plastic lids and lock bars. Clean grills and store them in a locked, secure place. Remove wildlife feeders or make them bear-resistant. Protect gardens, apiaries, compost and livestock with electric fencing. Pick ripe fruit from trees and remove fallen fruit from the ground. Encourage your homeowners association or local government to institute ordinances on keeping foods secure that would attract wildlife. BIG BAD BULL Thursday, October 25, 2012 Page 12 Black bears more active during fall

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CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA SP O RTS www.apalachtimes.com A Section Thursday, October 25, 2012 By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com With sunny weather, brisk winds and a ood of volunteers to help it along, Sundays third annual Running for the Bay marathon marked another success. While 655 runners signed up to take part, 509 runners actually ran, just a tad below last years eld of 522 runners. I think it went super, everybody seems to be really happy, said Mark Henderson, race organizer. Most importantly the residents were happy. We got great feedback from volunteers. Even the DOT (Florida Department of Transportation) was happy. Theyre happy we cleaned up really well. As part of its mission to assist with local needs, the race this year donated $2,500 to Bay Aid, a fund to assist struggling seafood workers. A large number of volunteers from Franklins Promise, which administers Bay Aid, were up at the crack of dawn Sunday to be at the 7:15 a.m. start from Battery Park in Apalachicola. The largest eld of runners, 132 females and 91 males, took part in the halfmarathon, won by Charlie Cooley, 34, of Davenport, in a time of 1:27.44. Top female nisher, and 20th overall, was Angela Dempsey, of Apalachicola, who took a break from her duties as circuit court judge to brave the marathon, which ran over the bridge into Eastpoint and across to St. George island and back. The weather was awesome, said Dempsey. The route is good, really at other than the bridge. Some people run on the grass but it wasnt bad. Dempsey, who ran track and cross country at San Diego State University during her undergraduate years, posted a 1:48.13, just slightly over her time last year, but a very respectable 8:16 mile. Im pretty satis ed, she said. Im 44, and it keeps me in shape. It helps with stress relief. Also running in the half-marathon was Talon WhiteEagle, 29, of Apalachicola, who posted a 1:52.08 to nish 31st overall, and Clint Kadel, 43, of St. George Island, who ran a 2:02 to nish 62nd overall. The marathon drew 73 males and 63 males, and was won by Daniel McCarthy, 44, Lake Mary, who ran a 2:58.13. It went well, he said. I was thinking at going out at a sub 2:50 but the rst few miles are really windy so I kind of adjusted my goals. I gave up on that the rst mile. The rst quarter of the course, and the third quarter of the course were very windy. The last stretch the wind was at my back and that helped a lot, he said. Normally I fade a little bit at that point but the tail wind kind of kept me steady. McCarthy, a senior business analyst for the American Automobile Association International, posted a time about six minutes slower than his personal best since he began running about 15 years ago. I used to play a lot of basketball but I broke my jaw playing basketball and I decided to do something a little safer so I started running, he said. He and his wife and two twin boys made the race part of a weeklong stay on St. George Island. Topping the marathons eld of women was Michele Patterson, 27, Dothan, Ala.. who ran a personal best 3:35.41 but missed qualifying for the Boston Marathon by 42 seconds. It went great until about mile 18 and I lost it, she said. It was a really good race, beautiful weather. Omigosh, the sunrise was gorgeous, the course was great. Its just the inevitable headwind that got me. A food scientist running ever since she graduated college six years ago, Patterson said she plans to make another try at qualifying for Boston next month. The 50k Ultra-Marathon, about 31 miles, was won by Andres Perez, 33, of Orlando, running with Team Red, White and Blue, a group created to assist returning combat veterans in adapting to life back at home. Perez, who nished second last year in the event, ran a 4:08.19 to top the eld of 19 males and 14 females, completing the course four minutes ahead of the top female, Angie Ave, 40, of Orlando. Perez, who served with the 82nd Airborne, said Team RWB was created to motivate solders having a dif cult time adapting to society after they come back from a combat zone. His teammate, Jaime Melendez, 43, from San Juan, Puerto Rico, retired after 20 years in the Army, said the team is committed to helping them getting them off the couch, not feeling sorry for themselves and get them out here to enjoy life again by pairing them with civilian advocates. We worked together in the front and now were going to be together back in the rear doing good things, he said. You get to focus on something other than your problems. It burns off a lot of negative energy. The 10k race drew 17 males and 44 females, and was won by Zachary Valentine, of Fort Drum, New York, in 44:24, about six minutes faster than the top female, Louise Valentine, 27, of Enterprise, Ala. Delighted with her nish was Cassie Gary, 40, of Apalachicola, who ran a personal best 1:00.56. Three years ago, I quit smoking and decided to start running again, she said. In fourth place overall, Richard Heckler, 20, of St. George island, ran a 52:11. The 5k race, with 17 males and 44 females, was won by David Grif n, 50, of Panama City Bach, in 23:16, with Lynden Robb, 22, of Crawfordville, the top female with a 26:53. Ladonna Ingram, 47, of Apalachicola, ran a 34:42 to nish 20th overall, while Press Witt, 54, of Apalachicola, ran 54:19 to nish 52nd. For complete results, visit www.racesmith.com PHOTOS BY DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times Marathon winner Daniel McCarthy, with wife Martine, and twin 2-year-olds, Dorian, left, and Gavin enjoy the swings in Battery Park. Bottom right: Team Red, White and Blue runners, made up of combat veterans, are Ultra 50k winner Andres Perez, left, and Jaime Melendez. Top right: Top female marathon runner Michele Patterson Marathon runners deliver help for bay Page 13 By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com After shutting out West Gadsden for nearly the entire game, Franklin County withstood a scoring barrage in the last two minutes to secure a 16-14 homecoming victory Friday night. After Seahawk senior Skyler Hutchinson barreled in from the 1 yard line in the opening play of the fourth quarter, Franklin County nursed a 16-0 lead for most of the nal quarter until West Gadsden put together the aerial game that had eluded them all night. With three minutes left, West Gadsden quarterback Dionte Jackson threw a 35-yard pass to Taderrius Knight, and then followed it up with a seven-yard toss, to bring the Panthers into the Seahawks red zone. A minute later, Jackson connected on a 12yard-touchdown pass. But the two-point conversion failed, and Franklin County looked to be sitting on a secure 16-6 lead. Seahawk senior lineman Chase Golden fell on the onside kick at mid eld, but Seahawks senior fullback Ladarius Rhodes coughed up the football a play later. The Panthers took advantage, and with less than a minute left, Jackson nailed on a 20-yard touchdown pass. They looked to kick the extra point, but faked instead and were successful on the two-point conversion to trail only by two, 16-14, with time remaining. But, for the second time in as many minutes, Golden pounced on a ricocheting onside kick and the Seahawks ran out the clock. Were one play away from getting a shutout, said Seahawks coach Josh Wright, whose Seahawks went to 2-5, and 1-2 in 1A District 4 play. They got the two little nuggets they wanted, two great play calls, but thats football, he said. Once you lose mo (momentum) and once they got mo, they had some con dence, Wright said. But we were able to stiffen. The Seahawks amassed 242 yards on the ground, led by Hutchinson, who carried the ball 20 times for 90 yards, and caught the only pass of the night from junior Dwayne Griggs, for 20 yards on the rst scoring drive. Griggs got the Seahawks on the scoreboard with a 22-yard rushing score with three minutes left in the rst quarter. He nished with 88 yards on 19 carries, and shared offensive player of the game honors with Hutchison. Rhodes added 59 yards on 12 carries, and was defensive player of the game, leading with seven tackles, two for a loss, two hurries, and a sack. Sophomore Cole Wheeler had a crucial interception for the Seahawks, stopping a Panther scoring drive on the Franklin County 35, and running it to the West Gadsden 35 with three minutes left in the third quarter. Senior Zach Howze nailed the Seahawks rst eld goal of the season, a 25-yarder with a minute left in the rst half. Senior punter Dan Carrino was honored at halftime as homecoming king by his classmates. His homecoming queen counterpart was Shelbi Myers, with Chena Segree, Emily Cash, Karlie Tucker and Hannah Oxendine also serving as senior representatives. Franklin County outlasts West Gadsden 16-14 DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times Dan Carrino and Shelbi Myers were crowned Franklin Countys homecoming king and queen Friday night. Gun Show October 27th & 28th Panama City Panama City Fairgrounds Fairgrounds 2086093 Sat 9 -5 Sun 10-4 C o n c e a l e d W e a p o n s C l a s s S a t / S u n 1 1 a m o r 2 p m Floridagunshows.com FREE PARKING

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Local A14 | The Times Thursday, October 25, 2012 Estate planning check-ups today in Carrabelle Its time for your estate planning check-up! Legal Services of North Florida will be conducting estate planning check-ups from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Franklin County Senior Center at 201 NW Ave. F St. in Carrabelle on Thursday, Oct. 25. Participants will be entered into a drawing to receive a simple will prepared by a Florida attorney. Learn about wills, living wills, heath care directives and much more. Attorneys will also be on hand to discuss issues related to BP oil spill claims, including any medical claims. No registration required. For more information contact Scott Manion at 850-701-3317. Learn about life on 1812 ship Saturday The Apalachicola Maritime Museum will feature a presentation on Life Aboard Ship During the War of 1812 on Saturday, Oct. 27. Matthew and Juliann Krogh, professional living historians from Richmond, Va., are volunteers with the U.S. Coast Guard Historic Ships Company, an auxiliary unit created to honor and portray the mission of the Coast Guard (Revenue Cutter Service) during the bicentennial of the War of 1812. The living history program includes uniformed sailors who describe shipboard life in the Revenue Cutter Service, including demonstrations of food preparation and preservation, navigation and depth nding, the arts of the sailor, weapons use and manual of arms, surgery and medicine, sailors games and diversions, and shipboard commands and phrases. Both educated at Virginia Tech, Matthew has a bachelors and masters in history while Juliann has a bachelors in political science and a masters in public administration. He has worked at several museums and specializes in maritime and military history, while she works for the Department of Defense as a contract buyer and specializes in period clothing and food. They have been reenacting for more than 10 years and have covered the Colonial period, War of 1812, and Civil War. The fee of $5 includes a low country boil, plus samples of sea biscuits and grog, and Blues on the Docks! For more info, call 653-2500 or email Admin@ApalachicolaMaritimeMuseum.org FCA plans Monday parent workshop The Franklin County Academy (FCA), Franklin County Schools newest educational program, will have its rst Parent Workshop from 6 8 p.m. Monday, Oct. 29. The topic will be Student Transcripts. Parents are encouraged to come out and learn more about this very important student document. Parents will also have the opportunity to tour the campus, visit the classrooms and sign up for Parent-StudentTeacher conferences. Light refreshments will be provided and students report cards will be distributed following the workshop. For further information, contact the Academys coordinator, Elinor Mount-Simmons at 670-2800, ext. 4127 Chamber hosts Nov. 2 oyster roast Love oysters? Dont miss the eighth annual Downtown Oyster Roast from 6 9 p.m. on Friday, Nov. 2 in Apalachicola. This enchanting event, sponsored by the Apalachicola Bay Chamber of Commerce, will feature roasted oysters, oysters on the half shell, creamy artichoke, oyster and thyme soup, fresh local shrimp, blue crabs, salad greens and fantastic desserts. Dine under the stars next to the Apalachicola River. Local blues man Joe Hutchinson will provide live entertainment. For tickets call 653-9419 or email info@apalachicolabay.org Tobacco-free partners to meet Nov. 7 There will be a TobaccoFree Franklin Partnership Coalition Meeting on Wednesday, Nov. 7. The meeting will be held at the Franklin County Health Department, 139 12th Street, from 5:30 until 6:30 p.m. in the second oor conference room. Bridge maintenance work continues Periodic lane restrictions began this week and run through Wednesday, Nov. 7, at the following locations in Franklin County, as Bridge Masters perform routine bridge maintenance work: State Road (S.R.) 30 / U.S. 98 Tillie Miller Bridge in Carrabelle, over the Carrabelle River S.R. 30 / U.S. 98 Porter Bar Creek Bridge, 2.5 miles west of S.R. 65 All activities are weather dependent and may be delayed or rescheduled in the event of inclement weather. Motorists are reminded to pay attention and use caution when driving through the work zone. For more Florida Department of Transportation District Three information. Follow us on twitter @ MyFDOT_NWFL. Stan Trappe ATTORNEY AT LAW Foreclosure Defense Bankruptcy Asset Protection Real Estate Probate ~ Wills Admitted to Practice Law in Florida Since 1974 Let Me Help You 850-769-6139 236 McKenzie Avenue Panama City, FL CITY OF CARRABELLE PROPOSED ENACTMENT OF CITY ORDINANCE The City Commission of the City of Carrabelle, Florida, proposes to enact the following ordinance: CITY OF CARRABELLE ORDINANCE 453 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF CARRABELLE, FLORIDA, PROVIDING FOR AMENDMENT OF ORDINANCE 115, PERTAINING TO THE LEVY OF LICENSE AND OCCUPATIONAL TAXES ON PERSONS AND ENTITIES ENGAGED IN OR CARRYING ON CERTAIN TYPES OF BUSINESS, PROFESSIONS, PRIVILEGES OR OCCUPATIONS IN THE CITY OF CARRABELLE; AND ESTABLISHING AN EFFECTIVE DATE. The proposed Ordinance may be inspected during regular hours at Carrabelle City Hall between 8 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., 1001 Gray Ave., Carrabelle, FL Monday through Friday, or call 850-697-2727 The proposed Ordinance will be considered for enactment during a public hearing to be held 6:00p.m., Thursday November 1, Carrabelle, FL. Interested parties may appear at the hearing and be heard with respect to the proposed Ordinance. If an individual decides to appeal any decision made by the City Commission with respect to this meeting, a verbatim transcript may be required. If so, the is asked to advise the city at least 48 hours before the meeting by contacting Keisha Smith at the above address or phone number. Wilburn Messer, Mayor Attest: Keisha Smith, City Clerk COLLINS CONSTRU C TION OF ST. GEOR G E I S LAND, INC & S EWA G E TREATMENT S ERV I CE S O VER 30 YEARS EXPERIEN C E OUR S ERV I CE S I NCLUDE: AFTER HOURS & EMERGEN C Y SERVI C E PROVIDED 850.670.5790 MA I NTENANCE@JCOLL I N S CON S TRUCT I ON.COM MEDICARE PLANS EX CELLEN T COV ERA G E A N YO NE C AN AFFO RD TOP QUALITY COMPANY TUCKER LIFE-HEALTH INSURANCE, INC. RATED A+ BY BETTER BUSINESS BUREAU Ross E. T ucker, Agent since 1981 Chartered Life Underwriter Registered Health Underwriter 850-926-2200 or 800-226-7005 www.tuckerlifehealth.com Members of the Franklin/Gulf Retired Educators Association Unit of the Florida Retired Educators Association held their business meeting at Carolines Restaurant in Apalachicola on Oct. 16. President Annada Faircloth introduced new member, Elizabeth Liz Sisung. Members in photo, from left, are Myra Ponder, Beverly Kelley, Faircloth, Christine White, Lula Wilson, Arlene Oehler, Sisung and Christine Williams. Kelley, Florida Retired Educators Foundation trustee, has sent information regarding available scholarships to the Franklin and Gulf county high schools. Arlene Oehler, FREA District 2 director, reported the district meeting Sept. 11 in Monticello received excellent ratings. Faircloth announced that Sunday, Nov. 18 has been declared Florida Retired Educators Day by Gov. Rick Scott. The next F/GREA meeting is Tuesday, Nov. 13 in Wewahitchka. F/GREA membership is open to any person who has retired from the education eld under the Florida Retirement System with ve or more years of service, or any person who has retired from the educational system of any other state or from any privately funded or parochial school with ve or more years of service. For information contact Annada at 653-8493. Editors note: An Apalachicola woman is seeking a good home for her English bull dog. Physical constraints prevent her from keeping her beloved pet and she hopes to nd a forever home nearby where she can visit her friend. If you can offer Mandy a home, even as a foster parent, please call 6538895 or contact Lois Swoboda at 653-5857. Help this kind soul keep in touch with her Mandy. My name is Mandy and I am a white English bulldog with spots. I am three years old, had all my shots and have been spayed. I love people, but Im not very good with children because Im too strong and powerful and might hurt them trying to play. I love to run and play! My adopted mama wants to keep me very much, but shes just not strong enough to handle me. I need somewhere that has a large area for me to run and play. I need someone young and strong that can take me for walks and play with me. I dont like cats, but what bulldog does? Can you nd it in your heart to give me a good home so I wont have to be con ned all day? This bulldog was born to run! Would someone who loves dogs and who would be good to me please give me a forever home? News BRIEFS Retired educators plan scholarships MANDY NEEDS A HOME

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Local The Times | A15 Thursday, October 25, 2012 Trades & Services GET YOUR AD IN 653-8868 Trades & Services Laban Bontrager, DMD Monica Bontrager, DMD 12761 Pea Ridge Road Bristol, Florida 32321 TELEPHONE (850) 643-5417 Bristol Dental Clinic DENTURE LAB ON PREMISES Same Day Service on Repairs and Relines Don Lively General Contractors L ICENSED AND I NSURED 20 Y EARS E XPERIENCE P .O. Box 439 C arrabelle, FL 32322 697-2783 or Mobile 566-2603 RC 0066499 R G0065255 Carrabelle Visa, Discover, and American Express Honored at Participating Ace Stores JACKSONS Building Supplies Building Supplies & Auto Repair Carrabelle 697-3333 We Deliver Anywhere Hardware and Paint Center J.J.s Tree Service, LLC Stump Grinder Licensed & Insured Call John : (850) 899-8432 ROBERTS APPLIANCE REPAIR ALL MAJOR BRANDS 18 Shadow Lane Apalachicola, FL 32320 Phone: (850) 653-8122 Cell: (850) 653-7654 From A to Z PO Box 364 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 850-340-0756 Gregs Handyman Service & Lawn Maintenance Gill Autrey has written a wonderful book. Gone with the Tides and Other Southern Stories, featuring prose by Gill Autrey, photography by wife Lane Autrey and recipes by both, is touching, funny and insightful. Autrey shares his thoughts on fishing, the Depression, boats, seagulls, Mama, author Lewis Grizzard and the viper infested jungles of Southeast Asia. I wish I had this book when I was away at school in Blacksburg because it would have made me less homesick. It is a taste of everything we love about Franklin County. In the essay Gulls on the Causeway, Autrey rails against the descendents of Adolph Hitler who are in too big a hurry to avoid hitting nesting shorebirds on their way to the island. In Dog Years, he shares memories of beloved four (and three) legged companions, and in Roastin Ears, he shares family recipes rated for difficulty using the martini system, as in *= one martini, **=two martinis, etc. This book is well worth reading and will even speak to unfortunate souls who have never watched the sunset over Apalachicola Bay. Gone with the Tides, is available at the Green Door and Downtown Books. Autrey will sign books and perform on the guitar with friend Slim Fatz at a cocktail reception from 6 9 p.m. on Thursday, Nov. 1 at the Green Door. The gallery will also host a show of Lane Autreys photography. A second book signing, with time to be announced, will be held, Saturday, Nov. 17 at Downtown Books. By LOIS SWOBODA Captain Gill to sign newest work Autrey promotes his humorous essays Gone with the Tides CLASSIFIEDS Thursday, October 25, 2012 The Times | A15 90557 PUBLIC NOTICE REQUEST FOR BIDS AND NOTICE OF BID OPENING PUBLIC MEETING Sealed bids will be received by the City of Apalachicola for the construction of the Project described as follows: City of Apalachicola CDBG Streetscape Improvements Phase I RESTROOMS, Project No. C.D.B.G. # 11DB-C45-02-29-01C05. Bids shall be addressed and delivered to Betty Webb -City Administrator, City of Apalachicola, 1 Bay Avenue, Apalachicola, Florida 32320. Bids shall be labeled as Sealed Bid City of Apalachicola CDBG Project, Restrooms. All bids must be received by the City prior to the deadline of 2:00 p.m. Eastern time on November 15, 2012 to be considered. The bid opening will be a City public meeting at the same location, at 2:00 p.m. November 15, 2012. There will be a mandatory Pre-Bid Conference at 10:30 a.m. on October 30, 2012 at the address listed above. The information for bidders, including design and contract documents, may be examined at the office of Inovia Consulting Group c/o Jim Waddell, PE, located at 1983 Centre Pointe Blvd., Suite 103, Tallahassee, Florida 32308, phone 850-298-4213. Copies may be obtained at this office upon payment of $100 which amount constitutes the cost of reproduction and handling. This payment will not be refunded. The City of Apalachicola reserves the right to waive any informalities or to reject any or all bids. The City of Apalachicola is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Each Bidder must deposit with his/her bid security in the amount, form and subject to the conditions provided in the Information for Bidders. Sureties used for obtaining bonds must appear as acceptable according to the Department of Treasury Circular 570. The contractor shall begin mobilization and procurement of materials within ten working days of the receipt of the Notice to Proceed. The project will be financed by the State of Florida Department of Economic Opportunity through a Community Development Block Grant (CDBG). Attention of Bidders is particularly called to the requirements as to conditions of employment to be observed and minimum wage rates to be paid under the Contract, Section 3, Section 109 Executive Order 11246, and all applicable laws and regulations of the Federal government and Sate of Florida, and bonding and insurance requirements. October 25, 2012 89192T IN THE CIRCUIT COURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 19-2012-CA-000218 BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. Plaintiff, vs. LESLI M. LARMON; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF LESLI M. LARMON; ANYAND ALLUNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER AND AGAINSTTHE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUALDEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOTKNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAYCLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF LESLI M. LARMON; UNKNOWN TENANT #1 IN POSSESSION OF THE PROPERTY; UNKNOWN TENANT #2 IN POSSESSION OF THE PROPERTY, Defendants NOTICE OF ACTION To the following Defendant(s): LESLI M. LARMON Last Known Address LOT8 MILLPOND CARRABELLE, FL 323022 UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF LESLIE M. LARMON Last Known Address LOT8 MILLPOND CARRABELLE, FL 323022 YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Foreclosure of Mortgage on the following described property: COMMENCE ATA LITEWOOD HUB AND AST. JOE PAPER COMPANYCONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHEASTCORNER OF THE NORTH HALF OF THE NORTHWESTQUARTER OF SECTION 9, TOWNSHIP7 SOUTH, RANGE 4 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 15 SECONDS WEST357.46 FEETTO AROD AND CAPLYING ON THE WESTERLYRIGHT OF WAYOF COUNTY ROAD NUMBER 67; THENCE NORTH 189 DEGREES 28 MINUTES 27 SECONDS WEST904.84 FEET TO APOINTLYING ON THE CENTERLINE OF A60 FOOTWIDE ACCESS AND UTILITYEASEMENT (SAWMILLTRAM ROAD; THENCE RUN ALONG SAID CENTERLINE NORTH 17 DEGREES 19 MINUTES 20 SECONDS WEST220.00 FEET TO THE POINTOF BEGINNING; THENCE FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE ALONG SAID CENTERLINE NORTH 17 DEGREES 19 MINUTES 20 SECONDS WEST223.35 FEET; THENCE LEAVING SAID CENTERLINE: RUN NORTH 82 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 48 SECONDS WEST 1257.33 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 29 MINUTES 08 SECONDS WEST203.96 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 48 SECONDS EAST1326.18 FEETTO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, CONTAINING 6.00 ACRES MORE OR LESS. SUBJECTTO A60 FOOTWIDE ACCESS AND UTILITYEASEMENTLYING OVER AND ACROSS THE EASTERLY30 FEET DESCRIBED THEREOF. a/k/a LOT8 MILL POND, CARRABELLE, FL323022 has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of you written defenses, if any, to it, on Marinosci Law Group, P.C., Attorney for Plaintiff, whose address is 100 W. Cypress Creek Road, Suite 1045, Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33309 on or before thirty (30) days after the first publication of this Notice in the APALACHICOLA CARRIBELLE TIMES file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demand in the complaint. This notice is provided pursuant to Administrative Order No. 2.065. IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT, If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of Court Administration at (850)577-4401, or at the Leon County Courthouse, Room 225, 301 S. Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL32301 within 2 working days of receipt of a notice compelling you to appear at a court proceeding; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court this 26th day of September, 2012. MARCIAM. JOHNSON As Clerk of the Court Michele Maxwell As Deputy Clerk Submitted by: Marinosci Law Group, P.C. 100 W. Cypress Creek Road, Suite 1045 Fort Lauderdale, FL 33309 Phone: (954) 644-8704 Fax: (954) 772-9601 Oct 25, Nov 1, 2012 89202T IN THE COUNTY COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 19 2012 CC 000024 ST. GEORGE PLANTATION OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., a Florida not for profit corporation, Plaintiff, v. DIVERSIFIED EXECUTIVE CRESTVIEW, LLC, A GEORGIA LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY, Defendant. NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated October 5, 2012, and entered in Case No. 19 2012 CC 000024 of the County Court Of The Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein ST. GEORGE PLANTATION OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC. is Plaintiff, and DIVERSIFIED EXECUTIVE CRESTVIEW, LLC, A GEORGIA LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY is Defendant, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in the front entrance of the Franklin County Courthouse at 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320, Franklin County, Florida, at 11:00 am on the 14th day of November, 2012 the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: Lot 15, Bay Cove Village, A subdivision as per map or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 5 at Pages 18 and 19 of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. Subject to covenants, restrictions, reservations and easements of record, if any; and taxes for the year 2005 and subsequent years. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Danny Davis, ADA Coordinator, Court Technology Office, Office of Court Administration, 301 S. Monroe St., Rm 225, Tallahassee, FL 32303, (850) 577-4401 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. DATED this 5th day of October, 2012. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk County Court Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Becker & Poliakoff, P.A. Attorneys for Plaintiff 348 Miracle Strip Pkwy SW, Suite 7 Ft. Walton Beach, FL 32548-5253 (850)664-2229 (850)664-7882 Fax Oct 18, 25, 2012 89212T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 19-2012-CA-000139 FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION, Plaintiff, vs. UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS, TRUSTEES OF JO CLARK A/K/A JO ORTON, DECEASED; KAMI ORTON, HEIR; IF LIVING, INCLUDING ANY UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SAID DEFENDANT(S), IF REMARRIED, AND IF DECEASED, THE RESPECTIVE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS, AND TRUSTEES, AND ALL OTHER PERSONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THE NAMED DEFENDANT(S); UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2; Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION TO: UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS, TRUSTEES OF JO CLARK A/K/A JO ORTON, DECEASED; KAMI ORTON, HEIR; Whose residence(s) is/ are unknown. YOU ARE HEREBY required to file your answer or written defenses, if any, in the above proceeding with the Clerk of this Court, and to serve a copy thereof upon the plaintiffs attorney, Law Offices of Daniel C. Consuegra, 9204 King Palm Drive, Tampa, FL 33619-1328, telephone (813) 915-8660, facsimile (813)915-0559, within thirty days of the first publication of this Notice, the nature of this proceeding being a suit for foreclosure of mortgage against the following described property, to wit: Lot 8, Block 8, LANARK VILLAGE UNIT NO. 1, according 10 the plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 2, Pages 14 and 14A, inclusive, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. If you fail to file your response or answer, if any, in the above proceeding with the Clerk of this Court, and to serve a copy thereof upon the plaintiffs attorney, Law Offices of Daniel C.Consuegra, 9204 King Palm Dr., Tampa, Florida 33619-1327, telephone (813)915-8660, Fax (813) 915-0559, within thirty days of the first publication of this Notice, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint or petition. DATED at FRANKLIN County this 19th day of 2012. Marcia M Johnson Clerk of the Circuit Court Terry E Creamer Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Danny Davis Office of Court Administration 301 South Monroe Street, Room 225 Tallahassee, FL 32303 850.577.4401 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. October 18, 25, 2012

