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The Apalachicola times
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100380/00184
 Material Information
Title: The Apalachicola times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: H.W. Johnston
Place of Publication: Apalachicola Fla
Apalachicola Fla
Publication Date: 08-23-2012
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1885.
General Note: Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 32911693
lccn - sn 95026907
System ID: UF00100380:00184
 Related Items
Preceded by: Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by: Apalachicola herald

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xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx 50 WWW.APALACHTIMES.COM Phone: 850-653-8868 Web: apalachtimes.com E-mail: dadlerstein@star .com Fax: 850-653-8036 Circulation: 800-345-8688 DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK: School News & Society: 11 a.m. Friday Real Estate Ads: 11 a.m. Thursday Legal Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Display Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Line Ads: 5 p.m. Monday xxxxx Contact Us xxxxx Out to see Index Spanish class cut; math coach spared By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com The school board last week approved a series of budget cuts for the upcoming scal year, including a 5 percent slice in pay to school administrators and board members, and elimination of Spanish classes and the after-school activity bus. In a series of mainly split votes, the board also took steps to shift funding of the school resource ofcer back to the sheriffs of ce but spared the proposed elimination of a math coach position. The cutbacks were part of a package proposed earlier this month by Superintendent Nina Marks, featuring savings she said the district could enact before returning to the bargaining table with the teachers union. Anything else has to be negotiated, School Board Chairman Jimmy Gander said in introducing the discussion. We dont have time to do any negotiations. We have the budget thats due Sept. 4. Were through talking about need, he said. Were just talking about what we can buy anymore. In all, the approved cuts save about $320,000, but this is short of about $800,000 in cuts Gander said is needed to give the district adequate cushion. The state requires a minimum of 3 percent of annual revenue to be held in reserves and prefers a district retain 5 percent. The schools outgoing nance director, Roy Carroll, provided budget summaries earlier this month that showed the district had about $217,000 in unrestricted funds available as of June 30, roughly 2.1 percent of the overall $10.3 million in revenue. Gander said the district outspent revenue last year by about Bordt trial reset for October Attorneys fail to reach plea agreement By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894| @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com The case of a German woman accused of drowning her 5-year-old grandson in the bathtub of a St. George Island vacation home nally might go to trial in October, after attorneys on either side of the case failed to reach a plea agreement Friday. Circuit Judge Angela Dempsey set jury selection for Oct. 24, three months after the trial rst was slated to commence in late July and almost three years after the crime occurred Jan. 4, 2010. Assistant State Attorney Jared Counties prep for oil spill funding By FELICIA KITZMILLER and VALERIE GARMAN 522-5114 | @PCNHFelicia fkitzmiller@pcnh.com PANAMA CITY BEACH Local leaders can be protective of money, but in the interest of keeping the state government out of the billions of dollars expected to ow to Florida from the RESTORE Act, county leaders from Floridas Gulf Coast are trying to get along. Representatives from 19 of Floridas 23 Gulf Coast counties convened at the Wyndham Bay Point Resort on Aug. 16 to discuss forming a consortium that would coordinate and implement a plan to assist in Floridas long-term economic and School board wields budget axe Thursday, August 23, 2012 BACK TO CLASS DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times Marianne Bordt, right, is escorted from the Franklin County Courthouse by Sheriffs Deputy David Varnes. See OIL SPILL A3 See BORDT A3 See SCHOOL BOARD A10 A FRESH START DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times Finishing their rst day back at Franklin County School are, left, Christopher Harris, 8, a student in Marvin Boyds third-grade class, and his younger brother Jonathon, 5, a kindergartner in Deane Cookes class. Picking them up after school are parents, George and Megan Harris of Eastpoint, and the boys 2-year-old brother, George Jr. By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com Monday was a new day for the Franklin County schools, a fresh start for scores of schoolchildren returning from a wet summer. The weather didnt disappoint, as it once again rained, but by all accounts everything went swimmingly. Its the smoothest we have had so far, said Principal George Oehlert. The only problem was scheduling changes, due to the switching over to a new Focus system, but everything went well. The week before school started had been beset by problems discovered with the air conditioning when educators returned to their classrooms. One of the chillers has a problem, but parts are on order and they should have been here today, said Al London, who oversees district operations. There was a Freon leak in the cooling coils, and they have to be replaced. Its under warranty. Chimene Johnson, principal of the Apalachicola Bay Charter School, said the schools 30-year-old structure had suffered minor roof leaks in the rain. Weve had had a few leaks but those will be taken care of, she said. The rivets need to be sealed in the roof. Johnson said all was well at the school, attended by about 327 students, 129 of them in pre-kindergarten. Oehlert said he would have an enrollment estimate later this week. Its going well, she said. We are off to running good start. Students are all in place, staff members are all in place. The last two days have gone smoothly. Opinion . . . . . . A4 Society . . . . . . A6 Faith . . . . . . . A7 Outdoors . . . . . A8 Tide Chart . . . . . A8 Sports . . . . . . A9 Classi eds . . . A11-A13 VOL. 127 ISSUE 17 Ready for some football? A9 Seahawks take the eld Friday The Seahawks varsity football team will take the eld for the rst time on Friday, hosting Bozeman on Friday at the Mikel Sports Complex in Eastpoint, for the annual preseason Kickoff Classic. Bene t to be Friday for sheriffs youth program From 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Friday, the sheriffs of ce will serve barbecue chicken dinners with baked beans, potato salad and bread at Taylors Building Supply in Eastpoint for a $6 donation. Proceeds go to the Sheriffs Youth Fund, with money used to fund events such as Kids and Cops Day, Movies in the Park, Kids Fishing Tournament and the Easter Egg Hunt. Paddling trip Saturday on the river Join the Apalachicola Riverkeeper on a monthly paddling trip Saturday in and around the Apalachicola River and Bay. The trips are free to members and $30 for nonmembers. For information, call 653-8936. Festival of Ice wraps up Saturday From noon to 5 p.m. Saturday, visit Gorrie Square for a celebration of Dr. Gorrie, featuring guest speaker Ellie Morris and an ice carving event and open house at the Apalachicola Municipal Library and the Gorrie Museum. For information, go to info@ historicapalachicola.com or call 1-855-APALACH. Florida snake lecture at ANERR Aug. 30 From 2-3 p.m. Aug. 30, come to the Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve headquarters, 108 Island Drive in Eastpoint, to learn about the incredible diversity and beauty of our native reptiles. For more information, call 6707700.

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Local A2 | The Times Thursday, August 23, 2012 (Pd.Pol.Ad.) Paid for and approved by Cliff Carroll for Franklin Co. Sheriff Hwy. 65 N Sumatra (850) 670-8441 THURSDAY A ll Y ou Can Eat S nowcrab $ 19 99 A ll Y ou Can Eat S hrimp $ 10 99 FRIDAY A ll Y ou Can Eat S nowcrab $ 19 99 A ll Y ou Can Eat S eafood Platter $ 16 99 $2 Longneck Beer S UNDAY A ll Y ou Can Eat S unday Lunch Buffet $ 9 99 I ncludes S alad Bar Family Coastal S eafood R estaurant Home of the All-U-Can-Eat menu By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star.com At Tuesdays meeting, commissioners voted unani mously to declare a local state of emergency and to invest in purchases to ad dress ongoing weather-re lated problems. The declaration puts the community on notice of more possible rain and po tential localized ooding and more mosquito problems, Director of Administrative Services Alan Pierce said following the meeting. As thunder rumbled and rain poured outside the meeting, county ofcials weighed in on the negative effects of a soaking wet sum mer that began with Tropi cal Storm Debby. During Debby, rain dam aged the courthouse roof and roads across the county, and as it continues to fall, permanent repairs are all but impossible and stopgap measures difcult. During her report, Emer gency Management Direc tor Pam Brownell warned more rain is likely, with three tropical systems developing offshore. Hubert Chipman, head of the road department, said rain is hobbling work crews, with conditions the worst he has seen during his tenure. Rain is preventing us from doing our job, he said. It may have to wait til it dries up. He said some roads were patched with shell but that ll dirt turns to mud. Also, many barricades to warn drivers of bad road condi tions were lost during Deb by, with Pierce noting that FEMA will pay to replace them. Commissioner Noah Lockley moved that Para dise Road, a private thor oughfare off of Bluff Road, receive a one-time upgrade, and commissioners voted unanimously to fund it. Every now and then you have to do something for people if you can do it le gally, Commissioner Bevin Putnal said. Chair Pinki Jackel and Putnal said they received calls about the condition of Buck Street in Eastpoint, also a private road. Chipman said his crews had done a one-time repair on the road. I am concerned with the continuing number of pri vate roads that need to be upgraded, County Attorney Michael Shuler said. Commissioners voted unanimously to approve overtime for road crews and to allow Chipman to call on personnel and equipment to help with repair work prior to storms predicted for this weekend. Dewitt Polous, head of county mosquito control, told commissioners his work has been impeded by equip ment failures, with one of his trucks having four break downs over the last week and the other having serious transmission problems. Commissioner Smokey Parrish said there have al ready been cases of mos quito-borne diseases west of Franklin County. We have a suspected West Nile case from East point, said Marsha Linde man, interim health depart ment director. She said a blood sample has been sent to the state for analysis and there have been 11 cases conrmed in Duval County and two in Es cambia. The health depart ment is distributing yers about West Nile within the county. We especially gave the hospital a heads up, she said. Were working closely with mosquito control. If we have a conrmed case, we expect the phone to ring off the hook. Jackel said it was im perative to provide mos quito control for the county and moved to buy two new trucks and additional spray equipment as needed. The commission voted unani mously to approve the pur chases and waived the bid process in the face of the on going emergency. Money for the purchase will come from county contingency funds. Can we not go to the governor for the inordi nate amount of rain weve received? she said. Its rained every day in July. Our courthouse and roads are continuing to be damaged from the rain. Pierce said permanent repairs will be covered by FEMA but was unsure about emergency repairs. He said he would write the governor to inform him a state of emergency has been declared. Shuler said the state of emergency must be re newed every seven days. Jackel has the option of renewing the statement or calling a special commission meeting to do so. WEST NILE VIRUS INFORMATION The Franklin County Health Department recommends residents follow the Five Ds of mosquito control: Dusk avoid when mosquitoes are most active. Dawn avoid the next most active period. DEET use personal chemical protection to ward off mosquitoes. Dress cover exposed skin to block mosquito access. Drain remove standing water in pots, pet dishes, gutters and other retainers. The health department also recommends these precautions: Apply insect repellent to exposed skin, or onto clothing, but not under clothing. In protecting children, read label instructions to be sure the repellent is age-appropriate. According to experts, mosquito repellents containing oil of lemon eucalyptus should not be used on children under 3 years old. DEET is not recommended on children younger than 2 months old. Avoid applying repellents to the hands of children. Adults should apply repellent rst to their own hands and then transfer it to the childs skin and clothing. By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @Apalach Times Dadlerstein@star.com Wilmer Deason withdrew last week from the race for District 3 county commissioner, pav ing the way for in cumbent Noah Lockley to secure a third term. In an Aug. 16 letter to Supervisor of Elections Ida Elliott, Deason wrote that unforeseen personal responsibilities and poor health forced him to leave the race. Deason, 59, 271 25th Ave., had qualied in June to run as Republican in the Nov. 6 general election. Be cause a Republican was on the ballot, the Democratic primary last week between Lockley and challenger Valentina Webb went from a universal race, open to members of all political parties, to a closed one, open only to Democrats. Deason had raised $4,550 for his campaign, $500 from the countys Re publican Executive Com mittee and the rest funded entirely from a loan by the candidate to his campaign. Among Deasons expen ditures had been the cost of the $1,502 ling fee, as well as $2,050 spent to pur chase a golf cart for use in campaigning. Kristy Branch Banks, chair man of the GOPs county committee, said last week she was talking with ofcials of the Re publican Party of Florida regarding whether Deason would be obligated to re turn the county commit tees contribution. I have not seen his re port lings and do not know if he expended the funds during his campaign or not, she said. In his candidate state ment, Deason promised to put the his commissioner salary, minus expenses, into a special fund that he, and three other reputable Franklin County citizens, would direct for use for the districts benet, estimat ing that the move would in vest in the district at least $95,000 over his rst term. I also promise to de fend the Constitution of the United States, Gods teachings and will strive for countywide voting for all county commissioners, he wrote. Elliott said Deasons withdrawal means his name will not appear on the ballot, and Lockley, 61, who downed challenger Valenti na Webb, 48, last week, will be declared the winner. Commissioners step up mosquito ght Deason pulls out of commissioner raceMARSHA LINDEMAN WILMER DEASON ELECTION 2012

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Local The Times | A3 Thursday, August 23, 2012 environmental recovery from the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill. The RESTORE (Resources and Ecosystems Sustainability, Tourism Opportunities and Revived Economies) Act mandates 80 percent of Clean Water Act penalties paid by those responsible for the spill go directly to the affected states. The penalties could range from $5 billion to $20 billion. Nobody thought wed be getting the RESTORE Act passed, but we did it, said Florida Association of Counties Executive Director Chris Holley. This could be a game-changer for the Gulf Coast states. Now the Florida Association of Counties (FAC) and its members are scrambling to establish a system for equitably doling out the money while maintaining the local control that was the impetus of the RESTORE Act. The legislation requires that a legal entity to receive the funds be established within six months of the bill being signed and a plan be in the works for how the money will be used. A draft of an interlocal agreement is circulating among the counties, and the goal is to have it passed by all counties by Oct. 1. If it is unsuccessful, or if the counties begin ghting among themselves, there is a possibility Gov. Rick Scott or the Legislature could step in and form their own committee to meet the requirements, FAC of cials said. I think some of the reason its set up the way it is right now is because the state didnt think we could do it, but they thought wed screw it up and they could have our money, Bay County Commissioner Mike Thomas said. The consortium will have at least one representative from each county and be responsible for the development of a state plan for Floridas share of the RESTORE Act dollars. Individual counties will have total control of their local allocation. This consortium has to prepare the plan, Holley said. Will there be competition for projects between the counties? You bet. With 23 counties combining in a single consortium, Panhandle of cials said they were concerned they would be outvoted by the peninsula counties and would lose out on state fund dollars. FAC representatives said they were working to address those concerns, which could be solved with a weighted voting system, but urged locals not to be distracted by details. The perfect de nition of a compromise is when everyone is equally dissatis ed, said Santa Rosa County Commissioner Jim Melvin, who spoke in favor of the consortium. Ecosystem The FAC vetted concerns from Rep. Steve Southerland, a Panama City Republican and major force in Washington behind the RESTORE Act, that the Gulf Coasts shing communities and smaller, rural counties would be overlooked in the process. Franklin County Commissioner Smokey Parrish said Franklin County has been particularly affected because of the large population that relies on the Gulf and Apalachicola Bay to make a living. Thats the base of our economy, Parrish said. Its all about the pristine value of our area. Were more concerned about our environment and our ecosystem. Parrish said RESTORE funding is needed to bring the Franklin County economy back to where it was before the spill. Theres no shrimp in Apalachicola Bay; there hasnt been in two years, Parrish said. We need studies to nd out whats going on. We need to take RESTORE dollars and gure out how to x it. Okaloosa County Commissioner Dave Parisot suggested addressing the economic losses felt by shing communities be carved out from the state plan, perhaps by setting aside a certain amount of money for sheries, instead of weighting the distribution formula to counties. I think we all need to go home and digest the draft and talk about it, he said. Key to the kingdom Gulf County Commissioner and former FAC President Bill Williams said the key to the kingdom lies in knowing the pots of money and where they ow. Williams also said he feels there is doubt at the state level as to whether the counties will be able to pull it off. I do think a lot of people, including the state, dont think we can do this, Williams said. The key is effectiveness, the key is implementation and the key is staying together; if we do that, well be ne. Williams, who has been involved with RESTORE since day one, said the process has gone from very few people understanding the bill to folks coming out of the woodwork looking for money. Weve got the opportunity to change the Panhandle and the state of Florida like no one has ever seen, Williams said. Our opportunity is through our numbers and our strategies. Between now and Oct. 1, FAC representatives will establish consortium framework, establish policy guidelines for the agency and conduct a preliminary legal analysis. The proposed budget for the transition period is $53,000, 75 percent of which will be paid for by the eight disproportionately affected counties and the remainder by the remaining 15. The Big Bend Area Health Education Center (Big Bend AHEC) is offering FREE tobacco cessation classes in Franklin County and throughout the Big Bend region. We know the challenges you face. We will help you develop the tools to succeed and we will provide the support you need. For more information, call Big Bend AHEC at: 850-509-6614 or 850-224-1177 (local office) or 1-87-QUIT-NOW-6 (1-877-848-6696) Visit www.ahectobacco.com for the schedule of classes we have available. FREE NICOTINE PATCHES! NO COST TO ATTEND! Begin your new life journey tobacco free! MAGNOLIA BLUFF Bay living at its best, you have to see the sunsets from this home to believe them. 3BR/3BA Custom home with great water depth for year round access to the Apalachicola Bay. M L S #246689...........