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The Apalachicola times
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100380/00183
 Material Information
Title: The Apalachicola times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: H.W. Johnston
Place of Publication: Apalachicola Fla
Apalachicola Fla
Publication Date: 08-16-2012
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1885.
General Note: Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 32911693
lccn - sn 95026907
System ID: UF00100380:00183
 Related Items
Preceded by: Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by: Apalachicola herald

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xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx 50 WWW.APALACHTIMES.COM Phone: 850-653-8868 Web: apalachtimes.com E-mail: dadlerstein@star .com Fax: 850-653-8036 Circulation: 800-345-8688 DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK: School News & Society: 11 a.m. Friday Real Estate Ads: 11 a.m. Thursday Legal Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Display Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Line Ads: 5 p.m. Monday xxxxx Contact Us xxxxx Out to see Index COUNTY RACES CANDIDATE VOTES PERCENT SHERIFF Mike Mock 2,292 59.8 Cliff Carroll 1,283 33.5 H. Jeff Vonier 255 6.7 SCHOOL BOARD, DISTRICT 5 Carl Whaley 367 45.4 Pamela Shiver 442 54.7 COUNTY COMMISSION, DIST. 5 Democrats Bevin Putnal 262 43.2 William Massey 345 56.8 COUNTY COMMISSION, DIST. 3 Democrats Noah Lockley 381 63.6 Valentina Webb 218 36.4 See more results on Page A14 Mock swept back in as sheriff Shiver wins school board seat By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com Four years after Franklin County voters ousted Mike Mock from the sheriffs ofce, he returned to the job in triumph Tuesday night, easily besting a three-man eld. Mock, 45, of Carrabelle, was the overwhelming choice of Democrats and Republicans alike, receiving nearly 60 percent of the vote countywide, as he defeated his chief contender, Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce Capt. Cliff Carroll, 49, of Eastpoint, with 33.5 percent of the vote. H. Jeff Vonier, 69, of Eastpoint, attracted just 6.7 percent of voter support. Mock was the victor in six of eight precincts, falling short to Carroll only in Alligator Point and St. George Island. Im honored and humbled by the vote, Mock said Tuesday night. They voted me right, and Im appreciative of that. Im honored that they would give me a second chance, and I got a lot of good support, he said. Im excited about going back to work. As might be expected in a countywide sheriffs race, where the winner assumes oversight of the countys largest and most in uential department, the primary campaign had been a tough, sharp-edged contest. Its been a long, hard contest, Mock said. I feel like its time to move past it. The elections over. Because no one in the GOP stepped forward to run in the general election, Mock will succeed the man who defeated him four years, Skip Shiver, MIKE MOCK PAM SHIVER WILLIAM MASSEY NOAH LOCKLEY DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times Apalachicolas Clipper Shoppe was busy Monday as owner Dorothy Cooper offered complimentary hair cuts to school kids getting ready for this Mondays return to classes. Cooper said it was the rst time she had ever tried it, and had already done more than three dozen by early afternoon. Among those who had their tresses trimmed was Brandy Parker, who had her hair shampooed by her fellow juniors Graycn Kirvin and Adriana Reeder. In the photo above, Parkers younger sister, Brooke, a freshman, has her long locks trimmed by Cooper. By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star .com During the turn of the century boom time, James Nathaniel Coombs and his family were the captains of industry that ruled Franklin County. The beautiful Coombs House Inn and the Coombs Armory are reminders of Coombs rich holdings in the west end of the county. But theres even remaining evidence how his power and in uence extended to Carrabelle. Coombs, born nearly 170 years ago to the day, on August 15, 1842 in Old Town, Maine, was the son of Malinda Parker and I. W. Coombs, owner of a saw mill. At age 21, he entered the federal Army as a volunteer, and served as a sergeant in the 28th Maine Regiment. He was stationed in Louisiana and fought under Gen. William Tecumseh Sherman. Coombs was part of a detachment of 180 men marched nine miles to the front lines near Port DAVID ADLERSTEIN | Cutting class By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com The countys reshelling project began with a sunny start Friday in Eastpoint, and will continue this Friday, Aug. 17 in Apalachicola. Franklin County Seafood Workers Associations President Shannon Hartseld said trucks from Coastline Clearing and Development were loading boats from early morning, and were nished by about noon. Loaded were 20-foot and larger vessels, capable of holding 1.5 to 2 yards, or about 20 bushels, of shells, taken from the shell pile the states Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer services maintains at Scipio Creek. The shells were then deposited, randomly, off Cat Point, in area 1642. They shovel them off while theyre drifting, said Harts eld,. And theyre scattered on the bottom. About 245 of the 360 oystermen who have signed up took part in Fridays shelling. Not everybody showed up, said the FCSWAs Jennifer Millender, who handled the checks. In all she said 245 loads, one load per individual, were deposited from 7 a.m. to 11:45 a.m. This Friday, Aug. 17, the boats will be loaded with shells at Lombardi Park west of Apalachicola, and carried to Hagans Flats. The FDOACS Bit Marshall said Fridays shelling will make a dent in the attempt to encourage spat to ourish in the four-mile by three-quarter-mile Area 1642, which opens Sept. 1. Its one of the slimmest bars, he said. What needs Smooth start for shelling See SHELLING A14 See COOMBS A5 Thursday, August 16, 2012 See ELECTIONS A14 The houses that Coombs built ................................................................. FLORIDA MEMORY PROJECT Right: James Nathaniel Coombs VOL. 127 ISSUE 16 Opinion . . . . . . A4 Society . . . . . . A6 Faith . . . . . . . A7 Outdoors . . . . . A8 Sports . . . . . . A9 Tide Chart . . . . . A8 Classi eds . . . A11-A13 A sizzling race, A9 Festival of Ice Saturday in Apalach On Saturday, Aug. 18, Main Street Apalachicola will continue the month-long Water Street Festival of Ice, downtown, from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. The will be an Ice Cream Churn Off and tasting from 5-7 p.m. Come compete and share your favorite recipes! For more information contact info@ historicapalachicola.com. Dixie premiers Family Portrait Barry Hand presents his original drama, The Family Portrait this Friday and Saturday evening, Aug. 17-18 at 7 p.m. at the Dixie Theatre. Tickets at the door are $15. For more information contact the Dixie at 653-3200. Maritime archaeology lecture Friday On Friday Aug. 17 at 7 p.m. a lecture will be given at the Apalachicola Maritime Museum, on Water Street, by Jason Burns, maritime project manager at Southeastern Research Inc. Burns professional career has been focused on submerged cultural resources management and public information. For more info call: 653-2500. Franklin Countys oldest summer visitors On Thursday Aug. 16, at 2 p.m., there will be a presentation called Sea Turtles, Franklin Countys Oldest Visitors, by the Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve (ANERR) and the St. George Island Volunteer Turtlers at ANERR, 1008 Island Drive. For information call 670-7700 or visit www. SeaTurtlesAtRisk.org. Summer bingo on the island Every Tuesday, come to St. George Island for Summer Bingo. Bring your marker and head upstairs at the Jay Abbott Fire Station (324 E. Pine Ave.) at 7 p.m. Just 25 cents a card. Sponsored by the St. George Island Civic Club. For details call 9272654. Everyone welcome. BACK-TO-SCHOOL SPECIAL

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Local A2 | The Times Thursday, August 16, 2012 Smart Lenses SM Can produce clear vision without glasses, at all distances "Freedom from Eye Glasses, Now a reality for many." NO HIDDEN CHARGES: It is our policy that the patient and any other person responsible for payments has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed by payment or any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment. www.mulliseye.com "WE WELCOME NE W PATIE N TS, C ALL T ODAY FOR YOUR P RIORITY APP OI N TME N T" FOR NEW PATIENTS 59 AND OLDER This certificate is good for a complete Medical Eye Exam with Todd Robinson, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Surgeon. The exam includes a prescription for eye glasses and tests for Glaucoma, Cataracts and other eye diseases FOR YOUR APPOINTMENT CALL: 850-763-6666 ELIGIBILITY: U.S. Citizens living in the Florida Panhandle, 59 years and older, not presently under our care. Coupon Expires: 8-31-12 FREE EYE EXAM CODE: AP00 Darren Payne, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon Lee Mullis, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon Todd Robinson, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon Robert C. Bruner Attorney Personal & Business Bankruptcy Over 30 Years Legal Experience 850-670-3030 bankruptcy relief under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon advertisements. Before you decide, ask us to send you free written information By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com The former home of the Apalachicola Volunteer Fire Department soon might be where you go to buy furniture or collectible glass. By a 3-1 vote, Apalachicola city commissioners voted Aug. 7 to refer the idea of transforming the Commerce Street site to the citys Community Pride committee for further exploration. That committee meets Aug. 23 at the City Hall at Battery Park. Mayor Van Johnson, a proponent of the plan, was the lone no vote, preferring instead an up or down decision at the meeting. Commissioner Mitchell Bartley was absent because of a medical issue. Joe Taylor, director of the Franklins Promise Coalition, and Sister Jeanne Drea, a Catholic nun active with the coalition, presented the idea as an ongoing hand up, not a handout partnership between Franklins Promise and one or more nonpro t organizations that comprise the coalition. The idea would be to have those groups supply workers to the shop, with their group then bene tting from the proceeds. The general consensus is we would need to have some paid person to open and close and run it, Taylor said in an interview Monday. The organizations would contribute help in the form of volunteers. He said this would help in furthering engagement and reciprocity between those who bene t from an outreach, perhaps by having their light bill paid, and the organization itself. Fran Edwards, a staffer at the Tourist Development Council who works closely with Franklins Promise, said she was familiar with a thrift store in Louisiana that made $40,000 annually. If all of the Franklins Promise Coalition has people there, there will be money, she said, noting that the store could employ people through Workforce Development, to help them further develop retail job skills. Paulette Moss, program manager for the citys Main Street program, told commissioners she had talked over the idea with leaders of the citys existing thrift store, Pennys Worth, at 195 Ave. E, and that the two stores would have different niches. Well take appliances that they wont take, and computers and furniture, she said. Taylor said Monday the downtown store would appeal to somewhat of a different customer than locals interested in saving money on secondhand clothes or other necessities. The idea is to cull our product and separate it into whats appropriate and have really good product for visitors, to come and leave some of their money with our nonprofits, he said. He added that downtown merchants might want to donate products that might have been returns, leftovers or seconds, or even buy products from the thrift store that they can resell in their shops. Necessities donated to Franklins Promise, such as clothing, pots and pans, would be kept at the ofce at the citys municipal building and provided to those in need, such as re victims. But discretionary items, like crystal punch cups and ice buckets, would be headed to the thrift store. Folks downtown like the collectible glass, ironstone, that is more decorative in nature and not really utilitarian, Taylor said. Commissioner Brenda Ash expressed concern over how Franklins Promise would cover the cost of utilities and insurance at the site and what effect it would have on existing forpro t businesses. Were all reaching and trying to make ends meet, she said. How will that affect the downtown merchants? How will you pay for ood insurance? How is the community bene tting as far as giving back to the city, as far as paying for the building? Ash long has questioned the wisdom of the city holding on to a lot of real estate, especially with the city in nancial straits. But Taylor reassured her the thrift store would not prevent an eventual sale. What were asking for is to use it while its in limbo, he said. Its not in lieu of selling it. Ash said she needed more time to consider the idea. I dont think Im against the idea, I just need more information, and maybe you have it. We need unity, and I want to make sure were on that path. The Bible said the poor will always be with us, she said. Im just trying to get all the pieces of the puzzle. Councilman Frank Cook said he, too, had concerns. We need to make sure that when that (a sale) occurs, the building will be ready to be sold, he said. Also, thats kind of a congested area already, and we may be bringing a different group downtown. Customers may not be the people that would be using the shops downtown now. The building is really not in a condition for most people to use. Johnson defended the idea as being good for the local community. My understanding is people less fortunate who need money to pay their utility bills can work their loans off, he said. I dont have a problem with such a project. DONT MISS FAMILY PORTRAIT THIS WEEKEND VERGIL MARSHALL | Special to the Times The Family Portrait, Barry Hands new two-act drama, will take the stage at the Dixie Theatre this Friday and Saturday, Aug. 17-18, with the curtain going up at 7 p.m. The show features a cast of seven, all local performers, and is set in the 1950s at the home of the late Cecil Lane in an unnamed American town. Actors, seated from left, are Trina Ford, Maranda Moses, Liz Sisung, Adam Cannon and Katie McFarland. Standing from left are Alisa Hand Hendels and Craig Hicks. The show also features original music and lyrics written and performed by Hand. Tickets for the show are available at the Dixie box of ce or by calling 653-3200. Old rehouse might become new thrift store DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times The old Apalachicola rehouse on Commerce Street might become a thrift store.

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By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com The question of whether Franklin County Commission Chairwoman Pinki Jackel provided false information for the purposes of obtaining a homestead exemption became something of a political hot potato this week. Willie Meggs, state attorney for the Second Judicial Circuit, initially approved the rst-degree misdemeanor charge, with a notice for Jackel to appear in court Sept. 6. On Aug. 8, Meggs assistant state attorney, Robin Myers, led what is known as an information with the clerk of courts of ce. A little more than an hour later, County Judge Van Russell recused himself from the matter, and asked that Chief Judge Charles Francis assign the case to another judge. Russell cited Chapter 38 of the Florida Statutes as well as the Code of Judicial Conduct, noting the portion that says a judge shall disqualify himself or herself in a proceeding in which the judges impartiality might reasonably be questioned. But on Monday morning, before another judge could be assigned and Jackel served notice of the charge, Meggs entered a nolle prosequi, commonly known as a do not prosecute order with the court, through Assistant State Attorney Jared Patterson. Due to the need for further investigation, this agency will not be pursuing charge at this time, Meggs order read. In a telephone interview Monday morning, Meggs said he planned to talk further this week with several parties in the case, including Jackel and Georgia of cials, and expected to make a decision by next week whether or not to move forward with ling a charge. In all honesty we may have moved a little faster on the complaint than we should have, he said. When I was informed about it personally, I had some questions that I needed answers to, questions that havent been asked. I asked Robin (Myers) to dismiss the information that we led so we could ask some pertinent questions, Meggs said. I think there are additional facts that we need to nd out that we did not have. Meggs said he had started getting a lot of inquires about it (the charge), but did not indicate who had contacted him. He said he had not spoken with Jackel, but planned to this week regarding the matter. We need to get a statement from her and shes willing to give one, he said. Meggs said he reviewed the 12-page report led by Larry Levy, the attorney for Property Appraiser Doris Pendletons of ce. Levys report led to Pendleton citing Jackel in June for holding dual homestead exemptions, both here and in Georgia. On June 26, Jackel repaid $4,947 in back taxes for years 2009, 2010 and 2011. Accompanying her check, Jackel provided a letter from Tallahassee attorney Stephen Slepin, who wrote that neither Jackel nor her husband, Marietta, Ga., attorney Dana Jackel, believes the homestead exemption was improperly allowed but were paying the back taxes out of an abundance of caution. Meggs said: We had a veri ed sworn complaint and alleged facts, and it appears to be a violation. It is clearly a violation to have homesteads in two places, in two states. But, he continued, he needed to examine more closely the details of Levys ndings, including his citations of a 1975 Florida attorney generals opinion, a 2005 decision by Circuit Court Judge N. Sanders Sauls and other opinions in the circuit and appellate courts. What I want to do is accurately look at case law as it pertains to this case, Meggs said. To see what our facts are as it relates to the Jackel case. In 2007, Meggs led misdemeanor charges in nine dual homestead cases, with four of these resulting months later in nolle prosequi ndings. The others pleaded no contest, adjudication was withheld and they were required to pay back taxes and penalties, as well as nes or court costs. He said he was proceeding cautiously in this matter because it involved a public of cial. 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Our team customizes each patients care to meet both patient and family needs. We are committed to returning those individuals who have been impaired by accident or disease to their highest level of independence by optimizing abilities and skills used in everyday activities. The purpose of in-patient rehabilitation is to improve the patients function and maximize the potential for returning to home, school, work, and to the community. Law Enforcement The Times | A3 Thursday, August 16, 2012 The following report is provided by the Franklin County Sheriffs Of ce. All defendants are to be considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law. Aug. 7 David G. Layton, 41, Eastpoint, Hillsborough County warrant for failure to appear (FCSO) Laura M. Williams, 31, Palm Bay, violation of probation FCSO) Aug. 8 Steven D. Herndon, 60, Eastpoint, failure to report as a sexual offender within 48 hours of address change, and failure to change drivers license (FCSO) Aug. 9 Arlene D. Thompson, 47, Eastpoint, resisting of cer with violence, battery on a law enforcement of cer, disorderly conduct and domestic battery (FCSO) Charles A. Creamer, 30, Apalachicola, grand theft and theft (APD) Vernon W. Simpson, 37, Bristol, resisting of cer without violence and three counts of enforcement of FWC rules (FWC) Jackel homestead exemption case in limbo Arrest REPORT

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Opinion A4 | The Times USPS 027-600 Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 Publisher: Roger Quinn Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola Times Dropping Spanish classes would be unwise I support our schools, and the choices that are having to be made are difcult ones. There are areas that have been addressed. One of the biggest ones health insurance for employees has not yet been broached. The most important element in this discussion is the student and his or her academic success. Everything else a student may learn from activities such as sports, music, art and other cocurricular activities is gravy. These tight budgetary times call for meat and potatoes; skip the gravy and the dessert. Parents and other volunteers step up to the plate when asked and appreciated. With all due respect to my former colleagues on the school board, the removal of Spanish classes is not the make or break of our budget. A foreign language is required for university entrance. In our region knowledge of Spanish can be the difference in someone getting a job. You dont have to like that, but it is fact. Ask anyone in the workforce: nurses, construction workers, sales, law enforcement, etc. if Spanish would be useful. Ask me! The virtual school can provide motivated students an opportunity to take other languages. It has been done. Learning a foreign language is much more difcult that way. Foreign language is best taken by those who have good skills in their native tongue. Those students understand the nuances of a different language better. It has to be practiced with others. You have to hear it. Cut back on the number of Spanish classes offered if you must, but pulling it out of our normal curriculum is unwise and speaks volumes of what we aspire for our students, whether it be college or a good job in an ever-changing workforce. The job of our superintendent, school board and all district employees is difcult. More and more demands are made. Offer solutions, respectfully disagree and do not be foolish enough to think that you dont have a dog in this hunt. We all do. Denise Butler Overzealous FWC ofcers give area black eye We have been frequent visitors to the Carrabelle area for over 20 years. Over these years we have made friends and acquaintances in the area. What has become all too apparent is the glaring need for cash to be infused into the faltering economy in this area. This much-needed money can be brought in by local entrepreneurs through their individual efforts utilizing the areas natural resources as was done during the CQuarters Tournament, or by enterprising men such as the group doing the mud boggs north of Carrabelle. I have been in town during the time other tournaments were held at C-Quarters and during the events held at the mud bogg site and I believe those times are the busiest I have seen the area in all of the 20-plus years I have been a visitor. These events need to be supported by all public ofcials and employees. They can not become the target of overzealous public employees. Although I was not in the area during the recent C-Quarters tournament I have heard repeatedly from many friends of the occurrences that have tainted this tournament and in turn the reputation of the entire area. I rmly believe that an investigation needs to be launched to see how and why this occurred. Perhaps better communication between the organizers and the FWC could result in pretournament safety checks of the entrants vessels at the dock, rather than stopping a boat with trolling lines out in the middle of a tournament. I drive over 1,000 miles to visit the area and will continue to do so as long as I am given the strength and ability to do so. Franklin County has become a second home to myself and over 15 members of my family. It hurts us personally to see it get a black eye from this unnecessary act. In all fairness I would like to add that many years ago as beginning shermen in the area we knew absolutely nothing. The FWC at the Moorings pointed us in the right direction and gave us some shing tips. The family has always been grateful for their help and kindness. Any FWC ofcers we have met both on and off the water have been more than considerate. However the reasons behind these recent actions, that seem to have been mainly one individual ofcer, must be investigated so that they do not occur again. Franklin County needs to welcome all events with open arms so that the visitors continue to bring their much-needed cash to shops and businesses in the area. Perhaps an all-out Franklin County Welcome for the next events would overcome the bad publicity of the unfortunate recent event. Respectfully, Ken DeVries FWC checks mean safety, not harassment With all due respect to Mr. Chuck Wheeler, his letter is a disgrace and an embarrassment to every citizen of Carrabelle, Franklin County, indeed the entire state of Florida! Where it not for the Herculean efforts of our FWC, on a myriad of fronts, the city would NOT be busting with folks spending money and helping our sluggish economy. As for safety inspections; I am condent that each and every businessman wants all boaters in our waters to be SAFE so as to come back another day! So, while you lament safety and sh management monitoring, to further suggest local elected ofcials request less than the full measure of compliance on these matters shows a complete lack of respect for the law. Furthermore, if a visitor to Carrabelle or Franklin County views law enforcement as harassment, I would just as soon have them visit elsewhere. John Hitron Carrabelle Thursday, August 16, 2012 By BILL BISHOP AND ROBER TO GALLARDO Special to the Times Franklin County has experienced a brain gain in the last 40 years, joining the rest of the country in what has been a massive increase in the number of adults who have earned college degrees. In 1970, 4.6 percent of those over 25 years of age had college degrees in Franklin County. By 2010, 18.8 percent of adults here had completed college. The percentage of adults with college degrees in the county was less than the national average of 27.9 percent in 2010. The collegeeducated rate here was less than the Florida average of 25.9 percent. The number of adults in the U.S. with college degrees has nearly tripled since 1970, when only 10.7 percent of adults had graduated from college. But the percentage of adults with degrees in rural counties, such as Franklin County, while increasing, has generally fallen behind the proportion of collegeeducated residents in urban counties. The loss of young, welleducated residents has posed a long-standing difculty for rural communities. One of the problems that rural areas face is that in order to get a college education, young people often have to leave, said Judith Stallmann, an economist at the University of Missouri. Once you leave, that introduces you to other opportunities that you might not have seen had you not left. The good news for rural America is that it has caught up in every other measure of education. In 1970, 7.8 percent of adults in rural counties had some education after high school, but less than a college degree. By 2010, 27.4 percent of rural adults had attained some post-high school education without earning a college diploma. That level of education was close to the national average of 28.1 percent. In Franklin County, 6.4 percent of adults had some college in 1970, rising to 24.8 percent in 2010. The Florida average in 2010 was 29.1 percent. Franklin County had 3,980 adults (those over 25 years of age) in 1970 and 8,692 adults in 2010. Overall, Stallmann said, the trends show that rural people have responded to the demand for increased job skills by the increasing their post secondary education. Only 21.7 percent of the adult population in the county had failed to graduate from high school in 2010. Nationally 15 percent of adults had not completed high school; in Florida, the rate was 14.7 percent. Mark Partridge, a rural economist at Ohio State University, said that regional differences in college graduation rates have increased in recent years. Partridge said his studies found that rural counties and counties with small cities in the South and West didnt fare as well as those in the Midwest and Northeast in attracting college graduates. Even though the Sunbelt has seen tremendous growth over the past few decades, the Souths rural counties havent kept up in terms of attracting adults with college degrees. But the problem of keeping college graduates in rural America is a national issue and one that is also enduring. Missouri economist Stallmann said this is a reection of the kinds of jobs that are generally available in rural communities. If there are fewer jobs demanding college degrees in a community, there are likely to be fewer college graduates. Its a big deal in a lot of rural counties because you dont see a lot of jobs that require a college education, Stallmann said. Young people graduating from high school dont see many jobs that demand a college diploma, so they dont think about coming home once they leave for the university. There can be a selfreinforcing cycle in rural communities, Stallmann said. Young people leave to gain higher education, they dont come back after college because there arent jobs that demand such education, and their absence diminishes the chances that more of these kinds of jobs will be created. Nationally, rural counties and counties with small cities have caught up with urban counties in the percentage of adults who have some posthigh school education. Stallmann sees this as a sign that there are perhaps more jobs in rural areas that require post secondary education but not college. Rural communities may need to think about the types of jobs being created, Stallmann said. There are some communities that are doing things like getting local businesses to put an emphasis on hiring local kids who got a college education. It really suggests that rural communities that arent thinking about making themselves attractive to educated people are really going to suffer, Partridge said. Bill Bishop is co-editor of the Daily Yonder, an online news publication covering rural America, published by the Center for Rural Strategies. Roberto Gallardo is an assistant extension professor at the Southern Rural Development Center at Mississippi State University.Economists: County sees hike in college grads JUDITH ST ALLMAN MARK P ARTRIDGE By SUE CRONKITE Special to the Times There was a time when a group of men met in the mornings at 10-FootHole to start their day discussing local gossip, politics, and spinning tall tales. Years later they moved over to Jiggs Zingarellis Franklin Press office, at Commerce Street and Avenue D, where they kept chewing the fat and reveling in one-upmanship. Since Jiggs died in 2008, those left have meandered back down to 10-Foot-Hole. Before noon most days a number of men sit on benches under a tin roof. Signs, some funny, some thought provoking, adorn the posts. In the files of the late Margaret Key, now being researched at the Apalachicola Municipal Library, a draft of an article was found about political signs and a loafers bench at 10 Foot Hole. The sign was said to be on a cypress tree. According to Mrs. Keys notes, the lone cypress tree had a sign:Historical Cypress T ree Here I stand so brave and tall, since 1800 Ive heard it all Posters nailed to my skin, hasnt yet made me give in I dont know how much longer Ill be around But if I could talk, some folks would leave town The story of the sign began in the sheriffs ofce where Deputy Sonny Whitehurst remarked, following a hot political campaign, that there must be 400 pounds of roofing nails in that tree. Over the years, candidates for office had nailed their names, and sometimes their faces, to its trunk. Mrs. Key credited Whitehurst with the idea for the sign. Two prisoners got together on it, one a trusty who was a professional sign painter and the other an escapee from Alabama waiting to be picked up. The Alabamian wrote the verse and the painter lettered the sign. The nearest cypress trees are in a yard a football fields length away, likely descendents of the tree which had leftover roong nails as proof of a hot political campaign. The present loafers or philosophers at the gazebo are carrying on the tradition of men who shot the bull and shared fun and politicking stories down by 10 Foot Hole many years ago. Sue Cronkite works with librarian Caty Greene at the Apalachicola Municipal Library. To reach her, call 653-8436. If a cypress tree could talk what would it say @ THE LIBRARY Caty Greene LETTERS TO THE EDITOR The old cronies hang out at 10 Foot Hole

