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The Apalachicola times
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100380/00191
 Material Information
Title: The Apalachicola times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: H.W. Johnston
Place of Publication: Apalachicola Fla
Apalachicola Fla
Publication Date: 10-11-2012
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1885.
General Note: Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 32911693
lccn - sn 95026907
System ID: UF00100380:00191
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Preceded by: Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by: Apalachicola herald

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xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx 50 WWW.APALACHTIMES.COM Phone: 850-653-8868 Web: apalachtimes.com E-mail: dadlerstein@star .com Fax: 850-653-8036 Circulation: 800-345-8688 DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK: School News & Society: 11 a.m. Friday Real Estate Ads: 11 a.m. Thursday Legal Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Display Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Line Ads: 5 p.m. Monday xxxxx Contact Us xxxxx Out to see Index Georgia shermen get friendly with giant shark By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com Three shermen visiting from South Georgia shared a once-in-a-lifetime experience two weeks ago when they lmed the biggest one that got away. Joe Bendis, who along with Brad Riner and Wendell Stone are frequent visitors to Franklin County, said he housesits a trailer in Lanark Village and frequently brings down his 25-foot shing boat, the Celestial Crab, to spend time on the water with family and friends. On Sept. 29, Bendis, Stone and Riner were about 30 miles offshore and Bendis was struggling to unhook a shark without losing a nger when Riner told him a whale shark had come to the back of the boat. At rst, Bendis thought it was a joke. Democrats rally for local races By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com If anyone was wondering if Franklin County Democrats were red up for the upcoming election, they got their answer Saturday afternoon in Eastpoint. About 50 of the party faithful gathered under sunny skies at Millender Park to listen to a series of hard-charging appeals from three candidates as to why they offer a better alternative than their Republican opponents. Mercedes Updyke, chair of the Democratic Executive Committee, introduced the three men who are campaigning, as well as three other county Democratic of ceholders, Tax Collector Jimmy Harris and Property Appraiser Rhonda Skipper, neither of whom faced opponents, and retiring Property Appraiser Doris Pendleton. Updyke said Organizing for America registered two new voters at the picnic, with all leftover food donated to the Apalachicola Food Bank. Harris used his time under the pavilion to stress his of ces open-door policy, welcoming questions and concerns. He said the of ces most recent purchase was an AS400 computer for $47,000, which is the brains we use to collect taxes. Most counties wont share theirs with the property appraiser, but we always shared an AS400. I know $47,000 sounds like a lot of money, and it is, but our last machine lasted eight years. First to speak was Liberty County Clerk of Courts Robert Hill, running for state representative in the newly drawn House District 7, which now encompasses all of Franklin County. Hill By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com Gov. Rick Scott dived headlong into the distress facing the countys oyster industry last week, spending an hour at a resource fair in Eastpoint to meet with local of cials and residents seeking help. Scotts Oct. 3 visit combined one-on-one talks with seafood of cials about the state of the Apalachicola Bay with a chance to talk with residents about their needs in the face of a decline of the sheries. Escorted by County Commissioner Pinki Jackel, Scott greeted a bevy of state, regional and local of cials, including State Sen. Bill Montford and Commissioner Cheryl Sanders. He discussed the industrys needs with Eastpoint seafood dealers Lynn Martina and Bruce Millender, and then later at greater length with Shannon Harts eld, president of the Franklin County Seafood Workers Association. Together with Jackel, Hartseld outlined the situation on a large map of the county and its waters, set up on the stage of the Eastpoint rehouse. We talked about getting some immediate assistance for relay and shelling, Harts eld said. We talked about possibly closing (Bob Sikes ) cut off, temporarily, for a short term, possibly a long term, because were xing to get these low winter tides and xing to get a little bit of fresh water there, and we dont want it all going out the cut. He said there was discussion about getting the Florida Department of Environmental Protection By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com A recently renovated park is looking down at the heel. A little more than three years ago, Apalachicola used two state grants totaling $400,000 to improve Riverside Park on the waterfront between avenues D and E. Of this, $56,000 was used to install a central fountain in the park. Plans for the park were inspired by design ideas suggested by the University of Georgias Riverways South committee and submitted to the city in 2008. Riverways report stressed the importance of the park to the downtown. This is Apalachicolas central park, read A whale of a sh tale SPECIAL TO THE TIMES This video still shows the whale shark that approached Joe Bendis shing boat about 30 miles offshore from Carrabelle. FIND IT ONLINE See video of the whale shark encounter at www.youtube. com/watch?v=2NHcOOR5F_U. See WHALE A14 ELECTION 2012 GOVERNOR VISITS COUNTY DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times Chris Millender, vice president of the Franklin County Seafood Workers Association, left, talks with Gov. Rick Scott. Scott gets an earful on oysters Riverfront Park waits for repairs See DEMOCRATS A5 LOIS SWOBODA | The Times This sidewalk was damaged by summer storms at Riverfront Park. See PARK A3 See SCOTT A10 Opinion . . . . . . A4 Society . . . . . . A6 Faith . . . . . . . A7 Outdoors . . . . . A8 Tide Chart . . . . . A8 Sports . . . . . . A9 Classi eds . . . A12-A13 Thursday, October 11, 2012 VOL. 127 ISSUE 24 Soccer league kicks off A9 Learn about domestic violence on Friday In honor of Domestic Violence Awareness Month, Refuge House and its community partners will host a public event from 4-7 p.m. Friday, Oct. 12, at Apalachicolas Battery. The theme for this year is The battle is not yours alone! For more info, call Carol Bar eld at 653-3313. Riverfront blues concert A Month of Blues continues along the Apalachicola Riverfront on Saturday, as the Smackwater Retrievers Band performs from 8-10 p.m. at Riverfront Park. Galleries and shops are open from 6-8 p.m. For more info, call 653-3930. Estuaries class The Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve will offer a one-day class in environmental science on Wednesday, Oct. 17. Estuaries Class covers the ecology, geology and economic importance of the Apalachicola Bay. Be prepared to spend part of the day in the classroom and part on a boat trawling, sampling bottom sediments and exploring life in the oyster beds. Cost is $10 per person. For info, contact Coastal Training Program Coordinator Rosalyn F. Kilcollins at 670-7708 or Rosalyn.kilcollins@dep.state. .us. Need a bosom buddy? October is National Breast Cancer Awareness month and Adopt-a-Dog from a Shelter month. The Franklin County Humane Society and Franklin Needs are offering women the opportunity to adopt a Bosom Buddy. Throughout the month, the adoption fee for shelter dogs will be reduced to $50 and $25 for cats. Mammogram clinic Weems Memorial Hospital will host a mammogram walkin clinic at 9:30 a.m. Oct. 19. Franklin Needs will cover the cost of mammograms for Franklin County residents who do not have insurance. Refreshments and educational handouts will be available. For more info, call 653-8853, ext. 119.

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Local A2 | The Times Thursday, October 11, 2012 National Mammography Day Friday, October 19th Weems Memorial Hospital and Franklin Needs, Inc. will be celebrating National Mammography Day on Friday, October 19th On this day, from 10am to 4pm, any woman in Frank lin County can walk-in to Weems Memorial Hospital and receive a free, screening mammogram courtesy of Franklin Needs, Inc. George E. Weems Memorial Hospital 135 Avenue G Apalachicola, FL 32320 (850) 653-8853 www.weemsmemorial.com Franklin Needs, Inc. 55 South Bayshore Drive Eastpoint, Florida 32328 (850) 670-1671 www.forgottencoastclassics.com NO HIDDEN CHARGES: It is our policy that the patient and any other person responsible for payments has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed by payment or any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment. www.mulliseye.com "WE WELCOME NE W PATIE N TS, C ALL T ODAY FOR YOUR P RIORITY APP OI N TME N T" FOR NEW PATIENTS 59 AND OLDER This certificate is good for a complete Medical Eye Exam with Todd Robinson, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Surgeon. The exam includes a prescription for eye glasses and tests for Glaucoma, Cataracts and other eye diseases FOR YOUR APPOINTMENT CALL: 850-763-6666 ELIGIBILITY: U.S. Citizens living in the Florida Panhandle, 59 years and older, not presently under our care. Coupon Expires: 10-31-12 FREE EYE EXAM CODE: AP00 Darren Payne, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon Lee Mullis, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon Todd Robinson, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon "Freedom from Eye Glasses, Now a reality for many." Smart Lenses SM MAGNOLIA BLUFF Bay living at its best, you have to see the sunsets from this home to believe them. 3BR/3BA Custom home with great water depth for year round access to the Apalachicola Bay. M L S #246689...........$699,000 Travis Stanley 850.653.6477 Grayson Shepard 850.653.6718 Leon Teat 850.653.5656 Sandy Mitchem 850.899.8300 BEACHFRONT C ONDO ST. G EORGE IS LAND 2BR/2BA with two balconies in Villas of St. George. Established rental history! Community pool, beach boardwalk, 2 blocks to lighthouse! M L S# 246110 ............... $319,500 B A Y FRONT CONDO Must see this 2 BR/2.1 BA townhouse next to the desirable Southside Historic District overlooking Apalachicola Bay. Property has community dock! M L S #247900 ...................... $275,000 B A Y FRONT HO M E Enjoy amazing sunsets everyday from this bay front home in prestigious St. George Plantation. 2BR/3BA home with unobstructed 180 degree bay views and 122 of bay front footage with white sandy beach. Dock your boat at the private pier with M L S #247962..... .......... $599,000 GULF FRONT HO M E This remarkable Gulf Front home provides the best of everything for laid back Island living. 5BR/4.1BA custom built home complete with a gourmet kitchen, granite countertops, elevator, a wet bar and upscale furnishings. Enjoy the inground 18X 36 pool and your private boardwalk. Call today to view this spectacular property. M L S #247998 ............... $995,000 N EW C ON S TRUCTION Great opportunity to buy a gulf view home. This quality constructed home has driven pilings, hardiboard siding and a metal roof for a low maintenance exterior. Inside you have 3 bedrooms with two baths and a great room opening to the front porch. New construction means low insurance cost. M L S #247359..............$289,000 N EW C ON S TRUCTION N EW C ON S TRUCTION Editors note: This is the rst part of a series called At Eternal Rest By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star .com Little Sumatra Cemetery tucked away in the woods has a tempestuous history for such a peaceful place. The cemetery is wholly in Franklin County, just a few hundred feet south of the countys border with Liberty County. It is the traditional resting place for residents of Sumatra in Liberty County. Burial plots in the cemetery were traditionally free and the county had maintained the graveyard for years, at one point erecting a brick monument and agpole as a tribute to veterans. A dispute surfaced in 2002 when the owner of surrounding land, arguing the cemetery was deeded to his father, sought to control who could be buried there. The two county attorneys argued that, by precedent, Floridians have the right to be buried near close relatives if space is available, and to have access to the graves of loved ones to maintain and beautify them. Commissioner Bevin Putnal was a vocal champion of the Sumatrans. After several months of discord, Franklin County purchased the two-acre cemetery for $10,000 in summer 2003, to avoid a lengthy court battle. The county placed it under the control of a not-for-pro t created by the Sumatra Assembly of God. Sumatra Cemetery is nearing the century mark. In 2002, William Bouington told the Times his father performed the rst funeral service in 1918, for the interment of World War I casualty John Wilson McCranie. The senior Bouington presided because tiny Sumatra lacked a preacher. There must have been other existing graves at the site since Tom Sadler of Sumatra told the Times his relatives had been buried there as far back as 1912. Possibly the sites were marked with cypress, which has since rotted away. A few cypress markers remain. McCranie, whose resting spot is the oldest marked grave, was one of thousands of fallen soldiers returned home during World War I, which ended in Nov. 1918. Prior to the 19th century, soldiers killed in combat were generally buried in a mass grave near the site of the battle where they died, with no further identi cation. During the 1800s, more of an effort was made to document the nal resting place of the fallen. During the Civil War, records were kept of the death and burial of both Union and Confederate soldiers. The body count during World War I was so horri c, it became clear early on that some kind of formal record needed to be kept to allow closure for families when the ghting ceased. By the end of the First Battle of the Marne (Sept. 5-12, 1914), 250,000 soldiers of all nationalities were dead. Deaths at medical facilities could be registered and the site of the burial documented for future repatriation, but many soldiers were buried by their friends where they fell with a simple marker. Others were taken to existing burial grounds nearby or impromptu cemeteries. In all, this Great War claimed 16 million lives of various nationalities, most from disease. The US entered World War I on April 6, 1917, and four months later, War Department General Order 104 authorized the organization of a Graves Registration Service. The first graves registration unit reached France on October 31 of the same year. Individual combat units had the responsibility of burying their dead as soon as possible. Most men killed in battle were buried within 24 hours, although it sometimes took a week or longer. Great care was taken to ensure graves were properly marked. The registration service eventually moved the bodies to an American military cemetery in Europe or shipped them back to the United States. The work of the Graves Registration Service continued until summer 1919. After the war, the Of ce of the Quartermaster General offered families the option of bringing their loved ones home for burial. From 1930-1933, female relatives of soldiers who remained buried abroad were able to visit their graves under a program of the federal government called the Gold Star Mother Pilgrimage. There are three more cemeteries just south of Sumatra hidden away in the green glades of the swamp, but thats another story. Next week Eternity at the Brickyard. Sumatra Cemetery rooted in Great War Far left: This monument for John Wilson McCranie marks the site of the rst funeral service held in Sumatra but is not the oldest burial site. Above: A handmade bench inlaid with red glass marks a pair of graves in Sumatra Cemetery. Left: This infants grave is still lovingly maintained after 81 years and the lettering had been freshly painted at the time this picture was made. PHOTOS BY LOIS SWOBODA | The Times

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Local The Times | A3 Thursday, October 11, 2012 the report. It is the closest open space to the citys commercial core. At the time, there was controversy over the renovations, which included the fountain as well as installation of planters, benches and picnic tables. Members of the citys waterfront committee chosen to review and oversee work on the waterfront, chaired by Harry Arnold, said they did not approve the plan before the fountain and other xtures were ordered. Architect Willoughby Marshall, brought in by Mayor Van Johnson to weigh in on the plan, said the design was not in keeping with what the city ought to pursue. Questions also were raised about why the city had not sought bids on installation of the fountain and other xtures. Nevertheless, Aquarius of Naples installed the fountain on April 19, 2009, with city grant writer Cindy Giametta supervising the work. Today, Riverfront Park is in need of maintenance and repairs. In December 2011, tiles began to fall off the sides and top of the fountain. For a short time, twine was used to secure the ceramic tile that remained, and silicone and mortar were applied to hide cracks and put fallen tiles back in place. Cracks in the fountains tile work continue to appear. On the night of April 11, the shing boat Gods Grace collided with the dock at Riverfront Park, damaging two pilings, knocking one down and breaking the other above water level. Apalachicola Police Chief Bobby Varnes said the boats captain, Nathan Peaden of Milton, agreed to pay the estimated cost of $5,000 to repair the pilings. Varnes said city of cials were trying to complete the repairs before the Apalachicola Antique and Classic Boat Show on April 28. The pilings remain unrepaired, although part of the damaged material has been removed, with the area festooned with ragged, yellow caution tape. Varnes said last week the owner of Gods Grace is ready to pay for repairs, but the chief has found it dif cult nding a contractor because the job is so small. Varnes said he has approached at least three rms that replace pilings but, so far, none has sent equipment to do the work. He is now negotiating with Reed Hicks of Carrabelle who said he has another job in Apalachicola and will attempt the Riverfront Park repair in two to three weeks when he brings a crew over to tackle the larger job. We have the poles, Varnes said. If anybody that can do the work and wants to come, well pay them. Three months ago, the soil began to erode along the western edge of a section of sidewalk running parallel to the dock. During Tropical Storm Debby, the erosion worsened, and by the end of the summer, the condition of the sidewalk deteriorated to where several large sections have upended and present an obvious safety hazard. The sidewalk is tilting along the entire waterfront, and about half of the walking trail is now surrounded by temporary fencing. The fence prevents the use of benches and trash receptacles purchased and installed in 2009. Contractor William Poloronis, who originally installed the sidewalk, said the riprap used to reinforce the river bank had washed away over time. But nobody was aware of the problem, he said, because the dock, installed after the sidewalk was built, hid the bank. He said he believed the engineer underestimated wave action at the site. Poloronis said the best x would be to drive sheet pilings deep along the bank, at a cost of as much as $1,000 a foot. But, a short-term repair might be made much more cheaply. Poloronis said after inspecting the site, he believes the sidewalk needs to be removed, and a larger support beam and additional riprap needs to be added to reinforce the bank. The dock can become part of the walking trail, he said. Poloronis said he has not worked out the cost of the interim repair, but estimated it would be much cheaper than sheet piling, which might run around $200,000. When repairs will be completed is uncertain. Staff in Apalachicolas city of ce said damage to the sidewalk is being reviewed by the Federal Emergency Management Agency and Preble Rish, the city engineer. This means you. THE FLU ENDS WITH U E ALL SHOW S FREE O F CH AR G E Check out www.BlastontheBay.com for detailed schedule and artist bios. Friday, Oct 19 6pm 6pm 6:30pm 7pm (CT) This project received VISIT FLORIDA Saturday, Oct 20 Sunday, Oct 21 Dockside Caf @ the Port 2pm Songwriters Workshop 5pm 7pm 6:30pm (CT) Indian Pass Raw Bar Indian Pass Raw Bar PHOTOS BY LOIS SWOBODA | The Times These fallen tiles have been repaired, but cracks continue to form between the tiles covering the fountain in Riverfront Park. At left, this piling damaged in April remains unrepaired. PARK from page A1

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Q. Can you provide some information on the proposed constitutional amendments that will be appearing on the November ballot? A. Using resources provided by the Florida Association of Counties, Florida Trend, The James Madison Institute, and the University of Florida Extension Service, I will try to summarize the amendments with the purpose only to provide information that might be helpful to encourage more informed votes. None of these proposed amendments are citizen initiatives. They were all placed on the ballot by our legislature. There is no Amendment 7 because it was rejected by the courts, tweaked by our lawmakers and then placed on the ballot as Amendment 8. Amendment 1 on Health Insurance This prohibits laws or rules compelling anyone to buy health insurance. It is essentially a referendum on the Affordable Care Act. If you favored the ACA, you might want to vote against Amendment 1. If you opposed the ACA, you might want to vote for Amendment 1. Supporters say a substantial vote of support will send a message that Florida voters oppose the ACA and, in the event the ACA were to be repealed or signicantly modied, the amendment would prevent Floridas own government from adopting a similar requirement at the state level as was done in Massachusetts. Opponents argue that since the ACA has been upheld in large part, it is unlikely to go away and cite that federal law trumps state law on these kinds of issues. Amendment 2 on Veterans Tax Relief This would permit partially or totally permanently disabled veterans who were not Florida residents when entering military service to be eligible for a combat-related disabled veterans ad valorem tax reduction on their homesteaded property in Florida. Florida already provides a discounted ad valorem tax payment for combat-related disability, but it is limited to those veterans who were Florida residents when entering U.S. military service. The amount of the reduction is based on the percentage of the veterans disability and is offered as recognition of the veterans commitment, service, and sacrice for our country and the state. There would be an impact at the local level of government (county, city, school board and special districts). Those in favor argue the revenue loss is a small price to pay for the sacrices made by veterans. About 74,000 veterans may qualify for the benet, according to the Florida Department of Veterans Affairs. Those who oppose might argue the property tax system isnt fair and continually adding exemptions and reductions makes it even less fair. Amendment 3 on State Budget Spending Limit This caps growth in state spending at no more than the rate of ination and population growth, instead of the current cap, which has been in place since 1994 and is based on growth in personal income. It would also require excess revenue to be deposited into a stabilization fund used to support public education, or if not required, to be returned to the taxpayers. Proponents say tougher limits on state spending are needed. Some may believe the only way to reduce programs that go beyond the scope of appropriate is to reduce the funds available to spend, thereby forcing prioritization. Opponents report that Colorado voters approved a similar measure but went back to the polls three years later and voted to suspend the law after it resulted in cuts to vital public services. They further report that since then, more than 20 state legislatures have rejected similar proposals. Opponents also warn that limiting state spending may well cause certain expenses now funded in whole or in part by the state government to be dumped onto cities, counties, and school boards. Amendment 4 on Property Tax Exemptions While current law caps annual assessment increases on non-homesteaded property such as businesses and rental properties at 10 percent a year, this will reduce the assessment cap to 5 percent. It will give rst-time homebuyers who havent purchased a home in the past three years an additional homestead exemption up to $150,000 phased out over ve years, and allows the Legislature to repeal Floridas recapture rule which causes some taxable values on homesteaded property to rise even when market values have dropped. This amendment, if passed, will have impacts felt at the local level of government (county, city, school board and special districts) in decreased revenues. The Florida Association of Counties is against this amendment and argues it does very little to lower the property taxes of existing homeowners but does a lot to help powerful special interest developers. FAC also states that it would mean big tax breaks for wealthy out-of-state snowbirds paid for by higher taxes for year-round Florida residents. Proponents feel that anything to stimulate the real estate and housing industries is benecial and necessary. Opponents point out that local governments will still have the ability to change the millage rate to offset the changes proposed in the amendment. Amendment 5 on Judicial Reform Currently, the Supreme Court is authorized to adopt rules for the practice and procedure in all courts and under those rules, the Governor appoints a justice of the Supreme Court from a list of nominees provided by a judicial nominating committee and those appointments by the governor are not subject to conrmation. This revision requires the Senate to conrm the appointment. This amendment also gives the Legislature power to repeal court rules by a simple majority vote, limits the re-adoption of repealed court rules, requires all les be made available to the House Speaker, and revises some language relating to the selection of chief judges of our circuits. Proponents feel it basically allows more legislative oversight over judicial rules. Opponents feel it will undermine the independence of the judicial branch of government. Additionally, critics argue its a bad idea to grant more authority over the judiciary to a legislative branch sorely decient in continuity because its composition and leadership frequently change due to eight-year term limits. Amendment 6 on Abortion Funding While federal and state laws already prohibit public nancing of abortions, this amendment would enshrine that ban in the state constitution. It also prohibits spending public funds on health benets that include coverage of abortion, but would not apply to expenditures required by federal law, which include an abortion to save the life of the mother or pregnancies resulting from rape and incest. It also exempts abortions from the privacy clause of the states constitution which could clear the way for a parental consent law Proponents state this amendment will provide another layer of protection. Opponents feel it could be interpreted to afrm parental consent requirements and would infringe on ones rights. Amendment 8 on Permissible Uses of Public Funds/Religious Funding This would delete a prohibition against using revenues from the public treasury directly or indirectly in aid of any church, sect, or religious denomination and would allow faith-based entities to receive public funds for providing public services. Proponents mention the U. S. Supreme Courts ruling that tax-funded school vouchers allowing children to attend church-operated schools are constitutional and say that unless this passes, lawsuits may follow. Opponents say this measure would open the door for government ofcials to provide some religious groups with tax money while denying aid to others. Moreover, they are concerned that strings will be attached to the public funds received that could intrude into matters such as the curriculum content for schools. Amendment 9 on Tax Relief for Surviving Spouses This would provide ad valorem homestead property tax relief to the surviving spouses of active duty members of the armed services or rst responders who died in the line of duty. It could be a total exemption or a partial exemption. A rst responder is dened as a law enforcement ofcer, correctional ofcer, reghter, emergency medical technician, or paramedic. Proponents say the amount of revenue that would be lost is very small and this is the least a grateful state could do to help these survivors and it serves to honor the deceased in service to the country, state, counties, and cities. Critics of all tax breaks say that when revenues are diminished, the government often compensates by raising the tax rates of those not in the group. Amendment 10 on Small Business Tax Relief This would grant Florida businesses, many of them small, an increase in the tax exemption on tangible personal property (machinery, ofce equipment, furniture, etc.) to $50,000. It is currently $25,000. Proponents feel this will most likely result in collateral economic benets and could help businesses by clearing away some of the nancial impediments that have deterred them from expanding their payrolls or hiring people for jobs. It would spare businesses a cost as well as the major hassle involved in complex calculating of the value of ordinary business equipment. Opponents cite this will cost local governments due to the loss in revenues at a time when the state has been dumping more responsibilities on them. It could result in a loss of services or a shift of the tax burden to others. Amendment 11 on Tax Relief for Low-Income Seniors This would allow counties and cities, by ordinance, to grant a substantial property tax break to low-income seniors age 65 or older (currently dened as those earning less than $27,030 a year) who have resided for at least 25 years in and have title to homes whose just (market) value is less than $250,000. Proponents say some lowincome seniors are at risk of being taxed out of the homes where they have lived and raised a family, especially in areas where real estate prices boomed. Opponents cite the loss of revenues and possible shifting of the tax burden to those who havent yet qualied for a tax break. Amendment 12 on Student Representation This changes the procedure provided for selecting the student representative on the Florida Board of Governors, which oversees the State University System. Instead of designating the head of the Florida Student Association (a group that not all state universities join), the representative would be chosen by a council comprising the student body presidents. This is sponsored by our Senator, Bill Montford and would make the representation more broadly inclusive. Proponents say every state university has a student body president, democratically elected, whereas not every state university chooses to participate in the Florida Student Association (FSA). Opponents argue that just because one or more universities choose to withdraw from the FSA is not a good reason to tinker with the state constitution. If you have any questions or comments about this column, please forward them to Marcia Johnson, Clerk of the Court, 33 Market Street, Ste. 203, Apalachicola, FL, or by email to: mmjohnson@franklinclerk. com. Visit the clerks website at www.franklinclerk.com. By MR. BILL Special to the Times Moving here permanently in Nov. 1960, Dads antique shop was not going to get it for a family of four. Besides the brass renishing and lamp repair, I tried pulp wooding, truck driving, bartending and few other distasteful chores not including septic tank repairs. At that time, the only real estate person was Charlie McKissack, who sold mostly McKissack family properties when you could nd him. His ofce was next to Burdas Drug Store. Jimmy and Maggie Lassiter had a two-room ofce at the corner of Arkansas and U.S. 98 at Lanark Beach, which was where Dad and I purchased our lots in 1954. They were Tallahassee Realty, one of the biggest in the city. Maggie was chairman of Florida Real Estate Commission in later years. I hacked it out for the next four years and decided to go to brokers school. Got my license in 1966. Sold the property where Ho Hum campground is to the Litton family from Mississippi in 1969, and Jimmy became my rst salesman. He died in 1985. He was married to Alice Potts. Next came Leonarda Perry from Nashville. She did real well. Passed away in 1994. Paul Spacey, a retired sergeant major, who opened my rst branch ofce in the old drug store brick building on Marine Street, where I had the Millers Mini-Pad camper park. It ended up stay free, although not planned that way. Paul also opened up the Barefoot Sails Pub at Carrabelle Beach across from Two Als Restaurant. Paul died in the 90s. I had another great lady, Arline Thornton, a real class act, who died of cancer in 1990. Then we had Barney Fish, great guy, did good, got a brokers license. Opened his ofce on 98 on right, just over the hill. Died a year and a half later in 1991. Al Hudson, retired Air Force pilot, was tops. Not only a good salesman, a great guy, served on county planning and zoning. I lost him in 2006. At this point in time, I am beginning to think Im a damn jinx or Dr. Death himself. Forgot Charles and Mary Miller, who lived next door to me. After all the training and client base I had, they got brokers license and opened Carrabelle Realty right next door to me. Kind of frosted my extremities. Company lives on with Ruby Litton at the helm. Charlie and Mary both passed on. Ed Diorio came to me in 98, a great guy with personality. Plus, after four years, he withdrew to a room with a computer. It consumed him, and cancer set in. Thats one reason I wont do computers. They can be as habit-forming as drugs. Only one of the early ones, Bill Bailey, escaped Millers Triangle. Still kicking. I guess Anne May, my current saleslady, doesnt believe the curse and hopefully wont be No. 10. I have watched all the big boys come and go Century 21, Anchor, Weichert plus a lot of the individuals. And Mr. Bills still kicking. First item in my bucket list, make it to Feb. 11, 2013 and the big 8-0. Mr. Bill is the pen name of Bill Miller. Opinion A4 | The Times Thursday, October 11, 2012 USPS 027-600 Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 Publisher: Roger Quinn Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola TimesLots of amendments on Floridas ballot YOUR PUBLIC TRUSTEE Marcia Johnson Fifty years of realty reality

