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The Apalachicola times
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100380/00179
 Material Information
Title: The Apalachicola times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: H.W. Johnston
Place of Publication: Apalachicola Fla
Apalachicola Fla
Publication Date: 07-05-2012
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1885.
General Note: Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 32911693
lccn - sn 95026907
System ID: UF00100380:00179
 Related Items
Preceded by: Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by: Apalachicola herald

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xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx 50 WWW.APALACHTIMES.COM Phone: 850-653-8868 Web: apalachtimes.com E-mail: dadlerstein@star .com Fax: 850-653-8036 Circulation: 800-345-8688 DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK: School News & Society: 11 a.m. Friday Real Estate Ads: 11 a.m. Thursday Legal Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Display Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Line Ads: 5 p.m. Monday xxxxx Contact Us xxxxx Out to see Index Thursday, July 5, 2012 Debbys rescues, A2 Movies in the Park Friday on SGI The Franklin County Sheriffs Of ce will host the 2012 Movies in the Park series, with the showing of the animated lm Puss in Boots, at Lighthouse Park on St. George Island, on Friday, July 6. Free hot dogs, popcorn and drinks for the kids. Come early; show begins at dusk. Carrabelle seniors host Saturday dance A free dance will be at 7 p.m. Saturday, July 7, at the Carrabelle Senior Center, 201 N.W. Ave. F, on the corner of First Street and Northwest Avenue F. Music will be provided by local disc jockey Ron Vice, serving up a lively mix of Big Band dance tunes and mellow pop hits. For more information on the dance and other activities at the senior center, visit www. CarrabelleSeniorCenter. com. Big Bend Saltwater Classic this weekend The 24th annual Big Bend Saltwater Classic will be this weekend, July 6-8, with tournament headquarters at the Carrabelle Boat Club. The date was changed from June 15, the traditional date that coincides with Fathers Day weekend, so anglers could sh for gag grouper, the harvest of which is permitted from July 1 through Oct. 31 in federal waters. The tourney opens with captains meetings at 6 p.m. today, July 5, at the boat club and at the Port St. Joe Marina. Lines are in the water at 5:30 a.m. Friday, July 6. Weigh-in stations are at the Carrabelle Boat Club, Shields Marina at St. Marks and the Port St. Joe marina. Weigh-in begins at 3 p.m. July 6 and ends at 7:30 p.m., when anglers must be in line. On Saturday, weighin begins at 3 p.m. and ends at 7:30 p.m., also when anglers must be in line. On Sunday, the awards presentation begins at 10 a.m. at the Carrabelle Boat Club. For more info, email bigbendsaltwaterclassic@ gmail.com or call 216-2272. ATLANTA (AP) Federal ofcials responsible for a dam at the center of a long-running water dispute between Alabama, Florida and Georgia say they have the legal authority to give metro Atlanta more water, though the agency has not yet decided how much to release. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers said in documents released June 26 that it can legally grant a 2000 request from Georgia to get 705 million gallons of water per day from Lake Lanier on the Chattahoochee River by 2030. The federal agency said it will need to conduct an environmental review before making any nal decisions on exactly how much water Atlanta should get. Federal of cials said Georgia would have to live up to its promise to return more than 100 million gallons of treated water daily to the lake. The Corps decision became public after the U.S. Supreme Court refused June 25 to intervene in a dispute over metro Atlantas use of water from a federal reservoir that severs all three southeastern states. The Chattahoochee River ows past Atlanta, then runs along the border of Alabama and Georgia. It merges with the Flint River at the Florida border to form the Apalachicola River, which cuts By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star .com Last week, contractors for Progress Energy pruned trees in Apalachicolas historic district, drawing both support and protest from residents. In the wake of Tropical Storm Debby, when 800 residents of Apalachicola were without power, some for three days, about 15 bucket trucks from Burfords Tree Service of Aniston, Ala. were involved in a large-scale Apalachicolas Dan Sangaree last month celebrated a century of fortitude and curiosity. On June 20, about 50 friends attended a birthday party at the Gulfside IGA, where Sangaree was presented a cake, a crown and a proclamation from the city. Looking t for a man of distinguished years and piloting a mobility scooter after driving himself to the party, Sangaree blew out his candle and cut the cake to a round of applause. An avid sherman as he stayed active in his younger years, Sangaree endured an injury in middle age that led to his use of crutches, and later a scooter. But that didnt keep him home-bound, as he continued for years to be an active gardener, including growing and marketing hydroponic vegetables, and an New RV park planned in Eastpoint LOCAL PERSPECTIVE Authorities in Florida, Alabama and even southern Georgia complain that Atlanta takes too much water from Lake Lanier, a federal reservoir, leaving too little downstream for drinking water systems, wildlife and industry, including nourishing the oyster beds of Apalachicola Bay. Corps: More water for Atlanta By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com At a public hearing on June 19, a plot of land in Eastpoint was rezoned for commercial use and soon will be an RV park. Commissioners voted unanimously to rezone the land at 957 U.S. 98 from residential to C-3 commercial recreational and approve the proposed site plan for development. The owner, Chester Creamer, plans to build Coastline RV Resort on the property. He said the footprint of the site, just east of Gulfview Campground and west of State Route 65, is about four acres, and the start date for construction will depend on a number of factors including permitting. Creamer said the high-end facility will employ at least three workers. Jack Husband, an engineer with Southeastern Consulting Engineers Inc. of Wewahitchka, represented Creamer at the meeting. He said there will be a 25-foot setback from U.S. 98 and a 5-foot buffer zone kept as green space on the other three sides. Commissioners received one letter of objection from Jimmy Meeks, who owns Sea Air RV Park, just east of the proposed site. I think it will be a great thing for Franklin County to have more transient traf c, said Commissioner Smokey Parish. This will be a place for people passing through to stay and enjoy the county. Commissioner Bevin Putnal said the existing Carrabelle Beach RV Park is bigger than this ones going to be. People are spending money all over Carrabelle. What we need to boost our economy is to nd things like this that work, he said. LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Dan Sangaree blows out the candles on his 100th birthday cake. Sangaree celebrates 100 years PRUNING AFTER STORM DRAWS SUPPORT, PROTESTERS LOIS SWOBODA | The Times At right, Robin Vroegop, left, and Debby Miller complain to Of cer Tim Davis about Progress Energys pruning. At top Martha Elliot, far right, watches as tree crews prune her 200year old patriarch oak. PROGRESS THE PRICE OF VOL. 127 ISSUE 10 See WATER A5 See PRUNING A5 See SANGAREE A5 Opinion . . . . . . A4 Society . . . . . . A6 Faith . . . . . . . A7 Outdoors . . . . . A8 Tide Chart . . . . . A8 Sports . . . . . . A9 Classi eds . . . A10-A11 Debbys rescues,

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Local A2 | The Times FREE DIABETES EDUCATION CLASSES EACH WEEK TWO LOCATIONS, TWO TIMES 10:00AM WEEMS MEDICAL CENTER EAST 110 NE 5TH ST CARRABELLE 697-2345 5:00PM WEEMS MEMORIAL HOSPITAL 135 AVENUE G APALACHICOLA 653-8853 X101 Classes taught by Erica Ceska, Registered Dietitian EVERYONE WELCOME! WHISPERING PINES, EASTPOINT 3BR/2BA well maintained home on one acre lot. Many upgrades throughout the home. Large deck and 2 storage sheds complete this ready to move in property. MLS #247364 ................. $149,900 Travis Stanley 850.653.6477 Grayson Shepard 850.653.6718 Leon Teat 850.653.5656 Sandy Mitchem 850.899.8300 B EA C H F RONT CON D O S T G EORGE I SLAN D 2BR/2BA with two balconies in Villas of St. George. Established rental history! Community pool, beach boardwalk, 2 blocks to lighthouse! MLS# 246110 ............... $319,500 ST. GEORGE ISLAN D GU L F V IEW 4BR/4BA close to center of island and kitchen. Lots of storage and lovely native landscaping. MLS# 245752 ...................... $399,000 NEW LOW PRI C E G REATER A PALA C HI C OLA Enjoy quiet country living on 3.75 acres. Lovely custom built 3BR/2.5 BA home with many upgrades Jacuzzi, deck, large walk in closet. 1600 sq.ft. outbuilding on concrete pad. MLS#244666 ................ $255,000 GU L F VIEW SGI P LANTATION Charming 5BR/3BA cypress home with Anderson doors/windows. Completely renovated in 2006 w/ granite countertops, new appliances/lighting/elevator! MLS# 240897 ............... $475,000 G U L F V IEW ST GEORGE ISLAN D Pre construction. Great opportunity to buy a gulf view home. 3BR/2BA with great room opening to the front porch, upgraded kitchen. New construction means low insurance costs! MLS#247359 ................... $289,000 Thursday, July 5, 2012 By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star .com Once again, St. George Islanders and the folks from the Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve have joined forces to rescue a nestling osprey from stormy weather. On Sunday, June 24, Rob and Kay Olin of St. George Island watched in horror as an osprey nest they have enjoyed watching all season, fell. Olin braved the storm surge bayside on the island to rescue the chick. I ran out there and it was chaos, he said, The nest was in a thousand pieces. I stood there wondering How am I going to nd it? Then I saw the chick was right in front of me. I picked it up and put it into a basket. Both parents were circling frantically overhead. I held the baby up for the mother to see, wanting to give her some hope. Olin vowed to return the chick to its parents. That Sunday afternoon, Olin and family, with the chick, evacuated to Tallahassee. Before leaving home, he was able to contact the Florida Wild Mammal Association wildlife rescue facility (FWMA) in Wakulla County. That Sunday evening around 9 p.m., Olin met Eric Lovestrand, a wildlife educator at the research reserve, in Crawfordville. Lovestrand took the chick to Chris Beatty, director of FWMA, where helpers were already overwhelmed dealing with close to two dozen baby pelicans also rescued from Tropical Storm Debby. Beatty said the osprey chick was a partially edged nestling, which quickly recovered given a little sh and some tender loving care. On Tuesday, June 26, Olin had carpenter Red Blaisdell build a platform atop the same standing dead pine that had held the original nest, but which was shorter now, having lost its top to a storm. Blaisdell shortened it further to create a at surface to better support the nest box. Olin and Blaisdell reconstructed the osprey nest as best they could. On Wednesday morning, June 27 at 7:30 a.m. Lovestrand picked the osprey chick up at FWMA, where Beatty now had more than 50 baby pelicans in-house. Also that morning, Olin, at home on the island, observed the osprey parents in the area of the nest platform. At 1 p.m., Lovestrand delivered the chick and Blaisdell immediately placed it in the new nest. Olin, Blaisdell, Lovestrand, and Matt Anderson, a coworker from the research reserve, kept vigil throughout the afternoon, watching over the chick and scanning the sky. Around 3:30 p.m., one adult osprey ew in, looked over the nest and ew away. It returned shortly and perched in a tree nearby. A second osprey landed in tree further away in the woods and they began calling back and forth. Lovestrand, an experienced birder, noticed the chick, which had been bobbing up and down before the adult bird arrived, attened itself in the nest when the big bird perched nearby. The rescuers watched the scene for a nerve-racking hour. Finally, the chick stirred. Lovestrand said, when the chick stretched its wings, the nearest adult took ight out over the bay and began hover hunting for sh. It returned around 4:30 p.m. with a sh, circled several times and then landed on the nest. In a few minutes, the other adult joined its mate on the platform. When the moment happened, it was unbelievably magical, said Olin. I had wondered about Eric and Matthew waiting around all afternoon for the parents to come back, but, when it happened, I realized this is what these guys live for. On Thursday morning, June 28, Olin awoke to a very happy scene of the osprey family reunited. The adults preened and groomed the baby and dgeted with the nest, taking turns retrieving sh for their rescued youngster. To view a gallery of photos of this rescue visit www. apalachtimes.com. While this little osprey is happy and safe, FWMA is struggling with many more animals that need help. As of last week, they had received 54 pelican chicks and three adult pelicans; a clapper rail, several other osprey chicks, a sooty tern, a snow egret, a screech owl and more, all suffering the effects of wind and torrential rain. In all, more than 70 Franklin County animals are sheltered there now and are consuming 75 pounds of sh daily. Many will be relocated to other shelters, but Beatty said volunteers and any emergency funding would be gratefully welcomed. Tax-deductible donations may be sent to Florida Wild Mammal Association, 198 Edgar Poole Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32327, or visit www.wakullawildlife.org/ and use the Paypal button to make an instant donation. By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star .com Three FWC staffers risked their lives during Tropical Storm Debby to pluck a pair of stranded campers off a storm-ravaged barrier island. On Friday, June 22, Gregory Farrell and his 14-year-old son drove from Shalimar to Indian Pass, and packed their camping gear into a 23-foot kayak for a weekend camping on Little St. George Island. On Sunday, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) office in Carrabelle received a phone call from Farrells wife, who said her husband had sent her a text message saying that the weather had become very bad. He wrote that he and their son had sufficient rations and equipment to ride out the storm. Later he contacted her again and said he planned to set off an emergency flare to try to get some help leaving the island. This prompted her to call the FWC. Capt. Craig Duval and another FWC of cer went to look for Farrells van at Indian Pass and couldnt nd it. Duval decided to take a boat and search the island for the Farrells. He said the crossing was treacherous. It was real rough between the rain and wind and sea conditions, Duval said. It was pretty bad. With Of cer John Allen and Lt. Charlie Wood, he launched a 28-foot Impact and headed for Little St. George. The of cers began their search at Sikes Cut and worked their way west until they after spotted an emergency are and located father and son about three-quarters of a mile from the west end of the island. The FWC boat was met at Scipio Creek Marina by a deputy from the Franklin County Sheriffs of ce and the Farrells were taken to the emergency operations center where they were given dry clothes and a hot meal. Duval said the FWC later found Farrells van at Indian Pass overwhelmed by salt water. Farrells wife drove over and picked up her husband and son. Farrell said he will attempt to recover his own boat and equipment. Duval praised Farrell, saying he made many good choices and was well equipped for the emergency. They had rations and an emergency broadcast unit, ares, safety equipment and a cell phone for communications, he said. Duval said that due to high water, the pair also wisely opted to stay with their tent and not try to get to the house on the island for shelter. I think they did a lot right, he said. RESCUED Osprey chick saved from Debbys fury Campers plucked from Little St. George Red Blaisdell places the rescued edgling in the nest. PHOTOS BY ERIC LOVESTRAND | Special to the Times The chick Rob Olin with the osprey chick he rescued.

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Local The Times | A3 AUTOM A TIC POWER PROTECTION 24/7 **PRICES VARY DEPENDING ON EQUIPMENT & INSTALLATION No lights, loss of communication and safety issues are just a few of the headaches associated with a power outage. When the power goes out, depend on a GENER A C standby generator to supply back-up electricity to your homes essential items, automatically. No manual starting. FOR TURN KEY INSTALLATION STARTING AT: $4500.00** Anderson Power Services 229-247-6630 http://andersonpowerservices.com Thursday, July 5, 2012 Robert Martin Tolentino, 50, of Grand Rapids, Mich., pleaded guilty in federal court in Tallahassee June 28 to defrauding SunTrust Mortgage, Inc. on a $2 million mortgage. Pamela C. Marsh, U.S. attorney for the Northern District of Florida, announced the guilty plea with the details outlined in a news release from her ofce. In Oct. 2006, Tolentino applied for renancing of his residential prop erty on St. George Island. According to the Franklin County property ap praisers website, Tolentino bought a beachfront home in the St. George Plantation at 1416 Elm Court for $2.34 million on July 17, 2006. The property currently has an as sessed value of $918,000. In his renancing application, Tolentino falsely represented that his monthly salary was $48,000 to $60,000 per month. According to his W-2 forms sub mitted to the Internal Revenue Service, his annual salary was ap proximately $183,647 and $174,250 for the 2005 and 2006 tax years, respectively. Tolentino also misrepresented the property as his primary resi dence, when in fact, he had listed the property with a vacation rental busi ness and had received more than $20,000 in rental income between July and Dec. 2006, according to the news release. The rental income was not dis closed on the application and Sun Trust Mortgage approved the loan for $2 million. Tolentinos sentencing is sched uled for Sept. 26, 2012, before U.S. District Judge Judge Robert L. Hinkle. He is facing a maximum sentence of 30 years in prison, a $1 million ne, ve years of supervised release and a $100 special monetary assessment as a result of his conviction for com mitting wire fraud affecting a nan cial institution. Marsh praised the work of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, whose investigation led to the prosecution. The case is being prosecuted by Assistant U.S. Attorney Winifred Acosta NeSmith. The following report is provided by the Franklin County Sheriffs Ofce. Arrests in this report were made by ofcers from the Apalachicola Police Department (APD), Carrabelle Police Department (CPD) and Franklin County Sheriffs Ofce (FCSO). All defendants are to be considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law. June 18 Carl B. Sanders, 48, Eastpoint, violation of probation (FCSO) Matthew P. Coyle, 31, Palm Harbor, violation of probation (FCSO) William C. Roche, Jr., 37, Jacksonville, withholding child support (FCSO) Charles W. Black, 47, Carrabelle, failure to appear (FCSO) June 19 George E. Silvis, 55, Carrabelle, violation of probation (CPD) Dewey J. Williams, Jr., 19, Carrabelle, domestic battery, burglary of a structure, and grand theft (CPD) June 21 Dewey J. Williams, Jr., 19, Carrabelle, burglary of a dwelling, dealing in stolen property, and grand theft (FCSO) Marisol Reyes, 23, Apalachicola, workmans compensation fraud (FCSO) Elvina Perez, 32, Apalachicola, workmans compensation fraud (FCSO) Aurora Leon Gordillo, 28, Apalachicola, workmans compensation fraud (FCSO) Andres Francisco Diego, 21, Apalachicola, workmans compensation fraud (FCSO) Victor Diego Gaspar, 53, Apalachicola, workmans compensation fraud (FCSO) Agustin Huertos Paez, 32, Apalachicola, workmans compensation fraud (FCSO) William H. Hoffmire, 50, Eastpoint, DUI, driving while license suspended or revoked and refusal to submit to breath test (FCSO) June 22 Charles D. Brown, 59, Apalachicola, domestic battery (APD) Douglas B. Kerley, Jr., 23, Mobile, Ala., burglary of a dwelling, grand theft and tampering with physical evidence (FCSO) June 24 Joshua R. Gordon, 36, Thomasville, Ga., domestic battery (CPD) June 25 Scotty C. Banks, 23, Eastpoint, disorderly intoxication, battery and resisting arrest without violence (FCSO) Paul H. Hunt, 23, Atlanta, Ga., burglary of a dwelling, grand theft and tampering with physical evidence (FCSO) June 26 Patricia A. Keil, 43, Eastpoint, battery (FCSO) Kamal Darwish, 35, Eastpoint, sexual battery or attempted sexual battery (FCSO) Halifax Media Group closed a deal with Free dom Communica tions June 27 to purchase eight daily and 11 week ly publications located in Florida and North Caro lina, including the Apalachicola and Carrabelle Times. The acquisition further expands Halifax Medias reach in these states, following the Jan. 6 purchase of the New York Times Regional News paper Group. With the Freedom pur chase, total circulation for the Halifax Media Group will grow to 635,000 daily and 752,000 Sunday. Other Florida newspa pers involved in the trans action include The News Herald, Panama City; Northwest Florida Daily News, Fort Walton Beach; The Destin Log, Destin; Santa Rosa Press Ga zette and Santa Rosa Free Press, Milton; Crestview News Bulletin, Crestview; Holmes County Times-Ad vertiser, Bonifay; Washing ton County News, Chipley; The Walton Sun, Santa Rosa Beach; and The Star in Port St. Joe North Carolina newspa pers include Times-News, Burlington; The Daily News, Jacksonville; The Gaston Gazette, Gastonia; The Star, Shelby; The Free Press and The Jones Post, Kin ston; The Have lock News, Have lock; The Sun Journal and The Shopper, New Bern; and The Topsail Advertis er, Surf City. What these newspapers have in common with the Halifax Media Group properties is this: They are the best and most reliable source for local news in their com munities, said Michael Redding, CEO of Halifax Media Group. We believe in the future of newspapers, both in print and online. We have to be great at both. These newspapers embody Halifax Media Groups phi losophy for providing local news that no one else can deliver. Founded in 2010, Halifax Media is headquartered in Daytona Beach. The companys invest ment group includes Ste phens Capital Partners, JAARSSS Media and Red ding Investments. The group consists of 36 newspapers and afli ated websites, published in six states, primarily in the Southeast. Halifax Medias strategy is to invest long-term capi tal in quality companies po sitioned in strong markets that are closely connected to the community. MICHAEL REDDING CEO of Halifax Media Group Arrest REPORT Plantation homeowner pleads guilty to mortgage fraud Halifax closes deal to buy Times, other papers Dr. Hobson Fulmer of Apalachicola Bay Animal Clinic Welcomes Our New Associate: Dr. John Duncan Along with Dr. Fulmer, Dr. Duncan will be seeing patients for small animal medicine and surgery. Please call for an appointment or come by to meet him. 850-670-8306 Clinic hours: Monday-Friday 8am 6 pm 187 Highway 98, Eastpoint Complete small animal medicine and surgery, wellness programs, laser surgery, diagnostic ultrasound, Serving Franklin and Gulf Counties for 30 years Theres a New Veterinarian in Town!

