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The Apalachicola times
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100380/00173
 Material Information
Title: The Apalachicola times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: H.W. Johnston
Place of Publication: Apalachicola Fla
Apalachicola Fla
Publication Date: 05-24-2012
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1885.
General Note: Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 32911693
lccn - sn 95026907
System ID: UF00100380:00173
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Preceded by: Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by: Apalachicola herald

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Photos by DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times Members of the Odyssey of the Mind teams are, seated from left, Fisher Edwards, Rory Countryman and Ethan Riley, and standing, from left, Connor Smith, James Hat eld, Kendall Meyer, Bobby Kilgore, Jalynn Liston and Ursula Countryman. Right Connor Smith recreates his Odyssey Angels performance. Thursday, May 24, 2012 By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star .com Tourists on St. George Island claim to have encountered visitors from further away. On May 10, someone posted the following account of a close encounter with something unknown in the sky over Franklin County: I like to get great sunset pictures, from the Florida coast, so every night at the beach house I would go up on top to the viewing area to watch the sunset, to see if it would be a memorable one or not. This particular evening, (I think it was Wednesday evening, but it might have been another night. The date and time should be part of the digital info however.) Anyway, as I was looking northwest to watch for the sunset, an object which appeared to be a black orb with a aming bottom streaked over my head from out over the Gulf, headed inland. I pointed my camera at it and zoomed the lens, and snapped a picture, before the object was beyond my sight. There was no sound at all. I have no idea how high the object was but it appeared to be about airplane height. Based on information given on the web page, the visitor viewed the unknown object from the Plantation so it must have been headed to Eastpoint or further up the river. The alleged photo was not posted with the report. The sighting was reported to MUFON, the Mutual UFO Network, an American nonpro t organization that investigates reported UFO sightings. MUFON was originally established as the Midwest UFO Network in Quincy, Illinois in May 1969 by Walter H. Andrus, Allen Utke, John Schuessler, and others. The network has more than 3,000 members worldwide, most of them based in the United States. Florida has one of the St. George Island visitor reports UFO PHOTO COURTESY OF MUFON An unidenti ed ying object photographed from Dog Island in 2011. Special to the Times Jeff Vonier has led his letter of intent to seek election to the of ce of sheriff. Vonier, 69, Highway 65, Eastpoint, has led as a Democrat. He became legally entitled to begin the process of getting petitions signed, with signatures due to the Supervisor of Elections of ce on May 7. Voniers name would then appear on the Aug. 14 primary ballot, provided he of cially quali es during the June 4 to 8 qualifying period. In the event only Democrats le for this of ce or any of the county of ces, Republicans and those without party af liation would be able to vote in any race that has candidates from only one political party, known as a universal race. The following is a statement issued by the candidate: My name is H. Jeff Vonier. My wife, Barbara Lynn Vonier (aka BJ) and I came to Franklin County back in 1984 hunting the perfect place to live and raise our two children, Jefferson Brook and Ivy Lynn. I graduated from Gulf Coast College in law enforcement and corrections at the top of my class. I worked for the Franklin County Sheriffs Department for eight Jeff Vonier to run for sheriff JEFF VONIER Federal probe prompts release of 41 employees By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894| @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com A directive from federal immigration of cials led to the dismissal of 41 Hispanic workers from Apalachicolas Leavins Seafood last week, due to an apparent failure to comply with regulations in producing valid documentation citing their right to work in the United States. According to Sister Mary Alice, a Catholic nun active in the churchs outreach to Apalachicolas Spanish-speaking community, a May 15 evening meeting called by Grady and Alice Leavins, who have owned and operated the facility on Water Street for the past 40 years, DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times The Leavins Seafood plant on Water Street. Leavins dismisses illegal workers By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com When Franklin County school kids take the stage, they like to make people laugh. Now this might not be a hard-andfast rule they could probably just as well pull off a tragedy that has an audience weeping in their seats but it seems clear they much prefer to act funny. They enjoy dressing up like sh and wiggling across the stage, scooting like an alligator on a skateboard and talking in a language using only a smile and Seahawk Sparks of drama y at Franklin County School xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx 50 WWW.APALACHTIMES.COM VOL. 126 ISSUE 4 Phone: 850-653-8868 Web: apalachtimes.com E-mail: dadlerstein@star .com Fax: 850-653-8036 Circulation: 800-345-8688 Opinion . . . . . . A4 Society . . . . . . A8 Faith . . . . . . . A9 Outdoors . . . . . A10 Tide Chart . . . . A10 Sports . . . . . . A11 Classi eds . . . A12-A13 DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK: School News & Society: 11 a.m. Friday Real Estate Ads: 11 a.m. Thursday Legal Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Display Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Line Ads: 5 p.m. Monday xxxxx Contact Us xxxxx Out to see Index Teaching new parents, A2 See VONIER A3 See UFO A12 See DRAMA A6 See LEAVINS A3 The Times Smith, James Hat eld, Kendall Meyer, Bobby Kilgore, Connor for this of ce or any of the county of ces, Republicans and those without party af liation would be able to vote in any race that has candidates from only one political party, known as a universal race. issued by the candidate: Barbara Lynn Vonier (aka BJ) and I came to Franklin County back in 1984 hunting the perfect place to live and raise our two children, Jefferson Brook and Ivy Lynn. College in law enforcement and corrections at the top of my class. Sheriffs Department for eight it seems clear they much prefer to act They enjoy dressing up like sh and wiggling across the stage, scooting like an alligator on a skateboard and talking in a language using only a smile and DRAMA A6 Try a kayak Saturday This Saturday, May 26, Journeys of St. George will host a kayak and stand-up paddleboard demo in the boat basin across from Harry As, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Call 927-3259 for more information. Captain Jack shing tourney This Saturday, May 26, a shing tournament to bene t the American Red Cross and the Alligator Point Fire Department will be on Alligator Point. First place prize for offshore is $2,000 and rst place inshore pays $1,000. Entry fee for offshore boats with four anglers is $350; sh inshore with two anglers for $175. Tourney kicks off with a Friday night captains party featuring low country boil. For more info, email captainjacktournament@ gmail.com. Pay tribute on Memorial Day On Monday, May 28, at 10 a.m., everyone is invited to a Memorial Day ceremony at Veterans Plaza in Apalachicola. The tribute features keynote speaker Gen. Charles Wilhelm, who retired from the Marine Corps in 2000 after more than 37 years of active service. In Lanark Village, Camp Gordon Johnston American Legion Post 82 will host its annual Memorial Day service and luncheon. The service will begin at the ag pole at noon, with a free nger food lunch to follow. Doors open at 11 a.m. Fishermans Choices kids tourney June 9 Charles and Rex Pennycuff are hosting their annual Fishermans Choice Youth Fishing Tournament on Saturday, June 9. Kids 16 and under will sh for all major fresh and saltwater species. Each entry receives a T-shirt, and after the tournament, entries are invited to attend a cookout at the Eastpoint Pavilion. Entry is free. Call 670-8808 or visit www. shermanschoice.net for more information. Seahawk Imagi Nation

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Local A2 | The Times Thursday, May 24, 2012 Franklin County Tourist Development Council PUBLIC MEETING SCHEDULE CHANGE Please note the following changes to the regular schedule: Tuesday, May 22, 2012 Regular Committee Meeting, City of Apalachicola Room, begins @ 1:30 PM Tuesday, June 12, 2012 Council Meeting, Carrabelle City Tuesday, June 26, 2012 Regular Committee Meeting, City of Apalachicola Room, begins @ 1:30 PM Tuesday, July 10, 1012 Regular Council Meeting Can celed and rescheduled for Tuesday, July 24 2012, City of Apalachicola Room, begins @ 1:30 PM Tuesday, July 24, 2012 Council/Committee Meeting, City of Apalachicola Room, begins @ 1:30 p.m. Tuesday, August 14, 2012, Board, Franklin County Court house Annex, 3:00 p.m. Tuesday, August 28, 2012, Grants and Marketing Commit tees, beginning at 1:30 pm Tuesday, September 11, 2012, Board, Carrabelle City Of Tuesday, September 25, 2012, Grants and Marketing Committees, beginning at 1:30 pm @ 17-1/2 Avenue E, Apalachicola, 653-8678, or visit our website: www.anaturalescape.com/administration. This is a public meeting and two or more County Commissioners may attend. OR To purchase a graduation greeting ad: Call Joel Reed at 370.6090 jreed@star.com or Kari Fortune at 227.7847 kfortune@star.com Your 2012 Senior By VALERIE GARMAN 229-7843 | @valeriegarman vgarman@star .com Russ Petrucka spent Thursday afternoon, May 10 reminding soon-to-be dads that every day is Fathers Day. Not long after the arrival of Mothers Day, Petrucka, an employee with Healthy Families in Franklin County, was on a mission to help young dads realize the importance of developing strong relationships and being there for their children. Dozens of new and expectant moms and dads, from Franklin and Gulf counties, attended the Healthy Start Coalitions fourth annual Baby Shower at the Centennial Building in Port St. Joe for plenty of parenting information, food, games, speakers and more. Even though its Mothers Day this weekend, every day is Fathers Day, Petrucka said as he greeted a barrage of expectant parents browsing his booth. He handed out informational brochures to the dads in the crowd and demonstrated the proper way to swaddle a baby. The young guys, you know, they want to be dads, they want to do good, Petrucka said. I tell the guys, you walk into the hospital and youre somebodys son, you walk out and youre somebodys father. Ifs a life-changing thing. Bret McClary came from Carrabelle to attend the shower. He will be a new father this August. This is my first kid Im just kind of trying to get some information, he said. Im not scared Im just ready for it to happen already. McClary said the booths at the event helped him realize how early a babys brain develops and how important it is to protect. Tonight is your night, proclaimed Kelly ByrnsDavis of the Healthy Start Coalition as she greeted parents. The purpose is to celebrate parents and to show honor and support to new parents, she said, noting the great turnout of dads in the audience. Healthy Start loves dads and we value their support. About 20 booths from various organizations were set up to provide parents with information and demonstrations on car seat safety, contraception, breastfeeding, infant brain development, diaper changing, swaddling and safe sleep. Ellie Tullis, a representative from Healthy Start and Healthy Families, manned a booth with a playpen set up alongside. Here everything is wrong, said Tullis as she motioned to the playpen with a sleeping doll inside. The doll was on its stomach, covered with a blanket and surrounded by stuffed animals, all dangers for a sleeping baby. Safe sleep is a big campaign statewide, she said. The frequency of rollover and co-sleeping deaths is really high. Dr. Robert Head, a pediatrician with Sacred Heart Medical Group, with a practice in Apalachicola, provided the audience with a speech on newborn anxiety, walking the soonto-be parents through the stresses surrounding bringing a baby home. Head went through the schedule of checkups, options for breastfeeding, how to handle fussiness and provided tips on discipline. New babies are work, Head said. The more you can enjoy that, the better off you are. The number one pointer he had for new parents is to learn how to keep your cool. Youre going to get tired, youre going to want to throw your baby against the wall, but you cant do that, he said. Everyone is here for the good of your child. Dr. David Dixon, an obstetrician with North Florida Womens Care, who makes regular visits to Weems Medical Center east in Carrabelle, provided insight into the push to increase access to information for new parents in northwest Florida through community involvement and events like the Healthy Start Baby Shower. Our neck of the woods has a significantly higher infant mortality rate, and theres a big push to gure out why, Dixon said. Thanks to organizations like Healthy Start and the March of Dimes, the awareness has really increased. Healthy Start Baby Shower celebrates parents VALERIE GARMAN | Florida Freedom Russ Petrucka of Healthy Families in Franklin County, right, helps soonto-be dad Bret McClary learn how to properly swaddle a baby at a booth catering to new fathers at the Healthy Start Baby Shower. Right: Apalachicola pediatrician Dr. Robert Head discusses the issues surrounding newborn anxiety to an audience lled with expectant mothers at the Healthy Start Baby Shower.

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Local The Times | A3 Thursday, May 24, 2012 LEAVINS from page A1 led to the dismissals. They expressed sadness at having to let so many peo ple go, said the nun, who attended the meeting, along with Spanish interpreter Ra mon Valenzuela. They also said (immigration) was not going after the employees but after the employer. They told them they could contin ue to live in Apalachicola but could not work for Leavins. Grady Leavins, 68, said Tuesday he was saddened by having to release the work ers, many of whom he said worked there several years and were like family to them. He said the facility remains open six days a week, and is continuing operations, al though with fewer staff and a larger volume of product imported from other states. As the number of Central American immigrants has grown in the county over the past decade, Leavins oyster plant has been a major em ployer, particularly of shuck ers, from their ranks. He has maintained a low-prole, but open about his employees, praising their hard work, and speaking of their value in growing the American economy, especially when, as he pointed out Tuesday, it is difcult to nd locals willing to work at jobs their parents and grandparents once did. He directed further ques tions to the rms Tallahas see attorney Elizabeth Ricci, managing partner of Ram bana and Ricci, which exclu sively handles immigration matters. Ricci said Tuesday Leavins acted following an investigation by U.S. Immi gration and Customs En forcement that dates back to the November 2011 Florida Seafood Festival, when ICE ofcials asked to review em ployment records for all of the rms workers. It all boils down to I-9 compliance, the employ ment eligibility verication form, Ricci said. Basically, the Leavinses asked all new hires for proof of their eligi bility to work in the United States. It appears that some of the workers may have taken advantage of the Leavinses. They were presented with documents that appear to be real, she said. They had to make the very dif cult decisions to terminate them. In an email, Ricci de scribed the I-9, which re quires proof of a valid Social Security number, birth certif icate, passport or citizenship or resident alien identica tion card, as a deceivingly simple one page form. It is practically impos sible to complete the I-9 cor rectly, she said. The work ers who appeared to have been eligible (to work in the U.S.) may not have been eligible. The attorney said the rm is required to deter mine whether documents reasonably appear to be genuine but are not asked to determine their validity. If those documents ap pear valid, their job is done as far as completing the I-9, Ricci said, noting she has re cently trained Leavins staff in proper I-9 completion. Going forward, they are in full compliance, she said. The attorney also con rmed the workers, most of who come from Guatemala or other Central America countries, are not in im mediate danger of being deported. This has nothing to do with deportation, she said. No one has been served with a notice to appear (be fore ICE). This is not part of this process. Ricci said the dismissed workers could face a simi lar problem if they seek jobs elsewhere. If a shucker were to try to shuck some where else, that other em ployer would be required to properly and completely execute an I-9, she said. Thats what this whole thing boils down to. She said about a dozen of Leavins immigrant work force remain employed at the processing plant, since they work under H-2B visas, part of a U.S. program for temporary/seasonal, nonagricultural employment by foreign nationals. This could be for some one who is working a peak load or a seasonal industry like oysters, Ricci said. You have to prove youre not taking a job away from a citizen. The employers have to prove you cant nd a U.S. worker to do the job. If a U.S. citizen walked in the door and said they wanted to shuck, Im sure theyd gladly hire them, she said. Ricci said Leavins has paid taxes on all these for eign workers and into Social Security. Not only does he pay taxes, he pays far above the prevailing wage that the Department of Labor requires, she said. The Department of Labor deter mines the wage in an alien employment setting, and he is always higher than the minimum. Not only is he paying the workers very well, but money is going into the So cial Security system that those workers may not ever be able to take out, she said, noting that these monies go into a suspension fund that cannot be touched. Ricci said they didnt yet know whether the govern ment will penalize Leavins. They are cooperating com pletely. Thats not on the table right now, she said. Employers can face nes if there is a pattern and prac tice of knowingly hire illegal aliens. This is not the case with Leavins. Leavins has been an in tegral part of the Apalachic ola community for almost 40 years. They have employed many locals over those years and it has been their intention to comply with the law, Ricci said. This is a good example of how all em ployees should be cognizant of (immigrant labor rules), and the seriousness of being in a position to comply with them. Catholic nuns do what they can Sister Mary Alice said she and the other nuns at the Martin House have prayed and counseled, and can be of some assistance, to workers who scramble to cope with the sudden loss of their jobs. Some are planning to go home and some are plan ning to look for work else where, she said. These are very resourceful people. The ones that I talked to at Mass yesterday said frankly, they hadnt decided yet. People need to make long-term plans, and thats not easy to do, said the nun. A lot of these folks are used to sending home what they dont need right away. They may not have a cushion here. Sister Mary Alice said Leavins paid the workers their wages the night of the meeting, but the nancial crunch is beginning to hit them, especially since they cannot obtain unemploy ment benets and other as sistance available to legal residents. I visited one home and there were eight adults and a little child in that house, and half of them worked at Leavins, said the nun. They simply couldnt make the rent on what the other four are earning. Its just go ing to be very hard. She said she has assisted some families with obtain ing passports for their chil dren who were born in the United States, and thus have citizenship. Theres a panic among those working at the other places, said Sister Mary Alice. Whats going to hap pen to them? Who knows? Yesterday at Mass, we had a special prayer and blessing for all of those planning what next to do in their lives, she said. The church has an Epiphany Fund for unusual circumstances, which can pay for a ticket to travel back to their home coun try or other necessary expenses. They can get something from the food pantry but thats emergen cy food. It comes twice a month, said the nun, who reected on the impact of the dismissals. This is easier on the im migrants themselves than if they brought vans in. They didnt come to the boss and round them all up. From my point of view its more humane, said Sister Mary Alice. We really have to get the immigration thing set tled. Its a really touch-andgo life for these folks. years and resigned as a captain. I also worked for the Florida Department of Corrections for ve and a half years and resigned in good standing. I am a real estate investor, land developer and a good candidate for Franklin County Sheriff. As a candidate for sheriff of Franklin County, I pledge to cut the budget from $4.8 million to $3.8 million. A total cut of $1 million at the rate of $250,000 per year for the rst four years of my term. With this $1 million cut in the budget, I plan to give back to our county and keep it safe for our future. With this being said, there will be no loss of jobs to anyone at the Franklin County Sheriffs Ofce. In times like these, with our economy the way its been, no one wants to lose their job, nor do taxpayers want their tax dollars wasted. In respect to the citizens of Franklin County, crime will be dealt with one case at a time, with each case being properly investigated and everyones civil rights being equally protected. As sheriff, my goal is to protect the children and citizens of Franklin County by taking drugs off the streets and seeing violators are dealt with by the court system. As sheriff, I promise the citizens I will serve and protect everyone with the full power of the Franklin County Sheriffs Ofce. My door will always be open to listen to problems large or small. For more information on my candidacy, call me at 670-1762. VONIER from page A1 They expressed sadness at having to let so many people go ... They told them they could continue to live in Apalachicola but could not work for Leavins. Sister Mary Alice

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Opinion A4 | The Times USPS 027-600 Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 Publisher: Rick Martin POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola Times Thursday, May 24, 2012 Special to the Times Earlier this month the Apalachicola Riverkeeper issued calls for action to the governors of Florida, Alabama and Georgia to mitigate economic and ecological impacts from the prolonged drought conditions all three states are experiencing. The Riverkeeper also is seeking action from Florida Senator Bill Nelson, the federal government and the Northwest Florida Water Management District. According to reports by the Southeast Climate Consortium and National Integrated Drought System, both D3-Extreme and D4Exceptional drought conditions exist throughout the ApalachicolaChattahoochee-Flint Basin. The severity of the drought is being reported across the basin. The following facts are of particular concern, and are the basis for this Call for Action. Lowest observed historical readings are being recorded on Flint River and groundwater levels in areas of southwest Georgia. Historically high, prolonged salinity levels in Apalachicola Bay, associated with loss of estuarine seafood habitat and signicant oyster mortality, are being reported by Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve. Shrimp harvests in Apalachicola Bay and the eastern Gulf of Mexico have diminished to levels that will not support commercial shrimping, as reported by shermen. Crab harvest is likewise below historical lows and cannot support commercial harvesting. Salt-water species rarely seen in upper portions of Apalachicola Bay, indicative of a prolonged depletion of normal freshwater ows necessary for a healthy estuarine habitat, are being observed by commercial shermen. Forecast by weather and climate experts at all levels is for continued extreme conditions to prevail for at least the next three months. On May 1, the Army Corps of Engineers decided it will move its operation of federal reservoirs in the ACF Basin into Exceptional Drought Operations mode, essentially further reducing the minimum water ows allowed to the Apalachicola system. Despite these repeated federal assessments of extreme drought conditions and forecast of continued drought, the states of Georgia and Florida have not yet called for additional available water conservation measures for water users in the ApalachicolaChattahoochee-Flint River basin. Apalachicola Riverkeeper is calling for the following actions: The governors of Florida, Alabama, and Georgia meet in an emergency session to assess joint and unilateral actions available to mitigate the signicant economic and ecological impact of this prolonged drought on the people and communities of their states. Florida Governor Rick Scott to call for action that will prompt effective state action to assist and provide Florida seafood industry workers relief during the ensuing disaster. Northwest Florida Water Management District to establish water conservation measures consistent with extreme drought in the Apalachicola Basin and to work with the Florida Department of Environmental Protection to ascertain the Ecological Instream Flow Needs of the Apalachicola river, oodplain, and bay. Georgia Governor Nathan Deal to encourage and impose signicant water use restrictions on water users to conserve the water to help all water users survive the drought. Senator Nelson, based on his demonstrated leadership on this issue, to continue to work with the Florida delegation and Florida state leadership for a fair allocation of water for the Apalachicola river, oodplain and bay that will ensure healthy wildlife populations and a productive commercial shing and oyster industry. That the three states and the federal government seek opportunities to involve the stakeholders that comprise the communities of the ACF Basin in effective action to mitigate the adverse impacts of this prolonged drought. The Apalachicola Riverkeeper is a non-prot organization that monitors the Apalachicola River from the upper reaches at the Florida/Georgia line downstream 107 miles, through the middle reaches around Wewahitchka, to the estuary and bay on the Gulf. Its mission is to provide stewardship and advocacy for the protection of the Apalachicola river and bay, its tributaries and watersheds, in order to improve and maintain its environmental integrity and to preserve the natural, scenic, recreational, and commercial shing character of these waterways. For more information, call 653-8936 or visit www. apalachicolariverkeeper. org. Riverkeeper calls for action by governors Special to the Times Of the 4.7 million Americans bitten by dogs annually, more than half are children, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The U.S. Postal Service, the medical community, veterinarians and the insurance industry are working together to educate the public that dog bites are avoidable. Dont worry my dog wont bite is often heard by our letter carriers before theyre attacked, said Mark Anderson, postmaster of Los Angeles, where 83 of nearly 5,600 postal employees nationwide were attacked last year. Given the right circumstances, any dog can attack. Dog attacks are a nationwide issue and not just a postal problem. Working with animal behavior experts, weve developed tips to avoid dog attacks, and for dog owners, tips for practicing responsible pet ownership. The Postal Service is releasing its ranking of the top 25 cities for dog attacks to letter carriers to kick off National Dog Bite Prevention Week, May 19-25. The annual event provides dog-bite prevention tips, information on responsible pet ownership and advice about medical treatment if attacked. The Postal Service, the American Academy of Pediatrics, www.aap. org; the American Society for Reconstructive Microsurgery, www. microsurg.org; the American Veterinary Medical Association, www. avma.org; the Insurance Information Institute, www. iii.org; and Prevent The Bite, www.preventthebite. org; are driving home the message that dog bites are a nationwide issue and that education can help prevent dog attacks to people of all ages. Between 12 and 20 people die from dog attacks annually, according to the CDC. Just last month a Nevada toddler was mauled to death by his family pet on his rst birthday. The Postal Service places the safety of its employees as a top priority. Letter carriers fearing for their safety due to a loose or unrestrained pet may stop delivery and ask homeowners to pick up their mail at the Post Ofce until the pet is restrained. In cases where a carrier sees a dog roaming and cant discern where it resides, delivery could be interrupted to the entire neighborhood. Harsh realities Nationwide last year, 5,577 postal employees were attacked in more than 1,400 cities. Los Angeles topped the list with 83 postal employees attacked in 2011. Beyond the needless pain and suffering, medical expenses from dog attacks cost the Postal Service nearly $1.2 million last year. Children are three times more likely than adults to be bitten by a dog, said PTB President Kathy Voigt, whose daughter Kelly, was mauled by a neighborhood dog. Education is essential to keeping children safe from dog bites. The attack prompted their creation of Prevent The Bite, a non-prot organization that promotes dog bite prevention to young children. AAP President Dr. Robert Block added, Parents, please dont ever leave a young child unsupervised around any dog, even a dog well-known to your family. Even very young children should be taught not to tease or hurt animals. And with school almost over for the year, children will be spending more time in parks, at friends homes, and other places where they may encounter dogs. They need to know what to do to minimize the risk of being bitten. According to the American Society of Plastic Surgeons, in 2011 alone more than 29,000 reconstructive procedures were performed as a result of injuries caused by dog bites. Dr. Michael Neumeister, ASRM president said, Even the friendliest dog may bite when startled or surprised. Be cautious, once a child is scarred they are scarred for life. We hear this line all the time The dog has never bitten anyone before. A dogs reaction to being surprised or angered is not predictable. Any dog can bite, said Dr. Ren Carlson, AVMA president. If it is physically or mentally unhealthy, is in pain, feels threatened, or is protecting its food or a favorite toy, it can bite. It is important to understand how dogs behave and how our behavior may be interpreted by a dog. Dog attacks accounted for more than one-third of all homeowner insurance liability claims paid out in 2011, said Dr. Robert Hartwig, III president and chief economist. The National Dog Bite Prevention Week partners offer the following tips: Avoiding attacks Never leave a baby or small child alone with a dog. Dont run past a dog. The dogs natural instinct is to chase and catch you. If a dog threatens you, dont scream. Avoid eye contact. Try to remain motionless until the dog leaves, then back away slowly until the dog is out of sight. Never approach a strange dog, especially one thats tethered or conned. Dont disturb a dog that is sleeping, eating or caring for puppies. Anyone wanting to pet a dog should rst obtain permission from the owner. Always let a dog see and sniff you before petting the animal. If you believe a dog is about to attack you, try to place something between yourself and the dog, such as a backpack or a bicycle. If you are knocked down by a dog, curl into a ball and protect your face with your hands. Be a responsible dog owner Obedience training can teach a dog to behave properly and help owners control their dogs. When letter carriers and others who are not familiar with your dog come to your home, keep your dog inside, in another room away from the door. In protecting their territory, dogs may interpret peoples actions as a threat. Spay or neuter your dog. Neutered dogs are less likely to roam. Dogs that receive little attention or handling, or are left tied up for long periods of time, frequently turn into biters. If bitten Rinse the bite area with soapy water. Elevate limb(s) that have been bitten. Apply antiseptic lotion or cream. Watch the area for signs of infection for several days after the incident. For deeper bites or puncture wounds, apply pressure with a clean bandage or towel to stop the bleeding. Then wash the wound, dry it and cover with a sterile dressing. Dont use tape or buttery bandages to close the wound. Its a good idea to call your childs physician because a bite could require antibiotics or a tetanus shot. The doctor also can help you to report the incident. If your child is bitten severely, call 9-1-1 or go to the emergency room. When going to the emergency room, advise the personnel of, your tetanus vaccination status; vaccine status of the dog; who the dog owner is; and if the dog has bitten before. By CA T Y G R EENE Special to the Times Well its almost June, and you know what that means: the Summer Reading Program, sponsored by the Apalachicola Municipal Library with the logistical and nancial support of Project Impact. The library has successfully put on a program since I started as the library director in 2009. In the past couple of years we have used the national Collaborative Summer Library Program theme and program manual (www. cslpreads.org/). This is a very organized group of library and literacy types, and a bunch of organizations, who select a theme Dream Big READ! for this year and put out a manual with program activities, graphics for bookmarks etc. and a bibliography. Reading to kids happens during six 45-minute sessions on Monday and Tuesday mornings at either Project Impacts ABC School site on Mondays, and at the citys municipal complex site on Tuesdays. After reading, a small, easy ageappropriate craft project is done. Volunteers are asked to do one session, but many volunteer for several weeks. If you want to read, but not do the craft, or vice versa, this is possible too. We need to expand our volunteer base and all skills are needed. You can get the book ahead of time and practice, even though you wont need to. It really is fun. A schedule is being drawn up to ll in the slots for each session. Did I mention you get a gift T-shirt for your participation? I see volunteers around town for years wearing theirs. In the afternoon of each of those days, kids come to the library to check out books. Many of the kids in past years have been surprised even at the concept of checking out a library book. I dont have to pay? they ask. No we say, but you do have to bring it back. OK they say, and most do. Volunteers will assist at the library as well from 12:30 to 3 p.m.. Even Phyllis, our post ofce driver, got involved. Books on the theme include those about dreams, wishes and aspirations. The theme is illustrated by the wonderful Brian Lies, of Bats at the Beach and Bats at the Library. You can see our yard signs in front of the library already. Next week I hope to detail some of the charming books selected for the summer, but for now I just want you to think about participating. Project Impact staff are always at the sessions as well as library personnel. The groups are a manageable size and the sessions go by in a ash. Come join us. Caty Greene is the librarian for the Apalachicola Municipal Library. To reach her, call 653-8436. Half of all dog bite victims are children Volunteers sought for Summer Reading @ THE LIBRARY Caty Greene

