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The Apalachicola times
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100380/00185
 Material Information
Title: The Apalachicola times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: H.W. Johnston
Place of Publication: Apalachicola Fla
Apalachicola Fla
Publication Date: 08-30-2012
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1885.
General Note: Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 32911693
lccn - sn 95026907
System ID: UF00100380:00185
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Preceded by: Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by: Apalachicola herald

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xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx 50 WWW.APALACHTIMES.COM Phone: 850-653-8868 Web: apalachtimes.com E-mail: dadlerstein@star .com Fax: 850-653-8036 Circulation: 800-345-8688 DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK: School News & Society: 11 a.m. Friday Real Estate Ads: 11 a.m. Thursday Legal Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Display Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Line Ads: 5 p.m. Monday xxxxx Contact Us xxxxx Out to see Index By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com Isaacs path shifted several hundred miles west of initial projections earlier this week, and the tropical storm was slow to strengthen over the warm Gulf waters. Franklin County largely was spared by Isaac, receiving little wind and rain, although a signi cant storm surge ooded several waterfront buildings in Apalachicola. Flooding was across Water Street at Up the Creek Restaurant and from the Maritime Museum to Ten Foot Hole. Part of the municipal parking lot at the courthouse was under water. Water was across Commerce Street at the Bowery Gallery. County workers had distributed sand bags and barricaded ooded areas and a Progress Energy truck prowled the streets. Schools and some downtown businesses closed, and a few shopkeepers boarded buildings in expectation of the worst. The courthouse remained opened, though, Tuesday, as did the health department. The barrier islands were evacuated beginning Monday morning, and several vacation rental companies canceled reservations for the week. Disappointed visitors were offered the option of booking on a new date or collecting travel insurance. By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com Proposed plans for a thrift store in downtown Apalachicola sparked spirited debate at the monthly meeting of the Community Pride committee. More than 60 people attended the meeting Aug. 23 to discuss a request from the Franklins Promise Coalition to open a thrift store in the old Water Street re station on Apalachicolas waterfront. City commissioners earlier this month had unanimously voted to refer the request to the Community Pride committee. City Administrator Betty Webb acted as mediator and used some creative techniques to take the pulse of the community on the issue. Franklins Promise had asked to use the building free of charge and to have a single employee who would receive $15,000 annually. Otherwise the store will be staffed by volunteers from charitable organizations that would share in the pro ts. Fran Edwards, a Franklins Promise board member, said the store would enable people who accepted nancial aid to maintain their dignity by working off the loan, as well as provide training in retail sales to those seeking work. Fishing regulations net debate By ZACK McDONALD 747-5180 | @PCNHzack zmcdonald@pcnh.com PANAMA CITY The bulk of some 60 bright-orange clad shermen stood applauding after Donald Waters delivered testimony Saturday at a congressional hearing in Panama City. After the crescendo of clapping hands, We got our word in, came from one of the audience members gathered at Florida State University Panama City. The U.S. House Natural Resources Committee oversight eld hearing, titled Fishing Jobs: How Strengthening By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894| @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com Like they say, behind every great American astronaut is a Navy of cer teaching him how to do it. With the passing last week of Neil Armstrong, who died at age 82 with the eternal honor of being the rst person to walk on the moon, America lost a hero whose cosmos-sized giant leap for mankind on July 20, 1969, was toasted in every corner of the globe. The military training that led to Armstrongs taking this small step for a man began 20 years earlier, in the twoman cockpit of a single-engine, 550-horsepower, all-metal SNJ Navy training aircraft, under the direction of Lee Rivers, now a retired lieutenant commander living in Apalachicola with his wife, Laurie. A former clerk of courts who was beloved in his second career as a social studies teacher at Apalachicola High School, Rivers is known by locals as Pal. But in the Navy, they knew him as Chipper, a term for a talkative sort fond of telling you how to do it, down to the smallest details. Its slang for somebody who cant keep their mouth shut, Rivers said. Armstrong already had four years of ying experience, having earned his pilots license on his 16th birthday in Wapakoneta, Ohio, when he was called to the Pensacola Naval Air Station in Florida in 1949 midway through studying for a degree in aeronautics engineering at Purdue University. But after acing preight training, nishing in the top 10 percent of his class, Armstrong learned under Rivers tutelage in ight school at Whiting Field that knowing how to y a small plane above the corn elds of northwest Ohio only went so far. He was one of the sharpest people Ive ever been around, but I had all kind of trouble with him, Rivers recalled this week. I couldnt get him to make a tight turn. Hed been ying these little FIRST STEP TOWARD THE MOON Apalachicolas Rivers trained Neil Armstrong during naval ight school DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times Lee Pal Rivers sits with a copy of First Man, the biography of Neil Armstrong. Isaac goes west, spares county He was one of the sharpest people Ive ever been around, but I had all kind of trouble with him. I couldnt get him to make a tight turn. Lee Pal Rivers, naval ight instructor INSIDE See Rivers progress notes for Armstrongs rst 14 hops during ight training on Page A5 AP PHOTOS See ISAAC A5 See FIRST STEP A5 Residents pick through thrift store plans LOIS SWOBODA | The Times This is the city building where workers with Franklins Promise Coalition want to put a thrift store. See FISHING A2 See THRIFT A2 Thursday, August 30, 2012 VOL. 127 ISSUE 18 Opinion . . . . . . A4 Society . . . . . . A6 Faith . . . . . . . A7 Outdoors . . . . . A8 Tide Chart . . . . . A8 Sports . . . . . . A9 Classi eds . . . A13-A15 Coping with coyotes A8 Bene t to be Friday for Terry Tipton Sr. At 11 a.m. Friday, Aug. 31, a fried mullet lunch at Taylors Building Supply in Eastpoint will bene t Terry Tipton Sr., out of work after recuperating from knee replacement surgery. Dinners are $6. For more info, call 653-5803. Bene t to be Saturday for Lisa Walden At 11 a.m. Saturday, there will be a bene t sh fry to assist with medical bills for Lisa Walden, at C-Quarters Marina on U.S. 98 in Carrabelle. Blue Moon Climb Friday at lighthouse The August Blue Moon Climb at the Cape St. George Lighthouse on St. George Island will be Friday evening. For more details or to make reservations, call the St. George Island Visitor Center at 927-7744 or toll free at 888-927-7744. Locals free at museum Saturday On Saturday, county residents can enjoy free trips and museum admission at Apalachicolas Maritime Museum. Pre-registration is required. A St. Vincent Island trip will be from 8 a.m. to noon, estuary cruise 1-4 p.m. and kayak rentals from the docks all day. Be sure to bring proof of residency. For more info, call 653-2500. Spohrer photo exhibit opens Saturday Beginning Saturday, the Apalachicola Center for History, Culture and Art at 89 Water St. will exhibit photographs from John Spohrers latest book, The Seasons of Apalachicola Bay. Everyone is welcome to a reception from 6 to 8 p.m. Artist tours start at 4 p.m. each Friday and Saturday. For more information, visit www. historicapalachicola.com. Help a student with school supplies The Franklin County Juvenile Justice Council will wrap up its school supply drive Sunday. Supplies cost $13 per student. To sponsor a student, stop by CVS. For more information, call Carol Bar eld, council chair, at 653-2784.

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Local A2 | The Times Thursday, August 30, 2012 Robert C. Bruner Attorney Personal & Business Bankruptcy Over 30 Years Legal Experience 850-670-3030 bankruptcy relief under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon advertisements. Before you decide, ask us to send you free written information I would like to thank everyone for their support, donations, and especially their vote in the Primary Election. I am humbled by your faith and trust in me. Visiting and talking with voters and residents in the past six months, I have seen what a truly wonderful county we live in. Working together we can make things even better. I am asking for your continued support in the November General Election. Thank you, William Massey (Pd.Pol.Ad.) Paid for by William Massey, Candidate for County Commissioner District 5 Americas Fisheries Strengthens Our Economy, was called by chairman of the Natural Resources Committee Doc Hastings, R-Wash., and Rep. Steve Southerland, R-Panama City, to gather information on how data collection and management policies have affected local sheries. In turn, the hearing drew concerned commercial shers from along the Gulf of Mexico. With all due respect, we dont need Congress taking us back to the failures of the past, Waters said. We need you to help us address the changes of the future. ... Do not turn back the clock, help us conserve our sheries and jobs for tomorrow. Many of the commercial shermen, wearing shirts that read Keep catchshares on the table, Keep sh on the table, agreed with Waters sentiments to not reform current policies. The main concern focused on guidelines set by the Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act, which is up for reauthorization as soon as 2013. We have a system that is working, or else we wouldnt be here ghting. Waters said. However, Southerland said the current legislation is not working for all. The federal government should have no role in picking winners and losers in hopes of locking up our sheries with overregulation, free of congressional oversight and public opinion, Southerland said. Most of the witness testimony during the hearing focused on the reliance on bad datas effects, not just on commercial and recreational shing jobs, but also small businesses and entire local economies, according to Hastings. One of the things that bothered me is a lot of the decisions made were made on old or not accurate data, Hastings said. There needs to be a closer look at recreational shing. Witnesses pointed to arbitrary deadlines and mandates, catch shares, annual catch limits and the National Ocean Policy as alternate causes for review of federal policies. About 150,000 Floridians are directly employed in shing-related businesses 100,000 in the commercial sector and 50,000 in the recreational sector. Florida alone accounts for almost 40 percent of all marine recreational shing nationally, with $5.7 billion in total sales from recreational shing in 2011 and $5.6 billion in commercial sales in 2008. Gulf of Mexico sheries are vital to Floridas economy. They are a main target for the recreational boating community and are highly prized by resident and visiting anglers, said Ken Wright, chairman of the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission. Richard Merrick, director of scienti c programs and chief scienti c advisor of the National Marine Fisheries Service, testi ed the Magnuson-Stevens Act mandates that all sheries conservation and management measures must be based upon the best scienti c information available. As an avid angler myself, I share serious concerns about a Magnuson-Stevens law that is broken, Southerland said. For the sake of our shermen, as well as the operators of marinas, hotels, restaurants and small businesses who rely on their continued success, Congress must commit to making the law more workable and responsive to the needs of our coastal communities. At the beginning and end of the meeting, Webb polled the audience with closed ballots to see how opinions had changed during the discussion. Participation in the poll was optional. Opinion was split down the middle. Before the discussion, 19 people gave the downtown thrift store thumbs down, 18 were in favor and two indicated they were neutral. After 90 minutes of debate, 18 voted against the project and 16 voted for. Several members of the audience left during the discussion. Ultimately, city commissioners must decide whether to let Franklins Promise use the rehouse, but only one, Commissioner Frank Cook, attended the Aug. 23 meeting. He told the assembly a Community Pride meeting was the right venue for letting the public air their ideas. This is a place where we can come and improve our ideas that will maybe make them better than they were to start with, Cook said. Representing Franklins Promise at the meeting were board members Sister Jeanne Drea, Bill Mahan and Edwards. Director Joe Taylor did not join them at the table facing the crowd but was vocal from a seat in the audience. Edwards started the discussion with a history of the thrift store idea and a prepared statement on the goals and bene ts of the store. She told the audience that when she joined the board about six months ago, There was a thrift store, and it was not doing well, and Sister Jeanne suggested it be shut down. Edwards was referring to a store at 117 Market St., which Taylor said never of cially opened. It did business for about 6 months earlier this year and was staffed by an employee provided and paid by Workforce Florida but was forced to close when sales were insuf cient to pay the rent, Edwards said. There were other issues with that building, Taylor said. Edwards said she helped open a thrift store in Slidell, La., that made $40,000 in its rst year of operation. She said with a free storefront, a thrift store here could generate substantial income for Franklins Promise. We are asking the city not to pay rent, Edwards said. Because all of the money is going out into the community, if we pay the city, the community will suffer. City wants property in private hands The audience raised many questions about the project, beginning with the buildings physical condition. Several people asked why the rehouse had been moved to its current location on Avenue E. Apalachicola Bay Chamber of Commerce Director Anita Grove suggested the building was infected with black mold. I didnt see it, Edwards said. Webb said the Federal Emergency Management Agency initiated the move to get the re station out of the ood plain. I heard there was mold but I was never told by ofcials, she said. The plan was to tear the building down and sell the land because we need the money out of it for the city, to replace the money that was spent on the new rehouse, Cook said. The city also wants the property back in private hands in order to generate tax revenue. The city is moving back downtown (to the 1 Ave. E building) and this will bring more cars, he said. So we (had planned) to clear that property to have more parking for city workers. Nobody wants to rent it because its not that nice, and every time theres a hurricane it oods, Cook said. Webb said though the city would like to sell the property, it is not in the current market and not listed for sale. Downtown businessman and resident George Mahr said the thrift store could help the city sell the property, because a building with any active business was more attractive than an empty one. I think it would behoove the city to put a for sale sign on that store, said Geoff Hewell, a member of the planning and zoning board. Webb said she would look into the idea. Someone questioned who would pay for insurance on the building. Edwards said only liability insurance would be needed and that the building would be covered by a city policy. What about ood insurance? asked city resident Arnold Tolliver. We havent worked that out because we dont know if we have the building, Edwards said. Carrie Kienzle asked what would happen in the event of an impending storm. Taylor replied that Franklins Promise would evacuate the building. That wouldnt be the citys responsibility, he said. I think you need more details worked out, said Dieter Ambos, a member of the Community Redevelopment Agency board. If you had more details people might have more support. Foot traf c is downtown Tom Morgan, owner of Apalach Out tters, said he felt the crux of the issue was that it is wrong policy for a city to put a business with no rent and most of the insurance paid in competition with other businesses. We are supporters of Franklins Promise and of many things, but this one is not fair. Its city-subsidized. Its bad for retailers and property owners. Theres not a person in this room that doesnt support this concept. The problem is the concept is about being able to capture a portion of the tourist dollar downtown because they dont have rent or insurance, he said. I have two shops, and I have to pay rent, utilities and garbage, said Sonja Powell, who owns a downtown gift shop. Kienzle said, I feel bad for the people who took a risk who came here and renovated stores. Its hard for all these shopkeepers. I just dont think its right to put this in the middle of all this hard work. Myra Ponder, who volunteers at the existing Pennys Worth thrift store on Avenue E, suggested the store be located at the old Apalachicola High School, near the Franklins Promise of ces. If you have good signs, people would come to the old high school, she said. Edwards disagreed. The foot traf c is downtown, she said. Former city commissioner Valentina Webb said the proposed store would cater to all sections of the community thats not coming downtown to the stores. Maybe we should cater to some of the locals. Taylor said the thrift store would not compete with other downtown businesses. He said there would be a policy of allowing other downtown merchants to view new items rst and buy what they wanted for resale. Edwards described the proposal as a high-end thrift store. Paulette (Moss) has talked with the Pennys Worth ladies. We dont want to be in competition with anybody. But at least one Pennys Worth volunteer is not happy with the plan. After the meeting, Susan Clementson said, I absolutely think it will be in competition with Pennys Worth. In the original presentation to city commissioners, Taylor said the store would not be in competition with Pennys Worth because it would not sell clothing. But at last weeks meeting, Edwards said the store would contain a dress for success shop with high-end used clothing. She said low-income persons with an upcoming job interview could shop there for free. Taylor said the majority of clothing donated to Franklins Promise would go to people in need, but highend items would be sold downtown. Ambos asked why the shop needed a paid manager. Edwards said there probably would not be an employee at rst but that eventually we do have to have somebody in there. Volunteers have a way of not showing up. It seems thats the way it is in Franklin County. Ambos said this is a subset of Franklins Promise which has a paid administrator. To start out, have it under their umbrella and let them administer it. Edwards replied, Thats part of the plan. Powell said she wanted to know who is currently being paid by Franklins Promise and how much. Edwards said that information is available at the organizations of ce. How will you decide what each organization receives? asked Apalachicola resident Pam Mahr. Taylor said decisions would be made by the Community Thrift Board. No de nite decision has been made about the boards membership, but he said Habitat for Humanity, Tamara Allen of Carrabelle and the Literacy Program are among those who have participated in planning the project. The committee is open to anyone who wants to come and work and volunteer, he said. One of the things we have to decide is, is this a worthwhile endeavor? Cook said at the end of the discussion. If it is, then we have to nd a way to make it work. Is the rehouse a good place for it? If not, where else do we put it? he said. We dont have those answers. THRIFT from page A1 FISHING from page A1

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The Times | A3 Thursday, August 30, 2012 218 Hwy 71 S Wewahitchka, FL (850) 639.2252 117 Hwy 98 Apalachicola, FL (850) 653.8825 302 Cecil G. Costin Sr Blvd. Port St. Joe, FL (850) 227.7099 VISIT OUR 3 AREA LOCATIONS: Rehabilitation Services Rehab, Restore, Return to Home George E. Weems Memorial Hospital offers in-patient rehabilitative services, which include physical therapy, cardiac conditioning, orthopedic therapy, and neurological therapy. Our team customizes each patients care to meet both patient and family needs. We are committed to returning those individuals who have been impaired by accident or disease to their highest level of independence by optimizing abilities and skills used in everyday activities. The purpose of in-patient rehabilitation is to improve the patients function and maximize the potential for returning to home, school, work, and to the community. By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star .com An audit released at the last Carrabelle meeting found some problems with the budget, including more than a million dollars in shortfalls and suggested some remedies to ongoing weaknesses. At the Aug. 2 meeting, Mark Payne, representing certified public accountants James Moore and Company, presented results of an audit of Carrabelles 2010-11 fiscal year. The audit found Carrabelle had $71 million in assets, and a debt of $32 million, leaving net assets of $41 million, but only $1.8 million of that in unrestricted assets. Most of the citys wealth is tied up in property and vehicles. At the end of the fiscal year, government funds reported a combined balance of $3.2 million, an increase of $29,000 over the 2009-10 fiscal year. Of this money, 69 percent is assigned, meaning it has been committed to generate income or for other restricted purposes. The city has about $61 million in capital assets, including land, buildings, machinery, equipment and roads. Over the last fiscal year, the city has upgraded the water and sewer system, and purchased the Moore House and a fire engine. The truck was bought for $114,476 at an interest rate of 5.84 percent, payable in annual installments of $16,811 paid annually through 2020. Water and sewer upgrades were financed by the federal government for $28 million, at 1.92 percent interest. Two other water and sewer projects, totaling about $1.5 million, were financed through 2040 at an interest rate of 2.71 percent. At the end of the fiscal year, the city had bank balances totaling $5.15 million, all covered by federal deposit insurance or collateral held by the citys custodial bank. Based on the city budget, there were significant overexpenditures $700,600 in the general fund, $276,000 in the special revenue fund, $674,500 in water and sewer fund, and $111,000 in the port and airport fund. Payne said these shortages would be adjusted by budget amendments at the years end. Its a small city, its what I normally see, Payne said. For all my small cities, every one of them had findings. However, the audit did find material weaknesses in the citys financial statements. The biggest issue is you guys being aware of segregation issues, said Payne, referring to how employees handle incoming and outgoing funds. You dont have enough people to do everything with regards to checks and balances, he said. Youre a small city but youve got a lot going on. A balance of $70 million is large for a city this size. The report said the city does not have an employee trained to prepare the necessary reports for an audit. Moore and Companys audit said duties related to spending and receiving funds should be formally assigned to employees with checks and balances in place. It recommended mail be opened by an employee not responsible for accounting who would record cash receipts. Bank statements and cancelled checks should also be received by someone other than the employee maintaining cash records and these should be periodically reconciled, it said. Anything out of the ordinary should be promptly investigated, cash deposited daily, and signed checks mailed by someone other than the person responsible for accounts payable, the audit advised. The report called for better documentation of expenses and an inventory of physical assets. Among its recommendations were that all expenses be documented by invoices, and that better records be kept for travel expenses, in particular. Journal entries should include adequate documentation and be approved by an employee other than the one who prepared the entry, and all employee time sheets should be signed and approved by a supervisor, read the audit. It also advised that the city maintain an approved vendor list and seek bids for significant expenses. The report also recommended the city prepare a detailed disaster recovery plan and an accounting procedures manual. In a letter responding to the findings prepared by the commission and city staff including City Attorney Dan Hartman, the city promised to segregate financial reporting duties and obtain additional training for one of their employees, possibly City Clerk Keisha Smith. The letter said preparation of the accounting manual and inventory are underway and the preparation of disaster recovery plans is ongoing. In the future, the city staff will follow Florida guidelines for travel expense and reimbursement and will seek competitive bids for large purposes although no dollar amount was specified. After hearing the report, Carrabelle resident Clifford Holcomb asked, In the foreseeable future, is there any possibility of Carrabelle experiencing bankruptcy? Payne replied that If I dont think youd survive a year Ill tell you that. If I felt you were deteriorating, I would have made a comment. But, he added. I can only look into the future one year. The following report is provided by the Franklin County Sheriffs Of ce. Arrests in this report were made by of cers from the Carrabelle Police Department (CPD), Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC), and Franklin County Sheriffs Of ce (FCSO). All defendants are to be considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law. Aug. 21 George R. Needer, 54, Eastpoint, public affray (FCSO) Marvin H. Garrett, Jr., 21, Eastpoint, violation of probation (FCSO) Vonnie R. Tinsley, 31, Tallahassee, burglary of a structure (FCSO) Aug. 22 Willie E. Pelt, 30, Port St. Joe, violation of a domestic violence injunction (FCSO) Oscar W. Medley, Jr., 43, Apalachicola, aggravated battery great bodily harm (FCSO) Terrance I. Walker, 44, Apalachicola, sale or possession of an controlled substance with intent to sell within 1,000 of a church, possession of an controlled substance with intent to sell within 1,000 of a church and Bay County warrant (FCSO) Damon B. Walker, 35, Apalachicola, three counts of tampering with a witness or informant, and possession of a contraband at a county detention facility (FCSO) Aug. 23 Cody E. Diorio, 22, Carrabelle, Wakulla County violation of probation (FCSO) Javier Mendoza-Sanchez, 39, Labelle, possession of saw palmetto berries (FWC) Gregorio L. Gomez, 28, Labelle, possession of saw palmetto berries (FWC) Charles L. Fasbenner, 43, Apalachicola, failure to appear (FCSO) Jesse Gordon Smith, Jr., 46, Eastpoint, violation of probation (FCSO) Charles K. Varnes, Jr., 20, Carrabelle, possession of less than 20 grams of cannabis, and violation of probation (FCSO) Corey M. Lashley, 18, Apalachicola, violation of probation (FCSO) Robert S. Parks, 29, Carrabelle, violation of probation (FCSO) Aug. 24 Quran Anderson, 28, Tallahassee, domestic battery and Leon County violation of probation (CPD) Brenda N. Barnett, 21, Carrabelle, dealing in stolen property (FCSO) Melissa A. McKnight, 43, Carrabelle, battery and trespass in an occupied structure (FCSO) James I. Daniels, 66, Crawfordville, sale of a prescription drug (FCSO) Steven C. Martin, 21, Carrabelle, dealing in stolen property and two counts of grand theft (FCSO) ARREST REPORT Auditors say Carrabelle must tighten books Local

