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The Apalachicola times
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100380/00166
 Material Information
Title: The Apalachicola times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: H.W. Johnston
Place of Publication: Apalachicola Fla
Apalachicola Fla
Publication Date: 03-29-2012
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1885.
General Note: Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 32911693
lccn - sn 95026907
System ID: UF00100380:00166
 Related Items
Preceded by: Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by: Apalachicola herald

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Corps seeks citizen input on water useBy LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star .com Now is the time to comment on a proposed north Georgia reservoir that could further reduce the Apalachicola Rivers water supply. Hall County, Ga., is seeking permission to dam Flat Creek, a tributary of the Chattahoochee River in north Georgia, to create the Glades Reservoir. In theory, the water would be used to maintain the flow of the Chattahoochee at acceptable levels during drought conditions so that Hall could continue to withdraw water from the river under any circumstances. Hall County said it needs the secure water supply because the population there, currently 180,000, is expected to swell to 800,000 by 2060. At their regular March 20 meeting, County Planner Alan Pierce informed commissioners that the Glade Reservoir was under review by the Army Corps of Engineers. The commission voted unanimously to send a letter to the Corps objecting to the construction of additional reservoirs in the Apalachicola/Chattahoochee/ Flint (ACF) watershed. Ashley Fielding, a reporter for the daily Gainesville Times, attended the scoping meeting hosted by the Army Corps of Engineers March 22 at the Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve in Eastpoint. She said she believes the reservoir is an attempt by Hall County to get control of the water situation. The Magnuson ruling really scared a lot of people, she said. Folks remember what it was like before Lake Lanier. They are afraid they wouldnt have any water. In a 97-page ruling written in 2009, U.S. District Court Judge Paul A. Magnuson said the Corps violated federal law by allowing water withdrawals that were not authorized by Congress when a dam was built to establish Lake Lanier in the 1950s. The ruling was later overturned in the 11th Circuit Court of Appeals. Fielding said not everyone in Hall County is in favor of the Glades project, and many residents are concerned about the Georgia reservoir will affect bay ELECTION 2012 Special to the TimesMike Mock has led his letter of intent to seek election to the of ce of sheriff. Mock, 45, 1462 Highway 67, Carrabelle, led as a Democrat. He is now legally entitled to begin the process of circulating petitions to be signed, with signatures due to the Supervisor of Elections of ce by May 7. Mocks name would then appear on the Aug. 14 primary ballot, provided he of cially quali es during the June 4-8 qualifying period. In the event that only Democrats le for this of ce, or any of the county of ces, Republicans and those without party af liation would be able to vote in any race that has candidates from only one political party, known as a universal race. The following is a statement issued by the candidate: My name is Mike Mock; I have been married to Debbie Langley Mock for the past 25 years. Debbie and I have been blessed with three beautiful children: Jared, Morgan and Parker.Mike Mock to run for sheriff MIKE MOCKBy DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com The immediate future of about 300 youth, for the next two months on baseball elds at Franklin Countys west, central and eastern sports complexes, began last weekend outside Carrabelle. The annual Day of Baseball wasnt always sparkling and sunny, it even rained a little in the morning, brie y and not very much. At one point, for example, it did not look very good for the Twisters, in the Majors, the 11-and12 year old boys. Down 3-0, with innings ticking down, Greg Sasnett and the other coaches T.J. Pendleton, Michael Newell and Bryan Kent were having a hard time convincing their team that rst of all, now was not the time to be OPENING THE 2012 SEASON A Day of Baseball By VALERIE GARMAN229-7843 | @valeriegarman vgarman@star .com Young Jacob Glantzman carried a sign on the lawn of the Capitol Building in Washington, D.C. that posed an innocent question, Jesus was a sherman, why cant I be? Jacob represents the fth generation of an American shing family, something anglers from coastal states across the country gathered to protect at the Keep Fishermen Fishing Rally March 21. About 1,500 anglers turned out to protect their livelihood, culture, jobs and recreation at the rally, with an ultimate goal to spark change in the MagnusonStevens Act, the law governing sheries management in the United States, which many anglers cite as diminishing their right to a public resource. The anglers came from across the country: on buses from Panama City and Jacksonville, planes from Alaska, from Cape Cod, the Outer Banks, Cape Canaveral and Staten Island. They held signs boldly stating, Save the shermen! Save our jobs! Put exibility back in Magnuson! United we sh! Protect shermen, not just sh! Although the number of attendees was far less than in previous years, down considerably from 5,000 attendees in 2010, the event produced nearly four times the legislative representatives. A group of 13 anglers from North Florida and Alabama made the trip by bus from Panama City to attend the rally. On the return home, they were not only pleased Panhandle anglers optimistic after rally VALERIE GARMAN | Florida FreedomFlorida District 22 Rep. Allen West pulled Jacob Glantzman onstage during his speech as an example of what they were ghting for. See MOCK A5 See RALLY A2 See BASEBALL A9 See RESERVOIR A5Photos by DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The TimesCoach Donny Raf eld shows Alonna Brown how to bat for the T-Ball Tomahawks, sponsored by Rusty Crum Seafood and IGA. At top, Ethan Riley, for the CCC Jay Hawks, slides into home to beat a tag by the Twisters Christian Amison. Apalachicola seniors plan Friday fundraiserHelp the new senior citizens program, that serves Apalachicolas Seasoned Citizens. This Friday, March 30 from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the new Holy Family Center, enjoy some great Bar-B-Que! We will have a Pork Butt Bar-B-Que the last Friday of each month at the new Apalachicola Senior Center, at the former site of the Holy Family School, 27 Sixth Street! Whole butts are $25. Please reserve in advance if you can by calling the city administration of ce at 6538715. Lunches are $8 per person. Peeples to play DixieApalachicolas Dixie Theatre will present popular area folk recording artist Grant Peeples & The Peeples Republik Band, featuring Erik Alvar and Mark Russell, this Saturday, March 31. This left neck, master songwriter brings his Dylan /Prine / Kerouac style to the Dixies nal weekend of the 2012 season. On Friday, March 30, the Swingin Harpoon Blues Band will delight the audience. Mike Salty Lanigan conceptualized a swinging blues band, then ne picked his musicians, with the band performing original songs and quality covers, from big city blues, swing, rockabilly and funk. Tickets $20; both shows at 8 p.m. For more info, call 653-3200 or visit www. dixietheatre.com.Carrabelle art exhibit SundayJoin the Carrabelle Artist Association as they present exhibition demonstrations every Sunday from 1 to 4 p.m. in March and April in the Fountain Room at St. James Bay Golf Resort. Many pieces are available for sale. Call 697-4381 for more details.Holocaust art exhibit to closeThe Holocaust art exhibit, at the City of Carrabelle Complex, 1001 Gray Ave., closes this Saturday, March 31. Hours are Monday-Friday 1-4 p.m., Thursday 1-6 p.m.; and Saturday 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Admission is free. xxxxx xxxxx xxxxxThursday, March 29, 2012 50 WWW.APALACHTIMES.COM VOL. 126 ISSUE 48Phone: 850-653-8868 Web: apalachtimes.com E-mail: dadlerstein@star .com Fax: 850-653-8036 Circulation: 800-345-8688Opinion . . . . . . A4 Society . . . . . . A6 Faith . . . . . . . A7 Outdoors . . . . . A8 Tide Chart . . . . . A8 Sports . . . . . . A9 Classi eds . . . A12-A13 DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK: School News & Society: 11 a.m. Friday Real Estate Ads: 11 a.m. Thursday Legal Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Display Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Line Ads: 5 p.m. Monday xxxxx Contact Us xxxxx Out to see Index Snuf ng out Tobacco, A14

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LocalA2 | The Times Thursday, March 29, 2012 that their voices were heard, but that the right people were listening. Chip Blackburn, Tom Adams, John Lee and Chuck Guilford, charter captains out of Mexico Beach, have been active in ghting for change in the MagnusonStevens act since seeing a drastic decline in business due to strict shing regulations. The group cited the legislative turnout at this years rally as the product of an election year and hope it will be enough to drive the action in Washington that the 2010 rally failed to produce. Ill tell you, something needs to change, said Blackburn, captain of the charter boat Miss Mary. There are some people out there who are really hurting. Guilford said that while the rally in 2010 brought out people from all over the U.S. and Canada, it wasnt enough to get anything changed. I dont know how much longer (I can charter), with all the regulations and the cost of fuel to operate, said Guilford, owner of Charisma Charters. In previous years, Guilford said he was shing around 190 to 240 days a year, but in 2011, he shed only 87 days on his boat Charisma and 58 days on his second boat. Although the rally is over, the anglers recognize that the ght is not. Until of cial changes are made, they will continue to rally on a local level by contacting legislators and networking and organizing local support groups. The Recreational Fishing Alliance (RFA), the organization that sponsored the rally, deemed it a success due to an impressive legislative line-up and commitments made by many in uential members of Congress. Rally organizers chalked up the lower attendance rate to high gas prices, a poor economy and the start of the spring break season, an important part of the year for many people in the shing business. Jim Donofrio, executive director of the RFA, said the rally showed that members of Congress are of cially recognizing the issues facing the American angler today, be it from the recreational or commercial sector. Donofrio said that while sh populations have surged in the past decade, it has been at the expense of the American sherman. Were all suffering from access to our nations healthy sh stocks, Donofrio said. Those regulations have brought upon devastation to an industry and an attack on a culture. Donofrio said the rally has helped spread interest among the legislators needed to make the changes the anglers are rallying for he said there are currently eight bills in the House and Senate addressing shery reform. We have a bunch of members of Congress that are interested in this, Donofrio said. In a place where progress is slow, were making great progress so were happy. Donofrio said choosing to address the federal sheries law should be an easy choice for Congress to make because no action will mean closure for many shoreline businesses in the U.S. At the rally, New York Sen. Charles Shumer called for Congress to begin hearings on the Magnuson-Stevens act this year. Shumer also presented a bill he introduced called Flexibility in Rebuilding American Fisheries Act, which would eliminate a one-sizets-all approach to sheries management that isnt based on good, sound science. Who knows how to conserve our shing stocks? Its the hard-working people in the shing industry. Not some guy in some ivory tower doing faulty studies, Shumer said. You folks dont want to deplete the stocks, we know that. But you also want to make a living, and thats the balance that we seek to nd here today. Shumer was backed in support for the bill by Sen. Scott Brown (R-MA), Sen. Kay Hagan (D-NC) and Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (D-NY). On the House of Representatives side, Rep. Frank Pallone (D-NJ) is the primary sponsor of the Flexibility and Access in Rebuilding American Fisheries Act, a bill that 15 other members of the house voiced co-sponsorship of at the rally. Weve got to work hard on a daily basis to keep up the momentum, Pallone said. Not just today, but when you go home. Pallone stressed the importance of continuing to ght for the agenda. He encouraged the anglers to go home and speak with their representatives and senators and continue to push for change. Rep. Steve Southerland (RPanama City) spoke in support of amending the Magnuson-Stevens Act, relaying the underlying problem as a freedom issue. You have a God-given right to participate in an activity that your fathers participated in, your grandfathers participated in, the founding fathers participated in, Southerland said. As long as Im privileged by the men and women of Floridas second congressional district, I will never waver in ghting for your rights and ghting for your freedoms. Southerland, whose family has lived in Northwest Florida for more than 200 years, relayed the regulation issues as an attack on the American family, the very basis of the seafood industry in country. This isnt just an attack on you, the shermen, Southerland said. In many ways, this is an attack on our families. Southerland, a member of the Congressional Natural Resource Committee, said the Magnuson-Stevens Act is unjust and must be amended. He stressed that changes are needed to preserve the culture of the American shing family. Eugene Raf eld attended the rally to protect a family business spanning six generations. Were ghting the environmental groups of todays time that (want) us to stop what weve been doing for all these years, said Raf eld, owner Raf elds Fisheries in Port St. Joe. Weve been in business since 1889, and Im sixth generation. Im here to voice my freedom. The theme of the rally orbited around Jacob Glantzman and his brother Joshua of Wall, N.J. whose signs posed questions to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration: Jesus was a sherman, why cant I be? and Why are you stopping me from shing? The Glantzman brothers sat in the front row and were pointed out and brought up on stage by many of the legislative speakers who stressed the importance of keeping the culture of shing alive in the U.S. We all talk about how shing is part of our culture, our history, and it has been, Sen. John Kerry (D-MA) said. But I dont want to talk about how it is part of our history; I want to talk about how it is part of our future and guarantee that you are shing for years to come. Florida District 22 Rep. Allen West pulled Jacob on stage during his speech as the basis for what they were ghting for. This is what its all about. Youre the reason were all here, West said. So that this young man can step up like his father and fore fathers did. West said strict government regulations from NOAA are shattering the ability for children to follow in their parents footsteps. When you look at it, its not just shermen, West said. We are destroying the next generation of entrepreneurs in this country. Thats what were here for. Washington, D.C. with its onerous regulations is crushing the American dream. CLEAN C UTSLawn Care ServiceResidential CommercialServices:* Pressure Washing Palm Tree Trimming Landscape DesignCarlos Castillo 850-624-8018 Chris Grin 850-323-1442 CALL FOR A FREE ESTIMATE RALLY from page A1 Photos by VALERIE GARMAN | Florida FreedomA crowd begins to gather in front of the Capitol Building in Washington D.C. for the Keep Fishermen Fishing rally Mach 21. Below, a rally attendee carries a Save the shermen sign.

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LocalThe Times | A3Thursday, March 29, 2012 GREATER APALACHICOLAEnjoy quiet country living on 3.75 acres. Lovely custom built 3BR/2.5 BA home with many upgrades Jacuzzi, deck, large walk in closet. 1600 sq.ft. outbuilding on concrete pad.MLS# 244666.................$265,000 Travis Stanley 850.653.6477 Grayson Shepard 850.653.6718 COMMERCIAL APALACHICOLA Two commercial lots for sale in Apalachicola on the corner of Commerce and Penton St. Great location, one block of Hwy 98, near all the best shops and restaurants in Apalach! MLS# 244870..............$125,000EASTPOINT3 BR/2BA home on private 3 acres! Low maintenance metal roof, vinyl siding and great front porch. Backs up to state landMLS#244269.................$120,000ST. GEORGEISLAND GULF VIEW4BR/4BA close to center of island and convenient to center of island. Good Lots of storage and lovely native landscaping.MLS# 245752...............$399,000 C O MM ERCIAL GREATER A PALACHICOLA EA S TPOI N T S T G T G T EOR G E I S LA ND Leon Teat 850.653.5656 Sandy Mitchem 850.899.8300ST. GEORGE ISLANDFirst tier lot. Right across the street from the beach with wonderful views! This lot backs up to the back path too. Just three blocks to the center of the island. Buy a lot and build EXACTLY what you want!MLS# 246317..............$225,000 ST. GEOR G E IS LA ND ST. GEORGE ISLAND PLANTATION2nd tier lot in a great location, right on the beach access in Nicks Hole. Just across Leisure lane from state owned bayfront land best of both worlds!MLS#246524..............$95,000 ST. GEOR G E IS LA ND NEW LOW PRICE! BANK OWNED LOVELY HOME! NEW LISTING! NEW LISTING! Weems Hospital would like to recognize and celebrate their Doctors on staff.NATIONAL their Doctors on staff. Weems Hospital would like to recognize and celebrate FRIDAY, MARCH 30TH, 2012 Shezad Sanaullah, MD Patrick Conrad, MD Eugene Charbonneau, DO Stephen Miniat, MD Tamara Marsh, DPM Helen Nitsios, MD James Stockwell, MD Paul D. Hart, MD Garrett H. Chumney, MD Nathanael Hawkins, MD F. Josef Plum, MD Joda G. Lynn, MD Timothy Adamcryk, MD Vincent Ivers, MD David E. Pierce, DO David F. Edwards, MD Steven Saul, MD David F. Edwards, MD Steven Saul, MD David F. Edwards, MD Steven Saul, MD Weems Medical Center East 110 NE 5 TH STREET, CARRABELLE, FL 850-697-2345 F. Josef Plum, MD Joda G. Lynn, MD Timothy Adamcryk, MD Vincent Ivers, MD David E. Pierce, DO David F. Edwards, MD Vincent Ivers, MD David E. Pierce, DO David F. Edwards, MD Vincent Ivers, MD David E. Pierce, DO David F. 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Edwards, MD Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Medical Center East Weems Memorial Hospital 135 AVENUE G, APALACHICOLA, FL 850-653-8853 Over35Years Experience.208 Reid Avenue, Downtown Port St. Joe850.229.1111www.BaysideFloristPSJ.comYour Full Service Wedding and Event Florist Deliveries Available Daily to Apalachicola with minimum order. Your Full Service Wedding and Event Florist Your Full Service Wedding and Event Florist BILL MILLER REALTY850-697-3751 (3310) 570-06583/2 DBL WD -3 FENCED COR. LOTS-2 CAR GAR $60,000 $29,500 $2,500 DOWN BUYS 2 BED APT. 2 6 ORRENT $500/MTH GULF VIEW & ACCESS 3 BDR 2 BA 2006 M/H 16 X 80 $89,000 3/B-D/W-3COR. LOTS DBL GARAGE $59,500 MIH 2 CRNRLOTS BLK. $ STORE REDUCED $49,500 COMM. BLDG-98 ON GULF-RENT $600/MTH Gail BrannanWe Hope You Have A GREAT Day!!! The following report is provided by the Franklin County Sheriffs Ofce. Arrests in this report were made by of cers from the Carrabelle Police Department (APD) and the Franklin County Sheriffs Of ce (FCSO. All defendants are considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law. March 22 Stephen A. Smiley, 30, Panama City, violation of probation (FCSO) Richard J. Duncan, 32, Apalachicola, possession of a rearm by a convicted felon, and violation of probation (FCSO) Kimberly J. Richards, 43, Panama City, violation of probation (FCSO) March 23 Charles K. Barnes, Jr., 20, Carrabelle, driving while license suspendered (CPD) March 24 Justin R. Griggs, 23, Apalachicola, violation of probation (FCSO) ARREST REPORT The following is the report of the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservations Commissions Division of Law Enforcement for March 16-22 for Franklin County. During patrol onboard the offshore patrol vessel, Gulf Sentry, the crew boarded several vessels inbound to East Pass. Following a fisheries and safety inspection onboard a Georgia registered vessel, Officer Will Raker issued citations for over the bag limit of red drum and possession of two oversized red drum. Later that night, the crew was patrolling off Little St. George Island when they encountered several shrimp boats dragging inside three miles. Officers boarded one of the vessels that appeared to be dragging more than two nets. Upon boarding the vessel, the officers confirmed the vessel was dragging two primary nets, as well as a try net within one mile from shore. Officer Josh Waite issued a citation for the above violation and a warning in reference to Turtle Excluder Device (TED) violations. Waite provided the captain with the necessary information to correct the TEDs. The crew of the Gulf Sentry was conducting a choke point patrol in the Carrabelle River utilizing smaller patrol boats. As the officers approached a vessel to conduct a fisheries and safety inspection, they observed what appeared to be a large red drum surface just off the stern of the vessel. The officers recovered the red drum and boarded the vessel. Upon inspection and interviews, Officer Matt Gore issued citations for possession of an oversized red drum, interference with an FWC officer, and possession of 13 undersized black sea bass. Later in the patrol, another vessel was inspected and officers observed that the operator showed indicators of impairment. After completing the field sobriety tasks Officer Raker arrested the vessel operator for boating under the influence. FWC REPORT Governor Stone to sail SaturdayWeather permitting of course. the Governor Stone will move to Apalachicola this weekend, hopefully under sail and captained by Capt. Gercak, tentatively embarking at 10 a.m. on Saturday, March 31 and arriving sometime in the afternoon at Riverfront Park. Those in Carrabelle consider this an opportunity for members and guests to sail a beautiful trip through St. George Sound. To register contact Cal Allen at 850-524-1124. Register early; the vessel will ll up quickly.Riverkeeper hosts annual meeting SaturdayAll are welcome to the Apalachicola Riverkeepers annual membership meeting on Saturday March 31 from 2 to 4 p.m. at the Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve, 108 Island Drive, Eastpoint. Special speaker is Matt Greene. Sure to be noted will be the departure of Meg Nelson, who served as deputy director for the Apalachicola Riverkeeper for the past year. Nelson left March 16 to pursue another venture closer to her home in Walton County. The Apalachicola Riverkeeper is grateful to Meg for the time she served and the energy and creativity she brought to the organization. The organization is currently seeking a deputy director to assist the executive director in all aspects of organization development and operations as needed For more info, call 653-8936 or visit www. ApalachicolaRiverkeeper.org .Gulf-Franklin offers digital photo courseDigital Photo Presentation will be taught at the Gulf/Franklin Campus on Wednesdays, April 11, 18, 25 and May 2from 9 to 11 a.m. The fee is $49, and registration can be handled at the Gulf / Franklin Campus in Port St. Joe prior to the rst class. Experience the bene ts of using digital photos along with the computer in order to share moments in color and with text. This course will teach how to use Microsoft PowerPoint and bring photography and photo editing to life. Present memories with captions and bullet point text to enhance the photography experience, as well as create slideshows and digital scrapbook. Course is team taught, by Education Encore instructors Lana Scroggins, with her enthusiastic expertise in computers and gadgets; and Sue Bull, experienced in photography and photo editing, at Gulf Coast State College. For more information, email susanbull@bellsouth.net, lws@ mindspring.com or jbarr@ gulfcoast.edu or call Jim Barr at (850) 873-3513.Cook to chair transportation committeeThe Apalachee Regional Planning Council (ARPC), which provides staff to the Franklin County Transportation Disadvantaged Committee asked for assistance in getting an elected of cial to serve as chairman of the committee meetings. On March 20, the county commission voted unanimously to appoint NEWS BRIEFSSee BRIEFS A14

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OpinionA4 | The Times USPS 027-600Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 Publisher: Rick Martin Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six monthsHome delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERSIn case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola TimesBy Caty GreeneSpecial to the TimesThe Book Drive now on at the Apalachicola Municipal Library is bringing in some great titles. We were just given the very first book ever written by John Grisham. It will go in the collection and not be sold at the book sale on May 5.Sorry, but you can check it out after we process it. We also added a Eugenia Price and some new funny Florida fiction. Did you know that Stephenie Meyers book Twilight has been put out in a graphic novel format? Do you even know what a graphic novel is? They are narrative works in which the story is conveyed to the reader using sequential art in either an experimental design or in a more traditional format, like comics. Graphic novels, as well as zines, are regular stock-in-trade in larger city libraries, but we own only a couple of the former. Zines are self-published magazines which are accessioned and circulated by numerous public and academic libraries, usually on specic topics. There are exclusively zine libraries too. Wikipedia has the history if you are interested. The Apalachicola library remains a predominantly print book collection, although we do offer some audio books, and would be happy to have donations of those also. The Book Drive is a new activity of the Patrons of the Apalachicola Library Society (PALS), our friends group founded in 2009. Friends groups are very common for libraries, as they help with fundraising to supplement the government funding source, and raise awareness of library benets, activities and issues. There have been a number of religious books donated, with some added but quite a few that will be for sale. There will be plenty of new releases which are duplicates in the collection, and books that have been withdrawn from the librarys collection will also be represented. In advance of the May 5 Book Sale, we will be pulling out more than 50 boxes of books accumulating in our storage. The sale will be right across the street from the Tour of Homes ticket and auction location, so please come by and see what we have. Thank you to all our patrons and friends for donating books and keep them coming! Caty Greene is the librarian for the Apalachicola Municipal Library. To reach her, call 653-8436. Books coming in for book drive@THE LIBRaARY Caty GreeneThursday, March 29, 2012Screenings help prevent colon cancerBy James Stockwell, M.D.Special to the Times Tragedy strikes when a family member, friend or anyone suffers and dies from a preventable cause. It could even happen to you or ones you love. Then comes the grief and question of, what could have been done differently to prevent this tragic loss? The sting and pain are even deeper with the realization the loss could have been prevented. The answer is colon cancer screening, which often prevents tragic loss. Colon cancer is a disease of the large intestine, preventable in at least 60 percent of cases. In those in whom cancer is discovered early, it is 90 percent curable. Yet colon cancer continues to be the third leading cause of cancer in men and woman, with over 150,000 new cases and 50,000 deaths per year in the United States. This occurs because individuals ignore screening recommendations and warning symptoms. I must emphasize the waiting for symptoms is a dangerous gamble since symptoms often occur late, when the disease is advanced with less chance of cure. Screening is key to lowering the death rate from colon cancer. With screening, colon cancer is often preventable because it begins in a noncancerous growth called a polyp which takes time to develop into a cancer. During this time the polyp can easily be removed during a colonoscopy and then no cancer will develop. There are many reasons individuals avoid screening for prevention of colon cancer. One is that some do not know colon cancer is preventable. Also, women may erroneously feel it is a mans disease. Men have a strong tendency to avoid medical care and, often, a real fear of such care. Seeking care can even be perceived as a weakness. Many other fears can be reasons for not undergoing screening. None of us wants to undergo perceived unpleasant tests. Many individuals are private and become uncomfortable in a medical setting, or have personal taboos in regard to their bodies. Some fear a painful experience will occur. Many have heard the preparation is unpleasant. Others worry about something serious being found and would rather not know. Potential complications of any medical treatment are also a concern. In this time of a poor economy, nancial concerns and realities can interfere with undergoing preventative tests or having worrisome symptoms investigated. Last, is the Yuk factor. The colon just does not seem to be a pleasant part of the body to discuss or address. Fear is no reason not to address lifesaving preventative tests. The fears are often much worse than the reality experienced. First, the procedure itself has little discomfort associated with it. The patient is safely sedated and has little or no memory of the procedure. The preparation for the procedure is quite tolerable and can even be modied, if requested. The team that interacts with the patient is professional, caring and dedicated to preserving the patients dignity and privacy. Fear that something might be found is misguided. Most of the time the exam is normal or small noncancerous polyps are found. It is actually wonderful the benign polyps are found and removed so they do not evolve into cancer. Again, if a cancer is found, it will be in an earlier and more curable stage. Fear of complications is always a concern for any patient. Complications are extremely rare and all measures are taken to make sure each patient has a safe experience. The safety of each patient is the most important concern of the team. Financial concerns and barriers are not to be ignored. The hospital, physician and all involved are aware of nancial adversities and stresses. All will make every effort to work with patients to make sure they can undergo preventative measures. The two most common and recommended tests used for the prevention of colon cancer are chemically testing the stool for small amounts of blood that cannot be seen (stool occult blood testing) and a colonoscopy. The testing for occult blood is important but not adequate, alone, for the early detection or prevention of colon cancer. Screening colonoscopies must be done. This involves inserting a lighted tube through the anus into the colon under sedation. The procedure takes about 30 minutes during which time the whole inside of the colon is visualized and benign polyps are removed. Following the procedure there is little or no discomfort and patient is able to promptly resume a normal diet. Current screening recommendations are as follows: Starting at age 50, yearly testing of the stool for occult blood and a colonoscopy every 10 years. Screening is recommended starting at age 45 in African Americans who may have an earlier onset and more advanced disease. An earlier screening age is recommended in those who have relatives with colon cancer or polyps. Also, earlier screening examinations may be appropriate in patients with other cancers such as uterine, ovarian, urinary tract, other digestive tract tumors and brain tumors. Since symptoms of colon cancer are often late, patients with rectal bleeding, change in bowel habit, unexplained abdominal pain and fatigue from anemia should promptly seek medical attention. I have seen too many tragic, needless deaths during my medical career from colon cancer. Please undergo colon cancer screening and encourage those who you care about to do the same. Dr, James Stockwell is a retired Tallahassee gastroenterologist who currently works on staff at Weems Memorial Hospital. He can be reached at 653-8853. This Saturday, March 31 there will be a 10 a.m. educational event at the Holy Family Community Center in Apalachicola. In addition to activities, 150 FIT (fecal immunochemical testing for occult blood) will be distributed free. Kits will be mailed back and, of course, any positive patients will undergo diagnostic testing. JAMES S S T OCKWELL, M M .D. LLETTERS TO THE EDITORTT ime to experience a state parkSpring begins. My calendar has informed me of the ofcial beginning of this refreshing season, although Ive felt it outside for a few weeks now. As a Floridian, I know spring will be short but it will also be time to break out of your everyday routine, release some stress, get out of the ofce and experience nature in Floridas state parks. Take the time this season to experience nature with all ve of your senses seeing Floridas vistas, smelling newly bloomed owers, feeling the sand between your toes, hearing the sounds of children playing and tasting the treats of your picnic basket in a state park. Spring is an optimum season to engross yourself in the natural and cultural resources of Floridas state parks. There are so many opportunities for new experiences and the special places to continue your old family traditions. Sometimes it is a hike in the forest, a walk on the beach, building sand castles with your kids, watching a sunrise or a sunset, grilling lunch under a big oak tree, looking for a bird species to add to your life list or paddling your canoe on a long stretch of river. Its about immersion, surrounding yourself with nature and coming away with a renewed appreciation for Floridas splendor. Sometimes you need a slow, relaxing experience, and sometime you might prefer a fast, exhilarating experience. I encourage you to spend time in Floridas award-winning state parks this season. Savor the atmosphere of spring and enjoy the Sunshine State in the Real Florida. Sincerely,Donald V. ForgioneDirector, Florida Park ServiceCarroll fair and honest to letter of lawThis might be strange coming from a criminal defense attorney but it is important that I speak out on behalf of Cliff Carroll, candidate for sheriff of Franklin County. I have been involved with Deputy Carroll for over 10 years. As someone coming from the other side of the legal world, I can tell you that I can trust him. He is very tough on crime but more than that, he also metes it out with a genuine respect for what is lawful. For example, in over 24 years of making motions to suppress evidence due to illegal searches and seizures I have yet to beat a Cliff Carroll case. He does it by the book! I have had many cases where I argued that a clients Miranda rights were never given or abused. I have never won a case in which Deputy Carroll was involved. Again, he is fair and honest to the letter of the law when it concerns constitutional rights. When he was working on the drug task force I could always count on him to be straight with a client who had confessed. If that client could help law enforcement I was never afraid to have Deputy Carroll interview the client even if I wasnt present. I could always trust Deputy Carrolls word that if my client would cooperate, he or she would receive leniency. In reality, only the state attorneys ofce can give leniency. However Deputy Carroll always stood up and did the right thing by going to bat for a client if and only if that client helped law enforcement. People of Franklin County, you could not go wrong electing this man to serve as your sheriff. His dedication to the letter of the law, respect for people, and  his tenacity at work make him an ideal person to head your sheriffs department.Steven P. GlazerCriminal and Juvenile Defense Attorney CrawfordvilleNot easy to pedal an oyster boatI live in Carrabelle, and travel a lot to Eastpoint. I was out Saturday doing my errands and I noticed a lot of gas stations did not have the gas prices lit up on their signs. I started asking questions as to why not and they told me We dont have any regular gas. If you want anything, you will have to buy hightest gas. They also told me they had no clue as to when they would be getting any at all. I heard someone say that it is because of the tankers are not being allowed here. I really think we need to do something, How are we all going to be able to get to work if we cannot put gas in our cars or trucks? It is kinda hard to pull a boat for oystering on a bike, dont you think? On another note about gas: I noticed a lot more times I have gotten gas from a few of these stations that I have had trouble with water content in the gas. The gas stations will say they dont have a problem, that I am the rst to complain, and they do nothing about it. My van runs great until I get what I call junk gas.Patty Johnson