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The Times | A5 Thursday, May 24, 2012 BAYVIEW HOME ST. GEOR G E IS LAND 3BR/2BA home in the bayfront community, East Bay Estates. Enjoy the community pool and dock overlooking the bay. Popular rental home with repeats! New deck just built, beach access right across the street! ML S# 246740....................$429,000 Travis Stanley 850.653.6477 Grayson Shepard 850.653.6718 Leon Teat 850.653.5656 Sandy Mitchem 850.899.8300 NEW LISTI N G! GREATER A PALACHICOLA 4BR/2BA on 1/3 acre lot with above ground pool. Many upgrades and new features tankless water heater, new plumbing, city water, updated kitchen, new carpet, windows, doors. ML S#245923..................$149,500 CAT POINT EA S TPOINT 2.63 acres of gorgeous bay view property on Cat Point. White sandy beach on the Apalachicola Bay. ML S# 245189................$290,000 GREATER A PALACHICOLA acre on the corner of Bluff Rd and Big Oaks just 1 mile drive to the Pine Log boat ramp. Zoned R-4 Single Family Home Industry. Beautiful cleared lot with some mature shade trees. ML S#247086....................$40,000 COMMERCIAL S T G EOR G E I S LAND Excellent location for 1500 square feet of commercial space in the heart of the island. Corner location on Franklin & Gulf Beach Dr high visibility! Also available for LONG TERM LEASE call for details. ML S#244926..................$339,000 NEW LISTI N G! ALSO FOR L E A SE! B AYVIEW ST. GEOR G E IS LAND 3BR 3BA located in the heart of the island, walking distance to all shops/restaurants. Screened porches, great bay views! ML S#240643...............$270,000 Come join in a Memorial Day Tribute to those who gave away all of their tomorrows so we could enjoy freedom today. Everyone is invited to come to the Veterans Plaza on Market Street in Apalachicola at 10 a.m. on Monday, May 28. The Keynote speaker will be Retired Marine General Charles E. Wilhelm. Music will be provided by Charles Thompson and Angela Stanley. A color guard will be provided by the US Marine Corps. NOTICE OF INTENT TO ADOPT WIND SPEED MAPS AND 2010 FLORIDA BUILDING CODE BY REFERENCE The Board of County Commissioners of Franklin County, Florida proposes to adopt the following wind speed maps by ordinance and the 2010 Florida Building Code by reference: Wind speed map 1609A), location of 130 mph line Franklin County, Florida. Wind speed map 1609B), location of 140 mph line Franklin County, Florida. Wind speed map 1609C), location of 120 mph line Franklin County, Florida and A public hearing on the proposed maps and 2010 Florida Building Code will be held on 5, 2012, at 10:30 a.m. at the Annex in Apalachicola, Florida. The maps and code are available for inspection in the Franklin County Building 34 1, Apalachicola more information, call the Franklin County Building Department at (850) 653-9783, ext 156. Persons wishing to comment may do so in person at the public hearing or in to the of 33 203, Apalachicola, 32320. of this will not recorded. Persons who wish to appeal any action resulting from this hearing should make the necessary arrangements to assure that a verbatim record is made, including testimony and evidence, if any, upon which the appeal is to be based. PUBLISH: MAY 24, 2012 First phase of enhanced 9-1-1 project to begin As most of the residents of Franklin County are aware, Franklin County has entered into a contract with GeoComm, Inc. of Saint Cloud MN (www.geo-comm.com) to implement an enhanced 9-1-1 system for the residents of Franklin County. Franklin County is in the beginning stages of updating their Enhanced 9-1-1 system. Part of this process, and the ultimate goal, will be to match the physical location with the current address for all residences and businesses in the county. GeoComm, Inc of Saint Cloud, Minn has been contracted by Franklin County to conduct countywide eldwork to collect technical data of roads, driveway, and structure locations of residences, businesses and other locations. During the months of May and June, representatives from GeoComm will be driving all the roads in Franklin County. They will each be driving a silver Hyundai Santa Fe, clearly marked with GeoComm and 9-1-1 logos on each side of the vehicle. If the address of the structure is not visible, the technician will approach the house to survey the resident. If the resident is not available they will leave an information packet including instructions for the resident to ll out an on-line survey. Information that the resident provides on this survey will assist in the timely completion of this project. Any information provided by the residents will be considered con dential. If you have any questions or concerns about this please contact Franklin County 9-1-1 Director Renee Brannan at 670-8300 or GeoComm, GIS Supervisor Dan Schmitz at 1-888-436-2666. By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com The man accused of a sexual battery that preceded an early morning re on April 21 at the Apalachicola River Inn has been released on bond. In addition, the state attorneys of ce has declined to press charges against another man who helped the alleged victim, but who then was accused of interfering with police. David Ray Smith, 25, of Fountain, charged with one count of sexual battery, was released this month on $20,000 bond. On the night of the incident, another man, Joe D. Jody Thrasher, 34, Montgomery, Ala., was arrested by Apalachicola police of cers for disorderly intoxication and resisting an of cer with violence. On May 2, Robin Myers, the assistant state attorney, issued a decision that there was insuf cient evidence to proceed with the case. An interview with Thrasher, and further details from the police report led by Capt. Steve James, shed new light on what happened. Smith told of cers he and a woman, a guest at the motel, spent the afternoon and evening drinking together and singing karaoke, before returning to her room. He said the woman performed consensual oral sex on him, but then refused to allow him to perform oral sex on her and went into the bathroom. He said after she returned from the bathroom, they engaged in sexual intercourse. She stated at rst she did not stop him, but after two or three minutes of intercourse, she told him to stop, read James report. Smith told police he lmed the intercourse with his cell phone. A police source said the pictures on the phone are not conclusive. The woman told police Smith did not honor her request to stop, and then became forceful, grabbing her by the throat, choking her and forcing her to have intercourse until she broke free. She said he refused to leave her room and told her that she was going to nish what she started and pushed her onto the bed, forcing himself onto her, putting his hand over her nose, saying I will kill you (expletive). It is unclear whether Smith was still in the hotel room when the alleged rape victim ran onto the boardwalk dressed only in a bed sheet, and then was taken into the room of Thrasher and his wife, who were visiting for the weekend. In a telephone interview, Thrasher said he and his wife heard the woman screaming, took her inside their room and locked the door in less than 30 seconds before calling 911. He said his wife provided the alleged victim with clothing. Both Thrasher and James said the alleged victim had bite marks on her arms. When Thrasher went to retrieve the alleged victims cell phone, nobody was in her room but he saw brie y an object burning in the middle of her room which he thought was a trash can. In his report, James reported a suitcase on the oor at the foot of the bed burning. Thrasher said after he saw the re, he returned to his room and instructed his wife and the alleged victim to go and hide. He said he then tried to extinguish the re with a blanket but was unable to control it. He said he then knocked on doors to awaken sleeping guests and alert them to the re, even helping several people carry things from their rooms. When police and re ghters arrived, Thrasher said he could not nd his wife and tried to reenter his room. He said police restrained him in spite of protests from hotel staff. I had no idea where my wife was, said Thrasher. That was the reason I started yelling at the police and trying to get back into the building. The hotel found rooms where the evacuated guests could spend the rest of the night. The Thrashers were given a suite of rooms to share with the alleged victim. Thrashers wife accompanied the woman to Weems Memorial Hospital and the police ferried her (Thrashers wife) back and forth several times during the evening until the alleged victim was released, he said. The woman departed early the next morning; Thrasher said he believed her car keys were salvaged from the hotel room. The re was determined to be arson and is still under investigation by the state re marshal. The following report is provided by the Franklin County Sheriffs Of ce. Arrests in this report were made by of cers from the Apalachicola Police Department, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission and the Franklin County Sheriffs Of ce. All defendants are to be considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law. May 15 Heather L. Hicks, 24, Apalachicola, burglary of a dwelling (FCSO) Marvin H. Garrett, Jr., 21, Eastpoint, domestic battery (FCSO) May 16 Frederick O. Naeck, 86, Manchester, NH, violation of probation (FCSO) Justin D. Massey, 21, Carrabelle, violation of probation (FCSO) James N. Glass, 32, Apalachicola, DUI and expired drivers license (FWC) May 17 Amanda F. Graybill, 28, Roanoke, Va., grand theft of a motor vehicle and grand theft (FCSO) Jerry M. Landrum, 34, Eastpoint, failure to appear (FCSO) Victoria L. Estes, grand theft, uttering and violation of probation (FCSO) Nathaniel T. Ceasor, 34, Tallahassee, burglary of a dwelling (FCSO) Sherry J. Bearden, 50, Chunchula, Ala., failure to appear (FCSO) James E. West, 50, Apalachicola, domestic battery (APD) May 18 Floyd B. Parramore, 52, Eastpoint, domestic battery (FCSO) Holly M. Polous, 18, Eastpoint, domestic battery (FCSO) May 20 Steve A. Johns, Sr., 53, Eastpoint, Clay County warrant for failure to appear (FWC) Jessica M. Music, 29, Eastpoint, battery (FCSO) DAVID R. SMITH Details emerge on alleged motel rape Law BRIEF Arrest REPORT Law Enforcement

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Local A6 | The Times Thursday, May 24, 2012 the strum of a guitar, and still communicate with their audience. In their newest production, students generate a scitale just from looking at a NASA satellite picture. The plot involves oysters falling from the sky, and a baby alien pickle, and a trip to Chile and Forget it, Hawk, its Chinatown. Two hilarious adventures students immersed themselves in over the past couple months are ample evidence for the creative spirit of Seahawks. Last week, it was The Wise Mullet, the debut of a newly-adapted play from a series of childrens books about the Gulf Coast by New Orleans writer Timothy Weeks, who was on hand for the performance (See related story, page A7.) Earlier in the year, there was the consolidated schools rst-ever sponsorship of Odyssey of the Mind teams, for middle and high school students, which was a giant step into the popular, nationwide competition to determine which schools can come up with the best original, dramatized answer to a perplexing creative challenge. Instead of Brain Bowl, its more like Brain CoOp, a cooperative project by a motivated group of inquisitive students who imagine a zany solution to an imaginary problem, and do so by following a strict set of conditions that govern everything from how much they can spend (no more than $125) to how long the show can last (under eight minutes). It has meant a lot of growth in their creative thinking, said team sponsor Lydia Countryman, who returned two years ago to Franklin County after a brief stint teaching in Georgia. It was there her daughter, Ursula, now in middle school, and son Rory, an elementary school student, who were introduced to Odyssey. In Franklin County, their background then helped lay the foundation for a crew of enthusiastic Omers, as they are called. I loved it, said Jalynn Liston, who along with Ursula Countryman, Matthew Turner, Connor Smith, Emily Owens, Kendall Meyer and Bobby Kilgore formed the middle school team. I would choose OM every day over cheerleading, she said. We work together; weve become really good friends. In fact, Liston incorporated her experience as a cheerleader into the teams choice of their long-term project how to solve the Odyssey Angels problem. The team opted against other four other possible choices, such as taking on the Shakespearean To be or not to be, problem, to devise a humorous performance of Hamlets famous question, or another called You Make the Call, which involved making a balsa wood structure that would support as much weight as possible. The Odyssey Angels challenge called for devising an eight-minute performance that challenges them to help out their fellow citizens ... where students travel throughout one or more team-created places where they encounter negative situations that they turn into positive ones. Not only that, the performance had to incorporate two characters, each with different problems, and two angels, one that cant speak and the other with a special power. At rst, the team was a little stumped, and labored six weeks to come up with a script that didnt satisfy anyone. Our little problems, they werent creative, Liston said. Ursula was like We have to come up with crazy stuff. It needs to be out there and crazy. We wanted to be outrageous, be noticed. So thats what the team did, and in a week, came up with a script that featured a place named FunkyTown, where no one was able to dance; Ursula Countryman was cast as an angel whose ute playing could help heal; Smith as an angel who could not speak, but could only communicate by strumming his guitar and using his facial expressions; Liston as a cheerleader permanently stuck in a split position; and Meyer, Owens and Turner as daffy townspeople who couldnt quite move their feet. Just thinking up a story wasnt enough, though; they had to bring it to life, and that meant solving a host of practical problems. Like how to dress up Kilgore so hed look like a dog that wouldnt stop clinging to Listons leg. And how to wear shoes with grip soles that could enable Liston to hold her split. Ursula had slippers from when she was a ballerina, she said. They were tight, but they t. They found glitter and sparkles to adorn the set to represent Heaven, where the autist angel analyzes the problems on earth by referring to the Book of Problems. They used a decorated umbrella as a backdrop to twirl so that the location of each scene was identi ed. And they had to do it all by themselves, as rules forbid outside assistance, with the exception of some basic instruction from the teacher. Elementary team takes on Weird Science In addition to their zany creativity, the elementary school team Rory Countryman, James Hat eld, Ethan Riley and Fisher Edwards had to overcome the challenge of losing key members of their team before Christmas as they set out to bring Odyssey to life. Lydia Countryman said the students proved up to the task, and ultimately came up with a Weird Science script, based on a team of scientists who see an actual photograph from a NASA satellite and work to uncover the cause of mysterious events, using a team-created device to collect two samples. It would be impossible to describe the story surrounding scientists who observed a strange ssure in Chiles Puyehue-Cordon Caulle volcanic complex, but suf ce it to say that the four boys came up with a tale about a Panacea pizza delivery man, an alien who communicates through blowing bubbles, an intergalactic oyster boat, and a talking sock puppet that doubles as one of the scientists. Are you ready to shuck some oysters? hollered the team as they began their production, which featured a colorful set, kooky headgear and a amboyant seriousness to the comedy that de nitely worked. They nally had to focus on one type of team, said Countryman. When the judges laughed at the right time, we knew the script was successful. In addition to featuring the long-term assignments, the OM team also hones their improvisational skills in spontaneous competition; in which judges see how well they do as individuals when confronted with a random question or object. Its all about thinking on your feet, and being imaginative in your response, a sharp contrast to the tasks of rote learning and test-taking so important to schools these days. While the school district paid for the teams membership, all other expenses were raised by the teammates themselves. Several parents helped out as well, especially when it came time to travel to Crestview March 3 for the Emerald Coast regional tournament. Madilyn Smith organized the team hallway spot at the tourney, as well as the carpool caravan on a day marked by terrible weather, even a pair of tornado storms. But Patti Kulick, Heather Riley and Jennifer Edwards all made it through safely with the young people, as Odyssey of the Mind made an impressive debut at the Franklin County School. BILL MILLER REALTY 850-697-3751 (3310) 570-0658 400 PLUS COMM. U.S. 98 & GULF ADJ. TO LANARK MARINA 850 K $29,500 $2,500 D O W N B UYS 2 B ED A PT 2 6 OR RENT $500/MTH GULFVIE W & ACCESS3 BDR 2 BA 2006 M/H $89,000 2 LG. SHADY LOTS-3 OUT BLDG. -400 TO MARINA-CITY W ATER $49,500 MIH 2 C RNR LOTS BLK. $ S TORE REDUCED $49,500 CITY COMM. LOTSU.S. 98 -$29,500 UP Margarets Mini Florist SILK BA S KET S LIVE HOUSE P L ANTS DE L IVERY A VAI L AB L E KEEP THESE NUMBERS (850) 653-3764 OR (850) 323-1937 dbutler@coastalcoverage.com Locally owned and operated Home Business Auto Health Workers Comp p a q u e t t a b r y a n t Paquetta Lavette Bryant earned her Bachelor of Science degree in Criminology from Fresno State University, in Fresno, CA, May 19, 2012. Paquetta is the daughter of Sonia Mills of Fresno and Johnny Bryant of Seattle, WA. Her proud grandparents are Fred and Mary Brown of Apalachicola and Sam and Ida Belle Bryant of Port St. Joe, FL. DRAMA from page A1 Photos by DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times Jalynn Liston limbers up before her role as a cheerleader caught in a split. For more photos of the Odyssey of the Mind teams, go to www. apalachtimes.com On the set of their Weird Science are, from left, Fisher Edwards, James Hat eld, Ethan Riley and Rory Countryman. Top left Ursula Countryman recreates her Odyssey Angels performance. Bottom left Ethan Riley has fun with a snake skin during an improvisational exercise.

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Local The Times | A7 Thursday, May 24, 2012 Top: The Shorties face the trauma of a hurricane. Middle: The entire cast of Wise Mullet: A Fishy Tail posed with playwright Pam Vest. Left: Fisherman Hunter Kelley drops a net over Silver, played by Jessica Rudd. For more Wise Mullet pictures, visit www. apalachtimes. com. Photos by DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times Smart Lenses SM Can produce clear vision without glasses, at all distances "Freedom from Eye Glasses, Now a reality for many." NO HIDDEN CHARGES: It is our policy that the patient and any other person responsible for payments has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed by payment or any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment. www.mulliseye.com "WE WELCOME NE W PATIE N TS, C ALL T ODAY FOR YOUR P RIORITY APP OI N TME N T" FOR NEW PATIENTS 59 AND OLDER This certificate is good for a complete Medical Eye Exam with Todd Robinson, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Surgeon. The exam includes a prescription for eye glasses and tests for Glaucoma, Cataracts and other eye diseases FOR YOUR APPOINTMENT CALL: 850-763-6666 ELIGIBILITY: U.S. Citizens living in the Florida Panhandle, 59 years and older, not presently under our care. Coupon Expires: 5-31-12 FREE EYE EXAM CODE: AP00 Darren Payne, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon Lee Mullis, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon Todd Robinson, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon FREE DIABETES EDUCATION CLASSES TO BE HELD EACH WEEK BEGINNING WEDNESDAY, MAY 16, 2012 TWO LOCATIONS, TWO TIMES! C LASSES TAU G HT B Y ER ICA C ESKA R E G ISTERE D DIETICIAN EVE RY ONE WELCOME! EVERYONE WELCOME! 10:00 AM WEEMS MEDICAL CENTER EAST 110 NE 5TH ST CARRABELLE 697-2345 5:00 PM WEEMS MEMORIAL HOSPITAL 135 AVENUE G APALACHICOLA 653-8853 X101 By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com Franklin County had a world premier last week, a wonderful production adapted from New Orleans author Timothy Weeks Wise Mullet childrens books. With the sponsorship of the Panhandle Players Inc. with which she has long been associated, veteran director Pam Vest adapted the three books into a three-act stage play Wise Mullet: A Fishy Tail, brought to life through the creative talents of director Melanie Humble and her enthusiastic students. Vest was working with Weeks three books, set along the Gulf Coast, that tell how Goldie, Silver, Ol Middler and other mullets and sea creatures face adversity and triumph as they face the challenges of life in the Gulf of Mexico. As Goldie always says, Think swift and act swifter! says Silver at the close of the play. Were all Wise Mullets and shermen will be telling our stories forever of how we were the ones that got awaay! Vest had to make changes in compressing, and bringing a happy ending to, the composite of the three books. The rst in 2005, The Wise Mullet of Cook Bayou was done with art by Miss Jeanne, Weeks mother. The second, Ol Middler Saves the Day was illustrated with photos and art by Miss Jeanne, as well as by Miss Lala. The third book, Goldies Search for Silver also featured work by Miss Lala and Miss Jeanne. Miss Lala is Lala Pascic, a performance artist from Sarajevo who Weeks met in Amsterdam. Now a post-graduate student in art, Pascic and Weeks were recently married. Both Pascic and the Weekses were on hand for last Thursdays performance, and thoroughly enjoyed the show. Weeks said he was delighted with how the show came out, and raved about the childrens spirited performances. He and the Panhandle Players have worked out a deal where the theater troupe has the rights for a couple of years to do the show before they revert back to him. He said he is now at work on a fourth book, to be set inland, that he expects to be out by this fall or next spring. It again will be based on photographs taken throughout the Gulf Coast, real places and real species. The players, the kids, were so much fun to watch, said Vest after the show, which was presented to all the schoolkids last week. One little player told me she didnt want it to be over, ever! APPEARING IN THE SHOW WERE: Fisherwoman-narrator: Beyla Walker Youngun: Morgan Ray Fisherman/narrator: Hunter Kelley Fisherman/narrator: Benjamin Juarez Goldie: Mikalin Huckeba Silver Act I: Hannah Hogan Silver Act II/Alligator: Casey Riley Silver Act III/Albatross: Jessica Rudd Ol Middler: Ethan Riley Mullet Dolphin: Kiana Foley Turtle/Shark: Ethan Frazier Pelicans/Dolphins/Shorties: Katie Newman, Destanie Proctor, Tressie Edwards Shorties: Eli Whaley, Brycin Huckeba, Maliah Lockley, Arryonna Cargill Stage manager: Tete Croom Lighting: Tonnor Segree Visuals: Duncan Whaley Wise Mullet swims into Franklin County As Goldie always says, Think swift and act swifter! Were all Wise Mullets and shermen will be telling our stories forever of how we were the ones that got awaay! Silver Mikalin Huckeba, as Goldie, tries to hide from the three pelicans. throughout the Gulf Coast, Mullets and shermen will be telling Top: the trauma of a hurricane. Middle: Wise Mullet: A Fishy Tail posed with playwright Pam Vest. Kelley drops a net over Silver, played by Jessica Rudd. For more Wise Mullet pictures, visit apalachtimes. com.

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A8 | The Times Thursday, May 24, 2012 Special to The Times Carrabelle writers Susana and Dr. Charles Lewis will sign copies of their new book at Downtown Books from 1-3 p.m. Saturday, May 26. Part Caribbean cookbook, part charming memoir and part blueprint for selecting, storing and preparing wholesome ingredients to promote health and vitality, A Taste of Paradise offers recipes adapted from the foods Susana learned to cook as a child in the Dominican Republic. Mouth-watering dishes like Coconut Garlic Chicken, Cacerola de Mariscos (Seafood Casserole) and Mango Salad re ect the islands Taino Indian, African, Moorish and Spanish in uences. The traditional Caribbean diet included little wheat, so these recipes are largely glutenfree. Many use coconut milk instead of cows milk and thus are also lactose-free. More than 200 recipes for breakfasts, sandwiches, soups and stews, main dishes, platillos (sides dishes) and beverages are complemented by illustrations of village life, botanic prints and quaint drawings of sh, fowl and hooved beasts. Dr. Charles Lewis, an authority on preventive medicine, adds advice on handling ingredients to derive the best nutritional bene ts, prevent disease and obesity, and achieve healthy weight loss without hunger. Susana grew up in a small village in a home without electricity and learned to cook by helping her aunts and grandmother prepare meals outside over an open re. Fresh coconut cream was prepared daily, by hand. Without refrigeration, sh was limited to salted cod, dried herring and dried tilapia. Her family raised goats, vegetables, plantains, avocados, mangoes and coconuts. It was not unusual to pass the evening with friends and family members, shelling pigeon peas, exchanging gossip and telling cautionary tales to the young. Other than some music on the radio, there was little electronic interference with their boisterous conversation, play and work. She moved to a provincial capitol on the coast to attend college, and there she expanded her culinary experience to include a wider variety of foods, including fresh seafood. Charles served as a Peace Corps volunteer in an isolated Dominican village and lived there for several years. He returned to the Dominican Republic after residency training, helped organize public efforts to improve childrens health, and worked at the regional hospital. He and Susana met at this time, when she was completing her college degree. In the United States, she has worked as a business manager and has taught elementary and secondary school. He is board-certi ed in public health and preventive medicine and has practiced medicine in Florida for 20 years. He is also the author of a textbook on enteroimmunology, an emerging eld of medicine, and is an expert on foodrelated diseases. For details, call Downtown Books at 653-1290. Qualications: Expertise in: Now Accepting Appointments Call Toll Free 888-681-5864 For more info www.seclung.com Lung Disease Specialist Rob Garver, MD Now Seeing Patients in Port St. Joe NOW BCBS-FL I N -NETWORK PROV I DER PET OF THE WEEK Franklin County Humane Society Society Dorian Evans graduates from Montevallo Dorian J. Evans, a 2004 graduate of Apalachicola High School, was among more than 350 University of Montevallo students to receive their diplomas at spring commencement May 5. Evans earned a Bachelor of Science degree. Evans is the son of Tyrone Evans Sr. of Apalachicola and Tronda Evans of Apalachicola. Kristina Scott, executive director of Alabama Possible, a campaign associated with the Alabama Poverty Project, was the keynote speaker. University president John W. Stewart III conferred degrees upon some 254 candidates for bachelors degrees, 71 candidates for masters degrees and 28 candidates for the educational specialist degree. After students received their diplomas, Jim Methvin, president of the National Alumni Association, inducted graduates into the 21,000-member organization. Elser earns degree from Concordia Russell Elser was awarded a Bachelor of Science degree in elementary education at Concordia College Alabama on May 12. He was among the graduates of the Class of 2012 who received degrees at the 86th commencement of the college, one of 10 colleges and universities of the Concordia University System of the Lutheran Church Missouri Synod. Tillahun M. Mendedo, Ph.D, president of Concordia College Alabama, awarded the degree during commencement. Elser, a 1995 graduate of Sarasota High School, is the son of Bob and Janet Elser, of Carrabelle. While at Concordia, he was a member of the Spiritual Life Team and was voted Mr. Concordia College Alabama 2011. He plans to enroll in the seminary and begin his ministerial studies after graduation. Concordia College Alabama is a liberal arts college in Selma, Ala., founded in 1922 by Dr. Rosa Young. Its mission is to prepare students through a Christcentered education for lives of responsible service in the church, community and world. B-Man is Double Digits Jackson Bailey Herrington celebrated his 10th birthday on Tuesday, April 3, on Panama City Beach with family and friends. Bailey is the son of Stacey and Richie Herrington of Apalachicola. Maternal grandparents are J. Stanley Anders of Lake City and Sara Land of St. James. Paternal grandparents are Betty Yates and the late Edward Herrington of Greensboro. Reanna Whatley, Mitchell Martina to wed June 2 Catherine Reanna Whatley, the daughter of Cathy Whatley of Jacksonville, and the late Omer Reece Whatley, is proud to announce her upcoming marriage to William Mitchell Martina, the son of Kenneth and Glenda Martina of Apalachicola. The ceremony will be Saturday, June 2, 2012, at the Living Waters Assembly of God church in Apalachicola. Pastor Craig Hicks will of ciate at the 5 p.m. nuptials. A reception in Camilla Hall at the Coombs House Inn will follow the ceremony. Food and drinks will be provided. We are asking everyone to please bring beverages of their choice so we can prepare an open bar for everyones enjoyment. All family and friends are invited to attend this special occasion as we make it of cial. Lewises to sign A Taste of Paradise cookbook Saturday SPECIAL TO THE TIMES Charles and Susana Lewis compiled A Taste of Paradise based on Susanas experiences learning to cook as a child in the Dominican Republic. Congratulations Wedding Happy BIRTHDAY Baby SHOWER Miller baby shower June 9 A baby girl shower for the upcoming new arrival for Laura Jackson Miller and John Miller will be at 3 p.m. Saturday, June 9, at the Masonic Lodge, 108 N.E. First St. in Carrabelle. The Millers are listed on the gift registry at Target and at BabiesRUs. For more information, please call 697-2766 or 653-6523.