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Local The Times | A5 Thursday, August 16, 2012 Hudson, La. where they clashed repeatedly with Confederate forces. Four weeks later, the regiment, repulsed a desperate assault of largely superior numbers of the enemy after three-and-a-half hours, killing 56 and taking 130 prisoners. The Maine regiment lost one of cer and 17 soldiers, with 14 wounded. Returning home in 1863 with a distinguished war record, Coombs married his childhood sweetheart three years later, Maria A. Starrett, ve years younger than he. The couple moved to Pensacola in 1871 where Coombs worked in the timber business. After a brief sojourn to Philadelphia in 1877, they moved to Apalachicola where Coombs, in partnership with Seth N. Kimball of Mobile, opened a store which expanded into the Sunny South sawmill. He made a success of Sunny South, then sold out to Kimball and set up the Coombs Lumber Company in 1888. As early as 1881, Coombs in uence was being felt in eastern Franklin County. Carrabelle incorporated in December of that year and Oliver H. Kelley, founder of the town, announced that he and other Carrabelle notables intended to form St. James County, with Carrabelle as its county seat. But the plan failed, and Kelley later blamed Coombs and Charles H. Parlin of Apalachicola for the failure of the succession. Partners with Parlin in Carrabelle Around 1887, Coombs purchased from Parlin a Carrabelle sawmill in nancial dif culty and renamed it the Franklin County Lumber Company. He expanded the market for locally-produced timber, shipping wood products to Europe and South America as well as New Orleans and northern cities. His mills produced shingles and railroad ties in addition to sawn lumber. Parlin was another Maine transplant, married to Cornelia Elizabeth Grady, of Apalachicola. After selling his mill, he went to work for Coombs and moved to Carrabelle to oversee the Coombs interests there. The Coombs mill and the timber industry in general became the economic engine that powered the county. By 1893 there were many lumber and sawmills along the Carrabelle River. Coombs Carrabelle mill stood on the location of the old Gulf State Community Bank, close to the mouth of the river, and was one of several mills furnished with power plants for electric lighting, providing power to much of the town. In August 1899, 400,000 board feet of timber and 50,000 barrels of rosin were swept away from a single dock in Carrabelle harbor during a hurricane. Based on photos of the storms aftermath, the mill appears to be standing after the hurricane had passed. By 1900, two steam tugs, the Bert Echo and the Tilton, owned by the Watson Brothers Line, were used to tow log barges for the lumber company. Later that year, the company bought its own steam tug, the Orono, named for a town in Maine. Coombs incorporated in Delaware in 1901 at $100,000, about $3 million in todays money. The city grew up around the mill, and the heart of Carrabelles commercial waterfront is known as the Coombs Addition. An Episcopalian and active Republican In both Apalachicola and Carrabelle, the Coombs family strongly supported the Episcopal Church. They donated the original pulpit in Apalachicolas Trinity Church. During his visits to Carrabelle, the beloved Bishop Edwin Weed lodged with the Parlin family. Coombs did not neglect his political interests. He was an active member of the Republican Party, and usually attended Republican Party conventions. In 1884, he and Fred Butter eld organized the Franklin Guards, a company of infantry that erected the rst Apalachicola armory in 1898, which was named for Coombs. He declined to accept his partys nomination for governor in 1900, and downplayed any talk of a vice presidential run with Theodore Roosevelt in 1904. At the Republican convention in Chicago in 1908, Coombs was elected to a four year term as member of the Republican National Committee. He reportedly met with Roosevelt in Jacksonville in 1905. Coombs was at the peak of his career, generally regarded as the wealthiest man in the county. Family tradition has it that he was so well-known, he could simply board a train and travel with no ticket and no cash on hand because tradesmen across the east recognized him and afforded him credit. On one occasion, he is said to have picked up his son Percy, at work at the Apalachicola mill during the summer, with nothing but the clothes on his back and taken him to New York. He became president of the First National Bank of Apalachicola and was a Mason and member of the Order of Elks and Knights of Pythias. In 1905, Coombs decided his family needed a larger home, to re ect their wealth and social status, and hired George H. Marshall, a prominent local builder responsible for design and construction of many of the Queen Anne style Victorian homes in Apalachicola. The Coombs house in Apalachicola is generally considered the most elegant of Marshalls creations but its construction was the rst step toward tragedy for the Coombs family. At midnight on March 6, 1911, a re started in the attic of the house and burned its way through the roof. Three volunteer horse drawn re companies answered the call to douse the ames, but the house was damaged and many of the furnishings a total loss. The Coombs moved into the Franklin Hotel until their home could be repaired. Ten days later, Marie Coombs died, reportedly of a broken heart, and in another three weeks her husband had followed her to the grave. Lynn Spohrer, who restored the house during the 1980s, has done extensive research on the property. She said she believes the couple died from inhaling smoke containing fumes released by burning lead paint. In any case, Marie and James are buried, side-byside, in the Chestnut Street Cemetery, across the street from their home. Although photos in the state archives attest that Coombs lumber company was still active in 1925, the timber industry failed in the Panhandle during the 1920s and the family scattered to the winds. Various members of the Coombs family took up residence in the house during the next ve decades, wrote Lynns husband Bill, in a history of the house. In the early 1960s the house was closed, boarded up, and left vacant except for an occasional homeless person who camped out in the empty rooms. Without care and maintenance, the unpainted structure began to deteriorate, and there was talk of condemning and demolishing the old structure. Windows were broken, the back balcony had fallen to the ground, the front and back yards were littered with debris and trash, and the once-blossoming ower beds were wastelands of weeds. The Spohrers purchased the house in 1979 and restored it to its original condition, transforming it into a bed and breakfast. A lesser known Coombs house overlooks Carrabelles harbor. East of the Coombs addition, the highest point on the waterfront is an ancient dune known as Coombs Hill (formerly Yellow Hill and Carrs Hill), site of the Moore House recently purchased by Carrabelle. The house on the hill was built by Coombs grandson, Chauncey Burr Coombs, son of Percy Coombs, who died of consumption. By 1913, Chauncey was rmly established in Carrabelle and reportedly joined a large party on a pleasure cruise to Dog Island. That same year, he and R.J. Camp Jr. launched a new steamship line when they purchased the steamer Falcon, one of the fastest steamers on the Gulf with a running speed of 10 knots per hour. Her main cargo was turpentine from the stills north of Carrabelle. He remained in Carrabelle until 1918, when the house was sold. His son, Chauncey Jr. was born there. Chauncey Sr. returned to Apalachicola and took up residence in his fathers house, passing it on to Chauncey Jr., when he died. dbutler@coastalcoverage.com Locally owned and operated Home Business Auto Health Workers Comp MEDICARE PLANS EX CELLEN T COV ERA G E A N YO NE C AN AFFO RD TOP QUALITY COMPANY TUCKER LIFE-HEALTH INSURANCE, INC. RATED A+ BY BETTER BUSINESS BUREAU Ross E. T ucker, Agent since 1981 Chartered Life Underwriter Registered Health Underwriter 850-926-2200 or 800-226-7005 www.tuckerlifehealth.com Qualications: Expertise in: New Patients Welcome Call Toll Free 888-681-5864 For more info www.seclung.com LUNG AND SLEEP DISORDERS DR. 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CHIWEENIES! We have three, 3 month old Chiweenies waiting to be adopted! There is one male and two females. We have a red one, a dark silver one and a chocolate one and they are all perfectly adorable. They are playful and social and will make some lucky family very happy. Dont delay, these pups are very popular! Volunteers are desperately needed to socialize all of our dogs and cats. We are always looking for people willing to bring one of our animals into their home to be fostered for various needs. Anytime you can spare would be greatly appreciated. Call Karen at 670-8417 for more details or visit the Franklin County Humane Society at 244 State Road 65 in Eastpoint. You may logon to the website at www. forgottenpets.org to see more of our adoptable pets. PET OF THE WEEK Franklin County Humane Society appreciated. Call Karen at 670-8417 for more details or visit the Franklin County Humane Society at 244 State Road 65 in Eastpoint. You may logon to the website at www. forgottenpets.org to see more of our adoptable pets. WE CAN HELP! GOT MOSQUITOES? CALL L OIS AT 653-5857 Franklin Countys ONLY LOC AL Pest Control Company La Robe Boutique Society A6 | The Times Thursday, August 16, 2012 Cliff Carroll wanted to thank all of you for joining him and Mrs. Carroll for breakfast last Saturday. Dont forget the pancake breakfast this Saturday, Aug. 18. Doors open at 9 a.m. at the Lanark Village Boat Club. There will be pancakes, French toast, bacon, juice and coffee for $5. Saturday evening is the Birthday Bash at Camp Gordon Johnston American Legion Post 82. Party starts at 6 p.m., and the fun starts when you come in the door. Bring a dish to share, your dancing shoes and your main squeeze. We will have our second annual Thanksgiving in August at the American Legion post on Sunday, Aug. 26. Members of the Legion, the Sons and the Ladies Auxiliary will be ready at 1 p.m. More on this later. Next time you stop by the pavilion at the back of the Legion, check out the new grill, donated by Mr. and Mrs. Harry Larsen. You still can have bingo Monday nights at the Franklin County Senior Center. Doors open at 5:30 p.m. Early bird is at 6 p.m., and regular at 7 p.m. We have two $250 jackpots, number progressive, along with the packets. Snacks will be on hand, as well as coffee and soft drinks. Please join us for fun and fellowship. Who knows? You just might win. Be kind to one another, check on the sick and housebound and dont forget God is watching us from a distance. Until next time, God bless America, our troops, the poor, homeless and hungry. Jessica Mock, Jordan Brock engaged Jimmy and Diane Mock are happy to announce the engagement of their daughter, Jessica Michelle Mock, to Jordan Colby Brock, son of Carey Brock, of Alford, and Penny Brock, of Mexico Beach. Jessica is the granddaughter of Waylon Graham, of Howard Creek, and Frances Graham, of St. Joe Beach. She is also the granddaughter of Nancy Mock and the late James Mock, of Port St. Joe. A 2006 graduate of Port St. Joe High School, Jessica graduated with a bachelor of science in elementary education from Florida State University in 2010. She will complete her masters in curriculum and instruction in December 2012. Jessica is employed as a second-grade teacher at Port St. Joe Elementary School. Jordan is the grandson of Buz and Genevieve Putnal, of Carrabelle. He is a 2006 graduate of Port St. Joe High School and a 2010 graduate of Gulf Coast State College Law Enforcement Academy. He is employed as a deputy sheriff with the Bay County Sheriffs Of ce. The wedding is planned for Oct. 13, 2012, at Centennial Park in Port St. Joe, with a reception to follow at the Centennial Building. Lockleys to celebrate fth anniversary Sara and Gabe Lockley will celebrate their fth wedding anniversary this Sunday, Aug. 18. Happy anniversary baby! I love you. Abduls turning 3! Abdul Artez Bessent turns 3 on Sunday, Aug. 19, 2012. Come party with him at his BIG birthday party at Battery Park. Meet him there at 4:30 p.m. Sunday. Abdul is the son of Nicole Henry, of Apalachicola, and Abdul Bessent Sr., of Jacksonville Please wear swimwear to have some Fun in the Sun! Sophia Zingarelli turns 3 Sophia Zingarelli turned 3 years old on Sunday, Aug. 12, 2012. She is the daughter of Richard and Ashley Zingarelli, of Apalachicola. Maternal grandparents are Joey Creamer, of Apalachicola, and Diane Cardenas, of Carrabelle. Paternal grandparents are Cairo and Kimberly Ingram, of Cairo, Ga., and the late Richard Tich Zingarelli. She is the niece of Angie Zingarelli, LaDonna Butler, Amanda Creamer, Valerie Creamer and Austin Taunton, all of Apalachicola. Sophia celebrated her third birthday together with her family and friends. Purity Myers turns 1 Purity Naikycia Myers turns 1 on Thursday, Aug. 16, 2012. She celebrated the special occasion at home with family and friends. Purity is the daughter of Naikycia Mitchell, of Apalachicola, and Gary Myers Jr., of Apalachicola. Maternal grandparents are Bridgette Mitchell, of Ocala, and Jermaine Fedd, of Apalachicola. Maternal great-grandparents are Charlie Mae Richards, Patricia and Charles Brown and Deloris Fedd, all of Apalachicola. Paternal grandparents are Loretta and Gary Myers Sr. of Apalachicola. Puritys godmothers are Angel Hughes, of Panama City, and Teresa Martin of Apalachicola. Brayden Brown turns 4 Brayden Jonathan Brown turns 4 on Sunday, Aug. 19, 2012. Brayden is the son of Jonathan and Jennifer Brown, of Apalachicola, and big brother to Bryson Brown. Maternal grandparents are Kenneth and Glenda Martina. Maternal great-grandparents are Curtis and Jean Watson, and Bill and Burnell Martina, all of Apalachicola. Paternal grandparents are Jerome and Geanise Brown, of Apalachicola. Paternal great-grandparent is Mary Brown, of Port St. Joe. Happy birthday to our special boy! We all love you so much. Party hardy at Saturdays Birthday Bash LANARK NEWS Jim Welsh Engagement Anniversary Birthdays

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The Times | A7 Thursday, August 16, 2012 The United Methodist Churches of Franklin County Welcome You First United Methodist Church of Apalachicola Worship Service 11:00 a.m. every Sunday Sunday School 10:00 a.m. 75 5 th St. Apalachicola 653-9530 fumcapalach@gtcom.net Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis Carrabelle United Methodist Church Worship Services 10:45 a.m. Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Celebrate Recovery Mondays 7-9 p.m. 102 NE Ave. B Carrabelle 697-3672 Pastor: Julie Stephens Eastpoint United Methodist Church Worship Service 10:00 a.m. every Sunday Healing service every fourth Monday at 7:00 p.m. 317 Patton Dr. (corner of David St.) 670-8825 Pastor: Rev. Beth White St. George Island United Methodist Church 9:00 a.m. Worship Service 10:00 a.m. Fellowship Hour 201 E. Gulf Beach Dr. 9274635 www.sgiumc.org Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis Nursery now provided for Sunday Church Service First Baptist Church St. George Island 501 E. Bayshore Drive 927-2257 R. Michael Waley, Pastor Join us as we praise and worship the living Christ. Great is the Lord and most worthy of praise. Psalm 145:3 Sunday Bible Study ................................................ 10:00am Worship Praise ........................................................ 11:00am Sunday Night ............................................................ 7:00pm Wednesday Power Hour ...................................... 7:00pm Wednesday Youth at S.P.L.A.S.H ....................... 7:00pm Walking in Christ R. Michael Whaley, Pastor First Pentecostal Holiness Church 379 Brownsville Road Apalachicola Were excited about what Gods doing!!! Sunday School 9:45 am Sunday Morning Worship 10:45 am Sunday Evening Service 6:00 pm Monday, Youth Group 6:30 pm Wednesday, Royal Rangers, G.A.P. 7:00 pm Wednesday Worship & Word 7:30 pm Nursery Provided during regular church services 7:00 7:00 Sacred Heart of Jesus Catholic Church -Your Church on the Coast2653 Highway 98 East P.O. Box 729, Lanark Village, Fl 32323 Pastor: Father Eddie Jones Mass Schedule: Saturday: (Vigil) 5:00 PM Sunday: 7:30 AM (850)697-3669 WELCOMES YOU Church of the Ascension 101 NE First Street Carrabelle SUNDAY 10:00 AM WELCOMES YOU Church THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH (850) 274-4490 (850) 545-2578 WELCOMES YOU Trinity Trinity Episcopal Church est. 1836 Welcomes You Hwy. 98 & 6th St. Apalachicola 850-653-9550 Sunday Worship Services 8 & 10:30 a.m. Wednesdays Healing Service 11 a.m. Centering Prayer 4 p.m. Sunday Worship Services 8 & 10:30 a.m. Wednesdays Healing Service 11 a.m. Centering Prayer 4 p.m. Faith The St. George Island Christian Retreat Center is sponsoring a Womens Retreat from 7 p.m. Aug. 31 to 12:30 p.m. Sept. 3. Living Proof Ministries has approved the showing of Beth Moores DVD series, The Patriarchs as the content of their study. Moores studies are always extremely practical and this one is no different with its focus on family life. They invite you to join them for worship, fellowship and prayer. There is special pricing for groups and individual registrations made on or before Aug. 20. Registration deadline is Aug. 27. Call Amy Howell at 9273818 for more information. Carrell N. Anderson was born on Jan. 21, 1929 in Franklin County to the late Noah and Hattie Anderson. He passed away on a Saturday, July 21, 2012 at the age of 83 in Willingboro, New Jersey. Andy was a sherman and domestic worker. He was educated at Holy Family Catholic School, and graduated from Wallace W. Quinn High School in Apalachicola. In 1948, he graduated from cooking school at Glassboro County College. He was in the U.S. Army from 1951 to 1953. While in the Army, he served in the Korean War for 33 months, and was awarded the Korean Service Medal with four Bronze Stars and the United Nations Service Medal. In 1980, he went to school for managers and sanitation at Rutgers State University. After serving in the military he moved to Philadelphia, Penn., and worked as a domestic, painter, brick mason, plumber and an electricians helper. In 1955, he worked at the Pub. He opened three restaurants in Palisades North Jersey. In 1960 he began working for Chubbys Restaurant as a chef until he retired in 1995. He leaves to cherish his memories his wife, Gwendolyn K. Dickerson-Anderson; two stepchildren, Ronald and Gwendolyn (Stephen); eight grandchildren, Marcia Leigh, Christina, Renee, Reggie, Harold III, Dominic, Dominica (Jason) and Donald; 13 great-grandchildren; special grandson, Dominic Dodimead, Sr.; and a host of nieces, nephews, other relatives and friends. He was preceded in death by two brothers, eight sisters, one son, Wayne, and his family; and one stepson, Harold. Services were Friday morning, July 27 at St. John Baptist Church in Camden, N.J. Interment followed at Brig. General William C. Doyle Veterans Cemetery, Wrightstown. www. mayfuneralhomes.com Carrell N. Anderson CARREL ANDERSON Louise Lou Williams Norred, of St. George Island, and previously of Tallahassee and Lake City, died Friday, Aug. 10, 2012, at home after a brief illness. Lou is survived by her husband, Willie Norred, of St. George Island; son Jim (Kelley), of Tallahassee, and daughter Nan Norred, of Atlanta, Ga.; granddaughters Lisa, of Orlando, and Amber and Casey, of Tallahassee; and great-granddaughter Morgan, of Orlando, along with many loving nieces and nephews. She is also survived by the Folger family with whom Lou shared lifes experiences for over 50 years and true and sincere friends, Kirk and Patty Brown, of Tallahassee. Lou was preceded in death by her parents Mallor Howard Williams and Gladys Russ Williams, along with brothers Howard and Henry Williams. Visitation was held Monday evening, Aug. 13 at Kelleys Funeral Home in Apalachicola. Graveside services were in Magnolia Cemetery, Apalachicola on Tuesday afternoon, Aug. 14. Lou was always thinking of friends. She passed on a couple of requests, including that her services be outside, short, and that in view of the summer heat, those attending wear casual clothing. In lieu of owers, friends may wish to join the Norred family in honoring Lous memory by making a contribution to Big Bend Hospice, 1723 Mahan Center Blvd., Tallahassee, FL 32328 and/or The Franklin County Humane Society, 244 State Highway 65 in Eastpoint, FL 32328.Louise Lou Norred The family of Robert Smith II would like to thank all the people in the community who donated money and gave support to us, during our difcult time. We appreciate the help that enabled us to handle our dads cremation. Thank you. We would like to say thank you to the people of Franklin County, for their great help in making Seahawk Media Day and mini camp a great success. The Seahawks are preparing for a great season, beginning with the preseason Classic Aug. 24 at home against Bozeman. Weve got a lot of hard work to do. Time to rise up!Seahawk coaches and players Obituaries Card of THANKSSeahawk Football Team Card of THANKSRobert Smith Family Womens Retreat planned By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star.com HCOLAs second annual honor students luncheon offered some inspiring words from an ambitious young lady who has lived through it. Held Saturday, Aug. 4 at the Holy Family Center, the event was again hosted by the Hillside Coalition of Laborers for Apalachicola and emceed by the groups president, Elinor Mount-Simmons, a veteran teacher who this year will lead a new learning academy for students who have fallen behind in their work. But at the luncheon, the subject was all about academic excellence and the importance of persevering through challenges. Following an invocation by Pastor David Walker, an HCOLA member, Apalachicola Mayor Van Johnson introduced in his greetings two retired educators, Lorine Banks, who taught for 38 years, and Rosa Tolliver, who worked in the system for 34 years. Apalachicola City Commissioner Brenda Ash then came forward to introduce the guest speaker, Angelita Stephens, a licensed practical nurse and 2007 Apalachicola High School graduate. She is an overcome, Ash said. She is a victor, not a victim. A woman of God, and a woman of strength. Stephens recounted to the young people how she was a little girl who grew up in the church, who had a gift for singing. But, she said when I was 15, thats when it all started. I had my own mind, and I did exactly what I wanted to. Stephens said peer pressure began to inuence her and her friends to experiment with sex. We lied and said were not doing anything. I developed a bad attitude and then became very sneaky, Stephens said, I got caught several times, but I didnt care. The man who then entered her life told me everything I wanted to hear. I was in 10th grade and knew nothing about raising a child. That got delayed because I wanted to do what I wanted to do. Stephens said she even got into serious enough trouble at age 17 to lead to juvenile custody for two days, before her mom got her and showed her unconditional love. Stephens said her mom helped her get back on the right track, and she went on to graduate high school and qualied for her license as a certied nursing assistant. Still, she had to explain her past to the state board of nursing and provide them with three letters attesting to her character. Stephens said going to nursing school full time wasnt easy, especially with having to hold down a part-time job. I had a pile of bills, and I still had a child to raise, she said. If you want it, you can manage. On June 12 she graduated nursing school and now is scheduled to take her board exams. Im still nervous, but its in Gods hands. Be obedient, she stressed Do what you need to do. Keep a close relationship with Him, and the skys the limit. Superintendent Nina Marks also addressed the students, telling how she bounced back from a negative assessment in high school to go on to a college degree and a successful teaching career. You should never, ever let anyone tell you you cant do something, Marks said. School board member Teresa Ann Martin also spoke, stressing that they should keep up their effort to meet academic challenges to the very end. Theres a blessing in pressing, she said. Receiving certicates were, for all As yearround, Kyera Crawford and Beyla Walker (Elementary school). For achieving the honor rolls, for one or more times, were: Elementary school: Kiani Allen, Amontaye Austin, Arryonna Cargill, Marcus Clayton, Takiah Ford, Tanaya Harris, Darius Johnson, Amani Jones, Calayia Jones, TaShawn Jones, Tariah Jones, Alexcia McNair, Michael Melton, Kobe Myers, Daijon Penamon, Jamal Robinson, Keondre Sewell, Jerymiah Stephens, Hannah Sweet, Tylin Tolliver, Jarvis Turrell, Kimberly Turrell, Honesti Williams and TyAsia Yarrell Middle school: DyCorian Brown, Tia Cummings, Jaylon Gainer, Maliek Rhodes, Natasia Robinson, India Sewell, Marshall Sweet, Tyanna Townsend and ChaMaiya Williams. High school: Corey Bratton, TreSean Carr, Trinity Hardy, Andrea Cupid, Cheyenne Martin, Jathan Martin, Morgan Martin, Bria Walker, Aaliyah West and Adreenah Wynn. HCOLA offers students word to the wise D AVI D A DLERS T E IN | the Times Angelita Stephens, left, was the guest speaker at HCOLAs second annual honor students luncheon. At right, an honor students earns her recognition.

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Email outdoors news to timesoutdoors @star .com O UTDOORS www.apalachtimes.com Section Section A By DANIELLE TORRENT Special to the Times University of Florida researchers curating a 17foot-7-inch Burmese python, the largest found in Florida, discovered 87 eggs in the snake, also a state record. Scientists at the Florida Museum of Natural History on the UF campus examined the internal anatomy of the 164.5-pound snake Friday. The animal was brought to the Florida Museum from Everglades National Park as part of a long-term project with the U.S. Department of the Interior to research methods for managing the states invasive Burmese python problem. Following scienti c investigation, the snake will be mounted for exhibition at the museum for about ve years, and then returned for exhibition at Everglades National Park. This thing is monstrous, its about a foot wide, said Florida Museum herpetology collection manager Kenneth Krysko. It means these snakes are surviving a long time in the wild, theres nothing stopping them and the native wildlife are in trouble. Krysko said the snake was in excellent health and its stomach contained feathers that will be identied by museum ornithologists. Burmese pythons are known to prey on native birds, deer, bobcats, alligators and other large animals. A 17.5-foot snake could eat anything it wants, Krysko said. By learning what this animal has been eating and its reproductive status, it will hopefully give us insight into how to potentially manage other wild Burmese pythons in the future. It also highlights the actual problem, which is invasive species. Native to Southeast Asia and rst found in the Everglades in 1979, the Burmese python is one of the deadliest and most competitive predators in South Florida. With no known natural predator, population estimates for the python range from the thousands to hundreds of thousands. They were determined to be an established species in 2000 and are a signi cant concern, Krysko said. They were here 25 years ago, but in very low numbers and it was difcult to nd one because of their cryptic behavior, Krysko said. Now, you can go out to the Everglades nearly any day of the week and nd a Burmese python. Weve found 14 in a single day. The rapid population growth led to recent state laws prohibiting people from owning Burmese pythons as pets or transporting the snakes across state lines without a federal permit. Florida residents also may hunt pythons in certain wildlife management areas during established seasons with a hunting license and required permits. Everglades National Park and the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission are partnering with other agencies to address the increasing populations. Skip Snow, a park wildlife biologist, said research of the snakes biology is important for understanding how to curtail the future spread of invasive species. I think one of the important facts about this animal is its reproductive capability, Snow said. There are not many records of how many eggs a large female snake carries in the wild. This shows theyre a really reproductive animal, which aids in their invasiveness. Non-native species are considered invasive if they have a negative impact on native species or habitat, cause economic damage or pose a threat to human health and safety. Exotic snakes found in Florida are often the result of pet owners accidentally or intentionally releasing the animals. Citizens may dial 1-800-IVE-GOT1 to receive removal assistance by trained handlers. Previous records for Burmese pythons captured in the wild were 16.8 feet long and 85 eggs. Im really happy to be part of this team of researchers working on the Burmese python problem in Florida, and have been for a number of years, Krysko said. But when Im able to conduct this type of research here at the university, Im able to teach new students and new researchers about python anatomy and discuss the problem with invasive species. We need all the help we can get, we really do. Florida has the worlds worst invasive reptile and amphibian problem. Krysko led a 20-year study published in September 2011 in Zootaxa showing 137 nonnative species were introduced to Florida between 1863 and 2010. The study veri ed the pet trade as the No. 1 cause of the species introductions and the Burmese python was one of 56 non-native species determined to be reproducing and established in the state. Danielle Torrent is a writer for the University of Florida. She can be reached at dtorrent@ mnh.u .edu Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL (next to Piggly Wiggly) www.BWOsh.com (next to Piggly Wiggly) www.BWOsh.com Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL (next to Piggly Wiggly) www.BWOsh.com Corner of Marina Drive, www.BWOsh.com Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL www.BWOsh.com Port St. Joe, FL EV E RYTHING FOR YOUR O UTDOOR ADV E NTUR E Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL EV E EV E EV RYTHING FOR YOUR E RYTHING FOR YOUR E O UTDOOR ADV E UTDOOR ADV E UTDOOR ADV NTUR E NTUR E E AUGUST FEATURE FISH: Stop in and register or go online at www. B W O sh.com AUGUST FEATURE FISH: Stop in and register or go online at Stop in and register or go online at Stop in and register or go online at KINGFISH $5.00 ENTRY FOR TH E ENTIR E YE AR GREAT PRIZES WEEKLY ALMANAC APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE TIDE TABLES MONTHLY AVERAGES To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from these given for APALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW Cat Point Minus 0:40 Minus 1:17 East Pass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27 To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from those given for CARRABELLE: HIGH LOW Bald Point Minus 9:16 Minus 0:03 Sponsor the WEEKLY ALMANAC Call Today! 653-8868 Date High Low % Precip Thu, August 16 85 77 40 % Fri, August 17 85 77 40 % Sat, August 18 84 77 50 % Sun, August 19 84 76 60 % Mon, August 20 84 76 60 % Tues, August 21 84 76 60 % Wed, August 22 85 76 60 % 16 Th 343am 2.6 141pm 2.9 738am 1.9 838pm 0.3 17 Fr 400am 2.6 232pm 2.9 817am 1.8 906pm 0.3 18 Sa 415am 2.6 323pm 2.9 855am 1.4 931pm 0.6 19 Su 430am 2.7 417pm 2.9 934am 1.3 957pm 0.8 20 Mo 447am 2.7 515pm 2.7 1017am 1.0 1022pm 1.1 21 Tu 509am 2.9 620pm 2.4 1108am 0.8 1048pm 1.4 22 We 536am 3.0 739pm 2.2 1208pm 0.6 1114pm 1.8 23 Th 608am 3.0 926pm 2.1 127pm 0.6 1134pm 1.9 24 Fr 649am 3.0 302pm 0.5 25 Sa 742am 3.0 429pm 0.3 26 Su 851am 3.0 540pm 0.3 27 Mo 231am 2.4 1017am 3.0 416am 2.2 637pm 0.2 28 Tu 246am 2.4 1145am 2.9 545am 2.2 725pm 0.3 29 We 16 Th 343am 2.6 141pm 2.9 738am 1.9 838pm 0.3 17 Fr 400am 2.6 232pm 2.9 817am 1.8 906pm 0.3 18 Sa 415am 2.6 323pm 2.9 855am 1.4 931pm 0.6 19 Su 430am 2.7 417pm 2.9 934am 1.3 957pm 0.8 20 Mo 447am 2.7 515pm 2.7 1017am 1.0 1022pm 1.1 21 Tu 509am 2.9 620pm 2.4 1108am 0.8 1048pm 1.4 22 We 536am 3.0 739pm 2.2 1208pm 0.6 1114pm 1.8 23 Th 608am 3.0 926pm 2.1 127pm 0.6 1134pm 1.9 24 Fr 649am 3.0 302pm 0.5 25 Sa 742am 3.0 429pm 0.3 26 Su 851am 3.0 540pm 0.3 27 Mo 231am 2.4 1017am 3.0 416am 2.2 637pm 0.2 28 Tu 246am 2.4 1145am 2.9 545am 2.2 725pm 0.3 Thursday, August 16, 2012 Page 8 Special to the Times Representatives of seven Florida Panhandle counties met last week in Tallahassee to launch the Panhandle Wild ower Alliance and discuss strategies for positioning the regions profuse wild owers as a primary focus of the states 2013 Viva Florida 500 commemoration. The alliance is a loosely structured group focused on education and marketing efforts that will increase conservation as well as awareness of potential wild ower ecotourism opportunities. Hosted by the Florida Wild ower Foundation and facilitated by Pam Portwood and Diane Delaney, the meeting brought together stakeholders to learn about establishing wild ower ecotourism in Liberty, Gadsden, Leon, Wakulla, Franklin, Jackson and Jefferson counties. Almost 50 people attended, representing county commissions, tourism agencies, chambers of commerce, environmental organizations, national and state lands, and state agencies. The Panhandle is widely acknowledged as the place in Florida to view wild owers due to the fantastic seasonal displays along its roadsides and in natural and rural areas. Some of the best displays in the Southeastern United States are at your doorstep, Lisa Roberts, the Foundations executive director, told participants By next year, every resident of the state should know that La Florida means land of owers, said FDOT State Landscape Architect Jeff Caster, who heads FDOTs wild ower program. He also suggested meeting participants help make government and business leaders aware of Floridas constitutional policy to protect the states natural resources and scenic beauty. Ask leaders to spend less money, not more, he said, referring to reduced mowing regimes that can save taxpayers money while promoting wild ower growth. State Department Marketing Director Kerri Post told the audience that more than 100 Viva Florida 500 events are planned for 2013, which marks 500 years since European arrival. Wild owers and the states beauty its a natural, she said, explaining that wild ower tourism crosses boundaries into many niche markets, such as photography and bird-watching. A wild ower ecotourism marketing plan, funded in part by Visit Florida, also was discussed during the meeting. With partner input, the plan will serve as a roadmap for the Panhandle effort. Six of the counties represented have resolutions to preserve and conserve wildowers, and participants had many ideas on how to achieve those goals. Eleanor Dietrich, who is leading a protection and awareness effort in Leon County, told the group that Leon commissioners modi ed the countys original resolution on July 10 to eliminate references to speci c roads. The move will allow more exibility to work with the county and FDOT to choose roads as options become available, she said. Dietrich, who continuously monitors Leon Countys roadsides, is also working on presentations for Leon County commissioners to help them understand what is taking place. Were trying to move slowly to make sure of our base of support, she said. Wakulla County Commissioner Lynn Artz told the group her county has made progress protecting roadside wild owers, but not without concerns from residents about safety. To address concerns, Wakulla increased the 6-foot strip being mowed along roadsides to 8 feet, she said. To learn more about Floridas wild owers or to request a brochure on Eastern Panhandle wild ower sites, visit www.FlaWildowers.org/learn.php. To learn about Viva Florida 500 events, visit www.VivaFlorida.org. Wild ower resolutions can be viewed at www. FlaWild owers.org/resolution.php. Snakes alive! UF scientists nd 87 eggs in Everglades python PHOTOS BY KRISTEN GRACE | University of Florida Researchers at the Florida Museum of Natural History on the University of Florida campus examine the internal anatomy of the largest Burmese python found in Florida to date. Pictured are, from left, Rebecca Reichart, Leroy Nunez, Nicholas Coutu, Claudia Grant and Kenneth Krysko. University of Florida herpetologist Kenneth Krysko displays eggs found in the largest Burmese python from Florida to date. Panhandle Wild ower Alliance to boost ecotourism PHOTO BY ELEANOR DIETRICH State Road 65 in Apalachicola National Forest Inshore Offshore SPONSORED BY Inshore action continues to be dominated by trout in St. Joe Bay. Good trout catches are still reported in Pig Island and the surrounding areas. Most of the action is on live shrimp; however, arti cials such as Gulp and D.O.A. lures will work ne also. Large amounts of mullet are also in these waters right now. Good grouper catches are still coming to the docks in St. Joe. Most action can be found on the live bottom or hard bottom sites due south of Cape San Blas. Good shing for gag, red grouper and scamp grouper are all found here. King sh are still hanging around the buoy line, but not in great numbers right now.

