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The Apalachicola times
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100380/00175
 Material Information
Title: The Apalachicola times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: H.W. Johnston
Place of Publication: Apalachicola Fla
Apalachicola Fla
Publication Date: 06-07-2012
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1885.
General Note: Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 32911693
lccn - sn 95026907
System ID: UF00100380:00175
 Related Items
Preceded by: Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by: Apalachicola herald

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By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894| @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com Franklin County High School marked a milestone Friday night, both for itself and for the 56 members of the Class of 2012 who received their high school diplomas. For the rst time since the consolidated school opened on its Eastpoint campus in fall 2008, the high school graduated a class that had been educated all four years, together on the new campus, as Seahawks. As our motto says: Together we have experienced life, separately we will pursue our dreams, and forever our memories will remain, said Adreenah Aupril Wynn, who offered the salutatorian address. Both she and valedictorian Jessica Ruth Dempsey each earned better than a straightA 4.0 grade point average. Deanna Natasha Diplomas presented to 56 FCHS graduates Photos by DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times Top Valedictorian Jessica Dempsey, left, and salutatorian Adreenah Wynn smile after receiving their plaques. Left Javeion Win eld hugs his mom Melissa Thomas. Below Deanna Quick presents a ower to band director Karl Lester. xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx Thursday, June 7, 2012 50 WWW.APALACHTIMES.COM VOL. 127 ISSUE 6 Phone: 850-653-8868 Web: apalachtimes.com E-mail: dadlerstein@star .com Fax: 850-653-8036 Circulation: 800-345-8688 Opinion . . . . . . A4 Law Enforcement . . . A7 Society . . . . . . A8 Faith . . . . . . . A9 Outdoors . . . . . A10 Tide Chart . . . . A10 Classi eds . . . A14-A15 DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK: School News & Society: 11 a.m. Friday Real Estate Ads: 11 a.m. Thursday Legal Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Display Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Line Ads: 5 p.m. Monday xxxxx Contact Us xxxxx Out to see Index Retirement time for Van A2 By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com Property Appraiser Doris Pendleton delivered to county commissioners Tuesday morning a downbeat assessment of the countys scal picture, estimating the tax base could shrink by as much as 10 percent for next years budget. We are looking at a million dollars in less money, she said, basing that on the county keeping the millage rate unchanged. Alan Pierce, county director of administrative services, said the shortfall could be even higher than that, upwards of $1.5 million, since the sheriffs of ce will be without about $300,000 in revenue that it had been able to generate by housing state prisoners. Plus there will be a drop of about $35,000 in Medicaid monies the county used to be able to count on. Pendleton said the state now requires county property appraisers to provide an advance estimate ahead of the traditional July 1 deadline for calculating a preliminary certi cation of taxable value. She said her of ce has estimated the countys tax base will be in the neighborhood of $1.74 billion, a drop of about $100 million over last years $1.84 billion tax base. Last years property valuation marked a 9.2 percent fall from the $2.01 billion two years ago. Pendleton said that while her current estimate showed only a 5 to 6 percent drop over last years tax base, she could not be sure of the exact gure so chose to err on the side of caution. It could Appraiser: Tax base may drop See TAX BASE A5 Special to the Times Freedom Communications on Friday announced the sale of its properties in Florida and North Carolina to Halifax Media Group. The transaction, terms of which were not disclosed, is expected to close within 30 days. The Florida properties involved in the transaction include The Times, Apalachicola; The Star, Port St. Joe; Holmes County Times-Advertiser, Bonifay; The Walton Sun, Santa Rosa Beach; Washington County News, Chipley; The Crestview News Bulletin, Crestview; The Destin Log, Destin; Santa Rosa Press Gazette and Santa Rosa Free Press, Milton; Northwest Florida Daily News, Fort Walton Beach; and The News Herald, Panama City. The North Carolina properties include Times-News, Burlington; Havelock News, Havelock; The Daily News, Jacksonville; Free Press, Kinston; The Gaston Gazette, Gastonia; Jones Post, Kinston; Sun Journal and The Shopper, New Bern; The Star, Shelby; and The Topsail Advertiser, Surf City. Halifax Media Group will offer employment to all existing employees. At a time when the newspaper industry as a whole faces many challenges, local newspapers like these continue to thrive because they play such a critical role in the lives of their communities, said Freedom CEO Mitch Stern. Its also a real tribute to the dedication and hard work of our employees that these properties were so attractive to a new owner. Providing value for our shareholders was a major goal of this transaction, and others that weve undertaken recently, said Mark McEachen, Freedom executive vice president, chief operating ofcer and chief nancial of cer. At the same time we wanted to make sure that current employees would transition to the new owner and that the new owner shared our view of the importance of community journalism. We believe these goals were all met in this transaction with Halifax. At Halifax Media Group, we believe in the future of newspapers, said Michael Redding, CEO of Halifax Media Group. The purchase of Freedoms Florida and North Carolina properties further demonstrates our commitment to newspapers, not only for their value as an investment, but for the value they provide to the communities they serve. These properties provide a perfect extension to our recently acquired New York Times Regional Newspaper Group papers and re ect our interest in preserving community journalism for many years to come. Freedom Communications, headquartered in Irvine, Calif., is a national privately-owned information and entertainment company of print publications and interactive Freedom announces sale of Florida, N.C. papers to Halifax Media See SALE A5 Special to the Times Valentina Webb has led her letter of intent to seek election to the of ce of District 3 county commissioner. Webb, 48, of 255 11th St., Apalachicola, has led as a Democrat. She is now legally entitled to get petitions signed. Her name would appear on the Aug. 14 primary ballot, provided she quali es during the June 4-8 qualifying period The following is a statement issued by the candidate: I, Valentina R. Webb, a Franklin County native, announce my candidacy for the of ce of Franklin County Commissioner District 3. I am married to Thomas Webb Jr. We have two children, Thomas J. Webb III and Ashley K. Webb and one grandson. We have enjoyed raising our children in our quiet seafood village. Thomas and myself are both local pastors of the Tabernacle of Faith International Ministries at 148 8th St., Apalachicola, under the leadership of Bishop Willie Battles of Williston. My mother is Gladys Gatlin, who served in the Franklin County school system for 35 years. My father is the late Robert Williams, eldest son of my grandfather Clarence Williams, who has been a public servant for many years with the Franklin County Sheriffs Department and a past Franklin County commissioner. Therefore, this native announces my candidacy for the of ce of Valentina Webb seeks election to county commission VALENTINA WEBB See WEBB A5 Seahawk sendoff See SENDOFF A11 Fishermans Choices kids tourney Saturday Charles and Rex Pennycuff host their annual Fishermans Choice Youth Fishing Tournament on Saturday, June 9. Kids 16 and under sh for all major fresh and saltwater species, with each entry receiving a T-shirt. After the tournament, entries are invited to attend a cookout at the Eastpoint Pavilion to weigh in their sh, eat hot dogs and hamburgers and get great prizes, such as rods and reels, tackle boxes and cast nets. Entry is free. Call Fishermans Choice for more information at 670-8808 or visit www. shermanschoice.net. Toss a mullet Saturday The Mullet Toss, which is set for Saturday, June 9, is sponsored by The Blue Parrot on St. George Island for the bene t of the Apalachicola Bay Charter School. For a $25 entry fee you get a unique Mullet Toss T-shirt, and two mullet to throw. Visitors and locals compete for bragging rights and prizes, for the longest throws in the mens, womens and kids divisions. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. For more info, visit www.blueparrotsgi.com/ calendar/mullet. Catch the Buzz this Saturday Historic Apalachicola Main Street and the merchants of downtown Apalachicola celebrate the Tupelo honey bee with a BEEdazzling schedule this Saturday, June 9, featuring local beekeepers, artist demonstrations, bee-related products and honey-infused menus at local restaurants. At 8 p.m., Riverfront Park will feature a free concert by Slim Fatz. Daytime events include multi-media exhibit at the Center for History, Culture and Art, with artists reception from 6-8 p.m.; encaustic art using Watkins beeswax; Kids bee craft; beekeepers Kevin Reeder, Chris Clark and George Watkins, and much, much more.

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Local A2 | The Times Thursday, June 7, 2012 Bidding farewell to the pick-up man By LOIS SWOBODA and DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 |@ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star.com It was a week of fare wells, full of fond memo ries, by all those who love and respect longtime county staffer Van John son, who retired May 31 after 30 years on the job. On May 30, Johnsons coworkers honored the director of the countys animal control, parks and recreation and solid waste departments with a retire ment luncheon at the road department. On Saturday night, it was the commu nitys turn, with a dinner at the Holy Family Senior Center. Enjoy this, said Com missioner Cheryl Sanders, as friends, coworkers and county ofcials gathered for lunch to celebrate his career. You are entering a second phase of life to spend time with your wife and grandchildren. Nikki Millender, com munity program director for parks and recreation has worked closely with Johnson for 10 years. She organized the meal and made a speech thanking Johnson for a great op portunity to learn a lot. I was basically a sin gle mother when I came to work for you and you told me to always put my children rst, she said. Thats the kind of thing that makes you strive to do your best. Commission Chairwom an Pinki Jackel acted as master of ceremonies and presented Johnson with a large plaque detailing the high points of his 30-year career with the county. The resolution detailed Johnsons career, begin ning in March 1982 when he was hired to work as a laborer trainee in the solid waste department. Eigh teen months later he was promoted to truck driver, and in September 1984 to heavy equipment operator at the landll. After earning certica tion in solid waste manage ment from the University of Florida TREEO Center, he was named manager of the landll, and in Novem ber 1991, the county com mission appointed him to head the solid waste department as they com pleted construction of a new landll and embarked upon a state-mandated re cycling program. The Florida Depart ment of Environmental Protection Northwest District Ofce selected the county landll as the solid waste management facility of the rst quarter of 1995. Two years later, Johnson was selected to head animal control as it transitioned from under the sheriffs ofce, and in January 2000, Johnson was entrusted to oversee operation of the newly es tablished parks and recre ation department. Commissioner Bevin Putnal presented Johnson with a second plaque from the commission thank ing Johnson for his ser vice. Sheriff Skip Shiver also presented Johnson with a plaque offering the gratitude and admiration of himself and the entire sheriffs ofce. Fonda Davis, who has acted as Johnsons righthand man for several years and was selected Tuesday morning to succeed him, presented the retiree with a beautiful clock. This is a clock to help you mark the hours that you now have all to yourself, he said with a tear in his eye. Johnson tearfully de clined to speak. The event concluded with a commu nal meal of smoked chick en and all the trimmings. On Saturday night, Da vis emceed the dinner, catered by A.J.s, which opened with a prayer by Pastor David Walker. Stella Bryant, from the sheriffs ofce, read the countys proclamation, while Frank Cook, Apala chicolas mayor pro tem, read a proclamation from the city, which cited John sons dedication to county government and as mayor, and then went further. Johnson has devoted his life to his family and friends, being a father, grandfather, mentor to our local youth and a loy al friend to many, Cook read. Throughout his ca reer of public service, Van also made time to display his pledge to volunteer ism by his involvement with multiple community organizations, serving as an avid coach to hundreds of children, and achiev ing countless accomplish ments in our commu nity and the surrounding area, being most known for his resolved support to the interest and goals of others. Elinor Mount-Simmons joked with the audience that with his dual roles with animal control, col lecting stray animals, and with the solid waste de partment, Johnson was the pick-up man. The evening featured reminiscences of longtime friend, co-worker and fel low coach Albert Floyd, as well as the memories of Paul Bankston, who grew up with Johnson play ing street ball on the Hill. Johnson was the driving force behind the Avenue J All-Stars while Bankston headed the Sixth Street All-Stars. Bankston said he knew Johnson was destined for a career in politics when he saw his friend manage to convince Apalachicola Police Chief Cotty Hendels to close the streets one time so vehicles would not interfere with the football game. Bankstons wife, Carla, and friend Brenda Cum mings also spoke about their affection for John son. The evening includ ed a quiz of personal de tails about Johnsons life, such as the rst team he coached (Florida Power), and the positions he played in high school (fullback and defensive end, plus All-Conference honors). To see a gallery of Johnsons retirement, visit www.apalachtimes.com. DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times Van Johnson cuts the cake at Saturdays retirement dinner, surrounded by grandson Darius, left, wife Gail, center, and daughter Kristy.

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Local The Times | A3 Thursday, June 7, 2012

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Opinion A4 | The Times USPS 027-600 Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 Publisher: Rick Martin POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola Times Thursday, June 7, 2012 By SUE CRONKITE Special to the Times Writings left behind when Margaret Key died in 1996 add a great deal to research materials for those who come to the Apalachicola Municipal Library. A celebrated packrat, Mrs. Key had intentions to write books and booklets on everything from breakfasts over the world to the Raney clan who occupied one of the citys main tourist attractions, the Raney House Museum. Mrs. Key was active in the Apalachicola Historical Society and kept notes and papers during her tenure. A box turned up among her books and memorabilia in storage with background on the Raney family, copies of a deed for the land where the now-defunct town Aspalaga was located on the Apalachicola River, and the story of David Greenway and Harriet Frances Jordan Armistead Raneys marriage. David G. Raney worked for a trading and land speculation rm owned by three Armistead brothers. The Miles Jordan family, with daughter Harriet Frances, also came to Aspalaga. According to family legend Harriet, angry with her father for breaking up a romance with a young man back in Virginia, married Latinus Armistead, 44 years her senior. Latinus died in 1833, leaving her well-off financially, and she married handsome, young David Raney in 1834. The Raneys came to Apalachicola where the home, now the Raney House Museum, was built in 1939. Raney was involved in civic activities, served as president of the chamber of commerce, served two terms as mayor, and was president of a Jockey Club which held horse races. Did you know there was a race track in Apalach? Much of what Mrs. Key learned about the people and Apalachicola found its way into publication. She worked for The Times, and also had articles in the Tallahassee Democrat. A large amount of background material was packed into boxes after her death. All Mrs. Keys file cabinets and boxes are being meticulously researched and many of the files are being made available to the public at the Apalachicola Municipal Library at 74 Sixth Ave. Among the jewels of information she kept included large packets of letters from her husband, popular author Alexander Key. The letters begin when they met in 1923 at the Art Institute in Chicago, go through their marriage into the time Alex spent in the military during World War II, until they were divorced in 1947. Margaret Key collected information on many things, especially people of the town she loved so. I think Mrs. Key knew more about the people here than they knew about themselves, once remarked former Mayor Jimmie Nichols, who died in 2009, after a long history of also writing for the Times. Sue Cronkite works at the Apalachicola Municipal Library. To reach her, or librarian Caty Greene, call 653-8436.Gems in boxes of Margaret Key notes @ THE LIBRARY Sue Cronkite By KATHI JACKSON Special to the Times An email message was sent to various rescue groups in Florida requesting a foster, or better yet an adoption, for Fluffy, a special dog that a north Florida humane society labeled a project. This dog was extremely fearful of people. As I read on further, I realized that I must have this dog. The Franklin County Animal Shelter was 200 miles north of my home. The dog was heartwormpositive and needed a smooth ride and a quiet, comfortable home to recover so I offered to pick Fluffy up from the shelter. Once home, I tried to think of the positive things she was displaying:. She was making eye-contact with me. She was not crying or whimpering. She was not panting too much. These are little things that need to be appreciated when working with a fearful dog. For the rst two days of fostering, Fluffy needed to be carried through the sliding glass door. At 67 pounds, I knew that walking through the door on her own was going to be her rst lesson. Luckily, Fluffy was a dogs dog. She was so attracted to my sheltiemix, Heidi, that she began following her everywhere. Heidi became the bait. Soon, Fluffys fear of the door faded. Fluffy became nervous about anything new. The rst time I opened the mailbox, she darted away as if from a shotgun blast. I began placing treats inside the mailbox and would make a point of opening the box every day during our walks and then treating her. She soon learned to love the mailbox. One day, to our amazement, Fluffy accepted a treat directly from my sisters hand. We knew the worm was turning. After a month, Fluffy nally began sleeping in the bedroom with the other dogs. Some sleep on my bed and some on doggy beds. Imagine my surprise when one night after midnight I was awakened by Fluffy standing in front of the bed looking at me, seemingly wanting to be scratched. Actually standing right in front of the head of the bed! Those moments are truly heartwarming! The dilemma came. How could I place this dog in another home? Shed have to start all over again. What would be best for this dog? Would Fluffy become another foster failure? How could I afford to care for yet another dog? By keeping Fluffy myself, I would not be able to accept as many foster dogs. I think the day when I made my decision came when I began calling her Ellie. It is commonly known that when you name a dog, it becomes yours. Ellie is now my dog. I am so lucky to have been approved to adopt this very special girl and I am thankful to everyone at the Franklin County Humane Society and the support of the community for making this possible. Happy endings: From Fluffy to Ellie Right now, a Senate Conference Committee is debating the nal version of the federal transportation bill. Senator Bill Nelson is one of 14 members serving on this critical committee. There are a few bad amendments including how our utility companies dispose of their coal ash. Floridians need to ask for a clean transportation bill, which provides jobs and protects the states water supply from mercury, arsenic, chromium and other toxics in coal ash. Florida has 14 coal power plants producing over 8 billion pounds of coal ash each year, and zero requirements for contamination prevention at coal ash landlls. Senator Nelson, be a leader and protect the public and our economy over the utility companies. Kick out the coal ash provision now!A ngelique Giraud Energy Community Organizer Clean Water ActionNelson should kick coal ash from bill My name is Addiction. Let me introduce myself to you. At rst I come to you very slowly easing all your troubles. You nd that you like me and how I made you feel. You nd yourself seeking for me in all kinds of places. Ill make you sweat and cry to nd me. Let me introduce you to my family. Mr. Coke, hes my right-hand man, if you need to stay up or t in. Hes your man. You can nd him nowadays almost on every street corner. Hes got a lot of offspring. His youngest son and only son, his name is Crack Daddy. Mr. Crack, he is a sneaky snake. Most of my own family are jealous of him. Hes got all the small towns and big cities right where he wants them. Shoot, hell even stop your heart, take all your belongings, your sons and daughters will even kill to follow him. Then there is my cousin Heroin, hes really popular in New York, California and Chicago. He has those towns and allows us to move there to make our family fortunes. To him we are grateful. Mr. Heroin enjoys putting your moms, dad, sisters and brothers to sleep. He even likes to make them look stupid but all of us do. We laugh at you while we are spending your money (and watching you fall.) Now let me introduce you to my Aunt Pot. She is the coolest of them all. Shoot, she enjoys making you lazy, causing you to forget things. She enjoys it. When you give her your bill money, she will hit you smoothly, then drop you hard. What a girl! The southern people are just crazy about Pot Girl. For the other uncle I have Mr. Meth, he lives mostly out west. He is like the Meth Maa King. Wow, he is bad news. He can be found in sheds in the country, most people that like him will give him anything he wants as long as he visits them in their pipes, light bulbs. He enjoys when you stay up all night seeing things that are not there. Shoot, he will make you pick your skin till you bleed. He is also a selsh kind of a guy, he wants to run all the others off so he can run the family business. We all like it very much when we get all you have and put you in places that will take all your rights away and end up costing you a lot of money. The most popular one of us is Cousin Alcohol. Now let me get all you straight about him. He is legal, once you hit 21 years old. But he aims to get you long before that birthday. The sooner the better he told us. See, he is the only one that government lets be sold legally in stores, Wal-Mart, grocery stores, hes got illegal places he is sold just like his granddad moonshine was. In his day he was the bomb. But he is just as deadly as we all are. It doesnt matter at all to us where we take you and what you lose. Because to tell the you the truth only your money matters to us. Now that about wraps it up for the addiction family. See you out there. Oh yeah, let us tell you about our newest family member. Her name is Pilgrim, we call her Pills. Now shes the kind of girl that is high-class. You have to have a prescription for her. She will make your pain go away, make you sleep, ease your mental outlook on things. She will even cause you to sell your body to feel her pleasures. She also spreads her popularity into the streets. She can be found in 98 percent of all American homes, just like Uncle Alcohol. Oh well, it is time to go to work for the family. You all know us very well anyways. Oh by the way. Who have you lost to us? Like we really care. No, we dont but how can you live without us, right? The jokes on you. Marjorie Sanders Boozer Addiction:Come meet the rest of the family PHOTO COURTESY S T A TE ARCHIVES OF F LORID A David Greenway Raney, in the 1860s KA THI JA C K SO N | Special to the Times. Ellie and Heidi

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Local The Times | A5 Thursday, June 7, 2012 ** 2011** DELINQUENT PERSONAL PROPERTY TAX ROLL ** 2011** NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVE THAT THE PERSONAL PROPERTY TAXES ASSESSED FOR THE TAX YEARS 2011 ARE NOW DELINQUENT AND SUCH TAXES ARE DRAWING INTEREST AT THE RATE OF EIGHTEEN (18%) PERCENT PER YEAR. UNLESS THE AMOUNT SET OPPOSITE EACH NAME BELOW IS PAID, WARRANTS WILL BE ISSUED THEREON PURSUANT TO FLORIDA STATUTES 197.413 AND THE TAX COLLECTOR WILL APPLY TO THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR AN ORDER DIRECTING LEVY UPON AND SEIZURE OF THE PERSONAL PROPERTY OF THE TAX PAYER FOR UNPAID TAXES. JAMES A. HARRIS, JR., CFC, FRANKLIN COUNTY TAX COLLECTOR P-0000600 $834.14 BOSS OYSTER, INC RICK BLOODWORTH 125 WATER STREET APALACHICOLA, FL 32320 00096-000 P-0002400 $657.51 GULF STATE BANK PO BOX 488 APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 00280-000 P-0003100 $73.91 PRO CHEF INC DBA CHEF EDDIES MAGNOLIA GRIL PO BOX 154 APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 00344-000 P-0003600 $115.03 JAMES A PADGETT, DDS, PA 218 AVE E DENTAL OFFICE APALACHICOLA, FL 32320 00393-000 P-0003900 $614.09 RANCHO INN 240 HWY 98 W APALACHICOLA, FL 32320 00420-000 P-0004100 $357.47 RED TOP RESTAURANT PO BOX 631 APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 00430-000 P-0009300 $853.24 COASTAL INTERNAL MEDICINE DR HELEN NITSIOS 74 16TH STREET APALACHICOLA, FL 32320 00716-000 P-0009400 $1,500.33 FLORIDA COASTAL CARDIOL OGY INC DR. SHEZAD SANAULLAH 74 16TH STREET APALACHICOLA, FL 32320 00717-000 P-0011900 $1,400.23 LAMB SOUP, INC REX HUMPHRIES 15 AVENUE D APALACHICOLA, FL 32320 00758-000 P-0012200 $281.66 VERANDAS AT RIVER MARK, INC 76 MARKET STREET APALACHICOLA, FL 32320 00763-000 P-0017200 $104.78 APALACHICOLA CHOCOLATE CO 15 AVE E APALACHICOLA, FL 32320 00849-000 P-0017900 $292.00 COASTAL COMMUNTIY BANK FKA/APALACHICOLA STATE BANK 12141 PANAMA CITY BCH PARKWAY PANAMA CITY BEACH, FL 32407 01025-000 P-0018400 $1,319.53 CARRABELLE MARINA CORPO RATION COXWELL & BLEVINS MARINA INC DRAWER BB CARRABELLE, FL 32322 01045-000 P-0019000 $1,183.61 GULF STATE BANK BOX GG CARRABELLE, FL 32322 01180-000 P-0026300 $653.72 PIRATES COVE MARINA LLC 2807 THOMASVILLE ROAD TALLAHASSEE, FL 32308 01491-000 P-0026400 $3,171.57 SUMMIT OUTDOOR ADVERTIS ING INC 1626 CRAWFORDVILL HIGHWAY UNIT B CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 01492-000 P-0029200 $1,040.13 GULF STATE BANK BOX 488 APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 02112-000 P-0031500 $5.04 GJ GRACE LLC RANDALL CHAMPION P.O. BOX 287 EASTPOINT, FL 32328 02323-000 P-0035800 $2,284.40 WATER MANAGEMENT SER VICES, INC 250 JOHN KNOX RD. #4 TALLAHASSEE, FL 32303 02434-000 P-0038200 $2,882.83 SUMMIT OUTDOOR ADVERTIS ING INC 1626 CRAWFORDVILLE HIGH WAY UNIT B CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 02469-000 P-0038300 $650.89 PANHANDLE ICE HOUSE LLC JASON CHEEK 221 W HIBISCUS STE 271 MELBOURNE, FL 32901 02470-000 P-0039900 $1,418.19 ANCHOR REALTY & MORTGAGE CO. 119 FRANKLIN BLVD. ST GEORGE ISLAND, FL 32328 03015-000 P-0042600 $1,611.36 GULF STATE BANK ST GEORGE ISLAND BRANCH PO BOX 488 APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 03287-000 P-0044700 $310.47 ST GEORGE INN 135 FRANKLIN BLVD ST GEORGE ISLAND, FL 32328 03474-000 P-0044800 $4,103.02 ST GEO ISLAND UTILITIES CO 250 JOHN KNOX ROAD SUITE #4 TALLAHASSEE, FL 32303 03475-000 P-0057400 $98.01 POOL SENSATIONS LLC KATHLEEN OSTYNSKI 2974 ARENDEL DR LAWRENCEVILLE, GA 30044-3579 03848-000 P-0060800 $2,049.55 SAPP BROS CONTRACTING LLC PO BOX 621 CARRABELLE, FL 32322 03892-000 P-0060900 $543.66 PANHANDLE ICE HOUSE LLC JASON CHEEK 221 W HIBISCUS BLVD STE 271 MELBOURNE, FL 32901 03893-000 P-0063800 $855.31 PANHANDLE ICE HOUSE JASON CHEEK 221 W HIBISCUS BLVD STE 271 MELBOURNE, FL 32901 03929-000 Many Other Prizes Entry Fee: 17 years and up $25 16 years and younger $15 Free T-Shirt with every entry SATURDAY, JUNE 9TH Proceeds go to Apalachicola Bay Charter School BILL MILLER REALTY 850-697-3751 (3310) 570-0658 400 PLUS COMM. 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Coupon Expires: 6-30-12 FREE EYE EXAM CODE: AP00 Darren Payne, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon Lee Mullis, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon Todd Robinson, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon mean it goes up or down (from the estimate) a little bit, 1 to 2 percent, she said. We went ahead and gave them the big blow. Franklin Countys tax base has been on a steady decline since 2006, when it was more than twice its current size. The last time the countys tax base was this small was in 2003, when it stood at $1.62 billion. Commissioner Cheryl Sanders signaled the dilemma that faces commissioners when they begin the budget debate next month. In July there will have to be budget cuts, she said. There are things we havent cut yet. Pierce noted that the departments under the commissioners direct control have absorbed most of the cuts made in recent years,. Sanders said she was shocked to see waterfront land selling for less than $10,000 per acre. Pendleton underscored her point, noting that banks had resumed ownership of much of the waterfront land. She cited an example in Eastpoint, right off Magnolia Bluff, where property that sold in 2006 for $125,000 an acre was now available for $12,500. Pendleton suggested the drop in the countys tax base might be even steeper if her office was able to use the results of foreclosures, short sales and banks sales in their calculations, which the state does not allow. They say that is not the true market, she said. In some aspects theyre holding their own but in others theyre losing their pants. Pendleton secured permission from the commissioners to use ACS to help in tracking down property owners who may have secured more than one homestead exemption, either in Florida or in other states. They have offered us that they can go nationwide and try to find dual homesteaders, she said. They will take our database and run it through their system and they can find if they are filing somewhere else. Right now were actually working off of tipsters, she said. Sometimes the tipster was not correct and sometimes they were. ACS charges the county 22 percent of what is eventually collected by the tax collectors office. You can go back 10 years and charge interest and penalties, plus they lose their cap, Pendleton said, estimating that the county can recoup 65 percent, plus back taxes. Weve had people to pay us $30,000-$40,000 if they go back 10 years, she said, noting that it is her offices job to make the ultimate determination on whether a property owner is dual homesteaded. TAX BASE from page A1 businesses. The companys print portfolio includes approximately 100 publications, including 20 daily newspapers, weekly newspapers, plus ancillary magazines and other specialty publications. The companys news, information and entertainment websites and mobile applications complement its print properties. For more information, visit www.freedom.com. Founded in 2010, Halifax Media is headquartered in Daytona Beach. The companys investment group includes Stephens Capital Partners, JAARSSS Media, and Redding Investments. The group consists of 16 publications in six states, primarily situated in the Southeast. Halifax Medias strategy is to invest long-term capital in quality companies positioned in strong markets that are closely connected to the community. SALE from page A1 County Commissioner District 3. My my, time ies by so fast. My past experience as an Apalachicola city commissioner for four years has prepared me for this opportunity, wanting to serve the people of Franklin County as County Commissioner in District 3. I am a graduate of Apalachicola High School. I also attended Jacksonville Junior College, where I studied fashion merchandising and later attended Gulf Coast Community College and became a graduate certi ed as correctional of cer/law enforcement. I have maintained my license for approximately 30 years. I worked at the Franklin County Sheriffs Department and was later employed with the largest employer in the state of Florida, the Florida Department of Corrections. I have experienced change while under several secretaries of the Department of Corrections. My career began as a correctional of cer and I of cially retired as a correctional ofcer captain. I know what it is to protect and serve the public, I understand the budget process. I know what it is and how to reach out to the disadvantaged children and adults. As a past commissioner I became involved in the growth and development of our unique area. This required accountability, responsibility and integrity. There are times when you will need someone on the payroll from whom you can receive assistance. This could be that place. I know what hard work and devotion means. I know what it is to serve, having lived, worked, and worshiped in Franklin County. I truly value our culture and at the same time understand we must move forward, building a future for our generations and for those who desire to live in this community. I will advocate and push to preserve and protect our way of life. This requires hard work to ensure improvement and that fair practices for equal employment are available to all of our citizens. Im ready to get back to working for the people of Franklin County. I know I can make an impact on our present economical condition. May God direct our lives to helping those in our community and our nation. Valentina R. Webb welcomes questions. She can be reached by phone at 370-0116 or by email at thewebb@ fairpoint.net. WEBB from page A1

