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The Apalachicola times
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100380/00162
 Material Information
Title: The Apalachicola times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: H.W. Johnston
Place of Publication: Apalachicola Fla
Apalachicola Fla
Publication Date: 02-09-2012
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1885.
General Note: Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 32911693
lccn - sn 95026907
System ID: UF00100380:00162
 Related Items
Preceded by: Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by: Apalachicola herald

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School Related Employee of the Year Celia McIntyre reacts to the announcement she has won. xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx Thursday, February 9, 2012 50 WWW.APALACHTIMES.COM VOL. 126 ISSUE 41 Phone: 850-653-8868 Web: apalachtimes.com E-mail: dadlerstein@star .com Fax: 850-653-8036 Circulation: 800-345-8688 Opinion . . . . . . A4 Tide Chart . . . . . A5 Society . . . . . . A8 Faith . . . . . . . A9 Outdoors . . . . . A10 Sports . . . . . . A11 Classi eds . . . A14-A15 DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK: School News & Society: 11 a.m. Friday Real Estate Ads: 11 a.m. Thursday Legal Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Display Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Line Ads: 5 p.m. Monday xxxxx Contact Us xxxxx Out to see Index A month-long celebration, A7 Carrabelle debates limits on alcohol sales By Lois Swoboda Times Staff Writer A showdown between religious values and economic interests is taking place in Carrabelle. The question: Where can alcohol be served in the city? The city commissions rst reading in December of proposed city ordinance No. 450, which would allow for case-by-case city review of requested liquor licenses, led to threats, animosity and posturing on three subsequent occasions. The ght resumed with a vengeance at the Feb. 1 city meeting, when more than 100 people packed the meeting room. Originally scheduled for Jan. 5, the ordinances second reading was postponed until March, after it was greeted by erce opposition from Carrabelle religious leaders, notably Homer McMillan, pastor of the Fellowship Baptist Church in December. Because the ordinance raised passionate arguments from the both businesses and religious groups, Carrabelle commissioners called for a Jan. 21 workshop. About 50 people attended the meeting, which was marked mainly by the religious activists, led by McMillan, voicing this position. Chief among the business owners and landlords who strongly support the rule change are Skip and Kathy Frink, owners of a property at 203 Tallahassee St., home to the Funky Oyster Shack and later Old Salts Caf. The Frinks say they want to bring the restaurant back to life, and maintain that only permission to serve wine and beer will allow them to do so. But, under the current ordinance, that permission is disallowed because businesses selling alcohol for onsite consumption cannot be located within 500 feet of a church, school or playground. The Frinks and other business people argue the existing 500-foot rule would Residents call to throttle the bottle By David Adlerstein Times City Editor A husband and wife in Alligator Point, alleged to have been connected with a marijuana growing operation in one of their rental houses are in hot water. But its not for cultivating cannabis. On Jan. 27, Debbie I. Brett, 45, and husband Thaddeus M. Brett, 44, were arrested for insurance fraud and subsequently granted a $10,000 bond each by Circuit Judge Angela Dempsey. According to details found in the probable cause af davit led by Investigator Brett Johnson with the Franklin County Sheriffs Of ce, the charges arose out of a criminal mischief complaint led by Debbie Brett March 3, 2011. Johnsons report says she complained to Lt. Brad Segree and Deputy Lawrence Brannan that a tenant in a home the Bretts own at 638 Alligator Drive had been growing pot inside the house and had caused extensive damaged the structure to do so. Couple nailed for insurance fraud in potgrowing case THAD BRETT DEBBIE BRETT Special to the Times Marcia M. Johnson led her letter of intent Thursday to seek reelection to the of ce of Clerk of Courts. Johnson, 55, of 5 Ellis Van Vleet St., in Apalachicola, led as a Democrat. She now is legally entitled to begin the process of getting petitions signed, with signatures due to the Supervisor of Elections of ce by May 7. Johnson would then be on the Aug. 14 primary ballot, provided she of cially quali es during this June 4 8 qualifying period. In the event that only Democrats led for this of ce, or any of the county of ces, Republicans and those without party af liation would be able to vote in any race that has candidates from only one political party, known as a universal race. The following is a statement issued by the candidate: Marcia M. Johnson has held the of ce for eight years, having been elected in 2004 and reelected without opposition in 2008. As Clerk of the Court, Mrs. Johnson serves three primary functions: 1) chief administrator of daily court operations, 2) county recorder and 3) nance of cer for the county. According to Mrs. Johnson, in 1998, Florida voters approved an amendment to Article V of the Florida Constitution which shifted the majority of funding of court responsibilities from local county government to the State of Florida although the county must provide of ce and meeting facilities, security, utilities, and the costs of communications services. The clerks of ce operates on two distinct budgets and scal years (state and county) and is subject to many nancial and operational audits. Mrs. Johnson identi ed some of her reasons for seeking another term. First, she said she still enjoys the job. Secondly, she has some big projects in the works that she would like to see through. Her of ce is beginning the process of accepting electronic lings in the Marcia Johnson seeks reelection as clerk ELECTION 2012 ELECTION 2012 SKIP FINK SHAWN OXENDINE HOMER M c MILLAN RON BARKS By David Adlerstein Time City Editor A longtime district teacher who returned to inaugurate the consolidated schools music program was named Teacher of the Year at Mondays banquet. And, for the rst time, the schools support staff formally selected a School-Related Employee of the Year. Karl Lester, a 23-year teaching veteran, was named Teacher of the Year, and Celia McIntyre, a 22-year staffer, was named School-Related Employee of the Year. Im humbled, said Lester, who has been the high school band director ever since the consolidated school opened six years ago. There are great teachers on staff, there are great teachers sitting up there with me tonight. Im real surprised and humbled that I was chosen. After teaching at Apalachicola High School, Lester left for a two-year stint at Wakulla High School, two years of Leader of the band Karl Lester named Franklin County District Teacher of the Year Photos by DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times Teacher of the Year Karl Lester, center, with wife Patti, and father Charles, left. Karl Lester named Franklin County District Teacher of the Year School Related Employee of the announcement she See BOTTLE A3 See FRAUD A5 See LEADER A13 See JOHNSON A5 Savor the Chef Sampler Sunday The 16th annual Forgotten Coast Chef Sampler, featuring the nest in local cuisine prepared by chefs from the areas nest restaurants will be held this Sunday, Feb. 12 from 6 9 p.m. at the Fort Coombs Armory. Tickets are $40 or $50. Reserved tables available. Call the Apalachicola Bay Chamber of Commerce at 653-9419 or email info@ apalachicolabay.org. Murder at Howard Johnsons? This Friday, Feb. 10 and Saturday, Feb. 11, the Panhandle Players present Murder at the Howard Johnsons, directed by Ed Tiley, at the Crooked River Grill as dinner theatre. The ultimate love triangle with homicidal overtones has never been so hilarious. Admission $30. For more information or reservations call Crooked River Grille directly at 697-5050. Season ticket holders can attend the dinner theatre performances by paying the dinner upcharge. Jerry Lee Lewis tribute at Dixie Piano Man Todd Williams is a king of tributes and plays the piano with everything imaginable. Occasionally he plays with his ngers! He will be doing a tribute to the legendary Jerry lee Lewis at the Dixie Theatre in Apalachicola Friday Feb. 10 at 8 p.m. Tickets are $20. For reservations or information call 653-3200 or visit www.DixieTheatre.com. Win lodging in Cape San Blas Keepers house The Cape San Blas Lighthouse is raf ing the opportunity to spend the weekend of the Florida Panhandle Lighthouse Challenge as a resident of the Head Keepers Cottage. Tickets are available now for the raf e to win two nights and three days in the cottage next door to the gift shop at the lighthouse. The bedroom has one double bed. Children are not eligible to participate. Tickets are $10 each and are available in the gift shop or by contacting Beverly Douds at 229-1151 or csblighthouselady2008@ gmail.com. Drawing will be held April 1, 2012.

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Local A2 | The Times Thursday, February 9, 2012 2012 MARDI GRAS Thank you from Habitat for Humanity ACE H A RDW A RE A H L A CA RT R ENT A LS ANN C OWLES AP A L A C H ICOL A P OLICE D EPT. AP A L A C H ICOL A VOL. FIRE D EPT. AP A L A C H ICOL A T IMES APEX P RODUCTIONS B A YSIDE W EDDING & FLORIST BET H M CKEE B A ND BOW W OW BE A C H SH OP BRI A N BOWEN BUD H A YES & FLETC H ER BUDDY WA RD & S ON S E AF OOD CADEN C E BANK CA NDID A R O B ERTSON CA ROLINE & JE FF I LL A RDI CA ROLYN P OWELL CA TY G REENE CENTENNIAL BANK C OLIRUS COLLINS VA C ATION REALTY C ONE D ISTRI B UTORS C OOM B S HOUSE DA N T OWNSMIRE DA NNY I TZ K O V ITZ DAV E & T M C LA IN DAV ID BUTLER D ELORES S WEET SH OP D IXIE TH E A TRE D ON & PAMELA A SHLEY D ON FORTNER & TH E AUR A B A ND D OWNTOWN BOO K S D R. HO B SON FULMER E AST P OINT L I BR A R Y E MO/ ARC HITE C TS I N C F A YE JO H NSON FR A N E DW A RDS FR A N K LIN C OUNTY ANIM A L SH ELTER FR A N K LIN C OUNTY C OMMISSIONERS FR A N K LIN C OUNTY SH ERI FF S D EPT GA IL PH ILLIPS G EM C OLLECTION H A RRIETT BE A C H IG A JERRY H A LL JO H N S PO H RER JOYCE E STES K A YD S ELDEN & L IZZIE K A T H Y KOUC K K A REN MA RTIN LA NE L OLLEY G ER K ING LA UR A & T IM L OWE L IND A S T A NTON L IS A C ONGILOSE MA DINGER JEWELERS M A R ILYN & M ASON BEAN MA YOR V A N JO H NSON M YSTIC KREWE O F SA LTY B A R K ERS O YSTER RA DIO PA R K S & R ECRE A TION D EPT. PA M N O B LES & TH E HOT FL A S H ES P ENELOPES P ET S TOP P ETUNI A S P ET SH OP P RO G ROOMER P RO J ECT I MP A CT S TUDENTS P U B LIX RESO R T VA C ATION P R O P E R TIES R IC HA RD BIC K EL R .J. SH ELLEY & CA TO RO B E R SON & A SSO C IATES SA R AH & T OR B EN MA DSEN. S ELIN A & SA LLY BOOT H SGI L IG H T H OUSE S OUT H ERN W INE & S PIRITS S US A N R IC HA RDSON TA M A R A S CAF E TA LL AHA SSEE C I V IC C ENTER T AYLO R S BUILDING S U PP LY T OURIST D E V ELOPMENT C OUNCIL THA TS A M OR A Y T I FF INS TH E C ONSUL A TE TH E D IXIE TH E A TRE TH E G RILL TH E OA SIS TH E O WL TH E RA NC H O I NN U P A C REE K RA W B A R WA TER S TREET FIS H ERIES WA TER S TREET HOTEL WA YNE TH OM A S W ILL & JODY R OSEN BA UM By Lois Swoboda Times Staff Writer A rm based in North Carolina has the nod for the xed base operators (FBO) contract at Apalachicola Regional Airport, but the county commissioners must agree to the change. Apalachicola International Aviation Training Center (AIATC), under the guidance of Bill Ruic, has held the FBO contract for 20 years, since Feb. 4, 1992. Last May, when the subject of the FBO contract was discussed, commissioners decided to ask for proposals to provide fuel at the airport. They hoped a new contractor might have ideas to increase business. Since a 12,000 square foot commercial hangar was also nearing completion, commissioners asked for proposals to lease that space at the same time. In all, they received ve proposals, some for the hangar, some for the FBO contract and some from both. The proposals were opened on July 19. The proposal from AIATC proposed to continue as FBO but did not make an offer on the hangar and offered no improvements or additional advertising to promote the airport. A second was from Skydance, a locally-based corporation formed by Dan Garlick, who leases a hangar at the airport; Randy Randolph, a member of the airport committee; and Alan Mathis who supplies fuel at several Georgia airports. Skydance made a bid for both the FBO contract and use of the hangar. Proposals were also submitted by Grace Industries, of Waynesboro, Tenn, which wanted both the FBO contract and the hangar; Island Air Express of Panama City also wanted both, After review, the commission voted to reject the entire rst batch of proposals. On Dec. 6, Ed Naggiar, a spokesman for the Apalach Regional Training Complex (ARTiC), appeared before commissioners and asked to rent the hangar for use as a base of operations. ARTiC is a rm that provides training for military and law enforcement organizations. The commission tabled the request. At the Dec. 20 meeting the board voted unanimously to advertise for a second set of proposals. At the Jan. 3 meeting, the commission voted to extend AIATCs contract for three months on a month-bymonth basis, so a new fuel provider need not be in place until May 4. The second set of airport proposals were opened at a special meeting Jan. 18 and given to the airport committee for discussion. The committee was instructed to bring a recommendation to commissioners at their Feb. 21 meeting. Proposals by ve companies were considered. AIATC requested a 10year extension of their current contract plus three ve-year options to extend the contract further. Ted Mosteller, chairman of the airport advisory board, estimated this contract would bring the county $561,000 over a 20-year period. ARTiC proposed a 20-year lease for the new hangar, with incremental increases in rent beginning at $18,000 annually and increasing to $30,000 annually. Mostellar said the lease would earn the county $552,000 over a 20-year period. Grace represented by James Lawrence. proposed to both rent the new hangar and take on the FBO contract. Mosteller said the proposed combined income to the county over 20 years would be more than $900,000: a half-million dollars to operate the FBO, $126,000 from fuel sales and $375,000 from rent. Island Air Express of Panama City proposed to both rent the hangar and assume the FBO contract. Mostellar said that, based on their proposal, the operation would bring an estimated $1.9 million over 20 years; $1.07 million from fuel revenue and $816,000 in rent from the commercial hangar. Skydance did not present a second proposal. After two meetings to consider the proposals, Mosteller said he will recommend the commission reject all proposals to lease the commercial hangar and readvertise. He said the committee will recommend Fly High of Lexington, NC be awarded the FBO contract. The company plans to launch the endeavor as Fly High Apalachicola and says it will increase fuel sales by lowering the retail price, and thus, gain a greater share of the regional market. Mosteller predicts Fly High will generate $689,532 for the county in fuel sales and rental fees over the next 20 years. Fly High would take over the existing hangar currently in use by AIATC, so the North Carolina company did not propose to rent the new commercial hangar. In the short term, Siller Helicopters of Yuba City, Calif. is renting the commercial hangar for $2,000 a month to house aircraft used to erect the new power poles crossing the river. Mostellar said they may remain in the hangar until the end of this month. Change recommended to FBO By Lois Swoboda Times Staff Writer At Tuesdays meeting, county commissioners authorized a one-time $750 bonus for all county employees. Commissioner Bevin Putnal suggested the bonus. Every county in Florida gave their employees a 3 percent raise or bonus except for two, us and Liberty County, he said. Morale is so bad in a lot of departments. Commissioner Noah Lockley moved to award the workers the 3 percent raise. Chairman Pinki Jackel then asked, Do yall know how much that is? Director of Administrative Services Alan Pierce and Clerk of Courts Marcia Johnson both said they were uncertain because they had not come to the meeting prepared to discuss the topic. Jackel said she was unsure whether some of the constitutional of cers had already awarded bonuses and wanted to nd out. Lockley restated his motion. Are you willing to make a decision without knowing where the money is coming from or how much? asked Jackel Lockley suggested it could be taken out of reserve funding. Johnson said the county has $1 million in reserves. She also said no one in her of ce had received a bonus. The commissioners instructed Johnson to have Erin Grif th in the nance of ce nd out how much a 3 percent bonus would cost. At the end of the meeting, Johnson told commissioners Grif th estimated the cost of a roughly 3 percent across-the-board bonus, to employees for both the county and constitutional of cers, would be $145,000 and would be best given out to all at $750. I think we certainly always try to look after our folks and do the best we can, said Jackel. We certainly would like to do more and better. But this will certainly be a help and appreciated. The commission voted unanimously to award the bonus with Commissioner Smokey Parrish absent. County employees to get $750 bonuses Panhandle Players commit comic murder The Panhandle Players last weekend almost made a killing at the Eastpoint Fire Station, and they plan to repeat themselves this weekend at the Crooked River Grille, at the St. James Bays Golf Course in Carrabelle. In Murder at the Howard Johnsons, the audience enjoyed a love triangle marked by both homicidal, and matrimonial, impulses. Written by Ron Clark and Sam Bobrick, The show was masterfully handled by veteran actress Megan Lamb, center, as well as newcomers Bob Inguagiato, left, and Ed Aguiar, all of whom produced hilarious results in the complicated, physically challenging farce, directed by Ed Tiley. Performances continue over the upcoming Valentines weekend with special dinner theatre shows at the Crooked River Grill, on Friday and Saturday evenings, Feb. 10 and 11. To make reservations call 697-5050. Season ticket holders can attend by paying the dinner upcharge. DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times

