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The Apalachicola times
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100380/00192
 Material Information
Title: The Apalachicola times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: H.W. Johnston
Place of Publication: Apalachicola Fla
Apalachicola Fla
Publication Date: 10-18-2012
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1885.
General Note: Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 32911693
lccn - sn 95026907
System ID: UF00100380:00192
 Related Items
Preceded by: Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by: Apalachicola herald

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xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx 50 WWW.APALACHTIMES.COM Phone: 850-653-8868 Web: apalachtimes.com E-mail: dadlerstein@star .com Fax: 850-653-8036 Circulation: 800-345-8688 DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK: School News & Society: 11 a.m. Friday Real Estate Ads: 11 a.m. Thursday Legal Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Display Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Line Ads: 5 p.m. Monday xxxxx Contact Us xxxxx Out to see Index By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com County commissioners have handed over responsibility for managing the airport to an established Tennessee xed-base operator. At the Tuesday morning meeting, commissioners voted unanimously to award Crystal Air Inc. of Chattanooga the position of FBO for the Apalachicola Regional Airport, beginning Nov. 1. Crystal Air was recommended for the position by the airport committee on Sept. 18 after a review of four applicants. The other three included Trident Aircraft of Gulf Shores, Ala., Apalachee Winds of Rock Hill, S.C., and Fly High Apalachicola of Lexington, N.C., a company making a second try at the contract after negotiations fell apart after it was awarded the contract earlier this year. Since the former FBO Bill Ruic left in April, Perky White and Ted Mosteller have acted as interim operators, but the county had to choose a permanent contractor by Nov. 1 or provide White and Mosteller with bene ts as full-time county employees. At their last meeting, the commission earmarked $900 to provide Mosteller and White with additional temporary help when Mosteller told them he would be forced By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com South of Sumatra in the heart of Tates Hell lie three small cemeteries that memorialize the lives and struggles of hearty Florida settlers. In the piney woods near the little Brickyard community is Brown and Smith Cemetery, a family burial plot sheltering mostly Walkers, Browns and Smiths. Adolph and Hattie Smith, parents of 100-year-old Preshia Crum, the oldest living graduate of Chapman High School, are buried there. The earliest interment, that of Rowan Appleton Brown, took place in 1901. Brown was born in 1863 and father of prominent beekeeper Rowan Brown Jr. The earliest birth recorded on a stone in Brown and Smith Cemetery is that of Berry Ann Walker, patriarch of the Walker family, born in England in 1833 and who lived until 1908. Marie Walker Wimberly of Sumatra said members of her family who go back at least three generations, including her parents, rest in Brown and Smith. When I was a little girl, I remember going to the cemetery, and my mom had me sit by a tree during the funeral, she said. The cemetery and the community are in a quiet wooded setting. Also at rest in Brown and County TDC revenues dip in June, July Yearly gures expected to show increase By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com During the rst two months of the summer, revenues collected by the Tourist Development Council dipped about 11 percent over the year before, but TDC of cials are con dent that revenue for the entire 2011-12 scal year that just ended should see an increase. A look at newly released numbers for June and July show the countys collections of the 2 percent bed tax dropped by 16.4 percent in June, from $172,029 in 2011 to $143,805 in 2012. Numbers for July showed a 5.3 percent decline, from $147,874 in 2011 to about $140,000 in 2012. But overall, collections for the scal year, as of July 31, were running about 10.5 percent ahead of the same time last year, when the county posted a record $803,141 in bed tax monies. Paul Parker, a member of the TDC for the past seven years, said the drop in June and July numbers was not a cause for concern. Its completely the timing of the collections, he said, noting that monthly numbers do not account for the latitude the state exercises in how it receives payments from the overnight accommodations industry and when it posts them. Parker, who owns Harbor Point Vacation Rentals in Alligator Point, pointed out that May 2012 numbers were up almost 55 percent from the year before, a bulge likely By TIM CROFT 227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com Think not just good, but great. That is what Congressman Steve Southerland urged commissioners from Gulf, Franklin and Wakulla counties during an informational meeting last Thursday at Apalachicola City Hall pertaining to the RESTORE Act. Southerland, R-Panama City, urged commissioners to be broad-based, transparent and cohesive, not only in spending the billions in BP ne money potentially coming to eight counties along the Northwest Florida coast, but also in rebuf ng attempts by the executive branch to change the dynamics of how those nes will be collected. The process (in RESTORE) will test you, but there is a fair and equitable way for all citizens on the Gulf Coast to bene t from these funds, Southerland said. Southerland spoke to commissioners from the three counties about what was contained in the bill passed with bipartisan support in both houses of Congress that aims, he said, to restore states affected environmentally and economically by the 2010 Deepwater Horizon explosion and spill. Crystal Air to run Apalach airport Taylor Newman is director of operations for Crystal Air. Southerland talks RESTORE Act to area counties A major reason for Congressman Steve Southerlands informational meeting last week at Apalachicola City Hall was to explain the basics of the RESTORE Act, which aims to provide a process for the distribution of BP nes that are estimated to be $5 billion to $20 billion. When those funds will be available is unknown. Southerland said he hoped a federal judge would hand down a ruling in the case, and ne total, sometime in early 2013. Under the bill, the RESTORE Act established four so-called buckets of money, which Southerland provided a handout on and also explained. Those four pots of funds established under RESTORE are: What is the RESTORE Act? Crystal Air to run Apalach airport LOIS SWOBODA | The Times AT ETERNAL REST: PART 2 Memories of Florida settlers inhabit Tates Hell PHOTOS BY LOIS SWOBODA | The Times John Keith died while worm grunting. Below family patriarch Berry Ann Walker was born in England. See CRYSTAL AIR A11 See TDC A11 See ETERNAL REST A14 See SOUTHERLAND A10 See RESTORE A10 Thursday, October 18, 2012 VOL. 127 ISSUE 25 Opinion . . . . . . A4 Society . . . . . . A6 Faith . . . . . . . A7 Outdoors . . . . . A8 Tide Chart . . . . . A8 Sports . . . . . . A9 Classi eds . . . A12-A13 No blues for Doris A6 Homecoming parade Friday in Eastpoint Franklin County High Schools annual homecoming parade kicks off Friday at 1 p.m. in Eastpoint along U.S. 98. At 7 p.m., enjoy the traditional homecoming game, as the Seahawks take on West Gadsden at Mikel Clark Stadium. Weems mammogram clinic to be Friday Weems Memorial Hospital will host a mammogram walkin clinic from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Friday, Oct. 19, which is National Mammography Day. Any resident of Franklin County between the ages of 40 and 64 who does not have insurance coverage can walk in to Weems and receive a free, screening mammogram courtesy of Franklin Needs Inc. For more info, call 6538853, ext. 119. Be inspired by light Friday From 6:30-9:30 p.m. Friday, Oct. 19, Bowery Art Gallery, 149 Commerce St., presents Inspired by Light, a sculptural show of lights. Everyone is welcome. Light refreshments will be served. For more information, call 653-2425. Blues in the Park Saturday On Saturday, Oct. 20, six blues bands will perform from noon to 10 p.m. as part of a Blues in the Park event in Riverfront Park. Proceeds from the music and barbecue will bene t area seniors. For more information, call 653-3930. Gulf County Bow Wow Bash Oct. 27 The St. Joe Bay Humane Society presents the seventh annual Bow Wow Bash, a bene t for the DAWGS in Prison program and the homeless animals of Gulf County, on Oct. 27. The Masquerade Party will be 6-10 p.m. at the Centennial Building in Port St. Joe. Enjoy food and drinks, masquerade contest (costumes optional), live music and a silent and live auction. Tickets, $30 each or 300 for a reserved table for 10, are available in Port St Joe at Bow Wow Beach Shop on Reid Avenue, St. Joseph Bay Humane Society on 10th Street or by visiting www. bowwowbash.org.

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Local A2 | The Times Thursday, October 18, 2012 National Mammography Day Friday, October 19th Weems Memorial Hospital and Franklin Needs, Inc. will be celebrating National Mammography Day on Friday, October 19th On this day, from 10am to 4pm, any woman in Frank lin County can walk-in to Weems Memorial Hospital and receive a free, screening mammogram courtesy of Franklin Needs, Inc. George E. Weems Memorial Hospital 135 Avenue G Apalachicola, FL 32320 (850) 653-8853 www.weemsmemorial.com Franklin Needs, Inc. 55 South Bayshore Drive Eastpoint, Florida 32328 (850) 670-1671 www.forgottencoastclassics.com ALL SHOW S FREE O F CH AR G E Check out www.BlastontheBay.com for detailed schedule and artist bios. Friday, Oct 19 6pm 6pm 6:30pm 7pm (CT) This project received VISIT FLORIDA Saturday, Oct 20 Sunday, Oct 21 Dockside Caf @ the Port 2pm Songwriters Workshop 5pm 7pm 6:30pm (CT) Indian Pass Raw Bar Indian Pass Raw Bar BILL MILLER REALTY 850-697-3751 (3310) 570-0658 400 + COMM. U.S. 98 & GULF ADJ. TO LANARK MARINA 850K $29,500 $2,500 D O W N B UYS 2 B ED AP T 2 6 OR RENT $500/MTH 2 B/R 1 BTH GULF VIE W HOME W/ F AMILY R OOM $70,000 GULFVIE W & ACCESS 3 BDR 2 BA 2006 M/H 89K 2 LG. SHADY LOTS 3 SHEDS 400 TO MARINA-CITY W ATER49K MIH 2 C RNR LOTS BLK. $ S TORE REDUCED $49,500 2 AC-AT RIVER UTIL. IN -$39,500 NOTICE The Florida Association of Benthologists (FAB) will hold its annual meeting Nov. 6-8, 2012 at the Apalachicola Environmental Education Training Center in Eastpoint. For more information contact the FAB President, Andy Rasmussen at 850.345.9711 or go to WWW.FLB E N T H O S. O RG By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star .com Albert E. Smythe of Lanark Village was arrested by sheriffs deputies on Oct. 3, for shooting a black bear and attempting to hide his actions. Initially, Smythe claimed to have witnessed a hitand-run involving the bear but further investigation showed the bear had been shot. Smythe, 42, was employed as a conservation law enforcement of cer for Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) from Dec. 12, 2003 to Sept. 10, 2007. He also worked parttime for the Wakulla Sheriffs Department for an unspecied period beginning May 29, 2009, but a spokesperson for human resources said he has not been employed there for some time. Smythe is president of a registered LLC, Clear Cut Solutions, that clears land and performs tree surgery. On April 10 at 2:30 a.m., Franklin County sheriffs deputies Jonathan Riley and Robert Hogan and Carrabelle Police Of ce Andy Pace were called to 2522 Palmetto Terrace, the residence of Albert Edward Smythe II, to investigate possible gun re reported by a neighbor, James Schumacher Schumacher said he saw a man he did not know with dark hair driving a white truck and a bear lying in the roadway. He said the man told him that somebody had hit a bear and ed the scene and that he had already called the police. The man told Schumacher to leave the area. When police arrived at Palmetto Terrace they found fur, blood and feces on the road and garbage strewn around the area. Smythe arrive at the scene in his white truck about ve minutes later. Someone ran over a bear and he ran away, Smythe told Hogan. I tried to track him but was unable to locate him. Hogan, Riley and Pace remained on the scene until FWC Lt. Charles Wood arrived. Smythe told Wood a bear had been struck by a vehicle and later said he had struck the bear with his truck. He then declined to discuss the event further. At about 4 a.m. Wood examined Smythes truck and photographed blood and fur on the undercarriage and in the bed. Riley, Pace and Hogan searched for the bear and Riley discovered fresh tire tracks in a wooded area near Lanark. The bear was located about a mile and a half from Smythes home by following those tracks. Wood and FWC Of cer Percy Cook recovered the bear from a ditch. Ryan and Gina Irvin, who live next door to Smythe, reported hearing a gunshot, and a truck and four-wheeler cranking up during the night. Ryan Irvin also reported hearing a bear moaning. In all ve witnesses reported hearing gunshots the night of the event. Gina Irvin said Smythe had trouble with bears getting into his garbage. A necropsy was performed on the 120-pound bear at the FWC Gainesville Research Lab and a bullet was recovered from the bears spine. Doctors concluded the bear could have died from bleeding from the gunshot wound, suffocation, or possible undetected injuries to the lungs. Injuries typically associated with bears hit by vehicles were not found on the Lanark bear. DNA tied the blood on Smythes truck to the bear found in the ditch. Although black bears were delisted as a species of special concern in August, Smythe was charged in the April incident with taking of a threatened species, a third degree felony punishable by up to ve years in prison and a $5,000 ne. In addition, he is accused of tampering with evidence and giving a false report to a law enforcement of cer. If convicted of killing the bear, Smythe could also lose his hunting and shing licenses inde nitely in Florida and in more than 30 other states with reciprocal agreements under the Interstate Wildlife Violator Compact. Smythe was released after posting a $2,500 bond and is scheduled for arraignment Nov. 14. Former FWC of cer charged with shooting bear ALBERT E. SMYTHE Franklin Correctional Institutions Canine Tracking Unit recently participated in the South Eastern States Manhunt Field Trials at Blackwater State Forest. Teams from Alabama, Arkansas, Louisiana and Florida competed in this event. Each team was required to follow a two-hour-old scent trail about 1.5 miles long, one in daylight and one in the dark. The Franklin C.I. K-9 Team consisted of Sgt. Greg Daniels; Sgt. Eric Crosby and Of cer Shawn Chisholm completed their day track with a time of 27:25 and had a 14:52 on their night track, recovering all four ags on each track. Santa Rosa Correctional Institutions K-9 Team narrowly edged Franklin C.I. for second place by one-half second. The team from Suwannee C.I. was the rst place nisher in the event. Pictured from left are Warden Russell Hosford, Sgt. Erik Crosby, Sgt. William Greg Daniels, Assistant Warden Edward Watson and Of cer Shawn Chisholm. SPECIAL TO THE TIMES Of cers from the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission cracked down on night harvesting of oysters last month. From Sept. 9 through 24, an operational detail was conducted on the waters of Apalachicola and Ochlockonee bays. Because recent stock assessments of oysters in Apalachicola Bay reveal a reduced number of shell sh, prices for oysters have increased greatly, and FWC ofcers received information from the eld that commercial oyster harvesters were harvesting at night within the closed waters of Apalachicola Bay. Of cers John Allen, Matt Gore, Wil Raker, Percy Cook, Blake Hoelscher, Jason Carroll, Steven Cook, Pilot David Calianno, and Lt. Charlie Wood participated in the detail, in which vessel patrols were conducted for 10 nights. Seven vessels and nine harvesters were inspected. Seven misdemeanor citations were issued for night harvest of oysters. Nine misdemeanor citations were issued for harvesting oysters from closed waters. Four written warnings were issued for insufcient vessel safety equipment. Along with the enforcement action taken by of cers, about 25 bags of oysters were seized and returned alive to the water. The interception and seizure of these shell sh harvested from closed waters prevented their introduction into the commercial shell sh market, potentially lessening the chance of illness from ingestion by consumers. FRANKLIN C.I. K-9 TEAM EARNS 3RD PLACE FWC REPORT

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Local The Times | A3 Thursday, October 18, 2012 This means you. 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The exam includes a prescription for eye glasses and tests for Glaucoma, Cataracts and other eye diseases FOR YOUR APPOINTMENT CALL: 850-763-6666 ELIGIBILITY: U.S. Citizens living in the Florida Panhandle, 59 years and older, not presently under our care. Coupon Expires: 10-31-12 FREE EYE EXAM CODE: AP00 Darren Payne, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon Lee Mullis, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon Todd Robinson, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon "Freedom from Eye Glasses, Now a reality for many." Smart Lenses SM SPECIAL TO THE TIMES Carrabelle cut the ribbon Oct. 5 on the citys new downtown pavilion. The new pavilion, next to the rehouse, was built as part of a $546,000 Community Development Block Grant for downtown revitalization. The grant also covered the cost of sidewalks, drainage, additional parking in the downtown area, restroom and landscaping. Work was completed by Duggar Excavating, with engineering by Inovia. Above: Mayor Curley Messer cuts the ribbon, with, from left, Inovias Jim Waddell, City Commissioner Cal Allen, Inovias Molly Mitchell, Chamber of Commerce Director Suzanne Zimmerman, Messer, City Administrator Courtney Millender, with daughter Raegan Dempsey, City Commissioner Brenda La Paz and Ann Wilson. The city encourages the public to use the new facilities the last Saturday of every month and create an outdoor market. Bring your fresh-baked goods, produce, arts, crafts, jewelry, etc. to display and sale. There will be no charge for space at this time and will be on a rst-come, rst-served basis. For more information, call the city at 697-3618. OUTDOOR MARKET PLANNED FOR NEW PAVILION Estate planning check-ups in Carrabelle Legal Services of North Florida will be conducting estate planning check-ups from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Franklin County Senior Center at 201 NW Ave. F in Carrabelle on Oct. 18 and 25. Participants will be entered into a drawing to receive a simple will prepared by a Florida attorney. Learn about wills, living wills, heath care directives and much more. Attorneys will also be on hand to discuss issues related to BP oil spill claims, including any medical claims. No registration required. For more information, contact Scott Manion at 850-701-3317. Bridge maintenance work continues Periodic lane restrictions will run through Nov. 7, at the following locations in Franklin County, as Bridge Masters perform routine bridge maintenance work: State Road (S.R.) 30 / U.S. 98 Tillie Miller Bridge in Carrabelle, over the Carrabelle River S.R. 30 / U.S. 98 Porter Bar Creek Bridge, 2.5 miles west of S.R. 65 All activities are weather-dependent and may be delayed or re-scheduled in the event of inclement weather. Motorists are reminded to pay attention and use caution when driving through the work zone. For more Florida Department of Transportation District Three information. follow us on twitter @MyFDOT_NWFL. Room for more students Pam Nobles Studio has room at 86 Market Street in Apalachicola for more students. Classes go from ages 18 months to adult, in ballet, tap, jazz, hip-hop, Mommy and Me and something new an exercise class for adults. I would also like very much to teach baton, Nobles said. Thats what I started out teaching many years ago. Baton twirlers look great in parades and exhibitions. The exercise class that has been added is something needed here, she said. Were just getting started with it. For more information, call 653-8078. Yoga class Wednesdays at community center A community hatha yoga class is held every Wednesday evening, from 5:30-7 p.m. at the City Hall Community Center at Battery Park. The class is taught by Kathy Jansen, a registered yoga teacher with the National Yoga Alliance. The class is free, with donations accepted. Yoga mats provided if needed. For more information, call 653-6719. News BRIEFS

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Opinion A4 | The Times USPS 027-600 Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 Publisher: Roger Quinn Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola Times Jackels knowledge of real estate an asset While the rhetoric always heats up before an election, I found some of Tony Shivers comments about Commissioner Pinki Jackel that were published in the Oct. 11 issue of The Times to be ill-considered and unfair. This county commission candidate complained that Ms. Jackel came to the area to make a prot. While I am sure that there were many things that brought Pinki to the area, I for one do not see making a prot as a bad thing. It certainly would make little sense to move to the area and start a business not expecting to do so, and certainly Mr. Shivers family has proted greatly from their businesses here in Franklin County. Politicians here in Franklin County are rightfully proud that they have spent their lives here, but in many cases, time spent outside the county can help ofceholders solve problems by giving them a broader perspective of how things are done differently, and sometimes better somewhere else. In Pinkis case, she also spent four years in Tallahassee getting her degree at Florida State. It seems that Pinki is often the outsider on county commission votes, though. She ghts hard for scal responsibility and works to minimize tax increases, which often places her at odds with the rest of the commission. Relative to Mr. Shivers other comments, I am also sure that both candidates agree that improvements and amenities are needed. Pinki has been behind many during the last four years, including the pavilion in Eastpoint and the improved landscaping at Lighthouse Park on the island that help attract the visitors who bring muchneeded revenue to Franklin County. And as for the charge that 85 percent of the people (in her commercials) are all real estate people well, take a look at the commercials and judge for yourself, but it does not look that way to me. If there are some real estate people among the small business owners, county workers and others in the commercials, thats not necessarily a bad thing. If we are going to get our employment and our tax rolls back up to where they need to be, we need people to build, remodel and buy homes and start businesses. Pinkis knowledge of this business is an asset to the commission, in a manner similar to the way that Mr. Smokey Parrishs intimate knowledge of the seafood industry serves us. This upcoming election is going to have a huge impact on our county, our state and our nation. We all have hot button issues that lead us to support the candidates we do, and I am glad to see The Times covering the issues. There are times, though, when taking a step back and looking at what is said from a little different perspective is constructive. Sincerely, Francis L. Giknis St. George Island School board should lead by example I would like to challenge each of the ve school board members of Franklin County. Each of them always expresses that they do everything for the kids and the schools. Well, why dont they allow their actions speak louder than their words? I was reading an article out of the Educators Journal about a school board member from Bay County named Jerry Register. Mr. Register took $5,000 from his school board pay and is giving it back by giving 50 teachers $100 gift certicates to Ms. Marys School Source to buy supplies for their classroom. I cannot applaud this gentleman enough for actually caring about the schools and showing positive action by giving back. I wonder if we have any school board members in Franklin County that will be willing to do the same? They dont have to give back the same way that Mr. Register did, but why not donate at least $10,000 or more of their salary back to the school system? Guess what, that would equal $50,000 and a teacher position. It could also buy uniforms for various sports teams or may it could allow for middle school sports. Imagine the possibilities of what could happen, if the school board members would lead by example. Sincerely, Dustin Martina Bachelor of science in political science Masters of science in education Specialist in educational leadership Ph.D. candidate in educational leadership Thursday, October 18, 2012 By David Adlerstein and Caty Greene Special to the Times When Dody Butler was a boy, he and his friends would swim in the river. I dont remember any kid who didnt swim back then, he told the audience that lled the Holy Family Senior Center Sept. 29 to hear him and three ladies tell stories of the place where they grew up. The afternoon session was part of the second annual Authors in Apalach weekend and featured a panel of storytellers including Dolores Roux, Peggy George and Cora Russ, with Susan Clementson as the moderator. Butler told of how it was down by the river when he rst met Alexander Key, the famed author, back before World War II. We were skinny dipping and he walked up and said Is Dody here? If theres a Dody here, his mothers calling him, Butler said. He sat down on a log and watched us. Pretty often when we were swimming, hed be there. A captivating detail from Keys life followed, told from the point of view of Butler, now a man in his 80s able to smoothly relate the Tom Sawyer-like memories of his boyhood. Key, he said, kept a 20-foot sailboat named Jewelry, and used it to shape his knowledge of the coastline, which gured in to two of his works, The Wrath and the Wind and Island Light, both of which he wrote after the war. He took me out on that sailboat and for no reason I could ever gure out he told me Im going to teach you to sail, said Butler. He used to scold me pretty often, for not doing what I was supposed to do. When Key left for the service, he told Butler, then still in his early teens, I want you to take care of my boat until I get back. Butler recalled how he would anchor the boat up the river during the hurricane reach, and swim back home, even once braving a storm to return to the boat to plug a hole. When it calmed down enough, I went back out. Finally got the engine xed, he said. Most of the time I sailed upriver because you could always get back. When Butler himself went off into the service, following the path of his older brothers, he left the Key boat in the care of two friends and it didnt work out. They let the boat sink at Nine-Foot-Hole When he came back on leave, Butler got the boat out, saw it suffered dryrotted mast right at the deck, and took it to his grandfather, who owned Bay City at the time. It later went to Demo Georges Fish House, and after that, Butler lost track. As far as I know, the Jewelry might still be in the Demo Georges Fish House, he said. He closed by unfurling a small colorful drawing that Key had once given him, which Roux properly held up for the audience to admire. The afternoons second panel of storytellers was of a more formal kind, featuring Orman House Park Ranger Mike Kinnett, and local historian Mark Curenton, and graced with a special guest, Harry P. Owens, professor emeritus from Ole Miss. Kinnett, a polished presenter of the towns history in his role at the Orman House, honored Owens by presenting him with a copy of the 1967 doctoral thesis Apalachicola Before 1861 that Owens completed while a graduate student at Florida State University. The thesis has not been published, but Kinnett said it was the best $80 he had ever spent. Its the rst link on the rebirth of Apalachicola and its history, the park ranger told the audience, and Owens was happy to sign it. Owens told of how pleased he had been to fall upon a cache of original Orman family documents for help in his research, documents that Kinnett said now 35 years later, have been preserved in digital form. An amazing collection, he said. Curenton eshed out rstperson details of the era as found in a Jan. 30, 1853 letter from a Walton County man who had come to Apalachicola to seek employment. Earlier that morning, Curenton had helped with ag placement to help in paying respect to the fallen of the Civil War at the Chestnut Cemetery. Local citizens represented veterans from well-known families, several representing their own kin including George Floyd and Tom Daly (Porter family). City Commissioner Frank Cook, also a Porter, was also in attendance. The weekends featured speaker, Jeff Shaara, a New York Times bestselling author several time over, addressed the forum with an animated sharing of how the work of his father, Killer Angels, had inuenced his own writings. Shaara told of how his fathers work, which eventually was made into the highest rated cable lm ever Gettysburg, had an inauspicious start, coming out after Vietnam when nobody wanted to read about generals. He didnt nd an audience, said Shaara. My father was a master of bad timing. But the book did nd success eventually, 19 years after it was published and ve years after the elder Shaaras death. For the younger Shaara, it was a journey of discovery, a creative exploration that began when he rst visited Gettysburg with his father. Since he rst began his writing career in earnest, Jeff Shaara shared details of his remarkable success, even groaning along with the audience at one point at some of the cheesy headlines that have accompanied reviews of his books, such as The Son Also Rises. Shaara, who lives in Tallahassee, released in May his most recent book, A Blaze of Glory, about the battle of Shiloh. The weekend began with Friday evening with a dinner of venison and seafood served to 60 people in candlelit Benedict Hall. Funds were raised for the Apalachicola Municipal Library through their friends group, PALS. Leon Bloodworth, his behind the scenes partner Perianne McKeown, volunteer kitchen staff Jaime Liang, Julie OMalley and Carole Braszky and servers from the Franklin County School, along with Beth Wright and Mark Friedman, kept the food and wine coming. Lee McLemore from the Piggly Wiggly described the wines. Close to 20 authors and publications were available in the morning at the Raney House, to meet a steady stream of book enthusiasts. Attendees were greeted by three cheerful junior authors on the front porch, Jan Annino, Adrian Fogelin and M. R. Street. Inside, the historical contingent, anchored by Willoughby Marshall, included Marlene Womack and Robin Ingram, with her mothers newly released book about the Apalachicola Ice Company. The best seller, after Shaara, was probably former Apalachicola Mayor Jimmie Nichols, whose Apalachicola Times columns have been compiled posthumously by former Times staff writer Kevin Begos. To conclude the afternoon, which was packed with almost too much stuff, were two panels. First, the Award Winners who turned out to number six: the aforementioned junior authors, plus Glynn Marsh Alam and Doug Alderson. Doug was also the nal speaker before the event was adjourned to the Orman House for a reception. Caty Greene is the librarian for the Apalachicola Municipal Library. To reach her, call 653-8436. CORRECTION In last weeks Oct. 11 issue, it was erroneously reported on the Society page that Shawn Dolan had graduated this summer from Florida A and M University with a masters degree in architecture. Authors tell, and sell, their tales @ THE LIBRARY Caty Greene LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PHOTO S BY D AV ID A DLER S TEIN | The Times Dody Butler recalls his youth. Mike Kinnett, left, retired Old Miss Prof. Harry P. Owens, right, and Mark Curenton share a laugh after their forum on Apalachicola history. Delores Roux holds up a drawing that Alexander Key gave to Dody Butler as Susan Clementson listens at left.