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Local A6 | The Times Thursday, June 7, 2012 BAYVIEW HOME ST. GEOR G E IS LAND 3BR/2BA home in the bayfront community, East Bay Estates. Enjoy the community pool and dock overlooking the bay. Popular rental home with repeats! New deck just built, beach access right across the street! ML S# 246740....................$429,000 Travis Stanley 850.653.6477 Grayson Shepard 850.653.6718 Leon Teat 850.653.5656 Sandy Mitchem 850.899.8300 NEW LISTI N G! GREATER A PALACHICOLA 4BR/2BA on 1/3 acre lot with above ground pool. Many upgrades and new features tankless water heater, new plumbing, city water, updated kitchen, new carpet, windows, doors. ML S#245923..................$149,500 CAT POINT EA S TPOINT 2.63 acres of gorgeous bay view property on Cat Point. White sandy beach on the Apalachicola Bay. ML S# 245189................$290,000 GREATER A PALACHICOLA acre on the corner of Bluff Rd and Big Oaks just 1 mile drive to the Pine Log boat ramp. Zoned R-4 Single Family Home Industry. Beautiful cleared lot with some mature shade trees. ML S#247086....................$40,000 COMMERCIAL S T G EOR G E I S LAND Excellent location for 1500 square feet of commercial space in the heart of the island. Corner location on Franklin & Gulf Beach Dr high visibility! Also available for LONG TERM LEASE call for details. ML S#244926..................$339,000 NEW LISTI N G! ALSO FOR L E A SE! B AYVIEW ST. GEOR G E IS LAND 3BR 3BA located in the heart of the island, walking distance to all shops/restaurants. Screened porches, great bay views! ML S#240643...............$270,000 Graduating students know their ABCs By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star .com The Apalachicola Bay Charter School last week ended the school year with three graduations ceremonies that marked important transitions for young students. On May 29, 35 kindergarten students spread their wings to tackle elementary school. Graduates from Lena Allens class were Hannah Grace Abel, Cody Abercrombie, Peyton Blackburn, LeLand Flowers, Trinity Creamer, Maya Itzkovitz, Reece Juno, Kristian Kilpatrick, William Luberto, Taylor Mallon, Lucy Neill, Kamryn Noblit, Malic ONeal, Landon Schoelles, Reagen Solomon, Weston Taranto and Jostyn Tipton. In Heather Friedmans class, graduating were Esteban Bernabe, Alonna Brown, Austin Chapman, Caelyn Constantine, C.J. Conway, Andie Hutchins, Preston McClain, Alexia McNair, Ryan Mills, Landrick Moore, Jentzen Odom, Taylor Pendleton, Isabella Price, Jhamere Rhodes, Joel Taylor Jr., Aubrie Thompson, Josalyn Ward and Jayla White. Most popular career choices with graduates were teacher and police of cer, but several mentioned other jobs including doctor, scientist, boat driver, heat and air conditioning technician and oysterman. Twenty-nine fth-grade Eagles soared into middle school this year including Janacia Bunyon, Grayson Constantine, Madison Coulter, Chloe Davis, Kevin Flores, Damien Freeman, Haley Gay, Angel Henning, Steven Hicks, Jaiden Hill, Alexus Johnson, Bryce Kent, Sophia Kirvin, Ian Lashley, Jan-Michael Lowe, Scout McLemore, Connor Messer, Karo-Lynn Myers, Christopher Newell, Daijon Penamon, Haley Scott, Cole Smith, Gabriel Smith, Brandon Taranto, Gage Thornton, Adria Valenzuela, Ethan Vonier, Rebecca Willis and Sean Williams. Honor roll students with all As for fth grade were Willis, Constantine, McLemore and Davis. AB honor roll students were Kirvin, Kent, Johnson, Flores, Lowe and Messer. The highest grade point average in reading was achieved by Lowe; Constantine had the second highest. In math, the order was reversed, as Constantine took top honors with Lowe in second place. McLemore had the top score in science, and Constantine held second place. Constantine had the highest average in social studies with Valenzuela in second place. Constantine had the highest average in both language arts and writing. Davis took second place in writing and there was a three-way tie for second in language arts between Davis, Johnson and Messer. The eighth-grade class graduating this year also had 29 students. Heading for high school are Chance Bar eld, Charles Bond, Ronald Bryant, Alyssa Creamer, Celest Creamer, Mackenzie Davis, Chanelle Ducker, Adriane Elliot, Brianna En nger, Vailan Gibbs, Kaleigh Hardy, Amber Henning, Glory Miller, Sydney Moore, Skylah Obee, Christian Page, Brooke Parker, Joshua Patriotis, Haley Pouncey, Jacquelyn Ramsey, Quinnaland Rhodes, Steven Russell, Alexis Shiver, Robert Shiver, Edmund Strickland, Xuripha Tiller, Kaylin Weiler, John C. White and Myah Wise. AB honor roll students were Patriotis, Bond, Davis, Rhodes, Moore, Weiler, White, Robert Shiver, Ramsey and Obee. The highest average in math was achieved by White, with Moore tying for second highest. Patriotis had the highest average in both algebra and science. Second in science was Obee and in algebra Robert Shiver. White had the highest average in social studies and Patriotis second highest. Patriotis was rst in language arts, and Bar eld took top honors in reading. For galleries of ABC graduation 2012, visit www. apalachtimes. com. LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Grayson Constantines grade point average was in the top two for his class in every subject, requiring mom and dad, Deidre and Nick, to help him display his bumper crop of awards. Right, Jayla White was the last student to accept her diploma during last weeks kindergarten graduation at ABC School. place in writing and there was a three-way tie for second in language arts between Davis, Johnson and Messer. The eighth-grade class graduating this year also had 29 students. Heading for high school are Chance Bar eld, Charles Bond, Ronald Bryant, Alyssa Creamer, Celest Creamer, Mackenzie Davis, Chanelle Ducker, Adriane Elliot, Brianna En nger, Vailan Gibbs, Kaleigh Hardy, Amber HenJoshua Patriotis, Haley Pouncey, Jacquelyn Ramsey, Quinnaland Rhodes, Steven Russell, in reading. For galleries of ABC graduation 2012, visit www. apalachtimes. com. Monday through Friday 8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Saturday 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m Eugene Charbonneau, DO Susan Hardin, ARNP Dana Whaley, ARNP 110 NE 5th Street Carrabelle, Florida

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The Times | A7 Thursday, June 7, 2012 Oyster harvest now includes weekends Starting June 1, Apalachicola oysters can be commercially harvested seven days a week throughout the year. Previously, commercial harvest was not allowed on Fridays and Saturdays from June 1 through Aug. 31 and on Saturdays and Sundays from Sept. 1 through Nov. 15. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission approved this change at its February meeting. This increased harvesting opportunity comes in response to public health management changes made by the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services in 2010. These changes signicantly reduced the number of hours available for harvest each day during the warmer months of the year. The seven-day work week will allow Apalachicola Bay oyster harvesters the ability to make up for time lost harvesting. This action by FWC was supported by the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. Scott appoints Alter to NWFWMD In April, Governor Rick Scott announced the appointment of John W. Alter to the ApalachicolaChipola-Lower Chattahoochee River Basin seat on the governing board of the Northwest Florida Water Management District. Alter, 75, of Malone, is a retired public relations executive and manages Alter-Bevis Farms, which was designated as a Florida Stewardship Forest in 2000. Recognized as Florida District One Tree Farmer of the Year in 2008, he was interim executive director of the Jackson County Chamber of Commerce in 1999. A Navy veteran, he received a bachelors degree from Ohio University and a masters degree from Villanova University. He succeeds Philip McMillan and is appointed for a term beginning April 25, 2012, and ending March 1, 2015. The appointment is subject to conrmation by the Florida Senate. Law BRIEFS ARREST REPORT The following report is provided by the Franklin County Sheriffs Ofce. Arrests in this report were made by ofcers from the Apalachicola Police Department (APD), Carrabelle Police Department (CPD), Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC), Florida Highway Patrol (FHP) and Franklin County Sheriffs Ofce (FCSO). All defendants are to be considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law. May 22 Claude F. Banks, Jr., 27, Apalachicola, aggravated battery pregnant victim (FCSO) (Editors note: This entry is a correction over last weeks item, which contained an erroneous age for the defendant) May 25 Stephen R. Pearson, 42, Carrabelle, domestic battery (FCSO) Robert R. Osburn, Jr., 20, Apalachicola, possession of cannabis less than 20 grams, possession of a controlled substance and possession of paraphernalia (FCSO) Frankie J. Crosby, 27, Eastpoint, sale or possession of a controlled substance within 1,000 feet of a church, possession of a controlled substance and violation of probation (FCSO) May 26 Fredrick T. Reynolds, 51, Carrabelle, driving while license suspended or revoked (APD) Reginald D. Giddens, 33, Apalachicola, boating under the inuence (FWC) May 27 Carmia L. Lee, 31, Panama City, disorderly intoxication and resisting ofcer without violence (APD) Kevin D. Hurley, 22, Crawfordville, DUI (CPD) Teresa Carr, 19, Apalachicola, domestic battery (APD) Patricia D. Jones, 48, Apalachicola, domestic battery (APD) Zachary E. Jones, 20, Apalachicola, domestic battery (APD) Michael W. Monteith, 27, Crawfordville, boating under the inuence (FWC) Rodney K. Trotman, 64, Tallahassee, boating under the inuence (FWC) Dustin C. Shahan, Jr., 22, Carrabelle, Collier County warrant for failure to appear (FCSO) May 28 Allan H. Gray, 26, Tallahassee, Leon County warrant for violation of probation (FCSO) Mary F. Beaty, 48, Crawfordville, principal in the rst degree sale or possession of a controlled substance with intent to sell within 1,0000 feet of a park, possession of a controlled substance, two counts delivery of a controlled substance and possession of paraphernalia (FHP) Michelle D. Provenzano, 47, Eastpoint, child neglect (FCSO) Thomas Pascual, 22, Apalachicola, disorderly intoxication (APD) May 29 Mary R. Nowling, 24, Eastpoint, violation of probation (FCSO) May 30 Keijuan M. Sims, 24, Port St. Joe, domestic battery and violation of repeat violence injunction (APD) Lenanya Morris, 20, Apalachicola, domestic battery (APD) Linda Hunter, 55, Alligator Point, violation of probation (FCSO) Chester A. Morris, 43, Tallahassee, possession of a controlled substance (FCSO) May 31 Stephen R. Pearson, 42, Carrabelle, DUI (CPD) Hardy G. King, 53, Apalachicola, failure to appear (FCSO) June 1 Sharon Teters, 35, Carrabelle, DUI (FWC) Christopher R. Richards, 32, Apalachicola, battery (FCSO) Johnny B. Tyson, 38, Monticello, violation of probation (FCSO) 2011 Annual Drinking Water Quality Report Alligator Point Water Resource District We are pleased to present to you this years Annual Water Quality Report. This report is designed to inform you about the quality water and services we deliver to you every day. Our constant goal is to provide you with a safe and dependable supply of drinking water. We want you to understand the efforts we make to continually improve the water treatment process and protect our water resources. We are committed to ensuring the quality of your drinking water. Our water source is ground water from six wells drawn from the Floridan Aquifer. Because of the excellent quality of our water, the only treatments required are chlorine for disinfection purposes and Aquamag, which is a polyphosphate compound injected as a sequestering agent that neutralizes scale and corrosion. In 2011 the Department of Environmental Protection performed a Source Water Assessment on our system and a search of the data sources indicated no potential sources of con If you have any questions about this report or concerning your water utility, please contact Alligator Point Water Resource District (APWRD), Deanna Murphy at (850) 349-2274. We encourage our valued customers to be informed about their water utility. If you want to learn more, please attend any of our regularly scheduled meetings. They are held monthly on the third Saturday of each month at 9:00 a.m., at th Alligator Point routinely monitors for contaminants in your drinking water according to Federal and State laws, rules, and regulations. Except where indicated otherwise, this report is based on the results of our monitoring for the period of January 1 to December 31, 2011. Data obtained before January 1, 2011, and presented in this report are from the most recent testing done in accordance with the laws, rules, and regulations. Action Level (AL) : The concentration of a contaminant which, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements that a water system must follow. Initial Distribution System Evaluation (IDSE) : An important part of the Stage 2 Disinfection Byproducts Rule (DBPR). The IDSE is a one-time study conducted by water systems to identify distribution system locations with high concentrations of trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acids (HAAs). Water systems will use results from the IDSE, in conjunction with their Stage 1 DBPR compliance monitoring data, to select compliance monitoring locations for the Stage 2 DB PR. Maximum Contaminant Level or MCL: The highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCLs are set as close to the MCLGs as feasible using the best available treatment technology. Maximum Contaminant Level Goal or MCLG: The level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MCLGs allow for a margin of safety. Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level or MRDL: The highest level of a disinfectant allowed in drinking water. There is convincing evidence that addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control of microbial contaminants. Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level Goal or MRDLG: The level of a drinking water disinfectant below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MRDLGs do icrobial contaminants. Non-Applicable (N/A): Does not apply Non-Detect (ND): means not detected and indicates that the substance was not found by laboratory analysis. Parts per million (ppm) or Milligrams per liter (mg/l): one part by weight of analyte to 1 million parts by weight of the water sample. one part by weight of analyte to 1 billion parts by weight of the water sample. Picocurie per liter (pCi/L): measure of the radioactivity in water. If present, elevated levels of lead can cause serious health problems, especially for pregnant women and young children. Lead in drinking water is primarily from materials and components associated with service lines and home plumbing. APWRD is responsible for providing high quality drinking water, but cannot control the variety of materials used before using water for drinking or cooking. If you are concerned about lead in your water, you may wish to have your water tested. Information on lead in drinking water, testing methods, and steps you can take to minimize exposure is availab While your drinking water meets EPAs standard for arsenic, it does contain low levels of arsenic. EPAs standard balances the current understanding of arsenics possible health effects against the costs of removing arsenic from drinking water. EPA continues to research the health effects of low levels of arsenic, which is a mineral known to cause cancer in humans at high concentrations and is linked to other health effects such as skin damage and circulatory problems. The State of Florida Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) sets drinking water standard for secondary contaminants and has determined that Chloride and Total Dis solved Solids are aesthetic concerns at certain levels of exposure. Chloride and Total Dissolved Solids were sampled in August 2009 and were found in higher levels than are allowed by the State (MCL violations). Chloride and Total Dissolved Solids, as secondary drinking water contaminants, do not pose a health risk. We will continue to sample as required by rule. The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells. As water travels over the surface of the land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human activity. Contaminants that may be present in source water include: (A) Microbial contaminants, such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricult ural livestock operations, and wildlife. (B) Inorganic contaminants, such as salts and metals, which can be naturally-occurring or result from urban stormwater runoff, industrial or domestic wastewater discharges, oil and gas production, mining, or farming. (C) Pesticides and herbicides, which may come from a variety of sources such as agriculture, urban stormwater runoff, and residential uses. (D) Organic chemical contaminants, including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals, which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can also come from gas stations, urban stormwater runoff, and septic systems. Page 4 of 4 (E) Radioactive contaminants, which can be naturally occurring or be the result of oil and gas production and mining activities In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, the EPA prescribes regulations, which limit the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water, which must provide the same protection for public health. Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that the water poses a health risk. More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the Environmental Protection Agencys Safe Drinking Water Hotline at 1-800-426-4791. Thank you for allowing us to continue providing your family with clean, quality water this year. In order to maintain a safe and dependable water supply, we sometimes need to Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population. Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer un dergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk from infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by Cryptosporidium and other microbiological contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800-426-4791). We work to provide top quality water to every tap. We ask that all our customers help us protect our water sources, which are the heart of our community, our way of life and our childrens future. If you have any questions or concerns about the information provided, please feel free to call any of the numbers listed. Enforcement

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PET OF THE WEEK Franklin County Humane Society Qualications: Expertise in: Now Accepting Appointments Call Toll Free 888-681-5864 For more info www.seclung.com Lung Disease Specialist Rob Garver, MD Now Seeing Patients in Port St. Joe NOW BCBS-FL I N -NETWORK PROV I DER Society A8 | The Times Thursday, June 7, 2012 Births Bronson Cade Copeland born Christian and Colin would like to announce the birth of their baby brother, Bronson Cade Copeland! Cade was born Tuesday, May 8, 2012, in Tallahassee. He was 20 inches long and weighed 6 pounds, 3 ounces. Cades parents are Ron and Melanie Copeland, of Apalachicola. His maternal grandparents are Annette and the late George Martina, of Apalachicola. His paternal grandparents are Theresa C. Melton and the late Ronald Copeland, Sr., of Hartsville, S.C. Chelsea Grace Martina born Big brother Chance Martina is proud to announce the birth of his baby sister, Chelsea Grace Martina. Chelsea Grace was born Wednesday, March 7, 2012, at Gulf Coast Hospital in Panama City at 4:30 a.m. weighing 7 pounds, 6.3 ounces and was 19 inches long. She is the daughter of Tyler and Terress Martina, of Apalachicola. Maternal grandparents are Terry Faircloth, of Eastpoint, and Tammie Cline, of Apalachicola. Paternal grandparents are Kevin and Patty Martina, of Apalachicola. Birthday Miller baby shower Saturday A baby girl shower for the upcoming new arrival for Laura Jackson Miller and John Miller will be Saturday, June 9 at 3 p.m. at the Masonic Lodge, 108 N.E. First St., in Carrabelle. The Millers are listed on the gift registry at Target and at BabiesRUs. For more information, call 697-2766 or 404-245-3330. USF honors Barnhill for public health work JaNya Bell turns 1 JaNya Denyse Bell celebrated her rst birthday on Saturday, May 26, with a pool party at her grandparents house. JaNya is the daughter of Tanicia Pugh and Courtney Bell, of Apalachicola, and sister of Jamal and Maleah. Her maternal grandparents are James and Alma Pugh, of Apalachicola. Her paternal grandmother is the late Karen Denyse Bell. Paternal great-grandparents are Rosa Tolliver, of Apalachicola, and Joseph Bell, of West Palm Beach. A special thank you to godmother Tamara Robinson, and family and friends, for making her birthday party so very special. Special to the Times Pam Nobles students will trip the light fantastic in a double-barreled dance recital at 1:09 and 6:09 p.m. Saturday, June 9, at the Dixie Theatre in Apalachicola. Acclaimed dancer and choreographer Scott Benson returns for the 31st annual event. Tickets are $8 pre-sale or $10 at the door. Call 653-8078. Doors open 45 minutes before each show. Dazzling dancers in the Shop Till You Drop theme include scholarship recipients Erin White, $2,000, and Montez Walker, $200. White and Walker will dazzle in Shopping for Shoes, with dancers Brooke Moore, Jackie Collinsworth, Amber Henning and Megan Gannon. The pair also will show off their star quality in other blockbuster numbers including The Dance Shop, Money for the Mall and CD Store FYE. White, who has studied dance with Pam Nobles Studio for 14 years, graduated from Port St. Joe High School with honors in May. She was an active member in Mu Alpha Theta and National Honor Society, and was senior class president. She said she plans to attend Troy University and major in business with a minor in Spanish. She will continue dance throughout college and hopes to join the Troy University Dance Team. Bensons dance career of more than 30 years has taken him all over the world to choreograph and perform with such artists as Michael Jackson, Pink, Aerosmith, Alice Cooper, Madonna, Sting, John Travolta, Bruce Willis, Tom Selleck, Paula Abdul, Reba McEntire and Tom Hanks, to name a few. He has been both in front of and behind the camera in countless television shows and commercials, including Scrubs, Jay Leno, The Academy Awards, The Super Bowl, Sea Doo/Ski Doo, Ebay, Hurley, and Visa. Some of his lm credits include Pirates of the Caribbean, Forrest Gump, Perfect and The Mask. Local celebrities getting into glittering footwork in Western Wear, include County Commissioner Noah Lockley, Superintendent Nina Marks, School Board Member Teresa Ann Martin, and candidates Cliff Carroll, Pam Shiver and Valentina Webb. Special awards go to dancers for three years, Meredith Alford, Eve Bond, Emily Gay, MacKenzie King, Shaylee Martina, Gracyn Paul, Olivia Poloronis and Kylee Smith; six years, Ella Friedman; 11 years, Holly Chambers; 12 years, Patricia Perryman; 14 years, Erin White; 17 years, Linda Grif n; 22 years, Bonnie Smith; 23 years, Linda Maloy; 25 years, Rita Theis; 26 years, Debby Ruffner; and 29 years, June Gray. Since beginning in 1981 as Horizon Twirlers, Pam Nobles Dance Studio has helped bring out amazing talent in hundreds of students. Happily tip-toeing through their favorite shopping malls Saturday are 75 dancers, showing off The Crystal Connection, The Crocdocshop, Gymboree, Toys R Us and many more. Dancers, in addition to those already mentioned, include Meredith Alford, Bailey Allen, Makenna Barber, Wanda Bar eld, Olivia Barineau, Trinity Barron, Kaydence Bartley, Macey Rae Benton, Jamison Broker, Kassidy Denney, Sara Beasley Flowers, Marissa Gilbert, Zariah Harvey, Kaylee Hicks, Janalyn Hippenseal, Bianca Huber, Bradlyn Hutchins, Calayia Jones, Harmony Jones, Brooklyn Klink, Skylar Layne, Kelsey Martina, Myia Maxwell, Ella McClain, Khali McNair, Livia Monod, Georgia Page, Emily Patterson, Grace Patterson, Javena Pearson, Jaliyah Rochelle, Dezmonae Sanders, Jalynn Segree, Kaylee Segree, Valerie Shattuck, Lyndsey Stiefel, Shalynn Suddeth, Jaelyn Tipton, Jostyn Tipton, Krista Varnes, Mabry Wallace, Jossalyn Ward, Paisley White, Maddisson Whitten and Sophia Zingarelli. Nobles dancers to Shop Til You Drop! Pam Nobles dancers won a Gold Award in recent competition. Special to the Times The University of South Floridas College of Public Health bestows the Florida Outstanding Woman in Public Health award each year to a woman whose career accomplishments and leadership have contributed signi cantly to the eld of public health in Florida. Kim Barnhill, interim director of the Franklin County Health Department, was honored at an awards ceremony April 4, in the colleges Samuel P. Bell III Auditorium, part of a week of events surrounding the celebration of National Public Health Week. Barnhill, who also is administrator for the Jefferson County and Madison County health departments, is known as a vigorous public health advocate. She led initiatives that increased access to dental care, including one that is now in the works in Franklin County. Barnhill also has worked to increase healthcare access for uninsured Floridians who fell between the cracks by creating a volunteer service provider network that provides more than $1 billion in donated health services. In his nomination letter, Michael Napier, administrator for the Seminole County Health Department, wrote that Barnhill is highly respected by her staff, her community and her peers as an action oriented, passion driven public health advocate. She often is sought out for her knowledge and opinions on everything from legislation, management issues and dealing with complex problems. You often will nd her working from early morning to late at night and on weekends moving the public health agenda forward. It is rare to nd someone with such passion in the eld of public health that is coupled with knowledge and experiential practice who have affected so many people in our state, he wrote. Earlier in her career, Barnhill planned and directed preventive dental care program for 37 counties, provided consultation for 106 community uoridation programs, managed the development of new programs, and assisted in conducting and analyzing needs assessment surveys. In 1996, Barnhill shifted her focus towards tapping into local community volunteer service providers, such as the Florida Medical Association, Florida Board of Medicine and Florida Hospital Association, to form volunteer teams to meet the needs of these uninsured Floridians. Now considered a model program, the Volunteer Health Care Provider Program provides more than $1 billion in donated health services. She then became director of Statewide Services in 2000, providing management and planning for all 67 county health departments in the state. In that job, she became involved in the legislative process as a registered lobbyist, planned programs, worked with the budget process and developed outcome measures. Barnhill graduated cum laude from Florida State University with a bachelors degree in health education. She also earned her masters in adult education (gerontology) and a masters in public health from FSU. She has been an active member of the Florida Association of County Health Of cers, serving as president in 2008 and currently serving as a board member at large. The Florida Outstanding Woman in Public Health Award was initiated by USF in 1988, and nominations are solicited from public health practitioners across the state. KIM BARNHILL

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The Times | A9 Thursday, June 7, 2012 The United Methodist Churches of Franklin County Welcome You First United Methodist Church of Apalachicola Worship Service 11:00 a.m. every Sunday Sunday School 10:00 a.m. 75 5 th St. Apalachicola 653-9530 fumcapalach@gtcom.net Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis Carrabelle United Methodist Church Worship Services 10:45 a.m. Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Celebrate Recovery Mondays 7-9 p.m. 102 NE Ave. B Carrabelle 697-3672 Pastor: Julie Stephens Eastpoint United Methodist Church Worship Service 10:00 a.m. every Sunday Healing service every fourth Monday at 7:00 p.m. 317 Patton Dr. (corner of David St.) 670-8825 Pastor: Rev. Beth White St. George Island United Methodist Church 9:00 a.m. Worship Service 10:00 a.m. Fellowship Hour 201 E. Gulf Beach Dr. 9274635 www.sgiumc.org Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis First Pentecostal Holiness Church 379 Brownsville Road Apalachicola Were excited about what Gods doing!!! Sunday School 9:45 am Sunday Morning Worship 10:45 am Sunday Evening Service 6:00 pm Monday, Youth Group 6:30 pm Wednesday, Royal Rangers, G.A.P. 7:00 pm Wednesday Worship & Word 7:30 pm Nursery Provided during regular church services 7:00 7:00 First Baptist Church St. George Island 501 E. Bayshore Drive 927-2257 R. Michael Waley, Pastor Join us as we praise and worship the living Christ. Great is the Lord and most worthy of praise. Psalm 145:3 Sunday Bible Study ................................................ 10:00am Worship Praise ........................................................ 11:00am Sunday Night ............................................................ 7:00pm Wednesday Power Hour ...................................... 7:00pm Wednesday Youth at S.P.L.A.S.H ....................... 7:00pm Walking in Christ R. Michael Whaley, Pastor WELCOMES YOU Church of the Ascension 101 NE First Street Carrabelle SUNDAY 10:00 AM WELCOMES YOU Church THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH (850) 274-4490 (850) 545-2578 WELCOMES YOU Trinity Trinity Episcopal Church est. 1836 Welcomes You Hwy. 98 & 6th St. Apalachicola 850-653-9550 Sunday Worship Services 8 & 10:30 a.m. Wednesdays Healing Service 11 a.m. Centering Prayer 4 p.m. Sunday Worship Services 8 & 10:30 a.m. Wednesdays Healing Service 11 a.m. Centering Prayer 4 p.m. Friday survivor lap opens Relay for Life Walkers will go around the clock in the battle against cancer when the American Cancer Societys Relay for Life of Franklin County open this Friday, June 8, at 6 p.m. at Pop Wagoner Stadium, the former Apalachicola High School football stadium. The survivor lap will begin at 6:30 p.m. followed by a survivor/caregiver meal provided by Tamaras Caf served at 6:45 p.m. Register as a survivor or caregiver and receive your T-shirt! For more information, please call local event chair Chala Parish at 370-0832 or your American Cancer Society at 850-785-9205 x3509. Entertainment will go on throughout the evening and into the morning, featuring such great acts as George Pruett and family, Ashley Carroll, Angel Stephens, Carrabelle Christian Center, Righteous Kind and much more. Dont forget to purchase lumanarias in honor, support or memory of your loved one or friend affected by cancer. In the event of rain, have no fear; rain contingency is the former Apalachicola High School gymnasium. Relay is a unique opportunity for our community to come together to celebrate people who have battled cancer, remember those weve lost and ght back against the disease, Parish said. Many of the participants are cancer survivors, which serves as a reminder that our community is not immune to this disease and that by participating in relay, we are joining with the American Cancer Societys efforts to create a world with less cancer and more birthdays. Please come out and have a great time. Re:Action Dodgeball Games this Saturday The Re:Action youth group, a nondenominational youth ministry, for sixth through eighth graders of the Apalachicola-St. George Island Cooperative Parish of the United Methodist Church, is hosting the rst Dodgeball Games tournament this Saturday, June 9, at the ABC School. Times for the annual event are 2-5 p.m., with three categories: elementary, middle and high school. The participation fee is $3 and spectator fee is $5. All proceeds go to fund the youth to attend The Gate conference in Charleston, W. Va. To sign up, email Adam Cannon at adamcannonmusic@ gmail.com or sign up at the eld the day of the tournament. Covenant Word plans Fathers Day weekend Covenant Word Christian Center International, at 15812th street in Apalachicola, will host a Fathers Day Prophetic Weekend beginning Friday, June 15, at 7 p.m., with an Impartation Service on Saturday morning, June 16 at 11 a.m. Prophet Bill Johnson from Restoration Life Church in Tallahassee will be our guest minister who moves in a powerful anointing of God in the Prophetic. Come out in faith believing you will receive a lifechanging word and/or impartation on these two power-packed days. Panacea church hosts Gaballi Taste Sampler The Ochlockonee Bay United Methodist Church, at 2780 Surf Road in Panacea, will hold a Taste Sampler of Gaballi Foods, on Saturday, June 16, from 9 a.m. to noon. Gaballi is a faith-based non-denominational organization that provides boxes of top quality fruits and vegetables at a 30 to 70 percent savings from the current national retail prices. Please visit www.obayumc.com or www.gaballi.com or call 850-984-0127 for further information. Faith BRIEFS Ill be looking for you Thursday at our weekly lunch at the Franklin County Senior Center. Serving begins at noon. A minimum donation of $3 is required. We almost always have a guest speaker and the drawings for door prizes and a cake to raf e off. Please come join us, have a good lunch and cool off! Hamburgers and chips are served at Camp Gordon Johnston American Legion Post 82, 2367 Oak Street, here in the village. Orders are taken from 5-7 p.m. Yum, yum! A donation of $6 will be collected at the bar. Come OLIVIER MONOD | Special to the Times Celebration of First Communion for 13 youth, ages 7 and 8, took place Sunday at St. Patrick Catholic Church in Apalachicola. This marked a young persons rst reception of the sacrament of the Holy Eucharist, where they receive from the priest the body and blood of Jesus Christ in the form of bread and wine. Receiving their First Communion were Krista Kelley, Katie Newman, Haley Miller, Abby Johnson, Meredith Alford, Jasmine Richards, Caden Turrell, Zach Riccard, Carson Davis, Nico Valenzuela, Nathan Richards, Josh Banico and Andrew Monod, pictured above with Father Roger Latosynski. Charles Chris Seward Allen, 53, of St. Marks, passed away Saturday, June 2, in St. Marks. He was born Sept. 14, 1958 in Ocala. The family moved to Apalachicola in 1960. He was a self-employed aquatic horticulturist. He attended River of Life Church in Crawfordville. He enjoyed shing and hunting. He was a member of the Christian Motorcycle Association and ABATE. Chris loved his daughters more than anything and loved his animals too. In lieu of owers, please make donations to Florida Wild Mammal Association (FWMA), 198 Edgar Poole Road, Crawfordville, FL 32327. Memorial services will be Saturday, June 9, at 11 a.m. at River of Life Church, Crawfordville. He is survived by two daughters, Nicole Anne Allen and Hannah Dane Allen, of Wakulla County, and their mother, Stephanie Kaye Allen; father Virgil Jerome Allen, of Apalachicola; brother Clifford Allen, Apalachicola; sisters Bonnie Jean Allen, Wakulla and Terra Carni, Gainesville, and her children, William David Carni III and Shannon J. Carni. He is predeceased by his mother, Anne OQuinn Allen. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel, Crawfordville is assisting with arrangements. CHRIS ALLEN LANARK NEWS Jim Welsh East Point Church of God 379 Avenue A Eastpoint, FL Saturday, June 9th 7:00 p.m. Sunday, June 10th 11:00 a.m. & 6:00 p.m. For More Information: Call: (850) 323-1206 and enjoy the evening with us. We have a pool table, shuf eboard, bar bingo, pull-tabs, or you can just enjoy the fellowship. Oh yes, we have three largescreen televisions, too. Pizza, pizza, pizza is featured every Sunday night at Camp Gordon Johnston American Legion Post 82. Eat-in by the slice is $1, and eat-in a whole pizza is $8, while pizza take out is $10. And as always, everyone welcome! Our monthly pancake breakfast will be served Saturday, June 16, at the Lanark Village Boat Club. Serving begins at 9 a.m. and lasts until noon. Your donation of $5 will be collected inside; fathers will eat free. See ya there! Everyone welcome! Sunday, June 17, as you know, is Fathers Day. Like our mothers, God gave us one father each, to treat with love and respect. Make sure he has a great day. Be kind to one another. Check in on the sick and housebound and keep smiling. You may not feel any better, but everyone will wonder what youre up to! Until next time, God bless America, our troops, the poor, homeless and hungry. FIRST COMMUNION Everyone welcome to weekly lunch Obituary Faith