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LocalThe Times | A5Thursday, March 29, 2012 As a lifelong resident of Franklin County, I have a vested interest in the future and success of this great county. I have 23 years experience with the Franklin County Sheriffs Of ce, including four years as sheriff. There is no greater teacher than hands-on experience. Having the last couple of years to re ect on the past and view life from a civilian perspective has enhanced my vision for the future and the citizens of Franklin County. It would indeed be a great honor and privilege to serve and protect all of Franklin Countys citizens as your next sheriff; as I am more than ready, willing and able to accept this challenge. My leadership and management capabilities in this capacity have been time-tested and proven. If elected your sheriff, I will continue to work diligently and enthusiastically to ensure our streets and communities are safer for all Franklin County residents, as well as the visitors and tourist that frequent our county. If you have any questions or concerns feel free to contact me at 653-6013. MOCK from page A1cost of constructing and maintaining the dam and 18 miles of pipeline. According to an environmental impact study (EIS) performed by AECOM, an Atlanta management consultant rm, the impact of the new reservoir on downstream communities will be negligible. Other experts disagree and say that any additional water taken from the ACF system will have a negative impact on downstream communities. In April 2009, Brig. Gen. Joseph Schroedel, commander of the Corps South Atlantic Division, spoke at a National Research Council conference in Washington, D.C., on the issue of managing the ows of water in the ACF Basin. There is not enough water in the ACF to meet current needs, and I want to repeat that for emphasis. Theres not enough water in the ACF Basin to meet current needs, he said. Dave McClain said ACF Stakeholders, Inc., a diverse group of individuals, corporations and non-profit organizations throughout Alabama, Florida and Georgia that represent interests within the ACF basin, has filed a letter objecting to the Glades project with the regulatory division of the Savannah District U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. On March 20, McClain told the county commission, Its a myth to think you can store water in bad times and use it in good times because you get evaporation and other diversions that reduce the amount of water available. This sets it aside for one select group. Were trying to work basin-wide. In the letter, McClain wrote that the proposed additional out-takes from the Chattahoochee River would put at hazard authorized downstream uses from Atlanta to LaGrange, to Eufaula, Ala., to Columbus, and the oodplain and shery habitat in the Apalachicola River and bay. On March 22, the Corps displayed results of the EIS at the scoping meeting, which drew about 15 county residents. One of about 20 Corps posters displayed at ANERR showed the potential impact on lakes downstream of Glades. According to the EIS, there will be no impact on Lake Seminole, the southernmost body of water addressed. The information provided at that meeting did not deal with the impact on Apalachicola Bay. A PowerPoint presentation, shown at the meeting also did not address impacts on Florida water levels. Tai Ye Su, an engineer employed by AECOM and project leader for the Glades EIS, said her company worked with data provided by Hall County. She urged anyone who might be affected by the reservoir to comment to the Corps. She said public comment would guide her companys future research on the Glades project. To learn more, visit the reservoirs website www. gladesreservoir.com. To comment on the Glades reservoir go to www.gladesreservoir. com/submit-comments or write to Attn: Richard Morgan, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Savannah District, 100 W. Oglethorpe Ave., Savannah, GA 31401-3640. All comments must be submitted by April 17. RESERVOIR from page A1 By DAVID ADLERSTEINTimes City Editor Franklin Countys jobless rate dropped below 8 percent in January, falling by 0.2 percentage points to 7.9 percent. According to preliminary numbers released March 13 by the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity (DEO), 11 people dropped off the countys jobless rolls in January, from 437 down to 426, while the labor force also shrank, from 5,398 to 5,383. The countys labor force remains larger than it was one year ago, when it comprised 5,266 workers, and the jobless rate was higher, at 8.6 percent. Franklin Countys jobless picture tied it with Lafayette and Jackson counties for eighth best in the state. Monroe County had the states lowest rate, at 5.7 percent, followed by Okaloosa and Walton at 6.9, Alachua at 7.3, Leon at 7.4, and Union and, Holmes counties both at 7.7 percent. The unemployment rate in the Gulf Coast Workforce region (Bay, Franklin, and Gulf counties) was 9.9 percent in January, 1.7 percentage points lower than the regions 2011 rate of 11.6 percent and above the current state rate of 9.5 percent. Out of a labor force of 100,225, there were 9,932 unemployed Gulf Coast residents. In January 2012, there were 71,100 nonagricultural jobs in the Panama CityLynn Haven-Panama City Beach metro area (Bay County), up 1,400 jobs over the year. This metro area experienced an annual rate of job gain of 2.0 percent, while the state gained jobs at a rate of 1.0 percent. We are a bit surprised to see our job growth rate double the states rate for the month of January, but well take it any day of the week, said Kim Bodine, executive director for the Gulf Coast Workforce Board. The other January 2012 unemployment rates in the counties that comprise the Gulf Coast Workforce region were Bay County, down 0.2 percentage points to 10.0, and Gulf County, unchanged at 10.0 percent. Leisure and hospitality (+900 jobs); trade, transportation, and utilities (+700 jobs); education and health services (+200 jobs); and nancial activities and other services (+100 jobs each) were major industries gaining jobs over the year in the Panama City-Lynn HavenPanama City Beach metro area. Although we are pleased to see the increased job growth in January, we realize that most of it is in retail trade and food and drinking establishments. We feel that we will be more fully recovered when we see other sectors coming back, especially manufacturing and wholesale trade, said Bodine. The gains were offset by losses in mining, logging, and construction (-400 jobs) and information and professional and business services (-100 jobs each). Manufacturing and government remained unchanged over the year. Nonagricultural employment growth in leisure and hospitality (+9.0 percent); trade, transportation, and utilities (+5.2 percent); other services (+3.4 percent); and nancial activities (+2.9 percent) exceeded state growth. County jobless rate drops below 8 percentBy LOIS SWOBODATimes Staff Writer On March 20, for the second time this year, the county commission changed their policy on travel spending. The move came after Clerk of Courts Marcia Johnson told them the new daily allowance for meals and incidental expenses, which they approved 4-1 on Jan. 18, exceeds the Internal Revenue Service standard of $46, and that the difference is taxable income. She suggested the county adopt the federal standard. In January, commissioners set the in-state per diem rate for county employees at $55 and out-of-state at $75; an increase of 41 percent and 92 percent respectively. Prior to the Jan. 18 resolution, county employees received $39 daily for meals and incidentals, higher than the $36 per diem provided in most Florida counties. Chairman Pinki Jackel said she favored adopting the federal standard, noting that she had gotten, a lot of pushback, over the Jan. 18 increase. Although we did nothing wrong, I wish we had discussed it at a regular meeting, she said. Commissioner Smokey Parrish moved to base the per diem on federal standards and the commission voted unanimously to do so. The change applies only to the allotment for meals and incidental expenses. Lodging costs are reimbursed at 100 percent, based on receipts. Traveling county employees will receive $8 for breakfast, $12 for lunch and $26 for dinner. Under the existing county resolution, the total cost of lodging and transportation are reimbursable with receipts. Reimbursement for mileage oats with the rate approved by the Internal Revenue Service. All travel must be preapproved by the Franklin County Commission. Traveling county employees can request their per diem in advance of travel and are not required to produce receipts for their meals, according to the county nance department. The new rates take affect April 1.Commissioners amend travel spendingWe are a bit surprised to see our job growth rate double the states rate for the month of January, but well take it any day of the week. Kim Bodine Gulf Coast Workforce Board

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PETOFTHEWEEK Franklin County Humane Society NIP FIRE ANTS IN THE BUD!CALLLOIS AT 653-5857Franklin Countys ONLY LOCALPest Control Company Robert C. Bruner Attorney Personal & Business BankruptcyOver 30 Years Legal Experience850-670-3030 bankruptcy relief under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon advertisements. Before you decide, ask us to send you free written information SocietyA6 | The Times Thursday, March 29, 2012 Grif n Browning turns 1Henry Grif n Browning celebrated his rst birthday with family and friends in Tallahassee at Pinezy Park on Thursday, Feb. 9, 2012. He is the son of Bert and Jennifer Browning and the brother of Jessica. His maternal grandparents are Don and Pamela Ashley, of St. James Island. His paternal grandmother is Sharon Browning of Lanark Village. Happy birthday, we all love you Grif n! BIRTHDAYS Adam McCullough bornAdam Lee McCullough was born on Wednesday, Dec. 7, 2011, at Tallahassee Memorial Hospital. He weighed 6 pounds, 15 ounces, and was 19.75 inches long. He is the son of Amber McCullough of Apalachicola. Maternal grandmother is Donna Mathes of Carrabelle. Maternal great-grandparents are Winston and Alberta Bellew of Apalachicola.Happy double-nickels Gail!With love, The Ya-Ya Sisters ENGAGEMENT Deborah Heiter, Douglas Craig engagedThe parents of Deborah Heiter are pleased to announce the engagement and upcoming wedding of their daughter to Douglas K. Craig of Crawfordville. An Oct. 20, 2012, wedding is planned at 3 p.m. at the Wildwood Country Club in Crawfordville and reception to follow. The wedding couple is registered at Bed, Bath and Beyond. Invitations will be sent. Partington awarded Weber State scholarship WEDDING Tiffany Grant, Michael ONeal to wed SaturdayWith joy and happiness, Tiffany Sheree Grant and Michael Jerod ONeal are pleased to announce their upcoming marriage this Saturday, March 31, 2012, at 5 p.m. at Lafayette Park in Apalachicola. A reception will follow at Fort Coombs Armory. The bride is the daughter of Carrie Carroll of Eastpoint. Maternal grandparents are Evelyn Carroll of Eastpoint and the late Clifford Carroll Sr.; and Linda Thompson of Apalachicola, and John Grant of Panama City. The groom is the son of Wayne ONeal Jr. of Apalachicola and Barbara Swiney of Apalachicola. Paternal grandparents are Wayne and Grace ONeal of Apalachicola and the late Richard and Keturah Robinson of Apalachicola All family and friends are invited to attend. Cara Rose Partington has been awarded the 2012-13 Matthew Shepard Memorial Scholarship at Weber State University in Ogden, Utah, for outstanding academic achievement and her activism in the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community. While at Weber, she will be majoring in criminal Justice and minoring in sociology. After graduating, Cara has plans to become a humane law enforcement of cer, working on behalf of animals and their rights. Other scholarships Cara has received are Minnesota State University Moorhead Rainbow Scholarship, Minnesota State University Moorhead Film Scholarship, PFUND Foundation Moxie Award, and the Rex Partington Memorial Scholarship, given by Curt and Beth Blair. Cara is the proud granddaughter of Cleo Holladay of Apalachicola, the late Rex Partington and niece of Dixie Partington and Jerry Hall of Apalachicola. CARA ROSE PARTINGTON DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The TimesThe Bay Area Choral Society offered a wondrous performance of Gabriel Faures Requiem at the Ilse Newell for the Performing Arts concert Sunday at Trinity Episcopal Church. The piece included solos by tenor Bill Crane, soprano Carla May and bass Gordon Adkins. During the rst half of the concert, a series of music be tting the Lenten season, soloists also included sopranos Frances Campbell, Leslie Coon and Virginia Harrison and bass Merel Young. Following the performance, Young, at right, announced he was retiring from his role in conducting the choral society. He also paid tribute to pianist Janis Ramos, at left, who was making her piano debut with the society. A reception catered by Renee Bacot followed. FAREWELL TO THE MAESTRO

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FaithThe Times | A7Thursday, March 29, 2012 The United Methodist Churches of Franklin County Welcome You First United Methodist Church of ApalachicolaWorship Service 11:00 a.m. every Sunday Sunday School 10:00 a.m. 75 5th St. Apalachicola 653-9530 fumcapalach@gtcom.net Pastor: Rev. Themo PatriotisCarrabelle United Methodist ChurchWorship Services 10:45 a.m. Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Celebrate Recovery Mondays 7-9 p.m. 102 NE Ave. B Carrabelle 697-3672 Pastor: Julie StephensEastpoint United Methodist ChurchWorship Service 10:00 a.m. every Sunday Healing service every fourth Monday at 7:00 p.m. 317 Patton Dr. (corner of David St.) 670-8825 Pastor: Rev. Beth WhiteSt. George Island United Methodist Church9:00 a.m. Worship Service 10:00 a.m. Fellowship Hour 201 E. Gulf Beach Dr. 9274635 www.sgiumc.org Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis First Pentecostal Holiness Church379 Brownsville Road Apalachicola Were excited about what Gods doing!!!Sunday School 9:45 am Sunday Morning Worship 10:45 am Sunday Evening Service 6:00 pm Monday, Youth Group 6:30 pm Wednesday, Royal Rangers, G.A.P.7:00 pm Wednesday Worship & Word 7:30 pmNursery Provided during regular church services 7:00 7:00 First Baptist ChurchSt. George Island 501 E. Bayshore Drive 927-2257 R. Michael Waley, Pastor Join us as we praise and worship the living Christ. Great is the Lord and most worthy of praise. Psalm 145:3 Sunday Bible Study................................................10:00am Worship Praise........................................................11:00am Sunday Night............................................................7:00pm Wednesday Power Hour......................................7:00pm Wednesday Youth at S.P.L.A.S.H.......................7:00pm Walking in Christ R. Michael Whaley, Pastor WELCOMES YOUChurch of the Ascension101 NE First Street CarrabelleSUNDAY10:00 AM WELCOMES YOUChurch THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH (850) 274-4490 (850) 545-2578 WELCOMES YOU Trinity Trinity Episcopal Churchest. 1836Welcomes YouHwy. 98 & 6th St. Apalachicola 850-653-9550Sunday Worship Services 8 & 10:30 a.m. Wednesdays Healing Service 11 a.m. Centering Prayer 4 p.m. Quilter loves to tell the storyBy LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star.com Carol Kelley is working on a unique project that brings back happy memories. She calls the quilt Precious Memories. It will be a keepsake designed to t a queen-sized bed. The coverlet will be a pattern of quilting patches and hymns embroidered on white cotton. Im doing things that remind me of my childhood, Kelley said. I used to hear my grandmother singing these when she was kneading her bread and cleaning her house. She always sang. I used to spend my summers at her house. She corrected us with scripture. She had scripture for everything you did. The quilt is Kelleys own design. She said she began mulling the idea months ago and nally set to work. This is the closest I can come to singing, she said. I cant carry a tune in a bucket. I would evacuate the whole church if I sang. But she loves the old hymns she remembers from childhood. Some she has already completed are I Surrender All and In the Garden. Born in Jacksonville, Kelley grew up in Orlando where she met her husband, Ron, and raised her family. He retired in 2003, and the Kelleys moved to Carrabelle. Before moving here, she inherited a keepsake quilt from her husbands grandmother that needed repairs and that launched her into her quilting career. I was more or less a seamstress before then, she said. She bought reproductions of vintage fabric, but was still a little hesitant until she heard about the Wandering Star Quilt Club. She decided to join in late 2006 to learn about quilting and since then has created at least eight quilts and worked on other club projects including the quilt to be rafed off at the Wandering Star quilt show this Saturday, March 31. Kelley said she embroiders when she is riding in the car or waiting at the doctors ofce or elsewhere. It takes her about a week to complete a hymn. She expects Precious Memories to take two-and-a-half to three years to complete but she loves her work. I thoroughly enjoy its very relaxing, she said. Come join me. Pearson benet SaturdayCovenant Word will hold a benet for John and Christina Pearson from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday at the Lighthouse on St. George Island. The menu will consist of fresh, hot fried mullet and/or fresh fried Gulf shrimp sandwiches and dinners, served with a side of baked beans and potato salad. There will also be bottled water ,  soda and boiled peanuts for sale.Island Baptist presents dramaFirst Baptist Church St. George Island will present a drama presentation by the Eagles Landing First Baptist Interpretative Team at 7 p.m. Monday, April 2, at the East End Firehouse on Pine Street on St. George Island.Covenant Word to pray for businessesCovenant Word has Noon Day Prayer  from 12:15-1:15 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays. All are w elcome. On April 3, there  will be a Special Day of Prayer  for Franklin County businesses. If you  are a business owner and would like to  come out, please feel  free. Send the name of your business or businesses to be  prayed over to cwcci@fairpoint.net or call Covenant Word at 653-8535. Expect God to do the  impossible concerning you business.Island church hosts Good Friday simulcastThe First Baptist Church of St. George Island will present a simulcast of The Secret Church, presented by Pastor David Platt of The Church at Brook Hills in Birmingham, Ala. at 7 p.m. Good Friday, April 6. For more information, call 927-2257.April 7 Easter egg huntThe Franklin County Sheriffs Ofce will host the annual Easter Egg Hunt on Saturday, April 7, at noon on the eld adjacent to the Sheriffs Ofce on U.S. Highway 65. All children are invited to come out and participate in a wonderful day of egg hunting, with lots of prizes to be given away. The sheriffs ofce will be grilling hot dogs for the occasion free of charge. Come out and enjoy the fun. Faith bBRiefsIEFSPam and I are very appreciative for the readers of the Youth Matters column that have extended kind words and complements. Each week our goal is to give encouraging words and occasional advice to the frazzled parent who wonders why this parenting thing does not come with a foolproof manual. Sometimes it seems that just when you think you have it all gured out, the rules change. About the time you think you have your children gured out, they change. We have experienced many of the trials associated with parenting, in youth ministry and with our children. As empty nesters, we wanted to share some of the experiences and the knowledge we gained along the way. We certainly do not know everything about children and teens, but we know the things that have worked for us. There are many tricks of the trade we wish we would have known when we were raising our children. We have dedicated our lives to mentoring teens and loving the notso-easy-to-love children through difcult times in their life. Recently, I was in the middle of preaching a sermon when a young lady who once attended our youth group came in with her 1-year-old baby and sat down. After service, she walked up to me, with a huge smile on her face, to show me her baby. I stopped what I was doing, held the little girl, and told her how pretty she was. That baby was her prize possession and it was important to the mom for me to meet and bless her. I was overwhelmed with humility and pride to know that I played such a signicant role in her life. There are many children in this county who could use a good mentor. They need someone who is willing to spend a little time getting past the tough exterior that covers the pain inside. Children who have lost a parent to death, imprisonment, drugs or divorce need a positive role model willing to take time with them. Sometimes young people just need to talk to someone they trust. One time, I had a parent show up at my house with her 9-year-old son. She had just picked him up from the jail after being arrested for criminal mischief and she wanted me to try to talk some sense into him. He was angry and rebellious and I knew it would lead to worst things for him and this community if his situation did not change. I took him shing a few times and sometimes I would pick him up just to hang out with me throughout my daily tasks. When he was about 16, he had to go away for a year to a boys home, but as soon as he got out, I received a call from him saying he would be in youth service that night. He turned 18 not long ago and he is doing well at staying out of trouble. As a mentor, there is no limit on the amount of time it will take to change a life. Those who have raised their children have much to offer to the children of this community to see that they grow up to be responsible adults. It is a terrible feeling to read about a youth in the police report or even worse, the obituary, and feel as if you could have done more. The Bible mandates: (Titus 2:3-4) Likewise, teach the older woman to be reverent in the way they live, not to be slanderers or addicted to much wine, but to teach what is good. Then they can train the younger woman to love their husbands and children, to be self-controlled and pure. (2:6), similarly, encourage the young men to be self-controlled. In everything, set an example by doing what is good. In your teaching show integrity, seriousness and soundness of speech that cannot be condemned, so that those who oppose you may be ashamed because they have nothing bad to say about us. We have a responsibility to get involved in this ongoing process. As a mentor, you can help create a memory of a shing trip for a young man or a day of pampering for a young woman. Ice cream is one of the best icebreakers and conversation starters for youth. Young people love to hear stories told with enthusiasm and enjoy adults talking to them as if they matter. Take time to mentor a child in need of guidance; it may inspire them forever. We welcome all suggestions and hope you enjoy this weekly column. Please send all emails to Scott Shiver at frontline247@mac.com.Children pay interest when you lend a handSpring Fling, quilt show on tap SaturdaySpring has sprung, and while you are working in your yard, dont forget to throw a couple of mothballs in your owers beds and under the bushes to keep the snakes out. Happy Spring Cleaning. What a turnout: the Clean-Up day was a big success. Even Cliff Carroll was on hand to help. Some of the pickup trucks picked up the larger items, and the others gathered the bags of trash. About 12:30 p.m., the volunteers came into Chillas Hall for the Reuben sandwich lunch. Pat Bott and her helpers did a good job. Thanks girls! Thanks to all who enjoyed the lunch. Everyone welcome. This Saturday, March 31, members of the Lanark Village Boat Club will hold their annual Spring Fling at the club. There will be arts, crafts, Easter items and more. Lunch will be available. Come on over and look around you might come across something you cant live without. Doors will be open from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Also this Saturday, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Chillas Hall, members of the Lanark Wandering Star Quilt Club will have the 20th annual quilt show. Chances on a beautiful quilt are $1 each, or six for $5. Lunch will be outside the hall. The show is open to everyone. Tee time is 1 p.m. this Saturday at our golf course here in the village. Also, there will be the Shoot-Out. Come over and join, or watch rst. The schedule for Holly Week at Sacred Heart of Jesus Catholic Church is as follows: Holy Thursday, April: 4 p.m.; Good Friday, April 6, 4 p.m.; No Mass on Saturday, April 7; and Easter Sunday, April 8, Mass at 11:30 a.m. Have a Blessed Holy Week and Easter. Be kind to one another, check-in on the sick and housebound, and Smile, Jesus Loves You. Until next time, God bless America, our troops, the poor, homeless and hungry. LaANaARK NewsEWSJim Welsh YOUTH MaA TTeERsSScott and Pamela Shiver ObituaryTereza Ann Carter, 44, Carrabelle, passed away Wednesday, March 21, 2012, in Carrabelle. Terri had fought a brave ght for three years against melanoma cancer. Born March 18, 1968, in Bradenton, Terri was the daughter of Matilda (Tillie) Williamson and the late Joe Williamson and sister to the late Jodi Williamson. She is survived by her mother, Tillie; son Joseph (Joe) and daughter-in-law Cecillia Carter; her daughter Kayla Carter and their father Jestin Carter; her best friend Donn Clough; and her family at The Moorings. Terri was always baking up special goodies for all the people in her life. She was a longtime front desk clerk at The Moorings at Carrabelle. She was an active member with the Lions Club in Carrabelle. Rest in Peace our dear friend, you will be truly missed! No services are scheduled at this time. In lieu of owers, donations can be made to Tonyas Hope. Online condolences may be made at www.abbeyfh. com.TT ereza Ann Carter CaAROlL Kelley KELLEY LO O IS SWO O BO O DA | The TimesA square from the quilt Kelley is creating.