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Local The Times | A5 Thursday, October 11, 2012 ANNOUNCING A PANAMA CITY PICTORIAL HISTORY BOOK About the book: The Panama City News Herald is pleased to be working with local historical organizations and libraries to bring our readers an heirloom-quality, coffee table pictorial book on the history of our area. This keepsake book will feature hundreds of stunning historic images from the late 1800s to present day from the greater Panama City area, and a section commemorating the 75th anniversary of The Panama City News Herald. Books are expected to ship late November. $ 29 .95 SHIP S MID NOVEMBER R eg. $ 39.95 BUY NOW! EX T E N DED DE A D LIN E BY PUBLISHING COMPANY D U E TO POPULAR DE MAN D OR DE R NO W & SA VE $10! ACTUAL C OVER & T I TL E Included in the book: Doral Bank, Innovations Federal Credit Union, Bay Credit Union, and The Tourist Development Council MA I L I N FORM OR ORDER O NL I N E AT : P ANA M AC I T Y.PI CT ORI AL BOOK. C OM Panama City area, and a section commemorating the 75th anniversary of The Panama City News Herald. Books are expected to ship late November. Panama City area, and a section commemorating the 75th anniversary of The Panama City News Herald. Books are expected to ship late November. BUY NOW! SAVE $10 I wish to pre-order: ______Copies at $29.95 plus $1.95 tax per book and pick up my order at The News Herald oce. Total $31.90/book ______ Copies at $29.95 plus $5.95 shipping and handling and $1.95 tax per book and have my order shipped to the address below. Total $37.85/ book T O TAL A MO UNT E NCL O S ED :_______________ Name ___________________________________________________________________________________ Address _________________________________________________________________________________ City ___________________________________________________ State _______________ Zip __________ Phone (_____) ______________________ E-mail ________________________________________________ Signature ________________________________________________________________________________ Charge Card Number_____________________________________ Security Code______________Exp. Date_____________________ P A YME NT ME T HOD C HE C K / MO N EYORDER Payable to: The News Herald VI SA A ME X M AST ER CA RD DI SC OVER is facing Republican Halsey Beshears, a Tallahassee nurseryman. Hills vote total in the Democratic primary was about the same as the total number of votes cast for all the Republicans, but the 64year-old Hill urged supporters not to look past the Nov. 6 election. Im very encouraged, he said. But Im not so overcon dent that Im not going to ask you to help me. He spoke in soft, courtly tones and did not mention his Republican opponent. He stressed that it would be an honor and privilege to represent the district in Tallahassee. Hill talked about economic development he helped bring to Liberty County, calling the crowning jewel an effort to attract a $100 million Georgia Paci c plant. As a former schoolteacher and school superintendent, Hill was critical of the states current system of testing and said he would work to bring the more successful districts in closer working contact with those that are struggling. The evaluation process is one thing that needs improvement, he said. The FCAT is a mess; it needs to be improved. Im not a big fan of that process. Hill also stressed his opposition to privatizing prisons and said he supported opening the new work camp at Franklin Correctional Institution and keeping the existing Bay City Work Camp open in Apalachicola. Ive been against privatizing from day one, he said. Theyre interested in one thing: pro t. Shiver sees threat from development Next up was Tony Shiver, a rst-time candidate challenging incumbent Republican Pinki Jackel for the county commission seat representing Eastpoint and St. George Island. I reached the point in my life and took a look around and realized things arent like I want them to be, he said. I felt this is my time to step up and be counted and do something about it. Shiver said he has lived in Franklin County all but six months of his 54 years, contrasting himself with Jackel, who he said was born in Jefferson County. She married an individual who is now a wellknown attorney in Atlanta, Ga., he said. She came down here and arrived here at the time of the land boom, to make a pro t. Shiver, who so far has run a low-key campaign, lodged a full-throated shot at his opponent. There are things that are going along in our county right now that are manipulating change behind the scenes we really dont need, he said. We need improvements, we need amenities, we need the little niceties put here. But we dont need our home destroyed and manipulated into something its not. Im ghting to keep the things the way they are. Shiver, who was employed in the seafood industry before turning to law enforcement, said he is working on behalf of the seafood workers. I want them to be able to keep our bay, he said. The seafood workers of this place are not just a part of our economy; they are solders to keep our environment like it is. He said seafood workers and environmental organizations and state regulators have fought for years to try to keep overwhelming development from coming. We need controlled development, but we dont need our home destroyed for the sake of an individual select few making pro t. Shiver took aim at Jackel, suggesting she is too close to the interests of land developers. I would like for you to understand that it is happening. If you notice her advertisements and campaign commercials, if you look real hard, 85 percent of the people are all real estate people, he said. That is who her ties are. That is her clique; that is her group. Lawson denounces opponents partisanship Former State Sen. Al Lawson, challenging incumbent Republican Congressman Steve Southerland to represent District 2, was last to address the group. Franklin County has always been a county very dear to me during the 28 years I served (in the Florida Senate and House), like an adopted hometown for me, he said. Lawson told of how during a campaign stop early in this career, an Eastpoint woman working as a shucker insisted he down a glass of raw oysters to prove he really wanted their votes. I said Well bring them on, he said. Ever since then Ive been eating oysters. Lawson said he has been motivated to run for Congress because partisan gridlock has broken the way Washington works. People dont want to work with each other, and thats not what Americas all about, he said. In order for us to be successful, we have to work with each other. When you go to war, you dont ask the person next to you, Are you a Republican or are you a Democrat? You pull together and do what is necessary to defend our country, Lawson said. He promised to put the needs of constituents rst and listed a series of positions: to preserve Social Security and Medicare, to boost infrastructure funding and money invested in universities and to seek creation of an ocean initiative for the Gulf of Mexico. You dont have to wonder where Im coming from when it comes down to Medicare and Social Security, he said. In Medicare some of the people want to change the game after youve paid. Its in the (Paul) Ryan bill, and what they want to do is give someone younger than me a voucher. Lawson said infrastructure funding and boosting money for universities has always been an area that provides jobs. It will create more jobs than you can think of. Thats where our energy needs to be. The 64-year-old lawmaker and insurance executive took aim at Southerlands core constituency on the conservative edge of the Republican Party. You cant go out representing the Tea Party and all these other groups and put the people you represent rst, Lawson said. I fought from the time I entered the legislature to protect jobs, to keep people working, to show that someone really cared about them. He said he long fought against prison privatization and remained opposed to offshore drilling in the Gulf of Mexico. You need to invest in our workers; you need to invest in the state of Florida, Lawson said. He said the situation in Apalachicola Bay is not unexpected and urged the federal government to approve the shery disaster declaration sought by Floridas legislative delegation, to go toward reshelling efforts in the bay. We knew eventually its going to have an effect when you allow Atlanta to take 5 million gallons a day and send it over the Lake Lanier, he said. We knew with the BP oil spill, everyone was encouraged to work the winter bars, and we knew eventually it would have a devastating effect, and now were seeing that effect. This bay is the most productive bay in America, Lawson said. We know what happens with the oil spill, and it is still going on. Now we have to ght to make sure when the money is released, Franklin County gets their fair share. Lawson closed with a direct attack on Southerlands campaign strategy to paint him as a career politician who has voted to raise his salary. When I came in to the legislature I made $12,000, and over 28 years my salary got up to $30,000 and then we cut our salary back to $28,000 because state workers didnt get a raise. The legislature raises were tied in to whatever raises the state workers receive, he said. What is interesting about Mr. Southerlands comment is that he made more money in two years, (close to $350,000). I did not make that in 20 years, Lawson said. They are just trying to nd something to tear you down and to deceive voters to think that all you were doing in the legislature is giving yourself a pay raise, but not talking about how you protect Apalachicola Bay. Theyre not talking about how you protect water across the state of Florida, or how youre ghting for better schools or health care needs. Its unbelievable when a person would talk about income, when he probably didnt deserve the $174,000 he made, compared to what weve had, Lawson said. The only things hes led up there are three funeral home bills to help the funeral industry that he works in. And hes gone straight down party line and not worked with colleagues on the other side. DEMOCRATS from page A1 PHOTOS BY DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times From left, Democrats Al Lawson, Robert Hill and Tony Shiver are running for of ce in the upcoming election.

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A6 | The Times Thursday, October 11, 2012 Hilarious Hank! Take a look at those ears! Is he not one of the cutest pups youve ever seen? He is about 3 months old and full of himself. He is a playful, high energy pup sure to entertain. He is part Chihuahua and part Jack Russell. He will be a small dog but will need plenty of exercise and attention. Come meet Mr. Personality, hes so worth a trip to the Adoption Center! Volunteers are desperately needed to socialize all of our dogs and cats. We are always looking for people willing to bring one of our animals into their home to be fostered for various needs. Anytime you can spare would be greatly appreciated. Call Karen at 670-8417 for more details or visit the Franklin County Humane Society at 244 State Road 65 in Eastpoint. You may logon to the website at www.forgottenpets.org to see more of our adoptable pets. PET OF THE WEEK Franklin County Humane Society Society Mr. and Mrs. James Mock request the honor of your presence at the marriage of their daughter, Jessica Michelle Mock to Jordan Colby Brock on Saturday, Oct. 13, 2012 at 5:30 p.m. (EST) at Centennial Park in Port St. Joe. All friends and family are invited to attend. No local invitations have been sent. A reception will be held following the ceremony at The Centennial Building. Mr. and Mrs. James Brownell and Mr. and Mrs. Joey Mallon are proud to announce the engagement and upcoming marriage of their children, Lacey Nicole Brownell and Corbin Joseph Mallon. Lacey is the daughter of the late Annette Brownell. Her grandparents are Sally Nixon and the late Jerry Nixon, of Mexico Beach; Madeline Rafeld and the late Capt. Sparkie Rafeld, of Overstreet; and Clinton and Janice Brownell of Overstreet. Corbins grandparents are Mr. and Mrs. Earl Duggar, of Apalachicola, and the late Rosa and John Whitey Mallon. Lacey, a 2010 graduate of Wewahitchka High School, is employed at the Old Time Soda Fountain in Apalachicola. Corbin attended Franklin County High School and is employed by Larry Clark Construction in Apalachicola. A November wedding is planned. Raymond West, Jr. celebrated his sixth birthday on Saturday. Oct. 6. He is the son of Brandy Austin, of Apalachicola, and brother to Jaquan, Amontaye and the late Jasmine Harris. Raymond is the grandson of Tammie Croom and the late James Austin, and Tawana Robinson and James West. We love you! Love, Mommy and family Bobby Joe and Debi Stevens of Panama City proudly announce the engagement and forthcoming marriage of their daughter, Whitney Jacqueline McAlister, to Christopher Addison Leuenberger, son of Mr. and Mrs. Tommy Leuenberger and Ms. Stephanie Ross of Graceville. Whitney is a 2005 graduate of Port St. Joe High School and received her bachelor of science in nursing degree from the University of West Florida. She will complete her master of science in nursing with a family nurse practitioner specialty in the spring of 2014. Whitney is currently employed as an emergency department registered nurse at Gulf Coast Medical Center. Christopher is a 2004 graduate of Graceville High School and has served in the United States military since 2005. He is currently pursuing his bachelor of science in technology management at Gulf Coast State College. An Oct. 27,, 2012 wedding is planned in Santa Rosa Beach. Michael Dolan, son of Aglaia and the late Hal Dolan, of Eastpoint, was promoted to the rank of major on Sept. 1. His maternal grandparents are the late Jim Mosconis and the late Zelda Mae Mosconis Stanley. Paternal grandparents are the late Ruth and John Dolan of Havana. He has one brother Shawn (Katherine) Dolan, of Tallahassee. Maj. Dolan is a 1997 graduate of Apalachicola High School and a 2001 graduate of the University of West Florida where he holds a bachelor of science degree in engineering technology/construction. He was previously assigned from 2002 to 2006 to the 3rd Battalion, 319th Airborne Field Artillery Regiment, 82nd Airborne Division, at Ft. Bragg, North Carolina. He was also assigned from 2008 to 2012 to the 2nd Battalion, 8th Field Artillery Regiment and 1st Battalion, 24th Infantry Regiment of the 1st Stryker Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division, Ft. Wainwright, Alaska. Maj. Dolan is currently assigned to the University of Scranton Army Reserve Ofcer Training Corps (ROTC) where he serves as the recruiting operations ofcer and Kings College Detachment Commander. A combat veteran of both Afghanistan and Iraq, he is married to the former Jennifer Kellett of Easley, South Carolina. Shawn Dolan graduated this summer from Florida A and M University with a masters degree in architecture. Commencement was held Aug. 3 in the Alfred Lawson Jr. Multipurpose Center and Teaching Gymnasium, with the Rev. O. Jermaine Simmons Sr., pastor of Jacob Chapel Baptist Church in Tallahassee, as commencement speaker. Dolans masters thesis is entitled The Role of Site Planning in Historical Restoration: Potential Design Guidelines for Future Historic Preservations. He is the son of Aglaia and the late Hal Dolan of Eastpoint, and has one brother, Maj. Michael Dolan, of Scranton, New York. Dolans maternal grandparents are the late Jim Mosconis and the late Zelda Mae Mosconis Stanley. Paternal grandparents are the late Ruth and John Dolan of Havana. Kristie Walker and Nicholas Soderholm would like to announce the birth of their son, Tyler Evan Soderholm. Born on Tuesday, Sept. 11, he weighed 7 pounds, 12 ounces and was 20 3/4 inches in length. Maternal grandparents are Ivan Walker, of Carrabelle, and Christine Silvey, of Crawfordville. Paternal grandmother is Sharon Soderholm, of Carrabelle. Maternal greatgrandparents are Dennis Allen, of Crawfordville, Judy Stevens, of Panacea, and Gail Browning, of Bridge City, Texas. Paternal great-grandmother is Margaret Zuberbeuhler, of Carrabelle. TYLER SODERHOLM BORN Happy sixth birthday, Raymond Michael Dolan promoted to major Shawn Dolan earns masters of architecture Lacey Brownell, Corbin Mallon engaged Whitney McAlister, Christopher Leuenberger engaged Jessica Mock, Jordan Brock to wed Saturday

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The Times | A7 Thursday, October 11, 2012 Special to the Times Happy 20th anniversary to Franklin County Public Library, which joined forces with Wilderness Coast Pub lic Libraries (Wakulla and Jefferson counties) in Au gust 1992. The county library be gan operations on Oct. 1, 1992, in a storefront in East point. Throughout the years the library has moved into three storefront units, to include administration and a branch in Carrabelle. It has a material collection that totals more than 37,000 items, more than 5,200 reg istered patrons, four fulltime staff and one part-time staff keeping two librar ies running with services and programs for Franklin County and guests. More than 32,000 items circulated last year. Volunteers are the heart of our success and allow us to offer programs to children, teens and adults. Services include assistance for food stamps, unemploy ment, job searches, fax ing to the Department of Children and Families, as well as business develop ment and job skills. Basic computer skills instruction is offered weekly by ap pointment. Visit http://fcpl. wildernesscoast.org for more information about your libraries and, check out our Facebook page and online catalog for materials and your account. To log into your account on the webpage, use your library card number for the user ID and the last four numbers as your password. At the Carrabelle branch, on Wednesday, Oct. 17, from 3-6 p.m., children and parents can see the movie Mirror, Mirror. This viewing is free and light refreshments will be offered. Mommy and Me story time program is every Friday at 3:30 p.m. in the li brary in Eastpoint that in cludes crafts, snacks, mu sic and fun games. The United Methodist Churches of Franklin County Welcome You First United Methodist Church of Apalachicola Worship Service 11:00 a.m. every Sunday Sunday School 10:00 a.m. 75 5 th St. Apalachicola 653-9530 fumcapalach@gtcom.net Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis Carrabelle United Methodist Church Worship Services 10:45 a.m. Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Celebrate Recovery Mondays 7-9 p.m. 102 NE Ave. B Carrabelle 697-3672 Pastor: Julie Stephens Eastpoint United Methodist Church Worship Service 10:00 a.m. every Sunday Healing service every fourth Monday at 7:00 p.m. 317 Patton Dr. (corner of David St.) 670-8825 Pastor: Rev. Beth White St. George Island United Methodist Church 9:00 a.m. Worship Service 10:00 a.m. Fellowship Hour 201 E. Gulf Beach Dr. 9274635 www.sgiumc.org Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis Nursery now provided for Sunday Church Service First Pentecostal Holiness Church 379 Brownsville Road Apalachicola Were excited about what Gods doing!!! Sunday School 9:45 am Sunday Morning Worship 10:45 am Sunday Evening Service 6:00 pm Monday, Youth Group 6:30 pm Wednesday, Royal Rangers, G.A.P. 7:00 pm Wednesday Worship & Word 7:30 pm Nursery Provided during regular church services 7:00 7:00 First Baptist Church St. George Island 501 E. Bayshore Drive 927-2257 R. Michael Waley, Pastor Join us as we praise and worship the living Christ. Great is the Lord and most worthy of praise. Psalm 145:3 Sunday Bible Study ................................................ 10:00am Worship Praise ........................................................ 11:00am Sunday Night ............................................................ 7:00pm Wednesday Power Hour ...................................... 7:00pm Wednesday Youth at S.P.L.A.S.H ....................... 7:00pm Walking in Christ R. Michael Whaley, Pastor WELCOMES YOU Church of the Ascension 101 NE First Street Carrabelle SUNDAY 10:00 AM WELCOMES YOU Church THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH (850) 274-4490 (850) 545-2578 WELCOMES YOU Trinity Trinity Episcopal Church est. 1836 Welcomes You Hwy. 98 & 6th St. Apalachicola 850-653-9550 Sunday Worship Services 8 & 10:30 a.m. Wednesdays Healing Service 11 a.m. Centering Prayer 4 p.m. Sunday Worship Services 8 & 10:30 a.m. Wednesdays Healing Service 11 a.m. Centering Prayer 4 p.m. A remembrance service will be held Wednesday, Oct. 24, from 4 to 6 p.m., on St. George Island to commemorate and celebrate the life of Lawrence J. Kienzle, who died Sept. 11 at age 86. Those interested in attending are asked to conrm attendance by calling his daughter, Patti Bielling at 757810-1675. In lieu of owers, the family requests donations be made to a favorite charity in the name of Lawrence Kienzle. Lawrence Kienzle LAWRENCE KIENZLE Tyrone Renard Evans was born on March 2, 1959, in Manhattan, New York to Julia Mae Fisher and Jon Dorian Evans. At a very young age Tyrone moved to Apalachicola and was raised by his late great-grandparents, Willie and Lettie Leverette. He graduated from Apalachicola High School in 1977. For almost 20 years, Tyrone worked at the Apalachicola Railroad until it shut down. In 2000, Tyrone started working for the Franklin County landll until the Lord called him home. On Thursday, Sept. 27, he peacefully slipped away to join his family who went on before him. Welcoming him were great-grandparents Willie and Lettie Leverette, grandmother Callie Mae Simon, grandparents Ceaphous and Margarette Fisher, grandfather John L. Evans, sister Eugenia Evans and brother Jon D. Evans, Jr. Remaining to cherish is loving memories are sons, Tyrone Renard Evans, Jr. of Charleston, West Virginia, and Dorian James Evans, of Apalachicola; mother Julia Mae Fisher, of Apalachicola; father Jon Dorian Evans, of Rapid City, South Dakota; grandmother, Susie Evans, of Suffolk, Virginia; sisters Gloria D. Hayward (Warren) of Orlando; Olivia D. Wynn (Adron) of Apalachicola; Gwendolyn Drakeford, of Hackensack, New Jersey; and Cynthia Phelps, of Irvington, New Jersey; and Regis Ackerman, of Baltimore, Maryland; brother Joseph D. Evans of Aiken, South Carolina; and former wife, Tronda Davis, of Apalachicola. He is also survived by granddaughters Tiandra Shiqualle Evans, of Gainesville, and Gabrielle Olivia Loehr-Evans of Charleston, West Virginia; great-grandson Tyoune Jaquell Evans of Gainesville; godchildren Marvin Croom, Jr. of Dothan, Alabama, and Ashaureah Brown of Apalachicola; special cousin Bobbie Gail Turrell, of Apalachicola; and a host of aunts, uncles, nieces, nephews, cousins and special friends. Tyrone also helped raise Justin Griggs, Cruz Griggs, and Nyasha Evans, all of Apalachicola. Tyrone will be remembered by his beautiful smile and making people laugh. He will be greatly missed by all who knew and loved him.Tyrone Renard Evans TYRONE EVANS To know that there are friends who really care, our burdens are made easier to bear. The family of the late Tyrone Renard Evans (Big Ty) acknowledges with sincere appreciation the many acts of love and kindness shown through your cards, owers, and prayers. For all your kind deeds and thoughtful expressions of sympathy during the passing of our loved one, we are forever grateful. We have been overwhelmed with kindness; so that no one is missed individual acknowledgements will not be sent. May God continue to bless each of you. You are all in our prayers. Again, we thank you with utmost heartfelt appreciation. The family of Tyrone Evans Our heartfelt thanks go out to our loving church family Carrabelle United Methodist Church for all the prayers, cards and kindness. We would also like to thank our American Legion Post #82, Sons of the American Legion and Ladies Auxiliary for all their support and all the hard work they put in on our benet Sept. 22. Words are not enough to express our thanks to our friends who looked after Poncho. With Love, Ann and Charlie Merrell Zella Smith, her friends and family wish to thank all of Franklin County and everybody who pitched in to help with our benet luncheon on Tuesday, Oct. 9, including the people and organizations too numerous to mention. Thanks to all who donated food and the use of equipment for the event, those who donated money and those who came and shared lunch with us. We sold more than 250 dinners to benet Zella and her family. The outpouring of love and support stretched over the entire county. Once again, thank you, Jennifer Finch and Peggy HicksDAVI D ADL ERS T EIN | The Times The community is invited to attend an open house and dedication of Christ Community Academy, at 12:30 p.m. this Sunday in the First United Methodist Church Sunday school building at 75 5th Street, Apalachicola. Christ Community Academy provides quality Christian child care services at an affordable price for families with young children. Stafng the new academy are, from left, Director Madeline Kidney, Coordinator Samantha Cannon and teachers Dakaya Floyd and Erin Bailey. Come by and meet the staff, tour the classrooms and enjoy refreshments. L OIS SWO B O D A | The Times Chaos Springer receives his blessing from Kay Wheeler at Trinity Episcopal Church on Sunday, part of the churchs annual blessing of the animals. A dozen canines and their owners attended the ceremony led by Wheeler and the Rev. John Sink. Following prayers and a reading from the book of Genesis (1:20-22, 24-28, 31a), the entire assembly joined in St. Francis of Assisis prayer Lord, make me an instrument of your peace. The animals were then anointed by holy water on a stem of rosemary. Music to was performed by Tom Adams and Brooks Jones. For a gallery of pictures, visit www.apalachtimes.com. Sure is great to see Old Glory waving over the Post Ofce again! Thank you, Tommy Jack! The girls at the thrift store have got it ready for Halloween. Lots of decorations and spooky stuff for sale. Come on by, look around, have a cup of coffee and just visit. Saturday was great for the yard sale, Black Bear Festival and the Democratic rally. The yard sale at the golf course was successful. Lots of donated items and plenty of shoppers. Hope you found that one thing you were looking for. The members of the Lanark Village Golf Club thank you for your support and donations. Mark your calendars for Saturday, Nov. 3. The golf club members will prepare and serve your full breakfast at Chillas Hall. Your donation of $5 will get you started. Find a place to sit, ll out the blank and enjoy! Orange juice, coffee, pancakes, French toast, bacon and eggs. See you there! When was the last time you got a mug of coffee for 30 cents? I thought so. Well you can at Chillas Hall, Monday through Saturday from 8 to 11 a.m. Come in, have a mug with your friends and neighbors, get your mail and have another mug. Sometimes there are goodies to go along with the coffee. We will have our annual Thanksgiving Dinner on Thursday, Nov. 22 at Chillas Hall. Bring your favorite dish to share and a donation and join us. Our friend Commissioner Cheryl Sanders is donating the turkeys. Serving begins at 1 p.m. See you there! When youre not using your boat, it should be parked in the boat yard or under your carport, but not taking up a space on the street! Be kind to one another, check on the sick and housebound and remember God is watching us from a distance! Until next time God bless America, our troops, the poor, homeless and hungry. Thrift store readies for Halloween LANARK NEWS Jim Welsh BLESSING THE BEASTS Cards of THANKS Obituaries Your COUNTY LIBRARY NEW CHRISTIAN CHILD CARE TO OPEN Faith

