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The Apalachicola times
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100380/00186
 Material Information
Title: The Apalachicola times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: H.W. Johnston
Place of Publication: Apalachicola Fla
Apalachicola Fla
Publication Date: 09-06-2012
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1885.
General Note: Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 32911693
lccn - sn 95026907
System ID: UF00100380:00186
 Related Items
Preceded by: Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by: Apalachicola herald

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xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx 50 WWW.APALACHTIMES.COM Phone: 850-653-8868 Web: apalachtimes.com E-mail: dadlerstein@star .com Fax: 850-653-8036 Circulation: 800-345-8688 DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK: School News & Society: 11 a.m. Friday Real Estate Ads: 11 a.m. Thursday Legal Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Display Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Line Ads: 5 p.m. Monday xxxxx Contact Us xxxxx Out to see Index Thursday, September 6, 2012 Seafood workers push county for help with depleted bay By LOIS SWOBODA and DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com At Tuesday mornings county meeting, commissioners and seafood workers spent three hours in an unplanned exchange about the shortage of oysters and other harvestable sea life in Apalachicola Bay. As Leslie Palmer, the states director of aquaculture, listened in by telephone, seafood workers from throughout the county packed the county commission chambers Tuesday morning, pleading for help with what they described as a desperate situation with the bay. A special meeting, with Palmer and representatives of the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission is planned for 5 p.m. today, Sept. 6, at the courthouse annex to address what many are calling a crisis situation. Eastpoints godmother to turn 100 Sept. 15 By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star .com On Sept. 15, Preshia Opal Crum will celebrate 100 years of life in Franklin County surrounded by friends and family. Ms. Preshia was born somewhere near Wright Lake on Sept. 17 1912, to boat builder and oysterman Adolph Smith and Hattie Brown Smith. Preshia, the oldest of four daughters, was named for her fathers school teacher Preshia Lovett. Aint nobody else got that name, she said, but added that she now has a 19-year-old great-granddaughter who is her namesake. Preshia was a cousin, through her mother, to Rowan and Dewey Brown of Brickyard and the entire extended Brown family. She said these were not the same Browns who founded Eastpoint, but Preshia and her descendents have done much to shape the community Eastpoint has become. She is a born mother and has always loved and been loved by children. When Preshia was a Fugitive doctor still on the run By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com A once-popular Apalachicola physician, who ed in November 2011 after he and a colleague were charged with multiple federal counts of health care fraud and unlawfully dispensing controlled substances out of a Panama City walk-in clinic, remains a fugitive almost 10 months later. Dr. Abdul Rasoul Salman, 66, owner and operator of Gulf Coast Walk-In Clinic, 3228 E. 15th St. in Panama City, is being sought in connection with 33 counts of unlawfully dispensing prescription drugs such as methadone, hydrocodone (Vicodin), diazepam (Valium) and alprazolam (Xanax), and one count of dispensing controlled substances resulting in a persons death. He also was charged with ve counts of health care fraud, for writing excessive and inappropriate quantities of controlled substances to patients outside of the usual course of professional practice, which then were paid for by Medicare, Medicaid and private insurance. His colleague, Rudolfo B. Torres, 76, practiced medicine out of the clinic, as well By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star .com A case of rabies has been con rmed from a fox killed last week in the residential district of Apalachicola. About 8 a.m. Aug. 31, Lisa Hooker was working in the yard of her home on Avenue D in Apalachicola when she noticed a young fox on a neighbors lawn. When she approached it, it bit her twice. She rushed inside to ush the wounds and called neighbor Geoff Hewell, who brought a pistol. When the animal charged him, he shot it in the neck and killed it. The animal was sent to Eastpoint veterinarian Dr. Hobson Fulmer for processing, and the health department had it tested for rabies. The test was returned positive on Friday. Director of Animal Control Fonda Davis said traps were deployed in the area Saturday to catch any additional foxes remaining. After having her wounds treated at Sacred Heart Hospital, Hooker received her rst shot of vaccine at Bay Medical Center in Panama City on Friday afternoon. She received her second shot at the county health department Monday. The county health department issued an alert on Friday after receiving the positive diagnosis. The release reads, Rabies is a fatal disease caused by a virus that is spread from animal to animal or animal to human during a bite, scratch, or mucous membrane/open-skin exposure to the infected animals saliva. Rabies in humans can be prevented if postexposure medication is received early enough following an exposure (bite or scratch); well before RASOUL SALMAN PHOTOS FROM THE CRUM FAMILY COLLECTION Above left is Preshia Crum as a young girl. At right are Preshia and her husband, Lucius, at their Eastpoint home. Preshia will turn 100 Sept. 15. Theres no way to make a living Ms. Preshia 99 and counting Rabies con rmed after fox bites woman WOMAN NEARS 100TH BIRTHDAY Our bay has been shocked and killed. If we dont do something, were going to lose what we have. The bay is the worst Ive seen it since 1985. Jesse Lolley Jr. INSIDE Lisa Hooker speaks out A5 PRESHIA CRUM WANT TO GO? Friends and family of Ms. Preshia are invited to a celebration from 2-4 p.m. at Eastpoints First United Methodist Church on Saturday, Sept. 15. See LIVING A5 See DOCTOR A2 See PRESHIA A14 See RABIES A5 VOL. 127 ISSUE 19 Bow hunting season, A8 Opinion . . . . . . A4 Society . . . . . . A6 Faith . . . . . . . A7 Outdoors . . . . . A8 Tide Chart . . . . . A8 Sports . . . . . . A9 Classi eds . . . A11-A13 Veterans to host annual reunion Saturday At 7 a.m. Saturday, the Franklin County Veterans will begin their 21st annual reunion at the Fort Coombs Armory in Apalachicola. Dinner will be at noon. Featured will be fresh fried mullet and grilled chicken, with baked beans and cole slaw. Please bring a dessert. The reunion is for Franklin County veterans of all wars or campaigns. Hats will be provided for all veterans present. For more information, call Charles Wilson at 653-6482 or John Sack at 670-8375 or email sack@fairpoint.net. Spohrer to sign new book Saturday Running all month, the Apalachicola Center for History, Culture and Art, 89 Water St. will exhibit photographs from John Spohrers latest book, The Seasons of Apalachicola Bay. From 1-3 p.m. Saturday, Spohrer will sign copies of the book at Downtown Books and Purl in Apalachicola Bay. For more information, visit www.historicapalachicola. com. Museum Day Wednesday at CGJ This is the sixth consecutive year Camp Gordon Johnston World War II Museum will participate in the Smithsonian Magazines annual National Museum Day. Visitors are welcome from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Come see our exhibits, watch documentaries, listen to live music and enjoy free refreshments. As always, admission by donation. For more info, email campgordonjohnston@ fairpoint.net or call 6978575. Trivia at the Senior Center On Thursdays, come to the Franklin County Senior Center at 201 N.W. Ave. F in Carrabelle for team trivia. The game begins at 7 p.m. We will pair you with a partner if you come alone. The donation is $2. Half the pot goes to the winning team, and the other half goes to the center. For more info, call 697-3760.

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Local A2 | The Times Thursday, September 6, 2012 FREE DIABETES EDUCATION CLASSES TO BE HELD EVERY TUESDAY BEGINNING TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 2012 TWO LOCATIONS, TWO TIMES 10:00AM WEEMS MEDICAL CENTER EAST 110 NE 5TH ST CARRABELLE 697-2345 5:00PM WEEMS MEMORIAL HOSPITAL 135 AVENUE G APALACHICOLA 653-8853 X101 Classes taught by Erica Ceska, Registered Dietitian EVERYONE WELCOME! Flood Risk Information Open House Franklin County, in partnership with the Northwest Florida Water Management District (NWFWMD) and the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) will be conducting a public open house meeting on the preliminary Flood Insurance Rate Maps (FIRM) and Flood Insurance Study (FIS) for Franklin County and the following municipalities: Apalachicola and Carrabelle. These new maps are part of FEMAs plan to modernize all ood hazard maps nationwide and will provide better and more accurate oodplain mapping for Franklin County. These maps will replace the existing FIRMs prepared by FEMA and adopted in 2002. Once adopted, the new maps would be used to determine which properties are located within special ood hazard areas for ood insurance purposes. The FIS and its preliminary FIRMs will be presented during an Open House for the public, to be held on Wednesday, September 12, 2012, from 4 to 7 p.m. at the Franklin County Courthouse Annex, Board of County Commission Meeting Room, 34 Forbes Street, Apalachicola, Florida, 32320. During the Open House, representatives from the NWFWMD and FEMA will provide the most current information regarding Franklin Countys ood risk, ood insurance, oodplain development regulations, oodplain mapping and timeline for FIS and FIRM adoption. Local government ofcials will also be on hand to assist citizens. The preliminary maps and FIS can be viewed online at http://portal.nwfwmdoodmaps.com Property owners, individuals living in or near the 100-year oodplain, realtors, lenders, and insurance agents may nd this Open House particularly informative. All interested persons are welcome. For additional information, please contact: Elaine McKinnon, NWFWMD, at (850) 539-5999 ext. 221. Smart Lenses SM Can produce clear vision without glasses, at all distances "Freedom from Eye Glasses, Now a reality for many." NO HIDDEN CHARGES: It is our policy that the patient and any other person responsible for payments has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed by payment or any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment. www.mulliseye.com "WE WELCOME NE W PATIE N TS, C ALL T ODAY FOR YOUR P RIORITY APP OI N TME N T" FOR NEW PATIENTS 59 AND OLDER This certificate is good for a complete Medical Eye Exam with Todd Robinson, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Surgeon. The exam includes a prescription for eye glasses and tests for Glaucoma, Cataracts and other eye diseases FOR YOUR APPOINTMENT CALL: 850-763-6666 ELIGIBILITY: U.S. Citizens living in the Florida Panhandle, 59 years and older, not presently under our care. Coupon Expires: 9-30-12 FREE EYE EXAM CODE: AP00 Darren Payne, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon Lee Mullis, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon Todd Robinson, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon as out of his home in Youngstown. He was taken into custody Nov. 18, 2011, after a federal grand jury charged him with 61 counts of unlawfully dispensing controlled substances, and one count of dispensing controlled substances resulting in the death of an individual. He also was charged with eight counts of health care fraud for a crime similar to Salmans alleged pattern of overprescribing. On July 10, U.S. District Judge Richard Smoak dismissed the case against Torres after both defense attorney Jean Marie Downing of Panama City Beach and federal prosecutor Assistant U.S. Attorney Gayle Littleton agreed the aging physician was incompetent to stand trial. In a March 28 motion, Downing argued that Torres, under the care of Dr. Kamel Elzwahry and Dr. Azzam Adhal for treatment of several ailments, had health issues that had deteriorated dramatically over the past year. (He) is unable to assist in preparation of his defense for trial, nor is he capable of making a decision to enter a plea to the charges against him, Downing wrote in her motion. (He) is suffering from irreversible medical problems causing health and mental instability is unable to assist with the preparation of his defense, nor can he appreciate the consequences of this prosecution, let alone to determine whether he should take a plea or go to trial. A court-ordered report by psychologist Dr. Harry McLaren remains sealed, but based on its ndings, the government did not oppose the courts nding of incompetency, said Len Register, assistant U.S. attorney. Given Mr. Torres age and the courts ndings, the government has no plans to re le the case at a later date, he said. There remains, however, an outstanding arrest warrant for Dr. Salman, who has not been taken into custody yet. His case is still active, but is on hold pending his capture or surrender, Register said. Where the Iraqi-born physician has gone is anyones guess, although sources familiar with his background say he owns homes in Iraq and Spain. If the authorities have any clue to Salmans whereabouts, they certainly are not letting on. Its an active case, said Scott Wilson, a spokesman for the U.S. Marshals Services Northern District of Florida, referring the matter to the FBI of ce. Jeff Westcott, an FBI spokesman, would con rm only that the bureau is handling the matter. The case is still open; were still looking for him and consider him a fugitive, he said. Salmans past remains shrouded in mystery, along a path to becoming a Panhandle physician and twice-married father of six that was marked by some unconventional steps. Born right after World War II in Iraq, he received his medical education in his homeland, although details of that are sketchy. The Florida Department of Healths online practitioner pro les, which provide information to the public that is self-reported by doctors and not veri ed by the state, Salman attended the Univ. of Mosue Baghdad from 1964, when he was 19, until 1997, when he was 52. Because he was practicing as an emergency room physician at Weems Memorial Hospital and Gulf Pines Hospital in Port St. Joe beginning in the mid-1980s, these dates for his education appear to be incorrect. Salman listed that he received a diploma in orthopedics from Baghdad University in the United Kingdom, but no date is given. The pro le says only that Salman did his residency in emergency medicine from 1970 to 1976 in Iraq, and that from 1981 to 1988 he studied internal medicine/orthopedic anesthesia in New York at the Institute of Applied Biology, an experimental cancer clinic in New York City. The clinic was run by a Rumanian-born physician Emanuel Revici, whose controversial methods of what he termed nontoxic cancer chemotherapy both in New York and at a clinic he set up in Mexico City were met with criticism from mainstream medicine, including the American Cancer Society. Eventually, after a series of vigorously contested medical malpractice lawsuits, Revici was stripped of his medical license in New York. Revicis preference for using selenium to treat cancer was evidently adopted by Salman, and it gured into his treatment of several local patients, including some that he saw at his Apalachicola home. Salman maintained a licensed lab to assist him in dispensing cancer medicine. He also received a patent in 2005 for a nasal passage cleaning composition. Salman began work in the Weems emergency room at about 1986 and handled physician duties for about the next decade, according to informed sources. In 1997, after divorcing his rst wife, a woman with whom he raised four children, Salman met an Apalachicola woman, a young lady several years younger than he, and together they married. That marriage would lead to the birth of a son and a daughter. The couple later divorced. On his practitioner pro le, Salman lists under professional or community service awards membership in the Sovereign Order of Cyprus and the Roman Catholic Church. Salman did not run afoul of state medical regulators until 2009, when an audit by the Agency for Health Care Administration determined he had overbilled for Medicaid claims in 2004 through 2006. AHCA sought in January 2010 that he return overpayment of about $41,000, which later was adjusted downward to about $22,000, with $3,000 in nes. He also agreed to relinquish his Medicaid number and was given the right to apply for reinstatement on his return to the U.S. After Salman did not reimburse AHCA based on the terms of the Jan. 7, 2010, settlement agreement, he was ned an additional $1,000 on June 11, 2010. Salman then retired from the practice of medicine in Florida and in November 2011 was indicted on the federal charges. On Aug. 21, county commissioners voted unanimously to promote Albert Floyd to assistant director of solid waste at the recommendation of director Fonda Davis. Floyd will remain supervisor of animal control, and receive a $2,000 a year salary increase. Land ll manager Kevin Shiver and administrative assistant Link Carroll also received salary increases of $1,500 each. Commissioners also moved to allow Davis to ll one of two existing job vacancies with an entry level employee for a salary of $25,500. Davis said the job will be posted in-house for 15 days and then, if it is not lled, will be advertized to the general public. Floyd new assistant solid waste director ALBERT FLOYD DOCTOR from page A1 Apalachicola to assist with oil spill claims Apalachicola has sent word that those of you having dif culty with your Deepwater Horizon claim under the new process are invited to contact Mayor Van Johnson so you may be referred to the new governmental liaison team set up for the purpose of analysis and assistance. Provide your name, telephone number and address (and old BP claim number, if you have one) by email to Johnson or by telephone to the city at 653-1519 so that you may be referred for this assistance. Apalachicola airport praised by AVweb AVweb, an online newsletter about aviation, has named the Apalachicola Regional Airports xed base operator FBO of the Week, for Aug. 27 through Sept. 2, as part of the newsletters ongoing award series. AVweb made its distinction after receiving the following review of one pilots visit to the airport. The FBO staff checked all the boxes in making our recent visit a pleasant stopover, wrote pilot Ray Mozingo. Flew down for a weekend of shing. The FBO met us when we landed and helped us unload and get to the terminal. Offered us hanger space if we needed. Got plane fueled while we were loading and getting ight plan. Looking forward to going back and meeting with them again! Went out of their way to be helpful. Congratulations to Perky White and Ted Mosteller, the two men who are operating the FBO under contract with the county. News BRIEFS