$699,000 Travis Stanley 850.653.6477 Grayson Shepard 850.653.6718 Leon Teat 850.653.5656 Sandy Mitchem 850.899.8300 BEACHFRONT C ONDO ST. G EORGE IS LAND 2BR/2BA with two balconies in Villas of St. George. Established rental history! Community pool, beach boardwalk, 2 blocks to lighthouse! M L S# 246110 ............... $319,500 S T GEORGE I S LAND G ULF VIEW 4BR/4BA close to center of island and kitchen. Lots of storage and lovely native landscaping. M L S# 245752 ...................... $399,000 NEW LOW P RICE G REATER AP ALACHICOLA Enjoy quiet country living on 3.75 acres. Lovely custom built 3BR/2.5 BA home with many upgrades Jacuzzi, deck, large walk in closet. 1600 sq.ft. outbuilding on concrete pad. M L S#244666 ................ $255,000 G ULF V IEW S GI PLANTATION Charming 5BR/3BA cypress home with Anderson doors/windows. Completely renovated in 2006 w/ granite countertops, new appliances/lighting/elevator! M L S# 240897 ............... $475,000 N EW C ON S TRUCTION Great opportunity to buy a gulf view home. This quality constructed home has driven pilings, hardiboard siding and a metal roof for a low maintenance exterior. Inside you have 3 bedrooms with two baths and a great room opening to the front porch. New construction means low insurance cost. M L S #247359................$289,000 Patterson and Bordts public defender, Andrew Thomas, met privately beforehand with Dempsey in her chambers, but at the outset of the brief hearing, the judge said they had failed to reach agreement. Prosecutors say publicly they are willing to agree to a 30-year sentence in state prison for 73year-old Bordt, a resident of Nufringen, Germany. If convicted of the two charges of rst-degree murder and aggravated child abuse, Bordt could be sentenced to death for killing her Americanborn grandson, Camden Hiers. The defense is seeking a verdict of not-guilty by reason of insanity, arguing Bordt suffers from dementia and depression that, in part, stem from a skull fracture she suffered as a 5-year-old in October 1944, when Russians bombed her childhood home of Breslau. Bordt, dressed in a pink velour jacket, in sharp contrast to the bright orange jumpsuits worn by the other defendants seated near her in the courtroom, did not speak at the hearing. Defense attorneys have kept Bordt out of jail and assigned to the Florida State Hospital in Chattahoochee since December 2010, when Dempsey ruled Bordts limited command of English, lack of understanding of the American judicial system and con icting evaluations by mental health professionals rendered her incompetent to stand trial. The judge later ruled her t to stand trial. Camdens grandmother Pat Hiers sat in the front row of Fridays hearing, holding a framed photograph of her grandson. At her side sat her husband, Bill, from Sharpsburg, Ga., and her son, David Hiers, all three having attended almost every hearing in the case. Were here because we support him, said Pat, her eyes welling with tears. We did support him when she divorced him, and he spent a lot of visitations at our house. Because we were family, and were still family. Bordts daughter, Karin, divorced David when Camden was a 1. She has refused any involvement in the case, declining to talk with Franklin County law enforcement of cials and not attending any of the hearings. The Bordt grandparents took their grandson to Florida on a week-long vacation between Christmas and New Years, and on the day before it was to end, Bordt allegedly took advantage of an errand to the Piggly Wiggly by her husband, Heinz, to kill Camden. David Hiers said Friday that the continuing delays have been painful to his family. We feel were extremely frustrated and upset that the defendant basically got a free ticket to do everything they want to in this courtroom, he said. Thats how it appears to us. We feel the defense can kind of do whatever they want and its tolerated, for whatever reason. David Hiers said the family stands behind the prosecutions efforts and is willing to accept a sentence short of capital punishment. We as a family discussed it, and we want her to be put in prison for the rest of her life, he said. Thats our goal. Pat Hiers said the worldwide publicity that has accompanied the case, read about as far away as London tabloids, troubles her. Camden did not get any attention; shes gotten it all, and she is in the one who took his life, she said. Were not in England, were in the United States of America, and we know the laws here. We know what they are, and they OIL SPILL from page A1 DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times Pat Hiers holds a photo of her grandson, Camden Hiers. BORDT from page A1

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Opinion A4 | The Times USPS 027-600 Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 Publisher: Roger Quinn Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola Times Thursday, August 23, 2012 By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star.com Three years ago, country star Tracy Lawrence played the Florida Seafood Festival in a memorable concert, a stirring performance that featured among its musical lineup his hit song Paint Me A Birmingham. In that ballad, the singer tells of wanting a plein air landscape artist to paint for him an idyllic scene of a little house on the edge of town/ Porch goin all the way around in which the singers lost love is still in a front yard swing, in a cotton dress. That sweet, idyllic scene is, for the singer, a Birmingham, a picture of all that is pretty and perfect, but eeting in this world. Last weekend at the Dixie Theatre in the debut of Barry Hands newest work, a two-act drama called The Family Portrait, the audience was treated to an entirely different sort of landscape, one where sweetness and perfection on the outside hides a painful and deeply troubling hidden world. From the moment the curtain opens on the shows two lead characters, and Vera Lane (Liz Sisung), the domineering matriarch of a well-to-do white family, is shown applying the strap to her black housekeeper, Plasy (Alisa Hendels), it is clear we are in store for melodrama of the Southern Gothic variety. Add to that Hands own keyboard work, like a movie score that punctuates the action with ourishing underlines and staccato exclamation points, and you have an impassioned show of that type of drama where plot and character are exaggerated to heighten the emotions. The plot is tightly woven; Lane, a widow, is caring for her sickly daughter, Mona (Maranda Moses), and has called for her son, Roy (Adam Cannon), and future daughterin-law Carol (Katie McFarland) to come to the house so they can sit for a family portrait. But all is not so picturesque among the family of the late Cecil Lane. It takes the familys physician Dr. Watkins (Craig Hicks) to burst everyones illusions with medical fact, and Plasys sister Mary Alice (Trina Ford) to puncture them with uninching honesty. In his comments about the show last week, Hand, known for his comedies, said he had cast his characters with people he had observed in the community, based on the type of personalities he wanted to infuse the roles. They did not let him down. The two leading ladies were remarkable in their performances. Sisung teetered throughout on the delicate balance of smiling good manners, and shrill and ugly bitterness, propelled by her fondness for drowning her angers in strong drink. The vivid, energetic performance by this veteran actress left a painful image on the stage of what it means never to admit, and never to accept. In counterpoint was Hendels in a softer, understated role, a blend of stoic perseverance that left the subtle, but unpleasant taste of subservience in the audiences mouths. When she rises at the end to provide her rst, and nal, show of deance, it is a testament to Hendels skill that even what seems so long overdue is still an emotionally satisfying surprise. Without exception, the other characters succeeded in bringing Hands curious mix of heartwrenching pathos and spirit-lifting conict to life. Fords stylish sashaying, and fancy footwork, brought with her the broad, soulrelieving laughter needed to balance the shows weightiness. Cannon provided a smooth, clear presence as the kind-hearted son, loving in equal parts to his emotionally fragile wife, and his physically ailing older sister. As the wife, McFarland rattled like a reed, frustrated at the snub from her future mother-in-law and shocked to nd shes in fact a lush. And as the sister, Moses, a high school student, conveyed the emotional maturity of a woman much older than she is, who has lived through the worst of it and kept smiling. Hicks, who like Hand is a church pastor, was well-cast as the doctor, a well-spoken, strong professional presence who had the right tone for conveying difcult news. Sally Crown as stage manager, and Beth Wright with lighting, made sure everything ran smoothly. Hand has plans to produce the play again, perhaps as a lm. If it is again on stage, the young playwright would be well-served by focusing on two improvements. Without question, he should add more songs, to go further than the one duet that Cannon, a youth pastor who works with music, and Moses, already an accomplished master of the violin and guitar, sang together. Their voices were marvelous, and left the audience wanting more. They would do justice to any future songs that Hand wrote for his play. Also, there ought to be less curtainclosing between scenes and more fullbore action on the stage. At times, the audience was left feeling a little like a local motorist at the four-way light in Apalachicola, waiting impatiently as a visiting tourist has stopped at a yellow light that he or she ought to just move right through without stopping. But those are things that can be handled, and they ought to be. Because what we have here is a piercing look through a melodramatic lens of the truths behind the lies we often tell ourselves, and the pain that ensues, with both victim and victimizer, when people live out those lies. Paint me a Barry Hand Statewide revenues dip; budget cuts restored Q. It was reported that clerks budgets were being cut by the Legislature. Can you explain what has happened? A. The budget reduction you refer to involves the court-side budget of my ofce, which is set by the Legislature. This has nothing to do with my county budget set by the county commission each year. Part of my ofce operations are funded by the state while another part is funded by the county. I must operate on separate budgets and even separate scal years, which creates quite a challenge. Pursuant to Article V of the state constitution, selected salaries, costs and expenses of court-related functions shall be funded from a portion of the revenues clerks collect from nes, fees, service charges and costs that are remitted to the state. The Legislative Budget Commission (LBC) met on Aug. 16. I thank Governor Rick Scott and the Legislature for their support in returning the clerks of court in Florida to our last years level of spending authority. They restored $29.5 million to our budgets that had been eliminated earlier this year as a result of reduced collection of court fees by the clerks and a difcult budget year for the legislature. As part of their budget process, clerks project what their court-related revenue will be. Due to many factors, mostly related to the economy, statewide collections have been lower than projected. With that said, if our revenues dont come in as projected, there are many variables in the rules that could affect an individual clerks budget. This LBC action will allow me to return my attention to the needs of my constituents, instead of worrying about decisions and setting priorities due to the initial reduction. While I was still considering options, many of my fellow clerks in larger counties had made signicant adjustments in their workforces and work hours. All the clerks recognize that tough budget challenges still remain, but the action of the LBC will help us fulll our duties for the coming year. We will continue our efforts to ensure our budgets are adequately funded in the future. If you have any questions or comments about this column, please forward them to Marcia Johnson, Clerk of the Court, 33 Market Street, Ste. 203, Apalachicola, FL 32320 or by email to: mmjohnson@franklinclerk.com. Visit the Clerks website at www.franklinclerk. com. At the Apalachicola Municipal Library the collection of books is always changing. We buy new books, ones we think are worthy of our limited shelf space and budget, and we withdraw books which have not been chosen by patrons in a reasonable number of years. Classic books are an exception to the latter however. This is how libraries work. Its called weeding the collection, and there is even an acronym, there seems to be an acronym for everything these days, CREW. It stands for Continuous, Review, Evaluation and Weeding. Google it and you get hundreds of websites that tell you how, and books you can buy on how it should be done. Because we are automating the collections, and because the CREW method has not always been followed, there are lots of books to be evaluated and possibly withdrawn. They are beginning to pile up under tables waiting for the librarian to determine their fate. The good news for local book lovers is that bunches of them will be on sale at our next book sale. Will we miss a few good ones we should have kept? Probably, so put that Friday of seafood festival on your calendar, to be the rst to peruse the offerings. The best part of managing a library is the books you get to add, either because they have been donated, or the library has purchased them. It is just amazing what books you can nd for sale on the internet, and places like Amazon make them more affordable than ever. Looking over the recent acquisitions, they seem quite diverse. Books are on the way from authors who have been invited to Authors in Apalach on Sept. 28 and 29, including Burnt Offerings by Michael Lister, and Man in the Blue Moon by Michael Morris. The latter is based in Apalachicola in 1918. We have completed our set of Jeff Kinneys Wimpy Kid books, after their great popularity at the Summer Reading Program. New bestsellers from Dorothea Benton Frank and James Lee Burke, have come in and quickly been scooped up by patrons. John Grishams new junior ction Theodore Boone series will be enjoyed by readers of all ages. If you think you know whats at the library, or you havent been to visit lately, come on by. We are still open six days per week starting at 10 a.m. We do close at 2 p.m. on Wednesdays and Saturdays. The rest we are open to 6 p.m. Caty Greene is the librarian for the Apalachicola Municipal Library. To reach her, call 653-8436. Standing in full support of commissioner Jackel This is from a group of friends and supporters in Eastpoint who are in full support of our commissioner Pinki Jackel regardless of the recent controversy she is facing. She is a lady of great integrity, very diplomatic, smart, and always handles issues in a fair and just manner. She is interested in county affairs as a whole, not only her district. She has represented our district very well. She tries to keep abreast of things that are important to us that will benet our district. If this is a misdemeanor, why is it creating such a stir among the political realm? Could it be that some county employees couldnt pass the white glove test? Pinki has no idea that we are writing this letter; however, we want her to know that we are standing with her and hoping that the attacks on her will subside. Your many friends in Eastpoint, Frances Hunnings, Bonnie Segree, Marie Segree Ruth and Gehrig would be better leaders I am looking at our choices for leadership for the next four years. I cant vote for either due to the fact that I dont believe either. In a perfect world, Babe Ruth and Lou Gehrig would lead us. When nobody had anything, they hung out in orphanages and childrens hospitals. The disregard for those who have not reaped the rewards of the bull market of the s, s and into the George W. Bush years is disgusting. I wont vote. Thanks, Ed Scanlon Carrabelle YOUR PUBLIC TRUSTEE Marcia Johnson @ THE LIBRARY Caty Greene Return library books, earn a star L O IS SW OBO DA | The Times Apalachicola librarian Caty Greene holds one of the Reading Star Awards presented to summer reading program participants who returned all their borrowed books. If you know someone who still has a book checked out this summer, tell them they can earn their star by bringing it back to the library. Letters to the EDITORV E RGIL MARS H ALL | Special to the Times Barry Hands two-act drama The Family Portrait debuted last weekend at the Dixie Theatre.