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Email outdoors news to timesoutdoors @star .com O UTDOORS www.apalachtimes.com Section Section A Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL (next to Piggly Wiggly) www.BWOsh.com (next to Piggly Wiggly) www.BWOsh.com Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL EV E RYTHING FOR YOUR O UTDOOR ADV E NTUR E EV E EV E EV RYTHING FOR YOUR E RYTHING FOR YOUR E O UTDOOR ADV E UTDOOR ADV E UTDOOR ADV NTUR E NTUR E E EV E EV E EV RYTHING FOR YOUR E RYTHING FOR YOUR E O UTDOOR ADV E UTDOOR ADV E UTDOOR ADV NTUR E NTUR E E SEPTEM B ER FEATURE FISH: Stop in and register or go online at www. B W O sh.com RED FISH ER FEATURE FISH: WEEKLY ALMANAC APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE TIDE TABLES MONTHLY AVERAGES To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from these given for APALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW Cat Point Minus 0:40 Minus 1:17 East Pass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27 To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from those given for CARRABELLE: HIGH LOW Bald Point Minus 9:16 Minus 0:03 Sponsor the WEEKLY ALMANAC Call Today! 653-8868 Date High Low % Precip Thu, Oct. 11 82 67 0 % Fri, Oct. 12 81 70 0 % Sat, Oct. 13 81 70 0 % Sun, Oct. 14 82 68 10 % Mon, Oct. 15 83 68 10 % Tues, Oct. 16 82 66 30 % Wed, Oct. 17 80 66 0 % 10 We 120am 1.6 1133am 1.5 649am 1.2 720pm 0.5 11 Th 151am 1.6 100pm 1.6 746am 1.0 808pm 0.6 12 Fr 216am 1.6 216pm 1.6 832am 0.8 850pm 0.7 13 Sa 238am 1.7 323pm 1.7 914am 0.6 928pm 0.8 14 Su 258am 1.7 426pm 1.7 955am 0.3 1004pm 1.0 15 Mo 321am 1.8 526pm 1.7 1036am 0.2 1037pm 1.1 16 Tu 346am 1.9 626pm 1.7 1120am 0.0 1109pm 1.3 17 We 416am 1.9 727pm 1.7 1207pm -0.1 1142pm 1.4 18 Th 452am 2.0 833pm 1.6 100pm -0.1 19 Fr 534am 2.0 942pm 1.5 1217am 1.4 200pm 0.0 20 Sa 623am 1.9 1053pm 1.5 101am 1.4 309pm 0.1 21 Su 722am 1.8 1152pm 1.5 209am 1.4 423pm 0.2 22 Mo 840am 1.6 354am 1.3 534pm 0.3 23 Tu 1235am 1.5 1023am 1.5 539am 1.2 638pm 0.5 11 Th 1226am 2.6 1135am 2.6 533am 1.6 555pm 1.0 12 Fr 1251am 2.6 1251pm 2.6 619am 1.3 637pm 1.1 13 Sa 113am 2.7 158pm 2.7 701am 1.0 715pm 1.3 14 Su 133am 2.7 301pm 2.7 742am 0.5 751pm 1.6 15 Mo 156am 2.9 401pm 2.7 823am 0.3 824pm 1.8 16 Tu 221am 3.0 501pm 2.7 907am 0.0 856pm 2.1 17 We 251am 3.0 602pm 2.7 954am -0.2 929pm 2.2 18 Th 327am 3.2 708pm 2.6 1047am -0.2 1004pm 2.2 19 Fr 409am 3.2 817pm 2.4 1147am 0.0 1048pm 2.2 20 Sa 458am 3.0 928pm 2.4 1256pm 0.2 1156pm 2.2 21 Su 557am 2.9 1027pm 2.4 210pm 0.3 22 Mo 715am 2.6 1110pm 2.4 141am 2.1 321pm 0.5 23 Tu 858am 2.4 1143pm 2.4 326am 1.9 425pm 0.8 24 We 1057am 2.2 445am 1.4 519pm 1.0 Thursday, October 11, 2012 Page 8 By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star .com The weather was perfect, the setting beautiful and there was plenty to do at this years Black Bear Festival in Carrabelle. More exhibits than in the past graced Sands Park, with several dozen booths clustered around the childrens activity tent. Presenters said about 300 people attended the event, down a bit from last year. Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission biologist Dave Telesco said he believed the Whatever Floats Your Boat Regatta at the marine lab competed with the festival for attendees, because both were environmentally oriented. He said a strong college sports line-up may also have reduced attendance. Organizers did a beautiful job pulling the whole thing together. The new reading circle and morning lectures were the most popular and best attended features of the festival. A surprise attendee on Saturday morning was an actual black bear. FWC Bear Biologist Adam Warwick brought a small female bear that had been trapped for relocation. He demonstrated handling with the little bear as a volunteer helper. As the crowd watched, Warwick darted, weighed and measured the bear. It seems pretty certain this is one bear who has learned her lesson about hanging around with people. After the awful experience of being surrounded by gawking human beings, shell certainly head for the hills once released. Several local authors were on hand to read their books and Maggie, the main character in Beagle with the Broken Tail was available to give paw prints. A dozen FWC interns came and provided hands-on wildlife activities. Telesco demonstrated the latest technology for discouraging nuisance bears, including a new bear-proof trash can design, electric fencing and an unwelcome mat. There were lots of craft booths and several choices of cuisine. Music was provided by Brian Bowen and King Cotton. As always, a highlight of the gathering was the procession of the species, when several dozen participants paraded through the park displaying a collection of hand-crafted animal masks. To see a gallery of the Black Bear Festival visit www.apalachtimes.com Black bear crashes Carrabelle festival On Saturday, seven sloops fashioned from discarded articles and foraged otsam competed for awards in the rst ever Whatever Floats Your Boat Regatta, at the Florida State University Coastal and Marine Laboratory. The only requirement was that the vessels be cobbled together from recycled goods. Mary Balthrop, a spokesperson for the event, said none of the fanciful otilla actually sank during the crossing of the canal adjacent to the lab, but the Palletdrome sailing under Capt. Marjorie Reviver Turnbull won the Titanic Award for the most spectacular failure. In the words of the judges, the Palletdrome entered the competition as a ne vessel and left as a mere shadow of herself. First to complete the crossing was the very seaworthy FLO created and crewed by Boy Scout Troop 8 from Crawfordville. FLO was composed of tree branches and scrap lumber lashed to empty plastic barrels. Ninjas astride a giant plastic turtle stuffed with bottles and anything that would oat won the prize for most creative use of materials. The S.S. Turtle, with Dayma Wasmund at the helm, was the creation of the FSU Aquatic Environmental Sciences Department. Best costume award went to Co-Captains Jack and Bridget Martin aboard Miss Marys Nemesis. Paddling enthusiast Katy Herzog of Carrabelle took the Peoples Choice prize for the HMS Carrabelle, a kayak constructed of aluminum beer cans. Balthrop estimated 150 people attended, not including boaters in the regatta, and promised a bigger, better event next year. Food was available from Poseys of Panacea and there was music by the New 76ers. Judges for this years event were Administrative Law Judge David Maloney, Mike Marshall from Marshalls berglass in Carrabelle, Michelle Gardner of FSU Human Resources, Jim Muller, environmental attorney at Muller and Associates and chairman of the marine labs board of trustees. By Lois Swoboda Nobody sank in rst ever recycling regatta By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star .com When Jim Bachrach of Apalachicolas Main Street program came to me and asked for a list of native plants to be used in the downtown streetscape, I was delighted to hear that the committee had pledged to install environmentally friendly plantings downtown. Thus I was equally disappointed when I saw the choice of plant material on Avenue E. Those little pink owers are Mexican petunia (Ruellia brittoniana), a native of Mexico. It is listed by the Florida Exotic Pest Plant Council as a Class One invasive and known to be especially aggressive in wetlands. It alters native plant communities by displacing native species and changing community structures or ecological functions. In other words, Mexican petunia invades wetlands and displaces native species. Its invasiveness is enhanced by its fast growth, proli c production of seeds, and an extensive root system. Now the Main Street committee is not the rst to introduce this bad actor into our local ecosystem. The blue form is running rampant in the alleys of the historic district already. But Main Streets use of Ruella in their downtown planting shows a disregard for environmental issues and ignorance of what sort of plant would be desirable in a planting on a river bank. Anything planted in our downtown is guaranteed to spread to surrounding wetlands. The Main Street Committee had an opportunity to do the right thing and set an example for the rest of the community by making the effort to use native plants. Sadly they chose not to do so. BUDS N BUGS: MEXICAN PETUNIA BUDS N BUGS Lois Swoboda PHOTOS BY LOIS SWOBODA | The Times FWC intern Robert Wiwi introduces Charity Larkin (wearing the bear mask) to Scooter, a female gopher tortoise. Allee Pritchard and Michael Justin Humphries created rainbow bears in the activity tent. Scout Troop 8 aboard the FLO PHOTOS BY LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Palletdrome winner of the Titanic Award SPONSORED BY Freshwater Inshore Flounder continue to be the hot ticket right now around St. Joe Bay and on most coastal waters. Goerge Tapper Bridge has had good reports of doormat flounder and slot sized red fish this week. The Mexico Beach canal is also a good place to get your limit of flounder from shore. Lakes and creeks are starting to reports on good freshwater fishing. Lake Wimico has had mixed reports of bass and bream this week, but not much to brag about. Good catfishing and bream are holding good in Howard Creek and the Brothers.

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CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA SP O RTS www.apalachtimes.com A Section CITY OF APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA PUBLIC NOTICE NEW THREE-WAY AND FOUR-WAY STOPS In the continued interest of public safety for our citizens and visitors, the City of Apalachicola will be Please take note of these changes and be prepared for additional required stops in your travel pattern Bay Avenue and 8 th Bay Avenue and 11 th 11 th 17 th 18 th 22 nd 22 nd Avenue and Bobby Cato 25 th Avenue and Bobby Cato 25 th 8 th 10 th 16 th 17 th 22 nd 22 nd 23 rd 24 th Avenue and Bobby Cato 24 th 24 th 24 th Avenue and 12 th 850-653-9319 or Bobby Varnes, Chief of Police at 850-653-9755. Page 9 Thursday, October 11, 2012 Franklin Countys youth football program got underway last month with the jamboree Sept. 29 in Blountstown. The Tiny Mites, for boys ages 7, 8 and 9, took on Wewahitchka for one half of play, and engineered a 12-6 victory. Brock Johnson, who coaches the team together with Byron Blan and Kelvin Martin, said the team had two offensive series and scored both times. Lamarius Martin scored on a 50-yard touchdown run, and Caden Turrell sprinted into the endzone on a 70-yard run. On Saturday, the two dozen young football players again traveled to Blountstown, this time to take on the budding Tigers in the season opener. Johnson said the team lost 34-14 to Blountstown. The up-and-coming Seahawks scored when Caden Turrell broke loose for a 55-yard touchdown run, and when Martin threw a 65-yard touchdown strike to Jarvis Turrell. We fumbled the ball too many times, said Johnson. Other than that we played good. For the Pee Wee bracket, for boys age 10, 11 and 12, Franklin County found victory in the jamboree, when they blanked Port St. Joe 14-0 on the strength of two touchdown runs by Ethan Riley in the one half of play.. Brad Segree, assistant to head coach Matt Kelley, said the team met defeat Saturday on opening day at Blountstown, when they were shut out 15-0. We got down inside the red zone, and one time inside the 5yard-line, and but we couldnt punch it through, said Segree. Both teams play Saturday in Chattahoochee. The teams are under the auspices of Franklin County Parks and Recreation. By David Adlerstein By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com Port St. Joe found success in the air Friday night to complement a steady running game, as they downed Franklin County 56-14. Holding a 14-7 lead after the rst quarter, freshman quarterback Troy Williams threw two scoring strikes to junior running back Natron Lee, a 25-yarder and a 60yarder, in the space of ve minutes in the second quarter to break the game open. In between the two aerial scores, Williams rushed for a touchdown, running it in from the one with four minutes left in the second quarter. In all, Williams connected on six-of eight for the night, for 157 yards, We threw the ball a little bit better tonight and the deal there is if were able to throw the ball a little bit, that will help us down the stretch and open up the running game, said Port St. Joe Coach Chuck Gannon, whose team went to 3-2 on the year and 1-1 in the league. The Tiger Shark running game didnt need much opening up against the Seahawks, as sophomore running back Jarkice Davis, posted two early rushing touchdowns of 11 and four yards, to give Port St. Joe a 14-0 lead, with three minutes left in the rst quarter. Right before the half, Davis ran in from 27 yards out, for his third touchdown, and a 42-14 Tiger Shark halftime lead. Davis carried the ball 12 times for 139 yards, and helped the cause on defense with his fourth and nal touchdown, scooping up a Seahawk fumble from his linebacker position and running it 26 yards into the endzone early in the third quarter, for a 49-14 lead. The eighth and nal Port St. Joe touchdown came with 10 minutes left in the game, when senior Corey North ran the ball 45 yards up the middle. Junior kicker Justin Hites connected on seven-ofeight extra points, with one blocked. Franklin County looked to make a game of it in the early stages, as junior Dwayne Griggs had a 10yard touchdown run with 25 seconds left in the rst quarter. Griggs, who is a cousin to Davis, with both sporting #1 on their jerseys, brought the Seahawks within six points 20-14 with an 80-yard touchdown tear midway through the second quarter. We gave the Griggs kid too much space, said Gannon. Hes a good runner and we just gave him too much space, but he made some good moves also. Griggs was saddled with an ankle injury for several minutes late in the game, and senior Skyler Hutchinson had two teeth damaged early on, all evidence of what was a tough physical performance all night by Port. St. Joe. Were getting better at it, said Gannon. We got to get stronger in the weight room and we have to play St. Joe football from the past, and that was coming in and stick you for four quarters. And thats what we did and thats what weve been stressing all year. Highlighting halftime was the sixth annual crowning of the Mr. and Miss Franklin County High School, the most coveted title bestowed upon a senior, elected by the student body for who they feel best embodies the spirit of the high school. When considering candidates, the students consider academics, character, leadership, athletics and school spirit. To handle the crowning duties, last years homecoming queen Emerald Norris, lled in for last years Miss FCHS, Adreenah Wynn, who is enrolled at the University of Florida. Tressie Buffkin crowned Mr. FCHS on behalf of her brother Chance Buffkin, last years recipient, who is presently in the Army. Selected Miss FCHS was Katie Wood, accompanied by her parents, Charlie and Jeanine Wood, of Carrabelle. She is the granddaughter of Donald and Sandra Wood of Crawfordville, and J.T. and the late Velma Boatwright, of Eastpoint. Active at school, including serving as vice president of the senior class, Wood plans to major in English and literature at a university. Selected Mr. FCHS was Zach Howze, accompanied by his mother and stepfather, Stephanie and Lee Jones, and in spirit by his father, the late William Meador. Howze is active in school, including serving as second vice president of the senior class, and is a student-athlete as well, a member of the football, soccer and baseball teams. He plans to major in sports training at the University of West Florida. The Seahawks, now 15, will not play this Friday night, since Bell, which was set to host Franklin County, has decided to cancel this game. The Seahawks are next up on Oct. 19, when they host West Gadsden for homecoming. A new day dawned Saturday for Franklin County soccer as the countywide league had its debut. League President Betty Sasnett said there are a dozen teams in the league, 10 from Apalachicola, an under-8 team from Eastpoint, and an under-6 team from Carrabelle. The younger teams will play their games mostly in the county, although the older teams have some dates in Gulf County with Port St. Joe, part of the league that the Franklin County teams spun off of. Teams this year, and their coaches, are for under-6, Harrison Bail Bond, coach Allen Millender; Ace Hardware, coach Lloyd Alford; and Best Western, coach Brad Blackburn; and under-8, Marks Insurance, coach Caleb Kembro; Ace Hardware, coach Isaac Diaz; and Five Star Home Repair, coached by the only female skipper, Shelby Lipscomb, pictured below. Teams in the under-10 division are Journeys of SGI, coach Clint Taylor, and Blue Parrot, coach Thomas Noffsinger; in the under-12 division, Ace Hardware, coach Richard Herrington, and Shaun Donahoe Real Estate, coach Craig Hicks; and in the under-14 division, Cates Electric, coach Greg Sasnett, and Harry As Restaurant, coach Stacy Kirvin. In photo above, players for the Apalachicola Ace Hardware under-8 team, in black, battle against the Marks Insurance team, in red. By David Adlerstein New soccer league begins play Future Seahawks hit the gridiron PHOTOS BY PHIL COALE | Special to the Times Franklin Countys Pee Wee quarterback Ethan Riley runs away from Blountstowns Cain Miller. Lamarius Martin, quarterback for the Franklin County Tiny Mites, front, runs away from Blountstowns John Thompson, left, as Franklin Countys Gabriel Lowry, right, attempts to block. DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times SHELBY LIPSCOMB Five Star Home Repair Coach Port St. Joe football team rolls past Seahawks DAVID ADLERSTEIN | the Times Mr. and Miss Franklin County High School Zach Howze and Katie Wood.

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Local A10 | The Times Thursday, October 11, 2012 to expedite review of a possible plan to dredge the Eastpoint channel, but funding from the Army Corps of Engineers remains uncertain. Were not worried about the channel right now, Harts eld said. Were focusing on whats in hand. Were worried about this bay right now. He said the governor asked Jackel to send him a letter with a map about all that was talked about. He pretty well told us that theres nothing in his power to get us some fresh water, but he would lobby the Corps and he would support us, Harts eld said. The resource fair, the second in less than a month, assisted several hundred residents. The governor announced that a National Emergency Grant from the U.S. Department of Labor will provide more than $250,000 to hire dislocated shermen as workers to help the county with traditional recovery efforts. During his visit, Scott toured the Department of Economic Opportunitys Mobile One-Stop Unit, which provides employment, reemployment and Re-employment Assistance Program services. DEO helped coordinate a food drive with state agencies to help impacted residents, and the rst batch of food was delivered the day of the governors visit. Farm Share provided 42,000 pounds of food, everything from donated beans, yogurt, soup, condiments to soft drinks, for more than 500 distressed families. Property Appraiser Doris Pendleton, Emergency Management Director Pam Brownell, Parks and Recreation Director Nikki Millender and Tony Shiver, candidate for county commissioner, were among those helping to unload the tractor trailer truck into a queue of cars and trucks. At one point Scott even pitched in, helping to load a few vehicles. We were thrilled that Gov. Scott came and handed out Farm Share food to the individuals who were driving through getting cases of basic food for their families, said Farm Share Founder and Chairman Patricia Robbins. We look forward to the governors continued support of food for the people of Franklin County through the Farm Share program. We will be doing a weekly food distribution there until things improve for our shermen. Farm Share also set aside food to be distributed later to shermen out on their boats and unable to attend. Scott spoke to residents about other needs as well, at one point summoning Bobby Pickels, community relations manager for Progress Energy, to talk with Catherine Shiver about her light bill. If there is any sign that needs to be publicized in Franklin County, its Help, Shiver told Pickels. Pickels said the company has an ongoing partnership with St. Patrick Catholic Church, and through the Progress Energy Foundation, plans to make an additional $10,000 contribution this year. Thats not going to solve everybodys problem, Pickels told Shiver. Were going to try as hard as we can within the structure that we have, to work with customers. He asked that customers in need of help contact the company before their lights are shut off, or it is much more dif cult to help. I dont want false hopes, sir. Please dont give us that, Shiver said. Do you all have little Cliff Notes that have the different counties and the different problems they are going through at the time? Like, lets say, New Orleans and ooding, and then Franklin county and the oystermen, do you all have little side notes that say these people are struggling? Because Im sure they hear these stories when the light bills come due, she said. I am sure they are hearing some stories and theyre true. Some of these people dont understand that. Theyve never had their lights cut off, and thats the hard part. At the tail end of his visit, Scott, anked by Montford, Jackel DEO Executive Director Hunting F. Deutsch and DCF Secretary David Wilkins, answered questions from the press. Florida is working with the Army Corps for a longterm plan to address the needs of Franklin County, while also helping to address short-term needs through worker training and food banks, Scott said. The Apalachicola Bay is critical to the state of Florida. It is home to the worlds best oysters and sheries, and the hardworking residents here rely on the bay to provide for their families. State agencies and community organizations are coming together to ensure families in this area can get back on their feet quickly. These are individuals that dont want a government handout, they want to be helped, he said. Theres not one person I talked to that said, I want to become dependent on government. They want to be able to get a job. Theyre struggling right now. Scott said the court decisions have not gone our way in the so-called water wars court case. He said Corps of cials told him their hands are tied by a congressional mandate. Weve got to make sure we get their mandate changed, Scott said. Its going to be incumbent on all of us involved to call on the Corps of Engineers to do the right thing. We have a great seafood industry in our state. Its a major part of our state, just like agriculture and cattle, he said. Were going to make sure that we continue to have a good commercial seafood operation in our state and a good recreational seafood operation. Montford underscored the gravity of the situation. These are serious issues, and one that needs to be addressed immediately. Its going to require immediate help and long-term planning, and the best way is through economic development. In the meantime, we need to provide food on the table. Jackel thanked the governor for his visit. We just appreciate the governor being in Franklin County today, she said. We know hes very busy, and we know Franklin County matters to the governor. Its a great shot in the arm. Stan Trappe ATTORNEY AT LAW Foreclosure Defense Bankruptcy Asset Protection Real Estate Probate ~ Wills Admitted to Practice Law in Florida Since 1974 Let Me Help You 850-769-6139 236 McKenzie Avenue Panama City, FL *VOTER INFORMATION* ***GENERAL ELECTION NOVEMBER 6, 2012*** **Sample Ballots will be mailed to EVERY voter** You should begin to receive your sample ballot in the mail beginning this week. There will be 3 federal races, 3 state races, 2 local district races, 7 retention of justices and judges races, 1 circuit judge race and 11 amendments on the ballot. In order to prevent long lines, we encourage every voter to bring his or her marked SAMPLE BALLOT when you come to vote to assist in the voting process. If you wait until you go to vote, it will take you a while to read through the ballot and mark your vote thus causing delays **ABSENTEE VOTING (Voting by Mail)** *ABSENTEES ARE NOW AVAILIBLE* The ballot is 19 and contains 11 Amendments which are very lengthy. or go to our website at www.votefranklin.com and click the Request Absentee tab. October 31, 2012 Deadline for Supervisors to receive request for absentee ballots to be mailed for the General Election. November 1, 2012 the General Election (Designee may pick up no more than two absentee ballots and must have written authorization from the voter). **LOGIC & ACCURACY TEST** **EARLY VOTING** October 27th November 3rd Saturdays & Sunday: 8:30a.m. 2:30 p.m. Monday Friday: 8:30 a.m. 5:30 p.m. Due to a change in the law, early voting for the General Election will only be conducted for eight days prior to election day. Remember, there will be no early voting the Sunday and Monday before the election. You will have to vote an absentee ballot or wait and go to the polls on election day. REMEMBER VOTE BY MAIL, VOTE EARLY OR VOTE AT THE POLLS NO EXCUSES, Florida Law Requires Photo Signature ID When Voting or You Must Vote a Provisional Ballot. Franklin County Supervisor of Elections Ida Cooper Elliott (850) 653-9520, fax (850) 653-9092 icelliott@votefranklin.com www.votefranklin.com FRANKLIN COUNTY DEPARTMENT OF 210 State Road 65 FRANKLIN COUNTY SOLID WASTE & RECYCLING WINTER HOURS. MONDAY FRIDAY 9AM 4:30PM dbutler@coastalcoverage.com Locally owned and operated Home Business Auto Health Workers Comp SCOTT from page A1 PHOTOS BY DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times At top, Gov. Rick Scott, left, greets State Sen. Bill Montford and County Commissioner Pinki Jackel. Above, Lori Switzer, left, and Property Appraiser Doris Pendleton bag Farm Share canned goods at the resource fair.

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The Times | A11 Thursday, October 11, 2012 Lanark woman killed in Taylor County crash A prominent member of the Lanark Village community was killed Monday afternoon in a one-car accident in Taylor County. Sharon H. Thoman, 67, a former president of the board of the Lanark Village Water and Sewer District, died after her car ran off the road around 12:10 p.m. as it was headed westbound on U.S. 98, a little more than one mile west of County Road 647. Thoman was a staffer at the Florida State University Coastal and Marine Lab at Alligator Point. According to the report led by Florida Highway Patrol crash investigator, Sgt, Aaron Stephens, and homicide investigator Cpl. Scotty Lolley, Thomans vehicle exited the roadway to the north shoulder, and she tried to correct by steering to the left, and then overcorrected to the right and lost control of the 2006 Kia Sorrento. The report said the vehicle overturned an unknown number of times and entered a waterlled ditch, where it came to rest facing southeast on its roof, with Thoman trapped inside, underwater. When they arrived, the state troopers found the vehicle facing north, upright, on the north shoulder, because it was moved by Taylor County Fire and Rescue. Thoman was taken to Doctors Memorial Hospital in Perry, and pronounced dead. The report said Thoman was wearing her seatbelt, and that alcohol tests are pending. Carrabelle woman charged with DUI manslaughter A 23-year-old Carrabelle woman has been charged with DUI manslaughter in connection with an April 17 crash in Carrabelle that killed the son of Sopchoppy Mayor Colleen Skipper. Rebecca Padowitz, 23, was arrested on Oct. 4 by Franklin County sheriffs deputies. Crash reports showed Padowitzs blood alcohol level was 0.17, more than twice the legal limit the day of the crash, which was her 23rd birthday. The Florida Highway Patrol reported that a 2001 Jeep Grand Cherokee driven by Padowitz spun out on a curve on U.S. 98 near Lake Morality Road, ipped over, struck a tree and caught re. Rona Hawkins, Jr., 28, was thrown from the car and killed. Padowitz sustained serious injuries and was treated at Tallahassee Memorial Hospital. Julian Collins, a second passenger, was wearing a seat belt, and did not sustain injuries. County retains lawyer in shing pier case Franklin County commissioners have voted to retain outside counsel as they seek to make sure the county is compensated for damages to the St. George Island shing bridge that occurred June 28 during Tropical Storm Debby. The commissioners voted unanimously Oct. 2 to hire Robert Dees, certi ed by the Florida Bar in maritime and admiralty law. County Attorney Michael Shuler said Dees had agreed to receive $200 an hour, less than his customary hourly rate of $300 an hour. Dees services will become necessary in the event that the countys insurance carrier denies coverage and payment is sought from Progress Energy or its subcontractor for the damages, caused when a barge smashed into the pier. Greg Preble, from the Preble-Rish engineering rm, shared a proposal at the meeting to repair the165foot gap in the pier and the broken pilings and dangling pipes and cables. He said equipment from the barge fell into the water, along with three concrete sections of the bridge, creating a potential liability for the county. He said it is so far too expensive to send divers to inspect the situation below the water, but he believed the heavy bridge decking may have damaged remaining pilings below the water line. Preble said the project would require a budget of about $900,000, comprising a 16-foot wide timber pier superstructure on concrete pilings, capable of withstanding pedestrians, emergency vehicles and new storms, for $600,000, another $200,000 for debris removal and an additional $100,000 in case further damage is detected. The debris would be removed to make way for new pilings, and placed on top of the existing debris site in the water, rather than hauled offshore. Preble estimated the project would take eight months assuming no regulatory delays, half of that spent in construction, and would be completed by June 1, 2013. The commissioners voted to take the funds out of the $1.66 million in the bridge fund, which was set up by the state after it built the new bridge a decade ago. Shuler cautioned the commissioners that recouping the money is not necessarily a sure thing. There are no guarantees, he said. Keep expectations reasonable. The following report is provided by the Franklin County Sheriffs Of ce. Arrests in this report were made by of cers from the Carrabelle Police Department (CPD) and the Franklin County Sheriffs Of ce (FCSO). All defendants are to be considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law. Oct. 2 Phillip McElravey, 31, no reported address, grand retail theft and burglary of a dwelling (FCSO) Shannon L. Bunn, 25, Apalachicola, failure to appear (FCSO) Oct. 3 Albert E. Smythe, II, 41, Lanark Village, taking of a threatened species, tampering with physical evidence and false report to a law enforcement of cer (FCSO) Shanese J. Pritchard, 28, Eastpoint, felony passing worthless bank checks and violation of probation (FCSO) Oct. 4 Catherine M. Terrell, 52, Apalachicola, Leon County warrant for violation of probation (FCSO) Rebecca Padowitz, 23, Carrabelle, manslaughter by DUI (FCSO) Oct. 5 Xaviera M. Rutherford, 30, Tallahassee, withholding child support (FCSO) Homero Guerrero-Estrada, 25, Murfreesboro, Tenn., no valid drivers license (CPD) Oct. 6 Eric A. Tatum, 32, Carrabelle, disorderly intoxication and battery (FCSO) Oct. 7 Patricia N. Kennedy, 35, Lanark Village, DUI (CPD) David D. Hartman, 34, Eastpoint, violation of probation (FCSO) Jamie Z. Godinez, 26, Apalachicola, habitual driving while license revoked (FCSO) Willie E. Pelt, 30, Port St. Joe, domestic battery and violation of repeat violence injunction (FCSO) Trades & Services GET YOUR AD IN 653-8868 Trades & Services Laban Bontrager, DMD Monica Bontrager, DMD 12761 Pea Ridge Road Bristol, Florida 32321 TELEPHONE (850) 643-5417 Bristol Dental Clinic DENTURE LAB ON PREMISES Same Day Service on Repairs and Relines Don Lively General Contractors L ICENSED AND I NSURED 20 Y EARS E XPERIENCE P .O. Box 439 C arrabelle, FL 32322 697-2783 or Mobile 566-2603 RC 0066499 R G0065255 Carrabelle Visa, Discover, and American Express Honored at Participating Ace Stores JACKSONS Building Supplies Building Supplies & Auto Repair Carrabelle 697-3333 We Deliver Anywhere Hardware and Paint Center J.J.s Tree Service, LLC Stump Grinder Licensed & Insured Call John : (850) 899-8432 ROBERTS APPLIANCE REPAIR ALL MAJOR BRANDS 18 Shadow Lane Apalachicola, FL 32320 Phone: (850) 653-8122 Cell: (850) 653-7654 From A to Z PO Box 364 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 850-340-0756 Gregs Handyman Service & Lawn Maintenance BILL MILLER REALTY 850-697-3751 (3310) 570-0658 400 + COMM. U.S. 98 & GULF ADJ. TO LANARK MARINA 850K $29,500 $2,500 D O W N B UYS 2 B ED AP T 2 6 OR RENT $500/MTH 2 B/R 1 BTH GULF VIE W HOME W/ F AMILY R OOM $70,000 GULFVIE W & ACCESS 3 BDR 2 BA 2006 M/H 89K 2 LG. SHADY LOTS 3 SHEDS 400 TO MARINA-CITY W ATER49K MIH 2 C RNR LOTS BLK. $ S TORE REDUCED $49,500 2 AC-AT RIVER UTIL. IN -$39,500 COLLINS CONSTRU C TION OF ST. GEOR G E I S LAND, INC & S EWA G E TREATMENT S ERV I CE S O VER 30 YEARS EXPERIEN C E OUR S ERV I CE S I NCLUDE: AFTER HOURS & EMERGEN C Y SERVI C E PROVIDED 850.670.5790 MA I NTENANCE@JCOLL I N S CON S TRUCT I ON.COM Robert C. Bruner Attorney Personal & Business Bankruptcy Over 30 Years Legal Experience 850-670-3030 bankruptcy relief under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon advertisements. Before you decide, ask us to send you free written information Arrest REPORT Law Enforcement BRIEFS Law Enforcement