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Opinion A4 | The Times USPS 027-600 Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 Publisher: Roger Quinn Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola Times By VALERIE GARMAN 747-5076 | @ vgarman vgarman@pcnh.com Gloria Salinard saw the local real estate market come to a screeching halt in the months following the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in 2010. More than two years later, Salinard said the market is taking baby steps toward recovery. Basically the market has been picking up, said Salinard, association executive for the Realtor Association for Franklin and Gulf counties. Theres a lot of interest. The ofces are very busy and the agents are very busy. Its denitely on the increase, nally. After the bubble burst for the housing market in 2006, the market started picking back up in Gulf and Franklin counties in January 2010, Salinard said, but was halted once again by the oil spill. It started picking back up in the second half of 2011, and weve gained momentum month by month, she said. Theyre baby steps, but theyre baby steps in the right direction. According to statistics from the Multiple Listing Service (MLS) for listings in Franklin County, Gulf County and Mexico Beach, residential sales have risen 35 percent, from 223 sales from Jan. 1 to June 30 of last year to 301 during the same time period in 2012. Mexico Beach and St. Joe Beach saw the most signicant increase, jumping 47 percent from 64 sales in 2011 to 94 in 2012. Sales of lots and land are also up 103 percent in the area, rising from 134 to 273, with signicant rises in land sales in South Gulf County and on Cape San Blas, more than tripling from 28 to 96. We have a lot of people coming in with investment money. The prices are great, Salinard said. Most of our sales are second homes and investment properties. Most of the large numbers of sales have been in Cape San Blas, Mexico Beach and St. George Island. Salinard said residential sales within area cities like Port St. Joe and Carrabelle saw less signicant increases, but many buyers scooped up lots and land in Carrabelle, more than three times the number as the rst half of 2011. The main economy is tourists and vacation homes, Salinard said. A lot of the buyers are coming from Georgia and Alabama. Along with increased number of sales, total sales prices are up so far this year, from roughly $55 million to $76 million this year. The average sales price also rose slightly from $245,983 to $253,758, but the median sales price dropped from $190,000 to $179,000. Salinard said the drop in the median sales price may be attributed to less inventory, especially on Cape San Blas. Last week, Port Authority of Port St. Joe attorney Tom Gibson noted that for the rst time in several years his law rm was handling closings in which the sale price was actually above the county appraised price. Salinard also cited a much lower number of short sales and foreclosures in the area compared to last year. A lot of the foreclosure and short sale listings have been purchased, she said, noting the wonderful interest rates have also helped boost sales. Star News Editor Tim Croft contributed to this story. Area real estate market picking up Thursday, August 30, 2012 Lots & Land 2012 The following numbers are for Jan. 1 to June 30, 2012 Area # of Sales Total Sales Median Sales Carrabelle 61 $2,045,550 $14,900 St. George Island 34 $4,014,150 $83,000 Apalachicola 9 $289,100 $31,900 Eastpoint 8 $529,500 $19,500 TOTALS 112 $6,878,300 $36,975 Lots & Land 2011 The following numbers are for Jan. 1 to June 30, 2011 Area # of Sales Total Sales Median Sales Carrabelle 19 $476,200 $7,500 St. George Island 22 $3,237,500 $70,500 Apalachicola 7 $603,500 $35,000 Eastpoint 6 $334,500 $40,000 TOTALS 54 $4,651,700 $43,750 Residential sales 2012 The following numbers are for Jan. 1 to June 30, 2012 Area # of Sales Total Sales Median Sales Carrabelle 34 $4,793,175 $80,250 St. George Island 55 $31,522,100 $450,000 Apalachicola 27 $4,713,301 $150,000 Eastpoint 14 $2,365,800 $97,125 TOTALS 130 $43,394,376 $269,250 Residential sales 2011 The following numbers are for Jan. 1 to June 30, 2011 Area # of Sales Total Sales Median Sales Carrabelle 31 $4,440,400 $80,000 St. George Island 47 $22,759,721 $435,000 Apalachicola 16 $2,249,965 $150,300 Eastpoint 6 $626,500 $73,500 TOTALS 100 $30,076,586 $230,000 By Gloria Johnston Special to the Times The POW/MIA Recognition Day is observed across the nation, on the third Friday of September each year. Many Americans take the time to remember those who were prisoners of war (POW), and those who are missing in action (MIA), as well as their families. As of April 2009, there were about 1,741 American personnel listed as missing in action or unaccounted for from the Vietnam War. About 90 percent of the 1,741 individuals still missing were lost in Vietnam or areas of Laos and Cambodia, under Vietnams wartime control. The number of United States personnel unaccounted for since the end of the Vietnam War in 1975 is 841. The United States Congress passed a resolution authorizing National POW/MIA Recognition Day to be observed July 18, 1979. The recognition date has been changed several times, but since 1986, it has been celebrated on the third Friday of September. The President each year proclaims National POW/ MIA Recognition Day and most states recognize this day of remembrance. The American Legion family remembers the loss of our comrades by placing a POW/MIA table in our post home and having a recitation at post ceremonies. The recitation is known as the POW/MIA Table. The reading highlights each item on the table as a symbol of what our soldiers have suffered and their dedication to our country. Newt Hensley was a pilot during World War II. After the war, he took a job in an advertising agency. He and other veterans realized the need for a ag designated to raise awareness of POW/ MIAs and he took up the challenge to achieve this goal. Hensleys son became a Marine and served in the Vietnam War. His son became ill with hepatitis and was medically discharged. Hensley looked at his sons frail condition and compared it to what prisoners of war must be suffering behind barbed wire fences on foreign shores. Mr. Hensley used his sons prole to sketch a silhouette. He used barbed wire, a tower and most prominently the silhouette of a gaunt young man, which became the symbolism on the POW/MIA ag. This ag has become a reminder of those that we should never forget. The silhouette of the face on the ag is the face of a husband, a father or a son who has paid for our freedom. The words on the bottom of the ag are so powerfulyou will never be forgotten. We, as American Legion Auxiliary Members, must spread the message of observing POW/MIA Recognition Day. We know that you might have someone in your community or someone in your family that may not have returned from service. These references can assist you in becoming more knowledgeable in discussions of this special day of observance www. dtic.mil/dpmo/pow_day/ and www.homeofheroes. com/hallofheroes. GLORIDA SALINARD Executive for the Realtor Association for Franklin and Gulf countiesL OI S SW O B OD A | The Times Three Servicemen Detail South POW/MIA Recognition Day Sept. 21 On the front page of the Panama City News Herald, Aug. 9, 2012 the article New Bill Takes Aim at Fishing Limits, states in the second paragraph Southerland, R-Panama City, said he introduced the legislation to remedy concerns with the Magnuson-Stevens Act, the federal policy that administers Americas sheries. Southerland is referring to H.R. 6350, a House bill about shing. Southerland did not introduce the bill at all. Jon Runyan, RN.J., introduced it and is its sponsor; Southerland merely cosponsored the bill. There is a big difference. According to Wikipedia, In contrast to a sponsor, a cosponsor is a senator or representative who adds his or her name as a supporter to the sponsors bill. In essence, a cosponsor only rides the coattails of the sponsor. Southerland is good at that. He has ridden the coattails of almost every representative that has sponsored a bill about shing. Although he misleads the public, he has yet to introduce any bill to help shermen. Lets look at the bills he has introduced since he has been in Washington for almost two years. He introduced just seven bills, none of which passed. Three of his bills, H.R. 4176, H.R. 4149 and H.R. 935 have to do with funeral and burial arrangements. In case you did not know, Southerland owns a funeral home in Panama City. Two bills, H.R. 6354 and H.R. 4150, would remove land from the John H. Chafee Costal Barrier Resources System. This is a longstanding piece of legislation that prevents the public from picking up the tab for reconstruction of mainly second homes on barrier islands that may be damaged by natural catastrophes. This environmentally protective legislation has saved taxpayers millions of dollars over the years. Southerlands two bills could reverse this and would encourage more development on barrier islands that should not be developed to begin with. A barrier island protects bays and estuaries where shrimp, oysters, crabs and sh breed and mature. Another of Southerlands bills, H.R. 3856, limits the authority of the EPA with respect to the water quality in our waterways, the very waterways that empty into these same estuaries. No wonder Southerland was voted Ocean Enemy #1 by Ocean Champions, the rst national organization of its kind focused solely on preserving oceans and ocean wildlife. Can you imagine that out of 435 House representatives, Southerland was selected as the most destructive to our oceans and ocean wildlife, which includes, you guessed it sh! Our current shing policies and rebuilding plans are working well, as Sera Drevenak with the Marine Fish Conservation Network pointed out in the same article mentioned. Southerland has expressed his distaste for environmental organizations and his sidekick, Bob Zales, wrote a follow-up article on Aug. 14, calling environmental organizations wackos. I take offense to that. I am a commercial sherman, and I respect the environment. I have lived through periods of overshing and know how devastating they can be and how hard they are to reverse. H.R. 6350 seeks to amend the MagnusonStevens Act to extend the timeline to rebuild sh that are overshed. Many are on a critical rebuilding plan now that should be left alone. If we have a large red tide like in 2005 or another oil spill and our sh stocks are not healthy enough to withstand such unforeseen catastrophes, they may be devastated. H.R. 6350 also puts restrictions on future catchshare programs that have worked so well for the Gulf commercial shermen. Since the programs inception in 2007 to 2010, the commercial sector was under its red snapper quota by 415,000 pounds. From 2007 through 2009, the recreational sector exceeded its quota by over 4.7 million pounds during the same period. 4.7 million pounds in three years! Yet Southerland wants more sh. One of Southerlands favorite phrases is that we have a God-given right to our natural resources. Whether he realizes it or not, we live in a world of limits. If we were given any right at all, it would be the right to respect and preserve our environment and the resources it nurtures and the fortitude to not seek short term prots while foregoing long term gains. While Southerland is using smoke and mirrors to court several thousand recreational shermen to get their votes at the expense of the few hundred commercial shermen, that is not what is important. What counts is that you, the reader, have the most right to our nsh resources in the form of Gulf wild-caught sh lets you purchase at the grocery store or the Gulf grouper platter you purchase at restaurants. If Southerland has his way, you will be the one that suffers long after he gets tired of playing politics and goes back to burying dead folks. Jim Clements Carrabelle CORRECTION On page A2 of the Aug. 23 Times, it was incorrectly reported that the Franklin County Commission moved to repair Paradise Road. The commission moved to allow a one-time repair and upgrade of Rita Road, which runs off of Paradise Road. The Times regrets the error. LETTER TO THE EDITOR Southerland playing politics with ocean policy

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Local The Times | A5 Thursday, August 30, 2012 Smart Lenses SM Can produce clear vision without glasses, at all distances "Freedom from Eye Glasses, Now a reality for many." NO HIDDEN CHARGES: It is our policy that the patient and any other person responsible for payments has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed by payment or any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment. www.mulliseye.com "WE WELCOME NE W PATIE N TS, C ALL T ODAY FOR YOUR P RIORITY APP OI N TME N T" FOR NEW PATIENTS 59 AND OLDER This certificate is good for a complete Medical Eye Exam with Todd Robinson, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Surgeon. The exam includes a prescription for eye glasses and tests for Glaucoma, Cataracts and other eye diseases FOR YOUR APPOINTMENT CALL: 850-763-6666 ELIGIBILITY: U.S. Citizens living in the Florida Panhandle, 59 years and older, not presently under our care. Coupon Expires: 8-31-12 FREE EYE EXAM CODE: AP00 Darren Payne, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon Lee Mullis, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon Todd Robinson, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon MAGNOLIA BLUFF Bay living at its best, you have to see the sunsets from this home to believe them. 3BR/3BA Custom home with great water depth for year round access to the Apalachicola Bay. M L S #246689...........$699,000 Travis Stanley 850.653.6477 Grayson Shepard 850.653.6718 Leon Teat 850.653.5656 Sandy Mitchem 850.899.8300 BEACHFRONT C ONDO ST. G EORGE IS LAND 2BR/2BA with two balconies in Villas of St. George. Established rental history! Community pool, beach boardwalk, 2 blocks to lighthouse! M L S# 246110 ............... $319,500 S T GEORGE I S LAND G ULF VIEW 4BR/4BA close to center of island and kitchen. Lots of storage and lovely native landscaping. M L S# 245752 ...................... $399,000 NEW LOW P RICE G REATER AP ALACHICOLA Enjoy quiet country living on 3.75 acres. Lovely custom built 3BR/2.5 BA home with many upgrades Jacuzzi, deck, large walk in closet. 1600 sq.ft. outbuilding on concrete pad. M L S#244666 ................ $255,000 G ULF V IEW S GI PLANTATION Charming 5BR/3BA cypress home with Anderson doors/windows. Completely renovated in 2006 w/ granite countertops, new appliances/lighting/elevator! M L S# 240897 ............... $475,000 N EW C ON S TRUCTION Great opportunity to buy a gulf view home. This quality constructed home has driven pilings, hardiboard siding and a metal roof for a low maintenance exterior. Inside you have 3 bedrooms with two baths and a great room opening to the front porch. New construction means low insurance cost. M L S #247359................$289,000 AUTOM A TIC POWER PROTECTION 24/7 **PRICES VARY DEPENDING ON EQUIPMENT & INSTALLATION No lights, loss of communication and safety issues are just a few of the headaches associated with a power outage. When the power goes out, depend on a GENER A C standby generator to supply back-up electricity to your homes essential items, automatically. No manual starting. FOR TURN KEY INSTALLATION STARTING AT: $4500.00** Anderson Power Services 229-247-6630 http://andersonpowerservices.com BILL MILLER REALTY 850-697-3751 (3310) 570-0658 400 + COMM. U.S. 98 & GULF ADJ. TO LANARK MARINA 850K $29,500 $2,500 D O W N B UYS 2 B ED AP T 2 6 OR RENT $500/MTH COR LOT 12 X 53 1 B / R 8 X 24 SHED $24,500 GULFVIE W & ACCESS 3 BDR 2 BA 2006 M/H 89K 2 LG. SHADY LOTS 3 SHEDS 400 TO MARINA-CITY W ATER49K MIH 2 C RNR LOTS BLK. $ S TORE REDUCED $49,500 2 AC-AT RIVER UTIL. IN -$39,500 tiny light planes, and there you y down with power on and land, and then take your power off and coast, lowering your tail, he said. But in the Navy, being trained to land on an aircraft carrier meant undoing old habits. And they died hard. In the Navy, you cocked up in the three-point attitude and ew a few knots above stalling speed, and cut power just before you touch down. You got to stall, so your tail hook will catch the wire on the carrier, Rivers said. You approached about 300 feet, about 100 feet above the carrier deck, and made a 180 degree turn and came right up to the stern, cut power and came in and landed, and hoped your hook would catch one. Neil grew up learning how to y a plane the traditional way, he said. There is a traditional way, and theres a right way in the Navy. And thats the Navy way. The initial Stage A of ight training consisted of 20 hops in the SNJ, the rst 18 of which were dual instruction ights. Armstrongs rst hop was on July 6, 1949, and over the next month, Rivers, who sat in the front seat, recorded Armstrongs progress. (See sidebar) He was a very good instructor, whose cockpit coaching was quite authoritarian, but fun-loving, Armstrong told author James R. Hansen, in the 2005 authorized biography First Man: the Life of Neil A. Armstrong. While another instructor, J.W. McNeil, gave Armstrong unsatisfactory for his approaches, and below average ratings for taxiing, stalls, landing, emergencies and headwork, the future Korean War pilot was spared being forced into additional instruction or a re-exam. By Aug. 30, on the 18th hop, Armstrong had addressed his de ciencies, and though Rivers graded him below average in transition, landing pattern and approaches, he judged him safe for solo. On Sept. 7, Armstrong made his rst Navy solo without an instructor. Afterward, a couple of Neils mates observed Navy tradition by cutting off the lower half of his tie, Hansen wrote. And Neil gave Chipper Rivers a bottle of his favorite whiskey. Hansens interviews with Armstrongs classmates showed that they regarded the future astronaut (who at age 20 was the youngest member of the squadron) as a promising aviator. He was con dent, but not cocky, David Stephenson told the biographer. Neil had a head start on most of us by virtue of his experience as a private pilot, said Bruce Clingan. Beyond that, I think he had a tremendous natural talent. If it involved ying, he was very good at it. Two years after graduation, Armstrong would go on to y 78 combat missions in Korea in the cockpit of a F9F Panther, one of the Navys rst successful carrier-based jet ghters. Rivers, now 88, continued on to a distinguished career in the Navy, including serving as assistant chief of naval intelligence for a 12-man Navy staff attached to the 8th Army in Korea before retiring for a second career as a school teacher in Apalachicola. He was at the couples cottage at Indian Pass on that famous day in July 1969, watching the sketchy reception on a black-andwhite television. He was still coaching him, still chipping all the way through, recalled Rivers wife, Laurie. Rivers wrote Armstrong a letter of congratulations, and on Sept, 25, 1969, he received a hand signed thank you letter, on NASA stationary, from his former student. I certainly appreciate your very kind words concerning our recent adventure, Armstrong wrote. It certainly was a satisfying experience for us, and we are very encouraged by the reception it has been given around the world. Rivers said he was not at all surprised by Armstrongs self-effacing tone in describing his role in one of mankinds most signi cant achievements. He was perhaps the most reserved person Ive ever known, Rivers said. I remember the days at Whiting Field very well and the excellent beginning that you provided me, Armstrong went on to write, before referring to other instructors of that vintage who he had occasion to run across in his current duties. I recall vividly the evening I spent with you and your wife at your home near Milton and look forward to renewing the acquaintance, Armstrong wrote in closing. I frequently drive through Apalachicola enroute to the Cape and will certainly plan on giving you a ring on my next trip that way. On this occasion, 20 years after he had studied ight under Rivers, Armstrong addressed the letter simply to Pal. There were minor power outages in Eastpoint. Isaac was still churning offshore at the time of this printing, on the verge of becoming a hurricane with a projected path that would take it across New Orleans on the seventh anniversary of Hurricane Katrinas catastrophic landfall. Yearly rain well above normal Franklin Countys multi-year drought has ended in a deluge. With rain over the past 12 months almost a foot above normal and still coming down, people across the county are experiencing wet feet and worse. Tim Barry, a forecaster in the National Weather Service of ce in Tallahassee, said last week that rainfall in the county so far in 2012 was 49 inches, even before Tropical Storm Isaac dumped more rain. He said the county normally would have received about 43 inches by this time of year. I cant get to the roof to x leaks for my neighbors. complained Emergency Management Coordinator Mike Rundel. County workers have been hampered in the repair of roads and the roof of the county courthouse, which was damaged during Tropical Storm Debby and continues to leak, causing problems with the buildings phone system. Plus, the wet weather has toppled trees. Apalachicola City Administrator Betty Webb expressed concern about the saturated ground. Weve already lost trees, she said. If we get a lot of wind, well lose a lot more. The saturated soil also has destabilized and even toppled markers in Magnolia Cemetery. Sometime between Friday evening and the following morning, a sinkhole opened in the westbound lane of U.S. 98 near Gramercy Plantation in Eastpoint. No accidents resulted, and it was repaired the next day. Even the shelling program was affected by stormy weather. At the Aug. 21 county commission meeting, Franklin County Seafood Workers Association President Shannon Harts eld said the weather impeded shelling on more distant bars. The county entered the summer with record rainfall in June thanks to Debby. The 21.6 inches of rain recorded was more than 16 inches above normal. More than a third of that total, 7 inches, roughly equivalent to the expected rainfall for the entire month, fell in a single 24-hour period on June 24 and 25. July was about an inch above normal with 8 inches of rain. August was already more than 2 inches above normal for the entire month before Isaac. Barry said this information is based on the new 30-year climate norms, re ecting the period from 1981 through 2010, which are revised every 10 years. Under the new norms, July, formerly rated the countys wettest month, comes in third, with an average of 7.17 inches of rain. The new wettest month is June, with 7.73 inches of rain on average. August outranks July as well, with an average of 7.35 inches of rain over the last 30 years. Average rainfall in May, formerly the driest month, increased over the last decade from 2.64 to 3.47 inches. April, with an average of just 3.06 inches, replaced May as the driest month. October also was drier than May over the last three decades, with an average of only 3.23 inches of precipitation. HOPPING WITH CHIPPER RIVERS James R. Hansen, in his 2005 authorized biography First Man: the Life of Neil A. Armstrong, recounts Chipper Rivers progress notes for Armstrongs rst 14 hops during his ight training in the summer of 1949. July 8 (A-2): Average to above. Student looks around very good & appears to be at ease. Applies instructions above average. July 11 (A-5 ): Good hop. Satisfactory progress. July 13 (A-5 ): Good on procedures for stalls; however, he has dif culty maintaining constant attitudes. Coordination is weak. July 18 (A-7 ): Rough on coordination. Is slow to use tabs when attitude is changed. July 19 (A-8 ): Rough coordination, especially in turns. Tries to level off at 90-degree position on approaches instead of making a continuous turn. Has a little trouble maintaining heading on touch and go takeoffs. August 5 (A-9 ): Doesnt use trim enoughcoordination in general is rough. Poor speed and attitude control in landing patterns. August 11 (A-11): Entire period, with the exception of spin and high altitude emergency, was spent on landings, handled with all the different ap settings. Good hop. August 12 (A-12): Aileron and erratic rudder pressures on recoveries. Slow reacting, improper procedures on low altitude emergencies. August 15 (A-13): Shows very good progress on landing pattern & landings. Mixed up on wind directions on rst two high altitude emergencies. Poor pattern. August 16 (A-14): Unsure of himself on high altitude emergency. ISAAC from page A1 FIRST STEP from page A1

