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The Apalachicola times
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100380/00163
 Material Information
Title: The Apalachicola times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: H.W. Johnston
Place of Publication: Apalachicola Fla
Apalachicola Fla
Publication Date: 02-23-2012
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1885.
General Note: Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 32911693
lccn - sn 95026907
System ID: UF00100380:00163
 Related Items
Preceded by: Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by: Apalachicola herald

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xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx 50 WWW.APALACHTIMES.COM Phone: 850-653-8868 Web: apalachtimes.com E-mail: dadlerstein@star .com Fax: 850-653-8036 Circulation: 800-345-8688 DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK: School News & Society: 11 a.m. Friday Real Estate Ads: 11 a.m. Thursday Legal Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Display Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Line Ads: 5 p.m. Monday xxxxx Contact Us xxxxx Out to see Index Thursday, February 23, 2012 VOL. 126 ISSUE 43 By Lois Swoboda Times Staff Writer A new fuel vendor is scheduled to take over as xed base operator at Apalachicola Regional Airport on May 1, but the length of the contract remains up in the air. On Tuesday morning, the county commission voted 3-1 to award the contract to Fly High of Lexington, N.C. Commissioner Noah Lockley voted no, and Bevin Putnal was absent. The commission directed County Attorney Michael Shuler to enter into negotiations with Fly High. The airport advisory board approved recommending Fly High after reviewing four bids at their meeting last month, one of which was from Apalachicola International Airport Training Center, the current FBO. AIATC since has taken steps to dispute the advisory boards recommendation. Shuler said AIATC attorney Joe Silva sent a letter demanding that the county engage in good faith negotiations to extend the lease by an additional 10-year period. Shuler told commissioners he did not believe AIATC had a right to extend the lease under the current contract without the commissions mutual approval. He said their lease, which commissioners extended by three months in February to allow an easy transition to any new FBO, is set to end May 1. Commissioners expressed concern about granting a 20-year extended contract to Fly High. One way to be sure you get jobs is to have a shorter term contract, County Planner Alan Pierce said. He pointed out that a new FBO would take over an existing facility, so less money and time would be required to set up operations. What I really want to see is Church school transformed into senior center By David Adlerstein Times City Editor Speaking before a backdrop of sparkling stucco and brightly painted doors, Apalachicola Mayor Van Johnson ended more than three years of anticipation as he dedicated the citys newest addition, a former Catholic church and school now renovated into a multifaceted senior citizen center and cultural hub. Wielding a giant pair of decorative cardboard shears in one hand, and a workable pair of scissors in the other, Johnson snipped the red ribbon that spanned the length of the renovated 84-year-old building at 203 Seventh St. The collaborations and hard work has paid off, and today the residents of Apalachicola can realize and celebrate a new beginning, Johnson said. For decades, this 80-yearold Spanish-style structure has served as a beacon of light, both as a learning facility and as a house of worship to the local African-American community. Today it gives me great pleasure to dedicate 3 ounces of cocaine seized in traf c stop By David Adlerstein Times City Editor Three area residents have been charged with drug crimes after a traf c stop in Apalachicola last week led to the discovery of 87 grams, or a little more than three ounces, of cocaine. According to a release from the Franklin County Sheriffs Of ce, deputies conducted a traf c stop Feb. 13 on U.S. 98, just east of Apalachicola. The driver of the vehicle, Jessica M. Wallace, 22, of Eastpoint, who later would be charged with one count of eeing or eluding a law enforcement of cer with lights and siren active, consented to the search of the vehicle after a brief conversation, according to the sheriffs of ce. While exiting the vehicle, deputies Anti-pole activists broaden their strategy Attorney: Its not over till its over, and its not over yet By David Adlerstein Times City Editor With unfavorable odds authorities will block a merger between Duke Energy and Progress Energy, activists working to reroute the large transmission lines around downtown Apalachicola have more than one ace up their sleeve. That (blocking the merger) is just one of the avenues that were trying to utilize to x the problem, said Fernandina Beach attorney Arthur Buddy Jacobs. I am very, very optimistic and have expended a lot of energy and time, and I will continue to do so until we nd a solution. Jacobs is hoping the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission will grant standing to the group of Apalachicola residents who Fly High new airport operator Johnson ended more than three years of anticipation as he dedicated the citys newest addition, a former Catholic church and school now renovated into a multifaceted senior citizen center and culSpeaking before a backdrop of ed doors, Apalachicola Mayor Van Johnson ended more than three Johnson ended more than three cated the citys newest addition, OMARSHAREK HARRIS JESSICA WALLACE RASHON A. BAHAMMOU BUDDY JACOBS Photos by DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times Enjoying a moment at the reception after the dedication are, from left, Annette Fagan, Brenda Ash and Marian Long. Below, from top, accepting the honor Saturday night of adding the late Charles Watson Clark to the panel of distinguished black leaders from Apalachicola is his niece, Marcia Thomas. Flanked by city of cials, Apalachicola Mayor Van Johnson speaks at the Holy Family dedication. Apalachicola businessman Curt Blair was honored at Saturdays Legends Ball for his creation of a panel display of distinguished local black citizens for the Holy Family Center. Holy Family reborn CHURCH SCHOOL HAS NEW BEGINNING See COCAINE A2 See FLY HIGH A12 See ACTIVISTS A12 See HOLY FAMILY A2 Opinion . . . . . . A4 Society . . . . . . A8 Faith . . . . . . . A9 Outdoors . . . . . A10 Tide Chart . . . . A10 Sports . . . . . . A11 Classi eds . . . A14-A15 INSIDE Willie Speed exempli ed the Greatest Generation A6 Celebrating black history A5 ABC School Carnival Friday From 3-7 p.m. Friday, everyone is invited to the ABC School Carnival at the former Chapman Elementary School in Apalachicola. Games and food for all ages, with proceeds supporting students and teachers in the classroom. There will be a mechanical bull, dunking booth, giant obstacle course, maze, bounce houses and more. Tickets for children are $8 and include a carnival T-shirt while supplies last. Adults and kids 3 and under are free. Tickets on sale at ABC School and at the gate. For more info, call 670-1151 or 653-1222. Dixie offers My Noble Destiny The Dixie Theatre will host the world premiere this weekend of My Noble Destiny, a one-woman show on the life of Marie Curie, written and performed by Beth Blair. Performances are at 8 p.m. Saturday and 3 p.m. Sunday. Performances for area students are at 10:30 a.m. today and Friday and are open to the public. Tickets are $20, and student tickets are $10. For more info, visit www.dixietheatre.com or call 653-3200. Museum to screen docudrama Saturday At 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. Saturday, a special showing of The Werth Eleven will be presented in the movie theater at the Camp Gordon Johnston World War II Museum. Admission is by donation, and there will be popcorn. The Werth Eleven is a docudrama based on the true story of 11 black soldiers ruthlessly murdered by the Nazi SS during the Battle of the Bulge. For more info, call 697-8575. Get ready for the St. George chili cook-off The 30th annual St. George Island Regional Chili Cook-Off & Auction will be 9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. March 3 in the center of the island. Sanctioned by the International Chili Society, more than 60 contestants square off, with the winner advancing to the world championship. All proceeds bene t the Island Volunteer Fire Department and First Responder Unit. Call 9272753 for more information.

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Local A2 | The Times Thursday, February 23, 2012 this building and grounds anew, as a center where our seniors can gather and a venue where the community can hold functions and a place where local African-American history, culture and art can be gathered and displayed. I would like to offer a simple prayer that this building will forever serve as a symbol of collaboration, where a community came together to create a place for all to use and enjoy, he said. Surrounded by several seniors who grew up under the sometimes stern, always loving guidance of the Catholic nuns who taught black students there, Johnson recounted the history of Holy Family, where he himself attended until the third grade. The Holy Family Center was an integral part of the Hillside community dating back to 1920, when both white and black nuns from New Orleans rst came to town to operate the school. The church closed the school in the late 1960s when it desegregated the Apalachicola Catholic community and then later kept the facility open as a community center until it no longer could be operated safely. The end of a long journey Todays dedication represents the end of a long journey, a journey that began four years ago, when Jim Croteau and Burt Ivey with Elder Care Services alerted city of cials of the availability of a state grant to build new or renovate existing buildings into senior citizen centers throughout the state, Johnson said. From that point forward, this project would not have been possible without the partnerships entered into by the Apalachicola board of city commissioners, including former city commissioner Valentina Webb, who was on the board at the time, he said. Crucial to the project was a decision by the administration of former Gov. Charlie Crist, speci cally the Department of Elder Affairs and its former secretary Dr. Douglas Beach, to contribute $1.5 million to fund the project. Johnson cited the assistance of former state representative Will Kendrick in helping the city secure the funds. Other partnerships and support came in from our current legislative delegation and the former Department of Communities Affairs, he said. In addition, the city received $50,000 from the countys Tourist Development Council to place a new roof over the community room. Working point on the project was city administrator Betty Taylor-Webb with much help from city commissioner Brenda Ash, deputy clerk and grants manager Cindy Summerhill and Joe Taylor from the History, Culture and Arts Committee, Johnson said. The mayor acknowledged the efforts of a group of senior ladies who have done a wonderful job preparing and hosting this dedication. I thank each of you: Ms. Yvonne Tolliver, Ms. Annette Fagan and Ms. Gladys Gatlin for your desire to keep giving back to your community. Led by Tolliver, the ladies were among a group of senior citizens who spoke out last month at the city commission meeting. Let it come about in our time, not in our childrens childrens time, said Fagan, who stood with a dozen or so seniors Friday at the dedication. Tolliver had urged the city to create an advisory body to give the seniors a seat at the table in directing the work of the new center, whose administrative tasks are under the auspices of HCOLA, the Hillside Coalition of Laborers for Apalachicola. So many people on the Hill are in ignorance of what is going on and they feel kind of left out, Tolliver said. Theyre not looking to just go and take part in events. They want to be a part of the planning. They feel they can better tell you what they want and how they want it. They have more of passion for it than me and you, she said. Thats where I got my foundation learning from, and thats where I got my butt whupped. I have the scars to prove it. Senior involvement Taylor-Webb appointed a committee, including Ash, Taylor and Summerhill, to work closely with the seniors to glean their input. She said the details of governance are still in the planning stages, with more detailed ideas to be explored. I understand your passion, Taylor-Webb said, noting that the new center will combine a senior citizens function, complete with a congregate site for the Meals on Wheels program and a history museum showcasing the legacy of Apalachicolas vital black history. At the semi-formal Legends Ball Friday evening, Apalachicola businessman Curt Blair unveiled the two newest additions to a series of decorative panels he commissioned to capture the contributions of distinguished black leaders in the city. The two newest names to be added this year are the late Willie Speed and Charles Watson Clark. Speeds widow, Ella, and son Allison were on hand for Friday evenings ceremony, as was Clarks niece Marcia Thomas. Taylor-Webb said HCOLAs role will augment the citys oversight. We cant be there all the time and watch those things, she said. The plan is to get Meals and Wheels relocated; that will be our rst step. Youre coming at the right time. Things are just beginning. Taylor-Webb said though the city has resources to operate the facility, it is still in need of contributions to help furnish and enhance the interior. We dont have enough funding to do everything up front, she said. Ash urged the seniors to continue to speak out on issues that concern them. I hope this is not your last visit to our monthly city commission meeting, she said. We are all working together for a common goal. We cant do it on our own, we need input. Dont ever feel youre being excluded. You are the city, and without you there would be no city. In his remarks at the dedication, the mayor praised the work by the design rm JRA Architects and engineer and construction manager Peter Brown. He introduced JRA Architect David Vincent and Project Superintendent Willie Robinson, who then conducted tours of the new facility. As you can see, city ofcials went through painstaking measures to ensure the building retained its historic avor, while incorporating 21st century technology, Johnson said. The heat and air-conditioning are energy-ef cient, zoned and controlled by computer whether on site or off site. The restrooms are modern ADA-compliant, and the kitchen is commercial-grade. The result is a building that represents a resounding success for all the residents of Apalachicola, one that we can be proud of for many generations to come. Franklin County subcontractors on the project included Jones Stucco and Plaster LLC of Apalachicola, which handled the painting and stucco work, while Alternative Electric LLC of Eastpoint handled the electrical work. Coastline Clearing and Development of Eastpoint performed site prep work. Photos by DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times Architect David Vincent stands next to one of the Holy Familys original chalkboards. At right, Yvonne Tolliver speaks at last months city commission meeting. HOLY FAMILY from page A1 observed one of the male passengers throw an object to the edge of the woods on the roadway. They later recovered the object, a plastic bag, and discovered $2,300 in U.S. currency and a clear plastic bag containing a white substance that eld tested positive for cocaine. The report said when deputies attempted to handcuff the male subject, Omarsharek Antoni Harris, 29, of Destin, he ed on foot. After a lengthy foot pursuit, deputies were able to apprehend Harris and placed him under arrest. A subsequent search of the vehicle, a 2003 Chevrolet Tahoe, resulted in the seizure of two clear plastic bags of suspected cocaine. In addition to the $2,300, deputies also seized the cocaine and the vehicle. Harris was charged with escape, resisting an of cer without violence, possession of a controlled substance more than 20 grams and traf cking in a controlled substance. Wallace was charged with possession of a controlled substance and trafcking in a controlled substance. Rashon A. Bahammou, 21, of Apalachicola, was charged with possession of a controlled substance. The sheriffs of ce said further charges might be issued in this case, pending further investigation. COCAINE from page A1 MORE ONLINE Find more news, sports and area coverage at apalachtimes.com

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Local The Times | A3 Thursday, February 23, 2012 Saving Lives...Building Hope... ENDING VIOL E NC E Crisis Intervention 24 hour crisis line staed 365-days/year 850-681-2111 Telephone or face to face individual advocacy services Supportive, condential and safe environment that will support the survivors decisions Accompaniment to hospital for sexual assault exam, which includes: treatment for physical injuries, evidence collection, testing for sexually transmitted infections and pregnancy testing Emergency room advocacy at Weems Memorial Hospital Referrals for alternate safe housing Legal Advocacy Assistance with Orders for Protection, Dating Violence, Repeat Violence, Sexual Violence and Domestic Violence Accompaniment in ling police reports Accompany survivors to court for both civil and criminal hearings Inform victim of their housing and employment rights in Florida as a victim of sexual assault Recovery Services Individual counseling for any person that has ever been a victim of sexual assault Individual counseling for adult victims of sexual child abuse Support groups for victims of sexual assault Services provided for victims age 18 and over 850-681-2111 406 Reid Avenue, Port St. Joe, FL 32456 (850) 229-6262 www.joemamaspizza.com Reid Avenue, Port St. Joe, FL 32456 (850) 229-6262 www.joemamaspizza.com 406 Reid Avenue, Port St. Joe, FL 32456 (850) 229-6262 Authentic hearth baked pies in the style of Naples Traditional wood oven baked pizza Garden fresh salads Freshly baked focaccia sandwiches Home made desserts Domestic and imported wine and craft beer SPRIN G /SUMMER HOUR S A S O F M ARC H 1 ST Tuesday through Thursday 4:30 PM 9:00 PM Friday through Sunday 11:30 AM 9:00 PM C losed M ondays By David Adlerstein Times City Editor Deputies from the Franklin County Sheriffs Of ce discovered what appeared to be a methamphetamine lab on a campsite near the Bald Point beach earlier this month. According to a news release from the sheriffs of ce, deputies responded to a Feb. 10 complaint in the Bald Point area regarding illegal camping on the beach. When deputies arrived on the scene, they located a campsite and a nearby truck, but nobody was present. The sheriffs of ce said the registered owner of the truck had outstanding warrants for burglary in Leon County. Witnesses indicated to deputies that a man, dressed only in shorts, had ed the area. K-9 units from the Florida Department of Corrections and of cers from the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission were called for assistance in locating the man. Upon a detailed search of the campsite, the deputies and of cers located what appeared to be a meth lab, according to the news release. While en route to the scene, deputies from the countys narcotics unit made contact with a man walking on the roadway and determined that he was the wanted individual from Leon County. Deputies arrested Robert Keith White, 49, of 6600 Reigh Count Trail, Tallahassee, and transported him to the Franklin County Jail where he is being held on warrants from Leon County. Guardian Environmental Inc. was contracted to remove all dangerous chemicals from the area. More charges are pending results of chemical testing from the Florida Department of Law Enforcements crime lab in Tallahassee. Meth lab found at Bald Point ROBERT KEITH WHITE Arrest REPORT The following report is provided by the Franklin County Sheriffs Of ce. Arrests in this report were made by of cers from the Franklin County Sheriffs Ofce (FCSO) and Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP). All defendants are considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law. FEB. 13 Omarsharek Harris, 29, Destin, escape, resisting an of cer without violence; possession of a controlled substance and traf cking in a controlled substance (FCSO) Rashon A. Bahammou, 21, Apalachicola, possession of a controlled substance (FCSO) Jessica M. Wallace, 22, Eastpoint, eeing or eluding a law enforcement of cer with lights and siren active, possession of a controlled substance; and traf cking in a controlled substance (FCSO) FEB. 14 Steven H. Mabery, 43, Houston, Texas, grand theft of a motor vehicle (FCSO) Edward A. Palmer, 35, Tallahassee, burglary of a dwelling (FCSO) Bobby C. Martin, Jr., 32, Apalachicola, eeing or attempting to elude a law enforcement of cer, and possession of a controlled substance with intent to sell. (FDEP) Kenneth D. Turner, 51, Apalachicola, sale or possession of a controlled substance with intent to sell. (FCSO) Joseph M. Lehning, 68, Eastpoint, DUI (FCSO)

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Opinion A4 | The Times USPS 027-600 Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 Publisher: Rick Martin Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola Times The proposed half mil referendum for county school taxes is outrageous! For the current school board, made up mostly of government or former government employees, to suggest this debacle, proves that they are out-oftouch with sound business practices and the plight of struggling taxpayers in Franklin County. I assert that our teachers, whom we all sincerely care about, are currently the highest paid, by far, employees in Franklin County. No other local employer, nor the county nor Gander Oil could afford to pay what the teachers receive now, in compensation and benets for the hours they work. Here are the facts from the School Board documents. The teachers are scheduled to work 173 full days and 13 half-days, plus paid holidays. They all get 10 sick days, sick or not, which they do not lose and can be accrued or sold until they retire! They also get 12-to-18 paid vacation days each school year, which are not taken during the summer, but during the short time school is in session. Meaning that many substitute teachers must be paid at the same time. Therefore, teachers actually only work about 31 weeks or 60 percent of the year. While most employers have had to cut salaries and benets, in the past three years the teachers have received a 10 percent and a 3 percent raise and a 3 percent bonus! More was proposed. This amounts to a cumulative 17 percent raise in the last three years. This proposed tax levy is earmarked to generate more raises and bonuses! They get paid training days plus travel expenses and most teachers get additional bonuses, Secondary Supplements from something called a Differentiated Pay Plan Bonus! Franklin County taxpayers provide 100 percent of the employees health and dental insurance. And the employees pay zero into their very liberal and expensive retirement plan. Teachers are so well paid, they do not have to work during the several weeks they are off during the summer. Franklin County property owners have had enough of the failures of out of control school board budgets. The board must learn to manage our schools on a reasonable and lean budget, just as everyone else has had to do in these tough times. Please vote and vote No on this preposterous tax. And remember to thoughtfully vote in the next school board election! Ted Ruffner Eastpoint Thursday, February 23, 2012 Special to the Times The growth of twoincome families and increasing levels of job stress are two of the most signicant work trends affecting American businesses and families in recent years. Having just one stressed-out spouse can harm couples work and home lives. But what about when its both? A new study conducted by Wayne Hochwarter, the Jim Moran professor of business administration in the Florida State University College of Business, examines the role of support in households where daily stress is common to both spouses. Given that a lack of support from ones spouse represents a major cause of both divorce and career derailment, this research is needed to address issues that affect both home and work, Hochwarter said. More than 400 working couples, in both blueand white-collar occupations, participated in Hochwarters research. Those who reported high levels of stress but strong spousal support as compared to stressed-out employees without such support experienced the following positive benets: percent higher rates of satisfaction with their marriage; percent greater likelihood of having positive relationships with co-workers; percent lower likelihood of experiencing guilt associated with home/family neglect; percent lower likelihood of being critical of others (spouse, children) at home; percent higher rates of concentration levels at work; percent lower likelihood of experiencing fatigue at home after work; percent higher rates of satisfaction with the amount of time spent with their children; percent higher views that their careers were heading in the right direction; and percent higher level of job satisfaction. The number of employees who returned to the workplace even more agitated because they were unable to generate coping support at home is particularly distressing to Hochwarter. When youre still angry or upset from yesterdays stress, your workday will likely go in only one direction down, he said. Further, Hochwarter identied key factors distinguishing favorable from unfavorable support. Some attempts to support your stressed-out spouse can backre, actually making the situation much worse, he said. Support that had a deep and far-reaching impact had several common characteristics, which included: Awareness of ones spouses daily work demands (i.e., time pressures, lack of resources, deadlines, and supervisors). Not forcing support. Understanding that communication lines are open regardless of the circumstances. Recognizing that distancing oneself from the family or lashing out is not a practical way to foster help. In fact, it tends to bring out the worst in others and even causes the supporting spouse to become distant and act out as well. Being able to bring ones spouse back to the middle up when down in the dumps and down when overly agitated. Not bombarding the family with complaints about minor workplace irritants. Not trying to one-up ones spouse in terms of who has had the worse day. Not being complacent continuing to work at it. Remaining rational and not automatically casting the spouse as the bad guy. Not keeping a running tab on who is giving and who is getting. Most important, though, was the ability for a spouse to offer support on days when he or she needs it just as much, Hochwarter said. In many cases, both return home from work stressed. Generating the mental and emotional resources needed to help when your own tank is empty is often difcult. Successful couples almost always kept a steady supply of support resources on reserve to be tapped on particularly demanding days. According to one 47year-old sales manager interviewed for the study, I had a horrible day, and all I wanted was a homecooked meal and some time to myself. Instead, I took my wife out to dinner and heard everything about her bad boss and how her co-workers werent pulling their weight. By the end of the evening, we both felt at least a little bit better. Hochwarter also noted that the men and women differed by gender in terms of what support behaviors worked best for them. In general, wives appreciated getting cut some slack in terms of household activities; feeling wanted; and receiving expressions of warmth and affection. The husbands, meanwhile, were more likely to respond positively to offers of assistance with errands and feeling appreciated and needed. Both husbands and wives, however, were especially grateful for their spouses help in getting time away from work and home hassles to simply rest and recharge their batteries. When stress enters any relationship, it has the potential to either bind people together or break them apart, Hochwarter said. Findings strongly conrm this with respect to job tension. What also became obvious was the critical role of communication and trust among spouses; without them, you have a foundation best described as crumbling, even in the best of circumstances. Afrming that is the view of one 54-year-old administrative assistant in the study. When questioned how job stress can affect a relationship, she responded, Ask my ex-husband. The study is being prepared for publication. By William Scott Special to the Times This weeks issue is to once again try and reach out to the veterans or the spouse or widow of a veteran who may have served in Vietnam, parts of Thailand, or parts of South Korea from 1961 through 1975. The Veterans Administration has conceded the following conditions were as likely as not caused by exposure to herbicides including Agent Orange and are to be compensated for. The listed conditions are diabetes mellitus type 2, Hodgkins disease, ischemic heart disease, respiratory cancers, prostate cancer, soft tissue sarcomas, multiple myeloma, nonHodgkins lymphoma, AL amyloidosis, chronic Bcell leukemia, chloracne, Parkinsons disease, peripheral neuropathy and porphyria cutanea tarda. If you are a veteran, the spouse or widow of a veteran, or know of a veterans widow who had one of these listed conditions give us a call. This not only applies to Army and Marines but Navy and Air Force personnel as well. The area of exposure is being expanded and includes parts of Thailand and South Korea. Specic Naval vessels are considered to have been contaminated as well. If you have any questions, contact us at 653-8096 or stop by and see us downstairs at the courthouse, room 103. We will also be at Lanark Village Chillas Hall, at 9:30 a.m., and the Carrabelle Senior Center at 10:30 a.m. most Thursdays. William Scott is Franklin Countys veterans service ofcer, and Charles Elliott is his assistant. VETERANS CORNER William Scott and Charles Elliott Q. It costs so much to le a divorce case or a small claims case. Who receives that money? A. These services by the clerks ofce are courtrelated functions which are funded from ling fees and service costs and not from the countys budget. It costs $397.50 to le a divorce case. The clerks ofce receives $115 of that amount. Pursuant to legislation, the remainder of the $397.50 is sent to the State of Florida in Tallahassee electronically to the Department of Revenue to be distributed to 10 separate State trust funds. Small claims cases have ling fees based on the amount of the claim. For claims that exceed $500 but are less than $2,500, the ling fee is $175. The clerks ofce receives $150, and the remainder is distributed to the State of Florida in Tallahassee to the States General Revenue Fund and four other state trust funds. For small claims greater than $2,500, the ling fee is $300. The clerks ofce receives $170 and the remainder is distributed to the states general revenue and four other state trust funds. If a determination is made that a ler is indigent, the ling fee may be waived, although other fees are not waived. This ofce has a procedure in indigent cases to accommodate partial payments for those costs other than ling fees. There are hundreds of nancial distribution schedules my ofce is responsible for. Every ne or court cost we collect, every ling fee we collect, and every service charge we collect must be accounted for and distributed correctly. My ofce is operated in a manner that is subject to a high degree of nancial, operating, and compliance oversight. If you have any questions or comments about this column, please forward them to: Marcia Johnson, Clerk of the Court, 33 Market Street, Ste 203, Apalachicola, FL 32320, or by email to: mmjohnson@franklin. clerk.com By Caty Greene Special to the Times The Apalachicola Municipal Library continues to celebrate African American History month. On Saturday, Mayor Van Johnson hosted kids with a reading of Barack Obamas childrens book, Of Thee I Sing: A Letter to My Daughters. This Saturday, Feb. 25, distinguished resident and former city commissioner, Valentina Webb will read from Every Tongue Got to Confess: Negro Folk-tales from the Gulf States by Zora Neale Hurston. This is a charming volume of very short tales, which have entertained young library patrons in the past. Since the weather for the HCOLA Festival was threatening severe thunderstorms, which of course did not happen, the library chose to do its annual display of books by and about African Americans in the library. This display will be up until the end of the month; come by and see what we have. Most of the books are available to be checked out. Another momentous occasion this past week was of course the publication of the Sports Illustrated annual swimsuit issue. One person came in with the hope that the library had a subscription. We had to laugh; we do not. In fact we have very few magazine subscriptions, because of our small budget, but we do have patrons who donate magazines regularly. Dr. Skip Oliver, professor emeritus of political science at Heidelberg University in Tifn, Ohio gave us a years subscription to The Nation. He is visiting in Apalachicola for six weeks. If you think you might like to support us with a subscription to your favorite magazine, please come by and let us know. Suggestions might include the Economist, Atlantic Monthly, Smithsonian, Coastal Living or even Garden and Gun. PALS, the library friends group, is planning the annual Mar. 15 Librarians Anniversary Party (more details to come), which will also be the launch for a twiceannual Book Drive. In previous years the library, and PALS, has sold books once per year at the Florida Seafood Festival. This year we are adding a sale on May 5, the Saturday of the Tour of Homes. PALS would like to encourage patrons and supporters to start looking through their bookshelves, and maybe do a little spring cleaning. All books will be accepted, and if you want to help us sort and store them before the sale, volunteers are always welcome. Come by and see the librarys extensive holdings on African Americans, and join us in celebrating African American History Month. Caty Greene is the librarian for the Apalachicola Municipal Library. To reach her, call 653-8436. Spousal support leads to lessened stress Agent Orange linked to illness YOUR PUBLIC TRUSTEE Marcia Johnson Who gets the ling fee monies? Lots on black history, but no subscriptions @ THE LIBRARY Caty Greene Half-mil is preposterous, vote it down W A YNE HOCHWARTER

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Local The Times | A5 Thursday, February 23, 2012 Strength in Numbers A Staff of Professionals to Help You Strengthen Your Business Roberson & Associates, P.A. is committed to providing services to our clients with personal care, condentiality, and professionalism. Our staff has the depth of knowledge and experience to help you and your business navigate the complexities of tax, nancial planning, and the business environment. Our client base includes individuals, restaurant, seafood, retail, construction related, real estate, healthcare, engineering, professional and personal services, non-prot and government entities. We have made good, sound business decisions for our business since 1997, and we can help you do the same for yours. SE R VICE S Accounting Services Tax Preparation and Planning Business C onsulting QuickBooks Support Payroll Services Auditing Business Analysis Loan Application Support Business Retirement Plans Financial Planning E state Planning O FF ICE L O C AT I ONS : rapacpas.com Professional Tax and Accounting Services Since 1997. 214 Seventh St. Port St. Joe, FL 32456 850.227.3838 219 Avenue E Apalachicola FL 32320 850.653.1090 IT I S OUR PLEA SUR E T O WELCOME Dr. Eugene Charbonneau And Dana Whaley, ARNP T O WEEM S MEDICAL CEN T E R EA ST Beginning MARCH 1, 2012 Primary Care and Urgent Care 110 NE 5TH STREET Celebrating African-American heritage PHOTOS BY DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times The pastors leading Sundays community prayer service as part of the annual African-American festival are, from left, Gerry Reed, from the St. Paul AME Church; David Walker from Covenant Word; Horace Solomon from New Life Church; Thomas Webb from Tabernacle of Faith International Ministry; and Joseph Green from the Apalachicola Church of God In Christ. FOR MORE PHOTOS OF LAST WEEKENDS AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY FESTIVAL, SEE THE PHOTO GALLERY AT WWW. APALACHTIMES. COM Hillside youth perform a pantomime dance as part of Sundays service. The Jones siblings, from left Mercedes, Johnny and Alexis Jones perform at Saturdays African-American festival. Dre Robinson serves up rap at Saturdays AfricanAmerican festival. The beauty was apparent at Saturdays African American Festival parade. Chip Sanders chicken and waf es was a big hit among the food booths. A military color guard led Saturdays parade.