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A12| The Times Thursday, October 11, 2012 CLASSIFIEDS 48 FEET-LONG / 96 INCHES WIDESIDE-DOOR / 2 BACK DOORS DUCT FLOORS $3,500 EACHCONTACT: C.E. MILLERS FREIGHTYARD EASTPOINT, FL (850)653-7816 -OR(850)670-8707 UTILITY INSULATED TRAILERS RENTALS1 BEDROOM, 1 BATH UNFURNISHED APT LANARK, REMODELED, INC WATER .................$425 2 BR, 1 BATH UNFURNISHED APT W/D HOOKUP, SMALL PORCH ..........................$375 1 BEDROOM, 1 BATH FURNISHED CONDO INCLUDES UTILITIES, MARINA .........................$910 3 BEDROOM, 2 BATH FURNISHED HOUSE ON RIVER, DOCK ..............................................$1000 3 BEDROOM 1 BATH DUPLEX UNFURNISHED, CARRABELLE ............................$600 3 BEDROOM 1 BATH END UNIT, W/D, WATER INCLUDED, UNFURNISHED .................$565 2 BR 1 BATH UNFURNISHED HOUSE FENCED YARD ......................................................$800 OFFICE SPACE US 98 CARRABELLE ........................................................$500 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322850-697-9604 850-323-0444 www.seacrestre.comwww. rst tness.com/carrabellePROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND RENTALS These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you. EmeraldCoast Marketplace 747-5020 Apalachicola 1Br/1Ba quiet, 2 blks from boat ramp, $600mo + first, last & dep. 850-570-9176 Text FL25130 to 56654 Apalachicola: 1 br, 1 ba efficiency Call for information 850-653-6103 Text FL5175 to 56654 St. GeorgeIsland $175/wk, elec, satellite, garbage incl. Pool tbl. 12’ X 65’ deck. Beautiful view! 850-653-5319 St. George Island 2Br, 1Ba, ground floor apt. Furnished or unfurnished, 12’ x 65’ Deck. $275/wk, 850-653-5319 1 BR, CottageH/AC in Apalachicola, Florida. 850-643-7740 Apalachicola, House for rent, Bay City Rd, Call 850-653-8965 or 850-323-1990 Carabelle: 3 bdr 2 bath with large spare room on 1 acre. Fenced yard, new tile throughout, freshly painted. $800 per month + dep. Call (850) 766-4357 Text FL26851 to 56654 Carrabelle 3 br, 2 ba all tile floors, newly remodeled inside All new appliances and heat pump. $750 per month + deposit 850-697-4080 or 850591-5899 For Sale By Owner3BR/1BA home in Sumatra on Hwy 65 Newly remodeled. $59,000. Call (850) 670-8135 for details.Text FL24247 to 56654 Apalachicola Lots Block 177 Lot 6, $29,500 Block 150 Lot 4 $25,500 Call 850-597-0217 LOW INTERESTFINANCING Borrow up to 20k and pay $389.00 per mo. at 8% Car Loans, Small Business Loans & Debt Consolidation Bad Credit Ok Call Toll Free: 888-741-9122 Today!! Estate SaleApalachicola : 143 Magnolia Ln (Old Pogey Plant) Friday and Saturday, October 12th and 13th from 9am til ??? Port St. Joe : 506 8th St. Friday and Saturday October 12 & 13th from 8am til 4pm; Handcarved fishing lures, All kinds of Tools, and Lots more Items! GUN SHOWSanta Rosa County Auditorium, Milton, FL. Oct.20th & 21st 9am -5pm. Call (850) 957-4952 or (850) 261-8407 General Admission, $6Text FL26461 to 56654 NOW OPENMerchandise Liquidation Store, In Hickory Plaza Shopping Center, 414 S. Tyndall Parkway, Open 9-6 Daily, Closed Sundays 89961T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 08-000364-CA U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, SUCCESSOR TRUSTEE TO BANK OF AMERICA N.A. (SUCCESSOR TO LASALLE BANK N.A.), AS TRUSTEE, ON BEHALF OF THE HOLDERS OF THE THORNBURG MORTGAGE SECURITIES TRUST 2005-3 MORTGAGE LOAN PASSTHROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-3, Plaintiff, vs. JEFFREY S. GALLOWAY a/k/a JEFFREY GALLOWAY a/k/a JEFF GALLOWAY; RBC BANK (USA) f/k/a RBC CENTURA BANK; REGIONS BANK; SCHOONER LANDING HOME OWNERS’ ASSOCIATION, INC. Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE is hereby given that the undersigned, Marcia Johnson, Clerk of the Circuit Court of Franklin County, Florida, will on the 24th day of October, 2011, at 11:00 o’clock A.M., EST, in the Civil Division of the Franklin County Clerk’s Office, Main Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida in accordance with Chapter 45, FS., offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash, the following described property situated in Franklin County, Florida, to wit: Lot 2, SCHOONER LANDING PHASE 1, according to the Plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 6, Page 5, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida pursuant to the Consent Final Judgment entered in a case pending in said Court, the style and case number of which is set forth above. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the office of Sirote & Permutt, 1115 E. Gonzalez Street, Pensacola, Florida 32503, (850) 462-1500, within two (2) working days of your receipt of this Notice of Foreclosure Sale; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 1-800-955-8771. WITNESS my hand and official seal of this Honorable Court, this 21st day of September, 2011. MARCIA JOHNSON Clerk of the Circuit Court of Franklin County, Florida By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk Submitted By: Sirote & Permutt, PC Attorneys for Plaintiff 1115 E. Gonzalez St. Pensacola, FL 32503 850-462-1500 Fax: 850-462-1599 September 4, 11, 2012 89993 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION CASE NO.: 12-55-CP IN RE: ESTATE OF VIRGIE L. REED Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of VIRGIE L. REED, deceased, whose date of death was August 15, 2012, is pending in the Circuit Court for Franklin County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida 32320. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representa-tive’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court, WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE OF THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate, must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS TIME NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is October 4, 2012. Personal Representative: BRIAN HARDY P.O. BOX 612 Carrabelle, FL 32322 Attorney for Personal Representative: Steve M. Watkins, III 41 Commerce Street Apalachicola, FL 32320 (850) 653-1949 Fla Bar No.: 0794996 October 4, 11, 2012 89963T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION Case No.: 12-52-CP IN RE: ESTATE OF HERMAN SCHOL Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of HERMAN SCHOL, deceased, File Number 12-52-CP, is pending in the Circuit Court for Franklin County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida 32320. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, on whom a copy of this notice is served must file their claims with the Court WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTIONS 733.702 AND 733.710, OR BE FOREVER BARRED. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 AND 733.710. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is October 4, 2012. Personal Representative: ROBERT SCHOL 100492 CR 32 Minature, NB 69356 Attorney for Personal Representative: Steve M. Watkins, III 41 Commerce Street Apalachicola, FL 32320 (850) 653-1949 Fla Bar No.: 0794996 October 4, 11, 2012 90033T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 19-2008-CA-000269 DIVISION: BANK OF AMERICA, N. A., Plaintiff, vs. REX H. ANDERSON et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated September 10, 2012 and entered in Case NO. 19-2008-CA000269 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for FRANKLIN County, Florida wherein BANK OF AMERICA, N. A., is the Plaintiff and REX H. ANDERSON; ANNE ANDERSON; KELLY’S LANDING HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC.; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at FRONT DOOR OF THE FRANKLIN COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 33 MARKET STREET, APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA at 11:00AM, on the 24th day of October, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT 2 OF KELLY’S LANDING, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 9 AT PAGE 4 OF THE OFFICIAL RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A XXX MILL ROAD, CARRABELLE, FL 32322 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on September 11, 2012. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Mr. Doug Smith, Office of Court Administration Leon County Courthouse, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301, Phone: 850577-4401, Fax: 850487-7947. F08037886 October 4, 11, 2012 90053T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 2012-CA-262 CENTENNIAL BANK, an Arkansas banking corporation Plaintiff, vs. JEFFERY A. STRICKLAND, RED TOP CAFE, INC., and UNITED STATES SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE Notice is hereby given that pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure, the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Franklin County, Florida, will on November 7th, 2012, at 11:00 a.m. (Eastern Time) at the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida 32320, in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes offer for sale, and sell to the highest and best bidder, the following described real and property situated in Franklin County, Florida: THAT PART OF LOT ONE (1) AND THAT PART OF LOT TWO (2) AS DESCRIBED BELOW, AND ALL OF LOT THREE (3) OF BLOCK 4, OF THE NEEL’S ADDITION TO THE CITY OF APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF ON FILE IN THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. EXCEPTING THEREFROM THAT PORTION OF LOTS TWO (2) AND THREE (3) PREVIOUSLY CONVEYED FOR RIGHT OF WAY FOR STATE ROAD NUMBER 30 (OLD NUMBER 10) AND ALSO KNOWN AS U.S. NUMBER 98. DESCRIPTION OF PARTIAL LOTS 1 AND 2: LOT ONE (1): ALL OF THAT PORTION LYING NORTH OF A LINE BEGINNING AT A POINT ON THE WEST PROPERTY LINE 82.0 FEET NORTH OF AN IRON PIPE MARKING THE SW CORNER OF LOT 1 AT THE INTERSECTION OF CENTER AND CHESTNUT STREETS AND RUNNING EASTERLY FOR A DISTANCE OF 92.4 FEET TO A POINT ENDING AT AN INTERSECTION 90.0 FEET FROM AND PERPENDICULAR TO THE WEST PROPERTY LINE AND 82.0 FEET FROM THE SOUTH PROPERTY LINE RUNNING PARALLEL TO THE WEST PROPERTY LINE AND ALSO INTERSECTING ON THE NE/SW CENTERLINE OF THE ABANDONED ALLEY. LOT TWO (2): ALL OF THAT PORTION LYING NORTH AND WEST OF A LINE BEGINNING AT THE PREVIOUSLY DESCRIBED ENDING POINT AND RUNNING NORTH AND PARALLEL TO THE WEST PROPERTY LINE A DISTANCE OF 28.7 FEET TO A POINT 36.0 FEET FROM A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE INTERSECTION OF LOTS 2 AND 3, THENCE RUNNING EASTERLY FOR A DISTANCE OF 36.0 FEET TO SAID MONUMENT. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim with the clerk of the court within 60 days after the sale. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Franklin County Clerk of Court, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL (850) 653-8861 at least 7 days before the scheduled foreclosure sale, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. WITNESS my hand and the official seal of this Honorable Court this 25th day of September, 2012. MARCIA JOHNSON Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk October 4, 11, 2012 90167T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No. 2011-000423-CA THE CARRABELLE BOAT CLUB ASSOCIATION, INC., a Florida non-profit corporation, Plaintiff, vs. STEVEN R. MACCHIARELLA and WOODWARD DEVELOPMENT, INC., Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION To: STEVEN R. MACCHIARELLA and WOODWARD DEVELOPMENT, INC., YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a claim of lien for assessments pursuant to Article 13 of the Declaration of Condominium for The Carrabelle Boat Club Association, Inc., a commercial condominium, recorded in Official Record Book 888, Page 552, et seq. of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida on the following real property in FRANKLIN County, Florida: Unit Number B-318 of that certain condominium of The Carrabelle Boat Club Association, Inc., a/k/a, The Carrabelle Boat Club Boathouse, and the undivided interest in the Common elements appurtenant thereto, in accordance with and subject to the Declaration of Condominium for the Carrabelle Boat Club Association, Inc., a Commercial Condominium recorded in official Records Book 888, Page 552-630 of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Barbara Sanders, Sanders and Duncan, P.A., the plaintiff’s attorney, whose address is P.O. Box 157, Apalachicola, Florida 32320, on or before 30 days of the last date of publication, and file the original with the clerk of this Court, MARCIA JOHNSON, Franklin County Clerk of Court, Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida 32320, either before service on the plaintiff’s attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. DATED this 3rd day of October, 2012. MARCIA M. JOHNSON As Clerk of the Court By: Terry E. Creamer As Deputy Clerk October 11,18, 2012 Franklin CountyLiquor License$165,000. Serious inquires/offers only at: anitalln242@aol.com Adopt *: Active young TV Producer & Attorney, home-cooking, beaches, sports await precious baby. Expenses paid *FLBar42311* *800-552-0045* Adopt *: Actor & Filmmaker, LOVE Awaits first baby. Matt & Kristi *Expenses paid* *FLBar42311* *800-552-0045* YORKIEAKC registered. 12 weeks old adorable puppy only 1 female left. Health Certified & 1st shots. $400. Please call 850-774-1229 Panama City Area Port St. Joe: 1017 Marvin Ave. October 11th -13th Thursday SaturdayHuge Yard SaleToo much to list!

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, October 11, 2012 The Times | A13 emeraldcoastjobs.com Employment Today By PETER VOGTMonster Senior Contributing Writer Every time youre on break from school, someone hits you with that most common question asked of college students: Whats your major?Ž For months, youve been able to get away with responses like Im not sure,Ž or Im keeping my options open.Ž But now „ thanks to your schools academic rules, your parents incessant nagging or even your own impatience „ youre forced to make a choice, and you dont know what to do. Thousands of college students around the country go through the same anxiety-producing experience every year, often around mid-semester when they have to choose their courses for the following semester (and theyve already taken all their general or core courses). Are you in the I have to pick a major „ now what?Ž mode? If so, dont panic. If youre like many college students, the major you select wont have a huge impact on your future career anyway. But even if it will, there are plenty of things you can do to help yourself make a sound decision.Meet with a campus career counselorYour schools career counselors know your institutions majors well, and they have a good general sense of where those majors might take you with respect to your career. Perhaps more importantly, though, many campus career centers keep detailed statistics on the types of jobs their schools graduates have landed with various majors. Typically, these statistics appear in the career centers placement report, which you can ask for and then read to find out where different majors might take you in the future.Read your undergraduate bulletin, related publicationsMaybe you dont need to actually read the entire undergraduate bulletin, but at the very least, page through it and look at all the majors available at your institution. You never know when youll stumble upon one that really fits your interests. If browsing your institutions undergraduate bulletin sounds far too boring, stop by your schools admissions office and ask for briefer major-related publications that might be available.Talk to professors and students in various majorsStart by asking your friends and acquaintances what theyre majoring in and why. What do these students like and dislike about their majors? And what can they tell you about the courses in their majors and the careers their majors might lead to? Similarly, ask professors in various academic departments to briefly describe their majors. Tell them youre interested in learning more about what previous students in the department have gone on to do, career-wise. Professors will gladly tell you in most cases, if you ask.Check out What Can I Do with a Major in ______?Ž materialsThere are lots of ways to answer the question, What can I do with a major in _______?Ž. Dozens of major-related books are available to you as well, often at your schools main library or your campus career centers library. VGM Career Horizons, for example, publishes several Great Jobs for _____ Majors books as well as the Opportunities in _____ ____ Careers series.Page through guides to college majorsSeveral publishers have developed books that offer extensive descriptions of various college majors and what careers those majors might lead to. JIST, for instance, offers The College Majors Handbook, which features information (based on a survey of some 150,000 college graduates) on 60 different majors. Ferguson Publishing, meanwhile, offers College Majors and Careers, which also describes 60 majors in detail. Theres no need to fly blind when it comes to researching and then choosing a college major, especially in this day of the Internet and easily accessible information. The more you talk to knowledgeable people and read about various majors, especially those you know little or nothing about, the better chance you have of picking the one that best fits both your short-term needs and your longterm career goals.I have to pick a major ... now what? Featured Jobs Contact Lorna at (850) 747-5019 or Email: lbrown@pcnh.com LORNA BROWNEMPLOYMENT SALES SPECIALIST LUSADY TAYLOREMPLOYMENT SALES SPECIALISTContact Lusady at (850) 522-5173 or Email: ltaylor@pcnh.com REPRESENTATIVES will be at the PORT ST. JOE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE on Tuesdays & Thursdays from 9 am … 1 pm EST accepting applications for numerous open positions.We offer competitive wages and a comprehensive bene t package including Company paid health, dental, and life insurance, 401(k), attendance & safety bonuses.EOE/Drug Free WorkplaceEASTERN SHIPBUILDING GROUP MORE THAN A JOB… A FUTURE! Earn While You Learn with the On the Job Training Program If you are unemployed you may be eligible for the Workforce Centers OJT program. On the job training gives you hands on experience in a new job … and employers, OJT helps you save money! For more informaon call (850) 370-0726 An equal opportunity employer/program. Aux iliary aids and services are available upon request to individuals with disabilies. All voice telephone numbers on this document may be reached by persons using TTY/TDD equipment via the Florida Relay Service at 711. Logsitcs/TransportDrivers:All Miles PAID (Loaded & Empty)! Home on the weekends! Running Class-A CDL Flatbed. Lease to Own-No Money Down CALL: 888-880-5911 Medical/HealthNow HiringFull time positions for CNAs at St James Health and Rehab Center. Apply in person at 239 Crooked River Rd Carrabelle, FL 32322 Medical/HealthCaring Peopleand CNAs needed. Join a team of people who make a difference in the lives of the elderly. Provide non medical companionship, in home help & personal care for the elderly. Must be flexible. PT leading to FT-positions in the Port St. Joe and Apalachicola areas.Home Instead Senior CareCall Mon-Thur 9-3pm 850-640-1223 or toll free 1-866-301-1919 Web ID#: 34224571 Text FL24571 to 56654 Food Svs/HospitalityNow HiringReservationistPleasant personality, basic bookkeeping skills, computer literate and a team player! Apply in person at Gibson Inn 51 Avenue C (850) 653-2191 Bldg Const/TradesWildlife TechnicianFL Fish & Wildlife Conservation Com. Box-R Wildlife Mgt. Area Franklin County $26,540 Annual. Heavy equipment operation, road and facility maintenance, controlled burns, manage public hunts and wildlife surveys. Applications must be completed online at: https://jobs.myflorida.com/ For additional information contact: Billie Clayton 850-265-3676 EEO/AA Employer Web ID#: 34226960 Text FL26960 to 56654 OtherTest AdministratorTAFB (part-time)To secure & administer tests while maintaining an environment conducive to fair & accurate testing of students; provide clerical duties related to testing. Approximately 16 hrs./ week (T & TH, 8am-4:30pm). Requires HS diploma, AA preferred, working knowledge of office & computer equipment. Must NOT be an undergraduate student. Range begins at $10.92/hr. Position Open Until Filled. Only those who provide all requested items, GCSC Application (must be completed) will be considered. Additional info: www.gulfcoast.edu/hr. Women & minorities are strongly encouraged to apply. GCSC is an EA/EO/M/F/Vet employer. GCSC Equity Office 850.873.3516 Web ID#: 34227517Text FL27517 to 56654 OtherOyster Shuckers(Apalachicola, FL)40 temporary positions. Wearing rubber gloves, boots & caps, shucker opens & washes oysters, uses shucking knife to gently pry open oyster shell & separate from muscle so that meat can be frozen, canned, packed or otherwise disposed of as necessary. No exp or edu reqs.. From 6 am to 03 pm, M-F, with no OT. Temporary employment from 10/20/2012 to 06/15/2013. No transport to work site provided. Wage paid is $10 per hour. Work location at: 592 W. Highway 98, Apalachicola, FL 32320 and 391 Market St. Apalachicola, FL 32320. Apply to: Water Street Seafood, Attn: Steven Rash, Owner, PO Box 121, Apalachicola, FL 32329 or via email: stevenrash@ waterstreetseafood.com or telephone at (850) 653-8902 Web ID#: 34227252 Text FL27252 to 56654 OtherOyster Shuckers(Apalachicola, FL)20 temporary positions. Wearing rubber gloves, boots & caps, shucker opens & washes oysters, uses shucking knife to gently pry open oyster shell & separate from muscle so that meat can be frozen, canned, packed or otherwise disposed of as necessary. No exp or edu reqd. From 6am-3pm, M-F, with no OT. Temp employment from 10/15/2012 to 06/01/2013. Employer will provide mobile home on premises w/kitchen & bathroom. Wage paid is $9 /hr. Work location: 101 Water St., Apalachicola, FL 32320. Apply to: Leavins Seafood, Attn: Darren Guillotte, Owner, PO Box 520, Apalachicola, FL 32329 or via email: lsi@gtcom.net or telephone at (850) 653-8823 OtherCheck Station OperatorFlorida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission Is Now HiringWhat:Check Station OperatorWhere:Tate’s Hell State ForestSchedule required:Wednesday through Sunday (10am – 6pm)Pay Rate:$8.00/hr This is a temporary position that is only during hunting season. To apply for this position please send resumes and letter of interest to adam.warwick@myfwc.co m For questions about the position please contact Billie Clayton at 850-265-3676 or billie.clayton@myfwc.co m Web ID#: 34226950 Classified Advertising works hard ...filling the employment needs of area business firms, helping people to meet their prospective employers, helping people buy and sell all kinds of goods and services, and much more! Nothing works harder than the Classifieds! 747-5020

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Local A14 | The Times Thursday, October 11, 2012 Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Real Estate Picks SELL YOUR LI S TING S HERE! Only $35 per week per listing Minimum 2 ads per week or 1 ad for 2 weeks Contact Joel or Kari for details: (850)814-7377 or (850)227-7847 SOLD MLS #247128 $389,000 312 LAND ST. ST. GEOR G E I SL AND Gulf Beaches Charming 3 bedroom/3 bath home with 30 vaulted ceiling and 3 levels of windows to enjoy incredible views of the bay. Home also features large pool with waterfall and wonderful landscaping. Schedule an appointment to see this home today! Mary Seymour, Je Galloway Real Estate 850-728-8578 MLS #247773 $334,000 1308 AZ AL E A DR. ST. GEOR G E I SLA N D Plantation Cozy Plantation beach cottage with private pool surrounded by lush vegetation and lovely landscaping on 1 acre lot. An extremely well priced home and move in ready! Mary Seymour, Je Galloway Real Estate 850-728-8578 MLS# 247848 $350,000 291 HWY. 98 AP ALA C H ICO LA Stunning 3 bedroom/3 bath Apalachicola home with unobstructed bay views. Home features a detached garage with rental apartment upstairs. Call today for more information on this income producing property! Mary Seymour, Je Galloway Real Estate 850-728-8578 John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.com MLS# 247601 $639,000 St. George Island HIDDEN TREASURE Enter into partially covered Courtyard with Waterfall, huge John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.com MLS# 247024 $14,000 Eastpoint MAGNOLIA RIDGE Foreclosure, one acre lot, located in a secluded area of beautiful Franklin County, paved roads and underground utilities, great location for a permanent residence or weekend retreat on Sago Drive, minutes away from St. George Island. Listing agent Michael Billings Our local real estate experts have identied what they feel are the best values around and are oering them to you in Real Estate Picks! (In this section), Discover the best real estate values in Mexico Beach, Port St. Joe, Apalachicola, Cape San Blas, St. George Island, Carrabelle and surrounding areas. I never expected to see a whale shark, he said. Its a rst for all of us. It was very surprising. The big sh remained nearby as Bendis succeeded in unhooking his catch and all three men rushed to the stern to view the rare creature. But it submerged fairly quickly, and because their cellphones were stowed in a waterproof bag, none of the men got pictures of the monster sh, Bendis said. They red up the engine and attempted to return to the exact place of the original sighting and, to everyones amazement, when they reached the spot and allowed the engine to idle, the whale shark resurfaced. We were all scrambling for phones, Bendis said. The shark, at least 30 feet long, seemed attracted to the boats engine and hung close to it in the water. Bendis retrieved his GoPro camera, which was in a waterproof container, and begin lming underwater although he could not be sure what he was lming. Bendis said the giant sh came up to the dive platform, and Brad and I both touched it. Wendell Stone tried to touch him, but didnt quite make it. We been given grief for not going in the water with it, but when this is happening, its not the rst thing on your mind, he said. All told, the experience lasted from about 3:45 to 4:45 p.m., with the shark returning to the Celestial Crab at least six times. Bendis said. It was de nitely boatrelated, he said. He seemed to come back when the boat idled. If we moved, he would come back. Bendis and his friends were thrilled with their hour-long interaction with one of the rarest creatures on the planet. I wish I could share this with every member of the shing community, Bendis said. The only thing that would have made it better was if Celeste and the kids had been there. I just hope people understand what gentle giants these creatures are and that no harm ever comes from them. Celeste Bendis, a masters student in Tallahassee, said she regrets having opted out of the shing trip to study. Id have been in the water with it! she said. The Celestial Crab is named both for Celeste and for Joe Bendis, who was born under the Zodiac sign of cancer. Bendis, Riner and Stone immediately began to communicate their rare adventure to the world. Brad had a cellphone, and when we were coming up the Carrabelle River, he had already posted to the Internet, Bendis said. Little did they expect their story would resonate around the world. Within 24 hours, friends and relatives began to call to tell the men they saw the video on television in points as far removed as Chicago and California. I think people are tired of hearing about murders and politics and Syria and Afghanistan, Bendis said. I think they want a feelgood story. Its such a big, ugly, cute animal. The three shermen went online and found a website maintained by researchers at the University of Southern Mississippi requesting information about whale shark sightings. Bendis said researchers were able to conclude the whale shark was a male. The research group maintains a database of whale sharks in the Gulf, identifying individuals using the pattern of spots on the shs left side. Unfortunately, Bendis GoPro pictures show the sharks right side, so its unclear if this was an individual that had been photographed in the past. Bendis said he studied biology as an undergraduate, and both Stone and Riner are educators, so they immediately recognized the whale shark and were not afraid of the enormous sh. Master waterman Joe Barber of Carrabelle and Apalachicola called their experience amazing. He said in 90 years spent on and around the Gulf, he has encountered a whale shark only twice. On the rst occasion, he was shing offshore when he and a crew member spotted the enormous animal surfacing just a few feet from their boat. We sat down and waited to see what it would do, he said, recalling stories of sh bumping boats and capsizing them. But, the whale shark proved not to be aggressive and soon disappeared below the surface of the Gulf. WHALE from page A1 ABOUT WHALE SHARKS According to the Florida Museum of Natural History Ichthyology Department, the whale shark (Rhincodon typus) is the largest member of the shark family and the largest vertebrate that is not a mammal. Individuals approaching 60 feet in length have been observed. Tipping the scales at 20 tons, they approach the larger dinosaurs in mass and date back to the Jurassic era. Scientists only became aware of the existence of this rare creature in 1828. Before the mid-1980s, there were fewer than 350 con rmed reports of whale sharks worldwide. With few defenses other than size and thick skin, the whale shark is listed by the World Conservation Union in the Red List of Threatened Species. Like some whales, the whale shark is a lter feeder and consumes mostly microscopic algae, though it will also devour small sh. Whale sharks are widely distributed in tropical and warm temperate seas, usually between latitudes 30 degrees north and 35 degrees south. They are thought to prefer surface sea-water temperatures of 70 to 80 degrees Fahrenheit. Whale sharks are known to inhabit both deep and shallow coastal waters and lagoons of coral atolls and reefs. They have approximately 3,000 tiny teeth that are not used while feeding. The whale shark sieves prey items as small as one millimeter through the ne mesh of the gillrakers. They are able to open their mouth over 3 feet wide to optimize feeding and are occasionally sighted hanging vertically in the water allowing bait sh and other concentrated food items to be sucked in. Highly migratory, satellite tracking of whale sharks in waters off the United States and in the South China Sea reveals these animals travel thousands of miles. These migrations can take years to complete. The most signi cant threat to this species appears to be humans. In India alone, as many as 1,000 whale sharks were believed killed in 1999 and 2000. Their habit of swimming at the surface makes them particularly susceptible to shing. The ns of whale sharks once sold for high prices on the Asian market, although demand has declined. There is still a market for whale shark meat in several countries including Taiwan and China. By Lois Swoboda ROBBIE CADA | Special to the Times SPECIAL TO THE TIMES This video still shows the whale shark that approached Joe Bendis shing boat about 30 miles offshore from Carrabelle.