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Special to the Times The Coastal & Marine Conservation Lecture Series continues occurs on the second Thursday of each month with a June 14 lecture in the Florida State University Coastal and Marine Lab auditorium. Slated for 7 p.m., and open to the public, this months lecture will feature Sharon McBreen, from the Pew Environment Group speaking on Conserving sh in the Southeast. Known as the American Mediterranean, the Gulf of Mexico is an economic and environmental treasure, with natural wonders and habitats ranging from an underwater Grand Canyon 12,000 feet deep to coral reefs and one of the largest contiguous seagrass beds in the Northern Hemisphere. From whales to dolphins, from osprey to brown pelicans, impor tant marine animals eat smaller sh and organisms to survive. Understand ing the role of these preys in the food web is critical to a healthy, robust ocean ecosystem. Populations of some of these small sh have plum meted, partly because bil lions have been scooped up by industrial shing to serve as ingredients in fertilizer, pet food, and other products. Depleting sh too fast risks tipping the balance of the ocean ecosystem and harming an economic engine that supports millions of people and jobs. The FSUCML, in associ ation with Second Harvest of the Big Bend, is collecting non-perishable food items at each monthly lecture. Please bring an item or two and help solve the hunger crisis in our community. The FSUCML is at 3618 Coastal Highway 98, in St. Teresa, about 10 miles east of Carrabelle just past the fork at U.S. 319 and 98, on the right. For more info, email fsucml@fsu.edu or call 697-4120, and on weekends 850-591-0224. Fish freshwater license-free Saturday To help you celebrate the State of Florida is offering two license-free recreational shing days. This Saturday, June 9, you can sh license-free in freshwater, which marks the end of National Fishing and Boating Week. Stone crab season ends The commercial and recreational harvest of stone crab claws in Florida closed May 16. This closure occurs each year during the species peak spawning season to help protect and sustain Floridas valuable stone crab resource. Stone crab claws may be possessed and sold during the closed season but only if they have been placed in inventory before May 16 by a licensed wholesale or retail dealer. Stone crab traps must be removed from the water within ve days after the close of the stone crab season Sign up for summer camp at Beau Turner The Beau Turner Youth Conservation Center in Jefferson County is offering weekly day-camp sessions this summer for youth ages 10-15 who are interested in hunting and related outdoor activities. During hunt camp, participants will learn about Floridas great hunting heritage and be taught such skills as wildlife identification, survival, first aid and tree-stand safety. Campers also will learn conservation, land stewardship and about hunting laws and ethics. Participants will spend extensive time on several gun ranges, shooting shotguns, rifles and muzzleloaders, and have the option of earning their hunter safety certification while they are at camp, if they choose to do so. There will be four weeks of camp, all during the month of June, and the sessions are June 4-8, June 11-15, June 18-22 and June 25-29. Hours are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday, and 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Fridays. The cost for each weekly session is $175, and parents may register their children at BTYCC.org. For more information, email Kelly Langston atKelly.Langston@ MyFWC.com. Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL (next to Piggly Wiggly) www.BWOsh.com May Winner: Brenda Grifes 24 1/2 Spanish Mackerel Your Hunting Headquarters This months grand prize: Penn 760 Slammer reel $149.99 Star Rod deluxe DLX20/8 $149.99 Pair of CALCUTTA sunglasses $22.99 Bluewater Outriggers GIFT CARD $100.00 JUNE FEATURE FISH: R ED S NAPPE R Stop in and register or go oline at www. B W O sh.com WEEKLY ALMANAC APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE TIDE TABLES MONTHLY AVERAGES To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from these given for APALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW Cat Point Minus 0:40 Minus 1:17 East Pass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27 To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from those given for CARRABELLE: HIGH LOW Bald Point Minus 9:16 Minus 0:03 Sponsor the WEEKLY ALMANAC Call Today! 653-8868 Date High Low % Precip Thu, June 7 86 72 40 % Fri, June 8 88 72 40 % Sat, June 9 87 73 40 % Sun, June 10 86 74 40 % Mon, June 11 87 73 60 % Tues, June 12 87 74 20 % Wed, June 13 89 75 30 % 6 We 637am 2.4 315pm 2.9 929am 2.1 1100pm -0.5 7 Th 710am 2.2 410pm 2.7 1025am 1.9 1142pm -0.3 8 Fr 739am 2.2 509pm 2.4 1129am 1.8 9 Sa 805am 2.2 615pm 2.2 1222am 0.0 1241pm 1.4 10 Su 831am 2.2 734pm 1.9 100am 0.5 158pm 1.3 11 Mo 857am 2.4 913pm 1.6 136am 0.8 314pm 1.0 12 Tu 925am 2.4 1118pm 1.6 213am 1.1 423pm 0.6 13 We 954am 2.6 254am 1.4 523pm 0.3 14 Th 125am 1.8 1026am 2.6 344am 1.6 615pm 0.0 15 Fr 249am 1.9 1100am 2.6 444am 1.8 702pm -0.2 16 Sa 341am 2.1 1137am 2.7 545am 1.9 745pm -0.3 17 Su 420am 2.2 1217pm 2.7 639am 2.1 823pm -0.3 18 Mo 452am 2.2 1258pm 2.7 727am 2.1 858pm -0.5 19 Tu 520am 2.4 140pm 2.7 809am 2.1 930pm -0.3 20 We 545am 2.4 223pm 2.7 849am 2.1 958pm -0.3 6 Su 450am 2.4 201pm 2.9 817am 1.9 929pm -0.6 7 Mo 549am 2.4 241pm 2.9 856am 2.1 1019pm -0.6 8 Tu 645am 2.4 326pm 2.9 937am 2.1 1111pm -0.5 9 We 737am 2.2 416pm 2.7 1027am 2.1 10 Th 825am 2.2 512pm 2.6 1205am -0.3 1130am 1.9 11 Fr 908am 2.2 618pm 2.2 101am 0.0 1251pm 1.8 12 Sa 945am 2.2 741pm 2.1 156am 0.2 221pm 1.6 13 Su 1018am 2.2 927pm 1.8 251am 0.5 345pm 1.3 14 Mo 1047am 2.2 1127pm 1.8 344am 0.8 454pm 0.8 15 Tu 1114am 2.4 434am 1.1 550pm 0.5 16 We 110am 1.9 1139am 2.4 520am 1.4 638pm 0.2 17 Th 226am 1.9 1204pm 2.4 603am 1.6 722pm 0.0 18 Fr 324am 2.1 1229pm 2.6 642am 1.8 801pm -0.2 19 Sa 412am 2.2 1256pm 2.6 719am 1.9 837pm -0.3 20 Su 452am 2.2 127pm 2.7 753am 1.9 911pm -0.3 Freshwater Red snapper are the main focus for the offshore guys this month. Good sized sh are coming out of 60ft of water in the M.B.A.R.A. number is Mexico Beach. Most of these sh will not be here long, so catch them during the week days before the weekend trafc is at its highest. King sh are holding good at the buoy line still, with some smaller chicken Dolphin as well. Inshore Offshore Blacks island and Pig Island are producing great trout catch es this month so far. Good ounder can be had at Towns Beach area when the tides and winds are right for gigging. Some small er trout and Spanish mackerel are coming in at the sea wall in the St. Joe Marina, but the big kings have moved out to sea. Fishing Depot creek should be productive if Shellcraker is your sh. Good numbers of shellcraker, painted bream, and smaller bass are being caught right now. Lake Wimico is also producing good shellcraker and bass on the early bite. SPONSORED BY Email outdoors news to timesoutdoors @star.com Page 10 Thursday, June 7, 2012 O UTD OO RS www.apalachtimes.com Section A Marine lab lecture June 14 on sh conservation SHANNON M c BREEN BRIEFS By Stan Kirkland Florida Wildlife Conservation Commission Phil Manor remembers the day like it was yester day. It was late spring in 1993 when he was working by himself on the Apala chicola River Wildlife and Environmental Area tear ing out a beaver dam on a wetland. Manor, who at the time had worked four years as a wildlife biologist with the Florida Game and Fresh Water Fish Commission, was almost through with his work when a 2.5to3-foot-long cottonmouth struck the index nger on his left hand. Almost imme diately his nger and hand began to throb and burn. Manor knew he had to get to a doctor. He cranked up his four-wheeler, drove himself to the Howard Creek compound and in a few minutes was at Gulf Pines Hospital in Port St. Joe. He was given ve vials of anti venin to negate the effects of the poisonous bite, but it took weeks for the swelling to go down in his left hand. Every year across the United States an estimated 7,000-8,000 people are bit ten by poisonous snakes. About ve people die from the bites, according to the Centers for Disease Con trol and Prevention. While most people see snakes around water and automatically assume they are cottonmouths, thats generally not the case, Dr. John Himes, a wildlife biol ogist with the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) said. Probably 80 percent to 90 percent of the snakes people see in and around water are harmless water snakes, Himes said. If you pick them up, they may bite because they dont like being handled, but they are not poisonous. Himes said both cotton mouths and the ve spe cies of water snakes found in the Panhandle play an important ecological role by feeding on dead or dying sh, amphibians and small invertebrates. All told, there are only six species of poisonous snakes and more than 40 non-poisonous species found in Florida. In addi tion to the cottonmouth, the list of poisonous snakes includes the canebrake rattlesnake, Eastern dia mondback, pygmy rattle snake, copperhead and coral snake. The canebrake, also called a timber rattler, is the rarest of the group. Specimens are occasional ly found in Northwest Flor ida from the Olustee area to Alachua County. Cane brakes are more common in Georgia and Alabama and Southeastern states. The more common poisonous snakes in Florida include the cotton mouth, Eastern diamond back and pygmy rattle snakes. The latter two are usually found in more rural settings where theres am ple cover. Himes said copper heads are usually found north of Highway 20 in the Panhandle and com monly in low-lying areas along creeks and rivers. He said they are expertly camouaged. Coral snakes are the only species of the group whose venom affects the central nervous system. They have small fangs, in comparison with the other poisonous snakes, and coral snake bites are fairly rare. Coral snakes are inof fensive and almost secre tive, Himes said. You nd them around yard litter or decaying leaves and such, but if a person wears gloves to do their yard work, they have nothing to fear from this snake. Although many people are afraid of all snakes, Himes said its important to remember poisonous and nonpoisonous species play an important role in the environment by preying on rats, mice, small rep tiles and amphib ians, rabbits and even each other in some cases. Himes said people, par ticularly those new to Florida and who fear snakes, should consider obtain ing a book or going online to look up the reptiles and amphibians of Florida. WATCH OUT! Be on the lookout for poinsonous and nonpoisonous snakes

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Quick also earned Highest Honors, which required a grade point average better than a 3.75. In her valedictory address, Dempsey re ected some of the uncertainty, and the con dence, that she and her fellow classmates were feeling as they look to the future. I feel like Im supposed to know what I want out of life. Everyone keeps asking me what I want to do or what I want to be. Truthfully, I have no idea. I do not know what the future holds but that doesnt mean that I am scared of it, nor should any of you, she said. I have been told that this is the time in life to make mistakes, she said. We are going to make many of them, but we are also going to have many successes. We each have the power to change our destiny, make the decision and dont let failure intimidate you. Welcome this change and all the ones to come because it is your life. It is here right now and we have the power to become whoever we want to be; lawyers, doctors, executives, culinary masters, educators, the list is never ending! Both Dempsey and Wynn thanked their family, teachers, coaches, community and church leaders and God for their support over the years. First, I want to thank God for giving me the strength and courage to keep on believing, said Wynn, who closed with a Gator chomp gesture, signaling her decision to attend the University of Florida next fall to study graphic design. I know that without my faith in God and all the love and support from my family and friends, I would not have overcome the challenges, said Dempsey, who plans a career as a biochemist. She closed with a citation from Jeremiah 29:11: For I know the plans I have for you, declares the Lord, plans for welfare and not for evil, to give you a future and a hope. Following a processional into the high school gymnasium, to the strains of the high school band, under the direction of the districts 2012 teacher of the year, Karl Lester, the ceremony opened with senior class vice-president Javeion Win eld leading the Pledge of Allegiance, and later the invocation. After teacher Sharon Solomon sang the national anthem, class president Wynn offered the welcome address, and then Ciara Moore and Kayle Martina sang the class song, Whenever You Remember, by Carrie Underwood. Reciting a poem, penned by Charles Bubba Fasbenner, were Stephen Jackson and Christina Pateritsas. High school Dean Al London stood in for George Oehlert at the commencement, after a death in the family prompted Oehlerts absence. London and guidance counselor Roderick Robinson presented the plaques to the valedictorian and salutatorian. London joined Superintendent Nina Marks and School Board Chairman Jimmy Gander in presenting the diplomas. As each name was read aloud, class sponsors Sally Wheeler and Jennifer Edwards read a short paragraph about each graduate, including their parents names, their plans for the future and a farewell message by the student. After receiving their diplomas, each student was given two of the class owers, a Gerber daisy. The students then ventured out into the crowded gym to present the owers to their parents. Earning High Honors, for a grade point average of 3.50-3.74 were Carli Elizabeth Klink and Jason Tanner Klink. Receiving diplomas for Honors, from grade points of 3.0-3.5 are Paul Michael Anderson, Samantha Gail Coulter, Marcus Andrew Dalton, Adrian Bryant Hendels, Homer Inman McMillan, David Jordan King, Ciara Nicole Moore, Megan Nichole Newell, Emerald Adrienne Norris, Christina Nicole Pateritsas, Cierra Nicole Russell, Tiffani Michelle Schmidt, Tiffany Danielle Varnes and Javieon Antonio Win eld. Earning the regular diplomas are Alfred Jay Allen, Maegan Georganne Andrews, Zachary Taylor Armistead, Robert Gage Brannan, Brett James Barrett, AnnMarie Brown, Chance Dewitt Buffkin, Kenneth Esby Davidson, Jr., Timothy Brandon Davis, Michael Joseph Desrosier, Kristopher Woodrow Duncan, Charles Thomas Wayne Fasbenner, John Henry Golden, Jr., Christopher Ray Granger, Emily Maleah Hat eld, Shawn Christopher Herzich-Smith, Stephen Alexander Jackson, Julius Anthony Jones, Terry Austin Larkin, Leann Siera Lyston, Lacey Danielle McAnally, Lyndsey Elizabeth Mahaffee, Kayle Nicole Martina, Robert Aaron Murray, Christopher Edwards Nabors, Morgan Elizabeth Newell, Magon Lynn Ray, Brianna Irene Riddle, Anthony Twoyne Sanders, Colton Blade Sheridan, Hunter Rene Shiver, Johnathan James Smith, Zachariah John Topham, Robert Brennan Walden, Lauren LaNelle Wheeler, Mackenzie Jared Wilson and Marc Ethan Wilson. After the students turned their tassels, they led out of the gym, to await the hugs, kisses and picture-taking from their families, and the whole wide world that awaits them. WE ARE THE CLASS OF 2012 We raged when the storm was calm Lived when the wind was dead We took the world in our palms And battled an academic thunderhead We were triumphant in abstract courses And declared war in the classroom We galloped like profound horses Sweeping intellectual pursuits with a broom Weve swam rivers and stomped bleachers Scored homeruns, baskets and touchdowns We spent time with great teachers And left our mark on all the towns We created memories that will never fade away We will now split up, spread our wings And y away. Charles Bubba Fasbenner Local The Times | A11 Thursday, June 7, 2012 SENDOFF from page A1 Cierra Russell gets a huge hug from parents Sarah Sanders and Gene Russell. Right Sonja Buffkin hugs her son, Chance, who is headed for the Army after graduation. For lots more photos, visit the Apalachicola Times Facebook page. Photos by DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times The following is a list of the scholarships, presenters and recipients of $156,000 in academic scholarships awarded at the third annual Franklin County High School Senior Recognition Night on May 25. Apalachicola Bay Charter School (Chimene Johnson) : Stephen Jackson and AnnMarie Brown Apalachicola Bay Rotary Club (Bill Mahan) : Adreenah Wynn The Butler Family (Jimmy Harris) : Carli Klink Centennial Bank (Donnie Gay) : Emily Hat eld and Adreenah Wynn Charles & Glendora Lockley Memorial (Elinor MountSimmons) : Adreenah Wynn College for Every Student CFES (Roderick Robinson) : Jordan King D.W. Wilson Family (Donna Crum) : Emerald Norris and Austin Larkin Daughters of the American Revolution Good Citizens Award (Elinor MountSimmons) : Deanna Quick Eastpoint Church of God (Pam Shiver) : Ciara Moore FairPoint Communications (Allen Millender) : Christina Pateritsas Florida Seafood Festival (Carl Whaley) : Carli Klink, Jessica Dempsey, Emerald Norris and Adreenah Wynn Forgotten Coast Builders Association (Roderick Robinson) : Adreenah Wynn Franklin Educational Support Personnel Association (Liz Roper) : Marcus Dalton, Leann Lyston, Aaron Murray, Emerald Norris and Mackenzie Wilson Franklin County School Board (Jimmy Gander and Teresa Ann Martin) : Emerald Norris, Stephen Jackson, Morgan Newell and Austin Larkin Franklin County School Nutrition Association (April Dalton) : Adreenah Wynn Franklin County School Trust (Carl Whaley) : Paul Anderson Franklin County Teachers Association (Laura Baney) : Jessica Dempsey Friends of the Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve (Roderick Robinson ): Carli Klink, Ciara Moore, AnnMarie Brown and Adreenah Wynn Friendship Missionary Baptist Church (Elinor MountSimmons) : Adreenah Wynn HCOLA (Tami RayHutchinson) : Adreenah Wyn n Linda Jefferson Educational Scholarship (Teresa Ann Martin) : Hunter Shiver and Andrew Waller Loretta Taylor Scholarship (Jimmy Harris) : Adreenah Wynn Kenneth H. Montgomery Foundation (Roderick Robinson ): Javieon Win eld, Adrian Hendels, Paul Anderson, Ciara Moore, Morgan Newell, Carli Klink and Leann Lyston Philaco Womans Club (Roderick Robinson) : Emerald Norris Project HOPE (Myrtis Wynn) : Adreenah Wynn, Austin Larkin, Ciara Moore, Jessica Dempsey and Javieon Win eld Ruge Family Scholarship (Roderick Robinson) : Christina Pateritsas, Adreenah Wynn, Javieon Win eld, Tanner Klink, Carli Klink, Austin Larkin and Ciara Moore Seahawk Booster Athletic Achievement Award (Lee and Buddy Mathes) : Morgan Newell, Brennan Walden, Megan Newell and Javieon Win eld Franklin County Tobacco Coalition /SWAT (David Walker) : Adreenah Wynn and Jordan King Take Stock in Children (Dr. Lois Catlin) : Jessica Dempsey, Christina Pateritsas, Lyndsey Mahaffee, Tiffani Schmidt and Javieon Win eld University of Florida Ruge (Roderick Robinson) : Adreenah Wynn Willie Speed Memorial (Gayle Speed Ringo and daughters Allison and Galen Ringo) : Adreenah Wynn Yent Family Memorial (Roderick Robinson) : Jessica Dempsey Jimmy Mosconis/ Gulf Coast State College (Roderick Robinson) : Shelby Shiver Gulf Coast State College Mosconis (Roderick Robinson) : Kayle Martina Gulf Coast State College Foundation (Jimmy Harris) : Jordan King U.S. Army (Roderick Robinson) : Chance Buffkin U.S. Navy (Roderick Robinson) : Jonathan Smith Seahawk scholars honored DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times Receiving a Seahawk Booster Athletic Achievement Award, from Lee and Buddy Mathes at right, are, from left, Javieon Win eld, Megan Newell and Morgan Newell. Not pictured is Brennan Walden. By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894| @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com At their May 27 baccalaureate service at the Eastpoint Church of God, students in the Class of 2012 were encouraged to risk failing. Dont be afraid to fail, said guidance counselor Roderick Robinson, an elder at New Life Fellowship Baptist Church, in his keynote speech. It is in your failures that sometimes you discover who you are. Sometimes you have to tell people who play it safe to be quiet, that I have failed at more things than you have tried. In using the story of Moses leading the children of Israel into the Promised Land, Robinson told of how the story of ones life shifts as they advance in age and accomplishments. He began to write the pages of his own life by the choices that he made, he said. Peer pressure has written the pages of your life, but the pen is now changing hands. As you begin to write, you are now becoming the writer of your own life. You now have the ability to determine the plot, the storyline of your life. You have the power to control the setting. Where will your life take you? Robinson said. You often have the ability to determine the outcome of your life. He stressed to the students the unlimited possibilities living on the inside of you, and to avoid just following others footsteps. You are a better original than you are a copy, he said. You are a triple threat destined to be great, created with a purpose and given a destiny. The moment you stop believing in yourself, you become dormant. Pastor David Walker, of Covenant Word Christian Center, delivered the welcome, followed by a processional of students entering the sanctuary to Pomp and Circumstance. After class president Adreenah Wynn led the Pledge of Allegiance, Ciara Moore and Kayle Martina performed the class song, Whenever You Remember, by Carrie Underwood. A slide show featuring childhood photos of the students followed. Scott Shiver, youth pastor at the Eastpoint Church of God, then honored three students for their participation in the fellowship of Christian Athletes Lacey McAnally, Austin Larkin and Morgan Newell. Larkin then played guitar as Moore sang Jesus Messiah. The Carrabelle Christian Centers Free Fire Ministries offered a special dance performance. The afternoon closed with a benediction from Robert Kimberling, pastor of the Eastpoint Church of God. The churchs womens ministry hosted a reception that followed in the fellowship hall. Students encouraged to risk failure RODERICK ROBINSON You are a triple threat destined to be great, created with a purpose and given a destiny. The moment you stop believing in yourself, you become dormant. Roderick Robinson Guidance Counselor

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Local A12 | The Times Thursday, June 7, 2012 PUBLIC NOTICE George E. Weems Hospital is proposing to license its existing helipad with the Florida Depart ment of Transportation. One of the requirements for DOT licensure is that public notice is given that a license is being sought. The existing helipad currently meets all applicable operation and safety standards. There will be no changes to the current helipad which is in front of Weems Hospital at 135 Avenue G, Apalachicola, Florida. Any persons wishing to comment or seeking additional information need to contact Mr. Alan C. Pierce, Director of Administrative Services, 34 Forbes St. Apalachicola, Florida, 32320 by Friday, June 8, 2012 by 4:00 PM, local time. Mr. Pierce may be reached by telephone at 850-653-9783, ext. 161. The countdown has started for Franklin County Public Librarys upcoming Summer Library Program. This years themes Dream Big Read for children, Own the Night for teens, and Between the Covers for adults, will run in libraries across the nation. Also, Franklin County adults can mark their calendars now for a summer program that is not only educational, but fun. Denise Williams is the speaker for How to Get a Good Nights Sleep, at the Carrabelle Branch on Thursday, June 28 at 6 p.m. Williams is a retired nurse of 28 years and specializes in alternative health medicine. Door prizes will be won by some lucky attendees and refreshments will be served to add to this noteworthy event. There is no cost for anyone interested in participating. Each year, exciting activities are offered to children at both branches of the county library and at the Franklin County Nest in Eastpoint and Carrabelle. This year, there is a summer program for teens ages 12-17 at both library branches. The teens can look forward to eld trips, black-light activities, guest speakers, selfdefense workshops, crafts and food, with prizes for those who attend all sessions. Teens will be able to document the program using a digital camera. Dream interpretation, astrology, and the New American Monster will be themes throughout the ve-week program. The Own the Night program will be Thursdays from 2-4 p.m. in Eastpoint beginning Thursday, June 21 and on Wednesdays from 4 to 6 p.m. in Carrabelle beginning June 20. There are a limited number of spots at both sites, so interested teens need to sign up quickly for this free fun summer library program. The children ages 511 will be squealing with delight as they participate in activities at the Carrabelle Branch each Friday from 10 a.m. to noon, Friday, June 22 and ending Friday, July 20. Sand art, pillow crafts, sleepy time snacks, ghostly campre crafts, and cute monster fun are just some highlights of what they can expect in their programs each week. Space is limited so caregivers will need to sign up their children soon. For the tots ages birth to 4, the Eastpoint branch will offer cute and cuddly stories, games, and crafts that not only teach but offer entertainment with the dreamy fun. This will begin on Friday, June 22 from 3:30 to 4:30 p.m., and end on Thursday, July 19. Ghostly sounds wont be scary anymore after they make their very own ghost pillow and monster feet. Research shows that children experience a retention loss of 22 percent during the summer months. Participation in the librarys summer reading program offers a fun way to keep kids excited about learning, staying active, and continuing social development. The Franklin County Public Library is committed to doing our part to make a difference in childrens lives. These exciting programs will be a sure hit with each participant. For more details about library programs please call the Eastpoint branch 6708151 or the Carrabelle branch 697-2366. Meet the candidates Friday The Franklin County Political Kickoff Jamboree will be this Friday, June 8, beginning at 5 p.m. at the Eastpoint Fire House, 24 Sixth Street, Eastpoint. All candidates, both local and state, whether they be Democrat, Republican, third party or no party are invited to address the gathering, mingle and shake hands with the crowd. Tickets are $25, which includes dinner and a drink. Space is limited. Make checks out to the Franklin Republican Executive Committee, or simply, Franklin REC. For more information, call Kristy Banks 653-5043, Rita O Connell 927-2893, Bill Snyder 697-3189 or Liz Sisung 670-8261. Political forum Hillside Coalition of Laborers for Apalachicola will host a political forum on Thursday, June 14 at 6 p.m. at the Holy Family Community Center, 203 Dr. Frederick Humphries Street in Apalachicola. For more information, please call 323-0544 or 653-7515 Nests summer adventure The Nest, the Franklin County Schools community learning program, which provides free academic and enrichment services for students in grades PreK through 8th grades, is gearing up for an exciting adventure this summer. The summer program will be in session from June 11 through July 30, Monday through Thursday, from 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. (closed July 4). Summer sites are the Franklin County Learning Center (formerly Brown Elementary School), at 85 School Road in Eastpoint; and the Carrabelle Municipal Complex site, at 1001 Gray Ave. Students at the Eastpoint site will dig for dinosaurs, create fossils, and make dinosaur puppets and dino-soaps during their rst week, before traveling to the Stone Age, where they will make cave paintings and cavemen dioramas. In later weeks, the program will explore ancient Egypt, medieval times and the pioneer eras, all the way through the 1950s and the future. In Carrabelle, students will take a trip in time to the signing of the Declaration of Independence, go to the Wild West and the 1950s. The students will explore life under the sea and Floridas history. Applications available at the Franklin County School and Learning Center, Carrabelle Municipal Complex, and at www.franklincountynest. org. For more info, call Eastpoint site director Emily Spindler 670-2820 or Carrabelle site director Joy Shiver 697-2177. YOUR COUNTY LIBRAR Y News BRIEFS