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CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA SP O RTS www.apalachtimes.com A Section By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com As odd as it sounds, with this years St. George Island Sizzler, it paid to be later rather than earlier. After organizers decided to move the race from its traditional place on the calendar in late June and put it in August, they found out last Saturday that they had a record eld of more than 275 runners in the 5K and another 30 in the one-mile Fun Run. So now it looks like race organizer Hobson Fulmer is looking to have the race moved to August, when rooms on the island are more easily obtainable and visitors like the idea of a summerending respite by the sea. With balmy weather and a gentle breeze, this years eld of 278 set a blistering pace. Stanley Linton, an 18-year-old Wakulla High School graduate, had boasted on Facebook that he would break the course record set by Lee L. Willis a few years back. Linton, now at Florida State, ended up running a 16:36, far better than the times in recent years, under blistering hot skies. Its not a personal best, but its a pretty good time for this race, he said. After a 5:01 rst mile, Linton was overtaken about a half-mile later by 33-year-old Vince Molosky, an environmental consultant from Tallahassee. Molosky took command the rest of the way, and ended up nishing 10 seconds ahead of Linton, for the crown. Ive taken a lot of the summer off, so this was faster than I expected, said Molosky, a veteran runner of longer races anywhere from 30 to 50 kilometers. Its cooler than it usually is for this race, he said. Ill take it. Molosky ran in high school in Amherst, Ohio, and then cross country for Bowling Green State University. He joked that he has veered off the mark in past races, getting confused as to turns, but this time he was spot on. I stayed on course today, he said. The race turned out to be a family affair from one set of seven visitors: Steve Baczewski and daughter Sarah; Paul, David and Debbie Baczewski; Rose Capasso and Robert Brown, from as far as South Carolina, South Florida and Tallahassee. In the end, Sarah edged out her dad, by seven seconds, running a 25:15, while Rose, with a 43:26, nished just ahead of Paul, 12 years her junior, to nish in 256th place. Winning the Fun Run was Franklin County Middle Schooler Matthew Turner, who ran it in 7:24, nine seconds ahead of 11-year-old Samantha Woolcock, from Oil City, Penn. She beat her brother and two cousins, who are also on vacation. Johns Run-Walk Shop once again handled timekeeping duties, while Fulmer created the decorated oyster medallions that participants won, and Ann Eason handled the ceramic plates for the top winners. The crowd of runners at Lighthouse Park proved to be so large that they used up the races allotment of dinner tickets, a testament to the races growing popularity as it enters it 16th year. To see the end results, go to apalachtimes.com Morgan Newell, 2012 graduate of Franklin County High School will be attending Gulf Coast State College and will play softball for the Commodores this coming season. Morgan is the daughter of Kevin and Jennifer Newell and big sister to Maddie and K.W. Newell. Morgan has played softball since the age of 8, the last 10 years playing on her dads teams. Morgan was a starter on the Franklin County High School Lady Seahawks varsity team since the 9th grade and has played third base and pitcher. She also competed in the Dixie Youth State Tournament held in Carrabelle, where her team won and advanced to the World Series In Virginia Aug 2. We are proud of Morgan and her accomplishments and wish her the best and hope this will advance a tradition of stellar athletes in Franklin County who go on to the next level and showcase their talents. By David Adlerstein With the fall sports practice season about to begin, the Florida High School Athletic Association has reminded schools of new standards put in place to safeguard the health and wellbeing of student-athletes. The FHSAAs director of athletics will conduct a workshop on the new safety requirements at a compliance seminar next week. Preseason practices of cially began Monday for studentathletes competing for their schools in football, golf, swimming/diving and girls volleyball, and new procedures are in place to protect the youths from the heat, inadequate hydration and concussions. For coaches, parents and everyone else associated with high school athletics, nothing is more important than the safety of the students, FHSAA Executive Director Dr. Roger Dearing said. At the FHSAA, we are committed to making sure our members understand what they must do to ensure that competitors have safe, enjoyable experiences as high school athletes. The FHSAAs Board of Directors adopted new heat-related policies in June, designed to ensure young athletes drink plenty of water and do not practice too many hours each week. Under the new policies, schools must: Limit weekly practice time to 18 hours during the rst two weeks of practice, to allow student-athletes to adapt to conditions Ensure that for every 30 minutes of practice, student-athletes get a minimum ve-minute rest and hydration break Require unrestricted access to water for student-athletes at all times Require coaches and others in authority to never deny a student-athlete access to water if requested. The FHSAA also adopted a new concussion and heat-related illness form intended to create safety awareness among students and their caretakers by explaining the risks and symptoms associated with each problem. A concussion action plan developed by the FHSAAs Sports Medicine Advisory Subcommittee and adopted by the Board requires that: Any student-athlete who exhibits signs, symptoms or behaviors consistent with a concussion such as loss of consciousness, headache, dizziness, confusion or balance problems must be immediately removed from the competition and cannot return to play until he or she is cleared by an appropriate health care professional. All head coaches and other paid coaches are required to view an online education course about concussions. The FHSAA also developed a new consent form related to concussions and heat-related illness to ensure that parents understand the conditions and the rules that apply to them. Since it was established in 1920, FHSAA has provided opportunities for high school students in Florida to participate fairly and equally in interscholastic athletic programs that produce vital educational bene ts. The FHSAA sponsors championship programs through which 108 teams and more than 720 student-athletes are crowned state champions in 30 sports each year. Through participation in these athletic programs, almost 800,000 students annually are extended opportunities to receive lessons in leadership, sportsmanship and citizenship. Page 9 Thursday, August 16, 2012 New state standards to protect athletes DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times Morgan Newell at the Lady Seahawks Senior Night Newell to play for GCSC Islands Sizzler attracts record crowd PHOTOS BY DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times Vince Molosky wins the Sizzler. Above: The Baczewski, Capasso and Brown families prepare for the race. Right: Matthew Turner wins the Fun Run. Coach Josh Wrights Seahawk football team did some important team building last weekend with the help of volunteers and local supporters. On Saturday, the team played host to a sh fry at Taylors Building Supply, as members of the community helped raise funds by offering fresh mullet dinners for a donation. Among those assisting Wrights squad was Panama Citys Lee Grif n, whose son was quarterback coach at Rutherford when Wright coached in Bay County. Grif n fried up the unique rope-like hush puppies. Also helping out was Grif ns nephew Derrell Suttles, his son Ray and Grif ns son-in-law Robbie Robbins. Theyre like family to me, said Wright. After the sh fry it was a chance to reach the highest level of conditioning, as Wright put it, as the team headed to a team-building weekend at the St. George Island Retreat, arranged through Pastor Mike Whaley and retreat manager Lee Howell. Practices continue this week in the evening as the team readies for the Aug. 24 pre-season home opener against Bozeman. Assistant coaches on hand were Michael Sweatt, in charge of defense, Tim Wheeler, who works the quarterbacks and the passing game, and volunteer Ashley Teat. Wright said he is working to bring on Bronson Sweatt, a corrections of cer, to handle coaching the offensive and defensive lines. By David Adlerstein Seahawks ready for 2012 season SPECIAL TO THE TIMES Mason Ray, left, helps serve up the chow as teammates Holden Foley, Tyler Rowell and David Butler (at right) help out. JOES LAWN CARE 850.323.0741 J OE S _L AWN @Y A H OO .C O M

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Local A10 | The Times Thursday, August 16, 2012 Trades & Services 653-8868 GET YOUR AD IN C A LL T ODAY! Laban Bontrager, DMD Monica Bontrager, DMD 12761 Pea Ridge Road Bristol, Florida 32321 TELEPHONE (850) 643-5417 Bristol Dental Clinic DENTURE LAB ON PREMISES Same Day Service on Repairs and Relines Don Lively General Contractors L ICENSED AND I NSURED 20 Y EARS E XPERIENCE P .O. Box 439 C arrabelle, FL 32322 697-2783 or Mobile 566-2603 RC 0066499 R G0065255 Carrabelle Visa, Discover, and American Express Honored at Participating Ace Stores JACKSONS Building Supplies & Auto Repair Carrabelle 697-3333 We Deliver Anywhere Hardware and Paint Center J.J.s Tree Service, LLC Stump Grinder Licensed & Insured Call John : (850) 899-8432 ROBERTS APPLIANCE REPAIR ALL MAJOR BRANDS 18 Shadow Lane Apalachicola, FL 32320 Phone: (850) 653-8122 Cell: (850) 653-7654 GET YOUR AD IN 653-8868 Trades & Services GET YOUR AD IN 653-8868 Trades & Services REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS LEASE OF COMMERCIAL-USE AIRCRAFT HANGAR/OFFICE FACILITY And FBO FACILITY interested in entering into leases of Business opportunities at FRANKLIN COUNTY/APALA CHICOLA REGIONAL AIRPORT. The Board is soliciting proposals for two items. Item #1 Item #2 Franklin County Clerk of Court meet Please submit seven (7) copies. Please identify on the exterior of the sealed envelope whether the proposal is for Item #1 or Item #2. The Board reserves the right to reject any and all Proposals. BILL MILLER REALTY 850-697-3751 (3310) 570-0658 400 + COMM. U.S. 98 & GULF ADJ. TO LANARK MARINA 85K $29,500 $2,500 D O W N B UYS 2 B ED AP T 2 6 OR RENT $500/MTH COR LOT 12 X 53 1 B / R 8 X 24 SHED 27,500 GULFVIE W & ACCESS 3 BDR 2 BA 2006 M/H 89K 2 LG. SHADY LOTS 3 SHEDS 400 TO MARINA-CITY W ATER49K MIH 2 C RNR LOTS BLK. $ S TORE REDUCED $49,500 CITY COMM. LOTSU.S. 98 $29,500 U P Special to The Times Dr. Dean Grubbs also known as the Shark Guy from the Florida State University Coastal and Marine Laboratory, will visit the Carrabelle Branch of Franklin County Public Library from 4:15-5:15 p.m. Aug. 28 for a memorable story time. Those who attend will be able to view specimens of his studies and gain a unique understanding of the mysterious creatures of the sea. While you are there, be sure to check out the collection of books that offer a fun way to learn about the aquatic life that live near our communities. The weekly story time offered at both branches offer activities and education to children with weekly themes. Eastpoint offers Mommy and Me on Fridays, at 3:30 p.m. to offer learning experiences to children as young as birth to age 9. Mothers join in with the fun and appreciate the opportunity to meet other parents with children at the same level. Simple crafts encourage ne motor skills while the music and sign language develop childrens verbal and non-verbal skills. Children entering preschool will be pleased to know that the staff makes library visits to both the Headstart in Carrabelle and in Eastpoint weekly. Tonia Granger brings books and shares stories to keep the children engaged. Her favorite stories to tell include Mercer Mayers Little Monster themed books. Anne Birchwell will begin the library outreach for Eastpoint preschools in September. Bringing library book stories to the children is just one of the ways that the county library works within the community for awareness and education. Eugenia Butler offers outreach for adults that have dif culty to physically get to their local libraries. For questions about the programs offered, please contact the library in Eastpoint at 670-8151 or the library in Carrabelle at 697-2366. Pre-K open house Thursday afternoon The pre-K Open House will be from 2-4 p.m. today at the Franklin County Learning Center cafeteria. A short program will introduce new staff members and share information with parents. After the largegroup meeting, parents and students are invited to visit their classrooms to talk with teachers and staff. FCHS registration Thursday and Friday Middle and high school registration in the Franklin County High School cafeteria will be from 3-6 p.m. today. Ninth grade orientation is from 1-2 p.m. Friday in the cafeteria. For more information, call 670-2800, ext. 3103. School starts Monday; hours set Franklin County High School, grades kindergarten though 12, opens Monday. School hours for students for the 2012-13 school wear will be as follows: Elementary school students report to the cafeteria at 7:45 a.m. for breakfast; the instructional day begins at 8:05 a.m.; and dismissal is at 2:05 p.m. Middle and high school students bell rings at 7:55 a.m., and the instructional day begins at 8 a.m. Dismissal is at 2:10 p.m. Help homeless students with school supplies The Franklin County School Districts Homeless Liaison, Sandi Hengle, is collecting school supplies for homeless and needy students. The school supply list is available on the front page of the Franklin County Schools website, www. franklincountyschools.org. School T-shirts also are needed. If your child has outgrown his or her shirt, graduated, is no longer in school or has moved up a grade, please consider donating his or her used shirts. If you wish to purchase new shirts for students who cant afford them, a donation can be made. The T-shirts are $6 each. The school cafeteria also has a Backpack Buddy Program that provides food for a needy student every weekend. The child is provided a backpack of food on Fridays with six meals, to last them through the weekend. The backpacks are returned on Monday to be re lled for the following Friday. Cost to sponsor a child is $5 a week, $25 a month or $300 a year. This is a very nominal donation to ll a hungry stomach. Donations of canned meats are also needed for families who dont have refrigerators or stoves. If you would like to sponsor a child for any of the programs, call Sandi Hengle at 323-0982. Correctional of cer class begins Aug. 22 A new correctional of cer basic standards class is scheduled to begin at the Gulf/Franklin Campus of Gulf Coast State College in Port St. Joe on Aug. 22. This class is required for anyone who wishes to become a correctional of cer at any state, county or private correctional facility throughout Florida. This will be the last class offered this year in Port St. Joe. For information, call Brenda Burkett at 227-9670, ext. 5507. Tobacco-free partnership meets Aug. 29 There will be a TobaccoFree Franklin Partnership coalition meeting on Wednesday, Aug. 29, at the Franklin County Health Department, 139 12th St., from 5:30-6:30 p.m. in the second oor conference room. County to upgrade 2 private roads At the Aug. 1 meeting, the county commission voted unanimously to upgrade two privately owned roads, Paddy Lane and Wood Duck off of Twin Lakes in Eastpoint. Chairman Pinki Jackel requested the work be done as a one-time project. She said the roads were badly damaged by Tropical Storm Debby and the work will have to be performed after the area dries. Commissioner Bevin Putnal said the road is so bad the mosquito truck and other county vehicles cant use it. These really are unusual emergency circumstances, County Attorney Michael Shuler said. Emergency Management Director Pam Brownell said FEMA will not reimburse the county for work on private roads. Shark Guy to visit library News BRIEFS

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, August 16, 2012 The Times | A11 88777 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case No.: 2009-CA-000549 Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as Trustee for Long Beach Mortgage Trust 2006-2 Plaintiff, vs. Marion C. Brewer. Defendant(s). AMENDED NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order rescheduling foreclosure sale dated July 23, 2012, entered in Civil Case No. 2009CA-000549 of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein Deutsche Bank National Trust Com-pany, as Trustee for Long Beach Mortgage Trust 2006-2, Plaintiff and Mariom C. Brewer and Richard C. Brewer, Wife and Husband are defendant(s), I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, AT THE WEST FRONT DOOR OF THE FRANK-LIN COUNTY COURTHOUSE, LOCATED ON HWY 98, IN APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA, AT 11:00AM, October 3, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit: LOT 3, BLOCK E, OF PENINSULAR POINT, UNIT 1, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OF PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 20, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. DATED at Apalachicola, Florida, this 24th day of July, 2012. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of Court Franklin County, FL Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF: SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACHE, LLP 4630 Woodland Corporate Blvd., Suite 100 Tampa, FL 33614 (813) 880-8888 (813) 880-8800 August 9, 16, 2012 88559T NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED Notice if hereby given that, MIKE B. BLAKE, the holders of the following certificate have filed said certificate for tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property and the name in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No: 1400 Year of issuance: 2010 Description of Property: Lot 7 Block 28 City of Apalachicola PARCEL NO: 01-09s-08w-8330-0028-00 70 Name is which assessed: John R. Bird All of said property being in the State of Florida, Franklin County. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the Courthouse door on the second (2nd) Monday in the month of September 2012, which is the 10th day of September 2012 at 11:00 a.m. DATED this 18th day of July, 2012. MARCIA M. JOHNSON CLERK OF COURTS FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Cassie B. Sapp Deputy Clerk August 2, 9, 16, 23, 2012 88555T NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED Notice if hereby given that, GARY MICHAEL MITCHELL Trustee of the Gary Michael Mitchell Revocable Trust, the holders of the following certificate have filed said certificate for tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property and the name in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No: 606 Year of issuance: 2009 Description of Property: Lots 1 through 16 Block 32(183) Keough’s Second Addition, City of Carrabelle Full Legal Description can be viewed at Clerk of the Circuit Court’s Office. PARCEL NO: 20-07s-04w-4212-0032-00 10 Name is which assessed: SGI LAND COMPANY LLC All of said property being in the State of Florida, Franklin County. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the Courthouse door on the second (2nd) Monday in the month of September 2012, which is the 10th day of September 2012 at 11:00 a.m. DATED this 19th day of July, 2012. MARCIA M. JOHNSON CLERK OF COURTS FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Cassie B. Sapp Deputy Clerk August 2, 9, 16, 23, 2012 88647T NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED Notice if hereby given that, GARY MICHAEL MITCHELL Trustee of the Gary Michael Mitchell Revocable Trust, the holders of the following certificate have filed said certificate for tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property and the name in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No: 594 Year of issuance: 2009 Description of Property: Lots 1 through 16 Block 16(161) Keough’s Second Addition, City of Carrabelle Full Legal Description can be viewed at Clerk of the Circuit Court’s Office. PARCEL NO: 20-07s-04w-4212-00160010 Name is which assessed: SGI LAND COMPANY LLC All of said property being in the State of Florida, Franklin County. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the Courthouse door on the second (2nd) Monday in the month of September 2012, which is the 10th day of September 2012 at 11:00 a.m. DATED this 26th day of July, 2012. MARCIA M. JOHNSON CLERK OF COURTS FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Cassie B. Sapp Deputy Clerk August 2, 9, 16, 23, 2012 88645T NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED Notice if hereby given that, GARY MICHAEL MITCHELL Trustee of the Gary Michael Mitchell Revocable Trust, the holders of the following certificate have filed said certificate for tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property and the name in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No: 597 Year of issuance: 2009 Description of Property: Lots 1 through 16 Block 19(164) Keough’s Second Addition, City of Carrabelle Full Legal Description can be viewed at Clerk of the Circuit Court’s Office. PARCEL NO: 20-07s-04w-4212-00190010 Name is which assessed: SGI LAND COMPANY LLC All of said property being in the State of Florida, Franklin County. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the Courthouse door on the second (2nd) Monday in the month of September 2012, which is the 10th day of September 2012 at 11:00 a.m. DATED this 26th day of July, 2012. MARCIA M. JOHNSON CLERK OF COURTS FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Cassie B. Sapp Deputy Clerk August 2, 9, 16, 23, 2012 88725T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION: CASE NO.: 19-2010-CA-000094-CA XXXX BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., vs. DESMOND J. O’NEILL; Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated the 25th day of July, 2012, and entered in Case No. 19-2010-CA-000094CAXXXX, of the Circuit Court of the 2ND Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, where-in BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. is the Plaintiff and DESMOND J. O’NEILL, UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF DESMOND J. O’NEILL and are defendants. The Clerk of this Court shall sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the, FRONT STEPS OF THE FRANKLIN COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 33 MARKET STREET, APALACHICOLA, FL 32320, 11:00 AM on the 11th day of September, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOTS 7 & 8 OF BLOCK 25 OF THE CITY OF APALACHICOLA, IN THE COUNTY OF FRANKLIN, STATE OF FLORIDA, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF IN COMMON USE. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301, 850-5774401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Dated this 26th day of July, 2012. MARCIA JOHNSON Clerk of The Circuit Court Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk August 9, 16, 2012 88775T IN THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 09-650-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, as successor in interest to COASTAL COMMUNITY BANK Plaintiff, vs. MICHAEL J. KREHL and JOSEPHINE CANELLA-KREHL, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated July 23, 2012, and entered in Civil Action No. 09-650-CA of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein the parties were the Plaintiff, CENTENNIAL BANK as successor in interest to COASTAL COMMUNITY BANK, and the Defendants, MICHAEL J. KREHL and JOSEPHINE CANELLA-KREHL, I will sell to the highest and best bidder, for cash, at 11:00 a.m. (Eastern Time) on the6th day of September, 2012, at the front steps of the Franklin County Courthouse, Apalachicola, Florida, the followingdescribed real property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: Lots 2, 8, and 11-13, Block J of ST. JAMES BAY SUBDIVISION, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 7, Page(s) 39, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. The successful bidder at the sale will be required to place the requisite state documentary stamps on the Certificate of Title. DATED this 30th day of July, 2012. Honorable MARCIA JOHNSON Clerk of the Court Franklin County, Florida By: Michele Maxwell As Deputy Clerk August 9, 16, 2012 88789T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2011-454-CA First National Bank of Decatur County, Plaintiff, vs. Coastline Properties of North Florida, LLC; Hexaport Building Systems of Florida, LLC, d/b/a Green Steel Homes; Defendants. NOTICE OF JUDICIAL SALE Pursuant to Section 45.031(1) of the Florida Statutes To Whom It May Concern: Notice is hereby given that the undersigned, Marcia Johnson, Clerk of the Circuit Court of Franklin County, Florida, will on September 6, 2012 at 11:00 AM, at the Franklin County Clerk’s Office, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, Florida, 32320, offer for sale, and sell at public auction to the highest bidder, the following described real property located in Franklin County, Florida: EXHIBIT “A” Commence at the Southwest corner of Section 13, Township 7 South, Range 5 West, Franklin County, Florida (as monumented), thence run North 1828.93 feet, thence run North 89 degrees 59 minutes 22 seconds East 2199.40 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING run South 00 degrees 10 minutes 32 seconds West 487.48 feet to the Northerly right-of-way boundary of Mill Road, thence run South 58 degrees 03 minutes 12 seconds East along said Northerly right-ofway boundary 287.08 feet to the intersection of said Northerly right-of-way boundary with the Westerly boundary of a 60.00 foot Roadway Easement (Kal Lane), thence leaving said Northeasterly right-of-way boundary run Northwesterly and Northeasterly along said Westerly easement boundary as follows: run North 05 degrees 53 minutes 56 seconds West 379.14 feet to a point of curve to the right, thence run along the arc of said curve having a radius of 433.83 feet, through a central angle of 40 degrees 45 minutes 42 seconds, for an arc distance of 308.64 feet, chord being North 14 degrees 31 minutes 01 seconds East 302.17 feet to a point of tangency, thence run North 34 degrees 54 minutes 09 seconds East 213.07 feet, thence leaving said Westerly easement boundary run North 50 degrees 51 minutes 08 seconds West 187.87 feet to an iron rod and cap (marked #7160), thence run North 09 degrees 44 minutes 22 seconds East 81.55 feet to an iron rod and cap (marked #7160), thence run North 25 degrees 25 minutes 02 seconds West 241.16 feet to an iron rod and cap (marked #7160), thence run North 04 degrees 34 minutes 04 seconds East 273.54 feet to an iron rod and cap (marked #7160) lying on the Southerly boundary of the aforementioned 60.00 foot wide roadway easement (Kal Lane), said point also lying on a curve concave to the Northerly, thence run Northeasterly along said Southerly easement boundary as follows, thence run along the arc of a curve having a radius of 50.00 feet, through a central angle of 76 degrees 49 minutes 06 seconds, chord being North 25 degrees 51 minutes 40 seconds West 62.13 feet, thence leaving said cul-de-sac run North 79 degrees 19 minutes 49 seconds West 163.70 feet, thence run South 00 degrees 02 minutes 47 seconds East 980.74 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. The sale will be held pursuant to the final judgment of foreclosure entered on July 23, 2012, in Case No. 2011-CA-454 of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit, Franklin County, Florida, in which the parties are as listed in the above case-style. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Notice of Lis Pendens, must file a claim with the Clerk of the Court within 60 days after the date of sale. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the undersigned not later than seven days prior to the proceeding to ensure that reasonable accommodations are available. Dated: July 31, 2012. Marcia Johnson Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Terry Creamer Deputy Clerk August 9, 16, 2012 88791T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 11-000436CA TYNDALL FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, Plaintiff, vs. WILLIAM WAYNE WEBB, WONDA WEBB ALLEN, EASTPOINT WATER AND SEWER DISTRICT, AND FRANKLIN COUNTY, Defendants. SECOND AMENDED NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Franklin County, Florida, pursuant to the Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure, entered in this cause, the Clerk of this Court shall sell the property at public sale at 11:00 A.M. E.D.T., on the 6th day of September, 2012, at the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida, 32320, the following described real property lying and being in Franklin County, Florida, to-wit: EXHIBIT “A” A parcel of land lying in the Southeast Quarter of Fraction Section 27, Township 8 South, Range 8 West, Franklin County, Florida being described as follows: Commence at the intersection of the Southeasterly boundary of the 60.0 foot State Road (S-384-A) with the Northeasterly boundary of the 60.0 foor State Road (S-384) abd run thence North then 17 degrees 02 minutes 55 seconds East along said right-of-way of State Road S-384-A 962.10 feet to the Point of Beginning. From said Point of Beginning run thence South 72 degrees 57 minutes 05 seconds East 325.00 feet to a point in the center of a creek, thence North 67 degrees 40 minutes 45 seconds East along said creek center line 252.24 thence leaving said creek North 72 degrees 57 minutes 05 seconds West 370.00, thence South 17 degrees 02 minutes 55 seconds West 131.10 feet, thence North 72 degrees 57 minutes 05 seconds West 150.00 feet, to a point on said right-of-way of State Road S-384-A, thence South 17 degrees 02 minutes 55 seconds West along said right-of-way 28.90 feet to the Point of Beginning. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. This Notice dated this 24th day of July, 2012. MARCIA JOHNSON Clerk Circuit Court, Franklin County, Florida By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk August 9, 16, 2012 88793T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.: 19-2010-CA-000598 CITIMORTGAGE, INC. AS SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO ABN AMRO MORTGAGE GROUP, INC., Plaintiff, vs. EVELYN JUANITA KIRBY; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF EVELYN JUANITA KIRBY; IF LIVING, INCLUDING ANY UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SAID DEFENDANT (S), IF REMARRIED, AND IF DECEASED, THE RESPECTIVE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS, AND TRUSTEES, AND ALL OTHER PERSONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THE NAMED DEFENDANT (S); BANK OF AMERICA, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO LASALLE BANK MIDWEST NATIONAL ASSOCIATION; PIRATES LANDING AT TIMBER ISLAND CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION, INC.; WHETHER DISSOLVED OR PRESENTLY EXISTING, TOGETHER WITH ANY GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS, OR TRUSTEES OF SAID DEFENDANT(S) AND ALL OTHER PERSONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, WHETHER UNDER, OR AGAINST DEFENDANT(S); UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2; Defendant(s) NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above styled cause, in the Circuit Court of Franklin County, Florida, I will sell the property situate in Franklin County, Florida, described as: EXHIBIT “P1 That certain Condominium Unit of PIRATES LANDING AT TIMBER ISLAND composed of Unit Number A-2, and the undivided 1/48 interest in the Common Elements appurtenant thereto, in accordance with the subject to the Master Declaration of Covenants, Conditions, and Restrictions, recorded in O.R. Vol. 879, Pages 348 through 372, and Declaration of Condominium of PIRATES LANDING AT TIMBER ISLAND, recorded in O.R. Vol. 879, Pages 373 through 541, both of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. A/K/A 280 Pirates Landing Road Carrabelle, FL 32322 at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, Front