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xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx 50 WWW.APALACHTIMES.COMPhone: 850-653-8868 Web: apalachtimes.com E-mail: dadlerstein@star .com Fax: 850-653-8036 Circulation: 800-345-8688 DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK: School News & Society: 11 a.m. Friday Real Estate Ads: 11 a.m. Thursday Legal Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Display Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Line Ads: 5 p.m. Monday xxxxx Contact Us xxxxx Out to see Index Georgia shermen get friendly with giant sharkBy LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com Three shermen visiting from South Georgia shared a once-in-a-lifetime experience two weeks ago when they lmed the biggest one that got away. Joe Bendis, who along with Brad Riner and Wendell Stone are frequent visitors to Franklin County, said he housesits a trailer in Lanark Village and frequently brings down his 25-foot shing boat, the Celestial Crab, to spend time on the water with family and friends. On Sept. 29, Bendis, Stone and Riner were about 30 miles offshore and Bendis was struggling to unhook a shark without losing a nger when Riner told him a whale shark had come to the back of the boat. At rst, Bendis thought it was a joke.Democrats rally for local racesBy DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com If anyone was wondering if Franklin County Democrats were red up for the upcoming election, they got their answer Saturday afternoon in Eastpoint. About 50 of the party faithful gathered under sunny skies at Millender Park to listen to a series of hard-charging appeals from three candidates as to why they offer a better alternative than their Republican opponents. Mercedes Updyke, chair of the Democratic Executive Committee, introduced the three men who are campaigning, as well as three other county Democratic of ceholders, Tax Collector Jimmy Harris and Property Appraiser Rhonda Skipper, neither of whom faced opponents, and retiring Property Appraiser Doris Pendleton. Updyke said Organizing for America registered two new voters at the picnic, with all leftover food donated to the Apalachicola Food Bank. Harris used his time under the pavilion to stress his of ces open-door policy, welcoming questions and concerns. He said the of ces most recent purchase was an AS400 computer for $47,000, which is the brains we use to collect taxes. Most counties wont share theirs with the property appraiser, but we always shared an AS400. I know $47,000 sounds like a lot of money, and it is, but our last machine lasted eight years. First to speak was Liberty County Clerk of Courts Robert Hill, running for state representative in the newly drawn House District 7, which now encompasses all of Franklin County. Hill By DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com Gov. Rick Scott dived headlong into the distress facing the countys oyster industry last week, spending an hour at a resource fair in Eastpoint to meet with local of cials and residents seeking help. Scotts Oct. 3 visit combined one-on-one talks with seafood of cials about the state of the Apalachicola Bay with a chance to talk with residents about their needs in the face of a decline of the sheries. Escorted by County Commissioner Pinki Jackel, Scott greeted a bevy of state, regional and local of cials, including State Sen. Bill Montford and Commissioner Cheryl Sanders. He discussed the industrys needs with Eastpoint seafood dealers Lynn Martina and Bruce Millender, and then later at greater length with Shannon Harts eld, president of the Franklin County Seafood Workers Association. Together with Jackel, Hartseld outlined the situation on a large map of the county and its waters, set up on the stage of the Eastpoint rehouse. We talked about getting some immediate assistance for relay and shelling, Harts eld said. We talked about possibly closing (Bob Sikes ) cut off, temporarily, for a short term, possibly a long term, because were xing to get these low winter tides and xing to get a little bit of fresh water there, and we dont want it all going out the cut. He said there was discussion about getting the Florida Department of Environmental Protection By LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com A recently renovated park is looking down at the heel. A little more than three years ago, Apalachicola used two state grants totaling $400,000 to improve Riverside Park on the waterfront between avenues D and E. Of this, $56,000 was used to install a central fountain in the park. Plans for the park were inspired by design ideas suggested by the University of Georgias Riverways South committee and submitted to the city in 2008. Riverways report stressed the importance of the park to the downtown. This is Apalachicolas central park, read A whale of a sh tale SPECIAL TO THE TIMESThis video still shows the whale shark that approached Joe Bendis shing boat about 30 miles offshore from Carrabelle. FIND IT ONLINESee video of the whale shark encounter at www.youtube. com/watch?v=2NHcOOR5F_U. See WHALE A14 ELECTION 2012 GOVERNOR VISITS COUNTYDAVID ADLERSTEIN | The TimesChris Millender, vice president of the Franklin County Seafood Workers Association, left, talks with Gov. Rick Scott. Scott gets an earful on oystersRiverfront Park waits for repairsSee DEMOCRATS A5 LOIS SWOBODA | The TimesThis sidewalk was damaged by summer storms at Riverfront Park.See PARK A3 See SCOTT A10Opinion . . . . . . A4 Society . . . . . . A6 Faith . . . . . . . A7 Outdoors . . . . . A8 Tide Chart . . . . . A8 Sports . . . . . . A9 Classi eds . . . A12-A13Thursday, October 11, 2012 VOL. 127 ISSUE 24Soccer league kicks off, A9 Learn about domestic violence on FridayIn honor of Domestic Violence Awareness Month, Refuge House and its community partners will host a public event from 4-7 p.m. Friday, Oct. 12, at Apalachicolas Battery. The theme for this year is The battle is not yours alone! For more info, call Carol Bar eld at 653-3313.Riverfront blues concertA Month of Blues continues along the Apalachicola Riverfront on Saturday, as the Smackwater Retrievers Band performs from 8-10 p.m. at Riverfront Park. Galleries and shops are open from 6-8 p.m. For more info, call 653-3930.Estuaries class The Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve will offer a one-day class in environmental science on Wednesday, Oct. 17. Estuaries Class covers the ecology, geology and economic importance of the Apalachicola Bay. Be prepared to spend part of the day in the classroom and part on a boat trawling, sampling bottom sediments and exploring life in the oyster beds. Cost is $10 per person. For info, contact Coastal Training Program Coordinator Rosalyn F. Kilcollins at 670-7708 or Rosalyn.kilcollins@dep.state. .us.Need a bosom buddy?October is National Breast Cancer Awareness month and Adopt-a-Dog from a Shelter month. The Franklin County Humane Society and Franklin Needs are offering women the opportunity to adopt a Bosom Buddy. Throughout the month, the adoption fee for shelter dogs will be reduced to $50 and $25 for cats.Mammogram clinicWeems Memorial Hospital will host a mammogram walkin clinic at 9:30 a.m. Oct. 19. Franklin Needs will cover the cost of mammograms for Franklin County residents who do not have insurance. Refreshments and educational handouts will be available. For more info, call 653-8853, ext. 119.

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LocalA2 | The Times Thursday, October 11, 2012 National Mammography Day Friday, October 19thWeems Memorial Hospital and Franklin Needs, Inc.will be celebrating National Mammography Day on Friday, October 19th On this day, from 10am to 4pm, any woman in Franklin County can walk-in to Weems Memorial Hospital and receive a free, screening mammogram courtesy of Franklin Needs, Inc.George E. Weems Memorial Hospital135 Avenue G Apalachicola, FL 32320 (850) 653-8853 www.weemsmemorial.com Franklin Needs, Inc. 55 South Bayshore Drive Eastpoint, Florida 32328 (850) 670-1671 www.forgottencoastclassics.com NO HIDDEN CHARGES: It is our policy that the patient and any other person responsible for payments has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed by payment or any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment. www.mulliseye.com"WE WELCOME NEW PATIENTS, CALLTODAY FOR YOUR PRIORITY APPOINTMENT" FOR NEW PATIENTS 59 AND OLDERThis certificate is good for a complete Medical Eye Exam withTodd Robinson, M.D.Board Certified Eye Physician and Surgeon.The exam includes a prescription for eye glasses and tests for Glaucoma, Cataracts and other eye diseases.FOR YOUR APPOINTMENT CALL: 850-763-6666 ELIGIBILITY: U.S. Citizens living in the Florida Panhandle, 59 years and older, not presently under our care. Coupon Expires: 10-31-12 FREEEYE EXAMCODE: AP00Darren Payne, M.D.Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract SurgeonLee Mullis, M.D.Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract SurgeonTodd Robinson, M.D.Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon "Freedom from Eye Glasses, Now a reality for many."Smart LensesSM MAGNOLIA BLUFFBay living at its best, you have to see the sunsets from this home to believe them. 3BR/3BA Custom home with great water depth for year round access to the Apalachicola Bay. MLS #246689...........$699,000 Travis Stanley 850.653.6477 Grayson Shepard 850.653.6718 Leon Teat 850.653.5656 Sandy Mitchem 850.899.8300 BEACHFRONT CONDO ST. GEORGE ISLAND2BR/2BA with two balconies in Villas of St. George. Established rental history! Community pool, beach boardwalk, 2 blocks to lighthouse! MLS# 246110...............$319,500 BAY FRONTCONDOMust see this 2 BR/2.1 BA townhouse next to the desirable Southside Historic District overlooking Apalachicola Bay. Property has community dock! MLS #247900......................$275,000BAY FRONTHOMEEnjoy amazing sunsets everyday from this bay front home in prestigious St. George Plantation. 2BR/3BA home with unobstructed 180 degree bay views and 122 of bay front footage with white sandy beach. Dock your boat at the private pier with MLS #247962...............$599,000 GULFFRONTHOMEThis remarkable Gulf Front home provides the best of everything for laid back Island living. 5BR/4.1BA custom built home complete with a gourmet kitchen, granite countertops, elevator, a wet bar and upscale furnishings. Enjoy the inground 18X 36 pool and your private boardwalk. Call today to view this spectacular property. MLS #247998...............$995,000NEW CONSTRUCTIONGreat opportunity to buy a gulf view home. This quality constructed home has driven pilings, hardiboard siding and a metal roof for a low maintenance exterior. Inside you have 3 bedrooms with two baths and a great room opening to the front porch. New construction means low insurance cost. MLS #247359..............$289,000 N EW C ON S TRUCTION N EW C ON S TRUCTION Editors note: This is the rst part of a series called At Eternal RestBy LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star .com Little Sumatra Cemetery tucked away in the woods has a tempestuous history for such a peaceful place. The cemetery is wholly in Franklin County, just a few hundred feet south of the countys border with Liberty County. It is the traditional resting place for residents of Sumatra in Liberty County. Burial plots in the cemetery were traditionally free and the county had maintained the graveyard for years, at one point erecting a brick monument and agpole as a tribute to veterans. A dispute surfaced in 2002 when the owner of surrounding land, arguing the cemetery was deeded to his father, sought to control who could be buried there. The two county attorneys argued that, by precedent, Floridians have the right to be buried near close relatives if space is available, and to have access to the graves of loved ones to maintain and beautify them. Commissioner Bevin Putnal was a vocal champion of the Sumatrans. After several months of discord, Franklin County purchased the two-acre cemetery for $10,000 in summer 2003, to avoid a lengthy court battle. The county placed it under the control of a not-for-pro t created by the Sumatra Assembly of God. Sumatra Cemetery is nearing the century mark. In 2002, William Bouington told the Times his father performed the rst funeral service in 1918, for the interment of World War I casualty John Wilson McCranie. The senior Bouington presided because tiny Sumatra lacked a preacher. There must have been other existing graves at the site since Tom Sadler of Sumatra told the Times his relatives had been buried there as far back as 1912. Possibly the sites were marked with cypress, which has since rotted away. A few cypress markers remain. McCranie, whose resting spot is the oldest marked grave, was one of thousands of fallen soldiers returned home during World War I, which ended in Nov. 1918. Prior to the 19th century, soldiers killed in combat were generally buried in a mass grave near the site of the battle where they died, with no further identi cation. During the 1800s, more of an effort was made to document the nal resting place of the fallen. During the Civil War, records were kept of the death and burial of both Union and Confederate soldiers. The body count during World War I was so horri c, it became clear early on that some kind of formal record needed to be kept to allow closure for families when the ghting ceased. By the end of the First Battle of the Marne (Sept. 5-12, 1914), 250,000 soldiers of all nationalities were dead. Deaths at medical facilities could be registered and the site of the burial documented for future repatriation, but many soldiers were buried by their friends where they fell with a simple marker. Others were taken to existing burial grounds nearby or impromptu cemeteries. In all, this Great War claimed 16 million lives of various nationalities, most from disease. The US entered World War I on April 6, 1917, and four months later, War Department General Order 104 authorized the organization of a Graves Registration Service. The first graves registration unit reached France on October 31 of the same year. Individual combat units had the responsibility of burying their dead as soon as possible. Most men killed in battle were buried within 24 hours, although it sometimes took a week or longer. Great care was taken to ensure graves were properly marked. The registration service eventually moved the bodies to an American military cemetery in Europe or shipped them back to the United States. The work of the Graves Registration Service continued until summer 1919. After the war, the Of ce of the Quartermaster General offered families the option of bringing their loved ones home for burial. From 1930-1933, female relatives of soldiers who remained buried abroad were able to visit their graves under a program of the federal government called the Gold Star Mother Pilgrimage. There are three more cemeteries just south of Sumatra hidden away in the green glades of the swamp, but thats another story. Next week Eternity at the Brickyard.Sumatra Cemetery rooted in Great WarFar left: This monument for John Wilson McCranie marks the site of the rst funeral service held in Sumatra but is not the oldest burial site. Above: A handmade bench inlaid with red glass marks a pair of graves in Sumatra Cemetery. Left: This infants grave is still lovingly maintained after 81 years and the lettering had been freshly painted at the time this picture was made.PHOTOS BY LOIS SWOBODA | The Times

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LocalThe Times | A3Thursday, October 11, 2012the report. It is the closest open space to the citys commercial core. At the time, there was controversy over the renovations, which included the fountain as well as installation of planters, benches and picnic tables. Members of the citys waterfront committee chosen to review and oversee work on the waterfront, chaired by Harry Arnold, said they did not approve the plan before the fountain and other xtures were ordered. Architect Willoughby Marshall, brought in by Mayor Van Johnson to weigh in on the plan, said the design was not in keeping with what the city ought to pursue. Questions also were raised about why the city had not sought bids on installation of the fountain and other xtures. Nevertheless, Aquarius of Naples installed the fountain on April 19, 2009, with city grant writer Cindy Giametta supervising the work. Today, Riverfront Park is in need of maintenance and repairs. In December 2011, tiles began to fall off the sides and top of the fountain. For a short time, twine was used to secure the ceramic tile that remained, and silicone and mortar were applied to hide cracks and put fallen tiles back in place. Cracks in the fountains tile work continue to appear. On the night of April 11, the shing boat Gods Grace collided with the dock at Riverfront Park, damaging two pilings, knocking one down and breaking the other above water level. Apalachicola Police Chief Bobby Varnes said the boats captain, Nathan Peaden of Milton, agreed to pay the estimated cost of $5,000 to repair the pilings. Varnes said city of cials were trying to complete the repairs before the Apalachicola Antique and Classic Boat Show on April 28. The pilings remain unrepaired, although part of the damaged material has been removed, with the area festooned with ragged, yellow caution tape. Varnes said last week the owner of Gods Grace is ready to pay for repairs, but the chief has found it dif cult nding a contractor because the job is so small. Varnes said he has approached at least three rms that replace pilings but, so far, none has sent equipment to do the work. He is now negotiating with Reed Hicks of Carrabelle who said he has another job in Apalachicola and will attempt the Riverfront Park repair in two to three weeks when he brings a crew over to tackle the larger job. We have the poles, Varnes said. If anybody that can do the work and wants to come, well pay them. Three months ago, the soil began to erode along the western edge of a section of sidewalk running parallel to the dock. During Tropical Storm Debby, the erosion worsened, and by the end of the summer, the condition of the sidewalk deteriorated to where several large sections have upended and present an obvious safety hazard. The sidewalk is tilting along the entire waterfront, and about half of the walking trail is now surrounded by temporary fencing. The fence prevents the use of benches and trash receptacles purchased and installed in 2009. Contractor William Poloronis, who originally installed the sidewalk, said the riprap used to reinforce the river bank had washed away over time. But nobody was aware of the problem, he said, because the dock, installed after the sidewalk was built, hid the bank. He said he believed the engineer underestimated wave action at the site. Poloronis said the best x would be to drive sheet pilings deep along the bank, at a cost of as much as $1,000 a foot. But, a short-term repair might be made much more cheaply. Poloronis said after inspecting the site, he believes the sidewalk needs to be removed, and a larger support beam and additional riprap needs to be added to reinforce the bank. The dock can become part of the walking trail, he said. Poloronis said he has not worked out the cost of the interim repair, but estimated it would be much cheaper than sheet piling, which might run around $200,000. When repairs will be completed is uncertain. Staff in Apalachicolas city of ce said damage to the sidewalk is being reviewed by the Federal Emergency Management Agency and Preble Rish, the city engineer. This means you. THE FLU ENDS WITH U E ALL SHOWS FREE OF CHARGE Check out www.BlastontheBay.com for detailed schedule and artist bios. Friday, Oct 196pm 6pm 6:30pm 7pm (CT) This project received VISIT FLORIDA Saturday, Oct 20 Sunday, Oct 21Dockside Caf @ the Port 2pm Songwriters Workshop 5pm 7pm 6:30pm (CT) Indian Pass Raw Bar Indian Pass Raw Bar PHOTOS BY LOIS SWOBODA | The TimesThese fallen tiles have been repaired, but cracks continue to form between the tiles covering the fountain in Riverfront Park. At left, this piling damaged in April remains unrepaired. PARK from page A1

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Q. Can you provide some information on the proposed constitutional amendments that will be appearing on the November ballot? A. Using resources provided by the Florida Association of Counties, Florida Trend, The James Madison Institute, and the University of Florida Extension Service, I will try to summarize the amendments with the purpose only to provide information that might be helpful to encourage more informed votes. None of these proposed amendments are citizen initiatives. They were all placed on the ballot by our legislature. There is no Amendment 7 because it was rejected by the courts, tweaked by our lawmakers and then placed on the ballot as Amendment 8.Amendment 1 on Health InsuranceThis prohibits laws or rules compelling anyone to buy health insurance. It is essentially a referendum on the Affordable Care Act. If you favored the ACA, you might want to vote against Amendment 1. If you opposed the ACA, you might want to vote for Amendment 1. Supporters say a substantial vote of support will send a message that Florida voters oppose the ACA and, in the event the ACA were to be repealed or signicantly modied, the amendment would prevent Floridas own government from adopting a similar requirement at the state level as was done in Massachusetts. Opponents argue that since the ACA has been upheld in large part, it is unlikely to go away and cite that federal law trumps state law on these kinds of issues.Amendment 2 on Veterans Tax ReliefThis would permit partially or totally permanently disabled veterans who were not Florida residents when entering military service to be eligible for a combat-related disabled veterans ad valorem tax reduction on their homesteaded property in Florida. Florida already provides a discounted ad valorem tax payment for combat-related disability, but it is limited to those veterans who were Florida residents when entering U.S. military service. The amount of the reduction is based on the percentage of the veterans disability and is offered as recognition of the veterans commitment, service, and sacrice for our country and the state. There would be an impact at the local level of government (county, city, school board and special districts). Those in favor argue the revenue loss is a small price to pay for the sacrices made by veterans. About 74,000 veterans may qualify for the benet, according to the Florida Department of Veterans Affairs. Those who oppose might argue the property tax system isnt fair and continually adding exemptions and reductions makes it even less fair.Amendment 3 on State Budget Spending LimitThis caps growth in state spending at no more than the rate of ination and population growth, instead of the current cap, which has been in place since 1994 and is based on growth in personal income. It would also require excess revenue to be deposited into a stabilization fund used to support public education, or if not required, to be returned to the taxpayers. Proponents say tougher limits on state spending are needed. Some may believe the only way to reduce programs that go beyond the scope of appropriate is to reduce the funds available to spend, thereby forcing prioritization. Opponents report that Colorado voters approved a similar measure but went back to the polls three years later and voted to suspend the law after it resulted in cuts to vital public services. They further report that since then, more than 20 state legislatures have rejected similar proposals. Opponents also warn that limiting state spending may well cause certain expenses now funded in whole or in part by the state government to be dumped onto cities, counties, and school boards. Amendment 4 on Property Tax ExemptionsWhile current law caps annual assessment increases on non-homesteaded property such as businesses and rental properties at 10 percent a year, this will reduce the assessment cap to 5 percent. It will give rst-time homebuyers who havent purchased a home in the past three years an additional homestead exemption up to $150,000 phased out over ve years, and allows the Legislature to repeal Floridas recapture rule which causes some taxable values on homesteaded property to rise even when market values have dropped. This amendment, if passed, will have impacts felt at the local level of government (county, city, school board and special districts) in decreased revenues. The Florida Association of Counties is against this amendment and argues it does very little to lower the property taxes of existing homeowners but does a lot to help powerful special interest developers. FAC also states that it would mean big tax breaks for wealthy out-of-state snowbirds paid for by higher taxes for year-round Florida residents. Proponents feel that anything to stimulate the real estate and housing industries is benecial and necessary. Opponents point out that local governments will still have the ability to change the millage rate to offset the changes proposed in the amendment. Amendment 5 on Judicial ReformCurrently, the Supreme Court is authorized to adopt rules for the practice and procedure in all courts and under those rules, the Governor appoints a justice of the Supreme Court from a list of nominees provided by a judicial nominating committee and those appointments by the governor are not subject to conrmation. This revision requires the Senate to conrm the appointment. This amendment also gives the Legislature power to repeal court rules by a simple majority vote, limits the re-adoption of repealed court rules, requires all les be made available to the House Speaker, and revises some language relating to the selection of chief judges of our circuits. Proponents feel it basically allows more legislative oversight over judicial rules. Opponents feel it will undermine the independence of the judicial branch of government. Additionally, critics argue its a bad idea to grant more authority over the judiciary to a legislative branch sorely decient in continuity because its composition and leadership frequently change due to eight-year term limits. Amendment 6 on Abortion FundingWhile federal and state laws already prohibit public nancing of abortions, this amendment would enshrine that ban in the state constitution. It also prohibits spending public funds on health benets that include coverage of abortion, but would not apply to expenditures required by federal law, which include an abortion to save the life of the mother or pregnancies resulting from rape and incest. It also exempts abortions from the privacy clause of the states constitution which could clear the way for a parental consent law Proponents state this amendment will provide another layer of protection. Opponents feel it could be interpreted to afrm parental consent requirements and would infringe on ones rights. Amendment 8 on Permissible Uses of Public Funds/Religious FundingThis would delete a prohibition against using revenues from the public treasury directly or indirectly in aid of any church, sect, or religious denomination and would allow faith-based entities to receive public funds for providing public services. Proponents mention the U. S. Supreme Courts ruling that tax-funded school vouchers allowing children to attend church-operated schools are constitutional and say that unless this passes, lawsuits may follow. Opponents say this measure would open the door for government ofcials to provide some religious groups with tax money while denying aid to others. Moreover, they are concerned that strings will be attached to the public funds received that could intrude into matters such as the curriculum content for schools. Amendment 9 on Tax Relief for Surviving SpousesThis would provide ad valorem homestead property tax relief to the surviving spouses of active duty members of the armed services or rst responders who died in the line of duty. It could be a total exemption or a partial exemption. A rst responder is dened as a law enforcement ofcer, correctional ofcer, reghter, emergency medical technician, or paramedic. Proponents say the amount of revenue that would be lost is very small and this is the least a grateful state could do to help these survivors and it serves to honor the deceased in service to the country, state, counties, and cities. Critics of all tax breaks say that when revenues are diminished, the government often compensates by raising the tax rates of those not in the group.Amendment 10 on Small Business Tax ReliefThis would grant Florida businesses, many of them small, an increase in the tax exemption on tangible personal property (machinery, ofce equipment, furniture, etc.) to $50,000. It is currently $25,000. Proponents feel this will most likely result in collateral economic benets and could help businesses by clearing away some of the nancial impediments that have deterred them from expanding their payrolls or hiring people for jobs. It would spare businesses a cost as well as the major hassle involved in complex calculating of the value of ordinary business equipment. Opponents cite this will cost local governments due to the loss in revenues at a time when the state has been dumping more responsibilities on them. It could result in a loss of services or a shift of the tax burden to others. Amendment 11 on Tax Relief for Low-Income SeniorsThis would allow counties and cities, by ordinance, to grant a substantial property tax break to low-income seniors age 65 or older (currently dened as those earning less than $27,030 a year) who have resided for at least 25 years in and have title to homes whose just (market) value is less than $250,000. Proponents say some lowincome seniors are at risk of being taxed out of the homes where they have lived and raised a family, especially in areas where real estate prices boomed. Opponents cite the loss of revenues and possible shifting of the tax burden to those who havent yet qualied for a tax break.Amendment 12 on Student RepresentationThis changes the procedure provided for selecting the student representative on the Florida Board of Governors, which oversees the State University System. Instead of designating the head of the Florida Student Association (a group that not all state universities join), the representative would be chosen by a council comprising the student body presidents. This is sponsored by our Senator, Bill Montford and would make the representation more broadly inclusive. Proponents say every state university has a student body president, democratically elected, whereas not every state university chooses to participate in the Florida Student Association (FSA). Opponents argue that just because one or more universities choose to withdraw from the FSA is not a good reason to tinker with the state constitution. If you have any questions or comments about this column, please forward them to Marcia Johnson, Clerk of the Court, 33 Market Street, Ste. 203, Apalachicola, FL, or by email to: mmjohnson@franklinclerk. com. Visit the clerks website at www.franklinclerk.com.By MR. BILLSpecial to the Times Moving here permanently in Nov. 1960, Dads antique shop was not going to get it for a family of four. Besides the brass renishing and lamp repair, I tried pulp wooding, truck driving, bartending and few other distasteful chores not including septic tank repairs. At that time, the only real estate person was Charlie McKissack, who sold mostly McKissack family properties when you could nd him. His ofce was next to Burdas Drug Store. Jimmy and Maggie Lassiter had a two-room ofce at the corner of Arkansas and U.S. 98 at Lanark Beach, which was where Dad and I purchased our lots in 1954. They were Tallahassee Realty, one of the biggest in the city. Maggie was chairman of Florida Real Estate Commission in later years. I hacked it out for the next four years and decided to go to brokers school. Got my license in 1966. Sold the property where Ho Hum campground is to the Litton family from Mississippi in 1969, and Jimmy became my rst salesman. He died in 1985. He was married to Alice Potts. Next came Leonarda Perry from Nashville. She did real well. Passed away in 1994. Paul Spacey, a retired sergeant major, who opened my rst branch ofce in the old drug store brick building on Marine Street, where I had the Millers Mini-Pad camper park. It ended up stay free, although not planned that way. Paul also opened up the Barefoot Sails Pub at Carrabelle Beach across from Two Als Restaurant. Paul died in the 90s. I had another great lady, Arline Thornton, a real class act, who died of cancer in 1990. Then we had Barney Fish, great guy, did good, got a brokers license. Opened his ofce on 98 on right, just over the hill. Died a year and a half later in 1991. Al Hudson, retired Air Force pilot, was tops. Not only a good salesman, a great guy, served on county planning and zoning. I lost him in 2006. At this point in time, I am beginning to think Im a damn jinx or Dr. Death himself. Forgot Charles and Mary Miller, who lived next door to me. After all the training and client base I had, they got brokers license and opened Carrabelle Realty right next door to me. Kind of frosted my extremities. Company lives on with Ruby Litton at the helm. Charlie and Mary both passed on. Ed Diorio came to me in 98, a great guy with personality. Plus, after four years, he withdrew to a room with a computer. It consumed him, and cancer set in. Thats one reason I wont do computers. They can be as habit-forming as drugs. Only one of the early ones, Bill Bailey, escaped Millers Triangle. Still kicking. I guess Anne May, my current saleslady, doesnt believe the curse and hopefully wont be No. 10. I have watched all the big boys come and go Century 21, Anchor, Weichert plus a lot of the individuals. And Mr. Bills still kicking. First item in my bucket list, make it to Feb. 11, 2013 and the big 8-0. Mr. Bill is the pen name of Bill Miller. OpinionA4 | The Times Thursday, October 11, 2012 USPS 027-600Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 Publisher: Roger Quinn Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six monthsHome delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERSIn case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola TimesLLots of amendments on Floridas ballot YOurUR PubliUBLIC TrusteeRUSTEEMarcia JohnsonFifty years of realty reality