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Local The Times | A13 Thursday, June 7, 2012 653-8868 GET YOUR AD IN C A LL T ODAY! GET YOUR AD IN 653-8868 Trades & Services Trades & Services Laban Bontrager, DMD Monica Bontrager, DMD 12761 Pea Ridge Road Bristol, Florida 32321 TELEPHONE (850) 643-5417 Bristol Dental Clinic DENTURE LAB ON PREMISES Same Day Service on Repairs and Relines Don Lively General Contractors L ICENSED AND I NSURED 20 Y EARS E XPERIENCE P .O. Box 439 C arrabelle, FL 32322 697-2783 or Mobile 566-2603 RC 0066499 R G0065255 Carrabelle Visa, Discover, and American Express Honored at Participating Ace Stores JACKSONS Building Supplies Building Supplies & Auto Repair Carrabelle 697-3333 We Deliver Anywhere Hardware and Paint Center J.J.s Tree Service, LLC Stump Grinder Licensed & Insured Call John : (850) 899-8432 JOES LAWN CARE FULL LAWN MAINTENANCE AND TREE TRI MM ING WITH RE M OVAL OF ALL DEBRIS AND JUNK NEW CUSTOMERS 10% DIS C OUNT FROM YOUR PREVIOUS LAWN C ARE PROVIDER W ITH STAT E M EN T OF TH E COST FIRST C UT FREE W ITH V E RBAL COMMITM EN T TO AT L E AST 12 MO N THS OF S E RVIC E P LEASE C ALL JOE @ 850-323-0741 ROBERTS APPLIANCE REPAIR ALL MAJOR BRANDS 18 Shadow Lane Apalachicola, FL 32320 Phone: (850) 653-8122 Cell: (850) 653-7654 From A to Z PO Box 364 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 850-340-0756 Gregs Handyman Service & Lawn Maintenance CARPET CERAMIC TILE HARDWOOD AREA RUGS WINDOW SHADES & BLINDS PITTSBURGH PAINTS WE BIND CARPETS We offer L P ort S aint Joe area D esign professionals on premise C P rofessional I nstallation 2760 H W est P ort S aint Joe L OCA LL Y O WNED aint Joe L OCA LL Y O WNED H W est W est W P ort P ort P S aint Joe $ 50 Off purchase of $ 750.00 or more T ile starting at C arpet starting at Robert C. Bruner Attorney Personal & Business Bankruptcy Over 30 Years Legal Experience 850-670-3030 bankruptcy relief under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon advertisements. Before you decide, ask us to send you free written information Special to the Times The Apalachicola Museum of Art at 96 Fifth Street is pleased to host a onewoman show featuring the work of Susan Richardson. The work will be exhibited Thursday, June 7; Friday, June 8; and Saturday, June 9, as well as Thursday, June 14; Friday, June 15; and Saturday, June 16. There will be an opening reception this Friday, June 8 from 6-8 p.m. Richardson was born and raised in London, England, the youngest child of very creative parents. Her portrait, painted by her father, a member of the Royal College of Art, is part of the show. She began painting as a child and over the years painted watercolors in England. After oil workshops here on St. George Island, she started painting in earnest. Apalachicola, with its rivers, estuaries, bays and Gulf waters, provides her with endless inspiration. She has exhibited in the Atlanta Artists Center in 2010 and 2011, receiving honorable mention both times. She has also exhibited in the Binders-Limelight show in 2010 as well as the Creative Tallahassee show this spring in which all three of her submissions were chosen for hanging. Locally, Richardsons work has been exhibited in the Museum of Arts November 2010 show, which exhibited art from throughout the county and featured the work of Alice Jean Gibbs. In May 2011, she received the Forgotten Coasts Plein Air Invitational award in its Quickdraw event at Mexico Beach as the Best Emerging Artist. LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Lauren Caleb, above, had the starring role of Bunny Sue in the play of the same name presented May 31 by the prekindergarten, kindergarten, rst and second grade classes at the ABC School. The musical presentation was attended by about 200 family members. Mother Bunny was played by Ella Friedman, Father Bunny was Nico Valenzuela, Bertie was Shondel Bass, Bea was Jasmine Richards, Betty was Trinity Taylor, Kevin Sullivan was Bobby, Benjamin was John Sanders and Dr. Brown was Caleb Abel. To see a gallery of images, visit www.apalachtimes.com. SPECIAL TO THE TIMES The oil painting Sunrise at 10 Hole Apalachicola museum hosts one-woman show ABC SCHOOL PRESENTS BUNNY SUE

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A14| The Times Thursday, June 7, 2012 CLASSIFIEDS BP Claims ProgramThis communication includes new information and claims procedures for individuals and businesses who wish to “ le a claim with BP under the Oil Pollution Act of 1990 (OPAŽ). The United States District Court for the Eastern District of Louisiana has granted preliminary approval to the economic and property damage settlement between BP and plaintiffs in MDL 2179 concerning the Deepwater Horizon Incident (SettlementŽ). If the Court grants “ nal approval of the settlement, individuals and businesses falling within the Settlements class de“ nition will be bound by the terms of the settlement unless the class member timely exercises the class members right to opt out of the settlement. Information concerning the Court-Supervised Settlement Program, including the right to opt out, may be found at www.DeepwaterHorizonSettlements.com or by calling 1-866-992-6174. Individuals and businesses that do not fall with the Settlements class de“ nition or that timely opt out of the Settlement may “ le claims under OPA with BP. This includes claims for interim, short-term damages representing less than the full amount to which the claimant may ultimately be entitled. Access to forms Effective June 4, 2012, claim forms for the BP Claims Program are available at www.bp.com/claims or may be requested by calling 1-855-687-2631. All claim forms for the BP Claims Program must be submitted in one of the following ways: By mail: BP Claims Program P.O. 330919 Houston, TX 77233-0919 By email: Scanned forms can be sent to: bpclaimsprogram@bp.com By fax: Faxed forms can be submitted to 1-866-542-4785 Additional information: Online: www.bp.com/claims By Phone: 1-855-687-2631 (toll-free, multilingual) TTY: 1-800-345-4039. For any claims under OPA that are denied or that are not resolved within 90 days after the date of submission to the BP Claims Program the claimant may, provided presentment and other requirements of law are satis“ ed, elect to commence an action in court against BP, or to present the claim to the NPFC, US Coast Guard Stop 7100 (ca), 4200 Wilson Boulevard, Suite 1000, Arlington, Virginia 20598-7100 for consideration. The NPFC may be contacted at 1-800-280-7118. 87378 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 19-2009-CA-000478 SUNTRUST BANK, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. RONALD K. HOWELL, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated May 8, 2012 and entered in Case No. 19-2009-CA-000478 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for FRANKLIN County, Florida wherein SUNTRUST BANK, is the Plaintiff and RONALD K. HOWELL; THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF RONALD K. HOWELL N/K/A FAYE HOWELL; SUNTRUST BANK; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at FRONT DOOR OF THE FRANKLIN COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 33 MARKET STREET, APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA at 11:00 AM, on the 19th day of June, 2012, the following desribed property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT 3, BLOCK D, UNIT 2, ST. GEORGE ISLAND GULF BEACHES, PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 15, PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 916 E. GORRIE DRIVE, SAINT GEORGE ISLAND, FL 32328 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on May 9, 2012. MARCIA M. JOHNSON Clerk of the Circuit Court By:Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk Attorney for Plaintiff: Ronald R. Wolfe & Associates P.O. Box 25018 Tampa, FL 33622 *See Americans with Disabilities Act: In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the (TDD) 850-892-8133. May 31, June 7, 2012 87442T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 11-000436CA TYNDALL FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, Plaintiff, vs. WILLIAM WAYNE WEBB, WONDA WEBB ALLEN, EASTPOINT WATER AND SEWER DISTRICT, AND FRANKLIN COUNTY, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Franklin County, Florida, pursuant to the Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure, entered in this cause, the Clerk of this Court shall sell the property at public sale at 11:00 A.M. E.D.T., on the 12th day of June, 2012, at the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida, 32320, the following described real property lying and being in Franklin County, Florida, to-wit: EXHIBIT “A” A parcel of land lying in the Southeast Quarter of Fraction Section 27, Township 8 South, Range 8 West, Franklin County, Florida being described as follows: Commence at the intersection of the Southeasterly boundary of the 60.0 foot State Road (S-384-A) with the Northeasterly boundary of the 60.0 foor State Road (S-384) abd run thence North then 17 degrees 02 minutes 55 seconds East along said right-of-way of State Road S-384-A 962.10 feet to the Point of Beginning. From said Point of Beginning run thence South 72 degrees 57 minutes 05 seconds East 325.00 feet to a point in the center of a creek, thence North 67 degrees 40 minutes 45 seconds East along said creek center line 252.24 thence leaving said creek North 72 degrees 57 minutes 05 seconds West 370.00, thence South 17 degrees 02 minutes 55 seconds West 131.10 feet, thence North 72 degrees 57 minutes 05 seconds West 150.00 feet, to a point on said right-of-way of State Road S-384-A, thence South 17 degrees 02 minutes 55 seconds West along said right-of-way 28.90 feet to the Point of Beginning. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. This Notice dated this 27th day of April, 2012. MARCIA JOHNSON Clerk Circuit Court, Franklin County, Florida By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk June 7, 14, 2012 87444T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 19-2010-CA-000292 DIVISION: BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP, Plaintiff, vs. ANGELA SHARP, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated May 14, 2012, and entered in Case No. 19-2010-CA-000292 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for FRANKLIN County, Florida wherein BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP, is the Plaintiff and ANGELA SHARP; THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF ANGELA SHARP N/K/A GUS PRESTON; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at FRONT DOOR OF THE FRANKLIN COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 33 MARKET STREET, APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA at 11:00 AM, on the 27th day of June, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT 27, BLOCK 3 OF SUN ‘N SAND, UNIT 2, AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE 12, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 637 PINE STREET, PANACEA, FL 32346 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and seal of this Court on May 18, 2012. MARCIA M. JOHNSON Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk Attorney for Plaintiff: RONALD R. WOLFE & ASSOCIATES, P.L. P.O. Box 25018 Tampa, Florida 33622-5018 **See Americans with Disabilities Act: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Mr. Doug Smith, Office of Court Administration, Leon County Courthouse, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 Phone: 850-577-4401 Fax: 850-487-7947 June 7, 14, 2012 87597T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 1200060CA NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE, LLC Plaintiff, vs. ROBERTA J. SNYDER A/K/A ROBERTA SNYDER; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF ROBERTA J. SNYDER A/K/A ROBERTA SNYDER; TOAD HOLLOW CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION, INC.; THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK AS SUCCESSOR TRUSTEE TO JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A., AS TRUSTEE ON BEHALF OF THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS OF THE CWHEQ INC., CWHEQ REVOLVING HOME EQUITY LOAN TRUST, SERIES 2006-1; UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2, ET AL Defendant(s) NOTICE OF ACTIONCONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE TO: ROBERTA J. SNYDER A/K/A ROBERTA SNYDER; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF ROBERTA J. SNYDER A/K/A ROBERTA SNYDER whose residence is unknown if he/she/they be living;. and if he/she/they be dead, the unknown defendants who may be spouses, heirs, devisees, grantees. assignees, lienors. creditors, trustees, and all parties claiming an interest by, through, under or against the Defendants, who are not known to be dead or alive, and all parties having or claiming to have any right, title or interest in the property described in the mortgage being foreclosed herein. YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property: THAT CERTAIN CONDOMINIUM UNIT COMPOSED OF UNIT NUMBER 207, BUILDING B, AND THE UNDIVIDED 1/7 INTEREST IN THE COMMON ELEMENTS APPURTENANT THERETO, IN ACCORDANCE WITH AND SUBJECT TO THE COVENANTS, RESTRICTIONS, RESERVATIONS, LIMITATIONS, CONDITIONS, LIENS, EASEMENTS, TERMS, AND OTHER PROVISIONS OF THE DECLARATION OF CONDOMINIUM OF TOAD HOLLOW, RECORDED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 793, PAGE(S) 169-250, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on counsel for Plaintiff, whose address is 3010 North Military Trail, Suite 300, Boca Raton, Florida 33431 on or before (30 days from Date of First Publication of this Notice) and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on Plaintiff’s attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition filed herein. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court at County, Florida, this 17th day of May, 2012. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk Attorney for Plaintiff: Robertson, Anschutz & Schneid, P.I. 3010 N. Military Trail, Suite 300 Boco Raton, FL 33431 (561) 241-6901 Fax (561) 241-9181 May 31, June 7, 2012 87661T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 19-2012-CA-000090 DIVISION: U.S. BANK AS TRUSTEE FOR CITIGROUP MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST, INC., Plaintiff, vs. GUY N. MAULDIN, et al., Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION To: GUY N. MAULDIN SHARON M. MAULDIN Last Known Address: 85 S. Bayshore Dr. Eastpoint, FL 323283212 Current Address: Unknown ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS Last Known Address: Unknown Current Address: Unknown YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in Franklin County, Florida. COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 36, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH. RANGE 7 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 53 MINUTES 47 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION 36, A DISTANCE OF 1824.61 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 29 DEGREES 53 MINUTES 47 SECONDS EAST 68.70 FEET TO A RE-ROD ON THE SOUTHWESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF COUNTY ROAD NO. S-65 (BAYSHORE DRIVE), SAID RE-ROD LYING ON A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHEASTERLY, THENCE RUN NORTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY AND ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 1109.30 FEET THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 13 DEGREES 10 MINUTES 06 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 254.95 FEET, THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING NORTH 51 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 42 SECONDS WEST 254.39 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 44 DEGREES 50 MINUTES 39 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 899.37 FEET TO THE POINTOF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING THENCE RUN SOUTH 45 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 25 SECONDS WEST 265.73 FEET TO THE APPROXIMATE MEAN HIGH WATER LINE OF APALACHICOLA BAY, THENCE RUN ALONG SAID APPROXIMATE MEAN HIGH WATER LINE AS FOLLOWS; NORTH 41 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 39 SECONDS WEST 34.80 FEET, THENCE NORTH 50 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 13 SECONDS WEST 48.11 FEET, THENCE NORTH 40 DEGREES 26 MINUTES 02 SECONDS WEST 56.25 FEET, THENCE NORTH 54 DEGREES 29 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 34.28 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID APPROXIMATE MEAN HIGH WATER LINE RUN NORTH 45 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 25 SECONDS EAST 268.63 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT ON THE SOUTHWESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF SAID COUNTY ROAD NO. S-65, THENCE RUN SOUTH 144 DEGREES 50 MINUTES 39 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 172.54 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. BEING SUBSTANTIALLY THE SAME LANDS AS THOSE DESCRIBED IN O.R. BOOK 468 AT PAGE 251 OF THE. PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 85 S. BAYSHORE DR., EASTPOINT, FL 32328-3212 has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses within 30 days after the first publication, if any, on Albertelli Law, Plaintiffs attorney, whose address is P.O. Box 23028, Tampa, FL 33623, and file the original with this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney, or immediately thereafter; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint or petition WITNESS my hand and the seal of this court on the 22nd day of May, 2012. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of the Circuit Court Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk Attorney for Plaintiff: ALBERTELLI LAW P.O. Box 23028 Tampa, FL 33623 **See the Americans with Disabilities Act: In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons needing special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the Clerk of the Courts, Marcia M. Johnson, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, FL 32320; telephone number (850) 653-8861, not later than seven (7) days prior to this proceeding. If you are hearing or voice impaired, please call (850) 577-4400. To file response please contact Franklin County Clerk of Court, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, FL 32320, Tel: (850) 653-8861; Fax: (850) 653-9339. May 31, June 7, 2012 87601T PUBLIC NOTICE Notice is hereby given that the Franklin County Board of County Commissioners intends to change the classification of the County Director of Emergency Management from Regular Class to Senior Management Class in the Florida Retirement System: 0000000260. May 31, June 7, 2012 87673T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No. 2012-00024-CP Division: Probate IN RE: ESTATE OF HOLLIE M. STOTT Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Hollie M. Stott, deceased, whose date of death was February 27, 2012, is pending in the Circuit Court for Franklin County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida 32320. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representa-tive’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is May 31, 2012. Personal Representative: Mara S. Liesegang 32 Belleview Avenue Brookhaven, NY 11719 Attorneys for Personal Representative SANDERS AND DUNCAN, P.A. FL Bar No. 442178 80 MARKET STREET APALACHICOLA, FL 32320 (850) 653-8976 E-Mail Address: bsanders@fairpoint.net May 31, June 7, 2012 87707T NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW PURSUANT TO SECTION 865.09, FLORIDA STATUTES NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of Tropic Ice Snow Cones located at 516 Ave A in the County of FRANKLIN, in the City of East Point, Florida, 32328 intends to register the said name with the Divisions of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, Florida. Dated at Eastpoint, Florida, this 30th day of May, 2012. Josh and Jake Richards Tropic Ice Snow Cones June 7, 2012

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, June 7, 2012 The Times | A15 16 -18 yard load clean fill dirt $90Delivered within 20 miles of Carravelle. Call Mike 850-899-5319 The Key to Savings Start here in Classifieds. Sales/Business DevInteractive Sales ManagerAre you passionate about providing the best media solutions to your customers? Florida’s Freedom Interactive Newspapers, is seeking a hands-on Interactive Sales Manager with a track record of driving revenue in multiplatform environments. You will be responsible for coaching, mentoring and developing your sales team with the goal of aggressively increasing revenue. Included within your sphere of responsibility are the following: Developing new revenue streams, setting sales goals, field coaching and managing sales performance -making this a very “hands on” leadership role. The Interactive Sales Manager will foster an attitude of exceptional customer service and provide motivation, leadership and fresh ideas to the selling process. Position Requirements: Proven sales experience in digital products Experience developing and leading a high performing sales team Vision and passion to drive growth in interactive sales Strong analytical ability to budget forecast and effectively utilize market research The successful candidate will lead cross-selling efforts in print and digital solutions and must possess a demonstrated expertise with the Internet. A college degree in advertising or marketing is preferred but not required. Sales Experience and previous media management experience is preferred. Florida Freedom offers an excellent benefit package including health, dental, vision and life insurance, 401(k) plan, vacation and sick leave. This role offers a chance to live and work along Florida’s Emerald Coast encompassing 24 miles of pristine white-sand beaches stretching along the Gulf of Mexico. If this sounds like the right mix of challenge and opportunity, please e-mail your resume or contact me at either of the following addresses: E-Mail: sfeith@notes.freedom.com http://www.facebook.com/#!/skfeith http://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=1999909&trk =tab_pro https://twitter.com/#!/skfeith For more information about our organization please go to: freedom.com/careers Web ID#: 34211062 ToPlace Your Classified ad inCall Our New Numbers Now!Call:850-747-5020 Toll Free:800-345-8688 Fax:850-747-5044 Email:thestar@pcnh.com Email:thetimes@pcnh.com theAPALACHICOLA & CARRABELLETIMES CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW Total Down Pmt $7752002 Chevy Blazer -3 Rows T otal Price $5,9000% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! Nice Car of Forgotten Coast, LLC For inventory log onto: www.nicecarofforgottencoastllc.com Total Down Pmt $12952002 Chevy Silverado X/Cab -4X4 T otal Price $7,9000% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! Total Down Pmt $9752001 Ford F-150 X/Cab -4X4 T otal Price $6,5000% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! St. George Island $160 week, Electric, Satellite, Garbage incl. Pool tble. 12’ X 65’ deck w/Beautiful view 850-653-5114 Lanark Village Carlton St. #5, 1 Br 1 Ba, All Tile, Walk-in Closet, Landlord pays Electric and Water, $525 month + $300 deposit. Call 850-927-2838 or 864-356-5949 1 BRCottageH/AC in Apalachicola, FL. 850-643-7740. East Point 3 bed, 2 bath, plus 1 apt. For rent or lease, fully furnished Call: 850-670-8463 or 850-653-5763Text FL11701 to 56654 Total Down Pmt $5751999 Chevy Impala T otal Price $4,2000% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! RENTALS1 BEDROOM, 1 BATH, UNFURNISHED APT. Lanark, Remodeled, Inc. Water ......................$425 2 BEDROOM, 1 BATH, UNFURNISHED APT. Lanark ............................................................$400 2 BEDROOM, 1 BATH, MOBILE HOME Fenced Yard ....................................................$500 3 BEDROOM, 2 BATH, UNFURNISHED Doublewide.....................................................$700 3 BEDROOM, 2 BATH, WATER VIEW HOME Unfurnished, Lawn Inc. ...................................$800 2 BEDROOM, 1 BATH, UNFURNISHED APT. Small Porch ....................................................$375 2 BEDROOM, 2 BATH, MOBILE HOME Large Yard ......................................................$500 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322850-697-9604 850-323-0444 www.seacrestre.comwww. rst tness.com/carrabellePROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND RENTALS 1 br, 1 ba efficiency Call for information 850-653-6103 Text FL11727 to 56654 Publisher’s NoticeAll real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on a equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. Education/TrainingPT Housekeeper/ nannyFor newborn on SGI. Nonsmoking. Must have childcare experience, references and pass background check. 850-274-1321 or augusta.west@ammfl.org. Food SvsOyster Shuckers Needed$9 per gallon, Leavins Seafood, Inc (850) 653-8823 Web ID#: 34211519 e Apalachicola Bay Charter School is accepting applications for the following positions for 2012-13 school year:€ Music/Art/Character education instructor € Physical Education instructor € Teacher assistant € Custodial personnel € Bus driverABC School is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Please send resumes to: Chimene Johnson, ABC School, 98 12th Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320 HELP WANTED Warehouse / Delivery Eastpoint Location C L E A N E R S CLEANERS N E E D E D NEEDEDLots of Work and Good Pay Must have Own Vehicle Must have Own SuppliesCALL 850.227.3806 GUN SHOWSanta Rosa County Auditorium, Milton, FL. June 16th & 17th 9am -5pm call (850) 957-4952 or (850) 261-8407 General Admission $6Text FL08625 to 56654 CASH PAID for unexpired, sealed DIABETIC TEST STRIPS-up to $25/Box! Shipping prepaid. (888) 883-8835 Incorrect Insertion PolicyFor Classified In-column AdvertisersAll ads placed by phone are read back to the advertiser to insure correctness. The newspaper will assume correctness at the time of the read-back procedure unless otherwise informed. Please your ad. Advertisers are requested to check the advertisement on the first insertion for correctness. Errors should be reported immediately. Your Florida Freedom newspaper will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion, nor will it be liable for any error in advertisements to a greater extent than the cost of the space occupied by the error. Any copy change, during an ordered schedule constitutes a new ad and new charges. We do not guarantee position of ANY ad under any classification. Publisher’s Notice “SCAM “To avoid possible scams, it is recommended that consumers should verify caller information when receiving calls regarding credit card payments. Consumers should also contact the local company themselves instead of giving this information to individuals who are contacting them directly. Adopt: Doctor, caring family lovingly waits for miracle 1st baby *Monica* 800552-0045* FLBar42311 Expenses Paid* Bay Harbour 801 Gulf Beach Dr. St. George Island, FL 32328. June 9, 2012. 8:00 am.MOVING SALEInside yard sale: bedroom sets, coffee table, pictures, and etc. Come out rain or shine! Text FL12332 to 56654 Park your car in Classified and see it take off in the fast lane!

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Local Our local real estate experts have identied what they feel are the best values around and are oering them to you in Real Estate Picks! (In this section), Discover the best real estate values in Mexico Beach, Port St. Joe, Apalachicola, Cape San Blas, St. George Island, Carrabelle and surrounding areas. Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Real Estate Picks John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.com MLS# 247279 $499,000 St. George Island 2ND TIER GULF VIEW Dawg Daze 4 BR, 3 BA, Heated Pool, Florida Room off of living room opens to open decks on either side large laundry room, 2 car garage, Nicely landscaped with wide driveway, Popular Rental, Short Sale. West Gulf Beach Drive. John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.com MLS# 247024 $15,000 Eastpoint MAGNOLIA RIDGE Foreclosure, One acre residential building site. Located in a secluded area of beautiful Franklin County. Paved roads and underground utilities make this a great location for a permanent residence or weekend retreat. Minutes away from St. George Island. Listing agent Michael Billings dbutler@coastalcoverage.com Locally owned and operated Home Business Auto Health Workers Comp Thursday, June 7, 2011 A16 | The Times By Lois Swoboda 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star .com The rst phase of proposed repairs to the Fort Coombs Armory and Convention Center will include repairs to the roof and the electrical system. On May 15, architect Warren Emo reported on the condition of Coombs Armory and Convention Center and estimated the total cost of phase one of repairs at $234,762. The commission has $234,000 in dedicated funds provided by the Franklin County Tourist Development Council for repairs to the structure. In a telephone interview, Emo said the plans for phase one will be ready in late July, and work will actually start on the Armory in about four months. Were going to do everything we can to optimize the use of local contractors and trades, he said. Its such a ne old building. I hope the money comes along to get it all xed. Its such an important part of historic Apalachicola. In April 2009, the county leased the Armory from the state for 50 years at a cost of $300 per year. Although military operations in the building ceased over a decade ago, the building has served as a venue for weddings, reunions, dances and more for decades. Since taking the lease on the building, county of cials say there have been persistent problems with the leaky roof, electrical system and lack of climate control in the main auditorium. Emo was chosen in November 2011 to oversee renovation of the more than century-old building. Emo provided commissioners with an illustrated report on the condition of the building. In his assessment, he listed the main priorities for the Armory as repair of roof leaks, restroom renovation and ADA (Americans with Disabilities Act) accessibility compliance, an upgrade to the electrical system and installation of a heat and air conditioning system in the main auditorium. He cited water damage, infestations of birds, rodents and possibly termites, and drainage problems in an adjacent alley, as other concerns. Emo said the shingled roof over the main building is in good condition, but the internal gutter system is partially blocked, which has led to water damage. He said the roof on the small addition to the building has been seriously undermined by water damage and the sprayon membrane attacked by birds. That portion of the building needs a new roof including sheathing, supports, gutters and downspouts, requiring the removal and replacement of 600 square feet of shingles, he said. The estimated cost of the roof repair is $43,000. Removal and reset of roof mechanical equipment, including exhaust fans, rings in at an additional $1,500 and lightning protection for the new roof will cost $15,000. Emo said the damage to the additions roof is so severe that he recommended limiting access to the southwest portion of the side building during heavy rain. Alan Pierce, the countys director of administrative services, said roof damage was of less concern than damage to the main electrical panel caused by a major leak in southwest corner of the addition. Pierce said the Armorys emergency lighting system does not meet code and the building has no re alarm. Emos estimate for replacing the electrical panel, rewiring the building and upgrading the emergency lighting system and re alarm is $55,000. He said the drainage problem in the alley behind the Armory is already being addressed by the city and requires no funding, but it will cost about $16,500 to tie the Armory into the new system once the pipes are replaced. Emo estimated the general contractors fees for phase one at $24,000. The remaining $75,000 budgeted for phase one will pay for insurance and permits, $18,000; performance and payment bonds, $2,500; architectural and engineering services, $20,000; painting $2,100 and miscellaneous expenses. The county commission voted unanimously to accept Emos recommendations. Assistant County Planner Mark Currenton said Emo will now draw up plans for the work to be performed in this phase of the renovation and the county will seek bids for a general contractor to oversee repairs. Currenton said Emo receives part of the $17,000 allocated for basic architectural and engineering services and $3,300 in fees for drawings. Also, he may also be reimbursed for expenses. His company may receive some of the money allocated for electrical repairs, and he could enter a bid for the general contractors position. Van Johnson, who retired from his position as director of parks and recreation May 31, had an of ce in the Armory for many years. He said the repairs are long overdue. A HISTORY OF THE ARMORY The Franklin Guards, an infantry company organized in Apalachicola in 1884 by J. H. Coombs and Fred Better eld, erected the rst building in the city to be used solely as an armory in 1898. Made of simulated brick, it was located at the corner of High Street and Center Avenue. On May 25, 1900, re destroyed it and much of the downtown. On July 3, 1900, a committee was formed to build a new armory. The facility was designed by Frank and Thomas Lockwood of Columbus, Ga., and constructed by John H. Hecker. It was completed in 1901 at a cost of $12,000. The replacement armory features real brick walls and a gable roof with a gable parapet. Solid massing of the walls, slit windows and a corner tower that resembles a medieval watchtower make this an imposing military structure. Fort Coombs is a unique example of fortress architecture in Florida and has served as the military and social nexus of Apalachicola for more than a century. Units stationed here have been mobilized for service in World Wars I and II, the Gulf War and the War with Iraq. Bronze plaques located on the exterior front wall memorialize the names of generations of Apalachicola and Franklin County citizens who have served their state and nation. Architect moves forward with Armory repairs LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Warren Emo FLORIDA MEMORY PROJECT A view of the Armory, taken about 20 years ago. On behalf of my staff and I, we would like to thank all our loyal patients for the honor of being selected for the multiple awards that we have received over the last 12 months; including voted most compassionate Dr. and Patients Choice Award. It is a great honor and we will continue to strive for the very best medical care for our patients. VINCENT IV ERS, M.D. 301 T wentieth S treet Port S t. Joe, FL 32456 850-227-7070 www.iversmd.com On behalf of my staff and I, we would like to thank all our loyal patients for the honor of On behalf of my staff and I, we would like to