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Local The Times | A5 Thursday, October 18, 2012 By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes Lswoboda@starfl.com Sharlene Posey is asking for your help in cataloguing her late brothers art work. Jimmy Smith, of St. George Island and Eastpoint, passed away Sept. 12 at St. James Bay Health and Rehabilitation Center after a prolonged illness. He was an early resident of St. George Island, an artist, a musician and a free spirited child of the 60s. Jimmys older brother Mike said his younger brother spent much of his childhood in Tripoli, Libya where his father was stationed on Wheelus Air Force Base. He attended the American high school at Wheelus and in 1965; began to play the guitar. Music became a lifelong passion for Jimmy, when he and Mike formed a sixman band called Time. By age 16, Jimmy was working five to six nights a week as a musician and earning about $300 weekly. Jimmy graduated high school in 1968 and traveled to Switzerland to visit a girlfriend. Then, in 1969, Moammar Khadafi ordered the American military out of Libya and the Smith family returned to Texas. Jimmy played with several bands in Canada and the Midwest. Mike entered the military and, in 1973, was stationed in Germany. Jimmy joined him there and again became part of the local music scene. Jimmy began studying marquetry, the art and craft of applying pieces of veneer to a structure to form decorative patterns, designs or pictures. He worked with two Dutch artists Michael Fickens and Rudy Schillen. Mike returned to the U.S. in 1975, but, Jimmy, who had found a special niche in Germany, remained for several years, traveling in western Europe and becoming fluent in German. Jimmy returned home in 1977 and bounced around until he found St. George Island, becoming a resident about 1982, just as the building boom was gaining momentum. Like many early island residents, Jimmy worked at more than one job to make ends meet. He tended bar at Harry As, worked construction, played in local clubs and later ran a music shop in Eastpoint. But his marquetry skills became a steady source of income during those years. Many island homes contain his art work, in some cases built into the structure of the house. Mike said he believes Jimmy created 1,000 pictures, perhaps 200 of which could be described as masterpieces. Jimmys sister, Sharlene, remembers he exhibited at art shows and became a member of International Marquetry Society. She said several galleries expressed interest in his work, but he had so many commissions, he couldnt supply a gallery as well. He also continued to pursue his music, playing with Betsy James and Clay Bailey in a band Shotgun Annie that performed on and off the island. Around this time, with Jimmy at the peak of his creative skills, tragedy struck. Jimmy was diagnosed with cancer that eventually affected his vision. Even after losing an eye, he continued to create his beautiful designs using a strong magnifying glass, but in the end, marquetry became impossible for him. He taught Mikes wife Libby the craft and she passed it on to her son Austin, who actually completed some pieces Jimmy left unfinished. With a reduced income due to illness and a divorce, Jimmy left the island and moved to less expensive digs in Eastpoint where he remained until his final hospitalization. John Spohrer, a close friend of Jimmys, remembers him well. Jimmy was a very talented guy but I think that what all of his friends remember best about him was his upbeat attitude to life, Spohrer said. That didnt change when his health failed. Anyone that knew him through the years of all of the horrible things that happened to him in the prime of life knew his attitude never turned negative. He stayed dedicated to his art even to point when he could hardly see, walk, or get around. It stayed important to him. His positive happy attitude toward life was one of his major attributes. He was loyal as a friend and a good animal owner, he said. He loved his dog Petey. He was really an inspiration. As he went through it all, you couldnt help but think if something bad happened to you, you would want react to it as Jimmy did. Karen Dennis remembered Jimmy as a wonderful person and master storyteller. Belinda Kelliher, a friend who met Jimmy at the Blue Parrot, said he was always worried about his friends. While Jimmy is gone, his memory and much of his artwork lives on, and sister Sharlene is asking for help in locating and photographing it so she can create a catalogue. Marquetry is a dying art form. Jimmys family owns only a few of his creations and Sharlene wants to create a permanent record of her brothers art. Jimmys work may be built into the woodwork of a building; it may adorn furniture, although those pieces are known to be rare. Most of Jimmys art hung on the wall like a painting. He is also known to have applied veneer to wooden cigar boxes. Sharlene said Jimmy always signed his work and often listed his materials of the reverse side of a piece with details about where and when the work was completed. If you believe you have a piece of Jimmy Smiths art, please share the information with Sharlene Posey at (850) 508-2809. COLLINS CONSTRU C TION OF ST. GEOR G E I S LAND, INC & S EWA G E TREATMENT S ERV I CE S O VER 30 YEARS EXPERIEN C E OUR S ERV I CE S I NCLUDE: AFTER HOURS & EMERGEN C Y SERVI C E PROVIDED 850.670.5790 MA I NTENANCE@JCOLL I N S CON S TRUCT I ON.COM Robert C. Bruner Attorney Personal & Business Bankruptcy Over 30 Years Legal Experience 850-670-3030 bankruptcy relief under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon advertisements. Before you decide, ask us to send you free written information Piecing together Jimmy Smiths legacy JIMMY SMITH FROM THE SMITH FAMILY COLLECTION Marquetry sailboat created by Jimmy Smith

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On Saturday evening, Doris Pendleton ended 36 years of service to the county on a high note surrounded by family and friends. The staff of the property appraisers of ce threw a retirement bash of which to be proud. The Coombs Armory was beautifully decorated with an autumn theme appropriate both to the season and the occasion. One by one, Pendletons coworkers came to the microphone to express their love and admiration for their departing supervisor. Rhonda Skipper, property appraiser elect, recalled shopping sprees, Christmas parties and a riverboat trip. The memories we created are anything but blue, she said. Paul Wasmund told Pendleton, I wouldnt have missed it for anything in the world. Joseph Ferrell called Pendleton the sweetest, most caring, kindest and most generous person he knew. There were jokes, too. Remember age is just a number, but in your case its a very large number, Terry Tipton said. Pendletons fellow constitutional of cers were on hand to honor her. Undersheriff Joel Norred presented her with a plaque from the sheriffs of ce. When I started working we were the only two people in the courthouse early in the morning and sat, gossiped and drank coffee until 8:30 a.m. Supervisor of Elections Ida Elliot recalled. We must be best friends, for me to miss a Gators game to be here. Clerk of Courts Marcia Johnson pointed out that when she and Pendleton began work at the courthouse there were no computers. Pendleton herself recalled the days when, at 19, she came to work for Property Appraiser John James. Reminiscences, sometimes tearful, were followed by fun when two groups of courthouse workers staged skits for the assembly. A group of hillbilly minstrels Skipper, Ferrell, property appraise staffers Rita Millender and Brenda Benjamin and County Planner Alan Pierce toted clay jugs as they sang a song with the chorus Gloom, despair and agony to me. The mountaineers were followed by ladies Casey Nash, Stephanie Smith, Brenda Benjamin and Rita Preston each in owery aprons and sunbonnets who gave their own musical tribute. A wonderful dinner, featuring mullet and chicken prepared by AJs was followed by dancing to records spun by deejay Van Johnson. Pendleton joined a group of talented dancers in the Electric Slide. Pendleton said she plans to focus more on family. We have a houseboat up the river and plan to spend more time there, she said, And Tommys an avid hunter, so well be visiting a camp up in Georgia, too. As a going-away gift, the staff of the property appraisers of ce presented the boss with a magni cent grandfather clock. To see a gallery of the retirement party, visit www.ApalachTimes.com. Stan Trappe ATTORNEY AT LAW Foreclosure Defense Bankruptcy Asset Protection Real Estate Probate ~ Wills Admitted to Practice Law in Florida Since 1974 Let Me Help You 850-769-6139 236 McKenzie Avenue Panama City, FL LARIENA! Oh my, just look at this face! Lariena is an 8 week old Spaniel mix. She and her litter mates came to us at 5 weeks old so they are well socialized. There are only two of four still available so if you have been wanting a puppy that wont grow to be a big dog, come meet Lariena. V OL U NTEERS ARE D ES P ERATEL Y NEE D E D TO SO C IALI Z E ALL O F O U R D O G S AN D C ATS We are always looking for people willing to bring one of our animals into their home to be fostered for various needs. Anytime you can spare would be greatly appreciated. C all Karen at 670-8417 for more details or visit the F ranklin C ounty Humane Society at 244 State Road 65 in Eastpoint. Y ou may logon to the website at www.forgottenpets.org to see more of our adoptable pets. PET OF THE WEEK Franklin County Humane Society NIP FIRE A N TS I N THE BUD! CALL L OIS AT 653-5857 Franklin Countys ONLY LOC AL Pest Control Company dbutler@coastalcoverage.com Locally owned and operated Home Business Auto Health Workers Comp Society A6 | The Times Thursday, October 18, 2012 Caden Haynes turns 1 Caden Steven Lee Haynes will be celebrating his rst birthday on Wednesday, Oct. 17, 2012. He is the son of Glenda Jean Martina and Joseph Haynes of Apalachicola. Maternal grandparents are Kenneth and Glenda Martina. Maternal great-grandparents are Curtis and Jean Watson, and Bill and Burnell Martina, all of Apalachicola. Paternal grandmother is Lorie Haynes, of Houston, Texas. Happy rst birthday! We Love You. Birthdays Happy birthday, Darlene Happy 21st birthday Darlene!! We love you so much and are proud of the young woman you are becoming. Love, Mom, Dad and Megan Ezra Hernandez born Proud parents Rick Hernandez and Krystal Shuler, of Apalachicola would like to announce the birth of their son, Ezra Jay Hernandez. Ezra was born Wednesday, Oct. 3, 2012, at 6 p.m. at Gulf Coast Hospital in Panama City. He weighed 7 pounds, 12 ounces and was 20.75 inches long. Tanicia Pugh, Courtney Bell to wed Saturday Family and friends are cordially invited to attend the wedding ceremony of Tanicia Pugh and Courtney Bell this Saturday, Oct. 20, at the National Guard Armory in Apalachicola. The ceremony will begin at 5 p.m. with the reception to follow. Come be a guest of this joyous occasion as two become one. Birth Special to the Times Wewahitchka author Michael Lister will be signing and reading from his newly released John Jordan mystery Blood Sacri ce from 1-3 p.m. Saturday at Apalachicolas Downtown Books. Blood Sacri ce is the fth entry in Listers popular and acclaimed mystery series featuring ex-cop turned prison chaplain John Jordan. Publishers Weekly said of Blood Sacri ce, Listers strong fth book featuring cop-turned-prison-chaplain John Jordan takes Jordan to the small Florida Panhandle town of Bridgeport, to undergo counseling at St. Anns Abbey. Well-handled plot twists complement one of todays more psychologically complex religious detectives. Following a particularly brutal and costly case, Jordan goes to a secluded retreat center and encounters one of the most bewildering and haunting cases of his career the suspicious death of a young woman undergoing an exorcism. A provocative thriller, Blood Sacri ce also is an exploration into unseen realms of darkness and light, especially those of Jordans con icted heart. Confronting the irrational, superstitious, and greedy, Blood Sacri ce delves into the rise of American exorcisms following their explosion in popular culture, and mourns the loss of Floridas nal corner of unspoiled beauty. Blood Sacri ce is an exciting entry into what bestseller Michael Connelly calls one of the most unique series in contemporary crime ction. Lister also will be signing his other books, including Meaning Every Moment, The Big Goodbye and Burnt Offerings. For more info, visit www. MichaelLister.com. Wedding Lister to sign new mystery at Downtown Books MICHAEL LISTER LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Doris Pendleton thanks the many people with whom she worked. Pendleton serenaded at retirement

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The Times | A7 Thursday, October 18, 2012 The United Methodist Churches of Franklin County Welcome You First United Methodist Church of Apalachicola Worship Service 11:00 a.m. every Sunday Sunday School 10:00 a.m. 75 5 th St. Apalachicola 653-9530 fumcapalach@gtcom.net Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis Carrabelle United Methodist Church Worship Services 10:45 a.m. Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Celebrate Recovery Mondays 7-9 p.m. 102 NE Ave. B Carrabelle 697-3672 Pastor: Julie Stephens Eastpoint United Methodist Church Worship Service 10:00 a.m. every Sunday Healing service every fourth Monday at 7:00 p.m. 317 Patton Dr. (corner of David St.) 670-8825 Pastor: Rev. Beth White St. George Island United Methodist Church 9:00 a.m. Worship Service 10:00 a.m. Fellowship Hour 201 E. Gulf Beach Dr. 9274635 www.sgiumc.org Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis Nursery now provided for Sunday Church Service WELCOMES YOU Trinity Trinity Episcopal Church est. 1836 Welcomes You Hwy. 98 & 6th St. Apalachicola 850-653-9550 Sunday Worship Services 8 & 10:30 a.m. Wednesdays Healing Service 11 a.m. Centering Prayer 4 p.m. Sunday Worship Services 8 & 10:30 a.m. Wednesdays Healing Service 11 a.m. Centering Prayer 4 p.m. First Pentecostal Holiness Church 379 Brownsville Road Apalachicola Were excited about what Gods doing!!! Sunday School 9:45 am Sunday Morning Worship 10:45 am Sunday Evening Service 6:00 pm Monday, Youth Group 6:30 pm Wednesday, Royal Rangers, G.A.P. 7:00 pm Wednesday Worship & Word 7:30 pm Nursery Provided during regular church services 7:00 7:00 First Baptist Church St. George Island 501 E. Bayshore Drive 927-2257 R. Michael Waley, Pastor Join us as we praise and worship the living Christ. Great is the Lord and most worthy of praise. Psalm 145:3 Sunday Bible Study ................................................ 10:00am Worship Praise ........................................................ 11:00am Sunday Night ............................................................ 7:00pm Wednesday Power Hour ...................................... 7:00pm Wednesday Youth at S.P.L.A.S.H ....................... 7:00pm Walking in Christ R. Michael Whaley, Pastor WELCOMES YOU Church of the Ascension 101 NE First Street Carrabelle SUNDAY 10:00 AM WELCOMES YOU Church THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH (850) 274-4490 (850) 545-2578 Faith David Bruton Wingate died Tuesday, Oct. 9, 2012, in Port St. Joe at the age of 77. He is survived by his wife of 52 years, Arlene Bergstrom Wingate of Apalachicola. David was born Jan. 30, 1935, in Charlotte, N.C. He was raised in Mt. Gilead, N.C., by his mother, Fannie Louisa Bruton, a piano teacher, and father Dr. George Clarence Wingate. He received his bachelors, mas ters and academic work for his doctorate at the Julliard School of Music in New York City. He then taught voice at the Florida State University School of Music from 1966-2003. David spent his pro fessional life performing nationally and internation ally in numerous opera and musical productions. He toured with the Robert Shaw Chorale, sang with major orchestras, per formed oratorios, served as choir director for many churches and performed as a soloist with the High Holy Days with Richard Tucker in Chicago. Other survivors in clude four children, John (Dana), Asheville, N.C.; Peter, Tallahassee; Tianne, Tallahassee; and David Daniel, Munich, Germany; four grandchildren, Ali, Strom, Jack and Cameron; Boots Wingate (cousin) and family of Albany, Ga.; special niece Rebecca (Marc) Ca bassa, Gulf Breeze; David Armon Bru ton (cousin), Chapel Hill, N.C.; William Bruton (cousin), Mt. Gilead, N.C.; Joseph Bruton (cousin), Maryland; many sis ters and brothersin-law, nieces and nephews and many colleagues and students. He was preceded in death by one son, David Bruton Wingate, Jr., and one brother, George C. Wingate. He was a member of Trinity Episcopal Church in Apalachicola and was cared for by the dedicated staff at the Bridge at Bay St. Joe in Port St. Joe. A memorial service will be held on Saturday, Oct. 20, at 11 am at Trinity Episcopal Church in Apala chicola. Memorial contribu tions may be made to the FSU School of Music, the Julliard School of Music or the Trinity Music Fund. David Bruton Wingate DAVID BRUTON WINGATE Obituary Covenant Word hosts Oct. 31 Joy Night Covenant Word Christian Center will have its annual Joy Night, a safe alternative to Halloween, from 6-9 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 31, in front of the old Apalachicola High School gym on 14th Street. The event is free and open to the entire community; kids and adults are invited. With many sponsors from local businesses, churches, organizations and individuals, the event will feature deejay Big Holy, from Panama City, bounce houses and a superslide, games, contests with prizes, drawings, cake/prize walk for adults and kids with cakes as prizes and gift bags, grilled hot dogs, hamburgers, chips and drinks and plenty of free candy. Call Joy Night coordinator Misty DeCourcey at 247-8524 for info or if you would like to donate candy/ prizes, etc. Donations are tax-deductible. Big Bend Hospice holds Nov. 10 remembrance service Big Bend Hospice invites everyone to the annual Services of Remembrance, to be held in each of the counties Big Bend Hospice serves. In Franklin County, the service will be at 10:30 a.m. Nov. 10 at the Three Servicemen Statue, 230 Market St., Apalachicola. The Service of Remembrance is a nondenominational service that brings the community together to honor the memories of loved ones at this very special time of the year. Many times people become overwhelmed with emotions during the holiday season, said Cathy Adkison, Big Bend Hospices president and CEO. This service provides a wonderful opportunity to pause to remember, pay honor and nd support. This is a time for remembrance open to everyone in the community. Services in each county include music by music therapists and words of encouragement from chaplains, all part of the Big Bend Hospice staff. Hospice grief and loss counselors will also be available to talk. Services conclude with a special candle lighting ceremony and passing of the candlelight in memory of loved ones. A reception follows, hosted by members from each countys advisory council. Everyone who attends shares a common purpose: to honor and to remember a loved one who has died, to be surrounded by others who are on a similar journey and to connect with loved ones. The service is proof that death ends a life and not a relationship, that holidays can still be a time of hope and of family, of love and of connection to all the things and all the people who have ever been important to us. For additional information about Big Bend Hospices bereavement services, contact Pam Mezzina at 878-5310, ext. 799 or pam@bigbendhospice.org. Registration information is also available at www. bigbendhospice.org. Big Bend Hospice has been serving this community since 1983 with compassionate end-of-life care along with grief and loss counselors available to provide information and support to anyone in Leon, Jefferson, Taylor, Madison, Gadsden, Liberty, Franklin or Wakulla county. Faith BRIEFS When Jimmy Lycett retired his shing boat, the Amanda Belle, he removed the name board and put it on the wall of his wifes restaurant, the Fishermans Wife. It looks really good there. Guess Ill see you this afternoon for lunch. You are planning to join us at the Franklin County Senior Center, arent you? Serving begins at noon. Be watching for you! You do know that every Friday night is hamburger night at the Camp Gordon Johnston American Legion Post 82, here in the Village at 2367 Oak Street. Order up at 5 to 7 p.m. A very large hamburger and chips for a donation of $6. Come enjoy the evening or call and order to go. Call 697-9998. Start Saturday with a full breakfast at the Lanark Village Boat Club. You can get your sugar x from 9 a.m. to noon. Your donation of $5 will be collected at the door. We have pancakes, French toast, eggs, bacon, sausage, juice and coffee. See ya there! Dont worry about the calories. You can work them off at the Birthday Bash at Post 82. Party starts at 6 p.m. The fun starts when you come in the door. Well its time for the covered dish dinner, already. Come on over to Chillas Hall, Sunday, Oct. 21 and join your friends and neighbors. Serving begins at 1 p.m. Bring your favorite dish to share, a donation and your empty stomach. Keep Randy Harrison and Sharon Thoman in your prayers. The angels took them home last week. Pray for their eternal peace and for their families. They both lived here in the village. Dont forget the Halloween contest and dance, Oct. 27 on spooky Saturday. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. and Greg K and Krewe will start the music at 7 p.m. Got your costume ready? Our rst Saturday breakfast will be at Chillas Hall Nov. 3 from 8:30 to 11 a.m. Members of the Lanark Village Golf Club will prepare your full breakfast you. Your donation of $5 will be collected at the door. Also on that Saturday, the Ladies Guild of the Sacred Heart Church will have their fall festival. They are now accepting donations for the sale. More info later. Be kind to one another, check on the sick and house bound and remember our little prayer. God grant me patience and I want it right now! Until next time, God bless America, our troops, the poor, homeless and hungry. LANARK NEWS Jim Welsh It seems that you often nd inspiration through strange circumstances. While riding my bike through a vacant lot on the island a few weeks ago, I was attacked and bitten by a dog. After a rst responder conrmed that I needed to get some stitches, my wife drove me to the emergency room at Weems. The staff there was professional and treated me with great care, but, though I was impressed and appreciative, that was not what surprised me most about the incident. State law requires the hospital le a report with Animal Control when they treat bites. This report was led, and later that day, I spoke to William Key at Franklin County Animal Control. The next morning he and a sheriff met me near the home of the dogs owner, where I identied the dog that bit me. While he was clearly in control of the situation, William took time to talk to me about what happened, explained the additional report I had to le and was sensitive with the animal, which was being impounded for a 10-day observation period. Somehow he did not t my image of a person in his often very tough line of work. A few days later, I got a voicemail that asked that I call William. When I returned the call, William said he was just checking to see how I was doing and how my bite was healing. He has since again followed up with me to assure that the report was led correctly. Though getting bitten was far from a pleasant experience, and though the dogs owner has yet to express any remorse for his dogs actions, things like this tend to remind you how decent and supportive people are. I was loaned crutches, had dinner brought over and received numerous expressions of sympathy from dear friends and other folks I hardly know. My wife seems to have been even more caring than usual these past few weeks, changing bandages frequently. The folks at Weems have seen me two more times with the same high level of care. Thanks to them, the wound is nearly healed. I was most impressed, though, with the help and expressions of interest from William, perhaps because they were sincere and unexpected. It certainly provides me with an example of the difference taking a moment to express concern can make, and I will try to better follow his example. Sincerely, Francis L. Giknis St. George Island Big Bend Hospice presented the Heart of Hospice Award to Bev Hewitt, owner of The Grill in Apalachicola, during the Apalachicola Bay Chamber of Commerces Oct. 4 Business After Hours. For more than 10 years, she has been a member of the hospices Franklin County Advisory Council, comprising local leaders who serve as community champions for hospice care to their neighbors. Hewitt, above left, was chosen because her passion and compassion for the hospice patients and families living in Franklin County. She is a great spokesperson for Big Bend Hospice and its mission to provide compassionate care to individuals with a lifelimiting illness, comfort to families and emotional support to anyone who has lost a loved one. She has worked many hours at hospice events to ensure funds are raised to help support the needs of the families in Franklin County. Bev is a tireless worker and a beloved member of our hospice team, said Pam Allbritton, community resources/volunteer coordinator for Big Bend Hospice, above right. She has truly made a difference. Big Bend Hospice has served the community since 1983 with compassionate end-oflife care along with grief and loss counselors available to provide information and support to anyone in Franklin and surrounding counties. For additional information about services, call 878-5310 or visit www. bigbendhospice.org. Dont forget Halloween dance Oct. 27 Card of Thanks Hewitt receives Heart of Hospice award

