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The Apalachicola times
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100380/00176
 Material Information
Title: The Apalachicola times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: H.W. Johnston
Place of Publication: Apalachicola Fla
Apalachicola Fla
Publication Date: 06-14-2012
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1885.
General Note: Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 32911693
lccn - sn 95026907
System ID: UF00100380:00176
 Related Items
Preceded by: Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by: Apalachicola herald

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xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx 50 WWW.APALACHTIMES.COM Phone: 850-653-8868 Web: apalachtimes.com E-mail: dadlerstein@star .com Fax: 850-653-8036 Circulation: 800-345-8688 DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK: School News & Society: 11 a.m. Friday Real Estate Ads: 11 a.m. Thursday Legal Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Display Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Line Ads: 5 p.m. Monday xxxxx Contact Us xxxxx Out to see Index District FCAT scores diverge By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894| @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com The Franklin School District got a burst of good news, and a dose of bad, when results of the 2012 Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test were announced earlier this month. Florida Department of Education of cials had warned communities statewide that with the introduction this year of a new FCAT 2.0, based on more demanding content standards and more rigorous achievement standards, scores may appear lower on the new scale than on the previous scale for certain grades and subjects. Such was not the case with the Apalachicola Bay Charter School, whose students in grades 3-8 almost entirely bested the state average, with most grade levels showing improved scores in reading and mathematics over 2011. Sheriff race to highlight primaries By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894| @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com The elections for ve of the six countywide of ces that are up this year were settled Friday, with only the sheriffs race to be contested. The re-election of Superintendent of Schools Nina Marks, Clerk of Court Marcia Johnson, Tax Collector James Harris and Supervisor of Elections Ida Elliott, each to another fouryear term, was assured at the conclusion of last weeks qualifying period, as no opponents stepped forward to challenge any of these four Democratic of ceholders. In addition, Rhonda Skipper, also a Democrat, will succeed Property Appraiser Doris Pendleton, who is retiring this year. No opponent stepped forward to Proposal would bring barge shipping to Carrabelle By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star .com At the June 7 meeting of Carrabelles commission, the subject of staging barges from the city was revived. Realtor Sandy Mitchem and Rob Cooke, spokesman for Hosfords Gulf Coast Aggregates, told commissioners GCA wants ELECTION 2012 FRANKLIN FCAT District percentage scoring 3 and above Grade Reading Mathematics 2011 2012 2011 2012 3 50 45 39 31 4 56 59 42 58 5 60 44 60 55 6 56 60 55 42 7 46 57 42 50 8 40 49 28 38 ABC School shines, Franklin School falters MIKE MOCK CLIFF CARROLL JEFF VONIER FRANKLIN COUNTY RELAY FOR LIFE Relay for Life attracts a spirited crowd By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894| @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com John Webb isnt ready to trade in his oyster tongs for a halo in heaven. The 56-year-old is back working the bay, after a successful battle with Stage 4 throat cancer. Webb was all smiles Friday night at the American Cancer Societys Relay for Life of Franklin County, held inside the gym of the former Apalachicola High School gymnasium after rain forced its exit from Pop Wagoner Stadium. Im a diehard, I guess, Webb said. I got a reason to stay here. I aint nished yet. He said back in 2007, Apalachicola family practitioner Dr. Stephen Miniat noticed lumps in the side of his throat and rst prescribed antibiotics. Theyd go down and then theyd come back, Webb said. So Miniat ordered a CT scan, which was conducted at GOING STRONG Im a diehard, I guess. I got a reason to stay here. I aint nished yet. John Webb cancer survivor PHOTOS BY DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times The luminarias at Franklin Countys Relay for Life celebration spell out hope. Below, Linda Thompson and Javeion Win eld compete in the Road to Recovery race. VOL. 127 ISSUE 7 Thursday, June 14, 2012 See PRIMARIES A7 See BARGE A6 See RELAY A7 See FCAT A6 Opinion . . . . . . A4 Society . . . . . . A8 Faith . . . . . . . A9 Outdoors . . . . . A10 Tide Chart . . . . A10 Sports . . . . . . A11 Classi eds . . . A12-A13 Happy Fathers Day! Golf Gone Wild tees off Saturday Golf Gone Wild, a golf tourney hosted by Forgotten Coast TV and St. James Bay Golf Resort, will be Saturday, June 16, at the resort, 151 Laughing Gull Lane in St. James Bay east of Lanark Village. Teams are welcome the day of the tourney; registration is at 10 a.m. At 4 p.m., nature photographer John Spohrer will present a slide-show presentation The Seasons of Apalachicola Bay, soon to be a published book. The Fountain Room will offer a chance to view art offerings and more at the silent auction, with creations by several local artists. Weekends in Apalachicola and St. George Island also are on the auction block. The evening concludes with an awards banquet featuring prime rib at the Crooked River Grill. The event bene ts the Florida Wild Mammal Association, a 501(c)(3) wildlife rehabilitation center that cares for sick, injured and orphaned birds and wildlife from Wakulla and Franklin counties. For more info, visit www. wakullawildlife.org or call Lynne Cooper 697-9507. King Buster Tourney June 23 The third annual King Buster Tournament continues June 23 at C-Quarters Marina, 501 St. James Ave. in Carrabelle. Entry fee is $100 per boat, per tournament. Fishing hours are from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m., with three chances to win each tournament. A portion of registration fees go to Make-A-Wish Foundation of Central and Northern Florida. For more info, call 697-8400 or visit www. c-quartersmarina.com. Dont miss reworks July 3 The Historic Apalachicola Main Street Program will sponsor a July 3 Independence Day Celebration on Riverfront Park downtown. The day begins with a parade at 6:30 p.m. with an ice cream social after. At approximately 9 p.m. will be a professional reworks display over the river.

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Local A2 | The Times Thursday, June 14, 2012 State says Hut site rubble can stay Dr. Hobson Fulmer of Apalachicola Bay Animal Clinic Welcomes Our New Associate: Dr. John Duncan Along with Dr. Fulmer, Dr. Duncan will be seeing patients for small animal medicine and surgery. Please call for an appointment or come by to meet him. 850-670-8306 Clinic hours: Monday-Friday 8am 6 pm 187 Highway 98, Eastpoint Complete small animal medicine and surgery, wellness programs, laser surgery, diagnostic ultrasound, Serving Franklin and Gulf Counties for 30 years Theres a New Veterinarian in Town! $ 000 00 FS 45 TRIMMER Easy-to-use, well-balanced trimmer for homeowner use STIHL has you covered with protective apparel and accessories. $ 000 00 M S 170 CHAIN SAW Designed for occasional wood-cutting tasks around the home Includes many of the excellent design features of our professional models Anti-vibration system for comfortable operation Bar lengths may vary by region. $ 000 00 BG 55 HANDHELD B LOWER Proven handheld blower at an affordable price THIS T IME I WAN T SOME T HING HARDWORK I NG STIHLusa.com Available at participating dealers while supplies last. 2011 STIHL Give Dad What He Really Wants for Fathers Day St. Joe Rent-All 706 E. 1st Street, Port St. Joe (850) 227-2112 GIFT CERTIFICATES AVAILABLE BY LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com Large piles of debris that attracted the publics attention on the site of the former Hut Restaurant have been cleared up, but how exactly they got there remains unclear. Trans eld Services, the rm under contract to clean and maintain the states right-of-way in Franklin County, removed some of the material June 7. Most of the debris remains on the property with the blessing of state of cials. Harry Arnold said he doesnt know the source of most of the debris that was dumped on the bayside lot on the outskirts of Apalachicola, which he co-owns with Bobby Kirvin. The vacant lot at 315 US 98 west of Apalachicola was once the site of the Hut Restaurant, which was destroyed by Hurricane Dennis in 2005. In 2009, Kirvin and Arnold agreed to allow debris from the downtown Apalachicola State Bank to be placed on the property. The building was destroyed in Nov. 2008 by a re caused when a truck was driven into the Avenue E outside. Arnold served as a member of the board of directors of Apalachicola State Bank, which was owned by Coastal Community Bank, whose assets were purchased by Centennial Bank in July 2010. Bobby Kirvins son, Ward, said he had been mowing and maintaining the property at 315 US 98 and that about six months ago he noticed some new piles of debris on the site. Over time, several dozen various sizes piles containing assorted materials appeared. The material may have been deposited at night since trucks were not observed in the area by the owners of the property. A small amount of asphalt, brick pavers and what appear to be the remains of a gas station accumulated until last month, when the debris began to spill out on the state right-of-way. Around that time, Ward Kirvin spray-painted no dumping on several piles of debris. The growing amount of rubble drew complaints from nearby neighbors and resulted in a meeting May 28 with members of the Kirvin family, Arnold, representatives of the Florida Departments of Transportation (DOT) and Florida Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) and Trans eld. In a telephone interview following the meeting, Ian Satter, public information director for the DOT, said the DEP determined most of the debris at the site to be stockpiled material, rather than waste, and said it could be retained at the site as long as it was removed from the right-of-way. He said Trans eld volunteered to remove a small amount of material classi ed as waste, mostly asphalt, and to push the rest of the material, mostly concrete rubble, onto the property belonging to Kirvin and Arnold with their permission. Satter said the material retained on site can be used as back ll, but not as rip rap. He said all parties were in agreement on the solution to the right-of-way encroachment.BY DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com Franklin Countys jobless rate continued its steady decline in April, falling by 0.4 of a percentage point to 6.1 percent even as the workforce expanded. According to preliminary numbers released May 18 by the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity (DEO), 18 people dropped off the countys jobless rolls in April, from 363 down to 345, while the labor force expanded, from 5,591 to 5,624. The countys labor force remains even larger than it was one year ago, when it comprised 5,509 workers and when the jobless rate was higher at 7.5 percent. Franklin Countys jobless picture moved it to fourth best in the state. Monroe County had the states lowest rate at 4.8 percent, followed by Walton at 5.2 and Okaloosa at 5.7. Many of the counties with the lowest unemployment rates were those with relatively high proportions of government employment. The countys rosier jobless picture corresponded to improvement in nearby counties, both of which are struggling with worse unemployment than Franklins. The unemployment rate in the entire Gulf Coast Workforce region, which encompasses Bay, Franklin and Gulf counties, continued its decline, dropping to 7.7 percent in April, the lowest since Nov. 2008. The April rate was 1.6 percentage points lower than the regions year-ago rate of 9.3 percent. Out of a labor force of 101,250, there were 7,756 unemployed Gulf Coast residents. This is the fth consecutive month weve seen our unemployment drop, Kim Bodine, executive director for the Gulf Coast Workforce Board, said. The positive trend is a result of small but steady economic improvements in all three counties that make up our workforce region. The April unemployment rate in Bay was 7.7 percent, down by half a percentage point from March, while Gulf saw its jobless rate fall to 7.9 percent, down from 8.6 percent in March. According to data collected by the Conference Board, there were 2,326 job openings advertised online in April for the Gulf Coast region, an increase of 4.4 percent in job demand from March. Since the beginning of the year, the workforce board has placed 1,627 individuals in jobs. Floridas seasonally adjusted unemployment rate was 8.7 percent in April, lowest since January 2009 when it was also 8.7 percent. There were 804,000 jobless Floridians out of a labor force of 9.26 million. The April rate was 1.9 percentage points lower than the year-ago rate of 10.6 percent. The U.S. unemployment rate was 8.1 percent in April. County jobless rate fourth best in Florida LOIS SWOBODA | The Times

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Local The Times | A3 Thursday, June 14, 2012

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Opinion A4 | The Times USPS 027-600 Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 Publisher: Rick Martin POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola Times Special to the Times A proposed constitutional amendment on the Nov. 2012 ballot would create Florida jobs, grow Floridas Gross Domestic Product, and increase the personal income of Floridians, if passed, according to an independent economic and scal analysis by Florida TaxWatch, a nonpartisan, nonprot public policy research institute and government watchdog. Amendment 4, a legislatively proposed amendment to the Florida Constitution that would make changes to the property tax system, was analyzed by a new Florida TaxWatch report Fiscal and Economic Impact of Amendment 4. Dominic M. Calabro, president and CEO of Florida TaxWatch, said Florida TaxWatch has been conducting analyses of the likely impacts of proposed constitutional amendments for more than three decades, and I know that this independent analysis will help Floridians judge the potential benets of this Amendment. Amendment 4 would take effect on Jan. 1, 2013, and proposes: an additional homestead exemption for rst-time Florida homebuyers, equal to 50 percent of the Just Value of a property up to the median Just Value of a homestead property in that county, which phases out over ve years by reducing by 20 percent each year; a reduction in the non-homestead maximum annual Assessed Value increase cap from the current 10 percent (on non-school levies) to a new level of 5 percent and an extension of non-homestead Assessed Value caps through the 2022 tax year (which also does not apply to school levies) and; providing legislative authority to eliminate the Save Our Homes Recapture Rule. Using the best available data and an advanced econometric analysis, Florida TaxWatch estimates passage of Amendment 4 would result in the creation of 19,483 private, non-farm jobs over the 10-year period of the analysis (2013-2022), that Florida GDP would increase by approximately $1.1 billion, and personal income would increase by more than $5.3 billion. The studys author, Jerry D. Parrish, Ph.D., Florida TaxWatch chief economist and executive director of the Center for Competitive Florida, said The increased economic activity estimated by the dynamic econometric model used in this analysis is the result of the savings from Amendment 4 being distributed throughout the economy. From an economists standpoint, these ndings are not surprising because the proposed Amendment 4 would reduce uncertainty for both personal and business investment, and when individuals and businesses can better estimate their future costs, including property taxes, they are more likely to invest. Basically, reducing the uncertainty of potentially large property tax increases will increase investment in both non-homestead residential and commercial property in Florida, and the econometric model bears that out. The Florida TaxWatch analysis also estimates that between 319,861 and 383,810 additional home sales would occur due to the effects of Amendment 4 during the 10-year period following its passage and implementation. According to the report, the additional home sales attributable to Amendment 4, over and above those estimated to have occurred in the absence of Amendment 4, are due to the effect of the additional homestead exemption, the additional income for Floridians, and the population growth predicted by this analysis. Additionally, there are effects from both the nonhomestead exemption on additional residential sales and the number of homes that are purchased by persons who have sold their homes and moved up in size or downsized. The full report can be found on the new Florida TaxWatch website at www. FloridaTaxWatch.org Thursday, June 14, 2012 Special to the Times After a comprehensive investigation into the hiring potential of 130 nationwide rms involved in the oyster reef restoration industry, the Duke University Center on Globalization, Governance and Competiveness on June 7 released a report restoring Gulf Oyster Reefs: Opportunities for Innovation, nding that oyster reef restoration projects could provide quadruple economic returns for the Gulf Coast states. The study comes as Congress is in the nal stages of considering passage of the RESTORE the Gulf Coast States Act. The legislation would ensure billions of dollars in penalties for the 2010 Gulf oil disaster would be returned to the region and dedicated to gulf restoration. This legislation, along with billions of dollars from the ongoing Natural Resource Damage Assessment for the disaster, could be used to repair the badly-damaged gulf ecosystem and jumpstart the gulf economy. Americas oyster reefs are hidden jewels that provide quadruple economic returns, said Shawn D. Stokes, research analyst for the Duke University center. They maximize the return on investment in coastal restoration by boosting industries vital to the U.S. economy, supporting the nations largest shing industries, stabilizing and protecting the valuable Gulf Coast, and ltering water to provide clean, safe, beautiful areas for recreation and tourism industries in addition to creating jobs in a new emerging industry for oyster reef restoration. Among its key ndings, the study identied 130 rms directly (e.g. oyster harvesting) and indirectly (e.g. materials and construction) involved with oyster reef industry and concluded that incorporating innovative oyster reef designs into the Gulf Coast states oil spill restoration efforts would provide new job opportunities in the Gulf and 17 other states. More than 80 percent of the identied employment locations are based in the ve Gulf states, and 68 percent of the rms qualify as small businesses by sales, according to Small Business Administration guidelines. Many of these rms are small, innovative startup companies striving to be at the forefront of the emerging oyster reef industry. Healthy oyster reefs, as nurseries for sh, are vital to the 200,000 jobs in the regions $2.4 billion shing industry. Investments in oyster reefs help small businesses like ours create jobs, build innovative products and support our local economy, said Stephen Addington, co-owner of Gulf Coast Aggregates near Carrabelle. Restoration is not only good for small businesses, it is vital for the economy here in the panhandle now and in the future. Stephanie Victory, president and CEO, HESCO Bastion USA, Inc., said the companys products can immediately be put to work in restoring the wetlands of Louisiana and in building oyster reefs that help our local economy thrive. With nal passage of the RESTORE Act and the new projects it would fund, we can create needed jobs and help ensure a healthy future for our oysters. Specically, the Duke study notes that: Increasing oyster production will generate revenue for the commercial oyster industry and create thousands of jobs in seafood processing. Oyster shuckers and seafood processors hold 30 to 50 percent of seafood industryrelated jobs across the Gulf. One acre of oyster reef increases sheries catch values by $4,200 a year by providing nooks and crannies of habitat for dozens of marine resident species. Each individual oyster lters up to 1.5 gallons of water per hour, removing excess nitrogen that contributes to marine dead zones, providing a service that avoids the need for expensive wastewater treatment plants to provide the same service. Each acre of oyster reef provides $6,500 in de-nitrication services annually. Oyster reefs stabilize bottom sediments, reduce wave energy, prevent erosion and fortify wetlands to serve as horizontal levees that provide $23 billion worth of storm protection annually to Gulf Coast businesses and communities as well as the oil and gas pipeline infrastructure offshore, which ensures economic and energy security for the United States. The study also serves as a follow-up to an earlier Duke University study released in December, which determined Clean Water Act penalties from the 2010 oil disaster could create jobs that would benet at least 140 businesses with nearly 400 employee locations in 37 states, including more than 260 in the Gulf Coast and 60 in Florida. Two-thirds of these companies also qualify as small businesses, and all would benet from the dedication of gulf oil spill nes to gulf restoration funding, as through the RESTORE Act. State-specic initiatives already underway include: In Alabama, a broad coalition of organizations has initiated the 100-1000 Restore Coastal Alabama plan that sets out to build 100 linear miles of oyster reefs. In Louisiana, the Coastal Wetlands Planning Protection and Restoration Act agency is experimenting with a variety of oyster reef restoration designs as part of their regular coastal restoration demonstration projects to fortify against erosion from hurricane and storm waves. In Florida, most of the restoration projects are funded by the Department of Environmental Protection and are sub-tidal oyster cultch reefs designed to improve biodiversity, increase shery production and provide shoreline protection. In Mississippi, The Nature Conservancy recently received two grant awards to build 35 acres of new oyster reef in a large area north of the east/west CSX rail line that prohibits commercial harvest of shellsh, which makes it an ideal location to expand restoration efforts. In Texas, the Parks and Wildlife Department has worked with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to install sub-tidal cultch reefs in order to boost marine sheries production. The study was made possible by support from the Walton Family Foundation. Special to the Times A new report from the Florida Department of Education has been released that highlights the positive effects of Afterschool and Summer Camp programs provided through the 21st Century Community Learning Centers. Based on research and on-the-ground experiences, the report outlines the key program elements state education and afterschool leaders promote in the hundreds of 21st Century Community Learning Centers across the state. Franklin County has two 21st CCLC program, The Nest in Eastpoint and Carrabelle, and Project Impact in Apalachicola. Entitled Inspired Programming Driving Student Success: A Look at Floridas 21st Century Community Learning Centers, the report was released by the Expanded Learning and Afterschool Project. The key to the success of Floridas 21st CCLCs is inspired programming, note the reports authors, with a major emphasis on providing students with fun, hands-on, engaged learning experiences that are tied to the regular school day. The effectiveness of Floridas programs depends on these four simple elements: Fun Students should nd the experience interesting and enjoyable. Hands-on Students should physically participate in activities Engaged learning Students should be mentally involved in activities Tie-In Connecting afterschool activities to regular school lessons makes activities relevant and more memorable These programs have made an incredible difference for students in Florida, and that was not by accident, said Joe Davis, former bureau chief in the Florida Department of Education and the current chief operating ofcer of the Florida Afterschool Network. The outcomes we have seen for our students are impressive, and the time we utilized after the school day was the key to our success. Data from the study indicated students who participate in the afterschool and summer programs demonstrated improvement in three areas: attendance, behavior and course work. Among students statewide who regularly participate in 21st CCLC, 78 percent either maintained or showed growth in math, and 79 percent maintained or showed growth in reading, as determined by report card grades. The report showed 75 percent of students demonstrated improvement in submitting homework on time, a crucial skill needed for academic success in the regular school day, and 80 percent demonstrated an increase in class participation. Overall, students who participated regularly in afterschool and summer programs were more likely to come to school, more likely to behave better, and more likely to do better on their course work. Editor note: the following is a letter written to Jimmy Mosconis from the general, who was keynote speaker at the May 28 Memorial Day ceremony at Apalachicolas Veterans Memorial Plaza. Just a short note to pass along my observations about the Memorial Day ceremony at the Veterans Memorial Plaza. The event was well attended by a good cross-section of Apalachicola residents and visitors. I was especially pleased to see the number of teenagers in the audience. I think its crucial that parents who have the proper respect for the country and those who have defended it pass those values along to their children. The second group that captured my attention were the veterans. The oldest former soldier in attendance was 101. Im sure you know him. Though he was in a wheelchair, mentally he was sharp as a tack. His mere presence was an inspiration to all who were there. You were keenly missed, but your name was repeatedly mentioned. We were all aware that you were representing Apalachicola and our Vietnam veterans at special events designed to confer on those who fought in that war the honor and recognition that has been too long denied. All of us who served in Southeast Asia thank you for representing us. We could not have asked for a better representative and spokesman. In your absence, Ella did a great job as your representative. Kinney Taylor and Lamar Moody came down with me. We deeply appreciated Ellas hospitality and the superb dinner you provided for us. I hope to come down in the fall for a return bout with the specs and reds. Im sure Ill see you then. For now, I just want to thank you again for the hard work and persistence that brought about the Veterans Memorial Plaza. As I mentioned in my comments, the veterans memorials in most other cities a hundred times the size of Apalachicola cannot begin to compare with yours. That says volumes about your town, its people and their values. Semper Fi, Marine Corps Gen. Charles E. Wilhelm (Retired) Villa Rica, Georgia Oyster reef restoration would jumpstart economy Afterschool and summer programs boost student achievement TaxWatch: Amendment 4 would spur state economy Young people in audience please general

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The Times | A5 Thursday, June 14, 2012 During the Memorial Day holiday, 31 of cers from the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC), Florida Highway Patrol, Florida Alcoholic Beverages and Tobacco Division, and the Franklin County Sheriffs Department conducted an operational detail for the 2012 White Trash Bash. The detail, designed to protect Floridas boating public through enhanced boating safety patrol, increase voluntary compliance of boating under the in uence (BUI) laws, provide highly visible law enforcement presence, and increase multi-agency working relationships, focused patrol around Dog Island and Alligator Point. During the detail, of cers boarded 145 vessels and checked 516 users. Seventeen boating safety warnings were issued, one uniform boating citation was issued for boating safety, two arrests were made for BUI, and one transport to an ambulance occurred for a sick individual. In another incident regarding the patrol vessel Gulf Sentry, Of cer Matt Gore completed one arrest for BUI in Franklin County. Gore also issued citations in Bay County for possession of over the bag limit of red snapper and possession of gag grouper during closed season. Of cer Ruel Raker arrested one subject for BUI in Franklin County and issued citations in Bay County for possession of gag grouper during closed season and possession of undersized gray trigger sh. Monday through Friday 8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Saturday 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m Eugene Charbonneau, DO Susan Hardin, ARNP Dana Whaley, ARNP 110 NE 5th Street Carrabelle, Florida DAY! & WHISPERING PINES, EASTPOINT 3BR/2BA well maintained home on one acre lot. Many upgrades throughout the home. Large deck and 2 storage sheds complete this ready to move in property. MLS #247364 ................. $149,900 Travis Stanley 850.653.6477 Grayson Shepard 850.653.6718 Leon Teat 850.653.5656 Sandy Mitchem 850.899.8300 B EA C H F RONT CON D O S T G EORGE I SLAN D 2BR/2BA with two balconies in Villas of St. George. Established rental history! Community pool, beach boardwalk, 2 blocks to lighthouse! MLS# 246110 ............... $319,500 ST. GEORGE ISLAN D GU L F V IEW 4BR/4BA close to center of island and kitchen. Lots of storage and lovely native landscaping. MLS# 245752 ...................... $399,000 NEW LOW PRI C E G REATER A PALA C HI C OLA Enjoy quiet country living on 3.75 acres. Lovely custom built 3BR/2.5 BA home with many upgrades Jacuzzi, deck, large walk in closet. 1600 sq.ft. outbuilding on concrete pad. MLS#244666 ................ $255,000 GU L F VIEW SGI P LANTATION Charming 5BR/3BA cypress home with Anderson doors/windows. Completely renovated in 2006 w/ granite countertops, new appliances/lighting/elevator! MLS# 240897 ............... $475,000 G U L F V IEW ST GEORGE ISLAN D Pre construction. Great opportunity to buy a gulf view home. 3BR/2BA with great room opening to the front porch, upgraded kitchen. New construction means low insurance costs! MLS#247359 ................... $289,000 The following report is provided by the Franklin County Sheriffs Of ce. Arrests in this report were made by of cers from the Apalachicola Police Department (APD), Carrabelle Police Department (CPD), Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC), Florida Highway Patrol (FHP) and Franklin County Sheriffs Of ce (FCSO). All defendants are to be considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law. June 2 Matthew E. Stuckey, 31, Whigham, Ga., DUI (FCSO) June 3 Billy D. Dalton, 37, Eastpoint, grand theft of a motor vehicle and driving while license suspended or revoked (FCSO) June 4 Heather M. Mahon, 37, Apalachicola, petit theft (APD) Jason M. Rudd, 31, Carrabelle, domestic battery (FCSO) Glenda Jean Martina, 20, Apalachicola, eeing or eluding law enforcement ofcer (FCSO) June 5 Rex M. Humphries, 50, Apalachicola, DUI and refusal to submit to breath test (FCSO) Glenn A. Richards, Jr., 22, Eastpoint, violation of probation (FCSO) Amanda F. Graybill, 28, Roanoke, Va., obtaining food or lodging with intent to defraud (FCSO) Joseph S. Haynes, 24, Apalachicola, burglary of a structure (FCSO) Donald D. Page, 38, Carrabelle, driving while license suspended or revoked (FCSO) George R. Needer, 54, Eastpoint, petit theft and violation of probation (FCSO) June 7 Fred C. Massey, 47, Carrabelle, domestic battery and violation of probation (CPD Kendall W. Shiver, 51, Eastpoint, criminal mischief (FCSO) June 8 Michael L. Lee, 43, Carrabelle, possession of less than 20 grams of cannabis and possession of paraphernalia (CPD) June 9 Crystal M. Segree, 32, Eastpoint, battery (FCSO) William B. Baker, 33, Decatur, Ga., grand theft of a motor vehicle and failure to appear (FCSO) June 10 Bobby J. Duncan, Jr., 38, Apalachicola, grand theft (FCSO) Reginald D. Giddens, 33, Apalachicola, violation of pretrial release and resisting of cer without violence (FCSO) Willie G. Dasher, Jr., 33, Eastpoint, violation of probation (FCSO) John D. James, 41, Apalachicola, reckless driving (FCSO) COLETTE LACASSE | Special to the Times Correctional Of cer Basic Standards Class 215 recently graduated from the Gulf/Franklin Campus of Gulf Coast State College. Each student completed 420 classroom hours of training to prepare them to become correctional of cers in any state, county or private correctional facility in Florida. Pictured, from left, front row, are John Paul Helms, Port St. Joe; Rita Massey, Carrabelle; Nita Massey, Carrabelle; Tomilee Babb, Carrabelle; and Danielle Davis, Apalachicola. Back row, from left, are instructor Donald Swanson; C. J. Massey, Bloxham; Tristan Davis, Port St. Joe; Jackie Rowland, Apalachicola; Joyce Thomas, Apalachicola; and Corrections Coordinator Clarke Joyner. The next class is scheduled for July at the Gulf/Franklin Campus; anyone interested can call Brenda Burkett at 227-9670 ext. 5507 for more information. Arrest REPORT GULF COAST GRADUATES CORRECTIONAL OFFICERS FWC REPORT Law Enforcement