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By DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894| @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com Franklin County High School marked a milestone Friday night, both for itself and for the 56 members of the Class of 2012 who received their high school diplomas. For the rst time since the consolidated school opened on its Eastpoint campus in fall 2008, the high school graduated a class that had been educated all four years, together on the new campus, as Seahawks. As our motto says: Together we have experienced life, separately we will pursue our dreams, and forever our memories will remain, said Adreenah Aupril Wynn, who offered the salutatorian address. Both she and valedictorian Jessica Ruth Dempsey each earned better than a straightA 4.0 grade point average. Deanna Natasha Diplomas presented to 56 FCHS graduatesPhotos by DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The TimesTop, Valedictorian Jessica Dempsey, left, and salutatorian Adreenah Wynn smile after receiving their plaques. Left, Javeion Win eld hugs his mom Melissa Thomas. Below, Deanna Quick presents a ower to band director Karl Lester. xxxxx xxxxx xxxxxThursday, June 7, 2012 50 WWW.APALACHTIMES.COM VOL. 127 ISSUE 6Phone: 850-653-8868 Web: apalachtimes.com E-mail: dadlerstein@star .com Fax: 850-653-8036 Circulation: 800-345-8688Opinion . . . . . . A4 Law Enforcement . . . A7 Society . . . . . . A8 Faith . . . . . . . A9 Outdoors . . . . . A10 Tide Chart . . . . A10 Classi eds . . . A14-A15 DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK: School News & Society: 11 a.m. Friday Real Estate Ads: 11 a.m. Thursday Legal Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Display Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Line Ads: 5 p.m. Monday xxxxx Contact Us xxxxx Out to see Index Retirement time for Van, A2By DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com Property Appraiser Doris Pendleton delivered to county commissioners Tuesday morning a downbeat assessment of the countys scal picture, estimating the tax base could shrink by as much as 10 percent for next years budget. We are looking at a million dollars in less money, she said, basing that on the county keeping the millage rate unchanged. Alan Pierce, county director of administrative services, said the shortfall could be even higher than that, upwards of $1.5 million, since the sheriffs of ce will be without about $300,000 in revenue that it had been able to generate by housing state prisoners. Plus there will be a drop of about $35,000 in Medicaid monies the county used to be able to count on. Pendleton said the state now requires county property appraisers to provide an advance estimate ahead of the traditional July 1 deadline for calculating a preliminary certi cation of taxable value. She said her of ce has estimated the countys tax base will be in the neighborhood of $1.74 billion, a drop of about $100 million over last years $1.84 billion tax base. Last years property valuation marked a 9.2 percent fall from the $2.01 billion two years ago. Pendleton said that while her current estimate showed only a 5 to 6 percent drop over last years tax base, she could not be sure of the exact gure so chose to err on the side of caution. It could Appraiser: Tax base may dropSee TAX BASE A5 Special to the TimesFreedom Communications on Friday announced the sale of its properties in Florida and North Carolina to Halifax Media Group. The transaction, terms of which were not disclosed, is expected to close within 30 days. The Florida properties involved in the transaction include The Times, Apalachicola; The Star, Port St. Joe; Holmes County Times-Advertiser, Bonifay; The Walton Sun, Santa Rosa Beach; Washington County News, Chipley; The Crestview News Bulletin, Crestview; The Destin Log, Destin; Santa Rosa Press Gazette and Santa Rosa Free Press, Milton; Northwest Florida Daily News, Fort Walton Beach; and The News Herald, Panama City. The North Carolina properties include Times-News, Burlington; Havelock News, Havelock; The Daily News, Jacksonville; Free Press, Kinston; The Gaston Gazette, Gastonia; Jones Post, Kinston; Sun Journal and The Shopper, New Bern; The Star, Shelby; and The Topsail Advertiser, Surf City. Halifax Media Group will offer employment to all existing employees. At a time when the newspaper industry as a whole faces many challenges, local newspapers like these continue to thrive because they play such a critical role in the lives of their communities, said Freedom CEO Mitch Stern. Its also a real tribute to the dedication and hard work of our employees that these properties were so attractive to a new owner. Providing value for our shareholders was a major goal of this transaction, and others that weve undertaken recently, said Mark McEachen, Freedom executive vice president, chief operating ofcer and chief nancial of cer. At the same time we wanted to make sure that current employees would transition to the new owner and that the new owner shared our view of the importance of community journalism. We believe these goals were all met in this transaction with Halifax. At Halifax Media Group, we believe in the future of newspapers, said Michael Redding, CEO of Halifax Media Group. The purchase of Freedoms Florida and North Carolina properties further demonstrates our commitment to newspapers, not only for their value as an investment, but for the value they provide to the communities they serve. These properties provide a perfect extension to our recently acquired New York Times Regional Newspaper Group papers and re ect our interest in preserving community journalism for many years to come. Freedom Communications, headquartered in Irvine, Calif., is a national privately-owned information and entertainment company of print publications and interactive Freedom announces sale of Florida, N.C. papers to Halifax Media See SALE A5Special to the TimesValentina Webb has led her letter of intent to seek election to the of ce of District 3 county commissioner. Webb, 48, of 255 11th St., Apalachicola, has led as a Democrat. She is now legally entitled to get petitions signed. Her name would appear on the Aug. 14 primary ballot, provided she quali es during the June 4-8 qualifying period The following is a statement issued by the candidate: I, Valentina R. Webb, a Franklin County native, announce my candidacy for the of ce of Franklin County Commissioner District 3. I am married to Thomas Webb Jr. We have two children, Thomas J. Webb III and Ashley K. Webb and one grandson. We have enjoyed raising our children in our quiet seafood village. Thomas and myself are both local pastors of the Tabernacle of Faith International Ministries at 148 8th St., Apalachicola, under the leadership of Bishop Willie Battles of Williston. My mother is Gladys Gatlin, who served in the Franklin County school system for 35 years. My father is the late Robert Williams, eldest son of my grandfather Clarence Williams, who has been a public servant for many years with the Franklin County Sheriffs Department and a past Franklin County commissioner. Therefore, this native announces my candidacy for the of ce of Valentina Webb seeks election to county commission VALENTINA WEBBSee WEBB A5 Seahawk sendoff See SENDOFF A11 Fishermans Choices kids tourney SaturdayCharles and Rex Pennycuff host their annual Fishermans Choice Youth Fishing Tournament on Saturday, June 9. Kids 16 and under sh for all major fresh and saltwater species, with each entry receiving a T-shirt. After the tournament, entries are invited to attend a cookout at the Eastpoint Pavilion to weigh in their sh, eat hot dogs and hamburgers and get great prizes, such as rods and reels, tackle boxes and cast nets. Entry is free. Call Fishermans Choice for more information at 670-8808 or visit www. shermanschoice.net.Toss a mullet SaturdayThe Mullet Toss, which is set for Saturday, June 9, is sponsored by The Blue Parrot on St. George Island for the bene t of the Apalachicola Bay Charter School. For a $25 entry fee you get a unique Mullet Toss T-shirt, and two mullet to throw. Visitors and locals compete for bragging rights and prizes, for the longest throws in the mens, womens and kids divisions. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. For more info, visit www.blueparrotsgi.com/ calendar/mullet.Catch the Buzz this SaturdayHistoric Apalachicola Main Street and the merchants of downtown Apalachicola celebrate the Tupelo honey bee with a BEEdazzling schedule this Saturday, June 9, featuring local beekeepers, artist demonstrations, bee-related products and honey-infused menus at local restaurants. At 8 p.m., Riverfront Park will feature a free concert by Slim Fatz. Daytime events include multi-media exhibit at the Center for History, Culture and Art, with artists reception from 6-8 p.m.; encaustic art using Watkins beeswax; Kids bee craft; beekeepers Kevin Reeder, Chris Clark and George Watkins, and much, much more.

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LocalA2 | The Times Thursday, June 7, 2012 Bidding farewell to the pick-up manBy LOIS SWOBODA and DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 |@ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star.com It was a week of farewells, full of fond memories, by all those who love and respect longtime county staffer Van Johnson, who retired May 31 after 30 years on the job. On May 30, Johnsons coworkers honored the director of the countys animal control, parks and recreation and solid waste departments with a retirement luncheon at the road department. On Saturday night, it was the communitys turn, with a dinner at the Holy Family Senior Center. Enjoy this, said Commissioner Cheryl Sanders, as friends, coworkers and county ofcials gathered for lunch to celebrate his career. You are entering a second phase of life to spend time with your wife and grandchildren. Nikki Millender, community program director for parks and recreation has worked closely with Johnson for 10 years. She organized the meal and made a speech thanking Johnson for a great opportunity to learn a lot. I was basically a single mother when I came to work for you and you told me to always put my children rst, she said. Thats the kind of thing that makes you strive to do your best. Commission Chairwoman Pinki Jackel acted as master of ceremonies and presented Johnson with a large plaque detailing the high points of his 30-year career with the county. The resolution detailed Johnsons career, beginning in March 1982 when he was hired to work as a laborer trainee in the solid waste department. Eighteen months later he was promoted to truck driver, and in September 1984 to heavy equipment operator at the landll. After earning certication in solid waste management from the University of Florida TREEO Center, he was named manager of the landll, and in November 1991, the county commission appointed him to head the solid waste department as they completed construction of a new landll and embarked upon a state-mandated recycling program. The Florida Department of Environmental Protection Northwest District Ofce selected the county landll as the solid waste management facility of the rst quarter of 1995. Two years later, Johnson was selected to head animal control as it transitioned from under the sheriffs ofce, and in January 2000, Johnson was entrusted to oversee operation of the newly established parks and recreation department. Commissioner Bevin Putnal presented Johnson with a second plaque from the commission thanking Johnson for his service. Sheriff Skip Shiver also presented Johnson with a plaque offering the gratitude and admiration of himself and the entire sheriffs ofce. Fonda Davis, who has acted as Johnsons righthand man for several years and was selected Tuesday morning to succeed him, presented the retiree with a beautiful clock. This is a clock to help you mark the hours that you now have all to yourself, he said with a tear in his eye. Johnson tearfully declined to speak. The event concluded with a communal meal of smoked chicken and all the trimmings. On Saturday night, Davis emceed the dinner, catered by A.J.s, which opened with a prayer by Pastor David Walker. Stella Bryant, from the sheriffs ofce, read the countys proclamation, while Frank Cook, Apalachicolas mayor pro tem, read a proclamation from the city, which cited Johnsons dedication to county government and as mayor, and then went further. Johnson has devoted his life to his family and friends, being a father, grandfather, mentor to our local youth and a loyal friend to many, Cook read. Throughout his career of public service, Van also made time to display his pledge to volunteerism by his involvement with multiple community organizations, serving as an avid coach to hundreds of children, and achieving countless accomplishments in our community and the surrounding area, being most known for his resolved support to the interest and goals of others. Elinor Mount-Simmons joked with the audience that with his dual roles with animal control, collecting stray animals, and with the solid waste department, Johnson was the pick-up man. The evening featured reminiscences of longtime friend, co-worker and fellow coach Albert Floyd, as well as the memories of Paul Bankston, who grew up with Johnson playing street ball on the Hill. Johnson was the driving force behind the Avenue J All-Stars while Bankston headed the Sixth Street All-Stars. Bankston said he knew Johnson was destined for a career in politics when he saw his friend manage to convince Apalachicola Police Chief Cotty Hendels to close the streets one time so vehicles would not interfere with the football game. Bankstons wife, Carla, and friend Brenda Cummings also spoke about their affection for Johnson. The evening included a quiz of personal details about Johnsons life, such as the rst team he coached (Florida Power), and the positions he played in high school (fullback and defensive end, plus All-Conference honors). To see a gallery of Johnsons retirement, visit www.apalachtimes.com. DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The TimesVan Johnson cuts the cake at Saturdays retirement dinner, surrounded by grandson Darius, left, wife Gail, center, and daughter Kristy.

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LocalThe Times | A3Thursday, June 7, 2012

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OpinionA4 | The Times USPS 027-600Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 Publisher: Rick Martin POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six monthsHome delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERSIn case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola TimesThursday, June 7, 2012By SUE CRONKITESpecial to the Times Writings left behind when Margaret Key died in 1996 add a great deal to research materials for those who come to the Apalachicola Municipal Library. A celebrated packrat, Mrs. Key had intentions to write books and booklets on everything from breakfasts over the world to the Raney clan who occupied one of the citys main tourist attractions, the Raney House Museum. Mrs. Key was active in the Apalachicola Historical Society and kept notes and papers during her tenure. A box turned up among her books and memorabilia in storage with background on the Raney family, copies of a deed for the land where the now-defunct town Aspalaga was located on the Apalachicola River, and the story of David Greenway and Harriet Frances Jordan Armistead Raneys marriage. David G. Raney worked for a trading and land speculation rm owned by three Armistead brothers. The Miles Jordan family, with daughter Harriet Frances, also came to Aspalaga. According to family legend Harriet, angry with her father for breaking up a romance with a young man back in Virginia, married Latinus Armistead, 44 years her senior. Latinus died in 1833, leaving her well-off financially, and she married handsome, young David Raney in 1834. The Raneys came to Apalachicola where the home, now the Raney House Museum, was built in 1939. Raney was involved in civic activities, served as president of the chamber of commerce, served two terms as mayor, and was president of a Jockey Club which held horse races. Did you know there was a race track in Apalach? Much of what Mrs. Key learned about the people and Apalachicola found its way into publication. She worked for The Times, and also had articles in the Tallahassee Democrat. A large amount of background material was packed into boxes after her death. All Mrs. Keys file cabinets and boxes are being meticulously researched and many of the files are being made available to the public at the Apalachicola Municipal Library at 74 Sixth Ave. Among the jewels of information she kept included large packets of letters from her husband, popular author Alexander Key. The letters begin when they met in 1923 at the Art Institute in Chicago, go through their marriage into the time Alex spent in the military during World War II, until they were divorced in 1947. Margaret Key collected information on many things, especially people of the town she loved so. I think Mrs. Key knew more about the people here than they knew about themselves, once remarked former Mayor Jimmie Nichols, who died in 2009, after a long history of also writing for the Times. Sue Cronkite works at the Apalachicola Municipal Library. To reach her, or librarian Caty Greene, call 653-8436.Gems in boxes of Margaret KKey notes@THE LIBRaARY Sue CronkiteBy KKATHI JAcCKsSON Special to the Times An email message was sent to various rescue groups in Florida requesting a foster, or better yet an adoption, for Fluffy, a special dog that a north Florida humane society labeled a project. This dog was extremely fearful of people. As I read on further, I realized that I must have this dog. The Franklin County Animal Shelter was 200 miles north of my home. The dog was heartwormpositive and needed a smooth ride and a quiet, comfortable home to recover so I offered to pick Fluffy up from the shelter. Once home, I tried to think of the positive things she was displaying:. She was making eye-contact with me. She was not crying or whimpering. She was not panting too much. These are little things that need to be appreciated when working with a fearful dog. For the rst two days of fostering, Fluffy needed to be carried through the sliding glass door. At 67 pounds, I knew that walking through the door on her own was going to be her rst lesson. Luckily, Fluffy was a dogs dog. She was so attracted to my sheltiemix, Heidi, that she began following her everywhere. Heidi became the bait. Soon, Fluffys fear of the door faded. Fluffy became nervous about anything new. The rst time I opened the mailbox, she darted away as if from a shotgun blast. I began placing treats inside the mailbox and would make a point of opening the box every day during our walks and then treating her. She soon learned to love the mailbox. One day, to our amazement, Fluffy accepted a treat directly from my sisters hand. We knew the worm was turning. After a month, Fluffy nally began sleeping in the bedroom with the other dogs. Some sleep on my bed and some on doggy beds. Imagine my surprise when one night after midnight I was awakened by Fluffy standing in front of the bed looking at me, seemingly wanting to be scratched. Actually standing right in front of the head of the bed! Those moments are truly heartwarming! The dilemma came. How could I place this dog in another home? Shed have to start all over again. What would be best for this dog? Would Fluffy become another foster failure? How could I afford to care for yet another dog? By keeping Fluffy myself, I would not be able to accept as many foster dogs. I think the day when I made my decision came when I began calling her Ellie. It is commonly known that when you name a dog, it becomes yours. Ellie is now my dog. I am so lucky to have been approved to adopt this very special girl and I am thankful to everyone at the Franklin County Humane Society and the support of the community for making this possible.Happy endings: From Fluffy to EllieRight now, a Senate Conference Committee is debating the nal version of the federal transportation bill. Senator Bill Nelson is one of 14 members serving on this critical committee. There are a few bad amendments including how our utility companies dispose of their coal ash. Floridians need to ask for a clean transportation bill, which provides jobs and protects the states water supply from mercury, arsenic, chromium and other toxics in coal ash. Florida has 14 coal power plants producing over 8 billion pounds of coal ash each year, and zero requirements for contamination prevention at coal ash landlls. Senator Nelson, be a leader and protect the public and our economy over the utility companies. Kick out the coal ash provision now!AA ngelique GiraudEnergy Community Organizer Clean Water AActionNNelson should kick coal ash from billMy name is Addiction. Let me introduce myself to you. At rst I come to you very slowly easing all your troubles. You nd that you like me and how I made you feel. You nd yourself seeking for me in all kinds of places. Ill make you sweat and cry to nd me. Let me introduce you to my family. Mr. Coke, hes my right-hand man, if you need to stay up or t in. Hes your man. You can nd him nowadays almost on every street corner. Hes got a lot of offspring. His youngest son and only son, his name is Crack Daddy. Mr. Crack, he is a sneaky snake. Most of my own family are jealous of him. Hes got all the small towns and big cities right where he wants them. Shoot, hell even stop your heart, take all your belongings, your sons and daughters will even kill to follow him. Then there is my cousin Heroin, hes really popular in New York, California and Chicago. He has those towns and allows us to move there to make our family fortunes. To him we are grateful. Mr. Heroin enjoys putting your moms, dad, sisters and brothers to sleep. He even likes to make them look stupid but all of us do. We laugh at you while we are spending your money (and watching you fall.) Now let me introduce you to my Aunt Pot. She is the coolest of them all. Shoot, she enjoys making you lazy, causing you to forget things. She enjoys it. When you give her your bill money, she will hit you smoothly, then drop you hard. What a girl! The southern people are just crazy about Pot Girl. For the other uncle I have Mr. Meth, he lives mostly out west. He is like the Meth Maa King. Wow, he is bad news. He can be found in sheds in the country, most people that like him will give him anything he wants as long as he visits them in their pipes, light bulbs. He enjoys when you stay up all night seeing things that are not there. Shoot, he will make you pick your skin till you bleed. He is also a selsh kind of a guy, he wants to run all the others off so he can run the family business. We all like it very much when we get all you have and put you in places that will take all your rights away and end up costing you a lot of money. The most popular one of us is Cousin Alcohol. Now let me get all you straight about him. He is legal, once you hit 21 years old. But he aims to get you long before that birthday. The sooner the better he told us. See, he is the only one that government lets be sold legally in stores, Wal-Mart, grocery stores, hes got illegal places he is sold just like his granddad moonshine was. In his day he was the bomb. But he is just as deadly as we all are. It doesnt matter at all to us where we take you and what you lose. Because to tell the you the truth only your money matters to us. Now that about wraps it up for the addiction family. See you out there. Oh yeah, let us tell you about our newest family member. Her name is Pilgrim, we call her Pills. Now shes the kind of girl that is high-class. You have to have a prescription for her. She will make your pain go away, make you sleep, ease your mental outlook on things. She will even cause you to sell your body to feel her pleasures. She also spreads her popularity into the streets. She can be found in 98 percent of all American homes, just like Uncle Alcohol. Oh well, it is time to go to work for the family. You all know us very well anyways. Oh by the way. Who have you lost to us? Like we really care. No, we dont but how can you live without us, right? The jokes on you.Marjorie Sanders Boozer Addiction:Come meet the rest of the family PHOTO COURTESY S S Ta A T E ARCHIVES OF FF LORIDa A David Greenway Raney, in the 1860s KATHI THI JAC C KSO SO N | Special to the Times.Ellie and Heidi

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LocalThe Times | A5Thursday, June 7, 2012 ** 2011** DELINQUENT PERSONAL PROPERTY TAX ROLL ** 2011**NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVE THAT THE PERSONAL PROPERTY TAXES ASSESSED FOR THE TAX YEARS 2011 ARE NOW DELINQUENT AND SUCH TAXES ARE DRAWING INTEREST AT THE RATE OF EIGHTEEN (18%) PERCENT PER YEAR. UNLESS THE AMOUNT SET OPPOSITE EACH NAME BELOW IS PAID, WARRANTS WILL BE ISSUED THEREON PURSUANT TO FLORIDA STATUTES 197.413 AND THE TAX COLLECTOR WILL APPLY TO THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR AN ORDER DIRECTING LEVY UPON AND SEIZURE OF THE PERSONAL PROPERTY OF THE TAX PAYER FOR UNPAID TAXES. JAMES A. HARRIS, JR., CFC, FRANKLIN COUNTY TAX COLLECTORP-0000600 $834.14 BOSS OYSTER, INC RICK BLOODWORTH 125 WATER STREET APALACHICOLA, FL 32320 00096-000 P-0002400 $657.51 GULF STATE BANK PO BOX 488 APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 00280-000 P-0003100 $73.91 PRO CHEF INC DBA CHEF EDDIES MAGNOLIA GRIL PO BOX 154 APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 00344-000 P-0003600 $115.03 JAMES A PADGETT, DDS, PA 218 AVE E DENTAL OFFICE APALACHICOLA, FL 32320 00393-000 P-0003900 $614.09 RANCHO INN 240 HWY 98 W APALACHICOLA, FL 32320 00420-000 P-0004100 $357.47 RED TOP RESTAURANT PO BOX 631 APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 00430-000 P-0009300 $853.24 COASTAL INTERNAL MEDICINE DR HELEN NITSIOS 74 16TH STREET APALACHICOLA, FL 32320 00716-000 P-0009400 $1,500.33 FLORIDA COASTAL CARDIOLOGY INC DR. SHEZAD SANAULLAH 74 16TH STREET APALACHICOLA, FL 32320 00717-000 P-0011900 $1,400.23 LAMB SOUP, INC REX HUMPHRIES 15 AVENUE D APALACHICOLA, FL 32320 00758-000 P-0012200 $281.66 VERANDAS AT RIVER MARK, INC 76 MARKET STREET APALACHICOLA, FL 32320 00763-000 P-0017200 $104.78 APALACHICOLA CHOCOLATE CO 15 AVE E APALACHICOLA, FL 32320 00849-000 P-0017900 $292.00 COASTAL COMMUNTIY BANK FKA/APALACHICOLA STATE BANK 12141 PANAMA CITY BCH PARKWAY PANAMA CITY BEACH, FL 32407 01025-000 P-0018400 $1,319.53 CARRABELLE MARINA CORPORATION COXWELL & BLEVINS MARINA INC DRAWER BB CARRABELLE, FL 32322 01045-000 P-0019000 $1,183.61 GULF STATE BANK BOX GG CARRABELLE, FL 32322 01180-000 P-0026300 $653.72 PIRATES COVE MARINA LLC 2807 THOMASVILLE ROAD TALLAHASSEE, FL 32308 01491-000 P-0026400 $3,171.57 SUMMIT OUTDOOR ADVERTISING INC 1626 CRAWFORDVILL HIGHWAY UNIT B CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 01492-000 P-0029200 $1,040.13 GULF STATE BANK BOX 488 APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 02112-000 P-0031500 $5.04 GJ GRACE LLC RANDALL CHAMPION P.O. BOX 287 EASTPOINT, FL 32328 02323-000 P-0035800 $2,284.40 WATER MANAGEMENT SERVICES, INC 250 JOHN KNOX RD. #4 TALLAHASSEE, FL 32303 02434-000 P-0038200 $2,882.83 SUMMIT OUTDOOR ADVERTISING INC 1626 CRAWFORDVILLE HIGHWAY UNIT B CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 02469-000 P-0038300 $650.89 PANHANDLE ICE HOUSE LLC JASON CHEEK 221 W HIBISCUS STE 271 MELBOURNE, FL 32901 02470-000 P-0039900 $1,418.19 ANCHOR REALTY & MORTGAGE CO. 119 FRANKLIN BLVD. ST GEORGE ISLAND, FL 32328 03015-000 P-0042600 $1,611.36 GULF STATE BANK ST GEORGE ISLAND BRANCH PO BOX 488 APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 03287-000 P-0044700 $310.47 ST GEORGE INN 135 FRANKLIN BLVD ST GEORGE ISLAND, FL 32328 03474-000 P-0044800 $4,103.02 ST GEO ISLAND UTILITIES CO 250 JOHN KNOX ROAD SUITE #4 TALLAHASSEE, FL 32303 03475-000 P-0057400 $98.01 POOL SENSATIONS LLC KATHLEEN OSTYNSKI 2974 ARENDEL DR LAWRENCEVILLE, GA 30044-3579 03848-000 P-0060800 $2,049.55 SAPP BROS CONTRACTING LLC PO BOX 621 CARRABELLE, FL 32322 03892-000 P-0060900 $543.66 PANHANDLE ICE HOUSE LLC JASON CHEEK 221 W HIBISCUS BLVD STE 271 MELBOURNE, FL 32901 03893-000 P-0063800 $855.31 PANHANDLE ICE HOUSE JASON CHEEK 221 W HIBISCUS BLVD STE 271 MELBOURNE, FL 32901 03929-000 Many Other PrizesEntry Fee: 17 years and up $25 16 years and younger $15 Free T-Shirt with every entrySATURDAY, JUNE 9THProceeds go to Apalachicola Bay Charter School BILL MILLER REALTY850-697-3751 (3310) 570-0658400 PLUS COMM. U.S. 98 & GULFADJ. TO LANARK MARINA 850 K$29,500 $2,500 DOWN BUYS 2 BED APT. 2 6 ORRENT $500/MTH GULFVIEW & ACCESS3 BDR 2 BA 2006 M/H $89,0002 LG. SHADY LOTS-3 OUT BLDG. -400 TO MARINA-CITY WATER $49,500MIH 2 CRNRLOTS BLK. $ STORE REDUCED $49,500 CITY COMM. LOTSU.S. 98 -$29,500 UP Smart LensesSMCan produce clear vision without glasses, at all distances "Freedom from Eye Glasses, Now a reality for many." NO HIDDEN CHARGES: It is our policy that the patient and any other person responsible for payments has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed by payment or any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment. www.mulliseye.com"WE WELCOME NEW PATIENTS, CALLTODAY FOR YOUR PRIORITY APPOINTMENT" FOR NEW PATIENTS 59 AND OLDERThis certificate is good for a complete Medical Eye Exam withTodd Robinson, M.D.Board Certified Eye Physician and Surgeon.The exam includes a prescription for eye glasses and tests for Glaucoma, Cataracts and other eye diseases.FOR YOUR APPOINTMENT CALL: 850-763-6666 ELIGIBILITY: U.S. Citizens living in the Florida Panhandle, 59 years and older, not presently under our care. Coupon Expires: 6-30-12 FREEEYE EXAMCODE: AP00Darren Payne, M.D.Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract SurgeonLee Mullis, M.D.Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract SurgeonTodd Robinson, M.D.Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon mean it goes up or down (from the estimate) a little bit, 1 to 2 percent, she said. We went ahead and gave them the big blow. Franklin Countys tax base has been on a steady decline since 2006, when it was more than twice its current size. The last time the countys tax base was this small was in 2003, when it stood at $1.62 billion. Commissioner Cheryl Sanders signaled the dilemma that faces commissioners when they begin the budget debate next month. In July there will have to be budget cuts, she said. There are things we havent cut yet. Pierce noted that the departments under the commissioners direct control have absorbed most of the cuts made in recent years,. Sanders said she was shocked to see waterfront land selling for less than $10,000 per acre. Pendleton underscored her point, noting that banks had resumed ownership of much of the waterfront land. She cited an example in Eastpoint, right off Magnolia Bluff, where property that sold in 2006 for $125,000 an acre was now available for $12,500. Pendleton suggested the drop in the countys tax base might be even steeper if her office was able to use the results of foreclosures, short sales and banks sales in their calculations, which the state does not allow. They say that is not the true market, she said. In some aspects theyre holding their own but in others theyre losing their pants. Pendleton secured permission from the commissioners to use ACS to help in tracking down property owners who may have secured more than one homestead exemption, either in Florida or in other states. They have offered us that they can go nationwide and try to find dual homesteaders, she said. They will take our database and run it through their system and they can find if they are filing somewhere else. Right now were actually working off of tipsters, she said. Sometimes the tipster was not correct and sometimes they were. ACS charges the county 22 percent of what is eventually collected by the tax collectors office. You can go back 10 years and charge interest and penalties, plus they lose their cap, Pendleton said, estimating that the county can recoup 65 percent, plus back taxes. Weve had people to pay us $30,000-$40,000 if they go back 10 years, she said, noting that it is her offices job to make the ultimate determination on whether a property owner is dual homesteaded. TAX BASE from page A1businesses. The companys print portfolio includes approximately 100 publications, including 20 daily newspapers, weekly newspapers, plus ancillary magazines and other specialty publications. The companys news, information and entertainment websites and mobile applications complement its print properties. For more information, visit www.freedom.com. Founded in 2010, Halifax Media is headquartered in Daytona Beach. The companys investment group includes Stephens Capital Partners, JAARSSS Media, and Redding Investments. The group consists of 16 publications in six states, primarily situated in the Southeast. Halifax Medias strategy is to invest long-term capital in quality companies positioned in strong markets that are closely connected to the community. SALE from page A1 County Commissioner District 3. My my, time ies by so fast. My past experience as an Apalachicola city commissioner for four years has prepared me for this opportunity, wanting to serve the people of Franklin County as County Commissioner in District 3. I am a graduate of Apalachicola High School. I also attended Jacksonville Junior College, where I studied fashion merchandising and later attended Gulf Coast Community College and became a graduate certi ed as correctional of cer/law enforcement. I have maintained my license for approximately 30 years. I worked at the Franklin County Sheriffs Department and was later employed with the largest employer in the state of Florida, the Florida Department of Corrections. I have experienced change while under several secretaries of the Department of Corrections. My career began as a correctional of cer and I of cially retired as a correctional ofcer captain. I know what it is to protect and serve the public, I understand the budget process. I know what it is and how to reach out to the disadvantaged children and adults. As a past commissioner I became involved in the growth and development of our unique area. This required accountability, responsibility and integrity. There are times when you will need someone on the payroll from whom you can receive assistance. This could be that place. I know what hard work and devotion means. I know what it is to serve, having lived, worked, and worshiped in Franklin County. I truly value our culture and at the same time understand we must move forward, building a future for our generations and for those who desire to live in this community. I will advocate and push to preserve and protect our way of life. This requires hard work to ensure improvement and that fair practices for equal employment are available to all of our citizens. Im ready to get back to working for the people of Franklin County. I know I can make an impact on our present economical condition. May God direct our lives to helping those in our community and our nation. Valentina R. Webb welcomes questions. She can be reached by phone at 370-0116 or by email at thewebb@ fairpoint.net. WEBB from page A1