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Local A6 | The Times Thursday, February 23, 2012 CAT POINT, EASTPOINT 2.63 acres of gorgeous bay view property on Cat Point. White sandy beach on the Apalachicola Bay. MLS# 245189.................$290,000 Travis Stanley 850.653.6477 Grayson Shepard 850.653.6718 B EAC HFR ONT C ON D O S T G EO R GE I SLAN D 2BR/2BA with two balconies in Villas of St. George. Established rental history! Community pool, beach boardwalk, 2 blocks to lighthouse! MLS# 246110..............$319,500 CA RR ABELLE BEAC H Own a piece of Carrabelle history! The original lighthouse keepers house has 3 BR/ 1 BA on 1.3 peaceful acres backing up to Tates Hell Hiking Trail. Lovely porches! MLS#243618.................$259,000 F I R ST TIE R ST. G EO R GE I SLAN D P LANTATION 4BR/4.5 BA home with private pool, great rental history, great views! Large decks. Priced to sell! MLS# 238520...............$549,000 B EAC HFR ONT C ON D O CAT POINT, EASTPOINT CA RR ABELLE BEAC H F I R ST TIE R ST. G EO R GE Leon Teat 850.653.5656 Jamie Crum 850.370.0835 Sandy Mitchem 850.899.8300 NEW LISTI N G! GR EATE R A PALAC H ICOLA 4BR/2BA on 1/3 acre lot with above ground pool. Many upgrades and new features tankless water heater, new plumbing, city water, updated kitchen, new carpet, windows, doors. MLS# 245923..............$139,500 GR EATE R A PALAC H ICOLA A FF O RD ABLE S T G EO R GE I SLAN D Interior home 3BR/2BA home on 1/3 acre lot in quiet area on Bayshore Dr. Cozy wood interior with freestanding resident or vacation home! MLS#243422..............$275,000 A FF O RD ABLE NEW LOW PRICE! SPECIAL FRANKLIN COUNTY PLANNING & ZONING MEETING Tuesday, February 28, 2012 Franklin County Courthouse Annex 6:30 P.M. 1 Approval of the minutes of the meeting held, Tuesday, January 10, 2012, as mailed. 2 Review of the Monthly Building Report for January 2012. 3 Election of Chairman & Vice Chairman. SINGLE FAMILY PRIVATE DOCKS: 4 Consideration of a request to construct a Single Family Dock at NW Lot 1, Block N, Peninsular Point, Unit 3, 1536 Alligator Drive, Alligator Point, Franklin County, Florida. The access walkway will be 400 x 4 with a 12 x 8 covered terminal platform with an additional 8 x 3 wide step down. This dock meets all local, state and federal requirements and has all state and federal permits. Request submitted by Larry Joe Colson, agent for David Ramba, applicant. (Has House). 5 Consideration of a request to construct a Single Family Private Dock at the West Lot 88, Block C, Unit 3, St. James Island Park, 3170 Highway 98 East, St. James, Franklin County, Florida. The access walkway will be 200 x 4 with 10 x 12 terminal platform. This dock meets all local, state and federal requirements and has all state and federal permits. Request submitted by Guillermo Morales, applicant. (Has House). SMALL SCALE LAND USE CHANGE & REZONING: 6 Consideration of a request to re-zone a 3.72 acre parcel of land described as 957 Highway 98 West, Eastpoint, Franklin County, Florida from R-1 Single Family Residential and R-4 Single Family Home Industry to C-3 Commercial Recreational and a Small Scale Land Use Change from Residential to Commercial Recreation. Request submitted by Coastline Rentals, LLC. COMMERCIAL SITE PLAN REVIEW: 7 Consideration of a request for Commercial Site Plan Review for a 3.72 acre parcel described as 957 Highway 98 West, Eastpoint, Franklin County, Florida. The proposed site plan will include an RV Resort with 36 sites and amenities such as Managers Residence/Ofce Space, Activity Center, Bath House and a Swimming Pool. Request submitted by Coastline Rentals. LLC. BILL MILLER REALTY 850-697-3751 (3310) 570-0658 3/2 DBL WD -3 F E NC ED C OR. LOTS-2 C AR GAR $60,000 $29,500 $2,500 D OW N BU YS 2 B ED AP T 2 6 OR RE N T $500/MTH GU LF V IEW & A CC ESS 3 B DR 2 BA 2006 M / H 16 X 80 $89,000 3/B-D/W-3 C OR. LOTS DBL GARAGE $59,500 MIH 2 CR N R LOTS BLK. $ S TORE RED UC ED $49,500 C OMM. BLDG-98 O N G U LF-RE N T $600/MTH C LEAN C UTS Lawn Care Service Residential Commercial Services: Pressure Washing Palm Tree Trimming Landscape Design Carlos Castillo 850-624-8018 Chris Grin 850-323-1442 CALL FOR A FREE E STIMATE Speed exempli ed the Greatest Generation By Lois Swoboda Times Staff Writer A man for all seasons, Willie Burghart Speed grew up in the maritime trades but pursued his dream and became one of Franklin Countys most in uential and effective educators. Speed was born and raised in Apalachicola. His son, Allison, said in the last years of his life he wanted to be driven through town at least once a day. Here I am, a 60-yearold man asking my 90-yearold father, Can we go home now? Allison said. Hed point out a building to me and tell me who lived there or what was there when he was a child. He loved his childhood home. Born Aug. 11, 1920, Speed grew up with his grandparents Papa Lee and Ma Rita at 150 Seventh St. in Apalachicola. From an early age, Speed worked at different jobs to help support the family and pay for clothes and school expenses. At age 12, he began selling mullet downtown and delivering oysters. In 1934, at 14, he spent the summer shrimping with his grandfather. While a young teenager, he cleaned a local barber shop and a jewelry store, delivered milk, shined shoes, raked leaves and cut grass. He got a job at Sheips Mill loading railroad ties over the summer of his junior year at Dunbar High. He quit in the fall to return to school. An excellent worker, he was the rst to be rehired for the summer when school ended in 1938. He graduated from Quinn High School in a white suit on April 21, 1939. In 1940, he was one of the founders of the Owl Social Club, a civic organization that organized social events but also worked on many projects to aid Apalachicolas African-American community. They paid doctor bills and provided for the elderly and young children. Speed became the societys president. After graduation, he continued to work at the mill, and tried his hand at road construction, helping before the war to build what now is called Cleve Randolph Field at the airport. When it became clear he would be drafted, he married his sweetheart, Ella Louise Breedlove, at her mothers home, in 1942. He focused on putting back a nest egg for him and his bride. Called into the service in February 1943, he had $500 in savings. He reported to Fort Blanding in Starke, and was sent to Sheppard Field in Wichita Falls, Texas, for training in the Army Air Corps. Before he was shipped overseas, the war ended. Speed had been spared the battle eld but his travels had broadened his horizons and he had developed the habit of reading the newspaper daily. His time in the service won him another bene t too. Under the GI Bill, he was eligible for a scholarship to attend college. He applied to Florida Agricultural University, now Florida A&M University, soon after returning to Apalachicola in September 1946. He could not matriculate until 1947 because of the in ux of GI, so in the interim, he shed and oystered. Speed struggled with his coursework the rst semester and failed English. Fortunately, he was able to bring Ella and his young son, Bill, to live with him in Tallahassee. He persevered and the second semester achieved the honor roll. He went to school year-round and worked odd jobs during breaks. During Speeds second year, Charles Watson, came to school and rented Ella and Willies spare room. Another Apalachicola native, Fred Jenkins, also came to FAMU that year. During Speeds third year, Ella became pregnant, which spurred him to work even harder. He was offered two jobs on graduation and accepted a teaching position at Howard Academy in Ocala. That was the beginning of a distinguished career in education that might never have happened had this remarkable man not belonged to a generation that received the gift of higher education. Speed served as teacher, principal, assistant superintendent and school board member in Franklin County. He received a wealth of honors in his lifetime, among them a Meritorious Achievement Award in May 1999 from FAMU. On presenting the award, FAMU president and Apalachicola native Frederick Humphries said: People recognize something special goes on in Apalachicola because you had people like Willie Speed, who made it special in this community. Today I want to say thanks to him, and his family, for being the kind of man who was unsel sh, to help the least among us to reach a highest pedestal. Speed died May 11, 2011, at his Apalachicola home at age 90. He is buried with his family in Magnolia Cemetery. D.J. EDMONDS | From Speed family collection Standing before the registrars of ce at Florida A&University in 1949, are, from left, Marion Watson, Anderson Reb Johnson, Hayward Glenn, Thomas Wynn, Willie Speed and Frederick Jenkins, all of Apalachicola. DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times Accepting the honor Saturday night of adding the late Willie Speed to the panel of distinguished African-American leaders from Apalachicola are his wife, Ella, and son, Allison.

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Local The Times | A7 Thursday, February 23, 2012 Smart Lenses SM Can produce clear vision without glasses, at all distances "Freedom from Eye Glasses, Now a reality for many." NO HIDDEN CHARGES: It is our policy that the patient and any other person responsible for payments has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed by payment or any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment. www.mulliseye.com "WE WELCOME NE W PATIE N TS, C ALL T ODAY FOR YOUR P RIORITY APP OI N TME N T" FOR NEW PATIENTS 59 AND OLDER This certificate is good for a complete Medical Eye Exam with Todd Robinson, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Surgeon. The exam includes a prescription for eye glasses and tests for Glaucoma, Cataracts and other eye diseases FOR YOUR APPOINTMENT CALL: 850-763-6666 ELIGIBILITY: U.S. Citizens living in the Florida Panhandle, 59 years and older, not presently under our care. Coupon Expires: 2-29-12 FREE EYE EXAM CODE: AP00 Darren Payne, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon Lee Mullis, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon Todd Robinson, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon Concerned Citizens of Franklin County, Inc. P.O. Box 990, Eastpoint, FL 32328 abetterfranklin.com By Lois Swoboda Times Staff Writer Two local authors greeted the public earlier this month in Lanark Village. A veteran author and a talented novice displayed their work during a Chillas Hall luncheon on Saturday, Feb. 11. Richard Edward Noble brought a dozen of his books already in print and a copy of his work in progress to the book signing. He offered special discounts to senior citizens. Nobles efforts on display included such well-known works as A Summer with Charlie and HoBo-ing America. Also on for sale were political works like Mein Kampf An analysis. Noble has also published works on local culture like Cat Point and them dang oyster people and Eastpointer. Noble showed off his upcoming collection of philosophical musings, Bits N Pieces. He said this is the beginning of a thoughtful and serious series that deals with some controversial ideas and contains strong language and themes he has not included in his earlier work. Seated next to Noble at the authors table was Gloria Tucker, of Crawfordville, who brought along her rst and only book, Victimized by a Serial Killer. Tucker is the cousin of 46-year-old Cheryl Dunlap, who was abducted from near her Crawfordville home in 2007 by Gary Michael Hilton, who kept her captive for two days before killing her, and disposing her body in the Apalachicola National Forest. Her book chronicles his trial for the killing, for which he was given the death penalty. I am more concerned about keeping the story out there than making money, she said. People need to understand that an event like this does not just affect the murder victim. Their entire family and members of the community around them are all victimized. In her dedication she writes: Too many people are senselessly victimized daily. Families suffer hardships as a result of these heinous crimes. The rights of victims are violated as a result of these laws made to protect perpetrators of crimes. Noble and Tucker said sales were good. Victimized by a Serial Killer and several works by Noble are available at Amazon and Barnes and Noble.com. By David Adlerstein Timed City Editor Kim Barnhill has been named acting administrator of the county health department, replacing Dr. Karen Chapman, who served as the interim director beginning in July 2011. Barnhill remains the full-time administrator of the Jefferson and Madison County health departments, a job she has held since January 2002. In her role as health ofcer for those two rural counties, she has focused on increasing access to dental care; linking Smart Growth principles to public health initiatives; enhancing health care career opportunities for local high school students; and increasing the availability of indoor and outdoor physical activity opportunities. Barnhill earned a bachelors degree in health education, a masters degree in adult education and gerontology and a masters of public health from the Florida State University. At this point, Im not sure how long I will be the acting administrator, but I know I wont leave until I can turn over the role to someone who can do it better than I can, she said. The staff at the county health department and the community deserves that. I am looking forward to the opportunities and have already gotten started on many changes that will result in positive changes for Franklin County. Earlier in her career, Barnhill served as the statewide services director in the state health of ce for two years, helping to oversee all 67 county health departments and the Institutional Review Board. In 2010, she also served as the acting administrator of the Gulf County Health Department. Her past experience includes directing the statewide of ce of volunteer services and promoting dental health and uoridation in the public health dental program of the Florida Department of Health. Barnhill serves on the executive committee of the Florida Association of County Health Of cers, the nominations and marketing committees for the National Association of County and City Health Of cials, and that associations liaison to the U.S. Taskforce on Community Preventive Services. Barnhill is a commissioner on the Partnership for Preventions National Commission on Prevention Priorities and on the board of directors of the National Public Health Foundation. She is a past-president of the Florida Association of County Health Of cers. Writers reign at Chillas Hall book event LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Richard Nobles of Eastpoint and Gloria Tucker of Crawfordville attended a book signing at Chillas Hall on Feb. 11. Barnhill appointed acting health department administrator DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times Kim Barnhill poses in her of ce at the health department.

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By Valerie Garman Florida Freedom Newspapers Mimi Delaruas eyes smiled as she looked back on her 101-year journey. Ive had a very enjoyable life, you know, she said. It was enough to bring her daughter, Diane Dieter, to tears. Its wonderful, Dieter said, as she recognized that not too many people are blessed with this much time with their mothers. Mildred Mimi Delarua, a resident at Beacon Villa Retirement Center in St. Joe Beach, welcomed her 101st birthday last Friday, with the surviving friends and family members who helped shape her story. The consensus was that she didnt look a day over 85. The attendants at Beacon Villa said Delarua spent all week looking forward to a visit from her people. Weve just had the nicest family, Delarua said. Were lucky about that. Her life has blessed her with two children, ve grandchildren and eight great-grandchildren. She smiled again as she remembered the births of those children and grandchildren. Family has always been a number one priority for her, her daughter explained. She received a visit from extended family across the country for her centennial birthday celebration last year. We had a real big blast in Apalach for her 100th birthday last year, said Dieter, wife of Bob Dieter. Relatives came in from California to Virginia to Tennessee to Alabama. And although her articulation has slowed, Delarua agreed she was excited about turning 101 and was grateful to spend it with her close family. When asked if she had any advice for the younger generation, Delarua said she wouldnt know how to put it into words. Delarua is not the rst in her family to live past 100. Her older sister lived to be 103, and she has two living sisters ages 99 and 93. Delarua was born in Houston, Mississippi in 1911, but spent most of her life living in Memphis, Tennessee. She also spent time in New Orleans while attending business school, a time she remembered fondly at her party, when she lived with her aunt, uncle and cousin. She also looked back on her time working as a secretary for a steel company in Memphis; her daughter said she always admired her mothers independence. She married her late husband, John Delarua, at age 23. He passed away in 1980. Delaruas kind spirit led also her to volunteer as a Pink Lady at Methodist Hospital in Memphis for 15 years. She moved to Apalachicola in 2002 to live with her daughter, where she attended St. Patricks Catholic Church. She became a resident at Beacon Villa last August. She was just always a very kind, gentle person, Dieter said. She was always very independent. The nurses and attendants at Beacon Villa recognize Ms. Mimi as a miracle. She is not completely wheelchair-bound and has no problem getting around in her room. Delarua, the eldest of the centers 25 residents by quite a few years, is possibly the oldest resident they have ever had. Jennifer Richter, activities director at Beacon Villa remembers some 97th and 98th birthdays, but never a 101st. She said Delarua is a quiet and gentle resident who always has to be just so. Her 101st birthday gift from the attendants at Beacon Villa was a delicate piece of jewelry, something Richter said re ects her prim mannerisms. For her to be that age, weve got a pretty wide age group here, she de nitely is better off mentally than many of her younger counterparts, Richter said. If I were to guess (her age) I would say late 80s or early 90s shes really a miracle her being that age. By Lois Swoboda Times Staff Writer A local thespian has put pen to paper to produce a one-woman show that is already making waves. Three years ago, Beth Blair was introduced to Marie Curie, when her father, a retired school superintendent who loves to read, recommended a biography of the pioneer physicist. After reading it, she was hooked. She sought out more books on the life of Curie, a Polish physicist and chemist, famous for her pioneering research on radioactivity, who was the rst woman to win a Nobel Prize, the only woman to date to win in two elds, and the only person to win in multiple sciences. This was a superhuman being to endure what she did, Blair said. Obstacles she had to face and the absolute jaw-dropping grit. I think I got interested in the story because cancer is everywhere. The way they deal with cancer now is thanks to this huge impact that Marie and Pierre Curie made. Blairs daughter survived breast cancer four years ago. Inspired by her research, Blair, an actress who loves the theatre, began work on a play. Her rst draft had many characters. Blair and husband Curt performed it for the family. It was just terrible, she said. Blair went back to work and rewrote the piece as a one-woman show entitled Marie Curie: My Noble Destiny. She debuted her new play at her reading group for June Dosik and Caroline Weiler, who told her it was really good and encouraged her to perform it. Dosik told Dixie Partington, owner of the Dixie Theatre about the show, and Partington asked for a private reading. She and her mother, awardwinning actress Cleo Holladay, listened to Blairs reading and asked her to perform it at the Dixie. While the play was in rehearsal, Blair got a note of encouragement from an unexpected source. A friend found an article about actor Alan Alda. It seems he had also written a play about Marie Curie, Passion of the Radiance, which was performed to excellent reviews at the Geffen Playhouse in Los Angeles last year. While his play dealt with the years after Pierre Curies death, and Blairs deals with the period before he died, the two works share many themes, including courage, discovery and the wonders of science. Blair wrote to invite Alda to attend a performance at the Dixie and, while he declined, he encouraged her to pursue her writing career. The only evening performance Of My Noble Destiny will be at 8 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 25. There also will be a matinee performance at 3 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 26. There will be special performances for area students at 10:30 a.m. Thursday and Friday, Feb. 23 and 24. These are open to the public and everyone is encouraged to attend. Blair said her hope is that the play will inspire even one student to undertake a career in science. Science is so amazingly fun, she said. Its like a mystery story. Marie found it to be absolutely the love of her life, next to Pierre. Tickets are $20 and student tickets are $10. For reservations or more information, visit www. dixietheatre.com or call 653-3200. PET OF THE WEEK Franklin County Humane Society Qualications: Expertise in: Now Accepting Appointments Call Toll Free 888-681-5864 For more info www.seclung.com Lung Disease Specialist Rob Garver, MD Now Seeing Patients in Port St. Joe NOW BCBS-FL I N -NETWORK PROV I DER On behalf of my staff and I, we would like to thank all our loyal patients for the honor of being selected for the multiple awards that we have received over the last 12 months; including voted most compassionate Dr. and Patients Choice Award. It is a great honor and we will continue to strive for the very best medical care for our patients. VINCENT IV ERS, M.D. 301 T wentieth S treet Port S t. Joe, FL 32456 850-227-7070 www.iversmd.com On behalf of my staff and I, we would like to thank all our loyal patients for the honor of On behalf of my staff and I, we would like to Society A8 | The Times Thursday, February 23, 2012 Mimi Delarua embarks on a 2nd century Lordy, Lordy. Look whos 40! Love, Ron, Mom, Christian and Colin Actress Blair to bring Marie Curie to life at the Dixie ED TILEY | Special to the Times Beth Blair as Marie Curie. Happy 2nd birthday, Payton Payton Grace Wood turned 2 on Sunday, Feb. 12, 2012. She is the daughter of Buddy and Cheree Wood of Carrabelle. Paternal grandparents are Leonard and Shirley Brannan. Maternal grandparents are Keith and Lucille Walden. A gathering of friends and family at the home of Lynn Wilson and Bill Spohrer helped former Coca Cola model and Rockette dancer Alice Jean Gibbs mark her 95th birthday Feb. 11. Looking radiant, Gibbs was celebrated with cards and gifts, and a beautiful table of food and drink, all surrounding a cake decorated with Miss Coca Cola. Gibbs continues to stay active in the painting career she took up following her days as a dancer, and as a model posing for the famous Haddon Sundblom, whose illustrations for Coca Cola made them an indelible American image. Pictured blowing out the candles are Gibbs great-grandson Hampton Graham, with, standing from left, his mom Piper Graham, Gibbs daughter Lynn Wilson Spohrer, Gibbs, and Gibbs daughter Carol Harris, Hamptons grandmother. Happy BIRTHDAY Friends help Alice Jean mark 95th birthday MIMI DELARUA

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The United Methodist Churches of Franklin County Welcome You First United Methodist Church of Apalachicola Worship Service 11:00 a.m. every Sunday Sunday School 10:00 a.m. 75 5 th St. Apalachicola 653-9530 fumcapalach@gtcom.net Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis Carrabelle United Methodist Church Worship Services 10:45 a.m. Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Celebrate Recovery Mondays 7-9 p.m. 102 NE Ave. B Carrabelle 697-3672 Pastor: Julie Stephens Eastpoint United Methodist Church Worship Service 10:00 a.m. every Sunday Healing service every fourth Monday at 7:00 p.m. 317 Patton Dr. (corner of David St.) 670-8825 Pastor: Rev. Beth White St. George Island United Methodist Church 9:00 a.m. Worship Service 10:00 a.m. Fellowship Hour 201 E. Gulf Beach Dr. 9274635 www.sgiumc.org Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis First Pentecostal Holiness Church 379 Brownsville Road Apalachicola Were excited about what Gods doing!!! Sunday School 9:45 am Sunday Morning Worship 10:45 am Sunday Evening Service 6:00 pm Monday, Youth Group 6:30 pm Wednesday, Royal Rangers, G.A.P. 7:00 pm Wednesday Worship & Word 7:30 pm Nursery Provided during regular church services 7:00 7:00 First Baptist Church St. George Island 501 E. Bayshore Drive 927-2257 R. Michael Waley, Pastor Join us as we praise and worship the living Christ. Great is the Lord and most worthy of praise. Psalm 145:3 Sunday Bible Study ................................................ 10:00am Worship Praise ........................................................ 11:00am Sunday Night ............................................................ 7:00pm Wednesday Power Hour ...................................... 7:00pm Wednesday Youth at S.P.L.A.S.H ....................... 7:00pm Walking in Christ R. Michael Whaley, Pastor WELCOMES YOU Church of the Ascension 101 NE First Street Carrabelle SUNDAY 10:00 AM WELCOMES YOU Church THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH (850) 274-4490 (850) 545-2578 WELCOMES YOU Trinity Trinity Episcopal Church est. 1836 Welcomes You Hwy. 98 & 6th St. Apalachicola 850-653-9550 Sunday Worship Services 8 & 10:30 a.m. Wednesdays Healing Service 11 a.m. Centering Prayer 4 p.m. Faith The Times | A9 Thursday, February 23, 2012 With lifes daily stressors, it is easy to neglect reecting on our many blessings: our health, joy and the greatest gift of all: family. Through family we learn traditions, forgiveness, patience, healing, self-control, and in some cases, self-defense. The lessons of our childhood shape and benet each day of our adult lives. We encounter nostalgic moments that cause a warm sensation in our heart and a smile on our face. The darkest of times do not seem as bleak as long as we have the support of family to encourage us. The relationship of family is the heartbeat that keeps us going when it seems there is nothing left in this life. I enjoy listening to my grown children when they get together and share stories of their childhood. Now that they are beyond the statute of limitation, they share confessions and stories of incidents that I was never privy to. Some events seemed catastrophic at the time but now they can laugh about it. They are honest with each other in a way no one else could be outside of their circle. Scott and I worked hard to create a peaceful atmosphere in our home amidst the chaos of raising four children. I attribute our success to God and to our determination to make our marriage and our merged family work. Sometimes the harmony we longed for appeared more like anarchy, but we remained a united (weary) force against the foes. Between homework, sports, school functions, fundraisers and extracurricular events, we had to work like a team to make it all happen. Taking time to bond with each other took great effort at the end of an exhausting day. Although it was not always feasible, sitting at the dinner table together, sharing the days events was when we really connected as a family. The Apostle Paul chose the bond of family to symbolize the unfathomable bond of love between Jesus Christ and the church, His bride. Who can comprehend the mysterious bond that enables a man and a woman to withstand the many storms of life and remain best friends for the rest of their lives together? The Bible describes the union between a man and woman like a cord that is not easily broken. Though one may be overpowered by another, two can withstand him. And a threefold cord is not quickly broken, Ecclesiastes 4:12. Of course, the third strand of the cord represents Jesus. In a culture that discourages the bond of matrimony, it is hard to understand the benets that derive from its commitment. The prince of darkness has launched his nal and greatest attack on Gods people. The one last standing institution, marriage, is under duress unlike any other time in history. According to statistics, the rate of divorce is declining. In reality, fewer people are getting married and more people are maintaining the friend-with-benets status. The government discourages marriage by offering benets not obtainable to married couples. Therefore an unmarried couple may see a marriage certicate as nothing more than a piece of paper that cripples them nancially. If the person you are with is not marriage material, prayerfully consider how to handle the situation. Til death do us part is taken about as literally as the Bibles principles are in modern day. I believe that if some could write their own vows they would be a little less committing. They would be more like until somebody better comes along, or until he/she tries to control my life, or until I realize he/she is not ambitious enough to suit me. For those who truly believe in the institution of marriage, do your homework before you say, I do. It takes time to learn people and their strong points and weaknesses. If you have not considered marriage yet you are living as a married couple, take time to analyze your situation. Marriage is so much more than a contract; it is a covenant, a union of souls, a bond, and a commitment of love and loyalty. A spouse is your best friend, teammate, and business partner. His and hers becomes ours, erasing the division of materialism. Parents stand a greater chance at staying together and raising their children as a family if they are married. Marriages have a much greater chance of success if they are Christ centered. It may appear as if we are losing the battle but we cannot give up the ght. Families are under attack and our job is critical. We must defend, support and strengthen families as a body of Christ. We welcome all suggestions and hope you enjoy this weekly column. Please send all emails to Scott Shiver at frontline247@ mac.com. Marriage a union of souls, bound in love YOUTH MATTERS Scott and Pamela Shiver Thank you, thank you, thank you! All of the fundraisers this past weekend were well-supported. All of our faithful volunteers worked very hard preparing and serving the meals. Last Sunday night, 18 of Betty Roberts friends gathered at Camp Gordon Johnston American Legion Post 82 to celebrate her 86th birthday. We enjoyed Bettys company and the pizza. Thanks for the good pizza, guys! The only bad thing about the spaghetti dinner, which was delicious, was I didnt win the half pot. Oh well, maybe next year. I didnt get to the covered dish lunch on Sunday because I was bringing Jerry Harnett home from Weems Memorial Hospital. I hope they had a good crowd, as well. At last Saturdays pancake breakfast at the Lanark Boat Club, the volunteers prepared and served 84 plates how about that! Just two more days, folks! We will have our annual community breakfast Saturday, Feb. 25. There will be great breakfast, great service and great fellowship. Doors open at Chillas Hall at 8 a.m. Enjoy a full breakfast for a donation of $6. And be sure not to miss the bake sale. Hope to see you there! Be kind to one another, check on the sick and house-bound. Until next time, God Bless America, our troops, the poor, homeless and hungry. Community breakfast, bake sale Saturday LANARK NEWS Jim Welsh Obituaries Bill WhiteEagle, 86, passed away Monday, Feb 20, 2012, in his home with family. Bill was one of Jehovahs Witnesses and attended the Kingdom Hall of Jehovahs Witnesses in Apalachicola. Bill is survived by his wife of 40 years, Judy; son Bill (Michelle), son Ben (Geanise), son Del, daughter Angie (Jim), daughter Gwen (Troy), son Neil (Waipio), son Lance, and son Talon; and many grandchildren who loved their Papa. A memorial will be held Saturday, Feb. 25, at 1 p.m., at the Kingdom Hall of Jehovahs Witnesses in Apalachicola. All who would like to are invited to attend.Bill WhiteEagle We regret to announce the passing of Mr. Gene Fanning, 84, of Donalsonville, Ga. Mr. Fanning passed away Tuesday morning, Feb. 14, 2012, at Seminole Manor Nursing Home. Mr. Fanning was born in Huntsville, Ala., Aug. 26, 1927, to the late Thomas and Mabel Travis Fanning. He served his country in the United States Navy and then worked many years with Huntsville Utilities in the water department. Mr. Fanning leaves to cherish his memory, a daughter, Patsy Collins of Donalsonville, Ga., and two grandsons, Heath Collins and Garrett Collins. He was preceded in death by his parents, Thomas and Mabel Travis Fanning; his wife, Jeanell Nunn Fanning; his brothers, Mayhew Fanning, Sidney Fanning, Bernice Fanning and Howard Fanning; and two sisters, Alice Talent and Frances Sherman. Evans-Skipper is in charge of arrangements. No services are planned at this time. Gene Fanning Charles Emerson Harris was born Dec. 2, 1928, in Apalachicola to the late Mary and Albert Harris. Charles passed away Feb. 15, 2012, at St. James Health and Rehabilitation Center in Carrabelle at the age of 83. Charles was a longtime public works employee for Franklin County and the City of Apalachicola. He is survived by his two daughters, Emma Chruscinski and Charlene Fincher; and ve grandchildren, Joseph, Damien, Heather, Cody and Deanna. Memorial services were Friday evening, Feb. 17, at Kelley Funeral Home, 149 Ave. H, Apalachicola.Charles Emerson Harris Cheryl K. Berberet of San Diego, Calif., died peacefully Feb. 3, 2012, after a long illness. Born Cheryl Kathleen Navin in Akron, Ohio on May 27, 1944, she lived in several cities as a child, perhaps inspiring a lifelong love of travel. Her family settled in Lincoln, Nebraska, when Cheryl was nine, where her father P.X. Navin was manager of the local Goodyear Tire and Rubber plant and her mother Helen was a nurse. She attended St. Theresa elementary school, Pius X High School, and the University of Nebraska where she was a member of Delta Gamma Sorority and majored in history and English. Following graduation she married William G. Jerry Berberet of Toston, Montana, in August 1966. Cheryl and Jerry were married 45 years and have two daughters, Heather M. (Delores) of San Diego and Meghan E. (Ron) of Novato, Calif., born in Plattsburgh, N.Y. Jerry and Cheryl lived in diverse regions of the country before settling in San Diego in 2007. In addition to her immediate family, Cheryl is survived by two brothers, John F. (Sharon) of Stillwater, Minn., and Philip X. (Debie) of Atlanta, Ga.; granddaughter Ryan McKenzie Berberet; and numerous cousins, nieces, nephews and in-laws. Cheryl Berberets last rites will be held at a funeral Mass at Saint Joseph Cathedral, San Diego at 3:30 p.m. on Friday, Feb. 24. A pictorial gallery of her life can be accessed at the MerkleyMitchell Mortuary website www.merkleymitchell.com. In lieu of owers, donations might be made to the National Dysautonomia Research Foundation, P.O. Box 301, Red Wing, MN 55066 (www.ndrf.org); the Pius X Foundation, 6000 A St., Lincoln, NE 68510 (www.foundation.piusx. net); or the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals at www.aspca.org/donate. Cheryl Berberet Ed Jackel, 94, of Atlanta, Ga., passed away on Thursday, Feb. 16, 2012. He was born to immigrant parents in New York City, where he met the love of his life, Ethel; she passed away in 1993 after 53 years of marriage. Ed served as an infantryman in World War II and was awarded three Purple Hearts and a Silver Star for bravery. After the war, Ed was the first in his family to attend college and received his bachelors and masters degrees from New York University while working to support his family. Ed was an assistant coach with the Georgia Tech basketball team and was a college and Southeastern Conference basketball referee. An outstanding athlete from a very young age, he was a health/fitness enthusiast long before it became popular. Ed ran in the first Peachtree Road Race and continued to run for many years. He won several state handball championships and one national title (featured in Sports Illustrated). A talented writer, Ed was published in the New York Times and many other publications. Eds book, Lucky Infantryman, about his World War II experiences, was published in his 80s; his novel, 65 and Going, was published in his 90s. He also made a name for himself telling stories at senior centers. Ed delighted in helping others. Until the very end, he was exceptionally grateful for all things large and small: the love of his family and friends, and the opportunities he had been given in life. He valued his independence more than anything and remained independent until the last two weeks. Ed took great pride and pleasure in his family, whom he loved dearly and who will cherish his memory. He is survived by his sister, Rose Lipson; two sons, Martin (Stephanie) and Dana (Pinki) Jackel; daughter Roberta Jackel (Chris); three grandchildren, William Jackel, Erica Newland and Laura Newland; and one great-grandchild, William Buck Jackel. A memorial service is planned for the spring, Eds favorite time of year.Ed Jackel