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The Times | A5 Thursday, August 23, 2012 CORRECTION AUTOM A TIC POWER PROTECTION 24/7 **PRICES VARY DEPENDING ON EQUIPMENT & INSTALLATION No lights, loss of communication and safety issues are just a few of the headaches associated with a power outage. When the power goes out, depend on a GENER A C standby generator to supply back-up electricity to your homes essential items, automatically. No manual starting. FOR TURN KEY INSTALLATION STARTING AT: $4500.00** Anderson Power Services 229-247-6630 http://andersonpowerservices.com Smart Lenses SM Can produce clear vision without glasses, at all distances "Freedom from Eye Glasses, Now a reality for many." NO HIDDEN CHARGES: It is our policy that the patient and any other person responsible for payments has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed by payment or any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment. www.mulliseye.com "WE WELCOME NE W PATIE N TS, C ALL T ODAY FOR YOUR P RIORITY APP OI N TME N T" FOR NEW PATIENTS 59 AND OLDER This certificate is good for a complete Medical Eye Exam with Todd Robinson, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Surgeon. The exam includes a prescription for eye glasses and tests for Glaucoma, Cataracts and other eye diseases FOR YOUR APPOINTMENT CALL: 850-763-6666 ELIGIBILITY: U.S. Citizens living in the Florida Panhandle, 59 years and older, not presently under our care. Coupon Expires: 8-31-12 FREE EYE EXAM CODE: AP00 Darren Payne, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon Lee Mullis, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon Todd Robinson, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon The following report is provided by the Franklin County Sheriffs Of ce. Arrests in this report were made by of cers from the Apalachicola Police Department (APD), Carrabelle Police Department (CPD), Florida Highway Patrol (FHP), and Franklin County Sheriffs Of ce (FCSO). All defendants are to be considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law. Aug. 10 James C. Yon, 46, Eastpoint, trespass on property after warning, retail theft and dealing in stolen property (FCSO) Jimmy R. Shiver, III, 20, Bristol, battery by an inmate (FCSO) Misty D. Dillon, 27, Apalachicola, violation of probation (FCSO) Charles K. Varnes, Jr., 20, Carrabelle, domestic battery (CPD) Aug. 11 Reginald T. Steele, 44, St. George Island, DUI with property damage (FHP) William D. Cooper, 54 Apalachicola, domestic battery (FCSO) Samuel D. Shef eld, 22, Hoschton, Ga., DUI and refusal to submit to breath test (FCSO) Aug. 12 Preston W. Hurd, 34, Apalachicola, violation of probation (APD) Aug. 13 Larry J. Colson, 58, Eastpoint, domestic battery (FCSO) Roger S. Tyler, 30, Tampa, violation of probation (FCSO) Joshua A. Hammond, 21, Apalachicola, failure to appear and violation of probation (FCSO) Aug. 14 Dewey J. Williams, Jr., 19, Carrabelle, grand theft and burglary of a dwelling (FCSO) Aug. 15 Phillip S. Creamer, 36, Apalachicola, false imprisonment and battery (APD) Jonathan G. Pace, 35, Apalachicola, withholding child support (FCSO) Aug. 16 Kimberly J. Wheeler, 41, Carrabelle, domestic battery (FCSO) Aug. 17 Bobby C. Martin, Jr., 33, Apalachicola, violation of probation (FCSO) Tony D. Polous, 47, Eastpoint, domestic battery (FCSO) Jesse J. Thompson, 28, Apalachicola, violation of probation (APD) Aug. 18 Howard N. Martin, 33, Carrabelle, battery (CPD) Aug. 20 Moses Duncan, 57, Savannah, Ga., violation of probation (FCSO) Ruby A. Murray, 43, Eastpoint, eeing or attempting to elude police (CPD) Marvin H. Garrett, Jr., 21, Eastpoint, DUI, corruption by threat against a public servant, criminal mischief, refusal to submit to a breath test, driving while license suspended or revoked and resisting without violence (FCSO) Courtney L. Brownell, 23, Eastpoint, false report to a law enforcement officer (FCSO) DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times The Franklin County Sheriffs Of ce youth program will host a bene t dinner this Friday, Aug. 24 at Taylors Building Supply, 268 U.S. 98, in Eastpoint. Serving will be from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. and will feature awardwinning chicken dinners for a $6 donation. Sides include baked beans, potato salad and bread. The Franklin County Sheriffs Youth Fund is donation-based, with money raised during the year used to fund events such as Movies in the Park, Kids Fishing Tournament, Easter Egg Hunt, and as featured in photo above, Kids and Cops Day, held each year right before the end of the school year. Arrest REPORT Sheriffs youth bene t dinner to be Friday The body of a 77-yearold Carrabelle was found Aug. 14 in a swampy area of Collier County, near Naples, discovered by a party of six hunters, scouting for a hunting spot. Herman Schol, of 327 Frank McKamey Way, was found oating in about three feet of water, deep in the wooded area, two miles east of Beck Boulevard and Ben eld Road, and about one mile south of I-75. He was dressed only in his underwear, according to an incident report. His death is still under investigation, but does not appear to be suspicious, according to the sheriffs of ce. The six hunters who called authorities said that at about 7 p.m. on Aug. 14, they had spotted what they rst thought was a blow-up doll oating in the water, according to the report. Detectives responding to the scene found a blue 2000 Ford Ranger registered to the deceased. The vehicle was stuck in about 4 feet of water about a quarter mile from the body. Investigators removed the body around 2:45 a.m. Aug. 15. By David Adlerstein Carrabelle man found dead near Naples Law Enforcement On Page A12 of the Aug. 9 Times, it was incorrectly reported that a Tourist Development Council grant had gone to pay the roughly $6,000 cost of purchasing Apalach 1, a pre-owned gas golf cart used by the mayor and others to circulate around town. City Administrator Betty Taylor Webb has advised that the monies for the golf cart were paid out of the citys general fund. She said the golf cart was purchased to help in the promotion of various tourist-related activities, such as Music in the Park and the Ice Festival, but did not come from a TDC grant. The Times regrets the error.

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Braedan is a very handsome, gentle, active Golden Retriever mix who was left in our drop pen. He is about a year and a half old and is a little smaller than most goldens. He has a happy temperament and is a pleasure to have around. If you have been looking for a canine companion, Braedan just may be your boy! Volunteers are desperately needed to socialize all of our dogs and cats. We are always looking for people willing to bring one of our animals into their home to be fostered for various needs. Anytime you can spare would be greatly appreciated. Call Karen at 670-8417 for more details or visit the Franklin County Humane Society at 244 State Road 65 in Eastpoint. You may logon to the website at www. forgottenpets.org to see more of our adoptable pets. PET OF THE WEEK Franklin County Humane Society WE CAN HELP! GOT MOSQUITOES? CALL L OIS AT 653-5857 Franklin Countys ONLY LOC AL Pest Control Company Qualications: Expertise in: New Patients Welcome Call Toll Free 888-681-5864 For more info www.seclung.com LUNG AND SLEEP DISORDERS DR. ROB GARVER Society A6 | The Times Thursday, August 23, 2012 Engagements Get ready for Thanksgiving in August Hope you can join us today for lunch at the Franklin County Senior Center in Carrabelle. It will be the last, because of lack of support. Serving begins at noon, and the minimum donation is $3. The Songbird, along with a few others, did a good job at keeping us jumping at the Birthday Bash last Saturday night. We had a nice meal, too. We have a Birthday Bash each month at Camp Gordon Johnston American Legion Post 82, 2367 Oak St., in Lanark Village. Everyone is always welcome at the Legion for hamburgers and fries on Friday nights, and pizza on Sunday nights. Serving begins at 5 p.m. each night. Donation for Hamburger Night is $6. One Sunday night, you can enjoy your pizza by the slice for $1 each. Eat-in a whole pizza is $8, and take-out is $10. You can call in your order at 697-9998. Thanks to the volunteers who make our meals possible. Mark Sunday, Aug. 26, on your calendar. Starting at 1 p.m., we will have our annual Thanksgiving in August turkey dinner at Camp Gordon Johnston American Legion Post 82. Roast turkey and all the trimmings. Your donation of $10 will get you started. Be kind to one another, check on the sick and housebound and remember. Volunteers make it happen; become one today. Until next time, God bless America, our troops, the poor, homeless and hungry. LANARK NEWS Jim Welsh Look whos having a birthday! Alaijah Comari Richardson will turn 1 year old this Saturday, Aug. 25. She is the daughter of Jessia Mitchell, of Apalachicola, and Alphonso Richardson, of Gainesville, and the sister to Hezekiah Mitchell. Her maternal grandparents are Shirley and Otis Walker, of Apalachicola, and her paternal grandparents are Emorgene Brown and Fred Farley, of Gainesville. Alaijahs godparents are Mellie Floyd and Bo Harris, both of Apalach, and her aunt is Yvonne Mitchell. Alaijah will celebrate her birthday with family and friends at 4:30 p.m. Saturday at Battery Park. Happy birthday, main man Donate I. Pittman will celebrate his 11h birthday on Friday, Aug. 24, 2012. He is the son of Aja Vandenandel, and has one sister Kyera. Love always, The family Poppie, GiGi, Sharon, Nate Aunts Ali, Jessie Mae, Pearlie Mae Godmother Stephnia Turrell His Top Cop Lt. Pam Lewis Birthdays Jimmy and Dianne Mock are happy to announce the engagement of their daughter, Jessica Michelle Mock, to Jordan Colby Brock, son of Carey Brock, of Alford, and Penny Brock, of Mexico Beach. Jessica is the granddaughter of Waylon Graham, of Howard Creek, and Frances Graham, of St. Joe Beach. She is also the granddaughter of Nancy Mock and the late James Mock, of Port St. Joe. A 2006 graduate of Port St. Joe High School, Jessica graduated in 2010 with a bachelor of science in elementary education from Florida State University. She will complete her masters in curriculum and instruction in Dec. 2012. Jessica is employed as a second grade teacher at Port St. Joe Elementary. Jordan is the grandson of Buz and Genevieve Putnal, of Carrabelle. He is a 2006 graduate of Port St. Joe High School, and 2010 graduate of Gulf Coast State College Law Enforcement Academy. He is employed as a deputy sheriff with the Bay County Sheriffs Of ce. The wedding is planned for Oct. 13, 2012 at Centennial Park in Port St. Joe, with reception to follow at the Centennial Building. Meghan Williams, Mathew Peek to wed Mr. and Mrs. Sammie Williams and the late Mrs. Susan Porter Gaylor would like to announce the engagement and forthcoming marriage of their daughter, Meghan Elizabeth Williams, to Mathew Jacob Peek, son of Mr. and Mrs. Jimmy Peek of Grif n, Ga. Meghan is the granddaughter of Ms. Bobbie Watts Marshall of Port St. Joe and the late Jack Watts of Hawaii, the late Mr. and Mrs. Sam Williams of Blakely, Ga., Mr. and Mrs. Reuben Farmer of Wewahitchka and Mr. and Mrs. Roger Beasley of Wewahitchka. Matt is the grandson of Ms. Mary Carver and Mr. John Floyd, Jr., and Mr. and Mrs. Jimmy Peek of Thomaston, Ga. On Sept. 15, 2012, the ceremony will be at Long Avenue Baptist Church at 3:30 p.m., with reception to follow at Oak Grove Church. All family and friends are invited. After their honeymoon, Meghan and Matt will be living in Grif n, Ga. Jessica Mock, Jordan Brock engaged

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The Times | A7 Thursday, August 23, 2012 Register by Monday for Labor Day Womens Retreat The St. George Island Christian Retreat Center is sponsoring a Womens Retreat on Labor Day weekend beginning Friday, Aug. 31, at 7 p.m. and concluding by 12:30 p.m. Monday, Sept. 3. Living Proof Ministries has graciously approved the showing of Beth Moores DVD series, The Patriarchs as the content of their study. Moores studies are always extremely practical and this one is no different with its focus on family life! They invite you to join them for worship, fellowship and prayer! Registration deadline is Monday, Aug. 27. Call Amy Howell at 927-3818 for more information. Annual Noma community reunion Sept. 1 The annual Noma Community Reunion will be held in the Noma Town Hall building on Saturday, Sept. 1. The town hall will open at 10 a.m. CST, and lunch will be served at noon CST. All past and present residents and their friends are cordially invited to attend. People planning to attend are asked to bring a well-lled basket of their favorite dishes. Also, please bring tea, if that is the beverage you prefer. Soft drinks, ice, cups, plates and eating utensils will be furnished. This gathering, held the Saturday before Labor Day, strengthens the bonds of friendship and lets us relive memories of the past, renew our ties with the land that once nourished us and walk among the graves of our dear departed kinsman. Anyone desiring additional information is urged to call Ludine Riddle at 850-974-8438. Gospel Explosion next month in Carrabelle The Prophetic Word Gospel Explosion, hosted by Bishop C.M Lockhart, founder of Anointed Word Ministries in Carrabelle, is coming. The ministries will host the explosion from Tuesday, Sept. 4 to Friday, Sept. 7 nightly at 7 p.m. Guest speakers will be here from Hattiesburg, Magee, and Columbia, Miss., all delivering the Word of God Come with expectancy in your heart! The United Methodist Churches of Franklin County Welcome You First United Methodist Church of Apalachicola Worship Service 11:00 a.m. every Sunday Sunday School 10:00 a.m. 75 5 th St. Apalachicola 653-9530 fumcapalach@gtcom.net Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis Carrabelle United Methodist Church Worship Services 10:45 a.m. Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Celebrate Recovery Mondays 7-9 p.m. 102 NE Ave. B Carrabelle 697-3672 Pastor: Julie Stephens Eastpoint United Methodist Church Worship Service 10:00 a.m. every Sunday Healing service every fourth Monday at 7:00 p.m. 317 Patton Dr. (corner of David St.) 670-8825 Pastor: Rev. Beth White St. George Island United Methodist Church 9:00 a.m. Worship Service 10:00 a.m. Fellowship Hour 201 E. Gulf Beach Dr. 9274635 www.sgiumc.org Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis Nursery now provided for Sunday Church Service First Pentecostal Holiness Church 379 Brownsville Road Apalachicola Were excited about what Gods doing!!! Sunday School 9:45 am Sunday Morning Worship 10:45 am Sunday Evening Service 6:00 pm Monday, Youth Group 6:30 pm Wednesday, Royal Rangers, G.A.P. 7:00 pm Wednesday Worship & Word 7:30 pm Nursery Provided during regular church services 7:00 7:00 First Baptist Church St. George Island 501 E. Bayshore Drive 927-2257 R. Michael Waley, Pastor Join us as we praise and worship the living Christ. Great is the Lord and most worthy of praise. Psalm 145:3 Sunday Bible Study ................................................ 10:00am Worship Praise ........................................................ 11:00am Sunday Night ............................................................ 7:00pm Wednesday Power Hour ...................................... 7:00pm Wednesday Youth at S.P.L.A.S.H ....................... 