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A16| The Times Thursday, October 25, 2012 CLASSIFIEDS ToPlace Your Classified ad inCall Our New Numbers Now!Call:850-747-5020 Toll Free:800-345-8688 Fax:850-747-5044 Email:thestar@pcnh.com Email:thetimes@pcnh.com theAPALACHICOLA & CARRABELLETIMES CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW RENTALS1 BEDROOM, 1 BATH UNFURNISHED APT LANARK, REMODELED, INC WATER .................$425 2 BR, 1 BATH UNFURNISHED APT W/D HOOKUP, SMALL PORCH ..........................$375 1 BEDROOM, 1 BATH FURNISHED CONDO INCLUDES UTILITIES, MARINA .........................$910 3 BEDROOM, 2 BATH FURNISHED HOUSE ON RIVER, DOCK ..............................................$1000 3 BEDROOM 1 BATH DUPLEX UNFURNISHED, CARRABELLE ............................$600 3 BEDROOM 1 BATH END UNIT, W/D, WATER INCLUDED, UNFURNISHED .................$565 2 BR 1 BATH UNFURNISHED HOUSE FENCED YARD ......................................................$800 OFFICE SPACE US 98 CARRABELLE ........................................................$500 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322850-697-9604 850-323-0444 www.seacrestre.comwww. rst tness.com/carrabellePROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND RENTALS AIRLINE CAREERS BEGIN HERE -Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualified. Housing available. Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 866-314-3769 We Buy Any Vehicle in Any Condition. Title/No Title, Bank Leans -NO Problem. Don’t Trade it in, We WILL PAY up to $35K. Any Make, Any Model, Call A.J. Today: 813-335-3794/237-1892 Apalachicola 1Br/1Ba quiet, 2 blks from boat ramp, $600mo + first, last & dep. 850-570-9167 Text FL25130 to 56654 Apalachicola: 1 br, 1 ba efficiency Call for information 850-653-6103 Text FL5175 to 56654 St. GeorgeIsland $175/wk, elec, satellite, garbage incl. Pool tbl. 12’ X 65’ deck. Beautiful view! 850-653-5319 2 br house in Eastpoint with washer & dryer and jacuzzi bathtub, $550 mo + $550 dep. Call (940) 389-8631 Carabelle: 3 bdr 2 bath with large spare room on 1 acre. Fenced yard, new tile throughout, freshly painted. $800 per month + dep. Call (850) 766-4357 Text FL26851 to 56654 Carrabelle 3 br, 2 ba all tile floors, newly remodeled inside All new appliances and heat pump. $750 per month + deposit 850-697-4080 or 850591-5899 Apalachicola: 3 br, 2 Bath. Newly Remodeled Call for details!! 850-653-6103 Text FL28701 to 56654 Apalachicola Lots Block 177 Lot 6, $29,500 Block 150 Lot 4 $25,50 Call 850-597-0217 YORKIE AKC PUPPIESSweet & Precious 2 females. Will be approx. 8-9 lbs when full grown. 13 weeks old They come with Health Certificate and 1st shots. Asking $500 850-691-7016 NOW OPENMerchandise Liquidation Store, In Hickory Plaza Shopping Center, 414 S. Tyndall Parkway, Open 9-6 Daily, Closed Sundays 90343T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 12-000065-CA HANCOCK BANK, Plaintiff, vs. DAVID L. SNOWDEN and ST. GEORGE PLANTATION OWNERS’ ASSOCIATION, INC., Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE BY CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT Notice is hereby given that the undersigned, MARCIA JOHNSON, Clerk of the Circuit Court of Franklin County, Florida, will on November 7, 2012, at 11:00 a.m., on the Second Floor Lobby of the Franklin County Courthouse, located at 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida, in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes offer for sale, and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder, the following described real property situated in Franklin County, Florida: Real Property LOT 50, Pelican Beach Village, as per map or plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 5, Page 12, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. Together with all improvements, easements, appurtenances, and fixtures (the “Property”). pursuant to the Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure in a case pending in said Court, the style of which is HANCOCK BANK Plaintiff, vs. DAVID L. SNOWDEN and ST. GEORGE PLANTATION OWNERS’ ASSOCIATION, Defendants. and the docket number of which is 12-000065-CA Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim with the clerk of the court within 60 days after the sale. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Clerk of Court, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL (850)653-8861 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. WITNESS my hand and the official seal of this Honorable Court this 25th day of September, 2012. MARCIA JOHNSON Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Michelle Maxwell Deputy Clerk October 18, 25, 2012 89220T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 192011 CA000394XXXXXX BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. HOWARD M. GLASSMAN; DIANE R. SALZ; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 1; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 2; and ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST A NAMED DEFENDANT TO THIS ACTION, OR HAVING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE ANY RIGHT, TITLE OR INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY HEREIN DESCRIBED, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order or Summary Final Judgment of foreclosure dated September 24, 2012, and entered in Case No. 192011CA0003 94XXXXXX of the Circuit Court in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. is Plaintiff and HOWARD M. GLASSMAN; DIANE R. SALZ; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 1; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 2; and ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST A NAMED DEFENDANT TO THIS ACTION, OR HAVING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE ANY RIGHT, TITLE OR INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY HEREIN DESCRIBED, are Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Front Door of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320 at Franklin County, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on the 29th day of January, 2013 the following described property as set forth in said Order or Final Judgment, to-wit: LOT 34, HOLIDAY BEACH, UNIT NO. 1, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 12, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons needing special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the Clerk of the Court not later than five business days prior to the proceeding at the Franklin County Courthouse. Telephone 850653-8861 or 1-800-9558770 via Florida Relay Service. DATED at Apalachicola, Florida, on September 25, 2012. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of Court Michele Maxwell As Deputy Clerk SMITH, HIATT & DIAZ, P.A. Attorneys for Plaintiff PO BOX 11438 Fort Lauderdale, FL 33339-1438 Phone: (954)564-0071 Oct 25, Nov 1, 2012. 90351T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.: 19-2011-CA-000402 BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING L.P. F/K/A COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, L.P., Plaintiff, vs. JASON L. WHITE; MARINER’S VIEW CONDOMINIUMS ASSOCIATION, INC.; UNKNOWN TENANT(S); IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated the 25th day of September, 2012, and entered in Case No. 19-2011-CA000402, of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, L.P. F/K/A COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, L.P. is the Plaintiff and JASON L. WHITE, MARINER’S VIEW CONDOMINIUMS ASSOCIATION, INC.; UNKNOWN TENANT (S); IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY are defendants. The Clerk o f this Court shall sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the FRONT STEPS OF THE FRANKLIN COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 33 MARKET STREET, APALACHICOLA, FL 32320, 11:00 AM on the 14th day of November, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: UNIT NUMBER 206 OF MARINERS VIEW CONDOMINIUM, AS PER THAT CERTAIN DECLARATION OF CONDOMINIUM RECORDED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 865, PAGE 369, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301, 850-5774401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Dated this 26th day of September, 2012. MARCIA JOHNSON Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Michelle Maxwell Deputy Clerk Submitted by: Law Offices of Marshall C. Watson, P.A. 1800 NW 49th Street, Suite 120 Fort Lauderdale, FL 33309 (954) 453-0365 Fax (954) 771-6052 Toll Free: 1-800-441-2438 October 18, 25, 2012 90509T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No. 12-00053-CP Division: PROBATE IN RE: ESTATE OF Dean S. Cambron Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Dean S. Cambron, deceased, whose date of death was January 11, 2012, is pending in the Circuit Court for Franklin County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida 32320. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is October 25, 2012. Personal Representative: Susan Cambron Lundy 1490 Pebble Creek Rd Marietta, GA 30067 Diane Cambron Jewell 125 Roberts Hill Drive Taylors, SC 29687 Attorneys for Personal Representative SANDERS AND DUNCAN, P.A. FL Bar No. 442178 80 MARKET STREET APALACHICOLA, FL 32320 (850) 653-8976 E-Mail Address: bsanders@fairpoint.netOc t. 25, Nov. 1, 2012 90463T IN THE CIRCUIT COURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITOF FLORIDAIN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTYGENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO.: 2010-CA-000065 SUNTRUSTBANK, Plaintiff, vs. JAKE T. BRYANT, et al., Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Consent Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered in Civil Case No. 2010-CA-000065 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Eastpoint, Florida, the Clerk of Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL. 32320 in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes on the 14th day of November, 2012 at 11:00 AM on the following described property as set forth in said Summary Final Judgment, to-wit: Lots 20 and 21, Block “104”, each 50’X 199.5’, according to an unrecorded map of the N.W. 1/4 of Fractional Section 31,T8S, R6W, and which said lots are further described as follows: Begin at a point, (LP, stake), on the East boundary of the 100 foot Jefferson Street, 1616 feet due South and 998.5 feet East from the N. W. Corner, (Concrete Monument), of said N.W. ; run thence West 199.5 Feet; thence South 100 feet; thence East 199.5 feet; thence North 100 feet, along said Jefferson Street, to the point of beginning. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 18th day of October, 2012. MARCIAM. JOHNSON As Clerk of the Court Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk Attorney for Plaintiff McCalla Raymer, LLC 225 E. Robinson Street Suite 660 Orlando, FL32801 (407) 674-1850 Oct. 25, Nov. 1, 2012 90511T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No. 11-000055-CP Division: PROBATE IN RE: ESTATE OF Willie Burghart Speed Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Willie Burghart Speed, deceased, whose date of death was May 11, 2011, is pending in the Circuit Court for Franklin County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida 32320. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is October 25, 2012. Personal Representative: Ella B. Speed 183 13th Street Apalachicola, FL 32320 Attorneys for Personal Representative SANDERS AND DUNCAN, P.A. FL Bar No. 442178 80 MARKET STREET APALACHICOLA, FL 32320 (850) 653-8976 E-Mail Address: bsanders@fairpoint.netOc t. 25, Nov. 1, 2012 VENDORS WANTEDfor Indoor Flea Market, Seafood Fest Weekend, Market Street Antiques in Apalachicola, Call Laura at 732-236-9516 *Adopt*:Successful Business Owners, at-home parents love awaits baby. *Expenses paid* *FLBar42311* *800-552-0045* *Patty & Sean* These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you. 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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, October 25, 2012 The Times | A17 emeraldcoastjobs.com Employment Today By JON PICOULTMonster Contributing Writer What do companies like Southwest Airlines, Ritz-Carlton, and Zappos have in common? They hire for attitude and train for skill. Its a simple mantra, but one that has a profound effect on how to successfully recruit and select new employees.Prioritizing soft skills During their hiring process, these companies weigh attitudinalŽ characteristics very heavily. These are personal attributes that its difficult to train employees on „ such as being a people-person, having an upbeat personality, or possessing a keen ability to learn new things. While these firms wont ignore technical skills (Southwest doesnt put unqualified pilots in the cockpit, no matter how bright and cheery they are) they nonetheless look very carefully at these soft skills. These companies gain a lot from this hiring strategy. By focusing on attitudinal characteristics that align with their company brand, these companies reinforce their company culture with each hire. And because theyre hiring people whose values align with that culture, the end result is a workforce thats happier, more engaged and less likely to turn over. But the benefits of this hiring process dont stop there. When a workforce embodies the company brand (think how Southwest employees exude funŽ), it differentiates the customer experience where it counts most „ in consumers one-on-one interactions with your staff. Steps to hiring for attitudeSo how should you go about hiring for attitude, seeding your workforce with true brand ambassadors? You could run your applicants through personality tests and behavioral assessments „ but that can be pricey, timeconsuming, and onerous for the candidates. Fortunately, there are other approaches you can employ to put this strategy in practice. Here are five ways to hire for attitude: 1. Be clear about expectations. Take advantage of candidate self-selection by clearly broadcasting what qualities you look for when hiring staff. For example, if you tell the world that youre in the market for extroverts „ fewer introverts will apply (and thats a good outcome for you and them). By defining what personal qualities youre searching for upfront, you make it more likely that candidates with those attributes will throw their hats into the ring. 2. Be proactive. Dont just wait for people with the right attitude to apply for a job „ spot them in the marketplace and make your pitch! When you see someone who clearly embodies the qualities you want on your team, give them your card and invite them to apply for employment. 3. Focus on the person behind the paper. Gauging attitude from a resume requires insight and vision. Consider how the personal qualities you seek would manifest themselves in a candidates resume and background. For example, individuals who are adept at overcoming adversity might have demonstrated that spirit in how they responded to a layoff. People-oriented extroverts might belong to a variety of business associations and community groups. Skilled communicators likely will design and organize their resume content in exceptional ways. In addition, your interview questions also can reveal attitudinal characteristics. Looking for someone with customer service in their DNA? Ask about the most over-the-top service they ever delivered (the best service people never forget such stories). Looking for someone with a sense of humor? Ask them about the time they laughed the hardest. Whatever attitude you seek to hire, the key is to look beyond the words on the resume and search for more subtle clues about a candidates character. 4. Observe applicants when they think no one is watching Want to see a candidates true colors? Then see how they behave when they think no one is watching. How did the applicant treat your receptionist? Did he strike up conversation with other applicants in the waiting room? Did he eat alone in the cafeteria or introduce himself to a table of strangers? What the candidate says and does outside of the hiring managers view can give you a glimpse into their true personality. Use these clues to help judge if the applicant will be a good fit for your company. 5. Enlist todays stars to spot tomorrows standouts. Toward the end of the hiring process, see if its possible to have your job finalists spend some time shadowing existing employees. This serves two objectives. First, candidates get an unfiltered look at the job they would be performing, so theres less chance of unpleasant surprises and post-hire buyers remorse. Second, by pairing these finalists with the best employees (the ones who embody the desired attitude), your staff can help identify those applicants who have the right stuff. Hiring for attitude is about building a distinctive workplace culture and company brand that, unlike skill sets, cant be easily copied in the market. Its what gives Southwest Airlines, RitzCarlton and Zappos their unique character „ and competitive advantage. Follow the lead of these legendary firms as you look to recruit great candidates.Hiring process: How do you hire for attitude? Featured Jobs SITE/UTILITY CONSTRUCTION COMPANY has immediate full time openings for experiencedHeavy Equipment Operators and Laborersfor South Franklin County area. Please call 850-265-9166 for information.EEO/drug free work force. Contact LornaEMPLOYMENT ADVERTISING SPECIALISTat (850) 747-5019 or Email: lbrown@pcnh.comTo Advertise Your Employment Opportunities Please Contact Our Employment Advertising Specialist Earn While You Learn with the On the Job Training Program If you are unemployed you may be eligible for the Workforce Centers OJT program. On the job training gives you hands on experience in a new job … and employers, OJT helps you save money! For more informaon call (850) 370-0726 An equal opportunity employer/program. Aux iliary aids and services are available upon request to individuals with disabilies. All voice telephone numbers on this document may be reached by persons using TTY/TDD equipment via the Florida Relay Service at 711. Education/TrainingPart Time BabysitterNeeded Wednesday, Thursday and Friday from 8:30 am-5:30 pm to take care of 6 mo old. Call (850) 370-0064 Medical/HealthNow HiringFull time positions for CNAs at St James Health and Rehab Center. Apply in person at 239 Crooked River Rd Carrabelle, FL 32322 Medical/HealthCaring Peopleand CNAs needed. Join a team of people who make a difference in the lives of the elderly. Provide non medical companionship, in home help & personal care for the elderly. Must be flexible. PT leading to FT-positions in the Port St. Joe and Apalachicola areas.Home Instead Senior CareCall Mon-Thur 9-3pm 850-640-1223 or toll free 1-866-301-1919 Web ID#: 34224571 Text FL24571 to 56654 Administrative/ClericalPart-time Administrative AssistantFor home office on SGI. Must have good computer skills including Excel. Knowledge of accounting and Quick Books helpful. Email augusta.west@ ammfl.org. OtherCheck Station OperatorFlorida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission Is Now HiringWhat:Check Station OperatorWhere:Tate’s Hell State ForestSchedule required:Wednesday through Sunday (10am – 6pm)Pay Rate:$8.00/hr This is a temporary position that is only during hunting season. To apply for this position please send resumes and letter of interest to adam.warwick@myfwc.co m For questions about the position please contact Billie Clayton at 850-265-3676 or billie.clayton@myfwc.co m Web ID#: 34226950 Classified Advertising works hard ...filling the employment needs of area business firms, helping people to meet their prospective employers, helping people buy and sell all kinds of goods and services, and much more! Nothing works harder than the Classifieds! 747-5020 The Key to Savings Start here in Classifieds. EASTERN SHIPBUILDING GROUP MORE THAN A JOB… A FUTURE! LONG TERM WORK an aggressive leader in the Marine Industry, located in Panama City, FL has the following opportunities for skilled craftsmen:PIPEFITTERS  PIPE WELDERS SHIPFITTERS  STRUCTURAL WELDERS X-RAY WELDERS  ELECTRICIANSCompetitive wages DOE, and a comprehensive bene ts package including: Company paid health, dental, and life insurance, 401(k), attendance & safety bonuses. Normal work week to include overtime. Quali ed craftsmen should apply in person: Mon-Fri, 8am-12pm 1pm4:30 pmHUMAN RESOURCES (2 Locations): 13300 Allanton Rd., Panama City, FL 32404 and 134 S. East Ave., Panama City, FL 32401Applications are also accepted at our East Ave Of ce Saturdays, 8am-12pm.(850) 522-7400, ext. 2285, 2322, or 2302 Fax: (850) 874-0208EOE/Drug Free Workplace

