<%BANNER%>
The Apalachicola times
ALL ISSUES CITATION PDF VIEWER
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100380/00164
 Material Information
Title: The Apalachicola times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: H.W. Johnston
Place of Publication: Apalachicola Fla
Apalachicola Fla
Publication Date: 03-08-2012
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1885.
General Note: Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 32911693
lccn - sn 95026907
System ID: UF00100380:00164
 Related Items
Preceded by: Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by: Apalachicola herald

Downloads

This item is only available as the following downloads:

( PDF )


Full Text

PAGE 1

xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx 50 WWW.APALACHTIMES.COM Phone: 850-653-8868 Web: apalachtimes.com E-mail: dadlerstein@star .com Fax: 850-653-8036 Circulation: 800-345-8688 DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK: School News & Society: 11 a.m. Friday Real Estate Ads: 11 a.m. Thursday Legal Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Display Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Line Ads: 5 p.m. Monday xxxxx Contact Us xxxxx Out to see Index By David Adlerstein Times Staff Writers The Apalachicola Volunteer Fire Department made their hometown proud Saturday as they became the rst local team in at least the past decade, and quite possibly in all 30 years of the event, to win top prize at the annual St. George Island Regional Charity Chili Cook-off and Auction. Love was the secret ingredient, according to Ashley Teat, who joined with fellow re ghters Mark Van Amberg, Charma Buchhalter, Fonda Davis, Jr., Mike Cates, Scott Harper and Anthony Thursday, March 8, 2012 By David Adlerstein Times City Editor Franklin County voters reassured the school district Tuesday they had its back, approving by a 54 to 46 percent margin a four-year extension of the half-mil operating revenue levy. With 829 votes in favor, and 703 against, the levy was given the thumbs up by voters in Apalachicola, Carrabelle and Eastpoint, while those places where retirees are more numerous Alligator Point, Lanark Village and St. George Island each said no. The levys victory at the special election means the school district will extend until June 30, 2016 a levy rst approved by citizens in spring 2008. The levy continues the shift of a half-mil from capital outlay monies to operating revenue, which the school district rst did in fall 2008 after the half-mil referendum was passed by voters in the spring, also at a special election. This time, though, the margin was closer than the nearly 64 percent approval the levy secured four years ago. It (the margin) is not what I had hoped for but its a win so Ill take it. Voters back school tax levy By Lois Swoboda Times Staff Writer In the course of their work, the construction crew renovating the courthouse has stirred up some dust, and maybe something else as well. Two weeks ago, some strange stuff happened to a crew working late at night in the building. A portion of $500,000 in federal stimulus money is being used to install solar panels and improve energy ef ciency. This means ceilings and portions of walls must be removed to install ductwork and rewire the building. On Feb. 23, three construction workers were busily employed on the ground oor of the courthouse between 11 p.m. and midnight. The crews often work late night hours to avoid disrupting courthouse business. One of the men was on a ladder in the veterans services ofce, a second man was on scaffolding in the probation of ce. The two men were removing a portion of the wall and could see each other through the hole they had created. The foreman of the crew, a clean-cut 30-something, was outside, preparing to install a concrete pad for a new air conditioner. Suddenly, the light in the probation of ce went out. The two workers thought they had cut a wire or tripped a breaker and went to tell their supervisor. He checked the breakers and found none had been tripped. He walked back into the probation of ce and ipped the switch. The light came back on. The switch had been in the off position. He chided the men, but they insisted neither had been anywhere near the switch when the lights went out. They went back to work and the foreman went out into the hall. He hadnt been outside long when he heard a shout from one of the workers, and came right back. The light in the probation ofce had gone out again. Once again, the switch was back in the off position. And the confused Renovation work riles courthouse ghost Apalachicola re ghters chili wins cook-off Home grown hot stuff See HOT STUFF A7 The ghost in question was seen standing in this doorway. LOIS SWOBODA | The Times See RENOVATION A8 Superintendent Nina Marks gives a thumbs-up after learning of the levys passage at the Supervisor of Elections of ce Tuesday evening. DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times See VOTERS A8 VOL. 126 ISSUE 45 Opinion . . . . . . A4 Society . . . . . A10 Faith . . . . . . A11 Outdoors . . . . . A12 Sports . . . . . . A13 Tide Chart . . . . A12 Classi eds . . . A14-A15 Camp Gordon Johnston Days this weekend This weekend, March 8 10, celebrate Carrabelle history by attending Camp Gordon Johnston Days. On Friday evening, March 9, American Legion Post 82, in Lanark Village hosts a free seafood buffet. Active duty troops are welcome to attend. Live music provided. On March 10, the parade will start at 10:45 a.m. on US Highway 98, featuring vintage World War WII vehicles, marching bands, and more, with a free lunch afterwards at the re house. That evening there will be a dinner and dance at the municipal complex auditorium. Public welcome at all events. The Germans are coming On Friday March 9, a contingent of German World War II SS Grenadiers will bivouac at the old high school football eld at the Carrabelle Municipal Complex, part of a historic re-enactment group out of Quincy. On Saturday at 2 p.m. March 10 the contingent will demonstrate German infantry tactics on the old Gulf State Community Bank property. There will be live re demonstrations, with blanks, using weapons carried by German World War II soldiers. No charge to attendees but please follow the safe distance areas marked by re-enactors. Full moon tours at Crooked River Light On Friday March 9, from 7-9 p.m. come to the Crooked River Light House Park for Full Moon Tower Tours. Climb tickets will be $10, which includes beverage and a pastry. Moonlight maritime movies will also be included, so please bring a chair. For more info contact Crooked River Lighthouse Association at crookedriverlighthouse.org. Whats at the Dixie? On Friday, March 9 watch the Maharajah Flamenco Trio perform moving and dynamic Flamenco Neuvo. On Saturday, March 10, The Sarah Mac Band returns for their third season with their joyous blend of blues, rock, jazz and soul. Both shows start at 8 p.m. and admission is $20. For more info, call 653-3200. The Apalachicola Volunteer Fire Department, from left, Ashley Teat, Craig Gibson, Mark Van Amberg, Fonda Davis, Jr., and Charma Buchhalter celebrate their win. Katie McFarland prepares to judge a bowl of chili. Photos by DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times Winning for the second year in a row in the crock pot competition were, from left, Ryan Austin, Scott Abercrombie and J.G. Carver, with Team Spice Boys out of Hoover, Ala.

PAGE 2

Local A2 | The Times Thursday, March 8, 2012 THANK YOU! Join us next year for the 10th Celebration! Visit our website www.hcola.org! appreciates the support of these ne sponsors and contributors to the success of the By Lois Swoboda Times Staff Writer During the World War II, the upsurge of patriotism in the United States seemed unparalleled anywhere in the history of the nation. Surveys conducted at the time found that 70 percent of the population, including more than 60 percent of high school students, favored mandatory military service for young men. Thousands did not wait to be drafted and volunteered to serve. On the home front, those not eligible for service on the battle eld worked in other capacities. The Civil Air Patrol enrolled civilian spotters to scan the skies for enemy aircrafts, join search-and-rescue missions and transport fuel and other supplies. In Apalachicola, Alexander Key, who volunteered for the Navy, brie y headed up a group of watchers who staffed the tower of the Coombs Armory 24-hours a day; ladies during the daylight hours and gentlemen at night. The list of volunteer air wardens included Gene Austin, Clyde Brown, Billy Buzzett, Percy Coombs, L.E. Deas, Eva Doyle, Clarence Floyd, Kathleen Hayes, Hal Hoffman, Jimmie Mahon, Mrs. Randolph, Joe Taranto and Mrs. Weems. It was one of those spotters who alerted the town to the sinking of the fuel carrier Empire Mica by a German U-boat in 1942 and dispatched rescuers to nd survivors. World War II volunteers were not all human. A number of pleasure craft and other privately owned vessels entered the service for the duration. Early in the war, U.S. military intelligence specialists realized the Atlantic coast and Gulf of Mexico were being stalked by German U-boats. With a huge effort to construct vessels for use overseas underway, there were no military craft available to patrol much of the endangered coastline. In Feb. 1941, the Coast Guard began enlisting temporary reservists to man local bases from which coastal patrols were staged. In July 1941, 270 pleasure craft were enlisted in the Coast Guard as Auxiliary vessels. The rst Auxiliary offshore patrol boat was the Two Pals, sailing out of Station Ft. Tilden, N.Y. A base was established in Apalachicola, at the end of Avenue F, where it remains to this day. Elgin We ng, chief engineer for Florida Power in the region, joined the Coast Guard Auxiliary and was appointed commander. His 50-foot yacht, the Sinbad III was pressed into service with him. An Apalachicola Times article from Aug. 8, 1941, noted the Sinbad had a Lathrop marine engine capable of cruising at 18 mph as well as a radio and onboard telephone, making her ideal for the task at hand. The Sinbad III, which was moored before the war in the channel off Ten Foot Hole, was moved to the Avenue F dock. R.H. Porter became her chief engineer and Angelo Taranto her rst cook. Three regular Coast Guard sailors came over from headquarters in New Orleans to act as her crew. The Sinbad III patrolled the coast from St. Marks to White City during the war. On the night the Empire Mica was torpedoed, the Sinbad III was in dry dock; another local vessel, the Countess, belonging to Dick Heyser, was commandeered for the rescue. The Countess began taking on water while returning from the scene of the shipwreck and another Apalachicola civilian boat, Willie Fred Randolphs Sea Dream took the survivors aboard. But she ran out of fuel and still another civilian boat, the Trouble, which belonged to Carol Macleod, towed the Sea Dream to safety. Governor Stone used as training vessel Another boat with local roots, re-visiting the county from now through the end of April, was volunteered for military use during the war. The Governor Stone, the last Gulf Coast schooner, was constructed in 1877 in Pascagoula, Miss. And today is a moving museum, designated as a national landmark. But when she was younger, she served as a training vessel for the Merchant Marine during the war. When the war broke out, the schooner sailed daily at the Inn by the Sea, a luxury resort in Pass Christian, Miss., operating under the name Queen of the Fleet. Some historians suspect her owner, Isaac Rhea, mistook her for another wreck located nearby when he salvaged the schooner. In 1942, the federal government purchased the vessel from him for $1 and she was put into service as a training ship. Apalachicola resident Billy Cook remembers her. In the spring of 1945, the war was almost over and the 17-year-old Cook was a cadet at the Merchant Marine Academy and a cadet midshipman in the Navy Reserve stationed at Pass Christian. He was training to be an engineers mate. Cook said that while deck cadets spent a lot of time learning to sail and navigate on the Governor Stone and other boats, an engineers mate was not expected to have those skills. But they were required to spend some time on a sailing ship so one afternoon, he and his fellow motor heads were marched across the street from where they worked to the ship, to spend several hours sailing aboard the then Queen of the Sea. Cook said working as an engineers mate was dirty and unpleasant and, when the war ended, he chose another path. The Governor Stone was not cut out for military service either. In 1947 she was returned to her former owner. Private vessels patrolled for victory during the war VIEW THE GOVERNOR STONE The Governor Stone will be in Carrabelle or most of the month of March, anchored at the City Wharf. Volunteers will open her for viewing each weekend. In April the vessel will be on display and sailing in Apalachicola. Plan to visit the Antique and Classic Boat Show April 20-21, and then see the Governor Stone the next weekend in Carrabelle for the Riverfront Festival. Atlantic coast and Gulf of Mexico reservists to man local Apalachicola, at the end of Avenue on water while returning from the scene of the shipwreck and another Apalachicola civilian boat, Willie Fred Randolphs Sea Dream took the survivors aboard. But she ran out of fuel and still another civilian boat, the Trouble, which belonged to Carol Macleod, towed the Sea Dream to safety. roots, re-visiting the county from Photos by LOIS SWOBODA | The Times The schooner Governor Stone, visiting the county during March and April, served as a training vessel during World War II. Below from the St. Vincent Island National Wildlife Refuge collection these photos show the Sinbad III which was Elgin We ngs private Yacht and was drafted as a coastal patrol vessel.

PAGE 3

Local The Times | A3 Thursday, March 8, 2012 dbutler@coastalcoverage.com Locally owned and operated Home Business Auto Health Workers Comp C LEAN C UTS Lawn Care Service Residential Commercial Services: Pressure Washing Palm Tree Trimming Landscape Design Carlos Castillo 850-624-8018 Chris Grin 850-323-1442 CALL FOR A FREE E STIMATE ACF Stakeholders host get-together You are invited to nd out how the ApalachicolaChattahoochee-Flint Stakeholders, a grassroots group representing all water users in the river system, is striving to do what 20 years of legal, political wrangling has been unable to. The Stakeholders are collecting data from all walks of science, and convening community meetings up & down the basin to create the rst sustainable water management plan for the ACF. The free event is at 5:30 p.m. Wednesday, March 14 at the Gibson Inn in Apalachicola. Beer, wine, and light hors doeuvres to be served. RSVP to admin@ acfstakeholders.org ArtWalk Apalachicola seeks artists Seeking artists and craftsmen for ArtWalk in Apalachicola from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Saturday, March 24. Accepted categories include paintings oil, acrylics & watercolor; graphics, glass, ber, printmaking and collage, jewelry, metalwork, paper, clay, wood, mixed media, sculpture and photography. All works must be original works of art by the artist. Prints and reproductions must be labeled as such and be limited editions, numbered and signed by the artist. Speci cally excluded are imports, commercial kits, manufactured or mass-produced items, dried ower arrangements, pour molds. The show will be held outdoors throughout downtown Apalachicola. Space size is exible. Email anita@apalachicolabay.org or call 653-9419. Interesting nds during post cook-off clean up Intrepid trash patrollers John Olander, Pete Ritch, Cliff and Ivanhoe Carroll, Ann and Fran Giknis, Skip and Terry Kemp, Barbara Sanders and Dail Mullins picked up 17 bags of litter in record time, 90 minutes, on Sunday morning following the chili cook-off. They battled strong winds but enjoyed glorious sun. Among the refuse were two credit cards and a drivers license, both now in the possession of the sheriffs of ce. Cliff Carroll found a $50 bill during the cleanup and is donating it to the St. George Island Civic Club. Organizer Ada Long sends her thanks to all who participated. Carrabelle Speed Festival At their March 1 meeting, Carrabelle city commissioners voted unanimously to allow Blake Hutchinson to stage a third Carrabelle Speed Festival, to be held at the Carrabelle-Thompson Airport on Saturday, March 24. Participants drive on an open runway giving them a full half mile of open throttle acceleration. In addition to the races, there will be a DJ and food vendors. City Attorney Dan Hartman told commissioners, Hutchison has purchased $2 million of insurance for the event. Participants must register by Monday, March 19. Drivers pay $85, and passengers $25, with a $10 charge for spectators. Drivers must prepay online at wannagofast.com/. Do you know of someone who is unable to get to either branch of the Franklin County Public Library? Perhaps someone you know is temporarily or permanently homebound due to illness or unable to drive to the library. Look no further, because there is a Homebound Service available through the library, at no cost to the participant. This service will come to your home with requested materials like large print books, books on audio tape or CDs, DVDs, or book format. Shut-ins need not feel excluded from the wellread patrons of Franklin County. The check-out time for books and CDs is 21 days and our DVDs are checked out for seven days. Materials are delivered by a special team of volunteers usually family members, neighbors, or friends who live or work in close proximity to the homebound patron. Just another way that library services touch the lives of the residents in this region. For more information about the service application and the other services offered, call 697-2366 or 670-8151. News BRIEFS YOUR COUNTY LIBRARY

PAGE 4

Opinion A4 | The Times USPS 027-600 Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 Publisher: Rick Martin Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola Times Teaching your children to be good nishers can be a heavy burden for a parent at times. Before children reach school age, parents should instill time management skills by giving them small tasks to complete within a certain time. Starting with small assignments, such as picking up toys, the parent will need to be persistent to keep the child focused until the job is completed. Making a game out of tasks will make it less tedious for the parent and the child. The parent may grow impatient at times and nd it easier to nish the job for them, such as with homework or chores. Children are quick to notice this and procrastinate in their duties if they believe their shortcomings will be compensated for. It is important for them to accomplish their commitments and complete tasks on their own. Doing things for them produces unjustied dependency. Deadlines and obligations are a part of everyday life and failing to learn how to meet them could be detrimental to their success in work and household commitments. When I was a child, my parents would give me specic things to do with the condition, when you are nished, you can play. I knew that there was no bending on my parents part. I would have to complete the job in order to receive the reward. The amount of playtime I had was determined by how fast I could get the job done. If the job was completed to their satisfaction, I could go play. However, if after inspection they were not completely satised, I would have to do it over until they were content with my work. I remember hearing the echoes of my buddies playing street ball while I worked, knowing that a job done right would have gotten me out of there sooner. My parents took their roles very seriously, knowing that it would not be to my benet if they nished the task for me or allowed me to do a halfhearted job. Being a nisher requires endurance and determination, something that can only be learned through testing. Easy parenting does not produce excellent nishers because it always follows the path of least resistance. Allowing children to quit when things get a little too challenging or non-accommodating will open the door of inconsistency and unreliability. Allowing your child to quit a program or extracurricular activity when they are bored with it is easier than continuing to take them to practice, games, recitals, etc. Meanwhile, the team may suffer, the part may go unlled, the group may lose heart, or the grades may decline. That one little character-building block of dependability affects their entire arena of life. Our oldest daughter participated in dual enrollment her senior year. After graduating from high school, she decided she did not want to nish the last remaining course of cosmetology school. Since she did not think she would pursue a career in cosmetology, she did not see the sense in nishing. I would not allow her to quit, reminding her that dual enrollment is paid for by the state and we could not waste tax dollars. If she nished, she would always have the training under her belt. Reluctantly she completed the course and we were so proud to see her graduate from cosmetology school that year. In order to forge your child into a strong nisher you must remove the quit word from your vocabulary. Teaching them that nishing is the only acceptable option will help prepare them for a hostile and very competitive business world. I remember my old football coach, Billy Granger used to say, Quitters never win and winners never quit. That is a very true statement, but I would like to say it like this, nishers never quit and quitters never nish. As parents, we must mold our children to produce the next generation of entrepreneurs, inventers, world changers or as I like to call them in the ministry, movers and shakers. We welcome all suggestions and hope you enjoy this weekly column. Please send all emails to Scott Shiver at frontline247@mac.com Thursday, March 8, 2012 YOUTH MA TTERS Scott and Pamela Shiver Finishers never quit and quitters never nish By Caty Greene Special to the Times Franklin County locals are familiar with the Arcadia Press publications with the wonderful sepia colored covers. Locally we have Apalachicola and Gulf County by Beverly MountDouds. There is also a Wakulla County offering by local historian Eddie Page. Now the list of publications includes Florida State University, in the Campus History Series, just out Feb. 20. Florida State University did not start, of course, as FSU. The university that now boasts 16 colleges offering more than 275 undergraduate, graduate, doctoral, professional and specialist degree programs started with an act calling for the creation of two seminaries in 1851. West Florida Seminary, which was established in Tallahassee, sent cadets to ght at the Battle of Natural Bridge to defend the state capital from the advancing Union troops. With the passing of the Buckman Act in 1905, the school began a new chapter as the Florida Female College, then Florida State College for Women in 1909. It went on to rank as one of the premier womens colleges in the country. In 1947, in part to accommodate the inux of returning GIs, the school resumed its coeducational status as Florida State. Photographs abound in this charming volume, bringing back images of bygone years, whether it is the Naturalist Club of 1882, or the 1904 football team whose only win, besides becoming state champion, was against the University of Florida. Javelin thrower Anne Harwick (22) shows off her technique, wearing the Jack Tar Middy, the athletic gear For the Outdoor Girl of Good Taste. Starting in 1947 the Florida State we know today begins to emerge in the photos, including early pictures of the Marching Chiefs. The 1960s brought the war protests, and FSU was known as the Berkeley of the South. Streakers ash through the doors of Strozier Library in the 1970s. Eddie Woodward, author of this campus history, has a masters degree in history from FSU and has served as the FSU heritage protocol archivist since 2007. The images in this book come from the FSU University Libraries Special Collections, the Heritage Protocol Photograph Collection, and a variety of other sources. You can nd the Heritage Protocol website at www.heritage. fsu.edu Whether you are an alum or just a fan of FSU, you will nd this book fun and full of interesting photos and facts. All of the author proceeds generated by the sale of the book will go to the FSU university libraries. Mr. Woodward plans to attend the librarys Thursday, March 15 party, themed Envisioning the Future of the AML, beginning at 5:30 p.m. The event, held on the librarians third anniversary, features a conversation with librarians in the community, and encourages discussion on such questions as What do you most like to nd in the library? What is your vision of the library ve years from now? and What would inspire you to volunteer in the next ve years? The usual libations and nger food will accompany the discussion. No RSVP is required; contributions of food welcome. All library supporters throughout the community are invited. For more info, call 653-8436 or 323-2305. Caty Greene is the librarian for the Apalachicola Municipal Library. To reach her, call 653-8436. @ THE LIBRAR Y Caty Greene Come out to discuss the library March 15 Special to the Times The economy of North Florida and its underdevelopment in rural counties will come under the wing of the Department of Economic Opportunity, thanks to an amendment sponsored by state Senator Bill Montford (DTallahassee). The Senate measure will set aside $150,000 to fund an Innovative Economic Development Study by the DEO in order to promote rural economic growth and development for eligible small businesses in these areas. And it will also examine why such counties have lagged the state in job growth and business creation. The people of North Florida are just as hard-working, just as industrious, and just as talented as people elsewhere in the state, said Sen. Montford. The problem is not a lack of work ethic. The problem is a lack of work. This study should help us better gure out how to turn our economy around. The funding is part of the Senates proposed budget for the upcoming scal year, and added with the assistance of Senator Lizbeth Benacquisto (R-Ft. Myers). If approved by the House and governor, the study will include a multitude of participants, including schools, businesses, non-prot organizations and local chambers. SEN. BILL MONTFORD March is National Social Work Month which makes it an appropriate time for us to salute the valuable and important job that social workers provide all year long. When lifes challenges become overwhelming, many people turn to a social worker for help. Here at Big Bend Hospice, we have 15 social workers who serve as family support counselors, grief counselors and Caring Tree counselors. They work tirelessly with our patients and families to help them cope with the many emotional and practical issues that accompany a life-limiting illness. These dedicated professionals assist with everything from coordinating community resources to helping families solve personal and nancial problems, to working through the emotional pain of dealing with an impending death. They recognize the family dynamics that are part of any life-threatening disease and help patients reach out to conclude the important business of giving and receiving love and asking for and granting forgiveness. Often it is the social worker who will pause to recognize a special occasion in a patients life and make sure that a birthday is celebrated or a caregiver gets a night out. Our wonderful social workers are an important part of our patient care team and our Big Bend Hospice family. The theme for the 2012 National Social Work Month is Social Work Matters. Time and again I have witnessed the powerful results of social workers both in our organization and in hospitals, nursing homes and assisted living facilities in recognizing and meeting the needs of the people they serve. On behalf of Big Bend Hospice we applaud social workers for their caring hearts and their important contributions to our community. Cathy Adkison, RN President and CEO Big Bend Hospice First I want to thank Denise Butler and Cathy Wood for their supportive letters on the half-mil tax referendum and the Franklin County School District and teachers. Recent letters to the editor excoriating the Franklin County school system and our teachers were unfair and insensitive to the needs and challenges that face our community. The most spectacular successes in bringing under-achieving schools up to A schools are those communities who are fully involved in the implementation of an aggressive plan of intervention. Educators, parents, students and community leaders coming together better serve the needs of their district schools. Identifying problems within the school district and inherent problems within the community that may inuence students is important. But I am writing about something that could very negatively impact our school district and all schools in the state of Florida, especially rural schools. Florida Senate Bill 1718 (2012) called the Parent Empowerment Act, better known as the Parent Trigger bill, passed the Senate subcommittee and goes to the Senate oor this week. The bill would authorize parents of students who are assigned to certain underperforming public schools (graded by the state) to submit a petition to the school district requesting implementation of a school turnaround option which would allow these schools to be taken over by private, for-prot, corporations or charter school operators, a move that would privatize what is now public education. The Parent Trigger bill is designed to give private companies and charter management organizations an open invitation to exploit parents and take over our public schools. Florida law already provides parents with alternatives for those who want other options for their children including enrolling in magnet programs and state funded high achieving, charter schools. Even more troubling is as this bill was-fast tracked through the House and now Senate (the Senate subcommittee allocated 20 minutes to discussion of this bill with little public input); the State Board of Education changed the grading system for the states schools, dramatically increasing the number of F schools from 38 to 268, a 700 percent increase. I am highly skeptical that Senate Bill 1718, and the recent decision by the State Board of Education to change the grading system for schools, would do anything but benet private, for-prot, corporations giving these operators access to $30 billion in state education funds and local property taxes. Other states have implemented Parent Empowerment Bills with very little improvement in their schools and have reported that it causes divisiveness and is a cumbersome and lengthy process that prevents immediate intervention to the under performing schools. It is especially ineffective in rural school systems like Franklin County. Florida parents dont want to see their children become pawns in a political game that benets outof-state interests and Tallahassees corporate friends at the expense of local public schools. Right now I would call this bill the Corporate Empowerment bill. Florida public schools need a governor and legislature that put education rst! Not try to privatize our public schools without a healthy and vigorous debate. Whatever happened to government in the sunshine? Parents, concerned citizens, school administrators and teachers can and should run the best possible schools we can. Franklin County come together for the sake of our children and beware of the mischief in Tallahassee. Mary Lou Short MONTFORD AMENDMENT Privatizing public schools calls for vigorous debate Social workers help families work through pain

PAGE 5

IT I S OUR PLEA SUR E T O WELCOME Dr. Eugene Charbonneau Dana Whaley, ARNP And Susan Hardin, ARNP T O WEEM S MEDICAL CEN T E R EA ST Beginning MARCH 1, 2012 Primary Care and Urgent Care 110 NE 5 TH STREET CARRABELLE, FL 850-697-2345 GREATER A PALACHICOLA Enjoy quiet country living on 3.75 acres. Lovely custom built 3BR/2.5 BA home with many upgrades Jacuzzi, deck, large walk in closet. 1600 sq.ft. outbuilding on concrete pad. M L S# 244666.................$265,000 Travis Stanley 850.653.6477 Grayson Shepard 850.653.6718 C O MM ERCIAL A PALACHICOLA Two commercial lots for sale in Apalachicola on the corner of Commerce and Penton St. Great location, one block of Hwy 98, near all the best shops and restaurants in Apalach! M L S# 244870..............$125,000 EA S TPOI N T 3 BR/2BA home on private 3 acres! Low maintenance metal roof, vinyl siding and great front porch. Backs up to state land M L S#244269.................$120,000 S T G EOR G E I S LA ND GULF VIEW 4BR/4BA close to center of island and convenient to center of island. Good Lots of storage and lovely native landscaping. M L S# 245752...............$399,000 C O MM ERCIAL GREATER A PALACHICOLA EA S TPOI N T S T G T G T EOR G E I S LA ND Leon Teat 850.653.5656 Sandy Mitchem 850.899.8300 ST. GEOR G E IS LA ND First tier lot. Right across the street from the beach with wonderful views! This lot backs up to the back path too. Just three blocks to the center of the island. Buy a lot and build EXACTLY what you want! M L S# 246317..............$225,000 ST. GEOR G E IS LA ND ST. GEOR G E IS LA ND P LA N TATIO N 2nd tier lot in a great location, right on the beach access in Nicks Hole. Just across Leisure lane from state owned bayfront land best of both worlds! M L S#246524..............$95,000 ST. GEOR G E IS LA ND NEW LOW PRICE! BA N K O W N ED LO V EL Y H O M E NEW LISTI N G! NEW LISTI N G! Name_____________________________________________ Address___________________________________________ City_________________ State______ Zip_______________ Daytime Phone_____________________________________ Make checks payable to The News Herald Send order form with payment and a self-addressed, stamped envelope to: Taste of Home Cooking School c/o The News Herald P.O. Box 1940, Panama City, FL 32402 # of Tickets Price Per Advance Ticket* Total Amount Make checks Join Us For The Fun of Free complimentary gift bag valued At $50 filled with coupons, promotional items, & a copy of the Taste of Home Cooking School magazine Watch the culinary specialist prepare scrumptious entrees and desserts right before your very eyes, and win a chance to take home one of these delicious dishes. Visit vendor booths before the show; including food samplings and a pre-tasting wine booth with National Sponsor, Gallo Wine. Grand prizes to include a microwave donated by Sears and other great prizes! Register to win door prizes from restaurants and other vendors throughout this fun-filled 2-hour event. A 67-year-old North Carolina man escaped injury last month when the sport utility vehicle he was driving struck a passing motorist and then rolled into Apalachicola Bay just east of the Apalachicola bridge. According to a crash report prepared by Florida Highway Patrol Master Cpl. M.S. Cross, Sr., Andrew Thomas Creekmore, 67, of Cary, N.C., was traveling west on U.S. Highway 98, about one mile east of Apalachicola, in a 1985 Chevrolet SUV at about 4 p.m. on Sunday, Feb. 26. According to the report, Creekmore drove left of center into the eastbound lane and struck a 2006 Chevrolet four-door driven by Carl E. Anderson, 67, of Amberg, Wis. After his left front struck Andersons left side, Creekmores SUV continued southward into the bay. Creekmore, who was wearing his seatbelt at the time, was able to exit the vehicle and wade on to the shore. Andersons vehicle came to rest on the south shoulder. Neither man sustained injuries. The FHP report said alcohol was not a factor in the crash. Creekmore was charged with failure to drive in a single lane. Chased by a Gulf County deputy into Franklin County, a eeing vehicle lost control Friday afternoon and collided with the cruiser. The driver ed the scene by foot, and had not been apprehended as of Tuesday afternoon. According to a crash report prepared by Florida Highway Patrol Master Cpl. M.S. Cross, Sr., Philip Austin Jaquinnton ONeal, 19, of Apalachicola, was traveling east on U.S. Highway 98, in Gulf County headed towards Franklin County sometime after 4 p.m. A Gulf County law enforcement vehicle spotted ONeals 2007 Dodge 4door vehicle and intended to stop it for what the report said was a minor traf c violation. Picking up the pursuit was a 2011 Ford 4-door driven by Gulf County Deputy Richard Lee Burkett, 38, of Port St. Joe. ONeal initially stopped but ed the scene after being stopped, said the report, noting Burketts vehicle had its emergency equipment engaged at the time of pursuit. The high-speed chase entered Franklin County and at about 4:23 p.m., ONeal tried to make a left on to 15th Street and lost control as he started to rotate counterclockwise, said the report. The left front of Burketts vehicle struck the left rear of the Dodge 4door and ONeal then ed the scene on foot, read the report. Gulf County deputies conducted an inventory of the vehicle and contraband was found, said the FHP report. Charges were led against ONeals passenger, Quanteka Shenay Croom, 21, for possession of cocaine, with charges of reckless driving and eeing/eluding, both felonies, pending against ONeal. Of cers from the Franklin County Sheriffs Of ce and Apalachicola Police Department also assisted at the scene. The report said alcohol was not a factor in the crash. By David Adlerstein The following report is provided by the Franklin County Sheriffs Of ce. Arrests in this report were made by of cers from the Apalachicola Police Department, Franklin County Sheriffs Office, Florida Highway Patrol and Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission. All defendants are considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law. Feb. 28 Patrick O. Linder, 31, Jacksonville, withholding child support (FCSO) Roger D. Mathis, 54, Apalachicola, felony driving under the in uence, driving while license suspended and refusal to submit (FCSO) Kayla R. Langley, 28, Eastpoint, failure to appear (FCSO) March 1 Tracey L. Carroll, 42, Eastpoint, driving while license revoked habitual, and failure to appear (FHP) March 2 Gerald H. Kent, Jr., 38, Apalachicola, domestic battery (FCSO) Justin E. McAlpin, 23, Eastpoint, violation of probation (FHP) Quanteka S. Croom, 21, Apalachicola, possession of a controlled substance (FCSO) March 3 Cliffton T. Worten, 43, White Springs, disorderly intoxication (FCSO) Jacob R. Eden eld, 29, Tallahassee, DUI and refusal to submit to breath test (FWC) Judy L. Patterson, 59, Apalachicola, reckless driving with damage and leaving the scene of a crash with damage (APD) March 5 Fabian M. Ceron, 32, Apalachicola, domestic battery (APD) DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times AN SUV FROM THE SEA Arrest REPORT Apalach man ees after car chase ONeal initially stopped but ed the scene after being stopped. Crash report .................................................................................... FRANKLIN COUNTY SHERIFFS OFFICE Law Enforcement The Times | A5 Thursday, March 8, 2012