7:00pm Walking in Christ R. Michael Whaley, Pastor WELCOMES YOU Church of the Ascension 101 NE First Street Carrabelle SUNDAY 10:00 AM WELCOMES YOU Church THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH (850) 274-4490 (850) 545-2578 WELCOMES YOU Trinity Trinity Episcopal Church est. 1836 Welcomes You Hwy. 98 & 6th St. Apalachicola 850-653-9550 Sunday Worship Services 8 & 10:30 a.m. Wednesdays Healing Service 11 a.m. Centering Prayer 4 p.m. Sunday Worship Services 8 & 10:30 a.m. Wednesdays Healing Service 11 a.m. Centering Prayer 4 p.m. Clara Ann Casteel Brown was born July 15, 1944, in LaGrange, Ark., to Lucielle and Ernest Casteel. She passed away Thursday, Aug. 16, 2012, at her home at the age of 68, surrounded by family. Ann is survived by her devoted husband, David Brown; children, David M. Brown, Deborah Hill and Deanna Shiver; six grandchildren; and ve great-grandchildren. Funeral services were held Saturday, Aug. 18, at the Eastpoint Church of God. Kelley Funeral Home is handling all arrangements. Clara Ann Brown Raymond Leslie Courage and his wife, Alice E. Courage were laid to rest at Arlington National Cemetery on Friday, Aug. 10, 2012, in the presence of family members and close friends. Ray Courage, born Jan. 12, 1925, passed away May 4, 2012, at the age of 87. His wife, Alice, born June 27, 1931, died April 24, 2004. With full military honors, their combined ashes were placed in the columbarium. As a combat veteran, Raymond served his country during World War II as an AAF radio operator and mechanic during the Central Pacic, Eastern Mandates, Ryukyus and Air Offensive Japan battles and campaigns. Ray was a 24-year resident of Lanark Village. Prior to his retirement and move to Lanark, Ray had been a Detroit newspaperman, investigative reporter and political editor for 11 years. It was his passion for politics that brought him to Washington, DC, for the remainder of his professional career, where he worked for both the government and private sector. He served as an administrative assistant and ofce manager for two Michigan congressmen, and went on to become the rst director of public information of the U.S. Department of Transportation. In the private sector he was the vice president of the Interstate Natural Gas Association, and he went on to become the senior vice president and Washington ofce manager of a New York public relations rm. He was a member of the National Press Club since 1969, a visiting lecturer in the George Washington University journalism department, and a life member of the Veterans of Foreign War. Ray proudly wore the maize and blue as a University of Michigan alumni association member. While in Lanark, Ray was involved with the Franklin County Democratic Committee, Carrabelle Lighthouse Association, Lanark Village Association, Lanark Golf Club, St. James Bay Golf Resort and he was a charter member of the Wildwood Golf Association. He was a member of the Boat Club and Coast Guard Auxiliary. Ray was an active volunteer with many organizations and individuals in the Lanark and Carrabelle community. Rays greatest accomplishment, however, was that of husband, father and grandfather. He is survived by four children, nine grandchildren, and two great-grandchildren; all will miss him terribly. Ray Courage Zelma Mae Nolton, born in Pittsburgh, Penn. on May 2, 1922, went to her heavenly home Saturday, Aug. 19, 2012. Zelma later moved to California and Texas before relocating permanently to Florida in the 1960s. A long-time resident of Franklin County, Miss Zelma never met a stranger. Through her work with Anchor Realty, she met and was beloved by many for her down-to-earth humor and genuine interest in people. Widowed three times, Zelma was also preceded in death by her youngest son. She is survived and lovingly remembered by two children, six grandchildren, and four great-grandchildren. A graveside service will be held Thursday, Aug. 23, at 3:30 p.m. at the new cemetery, also known as Evergreen Cemetery, in Carrabelle. The cemetery can be found by turning north on Fifth Street off U.S. 98, and then past the Sands condominiums, where the cemetery will be visible on the left. In lieu of owers, memorial contributions may be made to the Salvation Army. Lanark Village will hold a Zelma Nolton remembrance luncheon on Sunday, Sept., 1 at 1 p.m. at Chillas Hall. Zelma Mae Nolton In a parents life, the death of a child no matter what the age is a tragedy beyond comprehension, and almost beyond acceptance. No matter what the cause, such a death changes forever all the lives that have been touched within the circle of family, friends and neighbors. Attempting to move forward back to a normal life can seem to be an insurmountable challenge. Following the death of her young daughter, a bereaved mother, Lynn Rief of San Dismas, Calif., said, After the flowers were dried up and gone, after the visitors stopped coming, I wondered just what I was supposed to do in the weeks, months and years following my daughters death. Would I be the only one who remembered her? Sometimes, it is possible for those left behind to make a positive step forward in memory of their child. Such good came after the horrible death of young Adam Walsh. His father John and mother Reve pushed for the creation of the Missing Children Act in 1982 and the Missing Childrens Assistance Act of 1984. The family also founded the nonprofit Adam Walsh Child Resource Center, and helped lobby Congress to establish the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children in 1984. Stanford University was founded in memory of Leland Stanford, Jr. ; his wealthy mother and father determined that, although they could do nothing further for their own son, the children of California shall be our children. Alabama parents Grant and Kim Mizell started the Taylor Mizell Foundation in memory of their son who died after a four-year struggle with cancer. The non-profit organizations slogan is Touching Lives Forever and helps other families receive financial and emotional support from those uniquely qualified to understand the tragic experience. The small city of Carrabelle offers another such positive opportunity in memory of a beautiful child, lost to cancer at the age of 44. Lisa Crowder Jackson struggled and died from leukemia in Dec. 2002. She was the beloved daughter of Jimmie and the late Bobbie Crowder, of Carrabelle and Tallahassee. Jimmie, owner of C Quarters Marina and Jimmy Crowder Excavating and Land Clearing of Tallahassee, has dedicated his C-Quarters of Carrabelle staff and waterfront facility to a unique Kingfish Shootout fishing tournament, sponsored annually for the last nine years in Lisas honor and memory. Participants bring their boats from hundreds of miles away to support this important cause through competition. To date, $667,000 dollars has been donated for leukemia research. This year alone, more than 40 Gold, Silver and Bronze level sponsors, many areawide donors, plus the personal dedication and generosity of all contributors made this latest event successful. Paula Luberto, the Jackson Family, (The cooker man) Ron Hays Liquid Transport and Progress Energy were some well-known names showcased on this years sponsor board. Each donated dollar from the tournament carries the hopes for a cure on behalf of other peoples children, although it is too late to change the tragic outcome of the disease for the Crowder family. Participants come from a wide geographic area to enjoy the sportsmanship and fishing challenge of the annual Kingfish shootout fundraising tournament, held the first weekend of August. Sponsors, donations and profits successfully dedicate thousands of dollars each year to help research and fight this dread cancer of the blood. Monies are used to seek the causes, understand the mechanics of the disease and find cures for leukemia which took the life of Lisa and too many other children of loving but helpless parents. In the United States, every four minutes someone is diagnosed with one of the four types of cancer of the blood. More than 53,000 people died last year from the blood cancers of leukemia, lymphoma, myeloma and MDS (myelodysplastic syndrome). Leukemia killed 21,780 that year. Every 10 minutes on every clock saw the US cancer death of a spouse, family member, loved one or friend from these diseases that affect bone marrow, blood cells, lymph nodes and the lymphatic system. Although leukemia survival rates have improved over the last quarter century, moving upward from 34 percent in 1975 to 57 percent between 2001 and 2007, better statistics alone were not good enough to save Lisa Crowder Jackson in 2002. Leukemia ranks seventh as the cancer killer of women in the US. In 2011, there were 3,440 new cases of leukemia in Florida; there were 1,570 deaths in Florida from leukemia that same year. Donations raised during this memorial C Quarters tournament empower scientists, doctors and researchers to find cures and treatments so that other families can be spared the terrible loss and grief experienced by the Crowders and too many other families. Gone but not forgotten To a good soldier, Happy Birthday. I have fought a good fight, I have finished my course, I have kept the faith: Henceforth there is laid up for me a crown of righteousness, which the Lord, the righteous judge, shall give me at that day: and not to me only, but unto all them also that love his appearing. 2 Timothy 4, v. 7-8 From Eula and family RA Y COURAGE Obituaries In Memory WILLIE WEA VER Kingsh shootout has hooks in leukemia Faith BRIEFS Following the death of her young daughter, a bereaved mother, Lynn Rief of San Dismas, Calif., said, After the owers were dried up and gone, after the visitors stopped coming, I wondered just what I was supposed to do in the weeks, months and years following my daughters death. THOUGHTS FOR THE TIMES Mel Kelly Faith

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Email outdoors news to timesoutdoors @star .com O UTDOORS www.apalachtimes.com Section Section A By ALAN PEIRCE Special to the Times When I rst heard my brother-in-law, James Jim Bob Higgins, talking about catching full-grown greater amberjack on spinning tackle and top-water plugs, I was a bit skeptical, to say the least. Old Jim Bob, who has caught his share of AJs out of Carrabelle, is known to tell a sh tale or two. But this one has been veri ed, and if you get a chance to see what Im talking about, I promise you wont be disappointed. Greater amberjack, which opened for recreational harvest in Gulf state and federal waters Aug. 1, are one of the strongest sh in the sea. They have been known to break expensive rods and bring the burliest of shermen to their knees. Social in nature, when you nd one, you generally nd a whole bunch. They love arti cial reef structures with an ample amount of vertical relief. Need help nding an arti cial reef to sh on? Visit MyFWC.com/Fishing and click on Saltwater and Arti cial Reefs for coordinates in your area. Water depth is also very important. In my experience, which is primarily limited to the Florida Panhandle region, the minimum depth for good amberjack shing is about 65 feet, and most of the larger jacks will be in water depths greater than 80 feet. Once you are anchored over the right location, whats next? I like to start with some live bait to get them all red up. Using a standard slip-lead bottom/ sh nder rig with 60to 80pound test, drop a few frisky pin sh, grunts or blue runners halfway to the bottom. If AJs are in the area, it shouldnt take long for the live bait to be inhaled. Remember, circle hooks are required when using natural bait and shing for reef sh, which includes amberjack. Be sure to have your drag set appropriately for the tackle. With a circle hook, dont ever try to set the hook. The AJ will do all the work, so just hang on till your rod bends over and its pretty much sh-on from there! Once you catch a few on the grouper rod, put all that heavy tackle away and break out the spinning rods and bait-casters. I dont mean your bait rod with 8-pound test, but something in the 17to 30-pound range is perfect. The next thing you want to do is tie on a short piece of 40to 50-pound mono leader and a big, obnoxious, top-water popping plug. I dont think the color matters as long as its something bright and highly visible. Anything that catches your eye in the tackle store will also catch the jacks, but you want to use one of the atfaced chugger-type plugs that are designed to make a lot of commotion when you snatch them across the water. Remember to remove the treble hooks and replace with a single hook. You might also want to smash the barb down to facilitate hook removal or go with no hook at all if youre not intending to keep any more sh and just want to see some action. Work the plug fast and watch the jacks explode in excitement! Get close-up photos or video of the action by dragging the plug in a gure-eight pattern right next to the boat. To keep the school of AJs in range, you might need to periodically chum with some of the live bait. Good luck, and if you try them on the top-water plugs, give me a shout and let me know how you did or send me some photos or video to post on our website: MyFWC.com. Remember, on the Atlantic side, there is no closed season, so you can enjoy this shery on a year-round basis. The minimum size limit is 28 inches fork length in the Atlantic and 30 inches fork length in the Gulf, and the daily bag limit is one sh per person. Gone Coastal is one of many ways that the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission Division of Marine Fisheries Management helps recreational anglers understand complex saltwater regulations and learn more about the states saltwater shing opportunities. We are also available to answer questions by phone or email anytime, and would love the opportunity to share information through inperson presentations with recreational or commercial shing organizations. To contact the FWCs Regulatory Outreach subsection call 487-0554 or email Alan. Peirce@MyFWC.com. Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL (next to Piggly Wiggly) www.BWOsh.com (next to Piggly Wiggly) www.BWOsh.com Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL (next to Piggly Wiggly) www.BWOsh.com Corner of Marina Drive, www.BWOsh.com Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL www.BWOsh.com Port St. Joe, FL EV E RYTHING FOR YOUR O UTDOOR ADV E NTUR E Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL EV E EV E EV RYTHING FOR YOUR E RYTHING FOR YOUR E O UTDOOR ADV E UTDOOR ADV E UTDOOR ADV NTUR E NTUR E E AUGUST FEATURE FISH: Stop in and register or go online at www. B W O sh.com AUGUST FEATURE FISH: Stop in and register or go online at Stop in and register or go online at Stop in and register or go online at KINGFISH $5.00 ENTRY FOR TH E ENTIR E YE AR GREAT PRIZES WEEKLY ALMANAC APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE TIDE TABLES MONTHLY AVERAGES To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from these given for APALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW Cat Point Minus 0:40 Minus 1:17 East Pass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27 To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from those given for CARRABELLE: HIGH LOW Bald Point Minus 9:16 Minus 0:03 Sponsor the WEEKLY ALMANAC Call Today! 653-8868 Date High Low % Precip Thu, August 23 85 74 50 % Fri, August 24 85 75 30 % Sat, August 25 84 75 30 % Sun, August 26 83 75 30 % Mon, August 27 85 76 60 % Tues, August 28 85 75 20 % Wed, August 29 84 75 20 % 22 We 536am 3.0 739pm 2.2 1208pm 0.6 1114pm 1.8 23 Th 608am 3.0 926pm 2.1 127pm 0.6 1134pm 1.9 24 Fr 649am 3.0 302pm 0.5 25 Sa 742am 3.0 429pm 0.3 26 Su 851am 3.0 540pm 0.3 27 Mo 231am 2.4 1017am 3.0 416am 2.2 637pm 0.2 28 Tu 246am 2.4 1145am 2.9 545am 2.2 725pm 0.3 29 We 305am 2.6 100pm 3.0 647am 1.9 806pm 0.3 30 Th 322am 2.6 201pm 2.9 737am 1.6 840pm 0.6 31 Fr 336am 2.6 255pm 2.9 821am 1.4 908pm 0.8 23 Th 608am 3.0 926pm 2.1 127pm 0.6 1134pm 1.9 24 Fr 649am 3.0 302pm 0.5 25 Sa 742am 3.0 429pm 0.3 26 Su 851am 3.0 540pm 0.3 27 Mo 231am 2.4 1017am 3.0 416am 2.2 637pm 0.2 28 Tu 246am 2.4 1145am 2.9 545am 2.2 725pm 0.3 29 We 305am 2.6 100pm 3.0 647am 1.9 806pm 0.3 30 Th 322am 2.6 201pm 2.9 737am 1.6 840pm 0.6 31 Fr 336am 2.6 255pm 2.9 821am 1.4 908pm 0.8 FreeTideTables.com For comparison only Times are local Tides in feet from MLLW Date Day High Tide High Tide Low Tide Low Tide 1 Sa 513am 1.6 508pm 1.8 1114am 0.8 1144pm 0.7 2 Su 526am 1.7 556pm 1.7 1152am 0.6 3 Mo 540am 1.7 645pm 1.6 1203am 0.8 1230pm 0.6 4 Tu 559am 1.8 737pm 1.6 1221am 1.0 109pm 0.5 1 Sa 348am 2.6 343pm 2.9 901am 1.3 931pm 1.1 2 Su 401am 2.7 431pm 2.7 939am 1.0 950pm 1.3 3 Mo 415am 2.7 520pm 2.6 1017am 1.0 1008pm 1.6 4 Tu 434am 2.9 612pm 2.6 1056am 0.8 1028pm 1.8 The MBARA king sh tournament will be going on this weekend, so hundreds of boats will be in our waters, making for some crowded boat ramps and long lines. The offshore grouper bite is the best bet going with a amberjack in the mix. Most anglers are shing the hard bottom 40 plus miles due south from Cape San Blas. Inshore Offshore As the rain continues, St. Joe Bay will remain stained and muddy this week. Although the bad weather is upon us again this week, the shing is rather good. Great catches of trout and ounder are reported around the Pig Island area. Try shing the deeper channels for mid-afternoon action. SPONSORED BY Thursday, August 23, 2012 Page 8 Twelve-year-old Caitlin Smith makes her annual visit to St. George Island to see her grandparents, Joe and Charolette Bacher, a little more meaningful for the environment. For the second time, she organized a beach cleanup during her stay. About 30 volunteers turned out to help Aug. 15, and gathered about 450 pounds of trash off the public beach. The most common items collected were popup tents, beach chairs, plastic bottles and cans. We need to remember to remove these personal items from the beach so as to help sea turtle nesting and hatching. Litter puts marine life in jeopardy, said Smith. She thanked the volunteers, both visitors and residents, who helped with the event, the businesses who let her post flyers and most of all Grandma and Grandpa who provided refreshments to volunteers after the job was done. At Carrabelles Aug. 2 city meeting, Mayor Curley Messer announced that the Coast Guard detachment currently based in Carrabelle along with the cutter Sea Hawk is moving to Panama City. Messer said the harbor has become too narrow for the boat and would cost $5 million to dredge. He said the greatest anticipated loss in revenue to the city is about $4,000 the base spends monthly on supplies at the IGA. The move is scheduled for Nov. 1. Messer said he had made several calls attempting to stop the move but had been unsuccessful. Full moon climb at Cape St. George Lighthouse The August Blue Moon Climb at the Cape St. George Lighthouse on St. George Island will be held on Friday, August 31. The Sunset/Full Moon Climb will take place from 7:30 to 9 p.m. and will include light hors doeuvres and a sparkling cider toast to the full moon. Cost is $15 for the general public and $10 for members of the St. George Lighthouse Association. The sun will set at 8:02 p.m. and the moon will rise at 7:56 p.m. on August 31. Although there are several de nitions of a blue moon, the term commonly refers to the second full moon in a month. The moon was also full on August 2. After sunset, people are invited to climb to the top of the lighthouse for a breathtaking view of the full moon, as space and time permit. Cost is $10 for the general public and $5 for SGLA members. The Cape St. George Light is located in St. George Lighthouse Park at the center of St. George Island, where Island Drive (the road off the bridge) ends at Gulf Beach Drive. Parking is available in lots at either side of the park. Because space is limited, reservations are recommended. For reservations or more information, please contact the St. George Island Visitor Center at 927-7744 or toll free at 888-927-7744. Keeping it clean, Caitlins way CATHY SMITH | Special to the Times Caitlin Smith Sea Hawk to sail from Carrabelle Taking the ght to AJs AMANDA NALLEY | Special to the Times Kyle Miller holds his catch, a greater amberjack, after reeling it in off the waters of Panama City on an April tagging trip.