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LocalA6 | The Times Thursday, June 7, 2012 BAYVIEW HOME ST. GEORGE ISLAND3BR/2BA home in the bayfront community, East Bay Estates. Enjoy the community pool and dock overlooking the bay. Popular rental home with repeats! New deck just built, beach access right across the street! MLS# 246740....................$429,000 Travis Stanley 850.653.6477 Grayson Shepard 850.653.6718 Leon Teat 850.653.5656 Sandy Mitchem 850.899.8300 NEW LISTING! GREATER APALACHICOLA4BR/2BA on 1/3 acre lot with above ground pool. Many upgrades and new features tankless water heater, new plumbing, city water, updated kitchen, new carpet, windows, doors. MLS#245923..................$149,500 CATPOINT,EASTPOINT2.63 acres of gorgeous bay view property on Cat Point. White sandy beach on the Apalachicola Bay.MLS# 245189................$290,000GREATER APALACHICOLA acre on the corner of Bluff Rd and Big Oaks just 1 mile drive to the Pine Log boat ramp. Zoned R-4 Single Family Home Industry. Beautiful cleared lot with some mature shade trees.MLS#247086....................$40,000COMMERCIAL ST. GEORGEISLANDExcellent location for 1500 square feet of commercial space in the heart of the island. Corner location on Franklin & Gulf Beach Dr high visibility! Also available for LONG TERM LEASE call for details.MLS#244926..................$339,000 NEW LISTING! ALSO FOR LEASE!BAYVIEW ST. GEORGE ISLAND3BR 3BA located in the heart of the island, walking distance to all shops/restaurants. Screened porches, great bay views!MLS#240643...............$270,000 Graduating students know their ABCsBy LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star .com The Apalachicola Bay Charter School last week ended the school year with three graduations ceremonies that marked important transitions for young students. On May 29, 35 kindergarten students spread their wings to tackle elementary school. Graduates from Lena Allens class were Hannah Grace Abel, Cody Abercrombie, Peyton Blackburn, LeLand Flowers, Trinity Creamer, Maya Itzkovitz, Reece Juno, Kristian Kilpatrick, William Luberto, Taylor Mallon, Lucy Neill, Kamryn Noblit, Malic ONeal, Landon Schoelles, Reagen Solomon, Weston Taranto and Jostyn Tipton. In Heather Friedmans class, graduating were Esteban Bernabe, Alonna Brown, Austin Chapman, Caelyn Constantine, C.J. Conway, Andie Hutchins, Preston McClain, Alexia McNair, Ryan Mills, Landrick Moore, Jentzen Odom, Taylor Pendleton, Isabella Price, Jhamere Rhodes, Joel Taylor Jr., Aubrie Thompson, Josalyn Ward and Jayla White. Most popular career choices with graduates were teacher and police of cer, but several mentioned other jobs including doctor, scientist, boat driver, heat and air conditioning technician and oysterman. Twenty-nine fth-grade Eagles soared into middle school this year including Janacia Bunyon, Grayson Constantine, Madison Coulter, Chloe Davis, Kevin Flores, Damien Freeman, Haley Gay, Angel Henning, Steven Hicks, Jaiden Hill, Alexus Johnson, Bryce Kent, Sophia Kirvin, Ian Lashley, Jan-Michael Lowe, Scout McLemore, Connor Messer, Karo-Lynn Myers, Christopher Newell, Daijon Penamon, Haley Scott, Cole Smith, Gabriel Smith, Brandon Taranto, Gage Thornton, Adria Valenzuela, Ethan Vonier, Rebecca Willis and Sean Williams. Honor roll students with all As for fth grade were Willis, Constantine, McLemore and Davis. AB honor roll students were Kirvin, Kent, Johnson, Flores, Lowe and Messer. The highest grade point average in reading was achieved by Lowe; Constantine had the second highest. In math, the order was reversed, as Constantine took top honors with Lowe in second place. McLemore had the top score in science, and Constantine held second place. Constantine had the highest average in social studies with Valenzuela in second place. Constantine had the highest average in both language arts and writing. Davis took second place in writing and there was a three-way tie for second in language arts between Davis, Johnson and Messer. The eighth-grade class graduating this year also had 29 students. Heading for high school are Chance Bar eld, Charles Bond, Ronald Bryant, Alyssa Creamer, Celest Creamer, Mackenzie Davis, Chanelle Ducker, Adriane Elliot, Brianna En nger, Vailan Gibbs, Kaleigh Hardy, Amber Henning, Glory Miller, Sydney Moore, Skylah Obee, Christian Page, Brooke Parker, Joshua Patriotis, Haley Pouncey, Jacquelyn Ramsey, Quinnaland Rhodes, Steven Russell, Alexis Shiver, Robert Shiver, Edmund Strickland, Xuripha Tiller, Kaylin Weiler, John C. White and Myah Wise. AB honor roll students were Patriotis, Bond, Davis, Rhodes, Moore, Weiler, White, Robert Shiver, Ramsey and Obee. The highest average in math was achieved by White, with Moore tying for second highest. Patriotis had the highest average in both algebra and science. Second in science was Obee and in algebra Robert Shiver. White had the highest average in social studies and Patriotis second highest. Patriotis was rst in language arts, and Bar eld took top honors in reading. For galleries of ABC graduation 2012, visit www. apalachtimes. com. LOIS SWOBODA | The TimesGrayson Constantines grade point average was in the top two for his class in every subject, requiring mom and dad, Deidre and Nick, to help him display his bumper crop of awards. Right, Jayla White was the last student to accept her diploma during last weeks kindergarten graduation at ABC School. place in writing and there was a three-way tie for second in language arts between Davis, Johnson and Messer. The eighth-grade class graduating this year also had 29 students. Heading for high school are Chance Bar eld, Charles Bond, Ronald Bryant, Alyssa Creamer, Celest Creamer, Mackenzie Davis, Chanelle Ducker, Adriane Elliot, Brianna En nger, Vailan Gibbs, Kaleigh Hardy, Amber HenJoshua Patriotis, Haley Pouncey, Jacquelyn Ramsey, Quinnaland Rhodes, Steven Russell, in reading. For galleries of ABC graduation 2012, visit www. apalachtimes. com. Monday through Friday 8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Saturday 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.Eugene Charbonneau, DO Susan Hardin, ARNP Dana Whaley, ARNP110 NE 5th Street Carrabelle, Florida

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The Times | A7Thursday, June 7, 2012Oyster harvest now includes weekendsStarting June 1, Apalachicola oysters can be commercially harvested seven days a week throughout the year. Previously, commercial harvest was not allowed on Fridays and Saturdays from June 1 through Aug. 31 and on Saturdays and Sundays from Sept. 1 through Nov. 15. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission approved this change at its February meeting. This increased harvesting opportunity comes in response to public health management changes made by the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services in 2010. These changes signicantly reduced the number of hours available for harvest each day during the warmer months of the year. The seven-day work week will allow Apalachicola Bay oyster harvesters the ability to make up for time lost harvesting. This action by FWC was supported by the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. Scott appoints Alter to NWFWMDIn April, Governor Rick Scott announced the appointment of John W. Alter to the ApalachicolaChipola-Lower Chattahoochee River Basin seat on the governing board of the Northwest Florida Water Management District. Alter, 75, of Malone, is a retired public relations executive and manages Alter-Bevis Farms, which was designated as a Florida Stewardship Forest in 2000. Recognized as Florida District One Tree Farmer of the Year in 2008, he was interim executive director of the Jackson County Chamber of Commerce in 1999. A Navy veteran, he received a bachelors degree from Ohio University and a masters degree from Villanova University. He succeeds Philip McMillan and is appointed for a term beginning April 25, 2012, and ending March 1, 2015. The appointment is subject to conrmation by the Florida Senate. Law BRIEfsFS aARREsST REPoORTThe following report is provided by the Franklin County Sheriffs Ofce. Arrests in this report were made by ofcers from the Apalachicola Police Department (APD), Carrabelle Police Department (CPD), Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC), Florida Highway Patrol (FHP) and Franklin County Sheriffs Ofce (FCSO). All defendants are to be considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law.May 22Claude F. Banks, Jr., 27, Apalachicola, aggravated battery pregnant victim (FCSO) (Editors note: This entry is a correction over last weeks item, which contained an erroneous age for the defendant)May 25Stephen R. Pearson, 42, Carrabelle, domestic battery (FCSO) Robert R. Osburn, Jr., 20, Apalachicola, possession of cannabis less than 20 grams, possession of a controlled substance and possession of paraphernalia (FCSO) Frankie J. Crosby, 27, Eastpoint, sale or possession of a controlled substance within 1,000 feet of a church, possession of a controlled substance and violation of probation (FCSO)May 26Fredrick T. Reynolds, 51, Carrabelle, driving while license suspended or revoked (APD) Reginald D. Giddens, 33, Apalachicola, boating under the inuence (FWC)May 27Carmia L. Lee, 31, Panama City, disorderly intoxication and resisting ofcer without violence (APD) Kevin D. Hurley, 22, Crawfordville, DUI (CPD) Teresa Carr, 19, Apalachicola, domestic battery (APD) Patricia D. Jones, 48, Apalachicola, domestic battery (APD) Zachary E. Jones, 20, Apalachicola, domestic battery (APD) Michael W. Monteith, 27, Crawfordville, boating under the inuence (FWC) Rodney K. Trotman, 64, Tallahassee, boating under the inuence (FWC) Dustin C. Shahan, Jr., 22, Carrabelle, Collier County warrant for failure to appear (FCSO)May 28Allan H. Gray, 26, Tallahassee, Leon County warrant for violation of probation (FCSO) Mary F. Beaty, 48, Crawfordville, principal in the rst degree sale or possession of a controlled substance with intent to sell within 1,0000 feet of a park, possession of a controlled substance, two counts delivery of a controlled substance and possession of paraphernalia (FHP) Michelle D. Provenzano, 47, Eastpoint, child neglect (FCSO) Thomas Pascual, 22, Apalachicola, disorderly intoxication (APD)May 29Mary R. Nowling, 24, Eastpoint, violation of probation (FCSO)May 30Keijuan M. Sims, 24, Port St. Joe, domestic battery and violation of repeat violence injunction (APD) Lenanya Morris, 20, Apalachicola, domestic battery (APD) Linda Hunter, 55, Alligator Point, violation of probation (FCSO) Chester A. Morris, 43, Tallahassee, possession of a controlled substance (FCSO)May 31Stephen R. Pearson, 42, Carrabelle, DUI (CPD) Hardy G. King, 53, Apalachicola, failure to appear (FCSO)June 1Sharon Teters, 35, Carrabelle, DUI (FWC) Christopher R. Richards, 32, Apalachicola, battery (FCSO) Johnny B. Tyson, 38, Monticello, violation of probation (FCSO) 2011 Annual Drinking Water Quality Report Alligator Point Water Resource DistrictWe are pleased to present to you this years Annual Water Quality Report. This report is designed to inform you about the quality water and services we deliver to you every day. Our constant goal is to provide you with a safe and dependable supply of drinking water. We want you to understand the efforts we make to continually improve the water treatment process and protect our water resources. We are committed to ensuring the quality of your drinking water. Our water source is ground water from six wells drawn from the Floridan Aquifer. Because of the excellent quality of our water, the only treatments required are chlorine for disinfection purposes and Aquamag, which is a polyphosphate compound injected as a sequestering agent that neutralizes scale and corrosion. In 2011 the Department of Environmental Protection performed a Source Water Assessment on our system and a search of the data sources indicated no potential sources of conIf you have any questions about this report or concerning your water utility, please contact Alligator Point Water Resource District (APWRD), Deanna Murphy at (850) 349-2274. We encourage our valued customers to be informed about their water utility. If you want to learn more, please attend any of our regularly scheduled meetings. They are held monthly on the third Saturday of each month at 9:00 a.m., at th Alligator Point routinely monitors for contaminants in your drinking water according to Federal and State laws, rules, and regulations. Except where indicated otherwise, this report is based on the results of our monitoring for the period of January 1 to December 31, 2011. Data obtained before January 1, 2011, and presented in this report are from the most recent testing done in accordance with the laws, rules, and regulations. Action Level (AL): The concentration of a contaminant which, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements that a water system must follow. Initial Distribution System Evaluation (IDSE) : An important part of the Stage 2 Disinfection Byproducts Rule (DBPR). The IDSE is a one-time study conducted by water systems to identify distribution system locations with high concentrations of trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acids (HAAs). Water systems will use results from the IDSE, in conjunction with their Stage 1 DBPR compliance monitoring data, to select compliance monitoring locations for the Stage 2 DBPR. Maximum Contaminant Level or MCL: The highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCLs are set as close to the MCLGs as feasible using the best available treatment technology. Maximum Contaminant Level Goal or MCLG: The level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MCLGs allow for a margin of safety. Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level or MRDL: The highest level of a disinfectant allowed in drinking water. There is convincing evidence that addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control of microbial contaminants. Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level Goal or MRDLG: The level of a drinking water disinfectant below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MRDLGs do icrobial contaminants. Non-Applicable (N/A): Does not apply Non-Detect (ND): means not detected and indicates that the substance was not found by laboratory analysis. Parts per million (ppm) or Milligrams per liter (mg/l): one part by weight of analyte to 1 million parts by weight of the water sample. one part by weight of analyte to 1 billion parts by weight of the water sample. Picocurie per liter (pCi/L): measure of the radioactivity in water. If present, elevated levels of lead can cause serious health problems, especially for pregnant women and young children. Lead in drinking water is primarily from materials and components associated with service lines and home plumbing. APWRD is responsible for providing high quality drinking water, but cannot control the variety of materials used before using water for drinking or cooking. If you are concerned about lead in your water, you may wish to have your water tested. Information on lead in drinking water, testing methods, and steps you can take to minimize exposure is availab While your drinking water meets EPAs standard for arsenic, it does contain low levels of arsenic. EPAs standard balances the current understanding of arsenics possible health effects against the costs of removing arsenic from drinking water. EPA continues to research the health effects of low levels of arsenic, which is a mineral known to cause cancer in humans at high concentrations and is linked to other health effects such as skin damage and circulatory problems. The State of Florida Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) sets drinking water standard for secondary contaminants and has determined that Chloride and Total Dissolved Solids are aesthetic concerns at certain levels of exposure. Chloride and Total Dissolved Solids were sampled in August 2009 and were found in higher levels than are allowed by the State (MCL violations). Chloride and Total Dissolved Solids, as secondary drinking water contaminants, do not pose a health risk. We will continue to sample as required by rule. The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells. As water travels over the surface of the land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human activity. Contaminants that may be present in source water include: (A) Microbial contaminants, such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations, and wildlife. (B) Inorganic contaminants, such as salts and metals, which can be naturally-occurring or result from urban stormwater runoff, industrial or domestic wastewater discharges, oil and gas production, mining, or farming. (C) Pesticides and herbicides, which may come from a variety of sources such as agriculture, urban stormwater runoff, and residential uses. (D) Organic chemical contaminants, including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals, which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can also come from gas stations, urban stormwater runoff, and septic systems. Page 4 of 4 (E) Radioactive contaminants, which can be naturally occurring or be the result of oil and gas production and mining activities. In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, the EPA prescribes regulations, which limit the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water, which must provide the same protection for public health. Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that the water poses a health risk. More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the Environmental Protection Agencys Safe Drinking Water Hotline at 1-800-426-4791. Thank you for allowing us to continue providing your family with clean, quality water this year. In order to maintain a safe and dependable water supply, we sometimes need to Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population. Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk from infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by Cryptosporidium and other microbiological contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800-426-4791). We work to provide top quality water to every tap. We ask that all our customers help us protect our water sources, which are the heart of our community, our way of life and our childrens future. If you have any questions or concerns about the information provided, please feel free to call any of the numbers listed. Enforcement

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PETOFTHEWEEK Franklin County Humane Society Qualications: Expertise in: Now Accepting AppointmentsCall Toll Free 888-681-5864 For more info www.seclung.com Lung Disease SpecialistRob Garver, MDNow Seeing Patients in Port St. Joe NOW BCBS-FL IN-NETWORK PROVIDER SocietyA8 | The Times Thursday, June 7, 2012 BirthsBronson Cade Copeland bornChristian and Colin would like to announce the birth of their baby brother, Bronson Cade Copeland! Cade was born Tuesday, May 8, 2012, in Tallahassee. He was 20 inches long and weighed 6 pounds, 3 ounces. Cades parents are Ron and Melanie Copeland, of Apalachicola. His maternal grandparents are Annette and the late George Martina, of Apalachicola. His paternal grandparents are Theresa C. Melton and the late Ronald Copeland, Sr., of Hartsville, S.C.Chelsea Grace Martina bornBig brother Chance Martina is proud to announce the birth of his baby sister, Chelsea Grace Martina. Chelsea Grace was born Wednesday, March 7, 2012, at Gulf Coast Hospital in Panama City at 4:30 a.m. weighing 7 pounds, 6.3 ounces and was 19 inches long. She is the daughter of Tyler and Terress Martina, of Apalachicola. Maternal grandparents are Terry Faircloth, of Eastpoint, and Tammie Cline, of Apalachicola. Paternal grandparents are Kevin and Patty Martina, of Apalachicola. BirthdayMiller baby shower SaturdayA baby girl shower for the upcoming new arrival for Laura Jackson Miller and John Miller will be Saturday, June 9 at 3 p.m. at the Masonic Lodge, 108 N.E. First St., in Carrabelle. The Millers are listed on the gift registry at Target and at BabiesRUs. For more information, call 697-2766 or 404-245-3330.USF honors Barnhill for public health workJaNya Bell turns 1JaNya Denyse Bell celebrated her rst birthday on Saturday, May 26, with a pool party at her grandparents house. JaNya is the daughter of Tanicia Pugh and Courtney Bell, of Apalachicola, and sister of Jamal and Maleah. Her maternal grandparents are James and Alma Pugh, of Apalachicola. Her paternal grandmother is the late Karen Denyse Bell. Paternal great-grandparents are Rosa Tolliver, of Apalachicola, and Joseph Bell, of West Palm Beach. A special thank you to godmother Tamara Robinson, and family and friends, for making her birthday party so very special. Special to the TimesPam Nobles students will trip the light fantastic in a double-barreled dance recital at 1:09 and 6:09 p.m. Saturday, June 9, at the Dixie Theatre in Apalachicola. Acclaimed dancer and choreographer Scott Benson returns for the 31st annual event. Tickets are $8 pre-sale or $10 at the door. Call 653-8078. Doors open 45 minutes before each show. Dazzling dancers in the Shop Till You Drop theme include scholarship recipients Erin White, $2,000, and Montez Walker, $200. White and Walker will dazzle in Shopping for Shoes, with dancers Brooke Moore, Jackie Collinsworth, Amber Henning and Megan Gannon. The pair also will show off their star quality in other blockbuster numbers including The Dance Shop, Money for the Mall and CD Store FYE. White, who has studied dance with Pam Nobles Studio for 14 years, graduated from Port St. Joe High School with honors in May. She was an active member in Mu Alpha Theta and National Honor Society, and was senior class president. She said she plans to attend Troy University and major in business with a minor in Spanish. She will continue dance throughout college and hopes to join the Troy University Dance Team. Bensons dance career of more than 30 years has taken him all over the world to choreograph and perform with such artists as Michael Jackson, Pink, Aerosmith, Alice Cooper, Madonna, Sting, John Travolta, Bruce Willis, Tom Selleck, Paula Abdul, Reba McEntire and Tom Hanks, to name a few. He has been both in front of and behind the camera in countless television shows and commercials, including Scrubs, Jay Leno, The Academy Awards, The Super Bowl, Sea Doo/Ski Doo, Ebay, Hurley, and Visa. Some of his lm credits include Pirates of the Caribbean, Forrest Gump, Perfect and The Mask. Local celebrities getting into glittering footwork in Western Wear, include County Commissioner Noah Lockley, Superintendent Nina Marks, School Board Member Teresa Ann Martin, and candidates Cliff Carroll, Pam Shiver and Valentina Webb. Special awards go to dancers for three years, Meredith Alford, Eve Bond, Emily Gay, MacKenzie King, Shaylee Martina, Gracyn Paul, Olivia Poloronis and Kylee Smith; six years, Ella Friedman; 11 years, Holly Chambers; 12 years, Patricia Perryman; 14 years, Erin White; 17 years, Linda Grif n; 22 years, Bonnie Smith; 23 years, Linda Maloy; 25 years, Rita Theis; 26 years, Debby Ruffner; and 29 years, June Gray. Since beginning in 1981 as Horizon Twirlers, Pam Nobles Dance Studio has helped bring out amazing talent in hundreds of students. Happily tip-toeing through their favorite shopping malls Saturday are 75 dancers, showing off The Crystal Connection, The Crocdocshop, Gymboree, Toys R Us and many more. Dancers, in addition to those already mentioned, include Meredith Alford, Bailey Allen, Makenna Barber, Wanda Bar eld, Olivia Barineau, Trinity Barron, Kaydence Bartley, Macey Rae Benton, Jamison Broker, Kassidy Denney, Sara Beasley Flowers, Marissa Gilbert, Zariah Harvey, Kaylee Hicks, Janalyn Hippenseal, Bianca Huber, Bradlyn Hutchins, Calayia Jones, Harmony Jones, Brooklyn Klink, Skylar Layne, Kelsey Martina, Myia Maxwell, Ella McClain, Khali McNair, Livia Monod, Georgia Page, Emily Patterson, Grace Patterson, Javena Pearson, Jaliyah Rochelle, Dezmonae Sanders, Jalynn Segree, Kaylee Segree, Valerie Shattuck, Lyndsey Stiefel, Shalynn Suddeth, Jaelyn Tipton, Jostyn Tipton, Krista Varnes, Mabry Wallace, Jossalyn Ward, Paisley White, Maddisson Whitten and Sophia Zingarelli. Nobles dancers to Shop Til You Drop!Pam Nobles dancers won a Gold Award in recent competition.Special to the TimesThe University of South Floridas College of Public Health bestows the Florida Outstanding Woman in Public Health award each year to a woman whose career accomplishments and leadership have contributed signi cantly to the eld of public health in Florida. Kim Barnhill, interim director of the Franklin County Health Department, was honored at an awards ceremony April 4, in the colleges Samuel P. Bell III Auditorium, part of a week of events surrounding the celebration of National Public Health Week. Barnhill, who also is administrator for the Jefferson County and Madison County health departments, is known as a vigorous public health advocate. She led initiatives that increased access to dental care, including one that is now in the works in Franklin County. Barnhill also has worked to increase healthcare access for uninsured Floridians who fell between the cracks by creating a volunteer service provider network that provides more than $1 billion in donated health services. In his nomination letter, Michael Napier, administrator for the Seminole County Health Department, wrote that Barnhill is highly respected by her staff, her community and her peers as an action oriented, passion driven public health advocate. She often is sought out for her knowledge and opinions on everything from legislation, management issues and dealing with complex problems. You often will nd her working from early morning to late at night and on weekends moving the public health agenda forward. It is rare to nd someone with such passion in the eld of public health that is coupled with knowledge and experiential practice who have affected so many people in our state, he wrote. Earlier in her career, Barnhill planned and directed preventive dental care program for 37 counties, provided consultation for 106 community uoridation programs, managed the development of new programs, and assisted in conducting and analyzing needs assessment surveys. In 1996, Barnhill shifted her focus towards tapping into local community volunteer service providers, such as the Florida Medical Association, Florida Board of Medicine and Florida Hospital Association, to form volunteer teams to meet the needs of these uninsured Floridians. Now considered a model program, the Volunteer Health Care Provider Program provides more than $1 billion in donated health services. She then became director of Statewide Services in 2000, providing management and planning for all 67 county health departments in the state. In that job, she became involved in the legislative process as a registered lobbyist, planned programs, worked with the budget process and developed outcome measures. Barnhill graduated cum laude from Florida State University with a bachelors degree in health education. She also earned her masters in adult education (gerontology) and a masters in public health from FSU. She has been an active member of the Florida Association of County Health Of cers, serving as president in 2008 and currently serving as a board member at large. The Florida Outstanding Woman in Public Health Award was initiated by USF in 1988, and nominations are solicited from public health practitioners across the state. KIM BARNHILL

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The Times | A9Thursday, June 7, 2012 The United Methodist Churches of Franklin County Welcome You First United Methodist Church of ApalachicolaWorship Service 11:00 a.m. every Sunday Sunday School 10:00 a.m. 75 5th St. Apalachicola 653-9530 fumcapalach@gtcom.net Pastor: Rev. Themo PatriotisCarrabelle United Methodist ChurchWorship Services 10:45 a.m. Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Celebrate Recovery Mondays 7-9 p.m. 102 NE Ave. B Carrabelle 697-3672 Pastor: Julie StephensEastpoint United Methodist ChurchWorship Service 10:00 a.m. every Sunday Healing service every fourth Monday at 7:00 p.m. 317 Patton Dr. (corner of David St.) 670-8825 Pastor: Rev. Beth WhiteSt. George Island United Methodist Church9:00 a.m. Worship Service 10:00 a.m. Fellowship Hour 201 E. Gulf Beach Dr. 9274635 www.sgiumc.org Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis First Pentecostal Holiness Church379 Brownsville Road Apalachicola Were excited about what Gods doing!!!Sunday School 9:45 am Sunday Morning Worship 10:45 am Sunday Evening Service 6:00 pm Monday, Youth Group 6:30 pm Wednesday, Royal Rangers, G.A.P.7:00 pm Wednesday Worship & Word 7:30 pmNursery Provided during regular church services 7:00 7:00 First Baptist ChurchSt. George Island 501 E. Bayshore Drive 927-2257 R. Michael Waley, Pastor Join us as we praise and worship the living Christ. Great is the Lord and most worthy of praise. Psalm 145:3 Sunday Bible Study................................................10:00am Worship Praise........................................................11:00am Sunday Night............................................................7:00pm Wednesday Power Hour......................................7:00pm Wednesday Youth at S.P.L.A.S.H.......................7:00pm Walking in Christ R. Michael Whaley, Pastor WELCOMES YOUChurch of the Ascension101 NE First Street CarrabelleSUNDAY10:00 AM WELCOMES YOUChurch THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH (850) 274-4490 (850) 545-2578 WELCOMES YOU Trinity Trinity Episcopal Churchest. 1836Welcomes YouHwy. 98 & 6th St. Apalachicola 850-653-9550Sunday Worship Services 8 & 10:30 a.m. Wednesdays Healing Service 11 a.m. Centering Prayer 4 p.m. Sunday Worship Services 8 & 10:30 a.m. Wednesdays Healing Service 11 a.m. Centering Prayer 4 p.m. Friday survivor lap opens Relay for LifeWalkers will go around the clock in the battle against cancer when the American Cancer Societys Relay for Life of Franklin County open this Friday, June 8, at 6 p.m. at Pop Wagoner Stadium, the former Apalachicola High School football stadium. The survivor lap will begin at 6:30 p.m. followed by a survivor/caregiver meal provided by Tamaras Caf served at 6:45 p.m. Register as a survivor or caregiver and receive your T-shirt! For more information, please call local event chair Chala Parish at 370-0832 or your American Cancer Society at 850-785-9205 x3509. Entertainment will go on throughout the evening and into the morning, featuring such great acts as George Pruett and family, Ashley Carroll, Angel Stephens, Carrabelle Christian Center, Righteous Kind and much more. Dont forget to purchase lumanarias in honor, support or memory of your loved one or friend affected by cancer. In the event of rain, have no fear; rain contingency is the former Apalachicola High School gymnasium. Relay is a unique opportunity for our community to come together to celebrate people who have battled cancer, remember those weve lost and ght back against the disease, Parish said. Many of the participants are cancer survivors, which serves as a reminder that our community is not immune to this disease and that by participating in relay, we are joining with the American Cancer Societys efforts to create a world with less cancer and more birthdays. Please come out and have a great time.Re:Action Dodgeball Games this SaturdayThe Re:Action youth group, a nondenominational youth ministry, for sixth through eighth graders of the Apalachicola-St. George Island Cooperative Parish of the United Methodist Church, is hosting the rst Dodgeball Games tournament this Saturday, June 9, at the ABC School. Times for the annual event are 2-5 p.m., with three categories: elementary, middle and high school. The participation fee is $3 and spectator fee is $5. All proceeds go to fund the youth to attend The Gate conference in Charleston, W. Va. To sign up, email Adam Cannon at adamcannonmusic@ gmail.com or sign up at the eld the day of the tournament. Covenant Word plans Fathers Day weekendCovenant Word Christian Center International, at 15812th street in Apalachicola, will host a Fathers Day Prophetic Weekend beginning Friday, June 15, at 7 p.m., with an Impartation Service on Saturday morning, June 16 at 11 a.m. Prophet Bill Johnson from Restoration Life Church in Tallahassee will be our guest minister who moves in a powerful anointing of God in the Prophetic. Come out in faith believing you will receive a lifechanging word and/or impartation on these two power-packed days.Panacea church hosts Gaballi Taste SamplerThe Ochlockonee Bay United Methodist Church, at 2780 Surf Road in Panacea, will hold a Taste Sampler of Gaballi Foods, on Saturday, June 16, from 9 a.m. to noon. Gaballi is a faith-based non-denominational organization that provides boxes of top quality fruits and vegetables at a 30 to 70 percent savings from the current national retail prices. Please visit www.obayumc.com or www.gaballi.com or call 850-984-0127 for further information. Faith BRIEFSIll be looking for you Thursday at our weekly lunch at the Franklin County Senior Center. Serving begins at noon. A minimum donation of $3 is required. We almost always have a guest speaker and the drawings for door prizes and a cake to raf e off. Please come join us, have a good lunch and cool off! Hamburgers and chips are served at Camp Gordon Johnston American Legion Post 82, 2367 Oak Street, here in the village. Orders are taken from 5-7 p.m. Yum, yum! A donation of $6 will be collected at the bar. Come OLIVIER MONOD | Special to the TimesCelebration of First Communion for 13 youth, ages 7 and 8, took place Sunday at St. Patrick Catholic Church in Apalachicola. This marked a young persons rst reception of the sacrament of the Holy Eucharist, where they receive from the priest the body and blood of Jesus Christ in the form of bread and wine. Receiving their First Communion were Krista Kelley, Katie Newman, Haley Miller, Abby Johnson, Meredith Alford, Jasmine Richards, Caden Turrell, Zach Riccard, Carson Davis, Nico Valenzuela, Nathan Richards, Josh Banico and Andrew Monod, pictured above with Father Roger Latosynski.Charles Chris Seward Allen, 53, of St. Marks, passed away Saturday, June 2, in St. Marks. He was born Sept. 14, 1958 in Ocala. The family moved to Apalachicola in 1960. He was a self-employed aquatic horticulturist. He attended River of Life Church in Crawfordville. He enjoyed shing and hunting. He was a member of the Christian Motorcycle Association and ABATE. Chris loved his daughters more than anything and loved his animals too. In lieu of owers, please make donations to Florida Wild Mammal Association (FWMA), 198 Edgar Poole Road, Crawfordville, FL 32327. Memorial services will be Saturday, June 9, at 11 a.m. at River of Life Church, Crawfordville. He is survived by two daughters, Nicole Anne Allen and Hannah Dane Allen, of Wakulla County, and their mother, Stephanie Kaye Allen; father Virgil Jerome Allen, of Apalachicola; brother Clifford Allen, Apalachicola; sisters Bonnie Jean Allen, Wakulla and Terra Carni, Gainesville, and her children, William David Carni III and Shannon J. Carni. He is predeceased by his mother, Anne OQuinn Allen. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel, Crawfordville is assisting with arrangements.CHRIS ALLEN LANARK NEWSJim Welsh East Point Church of God379 Avenue A Eastpoint, FLSaturday, June 9th 7:00 p.m. Sunday, June 10th 11:00 a.m. & 6:00 p.m.For More Information:Call: (850) 323-1206 and enjoy the evening with us. We have a pool table, shuf eboard, bar bingo, pull-tabs, or you can just enjoy the fellowship. Oh yes, we have three largescreen televisions, too. Pizza, pizza, pizza is featured every Sunday night at Camp Gordon Johnston American Legion Post 82. Eat-in by the slice is $1, and eat-in a whole pizza is $8, while pizza take out is $10. And as always, everyone welcome! Our monthly pancake breakfast will be served Saturday, June 16, at the Lanark Village Boat Club. Serving begins at 9 a.m. and lasts until noon. Your donation of $5 will be collected inside; fathers will eat free. See ya there! Everyone welcome! Sunday, June 17, as you know, is Fathers Day. Like our mothers, God gave us one father each, to treat with love and respect. Make sure he has a great day. Be kind to one another. Check in on the sick and housebound and keep smiling. You may not feel any better, but everyone will wonder what youre up to! Until next time, God bless America, our troops, the poor, homeless and hungry. FIRST COMMUNIONEveryone welcome to weekly lunch Obituary Faith