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A6 | The Times Thursday, August 30, 2012 Qualications: Expertise in: New Patients Welcome Call Toll Free 888-681-5864 For more info www.seclung.com LUNG AND SLEEP DISORDERS DR. ROB GARVER Special to The Times Ron Charles Ringo, son of Ronald and Gayle Speed Ringo of Pensacola, graduated from Pensacola State College with an associate in arts degree in June 2012. Ron is now pursuing his bachelor of arts degree in criminal justice at Edward Waters College in Jacksonville. He is the grandson of Ella Breedlove Speed, of Apalachicola, and the late Willie B. Speed. DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times The Water Street Festival of Ice wrapped up Saturday afternoon, with an ice craving demonstration by Chef Billy Redd, an instructor in the Gulf Coast State College culinary arts program. Redd was on hand to oversee the demonstration by six of his students. In the photo above, Trisha Casey, left, and Brianna Lindsey set to work on their carving. Special to the Times When they met in a high school drama club at Chapman High School, now-89-year-old Frankie Cornell and her husband Jim Cornell, also 89, couldnt know that in a few years theyd be embarking on a relationship that would last 70 years. We met in the 10th grade, and weve been sweethearts ever since, Frankie Cornell said, sitting at the table in their Lincoln Tower apartment, a retirement community in Odessa, Texas. Known to her classmates as Frankie Clyde, named after two female relatives, Frankie is the daughter of the late William R Ras and Katie Kelley. She was born at home in Apalachicola on April 6, 1923, with Dr. Weems the physician and Mrs. Frankie Montgomery the midwife. Her father, Capt. Kelley, perished when Frankie was a young girl. He and six other shipmates drowned aboard a snapper vessel during a 1929 hurricane. While not a native of Apalachicola, Jim Cornell got there as fast as I could. Born in Des Moines, Iowa, on Feb. 17, 1923, to Edith Liek and Forrest Hill Cornell, he moved with them to Marianna at age 2, and to Apalachicola in 1933, when he was 10. Because of an injury from falling out of a tree, Jim missed too many days and was sent back a year in the fourth grade, so he ended up graduating from Chapman in 1942, a year behind his sweetheart. They had met in Reba Dunns drama class and rst courted while the class put on a couple plays at the Dixie Theatre. Those in school and others knew my future wife as Clyde, which I thought as too boyish so I liked the name Frankie much better and from then on, that became the name all knew her as, Jim said. Right after his graduation in 1942, he and Frankie were married on Aug. 20, 1942, at Trinity Episcopal Church by the Rev. Stephen Barnwell. While he was still in high school, Jim was fortunate to be selected by the local of cial in charge to learn how to make the three hourly weather observations with the weather bureau, at 10 p.m., 1 a.m. and 4 a.m., for 50 cents an observation. The of ce at that time was in the second oor of the Apalachicola post of ce building. Thats how I got into the weather department of the Navy, he said. This led to an appointment as a junior weather observer after graduation, June 1942, in Atlanta, Ga. So many of the professionals were being drafted into the military at that time that a shortage was created. My intention was to attend Georgia Tech while working full time with the Weather Bureau at Candler Field, later Atlanta International Airport. The local draft board in Apalachicola advised that I would be drafted soon, so I resigned my position with the Weather Bureau and went into the Navy, he said. Jim was assigned to the Naval Weather School, Lakehurst, N.J., and then to a naval air station in Houma, La. Following that assignment, he joined the crew of the USS Chester, CA27, as an aerographers mate, 2nd class, and served in the Paci c Fleet from early 1945 until after the end of the war. Meanwhile, Frankie stayed with her mother and gave birth to their rst child. It was rough, she said, but they wrote letters to each other every day. In 1946, Jim returned to employment with the Weather Bureau in Apalachicola for two years until the local of ce closed in 1948 when the bureau became the National Weather Service under NOAA. Jim then served in Savannah, Atlanta, New Orleans, Asheville, Corpus Christi and nally San Angelo, Texas, where he eventually retired at age 55 with 35 years service. After retiring in 1978, the couple traveled many years, RVing over the country and into Ontario, Canada, combining their studies of genealogy with visits to sites of ancestors. Frankies families are in a book that she donated to the Franklin County Library. Jim is a 60-year member of the Masonic Lodge, a 32nd degree Scottish Rite member, the York Rite and a Shriner. Frankie is a Past Matron of Oso Chapter 868, Corpus Christi, Texas, and of Concho Chapter 826, San Angelo, Texas, and Past Queen of Zipron Temple, Daughters of the Nile, San Angelo, Texas. The couple has three children in all, and about three years ago the Cornells moved to Odessa to be closer to their son. Frankie attributed their shared interests and inseparable nature to their long and successful marriage. I think it was a match made in heaven, she said. The couples oldest child, 68-year-old Rebecca Kristjanson said her parents are still very much in love. While they do disagree on things, Frankie said theyve never gone to bed angry. Ive never heard them argue, Kristjanson said. To celebrate this milestone, family and friends gathered for dinner at the Barn Door and the couple received a surprise party at Lincoln Tower. The couples friends, former city councilman Royce Bodiford and his wife Helen, read a signed proclamation for the couple that he secured from Odessa Mayor Larry Melton, honoring their anniversary. Jims a real fan of that tupelo honey, Bodiford said. He tells me it wont sugar on you either. After 70 years, the couple appears to have no regrets. Weve always done everything together, from bicycle riding to camping out in a tent, Frankie said of her husband. Id do it all over again as long as I can do it with him. Jim was more analytical in his assessment. Were striving for 75 but were going to have to do it in one-year increments, he said. This story was written by Gabriella Lopez, of the Odessa American, with assistance from David Adlerstein. Ringo graduates from Pensacola State Cornells celebrate 70 years together SUBMITTED PHOTO Left: James and Frankie Cornell marked their 70th wedding anniversary Aug. 20 after meeting for the rst time in a 10th grade play at Chapman High School. Right: The Cornells as a young couple CHIPS OFF THE OLD BLOCK MAGNIFICENT M AGN US! Magnus is a one year old Border C ollie mix. He is very intelligent, eager to please and social. He loves people and dogs alike and likes nothing more than to be by your side. His shiny, wavy coat and bright eyes make him a beautiful dog and combined with his fantastic temperament, a dog any family would adore. Volunteers are desperately needed to socialize all of our dogs and cats. We are always looking for people willing to bring one of our animals into their home to be fostered for various needs. A nytime you can spare would be greatly appreciated. C all Karen at 670-8417 for more details or visit the F ranklin C ounty Humane Society at 244 State Road 65 in E astpoint. You may logon to the website at www.forgottenpets.org to see more of our adoptable pets. PET OF THE WEEK Franklin County Humane Society C all Karen at 670-8417 for more details or visit the F ranklin C ounty Humane Society at 244 State Road 65 in E astpoint. You may logon to the website at www.forgottenpets.org to see more of our adoptable pets. WE CAN HELP! GOT MOSQUITOES? CALL L OIS AT 653-5857 Franklin Countys ONLY LOC AL Pest Control Company Society MARK STERKEL | Odessa American

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The Times | A7 Thursday, August 30, 2012 The United Methodist Churches of Franklin County Welcome You First United Methodist Church of Apalachicola Worship Service 11:00 a.m. every Sunday Sunday School 10:00 a.m. 75 5 th St. Apalachicola 653-9530 fumcapalach@gtcom.net Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis Carrabelle United Methodist Church Worship Services 10:45 a.m. Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Celebrate Recovery Mondays 7-9 p.m. 102 NE Ave. B Carrabelle 697-3672 Pastor: Julie Stephens Eastpoint United Methodist Church Worship Service 10:00 a.m. every Sunday Healing service every fourth Monday at 7:00 p.m. 317 Patton Dr. (corner of David St.) 670-8825 Pastor: Rev. Beth White St. George Island United Methodist Church 9:00 a.m. Worship Service 10:00 a.m. Fellowship Hour 201 E. Gulf Beach Dr. 9274635 www.sgiumc.org Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis Nursery now provided for Sunday Church Service First Baptist Church St. George Island 501 E. Bayshore Drive 927-2257 R. Michael Waley, Pastor Join us as we praise and worship the living Christ. Great is the Lord and most worthy of praise. Psalm 145:3 Sunday Bible Study ................................................ 10:00am Worship Praise ........................................................ 11:00am Sunday Night ............................................................ 7:00pm Wednesday Power Hour ...................................... 7:00pm Wednesday Youth at S.P.L.A.S.H ....................... 7:00pm Walking in Christ R. Michael Whaley, Pastor First Pentecostal Holiness Church 379 Brownsville Road Apalachicola Were excited about what Gods doing!!! Sunday School 9:45 am Sunday Morning Worship 10:45 am Sunday Evening Service 6:00 pm Monday, Youth Group 6:30 pm Wednesday, Royal Rangers, G.A.P. 7:00 pm Wednesday Worship & Word 7:30 pm Nursery Provided during regular church services 7:00 7:00 WELCOMES YOU Church of the Ascension 101 NE First Street Carrabelle SUNDAY 10:00 AM WELCOMES YOU Church THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH (850) 274-4490 (850) 545-2578 WELCOMES YOU Trinity Trinity Episcopal Church est. 1836 Welcomes You Hwy. 98 & 6th St. Apalachicola 850-653-9550 Sunday Worship Services 8 & 10:30 a.m. Wednesdays Healing Service 11 a.m. Centering Prayer 4 p.m. Sunday Worship Services 8 & 10:30 a.m. Wednesdays Healing Service 11 a.m. Centering Prayer 4 p.m. Faith Zelma Mae Nolton, 90, went to her heavenly home Saturday, Aug. 19, 2012. Lanark Village will hold a remembrance luncheon on Sunday, Sept. 16 at 1:30 p.m. at Chillas Hall. Zelma was born in Pittsburgh, Penn. on May 2, 1922, and later moved to California and Texas before relocating permanently to Florida in the 1960s. A long-time resident of Franklin County, Miss Zelma never met a stranger. Through her work with Anchor Realty, she met and was beloved by many for her down-to-earth humor and genuine interest in people. Widowed three times, Zelma was also preceded in death by her youngest son. She is survived and lovingly remembered by two children, six grandchildren, and four great-grandchildren. A graveside service was held Thursday afternoon, August 23 at Evergreen Cemetery, in Carrabelle. In lieu of owers, memorial contributions may be made to the Salvation Army. Zelma Mae Nolton Henry Elton Barber was born May 4, 1954 at Tyndall Air Force Base to the late Winona and John Barber. He passed away Saturday, Aug. 18 in Fernandina Beach at the age of 58 with his family at his side. He is survived by his children, Jessica Barber, Erica Barber, and Elijah Barber; grandchildren, Alex Smith, Avery Smith, Lauren Bennett, Anna Gehringer, and Evan Barber; sisters, Gynelle Bush (Joe), Joyce Moore (late husband Dave) and Jean Roberts (Ralph); brother, Robert Barber; fianc Nancy Horton; and many nieces, nephews, great-nieces and great-nephews. Funeral services were held Saturday afternoon, Aug. 25 at Kelley Funeral Home, 149 Avenue H, Apalachicola, with burial in Magnolia Cemetery. Viewing was held Friday evening, Aug. 24 at the funeral home. Henry Elton Barber Everett Bill McFarland was born April 7, 1931 in Blountstown to Pearl and Everett McFarland. He passed away Sunday, August 26, 2012 in Panama City at the age of 81. Bill was retired from Vitro, a long-time resident of Port St Joe, member of Oak Grove Assembly of God, and a US Air Force veteran. He is survived by his daughters, Cindy Tomlin (Jim) and Linda Pace (Johnny); eight grandchildren, Steven Odom, Jamie Tomlin, Jen nifer Tomlin, Bryan Hobbs, B.J. Tomlin, Jessica Pace, John Pace, and Megan Pace; siblings, Mary Ann Hornsby, Madelyn Harlow, Lois Jean Rammacher, and Patrick McFarland; brother-in-law, Anthony Taranto (Toni); sisters-in-law, Netta Hough and Dolores Roux (Louie); six great-grandchildren; numerous nieces, nephews, and cousins. He was preceded in death by his wife, Grace Taranto McFarland; son Tony McFarland; and daughter Suzanne McFarland. Funeral services will be held at noon, Thursday, August 30 at Oak Grove Assembly of God in Port St. Joe with burial in Holly Hill Cem etery. Viewing will be from 11 a.m. to noon prior to the funeral. Kelley Funeral Home handling all arrangements. Bill McFarland Annual Noma community reunion Saturday The annual Noma Community Reunion will be held in the Noma Town Hall building on Saturday, Sept. 1. The town hall will open at 10 a.m. CST, and lunch will be served at noon CST. All past and present residents and their friends are cordially invited to attend. People planning to attend are asked to bring a well-lled basket of their favorite dishes. Also, please bring tea, if that is the beverage you prefer. Soft drinks, ice, cups, plates and eating utensils will be furnished. This gathering, held the Saturday before Labor Day, strengthens the bonds of friendship and lets us relive memories of the past, renew our ties with the land that once nourished us and walk among the graves of our dear departed kinsman. Anyone desiring additional information is urged to call Ludine Riddle at 974-8438. Benet sh fry Saturday for Lisa Walden There will be a benet sh fry this Saturday for Lisa Walden, to offset the cost of mounting medical bills. The benet will be at C-Quarters Marina on Hwy 98 in Carrabelle, beginning at 11 a.m. For information, call 697-2899. Prophetic Words Gospel Explosion Sept. 4-7 The Prophetic Word Gospel Explosion, hosted by Bishop C.M. Lockhart, founder of Anointed Word Ministries in Carrabelle, is coming. The ministries will host the explosion from Tuesday, Sept. 4 to Friday, Sept. 7 nightly at 7 p.m. Guest speakers will be here from Hattiesburg, Magee, and Columbia, Miss., all delivering the Word of God Come with expectancy in your heart. CATHY PUCKETT | Special to the Times Lions Club members are pictured as they prepare to x lunch for senior citizens at the Franklin County Senior Citizens Center. The club members joined center volunteers for an afternoon of delicious food, fun and friendship. The seniors host lunch every Thursday at noon at the center on Avenue F in Carrabelle. Senior volunteers praised the Lions Club for their thoughtfulness in honoring senior citizens. DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times The Bishop OSullivan Council 1648 of the Knights of Columbus last week presented the food pantry, housed at the Apalachicola Municipal Building, with a check for $3,000, to be used to buy four new chest freezers from Taylors for the pantrys frozen food needs. Pictured above, at left are Bob Davis, the Knights nancial secretary, handing a check to Lori Switzer, the food pantry coordinator, From left are food pantry volunteers Rita OConnell, Linda Holland, Karen Foley, Tim Davis, Teresa Davis, Susan Antekeier, Norma Ethridge, Elizabeth Roffey, Art Hill, Andy Antekeier, Gerard Shuman. and Dustin Switzer. The local congregation of Jehovahs Witnesses would like to invite you to attend a twoday Assembly on Saturday and Sunday, Sept. 1-2 at the Marina Civic Center in Panama City. The theme of the Assembly is Safeguard Your Mind, based on Matthew 22:37. The program will start at 9:40 a.m. on Saturday and Sunday. There is no admission charge and no collections are taken. William Ad ams will be the featured speaker. Jesus instructed his disci ples to love Jehovah God with their whole heart, soul, and mind. This assembly has been designed to help Christians strengthen the person they are on the inside. It will help each one to analyze their thoughts with a view to being more pleas ing to Jehovah. A few of the questions that will be answered are: How can we allow God to mold our think ing? How can husbands, wives, parents and children contribute to family happiness? What ben et comes to those who apply what they learn from the Bible? Satan is waging a battle for our minds and is seeking to corrupt them (2 Cor. 11:3). So we must protect our minds and control our thoughts. Attending this assembly will help us brace up our minds to serve God more fully. Missed you last Thursday at lunch. During the meal, George Jackson let us know that the board had found someone to take over the meal planning and the kitchen so we can still enjoy our Thursday lunches at the Franklin County Senior Citizens Center Dynomite! Try your best to join us for lunch and fellowship. Serving begins at noon. At 3:30 p.m., family and friends gathered at Evergreen Cemetery to lay to rest our friend and neighbor, Zelma Nolton. Zelma was one of the great ladies of Lanark. She and I were good friends for a long time. Pray for Zelmas eternal peace and for strength for her family. Mark your calendars for Sunday, Sept. 16. Our monthly covered dish lunch is from 1-3 p.m. See you there. Bring a dish to share and a donation. Last Sunday, August 26, found many of us at the Thanksgiving in August dinner. What a meal. When members of the Camp Gordon Johnston American Legion Post 82 ll you plate, they really pile it on. Thanks to the members who prepared and served, and thanks to those who come and enjoy a great meal. Hats off to Ozzie and May Hanson. They celebrated 65 years of wedded bliss. Happy anniversary and many more. Dont forget Friday nights for big hamburger and fries, and pizza Sunday night, at Camp Gordon Johnston America Legion Post 82. Hamburger and fries, $6 donation, and pizza $1 per slice. Whole pizza, eat-in is $8, and take-out $10. Come and enjoy. Serving for both nights begins at 5 p.m. Hope to see you there! With Labor Day right around the corner, it would be great to have a ag ying over the post ofce and hall. Reckon what happened to the one I donated? Be kind to one another, check on the sick and housebound, and remember, contrary to popular opinion, Gods last name is not Damn! Until next time, God Bless America, the troops, the poor, homeless and hungry. Obituaries Ozzie and May Hanson mark 65th anniversary LANARK NEWS Jim Welsh Church BRIEFS WILLIAM ADAMS Jehovahs Witnesses assemble this weekend A FRIEND IN NEED LIONS CLUB VOLUNTEERS AT SENIOR CENTER