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E-mail outdoors news to timesoutdoors @star .com OUTDOORSwww.apalachtimes.comSection Section A EVERYTHING FOR YOUROUTDOOR ADVENTURECorner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL(next to Piggly Wiggly)www.BWOsh.com 5 th Annual EV E EV E EV RYTHING FOR E RYTHING FOR E Y OUR Y OUR Y O UTDOOR ADV E UTDOOR ADV E UTDOOR ADV NTUR E NTUR E E Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL 5 5 A A n A n A Our BIGGEST SALEof the Year!HUGE SAVINGS ON THOUSANDS OF ITEMSMARCH 30 & 31 FRIDAY 7AM6PMET&SATURDAY 7AM 5PMET WEEKLY ALMANAC APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE TIDE TABLES MONTHLY AVERAGESTo nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from these given for APALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW Cat Point Minus 0:40 Minus 1:17 East Pass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27 To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from those given for CARRABELLE: HIGH LOW Bald Point Minus 9:16 Minus 0:03 Sponsor the WEEKLY ALMANACCall Today!653-8868Date HighLow% Precip Thu, Mar 2980 6510% Fri, Mar 3079 6930% Sat, Mar 3178 6750% Sun, Apr 179 6710% Mon, Apr 280 6710% Tues, Apr 382 6410% Wed, Apr 481 6410% Freshwater InshoreThe feeding frenzy continues in the St. Joe Bay this week as the sheepshead shing is red hot. Try shing around the channel buoys with live shrimp for good sheepshead and black bass action. Spanish Mackerel are still schooling up around the tip of the cape and are easily caught on mackerel trees and got-cha plugs. A few cobia have been caught this week out of Mexico beach. A solid 40 pound sh and several smaller ones were spotted on the beach and at Hurricane cut. Our area is coming alive with good shing this month. Lake Wimico and the brothers are reporting good bass catches this week. Some anglers are using shiners, but most are using spinner baits and plastic worms. depot creek is heating up as well this week with good reports of painted bream and cat sh. SPONSORED BY Buds N Bugs: Cherokee roseBy Lois Swoboda653-1819 | @ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star .com Cherokee rose ( Rosa laevigata) is a white rose native to southern China, Taiwan, Laos and Vietnam. This fragrant, evergreen climbing rose produces long, thorny, vine-like canes that will form a 12-foot mound. This rose is often seen sprawling across adjacent shrubs and other supports it employs to climb to even greater heights. The pure white single owers are up to 4 inches in diameter. In our area, they can appear any time from December through July. They form garlands of blossoms in the trees. The fruit of the Cherokee rose is called a hip and is large and thorny. The ower stem is also very bristly. Cherokee rose has attractive evergreen compound leaves composed of three leaflets with the center lea et larger than its partners. The glossy light green lea ets are oval-shaped with a pointed tip. The Cherokee roses fast growth rate and long stems armed with large hooked thorns make it an effective screening and barrier plant. The species was introduced to the United States in about 1780, where it soon became naturalized and where it gained its English name. This plant is now considered to be an invasive species throughout much of the Deep South. The Cherokee rose was adopted by the Georgia General Assembly as the state ower of Georgia at the request of the Federation of Womens Clubs on Aug. 18, 1916. The proclamation incorrectly states that the Cherokee rose is a native plant. The white ower is commonly associated with the Trail of Tears, the forced relocation of Indians in the southeastern United States. According to legend, when the journey began in 1838, women and children were paralyzed by grief. The elders prayed for a sign that would lift the mothers spirits to give them strength. The next day, a beautiful rose began to grow where tears had fallen to earth. The rose is white for the tears; and the gold center represents the gold taken from Cherokee lands. The seven leaves on each stem are said to represent the seven Cherokee clans. In Victorian language of owers, white roses symbolize lost love.Special to The TimesAt the River Delta Bass Club of Apalachicolas February tournament, held Feb. 25 in White City, Lloyd Alford, right, nished in rst place with 13.37 pounds. Mike Pridgen, left, nished second with 13.19 pounds. Finishing third with 11.85 pounds was Gerald Dykes. Dewitt Galloway nished fourth with 10.79 pounds. Fifth place went to Greg Dykes with 10.36 pounds, followed by sixth place, Brandon King, 9.49 pounds; seventh place James Newsome, 9.20 pounds; eight place Paul Newsome, 8.80 pounds; ninth place Alvin Martina, 8.43 pounds; 10th place Pap Duncan, 5.42 pounds; 11th place Sherman Alford, 4.99 pounds; and 12th place Mark Yowell, with 3.00 pounds. The club is supported by Apalachicola Ace Hardware and Fishermans Choice Bait and Tackle of Eastpoint, For info about River Delta Bass Club, call Mike Pridgen at 653-5563.Capt. Nathan Donahoe is seen on March 17 with his rst pompano of 2012. The sh was caught on a Nylure Pompano Jig tipped with a sand ea. Its on! Donahoe said. Pompano are considered among the most avorful of all Gulf sh.PHOTO COURTESY OF ROBINSON BROTHERS GUIDE SERVICESpecial to The TimesGrab your shing rods and tackle box. April 7 is the rst of four licensefree shing days scheduled for this summer in Florida. Fishing is a great way to enjoy Floridas beautiful outdoors, great weather and a wonderful day with family and friends, Gov. Rick Scott said recently. License-free shing days are the perfect opportunity to discover the fun and excitement of shing and Floridas great outdoors. The days are perfect chances for parents who dont yet have a license to take youth shing, or for avid anglers to introduce a friend to the recreational pursuit without having to purchase a license. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission spread out the opportunities this year so more people will be able to head for their favorite lakes and rivers or saltwater destinations on designated days. Instead of providing one weekend for freshwater shing and one weekend for saltwater shing, commissioners decided at their February meeting to break up the days. You wont need a recreational shing license on the special days listed below. Florida residents and nonresidents, mark these Saturdays on your calendar for 2012: April 7: Freshwater June 2: Saltwater June 9: Freshwater Sept. 1: SaltwaterSpecial to the TimesFishermen targeting gag grouper in state waters off the coast of Franklin, Wakulla, Jefferson and Taylor counties will be able to take some of their catch home for dinner starting this Sunday, April 1. This regional season will end June 30 and is for 2012 only. The season also includes all waters of Apalachicola Bay and Indian Pass, including those in Gulf County, and all waters of the Steinhatchee River, including those in Dixie County. Gag grouper caught in state waters (from shore to nine miles out) off these four counties may not be taken ashore in areas that are closed to harvest. For example, a gag grouper caught April 1 in state waters off Jefferson County cannot be taken ashore in Dixie County, excluding the Steinhatchee River. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission established this regional season at its February meeting to provide shing opportunities for private recreational anglers when gag grouper are closer to shore and can be safely accessed by smaller boats. Overall shing effort for gag grouper is low in these counties, because it is the least densely populated region of Floridas Gulf Coast. Providing this spring season will balance the economic and social needs of this region with the conservation needs of gag grouper. In Gulf of Mexico federal waters (beyond nine miles) and in the remainder of Gulf of Mexico state waters, shermen will be able to keep gag grouper from July 1 through Oct. 31. State waters off Franklin, Wakulla, Jefferson and Taylor counties will not open during the July-through-October season. Gag grouper may be taken ashore in Franklin, Wakulla, Jefferson and Taylor counties during the Julythrough-October season, but boats with gag grouper aboard may not stop and must have gear stowed while traveling through state waters in that region. Monroe County state waters follow Atlantic rules for gag grouper and are not included in the July-through-October season. The FWC is working with Floridas anglers to rebuild gag grouper populations in the Gulf of Mexico back to strong, sustainable levels. The gag grouper recreational harvest minimum size and bag limits did not change and remain at 22 inches and two gag grouper per person. No more than four of any species of grouper may be kept. To learn more about these management changes, visit MyFWC.com/ Fishing and click on Saltwater, Latest News-Hot Topics for frequently asked questions and answers about the changes. License-free shing days to start April 7 Franklin waters to open longer for gag grouper LOIS SWOBODA | The Times IN PURSUIT OF POMPANOAlford tops February bass tournamentMIKE PRIDGEN LLOYD ALFORD Page 8 Thursday, March 29, 2012

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These Baby Girls, sponsored by the Hut and Island Maintenance, are, from left, Aunamaria Arroyo, Marisa Grace Branch and Krystia Marie Branch.DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Timescrying over an error in the eld, and secondly, that the team was, in fact, going to win the game. Keep your head up, shake it off, let it go, barked Sasnett, smiling. Dont be up there just looking. Hit em. We got to hit the pitcher. The Twisters came through in the clutch, surprising the Carrabelle Christian Center Jay Hawks with four runs in the bottom of the nal inning. So, that was Opening Day on Saturday afternoon for those two teams. For the Baby Girls, in the 7-8 year-old Darlings division, it was on your toes tension and then pandemonium on the diamond, as the girls kept their coaches Terri Shiver, Tammy Chambers, and Angela and Tommy Arroyo in heart-gripping suspense before they held on and got the outs needed for the win against a scrappy group of Fire Balls. At the T-ball, it was much the same thing, although more relaxed and less competitive. I want him to do his best, said Michelle Aikens, whose son Zachary is in his rst year, playing T-ball with the 5-6 year old boys and girls. Hes excited. He thinks every day is supposed to be T-ball, she said, gazing on her son standing with a collection of other children, waiting on a ground ball, rarely ever a y ball, hit their way from a child off a tee. If a ball did come their way, they would all chase it at once, and frequently bump one another in an attempt to be the rst one there. Hes a little irty, noticed his mother. Its really great to get your child into something when theyre younger, instead of waiting until theyre older and they have their mind on other things then. For rst-year assistant coach Karen Harris, whose son Micah is a Tomahawk, too, it was marvel at even the mistakes. Some of these kids have never played baseball before, she said. Im enjoying it so far. Theyre doing doo; Im proud of them. Bob Eddy has signed on to another year as league president, with his eye on keeping in step the three local leagues. Sasnett is the go-to guy for the Apalachicola teams; with Connie Hunnings batting clean-up as local president in Carrabelle, and Lanny Rester the lead-off man in Eastpoint. Eddy said he likes the way the league is going, with 27 teams and dozens of committed volunteers, making sure every child gets a chance to give their best as part of something larger than themselves. Were supposed to be teaching good sportsmanship, how to work together as a team and how to handle adversity in a positive way, to learn from it and grow from it, he said. You cant just throw a t because something didnt go your way, Eddy said. You have to learn What do I need to work on? What do I need to do to improve as a person and player? Good sportsmanship teaches how to handle adversity in a positive way and learn and grow from it. Whats the button to get the best out of that player? he asked. And thats one of the hardest things. You got to let them know whats expected and, in some way, shape or form, you have to let them know whats accepted, Eddy said. To be successful all the time you have to do X, Y and Z. If you want to get lazy you wont be as successful, as often. Fans of the league can visit a new website created to feature schedules, scores and standings. Visit www.allprosoftware.net/ franklincountydixieyouth/. Eddy was delighted at how well the elds looked Saturday. The county did a good job county to prep the elds, he said. That was way, way huge. He goes further than just attention to the fundamentals of the games; he wants everyone to know that theres a larger mission at hand. Theres no way a parent or a player should leave that ballpark mad at each other, he said. I tell everybody, take a breath, step back. Theyre not high school players, they learn different they act different. Everyone gets their skills at different times. Everybodys got an opinion, Eddy said, then grins. But somebody has to be the idiot head coach. Even the umpires see their role as trying to be a positive part of the game. I talk to them, said young Fonda Davis, a newly registered umpire with Dixie Softball Inc. I tell them good job, keep it up. Davis said he plans to ump three games a week, and the upcoming state softball tournament, and promises to keep calling em as he sees em. I keep it neutral, Davis said.CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA SP O RTS www.apalachtimes.comThursday, March 29, 2012 APage 9Section These Baby Girls, sponsored by the Hut and Island Maintenance, are, from left, Aunamaria Arroyo, Marisa Grace Branch and Krystia Marie Branch. DAVID ADLERSTEIN and how to handle adversity how to handle adversity in a positive way and learn and grow from it. Whats the button to get at hand. BASEBALL from page A1By DAVID ADLERSTEIN653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com The Franklin County Lady Seahawks have dropped their last four games, as they have struggled to score runs. The week opened with the dropping both ends of a March 20 doubleheader to Clay High. In the rst Morgan Mock smacked two hits, but Franklin County dropped a 12-2 contest Mock got a hit in each of her two at bats, in the rst and fth innings. The Lady Seahawks pushed across one run in the bottom of the third, when a Chena Segree single, one of two hits on the night, brought Mock home. Another Franklin County run crossed the plate in the bottom half of the fth, when Mock singled and then scored on an error. Gracyn Kirvin, Krista Martina and Morgan Newell each had a hit, with Martina and Newell each pitching. In the nightcap, Franklin County was outmuscled by Clay 16-5, as Newell went 2-3 at the plate. Two Franklin County runs were scored thanks to Newells timely hitting, as she singled in the fourth inning and doubled in the fth inning. Chena Segree was solid in the circle for Franklin County. She allowed seven earned runs over ve innings. Segree gave up 13 hits while walking seven and striking out none. Clay High pounded Franklin County pitching, as nine hitters combined for 17 hits, 11 RBIs and 21 runs scored. Two runs in the bottom of the fourth helped Franklin County close its de cit to 16-2. An RBI single by Scout Segree triggered Franklin Countys two-run inning. The Lady Seahawks pushing across three runs in the bottom of the fth, Franklin County faced just a 16-5 de cit. A two-run double by Newell and an RBI single by Vanessa Simmons set off a Franklin County rally. On March 22 at Wakulla, Franklin County managed just four hits, but it wasnt enough, as they ended up on the bad end of an 11-0 shutout. Kirvin reached base two times in the game, singling in the rst inning and later taking a base-on-balls. Chena Segree gave Wakulla ts in the circle. Wakulla managed just four hits off of Segree, who allowed four earned runs, walked four and struck out none during her 3 2/3 innings of work. Wakulla scored seven runs in the rst inning to build an early lead. Franklin County couldnt get anything going so long as Michael Cooper toed the rubber. Franklin County managed just one hit off of the Wakullas pitcher, who allowed no earned runs, walked none and struck out four during her two innings of work. On Friday at home, the Lady Seahawks dropped a 5-0 game in seven innings to Port St. Joe. Mock did all she could to give Franklin County a boost, getting on base three times, singling in the rst and third innings. Kirvin went 2-for-3, with Scout Segree also managing a hit. PSJs Makayla Ramsey kept Franklin County off the scoreboard for all seven innings she toed the rubber. She pitched a shutout, allowing no opposing players to cross the plate on ve hits while ringing up three. Lady Seahawks struggle to break skid DAVID ADLERSTEIN | the TimesCoach Lisa Sweatt has a talk with Morgan Newell.The St. Joseph Bay Golf Clubs Ladies Golf Associations 2012 Championship Tournament would surely have been on the air had the Golf Channel known it was being played. After two days of challenging play, Penelope Evanoff, of Eastpoint, won the 2012 St. Joseph Bay Club Championship. Ethel Bardsley, of Eastpoint is the 2012 Putting Champion and Barbara McQuinn is the 2012 Net Champion. Winner of the B Flight Gross was Patricia Hardman of Cape San Blas. Closest to the pin on the rst day was Pat Gearhart from Pennsylvania and second day was Geri McCarthy from Mexico Beach. Longest drive the rst day was Susan Galloway of Apalachicola and second day was Bardsley. An awards luncheon was held Friday at the Club. The snow birds thought they were playing in a summer sizzler while the locals thought it started out a little on the cool side, but the weather could not have been nicer during the two days play. LGA members at the St. Joseph Bay Golf Club are from as far away as Canada and Maine and join the local LGA for the winter play. The Ladies Golf Association invites lady golfers in the area to come out and join us in a game. We play on Thursday mornings as a group. Call the St Joseph Bay Golf Club at 227-1751 for more information about becoming a member. Pictured from left are Ethel Bardsley, Penelope Evanoff, and Barbara McQuinn.St. Joe Bay ladies conquer the greens DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The TimesPitcher Christopher Newell hurls for the Twisters, sponsored by Cook Insurance.

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By LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com On Saturday, March 10, hundreds of state park volunteers and employees gathered in Apalachicola to celebrate volunteerism. Organizers said 327 volunteers registered at the entry and about 100 support staff were on hand to feed and entertain the throng. Ranger Mike Kinnet said the turn out was a little less than expected, but he was very pleased with the days events and barring an occasional gusty wind, the celebration came off without a hitch. Orman House State Historic site opened its doors to the visitors and tents were pitched in Chapman Botanical Gardens to accommodate cooks, diners and entertainment. Michael Vickey of Pennsylvania, who volunteers for the month of December each year at Stephen Foster State Park, entertained the crowd performing on both hammered dulcimer and mountain dulcimer. Last year, he took rst place for hammered dulcimer at the USA Mid-East Region. Zach Thompson brought his uncles oyster boat to the party for show and tell. He and Alan Shiver served up Apalachicolas nest all afternoon and spun a few yarns along the way. There was a hospitality tent with snacks and beverages courtesy of the Friends of Wakulla Springs State Parks and Friends of Pensacola State Parks. Activities open to the honorees included exhibits from the Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve, Florida State University Marine Lab and St. Vincents National Wildlife Refuge. Alan Knothe of Audubon brought along a device of his own invention to teach identi cation of shorebird eggs and chicks. He talked to visitors about the plight of shorebirds faced with habitat loss. Mike Murphy, a regular volunteer at Wakulla Springs, demonstrated the blacksmiths trade. Allen Ritchie, a Wakulla Springs ranger brought along the U.S. Wisconsin, a model World War II warship he rescued and restored. District 1 Director Danny Jones, Donald Forgione director of Friends of Florida State Parks and Maryjo Morris also a member of the friends acted as presenters during the awards ceremony. Cathy Colvin won Adult Volunteer of the Year for her work at Dr. Julian Bruce Park. John and Judy Rutz, long time volunteers at the Orman House were honored for over 7,000 hours of service. Ernie Alessandrone, who also volunteers at Orman House, was honored for more than 6,000 hours of volunteer service. Alessandrone was not present at the ceremony. Jones thanked all volunteers and told the audience 3,622 volunteers in district 1, which stretches from Pensacola to Tallahassee and south to Perry, had worked 222,929 hours during 2011. In an interview after the ceremony he said that, especially in view of the current economy, Floridas parks could not operate without volunteers. He said volunteers do 50 percent of the work at many smaller parks, including Orman House. Jones also said that economic hard times have not kept folks away from state parks. The day ended with a low country boil courtesy of Friends of McClay Gardens. dbutler@coastalcoverage.com Locally owned and operated Home Business Auto Health Workers Comp Call Ernie 850-545-93926512631 MUSHROOM COMPOSTAVAILABLE NOW! On behalf of my staff and I, we would like to thank all our loyal patients for the honor of being selected for the multiple awards that we have received over the last 12 months; including voted most compassionate Dr. and Patients Choice Award. It is a great honor and we will continue to strive for the very best medical care for our patients.VINCENTIVERS, M.D.301TwentiethStreet Port St. Joe, FL 32456850-227-7070www.iversmd.com On behalf of my staff and I, we would like to thank all our loyal patients for the honor of On behalf of my staff and I, we would like to We Offer the Freshest Produce, See You There! HIGHWAY 98 EASTPOINT(BY THE BRIDGE) TOORDER CALL MARGARET: (850) 323 1937 HIG H WAY 98 EASTPOINT HIG H WAY 98 EASTPOINT WAY 98 EASTPOINT The Fruit Stand FLORIST NOW ONSITE LIVE PLANTS FOR GARDENS & BEDS PLANTS FOR GARDENS & LARGE SELECTION OF FLOWERING BASKETS & FERNS We Offer the Freshest Produce, We Offer the Freshest Produce, LocalA10 | The Times Thursday, March 29, 2012 Park volunteers pack botanical gardensPhotos by LOIS SWOBODA | The TimesAbove left, Cathy Colvin displays her award with St. George Island Park Director Josh Hodson. At right, Hard tack, chewing tobacco, a collection of coins and scrip and a bandanna were part of an exhibit on turpentine, Scraping the Coniferous Wounds presented by Bonnie Allen, assistant park manager at Wakulla Springs and her brother Cliff. Alan Shiver and Zach Thompson of Eastpoint shucked oysters and shared stories of the oystermans way of life. Lee Edmiston and Roy Ogles prepared low country boil for 500, including 200 pounds of shrimp donated by 13 Mile Seafood. LOU AND BETSY KELLENBERGER | Special to the Times

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LocalThe Times | A11Thursday, March 29, 2012 GET YOUR AD IN 653-8868Trades & Services Laban Bontrager, DMD Monica Bontrager, DMD 12761 Pea Ridge Road Bristol, Florida 32321TELEPHONE (850) 643-5417 Bristol Dental ClinicDENTURE LAB ON PREMISESSame Day Service on Repairs and Relines Don Lively General Contractors LICENSED ANDINSURED 20 YEARSEXPERIENCE P.O. Box 439 Carrabelle, FL 32322 697-2783 or Mobile 566-2603RC0066499RG0065255 Carrabelle Visa, Discover, and American Express Honored at Participating Ace Stores JACKSONS Building Supplies & Auto Repair Carrabelle 697-3333 We Deliver AnywhereHardware and Paint Center Electrical & Finish Carpentry850-229-6751850-227-5666Michael & Anthony TonyPoloronis&Sons,Inc. NO JOB TOO BIGPLEASE CALL JOE @ 850-670-5478joes_lawn@yahoo.comJOES LAWN CARE PILE DRIVING FOUNDATION/PILING REPAIR DOCK/MARINE WORK MOORING BOUYSOFFICE: 850.227.1709FAX: 850.762.2552 CELL: 850.527.5725 HOWARD227FAIRPOINT.NET ROBERTS APPLIANCE REPAIR ALL MAJOR BRANDS 18 Shadow Lane Apalachicola, FL 32320 Phone: (850) 653-8122 Cell: (850) 653-7654 Trades & Services J.J.s Tree Service, LLC Stump Grinder Licensed & Insured Call John : (850) 899-8432 Smart LensesSMCan produce clear vision without glasses, at all distances "Freedom from Eye Glasses, Now a reality for many." NO HIDDEN CHARGES: It is our policy that the patient and any other person responsible for payments has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed by payment or any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment. www.mulliseye.com"WE WELCOME NEW PATIENTS, CALLTODAY FOR YOUR PRIORITY APPOINTMENT" FOR NEW PATIENTS 59 AND OLDERThis certificate is good for a complete Medical Eye Exam withTodd Robinson, M.D.Board Certified Eye Physician and Surgeon.The exam includes a prescription for eye glasses and tests for Glaucoma, Cataracts and other eye diseases.FOR YOUR APPOINTMENT CALL: 850-763-6666 ELIGIBILITY: U.S. Citizens living in the Florida Panhandle, 59 years and older, not presently under our care. Coupon Expires: 3-31-12 FREEEYE EXAMCODE: AP00Darren Payne, M.D.Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract SurgeonLee Mullis, M.D.Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract SurgeonTodd Robinson, M.D.Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon Special to the TimesThe American Legion Post 82, on Oak Street in Lanark Village, is proud to host the sixth annual Tonyas Hope Day Saturday, April 7. Tonyas Hope was founded by the members of the post after Tonya Bridges of Lanark passed away from cancer. It is the mission of Tonyas Hope to relieve some of the financial stress of everyday expenses, such as gasoline, groceries, utilities, rent, etc. while being treated for cancer. To qualify, you must currently be undergoing treatment for cancer with radiation, chemo or surgery, and a resident of Franklin County. To receive an application, call 850-625-0382. Tonyas Hope Day fundraiser will be at the Lanark Village Post starting at 9 a.m., with a huge yard sale, a short memorial and praise service at noon and Thomas Lee Brannans famous pig roast.$10 donation. Immediately following, Deb Jordon will entertain everyone through the afternoon and at 3 p.m.there will be an auction. A raffle will take place at 6 p.m., with a first prize being $500, second prize is a 32-inch flat screen TV, third prize is a $100 Wal-Mart card and fourth prize a $50 gas card. Evelyn McAnally will finish off the evening with inside entertainment. Yard sale donations may be dropped off at the post any time after 4 p.m. April 1, and you may purchase raffle tickets while you are there. Please come out and support this worthwhile cause. We helped 21 people in 2011, and with the price of groceries and gas going up, the need is greater than ever.Legion plans Tonyas Hope Day for April 7 By LOIS SWOBODA653-1819 | @ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com On March 12, the Franklin County School hosted a job fair, with students from grades 5 through 7 given a glimpse of life outside the classroom. About two dozen booths were set up in the new multipurpose room at the Franklin County School. Some had information about continuing education. Florida State University, Florida A&M University, Keyser University and Gulf Coast State College were all present. Once again, Lively Technical Center had a table with information about dozens of technical training programs offered in Tallahassee. The Florida Department of Education offered advice and information on nancing technical school or college education and on teaching careers. Lisa Bailey, representing the Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve, distributed information and answered questions on careers in conservation and the sciences. Professions pro led ranged from educator to researcher to law enforcement and park ranger. She said the Friends of the Reserve offers a $500 scholarship to students graduating from public school in Franklin County in 2012. Preference will be given to students who plan to pursuer a career in the sciences and with a parent or guardian whose income is derived from the Apalachicola River or bay. For more information, call 670-7700. Recruiters from the Army, Navy and Marines brought information on careers in the military. Many county agencies including, the property appraiser, health department, sheriffs department and department of juvenile justice sent representatives to size up future employees. Juvenile justice and Refuge House also took the opportunity to educate youngsters on dangers of tobacco, drugs, alcohol and premarital sex. Also at the boot for juvenile justice was Carol Bar eld, director of the TIGERS program sponsored by the Franklin County Library. Bar eld brought with her author Felicia Thomas of Tallahassee, who had copies of her rst novel Proof Lives. The book concerns decisions young people face in todays world and the consequences of bad choices. Bar eld said TIGERS has purchased seven copies of the short novel for their students. She said Thomas will conduct writing workshops in Apalachicola with the TIGERS this summer. The Apalachicola Police Department talked to students about careers in local law enforcement. Beth Moseley manned a table for Centennial Bank where she took contact information and distributed information on banking. She said Centennial offers a VIP Checking Account to students 18 and older with no minimum balance, no monthly service charge and many more special features. She also brought along several pamphlets about financing higher education. Perhaps the most noticed booth in the gym was that of FairPoint Communications. The communications giant brought along a T-shirt canon that fired with ear-jarring regularity, and a wheel of career skills that students spun for prizes and free gifts.Students explore life after school LOIS SWOBODA | The TimesMaddie Newell spins the wheel of career fortune to win a T-shirt at Verizons recruitment booth at the job fair. Manning the booth, from left, are Brendan Martina, Alan Millender and Gary Skiller. Left Steve Dalton gives serious thought to a career in the sciences at the booth for the Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve.