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Local A6 | The Times Thursday, June 14, 2012 CARPET CERAMIC TILE HARDWOOD AREA RUGS WINDOW SHADES & BLINDS PITTSBURGH PAINTS WE BIND CARPETS We offer L P ort S aint Joe area D esign professionals on premise C P rofessional I nstallation 2760 H W est P ort S aint Joe L OCA LL Y O WNED aint Joe L OCA LL Y O WNED H W est W est W P ort P ort P S aint Joe $ 50 Off purchase of $ 750.00 or more T ile starting at C arpet starting at Robert C. Bruner Attorney Personal & Business Bankruptcy Over 30 Years Legal Experience 850-670-3030 bankruptcy relief under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon advertisements. Before you decide, ask us to send you free written information dbutler@coastalcoverage.com Locally owned and operated Home Business Auto Health Workers Comp The same, however, could not be said of the test results at the Franklin County School, where the percentage of students scoring at grade level or better in reading and math dropped throughout the elementary school. The scores climbed a bit in seventhand eighth-grade reading and in eighth-grade math, but for the most part were starkly at odds with the steady progress the district has made over the past decade. Im disappointed in it, said Superintendent Nina Marks. We do not always get the results we hope for. When this happens, we have to study the results to determine why we have not performed to our level of expectation. Marks offered praise for the work of the ABC School, with which school of cials have a more amicable and supportive relationship than at any time since the charter school came into being a decade ago. They did the job, she said. ABC School Principal Chimene Johnson said she was extremely proud of her schools results, attributing it to the dedication of both faculty and students. I attribute our scores to good teamwork, hard work and effort among our teachers, she said. They planned their year, they looked at every strand and every benchmark, and they worked together as a team. There were so many things that we put into place. The ABC School rebounded from a lackluster performance in 2011, when the number of students scoring at grade level or better was on the low end of the schools test results dating back to 2003. Johnson attributed this years success to full implementation of reading and math intervention throughout the school day as well as supplemental educational services through Title 1 funding for afterschool tutoring and FCAT camps two days a week after school. She said one of the states newest options for students who are below grade level is that they can be exempted from the physical education requirement, with that time used for special interventions. Our students participated in that, Johnson said. The students were taught bell-to-bell. Our teachers did an awesome job of keeping our kids engaged and motivated. Marks said she favors implementing a new approach at the Franklin County School to bounce back from the loss of momentum after steady improvement. Our teachers work very hard and need our support, but an aggressive plan for change will be considered, she said. Some faculty members have requested more time with students. Additional time on task leads to a critical budgetary consideration. We must manage the time we have and hope for a loosening of a very tight budget in the near future. An additional 30 minutes for teachers to work with students can be directly tied to the previous two years of success. 28 third-graders head to summer school The ABC Schools pro ciency could be seen across the board, beginning with the third grade, where three-quarters of students were at grade level or better in reading, a jump of 20 percentage points from the year before. In math, the jump was more modest, up nine percentage points to 61 percent, and on the low end of the schools third-grade scores dating back to 2003. The situation at the consolidated school for third-graders was more problematic, with only one of seven students scoring at grade level or better in math, and fewer than one in three students performing at grade level or better in reading. Marks said 25 third graders from the Franklin County School and three from the ABC School all of whom scored at Level 1 of the ve levels are required to attend summer school at the consolidated school if they are to be promoted to the fourth grade, according to the terms of the Pupil Progression Plan. Summer school is in full force on that campus, she said. Among ABC School fourth-graders, the results showed that twothirds were at grade level or better in reading, and nearly three-quarters in math, in both cases up by about 20 percentage points from the year before. At the consolidated school, a little more than half the fourth-graders were at grade level or better in both reading and math, similar to last year in reading and an eight-percentage-point improvement in math. The fth grade, though, showed a decline, with a 20-percentage-point drop, to just 38 percent performing at grade level or better in reading, and a nine-percentage-point drop, to 51 percent, at or above grade level in math. Among ABC School fth-graders, the numbers dropped slightly in reading and improved slightly in math, both subjects showing that roughly two out of three students were at grade level or better. Marks said a dozen fourth-graders and 22 fth graders have been invited to participate in summer reading camps and credit recovery, hoping to redo a class and move to the next grade level. Middle school shows gains, losses The numbers for the middle schools, typically a time when students show a dropoff in pro ciency that can plague them into high school, showed some variations in subject matter. Johnson said for the ABC School, it was a question of teachers ability to tailor the curriculum to the tests content. In the sixth grade, for example, the reading scores rose from 56 percent showing pro ciency or better last year to 73 percent in 2012, a rise of 17 percentage points. But nearly an identical dropoff could be seen with the math numbers, where only 58 percent of ABC sixth-graders were at grade level or better, 16 percentage points worse than last year. In the seventh grade, reading scores were steady at 63 percent showing pro ciency or better, while math showed an impressive 16percentage-point rise, to the point where better than three of four ABC School seventh-graders are at grade level or better. Eighth-grade math at the ABC School was the only area where we didnt hit state average, Johnson said, although 55 percent of these students were at grade level or better, still a jump of 21 percentage points over a down performance last year. The ABC principal said 11 of 29 students took a high school-level Algebra 1 course, which covered different material than was on the test. They werent exposed to eighthgrade FCAT standards, she said. At the Franklin County School, sixth-grade scores declined, from 57 percent at pro ciency or better in reading down to 49 percent, and from 42 percent at pro ciency in math last year down to 31 percent. The reading scores among seventh-graders showed a solid improvement, from 41 percent at prociency or better a year ago to 54 percent this year. But math scores dipped slightly, from 36 percent to 34 percent. At the eighth-grade level at the consolidated school, improvements could be seen in both subjects, a rise of 10 percentage points in reading, from 33 percent in pro ciency or better to 43 percent, and a rise of nine percentage points in math, from 25 to 34 percent at grade level or better. Marks said 11 sixth-graders, 14 seventh-graders and 16 eighth-graders have been invited to participate in summer school, to ensure they will be able to move to the next grade level. School board member David Hinton, who opposed the creation of the charter school and has frequently been a critic, said the differences in scores can be attributed to the ABC School having taken the cream of the crop of students who otherwise would be attending the consolidated school. But, he noted, this is not because the schools have differing populations in terms of race or socioeconomic factors, because the demographics between the two are very similar. Parents chose to put them there, theyre more concerned and they expect more of them, he said. They are the most motivated parents. Teachers and staff (at the consolidated school) continue to do the best they can with what they have to operate with, Hinton said, noting that reading and math specialists continue to use available grants to reach those students who struggle with testing. Marks said she plans to scrutinize how well teachers are adhering to the curriculum, and how much they are varying from it, a factor she believes can be important in determining how well students perform on pro ciency tests. During the summer months, teachers will learn a new approach in the utilization of state-approved instructional materials, she said. The district will also provide updated professional development, which will make a difference for our teachers and their students. Routinely studying the data gathered weekly, monthly or from the yearly FCAT affords teachers the ability to make informed decisions, leading to a better understanding of our strengths and weaknesses, Marks said. Aggressively attacking weaknesses and reinforcing strengths will lead this district to a stronger foundation and a strengthened grade-by-grade result. BARGE from page A1 FCAT from page A1 to ship fossil shell out of Carrabelle by barge. The plan is to truck tractor trailer loads of mined fossil shell down County Road 67 and along Lake Morality Road to U.S. 98, and transport the stone to Timber Island for shipping. GCA has tried unsuccessfully to set up a commercial shipping venue in a project partnering with Crowder Excavations. Last month, Odie Lazlo, spokesman for Crowder, proposed to remove 35 of 41 boat slips at Crowders C-Quarters Marina to allow large commercial vessels, including barges, to dock there. He sought the commissioners support for Crowder securing state and federal permits for the project. Under that original plan, containers of shell also would have been stored on the waterfront. Commissioners voted 3-2 to back the plan, with Cal Allen and Brenda LaPaz opposed. But Crowder scuttled his project after learning that storing and shipping shell from the downtown waterfront would require a change in the citys comprehensive development plan. Last week, Cooke and Mitchem told commissioners GCA has scrapped the idea of storing shell, which is classi ed as heavy industry and would require a comp plan change even on Timber Island, where light industry is allowed. Cooke said the company now hopes to bring truckloads loads of shell to a conveyor constructed on a 30-acre parcel of vacant land owned by The St. Joe Company, where they will be immediately loaded on a barge for shipping. Shipping mined material is classi ed as light industry. To allay fears about road damage, Cooke told commissioners GCA has reviewed reports on Tillie Miller Bridge and is investigating what would be needed to reinforce it. Nancy Burke, who lives in Harbor Bayou Estates off Timber Island Road, expressed concern about the proposal. How many trucks do you anticipate a day? she asked, adding that the road is already busy with traf c going to and from the RV park and the islands county boat ramp. LaPaz supported GCAs proposal, noting that Carrabelle is in need of industry, and Timber Island is the place for it. Cooke said the barges using the commercial dock would be about 140 feet by 30 feet. In a later telephone interview, he said the shipping vessels would be towed in by tugs one at a time and would not accumulate at the dock. He said the barges would be loaded during regular business hours Monday through Friday. Cooke said the project could bring as many as 20 jobs to Carrabelle, including mine labor, truck drivers and laborers to load the barges. GCA is in negotiation with a Louisiana rm to supply barges and tug boats, he said. Cooke said boat crews would purchase food and rent housing in Carrabelle, with fuel for the tugs also purchased locally. At the meeting, Cooke told commissioners he was not real sure when we will start because both the Army Corps of Engineers and Florida Department of Environmental Protection have to issue permits. He told commissioners County Attorney Dan Hartman advised him to come and discuss his new plans with the commission, to make sure there was no impediment to the project before he invested more money. We didnt expect problems with the rst proposal, Cooke said. We put a lot of money into it, and it didnt happen. We didnt want to do that again. GCAs project seems especially apropos in light of a study recently released by Duke University titled, Restoring Gulf Oyster Reefs: Opportunities for Innovation, which found that reef restoration projects had the potential for quadruple return on money invested. Cooke said he is aware of funding for reef restoration projects available from penalty money for the BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Cooke said his rm already is shipping truckloads of fossil oysters west for reef restoration in Louisiana and for coastline repair in Pensacola and he is in competition with companies that ship ll down the Mississippi by barge. Shipping by barge is cheaper than shipping by land, he said. Being able to ship by barge will make (GCA) more competitive with other companies.

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Local The Times | A7 Thursday, June 14, 2012 challenge Skipper, Pendletons chief deputy. The one countywide ofce that will be contested will be the sheriffs race, with three candidates qualifying, all of them Democrats, to succeed incumbent Skip Shiver, who decided not to stand for re-election. Mike Mock, 45, of Carrabelle; Cliff Carroll, 49, of Eastpoint; and Jeff Vonier, 69, of Eastpoint will square off in the Aug. 14 primary, with the winner then unopposed in the Nov. 6 general election. Because only Democrats have led for the sheriffs race, Republicans and those without party afliation will be able to vote in the primary, known as a universal race. According to the supervisor of elections website, as of June 12, the county had 4,980 registered Democrats, 1,663 Republicans and 666 individuals registered with other parties or with no party af liation, for a total of 7,309 registered voters. Individuals who are not yet registered have until July 16 to register to vote in the primary and until Oct. 9 to register to vote in the general election. In the case of the three county commission races on the ballot this year, none will be decided at the Aug. 14 primary. In District 5, which runs from the western portion of the Eastpoint area to the eastern portion of the Carrabelle area, incumbent Bevin Putnal, 70, of Carrabelle, is facing a challenge from William Massey, 52, also of Carrabelle, in the Democratic primary. In the general election, the winner will face Hank Garrett, 61, of Eastpoint, who is running without party af liation. In District 1, which encompasses St. George Island and most of Eastpoint, Republican incumbent Pinki Jackel, 54, of St. George Island is facing a challenge from Democrat Tony Shiver, 52, also of St. George Island. Because neither candidate has an opponent in the primary, they will square off Nov. 6. In District 3, which encompasses the Apalachicola neighborhood to the north and east of U.S. 98, incumbent Noah Lockley, 61, of Apalachicola, faces a challenge from Valentina Webb, 48, of Apalachicola. Because both are Democrats, they will square off in the Aug. 14 primary, with the winner going against Republican Wilmer Deason, 59, in the Nov. 6 general election. In the school board races for these three districts, both District 3 incumbent Teresa Ann Martin and District 1 incumbent George Thompson were re-elected to another four-year term after no opponents stepped forward to challenge them. In District 5, incumbent Carl Whaley, 43, of Carrabelle, faces a challenge from Pamela Shiver, 41, of Eastpoint. Because this is a nonpartisan election, this contest will be decided at the Nov. 6 ballot box. BILL MILLER REALTY 850-697-3751 (3310) 570-0658 400 PLUS COMM. U.S. 98 & GULF ADJ. TO LANARK MARINA 850 K $29,500 $2,500 D O W N B UYS 2 B ED A PT 2 6 OR RENT $500/MTH GULFVIE W & ACCESS3 BDR 2 BA 2006 M/H $89,000 2 LG. SHADY LOTS-3 OUT BLDG. -400 TO MARINA-CITY W ATER $49,500 MIH 2 C RNR LOTS BLK. $ S TORE REDUCED $49,500 CITY COMM. LOTSU.S. 98 -$29,500 UP Smart Lenses SM Can produce clear vision without glasses, at all distances "Freedom from Eye Glasses, Now a reality for many." NO HIDDEN CHARGES: It is our policy that the patient and any other person responsible for payments has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed by payment or any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment. www.mulliseye.com "WE WELCOME NE W PATIE N TS, C ALL T ODAY FOR YOUR P RIORITY APP OI N TME N T" FOR NEW PATIENTS 59 AND OLDER This certificate is good for a complete Medical Eye Exam with Todd Robinson, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Surgeon. The exam includes a prescription for eye glasses and tests for Glaucoma, Cataracts and other eye diseases FOR YOUR APPOINTMENT CALL: 850-763-6666 ELIGIBILITY: U.S. Citizens living in the Florida Panhandle, 59 years and older, not presently under our care. Coupon Expires: 6-30-12 FREE EYE EXAM CODE: AP00 Darren Payne, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon Lee Mullis, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon Todd Robinson, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon PUBLIC NOTICE George E. Weems Hospital is proposing to license its existing helipad with the Florida Depart ment of Transportation. One of the requirements for DOT licensure is that public notice is given that a license is being sought. The existing helipad currently meets all applicable operation and safety standards. There will be no changes to the current helipad which is in front of Weems Hospital at 135 Avenue G, Apalachicola, Florida. Any persons wishing to comment or seeking additional information need to contact Mr. Alan C. Pierce, Director of Administrative Services, 34 Forbes St. Apalachicola, Florida, 32320 by Friday, June 8, 2012 by 4:00 PM, local time. Mr. Pierce may be reached by telephone at 850-653-9783, ext. 161. RELAY from page A1 PRIMARIES from page A1 Bay Medical Center in Panama City and which led to the cancer diagnosis. Surgery solved part of the problem, followed by radiation and chemotherapy to tackle the remaining cancer, Webb said. So far Im cancer-free right now, he said. At rst I lost all the taste in my mouth, but Ive got a little back now. I lost my teeth, too. The only thing I didnt lose is my hair. His neck might be scarred from the treatments, but the main thing Webb didnt lose was his life, and for that he was a grateful man Friday night. Its a miracle, he said. Sitting next to Webb at the survivors table, after joining in the opening lap, were several other cancer survivors, including Michael James Sexton, who is recovering from a malignant eye lesion; Dolores Buzzett, who overcame a 2005 bout of breast cancer; and Linda Thompson, who triumphed over cervical cancer several years ago and melanoma more recently. In all, 20 survivors were on hand for the relay and were treated to a survivor/caregiver dinner of paella prepared by Tamaras Caf. Chala Parish, this years local chairperson of the event, said 14 of this years 18 teams were at Friday nights relay. Our event was dedicated to all survivors and remembering those who have lost their battle, Parish said. But one in particular who was a committee member, Amanda Segree, was named honorary chair during her courageous battle. And in her memory we will continue to ght. She gave us all hope to continue ghting for a cure. Amanda lost her battle this year, but we remembered her during relay. Also serving on the relay committee was Parish, Nasya Wagner, Cheryl FritschMiddleton, Tirah Chitty, Selena Noblit, Paula Applebee, Jessica Ard and Shannon Segree. Stephanie Bird assisted as the cancer society staff. This years sponsors included the Apalachicola Housing Authority, Kelley Funeral Home, Weems Memorial Hospital, Marks Insurance, Progress Energy and Ace Hardware. Among the in-kind donors were Ace Hardware, Ah La Carte, Angel Stephens, Apalachicola Times, Ashley Carroll, Bay City Work Camp, Buccaneer Inn, Butler Agency, Cadence Bank, City of Apalachicola, Florida Seafood Festival, George Pruett, Gulf Coast DJ LLC, Gulfside IGA, John Solomon, Mayor Van Johnson, Righteous Kind, St Joe Music Company, St. Joe Rent-All, Tamaras Caf and Water Street Seafood. Among the performers who lit up the night and early morning event were the Righteous Kind Band out of Gainesville, the Pruett family, Ashley Carroll, Angel Stephens (who sang the national anthem) and Gulf Coast DJ, with the St. Joe Music Company providing sound and lighting. We had a great year, said Parish, noting $17,000 has been raised so far, with more coming in ahead of the wrap-up party in July. Rain held back some attendance, but it was a great turnout and we are excited to have the support to get Relay going strong again in Franklin County. BEVIN PUTNAL WILLIAM MASSEY VALENTINA WEBB NOAH LOCKLEY RELAY TEAMS AND CAPTAINS High Hopes, Terri Creamer Pirates of the Cure-aBeing, Terry Tipton Franklin Correctional Institution, Jessica Chisholm Shooting Down Cancer, Javeion Win eld Soaring over Cancer, Jaime Duhart Team ABC, Tanya Joanos Team Ruth, Selena Noblit Team Snooks, Renee Grif n Weems Angels, Paula Applebee Team Rainbow, Chala Parish Debras Darling ABC School, Alexis ONeal Black & Blues Crews, Larry Applebee Pacing for a Cure, Sandy Harris Centennial Bank, Jera Horton Cadence Bank, Stephnia Turrell Franklin County Sheriffs Of ce, John Solomon Knights of Columbus, Bob Connors Trinity Episcopal, Bev Connors DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times Contestants get ready for the Road to Recovery race.

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A8 | The Times Thursday, June 14, 2012 Qualications: Expertise in: New Patients Welcome Call Toll Free 888-681-5864 For more info www.seclung.com LUNG AND SLEEP DISORDERS DR. ROB GARVER PET OF THE WEEK Franklin County Humane Society Society Maliah Lockley turned 9 on Tuesday, June 12 and her young brother, Isaiah Dorsey, turns 1 on Thursday, June 14. Happy birthday, Maliah and Isaiah! I love you both very much, Mommy By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star .com On Saturday night, about 50 people attended a reception to celebrate the opening of the Local Hands art exhibit at the Apalachicola Center for History, Culture and the Arts on Water Street. The soire was sponsored by Historic Apalachicola Main Street as part of its Second Saturday program to encourage downtown nightlife. The exhibit displayed the works of 25 artists. Images created by Dana Allen shared space with jewelry by master craftsman Kristin Anderson and photography by Lizzie Butler. Some of the work was familiar to art lovers. Neal Smith-Willow, who displayed a half dozen pieces on Saturday, recently ended a monthlong 50-year retrospective at the Apalachicola Museum of Art. A show by painter Susan Richardson is now on display at the Apalachicola art museum. She presents a handful of owery oils in the Local Hands show. Pastelist Lynn Wilson, whose work is included in Local Hands, recently hung a one-woman show at the Plantation clubhouse on St. George Island. Wilson is the daughter of painter and art teacher Alice Jean Gibbs, who has mentored a number of the artists displaying work in Local Hands, including Ed Springer, who brought pastel drawings, and Ellen Stitt, whose light, uncluttered paintings were a high point of the exhibition. Gibbs also has several pieces on display at the downtown center, popularly known by its original name, the Cotton Exchange. Shirley Cox displayed a half-dozen oils focusing on local scenery and was on hand to answer questions about her work. Cox said she paints from photographs, mixing and matching items within a scene. Mother-daughter team Amy and Emily Friedman brought mixed media including photography, sculpture and one of Amy Friedmans striking acrylic paintings. Frederic Kahler also presented a mixed media exhibit with ceramics and paintings. Katie McFarland added three dimensions to the display, with ceramic wall hangings including a startling rendition of the big bad wolf of storybook fame. There were oils by Jody Rosenbaum, Kathryn Beaty, Martha Linn and Josefa Benavides. Seasoned artist Joan Matey brought a few pieces, fretting that she had trouble nding work to display that hadnt already been hung at the Cotton Exchange in earlier showings. As always, her comic air was a showstopper. Another stand-out was Paula Harmon, who paints using pigmented beeswax, an ancient technique known as encaustic art. The work of husbandand-wife team Capt. Mark and Carol Goodwin re ected their day-to-day interests. Mark displayed carved sh with a twist, and Carol works in textiles, producing airy, knitted confections in silk, alpaca and other bers. Joe Kotzmans watercolors are a bright spot in the gallery, imaginative and fresh. Popular local sculptor David Barclay brought painted wood carvings to the Cotton Exchange. A string of pink foxgloves seemed to twinkle with dew next to a giant brown-eyed Susan. Mary Lou Athorn works in papier-mch. She employs the medium in both three-dimensional sculptures and paintings. Athorn said she started to work with paper when a downtown shop was seeking three-dimensional pieces. I started making papier-mch bowls, she said. One thing is I have always been encouraged in everything I tried to do. My husband Michael is very supportive. I was never told no. Athorns bowls blossomed into animals, especially birds, but her latest work has taken a new twist. On display at the Cotton Exchange are a bust of Joan of Arc and a full-sized papiermch statue of St. Francis of Assisi. Local Hands, which opened June 7, will remain on display through Thursday, June 28. The center is open from noon to 5 p.m. Thursday, Friday and Saturday. For a gallery of the opening reception, visit www. ApalachTimes.com. Special to The Times On June 6, the Apalachicola Bay Chamber of Commerce held its annual election during a luncheon meeting at Carolines on the River. New to this years board of directors are Jean Ulrich, a real estate agent with Jeff Galloway Real Estate and owner of Ulrich Construction, and Ouida Tartt, owner of the House of Tartts, a guest cottage in downtown Apalachicola. Continuing for another term are Brenda Ash, with Centennial Bank and an Apalachicola city commissioner; Mike Koun, owner of the Gibson Inn; Bonnie Gomes, owner of Oyster Radio 100.5FM and Hitz 106FM; Mark Friedman, with Friedman Financial Advisors; Bud Hayes, with the Franklin County Humane Society and the ABC School; Bev Hewitt, with the Apalachicola Seafood Grill and the Soda Fountain; Kristin Anderson, owner of LongDreamGallery.com; attorney Michael Shuler; Jerry Hall, with the Apalachicola Seafood Grill and The Soda Fountain; Ginny Griner with Weems Memorial Hospital; attorney Kristy Branch Banks; Kevin Ward with Blue Manta Technology Group and 13 Mile Seafood; and Donna Duncan, attorney with Sanders and Duncan. President for 20122013 is Duncan, with Hayes as vice president. Hall returns as treasurer, and Anderson remains secretary/historian. Candy Varnes, of Resort Vacation Rentals, retired from the board. Friedman, who steps down as president at the end of June, received two going away presents at this months meeting. Anita Grove, the chambers executive director, presented him with a shadowbox containing the February swimsuit edition of Sports Illustrated, with sections shot in Franklin County and a teeny bikini. Friedman also received from the staff of Sports Illustrated a framed group shot of the photographers, models and support staff who visited Apalachicola for the photo shoot. The chamber has 350 members. The Apalachicola Chamber was started in the 1830s. Among its many presidents were ice machine inventor John Gorrie and David Raney. In the 1980s, the chamber expanded its membership area to the shores of the Apalachicola Bay, including Eastpoint and St. George Island. Mr. and Mrs. James Banks, of Eastpoint, request the honor of your presence at the marriage of their daughter, Miranda Lynn, to Shawn Robert Shattuck. The wedding will be at 4 p.m. Saturday, June 23, at the Living Waters Assembly of God, 1580 Bluff Road, Apalachicola. The groom is the son of Bob Shattuck, of Apalachicola, and Ann Kent, of St. George Island. A reception will follow the ceremony in the fellowship hall. All family and friends are cordially invited to share in this joyous occasion. HAPPY BIRTHDAY, MALIAH AND ISAIAH Local Hands buzzing with talent Duncan elected president of Apalachicola Bay chamber MIRANDA BANKS, SHAWN SHATTUCK TO WED JUNE 23 DONNA DUNCAN Photos by LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Dolphins cruise by in this underwater scene by Shirley Cox. Alice Jean Gibbs and Frederic Kahler discuss techniques at the Saturday night opening. Sisters, circa 1912 by Ellen Stitt.