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Email outdoors news to timesoutdoors @star .com O UTDOORS www.apalachtimes.com Section Section A Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL (next to Piggly Wiggly) www.BWOsh.com (next to Piggly Wiggly) www.BWOsh.com Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL (next to Piggly Wiggly) www.BWOsh.com Corner of Marina Drive, www.BWOsh.com Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL www.BWOsh.com Port St. Joe, FL EV E RYTHING FOR YOUR O UTDOOR ADV E NTUR E Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL EV E EV E EV RYTHING FOR YOUR E RYTHING FOR YOUR E O UTDOOR ADV E UTDOOR ADV E UTDOOR ADV NTUR E NTUR E E AUGUST FEATURE FISH: Stop in and register or go online at www. B W O sh.com AUGUST FEATURE FISH: Stop in and register or go online at Stop in and register or go online at Stop in and register or go online at KINGFISH $5.00 ENTRY FOR TH E ENTIR E YE AR GREAT PRIZES WEEKLY ALMANAC APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE TIDE TABLES MONTHLY AVERAGES To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from these given for APALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW Cat Point Minus 0:40 Minus 1:17 East Pass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27 To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from those given for CARRABELLE: HIGH LOW Bald Point Minus 9:16 Minus 0:03 Sponsor the WEEKLY ALMANAC Call Today! 653-8868 Date High Low % Precip Thu, August 30 83 77 70 % Fri, August 31 83 76 40 % Sat, Sept. 01 85 76 30 % Sun, Sept. 02 85 75 30 % Mon, Sept. 03 84 76 60 % Tues, Sept. 04 84 75 60 % Wed, Sept. 05 84 75 60 % 30 Th 322am 2.6 201pm 2.9 737am 1.6 840pm 0.6 31 Fr 336am 2.6 255pm 2.9 821am 1.4 908pm 0.8 FreeTideTables.com For comparison only Times are local Tides in feet from MLLW 30 Th 322am 2.6 201pm 2.9 737am 1.6 840pm 0.6 31 Fr 336am 2.6 255pm 2.9 821am 1.4 908pm 0.8 FreeTideTables.com For comparison only Times are local Tides in feet from MLLW 1 Sa 513am 1.6 508pm 1.8 1114am 0.8 1144pm 0.7 2 Su 526am 1.7 556pm 1.7 1152am 0.6 3 Mo 540am 1.7 645pm 1.6 1203am 0.8 1230pm 0.6 4 Tu 559am 1.8 737pm 1.6 1221am 1.0 109pm 0.5 5 We 624am 1.8 837pm 1.5 1241am 1.1 153pm 0.5 6 Th 654am 1.9 949pm 1.4 106am 1.2 247pm 0.5 7 Fr 732am 1.9 1119pm 1.4 138am 1.3 358pm 0.5 8 Sa 818am 1.8 222am 1.3 520pm 0.5 9 Su 1255am 1.5 916am 1.8 342am 1.4 634pm 0.5 10 Mo 201am 1.5 1029am 1.7 535am 1.4 733pm 0.4 11 Tu 241am 1.6 1150am 1.7 702am 1.4 822pm 0.4 1 Sa 348am 2.6 343pm 2.9 901am 1.3 931pm 1.1 2 Su 401am 2.7 431pm 2.7 939am 1.0 950pm 1.3 3 Mo 415am 2.7 520pm 2.6 1017am 1.0 1008pm 1.6 4 Tu 434am 2.9 612pm 2.6 1056am 0.8 1028pm 1.8 5 We 459am 2.9 712pm 2.4 1140am 0.8 1053pm 1.9 6 Th 529am 3.0 824pm 2.2 1234pm 0.8 1125pm 2.1 7 Fr 607am 3.0 954pm 2.2 145pm 0.8 8 Sa 653am 2.9 1130pm 2.4 1209am 2.1 307pm 0.8 9 Su 751am 2.9 129am 2.2 421pm 0.8 10 Mo 1236am 2.4 904am 2.7 322am 2.2 520pm 0.6 11 Tu 116am 2.6 1025am 2.7 449am 2.2 609pm 0.6 Thursday, August 30, 2012 Page 8 By S TAN KIRKLAND FWC There was a time in the not-too-distant past when coyotes were a rarity in the eastern United States. However, that no longer is the case. The small animal predators scienti cally known as Canis latrans once were found almost exclusively in the Southwest, but they now are rmly entrenched throughout the U.S. and even much of Canada. Our home state of Florida is no exception. Coyotes are a rusty brown color and typically weigh 25 to 35 pounds. They usually move after sundown and are more apt to be seen at night in rural areas, crossing roads or scavenging on road kill. They also will make themselves welcome in urban areas, where there is cover. In a perfect world, coyotes would stick to the things that wildlife biologists say they normally eat rats, mice, small birds, snakes, carrion and even watermelons and cantaloupes. Unfortunately, coyotes sometimes cross paths with small pets, such as dogs and house cats, which they can attack and kill. A study published by the Journal of Wildlife Management a couple of years ago points out just what can happen when coyotes cross paths with house cats. The study looked at eight radio-collared coyotes on the outskirts of Tucson, Ariz., from November 2005 through February 2006. Of 36 instances where coyotes encountered the cats, cats died in 19 of the interactions. In Florida there have been a number of instances where coyotes have gone after small dogs. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) doesnt investigate the incidents but they are a recognized occurrence. So, what does a person do if they want coyotes removed? Under FWC rules, coyotes are an unprotected furbearer. That means they can be removed or killed during daylight hours, 365 days a year, on private property. Landowners can remove the coyotes or hire a trapper to do the work. While it may make a person feel better that theyve removed a coyote or two, biologists say coyotes from outside the area quickly move in and occupy the vacated range. Where the concern is for small pets, biologists say there are several things people can do. That includes clearing debris and brush piles around the property, making the site less suitable to coyotes. Where there are woods or elds that border home, biologists recommend a standard fence or electric fence to discourage coyotes from coming in the yard. Biologists say its also not a good idea to allow house cats to roam free. Another thing that biologists say is sometimes a problem is attractants, such as garbage or pet food. They say garbage cans should be secured and recommend not feeding pets where coyotes may have access to the food. While coyotes usually ee at the site of humans, on rare occasions they may approach. If that happens, the recommended advice is to make noise and wave your arms. Those looking for information about coyotes or help dealing with a coyote issue can contact the FWCs Regional Of ce in Panama City at 850-2653676. The FWC website MyFWC.com has information about coyotes by selecting Wildlife & Habitats and then Species Pro les. Coyotes and humans Gooseneck barnacles, Pollicipes polymerus, also called stalked barnacles, are lter-feeding shell sh related to crabs and lobsters that live attached to hard surfaces of rocks and otsam. Unlike most other types of barnacles, gooseneck barnacles depend on water motion for feeding, and are therefore found only on exposed or moderately exposed coasts where waves continuously break over the rocks. The gooseneck barnacle forms dense colonies in crevices on rocky shores with strong waves. Like oysters, the spat or larva is free-living but depends on sea currents for its transport. These shell sh anchor themselves to rocks by a tough, exible stalk, called a peduncle, which also contains the ovaries. Once the gooseneck barnacle has attached itself to an object, it secretes a series of pale plates at the end of its stalk, forming a shell around its featherlike legs, which comb through the water for food. The legs face away from the sea and toward shore, enabling the barnacle to feed by ltering out particles of detritus from returning tidal water as it funnels past them through cracks in the rocks. Gooseneck barnacles are adults at about ve years of age and may live for up to 20 years. Their main predators are gulls and star sh. The organism is a hermaphrodite but they rarely undergo self-fertilization. Eggs and sperm are released into the water and fertilization of eggs is external so cross fertilization is more common. Colonies of gooseneck barnacles are susceptible to the damaging effects of oil pollution and they recover only slowly from disturbance. In Portugal and Spain, they are a widely consumed and expensive delicacy known as percebes. They are harvested commercially and are also imported from overseas, particularly from Morocco and Canada. In recent years, they have also begun to appear in tony eateries in other parts of the world. In the days before it was known that birds migrate, it was thought that barnacle geese, Branta leucopsis, developed from this crustacean, since they were never seen to nest in Europe. The confusion was prompted by the similarities in color and shape between barnacles and the head and neck of a goose. Because they were often found on driftwood, it was assumed the barnacles were attached to branches of trees before they fell in the water. Since the geese were thought to be neither esh, nor born of esh, they were allowed to be eaten on days when eating meat was forbidden by religion. Special to the Times Although history traces the earliest maritime signal res to ancient times, the modern effort to protect seafarers began with the family Stevenson along the Scottish coast. For three generations spanning the 18th and 19th centuries, these remarkable engineers designed, developed, and constructed the rst modern lighthouses. Well, all but one. Robert Louis Stevenson tried his hand at the family business for a year or so, and then decided to follow his passion as a writer. Lucky for us. Stevenson-built lighthouses had walls 9 feet thick to withstand battering by the North Atlantic. Early lights had already been invented, but it took Augustin Fresnels design to illuminate the unforgiving waters of the coast far enough out to cut down the number of shipwrecks. The rst lenses, called catoptric lights placed the lens or re ector behind the ame, actually dissipating the light. By placing the lens in front, dioptric lights, candlepower was tripled even with the earliest prototypes, by bending the light towards a speci c point on the horizon. Think of the difference between a candles glow, and a light bulbs illumination. Fresnel lenses were ranked in order of size and resulting brightness from one to six. A sixthorder lens weighed about 220 pounds and was designed for piers and breakwaters. In contrast, the rst order lens weighed upwards of six tons, was used for major coastal lighthouses and shown 18 times brighter than the smallest. The Crooked River lighthouses Fresnel lens, now removed to Coast Guard headquarters in New Orleans is a fourth order lens. To learn more about the early days of lighthouse construction, you are directed to Bella Bathurts The Lighthouse Stevensons, ISBN: 0-06-019427-8. With site names like Mull of Kintyre Skerryvore, and the Butt of Lewis, youre guaranteed a fascinating read about our favorite subject. Starting soon, the Crooked River light will be opened for tours to the top of the catwalk on Thursdays and Fridays, as well as on weekends. Please join the Carrabelle Lighthouse Association in welcoming our newest volunteer, Captain Bob. He will be leading tours on Thursday and Friday, Sept. 27 and 28. KATHY ROBINSON | Special to the Times On Thursday, Aug. 23, for her birthday, Kathy Jansen of Apalachicola went shing with Capt. Junior Holland. This is the result of a half day on the water. Guess somebody must have a sweet spot. Happy birthday, KJ. BUDS N BUGS Lois Swoboda Gooseneck barnacles KJ SCORES A MESS OF FISH LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Can with gooseneck barnacles attached, discovered on St. George Island beach. PANAMA CITY NEWS HERALD Outdoors SUNDAY August 12, 2012 I watch in wonderment as boat after boat blasts out into the Gulf in pursuit of black grouper while all the time leaving more grouper behind than anglers could legally bring back to the landing if they tried. Most boaters leaving Carl Gray Park pass under the Hathaway Bridge and head to the pass while leaving behind grouper so large they would be a challenge to break away from the bridge and get to the top. I talked to a diver who inspects the bridge and he said there were goliath grouper under there that could eat a man in one bite. He said there were gag grouper up to 40 pounds and some black snapper that were humongous. When they blew up the old bridge a 35-pound red snapper that probably had lived under there for the better part of its life came floating to the top. Along the seawall at the shipyard and at the paper mill there are grouper that would be almost impossible to tear away from that wall. If you dont believe me, just don some gear and take a look around. Of course some of the biggest bull sharks you will ever see also live down there and the visibility isnt all that good. A lot of people have thrown stuff into the bay under the cover of darkness that has attracted a lot of fish; grouper as well as black and red snapper. I discovered one of these places in about 29 feet of water clear enough to actually see the grouper swimming around the structure. It was almost like shooting fish in a barrel until a hurricane moved this makeshift reef to parts unknown and the good fishing with it. Lets not forget the sewer line that caused so much consternation a few years back. They say they covered it up, but that only made it better as far as grouper fishing goes. And lets not forget the DuPont Bridge going to Tyndall Air Force Base. There are some grouper under this bridge as big as you ever will want to tangle with. You had better bring your big boy britches if you want to catch one of these fish. They have hidey holes they can run into before you get the slack out of your line. Big choffers and large mullet will get these fish out, but you better be ready to lose some tackle if you go. Hooked on Outdoors E-mail outdoors news to outdoors@pcnh.com More coverage online at newsherald.com IT OUT: See more outdoors photos and recipes at newsherald.com/sections/outdoors LOOK INSIDE For Lifestyle content: Ask Amy, Scrapbook, Out & About and more D3-8 Outdoor Life Scott Lindsey captainlindsey@ knology.net Section D By S TAN KIRKLAND FWC There was a time in the not-toodistant past when coyotes were a rarity in the eastern United States. However, that no longer is the case. The small animal predators scientifically known as Canis latrans once were found almost exclusively in the Southwest, but they now are firmly entrenched throughout the U.S. and even much of Canada. Our home state of Florida is no exception. Coyotes are a rusty brown color and typically weigh 25 to 35 pounds. They usually move after sundown and are more apt to be seen at night in rural areas, crossing roads or scavenging on road kill. They also will make themselves welcome in urban areas, where there is cover. In a perfect world, coyotes would stick to the things that wildlife biologists say they normally eat rats, mice, small birds, snakes, carrion and even watermelons and cantaloupes. Unfortunately, coyotes sometimes cross paths with small pets, such as dogs and house cats, which they can attack and kill. A study published by the Journal of Wildlife Management a couple of years ago points out just what can happen when coyotes cross paths with house cats. The study looked at eight radio-collared coyotes on the outskirts of Tucson, Ariz., from November 2005 through February 2006. Of 36 instances where coyotes encountered the cats, cats died in 19 of the interactions. In Florida there have been a number of instances where coyotes have gone after small dogs. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) doesnt investigate the incidents but they are a recognized occurrence. So, what does a person do if they want coyotes removed? Under FWC rules, coyotes are an unprotected furbearer. That means they can be removed or killed during daylight hours, 365 days a year, on private property. Landowners can remove the coyotes or hire a trapper to do the work. While it may make a person feel better that theyve removed a coyote or two, biologists say coyotes from outside the area quickly move in and occupy the vacated range. Where the concern is for small pets, biologists say there are several things people can do. That includes clearing debris and brush piles around the property, making the site less suitable to coyotes. Where there are woods or fields that border home, biologists recommend a standard fence or electric fence to discourage coyotes from coming in the yard. Biologists say its also not a good idea to allow house cats to roam free. Another thing that biologists say is sometimes a problem is attractants, such as garbage or pet food. They say garbage cans should be secured and recommend not feeding pets where coyotes may have access to the food. While coyotes usually flee at the site of humans, on rare occasions they may approach. If that happens, the recommended advice is to make noise and wave your arms. Those looking for information about coyotes or help dealing with a coyote issue can contact the FWCs Regional Office in Panama City at 850-265-3676. The FWC website MyFWC.com has information about coyotes by selecting Wildlife & Habitats and then Species Profiles. Coyotes and humans SXC Coyotes are a rusty brown color and typically weigh 25 to 35 pounds. They usually move after sundown and are more apt to be seen at night in rural areas, crossing roads or scavenging on road kill. Charter fishing making a comeback HOUMA, La. (AP) Charter fishing has proven to be a tough industry to sink in Terrebonne and Lafourche parishes. Many charter boat captains saw fewer and fewer customers as a result of the 2010 BP oil spill, but now they are starting to recover and reel in more anglers. I would classify this as a comeback year, said Daryl Carpenter, president of the Louisiana Charter Boat Association that represents more than 140 charter boat captains along Louisianas coast. Terrebonne and Lafourche parishes received more than $2 million each from BP as a result of the oil spill with much of the money going to tourism advertising. Pat Gordon, Planning and Zoning director for Terrebonne, said the parish isnt advertising for specific charter boat operations but for the industry a whole. Were advertising for people to come and fish in Terrebonne, Gordon said. Weve run ads in Cabelas Outfitter Journal and are running an ad in the Louisiana Fishing Regulation Brochure. Theres a fishing show that runs on HTV, and some ads are being played on that channel. One thing we have done for the local captains is get as many of them listed on the Convention and Visitors Bureau website as possible. Gordon said in addition to using the money to advertise fishing, local festivals and the new parish branding received a monetary boost from the BP money. But it wont last forever. We got the money two years ago, Gordon said, and it will all be spent by the end of the third year. Michel Claudet, Terrebonne Parish president, said he thought the advertising campaigns, which focused on promoting Terrebonne as the Salt Water Fishing Capital of the World, were paying off. I think it has worked out, Claudet said. Some captains have said they are really busy. I think these guys certainly want more, but business is good. Its like everything else, you make an investment and hope to see a return on it. We are doing things to show that we are the Salt Water Fishing Capital of the World. In addition to parishsponsored advertising, groups such as the Metairiebased Louisiana Tourism and Coastal Coalition have been advertising for these hard-hit companies. First of all, were seeing a rebound, said Carpenter, who also owns the Grand Isle-based Reel Screamers Guide Service. Ive stressed advertising to our members, and they should participate in these programs. But Im trying to say to BP and SEE CHARTER FISHING | D2 SXC Coyotes are a rusty brown color and typically weigh 25 to 35 pounds. They usually move after sundown and are more apt to be seen at night in rural areas, crossing roads or scavenging on road kill. Crooked River Lighthouse to expand tours SPONSORED BY The MBARA king sh tournament will be going on this weekend, so hundreds of boats will be in our waters, making for some crowded boat ramps and long lines. The offshore grouper bite is the best bet going with a amberjack in the mix. Most anglers are shing the hard bottom 40 plus miles due south from Cape San Blas. Offshore Inshore As the rain continues, St. Joe Bay will remain stained and muddy this week. Although the bad weather is upon us again this week, the shing is rather good. Great catches of trout and ounder are reported around the Pig Island area. Try shing the deeper channels for mid-afternoon action.