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Email outdoors news to timesoutdoors @star .com O UTDOORS www.apalachtimes.com Section Section A Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL (next to Piggly Wiggly) www.BWOsh.com (next to Piggly Wiggly) www.BWOsh.com Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL EV E RYTHING FOR YOUR O UTDOOR ADV E NTUR E EV E EV E EV RYTHING FOR YOUR E RYTHING FOR YOUR E O UTDOOR ADV E UTDOOR ADV E UTDOOR ADV NTUR E NTUR E E EV E EV E EV RYTHING FOR YOUR E RYTHING FOR YOUR E O UTDOOR ADV E UTDOOR ADV E UTDOOR ADV NTUR E NTUR E E SEPTEM B ER FEATURE FISH: Stop in and register or go online at www. B W O sh.com RED FISH ER FEATURE FISH: WEEKLY ALMANAC APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE TIDE TABLES MONTHLY AVERAGES To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from these given for APALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW Cat Point Minus 0:40 Minus 1:17 East Pass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27 To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from those given for CARRABELLE: HIGH LOW Bald Point Minus 9:16 Minus 0:03 Sponsor the WEEKLY ALMANAC Call Today! 653-8868 Date High Low % Precip Thu, Oct. 18 81 64 30 % Fri, Oct. 19 78 57 10 % Sat, Oct. 20 78 58 0 % Sun, Oct. 21 78 63 0 % Mon, Oct. 22 80 64 0 % Tues, Oct. 23 80 63 0 % Wed, Oct. 24 80 66 10 % 17 We 416am 1.9 727pm 1.7 1207pm -0.1 1142pm 1.4 18 Th 452am 2.0 833pm 1.6 100pm -0.1 19 Fr 534am 2.0 942pm 1.5 1217am 1.4 200pm 0.0 20 Sa 623am 1.9 1053pm 1.5 101am 1.4 309pm 0.1 21 Su 722am 1.8 1152pm 1.5 209am 1.4 423pm 0.2 22 Mo 840am 1.6 354am 1.3 534pm 0.3 23 Tu 1235am 1.5 1023am 1.5 539am 1.2 638pm 0.5 24 We 108am 1.5 1222pm 1.4 658am 0.9 732pm 0.6 25 Th 135am 1.5 203pm 1.4 759am 0.7 818pm 0.7 26 Fr 158am 1.5 317pm 1.5 849am 0.5 858pm 0.9 27 Sa 218am 1.6 416pm 1.5 933am 0.3 932pm 1.0 28 Su 236am 1.6 506pm 1.5 1013am 0.1 1001pm 1.1 29 Mo 256am 1.7 549pm 1.5 1049am 0.1 1027pm 1.2 30 Tu 318am 1.7 629pm 1.5 1122am 0.0 1052pm 1.2 17 We 251am 3.0 602pm 2.7 954am -0.2 929pm 2.2 18 Th 327am 3.2 708pm 2.6 1047am -0.2 1004pm 2.2 19 Fr 409am 3.2 817pm 2.4 1147am 0.0 1048pm 2.2 20 Sa 458am 3.0 928pm 2.4 1256pm 0.2 1156pm 2.2 21 Su 557am 2.9 1027pm 2.4 210pm 0.3 22 Mo 715am 2.6 1110pm 2.4 141am 2.1 321pm 0.5 23 Tu 858am 2.4 1143pm 2.4 326am 1.9 425pm 0.8 24 We 1057am 2.2 445am 1.4 519pm 1.0 25 Th 1210am 2.4 1238pm 2.2 546am 1.1 605pm 1.1 26 Fr 1233am 2.4 152pm 2.4 636am 0.8 645pm 1.4 27 Sa 1253am 2.6 251pm 2.4 720am 0.5 719pm 1.6 28 Su 111am 2.6 341pm 2.4 800am 0.2 748pm 1.8 29 Mo 131am 2.7 424pm 2.4 836am 0.2 814pm 1.9 30 Tu 153am 2.7 504pm 2.4 909am 0.0 839pm 1.9 31 We 219am 2.7 543pm 2.4 940am 0.0 907pm 2.1 SPONSORED BY Inshore/Bay Offshore/Bottom Gag grouper season will close Oct. 31, so now is the time for your last offshore bottom trips for gag grouper. Reports have been good on the live or hard bottom 20-40 miles offhshore. Large schools of Spanish mackerel are close to shore over the past few days in and around St. Joe Bay. Good reports of large king sh are being caught at the oil docks or sea wall in St. Joe Marina. As the cooler air settles in this week, St. Joe Bay should respond with good red sh and trout catches. This month has been great for the inshore angler so far, and we hope that trend will last throughout the month. Good reports from Towns Beach and Eagle Harbor are the talk of the town. Jan Gorman sent me this picture of a beautiful stand of wild owers she spotted on Spring Creek Highway. This is false yellow indigo (Baptisia sphaerocarpa) also called green indigo, round indigo, yellow baptisia, American indigo, baptisia root, baptista, false indigo, horse y weed, indigo broom, rattlebush, yellow broom, and yellow indigo. Yellow indigo is native to the southern US and blooms from May to October in Florida. It is highly attractive to butter ies. This hardy plant is drought tolerant and grows to a height of two to three feet. It makes a show at the rear of any garden border. It is easily grown in well-drained soil in full sun to part shade, and thrives in poor soils. It is dif cult to grow from seed and slow to establish. Over time, plants form slowly expanding clumps with deep and extensive root systems, and should not be disturbed once established. If you must move this plant, early spring is considered to be the best time for transplanting. There are no common pests or diseases of yellow indigo. The name Baptista literally means to dip and harkens back to a close relative of yellow indigo, true indigo. Indigo was the rst vegetable dye known to have been in use. An indigo-dyed garment dating from about 3000 BC was found in the ancient Egyptian city of Thebes; and references to blue in the book of Exodus (25:4 and 35:25) undoubtedly also refer to indigo. India is believed to be the oldest center of indigo dyeing in the Old World. Indigo dye is one of the few plant dyes naturally resistant to fading, and was the original dye used in blue jeans. Yellow indigo was traditionally reputed to have medicinal qualities and was used in the treatment of in uenza, kidney disease, ulcerations of the skin, sore nipples, mucous colitis, amebic dysentery, tonsillitis, quinsy, septic conditions of the blood, muscular soreness, rheumatic and arthritic pains, constriction of the chest, whooping cough, dropsy, epilepsy, nervous disorders, chills, fever, malaria, typhoid fever, scarlet fever, diphtheria, mumps, piles and worms. More recent studies of the plant indicate it is unsafe to consume or apply to the skin in large amounts. By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com A barrier island off Franklin Countys coast, once targeted for development, has been purchased by the Audubon Society. Audubon Florida has acquired the last private inholding on Lanark Reef, one of Floridas most signi cant sites for threatened and endangered coastal birds and a designated Important Bird Area (IBA). According to a Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) survey, Lanark Reef lies in the Gulf of Mexico roughly 0.7 miles offshore of Lanark Village, and stretches for approximately six miles parallel to the coast and contains both submerged and emerged areas. The submerged lands comprise the majority of the reef extending for almost ve miles and are rich in sea grasses. The emerged areas are a series of islands that stretch for approximately one mile of the reef, with a total area of about four acres. The eastern emerged section is heavily vegetated with grasses and shrubs. The submerged lands were already the property of the state, but Audubon has been in negotiation with Premier Bank of Tallahassee to acquire the rest of the reef for several years. Last month, Audubon closed the deal paying $33,000 for the property. Hurley Booth, a Tallahassee developer, once planned to build Lanark Reef Resort, a condominium community on the tiny spit of land, and the county health department approved permits for septic tanks. But, County Planner Alan Pierce said, it was unlikely Booth would have been permitted to build on the tiny island. (Lanark) reef is not zoned for development of any kind and is not part of Franklin Countys land use map, Pierce said. Its just a sandbar as far as we are concerned. We never saw any building plans for development and it never went before planning and zoning According to Audubon, the narrow barrier island provides essential habitat to some of the Gulf of Mexicos most imperiled species. In spring and summer, it hosts a large breeding colony of brown pelicans, as well as nesting American oystercatchers, black skimmers, willets and more. In fall and winter, migrant and wintering birds like red knots, piping and snowy plovers, and more ock to the islands to feed and rest. Many of these species are rare and declining, listed as endangered or threatened by state or federal agencies. The island has been designated an important birding area by Audubon. More than 250 species of birds use the reef for spring and summer nesting and as a stopping point for winter migration. Lanark Reef has been designated by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service as critical habitat for the piping plover, one of the most rapidly declining Gulf shorebirds due to habitat loss. Eric Draper, Audubon Floridas executive director said, Lanark Reef has long been important to Floridas iconic coastal landscape. Audubon is proud to protect this remarkable habitat while it still exists. Many of the species bene tting from this acquisition are the same most affected by the Deepwater Horizon oil spill; funding for the purchase was provided by the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation with revenue generated by the sale of oil recovered from the spill. Private donors from across the country also made contributions to ensure the acquisition and management of this special place. The reef will be closed to human beings and dogs although the pristine bird sanctuary can still be viewed from boats. Because of the extremely shallow water surrounding Lanark Reef; it can be reached by boat only at high tide. FWC has posted warning signs about disturbing wildlife and damaging sea grass beds on the emerged areas of the reef. In a press release, Julie Wraithmell, Audubons director of wildlife conservation said, This dynamic island, shaped by wind and waves, is a glimpse of what was once common along the Gulf Coast: shifting sands and swaying marsh grass supporting abundant wildlife, The public can sign up for updates on the reef, coastal birds, Florida conservation issues and volunteer opportunities at http:// .audubonaction.org. Gulf County plans Bow Wow Bash The St. Joe Bay Humane Society presents the seventh annual Bow Wow Bash, which bene ts both the DAWGS in Prison program and the homeless animals of Gulf County, on Oct. 27. The bashs Masquerade Party will be 6-10 p.m. at the Centennial Building in Port St. Joe. Food will be provided by Chef Ian Williams and Sunset Coastal Grill. Guests enjoy a cash bar, masquerade contest (costumes optional) and live music. A silent and live auction will culminate with the drawing for the winner of a new iPad. Tickets are available for $10 each at locations around Port St. Joe including Bow Wow Beach Shop or www. bowwowbash.org. Prizes will be awarded to the winners of the costume contests, including Best Couple, Best Man, Best Woman and Best Overall. Door prizes will be given throughout the event. All proceeds are used to help support the DAWGS in Prison program and needy animals in Gulf County. Tickets are $30 each or $300 for a reserved table for 10, which includes a free drink ticket per person. They are available in Port St Joe at Bow Wow Beach Shop on Reid Ave. or at St. Joseph Bay Humane Society on 10th Street, or by visiting www. bowwowbash.org or www. sjbhumanesociety.org One day classes at ANERR The Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve will offer a one-day class in environmental science next month. On Nov. 14 (rain date Nov. 15, Rivers and Floodplains Class covers the ecology, geology, and natural history of the rivers and oodplains of the Florida Panhandle with the main focus on the Apalachicola River and oodplain. Other types of river systems will also be discussed. Learn about the diversity of animals and plants found in the river and surrounding oodplain, and their connection to the bay. Be prepared to spend part of the day in the classroom and part in the eld on our boat exploring the river and walking in the oodplain. Cost is $10 per person. For additional information, contact Coastal Training Program Coordinator Rosalyn F. Kilcollins at 670-7708 or Rosalyn.kilcollins@dep. state. .us. Coming up at the FSU Marine Lab On Thursday, Oct. 25, join Dr. Toby Daly-Engel, University of West Florida, at 7 p.m. for a lecture on The evolution of female promiscuity in aquatic predators. On Saturday, Nov. 10, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. attend a workshop and learn how to construct and use your own SENSE IT Temperature Sensor. On Sunday, Nov. 18, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. join Peter C. Stone, author of Waltzes with Giants: The Twilight Journey of the North Atlantic Right Whales for a discussion of The Art and Science of Nature Journaling for the Observant Writer. All events will be held at the Florida State University Coastal and Marine Lab, 3618 U.S. 98, Saint Teresa. For more info call 697-4095 or 697-4120. JAN GORMAN | Special to the Times False Indigo BUDS N BUGS: YELLOW INDIGO BUDS N BUGS Lois Swoboda GEORGE WILLSON | Special to the Times Audubon to preserve Lanark Reef Outdoors BRIEFS Page 8 Thursday, October 18, 2012

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CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA SP O RTS www.apalachtimes.com A Section By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com This Sundays third annual Running for the Bay marathon is expected to draw a record crowd, besting last years eld of 522 runners. Organizer Mark Henderson said the race could see upwards of 650-700 runners, talking part in either the full or half-marathon, or the 5K, 10k or even the Ultra 50K races, all with wheelchair divisions. Henderson said this year the race will probably be one of the largest Ultra 50K races in Florida, a distance of 31 miles, from Battery Park in Apalachicola to Eastpoint to St. George Island and back. This year, Henderson has partnered with Franklins Promise, with a commitment to help out the beleaguered oyster shermen with a charitable contribution from race proceeds. In addition, the humane society will have a free table at Saturdays Expo, from noon to 7 p.m. at the Apalachicola Community Center in Battery Park, where they will offer shelter animals for adoption. The Expo, free and open to the public, will give runners a chance to obtain their race packets, and a chance to learn about the latest in the world of running. Its not glitz and glamour, just good people having a good time, said Henderson. Come to the event to meet new running friends and to nd out how to enjoy the Apalachicola Bay area. The races will begin before dawn on Sunday, at about 7:15 a.m. at Battery Park. Because the marathon is certi ed by the USA Track and Field (USATF), the course can be used to qualify for the Boston Marathon or any other major that requires times to be set on a certi ed course. As a result there should be lots of runners eager to cross the nish line with their best time ever. Last year, 34-year-old Brooke Strosnider from Pittsburgh, Pa. overcame a stroke less than six months earlier to top the eld of 194 female runners. For the 228 men, Jack McDermott, 42, of Tallahassee, took the top prize. Topping the eld among the runners in the Ultra 50K, about six miles longer than a marathon, was David Goggins, 36, of Santa Rosa, an active duty Navy Seal. Henderson has also pushed the status of the races exquisite medal, a twirling piece of art that has won national awards. But this year, he has inaugurated a special surprise for Carrabelle, by featuring the worlds smallest police station in the spinner inside the medal. I wanted just to make sure they feel involved in the race, said Henderson. For more info, email Friends@runningforthebay.com. Gun Show October 27th & 28th Panama City Panama City Fairgrounds Fairgrounds 2086093 Sat 9 -5 Sun 10-4 C o n c e a l e d W e a p o n s C l a s s S a t / S u n 1 1 a m o r 2 p m Floridagunshows.com FREE PARKING Thursday, October 18, 2012 Page A9 Huge eld expected for Sunday marathon In a thrilling match at home Oct. 9, the Lady Seahawks downed Port St. Joe 3-2 in a win that delighted the hometown fans. Franklin County won the rst two games, 2521, and 25-19, and looked to be easy winners before St. Joe got back into it and won the next two, 25-21 and 25-23. In the fth and nal game, the Seahawks led 8-0 before letting the Lady Tiger Sharks back into the game to nearly tie it. But strong play by Chena Segree and the crowd on its feet enabled the Lady Seahawks to win 15-11 for the victory. The win was anked by a series of 3-0 losses, to drop Franklin Countys record to 8-11 under head coach Hilary Stanton. On Oct. 3, the team lost at Wakulla, and then on Oct. 4 at Blountstown. At home on Oct. 11, the Lady Seahawks fell again 3-0 to Liberty County, losing 25-17, 2513 and 25-22. By DAVID ADLERSTEIN With a score of 56, Team Dodd Title bested the runners up by two strokes, on Oct. 10, as seven teams competed on the beautiful greenways at St. James Bay Golf Resort in the ninth annual Apalachicola Bay Chamber of Commerce golf tournament. Playing in perfect weather, Team Dodd Title, consisting of Robbie and son Brett Johnson, Stacey Kirvin and Tyler Poloronis, edged Team Fairpoint Communications and Team Robertson and Associates, both tied at 58 strokes in the Florida scramble format. Roberson & Associates managed to break the tie for runner-up status. The team consisted of Rex Buzzett, Mark Eden eld, Mike McDonald and Robert Daniels. Fairpoint comprised Sandy and Richard Reeves, Harvey Britts and Dan Surber. Each of the members of the winning teams got a gift certi cate for the St. James Bay pro shop. Also joining in the action were Centennial Bank (Jim Hayes, Dan Anderson, Dusty May and Ronald Pickett), Preble-Rish (Clay Kennedy, Clay Smallwood, Park Allman and Andy Bailey), Journeys of SGI (Justin McMillian, Patrick Sparks, Nathan Donahoe, and Jimmy Maxwell) and Mason Bean C21 Collins (Mason Bean, Roy Plout, Bob Landiss and Paul Riegelmayer). Robbie Johnson, who made the longest drive of the day, a whopping 300 yards, was especially pleased. Johnson had triple bypass surgery in February, but was back in tiptop form for the tourney. This years winners received gift cards from Taylors Building Supply, Ace Hardware, We ngs Marine Supply and Tamaras Caf Floridita as well as tickets to the Dixie Theatre. Sponsors for the tournament were Centennial Bank, Marks Insurance, Mason Bean and Century 12, Boyd Brothers, Roberson and Associates, Fairpoint Communications, Bill Montford, Touchpoint/ Graphic Solutions, Preble Rish and We ngs Marine. By Lois Swoboda Dodd Title takes top prize in Chamber golf tourney KAYTE HENDERSON | Special to the Times The excitement of the nish line Above Middle: The race medal, featuring the worlds smallest police station. A map of the race course PHOTOS BY ANITA GROVE | Special to the Times The winning Dodd Title Team, from left, Brett Johnson, Stacey Kirvin, Tyler Poloronis and Robbie Johnson. The Centennial Bank teams Dan Anderson follows through. Under the direction of girls coach Kelli Wright, and boys coach Ramon Valenzuela, the Franklin County High School soccer program has begun practice. First game is Nov. 8. It promises to be an exciting season. The following is the entire schedule: Thursday, Nov. 8 @ John Paul II 5 /7 Wednesday, Nov. 14 @ Rickards 5 /7 Thursday, Nov. 15 @ Rocky Bayou* 5 /7 Tuesday, Nov. 27 @ Port St. Joe* 6 /8 Thursday, Nov. 29 @ West Gadsden 5 /7 Friday, Nov. 30 Baker 5 /7 Saturday, Dec. 1 @ Freeport Noon /2 Tuesday, Dec. 4 John Paul II 5 (Girls only) Wednesday, Dec. 5 Rickards 5 /7 Friday, Dec. 7 Rocky Bayou 4 /6 Tuesday, Dec. 11 Port St. Joe 6 /8 Thursday, Dec. 13 @ Rutherford 7(Girls only) Friday, Dec. 14 Freeport* 5 /7 Monday, Dec. 17 @ Baker 5 /7 Wednesday, Jan. 9 Rutherford 7 (Girls only) Thursday, Jan. 10 West Gadsden 5 /7 Jan. 15-18 District PSJ Girls Jan. 22-25 District Freeport Boys *District Game All Times EST DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times Coaches Kelli Wright and Ramon Valenzuela SOCCER SEASON SET TO START Lady Seahawks down Port St. Joe PHOTOS BY DAVID BUTLER | FCHS Yearbook Staff Lady Seahawks, from left, Morgan Mock, Karlie Tucker and Scout Segree prepare to receive serve from Port St. Joe. Lady Seahawks Chena Segree gets ready for a kill against Port St. Joe.

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Local A10 | The Times Thursday, October 18, 2012 ANNOUNCING A PANAMA CITY PICTORIAL HISTORY BOOK About the book: The Panama City News Herald is pleased to be working with local historical organizations and libraries to bring our readers an heirloom-quality, coffee table pictorial book on the history of our area. This keepsake book will feature hundreds of stunning historic images from the late 1800s to present day from the greater Panama City area, and a section commemorating the 75th anniversary of The Panama City News Herald. Books are expected to ship late November. $ 29 .95 SHIP S MID NOVEMBER R eg. $ 39.95 BUY NOW! EX T E N DED DE A D LIN E BY PUBLISHING COMPANY D U E TO POPULAR DE MAN D OR DE R NO W & SA VE $10! ACTUAL C OVER & T I TL E Included in the book: Doral Bank, Innovations Federal Credit Union, Bay Credit Union, and The Tourist Development Council MA I L I N FORM OR ORDER O NL I N E AT : P ANA M AC I T Y.PI CT ORI AL BOOK. C OM Panama City area, and a section commemorating the 75th anniversary of The Panama City News Herald. Books are expected to ship late November. Panama City area, and a section commemorating the 75th anniversary of The Panama City News Herald. Books are expected to ship late November. BUY NOW! SAVE $10 I wish to pre-order: ______Copies at $29.95 plus $1.95 tax per book and pick up my order at The News Herald oce. Total $31.90/book ______ Copies at $29.95 plus $5.95 shipping and handling and $1.95 tax per book and have my order shipped to the address below. Total $37.85/ book T O TAL A MO UNT E NCL O S ED :_______________ Name ___________________________________________________________________________________ Address _________________________________________________________________________________ City ___________________________________________________ State _______________ Zip __________ Phone (_____) ______________________ E-mail ________________________________________________ Signature ________________________________________________________________________________ Charge Card Number_____________________________________ Security Code______________Exp. Date_____________________ P A YME NT ME T HOD C HE C K / MO N EYORDER Payable to: The News Herald VI SA A ME X M AST ER CA RD DI SC OVER The bill is unique in Florida in that 75 percent of the largest pot of ne dollars, so-called Pot One which will account for 35 percent of total nes paid (see sidebar), will be sent directly to the eight affected counties in Northwest Florida between Escambia and Wakulla. The nal decisions on how those funds will be spent will be made by each countys board of county commissioners. I urge you to make decisions not for you, not for your children, but for your grandchildren, Southerland said. Do the right thing. Come together as communities. Focus on single major goals. Dont just think good, think great. This is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity. But to whom much is given, much is expected. Southerland urged every county to establish a broadbased advisory committee to work through ideas and goals and provide input. Gulf County has established such a committee, which is meeting weekly, but Franklin County has yet to establish one. We are trying to get ahead of the curve so when the dollars do start owing we are ready to move the process forward, said Gulf County Commissioner Warren Yeager. Apalachicola is pressing other municipalities to join in a resolution urging more input from the cities in decisions on projects that affect them. Southerland said input from all stakeholders, particularly the public, was crucial, not just for local success of projects but also when the Department of Treasury assesses projects under criteria yet to be established. The Department of Treasury, Southerland said, would have nal say on what projects receive funding. The criteria must be established within 180 days of the signing of the RESTORE Act, or by Dec. 31. Under the process, once a proposal is forwarded to Treasury, approved and a check cut, the county must report to Congress in 12 months how that money was spent and whether it was spent for the purpose intended. Why would county commissioners take all the liability themselves? Southerland said. Commissioners should spread the risk. The public should be involved. You must make sure everyone has input. I think the counties can do this. Southerland said counties must join together to rebuff attempts by Department of Justice to assess BP nes estimated, he said, between $5 billion and $20 billion and which should be assessed by a federal judge sometime in 2013 under the National Resources Damage Assessment instead of under the Clean Water Act, which would render moot the provisions of the RESTORE Act. All funds the RESTORE Act divides the ne money between environmental and economic restoration would thereby be paid for environmental effects; no money would be earmarked for economic recovery from the spill, Southerland said. He said the president signed the bill in June. Southerland considered any attempt to undermine it unconstitutional. I cant see (the president) arguing a bill that has his name on it, Southerland said. 35 percent would go directly to affected counties from funds divided in equal shares to the ve Gulf Coast states: Louisiana, Alabama, Mississippi, Florida and Texas. The money can be spent on environmental projects, job creation and training, ood protection, tourism promotion and infrastructure such as ports. For Florida, 75 percent will go directly to the eight affected counties, including Gulf and Franklin counties, with 25 percent to all other Florida counties. Every state had input on where they wanted their funds to go, Southerland said. We saw that the majority of those funds should go to impacted counties. This pot of funds also puts on the onus on counties to provide project proposals to the Department of Treasury for approval and to provide a report to Congress 12 months after money disbursement to demonstrate how the money was spent. Southerland said to commissioners at the meeting that if there was to be controversy in their county over how RESTORE funds would be spent, the rst pot would be the focus. This bill provides local autonomy, local authority, local exibility over these funds, he said. But I caution you, to whom much is given, much is expected. 30 percent will go to a Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Council, with funds to be used for the development and implementation of a comprehensive restoration plan, created by a federal/ state Gulf Coast Restoration Council with all Gulf states represented on the council. The ve Gulf states governors and six federal of cials from the Interior, Commerce, Agriculture departments, the Army, the Environmental Protection Agency and the Coast Guard will comprise the council. Funds will be spent on big ecosystem projects with broad impact. The council sunsets once funds are completely expended. Im proud of this bill because it takes care of the bays, the estuaries, I grew up with, Southerland said. This is a golden opportunity to do the right thing at the right time. Southerland said county and state projects might have overlap and said counties should be aware of state plans when crafting the process for moving forward on county projects. For example, dredging of a particular pass or channel might be part of a state plan and should therefore not be a request from the county. 30 percent will be disbursed on an impact-driven formula to the Gulf Coast states according to plans submitted by the Gulf Coast states and approved by the council. It will be allocated to states based on a formula that approximates how badly each was damaged by the oil spill. The formula is based on average oiled shoreline, proximity to the spill and average population in coastal counties, with a minimum of 5 percent. States can spend the money on environmental projects, job creation and training, ood protection and tourism promotion. Louisiana had more environmental damage and economic damage, Southerland said. Florida suffered economic damage. We were alarmed at the number of vacations that were canceled. The purpose of RESTORE was not to grow government. This was meant to restore economically and environmentally. 5 percent of the ne funds establish Gulf Coast Centers of Excellence: 2.5 percent of the Gulf Coast Restoration Trust Fund to be allocated to the states for research within the Gulf Coast region and 2.5 sheries habitat. We still dont know what is going to happen in the future, Southerland said. We dont know the full rami cations of the bill. This money is to go to the unknowns. In part, the bill mandates these funds are used for data collection of sheries and other habitat along the Gulf Coast. This bill mandates (the federal government) collect good data and make good, solid decisions based on what that data says, Southerland said, noting ever shortening seasons and bag limits for a host of sh species. SOUTHERLAND from page A1 RESTORE from page A1 Congressman Steve Southerland spoke to area county commissioners last week about the RESTORE Act and its process of disbursing BP ne money to affected states and counties. TIM CROFT | The Star

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Local The Times | A11 Thursday, October 18, 2012 Trades & Services GET YOUR AD IN 653-8868 Trades & Services Laban Bontrager, DMD Monica Bontrager, DMD 12761 Pea Ridge Road Bristol, Florida 32321 TELEPHONE (850) 643-5417 Bristol Dental Clinic DENTURE LAB ON PREMISES Same Day Service on Repairs and Relines Don Lively General Contractors L ICENSED AND I NSURED 20 Y EARS E XPERIENCE P .O. Box 439 C arrabelle, FL 32322 697-2783 or Mobile 566-2603 RC 0066499 R G0065255 Carrabelle Visa, Discover, and American Express Honored at Participating Ace Stores JACKSONS Building Supplies Building Supplies & Auto Repair Carrabelle 697-3333 We Deliver Anywhere Hardware and Paint Center J.J.s Tree Service, LLC Stump Grinder Licensed & Insured Call John : (850) 899-8432 ROBERTS APPLIANCE REPAIR ALL MAJOR BRANDS 18 Shadow Lane Apalachicola, FL 32320 Phone: (850) 653-8122 Cell: (850) 653-7654 From A to Z PO Box 364 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 850-340-0756 Gregs Handyman Service & Lawn Maintenance NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT CITY OF APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA The Apalachicola Board of Adjustment will hold a Public Hearing on Tuesday, October 30th, 2012 at 5:30 PM at City Hall, Community Center Meeting Room, 1 Bay Avenue, Apalachicola, Florida to address the following variance requests and receive citizen comments relating to proposed changes on the parcels listed below. A Special Meeting will immediately follow. The following variance request items will be discussed and considered: 1. Installation of elevator shaft above the 35 height limit on the proposed new structure described as Wharf Lot 10. 2. Proposal to approve continued use of Suite B, an apartment unit partially located as Block 2 Lot 5 for transient lodging. St. The Apalachicola Land Development Code allows for variance when spe cial circumstances, conditions and/or undue hardships are determined. All interested parties are encouraged to attend and be heard with respect to this request. For further information, contact the MAGNOLIA BLUFF Bay living at its best, you have to see the sunsets from this home to believe them. 3BR/3BA Custom home with great water depth for year round access to the Apalachicola Bay. M L S #246689...........$699,000 Travis Stanley 850.653.6477 Leon Teat 850.653.5656 Sandy Mitchem 850.899.8300 BEACHFRONT C ONDO ST. G EORGE IS LAND 2BR/2BA with two balconies in Villas of St. George. Established rental history! Community pool, beach boardwalk, 2 blocks to lighthouse! M L S# 246110 ............... $319,500 B A Y FRONT CONDO Must see this 2 BR/2.1 BA townhouse next to the desirable Southside Historic District overlooking Apalachicola Bay. Property has community dock! M L S #247900 ...................... $275,000 B A Y FRONT HO M E Enjoy amazing sunsets everyday from this bay front home in prestigious St. George Plantation. 2BR/3BA home with unobstructed 180 degree bay views and 122 of bay front footage with white sandy beach. Dock your boat at the private pier with M L S #247962..... .......... $599,000 GULF FRONT HO M E This remarkable Gulf Front home provides the best of everything for laid back Island living. 5BR/4.1BA custom built home complete with a gourmet kitchen, granite countertops, elevator, a wet bar and upscale furnishings. Enjoy the inground 18X 36 pool and your private boardwalk. Call today to view this spectacular property. M L S #247998 ............... $995,000 N EW C ON S TRUCTION Great opportunity to buy a gulf view home. This quality constructed home has driven pilings, hardiboard siding and a metal roof for a low maintenance exterior. Inside you have 3 bedrooms with two baths and a great room opening to the front porch. New construction means low insurance cost. M L S #247359..............$289,000 N EW C ON S TRUCTION N EW C ON S TRUCTION attributable to when collections were posted. Its just been phenomenal year, he said. Wait and see what it is for the calendar year. Parker said based on his personal experience and after talking with the vacation rental companies that serve St. George Island, which remit the bulk of the bed tax money to the county, he is convinced the county is seeing a record volume of visitors. We expect to have at least as good a year or better than past year, he said. I think were on track to do 10 percent better. Right now your rentals are mostly full in October, he said, adding that he did not think the effects of Tropical Storm Debby at the beginning of the summer were longstanding. It was nothing like a seasonchanging event, he said. Overall, the season was really good. Also, some vacation rental companies will be able to recapture lost revenue when travel insurance claims are paid out as a result of the missed rental days, Parker said. He noted that in calendar year 2011, the countys bed tax collection totaled more than $824,000, almost $175,000 more than when the tax was instituted in 2005. This, he said, means the tourist industry generated about $41 million in direct revenue alone. Thats a sizeable industry, and thats just the accommodations revenue, Parker said. That doesnt count all the other things our guests are spending money on, like restaurants and trips with guides and much more. Thats what Im amazed at, at how much revenue the industry is generating for the county. TDC from page A1 to shut the airport down without more manpower. Under the proposed ve-year lease with Crystal Air, the county will receive $5,000 plus 7 percent sales tax for a total of $5,350 monthly. The Crystal Air contract will more than cover the xed costs of running the airport, Alan Pierce, director of administrative services, said Tuesday afternoon. He said the county will continue to receive additional income from the rental of two commercial hangars at the airport. Pierce said the proposed lease was written by Avcon, the countys aviation consultant, and must be reviewed by an attorney specializing in aviation law before the transaction is nalized. He said he doesnt expect any problem with the lease. Crystal Air is a family company. Director of Operations Taylor Newman owns 96 percent of the stock and his parents the remaining 4 percent. The company was founded as an aircraft and heavy equipment rental company when Newman was 18, but by the time he nished his bachelors in aviation administration, the focus had narrowed to aviation. Crystal Air is currently FBO at three airports. They have operated at Franklin County Airport in Sewanee, Tenn., since 2003; Cleveland Municipal Airport, also in Tennessee, since 2007 and Dalton Municipal Airport in Georgia since 2008. They provide other services at airports in Sparta and Chattanooga, Tenn. Crystal Air offers aircraft rental and maintenance, ight training and charter service in addition to FBO operations. Newman said his company provides charter ights to anywhere in the U.S. and regularly scheduled ights between Destin, Panama City, Chattanooga and Memphis. It is uncertain which services Crystal Air will bring to the county airport. The company plans to assess what needs exist at Apalachicola Regional Airport while providing FBO service. Newman said they will bring in an FBO manager initially, but he hopes to ll other positions from the local workforce. We like to train local folks so they have a vested interest, he said. He does not anticipate raising fuel costs. Well look at it and see if its where it should be, he said. I imagine it is. Plans to upgrade service in the short haul include making rental cars available to incoming pilots and adding aircraft maintenance staff. But Newman said he is in no hurry to make changes. We usually take our time in hiring pilots and mechanics, he said. We want a good t. We want them to stay a while. We plan to increase the level of service, he said. We would like to attract some additional aircraft to the airport. I believe you have space. Though he has no plans to locate a charter aircraft here immediately, Newman said he might bring a plane in next summer and is considering offering air tours of the area similar to the recreational tours his company offers in Tennessee. Apalachicola has a good look from the air compared to a lot of Florida, he said. The lack of commercialization has an appeal for a lot of people. Crystal Air is planning a community welcome party for December to make people aware of the airport and its new FBO. We like to work with local civic organizations, Newman said. Newman told commissioners Crystal Air keeps a daily account of planes landing, launching and in storage, as well as fuel sales and maintenance work. He said he had no objection to providing commissioners monthly reports. Newman plans to hit the ground running before Nov.1. He and an FBO manager will arrive on Monday, Oct. 29. Were getting there a few days early, he said. We want to make sure weve got our best foot forward. CRYSTAL AIR from page A1 ARREST REPORT The following report is provided by the Franklin County Sheriffs Of ce. Arrests were made by of cers from the Apalachicola Police Department (APD) and the Franklin County Sheriffs Of ce (FCSO). All defendants are to be considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law. OCT. 9 Glendod R. Forehand, 20, Wewahitchka, battery by inmate (FCSO) Johnny C. Jones, 39, Apalachicola, home invasion robbery, uttering, forgery and grand theft (APD) OCT. 10 Christopher E. Everitt, 26, Apalachicola, battery by inmate (FCSO) OCT. 11 Mack W. James, 48, Dalewood, failure to appear (FCSO) Walter R. Robinson, 25, Garland, Texas, Texas warrant for kidnapping to in ict bodily harm (FCSO) OCT. 16 Nicholas C. Roesner, 27, Birch Run, Michigan, criminal mischief and resisting of cer without violence (FCSO) Amanda C. Topham, 31, Eastpoint, violation of probation and failure to appear (FCSO)