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Local The Times | A3 Thursday, February 9, 2012 ban restaurants from practi cally all of Carrabelles com mercial district, and could affect existing business own ers right and ability to sell or rent their property. At the January workshop, Skip Frink said the current alcohol ordinance prevents him from attracting a renter for the former Old Salts restaurant, which he said closed because it was hin dered by lack of a wine and beer license. We would like it to go back to what it was before and do away with the feet, he said. All neighbors on the block have signed a pa per saying they dont object to the restaurant. An unidentied man in the audience said he lived two-tenths of a mile from the restaurant and wanted the 500-foot rule to remain in place. McMillan argued the Frinks had allowed the original liquor license to ex pire before the ordinance changed in 2010. He said it was their responsibility to maintain a businesss li cense. This is not the denial of anyones rights, but rath er an exception for a specic business, he said. Kathy Frink said Old Salts owners had asked for permission to serve wine and beer three months be fore the ordinance changed and were turned down. She said that as a result, there had been no reason to main tain the license. McMillan said he did not believe it was necessary for a restaurant to serve alcohol and launched into lengthy remarks on the evils of drinking. Carrabelle Chamber of Commerce Director Su zanne Zimmerman said she had owned two restaurants and believed visitors to the area expected to order wine or beer with a meal. Most of you folks dont know me but I spent 25 years as an appraiser of hospitality property, said Ed Padilla. Every dollar we spend (promoting tourism) puts $3 in our pockets. This is a restaurant that will cre ate eight to 10 jobs in the city. To deny a business capable of bringing jobs and tourism to town seems somewhat short-sighted. A sophisticat ed tourist expects a cocktail or beer or wine with his meal and if he doesnt get that he wont come back. Several landowners expressed concern the or dinance would reduce the value of their property and limit potential tenants. McMillan was strident in his opposition to the new by consent rule. To those of you who in vested in our community, we appreciate that, he said. I would see us further the dis cussion later on of giving en trepreneurs more opportu nity to do business, not less. If this ordinance chang es, it will lead to case-bycase discussion. We have the likelihood of using city resources and the time of the commissioners. These meetings consume money. The current ordinance leads to most efcient use of city resources and it is in keep ing with the policy of most cities in North Florida with similar characteristics. This change takes us outside the mainstream., he said. McMillan said Carra belles demographics will not support additional res taurants, and that 49 res taurants have been opened in Carrabelle in the last de cade. With all due respect, what church is next? to have alcohol served nearby, he asked. If this law remains in place no restaurant in the main commercial district will ever be successful, warned Kathy Frink. Commissioner Charlotte Schneider agreed. The Marker (restaurant) does not sell alcohol and to me thats a cost to them, she said, noting that restaurants could still bear responsibility for drinking even if the alco hol wasnt sold on premises. When you tell a restau rant they cant serve alcohol, you take their control of it away from them, she said. They still have a lot of liabil ity for no prot. After an hour of bicker ing, Mayor Curley Messer brought the meeting to a close against protests of attendees, including Com missioner Cal Allen, who had brought information on alcohol ordinances in other cities. Do you want to shut the whole city down? Both sides came to the Feb. 1 city meeting, prepared to continue the discussion, with more than 100 people packing the room. Skip Frink handed out copies of an aerial map of Carrabelle between 12th Street East and the foot of the Tillie Miller Bridge with an overlay showing the areas excluded from serving alcohol. Carrabelles desig nated commercial district is the area two blocks north of U.S. 98 and south to the water. Based on Frinks map, which he said was created by an owner of commercial property adjacent to a res taurant, it appeared that more than half of Carra belles commercial property, including most of downtown, would be excluded from the sale of alcohol under the 500foot rule. In a telephone interview, City Manager Courtney Mil lender said that, while the map has never been for mally adopted by the city, she viewed it as an accurate depiction of the business dis trict and the areas of exclu sion. Businesses that sold alcohol prior to the 500-foot rule change are entitled to continue to sell it, but they are prevented from trans ferring their license to a new owner. When the subject of the ordinance was raised, Frink was the rst to speak. Look at all the empty businesses. We should be encouraging new business. If you had the misfortune to graduate this year where will you go to work? Lets grow Carrabelle for our chil dren and their children, he said. He said the 500-foot rule could also have a negative effect on existing business es with liquor licenses that could not be transferred in the event of a sale. City At torney Dan Hartman con curred, noting there were cases where local govern ments had prevented the transfer of a business li cense. Former City Commis sioner Jim Brown advocat ed for the existing 500-foot law. We dont need a bar in front of a church. We had a hard time getting this law passed, he said. I talked to (Supervisor of Elections) Ida Elliot and she said we only need 10 percent for a recall election. If this gets passed, I imagine there will be a lot of people out in the morning trying to get signatures for a recall. McMillan brandished pa pers and said, After the last workshop, I was approached by some community lead ers who asked me if I would initiate a petition. I have 176 signatures indicating op position to the (new) ordi nance. He said the signatures included ve senior pastors, business leaders and some people who do not attend church. Carrabelle resident Shawn Oxendine said Mc Millans petition was mis represented at the church he attends and urged com missioners to scrutinize the signatures. In a telephone interview, Oxendine said the petition had been described as af fecting only the Frinks Tal lahassee Street property. He said people attending the service where the petition was presented were told they did not need to be resi dents to sign, and that par ents were encouraged to tell their under-aged children to sign the document. Is this going to be Car rabelle under Prohibition? he asked the audience at last weeks workshop. Im asking these men of God if it says anywhere in the Bible that it is illegal to drink or take a sip of wine. I wish they would show it to me. He said the Head Start nursery school, at 203 N. 5th St. was not shown on Frinks map and would exclude even more of the waterfront from the sale of alcohol. Do you want to shut the whole city down? Oxendine asked. This is not a few selective properties; its al most the whole commercial district. McMillan replied that the issue is not is it illegal to drink alcohol? The issue is Are we going to change the law to allow a few people to do what they want? Ron Barks pastor of the Assembly of God asked the commissioners to look closely at the way its word ed. Im not convinced that selling beer and wine that will make a restaurant go or not go. Im also concerned that there is a bar, an oyster bar, I can go in and eat a half dozen oysters and drink 10 beers and stagger out. Ive been here almost 30 years and Ive never tried to stop anything. A lot of us here are within the commer cial zone that will be affected by this. Please dont change this ordinance till you have something respectful to put in its place, he said. Oxendine asked what would happen, under the 500-foot rule, if a church de cided to open next to a res taurant that served alcohol. Dan, look at the ordi nance carefully, Schneider said to the city attorney. At no point did I ever want to have anything within one foot of a church. I believe ev erything can be solved. We need revenue for this down town area. I deeply respect and love our churches and what they do for this community. I love it with all my heart but I believe we need to somehow come together as a com munity and solve this, she said. Schneider asked for an other workshop but Messer said he would not allow one. No! he snapped. Its cost ing the city. This is what I call a put-off. Allen told the meeting the state statute says 500 feet from schools and churches. It doesnt mention Sunday school. However, the wisdom of the state also says there are exceptions. It allows a business that sells alcoholic beverages not for on-prop erty consumption. A second exception is restaurants that take 51 per cent of their income from food. Our ordinance says 75 percent, he said. Maybe we can rewrite it in such a way that we keep the 500 feet in there but keep it in keeping with the state. David Butler, director of Carrabelles Economic Development Council said, I agree with getting the groups together to come up with a better rule. I think this communitys tight enough that we can nd a solution. Commissioner Brenda La Paz said she spent hours in research and with the attorney. I spent countless sleepless nights. A consent of use type ordinance does not guarantee everyone who applies for a license will be given consent. This is also a moral issue. I dont want to limit property rights and want to encourage growth. Maybe we should assign the task to planning and zon ing and let them make rec ommendations that would be more appropriate to mod ern times as well as paying special attention to the spe cial needs of our churches and schools, she said. I would be happy to make a presentation and share my research. Hartman suggested the board advertise a joint meet ing of the city commission and planning and zoning. McMillan said the new ordinance should be voted down on the second read ing, and demanded to know where commissioners stood on the ordinance. Hartman said the board was not voting at that time and vote counting would be improper. The commission voted unanimously to table dis cussion on new ordinance until the joint meeting of the board and planning and zon ing on the third Thursday of the month, Feb. 16. BOTTLE from page A1 LOIS SWOBODA | The Times An aerial photograph, enhanced by Katherine Milla, shows sections of Carrabelles commercial district that are closed to businesses serving alcohol under the current ordinance. Restricted areas are designated in light green

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Great Emancipator earned a nations admiration This is in honor of Abraham Lincolns birthday. Born Feb. 12, 1809, the Great Emancipator was our 16th president, serving from 1861 to 1865. This brief allegory is a more fact-than-ction story about the young, self-educated Abraham Lincolns struggle from humble beginnings in a little log cabin in Springeld, Ill., to the pinnacle of success as president of our nation, and historys legendary Emancipator. However, the road to the White House was a grueling journey against bitter competition to thwart his ambitions to become president. Regardless of his fate in the race, he didnt lower his Christian standards to retaliate to false accusations and participate in his opponents character assassination contest. He continued to conduct an honorable campaign, and gained the nations admiration, an acclaimed victory and the complimentary name, Honest Abe. He took the oath of ofce fully committed to his promise to abolish the injustice of discrimination and grant freedom from oppression to all those bound as possessions in human bondage. His unorthodox mission to implement cultural change met stiff opposition to change the thinking of a mindset generations lifelong practice of segregation. In a matter of time, constant friction from irreconcilable differences exploded into an uncontrolled re of hostile resistance that divided the nation, and pitted brother against brother on opposite sides. Four years of bloody battles, tragic loss of life and depleted supplies compelled the Confederate rebels to concede defeat to the Union army, and end the strife. The Proclamation of Emancipation abolishing slavery became law overnight, to be enforced as a violation of the Constitutions Bill of Rights. The mandate denied any exception to comply, and the restrictions were considered an underhanded scheme to destroy their way of life; adding fuel to the smoldering embers of resentment at the infringement of their rights like salt in the open wounds that started the ght. After many give-andtake confrontations, time began to ease the tension of fractured feelings with less self-seeking and more sound reasoning ; and the healing process of recovery gradually spread across the land, re-uniting the war-torn nation with an outstretched hand of friendship, without malice toward any man. It was like a soulcleansing drink from the Holy Grail; closing the door on turbulent times and opening the door of freedom to all mankind. The saddest part of the story, this compassionate man known as the Great Emancipator died for the cause he never saw fully accepted by his generation. Mary Westberg Questions raised on school critics motives I am writing in response to John M. Comers letter in the Feb. 2 issue of the Apalachicola and Carrabelle Times. As a Franklin County graduate, a parent and an educator, I am obviously offended. As condescending as some of the comments in Mr. Comers letter were, they were actually not as abhorrent in nature as his previous communications with the school administrators of Franklin County. In one of the communications in which he gives the subject FCSD is an archetype of community cannibalism, he describes himself as an outsider whose educational experience, qualications and references are far superior to anyone in FCSD, and that FCSD staff members are cannibalizing the children of Franklin County. He goes on to question whether something is in the Franklin County water that is dumbing-down Franklin County students and nishes by asking faculty members how do you sleep at night after spending the day cannibalizing your students, their parents, and your community? For starters, I have never eaten a student I promise. I had to ask myself what Mr. Comers motive was in sending such communication. It quickly became apparent: He would like to offer a program to turn x our students and make them all Level 4 performers. What a great idea! Although Franklin County has made great strides in educating its students, there is always room for improvement and those of us who dedicate our lives to that very mission would be very anxious to learn of any program that could produce such results, particularly from a man who claims to have his home phone on the Harvard Admissions Ofce speed dial and evidently is a very important person in the Channel Islands. So, I visited one of Mr. Comers websites, www. SchoolingForAllStudents. com, which has some fabulous charts and graphics, but does not give any references from those who have used and improved because of this program. On another of Mr. Comers websites, www. retrac.com, he expresses his discontent with public schools, stating that U.S. schools have created a whole new segment of American society Professional Parasites and again offers his program as a solution. I just had to nd out more information about this program. So, in this digital age, I Googled it. Alas, I only found the same two websites already mentioned, so I amended my search asking for information on places where this program has been used and found to be effective. I got the same two websites. So, I looked, and I looked and I looked some more. You get the picture. Well, as one who always gives the benet of the doubt, I attempted to contact Mr. Comer directly. I called the number given in his previously mentioned correspondence and was greeted by a female who identied herself as Mr. Comers wife. I told her that I was intrigued on several levels about Mr. Comers comments and statistics and asked for references. She said that she was unable to provide any. I said that I didnt understand and asked her for assistance. She stated that Franklin County was asked to try something new and that if it was something new then there wouldnt be any references, now would there? She was not able to provide me with the name of a single school district, school, or individual student who could attest to this program. Not one single letter of praise, not one single testimonial from a school district. Does anyone else reading this feel like this is too much to ask under the circumstances? I left both my personal and work phone numbers, as well as my email address, and was promised that Mr. Comer would contact me soon to answer my questions. To date, I have had no response. Now, Mr. Comer may be quite the intellectual. He follows his name with EA-4. Again, Google doesnt recognize it. Self-created? Who knows. But to state that the socioeconomic status of a student has little to do with student achievement is ludicrous. Both the American Psychological Association and Health Services Research by PubMed Central go to considerable lengths to describe many of the differences experienced by students on the high end and on the low end of the spectrum. Are there exceptions to any rule or generalization? Of course there are, but to suggest that students in regions where average incomes are very high as opposed to regions where they are not have the same experiences, and often expectations, is questioning common sense. The bottom line is that I work diligently every day to help to make up those differences for my students, as do my colleagues, administrators, and many of my students parents. Franklin County schools have graduated many professional, successful people and will continue to do so. Will every one of our students go to college? Probably not, but many do. In addition, many are happy, healthy, productive members of society who have taken paths different than college. Im not a Pollyanna; I do, however, question Mr. Comers motives and his refusal to acknowledge the positive things taking place in Franklin County Schools. As if I could possibly end this letter on a better note, I just had to pause to read a text from my son telling me about the 101 that he just made on his college math exam. Yes, he is a Franklin County graduate. Respectfully, Donna Barber All students deserve chance at success In regards to Mr. John Comers letter in the Feb. 2 Apalachicola and Carrabelle Times, I cannot comprehend how he can justify that graduates of Franklin County, whether past or present are deemed illiterate, unprepared or poverty bound. I am a 2006 graduate of Carrabelle High School. I am neither illiterate nor poverty bound. In fact, when I graduated from Carrabelle High School I received a total of ve scholarships and was more prepared than most students who enter college. Unprepared students do not obtain scholarships, nor do they attempt to obtain scholarships. Illiterate students do not complete four college level classes before he/she graduates high school either. In later months, I attended Gulf Coast Community College. I obtained my rst college degree, an Associates of Arts degree in Elementary Education. When I graduated in 2010 within the top 15 percent of my class, was named to the Deans List several semesters, it was no stopping point for me. I had higher ambitions, higher dreams, to prove that I was more than a statistic who was destined for failure before I had a chance to even prove that I was worthy of obtaining such a goal. In my last semester of Gulf Coast, I applied and was accepted to Florida State University. Florida State University is among the top 10 state universities in the nation. A top ten nationally ranked university does not accept students who are ill equipped, but rather those students who obtain excellence and high academic achievements! Today, I am proud to say that on April 29, 2012, I will become an FSU alumna. I am among the top 10 percent of the 2012 Florida State University graduates. I currently have a grade point average of 3.677 and have been named to the Deans List every semester while at Florida State. I have received scholarships from the university and worked full time while obtaining my bachelors degree in Elementary Education. Less than six weeks ago, I was sworn into multiple honor societies. The rst honor society chapter is sponsored by Florida State and is called the Garnet Key society. This honor is awarded to the top 10 percent of Florida State students who maintain a grade point average of 3.5 or higher, possess professional levels of leadership and academic excellence. The second honor society is a national chapter founded by Gold Key. Gold Key honor society has a select group of students that is chosen by a committee and individuals may join by invitation only. Once again, illiterate (aka un-trainable) students do not get the privilege of having these honors. Graduates of Franklin County High School deserve more than to be told that a job at McDonalds is above them and that they are unprepared for college. ALL students deserve the chance to achieve their dreams and ambitions no matter who they are or where they come from. We can all change. We can all be great inventors, writers, teachers, explorers and so much more! It only takes one person to believe in us. Thats exactly what the teachers of Franklin County do; they believe in their students! On an ending note, I am here to inform you that the educators of Franklin County are of the highest profession. The teachers educate students to excel in life, academics, and their extracurricular activities. My teachers were there to mentor and educate me. They were my advocates, friends and supporters. I am looking forward to earning the title of a Franklin County School teacher! I will even go as far to say that the members of the Franklin County community are blessed to have such excellent teachers and a continually improving public school system! With best regards, Natasha Pennycuff Opinion A4 | The Times Thursday, February 9, 2012 USPS 027-600 Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 Publisher: Rick Martin Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola Times LETTERS TO THE EDITOR The Apalachicola Municipal Library has the pleasure of providing library services to a lot of visitors passing through. Many use public libraries to connect briey with the rest of their world, through email or Facebook. Free public access computers are a very important part of our services for locals and visitors alike. I should mention that all six of our public computers are now two years old or less, thanks to the Gulf Coast Workforce Board and our endowment from Margaret Key. Some of these visitors truly become friends as was the case with Cynthia Berger and Bill Carlsen, passing through in the solar canal boat, the Dragony. Cynthia and Bill are Loopers following Americas Great Loop (Americas Great Loop Cruisers Association at greatloop.org) from the Great Lakes, down the Mississippi to New Orleans or the Tombigbee River to Mobile, Alabama. A portion of the gulf intercoastal waterway runs east to Apalachicola. They head offshore east of here, to the Keys or in some cases through Lake Okeechobee, and up the East Coast. At New York they head back into the sweet water up the Hudson River. The yearlong Berger/Carlsen odyssey is documented on slowboatcruise.com, and SlowBoatCruise on Facebook. He is a professor of science education at Penn State, with training in the biological sciences and electrical engineering and she works for the local public radio station, WPSU, where she has won numerous awards. Loopers are not uncommon at the library as are other seafaring adventurers, who pause in before heading into blue water (a sailors term for open seas). Sailors jump off from here headed for Clearwater, 174 miles away. Others, like paddler Bill Nedderman, in his 20-year-old handmade canoe, continue to stay close to shore around the Big Bend. He photocopied Gazetteer maps at the library, to plot his course along the Big Bend Saltwater Paddling Trail (information at the FWC website). He plans to do the Loop in his canoe, probably a rst. He is based out of Des Moines, Iowa, and has been on the road for three months. He kayaked the Lewis and Clark expedition trail on its 200th anniversary. He recommended Undaunted Courage by Stephen Ambrose, which was on the library shelf. Denitely an off the grid devotee, he is a different breed of Looper. The State of Florida sponsors the Florida Circumnavigational Saltwater Paddling Trail Extensive maps and text are available at the Florida Department of Environmental Protection web site www.dep. state..us, but the library plans to put them into a book form for reference. Kayaking in Florida and especially in Northwest Florida is well covered by Doug Alderson in Waters Less Traveled; A Canoeing and Kayaking Guide to the Streams of Florida, Vol. 1, North Central Peninsula and Panhandle by Elizabeth Carter and John Pearce; and Sea Kayaking in Florida by David Glickman. The library has just bought Aldersons newest book, Wild Florida Waters. As usual patrons of the Apalachicola library and all visitors are encouraged to come look at our always expanding collection of Florida books. Caty Greene is the librarian for the Apalachicola Municipal Li brary. To reach her, call 653-8436. Loopers and other adventurers welcome @ THE LIBRARY Caty Greene S P E CI AL TO TH E T IM E S The solar canal boat, the Dragony