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The Times | A3 Thursday, September 6, 2012 The Big Bend Area Health Education Center (Big Bend AHEC) is offering FREE tobacco cessation classes in Franklin County and throughout the Big Bend region. We know the challenges you face. We will help you develop the tools to succeed and we will provide the support you need. For more information, call Big Bend AHEC at: 850-509-6614 or 850-224-1177 (local office) or 1-87-QUIT-NOW-6 (1-877-848-6696) Visit www.ahectobacco.com for the schedule of classes we have available. FREE NICOTINE PATCHES! NO COST TO ATTEND! Begin your new life journey tobacco free! The following report is provided by the Franklin County Sheriffs Of ce. Arrests in this report were made by of cers from the Apalachicola Police Department (APD), Carrabelle Police Department (CPD), and the Franklin County Sheriffs Of ce (FCSO). All defendants are to be considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law. Aug. 24: Cora B. Yon, 25, Apalachicola, Gulf County warrant for failure to appear (FCSO) Aug. 26: Patricia A. Demko, 45, Apalachicola, violation of probation (FCSO) Aug. 27: Alton L. Roberson, 69, Eastpoint, two counts of trespass on property after warning (FCSO) Aug. 28: Lewis M. Pedrick, 30, Carrabelle, possession of a controlled substance with intent to sell or deliver, and two counts of possession of a fraudulent drivers license (FCSO); Robert G Laney, 61, Carrabelle, failure to appear (FCSO) Aug. 30: Frederick Quirk, Sr., 65, Eastpoint, Harris County, Ga. violation of pretrial release (FCSO); Joseph C. Ward, 21, Apalachicola, uttering, resisting of cer without violence and reckless driving (APD); June M. Davis, 29, Eastpoint, violation of probation (FCSO); Lacey C. Maples, 21, Apalachicola, violation of probation (APD); Alice A. Amerson, 22, Carrabelle, domestic battery (CPD) Aug. 31: Alice A. Amerson, 22, Carrabelle, violation of probation (FCSO); John W. Nowling, 40, Eastpoint, possession of more than 20 grams of cannabis and possession of a controlled substance with intent to sell or deliver (FCSO) By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com Willie Meggs, state attorney for the Second Judicial Circuit, decided last week not to prosecute Franklin County Commission Chair Pinki Jackel for a misdemeanor related to ling for dual homestead exemptions. In a three-page amended nolle prosequi, commonly known as a do not prosecute order, Meggs elaborated on his Aug. 13 motion not to prosecute the case as a criminal matter, citing evidence that he said indicated Jackel had not knowingly led for exemptions both in Georgia and in Florida. The rst-degree misdemeanor in question requires that a person knowingly and willfully (gives) false information for the purpose of claiming homestead exemption. In his analysis, Meggs concluded Jackel acted in good faith in establishing a separate residence from her husband, and was not even aware of her husbands ling for homestead exemption on the Georgia home. In his analysis, Meggs agreed with the factual basis laid out in the 12-page report led June 20 by Larry Levy, attorney for Property Appraiser Doris Pendletons of ce. Levys report gave rise to Pendleton citing Jackel, as a civil matter, for back taxes and penalties due the county on her home at 301 West Gorrie Drive property, for the years 2009, 2010 and 2011. In paying the $4,947 bill on June 26, Jackel provided a letter from Tallahassee attorney Stephen Slepin, who wrote that neither she nor her husband, Marietta, Ga. attorney Dana Jackel, believes the homestead exemption was improperly allowed but were paying the back taxes out of an abundance of caution. Meggs indicated he did not think the fact that the Jackels maintained two homestead exemptions during that three-year period meant Pinki Jackel had run afoul of the law. While it is generally not permitted by law for a married couple to claim homestead exemption on two homes, there are limited circumstances in which a married couple may establish separate residences and claim separate homestead exemptions, Meggs wrote. The states attorney went on to cite a 1963 Florida Supreme Court ruling in Judd v. Schooley, as well as a 2005 advisory opinion by Florida Attorney General Charlie Crist that Meggs said, when taken together, gave a property appraiser discretion to determine whether a homestead exemption was legal. An argument could certainly be made that Pinki Jackel and her husband have in good faith established two separate residences as contemplated by the Judd court and the Attorney General, Meggs said. While Mr. and Mrs. Jackel are neither divorced nor estranged, maintain joint checking accounts for survivorship purposes, and le joint tax returns, they live separately. Meggs noted that in March 2009, Pinki Jackel had quit claimed her interest in the couples Kennesaw, Ga. home to her husband. Afterwards, her husband led application in Georgia for the Georgia homestead exemption under his signature alone, Meggs wrote. It appears that Mr. Jackel led this second homestead exemption without Mrs. Jackels knowledge. To underscore his conclusion that Pinki Jackel was unaware of her husbands actions, Meggs drew on statements from Tax Collector Jimmy Harris in which Harris said he had spoken to her on June 25 regarding an unrelated matter when he mentioned the homestead exemption violation and resulting tax bill. Mrs. Jackel said she didnt know what he was talking about, and proceeded to make a phone call to someone saying what have you done and then something about being accused of a double homestead exemption violation, Meggs wrote. Mr. Harris said based on Mrs. Jackels behavior, he didnt think she knew about Mr. Jackel claiming homestead exemption for the Kennesaw, Georgia residence. Meggs also noted that Pinki Jackel had paid the delinquent tax bill within days of being noti ed of it, and gave a sworn statement to State Attorney Investigator Johnny Turner that she was unaware that her husband had led for homestead in Georgia. Further, if Mrs. Jackel was not aware that her husband led for homestead exemption in Georgia, it appears that any violation of homestead exemption law (if there is any violation at all) occurred in Georgia, and by Mrs.. Jackels husband, Meggs wrote. By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star .com A 17-year-old Tallahassee youth reported missing on Saturday morning from his familys Apalachicola weekend home has returned home safe. Apalachicola Police Chief Bobby Varnes said the sheriffs of ce, the Apalachicola Police Department and Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission were all involved in a brief search for Riley Dennis, who had been last seen at about 11 p.m. Friday. The boys mother, Karen Cox Dennis, said she called 911 Saturday morning about 10:30 a.m. after nding her sons clothing on the end of a family-owned pier and evidence that he had walked away through the mud. Varnes said authorities immediately launched a full-blown search after receiving the call. Franklin Countys Wireless Emergency Noti cation System issued a county-wide alert just prior to noon Saturday. At about 2 p.m., recreational boaters later spotted the Dennis boy unclothed and muddy, waving a marker from a sea turtle nest on the bay side of St. Vincent Island. Varnes said investigators believe the young man walked and swam from his home to the island. The boys mother said her son told his parents he had decided to take a midnight swim, in the buff, to face his fear of dark water and was caught in a rip current. He said he swam and oated for almost seven hours before coming ashore on the island where he found a spring and drank. He then smeared himself with mud to avoid sunburn and mosquitoes and curled up in pine straw for a short sleep before agging down the boatload of recreational shermen from Cape San Blas. A family friend on the scene when he returned home said the boy was not sunburned and did not appear to be injured. Varnes said the family was grateful for the boys return and the missing youth appeared to be sorry to have caused so much excitement. We were just so happy he was found, said Varnes. I was amazed; I didnt expect it. The young mans family took him to Tallahassee Memorial Hospital for an examination after he was returned home. Cox-Dennis thanked the community for their support in the crisis. My husband and I and our family extend our heartfelt gratitude to our kind neighbors, the Apalachicola Police Department, Sheriffs Ofce, and the coordinated efforts of Lt. Wood and the FWC, and Mr. Long and family and friend, who rescued him from St. Vincent Island, she said, Meggs: No to Jackel misdemeanor PINKI JACKEL Arrest REPORT Missing teen found on barrier island Law Enforcement

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Opinion A4 | The Times USPS 027-600 Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 Publisher: Roger Quinn Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola Times Editors note: The following letter refers to an article in the Tallahassee Democrat regarding the closure of schools on Aug. 28 related to Hurricane Isaac. As superintendent of schools in Jefferson County, I was extremely disappointed to read the negative comment in the Aug. 29 edition of the Democrat regarding the closure of schools in Franklin and Taylor counties due to Hurricane Isaac. As superintendents, we were in close contact with our local emergency management ofces as well as receiving updates from national and state weather forecasters. My nal brieng with Jefferson Countys emergency management ofce showed that we were to expect two to eight inches of rain with wind gusts up to 45 mph. Needless-to-say, I will always put the safety of our students rst. Using that forecast, it was good common sense to cancel school on Tuesday, August 28. I refuse to put students, bus drivers and other district employees at risk, and I would never willingly create hardships on our families by making a late night decision which would make it difcult for families to make day care arrangements, etc. I want to commend Ms. Nina Marks, superintendent of Franklin County, and Paul Dyal, superintendent of Taylor County for joining with me in being concerned for the safety of their students and staff, and for using the best information we had at the time, to make the most informed decision that we could. We will always feel that it is better to err on the side of caution, and to be, better safe than sorry. Cordially, William E. Brumeld Superintendent Thursday, September 6, 2012 By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star.com Franklin Countys unemployment rate climbed slightly in July, but remained the fourth best for joblessness in the state. According to preliminary numbers released Aug. 17 by the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity, the countys jobless rate rose 0.3 percentage points, from 6.2 to 6.5 percent, Last month, 14 people were added to the unemployment rolls, boosting them from 362 to 376 people in search of work. The workforce shrank by 61 workers, from 5,843 to 5,782, but remained larger than one year ago, when it comprised 5,625 workers, and when the jobless rate was considerably higher, at 7.9 percent. Franklin Countys jobless picture continued to put it at fourth best in Florida. Monroe County, at 5.3 percent, had the states lowest unemployment rate, followed by Walton County (5.6 percent) and Okaloosa County (6.4 percent). Many of the counties with the lowest unemployment rates were those with relatively high proportions of government employment. The countys unemployment numbers continue to outperform the two nearby counties, Bay and Gulf, which also are part of the Gulf Coast Workforce region. Bay rose from 8.1 to 8.2 percent, while Gulf moved upwards, from 8.4 to 8.7 percent. The overall unemployment rate in the tri-county region was 9.2 percent in July, up from 9.0 percent in May. The July 2012 rate was 1.5 percentage points lower than the regions year ago rate of 9.7 percent and below the state rate of 9.3 percent. Out of a labor force of 105,018, there were 8,569 unemployed Gulf Coast residents. Overall our job market has been trending in the right direction despite slight uctuations from month to month, said Kim Bodine, executive director for the Gulf Coast Workforce Board. We are encouraged by the efforts of our local economic development partners and county commissions to attract more businesses to the area. Right now are our unemployment rate is below both the state and the nation; however, we anticipate that might change as we face recent layoffs and enter into the slower tourism months, she said, In July 2012, there were 73,500 nonagricultural jobs in the Panama CityLynn Haven-Panama City Beach metro area (Bay County), down 200 jobs over the year. The Panama City-Lynn Haven-Panama City Beach metro area experienced an annual rate of job loss of 0.3 percent, while the state gained jobs at a rate of 1.0 percent. Four out of 10 industries lost jobs over the year, while three industries gained jobs over the year. Of the industries losing jobs, mining, logging, and construction and nancial activities (-200 jobs each) lost the most jobs, followed by education and health services and other services (-100 jobs each). Leisure and hospitality (+200 jobs), manufacturing, and government (+100 jobs each) gained jobs over the year. The Franklin County Health Department urges all private homeowners and commercial businesses with swimming pools to properly maintain their swimming pools with necessary chemicals. If residents and/or businesses notice any abandoned and/or unkempt swimming pools, please notify Melissa Durkin at the health department at 653-2111 ext. 117. O call Dewitt Polous at Franklin County Mosquito Control at 670-8730. Abandoned swimming pools can be a breeding ground for mosquitoes and can cause mosquitoborne disease. Abandoned or unused swimming pools can be treated with mosquito dunks which are available at the local hardware store. Property owners may also contract with a swimming pool maintenance company to keep their pool properly maintained, said Durkin. Symptoms of West Nile virus may include headache, fever, fatigue, dizziness, weakness and confusion. Physicians should contact the health department if they suspect an individual may have a mosquito-borne illness. Florida Department of Health (DOH) laboratories provide testing services for physicians treating patients with clinical signs of mosquito-borne disease. DOH continues to conduct statewide surveillance for mosquito borne illnesses, including West Nile virus infections, Eastern equine encephalitis, St. Louis encephalitis, malaria and dengue. For more information on mosquito-borne illnesses, visit DOHs Environmental Health website www.doh.state..us/Environment/ medicine/arboviral/index.html. Superintendents wished to be better safe than sorry Health department cautions against abandoned pools County jobless ticks up, still states fourth best Pew study stresses need for protecting species By DEBBIE SALAMONE Special to the Times The Southeast sustained tens of millions of dollars in economic losses during a ve-year period because years of overshing depleted species and led to fewer recreational shing trips, according to an analysis commissioned by the Pew Environment Group. The study, conducted by the nonprot consulting rm Ecotrust, examined the impact of overshing from 2005 to 2009 on nine severely depleted species, including black sea bass and red snapper, in the South Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico, respectively. The biggest loss in direct expenditures nearly $53 million a year on average came from fewer shing trips to catch South Atlantic black sea bass. The gure represents money not spent on items such as boat rentals, charter fees, tackle, bait, fuel and other businesses directly dependent on anglers targeting this species. When looking at the broader economy, including spending at hotels, restaurants, wholesale suppliers and other downstream businesses, the region had a total estimated loss of $138 million because of fewer trips for black sea bass alone. Overshing catching sh faster than they can reproduce leaves a costly legacy that hurts our communities and shermen, said Lee Crockett, director of Pews sheries program. Recreational anglers are suffering the consequences of the nations failure to wisely manage our sh resources. The Ecotrust study makes a strong economic case for the laws we have today that require science-based annual catch limits to end and prevent overshing. These limits could help deliver robust sh populations, create jobs and put money back into our coastal communities. In the Gulf, where red snapper are at only 17.5 percent of a safe population level, direct spending losses amounted to an average of $13 million annually because of fewer shing trips targeting that species. When looking at the broader economy, this loss increased to $33 million. In the South Atlantic from Florida to North Carolina, where red snapper have declined to 12.5 percent of a safe level, the total economic loss was $42 million on average per year. Red snapper has needed a lot of help to recover, and its been a tough road, but the nancial payoff is clear, said Holly Binns, director of Pews sheries program in the Southeast U.S. Science-based catch limits appear to be working and will return this commercially important species to abundance. In the Gulf, red snapper are showing strong signs of rebounding, thanks to catch limits implemented in 2007. In the South Atlantic, they have been in critical condition but may be stabilizing, due to catch limits implemented in 2010. Overshing has depleted nearly 20 percent of the nations commercially and recreationally important ocean sh, including some species of tuna, cod, ounder, snapper and grouper. Restoring sh populations helps anglers, boosts commercial sheries and improves the health of the regions ecosystems, which draw shermen, divers and tourists from around the world. Overshing has made it signicantly tougher for me to make a living, said Capt. Bill Taylor, owneroperator of Black Dog Charters of Jupiter. Our local tourist economy can only benet from staying the course of rebuilding sh populations. These ndings demonstrate the economic importance of recreational shing to our economy and underscore the costly legacy of inadequate management that drove many popular recreational species to unsustainably low levels, said Kristen Sheeran, one of the Ecotrust report authors. The Pew Environment Group is the conservation arm of The Pew Charitable Trusts, a nongovernmental organization that works globally to establish pragmatic, science-based policies that protect our oceans, preserve our wild lands, and promote clean energy. Southeast suffered millions in losses from overshing DEBBIE SALAMONE The International Coastal Cleanup Day falls on Saturday, Sept.15 this year. This is the perfect time to show environmental awareness and love for nature in a tangible way. This is the largest international volunteer effort to maintain the health of aquatic ecosystems and is second only to Earth Day as an event to raise awareness of environmental issues. Coastal Cleanup began in 1986 when a staff member at the Ocean Conservancy was appalled by the amount of litter on the Texas coast. She organized 2,800 volunteers who collected 124 tons of trash. Two years later, the effort expanded to include 25 states and territories and the National Beach Cleanup Marine Debris Database was established. In 1989, Mexico and Canada joined the effort and International Coastal Cleanup Day was born. The day has expanded every year and last year, almost 600,000 volunteers around the world cleaned 20,776 miles of shore collecting more than nine million pounds of trash. Topping the international effort were the US, Philippines and Canada. Each year, volunteers not only pick up and dispose of environmentallyhazardous trash, they count the items collected to identify trends in waste disposal and explore solutions to littering. In 2011, the most commonly collected items were cigarette butts, caps and lids, plastic bottles and bags, food wrappers and containers, plastic cutlery and dishes, glass beverage bottles, straws, beverage cans and paper bags. These items accounted for 80 percent of the trash collected, with two million cigarette butts alone nding their way into trash bags. Over the last 25 years butts have accounted for about one-third of the total debris items collected. Food and beverage related items accounted for 42 percent of the trash items. This year, in Franklin County, 10 locations have been designated for volunteers to meet. In Apalachicola, come to Battery Park under the bridge; Abercrombie Landing on Pine Log Road at the end of Bluff Road; or the gazebo in Lafayette Park. In Eastpoint, volunteers will congregate by Captain Snooks and in Millender Park. On St. George Island, crews will form at Lighthouse Park and the state park gate. In Lanark Village, meet at Arizona Street south of US 98. In Carrabelle come to the public pavilion on Marine Street. A crew will also form at Bald Point State Park. The cleanup starts at 8:30 a.m. Bring sunscreen and insect repellant and wear protective clothing including work boots or closed toed water shoes. Trash bags, gloves, data cards, snacks, and water will be provided. Participants will receive a T-shirt to commemorate the event. Kayaks and canoes are used in some areas to collect trash offshore or along inaccessible coastline. The cleanup is sponsored by the Ocean Conservancy; Franklin County Parks and Recreation, Solid Waste and Recycling and the Apalachicola Riverkeeper. For more information call 927-3776 or email adalong@uab.edu. By Lois Swoboda Coastal Cleanup on the horizon