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Opinion A4 | The Times USPS 027-600 Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 Publisher: Rick Martin POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola Times Thursday, July 5, 2012 Special to the Times Human rights and national security expert Mark Schlakman of Tallahassee announced last week his candidacy in Floridas 2nd Congressional District, pledging to put his experience in both Democratic and Republican administrations at the state and federal level, to work in helping end the political gridlock in Congress. It is clear even to the most casual observer that partisan politics in Congress has paralyzed our country, and failure to nd common ground has been devastating to many families, and does a disservice to those who put their lives on the line for us every day, Schlakman said. Schlakman said his priorities include the economy and job growth, scal responsibility, national security and improving the administration of justice, rising sea levels and the implications to Floridas coastal areas, comprehensive immigration reform as an economic development imperative, as well as simplifying the tax code, foreign policy, international trade and smart development. Former Florida Comptroller Robert Milligan, a highly respected Republican leader, crossed party lines to endorse Schlakman, a Democrat, as a principled, bipartisan advocate who has the skills and ability to serve as a catalyst for change in a bitterly divided Congress. I am supporting Mark Schlakman because I trust him, Milligan said. Mark is a man of character. He is intelligent. He is genuinely concerned about people. At a time when the people of this nation are fed up with partisan politics, decit spending, and a do nothing Congress, we need someone like Mark who is a problem solver who seeks solutions by building consensus. Milligan, a retired three-star Marine Corps general who was elected to two terms as the states comptroller, later served as acting executive director of the Florida Department of Veterans Affairs upon the death of retired Navy Rear Adm. LeRoy Collins, Jr. By electing me to Congress, North Floridians can play an important role in restoring civility and decency in our national government and ensuring all Americans of the bipartisan, committed leadership they deserve in getting our nation back on track, said Schlakman, in thanking Milligan for his support. He said the bickering and inghting between Republicans and Democrats in Congress is hampering efforts to create jobs, increase opportunity and restore prosperity in an economically troubled nation. Vilifying the other party doesnt help to pay the bills or put food on the table nor will political posturing keep the lights on, Schlakman said. Despair is often very quiet but make no mistake; there are good people who want to work and families who want to believe theres a future brighter than what they can see today. At rst blush, given the nature of the political process today, because I am not an elected ofcial, career politician or party operative I am a decided underdog in this race. However, over the course of the next several weeks we will demonstrate to the people of this district why that fact coupled with my background and long history of public service position me to win the general election in November and, more importantly, to govern effectively from day one upon taking the oath of ofce, he said. Schlakman serves as senior program director at The Florida State University Center for the Advancement of Human Rights. He previously held senior positions of trust and condence in Tallahassee and Washington, with Gov. Lawton Chiles, Gov. Buddy MacKay, Gov. Jeb Bush, and under Presidents Bill Clinton and George W. Bush. He also served as a special adviser to a number of senior military leaders in Washington and Florida. During his tenure as special counsel to Gov. Chiles he developed, among other things, a nonviolent criminal alien deportation initiative that allowed the state to avoid an estimated $100 million in costs of incarceration, served as staff lead for mass migration contingencies and negotiated an $18 million payment from the U.S. Department of Justices Immigration Emergency Fund, which was the largest single disbursement received by any state at that time, and developed the governors Florida/Haiti Initiative, which served as a model for Gov. Jeb Bushs Florida/Haiti Initiative years later. A lawyer, he is a magna cum laude and Phi Beta Kappa graduate of the University of Miami and earned his law degree at Georgetown University Law Center, where he served as Student Bar Association president and received the Deans Certicate at graduation. He subsequently completed the Kennedy Schools Program for Senior Executives in State and Local Government at Harvard University. By SUE CRONKIE Special to the Times Alexander Key is known locally for his novels which romanticize Floridas Gulf Coast and Apalachicola Bay. His wife Margaret, also a writer, is revered for the gift of her home and antiques to the Apalachicola Municipal Library. Robert Key, Alexs younger brother, worked for the Apalachicola Times in the 1930s. In a notebook of Roberts found in Margarets les, are collected clippings of articles Bob wrote and sent to larger newspapers around Florida and the United States. Bob called himself the Franklin County Publicity Agent and sent articles to the Panama City Herald, Tallahassee Daily Democrat, Pensacola Journal, Florida Times-Union, St. Petersburg Evening Independent, New York Times, Chicago Daily News and papers in the far West. Each week 30 dispatches, containing stories describing Franklin County, were sent to newspapers in towns of 10,000 or more, rotating through a list of 100 cities, writes Bob in his cover sheet. At least one story in every dispatch was slanted for national news interest. The Keys moved to Apalachicola in 1936, and letters from Alex and Bobs Aunt Sallie in Quincy indicate that Bob lived with Margaret and Alex during the latter part of the 1930s. Most of the clippings bear no date, but a report of funeral services for Dorothea A. Hoppe tells her age and when she was born, which sets the year as 1938. Another funeral notice for R. G. Porter is dated 1939. Franklin D. Roosevelt is credited with expending funds from the Public Works Administration (PWA) to build a new courthouse, and $161,000 from Works Projects Administration (WPA) for county road improvements. Joe P. Anthony says in a dispatch that 10 Apalachicola seafood dealers would sponsor a radio program over WSUN, St. Petersburg, to advertise Apalachicola oysters. C. L. Richardson, State Board of Health inspector said 80 percent of all oysters produced in Florida came from Apalachicola. Another dispatch has Joe Taranto talking about caviar being everyday food for Apalachicola shermen. He said in addition to the high dollar for sturgeon meat, cured roe, or caviar, brought from $1 to $1.50 a pound. To cure the roe it was run through a sieve and allowed to dry, much like cottage cheese, for about eight days. Roberts dispatches werent all promotions and announcements of public funds. One clipping tells of a man arrested for counterfeiting after a gambling machine and bogus half-dollars were found in the home. Postmaster Hal Hoffmans red-wheeled roadster was stolen from in front of the post ofce and taken for a joy ride all the way to Marianna. A bottle of whiskey and two hitchhikers were found in the car. It wouldnt do but 90, J. Sumner said of the car, as the sheriff locked the handcuffs on him. Sue Cronkite works with librarian Caty Greene at the Apalachicola Municipal Library. To reach her, call 653-8436. Heavy rainfall from Tropical Storm Debby may have made your water unsafe. If you are unsure about the impact of ooding on your well water, either use bottled water, or boil or disinfect all the water you use for drinking, making beverages, cooking, brushing your teeth, washing dishes, and washing areas of the skin that have been cut or injured. Common unscented household bleach (4 to 6 percent) can be used effectively as a chlorine disinfectant. Add 8 drops (about 1/8 teaspoon) of unscented household bleach per gallon of water, then let stand for 30 minutes, repeating the procedure if the water is still cloudy. Or you can disinfect your water by bringing it to a rolling boil for one minute. If your well has been ooded, please call the Franklin County Health Departments Environmental Health Division, at 653-2111 Ext.118, for information about how to sample your water and where to bring the sample for bacteriological testing. If the test reveals bacteria, the well and water system need to be disinfected. It is important to disinfect both well and plumbing water with unscented household bleach to ensure that all infectious agents are destroyed. If you have water treatment devices, remove all membranes, cartridges, and lters and replace them after the chlorination process is completed. The amount of chlorine determines the length of time you allow the bleach to remain in your system. The Franklin County Health Department recommends the following steps to disinfect a contaminated well: If the water is discolored, before adding the bleach, run the water until it is clear for up to 10 minutes. Turn off and then drain your hot water heater; bleach is not effective in water above 105 degrees. Remove and replace charcoal lters after the disinfecting process is completed. To avoid adding contamination to the well during disinfection, clean the work area around the top of the well. Then remove grease and mineral deposits from accessible parts of the well head and ush the outside surfaces with 1/2 cup of unscented household bleach in 5 gallons of water. Turn off the pump. Remove the cap or the well plug on the rubber seal. There are many types of well caps and plugs. If you have questions, you should contact a licensed well driller. If you have a submersible pump, you may also want to contact a licensed well driller for advice on disinfection procedures. Pour the recommended amount of unscented bleach (4 to 6 percent) solution into the well. Try to coat the sides of the casing as you pour. If you get bleach on the pump or wiring, ush it thoroughly with fresh water to prevent later corrosion. Re-cap or plug the well opening and wait 30 minutes. Turn on and, if needed, re-prime the pump. Open all the faucets on the system one at a time. Allow the water to run until there is a noticeable smell of bleach. You may also want to ush the toilets. If you have outside faucets, you may want to direct the water away from sensitive plants. If you cannot detect a bleach odor, repeat the disinfecting process. Turn off all the faucets, and allow the bleach to remain in the system for at least eight hours. Backwash water softeners, sand lters, and iron removal lters with bleach water. Again, open all the faucets and run the water until there is no bleach smellfor up to 15 minutes. In last weeks June 28 Times, an article appeared on page A3 headlined Six charged with workers comp fraud. Each of the six Central American immigrants was charged by the Florida Department of Financial Services Division of Insurance Fraud with a single third-degree felony, as cited in Florida Statutes 440.105(4)(b)(9). That law makes it a crime for anyone to knowingly present or cause to be presented any false, fraudulent, or misleading oral or written statement to any person as evidence of identity for the purpose of obtaining employment or ling or supporting a claim for workers compensation benets. Because it is not clear from the available law enforcement documentation whether the six are alleged to have provided false documentation for the purpose of obtaining employment, or for the purpose of supporting a claim for workers compensation benets, it cannot be assumed that the charges stemmed from any of these individuals specically committing workers comp fraud. The Times regrets any misunderstanding from last weeks story. CORRECTION Schlakman to run for Congress MARK SCHLAKMAN Keys little brother promoted Apalach @ THE LIBRARY Caty Greene What to do if your well is ooded ROBERT KEY

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Local The Times | A5 Robert C. Bruner Attorney Personal & Business Bankruptcy Over 30 Years Legal Experience 850-670-3030 bankruptcy relief under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon advertisements. Before you decide, ask us to send you free written information H. Jeff Vonier for Sheriff Franklin County For a better and safer place for your children to grow up in. Pd. Pol. Ad. Paid for and approved by H. Jeff Vonier, Sheriff for Franklin County. Qualications: Expertise in: New Patients Welcome Call Toll Free 888-681-5864 For more info www.seclung.com LUNG AND SLEEP DISORDERS DR. ROB GARVER expert on orchid cultivation. He has maintained an avid interest on the history of his family and that of Apalachicola, especially the waterfront. And even today, he spends time at Ten Foot Hole, talking to his cronies at the DP Pavilion. To recount his life, Apalachicola Bay Chamber of Commerce Director Anita Grove read the citys proclamation, as follows: Whereas, Mr. Dan Sangaree, a prominent resident of Apalachicola, has been an inspirational attribute of the city of Apalachicola for his lifelong achievements and service to this grateful nation, and Whereas, he was born on June 20, 1912, he is today, this 20th day of June 2012, celebrating his 100th birthday of life on earth, and Whereas, in 2010 Mr. Sangaree was honored as the oldest veteran in Franklin County at our local veterans celebration held annually here in Apalachicola, serving in the Florida National Guard during World War II from 1939 until 1946, and was in active duty overseas from 1943 until 1945 stationed in Morotai off the northern coast of New Guinea, and Whereas, he has successfully embarked on several careers throughout his lifetime, Mr. Sangaree is most noted for his diligence in overseeing the birth of one of the rst modern movie theatres in Florida, The DeSoto, located in Arcadia, touted as one of the nest small theatres and considered a modern marvel in 1951, and Whereas, I, Van W. Johnson, Sr., Mayor, along with the distinguished Apalachicola Board of City Commissioners and staff, would like to take this opportunity to join with family and friends of this great community in honoring Mr. Dan Sangaree on this momentous occasion of his 100th birthday celebration on June 20, 2012. Therefore be it proclaimed, that I, Van W. Johnson, Sr., Mayor of the City of Apalachicola, on behalf of a grateful community, do hereby acknowledge, recognize and proclaim Wednesday, June 20, 2012, as a day of recognition in honor of Dan Sangaree in the City of Apalachicola and encourage all its citizens to show their gratitude for his service and the contributions he has made to the city of Apalachicola, the state of Florida and this great nation. By Lois Swoboda through the Florida panhandle and empties into the Gulf of Mexico. The Supreme Courts decision means an appeals court ruling favorable to metro Atlanta will stand. Authorities in Florida, Alabama and even southern Georgia complain that Atlanta takes too much water from Lake Lanier, a federal reservoir, leaving too little downstream for drinking water systems, wildlife and industry, including nourishing the oyster beds of Apalachicola Bay. Georgia Gov. Nathan Deal said he welcomed both the Supreme Court decision and the Corps report as federal of cials prepare to decide how much water Atlanta can get. We can now move forward with this issue behind us, have the governors work together and come to a long-term agreement that will provide for the water needs of all three states, Deal said in a written statement. That (Corps) decision will help us not only plan for Georgias future growth, but it will also give us greater certainty regarding existing resources. If its fully granted, Atlanta-area water of cials expect their old request for water might serve the region longer than the originally projected 2030 because conservation steps and a bad economy have reduced water use. Although the latest court rulings have been favorable to metro Atlanta, they do not mean the legal dispute is over. Alabama Gov. Robert Bentley said the Corps still must make additional reviews before deciding to release more water to Atlanta. As part of that process, Army of cials must consider downstream views. Alabama will be a full participant in that review in order to ensure that vital downstream interests are protected, Bentley spokesman Jeremy King said. We will make sure that the concerns of downstream communities are heard as this process continues. Authorities in Alabama and Florida have argued that Congress permitted the construction of the dam at Lake Lanier to control oods, produce electricity and make river navigation easier but not to supply drinking water. The city of Atlanta never contributed to the cost of building the dam, which was completed around 1960, because city of cials did not believe water would be in short supply. Georgia of cials maintain Congress envisioned the Corps would operate the dam so Atlanta still could get enough drinking water downstream from it. It currently supplies water to roughly 3 million people around Atlanta, more than half the metro areas population. In 2009, U.S. District Court Judge Paul Magnuson found that metro Atlanta had little right to water from Lake Lanier and threatened to reduce water withdrawals to levels last seen in the 1970s, when the metro region was far smaller. Those restrictions were supposed to take effect this year unless leaders from the three states worked out an agreement. But the 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals tossed aside that decision last year, deciding it was legal for metro Atlanta to use Lake Lanier as a water supply. The appeals court gave Army of cials one year to re-evaluate Georgias request for more water. pruning project. The treetrimming lasted from early afternoon June 26 until about 8 p.m. June 28. Tim Leljedal, a Progress Energy spokesman, said the work was, the result of the issues we ran into of tree limbs causing multiple outages in the same area during (the storm). We had had tree crews working in different portions of the state beginning Sunday, after we started experiencing power outages. In order to minimize the likelihood of additional outages in the same areas, they trimmed the trees along the lines of the standards applied throughout our system based on amount of clearance needed, he said. City Commissioner Frank Cook said pruning in the alleys had been authorized and was necessary in the emergency situation. Under Section V of the city tree ordinance, trees may be pruned or removed, following an emergency or an act of nature, when the city commission determines that permitting requirements will hamper private or public work. City Administrator Betty Taylor Webb said to her knowledge, there was no meeting to discuss the pruning. The workers began by pruning trees in alleys, which drew little protest, but on Thursday afternoon, the trucks converged on Avenue C in the historic district and set to work on trees lining that street. Burford had to be careful to avoid a potential violation of federal law when they pruned within 600 feet of an eagles nest at the corner of 11th Street. Some homeowners were in favor of the pruning. Colly and Lois Watkins applauded the workers. This should have been done 20 years ago, Lois Watkins said. She displayed a large chunk of pinkish glass resembling branching coral and said it had been formed several years ago when a tree limb separated a wire from a transformer on the right-of-way adjacent to their property. The wire, she said, stuck into the ground, showering sparks and melting a portion of the sandy soil. It took them 45 minutes to turn it off, Colly Watkins said. Every time theres a storm, this block, from (U.S.) 98 to the bay, is the rst to lose power because of the trees, and the last to have it turned back on Lois Watkins said. We cant do without power. Colly and I both have heart conditions. I have a 500-watt generator, Colly Watkins said, but to use it I have to drag it out and start it up. Farther down the street, some residents were not as happy about the tree crews. Dot Hill said the trees were badly pruned. They might as well cut them down as do that to them, she said. A small group of protestors followed the operation, shouting at the workers, photographing and videotaping them. When police interceded, angry words were exchanged. Whose side are you on? demanded one woman. The protestors were warned to stay away from the tree crews and eventually from the police of cers as well. One tree pruned was a huge patriarch oak in Martha Elliots front yard. I paid $800 of my own money to have that tree pruned myself by Gary Barco, a certi ed arborist from Tallahassee, she said. He removed any limbs within a 6-foot radius of the power lines in March 2011. I had that tree registered with the Live Oak Society when I bought the house. They determined the tree to be from 250 to 300 years old at that time, based on the girth of 21 feet. Now theyre pruning it, and nobody asked my permission. I guess because Im not a full-time resident, my opinions dont count, Elliot said. If there are only 16 of the patriarch trees in town, youd think they could be managed properly. She said she checked the tree earlier in the day, when the power was still out, and there were no branches in contact with the lines. It is beyond me how any human being could look at a tree of that age and with that majesty and not just put the saw down, Elliot said. It cant be put back. Wilbur Bellew, a city staffer charged with overseeing the pruning of patriarch trees, arrived on the scene as the Burford trucks began to depart, and later, Cook came as well. In a telephone interview Monday, Bellew said because the pruning was in response to an emergency situation, his presence was not required when the patriarch oak was pruned. SANGAREE from page A1 WATER from page A1 PRUNING from page A1 This should have been done 20 years ago. Lois Watkins, Apalachicola resident LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Lois and Colly Watkins display glass created by a fallen electric wire. Thursday, July 5, 2012

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A6 | The Times PRETTY LITTLE PENELOPE! Penelope is an 8 month old Chiwienie. She is social, affectionate and happy. Penelope gets along well with both children and other dogs so she would make an ideal addition to your family. Come and meet this sweetheart at the adoption center and see if shes the dog for you! Volunteers are desperately needed to socialize all of our dogs and cats. We are always looking for people willing to bring one of our animals into their home to be fostered for various needs. Anytime you can spare would be greatly appreciated. Call Karen at 670-8417 for more details or visit the Franklin County Humane Society at 244 State Road 65 in Eastpoint. You may logon to the website at www.forgottenpets.org to see more of our adoptable pets. PET OF THE WEEK Franklin County Humane Society Call Karen at 670-8417 for more details or visit the Franklin County Humane Society at 244 State Road 65 in Eastpoint. You may logon to the website at www.forgottenpets.org to see more of our adoptable pets. WE CAN HELP! GOT MOSQUITOES? CALL L OIS AT 653-5857 Franklin Countys ONLY LOC AL Pest Control Company CARPET CERAMIC TILE HARDWOOD AREA RUGS WINDOW SHADES & BLINDS PITTSBURGH PAINTS WE BIND CARPETS We offer L P ort S aint Joe area D esign professionals on premise C P rofessional I nstallation 2760 H W est P ort S aint Joe L OCA LL Y O WNED aint Joe L OCA LL Y O WNED H W est W est W P ort P ort P S aint Joe $ 50 Off purchase of $ 750.00 or more T ile starting at C arpet starting at dbutler@coastalcoverage.com Locally owned and operated Home Business Auto Health Workers Comp Thursday, July 5, 2012 Special to the Times The demand for nurses keeps calling, and Gulf Coast State College keeps answering. On June 7, the largest class of graduates from the 12-year-old practical nursing program at the Gulf/ Franklin Campus paused for their pinning ceremony all on their way to new jobs. All of them are going to work, in either Bay or Gulf County, said nurse Sharon Milner, assistant coordinator of the practical nursing and patient care assistant programs. She is also a proud teacher and cheerleader of these young nurses. Usually we have classes of 24 to 27 or so to graduate, so to have 31 is amazing, and eight of them have perfect attendance. Thats especially impressive. The eight graduates with perfect attendance were Lenka K. Doran, Regina M. Henderson, Terrah M. Huckeba, Javika K. King, Kim M. Nobles, Krystal M. Ramos, Abricka S. Smith and Amber A. Tharp. The other 2012 graduates were Rebecca L. Barnes, Heather D. Billingsley, Sophia J. Conerly, Victoria L. Dunn, Jessie D. Faircloth, Stephanie K. Gragg, Brandy N. Hicks-Lewis, James M. Hodges, Hellena L. Johnson, Karie M. Jones, Ariel N. Kemp, Theresa A. Kunkel, Anna M. Martinez, Clarissa Joy McAlpin, Vanessa R. Rhodes, Shelby D. Richards, Amanda C. Rotan, Courtney L. Shiver, Angelita T. Stephens, Morgan L. Swiech, Bernice M. Westfall, Ashley D. Zingarelli and Jordyn L. Zingarelli. Milner noted the strenuous class work the year-long program requires, plus the clinical time students split between Panama City and Port St. Joe. These students often arent traditional, she said. They may be older, with families, children and other commitments, plus they have the driving distance to the hospitals. But the rigorous schedule pays off. These newest graduates will sit for their national exams in mid-July from the Board of Nursing, and the job outlook remains strong, close to home or away. These 31 new nurses are giving back to the community in valuable work, bringing a better quality of life to themselves, their families and their patients. Milner started this practical nursing program when she arrived 13 years ago, and the years havent shaved a note off the pride in her voice. We had to write this program and present all the information to the Board of Nursing, she recalled of their efforts in the beginning. Through a selective admissions process, in June of every year, GCSC enrolls up to 36 students. A short 12 months later, the graduates are prepared to begin a whole new career and a promising future. Special to The Times At the annual summer conference of the Florida Court Clerks & Comptrollers June 12 in Panama City Beach, Pinellas County Clerk of Courts Ken Burke, president of the association, above right, presented Franklin County Clerk of Court Marcia Johnson with the Presidents Outstanding Service Award, a unique award presented by the president when there has been a Clerk of the Circuit Court who has undertaken a special issue and showed leadership skills among his or her peers. It is not every year that a clerk is chosen for this award. Johnson was tapped to receive the award for her three years of service spearheading the associations Best Practices committee, formed to identify and develop best business practices to enhance the services provided by the clerk to the public. Marcia Johnson has led our statewide committee on best practices for the past three years, Burke said. During that time, she has shown extraordinary leadership and dedication to working through so many of the clerks processes and helping her committee get them down on paper. It is a task that has helped us all provide training and common practices throughout our offices. We are proud to have her serving in a leadership role with the association. Johnson, an active member of the statewide association since she was first elected in 2004, will be re-elected to a third term this year after facing no opponent. Maranda Coatneys birthday Sunday Well, its nally time to get er done, On July 8, when Marandas the Birthday One; There will be cake, and presents and loads of fun, When she turns.. twenty-one! Love, From Mama, Jimmy, Colton, Erica and Aunt Jody Jayce James Carden born Jayce James Carden was born Tuesday, May 8, 2012, to Cilia Golden and James Carden of Eastpoint. He entered the world at Tallahassee Memorial HealthCares Womens Pavilion at 6:17 p.m., weighing 8 pounds, 2 ounces and measuring 20 inches long. Maternal grandparents are James and Jennifer Golden. Maternal great-grandfather is Dennis Causey of Camden, Ala., and maternal great-great-grandmother is Celia Segree of Carrabelle. Paternal grandparents are Linda and the late Ronald Carden. Paternal great-grandmother is Barbara Redwine of Statesboro, Ga. Jayce was welcomed into this world by his extended network of family and friends. Births and BIRTHDAYS Keisha Smith, Justin Messer to wed July 14 Kathy and Don Griswold of Carrabelle request the honor of your presence at the marriage of their daughter, Keisha Kay, to Justin Eric Messer. The wedding will be celebrated Saturday, July 14, at 4 p.m. at the Carrabelle United Methodist Church, 102 N.E. Ave. B. The bride is the granddaughter of Cecil and the late Kay Millender, and the late Marjorie and Butch Jones. The groom is the son of Jerry and Linda Messer of Carrabelle. He is the grandson of Mayor Curley and the late Audrey Messer, and Walt and Dot Worthington, all of Carrabelle. The bride-to-be, a 1999 graduate of Carrabelle High School, is employed as Carrabelles city clerk. The future groom, a 1990 graduate of Carrabelle High School, works for the city of Carrabelles water and sewer department. A reception will follow at the Carrabelle Boat Club. 1570 U.S. 98 W. All family and friends are cordially invited to share in this joyous occasion. Wedding Gulf Coast nursing grads get 100 percent placement Society Johnson wins Outstanding Service Award