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Local The Times | A5 Thursday, February 9, 2012 Segree noticed both bedrooms had re ective material covering the walls, wooden tables built for holding plants, holes both in the ceiling for ventilation and in the oor for water supply lines, tracks on the ceiling for UV lights and drying lines in the living room, as well as a circuit box rewired to control the UV lights, according to the af davit. Debbie Brett said the house was one of two she and her husband rented to Jake Wheeless in case he and his wife got into an argument and he needed a place to stay. She said Wheeless was several months behind in rent, and that she had discovered the grow house when she stopped by for the rst time in nine months. Debbie Brett produced two itemized estimates for the repair work, one for $27,913 from Salty Dog Construction and another for $28,319 from Gary Fritz Contracting. Wheeless, who was then living in Crawfordville, was arrested May 16, 2011, by deputies from the Wakulla County Sheriffs Ofce, and charged with criminal mischief, a third degree felony. But the case was just beginning. Johnson said Sgt. R.J. Shelley and Segree told investigators they had been conducting surveillance of the property and had evidence that Thad and Debbie were involved in growing marijuana. The af davit said videos showed Thad at the residence a few times a week during the time Jake is renting and growing marijuana. In a Nov. 21, 2011, interview by Shelley and Johnson, Wheeless said he had met the Bretts when Debbie Brett was working at Carrabelles Tiki Bar. He said he began smoking marijuana with Debbie and they became close, according to the report. Evidently, that closeness had become frayed by March 9, 2011, about the time Debbie Brett sought the criminal mischief charges against Wheeless. It was then she was able to secure a temporary injunction for protection against repeat violence from Jake Harris, presumably Wheeless, who is listed as Jake Harris Wheeless in several of the court lings. When interviewed by investigators in November 2011, Wheeless said that after he met the Bretts Thad Brett found out about his (Wheelesss) expertise in growing marijuana and began hinting around about going into business together. Wheeless said Thad Brett got his wifes permission to set up a grow house, and that he and Brett tore up carpet, set up lights and that Thad Brett used a Sawzall to cut holes in the oor of the rental home,. Jake advised that Thad and Debbie were aware of everything that went on inside the house and Thad bought most of the materials used for the growing process, Wheeless told investigators, noting that Thad Brett would stop by the house several times a week to pick up tools he kept underneath the house. Wheeless said he paid the Bretts rent in marijuana, up until about the time Thad Brett called him up with a dire warning. Near the end of the grow process, Thad called to warn him that the cops were watching the house, Johnson wrote in his report. Jake thought he was trying to rip him off, so Jake had a couple of friends clean out the house and take the marijuana plants. On Nov. 22, 2011, Johnson interviewed Donna Castor, who Wheeless said would con rm his story. Castor said she too had met Debbie Brett at the Tiki Bar, and that she knew about the grow house because her son was a friend of Wheeless. Castor said she used to buy marijuana for $150 an ounce from Wheeless. On Jan. 12, 2012, Mike Smith, an investigator with the Florida Department of Law Enforcement, and Johnson interviewed Castors son, who said he met the Bretts ve years ago and they drank and smoked weed together. The son said he worked for the couple and was paid half in cash, half in pot. Castors son said he met Wheeless three years ago and moved in with him for about a month, after he was kicked out of the house by his mom due to not having a job, read the report. He said during that month Jake and Thad Brett talked about growing marijuana together. The son told investigators he witnessed Thad Brett and Wheeless enter the house and return with pounds of marijuana in Ziploc bags while Debbie Brett was waiting outside. In early 2011, Johnson said Castor was angered at the treatment her son was receiving from the Bretts, and confronted Debbie Brett. On May 10, 2011, Castor was arrested for aggravated assault with a deadly weapon and ordered to have no contact with Thad and Debbie Brett or their son at their Alligator Drive residence, a different location than the alleged grow house. On Nov. 15, 2011, Castor pleaded no contest and Dempsey withheld adjudication. Castor was ned, given credit for time served and placed on probation. After Castor and her son appeared to verify Wheeless account, investigators contacted the Bretts attorney Richard Smith, who said his clients declined any further interviews with law enforcement. Johnson said Paula John, senior claim representatives from ASI Assurance, con rmed the Bretts had received two checks totaling $33,353 for the property damage they initially reported. Johnson said that because there were no marijuana plants left in the house, and no direct evidence of cannabis cultivation, no one would be charged with growing pot. Also, on Jan. 6, the states attorneys of ce decided not to prosecute Wheeless on the criminal mischief charge. Smart Lenses SM Can produce clear vision without glasses, at all distances "Freedom from Eye Glasses, Now a reality for many." 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Coupon Expires: 2-29-12 FREE EYE EXAM CODE: AP00 Darren Payne, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon Lee Mullis, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon Todd Robinson, M.D. Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon WEEKLY ALMANAC APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE TIDE TABLES MONTHLY AVERAGES To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from these given for APALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW Cat Point Minus 0:40 Minus 1:17 East Pass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27 To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from those given for CARRABELLE: HIGH LOW Bald Point Minus 9:16 Minus 0:03 Sponsor the WEEKLY ALMANAC Call Today! 653-8868 Date High Low % Precip Thu, Feb 9 68 43 20 % Fri, Feb 10 67 50 20 % Sat, Feb 11 65 43 20 % Sun, Feb 12 61 47 10 % Mon, Feb 13 65 54 10 % Tues, Feb 14 70 56 30 % Wed, Feb 15 72 57 30 % On behalf of my staff and I, we would like to thank all our loyal patients for the honor of being selected for the multiple awards that we have received over the last 12 months; including voted most compassionate Dr. and Patients Choice Award. It is a great honor and we will continue to strive for the very best medical care for our patients. VINCENT IV ERS, M.D. 301 T wentieth S treet Port S t. Joe, FL 32456 850-227-7070 www.iversmd.com On behalf of my staff and I, we would like to thank all our loyal patients for the honor of On behalf of my staff and I, we would like to On behalf of my staff and I, we would like to court division. This could help eventually make more types of court records available to the public online and is a step toward directives to become paperless. She is in the process of updating her case management software to a new system called CLERICUS that will provide a state-of-art upgrade to the existing case maintenance applications and will streamline the clerks processes. Third, Clerk Johnson stressed there can be no disputing the importance of experience as it relates to her constitutional duties. Her career in the clerks of ce spans over a period of 37 years. Mrs. Johnson said she is proud of the achievements accomplished during her tenure including efforts to scan and digitize older paper records including marriage licenses, probate, plats, county commission minutes and ordinances, of cial property records, and some court records. The protection of the of cial records was the driving factor, she said. She has installed a data protection system allowing for storage and back-up of records and networkbased disaster recovery offsite. She also expressed pride regarding the records that she has made available for public access and improvements to her website, www.franklinclerk. com. She reported she accepted the challenge to keep up with modern technology and changing legislation. She has put a program in place that provides the audio of the county commission meetings immediately following the meetings, and she writes her own monthly column for the paper to keep her constituents informed of clerk-related procedures.. When it comes to her of ce, Mrs. Johnson stated she knows she has used transparency, accountability and strong scal leadership as her guide. I maintain an open door policy, and Im always available to anyone who walks into my of ce, she added. When I rst ran for election, I emphasized what mattered to me was that people received the help they needed from the clerk, and I can always be found at my of ce, and I have given that help. Johnson has served on various committees with the Florida Association of Court Clerks and the Clerks of Courts Operations Corporation. She is serving her third year as chair of the Best Practices committee of the association which is geared toward helping clerks improve ef ciency and performance while reporting reliable data and meeting statutory requirements as well as increasing standardization between clerks of ces statewide. She is active in her community as well as a member of St. Patricks Catholic Church and the Philaco Womans Club. She has been married for 37 years to her husband, Robbie. They have three sons and ve grandchildren which she said completes her time when shes not working. JOHNSON from page A1 FRAUD from page A1

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Local A6 | The Times Thursday, February 9, 2012 Weems Medical Center East provides primary care services, urgent care services and rotating specialty care services. Ofce hours are 8a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday. Call 850-697-2345 for an appointment today! Walk-ins are welcome. Our mission is to improve the health status of the residents and visitors to Franklin County, by providing quality, compassionate, cost effective and convenient health care through community leadership and in collaboration with other healthcare organizations which serve our communities. Join us Friday, February 10, 2012 at 5:30pm for a discussion on Menopause to be hosted by Terrie Tullos, ARNP-C from North Fl Womens Care. BAYVIEW ST. G E OR GE I S L A ND home nestled on a private lot. 3BR/2Ba with open deck, expansive windows, sun room, screened porch, very tidy. M L S# 245514.................$299,000 Travis Stanley 850.653.6477 Grayson Shepard 850.653.6718 B EA CHFRONT C ONDO ST. G E OR GE I S L A ND 2BR/2BA with two balconies in Villas of St. George. Established rental history! Community pool, beach boardwalk, 2 blocks to lighthouse! M L S# 246110..............$319,500 CH A R MI N G P R ECON S TR U CT I ON St. George Island. Gulf view 3 BR/2BA, approx. 1200 sq. ft., lovely front porch, bead board cabinets, granite countertops, hardiboard, metal roof. Built by Galloway Construction M L S#245564.................$289,000 GU LF VIEW ST. G E OR GE I S L A ND Just half a block to the beach! 3 BR/2 BA, classic beach cottage with great decks, loft, widows walk. Right on beach access, popular rental! M L S# 245466...............$349,000 B EA CHFRONT C ONDO BAYVIEW CH A R MI N G GU LF VIEW LF VIEW LF Leon Teat 850.653.5656 Jamie Crum 850.370.0835 Sandy Mitchem 850.899.8300 NEW LISTI N G! GR EA T E R A PA L A CH I COL A 4BR/2BA on 1/3 acre lot with above ground pool. Many upgrades and new features tankless water heater, new plumbing, city water, updated kitchen, new carpet, windows, doors. M L S# 245923..............$139,500 GR EA T EA T EA E R A PA L A CH I COL A A FFORD AB L E ST. G E OR GE I S L A ND Interior home 3BR/2BA home on 1/3 acre lot in quiet area on Bayshore Dr. Cozy wood interior with freestanding resident or vacation home! M L S#243422..............$275,000 A FFORD AB L E NEW LOW PRICE! dbutler@coastalcoverage.com Locally owned and operated Home Business Auto Health Workers Comp Qualications: Expertise in: Now Accepting Appointments Call Toll Free 888-681-5864 For more info www.seclung.com Lung Disease Specialist Rob Garver, MD Now Seeing Patients in Port St. Joe NOW BCBS-FL I N -NETWORK PROV I DER Robert C. Bruner Attorney Personal & Business Bankruptcy Over 30 Years Legal Experience 850-670-3030 bankruptcy relief under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon advertisements. Before you decide, ask us to send you free written information The following report is provided by the Franklin County Sheriffs Of ce. Arrests are made by of cers from the following city, county, and state law enforcement agencies: Apalachicola (APD), Carrabelle (CPD), Florida Highway Patrol (FHP), Franklin County Sheriffs Of ce (FCSO), Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC), Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP), Florida Department of Corrections (FDOC), Florida Division of Insurance Fraud (DIF) and Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (FDACS). All defendants are considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law. Feb. 1 Dwight A. Spencer, Jr. 33, Parker, violation of probation (FCSO) Feb. 2 Edward W. Lively, 27, Carrabelle, burglary of a dwelling and grand theft (FCSO) Feb. 3 Bobby J. Bullock, Jr., 43, Eastpoint, domestic battery and violation of probation (FCSO) Timothy L. Custer, 24, Carrabelle, violation of probation (CPD) Marjorie L. Boozer, 50, Carrabelle, burglary of a dwelling and grand theft (CPD) Feb. 4 Richard A. Echols, 40, Havana, driving while license suspended or revoked and DUI (FHP) Julian S. Collins, 48, Carrabelle, domestic battery (FCSO) Angelee M. Fender, 35, Norman, Ga., domestic battery (CPD) Feb. 5 Michael T. Scott, 37, Carrabelle, domestic battery and Wakulla County violation of probation (CPD) Feb. 7 Benjamin K. Jones, 22, Tallahassee, violation of probation (FCSO) Darren L. Wallace, 43, Apalachicola, violation of probation (FCSO) Arrest REPORT FRANKLIN COUNTY SHERIFFS OFFICE Inspections continue across island bridge Motorists traveling in the northbound lanes of State Road 300 across the Bryant Patton Bridge between Eastpoint and St. George Island will encounter intermittent lane closures through Friday, Feb. 10. Trans eld Services Bridge inspectors are performing a routine inspection and repairs on the structure. Motorists can expect intermittent lane restrictions between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. daily. Routine inspections are a tool the Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) uses to provide a safe and ef cient transportation system. Drivers are reminded to pay attention to the speed limit when traveling through the construction area, and to use caution, especially at night when driving in work zones. For more FDOT District 3 information, follow us on twitter @myfdot_nw Enjoy the Chef Sampler this Sunday The 16th annual Forgotten Coast Chef Sampler, featuring the nest in local cuisine prepared by chefs from the areas nest restaurants will be Sunday, Feb. 12 from 6 9 p.m. at the Fort Coombs Armory. Tickets are $40 $50. Table reservations are available. Call the Apalachicola Bay Chamber of Commerce at 653-9419 or email info@ apalachicolabay.org. Seafood workers to meet Monday The Franklin County Seafood Workers will be holding a meeting on Monday, Feb. 13 at 5 p.m. at the Eastpoint Fire House. The FCSWA will be discussing the shelling program. Also, the FCSWA will be giving out shelling numbers to those who have signed up and giving another opportunity for people to register. Also up for discussion and voting will be the possibility of doing away with the AP Card that is purchased through the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services at the cost of $50. Additional board members will be discussed along with Progress Energy Bay closures due to power pole placement. For more information, call Jennifer Millender, FCSWA secretary, at (850) 597-0787. Juvenile Justice to meet Monday Franklin County Juvenile Justice Council will be meeting on Monday, Feb. 13 at Water Street Hotel from noon until 1:30 p.m. All are welcome to attend. For further information please contact Carol Bar eld, chairperson, at 653-2784 Aid to neuter pets available The Franklin County Humane Society has received a $2,000 grant from the Bif e Foundation to help fund the spay/neuter voucher program. The spay/ neuter program is designed to assist Franklin County citizens in getting their pets spayed and neutered. The cost is $20 and the service includes a rabies vaccination. This service is for people who cant otherwise afford to have their pets spayed or neutered. Come by the Humane Society, ll out an application and if you qualify, receive a voucher to have your pets altered. This is not a program for feral cats.For more information, please call 670-8417. FCHS offers GED classes GED classes are now being offered at the Franklin County School on Monday and Tuesday evenings from 4 8 p.m. Sign up during class meetings to prepare for next months GED test. Classes are being held in Building 1100 (Vocational Building) in Room 1111. If you need your GED, come out to the Franklin County School on Monday and Tuesday nights to sign up for the test and to get any help that you may need so that you can successfully pass the test and receive your high school diploma. Contact Linda Bradley at 670-2800 during class hours or call 370-6569 for more information. Franklin School plans Saturday FCAT camps The Franklin County Schools FCAT camps have been designed speci cally for students in grades 3-5 who are preparing to take the FCAT Writing Test on Feb. 28 and FCAT Reading/ Math/Science in April. The camps will be held on Saturdays, from 9 a.m. to noon at Franklin County School. Mrs. King and Ms. Clark will provide fourth graders with some awesome writing strategies and ne tune what they have already learned. Mrs. Creamer, Mrs. Gay, Mrs. Dykes, Mrs. King and Mrs. Clark will provide students with additional instruction in reading, math, and science. The writing camp will be held this Saturday, Feb. 11 and Feb. 25. The reading and math/science camp will be Saturday, Feb. 11 and Feb. 25, and March 3, 10, 17, 24 and 31. The science camp is limited to fth graders only. For more information, call Harolyn Walker at 670-2800 ext. 1402, or your childs teacher. News BRIEFS

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Local The Times | A7 Thursday, February 9, 2012 Valentines Day Menu Sunset Rainbow Garden Salad Lobster and Crab Stuffed Mushrooms with a Champagne Cream Sauce Grilled Filet Mignon with a Tarragon, Rose Butter Florette Lovers Red Velvet Cupcakes with a Crme Cheese Icing 850.227.7900 Reservations Recommended For your Dining Pleasure SUN S ET SPECIAL DINNER FOR THE ENTIRE W EE K Reservations Recommended 850.227.7900 Reservations Recommended Overlooking Romantic St. Joe Bay The Sun Sets at 6:30 PM on Valentines Day T h e C l i p p e r BALLOON PO P DISCOUNT BALLOON BALLOON BALLOON BALLOON BALLOON BALLOON BALLOON BALLOON BALLOON BALLOON PO PO PO PO PO PO PO P P DISCOUNT DISCOUNT DISCOUNT DISCOUNT DISCOUNT DISCOUNT DISCOUNT DISCOUNT DISCOUNT DISCOUNT DISCOUNT DISCOUNT DISCOUNT DISCOUNT DISCOUNT DISCOUNT DISCOUNT DISCOUNT DISCOUNT DISCOUNT DISCOUNT DISCOUNT DISCOUNT T T T T h h h T h T T h T e e h e h C C l l l C l C i i l i l p p p p i p i p p p p p p p p p p e e e p e p p e p r r r r e r e e r e e r e p r BALLOON BALLOON BALLOON BALLOON BALLOON BALLOON BALLOON BALLOON BALLOON BALLOON BALLOON BALLOON BALLOON BALLOON BALLOON BALLOON BALLOON BALLOON BALLOON BALLOON BALLOON BALLOON BALLOON BALLOON BALLOON BALLOON BALLOON BALLOON BALLOON BALLOON BALLOON BALLOON BALLOON BALLOON BALLOON PO PO PO PO PO PO PO P P P P P S h o p p e C OLOR SP ECIAL *BRANDI BRANNAN HORST D OROT H Y COOPER 10%-25% Andreas Nails & Tanning ACRYLICS M A NICURES PEDICURES M A KEU P T A NNING DONT FORGET G IFT CERTIFI C ATES FOR VALENTINES DAY! REGIS T ER WI T H ANDRE A FOR G IF T B A SKE T D R A WING! V A LUED AT $75.00 BALLOON BALLOON BALLOON BALLOON BALLOON BALLOON BALLOON BALLOON BALLOON By David Adlerstein Times City Editor A quiet prayer breakfast Saturday morning, and a rousing concert Saturday night, kicked off a monthlong celebration of AfricanAmerican History Month in Apalachicola. AJs Restaurant was the site for the breakfast, which concluded with a brief Scriptural lesson from Pastor David Walker, of Covenant Word, and a prayer circle led by Apalachicola Mayor Van Johnson. Elinor Mount-Simmons, president of HCOLA (Hillside Coalition of Laborers for Apalachicola), outlined the month-long series of events, all under a partnership between HCOLA, the city and the Tourist Development Council. Saturday evenings concert at New Life Church, featuring the Boys Choir of Tallahassee, had the audience on its feet, with an exuberant performance by the young men, ages 8 to 18, all students from the Tallahassee area. Under the direction of conductor Earle Lee, Jr., the choir offered a varied program, ranging from America, The Beautiful and the West Point alma mater to renaissance choral music to Irving Berlins Whatll I Do? and Oh, What A Beautiful Mornin from the musical Oklahoma. The program also featured the choirs smaller Show Choir and Praise Team in performance as well as solos by Tallahassee gospel singer Anita Franklin. The evening included an introduction of all the musical accompanists, and their academic work, as well as the adult backers of the community-based outreach program. A moving series of gospel songs, including There is A Balm in Gilead, and Precious Lord, and an inspiring message closed the evening. A list of the months upcoming activities includes: Saturday, Feb. 11 Celebrating African American History Month with Readings for Kids with Apalachicola Mayor Van Johnson, at 11 a.m. at the Apalachicola Municipal Library Florida Highwaymen exhibit, presentation and reception, 6-8 p.m. at the Apalachicola Center for History, Culture and Art, 86 Water Street, presented by Historic Apalachicola Main Street and the city. Monday, Feb. 13 Mondays Moment: How We Got Over: A timeline from then to now 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at the Franklin Square Recreation Center, on 6th Street Friday, Feb. 17 Holy Family Center Of cial Dedication and Ribbon Cutting 1 p.m. Holy Family Center Grand Opening 6 p.m. followed by a semi-formal Legends Ball from 8-11 p.m., where the unveiling of the newest panels of local historical AfricanAmerican gures will take place Saturday, Feb. 18 Ninth annual AfricanAmerican History Festival, at Franklin Square Festival parade 10 a.m. Festival opens 11 a.m. Festival closes 11 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 19 Ninth annual AfricanAmerican History Festival, at Franklin Square Church service in the open Noon Festival closes 4 p.m. Saturday Feb. 25 Celebrating African American History Month with Readings for Kids with Val Webb, at 11 a.m. at the Apalachicola Municipal Library Sunday, Feb. 26 Apalachicolas Sundays Best Celebration at 3 p.m. Location to be announced Monday, Feb. 27 Mondays Moment: Words of Wisdom from those with Wisdom 6:30 to 8 :30 p.m. at the Historic Holy Family Center African-American History Month kicks off PHOTOS BY DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times Participants in Saturdays prayer breakfast at A.J.s link hands Earle Lee, Jr. leads the Boys Choir of Tallahassee Members of the Show Choir and Praise Team