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A12| The Times Thursday, March 29, 2012 CLASSIFIEDS AIRLINES ARE HIRING -Train for hands on Aviation Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified -Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-206-9405 High School Diploma from Home 6-8 weeks. Nationally accredited. Get a diploma! Get a job! Call for free brochure.1-800-264-8330. www.diploma fromhome.com ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home Medical, Business, Criminal Justice Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 866-467-0054 www.CenturaOnline.com tCall 747-5020 to place an ad in the EmeraldCoast Marketplace Find the right person for your job today at emeraldcoastjobs.com 77274T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 19-2011-CA-000442 DEUTSCHE BANK TRUST COMPANY AMERICAS AS TRUSTEE RALI 2005QS9, Plaintiff, vs. CHESTER R. KRAWCZUK, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION TO: CHESTER R. KRAWCZUK Last Known Address: 210 NE 1ST STREET CARRABELLE, FL 32322-2174 Current Address: Unknown ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS Last Known Address: Unknown Current Address: Unknown YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in Franklin County, Florida: LOT 5, BLOCK B, RANGE 4, PICKETTS ADDITION TO THE CITY OF CARRABELLE, AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 20, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA AND ALSO LOT 6, BLOCK 74 (B4), PICKETTS ADDITION TO THE CITY OF CARABELLE, AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 20, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 210 FIRST STREET, CARABELLE, FL 32322-1659 has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses within 30 days after the first publication, if any, on Albertelli Law, Plaintiffs attorney, whose address is P.O. Box 23028, Tampa, FL 33623, and file the original with this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney, or immediately thereafter; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint or petition. This notice shall be published once a week for two consecutive weeks in the Apalachicola Times. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this court on this 7th day of March, 2012. MARCIA M. JOHNSON Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Terry Creamer Deputy Clerk Attorney for Plaintiff: ALBERTELLI LAW P.O. Box 23028 Tampa, FL 33623 **See the Americans with Disabilities Act: In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons needing special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the Clerk of the Courts, Marcia M. Johnson, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, FL 32320; telephone number (850) 653-8861, not later than seven (7) days prior to this proceeding. If you are hearing or voice impaired, please call (850) 577-4400. To file response please contact Franklin County Clerk of Court, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, FL 32320, Tel: (850) 653-8861; Fax: (850) 653-9339. March 22, 29, 2012 86388T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 11-450-CA CAPITAL CITY BANK, Plaintiff, vs. SUNG WOO LEE A/K/A SUNGWOO LEE, HYON SOOK LEE A/K/A HYONSOOK LEE, TARPON RUN HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., and UNKNOWN TENANT(S), Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE is given pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated February 29, 2012, in Case No. 11-450-CA, of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit, in and for Franklin County, Florida, in which CAPITAL CITY BANK is the Plaintiff and SUNG WOO LEE A/K/A SUNGWOO LEE, HYON SOOK LEE A/K/A HYONSOOK LEE and TARPON RUN HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC. are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Front Door of the Courthouse in Apalachicola, Franklin County, Florida at 11:00 a.m. on April 11, 2012, the property set forth in the Final Judgment of Foreclosure and more particularly described as follows: LOT 9 OF TARPON RUN, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 8, PAGE 1, PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. DATED: March 1, 2012 MARCIA M. JOHNSON Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Attorney for Plaintiff: Garvin B. Bowden, Esq., Gardner, Bist, Wiener, Wadsworth, Bowden, Bush, Dee, LaVia & Wright, P.A. 1300 Thomaswood Drive, Tallahassee, Florida 32308 March 29, April 5, 2012 86651T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 19-2011-CA-000052 DIVISION: JAMES B. NUTTER & COMPANY, Plaintiff, vs. THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, OR AGAINST, EDWIN DANIEL A/K/A EDWIN CLYDE DANIEL A/K/A EDWIN C. DANIEL, DECEASED et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION TO: THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, OR AGAINST, EDWIN DANIEL A/K/A EDWIN CLYDE DANIEL A/K/A EDWIN C. DANIEL, DECEASED LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: UNKNOWN CURRENT ADDRESS: UNKNOWN ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT (S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: UNKNOWN CURRENT ADDRESS: UNKNOWN YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in FRANKLIN County, Florida: LOT 5, AND 1/2 OF LOT 4, (30 BY 100 FEET), ADJOINING SAID LOT 5, IN BLOCK 143, OF THE CITY OF APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA. SAID PARCEL BEING 90 FEET BY 100 FEET has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses within 30 days after the first publication, if any, on Florida Default Law Group, P.L., Plaintiffs attorney, whose address is 4919 Memorial Highway, Suite 200, Tampa, Florida 33634, and file the original with this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint or petition. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court on this 8th day of March, 2012. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of the Court By: Terry E. Creamer As Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Mr. Doug Smith, Office of Court Administration, Leon County Courthouse, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301, Phone: 850577-4401, Fax: 850487-7947 March 29, April 5, 2012 86448T REQUEST FOR SEALED BIDS The City of Apalachicola is now accepting sealed bids for the following surplus vehicles: 1) 1997 Ford Ranger PU -VIN# 1FTCR10A8VUB69703 2) 2004 Ford Explorer VIN# 1FMZU62K24UB55284 3) 1988 Ford F350 Dump Truck -VIN# IFDKF37H2KNA4S480 4) 2001 Ford Explorer VIN# IFMZU63E72UA09680 5) 1999 Chevy Ventura Van -VIN# 1GNDX03EOXD142637 6) 1986 Chevrolet GMC Dump Truck -VIN# 1GBT7D4YOGV104196 Bids may be presented on any or all vehicles. All bids should be submitted in a sealed envelope with the vehicle(s) being bid on clearly noted on the outside of the envelope. Bids will be accepted until 4:00 p.m. Friday, April 20, 2012 at City Hall, 1 Bay Avenue, Apalachicola, Florida. Faxed or emailed bids will not be considered. Contact City Hall @ 850-653-9319 to make an appointment to inspect vehicles. March 29, 2012 86721T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 2012 CP 12 IN RE: ESTATE OF HARDY LEE SIMMONS also known as H. LEE SIMMONS, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Hardy Lee Simmons, also known as H. Lee Simmons, deceased, whose date of death was February 16, 2012, is pending in the Circuit Court for Franklin County, Florida, Probate Division, File Number 2012CP-12, the street address of which is 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, Florida 32320. The names and addresses of the ancillary personal representative and the ancillary personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is March 29, 2012. Personal Representative: Nelson B. Simmons 3303 Sharer Road Tallahassee, FL 32312 Attorney for Personal Representative: Terrence T. Dariotis FL Bar No. 190057 Post Office Box 16005 Tallahassee, Florida 32317-6005 (850) 523-9300 March 29, April 5, 2012 86731T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 11-000095-CA CADENCE BANK, N.A., Plaintiff vs. JIMMY R. BENNETT, LAKE McKISSACK PLACE HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., UNKNOWN TENANT(S) I and UNKNOWN TENANT(S) II, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE is given pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated March 13, 2012, in Case No. 11-000095CA, of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit, in and for Franklin County, Florida, in which Cadence Bank, N.A., is the Plaintiff and Jimmy R. Bennett, Lake McKissack Place Homeowners Association, Inc., Unknown Tenant(s) 1 and Unknown Tenant(s) 2, are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Second Floor Lobby of the Franklin County, Florida at 11:00 am, on May 2, 2012, the property set forth in the Final Judgment of Foreclosure, and more particularly described as follows: Lots 12 and 13 of LAKE MCKISSACK PLACE, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 10, Page(s) 9, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. DATED March 13, 2012. MARCIA M. JOHNSON Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk March 29, April 5, 2012 86735T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No.: 2011-000060-CP IN RE: ESTATE OF KENNETH PFEIFER, Deceased. NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION AND NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of KENNETH PFEIFER, deceased, File Number 2011000060-CP, is pending in the Circuit Court for Franklin County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, Franklin County, Florida 32320. The estate is testate, and the date of the will is May 22, 2011. The

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, March 29, 2012 The Times | A13 The News Herald offers a competitive bene t package including medical, dental, vision and life insurance, 401(k) plan, vacation and sick leave, and six paid holidays per year. (Part-time positions have 401(k) plan options). ADVERTISING SALES REPRESENTATIVESThe News Herald and the News Herald.com continue to expand. We are looking for highly motivated, energetic sales people. This is a unique opportunity to help build sales revenues and be a leading part of a progressive advertising sales team. The Sales Executive will be required to make sales calls, train and offer guidelines regarding pricing and packaging of all digital products and services. The ideal candidate must be a leader and have an innovative approach to client development and an understanding of how companies are using the internet to market their business. You must have a drive to win and a passion for consultative media sales. Available Positions: Territory Sales Representative Digital Sales RepresentativeRequired Skills Highly motivated and results driven Creative, conceptual and strategic thinker Professional and positive manner when working with clients and others Superior knowledge of Microsoft Of ce (Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and Outlook) Outstanding record of achievement in current/past positions Superior professionalism, discretion, and judgment Strong work ethic and capacity to thrive in a team environment Effective time management and organization skills Excellent verbal and written communication skills Keen attention to detail The candidate with mobile and Yahoo! experience will have an edge Required Experience To be considered, you must have at least 3 years of sales experience, including 1-3 successful years in the area of outside sales and/or online media including internet ad sales. Experience working with media is preferred. The candidate must be highly analytical with meticulous attention to detail. 4-year college degree in advertising/marketing or equivalent experience.SALES/RETENTION CLERK We are seeking an eager part-time telephone sales clerk to sell and/or retain home delivery and single copy circulation. Essential duties include providing excellent customer service, pleasant telephone voice, and outbound dialing. Quali ed candidates will have general of ce experience, sales experience and computer skills. High School Diploma or equivalent is required and one year of customer service experience. This is a parttime position with hour pay, plus commission and bene ts.CUSTOMER SERVICE REPRESENTATIVEWe are seeking an ambitious part-time Customer Service Representative who will actively answer phones and participate in the everyday work and special projects. This position is the primary link between current and potential subscribers and the newspaper. You will handle general of ce work and maintain subscriber and non-subscriber database. Quali ed candidate will have a High School diploma or equivalent and one year of customer service experience. Candidate should have a basic understanding of of ce machines such as calculator, printers, fax machine, computer and internet skills and able to sit for 8 hour shifts. On time attendance during scheduled time is critical in this role as well as working some holidays and weekend shifts.Come by The News Herald at 501 W. 11th Street for an application or send a resume to resumes@ afreedom.com.Freedom Florida is a Drug-free workplace, EOETO APPLY: The News HeraldCareers 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322850-697-9604 850-323-0444 www.seacrestre.comwww. rst tness.com/carrabellePROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND RENTALSRENTALS2 BR 1BA, UNFURNISHED HOUSE Big Yard/Deep Water Dock .............................$650 1 BR RIVER CONDO, BOAT SLIP 3 Night Minimum .......................$105 PLUS DAILY 3 BR 1 BA FURNISHED HOUSE Monthly Rate, Carrabelle ................................$850 1 BR 1 BA UNFURNISHED APT Lanark, Remodeled, Includes Water ...............$475 2 BR 1 BA UNFURNISHED APT Lanark ............................................................$450 1 BR, SUN ROOM/DAYBED Furnished, Lanark ..........................................$450 3 BR 2 BA FURNISHED HOME On River, Boat Dock & Lift ............................$1000 2 BR 1 BA FURNISHED HOUSE On Bay ............................................................$900 3 BR 3 BA FURNISHED CONDO Downtown, 3 Night Minimum ....$105 PLUS DAILY OFFICE SPACE HWY 98 Frontage, Carrabelle ....$550 Plus Utilities Lanark: RV space, private, 2 blocks from launch ramp, power, water, sewer, Dish TV included. $250/ month Call (850)576-4427 Text FL02155 to 56654 WALK TO THE BEACH318 Woodhill Rd. Carrabelle Beach 2 br, 2 ba, MH on 1 acre private lot. 1 mile inland. $550 per month. Please call 813-546-6987. References required.Text FL01629 to 56654 $37,000 5 Acres near Crystal Lake on Amos Hayes Rd, property has well septic and power pole. Current survey is available. About 1.5 acres of the property is cleared. 850-271-5761 and leave a message. Kohler Birthday BathTubCall: 850-251-1864 Carrabelle, Florida Total Down Pmt $6752000 Chevy Monte Carlo T otal Price $4,1000% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! Total Down Pmt $9751999 Ford Expedition -3-Rows T otal Price $5,5000% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! Total Down Pmt $7752002 Chevy Blazer -4-Door T otal Price $4,7000% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! Total Down Pmt $18952003 Chevy Silverado X/Cab -4 Door T otal Price $9,5000% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! Total Down Pmt $12752002 Ford F-250 -4X4 T otal Price $8,8000% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! Polaris Ranger 20054x4 with 250 hours Call: 850-251-1864 TextFL 98560 to 55554 Lanark Village: Clean 2 bedroom, 1 bath, screened porch, AC Long term lease: 7 months min. $500 monthly + $350. security deposit, references required or wkly & wkend rental w/deposit Pets-will consider. Non smoking. 850-212-2063 Text FL98418 to 56654 St. George Island $160 week, Electric, Satellite, Garbage incl. Pool tble. 12 X 65 deck w/Beautiful view 850-653-5114 St. George Island 2Br, 1Ba, Ground floor, Satellite. 12 x 50 Deck. Only $250 per week. Call: 850-653-5114 1 BRCottageH/AC in Apalachicola, FL. 850-643-7740. Apalachicola3 br, 2 ba house for rent, CH&A, W/D, D/W, $800 First and Last. Brenda 850-227-5380; Gilbert 201-895-4255 Eastpointe-Carrabelle 1bd, 800sf, $322 bi-weekly, (or $644/mo) includes: all utilities, elec, water, Sat TV, W/D, stone FP, & central AC. Secluded, 1/2 mile from beach. 6 mo lease. 1st & security. 954-816-7004 Magnolia Bluff Bayfront Sunset view. Spacious 3 br, 2.5 bath, large family room, screened deck. All appliances including Washr/Dryer, water & trash paid Call 877-963-4321 sunsetplaceinfo@gmail.comText FL00702 to 56654 South of Hwy 98, 3bd, 1.5ba, $850/mo. 1st & last + dep. Call 850899-8401 or 653-8401 Text FL02133 to 56654 St. George Island-2 br, 1 ba, Canal view. All utilities incl. 6 mo to 1 yr lse. $1125 mo + $500 dep. Call 850-653-5441 St. George Island Bayview Large 1 br 1 ba All utilities incl. 6 mo to 1 yr lease. $725 mo + $500 dep. Call 850-653-5441 Seeking mature quiet female, furn, w/laundry, bathrm. Kitchen Pvlgs no smokers/ pets Ref. + dep $375 mo + util. 850-653-8664 lv msg. Publishers NoticeAll real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on a equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. Furnished Loft Apt, in historic district. Cbl/wtr incl 1100sf high ceilings, Private entrance and deck. No smkg/ pets. $750 mo. + $750 dep. 850-653-3838 Heritage Villas and Southern Villas of Apalachicola ApartmentsAccepting applications for 1, 2, & 3 br HC & non-HC accessible units. Some rental assistance may be available. HUD vouchers accepted. Call 850-653-9277. TDD/TTY 711. This institution is an equal opportunity provider, and employer. names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives Attorney are set forth below. ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT: Any interested person on whom a copy of this notice of administration is served must file on or before the date that is 3 months after the date of service of a copy of the notice of administration on that person any objection that challenges the validity of the will, the qualifications of the personal representative, the venue, or jurisdiction of this Court. Persons who may be entitled to exempt property under Section 732.402, Florida Statutes will be deemed to have waived their rights to claim that property as exempt property unless a petition for determination of exempt property is filed by such persons or on their half on or before the later of the date that is 4 months after the date of service of a copy of this notice of administration on such persons or the date that is 40 days after the date of termination of any proceeding involving the construction, admission to probate, or validity of the will or involving any other matter affecting any part of the exempt property. An election to take an elective share must be filed on or before the earlier of the date that is 6 months after the date of service of a copy of the notice of administration on the surviving spouse, or an attorney in fact or a guardian of the property of the surviving spouse, or the date that is 2 years after the date of the decedents death. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file claims against the estate with with the Court during the time periods set forth in Section 733.702, Florida Statutes, or be forever barred. ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL. BE FOREVER BARRED. The date of the first publication of this Notice is March 29, 2012. Personal Representative: KEITH M. PFEIFER 8051 Rocky Wood Rd Tallahassee, FL 32305 Attorney for Personal Representative: J. GORDON SHULER, FL Bar No. 0700959 J. GORDON SHULER, P.A. P.O. Drawer 850 Apalachicola, Fl 32329 (850) 653-9226 March 29, April 5, 2012 Incorrect Insertion PolicyFor Classified In-column AdvertisersAll ads placed by phone are read back to the advertiser to insure correctness. The newspaper will assume correctness at the time of the read-back procedure unless otherwise informed. Please your ad. Advertisers are requested to check the advertisement on the first insertion for correctness. Errors should be reported immediately. Your Florida Freedom newspaper will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion, nor will it be liable for any error in advertisements to a greater extent than the cost of the space occupied by the error. Any copy change, during an ordered schedule constitutes a new ad and new charges. We do not guarantee position of ANY ad under any classification. Adopt: Broadway Actor & Kids Music Producer (Will stay-at-home) yearn for 1st baby(800) 552-0045 FLBar42311 *Expenses Paid* Sweatmore Strawberry RanchOPEN MAR 22nd 8AM Weather Permitting Mon-Sat 8am-7pm Sunday 8am-5pm 850-722-4819 Looking for a place to go on Wetapo Creek in case of Hurricane. 32ft Catamaran at Port St. Joe. Would like to pay to reserve space. Call Jim Morpeth 706-566-1172 or email jmorpeth@aol.com Administrative/ClericalMEDICAL RECEPTIONISTExperienced receptionist needed for busy medical practice in Eastpoint, FL. Must be organized, have people skills and ability to multi-task. Computer experience a must. Health care and medical assisting certification is preferred. Please send resume to HRdepartment@nfmc.org or Fax (850) 298-6054. EOE/ DFWP/ M-F Web ID#: 34201747 Food Svs/Hospitality*Servers *Cooks Dishwashers *Bartenders *BussersBLUE PARROT Now HIRINGPlease apply in person between 9a-5pm 7 days a week@ Blue Parrot St. Georges Island Food Svs/Hospitality The Port Inn & Mainstay Suites are now accepting applicationsPT Desk Service Agent FT Room Attendant PT Breakfast AttendantWeekends and holidays are required. Dependability is a must! If you have an eye for detail and a passion for service, we want you! Please apply in person at the address below: Make beds, make friends, make money! Inquire about benefits package. EOE, DFWP The Port Inn 501 Monument Ave, PSJ 32456 Food Svs/HospitalityWanted!!!Part time Housekeeper Wanted to join us at the Gibson Inn. Good attitude, references required. Apply in person at Gibson Inn team. 51 Avenue C Food Svs/HospitalityThe Water Street HotelIs recruiting hospitality minded people in key positions. Applicants should be well groomed, pleasant, computer savvy, willing to work a variety of shifts and positions, and be drug free. Resumes may be submitted to or applications obtained from the Hotel front desk. Competitive wages. EOE. HospitalityRESORT VACATION PROPERTIESAccepting applications for FT Front Desk Clerk. Office experience, computer skills & good customer service skills required. Great benefits, weekend work required. Apply in person 9-5 weekdays at 123 W Gulf Beach Dr St. George Island Logistics/TransportNow HiringCaptains and MatesRetail help needed. Commission based, flexible schedule, part time. Shipwright Wood Boat builder with experience. Call (850) 274-1321 or send email augusta.west@ammfl.org. Web ID#: 34201917 These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you. EmeraldCoast Marketplace 747-5020 Spot Advertising works!

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LocalA14 | The Times Thursday, March 29, 2012 Our local real estate experts have identied what they feel are the best values around and are oering them to you in Real Estate Picks! (In this section), Discover the best real estate values in Mexico Beach, Port St. Joe, Apalachicola, Cape San Blas, St. George Island, Carrabelle and surrounding areas. Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Real Estate Picks John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.comMLS#246747$399,000St. George IslandCOTTAGE BY THE SEAGround level 1st tier house with POOL, across the street from the beach with beach access easement, Upper level OBSERVATION DECK overlooks the pool, 3 BR & 3 BA, Large Third BR suite is located upstairs. West Gorrie Dr. John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.comMLS#245232$89,000St. George IslandHIGH & DRY 3RD TIER LOTLocated on the north side of Gulf Beach Drive and only two lots from the corner for easy beach access on 11th Street. Scrub Oaks line the road side of this lot creating privacy, but offers an open expanse of high sandy ground. Excellent building site. Qualications: Expertise in: Now Accepting AppointmentsCall Toll Free 888-681-5864 For more info www.seclung.com Lung Disease SpecialistRob Garver, MDNow Seeing Patients in Port St. Joe NOW BCBS-FL IN-NETWORK PROVIDER Apalachicola City Commissioner Frank Cook to the post for one year. At the same meeting, the commissioners unanimously approved a contract with ARPC for $3,500 to do the biennial Hazardous Waste Generator Report. The state requires the report be done; the money had been budgeted for the report.Solar panels switched onOn Thursday, March 15, the solar panels on the courthouse annex were activated so the building is now partially powered by solar energy. The amount of electrical energy saved depends on the time of year and the amount of cloud cover on any particular day. Energy consultants estimate that, on a bright sunny day, the solar panels will produce 20 percent of the energy consumed, resulting in 20 percent savings in the utility bill for the annex.The panels were installed by Independent Green Technologies of Tallahassee for $96,000. The project was funded by a federal energy grant awarded to the county through the Florida Energy Of ce.Commission to meet at ANERR April 17On Tuesday, April 17, the county commission meeting will take place at the Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve (ANERR) headquarters on Island Drive in Eastpoint, starting at 5 p.m. Chairman Pinki Jackel said this will be a good way to advertise the ANERR facility and encourage people to visit it.Free overnight camp opportunities availableThe 1st Sgt. Michael S. Curry Memorial Foundation is sponsoring a week-long overnight camp, from June 24 to 30, in beautiful Umatilla, about an one hour from Orlando. The free overnight camp will be held at the Florida Elks Youth Camp, which is fully accredited by the American Camping Association. The group Smiles Are Contagious, devoted to creating unforgettable opportunities to enrich the lives of children, is sponsoring the overnight camp, held near a stunning lake offering canoeing, shing and paddle boats, with camping in air-conditioned lodges. Funlled sporting activities include basketball, softball, ag-football, soccer, kickball, and volleyball, a golf-driving range and miniature golf facility, archery instruction and the challenge ropes course which builds con dence and selfesteem, through problem solving and teamwork. Representatives from Smiles Are Contagious will be in Apalachicola on Sunday, April 15 at Battery Park from Noon to 5 p.m. During this time there will be time for questions and answers, and applications will be provided. This camp is designed for children ages 9-13. For more info: call Rose Grif n at (786) 955-3978 or visit www.smilesarecontagious. org. Full moon climb April 6 at LighthouseThe April Full Moon Climb at the Cape St. George Lighthouse on St. George Island will be held on Friday, April 6. The Sunset/Full Moon Climb will take place from 7:30 to 9 p.m. and will include light hors doeuvres and a sparkling cider toast to the full moon. Cost is $15 for the general public and $10 for members of the St. George Lighthouse Association. The sun will set at 8:01 p.m. and the moon will rise at 8:14 p.m. on April 6. After sunset, people are invited to climb to the top of the lighthouse for a breathtaking view of the full moon, as space and time permit. Cost is $10 for the general public and $5 for SGLA members. The Cape St. George Light is located in St. George Lighthouse Park at the center of St. George Island, where Island Drive (the road off the bridge) ends at Gulf Beach Drive. Parking is available in lots at either side of the park. Because space is limited, reservations are recommended. For reservations or more information, please contact the St. George Island Visitor Center at 850-927-7744 or toll free at 888-927-7744. BRIEFS from page A3 This young unneutered male cat was found near Shadow Lane. He is wearing a ea collar and very friendly. He seems to be used to other cats. He has had a couple of seizures and may need medication. If you recognize him, please call Sondra at 850-509-1684. DO YOU KNOW THIS CAT? At a boisterous rally March 21 at Franklin County High School, the Seahawk SWAT (Students Working Against Tobacco) chapter drove home the message that its best to Kick Butt before the butts stand in your way. The day earlier, county commissioners voted unanimously to adopt March 26 to April 1 as Tobacco Free Florida Week, and to designate March 21 as Kick Butts Day. The students listened and learned from a series of exhibits and messages about the dangers of using tobacco. On hand were local dignitaries including Superintendent Nina Marks, School Board member Teresa Ann Martin, Undersheriff Jeff Norred, Florida Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms representative Lt. Ralph Campbell, Apalachicola Commissioner Brenda Ash and Apalachicola Police Of cer Anthony Croom. All shared a brief word, emphasizing the message of the day. SWAT advisor Dolores Croom and her SWAT members, in collaboration with David Walker, the program manager for the county health departments health education, and Gina Moore, administrative assistant, helped organize the rally, which also featured displays that illustrated the damage done to the bodys organs and how health is at risk if they choose to use tobacco. In the 3-point shoot-out competition, middle school teacher Laura Baney made her one, and only, shot.Students kick butt against tobaccoPhotos by DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The TimesMiddle school teacher Laura Baney demonstrated how to sink a bucket, on her rst try! Trenton Lee demonstrates how to kick butt at the March 21 rally at Franklin County High School. Apalachicola Police Of cer Anthony Croom addresses the rally, in front of a working model of two lungs, one healthy and one diseased.