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The Times | A7 The United Methodist Churches of Franklin County Welcome You First United Methodist Church of Apalachicola Worship Service 11:00 a.m. every Sunday Sunday School 10:00 a.m. 75 5 th St. Apalachicola 653-9530 fumcapalach@gtcom.net Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis Carrabelle United Methodist Church Worship Services 10:45 a.m. Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Celebrate Recovery Mondays 7-9 p.m. 102 NE Ave. B Carrabelle 697-3672 Pastor: Julie Stephens Eastpoint United Methodist Church Worship Service 10:00 a.m. every Sunday Healing service every fourth Monday at 7:00 p.m. 317 Patton Dr. (corner of David St.) 670-8825 Pastor: Rev. Beth White St. George Island United Methodist Church 9:00 a.m. Worship Service 10:00 a.m. Fellowship Hour 201 E. Gulf Beach Dr. 9274635 www.sgiumc.org Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis Nursery now provided for Sunday Church Service First Pentecostal Holiness Church 379 Brownsville Road Apalachicola Were excited about what Gods doing!!! Sunday School 9:45 am Sunday Morning Worship 10:45 am Sunday Evening Service 6:00 pm Monday, Youth Group 6:30 pm Wednesday, Royal Rangers, G.A.P. 7:00 pm Wednesday Worship & Word 7:30 pm Nursery Provided during regular church services 7:00 7:00 First Baptist Church St. George Island 501 E. Bayshore Drive 927-2257 R. Michael Waley, Pastor Join us as we praise and worship the living Christ. Great is the Lord and most worthy of praise. Psalm 145:3 Sunday Bible Study ................................................ 10:00am Worship Praise ........................................................ 11:00am Sunday Night ............................................................ 7:00pm Wednesday Power Hour ...................................... 7:00pm Wednesday Youth at S.P.L.A.S.H ....................... 7:00pm Walking in Christ R. Michael Whaley, Pastor WELCOMES YOU Church of the Ascension 101 NE First Street Carrabelle SUNDAY 10:00 AM WELCOMES YOU Church THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH (850) 274-4490 (850) 545-2578 WELCOMES YOU Trinity Trinity Episcopal Church est. 1836 Welcomes You Hwy. 98 & 6th St. Apalachicola 850-653-9550 Sunday Worship Services 8 & 10:30 a.m. Wednesdays Healing Service 11 a.m. Centering Prayer 4 p.m. Sunday Worship Services 8 & 10:30 a.m. Wednesdays Healing Service 11 a.m. Centering Prayer 4 p.m. Thursday, July 5, 2012 Apalachicola resident Richard S. Dosik, age 80, died on Wednesday, June 20, as a result of complications from Parkinsons and heart disease. Born in Brooklyn, N.Y., Mr. Dosik was the salutatorian in his graduating class from Dartmouth and subsequently did graduate work in economics at the London School of Economics and at Harvard. During this period, he interned for the Marshall Plan. He worked initially at the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, which involved a posting to Mexico, and later for the Agency for International Development in Turkey and Peru. But Mr. Dosik spent the bulk of his career with the World Bank, which he joined in 1966, focusing on Latin America and later on renewable energy. Even after formally retiring in 1987, he continued to work occasionally as a consultant for the Bank during the next decade. In 2002, Mr. Dosik and his second wife June, whom he married in 1981, moved to Apalachicola, where he was living at the time of his death. His rst wife Diana died in 1977. Throughout his life, he was a car enthusiast and loved opera, woodworking and travel. In addition to his wife, he is survived by his two children, Jonathan Dosik of Boulder, Colo., and Lauren Lehane of Arlington, Va. Other survivors include his sonin-law, four stepchildren and seven grandchildren. In lieu of owers, the family requests that donations be made to Patrons of the Apalachicola Library Society Dick Dosik Fund, Apalachicola Municipal Library, 74 Sixth St., Apalachicola, FL 32320. Richard S. Dosik RICHARD S. DOSIK Ms. Harriet Nonie Schoelles, 73, of Apalachicola, passed away on Friday, June 29, 2012, in Port St. Joe. A native of Washington, D.C., she lived several years in Tallahassee during the 1960s before moving to Apalachicola more than 40 years ago. She worked as an accountant and was a member of the First United Methodist Church of Apalachicola, where she sang in the choir and served as church bookkeeper. She was preceded in death by her husband, Roland M. Schoelles, Sr. Survivors include her son, Dennis Crosby and wife, Deedee, and her stepson, Roland Schoelles, Jr., all of Apalachicola; her grandchildren, Casey Crosby, Emily Crosby and Kevin Schoelles; her sister Mary Dorsey and husband, John, of Orlando; her brother, Luis Eason and wife, Pat, of Amelia Island; and her half-sister, Mickey Demarest of Chicago, Ill. The funeral service was held Tuesday morning, July 3, at the United Methodist Church of Apalachicola, conducted by the Rev. Themistocles Patriotis, with interment following in the family plot in Magnolia Cemetery. She lay in state at the church for an hour prior to the services. All services are under the direction of the Comforter Funeral Home, Port St. Joe. Harriet Schoelles Emergency aid comes in Debbys wake A June 29 report by Franklins Promise Coalition, which serves as emergency support function (ESF-15) for volunteers and donations, indicates 55 clients called the county hotline requesting support related to Tropical Storm Debby. Joe Taylor, director of Franklins Promise, said food needs have been met by the three local food pantries, after Americas Second Harvest sent a load of supplemental food and water June 28. The Eastpoint Baptist Church distributed on Saturday, June 30, the Apalachicola Food Pantry on Tuesday, July 3, and the Carrabelle Food Pantry today. Taylor said Living Waters Church of God is taking the lead on a project to help two clients in need of repairs and tree removal. Clients reported $24,150 in damages and $22,580 in lost wages, he said. He said $1,379 of critical immediate needs have been met by St. Patricks Catholic Church/Catholic Charities, but unmet needs are $10,004 and could go higher if the bay is closed again after reopening July 2. Please send all requests for support to the EOC hotline at 653-4206. Carrabelle seniors host Saturday dance A dance will be this Saturday evening, July 7, at the Carrabelle Senior Center, 201 N.W. Ave. F, on the corner of First Street and Northwest Avenue F in downtown Carrabelle. The dance starts at 7 p.m., and admission is free. Music will be provided by local disc jockey Ron Vice, serving up a lively mix of Big Band dance tunes and mellow pop hits. For more information on the dance and other activities at the center, visit www. CarrabelleSeniorCenter. com. Apalachicola history buffs to meet July 14 The annual meeting of Apalachicola Area Historical Society Inc. will be held at noon July 14 at the Carriage House of the Raney House Museum. At this meeting, of cers for the upcoming 2012-13 year will be elected, as well as two directors. The meal will be catered by A.J.s, and everyone attending is asked to bring a dessert. It is time once again to renew membership dues. The dues are $10. Please make your check payable to AAHS Inc. Senior forum planned for July 19 A senior citizens forum is scheduled for 1:30-3:30 p.m. July 19 at the Carrabelle Senior Center to discuss Franklin County senior issues. Participants are encouraged to arrive at noon and have lunch at the Senior Center. For more info, call Bill Mahan at 247-9359. Everyone enjoyed the picnic at the Lanark Boat Club on the Fourth of July. Lots of friends and neighbors, and food, food, food. Thanks to all who helped and came and had a good time! Members of the Lanark Village Golf Club will prepare and serve your breakfast this Saturday, July 7. There will be pancakes, French toast, bacon, eggs and orange juice. Your donation of $5 will be collected at the door. Come and enjoy the morning, and support the golf club. Doors open at Chillas Hall at 8:30 a.m. See ya there! Mark your calendars for Saturday, July 14. Jeff Vonier will treat us to doughnuts and coffee from 8:30 to 11 a.m. at Chillas Hall. Jeff is a candidate for sheriff of Franklin County. Come on down and meet Jeff, and enjoy the doughnuts and coffee. Hats off to Katlyn Wilson! She passed her exams and is now a Florida certi ed registered nurse. She is the daughter of Steve and Ann Wilson. I had lunch last Sunday, July 1, at the St. James Health and Rehab Center. I visited with our friend Diane Hubanks and several others while I was there. Diane is slowly gaining on a long process. Keep her and the other patients in your prayers. Be kind to one another, and check in on the sick and homebound. Got Jesus? Until next time, God Bless America, our troops, the poor, homeless and hungry and Sgt. Joe Taranto, who left for Afghanistan last week. The Library Summer Programs Own the Night for teens and Dream Big Read started off with fun activities that captivated the participants. The youngsters in Carrabelle were fascinated with the barred owl that was introduced from the live exhibition from the Tallahassee Museum. The teens from both branches thoroughly enjoyed the dream interpretation workshop with Ms. Kay Wheeler as facilitator. The Singing Bowl was shown as she explained all elements of the conscious and unconscious mind. Today we had a few visitors that told us about our dreams, Rory Countryman said. They told us that we have a conscious and an unconscious. Your conscious mind has all the information that you need right at this time. And your unconscious has all your memories. You may know this, but most of your dreams you dont remember. But some of them you do remember. I like to dream any dream I can. Good dreams and bad dreams tell you something. All dreams need to be written down because you can use them to write a book or make a movie. Dreams are one of the most amazing functions of the body. Next week we will offer tips to the teens on how to stay safe and protect yourself, and each teen will receive a safety ashlight and whistle. The children can look forward to stories like Theres a Nightmare in My Closet by Mercer Mayer and make their own eece ghost pillows. There are still openings for these programs, but parents will need to call for more information and details about library programs. Please call the Eastpoint branch 670-8151 or the Carrabelle branch at 697-2366. Obituaries Faith Share your condolences at apalachtimes.com Golf club to host breakfast Saturday LANARK NEWS Jim Welsh Faith BRIEFS SPECIAL TO THE TIMES Enjoying the Singing Bowl presentation by Kay Wheeler, center, are Jaylynn Lyston, left, and Ursula Countryman. Below, former Apalachicola resident Gibby Conrad shows a barred owl at the Carrabelle library. Your County LIBRARY Own the Night reaches area teens

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Email outdoors news to timesoutdoors @star .com O UTDOORS www.apalachtimes.com Section Section A Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL (next to Piggly Wiggly) www.BWOsh.com (next to Piggly Wiggly) www.BWOsh.com Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL (next to Piggly Wiggly) www.BWOsh.com Corner of Marina Drive, www.BWOsh.com Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL www.BWOsh.com Port St. Joe, FL Your Hunting Headquarters Your Hunting Headquarters Your Hunting Headquarters Independece Day Gun Sale Over 200 guns on sale at discount prices. New shotguns, ries, and pistols all priced to move. Call for a quote! 1(877)216-9600 JULY FEATURE FISH: Stop in and register or go online at www. B W O sh.com JULY FEATURE FISH: G A G G ROUPER WEEKLY ALMANAC APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE TIDE TABLES MONTHLY AVERAGES To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from these given for APALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW Cat Point Minus 0:40 Minus 1:17 East Pass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27 To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from those given for CARRABELLE: HIGH LOW Bald Point Minus 9:16 Minus 0:03 Sponsor the WEEKLY ALMANAC Call Today! 653-8868 Date High Low % Precip Thu, July 5 86 75 30 % Fri, July 6 85 75 30 % Sat, July 7 85 75 30 % Sun, July 8 85 76 30 % Mon, July 9 86 76 0 % Tues, July 10 88 76 30 % Wed, July 11 87 76 30 % 4 We 701am 1.5 348pm 1.8 1043am 1.3 5 Th 724am 1.5 443pm 1.8 1216am -0.3 1135am 1.2 6 Fr 744am 1.4 538pm 1.7 1251am -0.1 1228pm 1.0 7 Sa 802am 1.5 635pm 1.5 123am 0.0 124pm 0.9 8 Su 821am 1.5 737pm 1.4 150am 0.2 225pm 0.8 9 Mo 842am 1.5 849pm 1.2 215am 0.4 331pm 0.6 10 Tu 907am 1.6 1021pm 1.1 238am 0.6 443pm 0.5 11 We 935am 1.7 301am 0.8 555pm 0.4 12 Th 1225am 1.1 1009am 1.7 325am 1.0 702pm 0.2 13 Fr 1050am 1.7 800pm 0.1 14 Sa 1136am 1.7 852pm 0.0 15 Su 453am 1.4 1228pm 1.7 719am 1.3 937pm -0.1 16 Mo 519am 1.4 121pm 1.7 829am 1.3 1017pm -0.1 17 Tu 545am 1.5 213pm 1.8 923am 1.3 1051pm -0.1 18 We 607am 1.5 302pm 1.8 1008am 1.3 1122pm -0.1 19 Th 627am 1.5 349pm 1.8 1048am 1.2 1149pm -0.1 4 We 536am 2.4 223pm 2.9 830am 2.1 1003pm -0.5 5 Th 559am 2.4 318pm 2.9 922am 1.9 1038pm -0.2 6 Fr 619am 2.2 413pm 2.7 1015am 1.6 1110pm 0.0 7 Sa 637am 2.4 510pm 2.4 1111am 1.4 1137pm 0.3 8 Su 656am 2.4 612pm 2.2 1212pm 1.3 9 Mo 717am 2.4 724pm 1.9 1202am 0.6 118pm 1.0 10 Tu 742am 2.6 856pm 1.8 1225am 1.0 230pm 0.8 11 We 810am 2.7 1100pm 1.8 1248am 1.3 342pm 0.6 12 Th 844am 2.7 112am 1.6 449pm 0.3 13 Fr 925am 2.7 547pm 0.2 14 Sa 1011am 2.7 639pm 0.0 15 Su 328am 2.2 1103am 2.7 506am 2.1 724pm -0.2 16 Mo 354am 2.2 1156am 2.7 616am 2.1 804pm -0.2 17 Tu 420am 2.4 1248pm 2.9 710am 2.1 838pm -0.2 18 We 442am 2.4 137pm 2.9 755am 2.1 909pm -0.2 19 Th 502am 2.4 224pm 2.9 835am 1.9 936pm -0.2 Thursday, July 5, 2012 Page 8 Special to the Times The Florida State University Coastal and Marine Lab will present pioneering researcher Dr. Mark Albins, from Auburn University, on Thursday, July 12 from 7-9 p.m. in the auditorium. Albins will speak on Effects of the Invasive Pacific Red Lionfish On Atlantic Coral-Reef Fish Communities as part of the Conservation Lecture Series. Pacific red lionfish, introduced to Atlantic waters in the 1980s, have undergone a rapid range expansion and population explosion over the last decade. This invasive predator is now found across the Caribbean Sea, Gulf of Mexico, and southeastern coast of the United States. Lionfish are voracious fast-growing predators of small fishes, represent a novel predator type in the invaded system, and are reaching larger maximum sizes and substantially higher densities than they do in their native Pacific. While there is much speculation about the negative effects of lionfish on native species, few experimental studies have actually examined them. Albins changed all that by conducting controlled field experiments on coral-reefs in the Bahamas to examine the effects of lionfish on native fish communities. What he found was that lionfish caused substantial reductions in the abundance and species richness of small native fishes across ecologically important functional groups such as cleaners, predators, and herbivores. Lionfish also had stronger effects on native prey and grew more than six times faster than a similarly-sized native predator, the coney grouper. These results indicate that the lionfish invasion may have long-term, broad-scale impacts on the structure and function of invaded communities. Albinss dissertation research focused on investigating the effects of an invasive predator, the Pacific red lionfish, Pterois volitans, on Atlantic reef fish communities. For his current research as a post-doctoral associate at Auburn, in the Department of Fisheries and Allied Aquaculture, he will be investigating factors affecting settlement and early post-settlement mortality of fisheries species in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. Right: Researcher Mark Albins observes a lion sh hunting in a seagrass bed near Lee Stocking Island, Bahamas TIM PUSACK | Oregon State Researcher to speak on lion sh By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star .com Tropical Storm Debby has come and gone, but we will be feeling her effects for weeks to come. Debby dumped record rains on the county and a week later, there is still standing water everywhere. Franklin County has become mosquito heaven since, as most people know, mosquitoes lay their eggs in standing water. Following ooding, mosquito numbers will likely increase in about seven to 10 days, depending upon temperature. The warmer the weather, the sooner they begin to swarm. After a storm, water retention ponds, drainage ditches, storm drains, holes left by uprooted trees, tire ruts or soil erosion are full of water that can stagnate over days. All of these are ideal places for mosquitoes to lay their eggs. Even smaller containers hold enough water to act as mosquito nurseries. Larvae are commonly found in potted plants and the saucers under them, trash cans, bird baths, old tires, wading pools, discarded jars, cans and other containers, plastic toys, coolers, buckets, water bowls for animals, ornamental pools, boats, gutters, bromeliads, magnolia leaves sagging tarpaulins or other covers and at rooftops. Right now is the time to avoid a mosquito invasion by being proactive. Overturn any object containing storm water. Be sure to check trash cans and buckets. Collect and properly dispose of debris from the storm. Mulch magnolia leaves that have accumulated on the ground and clean out gutters. Remove water that collects on sagging tarpaulins or other covers or awnings. Clear debris from drainage ditches so that storm water runs off and does not stagnate and ll in holes left by uprooted trees, vehicles or heavy equipment. Wading pools and bird baths should be emptied weekly. Pet dishes, bromeliads and other small containers should be ushed several times a week. Repair window and door screens to keep mosquitoes out of your home. Larger temporary bodies of water should be treated with an insecticide containing the bacteria Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis (Bti), which does not pose a hazard to animals. You can buy Bti at the hardware store in the form of mosquito dunks. Spraying the shrubs in your yard, the underside of window air conditioners and low structures like sh cleaning stations and wooden stairs where mosquitoes rest during the hot part of the day will reduce the mosquito population. Some pest control companies offer this service. Permanent bodies of water, like ponds and retention pools can be stocked with guppies to eat the larvae. Personal protection is important too. Staying indoors is one way to avoid mosquitoes, although this is usually not possible or practical if you are active in cleanup and repair efforts. But remember that mosquitoes are most active at dusk, so avoid outdoor activity at those times. Wearing a hat, long sleeved shirts and long pants can also shield you from mosquito bites. Products containing DEET are safe and effective at repelling mosquitoes. Some herbal products are also effective insect repellants for much shorter periods of time. Perspiration reduces the duration of protection provided any insect repellant. Children and pregnant women should use small amounts and the lowest concentrations of any repellent. It is also best to apply these products to clothing rather than skin and remember DEET can etch watch glasses and plastic lenses or jewelry. Keeping mosquito populations under control is not only important for comfortable outdoor living; it is essential to human health and the health of companion animals like dogs and horses. Mosquitoes transmit malaria, heartworm, dengue fever, encephalitis and yellow fever. Special to the Times Gag grouper opened for recreational harvest in most Gulf of Mexico state and federal waters July 1, the same day the season closed in state waters off the coast of Franklin, Wakulla, Jefferson and Taylor counties. The gag grouper recreational harvest season in Gulf of Mexico state and federal waters, not including Franklin, Jefferson, Wakulla, Taylor and Monroe counties, will end Oct. 31. State waters off Franklin, Wakulla, Jefferson and Taylor counties opened April 1 and close June 30. They will not be open during the July-through-October season everywhere else. Monroe County is also excluded from the July-through-October season because it is included in the Atlantic rules for gag grouper. Gag grouper caught in state and federal waters during the July-through-October season may be taken ashore in Franklin, Wakulla, Jefferson and Taylor counties, but boats with gag grouper aboard may not stop in and must have gear stowed while traveling through state waters in that region. The four-county region includes all waters of Apalachicola Bay and Indian Pass, including those in Gulf County, and all waters of the Steinhatchee River, including those in Dixie County. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) manages marine sh from the shore to nine nautical miles in the Gulf of Mexico. The FWC is working with Floridas anglers to rebuild gag grouper populations in the Gulf of Mexico to strong, sustainable levels. The Commission established these seasons at its February meeting. The regional season was set for 2012 only and was established to provide shing opportunities for private, recreational anglers when gag grouper are closer to shore and can be safely accessed by smaller boats. The gag grouper recreational harvest minimum size and bag limits are 22 inches and two gag grouper per person. No more than four of any species of grouper may be kept. To learn more about these management changes, visit MyFWC.com/Fishing and click on Saltwater, Recreational Regulations and Gulf Grouper. The U.S. Coast Guard is looking to reestablish an Auxiliary Unit in the Carrabelle, Eastpoint, St. George Island, Apalachicola area and needs male and female volunteers over age 17 to serve in various capacities helping recreational boaters improve their safety skills, better appreciate the environment, and become a respected and responsible operator of their preferred water craft. Becoming a member of the Coast Guard Auxiliary provides opportunities to train and devote as much time as you wish in any of the following activities: public education, recreation vessel examination, safety patrols, recruiting, public information, event planning and coordination, environmental protection, marketing, and building support among local law enforcement and government agencies. If any of the above activities touch upon your interests, I strongly urge you to attend the open invitation for membership in the Coast Guard Auxiliary on Saturday, July 7 from 10 am until noon, at Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve, 108 Island Drive, Eastpoint. For additional information, contact Dave Rabon, Flotilla 1-2, at 850-274-4689. BUDS N BUGS Gag grouper recreational harvest opens, closes COAST GUARD AUXILLARY HOLDS OPEN HOUSE SATURDAY Skeeters & storms JAMES GATHANY | CDC Freshwater Saltwater St. Joe Bay is still the color of sweet tea. Opening days of scallop season are not to promising, however, good reports of bigger shells are in the deeper channels off of Blacks Island. Good reports of red sh and trout are coming in from the FIRE TOWER and from Towns beach early in the mornings. With the red snapper season extended until July 17, we should all get a little more time on the water this year! Rain water is still over lling most creeks and has the main rivers on a rise. Good news for the cat sherman, but not so much for the bass this week. The rising waters have pushed bream into the back waters of smaller creeks, so shing should be strong after the muddy water clears. SPONSORED BY

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CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA SP O RTS www.apalachtimes.com A Section Trades & Services Laban Bontrager, DMD Monica Bontrager, DMD 12761 Pea Ridge Road Bristol, Florida 32321 TELEPHONE (850) 643-5417 Bristol Dental Clinic DENTURE LAB ON PREMISES Same Day Service on Repairs and Relines Don Lively General Contractors L ICENSED AND I NSURED 20 Y EARS E XPERIENCE P .O. Box 439 C arrabelle, FL 32322 697-2783 or Mobile 566-2603 RC 0066499 R G0065255 Carrabelle Visa, Discover, and American Express Honored at Participating Ace Stores JACKSONS Building Supplies & Auto Repair Carrabelle 697-3333 We Deliver Anywhere Hardware and Paint Center J.J.s Tree Service, LLC Stump Grinder Licensed & Insured Call John : (850) 899-8432 From A to Z PO Box 364 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 850-340-0756 Gregs Handyman Service & Lawn Maintenance JOES LAWN CARE IF I TS I N YOUR YARD LET JOE TAKE CARE OF I T FULL L AWN SERVICE S TREE TRIMMING AND REMOVAL AL S O CLEAN GUTTER S AND IRRIGATION IN S TILLATION, PLANTING AND BEDDING AVAILABLE CALL JOE@ 850-323-0741 OR EMAIL J OE S_ LA WN @Y A H OO COM ROBERTS APPLIANCE REPAIR ALL MAJOR BRANDS 18 Shadow Lane Apalachicola, FL 32320 Phone: (850) 653-8122 Cell: (850) 653-7654 Clayton Concrete, Inc. Serving Franklin and Gulf Counties for over 20 years! Concrete Construction and Pumping House foundations, Slab Work, Driveways and Sidewalks Rock Driveways, Tractor work, Bush Hogging Storm Cleanup Glen Clayton (850)229-6525 (850)527-5256 cell Licensed and insured Thursday, July 5, 2012 By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894| @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com The Seahawks football program paid tribute to a bevy of graduating seniors May 31, at an endof-the-year banquet in the high school cafeteria. Seniors Paul Anderson, Marcus Dalton, Zach Armistead, Brennan Walden, Jonathan Smith, Chris Granger, Colton Sheridan, Buddy Davidson and Bubba Fasbenner were each presented with a framed jersey and words of encouragement from coach Josh Wright. Flanked by a giant poster of a muscled hawk toting a football, Wright recounted the season and urged players, parents and fans to redouble their efforts to make next year a stride forward. Three-and-seven was not the goal this year; the district title was the goal. We know we have some ways to go, Wright said. Our motto Team First, we got to get back to that. Some of us need to visit the wizard (of Oz) and nd courage and brains and heart. Weve got to go visit the wizard. In commenting on the team highlight lm, prepared by Antonio Croom, projected overhead, Wright said he and his staff had witnessed some outstanding plays and had seen rst-hand the teams unique chemistry. Player by player, Wright recounted last years roster of players who earned varsity letters. He began with sophomore running back Dwayne Griggs, who missed several games at the start of the season from injury but bounced back to become one of the teams leading offensive producers. In all, his stats over seven games were 839 yards on 79 carries for 13 touchdowns. Late word circulating in the community, as yet unveri ed, is that Griggs has opted to transfer to Godby for the 2012 season. Wright said he is at work trying to secure a hardship eligibility from the Florida High School Athletic Association for rising senior Tre Carr for the 2012 season. In addition to the seniors, Wright recounted the play of juniors Skyler Hutchinson, Ladarious Rhodes, Cole Lee, Chase Golden, David Butler, Jeffrey Murray, Zach Howze and Karl Sanford; sophomores Mercury Wynn, Holden Foley, Dillon Grant, Kyle Wheeler, Stephen DeVaughn and Mason Ray; and freshmen Jacob Wilson and Kelsey Jones. The Academic Achievement Award went to sophomore kicker Elton Olvera, who posted a grade point average of 3.75. Best Offensive Player honors went to quarterback Armistead, who completed 34 of 71 passes, for 484 yards and seven touchdowns. Hutchinson earned Best Defensive Player honors for 47 tackles, 25 of them solo, and one interception. Foley was named the Best Special Teams Player, as he had two kickoff returns for 28 yards, as well as a safety and two fumble recoveries on the year. The Coaches/ Captains Awards went to Armistead; Walden, who had eight receptions for 77 yards, as well 69 tackles and two sacks; Golden, who had 31 tackles, including 25 solos; and Granger, who had 119 yards on 28 carries, four receptions for 56 yards, and 29 tackles, before a season-ending injury just four games into the year. Wright also presented signed photos of the team to several assistant coaches, parents and fans who helped make the year a success, including Lisa Walden, Sally Wheeler, Sherry Reeder, Ashley Teat, Kelli Maggio, Mike Todd, Walter Armistead, Chris Granger Sr. and David Adlerstein. Teat, a volunteer coach, closed the banquet with a rousing speech of encouragement. 2012 SEAHAWKS SCHEDULE Friday, Aug. 24 vs. Bozeman (Preseason Classic) Friday, Aug. 31 @ Sneads Friday, Sept. 7 vs. Graceville Friday, Sept. 14 @ Cottondale Friday, Sept. 21 @ Liberty County Friday, Sept. 28 vs. Wewahitchka Friday, Oct. 5 vs. Port St. Joe Friday, Oct. 12 vs. Robert F. Munroe Friday, Oct. 19 vs. West Gadsden Friday, Oct. 26 @ Blountstown Friday, Nov. 2 Open Date Friday, Nov. 9 vs. South Walton District 2 Class 1A At an award banquet May 30, players for the 2011-12 Seahawk and Lady Seahawk basketball teams were honored. Girls coach Carlos Hill presented awards to his players, beginning with Aaliyah West, who won the Academic Achievement Award for her perfect 4.0 grade point average. The Best Offensive Player awards were shared by Shelby Meyers and Myesha Campbell, while the Best Defensive Player award went to Anna Lee. The Coaches Award went to Dyshereah Key. Boys coach Mike Sweatt awarded Most Valuable Player honors to his two graduating seniors, AJ Allen and Chance Buffkin. The Best Defensive Player went to Dwayne Griggs, while the Top Rookie Award was presented to Kelsey Jones. The Coaches award went to Rahkeim Pierce, while the Academic Achievement Award went to David Butler, who has a 3.19 grade point average. Page A9 Seahawk and Lady Seahawk basketball athletes honored DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times Left: Graduating seniors with coach Josh Wright, far left, are from left, Paul Anderson, Zach Armistead, Jonathan Smith, Chris Granger, Colton Sheridan and Buddy Davidson. Not pictured are Marcus Dalton, Brennan Walden and Bubba Fasbenner. Middle: Honored with Coaches/Captains awards are, from left, Chase Golden, Zach Armistead and Chris Granger, with coach Josh Wright, at right. Not pictured is Brennan Walden. Right: A giant hawk in a football uniform graced the stage at the football banquet. Seahawks salute gridiron seniors