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E-mail outdoors news to times outdoors@star .com O UTDOORS www.apalachtimes.com Section Section A Freshwater Inshore Spanish mackerel are still holding in close to shore, and in the surf. Casting plugs and spoons will work for these guys, however, trolling mackerel trees close to shore will produce more sh. Some nice trout catches are still being reported, but no one is bragging on red sh this week. Good reports are still comimg in from depot creek this past week. Crappie and shellcraker are still being caught regularly. Stripped bass and a few hybrid bass are in the I.C.W. up stream nd near the Overstrret Bridge. SPONSORED BY Thursday, February 23, 2012 Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL (next to Piggly Wiggly) www.BWOsh.com Your Hunting Headquarters REG $489. 99 SALE $289. 99 L IMITED ST O CK REG $489. 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Corner of Marina Drive, (next to Piggly Wiggly) Corner of Marina Drive, (next to Piggly Wiggly) 99 Corner of Marina Drive, 99 WEEKLY ALMANAC APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE TIDE TABLES MONTHLY AVERAGES To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from these given for APALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW Cat Point Minus 0:40 Minus 1:17 East Pass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27 To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from those given for CARRABELLE: HIGH LOW Bald Point Minus 9:16 Minus 0:03 Sponsor the WEEKLY ALMANAC Call Today! 653-8868 Date High Low % Precip Thu, Feb 23 71 65 20 % Fri, Feb 24 71 48 40 % Sat, Feb 25 63 44 10 % Sun, Feb 26 64 55 10 % Mon, Feb 27 69 53 10 % Tues, Feb 28 70 58 10 % Wed, Feb 29 72 57 60 % BUCKING THE TREND By Tim Croft Florida Freedom Florida is considered by international scientists to be part of a warming hole, said Dr. James OBrien. While other portions of the country, such as Iowa, Kansas, Ohio and parts of the Midwest and Northeast, are experiencing a steady warming of climate, Florida is not seeing similar types of changes, OBrien said. Georgia and Florida are in a warming hole, OBrien said while vacationing with his grandchildren. So we dont have the warming trends that you see in other parts of the country. Its probably because we are surrounded by ocean. And OBrien, a professor emeritus of meteorology and oceanography at Florida State University, should know. Hes been studying the oceans and their impacts on weather patterns for 45 years. For 25 of those years he was on a team of scientists and researchers that ultimately identi ed the phenomenon of El Nino, and in turn that led to the identi cation of El Nina changes in the oceans temperatures and patterns that have great impacts on weather throughout the Southeast and the hemisphere. The unusually warm winter? A product of El Nina, which alternately cycles on a regular basis with El Nino, OBrien said. These two ocean phenomenon contribute greatly to the weather in the Southeast, OBrien said. In the mid-1990s, OBrien said, there resulted a push by scientists to reach beyond government agencies and put the information to people who would need it. It was important to be able to forecast and predict impacts, he continued. So working through entities such as the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences extension services and the Southeast Climate Consortium, comprised of researchers throughout the Southeast, OBrien said this information is now trickling down to those most likely to feel the impacts. We helped convince state forest managers that they would have problems with forest res, as the cycle of El Nina arrives, OBrien said. By predicting a cycle of upcoming dry weather, land managers on state and federal lands are able to prevent a season of wild res through prescribed burning in forest lands. OBrien noted that prescribed burning such as this in a recent trend, due in part to the identi cation of changes in ocean currents and temperatures. OBrien will be the featured speaker during the fth annual meeting of the Supporters of St. Vincent National Wildlife Refuge. The meeting will be held from 1-4 p.m. ET at the St. Joseph Bay Buffer Preserve Center, 3915 State Road 30-A, 4.5 miles south of the intersection of U.S. Highway 98 and County Road 30-A in Port St. Joe and ve miles north of the Indian Pass Raw Bar. OBrien came to the attention of the Supporters of St. Vincent through a talk he gave at a meeting hosted by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service at St. Marks. I must have done okay because I have three requests to give the same talk, including from the group at St. Vincent, OBrien said. OBrien said he will be talking on a host of relevant topics. I am going to give the real scoop about climate change in Florida, OBrien said. What is really happening in Florida with climate change and whats really the truth about sea level rise. It will be a laypersons talk about what is really happening with climate change in Florida. Well, of course, also cover things like hurricanes and tornadoes and the changing weather patterns. The annual meeting of the Supporters of St. Vincent National Wildlife Refuge will be held from 1-4 p.m. ET on Sunday, Feb. 26 at the St. Joseph Bay Buffer Preserve Center. You must be a member of the Supporters group to attend and memberships will be sold at the door; $15 for individuals, $20 for families. The meeting will be catered by Paul Gants Bar-B-Q. For more information call 229-6735. Late hunt at end of slow season yields record buck By Mike Cazalas Florida Freedom Newspapers If Clayton Syfrett had followed conventional wisdom last weekend and skipped hunting with his son after delays had them climbing into their Washington County stand at 4:30 p.m., his name wouldnt be headed for the record books. Instead, with the season winding to an end and the drive to the property already behind them, Syfrett and his 7-year-old son, Chappell, decided to sit, and now he has the story of a lifetime. We literally had just sat down, and Chappell starts pulling his lunch out hed been pestering me the whole trip to eat it and we were having a discussion about why he spilled the crackers everywhere, and I looked up and there was a deer running across the food plot, Syfrett said. I could see it was a buck, and I said, Chappell, theres a deer, buddy, lets be quiet for a second, and I put the crosshairs on the base of his neck. He was walking away when I shot him, but I had no idea he was that big. Syfrett said he checked out the buck through his scope and told his son, Chappell, you have no idea what weve just done. Youll never forget this day. They had been in the stand about three minutes. On the ground, as they stood over the buck and surveyed its 13-point rack, the disbelief, shock and surprise gave away to another emotion. Chappell and I, we just both started laughing, Syfrett said. I mean, what are the odds of this? Ive been hunting this property since 1985, and this is a once-in-a-lifetime thing. Today marks the end of general gun season for the Northwest Florida zone and Syfretts buck, scored by Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission of cer Derek Fussell as a nontypical 146 1/8, net 142 7/8, tops the current record listed for Washington County: a buck taken by Bill Walsingham in 1983. It punctuated a season marked by warmerthan-usual weather that translated into less deer activity during daylight hours but also reaf rmed a true hunters mentality: No one ever has killed a nice deer from the couch. Thats an incredible deer, FWC Lt. Stan Kirkland said. Weve had a few really nice deer that have been killed in the region and we always look forward to measuring them for folks. Kirkland said the mixed weather brought mixed results based on what he has seen and heard this year. Its been a warmer winter than what we typically experience and I think overall most hunters have not had quite the season that theyve had in years past, he said. But Ive talked to a few people like Clayton Syfrett who have killed exceptional deer and had a better than average year and they are ecstatic. Cody Berens at The Deer Shack on East Avenue chalked it up as an average year, saying there was enough business to keep them busy but not enough to overwhelm them. And although it wasnt the busiest year for harvesting deer, it also wasnt the busiest year for FWC of cers to have to deal with accidents and complaints of hunting dogs running loose. We preach about wearing safety harnesses, and I dont how well the word is getting out but weve had very few instances of accidents with tree stands this year, Kirkland said. I think people are going to elevated shooting boxes more, too, and youd really have to work to fall out of one of those. Kirkland said complaints about people hunting deer with dogs illegally continue to drop, partly because of a lack of adequate acreage for that kind of hunting. Also, a law change in 2005 that requires those hunting with dogs to meet certain criteria precipitated a drop in those registering for it. Kirklands take on the season is anecdotal. He said while the year was calm, it had its interesting moments. The agency will conduct a survey to get more exact inf ormation. One, he said, involved three men and a woman from the Dothan area caught night hunting in Jackson County. He said they walked into court expecting a slap on the wrist but were about $1,200 lighter when it was done. A lot of the judges take it seriously, and the judge in Jackson County de nitely did, Kirkland said. Also taken seriously, as is the case every year, is the agencys robotic deer, affectionately known as Robo Deer by game of cers and likely dubbed something less pleasant by those arrested for shooting at it. They were just over the line with Robo Deer in Gulf County on Highway 22 when a father and son drove up on it, Kirkland said. They shot it three times the son was the shooter and they shot it from the car. Their excuse was they were headed toward Walmart and just happened to see the deer, he continued. But they had plastic lining the trunk of the vehicle and butchering tools, etc., so that explanation kind of fell at. Supporters of St. Vincent to meet Sunday SPECIAL TO THE TIMES This 13-point buck was shot by Clayton Syfrett and his 7-year-old son, Chappell, in Washington County. Page 10

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CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA SP O RTS www.apalachtimes.com A Section Thursday, February 23, 2011 OFFICIAL SPECIAL E LECTI O N BALL O T F ranklin C ounty, F lorida March 6, 2012 Page 11 By David Adlerstein Times City Editor With their 2012 season just getting underway, the Lady Seahawks varsity softball team has won its last two games, downing Bozeman and Rickards in away games. The team, under the direction of coach Lisa Sweatt and assistant Sally Wheeler, now sports a 4-4 record, and seeks to add a win tonight, Feb. 23 at home against Blountstown. Sweatt has her share of veteran players on a roster that includes Ally Millender, Anna Lee, Chena Segree, Christina Collins, Gracyn Kirvin, Hunter Shiver, Maegan Andrews, Morgan Newell, Tiffany Varnes, Vanessa Simmons, and Morgan Mock Junior varsity players include Adriana Butler, Scout Segree, Maryln Lee, Robyn Segree, Kimmie Boone, Krista Martina, Ashley Carroll, Lacey Hutchins, Bri Barrack, Myranda McLeod and Maddie Newell. As for stand out players for the beginning of the year, defensively, starting pitcher Chena Segree is holding down the circle! said Sweatt. Offensively, Morgan Mock is leading the team, stroking the ball at least twice a game! Franklin County vs. Ridge View Franklin County and Ridge View lit up the scoreboard Feb. 4 as they combined for 17 runs, with the Lady Seahawks winning the offensive battle at Clay High 9-8 in ve innings. Hitters on both sides were strong at the plate as the teams combined for 15 hits, including six extra base hits. Franklin County got its bats going early, scoring three runs in the rst inning. Varnes racked up three RBIs on two hits, tripling in the rst inning and doubling in the second. The Lady Seahawks piled up the steals, swiping nine bags in all. Mock had two stolen bases, and Newell, Shiver, Varnes, Segree, Collins, and Lee each with one. Franklin County vs. Orange Park Simmons had a sound game at the plate for Franklin County on Feb. 4 at Clay High, as the Lady Seahawks sustained a 5-1 loss in seven innings to Orange Park. Simmons singled in the sixth inning to go 1-1 and drive in the teams only run of the game. Orange Parks Chelest Bardroff baf ed Franklin County, striking out nine batters, and allowing one earned run on ve hits and one walk over seven innings. Franklin County vs. Rutherford In the Lady Seahawks home opener Feb. 7, Franklin County lost to Rutherford 8-2 Franklin County jumped out to an early lead, but it was unable to hang on. Rutherford worked its way back and took the lead on an RBI single in the sixth inning by Becca Taylor Taylor handled Franklin Countys lineup with ease, racking up 10 strikeouts, and allowing two earned runs on three hits and no walks over seven innings. Franklin County @ Wewahitchka In the Lady Seahawks visit to Wewa Feb. 9, Franklin County breezed to an 11-4 win. Singles by Mock, Varnes and Segree led to a two-run rst. A Collins triple in the second led to a third run when Simmons sacri ced her home. Franklin County busted the game open with a sixrun fth inning, highlighted by a line drive home run by Varnes, a Newell triple and a Mock double. The Lady Seahawks added two more in the seventh, keyed by an Andrews triple, and a Varnes single. Franklin County vs. Wakulla The Lady Seahawks hosted Wakulla Feb. 10, and fell 18-2. Wakulla pounded Franklin County pitching, as six hitters combined for 16 hits, 12 RBIs and 14 runs scored. Mock did her best to jumpstart the offense for Franklin County, reaching base two times, including a single in the third. Varnes also singled that inning, and Newell and Segree each walked. Wakulla scored nine runs in the rst inning to build an early lead. Aggressive base running led to six steals for Franklin County. Mock had four stolen bases, and Newell and Kirvin each one. Franklin County @ Godby The Lady Seahawks lost a tough one at Godby Feb. 14, falling 11-10 in 10 innings. Franklin County was paced by the Newells production, as she reached base four times. She scored two runs and had one RBI. Newell doubled in the second inning and singled in the fourth and 10th innings. Segree was a workhorse in the circle for Franklin County, allowing two earned runs, four hits and ve walks while striking out ve. Both squads had things going at the plate, tallying 21 runs and 25 hits, including 10 extra base hits. Franklin County jumped out to an early 1-0 lead in the top of the rst, following four walks. Franklin County @ Bozeman Varnes three hits helped Franklin County down Bozeman 11-6 in seven innings on Feb. 17 at Panama City. Franklin County hammered Bozeman pitching as six hitters had a eld day, combining for 15 hits, eight RBIs and 10 runs scored. Franklin County piled up the steals, swiping seven bags in all. Newell, Varnes, and Lee each had one stolen base and Mock and Kirvin each two. Franklin County stayed on top until the nal out after taking the lead in the rst, scoring two runs on a two-run triple by Lee. Franklin County added four more runs in the top of the third. Newell singled, plating Varnes to start the inning. That was followed up by Simmons double, scoring Lee. Franklin County built upon its lead with three runs in the fourth. An error scored Kirvin, who had opened the inning with a single. That was followed up by Ally Millenders double, scoring Lee and Newell. Franklin County @ Rickards The Lady Seahawks won 5-1 at Rickards Feb. 21. After Kirvin scored a run in the third, following two Rickards errors, Franklin County added two more in the top of the sixth, spurred by Lees single, and another two in the seventh, on a Mock single and a Newell triple. By David Adlerstein Times City Editor The Franklin County Seahawks varsity baseball team remains winless in its rst four starts, as players work out the kinks in the opening month of play. On Feb. 13 at Wewahitchaka, the team lost 10-0, and then on Feb. 15, Franklin County hosted Arnold and fell 15-2. On Friday at Bozeman, in the rst district game, the team lost a 6-3 outing. On Tuesday at home, Seahawk sophomore hurler James Newell gave up a two-run homer in the top of the rst to Blountstown, and then settled down to give a solid performance, including an instrumental double play that squelched a run coming home and nailed the runner to rst. Junior Seth Rogers drove home junior Skyler Hutchinson as the Seahawks crawled back to tie the game at 2-2. But a strong performance in the nal two stanzas by the Tigers sealed their 8-3 victory. Members of the team, coached by Mike Emerson and assistant Tim Wheeler, also include senior Marcus Dalton, senior Colton Sheridan, senior Austin Larkin, senior Zack Armistead, senior Brennan Walden, junior Zach Howze, senior Chance Buffkin, sophomore Logan McLeod, senior Adrian Hendels, and junior Billy Harris. Lady Seahawks ride back-to-back wins Seahawks remain winless in four starts THE UPCOMING SCHEDULE INCLUDES: Friday, Feb. 24 @ Liberty Saturday. Feb. 25 vs. Florida High Wednesday, Feb. 29 @ John Paul Thursday, March 1 @ Altha Friday, March 2 @ South Walton Tuesday, March 6 @ Blountstown Friday, March 9 vs. South Walton Monday, March 12 @ East Gadsden Tuesday, March 13 @ West Gadsden Wednesday, March 14 vs. John Paul II Monday, March 19 vs. Wewahitchka Tuesday, March 20 vs. Liberty Friday, March 23 vs. Port St. Joe Thursday, March 29 @ Florida High Friday, March 30 @ Port St. Joe Monday, April 2 vs. Altha Tuesday, April 3 vs. Aucilla Christian Tuesday, April 10 vs. Bozeman Friday, April 13 vs. West Gadsden Tuesday, April 17 @ Aucila Christian Thursday, April 19 @ Arnold Senior pinch runner Marcus Dalton scoots back to rst in Tuesdays game vs. Blountstown. PHOTOS BY DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Time s Senior pitchers Zach Armistead, right, and Adrian Hendels, stand in the dugout as sophomore James Newell sits in the back after pitching Tuesday night. Senior Colton Sheridan races to rst after swatting a single.

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Tudor, Tom Brocato, George Coon, Leon Bloodworth, Michael and Catherine Bailey, Robert Lindsley, Susan Buzzett Clementson and the Apalachicola Area Historical Society. The motion argues these Apalachicola citizens should be granted standing to intervene because the merger is not in the publics best interest. Progress through its action has virtually destroyed the life and livelihood of one of the treasured historic sites in Florida. Craig Cano, a spokesman for FERC, said the citizens were able to le the motion to intervene because of a window of opportunity that opened in December. In September 2011, FERC issued an order that conditionally authorized the merger, on the condition Duke and Progress led a mitigation plan to remedy potential harmful effects on competition in the Carolinas. The companies led their plan in October, but FERC rejected it in December, setting the stage for the companies to come back with a counterproposal for mitigating potential anti-competitive practices that might result from the merger in North and South Carolina. The companies since have asked for a rehearing, which is now pending before FERC. There really is not a deadline for them acting, Cano said. He said because the merger proceeding is a little ways down the track, Jacobs motion is considered a request for an out-of-time intervention and thus has a higher hurdle to cross than had it been led during the original comment period. Though declining to speculate how FERC might rule on Jacobs motion, he pointed to FERC rules posted on its website regarding motions for late intervention. These rules say that FERC might consider whether the movants the parties making the motion had good cause for not ling timely and whether their interest is adequately represented by other parties. FERC also must consider any disruption of the proceeding that might result from permitting intervention and whether any prejudice to, or additional burden on, existing parties might result from permitting intervention. According to the website, FERC is more liberal in granting late intervention at the early stages of a proceeding. A petitioner for late intervention, however, bears a higher burden to show good cause for late intervention after the issuance of a nal order in a proceeding and generally it is Commission policy to deny late intervention at the rehearing stage, even when the movant claims that the decision established a broad policy of general application. Jacobs said he has talked with FERC staffers, who were more optimistic about his chances. They havent said that to me, he said. There are other things were working on, he said. Were going at it from different directions. Jacobs said he has been in talks with Florida Sen. Bill Nelson, as well as other senators from Gulf states, to see if BP restoration money funneled to the Gulf might be available. One of those projects would be to assist Apalachicola in protecting the historical district from these people, he said. Progress Energy says they dont have the money to x the problem. Im trying to assist them in nding the money. Jacobs reiterated last week that he intends to ght on until the battle is won. Its not over till its over, and its not over yet, he said. From my perspective and that of people interested in the history of Apalachicola and preservation of that wonderful town, there is a solution. Im in it for the long haul. Were going to do what it takes, Jacobs said. Were going to keep at it; you never know whats going to work. FLY HIGH from page A1 a number of jobs, Lockley said. I want to see a lot of jobs; you know, so many jobs in a number of years. Commissioner Smokey Parrish said, theyre going to come in and train some locals to run it to their standards, but theyre going to be in North Carolina. I dont know how thats going to work. Youre dealing with someone you really dont know. On paper they look very good. Im not comfortable looking at a long-term contract now. Ted Mosteller, chairman of the airport advisory board, said representatives of Fly High were on hand to answer questions. Karel Van Der Linden and his wife, Mari-Elena Baldwin, owners of Fly High, took the podium and were prepared to answer questions elded by the board. Van Der Linden described their experience in the aviation industry. According to their proposal packet, he has 25 years experience in FBO management, fuel, hotels and casinos. He served as vice president nance of cer and corporate controller for Mercury Air Centers from 2000 to 2009, managing 30 FBO locations including ve maintenance facilities. Baldwin has 22 years of travel and tourism industry experience. She is the owner of Island Spice Inc., which represents Renaissance Aruba Resort, Renaissance Curacao Resort and Grand Cayman Beach Suites. She is also a member of the Travelocity advisory board. You can look at our records and see in one year what we achieved in North Carolina, Van Der Linden told commissioners. He said Fly High increased fuel sales at the Lexington Airport by 50 percent over the rst year by using media to market the facility, including building a website for the airport and courting Facebook followers to engage potential customers. He said Fly High has relationships with eets of commercial aircraft that use fuel cards to purchase fuel nationally. He said Fly High has 11 employees in Lexington and hopes to eventually employ the same number here. The Apalachicola airport has the potential to sell as much fuel as Lexington because the airport is well appointed and the area is a tourist destination, he said. He stressed the need for excellent on-ground service to attract pilots. I want to come here myself with one of the senior guys, but everyone else we want to hire here, Van Der Linden said. Fly High began with ve employees in Lexington and at the end of six months, employed 11; Van Der Linden expected to employ at least nine people here. Line employees will earn $8 hourly, managers $12 hourly and mechanics $15 hourly, he said. Baldwin said the company has a policy of hiring pilots, veterans and aviation students. She and her husband said they are committed to being hands-on managers and will spend substantial time in the county. Van Der Linden said Fly High has infrastructure that allows him to manage most problems from anywhere in the world. He answers his phone at night, Baldwin said. Van Der Linden said the FBO station will be open seven days a week, 12 hours a day, but that he would make special arrangements to serve emergency vehicles whenever needed. By Lois Swoboda Times Staff Writer Progress Energys new power poles wont kill you unless they fall on you. They might be seen by locals as ugly and detracting from the towns historical character, but there is scant scienti c evidence to support the idea that cancer is caused by exposure to the Extremely Low Frequency Radiation (ELF) radiating from Progress Energys new transmission lines. A 1976 study rst questioned whether ELF could cause cancer in children. Since then, dozens of studies have sought to determine whether ELF causes physical changes to the human body. Though a few studies gave a weak indication there might be a relationship between cancer and ELF, later researchers have been unable to obtain the same ndings in repeat experiments. In many cases, people exposed to ELF in the workplace also had been exposed to cancercausing chemicals. Where there seemed to be a cluster of cancers around high voltage lines, researchers were cautious in blaming ELF for the illness. In 1986, M.E. McDowell found a spike in lung cancer among women living near power lines in East Anglia, England, but cautioned that without information on tobacco use, his data was difcult to interpret. Another British study that seemed to show a strong relationship between childhood leukemia and exposure to ELF has been criticized because researchers considered the house where the child was born, not the home where the child lived. Adding to the evidence that exposure to ELF is not linked to cancer are ndings that laboratory exposure of animals to ELF did not elevate the rate of cancer, even in a strain of mice genetically predisposed to developing leukemia. The majority of research showed no relationship between any form of cancer and ELF exposure. Louis Heynick, the rst author of Radio Frequency Electromagnetic Fields: Cancer, Mutagenesis and Genotoxicity, a publication of the U.S. government, concluded, The ndings of this review indicate that there is no reproducible scienti cally valid experimental basis for the claims about a linkage between such exposures and the initiation, promotion or coproduction of cancer. Investigation of The Florida Cancer Data System records and the Florida Community Health Assessment Resource Tool Set also shows Franklin County does not have the highest rate of cancer in Florida. That unfortunate honor goes to Union County with 448 cancer deaths per 100,000 people in 2010. Franklin County, with only 170 deaths per 100,000 annually, was just barely higher than the state average of 160. In 2010, Franklin County had a lower rate of cancer deaths than any of the adjacent counties. In 2006, an exceptionally healthy year for Franklin County, the only county in Florida with a lower number of reported cancer cases per capita was Glades. Since 2000, the cancer death rate here has been level, and the overall trend shows a slight decline in cancer deaths. Deaths speci cally because of lung cancer, and the percentage of adults who use tobacco, are both higher in Franklin County than the state average. Studies: Radiation from poles unlikely to cause cancer There are other things were working on. Were going at it from different directions. Im in it for the long haul. Were going to do what it takes. Were going to keep at it; you never know whats going to work. Buddy Jacobs attorney