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Local The Times | A5 Thursday, September 6, 2012 But what remedy is available to bolster the economy and replenish the bay is unclear. Chairman Pinki Jackel thanked the more than 150 people overowing the an nex meeting room for at tending. So many are wor ried about our bay and sick to death at whats going on out there, she said. This is your meeting; you are welcome. Commissioner Cheryl Sanders said, Thank God for social media; this is how we got so many people in here. I think its bad enough and extensive enough that we need to have a meeting. Were here to listen. Before the discussion began, Commissioner Bev in Putnal asked Palmer if it would be possible to extend the harvest on the summer bars. We dont have any ex ibility as relates to that, she said. (If we extend the harvest there) the FDA (Food and Drug Adminis tration) would send some thing out saying we were out of compliance and not to accept Florida oysters. I absolutely know that its bad out there, Palmer said. Commissioner Smokey Parrish told the gathering he had vocally and loudly told the Florida Associa tion of Counties we have no oyster, crab and ounders. The Centers for Excellence (research groups funded by BP) received $500 mil lion, and somebody needs to come here and study the bay. I aint seen no one do ing a study here. Theres no way for peo ple to make a living. Weve kept our bay pristine for 200 years. The whole east ern part of the Gulf is, in my opinion, totally wiped out. Tallahassee has the data that shows the landings are headed to the bottom. People cant make a living, take care of their children and pay their mortgages. The economy is bad across the country, and its going to be severely bad here if we dont get help. Putnal warned an eco nomic trickle-down effect would affect everyone. Youre talking about a county that could go bank rupt, he said. Were not going to do that, Jackel said. Were going to be proactive and seek solutions. Shannon Hartseld, president of the Frank lin County Seafood Work ers Association, said the purpose of the crowd was to speed up this process. Weve got to have some thing done now so FEMA can come and help us. We havent been able to work for the last couple of months, and now were facing disaster. The east end is gone. Were tonging up nothing. Theres hardly any spat on the natural bottom. He said the few oysters remaining on the west end of the bay were not enough to sustain the economy. We got out early and worked till after 3 p.m. yes terday. Three of us got 13 bags of oysters. I talked to Joe Shields (an adminis trator with the division of aquaculture). I dont think hes is going to say how bad it really is. Its not fea sible. Weve got bills to pay. Before Debby there was shell on the bottom except where Progress Energy came in and destroyed it, but theyre gone. Were nding piles of dead shells on the east and west ends. After Debby, (the harvest) went down at least 50 per cent. We are having oysters dying constantly. Commissioner Noah Lockley agreed. Hes telling it like it is. Theyre saying its overworked. The whole bay is not overworked. Putnal was blunt: By the time they do a study, people will be starved, he said. Me and my brothers catch an average of day 20 to 25 bags a day, said Ricky Banks, vice president of the FCSWA. We went out Sun day, worked daylight to 10 a.m., and we had 40 pounds of oysters, and some of them were not legal. If these people dont get some help, Franklin County wont be anymore. These people have to make a living, and they cant wait, he said. If we wait till (the next commission meeting on Sept. 18), a lot of these people will be out of their homes and wont have a vehicle to carry any oysters, if there are ever any out there to catch. Loud applause erupted in the meeting room. Hartseld agreed relief is urgently needed. Prog ress Energy dont care. You dont pay, they cut your lights off. FCSWA Vice President Chris Millender said sea food workers should be put to work seeding the bay with shell and spat. Putnal supported the plan, If the federal gov ernment will fund it, we can buy shells and do some relaying, he said. We can buy seed oysters and hand scatter them out there. Some blamed the wet summer weather for the damage. Whats happened to our bay is shock, said Jesse Lolley Jr. Its not rainwa ter coming down the river. Its the acid from the for est. It happens every time. Debby comes in here and pushes in saltwater, then we get another tropical storm and too much rain. Yes, they should be poor this time of year. Its sum mertime. Our bay has been shocked and killed. If we dont do something, were going to lose what we have. The bay is the worst Ive seen it since 1985. Jerry Williams con curred. Ive worked on the bay for over 40 years, and this is the worst Ive seen it in all in all this time Theres no shell in this bay. Its been took out. Youve got a $1 million barge sitting down there doing nothing. If you take the remaining oysters out of this bay, youll have a sterile bay like Port St. Joe. Theres no way to know if oysters from out of state will survive. Others complained that seeding the bay with fos sil oysters instead of fresh shell is harmful. What can be done to stop them from hauling our shell out west? asked Cur tis Neal. Shell from the mine poisons the oysters with lime. Another man asked commissioners to look at the big picture. We need the county commission to bring in jobs for people to do. We have too many people in a small area. This isnt Texas. We need to cut down the amount of people working the bay. We need to go to Miami and bring solar energy and wind energy. Once you get one company, youll get more. Still others thought pol lution from the BP oil spill is to blame. John Crum said he had been oystering for 40 years. In 1985, we transplanted shells for a year until the bay grew back. Whatever was in the open died; what was sheltered by St Vin cent lived. The closer you got to the river, the more live (oysters) you got. In my opinion, the oil dispersant was pushed around St. Vincent. In my opinion, the dispersant is invisible. Oil was offshore, and BP sunk it. Of course (the bay) was overworked, but it didnt die because it was overworked, it died because the balls of disper sant was rolled in through the cuts. The rivers and head of the bay supposedly has kept the oil dispersant. Dispersant is coming out of both ends, mainly out of Carrabelle. Crabs is dying in the crab traps. Half the crabs is dead, and after they catch them they die in the cooler. BP tells them theyll reim burse them but just keep it working and make it look like its doing good, but I aint naming no names. This year we got four bags (in a day) on winter bars. Last year we got about 30. Rex Stubbs said the watermen need to do like a farmer does and till the bottom. From some of the old-timers Ive listened to, we need to turn over those shells. Where the water meets the beach, theres no ghost crabs like we used to see, no periwinkles. To help the oysters most we need to turn the bottom over, but theres a problem in the water, too. The ripple effect will be felt throughout ev ery facet of our economy. Eastpoint community leader Anna Carmichael said, I love the bay, and it is dead. We dont treat our bay with respect. We dont treat our life with respect. Weve got to listen to the people who have been working the bay for hundreds of years. Sandra Allen said, No matter what you put in the water, nothings going to take. I dont know that theres a x for the water. My husbands a guide sh erman, and in the winter he oysters. Both of our busi nesses are out of business. Lets bring in some jobs. Lets give the people some thing to do that wont harm the bay. Wayne Braswell asked, If weve been relaying and its not working, whats the next step youre going to do? If our bay is ruined, I dont think it needs to go to boat ramps or roads. It needs to go to a fund so we can work, even if its clean ing up beside the roads. Ninety-ve percent of us work the bay, and we cant go do something else. Im a bad speller; I cant go work for the state. The bay is our number one priority, Jackel as sured him. Parrish explained the current status of BP fund ing: As of now there is no money. BP has to pay a ne of $500 to $1,000 per bar rel. He then offered a brief explanation of the Restore Act. (The money) cant go to a compensation fund, he said. You cant take people to court, and you cant get money out of them if you cant prove your allegations. Theres a bunch of pots of money out there, and be lieve me, the countys been real active. We put in for $50 million in NRDA (Natural Resource Damage Assess ment) money (after the oil spill). Our projects all met all of the criteria but have not received one dollar. Parrish suggested the board write the Florida De partment of Environmental Protection and try to get our project (to reseed the bay) pushed through. He also stressed that not only oysters have been affected by whatever is happening to the bay. Its not just oysters, its shrimp and crabs. The bay dont work with just oys ters, he said. Parrish railed against existing legislation favor ing the oil companies. Un der the Oil Pollution Act of 1990, decisions go back to the responsible party (BP), he said. Its not right, and were going to get those laws changed. We have to go to Congress and see what state and federal laws need to be changed. You shouldnt have to go begging for help to the one that caused the damage. Banks said, (After the spill), I went after them for months. The man looked at me and said, The only way youre going to get anything is to settle out. Sanders moved to de clare a state of emergency in the county due to the economic impact of the con dition of the bay. Her mo tion passed unanimously. We have got to get these people some help in here now. Theyre not asking for a handout, Brownell said. She told Director of Administrative Services Alan Pierce to contact the countys state and fed eral representatives. Pam Brownell, emergency man agement director, urged the seafood workers to le for food stamps and unem ployment even though they are ineligible as indepen dent workers. Franklin County shows the lowest unemployment in the state. If you dont ap ply, you arent showing (up on the record), she said. Ive gone and helped some of these guys ll out for unemployment, and its awful, and you only get about $116, Sanders said. Oysterman Glen Rich ards said he applied, and they told me if I cant pro vide for my kids, I need to give them up for adoption. Brownell said sign-ups for assistance can be ob tained at the library or to Workforce Florida at the former Apalachicola High School. Jackel told Pierce to contact Workforce Flori da and ask for extra help. BE FOX-AWARE, NOT RA B IES-FOOLISH By Lisa Dean Hooker Special to the Times As much as I hate to see my own stupidity written in black and white, for the safety of others within my community I must write this story. Everyone needs to be aware of the high growth of foxes within our small community and the dangers of this. I was attacked by a small rabid fox pup last week, and truthfully, I am not completely over the experience. I ignored all the signs and rules that I have been taught since birth about wild animals. Instead, I thought to assist a hurt creature in need. Never again. The attack was vicious, and hopefully, in time, the memory will fade along with the wounds. For months, I have observed the pups playing in the streets and frolicking in my backyard during the early mornings. Until this incident, I had no idea just how many of these creatures are roaming our streets and within a two-mile radius of my home and on Avenue D. There is one located at Avenue D and 15th Street; another with both male and female and at least three pups in the area of Shadow Lane and Prado. They have also been spotted on Bay Avenue even during midday. This is not their normal roaming time. They generally travel and hunt from dusk dark to daylight. They are becoming braver and unafraid of humans. This is why we must see them all trapped and moved to an area that is in their habitat. The details of the attack are very morbid, and I choose not to discuss details. Bottom line: I survived. A child or family pet would not have been so lucky. I hope our county animal control will work diligently to correct this situation. Rabies can become an epidemic in a very short period of time. I would like to send much love and thanks to Vanessa Edeneld and Geoff Hewell for all of their assistance. If not for Vanessas timely intervention, the attack would have been even more severe. She also took charge to ensure that I could receive treatment as soon as the test results were available. And Geoff, thank you, my caring friend and neighbor, for assuring a clean shot so the animal could be tested properly. I love you both. Please take heed. Watch your neighborhoods for beautiful but harmful animals, and report immediately to our animal control ofcers. May no else have to go through such an awful experience. the onset of symptoms According to MayoClin ic.com, treatment for ra bies exposure consists of a fast-acting shot to prevent infection part of which is given near the bite if possi ble, as soon as possible af ter the exposure. The rst shot is followed by a series of rabies vaccines to help the body learn to identify and ght the rabies virus. Rabies vaccines are given as ve injections in the arm over 14 days. Under the Cruelty to Animals section of the Florida statutes, dogs and cats over 4 months of age must be routinely vac cinated for rabies by a li censed veterinarian. Fulmer will hold a free rabies vaccination clinic at the Apalachicola Bay Ani mal Clinic, 187 U.S. 98 in Eastpoint, from 9 a.m. to noon Saturday, Sept. 8. A $5 donation is requested. The health department urges everyone to super vise companion animals when they are outdoors and stay away from stray or wild animals and dogs or cats that are not yours. If a wild animal bites or scratches you or your pet, do not shoot the attacker in the head; damaged brains cannot be tested. If you are bitten or scratched by an animal, wash the wound immedi ately with soap and water. Seek medical treatment as needed and report the in jury to the Franklin Coun ty Health Department at 653-2111. If the animal is stray or wild, call Franklin County Animal Control at 670-4733. LIVING from page A1 RABIES from page A1

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Smirnoff is one of dozens of beautiful, healthy, social kittens waiting for adoption at the Humane Society. We are still offering the discounted adoption fee for all cats and kittens. The adoption fee for kittens is just $50.00 and the adoption fee for our cats has been waived. Wont you please consider adopting one of Volunteers are desperately needed to socialize all of our dogs and cats. We are always looking for people willing to bring one of our animals into their home to be fostered for various needs. Anytime you can spare would be greatly appreciated. Call Karen at 670-8417 for more details or visit the Franklin County Humane Society at 244 State Road 65 in Eastpoint. You may logon to the website at www.forgottenpets.org to see more of our adoptable pets. PET OF THE WEEK Franklin County Humane Society Call Karen at 670-8417 for more details or visit the Franklin County Humane Society at 244 State Road 65 in Eastpoint. You may logon to the website at www.forgottenpets.org to see more of our adoptable pets. WE CAN HELP! GOT MOSQUITOES? CALL L OIS AT 653-5857 Franklin Countys ONLY LOC AL Pest Control Company Robert C. Bruner Attorney Personal & Business Bankruptcy Over 30 Years Legal Experience 850-670-3030 bankruptcy relief under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon advertisements. Before you decide, ask us to send you free written information Society A6 | The Times Thursday, September 6, 2012 On Saturday evening, award-winning nature photographer John Spohrer debuted an exhibit of photographs from his newest book The Seasons of Apalachicola Bay at the Apalachicola center for History, Culture and the Arts, the former Cotton Exchange, on Water Street in Apalachicola. Twenty photos including images of bears, birds, beaches and the Florida sky will be on display throughout September. Spohrer will sign copies of his new work from 1-3 p.m. Saturday at Downtown Books. The new work has drawn early critical acclaim. All I can say is Wow! wrote David Moynahan, a distinguished nature photographer. What a beautiful book from cover to cover, from photos to writing, from layout to binding. A great job, and a great contribution to the Forgotten Coast! Your years of diligent daily effort are evident in the amazing captures of both sky and creature. Spohrer, an active supporter of the Franklin County Humane Society and the Florida Wild Mammal Association, wrote, in a statement distributed at the opening: My hope is that these images and stories remind you of the urgent need to protect and nurture the heart and soul of Floridas Forgotten Coast, its wild creatures in their wild places. They have nowhere else to go. By Lois Swoboda Obie Pelt turns 1 One of Gods little angels turned 1 on Thursday, July 12, 2012. Obie Lee Pelt is the son of Mary Nowling, of Eastpoint, and Willie Pelt, of Port St. Joe. He has two sweet sisters, Shirah Pelt and Alina Marie Pelt. Grandparents are Aline and William Murray, of Eastpoint, Kendell Shiver, also of Eastpoint, the late Wayne Nowling, and Steve and the late Mary Pelt, of Port St Joe. Great-grandparents are Charles E. and Mary Lou King, of Eastpoint, the late Ottis E. Russell II, Obie Dalton and Nancy Moses, Kenneth Shiver, of Eastpoint, and Johnny and Jean Shiver, of Eastpoint. God bless you my love; Stay well and happy. Granny and Paw Paw King and mama and family. We love you! Brayden Tucker born Kevin and Kimberly Tucker, of Apalachicola, are proud to announce the birth of their son, Brayden Ray Tucker. He was born Friday, Aug. 24, 2012, at Gulf Coast Medical Center in Panama City. He weighed 7 pounds, 14 ounces, and was 20 inches long He was welcomed home by his big sister, Kaylee, and big brother, Josh. Maternal grandparents are Linda and George Gassman, of Panama City, and Bill Pemberton, of Sumatra. Paternal grandparents are Ray and Lisa Tucker, of Eastpoint. Panhandle Players announce 2012-13 season Special to The Times The Panhandle Players hosted their annual meeting Aug. 14 at the Raney Carriage House in Apalachicola. Members and supporters from Franklin and Gulf counties were in attendance. The following productions for their new season were presented along with a brief synopsis. Coming Back to Jersey, a comedy by Carl L. Williams, to be directed by Megan Lamb, Nov. 9-11 at the Dixie Theatre. Cat sh Moon, a Southern comedy by Laddy Sartin, directed by Dan Wheeler, Feb. 1-3, 2013, Dinner Theatre at the Crooked River Grille and Feb. 8-10, 2013 at the Eastpoint Firehouse. Jury Room, a drama by C.B. Gilford, directed by Margy Oehlert, April 1921, 2013, at the Dixie Theatre. New of cers and board members were also elected at the meeting. These include Co-Presidents Bob Inguagiato and Margy Oehlert, Vice President Ann Cowles, Secretary Caroline Ilardi and Treasurer John Inzetta. Members at large include Ed Aguiar, Laura Baney, Frederic Kahler, Elaine Kozlowsky, Melonie Inzetta, Katie McFarland, Kathy McPherson, Sharon Solomon and Tom Loughridge (Emeritus). Maverick Lopez born Maverick Alexander Lopez was born at 7:34 a.m. Friday, July 13, 2012. in Albuquerque, N.M. He weighed 9 pounds, and was 22 inches long. He is the son of Air Force Staff Sgt. Adam and Nancy Lopez, of Albuquerque, N.M. Maternal grandparents are Eric and Cathy Bottoms, of Lynn Haven. Maternal great-grandparents are Garrell and Linda Bottoms, of Texas; Conway and Loretta Dye, of Oklahoma; and the late Ralph and Louise Tucker, of Vernon. Paternal grandparents are Aileen Roberts Lopez, of Apalachicola, and Charles Lopez, of Panama City. Paternal great-grandparents are the late Herman and Catherine Roberts, of Apalachicola. Births Birthday LOIS SWOBODA | The Times John Spohrer signs a copy of his latest book for an admirer. Spohrer debuts photography book, exhibit