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Local A18 | The Times Thursday, October 25, 2012 Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Real Estate Picks Our local real estate experts have identied what they feel are the best values around and are oering them to you in Real Estate Picks! (In this section), Discover the best real estate values in Mexico Beach, Port St. Joe, Apalachicola, Cape San Blas, St. George Island, Carrabelle and surrounding areas. SELL YOUR LI S TING S HERE! Only $35 per week per listing Minimum 2 ads per week or 1 ad for 2 weeks Contact Joel or Kari for details: (850)814-7377 or (850)227-7847 SOLD John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.com MLS# 245369 $999,000 St. George Island PLANTATION BEACHFRONT 5 BR, 5 BA home across the street from the new John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.com MLS# 248156 $110,000 St. George Island PLANTATION BAYFRONT LOT Sunset Views from this one acre bay front lot are spectacular! Located at the end of Avocet Lane for privacy but is tennis, and air strip. Osprey Village FRANKLIN COUNTY LANDFILL HOSTS HOUSEHOLD HAZARDOUS WASTE ROUNDUP will hold its Fall household hazardous waste roundup located at 210 Highway 65 Eastpoint. Items allowed Paint, household electronics and computers will be collected and disposed of at no charge. Hours of Collection 9:00 a.m. til 12:00 p.m. For more information contact: Franklin County Solid Waste & Recycling Department 850-670-8167 PUBLIC REMINDER BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA POLICY Title: Uncovered Debris Date Adopted: March 7, 2006 Effective Date: April 7, 2006 the health of its citizens: Commissioner Parrish has done, Sanders said. But I was blindsided when I went down south. I have never been so disrespected in all my life. Jackel supported Sanders objections. These are big decisions, she said. I have lost some sleep over it; Im sure Ill lose some more. The Florida Association of Counties has done a good job for the state and for the counties. But, their representation for the entire state of Florida sometimes overreaches what their intentions should be for some of the smaller counties. Ive read the RESTORE Act, she said. I studied it this weekend. There are two groups of counties; the eight affected counties and impacted counties. The consortia is to be formed of the affected counties, not the impacted counties. The letter of the law in the act says affected counties. She said though the act calls for the creation of a consortium, it does not state who should be seated on the board. Jackel warned against making snap decisions. There is a giant question mark about what else may be wrong with the bay, she said. When you join a club, the club doesnt have a lot of obligation to you to change their rules once youre a member. I think there is a bigger drawing board and a bigger plan when it comes to the consortium. Jackel suggested the county form its own alliance with its immediate neighbors. She said the FAC had presented a false deadline for the formation of the consortium and offered veiled threats the state would seize RESTORE Act funds. She said she was concerned with the lack of detail concerning the makeup and power of the Gulf Consortium. Lockley moved to support Parrishs recommendation to join the consortium, but Lockleys motion died for lack of a second. This is a whole bunch of material, and I need to go over something before I make a decision because Im hearing two different things, Putnal said. If were running out of time, Im sorry. Having to make a decision within ve minutes, its not fair to me. Parrish said Monday he believed the countys actions were headed in the wrong direction. I think we made a grave mistake, he said. The overall point Im trying to make is when you start all this squabbling, I think its going to lead to a break-up. Over a period of time, you develop relationships, and build them over a period of time. As far as Im concerned, its all for naught. Everything is accomplished with relationships. If you dont know the people youre dealing with, its hard to build consensus. Parrish also took issue with questions regarding the consortiums distribution formula and said he felt it was fair because Escambia and other counties to the west are still dealing with oil spill issues. Do I think Franklin County deserves as much as a county thats been impacted to that extent? I dont see it, he said. I thought $66 million for a few tar balls is pretty good for Franklin County. Hill is running as a Democrat against Halsey Beshears, R-Tallahassee. In Florida Senate District 3, incumbent Democrat Bill Montford is running against Republican John Shaw. Running for state attorney in the 2nd Judicial Circuit are incumbent Democrat Willie Meggs against Republican challenger Pete Williams. In the race for circuit judge of the 2nd Judicial Circuit, a nonpartisan race, Jose na Tamayo is running against Barbara Hobbs. Voters will decide whether three members of the Florida Supreme Court should be retained Justices R. Fred Lewis, Barbara Pariente and Peggy Quince and in the District 1 Court of Appeals, whether Judges Simone Marstiller, Stephanie Ray, Ron Swanson and Brad Thomas should be kept on. Eleven amendments to the Florida Constitution will be before voters, with each needing at least 60 percent support for approval. The county has 7,451 registered voters: 4,986 Democrats, 1,753 Republicans and 712 either unaf liated or with other parties, according to the supervisor of elections website, http://votefranklin. com. Two county commission races to be decided Of the ve county commission districts, two feature races on the ballot, and there are no school board races. In District 1, which includes St. George Island and most of Eastpoint, incumbent Pinki Jackel, 54, R-St. George Island, is facing a challenge from Tony Shiver, 52, D-St. George Island. In District 5, which encompasses portions of Eastpoint east to Carrabelle, William Massey, 52, D-Carrabelle, is squaring off against Hank Garrett, 61, of Eastpoint, who is running without party af liation. Massey defeated longtime incumbent county commissioner Bevin Putnal in the August primary. Though county voters are known for crossing party lines in casting their votes, Democrats outnumber Republicans in each district. In District 1, the largest of the ve, of the 1,826 registered voters, there are 1,111 Democrats, about twice the number of Republicans, 557. The remainder, 158, are without party af liation. In District 5, which has 1,519 registered voters, there are 1,033 Democrats, more than three times as many Republicans, 322, with the remainder, 164, with no party af liation. The most balance between the two parties is in District 2, which includes Alligator Point and Lanark Village, with 1,598 registered voters. A little more than half are Democrats, 870, with about a third Republicans, 521, and the remainder, 207, without party af liation. In District 3, which is the city of Apalachicola, north of U.S. 98, there are 1,022 Democrats, and just 152 Republicans, with 93 without party af liation, for a total of 1,267 registered voters. In District 4, the historic district of Apalachicola south of U.S. 98, there are 1,238 registered voters, 947 of these Democrats, 201 Republicans and the rest, 90, without party af liation. Elliott said county voters will be using the same voting method as four years ago, though there are now additional options for the disabled. These are still touch screens, but its just like a huge pencil, she said. It doesnt count, theres no counter; all it is a marking device and very nice and neat. They bring it straight to the M100 (optical scanner) machine and put it in. Elliott said absentee ballots can be picked up during of ce hours and can be mailed out until ve days before the election. All must be returned to the Supervisor of Elections of ce no later than 7 p.m. Election Day. Elliott said the county mailed out 25 military ballots 19 of them to domestic stations and six overseas on Sept. 22. They must be postmarked by Election Day and can arrive until Nov. 16 if they are from overseas. In the event any of the elections require a recount or there are provisional ballots to decide upon, the canvassing board consists of County Judge Van Russell, Commissioner Cheryl Sanders and Elliott. Elliott said the postal service this week is mailing out sample ballots throughout the county, and she encouraged individuals to take a look. Everybody should get them, she said. I dont consider it junk mail. Sample ballots are also available at http://votefranklin.com. of Florida sent a jet to bring Zella to Gainesville for surgery. Zella said she had never own before, but her caregivers at Weems made it clear she wouldnt survive without the surgery, so Zella ew for the rst time. She received emergency surgeries on Sept. 18 and 19. The aneurism was clamped and a shunt placed in her skull to reduce pressure. Zella remained in the hospital until the rst week in October. She returned home with some memory loss, a permanent shunt and $400,000 in medical bills. She continues to suffer severe headaches and takes blood pressure medication three times a day to control wild uctuations. Smith is happy to have her daughter home. Shes a walking miracle, between this hospital and Shands, and in my opinion the Lord must have been there too, she said. People talk about the hospital, but they did everything they could for her. Zella has oystered, washed dishes at Boss Oyster and worked at the Apalachicola Subway for two-and-ahalf years but now is unable to work Zella is trying to get by with help from her family and neighbors. She has two young sons, Christopher, 10, and Tyler, 7, to provide for. She has had dif culty nding a primary care physician who will undertake the next phase of her treatment. But Smith said Dr. Gene Charbonneau at Weems East in Carrabelle gave her an appointment this week, the rst physician to agree to see her since the surgery. Zella must return to Gainesville sometime in the next three weeks for a post-surgical examination. She said the counselors at Shands are trying to enroll her in Medicaid, but Smith said the family has yet to hear about possible nancial support. An account has been set up in Zellas name at Cadence Bank, and on Oct. 9 friends and family organized a bene t luncheon at Riverside Park that was a sell-out. Zella herself helped serve. RESTORE from page A5 VOTING from page A1 MIRACLE from page A1



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xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx 50 WWW.APALACHTIMES.COMPhone: 850-653-8868 Web: apalachtimes.com E-mail: dadlerstein@star .com Fax: 850-653-8036 Circulation: 800-345-8688 DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK: School News & Society: 11 a.m. Friday Real Estate Ads: 11 a.m. Thursday Legal Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Display Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Line Ads: 5 p.m. Monday xxxxx Contact Us xxxxx Out to see Index Thursday, October 25, 2012 VOL. 127 ISSUE 26Ghosts to walk at cemetery SaturdayHauntings will abound Apalachicola on Saturday at the historic Chestnut Street Cemetery. From 7-9 p.m., history enthusiasts will don the garb and take on the persona of several of the cemeterys notable inhabitants to tell their tales. All monies raised go to preserve the cemetery.LanternFest to light up lighthouse SaturdayCrooked River Lighthouse will host an evening of maritime enchantment from 6-10 p.m. Saturday for the 117th birthday of the lighthouse. The park will be lled with 117 glowing lanterns, musicians and dancers, story tellers and masters of traditional crafts. Be sure to climb the tower Saturday night, $5 for adults and $3 for children, as the moon will be nearly full and the lanterns are a lovely site to see. A lantern making workshop will be Friday afternoon. For more info call 697-2732 or visit www. crookedriverlighthouse.org.Month of Blues wraps up SaturdayA Month of Blues wraps up from 8-10 p.m. Saturday with Blues on the Dock of the Apalachicola Maritime Museum. For more info, call 653-3930 or visit www. historicapalachicola.com.Gulf County Bow Wow Bash SaturdayThe St. Joe Bay Humane Society presents the seventh annual Bow Wow Bash, an annual bene t for both the DAWGS in Prison program and the homeless animals of Gulf County, on Saturday. The bashs Masquerade Party will be 6-10 p.m. at the Centennial Building in Port St. Joe. Tickets $30 each are available in Port St Joe at Bow Wow Beach Shop or at St. Joseph Bay Humane Society, or by visiting www.bowwowbash.org.Trick or Treat Wednesday nightDont forget that all sorts of little ghouls and goblins will be out for Beggars Night in Apalachicola, Carrabelle and the rest of the county on Oct. 31. Be sure to have plenty of treats on hand, and be sure to drive carefully. Parrish steps down as Deepwater Horizon liaisonBy LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com A divided county commission took steps last week to create a local RESTORE Act council and to reject taking part in a consortium of 23 Florida counties bordering the Gulf of Mexico. After the 3-2 vote, Commissioner Smokey Parrish asked to be relieved of his duties dating back to the April 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill, when he acted as liaison to BP and federal and state authorities. He will be succeeded in his role as liaison by the seated chairman of the county commission. It sounded like the board had no con dence in what Ive been doing the last three years, Parrish said afterward. I gured it was time for me to step aside and let someone else take a shot. At the Oct. 16 meeting, commissioners voted 3-2 to establish a new RESTORE Act Council, based on an outline distributed by Chairman Pinki Jackel consisting of a one-page summary of the councils purpose and function and a six-page ordinance de ning it, modeled on one passed by Wakulla County. Jackel pushed for immediate approval of creating the council, saying urgency for it arose from discussions conducted Oct. 11 at a meeting in By DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com A couple of colonels from the Army Corps of Engineers tonged for oysters Monday, ate them fresh on the boat and later at an evening reception, and then talked as best they could about the key question at hand: How can we prevent the Apalachicola estuary from becoming the late, great bay? Monday afternoons trip, sponsored by the Apalachicola Riverkeeper and the Tri-Rivers Water Way Development Association, brought Cols. Donald Ed Jackson and Steven Roemhildt, commanders of the Corps South Atlantic and Mobile, Ala., districts respectively, out on the water to see rst-hand the challenges facing oystermen. With Franklin County Seafood Workers Association leadership Devin Barber, Chris Millender and Ricky Banks manning the wheelhouses of the three watercraft in the otilla, FCSWA President Shannon Harts eld offered a tonging lesson to Jackson, who seemed a natural at it. A former chief of staff of Army forces in South Korea, Jackson has been on the job just three months with the Corps and made Apalachicola Bay his rst stop on a factnding trip upstream. Its the opposite of a post hole digger, Harts eld advised, as Jackson got the hang of handling the enormous tongs, raking the bottom and then lifting to the culling board a small pile of oysters. We used to get 50-60 oysters off two tong licks, Harts eld said as he picked through the pile, separating the empty or undersized shells from the few that were good. That there was about seven-eight tong licks, he told the colonel. This half of board should have a pile like that, to be able to make a living. Harts eld said over the past seven to 10 years, an oystermans daily catch has gone from 20 down to 15 or 16 bags per day, to this year barely catching three bags. Even with local dealers paying as much as $30 a bag, the economic reality can be a tough one, a subject Harts eld provided the colonel some insight on. These tongs right there youre standing over, thats 350 bucks right By DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com There isnt any excitement brewing for countywide of ces this year. In fact, there arent even any on the upcoming ballot, but the Nov. 6 general election is upon us, and its a big one. Early voting opens Saturday and runs through Nov. 3 in Apalachicola and in Carrabelle, with the choice of president highlighting the ballot. Those who want to vote early can do so at the Supervisor of Elections of ce in Apalachicola or the Carrabelle annex from 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. weekdays and 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Supervisor of Elections Ida Elliott said the county could see upwards of an 80 to 85 percent turnout, bettering the 79.3 percent turnout four years ago. You always want a wonderful turnout, she said. In addition to deciding between Democratic incumbent President Barack Obama and Republican challenger Mitt Romney, Franklin County voters will decide whether to re-elect Democratic incumbent Florida Sen. Bill Nelson or put in Republican challenger Connie Mack. In Congressional District 2, incumbent Steve Southerland, R-Panama City, is facing a challenge from Al Lawson, D-Tallahassee. In the race to ll the Florida House District 7 seat vacated by Leonard Bembry, Liberty County Clerk of Court Robert By LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com A 30-year-old seafood worker and mother of two who suffered a life-threatening aneurism now struggles to pay the price for her survival. Everyone who depends on the bay for a living is experiencing hard times right now, but Zella Smiths problems are far worse than most. About a year ago, she began to experience bad headaches. On Sept. 17, her husband, oysterman Robbie Baxley, stopped by the home of Zellas mother, Carol Smith, on his way to work the bay and asked her to check in on Zella, who was ill during the night. About 5:30 a.m., Zella awakened and went into the bathroom, where she collapsed. Smith found her in the bathtub semiconscious. She took her daughter to Weems Memorial Hospital. In my opinion, Dr. (Joda) Lynn done a wonderful job, Smith said. He seen that my child got out of there and got help. The nurses were real good, too. Nurse Jean Powers stayed with Zella most of the time, and you can tell she was really concerned. Zella had suffered a stroke and a ruptured aneurism. The staff at Weems recognized Zella needed emergency surgery, but windy conditions made an airlift by helicopter impossible, so Shands Hospital at the University SMOKEY PARRISHCommission split on RESTORE plansDAVID ADLERSTEIN | The TimesArmy Corps of Engineers Col. Ed Jackson tongs for oysters Monday, as FCSWA President Shannon Harts eld, left, and Florida DEP Secretary Herschel Vinyard look on.Corps surveys bay CORPS STUDIES BAY CONDITIONS Walking miracle in need after aneurismLOIS SWOBODA | The TimesZella Smith suffered a stroke and a ruptured aneurism Sept. 17. ELECTION 2012Early voting begins Saturday See RESTORE A5 See VOTING A18 See MIRACLE A18 See CORPS A8Opinion . . . . . . A4 Society . . . . . A10 Faith . . . . . . A11 Outdoors . . . . . A12 Tide Chart . . . . A12 Sports . . . . . . A13 Classi eds . . . A15-A17 A Homecoming victory, A13

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LocalA2 | The Times Thursday, October 25, 2012 (Pd.Pol.Ad.) Toilers on the bay rest in Eastpoint CemeteryThis is the third in the series At Eternal Rest.By LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com Eastpoint Cemetery is, in many ways, the resting place most representative of the working waterfront and the followers of the maritime trades. Many headstones record the title of captain and one monument to a married couple celebrates their relationship as captain and rst mate. There are at least a half-dozen stones adorned with oyster boats. Others display ships wheels, shrimp boats and y shermen. Many boats are accurate to the point of bearing a state registration number. There is a marker for John Colson Goodson, buried at sea in 1959. Another bears the nickname River-Rat. The oldest marked burial is little Theodora Vrooman 1903-1905. Although there is no record of her life, she was born and lived between the censuses of 1900 and 1910; she was probably the child of Harry and Louise Vrooman who came to Eastpoint from Mackinaw Island, Michigan by way of Georgia. Vrooman was a Harvard graduate and social reformer. The Vroomans joined the Christian Commonwealth, a religious colony that founded Eastpoint. The colonists came down the river from Georgia on a otilla of three barges, two of them homemade. They carried with them household and farm equipment, chickens, horses, ducks and a pair of turkeys. The barges arrived April 5, 1898, and later were disassembled to build the rst houses. Vrooman followed a year after the rst pioneers. The Vroomans son, Lee, is widely believed to have donated the land for the Eastpoint Cemetery, but it is unclear when that occurred. The land must have been donated before 1930, because the earliest burials of people not named Vrooman occurred in the 1920s. There are a scattering of stones dated between 1920 and 1950 but burials dont become common until the late 50s. It is unclear why the cemetery was located at the junction of Avenue A and Otter Slide Road. The Vrooman home was on South Bayshore and is still standing. Whittier Brown surveyed the cemetery, along with most of Eastpoint, according to Charles Moore of Eastpoint, who served as the cemeterys caretaker for several years up until recently. He said Brown also was school bus driver in Eastpoint. Brown was the son of David and Rebecca Brown, a Quaker couple who had arrived with the rst group of Eastpoint settlers. Dolores Roux of Apalachicola remembered Whittier Brown also was the grave digger at the cemetery, a duty she said he carried out until he was more than 80 years old. Lee Vrooman died in 1954 at age 57 and is buried in Eastpoint Cemetery along with his wife and daughter, Theodora. Vroomans parents, Harry and Louise, do not appear to rest there. It is possible their graves were marked with cypress gravestones that have deteriorated. A few cypress markers remain in the cemetery, although all mark graves that now also have stone memorials. Veterans of both world wars and Vietnam are buried there. The earliest birth date shown on a headstone is James A. Williams, born in 1827. Although there is no shortage of youthful inhabitants in the cemetery, a survey of the almost 600 interments reveals something a little surprising. Four of the people resting there lived to be more than 100 years old: Herbert Egg Brown, Dec. 25, 1883 Aug. 1, 1984; Nettie S. Smith 1903-2004; Lenora Dennis Gilbert, 1900-2002; and Virginia McQuagge Barton, 1902-2006. This is well above the national average. In the general population of the United States, one person in 6,000 reaches 100 years of age. In 2010, there were 53,364 centenarians in the U.S. A 2008 study of elderly Americans of Japanese descent showed a gene called FOXO3A, was related to long life. Could it be since Eastpoint was founded by a small group of settlers and many current residents are related to those pioneers, that FOXO3A or a similar gene is common among Eastpoint residents? Moore created most of the concrete coping seen in the burial sites, and although he is retired as caretaker, signs at the cemetery continue to advertise his coping talents. The cemetery is under the care of Mr. and Mrs. Tommy Summerhill. LOIS SWOBODA | The TimesAbove, Queen Esther Evans and Prince Albert Bryant are occupants of Eastpoint Cemetery. At left, this wooden cross bears the nickname River-Rat. Below left, James T. Creamers headstone displays this poem about an oystermans life.Below, Whittier Brown was the grave digger at Eastpoint Cemetery for many years.STATE ARCHIVES OF FLORIDA | Florida Memory Project LOIS SWOBODA | The Times

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LocalThe Times | A3Thursday, October 25, 2012 for will top ofballot.a 28 for April, it fortoaa a BAa MBA a law ofHe 20of toof of 100 of of for for of 2003, to a 40 of $6 of of95%. to of lawto a of of of to of to low All of low too to of of of will $800,000, for 30 for to allow Mr. to$150,000 $100,000 a to act to I fair to of NRA PBA, law Political advertisement paid for and approved by Pete Williams, Republican, for State Attorney, 2nd Judicial Circuit. (Pd.Pol.Ad.) The 49th Annual Florida Seafood Festival Board of Directors would like to take this opportunity to thank all of the 2012 Festival Commodores. Thank you for being part of this great tradition in Franklin County and celebrating with us or beloved Seafood Industry. Resort Vacation PropertiesOyster Radio WOCY Fishermans ChoiceJ.V. Gander Distributors, Inc.WMBB TVChannel 13 Gulf Safe Florida Progress Energy Centennial BankApalachicola Ace HardwareCastaway Liquors & Buccaneer Inn Collins Vacation Rentals City of CarrabelleFranklin County Tobacco FreeFickling & Company WPAP Clear Channel Panama City Weems Memorial Halifax Media Group Northwest FloridaERICA RENAE Graphics, Media & PhotographyWTNTClear Channel Tallahassee Air Con Of Wakulla BP Claims653-6948 The Management Experts Apalachicola Seafood Grill Cadence BankJe Galloway Real Estate13 Mile SeafoodMarket Marks InsuranceSunCoast Vacation RentalsCoastal Foot & Ankle Main Stay Suites SunCoast Realty Journeys of SGI Tallahassee Regional Airport Gulf Coast Vacation Rentals Prudential Shimmering Sands Realty Sacred Heart Hospital Cates Electric Sacred Heart PediatricsApalachicola Bay Animal ClinicHomestead T-shirts Northridge Appraisal Coastal Glass and Screen WECP-TV Barbers Seafood 98 LiquorsEastpoint Dollar General Store2K WebgroupTony Shiverpaid ad for Tony Shiver for Co. Commissioner District 1 (D)Five Star Home Repair Big Fish SGI LLCApalachicola Bay Chamber of CommerceTamaras Tapas bar Long Dream Gallery Island AdventuresGary Ulrich ConstructionHouse Of Tartts Dodd Title Stage Left Pizza Boss Charters 653-8055 Carrabelle Beach RVC Outdoors Millenders and Sons Seafood Preble-Rish, IncAloha Bugs Pest ManagementBJS Pizza Water Street SeafoodEast Bay Oyster CompanyThank You! NO HIDDEN CHARGES: It is our policy that the patient and any other person responsible for payments has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed by payment or any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment. www.mulliseye.com"WE WELCOME NEW PATIENTS, CALLTODAY FOR YOUR PRIORITY APPOINTMENT" FOR NEW PATIENTS 59 AND OLDERThis certificate is good for a complete Medical Eye Exam withTodd Robinson, M.D.Board Certified Eye Physician and Surgeon.The exam includes a prescription for eye glasses and tests for Glaucoma, Cataracts and other eye diseases.FOR YOUR APPOINTMENT CALL: 850-763-6666 ELIGIBILITY: U.S. Citizens living in the Florida Panhandle, 59 years and older, not presently under our care. Coupon Expires: 10-31-12 FREEEYE EXAMCODE: AP00Darren Payne, M.D.Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract SurgeonLee Mullis, M.D.Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract SurgeonTodd Robinson, M.D.Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon "Freedom from Eye Glasses, Now a reality for many."Smart LensesSM The following report is provided by the Franklin County Sheriffs Of ce. Arrests in this weeks report were made by of cers from the Carrabelle Police Department (CPD) and the Franklin County Sheriffs Of ce (FCSO). All defendants are to be considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law.Oct. 18Rocky J. Keene Jr., 27, Satsuma, two counts of violation of a domestic violence injunction (FCSO) Larry M. Cummings, II, 25, Apalachicola, violation of probation (FCSO)Oct. 20Kimberly E. Avery, 28, Crawfordville, organized fraud (FCSO)Oct. 21Michael S. Langley, 26, Bristol, trespass in an occupied strucure (FCSO) Jessica L. Davis,, 25, Bristol, trespass in an occupied strucure (FCSO) Clifton R. Galloway, 24, Carrabelle, domestic battery and possession of less than 20 grams of cannabis (CPD)Oct. 22Brenda K. Pilkinton, 60, Carrabelle, disorderly intoxication and resisting of cer without violence (CPD) Johnny C. Jones, 39, Apalachicola, violation of probation (FCSO)By DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com Franklin Countys unemployment rate improved in September, and again emerged as the fourth best for joblessness in the state. According to preliminary numbers released Friday by the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity, the countys jobless rate dropped 0.1 percentage point, from 6.4 to 6.3 percent, Last month, seven people were dropped from the unemployment rolls, lessening them from 368 to 361 people in search of work. The workforce also grew by 20 workers, from 5,719 to 5,739, and remained considerably larger than one year ago, when it comprised 5,556 workers, and when the jobless rate was sharply higher, at 7.8 percent. Franklin Countys jobless picture continued to put it at fourth best in Florida. Monroe County, at 5.0 percent, had the states lowest unemployment rate, followed by Walton County (5.5 percent) and Okaloosa County (5.9 percent). Many of the counties with the lowest unemployment rates were those with relatively high proportions of government employment. The unemployment rate in the Gulf Coast Workforce region was 7.9 percent in September, unchanged from August. The September rate was 1.9 percentage points lower than the regions year ago rate of 9.8 percent and below the state rate of 8.6 percent. Out of a labor force of 102,625, there were 8,129 unemployed Gulf Coast residents. The countys unemployment numbers continue to run better than the two nearby counties, Bay and Gulf, which also are part of the Gulf Coast Workforce Region. Bay increased from 7.9 to 8.3 percent, and Gulf declined, from 8.5 to 8.3 percent. We continue to monitor the local employment situation in our region so that we can quickly respond to the needs of our residents and employers, said Kim Bodine, executive director of the Gulf Coast Workforce board. We are especially proud of the innovative partnerships and programs weve been able to put together to assist the displaced seafood workers in Franklin County. Ultimately were building a stronger workforce to support the economic vitality of our community. Floridas seasonally adjusted unemployment rate dropped to 8.7 percent in September, down 0.1 percentage point from August and 1.7 percentage points lower than the year-ago rate of 10.4 percent. There were 808,000 jobless Floridians out of a labor force of 9.3 million. The U.S. unemployment rate was 7.8 percent in September. Arrest REPORTCounty jobless picture continues to improve We are especially proud of the innovative partnerships and programs weve been able to put together to assist the displaced seafood workers in Franklin CountyKim Bodine executive director of the Gulf Coast Workforce board