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A10| The Times Thursday, July 5, 2012 CLASSIFIEDS 87616T LEGAL NOTICE Notice is given pursuant to Florida Self-Storage Facility Act, Florida Statutes, Chapter 83, Part IV that Franklin Mini Storage will hold a sale on: July 28, 2012 at 9:30 a.m. at 1627 US 98, Carrabelle, Florida 32322 of the contents of mini-warehouse(s) containing personal property of: Mike Horvath Zania Jones Before the sale date of July 28, 2012, the property may be redeemed by payment in cash or money order of the outstanding balance and cost by mailing it to Post Office Box 139, Carrabelle, Florida 32322, or by paying in person. June 28, July 5, 2012 87640T IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT NORTHERN DISTRICT OF FLORIDA TALLAHASSEE DIVISION CASE NO. 4:12-cv-00086-WS-CAS CENTENNIAL BANK, Plaintiff, vs. DOUGLAS BROWN a/k/a DOUGLAS W. BROWN; and BETINA BROWN, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that under and by virtue of the Final Judgment of Foreclosure rendered in the above-styled case on April 26, 2012, in the United States District Court For The Northern District Of Florida, in favor of the Plaintiff, the undersigned, appointed in that certain Order Appointing Special Master rendered May 25, 2012, will on the 24th day of July, 2012 at 12:00 p.m. Eastern Time, in the Second Floor Lobby of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, in the city of Apalachicola, Florida, offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the highest bidder, the following described property, situated, lying and being in Franklin County, Florida: Commence at the Northwest corner of the East half of the Northeast Quarter of the Northwest Quarter of Section 23, Township 6 South, Range 8 West, Franklin County, Florida; thence run South 89 degrees 49 minutes 01 seconds East 826.60 feet to a rod and cap; thence South 127.72 feet to a rod and cap for the POINT OF BEGINNING; thence from said POB continue South 142.73 feet to a rod and cap; thence South 79 degrees 05 minutes 17 seconds West 1083.60 feet to the approximate water’s edge of the Apalachicola River; thence run along said approximate water’s edge North 17 degrees 09 minutes 25 seconds West 112.81 feet; thence North 19 degrees 02 minutes 07 seconds West 142.88 feet; thence leaving, said approximate water’s edge run North 84 degrees 43 minutes 35 seconds East 1148.55 feet to the POB, containing 5.01 acres more or less. Together with all rights, easements, appurtenances, royalties, mineral rights, oil and gas rights, all water and riparian rights, ditches, and water stock and all existing and future improvements, structures, fixtures, and replacements that may now, or at any time in the future, be part of the real estate described above (all referred to as “Property”). For additional information concerning the above property contact: STEPHEN A. PITRE, ESQUIRE, Post Office Box 13010, Pensacola, Florida 32591-3010 or (850) 434-9200. All sales are subject to confirmation of the court. Method of payment is by postal money order or certified check made payable to Jeffrey P. Whitton, Esquire, Escrow Account. Ten (10) Percent of High/Acceptable bid in certified check or cashier’s check will be accepted with the balance due within 48 hours. No cash will be accepted. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim with the Clerk of the Court within 60 days after the sale. In accordance with the AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT, persons needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact Jeffrey P. Whitton, Esquire, Post Office Box 1956, Panama City, FL 32402 or (850) 769-7040 not later than seven days prior to the sale to ensure that reasonable accommodations are available. DATED this 14th day of June, 2012. SPECIAL MASTER: JEFFREY P. WHITTON, Esquire Florida Bar No. 329509 565 Harrison Ave. Post Office Box 1956 Panama City, FL 32402 Phone: 850-769-7040 Fax: 850-769-3014 June 21, 28, 2012 July 5, 12, 2012 87642T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 2011-000254-CA ATLANTIC NATIONAL BANK, Plaintiff, vs. W. NEAL BOLTON and MARINER’S VIEW CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION, INC., a Florida corporation, Defendants. AMENDED NOTICE OF JUDICIAL SALE PURSUANT TO SECTION 45.031 OF THE FLORIDA STATUTES TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to the Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale entered on June 13, 2012, in Case Number 2011-000254-CA of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit for Franklin County, Florida, in which ATLANTIC NATIONAL BANK is Plaintiff, and W. NEAL BOLTON and MARINER’S VIEW CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION, INC., a Florida corporation are Defendants, I, Marcia M. Johnson, Clerk of Circuit Court, will sell at public sale the following described real property: Unit Number 101 of Mariners View Condominium, as per that certain Declaration of Condominium recorded in Official Records Book 865, Page 369 of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. Together with an undivided interest in the common elements which are appurtenant to the unit as set out in said Declaration of Condominium. The sale will be held on July 31, 2012, at 11:00 A.M. (Eastern Time) to the highest and best bidder for cash, at the second floor lobby, West side of the Franklin County Courthouse, located at 33 Market Street, in Apalachicola, Franklin County, Florida, in accordance with Section 45.031 of the Florida Statutes. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 15th day of July, 2012. MARCIA M. JOHNSON Clerk of Court By: Michele Maxwell As Deputy Clerk June 28, 2012 July 5, 2012 87644T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 2011-000093-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, as successor in interest to COASTAL COMMUNITY BANK, a Florida banking corporation, Plaintiff, vs. LANDMARK GROUP, LLC, a Florida limited liability company, JEFFREY D. THACKER, HERBERT PRESS WITT and DAMIEN FRENCH, Defendants. AMENDED NOTICE OF JUDICIAL SALE PURSUANT TO SECTION 45.031 OF THE FLORIDA STATUTES TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to the Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale entered on June 13, 2012, in Case Number 2011-000093-CA of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit for Franklin County, Florida, in which LANDMARK GROUP, LLC, a Florida limited liability company, JEFFREY D. THACKER, HERBERT PRESS WITT and DAMIEN FRENCH are Defendants, I, Marcia M. Johnson, Clerk of Circuit Court, will sell at public sale the following described real property: Lots 15, 16, 17 and 18 of Fairway Park Subdivision, a subdivision as per map or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 8, Page 15, Public Records of Franklin County, Florida.

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, July 5, 2012 The Times | A11 Outside Sales Representative An exciting opportunity now exists to join The News Herald. We are searching for enthusiastic, hard-working, and driven Outside Sales Representatives to join our team! Job Description The News Herald is looking for motivated sales professionals to establish footholds in their local markets by providing products and services to businesses. The Outside Sales Representative’s duties may include but are not limited to:  Cold call and prospect new territory opportunities.  Introduce business owners to programs via presentation, answer detailed questions and maintain that relationship. Requirements  Have strong work ethic  Experience presenting advertising materials to a variety of businesses  Cold calling experience  Reliable Transportation  Experience handling warm leads and prospecting for new leads.  Field Sales, Business to Business Sales (B2B), Inside Sales, Outside Sales, or Outbound Sales experience ( Preferred) We Offer:  Room for advancement and career opportunity  Dynamic Monthly Residual Compensation  Bonus programs  Introductory and Ongoing Training  Business Materials including phone, laptop and IPad, business cards, sales material and product knowledge information The News Herald offers a competitive bene t package including medical, dental, vision and life insurance, 401(k) plan, vacation and sick leave, and six paid holidays per year. Come by The News Herald at 501 W. 11th Street for an application or send a resume to resumes@ afreedom.com.Freedom Florida is a Drug-free workplace, EOETO APPLY: RENTALS1 BEDROOM, 1 BATH, UNFURNISHED APT. Lanark, Remodeled, Inc. Water ......................$425 2 BEDROOM, 1 BATH, UNFURNISHED APT. Lanark ............................................................$400 3 BEDROOM, 2 BATH, UNFURNISHED Doublewide.....................................................$700 2 BEDROOM, 1 BATH, UNFURNISHED APT. Small Porch ....................................................$375 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322850-697-9604 850-323-0444 www.seacrestre.comwww. rst tness.com/carrabellePROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND RENTALS ToPlace Your Classified ad inCall Our New Numbers Now!Call: 850-747-5020 Toll Free: 800-345-8688 Fax: 850-747-5044 Email: thestar@pcnh.com thetimes@pcnh.com theAPALACHICOLA & CARRABELLETIMES CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW Total Down Pmt $7752002 Chevy Blazer -4 Door $4500 Total 0% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! Nice Car of Forgotten Coast, LLC For inventory log onto: www.nicecar offorgotten coastllc.com Total Down Pmt $19002004 Dodge Ram 4 Door -Crew Cab $9500 Total 0% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! Total Down Pmt $9752001 Ford F-150 -X/Cab $5900 Total 0% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! 2008 Harley Davidson Street Glide Anniversay Edition9,700 miles. Copper/ Black. In Excellent condition w/Rinehart Exhaust, Power Commander, ABS, Security, Extra Headlights, 2 Seats, many other options. Always garage kept and well maintaned. Original owner. Only $17,000, sold new for over $27,000.850-723-4642 1 BRCottageH/AC in Apalachicola, FL. 850-643-7740. Eastpoint Two adjacent lots on Jefferson St. Zone C4. $21,500 each or $39,500 for both. Owner financing available. Call Royce Hodge (850) 510-3797. Text FL13192 to 56654 For Sale By Owner St. James Golf Course. Two lots, on the fairway. Owner financing. Motivated to sell. Call Royce Hodge for info: (850) 510-3797. Text FL13194 to 56654 Total Down Pmt $6752000 Chevy Monte Carlo $4500 Total 0% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! Food Svs/HospitalityBest WesternAll PositionsPlease apply in Person 9am-3pm 249 Hwy 98 Apalachicola, FL. No phone calls!!! Install/Maint/RepairDiesel MechanicWith own tools, full time position. Extensive light, medium, and heavy equipment experience required. For immediate interview send resumes to Blind Box 3399 c/o The News Herald, P.O. Box 1940, Panama City, FL 32402 Web ID#: 34214643 Text FL14643 to 56654 Production/OpsPress Operator IThe News Herald is looking for an individual to train to be a web offset press operator. Duties include handling rolls of paper, filling/ cleaning ink fountains, placing/ removing plates for the press, setting ink on black/ white/ color pages, and computer skills. High school diploma or equivalent necessary. Must have excellent attendance and good work habits with mechanical aptitude and computer skills, be able to lift 50 pounds and be flexible in hours available to work. $10.00 per hour to start. We offer a generous benefits package including: 401(k), vacation and sick leave, and life/ health/ vision/ dental insurance. Year-round employment. E-mail resume to rsmith@ pcnh.com or pick up an application at 501 W. 11th Street, Panama City. Interview will be scheduled after application has been reviewed. Web ID#: 34210714 Employment AvailableThe Eastpoint Water and Sewer District is Seeking applications Applications are available at the Eastpoint Water and Sewer !" #$%#$&'( These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you. EmeraldCoast Marketplace 747-5020 The sale will be held on July 31, 2012, at 11:00 A.M. (Eastern Time) to the highest and best bidder for cash, at the second floor lobby, West side of the Franklin County Courthouse, located at 33 Market Street, in Apalachicola, Franklin County, Florida, in accordance with Section 45.031 of the Florida Statutes. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 15th day of June, 2012. MARCIA M. JOHNSON Clerk of Court By: Michele Maxwell As Deputy Clerk June 28, 2012 July 5, 2012 87733T PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF INTENDED ACTION FRANKLIN COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD Purpose and Effect: The Franklin County School Board proposes to update and adopt policies, as provided in the Administrative Procedures Act for the purpose of maintaining compliance with Florida Statutes and State Board of Education Rules. Summary: The following is a brief description of the proposed changes: School Board Policy Manual Student Code of Conduct Student Progression Plan Learning/Alternative Center Handbook Franklin County Academy Plan Statutory Authority: Section 1001.41, Florida Statutes These proposed rules will be considered by the Franklin County School Board at a meeting publicly advertised and held in the Willie Speed School Board Room at 85 School Road, Eastpoint, Florida no earlier than 28 days after the original date of this notice. Policies may be reviewed during the period of June 5, 2012 through July 2, 2012 at the Franklin County School Board Administrative Offices, 85 School Road, Eastpoint, Florida during the hours of 8:00 AM until 5:30 PM, Monday Thursday. June 14, 21, 28 July 5, 2012 87722T STATE OF FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION NOTICE OF APPLICATION The Department announces receipt of an application for permit from the US Army Corps of Engineers, Mobile District, File No. 07-129424-008-EI, to conduct maintenance snagging to remove tree snags from the navigation channel in the Apalachicola River portion of the Apalachicola, Chattahoochee and Flint Rivers (ACF) Federal Navigation Project. This proposed project will be located in the Apalachicola River between River Mile 0.0 and River Mile 106.4 in Jackson, Gadsden, Calhoun, Liberty, Gulf, and Franklin Counties. This application is being processed and is available for public inspection during normal business hours, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, except legal holidays, at the Northwest District office at 160 W. Government Street, Pensacola, FL 32502. July 5, 2012 87943T IN THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 09-490 CA CENTENNIAL BANK, as successor in interest to BAYSIDE SAVINGS BANK, Plaintiff, vs. JEREMY J. GLEATON, JR., and LUCIA ANN GLEATON Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated February 27, 2012, and Order to Reset Sale dated June 14, 2012, entered in Civil Action No. 09-490 CA of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein the parties were the Plaintiff, CENTENNIAL BANK, as successor in interest to BAYSIDE SAVINGS BANK, and the Defendants, JEREMY J. GLEATON, JR., and LUCIA ANN GLEATON, I will sell to the highest and best bidder, for cash, at 11:00 a.m. (Eastern Time) on the 31st day of July, 2012, at the front door foyer on the 2nd floor of the Franklin County Courthouse, Apalachicola, Florida, the following-described real property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: Lot 26 of PELICAN BEACH VILLAGE, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 5, Page(s) 12, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida, LESS AND EXCEPT any part of said land lying within and easement as shown on said plat. The successful bidder at the sale will be required to place the requisite state documentary stamps on the Certificate of Title. DATED this 14th day of June, 2012. Hon. MARCIA JOHNSON Clerk of the Court Franklin County, FL By: Michele Maxwell As Deputy Clerk June 28, July 5, 2012 88151T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2011 CA 182 HANCOCK BANK, Plaintiff, vs. JAMES K. HICKS, PATTI L. HICKS, PATTI L. HICKS AS TRUSTEE OF PATTI L. HICKS LIVING TRUST UTD 09/30/03 and ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY. THROUGH, UNDER, AGAINST, THE HEREIN NAMED DEFENDANTS WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID OWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE UNDER F.S. CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Plaintiff’s Final Judgment dated May 29, 2012, in the abovestyled cause, Marcia Johnson, Clerk of Courts for Franklin County, will sell to the highest bidder for cash at the front door of the courthouse in Franklin County in Apalachicola, Florida, in accordance with Section 45.031, Florida Statutes, at 11:00 A.M., on July 17, 2012, the following described property: Lot 1 of Sea Palm Village, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 4, Pages 30 & 31, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. Lot 4, Block 22, East, according to the plat known as St. George Island Gulf Beaches, Unit 1, a subdivision as per map or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 2, Page 7, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IT ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. DATED: June 27, 2012 MARCIA M. JOHNSON Clerk of the Court By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk July 5, 12, 2012 87961T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 07-000295-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, successor in interest to Coastal Community Bank, d/b/a Coastal Community Mortgage, Plaintiff, vs. RUBY J. LITTON and DANNY J. LITTON Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure dated April 23, 2012, in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Front Door of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market St., Apalachicola, FL 32320 at 11:00 a.m. on July 17, 2012, the following described property: Lot 3, of Block I, St. James Bay Subdivision, a subdivision as per map or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 7, Pages 39-46, Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. Dated: June 18, 2012. Marcia Johnson Clerk of Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk June 28, July 5, 2012 GUN SHOWJuly 7th & 8th Nat’l Peanut Fest. Bldg. 5622 US Hwy 231 S Dothan, Alabama OVER 275 TABLES Saturday 9-5pm Sunday 10-4pm Info: 334-279-9895 Text FL14275 to 56654 ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home Medical, Business, Criminal Justice Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 866-467-0054 www.CenturaOnline.com AIRLINE CAREERS BEGIN HERE -Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualified. Housing available. Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-206-9405 Buy it! Classified. Make your move to the medium that’s your number one source of information about homes for sale! For all your housing needs consult Classified when it’s time to buy, it’s the resource on which to rely.

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Local A12 | The Times Thursday, July 7, 2012 The following is the Honor Roll for the ABC Schools fourth nine-week grading period All As 1ST GRADE Aani Carltons class: Alisha Arroyo, Caleb Cassidy, Kendall Hill, Jayden Nichols, Owen Poloronis, River Sheridan, Trinity Taylor, JohnMichael Thompson Miriam Triscrittis class: Eric Lau, Arav Patel, Colin We ng, Jabara Pearson, Kylah Ross, Mark Willis 2ND GRADE Jenny Mallons class: Meredith Alford, Dominic Feliciano, Genevieve Montgomery, Sophia Salman, John Sanders, Nico Valenzuela Stacey Herringtons class: Weston Bockelman, Ella Friedman, Alex Itzkovitz, Jasmine Richards, Gracie Smith, Myia Maxwell 3RD GRADE Whitney Martinas class: Livia Monod Traci Moses class: Gillian Terhune 4TH GRADE Lindsey Bockelmans class: Jayden Justice, Camille Williams, Alyssa Robinson Marie Lees Class: Cade Juno, Jake Norred 5TH GRADE Brooke Linane / Teri Williams class: Grayson Constantine, Chloe Davis, Scout McLemore, Rebecca Willis A/B 1ST GRADE Aani Carltons class: Daisy Jimenez, Mason Moses, Gabie Register, Jackson Segree, Mahaley Shuler, Rainey Smith, Brianna Stephens, Kevin Sullivan Miriam Triscrittis class: Jonathan Carter, Miranda Diaz, Laithan Kent, Nathan Richards 2ND GRADE Jenny Mallons class: Caleb Abel, Lanie Allen, Carson Davis, Sevryn Everitt, Eulalia Gregorio, Andrew Monod, Leslie Rowland, Jaelyn Tipton, Wil Varnes Stacey Herringtons class: Lauren Conway, Gavin Lashley, Zach Riccard, Jeremy Shuler, Torin Spohrer 3RD GRADE Whitney Martinas class: Colin Amison, Camille Davis, Leslie Escobar, Dorian Fleming, Stanley Gay, Abigail Johnson, Elizabeth McAnally Traci Moses class: Skye Huber, Jon Michael Cates, Alex Joanos, Kaylee Hicks, Jayden Luberto, Ava Neill, Caden Turrell 4TH GRADE Lindsay Bockelmans class: Tanner Amison, Levi Rowland, Krista Kelley, Kalahn Kent, Allison Register Marie Lees Class: Matthew Gay, Bailey Herrington 5TH GRADE Brooke Linane /Teri Williams class: Sophia Kirvin, Bryce Kent, Alexus Johnson, Kevin Flores, Jan Michael Lowe, Conner Messer Perfect attendance Christa Bass, Corie Cates, Dorian Fleming, Eulalia Gregorio, Simon Hodgson (6 years), Marshall Sweet (6 years), Nico Valenzuela Smart Lenses SM Can produce clear vision without glasses, at all distances "Freedom from Eye Glasses, Now a reality for many." NO HIDDEN CHARGES: It is our policy that the patient and any other person responsible for payments has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed by payment or any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment. www.mulliseye.com "WE WELCOME NE W PATIE N TS, C ALL T ODAY FOR YOUR P RIORITY APP OI N TME N T" FOR NEW PATIENTS 59 AND OLDER This certificate is good for a complete Medical Eye Exam with Todd Robinson, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Surgeon. The exam includes a prescription for eye glasses and tests for Glaucoma, Cataracts and other eye diseases FOR YOUR APPOINTMENT CALL: 850-763-6666 ELIGIBILITY: U.S. Citizens living in the Florida Panhandle, 59 years and older, not presently under our care. Coupon Expires: 7-31-12 FREE EYE EXAM CODE: AP00 Darren Payne, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon Lee Mullis, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon Todd Robinson, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon Movies in the Park Friday on SGI The Franklin County Sheriffs Of ce will host the 2012 Movies in the Park series, with the showing of the animated lm Puss in Boots at Lighthouse Park on St. George Island, on Friday evening, July 6. Free hot dogs, popcorn and drinks for the kids. Work under way on Armory alley Last week, work began on renovation of the storm sewers in the alley that runs behind Coombs Armory and the First United Methodist Church of Apalachicola. A collapsed pipe had caused the church to ood on several occasions. Pastor Themo Patriotis said during Tropical Storm Debby, 12 to 15 gallons of water per minute poured into the building, but church members were able to keep the situation under control using shop vacuums. Jason White Construction, the contractor hired to repair the drain system, expects to complete the work by July 23. Oyster harvesting licensing period extended Commissioner of Agriculture Adam Putnam has announced a twoweek extension of the licensing period for the Apalachicola Bay Oyster Harvesting License. Due to extreme conditions caused by Tropical Storm Debby in the Apalachicola Bay area, the licensing period was extended through close of business Friday, July 13. The safety of the shell sh harvesters and all residents who are affected by current weather conditions is our rst priority, said Putnam. Under normal circumstances, the 45day licensing period for the harvesting license, required to commercially harvest oysters from the Apalachicola Bay system, ends June 30. With the extension, applicants will not be subject to the $500 late fee until after July 13. For more information about the Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, visit www. FreshFromFlorida.com. BILL MILLER REALTY 850-697-3751 (3310) 570-0658 400 + COMM. U.S. 98 & GULF ADJ. TO LANARK MARINA 85K $29,500 $2,500 D O W N B UYS 2 B ED AP T 2 6 OR RENT $500/MTH COR LOT 12 X 53 1 B / R 8 X 24 SHED 27,500 GULFVIE W & ACCESS 3 BDR 2 BA 2006 M/H 89K 2 LG. SHADY LOTS 3 SHEDS 400 TO MARINA-CITY W ATER49K MIH 2 C RNR LOTS BLK. $ S TORE REDUCED $49,500 CITY COMM. LOTSU.S. 98 $29,500 U P News BRIEFS Our local real estate experts have identied what they feel are the best values around and are oering them to you in Real Estate Picks! (In this section), Discover the best real estate values in Mexico Beach, Port St. Joe, Apalachicola, Cape San Blas, St. George Island, Carrabelle and surrounding areas. Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Real Estate Picks John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.com MLS# 244722 $369,000 St. George Island 1ST TIER ISLAND GETAWAY Vintage beach home, 3 BR, 2 BA, Great room, Spacious kitchen with breakfast bar, Immaculately maintained, beach access, furnished, outdoor shower, downstairs storage, decks front & back, West Gorrie Dr. Listing agent Michael Billings John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.com MLS# 247013 $20,000 Eastpoint MAGNOLIA RIDGE One acre bank owned residential building site, Located in a secluded area of beautiful Franklin County, Paved roads and underground utilities make this a great location for a permanent residence or weekend retreat. Sago Drive. Listed by Michael Billings FIGHTING FIRE WITH FABRIC Ruth Guernsey of the St. George Island Quilters, center, presented a check last month to St. George Island Volunteer Fire Department Chief Jay Abbott. The Quilters each year create an original quilt and sponsor its raf e, with proceeds going to the re department. Other Quilters, from left, are Celeste Wall, Maggie Estes, Sheri Roberts and Judy Crawford. COURTESY SGI QUILTERS Franklin County High School freshman Morgan Martin stands with her project on famed inventor John Gorrie, which took a rst place in Science and Technology in this years History Fair held at the end of the 2011-12 school year. Also taking rst place honors in that category were eighth-grader Alicia Risner and freshmen Sasha Carr and Logan Allen. In the Humanities category, rst place went to eighth-grader Amelia Newman and freshmen Jacob Shuler, Austin Carter and Aaliyah West. In the American History category, blue ribbons went to eighth-grader Krista Martina and freshmen Samantha Marxsen, Roxanna Barahona and Emily Cash. In the World History category, rst-place awards went to eighth-grader Ursula Countryman and freshmen Kelsey Jones, Amanda Anthony and Cyndi Nichols. DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times FOR LOVE OF HISTORY ABC ELEMENTARY HONOR ROLL