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PET OF THE WEEK Franklin County Humane Society Over 35 Years Experience. 208 Reid Avenue, Downtown Port St. Joe 850.229.1111 www.BaysideFloristPSJ.com Your Full Service Wedding and Event Florist Deliveries Available Daily to Apalachicola with minimum order Your Full Service Your Full Service Society A8 | The Times Thursday, February 9, 2012 BIRTHS Max Bridges born Max Breaux Bridges was born at 7:51 a.m. Thursday, Jan. 26, 2012, at Kona Community Hospital in Kona, Hawaii. He weighed 8 pounds, 12.5 ounces and was 21 inches long. He is the son of Chris and Renae Bridges of Kailua Kona, Hawaii. Paternal grandparents are Denise Johnson of Bristol and Bernarr Bridges of Blountstown. Maternal grandparents are Alvin and Kathy Martina of Apalachicola. Paternal great-grandparents are the late William J. and LoraAnne Bar eld and Bruce Bridges and the late Quinnon Bridges. Maternal great-grandparents are Red Hilton and the late Betty Hilton of Eastpoint and the late Buddy and Evelyn Martina. BIRTHDAYS Sisters celebrate birthdays Adrian Nicole turned 10 years old on Tuesday, Feb. 7, and her sister, Hannah Elizabeth, will turn 17 years old on Friday, Feb. 24. Happy birthday to my beautiful girls! I love you both, Mom ENGAGEMENTS Rachel Oliver, Sean Wheeler engaged Mr. Elmer Ellis Oliver Jr. and Mrs. Karla Sue Oliver, former residents of Wakulla Station, are pleased to announce the engagement of their daughter, Miss Rachel Abigail Oliver, to Mr. Sean Thomas Wheeler, son of Mr. Bill Noland Wheeler and Mrs. Charlotte Ann Wheeler, former residents of Tallahassee. A September wedding in Tallahassee is planned. Rachel is the granddaughter of the late Mr. Elmer Oliver Sr. of St. Marks and Mrs. Leth Oliver Revell of St. Marks and Sopchoppy, and Mr. Matthew Dice MD Raker and Mrs. Eva Pearl Ruth Raker of Crawfordville. Rachel graduated from Wakulla High School in 2001 and the St. Johns River Academy at St. Augustine in 2007. Sean is the grandson of Mr. Edward Carl Finuff and Mrs. Vera Jean Finuff of Telogia, and the late Mr. Elbert Cat sh Jackson and Mrs. Bernice Lorene Jackson of Carrabelle. Sean graduated from Lincoln High School in 1998. He graduated from Florida State University and the Pat Thomas Law Enforcement Academy in 2006. The couple shares the same career eld, law enforcement. Layla Burke turns 3 Layla Burke celebrated her third birthday on Wednesday, Feb. 1, 2012. Burke, daughter of Jeremy Burke of Apalachicola and Tina Burke of Thomasville, Ga., joined in the celebration with her older sister, Iolana. Maternal grandparents are John and Sonya Bellew of Apalachicola. Paternal grandparents are David and Beverly Burke of Apalachicola. Paternal greatgrandparents are Belvin and Johnnie Bryant of Apalachicola. Your County Library Gaming Day was a novel experience for the many families that attended the Franklin County Public Library event on Saturday, Jan. 28 at the Carrabelle Branch. This free annual event was well-attended with interactive games like Wii Sport resort and Mario Kart while board games of all variety were enjoyed by every age group. The county library is not just the place for books and public access computer use, but a place for families to play together. Reading instructions and learning rules offer children the ability to practice good sportsmanship and handle defeat. Many library volunteers helped to register, assist, and join in the library fun with the staff and participants. Refreshments were provided for the hard-playing attendees who joined in the library fun. Door prizes were won by the attendees thanks to the generosity of local donors to make this event more memorable. A special library thank you to the following merchants for their generosity; Crooked River Lighthouse, Red Pirate, Carrabelle Junction, Picnic Basket, 2 Als, Carrabelle Dollar General, Hog Wild, Carrabelle Express Lane, Marker 30 Restaurant, and Carrabelle IGA. For more details about library programs please call the Eastpoint branch 670-8151 or the Carrabelle branch 697-2366. Gail Mathes, right, and great-grandson Brandon Tarantino, 3, play Candyland.

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Island church plans spaghetti dinner Saturday The St. George Island United Methodist Church, 201 E. Gulf Beach Drive, will have its annual Valentine spaghetti dinner on Saturday, Feb. 11, beginning at 6:30 p.m. The cost per ticket is $10 and tickets will be available at the door. Takeout is also available. Door prizes, great food and live entertainment! Come celebrate Valentines Day! For more info, call Mary Lou Short at 927-2569. Millender reunion set for Feb. 19 The Millender reunion will be Sunday, Feb. 19 at the Eastpoint Fire Station. We will begin with a covered dish lunch at 1 p.m. There will be live music and prizes. Come join us for a fun afternoon. For more info, call Janice Tindell at 670-8280. Weatherization help now available Many Franklin County families are struggling with the high utility bills. Capital Area Community Action Agencys Weatherization Assistance Program may be able to help. This program provides permanent solutions to keep homes cooler in the summer and warmer in the winter. Services are provided to low-income residents whose income does not exceed 200 percent of the poverty level: $21,780 for a household of one; add $7,640 for each additional household member. Homeowners and renters may apply, but renters must have permission of the property owner. Singlefamily homes, mobile homes, and duplexes qualify. For more information, call Capital Area Community Action Agencys ofce in Apalachicola, open Monday to Thursday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. at 653-8057. Domestic violence counseling available Domestic violence group counseling is now being held in Franklin County, in conjunction with Refuge House. For further information please call Carol Bareld, domestic violence advocate at 653-3313. Disadvantaged transportation board meets Wednesday The Franklin County Transportation Disadvantaged Coordinating Board will meet on Wednesday, Feb. 15 at 10 a.m. at the Franklin County Courthouse Annex Courtroom, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola. In addition to iregular business, the agenda will include adoption of the Transportation Disadvantaged Service Plan, and rates and review of the Federal Transit Administration applications. For additional information, a copy of the agenda, or if you require special accommodations at the meeting because of a disability or physical impairment, contact Vanita Anderson at the Apalachee Regional Planning Council, 20776 Central Avenue East, Suite 1, Blountstown, FL 32424 at least ve working days before the meeting date. Bingo prizes needed for St. James Residents of St. James Health and Rehabilitation Center, at 239 Crooked River Road in Carrabelle, play bingo several times a week, where they win small prizes such as socks, lotion, jewelry, etc. Donations of items suitable as prizes are always needed. Items can be dropped off at the Times ofce at 129 Commerce Street in Apalachicola. The door at St. James Health and Rehabilitation is always opened for volunteers, churches and other organizations to come over and run programs. To volunteer, call 697-2020. Narcotics Anonymous meets Sunday evenings A Narcotics Anonymous group, providing group support for anyone beset by a drug problem, has begun meeting in Eastpoint. Meetings, open to anyone, are held Sunday evenings at 6 p.m. at the United Methodist Church, 317 Patton Drive. The United Methodist Churches of Franklin County Welcome You First United Methodist Church of Apalachicola Worship Service 11:00 a.m. every Sunday Sunday School 10:00 a.m. 75 5 th St. Apalachicola 653-9530 fumcapalach@gtcom.net Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis Carrabelle United Methodist Church Worship Services 10:45 a.m. Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Celebrate Recovery Mondays 7-9 p.m. 102 NE Ave. B Carrabelle 697-3672 Pastor: Julie Stephens Eastpoint United Methodist Church Worship Service 10:00 a.m. every Sunday Healing service every fourth Monday at 7:00 p.m. 317 Patton Dr. (corner of David St.) 670-8825 Pastor: Rev. Beth White St. George Island United Methodist Church 9:00 a.m. Worship Service 10:00 a.m. Fellowship Hour 201 E. Gulf Beach Dr. 9274635 www.sgiumc.org Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis First Pentecostal Holiness Church 379 Brownsville Road Apalachicola Were excited about what Gods doing!!! Sunday School 9:45 am Sunday Morning Worship 10:45 am Sunday Evening Service 6:00 pm Monday, Youth Group 6:30 pm Wednesday, Royal Rangers, G.A.P. 7:00 pm Wednesday Worship & Word 7:30 pm Nursery Provided during regular church services 7:00 7:00 First Baptist Church St. George Island 501 E. Bayshore Drive 927-2257 R. Michael Waley, Pastor Join us as we praise and worship the living Christ. Great is the Lord and most worthy of praise. Psalm 145:3 Sunday Bible Study ................................................ 10:00am Worship Praise ........................................................ 11:00am Sunday Night ............................................................ 7:00pm Wednesday Power Hour ...................................... 7:00pm Wednesday Youth at S.P.L.A.S.H ....................... 7:00pm Walking in Christ R. Michael Whaley, Pastor WELCOMES YOU Church of the Ascension 101 NE First Street Carrabelle SUNDAY 10:00 AM WELCOMES YOU Church THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH (850) 274-4490 (850) 545-2578 Trinity Episcopal Church est. 1836 Sunday Worship Services 8 & 10:30 a.m. Shrove Tuesday Pancake Supper February 21st, 5 7 p.m. All You Can Eat for $5 Ash Wednesday Services Noon & 7 p.m WELCOMES YOU Trinity Welcomes You Welcomes You Welcomes You Hwy. 98 & 6th St. Apalachicola 850-653-9550 Selsh indulgence always affects others By Pamela and Scott Shiver Special to The Times Last week we dis closed Mahatma Gandhis description of the seven deadly social sins: Politics without prin cipal Wealth without work Commerce without morality Pleasure without con science Education without character Science without hu manity In continuation of Gan dhis points, commerce without morality is an is sue that is so common that we take very little notice of it. Many Americans have accepted the idea they will not prosper with honesty. Cheating on taxes, lying about living arrangements, falsifying documents and being deceitful about our income seems permissible because there are so many doing it. Crooked business people deceive in order to make a prot that probably will not be reported as in come. Prosperity is the condi tion of enjoying wealth, suc cess, or good fortune. It is hard to enjoy wealth when you are continually looking over your shoulder or not sleeping at night because of your conscience. Prov erbs 11:1 says, The Lord detests the use of dishon est scales, but he delights in accurate weights. We should remember that right is right even if no one is do ing it, and wrong is wrong if everyone is doing it. The one who has no remorse for dishonesty is in serious danger, according to I Timothy 4:2. When I analyzed plea sure without conscience as a social sin, I thought about the many people who indulge in addictions, never considering the loved ones and friends they hurt nan cially and emotionally, be lieving they are hurting no one but themselves. Hurt ing relatives are helpless as their loved ones destroy their lives with the progres sion of the habit. My heart goes out to children born to parents who feel their plea sures, desires and habits are more important than the child that resulted from their pleasure. I thought of the young people indulging in sex, giv ing no thought to the conse quences that are attached to fornication physically, emotionally and spiritually. I thought of the unborn that are sacriced because they do not t into the lifestyle of the parent. I thought of all the undetected communica ble diseases that are shared with others in the name of pleasure. I pondered the many broken hearts that result from some John nie-come-lately who tells her he loves her only to get what he wants. Ironically, selsh indulgence or plea sure without conscience always affects others. I was a little bafed about what Gandhi meant by education without char acter. He may have been referring to the fact that education and character should be taught hand in hand. Character building by itself is equally as impor tant as an education. It is built when you realize that you do not have to always understand why or how and that challenging life events make us stronger. Resistance training drives us to achieve our potential instead of taking the easi est course possible. As a result, daily stressors be come much lighter to carry. We each have a destiny to fulll in life and some of us never reach it because we do not push ourselves to be stretched beyond the com fortable. Without character, an education is knowledge without purpose or direc tion. Science without human ity seems far-fetched to us because of the regulations we have in America gov erning studies. While my grandfather was in World War II, my grandmother collected paper clippings that reported war happen ings. I found hideous stories in some of the clippings of scientic experiments that were performed on prison ers of war. and captives of war. It was so disturbing and inhumane that I was haunted by the thought of it for days after I read it. Science always attempts to reason away the possibil ity of creation. The assump tion that we evolved from sludge or a monkey makes me question the sensibil ity of science. Question: If this is true, and there is still sludge and monkeys, where are the links in between? Why has the evolution pro cess stopped? We need to give credit where credit is due, to the creator. Ethical behavior has gone so far into the gray areas that it is hard to de ne its boundaries any longer. Christians need to read the Word and teach it to their children so that they will know the differ ence. If we truly desire to see our country healed, it will take self-examination and change on the part of the individual. No politician is capable of xing the bro kenness of our country. The solution is found in 2 Chron icles 7:14: If my people, who are called by my name, will humble themselves and pray and seek my face and turn from their wicked ways, then will I hear from heaven and will forgive their sin and will heal their land. We welcome all sugges tions and hope you enjoy this weekly column. Please send all emails to Scott Shiver at frontline247@ mac.com. YOUTH MA TTERS Scott and Pamela Shiver OBITUAR Y Eva Mae Coatney was born June 9, 1953, to the now late Alma and Otis Newell in Apalachicola. Eva Mae passed away surrounded by her family Tuesday, Jan. 31 at her home in Apalachicola at the age of 58. Eva Mae was a longtime seafood worker and member of the First Pentecostal Church in Apalachicola. She is survived by her husband, Ronnie Coatney; daughter, Cindy Carpenter (Scott); siblings, Jimmy Newell (Heidi), Betty (John) Nash, John Newell (Debbie), Alvin Newell (Linda), Gladys Newell and Edna Stanley (Tracy); brothers-in-law, Jimmy Coatney (Laura), Kenneth Coatney, and Donnie Coatney (Gail); numerous nieces, nephews, other family and friends. Funeral services were held Friday afternoon, Feb. 3 at the First Pentecostal Church with burial in Magnolia Cemetery. Visitation was Thursday evening, Feb. 2 at the First Pentecostal Church. Kelley Funeral Home is handling arrangements.Eva Mae Coatney Faith The Times | A9 Thursday, February 9, 2012 Faith BRIEFS Saturdays lled with lots to do this month By Jim Welsh Special to the Times Sure hope to see you Saturday, Feb. 11 and we can enjoy soup and salad together at Chillas Hall. Serving begins at 10 a.m. Members will make a dona tion of $6, and those of you who are not yet members will donate $7. There also might be a book signing. Enjoy! Then, Saturday eve ning is the Valentine Steak Dinner at Camp Gor don Johnston American Legion Post 82. Men members will make a donation of $11, women members are free. Call the Legion to order your steak at 697-9998, or drop by the Legion after 4 p.m. and sign up. See ya there! Members of the Lanark Village Boat Club will prepare and serve your sugar x, Satur day, Feb. 18. Your break fast will be served from 9 a.m. to noon. A donation of $5 will be collected at the door. Yum, yum! Also on Satur day, Feb. 18, members of the Lanark Village Golf Club will prepare and serve a spaghetti dinner at Chill as Hall. Serving begins at 5 p.m. Donation is $6 per person. Our 20th annual Community Breakfast will be at Chillas Hall, on Saturday, Feb. 25 from 8 to 11 a.m. Great breakfast, great service, great fellowship! After your breakfast, saunter on over to the bake sale table, and pick out some thing to top off your lunch. Your donation of $6 will be collected at the door. Be watching for you! On Saturday evening, Feb. 25, Chillas Hall will be jump ing! Members of the La nark Village Association will sponsor a Mardi Gras Dance Party. Greg K and Krew will start playing at 7 p.m. the fun starts when you come in the room. A donation of $5 be collected at the door. Bring your favorite bev erage, a snack to share, your dancing shoes, and your main squeeze. Party hardy! And of course, the third Sunday of each month we have our covered dish dinner. All you need is your favorite dish, a dona tion, and your empty stomach. We line up at 1 p.m., right after the blessing. Be kind to one another, check on the sick and house-bound, and remember our little prayer God grant me patience and I want it right now! Until next time, God Bless America, our troops, the poor, homeless and hungry. LANARK NEWS Jim Welsh Donation gets you food, dance and much more

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E-mail outdoors news to times outdoors@star .com O UTDOORS www.apalachtimes.com Section Section A It is kind of hard to believe January is gone and February is here. With the passing of January, so go some fish laws. Remember years back when it was almost impossible to catch a redfish because there were none? Well, those days are long gone, and I hope they stay gone. The state stopped the keeping of redfish for several years. It also stopped the selling of wild redfish. Redfish have been one of the most successful comeback stories next to red snapper. For many years, an angler has been able to catch and keep one redfish per day. If there were 10 people in the boat they could keep 10 redfish. All that has changed. There has been a push to keep two redfish per angler either in a boat or on the beach. The state held several meetings for the public to voice its opinion on raising the limit, and I suppose the unanimous decision was to raise it. So now you can keep two redfish per day with one exception; only eight redfish can be caught and brought to the shore in a boat. Sort of like ling. Only six ling can be brought to the dock no matter how many anglers are in the boat. This is sort of good and sort of bad. At least now only eight fish can be caught and kept. But now, four anglers can catch as many as eight anglers could before. Another change that seems to be confusing speckled trout fishermen is the number of trout an angler can keep. In our part of the state all you need to know is the number five. Five speckled trout is all you can keep. Starting Feb. 1 there is no closed season on speckled trout with the exception of the Lansing Smith Steam Plant canal. That area always will be closed from Nov. 1 until March 1 to the keeping of fish with no exceptions. Hooked on Outdoors Outdoor Life Scott Lindsey captainlindsey@ knology.net RETURN OF THE By Stan Kirkland Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission During the past few months, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission received a number of calls from the motoring public about dead striped skunks on the roadways of Northwest Florida. Seeing road-killed wildlife is nothing to be happy about but it does tell us something important. In its most base sense, it means skunks still are out there in the wildlife world. For a period of time that didnt seem to be the case. In the 1980s and even early 90s, calls and reports of skunks were almost nonexistent across much of North Florida. Even though striped skunks are nocturnal animals and move about mostly at night, their absence was noteworthy. During those days if we got a call about a (striped) skunk, you made a note of it. They were that rare, said Dr. Jeff Gore, a wildlife biologist with the FWC. Gore said it is only conjecture, but he believes its possible that a rabies or distemper outbreak in the 1980s had a devastating impact on the skunk population. Both diseases are highly infectious and easily spread among wildlife such as skunks, fox and raccoons. By the late 1990s, skunk numbers were apparently on the rebound. More than 2,000 Floridians responded to a 2002 FWC survey asking people to respond if they saw a skunk. The majority of the sightings were in the northern half of Florida. Florida actually is home to two species of skunks. The striped skunk is about the size of a house cat and the species with which most people are familiar. Striped skunks have short, powerful legs and are adept at digging. The species is an omnivore and will eat plant and animal matter, including insects, small reptiles and bird eggs. Perhaps the most notorious character of the striped skunk is its ability to spray predators with a strong-smelling and clinging oily fluid. Spotted skunks, which are smaller and more agile than striped skunks, are also found in Florida and in much of the Eastern United States. For more than 100 years Eastern spotted skunks have been bred in captivity and the furs sold in the fur trade. Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission received a number of calls Northwest Florida. Seeing road-killed They are making a resurgence SKUNK FACTS Skunk spray causes no real damage to its victims, but it sure makes them uncomfortable. It can linger for many days and defy attempts to remove it. As a defensive technique, the spray is very effective. Predators typically give skunks a wide berth unless little other food is available. Type Mammal Diet Omnivore Average life span in the wild 3 years Size Head and body, 8 to 19 inches; tail, 5 to 15 inches Weight 7 ounces to 14 pounds Group name Surfeit Source: nationalgeographic.com SKUNK Special to the Times Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) leadership announced Feb. 3 that Capt. Bruce Cooper will take over for retiring Maj. Dave Pridgen as regional commander for the FWCs Northwest Region. This new leg of his career began with the traditional pinning ceremony in the FWCs Panama City of ce, when gold oak leaves were pinned to his shirt and he became a major. The Northwest Region covers 16 counties in the Florida Panhandle, from Jefferson County west. The area boasts a range of hunting and shing opportunities, including commercial marine shing communities all along the coast. Cooper will oversee all law enforcement efforts there as FWC of cers patrol Floridas woods and waters. Cooper began his conservation law enforcement career in 1985 as a wildlife of cer in Broward County. Since then, he has worked his way through the ranks across the FWCs Northeast, North Central and Northwest regions as an investigator, training lieutenant, investigative lieutenant, patrol supervisor and captain. Most recently, as an area captain in Bay County, Cooper oversaw investigations for the entire Northwest Region. Capt. Cooper has been a valuable asset to the agency throughout his career, said Col. Jim Brown, director of the FWCs Division of Law Enforcement. In each position, he has furthered the FWCs mission to protect Floridas people and its natural resources. We are looking forward to what he will accomplish in this next role. Cooper received his bachelor of science in resource management from Auburn University. He has also attended the Florida Department of Law Enforcements Leadership Academy. Cooper and his wife, Amy, reside in Panama City Beach. They have two daughters; one attends Emory Law School, and the other recently graduated from Troy University with a degree in psychology. FWC selects new Northwest Region commander Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL (next to Piggly Wiggly) www.BWOsh.com Your Hunting Headquarters Corner of Marina Drive, (next to Piggly Wiggly) Your Hunting Headquarters Corner of Marina Drive, (next to Piggly Wiggly) Your Hunting Headquarters REG $1149. 99 SALE $849. 99 REG $1149. 99 REG $1149. 99 SIG SAUE R C3 1911 C O MPA C T Features C R IMP SO N TR A C E L A S E R GR IP S SIG SAUE R C3 1911 C R C3 1911 C R O MPA C T SIG SAUE R C3 1911 C R C3 1911 C R O MPA C T BWO Exclusive GET T H EM W H ILE Y OU CAN! SALE $849. WOW! WOW! Freshwater Inshore Believe it or not, the Spanish mackerel have been showing up on the beaches and in the St. Joe Marina. Most of the sh are small, however, some 20 sh have been reported. Silver spoons and Got-cha lures will produce Spanish and also any thing else that swims. Trout have invaded the marina last week also. Gulp and jigs will put you in the game! Unusually warm weather and water temps have improved the freshwater bite. Good reports from Depot Creek have been the talk of the town. Good sized crappie and shellcraker with an occasional cat sh have all been reported. No good word from Howard Creek or the big river this week. SPONSORED BY PHOTOS BY FWC Spotted skunks are smaller than striped skunks but just as adept as keeping away predators. Apalachtimes.com Thursday, February 9, 2012 Page 10 BRUCE COOPER