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A12| The Times Thursday, August 16, 2012 CLASSIFIEDS Carrabelle Riverfront Home3 bdrm, 2 bath w/boat dock, fully furnished, $1,659 per month w/utilities. Peyton at (850)294-7827 or visit www .mr493.com for pictures, details, location... Text FL17576 to 56654 Eastpoint 3 br, 2 ba, in exclusive Whispering Pines C/H/A, DW, WD Hkup, no smoke/pets $850 month, 1st & Last Deposit 850-670-8266 SEEKING RENTALRetired professional is couple seeking a furnished apartment in Apalach historic district or houseboat rental February & March. Please reply to Peter and Pam by email stoneoak2003 @yahoo.com or call at: 413-219-4409. 3 br, 2 ba, Very Nice Mobile Home 197 Old Ferry Dock Rd. in Eastpoint. Dishwasher, W/D, CH&A Jacuzzi tub 1 acre lot, with lawn maintenance Nice location, No Pets or Smoking. $650 mo 1st & last, $300 deposit Call 850-670-8460 $33,500 5 Acres near Crystal Lake on Amos Hayes Rd, property has well septic and power pole. Current survey is available. About 1.5 acres of the property is cleared. 850-271-5761 and leave a message. North Historic District 5th Street building lot. $29,000 obo. 60 x 100. Corner lot. Brokers protected (404) 218-0077 A GREAT BUY! Scenic Cruiser, 1993. Gulfstream, 34 ft, One slide out. $5,000. This is a steal! Needs some TLC. 850-653-5077. 2008 Harley Davidson Street Glide Anniversay Edition9,700 miles. Copper/ Black. In Excellent condition w/Rinehart Exhaust, Power Commander, ABS, Security, Extra Headlights, 2 Seats, many other options. Always garage kept and well maintaned. Original owner. Only $17,000, sold new for over $27,000.850-723-4642 Coleman Pop-up Camper2 king sized beds. Good Condition. $2,900 (850) 697-2031 Leave message. Text FL20896 to 56654 RENTALS3 BEDROOM, 3 BATH CONDO UNFURNISHED, POOL ................................$800 1 BR, 1 BATH UNFURNISHED APT LANARK, REMODELED, INC WATER ..........$425 2 BEDROOM, 1 BATH UNFURNISHED APT LANARK .........................................................$400 2 BR, 1 BATH, UNFURNISHED APT. W/D HOOKUP, SMALL PORCH ............................$375 1 BR 1 BATH FURNISHED APT. SUNROOM, W/D, LANARK UTILITIES INCLUDED .........$650 3 BR, 2 BATH, UNFURNISHED HOUSE, WOOD FENCED YARD ...............................................$600 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322850-697-9604 850-323-0444 www.seacrestre.comwww. rst tness.com/carrabellePROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND RENTALS Apalachicola: 1 br, 1 ba efficiency Call for information 850-653-6103 Text FL20208 to 56654 Heritage V illas of Apalachicola Apartments Now accepting applications for 1BR Handicap accessible unit. Some rental assistance may be available. HUD vouchers accepted. Call 850-653-9277. TDD/ TTY 711. This institution is an equal opportunity provider & employer. Heritage V illas of Apalachicola Apartments Now accepting applications for 2BR Some rental assistance may be available. HUD vouchers accepted. Call 850-653-9277. TDD/ TTY 711. This institution is an equal opportunity provider & employer. Lanark Village: Clean 2 bedroom, 1 bath, screened porch, AC, 7 months min. $500 monthly + $350. security deposit, references required Pets-will consider. Non smoking. Call: 850-212-2063 Text FL18819 to 56654 Studio Apt. Furnished Upstairs StudioQuiet location, Water & Electric incl. Walk to Dwntwn. $650+Dep N/P or N/S For appt 653-9116 or 320-1174 St. George Island $175 week, Electric, Satellite, Garbage incl. Pool tble. 12’ X 65’ deck w/Beautiful view 850-653-5114 1 BRCottageH/AC in Apalachicola, FL. 850-643-7740. Apalachicola Cottage Lovely 3Br 2Ba, granite/ SS kitchen wood/carpet, laundry, screened deck w/spa, fenced back yard, security, garage & opener Avail Sept. 1, 2012 $1,200 /mo incl utilities. References + $500 dep Call: 865-307-0600 Text FL 20201 to 56654 Carabelle: (in town) 3 bdrm 2 bath older home. Freshly painted. $700 per month + dep. Call (850) 766-4357 Text FL19365 to 56654 Carabelle: 3 bdr 2 bath with large spare room on 1 acre. Fenced yard, new tile throughout, freshly painted. $800 per month + dep. Call (850) 766-4357 Text FL19355 to 56654 steps of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street Apalachicola, FL 32320 at 11:00 AM, on August 21, 2012. DATED THIS 28th DAY OF June, 2012. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Witness, my hand and seal of this court on the 28th day of June, 2012. Marcia M. Johnson CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk THIS INSTRUMENT PREPARED BY: Law Offices of Daniel C. Consuegra 9204 King Palm Drive Tampa, FL 33619-1328 Attorneys for Plaintiff If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Danny Davis Office of Court Administration 301 South Monroe Street, Room 225 Tallahassee, FL 32303 850.577.4401 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. August 9, 16, 2012 88795T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 19-2009-CA-000534 DIVISION: BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. DIANA W GROAT, TRUSTEE OF THE DWG TRUST, U/A/D, MAY 15, 2008 et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated July 23, 2012 and entered in Case No. 19-2009-CA000534 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for FRANKLIN County, Florida wherein BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. is the Plaintiff and DIANA W GROAT, TRUSTEE OF THE DWG TRUST, U/A/D, MAY 15, 2008; THE UNKNOWN BENEFICIARIES OF THE DWG TRUST, U/A/D, MAY 15, 2008; DIANA W. GROAT; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT (S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSE, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; ST. JAMES BAY PROPERTY OWNERS’ ASSOCIATION, INC.; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at FRONT DOOR OF THE FRANKLIN COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 33 MARKET STREET, APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA at 11:00AM, on the 6th day of September, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT 4 OF BLOCK I, ST. JAMES BAY SUBDIVISION, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 7, PAGES 39-46, PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A LOT 4, BLOCK I, ST. JAMES, CARRABELLE, FL 32322 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on July 23, 2012. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Mr. Doug Smith, Office of Court Administration Leon County Courthouse, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301, Phone: 850-577-4401, Fax: 850-487-7947 F09091478 August 9, 16, 2012 88823T IN THE COUNTY COURT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2012-172-CA RIVERWALK CONDOMINIUM OWNER’S ASSOCIATION, INC, Florida Non-Profit Corporation, Plaintiff, vs. PAIGE F. KILLEEN, Defendant. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: PAIGE F. KILLEEN: YOU ARE NOTIFIED that a civil action has been filed against you in the Circuit Court, County of Franklin, State of Florida, to foreclose certain real property described as follows: Unit “K” of Riverwalk Condominiums, according to Declaration of Condominium, Covenants and Restrictions for Riverwalk Condominiums thereof recorded under Official Records Book 566, Page 220, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida; as amended by that certain Amended Declaration’ of Condominium, Covenants and Restrictions for Riverwalk Condominiums thereof recorded under Official Records Book 584, Pages 1-78, of the-Public Records of Franklin County, Florida; and Amendment to Master Declaration of Condominium, Covenants and Restrictions for Riverwalk Condominiums thereof recorded under Official Records Book 628, Pages 81-99, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida; and Amendment to Master Declaration of Condominium, Covenants and Restrictions for Riverwalk Condominiums thereof recorded under Official Records Book 635, Pages 548-552, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida, together with all appurtenances thereto. You are required to file a written response with the Court and serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Timothy D. Padgett, Plaintiff’s attorney, whose address is 2878 Remington Green Circle, Tallahassee, Florida 32308, at least thirty (30) days from the date of first publication, and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on Plaintiff’s attorney or immediately thereafter, otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. Dated this 30th day of July, 2012. Marcia M. Johnson CLERK OF COURT Terry Creamer Deputy Clerk Attorney for Plaintiff: Timothy D. Padgett, Esq., Timothy D. Padgett, P.A. 2878 Remington Green Circle, Tallahassee, Florida 32308 Ph: (850) 422-2520 Fax: (850) 422-2567 August 9, 16, 2012 88817T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO: 2012-000043-CP Florida Bar # 334618 IN RE: THE ESTATE OF BERNARD L. COSEY, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of BERNARD L. COSEY, deceased, whose date of death was June 30, 2012, is pending in the Circuit Court for Franklin County, File Number 2012-000043-CP is pending in the Circuit Court for Franklin County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is P. O. Box 340, Apalachicola, Florida 32320. The names and addresses of the Personal Representative and the Personal Representatives attorney are set forth below. ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT: All creditors of the decedent and other persons who have claims or demands against decedent’s estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, and who have been served a copy of this notice, must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY (30) DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.tions of the Personal Representative, venue, or jurisdiction of this Court are required to file their objections with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DEATH IS BARRED. The date of the first publication of this Notice is August 9, 2012. Personal Representative: KENDALL B. COSEY 1229 Parkside Village Drive Marietta, GA 30066 Attorney for Personal Representative: Joyce Terrell Timmons, Esquire P.O. Box 726 Eastpoint, FL 32328 (850) 670-8998 August 9, 16, 2012 88957T IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT NORTHERN DISTRICT OF FLORIDA TALLAHASSEE DIVISION CASE NO.: 4:12-CV-00053-RHWCS CENTENNIAL BANK, Plaintiff, vs. KEVIN R. GABY a/k/a KEVIN RILEY GABY; KERRY R. GABY; and WILDWOOD COUNTRY CLUB PROPERTY OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that under and by virtue of a Judgment of Foreclosure rendered in the abovestyled case on June 5, 2012, by the United States District Court For The Northern District Of Florida, in favor of the Plaintiff, and the Amendment to Judgment of Foreclosure entered July 10, 2012, by the United States District Court For The Northern District Of Florida, the undersigned, appointed in said decree, will on the 10th day of September, 2012 at 12:00 p.m. (Eastern Time), at the main foyer in the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327, offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the highest bidder, the following described property, situated, lying and being in Wakulla County and Franklin County, Florida: SEE EXHIBITS A, B AND C ATTACHED HERETO. EXHIBIT A COMMENCE AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 13, TOWNSHIP 4 SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND ALSO MARKING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF WOODLAND PARK SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 82 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 16 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARY OF SAID NORTHWEST QUARTER AND THE NORTH BOUNDARY OF SAID WOODLAND PARK SUBDIVISION 1575.73 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 34 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID SOUTH BOUNDARY OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER AND ALONG SAID NORTH BOUNDARY OF WOODLAND PARK SUBDIVISION 480.95 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE NORTH 89 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 34 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID SOUTH BOUNDARY OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER AND ALONG SAID NORTH BOUNDARY OF WOODLAND PARK SUBDIVISION AND AN EXTENSION THEREOF 386.57 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT ON THE WESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 319, THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 21 MINUTES 07 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 225.76 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 34 SECONDS WEST 385.15 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 17 SECONDS WEST 225.76 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. Together with all rights, easements, appurtenances, royalties, mineral rights, oil and gas rights, crops, timber, all diversion payments or third party payments made to crop producers, and all existing and future improvements, structures, fixtures, and replacements that may now, or at any time in the future, be part of the real estate described above (all referred to as “Property”). The term Property also includes, but is not limited to, any and all water wells, water, ditches, reservoirs, reservoir sites and dams located on the real estate and all riparian and water rights associated with the Property, however established. EXHIBIT B Parcel 1: Lot 21 of Wildwood Country Club, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 3, Page(s) 35, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Parcel 2: Lot 10, Block E of Sopchoppy River Subdivision, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page(s) 27, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Parcel 3: Lots 1, 2, 3, and 4, Block B of Sopchoppy River Subdivision, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page(s) 27, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Less and Except: that part of Lots 1 and 4, Block B of Sopchoppy River Subdivision, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page(s) 27, deeded to the State of Florida, recorded 12/19/1973 in Official Records Book 39, Page 784, Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Parcel 4: Lots 26 and 27, Block O of Lanark Beach Unit No. 1, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 2, Page(s) 13, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. Together with all rights, easements, appurtenances, royalties, mineral rights, oil and gas rights, all water and riparian rights, ditches, and water stock and all existing and future improvements, structures, and replacements that may now, or at any time the future, be part of the real estate described above (all referred to as “Property”). EXHIBIT C BEGIN AT CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 13, TOWNSHIP 4 SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 35 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE EAST BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION 13 A DISTANCE OF 726.15 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT ON THE EDGE OF SWIRL SWAMP, THENCE RUN ALONG THE EDGE OF SAID SWIRL SWAMP AS FOLLOWS: NORTH 70 DEGREES 26 MINUTES 22 SECONDS EAST 282.08 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE SOUTH 82 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 08 SECONDS EAST 213.59 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE NORTH 83 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 52 SECONDS EAST 107.30 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE NORTH 25 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 52 SECONDS EAST 97.25 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE NORTH 83 DEGREES 19 MINUTES 31 SECONDS EAST 125.54 FEET TO CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE NORTH 46 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 12 SECONDS EAST 243.65 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE NORTH 70 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 52 SECONDS EAST 190.70 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE NORTH 45 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 32 SECONDS EAST 152.83 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE NORTH 75 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 12 SECONDS EAST 285.84 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE NORTH 62 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 36 SECONDS EAST 133.29 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE LEAVING SAID SWAMP’S EDGE RUN SOUTH 02 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 56 SECONDS WEST 3340.12 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 73 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 1530.27 FEET TO AN OLD AXLE ON THE EAST BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION 13, THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 36 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID EAST BOUNDARY 834.01 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 24 SECONDS EAST 280.50 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 36 SECONDS WEST 1560.24 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 24 SECONDS WEST 280.50 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SITUATE, LYING AND BEING IN LOTS 86 AND 87 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. LESS AND EXCEPT THE FOLLOWING: COMMENCE AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 13, TOWNSHIP 4 SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 24 SECONDS EAST 280.50 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 36 SECONDS WEST 131.30 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 24 SECONDS EAST 330.00 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 36 SECONDS EAST 660.00 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 24 SECONDS WEST 330.00 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 36 SECONDS WEST 528.70 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH ACCESS OVER AND ACROSS THAT CERTAIN EASEMENT RECORDED OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 191, PAGE 350 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. Together with all rights, easements, appurtenances, royalties, mineral rights, oil and gas rights, crops, timber, all diversion payments or third party payments made to crop producers, and all existing and future improvements, structures, fixtures, and replacements that may now, or at any time in the future, be part of the real estate described above (all referred to as “Property”). The term Property also includes, but is not limited to, any and all water wells, water, ditches, reservoirs, reservoir sites and dams located on the real estate and all riparian and water rights associated with the Property, however established. For additional information concerning the above property contact: STEPHEN A. PITRE, ESQUIRE, Post Office Box 13010, Pensacola, Florida 325913010 or (850) 434-9200. All sales are subject to confirmation of the court. Method of payment is by postal money order or certified check made payable to the U.S. Marshal Service. Ten (10) Percent of High/ Acceptable bid in certified check or cashier’s check (NO CASH) will be accepted with the balance due within 48 hours. No cash will be accepted. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim with the Clerk of the Court within 60 days after the sale. In accordance with the AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT, persons needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact Stephen A. Pitre, Esquire, Post Office Box 13010, Pensacola, Florida 32591-3010 or (850) 434-9200 not later than seven days prior to the sale to ensure that reasonable accommodations are available. Ed Spooner United States Marshal Northern District of Florida Dated: August 8, 2012 By: Ed Spooner U.S. Marshals Service August 16, 23, 30 September 6, 2012 88925T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 2011 CA 378 HANCOCK BANK, Plaintiff, vs. SALLY A. JESKE nka SALLY JESKE nka SALLY FECHT, FRANKLIN COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS, and ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AGAINST, THE HEREIN NAMED DEFENDANTS WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID OWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE UNDER F.S. CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Plaintiff’s Final Judgment dated July 24, 2012, in the abovestyled cause, Marcia Johnson, Clerk of Courts for Franklin County, will sell to the highest bidder for cash at the front door of the courthouse in Franklin County in Apalachicola, Florida, in accordance with Section 45.031, Florida Statutes, at 11:00 A.M., on September 11, 2012, the following described property: Lot 24, Block Q of Lanark Beach, Unit No. 1, according to the plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 2, Page 13, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE Dated August 2, 2012. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of Court By: Terry Creamer Deputy Clerk August 16, 23, 2012 89037T PUBLIC NOTICE THE APALACHICOLA HOUSING AUTHORITY 141-15th STREET, APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA, PHONE 850-6539304, IS NOW ACCEPTING BIDS FOR THE FOLLOWING: YARD MAINTENANCE: INCLUDING MOWING, EDGING, WEEDING, CLEAN UP DEBRIS, AS IS NECESSARY, ON A BI-WEEKLY (EVERY TWO WEEKS) SCHEDULE. SUCCESSFUL BIDDER MUST SUPPLY ALL MACHINERY, MOWERS, FUEL, LABOR AND MATERIAL. SUCESSFUL BIDDER MUST HAVE INSURANCE OR ACQUIRE INSURANCE BEFORE STARTING JOB. BIDS MAY BE SUBMITTED IN LETTER FORM STATING AMOUNT OF MONEY CHARGED PER MONTH OR ANNUALLY. BIDS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY MAIL, FOR PROPER RECORDING. BIDS MAY BE SUBMITTED NO LATER THAN AUGUST 23, 2012. EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER PAUL E. MILLS, Executive Director August 16, 23, 2012 Publisher’s Notice “SCAM “To avoid possible scams, it is recommended that consumers should verify caller information when receiving calls regarding credit card payments. Consumers should also contact the local company themselves instead of giving this information to individuals who are contacting them directly. Springer Spaniel Pups, 4 wks old, Pure Bred w/papers ava., $400 each; 727-580-1160 YORKIE AKCregistered. 9 weeks old adorable puppies only 2 females left. They are Health Certified and have 1st shots. $500 ea. Mom & dad on premise. Please call 850-774-1229 Panama City Area For Sale Complete wood working shop tools. All in excellent condition. $4,000 OBO 850-697-8038 Text FL20793 to 56654 These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you. EmeraldCoast Marketplace 747-5020

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, August 16, 2012 The Times | A13 emeraldcoastjobs.com Employment Today By Bridget Quigg Imagine the following scenario. S omeone asks you how work is going and y ou say, Not bad. The pay is great and t he stress is manageable.Ž According to r esearch from online salary database P ayScale.com that could be your reality if y ou choose one of the following well-paying j obs where workers report below-average l evels of stress. PayScale.com collects salary and job i nformation from employees around the c ountry and has found the most enviable g igs are typically knowledge-based and r equire highly specialized training and e ducation. Being smart at something really helps y ou feel happy,Ž says Katie Bardaro, lead r esearch analyst at PayScale.com The m ore preparation you put into a career, the m ore you can define your career, such as b eing able to set your schedule and your t asks.Ž She adds that not having the pressure o f being a cog in the machine alleviates s ome stress.Ž It seems that being able to w alk into a room and command everyones a ttention as you share your expertise m akes you less likely to crave that sixth c up of coffee. Perhaps the promise of a career like t his will inspire you to get the degree or a dditional job training you need to land one of these five high-paying, low-stress jobs.1. Optometrist Median annual salary $99,200Good attention to detail and a strong background in the sciences help optometrists diagnose vision problems, prescribe vision-correcting eyewear and help manage eye diseases such as glaucoma. In addition to earning a bachelors degree and doctorate, optometrists must pass state and national exams. After all that, apparently, they are pretty happy. Job prospects are excellent, with 24 percent job growth expected through 2018, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS).2. Materials scientist Median annual salary $90,600Synthetic fibers, lubricants, leakproof materials „ these are a few of the products created by materials scientists. They need strong chemistry backgrounds and at least a bachelors degree to get started. Those holding a Ph.D. often specialize in areas such as analytical chemistry or polymer chemistry. 3. Economist Median annual salary $85,600Economists pay attention to the distribution of goods and resources. They might focus on money, natural resources or other valuables, and often work to predict future outcomes. Those with a Ph.D. fare best in what can be a very competitive job market. You have to be willing to produce plenty of reports and analyses based on hours of number crunching. The government employs the majority of economists, according to the BLS.4. Aeronautical engineer Median annual salary $82,800Who would not feel inspired working on the wonder of flight every day? From lowering aircraft weight and fuel needs to improving safety, aeronautical engineers spend a lot of time rethinking and improving how we travel through the air. Aeronautical engineers typically have a bachelors degree to start, but many earn masters degrees and pass both licensing and professional advancement exams.5. User experience designer Median annual salary $79,100User experience (UX) designers optimize any experience where humans interact with objects, such as board games, ATMs and cars. For example, in a world where almost anyone can create a website in hours, leading companies often hire UX designers to make their site more attractive and easy to use. UX designers come from a variety of disciplines, including psychology, industrial design and anthropology. I work on projects just as they start or even initiate the project myself,Ž says Mike Bibik, a senior UX designer in Seattle. This affords (me) a greater amount of influence, and I am not dealing with the stress of project decisions or directions with which I disagree.Ž5 high-paying, low-stress jobs Featured Jobs To Place An Employment Here Please Contact Lorna Brown Phone: (850) 747-5019 € Email: lbrown@pcnh.com Like Us On Facebook: www.facebook.com/emcoastjobs Or Follow Us on Twitter: @emcoastjobs Medical/HealthCaring Peopleand CNAs needed. Join a team of people who make a difference in the lives of the elderly. Provide non medical companionship, in home help & personal care for the elderly. Must be flexible. PT leading to FT-positions in the Port St. Joe and Apalachicola areas.Home Instead Senior CareCall Mon-Thur 9-3pm 850-640-1223 or toll free 1-866-301-1919 Web ID#: 34216824 Text FL16824 to 56654 AIRLINE CAREERS BEGIN HERE -Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualified. Housing available. Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-206-9405 ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINEfrom Home. Medical, Business, Criminal Justice Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 866-467-0054 www.CenturaOnline.com ToPlace Your Classified ad inCall Our New Numbers Now!Call:850-747-5020 Toll Free:800-345-8688 Fax:850-747-5044 Email:thestar@pcnh.com Email:thetimes@pcnh.com theAPALACHICOLA & CARRABELLETIMES CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW Classified Advertising works hard ...filling the employment needs of area business firms, helping people to meet their prospective employers, helping people buy and sell all kinds of goods and services, and much more! Nothing works harder than the Classifieds! 747-5020 REPRESENTATIVES will be at the PORT ST. JOE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE on Tuesdays & Thursdays from 9 am – 1 pm EST accepting applications for numerous open positions.We offer competitive wages and a comprehensive bene t package including Company paid health, dental, and life insurance, 401(k), attendance & safety bonuses.EOE/Drug Free WorkplaceEASTERN SHIPBUILDING GROUP MORE THAN A JOB… A FUTURE!

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Local A14 | The Times Thursday, August 16, 2012 who decided not to run for a second term. Mock said he planned to talk with Shiver in the days ahead about the transition. The oath of office is slated for right after the first of the year. Ill start getting ready and meeting with my folks, said Mock, who said it was too soon to make any decisions about personnel changes. Not yet, he said. I got to meet with some people. Mock has spent the last four years in a quieter role in Carrabelle, with he and his wife, Debbie, focusing on a changed family experience after Mocks sister was killed in an October 2008 car accident, right before he was set to leave office. Mock, who has spent 23 years in law enforcement, said the last four years have given him time to reflect on the lessons of his first term and how he plans to conduct his return to the job. I think folks in general want someone they can talk with if they have a situation, he said. They want someone who they can sit down and talk with. Theres not another county Id want to be sheriff in, Mock said. I wouldnt want to serve anywhere else. I love my home. Thats what its about to me; its about the people. Shiver ousts Whaley Also set to assume office is newcomer Pamela Shiver, 41, Eastpoint, who defeated incumbent Carl Whaley, 43, Carrabelle, in his bid for a second term. Shiver captured 442 votes, or 54.7 percent, to Whaleys 367, or 45.4 percent. She swamped Whaley among Eastpoint voters, and then ran just 61 votes behind in Carrabelle, even winning there among absentee voters. Im really overwhelmed, I know it was against all odds, she said Tuesday night. I didnt have a lot of family in the area and a lot of friends. I give God the glory, I really do. I appreciate my friends and family who supported me and helped me, she said. I especially thank the voters who supported me. Shiver said she had worked hard on her campaign, going door to door, doing a mail-out and working the absentees in her first bid for public office. It was a very clean race, and I appreciate them for that, she said. We hugged and shook hands and talked. Were all friends. Shiver, who has been attending school board meetings regularly but rarely addressing the board, said she plans to begin focusing on her priorities. The main thing I want to work on is going to be the communication, consistency and accountability, from the top down to the student, everybody doing their part and doing what theyre supposed to be doing. The childrens best interest is in my heart, and my focus is doing whats best for them, she said. Massey defeats Putnal Incumbent county commissioner Bevin Putnal, 70, of Carrabelle, was defeated in the Democratic primary by political newcomer William Massey, 52, of Carrabelle. Massey, known around the community as Little William, received 345 votes, nearly 57 percent of the total. He now must face a challenge in the Nov. 6 general election from Hank Garrett, 61, of Eastpoint, who is running without party affiliation. I feel very good, I feel great, after six months of hard work, Massey said. I want to thank everyone in District 5 for helping me out, for their support and their vote and their kindness to me, during the six months of politicking. Massey extended a gracious hand to his opponent, who was first elected in 1994 and was seeking a sixth term. Mr. Putnal is a very good man. I love Mr. Putnal, Massey said. I have nothing bad to say about Mr. Putnal. He done a good job. I just thought it was time for a change. Massey said he was optimistic about his chances against Garrett, whose decision to run without party affiliation closed the Democratic primary to Republicans, whose votes Massey said he was confident he would have attracted. I kind of wished hed come out as a Democrat, Massey said. I lost all my Republican voters. Massey, who is a second cousin to Putnal, is related by marriage to Garrett, and he said he wanted to be careful not to step on toes. Im well-known in Carrabelle; my familys been there since the 1800s, he said. Im a well liked fellow in the city. Lockley wins over Webb In District 3, which encompasses the Apalachicola neighborhood to the north and east of U.S. 98, incumbent Noah Lockley, 61, downed challenger Valentina Webb, 48. Lockley, who is seeking a third term, received 381 votes, or 63.6 percent of the vote in the Democratic primary. He now faces Republican Wilmer Deason, 59, in the Nov. 6 general election. In a district that is overwhelmingly Democrat, Lockley looks to be a shoo-in but he said he wasnt counting his chickens just yet. I run a serious race against everybody. I dont never take nothing for granted, Lockley said. I take all my opponents seriously. I take everybody seriously when Im out there running. Lockley said he was grateful for voters support. It was a good race. I appreciated the people keeping their con dence in me, and I appreciate my supporters. She (Webb) ran a straight race; I dont have a problem with her, he said. I want to thank all the voters in District 3 who supported me and the ones who supported her. I want to thank my wife and my family, Lockley said. Everybody who wants to talk to me just give me a call. Im here for the people. I got one more river to cross, and I hope my constituents stay with me and God bless em, he said. Vote tally goes well Superintendent of Elections Ida Elliott said she was delighted at how well the day had gone, as Franklin became among the rst Florida counties to complete its vote count, nishing up well before 8 p.m., just one hour after the polls closed Overall, 3,873 voters cast ballots, for a nearly 53 percent turnout. I claimed a good, smooth, blessed election day this morning, and we got it, she said. We might have done even better if we hadnt had the rain. In the race to ll the District 7 state representative seat, vacated by Leonard Bembry, who made a bid for Congress, Apalachicola native A.J. Smith lost to Liberty County Clerk of Court Robert Hill to represent the Democratic party in the race to serve the vast rural Florida district covering Calhoun, Liberty, Gulf, Franklin, Wakulla, Jefferson, Madison, Lafayette, Taylor and Leon counties. Medley attorney Thomas Dickens nished third. In the Republican Party primary, Tallahassee nurseryman Halsey Beshears emerged the victor, downing Perry forester Don Curtis, Port St. Joe businessman Jamey Westbrook and Madison businessman Mike Williams. Al Lawson, a veteran of the Florida Senate and House of Representatives, won the right to represent the Democratic Party in the November election to challenge incumbent Steve Southerland for Floridas District 2. Bembry ran second, Panama City attorney Alvin Peters third and Florida State University professor and human rights activist Mark Schlakman fourth. In the Democratic primary for U.S. senate, incumbent Bill Nelson trounced Glenn A. Burkett in the race. On the Republican primary for the U.S. senatorial race, Connie Mack, U.S. representative for Floridas 14 district, nished on top over retired Army Col. Mike McCalister, pro-life activist Marielena Stuart of Naples and Melbourne physician Dave Weldon. In the race for circuit court judge in the Second Judicial Circuit, Group Two, Barbara Hobbs of Tallahassee won over incumbent Jose na M. Tamayo, appointed by former Gov. Charlie Crist, and Kris Dunn. Individuals have until Oct. 9 to register to vote in the general election. Our local real estate experts have identied what they feel are the best values around and are oering them to you in Real Estate Picks! (In this section), Discover the best real estate values in Mexico Beach, Port St. Joe, Apalachicola, Cape San Blas, St. George Island, Carrabelle and surrounding areas. Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Real Estate Picks John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.com MLS# 244722 $369,000 St. George Island 1ST TIER ISLAND GETAWAY 3 BR, 2 BA, Great room, Spacious kitchen with breakfast bar, Immaculately maintained, beach access, furnished, outdoor shower, downstairs storage, decks front & back, vinyl siding, new metal roof, private well, West Gorrie Dr. Listing agent Michael Billings John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.com MLS# 247750 $39,900 St. George Island INTERIOR ISLAND LOT Nice home site in a quiet neighborhood. Property is close to the Bay and a short walk to the Gulf, Mature pines & native vegetation enhance privacy, great investment property or building site, Bradford Street. Listing agent Michael Billings ELECTION 2012 RESULTS STATE RACES STATEWIDE COUNTY U.S. SENATOR Democrats Glenn A. Burkett 182,781 (21.14%) 1,012 (38.1%) Bill Nelson 681,872 (78.86%) 1,644 (61.9%) Republicans Connie Mack 655,591 (58.66%) 440 (55.5%) Mike McCalister 154,795 (13.85%) 185 (23.3%) Marielena Stuart 81,601 (7.3%) 54 (6.8%) Dave Weldon 225,682 (20.19%) 114 (14.4%) DISTRICTWIDE COUNTY DISTRICT 7 STATE REPRESENTATIVE Democrats Thomas Dickens 7,147 (25.78%) 362 (13.8%) Robert Hill 11,133 (40.15%) 600 (22.8%) A.J. Smith 9,448 (34.07%) 1,668 (63.4%) Republicans Halsey Beshears 4,042 (37.83%) 299 (37.1%) Don Curtis 1,830 (17.13%) 143 (17.8%) Jamey Westbrook 2,253 (21.09%) 172 (21.4%) Mike Williams 2,560 (23.96%) 191 (23.8%) U.S. HOUSE FLORIDA DISTRICT 2 Democrats Leonard Bembry 22,140 (26.04%) 1,192 (44.5%) Al Lawson 46,567 (54.76%) 1,196 (44.7%) Alvin Peters 11,758 (13.83%) 163 (6.1%) Mark Schlakman 4,568 (5.37%) 127 (4.8%) JUDGE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, GROUP 2 Kris Dunn 16,750 (21.36%) 1,109 (33.6%) Barbara Hobbs 38,520 (49.11%) 1,513 (45.8%) Jose na M. Tamayo 23,160 (29.53%) 680 (20.6%) REGIONAL RACES SHELLING from page A1 it the most is what were trying to do. Harts eld said as soon as his fellow seafood workers nd rich pickings on a bar, theyll work it, but right now, they are nding too many places that are bare. The oysterman goes to work where he nds oysters, he said. Marshall said the spat, which oat with the tides, attach themselves to hard surfaces, but many will become tasty treats for crabs, sh and other predators. There isnt much that doesnt eat an oyster, he said. They love them little rascals, just like we do. Harts eld said the rain looked to dampen last Fridays shelling, but it turned out into a sunny morning. We was going to call it, but it didnt rain bad. It just drizzled, he said. Kendall Shiver was among those who thought everything went well. It was pretty well-arranged, for a change. There was less confusion, everything went well, he said, taking pride in the fact that his 52-year-old cypress boat, the oldest working boat on the bay, was able to handle the four trips it made with ease. This boats slow, it doesnt run very fast, said Durant Hartman, a member of the crew, and grateful for the chance to make $125 per boatload. Were about to starve to death, he said. Im glad to see this. Total budget for the project is $112,000, with $100,000 to pay for 800 boatloads going to participants; $7,500 going towards the FCSWA to provide monitoring and guidance during the project, and $4,500 for an operator to move the shells and load the boats. ELECTIONS from page A1 DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times Supervisor of Elections Ida Elliott talks with state election of cials on election night. DAVID ADLERSTEIN | the Times Kendall Shivers boat calls it a day