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Corps seeks citizen input on water use By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star .com Now is the time to comment on a proposed north Georgia reservoir that could further reduce the Apalachicola Rivers water supply. Hall County, Ga., is seeking permission to dam Flat Creek, a tributary of the Chattahoochee River in north Georgia, to create the Glades Reservoir. In theory, the water would be used to maintain the flow of the Chattahoochee at acceptable levels during drought conditions so that Hall could continue to withdraw water from the river under any circumstances. Hall County said it needs the secure water supply because the population there, currently 180,000, is expected to swell to 800,000 by 2060. At their regular March 20 meeting, County Planner Alan Pierce informed commissioners that the Glade Reservoir was under review by the Army Corps of Engineers. The commission voted unanimously to send a letter to the Corps objecting to the construction of additional reservoirs in the Apalachicola/Chattahoochee/ Flint (ACF) watershed. Ashley Fielding, a reporter for the daily Gainesville Times, attended the scoping meeting hosted by the Army Corps of Engineers March 22 at the Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve in Eastpoint. She said she believes the reservoir is an attempt by Hall County to get control of the water situation. The Magnuson ruling really scared a lot of people, she said. Folks remember what it was like before Lake Lanier. They are afraid they wouldnt have any water. In a 97-page ruling written in 2009, U.S. District Court Judge Paul A. Magnuson said the Corps violated federal law by allowing water withdrawals that were not authorized by Congress when a dam was built to establish Lake Lanier in the 1950s. The ruling was later overturned in the 11th Circuit Court of Appeals. Fielding said not everyone in Hall County is in favor of the Glades project, and many residents are concerned about the Georgia reservoir will affect bay ELECTION 2012 Special to the Times Mike Mock has led his letter of intent to seek election to the of ce of sheriff. Mock, 45, 1462 Highway 67, Carrabelle, led as a Democrat. He is now legally entitled to begin the process of circulating petitions to be signed, with signatures due to the Supervisor of Elections of ce by May 7. Mocks name would then appear on the Aug. 14 primary ballot, provided he of cially quali es during the June 4-8 qualifying period. In the event that only Democrats le for this of ce, or any of the county of ces, Republicans and those without party af liation would be able to vote in any race that has candidates from only one political party, known as a universal race. The following is a statement issued by the candidate: My name is Mike Mock; I have been married to Debbie Langley Mock for the past 25 years. Debbie and I have been blessed with three beautiful children: Jared, Morgan and Parker. Mike Mock to run for sheriff MIKE MOCK By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com The immediate future of about 300 youth, for the next two months on baseball elds at Franklin Countys west, central and eastern sports complexes, began last weekend outside Carrabelle. The annual Day of Baseball wasnt always sparkling and sunny, it even rained a little in the morning, brie y and not very much. At one point, for example, it did not look very good for the Twisters, in the Majors, the 11-and12 year old boys. Down 3-0, with innings ticking down, Greg Sasnett and the other coaches T.J. Pendleton, Michael Newell and Bryan Kent were having a hard time convincing their team that rst of all, now was not the time to be OPENING THE 2012 SEASON A Day of Baseball By VALERIE GARMAN 229-7843 | @valeriegarman vgarman@star .com Young Jacob Glantzman carried a sign on the lawn of the Capitol Building in Washington, D.C. that posed an innocent question, Jesus was a sherman, why cant I be? Jacob represents the fth generation of an American shing family, something anglers from coastal states across the country gathered to protect at the Keep Fishermen Fishing Rally March 21. About 1,500 anglers turned out to protect their livelihood, culture, jobs and recreation at the rally, with an ultimate goal to spark change in the MagnusonStevens Act, the law governing sheries management in the United States, which many anglers cite as diminishing their right to a public resource. The anglers came from across the country: on buses from Panama City and Jacksonville, planes from Alaska, from Cape Cod, the Outer Banks, Cape Canaveral and Staten Island. They held signs boldly stating, Save the shermen! Save our jobs! Put exibility back in Magnuson! United we sh! Protect shermen, not just sh! Although the number of attendees was far less than in previous years, down considerably from 5,000 attendees in 2010, the event produced nearly four times the legislative representatives. A group of 13 anglers from North Florida and Alabama made the trip by bus from Panama City to attend the rally. On the return home, they were not only pleased Panhandle anglers optimistic after rally VALERIE GARMAN | Florida Freedom Florida District 22 Rep. Allen West pulled Jacob Glantzman onstage during his speech as an example of what they were ghting for. See MOCK A5 See RALLY A2 See BASEBALL A9 See RESERVOIR A5 Photos by DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times Coach Donny Raf eld shows Alonna Brown how to bat for the T-Ball Tomahawks, sponsored by Rusty Crum Seafood and IGA. At top, Ethan Riley, for the CCC Jay Hawks, slides into home to beat a tag by the Twisters Christian Amison. Apalachicola seniors plan Friday fundraiser Help the new senior citizens program, that serves Apalachicolas Seasoned Citizens. This Friday, March 30 from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the new Holy Family Center, enjoy some great Bar-B-Que! We will have a Pork Butt Bar-B-Que the last Friday of each month at the new Apalachicola Senior Center, at the former site of the Holy Family School, 27 Sixth Street! Whole butts are $25. Please reserve in advance if you can by calling the city administration of ce at 6538715. Lunches are $8 per person. Peeples to play Dixie Apalachicolas Dixie Theatre will present popular area folk recording artist Grant Peeples & The Peeples Republik Band, featuring Erik Alvar and Mark Russell, this Saturday, March 31. This left neck, master songwriter brings his Dylan /Prine / Kerouac style to the Dixies nal weekend of the 2012 season. On Friday, March 30, the Swingin Harpoon Blues Band will delight the audience. Mike Salty Lanigan conceptualized a swinging blues band, then ne picked his musicians, with the band performing original songs and quality covers, from big city blues, swing, rockabilly and funk. Tickets $20; both shows at 8 p.m. For more info, call 653-3200 or visit www. dixietheatre.com. Carrabelle art exhibit Sunday Join the Carrabelle Artist Association as they present exhibition demonstrations every Sunday from 1 to 4 p.m. in March and April in the Fountain Room at St. James Bay Golf Resort. Many pieces are available for sale. Call 697-4381 for more details. Holocaust art exhibit to close The Holocaust art exhibit, at the City of Carrabelle Complex, 1001 Gray Ave., closes this Saturday, March 31. Hours are Monday-Friday 1-4 p.m., Thursday 1-6 p.m.; and Saturday 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Admission is free. xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx Thursday, March 29, 2012 50 WWW.APALACHTIMES.COM VOL. 126 ISSUE 48 Phone: 850-653-8868 Web: apalachtimes.com E-mail: dadlerstein@star .com Fax: 850-653-8036 Circulation: 800-345-8688 Opinion . . . . . . A4 Society . . . . . . A6 Faith . . . . . . . A7 Outdoors . . . . . A8 Tide Chart . . . . . A8 Sports . . . . . . A9 Classi eds . . . A12-A13 DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK: School News & Society: 11 a.m. Friday Real Estate Ads: 11 a.m. Thursday Legal Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Display Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Line Ads: 5 p.m. Monday xxxxx Contact Us xxxxx Out to see Index Snuf ng out Tobacco A14

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Local A2 | The Times Thursday, March 29, 2012 that their voices were heard, but that the right people were listening. Chip Blackburn, Tom Adams, John Lee and Chuck Guilford, charter captains out of Mexico Beach, have been active in ghting for change in the MagnusonStevens act since seeing a drastic decline in business due to strict shing regulations. The group cited the legislative turnout at this years rally as the product of an election year and hope it will be enough to drive the action in Washington that the 2010 rally failed to produce. Ill tell you, something needs to change, said Blackburn, captain of the charter boat Miss Mary. There are some people out there who are really hurting. Guilford said that while the rally in 2010 brought out people from all over the U.S. and Canada, it wasnt enough to get anything changed. I dont know how much longer (I can charter), with all the regulations and the cost of fuel to operate, said Guilford, owner of Charisma Charters. In previous years, Guilford said he was shing around 190 to 240 days a year, but in 2011, he shed only 87 days on his boat Charisma and 58 days on his second boat. Although the rally is over, the anglers recognize that the ght is not. Until of cial changes are made, they will continue to rally on a local level by contacting legislators and networking and organizing local support groups. The Recreational Fishing Alliance (RFA), the organization that sponsored the rally, deemed it a success due to an impressive legislative line-up and commitments made by many in uential members of Congress. Rally organizers chalked up the lower attendance rate to high gas prices, a poor economy and the start of the spring break season, an important part of the year for many people in the shing business. Jim Donofrio, executive director of the RFA, said the rally showed that members of Congress are of cially recognizing the issues facing the American angler today, be it from the recreational or commercial sector. Donofrio said that while sh populations have surged in the past decade, it has been at the expense of the American sherman. Were all suffering from access to our nations healthy sh stocks, Donofrio said. Those regulations have brought upon devastation to an industry and an attack on a culture. Donofrio said the rally has helped spread interest among the legislators needed to make the changes the anglers are rallying for he said there are currently eight bills in the House and Senate addressing shery reform. We have a bunch of members of Congress that are interested in this, Donofrio said. In a place where progress is slow, were making great progress so were happy. Donofrio said choosing to address the federal sheries law should be an easy choice for Congress to make because no action will mean closure for many shoreline businesses in the U.S. At the rally, New York Sen. Charles Shumer called for Congress to begin hearings on the Magnuson-Stevens act this year. Shumer also presented a bill he introduced called Flexibility in Rebuilding American Fisheries Act, which would eliminate a one-sizets-all approach to sheries management that isnt based on good, sound science. Who knows how to conserve our shing stocks? Its the hard-working people in the shing industry. Not some guy in some ivory tower doing faulty studies, Shumer said. You folks dont want to deplete the stocks, we know that. But you also want to make a living, and thats the balance that we seek to nd here today. Shumer was backed in support for the bill by Sen. Scott Brown (R-MA), Sen. Kay Hagan (D-NC) and Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (D-NY). On the House of Representatives side, Rep. Frank Pallone (D-NJ) is the primary sponsor of the Flexibility and Access in Rebuilding American Fisheries Act, a bill that 15 other members of the house voiced co-sponsorship of at the rally. Weve got to work hard on a daily basis to keep up the momentum, Pallone said. Not just today, but when you go home. Pallone stressed the importance of continuing to ght for the agenda. He encouraged the anglers to go home and speak with their representatives and senators and continue to push for change. Rep. Steve Southerland (RPanama City) spoke in support of amending the Magnuson-Stevens Act, relaying the underlying problem as a freedom issue. You have a God-given right to participate in an activity that your fathers participated in, your grandfathers participated in, the founding fathers participated in, Southerland said. As long as Im privileged by the men and women of Floridas second congressional district, I will never waver in ghting for your rights and ghting for your freedoms. Southerland, whose family has lived in Northwest Florida for more than 200 years, relayed the regulation issues as an attack on the American family, the very basis of the seafood industry in country. This isnt just an attack on you, the shermen, Southerland said. In many ways, this is an attack on our families. Southerland, a member of the Congressional Natural Resource Committee, said the Magnuson-Stevens Act is unjust and must be amended. He stressed that changes are needed to preserve the culture of the American shing family. Eugene Raf eld attended the rally to protect a family business spanning six generations. Were ghting the environmental groups of todays time that (want) us to stop what weve been doing for all these years, said Raf eld, owner Raf elds Fisheries in Port St. Joe. Weve been in business since 1889, and Im sixth generation. Im here to voice my freedom. The theme of the rally orbited around Jacob Glantzman and his brother Joshua of Wall, N.J. whose signs posed questions to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration: Jesus was a sherman, why cant I be? and Why are you stopping me from shing? The Glantzman brothers sat in the front row and were pointed out and brought up on stage by many of the legislative speakers who stressed the importance of keeping the culture of shing alive in the U.S. We all talk about how shing is part of our culture, our history, and it has been, Sen. John Kerry (D-MA) said. But I dont want to talk about how it is part of our history; I want to talk about how it is part of our future and guarantee that you are shing for years to come. Florida District 22 Rep. Allen West pulled Jacob on stage during his speech as the basis for what they were ghting for. This is what its all about. Youre the reason were all here, West said. So that this young man can step up like his father and fore fathers did. West said strict government regulations from NOAA are shattering the ability for children to follow in their parents footsteps. When you look at it, its not just shermen, West said. We are destroying the next generation of entrepreneurs in this country. Thats what were here for. Washington, D.C. with its onerous regulations is crushing the American dream. C LEAN C UTS Lawn Care Service Residential Commercial Services: Pressure Washing Palm Tree Trimming Landscape Design Carlos Castillo 850-624-8018 Chris Grin 850-323-1442 CALL FOR A FREE E STIMATE RALLY from page A1 Photos by VALERIE GARMAN | Florida Freedom A crowd begins to gather in front of the Capitol Building in Washington D.C. for the Keep Fishermen Fishing rally Mach 21. Below a rally attendee carries a Save the shermen sign.

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Local The Times | A3 Thursday, March 29, 2012 GREATER A PALACHICOLA Enjoy quiet country living on 3.75 acres. Lovely custom built 3BR/2.5 BA home with many upgrades Jacuzzi, deck, large walk in closet. 1600 sq.ft. outbuilding on concrete pad. M L S# 244666.................$265,000 Travis Stanley 850.653.6477 Grayson Shepard 850.653.6718 C O MM ERCIAL A PALACHICOLA Two commercial lots for sale in Apalachicola on the corner of Commerce and Penton St. Great location, one block of Hwy 98, near all the best shops and restaurants in Apalach! M L S# 244870..............$125,000 EA S TPOI N T 3 BR/2BA home on private 3 acres! Low maintenance metal roof, vinyl siding and great front porch. Backs up to state land M L S#244269.................$120,000 S T G EOR G E I S LA ND GULF VIEW 4BR/4BA close to center of island and convenient to center of island. Good Lots of storage and lovely native landscaping. M L S# 245752...............$399,000 C O MM ERCIAL GREATER A PALACHICOLA EA S TPOI N T S T G T G T EOR G E I S LA ND Leon Teat 850.653.5656 Sandy Mitchem 850.899.8300 ST. GEOR G E IS LA ND First tier lot. Right across the street from the beach with wonderful views! This lot backs up to the back path too. Just three blocks to the center of the island. Buy a lot and build EXACTLY what you want! M L S# 246317..............$225,000 ST. GEOR G E IS LA ND ST. GEOR G E IS LA ND P LA N TATIO N 2nd tier lot in a great location, right on the beach access in Nicks Hole. Just across Leisure lane from state owned bayfront land best of both worlds! M L S#246524..............$95,000 ST. GEOR G E IS LA ND NEW LOW PRICE! BA N K O W N ED LO V EL Y H O M E NEW LISTI N G! NEW LISTI N G! Weems Hospital would like to recognize and celebrate their Doctors on staff. NATIO N AL their Doctors on staff. Weems Hospital would like to recognize and celebrate FRIDAY, MARCH 30 TH 2012 Shezad Sanaullah, MD Patrick Conrad, MD Eugene Charbonneau, DO Stephen Miniat, MD Tamara Marsh, DPM Helen Nitsios, MD James Stockwell, MD Paul D. Hart, MD Garrett H. Chumney, MD Nathanael Hawkins, MD F. Josef Plum, MD Joda G. Lynn, MD Timothy Adamcryk, MD Vincent Ivers, MD David E. Pierce, DO David F. Edwards, MD Steven Saul, MD David F. Edwards, MD Steven Saul, MD David F. Edwards, MD Steven Saul, MD Weems Medical Center East 110 NE 5 TH STREET, CARRABELLE, FL 850-697-2345 F. Josef Plum, MD Joda G. Lynn, MD Timothy Adamcryk, MD Vincent Ivers, MD David E. Pierce, DO David F. Edwards, MD Vincent Ivers, MD David E. Pierce, DO David F. Edwards, MD Vincent Ivers, MD David E. Pierce, DO David F. Edwards, MD 110 NE 5 110 NE 5 110 NE 5 110 NE 5 110 NE 5 110 NE 5 110 NE 5 110 NE 5 110 NE 5 110 NE 5 110 NE 5 TH TH TH TH STREET, CARRABELLE, FL STREET, CARRABELLE, FL STREET, CARRABELLE, FL STREET, CARRABELLE, FL STREET, CARRABELLE, FL STREET, CARRABELLE, FL STREET, CARRABELLE, FL STREET, CARRABELLE, FL STREET, CARRABELLE, FL STREET, CARRABELLE, FL STREET, CARRABELLE, FL STREET, CARRABELLE, FL STREET, CARRABELLE, FL STREET, CARRABELLE, FL STREET, CARRABELLE, FL STREET, CARRABELLE, FL STREET, CARRABELLE, FL STREET, CARRABELLE, FL STREET, CARRABELLE, FL STREET, CARRABELLE, FL STREET, CARRABELLE, FL STREET, CARRABELLE, FL STREET, CARRABELLE, FL STREET, CARRABELLE, FL STREET, CARRABELLE, FL STREET, CARRABELLE, FL STREET, CARRABELLE, FL STREET, CARRABELLE, FL STREET, CARRABELLE, FL STREET, CARRABELLE, FL STREET, CARRABELLE, FL STREET, CARRABELLE, FL STREET, CARRABELLE, FL STREET, CARRABELLE, FL STREET, CARRABELLE, FL F. Josef Plum, MD Joda G. 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Your Full Service Wedding and Event Florist Your Full Service Wedding and Event Florist BILL MILLER REALTY 850-697-3751 (3310) 570-0658 3/2 DBL WD -3 F E NC ED C OR. LOTS-2 C AR GAR $60,000 $29,500 $2,500 D OW N BU YS 2 B ED AP T 2 6 OR RE N T $500/MTH GU LF V IEW & A CC ESS 3 B DR 2 BA 2006 M / H 16 X 80 $89,000 3/B-D/W-3 C OR. LOTS DBL GARAGE $59,500 MIH 2 CR N R LOTS BLK. $ S TORE RED UC ED $49,500 C OMM. BLDG-98 O N G U LF-RE N T $600/MTH Gail Brannan We Hope You Have A GREAT Day!!! The following report is provided by the Franklin County Sheriffs Ofce. Arrests in this report were made by of cers from the Carrabelle Police Department (APD) and the Franklin County Sheriffs Of ce (FCSO. All defendants are considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law. March 22 Stephen A. Smiley, 30, Panama City, violation of probation (FCSO) Richard J. Duncan, 32, Apalachicola, possession of a rearm by a convicted felon, and violation of probation (FCSO) Kimberly J. Richards, 43, Panama City, violation of probation (FCSO) March 23 Charles K. Barnes, Jr., 20, Carrabelle, driving while license suspendered (CPD) March 24 Justin R. Griggs, 23, Apalachicola, violation of probation (FCSO) ARREST REPORT The following is the report of the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservations Commissions Division of Law Enforcement for March 16-22 for Franklin County. During patrol onboard the offshore patrol vessel, Gulf Sentry, the crew boarded several vessels inbound to East Pass. Following a fisheries and safety inspection onboard a Georgia registered vessel, Officer Will Raker issued citations for over the bag limit of red drum and possession of two oversized red drum. Later that night, the crew was patrolling off Little St. George Island when they encountered several shrimp boats dragging inside three miles. Officers boarded one of the vessels that appeared to be dragging more than two nets. Upon boarding the vessel, the officers confirmed the vessel was dragging two primary nets, as well as a try net within one mile from shore. Officer Josh Waite issued a citation for the above violation and a warning in reference to Turtle Excluder Device (TED) violations. Waite provided the captain with the necessary information to correct the TEDs. The crew of the Gulf Sentry was conducting a choke point patrol in the Carrabelle River utilizing smaller patrol boats. As the officers approached a vessel to conduct a fisheries and safety inspection, they observed what appeared to be a large red drum surface just off the stern of the vessel. The officers recovered the red drum and boarded the vessel. Upon inspection and interviews, Officer Matt Gore issued citations for possession of an oversized red drum, interference with an FWC officer, and possession of 13 undersized black sea bass. Later in the patrol, another vessel was inspected and officers observed that the operator showed indicators of impairment. After completing the field sobriety tasks Officer Raker arrested the vessel operator for boating under the influence. FWC REPORT Governor Stone to sail Saturday Weather permitting of course. the Governor Stone will move to Apalachicola this weekend, hopefully under sail and captained by Capt. Gercak, tentatively embarking at 10 a.m. on Saturday, March 31 and arriving sometime in the afternoon at Riverfront Park. Those in Carrabelle consider this an opportunity for members and guests to sail a beautiful trip through St. George Sound. To register contact Cal Allen at 850-524-1124. Register early; the vessel will ll up quickly. Riverkeeper hosts annual meeting Saturday All are welcome to the Apalachicola Riverkeepers annual membership meeting on Saturday March 31 from 2 to 4 p.m. at the Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve, 108 Island Drive, Eastpoint. Special speaker is Matt Greene. Sure to be noted will be the departure of Meg Nelson, who served as deputy director for the Apalachicola Riverkeeper for the past year. Nelson left March 16 to pursue another venture closer to her home in Walton County. The Apalachicola Riverkeeper is grateful to Meg for the time she served and the energy and creativity she brought to the organization. The organization is currently seeking a deputy director to assist the executive director in all aspects of organization development and operations as needed For more info, call 653-8936 or visit www. ApalachicolaRiverkeeper.org Gulf-Franklin offers digital photo course Digital Photo Presentation will be taught at the Gulf/Franklin Campus on Wednesdays, April 11, 18, 25 and May 2from 9 to 11 a.m. The fee is $49, and registration can be handled at the Gulf / Franklin Campus in Port St. Joe prior to the rst class. Experience the bene ts of using digital photos along with the computer in order to share moments in color and with text. This course will teach how to use Microsoft PowerPoint and bring photography and photo editing to life. Present memories with captions and bullet point text to enhance the photography experience, as well as create slideshows and digital scrapbook. Course is team taught, by Education Encore instructors Lana Scroggins, with her enthusiastic expertise in computers and gadgets; and Sue Bull, experienced in photography and photo editing, at Gulf Coast State College. For more information, email susanbull@bellsouth.net, lws@ mindspring.com or jbarr@ gulfcoast.edu or call Jim Barr at (850) 873-3513. Cook to chair transportation committee The Apalachee Regional Planning Council (ARPC), which provides staff to the Franklin County Transportation Disadvantaged Committee asked for assistance in getting an elected of cial to serve as chairman of the committee meetings. On March 20, the county commission voted unanimously to appoint NEWS BRIEFS See BRIEFS A14