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CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA SP O RTS www.apalachtimes.com A Section PUBLIC NOTICE THE FRANKLIN COUNTY ADVISORY BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT WILL HOLD A PUBLIC HEARING ON WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 5, 2012, AT 10:00 A.M., IN THE COUNTY COMMISSION MEETING ROOM IN THE FRANKLIN COUNTY COURTHOUSE ANNEX TO CONSIDER THE FOLLOWING VARIANCES, APPEALS, AND SPECIAL EXCEPTIONS: 1 CONSIDERATION OF A REQUEST FOR A VARIANCE TO CONSTRUCT A RIP RAP REVETMENT WITHIN THE CRITICAL HABITAT ZONE ON PROPERTY DESCRIBED AS LOT 7, KINJA BAY SUBDIVISION, ST. GEORGE ISLAND, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. REQUEST SUBMITTED BY GARLICK ENVIRONMENTAL ASSOCIATES, INC, AGENT FOR PAUL AUGHTRY, III, OWNER. 2 CONSIDERATION OF A REQUEST FOR A VARIANCE TO CONSTRUCT A RIP RAP REVETMENT WITHIN THE CRITICAL HABITAT ZONE ON PROPERTY DESCRIBED AS LOT 9, BRE, INC., ALLIGATOR POINT, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. REQUEST SUBMITTED BY RANDY TAYLOR, AGENT FOR PIER 9, LLC. THE BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS ACTING AS THE BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT WILL CONSIDER THESE RECOMMENDATIONS ON TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 2012. NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED BIDS ing 850-653-9783 Page 9 Thursday, August 30, 2012 By BRAD MILNER 747-5065 | @PCNHBradMilner bmilner@pcnh.com EASTPOINT Bozeman could do little to shorten its drive home on Friday night. The Bucks shortened the football game instead. Bozeman blasted homestanding Franklin County 45-0 in a kickoff classic. The Seahawks had no answer for the Bucks offense, which rolled up 178 yards and four touchdowns in the rst quarter. Both teams top players were on the sidelines for much of the game. Franklin Countys leading returning rusher Dwayne Griggs was held out, a combination of lacking adequate practice time and needing a physical, coach Josh Wright said. Bozeman quarterback Jacob Martinez was limited with a back injury, played until late in the rst quarter and didnt showcase his ability as a runner, or at least that was the hope for Bozeman coach Loren Tillman. Martinez held himself in check, save one time, scrambling and running untouched for a 22-yard score to give Bozeman a 21-0 lead with 2:43 left in the rst. He was 3 of 5 for 93 yards with touchdown passes to Javoni Bell and David Elmore. Bozeman led 38-0 at halftime, outgaining Franklin County 269-41. The mercy rule and running clock started in the third quarter and put a quicker end to the preseason encounter. We set out to do three things, get everybody in and on lm, see speed from other guys than Martinez and throw a few balls, Tillman said. Check, check and check and overall it was good, we didnt miss a kick with two kickers and our lines played with con dence. Backup quarterback Bubba Thompson played the nal three quarters for Bozeman. Thompson nished 3 of 5 for 25 yards, including a 9-yarder to Kris Kenney for Bozemans fth score. McKee led all rushers with 110 yards and a fourthquarter touchdown to cap the scoring. Kenney added 44 yards rushing, Bell had one carry for 28 and Jernigan added 39 total yards. We saw the other speed from Bell and Jernigan, Tillman said. Kenney ran hard; they played well. Franklin Countys offense didnt fare as well, but Wright said the Seahawks would run more two-back sets going forward. Senior Skyler Hutchinson replaced Griggs as the starting running back and was held to zero yards on 12 carries before breaking free for 52 on his final carry. Bozeman controlled the push along both lines and Franklin County hurt its cause with five dropped passes. The Seahawks also were without two starters in the defense backfield, including Griggs. I think we took another good step and we could care less what the score was, Wright said. I think were moving forward, just some parts of our puzzle arent fitting now. Logan McLeod made his first start at quarterback for Franklin County after battling knee injuries for two seasons. The junior was 3 of 12 for 8 yards and an interception. He handled himself well, Wright said. He hasnt played, hell get into better game speed and hes worked hard to get there. Franklin County heads to Sneads Friday to open the season, while Bozeman is at West Gadsden. Bozeman 28 0 0 7 45 Franklin 0 0 0 0 0 First quarter BOZ Jernigan 19 run (Benjamin kick) 9:08 BOZ Bell 30 pass from Martinez (Benjamin kick) 5:50 BOZ Martinez 22 run (Burns kick) 2:43 BOZ Elmore 46 pass from Martinez (Burns kick) 2:08 Second quarter BOZ Kenney 9 pass from Thompson (Benjamin kick) 9:20 BOZ FG Burns 33, 1:51 Fourth quarter BOZ D.McKee 59 run (Benjamin kick) 10:00 Bozeman rolls past Franklin County By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com The newly formed Franklin County Youth Soccer League scored two goals last week an endorsement from the county commission and an enthusiastic reception from interested players. Greg Sasnett, president of the newly-formed league, said they are still looking for some more players, especially from Eastpoint and Carrabelle, so that each age group can eld enough teams to play one another, and cut down on the amount of travel needed to face off against Gulf County squads. After an appearance by Sasnetts wife, Betty, and league vice president, Craig Hicks, the new league got the backing it sought from county commissioners Aug. 21. The new league is an offshoot of the successful GulfFranklin League, which last year drew eight teams from Franklin County, ranging in age from 4 to 13, for a total of 115 players, more than half of that leagues participants. But, the only drawback for local players was that all games were played on Saturday mornings in Port St. Joe, with the exception of when two Franklin County squads were squaring off. Those games were played here in the county, at makeshift, but regulation-sized, elds at D.W. Wilson Field in Apalachicola or the Carrabelle soccer eld at Kendrick Field. So the plan with the new league is to play as many games as possible on those elds this year, beginning at the end of September, and lessen the travel needed to play away games against Gulf County opponents. By next year, they hope to have brand new elds, at either end of the county. County commissioners loved the idea, and unanimously supported Commissioner Smokey Parrishs motion to move forward on the league, including providing the teams insurance and taking steps to create of cial soccer elds, rather than using baseball elds, which include some of the dirt in eld. We are tearing up the baseball elds, said Hicks. And we need lighted elds. The new elds wont be ready this year, so the current practice elds will be used, which still pass muster with Gulf County, which requires regulation elds and certi ed of cials. Fields have been the biggest hangup, said Greg Sasnett. He said Gulf County has been helpful with formation of the new league, particularly since they had begun several years back as an offshoot of the Bay County program. Soccer backers here in the county have said that it is essential for there to be a Franklin County league if the high school program is to prosper. Last year only ve members of the high school had ever played before, Hicks told commissioners. We used to have soccer 15 years ago, noted Commissioner Cheryl Sanders. Theres nothing cuter than seeing a bunch of 4 year olds trying to gure out how to kick that ball. In order to attract more young people, the league plans to accept registrations through Friday, August 31. Registrations can be picked up and dropped off at all Centennial Banks in Franklin County. Weather permitting we will have one more registration day at the Armory in Apalach, on Thursday evening, Aug. 30, from 5:30 to 7 p.m., said Betty Sasnett. The more we have signed up, the more games will be played in Franklin County. As it stands now, the bulk of the players have come from Apalachicola, but Greg Sasnett said this is a legacy of the former Gulf-Franklin League which, because most all the games were played in Gulf County, had dif culty attracting players from the eastern end of the county. We want it to be fun for those teams, he said. If we can get kids involved it will work countywide. I think it will work; we just need support. Serving as league secretary is Janet Riccard, with Amanda Schneider as registrar. Ramon Valenzuela is working as coordinator with the middle and high school programs. For more info, call Betty Sasnett at 653-7598 or Craig Hicks at-556-7210. New soccer league gets county backing DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times Senior Skyler Hutchinson tries to go outside on the Bozeman defense PHOTOS BY DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times Serenity Schneider, a player in the under-6 age bracket, holds up one of last years soccer jerseys. Betty Sasnett, front, and Amanda Schneider handle registrations on Saturday.

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Local The Times | A11 Thursday, August 30, 2012 assessed as provided in paragraph (5), an assessment may not increase if the just value of the property is less than the just value of the property on the preceding January 1. (2) An No assessment may not shall exceed just value. (3) After a any change of ownership, as provided by general law, homestead property shall be assessed at just value as of January 1 of the following year, unless the provisions of paragraph (8) apply. Thereafter, the homestead shall be assessed as provided in this subsection. (4) New homestead property shall be assessed at just value as of January 1 1st of the year following the establishment of the homestead, unless the provisions of paragraph (8) apply. That assessment shall only change only as provided in this subsection. (5) Changes, additions, reductions, or improvements to homestead property shall be assessed as provided for by general law.; provided However, after the adjustment for any change, addition, reduction, or improvement, the property shall be assessed as provided in this subsection. (6) In the event of a termination of homestead status, the property shall be assessed as provided by general law. (7) The provisions of this subsection amendment are severable. If a provision any of the provisions of this subsection is amendment shall be held unconstitutional by a any court of competent jurisdiction, the decision of the such court does shall not affect or impair any remaining provisions of this subsection amendment. (8)a. A person who establishes a new homestead as of January 1, 2009, or January 1 of any subsequent year and who has received a home stead exemption pursuant to Section 6 of this Article as of January 1 of either of the 2 two years immediately preceding the establishment of a the new homestead is entitled to have the new homestead assessed at less than just value. If this revision is approved in January of 2008, a person who establishes a new homestead as of January 1, 2008, is entitled to have the new homestead assessed at less than just value only if that person received a homestead exemption on January 1, 2007. The assessed value of the newly established homestead shall be determined as follows: 1. If the just value of the new homestead is greater than or equal to the just value of the prior homestead as of January 1 of the year in which the prior homestead was abandoned, the assessed value of the new home stead shall be the just value of the new homestead minus an amount equal to the lesser of $500,000 or the difference between the just value and the assessed value of the prior homestead as of January 1 of the year in which the prior homestead was abandoned. Thereafter, the homestead shall be assessed as provided in this subsection. 2. If the just value of the new homestead is less than the just value of the prior homestead as of January 1 of the year in which the prior homestead was abandoned, the assessed value of the new homestead shall be equal to the just value of the new homestead divided by the just value of the prior homestead and multiplied by the assessed value of the prior homestead. However, if the difference between the just value of the new homestead and the assessed value of the new homestead calculated pursu ant to this sub-subparagraph is greater than $500,000, the assessed value of the new homestead shall be increased so that the difference between the just value and the assessed value equals $500,000. Thereafter, the home stead shall be assessed as provided in this subsection. b. By general law and subject to conditions therein, the leg islature shall provide for application of this paragraph to property owned by more than one person. (e) The legislature may, by general law, for assessment purposes and subject to the provisions of this subsection, allow counties and municipali ties to authorize by ordinance that historic property may be assessed solely on the basis of character or use. Such character or use assessment shall apply only to the jurisdiction adopting the ordinance. The requirements for eligible properties must be by general law. (f) A county may, in the manner prescribed by general law, provide for a reduction in the assessed value of homestead property to the extent of any increase in the assessed value of that property which results from the construction or reconstruction of the property for the purpose of providing living quarters for one or more natural or adoptive grandparents or parents of the owner of the property or of the owners spouse if at least one of the grandparents or parents for whom the living quarters are provided is 62 years of age or older. Such a reduction may not exceed the lesser of the following: (1) The increase in assessed value resulting from construction or reconstruction of the property. (2) Twenty percent of the total assessed value of the property as improved. (g) For all levies other than school district levies, assessments of residential real property, as by general law, which contains nine units or fewer and which is not subject to the assessment limitations set forth in subsections (a) through (d) shall change only as provided in this subsection. (1) Assessments subject to this subsection shall be changed annually on the date of assessment provided by law. However, ; but those changes in assessments may shall not exceed 5 ten percent (10%) of the assessment for the prior year. The legislature may provide by general law that, except for changes, additions, reductions, or improvements to property assessed as provided in paragraph (4), an assessment may not increase if the just value of the property is less than the just value of the property on the preceding date of assessment provided by law. (2) An No assessment may not shall exceed just value. (3) After a change of ownership or control, as by general law, including any change of ownership of a legal entity that owns the property, such property shall be assessed at just value as of the next assessment date. Thereafter, such property shall be assessed as provided in this subsection. (4) Changes, additions, reductions, or improvements to such property shall be assessed as provided for by general law.; However, after the ad justment for any change, addition, reduction, or improvement, the property shall be assessed as provided in this subsection. (h) For all levies other than school district levies, assessments of real property that is not subject to the assessment limitations set forth in subsections (a) through (d) and (g) shall change only as provided in this subsection. (1) Assessments subject to this subsection shall be changed annually on the date of assessment provided by law. However, ; but those changes in assessments may shall not exceed 5 ten percent (10%) of the assessment for the prior year. The legislature may provide by general law that, except for changes, additions, reductions, or improvements to property assessed as provided in paragraph (5), an assessment may not increase if the just value of the property is less than the just value of the property on the preceding date of assessment provided by law. (2) An No assessment may not shall exceed just value. (3) The legislature must provide that such property shall be assessed at just value as of the next assessment date after a qualifying improve ment, as by general law, is made to such property. Thereafter, such property shall be assessed as provided in this subsection. (4) The legislature may provide that such property shall be assessed at just value as of the next assessment date after a change of ownership or control, as by general law, including any change of ownership of the legal entity that owns the property. Thereafter, such property shall be assessed as provided in this subsection. (5) Changes, additions, reductions, or improvements to such property shall be assessed as provided for by general law.; However, after the ad justment for any change, addition, reduction, or improvement, the property shall be assessed as provided in this subsection. (i) The legislature, by general law and subject to conditions therein, may prohibit the consideration of the following in the determina tion of the assessed value of real property used for residential purposes: (1) Any change or improvement made for the purpose of improving the propertys resistance to wind damage. (2) The installation of a renewable energy source device. (j)(1) The assessment of the following working waterfront properties shall be based upon the current use of the property: a. Land used predominantly for commercial purposes. b. Land that is accessible to the public and used for vessel launches into waters that are navigable. c. Marinas and drystacks that are open to the public. d. Water-dependent marine manufacturing facilities, commercial ing facilities, and marine vessel construction and repair facilities and their support activities. (2) The assessment provided by this subsection is subject to conditions and limitations and reasonable as by the legislature by general law. SECTION 6. Homestead exemptions. (a) Every person who has the legal or equitable title to real estate and maintains thereon the permanent residence of the owner, or another legally or naturally dependent upon the owner, shall be exempt from taxation thereon, except assessments for special up to the assessed valua tion of $25,000 thousand dollars and, for all levies other than school district levies, on the assessed valuation greater than $50,000 thousand dollars and up to $75,000 thousand dollars upon establishment of right thereto in the manner prescribed by law. The real estate may be held by legal or equitable title, by the entireties, jointly, in common, as a condominium, or indirectly by stock ownership or member ship representing the owners or members proprietary interest in a cor poration owning a fee or a leasehold initially in excess of 98 ninety-eight years. The exemption shall not apply with respect to any assessment roll until such roll is determined to be in compliance with the provisions of Section 4 by a state agency designated by general law. This exemption is repealed on the effective date of any amendment to this Article which provides for the assessment of homestead property at less than just value. (b) Not more than one exemption shall be allowed any individual or family unit or with respect to any residential unit. No exemption shall exceed the value of the real estate assessable to the owner or, in case of ownership through stock or membership in a corporation, the value of the proportion which the interest in the corporation bears to the assessed value of the property. (c) By general law and subject to conditions therein, the legislature may provide to renters, who are permanent residents, ad valorem tax relief on all ad valorem tax levies. Such ad valorem tax relief shall be in the form and amount established by general law. (d) The legislature may, by general law, allow counties or munici palities, for the purpose of their respective tax levies and subject to the provisions of general law, to grant an additional homestead tax exemption not exceeding $50,000 thousand dollars to any person who has the legal or equitable title to real estate and maintains thereon the permanent residence of the owner and who has attained age 65 and whose household income, as by general law, does not exceed $20,000 twenty thousand dollars The general law must allow counties and munici palities to grant this additional exemption, within the limits prescribed in this subsection, by ordinance adopted in the manner prescribed by general law, and must provide for the periodic adjustment of the income limitation prescribed in this subsection for changes in the cost of living. (e) Each veteran who is age 65 or older who is partially or totally permanently disabled shall receive a discount from the amount of the ad valorem tax otherwise owed on homestead property the veteran owns and resides in if the disability was combat related, the veteran was a resident of this state at the time of entering the military service of the United States, and the veteran was honorably discharged upon separation from military service. The discount shall be in a percentage equal to the percentage of the veterans permanent, service-connected disability as determined by the United States Department of Veterans Affairs. To qualify for the discount granted by this subsection, an applicant must submit to the county property appraiser, by March 1, proof of residency at the time of entering military service, an letter from the United States Department of Veterans Affairs stating the percentage of the veterans service-connected disability and such evidence that reasonably the disability as combat related, and a copy of the veterans honorable discharge. If the property appraiser denies the request for a discount, the appraiser must notify the applicant in writing of the reasons for the denial, and the veteran may reap ply. The legislature may, by general law, waive the annual application re quirement in subsequent years. This subsection shall take effect December 7, 2006, is self-executing, and does not require implementing legislation. (f) As provided by general law and subject to conditions therein, every person who establishes the right to receive the homestead exemption provided in subsection (a) within 1 year after purchasing the homestead property and who has not owned property in the previous 3 cal endar years to which the homestead exemption provided in subsection (a) applied is entitled to an additional homestead exemption for all levies ex cept school district levies. The additional exemption is an amount equal to 50 percent of the homestead propertys just value on January 1 of the year the homestead is established. The additional exemption may not exceed the median just value of all homestead property within the county where the property at issue is located for the calendar year immediately preceding January 1 of the year the homestead is established. The additional exemp tion shall apply for a period of 5 years or until the year the property is sold, whichever occurs The amount of the additional exemption shall be reduced in each subsequent year by an amount equal to 20 percent of the amount of the additional exemption received in the year the homestead was established or by an amount equal to the difference between the just value of the property and the assessed value of the property determined under Section 4(d), whichever is greater. Not more than one exemption provided under this subsection shall be allowed per homestead property at one time. The additional exemption applies to property purchased on or after January 1, 2011, if this amendment is approved at a special election held on the date of the 2012 presidential preference primary, or to property purchased on or after January 1, 2012, if this amendment is approved at the 2012 general election, but the additional exemption is not available in the sixth and subsequent years after it is received. ARTICLE XII SCHEDULE SECTION 27. Property tax exemptions and limitations on property tax assessments.The amendments to Sections 3, 4, and 6 of Article VII, providing a $25,000 exemption for tangible personal property, provid ing an additional $25,000 homestead exemption, authorizing transfer of the accrued from the limitations on the assessment of homestead property, and this section, if submitted to the electors of this state for approval or rejection at a special election authorized by law to be held on January 29, 2008, shall take effect upon approval by the electors and shall operate retroactively to January 1, 2008, or, if submitted to the electors of this state for approval or rejection at the next general election, shall take effect January 1 of the year following such general election. The amend ments to Section 4 of Article VII creating subsections (f) and (g) of that section, creating a limitation on annual assessment increases for real property, shall take effect upon approval of the electors and shall limit assessments beginning January 1, 2009, if approved at a special elec tion held on January 29, 2008, or shall limit assessments beginning January 1, 2010, if approved at the general election held in November of 2008. Subsections (g) (f) and (h) (g) of Section 4 of Article VII, initially adopted as subsections (f) and (g) are repealed effective January 1, 2023 2019; however, the legislature shall by joint resolution propose an amend ment abrogating the repeal of subsections (g) (f) and (h) (g) which shall be submitted to the electors of this state for approval or rejection at the general election of 2022 2018 and, if approved, shall take effect January 1, 2023 2019 SECTION 32. Property assessments.This section and the amend ment of Section 4 of Article VII addressing homestead and non homestead property having a declining just value and reducing the limit on the maximum annual increase in the assessed value of nonhomestead property, if submitted to the electors of this state for approval or rejection at a special election authorized by law to be held on the date of the 2012 presidential preference primary, shall take effect upon approval by the electors and shall operate retroactively to January 1, 2012, or, if submitted to the electors of this state for approval or rejection at the 2012 general election, shall take effect January 1, 2013. SECTION 33. Additional homestead exemption for owners of homestead property who recently have not owned homestead property. This section and the amendment to Section 6 of Article VII providing for an additional homestead exemption for owners of homestead property who have not owned homestead property during the 3 calendar years immedi ately preceding purchase of the current homestead property, if submitted to the electors of this state for approval or rejection at a special election authorized by law to be held on the date of the 2012 presidential prefer ence primary, shall take effect upon approval by the electors and operate retroactively to January 1, 2012, and the additional homestead exemption shall be available for properties purchased on or after January 1, 2011, or if submitted to the electors of this state for approval or rejection at the 2012 general election, shall take effect January 1, 2013, and the additional homestead exemption shall be available for properties purchased on or after January 1, 2012. NO. 5 CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT ARTICLE V, SECTIONS 2, 11, AND 12 (Legislative) Ballot Title: STATE COURTS. Ballot Summary: Proposing a revision of Article V of the State Constitu tion relating to the judiciary. The State Constitution authorizes the Supreme Court to adopt rules for the practice and procedure in all courts. The constitution further provides that a rule of court may be repealed by a general law enacted by a two-thirds vote of the membership of each house of the Legislature. This proposed constitutional revision eliminates the requirement that a general law repealing a court rule pass by a two-thirds vote of each house, thereby providing that the Legislature may repeal a rule of court by a general law approved by a majority vote of each house of the Legislature that expresses the policy behind the repeal. The court could readopt the rule in conformity with the public policy expressed by the Legislature, but if the Legislature determines that a rule has been readopted and repeals the readopted rule, this proposed revision prohibits the court from further re adopting the repealed rule without the Legislatures prior approval. Under current law, rules of the judicial nominating commissions and the Judicial Commission may be repealed by general law enacted by a majority vote of the membership of each house of the Legislature. Under this proposed revision, a vote to repeal those rules is changed to repeal by general law enacted by a majority vote of the legislators present. Under current law, the Governor appoints a justice of the Supreme Court from a list of nominees provided by a judicial nominating commis sion, and appointments by the Governor are not subject to This revision requires Senate of a justice of the Supreme Court before the appointee can take If the Senate votes not to the appointment, the judicial nominating commission must reconvene and may not renominate any person whose prior appointment to the same vacancy was not by the Senate. For the purpose of the Senate may meet at any time. If the Senate fails to vote on the appointment of a justice within 90 days, the justice will be deemed and will take The Judicial Commission is an independent commis sion created by the State Constitution to investigate and prosecute before the Florida Supreme Court alleged misconduct by a justice or judge. Currently under the constitution, commission proceedings are until formal charges are by the investigative panel of the commission. Once formal charges are the formal charges and all further proceed ings of the commission are public. Currently, the constitution authorizes the House of Representatives to impeach a justice or judge. Further, the Speaker of the House of Representatives may request, and the Judicial Commission must make available, all information in the commissions possession for use in deciding whether to impeach a justice or judge. This proposed revision requires the commission to make all of its available to the Speaker of the House of Representatives but provides that such would remain during any investigation by the House of Representatives and until such information is used in the pursuit of an impeachment of a justice or judge. This revision also removes the power of the Governor to request of the Judicial Com mission to conform to a prior constitutional change. This revision also makes technical and clarifying additions and deletions relating to the selection of chief judges of a circuit and relating to the Judicial Commission, and makes other nonsubstantive conforming and technical changes in the judicial article of the constitution. Full Text: ARTICLE V JUDICIARY SECTION 2. Administration; practice and procedure. (a) The supreme court shall adopt rules for the practice and pro cedure in all courts including the time for seeking appellate review, the administrative supervision of all courts, the transfer to the court having jurisdiction of any proceeding when the jurisdiction of another court has been improvidently invoked, and a requirement that no cause shall be dismissed because an improper remedy has been sought. The supreme court shall adopt rules to allow it the court and the district courts of appeal to submit questions relating to military law to the federal Court of Appeals for the Armed Forces for an advisory opinion. Rules of court may be repealed by general law that expresses the policy behind the repeal enacted by two-thirds vote of the membership of each house of the legislature. The court may readopt the repealed rule only in conformity with the public policy expressed by the legislature. If the legislature determines that a rule has been readopted and repeals the readopted rule, the rule may not be readopted thereafter without prior approval of the legislature. (b) The chief justice of the supreme court shall be chosen by a major ity of the members of the court; shall be the chief administrative of the judicial system; and shall have the power to assign justices or judges, including consenting retired justices or judges, to temporary duty in any court for which the judge is and to delegate to a chief judge of a judicial circuit the power to assign judges for duty in that circuit. (c) A chief judge for each district court of appeal shall be chosen by a majority of the judges thereof or, if there is no majority, by the chief jus tice. The chief judge shall be responsible for the administrative supervision of the court. (d) A chief judge in each circuit shall be chosen from among the cir cuit judges as provided by supreme court rule. The chief judge of a circuit shall be responsible for the administrative supervision of the circuit courts and county courts in the his circuit. SECTION 11. Vacancies. (a) Whenever a vacancy occurs in a judicial to which election for retention applies, the governor shall the vacancy by appointing for a term ending on the Tuesday after the Monday in January of the year following the next general election occurring at least one year after the date of appointment, one of not fewer than three persons nor more than six persons nominated by the appropriate judicial nominating commission. (b) The governor shall each vacancy on a circuit court or on a county court, wherein the judges are elected by a majority vote of the electors, by appointing for a term ending on the Tuesday after the Monday in January of the year following the next primary and general election occurring at least one year after the date of appointment, one of not fewer than three persons nor more than six persons nominated by the appropriate judicial nominating commission. An election shall be held to that judicial for the term of the beginning at the end of the appointed term. (c) The nominations shall be made within thirty days from the occur rence of a vacancy unless the period is extended by the governor for a time not to exceed thirty days. The governor shall make the appointment within sixty days after the nominations have been to the governor. (d) Each appointment of a justice of the supreme court is subject to by the senate. The senate may sit for the purpose of tion regardless of whether the house of representatives is in session or not. If the senate fails to vote on the appointment of a justice within 90 days, the justice shall be deemed If the senate votes to not the appointment, the supreme court judicial nominating commission shall reconvene as though a new vacancy had occurred but may not renominate any person whose prior appointment to the same vacancy was not by the senate. The appointment of a justice is effective upon by the senate. (e) (d) There shall be a separate judicial nominating commission as provided by general law for the supreme court, one for each district court of appeal, and one for each judicial circuit for all trial courts within the circuit. Uniform rules of procedure shall be established by the judicial nominating commissions at each level of the court system. Such rules, or any part thereof, may be repealed by general law enacted by a majority vote of the membership of each house of the legislature, or by the supreme court, justices concurring. Except for deliberations of the judicial nominating commissions, the proceedings of the commissions and their records shall be open to the public. SECTION 12. Discipline; removal and retirement. (a) JUDICIAL QUALIFICATIONS COMMISSION.A judicial commission is created. (1) There shall be a judicial commission vested with jurisdiction to investigate and recommend to the Supreme Court of Florida the removal from of any justice or judge whose conduct, during term of or otherwise, occurring on or after November 1, 1966, (without regard to the effective date of this section) demonstrates a present to hold and to investigate and recommend the discipline of a justice or judge whose conduct, during term of or otherwise occurring on or after November 1, 1966 (without regard to the effective date of this sec tion), warrants such discipline. For purposes of this section, discipline is as any or all of the following: reprimand, suspension with or without pay, or lawyer discipline. The commission shall have jurisdiction over justices and judges regarding allegations that misconduct occurred before or during service as a justice or judge if a complaint is made no later than one year following service as a justice or judge. The commission shall have jurisdiction regarding allegations of incapacity during service as a justice or judge. The commission shall be composed of: a. Two judges of district courts of appeal selected by the judges of those courts, two circuit judges selected by the judges of the circuit courts and two judges of county courts selected by the judges of those courts; b. Four electors who reside in the state, who are members of the bar of Florida, and who shall be chosen by the governing body of the bar of Florida; and c. Five electors who reside in the state, who have never held judicial or been members of the bar of Florida, and who shall be appointed by the governor. (2) The members of the judicial commission shall serve staggered terms, not to exceed six years, as prescribed by general law. No member of the commission except a judge shall be eligible for state judicial while acting as a member of the commission and for a period of two years thereafter. No member of the commission shall hold in a political party or participate in any campaign for judicial or hold public provided that a judge may campaign for judicial of and hold that The commission shall elect one of its members as its chairperson. (3) Members of the judicial commission not subject to impeachment shall be subject to removal from the commission pursuant to the provisions of Article IV, Section 7, Florida Constitution. (4) The commission shall adopt rules regulating its proceedings, the of vacancies by the appointing authorities, the of members, the rotation of members between the panels, and the temporary replacement of or incapacitated members. The commissions rules, or any part thereof, may be repealed by general law enacted by a majority vote of the membership of each house of the legislature, or by the supreme court, justices concurring. The commission shall have power to issue subpoenas. Until formal charges against a justice or judge are by the investigative panel with the clerk of the supreme court of Florida all proceedings by or before the commission shall be provided, however, upon a of probable cause and the by the investiga tive panel with said clerk of such formal charges against a justice or judge such charges and all further proceedings before the commission shall be public. (5) The commission shall have access to all information from all executive, legislative and judicial agencies, including grand juries, subject to the rules of the commission. At any time, on request of the speaker of the house of representatives or the governor, the commission shall make available to the house of representatives all information in the possession of the commission, which information shall remain during any investigation and until such information is used in the pursuit for use in consideration of impeachment or suspension, respectively. (b) PANELS.The commission shall be divided into an investiga tive panel and a hearing panel as established by rule of the commission. The investigative panel is vested with the jurisdiction to receive or initiate complaints, conduct investigations, dismiss complaints, and upon a vote of a simple majority of the panel submit formal charges to the hearing panel. The hearing panel is vested with the authority to receive and hear formal charges from the investigative panel and upon a two-thirds vote of the panel recommend to the supreme court the removal of a justice or judge or the involuntary retirement of a justice or judge for any permanent disabil ity that seriously interferes with the performance of judicial duties. Upon a simple majority vote of the membership of the hearing panel, the panel may recommend to the supreme court that the justice or judge be subject to appropriate discipline. (c) SUPREME COURT.The supreme court shall receive recom mendations from the judicial commissions hearing panel. (1) The supreme court may accept, reject, or modify in whole or in part the conclusions, and recommendations of the commission and it may order that the justice or judge be subjected to appropriate discipline, or be removed from with termination of compensation for willful or persistent failure to perform judicial duties or for other conduct unbecoming a member of the judiciary demonstrating a present to hold or be involuntarily retired for any permanent disability that seriously interferes with the performance of judicial duties. scienter or moral turpitude on the part of a justice or judge shall not be required for removal from of a justice or judge whose conduct demonstrates a present to hold After the of a formal proceeding and upon request of the investigative panel, the supreme court may suspend the justice or judge from with or without compensa tion, pending determination of the inquiry. (2) The supreme court may award costs to the prevailing party. (d) REMOVAL POWER. The power of removal conferred by this section shall be both alternative and cumulative to the power of impeach ment. (e) PROCEEDINGS INVOLVING SUPREME COURT JUSTICE. Notwithstanding any of the foregoing provisions of this section, if the