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CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA SP O RTS www.apalachtimes.com Thursday, February 9, 2011 A Page 11 Section By Joe Shields Special to the Times A soccer season marked by vast improvement for the Franklin County High School boys varsity team came to a close in the regional quarter nal Wednesday night, Feb. 1 as the Seahawks played the Marauders of Maclay High School. Thirty-two teams entered the state playoffs last week, for a chance to play for the state championship. The Seahawks earned the right to be a part of that elite group when they nished runner-up in the 1-1A district championship to Port St. Joe Jan. 27. Boasting six more regular season wins than in the 2010-11, Franklin County entered this tilt at 7-6-2 and looked to pull an upset against the highly-touted Marauders, one of the Final Four teams looking at a state championship last season. In the opening minutes, the Seahawks were a little apprehensive but once they saw their team defense was as effective against Maclay as it had been against other opponents throughout the season, the Seahawks calmed down and began to play their game. Taking a bend-but-dont-break defensive position, the Seahawks were pushed into defending their defensive third of the eld for the majority of the rst half. The back liners senior Tanner Klink, Javeion Win eld, Julio Ramirez and Billy Harris were joined by midelders Alex Causey, James Harris, Elton Olvera and Zack Howze, in an attempt to further solidify the Seahawk defense. Through the rst 40 minutes, the stingy Seahawks team defense allowed only one goal, at the 11minute mark, off of a uky noncalled hand ball which paused the Seahawk defense long enough waiting for a whistle, and enabling a Marauder to successfully acquire the rebound and score. An additional nine shots on goal were all saved by net minder, Daniel Carrino. Offensively, the Seahawks were limited to a nite number of counter-attacking opportunities but Olvera and Klink (free kick) managed to generate one shot on goal apiece. Into the break, the Marauders held a 1-0 advantage. At the half, the Seahawks made some adjustments in both team play and the psyche of the players, acknowledging the Marauders might in fact be a little overrated this season. In the second half of play the game began to tilt towards the Seahawks as the Marauders became frustrated at their lack of nishing, and errant passes being dispossessed. The Seahawks wouldnt go down quietly. Although the majority of play moved to the middle third of the eld, the Seahawks were unable to nd any consistency with their passing game. With the offense reduced to through balls which didnt materialize into scoring opportunities, only Olvera was able to add to his totals with one shot on goal. The Seahawks defense continued to play fantastic ball and held off all scoring opportunities, with Carrino making an additional nine saves. In a play which encapsulated the resolve of the Seahawk defense this season, Carrino came out of the net to make a sliding save, but was unable to secure the loose, wet ball. The ball was then recovered by a Marauder who looked to score on the now empty net. As the shot was taken, a blur of red streaked across the eld to the open net, as Klink positioned himself between the ball and the net and was able to redirect the shot out of the air with a swift kick that sent the soccer ball harmlessly out of the defensive third. With 15 minutes left in the game, head coach Jono Williams had the Seahawks midelders push up into the offensive third of the eld, in a last-ditch effort to score by overloading the Marauders back line. Unfortunately, the Seahawks were unable to obtain the equalizer and the Marauders scored again on the then thinlystretched Seahawk back line, and eked out a 2-0 victory. We played hard and never gave up, Williams said. Our boys should be very proud of their season and the improvements they have made. Maclay is a very solid team, and we were competitive with them until the nal whistle. The Seahawks nished the season 7-7-2, the best record in school history for boys varsity soccer, and laid the groundwork for what could be an even better season next year. The entire Seahawks team was awarded Player of the Match for their combined efforts. Their stingy, cohesive, team defense was due in large part to each team member on the eld knowing their job based on their distance from the opposing ball carrier and executing their individual jobs. This was all done via communication and knowledge of the other teammates skills and abilities. The Seahawk team as a whole controlled the Marauder offense during their multiple offensive attacks by acquiring dispossessed passes, stepping up and stealing the ball off of the opponents dribble and procuring headers out of the air. Joe Shields serves as assistant to coach Jono Williams of the Seahawk boys soccer team. JOSH WRIGHT | Special to the Times The 2011-12 Seahawk boys soccer team, front row, from left, are junior defenseman Julio Ramirez, freshman defenseman Chase Taranto, sophomore mid elder James Harris, junior mid elder Elton Olvera, sophomore forward Graham Kirvin, sophomore mid elder Stefan DeVaughn, junior mid elder Zach Howze, and seventh grade defenseman Jonathan Whitcomb and sixth grade defenseman Matthew Turner. Back row, from left, assistant coach Joe Shields, senior goalkeeper Stephen Jackson, freshman defenseman Austin Carter, junior mid elder Billy Harris, sophomore forward James Newell, senior defenseman Tanner Klink, junior forward Casey Sapp, sophomore mid elder Alex Causey, senior defenseman Javeion Win eld, junior goalkeeper Daniel Carrino, and coach Jono Williams. Seahawks complete best soccer season Three members of the district champion Lady Seahawks soccer team have been named to the Class 1A girls soccer AllDistrict 1 team, based on coaches nal balloting for this past season. Senior defensive back Jessica Dempsey, senior forward Megan Newell and sophomore mid elder Gracyn Kirvin were all named to the all-district team. During the regular season, in which the Lady Seahawks nished 8-5-3, Dempsey, as sweeper and fullback, was highly regarded for her erce play in opponents territory. Newell nished with 11 goals and four assists during the regular season, and 43 shots on goal. Kirvin posted 13 goals and seven assists, and 44 shots. Also named to the All District 1-1A girls rst team-were Rocky Bayou senior goalkeeper Christiana Serban, junior forward Kelly Sambenedetto, eighth grader mid elder Suzi Sober, sophomore forward Amber Smith, and senior defensive back Katrina Jammer. Port St. Joe placed senior mid elder Rachel Jones, and sophomore forwards Christian Laine and Allie Strippling on the team. Given Honorable Mention honors were Franklin County sophomore forward Jessica Shields and freshman goalkeeper Macey Hunt. Shields had 13 goals, ve assists and 44 shots on goal during the regular season, while Hunt gave up 27 goals and had 216 saves, and posted four shutouts. Also named Honorable Mention were senior defensive back Elizabeth Sober from Rocky Bayou; freshman goalkeeper Shannon Pridgeon from Port St. Joe; and junior defensive back Bri Ross and senior goalkeeper Madelyn Jackson from Freeport. David Adlerstein DAVID ADLERSTEIN | the Times Members of the Lady Seahawks squad are, front row, from left, sophomore mid elder Adrianna Reeder, sophomore mid elder Brooke Pittman, eighth grade fullback Jessica Schmidt, senior sweeper Jessica Dempsey, sophomore mid elder Gracyn Kirvin, and sophomore fullback Laura Gallegos. Back row, from left, are assistant coach Ramon Valenzuela, senior forward Megan Newell, senior fullback Emmy Norris, sophomore mid elder Deborah Dempsey, freshman goalkeeper Macy Hunt, freshman forward Katie Seger, sophomore forward Jessica Shields, sophomore fullback Stephanie Marxsen, and coach Kelli Maggio. Not pictured are Kitana Peralta and Lea Venable. 3 named to all-district girls soccer team By David Adlerstein Times City Editor At the Feb. 1 signing day, inside Franklin County High Schools new multi-purpose room, former Seahawk standout Dalin Modican was proudly welcomed as a member of Florida Techs inaugural program, set to take the eld in fall 2013. Josh Wright, high school athletic director and head football coach, announced that Modican, a wide receiver, had signed his national letter of intent and scholarship award to play football for the Panthers. About 50 friends and family were gathered for the occasion. Florida Tech is a Division II program located in Melbourne, and member of the Gulf South Conference. Wright praised Modicans work ethic and scholastic abilities, and said his standard for discipline, cooperation and teamwork was a model for other students. After graduating in 2011, Modican went to Independence Community College in Kansas, and took part in the football program, but decided that his desire to remain in Florida compelled him to return. During his Seahawk career, Modican posted 195 carries for 1,522 rushing yards, and scored 27 rushing touchdowns and seven receiving touchdowns. As quarterback, he threw for 1,134 passing yards and 11 touchdowns. Defensively, Modican had ve interceptions, and caused 13 fumbles. He scored seven defensive touchdowns, and two kick return touchdowns. Modican will take part in a new program directed by coach Steve Englehart, who just announced his rst recruiting class for the Panthers. We worked really hard to put this class together, Englehart said. Overall it is a good class. It was exciting to get my rst class locked in place. I think theyll blend in really well with the 48 student-athletes we have on campus that are working hard and doing everything weve asked. The new student-athletes have a lot of competition when they arrive. When Florida Tech takes the gridiron for its rst Gulf South Conference (GSC) game in fall 2013, it will line up against six-time league champion Delta State University in Cleveland, Miss. The game is the rst of six on the Panthers inaugural conference schedule. The Gulf South Conference has some of this countrys top athletes and we are excited to bring this high level of football to the Space Coast, Director of Football Operations John Thomas said. After opening GSC play, the Panthers will host the University of West Alabama in their rst conference home game the following week. As the calendar turns to October, they will prepare for a trip to play two-time national champion Valdosta State University. Florida Tech will welcome Shorter University to the Space Coast in the middle of October. In their second to last conference game, the Panthers will travel to the University of West Georgia before concluding the conference portion of their schedule at home against the University of North Alabama, currently coached by Terry Bowden, son of legendary coach Bobby Bowden. Modican signs with Florida Tech LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Pictured at last weeks signing are, from left, Dalin Modicans mom Claudine KelloggWilson, Modican, stepfather, Kenny Wilson and grandmother, Maxine Kellogg. Not pictured at far left is younger brother Kalin Wilson.

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Local A12 | The Times Thursday, February 9, 2012 Gun Show February 11th & 12th Panama City Panama City Fairgrounds Fairgrounds 2077256 Sat 9 -5 Sun 10-4 C o n c e a l e d W e a p o n s C l a s s S a t / S u n 1 1 o r 2 Floridagunshows.com FREE PARKING Certied Medical Electrologist Electrolysis is the only proven method of PERMANENT hair removal. (Licensed & approved by the Board of Medicine) 1137 Harrison Ave. Suite 7 (850) 522-4884 By David Adlerstein Times City Editor Habitat for Humanity revived Apalachicolas Mardi Gras parade in ne fashion Friday and topped it off with a fabulous soiree Saturday night at the Armory. In doing so, the ninth annual Mardi Gras festivities brought in more than $13,000, said Pam Ashley, chair of the county Habitat chapter, which is about to embark on a new house in Eastpoint, the fth home it has built in the county. Don Ashley, chair of the fundraising committee, said he expected the weekend to net more than the $6,000 brought in last year. Its building, he said. Were happy; I think it went real well. We got a lot of good feedback. An exuberant golf cart parade Friday afternoon, complete with a bevy of beloved canines, wound from the Bowery to the courthouse and back to Riverfront Park, for a dinner and concert by Brian Bowen, and Orlandos Beth McKee Band. The trumpet sounds of Don Fortner and his band, Aura, wafted from the balcony of the Owl Caf. Led by King Rex and Princess Pearl, St. George Islands Mason and Marilyn Bean, the parade came about thanks to a wealth of volunteers, including a pet Krewe brought together by Caroline Ilardi, and golf carts from Gary and Lisa Hooker from Ah La Cart, the Water Street Hotel and St James Bay Golf Club. Faye Johnson from Project Impact helped bring a bevy of young people to lend excitement, while Caty Greene and members of Habitat board helped bring the event to life. Winning for the best themerelated oat was Harriet Beachs Yellow Crested Pooper Scooper with Chicks a cart of pups pretending to be parakeets. Winning for the best themerelated dog was Queen Lizzie, escorted by owner Kayd Selden. The judges choice went to Sir Elton George and Joan Nevitt, with their dog Lucy. Cited for best decorated carts were the vehicles decorated by Marisa Getter and friends, and Clarice Powell and her admirers. Concertgoers enjoyed seafood gumbo made by Jeff Ilardi and chicken gumbo created by Fran Edwards, while Lane Gerking baked up scrumptious cupcakes to help with the fundraiser. On Saturday night, about 160 people lled an elegantly decorated Armory; complete with curtains on loan from the Tallahassee Civic Center, to enjoy the food provided by Tamaras Caf, and the jazzy sounds of the Beth McKee Band. David Butler once again served as the emcee while Wayne Thomas and Mark Rodgers handled lighting and sound for the two concerts. Pam Nobles brought out her Hot Flashes to bring the party alive, and Smokey Parrish sang. It was truly a Mardi Gras for the record books. 2-day Mardi Gras twice the fun 2-day Mardi Gras twice the fun 2-day Mardi Gras twice the fun ON THE WEB To see more photos, visit www. apalachtimes.com. King Rex and Princess Pearl, St. George Islands Mason and Marilyn Bean The Beth McKee Band. Left Guess who? Bottom Queen Lizzie, escorted by owner Kayd Selden. Photos by DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times