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CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA SP O RTS www.apalachtimes.com A Section By BRAD MILNER 747-5065 | @PCNHBradMilner bmilner@pcnh.com EASTPOINT Josh Wright went about his business as Franklin Countys football coach throughout the summer with a roster in his hand that may or may not have included Dwayne Griggs. As the Seahawks enter the preseason classic next week, Griggs, one of the areas top running backs, is back on the listing. Griggs irted with a potential transfer, but the junior will be toting the football for the Seahawks in 2012. Thats enough to make Wright smile, as he eyes a team that he feels can be much better than its 3-7 nish a year ago. Griggs will again be the focal point for an offense fashioned for the running game. He gained more than 800 yards before missing the nal ve games with a back injury. He also scored 13 touchdowns and it doesnt take a high-end computer to calculate what his impact would be over a full season. He seems very grounded and mature in camp, Wright said. He is just at another level over everyone else, hes so football smart. A lot of kids dont have that, but he does. That said, Wright has instilled the belief that it takes a whole team to win games. Having a superstar is important, but it doesnt mean anything if others arent feeding off of it and performing, as was evidenced last season. Its Seahawk football, not just the Dwayne Griggs show, Wright said. Thats the way the team feels. Our goal is to get everyone to their full potential. Wright said Griggs can carry the load, but hes also con dent in senior Skylar Hutchinsons abilities. Hutchinson had more than 400 yards last season in Griggs place and Wright said Franklin County will employ more of a split Veer to keep defenses from keying on one player. Wright said wing Stefan DeVaughn also will work into the plans as a speedy third option. Fullbacks Ladarius Rhodes and Trenton Lee, a senior and freshman, respectively, provide for blocking and power running. Rhodes is 227 and Lee 190, marking a trend at a bigger complement of players to wear down the smaller Class 1A Rural teams. Senior Chase Golden anchors the offensive line and at 292 pounds and will start at right tackle but could move to guard, Wright said. North Carolina transplant Zach Tauscher (6-5, 310) will play at the other guard, senior Jeffrey Murray (242) is at left tackle, senior Karl Sanford, the smallest on the line at 5-9, 210, will play at guard and sophomore Eric Coleman (5-11, 285) will start at center. This is in addition to tight ends seniors Direek Farmer (6-0, 277), who also played basketball, and Holden Foley (6-2, 215), who also can play split end. The mix of experience and youth will gel in time, Wright said, and the line will need to come together quickly to support unproved quarterback Logan McCloud. The junior didnt play the last two seasons with knee issues, but Wright said the problems are behind the quarterback and hes been a quick learner. Wright isnt concerned with offense, however. Franklin County showed it could score last season and in bunches at nearly 23 points per game. But the Seahawks also showed opposing teams could score at will as well, giving up 36 points per game. It starts with that defensive attitude, Wright said. It starts with coming off the ball for us, we need a great start out of the blocks. Franklin County will run a 50 defense that will mirror a 3-4 scheme. There will be a rotation at defensive end along with nose tackle Jacob Wilson, who is quick, Wright said, and can work in multiple gaps. Hutchinson, Rhodes and Kyle Wheeler highlight the linebacking group, which may prove to be even more important in stopping the run, especially against District 4-1A teams with a penchant for rushing. Lee, Tyler Rowell and soccer player Dan Carrino will see time at defensive back, with each needing to grow into the positions. Wright called Lee a versatile athlete who also may see time at linebacker. Carrino also will be the teams punter, with eld position a key factor in stopping teams from scoring. Wright believes Franklin County can close the gap in scoring. He also feels the Seahawks can have a better showing in the district, despite playing with perennial powers Blountstown and Liberty County and expected improved programs at West Gadsden and Port St. Joe. Were looking at an uphill battle, but we want to make it interesting, said Wright, whose Seahawks were winless in district games in 2011. We want to shorten games, slow down the scoring pace and be competitive. SPECIAL TO THE TIMES Hilary Stanton, who teaches middle school social studies at Franklin County School, has been named to succeed Sally Wheeler as the high school volleyball coach. A 2006 graduate with high honors from Apalachicola High School, Stanton earned a bachelors degree from Florida State University. She will be assisted by 2012 Franklin County High School graduate Maegan Andrews. The season gets underway Tuesday, Aug. 28, at Altha and continues Wednesday, Aug. 29, at Class 3A FAMU. After the Labor Day break, play continues Thursday, Sept. 6, at Class 4A Godby and Tuesday, Sept. 11, at Class 2A Wewahitchka. The Lady Seahawks play their rst home game on Thursday, Sept. 13, against Blountstown, a district opponent. New soccer league in the works Organizers are excited to announce the election of the board for the newly-created Franklin County Soccer program, an endeavor to create our own soccer league within Franklin County. We hope to offer more local games, establish full-time soccer elds and boost opportunities in youth sports for the kids of the county, they said. Franklin County youth soccer is for youth ages 4-13 years old. Soccer registration will be available at the Armory in Apalachicola on Saturday, Aug. 25 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.. Forms may also be picked up and dropped off at any Centennial Bank. Please note a copy of their birth certi cate has to be with the returned application. Registration cost is $60 per player, with the nal deadline for registration Aug. 25. The new soccer board is also making an appeal for coaches and referees, with clinics to be offered for both roles. Volunteers and team sponsorships are also being sought, with team sponsorships only $300. For more information feel free to contact Craig Hicks at (850) 556-7210 or Betty Sasnett at 653-7598. Seahawks look for teamwork, defensive boost Sports BRIEF DON FORD PHOTOGRAPHY | Special to the Times Coaching this years Seahawks are, from left, assistants Michael Sweatt and Ashley Teat, head coach Josh Wright, kneeling, and assistants Bronson Sweatt and Tim Wheeler. Thursday, August 23, 2012 Page 9 FRANKLIN COUNTY FOOTBALL SCHEDULE Friday Aug. 24 Bozeman (Kickoff Classic) Friday, Aug. 31 @ Sneads Friday, Sept. 7 Graceville Friday, Sept. 14 @ Cottondale Friday, Sept. 21 @ Liberty County Friday, Sept. 28 Wewahitchka (Homecoming) Friday, Oct. 5 Port St. Joe Friday, Oct. 12 @ Bell Friday, Oct. 19 West Gadsden Friday, Oct. 26 @ Blountstown Friday, Nov. 9 South Walton Special to the Times The Nest after-school program will resume Monday, August 27, at two locations in Eastpoint and Carrabelle. The Eastpoint program is housed at the Franklin County Learning Center, 85 School Road, and is open from 2-5:30 p.m. weekdays. The Carrabelle Municipal Complex site, at 1001 Gray Avenue, is open from 2:45-5:45 p.m. The Nest, a 21st Century Community Learning Center administered by the school district, is open to students in preK through eighth grades. The Nest had a great summer program and is ready to make this school year the best ever. New programs this year include homework assistance and weekly character classes, part of an interdisciplinary character education program that combines reading, drama, community service and family activities to help students develop positive character traits. We will also be offering art, recreation, health and academic instruction in reading, math and science. Bus transportation is provided to both sites following the nal bell. Pre-K students living in Eastpoint will enter our program at the Franklin County Learning Center; Carrabelle Pre-K will be bused to the Carrabelle site. New transportation department requirements this year specify that students riding the morning bus in one city cannot attend a Nest location in a different city. For instance, if a student rides the Apalachicola bus, he or she will not be permitted to be dropped off at the Eastpoint Nest. Student applications are available at the Franklin County Learning Center, Franklin County School or at www. franklincountynest.org Please return the application to the program site. For more information, contact Eastpoint site director Emily Spindler at 670-2820 or Carrabelle site director Joy Shiver at 697-2177. The Nest is in need of certi ed teachers for both sites to lead reading, math and/or hands-on science activities for multiple age groups. Pay is $23 per hour, and we will make every attempt to accommodate your schedule if you can only work a few days a week. If you are interested in applying, please contact project coordinator Despina Williams at 670-2810 x 4131 or dwilliams@ franklin.k12. .us EMILY SPINDLER | Special to the Times Jonathan Kuhne and Hayleigh Mann perform the balcony scene of Romeo and Juliet during the Eastpoint Nests end of summer program. The Nest after-school program begins Monday Stanton named volleyball coach

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Local A10 | The Times Thursday, August 23, 2012 Trades & Services 653-8868 GET YOUR AD IN C A LL T ODAY! Laban Bontrager, DMD Monica Bontrager, DMD 12761 Pea Ridge Road Bristol, Florida 32321 TELEPHONE (850) 643-5417 Bristol Dental Clinic DENTURE LAB ON PREMISES Same Day Service on Repairs and Relines Don Lively General Contractors L ICENSED AND I NSURED 20 Y EARS E XPERIENCE P .O. Box 439 C arrabelle, FL 32322 697-2783 or Mobile 566-2603 RC 0066499 R G0065255 Carrabelle Visa, Discover, and American Express Honored at Participating Ace Stores JACKSONS Building Supplies Building Supplies & Auto Repair Carrabelle 697-3333 We Deliver Anywhere Hardware and Paint Center J.J.s Tree Service, LLC Stump Grinder Licensed & Insured Call John : (850) 899-8432 ROBERTS APPLIANCE REPAIR ALL MAJOR BRANDS 18 Shadow Lane Apalachicola, FL 32320 Phone: (850) 653-8122 Cell: (850) 653-7654 GET YOUR AD IN 653-8868 Trades & Services GET YOUR AD IN 653-8868 Trades & Services $735,000, and now is in a position where $800,000 was what we needed to trim. Were only at about $350,000 at best, he said. Weve got to get to $800,000 because we got to make up for what we lost last year. Before debating the cuts, the board heard from two parents, Paige Richards and Penny Sutton, both of whom urged the board to consider carefully the effect of the steps they were about to make. Richards, wife of Eastpoint businessman Mike Richards, said cutting out the Spanish class and replacing it with a program where students take a language online through Florida Virtual School, is not the answer. Kids who do that have to be really self-motivated, self-directed, she said, stressing that it would re ect poorly on the district if it cant offer a college-ready diploma. Richards said she and her husband had bought property in Indian Pass and were prepared to act on a request to transfer their children to the Gulf County schools. Sutton, too, offered words of caution, arguing the math coach position was needed to help students, such as her child, who struggled with math. I still dont know if hes ready for ninth-grade math, Sutton said, sharing frustration that though she can handle bookkeeping tasks for her business, she is not familiar enough with modern math curriculums to tutor her son. I cant help him with his math, she said. Give the kids what they need; some kids just dont get it. I understand cutting the fat; I have worked with budgets many a year, Sutton said. But I dont think cutting teachers to subsidize something else thats been thrown in the budget (is a good idea). When it comes down to the end of the day, get the teacher there, the right teachers. A student comes out of a multimillion dollar high school and cant go to college because he cant take Spanish? she asked. That makes no sense to me. Support for the cutting out of Spanish classes was lead by Board Member David Hinton, a retired science teacher and Air Force veteran, who said his views were based on my many years of experience ying around the world. I couldnt talk to them people in Spanish, but they could talk to me in English ne, he said. I ew around the world nine times (and found) they had to speak English. English is the worlds language. I dont know why we pick Spanish as the language we need to teach people, Hinton continued. If they need to teach a foreign language, teach Latin, which is the whole foundation of Spanish. Lets quit emphasizing Spanish. I think its a politically correct thing because theres a lot of Spanish people, he said. They dont need to know Spanish; they need to know English. Board Member Carl Whaley spoke against cutting Spanish, noting that we had quite a few kids who were college-bound at graduation this year. Do we harm our kids by cutting that out, or do we nd other ways? He proposed adding 10 to 20 minutes to each school day, which he said would provide students more teaching time, but save money in the long run because the school year would be trimmed and money saved. His suggestion was not picked up by fellow board members and was not taken to a vote. Whaley and Board Member Teresa Ann Martin were the only two no votes to the motion to cut Spanish, which is expected to save about $48,000. Trying to learn another foreign language on computer is going to be dif cult on our students, Martin said. Times are not what they used to be There was little discussion, and unanimous support, for two items on Marks list of cuts: a 5 percent across-the-board reduction in pay for district administrators and school board members, estimated to save $110,000, and the elimination of a ninth custodian position, which will save $35,000. The other item to draw considerable discussion was the elimination of a school resource of cer and of a math coach. Columbine did not plan to have a person walk in and take the lives of a lot of students, Whaley said. The school board fought for this (of cer). I understand the cuts, but at least cut it in half, to see if the sheriff is willing to pay for half of one of cer. At least have a presence of an of cer on that campus. That of cer knows our children, they know their school life, they know their home life, he said. You never know whats going to happen. In her remarks, Sutton voiced support for the resource of cer as well. Times are not what they used to be, she said. Its just a whole new world than it was 25 years ago. Asked by the board how the Apalachicola Bay Charter School handles law enforcement issues, Principal Chimene Johnson said there is no of cer on campus, but the school can call an Apalachicola police of cer at a moments notice. Within the city, its such a conned area, they can be there a lot quicker, Whaley said. Theres no telling where your deputy sheriffs will be inside the county. We need an SRO on that campus. Whaleys motion to split the SRO funding with the sheriffs ofce was seconded by Martin. I think its important when kids see someone in a uniform, theyre going to respect the law, she said. Though the motion passed 3-2 to eliminate the SRO, it is not clear when that will happen, how much it will save given that there is some grant funding and whether the sheriff will agree to assume some or all of the funding. Marks said the SRO is funded through October, with any new agreement starting then, so that the move could save the district about half the annual salary, or $21,000. District of cials indicated they planned to meet with incoming sheriff Mike Mock to discuss options for a new contract. The board also voted to cut out the activity bus that shuttles students involved in extracurricular activities back home after practices or after-school meetings. Martin urged the board to keep at least one bus route running, especially because many students do not drive to school and rely on others for transportation home. In the end, she said she was forced to vote reluctantly in favor of the $35,000 cut, which passed unanimously. The school board also passed unanimously a plan to save about $43,000 by eliminating a middle school career education position that was held by Jennifer Edwards and having a social studies teacher assume those duties. Edwards was moved to the high school to replace Sally Wheeler in teaching digital design, part of the computer curriculum. Wheeler resigned earlier this summer to assume a position in the Wakulla County Schools. Gander argued for cutting the math coach position, saying it would save the district at least $75,000. His suggestion drew Principal George Oehlert to come forward to speak, who warned against the move. We cannot cut staff unless we tell children not to go school, he said. You cant have math classes today with 30-40 kids in class. We need teachers to teach those children. Weve got to help these children with math, Oehlert said. They need the guidance of that expert math teacher for at least one year to bring this all together. (The math faculty) are better organized than theyve ever been to teach. Gander countered that while the math coach position had been in place for two years, school test grades in the subject had not improved. Oehlert countered that the position had not been narrowly tailored to strictly math coaching, but had been dispersed into other technology-related duties. She wasnt allowed to do her job, he said, noting afterward that the math coach needs to be in the classroom, seeing what is going on and then modeling what needs to be done. Gander said he would push to nd enough money to put the math coach back in but wanted it eliminated from the current budget. His motion died for lack of a second. Teacher pay cuts to be addressed Even with the approved cuts, the school district still must reopen negotiations to discuss whether teachers are willing to forgo pay or see bene ts cut back in light of circumstances. Gander opened the meeting by moving to have the budget discussion at the start of the meeting and signaled that he would push for teacher concessions. He said he would like to see the district save $40,000 by eliminating the agent of record for its health insurance plans, but said even if enacted, the cut wouldnt take effect until next year. That savings wont be realized until Jan. 1, he said. We have to look at the insurance picture at that time. The districts insurance committee is slated to meet Sept. 24, and possibly a second time Oct. 1. Gander also said he would like to see the district push for a chunk of the RESTORE Act money that is down the road for the county, although not during the upcoming scal year. Theres supposed to be a whole lot of money coming for the county, he said. I think we ought to all politic the county commission to get a portion of that money. Gander said he was frustrated district of cials had provided budget projections several months ago that appeared rosy, only to learn this summer of the districts nancial crunch. We negotiated then and we negotiated on what we had, on whatever we were given, and the information that was provided us, he said. At that time, the district agreed to give teachers step increases, which boost the pay scale, modestly, based on an additional year of service. Theres nothing we can do now, Gander said, unless we buy a lottery ticket every week and pray we hit before now and June. Weve got serious problems and were beyond trying to gure what happened and where we went. When you went to the fair and you only had so much to spend, you cant negotiate anything, he said. You just have that much to spend. Hinton said he expected to see negotiations include discussion of possible furlough days, which in the past has meant teachers would give up the pay they receive when they are off for federal holidays. But, he said, he would rather see pay cuts than teacher layoffs. We have a class size minimum, but theres one thing we have a choice. Theres no law that says we have to pay them a dime, he said, making the point the district would have more latitude with salary and bene ts than in other areas. We need to stress to our employees that theyre going to have to have a reduction, he said. Were going to have to cut salaries. Nobody on this board will disagree that I havent been the strongest supporter of teacher salaries. Ive always done the best I could. They need to recognize that were in a bind. Hinton proposed a possible negative bonus, which would involve a 5 percent reduction in salaries that could be recouped at years end. If we reach the end of the year and if we somehow can get our nances in order and we can pay that bonus out to them, he said. At least that can cut our budget down to where we can work it, and I dont think that would be hard to negotiate. Cathy Woods, who leads the local teachers union, thanked the board for their support of teachers in the past, noting that the 10 percent raise a few years ago had stood out among her colleagues around the state. She promised to work with the board in the upcoming negotiations. Theres lots of things in the works, and we do need to go to the table, she said. We want to be a help, we want to be there for the children. We will try our best to help and accommodate the countys needs. Gander, too, sought an atmosphere for cooperation. Well all work together, he said. We still have a bunch of struggles ahead of us. SCHOOL BOARD from page A1