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Local A12 | The Times Thursday, August 30, 2012 cations commission is a justice of the supreme court of Florida all justices of such such court with respect to all proceedings therein concerning such person and the supreme court for such purposes shall be composed of a panel consisting of the seven chief judges of the judicial circuits of the state of Florida purposes of determining seniority of such circuit judges in the event there be judges of udges from the he panel, the next most senior chief circuit judge or judges shall serve in place of his he ef date of this article shall continue in effect until superseded in the manner the commission consistent with it: eet the by the rules of the commission provided that no member shall vote as a cations commission shall expire upon the effective date of the amend ments to this section approved by the legislature during the regular session following staggered terms: s ts of appeal g h h Selection of members by district courts of appeal judges, circ uit judges, and county court judges, shall be by no less than a maj ority of members by the board of governors of the bar of Florida shall be by no i The commission shall be entitled to recover the costs of investi he supreme j k expenses or transportation and per diem allowance as provided by general NO. 6 CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT ARTICLE I, SECTION 28 (Legislative) Ballot Title: Ballot Summary: This proposed amendment provides that public funds rage a physical disorder, physical injury, or physical illness that would place her in danger of death unless an abortion is performed, or a ca se of rape This proposed amendment provides that the State Constitution may not be interpreted to create broader rights to an abortion than those contained amendment overrules court decisions which conclude that the right of Full Text: uc (a) Public funds may not be expended for any abortion or for healthnot apply to: condition caused by or arising from the pregnancy itself, whic h would, h unless an (b) This constitution may not be interpreted to create broader rights to an abortion than those contained in the United States Consti NO. 8 CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT ARTICLE I, SECTION 3 (Legislative) Ballot Title: Ballot Summary: Proposing an amendment to the State Constitution pro of religious deleting the prohibition against using revenues from the public treasury directly or indirectly in aid of any church, sect, or religious denomination Full Text: the establishment of religion or prohibiting or penalizing the free exercise tent with Except to the extent required by the First nment nor any agent of the government may deny to any individual or entity the of religious agency thereof shall ever be taken from the public treasury directly or indirectly in aid of any church, sect, or religious denominati on or in aid of NO. 9 CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT ARTICLE VII, SECTION 6 ARTICLE XII, SECTION 32 (Legislative) Ballot Title: Ballot Summary: Proposing an amendment to the State Constitution to authorize the Legislature to provide by general law ad valorem homestead property tax relief to the surviving spouse of a military veteran who died from service-connected causes while on active duty or to the surviving ment authorizes the Legislature to totally exempt or partially exempt er a Full Text: (a) Every person who has the legal or equitable title to real estate and maintains thereon the permanent residence of the owner, or another assessed her than ent of held by legal or equitable title, by the entireties, jointly, in common, as a present ing the owners or members proprietary interest in a corporation owning a tion shall not apply with respect to any assessment roll until such roll is ion 4 by ption shall ue of the proportion which the interest in the corporation bears to the assessed value n, the ad (d) The legislature may, by general law, allow counties or munici ubject to the egal or equitable title to real estate and maintains thereon the permanent residence hold subsection, by ordinance adopted in the manner prescribed by general law, and must provide for the periodic adjustment of the income limitation prescribed in ally permanently disabled shall receive a discount from the amount of the ad valorem tax otherwise owed on homestead property the veteran owns and United States, and the veteran was honorably discharged upon separation from military count granted by this subsection, an applicant must submit to t he county rtment of bility as property appraiser denies the request for a discount, the appra iser must notify the applicant in writing of the reasons for the denial menting peci equal to the total amount or a portion of the ad valorem tax otherwise owed on homestead property to the: cted of the term: l perfor SCHEDULE ponders who surviving spouses of veterans who died from service-connected causes and NO. 10 CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT ARTICLE VII, SECTION 3 ARTICLE XII, SECTION 32 (Legislative) Ballot Title: Ballot Summary: Proposing an amendment to the State Constitution to: s, on tangible personal property if the assessed value of an owners tangible personal wide tangible personal property tax exemptions provided by the Constitu Full Text: municipality, owning property outside the municipality, may be required by general law to make payment to the taxing unit in which the property y for of a family residing in this state, household goods and persona l ef fects to every widow or widower or person who is blind or totally and perma less than nd general law grant community and economic development ad valorem tax exemptions ned by the county or municipality, and only after the electors of the county or municipality voting on such question in a referendum authorize the county apply to improvements to real property made by or for the use of a new business and improvements to real property related to the expansion of an existing business and shall also apply to tangible personal property of such new business and tangible personal property related to the expansion of an exemption may be granted to a new business or expansion of an existing exemption shall expire ten years from the date of approval by the electors of the county or municipality, and may be renewable by referendum as tive tax levy and subject to the provisions of this subsection and general emption and the requirements for eligible properties must be s (e) tangible personal property is subject to tangible personal property tax shall be exempt from Tangible personal property is also exempt from ad valorem taxation if the assessed value of such property is greater than l law (f) There shall be granted an ad valorem tax exemption for real luding real property encumbered by perpetual conservation easements or by other in, y or military r year support of military operations designated by the legislature shall receive an additional exemption equal to a percentage of the taxable value of his as the number of days during the preceding calendar year the person was or Hawaii in support of military operations designated by the legislature SCHEDULE property is exempt from tangible personal property tax if the assessed ars but less NO. 11 CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT ARTICLE VII, SECTION 6 (Legislative) Ballot Title: Ballot Summary: Proposing an amendment to the State Constitution to authorize the Legislature, by general law and subject to condit ions set forth in the general law, to allow counties and municipalities to grant an additional homestead tax exemption equal to the assessed value of an owner who has maintained permanent residency on the property for not household Full Text: (a) Every person who has the legal or equitable title to real estate and maintains thereon the permanent residence of the owner, or another assessed her than ent of held by legal or equitable title, by the entireties, jointly, in common, as a present ing the owners or members proprietary interest in a corporation owning a tion shall not apply with respect to any assessment roll until such roll is ion 4 by ption shall ue of the proportion which the interest in the corporation bears to the assessed value n, the ad (d) The legislature may, by general law, allow counties or munici ubject to the either or both of the following an ad ditional homestead tax exemptions : who has the legal or equitable title to real estate and maintains thereon the permanent residence of the owner and who has attained age s twenty thousand dollars person who has the legal or equitable title to real estate with a just value ntained thereon the permanent residence of the owner for not less tha ncome The general law must allow counties and municipalities to grant these this additional exemptions within the limits prescribed in this subsection, by ordinance adopted in the manner prescribed by ge neral ally permanently disabled shall receive a discount from the amount of the ad valorem tax otherwise owed on homestead property the veteran owns and United States, and the veteran was honorably discharged upon separation from military count granted by this subsection, an applicant must submit to t he county rtment of bility as property appraiser denies the request for a discount, the appra iser must notify the applicant in writing of the reasons for the denial menting NO. 12 CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT ARTICLE IX, SECTION 7 (Legislative) Ballot Title: Ballot Summary: Proposing an amendment to the State Constitution to of the council of state university student body presidents as the student and to Full Text: shall administer each public university and a board of governors shall versity shall be administered by a board of trustees consisting of thirteen The board of governors shall establish the powers and duties of the boards of embers ap he board student body The board shall operate, regulate, control, and be fully res ponsible for the on of each con stituent university and its articulation with free public schools and com ration of The boards management shall be subject to the powers of the legislature l account for board fourteen citizens dedicated to the purposes of the state university sioner of education, the body presidents, which council shall be organized by the board of governors and consist of all the student body presidents of the state university system president of shall also be members of