PAGE 6

Local A6 | The Times Thursday, March 8, 2012 NOTICE TAX IMPACT OF VALUE ADJUSTMENT BOARD FRANKLIN COUNTY TAX YEAR 2011 Apalachicola Bay Charter School Open Enrollment For the 2012-2013 School Year March 19-30, 2012 Kindergarten Round-up (March 23,2012 Call for a scheduled time) Elementary School for Grades PreK 5 Middle School for Grades 6 8 Middle School for Grades 6 8 LIMITED ENROLLMENT To receive an enrollment packet call or visit the ABC School Apalachicola Bay Charter School 98 12th Street, Apalachicola, FL 653-1222 (phone) 653-1857 (fax) Call or come by the ABC School beginning March 19th. Over 35 Years Experience. 208 Reid Avenue, Downtown Port St. Joe 850.229.1111 www.BaysideFloristPSJ.com Your Full Service Wedding and Event Florist Deliveries Available Daily to Apalachicola with minimum order. Your Full Service Wedding and Event Florist Your Full Service Wedding and Event Florist BILL MILLER REALTY 850-697-3751 (3310) 570-0658 3/2 DBL WD -3 F E NC ED C OR. LOTS-2 C AR GAR $60,000 $29,500 $2,500 D OW N BU YS 2 B ED AP T 2 6 OR RE N T $500/MTH GU LF V IEW & A CC ESS 3 B DR 2 BA 2006 M / H 16 X 80 $89,000 3/B-D/W-3 C OR. LOTS DBL GARAGE $59,500 MIH 2 CR N R LOTS BLK. $ S TORE RED UC ED $49,500 C OMM. BLDG-98 O N G U LF-RE N T $600/MTH Progress Energy has been attracting attention as the company strings wires to the new power poles that span the river north of the Apalachicola Bridge. Source Choppers of Beaumont, Texas supplied the helicopter that, like a hovering dragon y, has been seen performing airborne gymnastics to the delight and amazement of onlookers. THREADING THE POWER POLES Special to The Times From Carrabelle to St James, this Saturdays Coastal Art Tour offers art exhibits and demonstrations at participating galleries, studios, and shops all day, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sponsored by the Carrabelle Artists Association, the tour features 12 locations with ne art, sculptures and pottery. The artists association will be showing at The Senior Center in Carrabelle and the St. James Bay Golf Resort Fountain Room, with local artists exhibiting works and demonstrating the process of creating watercolors, pastels, portraits, and pottery thrown on a wheel. Stops along the tour include: Joe and Josepha Kotzman, 328 River Road, Studio/Gallery (watercolors and oils); Moore Treasures, U.S. Highway 98 (Paintings, rock and crystal works, carvings); Marian Morris Earthsong Pottery Studio/ Gallery, 112 NE Ave. A and First Street; Mary Giles, Trader Antiques, 107 St. James ((Sculptured artifacts); Cal Allen at the History Museum 106 SE Ave. C (Tempera and watercolors); Joan Matey, 510 Gallery, 510 U.S. Highway 98 (Sculptures, 3D art, ne art); Shirley Cox Studio/Gallery, 801 SE 7th St. (Oils); Perpenders Gallery, 604 SE Ave. F, featuring artists Leon Wiesener and Alena Havlin (Pastels, oils, and acrylic); and Fred Aman, 2496 U.S. Highway 98 E (Gallery of renowned bronze sculptures). Maps and information available at the Carrabelle Chamber of Commerce, Carrabelle City Hall, the Franklin County Senior Center and participating locations. For information call 697-4381 or 294-9664 or email joekotzman@yahoo. com. Coastal Art Tour Saturday Missy Cumbie, right, member of Delta Kappa Chapter of the Delta Kappa Gamma Society International, presents $50 gift certi cates to the Franklin County Consolidated School Teacher of the Year candidates at the Feb. 6 banquet. Seated from left are Sharon Solomon, Learning Center teacher; Karl Lester, band director, Andrea Keuchel, middle school English teacher and Audrey Gay, fth grade teacher. DKG is an international organization of more than 100,000 key women educators dedicated to promote professional and personal development of women educators and excellence in education. DELTA KAPPA HONORS TOP TEACHERS LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Faith BRIEFS Knights of Columbus hosts bingo for cancer gh t The Knights of Columbus Council 1648 will sponsor a Bingo Night on Thursday, March, 8, beginning at 6:30 p.m. in the Parish Hall at St. Patrick Catholic Church, Sixth St. and Ave. C in Apalachicola. All proceeds go to the American Cancer Society. Donation is $20 per person which includes eight games of Bingo. Prizes will be awarded, plus a nal jackpot game. Refreshments on sale. Segree family reunion Saturday The Segree Family Reunion will begin at 10 a.m. Saturday, March 10, at the Eastpoint re house, 24 6th St. Please bring old pictures and a covered dish. For more information, call Inez at 670-1115. Living Waters celebrates Project 11 Payoff Sunday Join the Living Waters Assembly of God this Sunday, March 11, for a Project 11 Pay-Off Celebration, marking the elimination of the churchs $45,000 mortgage on the parsonage. In 2011 the church family set out on an endeavor to eliminate the mortgage in 11 months. Calling it Project 11, the church set forth a challenge to get 45 people to pledge $1,000, or to make one-time donations. District Superintendent Bro. Tommy Moore will be special guest speaker at the service, which begins at 10:45 a.m., followed by a dinner on the grounds/ mortgage burning ceremony. Lighthouse Childrens Home in Eastpoint Sunday The Lighthouse Childrens Home, in Tallahassee, will visit the United Baptist Church, 37 Brian St, Eastpoint, this Sunday, March 11 at 6 p.m. Young ladies from the childrens home will be singing and giving testimonies. They invite everyone to come for a special blessing. For more information, call Bobby Shiver at 670-8451. Dry Bones Ministry hosts March 17 anniversary You are invited to attend Dry Bones Ministrys second anniversary Saturday, March 17 at 1:30 p.m. at the Sixth Street Recreation Center. Evangelist Annie L. Austin Pierce is the host. Dont miss the Hillside Dancers for Christ, by Sister Teresa Ann Martin; the Covenant Word Praise Team, led by Pastor Harolyn Walker; and Ministry in Dance, led by Sister Nedra Jefferson. We will have food, games, and entertainment, plus Natalie ONeal Booth will be checking blood pressure and glucose. Call Annie Austin at (850) 2451920 for info.

PAGE 7

Local The Times | A7 Thursday, March 8, 2012 Croom to anchor a team led by Craig Gibson. Gibson and his wife Becky worked up the reci pe, which revolved around three meats ank steak, ground chuck, and hot cho rizo. To balance the chili powder blend, the team used chopped yellow and orange bell peppers, plus sweet onions, garlic, salt and pepper, cilantro and a little touch of brown sugar. Were still kind of in awe, said Craig Gibson, savoring victory in only the teams third year of compe tition. The rst time we came in 37th and last year we place ninth, so I thought Were on to the right recipe of what they want, he said. So we just tweaked our recipe a little bit and obvi ously we tweaked it right. We wanted to have the heat but not stay there and burn so you had to chase it with a drink. The win not only nets the re department the $500 rst prize, but earns them a berth in the Worlds Championship Chili Cookoff Oct. 5-7 on Magic Island near Charleston, West Vir ginia. Apalachicola Fire Chief George Watkins, who spent Saturday in Apalachicola minding re duties, said the department plans to explore ways to take part in the worlds champion ship, the dream of each of the 43 teams in Saturdays Gulf Coast Regional Cookoff, the largest regional chili cook-off in the nation. Were going to look into the expense. Its all hap pened so fast, said Watkins. I was so proud of our re department, and congratu lations to the members that went over and won the com petition. The entire com munity, including myself, is very proud. Finishing as runners-up, and earning $300, was Terry Metzlers Romeo Red team from Decatur, Ga., who said her secret ingredient was Worcestershire sauce. Her husbands team, Grateful Red, said his secret was red wine. In third place, and win ning $200, was the Chili Dawgs, from Jacksonville, led by Will English. Out of the money, but with a plaque nevertheless was Gary Dor ris Team Toilet Bowl, from Valdosta, Ga. in fourth place. Lynn Ellis Bubba and Cha Chas Chili, from Kennesaw, Ga. took fth. Best Booth honors went to the Cairo, Ga. Fire De partment in rst, with Dead Serious Chili, out of Tampa in second and Hot Lip, from Tallahassee in third. Taking Showmanship was the quartet of Elvises that made up the FART (Fireghters Annual Rec ompense Team) out of Woodstock, Ga., followed by Team Toilet Bowl in second and Burnin at Both Ends, from Destin, in third. Despite the threat of rain all week that dampened at tendance, the cook-off was held under sunny skies, with droplets not appearing until late in the afternoon, well after the winners were announced and people were packing up. Welcome to the 100 percent chance of rain chili cook-off, joked chief judge Lee Edmiston before an nouncing the winners. Some of the more cre ative cooks, especially those new to the circuit included unusual ingredients in the mix, according to one of the more than 50 volunteer judges. Fish, mango, cook ing chocolate and even cof fee have been incorporated into chili in years past, al though this years nalists were on the traditional side. Only 17 entries took part in the amateur crock pot competition, one of the smallest turnouts seen by Dayle Flint in the ve years she has overseen the com petition. Winning for the second year in a row was J.G. Carv er, also known as Mongo Faya from Team Spice Boys out of Hoover, Ala. which also includes Mike Honcho, (Scott Abercrom bie) and John Slade (Ryan Austin). Back to back, straight up, thats how we roll, said Carver. In front of their booth stood an array of trophies, underscoring their apparent success as chili acionados. But a closer look revealed that one of the trophies was earned by Abercrombie in 1984, for being Most Con sistent Piano Student and the other was from J. Parks 10th Annual National Tae Kwan Do championship for Free Sparring, Jr. 8-9, Be ginner 2nd Place. Carver admitted that award was actually won by J.D. Boone, his brother-inlaw. I didnt even know him then, said Carver. Finishing in second place in the crock pot com petition was Kathy Gor don, of Crawfordville, while third place was won by Lois Hauff and Karen Anderson, both from St. George Island. Judges were Richard Lang ford, Rick Hernandez, Luke Wetherington and Larry Harkness. This years Miss Hot Sauce and Mr. Chili Pep per pageant was another spirited affair. The seven entrants in Mr. Chili Pep per contest answered prob ing questions like, How much chili will people eat today? Do you think there will be any Beano left on St. George Island? and How do you think the President likes his chili? Contestants were judged on beauty, talent and charm. Richard Radford and Bill Mahan did the locals proud in all these categories but, in the end, the guy with the biggest jalapeno, Jason Cope of Burnin at Both Ends, won the day. Cope, who won last year, may be the only contestant to have won twice. There were twice as many Miss Hot Sauce con testants as Chili Peppers and a bevy of lovelies they were too. Judy Stokowski with the Cardiac Cowgirls from Water Street Hotel tossed chocolate and caution to the winds as she strutted her stuff before the cheering crowd. Several damsels sang, there was a lap dance, swords were swallowed, cartwheels carted, and one young lady shot a beer to enthusiastic applause. This years winner was Summer Padgett of Yellow Creek Swamp Sauce Chili from St. Petersburg, who shed her Tshirt for her crown. The daylong event was peaceful, with only minor medical incidents and fend er-benders to speak of. The sheriffs ofce, to gether with members of the islands re department and community patrol, joined with ofcers of the states Bureau of Alcohol Beverage & Tobacco, Florida Highway Patrol, Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Com mission, and Department of Environmental Protection to provide law enforcement, security and trafc control. The sheriffs ofce said there were three vehicle accidents; three medical in cidents; and six citations for consumption / possession of alcohol by persons under the age of 21. In addition to one arrest for disorderly in toxication, there where nine seat belt violations, three for open containers, and two speeding violations. Other citations issued were for fail ure to carry identication, no drivers license, providing alcohol to a minor, posses sion of a less than 20 grams of cannabis, possession of paraphernalia and expired license tag. Robert C. Bruner Attorney Personal & Business Bankruptcy Over 30 Years Legal Experience 850-670-3030 bankruptcy relief under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon advertisements. Before you decide, ask us to send you free written information HOT STUFF from page A1 PHOTOS BY DAVID ADLER ST EIN | The Times Gary Carlson, from Uncle Bugs Chili, Branford, Conn. stirs the pot. The Elvises from the F.A.R.T, team are, from left, Tony Banks, Luci Retzer, Toby Banks and Blake McDonald. The Cairo, Ga. Fire Department took Best Booth.

PAGE 8

Local A8 | The Times Thursday, March 8, 2012 Registration will be at 8:30am with the clinic to start approximately at 9am and run to 3pm. The clinic is Free to all Franklin County Residents. The clinic will include lunch, test, your patch and instruction from 2 Pro Umpires. Please bring with you your facemask and rulebook if you have them. Please remember that this year Dixie Youth is requiring all umpires to be certied in order to umpire a district game. ** New for 2012 Umpires certied through a clinic in 2012 will have the option in 2013 to renew without taking a clinic.** Dixie Youth strongly recommends umpire certication requirements for District tournament play as well. It is mandatory for all umpires in any Dixie Youth State Tournament to be certied. Many districts and leagues are also requiring umpires to be certied to umpire local league play and district tournaments. For More Information Contact Franklin County Parks & Recreation / Nikki Millender at 850-653-8277 9am and run to 3pm. The clinic is Free to all Franklin County Residents. Registration will be at 8:30am with the clinic to start approximately at 9am and run to 3pm. D I X I E YO UT H BA S E B ALL U MPIR E CL INIC H O ST E D B Y : F R A N KL IN CO UNTY PA R K S & RE CR EA TI O N MA RC H 10, 2012 L O C A TI O N : F R A N KL IN CO UNTY SHE RIFF S OFFIC E T R A ININ G B UI L DIN G 270 S T A T E ROA D 65, E A STP O INT RENOVATION from page A1 workman was still perched on his scaffolding. The three men had a nervous laugh and went back to work. Soon after, the two men working on the wall discovered a conduit they needed to remove to make way for ductwork. They summoned the foreman again and he asked one of the workers to accompany him to the second oor to try to determine if the conduit contained live wires. Not waiting for the other man to descend from scaffolding, the foreman headed upstairs via the eastern stairway at the front of the courthouse. He walked down the hall toward the back of the building. The hall was unlit but there were lights in the stairwells at each end of the hall. He continued on the eastern side of the hallway, just beyond the antique desk on display in the hall, when he noticed he could see his reection in the rear stairwell windows. Then he noticed something that stopped him in his tracks: The re ection of another man standing in the casement doorway about 12 feet behind him, in front of the courthouse entrance, now permanently sealed. It never occurred to me that it was anything but a normal human being and not one of my workers, said the foreman. When he turned to see who the intruder was, nobody was there. A few seconds later, his worker entered the lobby from the eastern stairwell. Did you see anyone? the foreman demanded. The worker said he had not. The foreman ran down the western stairway, but encountered nobody. The second worker, who met him on the rst oor, said nobody had passed. Convinced there must be an intruder, the three men searched the entire building, and found nothing. The foreman said he decided they were at a stopping point and it was time to go home. After they left the building, while they stood outside puzzling over the nights events, the light in the rear stairwell went out. They didnt re-enter to investigate. The next morning, the foreman asked sheriffs deputies to see the security tapes from the previous night. He reviewed them with a deputy and although they were able to nd footage of his visit to the second oor, no intruder appeared on the tape. Several courthouse employees who saw him that morning said he appeared shaken. Is it murderer? custodian? clerk? If there was a ghostly intruder, who might it be? Several people who work at the courthouse or have worked there in the past have voiced theories. Some favor former Clerk of Courts Bobby Howell, who was known to wear a hat and was a stickler for conserving electricity. It was my brother, said his sister Frances Ann Monroe. Former courthouse employees say he would make the rounds of the building at night and if he found a light on, would call the occupant of the of ce at home, and order them to come downtown and turn it off. Dolores Roux, a former courthouse worker, said she believes the ghost is Jimmy Vincent DeCosmo. He was the rst custodian of the building and typically wore a cowboy hat and tan jacket to work. He is said to have been very possessive of the courthouse and to have disliked renovations. Mark Curenton, an assistant county planner known for meticulous historical research, has his money on a fellow named Henry Jones. According to the newspaper in Sept. 1942, Jones was shot to death by Willard Ingram while seated on the front steps of the courthouse. Ingram put two bullets in Jones back, in front of a large number of local citizens as eyewitnesses to the killing, according to the Times. On Sept. 21, Ingram, 38, was arraigned for rst degree murder and pleaded not guilty by reason of insanity at the time of the crime. He had reportedly already confessed twice, to the coroners jury and to authorities in Tallahassee where he was taken for safekeeping shortly after the crime, said the newspaper. At the end of a two-day trial on Sept 24-25, the jury as out a record 30 minutes before deciding Ingram was guilty. They recommended mercy. He was sentenced to life imprisonment at hard labor at Raiford. No reason is given for the crime in the newspaper stories. Doris Pendleton, property appraiser, has of ces on the ground oor and has worked in the courthouse for more than 30 years. Her rst boss there, the late John James, told her the building was haunted by a tax assessor named Fred Richards who prowled the halls at night. This place is spooky, James told her. People come back down here after they die. Pendleton has a few other strange tales to tell. She is one of several people who report having had their of ce doorknob jiggled while working in the building alone. Most of her staff said they have heard the elevator ascending and descending, and the Coke machine being used, when they knew there was nobody else in the building, usually at night. Before the system was automated, it was often necessary to save large projects for the evening hours when the of ce was closed, Pendleton said. Both she and Rita Millender tell a similar tale about a ghostly experience they shared. Sometime around the year 2000, the two women were in the courthouse late at night working on the tax roll. There had recently been a problem with youngsters sneaking into the courthouse through the boiler room window at night to skateboard in the halls. The women heard the sound of children playing in the hall. They described the sounds as laughter and giggling, a sliding sound and running feet. It was more than one or two or three, said Millender. Pendleton told Millender she believed the children had jimmied a window into the boiler room. Im going to run their little tails off, Pendleton told her. The two women burst through the of ce door to nd nothing. The sound stopped and down the hall, the boiler room door was locked and sealed. The pair returned to work but, before long, the sound started again. This time Pendleton opened the door slowly and, although she could still hear the sound through the crack in the doorway, when she and Millender stepped into the hall, the commotion stopped. The women said they have no idea who the youngsters could be. Roux had an answer. When she was a girl, DeCosmo had allowed children to roller skate in a parking lot where the courthouse annex stands, but only when the courthouse was closed. VOTERS from page A1 I dont have to use my plan B now, said Superintendent Nina Marks Im extremely happy, she said. The Franklin County School District is going to continue to move forward. And up. I feel good about it. Im proud of our teachers that went to work for it and everyone that supported it because the school system needed this to maintain and to move forward, Marks said. We have several new programs for the bene t of the children that are going to go into place this fall. She said the school district plans to unveil within the next month program changes that will use a portion of the approximately $1 million annually the tax levy will raise. Marks acknowledged the backing of the Apalachicola Bay Charter School community contributed to the levys passage. They were supporting us and trying to push this through, she said. I think we have a positive relationship. The whole thing boils down to this this is about getting a good foundation for our students in the lower grades and moving them on up and eventually if children stay at the charter school through the eighth grade they will be with us in the ninth grade. So theyre feeding into us and were all working together to make sure the programs are good and the children are getting the education they deserve. With about two out of three voters in Apalachicola, Carrabelle and Eastpoint backing the ballot measure, the levy faced its strongest opposition in Alligator Point, where 75 percent of the voters said no, followed by St. George Island, where more than 68 percent of the voters were opposed. In Lanark Village, the vote was 56 percent against. Marks urged those opponents to consider working more closely with the schools towards improvement. If we have people that are that concerned, then they need to come and volunteer, she said. They need to be screened through, get their pass and come out there and work with our kids. I see people from the community myself go out to campus and math tutor and work with our students as mentors for Take Stock in Children. I see the volunteering going on, she said. If someone is negative, theyre not getting involved with our students and with our faculty to nd out what the needs are. If they are that concerned, they need to show their concern by getting involved with our kids. Election results were announced quickly after the polls closed at 7 p.m. Supervisor of Elections Ida Elliott said she expects the special election to cost about $8,000 to $10,000, with the school district picking up the entire tab. Because of an absence due to health issues on her staff, Elliott said she voted absentee for the rst time. Absentee ballots ran 234 against, and 169 for, the levy; there was no early voting. Turnout for the election was a tad more than 20 percent, about 1 percentage point better than it was four years ago.

PAGE 9

C a l l i n g a l l C a C a C l l i n i n i g n g n a l l K i n d e r g a r t e n e r s f o r Apalachicola Bay Charter School KINDERG A RTEN R OUNDUP March 23,2012 P lease bring birth certificate, social security card and immunization records. Beginning March 19th call or come by the ABC School for a registration form and to schedule an appointment for Friday, March 23 to meet teachers and visit classrooms. Apalachicola Bay Charter School 98 12th Street, Apalachicola, FL 653-1222 (phone) 653-1857 (fax) Smart Lenses SM Can produce clear vision without glasses, at all distances "Freedom from Eye Glasses, Now a reality for many." NO HIDDEN CHARGES: It is our policy that the patient and any other person responsible for payments has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed by payment or any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment. www.mulliseye.com "WE WELCOME NE W PATIE N TS, C ALL T ODAY FOR YOUR P RIORITY APP OI N TME N T" FOR NEW PATIENTS 59 AND OLDER This certificate is good for a complete Medical Eye Exam with Todd Robinson, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Surgeon. The exam includes a prescription for eye glasses and tests for Glaucoma, Cataracts and other eye diseases FOR YOUR APPOINTMENT CALL: 850-763-6666 ELIGIBILITY: U.S. Citizens living in the Florida Panhandle, 59 years and older, not presently under our care. Coupon Expires: 3-31-12 FREE EYE EXAM CODE: AP00 Darren Payne, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon Lee Mullis, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon Todd Robinson, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon City of Apalachicola Volunteer Board Member Vacancies Interested in serving on our Board of Adjustment or Planning & Zoning Board? Now taking applications from interested citizens who have a desire to get involved with the enhancement of the Citys architectural integrity and historical character by serving as a volunteer board member tasked with the responsibil ity of reviewing applications for development, and implementing and amending development standards as outlined in the Citys Land Development Code and Comprehensive Plan. For further information or to obtain an application visit Apalachicola City Hall @ 1 Bay Avenue, 850-653-9319. Members are appointed by the Apalachicola City Commission The following is the honor roll for the second nineweeks grading period at the Apalachicola Bay Charter School. 1st Grade Aani Carltons class All As : Alisha Arroyo, Kendall Hill, Jayden Nichols, River Sheridan, Mahaley Shuler, Trinity Taylor, John-Michael Thompson A/B : Ashton Amison, Caleb Cassidy, Daisy Jimenez-Perez, Trenton McClain, Mason Moses, Timothy Poloronis, Gabie Register, Jackson Segree, Rainey Smith, Brianna Stephens, Kevin Sullivan Miriam Triscrittis clas s All As : Miranda Diaz, Jabara Pearson, Kylah Ross, Mark Willis A/B : Jonathan Carter, Arav Patel, Colin We ng 2nd Grade Jenny Mallons class All As : Meredith Alford, Sophia Salman, John Sanders, Nicholas Valenzuela A/B : Caleb Abel, Carson Davis, Andrew Monod, Sevryn Everritt, Dominic Feliciano, Eulalia Gregorio, Genevieve Montgomery Stacey Herringtons class All As : Weston Bockelman, Lauren Conway, Ella Friedman, Alex Itzkovitz, Myia Maxwell, Kendall Meloche, Jasmine Richards, Gracie Smith A/B : Gavin Lashley, Trenton McClain, Zachary Riccard, Jeremy Shuler 3rd Grade Whitney Martinas class All As : Camille Davis, Livia Monod A/B : Leslie Escobar, Dorian Fleming, Stanley Gay, Abigail Johnson, Austin Shiver, Lyndsey Stiefel Traci Moses class All As: Gillian Terhune, Alex Joanos A/B: Jon Michael Cates, Martina Granger, Kaylee Hicks, Jadyn Luberto, Ava Neill, Caden Turrell 4th Grade Lindsey Bockelmans class: All As : Jayden Justice, Kalahn Kent, Alyssa Robinson, Camille Williams A/B : Krista Kelley, Allison Register Marie Lees class All As : Cade Juno A/B : Matthew Gay, Bailey Herrington, Paige Pullen 5th Grade Brooke Linanes class: All As : Grayson Constantine, Chloe Davis, Scout McLemore, Connor Messer, Rebecca Willis A/B : Hailey Gay, Jan-Michael Lowe, Adria Valenzuela Teri Williams class A/B : Kevin Flores, Steven Hicks, Alexus Johnson, Bryce Kent, Sophia Kirvin 6th Grade All As : Christian Amison, Michaela Cassidy, Brooke Martina, Ethan Moses, Kobe Myers, Faith Sapp, Natalie Terhune, Savannah Montgomery A/B : Samuel Hosford, Micah Patriotis, Sara Pouncey, Lucas Sasnett, Allie Zingarelli, Brian Bar eld, Andrew Nguyen, Sallie Rose Paul, Madison Smith, Grace Weiler ABC School Honor Roll By Lois Swoboda Times Staff Writer When the honor roll was announced last month, the Apalachicola Bay Charter School celebrated students accomplishments in style. Every nine weeks we celebrate honor roll, good attendance and citizenship with a pep rally, said Principal Chimene Johnson. Dozens of students received ribbons for academic achievement; a blue ribbon for A-honor roll and a red for A/B. Good citizens were given certi cates honoring them as exceptional eagles. An exceptional eagle is a student who shows good character and good academics and good attendance but mostly we look at character and their behavior towards adults and other students, said Johnson. Youngsters with perfect or near perfect attendance received prizes including movie passes, homework passes that could be turned in one time in place of homework and tickets to have lunch in the courtyard with a friend. Johnson said 20 names were drawn earlier in the week and those students attended a concert given by ragtime pianist Bob Milne at the Dixie Theatre. The culmination of the rally was teacher torture, part of a project to raise funds for the eighth grades planned trip to Tennessee. Classes that raised the most money got to play a prank of their choice on their teacher. Lindsey Bockleman got slimed with what looked like ve gallons of Pepto-Bismol to a cheering crowd. Jono Williams and Brant Banks pirouetted around the gym in tutus. A blindfolded Karen Ward ate a gold sh (actually a cold slice of peach) at her students request. Miriam Triscritti agreed to be duct taped to the wall, and then the crate on which she was standing was pulled from under her feet. Based on the outcome, we now know that two rolls of duct tape are not enough support even a petite teacher. The students jumped up and down, roared with laughter and recorded the pranks on dozens of cell phones. At the end of the day, they led calmly back into the school and prepared for the bus ride home with happy memories. To see more pictures of the ABC celebration visit www. Apalachtimes.com. Exceptional eagles soar at ABC School Education The Times | A9 Thursday, March 8, 2012 Photos LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Jono Williams, right, and Brant Banks took their teacher torture in good humor. Right Lindsey Bockelman gets a dose of Pepto Bismol in the interest of good fun.

PAGE 10

PET OF THE WEEK Franklin County Humane Society NIP FIRE A N TS I N THE BUD! CALL L OIS AT 653-5857 Franklin Countys ONLY LOC AL Pest Control Company Society A10 | The Times Thursday, March 8, 2012 Dont miss Saturdays dinner-dance Didnt the members of the golf club do a good job preparing and serving the breakfast for us? There was a good, steady crowd all morning. Wish you could have joined us at Chillas Hall last Saturday. Hope to see you this weekend, March 8, 9 and 10. Camp Gordon Johnston Days are here. Camp Gordon Johnston American Legion Post 82, 2367 Oak St., Lanark Village, is the place to be Friday, March 9. There will be a low country boil and The Dwellers will be on hand to play for your dancing and listening pleasure. Veterans attending the welcoming reception in their World War II uniforms will be served their favorite beverage free. Party time is 6 p.m.; the fun begins when you come in the door. Party hearty. The Saturday breakfast will be served at the Curfew Lodge in Carrabelle. It will be a great start to a great day. After youve enjoyed your breakfast, its off to the big parade. Step-off at 10 a.m. with marching bands, oats, World War II vehicles and much more. Then Saturday night the Dinner and Dance will be at the Carrabelle Municipal Complex, beginning at 5:30 p.m. Tickets are available at the Camp Gordon Johnston World War II Museum, or call 697-8575 to reserve your ticket. The price for each dinner will be $17; all active duty service member and World War II veterans will eat for free. Live music will be by the Not Quite Ready Combo for your dancing pleasure, and there will be door prizes. When you return home from the dance, turn your clock ahead one hour Daylight Savings Time begins. Be sure to check the batteries in your smoke alarm while youre at it. Be kind to one another, check-in on the sick and housebound, and get a grip, tie a knot, hang on to Jesus. Until next time, God bless America, our troops, the poor, homeless and hungry. Amontaye Austin turns 7 Amontaye (Tay Tay) Trevian Austin will celebrate his seventh birthday on Monday, March 12, 2012, with a party at Tom Brown Park in Tallahassee, with family and friends. He is the son of Brandi Austin and a special son to Larry and Brenda Cummings. We love you very much. Maternal grandparents are Tammy and Jerome Crooms, of Apalachicola. Paternal grandparents are Lisa Austin, of Ocala, and the late James Austin. Maternal greatgrandmother is Crystal Ford, of Apalachicola. Paternal great-grandparents are the late Mary Big Mama and Willie Smith, both formerly of Apalachicola. A special great-uncle and great-aunt are Darron Austin, of Apalachicola, and Annie Austin, of Tallahassee. ZyMarion Williams turns 3 ZyMarion JhKel Williams will celebrate his third birthday with family and friends in Tallahassee on Sunday, March 11, 2012. He is the son of James and Keneidra Williams, and the brother of Zyon and Heaven Williams, of Tallahassee. His maternal grandparents are Patricia Lane and the late William Bill Lane, and Alvin and Felicia Cummings, all of Apalachicola. His paternal grandparents are James Williams Sr. and the late Sheila Williams, of Fort Lauderdale. His Godmother is Ashley Johnson, of Marianna. Happy birthday. We love you, Kel. Happy Heavenly Birthday, Callie Lewis Happy Heavenly Birthday, Callie Lil Ma Lewis March 8, 1913 Nov. 25, 2007 The Legend of Cottage Hill, but the Legency still lives on in our minds and hearts forever. We love you! William J. and Marie Lane Patrick Lane Johnny Lane Monica Lane-Moron LANARK NEWS Jim Welsh Anniversaries A.L. and Gloria Quick mark 48th anniversary A.L. and Gloria Quick, of Eastpoint, celebrated their 48th wedding anniversary on Saturday, March 3. One week earlier, on Monday, Feb. 27, A.L.Quick celebrated his 72nd birthday. Randall and Angel Quick mark 10th anniversary Randall and Angel Quick celebrated their 10th wedding anniversary on Tuesday, Feb. 14. Angel Quick celebrated her 39th birthday the following day, Wednesday, Feb. 15. Jessie and Floria Lolley mark sixth anniversary Jessie and Floria Lolley celebrated their sixth wedding anniversary on Sunday, March 4. Carl and Audrey Wert, of California, are pleased to announce the engagement and upcoming marriage of their daughter, Karen Wert, of Apalachicola, to Phillip Wingo, son of John and Wilma Wingo, of Natchitoches, La. The bride-elect is a 1973 graduate of Terra Linda High School, in San Rafael, Calif. She graduated in 2011 from Gulf Coast State College, and is employed as an accountant with KaKo Bookkeeping Company. Her anc is a 1977 graduate of Natchitoches Central High School and a 1983 graduate of Louisiana State University. He is employed at Worley Co. as an insurance adjuster. A March 24, 2012 wedding is planned for 4 p.m. at the First Baptist Church in Apalachicola. A reception will follow at the Fort Coombs Armory in Apalachicola. The wedding couple is registered at Bed, Bath and Beyond. Invitations will be sent. Birthdays Engagement Karen Wert, Phillip Wingo to wed There was an unprecedented outpouring of affection and respect at a celebration at the Coombs Armory Saturday evening of the career of Ma Rose Tolliver. More than 150 people attended the surprise retirement party for Rosa Tolliver. Shortly before the event, she had been visiting her daughter in Georgia and friends said it took some fancy footwork to get her to come home. But her daughters Trina, Traci and Yolanda, succeeded and despite extremely inclement weather, the bash came off without a hitch. Ma Rose began her career with the Franklin County School District as a crossing guard and concluded it, 34 years later, as the accountant, having worked in between as a teachers aide, school secretary and bookkeeper. She was honored Saturday by her friends, family and admirers, who traveled from far and near to attend, as a mother, a professional and a community volunteer. Apalachicola Mayor Van Johnson proclaimed March 3 as Rose Tolliver Day and gifted her with a plaque and an autographed picture of himself. Myrtis Wynn, of Project Hope, which Ma Rose helped to found, presented her with a plaque and thanked her for her work. You always had time for us, Wynn said. Teresa Ann Martin thanked Ma Rose on behalf of the school board, recalling that no matter how bad things seemed, Ma Rose was always on hand to reassure everyone that, Its going to be alright. Ma Roses granddaughters and great-granddaughters, wearing T-shirts that proclaimed them as The Gems, entertained the group with a dance tribute to their matriarch. Elder Granville Croom offered the opening prayer, and Ma Roses cousin, Bernard Beans Simmons led grace, before the party enjoyed a sumptuous banquet prepared by attendees. Hi Fi Entertainment was on hand with tunes and a slide show prepared for the event. The nal presentation was a touching tribute by the three daughters who both planned the event and created the gorgeous decorations that transformed the Armory into a fairyland for the evening tribute. A gallery of photos taken at the celebration is available online at www.apalachtimes.com. By Lois Swoboda A big surprise for Ma Rose LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Rosa Tolliver is honored Saturday by family, friends and coworkers for her 34 years at the Franklin County School District.