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Special to the TimesThe Coastal & Marine Conservation Lecture Series continues occurs on the second Thursday of each month with a June 14 lecture in the Florida State University Coastal and Marine Lab auditorium. Slated for 7 p.m., and open to the public, this months lecture will feature Sharon McBreen, from the Pew Environment Group speaking on Conserving sh in the Southeast. Known as the American Mediterranean, the Gulf of Mexico is an economic and environmental treasure, with natural wonders and habitats ranging from an underwater Grand Canyon 12,000 feet deep to coral reefs and one of the largest contiguous seagrass beds in the Northern Hemisphere. From whales to dolphins, from osprey to brown pelicans, impor tant marine animals eat smaller sh and organisms to survive. Understand ing the role of these preys in the food web is critical to a healthy, robust ocean ecosystem. Populations of some of these small sh have plum meted, partly because bil lions have been scooped up by industrial shing to serve as ingredients in fertilizer, pet food, and other products. Depleting sh too fast risks tipping the balance of the ocean ecosystem and harming an economic engine that supports millions of people and jobs. The FSUCML, in associ ation with Second Harvest of the Big Bend, is collecting non-perishable food items at each monthly lecture. Please bring an item or two and help solve the hunger crisis in our community. The FSUCML is at 3618 Coastal Highway 98, in St. Teresa, about 10 miles east of Carrabelle just past the fork at U.S. 319 and 98, on the right. For more info, email fsucml@fsu.edu or call 697-4120, and on weekends 850-591-0224. Fish freshwater license-free SaturdayTo help you celebrate the State of Florida is offering two license-free recreational shing days. This Saturday, June 9, you can sh license-free in freshwater, which marks the end of National Fishing and Boating Week.Stone crab season endsThe commercial and recreational harvest of stone crab claws in Florida closed May 16. This closure occurs each year during the species peak spawning season to help protect and sustain Floridas valuable stone crab resource. Stone crab claws may be possessed and sold during the closed season but only if they have been placed in inventory before May 16 by a licensed wholesale or retail dealer. Stone crab traps must be removed from the water within ve days after the close of the stone crab seasonSign up for summer camp at Beau TurnerThe Beau Turner Youth Conservation Center in Jefferson County is offering weekly day-camp sessions this summer for youth ages 10-15 who are interested in hunting and related outdoor activities. During hunt camp, participants will learn about Floridas great hunting heritage and be taught such skills as wildlife identification, survival, first aid and tree-stand safety. Campers also will learn conservation, land stewardship and about hunting laws and ethics. Participants will spend extensive time on several gun ranges, shooting shotguns, rifles and muzzleloaders, and have the option of earning their hunter safety certification while they are at camp, if they choose to do so. There will be four weeks of camp, all during the month of June, and the sessions are June 4-8, June 11-15, June 18-22 and June 25-29.  Hours are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday, and 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Fridays. The cost for each weekly session is $175, and parents may register their children at BTYCC.org.  For more information, email Kelly Langston atKelly.Langston@ MyFWC.com. Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL(next to Piggly Wiggly) www.BWOsh.com May Winner: Brenda Grifes 24 1/2 Spanish MackerelYour Hunting Headquarters This months grand prize: Penn 760 Slammer reel $149.99 Star Rod deluxe DLX20/8 $149.99 Pair of CALCUTTA sunglasses $22.99 Bluewater Outriggers GIFT CARD $100.00 JUNE FEATURE FISH: RED SNAPPERStop in and register or go oline at www.BWOsh.com WEEKLY ALMANAC APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE TIDE TABLES MONTHLY AVERAGESTo nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from these given for APALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW Cat Point Minus 0:40 Minus 1:17 East Pass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27 To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from those given for CARRABELLE: HIGH LOW Bald Point Minus 9:16 Minus 0:03 Sponsor the WEEKLY ALMANACCall Today!653-8868 Date HighLow% Precip Thu, June 786 7240% Fri, June 888 7240% Sat, June 987 7340% Sun, June 1086 7440% Mon, June 1187 7360% Tues, June 1287 7420% Wed, June 1389 7530% 6 We 637am 2.4 315pm 2.9 929am 2.1 1100pm -0.5 7 Th 710am 2.2 410pm 2.7 1025am 1.9 1142pm -0.3 8 Fr 739am 2.2 509pm 2.4 1129am 1.8 9 Sa 805am 2.2 615pm 2.2 1222am 0.0 1241pm 1.4 10 Su 831am 2.2 734pm 1.9 100am 0.5 158pm 1.3 11 Mo 857am 2.4 913pm 1.6 136am 0.8 314pm 1.0 12 Tu 925am 2.4 1118pm 1.6 213am 1.1 423pm 0.6 13 We 954am 2.6 254am 1.4 523pm 0.3 14 Th 125am 1.8 1026am 2.6 344am 1.6 615pm 0.0 15 Fr 249am 1.9 1100am 2.6 444am 1.8 702pm -0.2 16 Sa 341am 2.1 1137am 2.7 545am 1.9 745pm -0.3 17 Su 420am 2.2 1217pm 2.7 639am 2.1 823pm -0.3 18 Mo 452am 2.2 1258pm 2.7 727am 2.1 858pm -0.5 19 Tu 520am 2.4 140pm 2.7 809am 2.1 930pm -0.3 20 We 545am 2.4 223pm 2.7 849am 2.1 958pm -0.3 6 Su 450am 2.4 201pm 2.9 817am 1.9 929pm -0.6 7 Mo 549am 2.4 241pm 2.9 856am 2.1 1019pm -0.6 8 Tu 645am 2.4 326pm 2.9 937am 2.1 1111pm -0.5 9 We 737am 2.2 416pm 2.7 1027am 2.1 10 Th 825am 2.2 512pm 2.6 1205am -0.3 1130am 1.9 11 Fr 908am 2.2 618pm 2.2 101am 0.0 1251pm 1.8 12 Sa 945am 2.2 741pm 2.1 156am 0.2 221pm 1.6 13 Su 1018am 2.2 927pm 1.8 251am 0.5 345pm 1.3 14 Mo 1047am 2.2 1127pm 1.8 344am 0.8 454pm 0.8 15 Tu 1114am 2.4 434am 1.1 550pm 0.5 16 We 110am 1.9 1139am 2.4 520am 1.4 638pm 0.2 17 Th 226am 1.9 1204pm 2.4 603am 1.6 722pm 0.0 18 Fr 324am 2.1 1229pm 2.6 642am 1.8 801pm -0.2 19 Sa 412am 2.2 1256pm 2.6 719am 1.9 837pm -0.3 20 Su 452am 2.2 127pm 2.7 753am 1.9 911pm -0.3 FreshwaterRed snapper are the main focus for the offshore guys this month. Good sized sh are coming out of 60ft of water in the M.B.A.R.A. number is Mexico Beach. Most of these sh will not be here long, so catch them during the week days before the weekend trafc is at its highest. King sh are holding good at the buoy line still, with some smaller chicken Dolphin as well.Inshore OffshoreBlacks island and Pig Island are producing great trout catch es this month so far. Good ounder can be had at Towns Beach area when the tides and winds are right for gigging. Some small er trout and Spanish mackerel are coming in at the sea wall in the St. Joe Marina, but the big kings have moved out to sea. Fishing Depot creek should be productive if Shellcraker is your sh. Good numbers of shellcraker, painted bream, and smaller bass are being caught right now. Lake Wimico is also producing good shellcraker and bass on the early bite. SPoONsoSORED BY Email outdoors news to timesoutdoors @star.com Page 10 Thursday, June 7, 2012 O UTDoo OO RS www.apalachtimes.comSection A Marine lab lecture June 14 on sh conservation sSHANNON M c bBREEN bBRIEfsFS By Stan KirklandFlorida Wildlife Conservation CommissionPhil Manor remembers the day like it was yester day. It was late spring in 1993 when he was working by himself on the Apala chicola River Wildlife and Environmental Area tear ing out a beaver dam on a wetland. Manor, who at the time had worked four years as a wildlife biologist with the Florida Game and Fresh Water Fish Commission, was almost through with his work when a 2.5to3-foot-long cottonmouth struck the index nger on his left hand. Almost imme diately his nger and hand began to throb and burn. Manor knew he had to get to a doctor. He cranked up his four-wheeler, drove himself to the Howard Creek compound and in a few minutes was at Gulf Pines Hospital in Port St. Joe. He was given ve vials of anti venin to negate the effects of the poisonous bite, but it took weeks for the swelling to go down in his left hand. Every year across the United States an estimated 7,000-8,000 people are bit ten by poisonous snakes. About ve people die from the bites, according to the Centers for Disease Con trol and Prevention. While most people see snakes around water and automatically assume they are cottonmouths, thats generally not the case, Dr. John Himes, a wildlife biol ogist with the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) said. Probably 80 percent to 90 percent of the snakes people see in and around water are harmless water snakes, Himes said. If you pick them up, they may bite because they dont like being handled, but they are not poisonous. Himes said both cotton mouths and the ve spe cies of water snakes found in the Panhandle play an important ecological role by feeding on dead or dying sh, amphibians and small invertebrates. All told, there are only six species of poisonous snakes and more than 40 non-poisonous species found in Florida. In addi tion to the cottonmouth, the list of poisonous snakes includes the canebrake rattlesnake, Eastern dia mondback, pygmy rattle snake, copperhead and coral snake. The canebrake, also called a timber rattler, is the rarest of the group. Specimens are occasional ly found in Northwest Flor ida from the Olustee area to Alachua County. Cane brakes are more common in Georgia and Alabama and Southeastern states. The more common poisonous snakes in Florida include the cotton mouth, Eastern diamond back and pygmy rattle snakes. The latter two are usually found in more rural settings where theres am ple cover. Himes said copper heads are usually found north of Highway 20 in the Panhandle and com monly in low-lying areas along creeks and rivers. He said they are expertly camouaged. Coral snakes are the only species of the group whose venom affects the central nervous system. They have small fangs, in comparison with the other poisonous snakes, and coral snake bites are fairly rare. Coral snakes are inof fensive and almost secre tive, Himes said. You nd them around yard litter or decaying leaves and such, but if a person wears gloves to do their yard work, they have nothing to fear from this snake. Although many people are afraid of all snakes, Himes said its important to remember poisonous and nonpoisonous species play an important role in the environment by preying on rats, mice, small rep tiles and amphib ians, rabbits and even each other in some cases. Himes said people, par ticularly those new to Florida and who fear snakes, should consider obtain ing a book or going online to look up the reptiles and amphibians of Florida.WATCH OUT! Be on the lookout for poinsonous and nonpoisonous snakes

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Quick also earned Highest Honors, which required a grade point average better than a 3.75. In her valedictory address, Dempsey re ected some of the uncertainty, and the con dence, that she and her fellow classmates were feeling as they look to the future. I feel like Im supposed to know what I want out of life. Everyone keeps asking me what I want to do or what I want to be. Truthfully, I have no idea. I do not know what the future holds but that doesnt mean that I am scared of it, nor should any of you, she said. I have been told that this is the time in life to make mistakes, she said. We are going to make many of them, but we are also going to have many successes. We each have the power to change our destiny, make the decision and dont let failure intimidate you. Welcome this change and all the ones to come because it is your life. It is here right now and we have the power to become whoever we want to be; lawyers, doctors, executives, culinary masters, educators, the list is never ending! Both Dempsey and Wynn thanked their family, teachers, coaches, community and church leaders and God for their support over the years. First, I want to thank God for giving me the strength and courage to keep on believing, said Wynn, who closed with a Gator chomp gesture, signaling her decision to attend the University of Florida next fall to study graphic design. I know that without my faith in God and all the love and support from my family and friends, I would not have overcome the challenges, said Dempsey, who plans a career as a biochemist. She closed with a citation from Jeremiah 29:11: For I know the plans I have for you, declares the Lord, plans for welfare and not for evil, to give you a future and a hope. Following a processional into the high school gymnasium, to the strains of the high school band, under the direction of the districts 2012 teacher of the year, Karl Lester, the ceremony opened with senior class vice-president Javeion Win eld leading the Pledge of Allegiance, and later the invocation. After teacher Sharon Solomon sang the national anthem, class president Wynn offered the welcome address, and then Ciara Moore and Kayle Martina sang the class song, Whenever You Remember, by Carrie Underwood. Reciting a poem, penned by Charles Bubba Fasbenner, were Stephen Jackson and Christina Pateritsas. High school Dean Al London stood in for George Oehlert at the commencement, after a death in the family prompted Oehlerts absence. London and guidance counselor Roderick Robinson presented the plaques to the valedictorian and salutatorian. London joined Superintendent Nina Marks and School Board Chairman Jimmy Gander in presenting the diplomas. As each name was read aloud, class sponsors Sally Wheeler and Jennifer Edwards read a short paragraph about each graduate, including their parents names, their plans for the future and a farewell message by the student. After receiving their diplomas, each student was given two of the class owers, a Gerber daisy. The students then ventured out into the crowded gym to present the owers to their parents. Earning High Honors, for a grade point average of 3.50-3.74 were Carli Elizabeth Klink and Jason Tanner Klink. Receiving diplomas for Honors, from grade points of 3.0-3.5 are Paul Michael Anderson, Samantha Gail Coulter, Marcus Andrew Dalton, Adrian Bryant Hendels, Homer Inman McMillan, David Jordan King, Ciara Nicole Moore, Megan Nichole Newell, Emerald Adrienne Norris, Christina Nicole Pateritsas, Cierra Nicole Russell, Tiffani Michelle Schmidt, Tiffany Danielle Varnes and Javieon Antonio Win eld. Earning the regular diplomas are Alfred Jay Allen, Maegan Georganne Andrews, Zachary Taylor Armistead, Robert Gage Brannan, Brett James Barrett, AnnMarie Brown, Chance Dewitt Buffkin, Kenneth Esby Davidson, Jr., Timothy Brandon Davis, Michael Joseph Desrosier, Kristopher Woodrow Duncan, Charles Thomas Wayne Fasbenner, John Henry Golden, Jr., Christopher Ray Granger, Emily Maleah Hat eld, Shawn Christopher Herzich-Smith, Stephen Alexander Jackson, Julius Anthony Jones, Terry Austin Larkin, Leann Siera Lyston, Lacey Danielle McAnally, Lyndsey Elizabeth Mahaffee, Kayle Nicole Martina, Robert Aaron Murray, Christopher Edwards Nabors, Morgan Elizabeth Newell, Magon Lynn Ray, Brianna Irene Riddle, Anthony Twoyne Sanders, Colton Blade Sheridan, Hunter Rene Shiver, Johnathan James Smith, Zachariah John Topham, Robert Brennan Walden, Lauren LaNelle Wheeler, Mackenzie Jared Wilson and Marc Ethan Wilson. After the students turned their tassels, they led out of the gym, to await the hugs, kisses and picture-taking from their families, and the whole wide world that awaits them. WE ARE THE CLASS OF 2012We raged when the storm was calm Lived when the wind was dead We took the world in our palms And battled an academic thunderhead We were triumphant in abstract courses And declared war in the classroom We galloped like profound horses Sweeping intellectual pursuits with a broom Weve swam rivers and stomped bleachers Scored homeruns, baskets and touchdowns We spent time with great teachers And left our mark on all the towns We created memories that will never fade away We will now split up, spread our wings And y away. Charles Bubba Fasbenner LocalThe Times | A11Thursday, June 7, 2012 SENDOFF from page A1Cierra Russell gets a huge hug from parents Sarah Sanders and Gene Russell. Right, Sonja Buffkin hugs her son, Chance, who is headed for the Army after graduation. For lots more photos, visit the Apalachicola Times Facebook page.Photos by DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times The following is a list of the scholarships, presenters and recipients of $156,000 in academic scholarships awarded at the third annual Franklin County High School Senior Recognition Night on May 25. Apalachicola Bay Charter School (Chimene Johnson): Stephen Jackson and AnnMarie Brown Apalachicola Bay Rotary Club (Bill Mahan): Adreenah Wynn The Butler Family (Jimmy Harris): Carli Klink Centennial Bank (Donnie Gay): Emily Hat eld and Adreenah Wynn Charles & Glendora Lockley Memorial (Elinor MountSimmons): Adreenah Wynn College for Every Student CFES (Roderick Robinson): Jordan King D.W. Wilson Family (Donna Crum): Emerald Norris and Austin Larkin Daughters of the American Revolution Good Citizens Award (Elinor MountSimmons): Deanna Quick Eastpoint Church of God (Pam Shiver): Ciara Moore FairPoint Communications (Allen Millender): Christina Pateritsas Florida Seafood Festival (Carl Whaley): Carli Klink, Jessica Dempsey, Emerald Norris and Adreenah Wynn Forgotten Coast Builders Association (Roderick Robinson): Adreenah Wynn Franklin Educational Support Personnel Association (Liz Roper): Marcus Dalton, Leann Lyston, Aaron Murray, Emerald Norris and Mackenzie Wilson Franklin County School Board (Jimmy Gander and Teresa Ann Martin): Emerald Norris, Stephen Jackson, Morgan Newell and Austin Larkin Franklin County School Nutrition Association (April Dalton): Adreenah Wynn Franklin County School Trust (Carl Whaley): Paul Anderson Franklin County Teachers Association (Laura Baney): Jessica Dempsey Friends of the Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve (Roderick Robinson): Carli Klink, Ciara Moore, AnnMarie Brown and Adreenah Wynn Friendship Missionary Baptist Church (Elinor MountSimmons): Adreenah Wynn HCOLA (Tami RayHutchinson): Adreenah Wynn Linda Jefferson Educational Scholarship (Teresa Ann Martin): Hunter Shiver and Andrew Waller Loretta Taylor Scholarship (Jimmy Harris): Adreenah Wynn Kenneth H. Montgomery Foundation (Roderick Robinson): Javieon Win eld, Adrian Hendels, Paul Anderson, Ciara Moore, Morgan Newell, Carli Klink and Leann Lyston Philaco Womans Club (Roderick Robinson): Emerald Norris Project HOPE (Myrtis Wynn): Adreenah Wynn, Austin Larkin, Ciara Moore, Jessica Dempsey and Javieon Win eld Ruge Family Scholarship (Roderick Robinson): Christina Pateritsas, Adreenah Wynn, Javieon Win eld, Tanner Klink, Carli Klink, Austin Larkin and Ciara Moore Seahawk Booster Athletic Achievement Award (Lee and Buddy Mathes): Morgan Newell, Brennan Walden, Megan Newell and Javieon Win eld Franklin County Tobacco Coalition /SWAT (David Walker): Adreenah Wynn and Jordan King Take Stock in Children (Dr. Lois Catlin): Jessica Dempsey, Christina Pateritsas, Lyndsey Mahaffee, Tiffani Schmidt and Javieon Win eld University of Florida Ruge (Roderick Robinson): Adreenah Wynn Willie Speed Memorial (Gayle Speed Ringo and daughters Allison and Galen Ringo) : Adreenah Wynn Yent Family Memorial (Roderick Robinson): Jessica Dempsey Jimmy Mosconis/ Gulf Coast State College (Roderick Robinson): Shelby Shiver Gulf Coast State College Mosconis (Roderick Robinson): Kayle Martina Gulf Coast State College Foundation (Jimmy Harris): Jordan King U.S. Army (Roderick Robinson): Chance Buffkin U.S. Navy (Roderick Robinson): Jonathan SmithSeahawk scholars honored DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The TimesReceiving a Seahawk Booster Athletic Achievement Award, from Lee and Buddy Mathes at right, are, from left, Javieon Win eld, Megan Newell and Morgan Newell. Not pictured is Brennan Walden. By DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894| @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com At their May 27 baccalaureate service at the Eastpoint Church of God, students in the Class of 2012 were encouraged to risk failing. Dont be afraid to fail, said guidance counselor Roderick Robinson, an elder at New Life Fellowship Baptist Church, in his keynote speech. It is in your failures that sometimes you discover who you are. Sometimes you have to tell people who play it safe to be quiet, that I have failed at more things than you have tried. In using the story of Moses leading the children of Israel into the Promised Land, Robinson told of how the story of ones life shifts as they advance in age and accomplishments. He began to write the pages of his own life by the choices that he made, he said. Peer pressure has written the pages of your life, but the pen is now changing hands. As you begin to write, you are now becoming the writer of your own life. You now have the ability to determine the plot, the storyline of your life. You have the power to control the setting. Where will your life take you? Robinson said. You often have the ability to determine the outcome of your life. He stressed to the students the unlimited possibilities living on the inside of you, and to avoid just following others footsteps. You are a better original than you are a copy, he said. You are a triple threat destined to be great, created with a purpose and given a destiny. The moment you stop believing in yourself, you become dormant. Pastor David Walker, of Covenant Word Christian Center, delivered the welcome, followed by a processional of students entering the sanctuary to Pomp and Circumstance. After class president Adreenah Wynn led the Pledge of Allegiance, Ciara Moore and Kayle Martina performed the class song, Whenever You Remember, by Carrie Underwood. A slide show featuring childhood photos of the students followed. Scott Shiver, youth pastor at the Eastpoint Church of God, then honored three students for their participation in the fellowship of Christian Athletes Lacey McAnally, Austin Larkin and Morgan Newell. Larkin then played guitar as Moore sang Jesus Messiah. The Carrabelle Christian Centers Free Fire Ministries offered a special dance performance. The afternoon closed with a benediction from Robert Kimberling, pastor of the Eastpoint Church of God. The churchs womens ministry hosted a reception that followed in the fellowship hall.Students encouraged to risk failure RODERICK ROBINSON You are a triple threat destined to be great, created with a purpose and given a destiny. The moment you stop believing in yourself, you become dormant.Roderick Robinson Guidance Counselor

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LocalA12 | The Times Thursday, June 7, 2012 PUBLIC NOTICEGeorge E. Weems Hospital is proposing to license its existing helipad with the Florida Department of Transportation. One of the requirements for DOT licensure is that public notice is given that a license is being sought. The existing helipad currently meets all applicable operation and safety standards. There will be no changes to the current helipad which is in front of Weems Hospital at 135 Avenue G, Apalachicola, Florida. Any persons wishing to comment or seeking additional information need to contact Mr. Alan C. Pierce, Director of Administrative Services, 34 Forbes St. Apalachicola, Florida, 32320 by Friday, June 8, 2012 by 4:00 PM, local time. Mr. Pierce may be reached by telephone at 850-653-9783, ext. 161. The countdown has started for Franklin County Public Librarys upcoming Summer Library Program. This years themes Dream Big Read for children, Own the Night for teens, and Between the Covers for adults, will run in libraries across the nation. Also, Franklin County adults can mark their calendars now for a summer program that is not only educational, but fun. Denise Williams is the speaker for How to Get a Good Nights Sleep, at the Carrabelle Branch on Thursday, June 28 at 6 p.m. Williams is a retired nurse of 28 years and specializes in alternative health medicine. Door prizes will be won by some lucky attendees and refreshments will be served to add to this noteworthy event. There is no cost for anyone interested in participating. Each year, exciting activities are offered to children at both branches of the county library and at the Franklin County Nest in Eastpoint and Carrabelle. This year, there is a summer program for teens ages 12-17 at both library branches. The teens can look forward to eld trips, black-light activities, guest speakers, selfdefense workshops, crafts and food, with prizes for those who attend all sessions. Teens will be able to document the program using a digital camera. Dream interpretation, astrology, and the New American Monster will be themes throughout the ve-week program. The Own the Night program will be Thursdays from 2-4 p.m. in Eastpoint beginning Thursday, June 21 and on Wednesdays from 4 to 6 p.m. in Carrabelle beginning June 20. There are a limited number of spots at both sites, so interested teens need to sign up quickly for this free fun summer library program. The children ages 511 will be squealing with delight as they participate in activities at the Carrabelle Branch each Friday from 10 a.m. to noon, Friday, June 22 and ending Friday, July 20. Sand art, pillow crafts, sleepy time snacks, ghostly campre crafts, and cute monster fun are just some highlights of what they can expect in their programs each week. Space is limited so caregivers will need to sign up their children soon. For the tots ages birth to 4, the Eastpoint branch will offer cute and cuddly stories, games, and crafts that not only teach but offer entertainment with the dreamy fun. This will begin on Friday, June 22 from 3:30 to 4:30 p.m., and end on Thursday, July 19. Ghostly sounds wont be scary anymore after they make their very own ghost pillow and monster feet. Research shows that children experience a retention loss of 22 percent during the summer months. Participation in the librarys summer reading program offers a fun way to keep kids excited about learning, staying active, and continuing social development. The Franklin County Public Library is committed to doing our part to make a difference in childrens lives. These exciting programs will be a sure hit with each participant. For more details about library programs please call the Eastpoint branch 6708151 or the Carrabelle branch 697-2366.Meet the candidates FridayThe Franklin County Political Kickoff Jamboree will be this Friday, June 8, beginning at 5 p.m. at the Eastpoint Fire House, 24 Sixth Street, Eastpoint. All candidates, both local and state, whether they be Democrat, Republican, third party or no party are invited to address the gathering, mingle and shake hands with the crowd. Tickets are $25, which includes dinner and a drink. Space is limited. Make checks out to the Franklin Republican Executive Committee, or simply, Franklin REC. For more information, call Kristy Banks 653-5043, Rita O Connell 927-2893, Bill Snyder 697-3189 or Liz Sisung 670-8261.Political forumHillside Coalition of Laborers for Apalachicola will host a political forum on Thursday, June 14 at 6 p.m. at the Holy Family Community Center, 203 Dr. Frederick Humphries Street in Apalachicola. For more information, please call 323-0544 or 653-7515 Nests summer adventure The Nest, the Franklin County Schools community learning program, which provides free academic and enrichment services for students in grades PreK through 8th grades, is gearing up for an exciting adventure this summer. The summer program will be in session from June 11 through July 30, Monday through Thursday, from 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. (closed July 4). Summer sites are the Franklin County Learning Center (formerly Brown Elementary School), at 85 School Road in Eastpoint; and the Carrabelle Municipal Complex site, at 1001 Gray Ave. Students at the Eastpoint site will dig for dinosaurs, create fossils, and make dinosaur puppets and dino-soaps during their rst week, before traveling to the Stone Age, where they will make cave paintings and cavemen dioramas. In later weeks, the program will explore ancient Egypt, medieval times and the pioneer eras, all the way through the 1950s and the future. In Carrabelle, students will take a trip in time to the signing of the Declaration of Independence, go to the Wild West and the 1950s. The students will explore life under the sea and Floridas history. Applications available at the Franklin County School and Learning Center, Carrabelle Municipal Complex, and at www.franklincountynest. org. For more info, call Eastpoint site director Emily Spindler 670-2820 or Carrabelle site director Joy Shiver 697-2177. YOUR COUnNTyY LIBRARy Y News BRIEfFS