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, August 30, 2012 The Times | A13 89303 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case No.: 2010-CA-000447 CitiMortgage, Inc. Plaintiff, vs. Ronald J. Harper, CitiBank, N.A.; Magnolia Bay Homeowners Association, Inc.; Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order of Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated July 26, 2012, entered in Civil Case No. 2010-CA-000447 of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein CitiMortgage, Inc., Plaintiff and Ronald J. Harper are defendant (s), I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash AT THE WEST FRONT DOOR OF THE FRANKLIN COUNTY COURTHOUSE, LOCATED ON HWY 98, IN APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA, AT 11:00 A.M. on September 11, 2012, the following property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit: LOT 1, BLOCK B, MAGNOLIA BAY, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 6, PAGES 21 THROUGH 22, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator; 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, Florida 32301; (850) 577-4430 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification of the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. MARCIA M. JOHNSON Clerk of Court Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk Attorney for Plaintiff: ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF: SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACHE, LLP 4630 Woodland Corporate Blvd. Tampa, FL 33614 (813) 880-8888 (813) 880-8800 August 30, September 6, 2012 89267 PUBLIC NOTICE Request for Proposal The Camp Gordon Johnston Association, a 501 (c) 3 Corporation is seeking design and engineering proposals for the creation of a Memorial Park honoring the WWII Soldiers who trained in Amphibious warfare at Camp Gordon Johnston in Franklin County. Proposals should be submitted, in writing, by September 30th. Complete details can be found on our website at http:// www.campgordonjohnston.co m/quote.htm Available funding will determine the feasibility of this proposal. Veteran-owned and businesses hiring veterans are encouraged to respond. August 30, 2012 88709T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 11-000078-CA Ameris Bank, as successor to the Central Bank of Georgia, a Georgia Banking Corporation, Plaintiff, vs. Estate of Andreww Scott Cobb, Deceased, University Internal Medicine, Credit Bureau of Southwest Georgia, Inc. Jesus M. Ramirez, MD Panhandle Anesthesiologists, Inc. Phoebe Putney c/o Robert L. Kraselky Gulf County EMS Credit Bureau of Panama City, Ltd. Bay Medical ER Physicians Rao, Reddy, Alibibi and Finlaw, MD Ray Radiology Associates, P.A. Practice Plus of SW Georgia, SWCA-P Bay Pharmacokinetic Associates, Bay Pathology Associates, P.A. Emerals Coast Gastroenterology Associates, P.A. Florida Inpt Medicines Assoc. LLC, Cardiology Associates, P.A. Panhandle Emergency Physicians Bay Medical Center Deb Bense, Esq., Guardian Ad Litem For Holland Elizabeth Cobb, and Cardiology Associates, P.A. Defendants. NOTICE OF JUDICIAL SALE PURSUANT TO SECTION 45.031(1) OF THE FLORIDA STATUTES TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosures entered on July 26, 2012, in Case Number 11-78-CA of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit Court, will sell at public sale the following described real property: Lot 8, Block 141 (Old Black F), Range 9, Picketts Addition to the City of Carrabelle, a subdivision as per map or plat thereof in Plat Book 2, Page 20 of the public records of Franklin County, Florida. The sale will be held on September 11, 2012, at 11:00 A.M. (Eastern Time) to the highest and best bidder for cash, at the Second Floor Lobby of the Franklin County Courthouse in Apalachicola, Florida, in accordance with Section 45.031 of the Florida Statutes. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 30th day of July, 2012. MARCIA M. JOHNSON Clerk of Court By: Michele Maxwell As Deputy Clerk August 23, 30, 2012 88920T IN THE CIRCUIT CIVIL COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 2009-CA-000661 CITIMORTGAGE, INC. Plaintiff, vs. EDITH A. PATERSON, ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT (S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES OR OTHER CLAIMANTS, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND UNKNOWN TENANTS/OWNERS, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given, pursuant to Final Judgment of Foreclosure for Plaintiff entered in this case on, in the Circuit Court of Franklin County, Florida, I will sell the property situated in Franklin County, Florida described as: COMMENCE AT AN OLD TERRA COTTA MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 27, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA AND THENCE RUN NORTH ALONG THE WEST BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION 27 A DISTANCE OF 1628.05 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 21 SECONDS EAST 900.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING, THENCE RUN SOUTH 77 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 24 SECONDS EAST 442.3 9 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 12 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 44 SECONDS WEST 260.50 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 84 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 50 SECONDS WEST 375.02 FEET TO THE CENTERLINE OF A 60.00 FOOT ROADWAY EASEMENT; THENCE RUN SOUTH ALONG SAID CENTERLINE 188.51 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING CONTAINING 2.00 ACRES MORE OR LESS. SUBJECT TO AN ACCESS EASEMENT OVER AND ACROSS THE NORTHERLY AND WESTERLY 30.00 FEET THEREOF. TOGETHER WITH A NON-EXCLUSIVE EASEMENT FOR INGRESS AND EGRESS, UTILITIES AND PURPOSES COMMONLY ASSOCIATED WITH ACCESS WAYS OVER, ACROSS AND WITHIN: (A) A STRIP 60 FEET WIDE TERMINATING IN A CUL-DE-SAC WITH 50 FOOT RADIUS, LYING 30 FEET ON EACH SIDE OF THE FOLLOWING CENTERLINE AND CONTINUATION THEREOF, TO-WIT: COMMENCE AT AN OLD TERRA COTTA MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 27, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA AND THENCE RUN NORTH ALONG THE WEST BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION 27 A DISTANCE OF 1628.05 FEET; THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 21 SECONDS EAST 900.00 FEET; THENCE RUN NORTH 587.75 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 84 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 50 SECONDS EAST 1129.33 FEET TO THE WESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF A & N RAILROAD FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING THENCE RUN NORTH 84 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 50 SECONDS WEST 1129.33 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 1055.80 FEET TO THE CENTER POINT OF CUL-DE-SAC HAVING A 50.00 FOOT RADIUS AND THE TERMINATION POINT OF SAID CENTERLINE AND; (B) A STRIP OF 60 FEET WIDE DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT AN OLD TERRA COTTA MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 27, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA AND THENCE RUN NORTH ALONG THE WEST BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION 27 A DISTANCE OF 2976.35 FEET; THENCE RUN NORTH 51 DEGREES 16 MINUTES 32 SECONDS EAST 1574.83 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE NORTH 51 DEGREES 16 MINUTES 32 SECONDS EAST 62.75 FEET TO THE WESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY OF THE A & N RAILROAD; THENCE RUN SOUTH 21 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 35 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY 1987.50 FEET TO THE INTERSECTION WITH THE NORTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY OF A 60.00 FOOT ROADWAY EASEMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 84 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 50 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID NORTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY 67.27 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 21 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 35 SECONDS WEST 1938.70 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, AND; (C) A STRIP 60 FEET WIDE DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: RUNNING NORTHWESTERLY FROM THE NORTHERLY END OF THE RIGHT-OF-WAY DESCRIBED IN (B) ABOVE, LYING ADJACENT TO THE RIGHT OF WAY OF THE A & N RAILROAD AND BLUFF ROAD TO INTERSECT WITH THE EXISTING “BORROW PIT” ROAD, BEING THAT RIGHT OF WAY RESERVED TO GRANTOR IN DEED OF DECEMBER 14, 1994, FROM GRANTOR HEREIN TO OLAN B. WARD AND WIFE MARTHA PEARL WARD, FURTHER DESCRIBED AS: COMMENCE AT AN OLD TERRA COTTA MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 27, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA AND THENCE RUN NORTH ALONG THE WEST BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION 27 A DISTANCE OF 2976.35 FEET; THENCE RUN NORTH 51 DEGREES 16 MINUTES 32 SECONDS EAST 1574.83 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE NORTH 51 DEGREES 16 MINUTES 32 SECONDS EAST 62.75 FEET TO THE WESTERLY-RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF BLUFF ROAD; THENCE RUN NORTH 21 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 35 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 100.00 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 51 DEGREES 16 MINUTES 32 SECONDS WEST 62.75 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 21 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 35 SECONDS EAST 100.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING CONTAINING 0.14 OF AN ACRE, MORE OR LESS. LESS AND EXCEPT THE FOLLOWING: COMMENCE AT AN OLD TERRA COTTA MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 27, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN NORTH ALONG THE WEST BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION 27 A DISTANCE OF 1628.05 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 21 SECONDS EAST 900.00 FEET TO THE CENTERLINE OF A 60.00 FOOT ACCESS EASEMENT FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING THENCE RUN NORTH ALONG SAID CENTERLINE 188.51 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 84 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 50 SECONDS EAST 214.94 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 218.47 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 77 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 24 SECONDS WEST 219.69 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING CONTAINING 1.00 ACRE, MORE OR LESS. SUBJECT TO AN ACCESS EASEMENT OVER AND ACROSS THE WESTERLY 30.00 FEET AND THE NORTHERLY 20.00 FEET THEREOF. TOGETHER WITH A NON-EXCLUSIVE EASEMENT FOR INGRESS AND EGRESS, UTILITIES AND PURPOSES COMMONLY ASSOCIATED WITH ACCESS WAYS OVER, ACROSS AND WITHIN: (A) A STRIP 60 FEET WIDE TERMINATING IN A CUL-DE-SAC WITH 50 FOOT RADIUS, LYING 3 0 FEET ON EACH SIDE OF THE FOLLOWING CENTERLINE AND CONTINUATION THEREOF, TO-WIT: COMMENCE AT AN OLD TERRA COTTA MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 27, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA AND THENCE RUN NORTH ALONG THE WEST BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION 27 A DISTANCE OF 1628.05 FEET; THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 21 SECONDS EAST 900.00 FEET; THENCE RUN NORTH 587.75 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 84 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 50 SECONDS EAST 1129.33 FEET TO THE WESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF A & N RAILROAD FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING THENCE RUN NORTH 84 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 50 SECONDS WEST 1129.33 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 1055.80 FEET TO THE CENTERPOINT OF CUL-DE-SAC HAVING A 50.00 FOOT RADIUS AND THE TERMINATION POINT OF SAID CENTERLINE, AND; (B) A STRIP OF 60 FEET WIDE DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT AN OLD TERRA COTTA MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 27, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA AND THENCE RUN NORTH ALONG THE WEST BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION 27 A DISTANCE OF 2976.35 FEET; THENCE RUN NORTH 51 DEGREES 16 MINUTES 32 SECONDS EAST 1574.83 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE NORTH 51 DEGREES 16 MINUTES 32 SECONDS EAST 62.75 FEET TO THE WESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY OF THE A & N RAILROAD; THENCE RUN SOUTH 21 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 35 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY 1987.50 FEET TO THE INTERSECTION WITH THE NORTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY OF A 60.00 FOOT ROADWAY EASEMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 84 DEGREES 4 8 MINUTES 50 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID NORTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY 67.27 FEET, THENCE RUN SCHEDULE A NORTH 21 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 35 SECONDS WEST 1938.70 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, AND; (C) A STRIP 60 FEET WIDE DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: RUNNING NORTHWESTERLY FROM THE NORTHERLY END OF THE RIGHT-OF-WAY DESCRIBED IN (B) ABOVE, LYING ADJACENT TO THE RIGHT OF WAY OF THE A & N RAILROAD AND BLUFF ROAD TO INTERSECT WITH THE EXISTING “BORROW PIT” ROAD, BEING THAT RIGHT OF WAY RESERVED TO GRANTOR IN DEED OF DECEMBER 14, 1994, FROM GRANTOR HEREIN TO OLAN B. WARD AND WIFE MARTHA PEARL WARD, FURTHER DESCRIBED AS: COMMENCE AT AN OLD TERRA COTTA MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 27, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA AND THENCE RUN NORTH ALONG THE WEST BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION 27 A DISTANCE OF 2976.35 FEET; THENCE RUN NORTH 51 DEGREES 16 MINUTES 32 SECONDS EAST 1574.83 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE NORTH 51 DEGREES 16 MINUTES 32 SECONDS EAST 62.75 FEET TO THE WESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF BLUFF ROAD; THENCE RUN NORTH 21 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 35 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 100.00 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 51 DEGREES 16 MINUTES 32 SECONDS WEST 62.75 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 21 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 35 SECONDS EAST 100.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING CONTAINING 0.14 OF AN ACRE, MORE OR LESS. and commonly known as: 258 PARADISE LANE, APALACHICOLA, FL 32320’ including the building, appurtenances, and fixtures located therein, at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, at the front door steps of the Courthouse, at 33 Market St., in Apalachicola, Florida, on September 6, 2012, at 11:00. Any persons claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 26th day of July, 2012. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of the Circuit Court Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk August 23, 30, 2012 88799T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION Case No.: 12-000044-CP IN RE: ESTATE OF GAYE PHIPPS LASS Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of GAYE PHIPPS LASS deceased, File Number 12-44, is pending in the Circuit Court for Franklin County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida 32320. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, on whom a copy of this notice is served must file their claims with the Court WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTIONS 733.702 AND 733.710, OR BE FOREVER BARRED. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 AND 733.710. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is August 23, 2012. Personal Representative: SHANNON WILSON 5420 La Patera Lane Las Vegas, Nevada 89149-6411 Attorney for Personal Representative: Steve M. Watkins, III 41 Commerce Street Apalachicola, FL 32320 (850) 653-1949 Fla Bar No.: 0794996 August 23, 30, 2012 88957T IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT NORTHERN DISTRICT OF FLORIDA TALLAHASSEE DIVISION CASE NO.: 4:12-CV-00053-RHWCS CENTENNIAL BANK, Plaintiff, vs. KEVIN R. GABY a/k/a KEVIN RILEY GABY; KERRY R. GABY; and WILDWOOD COUNTRY CLUB PROPERTY OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that under and by virtue of a Judgment of Foreclosure rendered in the abovestyled case on June 5, 2012, by the United States District Court For The Northern District Of Florida, in favor of the Plaintiff, and the Amendment to Judgment of Foreclosure entered July 10, 2012, by the United States District Court For The Northern District Of Florida, the undersigned, appointed in said decree, will on the 10th day of September, 2012 at 12:00 p.m. (Eastern Time), at the main foyer in the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327, offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the highest bidder, the following described property, situated, lying and being in Wakulla County and Franklin County, Florida: SEE EXHIBITS A, B AND C ATTACHED HERETO. EXHIBIT A COMMENCE AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 13, TOWNSHIP 4 SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND ALSO MARKING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF WOODLAND PARK SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 82 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 16 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARY OF SAID NORTHWEST QUARTER AND THE NORTH BOUNDARY OF SAID WOODLAND PARK SUBDIVISION 1575.73 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 34 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID SOUTH BOUNDARY OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER AND ALONG SAID NORTH BOUNDARY OF WOODLAND PARK SUBDIVISION 480.95 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE NORTH 89 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 34 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID SOUTH BOUNDARY OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER AND ALONG SAID NORTH BOUNDARY OF WOODLAND PARK SUBDIVISION AND AN EXTENSION THEREOF 386.57 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT ON THE WESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 319, THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 21 MINUTES 07 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 225.76 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 34 SECONDS WEST 385.15 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 17 SECONDS WEST 225.76 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. Together with all rights, easements, appurtenances, royalties, mineral rights, oil and gas rights, crops, timber, all diversion payments or third party payments made to crop producers, and all existing and future improvements, structures, fixtures, and replacements that may now, or at any time in the future, be part of the real estate described above (all referred to as “Property”). The term Property also includes, but is not limited to, any and all water wells, water, ditches, reservoirs, reservoir sites and dams located on the real estate and all riparian and water rights associated with the Property, however established. EXHIBIT B Parcel 1: Lot 21 of Wildwood Country Club, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 3, Page(s) 35, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Parcel 2: Lot 10, Block E of Sopchoppy River Subdivision, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page(s) 27, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida.