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xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx 50 WWW.APALACHTIMES.COMPhone: 850-653-8868 Web: apalachtimes.com E-mail: dadlerstein@star .com Fax: 850-653-8036 Circulation: 800-345-8688 DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK: School News & Society: 11 a.m. Friday Real Estate Ads: 11 a.m. Thursday Legal Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Display Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Line Ads: 5 p.m. Monday xxxxx Contact Us xxxxx Out to see Index COUNTY RACESCANDIDATE VOTES PERCENT SHERIFF Mike Mock 2,292 59.8 Cliff Carroll 1,283 33.5 H. Jeff Vonier 255 6.7SCHOOL BOARD, DISTRICT 5Carl Whaley 367 45.4 Pamela Shiver 442 54.7COUNTY COMMISSION, DIST. 5Democrats Bevin Putnal 262 43.2 William Massey 345 56.8COUNTY COMMISSION, DIST. 3Democrats Noah Lockley 381 63.6 Valentina Webb 218 36.4 See more results on Page A14 Mock swept back in as sheriffShiver wins school board seatBy DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com Four years after Franklin County voters ousted Mike Mock from the sheriffs ofce, he returned to the job in triumph Tuesday night, easily besting a three-man eld. Mock, 45, of Carrabelle, was the overwhelming choice of Democrats and Republicans alike, receiving nearly 60 percent of the vote countywide, as he defeated his chief contender, Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce Capt. Cliff Carroll, 49, of Eastpoint, with 33.5 percent of the vote. H. Jeff Vonier, 69, of Eastpoint, attracted just 6.7 percent of voter support. Mock was the victor in six of eight precincts, falling short to Carroll only in Alligator Point and St. George Island. Im honored and humbled by the vote, Mock said Tuesday night. They voted me right, and Im appreciative of that. Im honored that they would give me a second chance, and I got a lot of good support, he said. Im excited about going back to work. As might be expected in a countywide sheriffs race, where the winner assumes oversight of the countys largest and most in uential department, the primary campaign had been a tough, sharp-edged contest. Its been a long, hard contest, Mock said. I feel like its time to move past it. The elections over. Because no one in the GOP stepped forward to run in the general election, Mock will succeed the man who defeated him four years, Skip Shiver, MIKE MOCK PAM SHIVER WILLIAM MASSEY NOAH LOCKLEYDAVID ADLERSTEIN | The TimesApalachicolas Clipper Shoppe was busy Monday as owner Dorothy Cooper offered complimentary hair cuts to school kids getting ready for this Mondays return to classes. Cooper said it was the rst time she had ever tried it, and had already done more than three dozen by early afternoon. Among those who had their tresses trimmed was Brandy Parker, who had her hair shampooed by her fellow juniors Graycn Kirvin and Adriana Reeder. In the photo above, Parkers younger sister, Brooke, a freshman, has her long locks trimmed by Cooper. By LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star .com During the turn of the century boom time, James Nathaniel Coombs and his family were the captains of industry that ruled Franklin County. The beautiful Coombs House Inn and the Coombs Armory are reminders of Coombs rich holdings in the west end of the county. But theres even remaining evidence how his power and in uence extended to Carrabelle. Coombs, born nearly 170 years ago to the day, on August 15, 1842 in Old Town, Maine, was the son of Malinda Parker and I. W. Coombs, owner of a saw mill. At age 21, he entered the federal Army as a volunteer, and served as a sergeant in the 28th Maine Regiment. He was stationed in Louisiana and fought under Gen. William Tecumseh Sherman. Coombs was part of a detachment of 180 men marched nine miles to the front lines near Port DAVID ADLERSTEIN | Cutting classBy DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com The countys reshelling project began with a sunny start Friday in Eastpoint, and will continue this Friday, Aug. 17 in Apalachicola. Franklin County Seafood Workers Associations President Shannon Hartseld said trucks from Coastline Clearing and Development were loading boats from early morning, and were nished by about noon. Loaded were 20-foot and larger vessels, capable of holding 1.5 to 2 yards, or about 20 bushels, of shells, taken from the shell pile the states Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer services maintains at Scipio Creek. The shells were then deposited, randomly, off Cat Point, in area 1642. They shovel them off while theyre drifting, said Harts eld,. And theyre scattered on the bottom. About 245 of the 360 oystermen who have signed up took part in Fridays shelling. Not everybody showed up, said the FCSWAs Jennifer Millender, who handled the checks. In all she said 245 loads, one load per individual, were deposited from 7 a.m. to 11:45 a.m. This Friday, Aug. 17, the boats will be loaded with shells at Lombardi Park west of Apalachicola, and carried to Hagans Flats. The FDOACS Bit Marshall said Fridays shelling will make a dent in the attempt to encourage spat to ourish in the four-mile by three-quarter-mile Area 1642, which opens Sept. 1. Its one of the slimmest bars, he said. What needs Smooth start for shelling See SHELLING A14 See COOMBS A5Thursday, August 16, 2012See ELECTIONS A14 The houses that Coombs built................................................................. FLORIDA MEMORY PROJECTRight: James Nathaniel CoombsVOL. 127 ISSUE 16Opinion . . . . . . A4 Society . . . . . . A6 Faith . . . . . . . A7 Outdoors . . . . . A8 Sports . . . . . . A9 Tide Chart . . . . . A8 Classi eds . . . A11-A13A sizzling race, A9Festival of Ice Saturday in ApalachOn Saturday, Aug. 18, Main Street Apalachicola will continue the month-long Water Street Festival of Ice, downtown, from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. The will be an Ice Cream Churn Off and tasting from 5-7 p.m. Come compete and share your favorite recipes! For more information contact info@ historicapalachicola.com.Dixie premiers Family PortraitBarry Hand presents his original drama, The Family Portrait this Friday and Saturday evening, Aug. 17-18 at 7 p.m. at the Dixie Theatre. Tickets at the door are $15. For more information contact the Dixie at 653-3200.Maritime archaeology lecture FridayOn Friday Aug. 17 at 7 p.m. a lecture will be given at the Apalachicola Maritime Museum, on Water Street, by Jason Burns, maritime project manager at Southeastern Research Inc. Burns professional career has been focused on submerged cultural resources management and public information. For more info call: 653-2500.Franklin Countys oldest summer visitorsOn Thursday Aug. 16, at 2 p.m., there will be a presentation called Sea Turtles, Franklin Countys Oldest Visitors, by the Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve (ANERR) and the St. George Island Volunteer Turtlers at ANERR, 1008 Island Drive. For information call 670-7700 or visit www. SeaTurtlesAtRisk.org.Summer bingo on the islandEvery Tuesday, come to St. George Island for Summer Bingo. Bring your marker and head upstairs at the Jay Abbott Fire Station (324 E. Pine Ave.) at 7 p.m. Just 25 cents a card. Sponsored by the St. George Island Civic Club. For details call 9272654. Everyone welcome. BACK-TO-SCHOOL SPECIAL

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Coupon Expires: 8-31-12 FREEEYE EXAMCODE: AP00Darren Payne, M.D.Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract SurgeonLee Mullis, M.D.Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract SurgeonTodd Robinson, M.D.Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon Robert C. Bruner Attorney Personal & Business BankruptcyOver 30 Years Legal Experience850-670-3030 bankruptcy relief under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon advertisements. Before you decide, ask us to send you free written information By DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com The former home of the Apalachicola Volunteer Fire Department soon might be where you go to buy furniture or collectible glass. By a 3-1 vote, Apalachicola city commissioners voted Aug. 7 to refer the idea of transforming the Commerce Street site to the citys Community Pride committee for further exploration. That committee meets Aug. 23 at the City Hall at Battery Park. Mayor Van Johnson, a proponent of the plan, was the lone no vote, preferring instead an up or down decision at the meeting. Commissioner Mitchell Bartley was absent because of a medical issue. Joe Taylor, director of the Franklins Promise Coalition, and Sister Jeanne Drea, a Catholic nun active with the coalition, presented the idea as an ongoing hand up, not a handout partnership between Franklins Promise and one or more nonpro t organizations that comprise the coalition. The idea would be to have those groups supply workers to the shop, with their group then bene tting from the proceeds. The general consensus is we would need to have some paid person to open and close and run it, Taylor said in an interview Monday. The organizations would contribute help in the form of volunteers. He said this would help in furthering engagement and reciprocity between those who bene t from an outreach, perhaps by having their light bill paid, and the organization itself. Fran Edwards, a staffer at the Tourist Development Council who works closely with Franklins Promise, said she was familiar with a thrift store in Louisiana that made $40,000 annually. If all of the Franklins Promise Coalition has people there, there will be money, she said, noting that the store could employ people through Workforce Development, to help them further develop retail job skills. Paulette Moss, program manager for the citys Main Street program, told commissioners she had talked over the idea with leaders of the citys existing thrift store, Pennys Worth, at 195 Ave. E, and that the two stores would have different niches. Well take appliances that they wont take, and computers and furniture, she said. Taylor said Monday the downtown store would appeal to somewhat of a different customer than locals interested in saving money on secondhand clothes or other necessities. The idea is to cull our product and separate it into whats appropriate and have really good product for visitors, to come and leave some of their money with our nonprofits, he said. He added that downtown merchants might want to donate products that might have been returns, leftovers or seconds, or even buy products from the thrift store that they can resell in their shops. Necessities donated to Franklins Promise, such as clothing, pots and pans, would be kept at the ofce at the citys municipal building and provided to those in need, such as re victims. But discretionary items, like crystal punch cups and ice buckets, would be headed to the thrift store. Folks downtown like the collectible glass, ironstone, that is more decorative in nature and not really utilitarian, Taylor said. Commissioner Brenda Ash expressed concern over how Franklins Promise would cover the cost of utilities and insurance at the site and what effect it would have on existing forpro t businesses. Were all reaching and trying to make ends meet, she said. How will that affect the downtown merchants? How will you pay for ood insurance? How is the community bene tting as far as giving back to the city, as far as paying for the building? Ash long has questioned the wisdom of the city holding on to a lot of real estate, especially with the city in nancial straits. But Taylor reassured her the thrift store would not prevent an eventual sale. What were asking for is to use it while its in limbo, he said. Its not in lieu of selling it. Ash said she needed more time to consider the idea. I dont think Im against the idea, I just need more information, and maybe you have it. We need unity, and I want to make sure were on that path. The Bible said the poor will always be with us, she said. Im just trying to get all the pieces of the puzzle. Councilman Frank Cook said he, too, had concerns. We need to make sure that when that (a sale) occurs, the building will be ready to be sold, he said. Also, thats kind of a congested area already, and we may be bringing a different group downtown. Customers may not be the people that would be using the shops downtown now. The building is really not in a condition for most people to use. Johnson defended the idea as being good for the local community. My understanding is people less fortunate who need money to pay their utility bills can work their loans off, he said. I dont have a problem with such a project. DONT MISS FAMILY PORTRAIT THIS WEEKEND VERGIL MARSHALL | Special to the TimesThe Family Portrait, Barry Hands new two-act drama, will take the stage at the Dixie Theatre this Friday and Saturday, Aug. 17-18, with the curtain going up at 7 p.m. The show features a cast of seven, all local performers, and is set in the 1950s at the home of the late Cecil Lane in an unnamed American town. Actors, seated from left, are Trina Ford, Maranda Moses, Liz Sisung, Adam Cannon and Katie McFarland. Standing from left are Alisa Hand Hendels and Craig Hicks. The show also features original music and lyrics written and performed by Hand. Tickets for the show are available at the Dixie box of ce or by calling 653-3200. Old rehouse might become new thrift storeDAVID ADLERSTEIN | The TimesThe old Apalachicola rehouse on Commerce Street might become a thrift store.

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By DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com The question of whether Franklin County Commission Chairwoman Pinki Jackel provided false information for the purposes of obtaining a homestead exemption became something of a political hot potato this week. Willie Meggs, state attorney for the Second Judicial Circuit, initially approved the rst-degree misdemeanor charge, with a notice for Jackel to appear in court Sept. 6. On Aug. 8, Meggs assistant state attorney, Robin Myers, led what is known as an information with the clerk of courts of ce. A little more than an hour later, County Judge Van Russell recused himself from the matter, and asked that Chief Judge Charles Francis assign the case to another judge. Russell cited Chapter 38 of the Florida Statutes as well as the Code of Judicial Conduct, noting the portion that says a judge shall disqualify himself or herself in a proceeding in which the judges impartiality might reasonably be questioned. But on Monday morning, before another judge could be assigned and Jackel served notice of the charge, Meggs entered a nolle prosequi, commonly known as a do not prosecute order with the court, through Assistant State Attorney Jared Patterson. Due to the need for further investigation, this agency will not be pursuing charge at this time, Meggs order read. In a telephone interview Monday morning, Meggs said he planned to talk further this week with several parties in the case, including Jackel and Georgia of cials, and expected to make a decision by next week whether or not to move forward with ling a charge. In all honesty we may have moved a little faster on the complaint than we should have, he said. When I was informed about it personally, I had some questions that I needed answers to, questions that havent been asked. I asked Robin (Myers) to dismiss the information that we led so we could ask some pertinent questions, Meggs said. I think there are additional facts that we need to nd out that we did not have. Meggs said he had started getting a lot of inquires about it (the charge), but did not indicate who had contacted him. He said he had not spoken with Jackel, but planned to this week regarding the matter. We need to get a statement from her and shes willing to give one, he said. Meggs said he reviewed the 12-page report led by Larry Levy, the attorney for Property Appraiser Doris Pendletons of ce. Levys report led to Pendleton citing Jackel in June for holding dual homestead exemptions, both here and in Georgia. On June 26, Jackel repaid $4,947 in back taxes for years 2009, 2010 and 2011. Accompanying her check, Jackel provided a letter from Tallahassee attorney Stephen Slepin, who wrote that neither Jackel nor her husband, Marietta, Ga., attorney Dana Jackel, believes the homestead exemption was improperly allowed but were paying the back taxes out of an abundance of caution. Meggs said: We had a veri ed sworn complaint and alleged facts, and it appears to be a violation. It is clearly a violation to have homesteads in two places, in two states. But, he continued, he needed to examine more closely the details of Levys ndings, including his citations of a 1975 Florida attorney generals opinion, a 2005 decision by Circuit Court Judge N. Sanders Sauls and other opinions in the circuit and appellate courts. What I want to do is accurately look at case law as it pertains to this case, Meggs said. To see what our facts are as it relates to the Jackel case. In 2007, Meggs led misdemeanor charges in nine dual homestead cases, with four of these resulting months later in nolle prosequi ndings. The others pleaded no contest, adjudication was withheld and they were required to pay back taxes and penalties, as well as nes or court costs. He said he was proceeding cautiously in this matter because it involved a public of cial. 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FOR TURN KEY INSTALLATION STARTING AT:$4500.00**Anderson Power Services 229-247-6630 http://andersonpowerservices.com MAGNOLIA BLUFFBay living at its best, you have to see the sunsets from this home to believe them. 3BR/3BA Custom home with great water depth for year round access to the Apalachicola Bay. MLS #246689...........$699,000 Travis Stanley 850.653.6477 Grayson Shepard 850.653.6718 Leon Teat 850.653.5656 Sandy Mitchem 850.899.8300 BEACHFRONT CONDO ST. GEORGE ISLAND2BR/2BA with two balconies in Villas of St. George. Established rental history! Community pool, beach boardwalk, 2 blocks to lighthouse! MLS# 246110...............$319,500 ST. GEORGEISLAND GULF VIEW4BR/4BA close to center of island and kitchen. Lots of storage and lovely native landscaping. MLS# 245752......................$399,000NEWLOW PRICE GREATER APALACHICOLAEnjoy quiet country living on 3.75 acres. Lovely custom built 3BR/2.5 BA home with many upgrades Jacuzzi, deck, large walk in closet. 1600 sq.ft. outbuilding on concrete pad. MLS#244666................$255,000GULF VIEW SGI PLANTATIONCharming 5BR/3BA cypress home with Anderson doors/windows. Completely renovated in 2006 w/ granite countertops, new appliances/lighting/elevator! MLS# 240897...............$475,000NEW CONSTRUCTIONGreat opportunity to buy a gulf view home. This quality constructed home has driven pilings, hardiboard siding and a metal roof for a low maintenance exterior. Inside you have 3 bedrooms with two baths and a great room opening to the front porch. New construction means low insurance cost. MLS #247359................$289,000 Rehabilitation Services Rehab, Restore, Return to HomeGeorge E. Weems Memorial Hospital offers in-patient rehabilitative services, which include physical therapy,cardiac conditioning, orthopedic therapy, and neurological therapy.Our team customizes each patients care to meet both patient and family needs. We are committed to returning those individuals who have been impaired by accident or disease to their highest level of independenceby optimizing abilities and skills used in everyday activities. The purpose of in-patient rehabilitation is to improve the patients function and maximize the potential for returning to home, school, work, and to the community. Law EnforcementThe Times | A3Thursday, August 16, 2012The following report is provided by the Franklin County Sheriffs Of ce. All defendants are to be considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law.Aug. 7David G. Layton, 41, Eastpoint, Hillsborough County warrant for failure to appear (FCSO) Laura M. Williams, 31, Palm Bay, violation of probation FCSO)Aug. 8Steven D. Herndon, 60, Eastpoint, failure to report as a sexual offender within 48 hours of address change, and failure to change drivers license (FCSO)Aug. 9Arlene D. Thompson, 47, Eastpoint, resisting of cer with violence, battery on a law enforcement of cer, disorderly conduct and domestic battery (FCSO) Charles A. Creamer, 30, Apalachicola, grand theft and theft (APD) Vernon W. Simpson, 37, Bristol, resisting of cer without violence and three counts of enforcement of FWC rules (FWC)Jackel homestead exemption case in limbo Arrest REPORT

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OpinionA4 | The Times USPS 027-600Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 Publisher: Roger Quinn Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six monthsHome delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERSIn case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola TimesDropping Spanish classes would be unwiseI support our schools, and the choices that are having to be made are difcult ones. There are areas that have been addressed. One of the biggest ones health insurance for employees has not yet been broached. The most important element in this discussion is the student and his or her academic success. Everything else a student may learn from activities such as sports, music, art and other cocurricular activities is gravy. These tight budgetary times call for meat and potatoes; skip the gravy and the dessert. Parents and other volunteers step up to the plate when asked and appreciated. With all due respect to my former colleagues on the school board, the removal of Spanish classes is not the make or break of our budget. A foreign language is required for university entrance. In our region knowledge of Spanish can be the difference in someone getting a job. You dont have to like that, but it is fact. Ask anyone in the workforce: nurses, construction workers, sales, law enforcement, etc. if Spanish would be useful. Ask me! The virtual school can provide motivated students an opportunity to take other languages. It has been done. Learning a foreign language is much more difcult that way. Foreign language is best taken by those who have good skills in their native tongue. Those students understand the nuances of a different language better. It has to be practiced with others. You have to hear it. Cut back on the number of Spanish classes offered if you must, but pulling it out of our normal curriculum is unwise and speaks volumes of what we aspire for our students, whether it be college or a good job in an ever-changing workforce. The job of our superintendent, school board and all district employees is difcult. More and more demands are made. Offer solutions, respectfully disagree and do not be foolish enough to think that you dont have a dog in this hunt. We all do.Denise ButlerOverzealous FWC ofcers give area black eyeWe have been frequent visitors to the Carrabelle area for over 20 years. Over these years we have made friends and acquaintances in the area. What has become all too apparent is the glaring need for cash to be infused into the faltering economy in this area. This much-needed money can be brought in by local entrepreneurs through their individual efforts utilizing the areas natural resources as was done during the CQuarters Tournament, or by enterprising men such as the group doing the mud boggs north of Carrabelle. I have been in town during the time other tournaments were held at C-Quarters and during the events held at the mud bogg site and I believe those times are the busiest I have seen the area in all of the 20-plus years I have been a visitor. These events need to be supported by all public ofcials and employees. They can not become the target of overzealous public employees. Although I was not in the area during the recent C-Quarters tournament I have heard repeatedly from many friends of the occurrences that have tainted this tournament and in turn the reputation of the entire area. I rmly believe that an investigation needs to be launched to see how and why this occurred. Perhaps better communication between the organizers and the FWC could result in pretournament safety checks of the entrants vessels at the dock, rather than stopping a boat with trolling lines out in the middle of a tournament. I drive over 1,000 miles to visit the area and will continue to do so as long as I am given the strength and ability to do so. Franklin County has become a second home to myself and over 15 members of my family. It hurts us personally to see it get a black eye from this unnecessary act. In all fairness I would like to add that many years ago as beginning shermen in the area we knew absolutely nothing. The FWC at the Moorings pointed us in the right direction and gave us some shing tips. The family has always been grateful for their help and kindness. Any FWC ofcers we have met both on and off the water have been more than considerate. However the reasons behind these recent actions, that seem to have been mainly one individual ofcer, must be investigated so that they do not occur again. Franklin County needs to welcome all events with open arms so that the visitors continue to bring their much-needed cash to shops and businesses in the area. Perhaps an all-out Franklin County Welcome for the next events would overcome the bad publicity of the unfortunate recent event. Respectfully,Ken DeVriesFWC checks mean safety, not harassmentWith all due respect to Mr. Chuck Wheeler, his letter is a disgrace and an embarrassment to every citizen of Carrabelle, Franklin County, indeed the entire state of Florida! Where it not for the Herculean efforts of our FWC, on a myriad of fronts, the city would NOT be busting with folks spending money and helping our sluggish economy. As for safety inspections; I am condent that each and every businessman wants all boaters in our waters to be SAFE so as to come back another day! So, while you lament safety and sh management monitoring, to further suggest local elected ofcials request less than the full measure of compliance on these matters shows a complete lack of respect for the law. Furthermore, if a visitor to Carrabelle or Franklin County views law enforcement as harassment, I would just as soon have them visit elsewhere.John HitronCarrabelleThursday, August 16, 2012By BILL BIShHOP ANdD ROb BErR TO GALLArdRDOSpecial to the Times Franklin County has experienced a brain gain in the last 40 years, joining the rest of the country in what has been a massive increase in the number of adults who have earned college degrees. In 1970, 4.6 percent of those over 25 years of age had college degrees in Franklin County. By 2010, 18.8 percent of adults here had completed college. The percentage of adults with college degrees in the county was less than the national average of 27.9 percent in 2010. The collegeeducated rate here was less than the Florida average of 25.9 percent. The number of adults in the U.S. with college degrees has nearly tripled since 1970, when only 10.7 percent of adults had graduated from college. But the percentage of adults with degrees in rural counties, such as Franklin County, while increasing, has generally fallen behind the proportion of collegeeducated residents in urban counties. The loss of young, welleducated residents has posed a long-standing difculty for rural communities. One of the problems that rural areas face is that in order to get a college education, young people often have to leave, said Judith Stallmann, an economist at the University of Missouri. Once you leave, that introduces you to other opportunities that you might not have seen had you not left. The good news for rural America is that it has caught up in every other measure of education. In 1970, 7.8 percent of adults in rural counties had some education after high school, but less than a college degree. By 2010, 27.4 percent of rural adults had attained some post-high school education without earning a college diploma. That level of education was close to the national average of 28.1 percent. In Franklin County, 6.4 percent of adults had some college in 1970, rising to 24.8 percent in 2010. The Florida average in 2010 was 29.1 percent. Franklin County had 3,980 adults (those over 25 years of age) in 1970 and 8,692 adults in 2010. Overall, Stallmann said, the trends show that rural people have responded to the demand for increased job skills by the increasing their post secondary education. Only 21.7 percent of the adult population in the county had failed to graduate from high school in 2010. Nationally 15 percent of adults had not completed high school; in Florida, the rate was 14.7 percent. Mark Partridge, a rural economist at Ohio State University, said that regional differences in college graduation rates have increased in recent years. Partridge said his studies found that rural counties and counties with small cities in the South and West didnt fare as well as those in the Midwest and Northeast in attracting college graduates. Even though the Sunbelt has seen tremendous growth over the past few decades, the Souths rural counties havent kept up in terms of attracting adults with college degrees. But the problem of keeping college graduates in rural America is a national issue and one that is also enduring. Missouri economist Stallmann said this is a reection of the kinds of jobs that are generally available in rural communities. If there are fewer jobs demanding college degrees in a community, there are likely to be fewer college graduates. Its a big deal in a lot of rural counties because you dont see a lot of jobs that require a college education, Stallmann said. Young people graduating from high school dont see many jobs that demand a college diploma, so they dont think about coming home once they leave for the university. There can be a selfreinforcing cycle in rural communities, Stallmann said. Young people leave to gain higher education, they dont come back after college because there arent jobs that demand such education, and their absence diminishes the chances that more of these kinds of jobs will be created. Nationally, rural counties and counties with small cities have caught up with urban counties in the percentage of adults who have some posthigh school education. Stallmann sees this as a sign that there are perhaps more jobs in rural areas that require post secondary education but not college. Rural communities may need to think about the types of jobs being created, Stallmann said. There are some communities that are doing things like getting local businesses to put an emphasis on hiring local kids who got a college education. It really suggests that rural communities that arent thinking about making themselves attractive to educated people are really going to suffer, Partridge said. Bill Bishop is co-editor of the Daily Yonder, an online news publication covering rural America, published by the Center for Rural Strategies. Roberto Gallardo is an assistant extension professor at the Southern Rural Development Center at Mississippi State University.EEconomists: County sees hike in college grads JUdDITH STa ALLMaAN MaARK Pa ARTRIdDGEBy SSUE CrRONkKITESpecial to the Times There was a time when a group of men met in the mornings at 10-FootHole to start their day discussing local gossip, politics, and spinning tall tales. Years later they moved over to Jiggs Zingarellis Franklin Press office, at Commerce Street and Avenue D, where they kept chewing the fat and reveling in one-upmanship. Since Jiggs died in 2008, those left have meandered back down to 10-Foot-Hole. Before noon most days a number of men sit on benches under a tin roof. Signs, some funny, some thought provoking, adorn the posts. In the files of the late Margaret Key, now being researched at the Apalachicola Municipal Library, a draft of an article was found about political signs and a loafers bench at 10 Foot Hole. The sign was said to be on a cypress tree. According to Mrs. Keys notes, the lone cypress tree had a sign:HHistorical Cypress T T reeHere I stand so brave and tall, since 1800 Ive heard it all Posters nailed to my skin, hasnt yet made me give in I dont know how much longer Ill be around But if I could talk, some folks would leave town The story of the sign began in the sheriffs ofce where Deputy Sonny Whitehurst remarked, following a hot political campaign, that there must be 400 pounds of roofing nails in that tree. Over the years, candidates for office had nailed their names, and sometimes their faces, to its trunk. Mrs. Key credited Whitehurst with the idea for the sign. Two prisoners got together on it, one a trusty who was a professional sign painter and the other an escapee from Alabama waiting to be picked up. The Alabamian wrote the verse and the painter lettered the sign. The nearest cypress trees are in a yard a football fields length away, likely descendents of the tree which had leftover roong nails as proof of a hot political campaign. The present loafers or philosophers at the gazebo are carrying on the tradition of men who shot the bull and shared fun and politicking stories down by 10 Foot Hole many years ago. Sue Cronkite works with librarian Caty Greene at the Apalachicola Municipal Library. To reach her, call 653-8436.If a cypress tree could talk what would it say@THE LIBRaARY Caty Greene LLETTERsS ToO THE EdEDIToOR The old cronies hang out at 10 Foot Hole