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A12| The Times Thursday, October 18, 2012 CLASSIFIEDS AIRLINE CAREERS BEGIN HERE -Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualified. Housing available. Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 866-314-3769 We Buy Any Vehicle in Any Condition. Title/No Title, Bank Leans -NO Problem. Don’t Trade it in, We WILL PAY up to $35K. Any Make, Any Model, Call A.J. Today: 813-335-3794/237-1892 RENTALS1 BEDROOM, 1 BATH UNFURNISHED APT LANARK, REMODELED, INC WATER .................$425 2 BR, 1 BATH UNFURNISHED APT W/D HOOKUP, SMALL PORCH ..........................$375 1 BEDROOM, 1 BATH FURNISHED CONDO INCLUDES UTILITIES, MARINA .........................$910 3 BEDROOM, 2 BATH FURNISHED HOUSE ON RIVER, DOCK ..............................................$1000 3 BEDROOM 1 BATH DUPLEX UNFURNISHED, CARRABELLE ............................$600 3 BEDROOM 1 BATH END UNIT, W/D, WATER INCLUDED, UNFURNISHED .................$565 2 BR 1 BATH UNFURNISHED HOUSE FENCED YARD ......................................................$800 OFFICE SPACE US 98 CARRABELLE ........................................................$500 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322850-697-9604 850-323-0444 www.seacrestre.comwww. rst tness.com/carrabellePROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND RENTALS These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you. EmeraldCoast Marketplace 747-5020 Total Down Pmt $5852001 Chevy Impala T otal Price $4,5000% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! Total Down Pmt $7852001 Chevy Trailblazer T ot al Price $4,9000% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! Total Down Pmt $9852002 Ford F-150 -X/Cab T otal Price $5,9000% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! Polaris Sportman 500 2 wheel and 4 wheel drive, with wench, fuel injected. Cover, saddle bags, comes with trailer with side rails and spare tire, low hours, $5500. Call (850) 647-2633 Text FL28291 to 56654 89202T IN THE COUNTY COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 19 2012 CC 000024 ST. GEORGE PLANTATION OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., a Florida not for profit corporation, Plaintiff, v. DIVERSIFIED EXECUTIVE CRESTVIEW, LLC, A GEORGIA LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY, Defendant. NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated October 5, 2012, and entered in Case No. 19 2012 CC 000024 of the County Court Of The Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein ST. GEORGE PLANTATION OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC. is Plaintiff, and DIVERSIFIED EXECUTIVE CRESTVIEW, LLC, A GEORGIA LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY is Defendant, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in the front entrance of the Franklin County Courthouse at 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320, Franklin County, Florida, at 11:00 am on the 14th day of November, 2012 the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: Lot 15, Bay Cove Village, A subdivision as per map or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 5 at Pages 18 and 19 of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. Subject to covenants, restrictions, reservations and easements of record, if any; and taxes for the year 2005 and subsequent years. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Danny Davis, ADA Coordinator, Court Technology Office, Office of Court Administration, 301 S. Monroe St., Rm 225, Tallahassee, FL 32303, (850) 577-4401 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. DATED this 5th day of October, 2012. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk County Court Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Becker & Poliakoff, P.A. Attorneys for Plaintiff 348 Miracle Strip Pkwy SW, Suite 7 Ft. Walton Beach, FL 32548-5253 (850)664-2229 (850)664-7882 Fax Oct 18, 25, 2012 89198T PUBLIC NOTICE The Gulf Coast Workforce Board is seeking Public Comment on the 2012-2016 Local Workforce Services Plan, as required by the Workforce Investment Act. Plan copies are available at the Board office; please call 850-9133285 to arrange to see the plan or you may request the plan electronically from dwilliams@gcwb.org. All comments must be submitted in writing within 30 days of this posting. October 18, 2012 89212T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 19-2012-CA-000139 FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION, Plaintiff, vs. UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS, TRUSTEES OF JO CLARK A/K/A JO ORTON, DECEASED; KAMI ORTON, HEIR; IF LIVING, INCLUDING ANY UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SAID DEFENDANT(S), IF REMARRIED, AND IF DECEASED, THE RESPECTIVE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS, AND TRUSTEES, AND ALL OTHER PERSONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THE NAMED DEFENDANT(S); UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2; Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION TO: UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS, TRUSTEES OF JO CLARK A/K/A JO ORTON, DECEASED; KAMI ORTON, HEIR; Whose residence(s) is/ are unknown. YOU ARE HEREBY required to file your answer or written defenses, if any, in the above proceeding with the Clerk of this Court, and to serve a copy thereof upon the plaintiff’s attorney, Law Offices of Daniel C. Consuegra, 9204 King Palm Drive, Tampa, FL 33619-1328, telephone (813) 915-8660, facsimile (813)915-0559, within thirty days of the first publication of this Notice, the nature of this proceeding being a suit for foreclosure of mortgage against the following described property, to wit: Lot 8, Block 8, LANARK VILLAGE UNIT NO. 1, according 10 the plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 2, Pages 14 and 14A, inclusive, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. If you fail to file your response or answer, if any, in the above proceeding with the Clerk of this Court, and to serve a copy thereof upon the plaintiff’s attorney, Law Offices of Daniel C.Consuegra, 9204 King Palm Dr., Tampa, Florida 33619-1327, telephone (813)915-8660, Fax (813) 915-0559, within thirty days of the first publication of this Notice, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint or petition. DATED at FRANKLIN County this 19th day of 2012. Marcia M Johnson Clerk of the Circuit Court Terry E Creamer Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Danny Davis Office of Court Administration 301 South Monroe Street, Room 225 Tallahassee, FL 32303 850.577.4401 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. October 18, 25, 2012 90167T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No. 2011-000423-CA THE CARRABELLE BOAT CLUB ASSOCIATION, INC., a Florida non-profit corporation, Plaintiff, vs. STEVEN R. MACCHIARELLA and WOODWARD DEVELOPMENT, INC., Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION To: STEVEN R. MACCHIARELLA and WOODWARD DEVELOPMENT, INC., YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a claim of lien for assessments pursuant to Article 13 of the Declaration of Condominium for The Carrabelle Boat Club Association, Inc., a commercial condominium, recorded in Official Record Book 888, Page 552, et seq. of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida on the following real property in FRANKLIN County, Florida: Unit Number B-318 of that certain condominium of The Carrabelle Boat Club Association, Inc., a/k/a, The Carrabelle Boat Club Boathouse, and the undivided interest in the Common elements appurtenant thereto, in accordance with and subject to the Declaration of Condominium for the Carrabelle Boat Club Association, Inc., a Commercial Condominium recorded in official Records Book 888, Page 552-630 of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Barbara Sanders, Sanders and Duncan, P.A., the plaintiff’s attorney, whose address is P.O. Box 157, Apalachicola, Florida 32320, on or before 30 days of the last date of publication, and file the original with the clerk of this Court, MARCIA JOHNSON, Franklin County Clerk of Court, Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida 32320, either before service on the plaintiff’s attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. DATED this 3rd day of October, 2012. MARCIA M. JOHNSON As Clerk of the Court By: Terry E. Creamer As Deputy Clerk October 11,18, 2012 90343T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 12-000065-CA HANCOCK BANK, Plaintiff, vs. DAVID L. SNOWDEN and ST. GEORGE PLANTATION OWNERS’ ASSOCIATION, INC., Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE BY CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT Notice is hereby given that the undersigned, MARCIA JOHNSON, Clerk of the Circuit Court of Franklin County, Florida, will on November 7, 2012, at 11:00 a.m., on the Second Floor Lobby of the Franklin County Courthouse, located at 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida, in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes offer for sale, and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder, the following described real property situated in Franklin County, Florida: Real Property LOT 50, Pelican Beach Village, as per map or plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 5, Page 12, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. Together with all improvements, easements, appurtenances, and fixtures (the “Property”). pursuant to the Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure in a case pending in said Court, the style of which is HANCOCK BANK Plaintiff, vs. DAVID L. SNOWDEN and ST. GEORGE PLANTATION OWNERS’ ASSOCIATION, Defendants. and the docket number of which is 12-000065-CA Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim with the clerk of the court within 60 days after the sale. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Clerk of Court, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL (850)653-8861 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. WITNESS my hand and the official seal of this Honorable Court this 25th day of September, 2012. MARCIA JOHNSON Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Michelle Maxwell Deputy Clerk October 18, 25, 2012 90351T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.: 19-2011-CA-000402 BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING L.P. F/K/A COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, L.P., Plaintiff, vs. JASON L. WHITE; MARINER’S VIEW CONDOMINIUMS ASSOCIATION, INC.; UNKNOWN TENANT(S); IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated the 25th day of September, 2012, and entered in Case No. 19-2011-CA000402, of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, L.P. F/K/A COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, L.P. is the Plaintiff and JASON L. WHITE, MARINER’S VIEW CONDOMINIUMS ASSOCIATION, INC.; UNKNOWN TENANT (S); IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY are defendants. The Clerk o f this Court shall sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the FRONT STEPS OF THE FRANKLIN COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 33 MARKET STREET, APALACHICOLA, FL 32320, 11:00 AM on the 14th day of November, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: UNIT NUMBER 206 OF MARINERS VIEW CONDOMINIUM, AS PER THAT CERTAIN DECLARATION OF CONDOMINIUM RECORDED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 865, PAGE 369, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301, 850-5774401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Dated this 26th day of September, 2012. MARCIA JOHNSON Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Michelle Maxwell Deputy Clerk Submitted by: Law Offices of Marshall C. Watson, P.A. 1800 NW 49th Street, Suite 120 Fort Lauderdale, FL 33309 (954) 453-0365 Fax (954) 771-6052 Toll Free: 1-800-441-2438 October 18, 25, 2012 Franklin CountyLiquor License$165,000. Serious inquires/offers only at: anitalln242@aol.com Adopt *: Active young TV Producer & Attorney, home-cooking, beaches, sports await precious baby. Expenses paid *FLBar42311* *800-552-0045* Adopt *: Actor & Filmmaker, LOVE Awaits first baby. Matt & Kristi *Expenses paid* *FLBar42311* *800-552-0045* YORKIE AKCFemale Puppy Adorable,12 weeks old. She is Health Certified & has her 1st shots. $400 850-774-1229 GUN SHOWSanta Rosa County Auditorium, Milton, FL. Oct.20th & 21st 9am -5pm. Call (850) 957-4952 or (850) 261-8407 General Admission, $6Text FL26461 to 56654 NOW OPENMerchandise Liquidation Store, In Hickory Plaza Shopping Center, 414 S. Tyndall Parkway, Open 9-6 Daily, Closed Sundays Apalachicola 1Br/1Ba quiet, 2 blks from boat ramp, $600mo + first, last & dep. 850-570-9167 Text FL25130 to 56654 Apalachicola: 1 br, 1 ba efficiency Call for information 850-653-6103 Text FL5175 to 56654 St. GeorgeIsland $175/wk, elec, satellite, garbage incl. Pool tbl. 12’ X 65’ deck. Beautiful view! 850-653-5319 1 BR, CottageH/AC in Apalachicola, Florida. 850-643-7740 Apalachicola, House for rent, Bay City Rd, Call 850-653-8965 or 850-323-1990 Carabelle: 3 bdr 2 bath with large spare room on 1 acre. Fenced yard, new tile throughout, freshly painted. $800 per month + dep. Call (850) 766-4357 Text FL26851 to 56654 Carrabelle 3 br, 2 ba all tile floors, newly remodeled inside All new appliances and heat pump. $750 per month + deposit 850-697-4080 or 850591-5899 Apalachicola Lots Block 177 Lot 6, $29,500 Block 150 Lot 4 $25,50 Call 850-597-0217 SELL ALL YOUR ITEMS through classified.CALL 747-5020

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, October 18, 2012 The Times | A13 emeraldcoastjobs.com Employment Today By CAROLINE M.L. POTTERMonster Contributing Writer It takes a lot of steps to get a job offer. Your network has to yield a connection. Your resume has to earn an interview. And your performance in the interview has to be impressive enough to produce an offer. But what happens when you have cleared every one of these hurdles only to learn your impending offer now is on indefinite hold? Read on to find out why offers get shelved „ temporarily or permanently „ and what, if any, due diligence you can to do to activate an offer.Its not youDont take it personally if your job offer is postponed. There are dozens of reasons for a delay. The important thing is to not make assumptions as to why the communication has abruptly stopped short of the actual offer,Ž says careers and resume expert Lauren Milligan of ResuMayDay. It could have nothing to do with you. Perhaps a major company initiative went south, requiring everyones attention to this specific project. Perhaps your internal contact won the lottery and now theyre scrambling to replace her.Ž Consider, too, that an internal candidate might have thrown her hat in the ring at the last minute, temporarily derailing your offer. In this case, a potential employer isnt going to give you much information beyond that they have to put it on hold,Ž says Judi Perkins, the How-To Job Coach. Remember that its not a reflection of your qualifications, but, rather, that the company might give preference to current employees.Try to determine what it isRethink if you actually want to join this company. Putting an offer on hold is usually a sign of a softening balance sheet,Ž says staffing expert David Lewis of Express Employment Professionals and author of The Emerging Leader.Ž Jeanne Knight, a former HR executive turned career and job search coach, concurs. Offers typically go on hold because the company has decided their financial situation is not as positive as they thought it would be, dictating that most, if not all, of their open positions be put on hold until the picture looks brighter,Ž she says. Executive career coach Beth Ross tells clients to ask their contact at the company for plausible reasons for the delay. Lewis recommends asking several specific questions about the hold on the offer. First, ask if the person making the offer is the person responsible for deciding to put the offer on hold,Ž she says. If not, ask who decided to put the offer on hold (and, therefore, could decide to unfreeze the offer). And, finally, ask when you can meet this person and show her that you are worth hiring regardless of a blanket hiring freeze.ŽDecide what to do nextEven if you know the reason an offer has been temporarily tabled, Lewis urges job seekers not to get complacent about their job search. More than 50 percent of the time, in my experience, the offer will not rematerialize in the next 30 days,Ž he says. Says Ross: If it is indeed your dream job, you may elect to wait, but you should work with the company on a timetable that seems reasonable. Trying to nail this down might uncover what level of trust is there for both parties.Ž If you decide to continue to pursue a position thats on hold, Milligan says you have two tasks ahead of you: First, when leaving voice mails or emails, keep your tone breezy, cheery and upbeat. And second, forge ahead with your job search. In other words, hope for the best and prepare for more interviews elsewhere,Ž she says. Perkins adds, The more time that goes by with nothing happening, the greater the likelihood that your offer isnt going to become an actual job.ŽJob offer on hold? How to seal deal Seasonal Jobs Contact Lorna at (850) 747-5019 or Email: lbrown@pcnh.com LORNA BROWNEMPLOYMENT SALES SPECIALIST LUSADY TAYLOREMPLOYMENT SALES SPECIALISTContact Lusady at (850) 522-5173 or Email: ltaylor@pcnh.com EASTERN SHIPBUILDING GROUP MORE THAN A JOB… A FUTURE! LONG TERM WORK an aggressive leader in the Marine Industry, located in Panama City, FL has the following opportunities for skilled craftsmen:PIPEFITTERS  PIPE WELDERS SHIPFITTERS  STRUCTURAL WELDERS X-RAY WELDERS  ELECTRICIANSCompetitive wages DOE, and a comprehensive bene ts package including: Company paid health, dental, and life insurance, 401(k), attendance & safety bonuses. Normal work week to include overtime. Quali ed craftsmen should apply in person: Mon-Fri, 8am-12pm 1pm4:30 pmHUMAN RESOURCES (2 Locations): 13300 Allanton Rd., Panama City, FL 32404 and 134 S. East Ave., Panama City, FL 32401Applications are also accepted at our East Ave Of ce Saturdays, 8am-12pm.(850) 522-7400, ext. 2285, 2322, or 2302 Fax: (850) 874-0208EOE/Drug Free Workplace Earn While You Learn with the On the Job Training Program If you are unemployed you may be eligible for the Workforce Centers OJT program. On the job training gives you hands on experience in a new job … and employers, OJT helps you save money! For more informaon call (850) 370-0726 An equal opportunity employer/program. Aux iliary aids and services are available upon request to individuals with disabilies. All voice telephone numbers on this document may be reached by persons using TTY/TDD equipment via the Florida Relay Service at 711. ToPlace Your Classified ad inCall Our New Numbers Now!Call: 850-747-5020 Toll Free: 800-345-8688 Fax: 850-747-5044 Email: thestar@pcnh.com thetimes@pcnh.com theAPALACHICOLA & CARRABELLETIMES CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW Food Svs/HospitalityNow HiringReservationistPleasant personality, basic bookkeeping skills, computer literate and a team player! Apply in person at Gibson Inn 51 Avenue C (850) 653-2191 Medical/HealthNow HiringFull time positions for CNAs at St James Health and Rehab Center. Apply in person at 239 Crooked River Rd Carrabelle, FL 32322 Medical/HealthCaring Peopleand CNAs needed. Join a team of people who make a difference in the lives of the elderly. Provide non medical companionship, in home help & personal care for the elderly. Must be flexible. PT leading to FT-positions in the Port St. Joe and Apalachicola areas.Home Instead Senior CareCall Mon-Thur 9-3pm 850-640-1223 or toll free 1-866-301-1919 Web ID#: 34224571 Text FL24571 to 56654 Bldg Const/TradesWildlife TechnicianFL Fish & Wildlife Conservation Com. Box-R Wildlife Mgt. Area Franklin County $26,540 Annual. Heavy equipment operation, road and facility maintenance, controlled burns, manage public hunts and wildlife surveys. Applications must be completed online at: https://jobs.myflorida.com/ For additional information contact: Billie Clayton 850-265-3676 EEO/AA Employer Web ID#: 34226960 Text FL26960 to 56654 OtherCheck Station OperatorFlorida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission Is Now HiringWhat:Check Station OperatorWhere:Tate’s Hell State ForestSchedule required:Wednesday through Sunday (10am – 6pm)Pay Rate:$8.00/hr This is a temporary position that is only during hunting season. To apply for this position please send resumes and letter of interest to adam.warwick@myfwc.co m For questions about the position please contact Billie Clayton at 850-265-3676 or billie.clayton@myfwc.co m Web ID#: 34226950 Classified Advertising works hard ...filling the employment needs of area business firms, helping people to meet their prospective employers, helping people buy and sell all kinds of goods and services, and much more! Nothing works harder than the Classifieds! 747-5020 Slow Reader? Free tutoring for adults.Call Literacy Volunteers of Bay County Public Library, 872-7500

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Local A14 | The Times Thursday, October 18, 2012 Smith is John Keith, husband of Addie Brown Keith, who died while worm grunting. His death certi cate, led by M. Witherspoon, reads, It was found that the aforesaid came to his death from a heart attack, at Brickyard, Franklin County, Florida the 5th day of October, 1954. The body was found by Dewey Brown about mile from the home of Capers Smith. John Keith had been living in the home of Mr. and Mrs. Capers Smith. He often went out to dig worms for the shing boats. He left home about 7:30 that morning and failed to return at the noon hour. According to research at www. ndagrave.com, Keiths family knew for some time that he suffered from a heart condition. Wimberly said her parents built their home on the site of Keiths death, and when they went to inspect the property for the rst time, they found Keiths shovel and grunting rod still with his pail at site. Bloody Bluff, Fort Gadsden no longer used The origin of the name Bloody Bluff is shrouded in mystery, but some residents of the Sumatra area believe it commemorates a battle in the Seminole War. Few living souls remember the tiny Bloody Bluff community, but the burial ground with only a single headstone still remains. Although there are an unknown number of graves, the lone stone belongs to James David Buddy Branch, who rests beneath a veterans gravestone. Born Oct. 10, 1890, to Thomas J. and Sarah E. Freeman Branch at Bloody Bluff, Buddy served in World War I and died of pneumonia on Dec. 5, 1922. The Fort Gadsden Cemetery between Sumatra and Eastpoint is the oldest and the largest of the three, nestled deep in the woods near the site of the famed Negro Fort. But no gravestones can be seen there, mainly indentations in the earth. During the War of 1812, the British Royal Marines established the fort on Prospect Bluff on the Apalachicola. The garrison initially included about 1,000 Britons and several hundred blacks, some runaway slaves recruited by the British. In 1815, when the war ended, the British withdrew from the post and left the black population. Over the next few years, the fort became a colony for escaped slaves. By 1816, more than 800 freedmen and women had settled around the fort, along with friendly natives of the area. The fort grew into a ourishing free black community with cultivated elds and plantations extending 50 miles up the river. The community, though isolated and peaceful, drew the attention of white settlers because they feared its existence would inspire a slave uprising. After the construction of Fort Scott north of the Negro Fort, Gen. Andrew Jackson used the navy to transport goods to the outpost via the Apalachicola River. During one of these resupply missions, a party of sailors stopped near Prospect Bluff to ll their canteens and were attacked by men from the Negro Fort. All but one of the Americans were killed In response, Jackson, commander of the Southern Military District, ordered Gen. Edmund Pendleton Gaines to destroy the fort. Gunboats were dispatched to the outpost, occupied by about 330 people at the time of battle, at least 200 of them freedmen, armed with cannons and muskets. A handful were Seminole and Choctaw warriors, and the remaining occupants, about 100 women and children, families of the black militia. Gaines ordered the fort to surrender, but the leader, an African named Garson, refused, telling Gaines he had orders from the British military to hold the post. He raised the Union Jack and a red ag to symbolize that no quarter would be given. The gunboats opened re and, after fewer than a dozen rounds were launched, a super-heated cannonball or hot shot struck the forts powder magazine. The ensuing explosion destroyed the entire post and instantly killed 270 men, women and children. Many more died of their wounds. The explosion was awful, and the scene horrible beyond description. You cannot conceive, nor I describe the horrors of the scene, Gaines later wrote. In an instant, lifeless bodies were stretched upon the plain, buried in sand and rubbish, or suspended from the tops of the surrounding pines. Here lay an innocent babe, there a helpless mother; on the one side a sturdy warrior, on the other a bleeding squaw. History records no American casualties. Victims of the massacre were buried in the Fort Gadsden Cemetery in unmarked graves. In later years, residents of the area around Fort Gadsden continued to use the cemetery for occasional burials. One of these was Bunk Brown, brother to Rowan Appleton Brown. Wimberly remembers being told a story about how, in the late 1800s, Bunk contracted a mysterious disease that caused his limbs to begin to petrify before his death. He eventually died, but his travails didnt end there. Acting in the dead of night, someone came and robbed his grave, spiriting away the mummied corpse. Nobody knows what became of Bunk Brown. My father always said he was taken by a traveling show or a circus to display, Wimberly said. Next week, the Eastpoint Cemetery. Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Real Estate Picks Our local real estate experts have identied what they feel are the best values around and are oering them to you in Real Estate Picks! (In this section), Discover the best real estate values in Mexico Beach, Port St. Joe, Apalachicola, Cape San Blas, St. George Island, Carrabelle and surrounding areas. SELL YOUR LI S TING S HERE! Only $35 per week per listing Minimum 2 ads per week or 1 ad for 2 weeks Contact Joel or Kari for details: (850)814-7377 or (850)227-7847 SOLD John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.com MLS# 245232 $89,000 St. George Island HIGH & DRY 3RD TIER LOT Located on the north side of Gulf Beach Drive and only two lots from the corner for easy beach access on 11th Street. Scrub Oaks line the road side of this lot creating privacy, but offers an open expanse of high sandy ground. Excellent building site. John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.com MLS#242245 $439,900 St George Island GULF VIEW FROM WEST PINE 4 bedrooms (2 are masters), 3-1/2 bath, extra living area or 5th BR, large open Living/ Dining/ Kitchen area with ETERNAL REST from page A1 Franklin County High School has welcomed back husband and wife Robert and Maria Revercomb to the faculty, after they spent a year in the Marshall Islands. Robert teaches physical and marine science to high school students, while his wife, a trained Spanish teacher, has been hired on part-time to provide language lab tutoring as part of the schools Virtual School offering in Spanish. Robert taught in 2005-06 at Apalachicola High School, handling freshman integrated science, 10th grade biology and 11th grade chemistry, while coaching baseball and serving as assistant coach to girls basketball and football. Im back, and Im really thrilled to be on board, he said. Im really excited to be able to teach. This is the perfect place for it. The Revercombs most recently spent a year in the Marshall Islands, teaching at College of the Marshall Islands, where Robert instructed anatomy and physiology, human growth and development, nutrition and disease prevention and treatment. He helped administer a grant through Canvasback Missions Inc. for programs in public schools in Micronesia to educate and remediate Type II diabetes. Its the No. 1 cause of death and disease in Marshall Islands, a tragic killer, he said, noting that in addition to being a top killer, it results commonly in amputations. The diet of the Marshallese, who live 7 degrees north of the equator in the Paci c Ocean, was originally coconut, sh, bananas and breadfruit, augmented by the rst colonists bringing squash and cabbage and things that are good. But, the growth of re ned foods, high fat and hidden fat foods with re ned carbohydrates, led eventually to the diabetes epidemic, which is now the islands top national threat. There are lifestyle changes that can be made, Revercomb said. It was an amazing experience, I switched to the traditional Marshallese diet, and my serum cholesterol levels went down 50 points. Revercomb also worked with a national aquaculture project. I was spear shing when I wasnt in classroom. I was on the reef with natives, he said. He said he is delighted to be back in Franklin County. Its such an amazing place. One of the challenges is the kids have it all: They enjoy forest and bay and rivers and lakes, he said. This is such an amazing place if youre an outdoors person. I cant imagine a better outdoor laboratory and the inside facilities and opportunities growing by leaps and bounds. The Revercombs older children are now either married or in college. The two youngest are enrolled in school. Gabriella is a junior, while sister Clarina Langineo is a freshman. By David Adlerstein FCHS welcomes Revercombs back to classroom LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Above is Gen. Edmund P. Gaines. At left the only headstone in Bloody Bluff Cemetery belongs to James David Buddy Branch. DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times Robert Revercomb teaches physical and marine science.