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OpinionA4 | The Times USPS 027-600Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 Publisher: Roger Quinn Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six monthsHome delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERSIn case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola Times By Mary Claire LovellSpecial to the Times Im not a generally superstitious person, mind you, but I do have a healthy respect for the possibilities of the supernatural. A few years back on a Halloween n ight  as I  drove to my home on the Wakulla River around 10:30 p.m., I relived the fun and magic of the evening. I had assisted my daughter at her home in Tallahassee with the witches brew and the trickor-treaters. I had always enjoyed the excitement and wonder of Halloween. My house was dark and empty as other family members were still out for the evening at a football game. I turned on lights and settled down into the loneliness of the h ouse.  Finally retiring to bed, I turned on the television by remote control and contented myself by watching Saturday Night Live. It concluded, and I felt myself growing very sleepy, so I pushed the off button on t he TV remote  control and saw the screen shut down. I turned off the bedside lamp and snuggled into my covers. As I was falling asleep, I was suddenly frightened awake with the TV blaring away! Startled and u nbelieving, I bolted  upright in bed with quick visions of Jason racing through my head. Push as I might, the television would not turn off by remote control, nor would the channel or volume change! Gathering my courage, I slipped from my bed and attempted the manual controls. The television would not turn off! There was the Comedy Club, demanding that I watch it. Without thinking, I reached for the electric plug with the intention of pulling it from the wall outlet. I hesitated and then withdrew my h and. Oh, oh,  I thought. What if I pull that plug and the TV still doesnt go off? I could nd myself Poltergeisted away into nevernever Land forever! Unwilling to sacrice my last possibility for control, I telephoned my son and asked him to come home quickly. After hearing the circumstances, he would not tell me to pull the plug either. Within 15 minutes, several family members were there. Braced with human fortication, someone (not I) pulled the plug. The TV went black! Happenstance? Possibly. Prankster ghost? Maybe. The television set has worked ne since then as it always had before. Its fun to think that some friendly ghost realized he had a likely target for his folly and had a big laugh off of me. Regardless, I dont spend Halloween by myself anymore. Mary Claire Lovell is a resident of Carrabelle.Please keep longer gag grouper seasonEditors note: The following is a letter presented to the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission by a Wakulla County Commissioner at the FWCs Oct. 11 public workshop in Perry. On behalf of the citizens of Wakulla County, I want to thank you for your courageous vote on the S pring 2012  gag grouper season in state waters of the B ig Bend.  It is not always easy to stand up to Big B rother, but you did so,  and the people commend you and thank you. Wakulla Countys coastal e conomy is  directly or indirectly  dependent on our shing industry for jobs. More than 80 percent of our land mass is off of the tax rolls because it is either national forest or federal refuge. We are blessed to have a bountiful population of gag grouper in our state waters, but they are only there during the cooler months of March through J une and October  and November.  Our marinas, guides, bait and tackle shops, motels, restaurants, campgrounds, grocery stores and related coastal businesses have historically c ounted on  this six-month window  for small boaters, who trailer boats under 20 feet from Tallahassee, Quincy, Marianna, South Georgia, Alabama and beyond to pursue our shallow water gag grouper. During July and August, these same boaters catch scallops and sh our inshore waters for trout, reds and ounder. Our coastal businesses must get every possible customer during this 10-month period to carry them over during December and January when our coastal communities become ghost towns. The number of people grouper shing from big boats capable of shing federal waters has decreased in our area by more than 60 percent from what it was just ve years ago. Most people have sold or given away their big boats, because they can no longer afford to sh them or are discouraged with the enhanced restrictions and limited bag limits. Last springs gag grouper season was an absolute success in that it allowed small boaters to access gags for a threemonth period. Although reports from our local guides a nd  visiting sport shers indicate that we have more gag grouper in Big Bend waters now than we have had in years, there is still, by h istoric standards, very  little shing pressure coming from our boat landings and marinas. Taking these factors into consideration, I would urge the commission to increase the season dates in state waters of the Big Bend to include March through June as well as October and November. In addition, I would recommend that the federal season remain as it was last year. This will help maintain our coastal economy a nd  give the relatively  few people with larger boats an opportunity to pursue gags in deeper water. Your favorable consideration of these recommendations is appreciated. Sincerely,Jerry MooreWakulla County Commissioner, District 3Train kept a-rollin all night longI would like to congratulate Lois Swoboda on her excellent articles on early travel in Franklin County. I would like to share with you one of several trips my parents took us on during that period. In 1925 when I was mere 5 years of age, Mom took the family to Jacksonville for several days to attend worship services during Easter. We would leave Apalachicola at about 5 in the morning on the Jessie May and arrive in Carrabelle several hours later to catch the train, which was waiting, to Tallahassee. There we changed trains and arrived in Jacksonville at about 8 p.m. On the return trip, we would leave Jacksonville at about 8 p.m. and arrive in Tallahassee sometime in the middle of the night and spend the rest of the night there. Early the next morning, we would board the train to Carrabelle and catch the Jessie May on its return trip to Apalachicola several hours later. The alternative way to get to Jacksonville was to catch the 7 p.m. train from Apalachicola to River Junction (Chattahoochee) and transfer to another train to Jacksonville, arriving at eight in the morning. Travel was not easy in those days, but exciting. By comparison with todays travel by auto, the journey is about four hours. Today we have paved highways, whereas in 1928 there were no paved roads traveling east and west from Apalachicola, and no bridge to Eastpoint. Sincerely,Photis NicholsSchool board member gives backThis is a letter to the editor concerning a letter in the Oct. 18 Times headlined School board should lead by example, which referred to other school board members of Panama City. I want to bring to your remembrance one of Franklin Countys school board members, Ms. Teresa Ann Martin, who has been giving a scholarship to a student, and giving of herself to the community, ever since she has been an elected official. Thank you,Shirley WalkerWhy not just bear-proof garbage?In response to the recent shooting of a black bear I would like to say: Dear Mr. Smythe (and others who have problems with bears), wouldnt it be easier and a lot less expensive to simply spend the time and/ or money to bear-proof your garbage? Even if you dont value the wildlife, it sure can cost a lot to clean up this mess, literally and nancially.Caroline WeilerApalachicola Death has come too often to Franklin County of late. As life happens, some deaths could be anticipated in the elderly, some were feared in the ill and some were horrible surprises as the result of unexpected tragedy. But for each of those losses, the outcome was the same. Husbands and lovers were gone, brothers, sisters, aunts and uncles, neighbors, grandmas and g reat-grandfathers  were taken from within  the midst of our communities,  leaving us with only our memories and our sorrows. A long-ago promise, reportedly made by St Augustine, reminds us all that None of us will get out of this life alive! And how we live our life, day to day, can make an important difference to all those around us while we are here, as well as after we have been taken away under whatever circumstances. Each of the Franklin County people who inspired these thoughts made a positive difference for others over their many years here. William Hubert Bill Lindsey was born in nearby Sumatra, played football for the Mullets, graduated as salutatorian from Carrabelle High School and then served his career in the Army Air Corps (which became the Air Force), including time in Vietnam. At his retirement, he returned to Franklin County to make a nal home with his beautiful wife, Anne. They lived in the house across from the waterfront, which they purchased from her well-known and successful father, Judge Raymond Witherspoon. Their active service to both community and church served to distinguish them. They quietly celebrated their marriage of 60 years in July 2012 with family. I never knew Mr. Bill in earlier days, but when I did meet him, I recognized that he was a true Southern gentleman. The hat he wore to protect his fair skin from the hot sun as he walked through his town completing his errands identied him even at a distance. As Ms. Anne struggled with increasing limitations of hearing and sight, he provided both for her in their aging lives together. His recent sudden death caused by recurring heart problems left her alone, necessitating a move away from Franklin County to be with family. But their ashes will be returned to the family plot here when the time comes, Anne promised. Although Bill was 83 and ailing, and his death from ill health might have been anticipated by friends and family, nevertheless we all shared the loss with Ms. Anne, and Franklin County is poorer for his passing. Randy Harrison was at the peak of his middle years; he lived with and loved his longtime artistic partner wife, Joan Matey. Although he had his own interests, career and life, his personal investments of time and talents for her creative efforts, on her behalf, as well as for the community of Lanark and Franklin County made a positive difference to all of us who met and learned to care about him. Randy was a bear hug of a man with a smile and a helping hand for so many causes that made our lives better. Dedicated to a peaceful and healthy life, the cancer that stole his years was especially fearsome and unwarranted. His death was held at bay as long as possible even as his remission ended and the blood disease took over, and yet it was almost impossible to believe this strong, hearty man could ght bravely and yet fade into death much too soon. His passing reminded us all that life brings no guarantees or promises and that the tragedy of disease can end it for any of us sooner than later. Sharon Thoman, a vigorous and vivacious blond businesswoman whose creative enterprises and heartfelt promotional efforts on behalf of her adopted Carrabelle, who gave denition and recognition to downtown business and marketing, was unexpectedly lost to us, her partner Jerry and her family as the result of a tragic auto accident that happened as she was returning home to Franklin County. Sharons professional work at the marine lab and her volunteer hours and expertise dedicated to the Carrabelle Chamber, community and friends were noteworthy and commendable. Now she is gone, too soon, too suddenly and too tragically. Another important and beloved life has been taken from our community. Of course, others have recently died in our county too; each touching other lives. All have left their mark on those who remain. All these deaths should give us each pause as we consider our own places in the community, within our family, among our friends and in our relationships. As St. Augustine reminds, None of us will get out of this life alive! There are no hidden secrets to avoid the ultimate end we must all face at some time, which will occur under circumstances unknown as yet. Whether that ending will come unexpectedly too soon, or as a welcome end to pain or suffering, or even at the end of an old life well-lived is not ours to know. What we do know for sure is how we live our life in the days and years we are given. Mel Kelly is a frequent contributor to the Apalachicola and Carrabelle Times.A communitys love is stronger than death THOUGHtsTS FOR tTHE TIMEsSMel KellyThursday, October 25, 2012There is nothing wrong with your television set Letters to the EEDIITOROR

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LocalThe Times | A5Thursday, October 25, 2012 Apalachicola called by Congressman Steve Southerland. Commissioners Noah Lockley and Parrish were the lone no votes. One of the things that came out of the Southerland meeting is that we need to form a RESTORE Act Council, she said. Some of the other counties have already formed them. Congressman Southerland said there is not an allocation formula attached to the bill. Its going to be on a request basis. Under Jackels proposal, the council would comprise four atlarge members appointed by the county commission; a representative of Apalachicola and Carrabelle to be chosen by their respective city commissions; one representative each from the Tourist Development Council, Weems Memorial Hospital board, Franklin County School Board, Franklin County Seafood Workers Association and Franklin County Seafood Dealers Association; and one representative each from Alligator Point, Lanark Village, St. George Island and Eastpoint, each to be recommended to the board by the District Commissioner. Under these terms, the commissioners for Districts 1 and 2, Jackel and Sanders, each will recommend two members of the 15member board. Jackel said the council would sift through and analyze projects proposed for funding, with county commissioners having the ultimate say-so. Commissioner Bevin Putnal expressed concern with the councils diverse makeup. Youre putting this committee together to tell us how were going to spend this money, he said. You take ve or six of these people, a majority, that say we dont want to spend that money in the bay, we want to spend it somewhere else. I was under the impression the next pot of money would be for restoring our bay, not for everybody that wants some of it. Commissioners Cheryl Sanders and Jackel said the health and restoration of the bay was, has been and is the countys top priority and that commissioners would have the nal say in how RESTORE money was spent. If we dont form a council, this board is going to have to accept all the applications, Jackel said. Were going to have to vet all the projects that come forward. This council will stand between us and the community and be an arm of this board to vet applications and to make sure that the system is transparent. I believe the community would rather see folks of diverse backgrounds, she said. This is a community effort. This is not a time for us to divide the county up. The county needs to spread its resources and allocate wisely. In her comments, Sanders addressed the recent push by the countys two municipalities to create a council divided equally between representatives of the two city commissions and the unincorporated areas of the county, represented by county commissioners. Over the last few weeks, the city of Apalachicola is asking or telling us that they want to be a part of this RESTORE. This way, the cities of Carrabelle and Apalachicola would be there, Sanders said, ticking off a list of the many other interests also represented. Lockley said he supported the overall concept, but asked for more time to review the plan to make sure we aint leaving nobody out. I dont see any business people. Jackel said business people could ll the at-large posts or come forward from the communities. Director of Administrative Services Alan Pierce said federal law requires some money be spent on projects other than bay restoration. Thats one reason we have to have a council, he said. Lockley pointed out Parrish had said bay restoration funding would come from the state pot of money, not the county funding. What we need is a better understanding of what can be spent where, he said. Its as clear as mud, Jackel said. One thing I know we need to move forward with establishing this council. Other counties have done that. They already have their criteria posted; they have their application process going. I dont want us to be slow on the uptake on this. If we table this, well be by the end of the year getting this together. Jackel said the Wakulla County ordinance could be changed as needed. She said the cities and the respective boards would choose their representatives, and county commissioners would choose the at-large and the other representatives. Council members will submit a nancial disclosure as the ethics commission requires. Sanders moved to form the council, and Putnal seconded it. Alligator Point resident Alan Feiffer asked that a public meeting be held before the council is formed. Jackel gave Pierce a copy of the application to serve on the board and asked that he bring back recommendations to the Nov. 20 meeting. At this point, Parrish asked to be replaced on all oil spill matters other than the Governors Commission on Oil Spill Response. In an interview Tuesday, Parrish said he was disappointed the council proposal was presented and passed without a public workshop or any prior input from the other commissioners. He also said he felt the council appeared to be weighted to the east end of the county, and though it was good to include the oyster industry, there was no accommodation made for the other sheries. What about these other industries? Theres no representation on that. This was set up by one commissioner; thats my problem with it. There was no input from the board whatsoever. We operate as a board, supposedly, he said. The resolution actually come from Wakulla County. Franklin is supposed to be so good and so great, but we have to adopt a resolution from another county? He said he would have preferred to see the matter handled after the upcoming general election, when at least one, and perhaps two, new commissioners might be sworn in. There is no money yet, so what is the hurry? he said. Commissioners question consortiums structureParrish said the more urgent item was to decide whether Franklin would join the Gulf Consortium, a joint public entity formed by interlocal agreement among 22 of the 23 Florida counties bordering the Gulf. Each county is entitled to appoint one member on the consortiums board of directors. The consortium would oversee distribution of the 35 percent portion of RESTORE Act funds awarded directly to affected counties, money that can be spent on environmental projects, job creation and training, ood protection, tourism promotion and infrastructure such as ports. Unlike the other Gulf states plans, in Florida, three-quarters of the county money will go directly to the eight impacted counties, including Franklin, with 25 percent divided among all other Florida counties. The eight directly impacted counties have been ranked by the Florida Association of Counties and funds to be awarded based on a formula factoring such things as amount of damage, population and length of coastline. Escambia would receive 26.94 percent of funds, Okaloosa 15.57, Bay 15.43, Walton 13.86, Santa Rosa 10.25, Franklin 7.93, Gulf 6.02 and Wakulla 4 percent. I think we are the only county that has not signed the interlocal agreement, Parrish said. I think thats what we need to do. Without a seat at the table, we wont have a voice there to recommend and to quantify why were submitting a project. Id like to have the boards support to do that. Parrish said the other seven Panhandle counties agreed money to repair damage to sheries should come from a separate pot of money to be allocated by the state, leaving funds coming to the county available for other projects. I have commitment from seven counties in Panhandle, Parrish said, that they will vote with us as far as any problem we have with our sheries to get that money out of that state pot, not out of our local money. Parrish said of the fees associated with the consortium, Franklin County would have to contribute $3,800 to participate through Dec. 1. The money would be used to hire an executive director and an attorney and maintain an of ce in Tallahassee, he said. He described the investment as miniscule compared to the potential bene ts for the county, noting that if the county decided it was not happy with actions of the consortium, it could withdraw within 30 days of joining. Sanders, who attended a recent FAC meeting with Jackel, raised questions about the consortium. Little did we know we were expected to vote on a RESTORE Act measure, she said. I think we have to discuss this before we do any motions. Theres more to the story than just this. Sanders said when she and Jackel tried to ask questions about the consortium, they were rebuffed. One of the lobbyists did not like myself and Ms. Jackels objections, she said. Hes supposed to be representing us. He used some very awful terms. When he said what he did to me and Commissioner Jackel, he stepped over the line. That made me wonder what is this all up to. Sanders said cost of maintaining staff and an of ce for the consortium in Tallahassee could amount to $200,000 over a year. She expressed concern that large south Florida counties would seize control of RESTORE funds. As it reads in these papers, there will be a board made up of ve people from these 23 counties, she said. That tells me that somebody wont have a seat at the table. Parrish said creation of a consortium was mandated by law in Florida. With regards to the consortium, we can sit back and the state will come in and set up a consortium, and who knows who will be a part of that governing body? he said. As most of the money comes to the counties here in Florida, we (FAC) wanted to be in control of the consortium. Sanders replied that it may be that we will not have a seat at this table, but were going to have a seat. I thought this was a democracy where you can ask questions, but apparently not. To want to be part of this group just because they want us on it, I dont get it. We aint got but one time to get this right. I do appreciate the work that RESTORE from page A1See RESTORE A18

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LocalA6 | The Times Thursday, October 25, 2012

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LocalThe Times | A7Thursday, October 25, 2012 (Pd.Pol.Ad.) Paid for by a Concerned Citizen of Franklin County This means you. THE FLU ENDS WITH U E BILL MILLER REALTY850-697-3751 (3310) 570-0658400 + COMM. U.S. 98 & GULFADJ. TO LANARK MARINA 850K$29,500 $2,500 DOWN BUYS 2 BED APT. 2 6 ORRENT $500/MTH 2 B/R 1 BTH GULF VIEW HOME W/ FAMILY ROOM $70,000 GULFVIEW & ACCESS 3 BDR 2 BA 2006 M/H 89K2 LG. SHADY LOTS 3 SHEDS400 TO MARINA-CITY WATER49KMIH 2 CRNRLOTS BLK. $ STORE REDUCED $49,500 2 AC-AT RIVER UTIL. IN -$39,500 By MEL KELLYSpecial to the Times Every good cause deserves a celebration party, and the Breast Cancer Calendar Girls, on behalf of the Franklin Needs non-pro t fundraising organization, are hosting their second big event on Saturday from 8-11 p.m. at the Franklin County Armory This 2012 Cabaret is an additional major moneyraising effort for the eyecatching women who sell their calendars in order to help provide information and mammograms on behalf of early breast cancer diagnosis. The funds raised are used exclusively for local Franklin County women. The original Calendar Girls concept a British idea featured women discretely baring their good looks to raise funds for leukemia research in memory of a deceased husband. In 2009, the rst Franklin County calendar was designed to help ght breast cancer at the local level with the funds raised. Franklin Needs, Inc. board member Liz Sisung is spearheading this 2012 party, important for community education as well as for the funds raised. Light snacks will be on the complimentary menu; beer and soft drinks are available for an additional donation. A raf e with items provided by local supporters will be ongoing as part of the entertainment. Local singers and dancer talents will perform, and social dancing by the public will be encouraged during the festive celebration. As an additional ceremonial highlight, personalized lumenarias may be purchased from any Centennial Bank branch for $5. Those donations may be made in honor or in memory of a cancer survivor or casualty. Tickets for this Cabaret Party are $10 and may be purchased at the door. As a special feature, many of the Calendar Girls from the latest second edition, as well as the rst, will be on hand to personally customize autographs on their distinctive pictures. The 2013 calendars may be purchased at the Cabaret and are available at www.forgottencoastclassics.com In this latest calendar edition, local photographer Susan Bull again beautifully photographs more local leading women, presenting them in soft sepia tones. Clerk of Courts Marcia Johnson is shown discretely seated in a courthouse setting; Eastpoint beauty shop owner Debbie Flowers shows off her own beauty at the Apalachicola National Estuary Research Reserve. Carol Zurawka is featured in a World War II Jeep at Carrabelle Beach, a local historic amphibious training site. Dixie Partington beautifully decorates her theaters piano, Tamara Allen demonstrates her waterfront shing skills, Carol Bar eld poses siren-like atop a boat at Riverfront Park and Terry Kemp showcases the St George Lighthouse with her fabulous smile of welcome. Five others also star. The December page combines the calendar women of 2009 and 2012 who remind all purchasers that Every Day is a Gift. October commemorates Breast Cancer Month. Breast cancer is the most common cancer found in Florida women. For 2012, the American Cancer Society predicts 226,870 new cases of invasive breast cancer will be diagnosed, and 39,510 patients will die from the disease. National statistics prove that 50 percent of women over 40 have not had a mammogram in the last year. In Florida in 2012, 2600 women will die of breast cancer.Calendar Girls cabaret to rock Armory Saturday MAGNOLIA BLUFFBay living at its best, you have to see the sunsets from this home to believe them. 3BR/3BA Custom home with great water depth for year round access to the Apalachicola Bay. MLS #246689...........$699,000 Travis Stanley 850.653.6477 Leon Teat 850.653.5656 Sandy Mitchem 850.899.8300 BEACHFRONT CONDO ST. GEORGE ISLAND2BR/2BA with two balconies in Villas of St. George. Established rental history! Community pool, beach boardwalk, 2 blocks to lighthouse! MLS# 246110...............$319,500 BAY FRONTCONDOMust see this 2 BR/2.1 BA townhouse next to the desirable Southside Historic District overlooking Apalachicola Bay. Property has community dock! MLS #247900......................$275,000BAY FRONTHOMEEnjoy amazing sunsets everyday from this bay front home in prestigious St. George Plantation. 2BR/3BA home with unobstructed 180 degree bay views and 122 of bay front footage with white sandy beach. Dock your boat at the private pier with MLS #247962...............$599,000 GULFFRONTHOMEThis remarkable Gulf Front home provides the best of everything for laid back Island living. 5BR/4.1BA custom built home complete with a gourmet kitchen, granite countertops, elevator, a wet bar and upscale furnishings. Enjoy the inground 18X 36 pool and your private boardwalk. Call today to view this spectacular property. MLS #247998...............$995,000NEW CONSTRUCTIONGreat opportunity to buy a gulf view home. This quality constructed home has driven pilings, hardiboard siding and a metal roof for a low maintenance exterior. Inside you have 3 bedrooms with two baths and a great room opening to the front porch. New construction means low insurance cost. MLS #247359..............$289,000 N EW C ON S TRUCTION N EW C ON S TRUCTION