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Local The Times | A13 Thursday, February 23, 2012 GET YOUR AD IN 653-8868 Trades & Services Laban Bontrager, DMD Monica Bontrager, DMD 12761 Pea Ridge Road Bristol, Florida 32321 TELEPHONE (850) 643-5417 Bristol Dental Clinic DENTURE LAB ON PREMISES Same Day Service on Repairs and Relines Don Lively General Contractors L ICENSED AND I NSURED 20 Y EARS E XPERIENCE P .O. Box 439 C arrabelle, FL 32322 697-2783 or Mobile 566-2603 RC 0066499 R G0065255 Carrabelle Visa, Discover, and American Express Honored at Participating Ace Stores JACKSONS Building Supplies Building Supplies & Auto Repair Carrabelle 697-3333 We Deliver Anywhere Hardware and Paint Center Electrical & Finish Carpentry 850-229-6751 850-227-5666 Michael & Anthony T o n y P o l o r o n i s & S o n s I n c From A to Z PO Box 364 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 850-340-0756 Gregs Handyman Service & Lawn Maintenance NO JOB TOO BIG PLEASE CALL JOE @ 850-670-5478 joes_lawn@yahoo.com JOES LAWN CARE PILE DRIVING FOUN D ATION/PILING R E P AIR DOCK/MARINE WORK MOORING BOUYS OFFICE: 850.227.1709 FAX: 850.762.2552 CELL: 850.527.5725 HOWARD227 F AIRPOINT.NET ROBERTS APPLIANCE REPAIR ALL MAJOR BRANDS 18 Shadow Lane Apalachicola, FL 32320 Phone: (850) 653-8122 Cell: (850) 653-7654 Trades & Services Franklin County Elementary The following is the Honor Roll for Franklin County Elementary Schools second nine-week period. Kindergarten Linda Gibson All As: Monika Bell, William Chipman, Logan Bentley A/B: Joseph Aden Bass. Maryssa Branch, Zoe Cartiia, Marcus Clayton, Dillon Evans, Caitlin King, Tristan Lashley, Rebecca Mahon, Harmony Malone, Aniyah Rivera, Gavin Selley Perfect Attendance: Caitlin King, Rebecca Mahon, Harmony Malone Good Citizenship: Josie Smith, Aniyah Rivera 1st Grade Debbie Childress All As: Emaleigh Segree, Kylie Rudd A/B: Adia Siler, Kaiden Faison, Clarice Harris, Autumn Loesch, Brianna Sanders, Kaylee Segree, Ethan Shirley Good Citizenship: Autumn Loesch, Clarice Harris Katrina Ham All As: Grace Carroll, Dax Chitty, Marissa Gilbert, Ayla Navarro, Parker Mock, Matthew Gordon A/B:, Calayia Jones, Emily Smith, Ariana Tipton, Good Citizenship: Emily Fichera, Ariana Tipton, Leigh Smith All As: Don Davis, Lucy Edwards, TyAsia Yarrell A/B: September Ferrell, Emma Gragg, Daylon Hunnings, Tariah Jones, Ryland Martina, Shalyn Massey, Riley ONeal, Sarai Crumbliss Perfect Attendance: Bryson Carmichael, Don Davis, Ethan Edgecomb, Lucy Edwards, September Ferrell, Tariah Jones, Zach Libby Good Citizenship: Ethan Edgecomb, Tariah Jones Brenda Vause All As: Ellis Billingsley, Kyera Crawford, Jaden Golden, Alondra Jimenez, Jaylan Prince, Luis Ramirez, Evan Stanley A/B: Jessie Alday, Christian Brown, TaShawn Jones, Aubree Swango-Moore, William Wallace Perfect Attendance: Simon Garner, Jaylan Prince Good Citizenship: Jaylan Prince, Montana Woods 2nd Grade Shellie Blackburn All As: Cassandra Gibbens, Jack Robinson, Rachel Rudd, Austin Segree, Maddison Whitten A/B: Ariel Johnson, Michael Melton, Marina ONeal Perfect Attendance: Clayton Kelley, Michael Melton, Saunti Turrell Missy Cumbie All As: Josh Banico, Garrison Cook, Brooklyn ONeal, Kristen Stancil A/B: Gage Boone, Alexis Britcher, Bradley Burch, Cynthia Ceron, Grace Patterson, Mason Ray, Klaun Richards, Rebecca Shiver, Annie Smith, Tate Stanley, Larry Winchester Perfect Attendance: Gage Boone, Alexis Britcher, Cynthia Ceron, Brooklyn ONeal, Klaun Richards, Kristen Stancil, Larry Winchester Good Citizenship: Cynthia Ceron, Mason Ray Jeannie Ford All As: Dylan Grif n, Brantly Richards, Brianna Sutcliffe, Emma Crum, Cameron Nash A/B: Khiya Bell, Ava McAnally, Brendon Polous, Sydney Shuman, Trinity Cassell Perfect Attendance: Dylan Grif n, Mitchell Woods Good Citizenship: Trinity Cassell, Cameron Nash Misty Luberto All As: Kyler Custer A/B: Kiani Allen, Trinity Barron, Sage Brannan, Brianna Cooper, Andrew Kuhner, Gage Norris, Jalynn Segree, Ashton Shaw, Kylie Smith, Jerymiah Stephens, Hayley Creamer, Cadance Woods Good Citizenship: Maliah Topham, Sage Brannan 3rd Grade Marvin Boyd A/B: Layla Chisholm, Camron Evans, Francisco Juan, Stephen Malone, Logan Waller Perfect Attendance: Francisco Juan, Layla Chisholm, Danib Durbin, Stephen Malone, Carson Stusky, Makayla Varner Good Citizenship: Alaina Wilson, Charles Granger Paula Dykes A/B: Marci Kelley, Jarvis Turrell Perfect Attendance: Andrea Cooper, Jarvis Turrell Good Citizenship: Johnny Sullivan, Cailin Kuhner Pam Schaffer All As: Brycin Huckeba, Katie Newman, Clinton Rester A/B: Ethan Anderson, Arryonna Cargill, Tressie Edwards, Hollie Larkin, Destanie Proctor, Eli Whaley Perfect Attendance: Cole Shelley Good Citizenship: Krystina Arroyo, Charlee Winchester Lois Shirley All As: Austin Gray, Shirah Pely, Madalyn Topham A/B: Christian Mann, Anthony Millender, Jordan Millender, Landon Millender, Sean Nichols, Brooklyn Turner Perfect Attendance: Austin Gray, Anthony Millender, Breauna Shiver, Justin Worten Good Citizenship: Blake Chastain, Ashaureah Brown 4th Grade Donna Barber All As: Cale Barber, Caleb Sutten eld A/B: Chasity Ard, Isaiah Barber, Tommy Gragg, Darcy Kelly, Abner Ramirez, Kayla Souders Perfect Attendance: Chasity Ard, Cale Barber, Isaiah Barber, Alex Hardy, Darcy Kelly, Abner Ramirez Good Citizenship: Brandon Farr, Honesti Williams Lynn Clark All As: Kynsie Erickson, Jace Faircloth A/B: Dyna Edgecomb, MeiLi Chambers, Nicholas Hutchins, Morgan Malone, Jason White Perfect Attendance: Allyson Emswiller, Jonathan Lewis, Morgan Malone, Kaytlin Marriot, Good Citizenship: Morgan Malone Gretchen Hedman All As: Takiah Ford A/B: Drake Stanley, Lane Roberson, Aelyah Roberson, Mikel Register, Jesse Ray, Rosie Davis, Teri Messer Perfect Attendance: Hunter Anderson, Jesse Ray, Rosie Davis, Takiah Ford Good Citizenship: Drake Stanley, Tommy Varner Laura King All As: KT Nessly, Chloe Owens, Jacob Shirley A/B: Peyton Chitty, Kaleb Foley, Zander McCalpin, Keondre Sewell, Shelby Thompson, Freedom Wilson Perfect Attendance: Kaleb Foley, Zander McCalpin, KT Nessly, Keondre Sewell, Jacob Stanley Good Citizenship: Jacob Shirley, Chloe Owens 5th Grade Cathy Creamer All As: Mikalin Huckeba A/B: Kiana Foley Perfect Attendance: Kiana Foley Good Citizenship: Brooke Newell, Mikalin Huckeba Audrey Gay All As: Hannah Hogan, Casey Riley, Ethan Riley, Tonner Segree, Beyla Walker A/B: Colby Boatwright, Aracely Gallegos, Jonathan Ham, Tanaya Harris, Mitchell Monroe, Duncan Whaley Perfect Attendance: Benjamin Juarez, Thomas Juan Good Citizenship: Aracely Gallegos, Casey Riley Melanie Humble All As: Jessica Rudd A/B: Edgar Ceron, Fisher Edwards, Hunter Kelley, Jackson Mahon Perfect Attendance: Lorenzo ONeal Good Citizenship: Jessica Rudd, Brittani Bouzemann HONOR ROLL Prescribed burn this week on the island Over the past few months plans have been made between the Florida Forest Service and the Florida Department of Environmental Protection (owners of the undeveloped property in Unit 4) to work cooperatively using prescribed re to reduce wild re risk on the DEP property bordering East Pine Ave. from the bridge to 11th St. E. on St George Island. Burning this area is scheduled to occur during the week of Feb. 17 to 29. If you suffer from lung or breathing issues it is strongly recommended you avoid this area of the island or plan to leave the island on the days when burning is being done. This project is performed by trained and quali ed professionals from our agencies and will signi cantly reduce the wild re risk to those living in Unit 4. Prescribed res are only conducted when weather parameters are suitable. The nal decision to burn is made daily, after reviewing the Predicted Fire Weather forecast for that particular day. Prescribed burning mimics natural re cycles to restore healthy forests and natural communities, and reduce undergrowth that accumulates over time, thereby increasing the potential for wild re. Burned lands experience an increase in native wild owers, birds and other wildlife. We appreciate your patience during this week as we ask you to tolerate a little smoke now so we can prevent the smoke a wild re would produce later. Further questions should be addressed to Todd W. Schroeder, wild re mitigation specialist, Florida Forest Service, 519-0666 or Lee Edmiston, manager, Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve, 670-7721. Camp Gordon Johnston honors black history On Saturday Feb. 25, a special showing of The Werth Eleven will be presented in the movie theatre at the Camp Gordon Johnston World War II Museum, located in the Carrabelle Municipal Complex. The docudrama will have two showings: 1100 and 1300 hours (11 a.m.. and 1 p.m..) Admission is by donation and there will be free popcorn. During the war, 1.2 million African-Americans served in the armed forces. Fully 125,000 served overseas; 708 were killed. Among those were The Werth Eleven. Their story was lost to history, until now. The Werth Eleven is an ambitious docudrama based on the true story of 11 Africa-American soldiers who were ruthlessly murdered by the Nazi SS during the Battle of the Bulge. The lm weaves exciting visual effects, never before seen archival footage, and compelling interviews to detail one of the least-known atrocities committed during the war. Featured as The G.I. Film of the Year it is notable that the soldier/actors are present-day active duty soldiers serving in Germany. Because of the violence depicted in this docudrama it is recommended for viewing by adults only. News BRIEFS

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A14| The Times Thursday, February 23, 2012 CLASSIFIEDS ToPlace Your Classified ad inCall Our New Numbers Now!Call:850-747-5020 Toll Free:800-345-8688 Fax:850-747-5044 Email:thestar@pcnh.com Email:thetimes@pcnh.com theAPALACHICOLA & CARRABELLETIMES CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW 77331 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 19-2011-CA-000302 BRANCH BANKING AND TRUST COMPANY, Plaintiff, vs. NANCY REYNOLDS BRUCKER, et al., Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION TO: NANCY REYNOLDS BRUCKER AND UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF NANCY REYNOLDS BRUCKER if alive, and/or dead his (their) unknown heirs, devisees, legatees or grantees and all persons or parties claiming by, through, under or against him (them). Residence is unknown. YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an Action for foreclosure of a mortgage on the following property in FRANKLIN County, Florida: LOT 2, BAY PALM VILLAGE, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, AT PAGE 33, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, LEE, AND EXCEPT ANY PART OF SAID LAND LYING WITHIN THE EASEMENT AS SHOWN ON SAID PLAT. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on SPEAR AND HOFFMAN, P.A., Attorneys, whose address is 9700 South Dixie Highway, Suite 610, Miami, Florida 33156, (305) 6702299, within 30 days after the first publication of this notice, and to file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on SPEAR AND HOFFMAN, P.A., attorneys or immediately thereafter, otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint or Petition. WITNESS my hand and seal of this Court on this 18th day of November, 2011. Marcia M. Johnson As Clerk of the Court By: Terry E. Creamer As Deputy Clerk February 16, 23, 2012 76594T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO: 10-000275-CA NAVY FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, Plaintiff, vs. DEREK COFFMAN A/K/A DEREK G COFFMAN; KIMBERLY COFFMAN A/K/A KIMBERLY W. COFFMAN; SANDS OF CARRABELLE HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC.; UNKNOWN TENANT #1;’UNKNOWN TENANT #2, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE is hereby given that the a dersigned Clerk of the Circuit Court of Franklin County, Florida, will on the 21st day of March, 2012, at 11:00 o’clock A.M at the Front steps of the Franklin County Courthouse in Apalachicola Florida, offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash, the following-described property situate in Franklin County, Florida: LOT 5, BLOCK 71, THE SANDS OF CARRABELLE, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 8, PAGE 12, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA pursuant to the Final Judgment entered in a case pending in said Court, the style of which is indicated above. Any person or entity claiming an interest in the surplus, if any, resulting from the foreclosure sale, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a claim on same with the Clerk of Court within 60 days after the foreclosure sale. WITNESS my hand and official seal of said Court this 2nd day of February, 2012. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Clerk of the Court, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, FL 32320 or call (850) 653-8861, within 2 working days of your receipt of this Notice. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call 1-850-653-2227. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By: Terry Creamer Deputy Clerk ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF: Mark William Hernandez Butler & Hosch, P.A. 3185 S. Conway Rd., Ste. E Orlando, Florida 32812 (407) 381-5200 Feb 23, Mar 1, 2012 76925T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY CASE NO.: 2011-11-CA CENTENNIAL BANK as successor in interest to APALACHICOLA STATE BANK, a division of COASTAL COMMUNITY BANK, Plaintiff, vs. COASTLINE PROPERTIES OF NORTH FLORIDA, LLC, et al, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Summary Judgment of Foreclosure as to Count 1, dated January 24, 2012, in the abovestyled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at 11:00 a.m. Eastern Time) on March 14, 2012, at the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida, the following described real property located in Franklin County, Florida: EXHIBIT “A” ATTACHED HERE TO AND MADE A PART HEREOF. COMMENCE AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED “BCC”) MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 13, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND PROCEED NORTH ALONG THE WEST BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION 13, A DISTANCE OF 1,828.93 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED “BCC”), THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 22 SECONDS EAST 2,199.40 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED “BCC”) THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 36 SECONDS EAST 375.00 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #4261) MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING, FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING THENCE RUN NORTH 53 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 635.92 FEET, MORE OR LESS TO THE RIVERS EDGE OF NEW RIVER THENCE RUN NORTH 39 DEGREES 42 MINUTES 11 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIVERS EDGE 124.87 FEET, MORE OR LESS, THENCE RUN SOUTH 57 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 24 SECONDS EAST 511.04 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (RLS #4261), THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 36 SECONDS EAST 200.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SAID LANDS LYING AND BEING SITUATE IN SECTION 13, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH A NON-EXCLUSIVE EASEMENT FOR INGRESS AND EGRESS AS DESCRIBED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 269, PAGE 243, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 25th day of January, 2012. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of Court Franklin County, FL By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk NOTICE TO PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Danny Davis, Court Technology Office, Office of Court Administration, 301 S. Monroe St. Rm 225, Tallahassee, FL 32303, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving notification if the time before for scheduled appearance is less than 7 days, if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. February, 16, 23, 2012 77319T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 11-CA-000183 FARMERS AND MERCHANTS BANK, Plaintiff, vs. MARSHALL C. KNIGHT, JR., ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT (S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES OR OTHER CLAIMANTS, Defendants. CLERK’S NOTICE OF SALE UNDER F.S. CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated January 30, 2012 in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Franklin County Courthouse, 2nd Floor Lobby, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL at 11:00 a.m. on March 21, 2012, the following described property: Lot 11, Shell Harbour, according to the map or plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 4, Pages 25 and 26, Public Records of Franklin County, Florida ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. DATED this 31st day of January, 2012. Marcia M. Johnson CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT By: Michelle Maxwell Deputy Clerk February 16, 23, 2012 77010T NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE Under Florida Statutes “Self Service Storage Facility” Act 83.801-83.809, Bluff Road Storage will sell for cash, to the highest bidder, the contents of the following storage units, on Friday, March 2, 2012. The public sale will be conducted at Bluff Road Storage, 1005 Bluff Road, Apalachicola, Florida at 9:00 a.m. Owner may redeem unit contents prior to sale date and time, cash only! Bluff Road Storage reserves the right to bid. STORAGE UNIT# 26 Don Snyder Contents-Household STORAGE UNIT #34 Bobby Creamer Contents-Household STORAGE UNIT #96 Bill Shirah Contents-Household STORAGE UNIT #125 Larry Cummings Contents-Household Feb 23, Mar 1, 2012 77421T NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED BIDS Franklin County is seeking proposals from qualified mechanical contractors to replace a Carrier condensing unit that serves the Franklin County Courthouse Annex Building located at 34 Forbes Street in Apalachicola, Florida. Proposals shall include all costs for labor, equipment, materials, warranties and sub-contractors necessary for the replacement of the required equipment. The condensing unit to be replaced is a Carrier 40-ton Model 38AH-044-600BA. The condensing unit must be re-integrated with the building controls and set up to operate with the existing VAV system. The proposing contractor is responsible for ordering all options and accessories with the unit to provide a completely operational system. System must be a Carrier 40-Ton Model 38AH-044-600BA or an equivalent system. If an equivalent system is proposed the contractor must provide rating data for the proposed system and specify any accessories that would be necessary to make the system work, such as TXVs refrigerant line sizing, etc. The project is located in a harsh environment adjacent to saltwater. The unit must be provided with copper coils and fins with an epoxy coating applied to the entire coil assembly to protect from corrosion and provide a 5-year manufacturer’s warranty on materials and workmanship for the condensing unit, as well as, factory start up and one year parts and labor warranties from the contractor. The proposing contractor is responsible for the removal and disposal of the unit to be replaced. The two compressors on the unit will be removed by the contractor and given to Franklin County for storage. Disposal of the existing unit and refrigerant shall be compliant with all EPA and local codes, rules, and ordinances. Bids should in a sealed envelope and be clearly marked “Courthouse Annex Condenser”. Bids will be received until 4:30 p.m. (EST), on Monday, March 5, 2012, at the Franklin County Clerk’s Office, Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, Florida 32320-2317, and will be opened and read aloud on Tuesday, March 6, 2012, at the regularly scheduled County Commission meeting which begins at 9:00 a.m. at 34 Forbes Street, Apalachicola, Florida. The Board of County Commissioners reserves the right to waive informalities in any bid, to accept and/or reject any or all bids, and to accept the bid that in their judgment will be in the best interest of Franklin County. Any questions should be directed to Mark Curenton at 850653-9783 x-160. February 16, 23, 2012 77433T NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW PURSUANT TO SECTION 865.09, FLORIDA STATUTES NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of The Moorings at Carrabelle located at 1000 US Hwy 98, Carrabelle, FL in the County of FRANKLIN, in the City of Carrabelle, Florida intends to register the said name with the Divisions of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, Florida. Dated at Carrabelle Florida, this 31st day of January, 2012. REDUS Moorabelle, LLC February 23, 2012 Incorrect Insertion PolicyFor Classified In-column AdvertisersAll ads placed by phone are read back to the advertiser to insure correctness. The newspaper will assume correctness at the time of the read-back procedure unless otherwise informed. Please your ad. Advertisers are requested to check the advertisement on the first insertion for correctness. Errors should be reported immediately. Your Florida Freedom newspaper will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion, nor will it be liable for any error in advertisements to a greater extent than the cost of the space occupied by the error. Any copy change, during an ordered schedule constitutes a new ad and new charges. We do not guarantee position of ANY ad under any classification.

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, February 23, 2012 The Times | A15 AUCTION! 800.257.4161higgenbotham.comM.E. Higgenbotham, CAI, FL Lic.# AU305 AB158 James Lee Owen, Jr., GA BR#341775, H63426, AU0037441 Industrial Way, Grantville, GA High Volume Water Well & Historic Mill 1706 Hwy 98, Carrabelle, FL !!"$%'"$()*!% +-/:%;)< +;;=>?@%D -/:!'K'%NP%!Q/%S T;;'X%K"Y%X% Z$!:$()*!%$% 3 Bank Owned Properties In cooperation with RowellAuctions.com ONLINE ONLY Rowell Realty & Auction Co., Inc.800-323-8388 10% Buyers Premium AU 479, AB 2962% Broker ParticipationLot, James Bay Subd., Carrabelle, FL 4 Lots, Whispering Pines Subd., Eastpoint, FLBidding Ends March 6th at 3 p.m. EST 63 Bank Foreclosed Properties in North FLMany Selling Absolute! 2078232 $37,000 5 Acres near Crystal Lake on Amos Hayes Rd, property has well septic and power pole. Current survey is available. About 1.5 acres of the property is cleared. 850-271-5761 and leave a message. Total Down Pmt $6752002 Ford Focus T otal Price $5,5000% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!!Text FL98443 to 56654 Total Down Pmt $9752001 Ford Expedition -3 Rows T otal Price $5,8000% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!!Text FL98447 to 56654 Total Down Pmt $5752001 Chevy Blazer 4 Door T otal Price $4,2000% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!!Text FL98441 to 56654 Total Down Pmt $25002004 Chevy Silverdao X/Cab T otal Price $8,7000% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!!Text FL98450 to 56654 Total Down Pmt $12752001 Chevy Silverdao X/Cab T otal Price $6,8000% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!!Text FL98450 to 56654 ‘97 Buell S3 Thunderbolt Motorcycle, Harley Davidson Motor, runs great and garage kept, 17,000 miles. $3,500!! Call 850-271-5761 and leave a message. 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322850-697-9604 850-323-0444 www.seacrestre.comwww. rst tness.com/carrabellePROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND RENTALSRENTALS1 BR RIVER CONDO, BOAT SLIP3 Night Minimum .......................$105 PLUS DAILY3 BR 1 BA FURNISHED HOUSEMonthly Rate, Carrabelle ................................$8501 BR 1 BA UNFURNISHED APTLanark, Remodeled, Includes Water ...............$4752 BR 1 BA UNFURNISHED APTLanark ............................................................$4501 BR, SUN ROOM/DAYBEDFurnished, Lanark ..........................................$4503 BR 2 BA FURNISHED HOMEOn River, Boat Dock & Lift ............................$10002 BR 1 BA FURNISHED HOUSEOn Bay ..........................................................$10003 BR 3 BA FURNISHED CONDODowntown, 3 Night Minimum ....$105 PLUS DAILYOFFICE SPACE HWY 98 Frontage, Carrabelle ....$550 Plus Utilities St. George Island $160 week, Electric, Satellite, Garbage incl. Pool tble. 12’ X 65’ deck w/Beautiful view 850-653-5114 St. George Island 2Br, 1Ba, Ground floor, Satellite. 12’ x 50’ Deck. Only $250 per week. Call: 850-653-5114 Lanark Village Carlton St. #5, 1 Br 1 Ba, All Tile, Walk-in Closet, Landlord pays Electric and Water, $525 month + $300 deposit. Call 850-927-2838 or 864-356-5949 Lanark Village Parker St., 2 Br 1 Ba, All Tile, $525 month + $300 deposit. Please Call 850-927-2838 or 864-356-5949 1 or 3 BRCH/A in Apalachicola, FL. 850-643-7740. Eastpointe-Carrabelle 1bd, 800sf, $350 bi-weekly, (or $685/mo) includes: all utilities, elec, water, Sat TV, W/D, stone FP, & central AC. Secluded, 1/2 mile from beach. 6 mo lease. 1st & security. 954-816-7004 Text FL94643 to 56654 Magnolia Bluff Bayfront Sunset view. Spacious 3 br, 2.5 bath, large family room, screened deck. All appliances including W/D, water & trash paid $1300 + dep call 877-963-4321 orsunsetplaceinfo@gmail.comText FL97262 to 56654 12x60 2 br, 1 ba, Mobile Home at 555 Oyster Rd, $450 mo, $250 dep. Available March 1, (850) 640-0759 or (850) 257-6214 1 BR/1BA unfurnished apartment, downtown Apalach. Balcony, water, satellite, wireless included. $650 plus electric 653-8801 Lanark Village: Clean 2 bedroom, 1 bath, screened porch, AC Long term lease: 7 months min. $500 monthly + $350. security deposit, references required or wkly & wkend rental w/deposit Pets-will consider. Non smoking. 850-212-2063 Text FL95716 to 56654 Publisher’s NoticeAll real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on a equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. Southern V illas of Apalachicola Apartments Now accepting applications for 2br Handicap accessible unit. Some rental assistance may be available. Call 850-653-9277 TDD/TTY 711. This institution is an equal opportunity provider, and employer. Medical/HealthWeems MemorialIs now hiring for the following positions: Dietary Aide Paramedic Lab Technician EMT RN Housekeeping Registration Applications are available atwww weemsmemorial.com and may be submitted to Ginny Griner, WMH HR Director, ggriner@ weemsmemorial.com or FAXED to 850-653-1879 Web ID 34197890 AIRLINES ARE HIRING – Train for hands-on Aviation Career. FAA Approved Program. Financial Aid if qualified. Job Placement Assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance. 877-206-9405 ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE. *Medical *Business *Hospitality. Job Placement Assistance. Computer available. Financial aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 866-467-0054. wwwCenturaOnline.com Apalach RestaurantFull Service turn key restaurant. Excellent downtown location Lease. Call for information 850-653-8801 See emeraldcoastjobs.com to nd a job at the intersection of both.Wouldn’t you like a job that ful lls you both professionally and personally? With Monster’s new ltering tools, you can quickly hone in on the job that’s right for you. So visit emeraldcoastjobs.com and nd a job that makes everybody happy. Rental RerservationistFickling Vacation Rentals is looking for an experienced rental reservationist, F/T or P/T. Must have good customer service and computer skills. Pick up application at Fickling of ce on Island. Annual Boy Scout Yard Sale C H I L I C O O K O F F CHILI COOK-OFF W E E K E N D WEEKEND a t S u n C o a s t R e a l t y at Sun Coast Realty 2 2 4 F r a n k l i n B l v d 224 Franklin Blvd o n S t G e o r g e I s l a n d on St George Island M A R C H 5 T H & 6 T H MARCH 5TH & 6TH Y o u c a n d o n a t e u n w a n t e d i t e m s You can donate unwanted items a n d l e a v e w i t h and leave with N E W NEW t r e a s u r e s treasures S u p p o r t L o c a l C o E d Support Local Co-Ed S c o u t i n g & S a i l i n g P r o g r a m s Scouting & Sailing Programs M a r c h 5 t h & 6 t h March 5th & 6th C a l l ( 8 5 0 ) 9 2 7 2 3 9 5 Call (850)927-2395 f o r m o r e i n f o for more infoBack By Popular DemandCome on by and visit us! Food Svs/HospitalityPapa Joe’s Oyster Bar & GrillNow HiringAll Positions!!! Apply in person only GeneralSeasonal EmployeeNeeded for an Eco Tourism Company on St George Island. Must be outgoing and organized. Call Journeys (850) 927-3259 between 10am-4pm Web ID#: 34197637 Logistics/TransportNow HiringRetail help needed. Commission based with flexible schedule, part time. Shipwright Wood Boat builder with experience, Part time. USCG Captain, Part tine, with 100 ton license. Call (850) 320-0843 ask for Daniel Web ID#: 34197868 Administrative/ClericalImmediate OpeningReceptionist/ Front DeskSeeking fast learner with good customer service skills for Real Estate office on St. George Island. Candidate must be reliable, motivated, and a team player. Computer skills a must and weekend work required. Experience a plus. Send resume to Century 21 Collins Realty P.O. Box 589 Eastpoint, FL 32328 or Fax to 850-927-2360 or e-mail sales@century21collinsrealty.com Web ID#: 34198491 Food Svs/Hospitality*Servers *Cooks Dishwashers *Bartenders *BussersBLUE PARROT Now HIRINGPlease apply in person between 9a-5pm 7 days a week@ Blue Parrot St. George’s Island Food Svs/HospitalityCookPart time full service cook, drug free environment, Letter, resume or list of previous experience to P.O. Box 405 Eastpoint, Fl 32328 Food Svs/HospitalityWanted!!!Part time Night Auditor/Front Desk Must be dependable, have phone and own transport. Bookkeeping experience a plus. Apply in person at Gibson Inn team. 51 Avenue C Install/Maint/RepairHousekeepersNeeded*Full or part time positions available *Must be able to work weekends. *Have own transportation *Some experience preferred. *Must be able to work under pressure *Must be able to work well with others. *Pay will be based upon experience. Apply in person at the Buccaneer Inn on St. George Island between the hours of 9am to 4pm Monday through Friday. Background check will be performed. Mexico Beach 42nd St. February 25. 9:00 Eastern/ 8:00 Central.3-FAMILY SUPER SALECleaned out stuff, some antiques, formals, furniture, toys, kitchen, John Perry Sculptures, art. Great prices! Text FL98421 to 56654 GUN SHOWSanta Rosa County Auditorium, Milton, FL Feb 25th & 26th 9am -5pm call (850) 957-4952 or (850) 261-8407 General Admission $6 DIABETIC TEST STRIPS NEEDEDCall Bob (850)710-0189 Labra-Gold Retriever Puppies, 6 wks old, vet ckd, vacs & wormed. Both parents Registered. Father is a Lab, Mom is a Golden, Beautiful and loveable. $250. 850-227-2185 Text FL97782 to 56654 Miniature Yorkie $75.00 to a good family. Please call (850) 773-2776.Text FL97678 to 56654 Adorable YORKIE AKCpuppies, only 2 left. 1 female and 1 Male. They are 9 weeks old, have been Health Certified and 1st shots. $600 Call 850-554-0320 Panama City In-Home Services Do you or your loved ones need in-home services? Are you worried that you or your loved one is in danger of nursing home placement?WE CAN HELP...Wakulla County Senior Citizen Center is providing services in Franklin County. Based on your assessed needs we can provide case management, light homemaking, personal care, home delivered meals, companionship, emergency alert response systems, consumable/durable medical supplies, pest control, and respite (available to those with full-time care givers). All applicants will be screened and priority will be given to those having the greatest assessed need. Others will be placed on a waiting list for services. Please call 1-800-963-5337 and get the help that you need to stay in your home as long as possible. We also offer congregate meals, activities and health support at the Franklin County Senior Services of Carrabelle. Located at 302 Ave. F West in Carrabelle or call Gayle Mathes at 850-697-2371.Text FL96704 to 56654 Th ese tiny ads sell, hire, rent an d in f orm f or thousan d s o f f amilies each wee k .Let a little Classi f ie d a d d o a big j ob f or you. Em erald Co ast M ar k et p la c e 7 4 7-5020

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Local A16 | The Times Thursday, February 23, 2012 Our local real estate experts have identied what they feel are the best values around and are oering them to you in Real Estate Picks! (In this section), Discover the best real estate values in Mexico Beach, Port St. Joe, Apalachicola, Cape San Blas, St. George Island, Carrabelle and surrounding areas. Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Real Estate Picks Barbara & Larry Iman 850-323-1555 REALTORS barbara.iman@gmail.com MLS#244206 $777,777 St. George Island ST. GEORGE GULF FRONT Seller nancing available for gulf front home on East End of SGI with gorgeous gulf and beach views. Outstanding rental, grossing almost $100k in 2011. Sold furnished with 3 BR/2.5BA. Barbara & Larry Iman 850-323-1555 Barbara & Larry Iman Barbara & Larry Iman 850-323-1555 REALTORS barbara.iman@gmail.com MLS#243810 $144,900 Apalachicola Barbara & Larry Iman 850-323-1555 Barbara & Larry Iman CHARMING 2-STORY CONDO Beautifully maintained 3BR/2.5 BA plus bonus room. Wood & tile throughout. All appliances stay; new refrig.; new paint in 2010; built in 2005. Move in ready! Barbara & Larry Iman 850-323-1555 REALTORS barbara.iman@gmail.com MLS#246018 $30,000 Eastpoint MAGNOLIA BAY PRIVACY Beautiful wooded 1 acre building site in high end Magnolia Bay subdivision, facing sunsets over sparkling Magnolia Bay. Located across street from Bay with gated security, community pool/tennis courts and bay front gazebo/boat ramp. Bank-owned. Barbara & Larry Iman 850-323-1555 Barbara & Larry Iman Barbara & Larry Iman John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.com MLS#245369 $1,050,000 St. George Island PLANTATION BEACHFRONT 5 BR, 5 BA home across the street from the new Plantation John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.com MLS#245232 $89,900 St. George Island HIGH & DRY 3 RD TIER LOT Located on the north side of Gulf Beach Drive and only two lots from the corner for easy beach access on 11th Street. Scrub Oaks line the road side of this lot creating privacy, but offers an open expanse of high sandy ground. Excellent building site. The 16th annual Forgotten Coast Chef Sampler, the Apalachicola Bay Chamber of Commerces largest annual fundraiser, proved to be another success, Feb. 12 at the Armory. The buzz was all about the Sports Illustrated Swimsuit edition, set to hit the newsstand two days later. Taking part in the affair, and their offerings, were: Apalachicola Seafood Grill: Tacos with grouper, shrimp and scallops Blue Parrot Oceanfront Caf: Fish tacos Boss Oyster: Grilled oyster tacos, and red beans and rice Caf con Leche: Five different cakes and pastries. Carolines Dining on the River: Cheddar grits, and blackened red sh with lemon burre blanco sauce Christines Cuisine: Tiramisu, and fruits de mer pasta with cream sauce Crooked River Grill: Arepa with craw sh dip and tomato Eddy Teachs Raw Bar: Half-shell oysters with pirates or ladies cocktail sauce, and smoked mullet dip Owl Caf and The Tap Room: Pulled pork BBQ, Viennese chocolate triangle, tupelo honey and pecan baklava, gluten free lemon cookies, napoleon and key lime dessert Red Top Caf: Sweet and hot chicken wings and peach cobbler Sunset Coastal Grill: Salmon ceviche salmon, stuffed mushrooms and tiramisu Tamaras Caf Floridita: Grits bar, with sausage, cheese and other assorted toppings Thats A Moray: Crme puffs, puffs with lemon curd and sugar cookies Up the Creek: Pasta with crme sauce and alligator meat balls, and sweet potato donuts By David Adlerstein DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times Apalachicola Bay Chamber of Commerce Director Anita Grove peers up at a giant overhead projection of Sports Illustrated Swimsuit edition cover girl Kate Upton, at a Feb. 16 party at the Gibson Inn celebrating Apalachicolas participation in the project. The community had a chance to view photos of the Oct. 2011 photo shoot, and enjoy online videos that the magazine is touting about Apalachicola. Upton is shown with the Lady Louise shrimp boat at right. Chef Sampler a hit ON THE BIG SCREEN PHOTOS BY DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times Carolines Candice Lewicki spoons up cheddar grits to Gulf Coast State College President Dr. Jim Kerley. Above: Jessica Fofonov, left and Jason Ritchie, both sous shefs at the Sunset Coastal Grill, enjoy serving patrons at the Chef Sampler. Left: Serving up offerings from the Crooked River Grill are, from left, Cari Langston, Rita Strickland and Nola Tolbert.