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The Times | A9 Thursday, May 24, 2012 The United Methodist Churches of Franklin County Welcome You First United Methodist Church of Apalachicola Worship Service 11:00 a.m. every Sunday Sunday School 10:00 a.m. 75 5 th St. Apalachicola 653-9530 fumcapalach@gtcom.net Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis Carrabelle United Methodist Church Worship Services 10:45 a.m. Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Celebrate Recovery Mondays 7-9 p.m. 102 NE Ave. B Carrabelle 697-3672 Pastor: Julie Stephens Eastpoint United Methodist Church Worship Service 10:00 a.m. every Sunday Healing service every fourth Monday at 7:00 p.m. 317 Patton Dr. (corner of David St.) 670-8825 Pastor: Rev. Beth White St. George Island United Methodist Church 9:00 a.m. Worship Service 10:00 a.m. Fellowship Hour 201 E. Gulf Beach Dr. 9274635 www.sgiumc.org Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis First Pentecostal Holiness Church 379 Brownsville Road Apalachicola Were excited about what Gods doing!!! Sunday School 9:45 am Sunday Morning Worship 10:45 am Sunday Evening Service 6:00 pm Monday, Youth Group 6:30 pm Wednesday, Royal Rangers, G.A.P. 7:00 pm Wednesday Worship & Word 7:30 pm Nursery Provided during regular church services 7:00 7:00 First Baptist Church St. George Island 501 E. Bayshore Drive 927-2257 R. Michael Waley, Pastor Join us as we praise and worship the living Christ. Great is the Lord and most worthy of praise. Psalm 145:3 Sunday Bible Study ................................................ 10:00am Worship Praise ........................................................ 11:00am Sunday Night ............................................................ 7:00pm Wednesday Power Hour ...................................... 7:00pm Wednesday Youth at S.P.L.A.S.H ....................... 7:00pm Walking in Christ R. Michael Whaley, Pastor WELCOMES YOU Church of the Ascension 101 NE First Street Carrabelle SUNDAY 10:00 AM WELCOMES YOU Church THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH (850) 274-4490 (850) 545-2578 WELCOMES YOU Trinity Trinity Episcopal Church est. 1836 Welcomes You Hwy. 98 & 6th St. Apalachicola 850-653-9550 Sunday Worship Services 8 & 10:30 a.m. Wednesdays Healing Service 11 a.m. Centering Prayer 4 p.m. Sunday Worship Services 8 & 10:30 a.m. Wednesdays Healing Service 11 a.m. Centering Prayer 4 p.m. Faith All right you guys, its time to get that grill ready. The ofcial opening of the barbecue season is almost here. Everyone is invited to the Camp Gordon Johnston American Legion Post 82 on Monday, May 28. for our annual Memorial Day service and luncheon. The service will begin at the agpole at noon. The free nger-food lunch will follow the service. Come spend the afternoon with us, as we reect on those who gave their lives for our freedom. Doors open at 11 a.m. Went to the monthly covered dish luncheon at Chillas Hall last Sunday. Low and behold, there was B.J. Mallis. She has moved from Tennessee. Her late husband, Gary, was appointed re chief at St. James/Lanark Volunteer Fire Department. I was secretary/treasurer and ran our Tuesday night bingo while he was in ofce. So good to see her back. Bishop OSullivan Council 1648 of the Knights of Columbus will be 100 years old on June 12. We will have a celebration later in the year. For you vacationing Knights, our meetings are the second Monday of every month except August. The gavel falls at 7 p.m. at St. Patrick Church Hall, Sixth Street and Avenue C in Apalachicola. You are welcome to join us. As the hurricane season is upon us, make sure that you have your escape route and survival kit handy, and dont forget to pick up your re-entry forms at the Emergency Management Operations Center, 28 Airport Road in Apalachicola. You can also order one online at www. FranklinEmergencyManagement. com. Be kind to one another, check on the sick and the housebound and get a grip, tie a knot, hang onto Jesus. Until next time, God bless America, our troops, the poor, homeless and hungry. Re:Action youth to host dodgeball games Saturday The Re:Action youth group, a nondenominational youth ministry for sixththrough eighth-grade students of the Apalachicola-St. George Island Cooperative Parish of the United Methodist Church, is hosting the rst Dodgeball Games tournament from 2-5 p.m. Saturday, May 26, at the ABC School. There are three categories: elementary, middle and high school. The participation fee is $3, and spectator fee is $5. All proceeds go to fund the youth to attend The Gate conference in Charleston, W.Va. To sign up, email Adam Cannon at adamcannonmusic@gmail.com or sign up at the eld the day of the tournament. Memorial Day ceremony Monday in Apalachicola At 10 a.m. Monday, May 28, everyone is invited to pay their respects to Americas fallen heroes at a Memorial Day ceremony at Veterans Plaza in Apalachicola. The tribute begins with presentation of the ag by a U.S. Marine Color Guard from Tallahassee. Angeline Stanley will perform the National Anthem followed by keynote speaker Gen. Charles Wilhelm, who retired from the Marine Corps in 2000 after more than 37 years of active service. In his nal assignment, Wilhelm acted as commander in chief of the U.S. Southern Command from 1997-2000, responsible for military activities in 32 countries in Central and South America and the Caribbean. There will be additional music by Charles Thompson, as well as Stanley. The names of soldiers fallen over the last 12 months will be read aloud, accompanied by a tolling bell, and Ed Tiley will play Taps to complete the event. Cancer foes prepare for June 8 Relay for Life Walkers will go around the clock in the battle against cancer when the American Cancer Societys Relay for Life of Franklin County gets under way with teams of residents gathering at Pop Wagoner Stadium in Apalachicola at 6 p.m. June 8. Relay for Life events are held overnight as individuals and teams camp out at the stadium with the goal of keeping at least one team member on the track or pathway at all times throughout the evening. Teams do most of their fundraising before the event, but some teams also hold creative fundraisers at their camp sites during Relay. Relay brings together friends, families, businesses, hospitals, schools, faith-based groups and people from all walks of life, all aimed at furthering the American Cancer Societys efforts to save lives by helping people stay well, helping them get well, nding cures and ghting back. Opening ceremonies start at 6 p.m. with all cancer survivors, meaning anyone who has ever been diagnosed with cancer, joining together on the track to walk or wheelchair the rst lap, unied in victory and hope. This emotional lap honors the courage of all who have defeated cancer. The ceremonies are followed by the annual survivor and caregiver dinner at 6:30 p.m. in the middle of the eld; Paella will be provided by Tamaras Caf. If you are a survivor or a caregiver, please come out. For more information, call your American Cancer Society at 785-9205, ext. 3509 or local event chair Chala Parish at 370-0832. All survivors receive a free Relay for Life T-shirt and dinner. Come early to make sure to see opening ceremonies. We will have entertainment and activities throughout the night including the band Righteous Kind from Gainesville at 9:30 p.m.. Relay is a unique opportunity for our community to come together to celebrate people who have battled cancer, remember those weve lost and ght back against the disease, Parish said. Many of the participants are cancer survivors, which serves as a reminder that our community is not immune to this disease and that by participating in relay, we are joining with the American Cancer Societys efforts to create a world with less cancer and more birthdays. Mrs. Margaret Willoughby Holton passed away Saturday, May 19, 2012. A Celebration of Life Service was conducted Wednesday afternoon, May 23, in the Williams Funeral Home Chapel of Milledgeville, Ga. Interment followed at Heritage Memorial Park. The family received friends at the funeral home on Tuesday evening, May 22. Mrs. Holton was a native of Macon, Ga., and after moving from Florida, lived the past ve years in Hayesville, N.C. She attended Midway School and graduated from Baldwin High School in Milledgeville. She was the daughter of the late L.R. and Susie McDaniel Willoughby. Survivors include husband, Archie Brooks Holton, of Hayesville, N.C.; son Archie Lee Holton of Anaheim, Calif.; daughter Brooksayne Holton of Hayesville, N.C.; grandchildren A.J. Gillikin and Krystalyn Gillikin, both of Carrabelle; brother James L. (Kay) Willoughby of Milledgeville, Ga.; and sister Donna (Quincy) Simpson of Toomsboro, Ga. In lieu of owers, the family requests donations may be made to the Association of the Miraculous Medal, P.O. Box 8060, Perryville, MO 63775-8060. Express online condolences at www. williamsfuneralhome. net. Williams Funeral Home and Crematory of Milledgeville is in charge of arrangements. Margaret Holton MARGARET HOL TON Hughey Williams Sr. of Dalkeith passed away on Friday, May 11, 2012, in a local nursing facility after a long battle with cancer. He was born July 31, 1934, in Tampa. He proudly served three years in the Korean War and was a crane operator for the St. Joe Paper Company for 35 years before retiring. He is survived by his three children, Hughey Williams Jr. (Beverly) of Marianna, Cindy Ray of Panama City and Joey Williams (Kristie) of Panama City; six grandchildren, Steven Williams of Dalkeith, Lee Erwin of Panama City, Samantha Williams of Panama City, Ryann Paul (Jason), stationed in Japan, and Clayton Williams of Marianna; one great-grandson, Aiden Paul; one sister, Joannah Costine; and one nephew, Joe Costine, both of Lakeland. He was preceded in death by two brothers, Ted Williams and Morris Williams; and one sister, Wilma Patterson. A private family service will be held at a later date. The family would like to take this opportunity to thank the staff of St. Andrews Nursing Facility and Emerald Coast Hospice for all their care and support. Heritage Funeral Home, Panama City, is in charge of arrangements. Those wishing to extend a word of condolence may do so at www.heritagefhllc.com. Hughey Williams Sr. HUGHEY WILLIAMS SR. Obituaries Faith BRIEFS Card of THANKS We would like to take the time to send out a heartfelt thankyou for the compassion and generosity shown to us during our time of loss. The phone calls, food and owers were truly touching. We are certain that somehow someone has slipped through our less-than-perfect recordkeeping, but please know that each of gesture of love did not go unnoticed. We would like to thank Pastor Ray Creamer and the Highland Park Community Church for a beautiful viewing and service that Lonnie would have been proud of. To Rocky Comforter, thank you for the special attention that you have always given to our family. May God bless and keep each of you. Thanks, The Lonnie Moses Family Legion post to host Memorial Day service LANARK NEWS Jim Welsh View obituaries and leave condolences at www.apalachtimes.com Jimmy Mosconis has been in vited to attend the Memorial Day ceremony at the Vietnam Veterans Memorial, where Barack Obama will become the third American president to speak since the memo rial opened in 1982. Mosconis attended in 1984 when President Reagan spoke at the un veiling of the Three Serviceman Statue. He was among 2,500 people from throughout the country invited by the Department of Defense to at tend Mondays National Announce ment and Proclamation Ceremony, which marks the 50th anniversary of the beginning of the Vietnam War. The Obama Administration will join with the Vietnam Veterans Me morial Fund, the National Park Ser vice and the Department of Defense to pay special homage to those of the Vietnam War, as the DoD of cially launches its commemoration of the 50th anniversary of the war. We are honored to have Presi dent Obama take part in a ceremo ny at The Wall. His administration has been very helpful when we have asked for support with issues in cluding the Education Center. Two other U.S. presidents have spoken, President Ronald Reagan in 1984 and President Bill Clinton in 1993, said Jan C. Scruggs, president and founder of the VVMF. Obama will deliver the keynote speech and join other government ofcials and veterans to lay wreaths at The Wall during the ceremony. This years 10 name additions and their families also will be honored on Memorial Day. The ceremony begins as Memo rial Day events across the nation honor the fallen of all the nations conicts. For more information about the Vietnam War 50th Anniversary Commemoration, visit www.viet namwar50th.com. To learn more about the Viet nam Veterans Memorial Fund and the Memorial, visit www.vvmf.org. Mosconis to attend Memorial Day at The Wall Van Johnson Day May 31 On May 15, Van Johnson attended his nal county commission meeting acting as solid waste director. At that meeting, the commission thanked him for his service. After a motion by Cheryl Sanders, commissioners voted unanimously to declare Thursday, May 31, Johnsons nal day as head of the department, as Van Johnson Day in Franklin County. At their April 3 meeting, Johnson told county commissioners he had submitted his retirement papers. Meet the candidates June 8 The Franklin County Political Kickoff Jamboree will be held Friday, June 8, beginning at 5 p.m. at the Eastpoint Fire House, 24 Sixth St., Eastpoint. All candidates are invited to address the gathering, mingle and shake hands with the crowd. For more information, call Kristy Banks 653-5043, Rita O Connell 927-2893, Bill Snyder 6973189 or Liz Sisung 670-8261. News BRIEFS

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Email outdoors news to timesoutdoors @star .com O UTDOORS www.apalachtimes.com Section Section A WEEKLY ALMANAC APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE TIDE TABLES MONTHLY AVERAGES To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from these given for APALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW Cat Point Minus 0:40 Minus 1:17 East Pass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27 To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from those given for CARRABELLE: HIGH LOW Bald Point Minus 9:16 Minus 0:03 Sponsor the WEEKLY ALMANAC Call Today! 653-8868 Date High Low % Precip Thu, May 24 87 69 0 % Fri, May 25 87 72 10 % Sat, May 26 86 73 0 % Sun, May 27 85 73 0 % Mon, May 28 85 73 20 % Tues, May 29 85 73 0 % Wed, May 30 86 73 0 % Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL (next to Piggly Wiggly) www.BWOsh.com Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL (next to Piggly Wiggly) www.BWOsh.com Your Hunting Headquarters MAY FEATURED FISH: Corner of Marina Drive, Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL Your Hunting Headquarters Your Hunting Headquarters Your Hunting Headquarters MAY FEATURED FISH: This months grand prize: Calcutta prize pack includes, gear bag, T-shirt, a pair of sunglasses, decals, visor and drink coozie $129.99 value Wright Mcgill Blair Wiggins S-curve rod with a Sabalos SAB 30 reel combo, $100.00 gift card for online shopping at Bluewater Thursday, May 24, 2012 By STAN KIRKLAND Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission Those people looking for a different type of hunting experience will have their chance. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission is accepting permit applications to hunt alligators during the upcoming season. The state alligator harvest season is Aug. 15 through Nov. 1. It is the 25th year Florida has had a statewide alligator hunting season. Steve Stiegler, a wildlife biologist in the alligator management program, said about 5,800 permits will be available this year, which is down slightly from 2011. Each alligator harvest permit allows the trapper to take up to two alligators. We survey a number of lakes and rivers around the state, and for the most part the alligator population is stable, he said. If previous years are an indicator, somewhere between 7,000 and 8,000 alligators will be bagged during the 11-week season. The statewide alligator harvest Phase I application period began May 2 and will run through May 16. Applicants may submit only one application, with the chance of being drawn for one of ve hunt choices and hunting periods. It is a random draw selection. Any permits not issued after the Phase I period will be issued through Phase II and if needed, Phase III application periods. Alligator harvest applications can be submitted at any county tax collectors of ce, license agent (retail outlet that sells hunting and shing licenses) and online at .wildlifelicense.com Applications are not accepted by mail. Permits for Florida hunters cost $272. That includes two CITES tags, which must be af xed to each harvested gator. Non-residents must pay $1,022. Stiegler said its common for permitted gator trappers to have one or more assistants on board the vessel to help them. Each assistant must have a $52 Alligator Trapping Agents License. Floridas alligator population today is a far cry from 1967, when alligators landed on the endangered species list. Today, estimates put the alligator population in Florida waters around 1.3 million animals. Across their range, Floridas alligator population ranks second only to that of Louisiana. FWC rules dont specify an upper limit to the size of the gator, only that they have to be larger than a hatchling (18 inches). Gator trappers can hunt during their assigned period from 5 p.m. to 10 a.m. each day. Most use either a detachable gig or harpoon, crossbow or bow-and-arrow, with the gig, bolt or arrow tied to a restraining line, or a rod and reel with a snatch hook. Gator hunters in Florida are not allowed to use conventional rearms, but a bangstick can be used to kill the alligator. Some gator hunters who are successful in bagging a gator choose to process the animals themselves for the edible meat and hides. Others may sell the carcass to an alligator processor, or make a deal with a processor to split the head, hide and meat. GATOR GATHERING DEREK BOGGS | Special to Florida Freedom Newspapers The state alligator harvest season is Aug. 15 through Nov. 1. Now is time to apply for hunting permits Page 10 Last week, a group of Chicago dentists had an exceptionally good day of shing with guide David Heinke. The tooth docs reeled in ve black drum and three red sh, all tipping the scales at 40 to 50 pounds. Ken Sakamoto, left, caught two of the big drum, above, and one red sh. It was just a perfect day, Heinke said. We were y shing and got into a nice school. The water was smooth, and I could see the school and just follow it. The sh were nicky and it took a long time to gure out what they wanted to eat, but we nally did. Heinke said the group shing with him has been coming to the area several times a year for more than ve years. Ken Sakamoto with a black drum he caught last week. DAVID HEINKE | Special to the Times A GOOD DAY OF FISHING A new draft of the veyear update to the Gopher Tortoise Management Plan for the state is available for review. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission is asking for public input. The threatened gopher tortoise is classi ed as a keystone species, because its extensive burrows offer shelter to more than 350 other species such as the federally threatened eastern indigo snake. Gopher tortoise burrows average 6.5 feet deep and 15 feet long, provide a home for hundreds of other species and offer great amenities: constant temperature, refuge from res and bad weather, and protection from predators, said Deborah Burr, the FWCs gopher tortoise plan coordinator. The draft plan and link to comment are at MyFWC. com/GopherTortoise. Comments will be accepted through June 25. More than 100 individuals and stakeholders already have made suggestions. The draft revisions are scheduled to go before the FWCs commissioners at their Sept. 5-6 meeting. Objectives of the plan are to minimize loss of gopher tortoises by ensuring humane, responsible relocation from lands slated for development; increase and improve species habitat; enhance and restore populations where the species no longer occurs or has been severely depleted; and maintain its function as a keystone species by also conserving commensal species. Gopher tortoise management plan draft updated Offshore species are returning to the Forgotten Coast in great numbers this month. Spanish Mackerel and king sh are thick in the near shore number in Mexico Beach. Try the buoy line out of Mexico Beach rst trolling dusters with cigar minnows for both the Kings and Spanish. Plenty of chicken or peanut dolphin are showing up close to shore as well this month. Lighter spinning or casting gear with a silver spoon or Got-Cha plugs will keep the school around your boat if you keep one hooked. Only a few weeks left until red snapper season opens, so gear up! Inshore Offshore As May is at its midway mark, shing in St. Joe Bay is still red hot. Good conditions for inshore shing have produced great catches of trout, ounder, and red sh this past week. Most anglers are using live shrimp and bull minnows, but Gulp 3 shrimp in a New penny or Sugar spice glow is the hot bait now. Use a popping cork for the ats and grubs for the deeper holes around the bay. SPONSORED BY

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CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA SP O RTS www.apalachtimes.com A Section Journeys Journeys Journeys Demo Day May 26th, 2012 10am-3pm Free Hot Dogs! COME AND TRY OUT A KAYAK OR CATCH ON TO THE STAND UP PADDLE BOARD CRAZE! PERCEPTION & WILDERNESS KAYAKS SURFTECH SUP BOARDS Marina across from Harry As Call Journeys at (850) 927-3259 for more info Thursday, May 24, 2011 Page 11 Special to The Times The third annual King Buster Tournament has been expanded to include three events this year. The rst leg of the tournament took place on April 28, with two additional meets upcoming, on Saturday, May 26, and June 23. Entry fee is $100 per boat, per tournament. Fishing hours are from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. There are three chances to win each tournament. Cash prizes are for rst place (40 percent of entry fees), second place (30 percent of entry fees) and third place (10 percent of entry fees). The remaining 20 percent of the registration fees go to Make-A-Wish Foundation of Central and Northern Florida. The tourney is sponsored by Millard Collins, dockmaster of C-Quarters Marina. For more information, visit www.cquartersmarina.com or call 697-8400. By Lois Swoboda 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star .com From Crawfordville to Apalachicola, Panhandle golfers took to the links this month for the third annual Forgotten Coast Open to bene t Franklin County Habitat for Humanity. St. James Bay Golf Resort hosted the event May 5-6. Golf Pro Steve Hatcher said about 35 golfers competed, both professionals and amateurs. Its interesting, because although our numbers have remained about the same, we pick up new people every year, Hatcher said. Four ights of golfers competed over the two 18-hole rounds. I tried to break it down so players at all levels have a chance to succeed, Hatcher said. First in the Professional Flight and overall champion of the tournament was Jason Jones of Bainbridge, Ga. (77-69-146). He was followed in the ight by Evan Neihaus of Tallahassee (77-78-155). In the Championship Flight, rst place went to Will Grubbs of Crawfordville (74-76150). Second place was shared by Marcus Beck of Tallahassee and Mike Keller of Crawfordville, both with 76-75-151. In the Gamers Flight, for those with handicaps of 8 to 13, rst place went to Mike Wheelus of Carrabelle (82-78 -160). Second place went to Apalachicolas Tom Nobles (79-82-161). The Big Dogs Flight, for those with handicaps of 14-18, the winner was Doug Brock of Panacea (82-87-169). Second place went to Tim Potter of Crawfordville (90-86-176). Hatcher thanked the sponsors for making this years Forgotten Coast Open one of the most competitive in events history. Sponsors for this years event included Fairpoint Communications, Oyster and HITZ Radio, Must See Magazine and St. James Bay Resort. By Mike Sweatt Special to the Times The rst two tournaments of the countys newest 14-and-Under AAU team, the Franklin County Basketball Academy Hawks, are now under their belts. The rst tournament we played in was the Comets Summer Explosion in Tallahassee at Tallahassee Community College. The boys were kind of intimidated by all of the teams and talent at this event, so the opening game we lost by 20. We came out the next couple of games ghting with some pride. We ended up placing third in the tournament with six teams in our 14-and-under age bracket. In the semi nal game, we won 34-31 in a defensive battle. Tyler Howard scored 15 points and had six steals. Kelsey Jones scored eight points and had ve steals, four blocks and 14 rebounds. Marshall Sweet added four points and four steals, and Josue Barahona had four points and ve rebounds. Kenneth Wilson added three points, while Trent Lee pulled down seven rebounds in the game. The tournaments we participate in have age groups ranging from 9-17, with boys and girls teams. This past weekend we played in a Big Shots Tournament, one of the biggest college recruiting services in the nation, so there was a lot of talent and teams involved, including teams from Atlanta, Miami, North Carolina, Jacksonville, Tallahassee and Pensacola. We did not do well on Saturday, but responded back well on Sunday for a big win to place fth in the tournament. Carza Harvey had 21 points, six assists and four steals. Howard had 12 points and six steals. Sweet had eight points and ve assists. Barahona had seven points and three rebounds. Eddie Wright had two points and four rebounds. Wilson added in two points and four rebounds. Jones had two points and 13 rebounds, and Jan Lowe had two points and three steals. Final score was 56-31. We played an all-star AAU team from Tallahassee. The 14-under team members are Jones, Harvey, Howard, Sweet, Wilson, Barahona, Lowe, Wright, Lee and Brandon Walker. Team sponsors are Franklin County Parks and Recreation, City of Apalachicola, Centennial Bank, AJs Neighborhood Bar and Grill, Forbes Funeral Home, Eddy Teachs Raw Bar, Apalachicola ACE Hardware, Water Street Seafood, Kats Fine Line Painting, and Blue Parrot Restaurant. Thank you to all of our sponsors. Without you this would not be possible. If anyone would like to donate/sponsor the Franklin County Basketball Academy, contact Mike Sweatt at 5663434 or sweattfamu@hotmail.com Mike Sweatt is the coach of the Franklin County Basketball Academy Hawks. By TIM CROFT 227-7827 | @PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com The Tiger Sharks proved an inhospitable host as spring football practice came to a close Thursday night. Eleven Port St. Joe running backs rushed for more than 420 yards and the Tiger Sharks blanked both Franklin County and Wewahitchka over 24 minutes of play to come away with a clean sweep during a three-team jamboree. The Tiger Sharks pummeled Franklin County 27-0 over two quarters and dominated a battered Gator team 19-0. I was pleased with the effort, said Port St. Joe coach Chuck Gannon. We have good depth at running back, but we are young on the offensive line, and we cant afford any injuries. But I thought we played well tonight. Up rst for Port St. Joe was Franklin County, which scored the initial touchdown of the evening against Wewahitchka and did not reach pay dirt again, eventually falling 24-6. A fumbled Port St. Joe handoff on the rst series against the Seahawks was followed by domination as the Tiger Sharks rushed for 258 yards with 11 different backs, including three seventh-graders, getting touches. Franklin County fumbled the ball right back, and Jarkeice Davis, the nights leading rusher with 179 yards, sprinted 80 yards around left end for a touchdown. After stopping the Seahawks on downs, Port St. Joe needed just four plays to cover 54 yards, Natrone Lee catching a 24-yard touchdown pass at the ag from quarterback Ramello Zaccarro. The Tiger Sharks converted another Franklin County fumble one of six turnovers for the Seahawks into a 10-yard touchdown run by Lee, who nished with 101 rushing yards. The Seahawks fumbled on the ensuing play, and Dusty Richter carried from 11 yards out for the touchdown, Justin Hites extra point providing the nal scoring for the two quarters. The nal two quarters were between county rivals Port St. Joe and Wewahitchka, and after losing four starters in the opening half against Franklin County, the Gators were playing with one hand behind their back. While Wewahitchka was unable to mount any sustained threat, Port St. Joe drove 62 yards for a 1-yard dive by Zaccarro, 85 yards for another 1-yard keeper by Zaccarro and nished the night by converting one of three Gator fumbles into a 8-yard touchdown run by Joe Love. I didnt like that, said Wewahitchka coach Dennis Kizziah of the nal two quarters. We lost four kids in that rst half, and we just cant afford that. When we were fresh and the other team was fresh, we played well. After the rst possession, I thought our defense really cracked down. That initial possession ended in a 5-yard run by Franklin Countys Skyler Hutchinson, but from there it was the Jalyn Addison show. Addison rushed eight times for 136 yards in the 24 minutes against the Seahawks he nished the night with 162 rushing yards and scored on runs of 29, six and 58 yards. Meanwhile, Franklin County had three turnovers inside Gator territory, two in the red zone, and the Seahawks nal four possessions ended fumble, interception, fumble and fumble. STEVE HATCH | Special to the Times At left is Overall Champion Jason Jones. Will Grubbs of Crawfordville, right, scored rst in the Championship Flight. Locals win big at Forgotten Coast Open King Buster tourney continues Saturday Sports SHORT SEAHAWK SPRING ROSTER #1 Dwayne Griggs #2 Cole Wheeler #3 Stefan DeVaughn #4 Dan Carrino #5 Holden Foley #7 Skyler Hutchinson #25 Christian Jones #14 Tyler Webb #15 Logan McLeod #21 Thomas Benitez #20 Trenton Lee #24 Hunter Lee #30 Zach Howze #50 Chase Golden #51 Ricky Smith #53 Kyle Wheeler #54 Marcus Bunyon #55 Direek Farmer #56 Jacob Wilson #59 River Banks #58 Jake Robinson #52 Eric Coleman #71 Mason Ray #73 David Butler #74 Jeffery Murray #66 Lenny Ward #76 Karl Sanford 2012 SEAHAWK SCHEDULE Aug. 24 vs. Bozeman (Preseason) 7:30 p.m. Aug. 31 @ Sneads 7:30 p.m. Sept. 7 vs. Graceville 8 p.m. Sept. 14 @ Cottondale 7:30 p.m. Sept. 21 @ Liberty** 7:30 p.m. Sept. 28 vs. Wewahitchka 7:30 p.m. Oct. 5 vs. Port Saint Joe** 7:30 p.m. Oct. 12 vs. Robert F. Munroe 7:30 p.m. Oct. 19 vs. West Gadsden** 7:30 p.m. Oct. 26 @ Blountstown** 7:30 p.m. Nov. 2 OPEN Nov. 9 vs. South Walton 8 p.m. Nov. 16 FHSAA PLAYOFFS ** District 2 Class 1-A All games Eastern Standard Time PSJ dominates jamboree Hawks open tourney play