PAGE 11

The Times | A11 Thursday, March 8, 2012 An outpouring of love from friends and family said goodbye March 1 to Ruth E. Schoelles, who died Feb. 28, 2012, at age 78 in Port St. Joe, following a long illness. Born Feb. 7, 1934, in Apalachicola, to the now late Wyatt and Ella Fair Hall, Miss Ruths business acumen was surpassed only by her love for all creatures great and small. Good morning, Sugar, began Apalachicola J. Patrick Floyd, echoing Miss Ruths longtime greeting as he related how Schoelles life so embodied the commandment of Jesus to love thy neighbor as thyself. She knew that formula for love and went about practicing it every day and it was not a labor to her, it was a passion. She loved it and you could tell that, said Floyd, a lifelong friend of Schoelles ever since she worked at the school with his mother. A youthful beauty who was named Miss Apalachicola in 1951 at the age of 17, Schoelles became known as an extraordinary business woman who made a giant name for herself as a real estate agent even before the market took off. She began her real estate career at Century 21, working with started with Chuck Marks, and later was with Tom and Ellen Beavers at ERA before ending with Prudential. In the real estate world, she was just known to be able to bring both parties together at the closing table, said a colleague. She could get everybody on the same page. She was a master. Floyd told the gathering at Kelley Funeral Home that she was good at it because she knew by heart the formula: Find out what the need of the person was and get busy giving to meet that need. Schoelles career was also marked by 26 years as executive director and later consultant for the Apalachicola Housing Authority. An avid animal lover, she was said to name all the strays, even the alligator that came into her yard, with yellow ies the only creatures that she ever allowed to be eliminated. Schoelles married Eldon Schoelles on Aug. 26, 1967. He survives her, as do their four children, Richard Schoelles (Gloria), of 11 Mile; Eric Schoelles, of Port St Joe; Kendall Schoelles, of 11 Mile; and Marks Schoelles (Karen), of Cummings, Ga.; and her sister, Fair Wynette Tucker, of Eastpoint. She leaves behind seven grandchildren, Rhein Furr, Holly Jo and Hayden Furr, Kyndl and Christopher Schoelles, and Wade and Aaron Schoelles. Schoelles was preceded in death by her son, Rond Lamar Furr; brother, John Wyatt Hall; and grandchild, Jonathon Schoelles. The only thing that she didnt give was to give up or give in or give out! said Floyd. Her ght to use every moment of her life and not let it be taken by cancer or not feeling as well is one of the most courageous I have ever seen. Her courage she would have stood down and backed down a lion, he said. May God bless us with just some of the talents of Miss Ruth and the love and strength to apply those to the needs of others as she did so well. By David Adlerstein The United Methodist Churches of Franklin County Welcome You First United Methodist Church of Apalachicola Worship Service 11:00 a.m. every Sunday Sunday School 10:00 a.m. 75 5 th St. Apalachicola 653-9530 fumcapalach@gtcom.net Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis Carrabelle United Methodist Church Worship Services 10:45 a.m. Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Celebrate Recovery Mondays 7-9 p.m. 102 NE Ave. B Carrabelle 697-3672 Pastor: Julie Stephens Eastpoint United Methodist Church Worship Service 10:00 a.m. every Sunday Healing service every fourth Monday at 7:00 p.m. 317 Patton Dr. (corner of David St.) 670-8825 Pastor: Rev. Beth White St. George Island United Methodist Church 9:00 a.m. Worship Service 10:00 a.m. Fellowship Hour 201 E. Gulf Beach Dr. 9274635 www.sgiumc.org Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis First Pentecostal Holiness Church 379 Brownsville Road Apalachicola Were excited about what Gods doing!!! Sunday School 9:45 am Sunday Morning Worship 10:45 am Sunday Evening Service 6:00 pm Monday, Youth Group 6:30 pm Wednesday, Royal Rangers, G.A.P. 7:00 pm Wednesday Worship & Word 7:30 pm Nursery Provided during regular church services 7:00 7:00 First Baptist Church St. George Island 501 E. Bayshore Drive 927-2257 R. Michael Waley, Pastor Join us as we praise and worship the living Christ. Great is the Lord and most worthy of praise. Psalm 145:3 Sunday Bible Study ................................................ 10:00am Worship Praise ........................................................ 11:00am Sunday Night ............................................................ 7:00pm Wednesday Power Hour ...................................... 7:00pm Wednesday Youth at S.P.L.A.S.H ....................... 7:00pm Walking in Christ R. Michael Whaley, Pastor WELCOMES YOU Church of the Ascension 101 NE First Street Carrabelle SUNDAY 10:00 AM WELCOMES YOU Church THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH (850) 274-4490 (850) 545-2578 WELCOMES YOU Trinity Trinity Episcopal Church est. 1836 Welcomes You Hwy. 98 & 6th St. Apalachicola 850-653-9550 Sunday Worship Services 8 & 10:30 a.m. Wednesdays Healing Service 11 a.m. Centering Prayer 4 p.m. Faith Hollie Maria Stott, of Apalachicola, and Massapequa Park, New York, passed away shortly after midnight in Long Island on Monday, Feb.27, 2012. Hollie had fought a brave and arduous twoyear battle against lung cancer. Born Dec. 17, 1953, Hollie grew up on the Great South Bay in Long Island. From an early age she was at once at home and skillful on the water swimming, diving, yachting and sailing in her wonderful nautical playground. She attended Massapequa High School, and was an avid member of its locally admired choir. She studied art and ceramics at Long Island University and the University of Southern California at Idyllwild, and at the latter was fortunate to advance her skill with the famous Maria Martinez and family. She graduated from Southampton College cum laude in 1975. From 1976 to 1983 she owned and operated Hollie Stott Pottery in Hadley, Mass. She then joined the Stott familys injection molding plastic business from 1983 to 1992 while studying at the Laura Norman College for Massage Therapy and sharing a canal-side home in Amityville, Long Island, with now local Melicent Remy. Her trained hands went back to work as a massage therapist when she founded Balanced Energies, Inc. in 1986. Her expertise and licensed practice included the specialties of European (Swedish) Massage, Advanced Reiki, Reexology, Advanced Amma (Korean-based) Therapy, Cranio-Sacral Therapy, Advanced Sports Massage and Chi Kung healing. Moving to Apalachicola, at year-end 2004, Hollie practiced her massage techniques rst at Riverside Therapy, with Kathy Jansen, and later revived Balanced Energies in her own studio downtown, where she also taught the Tai Chi forms that she had learned and taught in N.Y. Hollie was a volunteer massage therapist at the Lake Placid Ironman in New York from 2000 to 2010 and at Ironman Florida in Panama City, from 2006 to 2010. Hollie always maintained her intense love of the water swimming, sailing, paddling and boating. For many years in Long Island, N. Y., she was an accomplished and dedicated member of the U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary, and held a 100-ton master captains license. Hollie has left many examples of both pottery and painting, and her musical talent will be remembered by many Franklin County residents. She played her guitar locally with Carol Harris and others, and with the Lanark Village Scottish Fiddle Orchestra. She sang in both the Trinity Episcopal Church and the Bay Area Choral Society choirs in Apalachicola. Hollie maintained her Florida residence while returning to New York for cancer treatment in Jan. 2010, always hoping to return to the little forgotten coast city she loved. Hollie is survived by her parents, Richard and Vanda Stott, Massapequa Park, N. Y.; sister Sheryl and husband Michael Fratino. of Chester, Vt.; brother Richard (Ric) Stott and wife Diana Pepi Stott. of Southampton, N. Y.; and sister Mara Liesegang and husband Fred. of Brookhaven, N. Y. Her memory is also cherished by the Southeastern, Midwestern and Western clan of Remy/Reamy/ Watts families. A memorial service was held in Massapequa Park on Saturday, March 3. A local Apalachicola memorial celebration will be held Sunday, March 18, at 1:30 p.m. at the gazebo in Lafayette Park. Bring your testimony and stories, readings and/or prayers. Although some chairs will be provided, you may wish to bring your own, favorite portable seating. In lieu of owers Hollie requested donations be made to Swim Across America (SAA), www. swimacrossamerica. org/goto/hollie. This organization will be setting up a memorial page for her. Hollie Stott HOLLIE STOTT Linda Delores Horvath, 64, of Carrabelle passed away Thursday, March 1, 2012, in Carrabelle. She is survived by her husband of 47 years, Michael Louis Horvath. She was born in Apalachicola and had lived in the area her entire life. She was a member of First Baptist Church of Carrabelle. She loved to cook and enjoyed working in the yard. Memorial Services were held Tuesday morning, March 6 at the First Baptist Church of Carrabelle. In addition to her husband, she is survived by one son, Michael Louis Horvath, II (Melissa), of Auburn, Calif.; brother, Billy Murray; sisters, Sandra Wilish (Bob), Joyce Murray, Joanne Leadon and Kathy Murray; and many nieces and nephews. She is predeceased by her parents, Bill and Katie Murray, and brother Jerry Murray. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel, Crawfordville, in charge of arrangements.Linda Horvath John Gilbert Rogers, born Feb. 18, 1941, went to be with the Lord on Saturday, Feb. 25, 2012, at the age of 71. He was preceded in death by his father and mother, George and Florine Rogers; his brother Manuel Rogers; and his son John Gilbert Rogers Jr. He is survived by his sister Donie (Rogers) Sasser (husband Charles); one aunt, Flossie Ward; three grandchildren, Kayla, Michael, and Seth Rogers; two great grandchildren; ve nieces and nephews, Jody Rogers (Marilyn) Andy Walley (Gail) Sharon Powell (Mike) Rhonda Walley, and Terry Walley(Sheila); three great-nieces one great-nephew; two greatgreat-nephews; one greatgreat-niece; and numerous cousins He was a retired commercial sherman and correction ofcer and instructor. Graveside services were held at Magnolia Cemetery on Thursday afternoon, March 1. Pastor Joey Smith of Glad Tidings Assembly of God, Wewahitchka, presided over the service. Services were under the direction of the Comforter Funeral Home, Port St. Joe. John Gilbert Rogers Obituaries Friends mourn loss of Miss Ruth Franklin County Food Pantry The Franklin County Food Pantry would like to thank the Bishop OSullivan Council 1648 Knights of Columbus for holding Bingo Night Feb. 16 at St. Patricks Parrish Hall. Proceeds were donated to the food pantry. We would also like to thank our friends and neighbors who came out to play bingo and enjoy a fun evening for a good cause. The Franklin County Food Pantry is a notfor-prot 501(c)(3) corporation which distributes food twice a month to local families in need. Donations of food and cash are always needed and appreciated. We would also like to acknowledge and thank the local schools and churches who participated in our 2011 Holiday Food Drive. The continued operation of the panty depends on support from our local community. Big Bend Hospice Big Bend Hospice would like to take this opportunity to thank Karla Ambos, Bev Hewitt and Pam Mahr for the beautiful tablescape they created for the annual Forgotten Coast Chef Sampler. In keeping with the theme from our Trees of Remembrance, the table theme was I have seen too many stars to let the darkness overwhelm me and it was gorgeous. Karla, Bev and Pam serve as Franklin County Advisory Council members for Big Bend Hospice and are very involved in supporting the patients and families in Franklin County. Again, Karla, Bev and Pam, we would just like to say thank you for the hard work and dedication that you give to your community. Pam Raker Allbritton Big Bend Hospice Wakulla/Franklin Team Community Resources/Volunteer Coordinator Amanda Segree Family The family of Amanda Inez Segree would like to thank everyone for trying to make our life easier during Amandas long illness and passing. Thank your for the prayers, hugs, food, and owers, and for the wonderful benet. A special thanks to all our co-workers, Big Bend Hospice, Cllinicare, all the aunts and uncles, for the lost sleep and just everything we love each of you. Theres lots of unmarked dishes at Inezs also. Thank you from the very bottom of our hearts. Randy, Kim, Alonah, Trenton and Emaleigh In Loving Memory Mother Katherine Bennett Robinson March 9, 1930 Dec. 2, 2008 A beautiful garden now stands alone, missing the one who nurtured it But now she is gone. Her owers still bloom, and the sun it still shines, But the rain is like teardrops, for the ones left behind. The beautiful memories of its keeper are in our hearts to stay, But just like her owers she was part of Gods plan, So when it was her time he reached out his hand. So when you start missing Mother Katherine, Remember if you just wait, When God has a spot in his garden, She will meet you at the gate. Cards of THANKS

PAGE 12

Thursday, March 8, 2012 EV E RYTHING FOR Y OUR O UTDOOR ADV E NTUR E Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL (next to Piggly Wiggly) www.BWOsh.com 5 t h A n n u a l EV E EV E EV RYTHING FOR E RYTHING FOR E Y OUR Y OUR Y O UTDOOR ADV E UTDOOR ADV E UTDOOR ADV NTUR E NTUR E E Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL 5 5 A A n A n A O ur BIGGEST S ALE of the Y ear! HUGE SAVINGS ON T H OUSANDS OF I TEMS MARCH 30 & 31 FRIDAY 7A M 6P M ET & S ATURDAY 7A M 5P M ET WEEKLY ALMANAC APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE TIDE TABLES MONTHLY AVERAGES To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from these given for APALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW Cat Point Minus 0:40 Minus 1:17 East Pass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27 To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from those given for CARRABELLE: HIGH LOW Bald Point Minus 9:16 Minus 0:03 Sponsor the WEEKLY ALMANAC Call Today! 653-8868 Date High Low % Precip Thu, Mar 8 71 62 10 % Fri, Mar 9 71 62 10 % Sat, Mar 10 71 63 20 % Sun, Mar 11 72 63 30 % Mon, Mar 12 71 61 30 % Tues, Mar 13 72 62 30 % Wed, Mar 14 72 61 30 % By Lois Swoboda Times Staff Writer The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission is asking for your help in updating a listing of local boat ramps, part of a database of Florida boat ramps FWC released last month. Pat Harrell, grant manager for the project said it was part of a statewide boating access economic assessment to promote boating in Florida and determine where more ramps are needed. The data was assembled over a two year period, 2005-07 by investigators using aerial photographs to locate ramps. FWC also sent inspectors into the eld to collect detailed information. She said work on the list is ongoing and FWC is seeking partners, including counties and municipalities, to ll in gaps in the data. Harrell said the database has so far had thousands of hits, many from overseas including one user in Korea. The ramps are organized by county and by area of the state. Each listing features an interactive map of the area around the ramp and a form displaying details about the facility, including available parking, condition of the ramp, additional amenities, fees and in some cases photographs. Thirty-one ramps are listed for Franklin County. Unfortunately, there is some misinformation on the site and a few obvious errors. Beginning at Bald Point Beginning on the east end of the county, Bald Point State Park features a kayak ramp described as in excellent condition with parking available. The Ochlocknee Bay Public Boat Ramp, south of the Ochlocknee River Bridge, is incorrectly listed as un nished. The concrete ramp, with large parking area, was completed six months ago. St. Teresa Wayside Park boasts a concrete ramp with roadside parking on sand. Moving east there is a poured cement ramp at the Lanark Boat Club, with a launch fee of $10 and a parking fee of $5. The Marine Street ramp in Carrabelle is poured concrete. No mention is made of the public restrooms, sh cleaning station and picnic pavilion located adjacent to the ramp. The Moorings on US 98 in Carrabelle received extensive coverage, including shots of the motel sign. The launch fee for the cement ramp is $25 and daily parking is $20. But C-Quarters Marina next door was left off the list. On Timber Island, Dockside Marina and Boat Works has a well-maintained cement ramp and lots of parking. There is a $5 launch fee. Not far away, the Timber Island Ramp is maintained by Carrabelle, and parking can be a challenge. There are at least three boat ramps north of Carrabelle on public land; the new database lists two. Pine Log Creek is a small ramp on County Road 67 with very limited parking at the roadside. Rock Landing is a gravel ramp in the state forest on the Crooked River. Not mentioned in the database is Womack Creek ramp, a launch point for small boats adjacent to Womack Creek Campground in the state forest. There is ample parking and the primitive campground has a bath house with showers. Through Eastpoint and St. George Island Three ramps are shown on St. George Island, two in Dr. Julian Bruce State Park. Both are well maintained sand ramps, and properly described, although the database does not list restrooms and a picnic and camping area for the ramp designated as St. George Island Park 1. More parking, and shade, are available at ramp 1. The third ramp listed for the island is an old sand ramp across the street from Harry As. But that ramp has not been in use for years, now closed and fenced, and the channel silted. The new county boat ramp at the foot of the St. George Island shing pier does not appear on the FWC list. Only two boat ramps are listed for Eastpoint. The Ferry Dock ramp in the new Indian Creek Par is a cement launch for small boats at the end of Old Ferry Dock Road. A few hundred feet away adjacent to the park is North Bayshore Drive ramp, another cement launch. The new Eastpoint boat ramp next to the Eastpoint Pavilion on Patton Drive is not included in the FWC database. North of Eastpoint off State Route 65 are eight ramps, some on state land and some on federal land. Cash Creek, state owned and maintained, is an excellent ramp with a picnic shelter and adequate parking. Whiskey George ramp, maintained by the FWC, has a large parking area and a few picnic tables. Doyle Creek, in the state forest, has soft surface parking and no amenities. Gardener Landing is another FWC ramp with a few picnic tables. Graham Creek is an FWC poured cement ramp along SR 65, with shaded parking area and a few picnic tables. Northernmost of the FWC ramps is Bloody Bluff on the Apalachicola River. It has accommodations for the handicapped and shaded parking. The ramps at Black Creek at Wright Lake, and nearby Hickory Landing, are in the Apalachicola National Forest, both with running water and bathrooms, camping areas and picnic tables. Winding up in Apalachicola In Apalachicola, the list includes the city boat ramps at Battery Park and Scipio Creek. But unmentioned are the new cement boat ramp at Seafood Workers Park, the former Lombardi property, which boasts restrooms, ample parking, kayak launch and picnic shelters. Several sites listed as boat ramps for public use along US 98 in the Miles west of Apalachicola appear to be private property. The database lists two Unknown boat ramps which appear to be on private property. Black Pearl Charters in the same area is listed as a commercial ramp for public use, but that ramp is gated and the phone number for the charter company has been disconnected. Abercrombie Boat ramp, a large ramp on the Apalachicola River with lots of parking, is listed as Box-R Wildlife Management Area. The database can be accessed https://public. myfwc.com/LE/boatramp/ public/ FWC requests that additional information and changes be emailed to BoatRamps@myFWC. com. Support for the creation of the database was provided by the United States Fish and Wildlife Service Federal Aid in Sport Fish Restoration Boating Access Program. Freshwater Inshore This week the water temperature in St. Joe Bay has reached 66 degrees. only a few more weeks until we reach the magic number of 68 degrees. Red sh are being spotted in Eagle Harbor and on the ats in the bay, as well as trout. Some decent sized sh are being caught at the sea wall in the marina, but the better reports are coming in from Cape San Blas and Inian pass. Snow birds are reporting good whiting catches from the beaches and a few pompano. This warming trend is great for shing. Good reports from Lake Wimico and Howard creek are of great catches of shellcracker, bass, and cat sh. The rising waters last week was also good for cat sh at the damns and in the Big rivers. Crappie continue to bite in all the waters around the Forgotten Coast, but better reports are coming in from Depot Creek. SPONSORED BY E-mail outdoors news to times outdoors@star .com Page 12 O UTDOORS www.apalachtimes.com Section Section A Missing links LOIS SWOBODA | The Times The new FWC database does not mention this kayak launch or the cement boat ramp, both in Seafood Workers Park on U.S. 98 west of Apalachicola. FWC seeks help to update boat ramp database The River Delta Bass Club of Apalachicola has named Lloyd Alford its 2011 Angler of the Year for his catch of a total of 124.29 pounds. He was awarded a plaque and his 2012 entry fees will be covered by the teams two sponsors, Apalachicola Ace Hardware and Fishermans Choice Bait and Tackle of Eastpoint. The remaining top 10 anglers, and their weights, were Gerald Dykes (119); Mike Pridgen (105.64); Greg Dykes (100.15); Pap Duncan (81.74); Dewitt Galloway (63.53); James Newsome (56.41); Earl Dugger (49.71); Scooter Braswell (48.39) and Sherman Alford (48.12). We would also like to give a big thanks and a welcome home to Sherman Alford who is active duty air force and just returned home from a six-month tour in Afghanistan, Mike Pridgen said. MIKE PRIDGEN | Special to the Times Lloyd Alford Angler of the Year

PAGE 13

Thursday, March 8, 2011 CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA SP O RTS www.apalachtimes.com A Page 13 Section By David Adlerstein Times City Editor The grandson of a former chili cook-off winner scored a victory of his own Saturday as he triumphed in the annual 5K Red Pepper Run. Bryan Harrington, from Redding, Calif. ran a 19:42 to nish rst overall. He is the son of Trent and Denise Hatcher, with Just Plane Chili, out of Santa Rosa, and the grandson of Ron and the late Shirley Judson, from Red Bluff, Calif. In 2005, his grandfather took rst place in the chili cook-off with his Great American Chili Company team, while grandmother took third. Now with his own Chile Dudes Chili Company, the 29-year-old Harrington won with nearly a minute between him and the runnerup, shaving 29 seconds off his previous best time. It went good. Had a little headwind, he said. When I saw a guy 100 yards behind me, I red it. Finishing tops among the women was Tallahassees Sam Fortunas, 21, who ran a 22:17. The top local male was St. George Island resident Steve Reider, 47, who ran second with a 20:30. The top local female was St. George Island resident Elisa Kamal, 41, who ran a 26:24. A re ghter with Cal Fire, the state re department, Harrington said he trains through the Redding af liate of CrossFit, a core strength and conditioning program that brings together Olympic lifting and heightened cardio into its workouts. Race organizer Susan Bassett said rain was not a factor in the race, nor in the turnout, with 126 registered runners, and 124 nishers, ranging in age from 6 to 76. We had 129 nishers last year, so participation was not too adversely affected by weather report, said Bassett. Runners hailed from Florida, Georgia, Alabama, South Carolina, Michigan, Indiana, Ohio, Tennessee, California, Wisconsin, Pennsylvania, West Virgina, and Ontario, Canada. Photos by DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times Bryan Harrington holds up his trophy for winning the Red Pepper Run. Chili winners grandson tops Red Pepper The following is a list of top nishers, their age, gender and times. 1 Bryan Harrington 29m 19:42 1st M Overall 2 Steve Reider 47m 20:30 1st M SGI 3 Phil Robinson 26m 20:35 1st M 25-29 4 David Zierden 47m 20:44 1st M 45-49 5 Calvin Hartness 58m 21:35 1st M 55-59 6 Sam Fortunas 21f 22:17 1st F Overall 7 David Savary 46m 22:59 2nd M 45-49 8 Joe Minor 47m 23:00 3rd M 45-49 9 Daniel Martin 25m 23:59 2nd M 25-29 10 Jensen Reinert 23f 23:40 1st F 20-24 11 Kristin Mejia 34f 24:07 1st F 15-19 12 Steve Newman 46m 24:09 13 Dwayne Maddron 51m 24:16 1st M 50-54 14 Todd Daniels 41m 24:46 1st M 40-44 15 Tiffany Schleeter 24f 24:45 2nd F 20-24 For a complete list, visit www.apalachtimes.com. AND THE WINNERS ARE... Janna Salyer, 11, who nished rst in the 9-14 age group with a time of 38:08, stands with aunt Mary Beth Williams, from Marietta Ga., who ran a 39:27. Salyer is the granddaughter of St. George Islands John and Teri Salyer By David Adlerstein Times City Editor After dropping their opening six games, the Franklin County Seahawks have won their last two out of three. The team won 17-6 at John Paul Feb. 29. and then traveled to Altha on March 1 and earned an 8-2 victory. On Friday, the team fell at South Walton 18-7. We have struggled with hitting in the first six games and add a few errors and it makes it hard to win, said coach Mike Emerson. The last three games have been better with hitting, but errors are still hurting us as a team. We are getting better. Against John Paul, Brennan Walden started off pitching, and James Newell came in relief in the fifth to pick up the win. Zack Howze was 1-1 with a triple and three RBIs. Walden had three hits and three RBIs. Against Altha, starter Skyler Hutchinson threw six innings, four of them shutout innings. He gave up only two hits en route to the win. Austin Larkin had four hits in the game with an RBI, while Chance Buffkin had two hits with two RBIs. Against South Walton, starting pitcher Zack Armistead went five innings, giving up 13 runs on nine hits to suffer the loss. Hutchinson was 2-2 at the plate, with two RBIs. The team opened the season with a string of losses. On Feb 13, they lost 10-0 at Wewahitchka, and on Feb. 15, fell 15-2 vs. Arnold. On Feb. 17, Franklin County lost 6-3 at Bozeman, and on Feb. 21, fell 8-3 against Blountstown at the nest. On Feb. 24 at Liberty County, the Seahawks lost 7-2, and then fell 7-0 on Feb. 25 at The Nest against Florida High. Seahawks win 2 of 3 By David Adlerstein Times City Editor The Lady Seahawks varsity softball team split its last two games, narrowly falling in nine innings at South Walton 1110 on March 1, and then bouncing back to top Bozeman 9-3 Friday on a fog-shrouded evening at The Nest. The South Walton outing was a heartbreaker, as The Seahawks opened a 1-0 lead in the top of the rst after Morgan Mock singled and came home on a Tiffany Varnes sacri ce y. After falling behind 5-1, the Lady Seahawks busted it open in the top of the sixth with seven runs. Mock opened with a single, and then advanced to second on a Varnes single. Chena Segrees single advanced both runners, and then Varnes scored on an Anna Lee single. A single by Morgan Newell scored Varnes, and then Ally Millender whacked a double to score Segree and Lee. A single by Vanessa Simmons brought Newell home, and then a Mock double scored Millender and Simmons to complete the scoring. The Lady Seahawks fell behind 10-8 after six innings, but tied it up with two runs in the top of the seventh. Varnes walked, and then Lee smacked a home run to center eld to account for the runs. In the bottom of the ninth, a pair of Lady Seahawk errors helped enable South Walton to bring home the winning run. In all Franklin County committed ve errors. Segree struck out eight over seven innings. Lee had three RBIs while Mock batted two runs in on three hits. Against Bozeman Friday, the Lady Seahawks, under the direction of Coach Lisa Sweatt and assistant Sally Wheeler, evened their record at 5-5 with a 9-3 victory. Franklin County scored ve runs in the bottom of the rst to begin the scoring. A Varnes single drove home Mock, and then a Lee sacri ce scored Graycn Kirvin, who had got safely on base on a dropped third strike. A Newell single scored Varnes, and then Segree and Newell both scored on errors. In the bottom of the third, Franklin County scored after Segree singled, Lee sacri ced her to second and she came home on a throwing error. In the bottom of the fourth, the home team added two more, when Scout Segree and Mock both walked, Kirvin advanced them with a single and Segree stole home. Mock scored when Lee grounded out to second. Franklin County added a nal run in the bottom of the sixth, when Newell scored on a long y ball by Hunter Shiver. Millender struck out three in her two innings on the mound, with Chena Segree appearing in relief. Photos by DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times Morgan Mock warms up before getting ready to bat. Right Tiffany Varnes makes a play at second against Bozeman. Lady Seahawks top Bozeman Fall to South Walton