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LocalThe Times | A5Thursday, October 11, 2012 ANNOUNCING A PANAMA CITY PICTORIAL HISTORY BOOKAbout the book:The Panama City News Herald is pleased to be working with local historical organizations and libraries to bring our readers an heirloom-quality,coffee table pictorial book on the history of our area. This keepsake book will feature hundreds of stunning historic images from the late 1800s to present day from the greater Panama City area, and a section commemorating the 75th anniversary of The Panama City News Herald. Books are expected to ship late November.$29.95SHIPS MID NOVEMBER Reg. $39.95 BUY NOW! EXTENDED DEADLINE BY PUBLISHINGCOMPANYDUE TOPOPULAR DEMANDORDERNOW & SAVE $10!ACTUAL COVER & TITLEIncluded in the book:Doral Bank, Innovations Federal Credit Union, Bay Credit Union, and The Tourist Development Council MAIL IN FORM OR ORDER ONLINE AT: PANAMACITY.PICTORIALBOOK.COM Panama City area, and a section commemorating the 75th anniversary of The Panama City News Herald. Books are expected to ship late November. Panama City area, and a section commemorating the 75th anniversary of The Panama City News Herald. Books are expected to ship late November. BUY NOW! SAVE $10 I wish to pre-order:______Copies at $29.95 plus $1.95 tax per book and pick up my order at The News Herald oce. Total $31.90/book ______Copies at $29.95 plus $5.95 shipping and handling and $1.95 tax per book and have my order shipped to the address below. Total $37.85/bookTOTAL AMOUNTENCLOSED:_______________Name ___________________________________________________________________________________ Address _________________________________________________________________________________ City ___________________________________________________ State _______________ Zip __________ Phone (_____) ______________________ E-mail ________________________________________________ Signature ________________________________________________________________________________ Charge Card Number_____________________________________ Security Code______________Exp. Date_____________________ PAYMENTMETHODCHECK/MONEYORDERPayable to: The News Herald VISA AMEX MASTERCARD DISCOVER is facing Republican Halsey Beshears, a Tallahassee nurseryman. Hills vote total in the Democratic primary was about the same as the total number of votes cast for all the Republicans, but the 64year-old Hill urged supporters not to look past the Nov. 6 election. Im very encouraged, he said. But Im not so overcon dent that Im not going to ask you to help me. He spoke in soft, courtly tones and did not mention his Republican opponent. He stressed that it would be an honor and privilege to represent the district in Tallahassee. Hill talked about economic development he helped bring to Liberty County, calling the crowning jewel an effort to attract a $100 million Georgia Paci c plant. As a former schoolteacher and school superintendent, Hill was critical of the states current system of testing and said he would work to bring the more successful districts in closer working contact with those that are struggling. The evaluation process is one thing that needs improvement, he said. The FCAT is a mess; it needs to be improved. Im not a big fan of that process. Hill also stressed his opposition to privatizing prisons and said he supported opening the new work camp at Franklin Correctional Institution and keeping the existing Bay City Work Camp open in Apalachicola. Ive been against privatizing from day one, he said. Theyre interested in one thing: pro t.Shiver sees threat from developmentNext up was Tony Shiver, a rst-time candidate challenging incumbent Republican Pinki Jackel for the county commission seat representing Eastpoint and St. George Island. I reached the point in my life and took a look around and realized things arent like I want them to be, he said. I felt this is my time to step up and be counted and do something about it. Shiver said he has lived in Franklin County all but six months of his 54 years, contrasting himself with Jackel, who he said was born in Jefferson County. She married an individual who is now a wellknown attorney in Atlanta, Ga., he said. She came down here and arrived here at the time of the land boom, to make a pro t. Shiver, who so far has run a low-key campaign, lodged a full-throated shot at his opponent. There are things that are going along in our county right now that are manipulating change behind the scenes we really dont need, he said. We need improvements, we need amenities, we need the little niceties put here. But we dont need our home destroyed and manipulated into something its not. Im ghting to keep the things the way they are. Shiver, who was employed in the seafood industry before turning to law enforcement, said he is working on behalf of the seafood workers. I want them to be able to keep our bay, he said. The seafood workers of this place are not just a part of our economy; they are solders to keep our environment like it is. He said seafood workers and environmental organizations and state regulators have fought for years to try to keep overwhelming development from coming. We need controlled development, but we dont need our home destroyed for the sake of an individual select few making pro t. Shiver took aim at Jackel, suggesting she is too close to the interests of land developers. I would like for you to understand that it is happening. If you notice her advertisements and campaign commercials, if you look real hard, 85 percent of the people are all real estate people, he said. That is who her ties are. That is her clique; that is her group.Lawson denounces opponents partisanshipFormer State Sen. Al Lawson, challenging incumbent Republican Congressman Steve Southerland to represent District 2, was last to address the group. Franklin County has always been a county very dear to me during the 28 years I served (in the Florida Senate and House), like an adopted hometown for me, he said. Lawson told of how during a campaign stop early in this career, an Eastpoint woman working as a shucker insisted he down a glass of raw oysters to prove he really wanted their votes. I said Well bring them on, he said. Ever since then Ive been eating oysters. Lawson said he has been motivated to run for Congress because partisan gridlock has broken the way Washington works. People dont want to work with each other, and thats not what Americas all about, he said. In order for us to be successful, we have to work with each other. When you go to war, you dont ask the person next to you, Are you a Republican or are you a Democrat? You pull together and do what is necessary to defend our country, Lawson said. He promised to put the needs of constituents rst and listed a series of positions: to preserve Social Security and Medicare, to boost infrastructure funding and money invested in universities and to seek creation of an ocean initiative for the Gulf of Mexico. You dont have to wonder where Im coming from when it comes down to Medicare and Social Security, he said. In Medicare some of the people want to change the game after youve paid. Its in the (Paul) Ryan bill, and what they want to do is give someone younger than me a voucher. Lawson said infrastructure funding and boosting money for universities has always been an area that provides jobs. It will create more jobs than you can think of. Thats where our energy needs to be. The 64-year-old lawmaker and insurance executive took aim at Southerlands core constituency on the conservative edge of the Republican Party. You cant go out representing the Tea Party and all these other groups and put the people you represent rst, Lawson said. I fought from the time I entered the legislature to protect jobs, to keep people working, to show that someone really cared about them. He said he long fought against prison privatization and remained opposed to offshore drilling in the Gulf of Mexico. You need to invest in our workers; you need to invest in the state of Florida, Lawson said. He said the situation in Apalachicola Bay is not unexpected and urged the federal government to approve the shery disaster declaration sought by Floridas legislative delegation, to go toward reshelling efforts in the bay. We knew eventually its going to have an effect when you allow Atlanta to take 5 million gallons a day and send it over the Lake Lanier, he said. We knew with the BP oil spill, everyone was encouraged to work the winter bars, and we knew eventually it would have a devastating effect, and now were seeing that effect. This bay is the most productive bay in America, Lawson said. We know what happens with the oil spill, and it is still going on. Now we have to ght to make sure when the money is released, Franklin County gets their fair share. Lawson closed with a direct attack on Southerlands campaign strategy to paint him as a career politician who has voted to raise his salary. When I came in to the legislature I made $12,000, and over 28 years my salary got up to $30,000 and then we cut our salary back to $28,000 because state workers didnt get a raise. The legislature raises were tied in to whatever raises the state workers receive, he said. What is interesting about Mr. Southerlands comment is that he made more money in two years, (close to $350,000). I did not make that in 20 years, Lawson said. They are just trying to nd something to tear you down and to deceive voters to think that all you were doing in the legislature is giving yourself a pay raise, but not talking about how you protect Apalachicola Bay. Theyre not talking about how you protect water across the state of Florida, or how youre ghting for better schools or health care needs. Its unbelievable when a person would talk about income, when he probably didnt deserve the $174,000 he made, compared to what weve had, Lawson said. The only things hes led up there are three funeral home bills to help the funeral industry that he works in. And hes gone straight down party line and not worked with colleagues on the other side. DEMOCRATS from page A1 PHOTOS BY DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The TimesFrom left, Democrats Al Lawson, Robert Hill and Tony Shiver are running for of ce in the upcoming election.

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A6 | The Times Thursday, October 11, 2012 Hilarious Hank! Take a look at those ears! Is he not one of the cutest pups youve ever seen? He is about 3 months old and full of himself. He is a playful, high energy pup sure to entertain. He is part Chihuahua and part Jack Russell. He will be a small dog but will need plenty of exercise and attention. Come meet Mr. Personality, hes so worth a trip to the Adoption Center! Volunteers are desperately needed to socialize all of our dogs and cats. We are always looking for people willing to bring one of our animals into their home to be fostered for various needs. Anytime you can spare would be greatly appreciated. Call Karen at 670-8417 for more details or visit the Franklin County Humane Society at 244 State Road 65 in Eastpoint. You may logon to the website at www.forgottenpets.org to see more of our adoptable pets. PETOFTHEWEEK Franklin County Humane Society SocietyMr. and Mrs. James Mock request the honor of your presence at the marriage of their daughter, Jessica Michelle Mock to Jordan Colby Brock on Saturday, Oct. 13, 2012 at 5:30 p.m. (EST) at Centennial Park in Port St. Joe. All friends and family are invited to attend. No local invitations have been sent. A reception will be held following the ceremony at The Centennial Building. Mr. and Mrs. James Brownell and Mr. and Mrs. Joey Mallon are proud to announce the engagement and upcoming marriage of their children, Lacey Nicole Brownell and Corbin Joseph Mallon. Lacey is the daughter of the late Annette Brownell. Her grandparents are Sally Nixon and the late Jerry Nixon, of Mexico Beach; Madeline Rafeld and the late Capt. Sparkie Rafeld, of Overstreet; and Clinton and Janice Brownell of Overstreet. Corbins grandparents are Mr. and Mrs. Earl Duggar, of Apalachicola, and the late Rosa and John Whitey Mallon. Lacey, a 2010 graduate of Wewahitchka High School, is employed at the Old Time Soda Fountain in Apalachicola. Corbin attended Franklin County High School and is employed by Larry Clark Construction in Apalachicola. A November wedding is planned. Raymond West, Jr. celebrated his sixth birthday on Saturday. Oct. 6. He is the son of Brandy Austin, of Apalachicola, and brother to Jaquan, Amontaye and the late Jasmine Harris. Raymond is the grandson of Tammie Croom and the late James Austin, and Tawana Robinson and James West. We love you! Love, Mommy and family Bobby Joe and Debi Stevens of Panama City proudly announce the engagement and forthcoming marriage of their daughter, Whitney Jacqueline McAlister, to Christopher Addison Leuenberger, son of Mr. and Mrs. Tommy Leuenberger and Ms. Stephanie Ross of Graceville. Whitney is a 2005 graduate of Port St. Joe High School and received her bachelor of science in nursing degree from the University of West Florida. She will complete her master of science in nursing with a family nurse practitioner specialty in the spring of 2014. Whitney is currently employed as an emergency department registered nurse at Gulf Coast Medical Center. Christopher is a 2004 graduate of Graceville High School and has served in the United States military since 2005. He is currently pursuing his bachelor of science in technology management at Gulf Coast State College. An Oct. 27,, 2012 wedding is planned in Santa Rosa Beach. Michael Dolan, son of Aglaia and the late Hal Dolan, of Eastpoint, was promoted to the rank of major on Sept. 1. His maternal grandparents are the late Jim Mosconis and the late Zelda Mae Mosconis Stanley. Paternal grandparents are the late Ruth and John Dolan of Havana. He has one brother Shawn (Katherine) Dolan, of Tallahassee. Maj. Dolan is a 1997 graduate of Apalachicola High School and a 2001 graduate of the University of West Florida where he holds a bachelor of science degree in engineering technology/construction. He was previously assigned from 2002 to 2006 to the 3rd Battalion, 319th Airborne Field Artillery Regiment, 82nd Airborne Division, at Ft. Bragg, North Carolina. He was also assigned from 2008 to 2012 to the 2nd Battalion, 8th Field Artillery Regiment and 1st Battalion, 24th Infantry Regiment of the 1st Stryker Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division, Ft. Wainwright, Alaska. Maj. Dolan is currently assigned to the University of Scranton Army Reserve Ofcer Training Corps (ROTC) where he serves as the recruiting operations ofcer and Kings College Detachment Commander. A combat veteran of both Afghanistan and Iraq, he is married to the former Jennifer Kellett of Easley, South Carolina. Shawn Dolan graduated this summer from Florida A and M University with a masters degree in architecture. Commencement was held Aug. 3 in the Alfred Lawson Jr. Multipurpose Center and Teaching Gymnasium, with the Rev. O. Jermaine Simmons Sr., pastor of Jacob Chapel Baptist Church in Tallahassee, as commencement speaker. Dolans masters thesis is entitled The Role of Site Planning in Historical Restoration: Potential Design Guidelines for Future Historic Preservations. He is the son of Aglaia and the late Hal Dolan of Eastpoint, and has one brother, Maj. Michael Dolan, of Scranton, New York. Dolans maternal grandparents are the late Jim Mosconis and the late Zelda Mae Mosconis Stanley. Paternal grandparents are the late Ruth and John Dolan of Havana. Kristie Walker and Nicholas Soderholm would like to announce the birth of their son, Tyler Evan Soderholm. Born on Tuesday, Sept. 11, he weighed 7 pounds, 12 ounces and was 20 3/4 inches in length. Maternal grandparents are Ivan Walker, of Carrabelle, and Christine Silvey, of Crawfordville. Paternal grandmother is Sharon Soderholm, of Carrabelle. Maternal greatgrandparents are Dennis Allen, of Crawfordville, Judy Stevens, of Panacea, and Gail Browning, of Bridge City, Texas. Paternal great-grandmother is Margaret Zuberbeuhler, of Carrabelle. TYLER SODERHOLM BORNHappy sixth birthday, RaymondMichael Dolan promoted to majorShawn Dolan earns masters of architectureLacey Brownell, Corbin Mallon engagedWhitney McAlister, Christopher Leuenberger engagedJessica Mock, Jordan Brock to wed Saturday

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The Times | A7Thursday, October 11, 2012Special to the TimesHappy 20th anniversary to Franklin County Public Library, which joined forces with Wilderness Coast Public Libraries (Wakulla and Jefferson counties) in August 1992. The county library began operations on Oct. 1, 1992, in a storefront in Eastpoint. Throughout the years the library has moved into three storefront units, to include administration and a branch in Carrabelle. It has a material collection that totals more than 37,000 items, more than 5,200 registered patrons, four fulltime staff and one part-time staff keeping two libraries running with services and programs for Franklin County and guests. More than 32,000 items circulated last year. Volunteers are the heart of our success and allow us to offer programs to children, teens and adults. Services include assistance for food stamps, unemployment, job searches, faxing to the Department of Children and Families, as well as business development and job skills. Basic computer skills instruction is offered weekly by appointment. Visit http://fcpl. wildernesscoast.org for more information about your libraries and, check out our Facebook page and online catalog for materials and your account. To log into your account on the webpage, use your library card number for the user ID and the last four numbers as your password. At the Carrabelle branch, on Wednesday, Oct. 17, from 3-6 p.m., children and parents can see the movie Mirror, Mirror. This viewing is free and light refreshments will be offered. Mommy and Me story time program is every Friday at 3:30 p.m. in the library in Eastpoint that includes crafts, snacks, music and fun games. The United Methodist Churches of Franklin County Welcome You First United Methodist Church of ApalachicolaWorship Service 11:00 a.m. every Sunday Sunday School 10:00 a.m. 75 5th St. Apalachicola 653-9530 fumcapalach@gtcom.net Pastor: Rev. Themo PatriotisCarrabelle United Methodist ChurchWorship Services 10:45 a.m. Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Celebrate Recovery Mondays 7-9 p.m. 102 NE Ave. B Carrabelle 697-3672 Pastor: Julie StephensEastpoint United Methodist ChurchWorship Service 10:00 a.m. every Sunday Healing service every fourth Monday at 7:00 p.m. 317 Patton Dr. (corner of David St.) 670-8825 Pastor: Rev. Beth WhiteSt. George Island United Methodist Church9:00 a.m. Worship Service 10:00 a.m. Fellowship Hour 201 E. Gulf Beach Dr. 9274635 www.sgiumc.org Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis Nursery now provided for Sunday Church Service First Pentecostal Holiness Church379 Brownsville Road Apalachicola Were excited about what Gods doing!!!Sunday School 9:45 am Sunday Morning Worship 10:45 am Sunday Evening Service 6:00 pm Monday, Youth Group 6:30 pm Wednesday, Royal Rangers, G.A.P.7:00 pm Wednesday Worship & Word 7:30 pmNursery Provided during regular church services 7:00 7:00 First Baptist ChurchSt. George Island 501 E. Bayshore Drive 927-2257 R. Michael Waley, Pastor Join us as we praise and worship the living Christ. Great is the Lord and most worthy of praise. Psalm 145:3 Sunday Bible Study................................................10:00am Worship Praise........................................................11:00am Sunday Night............................................................7:00pm Wednesday Power Hour......................................7:00pm Wednesday Youth at S.P.L.A.S.H.......................7:00pm Walking in Christ R. Michael Whaley, Pastor WELCOMES YOUChurch of the Ascension101 NE First Street CarrabelleSUNDAY10:00 AM WELCOMES YOUChurch THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH (850) 274-4490 (850) 545-2578 WELCOMES YOU Trinity Trinity Episcopal Churchest. 1836Welcomes YouHwy. 98 & 6th St. Apalachicola 850-653-9550Sunday Worship Services 8 & 10:30 a.m. Wednesdays Healing Service 11 a.m. Centering Prayer 4 p.m. Sunday Worship Services 8 & 10:30 a.m. Wednesdays Healing Service 11 a.m. Centering Prayer 4 p.m. A remembrance service will be held Wednesday, Oct. 24, from 4 to 6 p.m., on St. George Island to commemorate and celebrate the life of Lawrence J. Kienzle, who died Sept. 11 at age 86. Those interested in attending are asked to conrm attendance by calling his daughter, Patti Bielling at  757810-1675. In lieu of owers,  the family requests donations be made to a favorite charity in the name of Lawrence Kienzle.Lawrence Kienzle LAWRENCE KIENZlLETyrone Renard Evans was born on March 2, 1959, in Manhattan, New York to Julia Mae Fisher and Jon Dorian Evans. At a very young age Tyrone moved to Apalachicola and was raised by his late great-grandparents, Willie and Lettie Leverette. He graduated from Apalachicola High School in 1977. For almost 20 years, Tyrone worked at the Apalachicola Railroad until it shut down. In 2000, Tyrone started working for the Franklin County landll until the Lord called him home. On Thursday, Sept. 27, he peacefully slipped away to join his family who went on before him. Welcoming him were great-grandparents Willie and Lettie Leverette, grandmother Callie Mae Simon, grandparents Ceaphous and Margarette Fisher, grandfather John L. Evans, sister Eugenia Evans and brother Jon D. Evans, Jr. Remaining to cherish is loving memories are sons, Tyrone Renard Evans, Jr. of Charleston, West Virginia, and Dorian James Evans, of Apalachicola; mother Julia Mae Fisher, of Apalachicola; father Jon Dorian Evans, of Rapid City, South Dakota; grandmother, Susie Evans, of Suffolk, Virginia; sisters Gloria D. Hayward (Warren) of Orlando; Olivia D. Wynn (Adron) of Apalachicola; Gwendolyn Drakeford, of Hackensack, New Jersey; and Cynthia Phelps, of Irvington, New Jersey; and Regis Ackerman, of Baltimore, Maryland; brother Joseph D. Evans of Aiken, South Carolina; and former wife, Tronda Davis, of Apalachicola. He is also survived by granddaughters Tiandra Shiqualle Evans, of Gainesville, and Gabrielle Olivia Loehr-Evans of Charleston, West Virginia; great-grandson Tyoune Jaquell Evans of Gainesville; godchildren Marvin Croom, Jr. of Dothan, Alabama, and Ashaureah Brown of Apalachicola; special cousin Bobbie Gail Turrell, of Apalachicola; and a host of aunts, uncles, nieces, nephews, cousins and special friends. Tyrone also helped raise Justin Griggs, Cruz Griggs, and Nyasha Evans, all of Apalachicola. Tyrone will be remembered by his beautiful smile and making people laugh. He will be greatly missed by all who knew and loved him.Tyrone RRenard EEvans TYRONEEE EVANSTo know that there are friends who really care, our  burdens are made easier to bear. The family of the late Tyrone Renard Evans (Big Ty) acknowledges with sincere appreciation the many acts of love and kindness shown through your cards, owers, and prayers. For all your kind deeds and thoughtful expressions of sympathy during the passing of our loved one, we are forever grateful. We have been overwhelmed with kindness; so that no one is missed individual acknowledgements will not be sent. May God continue to bless each of you. You are all in our prayers. Again, we thank you with utmost heartfelt appreciation.The family of Tyrone EvansOur heartfelt thanks go out to our loving church family Carrabelle United Methodist Church for all the prayers, cards and kindness. We would also like to thank our American Legion Post #82, Sons of the American Legion and Ladies Auxiliary for all their support and all the hard work they put in on our benet Sept. 22. Words are not enough to express our thanks to our friends who looked after Poncho. With Love, Ann and Charlie MerrellZella Smith, her friends and family wish to thank all of Franklin County and everybody who pitched in to help with our benet luncheon on Tuesday, Oct. 9, including the people and organizations too numerous to mention. Thanks to all who donated food and the use of equipment for the event, those who donated money and those who came and shared lunch with us. We sold more than 250 dinners to benet Zella and her family. The outpouring of love and support stretched over the entire county. Once again, thank you, Jennifer Finch and Peggy HicksDAVId D AdlADL ERSt T EIN | The TimesThe community is invited to attend an open house and dedication of Christ Community Academy, at 12:30 p.m. this Sunday in the First United Methodist Church Sunday school building at 75 5th Street, Apalachicola. C hrist Community Academy provides  quality Christian child care services at an affordable price for families with young children. Stafng the new academy are, from left, Director Madeline Kidney, Coordinator Samantha Cannon and teachers Dakaya Floyd and Erin Bailey. Come by and meet the staff, tour the classrooms and enjoy refreshments. LOIS OIS SWOSWO BO O DA A | The TimesChaos Springer receives his blessing from Kay Wheeler at Trinity Episcopal Church on Sunday, part of the churchs annual blessing of the animals. A dozen canines and their owners attended the ceremony led by Wheeler and the Rev. John Sink. Following prayers and a reading from the book of Genesis (1:20-22, 24-28, 31a), the entire assembly joined in St. Francis of Assisis prayer Lord, make me an instrument of your peace. The animals were then anointed by holy water on a stem of rosemary. Music to was performed by Tom Adams and Brooks Jones. For a gallery of pictures, visit www.apalachtimes.com. Sure is great to see Old Glory waving over the Post Ofce again! Thank you, Tommy Jack! The girls at the thrift store have got it ready for Halloween. Lots of decorations and spooky stuff for sale. Come on by, look around, have a cup of coffee and just visit. Saturday was great for the yard sale, Black Bear Festival and the Democratic rally. The yard sale at the golf course was successful. Lots of donated items and plenty of shoppers. Hope you found that one thing you were looking for. The members of the Lanark Village Golf Club thank you for your support and donations. Mark your calendars for Saturday, Nov. 3. The golf club members will prepare and serve your full breakfast at Chillas Hall. Your donation of $5 will get you started. Find a place to sit, ll out the blank and enjoy! Orange juice, coffee, pancakes, French toast, bacon and eggs. See you there! When was the last time you got a mug of coffee for 30 cents? I thought so. Well you can at Chillas Hall, Monday through Saturday from 8 to 11 a.m. Come in, have a mug with your friends and neighbors, get your mail and have another mug. Sometimes there are goodies to go along with the coffee. We will have our annual Thanksgiving Dinner on Thursday, Nov. 22 at Chillas Hall. Bring your favorite dish to share and a donation and join us. Our friend Commissioner Cheryl Sanders is donating the turkeys. Serving begins at 1 p.m. See you there! When youre not using your boat, it should be parked in the boat yard or under your carport, but not taking up a space on the street! Be kind to one another, check on the sick and housebound and remember God is watching us from a distance! Until next time God bless America, our troops, the poor, homeless and hungry.Thrift store readies for Halloween LANARkK NEWSJim Welsh BlLESSING tTHE bBEAStTS Cards of THAN HANKSS Obituaries Your COUNtTY lLIbBRARY NEW CHRIStTIAN CHIldLD CARE tTO OPEN Faith