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Local A12 | The Times Thursday, May 24, 2012 A12 | The Times Thursday, May 24, 2012 CLASSIFIEDS 87557 PUBLIC NOTICE STATE OF FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION NOTICE OF INTENT TO ISSUE PERMIT The Department of Environmental Protection gives notice of its intent to issue an environmental resources permit for Scipio Creek Boat Basin Improvements, 19-0301773002-EI, to the City of Apalachicola, at One Avenue E, Apalachicola, Florida 32320. The purpose of the permit is to authorize construction of an open-air market/pavilion, re87487 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 12-108 CA CENTENNIAL BANK, an Arkansas banking corporation P.O. Box 610 Crawfordville, Florida 32327, Plaintiff, vs. RONALD D. BOOZER, MARJORIE L. BOOZER a/k/a MARJORIE LOUISE BOOZER, and CLERK OF COURT, FRANKLIN COUNTY, STATE OF FLORIDA Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: RONALD D. BOOZER, MARJORIE L. BOOZER a/k/a MARJORIE LOUISE BOOZER: YOU ARE NOTIFIED that a civil action has been filed against you in the Circuit Court, County of Franklin, State of Florida, to foreclose certain real property described as follows: LOT 1, BLOCK 48 (211), KEOUGHS SECOND ADDITION TO THE CITY OF CARRABELLE, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 20, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA; TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN 1977 AMHE MOBILE HOME, IDENTIFICATION NO. 21G6842D. You are required to file a written response with the Court and serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Keith L. Bell, Jr., Plaintiffs attorney, 87254 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 2011-000093-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, as successor in interest to COASTAL COMMUNITY BANK, a Florida banking corporation, Plaintiff, vs. LANDMARK GROUP, LLC, a Florida limited liability company, JEFFREY D. THACKER, HERBERT PRESS WITT and DAMIEN FRENCH, Defendants. NOTICE OF JUDICIAL SALE PURSUANT TO SECTION 45.031 OF THE FLORIDA STATUTES TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to the Amended Final Judgment of Foreclosure of Mortgage and Ordering Sale entered on May 2, 2012, in Case Number 2011-000093-CA of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit for Franklin County, Florida, in which LANDMARK GROUP, LLC, a Florida limited liability company, JEFFREY D. THACKER, HERBERT PRESS WITT and DAMIEN FRENCH are Defendants, I, Marcia M. Johnson, Clerk of Circuit Court, will sell at public sale the following described real property: Lots 15, 16, 17, and 18 of Fairway Park Subdivision, a subdivision as per map or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 8, Page 15, Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. The sale will be held on June 12, 2012, at 11:00 A.M. (Eastern Time) to the highest and best bidder for cash, at the second floor lobby, West side of the Franklin County Courthouse, located at 33 Market Street, in Apalachicola, Franklin County, Florida, in accordance with Section 45.031 of the Florida Statutes. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 3rd day of May, 2012. MARCIA M. JOHNSON Clerk of Court By: Michele Maxwell As Deputy Clerk Attorney for Plaintiff: Law Office of J. Gordon Shuler, P.A. P.O. Drawer 850 / 34 Fourth Street Apalachicola, Florida 32329 850-653-9226Phone 850-653-3382Fax May 17, 24, 2012 whose address is 106 East College Avenue, Suite 600, Tallahassee, Florida 32301, at least thirty (30) days from the date of first publication, and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. Dated this 11th day of May, 2012. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of Court Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk Attorney for Plaintiff: Keith L. Bell, Jr., Esq. Clark, Partington, Hart, Larry, Bond & Stackhouse 106 East College Ave. Suite 600 Tallahassee, FL 32301 (850) 597-7483 (Phone) (850) 597-7591 (Fax) May 24, 31, 2012 HOW TO RECORD A UFO In case you encounter ET, you might want to read the following advice taken from MUFONs website on how photograph a ying saucer. Stabilize the camera on a tripod. If there is no tripod, then set it on top of a stable, at surface. If that is not possible lean against a wall to stabilize your body and prevent the camera from lming in a shaky, unsteady manner. Provide visual reference points for comparison. This includes the horizon, treetops, lampposts, houses, and geographical landmarks (i.e., Horsetooth Reservoir, Mt. Adams, etc.) Provide this in the video whenever is appropriate and doesnt detract from what your focus is, the UFO. Narrate your videotape. Provide details of the date, time, location, and direction you are looking in. Provide observations on the weather, including approximate temperature, wind speed, any visible cloud cover or noticeable weather anomalies or events. Narrate on the shape, size, color, movements, approximate altitude of the UFO, etc and what it appears to be doing. Also include any unusual physical, psychological or emotional sensations you might have. Narrate any visual reference points on camera so they correlate with what the viewer will see, and thereby will be better able to understand. Be persistent and consistent. Return to the scene to videotape and record at this same location. If you have been successful once, the UFO sightings may be occurring in this region regularly, perhaps for specic reasons unknown, and you may be successful again. You may also wish to return to the same location at a different time of day for better orientation and reference. Film just a minute or two under normal circumstances for comparison. Write down what you remember immediately after. As soon as you are done recording the experience/event, immediately write down your impressions, memories, thoughts, emotions, etc. so it is on the record in writing. If there were other witnesses, have them independently record their own impressions, thoughts, etc. Include in this exercise any drawings, sketches, or diagrams. Make sure you date and sign your documentation. Always be prepared. Have a digital camera or better yet a video camera with you, charged and ready to go, at all times. Make sure you know how to use your camera (and your cellphone video/photo camera) quickly and properly. These events can occur suddenly, unexpectedly, and often quite randomly, so you will need to be prepared. the more active MUFON branches, headed by G. Bland Pugh of Gulf Breeze. MUFON operates a worldwide network for eld investigation of reported UFO sightings, holds an annual international symposium, and publishes the monthly MUFON UFO Journal. Visitors to their website, www.mufon. com can purchase a UFO investigation eld manual for $50, learn how to become a certied investigator, nd out about regional events and meet-and-greets, or join MUFON. MUFON maintains an online archive of reported UFO sightings and provides a portal for people to report their sightings, abductions etc. A search of MUFONs online records going back to 1995 reveals the latest encounter on the island is only one of four alleged UFO sightings reported in Franklin County over the past 17 years. The rst took place on Jan. 27, 2008, when, according to the report, a group of local women and children spotted something unusual while enjoying a warm winter day. One woman was bird watching with her grandchildren between 1 and 2 p.m. The trees were bare of leaves and there were no birds in sight. The sky was clear, blue and sunny, according to the report. As witness was searching the sky, she noticed an object in the sky that looked at rst like a tool or an upside-down screw. She thought to herself, What the hell is that? and asked her niece if she saw it. She said her niece got frightened, said she didnt see anything and went in the house. The woman continued to watch the object which she described as silent. The object approached her, and was reportedly ying about 5 mph. I never turned away, kept looking at it the whole time, she said, describing it as resembling a short lighthouse, old and rusty with no visible windows or doors. Suddenly, there was a metallic ash like a pie pan in the sun and the object became brilliant and changed shape to resemble an hourglass, she reported. She said seagulls seemed to be attracted to the object which changed shape again and took on a white color. The next reported sighting was April 16, 2009, when someone posted the following short note about Franklin County: I call them patrollers because they patrol our skies. I took a pic of one, there has been as many as three in the same areas. No picture was posted with the note. A picture was posted with a note about the third alleged sighting, reported on March 15, 2011. Spring seems to be a popular time for ETs to visit the county. The explanation with the photo shown here reads, My friend was on the beach of Dog Island. It was a beautiful, clear, sunny afternoon with a normal ocean breeze. He and his friend took several photos with a digital camera of the beach/ocean/sky, looking south over the Gulf of Mexico. Later when looking closely at the photos, he noticed a strange white hazy streak in the sky, which he thought was an optical anomaly. Then he also noticed a tiny object near the streak in the sky. When zooming in on the object in the photo, it looks like a disk in the sky with the top shiny, apparently due to reected sun light, and the bottom with a dark shadow. They had not noticed either the streak or the object when taking the photos. UFO from page A1 Carrabelles own poet laureate, Mary Westberg is back in print. The Carrabelle History Museum has published a collection of a dozen of her poems in a pretty little pocketbook. The new book features photographs of Carrabelle and the Wilderness Coast by Joan Matey, Sheila Hauser and others. In her well beloved Carrabelle by the Sea, Miss Mary pays homage to her beautiful home town. Other poems appear in print for the rst time, including Friendship, Beloved Grandmother and Splendor. The book will be on sale at local museums and other businesses. It is a lovely gift and a pocketful of happiness to carry with you everywhere. All proceeds from sales of the book benet the Carrabelle museum. A pocket full of poemsA MEMORIAL DAY PRAYER By MARY WESTBERG | Special to the Times Today, all freedom-loving Americans are called to honor, with gratitude, those valiant heroes who sacriced their lives for the cause they felt was right. We come as a grateful nation to place a wreath at the Tomb of the Unknown, to honor the memory of all the fallen heroes represented here today. In remembrance, we commend the courage they displayed, and mourn the supreme sacrice they made, for love of country when our freedom was at stake. Standing on sacred ground, we bow our heads in prayer, and hallow their names in the arms of Gods embrace. We depart, dear friend, with your memory in our heart, and a solemn salute of farewell in heavens eternal resting place. Amen. MARY WESTBERG Classieds

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, May 24, 2012 The Times | A13 AIRLINE CAREERS BEGIN HERE – Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech – FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualified. Housing available. Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-206-9405 ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical Business Criminal Justice Hospitality. Job Placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 866-467-0054 www.Centuraonline.com Mobile Airbrush Tanning ServiceGet that golden sun-kissed tan just in time for summer without the dangerous damaging effects of UV rays found in tanning beds and sun exposure. Airbrush tanning is a safe alternative, and provides you with instant color! The tan of a mechanized spray tan booth found at much larger tanning salons, can not compare to a custom airbrush tan guaranteed to give you a natural sun-kissed glow! Come on guys, don’t be afraid to get the tan you’ve always wanted, custom airbrush tanning isn’t just for the ladies! Want to get together with your friends? Have a tanning party and we’ll take 20% off everyone’s individual tan’s, the host tans free! We also offer monthly tanning packages! Individual tans start at 30 dollars, but we regularly have specials. Call for more information and get the best bang for your buck. We offer a hypoallergenic/ organic formula that will not turn your skin orange and is guaranteed not to run or streak. Appointments are always available: (850) 524-5105.Text FL09625 to 56654 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322850-697-9604 850-323-0444 www.seacrestre.comwww. rst tness.com/carrabellePROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND RENTALSRENTALS3 BR 2BA DOUBLEWIDE UNFURNISHED Large Yard, In Country ....................................$700 2 BR MOBILE HOME UNFURNISHED Country, Private ..............................................$550 1 BR FURNISHED CONDO Nice, Includes Utilities.....................................$910 1 BR RIVER CONDO, BOAT SLIP 3 Night Minimum ..........................$105 Plus Daily 1 BR 1BA, UNFURNISHED APT Lanark, Remodeled, Inc Water .......................$475 2 BR 1BA UNFURNISHED APT Lanark ...............................................$375 & $450 1 BR, SUN ROOM/DAY BED Furnished, Lanark, Inc Utilities ......................$650 2BR 1BA MOBILE HOME Fenced Yard ....................................................$500 1BR REMODELED HOUSE Carrabelle .......................................................$450 OFFICE SPACE Hwy 98 Frontage, Carrabelle .....$400 Plus Utilities HELP WANTED Warehouse / Delivery Eastpoint Location C L E A N E R S CLEANERS N E E D E D NEEDEDLots of Work and Good Pay Must have Own Vehicle Must have Own SuppliesCALL 850.227.3806 Total Down Pmt $6752001 Chevy Impala T otal Price $4,5000% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! Total Down Pmt $6752002 Ford Explorer T otal Price $5,2000% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! For inventory log onto: www.nicecarofforgotten coastllc.com Total Down Pmt $7752002 Ford Ranger -X/Cab T otal Price $5,2000% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! Total Down Pmt $9752000 Chevy Silverado -X/Cab T otal Price $6,5000% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! 1 BRCottageH/AC in Apalachicola, FL. 850-643-7740. For Sale or Trade $230,000 Lake Front home Toledo Bend Reservoir, Hamphill, Texas 3br, 2ba, 1 acre, boathouse, dock, pavilion, Call 409-579-1107 Medical/HealthCNA/HHABrightStar Care of Bay County (HHA 299993930) is seeking CNA/HHAs to provide loving, compassionate care to our clients in Gulf and Franklin County. Must have min of 1 yr of experience in providing Personal Care,meet all of the statutory requirements for being a home health worker, have reliable transport/safe driving record. If you love people and are servant-minded, please apply at www.brightstarcare.com/caree r-center or call (850) 238-3271 Web ID#: 34210595 Text FL10595 to 56654 Furnished Loft Apt, in historic district. Cbl/wtr incl 1100sf high ceilings, Private entrance and deck. No smkg/ pets. $750 mo. + $750 dep. 850-653-3838 Publisher’s NoticeAll real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on a equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. St. George Island $160 week, Electric, Satellite, Garbage incl. Pool tble. 12’ X 65’ deck w/Beautiful view 850-653-5114 Lanark Village Carlton St. #5, 1 Br 1 Ba, All Tile, Walk-in Closet, Landlord pays Electric and Water, $525 month + $300 deposit. Call 850-927-2838 or 864-356-5949 Adopt: Adoring Family, Veterinarian Doctor, LOVE awaits baby. Susan *800552-0045* FLBar42311 Expenses Paid* Carrabelle -2072 Lighthouse Rd. Sat 5/26 8am-2pm.Yard SaleBoat, Kayak, baby stuff, furniture and much more! Food Svs/HospitalityEvening Cook NeededThe Thirsty Goat is now accepting applications for an evening cook. The ideal candidate will have restaurant experience, but we are willing to train the right person. Applicants must have the ability to function in a fast paced environment while remaining professional and friendly. Candidates must be able to work weekends and holidays, dependability is a must! If you have an eye for detail, the highest desire to deliver superior service, and can play well with others, we would love to hear from you! Apply in person at the address below. E.O.E. DFWP Port Inn 501 Monument Ave. Port St. Joe, FL 32456 HospitalityRESORT VACATION PROPERTIESAccepting Applications *Full-time reservationist w/ great benefits. *Part-time maintenance office clerk. Both positions require weekend work. Apply in person 9-5 weekdays at 123 W Gulf Beach Dr, St. George Island 87465T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 19-2010-CA-000396 DIVISION: BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. WILLIAM S. HOWARD, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated April 30, 2012 and entered in Case No. 19-2010-CA000396 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for FRANKLIN County, Florida wherein BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. is the Plaintiff and WILLIAM S. HOWARD; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at FRONT DOOR OF THE FRANKLIN COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 33 MARKET STREET, APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA at 11:00AM, on the 19th day of June, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT 88, CARRABELLE LANDINGS, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 8, PAGE 47, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA A/K/A LOT 88 CARRABELLE LANDINGS, CARRABELLE, FL 32322 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on May 3, 2012. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Mr. Doug Smith, Office of Court Administration, Leon County Courthouse, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301, Phone: 850577-4401, Fax: 850487-7947 May 24, 31, 2012 87535T NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW PURSUANT TO SECTION 865.09, FLORIDA STATUTES NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of Mandi Singer Photography located at 82 Market Street, Unit C, in the County of FRANKLIN, in the City of Apalachicola, Florida, 32320 intends to register the said name with the Divisions of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, Florida. Dated at Apalachicola, Florida, this 18th day of May, 2012. Amanda L. Singer May 24, 2012 Incorrect Insertion PolicyFor Classified In-column AdvertisersAll ads placed by phone are read back to the advertiser to insure correctness. The newspaper will assume correctness at the time of the read-back procedure unless otherwise informed. Please your ad. Advertisers are requested to check the advertisement on the first insertion for correctness. Errors should be reported immediately. Your Florida Freedom newspaper will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion, nor will it be liable for any error in advertisements to a greater extent than the cost of the space occupied by the error. Any copy change, during an ordered schedule constitutes a new ad and new charges. We do not guarantee position of ANY ad under any classification. 87367T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 19-2011-CA-000295 DIVISION: BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., AS SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP, Plaintiff, vs. JAMES D. BRASWELL, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated April 30, 2012 and entered in Case No. 19-2011-CA000295 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for FRANKLIN County, Florida wherein BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., AS SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP is the Plaintiff and JAMES D. BRASWELL; SARAH L. BRASWELL; GULF STATE COMMUNITY BANK; FRANKLIN COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS; TENANT #1 N/K/A MIRIAN BARAHONA are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at FRONT DOOR OF THE FRANKLIN COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 33 MARKET STREET, APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA at 11:00AM, on the 12th day of June, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: PARCEL 1: COMMENCE AT A POINT 345 FEET WEST AND 145.15 FEET SOUTH OF THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF THE SOUTHWEST 1/4 OF SECTION 35, T8S, R8W, WHICH IS THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 93, HIGHLAND PARK SUBDIVISION, THENCE RUN ALONG THE COUNTY ROAD RIGHT-OF-WAY NORTH 63 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST, A DISTANCE OF 469 FEET TO A POINT OF BEGINNING, THENCE RUN NORTH 26 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 30 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 100 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 63 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 30 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 75 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 26 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 100 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 63 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 75 FEET TO POINT OF BEGINNING, THE SAME BEING PORTIONS OF LOTS 88 AND 89 OF HIGHLAND PARK SUBDIVISION AN UNRECORDED PLAT. PARCEL 2: A PARCEL OF LAND IN THE SW 1/4, SECTION 35, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST, DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT A POINT ON THE EASTERN BOUNDARY OF HIGHLAND PARK SUBDIVISION, AT ITS INTERSECTION WITH THE NORTHERN BOUNDARY OF THE COUNTY ROAD, WHICH IS 345 WEST AND 141.15 FEET SOUTH OF THE NE CORNER OF THE SE 1/4 OF THE SW 1/4 OF SAID SECTION 35, THE SAME BEING THE SOUTHEASTERLY TIP OF THE EASTERLY PARCEL NORTH OF SAID ADJACENT COUNTY ROAD, THENCE RUN NORTH 63 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID COUNTY ROAD A DISTANCE OF 269 FEET. THENCE RUN NORTH 26 DEGREES 3 MINUTES 30 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 100 FEET THEN RUN NORTH 63 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 110 FEET TO A POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE NORTH 63 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 15 FEET THENCE RUN SOUTH 26 DEGREES 3 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 100 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 63 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 30 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 15 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 26 DEGREES 3 MINUTES 30 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 100 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH A CERTAIN 1999 REDMAN MOBILE HOME LOCATED THEREON AS A FIXTURE AND APPURTENANCE THERETO VIN# FLA14614171A AND FLA14614171B. A/K/A 1063 CYPRESS STREET, APALACHICOLA, FL 32320 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on May 1, 2012 Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Mr. Doug Smith, Office of Court Administration, Leon County Courthouse, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301, Phone: 850-577-4401, Fax: 850-487-7947 May 17, 24, 2012 87401T PUBLIC NOTICE On May 3, 2012, Westminster Academy filed an application with the Federal Communications Commission for the assignment of license of radio stations to Bible Broadcasting Network, Inc.: WAFG, Fort Lauderdale, FL 90.3 FM; WKZG, Key West, FL 88.3 FM; WMRG, Key Colony Beach, FL, 88.7 FM; W285EK, Marathon, FL, 104.9; W288BV, Key West, FL, 105.5; W295AN, Marathon, FL, 106.9; W297AS, Islamorada, FL, 107.3; and a construction permit for Eastpoint, FL, 91.9. The officers and directors of Westminster Academy are: Bob Barnes, Russ Coningsby, Ryan Critch, Brian MacClugage, Jeff Masters, Terry McKay, George Moraitis, Rob Pacienza, Craig Peterson, Mike Pritchard, Terrie Roughen, Carole Sipowski, Larry Thompson and Leo Orsino. Westminster Academy is controlled by Coral Ridge Presbyterian Church. The officers and directors of this board are: Bill Ashcraft, James Branham, Clark Cochran, John Harper, Rod Hayes, Steve Howe, Robert Huth, Ronald Kovack, Mark Kreisel, Jeff Masters, David Russ, JT Turner III, Brian MacClugage and Mark Mansour. The officers and directors of Bible Broadcasting Network, Inc. are: Lowell L. Davey, Georgeanna Davey, Joseph J. Mast, Sr., Joy A. Raley, Barbara Redemann, Michael Raley, Carl Redemann and Juan Lopez. A copy of the application is available for public viewing in the following public files at 5555 N. Federal Hwy., Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33308. May 17, 24, 31, 2012 87270T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. CASE NO. 2008-CA-000358 LASALLE BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION AS TRUSTEE Plaintiff, vs. MULLINS, JOHN, et al. Defendants. RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order or Final Judgment entered in Case No. 2008-CA-000358 of the Circuit Court of the 2ND Judicial Circuit in and for FRANKLIN County, Florida, wherein, LASALLE BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION AS TRUSTEE, is Plaintiff, and, MULLINS, JOHN, et al., are Defendants, I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at, 33 MARKET STREET, FRONT STEPS OF THE COURTHOUSE, STE 203, APALACHICOLA, FL 32320, at the hour of 11:00 AM, on the 12th day of June, 2012, the following described property: LOT 13 OF WINDJAMMER VILLAGE, ACCORDING TO THE THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE(S) 38 & 39, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Property Address: 1701 KINGFISHER DRIVE, ST GEORGE ISLAND, FL 32328 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. DATED this 2nd day of May, 2012. MARCIA M. JOHNSON Clerk Circuit Court By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk Attorney for Plaintiff: GREENSPOON & MARDER, P.A. IMPORTANT If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Clerk of the Court’s disability coordinator at 301 S MONROE STREET ROOM 225, TALLAHASSEE, FL 32301, 850-577-4401 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. May 17, 24, 2012 stroom facilities, aboat repair facility, haul-out slip, waste oil facilities, ice house/loading dock, dock extensions, and dock repairs, including a stormwater management system, on approximately 5.45 acres of seven contiguous parcels totaling 239.17 acres. Stormwater treatment will be provided via seven dry retention facilities. The project will be located on Market Street at Latitude 29.7333 North, Longitude -84.9947 West, in Section 36, Township 8S, Range 8W, and Section 1, Township 9S, Range 8W, Class II Waters, Prohibited Shellfish Harvesting Area, in Franklin County. Based on all the above, and with the application of general and limiting specific conditions of the permit, the Department has reasonable assurance the project, as proposed, fully meets the environmental resources permitting requirements of Chapter 62-346, Florida Administrative Code, and will not harm the environment. A person whose substantial interests are affected by the Department’s action may petition for an administrative proceeding (hearing) under Sections 120.569 and 120.57 of the Florida Statutes. The petition must contain the information set forth below and must be filed (received by the clerk) in the Office of General Counsel of the Department at 3900 Commonwealth Boulevard, Mail Station 35, Tallahassee, Florida 323993000. Because the administrative hearing process is designed to re-determine final agency action on the application, the filing of a petition for an administrative hearing may result in a modification of the permit, or even a denial of the application. Accordingly, the applicant will not commence construction or other activities under this permit until the deadlines below for filing a petition for an administrative hearing, or request for an extension of time, have expired. Under subsection 62-110.106(4) of the Florida Administrative Code, a person whose substantial interests are affected by the Department’s action may also request an extension of time to file a petition for an administrative hearing. The Department may, for good cause shown, grant the request for an extension of time. Requests for extension of time must be filed with the Office of General Counsel of the Department at 3900 Commonwealth Boulevard, Mail Station 35, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-3000, before the applicable deadline. A timely request for extension of time shall toll the running time period for filing a petition until the request is acted upon. If a request is filed late, the Department may still grant it upon a motion by the requesting party showing that the failure to file a request for an extension of time before the deadline was the result of excusable neglect. In the event that a timely and sufficient petition for an administrative hearing is filed, other persons whose substantial interests will be affected by the outcome of the administrative process have the right to petition to intervene in the proceeding. Intervention will be only at the discretion of the presiding officer upon the filing of a motion in compliance with Rule 28-106.205 of the Florida Administrative Code. In accordance with subsection 28-106.111(2) and subparagraph 62-110.106(3)(a).4, Florida Administrative Code, petitions for an administrative hearing by the applicant must be filed within 14 days of receipt of written notice. Petitions filed by any persons other than the applicant, and other than those entitled to written notice under Section 120.60(3) of the Florida Statutes, must be filed within 14 days of publication of the notice. Under Section 120.60(3) of the Florida Statutes, however, any person who has asked the Department for notice of agency action may file a petition within 14 days of such notice, regardless of the date of publication. The petitioner shall mail a copy of the petition to the applicant at the address indicated above at the time of filing. The failure of any person to file a petition for an administrative hearing within the appropriate time period shall constitute a waiver of those rights. A petition that disputes the material facts on which the Department’s action is based must contain the following information: (a) The name and address of each agency affected and each agency’s file or identification number, if known; (b) The name, address, and telephone number of the petitioner; the name, address, and telephone number of the petitioner’s representative, if any, which shall be the address for service purposes during the course of the proceeding; and an explanation of how the petitioner’s substantial interests are or will be affected by the agency determination; (c) A statement of when and how the petitioner received notice of the agency decision; (d) A statement of all disputed issues of material fact. If there are none, the petition must so indicate; (e) A concise statement of the ultimate facts alleged, including the specific facts that the petitioner contends warrant reversal or modification of the agency’s proposed action; (f) A statement of the specific rules or statutes that the petitioner contends require reversal or modification of the agency’s proposed action; and (g) A statement of the relief sought by the petitioner, stating precisely the action that the petitioner wishes the agency to take with respect to the agency’s proposed action. A petition that does not dispute the material facts on which the Department’s action is based shall state that no such facts are in dispute and otherwise shall contain the same information as set forth above, as required by Rule 28-106.301, Florida Administrative Code. Under Sections 120.569(2)(c) and (d) of the Florida Statutes, a petition for administrative hearing must be dismissed by the agency if the petition does not substantially comply with the above requirements or is untimely filed. This action is final and effective on the date filed with the Clerk of the Department unless a petition is filed in accordance with the above. Upon the timely filing of petition this order will not be effective until further order of the Department. This permit, when issued, constitutes an order of the Department. The applicant has the right to seek judicial review of the order under Section 120.68 of the Florida Statutes, by the filing of a notice of appeal under Rule 9.110 of the Florida Rules of Appellate Procedure with the Clerk of the Department in the Office of General Counsel, 3900 Commonwealth Boulevard, Mail Station 35, Tallahassee, Florida, 32399-3000; and by filing a copy of the notice of the appeal accompanied by the applicable filing fees with the appropriate district court of appeal. The notice of appeal must be filed within 30 days from the date when the final order is filed with the Clerk of the Department. Requests for review before the Land and Water Adjudicatory Commission must be filed with the Secretary of the Commission and served on the Department within 20 days from the date when the final order is filed with the Clerk of the Department. The application for this permit is available for public inspection during normal business hours, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, except for legal holidays, at the Northwest District Branch Office, 2353 Jenks Avenue, Panama City, Florida 32405. May 24, 2012 These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you. EmeraldCoast Marketplace 747-5020 Nursing Faculty, Gulf Franklin CampusTo teach didactics, laboratories and clinicals for the Practical Nursing program at the Port St. Joe campus. Design and implement the curriculum plan to meet requirements for the program and the Certi ed Nursing Assistant program. This includes assessment, planning, implementation and evaluation of courses, program objectives and NLNAC requirements. Requires: MSN with a minimum two (2) years of general medical surgical nursing experience + a current FL RN license. Salary based on degree and experience. Position Open Until Filled with a review starting 6/1/12.Women & minorities are strongly encouraged to apply. Application (must be completed) & additional info:www.gulfcoast.edu/hr GCSC is an EA/EO/M/F/Vet employer. GCSC Equity O cer 850.872.3866

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Local A14 | The Times Thursday, May 24, 2012 Our local real estate experts have identied what they feel are the best values around and are oering them to you in Real Estate Picks! (In this section), Discover the best real estate values in Mexico Beach, Port St. Joe, Apalachicola, Cape San Blas, St. George Island, Carrabelle and surrounding areas. Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Real Estate Picks John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.com MLS#244406 $249,000 St George Island BAY VIEW HOME Located in the quiet area of the Island, only 3 lots from Bay, 4 BR, 2 BA, large fenced yard, balcony for each upstairs BR, galley kitchen with serving window, large living area, Florida room, large deck, large ground level storage, circular driveway. Brown Street John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.com MLS#242245 $439,900 St George Island GULF VIEW FROM WEST PINE AVE 4 BR (2 are masters), 3-1/2 BA with extra LR/5th BR, furnished, Interesting Architectural features, POOL with vinyl fencing, Enclosed outdoor shower, Screened porch, covered ground level entry. GET YOUR AD IN 653-8868 Trades & Services Laban Bontrager, DMD Monica Bontrager, DMD 12761 Pea Ridge Road Bristol, Florida 32321 TELEPHONE (850) 643-5417 Bristol Dental Clinic DENTURE LAB ON PREMISES Same Day Service on Repairs and Relines Don Lively General Contractors L ICENSED AND I NSURED 20 Y EARS E XPERIENCE P .O. Box 439 C arrabelle, FL 32322 697-2783 or Mobile 566-2603 RC 0066499 R G0065255 Carrabelle Visa, Discover, and American Express Honored at Participating Ace Stores JACKSONS Building Supplies & Auto Repair Carrabelle 697-3333 We Deliver Anywhere Hardware and Paint Center JOES LAWN CARE FULL LAWN MAINTENANCE AND TREE TRI MM ING WITH RE M OVAL OF ALL DEBRIS AND JUNK NEW CUSTOMERS 10% DIS C OUNT FROM YOUR PREVIOUS LAWN C ARE PROVIDER W ITH STAT E M EN T OF TH E COST FIRST C UT FREE W ITH V E RBAL COMMITM EN T TO AT L E AST 12 MO N THS OF S E RVIC E P LEASE C ALL JOE @ 850-323-0741 J.J.s Tree Service, LLC Stump Grinder Licensed & Insured Call John : (850) 899-8432 ROBERTS APPLIANCE REPAIR ALL MAJOR BRANDS 18 Shadow Lane Apalachicola, FL 32320 Phone: (850) 653-8122 Cell: (850) 653-7654 Trades & Services Robert C. Bruner Attorney Personal & Business Bankruptcy Over 30 Years Legal Experience 850-670-3030 bankruptcy relief under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon advertisements. Before you decide, ask us to send you free written information A new Memorial Day tradition Memorial Day honors the sacri ce of those who gave away all of their tomorrows so we can live in freedom today. In the past, it has been a tradition to place American ags on the graves of veterans. This year, Larry Hale of St. George Island, a veteran of the Vietnam War and a scout leader for nearly two decades, is suggesting a new tradition. In order to engage young people in the Memorial Day tradition, he is encouraging youth groups of all kinds to visit a local cemetery and clean the grave of a veteran, then return home and research the graves occupant on the Internet. In Franklin County, we have graves dating as far back as the Indian wars, so this will be an interesting history lesson, Hale said. It will also perform a much needed service, as many graves are untended, with tombstones half-covered in sand and leaves. If you are involved in a youth group or have children of your own, please consider joining in this new Memorial Day tradition. Call to all artists to submit works The Apalachicola Center for History, Culture and Art is calling for submissions by local artists. Art submitted can consist of but is not limited to oil paintings, drawings, pastels, watercolors, acrylic paintings, sculpture of any medium, glass, woodworking, photography and textiles. The exhibition will run June 7 to July 28 with an opening reception to be 6-8 p.m. June 9. The exhibition is open to any artist over 18 residing in Franklin County. Entries must be received by May 29. Work is subject to nal acceptance. The Apalachicola Center for History, Culture and Art will receive a 40 percent commission on any sales of artwork. For information, contact Paulette Moss at 855-APALACH. Museum assists with contamination removal The former Camp Gordon Johnston area once again will be checked for ordnance and any contamination that might remain from the camp. The Camp Gordon Johnston World War II Museum has been asked to assist locals who have any questions about what is taking place. If you missed the recent meeting at Chillas Hall, come by the museum Thursday through Saturday to receive materials. The museum will be closed June 2 because of electrical work being done by Progress Energy. Camp Gordon Johnston and other former military installations with explosives and contaminants left behind, together with taxpayer dollars channeled through the Army Corps of Engineers, are seeking to remove any possible items and contaminants. The project at the former Camp Gordon Johnston will take about three years to complete, with followups every ve years after that. News BRIEFS LIGHTHOUSE ADDS INTERACTIVE ARCHIVE A new interactive exhibit has been added to the Cape St. George Lighthouse Museum. The Interactive Archive is an audio-visual exhibit including videos, still photographs, documents and text detailing the history of the Cape St. George Light. Installation of the exhibit in the Keepers House Museum was completed in March. The collapse of the Cape St. George Light in October 2005 was a newsworthy occurrence in the Panhandle, and the event received considerable media coverage. Several videographers also lmed the reconstruction of the historic structure and developed brief documentaries about the lighthouse. This footage formed the basis for the exhibit, so visitors could view the various news accounts of our lighthouse. More than just a collection of video clips, the exhibit is a digital repository for videos, photographs and documents about the lighthouse and its keepers. The resulting Interactive Archive offers not only the opportunity to view news clips and documentary pieces, but provides a method for storing and sharing photographs and documents about the lighthouse. This archive will serve as a storage medium for future photographs and documents made available to the St. George Lighthouse Association. TERRY KEMP | Special to the Times