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xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx 50 WWW.APALACHTIMES.COMPhone: 850-653-8868 Web: apalachtimes.com E-mail: dadlerstein@star .com Fax: 850-653-8036 Circulation: 800-345-8688 DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK: School News & Society: 11 a.m. Friday Real Estate Ads: 11 a.m. Thursday Legal Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Display Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Line Ads: 5 p.m. Monday xxxxx Contact Us xxxxx Out to see Index By LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com County commissioners have handed over responsibility for managing the airport to an established Tennessee xed-base operator. At the Tuesday morning meeting, commissioners voted unanimously to award Crystal Air Inc. of Chattanooga the position of FBO for the Apalachicola Regional Airport, beginning Nov. 1. Crystal Air was recommended for the position by the airport committee on Sept. 18 after a review of four applicants. The other three included Trident Aircraft of Gulf Shores, Ala., Apalachee Winds of Rock Hill, S.C., and Fly High Apalachicola of Lexington, N.C., a company making a second try at the contract after negotiations fell apart after it was awarded the contract earlier this year. Since the former FBO Bill Ruic left in April, Perky White and Ted Mosteller have acted as interim operators, but the county had to choose a permanent contractor by Nov. 1 or provide White and Mosteller with bene ts as full-time county employees. At their last meeting, the commission earmarked $900 to provide Mosteller and White with additional temporary help when Mosteller told them he would be forced By LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com South of Sumatra in the heart of Tates Hell lie three small cemeteries that memorialize the lives and struggles of hearty Florida settlers. In the piney woods near the little Brickyard community is Brown and Smith Cemetery, a family burial plot sheltering mostly Walkers, Browns and Smiths. Adolph and Hattie Smith, parents of 100-year-old Preshia Crum, the oldest living graduate of Chapman High School, are buried there. The earliest interment, that of Rowan Appleton Brown, took place in 1901. Brown was born in 1863 and father of prominent beekeeper Rowan Brown Jr. The earliest birth recorded on a stone in Brown and Smith Cemetery is that of Berry Ann Walker, patriarch of the Walker family, born in England in 1833 and who lived until 1908. Marie Walker Wimberly of Sumatra said members of her family who go back at least three generations, including her parents, rest in Brown and Smith. When I was a little girl, I remember going to the cemetery, and my mom had me sit by a tree during the funeral, she said. The cemetery and the community are in a quiet wooded setting. Also at rest in Brown and County TDC revenues dip in June, JulyYearly gures expected to show increaseBy DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com During the rst two months of the summer, revenues collected by the Tourist Development Council dipped about 11 percent over the year before, but TDC of cials are con dent that revenue for the entire 2011-12 scal year that just ended should see an increase. A look at newly released numbers for June and July show the countys collections of the 2 percent bed tax dropped by 16.4 percent in June, from $172,029 in 2011 to $143,805 in 2012. Numbers for July showed a 5.3 percent decline, from $147,874 in 2011 to about $140,000 in 2012. But overall, collections for the scal year, as of July 31, were running about 10.5 percent ahead of the same time last year, when the county posted a record $803,141 in bed tax monies. Paul Parker, a member of the TDC for the past seven years, said the drop in June and July numbers was not a cause for concern. Its completely the timing of the collections, he said, noting that monthly numbers do not account for the latitude the state exercises in how it receives payments from the overnight accommodations industry and when it posts them. Parker, who owns Harbor Point Vacation Rentals in Alligator Point, pointed out that May 2012 numbers were up almost 55 percent from the year before, a bulge likely By TIM CROFT227-7827 |@PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com Think not just good, but great. That is what Congressman Steve Southerland urged commissioners from Gulf, Franklin and Wakulla counties during an informational meeting last Thursday at Apalachicola City Hall pertaining to the RESTORE Act. Southerland, R-Panama City, urged commissioners to be broad-based, transparent and cohesive, not only in spending the billions in BP ne money potentially coming to eight counties along the Northwest Florida coast, but also in rebuf ng attempts by the executive branch to change the dynamics of how those nes will be collected. The process (in RESTORE) will test you, but there is a fair and equitable way for all citizens on the Gulf Coast to bene t from these funds, Southerland said. Southerland spoke to commissioners from the three counties about what was contained in the bill passed with bipartisan support in both houses of Congress that aims, he said, to restore states affected environmentally and economically by the 2010 Deepwater Horizon explosion and spill. Crystal Air to run Apalach airportTaylor Newman is director of operations for Crystal Air.Southerland talks RESTORE Act to area counties A major reason for Congressman Steve Southerlands informational meeting last week at Apalachicola City Hall was to explain the basics of the RESTORE Act, which aims to provide a process for the distribution of BP nes that are estimated to be $5 billion to $20 billion. When those funds will be available is unknown. Southerland said he hoped a federal judge would hand down a ruling in the case, and ne total, sometime in early 2013. Under the bill, the RESTORE Act established four so-called buckets of money, which Southerland provided a handout on and also explained. Those four pots of funds established under RESTORE are:What is the RESTORE Act? Crystal Air to run Apalach airport LOIS SWOBODA | The Times AT ETERNAL REST: PART 2Memories of Florida settlers inhabit Tates HellPHOTOS BY LOIS SWOBODA | The TimesJohn Keith died while worm grunting. Below, family patriarch Berry Ann Walker was born in England.See CRYSTAL AIR A11 See TDC A11 See ETERNAL REST A14 See SOUTHERLAND A10 See RESTORE A10Thursday, October 18, 2012 VOL. 127 ISSUE 25Opinion . . . . . . A4 Society . . . . . . A6 Faith . . . . . . . A7 Outdoors . . . . . A8 Tide Chart . . . . . A8 Sports . . . . . . A9 Classi eds . . . A12-A13 No blues for Doris, A6Homecoming parade Friday in EastpointFranklin County High Schools annual homecoming parade kicks off Friday at 1 p.m. in Eastpoint along U.S. 98. At 7 p.m., enjoy the traditional homecoming game, as the Seahawks take on West Gadsden at Mikel Clark Stadium.Weems mammogram clinic to be FridayWeems Memorial Hospital will host a mammogram walkin clinic from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Friday, Oct. 19, which is National Mammography Day. Any resident of Franklin County between the ages of 40 and 64 who does not have insurance coverage can walk in to Weems and receive a free, screening mammogram courtesy of Franklin Needs Inc. For more info, call 6538853, ext. 119.Be inspired by light FridayFrom 6:30-9:30 p.m. Friday, Oct. 19, Bowery Art Gallery, 149 Commerce St., presents Inspired by Light, a sculptural show of lights. Everyone is welcome. Light refreshments will be served. For more information, call 653-2425.Blues in the Park SaturdayOn Saturday, Oct. 20, six blues bands will perform from noon to 10 p.m. as part of a Blues in the Park event in Riverfront Park. Proceeds from the music and barbecue will bene t area seniors. For more information, call 653-3930.Gulf County Bow Wow Bash Oct. 27The St. Joe Bay Humane Society presents the seventh annual Bow Wow Bash, a bene t for the DAWGS in Prison program and the homeless animals of Gulf County, on Oct. 27. The Masquerade Party will be 6-10 p.m. at the Centennial Building in Port St. Joe. Enjoy food and drinks, masquerade contest (costumes optional), live music and a silent and live auction. Tickets, $30 each or 300 for a reserved table for 10, are available in Port St Joe at Bow Wow Beach Shop on Reid Avenue, St. Joseph Bay Humane Society on 10th Street or by visiting www. bowwowbash.org.

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LocalA2 | The Times Thursday, October 18, 2012 National Mammography Day Friday, October 19thWeems Memorial Hospital and Franklin Needs, Inc.will be celebrating National Mammography Day on Friday, October 19th On this day, from 10am to 4pm, any woman in Franklin County can walk-in to Weems Memorial Hospital and receive a free, screening mammogram courtesy of Franklin Needs, Inc.George E. Weems Memorial Hospital135 Avenue G Apalachicola, FL 32320 (850) 653-8853 www.weemsmemorial.com Franklin Needs, Inc. 55 South Bayshore Drive Eastpoint, Florida 32328 (850) 670-1671 www.forgottencoastclassics.com ALL SHOWS FREE OF CHARGE Check out www.BlastontheBay.com for detailed schedule and artist bios. Friday, Oct 196pm 6pm 6:30pm 7pm (CT) This project received VISIT FLORIDA Saturday, Oct 20 Sunday, Oct 21Dockside Caf @ the Port 2pm Songwriters Workshop 5pm 7pm 6:30pm (CT) Indian Pass Raw Bar Indian Pass Raw Bar BILL MILLER REALTY850-697-3751 (3310) 570-0658400 + COMM. U.S. 98 & GULFADJ. TO LANARK MARINA 850K$29,500 $2,500 DOWN BUYS 2 BED APT. 2 6 ORRENT $500/MTH 2 B/R 1 BTH GULF VIEW HOME W/ FAMILY ROOM $70,000 GULFVIEW & ACCESS 3 BDR 2 BA 2006 M/H 89K2 LG. SHADY LOTS 3 SHEDS400 TO MARINA-CITY WATER49KMIH 2 CRNRLOTS BLK. $ STORE REDUCED $49,500 2 AC-AT RIVER UTIL. IN -$39,500 NOTICEThe Florida Association of Benthologists (FAB) will hold its annual meeting Nov. 6-8, 2012 at the Apalachicola Environmental EducationTraining Center in Eastpoint. For more information contact the FAB President, Andy Rasmussen at 850.345.9711 or go toWWW.FLBENTHOS.ORG By LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star .com Albert E. Smythe of Lanark Village was arrested by sheriffs deputies on Oct. 3, for shooting a black bear and attempting to hide his actions. Initially, Smythe claimed to have witnessed a hitand-run involving the bear but further investigation showed the bear had been shot. Smythe, 42, was employed as a conservation law enforcement of cer for Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) from Dec. 12, 2003 to Sept. 10, 2007. He also worked parttime for the Wakulla Sheriffs Department for an unspecied period beginning May 29, 2009, but a spokesperson for human resources said he has not been employed there for some time. Smythe is president of a registered LLC, Clear Cut Solutions, that clears land and performs tree surgery. On April 10 at 2:30 a.m., Franklin County sheriffs deputies Jonathan Riley and Robert Hogan and Carrabelle Police Of ce Andy Pace were called to 2522 Palmetto Terrace, the residence of Albert Edward Smythe II, to investigate possible gun re reported by a neighbor, James Schumacher Schumacher said he saw a man he did not know with dark hair driving a white truck and a bear lying in the roadway. He said the man told him that somebody had hit a bear and ed the scene and that he had already called the police. The man told Schumacher to leave the area. When police arrived at Palmetto Terrace they found fur, blood and feces on the road and garbage strewn around the area. Smythe arrive at the scene in his white truck about ve minutes later. Someone ran over a bear and he ran away, Smythe told Hogan. I tried to track him but was unable to locate him. Hogan, Riley and Pace remained on the scene until FWC Lt. Charles Wood arrived. Smythe told Wood a bear had been struck by a vehicle and later said he had struck the bear with his truck. He then declined to discuss the event further. At about 4 a.m. Wood examined Smythes truck and photographed blood and fur on the undercarriage and in the bed. Riley, Pace and Hogan searched for the bear and Riley discovered fresh tire tracks in a wooded area near Lanark. The bear was located about a mile and a half from Smythes home by following those tracks. Wood and FWC Of cer Percy Cook recovered the bear from a ditch. Ryan and Gina Irvin, who live next door to Smythe, reported hearing a gunshot, and a truck and four-wheeler cranking up during the night. Ryan Irvin also reported hearing a bear moaning. In all ve witnesses reported hearing gunshots the night of the event. Gina Irvin said Smythe had trouble with bears getting into his garbage. A necropsy was performed on the 120-pound bear at the FWC Gainesville Research Lab and a bullet was recovered from the bears spine. Doctors concluded the bear could have died from bleeding from the gunshot wound, suffocation, or possible undetected injuries to the lungs. Injuries typically associated with bears hit by vehicles were not found on the Lanark bear. DNA tied the blood on Smythes truck to the bear found in the ditch. Although black bears were delisted as a species of special concern in August, Smythe was charged in the April incident with taking of a threatened species, a third degree felony punishable by up to ve years in prison and a $5,000 ne. In addition, he is accused of tampering with evidence and giving a false report to a law enforcement of cer. If convicted of killing the bear, Smythe could also lose his hunting and shing licenses inde nitely in Florida and in more than 30 other states with reciprocal agreements under the Interstate Wildlife Violator Compact. Smythe was released after posting a $2,500 bond and is scheduled for arraignment Nov. 14.Former FWC of cer charged with shooting bear ALBERT E. SMYTHE Franklin Correctional Institutions Canine Tracking Unit recently participated in the South Eastern States Manhunt Field Trials at Blackwater State Forest. Teams from Alabama, Arkansas, Louisiana and Florida competed in this event. Each team was required to follow a two-hour-old scent trail about 1.5 miles long, one in daylight and one in the dark. The Franklin C.I. K-9 Team consisted of Sgt. Greg Daniels; Sgt. Eric Crosby and Of cer Shawn Chisholm completed their day track with a time of 27:25 and had a 14:52 on their night track, recovering all four ags on each track. Santa Rosa Correctional Institutions K-9 Team narrowly edged Franklin C.I. for second place by one-half second. The team from Suwannee C.I. was the rst place nisher in the event. Pictured from left are Warden Russell Hosford, Sgt. Erik Crosby, Sgt. William Greg Daniels, Assistant Warden Edward Watson and Of cer Shawn Chisholm. SPECIAL TO THE TIMESOf cers from the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission cracked down on night harvesting of oysters last month. From Sept. 9 through 24, an operational detail was conducted on the waters of Apalachicola and Ochlockonee bays. Because recent stock assessments of oysters in Apalachicola Bay reveal a reduced number of shell sh, prices for oysters have increased greatly, and FWC ofcers received information from the eld that commercial oyster harvesters were harvesting at night within the closed waters of Apalachicola Bay. Of cers John Allen, Matt Gore, Wil Raker, Percy Cook, Blake Hoelscher, Jason Carroll, Steven Cook, Pilot David Calianno, and Lt. Charlie Wood participated in the detail, in which vessel patrols were conducted for 10 nights. Seven vessels and nine harvesters were inspected. Seven misdemeanor citations were issued for night harvest of oysters. Nine misdemeanor citations were issued for harvesting oysters from closed waters. Four written warnings were issued for insufcient vessel safety equipment. Along with the enforcement action taken by of cers, about 25 bags of oysters were seized and returned alive to the water. The interception and seizure of these shell sh harvested from closed waters prevented their introduction into the commercial shell sh market, potentially lessening the chance of illness from ingestion by consumers. FRANKLIN C.I. K-9 TEAM EARNS 3RD PLACE FWC REPORT

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LocalThe Times | A3Thursday, October 18, 2012 This means you. THE FLU ENDS WITH U E Competitive Yields on FDIC Insured CDs Publishes: Wednesday, October 24, 2012in The Panama City News HeraldSpace and Copy Deadline: Monday, October 22 by 10 am WEEKLYDiscounterThe Monday, October 22 by 10 am 2 x 2 block$60 eachincludes full color(Actual size 3.22 wide by 2 tall) Purchase additional blocks for $50 each to create a larger adTo Advertise Contact Your Account Executive or Trisha at 522-5107 NO HIDDEN CHARGES: It is our policy that the patient and any other person responsible for payments has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed by payment or any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment. www.mulliseye.com"WE WELCOME NEW PATIENTS, CALLTODAY FOR YOUR PRIORITY APPOINTMENT" FOR NEW PATIENTS 59 AND OLDERThis certificate is good for a complete Medical Eye Exam withTodd Robinson, M.D.Board Certified Eye Physician and Surgeon.The exam includes a prescription for eye glasses and tests for Glaucoma, Cataracts and other eye diseases.FOR YOUR APPOINTMENT CALL: 850-763-6666 ELIGIBILITY: U.S. Citizens living in the Florida Panhandle, 59 years and older, not presently under our care. Coupon Expires: 10-31-12 FREEEYE EXAMCODE: AP00Darren Payne, M.D.Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract SurgeonLee Mullis, M.D.Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract SurgeonTodd Robinson, M.D.Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon "Freedom from Eye Glasses, Now a reality for many."Smart LensesSM SPECIAL TO THE TIMESCarrabelle cut the ribbon Oct. 5 on the citys new downtown pavilion. The new pavilion, next to the rehouse, was built as part of a $546,000 Community Development Block Grant for downtown revitalization. The grant also covered the cost of sidewalks, drainage, additional parking in the downtown area, restroom and landscaping. Work was completed by Duggar Excavating, with engineering by Inovia. Above: Mayor Curley Messer cuts the ribbon, with, from left, Inovias Jim Waddell, City Commissioner Cal Allen, Inovias Molly Mitchell, Chamber of Commerce Director Suzanne Zimmerman, Messer, City Administrator Courtney Millender, with daughter Raegan Dempsey, City Commissioner Brenda La Paz and Ann Wilson. The city encourages the public to use the new facilities the last Saturday of every month and create an outdoor market. Bring your fresh-baked goods, produce, arts, crafts, jewelry, etc. to display and sale. There will be no charge for space at this time and will be on a rst-come, rst-served basis. For more information, call the city at 697-3618. OUTDOOR MARKET PLANNED FOR NEW PAVILIONEstate planning check-ups in CarrabelleLegal Services of North Florida will be conducting estate planning check-ups from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Franklin County Senior Center at 201 NW Ave. F in Carrabelle on Oct. 18 and 25. Participants will be entered into a drawing to receive a simple will prepared by a Florida attorney. Learn about wills, living wills, heath care directives and much more. Attorneys will also be on hand to discuss issues related to BP oil spill claims, including any medical claims. No registration required. For more information, contact Scott Manion at 850-701-3317.Bridge maintenance work continuesPeriodic lane restrictions will run through Nov. 7, at the following locations in Franklin County, as Bridge Masters perform routine bridge maintenance work: State Road (S.R.) 30 / U.S. 98 Tillie Miller Bridge in Carrabelle, over the Carrabelle River S.R. 30 / U.S. 98 Porter Bar Creek Bridge, 2.5 miles west of S.R. 65 All activities are weather-dependent and may be delayed or re-scheduled in the event of inclement weather. Motorists are reminded to pay attention and use caution when driving through the work zone. For more Florida Department of Transportation District Three information. follow us on twitter @MyFDOT_NWFL.Room for more studentsPam Nobles Studio has room at 86 Market Street in Apalachicola for more students. Classes go from ages 18 months to adult, in ballet, tap, jazz, hip-hop, Mommy and Me and something new an exercise class for adults. I would also like very much to teach baton, Nobles said. Thats what I started out teaching many years ago. Baton twirlers look great in parades and exhibitions. The exercise class that has been added is something needed here, she said. Were just getting started with it. For more information, call 653-8078.Yoga class Wednesdays at community centerA community hatha yoga class is held every Wednesday evening, from 5:30-7 p.m. at the City Hall Community Center at Battery Park. The class is taught by Kathy Jansen, a registered yoga teacher with the National Yoga Alliance. The class is free, with donations accepted. Yoga mats provided if needed. For more information, call 653-6719. News BRIEFS

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OpinionA4 | The Times USPS 027-600Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 Publisher: Roger Quinn Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six monthsHome delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERSIn case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola TimesJackels knowledge of real estate an assetWhile the rhetoric always heats up before an election, I found some of Tony Shivers comments about Commissioner Pinki Jackel that were published in the Oct. 11 issue of The Times to be ill-considered and unfair. This county commission candidate complained that Ms. Jackel came to the area to make a prot. While I am sure that there were many things that brought Pinki to the area, I for one do not see making a prot as a bad thing. It certainly would make little sense to move to the area and start a business not expecting to do so, and certainly Mr. Shivers family has proted greatly from their businesses here in Franklin County. Politicians here in Franklin County are rightfully proud that they have spent their lives here, but in many cases, time spent outside the county can help ofceholders solve problems by giving them a broader perspective of how things are done differently, and sometimes better somewhere else. In Pinkis case, she also spent four years in Tallahassee getting her degree at Florida State. It seems that Pinki is often the outsider on county commission votes, though. She ghts hard for scal responsibility and works to minimize tax increases, which often places her at odds with the rest of the commission. Relative to Mr. Shivers other comments, I am also sure that both candidates agree that improvements and amenities are needed. Pinki has been behind many during the last four years, including the pavilion in Eastpoint and the improved landscaping at Lighthouse Park on the island that help attract the visitors who bring muchneeded revenue to Franklin County. And as for the charge that 85 percent of the people (in her commercials) are all real estate people well, take a look at the commercials and judge for yourself, but it does not look that way to me. If there are some real estate people among the small business owners, county workers and others in the commercials, thats not necessarily a bad thing. If we are going to get our employment and our tax rolls back up to where they need to be, we need people to build, remodel and buy homes and start businesses. Pinkis knowledge of this business is an asset to the commission, in a manner similar to the way that Mr. Smokey Parrishs intimate knowledge of the seafood industry serves us. This upcoming election is going to have a huge impact on our county, our state and our nation. We all have hot button issues that lead us to support the candidates we do, and I am glad to see The Times covering the issues. There are times, though, when taking a step back and looking at what is said from a little different perspective is constructive. Sincerely, Francis L. Giknis St. George IslandSchool board should lead by exampleI would like to challenge each of the ve school board members of Franklin County. Each of them always expresses that they do everything for the kids and the schools. Well, why dont they allow their actions speak louder than their words? I was reading an article out of the Educators Journal about a school board member from Bay County named Jerry Register. Mr. Register took $5,000 from his school board pay and is giving it back by giving 50 teachers $100 gift certicates to Ms. Marys School Source to buy supplies for their classroom. I cannot applaud this gentleman enough for actually caring about the schools and showing positive action by giving back. I wonder if we have any school board members in Franklin County that will be willing to do the same? They dont have to give back the same way that Mr. Register did, but why not donate at least $10,000 or more of their salary back to the school system? Guess what, that would equal $50,000 and a teacher position. It could also buy uniforms for various sports teams or may it could allow for middle school sports. Imagine the possibilities of what could happen, if the school board members would lead by example. Sincerely, Dustin Martina Bachelor of science in political science Masters of science in education Specialist in educational leadership Ph.D. candidate in educational leadershipThursday, October 18, 2012By David Adlerstein and Caty GreeneSpecial to the Times When Dody Butler was a boy, he and his friends would swim in the river. I dont remember any kid who didnt swim back then, he told the audience that lled the Holy Family Senior Center Sept. 29 to hear him and three ladies tell stories of the place where they grew up. The afternoon session was part of the second annual Authors in Apalach weekend and featured a panel of storytellers including Dolores Roux, Peggy George and Cora Russ, with Susan Clementson as the moderator. Butler told of how it was down by the river when he rst met Alexander Key, the famed author, back before World War II. We were skinny dipping and he walked up and said Is Dody here? If theres a Dody here, his mothers calling him, Butler said. He sat down on a log and watched us. Pretty often when we were swimming, hed be there. A captivating detail from Keys life followed, told from the point of view of Butler, now a man in his 80s able to smoothly relate the Tom Sawyer-like memories of his boyhood. Key, he said, kept a 20-foot sailboat named Jewelry, and used it to shape his knowledge of the coastline, which gured in to two of his works, The Wrath and the Wind and Island Light, both of which he wrote after the war. He took me out on that sailboat and for no reason I could ever gure out he told me Im going to teach you to sail, said Butler. He used to scold me pretty often, for not doing what I was supposed to do. When Key left for the service, he told Butler, then still in his early teens, I want you to take care of my boat until I get back. Butler recalled how he would anchor the boat up the river during the hurricane reach, and swim back home, even once braving a storm to return to the boat to plug a hole. When it calmed down enough, I went back out. Finally got the engine xed, he said. Most of the time I sailed upriver because you could always get back. When Butler himself went off into the service, following the path of his older brothers, he left the Key boat in the care of two friends and it didnt work out. They let the boat sink at Nine-Foot-Hole When he came back on leave, Butler got the boat out, saw it suffered dryrotted mast right at the deck, and took it to his grandfather, who owned Bay City at the time. It later went to Demo Georges Fish House, and after that, Butler lost track. As far as I know, the Jewelry might still be in the Demo Georges Fish House, he said. He closed by unfurling a small colorful drawing that Key had once given him, which Roux properly held up for the audience to admire. The afternoons second panel of storytellers was of a more formal kind, featuring Orman House Park Ranger Mike Kinnett, and local historian Mark Curenton, and graced with a special guest, Harry P. Owens, professor emeritus from Ole Miss. Kinnett, a polished presenter of the towns history in his role at the Orman House, honored Owens by presenting him with a copy of the 1967 doctoral thesis Apalachicola Before 1861 that Owens completed while a graduate student at Florida State University. The thesis has not been published, but Kinnett said it was the best $80 he had ever spent. Its the rst link on the rebirth of Apalachicola and its history, the park ranger told the audience, and Owens was happy to sign it. Owens told of how pleased he had been to fall upon a cache of original Orman family documents for help in his research, documents that Kinnett said now 35 years later, have been preserved in digital form. An amazing collection, he said. Curenton eshed out rstperson details of the era as found in a Jan. 30, 1853 letter from a Walton County man who had come to Apalachicola to seek employment. Earlier that morning, Curenton had helped with ag placement to help in paying respect to the fallen of the Civil War at the Chestnut Cemetery. Local citizens represented veterans from well-known families, several representing their own kin including George Floyd and Tom Daly (Porter family). City Commissioner Frank Cook, also a Porter, was also in attendance. The weekends featured speaker, Jeff Shaara, a New York Times bestselling author several time over, addressed the forum with an animated sharing of how the work of his father, Killer Angels, had inuenced his own writings. Shaara told of how his fathers work, which eventually was made into the highest rated cable lm ever Gettysburg, had an inauspicious start, coming out after Vietnam when nobody wanted to read about generals. He didnt nd an audience, said Shaara. My father was a master of bad timing. But the book did nd success eventually, 19 years after it was published and ve years after the elder Shaaras death. For the younger Shaara, it was a journey of discovery, a creative exploration that began when he rst visited Gettysburg with his father. Since he rst began his writing career in earnest, Jeff Shaara shared details of his remarkable success, even groaning along with the audience at one point at some of the cheesy headlines that have accompanied reviews of his books, such as The Son Also Rises. Shaara, who lives in Tallahassee, released in May his most recent book, A Blaze of Glory, about the battle of Shiloh. The weekend began with Friday evening with a dinner of venison and seafood served to 60 people in candlelit Benedict Hall. Funds were raised for the Apalachicola Municipal Library through their friends group, PALS. Leon Bloodworth, his behind the scenes partner Perianne McKeown, volunteer kitchen staff Jaime Liang, Julie OMalley and Carole Braszky and servers from the Franklin County School, along with Beth Wright and Mark Friedman, kept the food and wine coming. Lee McLemore from the Piggly Wiggly described the wines. Close to 20 authors and publications were available in the morning at the Raney House, to meet a steady stream of book enthusiasts. Attendees were greeted by three cheerful junior authors on the front porch, Jan Annino, Adrian Fogelin and M. R. Street. Inside, the historical contingent, anchored by Willoughby Marshall, included Marlene Womack and Robin Ingram, with her mothers newly released book about the Apalachicola Ice Company. The best seller, after Shaara, was probably former Apalachicola Mayor Jimmie Nichols, whose Apalachicola Times columns have been compiled posthumously by former Times staff writer Kevin Begos. To conclude the afternoon, which was packed with almost too much stuff, were two panels. First, the Award Winners who turned out to number six: the aforementioned junior authors, plus Glynn Marsh Alam and Doug Alderson. Doug was also the nal speaker before the event was adjourned to the Orman House for a reception. Caty Greene is the librarian for the Apalachicola Municipal Library. To reach her, call 653-8436. CORREcCTIONIn last weeks Oct. 11 issue, it was erroneously reported on the Society page that Shawn Dolan had graduated this summer from Florida A and M University with a masters degree in architecture. Authors tell, and sell, their tales@THE LIBRaARY Caty Greene LETTERsS TO THE EDITOR PHOTOs S BY DD AVID ID ADLER DLER STEIN TEIN | The TimesDody Butler recalls his youth. Mike Kinnett, left, retired Old Miss Prof. Harry P. Owens, right, and Mark Curenton share a laugh after their forum on Apalachicola history. Delores Roux holds up a drawing that Alexander Key gave to Dody Butler as Susan Clementson listens at left.