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Local The Times | A13 Thursday, February 9, 2012 freelance work and four years at Leon High School. But he returned when the consolidated school was open, and has since grown the marching and performing band to 33 members strong. His rst year began with just six members of a percussion band, and now its a full-scale performing band for seventh through 12th graders, offering two concerts a year. And the marching band performs regular halftime shows, and appears in parades. Lester married to wife, Patti, with one stepson, earned a bachelors degree in piano performance from Jacksonville State in Jacksonville, Ala., and a masters in music education from Florida State. He said students face a challenge when they embark on studying music, but the rewards are tremendous. The kids are interested in music but they have no clue what it is, he said. They really dont know what theyre in for. They just know that theyve heard something and they like it. Its not like a football game, he added. You want to play football, you pretty much know what youre getting into. Lester said his challenge as a music educator is getting them through that initial excitement period and to realize that this really is a course of study that takes a lot of dedication and determination and discipline and sometimes it takes a lot of hard work. And getting them on that path where they see their progress in daily little amounts. McIntyre, accompanied by her husband Freddie, was the picture of joyful exuberance when her name was read. She won a two-night stay on St. George Island for the honor, courtesy of Resort Vacation Properties. Now the custodian at the Learning Center, McIntyre was praised as being a consistent, friendly presence to students. Theres a smile on her face all day long, said Louise Chipman, who was informally named last years School-Related Employee of the Year. Franklin County School Volunteer Coordinator Dolores Croom worked to implement a new plan by Superintendent Nina Marks, who sought to have school-related employees recognized just as teachers are. She asked that I draft the forms took it to the school board and they passed it last term, Croom said. It has never been of cially done until last term, on a very small scale, and now the actual nominating and voting process has been established. Reading coach Harolyn Walker and I consolidated the two events, and the attendance as well as the participation was great. Chipman was given a $50 Walmart gift certi cate for her selection last year as the countys School RelatedEmployee of the Year. There were ve nominees for the SchoolRelated Employee of the Year award. Chipman began by introducing Mary Brown, who has worked fulltime in food service at the Learning Center for the past seven years. Every day the students grow a little bit more with her encouragement, she said. Principal George Oehlert introduced his secretary, Sharon Browning, who is in many ways the face of the administration to students and parents, well-respected for her knowledge, ef ciency and friendly manner. Shes awesome, Oehlert said. Roy Carroll, the director of nance, introduced Joy Towns, currently the of ce manager at the Learning Center after assuming a variety of roles within the system. Carroll praised her dependability, versatility and abilities David Meyers, the districts information technology guru, introduced Charles Justice, a young, fairly new employee and spoke warmly of his professionalism and willingness to tackle new challenges in his role with the increasingly complex world of computers and communications. Its a hard job and Charles is committed, Meyers said. There were three other nominees for the Teacher of the Year honor including Audrey Gay from the elementary school, Andrea Keuchel from the middle school and Sharon Solomon from the Learning Center. Melanie Humble introduced Gay, who teaches fth grade, and outlined the many contradictions in the beloved teachers personality. A proud Southern lady who busts out on bongos, and a softspoken, religious woman who has been known to burst into dance in a relentless push to motivate her students to excel. Laura Baney introduced Keuchel, who teaches middle school English, and described her quiet perseverance and integrity in getting the most from her students. Angeline Stanley introduced Solomon, who teaches reading at the Learning Center, and used the occasion to burst into sweet song in praise of her colleague. High school teacher Paul Marxsen introduced Lester. The band director now moves on to state competition, and will receive an expenses-paid trip to Atlanta to attend the Ron Clark Academy. After a welcome from Barbara Lee, last years Teacher of the Year, and from Chipman, the gathering were led in prayer by pastor David Walker, husband of Harolyn Walker, the 2009 Teacher of the Year/ Oehlert then introduced the three staffers who plan to retire this year, each with at least 30 years of professional service. These include high school attendance of cer Karen Smith, elementary school teacher Lois Shirley, and Cheryl Creek, director of the schools, culinary arts program. As a support staffer, Smith will receive a $50 gift certi cate from the Grady Market. After a dinner created and served by Creeks students, the audience watched a video presentation created by Justice. Missy Cumbie presented each of the teachers with a $50 gift certi cate, courtesy of Delta Kappa, the fraternal organization of retired teachers. Each of the nominees also received gift baskets provided courtesy of donations from staffers and area businesses. The high schools SWAT anti-tobacco organization also gave each of the nominees a gift bag. INVITATION TO BID St. George Plantation Owners Association, Inc., (SGPOA) is seeking candidates for a Landscape Architect to design a Master Landscaping Plan for the Plantation. The goal of the Master Plan is to achieve a harmonious and consistent ow of natural-looking and appropriate landscaping through the common areas of the Plantation, based on the Plantation Design Guide, the Florida-Friendly Landscaping Guidance by the University of Florida/IFAS, the Wildre Risk Reduction in Florida by the Florida Division of Forestry, and other guidance appropriate for coastal communities. The Landscape Architect will seek broad input from property owners and staff of the Plantation, including use of Plantation website as well as face to face meetings. The Landscape Architect must be licensed in the state of Florida and have relevant experience in Coastal communities. A bidders conference will be held on Friday, February 24, 2012, at 2 pm at the Plantation Clubhouse to answer questions related to this project and to provide a site visit. Candidates are encouraged to contact the General Manager at (850) 9272312 to indicate intent to bid before submitting a proposal and receive a detailed description of the project. Proposals and statements of qualications must be submitted at our ofces by noon Monday, March 5, 2012. Proposals will be opened 1 p.m., Monday, March 5, 2012. Selected candidate interviews will be conducted at a date certain to be determined. It is anticipated that the SGPOA will award this contract no later than March 19, 2012. SGPOA reserves the right to reject any and all proposals not deemed to be in the best interest of the SGPOA, or to accept that proposal which appears to be in the best interest of the SGPOA. SGPOA reserves the right to waive any informalities in or reject any or all proposals, or any part of any proposal. Proposals should be submitted in sealed envelopes to General Manager and marked in the lower left hand corner Landscape Architect Proposal. Submit to General Manager, St George Plantation Owners Association, 1712 Magnolia Road, St George Island, FL 32328. NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING PLANNING & ZONING CITY OF APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA The Apalachicola Planning & Zoning will hold a Public Hearing on Monday, February 13th 2012 at 6:00 PM at City Hall, Community Center Meeting Room, 1 Bay Avenue, Apalachicola, Florida to discuss and receive citizen comments on a special exception request relating to proposed business use of the structure on the parcel located at the corner of Hwy 98 and 12th St (C-2 Neighborhood Commercial), more specically described as Block 77, Lots 8 10 pursuant to the ofcial zoning map of the city. A Special Meeting will immediately follow. The following special exception request item will be discussed and considered: a) The applicant is interested in opening a Bed & Breakfast as well as apartments within the C-2 (Neighborhood Commercial) zoned area. The Apalachicola Land Development Code allows for such use if special exception approval is granted. All interested parties are encouraged to attend and be heard with respect to this request. For further information, contact the Apalachicola Administrative and Community Development Ofce, 1 Avenue E, Apalachicola, Florida 850-653-9319. BILL MILLER REALTY 850-697-3751 (3310) 570-0658 3/2 DBL WD -3 F E NC ED C OR. LOTS-2 C AR GAR $60,000 $29,500 $2,500 D OW N BU YS 2 B ED AP T 2 6 OR RE N T $500/MTH GU LF V IEW & A CC ESS 3 B DR 2 BA 2006 M / H 16 X 80 $89,000 3/B-D/W-3 C OR. LOTS DBL GARAGE $59,500 MIH 2 CR N R LOTS BLK. $ S TORE RED UC ED $49,500 C OMM. BLDG-98 O N G U LF-RE N T $600/MTH Laura Baney introduced in getting the most from her MARY BROWN SHARON BROWNING JOY TOWNS CHARLES JUSTICE introduced Lester. The band Franklin County Elementary Teacher of the Year Audrey Gay, center, with her family, seated from left, Warren Smith and Lois Long Smith, Gays mother; Robert and Audrey Gay; and granddaughters Hannah and Haley Smith, and Alison Gay; daughter-in-law Kellie Wood, and grandson Bobby Gay, Jr. Standing are Gays brother Randal Long and his wife Mary. Left Franklin County Learning Center Teacher of the Year Sharon Solomon, with brother John, and parents Margie and Roy Solomon. Bottom Left Franklin County Middle School Teacher of the Year Andrea Keuchel, center, with daughters Amelia, left, and Katie. Standing are her parents Edward and Mary Keuchel. Photos by DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times LEADER from page A1

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A14| The Times Thursday, February 9, 2012 CLASSIFIEDS 76482 IN THE CIRCUIT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY CASE NO:2007-000102-CA The Bank of New York as Trustee for the Certificateholders CWABS, Inc. Asset-Backed Certificates, Series 2002-03 Plaintiff, vs. Richard Sand ad Crystal Sand, his wife; United States of America; Lighthouse Pointe Estates Homeowners Association, Inc. Defendant(s). AMENDED NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order rescheduling foreclosure sale dated January 23, 2012, and entered in Civil Case No.: 2007-000102-CA of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein The Bank of New York as Trustee for the Certificateholders CWABS, Inc. Asset-Backed Certificates, Series 2002-03, Plaintiff and Richard Sand and Crystal Sand, his wife are defendant(s), I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, AT THE WEST FRONT DOOR OF THE FRANKLIN COUNTY COURTHOUSE, LOCATED ON HWY 98, IN APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA, AT 11:00 A.M., March 14, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit: LOT 36, LIGHTHOUSE POINTE ESTATES (UNRECORDED): COMMENCE AT AN OLD TERRA COTTA MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 35, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 39 MINUTES WEST ALONG THE SECTION LINE 2505.40 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 50 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 55 SECONDS EAST 291.01 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE SOUTH 50 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 55 SECONDS EAST 250.00 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 31 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 18 SECONDS EAST 1226.16 FEET TO THE SOUTHWESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF 60 FOOT RAILWAY, THENCE, RUN NORTH 62 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 47 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 220.00 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 33 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 11 SECONDS WEST 1177.80 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH A 2002 GENERAL JAGUAR 3 MOBILE HOME, ID# GMHGA4130229116A, AND ID# GMHGA4130229116B ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. DATED at Apalachicola, Florida, this 25th day of January, 2012. MARCIA M. JOHNSON CLERK OF COURT MICHELE MAXWELL CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT Franklin County, Florida ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF: SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACHE, LLP 4630 Woodland Corporate Blvd. Suite 100 Tampa, FL 33614 (813) 880-8888 Feb 9, 16, 2012 76436 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 2007-CA-000376 ARCH BAY HOLDINGS, LLC -SERIES 2010B Plaintiff, vs. JEFFREY GALLOWAY A/K/A JEFFREY S. GALLOWAY; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF JEFFREY GALLOWAY A/K/A JEFFREY S. GALLOWAY; IF LIVING, INCLUDING ANY UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SAID DEFENDANT(S), IF REMARRIED, AND IF DECEASED, THE RESPECTIVE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS, AND TRUSTEES, AND ALL OTHER PERSONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THE NAMED DEFENDANT(S); JOHN DOE; JANE DOE; Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-styled cause, in the Circuit Court of Franklin County, Florida, I will sell the property situated in Franklin County, Florida, described as: LOT 31, BAY COVE VILLAGE, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 5 AT PAGE 18 AND 19 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, Front steps of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320 at 11:00 a.m., on March 14, 2012. DATED THIS 24th DAY OF January, 2012. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Witness, my hand and seal of this court on the 24th day of January, 2012. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk THIS INSTRUMENT PREPARED BY: Law offices of Daniel C. Consuegra 9204 King Palm Drive Tampa, FL 33619-8660 Phone: 813-915-8660 Attorneys for Plaintiff Feb 2, 9, 2012 77279 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 2011 CA 439 AMERIS BANK, a Georgia Bank 2628 Crawfordville Hwy P.O. Box 1240 Crawfordville, Florida 32326-1240 Plaintiff, vs. DONALD GRISWOLD, KATHRYN GRISWOLD, and THE UNKNOWN TENANT IN POSSESSION OF 1002 NE 2nd Street, Carrabelle, Florida 32322, Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: DONALD GRISWOLD, KATHRYN GRISWOLD, and THE UNKNOWN TENANT IN POSSESSION OF 1002 NE 2nd Street, Carrabelle, Florida 32322: YOU ARE NOTIFIED that a civil action has been filed against you in the Circuit Court, County of Franklin, State of Florida, to foreclose certain real property described as follows: LOTS 1 AND 2, BLOCK 47 (210), KEOUGH’S SECOND ADDITION TO THE CITY OF CARRABELLE, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA; TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN 1995 “SKYL” DOUBLEWIDE MOBILE HOME BEARING VIN# 6H630502HA/ 6H630502HB AND TITLE #’S 69123651/ 69123652. Commonly known as 1002 NE 2nd Street, Carrabelle, Florida 32322 You are required to file a written response with the Court and serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Timothy D. Padgett, Plaintiff’;s attorney, whose address is 2878 Remington Green Circle, Tallahassee, Florida 32308, at least thirty (30) days from the date of first publication, and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on Plaintiff’s attorney or immediately thereafter, otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. Dated this 24th day of January, 2012,. Marcia M. Johnson CLERK OF COURT By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk Attorney for Plaintiff: Timothy D. Padgett, Esq. Timothy D. Padgett, P.A. 2878 Remington Green Circle Tallahassee, FL 32308 (850) 422-2520 Fax: (850) 422-2567 February 9, 16, 2012 76961 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case No.: 2010-CA-000518 CitiMortgage, Inc. Plaintiff, vs. Timothy Ray Davis a/k/a Timothy R. Davis a/k/a Timothy Davis and Loretta S. Davis a/k/a Loretta Davis, Husband and Wife, Atlantic Credit & Finance Inc., as Assignee of HSBC Card Services; Franklin County, Florida; Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order of Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated January 23, 2012 entered in Civil Case No. 2010-CA-000518 of the Circuit Court in the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein CitiMortgage, Inc., Plaintiff and Timothy Ray Davis a/k/a Timothy R. Davis a/k/a Timothy Davis and Loretta S. Davis a/k/a Loretta Davis, Husband and Wife are defendant (s), I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash AT THE WEST FRONT DOOR OF THE FRANKLIN COUNTY COURT-HOUSE, LOCATED ON HWY 98, IN APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA, AT 11:00 A.M. on March 7, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit: ALL OF LOTS 19, 20, AND 21, OF BLOCK 243, IN GREATER APALACHICOLA, IN THE CITY OF APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, IN COMMON USE. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator; 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, Florida 32301; (850) 577-4430 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification of the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of the Circuit Court Franklin County, FL Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk Submitted By: ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF: SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACHE, LLP 4630 Woodland Corporate Blvd. Suite 100 Tampa, FL 33614 (813) 880-8888 (813) 880-8800 February 9, 16, 2012 76418T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 19-2008-CA-000508 THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS OF THE CWABS, INC., ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-4 Plaintiff, vs. MICHAEL FORSLUND et. al., Defendant(s). RE-NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order or Final Judgment of Foreclosure date January 9, 2012, and entered in Case No. 19-2008-CA-000508 of the Circuit Couurt of the 2ND Judicial Circuit in and for FRANKLIN County, Florida, wherein THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS OF THE CWABS, INC., ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-4 is the Plaintiff and MICHAEL FORSLUND; and UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF MICHAEL FORSLUND; and ANGLERS HARBOR HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, LLC; and FIRST TENNESSEE BANK, F/K/A FIRST HORIZON HOME LOANS CORPORATION are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash are held at the front steps of the Franklin County Courthouse 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on the 15th day of February, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Order of Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 15, ANGLERS HARBOR, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 8, PAGE 8, AS REVISED BY THAT CERTAIN REPLAT RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 8, PAGE 32, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. IF YOU ARE A PERSON CLAIMING A RIGHT TO FUNDS REMAINING AFTER THE SALE, YOU MUST FILE A CLAIM WITH THE CLERK OF COURT NO LATER THAN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU FAIL TO FILE A CLAIM, YOU WILL NOT BE ENTITLED TO ANY REMAINING FUNDS. AFTER 60 DAYS, ONLY THE OWNER OF RECORD AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MAY CLAIM THE SURPLUS. DATED at FRANKLIN County, Florida, this 10th day of January, 2012. MARCIA M. JOHNSON Clerk FRANKLIN County, Florida By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk GILBERT GARCIA GROUP P.A. Attorney for Plaintiff(s) 2005 Pan Am Circle, Suite 110 Tampa, Florida 33607 (813) 443-5087 Fla. Bar# 438405 469549.001296TST Feb 2, 9, 2012 76484T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA BRANCH BANKING AND TRUST COMPANY, Plaintiff, vs. PHILLIPP A. SPENCER, et al., Defendant(s)., CASE NO. 2011-CA-000126 NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order or Final Judgment Scheduling Foreclosure Sale entered on January 24, 2012 in this case now pending in said Court, the style of which is indicated above. I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash on the front steps of Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida 32320, at 11:00 a.m., on the 7th day of March, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Order or Final Judgment, to-wit: LOT 12, HOLIDAY BEACH, UNIT 1, A SUBDIVISON AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 12, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. a/k/a: 9 CAROUSEL TERRACE, ALLIGATOR POINT, FLORIDA 32346 ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. ENTERED at FRANKLIN County, Florida, this 25th day of January, 2012. MARCIA M. JOHNSON As Clerk, Circuit Court FRANKLIN, Florida By: Michele Maxwell As Deputy Clerk SPEAR & HOFFMAN P.A. Dadeland Executive Center 9700 South Dixie Highway, Suite 610 Miami, Florida 33156 Telephone: (305) 670-2299 BBH-C-2432/mac Feb 9, 16, 2012 76486T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CURCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY CASE NO: 2011-CA-000419 PNC Bank, National Association, Plaintiff, vs. Vera M. Snider and Vera S. Dudley; Unknown Tenants in Posession #1, If living and all Unknown Parties claiming by, through, under and against the above named Defendant(s) who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said Unknown Parties may claim an interest as Spouse, Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, or Other Claimants; Unknown Tenants in Possession #2, If living, and all Unknown Parties claiming by, through, under and against the above named Defendant(s) who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said Unknown parties may claim an interest as Spouse, Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, or Other Claimants Defentant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION FORECLOSURE PROCEEDINGS PROPERTY TO:Vera S. Dudley; ADDRESS UNKNOWN BUT WHOSE LAST KNOWN ADDRESS IS: 155 River Road, Carabelle, FL 32322 Residence unknown, if living, including any unknown spouse of the said Defendants, if either has remarried and if either or both of said Defendants are dead, their respective unknown heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, creditors, lienors, and trustees, and all other persons claiming by, through, under or against the named Defendant(s); and the aforementioned named Defendant(s) and such of the aforementioned unknown Defendants and such of the aforementioned unknown Defendant(s) and such of the aforementioned Defendants as may be infants, incompetents or otherwise not sui juris. YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action has been commenced to foreclose mortgage on the following real property, lying and being and situated in Franklin County, Florida, more particularly described as follows: COMMENCE AT THE ABUTMENT OF THE SOUTH APPROACH OF THE CARRABELLE RIVER BRIDGE WITH THE CENTERLINE OF STATE ROAD NO: 30 (U.S. HIGHWAY NO:98) AND RUN SOUTH 21 DEGREES 57 DEGREES 00 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID CENTERLINE 100.00 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID CENTERLINE RUN NORTH 63 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 68.00 FEET TO THE WESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF STATE ROAD NO: 30 (U.S. HIGHWAY NO: 98), THENCE RUN SOUTH 21 DEGREES 75 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 351.90 FEET TO THE INTERSECTION OF SAID WESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY WITH THE NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF STATE ROAD NO: S-379 (RIVER ROAD), THENCE RUN NORTH 76 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 1230.40 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (MARKED #4261) MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE NORTH 76 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 127.81 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919), THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY RUN NORTH 13 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 39 SECONDS EAST 114.09 FEET TO A POINT LYING ON THE APPROXIMATE MEAN HIGH WATER LINE OF THE CARRABELLE RIVER, THENCE RUN SOUTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID APPROXIMATE MEAN HIGH WATER LINE AS FOLLOWS: SOUTH 74 DEGREES 08 MINUTES 52 SECONDS EAST 76.71 FEET, SOUTH 86 DEGREES 42 MINUTES 11 SECONDS EAST 6.26 FEET, SOUTH 76 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 24 SECONDS EAST 12.15 FEET, SOUTH 70 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 18 SECONDS EAST 18.64 FEET, SOUTH 76 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 03 SECONDS EAST 19.85 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID APPROXIMATE MEAN HIGH WATER LINE RUN SOUTH 15 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 01 SECONDS WEST 109.27 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. more commonly known as 155 River Road, Carrabelle, FL 32322. This action has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defense, if any, uponSHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACHE, LLP, Attorneys for Plaintiff, whose address is 4630 Woodland Corporate Blvd., Suite 100, Tampa, Florida 33614, within thirty (30) days after the first publication of this notice and file the original with the clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiff’s attorney or immediately there after; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. WITNESS my hand and seal of this Court on the 25th day of January, 2012. MARCIA M. JOHNSON Clerk of Court By:Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator; 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, Florida 32301; (850) 577-4430 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification of the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Feb 9, 16, 2012 76865T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 19-2009-CA-000266 DIVISION: BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. DEBORAH CALIANNO A/K/A DEBORAH J. CALIANNO, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated January 9, 2012 and entered in Case NO. 19-2009-CA-000266 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for FRANKLIN County, Florida wherein BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., is the Plaintiff and DEBORAH CALIANNO A/K/A DEBORAH J. CALIANNO; VITO A. CALIANNO A/K/A VITO ANTHONY CALIANNO A/K/A VITO CALIANNO; CAPITAL CITY BANK; KELLY’S LANDING HOMEOWNERS’ ASSOCIATION, INC.; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at FRONT DOOR OF THE FRANKLIN COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 33 MARKET STREET, APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA at 11:00AM, on the 15th day of February, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT 1 OF KELLY’S LANDING, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 9 AT PAGE 4 OF THE OFFICIAL RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA A/K/A LOT 1 KELLY’S LANDING, CARRABELLE, FL 32322 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on January 10, 2012. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Mr. Doug Smith, Office of Court Administration Leon County Courthouse, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301, Phone: 850-577-4401, Fax: 850-487-7947. F09047577 February 2, 9, 2012 76917T IN THE COUNTY COURT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 19 2010 CC 000051 ST. GEORGE PLANTATION OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., a Florida not for profit corporation Plaintiff, vs. TERESA L. JACOB, et al, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated January 24, 2012 and entered in Case No. 19 2010 CC 000051 of the County Court in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein St. George Plantation Owners Association, Inc. is Plaintiff, and TERESA L. JACOB and the UNKNOWN PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE, SPOUSE, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIE76915T IN THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 11-260-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, Plaintiff, vs. TIMOTHY C. POLORONIS and LEE ANNE POLORONIS Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated January 24, 2012, and entered in Civil Action No. 11-260-CA of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein the parties were the Plaintiff, CENTENNIAL BANK, and the Defendants, TIMOTHY C. POLORONIS and LEE ANNE POLORONIS, I will sell to the highest and best bidder, for cash, at 11:00 a.m. (Eastern Time) on the 14th day of March, 2012, at the front steps of the Franklin County Courthouse, Apalachicola, Florida, the following-described real property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure. Lot 8, Block 119, City of Apalachicola, Franklin County, Florida. The successful bidder at the sale will be required to place the requisite state documentary stamps on the Certificate of Title. DATED this 25th day of January, 2012. Hon. MARCIA JOHNSON Clerk of the Court Franklin County, FL By: Michele Maxwell As Deputy Clerk February 2, 9, 2012