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LocalA8 | The Times Thursday, October 25, 2012 Come Watch The Carrabelle Speed Festival Florida 1/2 Mile Shootout!!A 1/2 Mile Drag Racing Event featuring Exotic, American, and Import Cars! Located at the Carrabelle-Thompson Airport in Carrabelle, FLWhen: October 27th, 2012 Where: 296 Airport Rd., Carrabelle, FL 32322Spectator tickets are only $10 Kids 12 and under only $5 MEDICARE OPEN ENROLLMENTOCTOBER 15 DECEMBER 7 THIS IS THE TIME TO: Find us on Facebook 180096ELDER SHINE is a Florida Department of Elder Aairs program operated in partnership with the Area Agency on Aging for North Florida, Inc. to provide information and assistance with Medicare. All services are free, objective and condential. WE DO NOT SELL INSURANCE OR REPRESENT ANY INSURANCE ENTITY. PLEASE COME JOIN US FORChristmas Open HouseSATURDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 201210 OCLOCK UNTIL 5 OCLOCK ESTLOTS OF PRIZES AND IN-HOUSE SPECIALSSERVING LUNCHFROM 12 TILL 2PM ESTComeHelpUsKickOfftheHolidaySeason 328 Reid Ave., Port St. Joe, FL 850-227-1950 PLEASE COME JOIN US FOR Christmas Open House 15% OFF ALLCHRISTMASITEMS!* SERVING LUNCH FROM 12 TILL 2PM EST*EXCLUDES WILLOW TREE ITEMS dbutler@coastalcoverage.com Locally owned and operated Home Business Auto Health Workers Comp Robert C. Bruner Attorney Personal & Business BankruptcyOver 30 Years Legal Experience850-670-3030 bankruptcy relief under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon advertisements. Before you decide, ask us to send you free written information there, he said. You go through a pair of tongs, if youre working em regular, six, seven months. You get a year out of the heads but you dont get much out of (the rest),Harts eld said. Theyre wood; they dont last very long. After collecting the goodsized oysters Jackson tonged, Harts eld shucked them on the boat, and both Jackson and Herschel Vinyard, secretary of the Florida Department of Environmental Protection, enjoyed a few. Also on the lead boat were the Riverkeepers Don Ashley and Jon Steverson, executive director of the Northwest Florida Water Management District. On the second boat, Roemhildts party included Nick Wiley, executive director of the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission. A third boat carried Leslie Palmer, director of the division of aquaculture, and other of cials from the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. Back at the Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve, at a status brie ng featuring presentations by scienti c experts on the bay, the colonels thanked the oystermen for their hospitality. This was great opportunity today to get out on the water with the folks who work there, Jackson said. I understand the challenges that you have. Ashley made clear from the outset of the brie ng the stakes facing the Corps. The Apalachicola is a very thirsty river, and the Apalachicola Bay is dying of thirst, he said. This is not new, its a process taking place over the last two decades, but the drought may have magni ed the effect of the lack of freshwater of these systems. Working waterfront communities are just as endangered as many other species we try to protect, he said. If we move from crisis to collapse, it will be a sad day. We would have lost a national treasure. In his opening presentation on the ow needs of the river and oodplain, Ted Hoehn, an FWC biologist, stressed that seasonal variation in freshwater ows is needed to keep these waters healthy and productive. Seasonal oodplain inundation is essential for sh access for feeding, spawning and nursery habitats, as well as nutrient transport to the bay, he said. River ows moderate bay salinity and provide nutrients for the bays food web that are essential for oyster survival and growth. He pointed to studies documenting the effect on channel erosion and habitat loss, not only on oysters but on sport sh and wetland forest, including tupelo trees, as a result of drops in the ows from Woodruff Dam. The river bed has gone down anywhere from 2 to 5 feet of stage decline, Hoehn said. Were not getting recruitment of these trees, he said. We are losing the forest. Reduced ows from upstream have made the problem much worse. Hoehn said when ows drop below 10,000 cubic feet per second, dissolved oxygen goes to zero and there is a loss of habitat, as shown in studies of largemouth and striped bass and other sh species.. Operations have had an effect on our sport sh, he said. It doesnt take much to essentially dry out a bed. An hour and theyre gone. The biologists conclusion was that extreme low river ows in the summertime, once very rare, are now common, as lake levels in federal reservoirs have risen. The reservoirs and the river ow are out of balance, and weve got to nd that balance, Hoehn said. Lee Edmiston, ANERRs manager, talked of Floridas investment in its waters, pointing out that the state has spent more than $170 million buying property along the river and bay, with more than a half-million acres of watershed bought by state and federal interests. This system has every designation known to man, he said. The commercial shery, in 2007, produced $134 million in economic output, plus $71 million in value added bene ts, Edmiston said. We grow an oyster faster than anywhere else in the country, he said. The oyster industry supplies $30 million in economic bene ts annually. Its the lifeblood of the economy. He said seasonal variation in river ows are essential for a healthy river and bay, in terms of determining species distribution and density, in uencing predators, encouraging spawning and controlling disease. If you lose the estuaries, youre going to lose most of the offshore species, Edmiston said. Felicia Coleman, who directs the Florida State Universitys Coastal and Marine Laboratory, linked the coastal watershed to the dynamics of ows through the Gulf of Mexico. She said several factors, including ows of fertilizer residue down the Mississippi River, have contributed to the problems that beset the bay. Weve lost so much wetlands, were not retaining any of the sediment, she said. Coleman said the overall picture must be considered when considering remediation of problems. The bene ts extend beyond the boundaries of the bay; we have to think much further than that, she said. The river doesnt know those boundaries. Neither does the plume, neither does the life system of these animals. Chad Taylor, with the Riparian County Stakeholder Coalition, and Bill McCartney, with the Apalachicola-ChattahoocheeFlint Stakeholders, outlined the work of their respective groups. McCartney said the ACFS, a private, not-for-pro t coalition of water users up and down the entire system, has raised $1.2 million to do private studies, to be completed by December 2013. We hope that when this planning program is nished, the Corps and the three states will seriously consider some of the recommendations, he said. Were really trying to make a difference and provide state and federal government some alternatives. Though the Corps is pursuing public comments on changes to its water control manual, the document governing how much water is released down the river, it is unclear how long it might take to effect any changes. The scoping process for the ACF River Basin has been reopened until Dec. 11 to account for a June 28, 2011, decision of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 11th Circuit that concluded water supply is an authorized purpose for Lake Lanier. Vinyard, who did not address the gathering, said Florida had appealed that decision to the U.S. Supreme Court but was rebuffed. Still, he said, he remains optimistic. Gov. Scott is not a fan of litigation, he said. I think its important to work with our colleagues in Georgia. There are ongoing talks; its important to establish a relationship. If there is a silver lining, this crisis has brought attention to this region, Vinyard said. In their remarks, both Jackson and Roemhildt cautioned that the Corps had limited latitude to affect changes to river ow, in the absence of a clear directive from Congress or the courts. I was out there two years ago, and just in two years I have seen a difference in the health of the bay, Roemhildt said. No one entity that can resolve this; its about a way of life. How do we come together and collaborate and create the best environment out there for everyone? We have a playbook thats associated with drought conditions, he said. Nobody likes that; everybody thinks were not meeting their demands. Were trying to get the minimal amount of requirements for everybody. We dont make these things on the y, Roemhildt said. We operate under authorities; we operate under regulations. Its all very transparent. Right now theres very little we can do on a day-to-day, week-to-week basis. What were looking for is a tropical depression. Thats the only way were going to see higher ows in the near term. I would encourage the three state governors to come to some sort of agreement that gives us an environment to operate free of litigation, he said. Were soldiers; we follow directions very, very well. We dont make that box, Congress de nes that box. We have very little leeway in terms of how to operate that. Ashley closed by calling the situation a predictable tragedy. If this system reaches the tipping point, if we go from crisis to collapse, the impact is going to be irreversible. We have a chance to reverse it, he said. This system needs a freshwater transfusion as fast as possible. CORPS from page A1

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LocalThe Times | A9Thursday, October 25, 2012 a two-day event to honor camp gordon johnston world war ii museumInfo & Registration at www.campgordonjohnstongolf.com or by calling 850-227-1751 .Saturday, Nov 10, 2012Ceremony begins eastern Shotgun Start eastern 4-player, scramble format; $60 per player Meal & Awards Ceremony to follow $400: First Place team $350: Second Place team $200: Third Place team Hole-in-One Challenge: Cash prizes include:ST. JOSEPH BAY GOLF CLUB, PORT ST. JOE, FLORIDAGOLF TOURNAMENTCAMP GORDON JOHNSTON Friday, Nov 9, 2012 eastern Silent Auction and Hors Doeuvres Reception with cash bar at St. Joseph Bay Golf Club Clubhouse. Cost of admittance $10.00 (includes beer & wine) Some auction items can be viewed at www.campgordonjohnston.com/golf.htm A Salute to Americas Veterans TANNING, WAXING, EAR PIERCING, FEATHERS, FASHION EXTENSIONS & UP DOS.NOW OFFERING Manis & Pedis!NoAppointment Necessary Walk-ins WelcomeCOMETOTHE FALL FESTIVAL ATDURENS PIGGLY WIGGLY, SaturdayOctober 27thSTOP BY AND GET FREE COLORGEL IN YOUR HAIR!**GLOW IN THEDARKNAIL POLISH** **CANDY**With Mani/Pedi ComboEXPIRES: 11/14/12 NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT CITY OF APALACHICOLA, FLORIDAThe Apalachicola Board of Adjustment will hold a Public Hearing on Tuesday, October 30th, 2012 at 5:30 PM at City Hall, Community Center Meeting Room, 1 Bay Avenue, Apalachicola, Florida to address the following variance requests and receive citizen comments relating to proposed changes on the parcels listed below. A Special Meeting will immediately follow. The following variance request items will be discussed and considered:1.Installation of elevator shaft above the 35 height limit on the proposed new structure described as Wharf Lot 10. 2.Proposal to approve continued use of Suite B, an apartment unit partially located as Block 2 Lot 5 for transient lodging. St. The Apalachicola Land Development Code allows for variance when special circumstances, conditions and/or undue hardships are determined. All interested parties are encouraged to attend and be heard with respect to this request. For further information, contact the Dozens of businesses, churches and private citizens worked together to stage a Domestic Violence Community Event. On Oct 12 Refuge House hosted an event in Battery Park to raise awareness about domestic violence. October is Domestic Violence Awareness Month, and the theme for 2012 is, This battle is not yours alone! The occasion opened with an invocation led by Carol Bar eld, who represents Refuge House in Franklin County. Also in attendance were Refuge House Director Meg Baldwin and Regional Director Hilda Little. Zachary Jones read a poem he composed, This Battle is not Yours Alone, and members of the TIGERS after-school program performed domestic violence skits created under the direction of Barry Hand. Speakers were Dawn Radford, Laura Baney and Linda Gibson. Gina Allen read a county resolution supporting domestic violence awareness, and City Commissioner Cal Allen read a resolution from Carrabelle. Finally, everyone enjoyed a meal prepared by 10-4 BBQ, the sheriffs of ce cooking team. The next Domestic Violence Task Force meeting will be 3:30-5 p.m. Nov. 7 at the Carrabelle Library Conference room. All are welcome. By Lois Swoboda CHIMENE JOHNSON | Special to the TimesThe Apalachicola Bay Charter School united to collect 1,370 canned and nonperishable food items to bene t Eastpoints Food Bank last week. The ABCs Student Council was told the local food bank was empty and decided to take action. They created a contest to see which homeroom could bring in the most items. Ms. Bockelmans fourth-grade class won, bringing in 341 cans. Many thanks to all who sent in cans and nonperishables to bene t our local community! ABC SCHOOL UNITES FOR FOOD BANK Refuge House draws attention to domestic violenceLOIS SWOBODA | The TimesCarol Bar eld, the countys domestic violence advocate, welcomes participants to the Domestic Violence Community Event.

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A10 | The Times Thursday, October 25, 2012 CHAMP!Champ is an 8 month old Chocolate Lab. He is an energetic boy with a big personality. This boy needs his own boy to run and play with. He will do well in an active home where he will receive a lot of attention and direction. He has all the potential in the world, just needs some home training. VOLUNTEERS ARE DESPERATELY NEEDED TO SOCIALIZE WITHALL OF OUR DOGS AND CATS. We are always looking for people willing to bring one of our animals into their home to be fostered for various needs. Anytime you can spare would be greatly appreciated. Call Karen at 670-8417 for more details or visit the Franklin County Humane Society at 244 State Road 65 in Eastpoint. You may logon to the website at www.forgottenpets.org to see more of our adoptable pets. PETOFTHEWEEK Franklin County Humane Society NIP FIRE ANTS IN THE BUD!CALLLOIS AT 653-5857Franklin Countys ONLY LOCALPest Control Company James F. Stokes and Margaret Anne Stokes will celebrate 50 years of marriage on Saturday, Nov. 3. They were wed at St. Patricks Catholic Church in 1962 and have since lived in Apalachicola and raised four children. Jim is retired from Fairpoint Communications and the Florida National Guard, Margaret Anne was part-owner of the Seahorse Gift and Florist until selling in 1995. Love and congratulations from your children, Nancy Stokes Shuler, Sharon Stokes Anthony, James F. Stokes Jr. and Robert John Stokes, your eight grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. More than 200 people attended a gala show of lamps and lighted sculpture Friday evening at the Bowery Gallery on Commerce Street in Apalachicola. The 15 Franklin County artists displaying lighted creations included Olivia Monod, Leslie Wentzel, Judy Leutin, Ann Seaton, Fred Aman, Leslie Wallace-Coon, Phillip and Marti Campbell, Clarice Powell, David Pickering, Barb Ward, Jamie Llewellyn, Sharron Totter, Sherry Cook, Faye Johnson and Ann Eason. Wallace-Coon, Powell, Monod and Llewellyn all produced lighted ceramic towers. Eason entered a ligree tea set lighted with tea lights. Aman, a former taxidermist, created lamps out of bone. Johnson displayed a fairyland lamp with tiny woodland creatures. Most of the works were for sale. The themes ranged from whimsical to dramatic. For a gallery of the event visit www.Apalachtimes. com By LOIS SWOBODA Alina Marie Pelt, one of Gods little angels, turned 3 years old on Tuesday, Oct. 23. Alina is the sweet daughter of Mary Rae Nowling, of Eastpoint, and Willie Pelt, of Port St. Joe. She has a brother, Obie Lee Pelt, 1, and a sister, Shirah. Grandparents are Steve Pelt and the late Mary Pelt of Port. St. Joe and Kendell Shiver and the late Wayne Nowling of Eastpoint. Great-grandparents are Charles and Mary Lou King, the late Ottis E. Russell II and the late Obie Dalton, Nancy Dalton Moses, Kenneth Shiver and Johnny and Jean Shiver of Eastpoint. God bless you my love, and happy birthday. From your greatgranny Mary Lou and paw-paw Charles King, and your Mama, Mary Nowling and family. Scooter Braswell and Amanda Smith are happy to announce the birth of their son, Waylon Tripp Braswell. Waylon was born at 6:44 p.m. on Sept. 25, weighing 8 pounds, 15.2 ounces and was 21 inches long. His paternal grandparents are Wallace and Betty Mae Braswell. His maternal grandparents are Arthur and Janice Smith. We had a nice crowd of fellow Democrats at the Crooked River Grille Oct. 17. There was a lot of discussion on the candidates and the constitutional amendments, coffee and homemade goodies. The monthly Birthday Bash and the Halloween party were a howling success. Camp Gordon Johnston American Legion Post 82 was rocking last Saturday night. It looked like there was a lot of friends and neighbors at Chillas Hall for our monthly covered dish and memorial for Randy Harrison and Sharon Thoman. Randy was with the FBI. He would come to our rehouse on Tuesdays and make sure everyone got to their car safely after bingo. Sharon and I go way back, also. She and Jerry were members of the Moose Lodge #2603. I waited on them when I tended bar. Sharon had the movie rental store in Carrabelle and was a top-notch realtor. May Randy and Sharon rest in peace. I had lunch and visited with our friends and neighbors at St. James Bay Rehab last Sunday. Thats where I spend most Sundays. Everybody was doing as well as could be expected. There was a meeting of the Ladies Guild of Sacred Heart Church on Tuesday. They were putting together the nal plans for the Fall Festival. There will be a baked sale, yard sale, 50-50 drawing, plants for sale, coffee and goodies in the morning, and there will be brats and hot dogs with all the toppings for lunch. They need help setting up and manning the booths. If you can help, please call Arlene Oehler at 697-9790, or Pat Hilliard at 850-9845021. There is also a signup sheet in the church hall. This fundraiser event will be held on Saturday, Nov. 3, starting at 9 a.m. Thank you for your help. Be kind to one another, check on the sick and housebound and remember, contrary to popular opinion, Gods last name is not damn. Until next time, God bless America, our troops, the poor, homeless and hungry. LANARK NEWSJim Welsh Volunteers sought for Nov. 3 Fall FestivalWaylon Braswell bornTop: Olivia Monod was the youngest showing artist at the event. Bottom: Phillip and Marti Campbell stand next to a fountain they collaborated to create. Marti does pottery and Phillip does wood and metal work. The lighted turtle shell on the right was created by Fred Aman. LOIS SWOBODA | The TimesInspired by the light SocietyStokes mark golden wedding anniversary BIRTH INSPIRED BY THE LIGHTAlina Pelt turns 3