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LocalThe Times | A5Thursday, August 16, 2012Hudson, La. where they clashed repeatedly with Confederate forces. Four weeks later, the regiment, repulsed a desperate assault of largely superior numbers of the enemy after three-and-a-half hours, killing 56 and taking 130 prisoners. The Maine regiment lost one of cer and 17 soldiers, with 14 wounded. Returning home in 1863 with a distinguished war record, Coombs married his childhood sweetheart three years later, Maria A. Starrett, ve years younger than he. The couple moved to Pensacola in 1871 where Coombs worked in the timber business. After a brief sojourn to Philadelphia in 1877, they moved to Apalachicola where Coombs, in partnership with Seth N. Kimball of Mobile, opened a store which expanded into the Sunny South sawmill. He made a success of Sunny South, then sold out to Kimball and set up the Coombs Lumber Company in 1888. As early as 1881, Coombs in uence was being felt in eastern Franklin County. Carrabelle incorporated in December of that year and Oliver H. Kelley, founder of the town, announced that he and other Carrabelle notables intended to form St. James County, with Carrabelle as its county seat. But the plan failed, and Kelley later blamed Coombs and Charles H. Parlin of Apalachicola for the failure of the succession.Partners with Parlin in CarrabelleAround 1887, Coombs purchased from Parlin a Carrabelle sawmill in nancial dif culty and renamed it the Franklin County Lumber Company. He expanded the market for locally-produced timber, shipping wood products to Europe and South America as well as New Orleans and northern cities. His mills produced shingles and railroad ties in addition to sawn lumber. Parlin was another Maine transplant, married to Cornelia Elizabeth Grady, of Apalachicola. After selling his mill, he went to work for Coombs and moved to Carrabelle to oversee the Coombs interests there. The Coombs mill and the timber industry in general became the economic engine that powered the county. By 1893 there were many lumber and sawmills along the Carrabelle River. Coombs Carrabelle mill stood on the location of the old Gulf State Community Bank, close to the mouth of the river, and was one of several mills furnished with power plants for electric lighting, providing power to much of the town. In August 1899, 400,000 board feet of timber and 50,000 barrels of rosin were swept away from a single dock in Carrabelle harbor during a hurricane. Based on photos of the storms aftermath, the mill appears to be standing after the hurricane had passed. By 1900, two steam tugs, the Bert Echo and the Tilton, owned by the Watson Brothers Line, were used to tow log barges for the lumber company. Later that year, the company bought its own steam tug, the Orono, named for a town in Maine. Coombs incorporated in Delaware in 1901 at $100,000, about $3 million in todays money. The city grew up around the mill, and the heart of Carrabelles commercial waterfront is known as the Coombs Addition. An Episcopalian and active RepublicanIn both Apalachicola and Carrabelle, the Coombs family strongly supported the Episcopal Church. They donated the original pulpit in Apalachicolas Trinity Church. During his visits to Carrabelle, the beloved Bishop Edwin Weed lodged with the Parlin family. Coombs did not neglect his political interests. He was an active member of the Republican Party, and usually attended Republican Party conventions. In 1884, he and Fred Butter eld organized the Franklin Guards, a company of infantry that erected the rst Apalachicola armory in 1898, which was named for Coombs. He declined to accept his partys nomination for governor in 1900, and downplayed any talk of a vice presidential run with Theodore Roosevelt in 1904. At the Republican convention in Chicago in 1908, Coombs was elected to a four year term as member of the Republican National Committee. He reportedly met with Roosevelt in Jacksonville in 1905. Coombs was at the peak of his career, generally regarded as the wealthiest man in the county. Family tradition has it that he was so well-known, he could simply board a train and travel with no ticket and no cash on hand because tradesmen across the east recognized him and afforded him credit. On one occasion, he is said to have picked up his son Percy, at work at the Apalachicola mill during the summer, with nothing but the clothes on his back and taken him to New York. He became president of the First National Bank of Apalachicola and was a Mason and member of the Order of Elks and Knights of Pythias. In 1905, Coombs decided his family needed a larger home, to re ect their wealth and social status, and hired George H. Marshall, a prominent local builder responsible for design and construction of many of the Queen Anne style Victorian homes in Apalachicola. The Coombs house in Apalachicola is generally considered the most elegant of Marshalls creations but its construction was the rst step toward tragedy for the Coombs family. At midnight on March 6, 1911, a re started in the attic of the house and burned its way through the roof. Three volunteer horse drawn re companies answered the call to douse the ames, but the house was damaged and many of the furnishings a total loss. The Coombs moved into the Franklin Hotel until their home could be repaired. Ten days later, Marie Coombs died, reportedly of a broken heart, and in another three weeks her husband had followed her to the grave. Lynn Spohrer, who restored the house during the 1980s, has done extensive research on the property. She said she believes the couple died from inhaling smoke containing fumes released by burning lead paint. In any case, Marie and James are buried, side-byside, in the Chestnut Street Cemetery, across the street from their home. Although photos in the state archives attest that Coombs lumber company was still active in 1925, the timber industry failed in the Panhandle during the 1920s and the family scattered to the winds. Various members of the Coombs family took up residence in the house during the next ve decades, wrote Lynns husband Bill, in a history of the house. In the early 1960s the house was closed, boarded up, and left vacant except for an occasional homeless person who camped out in the empty rooms. Without care and maintenance, the unpainted structure began to deteriorate, and there was talk of condemning and demolishing the old structure. Windows were broken, the back balcony had fallen to the ground, the front and back yards were littered with debris and trash, and the once-blossoming ower beds were wastelands of weeds. The Spohrers purchased the house in 1979 and restored it to its original condition, transforming it into a bed and breakfast. A lesser known Coombs house overlooks Carrabelles harbor. East of the Coombs addition, the highest point on the waterfront is an ancient dune known as Coombs Hill (formerly Yellow Hill and Carrs Hill), site of the Moore House recently purchased by Carrabelle. The house on the hill was built by Coombs grandson, Chauncey Burr Coombs, son of Percy Coombs, who died of consumption. By 1913, Chauncey was rmly established in Carrabelle and reportedly joined a large party on a pleasure cruise to Dog Island. That same year, he and R.J. Camp Jr. launched a new steamship line when they purchased the steamer Falcon, one of the fastest steamers on the Gulf with a running speed of 10 knots per hour. Her main cargo was turpentine from the stills north of Carrabelle. He remained in Carrabelle until 1918, when the house was sold. His son, Chauncey Jr. was born there. Chauncey Sr. returned to Apalachicola and took up residence in his fathers house, passing it on to Chauncey Jr., when he died. dbutler@coastalcoverage.com Locally owned and operated Home Business Auto Health Workers Comp MEDICARE PLANSEXCELLENT COVERAGE ANYONE CAN AFFORDTOP QUALITY COMPANY TUCKER LIFE-HEALTH INSURANCE, INC. RATED A+ BY BETTER BUSINESS BUREAURoss E. Tucker, Agentsince 1981Chartered Life Underwriter Registered Health Underwriter850-926-2200 or 800-226-7005www.tuckerlifehealth.com Qualications: Expertise in: New Patients WelcomeCall Toll Free888-681-5864 For more info www.seclung.com LUNG AND SLEEP DISORDERS DR. ROB GARVER Business Card..................................................................................................... $30.00 1/4 page........................................................................................................... $225.00 1/2 page........................................................................................................... $400.00 Full page........................................................................................................... $750.00 Front Page....................................................................................................... $350.00 Inside Page 2................................................................................................... $500.00 COOMBS from page A1 FLORIDA MEMORY PROJECTThe Franklin County Lumber Company LOIS SWOBODA | The TimesThe Coombs House in Apalachicola

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CHIWEENIES! We have three, 3 month old Chiweenies waiting to be adopted! There is one male and two females. We have a red one, a dark silver one and a chocolate one and they are all perfectly adorable. They are playful and social and will make some lucky family very happy. Dont delay, these pups are very popular! Volunteers are desperately needed to socialize all of our dogs and cats. We are always looking for people willing to bring one of our animals into their home to be fostered for various needs. Anytime you can spare would be greatly appreciated. Call Karen at 670-8417 for more details or visit the Franklin County Humane Society at 244 State Road 65 in Eastpoint. You may logon to the website at www. forgottenpets.org to see more of our adoptable pets. PETOFTHEWEEK Franklin County Humane Society appreciated. Call Karen at 670-8417 for more details or visit the Franklin County Humane Society at 244 State Road 65 in Eastpoint. You may logon to the website at www. forgottenpets.org to see more of our adoptable pets. WE CAN HELP! GOT MOSQUITOES? CALLLOIS AT 653-5857Franklin Countys ONLY LOCALPest Control Company La Robe Boutique SocietyA6 | The Times Thursday, August 16, 2012Cliff Carroll wanted to thank all of you for joining him and Mrs. Carroll for breakfast last Saturday. Dont forget the pancake breakfast this Saturday, Aug. 18. Doors open at 9 a.m. at the Lanark Village Boat Club. There will be pancakes, French toast, bacon, juice and coffee for $5. Saturday evening is the Birthday Bash at Camp Gordon Johnston American Legion Post 82. Party starts at 6 p.m., and the fun starts when you come in the door. Bring a dish to share, your dancing shoes and your main squeeze. We will have our second annual Thanksgiving in August at the American Legion post on Sunday, Aug. 26. Members of the Legion, the Sons and the Ladies Auxiliary will be ready at 1 p.m. More on this later. Next time you stop by the pavilion at the back of the Legion, check out the new grill, donated by Mr. and Mrs. Harry Larsen. You still can have bingo Monday nights at the Franklin County Senior Center. Doors open at 5:30 p.m. Early bird is at 6 p.m., and regular at 7 p.m. We have two $250 jackpots, number progressive, along with the packets. Snacks will be on hand, as well as coffee and soft drinks. Please join us for fun and fellowship. Who knows? You just might win. Be kind to one another, check on the sick and housebound and dont forget God is watching us from a distance. Until next time, God bless America, our troops, the poor, homeless and hungry.Jessica Mock, Jordan Brock engagedJimmy and Diane Mock are happy to announce the engagement of their daughter, Jessica Michelle Mock, to Jordan Colby Brock, son of Carey Brock, of Alford, and Penny Brock, of Mexico Beach. Jessica is the granddaughter of Waylon Graham, of Howard Creek, and Frances Graham, of St. Joe Beach. She is also the granddaughter of Nancy Mock and the late James Mock, of Port St. Joe. A 2006 graduate of Port St. Joe High School, Jessica graduated with a bachelor of science in elementary education from Florida State University in 2010. She will complete her masters in curriculum and instruction in December 2012. Jessica is employed as a second-grade teacher at Port St. Joe Elementary School. Jordan is the grandson of Buz and Genevieve Putnal, of Carrabelle. He is a 2006 graduate of Port St. Joe High School and a 2010 graduate of Gulf Coast State College Law Enforcement Academy. He is employed as a deputy sheriff with the Bay County Sheriffs Of ce. The wedding is planned for Oct. 13, 2012, at Centennial Park in Port St. Joe, with a reception to follow at the Centennial Building.Lockleys to celebrate fth anniversarySara and Gabe Lockley will celebrate their fth wedding anniversary this Sunday, Aug. 18. Happy anniversary baby! I love you. Abduls turning 3!Abdul Artez Bessent turns 3 on Sunday, Aug. 19, 2012. Come party with him at his BIG birthday party at Battery Park. Meet him there at 4:30 p.m. Sunday. Abdul is the son of Nicole Henry, of Apalachicola, and Abdul Bessent Sr., of Jacksonville Please wear swimwear to have some Fun in the Sun!Sophia Zingarelli turns 3Sophia Zingarelli turned 3 years old on Sunday, Aug. 12, 2012. She is the daughter of Richard and Ashley Zingarelli, of Apalachicola. Maternal grandparents are Joey Creamer, of Apalachicola, and Diane Cardenas, of Carrabelle. Paternal grandparents are Cairo and Kimberly Ingram, of Cairo, Ga., and the late Richard Tich Zingarelli. She is the niece of Angie Zingarelli, LaDonna Butler, Amanda Creamer, Valerie Creamer and Austin Taunton, all of Apalachicola. Sophia celebrated her third birthday together with her family and friends. Purity Myers turns 1Purity Naikycia Myers turns 1 on Thursday, Aug. 16, 2012. She celebrated the special occasion at home with family and friends. Purity is the daughter of Naikycia Mitchell, of Apalachicola, and Gary Myers Jr., of Apalachicola. Maternal grandparents are Bridgette Mitchell, of Ocala, and Jermaine Fedd, of Apalachicola. Maternal great-grandparents are Charlie Mae Richards, Patricia and Charles Brown and Deloris Fedd, all of Apalachicola. Paternal grandparents are Loretta and Gary Myers Sr. of Apalachicola. Puritys godmothers are Angel Hughes, of Panama City, and Teresa Martin of Apalachicola. Brayden Brown turns 4Brayden Jonathan Brown turns 4 on Sunday, Aug. 19, 2012. Brayden is the son of Jonathan and Jennifer Brown, of Apalachicola, and big brother to Bryson Brown. Maternal grandparents are Kenneth and Glenda Martina. Maternal great-grandparents are Curtis and Jean Watson, and Bill and Burnell Martina, all of Apalachicola. Paternal grandparents are Jerome and Geanise Brown, of Apalachicola. Paternal great-grandparent is Mary Brown, of Port St. Joe. Happy birthday to our special boy! We all love you so much. Party hardy at Saturdays Birthday Bash LANARK NEWSJim Welsh Engagement Anniversary Birthdays

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The Times | A7Thursday, August 16, 2012 The United Methodist Churches of Franklin County Welcome You First United Methodist Church of ApalachicolaWorship Service 11:00 a.m. every Sunday Sunday School 10:00 a.m. 75 5th St. Apalachicola 653-9530 fumcapalach@gtcom.net Pastor: Rev. Themo PatriotisCarrabelle United Methodist ChurchWorship Services 10:45 a.m. Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Celebrate Recovery Mondays 7-9 p.m. 102 NE Ave. B Carrabelle 697-3672 Pastor: Julie StephensEastpoint United Methodist ChurchWorship Service 10:00 a.m. every Sunday Healing service every fourth Monday at 7:00 p.m. 317 Patton Dr. (corner of David St.) 670-8825 Pastor: Rev. Beth WhiteSt. George Island United Methodist Church9:00 a.m. Worship Service 10:00 a.m. Fellowship Hour 201 E. Gulf Beach Dr. 9274635 www.sgiumc.org Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis Nursery now provided for Sunday Church Service First Baptist ChurchSt. George Island 501 E. Bayshore Drive 927-2257 R. Michael Waley, Pastor Join us as we praise and worship the living Christ. Great is the Lord and most worthy of praise. Psalm 145:3 Sunday Bible Study................................................10:00am Worship Praise........................................................11:00am Sunday Night............................................................7:00pm Wednesday Power Hour......................................7:00pm Wednesday Youth at S.P.L.A.S.H.......................7:00pm Walking in Christ R. Michael Whaley, Pastor First Pentecostal Holiness Church379 Brownsville Road Apalachicola Were excited about what Gods doing!!!Sunday School 9:45 am Sunday Morning Worship 10:45 am Sunday Evening Service 6:00 pm Monday, Youth Group 6:30 pm Wednesday, Royal Rangers, G.A.P.7:00 pm Wednesday Worship & Word 7:30 pmNursery Provided during regular church services 7:00 7:00 Sacred Heart of Jesus Catholic Church-Your Church on the Coast-2653 Highway 98 East P.O. Box 729, Lanark Village, Fl 32323Pastor: Father Eddie Jones Mass Schedule: Saturday: (Vigil) 5:00 PM Sunday: 7:30 AM (850)697-3669 WELCOMES YOUChurch of the Ascension101 NE First Street CarrabelleSUNDAY10:00 AM WELCOMES YOUChurch THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH (850) 274-4490 (850) 545-2578 WELCOMES YOU Trinity Trinity Episcopal Churchest. 1836Welcomes YouHwy. 98 & 6th St. Apalachicola 850-653-9550Sunday Worship Services 8 & 10:30 a.m. Wednesdays Healing Service 11 a.m. Centering Prayer 4 p.m. Sunday Worship Services 8 & 10:30 a.m. Wednesdays Healing Service 11 a.m. Centering Prayer 4 p.m. FaithThe St. George Island Christian Retreat Center is sponsoring a Womens Retreat from 7 p.m. Aug. 31 to 12:30 p.m. Sept. 3. Living Proof Ministries has approved the showing of Beth Moores DVD series, The Patriarchs as the content of their study. Moores studies are always extremely practical and this one is no different with its focus on family life. They invite you to join them for worship, fellowship and prayer. There is special pricing for groups and individual registrations made on or before Aug. 20. Registration deadline is Aug. 27. Call Amy Howell at 9273818 for more information. Carrell N. Anderson was born on Jan. 21, 1929 in Franklin County to the late Noah and Hattie Anderson. He passed away on a Saturday, July 21, 2012 at the age of 83 in Willingboro, New Jersey. Andy was a sherman and domestic worker. He was educated at Holy Family Catholic School, and graduated from Wallace W. Quinn High School in Apalachicola. In 1948, he graduated from cooking school at Glassboro County College. He was in the U.S. Army from 1951 to 1953. While in the Army, he served in the Korean War for 33 months, and was awarded the Korean Service Medal with four Bronze Stars and the United Nations Service Medal. In 1980, he went to school for managers and sanitation at Rutgers State University. After serving in the military he moved to Philadelphia, Penn., and worked as a domestic, painter, brick mason, plumber and an electricians helper. In 1955, he worked at the Pub. He opened three restaurants in Palisades North Jersey. In 1960 he began working for Chubbys Restaurant as a chef until he retired in 1995. He leaves to cherish his memories his wife, Gwendolyn K. Dickerson-Anderson; two stepchildren, Ronald and Gwendolyn (Stephen); eight grandchildren, Marcia Leigh, Christina, Renee, Reggie, Harold III, Dominic, Dominica (Jason) and Donald; 13 great-grandchildren; special grandson, Dominic Dodimead, Sr.; and a host of nieces, nephews, other relatives and friends. He was preceded in death by two brothers, eight sisters, one son, Wayne, and his family; and one stepson, Harold. Services were Friday morning, July 27 at St. John Baptist Church in Camden, N.J. Interment followed at Brig. General William C. Doyle Veterans Cemetery, Wrightstown. www. mayfuneralhomes.comCarrell N. Anderson CaARREL AnNDERSOnNLouise Lou Williams Norred, of St. George Island, and previously of Tallahassee and Lake City, died Friday, Aug. 10, 2012, at home after a brief illness. Lou is survived by her husband, Willie Norred, of St. George Island; son Jim (Kelley), of Tallahassee, and daughter Nan Norred, of Atlanta, Ga.; granddaughters Lisa, of Orlando, and Amber and Casey, of Tallahassee; and great-granddaughter Morgan, of Orlando, along with many loving nieces and nephews. She is also survived by the Folger family with whom Lou shared lifes experiences for over 50 years and true and sincere friends, Kirk and Patty Brown, of Tallahassee. Lou was preceded in death by her parents Mallor Howard Williams and Gladys Russ Williams, along with brothers Howard and Henry Williams. Visitation was held Monday evening, Aug. 13 at Kelleys Funeral Home in Apalachicola. Graveside services were in Magnolia Cemetery, Apalachicola on Tuesday afternoon, Aug. 14. Lou was always thinking of friends. She passed on a couple of requests, including that her services be outside, short, and that in view of the summer heat, those attending wear casual clothing. In lieu of owers, friends may wish to join the Norred family in honoring Lous memory by making a contribution to Big Bend Hospice, 1723 Mahan Center Blvd., Tallahassee, FL 32328 and/or The Franklin County Humane Society, 244 State Highway 65 in Eastpoint, FL 32328.LLouise LLou NorredThe family of Robert Smith II would like to thank all the people in the community who donated money and gave support to us, during our difcult time. We appreciate the help that enabled us to handle our dads cremation. Thank you. We would like to say thank you to the people of Franklin County, for their great help in making Seahawk Media Day and mini camp a great success. The Seahawks are preparing for a great season, beginning with the preseason Classic Aug. 24 at home against Bozeman. Weve got a lot of hard work to do. Time to rise up!SSeahawk coaches and players Obituaries Card of THanANKSSSeahawk Football Team Card of THanANKSRRobert SSmith FamilyWomens Retreat planned By DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star.com HCOLAs second annual honor students luncheon offered some inspiring words from an ambitious young lady who has lived through it. Held Saturday, Aug. 4 at the Holy Family Center, the event was again hosted by the Hillside Coalition of Laborers for Apalachicola and emceed by the groups president, Elinor Mount-Simmons, a veteran teacher who this year will lead a new learning academy for students who have fallen behind in their work. But at the luncheon, the subject was all about academic excellence and the importance of persevering through challenges. Following an invocation by Pastor David Walker, an HCOLA member, Apalachicola Mayor Van Johnson introduced in his greetings two retired educators, Lorine Banks, who taught for 38 years, and Rosa Tolliver, who worked in the system for 34 years. Apalachicola City Commissioner Brenda Ash then came forward to introduce the guest speaker, Angelita Stephens, a licensed practical nurse and 2007 Apalachicola High School graduate. She is an overcome, Ash said. She is a victor, not a victim. A woman of God, and a woman of strength. Stephens recounted to the young people how she was a little girl who grew up in the church, who had a gift for singing. But, she said when I was 15, thats when it all started. I had my own mind, and I did exactly what I wanted to. Stephens said peer pressure began to inuence her and her friends to experiment with sex. We lied and said were not doing anything. I developed a bad attitude and then became very sneaky, Stephens said, I got caught several times, but I didnt care. The man who then entered her life told me everything I wanted to hear. I was in 10th grade and knew nothing about raising a child. That got delayed because I wanted to do what I wanted to do. Stephens said she even got into serious enough trouble at age 17 to lead to juvenile custody for two days, before her mom got her and showed her unconditional love. Stephens said her mom helped her get back on the right track, and she went on to graduate high school and qualied for her license as a certied nursing assistant. Still, she had to explain her past to the state board of nursing and provide them with three letters attesting to her character. Stephens said going to nursing school full time wasnt easy, especially with having to hold down a part-time job. I had a pile of bills, and I still had a child to raise, she said. If you want it, you can manage. On June 12 she graduated nursing school and now is scheduled to take her board exams. Im still nervous, but its in Gods hands. Be obedient, she stressed Do what you need to do. Keep a close relationship with Him, and the skys the limit. Superintendent Nina Marks also addressed the students, telling how she bounced back from a negative assessment in high school to go on to a college degree and a successful teaching career. You should never, ever let anyone tell you you cant do something, Marks said. School board member Teresa Ann Martin also spoke, stressing that they should keep up their effort to meet academic challenges to the very end. Theres a blessing in pressing, she said. Receiving certicates were, for all As yearround, Kyera Crawford and Beyla Walker (Elementary school). For achieving the honor rolls, for one or more times, were: Elementary school: Kiani Allen, Amontaye Austin, Arryonna Cargill, Marcus Clayton, Takiah Ford, Tanaya Harris, Darius Johnson, Amani Jones, Calayia Jones, TaShawn Jones, Tariah Jones, Alexcia McNair, Michael Melton, Kobe Myers, Daijon Penamon, Jamal Robinson, Keondre Sewell, Jerymiah Stephens, Hannah Sweet, Tylin Tolliver, Jarvis Turrell, Kimberly Turrell, Honesti Williams and TyAsia Yarrell Middle school: DyCorian Brown, Tia Cummings, Jaylon Gainer, Maliek Rhodes, Natasia Robinson, India Sewell, Marshall Sweet, Tyanna Townsend and ChaMaiya Williams. High school: Corey Bratton, TreSean Carr, Trinity Hardy, Andrea Cupid, Cheyenne Martin, Jathan Martin, Morgan Martin, Bria Walker, Aaliyah West and Adreenah Wynn. HCOLA offers students word to the wise DD AVID D ADLERS DLERS TE E IN | the TimesAngelita Stephens, left, was the guest speaker at HCOLAs second annual honor students luncheon. At right, an honor students earns her recognition.

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Email outdoors news to timesoutdoors @star .com OUTDOORSwww.apalachtimes.comSection Section A By DANIELLE TORRENTSpecial to the Times University of Florida researchers curating a 17foot-7-inch Burmese python, the largest found in Florida, discovered 87 eggs in the snake, also a state record. Scientists at the Florida Museum of Natural History on the UF campus examined the internal anatomy of the 164.5-pound snake Friday. The animal was brought to the Florida Museum from Everglades National Park as part of a long-term project with the U.S. Department of the Interior to research methods for managing the states invasive Burmese python problem. Following scienti c investigation, the snake will be mounted for exhibition at the museum for about ve years, and then returned for exhibition at Everglades National Park. This thing is monstrous, its about a foot wide, said Florida Museum herpetology collection manager Kenneth Krysko. It means these snakes are surviving a long time in the wild, theres nothing stopping them and the native wildlife are in trouble. Krysko said the snake was in excellent health and its stomach contained feathers that will be identied by museum ornithologists. Burmese pythons are known to prey on native birds, deer, bobcats, alligators and other large animals. A 17.5-foot snake could eat anything it wants, Krysko said. By learning what this animal has been eating and its reproductive status, it will hopefully give us insight into how to potentially manage other wild Burmese pythons in the future. It also highlights the actual problem, which is invasive species. Native to Southeast Asia and rst found in the Everglades in 1979, the Burmese python is one of the deadliest and most competitive predators in South Florida. With no known natural predator, population estimates for the python range from the thousands to hundreds of thousands. They were determined to be an established species in 2000 and are a signi cant concern, Krysko said. They were here 25 years ago, but in very low numbers and it was difcult to nd one because of their cryptic behavior, Krysko said. Now, you can go out to the Everglades nearly any day of the week and nd a Burmese python. Weve found 14 in a single day. The rapid population growth led to recent state laws prohibiting people from owning Burmese pythons as pets or transporting the snakes across state lines without a federal permit. Florida residents also may hunt pythons in certain wildlife management areas during established seasons with a hunting license and required permits. Everglades National Park and the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission are partnering with other agencies to address the increasing populations. Skip Snow, a park wildlife biologist, said research of the snakes biology is important for understanding how to curtail the future spread of invasive species. I think one of the important facts about this animal is its reproductive capability, Snow said. There are not many records of how many eggs a large female snake carries in the wild. This shows theyre a really reproductive animal, which aids in their invasiveness. Non-native species are considered invasive if they have a negative impact on native species or habitat, cause economic damage or pose a threat to human health and safety. Exotic snakes found in Florida are often the result of pet owners accidentally or intentionally releasing the animals. Citizens may dial 1-800-IVE-GOT1 to receive removal assistance by trained handlers. Previous records for Burmese pythons captured in the wild were 16.8 feet long and 85 eggs. Im really happy to be part of this team of researchers working on the Burmese python problem in Florida, and have been for a number of years, Krysko said. But when Im able to conduct this type of research here at the university, Im able to teach new students and new researchers about python anatomy and discuss the problem with invasive species. We need all the help we can get, we really do. Florida has the worlds worst invasive reptile and amphibian problem. Krysko led a 20-year study published in September 2011 in Zootaxa showing 137 nonnative species were introduced to Florida between 1863 and 2010. The study veri ed the pet trade as the No. 1 cause of the species introductions and the Burmese python was one of 56 non-native species determined to be reproducing and established in the state. Danielle Torrent is a writer for the University of Florida. She can be reached at dtorrent@ mnh.u .edu Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL(next to Piggly Wiggly) www.BWOsh.com (next to Piggly Wiggly) www.BWOsh.com Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL (next to Piggly Wiggly) www.BWOsh.com Corner of Marina Drive, www.BWOsh.com Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL www.BWOsh.com Port St. Joe, FL EVERYTHING FOR YOUR OUTDOOR ADVENTURE Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL EV E EV E EV RYTHING FOR YOUR E RYTHING FOR YOUR E O UTDOOR ADV E UTDOOR ADV E UTDOOR ADV NTUR E NTUR E E AUGUST FEATURE FISH: Stop in and register or go online at www.BWOsh.com AUGUST FEATURE FISH: Stop in and register or go online at Stop in and register or go online at Stop in and register or go online at KINGFISH $5.00 ENTRY FOR THE ENTIREYEAR GREAT PRIZES WEEKLY ALMANAC APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE TIDE TABLES MONTHLY AVERAGESTo nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from these given for APALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW Cat Point Minus 0:40 Minus 1:17 East Pass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27 To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from those given for CARRABELLE: HIGH LOW Bald Point Minus 9:16 Minus 0:03 Sponsor the WEEKLY ALMANACCall Today!653-8868 Date HighLow% Precip Thu, August 1685 7740% Fri, August 1785 7740% Sat, August 1884 7750% Sun, August 1984 7660% Mon, August 2084 7660% Tues, August 2184 7660% Wed, August 2285 7660% 16 Th 343am 2.6 141pm 2.9 738am 1.9 838pm 0.3 17 Fr 400am 2.6 232pm 2.9 817am 1.8 906pm 0.3 18 Sa 415am 2.6 323pm 2.9 855am 1.4 931pm 0.6 19 Su 430am 2.7 417pm 2.9 934am 1.3 957pm 0.8 20 Mo 447am 2.7 515pm 2.7 1017am 1.0 1022pm 1.1 21 Tu 509am 2.9 620pm 2.4 1108am 0.8 1048pm 1.4 22 We 536am 3.0 739pm 2.2 1208pm 0.6 1114pm 1.8 23 Th 608am 3.0 926pm 2.1 127pm 0.6 1134pm 1.9 24 Fr 649am 3.0 302pm 0.5 25 Sa 742am 3.0 429pm 0.3 26 Su 851am 3.0 540pm 0.3 27 Mo 231am 2.4 1017am 3.0 416am 2.2 637pm 0.2 28 Tu 246am 2.4 1145am 2.9 545am 2.2 725pm 0.3 29 We 16 Th 343am 2.6 141pm 2.9 738am 1.9 838pm 0.3 17 Fr 400am 2.6 232pm 2.9 817am 1.8 906pm 0.3 18 Sa 415am 2.6 323pm 2.9 855am 1.4 931pm 0.6 19 Su 430am 2.7 417pm 2.9 934am 1.3 957pm 0.8 20 Mo 447am 2.7 515pm 2.7 1017am 1.0 1022pm 1.1 21 Tu 509am 2.9 620pm 2.4 1108am 0.8 1048pm 1.4 22 We 536am 3.0 739pm 2.2 1208pm 0.6 1114pm 1.8 23 Th 608am 3.0 926pm 2.1 127pm 0.6 1134pm 1.9 24 Fr 649am 3.0 302pm 0.5 25 Sa 742am 3.0 429pm 0.3 26 Su 851am 3.0 540pm 0.3 27 Mo 231am 2.4 1017am 3.0 416am 2.2 637pm 0.2 28 Tu 246am 2.4 1145am 2.9 545am 2.2 725pm 0.3 Thursday, August 16, 2012 Page 8Special to the TimesRepresentatives of seven Florida Panhandle counties met last week in Tallahassee to launch the Panhandle Wild ower Alliance and discuss strategies for positioning the regions profuse wild owers as a primary focus of the states 2013 Viva Florida 500 commemoration. The alliance is a loosely structured group focused on education and marketing efforts that will increase conservation as well as awareness of potential wild ower ecotourism opportunities. Hosted by the Florida Wild ower Foundation and facilitated by Pam Portwood and Diane Delaney, the meeting brought together stakeholders to learn about establishing wild ower ecotourism in Liberty, Gadsden, Leon, Wakulla, Franklin, Jackson and Jefferson counties. Almost 50 people attended, representing county commissions, tourism agencies, chambers of commerce, environmental organizations, national and state lands, and state agencies. The Panhandle is widely acknowledged as the place in Florida to view wild owers due to the fantastic seasonal displays along its roadsides and in natural and rural areas. Some of the best displays in the Southeastern United States are at your doorstep, Lisa Roberts, the Foundations executive director, told participants By next year, every resident of the state should know that La Florida means land of owers, said FDOT State Landscape Architect Jeff Caster, who heads FDOTs wild ower program. He also suggested meeting participants help make government and business leaders aware of Floridas constitutional policy to protect the states natural resources and scenic beauty. Ask leaders to spend less money, not more, he said, referring to reduced mowing regimes that can save taxpayers money while promoting wild ower growth. State Department Marketing Director Kerri Post told the audience that more than 100 Viva Florida 500 events are planned for 2013, which marks 500 years since European arrival. Wild owers and the states beauty its a natural, she said, explaining that wild ower tourism crosses boundaries into many niche markets, such as photography and bird-watching. A wild ower ecotourism marketing plan, funded in part by Visit Florida, also was discussed during the meeting. With partner input, the plan will serve as a roadmap for the Panhandle effort. Six of the counties represented have resolutions to preserve and conserve wildowers, and participants had many ideas on how to achieve those goals. Eleanor Dietrich, who is leading a protection and awareness effort in Leon County, told the group that Leon commissioners modi ed the countys original resolution on July 10 to eliminate references to speci c roads. The move will allow more exibility to work with the county and FDOT to choose roads as options become available, she said. Dietrich, who continuously monitors Leon Countys roadsides, is also working on presentations for Leon County commissioners to help them understand what is taking place. Were trying to move slowly to make sure of our base of support, she said. Wakulla County Commissioner Lynn Artz told the group her county has made progress protecting roadside wild owers, but not without concerns from residents about safety. To address concerns, Wakulla increased the 6-foot strip being mowed along roadsides to 8 feet, she said. To learn more about Floridas wild owers or to request a brochure on Eastern Panhandle wild ower sites, visit www.FlaWildowers.org/learn.php. To learn about Viva Florida 500 events, visit www.VivaFlorida.org. Wild ower resolutions can be viewed at www. FlaWild owers.org/resolution.php.Snakes alive!UF scientists nd 87 eggs in Everglades python PHOTOS BY KRISTEN GRACE | University of FloridaResearchers at the Florida Museum of Natural History on the University of Florida campus examine the internal anatomy of the largest Burmese python found in Florida to date. Pictured are, from left, Rebecca Reichart, Leroy Nunez, Nicholas Coutu, Claudia Grant and Kenneth Krysko. University of Florida herpetologist Kenneth Krysko displays eggs found in the largest Burmese python from Florida to date. Panhandle Wild ower Alliance to boost ecotourism PHOTO BY ELEANOR DIETRICHState Road 65 in Apalachicola National Forest Inshore Offshore SPONSORED BY Inshore action continues to be dominated by trout in St. Joe Bay. Good trout catches are still reported in Pig Island and the surrounding areas. Most of the action is on live shrimp; however, arti cials such as Gulp and D.O.A. lures will work ne also. Large amounts of mullet are also in these waters right now. Good grouper catches are still coming to the docks in St. Joe. Most action can be found on the live bottom or hard bottom sites due south of Cape San Blas. Good shing for gag, red grouper and scamp grouper are all found here. King sh are still hanging around the buoy line, but not in great numbers right now.