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xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx 50 WWW.APALACHTIMES.COMPhone: 850-653-8868 Web: apalachtimes.com E-mail: dadlerstein@star .com Fax: 850-653-8036 Circulation: 800-345-8688 DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK: School News & Society: 11 a.m. Friday Real Estate Ads: 11 a.m. Thursday Legal Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Display Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Line Ads: 5 p.m. Monday xxxxx Contact Us xxxxx Out to see IndexThursday, July 5, 2012 Debbys rescues, A2Movies in the Park Friday on SGIThe Franklin County Sheriffs Of ce will host the 2012 Movies in the Park series, with the showing of the animated lm Puss in Boots, at Lighthouse Park on St. George Island, on Friday, July 6. Free hot dogs, popcorn and drinks for the kids. Come early; show begins at dusk.Carrabelle seniors host Saturday danceA free dance will be at 7 p.m. Saturday, July 7, at the Carrabelle Senior Center, 201 N.W. Ave. F, on the corner of First Street and Northwest Avenue F. Music will be provided by local disc jockey Ron Vice, serving up a lively mix of Big Band dance tunes and mellow pop hits. For more information on the dance and other activities at the senior center, visit www. CarrabelleSeniorCenter. com.Big Bend Saltwater Classic this weekendThe 24th annual Big Bend Saltwater Classic will be this weekend, July 6-8, with tournament headquarters at the Carrabelle Boat Club. The date was changed from June 15, the traditional date that coincides with Fathers Day weekend, so anglers could sh for gag grouper, the harvest of which is permitted from July 1 through Oct. 31 in federal waters. The tourney opens with captains meetings at 6 p.m. today, July 5, at the boat club and at the Port St. Joe Marina. Lines are in the water at 5:30 a.m. Friday, July 6. Weigh-in stations are at the Carrabelle Boat Club, Shields Marina at St. Marks and the Port St. Joe marina. Weigh-in begins at 3 p.m. July 6 and ends at 7:30 p.m., when anglers must be in line. On Saturday, weighin begins at 3 p.m. and ends at 7:30 p.m., also when anglers must be in line. On Sunday, the awards presentation begins at 10 a.m. at the Carrabelle Boat Club. For more info, email bigbendsaltwaterclassic@ gmail.com or call 216-2272.ATLANTA (AP) Federal ofcials responsible for a dam at the center of a long-running water dispute between Alabama, Florida and Georgia say they have the legal authority to give metro Atlanta more water, though the agency has not yet decided how much to release. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers said in documents released June 26 that it can legally grant a 2000 request from Georgia to get 705 million gallons of water per day from Lake Lanier on the Chattahoochee River by 2030. The federal agency said it will need to conduct an environmental review before making any nal decisions on exactly how much water Atlanta should get. Federal of cials said Georgia would have to live up to its promise to return more than 100 million gallons of treated water daily to the lake. The Corps decision became public after the U.S. Supreme Court refused June 25 to intervene in a dispute over metro Atlantas use of water from a federal reservoir that severs all three southeastern states. The Chattahoochee River ows past Atlanta, then runs along the border of Alabama and Georgia. It merges with the Flint River at the Florida border to form the Apalachicola River, which cuts By LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star .com Last week, contractors for Progress Energy pruned trees in Apalachicolas historic district, drawing both support and protest from residents. In the wake of Tropical Storm Debby, when 800 residents of Apalachicola were without power, some for three days, about 15 bucket trucks from Burfords Tree Service of Aniston, Ala. were involved in a large-scale Apalachicolas Dan Sangaree last month celebrated a century of fortitude and curiosity. On June 20, about 50 friends attended a birthday party at the Gulfside IGA, where Sangaree was presented a cake, a crown and a proclamation from the city. Looking t for a man of distinguished years and piloting a mobility scooter after driving himself to the party, Sangaree blew out his candle and cut the cake to a round of applause. An avid sherman as he stayed active in his younger years, Sangaree endured an injury in middle age that led to his use of crutches, and later a scooter. But that didnt keep him home-bound, as he continued for years to be an active gardener, including growing and marketing hydroponic vegetables, and an New RV park planned in Eastpoint LOCAL PERSPECTIVEAuthorities in Florida, Alabama and even southern Georgia complain that Atlanta takes too much water from Lake Lanier, a federal reservoir, leaving too little downstream for drinking water systems, wildlife and industry, including nourishing the oyster beds of Apalachicola Bay.Corps: More water for AtlantaBy LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com At a public hearing on June 19, a plot of land in Eastpoint was rezoned for commercial use and soon will be an RV park. Commissioners voted unanimously to rezone the land at 957 U.S. 98 from residential to C-3 commercial recreational and approve the proposed site plan for development. The owner, Chester Creamer, plans to build Coastline RV Resort on the property. He said the footprint of the site, just east of Gulfview Campground and west of State Route 65, is about four acres, and the start date for construction will depend on a number of factors including permitting. Creamer said the high-end facility will employ at least three workers. Jack Husband, an engineer with Southeastern Consulting Engineers Inc. of Wewahitchka, represented Creamer at the meeting. He said there will be a 25-foot setback from U.S. 98 and a 5-foot buffer zone kept as green space on the other three sides. Commissioners received one letter of objection from Jimmy Meeks, who owns Sea Air RV Park, just east of the proposed site. I think it will be a great thing for Franklin County to have more transient traf c, said Commissioner Smokey Parish. This will be a place for people passing through to stay and enjoy the county. Commissioner Bevin Putnal said the existing Carrabelle Beach RV Park is bigger than this ones going to be. People are spending money all over Carrabelle. What we need to boost our economy is to nd things like this that work, he said.LOIS SWOBODA | The TimesDan Sangaree blows out the candles on his 100th birthday cake.Sangaree celebrates 100 years PRUNING AFTER STORM DRAWS SUPPORT, PROTESTERSLOIS SWOBODA | The TimesAt right, Robin Vroegop, left, and Debby Miller complain to Of cer Tim Davis about Progress Energys pruning. At top, Martha Elliot, far right, watches as tree crews prune her 200year old patriarch oak. PROGRESS THE PRICE OFVOL. 127 ISSUE 10See WATER A5 See PRUNING A5 See SANGAREE A5Opinion . . . . . . A4 Society . . . . . . A6 Faith . . . . . . . A7 Outdoors . . . . . A8 Tide Chart . . . . . A8 Sports . . . . . . A9 Classi eds . . . A10-A11 Debbys rescues,

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LocalA2 | The Times FREE DIABETES EDUCATION CLASSES EACH WEEK TWO LOCATIONS, TWO TIMES! 10:00AMWEEMS MEDICAL CENTER EAST 110 NE 5TH ST CARRABELLE 697-23455:00PMWEEMS MEMORIAL HOSPITAL 135 AVENUE G APALACHICOLA 653-8853 X101 Classes taught by Erica Ceska, Registered DietitianEVERYONE WELCOME! WHISPERING PINES, EASTPOINT3BR/2BA well maintained home on one acre lot. Many upgrades throughout the home. Large deck and 2 storage sheds complete this ready to move in property. MLS #247364.................$149,900 Travis Stanley 850.653.6477 Grayson Shepard 850.653.6718 Leon Teat 850.653.5656 Sandy Mitchem 850.899.8300 BEACHFRONTCONDO ST. GEORGE ISLAND2BR/2BA with two balconies in Villas of St. George. Established rental history! Community pool, beach boardwalk, 2 blocks to lighthouse! MLS# 246110...............$319,500 ST. GEORGE ISLAND GULF VIEW4BR/4BA close to center of island and kitchen. Lots of storage and lovely native landscaping. MLS# 245752......................$399,000NEW LOW PRICE GREATER APALACHICOLAEnjoy quiet country living on 3.75 acres. Lovely custom built 3BR/2.5 BA home with many upgrades Jacuzzi, deck, large walk in closet. 1600 sq.ft. outbuilding on concrete pad. MLS#244666................$255,000GULF VIEW SGI PLANTATIONCharming 5BR/3BA cypress home with Anderson doors/windows. Completely renovated in 2006 w/ granite countertops, new appliances/lighting/elevator! MLS# 240897...............$475,000GULFVIEW ST GEORGE ISLANDPre construction. Great opportunity to buy a gulf view home. 3BR/2BA with great room opening to the front porch, upgraded kitchen. New construction means low insurance costs!MLS#247359...................$289,000 Thursday, July 5, 2012By LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star .com Once again, St. George Islanders and the folks from the Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve have joined forces to rescue a nestling osprey from stormy weather. On Sunday, June 24, Rob and Kay Olin of St. George Island watched in horror as an osprey nest they have enjoyed watching all season, fell. Olin braved the storm surge bayside on the island to rescue the chick. I ran out there and it was chaos, he said, The nest was in a thousand pieces. I stood there wondering How am I going to nd it? Then I saw the chick was right in front of me. I picked it up and put it into a basket. Both parents were circling frantically overhead. I held the baby up for the mother to see, wanting to give her some hope. Olin vowed to return the chick to its parents. That Sunday afternoon, Olin and family, with the chick, evacuated to Tallahassee. Before leaving home, he was able to contact the Florida Wild Mammal Association wildlife rescue facility (FWMA) in Wakulla County. That Sunday evening around 9 p.m., Olin met Eric Lovestrand, a wildlife educator at the research reserve, in Crawfordville. Lovestrand took the chick to Chris Beatty, director of FWMA, where helpers were already overwhelmed dealing with close to two dozen baby pelicans also rescued from Tropical Storm Debby. Beatty said the osprey chick was a partially edged nestling, which quickly recovered given a little sh and some tender loving care. On Tuesday, June 26, Olin had carpenter Red Blaisdell build a platform atop the same standing dead pine that had held the original nest, but which was shorter now, having lost its top to a storm. Blaisdell shortened it further to create a at surface to better support the nest box. Olin and Blaisdell reconstructed the osprey nest as best they could. On Wednesday morning, June 27 at 7:30 a.m. Lovestrand picked the osprey chick up at FWMA, where Beatty now had more than 50 baby pelicans in-house. Also that morning, Olin, at home on the island, observed the osprey parents in the area of the nest platform. At 1 p.m., Lovestrand delivered the chick and Blaisdell immediately placed it in the new nest. Olin, Blaisdell, Lovestrand, and Matt Anderson, a coworker from the research reserve, kept vigil throughout the afternoon, watching over the chick and scanning the sky. Around 3:30 p.m., one adult osprey ew in, looked over the nest and ew away. It returned shortly and perched in a tree nearby. A second osprey landed in tree further away in the woods and they began calling back and forth. Lovestrand, an experienced birder, noticed the chick, which had been bobbing up and down before the adult bird arrived, attened itself in the nest when the big bird perched nearby. The rescuers watched the scene for a nerve-racking hour. Finally, the chick stirred. Lovestrand said, when the chick stretched its wings, the nearest adult took ight out over the bay and began hover hunting for sh. It returned around 4:30 p.m. with a sh, circled several times and then landed on the nest. In a few minutes, the other adult joined its mate on the platform. When the moment happened, it was unbelievably magical, said Olin. I had wondered about Eric and Matthew waiting around all afternoon for the parents to come back, but, when it happened, I realized this is what these guys live for. On Thursday morning, June 28, Olin awoke to a very happy scene of the osprey family reunited. The adults preened and groomed the baby and dgeted with the nest, taking turns retrieving sh for their rescued youngster. To view a gallery of photos of this rescue visit www. apalachtimes.com. While this little osprey is happy and safe, FWMA is struggling with many more animals that need help. As of last week, they had received 54 pelican chicks and three adult pelicans; a clapper rail, several other osprey chicks, a sooty tern, a snow egret, a screech owl and more, all suffering the effects of wind and torrential rain. In all, more than 70 Franklin County animals are sheltered there now and are consuming 75 pounds of sh daily. Many will be relocated to other shelters, but Beatty said volunteers and any emergency funding would be gratefully welcomed. Tax-deductible donations may be sent to Florida Wild Mammal Association, 198 Edgar Poole Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32327, or visit www.wakullawildlife.org/ and use the Paypal button to make an instant donation. By LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star .com Three FWC staffers risked their lives during Tropical Storm Debby to pluck a pair of stranded campers off a storm-ravaged barrier island. On Friday, June 22, Gregory Farrell and his 14-year-old son drove from Shalimar to Indian Pass, and packed their camping gear into a 23-foot kayak for a weekend camping on Little St. George Island. On Sunday, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) office in Carrabelle received a phone call from Farrells wife, who said her husband had sent her a text message saying that the weather had become very bad. He wrote that he and their son had sufficient rations and equipment to ride out the storm. Later he contacted her again and said he planned to set off an emergency flare to try to get some help leaving the island. This prompted her to call the FWC. Capt. Craig Duval and another FWC of cer went to look for Farrells van at Indian Pass and couldnt nd it. Duval decided to take a boat and search the island for the Farrells. He said the crossing was treacherous. It was real rough between the rain and wind and sea conditions, Duval said. It was pretty bad. With Of cer John Allen and Lt. Charlie Wood, he launched a 28-foot Impact and headed for Little St. George. The of cers began their search at Sikes Cut and worked their way west until they after spotted an emergency are and located father and son about three-quarters of a mile from the west end of the island. The FWC boat was met at Scipio Creek Marina by a deputy from the Franklin County Sheriffs of ce and the Farrells were taken to the emergency operations center where they were given dry clothes and a hot meal. Duval said the FWC later found Farrells van at Indian Pass overwhelmed by salt water. Farrells wife drove over and picked up her husband and son. Farrell said he will attempt to recover his own boat and equipment. Duval praised Farrell, saying he made many good choices and was well equipped for the emergency. They had rations and an emergency broadcast unit, ares, safety equipment and a cell phone for communications, he said. Duval said that due to high water, the pair also wisely opted to stay with their tent and not try to get to the house on the island for shelter. I think they did a lot right, he said. RESCUEDOsprey chick saved from Debbys furyCampers plucked from Little St. George Red Blaisdell places the rescued edgling in the nest.PHOTOS BY ERIC LOVESTRAND | Special to the TimesThe chick Rob Olin with the osprey chick he rescued.

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LocalThe Times | A3 AUTOMATIC POWER PROTECTION 24/7**PRICES VARY DEPENDING ON EQUIPMENT & INSTALLATIONNo lights, loss of communication and safety issues are just a few of the headaches associated with a power outage. When the power goes out, depend on a GENERAC standby generator to supply back-up electricity to your homes essential items, automatically. No manual starting. FOR TURN KEY INSTALLATION STARTING AT:$4500.00**Anderson Power Services 229-247-6630 http://andersonpowerservices.com Thursday, July 5, 2012Robert Martin Tolentino, 50, of Grand Rapids, Mich., pleaded guilty in federal court in Tallahassee June 28 to defrauding SunTrust Mortgage, Inc. on a $2 million mortgage. Pamela C. Marsh, U.S. attorney for the Northern District of Florida, announced the guilty plea with the details outlined in a news release from her ofce. In Oct. 2006, Tolentino applied for renancing of his residential property on St. George Island. According to the Franklin County property appraisers website, Tolentino bought a beachfront home in the St. George Plantation at 1416 Elm Court for $2.34 million on July 17, 2006. The property currently has an assessed value of $918,000. In his renancing application, Tolentino falsely represented that his monthly salary was $48,000 to $60,000 per month. According to his W-2 forms submitted to the Internal Revenue Service, his annual salary was approximately $183,647 and $174,250 for the 2005 and 2006 tax years, respectively. Tolentino also misrepresented the property as his primary residence, when in fact, he had listed the property with a vacation rental business and had received more than $20,000 in rental income between July and Dec. 2006, according to the news release. The rental income was not disclosed on the application and Sun Trust Mortgage approved the loan for $2 million. Tolentinos sentencing is scheduled for Sept. 26, 2012, before U.S. District Judge Judge Robert L. Hinkle. He is facing a maximum sentence of 30 years in prison, a $1 million ne, ve years of supervised release and a $100 special monetary assessment as a result of his conviction for committing wire fraud affecting a nancial institution. Marsh praised the work of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, whose investigation led to the prosecution. The case is being prosecuted by Assistant U.S. Attorney Winifred Acosta NeSmith. The following report is provided by the Franklin County Sheriffs Ofce. Arrests in this report were made by ofcers from the Apalachicola Police Department (APD), Carrabelle Police Department (CPD) and Franklin County Sheriffs Ofce (FCSO). All defendants are to be considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law.June 18Carl B. Sanders, 48, Eastpoint, violation of probation (FCSO) Matthew P. Coyle, 31, Palm Harbor, violation of probation (FCSO) William C. Roche, Jr., 37, Jacksonville, withholding child support (FCSO) Charles W. Black, 47, Carrabelle, failure to appear (FCSO)June 19George E. Silvis, 55, Carrabelle, violation of probation (CPD) Dewey J. Williams, Jr., 19, Carrabelle, domestic battery, burglary of a structure, and grand theft (CPD)June 21Dewey J. Williams, Jr., 19, Carrabelle, burglary of a dwelling, dealing in stolen property, and grand theft (FCSO) Marisol Reyes, 23, Apalachicola, workmans compensation fraud (FCSO) Elvina Perez, 32, Apalachicola, workmans compensation fraud (FCSO) Aurora Leon Gordillo, 28, Apalachicola, workmans compensation fraud (FCSO) Andres Francisco Diego, 21, Apalachicola, workmans compensation fraud (FCSO) Victor Diego Gaspar, 53, Apalachicola, workmans compensation fraud (FCSO) Agustin Huertos Paez, 32, Apalachicola, workmans compensation fraud (FCSO) William H. Hoffmire, 50, Eastpoint, DUI, driving while license suspended or revoked and refusal to submit to breath test (FCSO)June 22Charles D. Brown, 59, Apalachicola, domestic battery (APD) Douglas B. Kerley, Jr., 23, Mobile, Ala., burglary of a dwelling, grand theft and tampering with physical evidence (FCSO)June 24Joshua R. Gordon, 36, Thomasville, Ga., domestic battery (CPD)June 25Scotty C. Banks, 23, Eastpoint, disorderly intoxication, battery and resisting arrest without violence (FCSO) Paul H. Hunt, 23, Atlanta, Ga., burglary of a dwelling, grand theft and tampering with physical evidence (FCSO)June 26Patricia A. Keil, 43, Eastpoint, battery (FCSO) Kamal Darwish, 35, Eastpoint, sexual battery or attempted sexual battery (FCSO) Halifax Media Group closed a deal with Freedom Communications June 27 to purchase eight daily and 11 weekly publications located in Florida and North Carolina, including the Apalachicola and Carrabelle Times. The acquisition further expands Halifax Medias reach in these states, following the Jan. 6 purchase of the New York Times Regional Newspaper Group. With the Freedom purchase, total circulation for the Halifax Media Group will grow to 635,000 daily and 752,000 Sunday. Other Florida newspapers involved in the transaction include The News Herald, Panama City; Northwest Florida Daily News, Fort Walton Beach; The Destin Log, Destin; Santa Rosa Press Gazette and Santa Rosa Free Press, Milton; Crestview News Bulletin, Crestview; Holmes County Times-Advertiser, Bonifay; Washington County News, Chipley; The Walton Sun, Santa Rosa Beach; and The Star in Port St. Joe North Carolina newspapers include Times-News, Burlington; The Daily News, Jacksonville; The Gaston Gazette, Gastonia; The Star, Shelby; The Free Press and The Jones Post, Kinston; The Havelock News, Havelock; The Sun Journal and The Shopper, New Bern; and The Topsail Advertiser, Surf City. What these newspapers have in common with the Halifax Media Group properties is this: They are the best and most reliable source for local news in their communities, said Michael Redding, CEO of Halifax Media Group. We believe in the future of newspapers, both in print and online. We have to be great at both. These newspapers embody Halifax Media Groups philosophy for providing local news that no one else can deliver. Founded in 2010, Halifax Media is headquartered in Daytona Beach. The companys investment group includes Stephens Capital Partners, JAARSSS Media and Redding Investments. The group consists of 36 newspapers and afliated websites, published in six states, primarily in the Southeast. Halifax Medias strategy is to invest long-term capital in quality companies positioned in strong markets that are closely connected to the community. MICHAEL REDDINGCEO of Halifax Media Group Arrest REPORTPlantation homeowner pleads guilty to mortgage fraudHalifax closes deal to buy Times, other papers Dr. Hobson Fulmer of Apalachicola Bay Animal ClinicWelcomes Our New Associate: Dr. John DuncanAlong with Dr. Fulmer, Dr. Duncan will be seeing patients for small animal medicine and surgery. Please call for an appointment or come by to meet him.850-670-8306Clinic hours: Monday-Friday 8am 6 pm187 Highway 98, Eastpoint Complete small animal medicine and surgery, wellness programs, laser surgery, diagnostic ultrasound, Serving Franklin and Gulf Counties for 30 years Theres a New Veterinarian in Town!