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LocalThe Times | A5Thursday, October 18, 2012By LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ApalachTimes Lswoboda@starfl.com Sharlene Posey is asking for your help in cataloguing her late brothers art work. Jimmy Smith, of St. George Island and Eastpoint, passed away Sept. 12 at St. James Bay Health and Rehabilitation Center after a prolonged illness. He was an early resident of St. George Island, an artist, a musician and a free spirited child of the 60s. Jimmys older brother Mike said his younger brother spent much of his childhood in Tripoli, Libya where his father was stationed on Wheelus Air Force Base. He attended the American high school at Wheelus and in 1965; began to play the guitar. Music became a lifelong passion for Jimmy, when he and Mike formed a sixman band called Time. By age 16, Jimmy was working five to six nights a week as a musician and earning about $300 weekly. Jimmy graduated high school in 1968 and traveled to Switzerland to visit a girlfriend. Then, in 1969, Moammar Khadafi ordered the American military out of Libya and the Smith family returned to Texas. Jimmy played with several bands in Canada and the Midwest. Mike entered the military and, in 1973, was stationed in Germany. Jimmy joined him there and again became part of the local music scene. Jimmy began studying marquetry, the art and craft of applying pieces of veneer to a structure to form decorative patterns, designs or pictures. He worked with two Dutch artists Michael Fickens and Rudy Schillen. Mike returned to the U.S. in 1975, but, Jimmy, who had found a special niche in Germany, remained for several years, traveling in western Europe and becoming fluent in German. Jimmy returned home in 1977 and bounced around until he found St. George Island, becoming a resident about 1982, just as the building boom was gaining momentum. Like many early island residents, Jimmy worked at more than one job to make ends meet. He tended bar at Harry As, worked construction, played in local clubs and later ran a music shop in Eastpoint. But his marquetry skills became a steady source of income during those years. Many island homes contain his art work, in some cases built into the structure of the house. Mike said he believes Jimmy created 1,000 pictures, perhaps 200 of which could be described as masterpieces. Jimmys sister, Sharlene, remembers he exhibited at art shows and became a member of International Marquetry Society. She said several galleries expressed interest in his work, but he had so many commissions, he couldnt supply a gallery as well. He also continued to pursue his music, playing with Betsy James and Clay Bailey in a band Shotgun Annie that performed on and off the island. Around this time, with Jimmy at the peak of his creative skills, tragedy struck. Jimmy was diagnosed with cancer that eventually affected his vision. Even after losing an eye, he continued to create his beautiful designs using a strong magnifying glass, but in the end, marquetry became impossible for him. He taught Mikes wife Libby the craft and she passed it on to her son Austin, who actually completed some pieces Jimmy left unfinished. With a reduced income due to illness and a divorce, Jimmy left the island and moved to less expensive digs in Eastpoint where he remained until his final hospitalization. John Spohrer, a close friend of Jimmys, remembers him well. Jimmy was a very talented guy but I think that what all of his friends remember best about him was his upbeat attitude to life, Spohrer said. That didnt change when his health failed. Anyone that knew him through the years of all of the horrible things that happened to him in the prime of life knew his attitude never turned negative. He stayed dedicated to his art even to point when he could hardly see, walk, or get around. It stayed important to him. His positive happy attitude toward life was one of his major attributes. He was loyal as a friend and a good animal owner, he said. He loved his dog Petey. He was really an inspiration. As he went through it all, you couldnt help but think if something bad happened to you, you would want react to it as Jimmy did. Karen Dennis remembered Jimmy as a wonderful person and master storyteller. Belinda Kelliher, a friend who met Jimmy at the Blue Parrot, said he was always worried about his friends. While Jimmy is gone, his memory and much of his artwork lives on, and sister Sharlene is asking for help in locating and photographing it so she can create a catalogue. Marquetry is a dying art form. Jimmys family owns only a few of his creations and Sharlene wants to create a permanent record of her brothers art. Jimmys work may be built into the woodwork of a building; it may adorn furniture, although those pieces are known to be rare. Most of Jimmys art hung on the wall like a painting. He is also known to have applied veneer to wooden cigar boxes. Sharlene said Jimmy always signed his work and often listed his materials of the reverse side of a piece with details about where and when the work was completed. If you believe you have a piece of Jimmy Smiths art, please share the information with Sharlene Posey at (850) 508-2809. COLLINSCONSTRUCTIONOF ST. GEORGE ISLAND, INC &SEWAGE TREATMENT SERVICESOVER 30 YEARS EXPERIENCE OURSERVICESINCLUDE: AFTER HOURS & EMERGENCY SERVICE PROVIDED 850.670.5790MAINTENANCE@JCOLLINSCONSTRUCTION.COM Robert C. Bruner Attorney Personal & Business BankruptcyOver 30 Years Legal Experience850-670-3030 bankruptcy relief under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon advertisements. Before you decide, ask us to send you free written information Piecing together Jimmy Smiths legacy JIMMY SMITHFROM THE SMITH FAMILY COLLECTIONMarquetry sailboat created by Jimmy Smith

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On Saturday evening, Doris Pendleton ended 36 years of service to the county on a high note surrounded by family and friends. The staff of the property appraisers of ce threw a retirement bash of which to be proud. The Coombs Armory was beautifully decorated with an autumn theme appropriate both to the season and the occasion. One by one, Pendletons coworkers came to the microphone to express their love and admiration for their departing supervisor. Rhonda Skipper, property appraiser elect, recalled shopping sprees, Christmas parties and a riverboat trip. The memories we created are anything but blue, she said. Paul Wasmund told Pendleton, I wouldnt have missed it for anything in the world. Joseph Ferrell called Pendleton the sweetest, most caring, kindest and most generous person he knew. There were jokes, too. Remember age is just a number, but in your case its a very large number, Terry Tipton said. Pendletons fellow constitutional of cers were on hand to honor her. Undersheriff Joel Norred presented her with a plaque from the sheriffs of ce. When I started working we were the only two people in the courthouse early in the morning and sat, gossiped and drank coffee until 8:30 a.m. Supervisor of Elections Ida Elliot recalled. We must be best friends, for me to miss a Gators game to be here. Clerk of Courts Marcia Johnson pointed out that when she and Pendleton began work at the courthouse there were no computers. Pendleton herself recalled the days when, at 19, she came to work for Property Appraiser John James. Reminiscences, sometimes tearful, were followed by fun when two groups of courthouse workers staged skits for the assembly. A group of hillbilly minstrels Skipper, Ferrell, property appraise staffers Rita Millender and Brenda Benjamin and County Planner Alan Pierce toted clay jugs as they sang a song with the chorus Gloom, despair and agony to me. The mountaineers were followed by ladies Casey Nash, Stephanie Smith, Brenda Benjamin and Rita Preston each in owery aprons and sunbonnets who gave their own musical tribute. A wonderful dinner, featuring mullet and chicken prepared by AJs was followed by dancing to records spun by deejay Van Johnson. Pendleton joined a group of talented dancers in the Electric Slide. Pendleton said she plans to focus more on family. We have a houseboat up the river and plan to spend more time there, she said, And Tommys an avid hunter, so well be visiting a camp up in Georgia, too. As a going-away gift, the staff of the property appraisers of ce presented the boss with a magni cent grandfather clock. To see a gallery of the retirement party, visit www.ApalachTimes.com. Stan TrappeATTORNEY AT LAW Foreclosure Defense Bankruptcy Asset Protection Real Estate Probate ~ WillsAdmitted to Practice Law in Florida Since 1974Let Me Help You 850-769-6139236 McKenzie Avenue Panama City, FL LARIENA! Oh my, just look at this face! Lariena is an 8 week old Spaniel mix. She and her litter mates came to us at 5 weeks old so they are well socialized. There are only two of four still available so if you have been wanting a puppy that wont grow to be a big dog, come meet Lariena.VOLUNTEERSARE DESPERATELY NEEDED TO SOCIALIZEALLOFOUR DOGSAND CATS.We are always looking for people willing to bring one of our animals into their home to be fostered for various needs. Anytime you can spare would be greatly appreciated. Call Karen at 670-8417 for more details or visit the Franklin County Humane Society at 244 State Road 65 in Eastpoint. You may logon to the website at www.forgottenpets.org to see more of our adoptable pets. PETOFTHEWEEK Franklin County Humane Society NIP FIRE ANTS IN THE BUD!CALLLOIS AT 653-5857Franklin Countys ONLY LOCALPest Control Company dbutler@coastalcoverage.com Locally owned and operated Home Business Auto Health Workers Comp SocietyA6 | The Times Thursday, October 18, 2012 Caden Haynes turns 1Caden Steven Lee Haynes will be celebrating his rst birthday on Wednesday, Oct. 17, 2012. He is the son of Glenda Jean Martina and Joseph Haynes of Apalachicola. Maternal grandparents are Kenneth and Glenda Martina. Maternal great-grandparents are Curtis and Jean Watson, and Bill and Burnell Martina, all of Apalachicola. Paternal grandmother is Lorie Haynes, of Houston, Texas. Happy rst birthday! We Love You. BirthdaysHappy birthday, DarleneHappy 21st birthday Darlene!! We love you so much and are proud of the young woman you are becoming. Love, Mom, Dad and MeganEzra Hernandez bornProud parents Rick Hernandez and Krystal Shuler, of Apalachicola would like to announce the birth of their son, Ezra Jay Hernandez. Ezra was born Wednesday, Oct. 3, 2012, at 6 p.m. at Gulf Coast Hospital in Panama City. He weighed 7 pounds, 12 ounces and was 20.75 inches long.Tanicia Pugh, Courtney Bell to wed SaturdayFamily and friends are cordially invited to attend the wedding ceremony of Tanicia Pugh and Courtney Bell this Saturday, Oct. 20, at the National Guard Armory in Apalachicola. The ceremony will begin at 5 p.m. with the reception to follow. Come be a guest of this joyous occasion as two become one. BirthSpecial to the TimesWewahitchka author Michael Lister will be signing and reading from his newly released John Jordan mystery Blood Sacri ce from 1-3 p.m. Saturday at Apalachicolas Downtown Books. Blood Sacri ce is the fth entry in Listers popular and acclaimed mystery series featuring ex-cop turned prison chaplain John Jordan. Publishers Weekly said of Blood Sacri ce, Listers strong fth book featuring cop-turned-prison-chaplain John Jordan takes Jordan to the small Florida Panhandle town of Bridgeport, to undergo counseling at St. Anns Abbey. Well-handled plot twists complement one of todays more psychologically complex religious detectives. Following a particularly brutal and costly case, Jordan goes to a secluded retreat center and encounters one of the most bewildering and haunting cases of his career the suspicious death of a young woman undergoing an exorcism. A provocative thriller, Blood Sacri ce also is an exploration into unseen realms of darkness and light, especially those of Jordans con icted heart. Confronting the irrational, superstitious, and greedy, Blood Sacri ce delves into the rise of American exorcisms following their explosion in popular culture, and mourns the loss of Floridas nal corner of unspoiled beauty. Blood Sacri ce is an exciting entry into what bestseller Michael Connelly calls one of the most unique series in contemporary crime ction. Lister also will be signing his other books, including Meaning Every Moment, The Big Goodbye and Burnt Offerings. For more info, visit www. MichaelLister.com. WeddingLister to sign new mystery at Downtown Books MICHAEL LISTER LOIS SWOBODA | The TimesDoris Pendleton thanks the many people with whom she worked.Pendleton serenaded at retirement

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The Times | A7Thursday, October 18, 2012 The United Methodist Churches of Franklin County Welcome You First United Methodist Church of ApalachicolaWorship Service 11:00 a.m. every Sunday Sunday School 10:00 a.m. 75 5th St. Apalachicola 653-9530 fumcapalach@gtcom.net Pastor: Rev. Themo PatriotisCarrabelle United Methodist ChurchWorship Services 10:45 a.m. Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Celebrate Recovery Mondays 7-9 p.m. 102 NE Ave. B Carrabelle 697-3672 Pastor: Julie StephensEastpoint United Methodist ChurchWorship Service 10:00 a.m. every Sunday Healing service every fourth Monday at 7:00 p.m. 317 Patton Dr. (corner of David St.) 670-8825 Pastor: Rev. Beth WhiteSt. George Island United Methodist Church9:00 a.m. Worship Service 10:00 a.m. Fellowship Hour 201 E. Gulf Beach Dr. 9274635 www.sgiumc.org Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis Nursery now provided for Sunday Church Service WELCOMES YOU Trinity Trinity Episcopal Churchest. 1836Welcomes YouHwy. 98 & 6th St. Apalachicola 850-653-9550Sunday Worship Services 8 & 10:30 a.m. Wednesdays Healing Service 11 a.m. Centering Prayer 4 p.m. Sunday Worship Services 8 & 10:30 a.m. Wednesdays Healing Service 11 a.m. Centering Prayer 4 p.m. First Pentecostal Holiness Church379 Brownsville Road Apalachicola Were excited about what Gods doing!!!Sunday School 9:45 am Sunday Morning Worship 10:45 am Sunday Evening Service 6:00 pm Monday, Youth Group 6:30 pm Wednesday, Royal Rangers, G.A.P.7:00 pm Wednesday Worship & Word 7:30 pmNursery Provided during regular church services 7:00 7:00 First Baptist ChurchSt. George Island 501 E. Bayshore Drive 927-2257 R. Michael Waley, Pastor Join us as we praise and worship the living Christ. Great is the Lord and most worthy of praise. Psalm 145:3 Sunday Bible Study................................................10:00am Worship Praise........................................................11:00am Sunday Night............................................................7:00pm Wednesday Power Hour......................................7:00pm Wednesday Youth at S.P.L.A.S.H.......................7:00pm Walking in Christ R. Michael Whaley, Pastor WELCOMES YOUChurch of the Ascension101 NE First Street CarrabelleSUNDAY10:00 AM WELCOMES YOUChurch THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH (850) 274-4490 (850) 545-2578 FaithDavid Bruton Wingate died Tuesday, Oct. 9, 2012, in Port St. Joe at the age of 77. He is survived by his wife of 52 years, Arlene Bergstrom Wingate of Apalachicola. David was born Jan. 30, 1935, in Charlotte, N.C. He was raised in Mt. Gilead, N.C., by his mother, Fannie Louisa Bruton, a piano teacher, and father Dr. George Clarence Wingate. He received his bachelors, masters and academic work for his doctorate at the Julliard School of Music in New York City. He then taught voice at the Florida State University School of Music from 1966-2003. David spent his professional life performing nationally and internationally in numerous opera and musical productions. He toured with the Robert Shaw Chorale, sang with major orchestras, performed oratorios, served as choir director for many churches and performed as a soloist with the High Holy Days with Richard Tucker in Chicago. Other survivors include four children, John (Dana), Asheville, N.C.; Peter, Tallahassee; Tianne, Tallahassee; and David Daniel, Munich, Germany; four grandchildren, Ali, Strom, Jack and Cameron; Boots Wingate (cousin) and family of Albany, Ga.; special niece Rebecca (Marc) Cabassa, Gulf Breeze; David Armon Bruton (cousin), Chapel Hill, N.C.; William Bruton (cousin), Mt. Gilead, N.C.; Joseph Bruton (cousin), Maryland; many sisters and brothersin-law, nieces and nephews and many colleagues and students. He was preceded in death by one son, David Bruton Wingate, Jr., and one brother, George C. Wingate. He was a member of Trinity Episcopal Church in Apalachicola and was cared for by the dedicated staff at the Bridge at Bay St. Joe in Port St. Joe. A memorial service will be held on Saturday, Oct. 20, at 11 am at Trinity Episcopal Church in Apalachicola. Memorial contributions may be made to the FSU School of Music, the Julliard School of Music or the Trinity Music Fund.David Bruton Wingate DAVIdD b BRUTON w WINGATE ObituaryCovenant Word hosts O Oct. 31 Joy NNightCovenant Word Christian Center will have its annual Joy Night, a safe alternative to Halloween, from 6-9 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 31, in front of the old Apalachicola High School gym on 14th Street. The event is free and open to the entire community; kids and adults are invited. With many sponsors from local businesses, churches, organizations and individuals, the event will feature deejay Big Holy, from Panama City, bounce houses and a superslide, games, contests with prizes, drawings, cake/prize walk for adults and kids with cakes as prizes and gift bags, grilled hot dogs, hamburgers, chips and drinks and plenty of free candy. Call Joy Night coordinator Misty DeCourcey at 247-8524 for info or if you would like to donate candy/ prizes, etc. Donations are tax-deductible.Big Bend Hospice holds NNov. 10 remembrance service Big Bend Hospice invites everyone to the annual Services of Remembrance, to be held in each of the counties Big Bend Hospice serves. In Franklin County, the service will be at 10:30 a.m. Nov. 10 at the Three Servicemen Statue, 230 Market St., Apalachicola. The Service of Remembrance is a nondenominational service that brings the community together to honor the memories of loved ones at this very special time of the year. Many times people become overwhelmed with emotions during the holiday season, said Cathy Adkison, Big Bend Hospices president and CEO. This service provides a wonderful opportunity to pause to remember, pay honor and nd support. This is a time for remembrance open to everyone in the community. Services in each county include music by music therapists and words of encouragement from chaplains, all part of the Big Bend Hospice staff. Hospice grief and loss counselors will also be available to talk. Services conclude with a special candle lighting ceremony and passing of the candlelight in memory of loved ones. A reception follows, hosted by members from each countys advisory council. Everyone who attends shares a common purpose: to honor and to remember a loved one who has died, to be surrounded by others who are on a similar journey and to connect with loved ones. The service is proof that death ends a life and not a relationship, that holidays can still be a time of hope and of family, of love and of connection to all the things and all the people who have ever been important to us. For additional information about Big Bend Hospices bereavement services, contact Pam Mezzina at 878-5310, ext. 799 or pam@bigbendhospice.org. Registration information is also available at www. bigbendhospice.org. Big Bend Hospice has been serving this community since 1983 with compassionate end-of-life care along with grief and loss counselors available to provide information and support to anyone in Leon, Jefferson, Taylor, Madison, Gadsden, Liberty, Franklin or Wakulla county. Faith bBRIEFS When Jimmy Lycett retired his shing boat, the Amanda Belle, he removed the name board and put it on the wall of his wifes restaurant, the Fishermans Wife. It looks really good there. Guess Ill see you this afternoon for lunch. You are planning to join us at the Franklin County Senior Center, arent you? Serving begins at noon. Be watching for you! You do know that every Friday night is hamburger night at the Camp Gordon Johnston American Legion Post 82, here in the Village at 2367 Oak Street. Order up at 5 to 7 p.m. A very large hamburger and chips for a donation of $6. Come enjoy the evening or call and order to go. Call 697-9998. Start Saturday with a full breakfast at the Lanark Village Boat Club. You can get your sugar x from 9 a.m. to noon. Your donation of $5 will be collected at the door. We have pancakes, French toast, eggs, bacon, sausage, juice and coffee. See ya there! Dont worry about the calories. You can work them off at the Birthday Bash at Post 82. Party starts at 6 p.m. The fun starts when you come in the door. Well its time for the covered dish dinner, already. Come on over to Chillas Hall, Sunday, Oct. 21 and join your friends and neighbors. Serving begins at 1 p.m. Bring your favorite dish to share, a donation and your empty stomach. Keep Randy Harrison and Sharon Thoman in your prayers. The angels took them home last week. Pray for their eternal peace and for their families. They both lived here in the village. Dont forget the Halloween contest and dance, Oct. 27 on spooky Saturday. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. and Greg K and Krewe will start the music at 7 p.m. Got your costume ready? Our rst Saturday breakfast will be at Chillas Hall Nov. 3 from 8:30 to 11 a.m. Members of the Lanark Village Golf Club will prepare your full breakfast you. Your donation of $5 will be collected at the door. Also on that Saturday, the Ladies Guild of the Sacred Heart Church will have their fall festival. They are now accepting donations for the sale. More info later. Be kind to one another, check on the sick and house bound and remember our little prayer. God grant me patience and I want it right now! Until next time, God bless America, our troops, the poor, homeless and hungry. LANARK NEwWSJim Welsh It seems that you often nd inspiration through strange circumstances. While riding my bike through a vacant lot on the island a few weeks ago, I was attacked and bitten by a dog. After a rst responder conrmed that I needed to get some stitches, my wife drove me to the emergency room at Weems. The staff there was professional and treated me with great care, but, though I was impressed and appreciative, that was not what surprised me most about the incident. State law requires the hospital le a report with Animal Control when they treat bites. This report was led, and later that day, I spoke to William Key at Franklin County Animal Control. The next morning he and a sheriff met me near the home of the dogs owner, where I identied the dog that bit me. While he was clearly in control of the situation, William took time to talk to me about what happened, explained the additional report I had to le and was sensitive with the animal, which was being impounded for a 10-day observation period. Somehow he did not t my image of a person in his often very tough line of work. A few days later, I got a voicemail that asked that I call William. When I returned the call, William said he was just checking to see how I was doing and how my bite was healing. He has since again followed up with me to assure that the report was led correctly. Though getting bitten was far from a pleasant experience, and though the dogs owner has yet to express any remorse for his dogs actions, things like this tend to remind you how decent and supportive people are. I was loaned crutches, had dinner brought over and received numerous expressions of sympathy from dear friends and other folks I hardly know. My wife seems to have been even more caring than usual these past few weeks, changing bandages frequently. The folks at Weems have seen me two more times with the same high level of care. Thanks to them, the wound is nearly healed. I was most impressed, though, with the help and expressions of interest from William, perhaps because they were sincere and unexpected. It certainly provides me with an example of the difference taking a moment to express concern can make, and I will try to better follow his example. Sincerely, Francis L. Giknis St. George Island Big Bend Hospice presented the Heart of Hospice Award to Bev Hewitt, owner of The Grill in Apalachicola, during the Apalachicola Bay Chamber of Commerces Oct. 4 Business After Hours. For more than 10 years, she has been a member of the hospices Franklin County Advisory Council, comprising local leaders who serve as community champions for hospice care to their neighbors. Hewitt, above left, was chosen because her passion and compassion for the hospice patients and families living in Franklin County. She is a great spokesperson for Big Bend Hospice and its mission to provide compassionate care to individuals with a lifelimiting illness, comfort to families and emotional support to anyone who has lost a loved one. She has worked many hours at hospice events to ensure funds are raised to help support the needs of the families in Franklin County. Bev is a tireless worker and a beloved member of our hospice team, said Pam Allbritton, community resources/volunteer coordinator for Big Bend Hospice, above right. She has truly made a difference. Big Bend Hospice has served the community since 1983 with compassionate end-oflife care along with grief and loss counselors available to provide information and support to anyone in Franklin and surrounding counties. For additional information about services, call 878-5310 or visit www. bigbendhospice.org.Dont forget Halloween dance Oct. 27 Card of Thanks Hewitt receives Heart of Hospice award