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CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA SP O RTS www.apalachtimes.com ASectionBy DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com As odd as it sounds, with this years St. George Island Sizzler, it paid to be later rather than earlier. After organizers decided to move the race from its traditional place on the calendar in late June and put it in August, they found out last Saturday that they had a record eld of more than 275 runners in the 5K and another 30 in the one-mile Fun Run. So now it looks like race organizer Hobson Fulmer is looking to have the race moved to August, when rooms on the island are more easily obtainable and visitors like the idea of a summerending respite by the sea. With balmy weather and a gentle breeze, this years eld of 278 set a blistering pace. Stanley Linton, an 18-year-old Wakulla High School graduate, had boasted on Facebook that he would break the course record set by Lee L. Willis a few years back. Linton, now at Florida State, ended up running a 16:36, far better than the times in recent years, under blistering hot skies. Its not a personal best, but its a pretty good time for this race, he said. After a 5:01 rst mile, Linton was overtaken about a half-mile later by 33-year-old Vince Molosky, an environmental consultant from Tallahassee. Molosky took command the rest of the way, and ended up nishing 10 seconds ahead of Linton, for the crown. Ive taken a lot of the summer off, so this was faster than I expected, said Molosky, a veteran runner of longer races anywhere from 30 to 50 kilometers. Its cooler than it usually is for this race, he said. Ill take it. Molosky ran in high school in Amherst, Ohio, and then cross country for Bowling Green State University. He joked that he has veered off the mark in past races, getting confused as to turns, but this time he was spot on. I stayed on course today, he said. The race turned out to be a family affair from one set of seven visitors: Steve Baczewski and daughter Sarah; Paul, David and Debbie Baczewski; Rose Capasso and Robert Brown, from as far as South Carolina, South Florida and Tallahassee. In the end, Sarah edged out her dad, by seven seconds, running a 25:15, while Rose, with a 43:26, nished just ahead of Paul, 12 years her junior, to nish in 256th place. Winning the Fun Run was Franklin County Middle Schooler Matthew Turner, who ran it in 7:24, nine seconds ahead of 11-year-old Samantha Woolcock, from Oil City, Penn. She beat her brother and two cousins, who are also on vacation. Johns Run-Walk Shop once again handled timekeeping duties, while Fulmer created the decorated oyster medallions that participants won, and Ann Eason handled the ceramic plates for the top winners. The crowd of runners at Lighthouse Park proved to be so large that they used up the races allotment of dinner tickets, a testament to the races growing popularity as it enters it 16th year. To see the end results, go to apalachtimes.comMorgan Newell, 2012 graduate of Franklin County High School will be attending Gulf Coast State College and will play softball for the Commodores this coming season. Morgan is the daughter of Kevin and Jennifer Newell and big sister to Maddie and K.W. Newell. Morgan has played softball since the age of 8, the last 10 years playing on her dads teams. Morgan was a starter on the Franklin County High School Lady Seahawks varsity team since the 9th grade and has played third base and pitcher. She also competed in the Dixie Youth State Tournament held in Carrabelle, where her team won and advanced to the World Series In Virginia Aug 2. We are proud of Morgan and her accomplishments and wish her the best and hope this will advance a tradition of stellar athletes in Franklin County who go on to the next level and showcase their talents. By David Adlerstein With the fall sports practice season about to begin, the Florida High School Athletic Association has reminded schools of new standards put in place to safeguard the health and wellbeing of student-athletes. The FHSAAs director of athletics will conduct a workshop on the new safety requirements at a compliance seminar next week. Preseason practices of cially began Monday for studentathletes competing for their schools in football, golf, swimming/diving and girls volleyball, and new procedures are in place to protect the youths from the heat, inadequate hydration and concussions. For coaches, parents and everyone else associated with high school athletics, nothing is more important than the safety of the students, FHSAA Executive Director Dr. Roger Dearing said. At the FHSAA, we are committed to making sure our members understand what they must do to ensure that competitors have safe, enjoyable experiences as high school athletes. The FHSAAs Board of Directors adopted new heat-related policies in June, designed to ensure young athletes drink plenty of water and do not practice too many hours each week. Under the new policies, schools must: Limit weekly practice time to 18 hours during the rst two weeks of practice, to allow student-athletes to adapt to conditions Ensure that for every 30 minutes of practice, student-athletes get a minimum ve-minute rest and hydration break Require unrestricted access to water for student-athletes at all times Require coaches and others in authority to never deny a student-athlete access to water if requested. The FHSAA also adopted a new concussion and heat-related illness form intended to create safety awareness among students and their caretakers by explaining the risks and symptoms associated with each problem. A concussion action plan developed by the FHSAAs Sports Medicine Advisory Subcommittee and adopted by the Board requires that: Any student-athlete who exhibits signs, symptoms or behaviors consistent with a concussion such as loss of consciousness, headache, dizziness, confusion or balance problems must be immediately removed from the competition and cannot return to play until he or she is cleared by an appropriate health care professional. All head coaches and other paid coaches are required to view an online education course about concussions. The FHSAA also developed a new consent form related to concussions and heat-related illness to ensure that parents understand the conditions and the rules that apply to them. Since it was established in 1920, FHSAA has provided opportunities for high school students in Florida to participate fairly and equally in interscholastic athletic programs that produce vital educational bene ts. The FHSAA sponsors championship programs through which 108 teams and more than 720 student-athletes are crowned state champions in 30 sports each year. Through participation in these athletic programs, almost 800,000 students annually are extended opportunities to receive lessons in leadership, sportsmanship and citizenship.Page 9 Thursday, August 16, 2012New state standards to protect athletes DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The TimesMorgan Newell at the Lady Seahawks Senior NightNewell to play for GCSCIslands Sizzler attracts record crowd PHOTOS BY DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The TimesVince Molosky wins the Sizzler.Above: The Baczewski, Capasso and Brown families prepare for the race. Right: Matthew Turner wins the Fun Run.Coach Josh Wrights Seahawk football team did some important team building last weekend with the help of volunteers and local supporters. On Saturday, the team played host to a sh fry at Taylors Building Supply, as members of the community helped raise funds by offering fresh mullet dinners for a donation. Among those assisting Wrights squad was Panama Citys Lee Grif n, whose son was quarterback coach at Rutherford when Wright coached in Bay County. Grif n fried up the unique rope-like hush puppies. Also helping out was Grif ns nephew Derrell Suttles, his son Ray and Grif ns son-in-law Robbie Robbins. Theyre like family to me, said Wright. After the sh fry it was a chance to reach the highest level of conditioning, as Wright put it, as the team headed to a team-building weekend at the St. George Island Retreat, arranged through Pastor Mike Whaley and retreat manager Lee Howell. Practices continue this week in the evening as the team readies for the Aug. 24 pre-season home opener against Bozeman. Assistant coaches on hand were Michael Sweatt, in charge of defense, Tim Wheeler, who works the quarterbacks and the passing game, and volunteer Ashley Teat. Wright said he is working to bring on Bronson Sweatt, a corrections of cer, to handle coaching the offensive and defensive lines. By David AdlersteinSeahawks ready for 2012 season SPECIAL TO THE TIMESMason Ray, left, helps serve up the chow as teammates Holden Foley, Tyler Rowell and David Butler (at right) help out. JOESLAWN CARE 850.323.0741JOES_LAWN@YAHOO.COM

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LocalA10 | The Times Thursday, August 16, 2012 Trades & Services 653-8868 GET YOUR AD INCALL TODAY! Laban Bontrager, DMD Monica Bontrager, DMD 12761 Pea Ridge Road Bristol, Florida 32321TELEPHONE (850) 643-5417 Bristol Dental ClinicDENTURE LAB ON PREMISESSame Day Service on Repairs and Relines Don Lively General Contractors LICENSED ANDINSURED 20 YEARSEXPERIENCE P.O. Box 439 Carrabelle, FL 32322 697-2783 or Mobile 566-2603RC0066499RG0065255 Carrabelle Visa, Discover, and American Express Honored at Participating Ace Stores JACKSONS Building Supplies & Auto Repair Carrabelle 697-3333 We Deliver AnywhereHardware and Paint Center J.J.s Tree Service, LLC Stump Grinder Licensed & Insured Call John : (850) 899-8432 ROBERTS APPLIANCE REPAIR ALL MAJOR BRANDS 18 Shadow Lane Apalachicola, FL 32320 Phone: (850) 653-8122 Cell: (850) 653-7654 GET YOUR AD IN 653-8868Trades & Services GET YOUR AD IN 653-8868Trades & Services REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS LEASE OF COMMERCIAL-USE AIRCRAFT HANGAR/OFFICE FACILITY And FBO FACILITY interested in entering into leases of Business opportunities at FRANKLIN COUNTY/APALACHICOLA REGIONAL AIRPORT. The Board is soliciting proposals for two items. Item #1 Item #2 Franklin County Clerk of Court meet Please submit seven (7) copies. Please identify on the exterior of the sealed envelope whether the proposal is for Item #1 or Item #2. The Board reserves the right to reject any and all Proposals. BILL MILLER REALTY850-697-3751 (3310) 570-0658400 + COMM. U.S. 98 & GULFADJ. TO LANARK MARINA 85K$29,500 $2,500 DOWN BUYS 2 BED APT. 2 6 ORRENT $500/MTH COR. LOT 12 X 53 1 B/R 8 X 24 SHED 27,500 GULFVIEW & ACCESS 3 BDR 2 BA 2006 M/H 89K2 LG. SHADY LOTS 3 SHEDS400 TO MARINA-CITY WATER49KMIH 2 CRNRLOTS BLK. $ STORE REDUCED $49,500 CITY COMM. LOTSU.S. 98 $29,500 UP Special to The TimesDr. Dean Grubbs also known as the Shark Guy from the Florida State University Coastal and Marine Laboratory, will visit the Carrabelle Branch of Franklin County Public Library from 4:15-5:15 p.m. Aug. 28 for a memorable story time. Those who attend will be able to view specimens of his studies and gain a unique understanding of the mysterious creatures of the sea. While you are there, be sure to check out the collection of books that offer a fun way to learn about the aquatic life that live near our communities. The weekly story time offered at both branches offer activities and education to children with weekly themes. Eastpoint offers Mommy and Me on Fridays, at 3:30 p.m. to offer learning experiences to children as young as birth to age 9. Mothers join in with the fun and appreciate the opportunity to meet other parents with children at the same level. Simple crafts encourage ne motor skills while the music and sign language develop childrens verbal and non-verbal skills. Children entering preschool will be pleased to know that the staff makes library visits to both the Headstart in Carrabelle and in Eastpoint weekly. Tonia Granger brings books and shares stories to keep the children engaged. Her favorite stories to tell include Mercer Mayers Little Monster themed books. Anne Birchwell will begin the library outreach for Eastpoint preschools in September. Bringing library book stories to the children is just one of the ways that the county library works within the community for awareness and education. Eugenia Butler offers outreach for adults that have dif culty to physically get to their local libraries. For questions about the programs offered, please contact the library in Eastpoint at 670-8151 or the library in Carrabelle at 697-2366.Pre-K open house Thursday afternoonThe pre-K Open House will be from 2-4 p.m. today at the Franklin County Learning Center cafeteria. A short program will introduce new staff members and share information with parents. After the largegroup meeting, parents and students are invited to visit their classrooms to talk with teachers and staff.FCHS registration Thursday and FridayMiddle and high school registration in the Franklin County High School cafeteria will be from 3-6 p.m. today. Ninth grade orientation is from 1-2 p.m. Friday in the cafeteria. For more information, call 670-2800, ext. 3103.School starts Monday; hours setFranklin County High School, grades kindergarten though 12, opens Monday. School hours for students for the 2012-13 school wear will be as follows: Elementary school students report to the cafeteria at 7:45 a.m. for breakfast; the instructional day begins at 8:05 a.m.; and dismissal is at 2:05 p.m. Middle and high school students bell rings at 7:55 a.m., and the instructional day begins at 8 a.m. Dismissal is at 2:10 p.m.Help homeless students with school suppliesThe Franklin County School Districts Homeless Liaison, Sandi Hengle, is collecting school supplies for homeless and needy students. The school supply list is available on the front page of the Franklin County Schools website, www. franklincountyschools.org. School T-shirts also are needed. If your child has outgrown his or her shirt, graduated, is no longer in school or has moved up a grade, please consider donating his or her used shirts. If you wish to purchase new shirts for students who cant afford them, a donation can be made. The T-shirts are $6 each. The school cafeteria also has a Backpack Buddy Program that provides food for a needy student every weekend. The child is provided a backpack of food on Fridays with six meals, to last them through the weekend. The backpacks are returned on Monday to be re lled for the following Friday. Cost to sponsor a child is $5 a week, $25 a month or $300 a year. This is a very nominal donation to ll a hungry stomach. Donations of canned meats are also needed for families who dont have refrigerators or stoves. If you would like to sponsor a child for any of the programs, call Sandi Hengle at 323-0982.Correctional of cer class begins Aug. 22A new correctional of cer basic standards class is scheduled to begin at the Gulf/Franklin Campus of Gulf Coast State College in Port St. Joe on Aug. 22. This class is required for anyone who wishes to become a correctional of cer at any state, county or private correctional facility throughout Florida. This will be the last class offered this year in Port St. Joe. For information, call Brenda Burkett at 227-9670, ext. 5507.Tobacco-free partnership meets Aug. 29There will be a TobaccoFree Franklin Partnership coalition meeting on Wednesday, Aug. 29, at the Franklin County Health Department, 139 12th St., from 5:30-6:30 p.m. in the second oor conference room.County to upgrade 2 private roadsAt the Aug. 1 meeting, the county commission voted unanimously to upgrade two privately owned roads, Paddy Lane and Wood Duck off of Twin Lakes in Eastpoint. Chairman Pinki Jackel requested the work be done as a one-time project. She said the roads were badly damaged by Tropical Storm Debby and the work will have to be performed after the area dries. Commissioner Bevin Putnal said the road is so bad the mosquito truck and other county vehicles cant use it. These really are unusual emergency circumstances, County Attorney Michael Shuler said. Emergency Management Director Pam Brownell said FEMA will not reimburse the county for work on private roads.Shark Guy to visit library News BRIEFS

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, August 16, 2012 The Times | A11 88777 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case No.: 2009-CA-000549 Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as Trustee for Long Beach Mortgage Trust 2006-2 Plaintiff, vs. Marion C. Brewer. Defendant(s). AMENDED NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order rescheduling foreclosure sale dated July 23, 2012, entered in Civil Case No. 2009CA-000549 of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein Deutsche Bank National Trust Com-pany, as Trustee for Long Beach Mortgage Trust 2006-2, Plaintiff and Mariom C. Brewer and Richard C. Brewer, Wife and Husband are defendant(s), I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, AT THE WEST FRONT DOOR OF THE FRANK-LIN COUNTY COURTHOUSE, LOCATED ON HWY 98, IN APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA, AT 11:00AM, October 3, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit: LOT 3, BLOCK E, OF PENINSULAR POINT, UNIT 1, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OF PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 20, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. DATED at Apalachicola, Florida, this 24th day of July, 2012. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of Court Franklin County, FL Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF: SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACHE, LLP 4630 Woodland Corporate Blvd., Suite 100 Tampa, FL 33614 (813) 880-8888 (813) 880-8800 August 9, 16, 2012 88559T NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED Notice if hereby given that, MIKE B. BLAKE, the holders of the following certificate have filed said certificate for tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property and the name in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No: 1400 Year of issuance: 2010 Description of Property: Lot 7 Block 28 City of Apalachicola PARCEL NO: 01-09s-08w-8330-0028-00 70 Name is which assessed: John R. Bird All of said property being in the State of Florida, Franklin County. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the Courthouse door on the second (2nd) Monday in the month of September 2012, which is the 10th day of September 2012 at 11:00 a.m. DATED this 18th day of July, 2012. MARCIA M. JOHNSON CLERK OF COURTS FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Cassie B. Sapp Deputy Clerk August 2, 9, 16, 23, 2012 88555T NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED Notice if hereby given that, GARY MICHAEL MITCHELL Trustee of the Gary Michael Mitchell Revocable Trust, the holders of the following certificate have filed said certificate for tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property and the name in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No: 606 Year of issuance: 2009 Description of Property: Lots 1 through 16 Block 32(183) Keoughs Second Addition, City of Carrabelle Full Legal Description can be viewed at Clerk of the Circuit Courts Office. PARCEL NO: 20-07s-04w-4212-0032-00 10 Name is which assessed: SGI LAND COMPANY LLC All of said property being in the State of Florida, Franklin County. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the Courthouse door on the second (2nd) Monday in the month of September 2012, which is the 10th day of September 2012 at 11:00 a.m. DATED this 19th day of July, 2012. MARCIA M. JOHNSON CLERK OF COURTS FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Cassie B. Sapp Deputy Clerk August 2, 9, 16, 23, 2012 88647T NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED Notice if hereby given that, GARY MICHAEL MITCHELL Trustee of the Gary Michael Mitchell Revocable Trust, the holders of the following certificate have filed said certificate for tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property and the name in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No: 594 Year of issuance: 2009 Description of Property: Lots 1 through 16 Block 16(161) Keoughs Second Addition, City of Carrabelle Full Legal Description can be viewed at Clerk of the Circuit Courts Office. PARCEL NO: 20-07s-04w-4212-00160010 Name is which assessed: SGI LAND COMPANY LLC All of said property being in the State of Florida, Franklin County. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the Courthouse door on the second (2nd) Monday in the month of September 2012, which is the 10th day of September 2012 at 11:00 a.m. DATED this 26th day of July, 2012. MARCIA M. JOHNSON CLERK OF COURTS FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Cassie B. Sapp Deputy Clerk August 2, 9, 16, 23, 2012 88645T NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED Notice if hereby given that, GARY MICHAEL MITCHELL Trustee of the Gary Michael Mitchell Revocable Trust, the holders of the following certificate have filed said certificate for tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property and the name in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate No: 597 Year of issuance: 2009 Description of Property: Lots 1 through 16 Block 19(164) Keoughs Second Addition, City of Carrabelle Full Legal Description can be viewed at Clerk of the Circuit Courts Office. PARCEL NO: 20-07s-04w-4212-00190010 Name is which assessed: SGI LAND COMPANY LLC All of said property being in the State of Florida, Franklin County. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the Courthouse door on the second (2nd) Monday in the month of September 2012, which is the 10th day of September 2012 at 11:00 a.m. DATED this 26th day of July, 2012. MARCIA M. JOHNSON CLERK OF COURTS FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Cassie B. Sapp Deputy Clerk August 2, 9, 16, 23, 2012 88725T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION: CASE NO.: 19-2010-CA-000094-CA XXXX BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., vs. DESMOND J. ONEILL; Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated the 25th day of July, 2012, and entered in Case No. 19-2010-CA-000094CAXXXX, of the Circuit Court of the 2ND Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, where-in BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. is the Plaintiff and DESMOND J. ONEILL, UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF DESMOND J. ONEILL and are defendants. The Clerk of this Court shall sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the, FRONT STEPS OF THE FRANKLIN COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 33 MARKET STREET, APALACHICOLA, FL 32320, 11:00 AM on the 11th day of September, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOTS 7 & 8 OF BLOCK 25 OF THE CITY OF APALACHICOLA, IN THE COUNTY OF FRANKLIN, STATE OF FLORIDA, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF IN COMMON USE. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301, 850-5774401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Dated this 26th day of July, 2012. MARCIA JOHNSON Clerk of The Circuit Court Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk August 9, 16, 2012 88775T IN THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 09-650-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, as successor in interest to COASTAL COMMUNITY BANK Plaintiff, vs. MICHAEL J. KREHL and JOSEPHINE CANELLA-KREHL, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated July 23, 2012, and entered in Civil Action No. 09-650-CA of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein the parties were the Plaintiff, CENTENNIAL BANK as successor in interest to COASTAL COMMUNITY BANK, and the Defendants, MICHAEL J. KREHL and JOSEPHINE CANELLA-KREHL, I will sell to the highest and best bidder, for cash, at 11:00 a.m. (Eastern Time) on the6th day of September, 2012, at the front steps of the Franklin County Courthouse, Apalachicola, Florida, the followingdescribed real property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: Lots 2, 8, and 11-13, Block J of ST. JAMES BAY SUBDIVISION, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 7, Page(s) 39, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. The successful bidder at the sale will be required to place the requisite state documentary stamps on the Certificate of Title. DATED this 30th day of July, 2012. Honorable MARCIA JOHNSON Clerk of the Court Franklin County, Florida By: Michele Maxwell As Deputy Clerk August 9, 16, 2012 88789T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2011-454-CA First National Bank of Decatur County, Plaintiff, vs. Coastline Properties of North Florida, LLC; Hexaport Building Systems of Florida, LLC, d/b/a Green Steel Homes; Defendants. NOTICE OF JUDICIAL SALE Pursuant to Section 45.031(1) of the Florida Statutes To Whom It May Concern: Notice is hereby given that the undersigned, Marcia Johnson, Clerk of the Circuit Court of Franklin County, Florida, will on September 6, 2012 at 11:00 AM, at the Franklin County Clerks Office, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, Florida, 32320, offer for sale, and sell at public auction to the highest bidder, the following described real property located in Franklin County, Florida: EXHIBIT A Commence at the Southwest corner of Section 13, Township 7 South, Range 5 West, Franklin County, Florida (as monumented), thence run North 1828.93 feet, thence run North 89 degrees 59 minutes 22 seconds East 2199.40 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING run South 00 degrees 10 minutes 32 seconds West 487.48 feet to the Northerly right-of-way boundary of Mill Road, thence run South 58 degrees 03 minutes 12 seconds East along said Northerly right-ofway boundary 287.08 feet to the intersection of said Northerly right-of-way boundary with the Westerly boundary of a 60.00 foot Roadway Easement (Kal Lane), thence leaving said Northeasterly right-of-way boundary run Northwesterly and Northeasterly along said Westerly easement boundary as follows: run North 05 degrees 53 minutes 56 seconds West 379.14 feet to a point of curve to the right, thence run along the arc of said curve having a radius of 433.83 feet, through a central angle of 40 degrees 45 minutes 42 seconds, for an arc distance of 308.64 feet, chord being North 14 degrees 31 minutes 01 seconds East 302.17 feet to a point of tangency, thence run North 34 degrees 54 minutes 09 seconds East 213.07 feet, thence leaving said Westerly easement boundary run North 50 degrees 51 minutes 08 seconds West 187.87 feet to an iron rod and cap (marked #7160), thence run North 09 degrees 44 minutes 22 seconds East 81.55 feet to an iron rod and cap (marked #7160), thence run North 25 degrees 25 minutes 02 seconds West 241.16 feet to an iron rod and cap (marked #7160), thence run North 04 degrees 34 minutes 04 seconds East 273.54 feet to an iron rod and cap (marked #7160) lying on the Southerly boundary of the aforementioned 60.00 foot wide roadway easement (Kal Lane), said point also lying on a curve concave to the Northerly, thence run Northeasterly along said Southerly easement boundary as follows, thence run along the arc of a curve having a radius of 50.00 feet, through a central angle of 76 degrees 49 minutes 06 seconds, chord being North 25 degrees 51 minutes 40 seconds West 62.13 feet, thence leaving said cul-de-sac run North 79 degrees 19 minutes 49 seconds West 163.70 feet, thence run South 00 degrees 02 minutes 47 seconds East 980.74 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. The sale will be held pursuant to the final judgment of foreclosure entered on July 23, 2012, in Case No. 2011-CA-454 of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit, Franklin County, Florida, in which the parties are as listed in the above case-style. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Notice of Lis Pendens, must file a claim with the Clerk of the Court within 60 days after the date of sale. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the undersigned not later than seven days prior to the proceeding to ensure that reasonable accommodations are available. Dated: July 31, 2012. Marcia Johnson Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Terry Creamer Deputy Clerk August 9, 16, 2012 88791T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 11-000436CA TYNDALL FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, Plaintiff, vs. WILLIAM WAYNE WEBB, WONDA WEBB ALLEN, EASTPOINT WATER AND SEWER DISTRICT, AND FRANKLIN COUNTY, Defendants. SECOND AMENDED NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Franklin County, Florida, pursuant to the Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure, entered in this cause, the Clerk of this Court shall sell the property at public sale at 11:00 A.M. E.D.T., on the 6th day of September, 2012, at the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida, 32320, the following described real property lying and being in Franklin County, Florida, to-wit: EXHIBIT A A parcel of land lying in the Southeast Quarter of Fraction Section 27, Township 8 South, Range 8 West, Franklin County, Florida being described as follows: Commence at the intersection of the Southeasterly boundary of the 60.0 foot State Road (S-384-A) with the Northeasterly boundary of the 60.0 foor State Road (S-384) abd run thence North then 17 degrees 02 minutes 55 seconds East along said right-of-way of State Road S-384-A 962.10 feet to the Point of Beginning. From said Point of Beginning run thence South 72 degrees 57 minutes 05 seconds East 325.00 feet to a point in the center of a creek, thence North 67 degrees 40 minutes 45 seconds East along said creek center line 252.24 thence leaving said creek North 72 degrees 57 minutes 05 seconds West 370.00, thence South 17 degrees 02 minutes 55 seconds West 131.10 feet, thence North 72 degrees 57 minutes 05 seconds West 150.00 feet, to a point on said right-of-way of State Road S-384-A, thence South 17 degrees 02 minutes 55 seconds West along said right-of-way 28.90 feet to the Point of Beginning. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. This Notice dated this 24th day of July, 2012. MARCIA JOHNSON Clerk Circuit Court, Franklin County, Florida By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk August 9, 16, 2012 88793T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.: 19-2010-CA-000598 CITIMORTGAGE, INC. AS SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO ABN AMRO MORTGAGE GROUP, INC., Plaintiff, vs. EVELYN JUANITA KIRBY; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF EVELYN JUANITA KIRBY; IF LIVING, INCLUDING ANY UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SAID DEFENDANT (S), IF REMARRIED, AND IF DECEASED, THE RESPECTIVE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS, AND TRUSTEES, AND ALL OTHER PERSONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THE NAMED DEFENDANT (S); BANK OF AMERICA, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO LASALLE BANK MIDWEST NATIONAL ASSOCIATION; PIRATES LANDING AT TIMBER ISLAND CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION, INC.; WHETHER DISSOLVED OR PRESENTLY EXISTING, TOGETHER WITH ANY GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS, OR TRUSTEES OF SAID DEFENDANT(S) AND ALL OTHER PERSONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, WHETHER UNDER, OR AGAINST DEFENDANT(S); UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2; Defendant(s) NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above styled cause, in the Circuit Court of Franklin County, Florida, I will sell the property situate in Franklin County, Florida, described as: EXHIBIT P1 That certain Condominium Unit of PIRATES LANDING AT TIMBER ISLAND composed of Unit Number A-2, and the undivided 1/48 interest in the Common Elements appurtenant thereto, in accordance with the subject to the Master Declaration of Covenants, Conditions, and Restrictions, recorded in O.R. Vol. 879, Pages 348 through 372, and Declaration of Condominium of PIRATES LANDING AT TIMBER ISLAND, recorded in O.R. Vol. 879, Pages 373 through 541, both of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. A/K/A 280 Pirates Landing Road Carrabelle, FL 32322 at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, Front