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Email outdoors news to timesoutdoors @star .com OUTDOORSwww.apalachtimes.comSection Section A Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL(next to Piggly Wiggly) www.BWOsh.com (next to Piggly Wiggly) www.BWOsh.com Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL EVERYTHING FOR YOUR OUTDOOR ADVENTURE EV E EV E EV RYTHING FOR YOUR E RYTHING FOR YOUR E O UTDOOR ADV E UTDOOR ADV E UTDOOR ADV NTUR E NTUR E E EV E EV E EV RYTHING FOR YOUR E RYTHING FOR YOUR E O UTDOOR ADV E UTDOOR ADV E UTDOOR ADV NTUR E NTUR E E SEPTEMBER FEATURE FISH: Stop in and register or go online at www.BWOsh.comREDFISH ER FEATURE FISH: WEEKLY ALMANAC APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE TIDE TABLES MONTHLY AVERAGESTo nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from these given for APALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW Cat Point Minus 0:40 Minus 1:17 East Pass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27 To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from those given for CARRABELLE: HIGH LOW Bald Point Minus 9:16 Minus 0:03 Sponsor the WEEKLY ALMANACCall Today!653-8868 Date HighLow% Precip Thu, Oct. 1182 67 0% Fri, Oct. 1281 70 0% Sat, Oct. 1381 70 0% Sun, Oct. 1482 6810% Mon, Oct. 1583 6810% Tues, Oct. 1682 6630% Wed, Oct. 1780 66 0% 10 We 120am 1.6 1133am 1.5 649am 1.2 720pm 0.5 11 Th 151am 1.6 100pm 1.6 746am 1.0 808pm 0.6 12 Fr 216am 1.6 216pm 1.6 832am 0.8 850pm 0.7 13 Sa 238am 1.7 323pm 1.7 914am 0.6 928pm 0.8 14 Su 258am 1.7 426pm 1.7 955am 0.3 1004pm 1.0 15 Mo 321am 1.8 526pm 1.7 1036am 0.2 1037pm 1.1 16 Tu 346am 1.9 626pm 1.7 1120am 0.0 1109pm 1.3 17 We 416am 1.9 727pm 1.7 1207pm -0.1 1142pm 1.4 18 Th 452am 2.0 833pm 1.6 100pm -0.1 19 Fr 534am 2.0 942pm 1.5 1217am 1.4 200pm 0.0 20 Sa 623am 1.9 1053pm 1.5 101am 1.4 309pm 0.1 21 Su 722am 1.8 1152pm 1.5 209am 1.4 423pm 0.2 22 Mo 840am 1.6 354am 1.3 534pm 0.3 23 Tu 1235am 1.5 1023am 1.5 539am 1.2 638pm 0.5 11 Th 1226am 2.6 1135am 2.6 533am 1.6 555pm 1.0 12 Fr 1251am 2.6 1251pm 2.6 619am 1.3 637pm 1.1 13 Sa 113am 2.7 158pm 2.7 701am 1.0 715pm 1.3 14 Su 133am 2.7 301pm 2.7 742am 0.5 751pm 1.6 15 Mo 156am 2.9 401pm 2.7 823am 0.3 824pm 1.8 16 Tu 221am 3.0 501pm 2.7 907am 0.0 856pm 2.1 17 We 251am 3.0 602pm 2.7 954am -0.2 929pm 2.2 18 Th 327am 3.2 708pm 2.6 1047am -0.2 1004pm 2.2 19 Fr 409am 3.2 817pm 2.4 1147am 0.0 1048pm 2.2 20 Sa 458am 3.0 928pm 2.4 1256pm 0.2 1156pm 2.2 21 Su 557am 2.9 1027pm 2.4 210pm 0.3 22 Mo 715am 2.6 1110pm 2.4 141am 2.1 321pm 0.5 23 Tu 858am 2.4 1143pm 2.4 326am 1.9 425pm 0.8 24 We 1057am 2.2 445am 1.4 519pm 1.0 Thursday, October 11, 2012 Page 8By LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star .com The weather was perfect, the setting beautiful and there was plenty to do at this years Black Bear Festival in Carrabelle. More exhibits than in the past graced Sands Park, with several dozen booths clustered around the childrens activity tent. Presenters said about 300 people attended the event, down a bit from last year. Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission biologist Dave Telesco said he believed the Whatever Floats Your Boat Regatta at the marine lab competed with the festival for attendees, because both were environmentally oriented. He said a strong college sports line-up may also have reduced attendance. Organizers did a beautiful job pulling the whole thing together. The new reading circle and morning lectures were the most popular and best attended features of the festival. A surprise attendee on Saturday morning was an actual black bear. FWC Bear Biologist Adam Warwick brought a small female bear that had been trapped for relocation. He demonstrated handling with the little bear as a volunteer helper. As the crowd watched, Warwick darted, weighed and measured the bear. It seems pretty certain this is one bear who has learned her lesson about hanging around with people. After the awful experience of being surrounded by gawking human beings, shell certainly head for the hills once released. Several local authors were on hand to read their books and Maggie, the main character in Beagle with the Broken Tail was available to give paw prints. A dozen FWC interns came and provided hands-on wildlife activities. Telesco demonstrated the latest technology for discouraging nuisance bears, including a new bear-proof trash can design, electric fencing and an unwelcome mat. There were lots of craft booths and several choices of cuisine. Music was provided by Brian Bowen and King Cotton. As always, a highlight of the gathering was the procession of the species, when several dozen participants paraded through the park displaying a collection of hand-crafted animal masks. To see a gallery of the Black Bear Festival visit www.apalachtimes.comBlack bear crashes Carrabelle festivalOn Saturday, seven sloops fashioned from discarded articles and foraged otsam competed for awards in the rst ever Whatever Floats Your Boat Regatta, at the Florida State University Coastal and Marine Laboratory. The only requirement was that the vessels be cobbled together from recycled goods. Mary Balthrop, a spokesperson for the event, said none of the fanciful otilla actually sank during the crossing of the canal adjacent to the lab, but the Palletdrome sailing under Capt. Marjorie Reviver Turnbull won the Titanic Award for the most spectacular failure. In the words of the judges, the Palletdrome entered the competition as a ne vessel and left as a mere shadow of herself. First to complete the crossing was the very seaworthy FLO created and crewed by Boy Scout Troop 8 from Crawfordville. FLO was composed of tree branches and scrap lumber lashed to empty plastic barrels. Ninjas astride a giant plastic turtle stuffed with bottles and anything that would oat won the prize for most creative use of materials. The S.S. Turtle, with Dayma Wasmund at the helm, was the creation of the FSU Aquatic Environmental Sciences Department. Best costume award went to Co-Captains Jack and Bridget Martin aboard Miss Marys Nemesis. Paddling enthusiast Katy Herzog of Carrabelle took the Peoples Choice prize for the HMS Carrabelle, a kayak constructed of aluminum beer cans. Balthrop estimated 150 people attended, not including boaters in the regatta, and promised a bigger, better event next year. Food was available from Poseys of Panacea and there was music by the New 76ers. Judges for this years event were Administrative Law Judge David Maloney, Mike Marshall from Marshalls berglass in Carrabelle, Michelle Gardner of FSU Human Resources, Jim Muller, environmental attorney at Muller and Associates and chairman of the marine labs board of trustees. By Lois SwobodaNobody sank in rst ever recycling regattaBy LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star .com When Jim Bachrach of Apalachicolas Main Street program came to me and asked for a list of native plants to be used in the downtown streetscape, I was delighted to hear that the committee had pledged to install environmentally friendly plantings downtown. Thus I was equally disappointed when I saw the choice of plant material on Avenue E. Those little pink owers are Mexican petunia (Ruellia brittoniana), a native of Mexico. It is listed by the Florida Exotic Pest Plant Council as a Class One invasive and known to be especially aggressive in wetlands. It alters native plant communities by displacing native species and changing community structures or ecological functions. In other words, Mexican petunia invades wetlands and displaces native species. Its invasiveness is enhanced by its fast growth, proli c production of seeds, and an extensive root system. Now the Main Street committee is not the rst to introduce this bad actor into our local ecosystem. The blue form is running rampant in the alleys of the historic district already. But Main Streets use of Ruella in their downtown planting shows a disregard for environmental issues and ignorance of what sort of plant would be desirable in a planting on a river bank. Anything planted in our downtown is guaranteed to spread to surrounding wetlands. The Main Street Committee had an opportunity to do the right thing and set an example for the rest of the community by making the effort to use native plants. Sadly they chose not to do so. BUDS N BUGS: MEXICAN PETUNIA BUDS N BUGSLois Swoboda PHOTOS BY LOIS SWOBODA | The TimesFWC intern Robert Wiwi introduces Charity Larkin (wearing the bear mask) to Scooter, a female gopher tortoise. Allee Pritchard and Michael Justin Humphries created rainbow bears in the activity tent. Scout Troop 8 aboard the FLOPHOTOS BY LOIS SWOBODA | The TimesPalletdrome winner of the Titanic Award SPONSORED BY Freshwater InshoreFlounder continue to be the hot ticket right now around St. Joe Bay and on most coastal waters. Goerge Tapper Bridge has had good reports of doormat flounder and slot sized red fish this week. The Mexico Beach canal is also a good place to get your limit of flounder from shore. Lakes and creeks are starting to reports on good freshwater fishing. Lake Wimico has had mixed reports of bass and bream this week, but not much to brag about. Good catfishing and bream are holding good in Howard Creek and the Brothers.

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CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA SP O RTS www.apalachtimes.com ASection CITY OF APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA PUBLIC NOTICE NEW THREE-WAY AND FOUR-WAY STOPSIn the continued interest of public safety for our citizens and visitors, the City of Apalachicola will be Please take note of these changes and be prepared for additional required stops in your travel pattern Bay Avenue and 8 th Bay Avenue and 11 th 11 th 17 th 18 th 22 nd 22 nd Avenue and Bobby Cato 25 th Avenue and Bobby Cato 25 th 8 th 10 th 16 th 17 th 22 nd 22 nd 23 rd 24 th Avenue and Bobby Cato 24 th 24 th 24 th Avenue and 12th 850-653-9319 or Bobby Varnes, Chief of Police at 850-653-9755. Page 9 Thursday, October 11, 2012Franklin Countys youth football program got underway last month with the jamboree Sept. 29 in Blountstown. The Tiny Mites, for boys ages 7, 8 and 9, took on Wewahitchka for one half of play, and engineered a 12-6 victory. Brock Johnson, who coaches the team together with Byron Blan and Kelvin Martin, said the team had two offensive series and scored both times. Lamarius Martin scored on a 50-yard touchdown run, and Caden Turrell sprinted into the endzone on a 70-yard run. On Saturday, the two dozen young football players again traveled to Blountstown, this time to take on the budding Tigers in the season opener. Johnson said the team lost 34-14 to Blountstown. The up-and-coming Seahawks scored when Caden Turrell broke loose for a 55-yard touchdown run, and when Martin threw a 65-yard touchdown strike to Jarvis Turrell. We fumbled the ball too many times, said Johnson. Other than that we played good. For the Pee Wee bracket, for boys age 10, 11 and 12, Franklin County found victory in the jamboree, when they blanked Port St. Joe 14-0 on the strength of two touchdown runs by Ethan Riley in the one half of play.. Brad Segree, assistant to head coach Matt Kelley, said the team met defeat Saturday on opening day at Blountstown, when they were shut out 15-0. We got down inside the red zone, and one time inside the 5yard-line, and but we couldnt punch it through, said Segree. Both teams play Saturday in Chattahoochee. The teams are under the auspices of Franklin County Parks and Recreation.By David Adlerstein By DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com Port St. Joe found success in the air Friday night to complement a steady running game, as they downed Franklin County 56-14. Holding a 14-7 lead after the rst quarter, freshman quarterback Troy Williams threw two scoring strikes to junior running back Natron Lee, a 25-yarder and a 60yarder, in the space of ve minutes in the second quarter to break the game open. In between the two aerial scores, Williams rushed for a touchdown, running it in from the one with four minutes left in the second quarter. In all, Williams connected on six-of eight for the night, for 157 yards, We threw the ball a little bit better tonight and the deal there is if were able to throw the ball a little bit, that will help us down the stretch and open up the running game, said Port St. Joe Coach Chuck Gannon, whose team went to 3-2 on the year and 1-1 in the league. The Tiger Shark running game didnt need much opening up against the Seahawks, as sophomore running back Jarkice Davis, posted two early rushing touchdowns of 11 and four yards, to give Port St. Joe a 14-0 lead, with three minutes left in the rst quarter. Right before the half, Davis ran in from 27 yards out, for his third touchdown, and a 42-14 Tiger Shark halftime lead. Davis carried the ball 12 times for 139 yards, and helped the cause on defense with his fourth and nal touchdown, scooping up a Seahawk fumble from his linebacker position and running it 26 yards into the endzone early in the third quarter, for a 49-14 lead. The eighth and nal Port St. Joe touchdown came with 10 minutes left in the game, when senior Corey North ran the ball 45 yards up the middle. Junior kicker Justin Hites connected on seven-ofeight extra points, with one blocked. Franklin County looked to make a game of it in the early stages, as junior Dwayne Griggs had a 10yard touchdown run with 25 seconds left in the rst quarter. Griggs, who is a cousin to Davis, with both sporting #1 on their jerseys, brought the Seahawks within six points 20-14 with an 80-yard touchdown tear midway through the second quarter. We gave the Griggs kid too much space, said Gannon. Hes a good runner and we just gave him too much space, but he made some good moves also. Griggs was saddled with an ankle injury for several minutes late in the game, and senior Skyler Hutchinson had two teeth damaged early on, all evidence of what was a tough physical performance all night by Port. St. Joe. Were getting better at it, said Gannon. We got to get stronger in the weight room and we have to play St. Joe football from the past, and that was coming in and stick you for four quarters. And thats what we did and thats what weve been stressing all year. Highlighting halftime was the sixth annual crowning of the Mr. and Miss Franklin County High School, the most coveted title bestowed upon a senior, elected by the student body for who they feel best embodies the spirit of the high school. When considering candidates, the students consider academics, character, leadership, athletics and school spirit. To handle the crowning duties, last years homecoming queen Emerald Norris, lled in for last years Miss FCHS, Adreenah Wynn, who is enrolled at the University of Florida. Tressie Buffkin crowned Mr. FCHS on behalf of her brother Chance Buffkin, last years recipient, who is presently in the Army. Selected Miss FCHS was Katie Wood, accompanied by her parents, Charlie and Jeanine Wood, of Carrabelle. She is the granddaughter of Donald and Sandra Wood of Crawfordville, and J.T. and the late Velma Boatwright, of Eastpoint. Active at school, including serving as vice president of the senior class, Wood plans to major in English and literature at a university. Selected Mr. FCHS was Zach Howze, accompanied by his mother and stepfather, Stephanie and Lee Jones, and in spirit by his father, the late William Meador. Howze is active in school, including serving as second vice president of the senior class, and is a student-athlete as well, a member of the football, soccer and baseball teams. He plans to major in sports training at the University of West Florida. The Seahawks, now 15, will not play this Friday night, since Bell, which was set to host Franklin County, has decided to cancel this game. The Seahawks are next up on Oct. 19, when they host West Gadsden for homecoming. A new day dawned Saturday for Franklin County soccer as the countywide league had its debut. League President Betty Sasnett said there are a dozen teams in the league, 10 from Apalachicola, an under-8 team from Eastpoint, and an under-6 team from Carrabelle. The younger teams will play their games mostly in the county, although the older teams have some dates in Gulf County with Port St. Joe, part of the league that the Franklin County teams spun off of. Teams this year, and their coaches, are for under-6, Harrison Bail Bond, coach Allen Millender; Ace Hardware, coach Lloyd Alford; and Best Western, coach Brad Blackburn; and under-8, Marks Insurance, coach Caleb Kembro; Ace Hardware, coach Isaac Diaz; and Five Star Home Repair, coached by the only female skipper, Shelby Lipscomb, pictured below. Teams in the under-10 division are Journeys of SGI, coach Clint Taylor, and Blue Parrot, coach Thomas Noffsinger; in the under-12 division, Ace Hardware, coach Richard Herrington, and Shaun Donahoe Real Estate, coach Craig Hicks; and in the under-14 division, Cates Electric, coach Greg Sasnett, and Harry As Restaurant, coach Stacy Kirvin. In photo above, players for the Apalachicola Ace Hardware under-8 team, in black, battle against the Marks Insurance team, in red. By David AdlersteinNew soccer league begins playFuture Seahawks hit the gridiron PHOTOS BY PHIL COALE | Special to the TimesFranklin Countys Pee Wee quarterback Ethan Riley runs away from Blountstowns Cain Miller. Lamarius Martin, quarterback for the Franklin County Tiny Mites, front, runs away from Blountstowns John Thompson, left, as Franklin Countys Gabriel Lowry, right, attempts to block. DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times SHELBY LIPSCOMBFive Star Home Repair CoachPort St. Joe football team rolls past SeahawksDAVID ADLERSTEIN | the TimesMr. and Miss Franklin County High School Zach Howze and Katie Wood.

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LocalA10 | The Times Thursday, October 11, 2012to expedite review of a possible plan to dredge the Eastpoint channel, but funding from the Army Corps of Engineers remains uncertain. Were not worried about the channel right now, Harts eld said. Were focusing on whats in hand. Were worried about this bay right now. He said the governor asked Jackel to send him a letter with a map about all that was talked about. He pretty well told us that theres nothing in his power to get us some fresh water, but he would lobby the Corps and he would support us, Harts eld said. The resource fair, the second in less than a month, assisted several hundred residents. The governor announced that a National Emergency Grant from the U.S. Department of Labor will provide more than $250,000 to hire dislocated shermen as workers to help the county with traditional recovery efforts. During his visit, Scott toured the Department of Economic Opportunitys Mobile One-Stop Unit, which provides employment, reemployment and Re-employment Assistance Program services. DEO helped coordinate a food drive with state agencies to help impacted residents, and the rst batch of food was delivered the day of the governors visit. Farm Share provided 42,000 pounds of food, everything from donated beans, yogurt, soup, condiments to soft drinks, for more than 500 distressed families. Property Appraiser Doris Pendleton, Emergency Management Director Pam Brownell, Parks and Recreation Director Nikki Millender and Tony Shiver, candidate for county commissioner, were among those helping to unload the tractor trailer truck into a queue of cars and trucks. At one point Scott even pitched in, helping to load a few vehicles. We were thrilled that Gov. Scott came and handed out Farm Share food to the individuals who were driving through getting cases of basic food for their families, said Farm Share Founder and Chairman Patricia Robbins. We look forward to the governors continued support of food for the people of Franklin County through the Farm Share program. We will be doing a weekly food distribution there until things improve for our shermen. Farm Share also set aside food to be distributed later to shermen out on their boats and unable to attend. Scott spoke to residents about other needs as well, at one point summoning Bobby Pickels, community relations manager for Progress Energy, to talk with Catherine Shiver about her light bill. If there is any sign that needs to be publicized in Franklin County, its Help, Shiver told Pickels. Pickels said the company has an ongoing partnership with St. Patrick Catholic Church, and through the Progress Energy Foundation, plans to make an additional $10,000 contribution this year. Thats not going to solve everybodys problem, Pickels told Shiver. Were going to try as hard as we can within the structure that we have, to work with customers. He asked that customers in need of help contact the company before their lights are shut off, or it is much more dif cult to help. I dont want false hopes, sir. Please dont give us that, Shiver said. Do you all have little Cliff Notes that have the different counties and the different problems they are going through at the time? Like, lets say, New Orleans and ooding, and then Franklin county and the oystermen, do you all have little side notes that say these people are struggling? Because Im sure they hear these stories when the light bills come due, she said. I am sure they are hearing some stories and theyre true. Some of these people dont understand that. Theyve never had their lights cut off, and thats the hard part. At the tail end of his visit, Scott, anked by Montford, Jackel DEO Executive Director Hunting F. Deutsch and DCF Secretary David Wilkins, answered questions from the press. Florida is working with the Army Corps for a longterm plan to address the needs of Franklin County, while also helping to address short-term needs through worker training and food banks, Scott said. The Apalachicola Bay is critical to the state of Florida. It is home to the worlds best oysters and sheries, and the hardworking residents here rely on the bay to provide for their families. State agencies and community organizations are coming together to ensure families in this area can get back on their feet quickly. These are individuals that dont want a government handout, they want to be helped, he said. Theres not one person I talked to that said, I want to become dependent on government. They want to be able to get a job. Theyre struggling right now. Scott said the court decisions have not gone our way in the so-called water wars court case. He said Corps of cials told him their hands are tied by a congressional mandate. Weve got to make sure we get their mandate changed, Scott said. Its going to be incumbent on all of us involved to call on the Corps of Engineers to do the right thing. We have a great seafood industry in our state. Its a major part of our state, just like agriculture and cattle, he said. Were going to make sure that we continue to have a good commercial seafood operation in our state and a good recreational seafood operation. Montford underscored the gravity of the situation. These are serious issues, and one that needs to be addressed immediately. Its going to require immediate help and long-term planning, and the best way is through economic development. In the meantime, we need to provide food on the table. Jackel thanked the governor for his visit. We just appreciate the governor being in Franklin County today, she said. We know hes very busy, and we know Franklin County matters to the governor. Its a great shot in the arm. Stan TrappeATTORNEY AT LAW Foreclosure Defense Bankruptcy Asset Protection Real Estate Probate ~ WillsAdmitted to Practice Law in Florida Since 1974Let Me Help You 850-769-6139236 McKenzie Avenue Panama City, FL *VOTER INFORMATION* ***GENERAL ELECTION NOVEMBER 6, 2012*****Sample Ballots will be mailed to EVERY voter**You should begin to receive your sample ballot in the mail beginning this week. There will be 3 federal races, 3 state races, 2 local district races, 7 retention of justices and judges races, 1 circuit judge race and 11 amendments on the ballot. In order to prevent long lines, we encourage every voter to bring his or her marked SAMPLE BALLOT when you come to vote to assist in the voting process. If you wait until you go to vote, it will take you a while to read through the ballot and mark your vote thus causing delays**ABSENTEE VOTING (Voting by Mail)** *ABSENTEES ARE NOW AVAILIBLE*The ballot is 19 and contains 11 Amendments which are very lengthy. or go to our website at www.votefranklin.com and click the Request Absentee tab. October 31, 2012 Deadline for Supervisors to receive request for absentee ballots to be mailed for the General Election. November 1, 2012 the General Election (Designee may pick up no more than two absentee ballots and must have written authorization from the voter).**LOGIC & ACCURACY TEST** **EARLY VOTING**October 27th November 3rd Saturdays & Sunday: 8:30a.m. 2:30 p.m. Monday Friday: 8:30 a.m. 5:30 p.m. Due to a change in the law, early voting for the General Election will only be conducted for eight days prior to election day. Remember, there will be no early voting the Sunday and Monday before the election. You will have to vote an absentee ballot or wait and go to the polls on election day. REMEMBER VOTE BY MAIL, VOTE EARLY OR VOTE AT THE POLLS NO EXCUSES, Florida Law Requires Photo Signature ID When Voting or You Must Vote a Provisional Ballot. Franklin County Supervisor of Elections Ida Cooper Elliott (850) 653-9520, fax (850) 653-9092 icelliott@votefranklin.com www.votefranklin.com FRANKLIN COUNTY DEPARTMENT OF 210 State Road 65 FRANKLIN COUNTY SOLID WASTE & RECYCLING WINTER HOURS. MONDAY FRIDAY 9AM 4:30PM dbutler@coastalcoverage.com Locally owned and operated Home Business Auto Health Workers Comp SCOTT from page A1PHOTOS BY DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The TimesAt top, Gov. Rick Scott, left, greets State Sen. Bill Montford and County Commissioner Pinki Jackel. Above, Lori Switzer, left, and Property Appraiser Doris Pendleton bag Farm Share canned goods at the resource fair.

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The Times | A11Thursday, October 11, 2012Lanark woman killed in Taylor County crashA prominent member of the Lanark Village community was killed Monday afternoon in a one-car accident in Taylor County. Sharon H. Thoman, 67, a former president of the board of the Lanark Village Water and Sewer District, died after her car ran off the road around 12:10 p.m. as it was headed westbound on U.S. 98, a little more than one mile west of County Road 647. Thoman was a staffer at the Florida State University Coastal and Marine Lab at Alligator Point. According to the report led by Florida Highway Patrol crash investigator, Sgt, Aaron Stephens, and homicide investigator Cpl. Scotty Lolley, Thomans vehicle exited the roadway to the north shoulder, and she tried to correct by steering to the left, and then overcorrected to the right and lost control of the 2006 Kia Sorrento. The report said the vehicle overturned an unknown number of times and entered a waterlled ditch, where it came to rest facing southeast on its roof, with Thoman trapped inside, underwater. When they arrived, the state troopers found the vehicle facing north, upright, on the north shoulder, because it was moved by Taylor County Fire and Rescue. Thoman was taken to Doctors Memorial Hospital in Perry, and pronounced dead. The report said Thoman was wearing her seatbelt, and that alcohol tests are pending. Carrabelle woman charged with DUI manslaughter A 23-year-old Carrabelle woman has been charged with DUI manslaughter in connection with an April 17 crash in Carrabelle that killed the son of Sopchoppy Mayor Colleen Skipper. Rebecca Padowitz, 23, was arrested on Oct. 4 by Franklin County sheriffs deputies. Crash reports showed Padowitzs blood alcohol level was 0.17, more than twice the legal limit the day of the crash, which was her 23rd birthday. The Florida Highway Patrol reported that a 2001 Jeep Grand Cherokee driven by Padowitz spun out on a curve on U.S. 98 near Lake Morality Road, ipped over, struck a tree and caught re. Rona Hawkins, Jr., 28, was thrown from the car and killed. Padowitz sustained serious injuries and was treated at Tallahassee Memorial Hospital. Julian Collins, a second passenger, was wearing a seat belt, and did not sustain injuries. County retains lawyer in shing pier caseFranklin County commissioners have voted to retain outside counsel as they seek to make sure the county is compensated for damages to the St. George Island shing bridge that occurred June 28 during Tropical Storm Debby. The commissioners voted unanimously Oct. 2 to hire Robert Dees, certi ed by the Florida Bar in maritime and admiralty law. County Attorney Michael Shuler said Dees had agreed to receive $200 an hour, less than his customary hourly rate of $300 an hour. Dees services will become necessary in the event that the countys insurance carrier denies coverage and payment is sought from Progress Energy or its subcontractor for the damages, caused when a barge smashed into the pier. Greg Preble, from the Preble-Rish engineering rm, shared a proposal at the meeting to repair the165foot gap in the pier and the broken pilings and dangling pipes and cables. He said equipment from the barge fell into the water, along with three concrete sections of the bridge, creating a potential liability for the county. He said it is so far too expensive to send divers to inspect the situation below the water, but he believed the heavy bridge decking may have damaged remaining pilings below the water line. Preble said the project would require a budget of about $900,000, comprising a 16-foot wide timber pier superstructure on concrete pilings, capable of withstanding pedestrians, emergency vehicles and new storms, for $600,000, another $200,000 for debris removal and an additional $100,000 in case further damage is detected. The debris would be removed to make way for new pilings, and placed on top of the existing debris site in the water, rather than hauled offshore. Preble estimated the project would take eight months assuming no regulatory delays, half of that spent in construction, and would be completed by June 1, 2013. The commissioners voted to take the funds out of the $1.66 million in the bridge fund, which was set up by the state after it built the new bridge a decade ago. Shuler cautioned the commissioners that recouping the money is not necessarily a sure thing. There are no guarantees, he said. Keep expectations reasonable. The following report is provided by the Franklin County Sheriffs Of ce. Arrests in this report were made by of cers from the Carrabelle Police Department (CPD) and the Franklin County Sheriffs Of ce (FCSO). All defendants are to be considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law.Oct. 2Phillip McElravey, 31, no reported address, grand retail theft and burglary of a dwelling (FCSO) Shannon L. Bunn, 25, Apalachicola, failure to appear (FCSO)Oct. 3Albert E. Smythe, II, 41, Lanark Village, taking of a threatened species, tampering with physical evidence and false report to a law enforcement of cer (FCSO) Shanese J. Pritchard, 28, Eastpoint, felony passing worthless bank checks and violation of probation (FCSO)Oct. 4Catherine M. Terrell, 52, Apalachicola, Leon County warrant for violation of probation (FCSO) Rebecca Padowitz, 23, Carrabelle, manslaughter by DUI (FCSO)Oct. 5Xaviera M. Rutherford, 30, Tallahassee, withholding child support (FCSO) Homero Guerrero-Estrada, 25, Murfreesboro, Tenn., no valid drivers license (CPD)Oct. 6Eric A. Tatum, 32, Carrabelle, disorderly intoxication and battery (FCSO)Oct. 7Patricia N. Kennedy, 35, Lanark Village, DUI (CPD) David D. Hartman, 34, Eastpoint, violation of probation (FCSO) Jamie Z. Godinez, 26, Apalachicola, habitual driving while license revoked (FCSO) Willie E. Pelt, 30, Port St. Joe, domestic battery and violation of repeat violence injunction (FCSO) Trades & Services GET YOUR AD IN 653-8868Trades & Services Laban Bontrager, DMD Monica Bontrager, DMD 12761 Pea Ridge Road Bristol, Florida 32321TELEPHONE (850) 643-5417 Bristol Dental ClinicDENTURE LAB ON PREMISESSame Day Service on Repairs and Relines Don Lively General Contractors LICENSED ANDINSURED 20 YEARSEXPERIENCE P.O. Box 439 Carrabelle, FL 32322 697-2783 or Mobile 566-2603RC0066499RG0065255 Carrabelle Visa, Discover, and American Express Honored at Participating Ace Stores JACKSONSBuilding Supplies Building Supplies & Auto Repair Carrabelle 697-3333 We Deliver AnywhereHardware and Paint Center J.J.s Tree Service, LLC Stump Grinder Licensed & Insured Call John : (850) 899-8432 ROBERTS APPLIANCE REPAIR ALL MAJOR BRANDS 18 Shadow Lane Apalachicola, FL 32320 Phone: (850) 653-8122 Cell: (850) 653-7654 From A to ZPO Box 364Port St. Joe, FL 32457850-340-0756 Gregs Handyman Service & Lawn Maintenance BILL MILLER REALTY850-697-3751 (3310) 570-0658400 + COMM. U.S. 98 & GULFADJ. TO LANARK MARINA 850K$29,500 $2,500 DOWN BUYS 2 BED APT. 2 6 ORRENT $500/MTH 2 B/R 1 BTH GULF VIEW HOME W/ FAMILY ROOM $70,000 GULFVIEW & ACCESS 3 BDR 2 BA 2006 M/H 89K2 LG. SHADY LOTS 3 SHEDS400 TO MARINA-CITY WATER49KMIH 2 CRNRLOTS BLK. $ STORE REDUCED $49,500 2 AC-AT RIVER UTIL. IN -$39,500 COLLINSCONSTRUCTIONOF ST. GEORGE ISLAND, INC &SEWAGE TREATMENT SERVICESOVER 30 YEARS EXPERIENCE OURSERVICESINCLUDE: AFTER HOURS & EMERGENCY SERVICE PROVIDED 850.670.5790MAINTENANCE@JCOLLINSCONSTRUCTION.COM Robert C. Bruner Attorney Personal & Business BankruptcyOver 30 Years Legal Experience850-670-3030 bankruptcy relief under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon advertisements. Before you decide, ask us to send you free written information Arrest REPORT Law Enforcement BRIEFS Law Enforcement