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LocalThe Times | A13Thursday, June 7, 2012 653-8868 GET YOUR AD INCALL TODAY! GET YOUR AD IN 653-8868Trades & Services Trades & Services Laban Bontrager, DMD Monica Bontrager, DMD 12761 Pea Ridge Road Bristol, Florida 32321TELEPHONE (850) 643-5417 Bristol Dental ClinicDENTURE LAB ON PREMISESSame Day Service on Repairs and Relines Don Lively General Contractors LICENSED ANDINSURED 20 YEARSEXPERIENCE P.O. Box 439 Carrabelle, FL 32322 697-2783 or Mobile 566-2603RC0066499RG0065255 Carrabelle Visa, Discover, and American Express Honored at Participating Ace Stores JACKSONSBuilding Supplies Building Supplies & Auto Repair Carrabelle 697-3333 We Deliver AnywhereHardware and Paint Center J.J.s Tree Service, LLC Stump Grinder Licensed & Insured Call John : (850) 899-8432 JOES LAWN CARE FULL LAWN MAINTENANCE AND TREE TRIMMING WITH REMOVAL OF ALL DEBRIS AND JUNKNEW CUSTOMERS 10% DISCOUNTFROM YOUR PREVIOUS LAWN CARE PROVIDER WITH STATEMENT OF THE COST FIRST CUT FREEWITH VERBAL COMMITMENT TO AT LEAST 12 MONTHS OF SERVICE.PLEASECALL JOE @ 850-323-0741 ROBERTS APPLIANCE REPAIR ALL MAJOR BRANDS 18 Shadow Lane Apalachicola, FL 32320 Phone: (850) 653-8122 Cell: (850) 653-7654 From A to ZPO Box 364Port St. Joe, FL 32457850-340-0756 Gregs Handyman Service & Lawn Maintenance CARPET CERAMIC TILE HARDWOOD AREA RUGS WINDOW SHADES & BLINDS PITTSBURGH PAINTS WE BIND CARPETS We offer LPort Saint Joe area Design professionals on premise C Professional Installation2760 HWest Port Saint JoeLOCALLYOWNED aint Joe L OCA LL Y O WNED H W est W est W P ort P ort P S aint Joe $50 Offpurchase of $ 750.00 or moreTile starting at Carpet starting at Robert C. Bruner Attorney Personal & Business BankruptcyOver 30 Years Legal Experience850-670-3030 bankruptcy relief under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon advertisements. Before you decide, ask us to send you free written information Special to the TimesThe Apalachicola Museum of Art at 96 Fifth Street is pleased to host a onewoman show featuring the work of Susan Richardson. The work will be exhibited Thursday, June 7; Friday, June 8; and Saturday, June 9, as well as Thursday, June 14; Friday, June 15; and Saturday, June 16. There will be an opening reception this Friday, June 8 from 6-8 p.m. Richardson was born and raised in London, England, the youngest child of very creative parents. Her portrait, painted by her father, a member of the Royal College of Art, is part of the show. She began painting as a child and over the years painted watercolors in England. After oil workshops here on St. George Island, she started painting in earnest. Apalachicola, with its rivers, estuaries, bays and Gulf waters, provides her with endless inspiration. She has exhibited in the Atlanta Artists Center in 2010 and 2011, receiving honorable mention both times. She has also exhibited in the Binders-Limelight show in 2010 as well as the Creative Tallahassee show this spring in which all three of her submissions were chosen for hanging. Locally, Richardsons work has been exhibited in the Museum of Arts November 2010 show, which exhibited art from throughout the county and featured the work of Alice Jean Gibbs. In May 2011, she received the Forgotten Coasts Plein Air Invitational award in its Quickdraw event at Mexico Beach as the Best Emerging Artist. LOIS SWOBODA | The TimesLauren Caleb, above, had the starring role of Bunny Sue in the play of the same name presented May 31 by the prekindergarten, kindergarten, rst and second grade classes at the ABC School. The musical presentation was attended by about 200 family members. Mother Bunny was played by Ella Friedman, Father Bunny was Nico Valenzuela, Bertie was Shondel Bass, Bea was Jasmine Richards, Betty was Trinity Taylor, Kevin Sullivan was Bobby, Benjamin was John Sanders and Dr. Brown was Caleb Abel. To see a gallery of images, visit www.apalachtimes.com.SPECIAL TO THE TIMESThe oil painting Sunrise at 10 Hole Apalachicola museum hosts one-woman show ABC SCHOOL PRESENTS BUNNY SUE

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A14| The Times Thursday, June 7, 2012 CLASSIFIEDS BP Claims ProgramThis communication includes new information and claims procedures for individuals and businesses who wish to le a claim with BP under the Oil Pollution Act of 1990 (OPA). The United States District Court for the Eastern District of Louisiana has granted preliminary approval to the economic and property damage settlement between BP and plaintiffs in MDL 2179 concerning the Deepwater Horizon Incident (Settlement). If the Court grants nal approval of the settlement, individuals and businesses falling within the Settlements class de nition will be bound by the terms of the settlement unless the class member timely exercises the class members right to opt out of the settlement. Information concerning the Court-Supervised Settlement Program, including the right to opt out, may be found at www.DeepwaterHorizonSettlements.com or by calling 1-866-992-6174. Individuals and businesses that do not fall with the Settlements class de nition or that timely opt out of the Settlement may le claims under OPA with BP. This includes claims for interim, short-term damages representing less than the full amount to which the claimant may ultimately be entitled. Access to forms Effective June 4, 2012, claim forms for the BP Claims Program are available at www.bp.com/claims or may be requested by calling 1-855-687-2631. All claim forms for the BP Claims Program must be submitted in one of the following ways: By mail: BP Claims Program P.O. 330919 Houston, TX 77233-0919 By email: Scanned forms can be sent to: bpclaimsprogram@bp.com By fax: Faxed forms can be submitted to 1-866-542-4785 Additional information: Online: www.bp.com/claims By Phone: 1-855-687-2631 (toll-free, multilingual) TTY: 1-800-345-4039. For any claims under OPA that are denied or that are not resolved within 90 days after the date of submission to the BP Claims Program the claimant may, provided presentment and other requirements of law are satis ed, elect to commence an action in court against BP, or to present the claim to the NPFC, US Coast Guard Stop 7100 (ca), 4200 Wilson Boulevard, Suite 1000, Arlington, Virginia 20598-7100 for consideration. The NPFC may be contacted at 1-800-280-7118. 87378 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 19-2009-CA-000478 SUNTRUST BANK, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. RONALD K. HOWELL, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated May 8, 2012 and entered in Case No. 19-2009-CA-000478 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for FRANKLIN County, Florida wherein SUNTRUST BANK, is the Plaintiff and RONALD K. HOWELL; THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF RONALD K. HOWELL N/K/A FAYE HOWELL; SUNTRUST BANK; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at FRONT DOOR OF THE FRANKLIN COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 33 MARKET STREET, APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA at 11:00 AM, on the 19th day of June, 2012, the following desribed property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT 3, BLOCK D, UNIT 2, ST. GEORGE ISLAND GULF BEACHES, PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 15, PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 916 E. GORRIE DRIVE, SAINT GEORGE ISLAND, FL 32328 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on May 9, 2012. MARCIA M. JOHNSON Clerk of the Circuit Court By:Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk Attorney for Plaintiff: Ronald R. Wolfe & Associates P.O. Box 25018 Tampa, FL 33622 *See Americans with Disabilities Act: In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the (TDD) 850-892-8133. May 31, June 7, 2012 87442T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 11-000436CA TYNDALL FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, Plaintiff, vs. WILLIAM WAYNE WEBB, WONDA WEBB ALLEN, EASTPOINT WATER AND SEWER DISTRICT, AND FRANKLIN COUNTY, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Franklin County, Florida, pursuant to the Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure, entered in this cause, the Clerk of this Court shall sell the property at public sale at 11:00 A.M. E.D.T., on the 12th day of June, 2012, at the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida, 32320, the following described real property lying and being in Franklin County, Florida, to-wit: EXHIBIT A A parcel of land lying in the Southeast Quarter of Fraction Section 27, Township 8 South, Range 8 West, Franklin County, Florida being described as follows: Commence at the intersection of the Southeasterly boundary of the 60.0 foot State Road (S-384-A) with the Northeasterly boundary of the 60.0 foor State Road (S-384) abd run thence North then 17 degrees 02 minutes 55 seconds East along said right-of-way of State Road S-384-A 962.10 feet to the Point of Beginning. From said Point of Beginning run thence South 72 degrees 57 minutes 05 seconds East 325.00 feet to a point in the center of a creek, thence North 67 degrees 40 minutes 45 seconds East along said creek center line 252.24 thence leaving said creek North 72 degrees 57 minutes 05 seconds West 370.00, thence South 17 degrees 02 minutes 55 seconds West 131.10 feet, thence North 72 degrees 57 minutes 05 seconds West 150.00 feet, to a point on said right-of-way of State Road S-384-A, thence South 17 degrees 02 minutes 55 seconds West along said right-of-way 28.90 feet to the Point of Beginning. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. This Notice dated this 27th day of April, 2012. MARCIA JOHNSON Clerk Circuit Court, Franklin County, Florida By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk June 7, 14, 2012 87444T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 19-2010-CA-000292 DIVISION: BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP, Plaintiff, vs. ANGELA SHARP, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated May 14, 2012, and entered in Case No. 19-2010-CA-000292 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for FRANKLIN County, Florida wherein BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP, is the Plaintiff and ANGELA SHARP; THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF ANGELA SHARP N/K/A GUS PRESTON; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at FRONT DOOR OF THE FRANKLIN COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 33 MARKET STREET, APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA at 11:00 AM, on the 27th day of June, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT 27, BLOCK 3 OF SUN N SAND, UNIT 2, AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE 12, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 637 PINE STREET, PANACEA, FL 32346 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and seal of this Court on May 18, 2012. MARCIA M. JOHNSON Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk Attorney for Plaintiff: RONALD R. WOLFE & ASSOCIATES, P.L. P.O. Box 25018 Tampa, Florida 33622-5018 **See Americans with Disabilities Act: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Mr. Doug Smith, Office of Court Administration, Leon County Courthouse, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 Phone: 850-577-4401 Fax: 850-487-7947 June 7, 14, 2012 87597T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 1200060CA NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE, LLC Plaintiff, vs. ROBERTA J. SNYDER A/K/A ROBERTA SNYDER; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF ROBERTA J. SNYDER A/K/A ROBERTA SNYDER; TOAD HOLLOW CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION, INC.; THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK AS SUCCESSOR TRUSTEE TO JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A., AS TRUSTEE ON BEHALF OF THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS OF THE CWHEQ INC., CWHEQ REVOLVING HOME EQUITY LOAN TRUST, SERIES 2006-1; UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2, ET AL Defendant(s) NOTICE OF ACTIONCONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE TO: ROBERTA J. SNYDER A/K/A ROBERTA SNYDER; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF ROBERTA J. SNYDER A/K/A ROBERTA SNYDER whose residence is unknown if he/she/they be living;. and if he/she/they be dead, the unknown defendants who may be spouses, heirs, devisees, grantees. assignees, lienors. creditors, trustees, and all parties claiming an interest by, through, under or against the Defendants, who are not known to be dead or alive, and all parties having or claiming to have any right, title or interest in the property described in the mortgage being foreclosed herein. YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property: THAT CERTAIN CONDOMINIUM UNIT COMPOSED OF UNIT NUMBER 207, BUILDING B, AND THE UNDIVIDED 1/7 INTEREST IN THE COMMON ELEMENTS APPURTENANT THERETO, IN ACCORDANCE WITH AND SUBJECT TO THE COVENANTS, RESTRICTIONS, RESERVATIONS, LIMITATIONS, CONDITIONS, LIENS, EASEMENTS, TERMS, AND OTHER PROVISIONS OF THE DECLARATION OF CONDOMINIUM OF TOAD HOLLOW, RECORDED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 793, PAGE(S) 169-250, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on counsel for Plaintiff, whose address is 3010 North Military Trail, Suite 300, Boca Raton, Florida 33431 on or before (30 days from Date of First Publication of this Notice) and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition filed herein. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court at County, Florida, this 17th day of May, 2012. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk Attorney for Plaintiff: Robertson, Anschutz & Schneid, P.I. 3010 N. Military Trail, Suite 300 Boco Raton, FL 33431 (561) 241-6901 Fax (561) 241-9181 May 31, June 7, 2012 87661T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 19-2012-CA-000090 DIVISION: U.S. BANK AS TRUSTEE FOR CITIGROUP MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST, INC., Plaintiff, vs. GUY N. MAULDIN, et al., Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION To: GUY N. MAULDIN SHARON M. MAULDIN Last Known Address: 85 S. Bayshore Dr. Eastpoint, FL 323283212 Current Address: Unknown ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS Last Known Address: Unknown Current Address: Unknown YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in Franklin County, Florida. COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 36, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH. RANGE 7 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 53 MINUTES 47 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION 36, A DISTANCE OF 1824.61 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 29 DEGREES 53 MINUTES 47 SECONDS EAST 68.70 FEET TO A RE-ROD ON THE SOUTHWESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF COUNTY ROAD NO. S-65 (BAYSHORE DRIVE), SAID RE-ROD LYING ON A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHEASTERLY, THENCE RUN NORTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY AND ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 1109.30 FEET THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 13 DEGREES 10 MINUTES 06 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 254.95 FEET, THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING NORTH 51 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 42 SECONDS WEST 254.39 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 44 DEGREES 50 MINUTES 39 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 899.37 FEET TO THE POINTOF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING THENCE RUN SOUTH 45 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 25 SECONDS WEST 265.73 FEET TO THE APPROXIMATE MEAN HIGH WATER LINE OF APALACHICOLA BAY, THENCE RUN ALONG SAID APPROXIMATE MEAN HIGH WATER LINE AS FOLLOWS; NORTH 41 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 39 SECONDS WEST 34.80 FEET, THENCE NORTH 50 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 13 SECONDS WEST 48.11 FEET, THENCE NORTH 40 DEGREES 26 MINUTES 02 SECONDS WEST 56.25 FEET, THENCE NORTH 54 DEGREES 29 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 34.28 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID APPROXIMATE MEAN HIGH WATER LINE RUN NORTH 45 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 25 SECONDS EAST 268.63 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT ON THE SOUTHWESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF SAID COUNTY ROAD NO. S-65, THENCE RUN SOUTH 144 DEGREES 50 MINUTES 39 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 172.54 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. BEING SUBSTANTIALLY THE SAME LANDS AS THOSE DESCRIBED IN O.R. BOOK 468 AT PAGE 251 OF THE. PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 85 S. BAYSHORE DR., EASTPOINT, FL 32328-3212 has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses within 30 days after the first publication, if any, on Albertelli Law, Plaintiffs attorney, whose address is P.O. Box 23028, Tampa, FL 33623, and file the original with this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney, or immediately thereafter; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint or petition WITNESS my hand and the seal of this court on the 22nd day of May, 2012. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of the Circuit Court Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk Attorney for Plaintiff: ALBERTELLI LAW P.O. Box 23028 Tampa, FL 33623 **See the Americans with Disabilities Act: In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons needing special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the Clerk of the Courts, Marcia M. Johnson, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, FL 32320; telephone number (850) 653-8861, not later than seven (7) days prior to this proceeding. If you are hearing or voice impaired, please call (850) 577-4400. To file response please contact Franklin County Clerk of Court, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, FL 32320, Tel: (850) 653-8861; Fax: (850) 653-9339. May 31, June 7, 2012 87601T PUBLIC NOTICE Notice is hereby given that the Franklin County Board of County Commissioners intends to change the classification of the County Director of Emergency Management from Regular Class to Senior Management Class in the Florida Retirement System: 0000000260. May 31, June 7, 2012 87673T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No. 2012-00024-CP Division: Probate IN RE: ESTATE OF HOLLIE M. STOTT Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Hollie M. Stott, deceased, whose date of death was February 27, 2012, is pending in the Circuit Court for Franklin County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida 32320. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representa-tives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is May 31, 2012. Personal Representative: Mara S. Liesegang 32 Belleview Avenue Brookhaven, NY 11719 Attorneys for Personal Representative SANDERS AND DUNCAN, P.A. FL Bar No. 442178 80 MARKET STREET APALACHICOLA, FL 32320 (850) 653-8976 E-Mail Address: bsanders@fairpoint.net May 31, June 7, 2012 87707T NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW PURSUANT TO SECTION 865.09, FLORIDA STATUTES NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of Tropic Ice Snow Cones located at 516 Ave A in the County of FRANKLIN, in the City of East Point, Florida, 32328 intends to register the said name with the Divisions of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, Florida. Dated at Eastpoint, Florida, this 30th day of May, 2012. Josh and Jake Richards Tropic Ice Snow Cones June 7, 2012

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, June 7, 2012 The Times | A15 16 -18 yard load clean fill dirt $90Delivered within 20 miles of Carravelle. Call Mike 850-899-5319 The Key to Savings Start here in Classifieds. Sales/Business DevInteractive Sales ManagerAre you passionate about providing the best media solutions to your customers? Floridas Freedom Interactive Newspapers, is seeking a hands-on Interactive Sales Manager with a track record of driving revenue in multiplatform environments. You will be responsible for coaching, mentoring and developing your sales team with the goal of aggressively increasing revenue. Included within your sphere of responsibility are the following: Developing new revenue streams, setting sales goals, field coaching and managing sales performance -making this a very hands on leadership role. The Interactive Sales Manager will foster an attitude of exceptional customer service and provide motivation, leadership and fresh ideas to the selling process. Position Requirements: Proven sales experience in digital products Experience developing and leading a high performing sales team Vision and passion to drive growth in interactive sales Strong analytical ability to budget forecast and effectively utilize market research The successful candidate will lead cross-selling efforts in print and digital solutions and must possess a demonstrated expertise with the Internet. A college degree in advertising or marketing is preferred but not required. Sales Experience and previous media management experience is preferred. Florida Freedom offers an excellent benefit package including health, dental, vision and life insurance, 401(k) plan, vacation and sick leave. This role offers a chance to live and work along Floridas Emerald Coast encompassing 24 miles of pristine white-sand beaches stretching along the Gulf of Mexico. If this sounds like the right mix of challenge and opportunity, please e-mail your resume or contact me at either of the following addresses: E-Mail: sfeith@notes.freedom.com http://www.facebook.com/#!/skfeith http://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=1999909&trk =tab_pro https://twitter.com/#!/skfeith For more information about our organization please go to: freedom.com/careers Web ID#: 34211062 ToPlace Your Classified ad inCall Our New Numbers Now!Call: 850-747-5020 Toll Free:800-345-8688 Fax: 850-747-5044 Email: thestar@pcnh.com Email: thetimes@pcnh.com theAPALACHICOLA & CARRABELLETIMES CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW Total Down Pmt $7752002 Chevy Blazer -3 Rows T otal Price $5,9000% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! Nice Car of Forgotten Coast, LLC For inventory log onto: www.nicecarofforgottencoastllc.com Total Down Pmt $12952002 Chevy Silverado X/Cab -4X4 T otal Price $7,9000% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! Total Down Pmt $9752001 Ford F-150 X/Cab -4X4 T otal Price $6,5000% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! St. George Island $160 week, Electric, Satellite, Garbage incl. Pool tble. 12 X 65 deck w/Beautiful view 850-653-5114 Lanark Village Carlton St. #5, 1 Br 1 Ba, All Tile, Walk-in Closet, Landlord pays Electric and Water, $525 month + $300 deposit. Call 850-927-2838 or 864-356-5949 1 BRCottageH/AC in Apalachicola, FL. 850-643-7740. East Point 3 bed, 2 bath, plus 1 apt. For rent or lease, fully furnished Call: 850-670-8463 or 850-653-5763Text FL11701 to 56654 Total Down Pmt $5751999 Chevy Impala T otal Price $4,2000% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! RENTALS1 BEDROOM, 1 BATH, UNFURNISHED APT. Lanark, Remodeled, Inc. Water ......................$425 2 BEDROOM, 1 BATH, UNFURNISHED APT. Lanark ............................................................$400 2 BEDROOM, 1 BATH, MOBILE HOME Fenced Yard ....................................................$500 3 BEDROOM, 2 BATH, UNFURNISHED Doublewide.....................................................$700 3 BEDROOM, 2 BATH, WATER VIEW HOME Unfurnished, Lawn Inc. ...................................$800 2 BEDROOM, 1 BATH, UNFURNISHED APT. Small Porch ....................................................$375 2 BEDROOM, 2 BATH, MOBILE HOME Large Yard ......................................................$500 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322850-697-9604 850-323-0444 www.seacrestre.comwww. rst tness.com/carrabellePROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND RENTALS 1 br, 1 ba, efficiency Call for information 850-653-6103 Text FL11727 to 56654 Publishers NoticeAll real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on a equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. Education/TrainingPT Housekeeper/ nannyFor newborn on SGI. Nonsmoking. Must have childcare experience, references and pass background check. 850-274-1321 or augusta.west@ammfl.org. Food SvsOyster Shuckers Needed$9 per gallon, Leavins Seafood, Inc (850) 653-8823 Web ID#: 34211519 e Apalachicola Bay Charter School is accepting applications for the following positions for 2012-13 school year: Music/Art/Character education instructor Physical Education instructor Teacher assistant Custodial personnel Bus driverABC School is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Please send resumes to: Chimene Johnson, ABC School, 98 12th Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320 HELP WANTED Warehouse / Delivery Eastpoint Location CLEANERS CLEANERS NEEDED NEEDEDLots of Work and Good Pay Must have Own Vehicle Must have Own SuppliesCALL 850.227.3806 GUN SHOWSanta Rosa County Auditorium, Milton, FL. June 16th & 17th 9am -5pm call (850) 957-4952 or (850) 261-8407 General Admission $6Text FL08625 to 56654 CASH PAID for unexpired, sealed DIABETIC TEST STRIPS-up to $25/Box! Shipping prepaid. (888) 883-8835 Incorrect Insertion PolicyFor Classified In-column AdvertisersAll ads placed by phone are read back to the advertiser to insure correctness. The newspaper will assume correctness at the time of the read-back procedure unless otherwise informed. Please your ad. Advertisers are requested to check the advertisement on the first insertion for correctness. Errors should be reported immediately. Your Florida Freedom newspaper will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion, nor will it be liable for any error in advertisements to a greater extent than the cost of the space occupied by the error. Any copy change, during an ordered schedule constitutes a new ad and new charges. We do not guarantee position of ANY ad under any classification. Publishers Notice SCAM To avoid possible scams, it is recommended that consumers should verify caller information when receiving calls regarding credit card payments. Consumers should also contact the local company themselves instead of giving this information to individuals who are contacting them directly. Adopt: Doctor, caring family lovingly waits for miracle 1st baby *Monica* 800552-0045*FLBar42311* Expenses Paid* Bay Harbour 801 Gulf Beach Dr. St. George Island, FL 32328. June 9, 2012. 8:00 am.MOVING SALEInside yard sale: bedroom sets, coffee table, pictures, and etc. Come out rain or shine! Text FL12332 to 56654 Park your car in Classified and see it take off in the fast lane!

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Local Our local real estate experts have identied what they feel are the best values around and are oering them to you in Real Estate Picks! (In this section), Discover the best real estate values in Mexico Beach, Port St. Joe, Apalachicola, Cape San Blas, St. George Island, Carrabelle and surrounding areas. 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West Gulf Beach Drive. John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.comMLS# 247024 $15,000 EastpointMAGNOLIA RIDGE Foreclosure, One acre residential building site. Located in a secluded area of beautiful Franklin County. Paved roads and underground utilities make this a great location for a permanent residence or weekend retreat. Minutes away from St. George Island. Listing agent Michael Billings dbutler@coastalcoverage.com Locally owned and operated Home Business Auto Health Workers Comp Thursday, June 7, 2011 A16 | The TimesBy Lois Swoboda653-1819 | @ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star .com The rst phase of proposed repairs to the Fort Coombs Armory and Convention Center will include repairs to the roof and the electrical system. On May 15, architect Warren Emo reported on the condition of Coombs Armory and Convention Center and estimated the total cost of phase one of repairs at $234,762. The commission has $234,000 in dedicated funds provided by the Franklin County Tourist Development Council for repairs to the structure. In a telephone interview, Emo said the plans for phase one will be ready in late July, and work will actually start on the Armory in about four months. Were going to do everything we can to optimize the use of local contractors and trades, he said. Its such a ne old building. I hope the money comes along to get it all xed. Its such an important part of historic Apalachicola. In April 2009, the county leased the Armory from the state for 50 years at a cost of $300 per year. Although military operations in the building ceased over a decade ago, the building has served as a venue for weddings, reunions, dances and more for decades. Since taking the lease on the building, county of cials say there have been persistent problems with the leaky roof, electrical system and lack of climate control in the main auditorium. Emo was chosen in November 2011 to oversee renovation of the more than century-old building. Emo provided commissioners with an illustrated report on the condition of the building. In his assessment, he listed the main priorities for the Armory as repair of roof leaks, restroom renovation and ADA (Americans with Disabilities Act) accessibility compliance, an upgrade to the electrical system and installation of a heat and air conditioning system in the main auditorium. He cited water damage, infestations of birds, rodents and possibly termites, and drainage problems in an adjacent alley, as other concerns. Emo said the shingled roof over the main building is in good condition, but the internal gutter system is partially blocked, which has led to water damage. He said the roof on the small addition to the building has been seriously undermined by water damage and the sprayon membrane attacked by birds. That portion of the building needs a new roof including sheathing, supports, gutters and downspouts, requiring the removal and replacement of 600 square feet of shingles, he said. The estimated cost of the roof repair is $43,000. Removal and reset of roof mechanical equipment, including exhaust fans, rings in at an additional $1,500 and lightning protection for the new roof will cost $15,000. Emo said the damage to the additions roof is so severe that he recommended limiting access to the southwest portion of the side building during heavy rain. Alan Pierce, the countys director of administrative services, said roof damage was of less concern than damage to the main electrical panel caused by a major leak in southwest corner of the addition. Pierce said the Armorys emergency lighting system does not meet code and the building has no re alarm. Emos estimate for replacing the electrical panel, rewiring the building and upgrading the emergency lighting system and re alarm is $55,000. He said the drainage problem in the alley behind the Armory is already being addressed by the city and requires no funding, but it will cost about $16,500 to tie the Armory into the new system once the pipes are replaced. Emo estimated the general contractors fees for phase one at $24,000. The remaining $75,000 budgeted for phase one will pay for insurance and permits, $18,000; performance and payment bonds, $2,500; architectural and engineering services, $20,000; painting $2,100 and miscellaneous expenses. The county commission voted unanimously to accept Emos recommendations. Assistant County Planner Mark Currenton said Emo will now draw up plans for the work to be performed in this phase of the renovation and the county will seek bids for a general contractor to oversee repairs. Currenton said Emo receives part of the $17,000 allocated for basic architectural and engineering services and $3,300 in fees for drawings. Also, he may also be reimbursed for expenses. His company may receive some of the money allocated for electrical repairs, and he could enter a bid for the general contractors position. Van Johnson, who retired from his position as director of parks and recreation May 31, had an of ce in the Armory for many years. He said the repairs are long overdue. A HISTORY OF THE ARMORYThe Franklin Guards, an infantry company organized in Apalachicola in 1884 by J. H. Coombs and Fred Better eld, erected the rst building in the city to be used solely as an armory in 1898. Made of simulated brick, it was located at the corner of High Street and Center Avenue. On May 25, 1900, re destroyed it and much of the downtown. On July 3, 1900, a committee was formed to build a new armory. The facility was designed by Frank and Thomas Lockwood of Columbus, Ga., and constructed by John H. Hecker. It was completed in 1901 at a cost of $12,000. The replacement armory features real brick walls and a gable roof with a gable parapet. Solid massing of the walls, slit windows and a corner tower that resembles a medieval watchtower make this an imposing military structure. Fort Coombs is a unique example of fortress architecture in Florida and has served as the military and social nexus of Apalachicola for more than a century. Units stationed here have been mobilized for service in World Wars I and II, the Gulf War and the War with Iraq. Bronze plaques located on the exterior front wall memorialize the names of generations of Apalachicola and Franklin County citizens who have served their state and nation.Architect moves forward with Armory repairsLOIS SWOBODA | The TimesWarren EmoFLORIDA MEMORY PROJECTA view of the Armory, taken about 20 years ago. On behalf of my staff and I, we would like to thank all our loyal patients for the honor of being selected for the multiple awards that we have received over the last 12 months; including voted most compassionate Dr. and Patients Choice Award. It is a great honor and we will continue to strive for the very best medical care for our patients.VINCENTIVERS, M.D.301TwentiethStreet Port St. Joe, FL 32456850-227-7070www.iversmd.com On behalf of my staff and I, we would like to thank all our loyal patients for the honor of On behalf of my staff and I, we would like to