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Opinion A4 | The Times USPS 027-600 Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 Publisher: Rick Martin Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola Times By Caty Greene Special to the Times The Book Drive now on at the Apalachicola Municipal Library is bringing in some great titles. We were just given the very first book ever written by John Grisham. It will go in the collection and not be sold at the book sale on May 5.Sorry, but you can check it out after we process it. We also added a Eugenia Price and some new funny Florida fiction. Did you know that Stephenie Meyers book Twilight has been put out in a graphic novel format? Do you even know what a graphic novel is? They are narrative works in which the story is conveyed to the reader using sequential art in either an experimental design or in a more traditional format, like comics. Graphic novels, as well as zines, are regular stock-in-trade in larger city libraries, but we own only a couple of the former. Zines are self-published magazines which are accessioned and circulated by numerous public and academic libraries, usually on specic topics. There are exclusively zine libraries too. Wikipedia has the history if you are interested. The Apalachicola library remains a predominantly print book collection, although we do offer some audio books, and would be happy to have donations of those also. The Book Drive is a new activity of the Patrons of the Apalachicola Library Society (PALS), our friends group founded in 2009. Friends groups are very common for libraries, as they help with fundraising to supplement the government funding source, and raise awareness of library benets, activities and issues. There have been a number of religious books donated, with some added but quite a few that will be for sale. There will be plenty of new releases which are duplicates in the collection, and books that have been withdrawn from the librarys collection will also be represented. In advance of the May 5 Book Sale, we will be pulling out more than 50 boxes of books accumulating in our storage. The sale will be right across the street from the Tour of Homes ticket and auction location, so please come by and see what we have. Thank you to all our patrons and friends for donating books and keep them coming! Caty Greene is the librarian for the Apalachicola Municipal Library. To reach her, call 653-8436. Books coming in for book drive @ THE LIBRARY Caty Greene Thursday, March 29, 2012 Screenings help prevent colon cancer By James Stockwell, M.D. Special to the Times Tragedy strikes when a family member, friend or anyone suffers and dies from a preventable cause. It could even happen to you or ones you love. Then comes the grief and question of, what could have been done differently to prevent this tragic loss? The sting and pain are even deeper with the realization the loss could have been prevented. The answer is colon cancer screening, which often prevents tragic loss. Colon cancer is a disease of the large intestine, preventable in at least 60 percent of cases. In those in whom cancer is discovered early, it is 90 percent curable. Yet colon cancer continues to be the third leading cause of cancer in men and woman, with over 150,000 new cases and 50,000 deaths per year in the United States. This occurs because individuals ignore screening recommendations and warning symptoms. I must emphasize the waiting for symptoms is a dangerous gamble since symptoms often occur late, when the disease is advanced with less chance of cure. Screening is key to lowering the death rate from colon cancer. With screening, colon cancer is often preventable because it begins in a noncancerous growth called a polyp which takes time to develop into a cancer. During this time the polyp can easily be removed during a colonoscopy and then no cancer will develop. There are many reasons individuals avoid screening for prevention of colon cancer. One is that some do not know colon cancer is preventable. Also, women may erroneously feel it is a mans disease. Men have a strong tendency to avoid medical care and, often, a real fear of such care. Seeking care can even be perceived as a weakness. Many other fears can be reasons for not undergoing screening. None of us wants to undergo perceived unpleasant tests. Many individuals are private and become uncomfortable in a medical setting, or have personal taboos in regard to their bodies. Some fear a painful experience will occur. Many have heard the preparation is unpleasant. Others worry about something serious being found and would rather not know. Potential complications of any medical treatment are also a concern. In this time of a poor economy, nancial concerns and realities can interfere with undergoing preventative tests or having worrisome symptoms investigated. Last, is the Yuk factor. The colon just does not seem to be a pleasant part of the body to discuss or address. Fear is no reason not to address lifesaving preventative tests. The fears are often much worse than the reality experienced. First, the procedure itself has little discomfort associated with it. The patient is safely sedated and has little or no memory of the procedure. The preparation for the procedure is quite tolerable and can even be modied, if requested. The team that interacts with the patient is professional, caring and dedicated to preserving the patients dignity and privacy. Fear that something might be found is misguided. Most of the time the exam is normal or small noncancerous polyps are found. It is actually wonderful the benign polyps are found and removed so they do not evolve into cancer. Again, if a cancer is found, it will be in an earlier and more curable stage. Fear of complications is always a concern for any patient. Complications are extremely rare and all measures are taken to make sure each patient has a safe experience. The safety of each patient is the most important concern of the team. Financial concerns and barriers are not to be ignored. The hospital, physician and all involved are aware of nancial adversities and stresses. All will make every effort to work with patients to make sure they can undergo preventative measures. The two most common and recommended tests used for the prevention of colon cancer are chemically testing the stool for small amounts of blood that cannot be seen (stool occult blood testing) and a colonoscopy. The testing for occult blood is important but not adequate, alone, for the early detection or prevention of colon cancer. Screening colonoscopies must be done. This involves inserting a lighted tube through the anus into the colon under sedation. The procedure takes about 30 minutes during which time the whole inside of the colon is visualized and benign polyps are removed. Following the procedure there is little or no discomfort and patient is able to promptly resume a normal diet. Current screening recommendations are as follows: Starting at age 50, yearly testing of the stool for occult blood and a colonoscopy every 10 years. Screening is recommended starting at age 45 in African Americans who may have an earlier onset and more advanced disease. An earlier screening age is recommended in those who have relatives with colon cancer or polyps. Also, earlier screening examinations may be appropriate in patients with other cancers such as uterine, ovarian, urinary tract, other digestive tract tumors and brain tumors. Since symptoms of colon cancer are often late, patients with rectal bleeding, change in bowel habit, unexplained abdominal pain and fatigue from anemia should promptly seek medical attention. I have seen too many tragic, needless deaths during my medical career from colon cancer. Please undergo colon cancer screening and encourage those who you care about to do the same. Dr, James Stockwell is a retired Tallahassee gastroenterologist who currently works on staff at Weems Memorial Hospital. He can be reached at 653-8853. This Saturday, March 31 there will be a 10 a.m. educational event at the Holy Family Community Center in Apalachicola. In addition to activities, 150 FIT (fecal immunochemical testing for occult blood) will be distributed free. Kits will be mailed back and, of course, any positive patients will undergo diagnostic testing. JAMES S TOCKWELL, M .D. LETTERS TO THE EDITORT ime to experience a state park Spring begins. My calendar has informed me of the ofcial beginning of this refreshing season, although Ive felt it outside for a few weeks now. As a Floridian, I know spring will be short but it will also be time to break out of your everyday routine, release some stress, get out of the ofce and experience nature in Floridas state parks. Take the time this season to experience nature with all ve of your senses seeing Floridas vistas, smelling newly bloomed owers, feeling the sand between your toes, hearing the sounds of children playing and tasting the treats of your picnic basket in a state park. Spring is an optimum season to engross yourself in the natural and cultural resources of Floridas state parks. There are so many opportunities for new experiences and the special places to continue your old family traditions. Sometimes it is a hike in the forest, a walk on the beach, building sand castles with your kids, watching a sunrise or a sunset, grilling lunch under a big oak tree, looking for a bird species to add to your life list or paddling your canoe on a long stretch of river. Its about immersion, surrounding yourself with nature and coming away with a renewed appreciation for Floridas splendor. Sometimes you need a slow, relaxing experience, and sometime you might prefer a fast, exhilarating experience. I encourage you to spend time in Floridas award-winning state parks this season. Savor the atmosphere of spring and enjoy the Sunshine State in the Real Florida. Sincerely, Donald V. Forgione Director, Florida Park Service Carroll fair and honest to letter of law This might be strange coming from a criminal defense attorney but it is important that I speak out on behalf of Cliff Carroll, candidate for sheriff of Franklin County. I have been involved with Deputy Carroll for over 10 years. As someone coming from the other side of the legal world, I can tell you that I can trust him. He is very tough on crime but more than that, he also metes it out with a genuine respect for what is lawful. For example, in over 24 years of making motions to suppress evidence due to illegal searches and seizures I have yet to beat a Cliff Carroll case. He does it by the book! I have had many cases where I argued that a clients Miranda rights were never given or abused. I have never won a case in which Deputy Carroll was involved. Again, he is fair and honest to the letter of the law when it concerns constitutional rights. When he was working on the drug task force I could always count on him to be straight with a client who had confessed. If that client could help law enforcement I was never afraid to have Deputy Carroll interview the client even if I wasnt present. I could always trust Deputy Carrolls word that if my client would cooperate, he or she would receive leniency. In reality, only the state attorneys ofce can give leniency. However Deputy Carroll always stood up and did the right thing by going to bat for a client if and only if that client helped law enforcement. People of Franklin County, you could not go wrong electing this man to serve as your sheriff. His dedication to the letter of the law, respect for people, and his tenacity at work make him an ideal person to head your sheriffs department. Steven P. Glazer Criminal and Juvenile Defense Attorney Crawfordville Not easy to pedal an oyster boat I live in Carrabelle, and travel a lot to Eastpoint. I was out Saturday doing my errands and I noticed a lot of gas stations did not have the gas prices lit up on their signs. I started asking questions as to why not and they told me We dont have any regular gas. If you want anything, you will have to buy hightest gas. They also told me they had no clue as to when they would be getting any at all. I heard someone say that it is because of the tankers are not being allowed here. I really think we need to do something, How are we all going to be able to get to work if we cannot put gas in our cars or trucks? It is kinda hard to pull a boat for oystering on a bike, dont you think? On another note about gas: I noticed a lot more times I have gotten gas from a few of these stations that I have had trouble with water content in the gas. The gas stations will say they dont have a problem, that I am the rst to complain, and they do nothing about it. My van runs great until I get what I call junk gas. Patty Johnson

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Local The Times | A5 Thursday, March 29, 2012 As a lifelong resident of Franklin County, I have a vested interest in the future and success of this great county. I have 23 years experience with the Franklin County Sheriffs Of ce, including four years as sheriff. There is no greater teacher than hands-on experience. Having the last couple of years to re ect on the past and view life from a civilian perspective has enhanced my vision for the future and the citizens of Franklin County. It would indeed be a great honor and privilege to serve and protect all of Franklin Countys citizens as your next sheriff; as I am more than ready, willing and able to accept this challenge. My leadership and management capabilities in this capacity have been time-tested and proven. If elected your sheriff, I will continue to work diligently and enthusiastically to ensure our streets and communities are safer for all Franklin County residents, as well as the visitors and tourist that frequent our county. If you have any questions or concerns feel free to contact me at 653-6013. MOCK from page A1 cost of constructing and maintaining the dam and 18 miles of pipeline. According to an environmental impact study (EIS) performed by AECOM, an Atlanta management consultant rm, the impact of the new reservoir on downstream communities will be negligible. Other experts disagree and say that any additional water taken from the ACF system will have a negative impact on downstream communities. In April 2009, Brig. Gen. Joseph Schroedel, commander of the Corps South Atlantic Division, spoke at a National Research Council conference in Washington, D.C., on the issue of managing the ows of water in the ACF Basin. There is not enough water in the ACF to meet current needs, and I want to repeat that for emphasis. Theres not enough water in the ACF Basin to meet current needs, he said. Dave McClain said ACF Stakeholders, Inc., a diverse group of individuals, corporations and non-profit organizations throughout Alabama, Florida and Georgia that represent interests within the ACF basin, has filed a letter objecting to the Glades project with the regulatory division of the Savannah District U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. On March 20, McClain told the county commission, Its a myth to think you can store water in bad times and use it in good times because you get evaporation and other diversions that reduce the amount of water available. This sets it aside for one select group. Were trying to work basin-wide. In the letter, McClain wrote that the proposed additional out-takes from the Chattahoochee River would put at hazard authorized downstream uses from Atlanta to LaGrange, to Eufaula, Ala., to Columbus, and the oodplain and shery habitat in the Apalachicola River and bay. On March 22, the Corps displayed results of the EIS at the scoping meeting, which drew about 15 county residents. One of about 20 Corps posters displayed at ANERR showed the potential impact on lakes downstream of Glades. According to the EIS, there will be no impact on Lake Seminole, the southernmost body of water addressed. The information provided at that meeting did not deal with the impact on Apalachicola Bay. A PowerPoint presentation, shown at the meeting also did not address impacts on Florida water levels. Tai Ye Su, an engineer employed by AECOM and project leader for the Glades EIS, said her company worked with data provided by Hall County. She urged anyone who might be affected by the reservoir to comment to the Corps. She said public comment would guide her companys future research on the Glades project. To learn more, visit the reservoirs website www. gladesreservoir.com. To comment on the Glades reservoir go to www.gladesreservoir. com/submit-comments or write to Attn: Richard Morgan, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Savannah District, 100 W. Oglethorpe Ave., Savannah, GA 31401-3640. All comments must be submitted by April 17. RESERVOIR from page A1 By DAVID ADLERSTEIN Times City Editor Franklin Countys jobless rate dropped below 8 percent in January, falling by 0.2 percentage points to 7.9 percent. According to preliminary numbers released March 13 by the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity (DEO), 11 people dropped off the countys jobless rolls in January, from 437 down to 426, while the labor force also shrank, from 5,398 to 5,383. The countys labor force remains larger than it was one year ago, when it comprised 5,266 workers, and the jobless rate was higher, at 8.6 percent. Franklin Countys jobless picture tied it with Lafayette and Jackson counties for eighth best in the state. Monroe County had the states lowest rate, at 5.7 percent, followed by Okaloosa and Walton at 6.9, Alachua at 7.3, Leon at 7.4, and Union and, Holmes counties both at 7.7 percent. The unemployment rate in the Gulf Coast Workforce region (Bay, Franklin, and Gulf counties) was 9.9 percent in January, 1.7 percentage points lower than the regions 2011 rate of 11.6 percent and above the current state rate of 9.5 percent. Out of a labor force of 100,225, there were 9,932 unemployed Gulf Coast residents. In January 2012, there were 71,100 nonagricultural jobs in the Panama CityLynn Haven-Panama City Beach metro area (Bay County), up 1,400 jobs over the year. This metro area experienced an annual rate of job gain of 2.0 percent, while the state gained jobs at a rate of 1.0 percent. We are a bit surprised to see our job growth rate double the states rate for the month of January, but well take it any day of the week, said Kim Bodine, executive director for the Gulf Coast Workforce Board. The other January 2012 unemployment rates in the counties that comprise the Gulf Coast Workforce region were Bay County, down 0.2 percentage points to 10.0, and Gulf County, unchanged at 10.0 percent. Leisure and hospitality (+900 jobs); trade, transportation, and utilities (+700 jobs); education and health services (+200 jobs); and nancial activities and other services (+100 jobs each) were major industries gaining jobs over the year in the Panama City-Lynn HavenPanama City Beach metro area. Although we are pleased to see the increased job growth in January, we realize that most of it is in retail trade and food and drinking establishments. We feel that we will be more fully recovered when we see other sectors coming back, especially manufacturing and wholesale trade, said Bodine. The gains were offset by losses in mining, logging, and construction (-400 jobs) and information and professional and business services (-100 jobs each). Manufacturing and government remained unchanged over the year. Nonagricultural employment growth in leisure and hospitality (+9.0 percent); trade, transportation, and utilities (+5.2 percent); other services (+3.4 percent); and nancial activities (+2.9 percent) exceeded state growth. County jobless rate drops below 8 percent By LOIS SWOBODA Times Staff Writer On March 20, for the second time this year, the county commission changed their policy on travel spending. The move came after Clerk of Courts Marcia Johnson told them the new daily allowance for meals and incidental expenses, which they approved 4-1 on Jan. 18, exceeds the Internal Revenue Service standard of $46, and that the difference is taxable income. She suggested the county adopt the federal standard. In January, commissioners set the in-state per diem rate for county employees at $55 and out-of-state at $75; an increase of 41 percent and 92 percent respectively. Prior to the Jan. 18 resolution, county employees received $39 daily for meals and incidentals, higher than the $36 per diem provided in most Florida counties. Chairman Pinki Jackel said she favored adopting the federal standard, noting that she had gotten, a lot of pushback, over the Jan. 18 increase. Although we did nothing wrong, I wish we had discussed it at a regular meeting, she said. Commissioner Smokey Parrish moved to base the per diem on federal standards and the commission voted unanimously to do so. The change applies only to the allotment for meals and incidental expenses. Lodging costs are reimbursed at 100 percent, based on receipts. Traveling county employees will receive $8 for breakfast, $12 for lunch and $26 for dinner. Under the existing county resolution, the total cost of lodging and transportation are reimbursable with receipts. Reimbursement for mileage oats with the rate approved by the Internal Revenue Service. All travel must be preapproved by the Franklin County Commission. Traveling county employees can request their per diem in advance of travel and are not required to produce receipts for their meals, according to the county nance department. The new rates take affect April 1. Commissioners amend travel spending We are a bit surprised to see our job growth rate double the states rate for the month of January, but well take it any day of the week. Kim Bodine Gulf Coast Workforce Board

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PET OF THE WEEK Franklin County Humane Society NIP FIRE A N TS I N THE BUD! CALL L OIS AT 653-5857 Franklin Countys ONLY LOC AL Pest Control Company Robert C. Bruner Attorney Personal & Business Bankruptcy Over 30 Years Legal Experience 850-670-3030 bankruptcy relief under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon advertisements. Before you decide, ask us to send you free written information Society A6 | The Times Thursday, March 29, 2012 Grif n Browning turns 1 Henry Grif n Browning celebrated his rst birthday with family and friends in Tallahassee at Pinezy Park on Thursday, Feb. 9, 2012. He is the son of Bert and Jennifer Browning and the brother of Jessica. His maternal grandparents are Don and Pamela Ashley, of St. James Island. His paternal grandmother is Sharon Browning of Lanark Village. Happy birthday, we all love you Grif n! BIRTHDAYS Adam McCullough born Adam Lee McCullough was born on Wednesday, Dec. 7, 2011, at Tallahassee Memorial Hospital. He weighed 6 pounds, 15 ounces, and was 19.75 inches long. He is the son of Amber McCullough of Apalachicola. Maternal grandmother is Donna Mathes of Carrabelle. Maternal great-grandparents are Winston and Alberta Bellew of Apalachicola. Happy double-nickels Gail! With love, The Ya-Ya Sisters ENGAGEMENT Deborah Heiter, Douglas Craig engaged The parents of Deborah Heiter are pleased to announce the engagement and upcoming wedding of their daughter to Douglas K. Craig of Crawfordville. An Oct. 20, 2012, wedding is planned at 3 p.m. at the Wildwood Country Club in Crawfordville and reception to follow. The wedding couple is registered at Bed, Bath and Beyond. Invitations will be sent. Partington awarded Weber State scholarship WEDDING Tiffany Grant, Michael ONeal to wed Saturday With joy and happiness, Tiffany Sheree Grant and Michael Jerod ONeal are pleased to announce their upcoming marriage this Saturday, March 31, 2012, at 5 p.m. at Lafayette Park in Apalachicola. A reception will follow at Fort Coombs Armory. The bride is the daughter of Carrie Carroll of Eastpoint. Maternal grandparents are Evelyn Carroll of Eastpoint and the late Clifford Carroll Sr.; and Linda Thompson of Apalachicola, and John Grant of Panama City. The groom is the son of Wayne ONeal Jr. of Apalachicola and Barbara Swiney of Apalachicola. Paternal grandparents are Wayne and Grace ONeal of Apalachicola and the late Richard and Keturah Robinson of Apalachicola All family and friends are invited to attend. Cara Rose Partington has been awarded the 2012-13 Matthew Shepard Memorial Scholarship at Weber State University in Ogden, Utah, for outstanding academic achievement and her activism in the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community. While at Weber, she will be majoring in criminal Justice and minoring in sociology. After graduating, Cara has plans to become a humane law enforcement of cer, working on behalf of animals and their rights. Other scholarships Cara has received are Minnesota State University Moorhead Rainbow Scholarship, Minnesota State University Moorhead Film Scholarship, PFUND Foundation Moxie Award, and the Rex Partington Memorial Scholarship, given by Curt and Beth Blair. Cara is the proud granddaughter of Cleo Holladay of Apalachicola, the late Rex Partington and niece of Dixie Partington and Jerry Hall of Apalachicola. CARA ROSE PARTINGTON DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times The Bay Area Choral Society offered a wondrous performance of Gabriel Faures Requiem at the Ilse Newell for the Performing Arts concert Sunday at Trinity Episcopal Church. The piece included solos by tenor Bill Crane, soprano Carla May and bass Gordon Adkins. During the rst half of the concert, a series of music be tting the Lenten season, soloists also included sopranos Frances Campbell, Leslie Coon and Virginia Harrison and bass Merel Young. Following the performance, Young, at right, announced he was retiring from his role in conducting the choral society. He also paid tribute to pianist Janis Ramos, at left, who was making her piano debut with the society. A reception catered by Renee Bacot followed. FAREWELL TO THE MAESTRO

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Faith The Times | A7 Thursday, March 29, 2012 The United Methodist Churches of Franklin County Welcome You First United Methodist Church of Apalachicola Worship Service 11:00 a.m. every Sunday Sunday School 10:00 a.m. 75 5 th St. Apalachicola 653-9530 fumcapalach@gtcom.net Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis Carrabelle United Methodist Church Worship Services 10:45 a.m. Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Celebrate Recovery Mondays 7-9 p.m. 102 NE Ave. B Carrabelle 697-3672 Pastor: Julie Stephens Eastpoint United Methodist Church Worship Service 10:00 a.m. every Sunday Healing service every fourth Monday at 7:00 p.m. 317 Patton Dr. (corner of David St.) 670-8825 Pastor: Rev. Beth White St. George Island United Methodist Church 9:00 a.m. Worship Service 10:00 a.m. Fellowship Hour 201 E. Gulf Beach Dr. 9274635 www.sgiumc.org Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis First Pentecostal Holiness Church 379 Brownsville Road Apalachicola Were excited about what Gods doing!!! Sunday School 9:45 am Sunday Morning Worship 10:45 am Sunday Evening Service 6:00 pm Monday, Youth Group 6:30 pm Wednesday, Royal Rangers, G.A.P. 7:00 pm Wednesday Worship & Word 7:30 pm Nursery Provided during regular church services 7:00 7:00 First Baptist Church St. George Island 501 E. Bayshore Drive 927-2257 R. Michael Waley, Pastor Join us as we praise and worship the living Christ. Great is the Lord and most worthy of praise. Psalm 145:3 Sunday Bible Study ................................................ 10:00am Worship Praise ........................................................ 11:00am Sunday Night ............................................................ 7:00pm Wednesday Power Hour ...................................... 7:00pm Wednesday Youth at S.P.L.A.S.H ....................... 7:00pm Walking in Christ R. Michael Whaley, Pastor WELCOMES YOU Church of the Ascension 101 NE First Street Carrabelle SUNDAY 10:00 AM WELCOMES YOU Church THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH (850) 274-4490 (850) 545-2578 WELCOMES YOU Trinity Trinity Episcopal Church est. 1836 Welcomes You Hwy. 98 & 6th St. Apalachicola 850-653-9550 Sunday Worship Services 8 & 10:30 a.m. Wednesdays Healing Service 11 a.m. Centering Prayer 4 p.m. Quilter loves to tell the story By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star.com Carol Kelley is working on a unique project that brings back happy memories. She calls the quilt Precious Memories. It will be a keepsake designed to t a queen-sized bed. The coverlet will be a pattern of quilting patches and hymns embroidered on white cotton. Im doing things that remind me of my childhood, Kelley said. I used to hear my grandmother singing these when she was kneading her bread and cleaning her house. She always sang. I used to spend my summers at her house. She corrected us with scripture. She had scripture for everything you did. The quilt is Kelleys own design. She said she began mulling the idea months ago and nally set to work. This is the closest I can come to singing, she said. I cant carry a tune in a bucket. I would evacuate the whole church if I sang. But she loves the old hymns she remembers from childhood. Some she has already completed are I Surrender All and In the Garden. Born in Jacksonville, Kelley grew up in Orlando where she met her husband, Ron, and raised her family. He retired in 2003, and the Kelleys moved to Carrabelle. Before moving here, she inherited a keepsake quilt from her husbands grandmother that needed repairs and that launched her into her quilting career. I was more or less a seamstress before then, she said. She bought reproductions of vintage fabric, but was still a little hesitant until she heard about the Wandering Star Quilt Club. She decided to join in late 2006 to learn about quilting and since then has created at least eight quilts and worked on other club projects including the quilt to be rafed off at the Wandering Star quilt show this Saturday, March 31. Kelley said she embroiders when she is riding in the car or waiting at the doctors ofce or elsewhere. It takes her about a week to complete a hymn. She expects Precious Memories to take two-and-a-half to three years to complete but she loves her work. I thoroughly enjoy its very relaxing, she said. Come join me. Pearson benet Saturday Covenant Word will hold a benet for John and Christina Pearson from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday at the Lighthouse on St. George Island. The menu will consist of fresh, hot fried mullet and/or fresh fried Gulf shrimp sandwiches and dinners, served with a side of baked beans and potato salad. There will also be bottled water, soda and boiled peanuts for sale. Island Baptist presents drama First Baptist Church St. George Island will present a drama presentation by the Eagles Landing First Baptist Interpretative Team at 7 p.m. Monday, April 2, at the East End Firehouse on Pine Street on St. George Island. Covenant Word to pray for businesses Covenant Word has Noon Day Prayer from 12:15-1:15 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays. All are welcome. On April 3, there will be a Special Day of Prayer for Franklin County businesses. If you are a business owner and would like to come out, please feel free. Send the name of your business or businesses to be prayed over to cwcci@fairpoint.net or call Covenant Word at 653-8535. Expect God to do the impossible concerning you business. Island church hosts Good Friday simulcast The First Baptist Church of St. George Island will present a simulcast of The Secret Church, presented by Pastor David Platt of The Church at Brook Hills in Birmingham, Ala. at 7 p.m. Good Friday, April 6. For more information, call 927-2257. April 7 Easter egg hunt The Franklin County Sheriffs Ofce will host the annual Easter Egg Hunt on Saturday, April 7, at noon on the eld adjacent to the Sheriffs Ofce on U.S. Highway 65. All children are invited to come out and participate in a wonderful day of egg hunting, with lots of prizes to be given away. The sheriffs ofce will be grilling hot dogs for the occasion free of charge. Come out and enjoy the fun. Faith BRIEFS Pam and I are very appreciative for the readers of the Youth Matters column that have extended kind words and complements. Each week our goal is to give encouraging words and occasional advice to the frazzled parent who wonders why this parenting thing does not come with a foolproof manual. Sometimes it seems that just when you think you have it all gured out, the rules change. About the time you think you have your children gured out, they change. We have experienced many of the trials associated with parenting, in youth ministry and with our children. As empty nesters, we wanted to share some of the experiences and the knowledge we gained along the way. We certainly do not know everything about children and teens, but we know the things that have worked for us. There are many tricks of the trade we wish we would have known when we were raising our children. We have dedicated our lives to mentoring teens and loving the notso-easy-to-love children through difcult times in their life. Recently, I was in the middle of preaching a sermon when a young lady who once attended our youth group came in with her 1-year-old baby and sat down. After service, she walked up to me, with a huge smile on her face, to show me her baby. I stopped what I was doing, held the little girl, and told her how pretty she was. That baby was her prize possession and it was important to the mom for me to meet and bless her. I was overwhelmed with humility and pride to know that I played such a signicant role in her life. There are many children in this county who could use a good mentor. They need someone who is willing to spend a little time getting past the tough exterior that covers the pain inside. Children who have lost a parent to death, imprisonment, drugs or divorce need a positive role model willing to take time with them. Sometimes young people just need to talk to someone they trust. One time, I had a parent show up at my house with her 9-year-old son. She had just picked him up from the jail after being arrested for criminal mischief and she wanted me to try to talk some sense into him. He was angry and rebellious and I knew it would lead to worst things for him and this community if his situation did not change. I took him shing a few times and sometimes I would pick him up just to hang out with me throughout my daily tasks. When he was about 16, he had to go away for a year to a boys home, but as soon as he got out, I received a call from him saying he would be in youth service that night. He turned 18 not long ago and he is doing well at staying out of trouble. As a mentor, there is no limit on the amount of time it will take to change a life. Those who have raised their children have much to offer to the children of this community to see that they grow up to be responsible adults. It is a terrible feeling to read about a youth in the police report or even worse, the obituary, and feel as if you could have done more. The Bible mandates: (Titus 2:3-4) Likewise, teach the older woman to be reverent in the way they live, not to be slanderers or addicted to much wine, but to teach what is good. Then they can train the younger woman to love their husbands and children, to be self-controlled and pure. (2:6), similarly, encourage the young men to be self-controlled. In everything, set an example by doing what is good. In your teaching show integrity, seriousness and soundness of speech that cannot be condemned, so that those who oppose you may be ashamed because they have nothing bad to say about us. We have a responsibility to get involved in this ongoing process. As a mentor, you can help create a memory of a shing trip for a young man or a day of pampering for a young woman. Ice cream is one of the best icebreakers and conversation starters for youth. Young people love to hear stories told with enthusiasm and enjoy adults talking to them as if they matter. Take time to mentor a child in need of guidance; it may inspire them forever. We welcome all suggestions and hope you enjoy this weekly column. Please send all emails to Scott Shiver at frontline247@mac.com. Children pay interest when you lend a hand Spring Fling, quilt show on tap Saturday Spring has sprung, and while you are working in your yard, dont forget to throw a couple of mothballs in your owers beds and under the bushes to keep the snakes out. Happy Spring Cleaning. What a turnout: the Clean-Up day was a big success. Even Cliff Carroll was on hand to help. Some of the pickup trucks picked up the larger items, and the others gathered the bags of trash. About 12:30 p.m., the volunteers came into Chillas Hall for the Reuben sandwich lunch. Pat Bott and her helpers did a good job. Thanks girls! Thanks to all who enjoyed the lunch. Everyone welcome. This Saturday, March 31, members of the Lanark Village Boat Club will hold their annual Spring Fling at the club. There will be arts, crafts, Easter items and more. Lunch will be available. Come on over and look around you might come across something you cant live without. Doors will be open from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Also this Saturday, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Chillas Hall, members of the Lanark Wandering Star Quilt Club will have the 20th annual quilt show. Chances on a beautiful quilt are $1 each, or six for $5. Lunch will be outside the hall. The show is open to everyone. Tee time is 1 p.m. this Saturday at our golf course here in the village. Also, there will be the Shoot-Out. Come over and join, or watch rst. The schedule for Holly Week at Sacred Heart of Jesus Catholic Church is as follows: Holy Thursday, April: 4 p.m.; Good Friday, April 6, 4 p.m.; No Mass on Saturday, April 7; and Easter Sunday, April 8, Mass at 11:30 a.m. Have a Blessed Holy Week and Easter. Be kind to one another, check-in on the sick and housebound, and Smile, Jesus Loves You. Until next time, God bless America, our troops, the poor, homeless and hungry. LANARK NEWS Jim Welsh YOUTH MA TTERS Scott and Pamela Shiver Obituary Tereza Ann Carter, 44, Carrabelle, passed away Wednesday, March 21, 2012, in Carrabelle. Terri had fought a brave ght for three years against melanoma cancer. Born March 18, 1968, in Bradenton, Terri was the daughter of Matilda (Tillie) Williamson and the late Joe Williamson and sister to the late Jodi Williamson. She is survived by her mother, Tillie; son Joseph (Joe) and daughter-in-law Cecillia Carter; her daughter Kayla Carter and their father Jestin Carter; her best friend Donn Clough; and her family at The Moorings. Terri was always baking up special goodies for all the people in her life. She was a longtime front desk clerk at The Moorings at Carrabelle. She was an active member with the Lions Club in Carrabelle. Rest in Peace our dear friend, you will be truly missed! No services are scheduled at this time. In lieu of owers, donations can be made to Tonyas Hope. Online condolences may be made at www.abbeyfh. com.T ereza Ann Carter CAROL KELLEY L O IS SW O B O DA | The Times A square from the quilt Kelley is creating.