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A12| The Times Thursday, October 11, 2012 CLASSIFIEDS 48 FEET-LONG / 96 INCHES WIDESIDE-DOOR / 2 BACK DOORS DUCT FLOORS $3,500 EACHCONTACT: C.E. MILLERS FREIGHTYARD EASTPOINT, FL (850)653-7816 -OR(850)670-8707 UTILITY INSULATED TRAILERS RENTALS1 BEDROOM, 1 BATH UNFURNISHED APT LANARK, REMODELED, INC WATER .................$425 2 BR, 1 BATH UNFURNISHED APT W/D HOOKUP, SMALL PORCH ..........................$375 1 BEDROOM, 1 BATH FURNISHED CONDO INCLUDES UTILITIES, MARINA .........................$910 3 BEDROOM, 2 BATH FURNISHED HOUSE ON RIVER, DOCK ..............................................$1000 3 BEDROOM 1 BATH DUPLEX UNFURNISHED, CARRABELLE ............................$600 3 BEDROOM 1 BATH END UNIT, W/D, WATER INCLUDED, UNFURNISHED .................$565 2 BR 1 BATH UNFURNISHED HOUSE FENCED YARD ......................................................$800 OFFICE SPACE US 98 CARRABELLE ........................................................$500 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322850-697-9604 850-323-0444 www.seacrestre.comwww. rst tness.com/carrabellePROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND RENTALS These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you. EmeraldCoast Marketplace 747-5020 Apalachicola 1Br/1Ba quiet, 2 blks from boat ramp, $600mo + first, last & dep. 850-570-9176 Text FL25130 to 56654 Apalachicola: 1 br, 1 ba efficiency Call for information 850-653-6103 Text FL5175 to 56654 St. GeorgeIsland $175/wk, elec, satellite, garbage incl. Pool tbl. 12 X 65 deck. Beautiful view! 850-653-5319 St. George Island 2Br, 1Ba, ground floor apt. Furnished or unfurnished, 12 x 65 Deck. $275/wk, 850-653-5319 1 BR, CottageH/AC in Apalachicola, Florida. 850-643-7740 Apalachicola, House for rent, Bay City Rd, Call 850-653-8965 or 850-323-1990 Carabelle: 3 bdr 2 bath with large spare room on 1 acre. Fenced yard, new tile throughout, freshly painted. $800 per month + dep. Call (850) 766-4357 Text FL26851 to 56654 Carrabelle 3 br, 2 ba, all tile floors, newly remodeled inside All new appliances and heat pump. $750 per month + deposit 850-697-4080 or 850591-5899 For Sale By Owner3BR/1BA home in Sumatra on Hwy 65 Newly remodeled. $59,000. Call (850) 670-8135 for details.Text FL24247 to 56654 Apalachicola Lots Block 177 Lot 6, $29,500 Block 150 Lot 4 $25,500 Call 850-597-0217 LOW INTERESTFINANCING Borrow up to 20k and pay $389.00 per mo. at 8% Car Loans, Small Business Loans & Debt Consolidation Bad Credit Ok Call Toll Free: 888-741-9122 Today!! Estate SaleApalachicola : 143 Magnolia Ln (Old Pogey Plant) Friday and Saturday, October 12th and 13th from 9am til ??? Port St. Joe : 506 8th St. Friday and Saturday October 12 & 13th from 8am til 4pm; Handcarved fishing lures, All kinds of Tools, and Lots more Items! GUN SHOWSanta Rosa County Auditorium, Milton, FL. Oct.20th & 21st 9am -5pm. Call (850) 957-4952 or (850) 261-8407 General Admission, $6Text FL26461 to 56654 NOW OPENMerchandise Liquidation Store, In Hickory Plaza Shopping Center, 414 S. Tyndall Parkway, Open 9-6 Daily, Closed Sundays 89961T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 08-000364-CA U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, SUCCESSOR TRUSTEE TO BANK OF AMERICA N.A. (SUCCESSOR TO LASALLE BANK N.A.), AS TRUSTEE, ON BEHALF OF THE HOLDERS OF THE THORNBURG MORTGAGE SECURITIES TRUST 2005-3 MORTGAGE LOAN PASSTHROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-3, Plaintiff, vs. JEFFREY S. GALLOWAY a/k/a JEFFREY GALLOWAY a/k/a JEFF GALLOWAY; RBC BANK (USA) f/k/a RBC CENTURA BANK; REGIONS BANK; SCHOONER LANDING HOME OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC. Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE is hereby given that the undersigned, Marcia Johnson, Clerk of the Circuit Court of Franklin County, Florida, will on the 24th day of October, 2011, at 11:00 oclock A.M., EST, in the Civil Division of the Franklin County Clerks Office, Main Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida in accordance with Chapter 45, FS., offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash, the following described property situated in Franklin County, Florida, to wit: Lot 2, SCHOONER LANDING PHASE 1, according to the Plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 6, Page 5, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida pursuant to the Consent Final Judgment entered in a case pending in said Court, the style and case number of which is set forth above. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the office of Sirote & Permutt, 1115 E. Gonzalez Street, Pensacola, Florida 32503, (850) 462-1500, within two (2) working days of your receipt of this Notice of Foreclosure Sale; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 1-800-955-8771. WITNESS my hand and official seal of this Honorable Court, this 21st day of September, 2011. MARCIA JOHNSON Clerk of the Circuit Court of Franklin County, Florida By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk Submitted By: Sirote & Permutt, PC Attorneys for Plaintiff 1115 E. Gonzalez St. Pensacola, FL 32503 850-462-1500 Fax: 850-462-1599 September 4, 11, 2012 89993 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION CASE NO.: 12-55-CP IN RE: ESTATE OF VIRGIE L. REED Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of VIRGIE L. REED, deceased, whose date of death was August 15, 2012, is pending in the Circuit Court for Franklin County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida 32320. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representa-tives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court, WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE OF THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate, must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS TIME NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is October 4, 2012. Personal Representative: BRIAN HARDY P.O. BOX 612 Carrabelle, FL 32322 Attorney for Personal Representative: Steve M. Watkins, III 41 Commerce Street Apalachicola, FL 32320 (850) 653-1949 Fla Bar No.: 0794996 October 4, 11, 2012 89963T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION Case No.: 12-52-CP IN RE: ESTATE OF HERMAN SCHOL Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of HERMAN SCHOL, deceased, File Number 12-52-CP, is pending in the Circuit Court for Franklin County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida 32320. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, on whom a copy of this notice is served must file their claims with the Court WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTIONS 733.702 AND 733.710, OR BE FOREVER BARRED. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 AND 733.710. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is October 4, 2012. Personal Representative: ROBERT SCHOL 100492 CR 32 Minature, NB 69356 Attorney for Personal Representative: Steve M. Watkins, III 41 Commerce Street Apalachicola, FL 32320 (850) 653-1949 Fla Bar No.: 0794996 October 4, 11, 2012 90033T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 19-2008-CA-000269 DIVISION: BANK OF AMERICA, N. A., Plaintiff, vs. REX H. ANDERSON et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated September 10, 2012 and entered in Case NO. 19-2008-CA000269 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for FRANKLIN County, Florida wherein BANK OF AMERICA, N. A., is the Plaintiff and REX H. ANDERSON; ANNE ANDERSON; KELLYS LANDING HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC.; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at FRONT DOOR OF THE FRANKLIN COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 33 MARKET STREET, APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA at 11:00AM, on the 24th day of October, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT 2 OF KELLYS LANDING, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 9 AT PAGE 4 OF THE OFFICIAL RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A XXX MILL ROAD, CARRABELLE, FL 32322 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on September 11, 2012. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Mr. Doug Smith, Office of Court Administration Leon County Courthouse, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301, Phone: 850577-4401, Fax: 850487-7947. F08037886 October 4, 11, 2012 90053T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 2012-CA-262 CENTENNIAL BANK, an Arkansas banking corporation Plaintiff, vs. JEFFERY A. STRICKLAND, RED TOP CAFE, INC., and UNITED STATES SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE Notice is hereby given that pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure, the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Franklin County, Florida, will on November 7th, 2012, at 11:00 a.m. (Eastern Time) at the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida 32320, in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes offer for sale, and sell to the highest and best bidder, the following described real and property situated in Franklin County, Florida: THAT PART OF LOT ONE (1) AND THAT PART OF LOT TWO (2) AS DESCRIBED BELOW, AND ALL OF LOT THREE (3) OF BLOCK 4, OF THE NEELS ADDITION TO THE CITY OF APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF ON FILE IN THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. EXCEPTING THEREFROM THAT PORTION OF LOTS TWO (2) AND THREE (3) PREVIOUSLY CONVEYED FOR RIGHT OF WAY FOR STATE ROAD NUMBER 30 (OLD NUMBER 10) AND ALSO KNOWN AS U.S. NUMBER 98. DESCRIPTION OF PARTIAL LOTS 1 AND 2: LOT ONE (1): ALL OF THAT PORTION LYING NORTH OF A LINE BEGINNING AT A POINT ON THE WEST PROPERTY LINE 82.0 FEET NORTH OF AN IRON PIPE MARKING THE SW CORNER OF LOT 1 AT THE INTERSECTION OF CENTER AND CHESTNUT STREETS AND RUNNING EASTERLY FOR A DISTANCE OF 92.4 FEET TO A POINT ENDING AT AN INTERSECTION 90.0 FEET FROM AND PERPENDICULAR TO THE WEST PROPERTY LINE AND 82.0 FEET FROM THE SOUTH PROPERTY LINE RUNNING PARALLEL TO THE WEST PROPERTY LINE AND ALSO INTERSECTING ON THE NE/SW CENTERLINE OF THE ABANDONED ALLEY. LOT TWO (2): ALL OF THAT PORTION LYING NORTH AND WEST OF A LINE BEGINNING AT THE PREVIOUSLY DESCRIBED ENDING POINT AND RUNNING NORTH AND PARALLEL TO THE WEST PROPERTY LINE A DISTANCE OF 28.7 FEET TO A POINT 36.0 FEET FROM A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE INTERSECTION OF LOTS 2 AND 3, THENCE RUNNING EASTERLY FOR A DISTANCE OF 36.0 FEET TO SAID MONUMENT. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim with the clerk of the court within 60 days after the sale. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Franklin County Clerk of Court, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL (850) 653-8861 at least 7 days before the scheduled foreclosure sale, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. WITNESS my hand and the official seal of this Honorable Court this 25th day of September, 2012. MARCIA JOHNSON Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk October 4, 11, 2012 90167T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No. 2011-000423-CA THE CARRABELLE BOAT CLUB ASSOCIATION, INC., a Florida non-profit corporation, Plaintiff, vs. STEVEN R. MACCHIARELLA and WOODWARD DEVELOPMENT, INC., Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION To: STEVEN R. MACCHIARELLA and WOODWARD DEVELOPMENT, INC., YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a claim of lien for assessments pursuant to Article 13 of the Declaration of Condominium for The Carrabelle Boat Club Association, Inc., a commercial condominium, recorded in Official Record Book 888, Page 552, et seq. of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida on the following real property in FRANKLIN County, Florida: Unit Number B-318 of that certain condominium of The Carrabelle Boat Club Association, Inc., a/k/a, The Carrabelle Boat Club Boathouse, and the undivided interest in the Common elements appurtenant thereto, in accordance with and subject to the Declaration of Condominium for the Carrabelle Boat Club Association, Inc., a Commercial Condominium recorded in official Records Book 888, Page 552-630 of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Barbara Sanders, Sanders and Duncan, P.A., the plaintiffs attorney, whose address is P.O. Box 157, Apalachicola, Florida 32320, on or before 30 days of the last date of publication, and file the original with the clerk of this Court, MARCIA JOHNSON, Franklin County Clerk of Court, Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida 32320, either before service on the plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. DATED this 3rd day of October, 2012. MARCIA M. JOHNSON As Clerk of the Court By: Terry E. Creamer As Deputy Clerk October 11,18, 2012 Franklin CountyLiquor License$165,000. Serious inquires/offers only at: anitalln242@aol.com Adopt*: Active young TV Producer & Attorney, home-cooking, beaches, sports await precious baby. Expenses paid *FLBar42311* *800-552-0045* Adopt*: Actor & Filmmaker, LOVE Awaits first baby. Matt & Kristi *Expenses paid* *FLBar42311* *800-552-0045* YORKIEAKC registered. 12 weeks old adorable puppy only 1 female left. Health Certified & 1st shots. $400. Please call 850-774-1229 Panama City Area Port St. Joe: 1017 Marvin Ave. October 11th -13th Thursday SaturdayHuge Yard SaleToo much to list!

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, October 11, 2012 The Times | A13 emeraldcoastjobs.com Employment Today By PETER VOGTMonster Senior Contributing Writer Every time youre on break from school, someone hits you with that most common question asked of college students: Whats your major? For months, youve been able to get away with responses like Im not sure, or Im keeping my options open. But now thanks to your schools academic rules, your parents incessant nagging or even your own impatience youre forced to make a choice, and you dont know what to do. Thousands of college students around the country go through the same anxiety-producing experience every year, often around mid-semester when they have to choose their courses for the following semester (and theyve already taken all their general or core courses). Are you in the I have to pick a major now what? mode? If so, dont panic. If youre like many college students, the major you select wont have a huge impact on your future career anyway. But even if it will, there are plenty of things you can do to help yourself make a sound decision.Meet with a campus career counselorYour schools career counselors know your institutions majors well, and they have a good general sense of where those majors might take you with respect to your career. Perhaps more importantly, though, many campus career centers keep detailed statistics on the types of jobs their schools graduates have landed with various majors. Typically, these statistics appear in the career centers placement report, which you can ask for and then read to find out where different majors might take you in the future.Read your undergraduate bulletin, related publicationsMaybe you dont need to actually read the entire undergraduate bulletin, but at the very least, page through it and look at all the majors available at your institution. You never know when youll stumble upon one that really fits your interests. If browsing your institutions undergraduate bulletin sounds far too boring, stop by your schools admissions office and ask for briefer major-related publications that might be available.Talk to professors and students in various majorsStart by asking your friends and acquaintances what theyre majoring in and why. What do these students like and dislike about their majors? And what can they tell you about the courses in their majors and the careers their majors might lead to? Similarly, ask professors in various academic departments to briefly describe their majors. Tell them youre interested in learning more about what previous students in the department have gone on to do, career-wise. Professors will gladly tell you in most cases, if you ask.Check out What Can I Do with a Major in ______? materialsThere are lots of ways to answer the question, What can I do with a major in _______?. Dozens of major-related books are available to you as well, often at your schools main library or your campus career centers library. VGM Career Horizons, for example, publishes several Great Jobs for _____ Majors books as well as the Opportunities in _____ ____ Careers series.Page through guides to college majorsSeveral publishers have developed books that offer extensive descriptions of various college majors and what careers those majors might lead to. JIST, for instance, offers The College Majors Handbook, which features information (based on a survey of some 150,000 college graduates) on 60 different majors. Ferguson Publishing, meanwhile, offers College Majors and Careers, which also describes 60 majors in detail. Theres no need to fly blind when it comes to researching and then choosing a college major, especially in this day of the Internet and easily accessible information. The more you talk to knowledgeable people and read about various majors, especially those you know little or nothing about, the better chance you have of picking the one that best fits both your short-term needs and your longterm career goals.I have to pick a major ... now what? Featured Jobs Contact Lorna at (850) 747-5019 or Email: lbrown@pcnh.com LORNA BROWNEMPLOYMENT SALES SPECIALIST LUSADY TAYLOREMPLOYMENT SALES SPECIALISTContact Lusady at (850) 522-5173 or Email: ltaylor@pcnh.com REPRESENTATIVES will be at the PORT ST. JOE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE on Tuesdays & Thursdays from 9 am 1 pm EST accepting applications for numerous open positions.We offer competitive wages and a comprehensive bene t package including Company paid health, dental, and life insurance, 401(k), attendance & safety bonuses.EOE/Drug Free WorkplaceEASTERN SHIPBUILDING GROUP MORE THAN A JOB A FUTURE! Earn While You Learn with the On the Job Training Program If you are unemployed you may be eligible for the Workforce Centers OJT program. On the job training gives you hands on experience in a new job and employers, OJT helps you save money! For more informaon call (850) 370-0726 An equal opportunity employer/program. Aux iliary aids and services are available upon request to individuals with disabilies. All voice telephone numbers on this document may be reached by persons using TTY/TDD equipment via the Florida Relay Service at 711. Logsitcs/TransportDrivers:All Miles PAID (Loaded & Empty)! Home on the weekends! Running Class-A CDL Flatbed. Lease to Own-No Money Down CALL: 888-880-5911 Medical/HealthNow HiringFull time positions for CNAs at St James Health and Rehab Center. Apply in person at 239 Crooked River Rd Carrabelle, FL 32322 Medical/HealthCaring Peopleand CNAs needed. Join a team of people who make a difference in the lives of the elderly. Provide non medical companionship, in home help & personal care for the elderly. Must be flexible. PT leading to FT-positions in the Port St. Joe and Apalachicola areas.Home Instead Senior CareCall Mon-Thur 9-3pm 850-640-1223 or toll free 1-866-301-1919 Web ID#: 34224571 Text FL24571 to 56654 Food Svs/HospitalityNow HiringReservationistPleasant personality, basic bookkeeping skills, computer literate and a team player! Apply in person at Gibson Inn 51 Avenue C (850) 653-2191 Bldg Const/TradesWildlife TechnicianFL Fish & Wildlife Conservation Com. Box-R Wildlife Mgt. Area Franklin County $26,540 Annual. Heavy equipment operation, road and facility maintenance, controlled burns, manage public hunts and wildlife surveys. Applications must be completed online at: https://jobs.myflorida.com/ For additional information contact: Billie Clayton 850-265-3676 EEO/AA Employer Web ID#: 34226960 Text FL26960 to 56654 OtherTest AdministratorTAFB (part-time)To secure & administer tests while maintaining an environment conducive to fair & accurate testing of students; provide clerical duties related to testing. Approximately 16 hrs./ week (T & TH, 8am-4:30pm). Requires HS diploma, AA preferred, working knowledge of office & computer equipment. Must NOT be an undergraduate student. Range begins at $10.92/hr. Position Open Until Filled. Only those who provide all requested items, GCSC Application (must be completed) will be considered. Additional info: www.gulfcoast.edu/hr. Women & minorities are strongly encouraged to apply. GCSC is an EA/EO/M/F/Vet employer. GCSC Equity Office 850.873.3516 Web ID#: 34227517Text FL27517 to 56654 OtherOyster Shuckers(Apalachicola, FL)40 temporary positions. Wearing rubber gloves, boots & caps, shucker opens & washes oysters, uses shucking knife to gently pry open oyster shell & separate from muscle so that meat can be frozen, canned, packed or otherwise disposed of as necessary. No exp or edu reqs.. From 6 am to 03 pm, M-F, with no OT. Temporary employment from 10/20/2012 to 06/15/2013. No transport to work site provided. Wage paid is $10 per hour. Work location at: 592 W. Highway 98, Apalachicola, FL 32320 and 391 Market St. Apalachicola, FL 32320. Apply to: Water Street Seafood, Attn: Steven Rash, Owner, PO Box 121, Apalachicola, FL 32329 or via email: stevenrash@ waterstreetseafood.com or telephone at (850) 653-8902 Web ID#: 34227252 Text FL27252 to 56654 OtherOyster Shuckers(Apalachicola, FL)20 temporary positions. Wearing rubber gloves, boots & caps, shucker opens & washes oysters, uses shucking knife to gently pry open oyster shell & separate from muscle so that meat can be frozen, canned, packed or otherwise disposed of as necessary. No exp or edu reqd. From 6am-3pm, M-F, with no OT. Temp employment from 10/15/2012 to 06/01/2013. Employer will provide mobile home on premises w/kitchen & bathroom. Wage paid is $9 /hr. Work location: 101 Water St., Apalachicola, FL 32320. Apply to: Leavins Seafood, Attn: Darren Guillotte, Owner, PO Box 520, Apalachicola, FL 32329 or via email: lsi@gtcom.net or telephone at (850) 653-8823 OtherCheck Station OperatorFlorida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission Is Now HiringWhat:Check Station OperatorWhere:Tates Hell State ForestSchedule required:Wednesday through Sunday (10am 6pm)Pay Rate:$8.00/hr This is a temporary position that is only during hunting season. To apply for this position please send resumes and letter of interest to adam.warwick@myfwc.co m For questions about the position please contact Billie Clayton at 850-265-3676 or billie.clayton@myfwc.co m Web ID#: 34226950 Classified Advertising works hard ...filling the employment needs of area business firms, helping people to meet their prospective employers, helping people buy and sell all kinds of goods and services, and much more! Nothing works harder than the Classifieds! 747-5020

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LocalA14 | The Times Thursday, October 11, 2012 Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Real Estate Picks SELL YOUR LISTINGS HERE! Only $35 per week per listing Minimum 2 ads per week or 1 ad for 2 weeks Contact Joel or Kari for details: (850)814-7377 or (850)227-7847SOLD MLS #247128 $389,000 312 LAND ST. ST. GEORGE ISLAND Gulf BeachesCharming 3 bedroom/3 bath home with 30 vaulted ceiling and 3 levels of windows to enjoy incredible views of the bay. Home also features large pool with waterfall and wonderful landscaping. Schedule an appointment to see this home today! Mary Seymour, Je Galloway Real Estate 850-728-8578 MLS #247773 $334,000 1308 AZALEA DR. ST. GEORGE ISLAND Plantation Cozy Plantation beach cottage with private pool surrounded by lush vegetation and lovely landscaping on 1 acre lot. An extremely well priced home and move in ready! Mary Seymour, Je Galloway Real Estate 850-728-8578 MLS# 247848 $350,000 291 HWY. 98 APALACHICOLA Stunning 3 bedroom/3 bath Apalachicola home with unobstructed bay views. Home features a detached garage with rental apartment upstairs. Call today for more information on this income producing property! Mary Seymour, Je Galloway Real Estate 850-728-8578 John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.comMLS# 247601$639,000St. George IslandHIDDEN TREASUREEnter into partially covered Courtyard with Waterfall, huge John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.comMLS# 247024$14,000 EastpointMAGNOLIA RIDGEForeclosure, one acre lot, located in a secluded area of beautiful Franklin County, paved roads and underground utilities, great location for a permanent residence or weekend retreat on Sago Drive, minutes away from St. George Island. Listing agent Michael Billings Our local real estate experts have identied what they feel are the best values around and are oering them to you in Real Estate Picks! (In this section), Discover the best real estate values in Mexico Beach, Port St. Joe, Apalachicola, Cape San Blas, St. George Island, Carrabelle and surrounding areas. I never expected to see a whale shark, he said. Its a rst for all of us. It was very surprising. The big sh remained nearby as Bendis succeeded in unhooking his catch and all three men rushed to the stern to view the rare creature. But it submerged fairly quickly, and because their cellphones were stowed in a waterproof bag, none of the men got pictures of the monster sh, Bendis said. They red up the engine and attempted to return to the exact place of the original sighting and, to everyones amazement, when they reached the spot and allowed the engine to idle, the whale shark resurfaced. We were all scrambling for phones, Bendis said. The shark, at least 30 feet long, seemed attracted to the boats engine and hung close to it in the water. Bendis retrieved his GoPro camera, which was in a waterproof container, and begin lming underwater although he could not be sure what he was lming. Bendis said the giant sh came up to the dive platform, and Brad and I both touched it. Wendell Stone tried to touch him, but didnt quite make it. We been given grief for not going in the water with it, but when this is happening, its not the rst thing on your mind, he said. All told, the experience lasted from about 3:45 to 4:45 p.m., with the shark returning to the Celestial Crab at least six times. Bendis said. It was de nitely boatrelated, he said. He seemed to come back when the boat idled. If we moved, he would come back. Bendis and his friends were thrilled with their hour-long interaction with one of the rarest creatures on the planet. I wish I could share this with every member of the shing community, Bendis said. The only thing that would have made it better was if Celeste and the kids had been there. I just hope people understand what gentle giants these creatures are and that no harm ever comes from them. Celeste Bendis, a masters student in Tallahassee, said she regrets having opted out of the shing trip to study. Id have been in the water with it! she said. The Celestial Crab is named both for Celeste and for Joe Bendis, who was born under the Zodiac sign of cancer. Bendis, Riner and Stone immediately began to communicate their rare adventure to the world. Brad had a cellphone, and when we were coming up the Carrabelle River, he had already posted to the Internet, Bendis said. Little did they expect their story would resonate around the world. Within 24 hours, friends and relatives began to call to tell the men they saw the video on television in points as far removed as Chicago and California. I think people are tired of hearing about murders and politics and Syria and Afghanistan, Bendis said. I think they want a feelgood story. Its such a big, ugly, cute animal. The three shermen went online and found a website maintained by researchers at the University of Southern Mississippi requesting information about whale shark sightings. Bendis said researchers were able to conclude the whale shark was a male. The research group maintains a database of whale sharks in the Gulf, identifying individuals using the pattern of spots on the shs left side. Unfortunately, Bendis GoPro pictures show the sharks right side, so its unclear if this was an individual that had been photographed in the past. Bendis said he studied biology as an undergraduate, and both Stone and Riner are educators, so they immediately recognized the whale shark and were not afraid of the enormous sh. Master waterman Joe Barber of Carrabelle and Apalachicola called their experience amazing. He said in 90 years spent on and around the Gulf, he has encountered a whale shark only twice. On the rst occasion, he was shing offshore when he and a crew member spotted the enormous animal surfacing just a few feet from their boat. We sat down and waited to see what it would do, he said, recalling stories of sh bumping boats and capsizing them. But, the whale shark proved not to be aggressive and soon disappeared below the surface of the Gulf. WHALE from page A1 ABOUT WHALE SHARKS According to the Florida Museum of Natural History Ichthyology Department, the whale shark (Rhincodon typus) is the largest member of the shark family and the largest vertebrate that is not a mammal. Individuals approaching 60 feet in length have been observed. Tipping the scales at 20 tons, they approach the larger dinosaurs in mass and date back to the Jurassic era. Scientists only became aware of the existence of this rare creature in 1828. Before the mid-1980s, there were fewer than 350 con rmed reports of whale sharks worldwide. With few defenses other than size and thick skin, the whale shark is listed by the World Conservation Union in the Red List of Threatened Species. Like some whales, the whale shark is a lter feeder and consumes mostly microscopic algae, though it will also devour small sh. Whale sharks are widely distributed in tropical and warm temperate seas, usually between latitudes 30 degrees north and 35 degrees south. They are thought to prefer surface sea-water temperatures of 70 to 80 degrees Fahrenheit. Whale sharks are known to inhabit both deep and shallow coastal waters and lagoons of coral atolls and reefs. They have approximately 3,000 tiny teeth that are not used while feeding. The whale shark sieves prey items as small as one millimeter through the ne mesh of the gillrakers. They are able to open their mouth over 3 feet wide to optimize feeding and are occasionally sighted hanging vertically in the water allowing bait sh and other concentrated food items to be sucked in. Highly migratory, satellite tracking of whale sharks in waters off the United States and in the South China Sea reveals these animals travel thousands of miles. These migrations can take years to complete. The most signi cant threat to this species appears to be humans. In India alone, as many as 1,000 whale sharks were believed killed in 1999 and 2000. Their habit of swimming at the surface makes them particularly susceptible to shing. The ns of whale sharks once sold for high prices on the Asian market, although demand has declined. There is still a market for whale shark meat in several countries including Taiwan and China. By Lois Swoboda ROBBIE CADA | Special to the Times SPECIAL TO THE TIMESThis video still shows the whale shark that approached Joe Bendis shing boat about 30 miles offshore from Carrabelle.