PAGE 14

A14| The Times Thursday, Month, Date, Year CLASSIFIEDS ToPlace Your Classified ad inCall Our New Numbers Now!Call:850-747-5020 Toll Free:800-345-8688 Fax:850-747-5044 Email:thestar@pcnh.com Email:thetimes@pcnh.com theAPALACHICOLA & CARRABELLETIMES CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW 77170T NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE BY CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT Notice is hereby given that the undersigned, Rebecca L. Norris, Clerk of the Circuit Court of Gulf County, Florida, will on March 22, 2012, at 11:00 a.m. ET in the lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil Costin Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida 32456, in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes, offer for sale, and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder, the following described real and personal property situated in Gulf County and Bay County, Florida: Real Property See Exhibit A (Gulf County, Florida) and Exhibit B (Bay County, Florida). Personal Property: (b)All buildings, structures and improvements of every nature whatsoever now or hereafter situated on the Land and all other furnishings, furniture, fixtures, machinery, equipment, appliances, vehicles and personal property of every kind and nature whatsoever now or hereafter owned by Mortgagor and located in, on or about, or used or intended to be used with or in connection with the use, operation or enjoyment of the Property, including all extensions, additions, improvements, betterments, renewals and replacements, substitutions, or proceeds from a permitted sale of any of the foregoing, and all building materials and supplies of every kind now or hereafter placed or located on the Land (collectively the “Improvements”), all of which are hereby declared and shall be deemed to be fixtures and accessions to the Land and a part of the Property as between the parties hereto and all persons claiming by, through or under them, and which shall be deemed to be a portion of the security for the indebtedness herein described and to be secured by this Mortgage; (c)All easements, rights-of-way, strips and gores of land, vaults, streets, ways, alleys, passages, sewer rights, waters, water courses, water rights and powers, minerals, flowers, shrubs, crops, trees, timber and other emblements now or hereafter located on the Land or under or above the same or any part or parcel thereof, and all ground leases, estates, rights, titles, interests, privileges, liberties, tenements, hereditaments and appurtenances, reversions, and remainders whatsoever, in any way belonging, relating or appertaining to the Property or any part thereof, or which hereafter shall in any way belong, relate or be appurtenant thereto, whether now owned or hereafter acquired by Mortgagor; and (d)All rents, issues, profits, revenues and proceeds from any sale or other disposition of the Property, or any part thereof, from time to time accruing (including without limitation all payments under leases, ground leases or tenancies, proceeds of insurance, condemnation payments, tenant security deposits and escrow funds), and all of the estate, right, title, interest, property, possession, claim and demand whatsoever at law, as well as in equity, of Mortgagor of, in and to the same. pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered in a case pending in said Court, the style of which is: ALABAMA AG CREDIT, FLCA, a part of the Farm Credit system and a federally chartered instrumentality of the United States of America, formerly known as FEDERAL LAND BANK ASSOCIATION OF SOUTH ALABAMA, FLCA, Plaintiff, vs. SOUTHERN FOREST LAND, INC., an Alabama corporation, GRABLE L. RICKS, JR., GRABLE L. RICKS, III, DELTA WOOD PRODUCTS, LLC, a Mississippi limited liability company, and SMURFIT-STONE CONTAINER CORPORATION, a Delaware corporation, formerly known as SMURFIT-STONE CONTAINER ENTERPRISES, INC., Defendants and the docket number of which is 11-142CA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim with the clerk of the court within 60 days after the sale. In accordance with the AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT, persons needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact Judson C. Brandt, Esquire at (850) 434-9200 not later than seven days prior to the proceeding to ensure reasonable accommodations are available. WITNESS my hand and the official seal of this Honorable Court this 22nd day of February, 2012. REBECCA L. NORRIS Clerk of the Circuit Court By:BA Baxter Deputy Clerk EXHIBIT A In Township 5 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida PARCEL 1 That portion of Section 9, Township 5 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida, lying South and West of the Florida Power Company Right-of-Way recorded in ORB 12, Page 140. PARCEL 2 That portion of Section 15, Township 5 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida, lying West of the Florida Power Company Right-of-Way recorded in ORB 12, Page 140. PARCEL 3 That portion of Section l6, Township 5 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida, lying West of the Florida Power Company Right-of-Way recorded in ORB 12, Page 140. PARCEL 4 All of Section 17, Township 5 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida. PARCEL 5 All of Section 18, Township 5 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida, EXCEPT that portion of the West Three-Quarters lying North of Horseshoe Creek. PARCEL 6 All of Section 19, Township 5 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida. LESS AND EXCEPT: Commence at an existing six-inch by six-inch St. Joe Paper Company concrete monument marking the Northwest Corner of Section 19, Township 5 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida; thence South 738.04 feet along the West line of said Section 19 to the Point of Beginning; thence continue South along said West line 4541.96 feet to the Southwest Corner of Section 19; thence N3724’16” E, 3467.13 feet to the centerline of Pleasant View Road; thence N5129’18”W, 2223.00 feet along said centerline to the beginning of a curve; thence Northwesterly along curve along said centerline concave to the North with a radius of 731.64 feet, through a central angle of 3732’20”, an arc distance of 479.36 feet; thence N8111’19”W, 101.20 feet to the Point of Beginning. PARCEL 7 All of Section 20, Township 5 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida. PARCEL 8 That portion of Section 21, Township 5 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida, lying West of the Florida Power Company Right-of-Way recorded in ORB 12, Page 140. PARCEL 9 That portion of Section 28, Township 5 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida, lying West of the Florida Power Company Right-of-Way recorded in ORB 12, Page 140, LESS all that portion of Southwest Quarter lying South of existing Pleasant Rest-East Bay Road. PARCEL 10 Fractional Northeast Quarter of Southeast Quarter, LESS that portion of the Northeast Quarter of Southeast Quarter of Section 29, Township 5 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida, lying South of the existing Pleasant Rest-East Bay Road. PARCEL 11 North Half of Southeast Quarter of Southwest Quarter of Section 29, Township 5 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida. PARCEL 12 West Half of Northwest Quarter of Southeast Quarter of Section 29, Township 5 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida. PARCEL 13 South Half of South Half of Northwest Quarter of Southwest Quarter of Section 29, Township 5 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida. PARCEL 14 Fractional-All that portion of Northwest Quarter of Southeast Quarter of Section 29, Township 5 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida, lying North of existing Pleasant Rest-East Bay Road. PARCEL 15 Fractional-All that portion of Southeast Quarter of Southeast Quarter of Section 29, Township 5 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida, lying North of existing Pleasant Rest-East Bay Road. PARCEL 16 Fractional Southwest Quarter of Southwest Quarter of Section 29, Township 5 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida, LESS South Half of South Half of Southwest Quarter of Southwest Quarter. PARCEL 17 Northeast Quarter of Southwest Quarter of Section 29, Township 5 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida. PARCEL 18 Southwest Quarter of Southeast Quarter of Southwest Quarter, of Section 29, Township 5 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida. PARCEL 19 Northeast Quarter and Fractional East Half of Southeast Quarter of Section 30, Township 5 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida; LESS AND EXCEPT West Half of the Northeast Quarter lying West and South of Intracoastal Canal. PARCEL 20 All that part of Northeast Quarter of Northwest Quarter and Northwest Quarter of Northeast Quarter of Section 32, Township 5 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida, lying North of Wetappo Creek. In Township 5 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida PARCEL 21 All of Section 5, Township 5 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida, EXCEPT that land lying North of that stream referred to as “Little Creek” and EXCEPT that land that lies East of the Northwest-Southeast road in the South Half of the Southeast Quarter. PARCEL 22 All of Section 7, Township 5 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County. Florida, EXCEPT. that land lying North of “Little Creek” and EXCEPT that land lying South of County Road 386. PARCEL 23 All that part of Section 8, Township 5 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County., Florida, lying North of the centerline of State Road 386, as the same now runs, EXCEPT that land lying North of “Little Creek.” PARCEL 24 A triangular parcel being 450 feet, more or less, on West boundary of Section 9, Township 5 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida; 250 feet, more or less, on State Road 386 and 400 feet, more or less, on a private unpaved road that intersects State Road 386. PARCEL 25 All that part of Section 17, Township 5 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida, lying North of the centerline of State Road 386, as the same now runs. PARCEL 26 All that part of Section 18, Township 5 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida, lying North of the centerline of State Road 386, LESS AND EXCEPT that portion conveyed to St. Joseph Telephone and Telegraph Company in ORB 18, Page 235. LESS AND EXCEPT: Commence at a steel half-inch rebar (#4346) marking the Southeast Corner of Section 7, Township 5 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida; thence N0112’42”W, 16.47 feet along the East line of Section 7 to the intersection with Northerly right of way line of State Road 386; thence S6015’18”W, 3173.68 feet along said Northerly right of way line to the Point of Beginning; thence continue S6015’18”W, 68.59 feet along said right of way line; thence N3427’07”W, 533.35 feet; thence S7356’19”W, 69.93 feet; thence N1427’03”W, 162.41 feet; thence N8419’20”W, 195.71 feet; thence N2703’48”W, 269.12 feet, thence N0459’21”W, 257.91 feet; thence S8035’11”W, 218.60 feet; thence N0050’32”W, 963.88 feet; thence S8731’30”E, 551.05 feet; thence S0001’11”E, 452.83 feet; thence S8403’13”E, 178.86 feet; thence S0954’40”W, 214.79 feet; thence S3212’50”W, 141.99 feet; thence S1957’00”E, 1234.90 feet to the Point of Beginning. GRANTORS HEREIN RESERVE THE RIGHT OF INGRESS AND EGRESS OVER, UPON AND ACROSS THE UNPAVED ROAD NORTHERLY THROUGH THE ABOVE EXCEPTION FOR THE NON-EXCLUSIVE USE OF THE ADJOINING OWNERS. LESS AND EXCEPT: Commence at a steel half-inch rebar (#4346) marking the Southeast Corner of Section 7, Township 5 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida; thence N0112’42”W, 16.47 feet along the East line of said Section 7 to the Intersection with the Northerly right of way line of State Road 386; thence N6015’18”E, 5299.22 feet along said Northerly right of way line, to the Point of Beginning; thence continue N6015’18”E, 100.00 feet along said right of way line; thence N4152’37”W, 280.41 feet; thence N2304’19”W, 153.36 feet; thence S6752’32”W, 228.80 feet; thence S2614’02”E, 159.72 feet; thence N7009’10”E, 134.24 feet; thence S3908’54”E, 278.06 feet to the Point of Beginning. Less and Except: Parcel l: Commence at an existing six-inch by six-inch Saint Joe Paper Company concrete monument marking the Northwest corner of Section 19, Township 5 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida; thence S 0116’56” W, 5280.00 feet along the West line of said Section 19; thence N 3841’ 12” E, 2367.13 feet; thence run S 3526’19” E, 68.62 feet to the Point of Beginning; thence run N 3841’12” E, 1117.49 feet to the centerline of Pleasant View Road; thence S 5012’22” E, 2101.62 feet; thence S 3813’05” W, 872.13 feet to the approximate mean high water line of Wetappo Creek; thence N 7001’21” W, 200.86 feet; thence S 6913’40” W, 25.79 feet; thence N 8536’01” W, 61.40 feet; thence N 3508’27” W, 25.49 feet; thence N 4615’06” W, 108.23 feet; thence N 5555’19” W, 61.68 feet; thence N 4525’39” W, 47.67 feet; thence N 6657’33” W, 159.83 feet; thence S 8336’46” W, 59.84 feet; thence N 8553’27” W, 30.66 feet; thence S 7127’12” W, 101.70 feet; thence S 6224’15” W, 51.96 feet; thence S 5011’54” W, 77.49 feet thence S 6542’47”W, 63.53 feet; thence S 4432’58” W, 91.04 feet; thence N 3526’19” W, 1312.16 feet to the Point of Beginning and containing 56.874 acres more or less. Parcel 2: Commence at the Northwest corner of Section 19, ‘Township 5 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida; thence run S 0116’56” W along the West line of said Section 19, a distance of 5280.00 feet; thence run N 3841’ 11” E, a distance of 607.76 feet to the Point of Beginning; thence continue N 3841’12” E, a distance of 2859.37 feet to the centerline of Pleasant View Road; thence run S 5012’22” E along said centerline, a distance of 66.01 feet; thence departing said centerline run S 3841’12” W, 1117.49 feet; thence run S 3526’19” E, 1312.16 feet to the approximate mean high water line of Wetappo Creek; thence run S 4432’58” W, 91.04 feet; thence run S 2757’27” W, 54.17 feet; thence run S 5323’49” W, 235.19 feet; thence run S 4943’46” W, 66.85 feet; thence run S 6232’51” W, 54.79 feet; thence run S 5405’57” W, 109.12 feet; thence run S 6400’14” W, 84.81 feet; thence run S 5710’17” W, 308.48 feet; thence run S 7308’50” W, 45.36 feet; thence run S 6157’25” W, 50.38 feet; thence run N 6633’09” W, 51.13 feet; thence run N 8738’00” W, 104.16 feet; thence run S 7854’30” W, 101.36 feet; thence run S 8323’56” W, 224.15 feet; thence run N 7228’24” W, 49.46 feet; thence run N 4141’08” W, 63.06 feet; thence run N 1831’22” W, 134.59 feet; thence run N 3123’44” W, 56.93 feet; thence run N 4518’38” W, 360.20 feet; thence run S 1918’15” W, 47.10 feet; thence run S 6142’18” W, 34.42 feet; thence run S 1339’47” W, 45.06 feet; thence run S 2941’54” W, 41.51 feet; thence run N 4155’55” W, 64.56 feet to the Point of Beginning and containing 41.461 acres more or less. EXHIBIT B (Bay County Property) Beginning at a St. Joe Paper Company concrete monument marking the Northeast Corner of Fractional Section 24, Township 5 South, Range 12 West; thence South 0042’49” East along the East boundary line of said Section 24 for 1725.85 feet; thence South 0424’24” East for 12.52 feet to a point on the approximate mean high water line of East Bay; thence meander along said approximate mean high water line the following bearings and distances: North 8332’59” West, 192.47 feet; North 0749’38” West, 70.97 feet; North 0204’40” East, 79.50 feet; North 1214’05” West, 113.21 feet; North 2510’17” West, 131.82 feet; North 4533’53” West, 134.49 feet; North 7950’26” West, 249.34 feet; South 8134’03” West 82.52 feet; North 2054’51” West, 34.97 feet; North 0849’36” East, 89.24 feet; North. 0316’57” West, 206.39 feet; North 2504’48” West, 140.27 feet; North 3917’15” West, 119.95 feet; North 5541’08” West, 180.27 feet; North 4104’ 12” West, 72.80 feet; North 3300’29” West, 56.90 feet; North 5612’49” West, 64.34 feet; North 3610’58” West, 55.31 feet .North 3202’27” West, 144.23 feet; North 2151’4” West, 71.11 feet; North 4411’10” West, 176.41 feet’ North 2741’ 01” West, 45.75 feet to a St. Joe Paper Company Concrete monument; thence leaving said approximate mean high water line run North 8900’09” East along the North boundary line of said Section 24 for 1386.03 feet to the Point of Beginning. Said parcel of land lying and being in Fractional Section 24, Township 5 South, Range 12 West, and having an area of 29.173 acres, more or less. March 8, 15, 2012 77525T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No. 12-006-CP Division: Probate IN RE: ESTATE OF JOHN ANDREWS Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of John Andrews, deceased, whose date of death was September 7, 2010, is pending in the Circuit Court for Franklin County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida 32320. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent’s estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT’S DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is March 1, 2012. Personal Representative: Martha Ann Wiggins 33 Stone Avenue Claremont, NH 03743 Attorneys for Personal Representative SANDERS AND DUNCAN, P.A. 80 MARKET STREET APALACHICOLA, FL 32320 (850) 653-8976 FL Bar No. 63869 E-Mail Address: bsanders@fairpoint.net March 1, 8, 2012 77471T REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS Weems Memorial Hospital is seeking proposals for therapy services. Successful therapy company must have the ability to provide occupational therapy, physical therapy and speech therapy as needed for the WMH Swing Bed program. Proposals should be submitted to Cynthia Drapal, CAO, CNO George E. Weems Memorial Hospital P. O. Box 580 Apalachicola, Fl 32329 Questions should be submitted to cdrapal@weemsmemorial.com. Deadline for Submissions is March 10, 2012. March 1, 8, 2012 86069T PUBLIC NOTICE Northwest Florida Transportation Corridor Authority (NWFTCA) Meeting Notice. The NWFTCA recently commissioned HDR Engineering, Inc. to prepare a major update to their regional Master Plan, originally adopted in 2007. As part of the initial phase of the update, HDR is working with key stakeholders (Florida DOT, FHWA, city and county reps., etc.) and the Authority to help analyze future transportation projects by assessing their respective economic benefits, developing an investment plan and proposing viable funding strategies. A series of workshops will be held during this process. The first workshop will be held at two alternate locations: March 13, 2012 from 10:00am to 1:00pm Central Time at the Florida State University Holley Academic Center, Panama City campus located at 4750 Collegiate Drive, Panama City, Florida and March 14, 2012 from 1:00pm to 4:00pm Central Time at the Days Inn & Suites, Navarre Conference Center, Room D located at 8700 Navarre Parkway, Navarre, Florida. Any person requiring special accommodations to participate in this meeting is asked to advise the Corridor Authority at least 48 hours prior to the meeting by contacting Alicia Stephen at (850) 429-8905 or by email Alicia. Stephen@hdrinc.com.Please RSVP by March 9 if you plan to attend. March 8, 2012 86099T PUBLIC NOTICE Public Scoping Meeting for Glades Reservoir Environmental Impact Statement: The US Army Corps of Engineers, Savannah District (USACE) will hold a public scoping meeting on March 22, 2012, from 4:00 to 8:00 pm at Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve located at 108 Island Drive, Eastpoint, FL 32328. The purpose of the meeting is to receive comments on the scope of the proposed Glades Reservoir Environment Impact Statement (EIS) pertaining to the Clean Water Act Section 404 permit application submitted by Hall County, Georgia (SAS-2007-00388). The public may provide verbal or written comments during the public scoping meetings. For more information on the project, please visit www.gladesreservoir. com. Comments: Written comments may be submitted by April 17, 2012, to be considered by the Draft EIS. Mailing address: Attn.: Richard Morgan, US Army Corps of Engineers, 100 West Oglethorpe Avenue, Savannah, GA 31401. Comments may also be submitted on the project website. Notice of Intent: The Glades Reservoir EIS Notice of Intent was published on February 17, 2012, and is available on the project website (http://www. gladesreservoir.com/notice-of-i ntent). The scoping period for the Glades Reservoir EIS extends from February 17, 2012, through April 17, 2012. March 8, 2012

PAGE 15

CLASSIFIEDSThursday, Month, Date, Year The Times | A15 The News Herald offers a competitive bene t package including medical, dental, vision and life insurance, 401(k) plan, vacation and sick leave, and six paid holidays per year. (Part-time positions have 401(k) plan options). DIGITAL ADVERTISING SALES REPRESENTATIVEThe News Herald online and the News Herald continue to expand our online presence. We are looking for a highly motivated, energetic Digital Sales person to achieve our online revenue goals, speci cally for panamacity.com. This is a unique opportunity to help build sales revenues and be a leading part of a progressive advertising sales team. The Digital Sales Executive will be required to make sales calls, train and offer guidelines regarding pricing and packaging of all digital products and services. The ideal candidate must be a leader and have an innovative approach to client development and an understanding of how companies are using the internet to market their business. You must have a drive to win and a passion for consultative media sales. Required Skills Highly motivated and results driven Creative, conceptual and strategic thinker Professional and positive manner when working with clients and others Superior knowledge of Microsoft Of ce (Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and Outlook) Outstanding record of achievement in current/past positions Superior professionalism, discretion, and judgment Strong work ethic and capacity to thrive in a team environment Effective time management and organization skills Excellent verbal and written communication skills Keen attention to detail The candidate with mobile and Yahoo! experience will have an edge Required Experience To be considered, you must have at least 3 years of sales experience, including 1-3 successful years in the area of online media including internet ad sales. Experience working with media is preferred. The candidate must be highly analytical with meticulous attention to detail and have experience with digital creative as this person will also work closely with Digital Director to ensure that all available resources are being utilized to support our needs. 4-year college degree in advertising/marketing or equivalent experience.ADVERTISING SALES REPRESENTATIVEThe News Herald and the News Herald.com continue to expand. We are looking for highly motivated, energetic sales people. This is a unique opportunity to help build sales revenues and be a leading part of a progressive advertising sales team. The Sales Executive will be required to make sales calls, train and offer guidelines regarding pricing and packaging of all digital products and services. The ideal candidate must be a leader and have an innovative approach to client development and an understanding of how companies are using the internet to market their business. You must have a drive to win and a passion for consultative media sales. Required Skills Highly motivated and results driven Creative, conceptual and strategic thinker Professional and positive manner when working with clients and others Superior knowledge of Microsoft Of ce (Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and Outlook) Outstanding record of achievement in current/past positions Superior professionalism, discretion, and judgment Strong work ethic and capacity to thrive in a team environment Effective time management and organization skills Excellent verbal and written communication skills Keen attention to detail The candidate with mobile and Yahoo! experience will have an edge Required Experience To be considered, you must have at least 3 years of sales experience, including 1-3 successful years in the area of outside sales and/or online media including internet ad sales. Experience working with media is preferred. The candidate must be highly analytical with meticulous attention to detail. 4-year college degree in advertising/marketing or equivalent experience. SALES/RETENTION CLERK We are seeking an eager part-time telephone sales clerk to sell and/or retain home delivery and single copy circulation. Essential duties include providing excellent customer service, pleasant telephone voice, and outbound dialing. Quali ed candidates will have general of ce experience, sales experience and computer skills. High School Diploma or equivalent is required and one year of customer service experience. This is a parttime position with hour pay, plus commission and bene ts.CUSTOMER SERVICE REPRESENTATIVEWe are seeking an ambitious part-time Customer Service Representative who will actively answer phones and participate in the everyday work and special projects. This position is the primary link between current and potential subscribers and the newspaper. You will handle general of ce work and maintain subscriber and non-subscriber database. Quali ed candidate will have a High School diploma or equivalent and one year of customer service experience. Candidate should have a basic understanding of of ce machines such as calculator, printers, fax machine, computer and internet skills and able to sit for 8 hour shifts. On time attendance during scheduled time is critical in this role as well as working some holidays and weekend shifts.The News HeraldCareers Come by The News Herald at 501 W. 11th street for an application or send a resume to resumes@ afreedom.com.Freedom Florida is a Drug-free workplace, EOETO APPLY: ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home Medical, Business, Criminal Justice Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 866-467-0054 www.CenturaOnline.com AIRLINES ARE HIRING -Train for hands on Aviation Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified -Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-206-9405 NEEDS:Florida Licensed Stylist & Nail TechVery busy location with lots of walk-ins 50% Commission PT/FT Flexible Schedule Paul Mitchell Advanced Training Apply within @ 147 W. Hwy 98 Port St. Joe, Florida 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322850-697-9604 850-323-0444 www.seacrestre.comwww. rst tness.com/carrabellePROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND RENTALSRENTALS2 BR 1BA, UNFURNISHED HOUSE Big Yard/Deep Water Dock .............................$650 1 BR RIVER CONDO, BOAT SLIP 3 Night Minimum .......................$105 PLUS DAILY 3 BR 1 BA FURNISHED HOUSE Monthly Rate, Carrabelle ................................$850 1 BR 1 BA UNFURNISHED APT Lanark, Remodeled, Includes Water ...............$475 2 BR 1 BA UNFURNISHED APT Lanark ............................................................$450 1 BR, SUN ROOM/DAYBED Furnished, Lanark ..........................................$450 3 BR 2 BA FURNISHED HOME On River, Boat Dock & Lift ............................$1000 2 BR 1 BA FURNISHED HOUSE On Bay ............................................................$900 3 BR 3 BA FURNISHED CONDO Downtown, 3 Night Minimum ....$105 PLUS DAILY OFFICE SPACE HWY 98 Frontage, Carrabelle ....$550 Plus Utilities Total Down Pmt $8752000 Dodge Ram -X/Cab T otal Price $4,9000% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!!Text FL00446 to 56654 Total Down Pmt $14752002 Chevy Silverado X/Cab T otal Price $7,2000% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!!Text FL00445 to 56654 Total Down Pmt $9752001 Ford F-150 X/Cab T otal Price $5,2000% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!!Text FL00447 to 56654 Polaris Ranger 20054x4 with 250 hours Call: 850-251-1864 TextFL 98560 to 55554 Luhrs 35’ 1980’s No motor, Hull damaged, located at 802 SE Ave. B, Carrabelle FL, Call Mr. Allen at 850-899-5319 for info, to be sold by 3/15/12. Kohler Birthday BathTubCall: 850-251-1864 Carrabelle, Florida Total Down Pmt $9752002 Chevrolet Monte Carlo T otal Price $5,5000% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!!Text FL00442 to 56654 Total Down Pmt $5752001 Pontiac Grand Prix T otal Price $4,0000% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!!Text FL00433 to 56654 Total Down Pmt $7752001 Chevy Blazer T otal Price $4,2000% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!!Text FL00444 to 56654 Eastpointe-Carrabelle 1bd, 800sf, $350 bi-weekly, (or $685/mo) includes: all utilities, elec, water, Sat TV, W/D, stone FP, & central AC. Secluded, 1/2 mile from beach. 6 mo lease. 1st & security. 954-816-7004 Text FL94643 to 56654 Magnolia Bluff Bayfront Sunset view. Spacious 3 br, 2.5 bath, large family room, screened deck. All appliances including W/D, water & trash paid $1300 + dep call 877-963-4321 orsunsetplaceinfo@gmail.comText FL99223 to 56654 St. George Island-2 br, 1 ba, Canal view. All utilities incl. 6 mo to 1 yr lse. $1125 mo + $500 dep. Call 850-653-5441 St. George Island Bayview Large 1 br 1 ba All utilities incl. 6 mo to 1 yr lease. $725 mo + $500 dep. Call 850-653-5441 St. George Plantation furnished 4BR, 3.5 Baths.$1,450 monthly. Home for rent, one year lease. Contact Prudential Shimmering Sands Realty 850-927-2666. Text FL99813 to 56654 Lanark Village: Clean 2 bedroom, 1 bath, screened porch, AC Long term lease: 7 months min. $500 monthly + $350. security deposit, references required or wkly & wkend rental w/deposit Pets-will consider. Non smoking. 850-212-2063 Text FL98418 to 56654 Southern V illas of Apalachicola Apartments Now accepting applications for 2br Handicap accessible unit. Some rental assistance may be available. Call 850-653-9277 TDD/TTY 711. This institution is an equal opportunity provider, and employer. St. George Island $160 week, Electric, Satellite, Garbage incl. Pool tble. 12’ X 65’ deck w/Beautiful view 850-653-5114 St. George Island 2Br, 1Ba, Ground floor, Satellite. 12’ x 50’ Deck. Only $250 per week. Call: 850-653-5114 Carrabelle 3 br, 1 ba, completely remodeled, appliances. included large private yard $600 month 210 NE 1st St. Lease/ Purchase Possible, Please call (404) 266-0067 or (404) 307-8912 Apalach RestaurantFull Service turn key restaurant. Excellent downtown location Lease. Call for information 850-653-8801 1 BR/1BA unfurnished apartment, downtown Apalach. Balcony, water, satellite, wireless included. $650 plus electric 653-8801 Publisher’s NoticeAll real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on a equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. Logistics/TransportCDL Class A Route DriverAverage 10 stops. Home base -Apalachicola, FL 850-653-8823 Web ID#: 34200243Text FL00243 to 56654 Medical/HealthCaring Peopleand CNAs needed. Join a team of people who make a difference in the lives of the elderly. Provide non medical companionship, in home help and personal care for the elderly. Flexible day, evening & weekend hours. Positions available in the Appalachicola, Mexico Beach and Port St. Joe areas.Home Instead Senior CareCall Mon-Thur 9-3pm 850-640-1223 or toll free 1-866-301-1919 Web ID#: 34199799 Text FL99799 to 56654 Food Svs/Hospitality*Servers *Cooks Dishwashers *Bartenders *BussersBLUE PARROT Now HIRINGPlease apply in person between 9a-5pm 7 days a week@ Blue Parrot St. George’s Island Food Svs/HospitalityPapa Joe’s Oyster Bar & GrillNow HiringAll Positions!!! Apply in person only Food Svs/HospitalityWanted!!!Part time Night Auditor/Front Desk Must be dependable, have phone and own transport. Bookkeeping experience a plus. Apply in person at Gibson Inn team. 51 Avenue C Food Svs/HospitalityWanted!!!Part time Housekeeper Wanted to join us at the Gibson Inn. Good attitude, references required. Apply in person at Gibson Inn team. 51 Avenue C Adorable YORKIE AKCPuppies, only 2 left. 1 Male. They are 9 weeks old, have been Health Certified and 1st shots. $600 Call 850-554-0320 Panama City Miniature Yorkie $75.00 to a good family. Please call (850) 773-2776.Text FL97678 to 56654 Two mens Schwinn bicycles brand new. All aluminum, with stainless steel chains to replace modern chains for durability. $140 each (850) 653-2615 Serious inquires only. Incorrect Insertion PolicyFor Classified In-column AdvertisersAll ads placed by phone are read back to the advertiser to insure correctness. The newspaper will assume correctness at the time of the read-back procedure unless otherwise informed. Please your ad. Advertisers are requested to check the advertisement on the first insertion for correctness. Errors should be reported immediately. Your Florida Freedom newspaper will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion, nor will it be liable for any error in advertisements to a greater extent than the cost of the space occupied by the error. Any copy change, during an ordered schedule constitutes a new ad and new charges. We do not guarantee position of ANY ad under any classification. Adopt: Active young stay-home-mom & successful dad, playful pup await miracle baby. *** David & Robyn *** FLBar42311 Expenses Paid 1-800-552-0045 Collins Vacation Rentals, Inc. St. George Islands Vacation Rentals Specialists Collins Vacation Rentals, Inc. is now accepting applications for our Reservations Department Strong computer skills and positive, enthusiastic attitude required! Prior experience preferred. Applicant must be willing to work weekends. Great pay! Great bene“ ts!Come be a team player at Collins Vacation Rentals!Applications are available at our o ce at 60 E. Gulf Beach Drive, St. George Island. For additional information and to make an appointment, please call: (850) 927-5442; (850) 927-5490.Collins Vacation Rentals, Inc. is a drug free work place.

PAGE 16

Local A16 | The Times Thursday, March 8, 2012 Our local real estate experts have identied what they feel are the best values around and are oering them to you in Real Estate Picks! (In this section), Discover the best real estate values in Mexico Beach, Port St. Joe, Apalachicola, Cape San Blas, St. George Island, Carrabelle and surrounding areas. Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Real Estate Picks John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.com MLS#242245 $439,900 St. George Island GULF VIEW FROM WEST PINE AVE 4 BR (2 are masters), 3-1/2 BA with extra LR/5th BR, FURNISHED, Interesting Architectural features, POOL with vinyl fencing, Enclosed outdoor shower, Screened porch, covered ground level entry, surprisingly good Gulf View! John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.com MLS#238697 $60,000 Lanark Village WATERFRONT LOT IN LANARK 50 ft water frontage directly on the St. George Sound. Close to Lanark Boat Club & launch area as well as all Lanark amenities are available, St. James Golf Course & Restaurant are close by. Nows the time to buy! Listed by Janie Burke Laban Bontrager, DMD Monica Bontrager, DMD 12761 Pea Ridge Road Bristol, Florida 32321 TELEPHONE (850) 643-5417 Bristol Dental Clinic DENTURE LAB ON PREMISES Same Day Service on Repairs and Relines Don Lively General Contractors L ICENSED AND I NSURED 20 Y EARS E XPERIENCE P .O. Box 439 C arrabelle, FL 32322 697-2783 or Mobile 566-2603 RC 0066499 R G0065255 Carrabelle Visa, Discover, and American Express Honored at Participating Ace Stores JACKSONS Building Supplies & Auto Repair Carrabelle 697-3333 We Deliver Anywhere Hardware and Paint Center Electrical & Finish Carpentry 850-229-6751 850-227-5666 Michael & Anthony T o n y P o l o r o n i s & S o n s I n c From A to Z PO Box 364 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 850-340-0756 Gregs Handyman Service & Lawn Maintenance NO JOB TOO BIG PLEASE CALL JOE @ 850-670-5478 joes_lawn@yahoo.com JOES LAWN CARE PILE DRIVING FOUN D ATION/PILING R E P AIR DOCK/MARINE WORK MOORING BOUYS OFFICE: 850.227.1709 FAX: 850.762.2552 CELL: 850.527.5725 HOWARD227 F AIRPOINT.NET ROBERTS APPLIANCE REPAIR ALL MAJOR BRANDS 18 Shadow Lane Apalachicola, FL 32320 Phone: (850) 653-8122 Cell: (850) 653-7654 Trades & Services L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W E W E E E W E W E W E E E W E E W E E E W E W E W E E E W E E W E E E W E W E W E E E W E A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A W A W W W A W A W A W W W A W W A W W W A W A W A W W W A W W A W W W A W A W A W W W A W W A W W W A W A W A W W W A W W A W W W A W A W A W W W A W W A W W W A W A W A W W W A W W A W W W A W A W A W W W A W N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N A N A A A N A N A N A A A N A A N A A A N A N A N A A A N A A N A A A N A N A N A A A N A A N A A A N A N A N A A A N A D D D D D D D D D O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S K K K K K K K K K K K K K K K K K K K K K K K K K K K K K K K K K K K K K K K K K K I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E I I I I I I I I I I I I N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G (850) 340-1359 Reliable Professional Farrier Service. For All Your Hoof Care Needs at an Affordable Rate. Qualications: Expertise in: Now Accepting Appointments Call Toll Free 888-681-5864 For more info www.seclung.com Lung Disease Specialist Rob Garver, MD Now Seeing Patients in Port St. Joe NOW BCBS-FL I N -NETWORK PROV I DER By Lois Swoboda Times Staff Writer If youre looking for a way to sweep the cobwebs out of your belfry and shake off the winter doldrums, come join the fun at Two Als on Thursday evenings. Through April, a motley crew of brainiacs meets at 7 p.m. to play trivia, but not your run of the mill Trivial Pursuit. The game, organized by Arthur Perry, who cofounded the caf with his dad, Leo, features speed rounds, word jumbles and more. Some weeks, Perry is the quizmaster and comes up with the questions and answers. Some weeks, one of the teams takes on the task. At a recent session, 17 players participated grouped into teams of various sizes with names like Real Naughty, Fossils, Back in the Corner and Peanuts. Some were regulars, but Back in the Corner was a couple who stopped in for dinner and decided to stay for the game. Perry said this was a slow night, possibly because dense fog. Normally 25 to 30 turn out, and as many as 55 have packed the bistro on trivia night. On several occasions, the Brain Bowl team from Franklin County High School has participated, and Perry said they performed very well. He remembers one night when 11 college students stumbled on the event and joined in. It turned out they were members of the University of Illinois choir and treated the players to an a cappella concert to thank them for the fun. There is no charge to play, and Perry said everyone is welcome. Many of the regulars said they drop in early for dinner before the game. It might not be Jeopardy, but its very good fun and you might win a bag of peanut butter crackers or a jar of banana peppers if you are up to the challenge. COOKIE TIME The annual Girl Scout cookie sale is upon us! This years avors include Thin Mints, Tagalongs, Samoas, Trefoils, Do-Si-Dos, Dulce de Leche, Thank U Berry Munch and the new signature avor, Savannah Smiles, a crisp tangy lemon cookie. This is the Scouts 100th anniversary. Troop 200 got cookie fever beginning at the Forgotten Coast Chefs Sampler this month. They decorated a table to promote Girl Scout Cookies and donated a box of each avor and a cookie tote bag for the silent auction. Pam Mahr won the auction, so she is of cially the rst person to receive her cookies. The cookies were distributed by Troop 200 last week, when sales started in earnest. Proceeds will be donated to local charities and will pay for a eld trip to Silver River State Park and Silver Springs in May. Over the past two years, the Girl Scouts of Franklin County have donated to the Franklin County Humane Society and First United Methodist Church of Apalachicola. This year, the girls hope to raise enough money to add another bene ciary to their annual giving. For information or to order, contact a Scout. Gaye Lass tells trivia partner Dick Fossil Rowalski to keep mum as they put their heads together to solve a trivia conundrum. At right, Steve Furtak assists with a Wheel of Fortune puzzle. LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Two Als offers trivia with a twist