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Photos by DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times Members of the Odyssey of the Mind teams are, seated from left, Fisher Edwards, Rory Countryman and Ethan Riley, and standing, from left, Connor Smith, James Hat eld, Kendall Meyer, Bobby Kilgore, Jalynn Liston and Ursula Countryman. Right Connor Smith recreates his Odyssey Angels performance. Thursday, May 24, 2012 By LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star .com Tourists on St. George Island claim to have encountered visitors from further away. On May 10, someone posted the following account of a close encounter with something unknown in the sky over Franklin County: I like to get great sunset pictures, from the Florida coast, so every night at the beach house I would go up on top to the viewing area to watch the sunset, to see if it would be a memorable one or not. This particular evening, (I think it was Wednesday evening, but it might have been another night. The date and time should be part of the digital info however.) Anyway, as I was looking northwest to watch for the sunset, an object which appeared to be a black orb with a aming bottom streaked over my head from out over the Gulf, headed inland. I pointed my camera at it and zoomed the lens, and snapped a picture, before the object was beyond my sight. There was no sound at all. I have no idea how high the object was but it appeared to be about airplane height. Based on information given on the web page, the visitor viewed the unknown object from the Plantation so it must have been headed to Eastpoint or further up the river. The alleged photo was not posted with the report. The sighting was reported to MUFON, the Mutual UFO Network, an American nonpro t organization that investigates reported UFO sightings. MUFON was originally established as the Midwest UFO Network in Quincy, Illinois in May 1969 by Walter H. Andrus, Allen Utke, John Schuessler, and others. The network has more than 3,000 members worldwide, most of them based in the United States. Florida has one of the St. George Island visitor reports UFO PHOTO COURTESY OF MUFONAn unidenti ed ying object photographed from Dog Island in 2011. Special to the TimesJeff Vonier has led his letter of intent to seek election to the of ce of sheriff. Vonier, 69, Highway 65, Eastpoint, has led as a Democrat. He became legally entitled to begin the process of getting petitions signed, with signatures due to the Supervisor of Elections of ce on May 7. Voniers name would then appear on the Aug. 14 primary ballot, provided he of cially quali es during the June 4 to 8 qualifying period. In the event only Democrats le for this of ce or any of the county of ces, Republicans and those without party af liation would be able to vote in any race that has candidates from only one political party, known as a universal race. The following is a statement issued by the candidate: My name is H. Jeff Vonier. My wife, Barbara Lynn Vonier (aka BJ) and I came to Franklin County back in 1984 hunting the perfect place to live and raise our two children, Jefferson Brook and Ivy Lynn. I graduated from Gulf Coast College in law enforcement and corrections at the top of my class. I worked for the Franklin County Sheriffs Department for eight Jeff Vonier to run for sheriff JEFF VONIERFederal probe prompts release of 41 employeesBy DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894| @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com A directive from federal immigration of cials led to the dismissal of 41 Hispanic workers from Apalachicolas Leavins Seafood last week, due to an apparent failure to comply with regulations in producing valid documentation citing their right to work in the United States. According to Sister Mary Alice, a Catholic nun active in the churchs outreach to Apalachicolas Spanish-speaking community, a May 15 evening meeting called by Grady and Alice Leavins, who have owned and operated the facility on Water Street for the past 40 years, DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The TimesThe Leavins Seafood plant on Water Street.Leavins dismisses illegal workers By DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com When Franklin County school kids take the stage, they like to make people laugh. Now this might not be a hard-andfast rule they could probably just as well pull off a tragedy that has an audience weeping in their seats but it seems clear they much prefer to act funny. They enjoy dressing up like sh and wiggling across the stage, scooting like an alligator on a skateboard and talking in a language using only a smile and SeahawkSparks of drama y at Franklin County School xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx 50 WWW.APALACHTIMES.COM VOL. 126 ISSUE 4Phone: 850-653-8868 Web: apalachtimes.com E-mail: dadlerstein@star .com Fax: 850-653-8036 Circulation: 800-345-8688Opinion . . . . . . A4 Society . . . . . . A8 Faith . . . . . . . A9 Outdoors . . . . . A10 Tide Chart . . . . A10 Sports . . . . . . A11 Classi eds . . . A12-A13 DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK: School News & Society: 11 a.m. Friday Real Estate Ads: 11 a.m. Thursday Legal Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Display Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Line Ads: 5 p.m. Monday xxxxx Contact Us xxxxx Out to see Index Teaching new parents, A2 See VONIER A3 See UFO A12 See DRAMA A6 See LEAVINS A3 The Times Smith, James Hat eld, Kendall Meyer, Bobby Kilgore, Connor for this of ce or any of the county of ces, Republicans and those without party af liation would be able to vote in any race that has candidates from only one political party, known as a universal race. issued by the candidate: Barbara Lynn Vonier (aka BJ) and I came to Franklin County back in 1984 hunting the perfect place to live and raise our two children, Jefferson Brook and Ivy Lynn. College in law enforcement and corrections at the top of my class. Sheriffs Department for eight it seems clear they much prefer to act They enjoy dressing up like sh and wiggling across the stage, scooting like an alligator on a skateboard and talking in a language using only a smile and DRAMA A6 Try a kayak SaturdayThis Saturday, May 26, Journeys of St. George will host a kayak and stand-up paddleboard demo in the boat basin across from Harry As, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Call 927-3259 for more information.Captain Jack shing tourneyThis Saturday, May 26, a shing tournament to bene t the American Red Cross and the Alligator Point Fire Department will be on Alligator Point. First place prize for offshore is $2,000 and rst place inshore pays $1,000. Entry fee for offshore boats with four anglers is $350; sh inshore with two anglers for $175. Tourney kicks off with a Friday night captains party featuring low country boil. For more info, email captainjacktournament@ gmail.com.Pay tribute on Memorial DayOn Monday, May 28, at 10 a.m., everyone is invited to a Memorial Day ceremony at Veterans Plaza in Apalachicola. The tribute features keynote speaker Gen. Charles Wilhelm, who retired from the Marine Corps in 2000 after more than 37 years of active service. In Lanark Village, Camp Gordon Johnston American Legion Post 82 will host its annual Memorial Day service and luncheon. The service will begin at the ag pole at noon, with a free nger food lunch to follow. Doors open at 11 a.m. Fishermans Choices kids tourney June 9Charles and Rex Pennycuff are hosting their annual Fishermans Choice Youth Fishing Tournament on Saturday, June 9. Kids 16 and under will sh for all major fresh and saltwater species. Each entry receives a T-shirt, and after the tournament, entries are invited to attend a cookout at the Eastpoint Pavilion. Entry is free. Call 670-8808 or visit www. shermanschoice.net for more information. Seahawk ImagiNation

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LocalA2 | The Times Thursday, May 24, 2012 Franklin County Tourist Development Council PUBLIC MEETING SCHEDULE CHANGEPlease note the following changes to the regular schedule: Tuesday, May 22, 2012 Regular Committee Meeting, City of Apalachicola Room, begins @ 1:30 PM Tuesday, June 12, 2012 Council Meeting, Carrabelle City Tuesday, June 26, 2012 Regular Committee Meeting, City of Apalachicola Room, begins @ 1:30 PM Tuesday, July 10, 1012 Regular Council Meeting Canceled and rescheduled for Tuesday, July 24, 2012, City of Apalachicola Room, begins @ 1:30 PM Tuesday, July 24, 2012 Council/Committee Meeting, City of Apalachicola Room, begins @ 1:30 p.m. Tuesday, August 14, 2012, Board, Franklin County Courthouse Annex, 3:00 p.m. Tuesday, August 28, 2012, Grants and Marketing Committees, beginning at 1:30 pm Tuesday, September 11, 2012, Board, Carrabelle City OfTuesday, September 25, 2012, Grants and Marketing Committees, beginning at 1:30 pm @ 17-1/2 Avenue E, Apalachicola, 653-8678, or visit our website: www.anaturalescape.com/administration. This is a public meeting and two or more County Commissioners may attend. OR To purchase a graduation greeting ad: Call Joel Reed at 370.6090 jreed@star.com or Kari Fortune at 227.7847 kfortune@star.com Your 2012 Senior By VALERIE GARMAN229-7843 | @valeriegarmanvgarman@star .comRuss Petrucka spent Thursday afternoon, May 10 reminding soon-to-be dads that every day is Fathers Day. Not long after the arrival of Mothers Day, Petrucka, an employee with Healthy Families in Franklin County, was on a mission to help young dads realize the importance of developing strong relationships and being there for their children. Dozens of new and expectant moms and dads, from Franklin and Gulf counties, attended the Healthy Start Coalitions fourth annual Baby Shower at the Centennial Building in Port St. Joe for plenty of parenting information, food, games, speakers and more. Even though its Mothers Day this weekend, every day is Fathers Day, Petrucka said as he greeted a barrage of expectant parents browsing his booth. He handed out informational brochures to the dads in the crowd and demonstrated the proper way to swaddle a baby. The young guys, you know, they want to be dads, they want to do good, Petrucka said. I tell the guys, you walk into the hospital and youre somebodys son, you walk out and youre somebodys father. Ifs a life-changing thing. Bret McClary came from Carrabelle to attend the shower. He will be a new father this August. This is my first kid Im just kind of trying to get some information, he said. Im not scared Im just ready for it to happen already. McClary said the booths at the event helped him realize how early a babys brain develops and how important it is to protect. Tonight is your night, proclaimed Kelly ByrnsDavis of the Healthy Start Coalition as she greeted parents. The purpose is to celebrate parents and to show honor and support to new parents, she said, noting the great turnout of dads in the audience. Healthy Start loves dads and we value their support. About 20 booths from various organizations were set up to provide parents with information and demonstrations on car seat safety, contraception, breastfeeding, infant brain development, diaper changing, swaddling and safe sleep. Ellie Tullis, a representative from Healthy Start and Healthy Families, manned a booth with a playpen set up alongside. Here everything is wrong, said Tullis as she motioned to the playpen with a sleeping doll inside. The doll was on its stomach, covered with a blanket and surrounded by stuffed animals, all dangers for a sleeping baby. Safe sleep is a big campaign statewide, she said. The frequency of rollover and co-sleeping deaths is really high. Dr. Robert Head, a pediatrician with Sacred Heart Medical Group, with a practice in Apalachicola, provided the audience with a speech on newborn anxiety, walking the soonto-be parents through the stresses surrounding bringing a baby home. Head went through the schedule of checkups, options for breastfeeding, how to handle fussiness and provided tips on discipline. New babies are work, Head said. The more you can enjoy that, the better off you are. The number one pointer he had for new parents is to learn how to keep your cool. Youre going to get tired, youre going to want to throw your baby against the wall, but you cant do that, he said. Everyone is here for the good of your child. Dr. David Dixon, an obstetrician with North Florida Womens Care, who makes regular visits to Weems Medical Center east in Carrabelle, provided insight into the push to increase access to information for new parents in northwest Florida through community involvement and events like the Healthy Start Baby Shower. Our neck of the woods has a significantly higher infant mortality rate, and theres a big push to gure out why, Dixon said. Thanks to organizations like Healthy Start and the March of Dimes, the awareness has really increased.Healthy Start Baby Shower celebrates parents VALERIE GARMAN | Florida FreedomRuss Petrucka of Healthy Families in Franklin County, right, helps soonto-be dad Bret McClary learn how to properly swaddle a baby at a booth catering to new fathers at the Healthy Start Baby Shower.Right: Apalachicola pediatrician Dr. Robert Head discusses the issues surrounding newborn anxiety to an audience lled with expectant mothers at the Healthy Start Baby Shower.

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LocalThe Times | A3Thursday, May 24, 2012 LEAVINS from page A1led to the dismissals. They expressed sadness at having to let so many people go, said the nun, who attended the meeting, along with Spanish interpreter Ramon Valenzuela. They also said (immigration) was not going after the employees but after the employer. They told them they could continue to live in Apalachicola but could not work for Leavins. Grady Leavins, 68, said Tuesday he was saddened by having to release the workers, many of whom he said worked there several years and were like family to them. He said the facility remains open six days a week, and is continuing operations, although with fewer staff and a larger volume of product imported from other states. As the number of Central American immigrants has grown in the county over the past decade, Leavins oyster plant has been a major employer, particularly of shuckers, from their ranks. He has maintained a low-prole, but open about his employees, praising their hard work, and speaking of their value in growing the American economy, especially when, as he pointed out Tuesday, it is difcult to nd locals willing to work at jobs their parents and grandparents once did. He directed further questions to the rms Tallahassee attorney Elizabeth Ricci, managing partner of Rambana and Ricci, which exclusively handles immigration matters. Ricci said Tuesday Leavins acted following an investigation by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement that dates back to the November 2011 Florida Seafood Festival, when ICE ofcials asked to review employment records for all of the rms workers. It all boils down to I-9 compliance, the employment eligibility verication form, Ricci said. Basically, the Leavinses asked all new hires for proof of their eligibility to work in the United States. It appears that some of the workers may have taken advantage of the Leavinses. They were presented with documents that appear to be real, she said. They had to make the very difcult decisions to terminate them. In an email, Ricci described the I-9, which requires proof of a valid Social Security number, birth certificate, passport or citizenship or resident alien identication card, as a deceivingly simple one page form. It is practically impossible to complete the I-9 correctly, she said. The workers who appeared to have been eligible (to work in the U.S.) may not have been eligible. The attorney said the rm is required to determine whether documents reasonably appear to be genuine but are not asked to determine their validity. If those documents appear valid, their job is done as far as completing the I-9, Ricci said, noting she has recently trained Leavins staff in proper I-9 completion. Going forward, they are in full compliance, she said. The attorney also conrmed the workers, most of who come from Guatemala or other Central America countries, are not in immediate danger of being deported. This has nothing to do with deportation, she said. No one has been served with a notice to appear (before ICE). This is not part of this process. Ricci said the dismissed workers could face a similar problem if they seek jobs elsewhere. If a shucker were to try to shuck somewhere else, that other employer would be required to properly and completely execute an I-9, she said. Thats what this whole thing boils down to. She said about a dozen of Leavins immigrant workforce remain employed at the processing plant, since they work under H-2B visas, part of a U.S. program for temporary/seasonal, nonagricultural employment by foreign nationals. This could be for someone who is working a peak load or a seasonal industry like oysters, Ricci said. You have to prove youre not taking a job away from a citizen. The employers have to prove you cant nd a U.S. worker to do the job. If a U.S. citizen walked in the door and said they wanted to shuck, Im sure theyd gladly hire them, she said. Ricci said Leavins has paid taxes on all these foreign workers and into Social Security. Not only does he pay taxes, he pays far above the prevailing wage that the Department of Labor requires, she said. The Department of Labor determines the wage in an alien employment setting, and he is always higher than the minimum. Not only is he paying the workers very well, but money is going into the Social Security system that those workers may not ever be able to take out, she said, noting that these monies go into a suspension fund that cannot be touched. Ricci said they didnt yet know whether the government will penalize Leavins. They are cooperating completely. Thats not on the table right now, she said. Employers can face nes if there is a pattern and practice of knowingly hire illegal aliens. This is not the case with Leavins. Leavins has been an integral part of the Apalachicola community for almost 40 years. They have employed many locals over those years and it has been their intention to comply with the law, Ricci said. This is a good example of how all employees should be cognizant of (immigrant labor rules), and the seriousness of being in a position to comply with them.Catholic nuns do what they canSister Mary Alice said she and the other nuns at the Martin House have prayed and counseled, and can be of some assistance, to workers who scramble to cope with the sudden loss of their jobs. Some are planning to go home and some are planning to look for work elsewhere, she said. These are very resourceful people. The ones that I talked to at Mass yesterday said frankly, they hadnt decided yet. People need to make long-term plans, and thats not easy to do, said the nun. A lot of these folks are used to sending home what they dont need right away. They may not have a cushion here. Sister Mary Alice said Leavins paid the workers their wages the night of the meeting, but the nancial crunch is beginning to hit them, especially since they cannot obtain unemployment benets and other assistance available to legal residents. I visited one home and there were eight adults and a little child in that house, and half of them worked at Leavins, said the nun. They simply couldnt make the rent on what the other four are earning. Its just going to be very hard. She said she has assisted some families with obtaining passports for their children who were born in the United States, and thus have citizenship. Theres a panic among those working at the other places, said Sister Mary Alice. Whats going to happen to them? Who knows? Yesterday at Mass, we had a special prayer and blessing for all of those planning what next to do in their lives, she said. The church has an Epiphany Fund for unusual circumstances, which can pay for a ticket to travel back to their home country or other necessary expenses. They can get something from the food pantry but thats emergency food. It comes twice a month, said the nun, who reected on the impact of the dismissals. This is easier on the immigrants themselves than if they brought vans in. They didnt come to the boss and round them all up. From my point of view its more humane, said Sister Mary Alice. We really have to get the immigration thing settled. Its a really touch-andgo life for these folks. years and resigned as a captain. I also worked for the Florida Department of Corrections for ve and a half years and resigned in good standing. I am a real estate investor, land developer and a good candidate for Franklin County Sheriff. As a candidate for sheriff of Franklin County, I pledge to cut the budget from $4.8 million to $3.8 million. A total cut of $1 million at the rate of $250,000 per year for the rst four years of my term. With this $1 million cut in the budget, I plan to give back to our county and keep it safe for our future. With this being said, there will be no loss of jobs to anyone at the Franklin County Sheriffs Ofce. In times like these, with our economy the way its been, no one wants to lose their job, nor do taxpayers want their tax dollars wasted. In respect to the citizens of Franklin County, crime will be dealt with one case at a time, with each case being properly investigated and everyones civil rights being equally protected. As sheriff, my goal is to protect the children and citizens of Franklin County by taking drugs off the streets and seeing violators are dealt with by the court system. As sheriff, I promise the citizens I will serve and protect everyone with the full power of the Franklin County Sheriffs Ofce. My door will always be open to listen to problems large or small. For more information on my candidacy, call me at 670-1762. VVONIER from page A1 They expressed sadness at having to let so many people go ... They told them they could continue to live in Apalachicola but could not work for Leavins.Sister Mary Alice

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OpinionA4 | The Times USPS 027-600Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 Publisher: Rick Martin POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six monthsHome delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERSIn case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola TimesThursday, May 24, 2012Special to the TimesEarlier this month the Apalachicola Riverkeeper issued calls for action to the governors of Florida, Alabama and Georgia to mitigate economic and ecological impacts from the prolonged drought conditions all three states are experiencing. The Riverkeeper also is seeking action from Florida Senator Bill Nelson, the federal government and the Northwest Florida Water Management District. According to reports by the Southeast Climate Consortium and National Integrated Drought System, both D3-Extreme and D4Exceptional drought conditions exist throughout the ApalachicolaChattahoochee-Flint Basin. The severity of the drought is being reported across the basin. The following facts are of particular concern, and are the basis for this Call for Action. Lowest observed historical readings are being recorded on Flint River and groundwater levels in areas of southwest Georgia. Historically high, prolonged salinity levels in Apalachicola Bay, associated with loss of estuarine seafood habitat and signicant oyster mortality, are being reported by Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve. Shrimp harvests in Apalachicola Bay and the eastern Gulf of Mexico have diminished to levels that will not support commercial shrimping, as reported by shermen. Crab harvest is likewise below historical lows and cannot support commercial harvesting. Salt-water species rarely seen in upper portions of Apalachicola Bay, indicative of a prolonged depletion of normal freshwater ows necessary for a healthy estuarine habitat, are being observed by commercial shermen. Forecast by weather and climate experts at all levels is for continued extreme conditions to prevail for at least the next three months. On May 1, the Army Corps of Engineers decided it will move its operation of federal reservoirs in the ACF Basin into Exceptional Drought Operations mode, essentially further reducing the minimum water ows allowed to the Apalachicola system. Despite these repeated federal assessments of extreme drought conditions and forecast of continued drought, the states of Georgia and Florida have not yet called for additional available water conservation measures for water users in the ApalachicolaChattahoochee-Flint River basin. Apalachicola Riverkeeper is calling for the following actions: The governors of Florida, Alabama, and Georgia meet in an emergency session to assess joint and unilateral actions available to mitigate the signicant economic and ecological impact of this prolonged drought on the people and communities of their states. Florida Governor Rick Scott to call for action that will prompt effective state action to assist and provide Florida seafood industry workers relief during the ensuing disaster. Northwest Florida Water Management District to establish water conservation measures consistent with extreme drought in the Apalachicola Basin and to work with the Florida Department of Environmental Protection to ascertain the Ecological Instream Flow Needs of the Apalachicola river, oodplain, and bay. Georgia Governor Nathan Deal to encourage and impose signicant water use restrictions on water users to conserve the water to help all water users survive the drought. Senator Nelson, based on his demonstrated leadership on this issue, to continue to work with the Florida delegation and Florida state leadership for a fair allocation of water for the Apalachicola river, oodplain and bay that will ensure healthy wildlife populations and a productive commercial shing and oyster industry. That the three states and the federal government seek opportunities to involve the stakeholders that comprise the communities of the ACF Basin in effective action to mitigate the adverse impacts of this prolonged drought. The Apalachicola Riverkeeper is a non-prot organization that monitors the Apalachicola River from the upper reaches at the Florida/Georgia line downstream 107 miles, through the middle reaches around Wewahitchka, to the estuary and bay on the Gulf. Its mission is to provide stewardship and advocacy for the protection of the Apalachicola river and bay, its tributaries and watersheds, in order to improve and maintain its environmental integrity and to preserve the natural, scenic, recreational, and commercial shing character of these waterways. For more information, call 653-8936 or visit www. apalachicolariverkeeper. org.Riverkeeper calls for action by governorsSpecial to the TimesOf the 4.7 million Americans bitten by dogs annually, more than half are children, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The U.S. Postal Service, the medical community, veterinarians and the insurance industry are working together to educate the public that dog bites are avoidable. Dont worry my dog wont bite is often heard by our letter carriers before theyre attacked, said Mark Anderson, postmaster of Los Angeles, where 83 of nearly 5,600 postal employees nationwide were attacked last year. Given the right circumstances, any dog can attack. Dog attacks are a nationwide issue and not just a postal problem. Working with animal behavior experts, weve developed tips to avoid dog attacks, and for dog owners, tips for practicing responsible pet ownership. The Postal Service is releasing its ranking of the top 25 cities for dog attacks to letter carriers to kick off National Dog Bite Prevention Week, May 19-25. The annual event provides dog-bite prevention tips, information on responsible pet ownership and advice about medical treatment if attacked. The Postal Service, the American Academy of Pediatrics, www.aap. org; the American Society for Reconstructive Microsurgery, www. microsurg.org; the American Veterinary Medical Association, www. avma.org; the Insurance Information Institute, www. iii.org; and Prevent The Bite, www.preventthebite. org; are driving home the message that dog bites are a nationwide issue and that education can help prevent dog attacks to people of all ages. Between 12 and 20 people die from dog attacks annually, according to the CDC. Just last month a Nevada toddler was mauled to death by his family pet on his rst birthday. The Postal Service places the safety of its employees as a top priority. Letter carriers fearing for their safety due to a loose or unrestrained pet may stop delivery and ask homeowners to pick up their mail at the Post Ofce until the pet is restrained. In cases where a carrier sees a dog roaming and cant discern where it resides, delivery could be interrupted to the entire neighborhood. Harsh realities Nationwide last year, 5,577 postal employees were attacked in more than 1,400 cities. Los Angeles topped the list with 83 postal employees attacked in 2011. Beyond the needless pain and suffering, medical expenses from dog attacks cost the Postal Service nearly $1.2 million last year. Children are three times more likely than adults to be bitten by a dog, said PTB President Kathy Voigt, whose daughter Kelly, was mauled by a neighborhood dog. Education is essential to keeping children safe from dog bites. The attack prompted their creation of Prevent The Bite, a non-prot organization that promotes dog bite prevention to young children. AAP President Dr. Robert Block added, Parents, please dont ever leave a young child unsupervised around any dog, even a dog well-known to your family. Even very young children should be taught not to tease or hurt animals. And with school almost over for the year, children will be spending more time in parks, at friends homes, and other places where they may encounter dogs. They need to know what to do to minimize the risk of being bitten. According to the American Society of Plastic Surgeons, in 2011 alone more than 29,000 reconstructive procedures were performed as a result of injuries caused by dog bites. Dr. Michael Neumeister, ASRM president said, Even the friendliest dog may bite when startled or surprised. Be cautious, once a child is scarred they are scarred for life. We hear this line all the time The dog has never bitten anyone before. A dogs reaction to being surprised or angered is not predictable. Any dog can bite, said Dr. Ren Carlson, AVMA president. If it is physically or mentally unhealthy, is in pain, feels threatened, or is protecting its food or a favorite toy, it can bite. It is important to understand how dogs behave and how our behavior may be interpreted by a dog. Dog attacks accounted for more than one-third of all homeowner insurance liability claims paid out in 2011, said Dr. Robert Hartwig, III president and chief economist. The National Dog Bite Prevention Week partners offer the following tips:Avoiding attacks Never leave a baby or small child alone with a dog. Dont run past a dog. The dogs natural instinct is to chase and catch you. If a dog threatens you, dont scream. Avoid eye contact. Try to remain motionless until the dog leaves, then back away slowly until the dog is out of sight. Never approach a strange dog, especially one thats tethered or conned. Dont disturb a dog that is sleeping, eating or caring for puppies. Anyone wanting to pet a dog should rst obtain permission from the owner. Always let a dog see and sniff you before petting the animal. If you believe a dog is about to attack you, try to place something between yourself and the dog, such as a backpack or a bicycle. If you are knocked down by a dog, curl into a ball and protect your face with your hands.Be a responsible dog owner Obedience training can teach a dog to behave properly and help owners control their dogs. When letter carriers and others who are not familiar with your dog come to your home, keep your dog inside, in another room away from the door. In protecting their territory, dogs may interpret peoples actions as a threat. Spay or neuter your dog. Neutered dogs are less likely to roam. Dogs that receive little attention or handling, or are left tied up for long periods of time, frequently turn into biters.If bitten Rinse the bite area with soapy water. Elevate limb(s) that have been bitten. Apply antiseptic lotion or cream. Watch the area for signs of infection for several days after the incident. For deeper bites or puncture wounds, apply pressure with a clean bandage or towel to stop the bleeding. Then wash the wound, dry it and cover with a sterile dressing. Dont use tape or buttery bandages to close the wound. Its a good idea to call your childs physician because a bite could require antibiotics or a tetanus shot. The doctor also can help you to report the incident. If your child is bitten severely, call 9-1-1 or go to the emergency room. When going to the emergency room, advise the personnel of, your tetanus vaccination status; vaccine status of the dog; who the dog owner is; and if the dog has bitten before. By CAt T Y Gr R EENESpecial to the Times Well its almost June, and you know what that means: the Summer Reading Program, sponsored by the Apalachicola Municipal Library with the logistical and nancial support of Project Impact. The library has successfully put on a program since I started as the library director in 2009. In the past couple of years we have used the national Collaborative Summer Library Program theme and program manual (www. cslpreads.org/). This is a very organized group of library and literacy types, and a bunch of organizations, who select a theme Dream Big READ! for this year and put out a manual with program activities, graphics for bookmarks etc. and a bibliography. Reading to kids happens during six 45-minute sessions on Monday and Tuesday mornings at either Project Impacts ABC School site on Mondays, and at the citys municipal complex site on Tuesdays. After reading, a small, easy ageappropriate craft project is done. Volunteers are asked to do one session, but many volunteer for several weeks. If you want to read, but not do the craft, or vice versa, this is possible too. We need to expand our volunteer base and all skills are needed. You can get the book ahead of time and practice, even though you wont need to. It really is fun. A schedule is being drawn up to ll in the slots for each session. Did I mention you get a gift T-shirt for your participation? I see volunteers around town for years wearing theirs. In the afternoon of each of those days, kids come to the library to check out books. Many of the kids in past years have been surprised even at the concept of checking out a library book. I dont have to pay? they ask. No we say, but you do have to bring it back. OK they say, and most do. Volunteers will assist at the library as well from 12:30 to 3 p.m.. Even Phyllis, our post ofce driver, got involved. Books on the theme include those about dreams, wishes and aspirations. The theme is illustrated by the wonderful Brian Lies, of Bats at the Beach and Bats at the Library. You can see our yard signs in front of the library already. Next week I hope to detail some of the charming books selected for the summer, but for now I just want you to think about participating. Project Impact staff are always at the sessions as well as library personnel. The groups are a manageable size and the sessions go by in a ash. Come join us. Caty Greene is the librarian for the Apalachicola Municipal Library. To reach her, call 653-8436.Half of all dog bite victims are childrenVolunteers sought for Summer Reading @ThHE LibIBRaARYCaty Greene