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, August 23, 2012 The Times | A11 88559T NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED Notice if hereby given that, MIKE B. BLAKE, the holders of the following certificate have filed said certificate for tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property and the name in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No: 1400 Year of issuance: 2010 Description of Property: Lot 7 Block 28 City of Apalachicola PARCEL NO: 01-09s-08w-8330-0028-00 70 Name is which assessed: John R. Bird All of said property being in the State of Florida, Franklin County. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the Courthouse door on the second (2nd) Monday in the month of September 2012, which is the 10th day of September 2012 at 11:00 a.m. DATED this 18th day of July, 2012. MARCIA M. JOHNSON CLERK OF COURTS FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Cassie B. Sapp Deputy Clerk August 2, 9, 16, 23, 2012 88555T NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED Notice if hereby given that, GARY MICHAEL MITCHELL Trustee of the Gary Michael Mitchell Revocable Trust, the holders of the following certificate have filed said certificate for tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property and the name in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No: 606 Year of issuance: 2009 Description of Property: Lots 1 through 16 Block 32(183) Keough’s Second Addition, City of Carrabelle Full Legal Description can be viewed at Clerk of the Circuit Court’s Office. PARCEL NO: 20-07s-04w-4212-0032-00 10 Name is which assessed: SGI LAND COMPANY LLC All of said property being in the State of Florida, Franklin County. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the Courthouse door on the second (2nd) Monday in the month of September 2012, which is the 10th day of September 2012 at 11:00 a.m. DATED this 19th day of July, 2012. MARCIA M. JOHNSON CLERK OF COURTS FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Cassie B. Sapp Deputy Clerk August 2, 9, 16, 23, 2012 88647T NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED Notice if hereby given that, GARY MICHAEL MITCHELL Trustee of the Gary Michael Mitchell Revocable Trust, the holders of the following certificate have filed said certificate for tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property and the name in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No: 594 Year of issuance: 2009 Description of Property: Lots 1 through 16 Block 16(161) Keough’s Second Addition, City of Carrabelle Full Legal Description can be viewed at Clerk of the Circuit Court’s Office. PARCEL NO: 20-07s-04w-4212-00160010 Name is which assessed: SGI LAND COMPANY LLC All of said property being in the State of Florida, Franklin County. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the Courthouse door on the second (2nd) Monday in the month of September 2012, which is the 10th day of September 2012 at 11:00 a.m. DATED this 26th day of July, 2012. MARCIA M. JOHNSON CLERK OF COURTS FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Cassie B. Sapp Deputy Clerk August 2, 9, 16, 23, 2012 88645T NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED Notice if hereby given that, GARY MICHAEL MITCHELL Trustee of the Gary Michael Mitchell Revocable Trust, the holders of the following certificate have filed said certificate for tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property and the name in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No: 597 Year of issuance: 2009 Description of Property: Lots 1 through 16 Block 19(164) Keough’s Second Addition, City of Carrabelle Full Legal Description can be viewed at Clerk of the Circuit Court’s Office. PARCEL NO: 20-07s-04w-4212-00190010 Name is which assessed: SGI LAND COMPANY LLC All of said property being in the State of Florida, Franklin County. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the Courthouse door on the second (2nd) Monday in the month of September 2012, which is the 10th day of September 2012 at 11:00 a.m. DATED this 26th day of July, 2012. MARCIA M. JOHNSON CLERK OF COURTS FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Cassie B. Sapp Deputy Clerk August 2, 9, 16, 23, 2012 88709T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 11-000078-CA Ameris Bank, as successor to the Central Bank of Georgia, a Georgia Banking Corporation, Plaintiff, vs. Estate of Andreww Scott Cobb, Deceased, University Internal Medicine, Credit Bureau of Southwest Georgia, Inc. Jesus M. Ramirez, MD Panhandle Anesthesiologists, Inc. Phoebe Putney c/o Robert L. Kraselky Gulf County EMS Credit Bureau of Panama City, Ltd. Bay Medical ER Physicians Rao, Reddy, Alibibi and Finlaw, MD Ray Radiology Associates, P.A. Practice Plus of SW Georgia, SWCA-P Bay Pharmacokinetic Associates, Bay Pathology Associates, P.A. Emerals Coast Gastroenterology Associates, P.A. Florida Inpt Medicines Assoc. LLC, Cardiology Associates, P.A. Panhandle Emergency Physicians Bay Medical Center Deb Bense, Esq., Guardian Ad Litem For Holland Elizabeth Cobb, and Cardiology Associates, P.A. Defendants. NOTICE OF JUDICIAL SALE PURSUANT TO SECTION 45.031(1) OF THE FLORIDA STATUTES TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosures entered on July 26, 2012, in Case Number 11-78-CA of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit Court, will sell at public sale the following described real property: Lot 8, Block 141 (Old Black F), Range 9, Picketts Addition to the City of Carrabelle, a subdivision as per map or plat thereof in Plat Book 2, Page 20 of the public records of Franklin County, Florida. The sale will be held on September 11, 2012, at 11:00 A.M. (Eastern Time) to the highest and best bidder for cash, at the Second Floor Lobby of the Franklin County Courthouse in Apalachicola, Florida, in accordance with Section 45.031 of the Florida Statutes. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 30th day of July, 2012. MARCIA M. JOHNSON Clerk of Court By: Michele Maxwell As Deputy Clerk August 23, 30, 2012 88920T IN THE CIRCUIT CIVIL COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 2009-CA-000661 CITIMORTGAGE, INC. Plaintiff, vs. EDITH A. PATERSON, ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT (S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES OR OTHER CLAIMANTS, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND UNKNOWN TENANTS/OWNERS, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given, pursuant to Final Judgment of Foreclosure for Plaintiff entered in this case on, in the Circuit Court of Franklin County, Florida, I will sell the property situated in Franklin County, Florida described as: COMMENCE AT AN OLD TERRA COTTA MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 27, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA AND THENCE RUN NORTH ALONG THE WEST BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION 27 A DISTANCE OF 1628.05 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 21 SECONDS EAST 900.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING, THENCE RUN SOUTH 77 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 24 SECONDS EAST 442.3 9 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 12 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 44 SECONDS WEST 260.50 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 84 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 50 SECONDS WEST 375.02 FEET TO THE CENTERLINE OF A 60.00 FOOT ROADWAY EASEMENT; THENCE RUN SOUTH ALONG SAID CENTERLINE 188.51 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING CONTAINING 2.00 ACRES MORE OR LESS. SUBJECT TO AN ACCESS EASEMENT OVER AND ACROSS THE NORTHERLY AND WESTERLY 30.00 FEET THEREOF. TOGETHER WITH A NON-EXCLUSIVE EASEMENT FOR INGRESS AND EGRESS, UTILITIES AND PURPOSES COMMONLY ASSOCIATED WITH ACCESS WAYS OVER, ACROSS AND WITHIN: (A) A STRIP 60 FEET WIDE TERMINATING IN A CUL-DE-SAC WITH 50 FOOT RADIUS, LYING 30 FEET ON EACH SIDE OF THE FOLLOWING CENTERLINE AND CONTINUATION THEREOF, TO-WIT: COMMENCE AT AN OLD TERRA COTTA MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 27, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA AND THENCE RUN NORTH ALONG THE WEST BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION 27 A DISTANCE OF 1628.05 FEET; THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 21 SECONDS EAST 900.00 FEET; THENCE RUN NORTH 587.75 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 84 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 50 SECONDS EAST 1129.33 FEET TO THE WESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF A & N RAILROAD FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING THENCE RUN NORTH 84 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 50 SECONDS WEST 1129.33 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 1055.80 FEET TO THE CENTER POINT OF CUL-DE-SAC HAVING A 50.00 FOOT RADIUS AND THE TERMINATION POINT OF SAID CENTERLINE AND; (B) A STRIP OF 60 FEET WIDE DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT AN OLD TERRA COTTA MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 27, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA AND THENCE RUN NORTH ALONG THE WEST BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION 27 A DISTANCE OF 2976.35 FEET; THENCE RUN NORTH 51 DEGREES 16 MINUTES 32 SECONDS EAST 1574.83 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE NORTH 51 DEGREES 16 MINUTES 32 SECONDS EAST 62.75 FEET TO THE WESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY OF THE A & N RAILROAD; THENCE RUN SOUTH 21 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 35 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY 1987.50 FEET TO THE INTERSECTION WITH THE NORTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY OF A 60.00 FOOT ROADWAY EASEMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 84 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 50 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID NORTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY 67.27 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 21 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 35 SECONDS WEST 1938.70 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, AND; (C) A STRIP 60 FEET WIDE DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: RUNNING NORTHWESTERLY FROM THE NORTHERLY END OF THE RIGHT-OF-WAY DESCRIBED IN (B) ABOVE, LYING ADJACENT TO THE RIGHT OF WAY OF THE A & N RAILROAD AND BLUFF ROAD TO INTERSECT WITH THE EXISTING “BORROW PIT” ROAD, BEING THAT RIGHT OF WAY RESERVED TO GRANTOR IN DEED OF DECEMBER 14, 1994, FROM GRANTOR HEREIN TO OLAN B. WARD AND WIFE MARTHA PEARL WARD, FURTHER DESCRIBED AS: COMMENCE AT AN OLD TERRA COTTA MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 27, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA AND THENCE RUN NORTH ALONG THE WEST BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION 27 A DISTANCE OF 2976.35 FEET; THENCE RUN NORTH 51 DEGREES 16 MINUTES 32 SECONDS EAST 1574.83 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE NORTH 51 DEGREES 16 MINUTES 32 SECONDS EAST 62.75 FEET TO THE WESTERLY-RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF BLUFF ROAD; THENCE RUN NORTH 21 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 35 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 100.00 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 51 DEGREES 16 MINUTES 32 SECONDS WEST 62.75 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 21 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 35 SECONDS EAST 100.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING CONTAINING 0.14 OF AN ACRE, MORE OR LESS. LESS AND EXCEPT THE FOLLOWING: COMMENCE AT AN OLD TERRA COTTA MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 27, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN NORTH ALONG THE WEST BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION 27 A DISTANCE OF 1628.05 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 21 SECONDS EAST 900.00 FEET TO THE CENTERLINE OF A 60.00 FOOT ACCESS EASEMENT FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING THENCE RUN NORTH ALONG SAID CENTERLINE 188.51 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 84 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 50 SECONDS EAST 214.94 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 218.47 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 77 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 24 SECONDS WEST 219.69 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING CONTAINING 1.00 ACRE, MORE OR LESS. SUBJECT TO AN ACCESS EASEMENT OVER AND ACROSS THE WESTERLY 30.00 FEET AND THE NORTHERLY 20.00 FEET THEREOF. TOGETHER WITH A NON-EXCLUSIVE EASEMENT FOR INGRESS AND EGRESS, UTILITIES AND PURPOSES COMMONLY ASSOCIATED WITH ACCESS WAYS OVER, ACROSS AND WITHIN: (A) A STRIP 60 FEET WIDE TERMINATING IN A CUL-DE-SAC WITH 50 FOOT RADIUS, LYING 3 0 FEET ON EACH SIDE OF THE FOLLOWING CENTERLINE AND CONTINUATION THEREOF, TO-WIT: COMMENCE AT AN OLD TERRA COTTA MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 27, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA AND THENCE RUN NORTH ALONG THE WEST BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION 27 A DISTANCE OF 1628.05 FEET; THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 21 SECONDS EAST 900.00 FEET; THENCE RUN NORTH 587.75 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 84 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 50 SECONDS EAST 1129.33 FEET TO THE WESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF A & N RAILROAD FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING THENCE RUN NORTH 84 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 50 SECONDS WEST 1129.33 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 1055.80 FEET TO THE CENTERPOINT OF CUL-DE-SAC HAVING A 50.00 FOOT RADIUS AND THE TERMINATION POINT OF SAID CENTERLINE, AND; (B) A STRIP OF 60 FEET WIDE DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT AN OLD TERRA COTTA MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 27, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA AND THENCE RUN NORTH ALONG THE WEST BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION 27 A DISTANCE OF 2976.35 FEET; THENCE RUN NORTH 51 DEGREES 16 MINUTES 32 SECONDS EAST 1574.83 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE NORTH 51 DEGREES 16 MINUTES 32 SECONDS EAST 62.75 FEET TO THE WESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY OF THE A & N RAILROAD; THENCE RUN SOUTH 21 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 35 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY 1987.50 FEET TO THE INTERSECTION WITH THE NORTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY OF A 60.00 FOOT ROADWAY EASEMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 84 DEGREES 4 8 MINUTES 50 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID NORTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY 67.27 FEET, THENCE RUN SCHEDULE A NORTH 21 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 35 SECONDS WEST 1938.70 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, AND; (C) A STRIP 60 FEET WIDE DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: RUNNING NORTHWESTERLY FROM THE NORTHERLY END OF THE RIGHT-OF-WAY DESCRIBED IN (B) ABOVE, LYING ADJACENT TO THE RIGHT OF WAY OF THE A & N RAILROAD AND BLUFF ROAD TO INTERSECT WITH THE EXISTING “BORROW PIT” ROAD, BEING THAT RIGHT OF WAY RESERVED TO GRANTOR IN DEED OF DECEMBER 14, 1994, FROM GRANTOR HEREIN TO OLAN B. WARD AND WIFE MARTHA PEARL WARD, FURTHER DESCRIBED AS: COMMENCE AT AN OLD TERRA COTTA MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 27, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA AND THENCE RUN NORTH ALONG THE WEST BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION 27 A DISTANCE OF 2976.35 FEET; THENCE RUN NORTH 51 DEGREES 16 MINUTES 32 SECONDS EAST 1574.83 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE NORTH 51 DEGREES 16 MINUTES 32 SECONDS EAST 62.75 FEET TO THE WESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF BLUFF ROAD; THENCE RUN NORTH 21 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 35 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 100.00 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 51 DEGREES 16 MINUTES 32 SECONDS WEST 62.75 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 21 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 35 SECONDS EAST 100.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING CONTAINING 0.14 OF AN ACRE, MORE OR LESS. and commonly known as: 258 PARADISE LANE, APALACHICOLA, FL 32320’ including the building, appurtenances, and fixtures located therein, at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, at the front door steps of the Courthouse, at 33 Market St., in Apalachicola, Florida, on September 6, 2012, at 11:00. Any persons claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 26th day of July, 2012. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of the Circuit Court Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk August 23, 30, 2012 88799T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION Case No.: 12-000044-CP IN RE: ESTATE OF GAYE PHIPPS LASS Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of GAYE PHIPPS LASS deceased, File Number 12-44, is pending in the Circuit Court for Franklin County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida 32320. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, on whom a copy of this notice is served must file their claims with the Court WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTIONS 733.702 AND 733.710, OR BE FOREVER BARRED. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 AND 733.710. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is August 23, 2012. Personal Representative: SHANNON WILSON 5420 La Patera Lane Las Vegas, Nevada 89149-6411 Attorney for Personal Representative: Steve M. Watkins, III 41 Commerce Street Apalachicola, FL 32320 (850) 653-1949 Fla Bar No.: 0794996 August 23, 30, 2012 88925T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 2011 CA 378 HANCOCK BANK, Plaintiff, vs. SALLY A. JESKE nka SALLY JESKE nka SALLY FECHT, FRANKLIN COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS, and ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AGAINST, THE HEREIN NAMED DEFENDANTS WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID OWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE UNDER F.S. CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Plaintiff’s Final Judgment dated July 24, 2012, in the abovestyled cause, Marcia Johnson, Clerk of Courts for Franklin County, will sell to the highest bidder for cash at the front door of the courthouse in Franklin County in Apalachicola, Florida, in accordance with Section 45.031, Florida Statutes, at 11:00 A.M., on September 11, 2012, the following described property: Lot 24, Block Q of Lanark Beach, Unit No. 1, according to the plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 2, Page 13, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE Dated August 2, 2012. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of Court By: Terry Creamer Deputy Clerk August 16, 23, 2012 88957T IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT NORTHERN DISTRICT OF FLORIDA TALLAHASSEE DIVISION CASE NO.: 4:12-CV-00053-RHWCS CENTENNIAL BANK, Plaintiff, vs. KEVIN R. GABY a/k/a KEVIN RILEY GABY; KERRY R. GABY; and WILDWOOD COUNTRY CLUB PROPERTY OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that under and by virtue of a Judgment of Foreclosure rendered in the abovestyled case on June 5, 2012, by the United States District Court For The Northern District Of Florida, in favor of the Plaintiff, and the Amendment to Judgment of Foreclosure entered July 10, 2012, by the United States District Court For The Northern District Of Florida, the undersigned, appointed in said decree, will on the 10th day of September, 2012 at 12:00 p.m. (Eastern Time), at the main foyer in the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327, offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the highest bidder, the following described property, situated, lying and being in Wakulla County and Franklin County, Florida:

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A12| The Times Thursday, August 23, 2012 CLASSIFIEDS 3530783 RENTALS3 BEDROOM, 3 BATH CONDO UNFURNISHED, POOL ................................$800 1 BR, 1 BATH UNFURNISHED APT LANARK, REMODELED, INC WATER ..........$425 2 BEDROOM, 1 BATH UNFURNISHED APT LANARK .........................................................$400 2 BR, 1 BATH, UNFURNISHED APT. W/D HOOKUP, SMALL PORCH ............................$375 1 BR 1 BATH FURNISHED APT. SUNROOM, W/D, LANARK UTILITIES INCLUDED .........$650 3 BR, 2 BATH, UNFURNISHED HOUSE, WOOD FENCED YARD ...............................................$600 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322850-697-9604 850-323-0444 www.seacrestre.comwww. rst tness.com/carrabellePROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND RENTALS SEE EXHIBITS A, B AND C ATTACHED HERETO. EXHIBIT A COMMENCE AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 13, TOWNSHIP 4 SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND ALSO MARKING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF WOODLAND PARK SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 82 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 16 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARY OF SAID NORTHWEST QUARTER AND THE NORTH BOUNDARY OF SAID WOODLAND PARK SUBDIVISION 1575.73 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 34 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID SOUTH BOUNDARY OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER AND ALONG SAID NORTH BOUNDARY OF WOODLAND PARK SUBDIVISION 480.95 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE NORTH 89 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 34 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID SOUTH BOUNDARY OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER AND ALONG SAID NORTH BOUNDARY OF WOODLAND PARK SUBDIVISION AND AN EXTENSION THEREOF 386.57 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT ON THE WESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 319, THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 21 MINUTES 07 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 225.76 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 34 SECONDS WEST 385.15 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 17 SECONDS WEST 225.76 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. Together with all rights, easements, appurtenances, royalties, mineral rights, oil and gas rights, crops, timber, all diversion payments or third party payments made to crop producers, and all existing and future improvements, structures, fixtures, and replacements that may now, or at any time in the future, be part of the real estate described above (all referred to as “Property”). The term Property also includes, but is not limited to, any and all water wells, water, ditches, reservoirs, reservoir sites and dams located on the real estate and all riparian and water rights associated with the Property, however established. EXHIBIT B Parcel 1: Lot 21 of Wildwood Country Club, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 3, Page(s) 35, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Parcel 2: Lot 10, Block E of Sopchoppy River Subdivision, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page(s) 27, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Parcel 3: Lots 1, 2, 3, and 4, Block B of Sopchoppy River Subdivision, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page(s) 27, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Less and Except: that part of Lots 1 and 4, Block B of Sopchoppy River Subdivision, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page(s) 27, deeded to the State of Florida, recorded 12/19/1973 in Official Records Book 39, Page 784, Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Parcel 4: Lots 26 and 27, Block O of Lanark Beach Unit No. 1, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 2, Page(s) 13, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. Together with all rights, easements, appurtenances, royalties, mineral rights, oil and gas rights, all water and riparian rights, ditches, and water stock and all existing and future improvements, structures, and replacements that may now, or at any time the future, be part of the real estate described above (all referred to as “Property”). EXHIBIT C BEGIN AT CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 13, TOWNSHIP 4 SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 35 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE EAST BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION 13 A DISTANCE OF 726.15 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT ON THE EDGE OF SWIRL SWAMP, THENCE RUN ALONG THE EDGE OF SAID SWIRL SWAMP AS FOLLOWS: NORTH 70 DEGREES 26 MINUTES 22 SECONDS EAST 282.08 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE SOUTH 82 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 08 SECONDS EAST 213.59 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE NORTH 83 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 52 SECONDS EAST 107.30 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE NORTH 25 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 52 SECONDS EAST 97.25 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE NORTH 83 DEGREES 19 MINUTES 31 SECONDS EAST 125.54 FEET TO CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE NORTH 46 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 12 SECONDS EAST 243.65 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE NORTH 70 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 52 SECONDS EAST 190.70 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE NORTH 45 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 32 SECONDS EAST 152.83 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE NORTH 75 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 12 SECONDS EAST 285.84 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE NORTH 62 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 36 SECONDS EAST 133.29 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE LEAVING SAID SWAMP’S EDGE RUN SOUTH 02 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 56 SECONDS WEST 3340.12 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 73 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 1530.27 FEET TO AN OLD AXLE ON THE EAST BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION 13, THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 36 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID EAST BOUNDARY 834.01 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 24 SECONDS EAST 280.50 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 36 SECONDS WEST 1560.24 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 24 SECONDS WEST 280.50 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SITUATE, LYING AND BEING IN LOTS 86 AND 87 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. LESS AND EXCEPT THE FOLLOWING: COMMENCE AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 13, TOWNSHIP 4 SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 24 SECONDS EAST 280.50 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 36 SECONDS WEST 131.30 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 24 SECONDS EAST 330.00 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 36 SECONDS EAST 660.00 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 24 SECONDS WEST 330.00 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 36 SECONDS WEST 528.70 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH ACCESS OVER AND ACROSS THAT CERTAIN EASEMENT RECORDED OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 191, PAGE 350 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. Together with all rights, easements, appurtenances, royalties, mineral rights, oil and gas rights, crops, timber, all diversion payments or third party payments made to crop producers, and all existing and future improvements, structures, fixtures, and replacements that may now, or at any time in the future, be part of the real estate described above (all referred to as “Property”). The term Property also includes, but is not limited to, any and all water wells, water, ditches, reservoirs, reservoir sites and dams located on the real estate and all riparian and water rights associated with the Property, however established. For additional information concerning the above property contact: STEPHEN A. PITRE, ESQUIRE, Post Office Box 13010, Pensacola, Florida 325913010 or (850) 434-9200. All sales are subject to confirmation of the court. Method of payment is by postal money order or certified check made payable to the U.S. Marshal Service. Ten (10) Percent of High/ Acceptable bid in certified check or cashier’s check (NO CASH) will be accepted with the balance due within 48 hours. No cash will be accepted. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim with the Clerk of the Court within 60 days after the sale. In accordance with the AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT, persons needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact Stephen A. Pitre, Esquire, Post Office Box 13010, Pensacola, Florida 32591-3010 or (850) 434-9200 not later than seven days prior to the sale to ensure that reasonable accommodations are available. Ed Spooner United States Marshal Northern District of Florida Dated: August 8, 2012 By: Ed Spooner U.S. Marshals Service August 16, 23, 30 September 6, 2012 89177T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY CASE NO.: 12-000006-CA HANKCOCK BANK, a Mississippi banking corporation, as assignee of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, as Receiver for Peoples First Community Bank, a Florida banking corporation, Plaintiff, vs. KIMBERLY WILKINS COFFMAN a/k/a KIMBERLY G. WILKINS, an individual, DEREK GREG COFFMAN. SR., an individual, BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, a political subdivision, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the undersigned Clerk of the Circuit Court of Franklin County, Florida, pursuant to the Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure, entered in this case, will sell the property at public sale to the highest bidder for cash, except as set forth hereinafter, on September 6, 2012, at 11:00 am Eastern Time at the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida, in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes, the following described real property lying and being in Franklin County, Florida, to-wit: A parcel of land in Fractional Section 30, Township 7 South, Range 4 West, Franklin County, Florida, shown as Lot 5, Block A, on an unrecorded plat prepared by L.G. Flanagon, Registered Surveyor, for Charles L. McKissack, described as follows: Commence at the Northwesterly corner of McKissack Beach Subdivision, according to the plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 13, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida, and run thence South 13 degrees 01 minute 00 second West a distance of 400 feet, to the Southwesterly corner of said subdivision, thence run South 78 degrees 49 minutes 00 seconds West a distance of 493.5 feet to a point, which is the POINT OF BEGINNING of the lands to be described; from said POINT OF BEGINNING continue South 78 degrees 49 minutes West a distance of 50 feet, thence run North 10 degrees 47 minutes 00 seconds West a distance of 116 feet, to an unnamed 30 foot street (known as First Avenue and/or Spacey Street), thence run North 76 degrees 32 minutes 00 seconds East along said street line 50.05 feet, thence run South 10 degrees 47 minutes 00 seconds East a distance of 118 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. This Notice dated this 27th day of July, 2012. Marcia Johnson Franklin County Clerk of Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk August 23, 30, 2012 89037T PUBLIC NOTICE THE APALACHICOLA HOUSING AUTHORITY 141-15th STREET, APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA, PHONE 850-6539304, IS NOW ACCEPTING BIDS FOR THE FOLLOWING: YARD MAINTENANCE: INCLUDING MOWING, EDGING, WEEDING, CLEAN UP DEBRIS, AS IS NECESSARY, ON A BI-WEEKLY (EVERY TWO WEEKS) SCHEDULE. SUCCESSFUL BIDDER MUST SUPPLY ALL MACHINERY, MOWERS, FUEL, LABOR AND MATERIAL. SUCESSFUL BIDDER MUST HAVE INSURANCE OR ACQUIRE INSURANCE BEFORE STARTING JOB. BIDS MAY BE SUBMITTED IN LETTER FORM STATING AMOUNT OF MONEY CHARGED PER MONTH OR ANNUALLY. BIDS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY MAIL, FOR PROPER RECORDING. BIDS MAY BE SUBMITTED NO LATER THAN AUGUST 23, 2012. EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER PAUL E. MILLS, Executive Director August 16, 23, 2012 89249T NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW PURSUANT TO SECTION 865.09, FLORIDA STATUTES NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of OYSTER CITY BREWING COMPANY located at 15 Avenue D, in the County of FRANKLIN, in the City of Apalachicola, Florida, 32320 intends to register the said name with the Divisions of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, Florida. Dated at Apalachicola, Florida, this 20th day of August, 2012. Lamp Soup, Inc. August 23, 2012 Publisher’s Notice “SCAM “To avoid possible scams, it is recommended that consumers should verify caller information when receiving calls regarding credit card payments. Consumers should also contact the local company themselves instead of giving this information to individuals who are contacting them directly. Springer Spaniel Pups, 4 wks old, Pure Bred w/papers ava., $400 each; 727-580-1160 YORKIE AKCregistered. 9 weeks old adorable puppies only 2 females left. They are Health Certified and have 1st shots. $500 ea. Mom & dad on premise. Please call 850-774-1229 Panama City Area For Sale Complete wood working shop tools. All in excellent condition. $4,000 OBO 850-697-8038 Text FL20793 to 56654 AIRLINE CAREERS BEGIN HERE -Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualified. Housing available. Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-206-9405 ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINEfrom Home. Medical, Business, Criminal Justice Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 866-467-0054 www.CenturaOnline.com Apalachicola: 1 br, 1 ba efficiency Call for information 850-653-6103 Text FL20208 to 56654 Heritage V illas of Apalachicola Apartments Now accepting applications for 2BR Some rental assistance may be available. HUD vouchers accepted. Call 850-653-9277. TDD/ TTY 711. This institution is an equal opportunity provider & employer. Lanark Village: Clean 2 bedroom, 1 bath, screened porch, AC, 7 months min. $500 monthly + $350. security deposit, references required Pets-will consider. Non smoking. Call: 850-212-2063 Text FL18819 to 56654 Studio Apt. Furnished Upstairs StudioQuiet location, Water & Electric incl. Walk to Dwntwn. $650+Dep N/P or N/S For appt 653-9116 or 320-1174 St. George Island $175 week, Electric, Satellite, Garbage incl. Pool tble. 12’ X 65’ deck w/Beautiful view 850-653-5114 St. George Island 2Br, 1Ba, ground floor apt. furnish or unfurnished, 12’ x 65’ Deck. $275/per week Call 850-653-5114 1 BRCottageH/AC in Apalachicola, FL. 850-643-7740. Apalachicola Cottage Lovely 3Br 2Ba, granite/ SS kitchen wood/carpet, laundry, screened deck w/spa, fenced back yard, security, garage & opener Avail Sept. 1, 2012 $1,200 /mo incl utilities. References + $500 dep Call: 865-307-0600 Text FL 20201 to 56654 Carabelle: (in town) 3 bdrm 2 bath older home. Freshly painted. $700 per month + dep. Call (850) 766-4357 Text FL19365 to 56654 Carabelle: 3 bdr 2 bath with large spare room on 1 acre. Fenced yard, new tile throughout, freshly painted. $800 per month + dep. Call (850) 766-4357 Text FL19355 to 56654 Eastpoint 3 br, 2 ba, in exclusive Whispering Pines C/H/A, DW, WD Hkup, no smoke/pets $850 month, 1st & Last Deposit 850-670-8266 SEEKING RENTALRetired professional is couple seeking a furnished apartment in Apalach historic district or houseboat rental February & March. Please reply to Peter and Pam by email stoneoak2003 @yahoo.com or call at: 413-219-4409. 3 br, 2 ba, Very Nice Mobile Home 197 Old Ferry Dock Rd. in Eastpoint. Dishwasher, W/D, CH&A Jacuzzi tub 1 acre lot, with lawn maintenance Nice location, No Pets or Smoking. $650 mo 1st & last, $300 deposit Call 850-670-8460 $33,500 5 Acres near Crystal Lake on Amos Hayes Rd, property has well septic and power pole. Current survey is available. About 1.5 acres of the property is cleared. 850-271-5761 and leave a message. North Historic District 5th Street building lot. $29,000 obo. 60 x 100. Corner lot. Brokers protected (404) 218-0077 A GREAT BUY! Scenic Cruiser, 1993. Gulfstream, 34 ft, One slide out. $5,000. This is a steal! Needs some TLC. 850-653-5077. 2008 Harley Davidson Street Glide Anniversay Edition9,700 miles. Copper/ Black. In Excellent condition w/Rinehart Exhaust, Power Commander, ABS, Security, Extra Headlights, 2 Seats, many other options. Always garage kept and well maintaned. Original owner. Only $17,000, sold new for over $27,000.850-723-4642 Classifiedcan!If you’re ready to move up or are just starting out Classified can help you open the door to home ownership. We’ve got properties at every price, with locations all over town! And if you’re planning to sell, Classified can introduce you to the market’s best prospects.