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xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx 50 WWW.APALACHTIMES.COMPhone: 850-653-8868 Web: apalachtimes.com E-mail: dadlerstein@star .com Fax: 850-653-8036 Circulation: 800-345-8688 DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK: School News & Society: 11 a.m. Friday Real Estate Ads: 11 a.m. Thursday Legal Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Display Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Line Ads: 5 p.m. Monday xxxxx Contact Us xxxxx Out to see Index Thursday, February 23, 2012 VOL. 126 ISSUE 43 By Lois SwobodaTimes Staff Writer A new fuel vendor is scheduled to take over as xed base operator at Apalachicola Regional Airport on May 1, but the length of the contract remains up in the air. On Tuesday morning, the county commission voted 3-1 to award the contract to Fly High of Lexington, N.C. Commissioner Noah Lockley voted no, and Bevin Putnal was absent. The commission directed County Attorney Michael Shuler to enter into negotiations with Fly High. The airport advisory board approved recommending Fly High after reviewing four bids at their meeting last month, one of which was from Apalachicola International Airport Training Center, the current FBO. AIATC since has taken steps to dispute the advisory boards recommendation. Shuler said AIATC attorney Joe Silva sent a letter demanding that the county engage in good faith negotiations to extend the lease by an additional 10-year period. Shuler told commissioners he did not believe AIATC had a right to extend the lease under the current contract without the commissions mutual approval. He said their lease, which commissioners extended by three months in February to allow an easy transition to any new FBO, is set to end May 1. Commissioners expressed concern about granting a 20-year extended contract to Fly High. One way to be sure you get jobs is to have a shorter term contract, County Planner Alan Pierce said. He pointed out that a new FBO would take over an existing facility, so less money and time would be required to set up operations. What I really want to see is Church school transformed into senior centerBy David AdlersteinTimes City Editor Speaking before a backdrop of sparkling stucco and brightly painted doors, Apalachicola Mayor Van Johnson ended more than three years of anticipation as he dedicated the citys newest addition, a former Catholic church and school now renovated into a multifaceted senior citizen center and cultural hub. Wielding a giant pair of decorative cardboard shears in one hand, and a workable pair of scissors in the other, Johnson snipped the red ribbon that spanned the length of the renovated 84-year-old building at 203 Seventh St. The collaborations and hard work has paid off, and today the residents of Apalachicola can realize and celebrate a new beginning, Johnson said. For decades, this 80-yearold Spanish-style structure has served as a beacon of light, both as a learning facility and as a house of worship to the local African-American community. Today it gives me great pleasure to dedicate 3 ounces of cocaine seized in traf c stopBy David AdlersteinTimes City Editor Three area residents have been charged with drug crimes after a traf c stop in Apalachicola last week led to the discovery of 87 grams, or a little more than three ounces, of cocaine. According to a release from the Franklin County Sheriffs Of ce, deputies conducted a traf c stop Feb. 13 on U.S. 98, just east of Apalachicola. The driver of the vehicle, Jessica M. Wallace, 22, of Eastpoint, who later would be charged with one count of eeing or eluding a law enforcement of cer with lights and siren active, consented to the search of the vehicle after a brief conversation, according to the sheriffs of ce. While exiting the vehicle, deputies Anti-pole activists broaden their strategyAttorney: Its not over till its over, and its not over yetBy David AdlersteinTimes City Editor With unfavorable odds authorities will block a merger between Duke Energy and Progress Energy, activists working to reroute the large transmission lines around downtown Apalachicola have more than one ace up their sleeve. That (blocking the merger) is just one of the avenues that were trying to utilize to x the problem, said Fernandina Beach attorney Arthur Buddy Jacobs. I am very, very optimistic and have expended a lot of energy and time, and I will continue to do so until we nd a solution. Jacobs is hoping the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission will grant standing to the group of Apalachicola residents who Fly High new airport operator Johnson ended more than three years of anticipation as he dedicated the citys newest addition, a former Catholic church and school now renovated into a multifaceted senior citizen center and culSpeaking before a backdrop of ed doors, Apalachicola Mayor Van Johnson ended more than three Johnson ended more than three cated the citys newest addition, OMARSHAREK HARRIS JESSICA WALLACE RASHON A. BAHAMMOU BUDDY JACOBS Photos by DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The TimesEnjoying a moment at the reception after the dedication are, from left, Annette Fagan, Brenda Ash and Marian Long. Below, from top, accepting the honor Saturday night of adding the late Charles Watson Clark to the panel of distinguished black leaders from Apalachicola is his niece, Marcia Thomas. Flanked by city of cials, Apalachicola Mayor Van Johnson speaks at the Holy Family dedication. Apalachicola businessman Curt Blair was honored at Saturdays Legends Ball for his creation of a panel display of distinguished local black citizens for the Holy Family Center. Holy Family rebornCHURCH SCHOOL HAS NEW BEGINNINGSee COCAINE A2 See FLY HIGH A12 See ACTIVISTS A12 See HOLY FAMILY A2Opinion . . . . . . A4 Society . . . . . . A8 Faith . . . . . . . A9 Outdoors . . . . . A10 Tide Chart . . . . A10 Sports . . . . . . A11 Classi eds . . . A14-A15INSIDEWillie Speed exempli ed the Greatest GenerationA6 Celebrating black history, A5 ABC School Carnival Friday From 3-7 p.m. Friday, everyone is invited to the ABC School Carnival at the former Chapman Elementary School in Apalachicola. Games and food for all ages, with proceeds supporting students and teachers in the classroom. There will be a mechanical bull, dunking booth, giant obstacle course, maze, bounce houses and more. Tickets for children are $8 and include a carnival T-shirt while supplies last. Adults and kids 3 and under are free. Tickets on sale at ABC School and at the gate. For more info, call 670-1151 or 653-1222. Dixie offers My Noble Destiny The Dixie Theatre will host the world premiere this weekend of My Noble Destiny, a one-woman show on the life of Marie Curie, written and performed by Beth Blair. Performances are at 8 p.m. Saturday and 3 p.m. Sunday. Performances for area students are at 10:30 a.m. today and Friday and are open to the public. Tickets are $20, and student tickets are $10. For more info, visit www.dixietheatre.com or call 653-3200. Museum to screen docudrama Saturday At 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. Saturday, a special showing of The Werth Eleven will be presented in the movie theater at the Camp Gordon Johnston World War II Museum. Admission is by donation, and there will be popcorn. The Werth Eleven is a docudrama based on the true story of 11 black soldiers ruthlessly murdered by the Nazi SS during the Battle of the Bulge. For more info, call 697-8575. Get ready for the St. George chili cook-off The 30th annual St. George Island Regional Chili Cook-Off & Auction will be 9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. March 3 in the center of the island. Sanctioned by the International Chili Society, more than 60 contestants square off, with the winner advancing to the world championship. All proceeds bene t the Island Volunteer Fire Department and First Responder Unit. Call 9272753 for more information.

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LocalA2 | The Times Thursday, February 23, 2012this building and grounds anew, as a center where our seniors can gather and a venue where the community can hold functions and a place where local African-American history, culture and art can be gathered and displayed. I would like to offer a simple prayer that this building will forever serve as a symbol of collaboration, where a community came together to create a place for all to use and enjoy, he said. Surrounded by several seniors who grew up under the sometimes stern, always loving guidance of the Catholic nuns who taught black students there, Johnson recounted the history of Holy Family, where he himself attended until the third grade. The Holy Family Center was an integral part of the Hillside community dating back to 1920, when both white and black nuns from New Orleans rst came to town to operate the school. The church closed the school in the late 1960s when it desegregated the Apalachicola Catholic community and then later kept the facility open as a community center until it no longer could be operated safely. The end of a long journeyTodays dedication represents the end of a long journey, a journey that began four years ago, when Jim Croteau and Burt Ivey with Elder Care Services alerted city of cials of the availability of a state grant to build new or renovate existing buildings into senior citizen centers throughout the state, Johnson said. From that point forward, this project would not have been possible without the partnerships entered into by the Apalachicola board of city commissioners, including former city commissioner Valentina Webb, who was on the board at the time, he said. Crucial to the project was a decision by the administration of former Gov. Charlie Crist, speci cally the Department of Elder Affairs and its former secretary Dr. Douglas Beach, to contribute $1.5 million to fund the project. Johnson cited the assistance of former state representative Will Kendrick in helping the city secure the funds. Other partnerships and support came in from our current legislative delegation and the former Department of Communities Affairs, he said. In addition, the city received $50,000 from the countys Tourist Development Council to place a new roof over the community room. Working point on the project was city administrator Betty Taylor-Webb with much help from city commissioner Brenda Ash, deputy clerk and grants manager Cindy Summerhill and Joe Taylor from the History, Culture and Arts Committee, Johnson said. The mayor acknowledged the efforts of a group of senior ladies who have done a wonderful job preparing and hosting this dedication. I thank each of you: Ms. Yvonne Tolliver, Ms. Annette Fagan and Ms. Gladys Gatlin for your desire to keep giving back to your community. Led by Tolliver, the ladies were among a group of senior citizens who spoke out last month at the city commission meeting. Let it come about in our time, not in our childrens childrens time, said Fagan, who stood with a dozen or so seniors Friday at the dedication. Tolliver had urged the city to create an advisory body to give the seniors a seat at the table in directing the work of the new center, whose administrative tasks are under the auspices of HCOLA, the Hillside Coalition of Laborers for Apalachicola. So many people on the Hill are in ignorance of what is going on and they feel kind of left out, Tolliver said. Theyre not looking to just go and take part in events. They want to be a part of the planning. They feel they can better tell you what they want and how they want it. They have more of passion for it than me and you, she said. Thats where I got my foundation learning from, and thats where I got my butt whupped. I have the scars to prove it.Senior involvementTaylor-Webb appointed a committee, including Ash, Taylor and Summerhill, to work closely with the seniors to glean their input. She said the details of governance are still in the planning stages, with more detailed ideas to be explored. I understand your passion, Taylor-Webb said, noting that the new center will combine a senior citizens function, complete with a congregate site for the Meals on Wheels program and a history museum showcasing the legacy of Apalachicolas vital black history. At the semi-formal Legends Ball Friday evening, Apalachicola businessman Curt Blair unveiled the two newest additions to a series of decorative panels he commissioned to capture the contributions of distinguished black leaders in the city. The two newest names to be added this year are the late Willie Speed and Charles Watson Clark. Speeds widow, Ella, and son Allison were on hand for Friday evenings ceremony, as was Clarks niece Marcia Thomas. Taylor-Webb said HCOLAs role will augment the citys oversight. We cant be there all the time and watch those things, she said. The plan is to get Meals and Wheels relocated; that will be our rst step. Youre coming at the right time. Things are just beginning. Taylor-Webb said though the city has resources to operate the facility, it is still in need of contributions to help furnish and enhance the interior. We dont have enough funding to do everything up front, she said. Ash urged the seniors to continue to speak out on issues that concern them. I hope this is not your last visit to our monthly city commission meeting, she said. We are all working together for a common goal. We cant do it on our own, we need input. Dont ever feel youre being excluded. You are the city, and without you there would be no city. In his remarks at the dedication, the mayor praised the work by the design rm JRA Architects and engineer and construction manager Peter Brown. He introduced JRA Architect David Vincent and Project Superintendent Willie Robinson, who then conducted tours of the new facility. As you can see, city ofcials went through painstaking measures to ensure the building retained its historic avor, while incorporating 21st century technology, Johnson said. The heat and air-conditioning are energy-ef cient, zoned and controlled by computer whether on site or off site. The restrooms are modern ADA-compliant, and the kitchen is commercial-grade. The result is a building that represents a resounding success for all the residents of Apalachicola, one that we can be proud of for many generations to come. Franklin County subcontractors on the project included Jones Stucco and Plaster LLC of Apalachicola, which handled the painting and stucco work, while Alternative Electric LLC of Eastpoint handled the electrical work. Coastline Clearing and Development of Eastpoint performed site prep work. Photos by DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The TimesArchitect David Vincent stands next to one of the Holy Familys original chalkboards. At right, Yvonne Tolliver speaks at last months city commission meeting. HOLY FAMILY from page A1observed one of the male passengers throw an object to the edge of the woods on the roadway. They later recovered the object, a plastic bag, and discovered $2,300 in U.S. currency and a clear plastic bag containing a white substance that eld tested positive for cocaine. The report said when deputies attempted to handcuff the male subject, Omarsharek Antoni Harris, 29, of Destin, he ed on foot. After a lengthy foot pursuit, deputies were able to apprehend Harris and placed him under arrest. A subsequent search of the vehicle, a 2003 Chevrolet Tahoe, resulted in the seizure of two clear plastic bags of suspected cocaine. In addition to the $2,300, deputies also seized the cocaine and the vehicle. Harris was charged with escape, resisting an of cer without violence, possession of a controlled substance more than 20 grams and traf cking in a controlled substance. Wallace was charged with possession of a controlled substance and trafcking in a controlled substance. Rashon A. Bahammou, 21, of Apalachicola, was charged with possession of a controlled substance. The sheriffs of ce said further charges might be issued in this case, pending further investigation. COCAINE from page A1 MORE ONLINEFind more news, sports and area coverage at apalachtimes.com

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LocalThe Times | A3Thursday, February 23, 2012 Saving Lives...Building Hope... ENDING VIOLENCE Crisis Intervention* 24 hour crisis line staed 365-days/year850-681-2111* Telephone or face to face individual advocacy services Supportive, condential and safe environment that will support the survivors decisions Accompaniment to hospital for sexual assault exam, which includes: treatment for physical injuries, evidence collection, testing for sexually transmitted infections and pregnancy testing Emergency room advocacy at Weems Memorial Hospital Referrals for alternate safe housingLegal Advocacy* Assistance with Orders for Protection, Dating Violence, Repeat Violence, Sexual Violence and Domestic Violence* Accompaniment in ling police reports Accompany survivors to court for both civil and criminal hearings Inform victim of their housing and employment rights in Florida as a victim of sexual assaultRecovery Services* Individual counseling for any person that has ever been a victim of sexual assault Individual counseling for adult victims of sexual child abuse Support groups for victims of sexual assault Services provided for victims age 18 and over 850-681-2111 406 Reid Avenue, Port St. Joe, FL 32456 (850) 229-6262www.joemamaspizza.com Reid Avenue, Port St. Joe, FL 32456 (850) 229-6262 www.joemamaspizza.com 406 Reid Avenue, Port St. Joe, FL 32456 (850) 229-6262 Authentic hearth baked pies in the style of Naples Traditional wood oven baked pizza Garden fresh salads Freshly baked focaccia sandwiches Home made desserts Domestic and imported wine and craft beer SPRING/SUMMER HOURSAS OFMARCH 1STTuesday through Thursday 4:30PM 9:00PM Friday through Sunday 11:30 AM 9:00PM ClosedMondays By David AdlersteinTimes City Editor Deputies from the Franklin County Sheriffs Of ce discovered what appeared to be a methamphetamine lab on a campsite near the Bald Point beach earlier this month. According to a news release from the sheriffs of ce, deputies responded to a Feb. 10 complaint in the Bald Point area regarding illegal camping on the beach. When deputies arrived on the scene, they located a campsite and a nearby truck, but nobody was present. The sheriffs of ce said the registered owner of the truck had outstanding warrants for burglary in Leon County. Witnesses indicated to deputies that a man, dressed only in shorts, had ed the area. K-9 units from the Florida Department of Corrections and of cers from the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission were called for assistance in locating the man. Upon a detailed search of the campsite, the deputies and of cers located what appeared to be a meth lab, according to the news release. While en route to the scene, deputies from the countys narcotics unit made contact with a man walking on the roadway and determined that he was the wanted individual from Leon County. Deputies arrested Robert Keith White, 49, of 6600 Reigh Count Trail, Tallahassee, and transported him to the Franklin County Jail where he is being held on warrants from Leon County. Guardian Environmental Inc. was contracted to remove all dangerous chemicals from the area. More charges are pending results of chemical testing from the Florida Department of Law Enforcements crime lab in Tallahassee. Meth lab found at Bald Point ROBERT KEITH WHITE Arrest REPORT The following report is provided by the Franklin County Sheriffs Of ce. Arrests in this report were made by of cers from the Franklin County Sheriffs Ofce (FCSO) and Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP). All defendants are considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law. FEB. 13 Omarsharek Harris, 29, Destin, escape, resisting an of cer without violence; possession of a controlled substance and traf cking in a controlled substance (FCSO) Rashon A. Bahammou, 21, Apalachicola, possession of a controlled substance (FCSO) Jessica M. Wallace, 22, Eastpoint, eeing or eluding a law enforcement of cer with lights and siren active, possession of a controlled substance; and traf cking in a controlled substance (FCSO) FEB. 14 Steven H. Mabery, 43, Houston, Texas, grand theft of a motor vehicle (FCSO) Edward A. Palmer, 35, Tallahassee, burglary of a dwelling (FCSO) Bobby C. Martin, Jr., 32, Apalachicola, eeing or attempting to elude a law enforcement of cer, and possession of a controlled substance with intent to sell. (FDEP) Kenneth D. Turner, 51, Apalachicola, sale or possession of a controlled substance with intent to sell. (FCSO) Joseph M. Lehning, 68, Eastpoint, DUI (FCSO)

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OpinionA4 | The Times USPS 027-600Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 Publisher: Rick Martin Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six monthsHome delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERSIn case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola TimesThe proposed half mil referendum for county school taxes is outrageous! For the current school board, made up mostly of government or former government employees, to suggest this debacle, proves that they are out-oftouch with sound business practices and the plight of struggling taxpayers in Franklin County. I assert that our teachers, whom we all sincerely care about, are currently the highest paid, by far, employees in Franklin County. No other local employer, nor the county nor Gander Oil could afford to pay what the teachers receive now, in compensation and benets for the hours they work. Here are the facts from the School Board documents. The teachers are scheduled to work 173 full days and 13 half-days, plus paid holidays. They all get 10 sick days, sick or not, which they do not lose and can be accrued or sold until they retire! They also get 12-to-18 paid vacation days each school year, which are not taken during the summer, but during the short time school is in session. Meaning that many substitute teachers must be paid at the same time. Therefore, teachers actually only work about 31 weeks or 60 percent of the year. While most employers have had to cut salaries and benets, in the past three years the teachers have received a 10 percent and a 3 percent raise and a 3 percent bonus! More was proposed. This amounts to a cumulative 17 percent raise in the last three years. This proposed tax levy is earmarked to generate more raises and bonuses! They get paid training days plus travel expenses and most teachers get additional bonuses, Secondary Supplements from something called a Differentiated Pay Plan Bonus! Franklin County taxpayers provide 100 percent of the employees health and dental insurance. And the employees pay zero into their very liberal and expensive retirement plan. Teachers are so well paid, they do not have to work during the several weeks they are off during the summer. Franklin County property owners have had enough of the failures of out of control school board budgets. The board must learn to manage our schools on a reasonable and lean budget, just as everyone else has had to do in these tough times. Please vote and vote No on this preposterous tax. And remember to thoughtfully vote in the next school board election! Ted Ruffner EastpointThursday, February 23, 2012Special to the TimesThe growth of twoincome families and increasing levels of job stress are two of the most signicant work trends affecting American businesses and families in recent years. Having just one stressed-out spouse can harm couples work and home lives. But what about when its both? A new study conducted by Wayne Hochwarter, the Jim Moran professor of business administration in the Florida State University College of Business, examines the role of support in households where daily stress is common to both spouses. Given that a lack of support from ones spouse represents a major cause of both divorce and career derailment, this research is needed to address issues that affect both home and work, Hochwarter said. More than 400 working couples, in both blueand white-collar occupations, participated in Hochwarters research. Those who reported high levels of stress but strong spousal support as compared to stressed-out employees without such support experienced the following positive benets: percent higher rates of satisfaction with their marriage; percent greater likelihood of having positive relationships with co-workers; percent lower likelihood of experiencing guilt associated with home/family neglect; percent lower likelihood of being critical of others (spouse, children) at home; percent higher rates of concentration levels at work; percent lower likelihood of experiencing fatigue at home after work; percent higher rates of satisfaction with the amount of time spent with their children; percent higher views that their careers were heading in the right direction; and percent higher level of job satisfaction. The number of employees who returned to the workplace even more agitated because they were unable to generate coping support at home is particularly distressing to Hochwarter. When youre still angry or upset from yesterdays stress, your workday will likely go in only one direction down, he said. Further, Hochwarter identied key factors distinguishing favorable from unfavorable support. Some attempts to support your stressed-out spouse can backre, actually making the situation much worse, he said. Support that had a deep and far-reaching impact had several common characteristics, which included: Awareness of ones spouses daily work demands (i.e., time pressures, lack of resources, deadlines, and supervisors). Not forcing support. Understanding that communication lines are open regardless of the circumstances. Recognizing that distancing oneself from the family or lashing out is not a practical way to foster help. In fact, it tends to bring out the worst in others and even causes the supporting spouse to become distant and act out as well. Being able to bring ones spouse back to the middle up when down in the dumps and down when overly agitated. Not bombarding the family with complaints about minor workplace irritants. Not trying to one-up ones spouse in terms of who has had the worse day. Not being complacent continuing to work at it. Remaining rational and not automatically casting the spouse as the bad guy. Not keeping a running tab on who is giving and who is getting. Most important, though, was the ability for a spouse to offer support on days when he or she needs it just as much, Hochwarter said. In many cases, both return home from work stressed. Generating the mental and emotional resources needed to help when your own tank is empty is often difcult. Successful couples almost always kept a steady supply of support resources on reserve to be tapped on particularly demanding days. According to one 47year-old sales manager interviewed for the study, I had a horrible day, and all I wanted was a homecooked meal and some time to myself. Instead, I took my wife out to dinner and heard everything about her bad boss and how her co-workers werent pulling their weight. By the end of the evening, we both felt at least a little bit better. Hochwarter also noted that the men and women differed by gender in terms of what support behaviors worked best for them. In general, wives appreciated getting cut some slack in terms of household activities; feeling wanted; and receiving expressions of warmth and affection. The husbands, meanwhile, were more likely to respond positively to offers of assistance with errands and feeling appreciated and needed. Both husbands and wives, however, were especially grateful for their spouses help in getting time away from work and home hassles to simply rest and recharge their batteries. When stress enters any relationship, it has the potential to either bind people together or break them apart, Hochwarter said. Findings strongly conrm this with respect to job tension. What also became obvious was the critical role of communication and trust among spouses; without them, you have a foundation best described as crumbling, even in the best of circumstances. Afrming that is the view of one 54-year-old administrative assistant in the study. When questioned how job stress can affect a relationship, she responded, Ask my ex-husband. The study is being prepared for publication.By William ScottSpecial to the Times This weeks issue is to once again try and reach out to the veterans or the spouse or widow of a veteran who may have served in Vietnam, parts of Thailand, or parts of South Korea from 1961 through 1975. The Veterans Administration has conceded the following conditions were as likely as not caused by exposure to herbicides including Agent Orange and are to be compensated for. The listed conditions are diabetes mellitus type 2, Hodgkins disease, ischemic heart disease, respiratory cancers, prostate cancer, soft tissue sarcomas, multiple myeloma, nonHodgkins lymphoma, AL amyloidosis, chronic Bcell leukemia, chloracne, Parkinsons disease, peripheral neuropathy and porphyria cutanea tarda. If you are a veteran, the spouse or widow of a veteran, or know of a veterans widow who had one of these listed conditions give us a call. This not only applies to Army and Marines but Navy and Air Force personnel as well. The area of exposure is being expanded and includes parts of Thailand and South Korea. Specic Naval vessels are considered to have been contaminated as well. If you have any questions, contact us at 653-8096 or stop by and see us downstairs at the courthouse, room 103. We will also be at Lanark Village Chillas Hall, at 9:30 a.m., and the Carrabelle Senior Center at 10:30 a.m. most Thursdays. William Scott is Franklin Countys veterans service ofcer, and Charles Elliott is his assistant. VETERaANS CORNERWilliam Scott and Charles Elliott Q. It costs so much to le a divorce case or a small claims case. Who receives that money? A. These services by the clerks ofce are courtrelated functions which are funded from ling fees and service costs and not from the countys budget. It costs $397.50 to le a divorce case. The clerks ofce receives $115 of that amount. Pursuant to legislation, the remainder of the $397.50 is sent to the State of Florida in Tallahassee electronically to the Department of Revenue to be distributed to 10 separate State trust funds. Small claims cases have ling fees based on the amount of the claim. For claims that exceed $500 but are less than $2,500, the ling fee is $175. The clerks ofce receives $150, and the remainder is distributed to the State of Florida in Tallahassee to the States General Revenue Fund and four other state trust funds. For small claims greater than $2,500, the ling fee is $300. The clerks ofce receives $170 and the remainder is distributed to the states general revenue and four other state trust funds. If a determination is made that a ler is indigent, the ling fee may be waived, although other fees are not waived. This ofce has a procedure in indigent cases to accommodate partial payments for those costs other than ling fees. There are hundreds of nancial distribution schedules my ofce is responsible for. Every ne or court cost we collect, every ling fee we collect, and every service charge we collect must be accounted for and distributed correctly. My ofce is operated in a manner that is subject to a high degree of nancial, operating, and compliance oversight. If you have any questions or comments about this column, please forward them to: Marcia Johnson, Clerk of the Court, 33 Market Street, Ste 203, Apalachicola, FL 32320, or by email to: mmjohnson@franklin. clerk.comBy Caty GreeneSpecial to the Times The Apalachicola Municipal Library continues to celebrate African American History month. On Saturday, Mayor Van Johnson hosted kids with a reading of Barack Obamas childrens book, Of Thee I Sing: A Letter to My Daughters. This Saturday, Feb. 25, distinguished resident and former city commissioner, Valentina Webb will read from Every Tongue Got to Confess: Negro Folk-tales from the Gulf States by Zora Neale Hurston. This is a charming volume of very short tales, which have entertained young library patrons in the past. Since the weather for the HCOLA Festival was threatening severe thunderstorms, which of course did not happen, the library chose to do its annual display of books by and about African Americans in the library. This display will be up until the end of the month; come by and see what we have. Most of the books are available to be checked out. Another momentous occasion this past week was of course the publication of the Sports Illustrated annual swimsuit issue. One person came in with the hope that the library had a subscription. We had to laugh; we do not. In fact we have very few magazine subscriptions, because of our small budget, but we do have patrons who donate magazines regularly. Dr. Skip Oliver, professor emeritus of political science at Heidelberg University in Tifn, Ohio gave us a years subscription to The Nation. He is visiting in Apalachicola for six weeks. If you think you might like to support us with a subscription to your favorite magazine, please come by and let us know. Suggestions might include the Economist, Atlantic Monthly, Smithsonian, Coastal Living or even Garden and Gun. PALS, the library friends group, is planning the annual Mar. 15 Librarians Anniversary Party (more details to come), which will also be the launch for a twiceannual Book Drive. In previous years the library, and PALS, has sold books once per year at the Florida Seafood Festival. This year we are adding a sale on May 5, the Saturday of the Tour of Homes. PALS would like to encourage patrons and supporters to start looking through their bookshelves, and maybe do a little spring cleaning. All books will be accepted, and if you want to help us sort and store them before the sale, volunteers are always welcome. Come by and see the librarys extensive holdings on African Americans, and join us in celebrating African American History Month. Caty Greene is the librarian for the Apalachicola Municipal Library. To reach her, call 653-8436.Spousal support leads to lessened stressAgent Orange linked to illness YOUR PUBLIcC T TRUSTEEMarcia JohnsonWho gets the ling fee monies?Lots on black history, but no subscriptions@THE LIBRaARY Caty Greene Half-mil is preposterous, vote it down Wa A YNE HOcCHwaWARTER

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LocalThe Times | A5Thursday, February 23, 2012 Strength in NumbersA Staff of Professionals to Help You Strengthen Your BusinessRoberson & Associates, P.A. is committed to providing services to our clients with personal care, condentiality, and professionalism. Our staff has the depth of knowledge and experience to help you and your business navigate the complexities of tax, nancial planning, and the business environment. Our client base includes individuals, restaurant, seafood, retail, construction related, real estate, healthcare, engineering, professional and personal services, non-prot and government entities. We have made good, sound business decisions for our business since 1997, and we can help you do the same for yours.SERVICESAccounting Services Tax Preparation and Planning Business Consulting QuickBooks Support Payroll Services Auditing Business Analysis Loan Application Support Business Retirement Plans Financial Planning Estate PlanningOFFICE LOCATIONS:rapacpas.comProfessional Tax and Accounting Services Since 1997. 214 Seventh St. Port St. Joe, FL 32456 850.227.3838 219 Avenue E Apalachicola FL 32320 850.653.1090 IT IS OUR PLEASURETO WELCOMEDr. Eugene Charbonneau And Dana Whaley, ARNPTO WEEMS MEDICAL CENTER EAST Beginning MARCH 1, 2012Primary Care and Urgent Care110 NE 5TH STREET Celebrating African-American heritagePHOTOS BY DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The TimesThe pastors leading Sundays community prayer service as part of the annual African-American festival are, from left, Gerry Reed, from the St. Paul AME Church; David Walker from Covenant Word; Horace Solomon from New Life Church; Thomas Webb from Tabernacle of Faith International Ministry; and Joseph Green from the Apalachicola Church of God In Christ. FOR MORE PHOTOS OF LAST WEEKENDS AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY FESTIVAL, SEE THE PHOTO GALLERY AT WWW. APALACHTIMES. COM Hillside youth perform a pantomime dance as part of Sundays service. The Jones siblings, from left Mercedes, Johnny and Alexis Jones perform at Saturdays African-American festival. Dre Robinson serves up rap at Saturdays AfricanAmerican festival. The beauty was apparent at Saturdays African American Festival parade. Chip Sanders chicken and waf es was a big hit among the food booths. A military color guard led Saturdays parade.