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OpinionA4 | The Times USPS 027-600Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 Publisher: Rick Martin POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six monthsHome delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERSIn case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola TimesThursday, July 5, 2012Special to the TimesHuman rights and national security expert Mark Schlakman of Tallahassee announced last week his candidacy in Floridas 2nd Congressional District, pledging to put his experience in both Democratic and Republican administrations at the state and federal level, to work in helping end the political gridlock in Congress. It is clear even to the most casual observer that partisan politics in Congress has paralyzed our country, and failure to nd common ground has been devastating to many families, and does a disservice to those who put their lives on the line for us every day, Schlakman said. Schlakman said his priorities include the economy and job growth, scal responsibility, national security and improving the administration of justice, rising sea levels and the implications to Floridas coastal areas, comprehensive immigration reform as an economic development imperative, as well as simplifying the tax code, foreign policy, international trade and smart development. Former Florida Comptroller Robert Milligan, a highly respected Republican leader, crossed party lines to endorse Schlakman, a Democrat, as a principled, bipartisan advocate who has the skills and ability to serve as a catalyst for change in a bitterly divided Congress. I am supporting Mark Schlakman because I trust him, Milligan said. Mark is a man of character. He is intelligent. He is genuinely concerned about people. At a time when the people of this nation are fed up with partisan politics, decit spending, and a do nothing Congress, we need someone like Mark who is a problem solver who seeks solutions by building consensus. Milligan, a retired three-star Marine Corps general who was elected to two terms as the states comptroller, later served as acting executive director of the Florida Department of Veterans Affairs upon the death of retired Navy Rear Adm. LeRoy Collins, Jr. By electing me to Congress, North Floridians can play an important role in restoring civility and decency in our national government and ensuring all Americans of the bipartisan, committed leadership they deserve in getting our nation back on track, said Schlakman, in thanking Milligan for his support. He said the bickering and inghting between Republicans and Democrats in Congress is hampering efforts to create jobs, increase opportunity and restore prosperity in an economically troubled nation. Vilifying the other party doesnt help to pay the bills or put food on the table nor will political posturing keep the lights on, Schlakman said. Despair is often very quiet but make no mistake; there are good people who want to work and families who want to believe theres a future brighter than what they can see today. At rst blush, given the nature of the political process today, because I am not an elected ofcial, career politician or party operative I am a decided underdog in this race. However, over the course of the next several weeks we will demonstrate to the people of this district why that fact coupled with my background and long history of public service position me to win the general election in November and, more importantly, to govern effectively from day one upon taking the oath of ofce, he said. Schlakman serves as senior program director at The Florida State University Center for the Advancement of Human Rights. He previously held senior positions of trust and condence in Tallahassee and Washington, with Gov. Lawton Chiles, Gov. Buddy MacKay, Gov. Jeb Bush, and under Presidents Bill Clinton and George W. Bush. He also served as a special adviser to a number of senior military leaders in Washington and Florida. During his tenure as special counsel to Gov. Chiles he developed, among other things, a nonviolent criminal alien deportation initiative that allowed the state to avoid an estimated $100 million in costs of incarceration, served as staff lead for mass migration contingencies and negotiated an $18 million payment from the U.S. Department of Justices Immigration Emergency Fund, which was the largest single disbursement received by any state at that time, and developed the governors Florida/Haiti Initiative, which served as a model for Gov. Jeb Bushs Florida/Haiti Initiative years later. A lawyer, he is a magna cum laude and Phi Beta Kappa graduate of the University of Miami and earned his law degree at Georgetown University Law Center, where he served as Student Bar Association president and received the Deans Certicate at graduation. He subsequently completed the Kennedy Schools Program for Senior Executives in State and Local Government at Harvard University. By SUE CRONKIESpecial to the Times Alexander Key is known locally for his novels which romanticize Floridas Gulf Coast and Apalachicola Bay. His wife Margaret, also a writer, is revered for the gift of her home and antiques to the Apalachicola Municipal Library. Robert Key, Alexs younger brother, worked for the Apalachicola Times in the 1930s. In a notebook of Roberts found in Margarets les, are collected clippings of articles Bob wrote and sent to larger newspapers around Florida and the United States. Bob called himself the Franklin County Publicity Agent and sent articles to the Panama City Herald, Tallahassee Daily Democrat, Pensacola Journal, Florida Times-Union, St. Petersburg Evening Independent, New York Times, Chicago Daily News and papers in the far West. Each week 30 dispatches, containing stories describing Franklin County, were sent to newspapers in towns of 10,000 or more, rotating through a list of 100 cities, writes Bob in his cover sheet. At least one story in every dispatch was slanted for national news interest. The Keys moved to Apalachicola in 1936, and letters from Alex and Bobs Aunt Sallie in Quincy indicate that Bob lived with Margaret and Alex during the latter part of the 1930s. Most of the clippings bear no date, but a report of funeral services for Dorothea A. Hoppe tells her age and when she was born, which sets the year as 1938. Another funeral notice for R. G. Porter is dated 1939. Franklin D. Roosevelt is credited with expending funds from the Public Works Administration (PWA) to build a new courthouse, and $161,000 from Works Projects Administration (WPA) for county road improvements. Joe P. Anthony says in a dispatch that 10 Apalachicola seafood dealers would sponsor a radio program over WSUN, St. Petersburg, to advertise Apalachicola oysters. C. L. Richardson, State Board of Health inspector said 80 percent of all oysters produced in Florida came from Apalachicola. Another dispatch has Joe Taranto talking about caviar being everyday food for Apalachicola shermen. He said in addition to the high dollar for sturgeon meat, cured roe, or caviar, brought from $1 to $1.50 a pound. To cure the roe it was run through a sieve and allowed to dry, much like cottage cheese, for about eight days. Roberts dispatches werent all promotions and announcements of public funds. One clipping tells of a man arrested for counterfeiting after a gambling machine and bogus half-dollars were found in the home. Postmaster Hal Hoffmans red-wheeled roadster was stolen from in front of the post ofce and taken for a joy ride all the way to Marianna. A bottle of whiskey and two hitchhikers were found in the car. It wouldnt do but 90, J. Sumner said of the car, as the sheriff locked the handcuffs on him. Sue Cronkite works with librarian Caty Greene at the Apalachicola Municipal Library. To reach her, call 653-8436. Heavy rainfall from Tropical Storm Debby may have made your water unsafe. If you are unsure about the impact of ooding on your well water, either use bottled water, or boil or disinfect all the water you use for drinking, making beverages, cooking, brushing your teeth, washing dishes, and washing areas of the skin that have been cut or injured. Common unscented household bleach (4 to 6 percent) can be used effectively as a chlorine disinfectant. Add 8 drops (about 1/8 teaspoon) of unscented household bleach per gallon of water, then let stand for 30 minutes, repeating the procedure if the water is still cloudy. Or you can disinfect your water by bringing it to a rolling boil for one minute. If your well has been ooded, please call the Franklin County Health Departments Environmental Health Division, at 653-2111 Ext.118, for information about how to sample your water and where to bring the sample for bacteriological testing. If the test reveals bacteria, the well and water system need to be disinfected. It is important to disinfect both well and plumbing water with unscented household bleach to ensure that all infectious agents are destroyed. If you have water treatment devices, remove all membranes, cartridges, and lters and replace them after the chlorination process is completed. The amount of chlorine determines the length of time you allow the bleach to remain in your system. The Franklin County Health Department recommends the following steps to disinfect a contaminated well: If the water is discolored, before adding the bleach, run the water until it is clear for up to 10 minutes. Turn off and then drain your hot water heater; bleach is not effective in water above 105 degrees. Remove and replace charcoal lters after the disinfecting process is completed. To avoid adding contamination to the well during disinfection, clean the work area around the top of the well. Then remove grease and mineral deposits from accessible parts of the well head and ush the outside surfaces with 1/2 cup of unscented household bleach in 5 gallons of water. Turn off the pump. Remove the cap or the well plug on the rubber seal. There are many types of well caps and plugs. If you have questions, you should contact a licensed well driller. If you have a submersible pump, you may also want to contact a licensed well driller for advice on disinfection procedures. Pour the recommended amount of unscented bleach (4 to 6 percent) solution into the well. Try to coat the sides of the casing as you pour. If you get bleach on the pump or wiring, ush it thoroughly with fresh water to prevent later corrosion. Re-cap or plug the well opening and wait 30 minutes. Turn on and, if needed, re-prime the pump. Open all the faucets on the system one at a time. Allow the water to run until there is a noticeable smell of bleach. You may also want to ush the toilets. If you have outside faucets, you may want to direct the water away from sensitive plants. If you cannot detect a bleach odor, repeat the disinfecting process. Turn off all the faucets, and allow the bleach to remain in the system for at least eight hours. Backwash water softeners, sand lters, and iron removal lters with bleach water. Again, open all the faucets and run the water until there is no bleach smellfor up to 15 minutes. In last weeks June 28 Times, an article appeared on page A3 headlined Six charged with workers comp fraud. Each of the six Central American immigrants was charged by the Florida Department of Financial Services Division of Insurance Fraud with a single third-degree felony, as cited in Florida Statutes 440.105(4)(b)(9). That law makes it a crime for anyone to knowingly present or cause to be presented any false, fraudulent, or misleading oral or written statement to any person as evidence of identity for the purpose of obtaining employment or ling or supporting a claim for workers compensation benets. Because it is not clear from the available law enforcement documentation whether the six are alleged to have provided false documentation for the purpose of obtaining employment, or for the purpose of supporting a claim for workers compensation benets, it cannot be assumed that the charges stemmed from any of these individuals specically committing workers comp fraud. The Times regrets any misunderstanding from last weeks story. CORRECTIONSchlakman to run for Congress MaARK SCHLaAKmaMAN KKeys little brother promoted Apalach@THE LIBRaARY Caty GreeneWhat to do if your well is ooded RROBERT KKEY

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LocalThe Times | A5 Robert C. Bruner Attorney Personal & Business BankruptcyOver 30 Years Legal Experience850-670-3030 bankruptcy relief under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon advertisements. Before you decide, ask us to send you free written information H. JeffVonier for SheriffFranklin County For a better and safer place for your children to grow up in.Pd. Pol. Ad.Paid for and approved by H. Jeff Vonier, Sheriff for Franklin County. Qualications: Expertise in: New Patients WelcomeCall Toll Free888-681-5864 For more info www.seclung.com LUNG AND SLEEP DISORDERS DR. ROB GARVER expert on orchid cultivation. He has maintained an avid interest on the history of his family and that of Apalachicola, especially the waterfront. And even today, he spends time at Ten Foot Hole, talking to his cronies at the DP Pavilion. To recount his life, Apalachicola Bay Chamber of Commerce Director Anita Grove read the citys proclamation, as follows: Whereas, Mr. Dan Sangaree, a prominent resident of Apalachicola, has been an inspirational attribute of the city of Apalachicola for his lifelong achievements and service to this grateful nation, and Whereas, he was born on June 20, 1912, he is today, this 20th day of June 2012, celebrating his 100th birthday of life on earth, and Whereas, in 2010 Mr. Sangaree was honored as the oldest veteran in Franklin County at our local veterans celebration held annually here in Apalachicola, serving in the Florida National Guard during World War II from 1939 until 1946, and was in active duty overseas from 1943 until 1945 stationed in Morotai off the northern coast of New Guinea, and Whereas, he has successfully embarked on several careers throughout his lifetime, Mr. Sangaree is most noted for his diligence in overseeing the birth of one of the rst modern movie theatres in Florida, The DeSoto, located in Arcadia, touted as one of the nest small theatres and considered a modern marvel in 1951, and Whereas, I, Van W. Johnson, Sr., Mayor, along with the distinguished Apalachicola Board of City Commissioners and staff, would like to take this opportunity to join with family and friends of this great community in honoring Mr. Dan Sangaree on this momentous occasion of his 100th birthday celebration on June 20, 2012. Therefore be it proclaimed, that I, Van W. Johnson, Sr., Mayor of the City of Apalachicola, on behalf of a grateful community, do hereby acknowledge, recognize and proclaim Wednesday, June 20, 2012, as a day of recognition in honor of Dan Sangaree in the City of Apalachicola and encourage all its citizens to show their gratitude for his service and the contributions he has made to the city of Apalachicola, the state of Florida and this great nation. By Lois Swobodathrough the Florida panhandle and empties into the Gulf of Mexico. The Supreme Courts decision means an appeals court ruling favorable to metro Atlanta will stand. Authorities in Florida, Alabama and even southern Georgia complain that Atlanta takes too much water from Lake Lanier, a federal reservoir, leaving too little downstream for drinking water systems, wildlife and industry, including nourishing the oyster beds of Apalachicola Bay. Georgia Gov. Nathan Deal said he welcomed both the Supreme Court decision and the Corps report as federal of cials prepare to decide how much water Atlanta can get. We can now move forward with this issue behind us, have the governors work together and come to a long-term agreement that will provide for the water needs of all three states, Deal said in a written statement. That (Corps) decision will help us not only plan for Georgias future growth, but it will also give us greater certainty regarding existing resources. If its fully granted, Atlanta-area water of cials expect their old request for water might serve the region longer than the originally projected 2030 because conservation steps and a bad economy have reduced water use. Although the latest court rulings have been favorable to metro Atlanta, they do not mean the legal dispute is over. Alabama Gov. Robert Bentley said the Corps still must make additional reviews before deciding to release more water to Atlanta. As part of that process, Army of cials must consider downstream views. Alabama will be a full participant in that review in order to ensure that vital downstream interests are protected, Bentley spokesman Jeremy King said. We will make sure that the concerns of downstream communities are heard as this process continues. Authorities in Alabama and Florida have argued that Congress permitted the construction of the dam at Lake Lanier to control oods, produce electricity and make river navigation easier but not to supply drinking water. The city of Atlanta never contributed to the cost of building the dam, which was completed around 1960, because city of cials did not believe water would be in short supply. Georgia of cials maintain Congress envisioned the Corps would operate the dam so Atlanta still could get enough drinking water downstream from it. It currently supplies water to roughly 3 million people around Atlanta, more than half the metro areas population. In 2009, U.S. District Court Judge Paul Magnuson found that metro Atlanta had little right to water from Lake Lanier and threatened to reduce water withdrawals to levels last seen in the 1970s, when the metro region was far smaller. Those restrictions were supposed to take effect this year unless leaders from the three states worked out an agreement. But the 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals tossed aside that decision last year, deciding it was legal for metro Atlanta to use Lake Lanier as a water supply. The appeals court gave Army of cials one year to re-evaluate Georgias request for more water. pruning project. The treetrimming lasted from early afternoon June 26 until about 8 p.m. June 28. Tim Leljedal, a Progress Energy spokesman, said the work was, the result of the issues we ran into of tree limbs causing multiple outages in the same area during (the storm). We had had tree crews working in different portions of the state beginning Sunday, after we started experiencing power outages. In order to minimize the likelihood of additional outages in the same areas, they trimmed the trees along the lines of the standards applied throughout our system based on amount of clearance needed, he said. City Commissioner Frank Cook said pruning in the alleys had been authorized and was necessary in the emergency situation. Under Section V of the city tree ordinance, trees may be pruned or removed, following an emergency or an act of nature, when the city commission determines that permitting requirements will hamper private or public work. City Administrator Betty Taylor Webb said to her knowledge, there was no meeting to discuss the pruning. The workers began by pruning trees in alleys, which drew little protest, but on Thursday afternoon, the trucks converged on Avenue C in the historic district and set to work on trees lining that street. Burford had to be careful to avoid a potential violation of federal law when they pruned within 600 feet of an eagles nest at the corner of 11th Street. Some homeowners were in favor of the pruning. Colly and Lois Watkins applauded the workers. This should have been done 20 years ago, Lois Watkins said. She displayed a large chunk of pinkish glass resembling branching coral and said it had been formed several years ago when a tree limb separated a wire from a transformer on the right-of-way adjacent to their property. The wire, she said, stuck into the ground, showering sparks and melting a portion of the sandy soil. It took them 45 minutes to turn it off, Colly Watkins said. Every time theres a storm, this block, from (U.S.) 98 to the bay, is the rst to lose power because of the trees, and the last to have it turned back on Lois Watkins said. We cant do without power. Colly and I both have heart conditions. I have a 500-watt generator, Colly Watkins said, but to use it I have to drag it out and start it up. Farther down the street, some residents were not as happy about the tree crews. Dot Hill said the trees were badly pruned. They might as well cut them down as do that to them, she said. A small group of protestors followed the operation, shouting at the workers, photographing and videotaping them. When police interceded, angry words were exchanged. Whose side are you on? demanded one woman. The protestors were warned to stay away from the tree crews and eventually from the police of cers as well. One tree pruned was a huge patriarch oak in Martha Elliots front yard. I paid $800 of my own money to have that tree pruned myself by Gary Barco, a certi ed arborist from Tallahassee, she said. He removed any limbs within a 6-foot radius of the power lines in March 2011. I had that tree registered with the Live Oak Society when I bought the house. They determined the tree to be from 250 to 300 years old at that time, based on the girth of 21 feet. Now theyre pruning it, and nobody asked my permission. I guess because Im not a full-time resident, my opinions dont count, Elliot said. If there are only 16 of the patriarch trees in town, youd think they could be managed properly. She said she checked the tree earlier in the day, when the power was still out, and there were no branches in contact with the lines. It is beyond me how any human being could look at a tree of that age and with that majesty and not just put the saw down, Elliot said. It cant be put back. Wilbur Bellew, a city staffer charged with overseeing the pruning of patriarch trees, arrived on the scene as the Burford trucks began to depart, and later, Cook came as well. In a telephone interview Monday, Bellew said because the pruning was in response to an emergency situation, his presence was not required when the patriarch oak was pruned. SANGAREE from page A1 WATER from page A1 PRUNING from page A1This should have been done 20 years ago. Lois Watkins, Apalachicola residentLOIS SWOBODA | The TimesLois and Colly Watkins display glass created by a fallen electric wire. Thursday, July 5, 2012

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A6 | The Times PRETTY LITTLE PENELOPE! Penelope is an 8 month old Chiwienie. She is social, affectionate and happy. Penelope gets along well with both children and other dogs so she would make an ideal addition to your family. Come and meet this sweetheart at the adoption center and see if shes the dog for you! Volunteers are desperately needed to socialize all of our dogs and cats. We are always looking for people willing to bring one of our animals into their home to be fostered for various needs. Anytime you can spare would be greatly appreciated. Call Karen at 670-8417 for more details or visit the Franklin County Humane Society at 244 State Road 65 in Eastpoint. You may logon to the website at www.forgottenpets.org to see more of our adoptable pets. PETOFTHEWEEK Franklin County Humane Society Call Karen at 670-8417 for more details or visit the Franklin County Humane Society at 244 State Road 65 in Eastpoint. You may logon to the website at www.forgottenpets.org to see more of our adoptable pets. WE CAN HELP! GOT MOSQUITOES? CALLLOIS AT 653-5857Franklin Countys ONLY LOCALPest Control Company CARPET CERAMIC TILE HARDWOOD AREA RUGS WINDOW SHADES & BLINDS PITTSBURGH PAINTS WE BIND CARPETS We offer LPort Saint Joe area Design professionals on premise C Professional Installation2760 HWest Port Saint JoeLOCALLYOWNED aint Joe L OCA LL Y O WNED H W est W est W P ort P ort P S aint Joe $50 Offpurchase of $ 750.00 or moreTile starting at Carpet starting at dbutler@coastalcoverage.com Locally owned and operated Home Business Auto Health Workers Comp Thursday, July 5, 2012Special to the TimesThe demand for nurses keeps calling, and Gulf Coast State College keeps answering. On June 7, the largest class of graduates from the 12-year-old practical nursing program at the Gulf/ Franklin Campus paused for their pinning ceremony all on their way to new jobs. All of them are going to work, in either Bay or Gulf County, said nurse Sharon Milner, assistant coordinator of the practical nursing and patient care assistant programs. She is also a proud teacher and cheerleader of these young nurses. Usually we have classes of 24 to 27 or so to graduate, so to have 31 is amazing, and eight of them have perfect attendance. Thats especially impressive. The eight graduates with perfect attendance were Lenka K. Doran, Regina M. Henderson, Terrah M. Huckeba, Javika K. King, Kim M. Nobles, Krystal M. Ramos, Abricka S. Smith and Amber A. Tharp. The other 2012 graduates were Rebecca L. Barnes, Heather D. Billingsley, Sophia J. Conerly, Victoria L. Dunn, Jessie D. Faircloth, Stephanie K. Gragg, Brandy N. Hicks-Lewis, James M. Hodges, Hellena L. Johnson, Karie M. Jones, Ariel N. Kemp, Theresa A. Kunkel, Anna M. Martinez, Clarissa Joy McAlpin, Vanessa R. Rhodes, Shelby D. Richards, Amanda C. Rotan, Courtney L. Shiver, Angelita T. Stephens, Morgan L. Swiech, Bernice M. Westfall, Ashley D. Zingarelli and Jordyn L. Zingarelli. Milner noted the strenuous class work the year-long program requires, plus the clinical time students split between Panama City and Port St. Joe. These students often arent traditional, she said. They may be older, with families, children and other commitments, plus they have the driving distance to the hospitals. But the rigorous schedule pays off. These newest graduates will sit for their national exams in mid-July from the Board of Nursing, and the job outlook remains strong, close to home or away. These 31 new nurses are giving back to the community in valuable work, bringing a better quality of life to themselves, their families and their patients. Milner started this practical nursing program when she arrived 13 years ago, and the years havent shaved a note off the pride in her voice. We had to write this program and present all the information to the Board of Nursing, she recalled of their efforts in the beginning. Through a selective admissions process, in June of every year, GCSC enrolls up to 36 students. A short 12 months later, the graduates are prepared to begin a whole new career and a promising future. Special to The TimesAt the annual summer conference of the Florida Court Clerks & Comptrollers June 12 in Panama City Beach, Pinellas County Clerk of Courts Ken Burke, president of the association, above right, presented Franklin County Clerk of Court Marcia Johnson with the Presidents Outstanding Service Award, a unique award presented by the president when there has been a Clerk of the Circuit Court who has undertaken a special issue and showed leadership skills among his or her peers. It is not every year that a clerk is chosen for this award. Johnson was tapped to receive the award for her three years of service spearheading the associations Best Practices committee, formed to identify and develop best business practices to enhance the services provided by the clerk to the public. Marcia Johnson has led our statewide committee on best practices for the past three years, Burke said. During that time, she has shown extraordinary leadership and dedication to working through so many of the clerks processes and helping her committee get them down on paper. It is a task that has helped us all provide training and common practices throughout our offices. We are proud to have her serving in a leadership role with the association. Johnson, an active member of the statewide association since she was first elected in 2004, will be re-elected to a third term this year after facing no opponent.Maranda Coatneys birthday SundayWell, its nally time to get er done, On July 8, when Marandas the Birthday One; There will be cake, and presents and loads of fun, When she turns.. twenty-one!Love,From Mama, Jimmy, Colton, Erica and Aunt JodyJayce James Carden bornJayce James Carden was born Tuesday, May 8, 2012, to Cilia Golden and James Carden of Eastpoint. He entered the world at Tallahassee Memorial HealthCares Womens Pavilion at 6:17 p.m., weighing 8 pounds, 2 ounces and measuring 20 inches long. Maternal grandparents are James and Jennifer Golden. Maternal great-grandfather is Dennis Causey of Camden, Ala., and maternal great-great-grandmother is Celia Segree of Carrabelle. Paternal grandparents are Linda and the late Ronald Carden. Paternal great-grandmother is Barbara Redwine of Statesboro, Ga. Jayce was welcomed into this world by his extended network of family and friends. Births and BIRTHDAYS Keisha Smith, Justin Messer to wed July 14Kathy and Don Griswold of Carrabelle request the honor of your presence at the marriage of their daughter, Keisha Kay, to Justin Eric Messer. The wedding will be celebrated Saturday, July 14, at 4 p.m. at the Carrabelle United Methodist Church, 102 N.E. Ave. B. The bride is the granddaughter of Cecil and the late Kay Millender, and the late Marjorie and Butch Jones. The groom is the son of Jerry and Linda Messer of Carrabelle. He is the grandson of Mayor Curley and the late Audrey Messer, and Walt and Dot Worthington, all of Carrabelle. The bride-to-be, a 1999 graduate of Carrabelle High School, is employed as Carrabelles city clerk. The future groom, a 1990 graduate of Carrabelle High School, works for the city of Carrabelles water and sewer department. A reception will follow at the Carrabelle Boat Club. 1570 U.S. 98 W. All family and friends are cordially invited to share in this joyous occasion. WeddingGulf Coast nursing grads get 100 percent placement SocietyJohnson wins Outstanding Service Award