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E-mail outdoors news to timesoutdoors @star .com O UTDOORS www.apalachtimes.com Section Section A EV E RYTHING FOR Y OUR O UTDOOR ADV E NTUR E Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL (next to Piggly Wiggly) www.BWOsh.com 5 t h A n n u a l EV E EV E EV RYTHING FOR E RYTHING FOR E Y OUR Y OUR Y O UTDOOR ADV E UTDOOR ADV E UTDOOR ADV NTUR E NTUR E E Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL 5 5 A A n A n A O ur BIGGEST S ALE of the Y ear! HUGE SAVINGS ON T H OUSANDS OF I TEMS MARCH 30 & 31 FRIDAY 7A M 6P M ET & S ATURDAY 7A M 5P M ET WEEKLY ALMANAC APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE TIDE TABLES MONTHLY AVERAGES To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from these given for APALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW Cat Point Minus 0:40 Minus 1:17 East Pass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27 To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from those given for CARRABELLE: HIGH LOW Bald Point Minus 9:16 Minus 0:03 Sponsor the WEEKLY ALMANAC Call Today! 653-8868 Date High Low % Precip Thu, Mar 29 80 65 10 % Fri, Mar 30 79 69 30 % Sat, Mar 31 78 67 50 % Sun, Apr 1 79 67 10 % Mon, Apr 2 80 67 10 % Tues, Apr 3 82 64 10 % Wed, Apr 4 81 64 10 % Freshwater Inshore The feeding frenzy continues in the St. Joe Bay this week as the sheepshead shing is red hot. Try shing around the channel buoys with live shrimp for good sheepshead and black bass action. Spanish Mackerel are still schooling up around the tip of the cape and are easily caught on mackerel trees and got-cha plugs. A few cobia have been caught this week out of Mexico beach. A solid 40 pound sh and several smaller ones were spotted on the beach and at Hurricane cut. Our area is coming alive with good shing this month. Lake Wimico and the brothers are reporting good bass catches this week. Some anglers are using shiners, but most are using spinner baits and plastic worms. depot creek is heating up as well this week with good reports of painted bream and cat sh. SPONSORED BY Buds N Bugs: Cherokee rose By Lois Swoboda 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes Lswoboda@star .com Cherokee rose ( Rosa laevigata ) is a white rose native to southern China, Taiwan, Laos and Vietnam. This fragrant, evergreen climbing rose produces long, thorny, vine-like canes that will form a 12-foot mound. This rose is often seen sprawling across adjacent shrubs and other supports it employs to climb to even greater heights. The pure white single owers are up to 4 inches in diameter. In our area, they can appear any time from December through July. They form garlands of blossoms in the trees. The fruit of the Cherokee rose is called a hip and is large and thorny. The ower stem is also very bristly. Cherokee rose has attractive evergreen compound leaves composed of three leaflets with the center lea et larger than its partners. The glossy light green lea ets are oval-shaped with a pointed tip. The Cherokee roses fast growth rate and long stems armed with large hooked thorns make it an effective screening and barrier plant. The species was introduced to the United States in about 1780, where it soon became naturalized and where it gained its English name. This plant is now considered to be an invasive species throughout much of the Deep South. The Cherokee rose was adopted by the Georgia General Assembly as the state ower of Georgia at the request of the Federation of Womens Clubs on Aug. 18, 1916. The proclamation incorrectly states that the Cherokee rose is a native plant. The white ower is commonly associated with the Trail of Tears, the forced relocation of Indians in the southeastern United States. According to legend, when the journey began in 1838, women and children were paralyzed by grief. The elders prayed for a sign that would lift the mothers spirits to give them strength. The next day, a beautiful rose began to grow where tears had fallen to earth. The rose is white for the tears; and the gold center represents the gold taken from Cherokee lands. The seven leaves on each stem are said to represent the seven Cherokee clans. In Victorian language of owers, white roses symbolize lost love. Special to The Times At the River Delta Bass Club of Apalachicolas February tournament, held Feb. 25 in White City, Lloyd Alford, right, nished in rst place with 13.37 pounds. Mike Pridgen, left, nished second with 13.19 pounds. Finishing third with 11.85 pounds was Gerald Dykes. Dewitt Galloway nished fourth with 10.79 pounds. Fifth place went to Greg Dykes with 10.36 pounds, followed by sixth place, Brandon King, 9.49 pounds; seventh place James Newsome, 9.20 pounds; eight place Paul Newsome, 8.80 pounds; ninth place Alvin Martina, 8.43 pounds; 10th place Pap Duncan, 5.42 pounds; 11th place Sherman Alford, 4.99 pounds; and 12th place Mark Yowell, with 3.00 pounds. The club is supported by Apalachicola Ace Hardware and Fishermans Choice Bait and Tackle of Eastpoint, For info about River Delta Bass Club, call Mike Pridgen at 653-5563. Capt. Nathan Donahoe is seen on March 17 with his rst pompano of 2012. The sh was caught on a Nylure Pompano Jig tipped with a sand ea. Its on! Donahoe said. Pompano are considered among the most avorful of all Gulf sh. PHOTO COURTESY OF ROBINSON BROTHERS GUIDE SERVICE Special to The Times Grab your shing rods and tackle box. April 7 is the rst of four licensefree shing days scheduled for this summer in Florida. Fishing is a great way to enjoy Floridas beautiful outdoors, great weather and a wonderful day with family and friends, Gov. Rick Scott said recently. License-free shing days are the perfect opportunity to discover the fun and excitement of shing and Floridas great outdoors. The days are perfect chances for parents who dont yet have a license to take youth shing, or for avid anglers to introduce a friend to the recreational pursuit without having to purchase a license. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission spread out the opportunities this year so more people will be able to head for their favorite lakes and rivers or saltwater destinations on designated days. Instead of providing one weekend for freshwater shing and one weekend for saltwater shing, commissioners decided at their February meeting to break up the days. You wont need a recreational shing license on the special days listed below. Florida residents and nonresidents, mark these Saturdays on your calendar for 2012: April 7: Freshwater June 2: Saltwater June 9: Freshwater Sept. 1: Saltwater Special to the Times Fishermen targeting gag grouper in state waters off the coast of Franklin, Wakulla, Jefferson and Taylor counties will be able to take some of their catch home for dinner starting this Sunday, April 1. This regional season will end June 30 and is for 2012 only. The season also includes all waters of Apalachicola Bay and Indian Pass, including those in Gulf County, and all waters of the Steinhatchee River, including those in Dixie County. Gag grouper caught in state waters (from shore to nine miles out) off these four counties may not be taken ashore in areas that are closed to harvest. For example, a gag grouper caught April 1 in state waters off Jefferson County cannot be taken ashore in Dixie County, excluding the Steinhatchee River. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission established this regional season at its February meeting to provide shing opportunities for private recreational anglers when gag grouper are closer to shore and can be safely accessed by smaller boats. Overall shing effort for gag grouper is low in these counties, because it is the least densely populated region of Floridas Gulf Coast. Providing this spring season will balance the economic and social needs of this region with the conservation needs of gag grouper. In Gulf of Mexico federal waters (beyond nine miles) and in the remainder of Gulf of Mexico state waters, shermen will be able to keep gag grouper from July 1 through Oct. 31. State waters off Franklin, Wakulla, Jefferson and Taylor counties will not open during the July-through-October season. Gag grouper may be taken ashore in Franklin, Wakulla, Jefferson and Taylor counties during the Julythrough-October season, but boats with gag grouper aboard may not stop and must have gear stowed while traveling through state waters in that region. Monroe County state waters follow Atlantic rules for gag grouper and are not included in the July-through-October season. The FWC is working with Floridas anglers to rebuild gag grouper populations in the Gulf of Mexico back to strong, sustainable levels. The gag grouper recreational harvest minimum size and bag limits did not change and remain at 22 inches and two gag grouper per person. No more than four of any species of grouper may be kept. To learn more about these management changes, visit MyFWC.com/ Fishing and click on Saltwater, Latest News-Hot Topics for frequently asked questions and answers about the changes. License-free shing days to start April 7 Franklin waters to open longer for gag grouper LOIS SWOBODA | The Times IN PURSUIT OF POMPANO Alford tops February bass tournament MIKE PRIDGEN LLOYD ALFORD Page 8 Thursday, March 29, 2012

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These Baby Girls, sponsored by the Hut and Island Maintenance, are, from left, Aunamaria Arroyo, Marisa Grace Branch and Krystia Marie Branch. DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times crying over an error in the eld, and secondly, that the team was, in fact, going to win the game. Keep your head up, shake it off, let it go, barked Sasnett, smiling. Dont be up there just looking. Hit em. We got to hit the pitcher. The Twisters came through in the clutch, surprising the Carrabelle Christian Center Jay Hawks with four runs in the bottom of the nal inning. So, that was Opening Day on Saturday afternoon for those two teams. For the Baby Girls, in the 7-8 year-old Darlings division, it was on your toes tension and then pandemonium on the diamond, as the girls kept their coaches Terri Shiver, Tammy Chambers, and Angela and Tommy Arroyo in heart-gripping suspense before they held on and got the outs needed for the win against a scrappy group of Fire Balls. At the T-ball, it was much the same thing, although more relaxed and less competitive. I want him to do his best, said Michelle Aikens, whose son Zachary is in his rst year, playing T-ball with the 5-6 year old boys and girls. Hes excited. He thinks every day is supposed to be T-ball, she said, gazing on her son standing with a collection of other children, waiting on a ground ball, rarely ever a y ball, hit their way from a child off a tee. If a ball did come their way, they would all chase it at once, and frequently bump one another in an attempt to be the rst one there. Hes a little irty, noticed his mother. Its really great to get your child into something when theyre younger, instead of waiting until theyre older and they have their mind on other things then. For rst-year assistant coach Karen Harris, whose son Micah is a Tomahawk, too, it was marvel at even the mistakes. Some of these kids have never played baseball before, she said. Im enjoying it so far. Theyre doing doo; Im proud of them. Bob Eddy has signed on to another year as league president, with his eye on keeping in step the three local leagues. Sasnett is the go-to guy for the Apalachicola teams; with Connie Hunnings batting clean-up as local president in Carrabelle, and Lanny Rester the lead-off man in Eastpoint. Eddy said he likes the way the league is going, with 27 teams and dozens of committed volunteers, making sure every child gets a chance to give their best as part of something larger than themselves. Were supposed to be teaching good sportsmanship, how to work together as a team and how to handle adversity in a positive way, to learn from it and grow from it, he said. You cant just throw a t because something didnt go your way, Eddy said. You have to learn What do I need to work on? What do I need to do to improve as a person and player? Good sportsmanship teaches how to handle adversity in a positive way and learn and grow from it. Whats the button to get the best out of that player? he asked. And thats one of the hardest things. You got to let them know whats expected and, in some way, shape or form, you have to let them know whats accepted, Eddy said. To be successful all the time you have to do X, Y and Z. If you want to get lazy you wont be as successful, as often. Fans of the league can visit a new website created to feature schedules, scores and standings. Visit www.allprosoftware.net/ franklincountydixieyouth/. Eddy was delighted at how well the elds looked Saturday. The county did a good job county to prep the elds, he said. That was way, way huge. He goes further than just attention to the fundamentals of the games; he wants everyone to know that theres a larger mission at hand. Theres no way a parent or a player should leave that ballpark mad at each other, he said. I tell everybody, take a breath, step back. Theyre not high school players, they learn different they act different. Everyone gets their skills at different times. Everybodys got an opinion, Eddy said, then grins. But somebody has to be the idiot head coach. Even the umpires see their role as trying to be a positive part of the game. I talk to them, said young Fonda Davis, a newly registered umpire with Dixie Softball Inc. I tell them good job, keep it up. Davis said he plans to ump three games a week, and the upcoming state softball tournament, and promises to keep calling em as he sees em. I keep it neutral, Davis said. CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA SP O RTS www.apalachtimes.com Thursday, March 29, 2012 A Page 9 Section These Baby Girls, sponsored by the Hut and Island Maintenance, are, from left, Aunamaria Arroyo, Marisa Grace Branch and Krystia Marie Branch. DAVID ADLERSTEIN and how to handle adversity how to handle adversity in a positive way and learn and grow from it. Whats the button to get at hand. BASEBALL from page A1 By DAVID ADLERSTEIN 653-8894 | @ApalachTimes Dadlerstein@star .com The Franklin County Lady Seahawks have dropped their last four games, as they have struggled to score runs. The week opened with the dropping both ends of a March 20 doubleheader to Clay High. In the rst Morgan Mock smacked two hits, but Franklin County dropped a 12-2 contest Mock got a hit in each of her two at bats, in the rst and fth innings. The Lady Seahawks pushed across one run in the bottom of the third, when a Chena Segree single, one of two hits on the night, brought Mock home. Another Franklin County run crossed the plate in the bottom half of the fth, when Mock singled and then scored on an error. Gracyn Kirvin, Krista Martina and Morgan Newell each had a hit, with Martina and Newell each pitching. In the nightcap, Franklin County was outmuscled by Clay 16-5, as Newell went 2-3 at the plate. Two Franklin County runs were scored thanks to Newells timely hitting, as she singled in the fourth inning and doubled in the fth inning. Chena Segree was solid in the circle for Franklin County. She allowed seven earned runs over ve innings. Segree gave up 13 hits while walking seven and striking out none. Clay High pounded Franklin County pitching, as nine hitters combined for 17 hits, 11 RBIs and 21 runs scored. Two runs in the bottom of the fourth helped Franklin County close its de cit to 16-2. An RBI single by Scout Segree triggered Franklin Countys two-run inning. The Lady Seahawks pushing across three runs in the bottom of the fth, Franklin County faced just a 16-5 de cit. A two-run double by Newell and an RBI single by Vanessa Simmons set off a Franklin County rally. On March 22 at Wakulla, Franklin County managed just four hits, but it wasnt enough, as they ended up on the bad end of an 11-0 shutout. Kirvin reached base two times in the game, singling in the rst inning and later taking a base-on-balls. Chena Segree gave Wakulla ts in the circle. Wakulla managed just four hits off of Segree, who allowed four earned runs, walked four and struck out none during her 3 2/3 innings of work. Wakulla scored seven runs in the rst inning to build an early lead. Franklin County couldnt get anything going so long as Michael Cooper toed the rubber. Franklin County managed just one hit off of the Wakullas pitcher, who allowed no earned runs, walked none and struck out four during her two innings of work. On Friday at home, the Lady Seahawks dropped a 5-0 game in seven innings to Port St. Joe. Mock did all she could to give Franklin County a boost, getting on base three times, singling in the rst and third innings. Kirvin went 2-for-3, with Scout Segree also managing a hit. PSJs Makayla Ramsey kept Franklin County off the scoreboard for all seven innings she toed the rubber. She pitched a shutout, allowing no opposing players to cross the plate on ve hits while ringing up three. Lady Seahawks struggle to break skid DAVID ADLERSTEIN | the Times Coach Lisa Sweatt has a talk with Morgan Newell. The St. Joseph Bay Golf Clubs Ladies Golf Associations 2012 Championship Tournament would surely have been on the air had the Golf Channel known it was being played. After two days of challenging play, Penelope Evanoff, of Eastpoint, won the 2012 St. Joseph Bay Club Championship. Ethel Bardsley, of Eastpoint is the 2012 Putting Champion and Barbara McQuinn is the 2012 Net Champion. Winner of the B Flight Gross was Patricia Hardman of Cape San Blas. Closest to the pin on the rst day was Pat Gearhart from Pennsylvania and second day was Geri McCarthy from Mexico Beach. Longest drive the rst day was Susan Galloway of Apalachicola and second day was Bardsley. An awards luncheon was held Friday at the Club. The snow birds thought they were playing in a summer sizzler while the locals thought it started out a little on the cool side, but the weather could not have been nicer during the two days play. LGA members at the St. Joseph Bay Golf Club are from as far away as Canada and Maine and join the local LGA for the winter play. The Ladies Golf Association invites lady golfers in the area to come out and join us in a game. We play on Thursday mornings as a group. Call the St Joseph Bay Golf Club at 227-1751 for more information about becoming a member. Pictured from left are Ethel Bardsley, Penelope Evanoff, and Barbara McQuinn. St. Joe Bay ladies conquer the greens DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times Pitcher Christopher Newell hurls for the Twisters, sponsored by Cook Insurance.

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By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com On Saturday, March 10, hundreds of state park volunteers and employees gathered in Apalachicola to celebrate volunteerism. Organizers said 327 volunteers registered at the entry and about 100 support staff were on hand to feed and entertain the throng. Ranger Mike Kinnet said the turn out was a little less than expected, but he was very pleased with the days events and barring an occasional gusty wind, the celebration came off without a hitch. Orman House State Historic site opened its doors to the visitors and tents were pitched in Chapman Botanical Gardens to accommodate cooks, diners and entertainment. Michael Vickey of Pennsylvania, who volunteers for the month of December each year at Stephen Foster State Park, entertained the crowd performing on both hammered dulcimer and mountain dulcimer. Last year, he took rst place for hammered dulcimer at the USA Mid-East Region. Zach Thompson brought his uncles oyster boat to the party for show and tell. He and Alan Shiver served up Apalachicolas nest all afternoon and spun a few yarns along the way. There was a hospitality tent with snacks and beverages courtesy of the Friends of Wakulla Springs State Parks and Friends of Pensacola State Parks. Activities open to the honorees included exhibits from the Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve, Florida State University Marine Lab and St. Vincents National Wildlife Refuge. Alan Knothe of Audubon brought along a device of his own invention to teach identi cation of shorebird eggs and chicks. He talked to visitors about the plight of shorebirds faced with habitat loss. Mike Murphy, a regular volunteer at Wakulla Springs, demonstrated the blacksmiths trade. Allen Ritchie, a Wakulla Springs ranger brought along the U.S. Wisconsin, a model World War II warship he rescued and restored. District 1 Director Danny Jones, Donald Forgione director of Friends of Florida State Parks and Maryjo Morris also a member of the friends acted as presenters during the awards ceremony. Cathy Colvin won Adult Volunteer of the Year for her work at Dr. Julian Bruce Park. John and Judy Rutz, long time volunteers at the Orman House were honored for over 7,000 hours of service. Ernie Alessandrone, who also volunteers at Orman House, was honored for more than 6,000 hours of volunteer service. Alessandrone was not present at the ceremony. Jones thanked all volunteers and told the audience 3,622 volunteers in district 1, which stretches from Pensacola to Tallahassee and south to Perry, had worked 222,929 hours during 2011. In an interview after the ceremony he said that, especially in view of the current economy, Floridas parks could not operate without volunteers. He said volunteers do 50 percent of the work at many smaller parks, including Orman House. Jones also said that economic hard times have not kept folks away from state parks. The day ended with a low country boil courtesy of Friends of McClay Gardens. dbutler@coastalcoverage.com Locally owned and operated Home Business Auto Health Workers Comp Call Ernie 850-545-9392 6512631 MUSHROOM COMPOST AVAILABLE NOW! On behalf of my staff and I, we would like to thank all our loyal patients for the honor of being selected for the multiple awards that we have received over the last 12 months; including voted most compassionate Dr. and Patients Choice Award. It is a great honor and we will continue to strive for the very best medical care for our patients. VINCENT IV ERS, M.D. 301 T wentieth S treet Port S t. Joe, FL 32456 850-227-7070 www.iversmd.com On behalf of my staff and I, we would like to thank all our loyal patients for the honor of On behalf of my staff and I, we would like to We Offer the Freshest Produce, See You There! HIG H WAY 98 EASTPOINT (BY T HE BRIDG E ) TO O RDER CALL MARGARET: (850) 323 1937 HIG H WAY 98 EASTPOINT HIG H WAY 98 EASTPOINT WAY 98 EASTPOINT The Fruit Stand FLORIST NOW ONSIT E LIV E PLANTS FOR GARDENS & BEDS PLANTS FOR GARDENS & LARGE SELECTION OF FLOWERING BASKETS & FERNS We Offer the Freshest Produce, We Offer the Freshest Produce, Local A10 | The Times Thursday, March 29, 2012 Park volunteers pack botanical gardens Photos by LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Above left, Cathy Colvin displays her award with St. George Island Park Director Josh Hodson. At right, Hard tack, chewing tobacco, a collection of coins and scrip and a bandanna were part of an exhibit on turpentine, Scraping the Coniferous Wounds presented by Bonnie Allen, assistant park manager at Wakulla Springs and her brother Cliff. Alan Shiver and Zach Thompson of Eastpoint shucked oysters and shared stories of the oystermans way of life. Lee Edmiston and Roy Ogles prepared low country boil for 500, including 200 pounds of shrimp donated by 13 Mile Seafood. LOU AND BETSY KELLENBERGER | Special to the Times

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Local The Times | A11 Thursday, March 29, 2012 GET YOUR AD IN 653-8868 Trades & Services Laban Bontrager, DMD Monica Bontrager, DMD 12761 Pea Ridge Road Bristol, Florida 32321 TELEPHONE (850) 643-5417 Bristol Dental Clinic DENTURE LAB ON PREMISES Same Day Service on Repairs and Relines Don Lively General Contractors L ICENSED AND I NSURED 20 Y EARS E XPERIENCE P .O. 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NO HIDDEN CHARGES: It is our policy that the patient and any other person responsible for payments has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed by payment or any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment. www.mulliseye.com "WE WELCOME NE W PATIE N TS, C ALL T ODAY FOR YOUR P RIORITY APP OI N TME N T" FOR NEW PATIENTS 59 AND OLDER This certificate is good for a complete Medical Eye Exam with Todd Robinson, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Surgeon. The exam includes a prescription for eye glasses and tests for Glaucoma, Cataracts and other eye diseases FOR YOUR APPOINTMENT CALL: 850-763-6666 ELIGIBILITY: U.S. Citizens living in the Florida Panhandle, 59 years and older, not presently under our care. Coupon Expires: 3-31-12 FREE EYE EXAM CODE: AP00 Darren Payne, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon Lee Mullis, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon Todd Robinson, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon Special to the Times The American Legion Post 82, on Oak Street in Lanark Village, is proud to host the sixth annual Tonyas Hope Day Saturday, April 7. Tonyas Hope was founded by the members of the post after Tonya Bridges of Lanark passed away from cancer. It is the mission of Tonyas Hope to relieve some of the financial stress of everyday expenses, such as gasoline, groceries, utilities, rent, etc. while being treated for cancer. To qualify, you must currently be undergoing treatment for cancer with radiation, chemo or surgery, and a resident of Franklin County. To receive an application, call 850-625-0382. Tonyas Hope Day fundraiser will be at the Lanark Village Post starting at 9 a.m., with a huge yard sale, a short memorial and praise service at noon and Thomas Lee Brannans famous pig roast.$10 donation. Immediately following, Deb Jordon will entertain everyone through the afternoon and at 3 p.m.there will be an auction. A raffle will take place at 6 p.m., with a first prize being $500, second prize is a 32-inch flat screen TV, third prize is a $100 Wal-Mart card and fourth prize a $50 gas card. Evelyn McAnally will finish off the evening with inside entertainment. Yard sale donations may be dropped off at the post any time after 4 p.m. April 1, and you may purchase raffle tickets while you are there. Please come out and support this worthwhile cause. We helped 21 people in 2011, and with the price of groceries and gas going up, the need is greater than ever. Legion plans Tonyas Hope Day for April 7 By LOIS SWOBODA 653-1819 | @ApalachTimes lswoboda@star .com On March 12, the Franklin County School hosted a job fair, with students from grades 5 through 7 given a glimpse of life outside the classroom. About two dozen booths were set up in the new multipurpose room at the Franklin County School. Some had information about continuing education. Florida State University, Florida A&M University, Keyser University and Gulf Coast State College were all present. Once again, Lively Technical Center had a table with information about dozens of technical training programs offered in Tallahassee. The Florida Department of Education offered advice and information on nancing technical school or college education and on teaching careers. Lisa Bailey, representing the Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve, distributed information and answered questions on careers in conservation and the sciences. Professions pro led ranged from educator to researcher to law enforcement and park ranger. She said the Friends of the Reserve offers a $500 scholarship to students graduating from public school in Franklin County in 2012. Preference will be given to students who plan to pursuer a career in the sciences and with a parent or guardian whose income is derived from the Apalachicola River or bay. For more information, call 670-7700. Recruiters from the Army, Navy and Marines brought information on careers in the military. Many county agencies including, the property appraiser, health department, sheriffs department and department of juvenile justice sent representatives to size up future employees. Juvenile justice and Refuge House also took the opportunity to educate youngsters on dangers of tobacco, drugs, alcohol and premarital sex. Also at the boot for juvenile justice was Carol Bar eld, director of the TIGERS program sponsored by the Franklin County Library. Bar eld brought with her author Felicia Thomas of Tallahassee, who had copies of her rst novel Proof Lives. The book concerns decisions young people face in todays world and the consequences of bad choices. Bar eld said TIGERS has purchased seven copies of the short novel for their students. She said Thomas will conduct writing workshops in Apalachicola with the TIGERS this summer. The Apalachicola Police Department talked to students about careers in local law enforcement. Beth Moseley manned a table for Centennial Bank where she took contact information and distributed information on banking. She said Centennial offers a VIP Checking Account to students 18 and older with no minimum balance, no monthly service charge and many more special features. She also brought along several pamphlets about financing higher education. Perhaps the most noticed booth in the gym was that of FairPoint Communications. The communications giant brought along a T-shirt canon that fired with ear-jarring regularity, and a wheel of career skills that students spun for prizes and free gifts. Students explore life after school LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Maddie Newell spins the wheel of career fortune to win a T-shirt at Verizons recruitment booth at the job fair. Manning the booth, from left, are Brendan Martina, Alan Millender and Gary Skiller. Left Steve Dalton gives serious thought to a career in the sciences at the booth for the Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve.