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The United Methodist Churches of Franklin County Welcome You First United Methodist Church of Apalachicola Worship Service 11:00 a.m. every Sunday Sunday School 10:00 a.m. 75 5 th St. Apalachicola 653-9530 fumcapalach@gtcom.net Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis Carrabelle United Methodist Church Worship Services 10:45 a.m. Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Celebrate Recovery Mondays 7-9 p.m. 102 NE Ave. B Carrabelle 697-3672 Pastor: Julie Stephens Eastpoint United Methodist Church Worship Service 10:00 a.m. every Sunday Healing service every fourth Monday at 7:00 p.m. 317 Patton Dr. (corner of David St.) 670-8825 Pastor: Rev. Beth White St. George Island United Methodist Church 9:00 a.m. Worship Service 10:00 a.m. Fellowship Hour 201 E. Gulf Beach Dr. 9274635 www.sgiumc.org Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis First Pentecostal Holiness Church 379 Brownsville Road Apalachicola Were excited about what Gods doing!!! Sunday School 9:45 am Sunday Morning Worship 10:45 am Sunday Evening Service 6:00 pm Monday, Youth Group 6:30 pm Wednesday, Royal Rangers, G.A.P. 7:00 pm Wednesday Worship & Word 7:30 pm Nursery Provided during regular church services 7:00 7:00 First Baptist Church St. George Island 501 E. Bayshore Drive 927-2257 R. Michael Waley, Pastor Join us as we praise and worship the living Christ. Great is the Lord and most worthy of praise. Psalm 145:3 Sunday Bible Study ................................................ 10:00am Worship Praise ........................................................ 11:00am Sunday Night ............................................................ 7:00pm Wednesday Power Hour ...................................... 7:00pm Wednesday Youth at S.P.L.A.S.H ....................... 7:00pm Walking in Christ R. Michael Whaley, Pastor WELCOMES YOU Church of the Ascension 101 NE First Street Carrabelle SUNDAY 10:00 AM WELCOMES YOU Church THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH (850) 274-4490 (850) 545-2578 WELCOMES YOU Trinity Trinity Episcopal Church est. 1836 Welcomes You Hwy. 98 & 6th St. Apalachicola 850-653-9550 Sunday Worship Services 8 & 10:30 a.m. Wednesdays Healing Service 11 a.m. Centering Prayer 4 p.m. Sunday Worship Services 8 & 10:30 a.m. Wednesdays Healing Service 11 a.m. Centering Prayer 4 p.m. Faith The Times | A9 Thursday, June 14, 2012 Covenant Word plans Fathers Day weekend Covenant Word Christian Center International, 158 12th Street in Apalachicola, will host a Fathers Day Prophetic Weekend beginning at 7 p.m. Friday, June 15, with an Impartation Service at 11 a.m. Saturday, June 16. Prophet Bill Johnson from Restoration Life Church in Tallahassee, who moves in a powerful anointing of God, will be our guest minister in the Prophetic. Come out in faith, believing you will receive a life-changing word and/or impartation on these two powerpacked days. Panacea church to host Gaballi Taste Sampler The Ochlockonee Bay United Methodist Church, 2780 Surf Road in Panacea, will hold a Taste Sampler of Gaballi Foods from 9 a.m. to noon Saturday, June 16. Gaballi is a faithbased, nondenominational organization that provides boxes of top-quality fruits and vegetables at a 30to 70-percent savings from national retail prices. Visit www.obayumc.com or www.gaballi.com or call 984-0127 for more information. Faith BRIEFS Ervin Bud Thomas Ammons, 78, passed away Saturday, June 9, 2012, in Panama City. He is survived by his wife of 60 years, Doris Johnson Ammons of Car rabelle. He was born Sept. 12, 1933, in Midland City, Ala., and had been in this area for 22 years after coming from Georgia. He retired from the United States Air Force after 20 years of service. He retired as postmaster in Carrabelle. He was a member of the Grovania Methodist Church. He was a de voted husband, father and grandfather. In lieu of owers, dona tions may be made to Big Bend Hospice, 1723 Ma han Center Blvd, Tallahas see, FL 32308. Memorial services will be at 2 p.m. Wednesday, June 13, at Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Cha pel, Crawfordville, which is in charge of arrange ments. He is also survived by two daughters, Brenda Bareld (Gil) and Sherry Sensat (Don); grandchil dren Brandon Atkinson (Sarah), Adam Bareld, Kiley Singleton (Eric), J.D. Sensat and Corey Sensat; two great-grand children; and one sister, Mavis Odom (Joe). He was preceded in death by a son, Bruce Al len Ammons.Ervin Bud Ammons Obituary There isnt a day that goes by that we dont miss or think about you! You are gone but certainly not forgotten! Love, Your family In Loving Memory of Amelia Varnes Dec. 4, 1955 June 18, 2007 Mail Carrier Food Drive The Franklin County Food Pantry would like to thank both the Apalachicola and Eastpoint post ofces for another successful U.S. Mail Carrier Food Drive, which took place May 12. Postmasters Lionel Bliss, Eastpoint, and Cynthia Davis, Apalachicola, and the hard-working mail carriers who loaded the food onto their trucks went the extra mile to help others in the community. We cannot thank then enough. Our appreciation goes out to all the residents of Franklin County who donated food. Without your support and giving nature, we would not be able to continue our effort in feeding the most vulnerable citizens. The Franklin County Food Pantry is a 501(c)(3) organization and relies on donations of food and cash to continue its operations. We are distributing food twice each month to an average of 350 families, our neighbors in need. To make donations, you can mail a check to P.O. Box 276, Apalachicola, FL 32329 or contact Lori Switzer, food pantry coordinator, at 6533930 to make a food donation or to help out as a volunteer. Sincerely, Franklin County Food Pantry staff CARD OF THANKS Happy Fathers Day all you dads! To start the weekend off right, you will be treated to a full breakfast at the Lanark Village Boat Club this Saturday, June 16. You may enjoy your breakfast from 9 a.m. until noon. A donation of $5 will be collected from everyone else. Enjoy! Our monthly covered dish lunch at Chillas Hall will be Sunday, June 17. Bring your favorite dish, a donation and your dad and join us. Serving will begin at 1 p.m. See ya there! Dont forget lunch will be ready at noon at the Franklin County Senior Center every Thursday. Our faithful volunteers will serve the lunch, and Dorothy will be at the desk to collect your donation. Be good to see you. While we are talking about volunteers, its time to give all of our volunteers a big round of applause. You will nd them at the food bank, the boat club, Chillas Hall, the re department, just to name a few. Thanks to all! After you enjoy lunch next Thursday, June 21, at the senior center, enjoy the Nostalgia Show, featuring the music of Bob Garber, from the 20s to the 50s. Dont forget June 21 is the date! Be kind to one another. check in on the sick and house bound, and remember our little prayer for those serving the public God grant me patience, And I Want It Right Now! Until next time, God Bless America, our troops, the poor, homeless and hungry.DAV I D ADL ER ST EIN | The Times Volunteers serve up lunch every Thursday at the Franklin County Senior Center. Boat club treats dads to breakfast LANARK NEWS Jim Welsh The Camp Gordon John ston World War II Museum is expanding the exhibits to include World War II, Korea and Vietnam. Though still in the initial stages, any one who wishes to donate articles or photos from these conicts for scan ning should contact Linda Minichiello or Bobbye Win chester at 697-8575. Please keep in mind that though photos will be scanned and the originals returned, be cause of special insurance requirements, all articles or items must be freely do nated and will become the property of the Camp Gor don Johnston Association. The museum has se cured tracings from the Vietnam Memorial Wall in Washington, D.C., for the following Franklin County residents killed during the war: Robert ONeal Cato, James Henry Clay, Clifford G. Rhodes, Herbert Eugene Smith and Robert Mill lender. Anyone knowing of additional Franklin County residents who served and paid the ultimate price, please contact the museum to have their tracings add ed to the exhibit. Camp Gordon Johnston expands exhibits

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Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL (next to Piggly Wiggly) www.BWOsh.com (next to Piggly Wiggly) www.BWOsh.com Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL (next to Piggly Wiggly) www.BWOsh.com Corner of Marina Drive, www.BWOsh.com Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL www.BWOsh.com Port St. Joe, FL Your Hunting Headquarters Your Hunting Headquarters Starting July 1st: Independence Day Gun Sale Huge savings on year end close outs by brands such as: Remington, Browning, Glock, Smith & Wesson, Taurus, and more!! JUNE FEATURE FISH: R ED S NAPPE R Stop in and register or go oline at www. B W O sh.com WEEKLY ALMANAC APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE TIDE TABLES MONTHLY AVERAGES To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from these given for APALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW Cat Point Minus 0:40 Minus 1:17 East Pass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27 To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from those given for CARRABELLE: HIGH LOW Bald Point Minus 9:16 Minus 0:03 Sponsor the WEEKLY ALMANAC Call Today! 653-8868 Date High Low % Precip Thu, June 14 86 73 40 % Fri, June 15 85 72 40 % Sat, June 16 86 71 40 % Sun, June 17 85 73 20 % Mon, June 18 86 73 0 % Tues, June 19 87 74 0 % Wed, June 20 88 75 40 % 13 We 954am 2.6 254am 1.4 523pm 0.3 14 Th 125am 1.8 1026am 2.6 344am 1.6 615pm 0.0 15 Fr 249am 1.9 1100am 2.6 444am 1.8 702pm -0.2 16 Sa 341am 2.1 1137am 2.7 545am 1.9 745pm -0.3 17 Su 420am 2.2 1217pm 2.7 639am 2.1 823pm -0.3 18 Mo 452am 2.2 1258pm 2.7 727am 2.1 858pm -0.5 19 Tu 520am 2.4 140pm 2.7 809am 2.1 930pm -0.3 20 We 545am 2.4 223pm 2.7 849am 2.1 958pm -0.3 21 Th 609am 2.4 308pm 2.7 929am 1.9 1024pm -0.3 22 Fr 631am 2.4 356pm 2.6 1013am 1.9 1051pm -0.2 23 Sa 654am 2.4 448pm 2.4 1102am 1.8 1121pm 0.0 24 Su 717am 2.4 547pm 2.2 1158am 1.4 1153pm 0.3 25 Mo 742am 2.4 700pm 1.9 105pm 1.3 26 Tu 808am 2.6 832pm 1.8 1227am 0.6 221pm 1.0 27 We 838am 2.6 1032pm 1.6 104am 1.0 340pm 0.6 13 We 954am 2.6 254am 1.4 523pm 0.3 14 Th 125am 1.8 1026am 2.6 344am 1.6 615pm 0.0 15 Fr 249am 1.9 1100am 2.6 444am 1.8 702pm -0.2 16 Sa 341am 2.1 1137am 2.7 545am 1.9 745pm -0.3 17 Su 420am 2.2 1217pm 2.7 639am 2.1 823pm -0.3 18 Mo 452am 2.2 1258pm 2.7 727am 2.1 858pm -0.5 19 Tu 520am 2.4 140pm 2.7 809am 2.1 930pm -0.3 20 We 545am 2.4 223pm 2.7 849am 2.1 958pm -0.3 21 Th 609am 2.4 308pm 2.7 929am 1.9 1024pm -0.3 22 Fr 631am 2.4 356pm 2.6 1013am 1.9 1051pm -0.2 23 Sa 654am 2.4 448pm 2.4 1102am 1.8 1121pm 0.0 24 Su 717am 2.4 547pm 2.2 1158am 1.4 1153pm 0.3 25 Mo 742am 2.4 700pm 1.9 105pm 1.3 26 Tu 808am 2.6 832pm 1.8 1227am 0.6 221pm 1.0 27 We 838am 2.6 1032pm 1.6 104am 1.0 340pm 0.6 28 Th 912am 2.7 142am 1.4 454pm 0.2 Email outdoors news to timesoutdoors @star .com Page 10 Thursday, June 14, 2012 O UTDOORS www.apalachtimes.com Section Section A Red snapper season is well under way. Hi winds and rough seas have kept many anglers at the docks hoping for better weather. Good sized red snapper are still close to shore, some as close as 6 miles out. Try using live bait rst to catch the bigger ones up off the bottom, but cut bait, such as cigar minnows and squid will work ne. Inshore Offshore Recent rain has the St. Joe Bay muddy and churned up right now. Before the rain we had great reports from the Eagle Harbor area of red sh and trout caught in the grass on live shrimp. Towns beach has had a few reports of nice trout and a few red sh this week also. Get in all your inshore shing in before the 2012 Scallop Season opens soon. SPONSORED BY By Lois Swoboda 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star .com The shrimp plant or false hop, Justicia brandegeana, is a popular owering shrub outdoors that can also be grown as a window sill plant indoors. Its white tongue-like owers emerge from shrimp-colored, modied leaves called bracts atop clumps of weak, twiggy stems that grow to 3-to-5 feet tall by 3 feet wide, and may spread to form a large colony. The leaves are variegated and usually grow in clusters on the branches. If the plant receives more sun, the amount of creamy white on the speckled leaves will increase, and vice versa. There are cultivars with yellow, red and lime green owers. This plant is a native of Mexico, where indigenous people used it to treat a variety of wounds and ailments, including dysentery and other gastrointestinal disorders. In south Florida it has escaped and become invasive in some areas. Shrimp plant is evergreen in mild climates and blooms almost continuously. In the Panhandle, it is evergreen some years and dies back to the ground when the winter is colder. Plants left outdoors in containers may be killed in cold weather. Shrimp plant does well in full to part sun and likes a fertile, welldrained soil. It is drought tolerant, but water it generously in hot weather to maintain lush foliage. In our area, some shade is recommended since the bracts fade in full hot sum. When the plant becomes leggy or if the foliage is damaged by cold or drought, cut it back to the base and it will grow out lush and green. You can start new plants from cuttings or by dividing clumps. Shrimp plant is extremely attractive to hummingbirds, bees and butter ies so it adds interest and motion to the garden. By Lois Swoboda 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star .com A timbering project ongoing in the Box R Wildlife Management District has both economic and environmental bene ts for Florida. Right now F&W Forestry, a Marianna rm, is overseeing extensive logging in Box R, their efforts part of a multi-decade plan to restore the original ecosystems. Jerry Pitts, Box Rs wildlife biologist, said F&W has been a strong partner in the restoration planning process. They handle the business end of the project, he said. We told them our ecological goals and we took our time and got a really good plan. He said he also worked with Florida Natural Areas Inventory (FNAI), a research group out of the University of Florida, to determine what Box R was like before it became a pine plantation. FNAIs stated goal is to collect, interpret, and disseminate ecological information critical to the conservation of Floridas biological diversity. Pitts said they used historical records, including aerial photographs to turn back the clock in Box R and glimpse the original lay of the land. He said lumber is being harvested on a 400-acre area originally scheduled to be cut under the 2011 contract. An additional 700 acres will be harvested this year and 500 will be harvested in 2013. Several logging rms will work in Box R over the next two years under F&Ws direction. Pitts said the cutting for 2011 and 2012 should be completed by the end of June unless the weather interferes. The loggers work fast, he said. To them time is money and they dont waste any. He said any damage to roads will be repaired before the state signs off on the logging contract. The trees are not being clear cut, rather they are thinned and the undergrowth reduced to encourage nature to take control and return Box R to its original state. Tracts marked for thinning are scattered throughout, so no single area will be severely impacted. Pitts said its not possible to predict how much income will be generated from the sale of the wood because trees of different sizes sell for different prices and the price of wood changes with the market. Smaller timber will be used for pulp and larger trees will become lumber or fence posts. The 10-year plan now underway will provide a sustained revenue stream that could amount to as much as $2 million, he said. The main purpose of the logging is not to make money but to open up the forest so that long-leaf pine, the naturally occurring conifer in this area, can be reintroduced. When The St. Joe Company had a paper mill in Port St. Joe, acreage originally covered in long-leaf was clear cut and replanted with fast growing loblolly and slash pine for commercial harvest. When St. Joe stopped harvesting pine for pulp, the pine plantations they abandoned became choked with undergrowth, especially titi, which was once con ned to dry ridges but now occurs throughout the forest. Pitts said he believes timber harvest is a good use for tracts of undeveloped land because the areas remain greenspace; the downside is that biodiversity is greatly reduced in timber plantations because fast-growing non-native trees replace the local plants. Pitts said plans for Box R include restoring the natural water levels in addition to thinning the trees. Controlled burns will also be used to suppress the undergrowth. Fire is an important component of the restoration program, he said. All of these are re-maintained communities. Fire is very important to the germination of wiregrass and long-leaf pine. Currently, controlled burns must be carried out in the winter and spring when the danger of wild re is reduced, but Pitts said after some of the most overgrown areas have been burned several times, the foresters can begin to burn during the growing season, which has less impact on wildlife in the area. According to Pitts, the key to restoring native forest is to open up the tree canopy through timber removal and plant long-leaf pine in the corridors this creates. As the long-leafs, grow, more nonnative trees will be thinned out until, eventually, the long-leaf will become the upper story canopy tree again. Pitts and other biologists like him hope that native understory plants will return on their own once the long-leaf forest is established. He said the entire progress will take decades. I may work here for 20 or 30 years, but when Im gone, somebody else will have to come along and pick up where I left off, he said. Ultimately, some of the land forested now will be returned to non-forest ecosystems like damp meadows and Pitts expects that in 20, or even 10 years from now, the face of Box R will look very different. He said the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, which manages Box R, views the restoration project as a pilot program for similar efforts in the vast acreage they steward. He said FWC will use the knowledge it gains from the Box R pilot program to launch similar programs in the Apalachicola River and Aucilla wildlife management districts. Have you ever thought about joining an organization that could use your talents, skills and experience in activities that save lives and the environment? The U.S. Coast Guard is looking to reestablish an Auxiliary Unit in the Carrabelle, Eastpoint, St. George Island and Apalachicola area and needs volunteers 17 and older to serve in various capacities. These would include helping recreational boaters to improve their safety skills, and their appreciation for the areas environment, to be respected and responsible operators of their preferred watercrafts. Becoming a member provides opportunities to train and devote as much time as you want in public education, recreation vessel examination, safety patrols on the water, recruiting, public information, event planning and coordination, environmental protection and marketing, as well as building support among local law enforcement and government agencies having a common interest in safe boating. All the activities can be enhanced with the knowledge, talents, skills and experience you bring. Your diverse backgrounds and personal strengths are keys to the successful delivery of the programs. If any of the above activities touch upon your interests, I strongly urge you to attend the Open Invitation for Membership in the US Coast Guard Auxiliary on Saturday, July 7 from 10 am until noon, at the Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve, 108 Island Drive, Eastpoint. For additional information, contact Dave Rabon, Flotilla 1-2, at 850-274-4689. Coast Guard Auxiliary seeks new members LOIS SWOBODA | The Times The shrimp plant, or false hop, is good for inside or outside. Buds N Bugs: The shrimp plant LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Ongoing timbering in Box R requires the use of heavy machinery. Timber project boosts Box R JERRY PITTS

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July 4th Advertising Deadlines Display Advertising Schedule July 5th IssueSpace Reservation and Ad Copy Submittal Deadline June 28th, 2012 3:00pm Final Ad Approval July 2nd, 12:00pm F OURTH O F J ULY SPADEA Business Card ........................................ $30.00 2 col x 1 mod Actual Size: 3.22 x 2 1/4 Page .................................................. $225.00 3 col x 5 mod Actual Size: 4.89 x 10 1/2 Page .................................................. $400.00 6 col x 5 mod Actual Size: 9.9 x 10 Full Page (back) ..................................... $750.00 6 col x 10 mod Actual Size: 9.9 x 20 P REMIUM P OSITIONS Front Page Bottom ............. $175.00 3 col x 2.5 mod Actual Size: 4.89 x 5 INSIDE Page 2 ..................... $450.00 3 col x 10 mod Actual Size: 4.89 x 20 Contact Joel or Kari to reserve your space today (850) 227-7847 (850) 370-6090 CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA SP O RTS www.apalachtimes.com Thursday, June 14, 2011 A Page 11 Section By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894| @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com For the fourth straight year, Eastpoints Hunter Bartley took home the top prize in the annual Mullet Toss on St. George Island. But runner-up and former champion Robert Wilhoit, of Carrabelle, didnt make it easy for him. Before a large audience gathered for the 21st annual spectacle on the beach in front of the Blue Parrot restaurant, Bartley let loose with a 188 foot, 3-inch throw, a personal best, during the regular competition, easily making it into the threeman toss-off that would determine the winner. More than 30 feet behind Bartley was Wilhoit, with a hurl of 156 feet that was still good enough to ensure he, too, would make the toss-off. Rounding out the trio was Apalachicolas Brett Johnson, who slung the sh 152 feet to make it to the nals, narrowly edging out Apalachicolas Dillon Grant, son of the events record holder, Stan Grant. Dillon Grant threw for 150 feet, two feet further than Liberty Countys Justin Mercer, for the honor of fourth and fth place, respectively. Missing out on a berth in the nals was former champion Chip Sanders, who had the distance, but hooked both of his throws out of bounds to the right. The toss-off was a dramatic one, as Johnson threw rst, arcing the mullet 141 feet, 8 inches. Wilhoit followed, his rst throw landing 166 feet past the starting line, and his second, 180 feet, to put the heat on Bartley to come up with a mammoth hurl. Bartleys rst throw spun in a circle and landed at the 179-foot, 5-inch mark, forcing him to make good on his nal shot for the title. And that he did, winding up and rearing back to throw 186 feet, 4 inches to win the $200 top prize for the sixth time. For his second place nish, Wilhoit took home a mountain bike donated by Tri-Eagle sales. I had to work out. Gotta eat my Wheaties, Wilhoit said afterwards. They was ying today, said Bartley, 29. The wind was kind of a side wind. Last year, it was right in our face. He thanked Kelsey Smith and Will Prescott for their work in shagging mullet for him all week as he practiced up for the event. He also heaped praise on his rivals. They stepped it up in the nals, Bartley said. Thats what I like, when they push you. Its worthwhile. It gives the crowd a show. Bartleys win was not without a touch of disappointment, since the Mullet Toss forced him to miss his daughter Kaydences performance in the afternoons Pam Nobles Studios dance recital at the Dixie Theatre. I havent lost since my daughters been born, he said. Now I can bring momma some money for missing that recital. From the moment the event got underway under sunny skies in the morning, plenty of young boys and girls were on hand to try their hand at tossing a sh, many for the rst time. With the Blue Parrots Paul Joanos overseeing the event, and Oyster Radio deejay Brian Bowen emceeing with the help of fellow staffer Katie Galloway, the Mullet Toss went smoothly from the start, managing to avoid the heavy rains that swept in at about 3 p.m. Easily capturing the age 11-and-under category was Eastpoints Jan Lowe, who threw 91 feet, 2 inches to win a shing pole and tackle box. Finishing as runner-up was Nick Keenan, a sixth grader from Buford, Ga., who posted a 77 feet, 1 inch pitch, narrowly edging out third-place tosser Will Prescott, from Eastpoint, who threw for 76 feet, 8 inches. In the age 12-16 category, Eastpoints Cash Creamer edged out Apalachicolas Trenton Lee to win a bicycle. Creamer threw the sh 131 feet, 2 inches, about two feet farther than Trenton Lee, who hurled it 129 feet. In third place was Ryder Jowers, from Columbus, Ga., who threw for 101 feet, 7 inches. In the womens category, it was a matter of a single inch that determined the winner. Paige Martin, of Leesburg, Ga., who played shortstop for Columbus State in Columbus, Ga., threw the mullet 95 feet, 5 inches, one inch better than Tallahassees Laura Davis. In third place, Carrie Johnson, Bretts wife, became the second member of the Johnson family to earn a winning spot, taking home third place with a throw of 86 feet, 3 inches. In the freestyle category, a three-man team used a Georgia and Louisiana State University Fish Propulsion System to shoot mullets maybe 20 or 30 feet. With Rick Daigle rearing back on the slingshot designed by his wife Mary, and David Fendley and Hutch Hutchinson anchoring the poles, the sh was well short of the 533-foot record, probably by about 500 feet. An impressive performance was put in by Huntler Bartley and Carl Ard with the 5150 Team as they used compressed air from an Ards service truck to shoot mullet several hundred feet, but still shy of the record. They won $100 for their efforts, and posed afterwards for a picture with former state senator Al Lawson, who is making a bid for the Democratic nomination for the congressional seat that includes Franklin County. All monies raised by the event go to the Apalachicola Bay Charter School. Bartley wins Mullet Toss with personal best Edges out Wilhoit by 6 feet in thrilling toss-off Hwy. 65 N Photos by DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times Stepping up to the Mullet Toss are: Right, Hunter Bartley, top, Carrie Johnson and, below Maya Itzkovitz. They stepped it up in the nals. Thats what I like, when they push you. Its worthwhile. It gives the crowd a show. Hunter Bartley Mullet Toss winner SEE MORE For lots more Mullet Toss photos, visit www. apalachtimes.com.