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The Times | A7 Thursday, September 6, 2012 The United Methodist Churches of Franklin County Welcome You First United Methodist Church of Apalachicola Worship Service 11:00 a.m. every Sunday Sunday School 10:00 a.m. 75 5 th St. Apalachicola 653-9530 fumcapalach@gtcom.net Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis Carrabelle United Methodist Church Worship Services 10:45 a.m. Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Celebrate Recovery Mondays 7-9 p.m. 102 NE Ave. B Carrabelle 697-3672 Pastor: Julie Stephens Eastpoint United Methodist Church Worship Service 10:00 a.m. every Sunday Healing service every fourth Monday at 7:00 p.m. 317 Patton Dr. (corner of David St.) 670-8825 Pastor: Rev. Beth White St. George Island United Methodist Church 9:00 a.m. Worship Service 10:00 a.m. Fellowship Hour 201 E. Gulf Beach Dr. 9274635 www.sgiumc.org Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis Nursery now provided for Sunday Church Service First Pentecostal Holiness Church 379 Brownsville Road Apalachicola Were excited about what Gods doing!!! Sunday School 9:45 am Sunday Morning Worship 10:45 am Sunday Evening Service 6:00 pm Monday, Youth Group 6:30 pm Wednesday, Royal Rangers, G.A.P. 7:00 pm Wednesday Worship & Word 7:30 pm Nursery Provided during regular church services 7:00 7:00 First Baptist Church St. George Island 501 E. Bayshore Drive 927-2257 R. Michael Waley, Pastor Join us as we praise and worship the living Christ. Great is the Lord and most worthy of praise. Psalm 145:3 Sunday Bible Study ................................................ 10:00am Worship Praise ........................................................ 11:00am Sunday Night ............................................................ 7:00pm Wednesday Power Hour ...................................... 7:00pm Wednesday Youth at S.P.L.A.S.H ....................... 7:00pm Walking in Christ R. Michael Whaley, Pastor Prophetic Words Gospel Explosion ends Friday The Prophetic Word Gospel Explosion, hosted by Bishop C.M. Lockhart, founder of Anointed Word Ministries in Carrabelle, is here The ministries are hosting the explosion from Thursday, Sept. 6 and Friday, Sept. 7 nightly at 7 p.m. Guest speakers are here from Hattiesburg, Magee and Columbia, Miss., all delivering the Word of God. Come with expectancy in your heart! Faith BRIEF The families of Nancy Horton and the late Elton Barber would like to thank everyone who sent food, owers and condolences to us during our time of sor row. Your kindness and prayers mean so much are very comforting. Elton was looking forward to his retirement and moving back to Apalachicola with Nancy, his family and friends whom he loved so much. He dreamed of doing a lot of shing on the river and bay here where he grew up. Elton raised three beautiful children and has ve grandchildren, all living in Fernandina Beach. His wonderful smile and heart of gold will be greatly missed by all who knew him. The families of Nancy Horton and the late Elton Barber We are so blessed that we live in a community that pulls together in time of need. Special thanks to all the local businesses, family and friends that helped so hard to pull off a great benet. We could not have done it without you all. Hope everyone enjoyed lunch, thank you for your support! The family of Terry Tipton Sr. Margaret E. Shiver Aug. 8, 1914 Feb. 27, 1998 Mama, if we could have one wish, we would wish we could spend one more day with you, to be able to see your pretty face again. But I know your time with us is over, youre now in Heaven with our Lord now and we nd peace in our hearts knowing that. And I feel sure some sweet day, we will all be together, with our loved ones and our Lord. Until then, Mama, know that I love you and miss you every day of my life. And you will always live in my heart until my dying day. God bless. Your son Charles King and Mary Lou King and Family Obituaries By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star.com On Aug. 30, the Carrabelle Lions Club presented the Franklin County Senior Center with a check for $1,000, a key piece of an ongoing to effort to sustain the regular Thursday lunches. In his Aug. 23 column in the Times, Jim Welsh sadly invited everyone to the last community lunch at the senior center. Devoted volunteers Robin Wells and Sid McOmie had announced they could no longer prepare the regular Thursday meal that has become an important social occasion in the community. In addition, there was a question of where funds could be found to fund the meals, offered for a nominal fee of $3 to $4. At the Aug. 30 luncheon, which was to have been the last, Becky McIntosh announced that new benefactors had come through to save the day. She told the happy lunchtime gathering of about 80 people that Suzie Cooper will take over cooking and coordinating the meal, with help from George Jackson. At the same luncheon, the Lions Club stepped forward to present McIntosh with the $1,000 check. President Bill Snyder said $700 of the money was raised at a sellout butt roast in August and the other $300 came from the club treasury. McIntosh also announced that Carrabelle has upped their donation to the center from $3,000 to $4,000 this year. We need volunteers, said Jackson, in a short speech. The more people we have to take part, the better center we will have. We want the communitys support. He also urged those present to call their county commissioner and ask them not to cut support for the center. Lunch at the senior center features door prizes and free blood pressure checks courtesy of NHC Home Health Care. Other regular activities are breakfast on Tuesday and Monday night bingo, Wii exercise, line dancing, yoga and legal aid. For a complete list of activities go to www. carrabelleseniorcenter. com or stop by the center and pick up a yer. The center is open Monday through Friday 8 a.m. to noon and 1-5 p.m. except on Thursday when the center remains open for the community lunch from noon to 1 p.m. For more information or to volunteer, call 697-3760. There wont be bingo at the Franklin County Senior Citizens Center for a while. We need callers and someone to work at the register. When I was on the board, one of the requirements was that each member either called or ran the register one night a month, Monday or Saturday. Had lunch at the St. James Health and Rehabilitation Center last Sunday. Visited with the friends and neighbors from the area. Here are some dates to mark on your calendar. Sunday, Sept. 16 is our monthly covered dish at Chillas Hall. It will be for our friend and neighbor Zelma Nolton, who passed away last month. Bring a dish to share and donation. Serving begins at 1 p.m. Hope you can make it! Pancake breakfast at the Lanark Village Boat Club will be Saturday, Sept. 15 from 9 a.m. to noon. Be watching for you! On Saturday, Oct. 6, there will be a yard sale at our golf course, starting at 8:30 a.m. Be kind to one another, check on the sick and housebound and as my friend Rita Millender says, Friends are like the stars in the sky you dont always see them, but you know theyre there. Until next time, God Bless America, the troops, the poor, homeless and hungry. LANARK NEWS Jim Welsh Senior center bingo looking for callersLO I S SWO B OD A | The Times Becky McIntosh, far left, accepts a check from Lions Club President Bill Snyder. Also on hand representing the Lions were, from left, Patty Lee, Janalyn Dowden, Linda and Tony Minichiello and, not pictured, Peggy Kight. Lions, Carrabelle fund senior center luncheon CARDS OF THANKS In loving memory William Hubert Bill Lindsey Sr., a retired Ai Force Master Sgt., was born at Sumatra at the home of his maternal grandparents on March 10, 1929, the son of Melvin and Ludy May Hill Lindsey. He died in Tallahassee Monday, Sept. 3, with his beloved wife of 60 years, Anne, by his side. After graduating from Carrabelle High School as salutatorian in 1947, Bill, also known locally as Hubert, enlisted in the U.S. Army Air Corps, which later became the US Air Force. His 27 years of active duty before retirement included a year of wartime service in Vietnam. Mr. Lindsey was a member of the Carrabelle United Methodist Church for many years and served as both financial secretary and treasurer. At the time of his passing, he was a member of the Carrabelle Episcopal Church of the Ascension and served as an usher. In addition to his wife Anne, he is survived by their two children, Linda Key (and husband Bill) of OFallon, Ill., and William H. Lindsey Jr. (and wife Barbara) of Houston, Texas; six grandchildren, Charles and Virginia Key of Illinois and Michael, Elizabeth, Kaitlyn and Megan Lindsey of Texas; four great-grandchildren, Danny, Will and Malcom Key and Reid Stabiler; three brothers, Melvin Louis (wife Ida Belle) of Port St. Joe, Fred of Sumatra and John G. (wife Sandra) of Blountstown; six nieces and eight nephews. Services to be held at a later date. Kelley Funeral Home, of Apalachicola, will be handling all arrangements.William H. Lindsey Sr. Eugene F. Hawkeye Russ Sr., 77, of Apalachicola, passed away in Port St. Joe on Friday, Aug. 24. He was born Oct. 24, 1934, in Apalachicola to the late Henry and Beatrice Russ. Mr. Russ attended Quinn High School. In his younger years, he was one of the sought-after shing and hunting guides in the area. He also worked in the seafood industry and dry-dock work.Late, in the 1980s and s, he served as custodian at Chapman Elementary School. After leaving Chapman, he followed the shing eets to Louisianan and Texas. He was twice-married, rst to Lela Mae EppsRuss and later to Clydia Mae Ray-Russ. Both preceded him in death. To cherish his memory, he leaves six daughters, Linda Russ-Henry (Robert), Bonnie RussJones (Harrison), and Patrice Weaver Lane, all of Apalachicola, Julie Byon of North Carolina, Jennifer Russ of Panama City and Cora McLemore of Pascagoula, Miss.; two sons, Eugene Russ Jr. of Panama City and Dwayne Griggs of Apalachicola; two sisters, Princess RussJones and Cora L. Russ; and one brother, Patton L. Russ. He also leaves behind a host of nieces, nephews and friends. His other siblings, Annie V. Russ, Ramona Russ-Conley, Mamie Russ, John H. Russ and Albert L. Russ, all preceded him in death. His son Leo Russ preceded him in death. Funeral services were held at St. Paul AME Church on Saturday afternoon, Sept. 1. Mr. Russ lay in state at the church for an hour prior to the service. All services are under the direction of Kelley Funeral Home, Apalachicola.Eugene F. Russ Sr. WELCOMES YOU Church of the Ascension 101 NE First Street Carrabelle SUNDAY 10:00 AM WELCOMES YOU Church THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH (850) 274-4490 (850) 545-2578 WELCOMES YOU Trinity Trinity Episcopal Church est. 1836 Welcomes You Hwy. 98 & 6th St. Apalachicola 850-653-9550 Sunday Worship Services 8 & 10:30 a.m. Wednesdays Healing Service 11 a.m. Centering Prayer 4 p.m. Sunday Worship Services 8 & 10:30 a.m. Wednesdays Healing Service 11 a.m. Centering Prayer 4 p.m. Faith

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Email outdoors news to timesoutdoors @star .com O UTDOORS www.apalachtimes.com Section Section A Horsemint By Lois Swoboda 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star .com Spotted horsemint also known as dotted horsemint and spotted bee balm, is a native strongly scented perennial plant 1-4 feet tall with the square stem, characteristic of the mint family pointed, and downy leaves dotted with small depressions. The two-lipped owers, like gaping mouths, are cream with ruddy spots and alternate along the tip of the stem with pale lavender modi ed leaves called bracts. The resulting display is attractive, if a little coarse. Horsemint blooms from July to October in our area. It likes full sun, but tolerates partial shade. This plant is drought tolerant, but will ower more profusely if given water during dry periods. Horsemint is highly salt tolerant making it a good choice for coastal gardens. Spotted horsemint can be propagated by dividing the root clumps, but it is easily grown from seeds. Seedlings can overrun a garden so be sure to deadhead this plant if you dont want it to spread. The nectar and pollen of the owers attract honeybees, bumblebees, miner bees and plasterer bees; all important pollinators. Butter ies also visit the owers of horsemint for nectar. Numerous insects feed on the owers, foliage or stems. The strongly scented foliage is repugnant to most mammals and rarely consumed by them. Traditionally, horsemint tea was taken for atulent, colic, suppressed urine, diarrhea, rheumatism, and digestive problems such as nausea, vomiting and side effects of alcoholism. Native Americans used the plant for fever, u, catarrhs, chills, decreased menstrual ow, and in ammations. Some native peoples drank a cold extract to relieve backache, and stimulate heart action. The Blackfoot tribe used poultices of the plant for skin infections and minor wounds and a tea made from the plant to treat mouth and throat infections caused by cavities and gingivitis. The oil derived from the leaves promotes sweating when used like liniment. This oil, also a fungicide and bactericide, is high in thymol, a chemical that expels parasitic worms. Thymol was one of the compounds used by the Egyptians during the mummi cation process. Now manufactured synthetically, thymol was once commercially derived from the herb thyme. During World War I, when the commercial thyme elds were destroyed in Europe, horsemint was grown in the United States as a substitute source of thymol. The dried oral heads of horsemint are used in ower arrangements and sachets. The leaves have a scent described as resembling oregano or thyme and the plant is considered a substitute for oregano. 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B W O sh.com FLOUNDER SHIMANO S HORT S LEEVE TOURNAMENT S HIRT (HIGH PERFORMANCE S TYLE)$59.99 S HIMANO TACKLE S TORAGE BAG $99.99 B W O $100.00 GIFT CARD SHIMANO ZALOR IN S HORE COMBO $79.99 WEEKLY ALMANAC APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE TIDE TABLES MONTHLY AVERAGES To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from these given for APALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW Cat Point Minus 0:40 Minus 1:17 East Pass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27 To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from those given for CARRABELLE: HIGH LOW Bald Point Minus 9:16 Minus 0:03 Sponsor the WEEKLY ALMANAC Call Today! 653-8868 Date High Low % Precip Thu, Sept. 06 85 76 30 % Fri, Sept. 07 85 76 30 % Sat, Sept. 08 85 75 50 % Sun, Sept. 09 83 71 30 % Mon, Sept. 10 82 74 10 % Tues, Sept. 11 84 74 0 % Wed, Sept. 12 83 73 0 % 5 We 624am 1.8 837pm 1.5 1241am 1.1 153pm 0.5 6 Th 654am 1.9 949pm 1.4 106am 1.2 247pm 0.5 7 Fr 732am 1.9 1119pm 1.4 138am 1.3 358pm 0.5 8 Sa 818am 1.8 222am 1.3 520pm 0.5 9 Su 1255am 1.5 916am 1.8 342am 1.4 634pm 0.5 10 Mo 201am 1.5 1029am 1.7 535am 1.4 733pm 0.4 11 Tu 241am 1.6 1150am 1.7 702am 1.4 822pm 0.4 12 We 312am 1.6 106pm 1.8 804am 1.3 904pm 0.4 13 Th 335am 1.6 213pm 1.8 851am 1.1 940pm 0.4 14 Fr 355am 1.6 312pm 1.8 933am 1.0 1013pm 0.5 15 Sa 412am 1.7 408pm 1.9 1011am 0.8 1043pm 0.6 16 Su 428am 1.7 504pm 1.8 1049am 0.6 1112pm 0.8 17 Mo 447am 1.8 601pm 1.8 1130am 0.4 1139pm 1.0 18 Tu 509am 1.9 702pm 1.7 1214pm 0.3 6 Th 529am 3.0 824pm 2.2 1234pm 0.8 1125pm 2.1 7 Fr 607am 3.0 954pm 2.2 145pm 0.8 8 Sa 653am 2.9 1130pm 2.4 1209am 2.1 307pm 0.8 9 Su 751am 2.9 129am 2.2 421pm 0.8 10 Mo 1236am 2.4 904am 2.7 322am 2.2 520pm 0.6 11 Tu 116am 2.6 1025am 2.7 449am 2.2 609pm 0.6 12 We 147am 2.6 1141am 2.9 551am 2.1 651pm 0.6 13 Th 210am 2.6 1248pm 2.9 638am 1.8 727pm 0.6 14 Fr 230am 2.6 147pm 2.9 720am 1.6 800pm 0.8 15 Sa 247am 2.7 243pm 3.0 758am 1.3 830pm 1.0 16 Su 303am 2.7 339pm 2.9 836am 1.0 859pm 1.3 17 Mo 322am 2.9 436pm 2.9 917am 0.6 926pm 1.6 18 Tu 344am 3.0 537pm 2.7 1001am 0.5 954pm 1.8 Thursday, September 6, 2012 Page 8 Special to the Times Even though you can hardly tell, summer is almost over. Kids have returned to school, football is back on TV, and hunting seasons already been going on for a month now in South Florida. Most of us have already nished our preseason scouting, and weve hung our tree stands along well-traveled deer trails next to a mature oak tree thatll soon begin dropping acorns, we hope. Finally, the time of year weve been waiting for is here. Just like last year on private lands, hunting season still comes in rst in Zone A, which is that part of the state south of State Road 70. Archery and crossbow seasons there started July 28. The fourth hunting zone, which was added two years ago and is made up in part by the Green Swamp Basin, is called Zone B and lies south of S.R. 50, west of U.S. 441 and the Kissimmee Waterway, north of S.R. 60 and east of the Gulf of Mexico. Archery and crossbow seasons in Zone B start this year on Oct. 13. The line that divides zones C and D begins at U.S. 27 at the Gadsden County line, dividing Florida-Georgia state line and runs south on U.S. 27 until it meets S.R. 61 in Tallahassee. From there, it follows S.R. 61, running south until it hits U.S. 319. There, the line follows U.S. 319, continuing south to U.S. 98; it then runs east along U.S. 98 before turning south on Spring Creek Highway and continuing to the Gulf of Mexico. If you hunt west of that line, youre in Zone D, where archery and crossbow seasons begin on Oct. 20 this year. In Zone C, archery and crossbow seasons open on the third Saturday in September. This year, that date is Sept. 15. To hunt during archery season, youll need a Florida hunting license and an archery permit. During crossbow season, youll need a hunting license and crossbow permit. If youre a Florida resident, an annual hunting license will cost $17. Nonresidents have the choice of paying $46.50 for a 10-day license or $151.50 for 12 months. Archery and crossbow permits cost just $5 each, and all deer hunters must have the $5 deer permit. Anyone planning on hunting one of Floridas many WMAs must purchase a management area permit for $26.50. And dont forget to pick up the WMA brochure for the area you wish to hunt, because hunting season dates on many of the areas are often different from what the zonal dates are. You can pick up a copy of these WMA brochures at your local tax collectors of ce or read them at MyFWC.com/Hunting. During archery season and that part of crossbow season that is concurrent with archery, you can take deer of either sex, regardless of antler size (except for spotted fawns). After archery ends, during the remaining portion of the crossbow season, only legal bucks (having at least one antler that is at least 5 inches long) may be taken. The daily bag limit on deer is two. Bag limits for deer on WMAs can differ, so check the speci cs of the area before you hunt. You can hunt wild hogs on private lands year-round with no bag or size limits. On most WMAs, theres also no bag or size limits, and hogs are legal to take during most hunting seasons except spring turkey. On a few WMAs, bag and size limits do apply, so be sure to check the brochure for the speci c area to be certain. Its also legal to shoot gobblers and bearded turkeys during archery and crossbow seasons, given you have a turkey permit ($10 for residents, $125 for nonresidents). You can take only one turkey per day, and theres a two-bird fall-season limit. Its against the law to hunt turkeys in Holmes County in the fall, and its illegal to shoot them while theyre on the roost, over bait, when youre within 100 yards of a game-feeding station when bait is present or with the aid of recorded turkey calls. If youre hunting during the archery season, you may hunt only with a bow and must have the $5 archery permit. During crossbow season, you may use either a crossbow or bow, but you must have the $5 crossbow permit. On WMAs, only hunters with a disabled crossbow permit are allowed to use crossbows during archery season. All bows must have a minimum draw weight of 35 pounds, and hand-held releases are permitted. For hunting deer, hogs and turkeys, broadheads must have at least two sharpened edges with a minimum width of 7/8 inch. Tony Young is the media relations coordinator for the FWCs Division of Hunting and Game Management. He can be reached with questions about hunting at Tony.Young@MyFWC.com. On Wednesday, Aug.29, with the water still high from rain and a storm surge caused by Hurricane Isaac, Shane Butler was up the river when he heard a sound like a baby crying. It was a baby fawn squealing for help. The young deer was caught in saw grass and struggling to stay a oat. Butler anchored, swam over and freed the fawn and carried it back to his boat. Since there was no sign of the mother, he decided to take it home. He called his best friend Richard Zingarelli and asked what to do. Zingarellis wife Ashley managed to feed the fawn a few swallows of diluted goats milk and nicknamed it Shirley. She started calling around for help. I called FWC and they told me to call Florida Wild Mammal Association (FWMA), she said. At FWMA, Director Chris Beatty told her to call Dr. Hobson Fulmers of ce in Eastpoint. He was kind enough to keep the fawn overnight and, on Thursday, wildlife advocate Jo Lewis carried her to FWMA. It was a really nice opportunity for my 3year-old daughter Sophia and my 8-year-old younger brother Taunton to get to interact with a wild creature and appreciate and touch it, said Ashley Zingarelli. On Friday, Beatty said she believed the fawn was about two months old and very strong and healthy. She was attempting to calm Shirley and had been able to give her four bottles, with two more feedings scheduled before bedtime. Beatty said fawns normally take six to eight bottles a day. Twenty percent of the injured and orphaned wildlife rescued by FWMA comes from Franklin County. FWMA receives no government funding and is entirely supported by grants and private donations. For more information about this important county resource, go to www.wakullawildlife. org/. By Lois Swoboda Pull back on a string; huntin season is here Florida Outdoors Tony Young FWC Media Relations Coordinator TONY YOUNG Outta The Woods BUDS N BUGS Lois Swoboda Monarda punctata LOIS SWOBODA | The Times SPONSORED BY Amberjack and grouper are still being caught in the 100-250ft of water. Offshore conditions have improved after the storm and the bottom bite is red hot right now. A few king sh and spanish are still around, but they will not be for long. Inshore Offshore Things are getting back to normal around St. Joe after last weeks close call with Hurrican Isaac. Trout, red sh, and ounder have all been reported on the bay this week. Lake Wimico has been hit-or-miss lately for bass, however, the moving water should stir things up this week. ASHLEY ZINGARELLI | Special to the Times Sophia Zingarelli and Shirley, the rescued fawn Community effort rescues drowning fawn