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LocalA6 | The Times Thursday, February 23, 2012 CAT POINT, EASTPOINT2.63 acres of gorgeous bay view property on Cat Point. White sandy beach on the Apalachicola Bay.MLS# 245189.................$290,000 Travis Stanley 850.653.6477 Grayson Shepard 850.653.6718 BEACHFRONT CONDO ST. GEORGE ISLAND2BR/2BA with two balconies in Villas of St. George. Established rental history! Community pool, beach boardwalk, 2 blocks to lighthouse! MLS# 246110..............$319,500CARRABELLE BEACHOwn a piece of Carrabelle history! The original lighthouse keepers house has 3 BR/ 1 BA on 1.3 peaceful acres backing up to Tates Hell Hiking Trail. Lovely porches!MLS#243618.................$259,000FIRST TIER ST. GEORGE ISLAND PLANTATION4BR/4.5 BA home with private pool, great rental history, great views! Large decks. Priced to sell! MLS# 238520...............$549,000 B EAC HFR ONT C ON D O CAT POINT, EASTPOINT CA RR ABELLE BEAC H F I R ST TIE R ST. G EO R GE Leon Teat 850.653.5656 Jamie Crum 850.370.0835 Sandy Mitchem 850.899.8300 NEW LISTING! GREATER APALACHICOLA4BR/2BA on 1/3 acre lot with above ground pool. Many upgrades and new features tankless water heater, new plumbing, city water, updated kitchen, new carpet, windows, doors.MLS# 245923..............$139,500 GR EATE R A PALAC H ICOLA AFFORDABLE ST. GEORGE ISLANDInterior home 3BR/2BA home on 1/3 acre lot in quiet area on Bayshore Dr. Cozy wood interior with freestanding resident or vacation home!MLS#243422..............$275,000 A FF O RD ABLE NEW LOW PRICE! SPECIAL FRANKLIN COUNTY PLANNING & ZONING MEETINGTuesday, February 28, 2012 Franklin County Courthouse Annex 6:30 P.M.1 Approval of the minutes of the meeting held, Tuesday, January 10, 2012, as mailed. 2 Review of the Monthly Building Report for January 2012. 3 Election of Chairman & Vice Chairman. SINGLE FAMILY PRIVATE DOCKS: 4 Consideration of a request to construct a Single Family Dock at NW Lot 1, Block N, Peninsular Point, Unit 3, 1536 Alligator Drive, Alligator Point, Franklin County, Florida. The access walkway will be 400 x 4 with a 12 x 8 covered terminal platform with an additional 8 x 3 wide step down. This dock meets all local, state and federal requirements and has all state and federal permits. Request submitted by Larry Joe Colson, agent for David Ramba, applicant. (Has House). 5 Consideration of a request to construct a Single Family Private Dock at the West Lot 88, Block C, Unit 3, St. James Island Park, 3170 Highway 98 East, St. James, Franklin County, Florida. The access walkway will be 200 x 4 with 10 x 12 terminal platform. This dock meets all local, state and federal requirements and has all state and federal permits. Request submitted by Guillermo Morales, applicant. (Has House). SMALL SCALE LAND USE CHANGE & REZONING: 6 Consideration of a request to re-zone a 3.72 acre parcel of land described as 957 Highway 98 West, Eastpoint, Franklin County, Florida from R-1 Single Family Residential and R-4 Single Family Home Industry to C-3 Commercial Recreational and a Small Scale Land Use Change from Residential to Commercial Recreation. Request submitted by Coastline Rentals, LLC. COMMERCIAL SITE PLAN REVIEW: 7 Consideration of a request for Commercial Site Plan Review for a 3.72 acre parcel described as 957 Highway 98 West, Eastpoint, Franklin County, Florida. The proposed site plan will include an RV Resort with 36 sites and amenities such as Managers Residence/Ofce Space, Activity Center, Bath House and a Swimming Pool. Request submitted by Coastline Rentals. LLC. BILL MILLER REALTY850-697-3751 (3310) 570-06583/2 DBL WD -3 FENCED COR. LOTS-2 CAR GAR $60,000 $29,500 $2,500 DOWN BUYS 2 BED APT. 2 6 ORRENT $500/MTH GULF VIEW & ACCESS 3 BDR 2 BA 2006 M/H 16 X 80 $89,000 3/B-D/W-3COR. LOTS DBL GARAGE $59,500 MIH 2 CRNRLOTS BLK. $ STORE REDUCED $49,500 COMM. BLDG-98 ON GULF-RENT $600/MTH CLEAN C UTSLawn Care ServiceResidential CommercialServices:* Pressure Washing Palm Tree Trimming Landscape DesignCarlos Castillo 850-624-8018 Chris Grin 850-323-1442 CALL FOR A FREE ESTIMATE Speed exempli ed the Greatest GenerationBy Lois SwobodaTimes Staff Writer A man for all seasons, Willie Burghart Speed grew up in the maritime trades but pursued his dream and became one of Franklin Countys most in uential and effective educators. Speed was born and raised in Apalachicola. His son, Allison, said in the last years of his life he wanted to be driven through town at least once a day. Here I am, a 60-yearold man asking my 90-yearold father, Can we go home now? Allison said. Hed point out a building to me and tell me who lived there or what was there when he was a child. He loved his childhood home. Born Aug. 11, 1920, Speed grew up with his grandparents Papa Lee and Ma Rita at 150 Seventh St. in Apalachicola. From an early age, Speed worked at different jobs to help support the family and pay for clothes and school expenses. At age 12, he began selling mullet downtown and delivering oysters. In 1934, at 14, he spent the summer shrimping with his grandfather. While a young teenager, he cleaned a local barber shop and a jewelry store, delivered milk, shined shoes, raked leaves and cut grass. He got a job at Sheips Mill loading railroad ties over the summer of his junior year at Dunbar High. He quit in the fall to return to school. An excellent worker, he was the rst to be rehired for the summer when school ended in 1938. He graduated from Quinn High School in a white suit on April 21, 1939. In 1940, he was one of the founders of the Owl Social Club, a civic organization that organized social events but also worked on many projects to aid Apalachicolas African-American community. They paid doctor bills and provided for the elderly and young children. Speed became the societys president. After graduation, he continued to work at the mill, and tried his hand at road construction, helping before the war to build what now is called Cleve Randolph Field at the airport. When it became clear he would be drafted, he married his sweetheart, Ella Louise Breedlove, at her mothers home, in 1942. He focused on putting back a nest egg for him and his bride. Called into the service in February 1943, he had $500 in savings. He reported to Fort Blanding in Starke, and was sent to Sheppard Field in Wichita Falls, Texas, for training in the Army Air Corps. Before he was shipped overseas, the war ended. Speed had been spared the battle eld but his travels had broadened his horizons and he had developed the habit of reading the newspaper daily. His time in the service won him another bene t too. Under the GI Bill, he was eligible for a scholarship to attend college. He applied to Florida Agricultural University, now Florida A&M University, soon after returning to Apalachicola in September 1946. He could not matriculate until 1947 because of the in ux of GI, so in the interim, he shed and oystered. Speed struggled with his coursework the rst semester and failed English. Fortunately, he was able to bring Ella and his young son, Bill, to live with him in Tallahassee. He persevered and the second semester achieved the honor roll. He went to school year-round and worked odd jobs during breaks. During Speeds second year, Charles Watson, came to school and rented Ella and Willies spare room. Another Apalachicola native, Fred Jenkins, also came to FAMU that year. During Speeds third year, Ella became pregnant, which spurred him to work even harder. He was offered two jobs on graduation and accepted a teaching position at Howard Academy in Ocala. That was the beginning of a distinguished career in education that might never have happened had this remarkable man not belonged to a generation that received the gift of higher education. Speed served as teacher, principal, assistant superintendent and school board member in Franklin County. He received a wealth of honors in his lifetime, among them a Meritorious Achievement Award in May 1999 from FAMU. On presenting the award, FAMU president and Apalachicola native Frederick Humphries said: People recognize something special goes on in Apalachicola because you had people like Willie Speed, who made it special in this community. Today I want to say thanks to him, and his family, for being the kind of man who was unsel sh, to help the least among us to reach a highest pedestal. Speed died May 11, 2011, at his Apalachicola home at age 90. He is buried with his family in Magnolia Cemetery. D.J. EDMONDS | From Speed family collectionStanding before the registrars of ce at Florida A&University in 1949, are, from left, Marion Watson, Anderson Reb Johnson, Hayward Glenn, Thomas Wynn, Willie Speed and Frederick Jenkins, all of Apalachicola.DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The TimesAccepting the honor Saturday night of adding the late Willie Speed to the panel of distinguished African-American leaders from Apalachicola are his wife, Ella, and son, Allison.

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LocalThe Times | A7Thursday, February 23, 2012 Smart LensesSMCan produce clear vision without glasses, at all distances "Freedom from Eye Glasses, Now a reality for many." NO HIDDEN CHARGES: It is our policy that the patient and any other person responsible for payments has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbursed by payment or any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for the free, discounted fee or reduced fee service, examination or treatment. www.mulliseye.com"WE WELCOME NEW PATIENTS, CALLTODAY FOR YOUR PRIORITY APPOINTMENT" FOR NEW PATIENTS 59 AND OLDERThis certificate is good for a complete Medical Eye Exam withTodd Robinson, M.D.Board Certified Eye Physician and Surgeon.The exam includes a prescription for eye glasses and tests for Glaucoma, Cataracts and other eye diseases.FOR YOUR APPOINTMENT CALL: 850-763-6666 ELIGIBILITY: U.S. Citizens living in the Florida Panhandle, 59 years and older, not presently under our care. Coupon Expires: 2-29-12 FREEEYE EXAMCODE: AP00Darren Payne, M.D.Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract SurgeonLee Mullis, M.D.Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract SurgeonTodd Robinson, M.D.Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon Concerned Citizens of Franklin County, Inc.P.O. Box 990, Eastpoint, FL 32328 abetterfranklin.com By Lois SwobodaTimes Staff Writer Two local authors greeted the public earlier this month in Lanark Village. A veteran author and a talented novice displayed their work during a Chillas Hall luncheon on Saturday, Feb. 11. Richard Edward Noble brought a dozen of his books already in print and a copy of his work in progress to the book signing. He offered special discounts to senior citizens. Nobles efforts on display included such well-known works as A Summer with Charlie and HoBo-ing America. Also on for sale were political works like Mein Kampf An analysis. Noble has also published works on local culture like Cat Point and them dang oyster people and Eastpointer. Noble showed off his upcoming collection of philosophical musings, Bits N Pieces. He said this is the beginning of a thoughtful and serious series that deals with some controversial ideas and contains strong language and themes he has not included in his earlier work. Seated next to Noble at the authors table was Gloria Tucker, of Crawfordville, who brought along her rst and only book, Victimized by a Serial Killer. Tucker is the cousin of 46-year-old Cheryl Dunlap, who was abducted from near her Crawfordville home in 2007 by Gary Michael Hilton, who kept her captive for two days before killing her, and disposing her body in the Apalachicola National Forest. Her book chronicles his trial for the killing, for which he was given the death penalty. I am more concerned about keeping the story out there than making money, she said. People need to understand that an event like this does not just affect the murder victim. Their entire family and members of the community around them are all victimized. In her dedication she writes: Too many people are senselessly victimized daily. Families suffer hardships as a result of these heinous crimes. The rights of victims are violated as a result of these laws made to protect perpetrators of crimes. Noble and Tucker said sales were good. Victimized by a Serial Killer and several works by Noble are available at Amazon and Barnes and Noble.com.By David AdlersteinTimed City Editor Kim Barnhill has been named acting administrator of the county health department, replacing Dr. Karen Chapman, who served as the interim director beginning in July 2011. Barnhill remains the full-time administrator of the Jefferson and Madison County health departments, a job she has held since January 2002. In her role as health ofcer for those two rural counties, she has focused on increasing access to dental care; linking Smart Growth principles to public health initiatives; enhancing health care career opportunities for local high school students; and increasing the availability of indoor and outdoor physical activity opportunities. Barnhill earned a bachelors degree in health education, a masters degree in adult education and gerontology and a masters of public health from the Florida State University. At this point, Im not sure how long I will be the acting administrator, but I know I wont leave until I can turn over the role to someone who can do it better than I can, she said. The staff at the county health department and the community deserves that. I am looking forward to the opportunities and have already gotten started on many changes that will result in positive changes for Franklin County. Earlier in her career, Barnhill served as the statewide services director in the state health of ce for two years, helping to oversee all 67 county health departments and the Institutional Review Board. In 2010, she also served as the acting administrator of the Gulf County Health Department. Her past experience includes directing the statewide of ce of volunteer services and promoting dental health and uoridation in the public health dental program of the Florida Department of Health. Barnhill serves on the executive committee of the Florida Association of County Health Of cers, the nominations and marketing committees for the National Association of County and City Health Of cials, and that associations liaison to the U.S. Taskforce on Community Preventive Services. Barnhill is a commissioner on the Partnership for Preventions National Commission on Prevention Priorities and on the board of directors of the National Public Health Foundation. She is a past-president of the Florida Association of County Health Of cers. Writers reign at Chillas Hall book eventLOIS SWOBODA | The TimesRichard Nobles of Eastpoint and Gloria Tucker of Crawfordville attended a book signing at Chillas Hall on Feb. 11.Barnhill appointed acting health department administrator DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The TimesKim Barnhill poses in her of ce at the health department.

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By Valerie GarmanFlorida Freedom Newspapers Mimi Delaruas eyes smiled as she looked back on her 101-year journey. Ive had a very enjoyable life, you know, she said. It was enough to bring her daughter, Diane Dieter, to tears. Its wonderful, Dieter said, as she recognized that not too many people are blessed with this much time with their mothers. Mildred Mimi Delarua, a resident at Beacon Villa Retirement Center in St. Joe Beach, welcomed her 101st birthday last Friday, with the surviving friends and family members who helped shape her story. The consensus was that she didnt look a day over 85. The attendants at Beacon Villa said Delarua spent all week looking forward to a visit from her people. Weve just had the nicest family, Delarua said. Were lucky about that. Her life has blessed her with two children, ve grandchildren and eight great-grandchildren. She smiled again as she remembered the births of those children and grandchildren. Family has always been a number one priority for her, her daughter explained. She received a visit from extended family across the country for her centennial birthday celebration last year. We had a real big blast in Apalach for her 100th birthday last year, said Dieter, wife of Bob Dieter. Relatives came in from California to Virginia to Tennessee to Alabama. And although her articulation has slowed, Delarua agreed she was excited about turning 101 and was grateful to spend it with her close family. When asked if she had any advice for the younger generation, Delarua said she wouldnt know how to put it into words. Delarua is not the rst in her family to live past 100. Her older sister lived to be 103, and she has two living sisters ages 99 and 93. Delarua was born in Houston, Mississippi in 1911, but spent most of her life living in Memphis, Tennessee. She also spent time in New Orleans while attending business school, a time she remembered fondly at her party, when she lived with her aunt, uncle and cousin. She also looked back on her time working as a secretary for a steel company in Memphis; her daughter said she always admired her mothers independence. She married her late husband, John Delarua, at age 23. He passed away in 1980. Delaruas kind spirit led also her to volunteer as a Pink Lady at Methodist Hospital in Memphis for 15 years. She moved to Apalachicola in 2002 to live with her daughter, where she attended St. Patricks Catholic Church. She became a resident at Beacon Villa last August. She was just always a very kind, gentle person, Dieter said. She was always very independent. The nurses and attendants at Beacon Villa recognize Ms. Mimi as a miracle. She is not completely wheelchair-bound and has no problem getting around in her room. Delarua, the eldest of the centers 25 residents by quite a few years, is possibly the oldest resident they have ever had. Jennifer Richter, activities director at Beacon Villa remembers some 97th and 98th birthdays, but never a 101st. She said Delarua is a quiet and gentle resident who always has to be just so. Her 101st birthday gift from the attendants at Beacon Villa was a delicate piece of jewelry, something Richter said re ects her prim mannerisms. For her to be that age, weve got a pretty wide age group here, she de nitely is better off mentally than many of her younger counterparts, Richter said. If I were to guess (her age) I would say late 80s or early 90s shes really a miracle her being that age. By Lois SwobodaTimes Staff Writer A local thespian has put pen to paper to produce a one-woman show that is already making waves. Three years ago, Beth Blair was introduced to Marie Curie, when her father, a retired school superintendent who loves to read, recommended a biography of the pioneer physicist. After reading it, she was hooked. She sought out more books on the life of Curie, a Polish physicist and chemist, famous for her pioneering research on radioactivity, who was the rst woman to win a Nobel Prize, the only woman to date to win in two elds, and the only person to win in multiple sciences. This was a superhuman being to endure what she did, Blair said. Obstacles she had to face and the absolute jaw-dropping grit. I think I got interested in the story because cancer is everywhere. The way they deal with cancer now is thanks to this huge impact that Marie and Pierre Curie made. Blairs daughter survived breast cancer four years ago. Inspired by her research, Blair, an actress who loves the theatre, began work on a play. Her rst draft had many characters. Blair and husband Curt performed it for the family. It was just terrible, she said. Blair went back to work and rewrote the piece as a one-woman show entitled Marie Curie: My Noble Destiny. She debuted her new play at her reading group for June Dosik and Caroline Weiler, who told her it was really good and encouraged her to perform it. Dosik told Dixie Partington, owner of the Dixie Theatre about the show, and Partington asked for a private reading. She and her mother, awardwinning actress Cleo Holladay, listened to Blairs reading and asked her to perform it at the Dixie. While the play was in rehearsal, Blair got a note of encouragement from an unexpected source. A friend found an article about actor Alan Alda. It seems he had also written a play about Marie Curie, Passion of the Radiance, which was performed to excellent reviews at the Geffen Playhouse in Los Angeles last year. While his play dealt with the years after Pierre Curies death, and Blairs deals with the period before he died, the two works share many themes, including courage, discovery and the wonders of science. Blair wrote to invite Alda to attend a performance at the Dixie and, while he declined, he encouraged her to pursue her writing career. The only evening performance Of My Noble Destiny will be at 8 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 25. There also will be a matinee performance at 3 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 26. There will be special performances for area students at 10:30 a.m. Thursday and Friday, Feb. 23 and 24. These are open to the public and everyone is encouraged to attend. Blair said her hope is that the play will inspire even one student to undertake a career in science. Science is so amazingly fun, she said. Its like a mystery story. Marie found it to be absolutely the love of her life, next to Pierre. Tickets are $20 and student tickets are $10. For reservations or more information, visit www. dixietheatre.com or call 653-3200. PETOFTHEWEEK Franklin County Humane Society Qualications: Expertise in: Now Accepting AppointmentsCall Toll Free 888-681-5864 For more info www.seclung.com Lung Disease SpecialistRob Garver, MDNow Seeing Patients in Port St. Joe NOW BCBS-FL IN-NETWORK PROVIDER On behalf of my staff and I, we would like to thank all our loyal patients for the honor of being selected for the multiple awards that we have received over the last 12 months; including voted most compassionate Dr. and Patients Choice Award. It is a great honor and we will continue to strive for the very best medical care for our patients.VINCENTIVERS, M.D.301TwentiethStreet Port St. Joe, FL 32456850-227-7070www.iversmd.com On behalf of my staff and I, we would like to thank all our loyal patients for the honor of On behalf of my staff and I, we would like to SocietyA8 | The Times Thursday, February 23, 2012Mimi Delarua embarks on a 2nd century Lordy, Lordy. Look whos 40!Love, Ron, Mom, Christian and ColinActress Blair to bring Marie Curie to life at the Dixie ED TILEY | Special to the TimesBeth Blair as Marie Curie.Happy 2nd birthday, PaytonPayton Grace Wood turned 2 on Sunday, Feb. 12, 2012. She is the daughter of Buddy and Cheree Wood of Carrabelle. Paternal grandparents are Leonard and Shirley Brannan. Maternal grandparents are Keith and Lucille Walden. A gathering of friends and family at the home of Lynn Wilson and Bill Spohrer helped former Coca Cola model and Rockette dancer Alice Jean Gibbs mark her 95th birthday Feb. 11. Looking radiant, Gibbs was celebrated with cards and gifts, and a beautiful table of food and drink, all surrounding a cake decorated with Miss Coca Cola. Gibbs continues to stay active in the painting career she took up following her days as a dancer, and as a model posing for the famous Haddon Sundblom, whose illustrations for Coca Cola made them an indelible American image. Pictured blowing out the candles are Gibbs great-grandson Hampton Graham, with, standing from left, his mom Piper Graham, Gibbs daughter Lynn Wilson Spohrer, Gibbs, and Gibbs daughter Carol Harris, Hamptons grandmother. Happy BIRTHDAY Friends help Alice Jean mark 95th birthday MIMI DELARUA

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The United Methodist Churches of Franklin County Welcome You First United Methodist Church of ApalachicolaWorship Service 11:00 a.m. every Sunday Sunday School 10:00 a.m. 75 5th St. Apalachicola 653-9530 fumcapalach@gtcom.net Pastor: Rev. Themo PatriotisCarrabelle United Methodist ChurchWorship Services 10:45 a.m. Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Celebrate Recovery Mondays 7-9 p.m. 102 NE Ave. B Carrabelle 697-3672 Pastor: Julie StephensEastpoint United Methodist ChurchWorship Service 10:00 a.m. every Sunday Healing service every fourth Monday at 7:00 p.m. 317 Patton Dr. (corner of David St.) 670-8825 Pastor: Rev. Beth WhiteSt. George Island United Methodist Church9:00 a.m. Worship Service 10:00 a.m. Fellowship Hour 201 E. Gulf Beach Dr. 9274635 www.sgiumc.org Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis First Pentecostal Holiness Church379 Brownsville Road Apalachicola Were excited about what Gods doing!!!Sunday School 9:45 am Sunday Morning Worship 10:45 am Sunday Evening Service 6:00 pm Monday, Youth Group 6:30 pm Wednesday, Royal Rangers, G.A.P.7:00 pm Wednesday Worship & Word 7:30 pmNursery Provided during regular church services 7:00 7:00 First Baptist ChurchSt. George Island 501 E. Bayshore Drive 927-2257 R. Michael Waley, Pastor Join us as we praise and worship the living Christ. Great is the Lord and most worthy of praise. Psalm 145:3 Sunday Bible Study................................................10:00am Worship Praise........................................................11:00am Sunday Night............................................................7:00pm Wednesday Power Hour......................................7:00pm Wednesday Youth at S.P.L.A.S.H.......................7:00pm Walking in Christ R. Michael Whaley, Pastor WELCOMES YOUChurch of the Ascension101 NE First Street CarrabelleSUNDAY10:00 AM WELCOMES YOUChurch THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH (850) 274-4490 (850) 545-2578 WELCOMES YOU Trinity Trinity Episcopal Churchest. 1836Welcomes YouHwy. 98 & 6th St. Apalachicola 850-653-9550Sunday Worship Services 8 & 10:30 a.m. Wednesdays Healing Service 11 a.m. Centering Prayer 4 p.m. FaithThe Times | A9Thursday, February 23, 2012With lifes daily stressors, it is easy to neglect reecting on our many blessings: our health, joy and the greatest gift of all: family. Through family we learn traditions, forgiveness, patience, healing, self-control, and in some cases, self-defense. The lessons of our childhood shape and benet each day of our adult lives. We encounter nostalgic moments that cause a warm sensation in our heart and a smile on our face. The darkest of times do not seem as bleak as long as we have the support of family to encourage us. The relationship of family is the heartbeat that keeps us going when it seems there is nothing left in this life. I enjoy listening to my grown children when they get together and share stories of their childhood. Now that they are beyond the statute of limitation, they share confessions and stories of incidents that I was never privy to. Some events seemed catastrophic at the time but now they can laugh about it. They are honest with each other in a way no one else could be outside of their circle. Scott and I worked hard to create a peaceful atmosphere in our home amidst the chaos of raising four children. I attribute our success to God and to our determination to make our marriage and our merged family work. Sometimes the harmony we longed for appeared more like anarchy, but we remained a united (weary) force against the foes. Between homework, sports, school functions, fundraisers and extracurricular events, we had to work like a team to make it all happen. Taking time to bond with each other took great effort at the end of an exhausting day. Although it was not always feasible, sitting at the dinner table together, sharing the days events was when we really connected as a family. The Apostle Paul chose the bond of family to symbolize the unfathomable bond of love between Jesus Christ and the church, His bride. Who can comprehend the mysterious bond that enables a man and a woman to withstand the many storms of life and remain best friends for the rest of their lives together? The Bible describes the union between a man and woman like a cord that is not easily broken. Though one may be overpowered by another, two can withstand him. And a threefold cord is not quickly broken, Ecclesiastes 4:12. Of course, the third strand of the cord represents Jesus. In a culture that discourages the bond of matrimony, it is hard to understand the benets that derive from its commitment. The prince of darkness has launched his nal and greatest attack on Gods people. The one last standing institution, marriage, is under duress unlike any other time in history. According to statistics, the rate of divorce is declining. In reality, fewer people are getting married and more people are maintaining the friend-with-benets status. The government discourages marriage by offering benets not obtainable to married couples. Therefore an unmarried couple may see a marriage certicate as nothing more than a piece of paper that cripples them nancially. If the person you are with is not marriage material, prayerfully consider how to handle the situation. Til death do us part is taken about as literally as the Bibles principles are in modern day. I believe that if some could write their own vows they would be a little less committing. They would be more like until somebody better comes along, or until he/she tries to control my life, or until I realize he/she is not ambitious enough to suit me. For those who truly believe in the institution of marriage, do your homework before you say, I do. It takes time to learn people and their strong points and weaknesses. If you have not considered marriage yet you are living as a married couple, take time to analyze your situation. Marriage is so much more than a contract; it is a covenant, a union of souls, a bond, and a commitment of love and loyalty. A spouse is your best friend, teammate, and business partner. His and hers becomes ours, erasing the division of materialism. Parents stand a greater chance at staying together and raising their children as a family if they are married. Marriages have a much greater chance of success if they are Christ centered. It may appear as if we are losing the battle but we cannot give up the ght. Families are under attack and our job is critical. We must defend, support and strengthen families as a body of Christ. We welcome all suggestions and hope you enjoy this weekly column. Please send all emails to Scott Shiver at frontline247@ mac.com.Marriage a union of souls, bound in love YOUTH MATTERSScott and Pamela Shiver Thank you, thank you, thank you! All of the fundraisers this past weekend were well-supported. All of our faithful volunteers worked very hard preparing and serving the meals. Last Sunday night, 18 of Betty Roberts friends gathered at Camp Gordon Johnston American Legion Post 82 to celebrate her 86th birthday. We enjoyed Bettys company and the pizza. Thanks for the good pizza, guys! The only bad thing about the spaghetti dinner, which was delicious, was I didnt win the half pot. Oh well, maybe next year. I didnt get to the covered dish lunch on Sunday because I was bringing Jerry Harnett home from Weems Memorial Hospital. I hope they had a good crowd, as well. At last Saturdays pancake breakfast at the Lanark Boat Club, the volunteers prepared and served 84 plates how about that! Just two more days, folks! We will have our annual community breakfast Saturday, Feb. 25. There will be great breakfast, great service and great fellowship. Doors open at Chillas Hall at 8 a.m. Enjoy a full breakfast for a donation of $6. And be sure not to miss the bake sale. Hope to see you there! Be kind to one another, check on the sick and house-bound. Until next time, God Bless America, our troops, the poor, homeless and hungry. Community breakfast, bake sale Saturday LANARK NEWSJim Welsh ObituariesBill WhiteEagle, 86, passed away Monday, Feb 20, 2012, in his home with family. Bill was one of Jehovahs Witnesses and attended the Kingdom Hall of Jehovahs Witnesses in Apalachicola. Bill is survived by his wife of 40 years, Judy; son Bill (Michelle), son Ben (Geanise), son Del, daughter Angie (Jim), daughter Gwen (Troy), son Neil (Waipio), son Lance, and son Talon; and many grandchildren who loved their Papa. A memorial will be held Saturday, Feb. 25, at 1 p.m., at the Kingdom Hall of Jehovahs Witnesses in Apalachicola. All who would like to are invited to attend.Bill WWhiteEEagleWe regret to announce the passing of Mr. Gene Fanning, 84, of Donalsonville, Ga. Mr. Fanning passed away Tuesday morning, Feb. 14, 2012, at Seminole Manor Nursing Home. Mr. Fanning was born in Huntsville, Ala., Aug. 26, 1927, to the late Thomas and Mabel Travis Fanning. He served his country in the United States Navy and then worked many years with Huntsville Utilities in the water department. Mr. Fanning leaves to cherish his memory, a daughter, Patsy Collins of Donalsonville, Ga., and two grandsons, Heath Collins and Garrett Collins. He was preceded in death by his parents, Thomas and Mabel Travis Fanning; his wife, Jeanell Nunn Fanning; his brothers, Mayhew Fanning, Sidney Fanning, Bernice Fanning and Howard Fanning; and two sisters, Alice Talent and Frances Sherman. Evans-Skipper is in charge of arrangements. No services are planned at this time.Gene FanningCharles Emerson Harris was born Dec. 2, 1928, in Apalachicola to the late Mary and Albert Harris. Charles passed away Feb. 15, 2012, at St. James Health and Rehabilitation Center in Carrabelle at the age of 83. Charles was a longtime public works employee for Franklin County and the City of Apalachicola. He is survived by his two daughters, Emma Chruscinski and Charlene Fincher; and ve grandchildren, Joseph, Damien, Heather, Cody and Deanna. Memorial services were Friday evening, Feb. 17, at Kelley Funeral Home, 149 Ave. H, Apalachicola.Charles EEmerson HHarrisCheryl K. Berberet of San Diego, Calif., died peacefully Feb. 3, 2012, after a long illness. Born Cheryl Kathleen Navin in Akron, Ohio on May 27, 1944, she lived in several cities as a child, perhaps inspiring a lifelong love of travel. Her family settled in Lincoln, Nebraska, when Cheryl was nine, where her father P.X. Navin was manager of the local Goodyear Tire and Rubber plant and her mother Helen was a nurse. She attended St. Theresa elementary school, Pius X High School, and the University of Nebraska where she was a member of Delta Gamma Sorority and majored in history and English. Following graduation she married William G. Jerry Berberet of Toston, Montana, in August 1966. Cheryl and Jerry were married 45 years and have two daughters, Heather M. (Delores) of San Diego and Meghan E. (Ron) of Novato, Calif., born in Plattsburgh, N.Y. Jerry and Cheryl lived in diverse regions of the country before settling in San Diego in 2007. In addition to her immediate family, Cheryl is survived by two brothers, John F. (Sharon) of Stillwater, Minn., and Philip X. (Debie) of Atlanta, Ga.; granddaughter Ryan McKenzie Berberet; and numerous cousins, nieces, nephews and in-laws. Cheryl Berberets last rites will be held at a funeral Mass at Saint Joseph Cathedral, San Diego at 3:30 p.m. on Friday, Feb. 24. A pictorial gallery of her life can be accessed at the MerkleyMitchell Mortuary website www.merkleymitchell.com. In lieu of owers, donations might be made to the National Dysautonomia Research Foundation, P.O. Box 301, Red Wing, MN 55066 (www.ndrf.org); the Pius X Foundation, 6000 A St., Lincoln, NE 68510 (www.foundation.piusx. net); or the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals at www.aspca.org/donate.Cheryl BerberetEd Jackel, 94, of Atlanta, Ga., passed away on Thursday, Feb. 16, 2012. He was born to immigrant parents in New York City, where he met the love of his life, Ethel; she passed away in 1993 after 53 years of marriage. Ed served as an infantryman in World War II and was awarded three Purple Hearts and a Silver Star for bravery. After the war, Ed was the first in his family to attend college and received his bachelors and masters degrees from New York University while working to support his family. Ed was an assistant coach with the Georgia Tech basketball team and was a college and Southeastern Conference basketball referee. An outstanding athlete from a very young age, he was a health/fitness enthusiast long before it became popular. Ed ran in the first Peachtree Road Race and continued to run for many years. He won several state handball championships and one national title (featured in Sports Illustrated). A talented writer, Ed was published in the New York Times and many other publications. Eds book, Lucky Infantryman, about his World War II experiences, was published in his 80s; his novel, 65 and Going, was published in his 90s. He also made a name for himself telling stories at senior centers. Ed delighted in helping others. Until the very end, he was exceptionally grateful for all things large and small: the love of his family and friends, and the opportunities he had been given in life. He valued his independence more than anything and remained independent until the last two weeks. Ed took great pride and pleasure in his family, whom he loved dearly and who will cherish his memory. He is survived by his sister, Rose Lipson; two sons, Martin (Stephanie) and Dana (Pinki) Jackel; daughter Roberta Jackel (Chris); three grandchildren, William Jackel, Erica Newland and Laura Newland; and one great-grandchild, William Buck Jackel. A memorial service is planned for the spring, Eds favorite time of year.EEd Jackel