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A12| The Times Thursday, June 14, 2012 CLASSIFIEDS BP Claims ProgramThis communication includes new information and claims procedures for individuals and businesses who wish to “ le a claim with BP under the Oil Pollution Act of 1990 (OPAŽ). The United States District Court for the Eastern District of Louisiana has granted preliminary approval to the economic and property damage settlement between BP and plaintiffs in MDL 2179 concerning the Deepwater Horizon Incident (SettlementŽ). If the Court grants “ nal approval of the settlement, individuals and businesses falling within the Settlements class de“ nition will be bound by the terms of the settlement unless the class member timely exercises the class members right to opt out of the settlement. Information concerning the Court-Supervised Settlement Program, including the right to opt out, may be found at www.DeepwaterHorizonSettlements.com or by calling 1-866-992-6174. Individuals and businesses that do not fall with the Settlements class de“ nition or that timely opt out of the Settlement may “ le claims under OPA with BP. This includes claims for interim, short-term damages representing less than the full amount to which the claimant may ultimately be entitled. Access to forms Effective June 4, 2012, claim forms for the BP Claims Program are available at www.bp.com/claims or may be requested by calling 1-855-687-2631. All claim forms for the BP Claims Program must be submitted in one of the following ways: By mail: BP Claims Program P.O. 330919 Houston, TX 77233-0919 By email: Scanned forms can be sent to: bpclaimsprogram@bp.com By fax: Faxed forms can be submitted to 1-866-542-4785 Additional information: Online: www.bp.com/claims By Phone: 1-855-687-2631 (toll-free, multilingual) TTY: 1-800-345-4039. For any claims under OPA that are denied or that are not resolved within 90 days after the date of submission to the BP Claims Program the claimant may, provided presentment and other requirements of law are satis“ ed, elect to commence an action in court against BP, or to present the claim to the NPFC, US Coast Guard Stop 7100 (ca), 4200 Wilson Boulevard, Suite 1000, Arlington, Virginia 20598-7100 for consideration. The NPFC may be contacted at 1-800-280-7118. 87442T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 11-000436CA TYNDALL FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, Plaintiff, vs. WILLIAM WAYNE WEBB, WONDA WEBB ALLEN, EASTPOINT WATER AND SEWER DISTRICT, AND FRANKLIN COUNTY, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Franklin County, Florida, pursuant to the Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure, entered in this cause, the Clerk of this Court shall sell the property at public sale at 11:00 A.M. E.D.T., on the 12th day of June, 2012, at the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida, 32320, the following described real property lying and being in Franklin County, Florida, to-wit: EXHIBIT “A” A parcel of land lying in the Southeast Quarter of Fraction Section 27, Township 8 South, Range 8 West, Franklin County, Florida being described as follows: Commence at the intersection of the Southeasterly boundary of the 60.0 foot State Road (S-384-A) with the Northeasterly boundary of the 60.0 foor State Road (S-384) abd run thence North then 17 degrees 02 minutes 55 seconds East along said right-of-way of State Road S-384-A 962.10 feet to the Point of Beginning. From said Point of Beginning run thence South 72 degrees 57 minutes 05 seconds East 325.00 feet to a point in the center of a creek, thence North 67 degrees 40 minutes 45 seconds East along said creek center line 252.24 thence leaving said creek North 72 degrees 57 minutes 05 seconds West 370.00, thence South 17 degrees 02 minutes 55 seconds West 131.10 feet, thence North 72 degrees 57 minutes 05 seconds West 150.00 feet, to a point on said right-of-way of State Road S-384-A, thence South 17 degrees 02 minutes 55 seconds West along said right-of-way 28.90 feet to the Point of Beginning. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. This Notice dated this 27th day of April, 2012. MARCIA JOHNSON Clerk Circuit Court, Franklin County, Florida By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk June 7, 14, 2012 87488T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File Number: 2012-000011-CP IN RE: ESTATE OF ERRIS VANVLEET VENTRY Deceased. NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION AND NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of ERRIS VANVLEET VENTRY, deceased, File Number 2012-000011-CP is pending in the Circuit Court for Franklin County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is the. Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, Franklin County, Florida 32320. The estate is testate. The date of the will is May 16, 1986. There are no codicils. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal resentative’s Attorney are set forth below. ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT: Any interested person on whom a copy of this notice of administration is served must file on or before the date that is 3 months after the date of service of a copy of the notice of administration on that person any objection that challenges the validity of the will, the qualifications of the personal representative, the venue, or jurisdiction of this Court. Persons who may be entitled to exempt property under Section 732.402, Florida Statutes will be deemed to have waived their rights to claim that property as exempt property unless a petition for determination of exempt property is filed by such persons or on their half on or before the later of the date that is 4 months after the date of service of a copy of this notice of administration on such persons or the date that is 40 days after the date of termination of any proceeding involving the construction, admission to probate, or validity of the will or involving any other matter affecting any part of the exempt property. An election to take an elective share must be filed on or before the earlier of the date that is 6 months after the date of service of a copy of the notice of administration on the surviving spouse, or an attorney in fact or a guardian of the property of the surviving spouse, or the date that is 2 years after the date of the decedent’s death. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate must file claims against the estate with the Court during the time periods set forth in Section 733.702, Florida Statutes, or be forever barred. ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. The date of the first publication of this Notice is June 14, 2012. Personal Representative: WILLIAM DAVID VENTRY Post Office Box 3984 Tallahassee, Florida 32315 Attorney for Personal Representative: J. GORDON SHULER of J. GORDON SHULER, P.A. Post Office Drawer 850 Apalachicola, Florida 32329 (850) 653-9226 Florida Bar Number 0700959 June 14, 21, 2012 87444T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 19-2010-CA-000292 DIVISION: BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP, Plaintiff, vs. ANGELA SHARP, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated May 14, 2012, and entered in Case No. 19-2010-CA-000292 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for FRANKLIN County, Florida wherein BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP, is the Plaintiff and ANGELA SHARP; THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF ANGELA SHARP N/K/A GUS PRESTON; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at FRONT DOOR OF THE FRANKLIN COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 33 MARKET STREET, APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA at 11:00 AM, on the 27th day of June, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT 27, BLOCK 3 OF SUN ‘N SAND, UNIT 2, AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE 12, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 637 PINE STREET, PANACEA, FL 32346 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and seal of this Court on May 18, 2012. MARCIA M. JOHNSON Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk Attorney for Plaintiff: RONALD R. WOLFE & ASSOCIATES, P.L. P.O. Box 25018 Tampa, Florida 33622-5018 **See Americans with Disabilities Act: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Mr. Doug Smith, Office of Court Administration, Leon County Courthouse, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 Phone: 850-577-4401 Fax: 850-487-7947 June 7, 14, 2012 87709T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 10-00002-CA Wann Van Robinson and Mary D. Robinson, individually and as Co-Trustees of the Wann Van Robinson Revocable Trust, Plaintiffs, vs Ronnie V. Worley individually and as the sole surviving Trustee of the Worley Revocable Family Trust; Jason Clint Worley individually and as Trustee of the Jason C. Worley Revocable Trust, Defendants. NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the Order of Public Sale entered in this cause, the Franklin County Clerk will, in accordance with Florida Statutes §64.061(4), sell the properties identified as the Alligator Point Property and the Dog Island Property, legally described below, separately, to the highest bidder, upon the further terms as set forth in the Order of Public Sale. The sale will take place on June 27, 2012, at public auctions held at the front door (or such other location within the Courthouse as is commonly used) of the Franklin County Courthouse, located at 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida, in Franklin County, 32320, beginning at 11:00 AM. Prospective bidders are notified that the properties are subject to mortgage. The approximate Alligator Point Property Mortgage payoff is $473,725.00. The approximate Dog Island Property Mortgage payoff is $333,484.00. IN ADDITION TO THE AMOUNT BID, THE SUCCESSFUL BIDDER WILL BE REQUIRED TO SATISFY THE RESPECTIVE MORTGAGE AT CLOSING, FOLLOWING THE SALE. FURTHER DETAILS ARE AVAILABLE IN THE ORDER OF PUBLIC SALE. LEGAL DESCRIPTIONS OF THE PROPERTIES ALLIGATOR POINT PROPERTY: LOT 8, BLOCK “L” OF PENINSULAR POINT, UNIT NO. 2 AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1 PAGES 21-23, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. ALSO: THE WEST 25 FEET OF THE LAND LYING BETWEEN LOT 1, BLOCK “I” AND LOT 8, BLOCK “H” OF PENINSULAR POINT, UNIT NO. 2 AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGES 21-23 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. ALSO: THE WEST 25 FEET OF THE LAND LYING BETWEEN LOT 1, OF SUB LOT 9, BLOCK “L” AND LOT 8 OF BLOCK “L”, OF PENINSULAR POINT, UNIT NO. 2, AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 21-23 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. DOG ISLAND PROPERTY: LOT 28 (UNRECORDED) COMMENCE AT A POINT MARKING THE INTERSECTION OF THE EAST BOUNDARY OF FRACTIONAL SECTION 11, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 4 WEST, DOG ISLAND, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA WITH THE SOUTHERLY RIGHTOF-WAY BOUNDARY OF GULF SHORE DRIVE AND RUN SOUTH 67 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 1096.00 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 60 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 2400.00 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919) MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING AND LEAVING SAID RIGHTOF-WAY BOUNDARY RUN SOUTH 26 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 41 SECONDS EAST 299.76 FEET TO THE APPROXIMATE MEAN HIGH WATER LINE OF THE GULF OF MEXICO, THENCE RUN SOUTH 59 DEGREES 35 MINUTES 20 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID MEAN HIGH WATER LINE 99.62 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID MEAN HIGH WATER LINE RUN NORTH 26 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 41 SECONDS WEST 303.49 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #4261) LYING ON THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF GULF SHORE DRIVE, THENCE RUN NORTH 61 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 09 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 99.43 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. Marcia Johnson Franklin County Clerk of Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk Attorneys for Plaintiffs: Susan K. Spurgeon, Esq. Pennington, Moore, Wilkinson, Bell & Dunbar, P.A. 2701 N. Rocky Point Dr Suite 900 Tampa, FL 33607 (813) 639-9599 (813) 639-1488 June 14, 21, 2012 87532T LEGAL NOTICE Notice is given pursuant to Florida Self-Storage Facility Act, Florida Statutes, Chapter 83, Part IV, that Seminole Safe N Secure Storage will hold a sale by sealed bid on: June 30, 2012 at: 10:00 a.m. at 162 US 98, Eastpoint, Florida 32328 of the contents of mini-warehouse(s) containing personal property of: Gomeshia Cohens Tonita Turner Paul Craft Lanny Hardman Michael Hicks Jerry Gleaton Before the sale date of June 30, 2012, the property may be redeemed by payment in cash or money order of the outstanding balance and cost by mailing it to Post Office Box 1054, Eastpoint, Florida 32328, or by paying in person. June 14, 21, 2012 87536T LEGAL NOTICE Notice is given pursuant to Florida Self-Storage Facility Act, Florida Statutes, Chapter 83, Part IV, that Seminole Safe N Secure Storage will hold a sale by sealed bid on: July 7th, 2012 at: 10:00 a.m. at 162 US 98, Eastpoint, Florida 32328 of the contents of mini-warehouse(s) containing personal property of: Andrew Butler Vessel#11582126 FL6510JS Before the sale date of July 7, 2012, the property may be redeemed by payment in cash or money order of the outstanding balance and cost by mailing it to Post Office Box 1054, Eastpoint, Florida 32328, or by paying in person. June 14, 21, 28, 2012 87733T PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF INTENDED ACTION FRANKLIN COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD Purpose and Effect: The Franklin County School Board proposes to update and adopt policies, as provided in the Administrative Procedures Act for the purpose of maintaining compliance with Florida Statutes and State Board of Education Rules. Summary: The following is a brief description of the proposed changes: School Board Policy Manual Student Code of Conduct Student Progression Plan Learning/Alternative Center Handbook Franklin County Academy Plan Statutory Authority: Section 1001.41, Florida Statutes These proposed rules will be considered by the Franklin County School Board at a meeting publicly advertised and held in the Willie Speed School Board Room at 85 School Road, Eastpoint, Florida no earlier than 28 days after the original date of this notice. Policies may be reviewed during the period of June 5, 2012 through July 2, 2012 at the Franklin County School Board Administrative Offices, 85 School Road, Eastpoint, Florida during the hours of 8:00 AM until 5:30 PM, Monday Thursday. June 14, 21, 28 July 5, 2012 87749T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO.: 11000505CA FLAGSTAR BANK, FSB Plaintiff, vs. NORBERT JOSEPH KAMINSKI A/K/A NORBERT J. KAMINSKI A/K/A NORBERT KAMINSKI; NANCY ANNE KAMINSKI A/K/A NANCY A. KAMINSKI A/K/A NANCY KAMINSKI; UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2, ET AL, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTIONCONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE TO: NORBERT JOSEPH KAMINSKI A/K/A NORBERT J. KAMINSKI A/K/A NORBERT KAMINSKI; NANCY ANNE KAMINSKI A/K/A NANCY A. KAMINSKI A/K/A NANCY KAMINSKI Whose Residence Is: 1023 BEDFORD PARK, GROSSE POINTE PARK, MI 48230 and who is evading service of process and the unknown defendants who may be spouses, heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, lienors, creditors, trustees, and all parties claiming an interest by, through, under or against the Defendant(s), who are not known to be dead or alive, and all parties having or claiming to have any right, title or interest in the property described in the mortgage being forclosed herein. YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property: LOT 28, BLOCK 10 EAST OF ST. GEORGE ISLAND GULF BEACHES UNIT NO. 1, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE(S) 7, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on counsel for Plaintiff, whose address is 3010 North Military Trail, Suite 300, Boca Raton, Florida 33431 30 days from the date of first publication of this Notice and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on Plaintiff’s attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition filed herein. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court at County, Florida, this 1st day of June, 2012. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk June 14, 21, 2012 87781T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.: 192009CA000646 XXXXXX U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION AS TRUSTEE, FOR THE BENEFIT OF HARBOURVIEW 2005-13 TRUST FUND Plaintiff, vs. JAMES P. KOURKOULIS, et al., Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order or Summary Final Judgment of foreclosure dated May 29, 2012, and entered in Case No. 192009CA 000646XXXXXX of the Circuit Court in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE, FOR THE BENEFIT OF HARBOR-VIEW 2005-13 TRUST FUND is Plaintiff and JAMES P. KOURKOULIS; REGIONS BANK AS SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO AMSOUTH BANK; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 1; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 2; and ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST A NAMED DEFENDANT TO THIS ACTION, OR HAVING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE ANY RIGHT, TITLE OR INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY HEREIN DESCRIBED, are Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Front Door of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320 at Franklin County, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on the 3rd day of October, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Order or Final Judgment, to-wit: LOT 5, BLOCK 97, CITY OF APALACHICOLA, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN THE OFFICE OF THE CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons needing special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the Clerk of the Court not later than five business days prior to the proceeding at the Franklin County Courthouse. (850) 653-8861 or 1-800-955-8770 via Florida Relay Service. DATED at Apalachicola, Florida on May 30, 2012. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of Court By: Terry E. Creamer As Deputy Clerk Attorneys for Plaintiff SMITH, HIATT & DIAZ, P.A. P.O. BOX 11438 Fort Lauderdale, FL 33339-1438 (954) 564-0071 June 14, 21, 2012 Look No Further Than The Classifieds What you want is right before your eyes in the Classified Section of your daily and Sunday newspaper. For Fast Results,Call 747-5020

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, June 14, 2012 The Times | A13 e Apalachicola Bay Charter School is accepting applications for the following positions for 2012-13 school year:€ Music/Art/Character education instructor € Physical Education instructor € Teacher assistant € Custodial personnel € Bus driverABC School is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Please send resumes to: Chimene Johnson, ABC School, 98 12th Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320 Fickling Vacation Rentals St. George IslandHousekeeping/maintenance supervisor for vacation rental company. Rental experience preferred, immediate start. Please apply in person or call ( 850) 927-2218 C L E A N E R S CLEANERS N E E D E D NEEDEDLots of Work and Good Pay Must have Own Vehicle Must have Own SuppliesCALL 850.227.3806 HELP WANTED Warehouse / Delivery Eastpoint Location RENTALS1 BEDROOM, 1 BATH, UNFURNISHED APT. Lanark, Remodeled, Inc. Water ......................$425 2 BEDROOM, 1 BATH, UNFURNISHED APT. Lanark ............................................................$400 2 BEDROOM, 1 BATH, MOBILE HOME Fenced Yard ....................................................$500 3 BEDROOM, 2 BATH, UNFURNISHED Doublewide.....................................................$700 3 BEDROOM, 2 BATH, WATER VIEW HOME Unfurnished, Lawn Inc. ...................................$800 2 BEDROOM, 1 BATH, UNFURNISHED APT. Small Porch ....................................................$375 2 BEDROOM, 2 BATH, MOBILE HOME Large Yard ......................................................$500 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322850-697-9604 850-323-0444 www.seacrestre.comwww. rst tness.com/carrabellePROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND RENTALS Sales/Business DevInteractive Sales ManagerAre you passionate about providing the best media solutions to your customers? Florida’s Freedom Interactive Newspapers, is seeking a hands-on Interactive Sales Manager with a track record of driving revenue in multiplatform environments. You will be responsible for coaching, mentoring and developing your sales team with the goal of aggressively increasing revenue. Included within your sphere of responsibility are the following: Developing new revenue streams, setting sales goals, field coaching and managing sales performance -making this a very “hands on” leadership role. The Interactive Sales Manager will foster an attitude of exceptional customer service and provide motivation, leadership and fresh ideas to the selling process. Position Requirements: Proven sales experience in digital products Experience developing and leading a high performing sales team Vision and passion to drive growth in interactive sales Strong analytical ability to budget forecast and effectively utilize market research The successful candidate will lead cross-selling efforts in print and digital solutions and must possess a demonstrated expertise with the Internet. A college degree in advertising or marketing is preferred but not required. Sales Experience and previous media management experience is preferred. Florida Freedom offers an excellent benefit package including health, dental, vision and life insurance, 401(k) plan, vacation and sick leave. This role offers a chance to live and work along Florida’s Emerald Coast encompassing 24 miles of pristine white-sand beaches stretching along the Gulf of Mexico. If this sounds like the right mix of challenge and opportunity, please e-mail your resume or contact me at either of the following addresses: E-Mail: sfeith@notes.freedom.com http://www.facebook.com/#!/skfeith http://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=1999909&trk =tab_pro https://twitter.com/#!/skfeith For more information about our organization please go to: freedom.com/careers Web ID#: 34211062 Outside Sales Representative An exciting opportunity now exists to join The News Herald. We are searching for enthusiastic, hard-working, and driven Outside Sales Representatives to join our team! Job Description The News Herald is looking for motivated sales professionals to establish footholds in their local markets by providing products and services to businesses. The Outside Sales Representative’s duties may include but are not limited to:  Cold call and prospect new territory opportunities.  Introduce business owners to programs via presentation, answer detailed questions and maintain that relationship. Requirements  Have strong work ethic  Experience presenting advertising materials to a variety of businesses  Cold calling experience  Reliable Transportation  Experience handling warm leads and prospecting for new leads.  Field Sales, Business to Business Sales (B2B), Inside Sales, Outside Sales, or Outbound Sales experience ( Preferred) We Offer:  Room for advancement and career opportunity  Bonuses  Dynamic Monthly Residual Compensation  Bonus programs  Introductory and Ongoing Training  Business Materials including phone, laptop and IPad, business cards, sales material and product knowledge information The News Herald offers a competitive bene t package including medical, dental, vision and life insurance, 401(k) plan, vacation and sick leave, and six paid holidays per year. Come by The News Herald at 501 W. 11th Street for an application or send a resume to resumes@ afreedom.com.Freedom Florida is a Drug-free workplace, EOETO APPLY: Publisher’s Notice “SCAM “To avoid possible scams, it is recommended that consumers should verify caller information when receiving calls regarding credit card payments. Consumers should also contact the local company themselves instead of giving this information to individuals who are contacting them directly. Adopt: Doctor, caring family lovingly waits for miracle 1st baby *Monica* 800552-0045* FLBar42311 Expenses Paid* GUN SHOWSanta Rosa County Auditorium, Milton, FL. June 16th & 17th 9am -5pm call (850) 957-4952 or (850) 261-8407 General Admission $6Text FL08625 to 56654 CASH PAID for unexpired, sealed DIABETIC TEST STRIPS-up to $25/Box! Shipping prepaid. (888) 883-8835 Education/TrainingPT Housekeeper/ nannyFor newborn on SGI. Nonsmoking. Must have childcare experience, references and pass background check. 850-274-1321 or augusta.west@ammfl.org. Food SvsOyster Shuckers Needed$9 per gallon, Leavins Seafood, Inc (850) 653-8823 Web ID#: 34211519 1 br, 1 ba efficiency Call for information 850-653-6103 Text FL11727 to 56654 Lanark Village: Clean 2 bedroom, 1 bath, screened porch, AC, Long term lease: 7 months min. $500 monthly + $350. security deposit, references required or wkly & wknd rental w/deposit Pets-will consider. Non smoking. 850-212-2063 Text FL11665 to 56654 Publisher’s NoticeAll real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on a equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. St. George Island $160 week, Electric, Satellite, Garbage incl. Pool tble. 12’ X 65’ deck w/Beautiful view 850-653-5114 Lanark Village Carlton St. #5, 1 Br 1 Ba, All Tile, Walk-in Closet, Landlord pays Electric and Water, $525 month + $300 deposit. Call 850-927-2838 or 864-356-5949 1 BRCottageH/AC in Apalachicola, FL. 850-643-7740. Apalachicola 3 bed, 1 bath, living rm, dining rm, central heat & air, partially furnished. $700 per month Call 850-653-8965 Text FL13240 to 56654 East Point 3 bed, 2 bath, plus 1 apt. For rent or lease, fully furnished Call: 850-670-8463 or 850-653-5763Text FL11701 to 56654 Eastpoint Two adjacent lots on Jefferson St. Zone C4. $21,500 each or $39,500 for both. Owner financing available. Call Royce Hodge (850) 510-3797. Text FL13192 to 56654 For Sale By Owner St. James Golf Course. Two lots, on the fairway. Owner financing. Motivated to sell. Call Royce Hodge for info: (850) 510-3797. Text FL13194 to 56654 Total Down Pmt $7752001 Chrysler 300 T otal Price $4,2000% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! Total Down Pmt $8752004 Chevy Blazer T otal Price $4,9000% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! Nice Car of Forgotten Coast, LLC For inventory log onto: www.nicecar offorgotten coastllc.com Total Down Pmt $1,5002003 Chevy Silverado X-Cab T otal Price $9,5000% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! Total Down Pmt $9752002 Ford F150 X-Cab T otal Price $5,8000% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! ToPlace Your Classified ad inCall Our New Numbers Now!Call: 850-747-5020 Toll Free: 800-345-8688 Fax: 850-747-5044 Email: thestar@pcnh.com thetimes@pcnh.com theAPALACHICOLA & CARRABELLETIMES CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you. EmeraldCoast Marketplace 747-5020 SELL ALL YOUR ITEMSthrough classified.CALL 747-5020 Buy it! Classified. Make your move to the medium that’s your number one source of information about homes for sale! For all your housing needs consult Classified when it’s time to buy, it’s the resource on which to rely. 16 -18 yard load clean fill dirt $90Delivered within 20 miles of Carravelle. Call Mike 850-899-5319 Park your car in Classified and see it take off in the fast lane!

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Local A14 | The Times Thursday, June 14, 2012 Our local real estate experts have identied what they feel are the best values around and are oering them to you in Real Estate Picks! (In this section), Discover the best real estate values in Mexico Beach, Port St. Joe, Apalachicola, Cape San Blas, St. George Island, Carrabelle and surrounding areas. Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Real Estate Picks John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.com MLS# 245232 $89,000 St. George Island HIGH & DRY 3RD TIER LOT Located on the north side of Gulf Beach Drive and only two lots from the corner for easy beach access on 11th Street. Scrub Oaks line the road side of this lot creating privacy, but offers an open expanse of high sandy ground. Excellent building site. John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.com MLS# 241735 $94,900 Lanark Village PERFECT FLORIDA LIVING Well-maintained home in a very desirable neighborhood with Bay view from front yard. 2 BR, 1 BA, Lanark Boat Club & Lanark Golf Course available. Furnished, Appliances, HVAC & Water Heater like new. Carl King Ave. Listed by Janie Burke Trades & Services Laban Bontrager, DMD Monica Bontrager, DMD 12761 Pea Ridge Road Bristol, Florida 32321 TELEPHONE (850) 643-5417 Bristol Dental Clinic DENTURE LAB ON PREMISES Same Day Service on Repairs and Relines Don Lively General Contractors L ICENSED AND I NSURED 20 Y EARS E XPERIENCE P .O. Box 439 C arrabelle, FL 32322 697-2783 or Mobile 566-2603 RC 0066499 R G0065255 653-8868 GET YOUR AD IN C A LL T ODAY! GET YOUR AD IN 653-8868 Trades & Services Carrabelle Visa, Discover, and American Express Honored at Participating Ace Stores JACKSONS Building Supplies Building Supplies & Auto Repair Carrabelle 697-3333 We Deliver Anywhere Hardware and Paint Center J.J.s Tree Service, LLC Stump Grinder Licensed & Insured Call John : (850) 899-8432 JOES LAWN CARE IF I TS I N YOUR YARD LET JOE TAKE CARE OF I T FULL L AWN SERVICE S TREE TRIMMING AND REMOVAL AL S O CLEAN GUTTER S AND IRRIGATION IN S TILLATION, PLANTING AND BEDDING AVAILABLE CALL JOE@ 850-323-0741 OR EMAIL J OE S_ LA WN @Y A H OO COM ROBERTS APPLIANCE REPAIR ALL MAJOR BRANDS 18 Shadow Lane Apalachicola, FL 32320 Phone: (850) 653-8122 Cell: (850) 653-7654 From A to Z PO Box 364 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 850-340-0756 Gregs Handyman Service & Lawn Maintenance News BRIEFS HCOLA to host political forum tonight Hillside Coalition of Laborers for Apalachicola will host a political forum at 6 p.m. Thursday, June 14 at the Holy Family Community Center, 203 Dr. Frederick Humphries St. in Apalachicola. For more information, please call 323-0544 or 653-7515. Train the trainer classes postponed The Community Emergency Response Teams Train-TheTrainer classes, originally announced for June 18-20 at the Emergency Operations Center, have been cancelled. Emergency Management Director Pam Brownell said regional classes will probably be scheduled for some time in August at an unspeci ed location. For more information, call 653-6748. Bridge inspection Monday in Eastpoint Intermittent lane closures will occur Monday, June 18 on U.S. 98 at the Porters Bar Bridge (approximately two miles west of State Road 65) in Eastpoint. Trans eld Services bridge inspectors will replace a bridge joint on the structure. Motorists can expect intermittent lane restrictions in the eastbound lanes between 8:30 a.m. and noon and in the westbound lanes from 12:30 p.m. to 5 p.m. Motorists are reminded to pay attention and use caution; traf c aggers will direct motorists through the work zone. Apalach to cut ribbon on reuse system Friday The City of Apalachicola has placed their land application and reclaimed water system in service. This system provides for 100 percent bene cial reuse of the wastewater treatment plants ef uent and will eliminate surface water discharge to wetlands. The city and BaskervilleDonovan, Inc. are hosting a ribbon cutting ceremony for the Apalachicola Reuse Water and Land Application System this Friday, June 15. The ceremony will be at Riverfront Park at 11 a.m. Refreshments will be provided. We would like to extend an invitation to each of you and hope that you will join us next Friday at the Park! Voluntary Pre-K registration June 21 Mr. Hardee from Early Learning Coalition will be at the Learning Center, 85 School Road, Eastpoint Room 1 on Thursday, June 21 to register children for Voluntary Pre-Kindergarten 201213. He will also complete forms for summer VPK certi cates. Please remember students who attend summer VPK must have a VPK certi cate. Pre-K Child Find Screenings will be on July 1819; please call for an appointment 1-866-277-6616. The screening will be for children age 3 and 4, with special needs such as vision, hearing and speech. 2012 hurricane guides At the June 5 meeting of the county commission, Emergency Management Director Pam Brownell announced that the 2012 Hurricane Survival Guides are ready for mass mailing. Every resident in the county should receive one within the next month SGI Plantation photo contest The St. George Plantation 2012 photo contest will be held from June 1 through Aug. 28. Entrants may submit photographs of St. George Island, Apalachicola or Franklin County, accompanied by a written release form granting St. George Plantation Owners Association permission to publish your photo. Any person identi able in the photograph must also sign the release. A parent must sign the release for any minor pictured. Include the following information on a label af xed to the back of the photograph: Your name, address and phone number; and title of photo or brief description. Entries must be on disk and professionally printed or in PDF or JPG format of less than 5 MBs. Entry must be mailed or emailed (photocontest10@sgpoa. com) by Aug. 28, to Plantation Photo Contest, 1712 Magnolia Road, St. George Island, FL 32328. Two entries per photographer. Entry fee is $5 per entry, with check made payable to SGPOA at the above address. First place wins $150, second place $100, third place $50 and Peoples Choice $50. Winners will be noti ed Sept. 14. Name your own sea turtle! Sea turtle nesting season is here! Refuge staff and volunteers began surveys for sea turtle nests at St. Vincent National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) on May 1. You can support this important monitoring work for a donation of $25, by joining our Adopt-a-Nest program. As in past years, participants receive an adoption certi cate, photo of adopted nest, activity/ hatchling report and recognition in Supporters newsletter. But were offering a new twist for 2012. Adopt-a-Nest participants will be able to name the turtle whose nest they adopt. Nest adoption proceeds help offset refuge costs for the monitoring program, including fuel for survey vehicles and materials for cages to protect nests from predators. Were hoping for more adoptions this year given rising fuel costs. Gift adoptions are available. To adopt a nest or learn more, e-mail supportstvin@hotmail.com or leave a message at 229-6735.