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CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA SP O RTS www.apalachtimes.com A Section Thursday, September 6, 2012 Page 9 By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com Just prior to kickoff Friday night the clouds and thunder rolled over Jackson County and served as an omen of a stormy night. Though it never actually rained, the Seahawk football squad never seemed to get on track in their opening game at Sneads, falling 62-12 for its rst loss of the season. Though the squad was forced to miss two valuable days of practice due to the precautionary measures and effects surrounding Hurricane Isaac, the team still had every opportunity to go up the road and take away a win in this non-league test. Instead, the Pirates scored early and often and costly turnovers contributed to 28 points for Sneads. The Seahawks experienced a string of injuries in the rst half, and at some point, nine players were forced to leave the game due to injury, only half of them able to return to play. The Seahawks offense struggled to get in any type of rhythm until late in the rst half and then again midway through the third quarter. We were proud of how some of our reserves stepped up for the challenge, without the advantage of getting rst team reps throughout the preseason, said Coach Josh Wright. Mercury Wynn was a shot of energy for the Hawks converting big plays and leading the team in rushing with 45 yards on nine carries and nding the end zone on a perfectly-blocked 11yard touchdown run in the third quarter. Wynn showed his toughness earlier in the game on an exciting reverse where he fought for hard yards. Wright said other bright spots included good two-way play from offensive and defensive linemen seniors Jeff Murray and Karl Sanford, and junior. Zach Tauscher. These players answered the bell when they realized they would have to go all night for the injury depleted Hawks, said Wright. Freshman Trenton Lee also saw extensive play at fullback and linebacker and popped off a quality run up the middle as well as pulling down a pass and converting a pair of rst downs. Junior Logan McLeod continued his growth at quarterback, with only a few mishaps and surprising everyone with a great play fake bootleg for a 17-yard scamper. Logan showed some signs of speed and looks to be getting faster as the season has progressed, said Wright. It was exciting to see him nd the end zone and lead a quality scoring drive capped off with a bootleg ve-yard touchdown just seconds prior to the end of the rst half. Sneads played starters all night on both sides of the ball so we earned every yard and learned several hard lessons on defense, said the coach. That happens sometimes and it is our job to be better prepared to play more competitive football. There is no time for excuses and our focus as a staff is to both nish games as a team and nish games individually. Longtime friend and former Rutherford High School head football and track coach Gregg Rivers used to always say that Excuses build bridges to failure, Wright said. He could not have been more correct, and we take the blame for this one and look to give the home fans something to cheer about in the home opener this Friday against Graceville. Kickoff for this Faculty and Staff Appreciation Game is set for 7:30 p.m. All faculty and staff are invited free of charge. Ticket booth opens at 6 p.m. and prices remain $5 for adults and $3 for students. Children 6 and under are free. Touchdown Club Boosters will be able to pickup their booster tshirts at the back pass gate. Sneads storms past Seahawks 62-12 At the August 21 county commission meeting, Commissioner Cheryl Sanders said that based on feedback from the community, the local Little League organization does not support bringing the Dixie League World Series to the county next year. At the July 17 meeting, Parks and Recreation Nikki Millender announced that the county had been asked to host the World Series for Angels and Ponytails X Play next year. XPlay is a newly introduced format that allows players in this age group to steal bases, among other rule variations. The commissioners over the Angels and Debs up in Virginia sure do want to come down here, but Ive talked to some of the coaches and they just didnt think that we should go out for the World Series, said Sanders. They like having the district or the state tournament. Millender said the state tournaments bring in more revenue but the county could also offer to host district tournaments. Id like to try to get something possibly in here for the boys, she said. She said she learned the World Series is expensive to stage because the host venue must provide each team with ve rooms at no cost. Sanders said the World Series event in Powhatan, Va. was much less elaborate than the state tournament staged by Franklin County. I can tell you, Franklin County knows how to do something, she said. Up there, it was nothing like it was done in Franklin County. It made me proud because everybody had talked about how Franklin County had done the state tournaments. She instructed Millender to produce an information pack concerning possible tournaments for the commission and bring it to the next meeting. Bring the cost of it too, instructed Commissioner Noah Lockley. At Tuesday mornings meeting, Millender reported that the cost to host a Dixie Boys All-Stars Baseball and Dixie Girls All-Stars Softball tournaments would be approximately $2,500 to $5,000 per each tournament. This cost covers tournament fees, trophies, and supplies. She said the estimate does not include overtime pay for the county employees who would be working the tournament. We do not have to do a banquet with that or anything, said Millender. I dont think its fair to just let the girls have a tournament when one represents the county as well as another, said Commissioner Bevin Putnal, whose motion to have a boys tournament in addition to the girls passed unanimously. Lockley asked that Millender check with the Tourist Development Council about a possible contribution. Normally, when we have a tournament, the TDC will step up, said Millender. Commission Chair Pinki Jackel said tournament of cials wont consider the county for a World Series until it had lighted scoreboards. Check with Pepsi and Coke and see if theyll provide lighted scoreboards, she said, and asked Millender to perform an assessment of all county parks for de ciencies. By Lois Swoboda JEFF MURRAY TRENTON LEE LOGAN MCLEOD KARL SANFORD ZACH TAUSCHER Countys World Series hopes strike out Seahawk volleyball team sweeps FAMU The Lady Seahawk varsity volleyball team, under the direction of rstyear coach Hilary Stanton, opened its 2012 season Aug. 29 at FAMU High School, and swept a doubleheader. The team won in three straight in the opener, 25-12, 25-16 and 25-19. In the nightcap, the Lady Seahawks lost the opening set, 25-22, and then notched three straight wins, 29-27, 25-22 and 25-19. The team is led by senior captain #10 Chena Segree, and co-captain #12 Anna Lee, both chosen by their teammates in a team vote. Rounding out the varsity team are seniors #11 Codee Crum, #23 Karlie Tucker and #17 Christina Collins. The two juniors on the team are #6 Morgan Mock and #00 Gracyn Kirvin, with #22 Scout Segree the lone eighth grader. Tara Klink, the 2006 Apalachicola High School valedictorian, has been helping out the team at every practice and will be assisting Stanton at every game. By David Adlerstein Police seek missing teen By CHRIS OLWELL News Herald Writer Twitter: @PCNHChrisO LYNN HAVEN Lynn Haven police are asking for the publics assistance in locating a missing teen. Nichole Leigh Rhine, 16, was last seen at 2 p.m. Sunday near her residence in Lynn Haven, according to a release from the Lynn Haven Police Department. At this point, investigators do not suspect foul play, said Investigator Steve McNeil. Theres no reason to believe shes being held against her will. ... Its a pretty straightforward runaway case, McNeil said. Rhine is originally from Franklin County and had run away from home to stay with family friends in Lynn Haven, McNeil said. Rhine was wearing a white tank top shirt with a ower design and blue jean shorts when she was last seen. She is about 5 feet tall, weighs about 95 pounds and has green eyes and brown hair. Police said she might have been with an unidenti ed 32-yearold black man with a light complexion who is known to drive a light gray or silver Nissan. Anyone with information about her whereabouts is urged to contact the Lynn Haven Police Department at 265-4111 or CrimeStoppers at 785TIPS (8477). Read more: www. newsherald.com/articles/ seek-105247-teen-haven. html#ixzz25bmUvZjM 2012 JUNIOR VARSITY/ VARSITY VOLLEYBALL SCHEDULE Thursday, Sept. 6 @ Godby (4A) JV/V 5/6 p.m. Monday, Sept. 10 Wakulla(4A) JV/V 5/6 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 11 @ Wewahitchka (2A) JV/V 6/7 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 13 Blountstown* JV/V 6/7 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 15 Panhandle Fall Classic (1A 7A) @ Mosley (Varsity only) Tuesday, Sept. 18 @ Port St. Joe* JV/V 6/7 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 20 West Gadsden* Varsity Only (DH) Saturday, Sept. 22 JV Blountstown Tournament Monday, Sept. 24 Wewahitchka (2A) JV/V 6/7 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 25 @ Liberty County* JV/V 6/7 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 27 Godby (4A) JV/V 5/6 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 2 Rickards (4A) JV/V 5:30/6:30 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 3 @ Wakulla(4A) JV/V 5/6 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 4 @ Blountstown JV/V 5/6 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 9 Port St. Joe JV/V 6/7 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 11 Liberty County JV/V 6/7 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 16 @ Rickards (4A) JV/V 5:30/6:30 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 18 Altha(1A) JV/V 6/7 p.m. (Senior Night) Tuesday, Oct. 23 District Tournament @ Blountstown 3/5/7 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 25 District Championship Blountstown 7 p.m. DISTRICT GAME DH DOUBLE HEADER TIMEALL EST 2012 SEAHAWK FOOTBALL ROSTER Seniors 4 Dan Carrino 5 165 WR-DB 5 Holden Foley 6 215 TE-DE 7 Skyler Hutchinson 5 188 RB-DB 10 Zach Howze 5 157 K/P 22 Ladarius Rhodes 5 223 FB-LB 27 David Butler 6 190 TE-DE 50 Chase Golden 6 292 OL-DL 52 Ellis Wilson 6 192 TE-LB 55 Direek Farmer 6 247 OL-DL 74 Jeff Murray 6 246 OL-DL 76 Karl Sanford 5 210 OL-DL Juniors 1 Dwayne Griggs 5 174 RB-DB 3 Stefan DeVaughn 5 155 WR-DB 11 Logan McLeod 6 160 QR-DB 14 Tyler Webb 5 176 WR-DB 24 Thomas Benitez 5 132 WR-DB 26 Kyle Hathcox 5 193 RB-LB 29 Christian Jones 6 155 WR-DB 51 Lenny Ward 5 242 OL-DL 73 Zach Tauscher 6 312 OL-DL Sophomores 2 Cole Wheeler 5 138 RB-DB 6 Kelsey Jones 5 152 WR-DB 71 Mason Ray 5 178 OL-DL 75 Eric Coleman 5 268 OL-DL Freshmen 8 Tyler Rowell 6 155 WR-DB 20 Trenton Lee 5 186 RB-DB 54 Marcus Bunyon 6 201 OL-DL 56 Jacob Wilson 5 247 OL-DL 58 Jake Robinson 5 175 OL-DL 59 Charles Golden 5 215 OL-DL Staff: Josh Wright, Michael Sweatt, Tim Wheeler, Bronson Sweatt, Ashley Teat, Kelli Wright Principal George Oehlert and Superintendent Nina Marks. NICHOLE RHINE

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Local A10 | The Times Thursday, September 6, 2012 Veterans host annual reunion Saturday The Franklin County Veterans will have their 21st annual reunion this Saturday, Sept 8, at the National Guard Armory in Apalachicola. We will start around 7 a.m. Dinner will be served at noon. We will have fresh fried mullet and grilled chicken, with baked beans and cole slaw. This reunion is for all the Franklin County veterans, of all wars or campaigns, said organizer Charles Wilson. We invite all of our veterans to come join us for good food and fellowship and veterans; bring your families. We have hats for all veterans who are present. Ladies, please bring a dessert if you can. For more information, call Wilson at 653-6482 or John Sack at 670-8375 or email to sack@fairpoint. net Seafood workers to meet Monday The Franklin County Seafood Workers Associations next meeting is scheduled for 6 p.m. Monday, Sept. 10, at the Eastpoint Firehouse, on the corner of 6th Street and CC Land Road. The meeting will have new sign-ups for next years shelling program, discussion of the current shelling program just completed for 2012, board member sign-ups and the Oyster Spat festival, to be held Oct. 57 in Eastpoint and on St. George Island. We will be having a fundraiser booth at the festival and need volunteers to help run the booth, donate and help clean up. If anyone has any questions contact Jennifer Millender at 850-597-0787 or Shannon Harts eld at 653-5190. Wilderness Coast libraries to meet in Crawfordville The Wilderness Coast Public Libraries (WILD) Governing Board will meet at 1:30 p.m. Monday, Sept. 10, at the Wakulla County Public Library at 4330 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville. The meeting is open to the public. For more information, please call (850) 997-7400. Transportation board to hold Wednesday meeting The Apalachee Regional Planning Council announces that all persons are invited to the Franklin County Transportation Disadvantaged Coordinating Board meeting on Wednesday, Sept. 12, at 10 a.m. at the Franklin County Courthouse Annex Courtroom, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola. In addition to its regular business, the agenda will include adoption of bylaws, complaint/grievance procedures and the annual operating report. A public hearing will follow the meeting. If any person decides to appeal any decision made by the board with respect to any matter considered at this meeting, he/she will need to ensure a verbatim record of the proceeding is made, including the testimony and evidence from which the appeal is to be issued. For additional information, copy of the agenda, or if you require special accommodations at the meeting because of a disability or physical impairment, contact Vanita Anderson at the Apalachee Regional Planning Council, 20776 Central Ave. East, Suite 1, Blountstown, FL 32424 at least ve working days prior to the meeting date. Public invited to view updated ood maps Franklin County residents are invited to attend an open house to view updated ood maps and learn more about the ood risks in the community. The open houses, conducted by the counties, the Northwest Florida Water Management District and the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) will give residents the opportunity to view the preliminary maps, learn about their risk of ooding and what the new maps may mean for their property and communities. Residents can meet one-on-one with specialists to discuss the preliminary maps, ood insurance, engineering and more. Local of cials will also be available to assist citizens. The open houses will take place on Wednesday, Sept. 12, from 4-7 p.m. at the Board of County Commissioners meeting room in the Franklin County Courthouse Annex, 34 Forbes St., Apalachicola. Up-to-date ood hazard maps are important tools that can help Floridians understand and prepare for ood risks. These new maps are part of FEMAs efforts to modernize ood maps for communities nationwide. The district and local communities are working closely with FEMA to incorporate the latest and most accurate information into the maps so that they better re ect the risk that communities face. The maps for Jefferson, Franklin and Wakulla counties are still preliminary and will become effective after a public comment period. Visit portal. nwfwmd oodmaps.com to view the preliminary maps online. Domestic violence task force to meet Sept. 18 The Franklin County Domestic Violence Task Force met Thursday, Aug. 30 at 2Als in Carrabelle. The next meeting will be held on Tuesday, Sept. 18 in Apalachicola. The Task Force was developed to provide community leadership and assistance to domestic and sexual violence survivors and their families. Membership is open to all residents, organizations and community agencies. For more information, please call Carol Bar eld, domestic violence advocate for Refuge House, at 653-3313 Relay for Life to kick off Sept. 27 Franklin County Relay for Life is holding a kickoff event on Thursday, Sept. 27. It will be held at Riverfront Park in downtown Apalachicola at 6 p.m. This years theme is Carnival for a Cure. Popcorn, nachos, cotton candy and other carnival-themed foods will be served. Sign up your team or join a team. Come see what Relay for Life is all about. Celebrate, Remember, Fight Back. Trades & Services 653-8868 GET YOUR AD IN C A LL T ODAY! GET YOUR AD IN 653-8868 Trades & Services GET YOUR AD IN 653-8868 Trades & Services Laban Bontrager, DMD Monica Bontrager, DMD 12761 Pea Ridge Road Bristol, Florida 32321 TELEPHONE (850) 643-5417 Bristol Dental Clinic DENTURE LAB ON PREMISES Same Day Service on Repairs and Relines Don Lively General Contractors L ICENSED AND I NSURED 20 Y EARS E XPERIENCE P .O. Box 439 C arrabelle, FL 32322 697-2783 or Mobile 566-2603 RC 0066499 R G0065255 Carrabelle Visa, Discover, and American Express Honored at Participating Ace Stores JACKSONS Building Supplies Building Supplies & Auto Repair Carrabelle 697-3333 We Deliver Anywhere Hardware and Paint Center J.J.s Tree Service, LLC Stump Grinder Licensed & Insured Call John : (850) 899-8432 ROBERTS APPLIANCE REPAIR ALL MAJOR BRANDS 18 Shadow Lane Apalachicola, FL 32320 Phone: (850) 653-8122 Cell: (850) 653-7654 News BRIEFS AUTOM A TIC POWER PROTECTION 24/7 **PRICES VARY DEPENDING ON EQUIPMENT & INSTALLATION No lights, loss of communication and safety issues are just a few of the headaches associated with a power outage. When the power goes out, depend on a GENER A C standby generator to supply back-up electricity to your homes essential items, automatically. No manual starting. FOR TURN KEY INSTALLATION STARTING AT: $4500.00** Anderson Power Services 229-247-6630 http://andersonpowerservices.com NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED BIDS ing 850-653-9783