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, February 9, 2012 The Times | A15 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322850-697-9604 850-323-0444 www.seacrestre.comwww. rst tness.com/carrabellePROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND RENTALSRENTALS1 BR RIVER CONDO, BOAT SLIP3 Night Minimum .......................$105 PLUS DAILY3 BR 1 BA FURNISHED HOUSEMonthly Rate, Carrabelle ................................$8501 BR 1 BA UNFURNISHED APTLanark, Remodeled, Includes Water ...............$4752 BR 1 BA UNFURNISHED APTLanark ............................................................$4501 BR, SUN ROOM/DAYBEDFurnished, Lanark ..........................................$4503 BR 2 BA FURNISHED HOMEOn River, Boat Dock & Lift ............................$10002 BR 1 BA FURNISHED HOUSEOn Bay ..........................................................$10003 BR 3 BA FURNISHED CONDODowntown, 3 Night Minimum ....$105 PLUS DAILYOFFICE SPACE HWY 98 Frontage, Carrabelle ....$550 Plus Utilities See emeraldcoastjobs.com to nd a job at the intersection of both.Wouldn’t you like a job that ful lls you both professionally and personally? With Monster’s new ltering tools, you can quickly hone in on the job that’s right for you. So visit emeraldcoastjobs.com and nd a job that makes everybody happy. Attend College Online from Home. *Medical *Business *Criminal Justice. *Hospitality. Job Placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. 877-206-5165. www. Centura Online.com NORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, AND ALL OTHER PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THE ESTATE OF WILLIAM M. JACOB, DECEASED, AND ALL UNKNOWN PERSONS OR PARTIES HAVING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE ANY RIGHT, TITLE, OR INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY LOCATED IN ST. GEORGE PLANTATION are Defendants, I Will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash on the Front Steps of the Franklin County Courthouse at 33 Market Street, Apalachicola. FL 32320, Franklin County, Florida, at 11:00 am on the 21st day of March, 2012 the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: Lot 16, Nick’s Hole, Phase I, a subdivision as per map or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 5 at Page 36 of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Danny Davis, ADA Coordinator, Court Technology Office, Office of Court Administration, 301 S. Monroe St., Rm 225, Tallahassee, FL 32303, (850) 577-3401 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. DATED this 25th day of January, 2012. Marcia M. Johnson, Clerk of Circuit Court By: Terry Creamer Deputy Clerk Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Becker & Poliakoff, P.A. Attorney for Plaintiff 348 Miracle Strip Pkwy SW, Suite 7 Ft. Walton Beach, FL 32548-5253 (850)-664-2229 (850) 664-7882 Fax February 2, 9, 2012 77303T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 11-251-CA PREMIER BANK, a Florida banking corporation, Plaintiff, vs. BOOMTOWN, LLC, a Florida limited liability company, RICKY R. REGISTER, CARLTON JACKSON a/k/a CARLTON L. JACKSON a/k/a CARLTON LEON JACKSON, VILLAGES OF ST. MARKS PROPERTY OWNERS’ ASSOCIATION, INC., a Florida non-profit corporation, UNKNOWN TENANT 1 and UNKNOWN TENANT 2, Defendants. NOTICE OF JUDICIAL SALE PURSUANT TO SECTION 45.031(1) OF THE FLORIDA STATUTES TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: Notice is hereby given that pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered on January 26, 2012, in Case No. 11-251-CA, of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit for Wakulla County, Florida, in which PREMIER BANK, a Florida banking corporation, is the Plaintiff, and BOOMTOWN, LLC, a Florida limited liability company, RICKY R. REGISTER, CARLTON JACKSON a/k/a CARLTON L. JACKSON a/k/a CARLTON LEON JACKSON, VILLAGES OF ST. MARKS PROPERTY OWNERS’ ASSOCIATION, INC., a Florida non-profit corporation, UNKNOWN TENANT 1 and UNKNOWN TENANT 2 n/k/a STEVEN MARTIN, are the Defendants, that the undersigned, Clerk of Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida, will sell at public sale the following described real property: Wakulla County: Lot 64, Villages of St. Marks, according to the Plat thereof, recorded in Plat Book 3, Page(s) 70, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. and Lot 131, Villages of St. Marks, according to the Plat thereof, recorded in Plat Book 3, Page(s) 70, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Franklin County Lots 1, 2, 3 and 4, Block “D” (113), Range 11, Pickett’s Addition to the City of Carrabelle, Florida, said land situate, lying and being in Franklin County, Florida. and All that tract of parcel of land lying and being in Franklin County, Florida, identified as Lot Number (5), Block D (113), Range Eleven (11), Pickett’s Addition, Carrabelle, State of Florida. The sale will be held on March 1, 2012, at 11:00 a.m., to the highest bidder for cash, at the Front Lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, Crawfordville, Florida, in accordance with Section 45.031, Florida Statutes. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated January 31, 2012. BRENT X. THURMOND Wakulla County Clerk of Court Becky Whaley Deputy Clerk February 9, 16, 2012 Incorrect Insertion PolicyFor Classified In-column AdvertisersAll ads placed by phone are read back to the advertiser to insure correctness. The newspaper will assume correctness at the time of the read-back procedure unless otherwise informed. Please your ad. Advertisers are requested to check the advertisement on the first insertion for correctness. Errors should be reported immediately. Your Florida Freedom newspaper will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion, nor will it be liable for any error in advertisements to a greater extent than the cost of the space occupied by the error. Any copy change, during an ordered schedule constitutes a new ad and new charges. We do not guarantee position of ANY ad under any classification. YORKIE AKC Valentine’s Puppies8 weeks old, 1st shots and comes w/health certificate Male $650 Female $750 mom & dad are located on premise and come from a loving home.The yorkies will be approx. 8 lbs when full grown. Please Call 850-554-0320 Panama City Eastpoint 45 Bagonia St Apt 106 Daily from 12pm-6pmEstate Saleworth $20,000 wants $10,000 Firm from Rolex Watches GUN SHOWSanta Rosa County Auditorium, Milton, FL Feb 25th & 26th 9am -5pm call (850) 957-4952 or (850) 261-8407 General Admission $6 DIABETIC TEST STRIPS NEEDEDCall Bob (850)710-0189 Mobile Home Steps. Steel with treated lumber. 5 steps -30 inches high x 46 inches wide. $75. Apalachicola Call: 727-515-8537 Food Svs/Hospitality*Servers *Cooks Dishwashers *Bartenders *BussersBLUE PARROT Now HIRINGPlease apply in person between 9a-5pm 7 days a week@ Blue Parrot St. George’s Island HospitalityRESORT VACATION PROPERTIESAccepting applications. Full-time positions, great benefits, weekend work required. *Maintenance Technician Requires general maintenance experience, good driving record & good customer service skills. Team player, works well under pressure. *Housekeeping Office Clerk Requires prior office experience & good customer service skills. Team player, works well under pressure. Apply in person 9-5 weekdays at 123 W Gulf Beach Dr, St. George Island Install/Maint/RepairHousekeepersNeeded*Full or part time positions available *Must be able to work weekends. *Have own transportation *Some experience preferred. *Must be able to work under pressure *Must be able to work well with others. *Pay will be based upon experience. Apply in person at the Buccaneer Inn on St. George Island between the hours of 9am to 4pm Monday through Friday. Background check will be performed. AIRLINES ARE HIRING – Train for hands-on Aviation Career. FAA Approved Program. Financial Aid if qualified. Job Placement Assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance. 877-206-9405 ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE. *Medical *Business *Hospitality. Job Placement Assistance. Computer available. Financial aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 866-467-0054. wwwCenturaOnline.com Apalachicola: Studio/Efficiency $550 per month + deposit. Includes Murphy bed, appliances & large fenced yard. Call Kathy @ Robinson Real Estate Co. 850-653-7196 Apartment avail. Lanark Village, Can be a 1 or 2 br, with sunroom $450 month + $250 deposit (850) 509-2460 Lanark Village: Clean 2 bedroom, 1 bath, screened porch, AC Long term lease: 7 months min. $500 monthly + $350. security deposit, references required or wkly & wkend rental w/deposit Pets-will consider. Non smoking. 850-212-2063 Text FL95716 to 56654 Publisher’s NoticeAll real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on a equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. Two Apartments!!1 br & 2br with 1 & 2 ba 2nd Story with Balcony in Historic Downtown Apalachicola. W/D included furn or unfurn, 1st, last & security. Call 850-323-0599 St. George Island $160 week, Electric, Satellite, Garbage incl. Pool tble. 12’ X 65’ deck w/Beautiful view 850-653-5114 St. George Island 2Br, 1Ba, Bar, Satellite, Foosball Table 12’ x 50’ Deck. Only $250/week 850-653-5114 Lanark Village Parker St., 2 Br 1 Ba, All Tile, $550 month + $300 deposit. Please Call 850-927-2838 or 864-356-5949 1 or 3 BRCH/A in Apalachicola, FL. 850-643-7740. Eastpointe/Carrabelle 1bd Cottage, $485 + $200 utils. Direct TV. In forest 800sf, stone FP, W/D gas range & central AC 954-816-7004 Text FL94643 to 56654 Waterfront CondoTwo Bedroom, completely renovated at The Landings on the Carrabelle River. Call: 850-545-0784 for information. Asking $112,000 $37,000 5 Acres near Crystal Lake on Amos Hayes Rd, property has well septic and power pole. Current survey is available. About 1.5 acres of the property is cleared. 850-271-5761 and leave a message. ‘97 Buell S3 Thunderbolt Motorcycle, Harley Davidson Motor, runs great and garage kept, 17,000 miles. $3,500!! Call 850-271-5761 and leave a message. SELL ALL YOUR ITEMS through classified.CALL 747-5020 Need a helping hand? Advertise in the Help Wanted Section in the Classifieds! 747-5020 ToPlace Your Classified ad inCall Our New Numbers Now!Call:850-747-5020 Toll Free:800-345-8688 Fax:850-747-5044 Email:thestar@pcnh.com Email:thetimes@pcnh.com theAPALACHICOLA & CARRABELLETIMES CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW

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Local A16 | The Times Thursday, February 9, 2012 Laban Bontrager, DMD Monica Bontrager, DMD 12761 Pea Ridge Road Bristol, Florida 32321 TELEPHONE (850) 643-5417 Bristol Dental Clinic DENTURE LAB ON PREMISES Same Day Service on Repairs and Relines Don Lively General Contractors L ICENSED AND I NSURED 20 Y EARS E XPERIENCE P .O. Box 439 C arrabelle, FL 32322 697-2783 or Mobile 566-2603 RC 0066499 R G0065255 Carrabelle Visa, Discover, and American Express Honored at Participating Ace Stores JACKSONS Building Supplies Building Supplies & Auto Repair Carrabelle 697-3333 We Deliver Anywhere Hardware and Paint Center Electrical & Finish Carpentry 850-229-6751 850-227-5666 Michael & Anthony T o n y P o l o r o n i s & S o n s I n c From A to Z PO Box 364 Port St. Joe, FL 32457 850-340-0756 Gregs Handyman Service & Lawn Maintenance NO JOB TOO BIG PLEASE CALL JOE @ 850-670-5478 joes_lawn@yahoo.com JOES LAWN CARE PILE DRIVING FOUN D ATION/PILING R E P AIR DOCK/MARINE WORK MOORING BOUYS OFFICE: 850.227.1709 FAX: 850.762.2552 CELL: 850.527.5725 HOWARD227 F AIRPOINT.NET ROBERTS APPLIANCE REPAIR ALL MAJOR BRANDS 18 Shadow Lane Apalachicola, FL 32320 Phone: (850) 653-8122 Cell: (850) 653-7654 Trades & Services Our local real estate experts have identied what they feel are the best values around and are oering them to you in Real Estate Picks! (In this section), Discover the best real estate values in Mexico Beach, Port St. Joe, Apalachicola, Cape San Blas, St. George Island, Carrabelle and surrounding areas. Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Real Estate Picks John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.com MLS#245180 $41,900 St. George Island LOVELY HIGH & DRY HOME SITE Located in the quiet neighborhood of the Gulf Beaches, Possible Gulf views from the second story of a home. Mature pines & native vegetation. Lot has been recently cleared, so you can see what youre buying! West Bayshore Drive. Listed by Michael Billings John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.com MLS#245456 $139,000 St. George Island ST. GEORGE PLANTATION One of the best one acre 2nd tier lots in the Plantation. Good elevation. One story house is in place on 1st tier lot in front of this one. Located in Pebble Beach Village on Forsythia Court, its adjacent to a lovely sand path leading to a boardwalk to the Gulf. Truly a beautiful lot! FACTORY DIRECT S pecial $5 O FF each faux window blind Blinds Shades Solar Shades Shutters GU ARA N TEE D L O W E S T CO MP ETITI V E P RICE S STORM SHUTTERS Accordian Roll Down Bahama Colonial For A ll Y our Window Needs, Weve Got Y ou C overed! American Shield Company (850) 697-3066 or (850)528-9355 F REE I n-Home E stimates 20-30% ALL STORM SHUTTERS By Lois Swoboda Times Staff Writer More than 300 visitors ocked to the island Saturday to tour homes, artful, elegant and historic. The weather was perfect and the homes were picture perfect the day of the event, which raised funds to bene t the St. George Island Lighthouse Association. Organizer Dani Ray said the initial pre-tour goal of 200 tickets was met a week before the big day. Another 100 tickets were sold on site at Lighthouse Park. One highlight of the tour was Hadden House, the oldest wooden house on the island built in 1955. Owner Sue Mahoney, who purchased the house in 1989, was on hand to regale visitors with tales of storms and renovations. She said that, after she retires next year, she plans to spend a lot more time on the island. Located nearby were Marilyn and Mason Beans home, Sea Wings, and Best Ever, a deceptively modest house from the outside that boasts a table for 12 in the dining area. Further east, visitors were welcomed to Whaley House, a 5,000-square foot beauty featuring exotic woods and a stunning Gulf view. Three additional houses and the Plantation Clubhouse were on display in the gated portion of the west end. Volunteer drivers ferried tour goers from Lighthouse Park to the Plantation sites to avoid complications at the guard gate. The tour offered a unique opportunity for visitors to experience the serenity of the exclusive enclave. Garber House, with its stark modern lines, and fun-loving Rainbow House standing side-by-side could not have been more different or more lovely. The Plantation Clubhouse cant fail to be impressive, but perhaps the best-kept secret of the tour was the Thompson House, located near the cut and surrounded by native foliage. Visitors dubbed it the chefs house. Ray said the new event, which got a boost from funding from the Tourist Development Council, went very well and raised funds beyond her expectations. Tour of island homes a runaway success Right: This water feature at Garber House lends a soothing touch to the great room. Bottom Right: This oyster shell lamp was spotted at Best Ever on East Gorrie. Bottom left: This whimsical chandelier exempli es the spirit of charming Rainbow House. Below: Sea Wings, home of Marilyn and Mason Bean, typi es St. George Island style. LOIS SWOBODA | The Times



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School Related Employee of the Year Celia McIntyre reacts to the announcement she has won. xxxxx xxxxx xxxxxThursday, February 9, 2012 50 WWW.APALACHTIMES.COM VOL. 126 ISSUE 41Phone: 850-653-8868 Web: apalachtimes.com E-mail: dadlerstein@star .com Fax: 850-653-8036 Circulation: 800-345-8688Opinion . . . . . . A4 Tide Chart . . . . . A5 Society . . . . . . A8 Faith . . . . . . . A9 Outdoors . . . . . A10 Sports . . . . . . A11 Classi eds . . . A14-A15 DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK: School News & Society: 11 a.m. Friday Real Estate Ads: 11 a.m. Thursday Legal Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Display Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classi ed Line Ads: 5 p.m. Monday xxxxx Contact Us xxxxx Out to see Index A month-long celebration, A7Carrabelle debates limits on alcohol salesBy Lois SwobodaTimes Staff Writer A showdown between religious values and economic interests is taking place in Carrabelle. The question: Where can alcohol be served in the city? The city commissions rst reading in December of proposed city ordinance No. 450, which would allow for case-by-case city review of requested liquor licenses, led to threats, animosity and posturing on three subsequent occasions. The ght resumed with a vengeance at the Feb. 1 city meeting, when more than 100 people packed the meeting room. Originally scheduled for Jan. 5, the ordinances second reading was postponed until March, after it was greeted by erce opposition from Carrabelle religious leaders, notably Homer McMillan, pastor of the Fellowship Baptist Church in December. Because the ordinance raised passionate arguments from the both businesses and religious groups, Carrabelle commissioners called for a Jan. 21 workshop. About 50 people attended the meeting, which was marked mainly by the religious activists, led by McMillan, voicing this position. Chief among the business owners and landlords who strongly support the rule change are Skip and Kathy Frink, owners of a property at 203 Tallahassee St., home to the Funky Oyster Shack and later Old Salts Caf. The Frinks say they want to bring the restaurant back to life, and maintain that only permission to serve wine and beer will allow them to do so. But, under the current ordinance, that permission is disallowed because businesses selling alcohol for onsite consumption cannot be located within 500 feet of a church, school or playground. The Frinks and other business people argue the existing 500-foot rule would Residents call to throttle the bottleBy David AdlersteinTimes City Editor A husband and wife in Alligator Point, alleged to have been connected with a marijuana growing operation in one of their rental houses are in hot water. But its not for cultivating cannabis. On Jan. 27, Debbie I. Brett, 45, and husband Thaddeus M. Brett, 44, were arrested for insurance fraud and subsequently granted a $10,000 bond each by Circuit Judge Angela Dempsey. According to details found in the probable cause af davit led by Investigator Brett Johnson with the Franklin County Sheriffs Of ce, the charges arose out of a criminal mischief complaint led by Debbie Brett March 3, 2011. Johnsons report says she complained to Lt. Brad Segree and Deputy Lawrence Brannan that a tenant in a home the Bretts own at 638 Alligator Drive had been growing pot inside the house and had caused extensive damaged the structure to do so.Couple nailed for insurance fraud in potgrowing case THAD BRETT DEBBIE BRETTSpecial to the TimesMarcia M. Johnson led her letter of intent Thursday to seek reelection to the of ce of Clerk of Courts. Johnson, 55, of 5 Ellis Van Vleet St., in Apalachicola, led as a Democrat. She now is legally entitled to begin the process of getting petitions signed, with signatures due to the Supervisor of Elections of ce by May 7. Johnson would then be on the Aug. 14 primary ballot, provided she of cially quali es during this June 4 8 qualifying period. In the event that only Democrats led for this of ce, or any of the county of ces, Republicans and those without party af liation would be able to vote in any race that has candidates from only one political party, known as a universal race. The following is a statement issued by the candidate: Marcia M. Johnson has held the of ce for eight years, having been elected in 2004 and reelected without opposition in 2008. As Clerk of the Court, Mrs. Johnson serves three primary functions: 1) chief administrator of daily court operations, 2) county recorder and 3) nance of cer for the county. According to Mrs. Johnson, in 1998, Florida voters approved an amendment to Article V of the Florida Constitution which shifted the majority of funding of court responsibilities from local county government to the State of Florida although the county must provide of ce and meeting facilities, security, utilities, and the costs of communications services. The clerks of ce operates on two distinct budgets and scal years (state and county) and is subject to many nancial and operational audits. Mrs. Johnson identi ed some of her reasons for seeking another term. First, she said she still enjoys the job. Secondly, she has some big projects in the works that she would like to see through. Her of ce is beginning the process of accepting electronic lings in the Marcia Johnson seeks reelection as clerk ELECTION 2012 ELECTION 2012 SKIP FINK SHAWN OXENDINE HOMER McMILLAN RON BARKSBy David AdlersteinTime City Editor A longtime district teacher who returned to inaugurate the consolidated schools music program was named Teacher of the Year at Mondays banquet. And, for the rst time, the schools support staff formally selected a School-Related Employee of the Year. Karl Lester, a 23-year teaching veteran, was named Teacher of the Year, and Celia McIntyre, a 22-year staffer, was named School-Related Employee of the Year. Im humbled, said Lester, who has been the high school band director ever since the consolidated school opened six years ago. There are great teachers on staff, there are great teachers sitting up there with me tonight. Im real surprised and humbled that I was chosen. After teaching at Apalachicola High School, Lester left for a two-year stint at Wakulla High School, two years of Leader of the bandKarl Lester named Franklin County District Teacher of the Year Photos by DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The TimesTeacher of the Year Karl Lester, center, with wife Patti, and father Charles, left. Karl Lester named Franklin County District Teacher of the Year School Related Employee of the announcement she See BOTTLE A3 See FRAUD A5 See LEADER A13 See JOHNSON A5 Savor the Chef Sampler SundayThe 16th annual Forgotten Coast Chef Sampler, featuring the nest in local cuisine prepared by chefs from the areas nest restaurants will be held this Sunday, Feb. 12 from 6 9 p.m. at the Fort Coombs Armory. Tickets are $40 or $50. Reserved tables available. Call the Apalachicola Bay Chamber of Commerce at 653-9419 or email info@ apalachicolabay.org.Murder at Howard Johnsons?This Friday, Feb. 10 and Saturday, Feb. 11, the Panhandle Players present Murder at the Howard Johnsons, directed by Ed Tiley, at the Crooked River Grill as dinner theatre. The ultimate love triangle with homicidal overtones has never been so hilarious. Admission $30. For more information or reservations call Crooked River Grille directly at 697-5050. Season ticket holders can attend the dinner theatre performances by paying the dinner upcharge.Jerry Lee Lewis tribute at DixiePiano Man Todd Williams is a king of tributes and plays the piano with everything imaginable. Occasionally he plays with his ngers! He will be doing a tribute to the legendary Jerry lee Lewis at the Dixie Theatre in Apalachicola Friday Feb. 10 at 8 p.m. Tickets are $20. For reservations or information call 653-3200 or visit www.DixieTheatre.com.Win lodging in Cape San Blas Keepers houseThe Cape San Blas Lighthouse is raf ing the opportunity to spend the weekend of the Florida Panhandle Lighthouse Challenge as a resident of the Head Keepers Cottage. Tickets are available now for the raf e to win two nights and three days in the cottage next door to the gift shop at the lighthouse. The bedroom has one double bed. Children are not eligible to participate. Tickets are $10 each and are available in the gift shop or by contacting Beverly Douds at 229-1151 or csblighthouselady2008@ gmail.com. Drawing will be held April 1, 2012.