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xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx 50 WWW.APALACHTIMES.COMPhone: 850-653-8868 Web: apalachtimes.com E-mail: dadlerstein@star .com Fax: 850-653-8036 Circulation: 800-345-8688 DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK: School News & Society: 11 a.m. Friday Real Estate Ads: 11 a.m. Thursday Legal Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Display Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Line Ads: 5 p.m. Monday xxxxx Contact Us xxxxx Out to see Index District FCAT scores divergeBy DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894| @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com The Franklin School District got a burst of good news, and a dose of bad, when results of the 2012 Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test were announced earlier this month. Florida Department of Education of cials had warned communities statewide that with the introduction this year of a new FCAT 2.0, based on more demanding content standards and more rigorous achievement standards, scores may appear lower on the new scale than on the previous scale for certain grades and subjects. Such was not the case with the Apalachicola Bay Charter School, whose students in grades 3-8 almost entirely bested the state average, with most grade levels showing improved scores in reading and mathematics over 2011.Sheriff race to highlight primariesBy DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894| @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com The elections for ve of the six countywide of ces that are up this year were settled Friday, with only the sheriffs race to be contested. The re-election of Superintendent of Schools Nina Marks, Clerk of Court Marcia Johnson, Tax Collector James Harris and Supervisor of Elections Ida Elliott, each to another fouryear term, was assured at the conclusion of last weeks qualifying period, as no opponents stepped forward to challenge any of these four Democratic of ceholders. In addition, Rhonda Skipper, also a Democrat, will succeed Property Appraiser Doris Pendleton, who is retiring this year. No opponent stepped forward to Proposal would bring barge shipping to CarrabelleBy LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star .com At the June 7 meeting of Carrabelles commission, the subject of staging barges from the city was revived. Realtor Sandy Mitchem and Rob Cooke, spokesman for Hosfords Gulf Coast Aggregates, told commissioners GCA wants ELECTION 2012 FRANKLIN FCATDistrict percentage scoring 3 and above Grade Reading Mathematics 2011 2012 2011 2012 3 50 45 39 31 4 56 59 42 58 5 60 44 60 55 6 56 60 55 42 7 46 57 42 50 8 40 49 28 38 ABC School shines, Franklin School falters MIKE MOCK CLIFF CARROLL JEFF VONIER FRANKLIN COUNTY RELAY FOR LIFERelay for Life attracts a spirited crowdBy DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894| @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com John Webb isnt ready to trade in his oyster tongs for a halo in heaven. The 56-year-old is back working the bay, after a successful battle with Stage 4 throat cancer. Webb was all smiles Friday night at the American Cancer Societys Relay for Life of Franklin County, held inside the gym of the former Apalachicola High School gymnasium after rain forced its exit from Pop Wagoner Stadium. Im a diehard, I guess, Webb said. I got a reason to stay here. I aint nished yet. He said back in 2007, Apalachicola family practitioner Dr. Stephen Miniat noticed lumps in the side of his throat and rst prescribed antibiotics. Theyd go down and then theyd come back, Webb said. So Miniat ordered a CT scan, which was conducted at GOING STRONG Im a diehard, I guess. I got a reason to stay here. I aint nished yet.John Webb cancer survivorPHOTOS BY DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The TimesThe luminarias at Franklin Countys Relay for Life celebration spell out hope. Below, Linda Thompson and Javeion Win eld compete in the Road to Recovery race.VOL. 127 ISSUE 7 Thursday, June 14, 2012 See PRIMARIES A7 See BARGE A6 See RELAY A7 See FCAT A6Opinion . . . . . . A4 Society . . . . . . A8 Faith . . . . . . . A9 Outdoors . . . . . A10 Tide Chart . . . . A10 Sports . . . . . . A11 Classi eds . . . A12-A13 Happy Fathers Day!Golf Gone Wild tees off SaturdayGolf Gone Wild, a golf tourney hosted by Forgotten Coast TV and St. James Bay Golf Resort, will be Saturday, June 16, at the resort, 151 Laughing Gull Lane in St. James Bay east of Lanark Village. Teams are welcome the day of the tourney; registration is at 10 a.m. At 4 p.m., nature photographer John Spohrer will present a slide-show presentation The Seasons of Apalachicola Bay, soon to be a published book. The Fountain Room will offer a chance to view art offerings and more at the silent auction, with creations by several local artists. Weekends in Apalachicola and St. George Island also are on the auction block. The evening concludes with an awards banquet featuring prime rib at the Crooked River Grill. The event bene ts the Florida Wild Mammal Association, a 501(c)(3) wildlife rehabilitation center that cares for sick, injured and orphaned birds and wildlife from Wakulla and Franklin counties. For more info, visit www. wakullawildlife.org or call Lynne Cooper 697-9507.King Buster Tourney June 23The third annual King Buster Tournament continues June 23 at C-Quarters Marina, 501 St. James Ave. in Carrabelle. Entry fee is $100 per boat, per tournament. Fishing hours are from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m., with three chances to win each tournament. A portion of registration fees go to Make-A-Wish Foundation of Central and Northern Florida. For more info, call 697-8400 or visit www. c-quartersmarina.com.Dont miss reworks July 3The Historic Apalachicola Main Street Program will sponsor a July 3 Independence Day Celebration on Riverfront Park downtown. The day begins with a parade at 6:30 p.m. with an ice cream social after. At approximately 9 p.m. will be a professional reworks display over the river.

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LocalA2 | The Times Thursday, June 14, 2012 State says Hut site rubble can stay Dr. Hobson Fulmer of Apalachicola Bay Animal ClinicWelcomes Our New Associate: Dr. John DuncanAlong with Dr. Fulmer, Dr. Duncan will be seeing patients for small animal medicine and surgery. Please call for an appointment or come by to meet him.850-670-8306Clinic hours: Monday-Friday 8am 6 pm187 Highway 98, Eastpoint Complete small animal medicine and surgery, wellness programs, laser surgery, diagnostic ultrasound, Serving Franklin and Gulf Counties for 30 years Theres a New Veterinarian in Town! $00000FS 45 TRIMMEREasy-to-use, well-balanced trimmer for homeowner use STIHL has you covered with protective apparel and accessories. $00000MS 170 CHAIN SAWDesigned for occasional wood-cutting tasks around the home Includes many of the excellent design features of our professional models Anti-vibration system for comfortable operation Bar lengths may vary by region. $00000BG 55 HANDHELD BLOWERProven handheld blower at an affordable price THIS TIME I WANT SOMETHINGHARDWORKING STIHLusa.com Available at participating dealers while supplies last. 2011 STIHL Give Dad What He Really Wants for Fathers DaySt. Joe Rent-All 706 E. 1st Street, Port St. Joe (850) 227-2112GIFT CERTIFICATES AVAILABLE BY LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com Large piles of debris that attracted the publics attention on the site of the former Hut Restaurant have been cleared up, but how exactly they got there remains unclear. Trans eld Services, the rm under contract to clean and maintain the states right-of-way in Franklin County, removed some of the material June 7. Most of the debris remains on the property with the blessing of state of cials. Harry Arnold said he doesnt know the source of most of the debris that was dumped on the bayside lot on the outskirts of Apalachicola, which he co-owns with Bobby Kirvin. The vacant lot at 315 US 98 west of Apalachicola was once the site of the Hut Restaurant, which was destroyed by Hurricane Dennis in 2005. In 2009, Kirvin and Arnold agreed to allow debris from the downtown Apalachicola State Bank to be placed on the property. The building was destroyed in Nov. 2008 by a re caused when a truck was driven into the Avenue E outside. Arnold served as a member of the board of directors of Apalachicola State Bank, which was owned by Coastal Community Bank, whose assets were purchased by Centennial Bank in July 2010. Bobby Kirvins son, Ward, said he had been mowing and maintaining the property at 315 US 98 and that about six months ago he noticed some new piles of debris on the site. Over time, several dozen various sizes piles containing assorted materials appeared. The material may have been deposited at night since trucks were not observed in the area by the owners of the property. A small amount of asphalt, brick pavers and what appear to be the remains of a gas station accumulated until last month, when the debris began to spill out on the state right-of-way. Around that time, Ward Kirvin spray-painted no dumping on several piles of debris. The growing amount of rubble drew complaints from nearby neighbors and resulted in a meeting May 28 with members of the Kirvin family, Arnold, representatives of the Florida Departments of Transportation (DOT) and Florida Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) and Trans eld. In a telephone interview following the meeting, Ian Satter, public information director for the DOT, said the DEP determined most of the debris at the site to be stockpiled material, rather than waste, and said it could be retained at the site as long as it was removed from the right-of-way. He said Trans eld volunteered to remove a small amount of material classi ed as waste, mostly asphalt, and to push the rest of the material, mostly concrete rubble, onto the property belonging to Kirvin and Arnold with their permission. Satter said the material retained on site can be used as back ll, but not as rip rap. He said all parties were in agreement on the solution to the right-of-way encroachment.BY DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes dadlerstein@star .com Franklin Countys jobless rate continued its steady decline in April, falling by 0.4 of a percentage point to 6.1 percent even as the workforce expanded. According to preliminary numbers released May 18 by the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity (DEO), 18 people dropped off the countys jobless rolls in April, from 363 down to 345, while the labor force expanded, from 5,591 to 5,624. The countys labor force remains even larger than it was one year ago, when it comprised 5,509 workers and when the jobless rate was higher at 7.5 percent. Franklin Countys jobless picture moved it to fourth best in the state. Monroe County had the states lowest rate at 4.8 percent, followed by Walton at 5.2 and Okaloosa at 5.7. Many of the counties with the lowest unemployment rates were those with relatively high proportions of government employment. The countys rosier jobless picture corresponded to improvement in nearby counties, both of which are struggling with worse unemployment than Franklins. The unemployment rate in the entire Gulf Coast Workforce region, which encompasses Bay, Franklin and Gulf counties, continued its decline, dropping to 7.7 percent in April, the lowest since Nov. 2008. The April rate was 1.6 percentage points lower than the regions year-ago rate of 9.3 percent. Out of a labor force of 101,250, there were 7,756 unemployed Gulf Coast residents. This is the fth consecutive month weve seen our unemployment drop, Kim Bodine, executive director for the Gulf Coast Workforce Board, said. The positive trend is a result of small but steady economic improvements in all three counties that make up our workforce region. The April unemployment rate in Bay was 7.7 percent, down by half a percentage point from March, while Gulf saw its jobless rate fall to 7.9 percent, down from 8.6 percent in March. According to data collected by the Conference Board, there were 2,326 job openings advertised online in April for the Gulf Coast region, an increase of 4.4 percent in job demand from March. Since the beginning of the year, the workforce board has placed 1,627 individuals in jobs. Floridas seasonally adjusted unemployment rate was 8.7 percent in April, lowest since January 2009 when it was also 8.7 percent. There were 804,000 jobless Floridians out of a labor force of 9.26 million. The April rate was 1.9 percentage points lower than the year-ago rate of 10.6 percent. The U.S. unemployment rate was 8.1 percent in April. County jobless rate fourth best in Florida LOIS SWOBODA | The Times

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LocalThe Times | A3Thursday, June 14, 2012

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OpinionA4 | The Times USPS 027-600Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 Publisher: Rick Martin POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six monthsHome delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERSIn case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola TimesSpecial to the TimesA proposed constitutional amendment on the Nov. 2012 ballot would create Florida jobs, grow Floridas Gross Domestic Product, and increase the personal income of Floridians, if passed, according to an independent economic and scal analysis by Florida TaxWatch, a nonpartisan, nonprot public policy research institute and government watchdog. Amendment 4, a legislatively proposed amendment to the Florida Constitution that would make changes to the property tax system, was analyzed by a new Florida TaxWatch report Fiscal and Economic Impact of Amendment 4. Dominic M. Calabro, president and CEO of Florida TaxWatch, said Florida TaxWatch has been conducting analyses of the likely impacts of proposed constitutional amendments for more than three decades, and I know that this independent analysis will help Floridians judge the potential benets of this Amendment. Amendment 4 would take effect on Jan. 1, 2013, and proposes: an additional homestead exemption for rst-time Florida homebuyers, equal to 50 percent of the Just Value of a property up to the median Just Value of a homestead property in that county, which phases out over ve years by reducing by 20 percent each year; a reduction in the non-homestead maximum annual Assessed Value increase cap from the current 10 percent (on non-school levies) to a new level of 5 percent and an extension of non-homestead Assessed Value caps through the 2022 tax year (which also does not apply to school levies) and; providing legislative authority to eliminate the Save Our Homes Recapture Rule. Using the best available data and an advanced econometric analysis, Florida TaxWatch estimates passage of Amendment 4 would result in the creation of 19,483 private, non-farm jobs over the 10-year period of the analysis (2013-2022), that Florida GDP would increase by approximately $1.1 billion, and personal income would increase by more than $5.3 billion. The studys author, Jerry D. Parrish, Ph.D., Florida TaxWatch chief economist and executive director of the Center for Competitive Florida, said The increased economic activity estimated by the dynamic econometric model used in this analysis is the result of the savings from Amendment 4 being distributed throughout the economy. From an economists standpoint, these ndings are not surprising because the proposed Amendment 4 would reduce uncertainty for both personal and business investment, and when individuals and businesses can better estimate their future costs, including property taxes, they are more likely to invest. Basically, reducing the uncertainty of potentially large property tax increases will increase investment in both non-homestead residential and commercial property in Florida, and the econometric model bears that out. The Florida TaxWatch analysis also estimates that between 319,861 and 383,810 additional home sales would occur due to the effects of Amendment 4 during the 10-year period following its passage and implementation. According to the report, the additional home sales attributable to Amendment 4, over and above those estimated to have occurred in the absence of Amendment 4, are due to the effect of the additional homestead exemption, the additional income for Floridians, and the population growth predicted by this analysis. Additionally, there are effects from both the nonhomestead exemption on additional residential sales and the number of homes that are purchased by persons who have sold their homes and moved up in size or downsized. The full report can be found on the new Florida TaxWatch website at www. FloridaTaxWatch.orgThursday, June 14, 2012Special to the TimesAfter a comprehensive investigation into the hiring potential of 130 nationwide rms involved in the oyster reef restoration industry, the Duke University Center on Globalization, Governance and Competiveness on June 7 released a report restoring Gulf Oyster Reefs: Opportunities for Innovation, nding that oyster reef restoration projects could provide quadruple economic returns for the Gulf Coast states. The study comes as Congress is in the nal stages of considering passage of the RESTORE the Gulf Coast States Act. The legislation would ensure billions of dollars in penalties for the 2010 Gulf oil disaster would be returned to the region and dedicated to gulf restoration. This legislation, along with billions of dollars from the ongoing Natural Resource Damage Assessment for the disaster, could be used to repair the badly-damaged gulf ecosystem and jumpstart the gulf economy. Americas oyster reefs are hidden jewels that provide quadruple economic returns, said Shawn D. Stokes, research analyst for the Duke University center. They maximize the return on investment in coastal restoration by boosting industries vital to the U.S. economy, supporting the nations largest shing industries, stabilizing and protecting the valuable Gulf Coast, and ltering water to provide clean, safe, beautiful areas for recreation and tourism industries in addition to creating jobs in a new emerging industry for oyster reef restoration. Among its key ndings, the study identied 130 rms directly (e.g. oyster harvesting) and indirectly (e.g. materials and construction) involved with oyster reef industry and concluded that incorporating innovative oyster reef designs into the Gulf Coast states oil spill restoration efforts would provide new job opportunities in the Gulf and 17 other states. More than 80 percent of the identied employment locations are based in the ve Gulf states, and 68 percent of the rms qualify as small businesses by sales, according to Small Business Administration guidelines. Many of these rms are small, innovative startup companies striving to be at the forefront of the emerging oyster reef industry. Healthy oyster reefs, as nurseries for sh, are vital to the 200,000 jobs in the regions $2.4 billion shing industry. Investments in oyster reefs help small businesses like ours create jobs, build innovative products and support our local economy, said Stephen Addington, co-owner of Gulf Coast Aggregates near Carrabelle. Restoration is not only good for small businesses, it is vital for the economy here in the panhandle now and in the future. Stephanie Victory, president and CEO, HESCO Bastion USA, Inc., said the companys products can immediately be put to work in restoring the wetlands of Louisiana and in building oyster reefs that help our local economy thrive. With nal passage of the RESTORE Act and the new projects it would fund, we can create needed jobs and help ensure a healthy future for our oysters. Specically, the Duke study notes that: Increasing oyster production will generate revenue for the commercial oyster industry and create thousands of jobs in seafood processing. Oyster shuckers and seafood processors hold 30 to 50 percent of seafood industryrelated jobs across the Gulf. One acre of oyster reef increases sheries catch values by $4,200 a year by providing nooks and crannies of habitat for dozens of marine resident species. Each individual oyster lters up to 1.5 gallons of water per hour, removing excess nitrogen that contributes to marine dead zones, providing a service that avoids the need for expensive wastewater treatment plants to provide the same service. Each acre of oyster reef provides $6,500 in de-nitrication services annually. Oyster reefs stabilize bottom sediments, reduce wave energy, prevent erosion and fortify wetlands to serve as horizontal levees that provide $23 billion worth of storm protection annually to Gulf Coast businesses and communities as well as the oil and gas pipeline infrastructure offshore, which ensures economic and energy security for the United States. The study also serves as a follow-up to an earlier Duke University study released in December, which determined Clean Water Act penalties from the 2010 oil disaster could create jobs that would benet at least 140 businesses with nearly 400 employee locations in 37 states, including more than 260 in the Gulf Coast and 60 in Florida. Two-thirds of these companies also qualify as small businesses, and all would benet from the dedication of gulf oil spill nes to gulf restoration funding, as through the RESTORE Act. State-specic initiatives already underway include: In Alabama, a broad coalition of organizations has initiated the 100-1000 Restore Coastal Alabama plan that sets out to build 100 linear miles of oyster reefs. In Louisiana, the Coastal Wetlands Planning Protection and Restoration Act agency is experimenting with a variety of oyster reef restoration designs as part of their regular coastal restoration demonstration projects to fortify against erosion from hurricane and storm waves. In Florida, most of the restoration projects are funded by the Department of Environmental Protection and are sub-tidal oyster cultch reefs designed to improve biodiversity, increase shery production and provide shoreline protection. In Mississippi, The Nature Conservancy recently received two grant awards to build 35 acres of new oyster reef in a large area north of the east/west CSX rail line that prohibits commercial harvest of shellsh, which makes it an ideal location to expand restoration efforts. In Texas, the Parks and Wildlife Department has worked with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to install sub-tidal cultch reefs in order to boost marine sheries production. The study was made possible by support from the Walton Family Foundation.Special to the TimesA new report from the Florida Department of Education has been released that highlights the positive effects of Afterschool and Summer Camp programs provided through the 21st Century Community Learning Centers. Based on research and on-the-ground experiences, the report outlines the key program elements state education and afterschool leaders promote in the hundreds of 21st Century Community Learning Centers across the state. Franklin County has two 21st CCLC program, The Nest in Eastpoint and Carrabelle, and Project Impact in Apalachicola. Entitled Inspired Programming Driving Student Success: A Look at Floridas 21st Century Community Learning Centers, the report was released by the Expanded Learning and Afterschool Project. The key to the success of Floridas 21st CCLCs is inspired programming, note the reports authors, with a major emphasis on providing students with fun, hands-on, engaged learning experiences that are tied to the regular school day. The effectiveness of Floridas programs depends on these four simple elements: Fun Students should nd the experience interesting and enjoyable. Hands-on Students should physically participate in activities Engaged learning Students should be mentally involved in activities Tie-In Connecting afterschool activities to regular school lessons makes activities relevant and more memorable These programs have made an incredible difference for students in Florida, and that was not by accident, said Joe Davis, former bureau chief in the Florida Department of Education and the current chief operating ofcer of the Florida Afterschool Network. The outcomes we have seen for our students are impressive, and the time we utilized after the school day was the key to our success. Data from the study indicated students who participate in the afterschool and summer programs demonstrated improvement in three areas: attendance, behavior and course work. Among students statewide who regularly participate in 21st CCLC, 78 percent either maintained or showed growth in math, and 79 percent maintained or showed growth in reading, as determined by report card grades. The report showed 75 percent of students demonstrated improvement in submitting homework on time, a crucial skill needed for academic success in the regular school day, and 80 percent demonstrated an increase in class participation. Overall, students who participated regularly in afterschool and summer programs were more likely to come to school, more likely to behave better, and more likely to do better on their course work. Editor note: the following is a letter written to Jimmy Mosconis from the general, who was keynote speaker at the May 28 Memorial Day ceremony at Apalachicolas Veterans Memorial Plaza. Just a short note to pass along my observations about the Memorial Day ceremony at the Veterans Memorial Plaza. The event was well attended by a good cross-section of Apalachicola residents and visitors. I was especially pleased to see the number of teenagers in the audience. I think its crucial that parents who have the proper respect for the country and those who have defended it pass those values along to their children. The second group that captured my attention were the veterans. The oldest former soldier in attendance was 101. Im sure you know him. Though he was in a wheelchair, mentally he was sharp as a tack. His mere presence was an inspiration to all who were there. You were keenly missed, but your name was repeatedly mentioned. We were all aware that you were representing Apalachicola and our Vietnam veterans at special events designed to confer on those who fought in that war the honor and recognition that has been too long denied. All of us who served in Southeast Asia thank you for representing us. We could not have asked for a better representative and spokesman. In your absence, Ella did a great job as your representative. Kinney Taylor and Lamar Moody came down with me. We deeply appreciated Ellas hospitality and the superb dinner you provided for us. I hope to come down in the fall for a return bout with the specs and reds. Im sure Ill see you then. For now, I just want to thank you again for the hard work and persistence that brought about the Veterans Memorial Plaza. As I mentioned in my comments, the veterans memorials in most other cities a hundred times the size of Apalachicola cannot begin to compare with yours. That says volumes about your town, its people and their values. Semper Fi, Marine Corps Gen. Charles E. Wilhelm (Retired) Villa Rica, GeorgiaOyster reef restoration would jumpstart economyAfterschool and summer programs boost student achievementTaxWatch: Amendment 4 would spur state economy Young people in audience please general

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The Times | A5Thursday, June 14, 2012During the Memorial Day holiday, 31 of cers from the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC), Florida Highway Patrol, Florida Alcoholic Beverages and Tobacco Division, and the Franklin County Sheriffs Department conducted an operational detail for the 2012 White Trash Bash. The detail, designed to protect Floridas boating public through enhanced boating safety patrol, increase voluntary compliance of boating under the in uence (BUI) laws, provide highly visible law enforcement presence, and increase multi-agency working relationships, focused patrol around Dog Island and Alligator Point. During the detail, of cers boarded 145 vessels and checked 516 users. Seventeen boating safety warnings were issued, one uniform boating citation was issued for boating safety, two arrests were made for BUI, and one transport to an ambulance occurred for a sick individual. In another incident regarding the patrol vessel Gulf Sentry, Of cer Matt Gore completed one arrest for BUI in Franklin County. Gore also issued citations in Bay County for possession of over the bag limit of red snapper and possession of gag grouper during closed season. Of cer Ruel Raker arrested one subject for BUI in Franklin County and issued citations in Bay County for possession of gag grouper during closed season and possession of undersized gray trigger sh. Monday through Friday 8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Saturday 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.Eugene Charbonneau, DO Susan Hardin, ARNP Dana Whaley, ARNP110 NE 5th Street Carrabelle, Florida DAY! & WHISPERING PINES, EASTPOINT3BR/2BA well maintained home on one acre lot. Many upgrades throughout the home. Large deck and 2 storage sheds complete this ready to move in property. MLS #247364.................$149,900 Travis Stanley 850.653.6477 Grayson Shepard 850.653.6718 Leon Teat 850.653.5656 Sandy Mitchem 850.899.8300 BEACHFRONTCONDO ST. GEORGE ISLAND2BR/2BA with two balconies in Villas of St. George. Established rental history! Community pool, beach boardwalk, 2 blocks to lighthouse! MLS# 246110...............$319,500 ST. GEORGE ISLAND GULF VIEW4BR/4BA close to center of island and kitchen. Lots of storage and lovely native landscaping. MLS# 245752......................$399,000NEW LOW PRICE GREATER APALACHICOLAEnjoy quiet country living on 3.75 acres. Lovely custom built 3BR/2.5 BA home with many upgrades Jacuzzi, deck, large walk in closet. 1600 sq.ft. outbuilding on concrete pad. MLS#244666................$255,000GULF VIEW SGI PLANTATIONCharming 5BR/3BA cypress home with Anderson doors/windows. Completely renovated in 2006 w/ granite countertops, new appliances/lighting/elevator! MLS# 240897...............$475,000GULFVIEW ST GEORGE ISLANDPre construction. Great opportunity to buy a gulf view home. 3BR/2BA with great room opening to the front porch, upgraded kitchen. New construction means low insurance costs!MLS#247359...................$289,000 The following report is provided by the Franklin County Sheriffs Of ce. Arrests in this report were made by of cers from the Apalachicola Police Department (APD), Carrabelle Police Department (CPD), Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC), Florida Highway Patrol (FHP) and Franklin County Sheriffs Of ce (FCSO). All defendants are to be considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law.June 2Matthew E. Stuckey, 31, Whigham, Ga., DUI (FCSO)June 3Billy D. Dalton, 37, Eastpoint, grand theft of a motor vehicle and driving while license suspended or revoked (FCSO)June 4Heather M. Mahon, 37, Apalachicola, petit theft (APD) Jason M. Rudd, 31, Carrabelle, domestic battery (FCSO) Glenda Jean Martina, 20, Apalachicola, eeing or eluding law enforcement ofcer (FCSO)June 5Rex M. Humphries, 50, Apalachicola, DUI and refusal to submit to breath test (FCSO) Glenn A. Richards, Jr., 22, Eastpoint, violation of probation (FCSO) Amanda F. Graybill, 28, Roanoke, Va., obtaining food or lodging with intent to defraud (FCSO) Joseph S. Haynes, 24, Apalachicola, burglary of a structure (FCSO) Donald D. Page, 38, Carrabelle, driving while license suspended or revoked (FCSO) George R. Needer, 54, Eastpoint, petit theft and violation of probation (FCSO)June 7Fred C. Massey, 47, Carrabelle, domestic battery and violation of probation (CPD Kendall W. Shiver, 51, Eastpoint, criminal mischief (FCSO)June 8Michael L. Lee, 43, Carrabelle, possession of less than 20 grams of cannabis and possession of paraphernalia (CPD)June 9Crystal M. Segree, 32, Eastpoint, battery (FCSO) William B. Baker, 33, Decatur, Ga., grand theft of a motor vehicle and failure to appear (FCSO)June 10Bobby J. Duncan, Jr., 38, Apalachicola, grand theft (FCSO) Reginald D. Giddens, 33, Apalachicola, violation of pretrial release and resisting of cer without violence (FCSO) Willie G. Dasher, Jr., 33, Eastpoint, violation of probation (FCSO) John D. James, 41, Apalachicola, reckless driving (FCSO)COLETTE LACASSE | Special to the TimesCorrectional Of cer Basic Standards Class 215 recently graduated from the Gulf/Franklin Campus of Gulf Coast State College. Each student completed 420 classroom hours of training to prepare them to become correctional of cers in any state, county or private correctional facility in Florida. Pictured, from left, front row, are John Paul Helms, Port St. Joe; Rita Massey, Carrabelle; Nita Massey, Carrabelle; Tomilee Babb, Carrabelle; and Danielle Davis, Apalachicola. Back row, from left, are instructor Donald Swanson; C. J. Massey, Bloxham; Tristan Davis, Port St. Joe; Jackie Rowland, Apalachicola; Joyce Thomas, Apalachicola; and Corrections Coordinator Clarke Joyner. The next class is scheduled for July at the Gulf/Franklin Campus; anyone interested can call Brenda Burkett at 227-9670 ext. 5507 for more information. Arrest REPORT GULF COAST GRADUATES CORRECTIONAL OFFICERS FWC REPORT Law Enforcement