PAGE 1

xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx 50 WWW.APALACHTIMES.COMPhone: 850-653-8868 Web: apalachtimes.com E-mail: dadlerstein@star .com Fax: 850-653-8036 Circulation: 800-345-8688 DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK: School News & Society: 11 a.m. Friday Real Estate Ads: 11 a.m. Thursday Legal Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Display Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Line Ads: 5 p.m. Monday xxxxx Contact Us xxxxx Out to see Index By David Adlerstein Times Staff Writers The Apalachicola Volunteer Fire Department made their hometown proud Saturday as they became the rst local team in at least the past decade, and quite possibly in all 30 years of the event, to win top prize at the annual St. George Island Regional Charity Chili Cook-off and Auction. Love was the secret ingredient, according to Ashley Teat, who joined with fellow re ghters Mark Van Amberg, Charma Buchhalter, Fonda Davis, Jr., Mike Cates, Scott Harper and Anthony Thursday, March 8, 2012 By David AdlersteinTimes City Editor Franklin County voters reassured the school district Tuesday they had its back, approving by a 54 to 46 percent margin a four-year extension of the half-mil operating revenue levy. With 829 votes in favor, and 703 against, the levy was given the thumbs up by voters in Apalachicola, Carrabelle and Eastpoint, while those places where retirees are more numerous Alligator Point, Lanark Village and St. George Island each said no. The levys victory at the special election means the school district will extend until June 30, 2016 a levy rst approved by citizens in spring 2008. The levy continues the shift of a half-mil from capital outlay monies to operating revenue, which the school district rst did in fall 2008 after the half-mil referendum was passed by voters in the spring, also at a special election. This time, though, the margin was closer than the nearly 64 percent approval the levy secured four years ago. It (the margin) is not what I had hoped for but its a win so Ill take it. Voters back school tax levyBy Lois SwobodaTimes Staff Writer In the course of their work, the construction crew renovating the courthouse has stirred up some dust, and maybe something else as well. Two weeks ago, some strange stuff happened to a crew working late at night in the building. A portion of $500,000 in federal stimulus money is being used to install solar panels and improve energy ef ciency. This means ceilings and portions of walls must be removed to install ductwork and rewire the building. On Feb. 23, three construction workers were busily employed on the ground oor of the courthouse between 11 p.m. and midnight. The crews often work late night hours to avoid disrupting courthouse business. One of the men was on a ladder in the veterans services ofce, a second man was on scaffolding in the probation of ce. The two men were removing a portion of the wall and could see each other through the hole they had created. The foreman of the crew, a clean-cut 30-something, was outside, preparing to install a concrete pad for a new air conditioner. Suddenly, the light in the probation of ce went out. The two workers thought they had cut a wire or tripped a breaker and went to tell their supervisor. He checked the breakers and found none had been tripped. He walked back into the probation of ce and ipped the switch. The light came back on. The switch had been in the off position. He chided the men, but they insisted neither had been anywhere near the switch when the lights went out. They went back to work and the foreman went out into the hall. He hadnt been outside long when he heard a shout from one of the workers, and came right back. The light in the probation ofce had gone out again. Once again, the switch was back in the off position. And the confused Renovation work riles courthouse ghost Apalachicola re ghters chili wins cook-off Home grown hot stuffSee HOT STUFF A7 The ghost in question was seen standing in this doorway.LOIS SWOBODA | The TimesSee RENOVATION A8 Superintendent Nina Marks gives a thumbs-up after learning of the levys passage at the Supervisor of Elections of ce Tuesday evening.DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The TimesSee VOTERS A8 VOL. 126 ISSUE 45Opinion . . . . . . A4 Society . . . . . A10 Faith . . . . . . A11 Outdoors . . . . . A12 Sports . . . . . . A13 Tide Chart . . . . A12 Classi eds . . . A14-A15Camp Gordon Johnston Days this weekendThis weekend, March 8 10, celebrate Carrabelle history by attending Camp Gordon Johnston Days. On Friday evening, March 9, American Legion Post 82, in Lanark Village hosts a free seafood buffet. Active duty troops are welcome to attend. Live music provided. On March 10, the parade will start at 10:45 a.m. on US Highway 98, featuring vintage World War WII vehicles, marching bands, and more, with a free lunch afterwards at the re house. That evening there will be a dinner and dance at the municipal complex auditorium. Public welcome at all events.The Germans are comingOn Friday March 9, a contingent of German World War II SS Grenadiers will bivouac at the old high school football eld at the Carrabelle Municipal Complex, part of a historic re-enactment group out of Quincy. On Saturday at 2 p.m. March 10 the contingent will demonstrate German infantry tactics on the old Gulf State Community Bank property. There will be live re demonstrations, with blanks, using weapons carried by German World War II soldiers. No charge to attendees but please follow the safe distance areas marked by re-enactors.Full moon tours at Crooked River LightOn Friday March 9, from 7-9 p.m. come to the Crooked River Light House Park for Full Moon Tower Tours. Climb tickets will be $10, which includes beverage and a pastry. Moonlight maritime movies will also be included, so please bring a chair. For more info contact Crooked River Lighthouse Association at crookedriverlighthouse.org.Whats at the Dixie?On Friday, March 9 watch the Maharajah Flamenco Trio perform moving and dynamic Flamenco Neuvo. On Saturday, March 10, The Sarah Mac Band returns for their third season with their joyous blend of blues, rock, jazz and soul. Both shows start at 8 p.m. and admission is $20. For more info, call 653-3200.The Apalachicola Volunteer Fire Department, from left, Ashley Teat, Craig Gibson, Mark Van Amberg, Fonda Davis, Jr., and Charma Buchhalter celebrate their win. Katie McFarland prepares to judge a bowl of chili. Photos by DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The TimesWinning for the second year in a row in the crock pot competition were, from left, Ryan Austin, Scott Abercrombie and J.G. Carver, with Team Spice Boys out of Hoover, Ala.

PAGE 2

LocalA2 | The Times Thursday, March 8, 2012 THANK YOU!Join us next year for the 10th Celebration! Visit our website www.hcola.org! appreciates the support of these ne sponsors and contributors to the success of the By Lois SwobodaTimes Staff Writer During the World War II, the upsurge of patriotism in the United States seemed unparalleled anywhere in the history of the nation. Surveys conducted at the time found that 70 percent of the population, including more than 60 percent of high school students, favored mandatory military service for young men. Thousands did not wait to be drafted and volunteered to serve. On the home front, those not eligible for service on the battle eld worked in other capacities. The Civil Air Patrol enrolled civilian spotters to scan the skies for enemy aircrafts, join search-and-rescue missions and transport fuel and other supplies. In Apalachicola, Alexander Key, who volunteered for the Navy, brie y headed up a group of watchers who staffed the tower of the Coombs Armory 24-hours a day; ladies during the daylight hours and gentlemen at night. The list of volunteer air wardens included Gene Austin, Clyde Brown, Billy Buzzett, Percy Coombs, L.E. Deas, Eva Doyle, Clarence Floyd, Kathleen Hayes, Hal Hoffman, Jimmie Mahon, Mrs. Randolph, Joe Taranto and Mrs. Weems. It was one of those spotters who alerted the town to the sinking of the fuel carrier Empire Mica by a German U-boat in 1942 and dispatched rescuers to nd survivors. World War II volunteers were not all human. A number of pleasure craft and other privately owned vessels entered the service for the duration. Early in the war, U.S. military intelligence specialists realized the Atlantic coast and Gulf of Mexico were being stalked by German U-boats. With a huge effort to construct vessels for use overseas underway, there were no military craft available to patrol much of the endangered coastline. In Feb. 1941, the Coast Guard began enlisting temporary reservists to man local bases from which coastal patrols were staged. In July 1941, 270 pleasure craft were enlisted in the Coast Guard as Auxiliary vessels. The rst Auxiliary offshore patrol boat was the Two Pals, sailing out of Station Ft. Tilden, N.Y. A base was established in Apalachicola, at the end of Avenue F, where it remains to this day. Elgin We ng, chief engineer for Florida Power in the region, joined the Coast Guard Auxiliary and was appointed commander. His 50-foot yacht, the Sinbad III was pressed into service with him. An Apalachicola Times article from Aug. 8, 1941, noted the Sinbad had a Lathrop marine engine capable of cruising at 18 mph as well as a radio and onboard telephone, making her ideal for the task at hand. The Sinbad III, which was moored before the war in the channel off Ten Foot Hole, was moved to the Avenue F dock. R.H. Porter became her chief engineer and Angelo Taranto her rst cook. Three regular Coast Guard sailors came over from headquarters in New Orleans to act as her crew. The Sinbad III patrolled the coast from St. Marks to White City during the war. On the night the Empire Mica was torpedoed, the Sinbad III was in dry dock; another local vessel, the Countess, belonging to Dick Heyser, was commandeered for the rescue. The Countess began taking on water while returning from the scene of the shipwreck and another Apalachicola civilian boat, Willie Fred Randolphs Sea Dream took the survivors aboard. But she ran out of fuel and still another civilian boat, the Trouble, which belonged to Carol Macleod, towed the Sea Dream to safety.Governor Stone used as training vesselAnother boat with local roots, re-visiting the county from now through the end of April, was volunteered for military use during the war. The Governor Stone, the last Gulf Coast schooner, was constructed in 1877 in Pascagoula, Miss. And today is a moving museum, designated as a national landmark. But when she was younger, she served as a training vessel for the Merchant Marine during the war. When the war broke out, the schooner sailed daily at the Inn by the Sea, a luxury resort in Pass Christian, Miss., operating under the name Queen of the Fleet. Some historians suspect her owner, Isaac Rhea, mistook her for another wreck located nearby when he salvaged the schooner. In 1942, the federal government purchased the vessel from him for $1 and she was put into service as a training ship. Apalachicola resident Billy Cook remembers her. In the spring of 1945, the war was almost over and the 17-year-old Cook was a cadet at the Merchant Marine Academy and a cadet midshipman in the Navy Reserve stationed at Pass Christian. He was training to be an engineers mate. Cook said that while deck cadets spent a lot of time learning to sail and navigate on the Governor Stone and other boats, an engineers mate was not expected to have those skills. But they were required to spend some time on a sailing ship so one afternoon, he and his fellow motor heads were marched across the street from where they worked to the ship, to spend several hours sailing aboard the then Queen of the Sea. Cook said working as an engineers mate was dirty and unpleasant and, when the war ended, he chose another path. The Governor Stone was not cut out for military service either. In 1947 she was returned to her former owner.Private vessels patrolled for victory during the war VIEW THE GOVERNOR STONEThe Governor Stone will be in Carrabelle or most of the month of March, anchored at the City Wharf. Volunteers will open her for viewing each weekend. In April the vessel will be on display and sailing in Apalachicola. Plan to visit the Antique and Classic Boat Show April 20-21, and then see the Governor Stone the next weekend in Carrabelle for the Riverfront Festival. Atlantic coast and Gulf of Mexico reservists to man local Apalachicola, at the end of Avenue on water while returning from the scene of the shipwreck and another Apalachicola civilian boat, Willie Fred Randolphs Sea Dream took the survivors aboard. But she ran out of fuel and still another civilian boat, the Trouble, which belonged to Carol Macleod, towed the Sea Dream to safety. roots, re-visiting the county from Photos by LOIS SWOBODA | The TimesThe schooner Governor Stone, visiting the county during March and April, served as a training vessel during World War II. Below, from the St. Vincent Island National Wildlife Refuge collection these photos show the Sinbad III which was Elgin We ngs private Yacht and was drafted as a coastal patrol vessel.

PAGE 3

LocalThe Times | A3Thursday, March 8, 2012 dbutler@coastalcoverage.com Locally owned and operated Home Business Auto Health Workers Comp CLEAN C UTSLawn Care ServiceResidential CommercialServices:* Pressure Washing Palm Tree Trimming Landscape DesignCarlos Castillo 850-624-8018 Chris Grin 850-323-1442 CALL FOR A FREE ESTIMATE ACF Stakeholders host get-togetherYou are invited to nd out how the ApalachicolaChattahoochee-Flint Stakeholders, a grassroots group representing all water users in the river system, is striving to do what 20 years of legal, political wrangling has been unable to. The Stakeholders are collecting data from all walks of science, and convening community meetings up & down the basin to create the rst sustainable water management plan for the ACF. The free event is at 5:30 p.m. Wednesday, March 14 at the Gibson Inn in Apalachicola. Beer, wine, and light hors doeuvres to be served. RSVP to admin@ acfstakeholders.orgArtWalk Apalachicola seeks artistsSeeking artists and craftsmen for ArtWalk in Apalachicola from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Saturday, March 24. Accepted categories include paintings oil, acrylics & watercolor; graphics, glass, ber, printmaking and collage, jewelry, metalwork, paper, clay, wood, mixed media, sculpture and photography. All works must be original works of art by the artist. Prints and reproductions must be labeled as such and be limited editions, numbered and signed by the artist. Speci cally excluded are imports, commercial kits, manufactured or mass-produced items, dried ower arrangements, pour molds. The show will be held outdoors throughout downtown Apalachicola. Space size is exible. Email anita@apalachicolabay.org or call 653-9419.Interesting nds during post cook-off clean upIntrepid trash patrollers John Olander, Pete Ritch, Cliff and Ivanhoe Carroll, Ann and Fran Giknis, Skip and Terry Kemp, Barbara Sanders and Dail Mullins picked up 17 bags of litter in record time, 90 minutes, on Sunday morning following the chili cook-off. They battled strong winds but enjoyed glorious sun. Among the refuse were two credit cards and a drivers license, both now in the possession of the sheriffs of ce. Cliff Carroll found a $50 bill during the cleanup and is donating it to the St. George Island Civic Club. Organizer Ada Long sends her thanks to all who participated.Carrabelle Speed Festival At their March 1 meeting, Carrabelle city commissioners voted unanimously to allow Blake Hutchinson to stage a third Carrabelle Speed Festival, to be held at the Carrabelle-Thompson Airport on Saturday, March 24. Participants drive on an open runway giving them a full half mile of open throttle acceleration. In addition to the races, there will be a DJ and food vendors. City Attorney Dan Hartman told commissioners, Hutchison has purchased $2 million of insurance for the event. Participants must register by Monday, March 19. Drivers pay $85, and passengers $25, with a $10 charge for spectators. Drivers must prepay online at wannagofast.com/. Do you know of someone who is unable to get to either branch of the Franklin County Public Library? Perhaps someone you know is temporarily or permanently homebound due to illness or unable to drive to the library. Look no further, because there is a Homebound Service available through the library, at no cost to the participant. This service will come to your home with requested materials like large print books, books on audio tape or CDs, DVDs, or book format. Shut-ins need not feel excluded from the wellread patrons of Franklin County. The check-out time for books and CDs is 21 days and our DVDs are checked out for seven days. Materials are delivered by a special team of volunteers usually family members, neighbors, or friends who live or work in close proximity to the homebound patron. Just another way that library services touch the lives of the residents in this region. For more information about the service application and the other services offered, call 697-2366 or 670-8151. News BRIEFS YOUR COUNTY LIBRARY

PAGE 4

OpinionA4 | The Times USPS 027-600Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 Publisher: Rick Martin Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six monthsHome delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERSIn case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola TimesTeaching your children to be good nishers can be a heavy burden for a parent at times. Before children reach school age, parents should instill time management skills by giving them small tasks to complete within a certain time. Starting with small assignments, such as picking up toys, the parent will need to be persistent to keep the child focused until the job is completed. Making a game out of tasks will make it less tedious for the parent and the child. The parent may grow impatient at times and nd it easier to nish the job for them, such as with homework or chores. Children are quick to notice this and procrastinate in their duties if they believe their shortcomings will be compensated for. It is important for them to accomplish their commitments and complete tasks on their own. Doing things for them produces unjustied dependency. Deadlines and obligations are a part of everyday life and failing to learn how to meet them could be detrimental to their success in work and household commitments. When I was a child, my parents would give me specic things to do with the condition, when you are nished, you can play. I knew that there was no bending on my parents part. I would have to complete the job in order to receive the reward. The amount of playtime I had was determined by how fast I could get the job done. If the job was completed to their satisfaction, I could go play. However, if after inspection they were not completely satised, I would have to do it over until they were content with my work. I remember hearing the echoes of my buddies playing street ball while I worked, knowing that a job done right would have gotten me out of there sooner. My parents took their roles very seriously, knowing that it would not be to my benet if they nished the task for me or allowed me to do a halfhearted job. Being a nisher requires endurance and determination, something that can only be learned through testing. Easy parenting does not produce excellent nishers because it always follows the path of least resistance. Allowing children to quit when things get a little too challenging or non-accommodating will open the door of inconsistency and unreliability. Allowing your child to quit a program or extracurricular activity when they are bored with it is easier than continuing to take them to practice, games, recitals, etc. Meanwhile, the team may suffer, the part may go unlled, the group may lose heart, or the grades may decline. That one little character-building block of dependability affects their entire arena of life. Our oldest daughter participated in dual enrollment her senior year. After graduating from high school, she decided she did not want to nish the last remaining course of cosmetology school. Since she did not think she would pursue a career in cosmetology, she did not see the sense in nishing. I would not allow her to quit, reminding her that dual enrollment is paid for by the state and we could not waste tax dollars. If she nished, she would always have the training under her belt. Reluctantly she completed the course and we were so proud to see her graduate from cosmetology school that year. In order to forge your child into a strong nisher you must remove the quit word from your vocabulary. Teaching them that nishing is the only acceptable option will help prepare them for a hostile and very competitive business world. I remember my old football coach, Billy Granger used to say, Quitters never win and winners never quit. That is a very true statement, but I would like to say it like this, nishers never quit and quitters never nish. As parents, we must mold our children to produce the next generation of entrepreneurs, inventers, world changers or as I like to call them in the ministry, movers and shakers. We welcome all suggestions and hope you enjoy this weekly column. Please send all emails to Scott Shiver at frontline247@mac.com Thursday, March 8, 2012 YOUTH MaA TTERSScott and Pamela ShiverFinishers never quit and quitters never nishBy Caty GreeneSpecial to the Times Franklin County locals are familiar with the Arcadia Press publications with the wonderful sepia colored covers. Locally we have Apalachicola and Gulf County by Beverly MountDouds. There is also a Wakulla County offering by local historian Eddie Page. Now the list of publications includes Florida State University, in the Campus History Series, just out Feb. 20. Florida State University did not start, of course, as FSU. The university that now boasts 16 colleges offering more than 275 undergraduate, graduate, doctoral, professional and specialist degree programs started with an act calling for the creation of two seminaries in 1851. West Florida Seminary, which was established in Tallahassee, sent cadets to ght at the Battle of Natural Bridge to defend the state capital from the advancing Union troops. With the passing of the Buckman Act in 1905, the school began a new chapter as the Florida Female College, then Florida State College for Women in 1909. It went on to rank as one of the premier womens colleges in the country. In 1947, in part to accommodate the inux of returning GIs, the school resumed its coeducational status as Florida State. Photographs abound in this charming volume, bringing back images of bygone years, whether it is the Naturalist Club of 1882, or the 1904 football team whose only win, besides becoming state champion, was against the University of Florida. Javelin thrower Anne Harwick (22) shows off her technique, wearing the Jack Tar Middy, the athletic gear For the Outdoor Girl of Good Taste. Starting in 1947 the Florida State we know today begins to emerge in the photos, including early pictures of the Marching Chiefs. The 1960s brought the war protests, and FSU was known as the Berkeley of the South. Streakers ash through the doors of Strozier Library in the 1970s. Eddie Woodward, author of this campus history, has a masters degree in history from FSU and has served as the FSU heritage protocol archivist since 2007. The images in this book come from the FSU University Libraries Special Collections, the Heritage Protocol Photograph Collection, and a variety of other sources. You can nd the Heritage Protocol website at www.heritage. fsu.edu Whether you are an alum or just a fan of FSU, you will nd this book fun and full of interesting photos and facts. All of the author proceeds generated by the sale of the book will go to the FSU university libraries. Mr. Woodward plans to attend the librarys Thursday, March 15 party, themed Envisioning the Future of the AML, beginning at 5:30 p.m. The event, held on the librarians third anniversary, features a conversation with librarians in the community, and encourages discussion on such questions as What do you most like to nd in the library? What is your vision of the library ve years from now? and What would inspire you to volunteer in the next ve years? The usual libations and nger food will accompany the discussion. No RSVP is required; contributions of food welcome. All library supporters throughout the community are invited. For more info, call 653-8436 or 323-2305. Caty Greene is the librarian for the Apalachicola Municipal Library. To reach her, call 653-8436.@THE LIBRaARy Y Caty GreeneCome out to discuss the library March 15Special to the TimesThe economy of North Florida and its underdevelopment in rural counties will come under the wing of the Department of Economic Opportunity, thanks to an amendment sponsored by state Senator Bill Montford (DTallahassee). The Senate measure will set aside $150,000 to fund an Innovative Economic Development Study by the DEO in order to promote rural economic growth and development for eligible small businesses in these areas. And it will also examine why such counties have lagged the state in job growth and business creation. The people of North Florida are just as hard-working, just as industrious, and just as talented as people elsewhere in the state, said Sen. Montford. The problem is not a lack of work ethic. The problem is a lack of work. This study should help us better gure out how to turn our economy around. The funding is part of the Senates proposed budget for the upcoming scal year, and added with the assistance of Senator Lizbeth Benacquisto (R-Ft. Myers). If approved by the House and governor, the study will include a multitude of participants, including schools, businesses, non-prot organizations and local chambers. SSEN. BBILL MONTFORDMarch is National Social Work Month which makes it an appropriate time for us to salute the valuable and important job that social workers provide all year long. When lifes challenges become overwhelming, many people turn to a social worker for help. Here at Big Bend Hospice, we have 15 social workers who serve as family support counselors, grief counselors and Caring Tree counselors. They work tirelessly with our patients and families to help them cope with the many emotional and practical issues that accompany a life-limiting illness. These dedicated professionals assist with everything from coordinating community resources to helping families solve personal and nancial problems, to working through the emotional pain of dealing with an impending death. They recognize the family dynamics that are part of any life-threatening disease and help patients reach out to conclude the important business of giving and receiving love and asking for and granting forgiveness. Often it is the social worker who will pause to recognize a special occasion in a patients life and make sure that a birthday is celebrated or a caregiver gets a night out. Our wonderful social workers are an important part of our patient care team and our Big Bend Hospice family. The theme for the 2012 National Social Work Month is Social Work Matters. Time and again I have witnessed the powerful results of social workers both in our organization and in hospitals, nursing homes and assisted living facilities in recognizing and meeting the needs of the people they serve. On behalf of Big Bend Hospice we applaud social workers for their caring hearts and their important contributions to our community.Cathy Adkison, RNPresident and CEO Big Bend Hospice First I want to thank Denise Butler and Cathy Wood for their supportive letters on the half-mil tax referendum and the Franklin County School District and teachers. Recent letters to the editor excoriating the Franklin County school system and our teachers were unfair and insensitive to the needs and challenges that face our community. The most spectacular successes in bringing under-achieving schools up to A schools are those communities who are fully involved in the implementation of an aggressive plan of intervention. Educators, parents, students and community leaders coming together better serve the needs of their district schools. Identifying problems within the school district and inherent problems within the community that may inuence students is important. But I am writing about something that could very negatively impact our school district and all schools in the state of Florida, especially rural schools. Florida Senate Bill 1718 (2012) called the Parent Empowerment Act, better known as the Parent Trigger bill, passed the Senate subcommittee and goes to the Senate oor this week. The bill would authorize parents of students who are assigned to certain underperforming public schools (graded by the state) to submit a petition to the school district requesting implementation of a school turnaround option which would allow these schools to be taken over by private, for-prot, corporations or charter school operators, a move that would privatize what is now public education. The Parent Trigger bill is designed to give private companies and charter management organizations an open invitation to exploit parents and take over our public schools. Florida law already provides parents with alternatives for those who want other options for their children including enrolling in magnet programs and state funded high achieving, charter schools. Even more troubling is as this bill was-fast tracked through the House and now Senate (the Senate subcommittee allocated 20 minutes to discussion of this bill with little public input); the State Board of Education changed the grading system for the states schools, dramatically increasing the number of F schools from 38 to 268, a 700 percent increase. I am highly skeptical that Senate Bill 1718, and the recent decision by the State Board of Education to change the grading system for schools, would do anything but benet private, for-prot, corporations giving these operators access to $30 billion in state education funds and local property taxes. Other states have implemented Parent Empowerment Bills with very little improvement in their schools and have reported that it causes divisiveness and is a cumbersome and lengthy process that prevents immediate intervention to the under performing schools. It is especially ineffective in rural school systems like Franklin County. Florida parents dont want to see their children become pawns in a political game that benets outof-state interests and Tallahassees corporate friends at the expense of local public schools. Right now I would call this bill the Corporate Empowerment bill. Florida public schools need a governor and legislature that put education rst! Not try to privatize our public schools without a healthy and vigorous debate. Whatever happened to government in the sunshine? Parents, concerned citizens, school administrators and teachers can and should run the best possible schools we can. Franklin County come together for the sake of our children and beware of the mischief in Tallahassee. Mary Lou Short mMONTFORD amAMENDmMENTPrivatizing public schools calls for vigorous debateSocial workers help families work through pain

PAGE 5

IT IS OUR PLEASURETO WELCOMEDr. Eugene Charbonneau Dana Whaley, ARNP And Susan Hardin, ARNPTO WEEMS MEDICAL CENTER EAST Beginning MARCH 1, 2012Primary Care and Urgent Care110 NE 5TH STREET CARRABELLE, FL 850-697-2345 GREATER APALACHICOLAEnjoy quiet country living on 3.75 acres. Lovely custom built 3BR/2.5 BA home with many upgrades Jacuzzi, deck, large walk in closet. 1600 sq.ft. outbuilding on concrete pad.MLS# 244666.................$265,000 Travis Stanley 850.653.6477 Grayson Shepard 850.653.6718 COMMERCIAL APALACHICOLA Two commercial lots for sale in Apalachicola on the corner of Commerce and Penton St. Great location, one block of Hwy 98, near all the best shops and restaurants in Apalach! MLS# 244870..............$125,000EASTPOINT3 BR/2BA home on private 3 acres! Low maintenance metal roof, vinyl siding and great front porch. Backs up to state landMLS#244269.................$120,000ST. GEORGEISLAND GULF VIEW4BR/4BA close to center of island and convenient to center of island. Good Lots of storage and lovely native landscaping.MLS# 245752...............$399,000 C O MM ERCIAL GREATER A PALACHICOLA EA S TPOI N T S T G T G T EOR G E I S LA ND Leon Teat 850.653.5656 Sandy Mitchem 850.899.8300ST. GEORGE ISLANDFirst tier lot. Right across the street from the beach with wonderful views! This lot backs up to the back path too. Just three blocks to the center of the island. Buy a lot and build EXACTLY what you want!MLS# 246317..............$225,000 ST. GEOR G E IS LA ND ST. GEORGE ISLAND PLANTATION2nd tier lot in a great location, right on the beach access in Nicks Hole. Just across Leisure lane from state owned bayfront land best of both worlds!MLS#246524..............$95,000 ST. GEOR G E IS LA ND NEW LOW PRICE! BANK OWNED LOVELY HOME! NEW LISTING! NEW LISTING! Name_____________________________________________ Address___________________________________________ City_________________ State______ Zip_______________ Daytime Phone_____________________________________Make checks payable to The News Herald. Send order form with payment and a self-addressed, stamped envelope to: Taste of Home Cooking School c/o The News Herald P.O. Box 1940, Panama City, FL 32402 # of Tickets Price Per Advance Ticket* Total Amount Make checks Join Us For The Fun of Free complimentary gift bag valued At $50 filled with coupons, promotional items, & a copy of the Taste of Home Cooking School magazine Watch the culinary specialist prepare scrumptious entrees and desserts right before your very eyes, and win a chance to take home one of these delicious dishes. Visit vendor booths before the show; including food samplings and a pre-tasting wine booth with National Sponsor, Gallo Wine. Grand prizes to include a microwave donated by Sears and other great prizes! Register to win door prizes from restaurants and other vendors throughout this fun-filled 2-hour event. A 67-year-old North Carolina man escaped injury last month when the sport utility vehicle he was driving struck a passing motorist and then rolled into Apalachicola Bay just east of the Apalachicola bridge. According to a crash report prepared by Florida Highway Patrol Master Cpl. M.S. Cross, Sr., Andrew Thomas Creekmore, 67, of Cary, N.C., was traveling west on U.S. Highway 98, about one mile east of Apalachicola, in a 1985 Chevrolet SUV at about 4 p.m. on Sunday, Feb. 26. According to the report, Creekmore drove left of center into the eastbound lane and struck a 2006 Chevrolet four-door driven by Carl E. Anderson, 67, of Amberg, Wis. After his left front struck Andersons left side, Creekmores SUV continued southward into the bay. Creekmore, who was wearing his seatbelt at the time, was able to exit the vehicle and wade on to the shore. Andersons vehicle came to rest on the south shoulder. Neither man sustained injuries. The FHP report said alcohol was not a factor in the crash. Creekmore was charged with failure to drive in a single lane. Chased by a Gulf County deputy into Franklin County, a eeing vehicle lost control Friday afternoon and collided with the cruiser. The driver ed the scene by foot, and had not been apprehended as of Tuesday afternoon. According to a crash report prepared by Florida Highway Patrol Master Cpl. M.S. Cross, Sr., Philip Austin Jaquinnton ONeal, 19, of Apalachicola, was traveling east on U.S. Highway 98, in Gulf County headed towards Franklin County sometime after 4 p.m. A Gulf County law enforcement vehicle spotted ONeals 2007 Dodge 4door vehicle and intended to stop it for what the report said was a minor traf c violation. Picking up the pursuit was a 2011 Ford 4-door driven by Gulf County Deputy Richard Lee Burkett, 38, of Port St. Joe. ONeal initially stopped but ed the scene after being stopped, said the report, noting Burketts vehicle had its emergency equipment engaged at the time of pursuit. The high-speed chase entered Franklin County and at about 4:23 p.m., ONeal tried to make a left on to 15th Street and lost control as he started to rotate counterclockwise, said the report. The left front of Burketts vehicle struck the left rear of the Dodge 4door and ONeal then ed the scene on foot, read the report. Gulf County deputies conducted an inventory of the vehicle and contraband was found, said the FHP report. Charges were led against ONeals passenger, Quanteka Shenay Croom, 21, for possession of cocaine, with charges of reckless driving and eeing/eluding, both felonies, pending against ONeal. Of cers from the Franklin County Sheriffs Of ce and Apalachicola Police Department also assisted at the scene. The report said alcohol was not a factor in the crash. By David AdlersteinThe following report is provided by the Franklin County Sheriffs Of ce. Arrests in this report were made by of cers from the Apalachicola Police Department, Franklin County Sheriffs Office, Florida Highway Patrol and Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission. All defendants are considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law.Feb. 28Patrick O. Linder, 31, Jacksonville, withholding child support (FCSO) Roger D. Mathis, 54, Apalachicola, felony driving under the in uence, driving while license suspended and refusal to submit (FCSO) Kayla R. Langley, 28, Eastpoint, failure to appear (FCSO)March 1Tracey L. Carroll, 42, Eastpoint, driving while license revoked habitual, and failure to appear (FHP)March 2Gerald H. Kent, Jr., 38, Apalachicola, domestic battery (FCSO) Justin E. McAlpin, 23, Eastpoint, violation of probation (FHP) Quanteka S. Croom, 21, Apalachicola, possession of a controlled substance (FCSO)March 3Cliffton T. Worten, 43, White Springs, disorderly intoxication (FCSO) Jacob R. Eden eld, 29, Tallahassee, DUI and refusal to submit to breath test (FWC) Judy L. Patterson, 59, Apalachicola, reckless driving with damage and leaving the scene of a crash with damage (APD)March 5Fabian M. Ceron, 32, Apalachicola, domestic battery (APD)DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times AN SUV FROM THE SEA Arrest REPORT Apalach man ees after car chaseONeal initially stopped but ed the scene after being stopped.Crash report .................................................................................... FRANKLIN COUNTY SHERIFFS OFFICE Law EnforcementThe Times | A5Thursday, March 8, 2012