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A12| The Times Thursday, August 16, 2012 CLASSIFIEDS Carrabelle Riverfront Home3 bdrm, 2 bath w/boat dock, fully furnished, $1,659 per month w/utilities. Peyton at (850)294-7827 or visit www .mr493.com for pictures, details, location... Text FL17576 to 56654 Eastpoint 3 br, 2 ba, in exclusive Whispering Pines C/H/A, DW, WD Hkup, no smoke/pets $850 month, 1st & Last Deposit 850-670-8266 SEEKING RENTALRetired professional is couple seeking a furnished apartment in Apalach historic district or houseboat rental February & March. Please reply to Peter and Pam by email stoneoak2003 @yahoo.com or call at: 413-219-4409. 3 br, 2 ba, Very Nice Mobile Home 197 Old Ferry Dock Rd. in Eastpoint. Dishwasher, W/D, CH&A Jacuzzi tub 1 acre lot, with lawn maintenance Nice location, No Pets or Smoking. $650 mo 1st & last, $300 deposit Call 850-670-8460 $33,500 5 Acres near Crystal Lake on Amos Hayes Rd, property has well septic and power pole. Current survey is available. About 1.5 acres of the property is cleared. 850-271-5761 and leave a message. North Historic District 5th Street building lot. $29,000 obo. 60 x 100. Corner lot. Brokers protected (404) 218-0077 A GREAT BUY! Scenic Cruiser, 1993. Gulfstream, 34 ft, One slide out. $5,000. This is a steal! Needs some TLC. 850-653-5077. 2008 Harley Davidson Street Glide Anniversay Edition9,700 miles. Copper/ Black. In Excellent condition w/Rinehart Exhaust, Power Commander, ABS, Security, Extra Headlights, 2 Seats, many other options. Always garage kept and well maintaned. Original owner. Only $17,000, sold new for over $27,000.850-723-4642 Coleman Pop-up Camper2 king sized beds. Good Condition. $2,900 (850) 697-2031 Leave message. Text FL20896 to 56654 RENTALS3 BEDROOM, 3 BATH CONDO UNFURNISHED, POOL ................................$800 1 BR, 1 BATH UNFURNISHED APT LANARK, REMODELED, INC WATER ..........$425 2 BEDROOM, 1 BATH UNFURNISHED APT LANARK .........................................................$400 2 BR, 1 BATH, UNFURNISHED APT. W/D HOOKUP, SMALL PORCH ............................$375 1 BR 1 BATH FURNISHED APT. SUNROOM, W/D, LANARK UTILITIES INCLUDED .........$650 3 BR, 2 BATH, UNFURNISHED HOUSE, WOOD FENCED YARD ...............................................$600 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322850-697-9604 850-323-0444 www.seacrestre.comwww. rst tness.com/carrabellePROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND RENTALS Apalachicola: 1 br, 1 ba efficiency Call for information 850-653-6103 Text FL20208 to 56654 Heritage V illas of Apalachicola Apartments Now accepting applications for 1BR Handicap accessible unit. Some rental assistance may be available. HUD vouchers accepted. Call 850-653-9277. TDD/ TTY 711. This institution is an equal opportunity provider & employer. Heritage V illas of Apalachicola Apartments Now accepting applications for 2BR Some rental assistance may be available. HUD vouchers accepted. Call 850-653-9277. TDD/ TTY 711. This institution is an equal opportunity provider & employer. Lanark Village: Clean 2 bedroom, 1 bath, screened porch, AC, 7 months min. $500 monthly + $350. security deposit, references required Pets-will consider. Non smoking. Call: 850-212-2063 Text FL18819 to 56654 Studio Apt. Furnished Upstairs StudioQuiet location, Water & Electric incl. Walk to Dwntwn. $650+Dep N/P or N/S For appt 653-9116 or 320-1174 St. George Island $175 week, Electric, Satellite, Garbage incl. Pool tble. 12 X 65 deck w/Beautiful view 850-653-5114 1 BRCottageH/AC in Apalachicola, FL. 850-643-7740. Apalachicola Cottage Lovely 3Br 2Ba, granite/ SS kitchen wood/carpet, laundry, screened deck w/spa, fenced back yard, security, garage & opener Avail Sept. 1, 2012 $1,200 /mo incl utilities. References + $500 dep Call: 865-307-0600 Text FL 20201 to 56654 Carabelle: (in town) 3 bdrm 2 bath older home. Freshly painted. $700 per month + dep. Call (850) 766-4357 Text FL19365 to 56654 Carabelle: 3 bdr 2 bath with large spare room on 1 acre. Fenced yard, new tile throughout, freshly painted. $800 per month + dep. Call (850) 766-4357 Text FL19355 to 56654 steps of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street Apalachicola, FL 32320 at 11:00 AM, on August 21, 2012. DATED THIS 28th DAY OF June, 2012. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Witness, my hand and seal of this court on the 28th day of June, 2012. Marcia M. Johnson CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk THIS INSTRUMENT PREPARED BY: Law Offices of Daniel C. Consuegra 9204 King Palm Drive Tampa, FL 33619-1328 Attorneys for Plaintiff If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Danny Davis Office of Court Administration 301 South Monroe Street, Room 225 Tallahassee, FL 32303 850.577.4401 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. August 9, 16, 2012 88795T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 19-2009-CA-000534 DIVISION: BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. DIANA W GROAT, TRUSTEE OF THE DWG TRUST, U/A/D, MAY 15, 2008 et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated July 23, 2012 and entered in Case No. 19-2009-CA000534 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for FRANKLIN County, Florida wherein BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. is the Plaintiff and DIANA W GROAT, TRUSTEE OF THE DWG TRUST, U/A/D, MAY 15, 2008; THE UNKNOWN BENEFICIARIES OF THE DWG TRUST, U/A/D, MAY 15, 2008; DIANA W. GROAT; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT (S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSE, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; ST. JAMES BAY PROPERTY OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC.; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at FRONT DOOR OF THE FRANKLIN COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 33 MARKET STREET, APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA at 11:00AM, on the 6th day of September, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT 4 OF BLOCK I, ST. JAMES BAY SUBDIVISION, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 7, PAGES 39-46, PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A LOT 4, BLOCK I, ST. JAMES, CARRABELLE, FL 32322 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on July 23, 2012. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Mr. Doug Smith, Office of Court Administration Leon County Courthouse, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301, Phone: 850-577-4401, Fax: 850-487-7947 F09091478 August 9, 16, 2012 88823T IN THE COUNTY COURT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2012-172-CA RIVERWALK CONDOMINIUM OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC, Florida Non-Profit Corporation, Plaintiff, vs. PAIGE F. KILLEEN, Defendant. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: PAIGE F. KILLEEN: YOU ARE NOTIFIED that a civil action has been filed against you in the Circuit Court, County of Franklin, State of Florida, to foreclose certain real property described as follows: Unit K of Riverwalk Condominiums, according to Declaration of Condominium, Covenants and Restrictions for Riverwalk Condominiums thereof recorded under Official Records Book 566, Page 220, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida; as amended by that certain Amended Declaration of Condominium, Covenants and Restrictions for Riverwalk Condominiums thereof recorded under Official Records Book 584, Pages 1-78, of the-Public Records of Franklin County, Florida; and Amendment to Master Declaration of Condominium, Covenants and Restrictions for Riverwalk Condominiums thereof recorded under Official Records Book 628, Pages 81-99, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida; and Amendment to Master Declaration of Condominium, Covenants and Restrictions for Riverwalk Condominiums thereof recorded under Official Records Book 635, Pages 548-552, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida, together with all appurtenances thereto. You are required to file a written response with the Court and serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Timothy D. Padgett, Plaintiffs attorney, whose address is 2878 Remington Green Circle, Tallahassee, Florida 32308, at least thirty (30) days from the date of first publication, and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter, otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. Dated this 30th day of July, 2012. Marcia M. Johnson CLERK OF COURT Terry Creamer Deputy Clerk Attorney for Plaintiff: Timothy D. Padgett, Esq., Timothy D. Padgett, P.A. 2878 Remington Green Circle, Tallahassee, Florida 32308 Ph: (850) 422-2520 Fax: (850) 422-2567 August 9, 16, 2012 88817T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO: 2012-000043-CP Florida Bar # 334618 IN RE: THE ESTATE OF BERNARD L. COSEY, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of BERNARD L. COSEY, deceased, whose date of death was June 30, 2012, is pending in the Circuit Court for Franklin County, File Number 2012-000043-CP is pending in the Circuit Court for Franklin County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is P. O. Box 340, Apalachicola, Florida 32320. The names and addresses of the Personal Representative and the Personal Representatives attorney are set forth below. ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT: All creditors of the decedent and other persons who have claims or demands against decedents estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, and who have been served a copy of this notice, must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY (30) DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.tions of the Personal Representative, venue, or jurisdiction of this Court are required to file their objections with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DEATH IS BARRED. The date of the first publication of this Notice is August 9, 2012. Personal Representative: KENDALL B. COSEY 1229 Parkside Village Drive Marietta, GA 30066 Attorney for Personal Representative: Joyce Terrell Timmons, Esquire P.O. Box 726 Eastpoint, FL 32328 (850) 670-8998 August 9, 16, 2012 88957T IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT NORTHERN DISTRICT OF FLORIDA TALLAHASSEE DIVISION CASE NO.: 4:12-CV-00053-RHWCS CENTENNIAL BANK, Plaintiff, vs. KEVIN R. GABY a/k/a KEVIN RILEY GABY; KERRY R. GABY; and WILDWOOD COUNTRY CLUB PROPERTY OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that under and by virtue of a Judgment of Foreclosure rendered in the abovestyled case on June 5, 2012, by the United States District Court For The Northern District Of Florida, in favor of the Plaintiff, and the Amendment to Judgment of Foreclosure entered July 10, 2012, by the United States District Court For The Northern District Of Florida, the undersigned, appointed in said decree, will on the 10th day of September, 2012 at 12:00 p.m. (Eastern Time), at the main foyer in the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327, offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the highest bidder, the following described property, situated, lying and being in Wakulla County and Franklin County, Florida: SEE EXHIBITS A, B AND C ATTACHED HERETO. EXHIBIT A COMMENCE AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 13, TOWNSHIP 4 SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND ALSO MARKING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF WOODLAND PARK SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 82 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 16 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARY OF SAID NORTHWEST QUARTER AND THE NORTH BOUNDARY OF SAID WOODLAND PARK SUBDIVISION 1575.73 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 34 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID SOUTH BOUNDARY OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER AND ALONG SAID NORTH BOUNDARY OF WOODLAND PARK SUBDIVISION 480.95 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE NORTH 89 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 34 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID SOUTH BOUNDARY OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER AND ALONG SAID NORTH BOUNDARY OF WOODLAND PARK SUBDIVISION AND AN EXTENSION THEREOF 386.57 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT ON THE WESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 319, THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 21 MINUTES 07 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 225.76 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 34 SECONDS WEST 385.15 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 17 SECONDS WEST 225.76 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. Together with all rights, easements, appurtenances, royalties, mineral rights, oil and gas rights, crops, timber, all diversion payments or third party payments made to crop producers, and all existing and future improvements, structures, fixtures, and replacements that may now, or at any time in the future, be part of the real estate described above (all referred to as Property). The term Property also includes, but is not limited to, any and all water wells, water, ditches, reservoirs, reservoir sites and dams located on the real estate and all riparian and water rights associated with the Property, however established. EXHIBIT B Parcel 1: Lot 21 of Wildwood Country Club, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 3, Page(s) 35, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Parcel 2: Lot 10, Block E of Sopchoppy River Subdivision, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page(s) 27, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Parcel 3: Lots 1, 2, 3, and 4, Block B of Sopchoppy River Subdivision, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page(s) 27, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Less and Except: that part of Lots 1 and 4, Block B of Sopchoppy River Subdivision, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page(s) 27, deeded to the State of Florida, recorded 12/19/1973 in Official Records Book 39, Page 784, Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Parcel 4: Lots 26 and 27, Block O of Lanark Beach Unit No. 1, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 2, Page(s) 13, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. Together with all rights, easements, appurtenances, royalties, mineral rights, oil and gas rights, all water and riparian rights, ditches, and water stock and all existing and future improvements, structures, and replacements that may now, or at any time the future, be part of the real estate described above (all referred to as Property). EXHIBIT C BEGIN AT CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 13, TOWNSHIP 4 SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 35 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE EAST BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION 13 A DISTANCE OF 726.15 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT ON THE EDGE OF SWIRL SWAMP, THENCE RUN ALONG THE EDGE OF SAID SWIRL SWAMP AS FOLLOWS: NORTH 70 DEGREES 26 MINUTES 22 SECONDS EAST 282.08 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE SOUTH 82 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 08 SECONDS EAST 213.59 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE NORTH 83 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 52 SECONDS EAST 107.30 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE NORTH 25 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 52 SECONDS EAST 97.25 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE NORTH 83 DEGREES 19 MINUTES 31 SECONDS EAST 125.54 FEET TO CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE NORTH 46 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 12 SECONDS EAST 243.65 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE NORTH 70 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 52 SECONDS EAST 190.70 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE NORTH 45 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 32 SECONDS EAST 152.83 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE NORTH 75 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 12 SECONDS EAST 285.84 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE NORTH 62 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 36 SECONDS EAST 133.29 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE LEAVING SAID SWAMPS EDGE RUN SOUTH 02 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 56 SECONDS WEST 3340.12 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 73 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 1530.27 FEET TO AN OLD AXLE ON THE EAST BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION 13, THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 36 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID EAST BOUNDARY 834.01 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 24 SECONDS EAST 280.50 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 36 SECONDS WEST 1560.24 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 24 SECONDS WEST 280.50 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SITUATE, LYING AND BEING IN LOTS 86 AND 87 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. LESS AND EXCEPT THE FOLLOWING: COMMENCE AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 13, TOWNSHIP 4 SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 24 SECONDS EAST 280.50 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 36 SECONDS WEST 131.30 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 24 SECONDS EAST 330.00 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 36 SECONDS EAST 660.00 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 24 SECONDS WEST 330.00 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 36 SECONDS WEST 528.70 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH ACCESS OVER AND ACROSS THAT CERTAIN EASEMENT RECORDED OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 191, PAGE 350 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. Together with all rights, easements, appurtenances, royalties, mineral rights, oil and gas rights, crops, timber, all diversion payments or third party payments made to crop producers, and all existing and future improvements, structures, fixtures, and replacements that may now, or at any time in the future, be part of the real estate described above (all referred to as Property). The term Property also includes, but is not limited to, any and all water wells, water, ditches, reservoirs, reservoir sites and dams located on the real estate and all riparian and water rights associated with the Property, however established. For additional information concerning the above property contact: STEPHEN A. PITRE, ESQUIRE, Post Office Box 13010, Pensacola, Florida 325913010 or (850) 434-9200. All sales are subject to confirmation of the court. Method of payment is by postal money order or certified check made payable to the U.S. Marshal Service. Ten (10) Percent of High/ Acceptable bid in certified check or cashiers check (NO CASH) will be accepted with the balance due within 48 hours. No cash will be accepted. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim with the Clerk of the Court within 60 days after the sale. In accordance with the AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT, persons needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact Stephen A. Pitre, Esquire, Post Office Box 13010, Pensacola, Florida 32591-3010 or (850) 434-9200 not later than seven days prior to the sale to ensure that reasonable accommodations are available. Ed Spooner United States Marshal Northern District of Florida Dated: August 8, 2012 By: Ed Spooner U.S. Marshals Service August 16, 23, 30 September 6, 2012 88925T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 2011 CA 378 HANCOCK BANK, Plaintiff, vs. SALLY A. JESKE nka SALLY JESKE nka SALLY FECHT, FRANKLIN COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS, and ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AGAINST, THE HEREIN NAMED DEFENDANTS WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID OWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE UNDER F.S. CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Plaintiffs Final Judgment dated July 24, 2012, in the abovestyled cause, Marcia Johnson, Clerk of Courts for Franklin County, will sell to the highest bidder for cash at the front door of the courthouse in Franklin County in Apalachicola, Florida, in accordance with Section 45.031, Florida Statutes, at 11:00 A.M., on September 11, 2012, the following described property: Lot 24, Block Q of Lanark Beach, Unit No. 1, according to the plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 2, Page 13, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE Dated August 2, 2012. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of Court By: Terry Creamer Deputy Clerk August 16, 23, 2012 89037T PUBLIC NOTICE THE APALACHICOLA HOUSING AUTHORITY 141-15th STREET, APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA, PHONE 850-6539304, IS NOW ACCEPTING BIDS FOR THE FOLLOWING: YARD MAINTENANCE: INCLUDING MOWING, EDGING, WEEDING, CLEAN UP DEBRIS, AS IS NECESSARY, ON A BI-WEEKLY (EVERY TWO WEEKS) SCHEDULE. SUCCESSFUL BIDDER MUST SUPPLY ALL MACHINERY, MOWERS, FUEL, LABOR AND MATERIAL. SUCESSFUL BIDDER MUST HAVE INSURANCE OR ACQUIRE INSURANCE BEFORE STARTING JOB. BIDS MAY BE SUBMITTED IN LETTER FORM STATING AMOUNT OF MONEY CHARGED PER MONTH OR ANNUALLY. BIDS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY MAIL, FOR PROPER RECORDING. BIDS MAY BE SUBMITTED NO LATER THAN AUGUST 23, 2012. EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER PAUL E. MILLS, Executive Director August 16, 23, 2012 Publishers Notice SCAM To avoid possible scams, it is recommended that consumers should verify caller information when receiving calls regarding credit card payments. Consumers should also contact the local company themselves instead of giving this information to individuals who are contacting them directly. Springer Spaniel Pups, 4 wks old, Pure Bred w/papers ava., $400 each; 727-580-1160 YORKIE AKCregistered. 9 weeks old adorable puppies only 2 females left. They are Health Certified and have 1st shots. $500 ea. Mom & dad on premise. Please call 850-774-1229 Panama City Area For Sale Complete wood working shop tools. All in excellent condition. $4,000 OBO 850-697-8038 Text FL20793 to 56654 These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you. EmeraldCoast Marketplace 747-5020

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, August 16, 2012 The Times | A13 emeraldcoastjobs.com Employment Today By Bridget Quigg Imagine the following scenario. S omeone asks you how work is going and y ou say, Not bad. The pay is great and t he stress is manageable. According to r esearch from online salary database P ayScale.com, that could be your reality if y ou choose one of the following well-paying j obs where workers report below-average l evels of stress. PayScale.com collects salary and job i nformation from employees around the c ountry and has found the most enviable g igs are typically knowledge-based and r equire highly specialized training and e ducation. Being smart at something really helps y ou feel happy, says Katie Bardaro, lead r esearch analyst at PayScale.com. The m ore preparation you put into a career, the m ore you can define your career, such as b eing able to set your schedule and your t asks. She adds that not having the pressure o f being a cog in the machine alleviates s ome stress. It seems that being able to w alk into a room and command everyones a ttention as you share your expertise m akes you less likely to crave that sixth c up of coffee. Perhaps the promise of a career like t his will inspire you to get the degree or a dditional job training you need to land one of these five high-paying, low-stress jobs.1. Optometrist Median annual salary $99,200Good attention to detail and a strong background in the sciences help optometrists diagnose vision problems, prescribe vision-correcting eyewear and help manage eye diseases such as glaucoma. In addition to earning a bachelors degree and doctorate, optometrists must pass state and national exams. After all that, apparently, they are pretty happy. Job prospects are excellent, with 24 percent job growth expected through 2018, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS).2. Materials scientist Median annual salary $90,600Synthetic fibers, lubricants, leakproof materials these are a few of the products created by materials scientists. They need strong chemistry backgrounds and at least a bachelors degree to get started. Those holding a Ph.D. often specialize in areas such as analytical chemistry or polymer chemistry. 3. Economist Median annual salary $85,600Economists pay attention to the distribution of goods and resources. They might focus on money, natural resources or other valuables, and often work to predict future outcomes. Those with a Ph.D. fare best in what can be a very competitive job market. You have to be willing to produce plenty of reports and analyses based on hours of number crunching. The government employs the majority of economists, according to the BLS.4. Aeronautical engineer Median annual salary $82,800Who would not feel inspired working on the wonder of flight every day? From lowering aircraft weight and fuel needs to improving safety, aeronautical engineers spend a lot of time rethinking and improving how we travel through the air. Aeronautical engineers typically have a bachelors degree to start, but many earn masters degrees and pass both licensing and professional advancement exams.5. User experience designer Median annual salary $79,100User experience (UX) designers optimize any experience where humans interact with objects, such as board games, ATMs and cars. For example, in a world where almost anyone can create a website in hours, leading companies often hire UX designers to make their site more attractive and easy to use. UX designers come from a variety of disciplines, including psychology, industrial design and anthropology. I work on projects just as they start or even initiate the project myself, says Mike Bibik, a senior UX designer in Seattle. This affords (me) a greater amount of influence, and I am not dealing with the stress of project decisions or directions with which I disagree.5 high-paying, low-stress jobs Featured Jobs To Place An Employment Here Please Contact Lorna Brown Phone: (850) 747-5019 Email: lbrown@pcnh.com Like Us On Facebook: www.facebook.com/emcoastjobs Or Follow Us on Twitter: @emcoastjobs Medical/HealthCaring Peopleand CNAs needed. Join a team of people who make a difference in the lives of the elderly. Provide non medical companionship, in home help & personal care for the elderly. Must be flexible. PT leading to FT-positions in the Port St. Joe and Apalachicola areas.Home Instead Senior CareCall Mon-Thur 9-3pm 850-640-1223 or toll free 1-866-301-1919 Web ID#: 34216824 Text FL16824 to 56654 AIRLINE CAREERS BEGIN HERE -Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualified. Housing available. Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-206-9405 ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINEfrom Home. Medical, Business, Criminal Justice Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 866-467-0054 www.CenturaOnline.com ToPlace Your Classified ad inCall Our New Numbers Now!Call: 850-747-5020 Toll Free:800-345-8688 Fax: 850-747-5044 Email: thestar@pcnh.com Email: thetimes@pcnh.com theAPALACHICOLA & CARRABELLETIMES CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW Classified Advertising works hard ...filling the employment needs of area business firms, helping people to meet their prospective employers, helping people buy and sell all kinds of goods and services, and much more! Nothing works harder than the Classifieds! 747-5020 REPRESENTATIVES will be at the PORT ST. 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LocalA14 | The Times Thursday, August 16, 2012who decided not to run for a second term. Mock said he planned to talk with Shiver in the days ahead about the transition. The oath of office is slated for right after the first of the year. Ill start getting ready and meeting with my folks, said Mock, who said it was too soon to make any decisions about personnel changes. Not yet, he said. I got to meet with some people. Mock has spent the last four years in a quieter role in Carrabelle, with he and his wife, Debbie, focusing on a changed family experience after Mocks sister was killed in an October 2008 car accident, right before he was set to leave office. Mock, who has spent 23 years in law enforcement, said the last four years have given him time to reflect on the lessons of his first term and how he plans to conduct his return to the job. I think folks in general want someone they can talk with if they have a situation, he said. They want someone who they can sit down and talk with. Theres not another county Id want to be sheriff in, Mock said. I wouldnt want to serve anywhere else. I love my home. Thats what its about to me; its about the people.Shiver ousts WhaleyAlso set to assume office is newcomer Pamela Shiver, 41, Eastpoint, who defeated incumbent Carl Whaley, 43, Carrabelle, in his bid for a second term. Shiver captured 442 votes, or 54.7 percent, to Whaleys 367, or 45.4 percent. She swamped Whaley among Eastpoint voters, and then ran just 61 votes behind in Carrabelle, even winning there among absentee voters. Im really overwhelmed, I know it was against all odds, she said Tuesday night. I didnt have a lot of family in the area and a lot of friends. I give God the glory, I really do. I appreciate my friends and family who supported me and helped me, she said. I especially thank the voters who supported me. Shiver said she had worked hard on her campaign, going door to door, doing a mail-out and working the absentees in her first bid for public office. It was a very clean race, and I appreciate them for that, she said. We hugged and shook hands and talked. Were all friends. Shiver, who has been attending school board meetings regularly but rarely addressing the board, said she plans to begin focusing on her priorities. The main thing I want to work on is going to be the communication, consistency and accountability, from the top down to the student, everybody doing their part and doing what theyre supposed to be doing. The childrens best interest is in my heart, and my focus is doing whats best for them, she said.Massey defeats PutnalIncumbent county commissioner Bevin Putnal, 70, of Carrabelle, was defeated in the Democratic primary by political newcomer William Massey, 52, of Carrabelle. Massey, known around the community as Little William, received 345 votes, nearly 57 percent of the total. He now must face a challenge in the Nov. 6 general election from Hank Garrett, 61, of Eastpoint, who is running without party affiliation. I feel very good, I feel great, after six months of hard work, Massey said. I want to thank everyone in District 5 for helping me out, for their support and their vote and their kindness to me, during the six months of politicking. Massey extended a gracious hand to his opponent, who was first elected in 1994 and was seeking a sixth term. Mr. Putnal is a very good man. I love Mr. Putnal, Massey said. I have nothing bad to say about Mr. Putnal. He done a good job. I just thought it was time for a change. Massey said he was optimistic about his chances against Garrett, whose decision to run without party affiliation closed the Democratic primary to Republicans, whose votes Massey said he was confident he would have attracted. I kind of wished hed come out as a Democrat, Massey said. I lost all my Republican voters. Massey, who is a second cousin to Putnal, is related by marriage to Garrett, and he said he wanted to be careful not to step on toes. Im well-known in Carrabelle; my familys been there since the 1800s, he said. Im a well liked fellow in the city.Lockley wins over WebbIn District 3, which encompasses the Apalachicola neighborhood to the north and east of U.S. 98, incumbent Noah Lockley, 61, downed challenger Valentina Webb, 48. Lockley, who is seeking a third term, received 381 votes, or 63.6 percent of the vote in the Democratic primary. He now faces Republican Wilmer Deason, 59, in the Nov. 6 general election. In a district that is overwhelmingly Democrat, Lockley looks to be a shoo-in but he said he wasnt counting his chickens just yet. I run a serious race against everybody. I dont never take nothing for granted, Lockley said. I take all my opponents seriously. I take everybody seriously when Im out there running. Lockley said he was grateful for voters support. It was a good race. I appreciated the people keeping their con dence in me, and I appreciate my supporters. She (Webb) ran a straight race; I dont have a problem with her, he said. I want to thank all the voters in District 3 who supported me and the ones who supported her. I want to thank my wife and my family, Lockley said. Everybody who wants to talk to me just give me a call. Im here for the people. I got one more river to cross, and I hope my constituents stay with me and God bless em, he said.Vote tally goes wellSuperintendent of Elections Ida Elliott said she was delighted at how well the day had gone, as Franklin became among the rst Florida counties to complete its vote count, nishing up well before 8 p.m., just one hour after the polls closed Overall, 3,873 voters cast ballots, for a nearly 53 percent turnout. I claimed a good, smooth, blessed election day this morning, and we got it, she said. We might have done even better if we hadnt had the rain. In the race to ll the District 7 state representative seat, vacated by Leonard Bembry, who made a bid for Congress, Apalachicola native A.J. Smith lost to Liberty County Clerk of Court Robert Hill to represent the Democratic party in the race to serve the vast rural Florida district covering Calhoun, Liberty, Gulf, Franklin, Wakulla, Jefferson, Madison, Lafayette, Taylor and Leon counties. Medley attorney Thomas Dickens nished third. In the Republican Party primary, Tallahassee nurseryman Halsey Beshears emerged the victor, downing Perry forester Don Curtis, Port St. Joe businessman Jamey Westbrook and Madison businessman Mike Williams. Al Lawson, a veteran of the Florida Senate and House of Representatives, won the right to represent the Democratic Party in the November election to challenge incumbent Steve Southerland for Floridas District 2. Bembry ran second, Panama City attorney Alvin Peters third and Florida State University professor and human rights activist Mark Schlakman fourth. In the Democratic primary for U.S. senate, incumbent Bill Nelson trounced Glenn A. Burkett in the race. On the Republican primary for the U.S. senatorial race, Connie Mack, U.S. representative for Floridas 14 district, nished on top over retired Army Col. Mike McCalister, pro-life activist Marielena Stuart of Naples and Melbourne physician Dave Weldon. In the race for circuit court judge in the Second Judicial Circuit, Group Two, Barbara Hobbs of Tallahassee won over incumbent Jose na M. Tamayo, appointed by former Gov. Charlie Crist, and Kris Dunn. Individuals have until Oct. 9 to register to vote in the general election. Our local real estate experts have identied what they feel are the best values around and are oering them to you in Real Estate Picks! (In this section), Discover the best real estate values in Mexico Beach, Port St. Joe, Apalachicola, Cape San Blas, St. George Island, Carrabelle and surrounding areas. Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Real Estate Picks John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.comMLS# 244722$369,000St. George Island1ST TIER ISLAND GETAWAY3 BR, 2 BA, Great room, Spacious kitchen with breakfast bar, Immaculately maintained, beach access, furnished, outdoor shower, downstairs storage, decks front & back, vinyl siding, new metal roof, private well, West Gorrie Dr. Listing agent Michael Billings John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.comMLS# 247750$39,900St. George IslandINTERIOR ISLAND LOTNice home site in a quiet neighborhood. Property isclose to the Bay and a short walk to the Gulf, Mature pines & native vegetation enhance privacy, great investment property or building site, Bradford Street. Listing agent Michael Billings ELECTION 2012 RESULTS STATE RACES STATEWIDE COUNTY U.S. SENATORDemocrats Glenn A. Burkett 182,781 (21.14%) 1,012 (38.1%) Bill Nelson 681,872 (78.86%) 1,644 (61.9%) Republicans Connie Mack 655,591 (58.66%) 440 (55.5%) Mike McCalister 154,795 (13.85%) 185 (23.3%) Marielena Stuart 81,601 (7.3%) 54 (6.8%) Dave Weldon 225,682 (20.19%) 114 (14.4%) DISTRICTWIDE COUNTY DISTRICT 7 STATE REPRESENTATIVEDemocrats Thomas Dickens 7,147 (25.78%) 362 (13.8%) Robert Hill 11,133 (40.15%) 600 (22.8%) A.J. Smith 9,448 (34.07%) 1,668 (63.4%) Republicans Halsey Beshears 4,042 (37.83%) 299 (37.1%) Don Curtis 1,830 (17.13%) 143 (17.8%) Jamey Westbrook 2,253 (21.09%) 172 (21.4%) Mike Williams 2,560 (23.96%) 191 (23.8%)U.S. HOUSE FLORIDA DISTRICT 2 Democrats Leonard Bembry 22,140 (26.04%) 1,192 (44.5%) Al Lawson 46,567 (54.76%) 1,196 (44.7%) Alvin Peters 11,758 (13.83%) 163 (6.1%) Mark Schlakman 4,568 (5.37%) 127 (4.8%)JUDGE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, GROUP 2Kris Dunn 16,750 (21.36%) 1,109 (33.6%) Barbara Hobbs 38,520 (49.11%) 1,513 (45.8%) Jose na M. Tamayo 23,160 (29.53%) 680 (20.6%) REGIONAL RACES SHELLING from page A1it the most is what were trying to do. Harts eld said as soon as his fellow seafood workers nd rich pickings on a bar, theyll work it, but right now, they are nding too many places that are bare. The oysterman goes to work where he nds oysters, he said. Marshall said the spat, which oat with the tides, attach themselves to hard surfaces, but many will become tasty treats for crabs, sh and other predators. There isnt much that doesnt eat an oyster, he said. They love them little rascals, just like we do. Harts eld said the rain looked to dampen last Fridays shelling, but it turned out into a sunny morning. We was going to call it, but it didnt rain bad. It just drizzled, he said. Kendall Shiver was among those who thought everything went well. It was pretty well-arranged, for a change. There was less confusion, everything went well, he said, taking pride in the fact that his 52-year-old cypress boat, the oldest working boat on the bay, was able to handle the four trips it made with ease. This boats slow, it doesnt run very fast, said Durant Hartman, a member of the crew, and grateful for the chance to make $125 per boatload. Were about to starve to death, he said. Im glad to see this. Total budget for the project is $112,000, with $100,000 to pay for 800 boatloads going to participants; $7,500 going towards the FCSWA to provide monitoring and guidance during the project, and $4,500 for an operator to move the shells and load the boats. ELECTIONS from page A1 DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The TimesSupervisor of Elections Ida Elliott talks with state election of cials on election night. DAVID ADLERSTEIN | the TimesKendall Shivers boat calls it a day