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The Times | A7 The United Methodist Churches of Franklin County Welcome You First United Methodist Church of ApalachicolaWorship Service 11:00 a.m. every Sunday Sunday School 10:00 a.m. 75 5th St. Apalachicola 653-9530 fumcapalach@gtcom.net Pastor: Rev. Themo PatriotisCarrabelle United Methodist ChurchWorship Services 10:45 a.m. Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Celebrate Recovery Mondays 7-9 p.m. 102 NE Ave. B Carrabelle 697-3672 Pastor: Julie StephensEastpoint United Methodist ChurchWorship Service 10:00 a.m. every Sunday Healing service every fourth Monday at 7:00 p.m. 317 Patton Dr. (corner of David St.) 670-8825 Pastor: Rev. Beth WhiteSt. George Island United Methodist Church9:00 a.m. Worship Service 10:00 a.m. Fellowship Hour 201 E. Gulf Beach Dr. 9274635 www.sgiumc.org Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis Nursery now provided for Sunday Church Service First Pentecostal Holiness Church379 Brownsville Road Apalachicola Were excited about what Gods doing!!!Sunday School 9:45 am Sunday Morning Worship 10:45 am Sunday Evening Service 6:00 pm Monday, Youth Group 6:30 pm Wednesday, Royal Rangers, G.A.P.7:00 pm Wednesday Worship & Word 7:30 pmNursery Provided during regular church services 7:00 7:00 First Baptist ChurchSt. George Island 501 E. Bayshore Drive 927-2257 R. Michael Waley, Pastor Join us as we praise and worship the living Christ. Great is the Lord and most worthy of praise. Psalm 145:3 Sunday Bible Study................................................10:00am Worship Praise........................................................11:00am Sunday Night............................................................7:00pm Wednesday Power Hour......................................7:00pm Wednesday Youth at S.P.L.A.S.H.......................7:00pm Walking in Christ R. Michael Whaley, Pastor WELCOMES YOUChurch of the Ascension101 NE First Street CarrabelleSUNDAY10:00 AM WELCOMES YOUChurch THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH (850) 274-4490 (850) 545-2578 WELCOMES YOU Trinity Trinity Episcopal Churchest. 1836Welcomes YouHwy. 98 & 6th St. Apalachicola 850-653-9550Sunday Worship Services 8 & 10:30 a.m. Wednesdays Healing Service 11 a.m. Centering Prayer 4 p.m. Sunday Worship Services 8 & 10:30 a.m. Wednesdays Healing Service 11 a.m. Centering Prayer 4 p.m. Thursday, July 5, 2012Apalachicola resident Richard S. Dosik, age 80, died on Wednesday, June 20, as a result of complications from Parkinsons and heart disease. Born in Brooklyn, N.Y., Mr. Dosik was the salutatorian in his graduating class from Dartmouth and subsequently did graduate work in economics at the London School of Economics and at Harvard. During this period, he interned for the Marshall Plan. He worked initially at the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, which involved a posting to Mexico, and later for the Agency for International Development in Turkey and Peru. But Mr. Dosik spent the bulk of his career with the World Bank, which he joined in 1966, focusing on Latin America and later on renewable energy. Even after formally retiring in 1987, he continued to work occasionally as a consultant for the Bank during the next decade. In 2002, Mr. Dosik and his second wife June, whom he married in 1981, moved to Apalachicola, where he was living at the time of his death. His rst wife Diana died in 1977. Throughout his life, he was a car enthusiast and loved opera, woodworking and travel. In addition to his wife, he is survived by his two children, Jonathan Dosik of Boulder, Colo., and Lauren Lehane of Arlington, Va. Other survivors include his sonin-law, four stepchildren and seven grandchildren. In lieu of owers, the family requests that donations be made to Patrons of the Apalachicola Library Society Dick Dosik Fund, Apalachicola Municipal Library, 74 Sixth St., Apalachicola, FL 32320.Richard S. Dosik RICHARD S. DOSIKMs. Harriet Nonie Schoelles, 73, of Apalachicola, passed away on Friday, June 29, 2012, in Port St. Joe. A native of Washington, D.C., she lived several years in Tallahassee during the 1960s before moving to Apalachicola more than 40 years ago. She worked as an accountant and was a member of the First United Methodist Church of Apalachicola, where she sang in the choir and served as church bookkeeper. She was preceded in death by her husband, Roland M. Schoelles, Sr. Survivors include her son, Dennis Crosby and wife, Deedee, and her stepson, Roland Schoelles, Jr., all of Apalachicola; her grandchildren, Casey Crosby, Emily Crosby and Kevin Schoelles; her sister Mary Dorsey and husband, John, of Orlando; her brother, Luis Eason and wife, Pat, of Amelia Island; and her half-sister, Mickey Demarest of Chicago, Ill. The funeral service was held Tuesday morning, July 3, at the United Methodist Church of Apalachicola, conducted by the Rev. Themistocles Patriotis, with interment following in the family plot in Magnolia Cemetery. She lay in state at the church for an hour prior to the services. All services are under the direction of the Comforter Funeral Home, Port St. Joe.Harriet Schoelles Emergency aid comes in Debbys wakeA June 29 report by Franklins Promise Coalition, which serves as emergency support function (ESF-15) for volunteers and donations, indicates 55 clients called the county hotline requesting support related to Tropical Storm Debby. Joe Taylor, director of Franklins Promise, said food needs have been met by the three local food pantries, after Americas Second Harvest sent a load of supplemental food and water June 28. The Eastpoint Baptist Church distributed on Saturday, June 30, the Apalachicola Food Pantry on Tuesday, July 3, and the Carrabelle Food Pantry today. Taylor said Living Waters Church of God is taking the lead on a project to help two clients in need of repairs and tree removal. Clients reported $24,150 in damages and $22,580 in lost wages, he said. He said $1,379 of critical immediate needs have been met by St. Patricks Catholic Church/Catholic Charities, but unmet needs are $10,004 and could go higher if the bay is closed again after reopening July 2. Please send all requests for support to the EOC hotline at 653-4206.Carrabelle seniors host Saturday danceA dance will be this Saturday evening, July 7, at the Carrabelle Senior Center, 201 N.W. Ave. F, on the corner of First Street and Northwest Avenue F in downtown Carrabelle. The dance starts at 7 p.m., and admission is free. Music will be provided by local disc jockey Ron Vice, serving up a lively mix of Big Band dance tunes and mellow pop hits. For more information on the dance and other activities at the center, visit www. CarrabelleSeniorCenter. com.Apalachicola history buffs to meet July 14The annual meeting of Apalachicola Area Historical Society Inc. will be held at noon July 14 at the Carriage House of the Raney House Museum. At this meeting, of cers for the upcoming 2012-13 year will be elected, as well as two directors. The meal will be catered by A.J.s, and everyone attending is asked to bring a dessert. It is time once again to renew membership dues. The dues are $10. Please make your check payable to AAHS Inc.Senior forum planned for July 19A senior citizens forum is scheduled for 1:30-3:30 p.m. July 19 at the Carrabelle Senior Center to discuss Franklin County senior issues. Participants are encouraged to arrive at noon and have lunch at the Senior Center. For more info, call Bill Mahan at 247-9359. Everyone enjoyed the picnic at the Lanark Boat Club on the Fourth of July. Lots of friends and neighbors, and food, food, food. Thanks to all who helped and came and had a good time! Members of the Lanark Village Golf Club will prepare and serve your breakfast this Saturday, July 7. There will be pancakes, French toast, bacon, eggs and orange juice. Your donation of $5 will be collected at the door. Come and enjoy the morning, and support the golf club. Doors open at Chillas Hall at 8:30 a.m. See ya there! Mark your calendars for Saturday, July 14. Jeff Vonier will treat us to doughnuts and coffee from 8:30 to 11 a.m. at Chillas Hall. Jeff is a candidate for sheriff of Franklin County. Come on down and meet Jeff, and enjoy the doughnuts and coffee. Hats off to Katlyn Wilson! She passed her exams and is now a Florida certi ed registered nurse. She is the daughter of Steve and Ann Wilson. I had lunch last Sunday, July 1, at the St. James Health and Rehab Center. I visited with our friend Diane Hubanks and several others while I was there. Diane is slowly gaining on a long process. Keep her and the other patients in your prayers. Be kind to one another, and check in on the sick and homebound. Got Jesus? Until next time, God Bless America, our troops, the poor, homeless and hungry and Sgt. Joe Taranto, who left for Afghanistan last week. The Library Summer Programs Own the Night for teens and Dream Big Read started off with fun activities that captivated the participants. The youngsters in Carrabelle were fascinated with the barred owl that was introduced from the live exhibition from the Tallahassee Museum. The teens from both branches thoroughly enjoyed the dream interpretation workshop with Ms. Kay Wheeler as facilitator. The Singing Bowl was shown as she explained all elements of the conscious and unconscious mind. Today we had a few visitors that told us about our dreams, Rory Countryman said. They told us that we have a conscious and an unconscious. Your conscious mind has all the information that you need right at this time. And your unconscious has all your memories. You may know this, but most of your dreams you dont remember. But some of them you do remember. I like to dream any dream I can. Good dreams and bad dreams tell you something. All dreams need to be written down because you can use them to write a book or make a movie. Dreams are one of the most amazing functions of the body. Next week we will offer tips to the teens on how to stay safe and protect yourself, and each teen will receive a safety ashlight and whistle. The children can look forward to stories like Theres a Nightmare in My Closet by Mercer Mayer and make their own eece ghost pillows. There are still openings for these programs, but parents will need to call for more information and details about library programs. Please call the Eastpoint branch 670-8151 or the Carrabelle branch at 697-2366. Obituaries Faith Share your condolences at apalachtimes.comGolf club to host breakfast Saturday LANARK NEWSJim Welsh Faith BRIEFS SPECIAL TO THE TIMESEnjoying the Singing Bowl presentation by Kay Wheeler, center, are Jaylynn Lyston, left, and Ursula Countryman. Below, former Apalachicola resident Gibby Conrad shows a barred owl at the Carrabelle library. Your County LIBRARYOwn the Night reaches area teens

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Email outdoors news to timesoutdoors @star .com OUTDOORSwww.apalachtimes.comSection Section A Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL(next to Piggly Wiggly) www.BWOsh.com (next to Piggly Wiggly) www.BWOsh.com Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL (next to Piggly Wiggly) www.BWOsh.com Corner of Marina Drive, www.BWOsh.com Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL www.BWOsh.com Port St. Joe, FL Your Hunting Headquarters Your Hunting Headquarters Your Hunting Headquarters Independece Day Gun SaleOver 200 guns on sale at discount prices. New shotguns, ries, and pistols all priced to move. Call for a quote! 1(877)216-9600 JULY FEATURE FISH: Stop in and register or go online at www.BWOsh.com JULY FEATURE FISH: GAG GROUPER WEEKLY ALMANAC APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE TIDE TABLES MONTHLY AVERAGESTo nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from these given for APALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW Cat Point Minus 0:40 Minus 1:17 East Pass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27 To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from those given for CARRABELLE: HIGH LOW Bald Point Minus 9:16 Minus 0:03 Sponsor the WEEKLY ALMANACCall Today!653-8868 Date HighLow% Precip Thu, July 586 7530% Fri, July 685 7530% Sat, July 785 7530% Sun, July 885 7630% Mon, July 986 76 0% Tues, July 1088 7630% Wed, July 1187 7630% 4 We 701am 1.5 348pm 1.8 1043am 1.3 5 Th 724am 1.5 443pm 1.8 1216am -0.3 1135am 1.2 6 Fr 744am 1.4 538pm 1.7 1251am -0.1 1228pm 1.0 7 Sa 802am 1.5 635pm 1.5 123am 0.0 124pm 0.9 8 Su 821am 1.5 737pm 1.4 150am 0.2 225pm 0.8 9 Mo 842am 1.5 849pm 1.2 215am 0.4 331pm 0.6 10 Tu 907am 1.6 1021pm 1.1 238am 0.6 443pm 0.5 11 We 935am 1.7 301am 0.8 555pm 0.4 12 Th 1225am 1.1 1009am 1.7 325am 1.0 702pm 0.2 13 Fr 1050am 1.7 800pm 0.1 14 Sa 1136am 1.7 852pm 0.0 15 Su 453am 1.4 1228pm 1.7 719am 1.3 937pm -0.1 16 Mo 519am 1.4 121pm 1.7 829am 1.3 1017pm -0.1 17 Tu 545am 1.5 213pm 1.8 923am 1.3 1051pm -0.1 18 We 607am 1.5 302pm 1.8 1008am 1.3 1122pm -0.1 19 Th 627am 1.5 349pm 1.8 1048am 1.2 1149pm -0.1 4 We 536am 2.4 223pm 2.9 830am 2.1 1003pm -0.5 5 Th 559am 2.4 318pm 2.9 922am 1.9 1038pm -0.2 6 Fr 619am 2.2 413pm 2.7 1015am 1.6 1110pm 0.0 7 Sa 637am 2.4 510pm 2.4 1111am 1.4 1137pm 0.3 8 Su 656am 2.4 612pm 2.2 1212pm 1.3 9 Mo 717am 2.4 724pm 1.9 1202am 0.6 118pm 1.0 10 Tu 742am 2.6 856pm 1.8 1225am 1.0 230pm 0.8 11 We 810am 2.7 1100pm 1.8 1248am 1.3 342pm 0.6 12 Th 844am 2.7 112am 1.6 449pm 0.3 13 Fr 925am 2.7 547pm 0.2 14 Sa 1011am 2.7 639pm 0.0 15 Su 328am 2.2 1103am 2.7 506am 2.1 724pm -0.2 16 Mo 354am 2.2 1156am 2.7 616am 2.1 804pm -0.2 17 Tu 420am 2.4 1248pm 2.9 710am 2.1 838pm -0.2 18 We 442am 2.4 137pm 2.9 755am 2.1 909pm -0.2 19 Th 502am 2.4 224pm 2.9 835am 1.9 936pm -0.2 Thursday, July 5, 2012 Page 8Special to the TimesThe Florida State University Coastal and Marine Lab will present pioneering researcher Dr. Mark Albins, from Auburn University, on Thursday, July 12 from 7-9 p.m. in the auditorium. Albins will speak on Effects of the Invasive Pacific Red Lionfish On Atlantic Coral-Reef Fish Communities as part of the Conservation Lecture Series. Pacific red lionfish, introduced to Atlantic waters in the 1980s, have undergone a rapid range expansion and population explosion over the last decade. This invasive predator is now found across the Caribbean Sea, Gulf of Mexico, and southeastern coast of the United States. Lionfish are voracious fast-growing predators of small fishes, represent a novel predator type in the invaded system, and are reaching larger maximum sizes and substantially higher densities than they do in their native Pacific. While there is much speculation about the negative effects of lionfish on native species, few experimental studies have actually examined them. Albins changed all that by conducting controlled field experiments on coral-reefs in the Bahamas to examine the effects of lionfish on native fish communities. What he found was that lionfish caused substantial reductions in the abundance and species richness of small native fishes across ecologically important functional groups such as cleaners, predators, and herbivores. Lionfish also had stronger effects on native prey and grew more than six times faster than a similarly-sized native predator, the coney grouper. These results indicate that the lionfish invasion may have long-term, broad-scale impacts on the structure and function of invaded communities. Albinss dissertation research focused on investigating the effects of an invasive predator, the Pacific red lionfish, Pterois volitans, on Atlantic reef fish communities. For his current research as a post-doctoral associate at Auburn, in the Department of Fisheries and Allied Aquaculture, he will be investigating factors affecting settlement and early post-settlement mortality of fisheries species in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. Right: Researcher Mark Albins observes a lion sh hunting in a seagrass bed near Lee Stocking Island, Bahamas TIM PUSACK | Oregon State Researcher to speak on lion shBy LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star .com Tropical Storm Debby has come and gone, but we will be feeling her effects for weeks to come. Debby dumped record rains on the county and a week later, there is still standing water everywhere. Franklin County has become mosquito heaven since, as most people know, mosquitoes lay their eggs in standing water. Following ooding, mosquito numbers will likely increase in about seven to 10 days, depending upon temperature. The warmer the weather, the sooner they begin to swarm. After a storm, water retention ponds, drainage ditches, storm drains, holes left by uprooted trees, tire ruts or soil erosion are full of water that can stagnate over days. All of these are ideal places for mosquitoes to lay their eggs. Even smaller containers hold enough water to act as mosquito nurseries. Larvae are commonly found in potted plants and the saucers under them, trash cans, bird baths, old tires, wading pools, discarded jars, cans and other containers, plastic toys, coolers, buckets, water bowls for animals, ornamental pools, boats, gutters, bromeliads, magnolia leaves sagging tarpaulins or other covers and at rooftops. Right now is the time to avoid a mosquito invasion by being proactive. Overturn any object containing storm water. Be sure to check trash cans and buckets. Collect and properly dispose of debris from the storm. Mulch magnolia leaves that have accumulated on the ground and clean out gutters. Remove water that collects on sagging tarpaulins or other covers or awnings. Clear debris from drainage ditches so that storm water runs off and does not stagnate and ll in holes left by uprooted trees, vehicles or heavy equipment. Wading pools and bird baths should be emptied weekly. Pet dishes, bromeliads and other small containers should be ushed several times a week. Repair window and door screens to keep mosquitoes out of your home. Larger temporary bodies of water should be treated with an insecticide containing the bacteria Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis (Bti), which does not pose a hazard to animals. You can buy Bti at the hardware store in the form of mosquito dunks. Spraying the shrubs in your yard, the underside of window air conditioners and low structures like sh cleaning stations and wooden stairs where mosquitoes rest during the hot part of the day will reduce the mosquito population. Some pest control companies offer this service. Permanent bodies of water, like ponds and retention pools can be stocked with guppies to eat the larvae. Personal protection is important too. Staying indoors is one way to avoid mosquitoes, although this is usually not possible or practical if you are active in cleanup and repair efforts. But remember that mosquitoes are most active at dusk, so avoid outdoor activity at those times. Wearing a hat, long sleeved shirts and long pants can also shield you from mosquito bites. Products containing DEET are safe and effective at repelling mosquitoes. Some herbal products are also effective insect repellants for much shorter periods of time. Perspiration reduces the duration of protection provided any insect repellant. Children and pregnant women should use small amounts and the lowest concentrations of any repellent. It is also best to apply these products to clothing rather than skin and remember DEET can etch watch glasses and plastic lenses or jewelry. Keeping mosquito populations under control is not only important for comfortable outdoor living; it is essential to human health and the health of companion animals like dogs and horses. Mosquitoes transmit malaria, heartworm, dengue fever, encephalitis and yellow fever.Special to the TimesGag grouper opened for recreational harvest in most Gulf of Mexico state and federal waters July 1, the same day the season closed in state waters off the coast of Franklin, Wakulla, Jefferson and Taylor counties. The gag grouper recreational harvest season in Gulf of Mexico state and federal waters, not including Franklin, Jefferson, Wakulla, Taylor and Monroe counties, will end Oct. 31. State waters off Franklin, Wakulla, Jefferson and Taylor counties opened April 1 and close June 30. They will not be open during the July-through-October season everywhere else. Monroe County is also excluded from the July-through-October season because it is included in the Atlantic rules for gag grouper. Gag grouper caught in state and federal waters during the July-through-October season may be taken ashore in Franklin, Wakulla, Jefferson and Taylor counties, but boats with gag grouper aboard may not stop in and must have gear stowed while traveling through state waters in that region. The four-county region includes all waters of Apalachicola Bay and Indian Pass, including those in Gulf County, and all waters of the Steinhatchee River, including those in Dixie County. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) manages marine sh from the shore to nine nautical miles in the Gulf of Mexico. The FWC is working with Floridas anglers to rebuild gag grouper populations in the Gulf of Mexico to strong, sustainable levels. The Commission established these seasons at its February meeting. The regional season was set for 2012 only and was established to provide shing opportunities for private, recreational anglers when gag grouper are closer to shore and can be safely accessed by smaller boats. The gag grouper recreational harvest minimum size and bag limits are 22 inches and two gag grouper per person. No more than four of any species of grouper may be kept. To learn more about these management changes, visit MyFWC.com/Fishing and click on Saltwater, Recreational Regulations and Gulf Grouper. The U.S. Coast Guard is looking to reestablish an Auxiliary Unit in the Carrabelle, Eastpoint, St. George Island, Apalachicola area and needs male and female volunteers over age 17 to serve in various capacities helping recreational boaters improve their safety skills, better appreciate the environment, and become a respected and responsible operator of their preferred water craft. Becoming a member of the Coast Guard Auxiliary provides opportunities to train and devote as much time as you wish in any of the following activities: public education, recreation vessel examination, safety patrols, recruiting, public information, event planning and coordination, environmental protection, marketing, and building support among local law enforcement and government agencies. If any of the above activities touch upon your interests, I strongly urge you to attend the open invitation for membership in the Coast Guard Auxiliary on Saturday, July 7 from 10 am until noon, at Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve, 108 Island Drive, Eastpoint. For additional information, contact Dave Rabon, Flotilla 1-2, at 850-274-4689. BUDS N BUGSGag grouper recreational harvest opens, closes COAST GUARD AUXILLARY HOLDS OPEN HOUSE SATURDAY Skeeters & storms JAMES GATHANY | CDC Freshwater Saltwater St. Joe Bay is still the color of sweet tea. Opening days of scallop season are not to promising, however, good reports of bigger shells are in the deeper channels off of Blacks Island. Good reports of red sh and trout are coming in from the FIRE TOWER and from Towns beach early in the mornings. With the red snapper season extended until July 17, we should all get a little more time on the water this year! Rain water is still over lling most creeks and has the main rivers on a rise. Good news for the cat sherman, but not so much for the bass this week. The rising waters have pushed bream into the back waters of smaller creeks, so shing should be strong after the muddy water clears. SPONSORED BY

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CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA SP O RTS www.apalachtimes.com ASection Trades & Services Laban Bontrager, DMD Monica Bontrager, DMD 12761 Pea Ridge Road Bristol, Florida 32321TELEPHONE (850) 643-5417 Bristol Dental ClinicDENTURE LAB ON PREMISESSame Day Service on Repairs and Relines Don Lively General Contractors LICENSED ANDINSURED 20 YEARSEXPERIENCE P.O. Box 439 Carrabelle, FL 32322 697-2783 or Mobile 566-2603RC0066499RG0065255 Carrabelle Visa, Discover, and American Express Honored at Participating Ace Stores JACKSONS Building Supplies & Auto Repair Carrabelle 697-3333 We Deliver AnywhereHardware and Paint Center J.J.s Tree Service, LLC Stump Grinder Licensed & Insured Call John : (850) 899-8432 From A to ZPO Box 364Port St. Joe, FL 32457850-340-0756 Gregs Handyman Service & Lawn Maintenance JOES LAWN CARE IF ITS IN YOUR YARD LET JOE TAKE CARE OF IT FULL LAWN SERVICES, TREE TRIMMING AND REMOVALALSO CLEAN GUTTERS AND IRRIGATION INSTILLATION, PLANTING AND BEDDING AVAILABLE CALL JOE@ 850-323-0741 OR EMAIL JOES_LAWN @YAHOO.COM ROBERTS APPLIANCE REPAIR ALL MAJOR BRANDS 18 Shadow Lane Apalachicola, FL 32320 Phone: (850) 653-8122 Cell: (850) 653-7654 Clayton Concrete, Inc.Serving Franklin and Gulf Counties for over 20 years!Concrete Construction and PumpingHouse foundations, Slab Work, Driveways and Sidewalks Rock Driveways, Tractor work, Bush Hogging Storm CleanupGlen Clayton (850)229-6525 (850)527-5256 cellLicensed and insured Thursday, July 5, 2012 By DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894| @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com The Seahawks football program paid tribute to a bevy of graduating seniors May 31, at an endof-the-year banquet in the high school cafeteria. Seniors Paul Anderson, Marcus Dalton, Zach Armistead, Brennan Walden, Jonathan Smith, Chris Granger, Colton Sheridan, Buddy Davidson and Bubba Fasbenner were each presented with a framed jersey and words of encouragement from coach Josh Wright. Flanked by a giant poster of a muscled hawk toting a football, Wright recounted the season and urged players, parents and fans to redouble their efforts to make next year a stride forward. Three-and-seven was not the goal this year; the district title was the goal. We know we have some ways to go, Wright said. Our motto Team First, we got to get back to that. Some of us need to visit the wizard (of Oz) and nd courage and brains and heart. Weve got to go visit the wizard. In commenting on the team highlight lm, prepared by Antonio Croom, projected overhead, Wright said he and his staff had witnessed some outstanding plays and had seen rst-hand the teams unique chemistry. Player by player, Wright recounted last years roster of players who earned varsity letters. He began with sophomore running back Dwayne Griggs, who missed several games at the start of the season from injury but bounced back to become one of the teams leading offensive producers. In all, his stats over seven games were 839 yards on 79 carries for 13 touchdowns. Late word circulating in the community, as yet unveri ed, is that Griggs has opted to transfer to Godby for the 2012 season. Wright said he is at work trying to secure a hardship eligibility from the Florida High School Athletic Association for rising senior Tre Carr for the 2012 season. In addition to the seniors, Wright recounted the play of juniors Skyler Hutchinson, Ladarious Rhodes, Cole Lee, Chase Golden, David Butler, Jeffrey Murray, Zach Howze and Karl Sanford; sophomores Mercury Wynn, Holden Foley, Dillon Grant, Kyle Wheeler, Stephen DeVaughn and Mason Ray; and freshmen Jacob Wilson and Kelsey Jones. The Academic Achievement Award went to sophomore kicker Elton Olvera, who posted a grade point average of 3.75. Best Offensive Player honors went to quarterback Armistead, who completed 34 of 71 passes, for 484 yards and seven touchdowns. Hutchinson earned Best Defensive Player honors for 47 tackles, 25 of them solo, and one interception. Foley was named the Best Special Teams Player, as he had two kickoff returns for 28 yards, as well as a safety and two fumble recoveries on the year. The Coaches/ Captains Awards went to Armistead; Walden, who had eight receptions for 77 yards, as well 69 tackles and two sacks; Golden, who had 31 tackles, including 25 solos; and Granger, who had 119 yards on 28 carries, four receptions for 56 yards, and 29 tackles, before a season-ending injury just four games into the year. Wright also presented signed photos of the team to several assistant coaches, parents and fans who helped make the year a success, including Lisa Walden, Sally Wheeler, Sherry Reeder, Ashley Teat, Kelli Maggio, Mike Todd, Walter Armistead, Chris Granger Sr. and David Adlerstein. Teat, a volunteer coach, closed the banquet with a rousing speech of encouragement. 2012 SEAHAWKS SCHEDULEFriday, Aug. 24 vs. Bozeman (Preseason Classic) Friday, Aug. 31 @ Sneads Friday, Sept. 7 vs. Graceville Friday, Sept. 14 @ Cottondale Friday, Sept. 21 @ Liberty County Friday, Sept. 28 vs. Wewahitchka Friday, Oct. 5 vs. Port St. Joe Friday, Oct. 12 vs. Robert F. Munroe Friday, Oct. 19 vs. West Gadsden Friday, Oct. 26 @ Blountstown Friday, Nov. 2 Open Date Friday, Nov. 9 vs. South Walton District 2 Class 1AAt an award banquet May 30, players for the 2011-12 Seahawk and Lady Seahawk basketball teams were honored. Girls coach Carlos Hill presented awards to his players, beginning with Aaliyah West, who won the Academic Achievement Award for her perfect 4.0 grade point average. The Best Offensive Player awards were shared by Shelby Meyers and Myesha Campbell, while the Best Defensive Player award went to Anna Lee. The Coaches Award went to Dyshereah Key. Boys coach Mike Sweatt awarded Most Valuable Player honors to his two graduating seniors, AJ Allen and Chance Buffkin. The Best Defensive Player went to Dwayne Griggs, while the Top Rookie Award was presented to Kelsey Jones. The Coaches award went to Rahkeim Pierce, while the Academic Achievement Award went to David Butler, who has a 3.19 grade point average.Page A9Seahawk and Lady Seahawk basketball athletes honored DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The TimesLeft: Graduating seniors with coach Josh Wright, far left, are from left, Paul Anderson, Zach Armistead, Jonathan Smith, Chris Granger, Colton Sheridan and Buddy Davidson. Not pictured are Marcus Dalton, Brennan Walden and Bubba Fasbenner. Middle: Honored with Coaches/Captains awards are, from left, Chase Golden, Zach Armistead and Chris Granger, with coach Josh Wright, at right. Not pictured is Brennan Walden. Right: A giant hawk in a football uniform graced the stage at the football banquet. Seahawks salute gridiron seniors