PAGE 6

LocalA6 | The Times Thursday, March 8, 2012 NOTICETAX IMPACT OF VALUE ADJUSTMENT BOARDFRANKLIN COUNTY TAX YEAR 2011 Apalachicola Bay Charter SchoolOpen EnrollmentFor the 2012-2013 School Year March 19-30, 2012Kindergarten Round-up(March 23,2012 Call for a scheduled time) Elementary School for Grades PreK 5 Middle School for Grades 6 8 Middle School for Grades 6 8 LIMITED ENROLLMENTTo receive an enrollment packet call or visit the ABC SchoolApalachicola Bay Charter School 98 12th Street, Apalachicola, FL 653-1222 (phone) 653-1857 (fax)Call or come by the ABC School beginning March 19th. Over35Years Experience.208 Reid Avenue, Downtown Port St. Joe850.229.1111www.BaysideFloristPSJ.comYour Full Service Wedding and Event Florist Deliveries Available Daily to Apalachicola with minimum order. Your Full Service Wedding and Event Florist Your Full Service Wedding and Event Florist BILL MILLER REALTY850-697-3751 (3310) 570-06583/2 DBL WD -3 FENCED COR. LOTS-2 CAR GAR $60,000 $29,500 $2,500 DOWN BUYS 2 BED APT. 2 6 ORRENT $500/MTH GULF VIEW & ACCESS 3 BDR 2 BA 2006 M/H 16 X 80 $89,000 3/B-D/W-3COR. LOTS DBL GARAGE $59,500 MIH 2 CRNRLOTS BLK. $ STORE REDUCED $49,500 COMM. BLDG-98 ON GULF-RENT $600/MTH Progress Energy has been attracting attention as the company strings wires to the new power poles that span the river north of the Apalachicola Bridge. Source Choppers of Beaumont, Texas supplied the helicopter that, like a hovering dragon y, has been seen performing airborne gymnastics to the delight and amazement of onlookers. THREADING THE POWER POLESSpecial to The TimesFrom Carrabelle to St James, this Saturdays Coastal Art Tour offers art exhibits and demonstrations at participating galleries, studios, and shops all day, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sponsored by the Carrabelle Artists Association, the tour features 12 locations with ne art, sculptures and pottery. The artists association will be showing at The Senior Center in Carrabelle and the St. James Bay Golf Resort Fountain Room, with local artists exhibiting works and demonstrating the process of creating watercolors, pastels, portraits, and pottery thrown on a wheel. Stops along the tour include: Joe and Josepha Kotzman, 328 River Road, Studio/Gallery (watercolors and oils); Moore Treasures, U.S. Highway 98 (Paintings, rock and crystal works, carvings); Marian Morris Earthsong Pottery Studio/ Gallery, 112 NE Ave. A and First Street; Mary Giles, Trader Antiques, 107 St. James ((Sculptured artifacts); Cal Allen at the History Museum 106 SE Ave. C (Tempera and watercolors); Joan Matey, 510 Gallery, 510 U.S. Highway 98 (Sculptures, 3D art, ne art); Shirley Cox Studio/Gallery, 801 SE 7th St. (Oils); Perpenders Gallery, 604 SE Ave. F, featuring artists Leon Wiesener and Alena Havlin (Pastels, oils, and acrylic); and Fred Aman, 2496 U.S. Highway 98 E (Gallery of renowned bronze sculptures). Maps and information available at the Carrabelle Chamber of Commerce, Carrabelle City Hall, the Franklin County Senior Center and participating locations. For information call 697-4381 or 294-9664 or email joekotzman@yahoo. com.Coastal Art Tour Saturday Missy Cumbie, right, member of Delta Kappa Chapter of the Delta Kappa Gamma Society International, presents $50 gift certi cates to the Franklin County Consolidated School Teacher of the Year candidates at the Feb. 6 banquet. Seated from left are Sharon Solomon, Learning Center teacher; Karl Lester, band director, Andrea Keuchel, middle school English teacher and Audrey Gay, fth grade teacher. DKG is an international organization of more than 100,000 key women educators dedicated to promote professional and personal development of women educators and excellence in education. DELTA KAPPA HONORS TOP TEACHERS LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Faith BRIEFSKnights of Columbus hosts bingo for cancer gh t The Knights of Columbus Council 1648 will sponsor a Bingo Night on Thursday, March, 8, beginning at 6:30 p.m. in the Parish Hall at St. Patrick Catholic Church, Sixth St. and Ave. C in Apalachicola. All proceeds go to the American Cancer Society. Donation is $20 per person which includes eight games of Bingo. Prizes will be awarded, plus a nal jackpot game. Refreshments on sale. Segree family reunion Saturday The Segree Family Reunion will begin at 10 a.m. Saturday, March 10, at the Eastpoint re house, 24 6th St. Please bring old pictures and a covered dish. For more information, call Inez at 670-1115. Living Waters celebrates Project 11 Payoff Sunday Join the Living Waters Assembly of God this Sunday, March 11, for a Project 11 Pay-Off Celebration, marking the elimination of the churchs $45,000 mortgage on the parsonage. In 2011 the church family set out on an endeavor to eliminate the mortgage in 11 months. Calling it Project 11, the church set forth a challenge to get 45 people to pledge $1,000, or to make one-time donations. District Superintendent Bro. Tommy Moore will be special guest speaker at the service, which begins at 10:45 a.m., followed by a dinner on the grounds/ mortgage burning ceremony. Lighthouse Childrens Home in Eastpoint Sunday The Lighthouse Childrens Home, in Tallahassee, will visit the United Baptist Church, 37 Brian St, Eastpoint, this Sunday, March 11 at 6 p.m. Young ladies from the childrens home will be singing and giving testimonies. They invite everyone to come for a special blessing. For more information, call Bobby Shiver at 670-8451. Dry Bones Ministry hosts March 17 anniversary You are invited to attend Dry Bones Ministrys second anniversary Saturday, March 17 at 1:30 p.m. at the Sixth Street Recreation Center. Evangelist Annie L. Austin Pierce is the host. Dont miss the Hillside Dancers for Christ, by Sister Teresa Ann Martin; the Covenant Word Praise Team, led by Pastor Harolyn Walker; and Ministry in Dance, led by Sister Nedra Jefferson. We will have food, games, and entertainment, plus Natalie ONeal Booth will be checking blood pressure and glucose. Call Annie Austin at (850) 2451920 for info.

PAGE 7

LocalThe Times | A7Thursday, March 8, 2012Croom to anchor a team led by Craig Gibson. Gibson and his wife Becky worked up the recipe, which revolved around three meats ank steak, ground chuck, and hot chorizo. To balance the chili powder blend, the team used chopped yellow and orange bell peppers, plus sweet onions, garlic, salt and pepper, cilantro and a little touch of brown sugar. Were still kind of in awe, said Craig Gibson, savoring victory in only the teams third year of competition. The rst time we came in 37th and last year we place ninth, so I thought Were on to the right recipe of what they want, he said. So we just tweaked our recipe a little bit and obviously we tweaked it right. We wanted to have the heat but not stay there and burn so you had to chase it with a drink. The win not only nets the re department the $500 rst prize, but earns them a berth in the Worlds Championship Chili Cookoff Oct. 5-7 on Magic Island near Charleston, West Virginia. Apalachicola Fire Chief George Watkins, who spent Saturday in Apalachicola minding re duties, said the department plans to explore ways to take part in the worlds championship, the dream of each of the 43 teams in Saturdays Gulf Coast Regional Cookoff, the largest regional chili cook-off in the nation. Were going to look into the expense. Its all happened so fast, said Watkins. I was so proud of our re department, and congratulations to the members that went over and won the competition. The entire community, including myself, is very proud. Finishing as runners-up, and earning $300, was Terry Metzlers Romeo Red team from Decatur, Ga., who said her secret ingredient was Worcestershire sauce. Her husbands team, Grateful Red, said his secret was red wine. In third place, and winning $200, was the Chili Dawgs, from Jacksonville, led by Will English. Out of the money, but with a plaque nevertheless was Gary Dorris Team Toilet Bowl, from Valdosta, Ga. in fourth place. Lynn Ellis Bubba and Cha Chas Chili, from Kennesaw, Ga. took fth. Best Booth honors went to the Cairo, Ga. Fire Department in rst, with Dead Serious Chili, out of Tampa in second and Hot Lip, from Tallahassee in third. Taking Showmanship was the quartet of Elvises that made up the FART (Fireghters Annual Recompense Team) out of Woodstock, Ga., followed by Team Toilet Bowl in second and Burnin at Both Ends, from Destin, in third. Despite the threat of rain all week that dampened attendance, the cook-off was held under sunny skies, with droplets not appearing until late in the afternoon, well after the winners were announced and people were packing up. Welcome to the 100 percent chance of rain chili cook-off, joked chief judge Lee Edmiston before announcing the winners. Some of the more creative cooks, especially those new to the circuit included unusual ingredients in the mix, according to one of the more than 50 volunteer judges. Fish, mango, cooking chocolate and even coffee have been incorporated into chili in years past, although this years nalists were on the traditional side. Only 17 entries took part in the amateur crock pot competition, one of the smallest turnouts seen by Dayle Flint in the ve years she has overseen the competition. Winning for the second year in a row was J.G. Carver, also known as Mongo Faya from Team Spice Boys out of Hoover, Ala. which also includes Mike Honcho, (Scott Abercrombie) and John Slade (Ryan Austin). Back to back, straight up, thats how we roll, said Carver. In front of their booth stood an array of trophies, underscoring their apparent success as chili acionados. But a closer look revealed that one of the trophies was earned by Abercrombie in 1984, for being Most Consistent Piano Student and the other was from J. Parks 10th Annual National Tae Kwan Do championship for Free Sparring, Jr. 8-9, Beginner 2nd Place. Carver admitted that award was actually won by J.D. Boone, his brother-inlaw. I didnt even know him then, said Carver. Finishing in second place in the crock pot competition was Kathy Gordon, of Crawfordville, while third place was won by Lois Hauff and Karen Anderson, both from St. George Island. Judges were Richard Langford, Rick Hernandez, Luke Wetherington and Larry Harkness. This years Miss Hot Sauce and Mr. Chili Pepper pageant was another spirited affair. The seven entrants in Mr. Chili Pepper contest answered probing questions like, How much chili will people eat today? Do you think there will be any Beano left on St. George Island? and How do you think the President likes his chili? Contestants were judged on beauty, talent and charm. Richard Radford and Bill Mahan did the locals proud in all these categories but, in the end, the guy with the biggest jalapeno, Jason Cope of Burnin at Both Ends, won the day. Cope, who won last year, may be the only contestant to have won twice. There were twice as many Miss Hot Sauce contestants as Chili Peppers and a bevy of lovelies they were too. Judy Stokowski with the Cardiac Cowgirls from Water Street Hotel tossed chocolate and caution to the winds as she strutted her stuff before the cheering crowd. Several damsels sang, there was a lap dance, swords were swallowed, cartwheels carted, and one young lady shot a beer to enthusiastic applause. This years winner was Summer Padgett of Yellow Creek Swamp Sauce Chili from St. Petersburg, who shed her Tshirt for her crown. The daylong event was peaceful, with only minor medical incidents and fender-benders to speak of. The sheriffs ofce, together with members of the islands re department and community patrol, joined with ofcers of the states Bureau of Alcohol Beverage & Tobacco, Florida Highway Patrol, Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, and Department of Environmental Protection to provide law enforcement, security and trafc control. The sheriffs ofce said there were three vehicle accidents; three medical incidents; and six citations for consumption / possession of alcohol by persons under the age of 21. In addition to one arrest for disorderly intoxication, there where nine seat belt violations, three for open containers, and two speeding violations. Other citations issued were for failure to carry identication, no drivers license, providing alcohol to a minor, possession of a less than 20 grams of cannabis, possession of paraphernalia and expired license tag. Robert C. Bruner Attorney Personal & Business BankruptcyOver 30 Years Legal Experience850-670-3030 bankruptcy relief under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon advertisements. Before you decide, ask us to send you free written information HOT STUFF from page A1 PHOTOS BY DAVID ADLERST ST EIN | The TimesGary Carlson, from Uncle Bugs Chili, Branford, Conn. stirs the pot. The Elvises from the F.A.R.T, team are, from left, Tony Banks, Luci Retzer, Toby Banks and Blake McDonald. The Cairo, Ga. Fire Department took Best Booth.

PAGE 8

LocalA8 | The Times Thursday, March 8, 2012 Registration will be at 8:30am with the clinic to start approximately at 9am and run to 3pm. The clinic is Free to all Franklin County Residents. The clinic will include lunch, test, your patch and instruction from 2 Pro Umpires. Please bring with you your facemask and rulebook if you have them. Please remember that this year Dixie Youth is requiring all umpires to be certied in order to umpire a district game. ** New for 2012 Umpires certied through a clinic in 2012 will have the option in 2013 to renew without taking a clinic.** Dixie Youth strongly recommends umpire certication requirements for District tournament play as well. It is mandatory for all umpires in any Dixie Youth State Tournament to be certied. Many districts and leagues are also requiring umpires to be certied to umpire local league play and district tournaments. For More Information Contact Franklin County Parks & Recreation / Nikki Millender at 850-653-8277 9am and run to 3pm. The clinic is Free to all Franklin County Residents. Registration will be at 8:30am with the clinic to start approximately at 9am and run to 3pm. DIXIE YOUTH BASEBALL UMPIRE CLINICHOSTED BY: FRANKLIN COUNTY PARKS & RECREATIONMARCH 10, 2012LOCATION: FRANKLIN COUNTY SHERIFFSOFFICE TRAINING BUILDING 270 STATE ROAD 65, EASTPOINT RENOVATION from page A1workman was still perched on his scaffolding. The three men had a nervous laugh and went back to work. Soon after, the two men working on the wall discovered a conduit they needed to remove to make way for ductwork. They summoned the foreman again and he asked one of the workers to accompany him to the second oor to try to determine if the conduit contained live wires. Not waiting for the other man to descend from scaffolding, the foreman headed upstairs via the eastern stairway at the front of the courthouse. He walked down the hall toward the back of the building. The hall was unlit but there were lights in the stairwells at each end of the hall. He continued on the eastern side of the hallway, just beyond the antique desk on display in the hall, when he noticed he could see his reection in the rear stairwell windows. Then he noticed something that stopped him in his tracks: The re ection of another man standing in the casement doorway about 12 feet behind him, in front of the courthouse entrance, now permanently sealed. It never occurred to me that it was anything but a normal human being and not one of my workers, said the foreman. When he turned to see who the intruder was, nobody was there. A few seconds later, his worker entered the lobby from the eastern stairwell. Did you see anyone? the foreman demanded. The worker said he had not. The foreman ran down the western stairway, but encountered nobody. The second worker, who met him on the rst oor, said nobody had passed. Convinced there must be an intruder, the three men searched the entire building, and found nothing. The foreman said he decided they were at a stopping point and it was time to go home. After they left the building, while they stood outside puzzling over the nights events, the light in the rear stairwell went out. They didnt re-enter to investigate. The next morning, the foreman asked sheriffs deputies to see the security tapes from the previous night. He reviewed them with a deputy and although they were able to nd footage of his visit to the second oor, no intruder appeared on the tape. Several courthouse employees who saw him that morning said he appeared shaken.Is it murderer? custodian? clerk?If there was a ghostly intruder, who might it be? Several people who work at the courthouse or have worked there in the past have voiced theories. Some favor former Clerk of Courts Bobby Howell, who was known to wear a hat and was a stickler for conserving electricity. It was my brother, said his sister Frances Ann Monroe. Former courthouse employees say he would make the rounds of the building at night and if he found a light on, would call the occupant of the of ce at home, and order them to come downtown and turn it off. Dolores Roux, a former courthouse worker, said she believes the ghost is Jimmy Vincent DeCosmo. He was the rst custodian of the building and typically wore a cowboy hat and tan jacket to work. He is said to have been very possessive of the courthouse and to have disliked renovations. Mark Curenton, an assistant county planner known for meticulous historical research, has his money on a fellow named Henry Jones. According to the newspaper in Sept. 1942, Jones was shot to death by Willard Ingram while seated on the front steps of the courthouse. Ingram put two bullets in Jones back, in front of a large number of local citizens as eyewitnesses to the killing, according to the Times. On Sept. 21, Ingram, 38, was arraigned for rst degree murder and pleaded not guilty by reason of insanity at the time of the crime. He had reportedly already confessed twice, to the coroners jury and to authorities in Tallahassee where he was taken for safekeeping shortly after the crime, said the newspaper. At the end of a two-day trial on Sept 24-25, the jury as out a record 30 minutes before deciding Ingram was guilty. They recommended mercy. He was sentenced to life imprisonment at hard labor at Raiford. No reason is given for the crime in the newspaper stories. Doris Pendleton, property appraiser, has of ces on the ground oor and has worked in the courthouse for more than 30 years. Her rst boss there, the late John James, told her the building was haunted by a tax assessor named Fred Richards who prowled the halls at night. This place is spooky, James told her. People come back down here after they die. Pendleton has a few other strange tales to tell. She is one of several people who report having had their of ce doorknob jiggled while working in the building alone. Most of her staff said they have heard the elevator ascending and descending, and the Coke machine being used, when they knew there was nobody else in the building, usually at night. Before the system was automated, it was often necessary to save large projects for the evening hours when the of ce was closed, Pendleton said. Both she and Rita Millender tell a similar tale about a ghostly experience they shared. Sometime around the year 2000, the two women were in the courthouse late at night working on the tax roll. There had recently been a problem with youngsters sneaking into the courthouse through the boiler room window at night to skateboard in the halls. The women heard the sound of children playing in the hall. They described the sounds as laughter and giggling, a sliding sound and running feet. It was more than one or two or three, said Millender. Pendleton told Millender she believed the children had jimmied a window into the boiler room. Im going to run their little tails off, Pendleton told her. The two women burst through the of ce door to nd nothing. The sound stopped and down the hall, the boiler room door was locked and sealed. The pair returned to work but, before long, the sound started again. This time Pendleton opened the door slowly and, although she could still hear the sound through the crack in the doorway, when she and Millender stepped into the hall, the commotion stopped. The women said they have no idea who the youngsters could be. Roux had an answer. When she was a girl, DeCosmo had allowed children to roller skate in a parking lot where the courthouse annex stands, but only when the courthouse was closed. VOTERS from page A1I dont have to use my plan B now, said Superintendent Nina Marks Im extremely happy, she said. The Franklin County School District is going to continue to move forward. And up. I feel good about it. Im proud of our teachers that went to work for it and everyone that supported it because the school system needed this to maintain and to move forward, Marks said. We have several new programs for the bene t of the children that are going to go into place this fall. She said the school district plans to unveil within the next month program changes that will use a portion of the approximately $1 million annually the tax levy will raise. Marks acknowledged the backing of the Apalachicola Bay Charter School community contributed to the levys passage. They were supporting us and trying to push this through, she said. I think we have a positive relationship. The whole thing boils down to this this is about getting a good foundation for our students in the lower grades and moving them on up and eventually if children stay at the charter school through the eighth grade they will be with us in the ninth grade. So theyre feeding into us and were all working together to make sure the programs are good and the children are getting the education they deserve. With about two out of three voters in Apalachicola, Carrabelle and Eastpoint backing the ballot measure, the levy faced its strongest opposition in Alligator Point, where 75 percent of the voters said no, followed by St. George Island, where more than 68 percent of the voters were opposed. In Lanark Village, the vote was 56 percent against. Marks urged those opponents to consider working more closely with the schools towards improvement. If we have people that are that concerned, then they need to come and volunteer, she said. They need to be screened through, get their pass and come out there and work with our kids. I see people from the community myself go out to campus and math tutor and work with our students as mentors for Take Stock in Children. I see the volunteering going on, she said. If someone is negative, theyre not getting involved with our students and with our faculty to nd out what the needs are. If they are that concerned, they need to show their concern by getting involved with our kids. Election results were announced quickly after the polls closed at 7 p.m. Supervisor of Elections Ida Elliott said she expects the special election to cost about $8,000 to $10,000, with the school district picking up the entire tab. Because of an absence due to health issues on her staff, Elliott said she voted absentee for the rst time. Absentee ballots ran 234 against, and 169 for, the levy; there was no early voting. Turnout for the election was a tad more than 20 percent, about 1 percentage point better than it was four years ago.

PAGE 9

Callingall C a C a C l l i n i n i g n g n a l l KindergartenersforApalachicola Bay Charter SchoolKINDERGARTENROUNDUPMarch 23,2012 Please bring birth certificate, social security card and immunization records.Beginning March 19th call or come by the ABC School for a registration form and to schedule an appointment for Friday, March 23 to meet teachers and visit classrooms.Apalachicola Bay Charter School 98 12th Street, Apalachicola, FL 653-1222 (phone) 653-1857 (fax) Smart LensesSMCan produce clear vision without glasses, at all distances "Freedom from Eye Glasses, Now a reality for many." NO HIDDEN CHARGES: It is our policy that the patient and any other person responsible for payments has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed by payment or any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment. www.mulliseye.com"WE WELCOME NEW PATIENTS, CALLTODAY FOR YOUR PRIORITY APPOINTMENT" FOR NEW PATIENTS 59 AND OLDERThis certificate is good for a complete Medical Eye Exam withTodd Robinson, M.D.Board Certified Eye Physician and Surgeon.The exam includes a prescription for eye glasses and tests for Glaucoma, Cataracts and other eye diseases.FOR YOUR APPOINTMENT CALL: 850-763-6666 ELIGIBILITY: U.S. Citizens living in the Florida Panhandle, 59 years and older, not presently under our care. Coupon Expires: 3-31-12 FREEEYE EXAMCODE: AP00Darren Payne, M.D.Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract SurgeonLee Mullis, M.D.Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract SurgeonTodd Robinson, M.D.Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon City of Apalachicola Volunteer Board Member VacanciesInterested in serving on our Board of Adjustment or Planning & Zoning Board?Now taking applications from interested citizens who have a desire to get involved with the enhancement of the Citys architectural integrity and historical character by serving as a volunteer board member tasked with the responsibility of reviewing applications for development, and implementing and amending development standards as outlined in the Citys Land Development Code and Comprehensive Plan. For further information or to obtain an application visit Apalachicola City Hall @ 1 Bay Avenue, 850-653-9319. Members are appointed by the Apalachicola City Commission The following is the honor roll for the second nineweeks grading period at the Apalachicola Bay Charter School.1st GradeAani Carltons class All As : Alisha Arroyo, Kendall Hill, Jayden Nichols, River Sheridan, Mahaley Shuler, Trinity Taylor, John-Michael Thompson A/B : Ashton Amison, Caleb Cassidy, Daisy Jimenez-Perez, Trenton McClain, Mason Moses, Timothy Poloronis, Gabie Register, Jackson Segree, Rainey Smith, Brianna Stephens, Kevin Sullivan Miriam Triscrittis clas s All As : Miranda Diaz, Jabara Pearson, Kylah Ross, Mark Willis A/B : Jonathan Carter, Arav Patel, Colin We ng 2nd GradeJenny Mallons class All As : Meredith Alford, Sophia Salman, John Sanders, Nicholas Valenzuela A/B : Caleb Abel, Carson Davis, Andrew Monod, Sevryn Everritt, Dominic Feliciano, Eulalia Gregorio, Genevieve Montgomery Stacey Herringtons class All As : Weston Bockelman, Lauren Conway, Ella Friedman, Alex Itzkovitz, Myia Maxwell, Kendall Meloche, Jasmine Richards, Gracie Smith A/B : Gavin Lashley, Trenton McClain, Zachary Riccard, Jeremy Shuler3rd GradeWhitney Martinas class All As : Camille Davis, Livia Monod A/B : Leslie Escobar, Dorian Fleming, Stanley Gay, Abigail Johnson, Austin Shiver, Lyndsey Stiefel Traci Moses class All As: Gillian Terhune, Alex Joanos A/B: Jon Michael Cates, Martina Granger, Kaylee Hicks, Jadyn Luberto, Ava Neill, Caden Turrell4th GradeLindsey Bockelmans class: All As : Jayden Justice, Kalahn Kent, Alyssa Robinson, Camille Williams A/B : Krista Kelley, Allison Register Marie Lees class All As : Cade Juno A/B : Matthew Gay, Bailey Herrington, Paige Pullen5th GradeBrooke Linanes class: All As : Grayson Constantine, Chloe Davis, Scout McLemore, Connor Messer, Rebecca Willis A/B : Hailey Gay, Jan-Michael Lowe, Adria Valenzuela Teri Williams class A/B : Kevin Flores, Steven Hicks, Alexus Johnson, Bryce Kent, Sophia Kirvin6th GradeAll As : Christian Amison, Michaela Cassidy, Brooke Martina, Ethan Moses, Kobe Myers, Faith Sapp, Natalie Terhune, Savannah Montgomery A/B : Samuel Hosford, Micah Patriotis, Sara Pouncey, Lucas Sasnett, Allie Zingarelli, Brian Bar eld, Andrew Nguyen, Sallie Rose Paul, Madison Smith, Grace Weiler ABC School Honor RollBy Lois SwobodaTimes Staff Writer When the honor roll was announced last month, the Apalachicola Bay Charter School celebrated students accomplishments in style. Every nine weeks we celebrate honor roll, good attendance and citizenship with a pep rally, said Principal Chimene Johnson. Dozens of students received ribbons for academic achievement; a blue ribbon for A-honor roll and a red for A/B. Good citizens were given certi cates honoring them as exceptional eagles. An exceptional eagle is a student who shows good character and good academics and good attendance but mostly we look at character and their behavior towards adults and other students, said Johnson. Youngsters with perfect or near perfect attendance received prizes including movie passes, homework passes that could be turned in one time in place of homework and tickets to have lunch in the courtyard with a friend. Johnson said 20 names were drawn earlier in the week and those students attended a concert given by ragtime pianist Bob Milne at the Dixie Theatre. The culmination of the rally was teacher torture, part of a project to raise funds for the eighth grades planned trip to Tennessee. Classes that raised the most money got to play a prank of their choice on their teacher. Lindsey Bockleman got slimed with what looked like ve gallons of Pepto-Bismol to a cheering crowd. Jono Williams and Brant Banks pirouetted around the gym in tutus. A blindfolded Karen Ward ate a gold sh (actually a cold slice of peach) at her students request. Miriam Triscritti agreed to be duct taped to the wall, and then the crate on which she was standing was pulled from under her feet. Based on the outcome, we now know that two rolls of duct tape are not enough support even a petite teacher. The students jumped up and down, roared with laughter and recorded the pranks on dozens of cell phones. At the end of the day, they led calmly back into the school and prepared for the bus ride home with happy memories. To see more pictures of the ABC celebration visit www. Apalachtimes.com.Exceptional eagles soar at ABC School EducationThe Times | A9Thursday, March 8, 2012 Photos LOIS SWOBODA | The TimesJono Williams, right, and Brant Banks took their teacher torture in good humor. Right, Lindsey Bockelman gets a dose of Pepto Bismol in the interest of good fun.

PAGE 10

PETOFTHEWEEK Franklin County Humane Society NIP FIRE ANTS IN THE BUD!CALLLOIS AT 653-5857Franklin Countys ONLY LOCALPest Control Company SocietyA10 | The Times Thursday, March 8, 2012 Dont miss Saturdays dinner-danceDidnt the members of the golf club do a good job preparing and serving the breakfast for us? There was a good, steady crowd all morning. Wish you could have joined us at Chillas Hall last Saturday. Hope to see you this weekend, March 8, 9 and 10. Camp Gordon Johnston Days are here. Camp Gordon Johnston American Legion Post 82, 2367 Oak St., Lanark Village, is the place to be Friday, March 9. There will be a low country boil and The Dwellers will be on hand to play for your dancing and listening pleasure. Veterans attending the welcoming reception in their World War II uniforms will be served their favorite beverage free. Party time is 6 p.m.; the fun begins when you come in the door. Party hearty. The Saturday breakfast will be served at the Curfew Lodge in Carrabelle. It will be a great start to a great day. After youve enjoyed your breakfast, its off to the big parade. Step-off at 10 a.m. with marching bands, oats, World War II vehicles and much more. Then Saturday night the Dinner and Dance will be at the Carrabelle Municipal Complex, beginning at 5:30 p.m. Tickets are available at the Camp Gordon Johnston World War II Museum, or call 697-8575 to reserve your ticket. The price for each dinner will be $17; all active duty service member and World War II veterans will eat for free. Live music will be by the Not Quite Ready Combo for your dancing pleasure, and there will be door prizes. When you return home from the dance, turn your clock ahead one hour Daylight Savings Time begins. Be sure to check the batteries in your smoke alarm while youre at it. Be kind to one another, check-in on the sick and housebound, and get a grip, tie a knot, hang on to Jesus. Until next time, God bless America, our troops, the poor, homeless and hungry.Amontaye Austin turns 7Amontaye (Tay Tay) Trevian Austin will celebrate his seventh birthday on Monday, March 12, 2012, with a party at Tom Brown Park in Tallahassee, with family and friends. He is the son of Brandi Austin and a special son to Larry and Brenda Cummings. We love you very much. Maternal grandparents are Tammy and Jerome Crooms, of Apalachicola. Paternal grandparents are Lisa Austin, of Ocala, and the late James Austin. Maternal greatgrandmother is Crystal Ford, of Apalachicola. Paternal great-grandparents are the late Mary Big Mama and Willie Smith, both formerly of Apalachicola. A special great-uncle and great-aunt are Darron Austin, of Apalachicola, and Annie Austin, of Tallahassee.ZyMarion Williams turns 3ZyMarion JhKel Williams will celebrate his third birthday with family and friends in Tallahassee on Sunday, March 11, 2012. He is the son of James and Keneidra Williams, and the brother of Zyon and Heaven Williams, of Tallahassee. His maternal grandparents are Patricia Lane and the late William Bill Lane, and Alvin and Felicia Cummings, all of Apalachicola. His paternal grandparents are James Williams Sr. and the late Sheila Williams, of Fort Lauderdale. His Godmother is Ashley Johnson, of Marianna. Happy birthday. We love you, Kel.Happy Heavenly Birthday, Callie LewisHappy Heavenly Birthday, Callie Lil Ma Lewis March 8, 1913 Nov. 25, 2007 The Legend of Cottage Hill, but the Legency still lives on in our minds and hearts forever. We love you! William J. and Marie Lane Patrick Lane Johnny Lane Monica Lane-Moron LANARK NEWSJim Welsh AnniversariesA.L. and Gloria Quick mark 48th anniversaryA.L. and Gloria Quick, of Eastpoint, celebrated their 48th wedding anniversary on Saturday, March 3. One week earlier, on Monday, Feb. 27, A.L.Quick celebrated his 72nd birthday.Randall and Angel Quick mark 10th anniversaryRandall and Angel Quick celebrated their 10th wedding anniversary on Tuesday, Feb. 14. Angel Quick celebrated her 39th birthday the following day, Wednesday, Feb. 15.Jessie and Floria Lolley mark sixth anniversaryJessie and Floria Lolley celebrated their sixth wedding anniversary on Sunday, March 4. Carl and Audrey Wert, of California, are pleased to announce the engagement and upcoming marriage of their daughter, Karen Wert, of Apalachicola, to Phillip Wingo, son of John and Wilma Wingo, of Natchitoches, La. The bride-elect is a 1973 graduate of Terra Linda High School, in San Rafael, Calif. She graduated in 2011 from Gulf Coast State College, and is employed as an accountant with KaKo Bookkeeping Company. Her anc is a 1977 graduate of Natchitoches Central High School and a 1983 graduate of Louisiana State University. He is employed at Worley Co. as an insurance adjuster. A March 24, 2012 wedding is planned for 4 p.m. at the First Baptist Church in Apalachicola. A reception will follow at the Fort Coombs Armory in Apalachicola. The wedding couple is registered at Bed, Bath and Beyond. Invitations will be sent. Birthdays Engagement Karen Wert, Phillip Wingo to wed There was an unprecedented outpouring of affection and respect at a celebration at the Coombs Armory Saturday evening of the career of Ma Rose Tolliver. More than 150 people attended the surprise retirement party for Rosa Tolliver. Shortly before the event, she had been visiting her daughter in Georgia and friends said it took some fancy footwork to get her to come home. But her daughters Trina, Traci and Yolanda, succeeded and despite extremely inclement weather, the bash came off without a hitch. Ma Rose began her career with the Franklin County School District as a crossing guard and concluded it, 34 years later, as the accountant, having worked in between as a teachers aide, school secretary and bookkeeper. She was honored Saturday by her friends, family and admirers, who traveled from far and near to attend, as a mother, a professional and a community volunteer. Apalachicola Mayor Van Johnson proclaimed March 3 as Rose Tolliver Day and gifted her with a plaque and an autographed picture of himself. Myrtis Wynn, of Project Hope, which Ma Rose helped to found, presented her with a plaque and thanked her for her work. You always had time for us, Wynn said. Teresa Ann Martin thanked Ma Rose on behalf of the school board, recalling that no matter how bad things seemed, Ma Rose was always on hand to reassure everyone that, Its going to be alright. Ma Roses granddaughters and great-granddaughters, wearing T-shirts that proclaimed them as The Gems, entertained the group with a dance tribute to their matriarch. Elder Granville Croom offered the opening prayer, and Ma Roses cousin, Bernard Beans Simmons led grace, before the party enjoyed a sumptuous banquet prepared by attendees. Hi Fi Entertainment was on hand with tunes and a slide show prepared for the event. The nal presentation was a touching tribute by the three daughters who both planned the event and created the gorgeous decorations that transformed the Armory into a fairyland for the evening tribute. A gallery of photos taken at the celebration is available online at www.apalachtimes.com. By Lois SwobodaA big surprise for Ma RoseLOIS SWOBODA | The TimesRosa Tolliver is honored Saturday by family, friends and coworkers for her 34 years at the Franklin County School District.