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A14| The Times Thursday, August 30, 2012 CLASSIFIEDS North Historic District 5th Street building lot. $29,000 obo. 60 x 100. Corner lot. Brokers protected (404) 218-0077 A GREAT BUY! Scenic Cruiser, 1993. Gulfstream, 34 ft, One slide out. $5,000. This is a steal! Needs some TLC. 850-653-5077. 2008 Harley Davidson Street Glide Anniversay Edition9,700 miles. Copper/ Black. In Excellent condition w/Rinehart Exhaust, Power Commander, ABS, Security, Extra Headlights, 2 Seats, many other options. Always garage kept and well maintaned. Original owner. Only $17,000, sold new for over $27,000.850-723-4642 3530415 BidNowFL.com 866-539-9544 OPENHouseTODAY: Sunday,August26;1-3pm Upto2% toBuyer  s Agents !€NoBackTaxesorLiens €InsurableTitle HOMEAUCTION €137GeorgiaSt.,Crestview 3BR,2BA,1637SFHOME SellingOnSite:Tues,Sep4,3:30PM €4300BayPtRd,#417,PanamaCty2BR,2BA,1300SFHOME SellingOnSite:Wed,Sept5,10AMH&MCQ1035357,AB110; B.G.Hudson,Jr., BK3006464,AU230 FLBank-OwnedHOMES RENTALS3 BEDROOM, 3 BATH CONDO UNFURNISHED, POOL ................................$800 1 BR, 1 BATH UNFURNISHED APT LANARK, REMODELED, INC WATER ..........$425 2 BEDROOM, 1 BATH UNFURNISHED APT LANARK .........................................................$400 2 BR, 1 BATH, UNFURNISHED APT. W/D HOOKUP, SMALL PORCH ............................$375 1 BR 1 BATH FURNISHED APT. SUNROOM, W/D, LANARK UTILITIES INCLUDED .........$650 3 BR, 2 BATH, UNFURNISHED HOUSE, WOOD FENCED YARD ...............................................$600 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322850-697-9604 850-323-0444 www.seacrestre.comwww. rst tness.com/carrabellePROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND RENTALS SEEKING RENTALRetired professional is couple seeking a furnished apartment in Apalach historic district or houseboat rental February & March. Please reply to Peter and Pam by email stoneoak2003 @yahoo.com or call at: 413-219-4409. 3 br, 2 ba, Very Nice Mobile Home 197 Old Ferry Dock Rd. in Eastpoint. Dishwasher, W/D, CH&A Jacuzzi tub 1 acre lot, with lawn maintenance Nice location, No Pets or Smoking. $650 mo 1st & last, $300 deposit Call 850-670-8460 Walk to Bay or State Forest 2BR, 2BA, SW on 1 acre. $550/mo, $550 dep, plus elec and garbage. References and rental history required. Call (813) 546-6987. Text FL22520 to 56654 Heritage V illas of Apalachicola Apartments Now accepting applications for 2BR Some rental assistance may be available. HUD vouchers accepted. Call 850-653-9277. TDD/ TTY 711. This institution is an equal opportunity provider & employer. Lanark Village Carlton St. #6, 1 Br 1 Ba, All Tile, Walk-in Closet, Landlord pays Electric and Water, $600 month + $300 deposit. Call 850-927-2838 or 864-356-5949 Lanark Village: Clean 2 bedroom, 1 bath, screened porch, AC, 7 months min. $500 monthly + $350. security deposit, references required Pets-will consider. Non smoking. Call: 850-212-2063 Text FL18819 to 56654 Studio Apt. Furnished Upstairs StudioQuiet location, Water & Electric incl. Walk to Dwntwn. $650+Dep N/P or N/S For appt 653-9116 or 320-1174 St. George Island $175 week, Electric, Satellite, Garbage incl. Pool tble. 12’ X 65’ deck w/Beautiful view 850-653-5114 St. George Island 2Br, 1Ba, ground floor apt. furnish or unfurnished, 12’ x 65’ Deck. $275/per week Call 850-653-5114 1 BRCottageH/AC in Apalachicola, FL. 850-643-7740. Carabelle: (in town) 3 bdrm 2 bath older home. Freshly painted. $700 per month + dep. Call (850) 766-4357 Text FL19365 to 56654 Carabelle: 3 bdr 2 bath with large spare room on 1 acre. Fenced yard, new tile throughout, freshly painted. $800 per month + dep. Call (850) 766-4357 Text FL19355 to 56654 East Point Carrabelle 900 Square ft designer 1bedroom, open plan, Jacuzzi, washer & dryer, satellite, secluded, 1/2 mile from beach. $440/month. Call 954-816-7004 Text FL22547 to 56654 Lanark Village3br 2ba home, near water, lg fence yard, $600 mo. 850-545-8813 ToPlace Your Classified ad inCall Our New Numbers Now!Call:850-747-5020 Toll Free:800-345-8688 Fax:850-747-5044 Email:thestar@pcnh.com Email:thetimes@pcnh.com theAPALACHICOLA & CARRABELLETIMES CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW Springer Spaniel Pups, 4 wks old, Pure Bred w/papers ava., $400 each; 727-580-1160 YORKIE AKCregistered. 9 weeks old adorable puppies only 2 females left. They are Health Certified and have 1st shots. $500 ea. Mom & dad on premise. Please call 850-774-1229 Panama City Area Parcel 3: Lots 1, 2, 3, and 4, Block B of Sopchoppy River Subdivision, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page(s) 27, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Less and Except: that part of Lots 1 and 4, Block B of Sopchoppy River Subdivision, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page(s) 27, deeded to the State of Florida, recorded 12/19/1973 in Official Records Book 39, Page 784, Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Parcel 4: Lots 26 and 27, Block O of Lanark Beach Unit No. 1, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 2, Page(s) 13, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. Together with all rights, easements, appurtenances, royalties, mineral rights, oil and gas rights, all water and riparian rights, ditches, and water stock and all existing and future improvements, structures, and replacements that may now, or at any time the future, be part of the real estate described above (all referred to as “Property”). EXHIBIT C BEGIN AT CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 13, TOWNSHIP 4 SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 35 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE EAST BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION 13 A DISTANCE OF 726.15 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT ON THE EDGE OF SWIRL SWAMP, THENCE RUN ALONG THE EDGE OF SAID SWIRL SWAMP AS FOLLOWS: NORTH 70 DEGREES 26 MINUTES 22 SECONDS EAST 282.08 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE SOUTH 82 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 08 SECONDS EAST 213.59 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE NORTH 83 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 52 SECONDS EAST 107.30 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE NORTH 25 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 52 SECONDS EAST 97.25 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE NORTH 83 DEGREES 19 MINUTES 31 SECONDS EAST 125.54 FEET TO CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE NORTH 46 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 12 SECONDS EAST 243.65 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE NORTH 70 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 52 SECONDS EAST 190.70 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE NORTH 45 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 32 SECONDS EAST 152.83 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE NORTH 75 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 12 SECONDS EAST 285.84 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE NORTH 62 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 36 SECONDS EAST 133.29 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE LEAVING SAID SWAMP’S EDGE RUN SOUTH 02 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 56 SECONDS WEST 3340.12 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 73 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 1530.27 FEET TO AN OLD AXLE ON THE EAST BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION 13, THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 36 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID EAST BOUNDARY 834.01 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 24 SECONDS EAST 280.50 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 36 SECONDS WEST 1560.24 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 24 SECONDS WEST 280.50 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SITUATE, LYING AND BEING IN LOTS 86 AND 87 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. LESS AND EXCEPT THE FOLLOWING: COMMENCE AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 13, TOWNSHIP 4 SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 24 SECONDS EAST 280.50 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 36 SECONDS WEST 131.30 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 24 SECONDS EAST 330.00 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 36 SECONDS EAST 660.00 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 24 SECONDS WEST 330.00 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 36 SECONDS WEST 528.70 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH ACCESS OVER AND ACROSS THAT CERTAIN EASEMENT RECORDED OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 191, PAGE 350 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. Together with all rights, easements, appurtenances, royalties, mineral rights, oil and gas rights, crops, timber, all diversion payments or third party payments made to crop producers, and all existing and future improvements, structures, fixtures, and replacements that may now, or at any time in the future, be part of the real estate described above (all referred to as “Property”). The term Property also includes, but is not limited to, any and all water wells, water, ditches, reservoirs, reservoir sites and dams located on the real estate and all riparian and water rights associated with the Property, however established. For additional information concerning the above property contact: STEPHEN A. PITRE, ESQUIRE, Post Office Box 13010, Pensacola, Florida 325913010 or (850) 434-9200. All sales are subject to confirmation of the court. Method of payment is by postal money order or certified check made payable to the U.S. Marshal Service. Ten (10) Percent of High/ Acceptable bid in certified check or cashier’s check (NO CASH) will be accepted with the balance due within 48 hours. No cash will be accepted. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim with the Clerk of the Court within 60 days after the sale. In accordance with the AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT, persons needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact Stephen A. Pitre, Esquire, Post Office Box 13010, Pensacola, Florida 32591-3010 or (850) 434-9200 not later than seven days prior to the sale to ensure that reasonable accommodations are available. Ed Spooner United States Marshal Northern District of Florida Dated: August 8, 2012 By: Ed Spooner U.S. Marshals Service August 16, 23, 30 September 6, 2012 89177T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY CASE NO.: 12-000006-CA HANKCOCK BANK, a Mississippi banking corporation, as assignee of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, as Receiver for Peoples First Community Bank, a Florida banking corporation, Plaintiff, vs. KIMBERLY WILKINS COFFMAN a/k/a KIMBERLY G. WILKINS, an individual, DEREK GREG COFFMAN. SR., an individual, BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, a political subdivision, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the undersigned Clerk of the Circuit Court of Franklin County, Florida, pursuant to the Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure, entered in this case, will sell the property at public sale to the highest bidder for cash, except as set forth hereinafter, on September 6, 2012, at 11:00 am Eastern Time at the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida, in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes, the following described real property lying and being in Franklin County, Florida, to-wit: A parcel of land in Fractional Section 30, Township 7 South, Range 4 West, Franklin County, Florida, shown as Lot 5, Block A, on an unrecorded plat prepared by L.G. Flanagon, Registered Surveyor, for Charles L. McKissack, described as follows: Commence at the Northwesterly corner of McKissack Beach Subdivision, according to the plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 13, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida, and run thence South 13 degrees 01 minute 00 second West a distance of 400 feet, to the Southwesterly corner of said subdivision, thence run South 78 degrees 49 minutes 00 seconds West a distance of 493.5 feet to a point, which is the POINT OF BEGINNING of the lands to be described; from said POINT OF BEGINNING continue South 78 degrees 49 minutes West a distance of 50 feet, thence run North 10 degrees 47 minutes 00 seconds West a distance of 116 feet, to an unnamed 30 foot street (known as First Avenue and/or Spacey Street), thence run North 76 degrees 32 minutes 00 seconds East along said street line 50.05 feet, thence run South 10 degrees 47 minutes 00 seconds East a distance of 118 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. This Notice dated this 27th day of July, 2012. Marcia Johnson Franklin County Clerk of Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk August 23, 30, 2012 89291T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2009-CA-000273 YALE MORTGAGE CORPORATION, a Florida corporation, Plaintiff, vs. THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES AND ALL OTHER PERSONS CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE REAL PROPERTY WHICH IS THE SUBJECT MATTER OF THIS ACTION BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST JERRY A. SAMUELLS, DECEASED; JOHN DOE and JANE DOE, unknown parties in possession, if any, Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION IN MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE TO: THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES AND ALL OTHER PERSONS CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE REAL PROPERTY WHICH IS THE SUBJECT MATTER OF THIS ACTION BY THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST JERRY A. SAMUELLS, DECEASED; Last Known Address: 2314 Eisenhower Drive Tallahassee, FL 32310 and 5850 East Milton Road Milton, FL 32583 YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following real property in Franklin County, Florida: Lot 12, Block 82, St. George Island Gulf Beaches No. 5, according to the map or plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 3, Page 16, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it, on Eric R. Schwartz, Esquire, Weitz & Schwartz, P.A., Plaintiffs’ Attorney, whose address is 900 S.E. 3rd Avenue, Suite 204, Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33316 30 days of the first publication of this notice and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiff’s attorneys or immediately thereafter, otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Mortgage Foreclosure Complaint. DATED this August 16, 2012. MARCIA JOHNSON As Clerk of the Court By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk August 30, September 6, 2012 89287T NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE BY CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT Notice is hereby given that the undersigned, MARCIA JOHNSON, Clerk of the Circuit Court of Franklin County, Florida, will on the 3rd of October, 2012, at 11:00 a.m. Eastern Time, at the Second Floor Lobby of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, in the city of Apalachicola, Florida, offer for sale, and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder, the following described real and personal property situated in Franklin County, Florida: LOT 5 AND 5A, SOUND BREEZE SUBDIVISION, ACCORING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 8, PAGE 44, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. Together with all rights, easements, appurtenances, royalties, mineral rights, oil and gas rights, crops, timber, all diversion payments or third party payments made to crop producers, and all existing and future improvements, structures, fixtures, and replacements that may now, or at any time in the future, be part of the real estate described above (all referred to as “Property”). The term Property also includes, but is not limited to, any and all water wells, water, ditches, reservoirs, reservoir sites and dams located on the real estate and all riparian and water rights associated with the Property, however established. pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure as to Count I in a case pending in said Court, the style of which is: CENTENNIAL BANK, Plaintiff, vs. COASTAL BLUE WATERS, PROPERTIES, LLC, a/k/a COASTAL BLUE WATERS PROPERTIES, LLC, LEON D. HUMPHRIES, and PAUL S. LOWE, Defendants, and the docket number of which is 11-000024-CA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim with the clerk of the court within 60 days after the sale. In accordance with the AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT, persons needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact Stephen A. Pitre, Esquire, Post Office Box 13010, Pensacola, Florida 32591-3010 not later than seven days prior to the proceeding to ensure that reasonable accommodations are available. WITNESS my hand and the official seal of this Honorable Court this 20th day of August, 2012. MARCIA JOHNSON Clerk of the Circuit Court Franklin County, Florida By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk August 30, September 6, 2012 89295T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 19-2009-CA-000683 DIVISION: SUNTRUST MORTGAGE, INC., Plaintiff, vs. DEBORAH H. NEWMAN et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated July 25, 2012, and entered in Case No. 19-2009-CA000683 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for FRANKLIN County, Florida wherein SUNTRUST MORTGAGE, INC. is the Plaintiff and DEBORAH H. NEWMAN; THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF DEBORAH H. NEWMAN N/K/A JOHN DOE; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at FRONT DOOR OF THE FRANKLIN COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 33 MARKET STREET, APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA at 11:00AM, on the 24th day of October, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT 17, BLOCK I, ST. GEORGE ISLAND GULF BEACHES, UNIT NO. 2, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, AT PAGE 15, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 941 E GORRIE DRIVE, ST GEORGE ISLAND, FL 32328 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on _July 25, 2012. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Marcia M. Johnson Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Mr. Doug Smith, Office of Court Administration, Leon County Courthouse, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301, Phone: 850577-4401, Fax: 850487-7947. F09116584 August 30, September 6, 2012 89329T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL DISTRICT IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF FRANKLIN PROBATE DIVISION File No.: 12-00033CP IN RE: ESTATE OF DIANA PATRICIA CURRAN Also Known As TRISHA CURRAN Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the Estate of DIANA PATRICIA CURRAN, also known as TRISHA CURRAN. Deceased, whose date of death was January 22, 2011, is pending in the Circuit Court for Franklin County Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, Florida 32320, under File Number 12-00033CP. The name and address of the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against the decedent’s estate, on whom a copy of this Notice is required to be served must file their claims with this Court, WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR WITHIN THIRTY (30) DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against the decedent’s estate, must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION Of THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE: DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is August 30, 2012. Personal Representative: JOHN J. CURRAN 92 Warner Street, Unit #2 Newport, Rhode Island 02840 Attorney for Personal Representative: Paul J. Bupivi FL Bar No. 94635 LAWRENCE & ASSOCIATES 1990 Main Street Suite 750 Sarasota, FL 34236 (941) 404-6360 Fax: (941) 269-8689 August 30 September 6, 2012 89297T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 19-2010-CA-000194 DIVISION: CHASE HOME FINANCE LLC, Plaintiff, vs. MATTHEW MCCULLOUGH, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated July 25, 2012, and entered in Case No. 19-2010-CA000194 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for FRANKLIN County, Florida wherein JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO CHASE HOME FINANCE LLC1, is the Plaintiff and MATTHEW MCCULLOUGH; DANIELLE MCCULLOUGH; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT (S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSE, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; FRANKLIN COUNTY; TENANT #1 N/K/A DONALD DEMPSEY are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at FRONT DOOR OF THE FRANKLIN COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 33 MARKET STREET, APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA at 11:00AM, on the 7th day of November, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT 4 BLOCK 187, KEOUGH’S SECOND ADDITION TO THE TOWN OF CARRABELLE, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 20, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 908 NE 6TH STREET, CARRABELLE, FL 32322 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on July 26, 2012. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Mr. Doug Smith, Office of Court Administration, Leon County Courthouse, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 Phone: 850577-4401, Fax: 850487-7947. F10016145 August 30, September 6, 2012 Publisher’s Notice “SCAM “To avoid possible scams, it is recommended that consumers should verify caller information when receiving calls regarding credit card payments. Consumers should also contact the local company themselves instead of giving this information to individuals who are contacting them directly.

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, August 30, 2012 The Times | A15 Tips Provided by the 1.Be thorough – carefully read and answer all questions. If not applicable, mark n/a. 2.When an application asks for professional references, it means the employer wants contacts who can evaluate your work performance. Don’t list your best friend, your father-in-law, etc., unless you have worked with them. 3.Explain any gaps in your employment, such as furthering your education, working from home, etc. 4.If you have little or no work history, don’t hesitate to list volunteer positions you have held. 5.If applying for a management or supervisory job, it’s a good idea to have a resume which will list past work history and skills required for such a position. 6.CHECK SPELLING. Even when applying for an entry-level job, spelling, grammar and correct word usage are steps in the right direction. Tips for completing an employment application: Logistics/TransportClass-A CDL Flatbed DriversHome on the weekends! All Miles PAID (Loaded & Empty)! Lease to Own-No Money Down CALL: 888-880-5911 AIRLINE CAREERS BEGIN HERE -Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualified. Housing available. Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-206-9405 ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINEfrom Home. Medical, Business, Criminal Justice Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 866-467-0054 www.CenturaOnline.com Food Svc/HospitalityPT Counter Help/Sandwich Makerminimum age 18 apply in person at 88 Tallahassee st. Carrabelle web id 34221840 text FL21840 to 56654 Classified Advertising works hard ...filling the employment needs of area business firms, helping people to meet their prospective employers, helping people buy and sell all kinds of goods and services, and much more! Nothing works harder than the Classifieds! 747-5020 REPRESENTATIVES will be at the PORT ST. JOE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE on Tuesdays & Thursdays from 9 am – 1 pm EST accepting applications for numerous open positions.We offer competitive wages and a comprehensive bene t package including Company paid health, dental, and life insurance, 401(k), attendance & safety bonuses.EOE/Drug Free WorkplaceEASTERN SHIPBUILDING GROUP MORE THAN A JOB… A FUTURE! emeraldcoastjobs.com Employment Today By ROBERT ORDONAMonster Contributing Writer Savvy job seekers know how important choosing the right words is when communicating with prospective employers. But what about nonverbal communication? You could be saying how great you are, but your body could be giving your true feelings away,Ž says Alison Craig, image consultant and author of Hello Job! How to Psych Up, Suit Up & Show Up. Mark Bowden, author of Winning Body Language, agrees with Craig „ and with the highly regarded Mehrabian communication study, which found that if whats coming out of your mouth doesnt match what your body is saying, your audience is more likely to believe your body. Heres some expert advice on how to effectively let your body do the talking in a j ob interview:Making a great entranceCraig and Bowden agree that the interview starts even before you get to the interview room. You dont know who could be in the parking lot with you, looking at you from a window or standing next to you in the elevator,Ž says Craig. Your body should tell anyone who might be watching that youre confident and calm. Its not the time to be frantically searching through your portfolio for printouts of your resume.ŽShow your good sideHiring managers often ask receptionists for their take on people who come to the office for interviews, so Bowden suggests letting them observe you without letting on that you know they are watching. Sit with your profile to them,Ž he says. It makes them feel comfortable, and if theyre comfortable, theyre more likely to form a good impression.Ž Craig suggests trying to predict the direction your interviewer will come from, so you can sit facing that direction. It will make the greeting more graceful.First impressionsWhile waiting, dont hunch your shoulders or tuck your chin into your chest, which will make you seem closed off. Sit with your back straight and your chest open „ signs you are confident and assertive. But dont take this to the extreme,Ž cautions Bowden. Elongating your legs or throwing your arm across the back of the chair can make you appear too comfortable, even arrogant.Ž Also, says Craig, dont have so much stuff on your lap that you are clumsily moving everything aside when you are called. You want to rise gracefully, without dropping things, so you can smoothly greet the person coming to get you.Shake it „ dont break itJob interviews mean handshakes „ so what are the secrets to the perfect handshake? The overly aggressive shake, or death grip,Ž as Craig calls it, can be as off-putting as the limp handshake, so practice with a friend before the interview to find the right balance. You are going to be shaking with your right hand, so prepare by arranging your belongings on your left side. Offer your hand with the palm slightly up so your interviewers hand covers yours. Its a sign that youre giving them status,Ž says Bowden. And never cover the other persons hand with the hand youre not shaking with „ it can be interpreted as a sign of domination.Important stepsThe walk to the interview is the perfect time to use body language. Always follow that person, whether the person is the hiring manager or an assistant, to show you understand the protocol. You are saying, Im the job candidate, and youre the company representative „ I follow your lead.Ž Bowden adds that you should try to mirrorŽ that persons tempo and demeanor. It shows you can easily fit into the environment,Ž he says.At the interview deskIn the interview room, its OK to place a slim portfolio on the table, especially if you will be presenting its contents, but put you r other belongings on the floor beside you. Holding a briefcase or handbag on your lap will make you seem as though you are trying to create a barrier around yourself, cautions Craig. Avoid leaning forward, which makes you appear closed off, Bowden says. Instead, he advises sitting up straight and displaying your neck, chest and stomach area „ to signal that you are open. When gesturing with your hands, Craig says, you always should keep them above the desk and below the collarbone. Any higher and youre going to appear frantic,Ž she says. Bowden advises that you keep your hands even lower, in what he calls the truth planeŽ „ an area that fans out 180 degrees from your navel. Gesturing from here communicates that youre centered, controlled and calm „ and that you want to help,Ž he says. Its fine to sit about a foot away from the table so that your gestures are visible, he says.Looking for a job? Use your bod y Featured Jobs To Place An Employment Here Please Contact Lorna Brown Phone: (850) 747-5019 € Email: lbrown@pcnh.com Like Us On Facebook: www.facebook.com/emcoastjobs Or Follow Us on Twitter: @emcoastjobs

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Local A16 | The Times Thursday, August 30, 2012 Our local real estate experts have identied what they feel are the best values around and are oering them to you in Real Estate Picks! (In this section), Discover the best real estate values in Mexico Beach, Port St. Joe, Apalachicola, Cape San Blas, St. George Island, Carrabelle and surrounding areas. Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Real Estate Picks John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.com MLS# 247279 $389,000 St. George Island 2ND TIER GULF VIEW Dawg Daze 4 BR, 3 BA, Heated Pool, Florida room off living room opens to decks overlooking pool, Fireplace, John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.com MLS#247518 $698,500 St. George Island PLANTATION BAYFRONT HOME Open Living area, Elevator, Fireplace, 5 BR, 5 BA, Extra BR or Den, Kitchen designed for great cooks, 2 dishwashers, gas stove, island with sink, Screened Pool & Spa, louvered garage, Dock with Slips for 4 owners, Great Bay views, near The Cut! dbutler@coastalcoverage.com Locally owned and operated Home Business Auto Health Workers Comp Trades & Services 653-8868 GET YOUR AD IN C A LL T ODAY! Laban Bontrager, DMD Monica Bontrager, DMD 12761 Pea Ridge Road Bristol, Florida 32321 TELEPHONE (850) 643-5417 Bristol Dental Clinic DENTURE LAB ON PREMISES Same Day Service on Repairs and Relines Don Lively General Contractors L ICENSED AND I NSURED 20 Y EARS E XPERIENCE P .O. Box 439 C arrabelle, FL 32322 697-2783 or Mobile 566-2603 RC 0066499 R G0065255 Carrabelle Visa, Discover, and American Express Honored at Participating Ace Stores JACKSONS Building Supplies & Auto Repair Carrabelle 697-3333 We Deliver Anywhere Hardware and Paint Center J.J.s Tree Service, LLC Stump Grinder Licensed & Insured Call John : (850) 899-8432 ROBERTS APPLIANCE REPAIR ALL MAJOR BRANDS 18 Shadow Lane Apalachicola, FL 32320 Phone: (850) 653-8122 Cell: (850) 653-7654 GET YOUR AD IN 653-8868 Trades & Services GET YOUR AD IN 653-8868 Trades & Services Carrabelle seniors host Saturday dance A dance held Saturday evening, Sept. 1, at the Carrabelle Senior Center at 201 NW Avenue F, on the corner of 1st Street and NW Avenue F in downtown Carrabelle. The dance starts at 7 p.m., and admission is free. Music will be provided by local disc jockey Ron Vice, serving up a lively mix of Big Band dance tunes and mellow pop hits. Come down to dance... or just to listen to the music! For more information on the dance and other activities at center, visit www.CarrabelleSenior Center.com. TDC committees to meet Tuesday The meetings of the Franklin County Tourist Development Council committees were cancelled for Tuesday, Aug. 28, and rescheduled for Tuesday, Sept. 4, beginning at 1:30 p.m. at the city of Apalachicolas Community Room at Battery Park. The grants committee will meet at 1:30 p.m. and the marketing committee begins at 2:30 p.m. Seafood workers to meet Sept. 10 The Franklin County Seafood Workers Associations next meeting scheduled for Monday, Sept. 10 at 6 p.m. at the Eastpoint Firehouse, on the corner of 6th Street and CC Land Road. The meeting will have new sign-ups for next years shelling program and discussion of the current shelling program just completed for 2012, board member sign-ups and the Oyster Spat festival, to be held Oct. 57 in Eastpoint and on St. George Island. We will be having a fundraiser booth at the festival and need volunteers to help run the booth, donate and help clean up. If anyone has any questions contact Jennifer Millender at 850-597-0787 or Shannon Harts eld at 653-5190. Four proposals for airport operation received At the Aug. 21 meeting, the county commission opened four proposals to operate the Apalachicola Regional Airport. Applicants for the airport contract included Apalachee Winds Aviation, operated by Dale and Nancy Frump. Director of Administrative Services Alan Pierce said the proposal listed the company as based in Franklin County, but the address given was in South Carolina. Fly High of Lafayette, N.C., presented a package. Fly High, owned by Karel Van Der Linden, bid on the xed base operation in the last round of proposals and won the contract, but negotiations over the length of the contract and other details fell through. Trident Aircraft of Gulf Shores, Ala., and Crystal Air of Chattanooga, Tenn., also sent proposal packages. The airport board will review the bids and come back to the commission with a suggested vendor. Committee to rank debris management providers At the Aug. 21 meeting, county commissioners discussed disaster debris removal and disposal services. After opening 10 packages received from companies in response to a request for quali cations, commissioners voted unanimously to appoint a committee with representatives from the roads, solid waste and emergency management departments to rank applicants. Director of Administrative Services Alan Pierce and County Attorney Michael Shuler will also assist with the review. If we get overwhelmed we need somebody to come here and help us recover from a large hit on the coast, said Emergency Management Coordinator Mike Rundel in a telephone interviews At the commission meeting, Emergency Management Director Pam Brownell said, We dont want to be in the position we were in at the beginning of the oil spill that we didnt have a contractor that was capable of handling hazardous materials. What were doing is looking forward and making sure we get new contracts in place as the old ones are expiring. Bidders are Tag Grinding Services Inc., Crowder Gulf, Ceres Environmental Services, Phillips and Jordan Inc., J.B Coxwell Contracting Inc., Bergeron, Asplundh Tree Expert Company, T.F.R Enterprises Inc., D and J Enterprises and Ashbritt Inc. Brownell said the companies will be invited to make a presentation to the committee. Commission Chair Pinki Jackel said the companies appeared to provide different services, but Brownell said request for quali cations speci ed that any company chosen for the contract must provide a complete range of debris management services. Relay for Life to kick off Sept. 27 Franklin County Relay for Life is holding a kickoff event on Thursday, Sept. 27. It will be held at Riverfront Park in downtown Apalachicola at 6 p.m. This years theme is Carnival for a Cure. Popcorn, nachos, cotton candy and other carnival-themed foods will be served. Sign up your team or join a team. Come see what Relay for Life is all about. Celebrate, Remember, Fight Back. News BRIEFS