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, September 6, 2012 The Times | A11 88940T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 19-2012-CA-000204CAXX XX WELLS FARGO BANK, NA, Plaintiff, vs. MARK CUSTER, et al., Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION TO: Unknown Spouse of Carol Dupuis last known residence: 12 5 St, Eastpoint, FL 32328 and all persons claiming by, through, under or against the named Defendants. YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in Franklin County, Florida: FROM A POINT (CONCRETE P.R.M.) ON THE NORTHERN BOUNDARY OF THE 100-FOOT HIGHWAY (U.S. 319) 422 FEET SOUTH (TRUE MERIDIAN) FROM THE NE CORNER OF THE SE 1/4 OF SW 1/4 OF SECTION 29, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 6 WEST; RUN SOUTH 66 DEGREES 17 MINUTES WEST 770.5 FEET ALONG SAID BOUNDARY AND ON LINE TANGENT TO ITS CURVE; THEN NORTH 23 DEGREES 43 MINUTES WEST ALONG THE EASTERLY BOUNDARY OF FIFTH STREET 200 FEET TO A POINT (CON P.R.M.) FOR BEGINNING. RUN THENCE NORTH 66 DEGREES 17 MINUTES EAST 200 FEET, THENCE NORTH 23 DEGREES 43 MINUTES WEST 155 FEE, THENCE SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG THE NORTHERLY BOUNDARY OF AN EASEMENT RIGHT-OF-WAY TO THE FLORIDA POWER CORP. AND 50 FEET EQUI-DISTANT FROM THEIR POLE LINE, APPROXIMATELY 205 FEET. THENCE SOUTH 23 DEGREES 43 MINUTES EAST 120 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. THUS FORMING AN IRREGULAR TRACT IN THE SW 1/4 OF SAID SECTION 29 FRONTING 120 FEET OF FIFTH ST., AT EASTPOINT IN FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH 1999 GRAND MANOR, VIN #0616699 AND 0616700 has been filed against you and your are required to serve a copy of your written defense, if any, to it on Aldridge Connors, LLP, plaintiff’s attorney, at 7000 West Palmetto Park Road, Suit 307, Boca Raton, Florida 33433, within 30 days of the first date of publication of this notice, and file the original with the clerk of this court on plaintiff’s attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. Dated on August 13, 2012. Marcia Johnson As Clerk of the Court Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk September 6, 2012 September 13, 2012 88801T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.: 192009CA000261CA XXXX U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE, SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO STATE STREET BANK AND TRUST, AS TRUSTEE FOR WAMMS 2002-MS8 vs. JAMES EMORY MORRIS, et al. Plaintiff, vs. JAMES EMORY MORRIS A/K/A EMORY MORRIS, et al Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of foreclosure dated July 26, 2012, and entered in Case No. 192009CA 000261CAXXXX of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for FRANKLIN COUNTY, Florida, wherein U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE, SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO STATE STREET BANK AND TRUST, AS TRUSTEE FOR WAMMS 2002-MS8 vs. JAMES EMORY MORRIS et al., is Plaintiff, and JAMES EMORY MORRIS A/K/A EMORY MORRIS, et al are Defendants, the clerk will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, beginning at 11:00 AM at FRANKLIN County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, FL 32301, in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes, on the 3rd day of October, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Summary Final Judgment, to wit: Lot 2, in Block 11 West of St. George Island Gulf Beaches, Unit No. 1, according to the plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 2, Page 7, of the public records of Franklin County, Florida. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus funds from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated at Apalachicola, FRANKLIN COUNTY, Florida, this 27th day of July, 2012. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of said Circuit Court By: Terry Creamer As Deputy Clerk September 6, 13, 2012 88957T IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT NORTHERN DISTRICT OF FLORIDA TALLAHASSEE DIVISION CASE NO.: 4:12-CV-00053-RHWCS CENTENNIAL BANK, Plaintiff, vs. KEVIN R. GABY a/k/a KEVIN RILEY GABY; KERRY R. GABY; and WILDWOOD COUNTRY CLUB PROPERTY OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that under and by virtue of a Judgment of Foreclosure rendered in the abovestyled case on June 5, 2012, by the United States District Court For The Northern District Of Florida, in favor of the Plaintiff, and the Amendment to Judgment of Foreclosure entered July 10, 2012, by the United States District Court For The Northern District Of Florida, the undersigned, appointed in said decree, will on the 10th day of September, 2012 at 12:00 p.m. (Eastern Time), at the main foyer in the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327, offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the highest bidder, the following described property, situated, lying and being in Wakulla County and Franklin County, Florida: SEE EXHIBITS A, B AND C ATTACHED HERETO. EXHIBIT A COMMENCE AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 13, TOWNSHIP 4 SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND ALSO MARKING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF WOODLAND PARK SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 82 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 16 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARY OF SAID NORTHWEST QUARTER AND THE NORTH BOUNDARY OF SAID WOODLAND PARK SUBDIVISION 1575.73 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 34 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID SOUTH BOUNDARY OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER AND ALONG SAID NORTH BOUNDARY OF WOODLAND PARK SUBDIVISION 480.95 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE NORTH 89 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 34 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID SOUTH BOUNDARY OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER AND ALONG SAID NORTH BOUNDARY OF WOODLAND PARK SUBDIVISION AND AN EXTENSION THEREOF 386.57 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT ON THE WESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 319, THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 21 MINUTES 07 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 225.76 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 34 SECONDS WEST 385.15 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 17 SECONDS WEST 225.76 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. Together with all rights, easements, appurtenances, royalties, mineral rights, oil and gas rights, crops, timber, all diversion payments or third party payments made to crop producers, and all existing and future improvements, structures, fixtures, and replacements that may now, or at any time in the future, be part of the real estate described above (all referred to as “Property”). The term Property also includes, but is not limited to, any and all water wells, water, ditches, reservoirs, reservoir sites and dams located on the real estate and all riparian and water rights associated with the Property, however established. EXHIBIT B Parcel 1: Lot 21 of Wildwood Country Club, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 3, Page(s) 35, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Parcel 2: Lot 10, Block E of Sopchoppy River Subdivision, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page(s) 27, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Parcel 3: Lots 1, 2, 3, and 4, Block B of Sopchoppy River Subdivision, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page(s) 27, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Less and Except: that part of Lots 1 and 4, Block B of Sopchoppy River Subdivision, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page(s) 27, deeded to the State of Florida, recorded 12/19/1973 in Official Records Book 39, Page 784, Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Parcel 4: Lots 26 and 27, Block O of Lanark Beach Unit No. 1, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 2, Page(s) 13, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. Together with all rights, easements, appurtenances, royalties, mineral rights, oil and gas rights, all water and riparian rights, ditches, and water stock and all existing and future improvements, structures, and replacements that may now, or at any time the future, be part of the real estate described above (all referred to as “Property”). EXHIBIT C BEGIN AT CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 13, TOWNSHIP 4 SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 35 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE EAST BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION 13 A DISTANCE OF 726.15 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT ON THE EDGE OF SWIRL SWAMP, THENCE RUN ALONG THE EDGE OF SAID SWIRL SWAMP AS FOLLOWS: NORTH 70 DEGREES 26 MINUTES 22 SECONDS EAST 282.08 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE SOUTH 82 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 08 SECONDS EAST 213.59 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE NORTH 83 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 52 SECONDS EAST 107.30 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE NORTH 25 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 52 SECONDS EAST 97.25 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE NORTH 83 DEGREES 19 MINUTES 31 SECONDS EAST 125.54 FEET TO CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE NORTH 46 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 12 SECONDS EAST 243.65 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE NORTH 70 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 52 SECONDS EAST 190.70 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE NORTH 45 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 32 SECONDS EAST 152.83 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE NORTH 75 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 12 SECONDS EAST 285.84 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE NORTH 62 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 36 SECONDS EAST 133.29 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE LEAVING SAID SWAMP’S EDGE RUN SOUTH 02 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 56 SECONDS WEST 3340.12 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 73 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 1530.27 FEET TO AN OLD AXLE ON THE EAST BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION 13, THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 36 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID EAST BOUNDARY 834.01 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 24 SECONDS EAST 280.50 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 36 SECONDS WEST 1560.24 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 24 SECONDS WEST 280.50 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SITUATE, LYING AND BEING IN LOTS 86 AND 87 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. LESS AND EXCEPT THE FOLLOWING: COMMENCE AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 13, TOWNSHIP 4 SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 24 SECONDS EAST 280.50 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 36 SECONDS WEST 131.30 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 24 SECONDS EAST 330.00 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 36 SECONDS EAST 660.00 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 24 SECONDS WEST 330.00 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 36 SECONDS WEST 528.70 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH ACCESS OVER AND ACROSS THAT CERTAIN EASEMENT RECORDED OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 191, PAGE 350 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. Together with all rights, easements, appurtenances, royalties, mineral rights, oil and gas rights, crops, timber, all diversion payments or third party payments made to crop producers, and all existing and future improvements, structures, fixtures, and replacements that may now, or at any time in the future, be part of the real estate described above (all referred to as “Property”). The term Property also includes, but is not limited to, any and all water wells, water, ditches, reservoirs, reservoir sites and dams located on the real estate and all riparian and water rights associated with the Property, however established. For additional information concerning the above property contact: STEPHEN A. PITRE, ESQUIRE, Post Office Box 13010, Pensacola, Florida 325913010 or (850) 434-9200. All sales are subject to confirmation of the court. Method of payment is by postal money order or certified check made payable to the U.S. Marshal Service. Ten (10) Percent of High/ Acceptable bid in certified check or cashier’s check (NO CASH) will be accepted with the balance due within 48 hours. No cash will be accepted. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim with the Clerk of the Court within 60 days after the sale. In accordance with the AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT, persons needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact Stephen A. Pitre, Esquire, Post Office Box 13010, Pensacola, Florida 32591-3010 or (850) 434-9200 not later than seven days prior to the sale to ensure that reasonable accommodations are available. Ed Spooner United States Marshal Northern District of Florida Dated: August 8, 2012 By: Ed Spooner U.S. Marshals Service August 16, 23, 30 September 6, 2012 89006T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No. 192012CP000048XXXXXX IN RE; ESTATE OF CRAIG LELAND HARRIS, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of CRAIG LELAND HARRIS, deceased, is pending in the Circuit Court for Franklin County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, FL 32320. The names and addresses of the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is September 6, 2012. Attorney for Personal Representative: CHRISTINE BIALCZAK, ESQ. Fla. Bar No. 30798 Downey & Downey, P.A. 3501 PGA Boulevard, Suite 201, Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33410 Personal Representative: NATHAN ALEXANDER HARRIS 5402 Mittlestedt Road, Houston, TX 770692758 September 6, 13, 2012 89000T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 10-000312-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, as successor in Interest to GULF STATE COMMUNITY BANK, Plaintiff, vs FREDERICK L. BATEMAN, JR. Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE is hereby given that, pursuant to the Order of Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure in this cause, in the Circuit Court of Franklin County, Florida, I will sell the property situated in Franklin County, Florida described as: EXHIBIT A LEGAL DESCRIPTION Alligator Point Townhomes Unit 322 Commence at the Southwest corner of Lot 47; ALLIGATOR POINT, a subdivision as per map or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 25, Public Records of Franklin County, Florida lying North of Alligator Drive (County Road No. 370); run thence North 01 degrees 13 minutes 25 seconds East along the Westerly boundary of said Lot 47, 119.68 feet; thence leaving said Westerly boundary run South 86 degrees 58 minutes 53 seconds East, 0.29 feet; thence continue South 86 degrees 58 minutes 53 seconds East, 25.50 feet; thence South 03 degrees 01 minute 07 seconds West, 10.00 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING run thence South 86 degrees 58 minutes 53 seconds East, 20.00 feet; thence North 03 degrees 01 minute 07 seconds East, 65.66 feet; thence North 86 degrees 58 minutes 53 seconds West, 20.00 feet; thence South 03 degrees 01 minute 07 seconds West, 65.66 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. at Public Sale, to the highest bidder, for cash, at the steps of the Franklin County Courthouse, Apalachicola, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on October 9, 2012.Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court this 28th day of August, 2012. Marcia M. Johnson CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk Steve M. Watkins, III FBN: 0794996 41 Commerce Street Apalachicola, FL 32320 (850)653-1949 September 6, 13, 2012 89287T NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE BY CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT Notice is hereby given that the undersigned, MARCIA JOHNSON, Clerk of the Circuit Court of Franklin County, Florida, will on the 3rd of October, 2012, at 11:00 a.m. Eastern Time, at the Second Floor Lobby of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, in the city of Apalachicola, Florida, offer for sale, and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder, the following described real and personal property situated in Franklin County, Florida: LOT 5 AND 5A, SOUND BREEZE SUBDIVISION, ACCORING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 8, PAGE 44, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. Together with all rights, easements, appurtenances, royalties, mineral rights, oil and gas rights, crops, timber, all diversion payments or third party payments made to crop producers, and all existing and future improvements, structures, fixtures, and replacements that may now, or at any time in the future, be part of the real estate described above (all referred to as “Property”). The term Property also includes, but is not limited to, any and all water wells, water, ditches, reservoirs, reservoir sites and dams located on the real estate and all riparian and water rights associated with the Property, however established. pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure as to Count I in a case pending in said Court, the style of which is: CENTENNIAL BANK, Plaintiff, vs. COASTAL BLUE WATERS, PROPERTIES, LLC, a/k/a COASTAL BLUE WATERS PROPERTIES, LLC, LEON D. HUMPHRIES, and PAUL S. LOWE, Defendants, and the docket number of which is 11-000024-CA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim with the clerk of the court within 60 days after the sale. In accordance with the AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT, persons needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact Stephen A. Pitre, Esquire, Post Office Box 13010, Pensacola, Florida 32591-3010 not later than seven days prior to the proceeding to ensure that reasonable accommodations are available. WITNESS my hand and the official seal of this Honorable Court this 20th day of August, 2012. MARCIA JOHNSON Clerk of the Circuit Court Franklin County, Florida By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk August 30, September 6, 2012 89291T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2009-CA-000273 YALE MORTGAGE CORPORATION, a Florida corporation, Plaintiff, vs. THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES AND ALL OTHER PERSONS CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE REAL PROPERTY WHICH IS THE SUBJECT MATTER OF THIS ACTION BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST JERRY A. SAMUELLS, DECEASED; JOHN DOE and JANE DOE, unknown parties in possession, if any, Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION IN MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE TO: THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES AND ALL OTHER PERSONS CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE REAL PROPERTY WHICH IS THE SUBJECT MATTER OF THIS ACTION BY THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST JERRY A. SAMUELLS, DECEASED; Last Known Address: 2314 Eisenhower Drive Tallahassee, FL 32310 and 5850 East Milton Road Milton, FL 32583 YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following real property in Franklin County, Florida: Lot 12, Block 82, St. George Island Gulf Beaches No. 5, according to the map or plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 3, Page 16, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it, on Eric R. Schwartz, Esquire, Weitz & Schwartz, P.A., Plaintiffs’ Attorney, whose address is 900 S.E. 3rd Avenue, Suite 204, Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33316 30 days of the first publication of this notice and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiff’s attorneys or immediately thereafter, otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Mortgage Foreclosure Complaint. DATED this August 16, 2012. MARCIA JOHNSON As Clerk of the Court By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk August 30, September 6, 2012 89297T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 19-2010-CA-000194 DIVISION: CHASE HOME FINANCE LLC, Plaintiff, vs. MATTHEW MCCULLOUGH, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE 89295T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 19-2009-CA-000683 DIVISION: SUNTRUST MORTGAGE, INC., Plaintiff, vs. DEBORAH H. NEWMAN et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated July 25, 2012, and entered in Case No. 19-2009-CA000683 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for FRANKLIN County, Florida wherein SUNTRUST MORTGAGE, INC. is the Plaintiff and DEBORAH H. NEWMAN; THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF DEBORAH H. NEWMAN N/K/A JOHN DOE; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at FRONT DOOR OF THE FRANKLIN COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 33 MARKET STREET, APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA at 11:00AM, on the 24th day of October, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT 17, BLOCK I, ST. GEORGE ISLAND GULF BEACHES, UNIT NO. 2, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, AT PAGE 15, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 941 E GORRIE DRIVE, ST GEORGE ISLAND, FL 32328 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on _July 25, 2012. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Marcia M. Johnson Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Mr. Doug Smith, Office of Court Administration, Leon County Courthouse, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301, Phone: 850577-4401, Fax: 850487-7947. F09116584 August 30, September 6, 2012