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The Times | A11Thursday, October 25, 2012 SGI Methodist church holds Saturday yard saleSt. George Island Methodist Church, 201 E. Gulf Beach Drive, will havea yard sale and barbecue from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m Saturday, Oct. 27. Pre-sale will be 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesday through Friday. We have a huge selection of clothes, kitchen items, linens and furniture. Stop by for some of Art Littles famous barbecue. For more info, call Judi Little at 927-2088.Covenant Word hosts Joy Night WednesdayCovenant Word Christian Center will hold its annual Joy Night, a safe alternative to Halloween, from 6-9 p.m. Oct. 31 in front of the old Apalachicola High School gym on 14th Street. The event is free and open to the entire community; kids and adults are invited. The event will feature deejay Big Holy, from Panama City, bounce houses and superslide, games, contests with prizes, drawings, cake/prize walk for adults and kids with cakes as prizes and gift bags, grilled hot dogs, hamburgers, chips and drinks and plenty of free candy. Call Joy Night coordinator Misty DeCourcey 850-247-8524 for info or if you would like to donate candy/prizes, etc. Tax-deductible.Big Bend Hospice remembrance service Big Bend Hospice invites everyone to the annual Service of Remembrance at 10:30 a.m. Nov. 10 at the Three Servicemen Statue, 230 Market St., Apalachicola. The nondenominational service brings together those in the community to honor the memories of loved ones at this very special time of the year. Many times people become overwhelmed with emotions during the holiday season. This service provides a wonderful opportunity to pause to remember, pay honor and nd support. This is a time for remembrance open to everyone in the community, said Cathy Adkison, Big Bend Hospices president and CEO. Services include music by music therapists and words of encouragement from chaplains, all part of the Big Bend Hospice staff. Hospice grief and loss counselors will be available. Services conclude with a special candle lighting ceremony and passing of the candlelight in memory of loved ones. A reception follows. Everyone who attends shares a common purpose: to honor and to remember a loved one who has died, to be surrounded by others who are on a similar journey and to connect with loved ones. The service is proof that death ends a life and not a relationship, that holidays can still be a time of hope and of family, of love and of connection to all the things and all the people who have ever been important to us. For additional information about Big Bend Hospices bereavement services, please contact Pam Mezzina at 878-5310, ext. 799 or pam@bigbendhospice. org. Registration information is also available at www. bigbendhospice.org. Big Bend Hospice has been serving this community since 1983 with compassionate end of life care along with grief and loss counselors available to provide information and support. Sacred Heart of Jesus Catholic Church-Your Church on the Coast-2653 Highway 98 East P.O. Box 729, Lanark Village, Fl 32323Pastor: Father Eddie Jones Mass Schedule: Saturday: (Vigil) 5:00 PM Sunday: 7:30 AM (850)697-3669 The United Methodist Churches of Franklin County Welcome You First United Methodist Church of ApalachicolaWorship Service 11:00 a.m. every Sunday Sunday School 10:00 a.m. 75 5th St. Apalachicola 653-9530 fumcapalach@gtcom.net Pastor: Rev. Themo PatriotisCarrabelle United Methodist ChurchWorship Services 10:45 a.m. Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Celebrate Recovery Mondays 7-9 p.m. 102 NE Ave. B Carrabelle 697-3672 Pastor: Julie StephensEastpoint United Methodist ChurchWorship Service 10:00 a.m. every Sunday Healing service every fourth Monday at 7:00 p.m. 317 Patton Dr. (corner of David St.) 670-8825 Pastor: Rev. Beth WhiteSt. George Island United Methodist Church9:00 a.m. Worship Service 10:00 a.m. Fellowship Hour 201 E. Gulf Beach Dr. 9274635 www.sgiumc.org Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis Nursery now provided for Sunday Church Service First Baptist ChurchSt. George Island 501 E. Bayshore Drive 927-2257 R. Michael Waley, Pastor Join us as we praise and worship the living Christ. Great is the Lord and most worthy of praise. Psalm 145:3 Sunday Bible Study................................................10:00am Worship Praise........................................................11:00am Sunday Night............................................................7:00pm Wednesday Power Hour......................................7:00pm Wednesday Youth at S.P.L.A.S.H.......................7:00pm Walking in Christ R. Michael Whaley, Pastor First Pentecostal Holiness Church379 Brownsville Road Apalachicola Were excited about what Gods doing!!!Sunday School 9:45 am Sunday Morning Worship 10:45 am Sunday Evening Service 6:00 pm Monday, Youth Group 6:30 pm Wednesday, Royal Rangers, G.A.P.7:00 pm Wednesday Worship & Word 7:30 pmNursery Provided during regular church services 7:00 7:00 WELCOMES YOU Trinity Trinity Episcopal Churchest. 1836Welcomes YouHwy. 98 & 6th St. Apalachicola 850-653-9550Sunday Worship Services 8 & 10:30 a.m. Wednesdays Healing Service 11 a.m. Centering Prayer 4 p.m. Sunday Worship Services 8 & 10:30 a.m. Wednesdays Healing Service 11 a.m. Centering Prayer 4 p.m. WELCOMES YOUChurch of the Ascension101 NE First Street CarrabelleSUNDAY10:00 AM WELCOMES YOUChurch THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH (850) 274-4490 (850) 545-2578 FaithHeaven has welcomed home an angel. On Tuesday, Oct. 16, our precious mother went to meet her Lord and Savior. Betty Mae Paul Braswell was born Oct. 11, 1942 to Hilburn and Lizzie Paul in Lynn Haven. She is survived by her husband, Wallace Braswell; daughters Deborah Bell (Tommy), Becky King (Franklin). and Jennifer Allen (Jimmy); sons Scooter Braswell (Amanda) and Chris Braswell (Maria); grandchildren Eric Bell, Russell King, Kirstie King, Jenna Allen, Caden Allen and Waylon Braswell; great-grandchild Kailyn Bell; and brothers Buddy Paul and Allen Paul (Sallie). She was welcomed into heaven by her parents Hilburn and Lizzie Paul, sister Lorraine Fleener and brother James Paul. Her love was working for the Lord. She was our foundation and although it has been shaken, it has not been compromised. Visitation was held Friday Oct. 19 at First Pentecostal Holiness Church, Brownsville Road, Apalachicola. Services were held Saturday morning, Oct. 21 at the church as well. Pallbearers were Ricky Abercrombie, Chase Crum, Dennis Gay, Trey Millender, Lonnie Moses and Eddie Joe Moses Jr., Tyler Sizemore and Wesley Wilson. Funeral arrangements through Holly Hills Funeral Home, Port St Joe.Betty Mae Paul BraswellEarel Hardy, 75 of Apalachicola, passed away Thursday, Sept. 6, 2012 at his daughters residence in Eastpoint. Mr. Hardy was born March 18, 1937 in Holmes County to the late Shepard and Mary Lue Hardy. He retired as a foreman at the Port St. Joe Paper Company after 35 years of service and was a member of the union. He was a member of the Church of God in Eastpoint. Mr. Hardy loved to hunt and sh especially loggerheads, squirrels and catsh. He is preceded in death by his parents; a brother, Monroe Hardy; a sister, Mary J. Bean; and a grandchild, Brandon Segree. He is survived by his beloved wife of 54 years, Wynette D. Hardy; a son, Ronnie E. Hardy and Angelina, of Eastpoint; daughters, Earlene Segree and Donnie, of Eastpoint, and Doralene Rickards of Apalachicola; grandchildren, Tabitha Dawn Hardy, Eric Garst and Lee Segree; one great-grandchild, Austin Segree; brothers, Leo Hardy and Nancy, of Bainbridge, Ga., Ecra Hardy and Judy, of Deland, and Charles Shorty Hardy and Linda, of Apalachicola; a sister, Rosette Calhoun and Herbert, of Milton; a sister-in-law, Rebecca Hardy of Milton; and other extended family. Visitation and funeral services were held Monday afternoon, Sept. 10 at Church of God in Eastpoint with Brother Ronnie Segree ofciating. Interment followed immediately in Eastpoint Cemetery. Southerland Family Funeral Homes was in charge of arrangements.Earel HardyRandy Harrison of Lanark Village was much loved by all who knew him and projected a positive nature that impressed even those who met him only once. When asked What do you do? at a party, he would say I try to be a better person. He was dedicated to a peaceful and healthy life, working as a tness trainer for the Tallahassee YMCA and other workout facilities. Many appreciated his calm and clear demeanor as the First Friday bicycle security at Railroad Square in Tallahassee. He was also known for his automotive expertise, and many recall getting their rst car via Randys advice. Randy was dedicated to the Lanark community, volunteering for the Lanark Patrol and the Lanark Village re department. He was also instrumental in providing tness training opportunities for the Carrabelle Police Department. Strength and clarity, kindness and spiritual awareness were Randys outstanding virtues. He would have embraced the world if he could have and no one gave better hugs. He sure will be missed. Randy Harrison passed away on Tuesday, Oct. 2, 2012 due to chronic lymphocytic leukemia. His local family includes his wife, Joan Matey of Lanark Village, and his mother Harriet Fairchild, of Tallahassee. His out-of-state relatives include his brother, sister-in-law and two nieces, Vic, Sue, Dana and Julie Harrison, and his sister and her husband, Nina and Eric Peterson. A memorial luncheon was held Sunday, Oct. 21 at Chillas Hall in Lanark Village.Randy Harrison Obituaries eEAreREL hHArRDY Faith brieBRIEFsS Cards of ThHAnNKsS DDomestic violence awarenessThank you to all those who helped make the Domestic Violence Awareness Event happen. This years theme for the event organized by Refuge House and the Franklin County Domestic Violence Task Force was The battle is not yours alon. Thanks to Gulfside IGA, Ace Hardware, Hi-Fi Entertainment, 10-4 BBQ, HogWild BBQ, Gants BBQ, Franklin Correctional Institution, Grannys Love Shack, Friendship Missionary Baptist Church, Living Waters Assembly of God, Apalachicola Church of God in Christ, St. Paul African Methodist Episcopal Church, Tabernacle of Faith Ministries Inc., Pastor Barry Hand, Anointed Word Ministry, Freddie and Mary Brown, Antriniqua Richards, Allan ONeal II, Irestine Bouie, LaTresa and Teresa Carr, Dixie Partington, Zachary Jones, Bob and Tiffany Shattuck, Take Two, Cadence Bank, Centennial Bank and members of the Franklin County Domestic Violence Task Force Gladys Gatlin, Calvin and Tamara Allen, Donna McCoy, Judy Duggan, John and Gina Allen, Clarice Powell, Richard and Dawn Radford, Liz Sisung, Lisa Guzda, Stella Bryant and Bill Mahan. Sincerely,Carol BareldDomestic violence advocate Earel Hardy familyWe want to say a special thank you to Ronnie Segree rst and foremost for conducting the service for us and all he did. For the cards that Mama received, thank you for your thoughtful and kind cards of condolences. It was thoughtful and kind of you to take time to share your memories of Earel with me. Your words were not only a comfort but a source of strength for my family and me in this difcult time. For the food and help that was provided, thank you for your thoughtfulness in helping us with the food and guests at the services. I am so grateful for your helping hand in our time of need. Thanks again. We also wish to thank those for serving as pallbearers. You all are reliable and dear friends. Your contribution to the services were a tremendous comfort. I will be eternally grateful. Thank you For everyone who attended the service or sent the lovely owers of closer friends, thank you. I appreciate you taking the time to come and share in the remembrance of Earel Hardy. Although this is a sad time for all of us, I nd comfort in knowing how fortunate Earel and I have been to know you. AAuthors in AApalachPALS, the Patrons of the Apalachicola Library Society, would like to thank all those who made Authors in Apalach possible this year. THANK YOU Events like this are not possible without the help of a lot of people. We would also like to thank all the patrons and book enthusiasts who attended. See you next year!

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Email outdoors news to timesoutdoors @star .com OUTDOORSwww.apalachtimes.comSection Section A Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL(next to Piggly Wiggly) www.BWOsh.com (next to Piggly Wiggly) www.BWOsh.com Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL EVERYTHING FOR YOUR OUTDOOR ADVENTURE EV E EV E EV RYTHING FOR YOUR E RYTHING FOR YOUR E O UTDOOR ADV E UTDOOR ADV E UTDOOR ADV NTUR E NTUR E E EV E EV E EV RYTHING FOR YOUR E RYTHING FOR YOUR E O UTDOOR ADV E UTDOOR ADV E UTDOOR ADV NTUR E NTUR E E OCTOBER FEATURE FISH: Stop in and register or go online at www.BWOsh.comREDFISH ER FEATURE FISH: WEEKLY ALMANAC APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE TIDE TABLES MONTHLY AVERAGESTo nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from these given for APALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW Cat Point Minus 0:40 Minus 1:17 East Pass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27 To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from those given for CARRABELLE: HIGH LOW Bald Point Minus 9:16 Minus 0:03 Sponsor the WEEKLY ALMANACCall Today!653-8868 Date HighLow% Precip Thu, Oct. 2582 66 0% Fri, Oct. 2683 6310% Sat, Oct. 2783 62 0% Sun, Oct. 2880 5620% Mon, Oct. 2973 57 0% Tues, Oct. 3072 58 0% Wed, Oct. 3175 58 0% 24 We 108am 1.5 1222pm 1.4 658am 0.9 732pm 0.6 25 Th 135am 1.5 203pm 1.4 759am 0.7 818pm 0.7 26 Fr 158am 1.5 317pm 1.5 849am 0.5 858pm 0.9 27 Sa 218am 1.6 416pm 1.5 933am 0.3 932pm 1.0 28 Su 236am 1.6 506pm 1.5 1013am 0.1 1001pm 1.1 29 Mo 256am 1.7 549pm 1.5 1049am 0.1 1027pm 1.2 30 Tu 318am 1.7 629pm 1.5 1122am 0.0 1052pm 1.2 31 We 344am 1.7 708pm 1.5 1153am 0.0 1120pm 1.3 FreeTideTables.com For comparison only Times are local Tides in feet from MLLW 25 Th 1210am 2.4 1238pm 2.2 546am 1.1 605pm 1.1 26 Fr 1233am 2.4 152pm 2.4 636am 0.8 645pm 1.4 27 Sa 1253am 2.6 251pm 2.4 720am 0.5 719pm 1.6 28 Su 111am 2.6 341pm 2.4 800am 0.2 748pm 1.8 29 Mo 131am 2.7 424pm 2.4 836am 0.2 814pm 1.9 30 Tu 153am 2.7 504pm 2.4 909am 0.0 839pm 1.9 31 We 219am 2.7 543pm 2.4 940am 0.0 907pm 2.1 FreeTideTables.com For comparison only Times are local Tides in feet from MLLW 1 Th 250am 2.7 622pm 2.4 1010am 0.0 939pm 2.1 2 Fr 325am 2.7 703pm 2.4 1042am 0.0 1018pm 2.1 3 Sa 405am 2.7 747pm 2.4 1117am 0.2 1108pm 1.9 4 Su 350am 2.6 732pm 2.4 1059am 0.2 1112pm 1.9 5 Mo 442am 2.4 816pm 2.4 1148am 0.3 6 Tu 548am 2.2 856pm 2.4 1233am 1.8 1244pm 0.5 7 We 712am 2.1 932pm 2.4 159am 1.6 145pm 0.6 1 Th 415am 1.7 747pm 1.5 1223pm 0.0 1152pm 1.3 2 Fr 450am 1.7 828pm 1.5 1255pm 0.0 3 Sa 530am 1.7 912pm 1.5 1231am 1.3 130pm 0.1 4 Su 515am 1.6 857pm 1.5 121am 1.2 112pm 0.1 5 Mo 607am 1.5 941pm 1.5 125am 1.2 201pm 0.2 6 Tu 713am 1.4 1021pm 1.5 246am 1.1 257pm 0.3 7 We 837am 1.3 1057pm 1.5 412am 1.0 358pm 0.4 TURTLE TOTALS UP By KEVIN BAXTERFlorida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission Loggerhead sea turtle nesting was near a 24-year high along Florida beaches this year, according to data compiled by Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission researchers. The loggerhead is listed federally as a threatened species. Trained surveyors from partners across the state count nests on almost 250 miles of beaches as part of the Index Beach Nesting Survey. Surveyors follow rm counting guidelines, making it possible for FWC researchers to use the data from these beaches to identify trends. Index beach surveyors counted 58,172 loggerhead nests this year, one of the highest counts since monitoring began in 1989. Nesting on these beaches peaked at 59,918 nests in 1998, and hit a low of 28,074 in 2007. After a steep decline in Florida loggerhead nesting between 1998 and 2007, nesting has risen over the past ve years, said Dr. Blair Witherington, FWC research scientist. Were pleased to see this increase, but we recognize that loggerheads and other sea turtle species still face many challenges. As hatchlings will continue to emerge from nests through November, people are asked to stay at a distance if they spot sea turtles on the beach. People are also asked to remove beach furniture and other objects from the beach at night so there is a clear path for hatchlings to make it to the water. In the U.S., 90 percent of all loggerhead nesting occurs in Florida, the majority of which takes place along the states east coast. The loggerhead is the most common sea turtle species to nest in Florida. Green turtles and leatherbacks, federally endangered species, also nest on Florida beaches, primarily on the east coast, and their nesting numbers have been increasing over time. Since tracking began in 1989, green turtle nesting in Florida has increased about tenfold. This year, surveyors found 6,054 green turtle nests on index beaches, down from last year, but consistent with normal variation. Leatherback nesting in Florida also has been on the rise since monitoring began. For the 2012 season, surveyors counted 515 leatherback nests on index beaches. Only 45 leatherback nests were counted on the same beaches in 1989. The extensive data collection is made possible with the help of hundreds of surveyors from conservation organizations, universities and federal, state and local governments along with private volunteers. These and other partners also provide data to FWC researchers through the Statewide Nesting Beach Survey, which documents all sea turtle nesting in Florida. The FWCs role in coordinating Floridas sea turtle nest counts, training surveyors and compiling data is funded by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and sales of the states sea turtle license plate. For more information about trends in sea turtle nest counts, visit MyFWC.com/Research, click on Wildlife, then click on Nesting under the Sea Turtle heading. Report sick or injured sea turtles to the FWCs Wildlife Alert Hotline at 888-404-FWCC (3922). Nesting on these beaches peaked at 59,918 nests in 1998, and hit a low of coast. The loggerhead is the most common sea turtle species to nest in Florida. Green turtles and leatherbacks, federally endangered species, also nest on Florida beaches, primarily on the east coast, and their nesting numbers have been increasing over time. 1989, green turtle nesting in Strong 2012 nesting season for Florida loggerheads SPONSORED BY Inshore/Bay Offshore/BottomGag grouper season will close Oct. 31, so now is the time for your last offshore bottom trips for gag grouper. Reports have been good on the live or hard bottom 2040 miles offshore. Large schools of Spanish mackerel are close to shore over the past few days in and around St. Joe Bay. Good reports of large kingfish are being caught at the oil docks or sea wall in St. Joe Marina. As the cooler air settles in this week, St. Joe Bay should respond with good redfish and trout catches. This month has been great for the inshore angler so far, and we hope that trend will last throughout the month. Good reports from Towns Beach and Eagle Harbor are the talk of the town.Daniel Boyd of Havana caught this 20-pound red drum with Capt. Chris Robinson on Oct. 15. Red drum is a fast growing sh reaching 6-8 pounds in three years. The record red drum was 94 pounds and was caught on the east coast.CHRIS ROBINSON | Special to the TimesFall is an active time for Florida black bears as they stock up on calories for the coming winter. Though they dont need to put on pounds to survive the states usually mild winters, they behave as if they do, eating about three times as much as usual. In autumn, bears begin a natural process called hyperphagia, putting on fat for the winter. They will consume around 25,000 calories a day and eat almost anything thats convenient. The easier a food item is to get, the more likely it is that a bear will take advantage of it and a bears sense of smell is so keen it can detect food more than a mile away. To keep bears away from your home and neighborhood, follow these tips: Feed your pets indoors or bring in dishes after feeding. Secure household garbage in a shed, garage or a wildlife-resistant container. Put household garbage out on the morning of pickup, not the night before. Secure commercial garbage in bear-resistant Dumpsters consisting of metal lids or metal-reinforced plastic lids and lock bars. Clean grills and store them in a locked, secure place. Remove wildlife feeders or make them bear-resistant. Protect gardens, apiaries, compost and livestock with electric fencing. Pick ripe fruit from trees and remove fallen fruit from the ground. Encourage your homeowners association or local government to institute ordinances on keeping foods secure that would attract wildlife. BIG BAD BULLThursday, October 25, 2012 Page 12Black bears more active during fall

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CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA SP O RTS www.apalachtimes.com ASectionThursday, October 25, 2012By DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com With sunny weather, brisk winds and a ood of volunteers to help it along, Sundays third annual Running for the Bay marathon marked another success. While 655 runners signed up to take part, 509 runners actually ran, just a tad below last years eld of 522 runners. I think it went super, everybody seems to be really happy, said Mark Henderson, race organizer. Most importantly the residents were happy. We got great feedback from volunteers. Even the DOT (Florida Department of Transportation) was happy. Theyre happy we cleaned up really well. As part of its mission to assist with local needs, the race this year donated $2,500 to Bay Aid, a fund to assist struggling seafood workers. A large number of volunteers from Franklins Promise, which administers Bay Aid, were up at the crack of dawn Sunday to be at the 7:15 a.m. start from Battery Park in Apalachicola. The largest eld of runners, 132 females and 91 males, took part in the halfmarathon, won by Charlie Cooley, 34, of Davenport, in a time of 1:27.44. Top female nisher, and 20th overall, was Angela Dempsey, of Apalachicola, who took a break from her duties as circuit court judge to brave the marathon, which ran over the bridge into Eastpoint and across to St. George island and back. The weather was awesome, said Dempsey. The route is good, really at other than the bridge. Some people run on the grass but it wasnt bad. Dempsey, who ran track and cross country at San Diego State University during her undergraduate years, posted a 1:48.13, just slightly over her time last year, but a very respectable 8:16 mile. Im pretty satis ed, she said. Im 44, and it keeps me in shape. It helps with stress relief. Also running in the half-marathon was Talon WhiteEagle, 29, of Apalachicola, who posted a 1:52.08 to nish 31st overall, and Clint Kadel, 43, of St. George Island, who ran a 2:02 to nish 62nd overall. The marathon drew 73 males and 63 males, and was won by Daniel McCarthy, 44, Lake Mary, who ran a 2:58.13. It went well, he said. I was thinking at going out at a sub 2:50 but the rst few miles are really windy so I kind of adjusted my goals. I gave up on that the rst mile. The rst quarter of the course, and the third quarter of the course were very windy. The last stretch the wind was at my back and that helped a lot, he said. Normally I fade a little bit at that point but the tail wind kind of kept me steady. McCarthy, a senior business analyst for the American Automobile Association International, posted a time about six minutes slower than his personal best since he began running about 15 years ago. I used to play a lot of basketball but I broke my jaw playing basketball and I decided to do something a little safer so I started running, he said. He and his wife and two twin boys made the race part of a weeklong stay on St. George Island. Topping the marathons eld of women was Michele Patterson, 27, Dothan, Ala.. who ran a personal best 3:35.41 but missed qualifying for the Boston Marathon by 42 seconds. It went great until about mile 18 and I lost it, she said. It was a really good race, beautiful weather. Omigosh, the sunrise was gorgeous, the course was great. Its just the inevitable headwind that got me. A food scientist running ever since she graduated college six years ago, Patterson said she plans to make another try at qualifying for Boston next month. The 50k Ultra-Marathon, about 31 miles, was won by Andres Perez, 33, of Orlando, running with Team Red, White and Blue, a group created to assist returning combat veterans in adapting to life back at home. Perez, who nished second last year in the event, ran a 4:08.19 to top the eld of 19 males and 14 females, completing the course four minutes ahead of the top female, Angie Ave, 40, of Orlando. Perez, who served with the 82nd Airborne, said Team RWB was created to motivate solders having a dif cult time adapting to society after they come back from a combat zone. His teammate, Jaime Melendez, 43, from San Juan, Puerto Rico, retired after 20 years in the Army, said the team is committed to helping them getting them off the couch, not feeling sorry for themselves and get them out here to enjoy life again by pairing them with civilian advocates. We worked together in the front and now were going to be together back in the rear doing good things, he said. You get to focus on something other than your problems. It burns off a lot of negative energy. The 10k race drew 17 males and 44 females, and was won by Zachary Valentine, of Fort Drum, New York, in 44:24, about six minutes faster than the top female, Louise Valentine, 27, of Enterprise, Ala. Delighted with her nish was Cassie Gary, 40, of Apalachicola, who ran a personal best 1:00.56. Three years ago, I quit smoking and decided to start running again, she said. In fourth place overall, Richard Heckler, 20, of St. George island, ran a 52:11. The 5k race, with 17 males and 44 females, was won by David Grif n, 50, of Panama City Bach, in 23:16, with Lynden Robb, 22, of Crawfordville, the top female with a 26:53. Ladonna Ingram, 47, of Apalachicola, ran a 34:42 to nish 20th overall, while Press Witt, 54, of Apalachicola, ran 54:19 to nish 52nd. For complete results, visit www.racesmith.comPHOTOS BY DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The TimesMarathon winner Daniel McCarthy, with wife Martine, and twin 2-year-olds, Dorian, left, and Gavin enjoy the swings in Battery Park.Bottom right: Team Red, White and Blue runners, made up of combat veterans, are Ultra 50k winner Andres Perez, left, and Jaime Melendez. Top right:Top female marathon runner Michele PattersonMarathon runners deliver help for bayPage 13By DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com After shutting out West Gadsden for nearly the entire game, Franklin County withstood a scoring barrage in the last two minutes to secure a 16-14 homecoming victory Friday night. After Seahawk senior Skyler Hutchinson barreled in from the 1 yard line in the opening play of the fourth quarter, Franklin County nursed a 16-0 lead for most of the nal quarter until West Gadsden put together the aerial game that had eluded them all night. With three minutes left, West Gadsden quarterback Dionte Jackson threw a 35-yard pass to Taderrius Knight, and then followed it up with a seven-yard toss, to bring the Panthers into the Seahawks red zone. A minute later, Jackson connected on a 12yard-touchdown pass. But the two-point conversion failed, and Franklin County looked to be sitting on a secure 16-6 lead. Seahawk senior lineman Chase Golden fell on the onside kick at mid eld, but Seahawks senior fullback Ladarius Rhodes coughed up the football a play later. The Panthers took advantage, and with less than a minute left, Jackson nailed on a 20-yard touchdown pass. They looked to kick the extra point, but faked instead and were successful on the two-point conversion to trail only by two, 16-14, with time remaining. But, for the second time in as many minutes, Golden pounced on a ricocheting onside kick and the Seahawks ran out the clock. Were one play away from getting a shutout, said Seahawks coach Josh Wright, whose Seahawks went to 2-5, and 1-2 in 1A District 4 play. They got the two little nuggets they wanted, two great play calls, but thats football, he said. Once you lose mo (momentum) and once they got mo, they had some con dence, Wright said. But we were able to stiffen. The Seahawks amassed 242 yards on the ground, led by Hutchinson, who carried the ball 20 times for 90 yards, and caught the only pass of the night from junior Dwayne Griggs, for 20 yards on the rst scoring drive. Griggs got the Seahawks on the scoreboard with a 22-yard rushing score with three minutes left in the rst quarter. He nished with 88 yards on 19 carries, and shared offensive player of the game honors with Hutchison. Rhodes added 59 yards on 12 carries, and was defensive player of the game, leading with seven tackles, two for a loss, two hurries, and a sack. Sophomore Cole Wheeler had a crucial interception for the Seahawks, stopping a Panther scoring drive on the Franklin County 35, and running it to the West Gadsden 35 with three minutes left in the third quarter. Senior Zach Howze nailed the Seahawks rst eld goal of the season, a 25-yarder with a minute left in the rst half. Senior punter Dan Carrino was honored at halftime as homecoming king by his classmates. His homecoming queen counterpart was Shelbi Myers, with Chena Segree, Emily Cash, Karlie Tucker and Hannah Oxendine also serving as senior representatives. Franklin County outlasts West Gadsden 16-14 DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The TimesDan Carrino and Shelbi Myers were crowned Franklin Countys homecoming king and queen Friday night. Gun ShowOctober 27th & 28thPanama City Panama City Fairgrounds Fairgrounds2086093Sat 9 -5 Sun 10-4C o n c e a l e d W e a p o n s C l a s s S a t / S u n 1 1 a m o r 2 p m Floridagunshows.com FREE PARKING