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LocalA6 | The Times Thursday, June 14, 2012 CARPET CERAMIC TILE HARDWOOD AREA RUGS WINDOW SHADES & BLINDS PITTSBURGH PAINTS WE BIND CARPETS We offer LPort Saint Joe area Design professionals on premise C Professional Installation2760 HWest Port Saint JoeLOCALLYOWNED aint Joe L OCA LL Y O WNED H W est W est W P ort P ort P S aint Joe $50 Offpurchase of $ 750.00 or moreTile starting at Carpet starting at Robert C. Bruner Attorney Personal & Business BankruptcyOver 30 Years Legal Experience850-670-3030 bankruptcy relief under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon advertisements. Before you decide, ask us to send you free written information dbutler@coastalcoverage.com Locally owned and operated Home Business Auto Health Workers Comp The same, however, could not be said of the test results at the Franklin County School, where the percentage of students scoring at grade level or better in reading and math dropped throughout the elementary school. The scores climbed a bit in seventhand eighth-grade reading and in eighth-grade math, but for the most part were starkly at odds with the steady progress the district has made over the past decade. Im disappointed in it, said Superintendent Nina Marks. We do not always get the results we hope for. When this happens, we have to study the results to determine why we have not performed to our level of expectation. Marks offered praise for the work of the ABC School, with which school of cials have a more amicable and supportive relationship than at any time since the charter school came into being a decade ago. They did the job, she said. ABC School Principal Chimene Johnson said she was extremely proud of her schools results, attributing it to the dedication of both faculty and students. I attribute our scores to good teamwork, hard work and effort among our teachers, she said. They planned their year, they looked at every strand and every benchmark, and they worked together as a team. There were so many things that we put into place. The ABC School rebounded from a lackluster performance in 2011, when the number of students scoring at grade level or better was on the low end of the schools test results dating back to 2003. Johnson attributed this years success to full implementation of reading and math intervention throughout the school day as well as supplemental educational services through Title 1 funding for afterschool tutoring and FCAT camps two days a week after school. She said one of the states newest options for students who are below grade level is that they can be exempted from the physical education requirement, with that time used for special interventions. Our students participated in that, Johnson said. The students were taught bell-to-bell. Our teachers did an awesome job of keeping our kids engaged and motivated. Marks said she favors implementing a new approach at the Franklin County School to bounce back from the loss of momentum after steady improvement. Our teachers work very hard and need our support, but an aggressive plan for change will be considered, she said. Some faculty members have requested more time with students. Additional time on task leads to a critical budgetary consideration. We must manage the time we have and hope for a loosening of a very tight budget in the near future. An additional 30 minutes for teachers to work with students can be directly tied to the previous two years of success.28 third-graders head to summer schoolThe ABC Schools pro ciency could be seen across the board, beginning with the third grade, where three-quarters of students were at grade level or better in reading, a jump of 20 percentage points from the year before. In math, the jump was more modest, up nine percentage points to 61 percent, and on the low end of the schools third-grade scores dating back to 2003. The situation at the consolidated school for third-graders was more problematic, with only one of seven students scoring at grade level or better in math, and fewer than one in three students performing at grade level or better in reading. Marks said 25 third graders from the Franklin County School and three from the ABC School all of whom scored at Level 1 of the ve levels are required to attend summer school at the consolidated school if they are to be promoted to the fourth grade, according to the terms of the Pupil Progression Plan. Summer school is in full force on that campus, she said. Among ABC School fourth-graders, the results showed that twothirds were at grade level or better in reading, and nearly three-quarters in math, in both cases up by about 20 percentage points from the year before. At the consolidated school, a little more than half the fourth-graders were at grade level or better in both reading and math, similar to last year in reading and an eight-percentage-point improvement in math. The fth grade, though, showed a decline, with a 20-percentage-point drop, to just 38 percent performing at grade level or better in reading, and a nine-percentage-point drop, to 51 percent, at or above grade level in math. Among ABC School fth-graders, the numbers dropped slightly in reading and improved slightly in math, both subjects showing that roughly two out of three students were at grade level or better. Marks said a dozen fourth-graders and 22 fth graders have been invited to participate in summer reading camps and credit recovery, hoping to redo a class and move to the next grade level.Middle school shows gains, lossesThe numbers for the middle schools, typically a time when students show a dropoff in pro ciency that can plague them into high school, showed some variations in subject matter. Johnson said for the ABC School, it was a question of teachers ability to tailor the curriculum to the tests content. In the sixth grade, for example, the reading scores rose from 56 percent showing pro ciency or better last year to 73 percent in 2012, a rise of 17 percentage points. But nearly an identical dropoff could be seen with the math numbers, where only 58 percent of ABC sixth-graders were at grade level or better, 16 percentage points worse than last year. In the seventh grade, reading scores were steady at 63 percent showing pro ciency or better, while math showed an impressive 16percentage-point rise, to the point where better than three of four ABC School seventh-graders are at grade level or better. Eighth-grade math at the ABC School was the only area where we didnt hit state average, Johnson said, although 55 percent of these students were at grade level or better, still a jump of 21 percentage points over a down performance last year. The ABC principal said 11 of 29 students took a high school-level Algebra 1 course, which covered different material than was on the test. They werent exposed to eighthgrade FCAT standards, she said. At the Franklin County School, sixth-grade scores declined, from 57 percent at pro ciency or better in reading down to 49 percent, and from 42 percent at pro ciency in math last year down to 31 percent. The reading scores among seventh-graders showed a solid improvement, from 41 percent at prociency or better a year ago to 54 percent this year. But math scores dipped slightly, from 36 percent to 34 percent. At the eighth-grade level at the consolidated school, improvements could be seen in both subjects, a rise of 10 percentage points in reading, from 33 percent in pro ciency or better to 43 percent, and a rise of nine percentage points in math, from 25 to 34 percent at grade level or better. Marks said 11 sixth-graders, 14 seventh-graders and 16 eighth-graders have been invited to participate in summer school, to ensure they will be able to move to the next grade level. School board member David Hinton, who opposed the creation of the charter school and has frequently been a critic, said the differences in scores can be attributed to the ABC School having taken the cream of the crop of students who otherwise would be attending the consolidated school. But, he noted, this is not because the schools have differing populations in terms of race or socioeconomic factors, because the demographics between the two are very similar. Parents chose to put them there, theyre more concerned and they expect more of them, he said. They are the most motivated parents. Teachers and staff (at the consolidated school) continue to do the best they can with what they have to operate with, Hinton said, noting that reading and math specialists continue to use available grants to reach those students who struggle with testing. Marks said she plans to scrutinize how well teachers are adhering to the curriculum, and how much they are varying from it, a factor she believes can be important in determining how well students perform on pro ciency tests. During the summer months, teachers will learn a new approach in the utilization of state-approved instructional materials, she said. The district will also provide updated professional development, which will make a difference for our teachers and their students. Routinely studying the data gathered weekly, monthly or from the yearly FCAT affords teachers the ability to make informed decisions, leading to a better understanding of our strengths and weaknesses, Marks said. Aggressively attacking weaknesses and reinforcing strengths will lead this district to a stronger foundation and a strengthened grade-by-grade result. BARGE from page A1 FCAT from page A1 to ship fossil shell out of Carrabelle by barge. The plan is to truck tractor trailer loads of mined fossil shell down County Road 67 and along Lake Morality Road to U.S. 98, and transport the stone to Timber Island for shipping. GCA has tried unsuccessfully to set up a commercial shipping venue in a project partnering with Crowder Excavations. Last month, Odie Lazlo, spokesman for Crowder, proposed to remove 35 of 41 boat slips at Crowders C-Quarters Marina to allow large commercial vessels, including barges, to dock there. He sought the commissioners support for Crowder securing state and federal permits for the project. Under that original plan, containers of shell also would have been stored on the waterfront. Commissioners voted 3-2 to back the plan, with Cal Allen and Brenda LaPaz opposed. But Crowder scuttled his project after learning that storing and shipping shell from the downtown waterfront would require a change in the citys comprehensive development plan. Last week, Cooke and Mitchem told commissioners GCA has scrapped the idea of storing shell, which is classi ed as heavy industry and would require a comp plan change even on Timber Island, where light industry is allowed. Cooke said the company now hopes to bring truckloads loads of shell to a conveyor constructed on a 30-acre parcel of vacant land owned by The St. Joe Company, where they will be immediately loaded on a barge for shipping. Shipping mined material is classi ed as light industry. To allay fears about road damage, Cooke told commissioners GCA has reviewed reports on Tillie Miller Bridge and is investigating what would be needed to reinforce it. Nancy Burke, who lives in Harbor Bayou Estates off Timber Island Road, expressed concern about the proposal. How many trucks do you anticipate a day? she asked, adding that the road is already busy with traf c going to and from the RV park and the islands county boat ramp. LaPaz supported GCAs proposal, noting that Carrabelle is in need of industry, and Timber Island is the place for it. Cooke said the barges using the commercial dock would be about 140 feet by 30 feet. In a later telephone interview, he said the shipping vessels would be towed in by tugs one at a time and would not accumulate at the dock. He said the barges would be loaded during regular business hours Monday through Friday. Cooke said the project could bring as many as 20 jobs to Carrabelle, including mine labor, truck drivers and laborers to load the barges. GCA is in negotiation with a Louisiana rm to supply barges and tug boats, he said. Cooke said boat crews would purchase food and rent housing in Carrabelle, with fuel for the tugs also purchased locally. At the meeting, Cooke told commissioners he was not real sure when we will start because both the Army Corps of Engineers and Florida Department of Environmental Protection have to issue permits. He told commissioners County Attorney Dan Hartman advised him to come and discuss his new plans with the commission, to make sure there was no impediment to the project before he invested more money. We didnt expect problems with the rst proposal, Cooke said. We put a lot of money into it, and it didnt happen. We didnt want to do that again. GCAs project seems especially apropos in light of a study recently released by Duke University titled, Restoring Gulf Oyster Reefs: Opportunities for Innovation, which found that reef restoration projects had the potential for quadruple return on money invested. Cooke said he is aware of funding for reef restoration projects available from penalty money for the BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Cooke said his rm already is shipping truckloads of fossil oysters west for reef restoration in Louisiana and for coastline repair in Pensacola and he is in competition with companies that ship ll down the Mississippi by barge. Shipping by barge is cheaper than shipping by land, he said. Being able to ship by barge will make (GCA) more competitive with other companies.

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LocalThe Times | A7Thursday, June 14, 2012 challenge Skipper, Pendletons chief deputy. The one countywide ofce that will be contested will be the sheriffs race, with three candidates qualifying, all of them Democrats, to succeed incumbent Skip Shiver, who decided not to stand for re-election. Mike Mock, 45, of Carrabelle; Cliff Carroll, 49, of Eastpoint; and Jeff Vonier, 69, of Eastpoint will square off in the Aug. 14 primary, with the winner then unopposed in the Nov. 6 general election. Because only Democrats have led for the sheriffs race, Republicans and those without party afliation will be able to vote in the primary, known as a universal race. According to the supervisor of elections website, as of June 12, the county had 4,980 registered Democrats, 1,663 Republicans and 666 individuals registered with other parties or with no party af liation, for a total of 7,309 registered voters. Individuals who are not yet registered have until July 16 to register to vote in the primary and until Oct. 9 to register to vote in the general election. In the case of the three county commission races on the ballot this year, none will be decided at the Aug. 14 primary. In District 5, which runs from the western portion of the Eastpoint area to the eastern portion of the Carrabelle area, incumbent Bevin Putnal, 70, of Carrabelle, is facing a challenge from William Massey, 52, also of Carrabelle, in the Democratic primary. In the general election, the winner will face Hank Garrett, 61, of Eastpoint, who is running without party af liation. In District 1, which encompasses St. George Island and most of Eastpoint, Republican incumbent Pinki Jackel, 54, of St. George Island is facing a challenge from Democrat Tony Shiver, 52, also of St. George Island. Because neither candidate has an opponent in the primary, they will square off Nov. 6. In District 3, which encompasses the Apalachicola neighborhood to the north and east of U.S. 98, incumbent Noah Lockley, 61, of Apalachicola, faces a challenge from Valentina Webb, 48, of Apalachicola. Because both are Democrats, they will square off in the Aug. 14 primary, with the winner going against Republican Wilmer Deason, 59, in the Nov. 6 general election. In the school board races for these three districts, both District 3 incumbent Teresa Ann Martin and District 1 incumbent George Thompson were re-elected to another four-year term after no opponents stepped forward to challenge them. In District 5, incumbent Carl Whaley, 43, of Carrabelle, faces a challenge from Pamela Shiver, 41, of Eastpoint. Because this is a nonpartisan election, this contest will be decided at the Nov. 6 ballot box. BILL MILLER REALTY850-697-3751 (3310) 570-0658400 PLUS COMM. U.S. 98 & GULFADJ. TO LANARK MARINA 850 K$29,500 $2,500 DOWN BUYS 2 BED APT. 2 6 ORRENT $500/MTH GULFVIEW & ACCESS3 BDR 2 BA 2006 M/H $89,0002 LG. SHADY LOTS-3 OUT BLDG. -400 TO MARINA-CITY WATER $49,500MIH 2 CRNRLOTS BLK. $ STORE REDUCED $49,500 CITY COMM. LOTSU.S. 98 -$29,500 UP Smart LensesSMCan produce clear vision without glasses, at all distances "Freedom from Eye Glasses, Now a reality for many." NO HIDDEN CHARGES: It is our policy that the patient and any other person responsible for payments has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed by payment or any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment. www.mulliseye.com"WE WELCOME NEW PATIENTS, CALLTODAY FOR YOUR PRIORITY APPOINTMENT" FOR NEW PATIENTS 59 AND OLDERThis certificate is good for a complete Medical Eye Exam withTodd Robinson, M.D.Board Certified Eye Physician and Surgeon.The exam includes a prescription for eye glasses and tests for Glaucoma, Cataracts and other eye diseases.FOR YOUR APPOINTMENT CALL: 850-763-6666 ELIGIBILITY: U.S. Citizens living in the Florida Panhandle, 59 years and older, not presently under our care. Coupon Expires: 6-30-12 FREEEYE EXAMCODE: AP00Darren Payne, M.D.Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract SurgeonLee Mullis, M.D.Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract SurgeonTodd Robinson, M.D.Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon PUBLIC NOTICEGeorge E. Weems Hospital is proposing to license its existing helipad with the Florida Department of Transportation. One of the requirements for DOT licensure is that public notice is given that a license is being sought. The existing helipad currently meets all applicable operation and safety standards. There will be no changes to the current helipad which is in front of Weems Hospital at 135 Avenue G, Apalachicola, Florida. Any persons wishing to comment or seeking additional information need to contact Mr. Alan C. Pierce, Director of Administrative Services, 34 Forbes St. Apalachicola, Florida, 32320 by Friday, June 8, 2012 by 4:00 PM, local time. Mr. Pierce may be reached by telephone at 850-653-9783, ext. 161. RELAY from page A1 PRIMARIES from page A1Bay Medical Center in Panama City and which led to the cancer diagnosis. Surgery solved part of the problem, followed by radiation and chemotherapy to tackle the remaining cancer, Webb said. So far Im cancer-free right now, he said. At rst I lost all the taste in my mouth, but Ive got a little back now. I lost my teeth, too. The only thing I didnt lose is my hair. His neck might be scarred from the treatments, but the main thing Webb didnt lose was his life, and for that he was a grateful man Friday night. Its a miracle, he said. Sitting next to Webb at the survivors table, after joining in the opening lap, were several other cancer survivors, including Michael James Sexton, who is recovering from a malignant eye lesion; Dolores Buzzett, who overcame a 2005 bout of breast cancer; and Linda Thompson, who triumphed over cervical cancer several years ago and melanoma more recently. In all, 20 survivors were on hand for the relay and were treated to a survivor/caregiver dinner of paella prepared by Tamaras Caf. Chala Parish, this years local chairperson of the event, said 14 of this years 18 teams were at Friday nights relay. Our event was dedicated to all survivors and remembering those who have lost their battle, Parish said. But one in particular who was a committee member, Amanda Segree, was named honorary chair during her courageous battle. And in her memory we will continue to ght. She gave us all hope to continue ghting for a cure. Amanda lost her battle this year, but we remembered her during relay. Also serving on the relay committee was Parish, Nasya Wagner, Cheryl FritschMiddleton, Tirah Chitty, Selena Noblit, Paula Applebee, Jessica Ard and Shannon Segree. Stephanie Bird assisted as the cancer society staff. This years sponsors included the Apalachicola Housing Authority, Kelley Funeral Home, Weems Memorial Hospital, Marks Insurance, Progress Energy and Ace Hardware. Among the in-kind donors were Ace Hardware, Ah La Carte, Angel Stephens, Apalachicola Times, Ashley Carroll, Bay City Work Camp, Buccaneer Inn, Butler Agency, Cadence Bank, City of Apalachicola, Florida Seafood Festival, George Pruett, Gulf Coast DJ LLC, Gulfside IGA, John Solomon, Mayor Van Johnson, Righteous Kind, St Joe Music Company, St. Joe Rent-All, Tamaras Caf and Water Street Seafood. Among the performers who lit up the night and early morning event were the Righteous Kind Band out of Gainesville, the Pruett family, Ashley Carroll, Angel Stephens (who sang the national anthem) and Gulf Coast DJ, with the St. Joe Music Company providing sound and lighting. We had a great year, said Parish, noting $17,000 has been raised so far, with more coming in ahead of the wrap-up party in July. Rain held back some attendance, but it was a great turnout and we are excited to have the support to get Relay going strong again in Franklin County. BEVIN PUTNAL WILLIAM MASSEY VALENTINA WEBB NOAH LOCKLEY RELAY TEAMS AND CAPTAINSHigh Hopes, Terri Creamer Pirates of the Cure-aBeing, Terry Tipton Franklin Correctional Institution, Jessica Chisholm Shooting Down Cancer, Javeion Win eld Soaring over Cancer, Jaime Duhart Team ABC, Tanya Joanos Team Ruth, Selena Noblit Team Snooks, Renee Grif n Weems Angels, Paula Applebee Team Rainbow, Chala Parish Debras Darling ABC School, Alexis ONeal Black & Blues Crews, Larry Applebee Pacing for a Cure, Sandy Harris Centennial Bank, Jera Horton Cadence Bank, Stephnia Turrell Franklin County Sheriffs Of ce, John Solomon Knights of Columbus, Bob Connors Trinity Episcopal, Bev ConnorsDAVID ADLERSTEIN | The TimesContestants get ready for the Road to Recovery race.

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A8 | The Times Thursday, June 14, 2012 Qualications: Expertise in: New Patients WelcomeCall Toll Free888-681-5864 For more info www.seclung.com LUNG AND SLEEP DISORDERS DR. ROB GARVER PETOFTHEWEEK Franklin County Humane Society SocietyMaliah Lockley turned 9 on Tuesday, June 12 and her young brother, Isaiah Dorsey, turns 1 on Thursday, June 14. Happy birthday, Maliah and Isaiah! I love you both very much, MommyBy LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star .com On Saturday night, about 50 people attended a reception to celebrate the opening of the Local Hands art exhibit at the Apalachicola Center for History, Culture and the Arts on Water Street. The soire was sponsored by Historic Apalachicola Main Street as part of its Second Saturday program to encourage downtown nightlife. The exhibit displayed the works of 25 artists. Images created by Dana Allen shared space with jewelry by master craftsman Kristin Anderson and photography by Lizzie Butler. Some of the work was familiar to art lovers. Neal Smith-Willow, who displayed a half dozen pieces on Saturday, recently ended a monthlong 50-year retrospective at the Apalachicola Museum of Art. A show by painter Susan Richardson is now on display at the Apalachicola art museum. She presents a handful of owery oils in the Local Hands show. Pastelist Lynn Wilson, whose work is included in Local Hands, recently hung a one-woman show at the Plantation clubhouse on St. George Island. Wilson is the daughter of painter and art teacher Alice Jean Gibbs, who has mentored a number of the artists displaying work in Local Hands, including Ed Springer, who brought pastel drawings, and Ellen Stitt, whose light, uncluttered paintings were a high point of the exhibition. Gibbs also has several pieces on display at the downtown center, popularly known by its original name, the Cotton Exchange. Shirley Cox displayed a half-dozen oils focusing on local scenery and was on hand to answer questions about her work. Cox said she paints from photographs, mixing and matching items within a scene. Mother-daughter team Amy and Emily Friedman brought mixed media including photography, sculpture and one of Amy Friedmans striking acrylic paintings. Frederic Kahler also presented a mixed media exhibit with ceramics and paintings. Katie McFarland added three dimensions to the display, with ceramic wall hangings including a startling rendition of the big bad wolf of storybook fame. There were oils by Jody Rosenbaum, Kathryn Beaty, Martha Linn and Josefa Benavides. Seasoned artist Joan Matey brought a few pieces, fretting that she had trouble nding work to display that hadnt already been hung at the Cotton Exchange in earlier showings. As always, her comic air was a showstopper. Another stand-out was Paula Harmon, who paints using pigmented beeswax, an ancient technique known as encaustic art. The work of husbandand-wife team Capt. Mark and Carol Goodwin re ected their day-to-day interests. Mark displayed carved sh with a twist, and Carol works in textiles, producing airy, knitted confections in silk, alpaca and other bers. Joe Kotzmans watercolors are a bright spot in the gallery, imaginative and fresh. Popular local sculptor David Barclay brought painted wood carvings to the Cotton Exchange. A string of pink foxgloves seemed to twinkle with dew next to a giant brown-eyed Susan. Mary Lou Athorn works in papier-mch. She employs the medium in both three-dimensional sculptures and paintings. Athorn said she started to work with paper when a downtown shop was seeking three-dimensional pieces. I started making papier-mch bowls, she said. One thing is I have always been encouraged in everything I tried to do. My husband Michael is very supportive. I was never told no. Athorns bowls blossomed into animals, especially birds, but her latest work has taken a new twist. On display at the Cotton Exchange are a bust of Joan of Arc and a full-sized papiermch statue of St. Francis of Assisi. Local Hands, which opened June 7, will remain on display through Thursday, June 28. The center is open from noon to 5 p.m. Thursday, Friday and Saturday. For a gallery of the opening reception, visit www. ApalachTimes.com. Special to The TimesOn June 6, the Apalachicola Bay Chamber of Commerce held its annual election during a luncheon meeting at Carolines on the River. New to this years board of directors are Jean Ulrich, a real estate agent with Jeff Galloway Real Estate and owner of Ulrich Construction, and Ouida Tartt, owner of the House of Tartts, a guest cottage in downtown Apalachicola. Continuing for another term are Brenda Ash, with Centennial Bank and an Apalachicola city commissioner; Mike Koun, owner of the Gibson Inn; Bonnie Gomes, owner of Oyster Radio 100.5FM and Hitz 106FM; Mark Friedman, with Friedman Financial Advisors; Bud Hayes, with the Franklin County Humane Society and the ABC School; Bev Hewitt, with the Apalachicola Seafood Grill and the Soda Fountain; Kristin Anderson, owner of LongDreamGallery.com; attorney Michael Shuler; Jerry Hall, with the Apalachicola Seafood Grill and The Soda Fountain; Ginny Griner with Weems Memorial Hospital; attorney Kristy Branch Banks; Kevin Ward with Blue Manta Technology Group and 13 Mile Seafood; and Donna Duncan, attorney with Sanders and Duncan. President for 20122013 is Duncan, with Hayes as vice president. Hall returns as treasurer, and Anderson remains secretary/historian. Candy Varnes, of Resort Vacation Rentals, retired from the board. Friedman, who steps down as president at the end of June, received two going away presents at this months meeting. Anita Grove, the chambers executive director, presented him with a shadowbox containing the February swimsuit edition of Sports Illustrated, with sections shot in Franklin County and a teeny bikini. Friedman also received from the staff of Sports Illustrated a framed group shot of the photographers, models and support staff who visited Apalachicola for the photo shoot. The chamber has 350 members. The Apalachicola Chamber was started in the 1830s. Among its many presidents were ice machine inventor John Gorrie and David Raney. In the 1980s, the chamber expanded its membership area to the shores of the Apalachicola Bay, including Eastpoint and St. George Island. Mr. and Mrs. James Banks, of Eastpoint, request the honor of your presence at the marriage of their daughter, Miranda Lynn, to Shawn Robert Shattuck. The wedding will be at 4 p.m. Saturday, June 23, at the Living Waters Assembly of God, 1580 Bluff Road, Apalachicola. The groom is the son of Bob Shattuck, of Apalachicola, and Ann Kent, of St. George Island. A reception will follow the ceremony in the fellowship hall. All family and friends are cordially invited to share in this joyous occasion. HAPPY BIRTHDAY, MALIAH AND ISAIAH Local Hands buzzing with talentDuncan elected president of Apalachicola Bay chamber MIRANDA BANKS, SHAWN SHATTUCK TO WED JUNE 23 DONNA DUNCAN Photos by LOIS SWOBODA | The TimesDolphins cruise by in this underwater scene by Shirley Cox. Alice Jean Gibbs and Frederic Kahler discuss techniques at the Saturday night opening. Sisters, circa 1912 by Ellen Stitt.