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A12| The Times Thursday, September 6, 2012 CLASSIFIEDS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated July 25, 2012, and entered in Case No. 19-2010-CA000194 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for FRANKLIN County, Florida wherein JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO CHASE HOME FINANCE LLC1, is the Plaintiff and MATTHEW MCCULLOUGH; DANIELLE MCCULLOUGH; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT (S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSE, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; FRANKLIN COUNTY; TENANT #1 N/K/A DONALD DEMPSEY are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at FRONT DOOR OF THE FRANKLIN COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 33 MARKET STREET, APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA at 11:00AM, on the 7th day of November, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT 4 BLOCK 187, KEOUGH’S SECOND ADDITION TO THE TOWN OF CARRABELLE, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 20, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 908 NE 6TH STREET, CARRABELLE, FL 32322 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on July 26, 2012. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Mr. Doug Smith, Office of Court Administration, Leon County Courthouse, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 Phone: 850577-4401, Fax: 850487-7947. F10016145 August 30, September 6, 2012 89303T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case No.: 2010-CA-000447 CitiMortgage, Inc. Plaintiff, vs. Ronald J. Harper, CitiBank, N.A.; Magnolia Bay Homeowners Association, Inc.; Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order of Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated July 26, 2012, entered in Civil Case No. 2010-CA-000447 of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein CitiMortgage, Inc., Plaintiff and Ronald J. Harper are defendant (s), I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash AT THE WEST FRONT DOOR OF THE FRANKLIN COUNTY COURTHOUSE, LOCATED ON HWY 98, IN APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA, AT 11:00 A.M. on September 11, 2012, the following property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit: LOT 1, BLOCK B, MAGNOLIA BAY, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 6, PAGES 21 THROUGH 22, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator; 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, Florida 32301; (850) 577-4430 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification of the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. MARCIA M. JOHNSON Clerk of Court Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk Attorney for Plaintiff: ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF: SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACHE, LLP 4630 Woodland Corporate Blvd. Tampa, FL 33614 (813) 880-8888 (813) 880-8800 August 30, September 6, 2012 89417T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No. 12-00047CP IN RE: ESTATE OF ALBERT MORONI SHULER, JR., Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of ALBERT MORONI SHULER, JR., deceased, whose date of death was May 29, 2012, is pending in the Circuit Court for Franklin County, Florida, Probate Division, File Number 12-00047CP, the address of which is 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, FL 32329. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be serve must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY (30) DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons who have claims or demands against the decedent’s estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. THE DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE IS: September 6, 2012. Personal Representative: PATSY ANN SHULER 99 South Bay Shore Dr. Eastpoint, FL 32328 Attorney for Personal Representative: ROBERT A. PIERCE FL Bar No. 0175399 Ausley & McMullen, P.A. Post Office Box 391 Tallahassee, FL 32302 (850) 224-9115 September 6, 13, 2012 89329T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL DISTRICT IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF FRANKLIN PROBATE DIVISION File No.: 12-00033CP IN RE: ESTATE OF DIANA PATRICIA CURRAN Also Known As TRISHA CURRAN Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the Estate of DIANA PATRICIA CURRAN, also known as TRISHA CURRAN. Deceased, whose date of death was January 22, 2011, is pending in the Circuit Court for Franklin County Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, Florida 32320, under File Number 12-00033CP. The name and address of the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against the decedent’s estate, on whom a copy of this Notice is required to be served must file their claims with this Court, WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR WITHIN THIRTY (30) DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against the decedent’s estate, must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION Of THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE: DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is August 30, 2012. Personal Representative: JOHN J. CURRAN 92 Warner Street, Unit #2 Newport, Rhode Island 02840 Attorney for Personal Representative: Paul J. Bupivi FL Bar No. 94635 LAWRENCE & ASSOCIATES 1990 Main Street Suite 750 Sarasota, FL 34236 (941) 404-6360 Fax: (941) 269-8689 August 30 September 6, 2012 89419T PUBLIC NOTICE STATE OF FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION NOTICE OF INTENT TO ISSUE PERMIT The Department of Environmental Protection gives notice of its intent to issue an environmental resources permit for FFWCC Law Enforcement Dock, 19-0312429-001-EI, to Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission. The purpose of the permit is to authorize construction of [a 1,223 sq. ft. boardwalk to a 2,060 sq. ft. dock for the purposes of mooring one 85’ vessel with a 7’ draft and 3 24’ vessels with a 2’ draft. A portion of dock will include a 31’ x 6’ floating dock with an associated 20’ x 3’ gangway. The uplands include an existing development of an office, parking, and storage area on a 4.39 acre parcel The project will be located at 287 Graham Drive, Carrabelle, Florida 32322, Latitude 29.8492 degrees North, Longitude 84.6681 degrees West, Carrabelle River, Class III Waters, in Franklin County. Based on all the above, and with the application of general and limiting specific conditions of the permit, the Department has reasonable assurance the project, as proposed, fully meets the environmental resources permitting requirements of Chapter 62-346, Florida Administrative Code, and will not harm the environment. A person whose substantial interests are affected by the Department’s action may petition for an administrative proceeding (hearing) under Sections 120.569 and 120.57 of the Florida Statute. The petition must contain the information set forth below and must be filed (received by the clerk) in the Office of General Counsel of the Department at 3900 Commonwealth Boulevard, Mail Station 35, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-3000. Because the administrative hearing process is designed to re-determine final agency action on the application, the filing of a petition for an administrative hearing may result in a modification of the permit, or even a denial of the application. Accordingly, the applicant will not commence construction or other activities under this permit until the deadlines below for filing a petition for an administrative hearing, or request for an extension of time, have expired. Under subsection 62-110.106(4) of the Florida Administrative Code, a person whose substantial interests are affected by the Department’s action may also request an extension of time to file a petition for an administrative hearing. The Department may, for good cause shown, grant the request for an extension of time. Requests for extension of time must be filed with the Office of General Counsel of the Department at 3900 Commonwealth Boulevard, Mail Station 35, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-3000, before the applicable deadline. A timely request for extension of time shall toll the running time period for filing a petition until the request is acted upon. If a request is filed late, the Department may still grant it upon a motion by the requesting party showing that the failure to file a request for an extension of time before the deadline was the result of excusable neglect. In the event that a timely and sufficient petition for an administrative hearing is filed, other persons whose substantial interests will be affected by the outcome of the administrative process have the right to petition to intervene in the proceeding. Intervention will be only at the discretion of the presiding officer upon the filing of a motion in compliance with Rule 28-106.205 of the Florida Administrative Code. In accordance with subsection 28-106.111 (2) and subparagraph 62-110.106(3)(a).4, Florida Administrative Code, petitions for an administrative hearing by the applicant must be filed within 14 days of receipt of written notice. Petitions filed by any persons other than the applicant, and other than those entitled to written notice under Section 120.60 (3) of the Florida Statutes, must be filed within 14 days of publication of the notice. Under Section 120.60 (3) of the Florida Statute, however, any person who has asked the Department for notice of agency action may file a petition within 14 days of such notice, regardless of the date of publication. The petitioner shall mail a copy of the petition to the applicant at the address indicated above at the time of filing. The failure of any person to file a petition for an administrative hearing within the appropriate time period shall constitute a waiver of those rights. A petition that disputes the material facts on which the Department’s action is based must contain the following information: (a) The name and address of each agency affected and each agency’s file or identification number, if known; (b) The name, address, and telephone number of the petitioner; the name, address, and telephone number of the petitioner’s representative, if any, which shall be the address for service purposes during the course of the proceeding; and an explanation of how the petitioner’s substantial interests are or will be affected by the agency determination; (c) A statement of when and how the petitioner received notice of the agency decision; (d) A statement of all disputed issues of material fact. If there are none, the petition must so indicate; (e) A concise statement of the ultimate facts alleged, including the specific facts that the petitioner contends warrant reversal or modification of the agency’s proposed action; (f) A statement of the specific rules or statutes that the petitioner contends require reversal or modification of the agency’s proposed action; and (g) A statement of the relief sought by the petitioner, stating precisely the action that the petitioner wishes the agency to take with respect to the agency’s proposed action. A petition that does not dispute the material facts on which the Department’s action is based shall state that no such facts are in dispute and otherwise shall contain the same information as set forth above, as required by Rule 28-106.301, Florida Administrative Code. Under Sections 120.569(2)(c) and (d) of the Florida Statute, a petition for administrative hearing must be dismissed by the agency if the petition does not substantially comply with the above requirements or is untimely filed. This action is final and effective on the date filed with the Clerk of the Department unless a petition is filed in accordance with the above. Upon the timely filing of petition this order will not be effective until further order of the Department. This permit, when issued, constitutes an order of the Department. The applicant has the right to seek judicial review of the order under Section 120.68 of the Florida Statute, by the filing of a notice of appeal under Rule 9.110 of the Florida Rules of Appellate Procedure with the Clerk of the Department in the Office of General Counsel, 3900 Commonwealth Boulevard, Mail Station 35, Tallahassee, Florida, 323993000; and by filing a copy of the notice of the appeal accompanied by the applicable filing fees with the appropriate district court of appeal. The notice of appeal must be filed within 30 days from the date when the final order is filed with the Clerk of the Department. Requests for review before the Land and Water Adjudicatory Commission must be filed with the Secretary of the Commission and served on the Department within 20 days from the date when the final order is filed with the Clerk of the Department. The application for this permit is available for public inspection during normal business hours, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, except for legal holidays, at the Northwest District office, 3900 Commonwealth Blvd. MS55, Tallahassee, Florida 32312. September 6, 2012 89457T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 2012-205 CA CENTENNIAL BANK, an Arkansas banking corporation, Plaintiff, vs. PENINSULA TILING AND CONSTRUCTION, INC., REBECCA SUE COOPER a/k/a REBECCA JONES a/k/a REBECCA S. JONES, and JERRY S. JONES, Defendants NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE Notice is hereby given that pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure, the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Franklin County, Florida, will on October 9, 2012, at 11:00 a.m. (Eastern Time) at the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida 32320, in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes offer for sale, and sell to the highest and best bidder, the following described real and property situated in Franklin County, Florida: A PARCEL OF LAND IN THE SW 1/4, SECTION 35, T8S, R8W, DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT A POINT ALONG SOUTHERN BOUNDARY OF COUNTY ROAD, A DISTANCE OF 150 FT. EAST OF THE NE CORNER OF THE PROPERTY HERETOFORE CONVEYED TO THERON C. HESS, DESCRIBED IN OFFICIAL RECORD VOLUME 126, PAGE 494, PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, FROM SAID POINT RUN SOUTH 26 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST, A DISTANCE OF 100 FT., THENCE RUN SOUTH 63 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 30 SECONDS EAST, A DISTANCE OF 75 FT., THENCE RUN NORTH 26 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 30 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 100 FT., THENCE RUN NORTH 63 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST, A DISTANCE OF 75 FT., TO POINT OF BEGINNING, THE SAME BEING LOT #79, AND A PORTION OF #78, AS SHOWN ON UNRECORDED PLAT OF HIGHLAND PARK SUBDIVISION AS THE SAME IS ON RECORD IN OFFICE OF DODD ABSTRACT COMPANY, APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN 1985 VEGA DOUBLE WIDE MOBILE HOME, IDENTIFICATION NUMBER: KH52D3RD5756GAA AND KH52D3RD5756GAB. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim with the clerk of the court within 60 days after the sale. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Franklin County Clerk of Court, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL (850) 6538861 at least 7 days before the scheduled foreclosure sale, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. WITNESS my hand and the offical seal of this Honorable Court this 29th day of August, 2012. MARCIA JOHNSON Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk September 6, 13, 2012 89437T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF SECOND THE JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 12-00023-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, an Arkansas banking corporation successor in interest to Coastal Community Bank, Plaintiff, vs. STEPHEN MICHAEL MALONE, SR. and the unknown spouse of Stephen Michael Malone, Sr., and unknown tenant(s), Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure dated August 27, 2012, in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Front Door of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market St., Apalachicola, FL 31320 at 11:00 a.m. on October 9, 2012, the following described property: Commence at the Southeast Corner of Section 20, Township 8 South, Range 6 West, Franklin County, Florida and run thence North 02 degrees 20 minutes East along East boundary of Section 20 a distance of 1481.46 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING run thence South 63 degrees 44 minutes West 115.26 feet; thence North 26 degrees 16 minutes 00 seconds West 380.00 feet to the point on the Southerly right-of-way of Ridge Road (60 foot right-ofway); thence run North 63 degrees 44 minutes 00 seconds East along said Southerly right-ofway a distance of 247.34 feet to a point ofd curve to the right; thence run along said curve with a radius of 44.53 feet through a central angle of 118 degrees 36 minutes 00 seconds for an arc length South 02 degrees 20 minutes 00 seconds west along the Easterly boundary of Section 20 distance of 357.81 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. Being Lot 60 (Revised), Unit 2, Tarpon Shores, according to the plat thereof on file in the Franklin County Planning and Zoning Office, 33 Commerce Street, Apalachicola, Florida. Dated: August 28, 2012. Marcia Johnson Clerk of Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk September 6, 13, 2012 How To Make Your Car Disappear... Advertise it for sale in the Auto section of Classifieds! That’s where auto buyers and sellers meet to get the best deals on wheels! Emerald Coast Marketplace 747-5020 Springer Spaniel Pups, 4 wks old, Pure Bred w/papers ava., $400 each; 727-580-1160 YORKIE AKCregistered. 9 weeks old adorable puppies only 2 females left. They are Health Certified and have 1st shots. $500 ea. Mom & dad on premise. Please call 850-774-1229 Panama City Area Heritage V illas of Apalachicola Apartments Now accepting applications for 2BR Some rental assistance may be available. HUD vouchers accepted. Call 850-653-9277. TDD/ TTY 711. This institution is an equal opportunity provider & employer. Lanark Village Carlton St. #6, 1 Br 1 Ba, All Tile, Walk-in Closet, Landlord pays Electric and Water, $600 month + $300 deposit. Call 850-927-2838 or 864-356-5949 Studio Apt. Furnished Upstairs StudioQuiet location, Water & Electric incl. Walk to Dwntwn. $650+Dep N/P or N/S For appt 653-9116 or 320-1174 St. George Island $175 week, Electric, Satellite, Garbage incl. Pool tble. 12’ X 65’ deck w/Beautiful view 850-653-5319 1 BRCottageH/AC in Apalachicola, FL. 850-643-7740. East Point Carrabelle 900 Square ft designer 1bedroom, open plan, Jacuzzi, washer & dryer, satellite, secluded, 1/2 mile from beach. $440/month. Call 954-816-7004 Text FL22547 to 56654 Lanark Village3br 2ba home, near water, lg fence yard, $600 mo. 850-545-8813 3 br, 2 ba, Very Nice Mobile Home 197 Old Ferry Dock Rd. in Eastpoint. Dishwasher, W/D, CH&A Jacuzzi tub 1 acre lot, with lawn maintenance Nice location, No Pets or Smoking. $650 mo 1st & last, $300 deposit Call 850-670-8460 Walk to Bay or State Forest 2BR, 2BA, SW on 1 acre. $550/mo, $550 dep, plus elec and garbage. References and rental history required. Call (813) 546-6987. Text FL22520 to 56654 North Historic District 5th Street building lot. $29,000 obo. 60 x 100. Corner lot. Brokers protected (404) 218-0077 A GREAT BUY! Scenic Cruiser, 1993. Gulfstream, 34 ft, One slide out. $5,000. This is a steal! Needs some TLC. 850-653-5077. 2008 Harley Davidson Street Glide Anniversay Edition9,700 miles. Copper/ Black. In Excellent condition w/Rinehart Exhaust, Power Commander, ABS, Security, Extra Headlights, 2 Seats, many other options. Always garage kept and well maintaned. Original owner. Only $16,800, sold new for over $27,000.850-723-4642 These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you. EmeraldCoast Marketplace 747-5020 LOW INTERESTFINANCING Borrow up to 20k and pay $389.00 per mo. at 8% Car Loans, Small Business Loans & Debt Consolidation Bad Credit Ok Call Toll Free: 888-741-9122 Today!! These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you. EmeraldCoast Marketplace 747-5020 RENTALS1 BEDROOM, 1 BATH UNFURNISHED APT LANARK, REMODELED, INC WATER ..........$425 2 BR, 1 BATH UNFURNISHED APT W/D HOOKUP, SMALL PORCH ...................$375 1 BEDROOM, 2 BATH FURNISHED CONDO INCLUDES UTILITIES, MARINA ..................$910 3 BEDROOM, 2 BATH FURNISHED HOUSE ON RIVER, DOCK .......................................$1000 OFFICE SPACE ON US 98 CARRABELLE .................................................$500 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322850-697-9604 850-323-0444 www.seacrestre.comwww. rst tness.com/carrabellePROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND RENTALS