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, August 23, 2012 The Times | A13 emeraldcoastjobs.com Employment Today By DIANE DIRESTAMonster Contributing Writer You might look good on paper or in your interview suit, but if you are looking to nail your big interview, looks are not everything. How you sound often is more important. But many job seekers let careless speech habits sink their chances of landing that plum job. Here are six common language mistakes and how to keep them from sabotaging your interview:1. NonwordsFiller words such as um,Ž ah,Ž you know,Ž OKŽ or likeŽ tell the interviewer you are not prepared and make you sound like a Valley Girl (or Boy). A better strategy is to think before you speak, taking pauses and breaths when you lose your train of thought. Everybody utters an occasional um,Ž but dont let it start every sentence.2. Up-talkA singsong or rising inflection at the end of every sentence creates a tentative impression and makes it sound as though you are asking a question instead of making a definitive statement. You need to speak with conviction when selling yourself in an interview. Bring your intonation down when ending a sentence to avoid talking up.3. Grammatical errorsThe interviewer might question your education when you use incorrect grammar or slang. Expressions such as aintŽ she dont,Ž me and my friendŽ and so I goes to himŽ are not appropriate. Be sure you speak in complete sentences and that tenses agree. The interview is not the venue for regional expressions or informality.4. Sloppy speechSlurring words together or dropping their endings impairs the clarity of your message. To avoid slurring and increase understanding, speak slowly during an interview. Make a list of commonly mispronounced words, and practice saying them into a tape recorder before the interview. Some common incorrect pronunciations include aksŽ for ask,Ž ath-a-leteŽ for athlete,Ž wifŽ for withŽ and dreeŽ for three.Ž5. Speed talkingWhile everybody is a bit anxious during an interview, you do not want your information to fly by like a speeding bullet. A rapid speaking rate is difficult to follow, and speed talkers are seen as nervous. Slow down your racing heart by doing some breathing exercises before the interview. To avoid rushing, listen to the question, and then count two beats in your head before answering. When you finish a sentence, count two beats again before continuing. Dont be afraid of silence. Pausing is an effective communication technique. The interviewer needs a few seconds to process what you just said anyway.6. Weak speakWimpy words modify or water down your conviction and in the end your position. When you pepper a conversation with hopefully,Ž perhaps,Ž I feel,Ž kind ofŽ and sort of,Ž the message you convey is a lack of confidence. Use power words such as Im confident that,Ž my track record shows,Ž I take the position that,Ž I recommendŽ or my goal is.Ž The language you use gives the listener an impression about your level of confidence and conviction.The bottom lineYou do not have to study elocution to speak well. Simply slow down, take time to pronounce all the syllables and leave slang at home. Companies want job candidates who are well-spoken and articulate, and recruiters will not represent a job candidate if they do not match the clients profile. According to Lori Zelman, vice president of human resources at Strategic Workforce Solutions in New York City, The people most highly sought after are the ones who are succinct in the explanation of their work experience.Ž6 speech habits which sabotage F e a t u r e d J o b s Featured Jobs To Place An Employment Here Please Contact Lorna Brown Phone: (850) 747-5019 € Email: lbrown@pcnh.com Like Us On Facebook: www.facebook.com/emcoastjobs Or Follow Us on Twitter: @emcoastjobs REPRESENTATIVES will be at the PORT ST. JOE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE on Tuesdays & Thursdays from 9 am – 1 pm EST accepting applications for numerous open positions.We offer competitive wages and a comprehensive bene t package including Company paid health, dental, and life insurance, 401(k), attendance & safety bonuses.EOE/Drug Free WorkplaceEASTERN SHIPBUILDING GROUP MORE THAN A JOB… A FUTURE! SUPER SAVERS* UPTO6LINES FOR8DAYS*Price of item must be included. Flat Rate, no refunds upon cancellation, nocommercial advertising. No abbreviations please. No pets. Must be paid in advance.Price Includes New F Price Includes New F or Y or Y ou T ou T oday and oday and TOP ADS. TOP ADS.•SS3000: $29.25Item $1001-$3000SS1000: $27.00Item $501-$1000SS7500: $35.00Item $5001-$7500SS5000: $31.75Item $3001-$5000SS500: $23.25Item $51-$500 ToPlace Your Classified ad inCall Our New Numbers Now!Call:850-747-5020 Toll Free:800-345-8688 Fax:850-747-5044 Email:thestar@pcnh.com Email:thetimes@pcnh.com theAPALACHICOLA & CARRABELLETIMES CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW

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Local A14 | The Times Thursday, August 23, 2012 By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star .com Organizations seeking funds for off-season tourist events will receive half of the money requested. On Aug. 1, county commissioners approved Tourist Development Council funding for all 36 of the offseason events that applied for grants for the 2012-13 cycle. About $135,000 was requested, but only $72,000 in funds were available, so each applicant received a little more than half the money they asked for. Sixteen applicants requested $5,000 and will receive $2,685 to support multi-day events. These are the HCOLA Festival, Ilse Newell Concert Series, Apalachicola Maritime Museum lecture series, and the Apalachicola Center for History, Culture and the Arts, which received awards for both an exhibition series and a lecture series. Also included was the Apalachicola Historic Home Tour, the Apalach Wine and Jazz Festival, Blues in the Park, Camp Gordon Johnston Days, the Historic Apalach Holiday Celebration, Plein Air, Rock by the Tee, The St. George Island Chili Cook-off, Water Street Festival of Ice and Second Saturdays. Events requesting $4,000 and receiving $2,148 were the Carrabelle Riverfront Festival, Authors in Apalach, a Civil War Exhibit and Living History Weekend, Carrabelles Holiday on the Harbor, the St. George Island Tour of Homes and Habitat for Humanitys Mardi Gras. Only two events requested $3,000 the Dixie Theatres March professional season and the Apalachicola Wooden Boat Show and each received stipends of $1,611. The Dixie also requested $3,500 for its January and February seasons and will receive $1,859 for each. Events requesting $2,000 will receive $1,074; Ghostwalk 2012, Apalach Art Walk, Florida State University Coastal and Marine Lab open house, the Black Bear Festival, the Crooked River Lighthouse Lantern Fest, Franklin County Oyster Festival, Snowbird Day on St. George Island, the St. Vincent Island open house and the Panhandle Players, which received a stipend for each of their three productions. Twenty of the funded events take place in Apalachicola, ve in Carrabelle, four on St. George Island, one each in St. Teresa and on St. Vincent Island. Plein Air, Rock by the Tee and the Panhandle Players productions are designated as countywide. TDC spokesperson Fran Edwards said the only new events funded this year are the Maritime Museum lecture series and Living History Weekend, also proposed by the museum. Not applying for funds this cycle were the Apalachicola Volunteer Fire Departments Oyster CookOff and The Eastpoint Fire Departments Rib Cook-Off. The Apalachicola Riverkeeper was awarded a grant for their Wild and Scenic Film Festival but cancelled the event. Edwards said any nonreligious organization staging an off-season event can get free advertising on the TDC website. According to the rules for the off-season grant program, at least half of the TDC-awarded grant funding must be used to reach out-of-county audiences. Local vendors specializing in TV, radio, public relations and Internet marketing may be used to reach these out of county audiences. Rules also stipulate offseason grant monies are awarded on a reimbursement basis, after the event has occurred, as one-time payment. Any payments later shown to be an unauthorized expenditure must be returned to Franklin County. Payments are made to the organization, and not directly to vendors or individuals. Performers and technical support can receive no more than 15 percent of the grant and funding may not be used to pay administrators. From staff reports County renews TDC contracts During its Aug. 1 meeting, the county commission voted unanimously to continue to employ four local vendors for Tourist Development Council programs. Curt Blair, CEO of Allyn, the rm that administers the TDC operation, said funding has been reduced because the county no longer receives BP subsidies. That milk cow is xing to run dry, Commissioner Cheryl Sanders said. Allyns budget been reduced to a maximum of $89,000, which funds billable hours for work performed by Allyn employees, of ce space, insurance, equipment and general of ce supplies. Spokesperson Fran Edwards said the budgeted sum is rarely used. An additional $75,000 was earmarked for TDC promotions and creative media, with 2K Web group receiving $24,000 to maintain the website; Bay Media receiving $24,000 for production of creative media; and $21,600 paid to Forgotten Coast TV for production and broadcast of two hours of tourism programming seven days a week, plus free 30-second public service announcements provided to the 36 TDC grant recipients. Capital Area Community Action ends walk-ins Effective Aug. 1, Capital Area Community Action Agency will serve county residents who are seeking emergency services assistance, such as utility bill assistance, by appointment only. No walk-ins will be served. In addition, only priority households will be served the rst two weeks of the month. Priority is given to households with seniors 60 or older; disabled persons having documentation and receiving SSD, SSI, V.A. Disability, etc. and children 5 or under. All quali ed households will be assisted the remainder of the month, pending funding. The Apalachicola of ce is at 192 14th St., Suite 113, and the Carrabelle of ce at 203 N. 50th St. To make an appointment for both the Apalachicola and Carrabelle of ces, call 653-8057. City to assist with oil spill claims Apalachicola has sent word that those of you having dif culty with your Deepwater Horizon claim under the new process are invited to contact Mayor Van Johnson so that you can be referred to the new governmental liaison team set up for the purpose of analysis and assistance. Simply provide your name, telephone number and address (and old BP claim number, if you have one) by email to Mayor Van Johnson or by telephone at 653 1519, so that you can be referred for this assistance. Plantation photo deadline Tuesday Entries to the St. George Plantation 2012 photo contest must be sent by Tuesday to Plantation Photo Contest, 1712 Magnolia Road, St. George Island, FL 32328, or photocontest10@sgpoa.com. Entrants may submit photographs of St. George Island, Apalachicola or Franklin County, accompanied by a written release form granting St. George Plantation Owners Association permission to publish your photo. Anyone identi able in the photograph also must sign the release. A parent must sign the release for any minor pictured. Include the following information on a label af xed to the back of the photograph: your name, address and phone number and title of photo or brief description. Entries must be on disk and professionally printed or in PDF or JPG format of less than 5 MBs. Limit is two entries per photographer. Entry fee is $5 per entry, with check made payable to SGPOA at the above address. First place wins $150, second place $100, third place $50 and Peoples Choice $50. Winners will be noti ed by Sept. 14. Our local real estate experts have identied what they feel are the best values around and are oering them to you in Real Estate Picks! (In this section), Discover the best real estate values in Mexico Beach, Port St. Joe, Apalachicola, Cape San Blas, St. George Island, Carrabelle and surrounding areas. Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Real Estate Picks John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.com MLS# 247776 $94,900 Lanark Village PERFECT FLORIDA LIVING Well-maintained, well built home in a very desirable neighborhood with Bay view from front yard, 2 BR, 1 BA, Furnished, Appliances, HVAC & Water Heater like new. VERY CLEAN & NEAT, Lanark Boat Club & Lanark Golf Course available, Carl King Ave. Listed by Janie Burke John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.com MLS# 247024 $15,000 Eastpoint MAGNOLIA RIDGE Foreclosure, one acre lot, located in a secluded area of beautiful Franklin County, paved roads and underground utilities, great location for a permanent residence or weekend retreat on Sago Drive. Listing agent Michael Billings dbutler@coastalcoverage.com Locally owned and operated Home Business Auto Health Workers Comp BILL MILLER REALTY 850-697-3751 (3310) 570-0658 400 + COMM. U.S. 98 & GULF ADJ. TO LANARK MARINA 850K $29,500 $2,500 D O W N B UYS 2 B ED AP T 2 6 OR RENT $500/MTH COR LOT 12 X 53 1 B / R 8 X 24 SHED $24,500 GULFVIE W & ACCESS 3 BDR 2 BA 2006 M/H 89K 2 LG. SHADY LOTS 3 SHEDS 400 TO MARINA-CITY W ATER49K MIH 2 C RNR LOTS BLK. $ S TORE REDUCED $49,500 2 AC-AT RIVER UTIL. IN -$39,500 Rehabilitation Services Rehab, Restore, Return to Home George E. Weems Memorial Hospital offers in-patient rehabilitative services, which include physical therapy, cardiac conditioning, orthopedic therapy, and neurological therapy. Our team customizes each patients care to meet both patient and family needs. We are committed to returning those individuals who have been impaired by accident or disease to their highest level of independence by optimizing abilities and skills used in everyday activities. The purpose of in-patient rehabilitation is to improve the patients function and maximize the potential for returning to home, school, work, and to the community. Robert C. Bruner Attorney Personal & Business Bankruptcy Over 30 Years Legal Experience 850-670-3030 bankruptcy relief under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon advertisements. Before you decide, ask us to send you free written information TDC funding cut back for off-season events News BRIEFS