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The United Methodist Churches of Franklin County Welcome You First United Methodist Church of ApalachicolaWorship Service 11:00 a.m. every Sunday Sunday School 10:00 a.m. 75 5th St. Apalachicola 653-9530 fumcapalach@gtcom.net Pastor: Rev. Themo PatriotisCarrabelle United Methodist ChurchWorship Services 10:45 a.m. Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Celebrate Recovery Mondays 7-9 p.m. 102 NE Ave. B Carrabelle 697-3672 Pastor: Julie StephensEastpoint United Methodist ChurchWorship Service 10:00 a.m. every Sunday Healing service every fourth Monday at 7:00 p.m. 317 Patton Dr. (corner of David St.) 670-8825 Pastor: Rev. Beth WhiteSt. George Island United Methodist Church9:00 a.m. Worship Service 10:00 a.m. Fellowship Hour 201 E. Gulf Beach Dr. 9274635 www.sgiumc.org Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis First Pentecostal Holiness Church379 Brownsville Road Apalachicola Were excited about what Gods doing!!!Sunday School 9:45 am Sunday Morning Worship 10:45 am Sunday Evening Service 6:00 pm Monday, Youth Group 6:30 pm Wednesday, Royal Rangers, G.A.P.7:00 pm Wednesday Worship & Word 7:30 pmNursery Provided during regular church services 7:00 7:00 First Baptist ChurchSt. George Island 501 E. Bayshore Drive 927-2257 R. Michael Waley, Pastor Join us as we praise and worship the living Christ. Great is the Lord and most worthy of praise. Psalm 145:3 Sunday Bible Study................................................10:00am Worship Praise........................................................11:00am Sunday Night............................................................7:00pm Wednesday Power Hour......................................7:00pm Wednesday Youth at S.P.L.A.S.H.......................7:00pm Walking in Christ R. Michael Whaley, Pastor WELCOMES YOUChurch of the Ascension101 NE First Street CarrabelleSUNDAY10:00 AM WELCOMES YOUChurch THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH (850) 274-4490 (850) 545-2578 WELCOMES YOU Trinity Trinity Episcopal Churchest. 1836Welcomes YouHwy. 98 & 6th St. Apalachicola 850-653-9550Sunday Worship Services 8 & 10:30 a.m. Wednesdays Healing Service 11 a.m. Centering Prayer 4 p.m. Sunday Worship Services 8 & 10:30 a.m. Wednesdays Healing Service 11 a.m. Centering Prayer 4 p.m. FaithThe Times | A9Thursday, June 14, 2012Covenant Word plans Fathers Day weekendCovenant Word Christian Center International, 158 12th Street in Apalachicola, will host a Fathers Day Prophetic Weekend beginning at 7 p.m. Friday, June 15, with an Impartation Service at 11 a.m. Saturday, June 16. Prophet Bill Johnson from Restoration Life Church in Tallahassee, who moves in a powerful anointing of God, will be our guest minister in the Prophetic. Come out in faith, believing you will receive a life-changing word and/or impartation on these two powerpacked days.Panacea church to host Gaballi Taste SamplerThe Ochlockonee Bay United Methodist Church, 2780 Surf Road in Panacea, will hold a Taste Sampler of Gaballi Foods from 9 a.m. to noon Saturday, June 16. Gaballi is a faithbased, nondenominational organization that provides boxes of top-quality fruits and vegetables at a 30to 70-percent savings from national retail prices. Visit www.obayumc.com or www.gaballi.com or call 984-0127 for more information. Faith BRIEfsFSErvin Bud Thomas Ammons, 78, passed away Saturday, June 9, 2012, in Panama City. He is survived by his wife of 60 years, Doris Johnson Ammons of Carrabelle. He was born Sept. 12, 1933, in Midland City, Ala., and had been in this area for 22 years after coming from Georgia. He retired from the United States Air Force after 20 years of service. He retired as postmaster in Carrabelle. He was a member of the Grovania Methodist Church. He was a devoted husband, father and grandfather. In lieu of owers, donations may be made to Big Bend Hospice, 1723 Mahan Center Blvd, Tallahassee, FL 32308. Memorial services will be at 2 p.m. Wednesday, June 13, at Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel, Crawfordville, which is in charge of arrangements. He is also survived by two daughters, Brenda Bareld (Gil) and Sherry Sensat (Don); grandchildren Brandon Atkinson (Sarah), Adam Bareld, Kiley Singleton (Eric), J.D. Sensat and Corey Sensat; two great-grandchildren; and one sister, Mavis Odom (Joe). He was preceded in death by a son, Bruce Allen Ammons.EErvin BBud Ammons Obituary There isnt a day that goes by that we dont miss or think about you! You are gone but certainly not forgotten! Love, Your family In Loving Memory of Amelia VarnesDec. 4, 1955 June 18, 2007 Mail Carrier Food DriveThe Franklin County Food Pantry would like to thank both the Apalachicola and Eastpoint post ofces for another successful U.S. Mail Carrier Food Drive, which took place May 12. Postmasters Lionel Bliss, Eastpoint, and Cynthia Davis, Apalachicola, and the hard-working mail carriers who loaded the food onto their trucks went the extra mile to help others in the community. We cannot thank then enough. Our appreciation goes out to all the residents of Franklin County who donated food. Without your support and giving nature, we would not be able to continue our effort in feeding the most vulnerable citizens. The Franklin County Food Pantry is a 501(c)(3) organization and relies on donations of food and cash to continue its operations. We are distributing food twice each month to an average of 350 families, our neighbors in need. To make donations, you can mail a check to P.O. Box 276, Apalachicola, FL 32329 or contact Lori Switzer, food pantry coordinator, at 6533930 to make a food donation or to help out as a volunteer. Sincerely, Franklin County Food Pantry staff caCARdD OfF tTHaANKsS Happy Fathers Day all you dads! To start the weekend off right, you will be treated to a full breakfast at the Lanark Village Boat Club this Saturday, June 16. You may enjoy your breakfast from 9 a.m. until noon. A donation of $5 will be collected from everyone else. Enjoy! Our monthly covered dish lunch at Chillas Hall will be Sunday, June 17. Bring your favorite dish, a donation and your dad and join us. Serving will begin at 1 p.m. See ya there! Dont forget lunch will be ready at noon at the Franklin County Senior Center every Thursday. Our faithful volunteers will serve the lunch, and Dorothy will be at the desk to collect your donation. Be good to see you. While we are talking about volunteers, its time to give all of our volunteers a big round of applause. You will nd them at the food bank, the boat club, Chillas Hall, the re department, just to name a few. Thanks to all! After you enjoy lunch next Thursday, June 21, at the senior center, enjoy the Nostalgia Show, featuring the music of Bob Garber, from the 20s to the 50s. Dont forget June 21 is the date! Be kind to one another. check in on the sick and house bound, and remember our little prayer for those serving the public God grant me patience, And I Want It Right Now! Until next time, God Bless America, our troops, the poor, homeless and hungry.DAVI I D ADLER ER STEIN EIN | The TimesVolunteers serve up lunch every Thursday at the Franklin County Senior Center.Boat club treats dads to breakfast LaANaARK NEwsWSJim Welsh The Camp Gordon Johnston World War II Museum is expanding the exhibits to include World War II, Korea and Vietnam. Though still in the initial stages, anyone who wishes to donate articles or photos from these conicts for scanning should contact Linda Minichiello or Bobbye Winchester at 697-8575. Please keep in mind that though photos will be scanned and the originals returned, because of special insurance requirements, all articles or items must be freely donated and will become the property of the Camp Gordon Johnston Association. The museum has secured tracings from the Vietnam Memorial Wall in Washington, D.C., for the following Franklin County residents killed during the war: Robert ONeal Cato, James Henry Clay, Clifford G. Rhodes, Herbert Eugene Smith and Robert Milllender. Anyone knowing of additional Franklin County residents who served and paid the ultimate price, please contact the museum to have their tracings added to the exhibit.Camp Gordon Johnston expands exhibits

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Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL(next to Piggly Wiggly) www.BWOsh.com (next to Piggly Wiggly) www.BWOsh.com Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL (next to Piggly Wiggly) www.BWOsh.com Corner of Marina Drive, www.BWOsh.com Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL www.BWOsh.com Port St. Joe, FL Your Hunting Headquarters Your Hunting Headquarters Starting July 1st: Independence Day Gun SaleHuge savings on year end close outs by brands such as: Remington, Browning, Glock, Smith & Wesson, Taurus, and more!! JUNE FEATURE FISH: RED SNAPPERStop in and register or go oline at www.BWOsh.com WEEKLY ALMANAC APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE TIDE TABLES MONTHLY AVERAGESTo nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from these given for APALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW Cat Point Minus 0:40 Minus 1:17 East Pass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27 To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from those given for CARRABELLE: HIGH LOW Bald Point Minus 9:16 Minus 0:03 Sponsor the WEEKLY ALMANACCall Today!653-8868 Date HighLow% Precip Thu, June 1486 7340% Fri, June 1585 7240% Sat, June 1686 7140% Sun, June 1785 7320% Mon, June 1886 73 0% Tues, June 1987 74 0% Wed, June 2088 7540% 13 We 954am 2.6 254am 1.4 523pm 0.3 14 Th 125am 1.8 1026am 2.6 344am 1.6 615pm 0.0 15 Fr 249am 1.9 1100am 2.6 444am 1.8 702pm -0.2 16 Sa 341am 2.1 1137am 2.7 545am 1.9 745pm -0.3 17 Su 420am 2.2 1217pm 2.7 639am 2.1 823pm -0.3 18 Mo 452am 2.2 1258pm 2.7 727am 2.1 858pm -0.5 19 Tu 520am 2.4 140pm 2.7 809am 2.1 930pm -0.3 20 We 545am 2.4 223pm 2.7 849am 2.1 958pm -0.3 21 Th 609am 2.4 308pm 2.7 929am 1.9 1024pm -0.3 22 Fr 631am 2.4 356pm 2.6 1013am 1.9 1051pm -0.2 23 Sa 654am 2.4 448pm 2.4 1102am 1.8 1121pm 0.0 24 Su 717am 2.4 547pm 2.2 1158am 1.4 1153pm 0.3 25 Mo 742am 2.4 700pm 1.9 105pm 1.3 26 Tu 808am 2.6 832pm 1.8 1227am 0.6 221pm 1.0 27 We 838am 2.6 1032pm 1.6 104am 1.0 340pm 0.6 13 We 954am 2.6 254am 1.4 523pm 0.3 14 Th 125am 1.8 1026am 2.6 344am 1.6 615pm 0.0 15 Fr 249am 1.9 1100am 2.6 444am 1.8 702pm -0.2 16 Sa 341am 2.1 1137am 2.7 545am 1.9 745pm -0.3 17 Su 420am 2.2 1217pm 2.7 639am 2.1 823pm -0.3 18 Mo 452am 2.2 1258pm 2.7 727am 2.1 858pm -0.5 19 Tu 520am 2.4 140pm 2.7 809am 2.1 930pm -0.3 20 We 545am 2.4 223pm 2.7 849am 2.1 958pm -0.3 21 Th 609am 2.4 308pm 2.7 929am 1.9 1024pm -0.3 22 Fr 631am 2.4 356pm 2.6 1013am 1.9 1051pm -0.2 23 Sa 654am 2.4 448pm 2.4 1102am 1.8 1121pm 0.0 24 Su 717am 2.4 547pm 2.2 1158am 1.4 1153pm 0.3 25 Mo 742am 2.4 700pm 1.9 105pm 1.3 26 Tu 808am 2.6 832pm 1.8 1227am 0.6 221pm 1.0 27 We 838am 2.6 1032pm 1.6 104am 1.0 340pm 0.6 28 Th 912am 2.7 142am 1.4 454pm 0.2 Email outdoors news to timesoutdoors @star .com Page 10 Thursday, June 14, 2012 OUTDOORSwww.apalachtimes.comSection Section A Red snapper season is well under way. Hi winds and rough seas have kept many anglers at the docks hoping for better weather. Good sized red snapper are still close to shore, some as close as 6 miles out. Try using live bait rst to catch the bigger ones up off the bottom, but cut bait, such as cigar minnows and squid will work ne.Inshore OffshoreRecent rain has the St. Joe Bay muddy and churned up right now. Before the rain we had great reports from the Eagle Harbor area of red sh and trout caught in the grass on live shrimp. Towns beach has had a few reports of nice trout and a few red sh this week also. Get in all your inshore shing in before the 2012 Scallop Season opens soon. SPONSORED BY By Lois Swoboda653-1819 | @ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star .com The shrimp plant or false hop, Justicia brandegeana, is a popular owering shrub outdoors that can also be grown as a window sill plant indoors. Its white tongue-like owers emerge from shrimp-colored, modied leaves called bracts atop clumps of weak, twiggy stems that grow to 3-to-5 feet tall by 3 feet wide, and may spread to form a large colony. The leaves are variegated and usually grow in clusters on the branches. If the plant receives more sun, the amount of creamy white on the speckled leaves will increase, and vice versa. There are cultivars with yellow, red and lime green owers. This plant is a native of Mexico, where indigenous people used it to treat a variety of wounds and ailments, including dysentery and other gastrointestinal disorders. In south Florida it has escaped and become invasive in some areas. Shrimp plant is evergreen in mild climates and blooms almost continuously. In the Panhandle, it is evergreen some years and dies back to the ground when the winter is colder. Plants left outdoors in containers may be killed in cold weather. Shrimp plant does well in full to part sun and likes a fertile, welldrained soil. It is drought tolerant, but water it generously in hot weather to maintain lush foliage. In our area, some shade is recommended since the bracts fade in full hot sum. When the plant becomes leggy or if the foliage is damaged by cold or drought, cut it back to the base and it will grow out lush and green. You can start new plants from cuttings or by dividing clumps. Shrimp plant is extremely attractive to hummingbirds, bees and butter ies so it adds interest and motion to the garden.By Lois Swoboda653-1819 | @ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star .com A timbering project ongoing in the Box R Wildlife Management District has both economic and environmental bene ts for Florida. Right now F&W Forestry, a Marianna rm, is overseeing extensive logging in Box R, their efforts part of a multi-decade plan to restore the original ecosystems. Jerry Pitts, Box Rs wildlife biologist, said F&W has been a strong partner in the restoration planning process. They handle the business end of the project, he said. We told them our ecological goals and we took our time and got a really good plan. He said he also worked with Florida Natural Areas Inventory (FNAI), a research group out of the University of Florida, to determine what Box R was like before it became a pine plantation. FNAIs stated goal is to collect, interpret, and disseminate ecological information critical to the conservation of Floridas biological diversity. Pitts said they used historical records, including aerial photographs to turn back the clock in Box R and glimpse the original lay of the land. He said lumber is being harvested on a 400-acre area originally scheduled to be cut under the 2011 contract. An additional 700 acres will be harvested this year and 500 will be harvested in 2013. Several logging rms will work in Box R over the next two years under F&Ws direction. Pitts said the cutting for 2011 and 2012 should be completed by the end of June unless the weather interferes. The loggers work fast, he said. To them time is money and they dont waste any. He said any damage to roads will be repaired before the state signs off on the logging contract. The trees are not being clear cut, rather they are thinned and the undergrowth reduced to encourage nature to take control and return Box R to its original state. Tracts marked for thinning are scattered throughout, so no single area will be severely impacted. Pitts said its not possible to predict how much income will be generated from the sale of the wood because trees of different sizes sell for different prices and the price of wood changes with the market. Smaller timber will be used for pulp and larger trees will become lumber or fence posts. The 10-year plan now underway will provide a sustained revenue stream that could amount to as much as $2 million, he said. The main purpose of the logging is not to make money but to open up the forest so that long-leaf pine, the naturally occurring conifer in this area, can be reintroduced. When The St. Joe Company had a paper mill in Port St. Joe, acreage originally covered in long-leaf was clear cut and replanted with fast growing loblolly and slash pine for commercial harvest. When St. Joe stopped harvesting pine for pulp, the pine plantations they abandoned became choked with undergrowth, especially titi, which was once con ned to dry ridges but now occurs throughout the forest. Pitts said he believes timber harvest is a good use for tracts of undeveloped land because the areas remain greenspace; the downside is that biodiversity is greatly reduced in timber plantations because fast-growing non-native trees replace the local plants. Pitts said plans for Box R include restoring the natural water levels in addition to thinning the trees. Controlled burns will also be used to suppress the undergrowth. Fire is an important component of the restoration program, he said. All of these are re-maintained communities. Fire is very important to the germination of wiregrass and long-leaf pine. Currently, controlled burns must be carried out in the winter and spring when the danger of wild re is reduced, but Pitts said after some of the most overgrown areas have been burned several times, the foresters can begin to burn during the growing season, which has less impact on wildlife in the area. According to Pitts, the key to restoring native forest is to open up the tree canopy through timber removal and plant long-leaf pine in the corridors this creates. As the long-leafs, grow, more nonnative trees will be thinned out until, eventually, the long-leaf will become the upper story canopy tree again. Pitts and other biologists like him hope that native understory plants will return on their own once the long-leaf forest is established. He said the entire progress will take decades. I may work here for 20 or 30 years, but when Im gone, somebody else will have to come along and pick up where I left off, he said. Ultimately, some of the land forested now will be returned to non-forest ecosystems like damp meadows and Pitts expects that in 20, or even 10 years from now, the face of Box R will look very different. He said the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, which manages Box R, views the restoration project as a pilot program for similar efforts in the vast acreage they steward. He said FWC will use the knowledge it gains from the Box R pilot program to launch similar programs in the Apalachicola River and Aucilla wildlife management districts. Have you ever thought about joining an organization that could use your talents, skills and experience in activities that save lives and the environment? The U.S. Coast Guard is looking to reestablish an Auxiliary Unit in the Carrabelle, Eastpoint, St. George Island and Apalachicola area and needs volunteers 17 and older to serve in various capacities. These would include helping recreational boaters to improve their safety skills, and their appreciation for the areas environment, to be respected and responsible operators of their preferred watercrafts. Becoming a member provides opportunities to train and devote as much time as you want in public education, recreation vessel examination, safety patrols on the water, recruiting, public information, event planning and coordination, environmental protection and marketing, as well as building support among local law enforcement and government agencies having a common interest in safe boating. All the activities can be enhanced with the knowledge, talents, skills and experience you bring. Your diverse backgrounds and personal strengths are keys to the successful delivery of the programs. If any of the above activities touch upon your interests, I strongly urge you to attend the Open Invitation for Membership in the US Coast Guard Auxiliary on Saturday, July 7 from 10 am until noon, at the Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve, 108 Island Drive, Eastpoint. For additional information, contact Dave Rabon, Flotilla 1-2, at 850-274-4689. Coast Guard Auxiliary seeks new members LOIS SWOBODA | The TimesThe shrimp plant, or false hop, is good for inside or outside.Buds N Bugs: The shrimp plant LOIS SWOBODA | The TimesOngoing timbering in Box R requires the use of heavy machinery.Timber project boosts Box R JERRY PITTS

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July 4th Advertising Deadlines Display Advertising Schedule July 5th IssueSpace Reservation and Ad Copy Submittal DeadlineJune 28th, 2012 3:00pm Final Ad Approval July 2nd, 12:00pmFOURTHOF JULY SPADEABusiness Card........................................$30.002 col x 1 mod Actual Size: 3.22 x 21/4 Page..................................................$225.003 col x 5 mod Actual Size: 4.89 x 101/2 Page..................................................$400.006 col x 5 mod Actual Size: 9.9 x 10Full Page (back).....................................$750.006 col x 10 mod Actual Size: 9.9 x 20 PREMIUM POSITIONSFront Page Bottom.............$175.003 col x 2.5 mod Actual Size: 4.89 x 5INSIDE Page 2.....................$450.003 col x 10 mod Actual Size: 4.89 x 20Contact Joel or Kari to reserve your space today (850) 227-7847 (850) 370-6090 CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA SP O RTS www.apalachtimes.comThursday, June 14, 2011 APage 11SectionBy DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894| @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com For the fourth straight year, Eastpoints Hunter Bartley took home the top prize in the annual Mullet Toss on St. George Island. But runner-up and former champion Robert Wilhoit, of Carrabelle, didnt make it easy for him. Before a large audience gathered for the 21st annual spectacle on the beach in front of the Blue Parrot restaurant, Bartley let loose with a 188 foot, 3-inch throw, a personal best, during the regular competition, easily making it into the threeman toss-off that would determine the winner. More than 30 feet behind Bartley was Wilhoit, with a hurl of 156 feet that was still good enough to ensure he, too, would make the toss-off. Rounding out the trio was Apalachicolas Brett Johnson, who slung the sh 152 feet to make it to the nals, narrowly edging out Apalachicolas Dillon Grant, son of the events record holder, Stan Grant. Dillon Grant threw for 150 feet, two feet further than Liberty Countys Justin Mercer, for the honor of fourth and fth place, respectively. Missing out on a berth in the nals was former champion Chip Sanders, who had the distance, but hooked both of his throws out of bounds to the right. The toss-off was a dramatic one, as Johnson threw rst, arcing the mullet 141 feet, 8 inches. Wilhoit followed, his rst throw landing 166 feet past the starting line, and his second, 180 feet, to put the heat on Bartley to come up with a mammoth hurl. Bartleys rst throw spun in a circle and landed at the 179-foot, 5-inch mark, forcing him to make good on his nal shot for the title. And that he did, winding up and rearing back to throw 186 feet, 4 inches to win the $200 top prize for the sixth time. For his second place nish, Wilhoit took home a mountain bike donated by Tri-Eagle sales. I had to work out. Gotta eat my Wheaties, Wilhoit said afterwards. They was ying today, said Bartley, 29. The wind was kind of a side wind. Last year, it was right in our face. He thanked Kelsey Smith and Will Prescott for their work in shagging mullet for him all week as he practiced up for the event. He also heaped praise on his rivals. They stepped it up in the nals, Bartley said. Thats what I like, when they push you. Its worthwhile. It gives the crowd a show. Bartleys win was not without a touch of disappointment, since the Mullet Toss forced him to miss his daughter Kaydences performance in the afternoons Pam Nobles Studios dance recital at the Dixie Theatre. I havent lost since my daughters been born, he said. Now I can bring momma some money for missing that recital. From the moment the event got underway under sunny skies in the morning, plenty of young boys and girls were on hand to try their hand at tossing a sh, many for the rst time. With the Blue Parrots Paul Joanos overseeing the event, and Oyster Radio deejay Brian Bowen emceeing with the help of fellow staffer Katie Galloway, the Mullet Toss went smoothly from the start, managing to avoid the heavy rains that swept in at about 3 p.m. Easily capturing the age 11-and-under category was Eastpoints Jan Lowe, who threw 91 feet, 2 inches to win a shing pole and tackle box. Finishing as runner-up was Nick Keenan, a sixth grader from Buford, Ga., who posted a 77 feet, 1 inch pitch, narrowly edging out third-place tosser Will Prescott, from Eastpoint, who threw for 76 feet, 8 inches. In the age 12-16 category, Eastpoints Cash Creamer edged out Apalachicolas Trenton Lee to win a bicycle. Creamer threw the sh 131 feet, 2 inches, about two feet farther than Trenton Lee, who hurled it 129 feet. In third place was Ryder Jowers, from Columbus, Ga., who threw for 101 feet, 7 inches. In the womens category, it was a matter of a single inch that determined the winner. Paige Martin, of Leesburg, Ga., who played shortstop for Columbus State in Columbus, Ga., threw the mullet 95 feet, 5 inches, one inch better than Tallahassees Laura Davis. In third place, Carrie Johnson, Bretts wife, became the second member of the Johnson family to earn a winning spot, taking home third place with a throw of 86 feet, 3 inches. In the freestyle category, a three-man team used a Georgia and Louisiana State University Fish Propulsion System to shoot mullets maybe 20 or 30 feet. With Rick Daigle rearing back on the slingshot designed by his wife Mary, and David Fendley and Hutch Hutchinson anchoring the poles, the sh was well short of the 533-foot record, probably by about 500 feet. An impressive performance was put in by Huntler Bartley and Carl Ard with the 5150 Team as they used compressed air from an Ards service truck to shoot mullet several hundred feet, but still shy of the record. They won $100 for their efforts, and posed afterwards for a picture with former state senator Al Lawson, who is making a bid for the Democratic nomination for the congressional seat that includes Franklin County. All monies raised by the event go to the Apalachicola Bay Charter School.Bartley wins Mullet Toss with personal bestEdges out Wilhoit by 6 feet in thrilling toss-off Hwy. 65 N Photos by DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The TimesStepping up to the Mullet Toss are: Right, Hunter Bartley, top, Carrie Johnson and, below, Maya Itzkovitz.They stepped it up in the nals. Thats what I like, when they push you. Its worthwhile. It gives the crowd a show.Hunter Bartley Mullet Toss winner SEE MOREFor lots more Mullet Toss photos, visit www. apalachtimes.com.