PAGE 11

The Times | A11Thursday, March 8, 2012An outpouring of love from friends and family said goodbye March 1 to Ruth E. Schoelles, who died Feb. 28, 2012, at age 78 in Port St. Joe, following a long illness. Born Feb. 7, 1934, in Apalachicola, to the now late Wyatt and Ella Fair Hall, Miss Ruths business acumen was surpassed only by her love for all creatures great and small. Good morning, Sugar, began Apalachicola J. Patrick Floyd, echoing Miss Ruths longtime greeting as he related how Schoelles life so embodied the commandment of Jesus to love thy neighbor as thyself. She knew that formula for love and went about practicing it every day and it was not a labor to her, it was a passion. She loved it and you could tell that, said Floyd, a lifelong friend of Schoelles ever since she worked at the school with his mother. A youthful beauty who was named Miss Apalachicola in 1951 at the age of 17, Schoelles became known as an extraordinary business woman who made a giant name for herself as a real estate agent even before the market took off. She began her real estate career at Century 21, working with started with Chuck Marks, and later was with Tom and Ellen Beavers at ERA before ending with Prudential. In the real estate world, she was just known to be able to bring both parties together at the closing table, said a colleague. She could get everybody on the same page. She was a master. Floyd told the gathering at Kelley Funeral Home that she was good at it because she knew by heart the formula: Find out what the need of the person was and get busy giving to meet that need. Schoelles career was also marked by 26 years as executive director and later consultant for the Apalachicola Housing Authority. An avid animal lover, she was said to name all the strays, even the alligator that came into her yard, with yellow ies the only creatures that she ever allowed to be eliminated. Schoelles married Eldon Schoelles on Aug. 26, 1967. He survives her, as do their four children, Richard Schoelles (Gloria), of 11 Mile; Eric Schoelles, of Port St Joe; Kendall Schoelles, of 11 Mile; and Marks Schoelles (Karen), of Cummings, Ga.; and her sister, Fair Wynette Tucker, of Eastpoint. She leaves behind seven grandchildren, Rhein Furr, Holly Jo and Hayden Furr, Kyndl and Christopher Schoelles, and Wade and Aaron Schoelles. Schoelles was preceded in death by her son, Rond Lamar Furr; brother, John Wyatt Hall; and grandchild, Jonathon Schoelles. The only thing that she didnt give was to give up or give in or give out! said Floyd. Her ght to use every moment of her life and not let it be taken by cancer or not feeling as well is one of the most courageous I have ever seen. Her courage she would have stood down and backed down a lion, he said. May God bless us with just some of the talents of Miss Ruth and the love and strength to apply those to the needs of others as she did so well. By David Adlerstein The United Methodist Churches of Franklin County Welcome You First United Methodist Church of ApalachicolaWorship Service 11:00 a.m. every Sunday Sunday School 10:00 a.m. 75 5th St. Apalachicola 653-9530 fumcapalach@gtcom.net Pastor: Rev. Themo PatriotisCarrabelle United Methodist ChurchWorship Services 10:45 a.m. Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Celebrate Recovery Mondays 7-9 p.m. 102 NE Ave. B Carrabelle 697-3672 Pastor: Julie StephensEastpoint United Methodist ChurchWorship Service 10:00 a.m. every Sunday Healing service every fourth Monday at 7:00 p.m. 317 Patton Dr. (corner of David St.) 670-8825 Pastor: Rev. Beth WhiteSt. George Island United Methodist Church9:00 a.m. Worship Service 10:00 a.m. Fellowship Hour 201 E. Gulf Beach Dr. 9274635 www.sgiumc.org Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis First Pentecostal Holiness Church379 Brownsville Road Apalachicola Were excited about what Gods doing!!!Sunday School 9:45 am Sunday Morning Worship 10:45 am Sunday Evening Service 6:00 pm Monday, Youth Group 6:30 pm Wednesday, Royal Rangers, G.A.P.7:00 pm Wednesday Worship & Word 7:30 pmNursery Provided during regular church services 7:00 7:00 First Baptist ChurchSt. George Island 501 E. Bayshore Drive 927-2257 R. Michael Waley, Pastor Join us as we praise and worship the living Christ. Great is the Lord and most worthy of praise. Psalm 145:3 Sunday Bible Study................................................10:00am Worship Praise........................................................11:00am Sunday Night............................................................7:00pm Wednesday Power Hour......................................7:00pm Wednesday Youth at S.P.L.A.S.H.......................7:00pm Walking in Christ R. Michael Whaley, Pastor WELCOMES YOUChurch of the Ascension101 NE First Street CarrabelleSUNDAY10:00 AM WELCOMES YOUChurch THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH (850) 274-4490 (850) 545-2578 WELCOMES YOU Trinity Trinity Episcopal Churchest. 1836Welcomes YouHwy. 98 & 6th St. Apalachicola 850-653-9550Sunday Worship Services 8 & 10:30 a.m. Wednesdays Healing Service 11 a.m. Centering Prayer 4 p.m. FaithHollie Maria Stott, of Apalachicola, and Massapequa Park, New York, passed away shortly after midnight in Long Island on Monday, Feb.27, 2012. Hollie had fought a brave and arduous twoyear battle against lung cancer. Born Dec. 17, 1953, Hollie grew up on the Great South Bay in Long Island. From an early age she was at once at home and skillful on the water swimming, diving, yachting and sailing in her wonderful nautical playground. She attended Massapequa High School, and was an avid member of its locally admired choir. She studied art and ceramics at Long Island University and the University of Southern California at Idyllwild, and at the latter was fortunate to advance her skill with the famous Maria Martinez and family. She graduated from Southampton College cum laude in 1975. From 1976 to 1983 she owned and operated Hollie Stott Pottery in Hadley, Mass. She then joined the Stott familys injection molding plastic business from 1983 to 1992 while studying at the Laura Norman College for Massage Therapy and sharing a canal-side home in Amityville, Long Island, with now local Melicent Remy. Her trained hands went back to work as a massage therapist when she founded Balanced Energies, Inc. in 1986. Her expertise and licensed practice included the specialties of European (Swedish) Massage, Advanced Reiki, Reexology, Advanced Amma (Korean-based) Therapy, Cranio-Sacral Therapy, Advanced Sports Massage and Chi Kung healing. Moving to Apalachicola, at year-end 2004, Hollie practiced her massage techniques rst at Riverside Therapy, with Kathy Jansen, and later revived Balanced Energies in her own studio downtown, where she also taught the Tai Chi forms that she had learned and taught in N.Y. Hollie was a volunteer massage therapist at the Lake Placid Ironman in New York from 2000 to 2010 and at Ironman Florida in Panama City, from 2006 to 2010. Hollie always maintained her intense love of the water swimming, sailing, paddling and boating. For many years in Long Island, N. Y., she was an accomplished and dedicated member of the U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary, and held a 100-ton master captains license. Hollie has left many examples of both pottery and painting, and her musical talent will be remembered by many Franklin County residents. She played her guitar locally with Carol Harris and others, and with the Lanark Village Scottish Fiddle Orchestra. She sang in both the Trinity Episcopal Church and the Bay Area Choral Society choirs in Apalachicola. Hollie maintained her Florida residence while returning to New York for cancer treatment in Jan. 2010, always hoping to return to the little forgotten coast city she loved. Hollie is survived by her parents, Richard and Vanda Stott, Massapequa Park, N. Y.; sister Sheryl and husband Michael Fratino. of Chester, Vt.; brother Richard (Ric) Stott and wife Diana Pepi Stott. of Southampton, N. Y.; and sister Mara Liesegang and husband Fred. of Brookhaven, N. Y. Her memory is also cherished by the Southeastern, Midwestern and Western clan of Remy/Reamy/ Watts families. A memorial service was held in Massapequa Park on Saturday, March 3. A local Apalachicola memorial celebration will be held Sunday, March 18, at 1:30 p.m. at the gazebo in Lafayette Park. Bring your testimony and stories, readings and/or prayers. Although some chairs will be provided, you may wish to bring your own, favorite portable seating. In lieu of owers Hollie requested donations be made to Swim Across America (SAA), www. swimacrossamerica. org/goto/hollie. This organization will be setting up a memorial page for her.Hollie Stott HOLLIE STOTTLinda Delores Horvath, 64, of Carrabelle passed away Thursday, March 1, 2012, in Carrabelle. She is survived by her husband of 47 years, Michael Louis Horvath. She was born in Apalachicola and had lived in the area her entire life. She was a member of First Baptist Church of Carrabelle. She loved to cook and enjoyed working in the yard. Memorial Services were held Tuesday morning, March 6 at the First Baptist Church of Carrabelle. In addition to her husband, she is survived by one son, Michael Louis Horvath, II (Melissa), of Auburn, Calif.; brother, Billy Murray; sisters, Sandra Wilish (Bob), Joyce Murray, Joanne Leadon and Kathy Murray; and many nieces and nephews. She is predeceased by her parents, Bill and Katie Murray, and brother Jerry Murray. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel, Crawfordville, in charge of arrangements.LLinda HorvathJohn Gilbert Rogers, born Feb. 18, 1941, went to be with the Lord on Saturday, Feb. 25, 2012, at the age of 71. He was preceded in death by his father and mother, George and Florine Rogers; his brother Manuel Rogers; and his son John Gilbert Rogers Jr. He is survived by his sister Donie (Rogers) Sasser (husband Charles); one aunt, Flossie Ward; three grandchildren, Kayla, Michael, and Seth Rogers; two great grandchildren; ve nieces and nephews, Jody Rogers (Marilyn) Andy Walley (Gail) Sharon Powell (Mike) Rhonda Walley, and Terry Walley(Sheila); three great-nieces one great-nephew; two greatgreat-nephews; one greatgreat-niece; and numerous cousins He was a retired commercial sherman and correction ofcer and instructor. Graveside services were held at Magnolia Cemetery on Thursday afternoon, March 1. Pastor Joey Smith of Glad Tidings Assembly of God, Wewahitchka, presided over the service. Services were under the direction of the Comforter Funeral Home, Port St. Joe.John Gilbert Rogers Obituaries Friends mourn loss of Miss Ruth Franklin County Food PantryThe Franklin County Food Pantry would like to thank the Bishop OSullivan Council 1648 Knights of Columbus for holding Bingo Night Feb. 16 at St. Patricks Parrish Hall. Proceeds were donated to the food pantry. We would also like to thank our friends and neighbors who came out to play bingo and enjoy a fun evening for a good cause. The Franklin County Food Pantry is a notfor-prot 501(c)(3) corporation which distributes food twice a month to local families in need. Donations of food and cash are always needed and appreciated. We would also like to acknowledge and thank the local schools and churches who participated in our 2011 Holiday Food Drive. The continued operation of the panty depends on support from our local community. Big Bend HospiceBig Bend Hospice would like to take this opportunity to thank Karla Ambos, Bev Hewitt and Pam Mahr for the beautiful tablescape they created for the annual Forgotten Coast Chef Sampler. In keeping with the theme from our Trees of Remembrance, the table theme was I have seen too many stars to let the darkness overwhelm me and it was gorgeous. Karla, Bev and Pam serve as Franklin County Advisory Council members for Big Bend Hospice and are very involved in supporting the patients and families in Franklin County. Again, Karla, Bev and Pam, we would just like to say thank you for the hard work and dedication that you give to your community.Pam Raker AllbrittonBig Bend Hospice Wakulla/Franklin Team Community Resources/Volunteer CoordinatorAmanda Segree FamilyThe family of Amanda Inez Segree would like to thank everyone for trying to make our life easier during Amandas long illness and passing. Thank your for the prayers, hugs, food, and owers, and for the wonderful benet. A special thanks to all our co-workers, Big Bend Hospice, Cllinicare, all the aunts and uncles, for the lost sleep and just everything we love each of you. Theres lots of unmarked dishes at Inezs also. Thank you from the very bottom of our hearts.Randy, Kim, Alonah, Trenton and EmaleighIn Loving MemoryMother Katherine Bennett RobinsonMarch 9, 1930 Dec. 2, 2008A beautiful garden now stands alone, missing the one who nurtured it But now she is gone. Her owers still bloom, and the sun it still shines, But the rain is like teardrops, for the ones left behind. The beautiful memories of its keeper are in our hearts to stay, But just like her owers she was part of Gods plan, So when it was her time he reached out his hand. So when you start missing Mother Katherine, Remember if you just wait, When God has a spot in his garden, She will meet you at the gate. Cards of ThaTHANksKS

PAGE 12

Thursday, March 8, 2012 EVERYTHING FOR YOUROUTDOOR ADVENTURECorner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL(next to Piggly Wiggly)www.BWOsh.com 5 th Annual EV E EV E EV RYTHING FOR E RYTHING FOR E Y OUR Y OUR Y O UTDOOR ADV E UTDOOR ADV E UTDOOR ADV NTUR E NTUR E E Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL 5 5 A A n A n A Our BIGGEST SALEof the Year!HUGE SAVINGS ON THOUSANDS OF ITEMSMARCH 30 & 31 FRIDAY 7AM6PMET&SATURDAY 7AM 5PMET WEEKLY ALMANAC APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE TIDE TABLES MONTHLY AVERAGESTo nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from these given for APALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW Cat Point Minus 0:40 Minus 1:17 East Pass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27 To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from those given for CARRABELLE: HIGH LOW Bald Point Minus 9:16 Minus 0:03 Sponsor the WEEKLY ALMANACCall Today!653-8868Date HighLow% Precip Thu, Mar 871 6210% Fri, Mar 971 6210% Sat, Mar 1071 6320% Sun, Mar 1172 6330% Mon, Mar 1271 6130% Tues, Mar 1372 6230% Wed, Mar 1472 6130% By Lois SwobodaTimes Staff Writer The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission is asking for your help in updating a listing of local boat ramps, part of a database of Florida boat ramps FWC released last month. Pat Harrell, grant manager for the project said it was part of a statewide boating access economic assessment to promote boating in Florida and determine where more ramps are needed. The data was assembled over a two year period, 2005-07 by investigators using aerial photographs to locate ramps. FWC also sent inspectors into the eld to collect detailed information. She said work on the list is ongoing and FWC is seeking partners, including counties and municipalities, to ll in gaps in the data. Harrell said the database has so far had thousands of hits, many from overseas including one user in Korea. The ramps are organized by county and by area of the state. Each listing features an interactive map of the area around the ramp and a form displaying details about the facility, including available parking, condition of the ramp, additional amenities, fees and in some cases photographs. Thirty-one ramps are listed for Franklin County. Unfortunately, there is some misinformation on the site and a few obvious errors.Beginning at Bald PointBeginning on the east end of the county, Bald Point State Park features a kayak ramp described as in excellent condition with parking available. The Ochlocknee Bay Public Boat Ramp, south of the Ochlocknee River Bridge, is incorrectly listed as un nished. The concrete ramp, with large parking area, was completed six months ago. St. Teresa Wayside Park boasts a concrete ramp with roadside parking on sand. Moving east there is a poured cement ramp at the Lanark Boat Club, with a launch fee of $10 and a parking fee of $5. The Marine Street ramp in Carrabelle is poured concrete. No mention is made of the public restrooms, sh cleaning station and picnic pavilion located adjacent to the ramp. The Moorings on US 98 in Carrabelle received extensive coverage, including shots of the motel sign. The launch fee for the cement ramp is $25 and daily parking is $20. But C-Quarters Marina next door was left off the list. On Timber Island, Dockside Marina and Boat Works has a well-maintained cement ramp and lots of parking. There is a $5 launch fee. Not far away, the Timber Island Ramp is maintained by Carrabelle, and parking can be a challenge. There are at least three boat ramps north of Carrabelle on public land; the new database lists two. Pine Log Creek is a small ramp on County Road 67 with very limited parking at the roadside. Rock Landing is a gravel ramp in the state forest on the Crooked River. Not mentioned in the database is Womack Creek ramp, a launch point for small boats adjacent to Womack Creek Campground in the state forest. There is ample parking and the primitive campground has a bath house with showers.Through Eastpoint and St. George IslandThree ramps are shown on St. George Island, two in Dr. Julian Bruce State Park. Both are well maintained sand ramps, and properly described, although the database does not list restrooms and a picnic and camping area for the ramp designated as St. George Island Park 1. More parking, and shade, are available at ramp 1. The third ramp listed for the island is an old sand ramp across the street from Harry As. But that ramp has not been in use for years, now closed and fenced, and the channel silted. The new county boat ramp at the foot of the St. George Island shing pier does not appear on the FWC list. Only two boat ramps are listed for Eastpoint. The Ferry Dock ramp in the new Indian Creek Par is a cement launch for small boats at the end of Old Ferry Dock Road. A few hundred feet away adjacent to the park is North Bayshore Drive ramp, another cement launch. The new Eastpoint boat ramp next to the Eastpoint Pavilion on Patton Drive is not included in the FWC database. North of Eastpoint off State Route 65 are eight ramps, some on state land and some on federal land. Cash Creek, state owned and maintained, is an excellent ramp with a picnic shelter and adequate parking. Whiskey George ramp, maintained by the FWC, has a large parking area and a few picnic tables. Doyle Creek, in the state forest, has soft surface parking and no amenities. Gardener Landing is another FWC ramp with a few picnic tables. Graham Creek is an FWC poured cement ramp along SR 65, with shaded parking area and a few picnic tables. Northernmost of the FWC ramps is Bloody Bluff on the Apalachicola River. It has accommodations for the handicapped and shaded parking. The ramps at Black Creek at Wright Lake, and nearby Hickory Landing, are in the Apalachicola National Forest, both with running water and bathrooms, camping areas and picnic tables.Winding up in ApalachicolaIn Apalachicola, the list includes the city boat ramps at Battery Park and Scipio Creek. But unmentioned are the new cement boat ramp at Seafood Workers Park, the former Lombardi property, which boasts restrooms, ample parking, kayak launch and picnic shelters. Several sites listed as boat ramps for public use along US 98 in the Miles west of Apalachicola appear to be private property. The database lists two Unknown boat ramps which appear to be on private property. Black Pearl Charters in the same area is listed as a commercial ramp for public use, but that ramp is gated and the phone number for the charter company has been disconnected. Abercrombie Boat ramp, a large ramp on the Apalachicola River with lots of parking, is listed as Box-R Wildlife Management Area. The database can be accessed https://public. myfwc.com/LE/boatramp/ public/ FWC requests that additional information and changes be emailed to BoatRamps@myFWC. com. Support for the creation of the database was provided by the United States Fish and Wildlife Service Federal Aid in Sport Fish Restoration Boating Access Program. Freshwater InshoreThis week the water temperature in St. Joe Bay has reached 66 degrees. only a few more weeks until we reach the magic number of 68 degrees. Red sh are being spotted in Eagle Harbor and on the ats in the bay, as well as trout. Some decent sized sh are being caught at the sea wall in the marina, but the better reports are coming in from Cape San Blas and Inian pass. Snow birds are reporting good whiting catches from the beaches and a few pompano. This warming trend is great for shing. Good reports from Lake Wimico and Howard creek are of great catches of shellcracker, bass, and cat sh. The rising waters last week was also good for cat sh at the damns and in the Big rivers. Crappie continue to bite in all the waters around the Forgotten Coast, but better reports are coming in from Depot Creek. SPONSORED BY E-mail outdoors news to times outdoors@star .com Page 12 OUTDOORSwww.apalachtimes.comSection Section A Missing links LOIS SWOBODA | The TimesThe new FWC database does not mention this kayak launch or the cement boat ramp, both in Seafood Workers Park on U.S. 98 west of Apalachicola. FWC seeks help to update boat ramp databaseThe River Delta Bass Club of Apalachicola has named Lloyd Alford its 2011 Angler of the Year for his catch of a total of 124.29 pounds. He was awarded a plaque and his 2012 entry fees will be covered by the teams two sponsors, Apalachicola Ace Hardware and Fishermans Choice Bait and Tackle of Eastpoint. The remaining top 10 anglers, and their weights, were Gerald Dykes (119); Mike Pridgen (105.64); Greg Dykes (100.15); Pap Duncan (81.74); Dewitt Galloway (63.53); James Newsome (56.41); Earl Dugger (49.71); Scooter Braswell (48.39) and Sherman Alford (48.12). We would also like to give a big thanks and a welcome home to Sherman Alford who is active duty air force and just returned home from a six-month tour in Afghanistan, Mike Pridgen said. MIKE PRIDGEN | Special to the Times Lloyd Alford Angler of the Year

PAGE 13

Thursday, March 8, 2011CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA SP O RTS www.apalachtimes.com APage 13Section By David AdlersteinTimes City Editor The grandson of a former chili cook-off winner scored a victory of his own Saturday as he triumphed in the annual 5K Red Pepper Run. Bryan Harrington, from Redding, Calif. ran a 19:42 to nish rst overall. He is the son of Trent and Denise Hatcher, with Just Plane Chili, out of Santa Rosa, and the grandson of Ron and the late Shirley Judson, from Red Bluff, Calif. In 2005, his grandfather took rst place in the chili cook-off with his Great American Chili Company team, while grandmother took third. Now with his own Chile Dudes Chili Company, the 29-year-old Harrington won with nearly a minute between him and the runnerup, shaving 29 seconds off his previous best time. It went good. Had a little headwind, he said. When I saw a guy 100 yards behind me, I red it. Finishing tops among the women was Tallahassees Sam Fortunas, 21, who ran a 22:17. The top local male was St. George Island resident Steve Reider, 47, who ran second with a 20:30. The top local female was St. George Island resident Elisa Kamal, 41, who ran a 26:24. A re ghter with Cal Fire, the state re department, Harrington said he trains through the Redding af liate of CrossFit, a core strength and conditioning program that brings together Olympic lifting and heightened cardio into its workouts. Race organizer Susan Bassett said rain was not a factor in the race, nor in the turnout, with 126 registered runners, and 124 nishers, ranging in age from 6 to 76. We had 129 nishers last year, so participation was not too adversely affected by weather report, said Bassett. Runners hailed from Florida, Georgia, Alabama, South Carolina, Michigan, Indiana, Ohio, Tennessee, California, Wisconsin, Pennsylvania, West Virgina, and Ontario, Canada.Photos by DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The TimesBryan Harrington holds up his trophy for winning the Red Pepper Run.Chili winners grandson tops Red PepperThe following is a list of top nishers, their age, gender and times. 1 Bryan Harrington 29m 19:42 1st M Overall 2 Steve Reider 47m 20:30 1st M SGI 3 Phil Robinson 26m 20:35 1st M 25-29 4 David Zierden 47m 20:44 1st M 45-49 5 Calvin Hartness 58m 21:35 1st M 55-59 6 Sam Fortunas 21f 22:17 1st F Overall 7 David Savary 46m 22:59 2nd M 45-49 8 Joe Minor 47m 23:00 3rd M 45-49 9 Daniel Martin 25m 23:59 2nd M 25-29 10 Jensen Reinert 23f 23:40 1st F 20-24 11 Kristin Mejia 34f 24:07 1st F 15-19 12 Steve Newman 46m 24:09 13 Dwayne Maddron 51m 24:16 1st M 50-54 14 Todd Daniels 41m 24:46 1st M 40-44 15 Tiffany Schleeter 24f 24:45 2nd F 20-24 For a complete list, visit www.apalachtimes.com. AND THE WINNERS ARE... Janna Salyer, 11, who nished rst in the 9-14 age group with a time of 38:08, stands with aunt Mary Beth Williams, from Marietta Ga., who ran a 39:27. Salyer is the granddaughter of St. George Islands John and Teri SalyerBy David AdlersteinTimes City Editor After dropping their opening six games, the Franklin County Seahawks have won their last two out of three. The team won 17-6 at John Paul Feb. 29. and then traveled to Altha on March 1 and earned an 8-2 victory. On Friday, the team fell at South Walton 18-7. We have struggled with hitting in the first six games and add a few errors and it makes it hard to win, said coach Mike Emerson. The last three games have been better with hitting, but errors are still hurting us as a team. We are getting better. Against John Paul, Brennan Walden started off pitching, and James Newell came in relief in the fifth to pick up the win. Zack Howze was 1-1 with a triple and three RBIs. Walden had three hits and three RBIs. Against Altha, starter Skyler Hutchinson threw six innings, four of them shutout innings. He gave up only two hits en route to the win. Austin Larkin had four hits in the game with an RBI, while Chance Buffkin had two hits with two RBIs. Against South Walton, starting pitcher Zack Armistead went five innings, giving up 13 runs on nine hits to suffer the loss. Hutchinson was 2-2 at the plate, with two RBIs. The team opened the season with a string of losses. On Feb 13, they lost 10-0 at Wewahitchka, and on Feb. 15, fell 15-2 vs. Arnold. On Feb. 17, Franklin County lost 6-3 at Bozeman, and on Feb. 21, fell 8-3 against Blountstown at the nest. On Feb. 24 at Liberty County, the Seahawks lost 7-2, and then fell 7-0 on Feb. 25 at The Nest against Florida High.Seahawks win 2 of 3By David AdlersteinTimes City Editor The Lady Seahawks varsity softball team split its last two games, narrowly falling in nine innings at South Walton 1110 on March 1, and then bouncing back to top Bozeman 9-3 Friday on a fog-shrouded evening at The Nest. The South Walton outing was a heartbreaker, as The Seahawks opened a 1-0 lead in the top of the rst after Morgan Mock singled and came home on a Tiffany Varnes sacri ce y. After falling behind 5-1, the Lady Seahawks busted it open in the top of the sixth with seven runs. Mock opened with a single, and then advanced to second on a Varnes single. Chena Segrees single advanced both runners, and then Varnes scored on an Anna Lee single. A single by Morgan Newell scored Varnes, and then Ally Millender whacked a double to score Segree and Lee. A single by Vanessa Simmons brought Newell home, and then a Mock double scored Millender and Simmons to complete the scoring. The Lady Seahawks fell behind 10-8 after six innings, but tied it up with two runs in the top of the seventh. Varnes walked, and then Lee smacked a home run to center eld to account for the runs. In the bottom of the ninth, a pair of Lady Seahawk errors helped enable South Walton to bring home the winning run. In all Franklin County committed ve errors. Segree struck out eight over seven innings. Lee had three RBIs while Mock batted two runs in on three hits. Against Bozeman Friday, the Lady Seahawks, under the direction of Coach Lisa Sweatt and assistant Sally Wheeler, evened their record at 5-5 with a 9-3 victory. Franklin County scored ve runs in the bottom of the rst to begin the scoring. A Varnes single drove home Mock, and then a Lee sacri ce scored Graycn Kirvin, who had got safely on base on a dropped third strike. A Newell single scored Varnes, and then Segree and Newell both scored on errors. In the bottom of the third, Franklin County scored after Segree singled, Lee sacri ced her to second and she came home on a throwing error. In the bottom of the fourth, the home team added two more, when Scout Segree and Mock both walked, Kirvin advanced them with a single and Segree stole home. Mock scored when Lee grounded out to second. Franklin County added a nal run in the bottom of the sixth, when Newell scored on a long y ball by Hunter Shiver. Millender struck out three in her two innings on the mound, with Chena Segree appearing in relief.Photos by DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The TimesMorgan Mock warms up before getting ready to bat. Right, Tiffany Varnes makes a play at second against Bozeman.Lady Seahawks top BozemanFall to South Walton