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LocalA14 | The Times Thursday, October 25, 2012Estate planning check-ups today in CarrabelleIts time for your estate planning check-up! Legal Services of North Florida will be conducting estate planning check-ups from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Franklin County Senior Center at 201 NW Ave. F St. in Carrabelle on Thursday, Oct. 25. Participants will be entered into a drawing to receive a simple will prepared by a Florida attorney. Learn about wills, living wills, heath care directives and much more. Attorneys will also be on hand to discuss issues related to BP oil spill claims, including any medical claims. No registration required. For more information contact Scott Manion at 850-701-3317.Learn about life on 1812 ship SaturdayThe Apalachicola Maritime Museum will feature a presentation on Life Aboard Ship During the War of 1812 on Saturday, Oct. 27. Matthew and Juliann Krogh, professional living historians from Richmond, Va., are volunteers with the U.S. Coast Guard Historic Ships Company, an auxiliary unit created to honor and portray the mission of the Coast Guard (Revenue Cutter Service) during the bicentennial of the War of 1812. The living history program includes uniformed sailors who describe shipboard life in the Revenue Cutter Service, including demonstrations of food preparation and preservation, navigation and depth nding, the arts of the sailor, weapons use and manual of arms, surgery and medicine, sailors games and diversions, and shipboard commands and phrases. Both educated at Virginia Tech, Matthew has a bachelors and masters in history while Juliann has a bachelors in political science and a masters in public administration. He has worked at several museums and specializes in maritime and military history, while she works for the Department of Defense as a contract buyer and specializes in period clothing and food. They have been reenacting for more than 10 years and have covered the Colonial period, War of 1812, and Civil War. The fee of $5 includes a low country boil, plus samples of sea biscuits and grog, and Blues on the Docks! For more info, call 653-2500 or email Admin@ApalachicolaMaritimeMuseum.orgFCA plans Monday parent workshopThe Franklin County Academy (FCA), Franklin County Schools newest educational program, will have its rst Parent Workshop from 6 8 p.m. Monday, Oct. 29. The topic will be Student Transcripts. Parents are encouraged to come out and learn more about this very important student document. Parents will also have the opportunity to tour the campus, visit the classrooms and sign up for Parent-StudentTeacher conferences. Light refreshments will be provided and students report cards will be distributed following the workshop. For further information, contact the Academys coordinator, Elinor Mount-Simmons at 670-2800, ext. 4127Chamber hosts Nov. 2 oyster roastLove oysters? Dont miss the eighth annual Downtown Oyster Roast from 6 9 p.m. on Friday, Nov. 2 in Apalachicola. This enchanting event, sponsored by the Apalachicola Bay Chamber of Commerce, will feature roasted oysters, oysters on the half shell, creamy artichoke, oyster and thyme soup, fresh local shrimp, blue crabs, salad greens and fantastic desserts. Dine under the stars next to the Apalachicola River. Local blues man Joe Hutchinson will provide live entertainment. For tickets call 653-9419 or email info@apalachicolabay.orgTobacco-free partners to meet Nov. 7There will be a TobaccoFree Franklin Partnership Coalition Meeting on Wednesday, Nov. 7. The meeting will be held at the Franklin County Health Department, 139 12th Street, from 5:30 until 6:30 p.m. in the second oor conference room. Bridge maintenance work continuesPeriodic lane restrictions began this week and run through Wednesday, Nov. 7, at the following locations in Franklin County, as Bridge Masters perform routine bridge maintenance work: State Road (S.R.) 30 / U.S. 98 Tillie Miller Bridge in Carrabelle, over the Carrabelle River S.R. 30 / U.S. 98 Porter Bar Creek Bridge, 2.5 miles west of S.R. 65 All activities are weather dependent and may be delayed or rescheduled in the event of inclement weather. Motorists are reminded to pay attention and use caution when driving through the work zone. For more Florida Department of Transportation District Three information. Follow us on twitter @ MyFDOT_NWFL. Stan TrappeATTORNEY AT LAW Foreclosure Defense Bankruptcy Asset Protection Real Estate Probate ~ WillsAdmitted to Practice Law in Florida Since 1974Let Me Help You 850-769-6139236 McKenzie Avenue Panama City, FL CITY OF CARRABELLE PROPOSED ENACTMENT OF CITY ORDINANCEThe City Commission of the City of Carrabelle, Florida, proposes to enact the following ordinance: CITY OF CARRABELLE ORDINANCE 453AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF CARRABELLE, FLORIDA, PROVIDING FOR AMENDMENT OF ORDINANCE 115, PERTAINING TO THE LEVY OF LICENSE AND OCCUPATIONAL TAXES ON PERSONS AND ENTITIES ENGAGED IN OR CARRYING ON CERTAIN TYPES OF BUSINESS, PROFESSIONS, PRIVILEGES OR OCCUPATIONS IN THE CITY OF CARRABELLE; AND ESTABLISHING AN EFFECTIVE DATE. The proposed Ordinance may be inspected during regular hours at Carrabelle City Hall between 8 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., 1001 Gray Ave., Carrabelle, FL Monday through Friday, or call 850-697-2727. The proposed Ordinance will be considered for enactment during a public hearing to be held 6:00p.m., Thursday November 1, Carrabelle, FL. Interested parties may appear at the hearing and be heard with respect to the proposed Ordinance. If an individual decides to appeal any decision made by the City Commission with respect to this meeting, a verbatim transcript may be required. If so, the is asked to advise the city at least 48 hours before the meeting by contacting Keisha Smith at the above address or phone number. Wilburn Messer, Mayor Attest: Keisha Smith, City Clerk COLLINSCONSTRUCTIONOF ST. GEORGE ISLAND, INC &SEWAGE TREATMENT SERVICESOVER 30 YEARS EXPERIENCE OURSERVICESINCLUDE: AFTER HOURS & EMERGENCY SERVICE PROVIDED 850.670.5790MAINTENANCE@JCOLLINSCONSTRUCTION.COM MEDICARE PLANSEXCELLENT COVERAGE ANYONE CAN AFFORDTOP QUALITY COMPANY TUCKER LIFE-HEALTH INSURANCE, INC. RATED A+ BY BETTER BUSINESS BUREAURoss E. Tucker, Agentsince 1981Chartered Life Underwriter Registered Health Underwriter850-926-2200 or 800-226-7005www.tuckerlifehealth.com Members of the Franklin/Gulf Retired Educators Association Unit of the Florida Retired Educators Association held their business meeting at Carolines Restaurant in Apalachicola on Oct. 16. President Annada Faircloth introduced new member, Elizabeth Liz Sisung. Members in photo, from left, are Myra Ponder, Beverly Kelley, Faircloth, Christine White, Lula Wilson, Arlene Oehler, Sisung and Christine Williams. Kelley, Florida Retired Educators Foundation trustee, has sent information regarding available scholarships to the Franklin and Gulf county high schools. Arlene Oehler, FREA District 2 director, reported the district meeting Sept. 11 in Monticello received excellent ratings. Faircloth announced that Sunday, Nov. 18 has been declared Florida Retired Educators Day by Gov. Rick Scott. The next F/GREA meeting is Tuesday, Nov. 13 in Wewahitchka. F/GREA membership is open to any person who has retired from the education eld under the Florida Retirement System with ve or more years of service, or any person who has retired from the educational system of any other state or from any privately funded or parochial school with ve or more years of service. For information contact Annada at 653-8493. Editors note: An Apalachicola woman is seeking a good home for her English bull dog. Physical constraints prevent her from keeping her beloved pet and she hopes to nd a forever home nearby where she can visit her friend. If you can offer Mandy a home, even as a foster parent, please call 6538895 or contact Lois Swoboda at 653-5857. Help this kind soul keep in touch with her Mandy. My name is Mandy and I am a white English bulldog with spots. I am three years old, had all my shots and have been spayed. I love people, but Im not very good with children because Im too strong and powerful and might hurt them trying to play. I love to run and play! My adopted mama wants to keep me very much, but shes just not strong enough to handle me. I need somewhere that has a large area for me to run and play. I need someone young and strong that can take me for walks and play with me. I dont like cats, but what bulldog does? Can you nd it in your heart to give me a good home so I wont have to be con ned all day? This bulldog was born to run! Would someone who loves dogs and who would be good to me please give me a forever home? News BRIEFSRetired educators plan scholarships MANDY NEEDS A HOME

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LocalThe Times | A15Thursday, October 25, 2012 Trades & Services GET YOUR AD IN 653-8868Trades & Services Laban Bontrager, DMD Monica Bontrager, DMD 12761 Pea Ridge Road Bristol, Florida 32321TELEPHONE (850) 643-5417 Bristol Dental ClinicDENTURE LAB ON PREMISESSame Day Service on Repairs and Relines Don Lively General Contractors LICENSED ANDINSURED 20 YEARSEXPERIENCE P.O. Box 439 Carrabelle, FL 32322 697-2783 or Mobile 566-2603RC0066499RG0065255 Carrabelle Visa, Discover, and American Express Honored at Participating Ace Stores JACKSONSBuilding Supplies Building Supplies & Auto Repair Carrabelle 697-3333 We Deliver AnywhereHardware and Paint Center J.J.s Tree Service, LLC Stump Grinder Licensed & Insured Call John : (850) 899-8432 ROBERTS APPLIANCE REPAIR ALL MAJOR BRANDS 18 Shadow Lane Apalachicola, FL 32320 Phone: (850) 653-8122 Cell: (850) 653-7654 From A to ZPO Box 364Port St. Joe, FL 32457850-340-0756 Gregs Handyman Service & Lawn Maintenance Gill Autrey has written a wonderful book. Gone with the Tides and Other Southern Stories, featuring prose by Gill Autrey, photography by wife Lane Autrey and recipes by both, is touching, funny and insightful. Autrey shares his thoughts on fishing, the Depression, boats, seagulls, Mama, author Lewis Grizzard and the viper infested jungles of Southeast Asia. I wish I had this book when I was away at school in Blacksburg because it would have made me less homesick. It is a taste of everything we love about Franklin County. In the essay Gulls on the Causeway, Autrey rails against the descendents of Adolph Hitler who are in too big a hurry to avoid hitting nesting shorebirds on their way to the island. In Dog Years, he shares memories of beloved four (and three) legged companions, and in Roastin Ears, he shares family recipes rated for difficulty using the martini system, as in *= one martini, **=two martinis, etc. This book is well worth reading and will even speak to unfortunate souls who have never watched the sunset over Apalachicola Bay. Gone with the Tides, is available at the Green Door and Downtown Books. Autrey will sign books and perform on the guitar with friend Slim Fatz at a cocktail reception from 6 9 p.m. on Thursday, Nov. 1 at the Green Door. The gallery will also host a show of Lane Autreys photography. A second book signing, with time to be announced, will be held, Saturday, Nov. 17 at Downtown Books. By LOIS SWOBODACaptain Gill to sign newest work Autrey promotes his humorous essays Gone with the Tides CLASSIFIEDSThursday, October 25, 2012 The Times | A15 90557 PUBLIC NOTICE REQUEST FOR BIDS AND NOTICE OF BID OPENING PUBLIC MEETING Sealed bids will be received by the City of Apalachicola for the construction of the Project described as follows: City of Apalachicola CDBG Streetscape Improvements Phase I RESTROOMS, Project No. C.D.B.G. # 11DB-C45-02-29-01C05. Bids shall be addressed and delivered to Betty Webb -City Administrator, City of Apalachicola, 1 Bay Avenue, Apalachicola, Florida 32320. Bids shall be labeled as Sealed Bid City of Apalachicola CDBG Project, Restrooms. All bids must be received by the City prior to the deadline of 2:00 p.m. Eastern time on November 15, 2012 to be considered. The bid opening will be a City public meeting at the same location, at 2:00 p.m. November 15, 2012. There will be a mandatory Pre-Bid Conference at 10:30 a.m. on October 30, 2012 at the address listed above. The information for bidders, including design and contract documents, may be examined at the office of Inovia Consulting Group c/o Jim Waddell, PE, located at 1983 Centre Pointe Blvd., Suite 103, Tallahassee, Florida 32308, phone 850-298-4213. Copies may be obtained at this office upon payment of $100 which amount constitutes the cost of reproduction and handling. This payment will not be refunded. The City of Apalachicola reserves the right to waive any informalities or to reject any or all bids. The City of Apalachicola is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Each Bidder must deposit with his/her bid security in the amount, form and subject to the conditions provided in the Information for Bidders. Sureties used for obtaining bonds must appear as acceptable according to the Department of Treasury Circular 570. The contractor shall begin mobilization and procurement of materials within ten working days of the receipt of the Notice to Proceed. The project will be financed by the State of Florida Department of Economic Opportunity through a Community Development Block Grant (CDBG). Attention of Bidders is particularly called to the requirements as to conditions of employment to be observed and minimum wage rates to be paid under the Contract, Section 3, Section 109 Executive Order 11246, and all applicable laws and regulations of the Federal government and Sate of Florida, and bonding and insurance requirements. October 25, 2012 89192T IN THE CIRCUIT COURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE N O.: 19-2012-CA-000218 BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. Plaintiff, vs. LESLI M. LARMON; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF LESLI M. LARMON; ANYAND ALLUNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER AND AGAINSTTHE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUALDEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOTKNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAYCLAIM AN INTEREST A S SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF LESLI M. LARMON; UNKNOWN TENANT #1 IN POSSESSION OF THE PROPERTY; UNKNOWN TENANT #2 IN POSSESSION OF THE PROPERTY, Defendants NOTICE OF ACTION To the following Defendant(s): LESLI M. LARMON Last Known Address LOT8 MILLPOND CARRABELLE, FL 323022 UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF LESLIE M. LARMON Last Known Address LOT8 MILLPOND CARRABELLE, FL 323022 YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Foreclosure of Mortgage on the following described property: COMMENCE ATA LITEWOOD HUB AND AST. JOE PAPER COMPANYCONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHEASTCORNER OF THE NORTH HALF OF THE NORTHWESTQUARTER OF SECTION 9, TOWNSHIP7 SOUTH, RANGE 4 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 15 SECONDS WEST357.46 FEETTO AROD AND CAPLYING ON THE WESTERLYRIGHT OF WAYOF COUNTY ROAD NUMBER 67; THENCE NORTH 189 DEGREES 28 MINUTES 27 SECONDS WEST904.84 FEET TO APOINTLYING ON THE CENTERLINE OF A60 FOOTWIDE ACCESS AND UTILITYEASEMENT (SAWMILLTRAM ROAD; THENCE RUN ALONG SAID CENTERLINE NORTH 17 DEGREES 19 MINUTES 20 SECONDS WEST220.00 FEET TO THE POINTOF BEGINNING; THENCE FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE ALONG SAID CENTERLINE NORTH 17 DEGREES 19 MINUTES 20 SECONDS WEST223.35 FEET; THENCE LEAVING SAID CENTERLINE: RUN NORTH 82 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 48 SECONDS WEST 1257.33 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 29 MINUTES 08 SECONDS WEST203.96 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 1 5 MINUTES 48 SECONDS EAST1326.18 FEETTO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, CONTAINING 6.00 ACRES MORE OR LESS. SUBJECTTO A60 FOOTWIDE ACCESS AND UTILITYEASEMENTLYING OVER AND ACROSS THE EASTERLY30 FEET DESCRIBED THEREOF. a/k/a LOT8 MILL POND, CARRABELLE, FL323022 has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of you written defenses, if any, to it, on Marinosci Law Group, P.C., Attorney for Plaintiff, whose address is 100 W. Cypress Creek Road, Suite 1045, Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33309 on or before thirty (30) days after the first publication of this Notice in the APALACHICOLA CARRIBELLE TIMES file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demand in the complaint. This notice is provided pursuant to Administrative Order No. 2.065. IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT, If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of Court Administration a t (850)577-4401, or at the Leon County Courthouse, Room 225, 301 S. Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL32301 within 2 working days of receipt of a notice compelling you to appear at a court proceeding; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court this 26th day of September, 2012. MARCIAM. JOHNSON As Clerk of the Court Michele Maxwell As Deputy Clerk Submitted by: Marinosci Law Group, P.C. 100 W. Cypress Creek Road, Suite 1045 Fort Lauderdale, FL 33309 Phone: (954) 644-8704 Fax: (954) 772-9601 Oct 25, Nov 1, 2012 89202T IN THE COUNTY COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 19 2012 CC 000024 ST. GEORGE PLANTATION OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., a Florida not for profit corporation, Plaintiff, v. DIVERSIFIED EXECUTIVE CRESTVIEW, LLC, A GEORGIA LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY, Defendant. NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated October 5, 2012, and entered in Case No. 19 2012 CC 000024 of the County Court Of The Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein ST. GEORGE PLANTATION OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC. is Plaintiff, and DIVERSIFIED EXECUTIVE CRESTVIEW, LLC, A GEORGIA LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY is Defendant, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in the front entrance of the Franklin County Courthouse at 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320, Franklin County, Florida, at 11:00 am on the 14th day of November, 2012 the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: Lot 15, Bay Cove Village, A subdivision as per map or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 5 at Pages 18 and 19 of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. Subject to covenants, restrictions, reservations and easements of record, if any; and taxes for the year 2005 and subsequent years. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Danny Davis, ADA Coordinator, Court Technology Office, Office of Court Administration, 301 S. Monroe St., Rm 225, Tallahassee, FL 32303, (850) 577-4401 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. DATED this 5th day of October, 2012. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk County Court Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Becker & Poliakoff, P.A. Attorneys for Plaintiff 348 Miracle Strip Pkwy SW, Suite 7 Ft. Walton Beach, FL 32548-5253 (850)664-2229 (850)664-7882 Fax Oct 18, 25, 2012 89212T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION CASE N O. 19-2012-CA-000139 FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION, Plaintiff, vs. UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS, TRUSTEES OF JO CLARK A/K/A JO ORTON, DECEASED; KAMI ORTON, HEIR; IF LIVING, INCLUDING ANY UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SAID DEFENDANT(S), IF REMARRIED, AND IF DECEASED, THE RESPECTIVE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS, AND TRUSTEES, AND ALL OTHER PERSONS CLAIMING B Y, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THE NAMED DEFENDANT(S); UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2; Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION TO: UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS, TRUSTEES OF JO CLARK A/K/A JO ORTON, DECEASED; KAMI ORTON, HEIR; Whose residence(s) is/ are unknown. YOU ARE HEREBY required to file your answer or written defenses, if any, in the above proceeding with the Clerk of this Court, and to serve a copy thereof upon the plaintiffs attorney, Law Offices of Daniel C. Consuegra, 9204 King Palm Drive, Tampa, FL 33619-1328, telephone (813) 915-8660, facsimile (813)915-0559, within thirty days of the first publication of this Notice, the nature of this proceeding being a suit for foreclosure of mortgage against the following described property, to wit: Lot 8, Block 8, LANARK VILLAGE UNIT NO. 1, according 10 the plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 2, Pages 14 and 14A, inclusive, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. If you fail to file your response or answer, if any, in the above proceeding with the Clerk of this Court, and to serve a copy thereof upon the plaintiffs attorney, Law Offices of Daniel C.Consuegra, 9204 King Palm Dr., Tampa, Florida 33619-1327, telephone (813)915-8660, Fax (813) 915-0559, within thirty days of the first publication of this Notice, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint or petition. DATED at FRANKLIN County this 19th day of 2012. Marcia M Johnson Clerk of the Circuit Court Terry E Creamer Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Danny Davis Office of Court Administration 301 South Monroe Street, Room 225 Tallahassee, FL 32303 850.577.4401 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. October 18, 25, 2012