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The Times | A5Thursday, May 24, 2012 BAYVIEW HOME ST. GEORGE ISLAND3BR/2BA home in the bayfront community, East Bay Estates. Enjoy the community pool and dock overlooking the bay. Popular rental home with repeats! New deck just built, beach access right across the street! MLS# 246740....................$429,000 Travis Stanley 850.653.6477 Grayson Shepard 850.653.6718 Leon Teat 850.653.5656 Sandy Mitchem 850.899.8300 NEW LISTING! GREATER APALACHICOLA4BR/2BA on 1/3 acre lot with above ground pool. Many upgrades and new features tankless water heater, new plumbing, city water, updated kitchen, new carpet, windows, doors. MLS#245923..................$149,500 CATPOINT,EASTPOINT2.63 acres of gorgeous bay view property on Cat Point. White sandy beach on the Apalachicola Bay.MLS# 245189................$290,000GREATER APALACHICOLA acre on the corner of Bluff Rd and Big Oaks just 1 mile drive to the Pine Log boat ramp. Zoned R-4 Single Family Home Industry. Beautiful cleared lot with some mature shade trees.MLS#247086....................$40,000COMMERCIAL ST. GEORGEISLANDExcellent location for 1500 square feet of commercial space in the heart of the island. Corner location on Franklin & Gulf Beach Dr high visibility! Also available for LONG TERM LEASE call for details.MLS#244926..................$339,000 NEW LISTING! ALSO FOR LEASE!BAYVIEW ST. GEORGE ISLAND3BR 3BA located in the heart of the island, walking distance to all shops/restaurants. Screened porches, great bay views!MLS#240643...............$270,000 Come join in a Memorial Day Tributeto those who gave away all of their tomorrows so we could enjoy freedom today. Everyone is invited to come to the Veterans Plaza on Market Street in Apalachicola at 10 a.m. on Monday, May 28. The Keynote speaker will be Retired Marine General Charles E. Wilhelm. Music will be provided by Charles Thompson and Angela Stanley. A color guard will be provided by the US Marine Corps. NOTICE OF INTENT TO ADOPT WIND SPEED MAPS AND 2010 FLORIDA BUILDING CODE BY REFERENCEThe Board of County Commissioners of Franklin County, Florida proposes to adopt the following wind speed maps by ordinance and the 2010 Florida Building Code by reference: Wind speed map 1609A), location of 130 mph line Franklin County, Florida. Wind speed map 1609B), location of 140 mph line Franklin County, Florida. Wind speed map 1609C), location of 120 mph line Franklin County, Florida and A public hearing on the proposed maps and 2010 Florida Building Code will be held on 5, 2012, at 10:30 a.m. at the Annex in Apalachicola, Florida. The maps and code are available for inspection in the Franklin County Building 34 1, Apalachicola more information, call the Franklin County Building Department at (850) 653-9783, ext 156. Persons wishing to comment may do so in person at the public hearing or in to the of 33 203, Apalachicola, 32320. of this will not recorded. Persons who wish to appeal any action resulting from this hearing should make the necessary arrangements to assure that a verbatim record is made, including testimony and evidence, if any, upon which the appeal is to be based. PUBLISH: MAY 24, 2012 First phase of enhanced 9-1-1 project to beginAs most of the residents of Franklin County are aware, Franklin County has entered into a contract with GeoComm, Inc. of Saint Cloud MN (www.geo-comm.com) to implement an enhanced 9-1-1 system for the residents of Franklin County. Franklin County is in the beginning stages of updating their Enhanced 9-1-1 system. Part of this process, and the ultimate goal, will be to match the physical location with the current address for all residences and businesses in the county. GeoComm, Inc of Saint Cloud, Minn has been contracted by Franklin County to conduct countywide eldwork to collect technical data of roads, driveway, and structure locations of residences, businesses and other locations. During the months of May and June, representatives from GeoComm will be driving all the roads in Franklin County. They will each be driving a silver Hyundai Santa Fe, clearly marked with GeoComm and 9-1-1 logos on each side of the vehicle. If the address of the structure is not visible, the technician will approach the house to survey the resident. If the resident is not available they will leave an information packet including instructions for the resident to ll out an on-line survey. Information that the resident provides on this survey will assist in the timely completion of this project. Any information provided by the residents will be considered con dential. If you have any questions or concerns about this please contact Franklin County 9-1-1 Director Renee Brannan at 670-8300 or GeoComm, GIS Supervisor Dan Schmitz at 1-888-436-2666.By LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com The man accused of a sexual battery that preceded an early morning re on April 21 at the Apalachicola River Inn has been released on bond. In addition, the state attorneys of ce has declined to press charges against another man who helped the alleged victim, but who then was accused of interfering with police. David Ray Smith, 25, of Fountain, charged with one count of sexual battery, was released this month on $20,000 bond. On the night of the incident, another man, Joe D. Jody Thrasher, 34, Montgomery, Ala., was arrested by Apalachicola police of cers for disorderly intoxication and resisting an of cer with violence. On May 2, Robin Myers, the assistant state attorney, issued a decision that there was insuf cient evidence to proceed with the case. An interview with Thrasher, and further details from the police report led by Capt. Steve James, shed new light on what happened. Smith told of cers he and a woman, a guest at the motel, spent the afternoon and evening drinking together and singing karaoke, before returning to her room. He said the woman performed consensual oral sex on him, but then refused to allow him to perform oral sex on her and went into the bathroom. He said after she returned from the bathroom, they engaged in sexual intercourse. She stated at rst she did not stop him, but after two or three minutes of intercourse, she told him to stop, read James report. Smith told police he lmed the intercourse with his cell phone. A police source said the pictures on the phone are not conclusive. The woman told police Smith did not honor her request to stop, and then became forceful, grabbing her by the throat, choking her and forcing her to have intercourse until she broke free. She said he refused to leave her room and told her that she was going to nish what she started and pushed her onto the bed, forcing himself onto her, putting his hand over her nose, saying I will kill you (expletive). It is unclear whether Smith was still in the hotel room when the alleged rape victim ran onto the boardwalk dressed only in a bed sheet, and then was taken into the room of Thrasher and his wife, who were visiting for the weekend. In a telephone interview, Thrasher said he and his wife heard the woman screaming, took her inside their room and locked the door in less than 30 seconds before calling 911. He said his wife provided the alleged victim with clothing. Both Thrasher and James said the alleged victim had bite marks on her arms. When Thrasher went to retrieve the alleged victims cell phone, nobody was in her room but he saw brie y an object burning in the middle of her room which he thought was a trash can. In his report, James reported a suitcase on the oor at the foot of the bed burning. Thrasher said after he saw the re, he returned to his room and instructed his wife and the alleged victim to go and hide. He said he then tried to extinguish the re with a blanket but was unable to control it. He said he then knocked on doors to awaken sleeping guests and alert them to the re, even helping several people carry things from their rooms. When police and re ghters arrived, Thrasher said he could not nd his wife and tried to reenter his room. He said police restrained him in spite of protests from hotel staff. I had no idea where my wife was, said Thrasher. That was the reason I started yelling at the police and trying to get back into the building. The hotel found rooms where the evacuated guests could spend the rest of the night. The Thrashers were given a suite of rooms to share with the alleged victim. Thrashers wife accompanied the woman to Weems Memorial Hospital and the police ferried her (Thrashers wife) back and forth several times during the evening until the alleged victim was released, he said. The woman departed early the next morning; Thrasher said he believed her car keys were salvaged from the hotel room. The re was determined to be arson and is still under investigation by the state re marshal. The following report is provided by the Franklin County Sheriffs Of ce. Arrests in this report were made by of cers from the Apalachicola Police Department, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission and the Franklin County Sheriffs Of ce. All defendants are to be considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law.May 15Heather L. Hicks, 24, Apalachicola, burglary of a dwelling (FCSO) Marvin H. Garrett, Jr., 21, Eastpoint, domestic battery (FCSO)May 16Frederick O. Naeck, 86, Manchester, NH, violation of probation (FCSO) Justin D. Massey, 21, Carrabelle, violation of probation (FCSO) James N. Glass, 32, Apalachicola, DUI and expired drivers license (FWC)May 17Amanda F. Graybill, 28, Roanoke, Va., grand theft of a motor vehicle and grand theft (FCSO) Jerry M. Landrum, 34, Eastpoint, failure to appear (FCSO) Victoria L. Estes, grand theft, uttering and violation of probation (FCSO) Nathaniel T. Ceasor, 34, Tallahassee, burglary of a dwelling (FCSO) Sherry J. Bearden, 50, Chunchula, Ala., failure to appear (FCSO) James E. West, 50, Apalachicola, domestic battery (APD)May 18Floyd B. Parramore, 52, Eastpoint, domestic battery (FCSO) Holly M. Polous, 18, Eastpoint, domestic battery (FCSO)May 20Steve A. Johns, Sr., 53, Eastpoint, Clay County warrant for failure to appear (FWC) Jessica M. Music, 29, Eastpoint, battery (FCSO) DAVID R. SMITHDetails emerge on alleged motel rape Law BRIEF Arrest REPORT Law Enforcement

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LocalA6 | The Times Thursday, May 24, 2012 the strum of a guitar, and still communicate with their audience. In their newest production, students generate a scitale just from looking at a NASA satellite picture. The plot involves oysters falling from the sky, and a baby alien pickle, and a trip to Chile and Forget it, Hawk, its Chinatown. Two hilarious adventures students immersed themselves in over the past couple months are ample evidence for the creative spirit of Seahawks. Last week, it was The Wise Mullet, the debut of a newly-adapted play from a series of childrens books about the Gulf Coast by New Orleans writer Timothy Weeks, who was on hand for the performance (See related story, page A7.) Earlier in the year, there was the consolidated schools rst-ever sponsorship of Odyssey of the Mind teams, for middle and high school students, which was a giant step into the popular, nationwide competition to determine which schools can come up with the best original, dramatized answer to a perplexing creative challenge. Instead of Brain Bowl, its more like Brain CoOp, a cooperative project by a motivated group of inquisitive students who imagine a zany solution to an imaginary problem, and do so by following a strict set of conditions that govern everything from how much they can spend (no more than $125) to how long the show can last (under eight minutes). It has meant a lot of growth in their creative thinking, said team sponsor Lydia Countryman, who returned two years ago to Franklin County after a brief stint teaching in Georgia. It was there her daughter, Ursula, now in middle school, and son Rory, an elementary school student, who were introduced to Odyssey. In Franklin County, their background then helped lay the foundation for a crew of enthusiastic Omers, as they are called. I loved it, said Jalynn Liston, who along with Ursula Countryman, Matthew Turner, Connor Smith, Emily Owens, Kendall Meyer and Bobby Kilgore formed the middle school team. I would choose OM every day over cheerleading, she said. We work together; weve become really good friends. In fact, Liston incorporated her experience as a cheerleader into the teams choice of their long-term project how to solve the Odyssey Angels problem. The team opted against other four other possible choices, such as taking on the Shakespearean To be or not to be, problem, to devise a humorous performance of Hamlets famous question, or another called You Make the Call, which involved making a balsa wood structure that would support as much weight as possible. The Odyssey Angels challenge called for devising an eight-minute performance that challenges them to help out their fellow citizens ... where students travel throughout one or more team-created places where they encounter negative situations that they turn into positive ones. Not only that, the performance had to incorporate two characters, each with different problems, and two angels, one that cant speak and the other with a special power. At rst, the team was a little stumped, and labored six weeks to come up with a script that didnt satisfy anyone. Our little problems, they werent creative, Liston said. Ursula was like We have to come up with crazy stuff. It needs to be out there and crazy. We wanted to be outrageous, be noticed. So thats what the team did, and in a week, came up with a script that featured a place named FunkyTown, where no one was able to dance; Ursula Countryman was cast as an angel whose ute playing could help heal; Smith as an angel who could not speak, but could only communicate by strumming his guitar and using his facial expressions; Liston as a cheerleader permanently stuck in a split position; and Meyer, Owens and Turner as daffy townspeople who couldnt quite move their feet. Just thinking up a story wasnt enough, though; they had to bring it to life, and that meant solving a host of practical problems. Like how to dress up Kilgore so hed look like a dog that wouldnt stop clinging to Listons leg. And how to wear shoes with grip soles that could enable Liston to hold her split. Ursula had slippers from when she was a ballerina, she said. They were tight, but they t. They found glitter and sparkles to adorn the set to represent Heaven, where the autist angel analyzes the problems on earth by referring to the Book of Problems. They used a decorated umbrella as a backdrop to twirl so that the location of each scene was identi ed. And they had to do it all by themselves, as rules forbid outside assistance, with the exception of some basic instruction from the teacher.Elementary team takes on Weird ScienceIn addition to their zany creativity, the elementary school team Rory Countryman, James Hat eld, Ethan Riley and Fisher Edwards had to overcome the challenge of losing key members of their team before Christmas as they set out to bring Odyssey to life. Lydia Countryman said the students proved up to the task, and ultimately came up with a Weird Science script, based on a team of scientists who see an actual photograph from a NASA satellite and work to uncover the cause of mysterious events, using a team-created device to collect two samples. It would be impossible to describe the story surrounding scientists who observed a strange ssure in Chiles Puyehue-Cordon Caulle volcanic complex, but suf ce it to say that the four boys came up with a tale about a Panacea pizza delivery man, an alien who communicates through blowing bubbles, an intergalactic oyster boat, and a talking sock puppet that doubles as one of the scientists. Are you ready to shuck some oysters? hollered the team as they began their production, which featured a colorful set, kooky headgear and a amboyant seriousness to the comedy that de nitely worked. They nally had to focus on one type of team, said Countryman. When the judges laughed at the right time, we knew the script was successful. In addition to featuring the long-term assignments, the OM team also hones their improvisational skills in spontaneous competition; in which judges see how well they do as individuals when confronted with a random question or object. Its all about thinking on your feet, and being imaginative in your response, a sharp contrast to the tasks of rote learning and test-taking so important to schools these days. While the school district paid for the teams membership, all other expenses were raised by the teammates themselves. Several parents helped out as well, especially when it came time to travel to Crestview March 3 for the Emerald Coast regional tournament. Madilyn Smith organized the team hallway spot at the tourney, as well as the carpool caravan on a day marked by terrible weather, even a pair of tornado storms. But Patti Kulick, Heather Riley and Jennifer Edwards all made it through safely with the young people, as Odyssey of the Mind made an impressive debut at the Franklin County School. BILL MILLER REALTY850-697-3751 (3310) 570-0658400 PLUS COMM. U.S. 98 & GULFADJ. TO LANARK MARINA 850 K$29,500 $2,500 DOWN BUYS 2 BED APT. 2 6 ORRENT $500/MTH GULFVIEW & ACCESS3 BDR 2 BA 2006 M/H $89,0002 LG. SHADY LOTS-3 OUT BLDG. -400 TO MARINA-CITY WATER $49,500MIH 2 CRNRLOTS BLK. $ STORE REDUCED $49,500 CITY COMM. LOTSU.S. 98 -$29,500 UP Margarets Mini Florist SILK BASKETS LIVE HOUSE PLANTSDELIVERYAVAILABLE KEEP THESE NUMBERS (850) 653-3764 OR (850) 323-1937 dbutler@coastalcoverage.com Locally owned and operated Home Business Auto Health Workers Comp paquettabryantPaquetta Lavette Bryant earned her Bachelor of Science degree in Criminology from Fresno State University, in Fresno, CA, May 19, 2012. Paquetta is the daughter of Sonia Mills of Fresno and Johnny Bryant of Seattle, WA. Her proud grandparents are Fred and Mary Brown of Apalachicola and Sam and Ida Belle Bryant of Port St. Joe, FL. DRAMA from page A1 Photos by DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times Jalynn Liston limbers up before her role as a cheerleader caught in a split. For more photos of the Odyssey of the Mind teams, go to www. apalachtimes.com. On the set of their Weird Science are, from left, Fisher Edwards, James Hat eld, Ethan Riley and Rory Countryman. Top left, Ursula Countryman recreates her Odyssey Angels performance. Bottom left, Ethan Riley has fun with a snake skin during an improvisational exercise.

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LocalThe Times | A7Thursday, May 24, 2012 Top: The Shorties face the trauma of a hurricane. Middle: The entire cast of Wise Mullet: A Fishy Tail posed with playwright Pam Vest. Left: Fisherman Hunter Kelley drops a net over Silver, played by Jessica Rudd. For more Wise Mullet pictures, visit www. apalachtimes. com.Photos by DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times Smart LensesSMCan produce clear vision without glasses, at all distances "Freedom from Eye Glasses, Now a reality for many." NO HIDDEN CHARGES: It is our policy that the patient and any other person responsible for payments has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed by payment or any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment. www.mulliseye.com"WE WELCOME NEW PATIENTS, CALLTODAY FOR YOUR PRIORITY APPOINTMENT" FOR NEW PATIENTS 59 AND OLDERThis certificate is good for a complete Medical Eye Exam withTodd Robinson, M.D.Board Certified Eye Physician and Surgeon.The exam includes a prescription for eye glasses and tests for Glaucoma, Cataracts and other eye diseases.FOR YOUR APPOINTMENT CALL: 850-763-6666 ELIGIBILITY: U.S. Citizens living in the Florida Panhandle, 59 years and older, not presently under our care. Coupon Expires: 5-31-12 FREEEYE EXAMCODE: AP00Darren Payne, M.D.Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract SurgeonLee Mullis, M.D.Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract SurgeonTodd Robinson, M.D.Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon FREEDIABETES EDUCATION CLASSES TO BE HELD EACH WEEK BEGINNINGWEDNESDAY, MAY 16, 2012TWO LOCATIONS, TWO TIMES!CLASSESTAUGHTBY ERICA CESKA, REGISTEREDDIETICIANEVERYONE WELCOME!EVERYONE WELCOME!10:00 AM WEEMS MEDICAL CENTER EAST 110 NE 5TH ST CARRABELLE697-23455:00 PM WEEMS MEMORIAL HOSPITAL 135 AVENUE G APALACHICOLA653-8853 X101 By DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com Franklin County had a world premier last week, a wonderful production adapted from New Orleans author Timothy Weeks Wise Mullet childrens books. With the sponsorship of the Panhandle Players Inc. with which she has long been associated, veteran director Pam Vest adapted the three books into a three-act stage play Wise Mullet: A Fishy Tail, brought to life through the creative talents of director Melanie Humble and her enthusiastic students. Vest was working with Weeks three books, set along the Gulf Coast, that tell how Goldie, Silver, Ol Middler and other mullets and sea creatures face adversity and triumph as they face the challenges of life in the Gulf of Mexico. As Goldie always says, Think swift and act swifter! says Silver at the close of the play. Were all Wise Mullets and shermen will be telling our stories forever of how we were the ones that got awaay! Vest had to make changes in compressing, and bringing a happy ending to, the composite of the three books. The rst in 2005, The Wise Mullet of Cook Bayou was done with art by Miss Jeanne, Weeks mother. The second, Ol Middler Saves the Day was illustrated with photos and art by Miss Jeanne, as well as by Miss Lala. The third book, Goldies Search for Silver also featured work by Miss Lala and Miss Jeanne. Miss Lala is Lala Pascic, a performance artist from Sarajevo who Weeks met in Amsterdam. Now a post-graduate student in art, Pascic and Weeks were recently married. Both Pascic and the Weekses were on hand for last Thursdays performance, and thoroughly enjoyed the show. Weeks said he was delighted with how the show came out, and raved about the childrens spirited performances. He and the Panhandle Players have worked out a deal where the theater troupe has the rights for a couple of years to do the show before they revert back to him. He said he is now at work on a fourth book, to be set inland, that he expects to be out by this fall or next spring. It again will be based on photographs taken throughout the Gulf Coast, real places and real species. The players, the kids, were so much fun to watch, said Vest after the show, which was presented to all the schoolkids last week. One little player told me she didnt want it to be over, ever! APPEARING IN THE SHOW WERE: Fisherwoman-narrator: Beyla Walker Youngun: Morgan Ray Fisherman/narrator: Hunter Kelley Fisherman/narrator: Benjamin Juarez Goldie: Mikalin Huckeba Silver Act I: Hannah Hogan Silver Act II/Alligator: Casey Riley Silver Act III/Albatross: Jessica Rudd Ol Middler: Ethan Riley Mullet Dolphin: Kiana Foley Turtle/Shark: Ethan Frazier Pelicans/Dolphins/Shorties: Katie Newman, Destanie Proctor, Tressie Edwards Shorties: Eli Whaley, Brycin Huckeba, Maliah Lockley, Arryonna Cargill Stage manager: Tete Croom Lighting: Tonnor Segree Visuals: Duncan WhaleyWise Mullet swims into Franklin County As Goldie always says, Think swift and act swifter! Were all Wise Mullets and shermen will be telling our stories forever of how we were the ones that got awaay!Silver Mikalin Huckeba, as Goldie, tries to hide from the three pelicans. throughout the Gulf Coast, Mullets and shermen will be telling Top: the trauma of a hurricane. Middle: Wise Mullet: A Fishy Tail posed with playwright Pam Vest. Kelley drops a net over Silver, played by Jessica Rudd. For more Wise Mullet pictures, visit apalachtimes. com.

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A8 | The Times Thursday, May 24, 2012 Special to The TimesCarrabelle writers Susana and Dr. Charles Lewis will sign copies of their new book at Downtown Books from 1-3 p.m. Saturday, May 26. Part Caribbean cookbook, part charming memoir and part blueprint for selecting, storing and preparing wholesome ingredients to promote health and vitality, A Taste of Paradise offers recipes adapted from the foods Susana learned to cook as a child in the Dominican Republic. Mouth-watering dishes like Coconut Garlic Chicken, Cacerola de Mariscos (Seafood Casserole) and Mango Salad re ect the islands Taino Indian, African, Moorish and Spanish in uences. The traditional Caribbean diet included little wheat, so these recipes are largely glutenfree. Many use coconut milk instead of cows milk and thus are also lactose-free. More than 200 recipes for breakfasts, sandwiches, soups and stews, main dishes, platillos (sides dishes) and beverages are complemented by illustrations of village life, botanic prints and quaint drawings of sh, fowl and hooved beasts. Dr. Charles Lewis, an authority on preventive medicine, adds advice on handling ingredients to derive the best nutritional bene ts, prevent disease and obesity, and achieve healthy weight loss without hunger. Susana grew up in a small village in a home without electricity and learned to cook by helping her aunts and grandmother prepare meals outside over an open re. Fresh coconut cream was prepared daily, by hand. Without refrigeration, sh was limited to salted cod, dried herring and dried tilapia. Her family raised goats, vegetables, plantains, avocados, mangoes and coconuts. It was not unusual to pass the evening with friends and family members, shelling pigeon peas, exchanging gossip and telling cautionary tales to the young. Other than some music on the radio, there was little electronic interference with their boisterous conversation, play and work. She moved to a provincial capitol on the coast to attend college, and there she expanded her culinary experience to include a wider variety of foods, including fresh seafood. Charles served as a Peace Corps volunteer in an isolated Dominican village and lived there for several years. He returned to the Dominican Republic after residency training, helped organize public efforts to improve childrens health, and worked at the regional hospital. He and Susana met at this time, when she was completing her college degree. In the United States, she has worked as a business manager and has taught elementary and secondary school. He is board-certi ed in public health and preventive medicine and has practiced medicine in Florida for 20 years. He is also the author of a textbook on enteroimmunology, an emerging eld of medicine, and is an expert on foodrelated diseases. For details, call Downtown Books at 653-1290. Qualications: Expertise in: Now Accepting AppointmentsCall Toll Free 888-681-5864 For more info www.seclung.com Lung Disease SpecialistRob Garver, MDNow Seeing Patients in Port St. Joe NOW BCBS-FL IN-NETWORK PROVIDER PETOFTHEWEEK Franklin County Humane Society SocietyDorian Evans graduates from MontevalloDorian J. Evans, a 2004 graduate of Apalachicola High School, was among more than 350 University of Montevallo students to receive their diplomas at spring commencement May 5. Evans earned a Bachelor of Science degree. Evans is the son of Tyrone Evans Sr. of Apalachicola and Tronda Evans of Apalachicola. Kristina Scott, executive director of Alabama Possible, a campaign associated with the Alabama Poverty Project, was the keynote speaker. University president John W. Stewart III conferred degrees upon some 254 candidates for bachelors degrees, 71 candidates for masters degrees and 28 candidates for the educational specialist degree. After students received their diplomas, Jim Methvin, president of the National Alumni Association, inducted graduates into the 21,000-member organization. Elser earns degree from ConcordiaRussell Elser was awarded a Bachelor of Science degree in elementary education at Concordia College Alabama on May 12. He was among the graduates of the Class of 2012 who received degrees at the 86th commencement of the college, one of 10 colleges and universities of the Concordia University System of the Lutheran Church Missouri Synod. Tillahun M. Mendedo, Ph.D, president of Concordia College Alabama, awarded the degree during commencement. Elser, a 1995 graduate of Sarasota High School, is the son of Bob and Janet Elser, of Carrabelle. While at Concordia, he was a member of the Spiritual Life Team and was voted Mr. Concordia College Alabama 2011. He plans to enroll in the seminary and begin his ministerial studies after graduation. Concordia College Alabama is a liberal arts college in Selma, Ala., founded in 1922 by Dr. Rosa Young. Its mission is to prepare students through a Christcentered education for lives of responsible service in the church, community and world.B-Man is Double DigitsJackson Bailey Herrington celebrated his 10th birthday on Tuesday, April 3, on Panama City Beach with family and friends. Bailey is the son of Stacey and Richie Herrington of Apalachicola. Maternal grandparents are J. Stanley Anders of Lake City and Sara Land of St. James. Paternal grandparents are Betty Yates and the late Edward Herrington of Greensboro.Reanna Whatley, Mitchell Martina to wed June 2Catherine Reanna Whatley, the daughter of Cathy Whatley of Jacksonville, and the late Omer Reece Whatley, is proud to announce her upcoming marriage to William Mitchell Martina, the son of Kenneth and Glenda Martina of Apalachicola. The ceremony will be Saturday, June 2, 2012, at the Living Waters Assembly of God church in Apalachicola. Pastor Craig Hicks will of ciate at the 5 p.m. nuptials. A reception in Camilla Hall at the Coombs House Inn will follow the ceremony. Food and drinks will be provided. We are asking everyone to please bring beverages of their choice so we can prepare an open bar for everyones enjoyment. All family and friends are invited to attend this special occasion as we make it of cial. Lewises to sign A Taste of Paradise cookbook SaturdaySPECIAL TO THE TIMESCharles and Susana Lewis compiled A Taste of Paradise based on Susanas experiences learning to cook as a child in the Dominican Republic. Congratulations Wedding Happy BIRTHDAY Baby SHOWERMiller baby shower June 9A baby girl shower for the upcoming new arrival for Laura Jackson Miller and John Miller will be at 3 p.m. Saturday, June 9, at the Masonic Lodge, 108 N.E. First St. in Carrabelle. The Millers are listed on the gift registry at Target and at BabiesRUs. For more information, please call 697-2766 or 653-6523.