PAGE 14

A14| The Times Thursday, Month, Date, Year CLASSIFIEDS ToPlace Your Classified ad inCall Our New Numbers Now!Call: 850-747-5020 Toll Free:800-345-8688 Fax: 850-747-5044 Email: thestar@pcnh.com Email: thetimes@pcnh.com theAPALACHICOLA & CARRABELLETIMES CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW 77170T NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE BY CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT Notice is hereby given that the undersigned, Rebecca L. Norris, Clerk of the Circuit Court of Gulf County, Florida, will on March 22, 2012, at 11:00 a.m. ET in the lobby of the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil Costin Blvd., Port St. Joe, Florida 32456, in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes, offer for sale, and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder, the following described real and personal property situated in Gulf County and Bay County, Florida: Real Property See Exhibit A (Gulf County, Florida) and Exhibit B (Bay County, Florida). Personal Property: (b)All buildings, structures and improvements of every nature whatsoever now or hereafter situated on the Land and all other furnishings, furniture, fixtures, machinery, equipment, appliances, vehicles and personal property of every kind and nature whatsoever now or hereafter owned by Mortgagor and located in, on or about, or used or intended to be used with or in connection with the use, operation or enjoyment of the Property, including all extensions, additions, improvements, betterments, renewals and replacements, substitutions, or proceeds from a permitted sale of any of the foregoing, and all building materials and supplies of every kind now or hereafter placed or located on the Land (collectively the Improvements), all of which are hereby declared and shall be deemed to be fixtures and accessions to the Land and a part of the Property as between the parties hereto and all persons claiming by, through or under them, and which shall be deemed to be a portion of the security for the indebtedness herein described and to be secured by this Mortgage; (c)All easements, rights-of-way, strips and gores of land, vaults, streets, ways, alleys, passages, sewer rights, waters, water courses, water rights and powers, minerals, flowers, shrubs, crops, trees, timber and other emblements now or hereafter located on the Land or under or above the same or any part or parcel thereof, and all ground leases, estates, rights, titles, interests, privileges, liberties, tenements, hereditaments and appurtenances, reversions, and remainders whatsoever, in any way belonging, relating or appertaining to the Property or any part thereof, or which hereafter shall in any way belong, relate or be appurtenant thereto, whether now owned or hereafter acquired by Mortgagor; and (d)All rents, issues, profits, revenues and proceeds from any sale or other disposition of the Property, or any part thereof, from time to time accruing (including without limitation all payments under leases, ground leases or tenancies, proceeds of insurance, condemnation payments, tenant security deposits and escrow funds), and all of the estate, right, title, interest, property, possession, claim and demand whatsoever at law, as well as in equity, of Mortgagor of, in and to the same. pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered in a case pending in said Court, the style of which is: ALABAMA AG CREDIT, FLCA, a part of the Farm Credit system and a federally chartered instrumentality of the United States of America, formerly known as FEDERAL LAND BANK ASSOCIATION OF SOUTH ALABAMA, FLCA, Plaintiff, vs. SOUTHERN FOREST LAND, INC., an Alabama corporation, GRABLE L. RICKS, JR., GRABLE L. RICKS, III, DELTA WOOD PRODUCTS, LLC, a Mississippi limited liability company, and SMURFIT-STONE CONTAINER CORPORATION, a Delaware corporation, formerly known as SMURFIT-STONE CONTAINER ENTERPRISES, INC., Defendants and the docket number of which is 11-142CA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim with the clerk of the court within 60 days after the sale. In accordance with the AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT, persons needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact Judson C. Brandt, Esquire at (850) 434-9200 not later than seven days prior to the proceeding to ensure reasonable accommodations are available. WITNESS my hand and the official seal of this Honorable Court this 22nd day of February, 2012. REBECCA L. NORRIS Clerk of the Circuit Court By:BA Baxter Deputy Clerk EXHIBIT A In Township 5 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida PARCEL 1 That portion of Section 9, Township 5 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida, lying South and West of the Florida Power Company Right-of-Way recorded in ORB 12, Page 140. PARCEL 2 That portion of Section 15, Township 5 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida, lying West of the Florida Power Company Right-of-Way recorded in ORB 12, Page 140. PARCEL 3 That portion of Section l6, Township 5 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida, lying West of the Florida Power Company Right-of-Way recorded in ORB 12, Page 140. PARCEL 4 All of Section 17, Township 5 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida. PARCEL 5 All of Section 18, Township 5 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida, EXCEPT that portion of the West Three-Quarters lying North of Horseshoe Creek. PARCEL 6 All of Section 19, Township 5 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida. LESS AND EXCEPT: Commence at an existing six-inch by six-inch St. Joe Paper Company concrete monument marking the Northwest Corner of Section 19, Township 5 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida; thence South 738.04 feet along the West line of said Section 19 to the Point of Beginning; thence continue South along said West line 4541.96 feet to the Southwest Corner of Section 19; thence N37 E, 3467.13 feet to the centerline of Pleasant View Road; thence N51W, 2223.00 feet along said centerline to the beginning of a curve; thence Northwesterly along curve along said centerline concave to the North with a radius of 731.64 feet, through a central angle of 37, an arc distance of 479.36 feet; thence N81W, 101.20 feet to the Point of Beginning. PARCEL 7 All of Section 20, Township 5 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida. PARCEL 8 That portion of Section 21, Township 5 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida, lying West of the Florida Power Company Right-of-Way recorded in ORB 12, Page 140. PARCEL 9 That portion of Section 28, Township 5 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida, lying West of the Florida Power Company Right-of-Way recorded in ORB 12, Page 140, LESS all that portion of Southwest Quarter lying South of existing Pleasant Rest-East Bay Road. PARCEL 10 Fractional Northeast Quarter of Southeast Quarter, LESS that portion of the Northeast Quarter of Southeast Quarter of Section 29, Township 5 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida, lying South of the existing Pleasant Rest-East Bay Road. PARCEL 11 North Half of Southeast Quarter of Southwest Quarter of Section 29, Township 5 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida. PARCEL 12 West Half of Northwest Quarter of Southeast Quarter of Section 29, Township 5 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida. PARCEL 13 South Half of South Half of Northwest Quarter of Southwest Quarter of Section 29, Township 5 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida. PARCEL 14 Fractional-All that portion of Northwest Quarter of Southeast Quarter of Section 29, Township 5 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida, lying North of existing Pleasant Rest-East Bay Road. PARCEL 15 Fractional-All that portion of Southeast Quarter of Southeast Quarter of Section 29, Township 5 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida, lying North of existing Pleasant Rest-East Bay Road. PARCEL 16 Fractional Southwest Quarter of Southwest Quarter of Section 29, Township 5 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida, LESS South Half of South Half of Southwest Quarter of Southwest Quarter. PARCEL 17 Northeast Quarter of Southwest Quarter of Section 29, Township 5 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida. PARCEL 18 Southwest Quarter of Southeast Quarter of Southwest Quarter, of Section 29, Township 5 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida. PARCEL 19 Northeast Quarter and Fractional East Half of Southeast Quarter of Section 30, Township 5 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida; LESS AND EXCEPT West Half of the Northeast Quarter lying West and South of Intracoastal Canal. PARCEL 20 All that part of Northeast Quarter of Northwest Quarter and Northwest Quarter of Northeast Quarter of Section 32, Township 5 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida, lying North of Wetappo Creek. In Township 5 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida PARCEL 21 All of Section 5, Township 5 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida, EXCEPT that land lying North of that stream referred to as Little Creek and EXCEPT that land that lies East of the Northwest-Southeast road in the South Half of the Southeast Quarter. PARCEL 22 All of Section 7, Township 5 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County. Florida, EXCEPT. that land lying North of Little Creek and EXCEPT that land lying South of County Road 386. PARCEL 23 All that part of Section 8, Township 5 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County., Florida, lying North of the centerline of State Road 386, as the same now runs, EXCEPT that land lying North of Little Creek. PARCEL 24 A triangular parcel being 450 feet, more or less, on West boundary of Section 9, Township 5 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida; 250 feet, more or less, on State Road 386 and 400 feet, more or less, on a private unpaved road that intersects State Road 386. PARCEL 25 All that part of Section 17, Township 5 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida, lying North of the centerline of State Road 386, as the same now runs. PARCEL 26 All that part of Section 18, Township 5 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida, lying North of the centerline of State Road 386, LESS AND EXCEPT that portion conveyed to St. Joseph Telephone and Telegraph Company in ORB 18, Page 235. LESS AND EXCEPT: Commence at a steel half-inch rebar (#4346) marking the Southeast Corner of Section 7, Township 5 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida; thence N01W, 16.47 feet along the East line of Section 7 to the intersection with Northerly right of way line of State Road 386; thence S60W, 3173.68 feet along said Northerly right of way line to the Point of Beginning; thence continue S60W, 68.59 feet along said right of way line; thence N34W, 533.35 feet; thence S73W, 69.93 feet; thence N14W, 162.41 feet; thence N84W, 195.71 feet; thence N27W, 269.12 feet, thence N04W, 257.91 feet; thence S80W, 218.60 feet; thence N00W, 963.88 feet; thence S87E, 551.05 feet; thence S00E, 452.83 feet; thence S84E, 178.86 feet; thence S09W, 214.79 feet; thence S32W, 141.99 feet; thence S19E, 1234.90 feet to the Point of Beginning. GRANTORS HEREIN RESERVE THE RIGHT OF INGRESS AND EGRESS OVER, UPON AND ACROSS THE UNPAVED ROAD NORTHERLY THROUGH THE ABOVE EXCEPTION FOR THE NON-EXCLUSIVE USE OF THE ADJOINING OWNERS. LESS AND EXCEPT: Commence at a steel half-inch rebar (#4346) marking the Southeast Corner of Section 7, Township 5 South, Range 10 West, Gulf County, Florida; thence N01W, 16.47 feet along the East line of said Section 7 to the Intersection with the Northerly right of way line of State Road 386; thence N60E, 5299.22 feet along said Northerly right of way line, to the Point of Beginning; thence continue N60E, 100.00 feet along said right of way line; thence N41W, 280.41 feet; thence N23W, 153.36 feet; thence S67W, 228.80 feet; thence S26E, 159.72 feet; thence N70E, 134.24 feet; thence S39E, 278.06 feet to the Point of Beginning. Less and Except: Parcel l: Commence at an existing six-inch by six-inch Saint Joe Paper Company concrete monument marking the Northwest corner of Section 19, Township 5 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida; thence S 01 W, 5280.00 feet along the West line of said Section 19; thence N 38 12 E, 2367.13 feet; thence run S 35 E, 68.62 feet to the Point of Beginning; thence run N 38 E, 1117.49 feet to the centerline of Pleasant View Road; thence S 50 E, 2101.62 feet; thence S 38 W, 872.13 feet to the approximate mean high water line of Wetappo Creek; thence N 70 W, 200.86 feet; thence S 69 W, 25.79 feet; thence N 85 W, 61.40 feet; thence N 35 W, 25.49 feet; thence N 46 W, 108.23 feet; thence N 55 W, 61.68 feet; thence N 45 W, 47.67 feet; thence N 66 W, 159.83 feet; thence S 83 W, 59.84 feet; thence N 85 W, 30.66 feet; thence S 71 W, 101.70 feet; thence S 62 W, 51.96 feet; thence S 50 W, 77.49 feet thence S 65W, 63.53 feet; thence S 44 W, 91.04 feet; thence N 35 W, 1312.16 feet to the Point of Beginning and containing 56.874 acres more or less. Parcel 2: Commence at the Northwest corner of Section 19, Township 5 South, Range 11 West, Gulf County, Florida; thence run S 01 W along the West line of said Section 19, a distance of 5280.00 feet; thence run N 38 11 E, a distance of 607.76 feet to the Point of Beginning; thence continue N 38 E, a distance of 2859.37 feet to the centerline of Pleasant View Road; thence run S 50 E along said centerline, a distance of 66.01 feet; thence departing said centerline run S 38 W, 1117.49 feet; thence run S 35 E, 1312.16 feet to the approximate mean high water line of Wetappo Creek; thence run S 44 W, 91.04 feet; thence run S 27 W, 54.17 feet; thence run S 53 W, 235.19 feet; thence run S 49 W, 66.85 feet; thence run S 62 W, 54.79 feet; thence run S 54 W, 109.12 feet; thence run S 64 W, 84.81 feet; thence run S 57 W, 308.48 feet; thence run S 73 W, 45.36 feet; thence run S 61 W, 50.38 feet; thence run N 66 W, 51.13 feet; thence run N 87 W, 104.16 feet; thence run S 78 W, 101.36 feet; thence run S 83 W, 224.15 feet; thence run N 72 W, 49.46 feet; thence run N 41 W, 63.06 feet; thence run N 18 W, 134.59 feet; thence run N 31 W, 56.93 feet; thence run N 45 W, 360.20 feet; thence run S 19 W, 47.10 feet; thence run S 61 W, 34.42 feet; thence run S 13 W, 45.06 feet; thence run S 29 W, 41.51 feet; thence run N 41 W, 64.56 feet to the Point of Beginning and containing 41.461 acres more or less. EXHIBIT B (Bay County Property) Beginning at a St. Joe Paper Company concrete monument marking the Northeast Corner of Fractional Section 24, Township 5 South, Range 12 West; thence South 00 East along the East boundary line of said Section 24 for 1725.85 feet; thence South 04 East for 12.52 feet to a point on the approximate mean high water line of East Bay; thence meander along said approximate mean high water line the following bearings and distances: North 83 West, 192.47 feet; North 07 West, 70.97 feet; North 02 East, 79.50 feet; North 12 West, 113.21 feet; North 25 West, 131.82 feet; North 45 West, 134.49 feet; North 79 West, 249.34 feet; South 81 West 82.52 feet; North 20 West, 34.97 feet; North 08 East, 89.24 feet; North. 03 West, 206.39 feet; North 25 West, 140.27 feet; North 39 West, 119.95 feet; North 55 West, 180.27 feet; North 41 12 West, 72.80 feet; North 33 West, 56.90 feet; North 56 West, 64.34 feet; North 36 West, 55.31 feet .North 32 West, 144.23 feet; North 21 West, 71.11 feet; North 44 West, 176.41 feet North 27 01 West, 45.75 feet to a St. Joe Paper Company Concrete monument; thence leaving said approximate mean high water line run North 89 East along the North boundary line of said Section 24 for 1386.03 feet to the Point of Beginning. Said parcel of land lying and being in Fractional Section 24, Township 5 South, Range 12 West, and having an area of 29.173 acres, more or less. March 8, 15, 2012 77525T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No. 12-006-CP Division: Probate IN RE: ESTATE OF JOHN ANDREWS Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of John Andrews, deceased, whose date of death was September 7, 2010, is pending in the Circuit Court for Franklin County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida 32320. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is March 1, 2012. Personal Representative: Martha Ann Wiggins 33 Stone Avenue Claremont, NH 03743 Attorneys for Personal Representative SANDERS AND DUNCAN, P.A. 80 MARKET STREET APALACHICOLA, FL 32320 (850) 653-8976 FL Bar No. 63869 E-Mail Address: bsanders@fairpoint.net March 1, 8, 2012 77471T REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS Weems Memorial Hospital is seeking proposals for therapy services. Successful therapy company must have the ability to provide occupational therapy, physical therapy and speech therapy as needed for the WMH Swing Bed program. Proposals should be submitted to Cynthia Drapal, CAO, CNO George E. Weems Memorial Hospital P. O. Box 580 Apalachicola, Fl 32329 Questions should be submitted to cdrapal@weemsmemorial.com. Deadline for Submissions is March 10, 2012. March 1, 8, 2012 86069T PUBLIC NOTICE Northwest Florida Transportation Corridor Authority (NWFTCA) Meeting Notice. The NWFTCA recently commissioned HDR Engineering, Inc. to prepare a major update to their regional Master Plan, originally adopted in 2007. As part of the initial phase of the update, HDR is working with key stakeholders (Florida DOT, FHWA, city and county reps., etc.) and the Authority to help analyze future transportation projects by assessing their respective economic benefits, developing an investment plan and proposing viable funding strategies. A series of workshops will be held during this process. The first workshop will be held at two alternate locations: March 13, 2012 from 10:00am to 1:00pm Central Time at the Florida State University Holley Academic Center, Panama City campus located at 4750 Collegiate Drive, Panama City, Florida and March 14, 2012 from 1:00pm to 4:00pm Central Time at the Days Inn & Suites, Navarre Conference Center, Room D located at 8700 Navarre Parkway, Navarre, Florida. Any person requiring special accommodations to participate in this meeting is asked to advise the Corridor Authority at least 48 hours prior to the meeting by contacting Alicia Stephen at (850) 429-8905 or by email Alicia. Stephen@hdrinc.com.Please RSVP by March 9 if you plan to attend. March 8, 2012 86099T PUBLIC NOTICE Public Scoping Meeting for Glades Reservoir Environmental Impact Statement: The US Army Corps of Engineers, Savannah District (USACE) will hold a public scoping meeting on March 22, 2012, from 4:00 to 8:00 pm at Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve located at 108 Island Drive, Eastpoint, FL 32328. The purpose of the meeting is to receive comments on the scope of the proposed Glades Reservoir Environment Impact Statement (EIS) pertaining to the Clean Water Act Section 404 permit application submitted by Hall County, Georgia (SAS-2007-00388). The public may provide verbal or written comments during the public scoping meetings. For more information on the project, please visit www.gladesreservoir. com. Comments: Written comments may be submitted by April 17, 2012, to be considered by the Draft EIS. Mailing address: Attn.: Richard Morgan, US Army Corps of Engineers, 100 West Oglethorpe Avenue, Savannah, GA 31401. Comments may also be submitted on the project website. Notice of Intent: The Glades Reservoir EIS Notice of Intent was published on February 17, 2012, and is available on the project website (http://www. gladesreservoir.com/notice-of-i ntent). The scoping period for the Glades Reservoir EIS extends from February 17, 2012, through April 17, 2012. March 8, 2012

PAGE 15

CLASSIFIEDSThursday, Month, Date, Year The Times | A15 The News Herald offers a competitive bene t package including medical, dental, vision and life insurance, 401(k) plan, vacation and sick leave, and six paid holidays per year. (Part-time positions have 401(k) plan options). DIGITAL ADVERTISING SALES REPRESENTATIVEThe News Herald online and the News Herald continue to expand our online presence. We are looking for a highly motivated, energetic Digital Sales person to achieve our online revenue goals, speci cally for panamacity.com. This is a unique opportunity to help build sales revenues and be a leading part of a progressive advertising sales team. The Digital Sales Executive will be required to make sales calls, train and offer guidelines regarding pricing and packaging of all digital products and services. The ideal candidate must be a leader and have an innovative approach to client development and an understanding of how companies are using the internet to market their business. You must have a drive to win and a passion for consultative media sales. Required Skills Highly motivated and results driven Creative, conceptual and strategic thinker Professional and positive manner when working with clients and others Superior knowledge of Microsoft Of ce (Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and Outlook) Outstanding record of achievement in current/past positions Superior professionalism, discretion, and judgment Strong work ethic and capacity to thrive in a team environment Effective time management and organization skills Excellent verbal and written communication skills Keen attention to detail The candidate with mobile and Yahoo! experience will have an edge Required Experience To be considered, you must have at least 3 years of sales experience, including 1-3 successful years in the area of online media including internet ad sales. Experience working with media is preferred. The candidate must be highly analytical with meticulous attention to detail and have experience with digital creative as this person will also work closely with Digital Director to ensure that all available resources are being utilized to support our needs. 4-year college degree in advertising/marketing or equivalent experience.ADVERTISING SALES REPRESENTATIVEThe News Herald and the News Herald.com continue to expand. We are looking for highly motivated, energetic sales people. This is a unique opportunity to help build sales revenues and be a leading part of a progressive advertising sales team. The Sales Executive will be required to make sales calls, train and offer guidelines regarding pricing and packaging of all digital products and services. The ideal candidate must be a leader and have an innovative approach to client development and an understanding of how companies are using the internet to market their business. You must have a drive to win and a passion for consultative media sales. Required Skills Highly motivated and results driven Creative, conceptual and strategic thinker Professional and positive manner when working with clients and others Superior knowledge of Microsoft Of ce (Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and Outlook) Outstanding record of achievement in current/past positions Superior professionalism, discretion, and judgment Strong work ethic and capacity to thrive in a team environment Effective time management and organization skills Excellent verbal and written communication skills Keen attention to detail The candidate with mobile and Yahoo! experience will have an edge Required Experience To be considered, you must have at least 3 years of sales experience, including 1-3 successful years in the area of outside sales and/or online media including internet ad sales. Experience working with media is preferred. The candidate must be highly analytical with meticulous attention to detail. 4-year college degree in advertising/marketing or equivalent experience.SALES/RETENTION CLERK We are seeking an eager part-time telephone sales clerk to sell and/or retain home delivery and single copy circulation. Essential duties include providing excellent customer service, pleasant telephone voice, and outbound dialing. Quali ed candidates will have general of ce experience, sales experience and computer skills. High School Diploma or equivalent is required and one year of customer service experience. This is a parttime position with hour pay, plus commission and bene ts.CUSTOMER SERVICE REPRESENTATIVEWe are seeking an ambitious part-time Customer Service Representative who will actively answer phones and participate in the everyday work and special projects. This position is the primary link between current and potential subscribers and the newspaper. You will handle general of ce work and maintain subscriber and non-subscriber database. Quali ed candidate will have a High School diploma or equivalent and one year of customer service experience. Candidate should have a basic understanding of of ce machines such as calculator, printers, fax machine, computer and internet skills and able to sit for 8 hour shifts. On time attendance during scheduled time is critical in this role as well as working some holidays and weekend shifts.The News HeraldCareersCome by The News Herald at 501 W. 11th street for an application or send a resume to resumes@ afreedom.com.Freedom Florida is a Drug-free workplace, EOETO APPLY: ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home Medical, Business, Criminal Justice Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 866-467-0054 www.CenturaOnline.com AIRLINES ARE HIRING -Train for hands on Aviation Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified -Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-206-9405 NEEDS:Florida Licensed Stylist & Nail TechVery busy location with lots of walk-ins 50% Commission PT/FT Flexible Schedule Paul Mitchell Advanced Training Apply within @ 147 W. Hwy 98 Port St. Joe, Florida 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322850-697-9604 850-323-0444 www.seacrestre.comwww. rst tness.com/carrabellePROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND RENTALSRENTALS2 BR 1BA, UNFURNISHED HOUSE Big Yard/Deep Water Dock .............................$650 1 BR RIVER CONDO, BOAT SLIP 3 Night Minimum .......................$105 PLUS DAILY 3 BR 1 BA FURNISHED HOUSE Monthly Rate, Carrabelle ................................$850 1 BR 1 BA UNFURNISHED APT Lanark, Remodeled, Includes Water ...............$475 2 BR 1 BA UNFURNISHED APT Lanark ............................................................$450 1 BR, SUN ROOM/DAYBED Furnished, Lanark ..........................................$450 3 BR 2 BA FURNISHED HOME On River, Boat Dock & Lift ............................$1000 2 BR 1 BA FURNISHED HOUSE On Bay ............................................................$900 3 BR 3 BA FURNISHED CONDO Downtown, 3 Night Minimum ....$105 PLUS DAILY OFFICE SPACE HWY 98 Frontage, Carrabelle ....$550 Plus Utilities Total Down Pmt $8752000 Dodge Ram -X/Cab T otal Price $4,9000% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!!Text FL00446 to 56654 Total Down Pmt $14752002 Chevy Silverado X/Cab T otal Price $7,2000% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!!Text FL00445 to 56654 Total Down Pmt $9752001 Ford F-150 X/Cab T otal Price $5,2000% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!!Text FL00447 to 56654 Polaris Ranger 20054x4 with 250 hours Call: 850-251-1864 TextFL 98560 to 55554 Luhrs 35 1980s No motor, Hull damaged, located at 802 SE Ave. B, Carrabelle FL, Call Mr. Allen at 850-899-5319 for info, to be sold by 3/15/12. Kohler Birthday BathTubCall: 850-251-1864 Carrabelle, Florida Total Down Pmt $9752002 Chevrolet Monte Carlo T otal Price $5,5000% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!!Text FL00442 to 56654 Total Down Pmt $5752001 Pontiac Grand Prix T otal Price $4,0000% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!!Text FL00433 to 56654 Total Down Pmt $7752001 Chevy Blazer T otal Price $4,2000% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!!Text FL00444 to 56654 Eastpointe-Carrabelle 1bd, 800sf, $350 bi-weekly, (or $685/mo) includes: all utilities, elec, water, Sat TV, W/D, stone FP, & central AC. Secluded, 1/2 mile from beach. 6 mo lease. 1st & security. 954-816-7004 Text FL94643 to 56654 Magnolia Bluff Bayfront Sunset view. Spacious 3 br, 2.5 bath, large family room, screened deck. All appliances including W/D, water & trash paid $1300 + dep call 877-963-4321 orsunsetplaceinfo@gmail.comText FL99223 to 56654 St. George Island-2 br, 1 ba, Canal view. All utilities incl. 6 mo to 1 yr lse. $1125 mo + $500 dep. Call 850-653-5441 St. George Island Bayview Large 1 br 1 ba All utilities incl. 6 mo to 1 yr lease. $725 mo + $500 dep. Call 850-653-5441 St. George Plantation furnished 4BR, 3.5 Baths.$1,450 monthly. Home for rent, one year lease. Contact Prudential Shimmering Sands Realty 850-927-2666. Text FL99813 to 56654 Lanark Village: Clean 2 bedroom, 1 bath, screened porch, AC Long term lease: 7 months min. $500 monthly + $350. security deposit, references required or wkly & wkend rental w/deposit Pets-will consider. Non smoking. 850-212-2063 Text FL98418 to 56654 Southern V illas of Apalachicola Apartments Now accepting applications for 2br Handicap accessible unit. Some rental assistance may be available. Call 850-653-9277 TDD/TTY 711. This institution is an equal opportunity provider, and employer. St. George Island $160 week, Electric, Satellite, Garbage incl. Pool tble. 12 X 65 deck w/Beautiful view 850-653-5114 St. George Island 2Br, 1Ba, Ground floor, Satellite. 12 x 50 Deck. Only $250 per week. Call: 850-653-5114 Carrabelle 3 br, 1 ba, completely remodeled, appliances. included large private yard $600 month 210 NE 1st St. Lease/ Purchase Possible, Please call (404) 266-0067 or (404) 307-8912 Apalach RestaurantFull Service turn key restaurant. Excellent downtown location Lease. Call for information 850-653-8801 1 BR/1BA unfurnished apartment, downtown Apalach. Balcony, water, satellite, wireless included. $650 plus electric 653-8801 Publishers NoticeAll real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on a equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. Logistics/TransportCDL Class A Route DriverAverage 10 stops. Home base -Apalachicola, FL 850-653-8823 Web ID#: 34200243Text FL00243 to 56654 Medical/HealthCaring Peopleand CNAs needed. Join a team of people who make a difference in the lives of the elderly. Provide non medical companionship, in home help and personal care for the elderly. Flexible day, evening & weekend hours. Positions available in the Appalachicola, Mexico Beach and Port St. Joe areas.Home Instead Senior CareCall Mon-Thur 9-3pm 850-640-1223 or toll free 1-866-301-1919 Web ID#: 34199799 Text FL99799 to 56654 Food Svs/Hospitality*Servers *Cooks Dishwashers *Bartenders *BussersBLUE PARROT Now HIRINGPlease apply in person between 9a-5pm 7 days a week@ Blue Parrot St. Georges Island Food Svs/HospitalityPapa Joes Oyster Bar & GrillNow HiringAll Positions!!! Apply in person only Food Svs/HospitalityWanted!!!Part time Night Auditor/Front Desk Must be dependable, have phone and own transport. Bookkeeping experience a plus. Apply in person at Gibson Inn team. 51 Avenue C Food Svs/HospitalityWanted!!!Part time Housekeeper Wanted to join us at the Gibson Inn. Good attitude, references required. Apply in person at Gibson Inn team. 51 Avenue C Adorable YORKIE AKCPuppies, only 2 left. 1 Male. They are 9 weeks old, have been Health Certified and 1st shots. $600 Call 850-554-0320 Panama City Miniature Yorkie $75.00 to a good family. Please call (850) 773-2776.Text FL97678 to 56654 Two mens Schwinn bicycles brand new. All aluminum, with stainless steel chains to replace modern chains for durability. $140 each (850) 653-2615 Serious inquires only. Incorrect Insertion PolicyFor Classified In-column AdvertisersAll ads placed by phone are read back to the advertiser to insure correctness. The newspaper will assume correctness at the time of the read-back procedure unless otherwise informed. Please your ad. Advertisers are requested to check the advertisement on the first insertion for correctness. Errors should be reported immediately. Your Florida Freedom newspaper will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion, nor will it be liable for any error in advertisements to a greater extent than the cost of the space occupied by the error. Any copy change, during an ordered schedule constitutes a new ad and new charges. We do not guarantee position of ANY ad under any classification. Adopt: Active young stay-home-mom & successful dad, playful pup await miracle baby. *** David & Robyn*** FLBar42311 Expenses Paid 1-800-552-0045 Collins Vacation Rentals, Inc. St. George Islands Vacation Rentals SpecialistsCollins Vacation Rentals, Inc. is now accepting applications for our Reservations Department Strong computer skills and positive, enthusiastic attitude required! Prior experience preferred. Applicant must be willing to work weekends. Great pay! Great bene ts!Come be a team player at Collins Vacation Rentals!Applications are available at our o ce at 60 E. Gulf Beach Drive, St. George Island. For additional information and to make an appointment, please call: (850) 927-5442; (850) 927-5490.Collins Vacation Rentals, Inc. is a drug free work place.

PAGE 16

LocalA16 | The Times Thursday, March 8, 2012 Our local real estate experts have identied what they feel are the best values around and are oering them to you in Real Estate Picks! (In this section), Discover the best real estate values in Mexico Beach, Port St. Joe, Apalachicola, Cape San Blas, St. George Island, Carrabelle and surrounding areas. Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Real Estate Picks John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.comMLS#242245$439,900St. George Island GULF VIEW FROM WEST PINE AVE4 BR (2 are masters), 3-1/2 BA with extra LR/5th BR, FURNISHED, Interesting Architectural features, POOL with vinyl fencing, Enclosed outdoor shower, Screened porch, covered ground level entry, surprisingly good Gulf View! John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.comMLS#238697$60,000Lanark VillageWATERFRONT LOT IN LANARK50 ft water frontage directly on the St. George Sound. Close to Lanark Boat Club & launch area as well as all Lanark amenities are available, St. James Golf Course & Restaurant are close by. Nows the time to buy! Listed by Janie Burke Laban Bontrager, DMD Monica Bontrager, DMD 12761 Pea Ridge Road Bristol, Florida 32321TELEPHONE (850) 643-5417 Bristol Dental ClinicDENTURE LAB ON PREMISESSame Day Service on Repairs and Relines Don Lively General Contractors LICENSED ANDINSURED 20 YEARSEXPERIENCE P.O. Box 439 Carrabelle, FL 32322 697-2783 or Mobile 566-2603RC0066499RG0065255 Carrabelle Visa, Discover, and American Express Honored at Participating Ace Stores JACKSONS Building Supplies & Auto Repair Carrabelle 697-3333 We Deliver AnywhereHardware and Paint Center Electrical & Finish Carpentry850-229-6751850-227-5666Michael & Anthony TonyPoloronis&Sons,Inc. From A to ZPO Box 364Port St. Joe, FL 32457850-340-0756 Gregs Handyman Service & Lawn Maintenance NO JOB TOO BIGPLEASE CALL JOE @ 850-670-5478joes_lawn@yahoo.comJOES LAWN CARE PILE DRIVING FOUNDATION/PILING REPAIR DOCK/MARINE WORK MOORING BOUYSOFFICE: 850.227.1709FAX: 850.762.2552 CELL: 850.527.5725 HOWARD227FAIRPOINT.NET ROBERTS APPLIANCE REPAIR ALL MAJOR BRANDS 18 Shadow Lane Apalachicola, FL 32320 Phone: (850) 653-8122 Cell: (850) 653-7654 Trades & Services L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L L E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W E W E E E W E W E W E E E W E E W E E E W E W E W E E E W E E W E E E W E W E W E E E W E A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A W A W W W A W A W A W W W A W W A W W W A W A W A W W W A W W A W W W A W A W A W W W A W W A W W W A W A W A W W W A W W A W W W A W A W A W W W A W W A W W W A W A W A W W W A W W A W W W A W A W A W W W A W N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N A N A A A N A N A N A A A N A A N A A A N A N A N A A A N A A N A A A N A N A N A A A N A A N A A A N A N A N A A A N A D D D D D D D D D O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S K K K K K K K K K K K K K K K K K K K K K K K K K K K K K K K K K K K K K K K K K K I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R R S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S S H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E I I I I I I I I I I I I N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G G (850) 340-1359Reliable Professional Farrier Service.For All Your Hoof Care Needs at an Affordable Rate. Qualications: Expertise in: Now Accepting AppointmentsCall Toll Free 888-681-5864 For more info www.seclung.com Lung Disease SpecialistRob Garver, MDNow Seeing Patients in Port St. Joe NOW BCBS-FL IN-NETWORK PROVIDER By Lois SwobodaTimes Staff Writer If youre looking for a way to sweep the cobwebs out of your belfry and shake off the winter doldrums, come join the fun at Two Als on Thursday evenings. Through April, a motley crew of brainiacs meets at 7 p.m. to play trivia, but not your run of the mill Trivial Pursuit. The game, organized by Arthur Perry, who cofounded the caf with his dad, Leo, features speed rounds, word jumbles and more. Some weeks, Perry is the quizmaster and comes up with the questions and answers. Some weeks, one of the teams takes on the task. At a recent session, 17 players participated grouped into teams of various sizes with names like Real Naughty, Fossils, Back in the Corner and Peanuts. Some were regulars, but Back in the Corner was a couple who stopped in for dinner and decided to stay for the game. Perry said this was a slow night, possibly because dense fog. Normally 25 to 30 turn out, and as many as 55 have packed the bistro on trivia night. On several occasions, the Brain Bowl team from Franklin County High School has participated, and Perry said they performed very well. He remembers one night when 11 college students stumbled on the event and joined in. It turned out they were members of the University of Illinois choir and treated the players to an a cappella concert to thank them for the fun. There is no charge to play, and Perry said everyone is welcome. Many of the regulars said they drop in early for dinner before the game. It might not be Jeopardy, but its very good fun and you might win a bag of peanut butter crackers or a jar of banana peppers if you are up to the challenge. COOKIE TIMEThe annual Girl Scout cookie sale is upon us! This years avors include Thin Mints, Tagalongs, Samoas, Trefoils, Do-Si-Dos, Dulce de Leche, Thank U Berry Munch and the new signature avor, Savannah Smiles, a crisp tangy lemon cookie. This is the Scouts 100th anniversary. Troop 200 got cookie fever beginning at the Forgotten Coast Chefs Sampler this month. They decorated a table to promote Girl Scout Cookies and donated a box of each avor and a cookie tote bag for the silent auction. Pam Mahr won the auction, so she is of cially the rst person to receive her cookies. The cookies were distributed by Troop 200 last week, when sales started in earnest. Proceeds will be donated to local charities and will pay for a eld trip to Silver River State Park and Silver Springs in May. Over the past two years, the Girl Scouts of Franklin County have donated to the Franklin County Humane Society and First United Methodist Church of Apalachicola. This year, the girls hope to raise enough money to add another bene ciary to their annual giving. For information or to order, contact a Scout.Gaye Lass tells trivia partner Dick Fossil Rowalski to keep mum as they put their heads together to solve a trivia conundrum. At right, Steve Furtak assists with a Wheel of Fortune puzzle.LOIS SWOBODA | The TimesTwo Als offers trivia with a twist