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Email outdoors news to timesoutdoors @star .com OUTDOORSwww.apalachtimes.comSection Section A Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL(next to Piggly Wiggly) www.BWOsh.com (next to Piggly Wiggly) www.BWOsh.com Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL EVERYTHING FOR YOUR OUTDOOR ADVENTURE EV E EV E EV RYTHING FOR YOUR E RYTHING FOR YOUR E O UTDOOR ADV E UTDOOR ADV E UTDOOR ADV NTUR E NTUR E E EV E EV E EV RYTHING FOR YOUR E RYTHING FOR YOUR E O UTDOOR ADV E UTDOOR ADV E UTDOOR ADV NTUR E NTUR E E SEPTEMBER FEATURE FISH: Stop in and register or go online at www.BWOsh.comREDFISH ER FEATURE FISH: WEEKLY ALMANAC APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE TIDE TABLES MONTHLY AVERAGESTo nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from these given for APALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW Cat Point Minus 0:40 Minus 1:17 East Pass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27 To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from those given for CARRABELLE: HIGH LOW Bald Point Minus 9:16 Minus 0:03 Sponsor the WEEKLY ALMANACCall Today!653-8868 Date HighLow% Precip Thu, Oct. 1881 6430% Fri, Oct. 1978 5710% Sat, Oct. 2078 58 0% Sun, Oct. 2178 63 0% Mon, Oct. 2280 64 0% Tues, Oct. 2380 63 0% Wed, Oct. 2480 6610% 17 We 416am 1.9 727pm 1.7 1207pm -0.1 1142pm 1.4 18 Th 452am 2.0 833pm 1.6 100pm -0.1 19 Fr 534am 2.0 942pm 1.5 1217am 1.4 200pm 0.0 20 Sa 623am 1.9 1053pm 1.5 101am 1.4 309pm 0.1 21 Su 722am 1.8 1152pm 1.5 209am 1.4 423pm 0.2 22 Mo 840am 1.6 354am 1.3 534pm 0.3 23 Tu 1235am 1.5 1023am 1.5 539am 1.2 638pm 0.5 24 We 108am 1.5 1222pm 1.4 658am 0.9 732pm 0.6 25 Th 135am 1.5 203pm 1.4 759am 0.7 818pm 0.7 26 Fr 158am 1.5 317pm 1.5 849am 0.5 858pm 0.9 27 Sa 218am 1.6 416pm 1.5 933am 0.3 932pm 1.0 28 Su 236am 1.6 506pm 1.5 1013am 0.1 1001pm 1.1 29 Mo 256am 1.7 549pm 1.5 1049am 0.1 1027pm 1.2 30 Tu 318am 1.7 629pm 1.5 1122am 0.0 1052pm 1.2 17 We 251am 3.0 602pm 2.7 954am -0.2 929pm 2.2 18 Th 327am 3.2 708pm 2.6 1047am -0.2 1004pm 2.2 19 Fr 409am 3.2 817pm 2.4 1147am 0.0 1048pm 2.2 20 Sa 458am 3.0 928pm 2.4 1256pm 0.2 1156pm 2.2 21 Su 557am 2.9 1027pm 2.4 210pm 0.3 22 Mo 715am 2.6 1110pm 2.4 141am 2.1 321pm 0.5 23 Tu 858am 2.4 1143pm 2.4 326am 1.9 425pm 0.8 24 We 1057am 2.2 445am 1.4 519pm 1.0 25 Th 1210am 2.4 1238pm 2.2 546am 1.1 605pm 1.1 26 Fr 1233am 2.4 152pm 2.4 636am 0.8 645pm 1.4 27 Sa 1253am 2.6 251pm 2.4 720am 0.5 719pm 1.6 28 Su 111am 2.6 341pm 2.4 800am 0.2 748pm 1.8 29 Mo 131am 2.7 424pm 2.4 836am 0.2 814pm 1.9 30 Tu 153am 2.7 504pm 2.4 909am 0.0 839pm 1.9 31 We 219am 2.7 543pm 2.4 940am 0.0 907pm 2.1 SPONSORED BY Inshore/Bay Offshore/BottomGag grouper season will close Oct. 31, so now is the time for your last offshore bottom trips for gag grouper. Reports have been good on the live or hard bottom 20-40 miles offhshore. Large schools of Spanish mackerel are close to shore over the past few days in and around St. Joe Bay. Good reports of large king sh are being caught at the oil docks or sea wall in St. Joe Marina. As the cooler air settles in this week, St. Joe Bay should respond with good red sh and trout catches. This month has been great for the inshore angler so far, and we hope that trend will last throughout the month. Good reports from Towns Beach and Eagle Harbor are the talk of the town.Jan Gorman sent me this picture of a beautiful stand of wild owers she spotted on Spring Creek Highway. This is false yellow indigo (Baptisia sphaerocarpa) also called green indigo, round indigo, yellow baptisia, American indigo, baptisia root, baptista, false indigo, horse y weed, indigo broom, rattlebush, yellow broom, and yellow indigo. Yellow indigo is native to the southern US and blooms from May to October in Florida. It is highly attractive to butter ies. This hardy plant is drought tolerant and grows to a height of two to three feet. It makes a show at the rear of any garden border. It is easily grown in well-drained soil in full sun to part shade, and thrives in poor soils. It is dif cult to grow from seed and slow to establish. Over time, plants form slowly expanding clumps with deep and extensive root systems, and should not be disturbed once established. If you must move this plant, early spring is considered to be the best time for transplanting. There are no common pests or diseases of yellow indigo. The name Baptista literally means to dip and harkens back to a close relative of yellow indigo, true indigo. Indigo was the rst vegetable dye known to have been in use. An indigo-dyed garment dating from about 3000 BC was found in the ancient Egyptian city of Thebes; and references to blue in the book of Exodus (25:4 and 35:25) undoubtedly also refer to indigo. India is believed to be the oldest center of indigo dyeing in the Old World. Indigo dye is one of the few plant dyes naturally resistant to fading, and was the original dye used in blue jeans. Yellow indigo was traditionally reputed to have medicinal qualities and was used in the treatment of in uenza, kidney disease, ulcerations of the skin, sore nipples, mucous colitis, amebic dysentery, tonsillitis, quinsy, septic conditions of the blood, muscular soreness, rheumatic and arthritic pains, constriction of the chest, whooping cough, dropsy, epilepsy, nervous disorders, chills, fever, malaria, typhoid fever, scarlet fever, diphtheria, mumps, piles and worms. More recent studies of the plant indicate it is unsafe to consume or apply to the skin in large amounts.By LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com A barrier island off Franklin Countys coast, once targeted for development, has been purchased by the Audubon Society. Audubon Florida has acquired the last private inholding on Lanark Reef, one of Floridas most signi cant sites for threatened and endangered coastal birds and a designated Important Bird Area (IBA). According to a Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) survey, Lanark Reef lies in the Gulf of Mexico roughly 0.7 miles offshore of Lanark Village, and stretches for approximately six miles parallel to the coast and contains both submerged and emerged areas. The submerged lands comprise the majority of the reef extending for almost ve miles and are rich in sea grasses. The emerged areas are a series of islands that stretch for approximately one mile of the reef, with a total area of about four acres. The eastern emerged section is heavily vegetated with grasses and shrubs. The submerged lands were already the property of the state, but Audubon has been in negotiation with Premier Bank of Tallahassee to acquire the rest of the reef for several years. Last month, Audubon closed the deal paying $33,000 for the property. Hurley Booth, a Tallahassee developer, once planned to build Lanark Reef Resort, a condominium community on the tiny spit of land, and the county health department approved permits for septic tanks. But, County Planner Alan Pierce said, it was unlikely Booth would have been permitted to build on the tiny island. (Lanark) reef is not zoned for development of any kind and is not part of Franklin Countys land use map, Pierce said. Its just a sandbar as far as we are concerned. We never saw any building plans for development and it never went before planning and zoning According to Audubon, the narrow barrier island provides essential habitat to some of the Gulf of Mexicos most imperiled species. In spring and summer, it hosts a large breeding colony of brown pelicans, as well as nesting American oystercatchers, black skimmers, willets and more. In fall and winter, migrant and wintering birds like red knots, piping and snowy plovers, and more ock to the islands to feed and rest. Many of these species are rare and declining, listed as endangered or threatened by state or federal agencies. The island has been designated an important birding area by Audubon. More than 250 species of birds use the reef for spring and summer nesting and as a stopping point for winter migration. Lanark Reef has been designated by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service as critical habitat for the piping plover, one of the most rapidly declining Gulf shorebirds due to habitat loss. Eric Draper, Audubon Floridas executive director said, Lanark Reef has long been important to Floridas iconic coastal landscape. Audubon is proud to protect this remarkable habitat while it still exists. Many of the species bene tting from this acquisition are the same most affected by the Deepwater Horizon oil spill; funding for the purchase was provided by the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation with revenue generated by the sale of oil recovered from the spill. Private donors from across the country also made contributions to ensure the acquisition and management of this special place. The reef will be closed to human beings and dogs although the pristine bird sanctuary can still be viewed from boats. Because of the extremely shallow water surrounding Lanark Reef; it can be reached by boat only at high tide. FWC has posted warning signs about disturbing wildlife and damaging sea grass beds on the emerged areas of the reef. In a press release, Julie Wraithmell, Audubons director of wildlife conservation said, This dynamic island, shaped by wind and waves, is a glimpse of what was once common along the Gulf Coast: shifting sands and swaying marsh grass supporting abundant wildlife, The public can sign up for updates on the reef, coastal birds, Florida conservation issues and volunteer opportunities at http:// .audubonaction.org. Gulf County plans Bow Wow BashThe St. Joe Bay Humane Society presents the seventh annual Bow Wow Bash, which bene ts both the DAWGS in Prison program and the homeless animals of Gulf County, on Oct. 27. The bashs Masquerade Party will be 6-10 p.m. at the Centennial Building in Port St. Joe. Food will be provided by Chef Ian Williams and Sunset Coastal Grill. Guests enjoy a cash bar, masquerade contest (costumes optional) and live music. A silent and live auction will culminate with the drawing for the winner of a new iPad. Tickets are available for $10 each at locations around Port St. Joe including Bow Wow Beach Shop or www. bowwowbash.org. Prizes will be awarded to the winners of the costume contests, including Best Couple, Best Man, Best Woman and Best Overall. Door prizes will be given throughout the event. All proceeds are used to help support the DAWGS in Prison program and needy animals in Gulf County. Tickets are $30 each or $300 for a reserved table for 10, which includes a free drink ticket per person. They are available in Port St Joe at Bow Wow Beach Shop on Reid Ave. or at St. Joseph Bay Humane Society on 10th Street, or by visiting www. bowwowbash.org or www. sjbhumanesociety.orgOne day classes at ANERRThe Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve will offer a one-day class in environmental science next month. On Nov. 14 (rain date Nov. 15, Rivers and Floodplains Class covers the ecology, geology, and natural history of the rivers and oodplains of the Florida Panhandle with the main focus on the Apalachicola River and oodplain. Other types of river systems will also be discussed. Learn about the diversity of animals and plants found in the river and surrounding oodplain, and their connection to the bay. Be prepared to spend part of the day in the classroom and part in the eld on our boat exploring the river and walking in the oodplain. Cost is $10 per person. For additional information, contact Coastal Training Program Coordinator Rosalyn F. Kilcollins at 670-7708 or Rosalyn.kilcollins@dep. state. .us.Coming up at the FSU Marine LabOn Thursday, Oct. 25, join Dr. Toby Daly-Engel, University of West Florida, at 7 p.m. for a lecture on The evolution of female promiscuity in aquatic predators. On Saturday, Nov. 10, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. attend a workshop and learn how to construct and use your own SENSE IT Temperature Sensor. On Sunday, Nov. 18, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. join Peter C. Stone, author of Waltzes with Giants: The Twilight Journey of the North Atlantic Right Whales for a discussion of The Art and Science of Nature Journaling for the Observant Writer. All events will be held at the Florida State University Coastal and Marine Lab, 3618 U.S. 98, Saint Teresa. For more info call 697-4095 or 697-4120. JAN GORMAN | Special to the TimesFalse Indigo BUDS N BUGS: YELLOW INDIGO BUDS N BUGSLois SwobodaGEORGE WILLSON | Special to the TimesAudubon to preserve Lanark Reef Outdoors BRIEFS Page 8 Thursday, October 18, 2012

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CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA SP O RTS www.apalachtimes.com ASectionBy DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com This Sundays third annual Running for the Bay marathon is expected to draw a record crowd, besting last years eld of 522 runners. Organizer Mark Henderson said the race could see upwards of 650-700 runners, talking part in either the full or half-marathon, or the 5K, 10k or even the Ultra 50K races, all with wheelchair divisions. Henderson said this year the race will probably be one of the largest Ultra 50K races in Florida, a distance of 31 miles, from Battery Park in Apalachicola to Eastpoint to St. George Island and back. This year, Henderson has partnered with Franklins Promise, with a commitment to help out the beleaguered oyster shermen with a charitable contribution from race proceeds. In addition, the humane society will have a free table at Saturdays Expo, from noon to 7 p.m. at the Apalachicola Community Center in Battery Park, where they will offer shelter animals for adoption. The Expo, free and open to the public, will give runners a chance to obtain their race packets, and a chance to learn about the latest in the world of running. Its not glitz and glamour, just good people having a good time, said Henderson. Come to the event to meet new running friends and to nd out how to enjoy the Apalachicola Bay area. The races will begin before dawn on Sunday, at about 7:15 a.m. at Battery Park. Because the marathon is certi ed by the USA Track and Field (USATF), the course can be used to qualify for the Boston Marathon or any other major that requires times to be set on a certi ed course. As a result there should be lots of runners eager to cross the nish line with their best time ever. Last year, 34-year-old Brooke Strosnider from Pittsburgh, Pa. overcame a stroke less than six months earlier to top the eld of 194 female runners. For the 228 men, Jack McDermott, 42, of Tallahassee, took the top prize. Topping the eld among the runners in the Ultra 50K, about six miles longer than a marathon, was David Goggins, 36, of Santa Rosa, an active duty Navy Seal. Henderson has also pushed the status of the races exquisite medal, a twirling piece of art that has won national awards. But this year, he has inaugurated a special surprise for Carrabelle, by featuring the worlds smallest police station in the spinner inside the medal. I wanted just to make sure they feel involved in the race, said Henderson. For more info, email Friends@runningforthebay.com. Gun ShowOctober 27th & 28thPanama City Panama City Fairgrounds Fairgrounds2086093Sat 9 -5 Sun 10-4C o n c e a l e d W e a p o n s C l a s s S a t / S u n 1 1 a m o r 2 p m Floridagunshows.com FREE PARKING Thursday, October 18, 2012 Page A9Huge eld expected for Sunday marathonIn a thrilling match at home Oct. 9, the Lady Seahawks downed Port St. Joe 3-2 in a win that delighted the hometown fans. Franklin County won the rst two games, 2521, and 25-19, and looked to be easy winners before St. Joe got back into it and won the next two, 25-21 and 25-23. In the fth and nal game, the Seahawks led 8-0 before letting the Lady Tiger Sharks back into the game to nearly tie it. But strong play by Chena Segree and the crowd on its feet enabled the Lady Seahawks to win 15-11 for the victory. The win was anked by a series of 3-0 losses, to drop Franklin Countys record to 8-11 under head coach Hilary Stanton. On Oct. 3, the team lost at Wakulla, and then on Oct. 4 at Blountstown. At home on Oct. 11, the Lady Seahawks fell again 3-0 to Liberty County, losing 25-17, 2513 and 25-22. By DAVID ADLERSTEINWith a score of 56, Team Dodd Title bested the runners up by two strokes, on Oct. 10, as seven teams competed on the beautiful greenways at St. James Bay Golf Resort in the ninth annual Apalachicola Bay Chamber of Commerce golf tournament. Playing in perfect weather, Team Dodd Title, consisting of Robbie and son Brett Johnson, Stacey Kirvin and Tyler Poloronis, edged Team Fairpoint Communications and Team Robertson and Associates, both tied at 58 strokes in the Florida scramble format. Roberson & Associates managed to break the tie for runner-up status. The team consisted of Rex Buzzett, Mark Eden eld, Mike McDonald and Robert Daniels. Fairpoint comprised Sandy and Richard Reeves, Harvey Britts and Dan Surber. Each of the members of the winning teams got a gift certi cate for the St. James Bay pro shop. Also joining in the action were Centennial Bank (Jim Hayes, Dan Anderson, Dusty May and Ronald Pickett), Preble-Rish (Clay Kennedy, Clay Smallwood, Park Allman and Andy Bailey), Journeys of SGI (Justin McMillian, Patrick Sparks, Nathan Donahoe, and Jimmy Maxwell) and Mason Bean C21 Collins (Mason Bean, Roy Plout, Bob Landiss and Paul Riegelmayer). Robbie Johnson, who made the longest drive of the day, a whopping 300 yards, was especially pleased. Johnson had triple bypass surgery in February, but was back in tiptop form for the tourney. This years winners received gift cards from Taylors Building Supply, Ace Hardware, We ngs Marine Supply and Tamaras Caf Floridita as well as tickets to the Dixie Theatre. Sponsors for the tournament were Centennial Bank, Marks Insurance, Mason Bean and Century 12, Boyd Brothers, Roberson and Associates, Fairpoint Communications, Bill Montford, Touchpoint/ Graphic Solutions, Preble Rish and We ngs Marine. By Lois SwobodaDodd Title takes top prize in Chamber golf tourney KAYTE HENDERSON | Special to the TimesThe excitement of the nish lineAbove Middle: The race medal, featuring the worlds smallest police station. A map of the race course PHOTOS BY ANITA GROVE | Special to the TimesThe winning Dodd Title Team, from left, Brett Johnson, Stacey Kirvin, Tyler Poloronis and Robbie Johnson. The Centennial Bank teams Dan Anderson follows through.Under the direction of girls coach Kelli Wright, and boys coach Ramon Valenzuela, the Franklin County High School soccer program has begun practice. First game is Nov. 8. It promises to be an exciting season. The following is the entire schedule: Thursday, Nov. 8 @ John Paul II 5 /7 Wednesday, Nov. 14 @ Rickards 5 /7 Thursday, Nov. 15 @ Rocky Bayou* 5 /7 Tuesday, Nov. 27 @ Port St. Joe* 6 /8 Thursday, Nov. 29 @ West Gadsden 5 /7 Friday, Nov. 30 Baker 5 /7 Saturday, Dec. 1 @ Freeport Noon /2 Tuesday, Dec. 4 John Paul II 5 (Girls only) Wednesday, Dec. 5 Rickards 5 /7 Friday, Dec. 7 Rocky Bayou 4 /6 Tuesday, Dec. 11 Port St. Joe 6 /8 Thursday, Dec. 13 @ Rutherford 7(Girls only) Friday, Dec. 14 Freeport* 5 /7 Monday, Dec. 17 @ Baker 5 /7 Wednesday, Jan. 9 Rutherford 7 (Girls only) Thursday, Jan. 10 West Gadsden 5 /7 Jan. 15-18 District PSJ Girls Jan. 22-25 District Freeport Boys *District Game All Times ESTDAVID ADLERSTEIN | The TimesCoaches Kelli Wright and Ramon Valenzuela SOCCER SEASON SET TO START Lady Seahawks down Port St. Joe PHOTOS BY DAVID BUTLER | FCHS Yearbook StaffLady Seahawks, from left, Morgan Mock, Karlie Tucker and Scout Segree prepare to receive serve from Port St. Joe. Lady Seahawks Chena Segree gets ready for a kill against Port St. Joe.

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LocalA10 | The Times Thursday, October 18, 2012 ANNOUNCING A PANAMA CITY PICTORIAL HISTORY BOOKAbout the book:The Panama City News Herald is pleased to be working with local historical organizations and libraries to bring our readers an heirloom-quality,coffee table pictorial book on the history of our area. This keepsake book will feature hundreds of stunning historic images from the late 1800s to present day from the greater Panama City area, and a section commemorating the 75th anniversary of The Panama City News Herald. Books are expected to ship late November.$29.95SHIPS MID NOVEMBER Reg. $39.95 BUY NOW! EXTENDED DEADLINE BY PUBLISHINGCOMPANYDUE TOPOPULAR DEMANDORDERNOW & SAVE $10!ACTUAL COVER & TITLEIncluded in the book:Doral Bank, Innovations Federal Credit Union, Bay Credit Union, and The Tourist Development Council MAIL IN FORM OR ORDER ONLINE AT: PANAMACITY.PICTORIALBOOK.COM Panama City area, and a section commemorating the 75th anniversary of The Panama City News Herald. Books are expected to ship late November. Panama City area, and a section commemorating the 75th anniversary of The Panama City News Herald. Books are expected to ship late November. BUY NOW! SAVE $10 I wish to pre-order:______Copies at $29.95 plus $1.95 tax per book and pick up my order at The News Herald oce. Total $31.90/book ______Copies at $29.95 plus $5.95 shipping and handling and $1.95 tax per book and have my order shipped to the address below. Total $37.85/bookTOTAL AMOUNTENCLOSED:_______________Name ___________________________________________________________________________________ Address _________________________________________________________________________________ City ___________________________________________________ State _______________ Zip __________ Phone (_____) ______________________ E-mail ________________________________________________ Signature ________________________________________________________________________________ Charge Card Number_____________________________________ Security Code______________Exp. Date_____________________ PAYMENTMETHODCHECK/MONEYORDERPayable to: The News Herald VISA AMEX MASTERCARD DISCOVER The bill is unique in Florida in that 75 percent of the largest pot of ne dollars, so-called Pot One which will account for 35 percent of total nes paid (see sidebar), will be sent directly to the eight affected counties in Northwest Florida between Escambia and Wakulla. The nal decisions on how those funds will be spent will be made by each countys board of county commissioners. I urge you to make decisions not for you, not for your children, but for your grandchildren, Southerland said. Do the right thing. Come together as communities. Focus on single major goals. Dont just think good, think great. This is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity. But to whom much is given, much is expected. Southerland urged every county to establish a broadbased advisory committee to work through ideas and goals and provide input. Gulf County has established such a committee, which is meeting weekly, but Franklin County has yet to establish one. We are trying to get ahead of the curve so when the dollars do start owing we are ready to move the process forward, said Gulf County Commissioner Warren Yeager. Apalachicola is pressing other municipalities to join in a resolution urging more input from the cities in decisions on projects that affect them. Southerland said input from all stakeholders, particularly the public, was crucial, not just for local success of projects but also when the Department of Treasury assesses projects under criteria yet to be established. The Department of Treasury, Southerland said, would have nal say on what projects receive funding. The criteria must be established within 180 days of the signing of the RESTORE Act, or by Dec. 31. Under the process, once a proposal is forwarded to Treasury, approved and a check cut, the county must report to Congress in 12 months how that money was spent and whether it was spent for the purpose intended. Why would county commissioners take all the liability themselves? Southerland said. Commissioners should spread the risk. The public should be involved. You must make sure everyone has input. I think the counties can do this. Southerland said counties must join together to rebuff attempts by Department of Justice to assess BP nes estimated, he said, between $5 billion and $20 billion and which should be assessed by a federal judge sometime in 2013 under the National Resources Damage Assessment instead of under the Clean Water Act, which would render moot the provisions of the RESTORE Act. All funds the RESTORE Act divides the ne money between environmental and economic restoration would thereby be paid for environmental effects; no money would be earmarked for economic recovery from the spill, Southerland said. He said the president signed the bill in June. Southerland considered any attempt to undermine it unconstitutional. I cant see (the president) arguing a bill that has his name on it, Southerland said. 35 percent would go directly to affected counties from funds divided in equal shares to the ve Gulf Coast states: Louisiana, Alabama, Mississippi, Florida and Texas. The money can be spent on environmental projects, job creation and training, ood protection, tourism promotion and infrastructure such as ports. For Florida, 75 percent will go directly to the eight affected counties, including Gulf and Franklin counties, with 25 percent to all other Florida counties. Every state had input on where they wanted their funds to go, Southerland said. We saw that the majority of those funds should go to impacted counties. This pot of funds also puts on the onus on counties to provide project proposals to the Department of Treasury for approval and to provide a report to Congress 12 months after money disbursement to demonstrate how the money was spent. Southerland said to commissioners at the meeting that if there was to be controversy in their county over how RESTORE funds would be spent, the rst pot would be the focus. This bill provides local autonomy, local authority, local exibility over these funds, he said. But I caution you, to whom much is given, much is expected. 30 percent will go to a Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Council, with funds to be used for the development and implementation of a comprehensive restoration plan, created by a federal/ state Gulf Coast Restoration Council with all Gulf states represented on the council. The ve Gulf states governors and six federal of cials from the Interior, Commerce, Agriculture departments, the Army, the Environmental Protection Agency and the Coast Guard will comprise the council. Funds will be spent on big ecosystem projects with broad impact. The council sunsets once funds are completely expended. Im proud of this bill because it takes care of the bays, the estuaries, I grew up with, Southerland said. This is a golden opportunity to do the right thing at the right time. Southerland said county and state projects might have overlap and said counties should be aware of state plans when crafting the process for moving forward on county projects. For example, dredging of a particular pass or channel might be part of a state plan and should therefore not be a request from the county. 30 percent will be disbursed on an impact-driven formula to the Gulf Coast states according to plans submitted by the Gulf Coast states and approved by the council. It will be allocated to states based on a formula that approximates how badly each was damaged by the oil spill. The formula is based on average oiled shoreline, proximity to the spill and average population in coastal counties, with a minimum of 5 percent. States can spend the money on environmental projects, job creation and training, ood protection and tourism promotion. Louisiana had more environmental damage and economic damage, Southerland said. Florida suffered economic damage. We were alarmed at the number of vacations that were canceled. The purpose of RESTORE was not to grow government. This was meant to restore economically and environmentally. 5 percent of the ne funds establish Gulf Coast Centers of Excellence: 2.5 percent of the Gulf Coast Restoration Trust Fund to be allocated to the states for research within the Gulf Coast region and 2.5 sheries habitat. We still dont know what is going to happen in the future, Southerland said. We dont know the full rami cations of the bill. This money is to go to the unknowns. In part, the bill mandates these funds are used for data collection of sheries and other habitat along the Gulf Coast. This bill mandates (the federal government) collect good data and make good, solid decisions based on what that data says, Southerland said, noting ever shortening seasons and bag limits for a host of sh species. SOUTHERLAND from page A1 RESTORE from page A1Congressman Steve Southerland spoke to area county commissioners last week about the RESTORE Act and its process of disbursing BP ne money to affected states and counties.TIM CROFT | The Star

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LocalThe Times | A11Thursday, October 18, 2012 Trades & Services GET YOUR AD IN 653-8868Trades & Services Laban Bontrager, DMD Monica Bontrager, DMD 12761 Pea Ridge Road Bristol, Florida 32321TELEPHONE (850) 643-5417 Bristol Dental ClinicDENTURE LAB ON PREMISESSame Day Service on Repairs and Relines Don Lively General Contractors LICENSED ANDINSURED 20 YEARSEXPERIENCE P.O. Box 439 Carrabelle, FL 32322 697-2783 or Mobile 566-2603RC0066499RG0065255 Carrabelle Visa, Discover, and American Express Honored at Participating Ace Stores JACKSONSBuilding Supplies Building Supplies & Auto Repair Carrabelle 697-3333 We Deliver AnywhereHardware and Paint Center J.J.s Tree Service, LLC Stump Grinder Licensed & Insured Call John : (850) 899-8432 ROBERTS APPLIANCE REPAIR ALL MAJOR BRANDS 18 Shadow Lane Apalachicola, FL 32320 Phone: (850) 653-8122 Cell: (850) 653-7654 From A to ZPO Box 364Port St. Joe, FL 32457850-340-0756 Gregs Handyman Service & Lawn Maintenance NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT CITY OF APALACHICOLA, FLORIDAThe Apalachicola Board of Adjustment will hold a Public Hearing on Tuesday, October 30th, 2012 at 5:30 PM at City Hall, Community Center Meeting Room, 1 Bay Avenue, Apalachicola, Florida to address the following variance requests and receive citizen comments relating to proposed changes on the parcels listed below. A Special Meeting will immediately follow. The following variance request items will be discussed and considered:1.Installation of elevator shaft above the 35 height limit on the proposed new structure described as Wharf Lot 10. 2.Proposal to approve continued use of Suite B, an apartment unit partially located as Block 2 Lot 5 for transient lodging. St. The Apalachicola Land Development Code allows for variance when special circumstances, conditions and/or undue hardships are determined. All interested parties are encouraged to attend and be heard with respect to this request. For further information, contact the MAGNOLIA BLUFFBay living at its best, you have to see the sunsets from this home to believe them. 3BR/3BA Custom home with great water depth for year round access to the Apalachicola Bay. MLS #246689...........$699,000 Travis Stanley 850.653.6477 Leon Teat 850.653.5656 Sandy Mitchem 850.899.8300 BEACHFRONT CONDO ST. GEORGE ISLAND2BR/2BA with two balconies in Villas of St. George. Established rental history! Community pool, beach boardwalk, 2 blocks to lighthouse! MLS# 246110...............$319,500 BAY FRONTCONDOMust see this 2 BR/2.1 BA townhouse next to the desirable Southside Historic District overlooking Apalachicola Bay. Property has community dock! MLS #247900......................$275,000BAY FRONTHOMEEnjoy amazing sunsets everyday from this bay front home in prestigious St. George Plantation. 2BR/3BA home with unobstructed 180 degree bay views and 122 of bay front footage with white sandy beach. Dock your boat at the private pier with MLS #247962...............$599,000 GULFFRONTHOMEThis remarkable Gulf Front home provides the best of everything for laid back Island living. 5BR/4.1BA custom built home complete with a gourmet kitchen, granite countertops, elevator, a wet bar and upscale furnishings. Enjoy the inground 18X 36 pool and your private boardwalk. Call today to view this spectacular property. MLS #247998...............$995,000NEW CONSTRUCTIONGreat opportunity to buy a gulf view home. This quality constructed home has driven pilings, hardiboard siding and a metal roof for a low maintenance exterior. Inside you have 3 bedrooms with two baths and a great room opening to the front porch. New construction means low insurance cost. MLS #247359..............$289,000 N EW C ON S TRUCTION N EW C ON S TRUCTION attributable to when collections were posted. Its just been phenomenal year, he said. Wait and see what it is for the calendar year. Parker said based on his personal experience and after talking with the vacation rental companies that serve St. George Island, which remit the bulk of the bed tax money to the county, he is convinced the county is seeing a record volume of visitors. We expect to have at least as good a year or better than past year, he said. I think were on track to do 10 percent better. Right now your rentals are mostly full in October, he said, adding that he did not think the effects of Tropical Storm Debby at the beginning of the summer were longstanding. It was nothing like a seasonchanging event, he said. Overall, the season was really good. Also, some vacation rental companies will be able to recapture lost revenue when travel insurance claims are paid out as a result of the missed rental days, Parker said. He noted that in calendar year 2011, the countys bed tax collection totaled more than $824,000, almost $175,000 more than when the tax was instituted in 2005. This, he said, means the tourist industry generated about $41 million in direct revenue alone. Thats a sizeable industry, and thats just the accommodations revenue, Parker said. That doesnt count all the other things our guests are spending money on, like restaurants and trips with guides and much more. Thats what Im amazed at, at how much revenue the industry is generating for the county. TDC from page A1to shut the airport down without more manpower. Under the proposed ve-year lease with Crystal Air, the county will receive $5,000 plus 7 percent sales tax for a total of $5,350 monthly. The Crystal Air contract will more than cover the xed costs of running the airport, Alan Pierce, director of administrative services, said Tuesday afternoon. He said the county will continue to receive additional income from the rental of two commercial hangars at the airport. Pierce said the proposed lease was written by Avcon, the countys aviation consultant, and must be reviewed by an attorney specializing in aviation law before the transaction is nalized. He said he doesnt expect any problem with the lease. Crystal Air is a family company. Director of Operations Taylor Newman owns 96 percent of the stock and his parents the remaining 4 percent. The company was founded as an aircraft and heavy equipment rental company when Newman was 18, but by the time he nished his bachelors in aviation administration, the focus had narrowed to aviation. Crystal Air is currently FBO at three airports. They have operated at Franklin County Airport in Sewanee, Tenn., since 2003; Cleveland Municipal Airport, also in Tennessee, since 2007 and Dalton Municipal Airport in Georgia since 2008. They provide other services at airports in Sparta and Chattanooga, Tenn. Crystal Air offers aircraft rental and maintenance, ight training and charter service in addition to FBO operations. Newman said his company provides charter ights to anywhere in the U.S. and regularly scheduled ights between Destin, Panama City, Chattanooga and Memphis. It is uncertain which services Crystal Air will bring to the county airport. The company plans to assess what needs exist at Apalachicola Regional Airport while providing FBO service. Newman said they will bring in an FBO manager initially, but he hopes to ll other positions from the local workforce. We like to train local folks so they have a vested interest, he said. He does not anticipate raising fuel costs. Well look at it and see if its where it should be, he said. I imagine it is. Plans to upgrade service in the short haul include making rental cars available to incoming pilots and adding aircraft maintenance staff. But Newman said he is in no hurry to make changes. We usually take our time in hiring pilots and mechanics, he said. We want a good t. We want them to stay a while. We plan to increase the level of service, he said. We would like to attract some additional aircraft to the airport. I believe you have space. Though he has no plans to locate a charter aircraft here immediately, Newman said he might bring a plane in next summer and is considering offering air tours of the area similar to the recreational tours his company offers in Tennessee. Apalachicola has a good look from the air compared to a lot of Florida, he said. The lack of commercialization has an appeal for a lot of people. Crystal Air is planning a community welcome party for December to make people aware of the airport and its new FBO. We like to work with local civic organizations, Newman said. Newman told commissioners Crystal Air keeps a daily account of planes landing, launching and in storage, as well as fuel sales and maintenance work. He said he had no objection to providing commissioners monthly reports. Newman plans to hit the ground running before Nov.1. He and an FBO manager will arrive on Monday, Oct. 29. Were getting there a few days early, he said. We want to make sure weve got our best foot forward. CRYSTAL AIR from page A1 ARREST REPORTThe following report is provided by the Franklin County Sheriffs Of ce. Arrests were made by of cers from the Apalachicola Police Department (APD) and the Franklin County Sheriffs Of ce (FCSO). All defendants are to be considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law. OCT. 9 Glendod R. Forehand, 20, Wewahitchka, battery by inmate (FCSO) Johnny C. Jones, 39, Apalachicola, home invasion robbery, uttering, forgery and grand theft (APD) OCT. 10 Christopher E. Everitt, 26, Apalachicola, battery by inmate (FCSO) OCT. 11 Mack W. James, 48, Dalewood, failure to appear (FCSO) Walter R. Robinson, 25, Garland, Texas, Texas warrant for kidnapping to in ict bodily harm (FCSO) OCT. 16 Nicholas C. Roesner, 27, Birch Run, Michigan, criminal mischief and resisting of cer without violence (FCSO) Amanda C. Topham, 31, Eastpoint, violation of probation and failure to appear (FCSO)