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A12| The Times Thursday, March 29, 2012 CLASSIFIEDS AIRLINES ARE HIRING -Train for hands on Aviation Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified -Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-206-9405 High School Diploma from Home 6-8 weeks. Nationally accredited. Get a diploma! Get a job! Call for free brochure.1-800-264-8330. www.diploma fromhome.com ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home Medical, Business, Criminal Justice Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 866-467-0054 www.CenturaOnline.com tCall 747-5020 to place an ad in the EmeraldCoast Marketplace Find the right person for your job today at emeraldcoastjobs.com 77274T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 19-2011-CA-000442 DEUTSCHE BANK TRUST COMPANY AMERICAS AS TRUSTEE RALI 2005QS9, Plaintiff, vs. CHESTER R. KRAWCZUK, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION TO: CHESTER R. KRAWCZUK Last Known Address: 210 NE 1ST STREET CARRABELLE, FL 32322-2174 Current Address: Unknown ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS Last Known Address: Unknown Current Address: Unknown YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in Franklin County, Florida: LOT 5, BLOCK B, RANGE 4, PICKETT’S ADDITION TO THE CITY OF CARRABELLE, AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 20, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA AND ALSO LOT 6, BLOCK 74 (B4), PICKETT’S ADDITION TO THE CITY OF CARABELLE, AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 20, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 210 FIRST STREET, CARABELLE, FL 32322-1659 has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses within 30 days after the first publication, if any, on Albertelli Law, Plaintiff’s attorney, whose address is P.O. Box 23028, Tampa, FL 33623, and file the original with this Court either before service on Plaintiff’s attorney, or immediately thereafter; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint or petition. This notice shall be published once a week for two consecutive weeks in the Apalachicola Times. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this court on this 7th day of March, 2012. MARCIA M. JOHNSON Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Terry Creamer Deputy Clerk Attorney for Plaintiff: ALBERTELLI LAW P.O. Box 23028 Tampa, FL 33623 **See the Americans with Disabilities Act: In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons needing special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the Clerk of the Courts, Marcia M. Johnson, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, FL 32320; telephone number (850) 653-8861, not later than seven (7) days prior to this proceeding. If you are hearing or voice impaired, please call (850) 577-4400. To file response please contact Franklin County Clerk of Court, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, FL 32320, Tel: (850) 653-8861; Fax: (850) 653-9339. March 22, 29, 2012 86388T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 11-450-CA CAPITAL CITY BANK, Plaintiff, vs. SUNG WOO LEE A/K/A SUNGWOO LEE, HYON SOOK LEE A/K/A HYONSOOK LEE, TARPON RUN HOMEOWNERS’ ASSOCIATION, INC., and UNKNOWN TENANT(S), Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE is given pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated February 29, 2012, in Case No. 11-450-CA, of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit, in and for Franklin County, Florida, in which CAPITAL CITY BANK is the Plaintiff and SUNG WOO LEE A/K/A SUNGWOO LEE, HYON SOOK LEE A/K/A HYONSOOK LEE and TARPON RUN HOMEOWNERS’ ASSOCIATION, INC. are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Front Door of the Courthouse in Apalachicola, Franklin County, Florida at 11:00 a.m. on April 11, 2012, the property set forth in the Final Judgment of Foreclosure and more particularly described as follows: LOT 9 OF TARPON RUN, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 8, PAGE 1, PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. DATED: March 1, 2012 MARCIA M. JOHNSON Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Attorney for Plaintiff: Garvin B. Bowden, Esq., Gardner, Bist, Wiener, Wadsworth, Bowden, Bush, Dee, LaVia & Wright, P.A. 1300 Thomaswood Drive, Tallahassee, Florida 32308 March 29, April 5, 2012 86651T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 19-2011-CA-000052 DIVISION: JAMES B. NUTTER & COMPANY, Plaintiff, vs. THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, OR AGAINST, EDWIN DANIEL A/K/A EDWIN CLYDE DANIEL A/K/A EDWIN C. DANIEL, DECEASED et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION TO: THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, OR AGAINST, EDWIN DANIEL A/K/A EDWIN CLYDE DANIEL A/K/A EDWIN C. DANIEL, DECEASED LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: UNKNOWN CURRENT ADDRESS: UNKNOWN ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT (S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: UNKNOWN CURRENT ADDRESS: UNKNOWN YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in FRANKLIN County, Florida: LOT 5, AND 1/2 OF LOT 4, (30 BY 100 FEET), ADJOINING SAID LOT 5, IN BLOCK 143, OF THE CITY OF APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA. SAID PARCEL BEING 90 FEET BY 100 FEET has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses within 30 days after the first publication, if any, on Florida Default Law Group, P.L., Plaintiff’s attorney, whose address is 4919 Memorial Highway, Suite 200, Tampa, Florida 33634, and file the original with this Court either before service on Plaintiff’s attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint or petition. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court on this 8th day of March, 2012. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of the Court By: Terry E. Creamer As Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Mr. Doug Smith, Office of Court Administration, Leon County Courthouse, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301, Phone: 850577-4401, Fax: 850487-7947 March 29, April 5, 2012 86448T REQUEST FOR SEALED BIDS The City of Apalachicola is now accepting sealed bids for the following surplus vehicles: 1) 1997 Ford Ranger PU -VIN# 1FTCR10A8VUB69703 2) 2004 Ford Explorer VIN# 1FMZU62K24UB55284 3) 1988 Ford F350 Dump Truck -VIN# IFDKF37H2KNA4S480 4) 2001 Ford Explorer VIN# IFMZU63E72UA09680 5) 1999 Chevy Ventura Van -VIN# 1GNDX03EOXD142637 6) 1986 Chevrolet GMC Dump Truck -VIN# 1GBT7D4YOGV104196 Bids may be presented on any or all vehicles. All bids should be submitted in a sealed envelope with the vehicle(s) being bid on clearly noted on the outside of the envelope. Bids will be accepted until 4:00 p.m. Friday, April 20, 2012 at City Hall, 1 Bay Avenue, Apalachicola, Florida. Faxed or emailed bids will not be considered. Contact City Hall @ 850-653-9319 to make an appointment to inspect vehicles. March 29, 2012 86721T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 2012 CP 12 IN RE: ESTATE OF HARDY LEE SIMMONS also known as H. LEE SIMMONS, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Hardy Lee Simmons, also known as H. Lee Simmons, deceased, whose date of death was February 16, 2012, is pending in the Circuit Court for Franklin County, Florida, Probate Division, File Number 2012CP-12, the street address of which is 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, Florida 32320. The names and addresses of the ancillary personal representative and the ancillary personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is March 29, 2012. Personal Representative: Nelson B. Simmons 3303 Sharer Road Tallahassee, FL 32312 Attorney for Personal Representative: Terrence T. Dariotis FL Bar No. 190057 Post Office Box 16005 Tallahassee, Florida 32317-6005 (850) 523-9300 March 29, April 5, 2012 86731T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 11-000095-CA CADENCE BANK, N.A., Plaintiff vs. JIMMY R. BENNETT, LAKE McKISSACK PLACE HOMEOWNERS’ ASSOCIATION, INC., UNKNOWN TENANT(S) I and UNKNOWN TENANT(S) II, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 4 5 NOTICE is given pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated March 13, 2012, in Case No. 11-000095CA, of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit, in and for Franklin County, Florida, in which Cadence Bank, N.A., is the Plaintiff and Jimmy R. Bennett, Lake McKissack Place Homeowners’ Association, Inc., Unknown Tenant(s) 1 and Unknown Tenant(s) 2, are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Second Floor Lobby of the Franklin County, Florida at 11:00 am, on May 2, 2012, the property set forth in the Final Judgment of Foreclosure, and more particularly described as follows: Lots 12 and 13 of LAKE MCKISSACK PLACE, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 10, Page(s) 9, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. DATED March 13, 2012. MARCIA M. JOHNSON Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk March 29, April 5, 2012 86735T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No.: 2011-000060-CP IN RE: ESTATE OF KENNETH PFEIFER, Deceased. NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION AND NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of KENNETH PFEIFER, deceased, File Number 2011000060-CP, is pending in the Circuit Court for Franklin County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, Franklin County, Florida 32320. The estate is testate, and the date of the will is May 22, 2011. The

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, March 29, 2012 The Times | A13 The News Herald offers a competitive bene t package including medical, dental, vision and life insurance, 401(k) plan, vacation and sick leave, and six paid holidays per year. (Part-time positions have 401(k) plan options). ADVERTISING SALES REPRESENTATIVESThe News Herald and the News Herald.com continue to expand. We are looking for highly motivated, energetic sales people. This is a unique opportunity to help build sales revenues and be a leading part of a progressive advertising sales team. The Sales Executive will be required to make sales calls, train and offer guidelines regarding pricing and packaging of all digital products and services. The ideal candidate must be a leader and have an innovative approach to client development and an understanding of how companies are using the internet to market their business. You must have a drive to win and a passion for consultative media sales. Available Positions: Territory Sales Representative Digital Sales RepresentativeRequired Skills  Highly motivated and results driven  Creative, conceptual and strategic thinker  Professional and positive manner when working with clients and others  Superior knowledge of Microsoft Of ce (Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and Outlook)  Outstanding record of achievement in current/past positions  Superior professionalism, discretion, and judgment  Strong work ethic and capacity to thrive in a team environment  Effective time management and organization skills  Excellent verbal and written communication skills  Keen attention to detail  The candidate with mobile and Yahoo! experience will have an edge Required Experience To be considered, you must have at least 3 years of sales experience, including 1-3 successful years in the area of outside sales and/or online media including internet ad sales. Experience working with media is preferred. The candidate must be highly analytical with meticulous attention to detail. 4-year college degree in advertising/marketing or equivalent experience. SALES/RETENTION CLERK We are seeking an eager part-time telephone sales clerk to sell and/or retain home delivery and single copy circulation. Essential duties include providing excellent customer service, pleasant telephone voice, and outbound dialing. Quali ed candidates will have general of ce experience, sales experience and computer skills. High School Diploma or equivalent is required and one year of customer service experience. This is a parttime position with hour pay, plus commission and bene ts.CUSTOMER SERVICE REPRESENTATIVEWe are seeking an ambitious part-time Customer Service Representative who will actively answer phones and participate in the everyday work and special projects. This position is the primary link between current and potential subscribers and the newspaper. You will handle general of ce work and maintain subscriber and non-subscriber database. Quali ed candidate will have a High School diploma or equivalent and one year of customer service experience. Candidate should have a basic understanding of of ce machines such as calculator, printers, fax machine, computer and internet skills and able to sit for 8 hour shifts. On time attendance during scheduled time is critical in this role as well as working some holidays and weekend shifts. Come by The News Herald at 501 W. 11th Street for an application or send a resume to resumes@ afreedom.com.Freedom Florida is a Drug-free workplace, EOETO APPLY: The News HeraldCareers 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322850-697-9604 850-323-0444 www.seacrestre.comwww. rst tness.com/carrabellePROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND RENTALSRENTALS2 BR 1BA, UNFURNISHED HOUSE Big Yard/Deep Water Dock .............................$650 1 BR RIVER CONDO, BOAT SLIP 3 Night Minimum .......................$105 PLUS DAILY 3 BR 1 BA FURNISHED HOUSE Monthly Rate, Carrabelle ................................$850 1 BR 1 BA UNFURNISHED APT Lanark, Remodeled, Includes Water ...............$475 2 BR 1 BA UNFURNISHED APT Lanark ............................................................$450 1 BR, SUN ROOM/DAYBED Furnished, Lanark ..........................................$450 3 BR 2 BA FURNISHED HOME On River, Boat Dock & Lift ............................$1000 2 BR 1 BA FURNISHED HOUSE On Bay ............................................................$900 3 BR 3 BA FURNISHED CONDO Downtown, 3 Night Minimum ....$105 PLUS DAILY OFFICE SPACE HWY 98 Frontage, Carrabelle ....$550 Plus Utilities Lanark: RV space, private, 2 blocks from launch ramp, power, water, sewer, Dish TV included. $250/ month Call (850)576-4427 Text FL02155 to 56654 WALK TO THE BEACH318 Woodhill Rd. Carrabelle Beach 2 br, 2 ba, MH on 1 acre private lot. 1 mile inland. $550 per month. Please call 813-546-6987. References required.Text FL01629 to 56654 $37,000 5 Acres near Crystal Lake on Amos Hayes Rd, property has well septic and power pole. Current survey is available. About 1.5 acres of the property is cleared. 850-271-5761 and leave a message. Kohler Birthday BathTubCall: 850-251-1864 Carrabelle, Florida Total Down Pmt $6752000 Chevy Monte Carlo T otal Price $4,1000% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! Total Down Pmt $9751999 Ford Expedition -3-Rows T otal Price $5,5000% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! Total Down Pmt $7752002 Chevy Blazer -4-Door T otal Price $4,7000% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! Total Down Pmt $18952003 Chevy Silverado X/Cab -4 Door T otal Price $9,5000% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! Total Down Pmt $12752002 Ford F-250 -4X4 T otal Price $8,8000% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!! Polaris Ranger 20054x4 with 250 hours Call: 850-251-1864 TextFL 98560 to 55554 Lanark Village: Clean 2 bedroom, 1 bath, screened porch, AC Long term lease: 7 months min. $500 monthly + $350. security deposit, references required or wkly & wkend rental w/deposit Pets-will consider. Non smoking. 850-212-2063 Text FL98418 to 56654 St. George Island $160 week, Electric, Satellite, Garbage incl. Pool tble. 12’ X 65’ deck w/Beautiful view 850-653-5114 St. George Island 2Br, 1Ba, Ground floor, Satellite. 12’ x 50’ Deck. Only $250 per week. Call: 850-653-5114 1 BRCottageH/AC in Apalachicola, FL. 850-643-7740. Apalachicola3 br, 2 ba house for rent, CH&A, W/D, D/W, $800 First and Last. Brenda 850-227-5380; Gilbert 201-895-4255 Eastpointe-Carrabelle 1bd, 800sf, $322 bi-weekly, (or $644/mo) includes: all utilities, elec, water, Sat TV, W/D, stone FP, & central AC. Secluded, 1/2 mile from beach. 6 mo lease. 1st & security. 954-816-7004 Magnolia Bluff Bayfront Sunset view. Spacious 3 br, 2.5 bath, large family room, screened deck. All appliances including Washr/Dryer, water & trash paid Call 877-963-4321 sunsetplaceinfo@gmail.comText FL00702 to 56654 South of Hwy 98, 3bd, 1.5ba, $850/mo. 1st & last + dep. Call 850899-8401 or 653-8401 Text FL02133 to 56654 St. George Island-2 br, 1 ba, Canal view. All utilities incl. 6 mo to 1 yr lse. $1125 mo + $500 dep. Call 850-653-5441 St. George Island Bayview Large 1 br 1 ba All utilities incl. 6 mo to 1 yr lease. $725 mo + $500 dep. Call 850-653-5441 Seeking mature quiet female, furn, w/laundry, bathrm. Kitchen Pvlgs no smokers/ pets Ref. + dep $375 mo + util. 850-653-8664 lv msg. Publisher’s NoticeAll real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on a equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. Furnished Loft Apt, in historic district. Cbl/wtr incl 1100sf high ceilings, Private entrance and deck. No smkg/ pets. $750 mo. + $750 dep. 850-653-3838 Heritage Villas and Southern Villas of Apalachicola ApartmentsAccepting applications for 1, 2, & 3 br HC & non-HC accessible units. Some rental assistance may be available. HUD vouchers accepted. Call 850-653-9277. TDD/TTY 711. This institution is an equal opportunity provider, and employer. names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative’s Attorney are set forth below. ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT: Any interested person on whom a copy of this notice of administration is served must file on or before the date that is 3 months after the date of service of a copy of the notice of administration on that person any objection that challenges the validity of the will, the qualifications of the personal representative, the venue, or jurisdiction of this Court. Persons who may be entitled to exempt property under Section 732.402, Florida Statutes will be deemed to have waived their rights to claim that property as exempt property unless a petition for determination of exempt property is filed by such persons or on their half on or before the later of the date that is 4 months after the date of service of a copy of this notice of administration on such persons or the date that is 40 days after the date of termination of any proceeding involving the construction, admission to probate, or validity of the will or involving any other matter affecting any part of the exempt property. An election to take an elective share must be filed on or before the earlier of the date that is 6 months after the date of service of a copy of the notice of administration on the surviving spouse, or an attorney in fact or a guardian of the property of the surviving spouse, or the date that is 2 years after the date of the decedent’s death. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate must file claims against the estate with with the Court during the time periods set forth in Section 733.702, Florida Statutes, or be forever barred. ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL. BE FOREVER BARRED. The date of the first publication of this Notice is March 29, 2012. Personal Representative: KEITH M. PFEIFER 8051 Rocky Wood Rd Tallahassee, FL 32305 Attorney for Personal Representative: J. GORDON SHULER, FL Bar No. 0700959 J. GORDON SHULER, P.A. P.O. Drawer 850 Apalachicola, Fl 32329 (850) 653-9226 March 29, April 5, 2012 Incorrect Insertion PolicyFor Classified In-column AdvertisersAll ads placed by phone are read back to the advertiser to insure correctness. The newspaper will assume correctness at the time of the read-back procedure unless otherwise informed. Please your ad. Advertisers are requested to check the advertisement on the first insertion for correctness. Errors should be reported immediately. Your Florida Freedom newspaper will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion, nor will it be liable for any error in advertisements to a greater extent than the cost of the space occupied by the error. Any copy change, during an ordered schedule constitutes a new ad and new charges. We do not guarantee position of ANY ad under any classification. Adopt: Broadway Actor & Kids Music Producer (Will stay-at-home) yearn for 1st baby(800) 552-0045 FLBar42311 *Expenses Paid* Sweatmore Strawberry RanchOPEN MAR 22nd 8AM Weather Permitting Mon-Sat 8am-7pm Sunday 8am-5pm 850-722-4819 Looking for a place to go on Wetapo Creek in case of Hurricane. 32ft Catamaran at Port St. Joe. Would like to pay to reserve space. Call Jim Morpeth 706-566-1172 or email jmorpeth@aol.com Administrative/ClericalMEDICAL RECEPTIONISTExperienced receptionist needed for busy medical practice in Eastpoint, FL. Must be organized, have people skills and ability to multi-task. Computer experience a must. Health care and medical assisting certification is preferred. Please send resume to HRdepartment@nfmc.org or Fax (850) 298-6054. EOE/ DFWP/ M-F Web ID#: 34201747 Food Svs/Hospitality*Servers *Cooks Dishwashers *Bartenders *BussersBLUE PARROT Now HIRINGPlease apply in person between 9a-5pm 7 days a week@ Blue Parrot St. George’s Island Food Svs/Hospitality The Port Inn & Mainstay Suites are now accepting applicationsPT Desk Service Agent FT Room Attendant PT Breakfast AttendantWeekends and holidays are required. Dependability is a must! If you have an eye for detail and a passion for service, we want you! Please apply in person at the address below: Make beds, make friends, make money! Inquire about benefits package. EOE, DFWP The Port Inn 501 Monument Ave, PSJ 32456 Food Svs/HospitalityWanted!!!Part time Housekeeper Wanted to join us at the Gibson Inn. Good attitude, references required. Apply in person at Gibson Inn team. 51 Avenue C Food Svs/HospitalityThe Water Street HotelIs recruiting hospitality minded people in key positions. Applicants should be well groomed, pleasant, computer savvy, willing to work a variety of shifts and positions, and be drug free. Resume’s may be submitted to or applications obtained from the Hotel front desk. Competitive wages. EOE. HospitalityRESORT VACATION PROPERTIESAccepting applications for FT Front Desk Clerk. Office experience, computer skills & good customer service skills required. Great benefits, weekend work required. Apply in person 9-5 weekdays at 123 W Gulf Beach Dr St. George Island Logistics/TransportNow HiringCaptains and MatesRetail help needed. Commission based, flexible schedule, part time. Shipwright Wood Boat builder with experience. Call (850) 274-1321 or send email augusta.west@ammfl.org. Web ID#: 34201917 These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inform for thousands of families each week.Let a little Classified ad do a big job for you. EmeraldCoast Marketplace 747-5020 Spot Advertising works!

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Local A14 | The Times Thursday, March 29, 2012 Our local real estate experts have identied what they feel are the best values around and are oering them to you in Real Estate Picks! (In this section), Discover the best real estate values in Mexico Beach, Port St. Joe, Apalachicola, Cape San Blas, St. George Island, Carrabelle and surrounding areas. Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Real Estate Picks John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.com MLS#246747 $399,000 St. George Island COTTAGE BY THE SEA Ground level 1st tier house with POOL, across the street from the beach with beach access easement, Upper level OBSERVATION DECK overlooks the pool, 3 BR & 3 BA, Large Third BR suite is located upstairs. West Gorrie Dr. John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.com MLS#245232 $89,000 St. George Island HIGH & DRY 3 RD TIER LOT Located on the north side of Gulf Beach Drive and only two lots from the corner for easy beach access on 11th Street. Scrub Oaks line the road side of this lot creating privacy, but offers an open expanse of high sandy ground. Excellent building site. Qualications: Expertise in: Now Accepting Appointments Call Toll Free 888-681-5864 For more info www.seclung.com Lung Disease Specialist Rob Garver, MD Now Seeing Patients in Port St. Joe NOW BCBS-FL I N -NETWORK PROV I DER Apalachicola City Commissioner Frank Cook to the post for one year. At the same meeting, the commissioners unanimously approved a contract with ARPC for $3,500 to do the biennial Hazardous Waste Generator Report. The state requires the report be done; the money had been budgeted for the report. Solar panels switched on On Thursday, March 15, the solar panels on the courthouse annex were activated so the building is now partially powered by solar energy. The amount of electrical energy saved depends on the time of year and the amount of cloud cover on any particular day. Energy consultants estimate that, on a bright sunny day, the solar panels will produce 20 percent of the energy consumed, resulting in 20 percent savings in the utility bill for the annex.The panels were installed by Independent Green Technologies of Tallahassee for $96,000. The project was funded by a federal energy grant awarded to the county through the Florida Energy Of ce. Commission to meet at ANERR April 17 On Tuesday, April 17, the county commission meeting will take place at the Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve (ANERR) headquarters on Island Drive in Eastpoint, starting at 5 p.m. Chairman Pinki Jackel said this will be a good way to advertise the ANERR facility and encourage people to visit it. Free overnight camp opportunities available The 1st Sgt. Michael S. Curry Memorial Foundation is sponsoring a week-long overnight camp, from June 24 to 30, in beautiful Umatilla, about an one hour from Orlando. The free overnight camp will be held at the Florida Elks Youth Camp, which is fully accredited by the American Camping Association. The group Smiles Are Contagious, devoted to creating unforgettable opportunities to enrich the lives of children, is sponsoring the overnight camp, held near a stunning lake offering canoeing, shing and paddle boats, with camping in air-conditioned lodges. Funlled sporting activities include basketball, softball, ag-football, soccer, kickball, and volleyball, a golf-driving range and miniature golf facility, archery instruction and the challenge ropes course which builds con dence and selfesteem, through problem solving and teamwork. Representatives from Smiles Are Contagious will be in Apalachicola on Sunday, April 15 at Battery Park from Noon to 5 p.m. During this time there will be time for questions and answers, and applications will be provided. This camp is designed for children ages 9-13. For more info: call Rose Grif n at (786) 955-3978 or visit www.smilesarecontagious. org. Full moon climb April 6 at Lighthouse The April Full Moon Climb at the Cape St. George Lighthouse on St. George Island will be held on Friday, April 6. The Sunset/Full Moon Climb will take place from 7:30 to 9 p.m. and will include light hors doeuvres and a sparkling cider toast to the full moon. Cost is $15 for the general public and $10 for members of the St. George Lighthouse Association. The sun will set at 8:01 p.m. and the moon will rise at 8:14 p.m. on April 6. After sunset, people are invited to climb to the top of the lighthouse for a breathtaking view of the full moon, as space and time permit. Cost is $10 for the general public and $5 for SGLA members. The Cape St. George Light is located in St. George Lighthouse Park at the center of St. George Island, where Island Drive (the road off the bridge) ends at Gulf Beach Drive. Parking is available in lots at either side of the park. Because space is limited, reservations are recommended. For reservations or more information, please contact the St. George Island Visitor Center at 850-927-7744 or toll free at 888-927-7744. BRIEFS from page A3 This young unneutered male cat was found near Shadow Lane. He is wearing a ea collar and very friendly. He seems to be used to other cats. He has had a couple of seizures and may need medication. If you recognize him, please call Sondra at 850-509-1684. DO YOU KNOW THIS CAT? At a boisterous rally March 21 at Franklin County High School, the Seahawk SWAT (Students Working Against Tobacco) chapter drove home the message that its best to Kick Butt before the butts stand in your way. The day earlier, county commissioners voted unanimously to adopt March 26 to April 1 as Tobacco Free Florida Week, and to designate March 21 as Kick Butts Day. The students listened and learned from a series of exhibits and messages about the dangers of using tobacco. On hand were local dignitaries including Superintendent Nina Marks, School Board member Teresa Ann Martin, Undersheriff Jeff Norred, Florida Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms representative Lt. Ralph Campbell, Apalachicola Commissioner Brenda Ash and Apalachicola Police Of cer Anthony Croom. All shared a brief word, emphasizing the message of the day. SWAT advisor Dolores Croom and her SWAT members, in collaboration with David Walker, the program manager for the county health departments health education, and Gina Moore, administrative assistant, helped organize the rally, which also featured displays that illustrated the damage done to the bodys organs and how health is at risk if they choose to use tobacco. In the 3-point shoot-out competition, middle school teacher Laura Baney made her one, and only, shot. Students kick butt against tobacco P hotos by DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times Middle school teacher Laura Baney demonstrated how to sink a bucket, on her rst try! Trenton Lee demonstrates how to kick butt at the March 21 rally at Franklin County High School. Apalachicola Police Of cer Anthony Croom addresses the rally, in front of a working model of two lungs, one healthy and one diseased.