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The Times | A9Thursday, May 24, 2012 The United Methodist Churches of Franklin County Welcome You First United Methodist Church of ApalachicolaWorship Service 11:00 a.m. every Sunday Sunday School 10:00 a.m. 75 5th St. Apalachicola 653-9530 fumcapalach@gtcom.net Pastor: Rev. Themo PatriotisCarrabelle United Methodist ChurchWorship Services 10:45 a.m. Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Celebrate Recovery Mondays 7-9 p.m. 102 NE Ave. B Carrabelle 697-3672 Pastor: Julie StephensEastpoint United Methodist ChurchWorship Service 10:00 a.m. every Sunday Healing service every fourth Monday at 7:00 p.m. 317 Patton Dr. (corner of David St.) 670-8825 Pastor: Rev. Beth WhiteSt. George Island United Methodist Church9:00 a.m. Worship Service 10:00 a.m. Fellowship Hour 201 E. Gulf Beach Dr. 9274635 www.sgiumc.org Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis First Pentecostal Holiness Church379 Brownsville Road Apalachicola Were excited about what Gods doing!!!Sunday School 9:45 am Sunday Morning Worship 10:45 am Sunday Evening Service 6:00 pm Monday, Youth Group 6:30 pm Wednesday, Royal Rangers, G.A.P.7:00 pm Wednesday Worship & Word 7:30 pmNursery Provided during regular church services 7:00 7:00 First Baptist ChurchSt. George Island 501 E. Bayshore Drive 927-2257 R. Michael Waley, Pastor Join us as we praise and worship the living Christ. Great is the Lord and most worthy of praise. Psalm 145:3 Sunday Bible Study................................................10:00am Worship Praise........................................................11:00am Sunday Night............................................................7:00pm Wednesday Power Hour......................................7:00pm Wednesday Youth at S.P.L.A.S.H.......................7:00pm Walking in Christ R. Michael Whaley, Pastor WELCOMES YOUChurch of the Ascension101 NE First Street CarrabelleSUNDAY10:00 AM WELCOMES YOUChurch THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH (850) 274-4490 (850) 545-2578 WELCOMES YOU Trinity Trinity Episcopal Churchest. 1836Welcomes YouHwy. 98 & 6th St. Apalachicola 850-653-9550Sunday Worship Services 8 & 10:30 a.m. Wednesdays Healing Service 11 a.m. Centering Prayer 4 p.m. Sunday Worship Services 8 & 10:30 a.m. Wednesdays Healing Service 11 a.m. Centering Prayer 4 p.m. FaithAll right you guys, its time to get that grill ready. The ofcial opening of the barbecue season is almost here. Everyone is invited to the Camp Gordon Johnston American Legion Post 82 on Monday, May 28. for our annual Memorial Day service and luncheon. The service will begin at the agpole at noon. The free nger-food lunch will follow the service. Come spend the afternoon with us, as we reect on those who gave their lives for our freedom. Doors open at 11 a.m. Went to the monthly covered dish luncheon at Chillas Hall last Sunday. Low and behold, there was B.J. Mallis. She has moved from Tennessee. Her late husband, Gary, was appointed re chief at St. James/Lanark Volunteer Fire Department. I was secretary/treasurer and ran our Tuesday night bingo while he was in ofce. So good to see her back. Bishop OSullivan Council 1648 of the Knights of Columbus will be 100 years old on June 12. We will have a celebration later in the year. For you vacationing Knights, our meetings are the second Monday of every month except August. The gavel falls at 7 p.m. at St. Patrick Church Hall, Sixth Street and Avenue C in Apalachicola. You are welcome to join us. As the hurricane season is upon us, make sure that you have your escape route and survival kit handy, and dont forget to pick up your re-entry forms at the Emergency Management Operations Center, 28 Airport Road in Apalachicola. You can also order one online at www. FranklinEmergencyManagement. com. Be kind to one another, check on the sick and the housebound and get a grip, tie a knot, hang onto Jesus. Until next time, God bless America, our troops, the poor, homeless and hungry.Re:Action youth to host dodgeball games SaturdayThe Re:Action youth group, a nondenominational youth ministry for sixththrough eighth-grade students of the Apalachicola-St. George Island Cooperative Parish of the United Methodist Church, is hosting the rst Dodgeball Games tournament from 2-5 p.m. Saturday, May 26, at the ABC School. There are three categories: elementary, middle and high school. The participation fee is $3, and spectator fee is $5. All proceeds go to fund the youth to attend The Gate conference in Charleston, W.Va. To sign up, email Adam Cannon at adamcannonmusic@gmail.com or sign up at the eld the day of the tournament. Memorial Day ceremony Monday in ApalachicolaAt 10 a.m. Monday, May 28, everyone is invited to pay their respects to Americas fallen heroes at a Memorial Day ceremony at Veterans Plaza in Apalachicola. The tribute begins with presentation of the ag by a U.S. Marine Color Guard from Tallahassee. Angeline Stanley will perform the National Anthem followed by keynote speaker Gen. Charles Wilhelm, who retired from the Marine Corps in 2000 after more than 37 years of active service. In his nal assignment, Wilhelm acted as commander in chief of the U.S. Southern Command from 1997-2000, responsible for military activities in 32 countries in Central and South America and the Caribbean. There will be additional music by Charles Thompson, as well as Stanley. The names of soldiers fallen over the last 12 months will be read aloud, accompanied by a tolling bell, and Ed Tiley will play Taps to complete the event.Cancer foes prepare for June 8 Relay for LifeWalkers will go around the clock in the battle against cancer when the American Cancer Societys Relay for Life of Franklin County gets under way with teams of residents gathering at Pop Wagoner Stadium in Apalachicola at 6 p.m. June 8. Relay for Life events are held overnight as individuals and teams camp out at the stadium with the goal of keeping at least one team member on the track or pathway at all times throughout the evening. Teams do most of their fundraising before the event, but some teams also hold creative fundraisers at their camp sites during Relay. Relay brings together friends, families, businesses, hospitals, schools, faith-based groups and people from all walks of life, all aimed at furthering the American Cancer Societys efforts to save lives by helping people stay well, helping them get well, nding cures and ghting back. Opening ceremonies start at 6 p.m. with all cancer survivors, meaning anyone who has ever been diagnosed with cancer, joining together on the track to walk or wheelchair the rst lap, unied in victory and hope. This emotional lap honors the courage of all who have defeated cancer. The ceremonies are followed by the annual survivor and caregiver dinner at 6:30 p.m. in the middle of the eld; Paella will be provided by Tamaras Caf. If you are a survivor or a caregiver, please come out. For more information, call your American Cancer Society at 785-9205, ext. 3509 or local event chair Chala Parish at 370-0832. All survivors receive a free Relay for Life T-shirt and dinner. Come early to make sure to see opening ceremonies. We will have entertainment and activities throughout the night including the band Righteous Kind from Gainesville at 9:30 p.m.. Relay is a unique opportunity for our community to come together to celebrate people who have battled cancer, remember those weve lost and ght back against the disease, Parish said. Many of the participants are cancer survivors, which serves as a reminder that our community is not immune to this disease and that by participating in relay, we are joining with the American Cancer Societys efforts to create a world with less cancer and more birthdays. Mrs. Margaret Willoughby Holton passed away Saturday, May 19, 2012. A Celebration of Life Service was conducted Wednesday afternoon, May 23, in the Williams Funeral Home Chapel of Milledgeville, Ga. Interment followed at Heritage Memorial Park. The family received friends at the funeral home on Tuesday evening, May 22. Mrs. Holton was a native of Macon, Ga., and after moving from Florida, lived the past ve years in Hayesville, N.C. She attended Midway School and graduated from Baldwin High School in Milledgeville. She was the daughter of the late L.R. and Susie McDaniel Willoughby. Survivors include husband, Archie Brooks Holton, of Hayesville, N.C.; son Archie Lee Holton of Anaheim, Calif.; daughter Brooksayne Holton of Hayesville, N.C.; grandchildren A.J. Gillikin and Krystalyn Gillikin, both of Carrabelle; brother James L. (Kay) Willoughby of Milledgeville, Ga.; and sister Donna (Quincy) Simpson of Toomsboro, Ga. In lieu of owers, the family requests donations may be made to the Association of the Miraculous Medal, P.O. Box 8060, Perryville, MO 63775-8060. Express online condolences at www. williamsfuneralhome. net. Williams Funeral Home and Crematory of Milledgeville is in charge of arrangements.Margaret Holton MarARGarARET HOlL TONHughey Williams Sr. of Dalkeith passed away on Friday, May 11, 2012, in a local nursing facility after a long battle with cancer. He was born July 31, 1934, in Tampa. He proudly served three years in the Korean War and was a crane operator for the St. Joe Paper Company for 35 years before retiring. He is survived by his three children, Hughey Williams Jr. (Beverly) of Marianna, Cindy Ray of Panama City and Joey Williams (Kristie) of Panama City; six grandchildren, Steven Williams of Dalkeith, Lee Erwin of Panama City, Samantha Williams of Panama City, Ryann Paul (Jason), stationed in Japan, and Clayton Williams of Marianna; one great-grandson, Aiden Paul; one sister, Joannah Costine; and one nephew, Joe Costine, both of Lakeland. He was preceded in death by two brothers, Ted Williams and Morris Williams; and one sister, Wilma Patterson. A private family service will be held at a later date. The family would like to take this opportunity to thank the staff of St. Andrews Nursing Facility and Emerald Coast Hospice for all their care and support. Heritage Funeral Home, Panama City, is in charge of arrangements. Those wishing to extend a word of condolence may do so at www.heritagefhllc.com.Hughey Williams Sr. HUGhHEY WIllLLIamsAMS SrR. Obituaries Faith BrRIEFsS Card of TTHANNKSWe would like to take the time to send out a heartfelt thankyou for the compassion and generosity shown to us during our time of loss. The phone calls, food and owers were truly touching. We are certain that somehow someone has slipped through our less-than-perfect recordkeeping, but please know that each of gesture of love did not go unnoticed. We would like to thank Pastor Ray Creamer and the Highland Park Community Church for a beautiful viewing and service that Lonnie would have been proud of. To Rocky Comforter, thank you for the special attention that you have always given to our family. May God bless and keep each of you. Thanks,The Lonnie Moses Family Legion post to host Memorial Day service LaANarkARK NEwsWSJim Welsh View obituaries and leave condolences at www.apalachtimes.comJimmy Mosconis has been invited to attend the Memorial Day ceremony at the Vietnam Veterans Memorial, where Barack Obama will become the third American president to speak since the memorial opened in 1982. Mosconis attended in 1984 when President Reagan spoke at the unveiling of the Three Serviceman Statue. He was among 2,500 people from throughout the country invited by the Department of Defense to attend Mondays National Announcement and Proclamation Ceremony, which marks the 50th anniversary of the beginning of the Vietnam War. The Obama Administration will join with the Vietnam Veterans Memorial Fund, the National Park Service and the Department of Defense to pay special homage to those of the Vietnam War, as the DoD ofcially launches its commemoration of the 50th anniversary of the war. We are honored to have President Obama take part in a ceremony at The Wall. His administration has been very helpful when we have asked for support with issues including the Education Center. Two other U.S. presidents have spoken, President Ronald Reagan in 1984 and President Bill Clinton in 1993, said Jan C. Scruggs, president and founder of the VVMF. Obama will deliver the keynote speech and join other government ofcials and veterans to lay wreaths at The Wall during the ceremony. This years 10 name additions and their families also will be honored on Memorial Day. The ceremony begins as Memorial Day events across the nation honor the fallen of all the nations conicts. For more information about the Vietnam War 50th Anniversary Commemoration, visit www.vietnamwar50th.com. To learn more about the Vietnam Veterans Memorial Fund and the Memorial, visit www.vvmf.org. Mosconis to attend Memorial Day at The WallVan Johnson Day May 31On May 15, Van Johnson attended his nal county commission meeting acting as solid waste director. At that meeting, the commission thanked him for his service. After a motion by Cheryl Sanders, commissioners voted unanimously to declare Thursday, May 31, Johnsons nal day as head of the department, as Van Johnson Day in Franklin County. At their April 3 meeting, Johnson told county commissioners he had submitted his retirement papers.Meet the candidates June 8The Franklin County Political Kickoff Jamboree will be held Friday, June 8, beginning at 5 p.m. at the Eastpoint Fire House, 24 Sixth St., Eastpoint. All candidates are invited to address the gathering, mingle and shake hands with the crowd. For more information, call Kristy Banks 653-5043, Rita O Connell 927-2893, Bill Snyder 6973189 or Liz Sisung 670-8261. News BrRIEFsS

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Email outdoors news to timesoutdoors @star .com OUTDOORSwww.apalachtimes.comSection Section A WEEKLY ALMANAC APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE TIDE TABLES MONTHLY AVERAGESTo nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from these given for APALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW Cat Point Minus 0:40 Minus 1:17 East Pass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27 To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from those given for CARRABELLE: HIGH LOW Bald Point Minus 9:16 Minus 0:03 Sponsor the WEEKLY ALMANACCall Today!653-8868 Date HighLow% Precip Thu, May 2487 69 0% Fri, May 2587 7210% Sat, May 2686 73 0% Sun, May 2785 73 0% Mon, May 2885 7320% Tues, May 2985 73 0% Wed, May 3086 73 0% Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL(next to Piggly Wiggly) www.BWOsh.com Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL (next to Piggly Wiggly) www.BWOsh.com Your Hunting HeadquartersMAY FEATURED FISH: Corner of Marina Drive, Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL Your Hunting Headquarters Your Hunting Headquarters Your Hunting Headquarters MAY FEATURED FISH: This months grand prize: Calcutta prize pack includes, gear bag, T-shirt, a pair of sunglasses, decals, visor and drink coozie $129.99 value Wright Mcgill Blair Wiggins S-curve rod with a Sabalos SAB 30 reel combo, $100.00 gift card for online shopping at Bluewater Thursday, May 24, 2012 By STAN KIRKLANDFlorida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission Those people looking for a different type of hunting experience will have their chance. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission is accepting permit applications to hunt alligators during the upcoming season. The state alligator harvest season is Aug. 15 through Nov. 1. It is the 25th year Florida has had a statewide alligator hunting season. Steve Stiegler, a wildlife biologist in the alligator management program, said about 5,800 permits will be available this year, which is down slightly from 2011. Each alligator harvest permit allows the trapper to take up to two alligators. We survey a number of lakes and rivers around the state, and for the most part the alligator population is stable, he said. If previous years are an indicator, somewhere between 7,000 and 8,000 alligators will be bagged during the 11-week season. The statewide alligator harvest Phase I application period began May 2 and will run through May 16. Applicants may submit only one application, with the chance of being drawn for one of ve hunt choices and hunting periods. It is a random draw selection. Any permits not issued after the Phase I period will be issued through Phase II and if needed, Phase III application periods. Alligator harvest applications can be submitted at any county tax collectors of ce, license agent (retail outlet that sells hunting and shing licenses) and online at .wildlifelicense.com Applications are not accepted by mail. Permits for Florida hunters cost $272. That includes two CITES tags, which must be af xed to each harvested gator. Non-residents must pay $1,022. Stiegler said its common for permitted gator trappers to have one or more assistants on board the vessel to help them. Each assistant must have a $52 Alligator Trapping Agents License. Floridas alligator population today is a far cry from 1967, when alligators landed on the endangered species list. Today, estimates put the alligator population in Florida waters around 1.3 million animals. Across their range, Floridas alligator population ranks second only to that of Louisiana. FWC rules dont specify an upper limit to the size of the gator, only that they have to be larger than a hatchling (18 inches). Gator trappers can hunt during their assigned period from 5 p.m. to 10 a.m. each day. Most use either a detachable gig or harpoon, crossbow or bow-and-arrow, with the gig, bolt or arrow tied to a restraining line, or a rod and reel with a snatch hook. Gator hunters in Florida are not allowed to use conventional rearms, but a bangstick can be used to kill the alligator. Some gator hunters who are successful in bagging a gator choose to process the animals themselves for the edible meat and hides. Others may sell the carcass to an alligator processor, or make a deal with a processor to split the head, hide and meat. GATOR GATHERINGDEREK BOGGS | Special to Florida Freedom NewspapersThe state alligator harvest season is Aug. 15 through Nov. 1.Now is time to apply for hunting permitsPage 10Last week, a group of Chicago dentists had an exceptionally good day of shing with guide David Heinke. The tooth docs reeled in ve black drum and three red sh, all tipping the scales at 40 to 50 pounds. Ken Sakamoto, left, caught two of the big drum, above, and one red sh. It was just a perfect day, Heinke said. We were y shing and got into a nice school. The water was smooth, and I could see the school and just follow it. The sh were nicky and it took a long time to gure out what they wanted to eat, but we nally did. Heinke said the group shing with him has been coming to the area several times a year for more than ve years.Ken Sakamoto with a black drum he caught last week.DAVID HEINKE | Special to the Times A GOOD DAY OF FISHINGA new draft of the veyear update to the Gopher Tortoise Management Plan for the state is available for review. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission is asking for public input. The threatened gopher tortoise is classi ed as a keystone species, because its extensive burrows offer shelter to more than 350 other species such as the federally threatened eastern indigo snake. Gopher tortoise burrows average 6.5 feet deep and 15 feet long, provide a home for hundreds of other species and offer great amenities: constant temperature, refuge from res and bad weather, and protection from predators, said Deborah Burr, the FWCs gopher tortoise plan coordinator. The draft plan and link to comment are at MyFWC. com/GopherTortoise. Comments will be accepted through June 25. More than 100 individuals and stakeholders already have made suggestions. The draft revisions are scheduled to go before the FWCs commissioners at their Sept. 5-6 meeting. Objectives of the plan are to minimize loss of gopher tortoises by ensuring humane, responsible relocation from lands slated for development; increase and improve species habitat; enhance and restore populations where the species no longer occurs or has been severely depleted; and maintain its function as a keystone species by also conserving commensal species.Gopher tortoise management plan draft updated Offshore species are returning to the Forgotten Coast in great numbers this month. Spanish Mackerel and king sh are thick in the near shore number in Mexico Beach. Try the buoy line out of Mexico Beach rst trolling dusters with cigar minnows for both the Kings and Spanish. Plenty of chicken or peanut dolphin are showing up close to shore as well this month. Lighter spinning or casting gear with a silver spoon or Got-Cha plugs will keep the school around your boat if you keep one hooked. Only a few weeks left until red snapper season opens, so gear up! Inshore OffshoreAs May is at its midway mark, shing in St. Joe Bay is still red hot. Good conditions for inshore shing have produced great catches of trout, ounder, and red sh this past week. Most anglers are using live shrimp and bull minnows, but Gulp 3 shrimp in a New penny or Sugar spice glow is the hot bait now. Use a popping cork for the ats and grubs for the deeper holes around the bay. SPONSORED BY

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CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA SP O RTS www.apalachtimes.com ASection Journeys Journeys JourneysDemo DayMay 26th, 2012 10am-3pmFree Hot Dogs!COME AND TRY OUT A KAYAK OR CATCH ON TO THE STAND UPPADDLE BOARD CRAZE!PERCEPTION & WILDERNESS KAYAKS SURFTECH SUP BOARDSMarina across from Harry As Call Journeys at (850) 927-3259 for more info Thursday, May 24, 2011 Page 11Special to The TimesThe third annual King Buster Tournament has been expanded to include three events this year. The rst leg of the tournament took place on April 28, with two additional meets upcoming, on Saturday, May 26, and June 23. Entry fee is $100 per boat, per tournament. Fishing hours are from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. There are three chances to win each tournament. Cash prizes are for rst place (40 percent of entry fees), second place (30 percent of entry fees) and third place (10 percent of entry fees). The remaining 20 percent of the registration fees go to Make-A-Wish Foundation of Central and Northern Florida. The tourney is sponsored by Millard Collins, dockmaster of C-Quarters Marina. For more information, visit www.cquartersmarina.com or call 697-8400.By Lois Swoboda653-1819 | @ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star .com From Crawfordville to Apalachicola, Panhandle golfers took to the links this month for the third annual Forgotten Coast Open to bene t Franklin County Habitat for Humanity. St. James Bay Golf Resort hosted the event May 5-6. Golf Pro Steve Hatcher said about 35 golfers competed, both professionals and amateurs. Its interesting, because although our numbers have remained about the same, we pick up new people every year, Hatcher said. Four ights of golfers competed over the two 18-hole rounds. I tried to break it down so players at all levels have a chance to succeed, Hatcher said. First in the Professional Flight and overall champion of the tournament was Jason Jones of Bainbridge, Ga. (77-69-146). He was followed in the ight by Evan Neihaus of Tallahassee (77-78-155). In the Championship Flight, rst place went to Will Grubbs of Crawfordville (74-76150). Second place was shared by Marcus Beck of Tallahassee and Mike Keller of Crawfordville, both with 76-75-151. In the Gamers Flight, for those with handicaps of 8 to 13, rst place went to Mike Wheelus of Carrabelle (82-78 -160). Second place went to Apalachicolas Tom Nobles (79-82-161). The Big Dogs Flight, for those with handicaps of 14-18, the winner was Doug Brock of Panacea (82-87-169). Second place went to Tim Potter of Crawfordville (90-86-176). Hatcher thanked the sponsors for making this years Forgotten Coast Open one of the most competitive in events history. Sponsors for this years event included Fairpoint Communications, Oyster and HITZ Radio, Must See Magazine and St. James Bay Resort.By Mike SweattSpecial to the Times The rst two tournaments of the countys newest 14-and-Under AAU team, the Franklin County Basketball Academy Hawks, are now under their belts. The rst tournament we played in was the Comets Summer Explosion in Tallahassee at Tallahassee Community College. The boys were kind of intimidated by all of the teams and talent at this event, so the opening game we lost by 20. We came out the next couple of games ghting with some pride. We ended up placing third in the tournament with six teams in our 14-and-under age bracket. In the semi nal game, we won 34-31 in a defensive battle. Tyler Howard scored 15 points and had six steals. Kelsey Jones scored eight points and had ve steals, four blocks and 14 rebounds. Marshall Sweet added four points and four steals, and Josue Barahona had four points and ve rebounds. Kenneth Wilson added three points, while Trent Lee pulled down seven rebounds in the game. The tournaments we participate in have age groups ranging from 9-17, with boys and girls teams. This past weekend we played in a Big Shots Tournament, one of the biggest college recruiting services in the nation, so there was a lot of talent and teams involved, including teams from Atlanta, Miami, North Carolina, Jacksonville, Tallahassee and Pensacola. We did not do well on Saturday, but responded back well on Sunday for a big win to place fth in the tournament. Carza Harvey had 21 points, six assists and four steals. Howard had 12 points and six steals. Sweet had eight points and ve assists. Barahona had seven points and three rebounds. Eddie Wright had two points and four rebounds. Wilson added in two points and four rebounds. Jones had two points and 13 rebounds, and Jan Lowe had two points and three steals. Final score was 56-31. We played an all-star AAU team from Tallahassee. The 14-under team members are Jones, Harvey, Howard, Sweet, Wilson, Barahona, Lowe, Wright, Lee and Brandon Walker. Team sponsors are Franklin County Parks and Recreation, City of Apalachicola, Centennial Bank, AJs Neighborhood Bar and Grill, Forbes Funeral Home, Eddy Teachs Raw Bar, Apalachicola ACE Hardware, Water Street Seafood, Kats Fine Line Painting, and Blue Parrot Restaurant. Thank you to all of our sponsors. Without you this would not be possible. If anyone would like to donate/sponsor the Franklin County Basketball Academy, contact Mike Sweatt at 5663434 or sweattfamu@hotmail.com Mike Sweatt is the coach of the Franklin County Basketball Academy Hawks.By TIM CROFT227-7827 | @PSJ_Star tcroft@star .com The Tiger Sharks proved an inhospitable host as spring football practice came to a close Thursday night. Eleven Port St. Joe running backs rushed for more than 420 yards and the Tiger Sharks blanked both Franklin County and Wewahitchka over 24 minutes of play to come away with a clean sweep during a three-team jamboree. The Tiger Sharks pummeled Franklin County 27-0 over two quarters and dominated a battered Gator team 19-0. I was pleased with the effort, said Port St. Joe coach Chuck Gannon. We have good depth at running back, but we are young on the offensive line, and we cant afford any injuries. But I thought we played well tonight. Up rst for Port St. Joe was Franklin County, which scored the initial touchdown of the evening against Wewahitchka and did not reach pay dirt again, eventually falling 24-6. A fumbled Port St. Joe handoff on the rst series against the Seahawks was followed by domination as the Tiger Sharks rushed for 258 yards with 11 different backs, including three seventh-graders, getting touches. Franklin County fumbled the ball right back, and Jarkeice Davis, the nights leading rusher with 179 yards, sprinted 80 yards around left end for a touchdown. After stopping the Seahawks on downs, Port St. Joe needed just four plays to cover 54 yards, Natrone Lee catching a 24-yard touchdown pass at the ag from quarterback Ramello Zaccarro. The Tiger Sharks converted another Franklin County fumble one of six turnovers for the Seahawks into a 10-yard touchdown run by Lee, who nished with 101 rushing yards. The Seahawks fumbled on the ensuing play, and Dusty Richter carried from 11 yards out for the touchdown, Justin Hites extra point providing the nal scoring for the two quarters. The nal two quarters were between county rivals Port St. Joe and Wewahitchka, and after losing four starters in the opening half against Franklin County, the Gators were playing with one hand behind their back. While Wewahitchka was unable to mount any sustained threat, Port St. Joe drove 62 yards for a 1-yard dive by Zaccarro, 85 yards for another 1-yard keeper by Zaccarro and nished the night by converting one of three Gator fumbles into a 8-yard touchdown run by Joe Love. I didnt like that, said Wewahitchka coach Dennis Kizziah of the nal two quarters. We lost four kids in that rst half, and we just cant afford that. When we were fresh and the other team was fresh, we played well. After the rst possession, I thought our defense really cracked down. That initial possession ended in a 5-yard run by Franklin Countys Skyler Hutchinson, but from there it was the Jalyn Addison show. Addison rushed eight times for 136 yards in the 24 minutes against the Seahawks he nished the night with 162 rushing yards and scored on runs of 29, six and 58 yards. Meanwhile, Franklin County had three turnovers inside Gator territory, two in the red zone, and the Seahawks nal four possessions ended fumble, interception, fumble and fumble. STEVE HATCH | Special to the TimesAt left is Overall Champion Jason Jones. Will Grubbs of Crawfordville, right, scored rst in the Championship Flight.Locals win big at Forgotten Coast OpenKing Buster tourney continues Saturday Sports SHORTSEAHAWK SPRING ROSTER#1 Dwayne Griggs #2 Cole Wheeler #3 Stefan DeVaughn #4 Dan Carrino #5 Holden Foley #7 Skyler Hutchinson #25 Christian Jones #14 Tyler Webb #15 Logan McLeod #21 Thomas Benitez #20 Trenton Lee #24 Hunter Lee #30 Zach Howze #50 Chase Golden #51 Ricky Smith #53 Kyle Wheeler #54 Marcus Bunyon #55 Direek Farmer #56 Jacob Wilson #59 River Banks #58 Jake Robinson #52 Eric Coleman #71 Mason Ray #73 David Butler #74 Jeffery Murray #66 Lenny Ward #76 Karl Sanford 2012 SEAHAWK SCHEDULE Aug. 24 vs. Bozeman (Preseason) 7:30 p.m. Aug. 31 @ Sneads 7:30 p.m. Sept. 7 vs. Graceville 8 p.m. Sept. 14 @ Cottondale 7:30 p.m. Sept. 21 @ Liberty** 7:30 p.m. Sept. 28 vs. Wewahitchka 7:30 p.m. Oct. 5 vs. Port Saint Joe** 7:30 p.m. Oct. 12 vs. Robert F. Munroe 7:30 p.m. Oct. 19 vs. West Gadsden** 7:30 p.m. Oct. 26 @ Blountstown** 7:30 p.m. Nov. 2 OPEN Nov. 9 vs. South Walton 8 p.m. Nov. 16 FHSAA PLAYOFFS ** District 2 Class 1-A All games Eastern Standard Time PSJ dominates jamboreeHawks open tourney play