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E-mail outdoors news to times outdoors@star .com OUTDOORSwww.apalachtimes.comSection Section A Freshwater InshoreSpanish mackerel are still holding in close to shore, and in the surf. Casting plugs and spoons will work for these guys, however, trolling mackerel trees close to shore will produce more sh. Some nice trout catches are still being reported, but no one is bragging on red sh this week. Good reports are still comimg in from depot creek this past week. Crappie and shellcraker are still being caught regularly. Stripped bass and a few hybrid bass are in the I.C.W. up stream nd near the Overstrret Bridge. SPONSORED BY Thursday, February 23, 2012 Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL(next to Piggly Wiggly)www.BWOsh.comYour Hunting Headquarters REG $489.99SALE $289.99LIMITED STOCK REG $489. 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Corner of Marina Drive, (next to Piggly Wiggly) Corner of Marina Drive, (next to Piggly Wiggly) 99 Corner of Marina Drive, 99 WEEKLY ALMANAC APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE TIDE TABLES MONTHLY AVERAGESTo nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from these given for APALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW Cat Point Minus 0:40 Minus 1:17 East Pass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27 To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from those given for CARRABELLE: HIGH LOW Bald Point Minus 9:16 Minus 0:03 Sponsor the WEEKLY ALMANACCall Today!653-8868Date HighLow% Precip Thu, Feb 2371 6520% Fri, Feb 2471 4840% Sat, Feb 2563 4410% Sun, Feb 2664 5510% Mon, Feb 2769 5310% Tues, Feb 2870 5810% Wed, Feb 2972 5760% BUCKING THE TREND By Tim CroftFlorida Freedom Florida is considered by international scientists to be part of a warming hole, said Dr. James OBrien. While other portions of the country, such as Iowa, Kansas, Ohio and parts of the Midwest and Northeast, are experiencing a steady warming of climate, Florida is not seeing similar types of changes, OBrien said. Georgia and Florida are in a warming hole, OBrien said while vacationing with his grandchildren. So we dont have the warming trends that you see in other parts of the country. Its probably because we are surrounded by ocean. And OBrien, a professor emeritus of meteorology and oceanography at Florida State University, should know. Hes been studying the oceans and their impacts on weather patterns for 45 years. For 25 of those years he was on a team of scientists and researchers that ultimately identi ed the phenomenon of El Nino, and in turn that led to the identi cation of El Nina changes in the oceans temperatures and patterns that have great impacts on weather throughout the Southeast and the hemisphere. The unusually warm winter? A product of El Nina, which alternately cycles on a regular basis with El Nino, OBrien said. These two ocean phenomenon contribute greatly to the weather in the Southeast, OBrien said. In the mid-1990s, OBrien said, there resulted a push by scientists to reach beyond government agencies and put the information to people who would need it. It was important to be able to forecast and predict impacts, he continued. So working through entities such as the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences extension services and the Southeast Climate Consortium, comprised of researchers throughout the Southeast, OBrien said this information is now trickling down to those most likely to feel the impacts. We helped convince state forest managers that they would have problems with forest res, as the cycle of El Nina arrives, OBrien said. By predicting a cycle of upcoming dry weather, land managers on state and federal lands are able to prevent a season of wild res through prescribed burning in forest lands. OBrien noted that prescribed burning such as this in a recent trend, due in part to the identi cation of changes in ocean currents and temperatures. OBrien will be the featured speaker during the fth annual meeting of the Supporters of St. Vincent National Wildlife Refuge. The meeting will be held from 1-4 p.m. ET at the St. Joseph Bay Buffer Preserve Center, 3915 State Road 30-A, 4.5 miles south of the intersection of U.S. Highway 98 and County Road 30-A in Port St. Joe and ve miles north of the Indian Pass Raw Bar. OBrien came to the attention of the Supporters of St. Vincent through a talk he gave at a meeting hosted by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service at St. Marks. I must have done okay because I have three requests to give the same talk, including from the group at St. Vincent, OBrien said. OBrien said he will be talking on a host of relevant topics. I am going to give the real scoop about climate change in Florida, OBrien said. What is really happening in Florida with climate change and whats really the truth about sea level rise. It will be a laypersons talk about what is really happening with climate change in Florida. Well, of course, also cover things like hurricanes and tornadoes and the changing weather patterns. The annual meeting of the Supporters of St. Vincent National Wildlife Refuge will be held from 1-4 p.m. ET on Sunday, Feb. 26 at the St. Joseph Bay Buffer Preserve Center. You must be a member of the Supporters group to attend and memberships will be sold at the door; $15 for individuals, $20 for families. The meeting will be catered by Paul Gants Bar-B-Q. For more information call 229-6735. Late hunt at end of slow season yields record buckBy Mike CazalasFlorida Freedom Newspapers If Clayton Syfrett had followed conventional wisdom last weekend and skipped hunting with his son after delays had them climbing into their Washington County stand at 4:30 p.m., his name wouldnt be headed for the record books. Instead, with the season winding to an end and the drive to the property already behind them, Syfrett and his 7-year-old son, Chappell, decided to sit, and now he has the story of a lifetime. We literally had just sat down, and Chappell starts pulling his lunch out hed been pestering me the whole trip to eat it and we were having a discussion about why he spilled the crackers everywhere, and I looked up and there was a deer running across the food plot, Syfrett said. I could see it was a buck, and I said, Chappell, theres a deer, buddy, lets be quiet for a second, and I put the crosshairs on the base of his neck. He was walking away when I shot him, but I had no idea he was that big. Syfrett said he checked out the buck through his scope and told his son, Chappell, you have no idea what weve just done. Youll never forget this day. They had been in the stand about three minutes. On the ground, as they stood over the buck and surveyed its 13-point rack, the disbelief, shock and surprise gave away to another emotion. Chappell and I, we just both started laughing, Syfrett said. I mean, what are the odds of this? Ive been hunting this property since 1985, and this is a once-in-a-lifetime thing. Today marks the end of general gun season for the Northwest Florida zone and Syfretts buck, scored by Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission of cer Derek Fussell as a nontypical 146 1/8, net 142 7/8, tops the current record listed for Washington County: a buck taken by Bill Walsingham in 1983. It punctuated a season marked by warmerthan-usual weather that translated into less deer activity during daylight hours but also reaf rmed a true hunters mentality: No one ever has killed a nice deer from the couch. Thats an incredible deer, FWC Lt. Stan Kirkland said. Weve had a few really nice deer that have been killed in the region and we always look forward to measuring them for folks. Kirkland said the mixed weather brought mixed results based on what he has seen and heard this year. Its been a warmer winter than what we typically experience and I think overall most hunters have not had quite the season that theyve had in years past, he said. But Ive talked to a few people like Clayton Syfrett who have killed exceptional deer and had a better than average year and they are ecstatic. Cody Berens at The Deer Shack on East Avenue chalked it up as an average year, saying there was enough business to keep them busy but not enough to overwhelm them. And although it wasnt the busiest year for harvesting deer, it also wasnt the busiest year for FWC of cers to have to deal with accidents and complaints of hunting dogs running loose. We preach about wearing safety harnesses, and I dont how well the word is getting out but weve had very few instances of accidents with tree stands this year, Kirkland said. I think people are going to elevated shooting boxes more, too, and youd really have to work to fall out of one of those. Kirkland said complaints about people hunting deer with dogs illegally continue to drop, partly because of a lack of adequate acreage for that kind of hunting. Also, a law change in 2005 that requires those hunting with dogs to meet certain criteria precipitated a drop in those registering for it. Kirklands take on the season is anecdotal. He said while the year was calm, it had its interesting moments. The agency will conduct a survey to get more exact information. One, he said, involved three men and a woman from the Dothan area caught night hunting in Jackson County. He said they walked into court expecting a slap on the wrist but were about $1,200 lighter when it was done. A lot of the judges take it seriously, and the judge in Jackson County de nitely did, Kirkland said. Also taken seriously, as is the case every year, is the agencys robotic deer, affectionately known as Robo Deer by game of cers and likely dubbed something less pleasant by those arrested for shooting at it. They were just over the line with Robo Deer in Gulf County on Highway 22 when a father and son drove up on it, Kirkland said. They shot it three times the son was the shooter and they shot it from the car. Their excuse was they were headed toward Walmart and just happened to see the deer, he continued. But they had plastic lining the trunk of the vehicle and butchering tools, etc., so that explanation kind of fell at. Supporters of St. Vincent to meet Sunday SPECIAL TO THE TIMES This 13-point buck was shot by Clayton Syfrett and his 7-year-old son, Chappell, in Washington County.Page 10

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CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA SP O RTS www.apalachtimes.com ASectionThursday, February 23, 2011 OFFICIAL SPECIAL ELECTION BALLOTFranklinCounty, Florida March 6, 2012 Page 11By David AdlersteinTimes City Editor With their 2012 season just getting underway, the Lady Seahawks varsity softball team has won its last two games, downing Bozeman and Rickards in away games. The team, under the direction of coach Lisa Sweatt and assistant Sally Wheeler, now sports a 4-4 record, and seeks to add a win tonight, Feb. 23 at home against Blountstown. Sweatt has her share of veteran players on a roster that includes Ally Millender, Anna Lee, Chena Segree, Christina Collins, Gracyn Kirvin, Hunter Shiver, Maegan Andrews, Morgan Newell, Tiffany Varnes, Vanessa Simmons, and Morgan Mock Junior varsity players include Adriana Butler, Scout Segree, Maryln Lee, Robyn Segree, Kimmie Boone, Krista Martina, Ashley Carroll, Lacey Hutchins, Bri Barrack, Myranda McLeod and Maddie Newell. As for stand out players for the beginning of the year, defensively, starting pitcher Chena Segree is holding down the circle! said Sweatt. Offensively, Morgan Mock is leading the team, stroking the ball at least twice a game! Franklin County vs. Ridge View Franklin County and Ridge View lit up the scoreboard Feb. 4 as they combined for 17 runs, with the Lady Seahawks winning the offensive battle at Clay High 9-8 in ve innings. Hitters on both sides were strong at the plate as the teams combined for 15 hits, including six extra base hits. Franklin County got its bats going early, scoring three runs in the rst inning. Varnes racked up three RBIs on two hits, tripling in the rst inning and doubling in the second. The Lady Seahawks piled up the steals, swiping nine bags in all. Mock had two stolen bases, and Newell, Shiver, Varnes, Segree, Collins, and Lee each with one. Franklin County vs. Orange Park Simmons had a sound game at the plate for Franklin County on Feb. 4 at Clay High, as the Lady Seahawks sustained a 5-1 loss in seven innings to Orange Park. Simmons singled in the sixth inning to go 1-1 and drive in the teams only run of the game. Orange Parks Chelest Bardroff baf ed Franklin County, striking out nine batters, and allowing one earned run on ve hits and one walk over seven innings. Franklin County vs. Rutherford In the Lady Seahawks home opener Feb. 7, Franklin County lost to Rutherford 8-2 Franklin County jumped out to an early lead, but it was unable to hang on. Rutherford worked its way back and took the lead on an RBI single in the sixth inning by Becca Taylor Taylor handled Franklin Countys lineup with ease, racking up 10 strikeouts, and allowing two earned runs on three hits and no walks over seven innings. Franklin County @ Wewahitchka In the Lady Seahawks visit to Wewa Feb. 9, Franklin County breezed to an 11-4 win. Singles by Mock, Varnes and Segree led to a two-run rst. A Collins triple in the second led to a third run when Simmons sacri ced her home. Franklin County busted the game open with a sixrun fth inning, highlighted by a line drive home run by Varnes, a Newell triple and a Mock double. The Lady Seahawks added two more in the seventh, keyed by an Andrews triple, and a Varnes single. Franklin County vs. Wakulla The Lady Seahawks hosted Wakulla Feb. 10, and fell 18-2. Wakulla pounded Franklin County pitching, as six hitters combined for 16 hits, 12 RBIs and 14 runs scored. Mock did her best to jumpstart the offense for Franklin County, reaching base two times, including a single in the third. Varnes also singled that inning, and Newell and Segree each walked. Wakulla scored nine runs in the rst inning to build an early lead. Aggressive base running led to six steals for Franklin County. Mock had four stolen bases, and Newell and Kirvin each one. Franklin County @ Godby The Lady Seahawks lost a tough one at Godby Feb. 14, falling 11-10 in 10 innings. Franklin County was paced by the Newells production, as she reached base four times. She scored two runs and had one RBI. Newell doubled in the second inning and singled in the fourth and 10th innings. Segree was a workhorse in the circle for Franklin County, allowing two earned runs, four hits and ve walks while striking out ve. Both squads had things going at the plate, tallying 21 runs and 25 hits, including 10 extra base hits. Franklin County jumped out to an early 1-0 lead in the top of the rst, following four walks. Franklin County @ Bozeman Varnes three hits helped Franklin County down Bozeman 11-6 in seven innings on Feb. 17 at Panama City. Franklin County hammered Bozeman pitching as six hitters had a eld day, combining for 15 hits, eight RBIs and 10 runs scored. Franklin County piled up the steals, swiping seven bags in all. Newell, Varnes, and Lee each had one stolen base and Mock and Kirvin each two. Franklin County stayed on top until the nal out after taking the lead in the rst, scoring two runs on a two-run triple by Lee. Franklin County added four more runs in the top of the third. Newell singled, plating Varnes to start the inning. That was followed up by Simmons double, scoring Lee. Franklin County built upon its lead with three runs in the fourth. An error scored Kirvin, who had opened the inning with a single. That was followed up by Ally Millenders double, scoring Lee and Newell. Franklin County @ Rickards The Lady Seahawks won 5-1 at Rickards Feb. 21. After Kirvin scored a run in the third, following two Rickards errors, Franklin County added two more in the top of the sixth, spurred by Lees single, and another two in the seventh, on a Mock single and a Newell triple. By David AdlersteinTimes City Editor The Franklin County Seahawks varsity baseball team remains winless in its rst four starts, as players work out the kinks in the opening month of play. On Feb. 13 at Wewahitchaka, the team lost 10-0, and then on Feb. 15, Franklin County hosted Arnold and fell 15-2. On Friday at Bozeman, in the rst district game, the team lost a 6-3 outing. On Tuesday at home, Seahawk sophomore hurler James Newell gave up a two-run homer in the top of the rst to Blountstown, and then settled down to give a solid performance, including an instrumental double play that squelched a run coming home and nailed the runner to rst. Junior Seth Rogers drove home junior Skyler Hutchinson as the Seahawks crawled back to tie the game at 2-2. But a strong performance in the nal two stanzas by the Tigers sealed their 8-3 victory. Members of the team, coached by Mike Emerson and assistant Tim Wheeler, also include senior Marcus Dalton, senior Colton Sheridan, senior Austin Larkin, senior Zack Armistead, senior Brennan Walden, junior Zach Howze, senior Chance Buffkin, sophomore Logan McLeod, senior Adrian Hendels, and junior Billy Harris.Lady Seahawks ride back-to-back winsSeahawks remain winless in four starts THE UPCOMING SCHEDULE INCLUDES:Friday, Feb. 24 @ Liberty Saturday. Feb. 25 vs. Florida High Wednesday, Feb. 29 @ John Paul Thursday, March 1 @ Altha Friday, March 2 @ South Walton Tuesday, March 6 @ Blountstown Friday, March 9 vs. South Walton Monday, March 12 @ East Gadsden Tuesday, March 13 @ West Gadsden Wednesday, March 14 vs. John Paul II Monday, March 19 vs. Wewahitchka Tuesday, March 20 vs. Liberty Friday, March 23 vs. Port St. Joe Thursday, March 29 @ Florida High Friday, March 30 @ Port St. Joe Monday, April 2 vs. Altha Tuesday, April 3 vs. Aucilla Christian Tuesday, April 10 vs. Bozeman Friday, April 13 vs. West Gadsden Tuesday, April 17 @ Aucila Christian Thursday, April 19 @ Arnold Senior pinch runner Marcus Dalton scoots back to rst in Tuesdays game vs. Blountstown. PHOTOS BY DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Time s Senior pitchers Zach Armistead, right, and Adrian Hendels, stand in the dugout as sophomore James Newell sits in the back after pitching Tuesday night. Senior Colton Sheridan races to rst after swatting a single.

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LocalA12 | The Times Thursday, February 23, 2012 Robert C. Bruner Attorney Personal & Business BankruptcyOver 30 Years Legal Experience850-670-3030 bankruptcy relief under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon advertisements. Before you decide, ask us to send you free written information dbutler@coastalcoverage.com Locally owned and operated Home Business Auto Health Workers Comp Over35Years Experience.208 Reid Avenue, Downtown Port St. Joe850.229.1111www.BaysideFloristPSJ.comYour Full Service Wedding and Event Florist Deliveries Available Daily to Apalachicola with minimum order. Your Full Service Wedding and Event Florist Your Full Service Wedding and Event Florist ACTIVISTS from page A1 led a motion last month before the commission. I think our odds are about even, he said. Named as potential intervenors in the merger are Richard Bickel, Dr. Helen E.A. Tudor, Tom Brocato, George Coon, Leon Bloodworth, Michael and Catherine Bailey, Robert Lindsley, Susan Buzzett Clementson and the Apalachicola Area Historical Society. The motion argues these Apalachicola citizens should be granted standing to intervene because the merger is not in the publics best interest. Progress through its action has virtually destroyed the life and livelihood of one of the treasured historic sites in Florida. Craig Cano, a spokesman for FERC, said the citizens were able to le the motion to intervene because of a window of opportunity that opened in December. In September 2011, FERC issued an order that conditionally authorized the merger, on the condition Duke and Progress led a mitigation plan to remedy potential harmful effects on competition in the Carolinas. The companies led their plan in October, but FERC rejected it in December, setting the stage for the companies to come back with a counterproposal for mitigating potential anti-competitive practices that might result from the merger in North and South Carolina. The companies since have asked for a rehearing, which is now pending before FERC. There really is not a deadline for them acting, Cano said. He said because the merger proceeding is a little ways down the track, Jacobs motion is considered a request for an out-of-time intervention and thus has a higher hurdle to cross than had it been led during the original comment period. Though declining to speculate how FERC might rule on Jacobs motion, he pointed to FERC rules posted on its website regarding motions for late intervention. These rules say that FERC might consider whether the movants the parties making the motion had good cause for not ling timely and whether their interest is adequately represented by other parties. FERC also must consider any disruption of the proceeding that might result from permitting intervention and whether any prejudice to, or additional burden on, existing parties might result from permitting intervention. According to the website, FERC is more liberal in granting late intervention at the early stages of a proceeding. A petitioner for late intervention, however, bears a higher burden to show good cause for late intervention after the issuance of a nal order in a proceeding and generally it is Commission policy to deny late intervention at the rehearing stage, even when the movant claims that the decision established a broad policy of general application. Jacobs said he has talked with FERC staffers, who were more optimistic about his chances. They havent said that to me, he said. There are other things were working on, he said. Were going at it from different directions. Jacobs said he has been in talks with Florida Sen. Bill Nelson, as well as other senators from Gulf states, to see if BP restoration money funneled to the Gulf might be available. One of those projects would be to assist Apalachicola in protecting the historical district from these people, he said. Progress Energy says they dont have the money to x the problem. Im trying to assist them in nding the money. Jacobs reiterated last week that he intends to ght on until the battle is won. Its not over till its over, and its not over yet, he said. From my perspective and that of people interested in the history of Apalachicola and preservation of that wonderful town, there is a solution. Im in it for the long haul. Were going to do what it takes, Jacobs said. Were going to keep at it; you never know whats going to work. FLY HIGH from page A1a number of jobs, Lockley said. I want to see a lot of jobs; you know, so many jobs in a number of years. Commissioner Smokey Parrish said, theyre going to come in and train some locals to run it to their standards, but theyre going to be in North Carolina. I dont know how thats going to work. Youre dealing with someone you really dont know. On paper they look very good. Im not comfortable looking at a long-term contract now. Ted Mosteller, chairman of the airport advisory board, said representatives of Fly High were on hand to answer questions. Karel Van Der Linden and his wife, Mari-Elena Baldwin, owners of Fly High, took the podium and were prepared to answer questions elded by the board. Van Der Linden described their experience in the aviation industry. According to their proposal packet, he has 25 years experience in FBO management, fuel, hotels and casinos. He served as vice president nance of cer and corporate controller for Mercury Air Centers from 2000 to 2009, managing 30 FBO locations including ve maintenance facilities. Baldwin has 22 years of travel and tourism industry experience. She is the owner of Island Spice Inc., which represents Renaissance Aruba Resort, Renaissance Curacao Resort and Grand Cayman Beach Suites. She is also a member of the Travelocity advisory board. You can look at our records and see in one year what we achieved in North Carolina, Van Der Linden told commissioners. He said Fly High increased fuel sales at the Lexington Airport by 50 percent over the rst year by using media to market the facility, including building a website for the airport and courting Facebook followers to engage potential customers. He said Fly High has relationships with eets of commercial aircraft that use fuel cards to purchase fuel nationally. He said Fly High has 11 employees in Lexington and hopes to eventually employ the same number here. The Apalachicola airport has the potential to sell as much fuel as Lexington because the airport is well appointed and the area is a tourist destination, he said. He stressed the need for excellent on-ground service to attract pilots. I want to come here myself with one of the senior guys, but everyone else we want to hire here, Van Der Linden said. Fly High began with ve employees in Lexington and at the end of six months, employed 11; Van Der Linden expected to employ at least nine people here. Line employees will earn $8 hourly, managers $12 hourly and mechanics $15 hourly, he said. Baldwin said the company has a policy of hiring pilots, veterans and aviation students. She and her husband said they are committed to being hands-on managers and will spend substantial time in the county. Van Der Linden said Fly High has infrastructure that allows him to manage most problems from anywhere in the world. He answers his phone at night, Baldwin said. Van Der Linden said the FBO station will be open seven days a week, 12 hours a day, but that he would make special arrangements to serve emergency vehicles whenever needed.By Lois Swoboda Times Staff Writer Progress Energys new power poles wont kill you unless they fall on you. They might be seen by locals as ugly and detracting from the towns historical character, but there is scant scienti c evidence to support the idea that cancer is caused by exposure to the Extremely Low Frequency Radiation (ELF) radiating from Progress Energys new transmission lines. A 1976 study rst questioned whether ELF could cause cancer in children. Since then, dozens of studies have sought to determine whether ELF causes physical changes to the human body. Though a few studies gave a weak indication there might be a relationship between cancer and ELF, later researchers have been unable to obtain the same ndings in repeat experiments. In many cases, people exposed to ELF in the workplace also had been exposed to cancercausing chemicals. Where there seemed to be a cluster of cancers around high voltage lines, researchers were cautious in blaming ELF for the illness. In 1986, M.E. McDowell found a spike in lung cancer among women living near power lines in East Anglia, England, but cautioned that without information on tobacco use, his data was difcult to interpret. Another British study that seemed to show a strong relationship between childhood leukemia and exposure to ELF has been criticized because researchers considered the house where the child was born, not the home where the child lived. Adding to the evidence that exposure to ELF is not linked to cancer are ndings that laboratory exposure of animals to ELF did not elevate the rate of cancer, even in a strain of mice genetically predisposed to developing leukemia. The majority of research showed no relationship between any form of cancer and ELF exposure. Louis Heynick, the rst author of Radio Frequency Electromagnetic Fields: Cancer, Mutagenesis and Genotoxicity, a publication of the U.S. government, concluded, The ndings of this review indicate that there is no reproducible scienti cally valid experimental basis for the claims about a linkage between such exposures and the initiation, promotion or coproduction of cancer. Investigation of The Florida Cancer Data System records and the Florida Community Health Assessment Resource Tool Set also shows Franklin County does not have the highest rate of cancer in Florida. That unfortunate honor goes to Union County with 448 cancer deaths per 100,000 people in 2010. Franklin County, with only 170 deaths per 100,000 annually, was just barely higher than the state average of 160. In 2010, Franklin County had a lower rate of cancer deaths than any of the adjacent counties. In 2006, an exceptionally healthy year for Franklin County, the only county in Florida with a lower number of reported cancer cases per capita was Glades. Since 2000, the cancer death rate here has been level, and the overall trend shows a slight decline in cancer deaths. Deaths speci cally because of lung cancer, and the percentage of adults who use tobacco, are both higher in Franklin County than the state average.Studies: Radiation from poles unlikely to cause cancer There are other things were working on. Were going at it from different directions. Im in it for the long haul. Were going to do what it takes. Were going to keep at it; you never know whats going to work. Buddy Jacobs attorney