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A16| The Times Thursday, October 25, 2012 CLASSIFIEDS ToPlace Your Classified ad inCall Our New Numbers Now!Call: 850-747-5020 Toll Free:800-345-8688 Fax: 850-747-5044 Email: thestar@pcnh.com Email: thetimes@pcnh.com theAPALACHICOLA & CARRABELLETIMES CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW RENTALS1 BEDROOM, 1 BATH UNFURNISHED APT LANARK, REMODELED, INC WATER .................$425 2 BR, 1 BATH UNFURNISHED APT W/D HOOKUP, SMALL PORCH ..........................$375 1 BEDROOM, 1 BATH FURNISHED CONDO INCLUDES UTILITIES, MARINA .........................$910 3 BEDROOM, 2 BATH FURNISHED HOUSE ON RIVER, DOCK ..............................................$1000 3 BEDROOM 1 BATH DUPLEX UNFURNISHED, CARRABELLE ............................$600 3 BEDROOM 1 BATH END UNIT, W/D, WATER INCLUDED, UNFURNISHED .................$565 2 BR 1 BATH UNFURNISHED HOUSE FENCED YARD ......................................................$800 OFFICE SPACE US 98 CARRABELLE ........................................................$500 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322850-697-9604 850-323-0444 www.seacrestre.comwww. rst tness.com/carrabellePROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND RENTALS AIRLINE CAREERS BEGIN HERE -Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualified. Housing available. Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 866-314-3769 We Buy Any Vehicle in Any Condition. Title/No Title, Bank Leans -NO Problem. Dont Trade it in, We WILL PAY up to $35K. Any Make, Any Model, Call A.J. Today: 813-335-3794/237-1892 Apalachicola 1Br/1Ba quiet, 2 blks from boat ramp, $600mo + first, last & dep. 850-570-9167 Text FL25130 to 56654 Apalachicola: 1 br, 1 ba efficiency Call for information 850-653-6103 Text FL5175 to 56654 St. GeorgeIsland $175/wk, elec, satellite, garbage incl. Pool tbl. 12 X 65 deck. Beautiful view! 850-653-5319 2 br house in Eastpoint with washer & dryer and jacuzzi bathtub, $550 mo + $550 dep. Call (940) 389-8631 Carabelle: 3 bdr 2 bath with large spare room on 1 acre. Fenced yard, new tile throughout, freshly painted. $800 per month + dep. Call (850) 766-4357 Text FL26851 to 56654 Carrabelle 3 br, 2 ba, all tile floors, newly remodeled inside All new appliances and heat pump. $750 per month + deposit 850-697-4080 or 850591-5899 Apalachicola: 3 br, 2 Bath. Newly Remodeled Call for details!! 850-653-6103 Text FL28701 to 56654 Apalachicola Lots Block 177 Lot 6, $29,500 Block 150 Lot 4 $25,50 Call 850-597-0217 YORKIE AKC PUPPIESSweet & Precious 2 females. Will be approx. 8-9 lbs when full grown. 13 weeks old They come with Health Certificate and 1st shots. Asking $500 850-691-7016 NOW OPENMerchandise Liquidation Store, In Hickory Plaza Shopping Center, 414 S. Tyndall Parkway, Open 9-6 Daily, Closed Sundays 90343T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 12-000065-CA HANCOCK BANK, Plaintiff, vs. DAVID L. SNOWDEN and ST. GEORGE PLANTATION OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE BY CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT Notice is hereby given that the undersigned, MARCIA JOHNSON, Clerk of the Circuit Court of Franklin County, Florida, will on November 7, 2012, at 11:00 a.m., on the Second Floor Lobby of the Franklin County Courthouse, located at 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida, in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes offer for sale, and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder, the following described real property situated in Franklin County, Florida: Real Property LOT 50, Pelican Beach Village, as per map or plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 5, Page 12, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. Together with all improvements, easements, appurtenances, and fixtures (the Property). pursuant to the Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure in a case pending in said Court, the style of which is HANCOCK BANK Plaintiff, vs. DAVID L. SNOWDEN and ST. GEORGE PLANTATION OWNERS ASSOCIATION, Defendants. and the docket number of which is 12-000065-CA Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim with the clerk of the court within 60 days after the sale. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Clerk of Court, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL (850)653-8861 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. WITNESS my hand and the official seal of this Honorable Court this 25th day of September, 2012. MARCIA JOHNSON Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Michelle Maxwell Deputy Clerk October 18, 25, 2012 89220T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 192011 CA000394XXXXXX BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. HOWARD M. GLASSMAN; DIANE R. SALZ; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 1; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 2; and ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST A NAMED DEFENDANT TO THIS ACTION, OR HAVING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE ANY RIGHT, TITLE OR INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY HEREIN DESCRIBED, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order or Summary Final Judgment of foreclosure dated September 24, 2012, and entered in Case No. 192011CA0003 94XXXXXX of the Circuit Court in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. is Plaintiff and HOWARD M. GLASSMAN; DIANE R. SALZ; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 1; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 2; and ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST A NAMED DEFENDANT TO THIS ACTION, OR HAVING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE ANY RIGHT, TITLE OR INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY HEREIN DESCRIBED, are Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Front Door of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320 at Franklin County, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on the 29th day of January, 2013 the following described property as set forth in said Order or Final Judgment, to-wit: LOT 34, HOLIDAY BEACH, UNIT NO. 1, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 12, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons needing special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the Clerk of the Court not later than five business days prior to the proceeding at the Franklin County Courthouse. Telephone 850653-8861 or 1-800-9558770 via Florida Relay Service. DATED at Apalachicola, Florida, on September 25, 2012. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of Court Michele Maxwell As Deputy Clerk SMITH, HIATT & DIAZ, P.A. Attorneys for Plaintiff PO BOX 11438 Fort Lauderdale, FL 33339-1438 Phone: (954)564-0071 Oct 25, Nov 1, 2012. 90351T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.: 19-2011-CA-000402 BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING L.P. F/K/A COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, L.P., Plaintiff, vs. JASON L. WHITE; MARINERS VIEW CONDOMINIUMS ASSOCIATION, INC.; UNKNOWN TENANT(S); IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated the 25th day of September, 2012, and entered in Case No. 19-2011-CA000402, of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, L.P. F/K/A COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, L.P. is the Plaintiff and JASON L. WHITE, MARINERS VIEW CONDOMINIUMS ASSOCIATION, INC.; UNKNOWN TENANT (S); IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY are defendants. The Clerk o f this Court shall sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the FRONT STEPS OF THE FRANKLIN COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 33 MARKET STREET, APALACHICOLA, FL 32320, 11:00 AM on the 14th day of November, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: UNIT NUMBER 206 OF MARINERS VIEW CONDOMINIUM, AS PER THAT CERTAIN DECLARATION OF CONDOMINIUM RECORDED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 865, PAGE 369, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301, 850-5774401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Dated this 26th day of September, 2012. MARCIA JOHNSON Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Michelle Maxwell Deputy Clerk Submitted by: Law Offices of Marshall C. Watson, P.A. 1800 NW 49th Street, Suite 120 Fort Lauderdale, FL 33309 (954) 453-0365 Fax (954) 771-6052 Toll Free: 1-800-441-2438 October 18, 25, 2012 90509T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No. 12-00053-CP Division: PROBATE IN RE: ESTATE OF Dean S. Cambron Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Dean S. Cambron, deceased, whose date of death was January 11, 2012, is pending in the Circuit Court for Franklin County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida 32320. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is October 25, 2012. Personal Representative: Susan Cambron Lundy 1490 Pebble Creek Rd Marietta, GA 30067 Diane Cambron Jewell 125 Roberts Hill Drive Taylors, SC 29687 Attorneys for Personal Representative SANDERS AND DUNCAN, P.A. FL Bar No. 442178 80 MARKET STREET APALACHICOLA, FL 32320 (850) 653-8976 E-Mail Address: bsanders@fairpoint.netOc t. 25, Nov. 1, 2012 90463T IN THE CIRCUIT COURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITOF FLORIDAIN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTYGENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO.: 2010-CA-000065 SUNTRUSTBANK, Plaintiff, vs. JAKE T. BRYANT, et al., Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Consent Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered in Civil Case No. 2010-CA-000065 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Eastpoint, Florida, the Clerk of Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL. 32320 in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes on the 14th day of November, 2012 at 11:00 AM on the following described property as set forth in said Summary Final Judgment, to-wit: Lots 20 and 21, Block , each 50X 199.5, according to an unrecorded map of the N.W. 1/4 of Fractional Section 31,T8S, R6W, and which said lots are further described as follows: Begin at a point, (LP, stake), on the East boundary of the 100 foot Jefferson Street, 1616 feet due South and 998.5 feet East from the N. W. Corner, (Concrete Monument), of said N.W. ; run thence West 199.5 Feet; thence South 100 feet; thence East 199.5 feet; thence North 100 feet, along said Jefferson Street, to the point of beginning. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 18th day of October, 2012. MARCIAM. JOHNSON As Clerk of the Court Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk Attorney for Plaintiff McCalla Raymer, LLC 225 E. Robinson Street Suite 660 Orlando, FL32801 (407) 674-1850 Oct. 25, Nov. 1, 2012 90511T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No. 11-000055-CP Division: PROBATE IN RE: ESTATE OF Willie Burghart Speed Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Willie Burghart Speed, deceased, whose date of death was May 11, 2011, is pending in the Circuit Court for Franklin County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida 32320. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is October 25, 2012. Personal Representative: Ella B. Speed 183 13th Street Apalachicola, FL 32320 Attorneys for Personal Representative SANDERS AND DUNCAN, P.A. FL Bar No. 442178 80 MARKET STREET APALACHICOLA, FL 32320 (850) 653-8976 E-Mail Address: bsanders@fairpoint.netOc t. 25, Nov. 1, 2012 VENDORS WANTEDfor Indoor Flea Market, Seafood Fest Weekend, Market Street Antiques in Apalachicola, Call Laura at 732-236-9516 *Adopt*:Successful Business Owners, at-home parents love awaits baby. *Expenses paid* *FLBar42311* *800-552-0045* *Patty & Sean* These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you. EmeraldCoast Marketplace 747-5020

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, October 25, 2012 The Times | A17 emeraldcoastjobs.com Employment Today By JON PICOULTMonster Contributing Writer What do companies like Southwest Airlines, Ritz-Carlton, and Zappos have in common? They hire for attitude and train for skill. Its a simple mantra, but one that has a profound effect on how to successfully recruit and select new employees.Prioritizing soft skills During their hiring process, these companies weigh attitudinal characteristics very heavily. These are personal attributes that its difficult to train employees on such as being a people-person, having an upbeat personality, or possessing a keen ability to learn new things. While these firms wont ignore technical skills (Southwest doesnt put unqualified pilots in the cockpit, no matter how bright and cheery they are) they nonetheless look very carefully at these soft skills. These companies gain a lot from this hiring strategy. By focusing on attitudinal characteristics that align with their company brand, these companies reinforce their company culture with each hire. And because theyre hiring people whose values align with that culture, the end result is a workforce thats happier, more engaged and less likely to turn over. But the benefits of this hiring process dont stop there. When a workforce embodies the company brand (think how Southwest employees exude fun), it differentiates the customer experience where it counts most in consumers one-on-one interactions with your staff. Steps to hiring for attitudeSo how should you go about hiring for attitude, seeding your workforce with true brand ambassadors? You could run your applicants through personality tests and behavioral assessments but that can be pricey, timeconsuming, and onerous for the candidates. Fortunately, there are other approaches you can employ to put this strategy in practice. Here are five ways to hire for attitude: 1. Be clear about expectations. Take advantage of candidate self-selection by clearly broadcasting what qualities you look for when hiring staff. For example, if you tell the world that youre in the market for extroverts fewer introverts will apply (and thats a good outcome for you and them). By defining what personal qualities youre searching for upfront, you make it more likely that candidates with those attributes will throw their hats into the ring. 2. Be proactive. Dont just wait for people with the right attitude to apply for a job spot them in the marketplace and make your pitch! When you see someone who clearly embodies the qualities you want on your team, give them your card and invite them to apply for employment. 3. Focus on the person behind the paper. Gauging attitude from a resume requires insight and vision. Consider how the personal qualities you seek would manifest themselves in a candidates resume and background. For example, individuals who are adept at overcoming adversity might have demonstrated that spirit in how they responded to a layoff. People-oriented extroverts might belong to a variety of business associations and community groups. Skilled communicators likely will design and organize their resume content in exceptional ways. In addition, your interview questions also can reveal attitudinal characteristics. Looking for someone with customer service in their DNA? Ask about the most over-the-top service they ever delivered (the best service people never forget such stories). Looking for someone with a sense of humor? Ask them about the time they laughed the hardest. Whatever attitude you seek to hire, the key is to look beyond the words on the resume and search for more subtle clues about a candidates character. 4. Observe applicants when they think no one is watching. Want to see a candidates true colors? Then see how they behave when they think no one is watching. How did the applicant treat your receptionist? Did he strike up conversation with other applicants in the waiting room? Did he eat alone in the cafeteria or introduce himself to a table of strangers? What the candidate says and does outside of the hiring managers view can give you a glimpse into their true personality. Use these clues to help judge if the applicant will be a good fit for your company. 5. Enlist todays stars to spot tomorrows standouts. Toward the end of the hiring process, see if its possible to have your job finalists spend some time shadowing existing employees. This serves two objectives. First, candidates get an unfiltered look at the job they would be performing, so theres less chance of unpleasant surprises and post-hire buyers remorse. Second, by pairing these finalists with the best employees (the ones who embody the desired attitude), your staff can help identify those applicants who have the right stuff. Hiring for attitude is about building a distinctive workplace culture and company brand that, unlike skill sets, cant be easily copied in the market. Its what gives Southwest Airlines, RitzCarlton and Zappos their unique character and competitive advantage. Follow the lead of these legendary firms as you look to recruit great candidates.Hiring process: How do you hire for attitude? Featured Jobs SITE/UTILITY CONSTRUCTION COMPANY has immediate full time openings for experiencedHeavy Equipment Operators and Laborersfor South Franklin County area. Please call 850-265-9166 for information.EEO/drug free work force. Contact LornaEMPLOYMENT ADVERTISING SPECIALISTat (850) 747-5019 or Email: lbrown@pcnh.comTo Advertise Your Employment Opportunities Please Contact Our Employment Advertising Specialist Earn While You Learn with the On the Job Training Program If you are unemployed you may be eligible for the Workforce Centers OJT program. On the job training gives you hands on experience in a new job and employers, OJT helps you save money! For more informaon call (850) 370-0726 An equal opportunity employer/program. Aux iliary aids and services are available upon request to individuals with disabilies. All voice telephone numbers on this document may be reached by persons using TTY/TDD equipment via the Florida Relay Service at 711. Education/TrainingPart Time BabysitterNeeded Wednesday, Thursday and Friday from 8:30 am-5:30 pm to take care of 6 mo old. Call (850) 370-0064 Medical/HealthNow HiringFull time positions for CNAs at St James Health and Rehab Center. Apply in person at 239 Crooked River Rd Carrabelle, FL 32322 Medical/HealthCaring Peopleand CNAs needed. Join a team of people who make a difference in the lives of the elderly. Provide non medical companionship, in home help & personal care for the elderly. Must be flexible. PT leading to FT-positions in the Port St. Joe and Apalachicola areas.Home Instead Senior CareCall Mon-Thur 9-3pm 850-640-1223 or toll free 1-866-301-1919 Web ID#: 34224571 Text FL24571 to 56654 Administrative/ClericalPart-time Administrative AssistantFor home office on SGI. Must have good computer skills including Excel. Knowledge of accounting and Quick Books helpful. Email augusta.west@ ammfl.org. OtherCheck Station OperatorFlorida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission Is Now HiringWhat:Check Station OperatorWhere:Tates Hell State ForestSchedule required:Wednesday through Sunday (10am 6pm)Pay Rate:$8.00/hr This is a temporary position that is only during hunting season. To apply for this position please send resumes and letter of interest to adam.warwick@myfwc.co m For questions about the position please contact Billie Clayton at 850-265-3676 or billie.clayton@myfwc.co m Web ID#: 34226950 Classified Advertising works hard ...filling the employment needs of area business firms, helping people to meet their prospective employers, helping people buy and sell all kinds of goods and services, and much more! Nothing works harder than the Classifieds! 747-5020 The Key to Savings Start here in Classifieds. EASTERN SHIPBUILDING GROUP MORE THAN A JOB A FUTURE!LONG TERM WORKan aggressive leader in the Marine Industry, located in Panama City, FL has the following opportunities for skilled craftsmen:PIPEFITTERS PIPE WELDERS SHIPFITTERS STRUCTURAL WELDERS X-RAY WELDERS ELECTRICIANSCompetitive wages DOE, and a comprehensive bene ts package including: Company paid health, dental, and life insurance, 401(k), attendance & safety bonuses. Normal work week to include overtime. Quali ed craftsmen should apply in person: Mon-Fri, 8am-12pm 1pm4:30 pmHUMAN RESOURCES (2 Locations): 13300 Allanton Rd., Panama City, FL 32404 and 134 S. East Ave., Panama City, FL 32401Applications are also accepted at our East Ave Of ce Saturdays, 8am-12pm.(850) 522-7400, ext. 2285, 2322, or 2302 Fax: (850) 874-0208EOE/Drug Free Workplace

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LocalA18 | The Times Thursday, October 25, 2012 Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Real Estate PicksOur local real estate experts have identied what they feel are the best values around and are oering them to you in Real Estate Picks! (In this section), Discover the best real estate values in Mexico Beach, Port St. Joe, Apalachicola, Cape San Blas, St. George Island, Carrabelle and surrounding areas. SELL YOUR LISTINGS HERE! Only $35 per week per listing Minimum 2 ads per week or 1 ad for 2 weeks Contact Joel or Kari for details: (850)814-7377 or (850)227-7847SOLD John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.comMLS# 245369$999,000St. George IslandPLANTATION BEACHFRONT5 BR, 5 BA home across the street from the new John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.comMLS# 248156$110,000St. George IslandPLANTATION BAYFRONT LOTSunset Views from this one acre bay front lot are spectacular! Located at the end of Avocet Lane for privacy but is tennis, and air strip. Osprey Village FRANKLIN COUNTY LANDFILL HOSTS HOUSEHOLD HAZARDOUS WASTE ROUNDUPwill hold its Fall household hazardous waste roundup located at 210 Highway 65 Eastpoint. Items allowed Paint, household electronics and computers will be collected and disposed of at no charge. Hours of Collection 9:00 a.m. til 12:00 p.m. For more information contact:Franklin County Solid Waste & Recycling Department850-670-8167 PUBLIC REMINDERBOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA POLICYTitle: Uncovered Debris Date Adopted: March 7, 2006 Effective Date: April 7, 2006 the health of its citizens: Commissioner Parrish has done, Sanders said. But I was blindsided when I went down south. I have never been so disrespected in all my life. Jackel supported Sanders objections. These are big decisions, she said. I have lost some sleep over it; Im sure Ill lose some more. The Florida Association of Counties has done a good job for the state and for the counties. But, their representation for the entire state of Florida sometimes overreaches what their intentions should be for some of the smaller counties. Ive read the RESTORE Act, she said. I studied it this weekend. There are two groups of counties; the eight affected counties and impacted counties. The consortia is to be formed of the affected counties, not the impacted counties. The letter of the law in the act says affected counties. She said though the act calls for the creation of a consortium, it does not state who should be seated on the board. Jackel warned against making snap decisions. There is a giant question mark about what else may be wrong with the bay, she said. When you join a club, the club doesnt have a lot of obligation to you to change their rules once youre a member. I think there is a bigger drawing board and a bigger plan when it comes to the consortium. Jackel suggested the county form its own alliance with its immediate neighbors. She said the FAC had presented a false deadline for the formation of the consortium and offered veiled threats the state would seize RESTORE Act funds. She said she was concerned with the lack of detail concerning the makeup and power of the Gulf Consortium. Lockley moved to support Parrishs recommendation to join the consortium, but Lockleys motion died for lack of a second. This is a whole bunch of material, and I need to go over something before I make a decision because Im hearing two different things, Putnal said. If were running out of time, Im sorry. Having to make a decision within ve minutes, its not fair to me. Parrish said Monday he believed the countys actions were headed in the wrong direction. I think we made a grave mistake, he said. The overall point Im trying to make is when you start all this squabbling, I think its going to lead to a break-up. Over a period of time, you develop relationships, and build them over a period of time. As far as Im concerned, its all for naught. Everything is accomplished with relationships. If you dont know the people youre dealing with, its hard to build consensus. Parrish also took issue with questions regarding the consortiums distribution formula and said he felt it was fair because Escambia and other counties to the west are still dealing with oil spill issues. Do I think Franklin County deserves as much as a county thats been impacted to that extent? I dont see it, he said. I thought $66 million for a few tar balls is pretty good for Franklin County. Hill is running as a Democrat against Halsey Beshears, R-Tallahassee. In Florida Senate District 3, incumbent Democrat Bill Montford is running against Republican John Shaw. Running for state attorney in the 2nd Judicial Circuit are incumbent Democrat Willie Meggs against Republican challenger Pete Williams. In the race for circuit judge of the 2nd Judicial Circuit, a nonpartisan race, Jose na Tamayo is running against Barbara Hobbs. Voters will decide whether three members of the Florida Supreme Court should be retained Justices R. Fred Lewis, Barbara Pariente and Peggy Quince and in the District 1 Court of Appeals, whether Judges Simone Marstiller, Stephanie Ray, Ron Swanson and Brad Thomas should be kept on. Eleven amendments to the Florida Constitution will be before voters, with each needing at least 60 percent support for approval. The county has 7,451 registered voters: 4,986 Democrats, 1,753 Republicans and 712 either unaf liated or with other parties, according to the supervisor of elections website, http://votefranklin. com.Two county commission races to be decidedOf the ve county commission districts, two feature races on the ballot, and there are no school board races. In District 1, which includes St. George Island and most of Eastpoint, incumbent Pinki Jackel, 54, R-St. George Island, is facing a challenge from Tony Shiver, 52, D-St. George Island. In District 5, which encompasses portions of Eastpoint east to Carrabelle, William Massey, 52, D-Carrabelle, is squaring off against Hank Garrett, 61, of Eastpoint, who is running without party af liation. Massey defeated longtime incumbent county commissioner Bevin Putnal in the August primary. Though county voters are known for crossing party lines in casting their votes, Democrats outnumber Republicans in each district. In District 1, the largest of the ve, of the 1,826 registered voters, there are 1,111 Democrats, about twice the number of Republicans, 557. The remainder, 158, are without party af liation. In District 5, which has 1,519 registered voters, there are 1,033 Democrats, more than three times as many Republicans, 322, with the remainder, 164, with no party af liation. The most balance between the two parties is in District 2, which includes Alligator Point and Lanark Village, with 1,598 registered voters. A little more than half are Democrats, 870, with about a third Republicans, 521, and the remainder, 207, without party af liation. In District 3, which is the city of Apalachicola, north of U.S. 98, there are 1,022 Democrats, and just 152 Republicans, with 93 without party af liation, for a total of 1,267 registered voters. In District 4, the historic district of Apalachicola south of U.S. 98, there are 1,238 registered voters, 947 of these Democrats, 201 Republicans and the rest, 90, without party af liation. Elliott said county voters will be using the same voting method as four years ago, though there are now additional options for the disabled. These are still touch screens, but its just like a huge pencil, she said. It doesnt count, theres no counter; all it is a marking device and very nice and neat. They bring it straight to the M100 (optical scanner) machine and put it in. Elliott said absentee ballots can be picked up during of ce hours and can be mailed out until ve days before the election. All must be returned to the Supervisor of Elections of ce no later than 7 p.m. Election Day. Elliott said the county mailed out 25 military ballots 19 of them to domestic stations and six overseas on Sept. 22. They must be postmarked by Election Day and can arrive until Nov. 16 if they are from overseas. In the event any of the elections require a recount or there are provisional ballots to decide upon, the canvassing board consists of County Judge Van Russell, Commissioner Cheryl Sanders and Elliott. Elliott said the postal service this week is mailing out sample ballots throughout the county, and she encouraged individuals to take a look. Everybody should get them, she said. I dont consider it junk mail. Sample ballots are also available at http://votefranklin.com. of Florida sent a jet to bring Zella to Gainesville for surgery. Zella said she had never own before, but her caregivers at Weems made it clear she wouldnt survive without the surgery, so Zella ew for the rst time. She received emergency surgeries on Sept. 18 and 19. The aneurism was clamped and a shunt placed in her skull to reduce pressure. Zella remained in the hospital until the rst week in October. She returned home with some memory loss, a permanent shunt and $400,000 in medical bills. She continues to suffer severe headaches and takes blood pressure medication three times a day to control wild uctuations. Smith is happy to have her daughter home. Shes a walking miracle, between this hospital and Shands, and in my opinion the Lord must have been there too, she said. People talk about the hospital, but they did everything they could for her. Zella has oystered, washed dishes at Boss Oyster and worked at the Apalachicola Subway for two-and-ahalf years but now is unable to work Zella is trying to get by with help from her family and neighbors. She has two young sons, Christopher, 10, and Tyler, 7, to provide for. She has had dif culty nding a primary care physician who will undertake the next phase of her treatment. But Smith said Dr. Gene Charbonneau at Weems East in Carrabelle gave her an appointment this week, the rst physician to agree to see her since the surgery. Zella must return to Gainesville sometime in the next three weeks for a post-surgical examination. She said the counselors at Shands are trying to enroll her in Medicaid, but Smith said the family has yet to hear about possible nancial support. An account has been set up in Zellas name at Cadence Bank, and on Oct. 9 friends and family organized a bene t luncheon at Riverside Park that was a sell-out. Zella herself helped serve. RESTORE from page A5 VOTING from page A1 MIRACLE from page A1