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A10| The Times Thursday, July 5, 2012 CLASSIFIEDS 87616T LEGAL NOTICE Notice is given pursuant to Florida Self-Storage Facility Act, Florida Statutes, Chapter 83, Part IV that Franklin Mini Storage will hold a sale on: July 28, 2012 at 9:30 a.m. at 1627 US 98, Carrabelle, Florida 32322 of the contents of mini-warehouse(s) containing personal property of: Mike Horvath Zania Jones Before the sale date of July 28, 2012, the property may be redeemed by payment in cash or money order of the outstanding balance and cost by mailing it to Post Office Box 139, Carrabelle, Florida 32322, or by paying in person. June 28, July 5, 2012 87640T IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT NORTHERN DISTRICT OF FLORIDA TALLAHASSEE DIVISION CASE NO. 4:12-cv-00086-WS-CAS CENTENNIAL BANK, Plaintiff, vs. DOUGLAS BROWN a/k/a DOUGLAS W. BROWN; and BETINA BROWN, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that under and by virtue of the Final Judgment of Foreclosure rendered in the above-styled case on April 26, 2012, in the United States District Court For The Northern District Of Florida, in favor of the Plaintiff, the undersigned, appointed in that certain Order Appointing Special Master rendered May 25, 2012, will on the 24th day of July, 2012 at 12:00 p.m. Eastern Time, in the Second Floor Lobby of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, in the city of Apalachicola, Florida, offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the highest bidder, the following described property, situated, lying and being in Franklin County, Florida: Commence at the Northwest corner of the East half of the Northeast Quarter of the Northwest Quarter of Section 23, Township 6 South, Range 8 West, Franklin County, Florida; thence run South 89 degrees 49 minutes 01 seconds East 826.60 feet to a rod and cap; thence South 127.72 feet to a rod and cap for the POINT OF BEGINNING; thence from said POB continue South 142.73 feet to a rod and cap; thence South 79 degrees 05 minutes 17 seconds West 1083.60 feet to the approximate waters edge of the Apalachicola River; thence run along said approximate waters edge North 17 degrees 09 minutes 25 seconds West 112.81 feet; thence North 19 degrees 02 minutes 07 seconds West 142.88 feet; thence leaving, said approximate waters edge run North 84 degrees 43 minutes 35 seconds East 1148.55 feet to the POB, containing 5.01 acres more or less. Together with all rights, easements, appurtenances, royalties, mineral rights, oil and gas rights, all water and riparian rights, ditches, and water stock and all existing and future improvements, structures, fixtures, and replacements that may now, or at any time in the future, be part of the real estate described above (all referred to as Property). For additional information concerning the above property contact: STEPHEN A. PITRE, ESQUIRE, Post Office Box 13010, Pensacola, Florida 32591-3010 or (850) 434-9200. All sales are subject to confirmation of the court. Method of payment is by postal money order or certified check made payable to Jeffrey P. Whitton, Esquire, Escrow Account. Ten (10) Percent of High/Acceptable bid in certified check or cashiers check will be accepted with the balance due within 48 hours. No cash will be accepted. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim with the Clerk of the Court within 60 days after the sale. In accordance with the AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT, persons needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact Jeffrey P. Whitton, Esquire, Post Office Box 1956, Panama City, FL 32402 or (850) 769-7040 not later than seven days prior to the sale to ensure that reasonable accommodations are available. DATED this 14th day of June, 2012. SPECIAL MASTER: JEFFREY P. WHITTON, Esquire Florida Bar No. 329509 565 Harrison Ave. Post Office Box 1956 Panama City, FL 32402 Phone: 850-769-7040 Fax: 850-769-3014 June 21, 28, 2012 July 5, 12, 2012 87642T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 2011-000254-CA ATLANTIC NATIONAL BANK, Plaintiff, vs. W. NEAL BOLTON and MARINERS VIEW CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION, INC., a Florida corporation, Defendants. AMENDED NOTICE OF JUDICIAL SALE PURSUANT TO SECTION 45.031 OF THE FLORIDA STATUTES TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to the Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale entered on June 13, 2012, in Case Number 2011-000254-CA of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit for Franklin County, Florida, in which ATLANTIC NATIONAL BANK is Plaintiff, and W. NEAL BOLTON and MARINERS VIEW CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION, INC., a Florida corporation are Defendants, I, Marcia M. Johnson, Clerk of Circuit Court, will sell at public sale the following described real property: Unit Number 101 of Mariners View Condominium, as per that certain Declaration of Condominium recorded in Official Records Book 865, Page 369 of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. Together with an undivided interest in the common elements which are appurtenant to the unit as set out in said Declaration of Condominium. The sale will be held on July 31, 2012, at 11:00 A.M. (Eastern Time) to the highest and best bidder for cash, at the second floor lobby, West side of the Franklin County Courthouse, located at 33 Market Street, in Apalachicola, Franklin County, Florida, in accordance with Section 45.031 of the Florida Statutes. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 15th day of July, 2012. MARCIA M. JOHNSON Clerk of Court By: Michele Maxwell As Deputy Clerk June 28, 2012 July 5, 2012 87644T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 2011-000093-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, as successor in interest to COASTAL COMMUNITY BANK, a Florida banking corporation, Plaintiff, vs. LANDMARK GROUP, LLC, a Florida limited liability company, JEFFREY D. THACKER, HERBERT PRESS WITT and DAMIEN FRENCH, Defendants. AMENDED NOTICE OF JUDICIAL SALE PURSUANT TO SECTION 45.031 OF THE FLORIDA STATUTES TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to the Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale entered on June 13, 2012, in Case Number 2011-000093-CA of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit for Franklin County, Florida, in which LANDMARK GROUP, LLC, a Florida limited liability company, JEFFREY D. THACKER, HERBERT PRESS WITT and DAMIEN FRENCH are Defendants, I, Marcia M. Johnson, Clerk of Circuit Court, will sell at public sale the following described real property: Lots 15, 16, 17 and 18 of Fairway Park Subdivision, a subdivision as per map or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 8, Page 15, Public Records of Franklin County, Florida.

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, July 5, 2012 The Times | A11 Outside Sales Representative An exciting opportunity now exists to join The News Herald. We are searching for enthusiastic, hard-working, and driven Outside Sales Representatives to join our team! Job Description The News Herald is looking for motivated sales professionals to establish footholds in their local markets by providing products and services to businesses. The Outside Sales Representatives duties may include but are not limited to: Cold call and prospect new territory opportunities. Introduce business owners to programs via presentation, answer detailed questions and maintain that relationship. Requirements Have strong work ethic Experience presenting advertising materials to a variety of businesses Cold calling experience Reliable Transportation Experience handling warm leads and prospecting for new leads. Field Sales, Business to Business Sales (B2B), Inside Sales, Outside Sales, or Outbound Sales experience ( Preferred) We Offer: Room for advancement and career opportunity Dynamic Monthly Residual Compensation Bonus programs Introductory and Ongoing Training Business Materials including phone, laptop and IPad, business cards, sales material and product knowledge information The News Herald offers a competitive bene t package including medical, dental, vision and life insurance, 401(k) plan, vacation and sick leave, and six paid holidays per year.Come by The News Herald at 501 W. 11th Street for an application or send a resume to resumes@ afreedom.com.Freedom Florida is a Drug-free workplace, EOETO APPLY: RENTALS1 BEDROOM, 1 BATH, UNFURNISHED APT. Lanark, Remodeled, Inc. Water ......................$425 2 BEDROOM, 1 BATH, UNFURNISHED APT. Lanark ............................................................$400 3 BEDROOM, 2 BATH, UNFURNISHED Doublewide.....................................................$700 2 BEDROOM, 1 BATH, UNFURNISHED APT. Small Porch ....................................................$375 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322850-697-9604 850-323-0444 www.seacrestre.comwww. rst tness.com/carrabellePROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND RENTALS ToPlace Your Classified ad inCall Our New Numbers Now!Call: 850-747-5020 Toll Free: 800-345-8688 Fax: 850-747-5044 Email: thestar@pcnh.com thetimes@pcnh.com theAPALACHICOLA & CARRABELLETIMES CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW Total Down Pmt $7752002 Chevy Blazer -4 Door $4500 Total 0% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! Nice Car of Forgotten Coast, LLC For inventory log onto: www.nicecar offorgotten coastllc.com Total Down Pmt $19002004 Dodge Ram 4 Door -Crew Cab $9500 Total 0% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! Total Down Pmt $9752001 Ford F-150 -X/Cab $5900 Total 0% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! 2008 Harley Davidson Street Glide Anniversay Edition9,700 miles. Copper/ Black. In Excellent condition w/Rinehart Exhaust, Power Commander, ABS, Security, Extra Headlights, 2 Seats, many other options. Always garage kept and well maintaned. Original owner. Only $17,000, sold new for over $27,000.850-723-4642 1 BRCottageH/AC in Apalachicola, FL. 850-643-7740. Eastpoint Two adjacent lots on Jefferson St. Zone C4. $21,500 each or $39,500 for both. Owner financing available. Call Royce Hodge (850) 510-3797. Text FL13192 to 56654 For Sale By Owner St. James Golf Course. Two lots, on the fairway. Owner financing. Motivated to sell. Call Royce Hodge for info: (850) 510-3797. Text FL13194 to 56654 Total Down Pmt $6752000 Chevy Monte Carlo $4500 Total 0% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! Food Svs/HospitalityBest WesternAll PositionsPlease apply in Person 9am-3pm 249 Hwy 98 Apalachicola, FL. No phone calls!!! Install/Maint/RepairDiesel MechanicWith own tools, full time position. Extensive light, medium, and heavy equipment experience required. For immediate interview send resumes to Blind Box 3399 c/o The News Herald, P.O. Box 1940, Panama City, FL 32402 Web ID#: 34214643 Text FL14643 to 56654 Production/OpsPress Operator IThe News Herald is looking for an individual to train to be a web offset press operator. Duties include handling rolls of paper, filling/ cleaning ink fountains, placing/ removing plates for the press, setting ink on black/ white/ color pages, and computer skills. High school diploma or equivalent necessary. Must have excellent attendance and good work habits with mechanical aptitude and computer skills, be able to lift 50 pounds and be flexible in hours available to work. $10.00 per hour to start. We offer a generous benefits package including: 401(k), vacation and sick leave, and life/ health/ vision/ dental insurance. Year-round employment. E-mail resume to rsmith@ pcnh.com or pick up an application at 501 W. 11th Street, Panama City. Interview will be scheduled after application has been reviewed. Web ID#: 34210714 Employment AvailableThe Eastpoint Water and Sewer District is Seeking applications btnbfbrtb rbttbb Applications are available at the Eastpoint Water and Sewer btnfrbbbfrb rbb b b!"b #b$b%b#b$b&'(btrttbbbtt b!rrttnbrnb bb"rb These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you. EmeraldCoast Marketplace 747-5020 The sale will be held on July 31, 2012, at 11:00 A.M. (Eastern Time) to the highest and best bidder for cash, at the second floor lobby, West side of the Franklin County Courthouse, located at 33 Market Street, in Apalachicola, Franklin County, Florida, in accordance with Section 45.031 of the Florida Statutes. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 15th day of June, 2012. MARCIA M. JOHNSON Clerk of Court By: Michele Maxwell As Deputy Clerk June 28, 2012 July 5, 2012 87733T PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF INTENDED ACTION FRANKLIN COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD Purpose and Effect: The Franklin County School Board proposes to update and adopt policies, as provided in the Administrative Procedures Act for the purpose of maintaining compliance with Florida Statutes and State Board of Education Rules. Summary: The following is a brief description of the proposed changes: School Board Policy Manual Student Code of Conduct Student Progression Plan Learning/Alternative Center Handbook Franklin County Academy Plan Statutory Authority: Section 1001.41, Florida Statutes These proposed rules will be considered by the Franklin County School Board at a meeting publicly advertised and held in the Willie Speed School Board Room at 85 School Road, Eastpoint, Florida no earlier than 28 days after the original date of this notice. Policies may be reviewed during the period of June 5, 2012 through July 2, 2012 at the Franklin County School Board Administrative Offices, 85 School Road, Eastpoint, Florida during the hours of 8:00 AM until 5:30 PM, Monday Thursday. June 14, 21, 28 July 5, 2012 87722T STATE OF FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION NOTICE OF APPLICATION The Department announces receipt of an application for permit from the US Army Corps of Engineers, Mobile District, File No. 07-129424-008-EI, to conduct maintenance snagging to remove tree snags from the navigation channel in the Apalachicola River portion of the Apalachicola, Chattahoochee and Flint Rivers (ACF) Federal Navigation Project. This proposed project will be located in the Apalachicola River between River Mile 0.0 and River Mile 106.4 in Jackson, Gadsden, Calhoun, Liberty, Gulf, and Franklin Counties. This application is being processed and is available for public inspection during normal business hours, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, except legal holidays, at the Northwest District office at 160 W. Government Street, Pensacola, FL 32502. July 5, 2012 87943T IN THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 09-490 CA CENTENNIAL BANK, as successor in interest to BAYSIDE SAVINGS BANK, Plaintiff, vs. JEREMY J. GLEATON, JR., and LUCIA ANN GLEATON Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated February 27, 2012, and Order to Reset Sale dated June 14, 2012, entered in Civil Action No. 09-490 CA of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein the parties were the Plaintiff, CENTENNIAL BANK, as successor in interest to BAYSIDE SAVINGS BANK, and the Defendants, JEREMY J. GLEATON, JR., and LUCIA ANN GLEATON, I will sell to the highest and best bidder, for cash, at 11:00 a.m. (Eastern Time) on the 31st day of July, 2012, at the front door foyer on the 2nd floor of the Franklin County Courthouse, Apalachicola, Florida, the following-described real property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: Lot 26 of PELICAN BEACH VILLAGE, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 5, Page(s) 12, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida, LESS AND EXCEPT any part of said land lying within and easement as shown on said plat. The successful bidder at the sale will be required to place the requisite state documentary stamps on the Certificate of Title. DATED this 14th day of June, 2012. Hon. MARCIA JOHNSON Clerk of the Court Franklin County, FL By: Michele Maxwell As Deputy Clerk June 28, July 5, 2012 88151T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2011 CA 182 HANCOCK BANK, Plaintiff, vs. JAMES K. HICKS, PATTI L. HICKS, PATTI L. HICKS AS TRUSTEE OF PATTI L. HICKS LIVING TRUST UTD 09/30/03 and ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY. THROUGH, UNDER, AGAINST, THE HEREIN NAMED DEFENDANTS WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID OWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE UNDER F.S. CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Plaintiffs Final Judgment dated May 29, 2012, in the abovestyled cause, Marcia Johnson, Clerk of Courts for Franklin County, will sell to the highest bidder for cash at the front door of the courthouse in Franklin County in Apalachicola, Florida, in accordance with Section 45.031, Florida Statutes, at 11:00 A.M., on July 17, 2012, the following described property: Lot 1 of Sea Palm Village, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 4, Pages 30 & 31, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. Lot 4, Block 22, East, according to the plat known as St. George Island Gulf Beaches, Unit 1, a subdivision as per map or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 2, Page 7, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IT ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. DATED: June 27, 2012 MARCIA M. JOHNSON Clerk of the Court By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk July 5, 12, 2012 87961T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 07-000295-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, successor in interest to Coastal Community Bank, d/b/a Coastal Community Mortgage, Plaintiff, vs. RUBY J. LITTON and DANNY J. LITTON Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure dated April 23, 2012, in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Front Door of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market St., Apalachicola, FL 32320 at 11:00 a.m. on July 17, 2012, the following described property: Lot 3, of Block I, St. James Bay Subdivision, a subdivision as per map or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 7, Pages 39-46, Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. Dated: June 18, 2012. Marcia Johnson Clerk of Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk June 28, July 5, 2012 GUN SHOWJuly 7th & 8th Natl Peanut Fest. Bldg. 5622 US Hwy 231 S Dothan, Alabama OVER 275 TABLES Saturday 9-5pm Sunday 10-4pm Info: 334-279-9895 Text FL14275 to 56654 ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home Medical, Business, Criminal Justice Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 866-467-0054 www.CenturaOnline.com AIRLINE CAREERS BEGIN HERE -Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualified. Housing available. Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-206-9405 Buy it! Classified. Make your move to the medium thats your number one source of information about homes for sale! For all your housing needs consult Classified when its time to buy, its the resource on which to rely.

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LocalA12 | The Times Thursday, July 7, 2012The following is the Honor Roll for the ABC Schools fourth nine-week grading periodAll As1ST GRADE Aani Carltons class: Alisha Arroyo, Caleb Cassidy, Kendall Hill, Jayden Nichols, Owen Poloronis, River Sheridan, Trinity Taylor, JohnMichael Thompson Miriam Triscrittis class: Eric Lau, Arav Patel, Colin We ng, Jabara Pearson, Kylah Ross, Mark Willis2ND GRADEJenny Mallons class: Meredith Alford, Dominic Feliciano, Genevieve Montgomery, Sophia Salman, John Sanders, Nico Valenzuela Stacey Herringtons class: Weston Bockelman, Ella Friedman, Alex Itzkovitz, Jasmine Richards, Gracie Smith, Myia Maxwell3RD GRADEWhitney Martinas class: Livia Monod Traci Moses class: Gillian Terhune4TH GRADELindsey Bockelmans class: Jayden Justice, Camille Williams, Alyssa Robinson Marie Lees Class: Cade Juno, Jake Norred5TH GRADEBrooke Linane / Teri Williams class: Grayson Constantine, Chloe Davis, Scout McLemore, Rebecca WillisA/B1ST GRADEAani Carltons class: Daisy Jimenez, Mason Moses, Gabie Register, Jackson Segree, Mahaley Shuler, Rainey Smith, Brianna Stephens, Kevin Sullivan Miriam Triscrittis class: Jonathan Carter, Miranda Diaz, Laithan Kent, Nathan Richards2ND GRADEJenny Mallons class: Caleb Abel, Lanie Allen, Carson Davis, Sevryn Everitt, Eulalia Gregorio, Andrew Monod, Leslie Rowland, Jaelyn Tipton, Wil Varnes Stacey Herringtons class: Lauren Conway, Gavin Lashley, Zach Riccard, Jeremy Shuler, Torin Spohrer3RD GRADEWhitney Martinas class: Colin Amison, Camille Davis, Leslie Escobar, Dorian Fleming, Stanley Gay, Abigail Johnson, Elizabeth McAnally Traci Moses class: Skye Huber, Jon Michael Cates, Alex Joanos, Kaylee Hicks, Jayden Luberto, Ava Neill, Caden Turrell4TH GRADELindsay Bockelmans class: Tanner Amison, Levi Rowland, Krista Kelley, Kalahn Kent, Allison Register Marie Lees Class: Matthew Gay, Bailey Herrington5TH GRADEBrooke Linane /Teri Williams class: Sophia Kirvin, Bryce Kent, Alexus Johnson, Kevin Flores, Jan Michael Lowe, Conner MesserPerfect attendanceChrista Bass, Corie Cates, Dorian Fleming, Eulalia Gregorio, Simon Hodgson (6 years), Marshall Sweet (6 years), Nico Valenzuela Smart LensesSMCan produce clear vision without glasses, at all distances "Freedom from Eye Glasses, Now a reality for many." NO HIDDEN CHARGES: It is our policy that the patient and any other person responsible for payments has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed by payment or any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment. www.mulliseye.com"WE WELCOME NEW PATIENTS, CALLTODAY FOR YOUR PRIORITY APPOINTMENT" FOR NEW PATIENTS 59 AND OLDERThis certificate is good for a complete Medical Eye Exam withTodd Robinson, M.D.Board Certified Eye Physician and Surgeon.The exam includes a prescription for eye glasses and tests for Glaucoma, Cataracts and other eye diseases.FOR YOUR APPOINTMENT CALL: 850-763-6666 ELIGIBILITY: U.S. Citizens living in the Florida Panhandle, 59 years and older, not presently under our care. Coupon Expires: 7-31-12 FREEEYE EXAMCODE: AP00Darren Payne, M.D.Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract SurgeonLee Mullis, M.D.Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract SurgeonTodd Robinson, M.D.Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon Movies in the Park Friday on SGIThe Franklin County Sheriffs Of ce will host the 2012 Movies in the Park series, with the showing of the animated lm Puss in Boots at Lighthouse Park on St. George Island, on Friday evening, July 6. Free hot dogs, popcorn and drinks for the kids. Work under way on Armory alleyLast week, work began on renovation of the storm sewers in the alley that runs behind Coombs Armory and the First United Methodist Church of Apalachicola. A collapsed pipe had caused the church to ood on several occasions. Pastor Themo Patriotis said during Tropical Storm Debby, 12 to 15 gallons of water per minute poured into the building, but church members were able to keep the situation under control using shop vacuums. Jason White Construction, the contractor hired to repair the drain system, expects to complete the work by July 23.Oyster harvesting licensing period extendedCommissioner of Agriculture Adam Putnam has announced a twoweek extension of the licensing period for the Apalachicola Bay Oyster Harvesting License. Due to extreme conditions caused by Tropical Storm Debby in the Apalachicola Bay area, the licensing period was extended through close of business Friday, July 13. The safety of the shell sh harvesters and all residents who are affected by current weather conditions is our rst priority, said Putnam. Under normal circumstances, the 45day licensing period for the harvesting license, required to commercially harvest oysters from the Apalachicola Bay system, ends June 30. With the extension, applicants will not be subject to the $500 late fee until after July 13. For more information about the Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, visit www. FreshFromFlorida.com. BILL MILLER REALTY850-697-3751 (3310) 570-0658400 + COMM. U.S. 98 & GULFADJ. TO LANARK MARINA 85K$29,500 $2,500 DOWN BUYS 2 BED APT. 2 6 ORRENT $500/MTH COR. LOT 12 X 53 1 B/R 8 X 24 SHED 27,500 GULFVIEW & ACCESS 3 BDR 2 BA 2006 M/H 89K2 LG. SHADY LOTS 3 SHEDS400 TO MARINA-CITY WATER49KMIH 2 CRNRLOTS BLK. $ STORE REDUCED $49,500 CITY COMM. LOTSU.S. 98 $29,500 UP News BRIEFS Our local real estate experts have identied what they feel are the best values around and are oering them to you in Real Estate Picks! (In this section), Discover the best real estate values in Mexico Beach, Port St. Joe, Apalachicola, Cape San Blas, St. George Island, Carrabelle and surrounding areas. Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Real Estate Picks John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.comMLS# 244722$369,000St. George Island1ST TIER ISLAND GETAWAY Vintage beach home, 3 BR, 2 BA, Great room, Spacious kitchen with breakfast bar, Immaculately maintained, beach access, furnished, outdoor shower, downstairs storage, decks front & back, West Gorrie Dr. Listing agent Michael Billings John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.comMLS# 247013$20,000 EastpointMAGNOLIA RIDGE One acre bank owned residential building site, Located in a secluded area of beautiful Franklin County, Paved roads and underground utilities make this a great location for a permanent residence or weekend retreat. Sago Drive. Listed by Michael Billings FIGHTING FIRE WITH FABRICRuth Guernsey of the St. George Island Quilters, center, presented a check last month to St. George Island Volunteer Fire Department Chief Jay Abbott. The Quilters each year create an original quilt and sponsor its raf e, with proceeds going to the re department. Other Quilters, from left, are Celeste Wall, Maggie Estes, Sheri Roberts and Judy Crawford. COURTESY SGI QUILTERSFranklin County High School freshman Morgan Martin stands with her project on famed inventor John Gorrie, which took a rst place in Science and Technology in this years History Fair held at the end of the 2011-12 school year. Also taking rst place honors in that category were eighth-grader Alicia Risner and freshmen Sasha Carr and Logan Allen. In the Humanities category, rst place went to eighth-grader Amelia Newman and freshmen Jacob Shuler, Austin Carter and Aaliyah West. In the American History category, blue ribbons went to eighth-grader Krista Martina and freshmen Samantha Marxsen, Roxanna Barahona and Emily Cash. In the World History category, rst-place awards went to eighth-grader Ursula Countryman and freshmen Kelsey Jones, Amanda Anthony and Cyndi Nichols.DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times FOR LOVE OF HISTORY ABC ELEMENTARY HONOR ROLL