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A12| The Times Thursday, June 14, 2012 CLASSIFIEDS BP Claims ProgramThis communication includes new information and claims procedures for individuals and businesses who wish to le a claim with BP under the Oil Pollution Act of 1990 (OPA). The United States District Court for the Eastern District of Louisiana has granted preliminary approval to the economic and property damage settlement between BP and plaintiffs in MDL 2179 concerning the Deepwater Horizon Incident (Settlement). If the Court grants nal approval of the settlement, individuals and businesses falling within the Settlements class de nition will be bound by the terms of the settlement unless the class member timely exercises the class members right to opt out of the settlement. Information concerning the Court-Supervised Settlement Program, including the right to opt out, may be found at www.DeepwaterHorizonSettlements.com or by calling 1-866-992-6174. Individuals and businesses that do not fall with the Settlements class de nition or that timely opt out of the Settlement may le claims under OPA with BP. This includes claims for interim, short-term damages representing less than the full amount to which the claimant may ultimately be entitled. Access to forms Effective June 4, 2012, claim forms for the BP Claims Program are available at www.bp.com/claims or may be requested by calling 1-855-687-2631. All claim forms for the BP Claims Program must be submitted in one of the following ways: By mail: BP Claims Program P.O. 330919 Houston, TX 77233-0919 By email: Scanned forms can be sent to: bpclaimsprogram@bp.com By fax: Faxed forms can be submitted to 1-866-542-4785 Additional information: Online: www.bp.com/claims By Phone: 1-855-687-2631 (toll-free, multilingual) TTY: 1-800-345-4039. For any claims under OPA that are denied or that are not resolved within 90 days after the date of submission to the BP Claims Program the claimant may, provided presentment and other requirements of law are satis ed, elect to commence an action in court against BP, or to present the claim to the NPFC, US Coast Guard Stop 7100 (ca), 4200 Wilson Boulevard, Suite 1000, Arlington, Virginia 20598-7100 for consideration. The NPFC may be contacted at 1-800-280-7118. 87442T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 11-000436CA TYNDALL FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, Plaintiff, vs. WILLIAM WAYNE WEBB, WONDA WEBB ALLEN, EASTPOINT WATER AND SEWER DISTRICT, AND FRANKLIN COUNTY, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Franklin County, Florida, pursuant to the Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure, entered in this cause, the Clerk of this Court shall sell the property at public sale at 11:00 A.M. E.D.T., on the 12th day of June, 2012, at the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida, 32320, the following described real property lying and being in Franklin County, Florida, to-wit: EXHIBIT A A parcel of land lying in the Southeast Quarter of Fraction Section 27, Township 8 South, Range 8 West, Franklin County, Florida being described as follows: Commence at the intersection of the Southeasterly boundary of the 60.0 foot State Road (S-384-A) with the Northeasterly boundary of the 60.0 foor State Road (S-384) abd run thence North then 17 degrees 02 minutes 55 seconds East along said right-of-way of State Road S-384-A 962.10 feet to the Point of Beginning. From said Point of Beginning run thence South 72 degrees 57 minutes 05 seconds East 325.00 feet to a point in the center of a creek, thence North 67 degrees 40 minutes 45 seconds East along said creek center line 252.24 thence leaving said creek North 72 degrees 57 minutes 05 seconds West 370.00, thence South 17 degrees 02 minutes 55 seconds West 131.10 feet, thence North 72 degrees 57 minutes 05 seconds West 150.00 feet, to a point on said right-of-way of State Road S-384-A, thence South 17 degrees 02 minutes 55 seconds West along said right-of-way 28.90 feet to the Point of Beginning. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. This Notice dated this 27th day of April, 2012. MARCIA JOHNSON Clerk Circuit Court, Franklin County, Florida By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk June 7, 14, 2012 87488T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File Number: 2012-000011-CP IN RE: ESTATE OF ERRIS VANVLEET VENTRY Deceased. NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION AND NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of ERRIS VANVLEET VENTRY, deceased, File Number 2012-000011-CP is pending in the Circuit Court for Franklin County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is the. Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, Franklin County, Florida 32320. The estate is testate. The date of the will is May 16, 1986. There are no codicils. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal resentatives Attorney are set forth below. ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT: Any interested person on whom a copy of this notice of administration is served must file on or before the date that is 3 months after the date of service of a copy of the notice of administration on that person any objection that challenges the validity of the will, the qualifications of the personal representative, the venue, or jurisdiction of this Court. Persons who may be entitled to exempt property under Section 732.402, Florida Statutes will be deemed to have waived their rights to claim that property as exempt property unless a petition for determination of exempt property is filed by such persons or on their half on or before the later of the date that is 4 months after the date of service of a copy of this notice of administration on such persons or the date that is 40 days after the date of termination of any proceeding involving the construction, admission to probate, or validity of the will or involving any other matter affecting any part of the exempt property. An election to take an elective share must be filed on or before the earlier of the date that is 6 months after the date of service of a copy of the notice of administration on the surviving spouse, or an attorney in fact or a guardian of the property of the surviving spouse, or the date that is 2 years after the date of the decedents death. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file claims against the estate with the Court during the time periods set forth in Section 733.702, Florida Statutes, or be forever barred. ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. The date of the first publication of this Notice is June 14, 2012. Personal Representative: WILLIAM DAVID VENTRY Post Office Box 3984 Tallahassee, Florida 32315 Attorney for Personal Representative: J. GORDON SHULER of J. GORDON SHULER, P.A. Post Office Drawer 850 Apalachicola, Florida 32329 (850) 653-9226 Florida Bar Number 0700959 June 14, 21, 2012 87444T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 19-2010-CA-000292 DIVISION: BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP, Plaintiff, vs. ANGELA SHARP, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated May 14, 2012, and entered in Case No. 19-2010-CA-000292 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for FRANKLIN County, Florida wherein BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP, is the Plaintiff and ANGELA SHARP; THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF ANGELA SHARP N/K/A GUS PRESTON; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at FRONT DOOR OF THE FRANKLIN COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 33 MARKET STREET, APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA at 11:00 AM, on the 27th day of June, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT 27, BLOCK 3 OF SUN N SAND, UNIT 2, AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE 12, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 637 PINE STREET, PANACEA, FL 32346 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and seal of this Court on May 18, 2012. MARCIA M. JOHNSON Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk Attorney for Plaintiff: RONALD R. WOLFE & ASSOCIATES, P.L. P.O. Box 25018 Tampa, Florida 33622-5018 **See Americans with Disabilities Act: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Mr. Doug Smith, Office of Court Administration, Leon County Courthouse, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 Phone: 850-577-4401 Fax: 850-487-7947 June 7, 14, 2012 87709T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 10-00002-CA Wann Van Robinson and Mary D. Robinson, individually and as Co-Trustees of the Wann Van Robinson Revocable Trust, Plaintiffs, vs Ronnie V. Worley individually and as the sole surviving Trustee of the Worley Revocable Family Trust; Jason Clint Worley individually and as Trustee of the Jason C. Worley Revocable Trust, Defendants. NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the Order of Public Sale entered in this cause, the Franklin County Clerk will, in accordance with Florida Statutes .061(4), sell the properties identified as the Alligator Point Property and the Dog Island Property, legally described below, separately, to the highest bidder, upon the further terms as set forth in the Order of Public Sale. The sale will take place on June 27, 2012, at public auctions held at the front door (or such other location within the Courthouse as is commonly used) of the Franklin County Courthouse, located at 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida, in Franklin County, 32320, beginning at 11:00 AM. Prospective bidders are notified that the properties are subject to mortgage. The approximate Alligator Point Property Mortgage payoff is $473,725.00. The approximate Dog Island Property Mortgage payoff is $333,484.00. IN ADDITION TO THE AMOUNT BID, THE SUCCESSFUL BIDDER WILL BE REQUIRED TO SATISFY THE RESPECTIVE MORTGAGE AT CLOSING, FOLLOWING THE SALE. FURTHER DETAILS ARE AVAILABLE IN THE ORDER OF PUBLIC SALE. LEGAL DESCRIPTIONS OF THE PROPERTIES ALLIGATOR POINT PROPERTY: LOT 8, BLOCK L OF PENINSULAR POINT, UNIT NO. 2 AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1 PAGES 21-23, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. ALSO: THE WEST 25 FEET OF THE LAND LYING BETWEEN LOT 1, BLOCK I AND LOT 8, BLOCK H OF PENINSULAR POINT, UNIT NO. 2 AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGES 21-23 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. ALSO: THE WEST 25 FEET OF THE LAND LYING BETWEEN LOT 1, OF SUB LOT 9, BLOCK L AND LOT 8 OF BLOCK L, OF PENINSULAR POINT, UNIT NO. 2, AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 21-23 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. DOG ISLAND PROPERTY: LOT 28 (UNRECORDED) COMMENCE AT A POINT MARKING THE INTERSECTION OF THE EAST BOUNDARY OF FRACTIONAL SECTION 11, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 4 WEST, DOG ISLAND, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA WITH THE SOUTHERLY RIGHTOF-WAY BOUNDARY OF GULF SHORE DRIVE AND RUN SOUTH 67 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 1096.00 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 60 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 2400.00 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919) MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING AND LEAVING SAID RIGHTOF-WAY BOUNDARY RUN SOUTH 26 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 41 SECONDS EAST 299.76 FEET TO THE APPROXIMATE MEAN HIGH WATER LINE OF THE GULF OF MEXICO, THENCE RUN SOUTH 59 DEGREES 35 MINUTES 20 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID MEAN HIGH WATER LINE 99.62 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID MEAN HIGH WATER LINE RUN NORTH 26 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 41 SECONDS WEST 303.49 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #4261) LYING ON THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF GULF SHORE DRIVE, THENCE RUN NORTH 61 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 09 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 99.43 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. Marcia Johnson Franklin County Clerk of Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk Attorneys for Plaintiffs: Susan K. Spurgeon, Esq. Pennington, Moore, Wilkinson, Bell & Dunbar, P.A. 2701 N. Rocky Point Dr Suite 900 Tampa, FL 33607 (813) 639-9599 (813) 639-1488 June 14, 21, 2012 87532T LEGAL NOTICE Notice is given pursuant to Florida Self-Storage Facility Act, Florida Statutes, Chapter 83, Part IV, that Seminole Safe N Secure Storage will hold a sale by sealed bid on: June 30, 2012 at: 10:00 a.m. at 162 US 98, Eastpoint, Florida 32328 of the contents of mini-warehouse(s) containing personal property of: Gomeshia Cohens Tonita Turner Paul Craft Lanny Hardman Michael Hicks Jerry Gleaton Before the sale date of June 30, 2012, the property may be redeemed by payment in cash or money order of the outstanding balance and cost by mailing it to Post Office Box 1054, Eastpoint, Florida 32328, or by paying in person. June 14, 21, 2012 87536T LEGAL NOTICE Notice is given pursuant to Florida Self-Storage Facility Act, Florida Statutes, Chapter 83, Part IV, that Seminole Safe N Secure Storage will hold a sale by sealed bid on: July 7th, 2012 at: 10:00 a.m. at 162 US 98, Eastpoint, Florida 32328 of the contents of mini-warehouse(s) containing personal property of: Andrew Butler Vessel#11582126 FL6510JS Before the sale date of July 7, 2012, the property may be redeemed by payment in cash or money order of the outstanding balance and cost by mailing it to Post Office Box 1054, Eastpoint, Florida 32328, or by paying in person. June 14, 21, 28, 2012 87733T PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF INTENDED ACTION FRANKLIN COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD Purpose and Effect: The Franklin County School Board proposes to update and adopt policies, as provided in the Administrative Procedures Act for the purpose of maintaining compliance with Florida Statutes and State Board of Education Rules. Summary: The following is a brief description of the proposed changes: School Board Policy Manual Student Code of Conduct Student Progression Plan Learning/Alternative Center Handbook Franklin County Academy Plan Statutory Authority: Section 1001.41, Florida Statutes These proposed rules will be considered by the Franklin County School Board at a meeting publicly advertised and held in the Willie Speed School Board Room at 85 School Road, Eastpoint, Florida no earlier than 28 days after the original date of this notice. Policies may be reviewed during the period of June 5, 2012 through July 2, 2012 at the Franklin County School Board Administrative Offices, 85 School Road, Eastpoint, Florida during the hours of 8:00 AM until 5:30 PM, Monday Thursday. June 14, 21, 28 July 5, 2012 87749T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO.: 11000505CA FLAGSTAR BANK, FSB Plaintiff, vs. NORBERT JOSEPH KAMINSKI A/K/A NORBERT J. KAMINSKI A/K/A NORBERT KAMINSKI; NANCY ANNE KAMINSKI A/K/A NANCY A. KAMINSKI A/K/A NANCY KAMINSKI; UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2, ET AL, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTIONCONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE TO: NORBERT JOSEPH KAMINSKI A/K/A NORBERT J. KAMINSKI A/K/A NORBERT KAMINSKI; NANCY ANNE KAMINSKI A/K/A NANCY A. KAMINSKI A/K/A NANCY KAMINSKI Whose Residence Is: 1023 BEDFORD PARK, GROSSE POINTE PARK, MI 48230 and who is evading service of process and the unknown defendants who may be spouses, heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, lienors, creditors, trustees, and all parties claiming an interest by, through, under or against the Defendant(s), who are not known to be dead or alive, and all parties having or claiming to have any right, title or interest in the property described in the mortgage being forclosed herein. YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property: LOT 28, BLOCK 10 EAST OF ST. GEORGE ISLAND GULF BEACHES UNIT NO. 1, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE(S) 7, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on counsel for Plaintiff, whose address is 3010 North Military Trail, Suite 300, Boca Raton, Florida 33431 30 days from the date of first publication of this Notice and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition filed herein. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court at County, Florida, this 1st day of June, 2012. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk June 14, 21, 2012 87781T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.: 192009CA000646 XXXXXX U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION AS TRUSTEE, FOR THE BENEFIT OF HARBOURVIEW 2005-13 TRUST FUND Plaintiff, vs. JAMES P. KOURKOULIS, et al., Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order or Summary Final Judgment of foreclosure dated May 29, 2012, and entered in Case No. 192009CA 000646XXXXXX of the Circuit Court in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE, FOR THE BENEFIT OF HARBOR-VIEW 2005-13 TRUST FUND is Plaintiff and JAMES P. KOURKOULIS; REGIONS BANK AS SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO AMSOUTH BANK; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 1; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 2; and ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST A NAMED DEFENDANT TO THIS ACTION, OR HAVING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE ANY RIGHT, TITLE OR INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY HEREIN DESCRIBED, are Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Front Door of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320 at Franklin County, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on the 3rd day of October, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Order or Final Judgment, to-wit: LOT 5, BLOCK 97, CITY OF APALACHICOLA, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN THE OFFICE OF THE CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons needing special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the Clerk of the Court not later than five business days prior to the proceeding at the Franklin County Courthouse. (850) 653-8861 or 1-800-955-8770 via Florida Relay Service. DATED at Apalachicola, Florida on May 30, 2012. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of Court By: Terry E. Creamer As Deputy Clerk Attorneys for Plaintiff SMITH, HIATT & DIAZ, P.A. P.O. BOX 11438 Fort Lauderdale, FL 33339-1438 (954) 564-0071 June 14, 21, 2012 Look No Further Than The Classifieds What you want is right before your eyes in the Classified Section of your daily and Sunday newspaper. For Fast Results,Call 747-5020

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, June 14, 2012 The Times | A13 e Apalachicola Bay Charter School is accepting applications for the following positions for 2012-13 school year: Music/Art/Character education instructor Physical Education instructor Teacher assistant Custodial personnel Bus driverABC School is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Please send resumes to: Chimene Johnson, ABC School, 98 12th Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320 Fickling Vacation Rentals St. George IslandHousekeeping/maintenance supervisor for vacation rental company. Rental experience preferred, immediate start. Please apply in person or call (850) 927-2218 CLEANERS CLEANERS NEEDED NEEDEDLots of Work and Good Pay Must have Own Vehicle Must have Own SuppliesCALL 850.227.3806 HELP WANTED Warehouse / Delivery Eastpoint Location RENTALS1 BEDROOM, 1 BATH, UNFURNISHED APT. Lanark, Remodeled, Inc. Water ......................$425 2 BEDROOM, 1 BATH, UNFURNISHED APT. Lanark ............................................................$400 2 BEDROOM, 1 BATH, MOBILE HOME Fenced Yard ....................................................$500 3 BEDROOM, 2 BATH, UNFURNISHED Doublewide.....................................................$700 3 BEDROOM, 2 BATH, WATER VIEW HOME Unfurnished, Lawn Inc. ...................................$800 2 BEDROOM, 1 BATH, UNFURNISHED APT. Small Porch ....................................................$375 2 BEDROOM, 2 BATH, MOBILE HOME Large Yard ......................................................$500 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322850-697-9604 850-323-0444 www.seacrestre.comwww. rst tness.com/carrabellePROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND RENTALS Sales/Business DevInteractive Sales ManagerAre you passionate about providing the best media solutions to your customers? Floridas Freedom Interactive Newspapers, is seeking a hands-on Interactive Sales Manager with a track record of driving revenue in multiplatform environments. You will be responsible for coaching, mentoring and developing your sales team with the goal of aggressively increasing revenue. Included within your sphere of responsibility are the following: Developing new revenue streams, setting sales goals, field coaching and managing sales performance -making this a very hands on leadership role. The Interactive Sales Manager will foster an attitude of exceptional customer service and provide motivation, leadership and fresh ideas to the selling process. Position Requirements: Proven sales experience in digital products Experience developing and leading a high performing sales team Vision and passion to drive growth in interactive sales Strong analytical ability to budget forecast and effectively utilize market research The successful candidate will lead cross-selling efforts in print and digital solutions and must possess a demonstrated expertise with the Internet. A college degree in advertising or marketing is preferred but not required. Sales Experience and previous media management experience is preferred. Florida Freedom offers an excellent benefit package including health, dental, vision and life insurance, 401(k) plan, vacation and sick leave. This role offers a chance to live and work along Floridas Emerald Coast encompassing 24 miles of pristine white-sand beaches stretching along the Gulf of Mexico. If this sounds like the right mix of challenge and opportunity, please e-mail your resume or contact me at either of the following addresses: E-Mail: sfeith@notes.freedom.com http://www.facebook.com/#!/skfeith http://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=1999909&trk =tab_pro https://twitter.com/#!/skfeith For more information about our organization please go to: freedom.com/careers Web ID#: 34211062 Outside Sales Representative An exciting opportunity now exists to join The News Herald. We are searching for enthusiastic, hard-working, and driven Outside Sales Representatives to join our team! Job Description The News Herald is looking for motivated sales professionals to establish footholds in their local markets by providing products and services to businesses. The Outside Sales Representatives duties may include but are not limited to: Cold call and prospect new territory opportunities. Introduce business owners to programs via presentation, answer detailed questions and maintain that relationship. Requirements Have strong work ethic Experience presenting advertising materials to a variety of businesses Cold calling experience Reliable Transportation Experience handling warm leads and prospecting for new leads. Field Sales, Business to Business Sales (B2B), Inside Sales, Outside Sales, or Outbound Sales experience ( Preferred) We Offer: Room for advancement and career opportunity Bonuses Dynamic Monthly Residual Compensation Bonus programs Introductory and Ongoing Training Business Materials including phone, laptop and IPad, business cards, sales material and product knowledge information The News Herald offers a competitive bene t package including medical, dental, vision and life insurance, 401(k) plan, vacation and sick leave, and six paid holidays per year.Come by The News Herald at 501 W. 11th Street for an application or send a resume to resumes@ afreedom.com.Freedom Florida is a Drug-free workplace, EOETO APPLY: Publishers Notice SCAM To avoid possible scams, it is recommended that consumers should verify caller information when receiving calls regarding credit card payments. Consumers should also contact the local company themselves instead of giving this information to individuals who are contacting them directly. Adopt: Doctor, caring family lovingly waits for miracle 1st baby *Monica* 800552-0045*FLBar42311* Expenses Paid* GUN SHOWSanta Rosa County Auditorium, Milton, FL. June 16th & 17th 9am -5pm call (850) 957-4952 or (850) 261-8407 General Admission $6Text FL08625 to 56654 CASH PAID for unexpired, sealed DIABETIC TEST STRIPS-up to $25/Box! Shipping prepaid. (888) 883-8835 Education/TrainingPT Housekeeper/ nannyFor newborn on SGI. Nonsmoking. Must have childcare experience, references and pass background check. 850-274-1321 or augusta.west@ammfl.org. Food SvsOyster Shuckers Needed$9 per gallon, Leavins Seafood, Inc (850) 653-8823 Web ID#: 34211519 1 br, 1 ba, efficiency Call for information 850-653-6103 Text FL11727 to 56654 Lanark Village: Clean 2 bedroom, 1 bath, screened porch, AC, Long term lease: 7 months min. $500 monthly + $350. security deposit, references required or wkly & wknd rental w/deposit Pets-will consider. Non smoking. 850-212-2063 Text FL11665 to 56654 Publishers NoticeAll real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on a equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. St. George Island $160 week, Electric, Satellite, Garbage incl. Pool tble. 12 X 65 deck w/Beautiful view 850-653-5114 Lanark Village Carlton St. #5, 1 Br 1 Ba, All Tile, Walk-in Closet, Landlord pays Electric and Water, $525 month + $300 deposit. Call 850-927-2838 or 864-356-5949 1 BRCottageH/AC in Apalachicola, FL. 850-643-7740. Apalachicola 3 bed, 1 bath, living rm, dining rm, central heat & air, partially furnished. $700 per month Call 850-653-8965 Text FL13240 to 56654 East Point 3 bed, 2 bath, plus 1 apt. For rent or lease, fully furnished Call: 850-670-8463 or 850-653-5763Text FL11701 to 56654 Eastpoint Two adjacent lots on Jefferson St. Zone C4. $21,500 each or $39,500 for both. Owner financing available. Call Royce Hodge (850) 510-3797. Text FL13192 to 56654 For Sale By Owner St. James Golf Course. Two lots, on the fairway. Owner financing. Motivated to sell. Call Royce Hodge for info: (850) 510-3797. Text FL13194 to 56654 Total Down Pmt $7752001 Chrysler 300 T otal Price $4,2000% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! Total Down Pmt $8752004 Chevy Blazer T otal Price $4,9000% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! Nice Car of Forgotten Coast, LLC For inventory log onto: www.nicecar offorgotten coastllc.com Total Down Pmt $1,5002003 Chevy Silverado X-Cab T otal Price $9,5000% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! Total Down Pmt $9752002 Ford F150 X-Cab T otal Price $5,8000% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! ToPlace Your Classified ad inCall Our New Numbers Now!Call: 850-747-5020 Toll Free: 800-345-8688 Fax: 850-747-5044 Email: thestar@pcnh.com thetimes@pcnh.com theAPALACHICOLA & CARRABELLETIMES CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you. EmeraldCoast Marketplace 747-5020 SELL ALL YOUR ITEMSthrough classified.CALL 747-5020 Buy it! Classified. Make your move to the medium thats your number one source of information about homes for sale! For all your housing needs consult Classified when its time to buy, its the resource on which to rely. 16 -18 yard load clean fill dirt $90Delivered within 20 miles of Carravelle. Call Mike 850-899-5319 Park your car in Classified and see it take off in the fast lane!

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LocalA14 | The Times Thursday, June 14, 2012 Our local real estate experts have identied what they feel are the best values around and are oering them to you in Real Estate Picks! (In this section), Discover the best real estate values in Mexico Beach, Port St. Joe, Apalachicola, Cape San Blas, St. George Island, Carrabelle and surrounding areas. Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Real Estate Picks John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.comMLS# 245232$89,000St. George IslandHIGH & DRY 3RD TIER LOTLocated on the north side of Gulf Beach Drive and only two lots from the corner for easy beach access on 11th Street. Scrub Oaks line the road side of this lot creating privacy, but offers an open expanse of high sandy ground. Excellent building site. John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.comMLS# 241735$94,900Lanark VillagePERFECT FLORIDA LIVING Well-maintained home in a very desirable neighborhood with Bay view from front yard. 2 BR, 1 BA, Lanark Boat Club & Lanark Golf Course available. Furnished, Appliances, HVAC & Water Heater like new. Carl King Ave. Listed by Janie Burke Trades & Services Laban Bontrager, DMD Monica Bontrager, DMD 12761 Pea Ridge Road Bristol, Florida 32321TELEPHONE (850) 643-5417 Bristol Dental ClinicDENTURE LAB ON PREMISESSame Day Service on Repairs and Relines Don Lively General Contractors LICENSED ANDINSURED 20 YEARSEXPERIENCE P.O. Box 439 Carrabelle, FL 32322 697-2783 or Mobile 566-2603RC0066499RG0065255 653-8868 GET YOUR AD INCALL TODAY! GET YOUR AD IN 653-8868Trades & Services Carrabelle Visa, Discover, and American Express Honored at Participating Ace Stores JACKSONSBuilding Supplies Building Supplies & Auto Repair Carrabelle 697-3333 We Deliver AnywhereHardware and Paint Center J.J.s Tree Service, LLC Stump Grinder Licensed & Insured Call John : (850) 899-8432 JOES LAWN CARE IF ITS IN YOUR YARD LET JOE TAKE CARE OF IT FULL LAWN SERVICES, TREE TRIMMING AND REMOVALALSO CLEAN GUTTERS AND IRRIGATION INSTILLATION, PLANTING AND BEDDING AVAILABLE CALL JOE@ 850-323-0741 OR EMAIL JOES_LAWN @YAHOO.COM ROBERTS APPLIANCE REPAIR ALL MAJOR BRANDS 18 Shadow Lane Apalachicola, FL 32320 Phone: (850) 653-8122 Cell: (850) 653-7654 From A to ZPO Box 364Port St. Joe, FL 32457850-340-0756 Gregs Handyman Service & Lawn Maintenance News BRIEFSHCOLA to host political forum tonightHillside Coalition of Laborers for Apalachicola will host a political forum at 6 p.m. Thursday, June 14 at the Holy Family Community Center, 203 Dr. Frederick Humphries St. in Apalachicola. For more information, please call 323-0544 or 653-7515. Train the trainer classes postponedThe Community Emergency Response Teams Train-TheTrainer classes, originally announced for June 18-20 at the Emergency Operations Center, have been cancelled. Emergency Management Director Pam Brownell said regional classes will probably be scheduled for some time in August at an unspeci ed location. For more information, call 653-6748.Bridge inspection Monday in EastpointIntermittent lane closures will occur Monday, June 18 on U.S. 98 at the Porters Bar Bridge (approximately two miles west of State Road 65) in Eastpoint. Trans eld Services bridge inspectors will replace a bridge joint on the structure. Motorists can expect intermittent lane restrictions in the eastbound lanes between 8:30 a.m. and noon and in the westbound lanes from 12:30 p.m. to 5 p.m. Motorists are reminded to pay attention and use caution; traf c aggers will direct motorists through the work zone.Apalach to cut ribbon on reuse system FridayThe City of Apalachicola has placed their land application and reclaimed water system in service. This system provides for 100 percent bene cial reuse of the wastewater treatment plants ef uent and will eliminate surface water discharge to wetlands. The city and BaskervilleDonovan, Inc. are hosting a ribbon cutting ceremony for the Apalachicola Reuse Water and Land Application System this Friday, June 15. The ceremony will be at Riverfront Park at 11 a.m. Refreshments will be provided. We would like to extend an invitation to each of you and hope that you will join us next Friday at the Park!Voluntary Pre-K registration June 21Mr. Hardee from Early Learning Coalition will be at the Learning Center, 85 School Road, Eastpoint Room 1 on Thursday, June 21 to register children for Voluntary Pre-Kindergarten 201213. He will also complete forms for summer VPK certi cates. Please remember students who attend summer VPK must have a VPK certi cate. Pre-K Child Find Screenings will be on July 1819; please call for an appointment 1-866-277-6616. The screening will be for children age 3 and 4, with special needs such as vision, hearing and speech. 2012 hurricane guidesAt the June 5 meeting of the county commission, Emergency Management Director Pam Brownell announced that the 2012 Hurricane Survival Guides are ready for mass mailing. Every resident in the county should receive one within the next monthSGI Plantation photo contestThe St. George Plantation 2012 photo contest will be held from June 1 through Aug. 28. Entrants may submit photographs of St. George Island, Apalachicola or Franklin County, accompanied by a written release form granting St. George Plantation Owners Association permission to publish your photo. Any person identi able in the photograph must also sign the release. A parent must sign the release for any minor pictured. Include the following information on a label af xed to the back of the photograph: Your name, address and phone number; and title of photo or brief description. Entries must be on disk and professionally printed or in PDF or JPG format of less than 5 MBs. Entry must be mailed or emailed (photocontest10@sgpoa. com) by Aug. 28, to Plantation Photo Contest, 1712 Magnolia Road, St. George Island, FL 32328. Two entries per photographer. Entry fee is $5 per entry, with check made payable to SGPOA at the above address. First place wins $150, second place $100, third place $50 and Peoples Choice $50. Winners will be noti ed Sept. 14.Name your own sea turtle! Sea turtle nesting season is here! Refuge staff and volunteers began surveys for sea turtle nests at St. Vincent National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) on May 1. You can support this important monitoring work for a donation of $25, by joining our Adopt-a-Nest program. As in past years, participants receive an adoption certi cate, photo of adopted nest, activity/ hatchling report and recognition in Supporters newsletter. But were offering a new twist for 2012. Adopt-a-Nest participants will be able to name the turtle whose nest they adopt. Nest adoption proceeds help offset refuge costs for the monitoring program, including fuel for survey vehicles and materials for cages to protect nests from predators. Were hoping for more adoptions this year given rising fuel costs. Gift adoptions are available. To adopt a nest or learn more, e-mail supportstvin@hotmail.com or leave a message at 229-6735.