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LocalThe Times | A13Thursday, February 23, 2012 GET YOUR AD IN 653-8868Trades & Services Laban Bontrager, DMD Monica Bontrager, DMD 12761 Pea Ridge Road Bristol, Florida 32321TELEPHONE (850) 643-5417 Bristol Dental ClinicDENTURE LAB ON PREMISESSame Day Service on Repairs and Relines Don Lively General Contractors LICENSED ANDINSURED 20 YEARSEXPERIENCE P.O. Box 439 Carrabelle, FL 32322 697-2783 or Mobile 566-2603RC0066499RG0065255 Carrabelle Visa, Discover, and American Express Honored at Participating Ace Stores JACKSONSBuilding Supplies Building Supplies & Auto Repair Carrabelle 697-3333 We Deliver AnywhereHardware and Paint Center Electrical & Finish Carpentry850-229-6751850-227-5666Michael & Anthony TonyPoloronis&Sons,Inc. From A to ZPO Box 364Port St. Joe, FL 32457850-340-0756 Gregs Handyman Service & Lawn Maintenance NO JOB TOO BIGPLEASE CALL JOE @ 850-670-5478joes_lawn@yahoo.comJOES LAWN CARE PILE DRIVING FOUNDATION/PILING REPAIR DOCK/MARINE WORK MOORING BOUYSOFFICE: 850.227.1709FAX: 850.762.2552 CELL: 850.527.5725 HOWARD227FAIRPOINT.NET ROBERTS APPLIANCE REPAIR ALL MAJOR BRANDS 18 Shadow Lane Apalachicola, FL 32320 Phone: (850) 653-8122 Cell: (850) 653-7654 Trades & Services Franklin County ElementaryThe following is the Honor Roll for Franklin County Elementary Schools second nine-week period.KindergartenLinda Gibson All As: Monika Bell, William Chipman, Logan Bentley A/B: Joseph Aden Bass. Maryssa Branch, Zoe Cartiia, Marcus Clayton, Dillon Evans, Caitlin King, Tristan Lashley, Rebecca Mahon, Harmony Malone, Aniyah Rivera, Gavin Selley Perfect Attendance: Caitlin King, Rebecca Mahon, Harmony Malone Good Citizenship: Josie Smith, Aniyah Rivera1st GradeDebbie Childress All As: Emaleigh Segree, Kylie Rudd A/B: Adia Siler, Kaiden Faison, Clarice Harris, Autumn Loesch, Brianna Sanders, Kaylee Segree, Ethan Shirley Good Citizenship: Autumn Loesch, Clarice Harris Katrina Ham All As: Grace Carroll, Dax Chitty, Marissa Gilbert, Ayla Navarro, Parker Mock, Matthew Gordon A/B:, Calayia Jones, Emily Smith, Ariana Tipton, Good Citizenship: Emily Fichera, Ariana Tipton, Leigh Smith All As: Don Davis, Lucy Edwards, TyAsia Yarrell A/B: September Ferrell, Emma Gragg, Daylon Hunnings, Tariah Jones, Ryland Martina, Shalyn Massey, Riley ONeal, Sarai Crumbliss Perfect Attendance: Bryson Carmichael, Don Davis, Ethan Edgecomb, Lucy Edwards, September Ferrell, Tariah Jones, Zach Libby Good Citizenship: Ethan Edgecomb, Tariah Jones Brenda Vause All As: Ellis Billingsley, Kyera Crawford, Jaden Golden, Alondra Jimenez, Jaylan Prince, Luis Ramirez, Evan Stanley A/B: Jessie Alday, Christian Brown, TaShawn Jones, Aubree Swango-Moore, William Wallace Perfect Attendance: Simon Garner, Jaylan Prince Good Citizenship: Jaylan Prince, Montana Woods2nd GradeShellie Blackburn All As: Cassandra Gibbens, Jack Robinson, Rachel Rudd, Austin Segree, Maddison Whitten A/B: Ariel Johnson, Michael Melton, Marina ONeal Perfect Attendance: Clayton Kelley, Michael Melton, Saunti Turrell Missy Cumbie All As: Josh Banico, Garrison Cook, Brooklyn ONeal, Kristen Stancil A/B: Gage Boone, Alexis Britcher, Bradley Burch, Cynthia Ceron, Grace Patterson, Mason Ray, Klaun Richards, Rebecca Shiver, Annie Smith, Tate Stanley, Larry Winchester Perfect Attendance: Gage Boone, Alexis Britcher, Cynthia Ceron, Brooklyn ONeal, Klaun Richards, Kristen Stancil, Larry Winchester Good Citizenship: Cynthia Ceron, Mason Ray Jeannie Ford All As: Dylan Grif n, Brantly Richards, Brianna Sutcliffe, Emma Crum, Cameron Nash A/B: Khiya Bell, Ava McAnally, Brendon Polous, Sydney Shuman, Trinity Cassell Perfect Attendance: Dylan Grif n, Mitchell Woods Good Citizenship: Trinity Cassell, Cameron Nash Misty Luberto All As: Kyler Custer A/B: Kiani Allen, Trinity Barron, Sage Brannan, Brianna Cooper, Andrew Kuhner, Gage Norris, Jalynn Segree, Ashton Shaw, Kylie Smith, Jerymiah Stephens, Hayley Creamer, Cadance Woods Good Citizenship: Maliah Topham, Sage Brannan 3rd GradeMarvin Boyd A/B: Layla Chisholm, Camron Evans, Francisco Juan, Stephen Malone, Logan Waller Perfect Attendance: Francisco Juan, Layla Chisholm, Danib Durbin, Stephen Malone, Carson Stusky, Makayla Varner Good Citizenship: Alaina Wilson, Charles Granger Paula Dykes A/B: Marci Kelley, Jarvis Turrell Perfect Attendance: Andrea Cooper, Jarvis Turrell Good Citizenship: Johnny Sullivan, Cailin Kuhner Pam Schaffer All As: Brycin Huckeba, Katie Newman, Clinton Rester A/B: Ethan Anderson, Arryonna Cargill, Tressie Edwards, Hollie Larkin, Destanie Proctor, Eli Whaley Perfect Attendance: Cole Shelley Good Citizenship: Krystina Arroyo, Charlee Winchester Lois Shirley All As: Austin Gray, Shirah Pely, Madalyn Topham A/B: Christian Mann, Anthony Millender, Jordan Millender, Landon Millender, Sean Nichols, Brooklyn Turner Perfect Attendance: Austin Gray, Anthony Millender, Breauna Shiver, Justin Worten Good Citizenship: Blake Chastain, Ashaureah Brown4th GradeDonna Barber All As: Cale Barber, Caleb Sutten eld A/B: Chasity Ard, Isaiah Barber, Tommy Gragg, Darcy Kelly, Abner Ramirez, Kayla Souders Perfect Attendance: Chasity Ard, Cale Barber, Isaiah Barber, Alex Hardy, Darcy Kelly, Abner Ramirez Good Citizenship: Brandon Farr, Honesti Williams Lynn Clark All As: Kynsie Erickson, Jace Faircloth A/B: Dyna Edgecomb, MeiLi Chambers, Nicholas Hutchins, Morgan Malone, Jason White Perfect Attendance: Allyson Emswiller, Jonathan Lewis, Morgan Malone, Kaytlin Marriot, Good Citizenship: Morgan Malone Gretchen Hedman All As: Takiah Ford A/B: Drake Stanley, Lane Roberson, Aelyah Roberson, Mikel Register, Jesse Ray, Rosie Davis, Teri Messer Perfect Attendance: Hunter Anderson, Jesse Ray, Rosie Davis, Takiah Ford Good Citizenship: Drake Stanley, Tommy Varner Laura King All As: KT Nessly, Chloe Owens, Jacob Shirley A/B: Peyton Chitty, Kaleb Foley, Zander McCalpin, Keondre Sewell, Shelby Thompson, Freedom Wilson Perfect Attendance: Kaleb Foley, Zander McCalpin, KT Nessly, Keondre Sewell, Jacob Stanley Good Citizenship: Jacob Shirley, Chloe Owens5th GradeCathy Creamer All As: Mikalin Huckeba A/B: Kiana Foley Perfect Attendance: Kiana Foley Good Citizenship: Brooke Newell, Mikalin Huckeba Audrey Gay All As: Hannah Hogan, Casey Riley, Ethan Riley, Tonner Segree, Beyla Walker A/B: Colby Boatwright, Aracely Gallegos, Jonathan Ham, Tanaya Harris, Mitchell Monroe, Duncan Whaley Perfect Attendance: Benjamin Juarez, Thomas Juan Good Citizenship: Aracely Gallegos, Casey Riley Melanie Humble All As: Jessica Rudd A/B: Edgar Ceron, Fisher Edwards, Hunter Kelley, Jackson Mahon Perfect Attendance: Lorenzo ONeal Good Citizenship: Jessica Rudd, Brittani Bouzemann HONOR ROLL Prescribed burn this week on the islandOver the past few months plans have been made between the Florida Forest Service and the Florida Department of Environmental Protection (owners of the undeveloped property in Unit 4) to work cooperatively using prescribed re to reduce wild re risk on the DEP property bordering East Pine Ave. from the bridge to 11th St. E. on St George Island. Burning this area is scheduled to occur during the week of Feb. 17 to 29. If you suffer from lung or breathing issues it is strongly recommended you avoid this area of the island or plan to leave the island on the days when burning is being done. This project is performed by trained and quali ed professionals from our agencies and will signi cantly reduce the wild re risk to those living in Unit 4. Prescribed res are only conducted when weather parameters are suitable. The nal decision to burn is made daily, after reviewing the Predicted Fire Weather forecast for that particular day. Prescribed burning mimics natural re cycles to restore healthy forests and natural communities, and reduce undergrowth that accumulates over time, thereby increasing the potential for wild re. Burned lands experience an increase in native wild owers, birds and other wildlife. We appreciate your patience during this week as we ask you to tolerate a little smoke now so we can prevent the smoke a wild re would produce later. Further questions should be addressed to Todd W. Schroeder, wild re mitigation specialist, Florida Forest Service, 519-0666 or Lee Edmiston, manager, Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve, 670-7721.Camp Gordon Johnston honors black historyOn Saturday Feb. 25, a special showing of The Werth Eleven will be presented in the movie theatre at the Camp Gordon Johnston World War II Museum, located in the Carrabelle Municipal Complex. The docudrama will have two showings: 1100 and 1300 hours (11 a.m.. and 1 p.m..) Admission is by donation and there will be free popcorn. During the war, 1.2 million African-Americans served in the armed forces. Fully 125,000 served overseas; 708 were killed. Among those were The Werth Eleven. Their story was lost to history, until now. The Werth Eleven is an ambitious docudrama based on the true story of 11 Africa-American soldiers who were ruthlessly murdered by the Nazi SS during the Battle of the Bulge. The lm weaves exciting visual effects, never before seen archival footage, and compelling interviews to detail one of the least-known atrocities committed during the war. Featured as The G.I. Film of the Year it is notable that the soldier/actors are present-day active duty soldiers serving in Germany. Because of the violence depicted in this docudrama it is recommended for viewing by adults only. News BRIEFS

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A14| The Times Thursday, February 23, 2012 CLASSIFIEDS ToPlace Your Classified ad inCall Our New Numbers Now!Call: 850-747-5020 Toll Free:800-345-8688 Fax: 850-747-5044 Email: thestar@pcnh.com Email: thetimes@pcnh.com theAPALACHICOLA & CARRABELLETIMES CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW 77331 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 19-2011-CA-000302 BRANCH BANKING AND TRUST COMPANY, Plaintiff, vs. NANCY REYNOLDS BRUCKER, et al., Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION TO: NANCY REYNOLDS BRUCKER AND UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF NANCY REYNOLDS BRUCKER if alive, and/or dead his (their) unknown heirs, devisees, legatees or grantees and all persons or parties claiming by, through, under or against him (them). Residence is unknown. YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an Action for foreclosure of a mortgage on the following property in FRANKLIN County, Florida: LOT 2, BAY PALM VILLAGE, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, AT PAGE 33, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, LEE, AND EXCEPT ANY PART OF SAID LAND LYING WITHIN THE EASEMENT AS SHOWN ON SAID PLAT. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on SPEAR AND HOFFMAN, P.A., Attorneys, whose address is 9700 South Dixie Highway, Suite 610, Miami, Florida 33156, (305) 6702299, within 30 days after the first publication of this notice, and to file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on SPEAR AND HOFFMAN, P.A., attorneys or immediately thereafter, otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint or Petition. WITNESS my hand and seal of this Court on this 18th day of November, 2011. Marcia M. Johnson As Clerk of the Court By: Terry E. Creamer As Deputy Clerk February 16, 23, 2012 76594T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO: 10-000275-CA NAVY FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, Plaintiff, vs. DEREK COFFMAN A/K/A DEREK G COFFMAN; KIMBERLY COFFMAN A/K/A KIMBERLY W. COFFMAN; SANDS OF CARRABELLE HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC.; UNKNOWN TENANT #1;UNKNOWN TENANT #2, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE is hereby given that the a dersigned Clerk of the Circuit Court of Franklin County, Florida, will on the 21st day of March, 2012, at 11:00 oclock A.M at the Front steps of the Franklin County Courthouse in Apalachicola Florida, offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash, the following-described property situate in Franklin County, Florida: LOT 5, BLOCK 71, THE SANDS OF CARRABELLE, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 8, PAGE 12, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA pursuant to the Final Judgment entered in a case pending in said Court, the style of which is indicated above. Any person or entity claiming an interest in the surplus, if any, resulting from the foreclosure sale, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a claim on same with the Clerk of Court within 60 days after the foreclosure sale. WITNESS my hand and official seal of said Court this 2nd day of February, 2012. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Clerk of the Court, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, FL 32320 or call (850) 653-8861, within 2 working days of your receipt of this Notice. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call 1-850-653-2227. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By: Terry Creamer Deputy Clerk ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF: Mark William Hernandez Butler & Hosch, P.A. 3185 S. Conway Rd., Ste. E Orlando, Florida 32812 (407) 381-5200 Feb 23, Mar 1, 2012 76925T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY CASE NO.: 2011-11-CA CENTENNIAL BANK as successor in interest to APALACHICOLA STATE BANK, a division of COASTAL COMMUNITY BANK, Plaintiff, vs. COASTLINE PROPERTIES OF NORTH FLORIDA, LLC, et al, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Summary Judgment of Foreclosure as to Count 1, dated January 24, 2012, in the abovestyled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at 11:00 a.m. Eastern Time) on March 14, 2012, at the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida, the following described real property located in Franklin County, Florida: EXHIBIT A ATTACHED HERE TO AND MADE A PART HEREOF. COMMENCE AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED BCC) MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 13, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND PROCEED NORTH ALONG THE WEST BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION 13, A DISTANCE OF 1,828.93 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED BCC), THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 22 SECONDS EAST 2,199.40 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED BCC) THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 36 SECONDS EAST 375.00 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #4261) MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING, FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING THENCE RUN NORTH 53 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 635.92 FEET, MORE OR LESS TO THE RIVERS EDGE OF NEW RIVER THENCE RUN NORTH 39 DEGREES 42 MINUTES 11 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIVERS EDGE 124.87 FEET, MORE OR LESS, THENCE RUN SOUTH 57 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 24 SECONDS EAST 511.04 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (RLS #4261), THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 36 SECONDS EAST 200.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SAID LANDS LYING AND BEING SITUATE IN SECTION 13, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH A NON-EXCLUSIVE EASEMENT FOR INGRESS AND EGRESS AS DESCRIBED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 269, PAGE 243, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 25th day of January, 2012. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of Court Franklin County, FL By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk NOTICE TO PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Danny Davis, Court Technology Office, Office of Court Administration, 301 S. Monroe St. Rm 225, Tallahassee, FL 32303, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving notification if the time before for scheduled appearance is less than 7 days, if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. February, 16, 23, 2012 77319T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 11-CA-000183 FARMERS AND MERCHANTS BANK, Plaintiff, vs. MARSHALL C. KNIGHT, JR., ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT (S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES OR OTHER CLAIMANTS, Defendants. CLERKS NOTICE OF SALE UNDER F.S. CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated January 30, 2012 in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Franklin County Courthouse, 2nd Floor Lobby, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL at 11:00 a.m. on March 21, 2012, the following described property: Lot 11, Shell Harbour, according to the map or plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 4, Pages 25 and 26, Public Records of Franklin County, Florida ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. DATED this 31st day of January, 2012. Marcia M. Johnson CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT By: Michelle Maxwell Deputy Clerk February 16, 23, 2012 77010T NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE Under Florida Statutes Self Service Storage Facility Act 83.801-83.809, Bluff Road Storage will sell for cash, to the highest bidder, the contents of the following storage units, on Friday, March 2, 2012. The public sale will be conducted at Bluff Road Storage, 1005 Bluff Road, Apalachicola, Florida at 9:00 a.m. Owner may redeem unit contents prior to sale date and time, cash only! Bluff Road Storage reserves the right to bid. STORAGE UNIT# 26 Don Snyder Contents-Household STORAGE UNIT #34 Bobby Creamer Contents-Household STORAGE UNIT #96 Bill Shirah Contents-Household STORAGE UNIT #125 Larry Cummings Contents-Household Feb 23, Mar 1, 2012 77421T NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED BIDS Franklin County is seeking proposals from qualified mechanical contractors to replace a Carrier condensing unit that serves the Franklin County Courthouse Annex Building located at 34 Forbes Street in Apalachicola, Florida. Proposals shall include all costs for labor, equipment, materials, warranties and sub-contractors necessary for the replacement of the required equipment. The condensing unit to be replaced is a Carrier 40-ton Model 38AH-044-600BA. The condensing unit must be re-integrated with the building controls and set up to operate with the existing VAV system. The proposing contractor is responsible for ordering all options and accessories with the unit to provide a completely operational system. System must be a Carrier 40-Ton Model 38AH-044-600BA or an equivalent system. If an equivalent system is proposed the contractor must provide rating data for the proposed system and specify any accessories that would be necessary to make the system work, such as TXVs refrigerant line sizing, etc. The project is located in a harsh environment adjacent to saltwater. The unit must be provided with copper coils and fins with an epoxy coating applied to the entire coil assembly to protect from corrosion and provide a 5-year manufacturers warranty on materials and workmanship for the condensing unit, as well as, factory start up and one year parts and labor warranties from the contractor. The proposing contractor is responsible for the removal and disposal of the unit to be replaced. The two compressors on the unit will be removed by the contractor and given to Franklin County for storage. Disposal of the existing unit and refrigerant shall be compliant with all EPA and local codes, rules, and ordinances. Bids should in a sealed envelope and be clearly marked Courthouse Annex Condenser. Bids will be received until 4:30 p.m. (EST), on Monday, March 5, 2012, at the Franklin County Clerks Office, Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, Florida 32320-2317, and will be opened and read aloud on Tuesday, March 6, 2012, at the regularly scheduled County Commission meeting which begins at 9:00 a.m. at 34 Forbes Street, Apalachicola, Florida. The Board of County Commissioners reserves the right to waive informalities in any bid, to accept and/or reject any or all bids, and to accept the bid that in their judgment will be in the best interest of Franklin County. Any questions should be directed to Mark Curenton at 850653-9783 x-160. February 16, 23, 2012 77433T NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW PURSUANT TO SECTION 865.09, FLORIDA STATUTES NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of The Moorings at Carrabelle located at 1000 US Hwy 98, Carrabelle, FL in the County of FRANKLIN, in the City of Carrabelle, Florida intends to register the said name with the Divisions of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, Florida. Dated at Carrabelle Florida, this 31st day of January, 2012. REDUS Moorabelle, LLC February 23, 2012 Incorrect Insertion PolicyFor Classified In-column AdvertisersAll ads placed by phone are read back to the advertiser to insure correctness. The newspaper will assume correctness at the time of the read-back procedure unless otherwise informed. Please your ad. Advertisers are requested to check the advertisement on the first insertion for correctness. Errors should be reported immediately. Your Florida Freedom newspaper will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion, nor will it be liable for any error in advertisements to a greater extent than the cost of the space occupied by the error. Any copy change, during an ordered schedule constitutes a new ad and new charges. We do not guarantee position of ANY ad under any classification.

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, February 23, 2012 The Times | A15 AUCTION! 800.257.4161higgenbotham.comM.E. Higgenbotham, CAI, FL Lic.# AU305 AB158 James Lee Owen, Jr., GA BR#341775, H63426, AU0037441 Industrial Way, Grantville, GA High Volume Water Well & Historic Mill btnfrbbbbbbbfbf 1706 Hwy 98, Carrabelle, FL !!fn"$fnf%b'f"$(b)ff*!f%bf +btnfrb-/:b%bfbb;b)nb?b@bf%nffbD -/:rf!b'fbKb'%bNbP%n!fbQ/n%S T;btnfrbb;b'fbX%rbKbbf"Y%bX%r tZb$!b:b$(b)ff*!f%bbbb$fb%fb 3 Bank Owned Properties btnfrt rt rt In cooperation with RowellAuctions.com ONLINE ONLY Rowell Realty & Auction Co., Inc.800-323-8388 10% Buyers Premium AU 479, AB 2962% Broker ParticipationLot, James Bay Subd., Carrabelle, FL 4 Lots, Whispering Pines Subd., Eastpoint, FLBidding Ends March 6th at 3 p.m. EST 63 Bank Foreclosed Properties in North FLMany Selling Absolute!2078232 $37,000 5 Acres near Crystal Lake on Amos Hayes Rd, property has well septic and power pole. Current survey is available. About 1.5 acres of the property is cleared. 850-271-5761 and leave a message. Total Down Pmt $6752002 Ford Focus T otal Price $5,5000% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!!Text FL98443 to 56654 Total Down Pmt $9752001 Ford Expedition -3 Rows T otal Price $5,8000% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!!Text FL98447 to 56654 Total Down Pmt $5752001 Chevy Blazer 4 Door T otal Price $4,2000% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!!Text FL98441 to 56654 Total Down Pmt $25002004 Chevy Silverdao X/Cab T otal Price $8,7000% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!!Text FL98450 to 56654 Total Down Pmt $12752001 Chevy Silverdao X/Cab T otal Price $6,8000% Interest Daylight Auto Financing 2816 Hwy 98 West 850-215-1769 9am-9pm Mon-Sat 11am-6pm Sunday You Are Automatically Approved If You Can Make Payments On Time!!!Text FL98450 to 56654 Buell S3 Thunderbolt Motorcycle, Harley Davidson Motor, runs great and garage kept, 17,000 miles. $3,500!! Call 850-271-5761 and leave a message. 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322850-697-9604 850-323-0444 www.seacrestre.comwww. rst tness.com/carrabellePROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND RENTALSRENTALS1 BR RIVER CONDO, BOAT SLIP3 Night Minimum .......................$105 PLUS DAILY3 BR 1 BA FURNISHED HOUSEMonthly Rate, Carrabelle ................................$8501 BR 1 BA UNFURNISHED APTLanark, Remodeled, Includes Water ...............$4752 BR 1 BA UNFURNISHED APTLanark ............................................................$4501 BR, SUN ROOM/DAYBEDFurnished, Lanark ..........................................$4503 BR 2 BA FURNISHED HOMEOn River, Boat Dock & Lift ............................$10002 BR 1 BA FURNISHED HOUSEOn Bay ..........................................................$10003 BR 3 BA FURNISHED CONDODowntown, 3 Night Minimum ....$105 PLUS DAILYOFFICE SPACE HWY 98 Frontage, Carrabelle ....$550 Plus Utilities St. George Island $160 week, Electric, Satellite, Garbage incl. Pool tble. 12 X 65 deck w/Beautiful view 850-653-5114 St. George Island 2Br, 1Ba, Ground floor, Satellite. 12 x 50 Deck. Only $250 per week. Call: 850-653-5114 Lanark Village Carlton St. #5, 1 Br 1 Ba, All Tile, Walk-in Closet, Landlord pays Electric and Water, $525 month + $300 deposit. Call 850-927-2838 or 864-356-5949 Lanark Village Parker St., 2 Br 1 Ba, All Tile, $525 month + $300 deposit. Please Call 850-927-2838 or 864-356-5949 1 or 3 BRCH/A in Apalachicola, FL. 850-643-7740. Eastpointe-Carrabelle 1bd, 800sf, $350 bi-weekly, (or $685/mo) includes: all utilities, elec, water, Sat TV, W/D, stone FP, & central AC. Secluded, 1/2 mile from beach. 6 mo lease. 1st & security. 954-816-7004 Text FL94643 to 56654 Magnolia Bluff Bayfront Sunset view. Spacious 3 br, 2.5 bath, large family room, screened deck. All appliances including W/D, water & trash paid $1300 + dep call 877-963-4321 orsunsetplaceinfo@gmail.comText FL97262 to 56654 12x60 2 br, 1 ba, Mobile Home at 555 Oyster Rd, $450 mo, $250 dep. Available March 1, (850) 640-0759 or (850) 257-6214 1 BR/1BA unfurnished apartment, downtown Apalach. Balcony, water, satellite, wireless included. $650 plus electric 653-8801 Lanark Village: Clean 2 bedroom, 1 bath, screened porch, AC Long term lease: 7 months min. $500 monthly + $350. security deposit, references required or wkly & wkend rental w/deposit Pets-will consider. Non smoking. 850-212-2063 Text FL95716 to 56654 Publishers NoticeAll real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on a equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. Southern V illas of Apalachicola Apartments Now accepting applications for 2br Handicap accessible unit. Some rental assistance may be available. Call 850-653-9277 TDD/TTY 711. This institution is an equal opportunity provider, and employer. Medical/HealthWeems MemorialIs now hiring for the following positions: Dietary Aide Paramedic Lab Technician EMT RN Housekeeping Registration Applications are available atwww weemsmemorial.com and may be submitted to Ginny Griner, WMH HR Director, ggriner@ weemsmemorial.com or FAXED to 850-653-1879 Web ID 34197890 AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train for hands-on Aviation Career. FAA Approved Program. Financial Aid if qualified. Job Placement Assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance. 877-206-9405 ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE. *Medical *Business *Hospitality. Job Placement Assistance. Computer available. Financial aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 866-467-0054. wwwCenturaOnline.com Apalach RestaurantFull Service turn key restaurant. Excellent downtown location Lease. Call for information 850-653-8801 See emeraldcoastjobs.com to nd a job at the intersection of both.Wouldnt you like a job that ful lls you both professionally and personally? With Monsters new ltering tools, you can quickly hone in on the job thats right for you. So visit emeraldcoastjobs.com and nd a job that makes everybody happy. Rental RerservationistFickling Vacation Rentals is looking for an experienced rental reservationist, F/T or P/T. Must have good customer service and computer skills. Pick up application at Fickling of ce on Island. Annual Boy Scout Yard Sale CHILI COOK-OFF CHILI COOK-OFF WEEKEND WEEKEND at Sun Coast Realty at Sun Coast Realty 224 Franklin Blvd 224 Franklin Blvd on St George Island on St George Island MARCH 5TH & 6TH MARCH 5TH & 6TH You can donate unwanted items You can donate unwanted items and leave with and leave with NEW NEW treasures treasures Support Local Co-Ed Support Local Co-Ed Scouting & Sailing Programs Scouting & Sailing Programs March 5th & 6th March 5th & 6th Call (850)927-2395 Call (850)927-2395 for more info for more infoBack By Popular DemandCome on by and visit us! Food Svs/HospitalityPapa Joes Oyster Bar & GrillNow HiringAll Positions!!! Apply in person only GeneralSeasonal EmployeeNeeded for an Eco Tourism Company on St George Island. Must be outgoing and organized. Call Journeys (850) 927-3259 between 10am-4pm Web ID#: 34197637 Logistics/TransportNow HiringRetail help needed. Commission based with flexible schedule, part time. Shipwright Wood Boat builder with experience, Part time. USCG Captain, Part tine, with 100 ton license. Call (850) 320-0843 ask for Daniel Web ID#: 34197868 Administrative/ClericalImmediate OpeningReceptionist/ Front DeskSeeking fast learner with good customer service skills for Real Estate office on St. George Island. Candidate must be reliable, motivated, and a team player. Computer skills a must and weekend work required. Experience a plus. Send resume to Century 21 Collins Realty P.O. Box 589 Eastpoint, FL 32328 or Fax to 850-927-2360 or e-mail sales@century21collinsrealty.com Web ID#: 34198491 Food Svs/Hospitality*Servers *Cooks Dishwashers *Bartenders *BussersBLUE PARROT Now HIRINGPlease apply in person between 9a-5pm 7 days a week@ Blue Parrot St. Georges Island Food Svs/HospitalityCookPart time full service cook, drug free environment, Letter, resume or list of previous experience to P.O. Box 405 Eastpoint, Fl 32328 Food Svs/HospitalityWanted!!!Part time Night Auditor/Front Desk Must be dependable, have phone and own transport. Bookkeeping experience a plus. Apply in person at Gibson Inn team. 51 Avenue C Install/Maint/RepairHousekeepersNeeded*Full or part time positions available *Must be able to work weekends. *Have own transportation *Some experience preferred. *Must be able to work under pressure *Must be able to work well with others. *Pay will be based upon experience. Apply in person at the Buccaneer Inn on St. George Island between the hours of 9am to 4pm Monday through Friday. Background check will be performed. Mexico Beach 42nd St. February 25. 9:00 Eastern/ 8:00 Central.3-FAMILY SUPER SALECleaned out stuff, some antiques, formals, furniture, toys, kitchen, John Perry Sculptures, art. Great prices! Text FL98421 to 56654 GUN SHOWSanta Rosa County Auditorium, Milton, FL Feb 25th & 26th 9am -5pm call (850) 957-4952 or (850) 261-8407 General Admission $6 DIABETIC TEST STRIPS NEEDEDCall Bob (850)710-0189 Labra-Gold Retriever Puppies, 6 wks old, vet ckd, vacs & wormed. Both parents Registered. Father is a Lab, Mom is a Golden, Beautiful and loveable. $250. 850-227-2185 Text FL97782 to 56654 Miniature Yorkie $75.00 to a good family. Please call (850) 773-2776.Text FL97678 to 56654 Adorable YORKIE AKCpuppies, only 2 left. 1 female and 1 Male. They are 9 weeks old, have been Health Certified and 1st shots. $600 Call 850-554-0320 Panama City In-Home Services Do you or your loved ones need in-home services? Are you worried that you or your loved one is in danger of nursing home placement?WE CAN HELP...Wakulla County Senior Citizen Center is providing services in Franklin County. Based on your assessed needs we can provide case management, light homemaking, personal care, home delivered meals, companionship, emergency alert response systems, consumable/durable medical supplies, pest control, and respite (available to those with full-time care givers). All applicants will be screened and priority will be given to those having the greatest assessed need. Others will be placed on a waiting list for services. Please call 1-800-963-5337 and get the help that you need to stay in your home as long as possible. We also offer congregate meals, activities and health support at the Franklin County Senior Services of Carrabelle. Located at 302 Ave. F West in Carrabelle or call Gayle Mathes at 850-697-2371.Text FL96704 to 56654 These tiny ads sell, hire, rent and inf orm f or thousands of f amilies each wee k.Let a little Classified ad do a big j ob f or you. Emerald Coast Marketplace 747-5020

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LocalA16 | The Times Thursday, February 23, 2012 Our local real estate experts have identied what they feel are the best values around and are oering them to you in Real Estate Picks! (In this section), Discover the best real estate values in Mexico Beach, Port St. Joe, Apalachicola, Cape San Blas, St. George Island, Carrabelle and surrounding areas. Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Real Estate Picks Barbara & Larry Iman 850-323-1555REALTORS barbara.iman@gmail.comMLS#244206$777,777St. George Island ST. GEORGE GULF FRONTSeller nancing available for gulf front home on East End of SGI with gorgeous gulf and beach views. Outstanding rental, grossing almost $100k in 2011. Sold furnished with 3 BR/2.5BA. Barbara & Larry Iman 850-323-1555 Barbara & Larry Iman Barbara & Larry Iman 850-323-1555REALTORS barbara.iman@gmail.comMLS#243810$144,900Apalachicola Barbara & Larry Iman 850-323-1555 Barbara & Larry Iman CHARMING 2-STORY CONDO Beautifully maintained 3BR/2.5 BA plus bonus room. Wood & tile throughout. All appliances stay; new refrig.; new paint in 2010; built in 2005.Move in ready! Barbara & Larry Iman 850-323-1555REALTORS barbara.iman@gmail.comMLS#246018$30,000Eastpoint MAGNOLIA BAY PRIVACY Beautiful wooded 1 acre building site in high end Magnolia Bay subdivision, facing sunsets over sparkling Magnolia Bay. Located across street from Bay with gated security, community pool/tennis courts and bay front gazebo/boat ramp. Bank-owned. Barbara & Larry Iman 850-323-1555 Barbara & Larry Iman Barbara & Larry Iman John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.comMLS#245369$1,050,000St. George IslandPLANTATION BEACHFRONT 5 BR, 5 BA home across the street from the new Plantation John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.comMLS#245232$89,900St. George IslandHIGH & DRY 3RD TIER LOT Located on the north side of Gulf Beach Drive and only two lots from the corner for easy beach access on 11th Street. Scrub Oaks line the road side of this lot creating privacy, but offers an open expanse of high sandy ground. Excellent building site. The 16th annual Forgotten Coast Chef Sampler, the Apalachicola Bay Chamber of Commerces largest annual fundraiser, proved to be another success, Feb. 12 at the Armory. The buzz was all about the Sports Illustrated Swimsuit edition, set to hit the newsstand two days later. Taking part in the affair, and their offerings, were: Apalachicola Seafood Grill: Tacos with grouper, shrimp and scallops Blue Parrot Oceanfront Caf: Fish tacos Boss Oyster: Grilled oyster tacos, and red beans and rice Caf con Leche: Five different cakes and pastries. Carolines Dining on the River: Cheddar grits, and blackened red sh with lemon burre blanco sauce Christines Cuisine: Tiramisu, and fruits de mer pasta with cream sauce Crooked River Grill: Arepa with craw sh dip and tomato Eddy Teachs Raw Bar: Half-shell oysters with pirates or ladies cocktail sauce, and smoked mullet dip Owl Caf and The Tap Room: Pulled pork BBQ, Viennese chocolate triangle, tupelo honey and pecan baklava, gluten free lemon cookies, napoleon and key lime dessert Red Top Caf: Sweet and hot chicken wings and peach cobbler Sunset Coastal Grill: Salmon ceviche salmon, stuffed mushrooms and tiramisu Tamaras Caf Floridita: Grits bar, with sausage, cheese and other assorted toppings Thats A Moray: Crme puffs, puffs with lemon curd and sugar cookies Up the Creek: Pasta with crme sauce and alligator meat balls, and sweet potato donuts By David AdlersteinDAVID ADLERSTEIN | The TimesApalachicola Bay Chamber of Commerce Director Anita Grove peers up at a giant overhead projection of Sports Illustrated Swimsuit edition cover girl Kate Upton, at a Feb. 16 party at the Gibson Inn celebrating Apalachicolas participation in the project. The community had a chance to view photos of the Oct. 2011 photo shoot, and enjoy online videos that the magazine is touting about Apalachicola. Upton is shown with the Lady Louise shrimp boat at right.Chef Sampler a hit ON THE BIG SCREEN PHOTOS BY DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The TimesCarolines Candice Lewicki spoons up cheddar grits to Gulf Coast State College President Dr. Jim Kerley. Above: Jessica Fofonov, left and Jason Ritchie, both sous shefs at the Sunset Coastal Grill, enjoy serving patrons at the Chef Sampler.Left: Serving up offerings from the Crooked River Grill are, from left, Cari Langston, Rita Strickland and Nola Tolbert.