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, September 6, 2012 The Times | A13 emeraldcoastjobs.com Employment Today By LARRY BUHLMonster Contributing Writer If you spend a lot of time at a desk, personalizing the space makes sense „ whether its a private corner office or a shared cubicle. But just as your clothes and body language make an impression on others, your workspace gives co-workers and clients a distinct impression about you. Plants, books, artwork „ even your name plaque „ transmit clues about your efficiency, sociability and competence, experts say. Everything in your office sends a message, whether you want it to or not,Ž said Lisa Marie Luccioni, an adjunct professor of communication at the University of Cincinnati. So what might they be thinking when they see your space?You would rather be fishing (or skiing or skydiving or ... )Evidence: Pictures and artifacts from your hobby on every surface. Theres a delicate balance between sharing your interests and giving the impression that you are daydreaming all day about jumping out of planes or skiing, according to Barbara Pachter, business etiquette expert and the author of New Rules at Work.Ž Pictures of your hobby are good conversation starters, but if you have too many of them, it makes people wonder whether youre really daydreaming about fly-fishing,Ž she says.They can hang aroundEvidence: A full candy dish, aspirin in the drawer, well-tended plants, pictures of children and babies. Things like an open door, candy, a comfortable guest chair and photos of people „ but not pictures of objects „ signal an extroverted workspace that people will feel free to linger in,Ž said Sam Gosling, a professor of psychology at the University of Texas and author of Snoop: What Your Stuff Says About You.ŽThey shouldnt hang around Evidence: Flimsy guest chair, guest chair covered in files or no guest chair. Your desk faces away from guests. Minimal or no decoration. Even if your office has photos or artwork, but theyre images of things and not people, (people) can make an assumption youre more introverted and might not want them to linger,Ž Gosling says.You demand respect Evidence: Multiple degrees on the wall, awards on the shelf, pictures of you and important people, magazines featuring articles about you. The plaque on your desk says your full name and title and lists your advanced degrees. Name plaques form a strong impression,Ž Luccioni says. If it says just your first name, people assume youre friendly and approachable. If it has a formal title, they think you want to be respected for your rank.Ž They should avoid doing business with youEvidence: Messy piles of papers on every surface. Half-eaten donuts atop teetering stacks of binders. Carpet stains. Experts agree a messy office can seriously damage your reputation as a conscientious person. Its hard to function in a messy office, and people assume your office chaos will spill over to their project and their files will be lost in your mess,Ž Pachter says.You dont take the whole work thing too seriouslyEvidence: Humorous posters, ironic bumper stickers, whimsical images and toys.Conscious decoratingExperts have several suggestions for making sure your workspace matches the image you want to project. Err on the conservative side: If clients visit you or if you are in a high-traffic area, you want to make sure people dont stop in their tracks to gawk at your collection of teddy bears or tiki torches. Be careful with controversial items: Consider the cost-reward ratio of putting up something like a political campaign poster,Ž Luccioni says. You might find kindred spirits, or you might offend people and get a first meeting off to a bad start.Ž All experts say anything potentially racist, sexist, homophobic or otherwise disparaging of a group is a no-no. Follow industry norms: Some industries demand a strict image of seriousness, while others are more laid-back. A poster with a funny or counterculture slogan is more appropriate in the office of an advertising copywriter than the office a defense attorney. Consider the physical arrangement: A desk can act as a barrier and give formality, which is good for reviews but can be intimidating,Ž Luccioni says. She adds that a small circular table allows everyone to meet on an equal basis. A power difference, if you want that, can be achieved by giving guests smaller, flimsier chairs. And if you tend to make snap judgments about others offices, try to look at the bigger picture, Gosling recommends. Any one item can have many different purposes,Ž he says. If someone has a plant, maybe they have a green thumb, maybe theyre into feng shui or maybe the plant was left over from the last person in that office. If you see someone with a super-neat desk, how do you know whether theyre truly neat, or whether they swept everything into a drawer before you stopped by?Ž What your workplace says about you Featured Jobs has the following opening:FIELD AUDITORCovers Tyndall AFB, Port St. Joe, Carabelle & Apalachicola, FL Inspects & audits all outside cable connections in assigned areas. Investigate leads involving illegal activities related to cable service. Base pay plus commissions. Must have a valid drivers license with a satisfactory driving record. Mediacom offers competitive pay and bene“ts including Medical/ Dental/Vision/401K.For immediate consideration please visit our online career center to apply at:http://www.mediacomcable.com/careers and select job 4049.Mediacom is an Equal Opportunity Employer MFDV To Place An Employment Here Please Contact Lorna Brown Phone: (850) 747-5019 € Email: lbrown@pcnh.com Like Us On Facebook: www.facebook.com/emcoastjobs Or Follow Us on Twitter: @emcoastjobs REPRESENTATIVES will be at the PORT ST. JOE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE on Tuesdays & Thursdays from 9 am … 1 pm EST accepting applications for numerous open positions.We offer competitive wages and a comprehensive bene“ t package including Company paid health, dental, and life insurance, 401(k), attendance & safety bonuses.EOE/Drug Free WorkplaceEASTERN SHIPBUILDING GROUP MORE THAN A JOB… A FUTURE! The Apalachicola Bay Charter School is accepting applications for the following positions for 2012-13 school year: Teacher Assistant Full-time position to work with a student with special needs (implementing academic plans, therapies, and social goals.)  Bus Monitor Part-time position monitoring am/pm routes ABC School is an Equal Opportunity Employer Please send resumes to: Chimene Johnson, ABC School 98 12th Street Apalachicola, FL 32320 Fax: 850-653-1857 Coordinator, Correctional Officer TrainingTo take care of the administrative details of the Correctional Officer Basic Standards classes at the Gulf/Franklin Campus & maintain an instructional presence in the classroom. Requires AA, AS or AAS in Criminal Justice or related field, Bachelor’s degree preferred + successful completion of CJB2801, DMS General FLInstructor Techniques (4 cr hrs) & additional high liability instructor training; and 3 yrs. exp. in law enforcement, corrections, or correctional probation. Salary $25,500/yr. Open Until Filled. Only those who provide GCSC Application (must be completed), resume & transcripts will be considered. Additional info: www.gulfcoast.edu / hr. Women & minorities are strongly encouraged to apply. GCSC is an EA/EO/M/F/Vet employer. GCSC Equity Office 850.873.3516 Web ID#:34223252Text FL232352to 56654 AIRLINE CAREERS BEGIN HERE -Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualified. Housing available. Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-206-9405 ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINEfrom Home. Medical, Business, Criminal Justice Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 866-467-0054 www.CenturaOnline.com ToPlace Your Classified ad inCall Our New Numbers Now!Call: 850-747-5020 Toll Free: 800-345-8688 Fax: 850-747-5044 Email: thestar@pcnh.com thetimes@pcnh.com theAPALACHICOLA & CARRABELLETIMES CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you. EmeraldCoast Marketplace 747-5020 Check our cars and trucks in today’s classified section!

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Local A14 | The Times Thursday, September 6, 2012 newlywed, her mother died, and she took in and raised her three sisters, Billie, Essie Mae and Margaret. She began her education in the one-room Eastpoint schoolhouse, which was furnished with old-fashioned wooden double-seater desks where two youngsters sat side by side. A lifelong resident of Franklin County and pillar of the Eastpoint community, Ms. Preshia, who nished school in 1931, is the oldest living graduate of Chapman High School in Apalachicola. She is also the only living founder of the First United Methodist Church in Eastpoint, established around 1939. She recalled that before the church was built, the congregation took turns hosting worship in their homes. The pastor of the church in Carrabelle used to come and do the service, she said. As a young wife, she would walk to church holding hands with her three sisters. I would start out holding hands with three younguns, Ms. Preshia said. And by the time we got there, thered be 12. I picked them up along the way, and we all walked hand-in-hand. At 21, she married her sweetheart, the handsome and popular Lucius Crum, who was ve years older. The pair met at one of the square dances held around the county. She frequently danced at the Eastpoint community house where Crum was a caller. Dances also were hosted at the old Hathcock house in Liberty County. Lucius reminisced to his niece, Pat McWhinnie, that he remembered traveling to the Hathcock house by boat and dancing all night long. On the day they were married, Lucius and Preshia caught the ferry to Apalachicola, where they were united by a judge, possibly Judge Sawyer. Preshia remembers the judge thought she was telling a story about her age and told her, You know, you didnt have to be 21, you can get married at 18. The couple celebrated with dinner at the Riverside Caf. The blue plate special was meatloaf with green peas for $2 a plate. After the wedding supper, they took the ferry home, and prominent Eastpoint resident Herbert Brown, who had the only car in town, gave them a ride part of the way home to High Bluffs up County Road 65 near the Brickyard community. Brown was a schoolteacher as well as Eastpoints postmaster. He lived to be more than 100 years old and continued to walk to church until shortly before his death. Because he was the rst Eastpoint resident to possess a car, each week he would make a list of his neighbors needs and journey to the store in Apalachicola to shop. We didnt have no car to drive in, Ms. Preshia said. When we wanted to go somewhere, we walked. Lucius Crum worked at a turpentine still belonging to local legend C.C. Land. Preshia remembers that when the couple still lived up 65, Lucius would walk to Eastpoint to sh all night and then walk home, wash and change clothes and work all day at the still. Shortly after being married, the couple moved to a house near Cat Point. Eastpoint was very different in the days before the roads were paved and a bridge spanned the Apalachicola River. If I heard a car coming at night, I got up to see where it was coming, she said. There was a small store, and she remembers giving her oldest son, James, a dime to buy a loaf of bread. Lucius and Preshia would remain together 75 years until Lucius passed away in 1999. They later bought the property where Ms. Preshia still lives from Lee Vrooman, who also donated the land for the Eastpoint Cemetery. We didnt have no contract, Ms. Preshia said. Just a handshake. The community helped the young couple establish a home. Preshias cousin Cape Smith helped build the house. Mr. Lamb Buck had a sawmill, Ms. Preshia said. He let us have all (the wood) we needed. Two of the original windows, still in the living room, were ordered from the Spiegel catalogue. It was a good long time till we had electricity, Ms. Preshia said. The younguns sat at the kitchen table and did their lessons with a kerosene lamp. Lucius was hardworking and ambitious. After leaving employment with Land, he took a job with the Florida Division of Forestry. Preshia still has his work cap and a picture in a shadowbox in her living room. Working for forestry meant Lucius had a service phone on the living room wall, a crank model attached to a party line. Later, Preshia also worked for the service as a re tower watcher up County Road 65. During her years in Eastpoint, she was also a poll watcher and shucked oysters and picked crab at Joe Barbers seafood house. The couple had four children. Dr. Dykes came over from Carrabelle to assist in the births. He was a wonderful doctor, she said. The eldest was a daughter Marion, who now lives in Pascagoula, Miss. The three younger boys, James, Jerry and Randy, all served in the Air Force. Jerry was killed in a car accident while deployed in France. The other boys live nearby, James in Eastpoint and Randy in Panama City. Ms. Preshia, who still lives alone, said she has no secret to explain her longevity except being surrounded by a loving family, comprising her own children as well as grandchildren, great-grandchildren, cousins and beyond. Although she wasnt that into things, outside the home and family, the Crums had some memorable experiences. When the rst bridge across the Apalachicola opened in 1935, Lucius and Preshia were among the rst to cross it. When the new bridge was opened in 1988, Lucius told son John about the experience, and they were again among the rst to cross the river. When Carrabelles old wooden drawbridge burned in 1960, Lucius was on the last re truck to cross it battling the blaze. He owned one of the rst trucks in Eastpoint, and the Crums shared the honor of owning one of the rst televisions with the Barbers. Ms. Preshia continues to try new things. On her 98th birthday, she rode a motorcycle for the rst time. She has own once, on May 25, 1979, to visit family in West Palm Beach. She found the whole experience so unsettling that her son James drove down and fetched her by car. In her long years, she has never smoked or drunk anything stronger than sweet tea. She has a private Facebook page to keep in touch with friends and family. Speaking of her impending birthday, Ms. Preshia said, Its not no glory of mine. My good Lord took care of me. If I live to be 100, the whole of Franklin County can come celebrate. Friends and family of Ms. Preshia are invited to a celebration from 2-4 p.m. at Eastpoints First United Methodist Church on Saturday, Sept. 15. Our local real estate experts have identied what they feel are the best values around and are oering them to you in Real Estate Picks! (In this section), Discover the best real estate values in Mexico Beach, Port St. Joe, Apalachicola, Cape San Blas, St. George Island, Carrabelle and surrounding areas. Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Real Estate Picks John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.com MLS# 247601 $639,000 St. George Island HIDDEN TREASURE Enter into partially covered Courtyard with Waterfall, huge John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.com MLS# 247025 $14,000 Eastpoint MAGNOLIA RIDGE One acre bank owned building site, located in secluded area of beautiful Franklin County, paved roads & underground utilities, great location as permanent residence or weekend retreat. Minutes from St. George Island, Shadow Bay Dr. Listed by Michael Billings dbutler@coastalcoverage.com Locally owned and operated Home Business Auto Health Workers Comp BILL MILLER REALTY 850-697-3751 (3310) 570-0658 400 + COMM. U.S. 98 & GULF ADJ. TO LANARK MARINA 850K $29,500 $2,500 D O W N B UYS 2 B ED AP T 2 6 OR RENT $500/MTH COR LOT 12 X 53 1 B / R 8 X 24 SHED $24,500 GULFVIE W & ACCESS 3 BDR 2 BA 2006 M/H 89K 2 LG. SHADY LOTS 3 SHEDS 400 TO MARINA-CITY W ATER49K MIH 2 C RNR LOTS BLK. $ S TORE REDUCED $49,500 2 AC-AT RIVER UTIL. IN -$39,500 TANNING, WAXING, EAR PI E RCING, F E A T H E RS, FASHION EX TE NSIONS & U P DOS. Welcomes Lindsay S treet Walk-ins Welcome MAGNOLIA BLUFF Bay living at its best, you have to see the sunsets from this home to believe them. 3BR/3BA Custom home with great water depth for year round access to the Apalachicola Bay. M L S #246689...........$699,000 Travis Stanley 850.653.6477 Grayson Shepard 850.653.6718 Leon Teat 850.653.5656 Sandy Mitchem 850.899.8300 BEACHFRONT C ONDO ST. G EORGE IS LAND 2BR/2BA with two balconies in Villas of St. George. Established rental history! Community pool, beach boardwalk, 2 blocks to lighthouse! M L S# 246110 ............... $319,500 S T GEORGE I S LAND G ULF VIEW 4BR/4BA close to center of island and kitchen. Lots of storage and lovely native landscaping. M L S# 245752 ...................... $399,000 NEW LOW P RICE G REATER AP ALACHICOLA Enjoy quiet country living on 3.75 acres. Lovely custom built 3BR/2.5 BA home with many upgrades Jacuzzi, deck, large walk in closet. 1600 sq.ft. outbuilding on concrete pad. M L S#244666 ................ $255,000 G ULF V IEW S GI PLANTATION Charming 5BR/3BA cypress home with Anderson doors/windows. Completely renovated in 2006 w/ granite countertops, new appliances/lighting/elevator! M L S# 240897 ............... $475,000 N EW C ON S TRUCTION Great opportunity to buy a gulf view home. This quality constructed home has driven pilings, hardiboard siding and a metal roof for a low maintenance exterior. Inside you have 3 bedrooms with two baths and a great room opening to the front porch. New construction means low insurance cost. M L S #247359................$289,000 PRESHIA from page A1