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A12| The Times Thursday, October 18, 2012 CLASSIFIEDS AIRLINE CAREERS BEGIN HERE -Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualified. Housing available. Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 866-314-3769 We Buy Any Vehicle in Any Condition. Title/No Title, Bank Leans -NO Problem. Dont Trade it in, We WILL PAY up to $35K. Any Make, Any Model, Call A.J. Today: 813-335-3794/237-1892 RENTALS1 BEDROOM, 1 BATH UNFURNISHED APT LANARK, REMODELED, INC WATER .................$425 2 BR, 1 BATH UNFURNISHED APT W/D HOOKUP, SMALL PORCH ..........................$375 1 BEDROOM, 1 BATH FURNISHED CONDO INCLUDES UTILITIES, MARINA .........................$910 3 BEDROOM, 2 BATH FURNISHED HOUSE ON RIVER, DOCK ..............................................$1000 3 BEDROOM 1 BATH DUPLEX UNFURNISHED, CARRABELLE ............................$600 3 BEDROOM 1 BATH END UNIT, W/D, WATER INCLUDED, UNFURNISHED .................$565 2 BR 1 BATH UNFURNISHED HOUSE FENCED YARD ......................................................$800 OFFICE SPACE US 98 CARRABELLE ........................................................$500 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322850-697-9604 850-323-0444 www.seacrestre.comwww. rst tness.com/carrabellePROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND RENTALS These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you. EmeraldCoast Marketplace 747-5020 Total Down Pmt $5852001 Chevy Impala T otal Price $4,5000% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! Total Down Pmt $7852001 Chevy Trailblazer T ot al Price $4,9000% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! Total Down Pmt $9852002 Ford F-150 -X/Cab T otal Price $5,9000% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! Polaris Sportman 500 2 wheel and 4 wheel drive, with wench, fuel injected. Cover, saddle bags, comes with trailer with side rails and spare tire, low hours, $5500. Call (850) 647-2633 Text FL28291 to 56654 89202T IN THE COUNTY COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 19 2012 CC 000024 ST. GEORGE PLANTATION OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., a Florida not for profit corporation, Plaintiff, v. DIVERSIFIED EXECUTIVE CRESTVIEW, LLC, A GEORGIA LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY, Defendant. NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated October 5, 2012, and entered in Case No. 19 2012 CC 000024 of the County Court Of The Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein ST. GEORGE PLANTATION OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC. is Plaintiff, and DIVERSIFIED EXECUTIVE CRESTVIEW, LLC, A GEORGIA LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY is Defendant, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in the front entrance of the Franklin County Courthouse at 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320, Franklin County, Florida, at 11:00 am on the 14th day of November, 2012 the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: Lot 15, Bay Cove Village, A subdivision as per map or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 5 at Pages 18 and 19 of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. Subject to covenants, restrictions, reservations and easements of record, if any; and taxes for the year 2005 and subsequent years. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Danny Davis, ADA Coordinator, Court Technology Office, Office of Court Administration, 301 S. Monroe St., Rm 225, Tallahassee, FL 32303, (850) 577-4401 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. DATED this 5th day of October, 2012. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk County Court Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Becker & Poliakoff, P.A. Attorneys for Plaintiff 348 Miracle Strip Pkwy SW, Suite 7 Ft. Walton Beach, FL 32548-5253 (850)664-2229 (850)664-7882 Fax Oct 18, 25, 2012 89198T PUBLIC NOTICE The Gulf Coast Workforce Board is seeking Public Comment on the 2012-2016 Local Workforce Services Plan, as required by the Workforce Investment Act. Plan copies are available at the Board office; please call 850-9133285 to arrange to see the plan or you may request the plan electronically from dwilliams@gcwb.org. All comments must be submitted in writing within 30 days of this posting. October 18, 2012 89212T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 19-2012-CA-000139 FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION, Plaintiff, vs. UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS, TRUSTEES OF JO CLARK A/K/A JO ORTON, DECEASED; KAMI ORTON, HEIR; IF LIVING, INCLUDING ANY UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SAID DEFENDANT(S), IF REMARRIED, AND IF DECEASED, THE RESPECTIVE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS, AND TRUSTEES, AND ALL OTHER PERSONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THE NAMED DEFENDANT(S); UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2; Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION TO: UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS, TRUSTEES OF JO CLARK A/K/A JO ORTON, DECEASED; KAMI ORTON, HEIR; Whose residence(s) is/ are unknown. YOU ARE HEREBY required to file your answer or written defenses, if any, in the above proceeding with the Clerk of this Court, and to serve a copy thereof upon the plaintiffs attorney, Law Offices of Daniel C. Consuegra, 9204 King Palm Drive, Tampa, FL 33619-1328, telephone (813) 915-8660, facsimile (813)915-0559, within thirty days of the first publication of this Notice, the nature of this proceeding being a suit for foreclosure of mortgage against the following described property, to wit: Lot 8, Block 8, LANARK VILLAGE UNIT NO. 1, according 10 the plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 2, Pages 14 and 14A, inclusive, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. If you fail to file your response or answer, if any, in the above proceeding with the Clerk of this Court, and to serve a copy thereof upon the plaintiffs attorney, Law Offices of Daniel C.Consuegra, 9204 King Palm Dr., Tampa, Florida 33619-1327, telephone (813)915-8660, Fax (813) 915-0559, within thirty days of the first publication of this Notice, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint or petition. DATED at FRANKLIN County this 19th day of 2012. Marcia M Johnson Clerk of the Circuit Court Terry E Creamer Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Danny Davis Office of Court Administration 301 South Monroe Street, Room 225 Tallahassee, FL 32303 850.577.4401 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. October 18, 25, 2012 90167T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No. 2011-000423-CA THE CARRABELLE BOAT CLUB ASSOCIATION, INC., a Florida non-profit corporation, Plaintiff, vs. STEVEN R. MACCHIARELLA and WOODWARD DEVELOPMENT, INC., Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION To: STEVEN R. MACCHIARELLA and WOODWARD DEVELOPMENT, INC., YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a claim of lien for assessments pursuant to Article 13 of the Declaration of Condominium for The Carrabelle Boat Club Association, Inc., a commercial condominium, recorded in Official Record Book 888, Page 552, et seq. of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida on the following real property in FRANKLIN County, Florida: Unit Number B-318 of that certain condominium of The Carrabelle Boat Club Association, Inc., a/k/a, The Carrabelle Boat Club Boathouse, and the undivided interest in the Common elements appurtenant thereto, in accordance with and subject to the Declaration of Condominium for the Carrabelle Boat Club Association, Inc., a Commercial Condominium recorded in official Records Book 888, Page 552-630 of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Barbara Sanders, Sanders and Duncan, P.A., the plaintiffs attorney, whose address is P.O. Box 157, Apalachicola, Florida 32320, on or before 30 days of the last date of publication, and file the original with the clerk of this Court, MARCIA JOHNSON, Franklin County Clerk of Court, Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida 32320, either before service on the plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. DATED this 3rd day of October, 2012. MARCIA M. JOHNSON As Clerk of the Court By: Terry E. Creamer As Deputy Clerk October 11,18, 2012 90343T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 12-000065-CA HANCOCK BANK, Plaintiff, vs. DAVID L. SNOWDEN and ST. GEORGE PLANTATION OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE BY CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT Notice is hereby given that the undersigned, MARCIA JOHNSON, Clerk of the Circuit Court of Franklin County, Florida, will on November 7, 2012, at 11:00 a.m., on the Second Floor Lobby of the Franklin County Courthouse, located at 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida, in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes offer for sale, and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder, the following described real property situated in Franklin County, Florida: Real Property LOT 50, Pelican Beach Village, as per map or plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 5, Page 12, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. Together with all improvements, easements, appurtenances, and fixtures (the Property). pursuant to the Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure in a case pending in said Court, the style of which is HANCOCK BANK Plaintiff, vs. DAVID L. SNOWDEN and ST. GEORGE PLANTATION OWNERS ASSOCIATION, Defendants. and the docket number of which is 12-000065-CA Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim with the clerk of the court within 60 days after the sale. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Clerk of Court, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL (850)653-8861 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. WITNESS my hand and the official seal of this Honorable Court this 25th day of September, 2012. MARCIA JOHNSON Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Michelle Maxwell Deputy Clerk October 18, 25, 2012 90351T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.: 19-2011-CA-000402 BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING L.P. F/K/A COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, L.P., Plaintiff, vs. JASON L. WHITE; MARINERS VIEW CONDOMINIUMS ASSOCIATION, INC.; UNKNOWN TENANT(S); IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated the 25th day of September, 2012, and entered in Case No. 19-2011-CA000402, of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, L.P. F/K/A COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, L.P. is the Plaintiff and JASON L. WHITE, MARINERS VIEW CONDOMINIUMS ASSOCIATION, INC.; UNKNOWN TENANT (S); IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY are defendants. The Clerk o f this Court shall sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the FRONT STEPS OF THE FRANKLIN COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 33 MARKET STREET, APALACHICOLA, FL 32320, 11:00 AM on the 14th day of November, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: UNIT NUMBER 206 OF MARINERS VIEW CONDOMINIUM, AS PER THAT CERTAIN DECLARATION OF CONDOMINIUM RECORDED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 865, PAGE 369, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301, 850-5774401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Dated this 26th day of September, 2012. MARCIA JOHNSON Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Michelle Maxwell Deputy Clerk Submitted by: Law Offices of Marshall C. Watson, P.A. 1800 NW 49th Street, Suite 120 Fort Lauderdale, FL 33309 (954) 453-0365 Fax (954) 771-6052 Toll Free: 1-800-441-2438 October 18, 25, 2012 Franklin CountyLiquor License$165,000. Serious inquires/offers only at: anitalln242@aol.com Adopt*: Active young TV Producer & Attorney, home-cooking, beaches, sports await precious baby. Expenses paid *FLBar42311* *800-552-0045* Adopt*: Actor & Filmmaker, LOVE Awaits first baby. Matt & Kristi *Expenses paid* *FLBar42311* *800-552-0045* YORKIE AKCFemale Puppy Adorable,12 weeks old. She is Health Certified & has her 1st shots. $400 850-774-1229 GUN SHOWSanta Rosa County Auditorium, Milton, FL. Oct.20th & 21st 9am -5pm. Call (850) 957-4952 or (850) 261-8407 General Admission, $6Text FL26461 to 56654 NOW OPENMerchandise Liquidation Store, In Hickory Plaza Shopping Center, 414 S. Tyndall Parkway, Open 9-6 Daily, Closed Sundays Apalachicola 1Br/1Ba quiet, 2 blks from boat ramp, $600mo + first, last & dep. 850-570-9167 Text FL25130 to 56654 Apalachicola: 1 br, 1 ba efficiency Call for information 850-653-6103 Text FL5175 to 56654 St. GeorgeIsland $175/wk, elec, satellite, garbage incl. Pool tbl. 12 X 65 deck. Beautiful view! 850-653-5319 1 BR, CottageH/AC in Apalachicola, Florida. 850-643-7740 Apalachicola, House for rent, Bay City Rd, Call 850-653-8965 or 850-323-1990 Carabelle: 3 bdr 2 bath with large spare room on 1 acre. Fenced yard, new tile throughout, freshly painted. $800 per month + dep. Call (850) 766-4357 Text FL26851 to 56654 Carrabelle 3 br, 2 ba, all tile floors, newly remodeled inside All new appliances and heat pump. $750 per month + deposit 850-697-4080 or 850591-5899 Apalachicola Lots Block 177 Lot 6, $29,500 Block 150 Lot 4 $25,50 Call 850-597-0217 SELL ALL YOUR ITEMS through classified.CALL 747-5020

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, October 18, 2012 The Times | A13 emeraldcoastjobs.com Employment Today By CAROLINE M.L. POTTERMonster Contributing Writer It takes a lot of steps to get a job offer. Your network has to yield a connection. Your resume has to earn an interview. And your performance in the interview has to be impressive enough to produce an offer. But what happens when you have cleared every one of these hurdles only to learn your impending offer now is on indefinite hold? Read on to find out why offers get shelved temporarily or permanently and what, if any, due diligence you can to do to activate an offer.Its not youDont take it personally if your job offer is postponed. There are dozens of reasons for a delay. The important thing is to not make assumptions as to why the communication has abruptly stopped short of the actual offer, says careers and resume expert Lauren Milligan of ResuMayDay. It could have nothing to do with you. Perhaps a major company initiative went south, requiring everyones attention to this specific project. Perhaps your internal contact won the lottery and now theyre scrambling to replace her. Consider, too, that an internal candidate might have thrown her hat in the ring at the last minute, temporarily derailing your offer. In this case, a potential employer isnt going to give you much information beyond that they have to put it on hold, says Judi Perkins, the How-To Job Coach. Remember that its not a reflection of your qualifications, but, rather, that the company might give preference to current employees.Try to determine what it isRethink if you actually want to join this company. Putting an offer on hold is usually a sign of a softening balance sheet, says staffing expert David Lewis of Express Employment Professionals and author of The Emerging Leader. Jeanne Knight, a former HR executive turned career and job search coach, concurs. Offers typically go on hold because the company has decided their financial situation is not as positive as they thought it would be, dictating that most, if not all, of their open positions be put on hold until the picture looks brighter, she says. Executive career coach Beth Ross tells clients to ask their contact at the company for plausible reasons for the delay. Lewis recommends asking several specific questions about the hold on the offer. First, ask if the person making the offer is the person responsible for deciding to put the offer on hold, she says. If not, ask who decided to put the offer on hold (and, therefore, could decide to unfreeze the offer). And, finally, ask when you can meet this person and show her that you are worth hiring regardless of a blanket hiring freeze.Decide what to do nextEven if you know the reason an offer has been temporarily tabled, Lewis urges job seekers not to get complacent about their job search. More than 50 percent of the time, in my experience, the offer will not rematerialize in the next 30 days, he says. Says Ross: If it is indeed your dream job, you may elect to wait, but you should work with the company on a timetable that seems reasonable. Trying to nail this down might uncover what level of trust is there for both parties. If you decide to continue to pursue a position thats on hold, Milligan says you have two tasks ahead of you: First, when leaving voice mails or emails, keep your tone breezy, cheery and upbeat. And second, forge ahead with your job search. In other words, hope for the best and prepare for more interviews elsewhere, she says. Perkins adds, The more time that goes by with nothing happening, the greater the likelihood that your offer isnt going to become an actual job.Job offer on hold? How to seal deal Seasonal Jobs Contact Lorna at (850) 747-5019 or Email: lbrown@pcnh.com LORNA BROWNEMPLOYMENT SALES SPECIALIST LUSADY TAYLOREMPLOYMENT SALES SPECIALISTContact Lusady at (850) 522-5173 or Email: ltaylor@pcnh.com EASTERN SHIPBUILDING GROUP MORE THAN A JOB A FUTURE!LONG TERM WORKan aggressive leader in the Marine Industry, located in Panama City, FL has the following opportunities for skilled craftsmen:PIPEFITTERS PIPE WELDERS SHIPFITTERS STRUCTURAL WELDERS X-RAY WELDERS ELECTRICIANSCompetitive wages DOE, and a comprehensive bene ts package including: Company paid health, dental, and life insurance, 401(k), attendance & safety bonuses. Normal work week to include overtime. Quali ed craftsmen should apply in person: Mon-Fri, 8am-12pm 1pm4:30 pmHUMAN RESOURCES (2 Locations): 13300 Allanton Rd., Panama City, FL 32404 and 134 S. East Ave., Panama City, FL 32401Applications are also accepted at our East Ave Of ce Saturdays, 8am-12pm.(850) 522-7400, ext. 2285, 2322, or 2302 Fax: (850) 874-0208EOE/Drug Free Workplace Earn While You Learn with the On the Job Training Program If you are unemployed you may be eligible for the Workforce Centers OJT program. On the job training gives you hands on experience in a new job and employers, OJT helps you save money! For more informaon call (850) 370-0726 An equal opportunity employer/program. Aux iliary aids and services are available upon request to individuals with disabilies. All voice telephone numbers on this document may be reached by persons using TTY/TDD equipment via the Florida Relay Service at 711. ToPlace Your Classified ad inCall Our New Numbers Now!Call: 850-747-5020 Toll Free: 800-345-8688 Fax: 850-747-5044 Email: thestar@pcnh.com thetimes@pcnh.com theAPALACHICOLA & CARRABELLETIMES CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW Food Svs/HospitalityNow HiringReservationistPleasant personality, basic bookkeeping skills, computer literate and a team player! Apply in person at Gibson Inn 51 Avenue C (850) 653-2191 Medical/HealthNow HiringFull time positions for CNAs at St James Health and Rehab Center. Apply in person at 239 Crooked River Rd Carrabelle, FL 32322 Medical/HealthCaring Peopleand CNAs needed. Join a team of people who make a difference in the lives of the elderly. Provide non medical companionship, in home help & personal care for the elderly. Must be flexible. PT leading to FT-positions in the Port St. Joe and Apalachicola areas.Home Instead Senior CareCall Mon-Thur 9-3pm 850-640-1223 or toll free 1-866-301-1919 Web ID#: 34224571 Text FL24571 to 56654 Bldg Const/TradesWildlife TechnicianFL Fish & Wildlife Conservation Com. Box-R Wildlife Mgt. Area Franklin County $26,540 Annual. Heavy equipment operation, road and facility maintenance, controlled burns, manage public hunts and wildlife surveys. Applications must be completed online at: https://jobs.myflorida.com/ For additional information contact: Billie Clayton 850-265-3676 EEO/AA Employer Web ID#: 34226960 Text FL26960 to 56654 OtherCheck Station OperatorFlorida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission Is Now HiringWhat:Check Station OperatorWhere:Tates Hell State ForestSchedule required:Wednesday through Sunday (10am 6pm)Pay Rate:$8.00/hr This is a temporary position that is only during hunting season. To apply for this position please send resumes and letter of interest to adam.warwick@myfwc.co m For questions about the position please contact Billie Clayton at 850-265-3676 or billie.clayton@myfwc.co m Web ID#: 34226950 Classified Advertising works hard ...filling the employment needs of area business firms, helping people to meet their prospective employers, helping people buy and sell all kinds of goods and services, and much more! Nothing works harder than the Classifieds! 747-5020 Slow Reader? Free tutoring for adults.Call Literacy Volunteers of Bay County Public Library, 872-7500

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LocalA14 | The Times Thursday, October 18, 2012Smith is John Keith, husband of Addie Brown Keith, who died while worm grunting. His death certi cate, led by M. Witherspoon, reads, It was found that the aforesaid came to his death from a heart attack, at Brickyard, Franklin County, Florida the 5th day of October, 1954. The body was found by Dewey Brown about mile from the home of Capers Smith. John Keith had been living in the home of Mr. and Mrs. Capers Smith. He often went out to dig worms for the shing boats. He left home about 7:30 that morning and failed to return at the noon hour. According to research at www. ndagrave.com, Keiths family knew for some time that he suffered from a heart condition. Wimberly said her parents built their home on the site of Keiths death, and when they went to inspect the property for the rst time, they found Keiths shovel and grunting rod still with his pail at site.Bloody Bluff, Fort Gadsden no longer usedThe origin of the name Bloody Bluff is shrouded in mystery, but some residents of the Sumatra area believe it commemorates a battle in the Seminole War. Few living souls remember the tiny Bloody Bluff community, but the burial ground with only a single headstone still remains. Although there are an unknown number of graves, the lone stone belongs to James David Buddy Branch, who rests beneath a veterans gravestone. Born Oct. 10, 1890, to Thomas J. and Sarah E. Freeman Branch at Bloody Bluff, Buddy served in World War I and died of pneumonia on Dec. 5, 1922. The Fort Gadsden Cemetery between Sumatra and Eastpoint is the oldest and the largest of the three, nestled deep in the woods near the site of the famed Negro Fort. But no gravestones can be seen there, mainly indentations in the earth. During the War of 1812, the British Royal Marines established the fort on Prospect Bluff on the Apalachicola. The garrison initially included about 1,000 Britons and several hundred blacks, some runaway slaves recruited by the British. In 1815, when the war ended, the British withdrew from the post and left the black population. Over the next few years, the fort became a colony for escaped slaves. By 1816, more than 800 freedmen and women had settled around the fort, along with friendly natives of the area. The fort grew into a ourishing free black community with cultivated elds and plantations extending 50 miles up the river. The community, though isolated and peaceful, drew the attention of white settlers because they feared its existence would inspire a slave uprising. After the construction of Fort Scott north of the Negro Fort, Gen. Andrew Jackson used the navy to transport goods to the outpost via the Apalachicola River. During one of these resupply missions, a party of sailors stopped near Prospect Bluff to ll their canteens and were attacked by men from the Negro Fort. All but one of the Americans were killed In response, Jackson, commander of the Southern Military District, ordered Gen. Edmund Pendleton Gaines to destroy the fort. Gunboats were dispatched to the outpost, occupied by about 330 people at the time of battle, at least 200 of them freedmen, armed with cannons and muskets. A handful were Seminole and Choctaw warriors, and the remaining occupants, about 100 women and children, families of the black militia. Gaines ordered the fort to surrender, but the leader, an African named Garson, refused, telling Gaines he had orders from the British military to hold the post. He raised the Union Jack and a red ag to symbolize that no quarter would be given. The gunboats opened re and, after fewer than a dozen rounds were launched, a super-heated cannonball or hot shot struck the forts powder magazine. The ensuing explosion destroyed the entire post and instantly killed 270 men, women and children. Many more died of their wounds. The explosion was awful, and the scene horrible beyond description. You cannot conceive, nor I describe the horrors of the scene, Gaines later wrote. In an instant, lifeless bodies were stretched upon the plain, buried in sand and rubbish, or suspended from the tops of the surrounding pines. Here lay an innocent babe, there a helpless mother; on the one side a sturdy warrior, on the other a bleeding squaw. History records no American casualties. Victims of the massacre were buried in the Fort Gadsden Cemetery in unmarked graves. In later years, residents of the area around Fort Gadsden continued to use the cemetery for occasional burials. One of these was Bunk Brown, brother to Rowan Appleton Brown. Wimberly remembers being told a story about how, in the late 1800s, Bunk contracted a mysterious disease that caused his limbs to begin to petrify before his death. He eventually died, but his travails didnt end there. Acting in the dead of night, someone came and robbed his grave, spiriting away the mummied corpse. Nobody knows what became of Bunk Brown. My father always said he was taken by a traveling show or a circus to display, Wimberly said. Next week, the Eastpoint Cemetery. 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(In this section), Discover the best real estate values in Mexico Beach, Port St. Joe, Apalachicola, Cape San Blas, St. George Island, Carrabelle and surrounding areas. SELL YOUR LISTINGS HERE! Only $35 per week per listing Minimum 2 ads per week or 1 ad for 2 weeks Contact Joel or Kari for details: (850)814-7377 or (850)227-7847SOLD John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.comMLS# 245232$89,000St. George IslandHIGH & DRY 3RD TIER LOTLocated on the north side of Gulf Beach Drive and only two lots from the corner for easy beach access on 11th Street. Scrub Oaks line the road side of this lot creating privacy, but offers an open expanse of high sandy ground. Excellent building site. John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.comMLS#242245$439,900St George IslandGULF VIEW FROM WEST PINE4 bedrooms (2 are masters), 3-1/2 bath, extra living area or 5th BR, large open Living/ Dining/ Kitchen area with ETERNAL REST from page A1 Franklin County High School has welcomed back husband and wife Robert and Maria Revercomb to the faculty, after they spent a year in the Marshall Islands. Robert teaches physical and marine science to high school students, while his wife, a trained Spanish teacher, has been hired on part-time to provide language lab tutoring as part of the schools Virtual School offering in Spanish. Robert taught in 2005-06 at Apalachicola High School, handling freshman integrated science, 10th grade biology and 11th grade chemistry, while coaching baseball and serving as assistant coach to girls basketball and football. Im back, and Im really thrilled to be on board, he said. Im really excited to be able to teach. This is the perfect place for it. The Revercombs most recently spent a year in the Marshall Islands, teaching at College of the Marshall Islands, where Robert instructed anatomy and physiology, human growth and development, nutrition and disease prevention and treatment. He helped administer a grant through Canvasback Missions Inc. for programs in public schools in Micronesia to educate and remediate Type II diabetes. Its the No. 1 cause of death and disease in Marshall Islands, a tragic killer, he said, noting that in addition to being a top killer, it results commonly in amputations. The diet of the Marshallese, who live 7 degrees north of the equator in the Paci c Ocean, was originally coconut, sh, bananas and breadfruit, augmented by the rst colonists bringing squash and cabbage and things that are good. But, the growth of re ned foods, high fat and hidden fat foods with re ned carbohydrates, led eventually to the diabetes epidemic, which is now the islands top national threat. There are lifestyle changes that can be made, Revercomb said. It was an amazing experience, I switched to the traditional Marshallese diet, and my serum cholesterol levels went down 50 points. Revercomb also worked with a national aquaculture project. I was spear shing when I wasnt in classroom. I was on the reef with natives, he said. He said he is delighted to be back in Franklin County. Its such an amazing place. One of the challenges is the kids have it all: They enjoy forest and bay and rivers and lakes, he said. This is such an amazing place if youre an outdoors person. I cant imagine a better outdoor laboratory and the inside facilities and opportunities growing by leaps and bounds. The Revercombs older children are now either married or in college. The two youngest are enrolled in school. Gabriella is a junior, while sister Clarina Langineo is a freshman. By David AdlersteinFCHS welcomes Revercombs back to classroomLOIS SWOBODA | The TimesAbove is Gen. Edmund P. Gaines. At left, the only headstone in Bloody Bluff Cemetery belongs to James David Buddy Branch. DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The TimesRobert Revercomb teaches physical and marine science.