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LocalA12 | The Times Thursday, May 24, 2012 A12| The Times Thursday, May 24, 2012 CLASSIFIEDS 87557 PUBLIC NOTICE STATE OF FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION NOTICE OF INTENT TO ISSUE PERMIT The Department of Environmental Protection gives notice of its intent to issue an environmental resources permit for Scipio Creek Boat Basin Improvements, 19-0301773002-EI, to the City of Apalachicola, at One Avenue E, Apalachicola, Florida 32320. The purpose of the permit is to authorize construction of an open-air market/pavilion, re87487 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 12-108 CA CENTENNIAL BANK, an Arkansas banking corporation P.O. Box 610 Crawfordville, Florida 32327, Plaintiff, vs. RONALD D. BOOZER, MARJORIE L. BOOZER a/k/a MARJORIE LOUISE BOOZER, and CLERK OF COURT, FRANKLIN COUNTY, STATE OF FLORIDA Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: RONALD D. BOOZER, MARJORIE L. BOOZER a/k/a MARJORIE LOUISE BOOZER: YOU ARE NOTIFIED that a civil action has been filed against you in the Circuit Court, County of Franklin, State of Florida, to foreclose certain real property described as follows: LOT 1, BLOCK 48 (211), KEOUGHS SECOND ADDITION TO THE CITY OF CARRABELLE, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 20, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA; TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN 1977 AMHE MOBILE HOME, IDENTIFICATION NO. 21G6842D. You are required to file a written response with the Court and serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Keith L. Bell, Jr., Plaintiffs attorney, 87254 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE N O. 2011-000093-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, as successor in interest to COASTAL COMMUNITY BANK, a Florida banking corporation, Plaintiff, vs. LANDMARK GROUP, LLC, a Florida limited liability company, JEFFREY D. THACKER, HERBERT PRESS WITT and DAMIEN FRENCH, Defendants. NOTICE OF JUDICIAL SALE PURSUANT TO SECTION 45.031 OF THE FLORIDA STATUTES TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to the Amended Final Judgment of Foreclosure of Mortgage and Ordering Sale entered on May 2, 2012, in Case N umber 2011-000093-CA of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit for Franklin County, Florida, in which LANDMARK GROUP, LLC, a Florida limited liability company, JEFFREY D. THACKER, HERBERT PRESS WITT and DAMIEN FRENCH are Defendants, I, Marcia M. Johnson, Clerk of Circuit Court, will sell at public sale the following described real property: Lots 15, 16, 17, and 18 of Fairway Park Subdivision, a subdivision as per map or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 8, Page 15, Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. The sale will be held on June 12, 2012, at 11:00 A.M. (Eastern Time) to the highest and best bidder for cash, at the second floor lobby, West side of the Franklin County Courthouse, located at 33 Market Street, in Apalachicola, Franklin County, Florida, in accordance with Section 45.031 of the Florida Statutes. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 3rd day of May, 2012. MARCIA M. JOHNSON Clerk of Court By: Michele Maxwell As Deputy Clerk Attorney for Plaintiff: Law Office of J. Gordon Shuler, P.A. P.O. Drawer 850 / 34 Fourth Street Apalachicola, Florida 32329 850-653-9226Phone 850-653-3382Fax May 17, 24, 2012 whose address is 106 East College Avenue, Suite 600, Tallahassee, Florida 32301, at least thirty (30) days from the date of first publication, and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. Dated this 11th day of May, 2012. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of Court Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk Attorney for Plaintiff: Keith L. Bell, Jr., Esq. Clark, Partington, Hart, Larry, Bond & Stackhouse 106 East College Ave. Suite 600 Tallahassee, FL 32301 (850) 597-7483 (Phone) (850) 597-7591 (Fax) May 24, 31, 2012 HOW TO RECORD A UFOOIn case you encounter ET, you might want to read the following advice taken from MUFONs website on how photograph a ying saucer. Stabilize the camera on a tripod. If there is no tripod, then set it on top of a stable, at surface. If that is not possible lean against a wall to stabilize your body and prevent the camera from lming in a shaky, unsteady manner. Provide visual reference points for comparison. This includes the horizon, treetops, lampposts, houses, and geographical landmarks (i.e., Horsetooth Reservoir, Mt. Adams, etc.) Provide this in the video whenever is appropriate and doesnt detract from what your focus is, the UFO. Narrate your videotape. Provide details of the date, time, location, and direction you are looking in. Provide observations on the weather, including approximate temperature, wind speed, any visible cloud cover or noticeable weather anomalies or events. Narrate on the shape, size, color, movements, approximate altitude of the UFO, etc and what it appears to be doing. Also include any unusual physical, psychological or emotional sensations you might have. Narrate any visual reference points on camera so they correlate with what the viewer will see, and thereby will be better able to understand. Be persistent and consistent. Return to the scene to videotape and record at this same location. If you have been successful once, the UFO sightings may be occurring in this region regularly, perhaps for specic reasons unknown, and you may be successful again. You may also wish to return to the same location at a different time of day for better orientation and reference. Film just a minute or two under normal circumstances for comparison. Write down what you remember immediately after. As soon as you are done recording the experience/event, immediately write down your impressions, memories, thoughts, emotions, etc. so it is on the record in writing. If there were other witnesses, have them independently record their own impressions, thoughts, etc. Include in this exercise any drawings, sketches, or diagrams. Make sure you date and sign your documentation. Always be prepared. Have a digital camera or better yet a video camera with you, charged and ready to go, at all times. Make sure you know how to use your camera (and your cellphone video/photo camera) quickly and properly. These events can occur suddenly, unexpectedly, and often quite randomly, so you will need to be prepared. the more active MUFON branches, headed by G. Bland Pugh of Gulf Breeze. MUFON operates a worldwide network for eld investigation of reported UFO sightings, holds an annual international symposium, and publishes the monthly MUFON UFO Journal. Visitors to their website, www.mufon. com can purchase a UFO investigation eld manual for $50, learn how to become a certied investigator, nd out about regional events and meet-and-greets, or join MUFON. MUFON maintains an online archive of reported UFO sightings and provides a portal for people to report their sightings, abductions etc. A search of MUFONs online records going back to 1995 reveals the latest encounter on the island is only one of four alleged UFO sightings reported in Franklin County over the past 17 years. The rst took place on Jan. 27, 2008, when, according to the report, a group of local women and children spotted something unusual while enjoying a warm winter day. One woman was bird watching with her grandchildren between 1 and 2 p.m. The trees were bare of leaves and there were no birds in sight. The sky was clear, blue and sunny, according to the report. As witness was searching the sky, she noticed an object in the sky that looked at rst like a tool or an upside-down screw. She thought to herself, What the hell is that? and asked her niece if she saw it. She said her niece got frightened, said she didnt see anything and went in the house. The woman continued to watch the object which she described as silent. The object approached her, and was reportedly ying about 5 mph. I never turned away, kept looking at it the whole time, she said, describing it as resembling a short lighthouse, old and rusty with no visible windows or doors. Suddenly, there was a metallic ash like a pie pan in the sun and the object became brilliant and changed shape to resemble an hourglass, she reported. She said seagulls seemed to be attracted to the object which changed shape again and took on a white color. The next reported sighting was April 16, 2009, when someone posted the following short note about Franklin County: I call them patrollers because they patrol our skies. I took a pic of one, there has been as many as three in the same areas. No picture was posted with the note. A picture was posted with a note about the third alleged sighting, reported on March 15, 2011. Spring seems to be a popular time for ETs to visit the county. The explanation with the photo shown here reads, My friend was on the beach of Dog Island. It was a beautiful, clear, sunny afternoon with a normal ocean breeze. He and his friend took several photos with a digital camera of the beach/ocean/sky, looking south over the Gulf of Mexico. Later when looking closely at the photos, he noticed a strange white hazy streak in the sky, which he thought was an optical anomaly. Then he also noticed a tiny object near the streak in the sky. When zooming in on the object in the photo, it looks like a disk in the sky with the top shiny, apparently due to reected sun light, and the bottom with a dark shadow. They had not noticed either the streak or the object when taking the photos. UFO from page A1Carrabelles own poet laureate, Mary Westberg is back in print. The Carrabelle History Museum has published a collection of a dozen of her poems in a pretty little pocketbook. The new book features photographs of Carrabelle and the Wilderness Coast by Joan Matey, Sheila Hauser and others. In her well beloved Carrabelle by the Sea, Miss Mary pays homage to her beautiful home town. Other poems appear in print for the rst time, including Friendship, Beloved Grandmother and Splendor. The book will be on sale at local museums and other businesses. It is a lovely gift and a pocketful of happiness to carry with you everywhere. All proceeds from sales of the book benet the Carrabelle museum. A pocket full of poemsAA MEmMORIAL DDAY PRAYERBy MARY WESTbBERG | Special to the Times Today, all freedom-loving Americans are called to honor, with gratitude, those valiant heroes who sacriced their lives for the cause they felt was right. We come as a grateful nation to place a wreath at the Tomb of the Unknown, to honor the memory of all the fallen heroes represented here today. In remembrance, we commend the courage they displayed, and mourn the supreme sacrice they made, for love of country when our freedom was at stake. Standing on sacred ground, we bow our heads in prayer, and hallow their names in the arms of Gods embrace. We depart, dear friend, with your memory in our heart, and a solemn salute of farewell in heavens eternal resting place. Amen. MARY WWESTBERG Classieds

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A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322850-697-9604 850-323-0444 www.seacrestre.comwww. rst tness.com/carrabellePROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND RENTALSRENTALS3 BR 2BA DOUBLEWIDE UNFURNISHED Large Yard, In Country ....................................$700 2 BR MOBILE HOME UNFURNISHED Country, Private ..............................................$550 1 BR FURNISHED CONDO Nice, Includes Utilities.....................................$910 1 BR RIVER CONDO, BOAT SLIP 3 Night Minimum ..........................$105 Plus Daily 1 BR 1BA, UNFURNISHED APT Lanark, Remodeled, Inc Water .......................$475 2 BR 1BA UNFURNISHED APT Lanark ...............................................$375 & $450 1 BR, SUN ROOM/DAY BED Furnished, Lanark, Inc Utilities ......................$650 2BR 1BA MOBILE HOME Fenced Yard ....................................................$500 1BR REMODELED HOUSE Carrabelle .......................................................$450 OFFICE SPACE Hwy 98 Frontage, Carrabelle .....$400 Plus Utilities HELP WANTED Warehouse / Delivery Eastpoint Location CLEANERS CLEANERS NEEDED NEEDEDLots of Work and Good Pay Must have Own Vehicle Must have Own SuppliesCALL 850.227.3806 Total Down Pmt $6752001 Chevy Impala T otal Price $4,5000% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! Total Down Pmt $6752002 Ford Explorer T otal Price $5,2000% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! For inventory log onto: www.nicecarofforgotten coastllc.com Total Down Pmt $7752002 Ford Ranger -X/Cab T otal Price $5,2000% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! Total Down Pmt $9752000 Chevy Silverado -X/Cab T otal Price $6,5000% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! 1 BRCottageH/AC in Apalachicola, FL. 850-643-7740. For Sale or Trade $230,000 Lake Front home Toledo Bend Reservoir, Hamphill, Texas 3br, 2ba, 1 acre, boathouse, dock, pavilion, Call 409-579-1107 Medical/HealthCNA/HHABrightStar Care of Bay County (HHA 299993930) is seeking CNA/HHAs to provide loving, compassionate care to our clients in Gulf and Franklin County. Must have min of 1 yr of experience in providing Personal Care,meet all of the statutory requirements for being a home health worker, have reliable transport/safe driving record. If you love people and are servant-minded, please apply at www.brightstarcare.com/caree r-center or call (850) 238-3271 Web ID#: 34210595 Text FL10595 to 56654 Furnished Loft Apt, in historic district. Cbl/wtr incl 1100sf high ceilings, Private entrance and deck. No smkg/ pets. $750 mo. + $750 dep. 850-653-3838 Publishers NoticeAll real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on a equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. St. George Island $160 week, Electric, Satellite, Garbage incl. Pool tble. 12 X 65 deck w/Beautiful view 850-653-5114 Lanark Village Carlton St. #5, 1 Br 1 Ba, All Tile, Walk-in Closet, Landlord pays Electric and Water, $525 month + $300 deposit. Call 850-927-2838 or 864-356-5949 Adopt: Adoring Family, Veterinarian Doctor, LOVE awaits baby. Susan *800552-0045* FLBar42311* Expenses Paid* Carrabelle -2072 Lighthouse Rd. Sat 5/26 8am-2pm.Yard SaleBoat, Kayak, baby stuff, furniture and much more! Food Svs/HospitalityEvening Cook NeededThe Thirsty Goat is now accepting applications for an evening cook. The ideal candidate will have restaurant experience, but we are willing to train the right person. Applicants must have the ability to function in a fast paced environment while remaining professional and friendly. Candidates must be able to work weekends and holidays, dependability is a must! If you have an eye for detail, the highest desire to deliver superior service, and can play well with others, we would love to hear from you! Apply in person at the address below. E.O.E. DFWP Port Inn 501 Monument Ave. Port St. Joe, FL 32456 HospitalityRESORT VACATION PROPERTIESAccepting Applications *Full-time reservationist w/ great benefits. *Part-time maintenance office clerk. Both positions require weekend work. Apply in person 9-5 weekdays at 123 W Gulf Beach Dr, St. George Island 87465T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 19-2010-CA-000396 DIVISION: BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. WILLIAM S. HOWARD, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated April 30, 2012 and entered in Case No. 19-2010-CA000396 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for FRANKLIN County, Florida wherein BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. is the Plaintiff and WILLIAM S. HOWARD; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at FRONT DOOR OF THE FRANKLIN COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 33 MARKET STREET, APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA at 11:00AM, on the 19th day of June, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT 88, CARRABELLE LANDINGS, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 8, PAGE 47, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA A/K/A LOT 88 CARRABELLE LANDINGS, CARRABELLE, FL 32322 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on May 3, 2012. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Mr. Doug Smith, Office of Court Administration, Leon County Courthouse, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301, Phone: 850577-4401, Fax: 850487-7947 May 24, 31, 2012 87535T NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW PURSUANT TO SECTION 865.09, FLORIDA STATUTES NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of Mandi Singer Photography located at 82 Market Street, Unit C, in the County of FRANKLIN, in the City of Apalachicola, Florida, 32320 intends to register the said name with the Divisions of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, Florida. Dated at Apalachicola, Florida, this 18th day of May, 2012. Amanda L. Singer May 24, 2012 Incorrect Insertion PolicyFor Classified In-column AdvertisersAll ads placed by phone are read back to the advertiser to insure correctness. The newspaper will assume correctness at the time of the read-back procedure unless otherwise informed. Please your ad. Advertisers are requested to check the advertisement on the first insertion for correctness. Errors should be reported immediately. Your Florida Freedom newspaper will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion, nor will it be liable for any error in advertisements to a greater extent than the cost of the space occupied by the error. Any copy change, during an ordered schedule constitutes a new ad and new charges. We do not guarantee position of ANY ad under any classification. 87367T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 19-2011-CA-000295 DIVISION: BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., AS SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP, Plaintiff, vs. JAMES D. BRASWELL, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated April 30, 2012 and entered in Case No. 19-2011-CA000295 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for FRANKLIN County, Florida wherein BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., AS SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP is the Plaintiff and JAMES D. BRASWELL; SARAH L. BRASWELL; GULF STATE COMMUNITY BANK; FRANKLIN COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS; TENANT #1 N/K/A MIRIAN BARAHONA are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at FRONT DOOR OF THE FRANKLIN COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 33 MARKET STREET, APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA at 11:00AM, on the 12th day of June, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: PARCEL 1: COMMENCE AT A POINT 345 FEET WEST AND 145.15 FEET SOUTH OF THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF THE SOUTHWEST 1/4 OF SECTION 35, T8S, R8W, WHICH IS THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 93, HIGHLAND PARK SUBDIVISION, THENCE RUN ALONG THE COUNTY ROAD RIGHT-OF-WAY NORTH 63 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST, A DISTANCE OF 469 FEET TO A POINT OF BEGINNING, THENCE RUN NORTH 26 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 30 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 100 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 63 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 30 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 75 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 26 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 100 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 63 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 75 FEET TO POINT OF BEGINNING, THE SAME BEING PORTIONS OF LOTS 88 AND 89 OF HIGHLAND PARK SUBDIVISION AN UNRECORDED PLAT. PARCEL 2: A PARCEL OF LAND IN THE SW 1/4, SECTION 35, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST, DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT A POINT ON THE EASTERN BOUNDARY OF HIGHLAND PARK SUBDIVISION, AT ITS INTERSECTION WITH THE NORTHERN BOUNDARY OF THE COUNTY ROAD, WHICH IS 345 WEST AND 141.15 FEET SOUTH OF THE NE CORNER OF THE SE 1/4 OF THE SW 1/4 OF SAID SECTION 35, THE SAME BEING THE SOUTHEASTERLY TIP OF THE EASTERLY PARCEL NORTH OF SAID ADJACENT COUNTY ROAD, THENCE RUN NORTH 63 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID COUNTY ROAD A DISTANCE OF 269 FEET. THENCE RUN NORTH 26 DEGREES 3 MINUTES 30 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 100 FEET THEN RUN NORTH 63 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 110 FEET TO A POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE NORTH 63 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 15 FEET THENCE RUN SOUTH 26 DEGREES 3 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 100 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 63 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 30 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 15 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 26 DEGREES 3 MINUTES 30 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 100 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH A CERTAIN 1999 REDMAN MOBILE HOME LOCATED THEREON AS A FIXTURE AND APPURTENANCE THERETO VIN# FLA14614171A AND FLA14614171B. A/K/A 1063 CYPRESS STREET, APALACHICOLA, FL 32320 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on May 1, 2012 Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Mr. Doug Smith, Office of Court Administration, Leon County Courthouse, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301, Phone: 850-577-4401, Fax: 850-487-7947 May 17, 24, 2012 87401T PUBLIC NOTICE On May 3, 2012, Westminster Academy filed an application with the Federal Communications Commission for the assignment of license of radio stations to Bible Broadcasting Network, Inc.: WAFG, Fort Lauderdale, FL 90.3 FM; WKZG, Key West, FL 88.3 FM; WMRG, Key Colony Beach, FL, 88.7 FM; W285EK, Marathon, FL, 104.9; W288BV, Key West, FL, 105.5; W295AN, Marathon, FL, 106.9; W297AS, Islamorada, FL, 107.3; and a construction permit for Eastpoint, FL, 91.9. The officers and directors of Westminster Academy are: Bob Barnes, Russ Coningsby, Ryan Critch, Brian MacClugage, Jeff Masters, Terry McKay, George Moraitis, Rob Pacienza, Craig Peterson, Mike Pritchard, Terrie Roughen, Carole Sipowski, Larry Thompson and Leo Orsino. Westminster Academy is controlled by Coral Ridge Presbyterian Church. The officers and directors of this board are: Bill Ashcraft, James Branham, Clark Cochran, John Harper, Rod Hayes, Steve Howe, Robert Huth, Ronald Kovack, Mark Kreisel, Jeff Masters, David Russ, JT Turner III, Brian MacClugage and Mark Mansour. The officers and directors of Bible Broadcasting Network, Inc. are: Lowell L. Davey, Georgeanna Davey, Joseph J. Mast, Sr., Joy A. Raley, Barbara Redemann, Michael Raley, Carl Redemann and Juan Lopez. A copy of the application is available for public viewing in the following public files at 5555 N. Federal Hwy., Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33308. May 17, 24, 31, 2012 87270T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. CASE NO. 2008-CA-000358 LASALLE BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION AS TRUSTEE Plaintiff, vs. MULLINS, JOHN, et al. Defendants. RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order or Final Judgment entered in Case No. 2008-CA-000358 of the Circuit Court of the 2ND Judicial Circuit in and for FRANKLIN County, Florida, wherein, LASALLE BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION AS TRUSTEE, is Plaintiff, and, MULLINS, JOHN, et al., are Defendants, I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at, 33 MARKET STREET, FRONT STEPS OF THE COURTHOUSE, STE 203, APALACHICOLA, FL 32320, at the hour of 11:00 AM, on the 12th day of June, 2012, the following described property: LOT 13 OF WINDJAMMER VILLAGE, ACCORDING TO THE THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE(S) 38 & 39, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Property Address: 1701 KINGFISHER DRIVE, ST GEORGE ISLAND, FL 32328 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. DATED this 2nd day of May, 2012. MARCIA M. JOHNSON Clerk Circuit Court By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk Attorney for Plaintiff: GREENSPOON & MARDER, P.A. IMPORTANT If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Clerk of the Courts disability coordinator at 301 S MONROE STREET ROOM 225, TALLAHASSEE, FL 32301, 850-577-4401 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. May 17, 24, 2012 stroom facilities, aboat repair facility, haul-out slip, waste oil facilities, ice house/loading dock, dock extensions, and dock repairs, including a stormwater management system, on approximately 5.45 acres of seven contiguous parcels totaling 239.17 acres. Stormwater treatment will be provided via seven dry retention facilities. The project will be located on Market Street at Latitude 29.7333 North, Longitude -84.9947 West, in Section 36, Township 8S, Range 8W, and Section 1, Township 9S, Range 8W, Class II Waters, Prohibited Shellfish Harvesting Area, in Franklin County. Based on all the above, and with the application of general and limiting specific conditions of the permit, the Department has reasonable assurance the project, as proposed, fully meets the environmental resources permitting requirements of Chapter 62-346, Florida Administrative Code, and will not harm the environment. A person whose substantial interests are affected by the Departments action may petition for an administrative proceeding (hearing) under Sections 120.569 and 120.57 of the Florida Statutes. The petition must contain the information set forth below and must be filed (received by the clerk) in the Office of General Counsel of the Department at 3900 Commonwealth Boulevard, Mail Station 35, Tallahassee, Florida 323993000. Because the administrative hearing process is designed to re-determine final agency action on the application, the filing of a petition for an administrative hearing may result in a modification of the permit, or even a denial of the application. Accordingly, the applicant will not commence construction or other activities under this permit until the deadlines below for filing a petition for an administrative hearing, or request for an extension of time, have expired. Under subsection 62-110.106(4) of the Florida Administrative Code, a person whose substantial interests are affected by the Departments action may also request an extension of time to file a petition for an administrative hearing. The Department may, for good cause shown, grant the request for an extension of time. Requests for extension of time must be filed with the Office of General Counsel of the Department at 3900 Commonwealth Boulevard, Mail Station 35, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-3000, before the applicable deadline. A timely request for extension of time shall toll the running time period for filing a petition until the request is acted upon. If a request is filed late, the Department may still grant it upon a motion by the requesting party showing that the failure to file a request for an extension of time before the deadline was the result of excusable neglect. In the event that a timely and sufficient petition for an administrative hearing is filed, other persons whose substantial interests will be affected by the outcome of the administrative process have the right to petition to intervene in the proceeding. Intervention will be only at the discretion of the presiding officer upon the filing of a motion in compliance with Rule 28-106.205 of the Florida Administrative Code. In accordance with subsection 28-106.111(2) and subparagraph 62-110.106(3)(a).4, Florida Administrative Code, petitions for an administrative hearing by the applicant must be filed within 14 days of receipt of written notice. Petitions filed by any persons other than the applicant, and other than those entitled to written notice under Section 120.60(3) of the Florida Statutes, must be filed within 14 days of publication of the notice. Under Section 120.60(3) of the Florida Statutes, however, any person who has asked the Department for notice of agency action may file a petition within 14 days of such notice, regardless of the date of publication. The petitioner shall mail a copy of the petition to the applicant at the address indicated above at the time of filing. The failure of any person to file a petition for an administrative hearing within the appropriate time period shall constitute a waiver of those rights. A petition that disputes the material facts on which the Departments action is based must contain the following information: (a) The name and address of each agency affected and each agencys file or identification number, if known; (b) The name, address, and telephone number of the petitioner; the name, address, and telephone number of the petitioners representative, if any, which shall be the address for service purposes during the course of the proceeding; and an explanation of how the petitioners substantial interests are or will be affected by the agency determination; (c) A statement of when and how the petitioner received notice of the agency decision; (d) A statement of all disputed issues of material fact. If there are none, the petition must so indicate; (e) A concise statement of the ultimate facts alleged, including the specific facts that the petitioner contends warrant reversal or modification of the agencys proposed action; (f) A statement of the specific rules or statutes that the petitioner contends require reversal or modification of the agencys proposed action; and (g) A statement of the relief sought by the petitioner, stating precisely the action that the petitioner wishes the agency to take with respect to the agencys proposed action. A petition that does not dispute the material facts on which the Departments action is based shall state that no such facts are in dispute and otherwise shall contain the same information as set forth above, as required by Rule 28-106.301, Florida Administrative Code. Under Sections 120.569(2)(c) and (d) of the Florida Statutes, a petition for administrative hearing must be dismissed by the agency if the petition does not substantially comply with the above requirements or is untimely filed. This action is final and effective on the date filed with the Clerk of the Department unless a petition is filed in accordance with the above. Upon the timely filing of petition this order will not be effective until further order of the Department. This permit, when issued, constitutes an order of the Department. The applicant has the right to seek judicial review of the order under Section 120.68 of the Florida Statutes, by the filing of a notice of appeal under Rule 9.110 of the Florida Rules of Appellate Procedure with the Clerk of the Department in the Office of General Counsel, 3900 Commonwealth Boulevard, Mail Station 35, Tallahassee, Florida, 32399-3000; and by filing a copy of the notice of the appeal accompanied by the applicable filing fees with the appropriate district court of appeal. The notice of appeal must be filed within 30 days from the date when the final order is filed with the Clerk of the Department. Requests for review before the Land and Water Adjudicatory Commission must be filed with the Secretary of the Commission and served on the Department within 20 days from the date when the final order is filed with the Clerk of the Department. The application for this permit is available for public inspection during normal business hours, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, except for legal holidays, at the Northwest District Branch Office, 2353 Jenks Avenue, Panama City, Florida 32405. May 24, 2012 These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you. EmeraldCoast Marketplace 747-5020 Nursing Faculty, Gulf Franklin CampusTo teach didactics, laboratories and clinicals for the Practical Nursing program at the Port St. Joe campus. Design and implement the curriculum plan to meet requirements for the program and the Certi ed Nursing Assistant program. This includes assessment, planning, implementation and evaluation of courses, program objectives and NLNAC requirements. Requires: MSN with a minimum two (2) years of general medical surgical nursing experience + a current FL RN license. Salary based on degree and experience. Position Open Until Filled with a review starting 6/1/12.Women & minorities are strongly encouraged to apply. Application (must be completed) & additional info:www.gulfcoast.edu/hr GCSC is an EA/EO/M/F/Vet employer. GCSC Equity O cer 850.872.3866

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LocalA14 | The Times Thursday, May 24, 2012 Our local real estate experts have identied what they feel are the best values around and are oering them to you in Real Estate Picks! (In this section), Discover the best real estate values in Mexico Beach, Port St. Joe, Apalachicola, Cape San Blas, St. George Island, Carrabelle and surrounding areas. Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Real Estate Picks John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.comMLS#244406$249,000St George IslandBAY VIEW HOME Located in the quiet area of the Island, only 3 lots from Bay, 4 BR, 2 BA, large fenced yard, balcony for each upstairs BR, galley kitchen with serving window, large living area, Florida room, large deck, large ground level storage, circular driveway. Brown Street John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.comMLS#242245$439,900St George IslandGULF VIEW FROM WEST PINE AVE 4 BR (2 are masters), 3-1/2 BA with extra LR/5th BR, furnished, Interesting Architectural features, POOL with vinyl fencing, Enclosed outdoor shower, Screened porch, covered ground level entry. GET YOUR AD IN 653-8868Trades & Services Laban Bontrager, DMD Monica Bontrager, DMD 12761 Pea Ridge Road Bristol, Florida 32321TELEPHONE (850) 643-5417 Bristol Dental ClinicDENTURE LAB ON PREMISESSame Day Service on Repairs and Relines Don Lively General Contractors LICENSED ANDINSURED 20 YEARSEXPERIENCE P.O. Box 439 Carrabelle, FL 32322 697-2783 or Mobile 566-2603RC0066499RG0065255 Carrabelle Visa, Discover, and American Express Honored at Participating Ace Stores JACKSONS Building Supplies & Auto Repair Carrabelle 697-3333 We Deliver AnywhereHardware and Paint Center JOES LAWN CARE FULL LAWN MAINTENANCE AND TREE TRIMMING WITH REMOVAL OF ALL DEBRIS AND JUNKNEW CUSTOMERS 10% DISCOUNTFROM YOUR PREVIOUS LAWN CARE PROVIDER WITH STATEMENT OF THE COST FIRST CUT FREEWITH VERBAL COMMITMENT TO AT LEAST 12 MONTHS OF SERVICE.PLEASECALL JOE @ 850-323-0741 J.J.s Tree Service, LLC Stump Grinder Licensed & Insured Call John : (850) 899-8432 ROBERTS APPLIANCE REPAIR ALL MAJOR BRANDS 18 Shadow Lane Apalachicola, FL 32320 Phone: (850) 653-8122 Cell: (850) 653-7654 Trades & Services Robert C. Bruner Attorney Personal & Business BankruptcyOver 30 Years Legal Experience850-670-3030 bankruptcy relief under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon advertisements. Before you decide, ask us to send you free written information A new Memorial Day traditionMemorial Day honors the sacri ce of those who gave away all of their tomorrows so we can live in freedom today. In the past, it has been a tradition to place American ags on the graves of veterans. This year, Larry Hale of St. George Island, a veteran of the Vietnam War and a scout leader for nearly two decades, is suggesting a new tradition. In order to engage young people in the Memorial Day tradition, he is encouraging youth groups of all kinds to visit a local cemetery and clean the grave of a veteran, then return home and research the graves occupant on the Internet. In Franklin County, we have graves dating as far back as the Indian wars, so this will be an interesting history lesson, Hale said. It will also perform a much needed service, as many graves are untended, with tombstones half-covered in sand and leaves. If you are involved in a youth group or have children of your own, please consider joining in this new Memorial Day tradition.Call to all artists to submit worksThe Apalachicola Center for History, Culture and Art is calling for submissions by local artists. Art submitted can consist of but is not limited to oil paintings, drawings, pastels, watercolors, acrylic paintings, sculpture of any medium, glass, woodworking, photography and textiles. The exhibition will run June 7 to July 28 with an opening reception to be 6-8 p.m. June 9. The exhibition is open to any artist over 18 residing in Franklin County. Entries must be received by May 29. Work is subject to nal acceptance. The Apalachicola Center for History, Culture and Art will receive a 40 percent commission on any sales of artwork. For information, contact Paulette Moss at 855-APALACH.Museum assists with contamination removalThe former Camp Gordon Johnston area once again will be checked for ordnance and any contamination that might remain from the camp. The Camp Gordon Johnston World War II Museum has been asked to assist locals who have any questions about what is taking place. If you missed the recent meeting at Chillas Hall, come by the museum Thursday through Saturday to receive materials. The museum will be closed June 2 because of electrical work being done by Progress Energy. Camp Gordon Johnston and other former military installations with explosives and contaminants left behind, together with taxpayer dollars channeled through the Army Corps of Engineers, are seeking to remove any possible items and contaminants. The project at the former Camp Gordon Johnston will take about three years to complete, with followups every ve years after that. News BRIEFS LIGHTHOUSE ADDS INTERACTIVE ARCHIVEA new interactive exhibit has been added to the Cape St. George Lighthouse Museum. The Interactive Archive is an audio-visual exhibit including videos, still photographs, documents and text detailing the history of the Cape St. George Light. Installation of the exhibit in the Keepers House Museum was completed in March. The collapse of the Cape St. George Light in October 2005 was a newsworthy occurrence in the Panhandle, and the event received considerable media coverage. Several videographers also lmed the reconstruction of the historic structure and developed brief documentaries about the lighthouse. This footage formed the basis for the exhibit, so visitors could view the various news accounts of our lighthouse. More than just a collection of video clips, the exhibit is a digital repository for videos, photographs and documents about the lighthouse and its keepers. The resulting Interactive Archive offers not only the opportunity to view news clips and documentary pieces, but provides a method for storing and sharing photographs and documents about the lighthouse. This archive will serve as a storage medium for future photographs and documents made available to the St. George Lighthouse Association. TERRY KEMP | Special to the Times