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LocalA2 | The Times Thursday, February 9, 2012 2012 MARDI GRASThank you from Habitat for HumanityACE HARDWARE AH LACARTRENTALS ANNCOWLES APALACHICOLAPOLICEDEPT. APALACHICOLA VOL. FIRE DEPT. APALACHICOLATIMES APEXPRODUCTIONS BAYSIDEWEDDING & FLORIST BETHMCKEE BAND BOWWOW BEACHSHOP BRIAN BOWEN BUD HAYES & FLETCHER BUDDYWARD & SONSEAFOOD CADENCE BANK CANDIDAROBERTSON CAROLINE & JEFFILLARDI CAROLYN POWELL CATYGREENE CENTENNIAL BANK COLIRUS COLLINS VACATION REALTY CONEDISTRIBUTORS COOMBS HOUSE DANTOWNSMIRE DANNYITZKOVITZ DAVE & TMCLAIN DAVID BUTLER DELORES SWEETSHOP DIXIETHEATRE DON & PAMELA ASHLEY DON FORTNER & THE AURA BAND DOWNTOWN BOOKS DR. HOBSON FULMER EASTPOINTLIBRARY EMO/ARCHITECTSINC. FAYE JOHNSON FRANEDWARDS FRANKLINCOUNTY ANIMALSHELTER FRANKLINCOUNTYCOMMISSIONERS FRANKLINCOUNTYSHERIFFSDEPT GAILPHILLIPS GEMCOLLECTION HARRIETT BEACH IGA JERRY HALL JOHNSPOHRER JOYCE ESTES KAYDSELDEN & LIZZIE KATHY KOUCK KARENMARTIN LANELOLLEYGERKING LAURA & TIMLOWE LINDASTANTON LISACONGILOSE MADINGER JEWELERS MARILYN & MASON BEAN MAYOR VAN JOHNSON MYSTIC KREWE OFSALTY BARKERS OYSTERRADIO PARKS & RECREATIONDEPT. PAMNOBLES & THE HOT FLASHES PENELOPES PETSTOP PETUNIASPETSHOP PROGROOMER PROJECTIMPACTSTUDENTS PUBLIX RESORT VACATION PROPERTIES RICHARD BICKEL R.J.SHELLEY & CATO ROBERSON & ASSOCIATES SARAH & TORBENMADSEN. SELINA & SALLY BOOTH SGILIGHTHOUSE SOUTHERNWINE & SPIRITS SUSANRICHARDSON TAMARASCAFE TALLAHASSEE CIVICCENTER TAYLORS BUILDING SUPPLY TOURISTDEVELOPMENT COUNCIL THATS A MORAY TIFFINS THECONSULATE THEDIXIETHEATRE THEGRILL THEOASIS THEOWL THERANCHOINN UP A CREEKRAW BAR WATERSTREET FISHERIES WATERSTREET HOTEL WAYNETHOMAS WILL & JODY ROSENBAUM By Lois SwobodaTimes Staff Writer A rm based in North Carolina has the nod for the xed base operators (FBO) contract at Apalachicola Regional Airport, but the county commissioners must agree to the change. Apalachicola International Aviation Training Center (AIATC), under the guidance of Bill Ruic, has held the FBO contract for 20 years, since Feb. 4, 1992. Last May, when the subject of the FBO contract was discussed, commissioners decided to ask for proposals to provide fuel at the airport. They hoped a new contractor might have ideas to increase business. Since a 12,000 square foot commercial hangar was also nearing completion, commissioners asked for proposals to lease that space at the same time. In all, they received ve proposals, some for the hangar, some for the FBO contract and some from both. The proposals were opened on July 19. The proposal from AIATC proposed to continue as FBO but did not make an offer on the hangar and offered no improvements or additional advertising to promote the airport. A second was from Skydance, a locally-based corporation formed by Dan Garlick, who leases a hangar at the airport; Randy Randolph, a member of the airport committee; and Alan Mathis who supplies fuel at several Georgia airports. Skydance made a bid for both the FBO contract and use of the hangar. Proposals were also submitted by Grace Industries, of Waynesboro, Tenn, which wanted both the FBO contract and the hangar; Island Air Express of Panama City also wanted both, After review, the commission voted to reject the entire rst batch of proposals. On Dec. 6, Ed Naggiar, a spokesman for the Apalach Regional Training Complex (ARTiC), appeared before commissioners and asked to rent the hangar for use as a base of operations. ARTiC is a rm that provides training for military and law enforcement organizations. The commission tabled the request. At the Dec. 20 meeting the board voted unanimously to advertise for a second set of proposals. At the Jan. 3 meeting, the commission voted to extend AIATCs contract for three months on a month-bymonth basis, so a new fuel provider need not be in place until May 4. The second set of airport proposals were opened at a special meeting Jan. 18 and given to the airport committee for discussion. The committee was instructed to bring a recommendation to commissioners at their Feb. 21 meeting. Proposals by ve companies were considered. AIATC requested a 10year extension of their current contract plus three ve-year options to extend the contract further. Ted Mosteller, chairman of the airport advisory board, estimated this contract would bring the county $561,000 over a 20-year period. ARTiC proposed a 20-year lease for the new hangar, with incremental increases in rent beginning at $18,000 annually and increasing to $30,000 annually. Mostellar said the lease would earn the county $552,000 over a 20-year period. Grace represented by James Lawrence. proposed to both rent the new hangar and take on the FBO contract. Mosteller said the proposed combined income to the county over 20 years would be more than $900,000: a half-million dollars to operate the FBO, $126,000 from fuel sales and $375,000 from rent. Island Air Express of Panama City proposed to both rent the hangar and assume the FBO contract. Mostellar said that, based on their proposal, the operation would bring an estimated $1.9 million over 20 years; $1.07 million from fuel revenue and $816,000 in rent from the commercial hangar. Skydance did not present a second proposal. After two meetings to consider the proposals, Mosteller said he will recommend the commission reject all proposals to lease the commercial hangar and readvertise. He said the committee will recommend Fly High of Lexington, NC be awarded the FBO contract. The company plans to launch the endeavor as Fly High Apalachicola and says it will increase fuel sales by lowering the retail price, and thus, gain a greater share of the regional market. Mosteller predicts Fly High will generate $689,532 for the county in fuel sales and rental fees over the next 20 years. Fly High would take over the existing hangar currently in use by AIATC, so the North Carolina company did not propose to rent the new commercial hangar. In the short term, Siller Helicopters of Yuba City, Calif. is renting the commercial hangar for $2,000 a month to house aircraft used to erect the new power poles crossing the river. Mostellar said they may remain in the hangar until the end of this month.Change recommended to FBOBy Lois SwobodaTimes Staff Writer At Tuesdays meeting, county commissioners authorized a one-time $750 bonus for all county employees. Commissioner Bevin Putnal suggested the bonus. Every county in Florida gave their employees a 3 percent raise or bonus except for two, us and Liberty County, he said. Morale is so bad in a lot of departments. Commissioner Noah Lockley moved to award the workers the 3 percent raise. Chairman Pinki Jackel then asked, Do yall know how much that is? Director of Administrative Services Alan Pierce and Clerk of Courts Marcia Johnson both said they were uncertain because they had not come to the meeting prepared to discuss the topic. Jackel said she was unsure whether some of the constitutional of cers had already awarded bonuses and wanted to nd out. Lockley restated his motion. Are you willing to make a decision without knowing where the money is coming from or how much? asked Jackel Lockley suggested it could be taken out of reserve funding. Johnson said the county has $1 million in reserves. She also said no one in her of ce had received a bonus. The commissioners instructed Johnson to have Erin Grif th in the nance of ce nd out how much a 3 percent bonus would cost. At the end of the meeting, Johnson told commissioners Grif th estimated the cost of a roughly 3 percent across-the-board bonus, to employees for both the county and constitutional of cers, would be $145,000 and would be best given out to all at $750. I think we certainly always try to look after our folks and do the best we can, said Jackel. We certainly would like to do more and better. But this will certainly be a help and appreciated. The commission voted unanimously to award the bonus with Commissioner Smokey Parrish absent.County employees to get $750 bonuses Panhandle Players commit comic murderThe Panhandle Players last weekend almost made a killing at the Eastpoint Fire Station, and they plan to repeat themselves this weekend at the Crooked River Grille, at the St. James Bays Golf Course in Carrabelle. In Murder at the Howard Johnsons, the audience enjoyed a love triangle marked by both homicidal, and matrimonial, impulses. Written by Ron Clark and Sam Bobrick, The show was masterfully handled by veteran actress Megan Lamb, center, as well as newcomers Bob Inguagiato, left, and Ed Aguiar, all of whom produced hilarious results in the complicated, physically challenging farce, directed by Ed Tiley. Performances continue over the upcoming Valentines weekend with special dinner theatre shows at the Crooked River Grill, on Friday and Saturday evenings, Feb. 10 and 11. To make reservations call 697-5050. Season ticket holders can attend by paying the dinner upcharge. DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times

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LocalThe Times | A3Thursday, February 9, 2012ban restaurants from practically all of Carrabelles commercial district, and could affect existing business owners right and ability to sell or rent their property. At the January workshop, Skip Frink said the current alcohol ordinance prevents him from attracting a renter for the former Old Salts restaurant, which he said closed because it was hindered by lack of a wine and beer license. We would like it to go back to what it was before and do away with the feet, he said. All neighbors on the block have signed a paper saying they dont object to the restaurant. An unidentied man in the audience said he lived two-tenths of a mile from the restaurant and wanted the 500-foot rule to remain in place. McMillan argued the Frinks had allowed the original liquor license to expire before the ordinance changed in 2010. He said it was their responsibility to maintain a businesss license. This is not the denial of anyones rights, but rather an exception for a specic business, he said. Kathy Frink said Old Salts owners had asked for permission to serve wine and beer three months before the ordinance changed and were turned down. She said that as a result, there had been no reason to maintain the license. McMillan said he did not believe it was necessary for a restaurant to serve alcohol and launched into lengthy remarks on the evils of drinking. Carrabelle Chamber of Commerce Director Suzanne Zimmerman said she had owned two restaurants and believed visitors to the area expected to order wine or beer with a meal. Most of you folks dont know me but I spent 25 years as an appraiser of hospitality property, said Ed Padilla. Every dollar we spend (promoting tourism) puts $3 in our pockets. This is a restaurant that will create eight to 10 jobs in the city. To deny a business capable of bringing jobs and tourism to town seems somewhat short-sighted. A sophisticated tourist expects a cocktail or beer or wine with his meal and if he doesnt get that he wont come back. Several landowners expressed concern the ordinance would reduce the value of their property and limit potential tenants. McMillan was strident in his opposition to the new by consent rule. To those of you who invested in our community, we appreciate that, he said. I would see us further the discussion later on of giving entrepreneurs more opportunity to do business, not less. If this ordinance changes, it will lead to case-bycase discussion. We have the likelihood of using city resources and the time of the commissioners. These meetings consume money. The current ordinance leads to most efcient use of city resources and it is in keeping with the policy of most cities in North Florida with similar characteristics. This change takes us outside the mainstream., he said. McMillan said Carrabelles demographics will not support additional restaurants, and that 49 restaurants have been opened in Carrabelle in the last decade. With all due respect, what church is next? to have alcohol served nearby, he asked. If this law remains in place no restaurant in the main commercial district will ever be successful, warned Kathy Frink. Commissioner Charlotte Schneider agreed. The Marker (restaurant) does not sell alcohol and to me thats a cost to them, she said, noting that restaurants could still bear responsibility for drinking even if the alcohol wasnt sold on premises. When you tell a restaurant they cant serve alcohol, you take their control of it away from them, she said. They still have a lot of liability for no prot. After an hour of bickering, Mayor Curley Messer brought the meeting to a close against protests of attendees, including Commissioner Cal Allen, who had brought information on alcohol ordinances in other cities.Do you want to shut the whole city down?Both sides came to the Feb. 1 city meeting, prepared to continue the discussion, with more than 100 people packing the room. Skip Frink handed out copies of an aerial map of Carrabelle between 12th Street East and the foot of the Tillie Miller Bridge with an overlay showing the areas excluded from serving alcohol. Carrabelles designated commercial district is the area two blocks north of U.S. 98 and south to the water. Based on Frinks map, which he said was created by an owner of commercial property adjacent to a restaurant, it appeared that more than half of Carrabelles commercial property, including most of downtown, would be excluded from the sale of alcohol under the 500foot rule. In a telephone interview, City Manager Courtney Millender said that, while the map has never been formally adopted by the city, she viewed it as an accurate depiction of the business district and the areas of exclusion. Businesses that sold alcohol prior to the 500-foot rule change are entitled to continue to sell it, but they are prevented from transferring their license to a new owner. When the subject of the ordinance was raised, Frink was the rst to speak. Look at all the empty businesses. We should be encouraging new business. If you had the misfortune to graduate this year where will you go to work? Lets grow Carrabelle for our children and their children, he said. He said the 500-foot rule could also have a negative effect on existing businesses with liquor licenses that could not be transferred in the event of a sale. City Attorney Dan Hartman concurred, noting there were cases where local governments had prevented the transfer of a business license. Former City Commissioner Jim Brown advocated for the existing 500-foot law. We dont need a bar in front of a church. We had a hard time getting this law passed, he said. I talked to (Supervisor of Elections) Ida Elliot and she said we only need 10 percent for a recall election. If this gets passed, I imagine there will be a lot of people out in the morning trying to get signatures for a recall. McMillan brandished papers and said, After the last workshop, I was approached by some community leaders who asked me if I would initiate a petition. I have 176 signatures indicating opposition to the (new) ordinance. He said the signatures included ve senior pastors, business leaders and some people who do not attend church. Carrabelle resident Shawn Oxendine said McMillans petition was misrepresented at the church he attends and urged commissioners to scrutinize the signatures. In a telephone interview, Oxendine said the petition had been described as affecting only the Frinks Tallahassee Street property. He said people attending the service where the petition was presented were told they did not need to be residents to sign, and that parents were encouraged to tell their under-aged children to sign the document. Is this going to be Carrabelle under Prohibition? he asked the audience at last weeks workshop. Im asking these men of God if it says anywhere in the Bible that it is illegal to drink or take a sip of wine. I wish they would show it to me. He said the Head Start nursery school, at 203 N. 5th St. was not shown on Frinks map and would exclude even more of the waterfront from the sale of alcohol. Do you want to shut the whole city down? Oxendine asked. This is not a few selective properties; its almost the whole commercial district. McMillan replied that the issue is not is it illegal to drink alcohol? The issue is Are we going to change the law to allow a few people to do what they want? Ron Barks pastor of the Assembly of God asked the commissioners to look closely at the way its worded. Im not convinced that selling beer and wine that will make a restaurant go or not go. Im also concerned that there is a bar, an oyster bar, I can go in and eat a half dozen oysters and drink 10 beers and stagger out. Ive been here almost 30 years and Ive never tried to stop anything. A lot of us here are within the commercial zone that will be affected by this. Please dont change this ordinance till you have something respectful to put in its place, he said. Oxendine asked what would happen, under the 500-foot rule, if a church decided to open next to a restaurant that served alcohol. Dan, look at the ordinance carefully, Schneider said to the city attorney. At no point did I ever want to have anything within one foot of a church. I believe everything can be solved. We need revenue for this downtown area. I deeply respect and love our churches and what they do for this community. I love it with all my heart but I believe we need to somehow come together as a community and solve this, she said. Schneider asked for another workshop but Messer said he would not allow one. No! he snapped. Its costing the city. This is what I call a put-off. Allen told the meeting the state statute says 500 feet from schools and churches. It doesnt mention Sunday school. However, the wisdom of the state also says there are exceptions. It allows a business that sells alcoholic beverages not for on-property consumption. A second exception is restaurants that take 51 percent of their income from food. Our ordinance says 75 percent, he said. Maybe we can rewrite it in such a way that we keep the 500 feet in there but keep it in keeping with the state. David Butler, director of Carrabelles Economic Development Council said, I agree with getting the groups together to come up with a better rule. I think this communitys tight enough that we can nd a solution. Commissioner Brenda La Paz said she spent hours in research and with the attorney. I spent countless sleepless nights. A consent of use type ordinance does not guarantee everyone who applies for a license will be given consent. This is also a moral issue. I dont want to limit property rights and want to encourage growth. Maybe we should assign the task to planning and zoning and let them make recommendations that would be more appropriate to modern times as well as paying special attention to the special needs of our churches and schools, she said. I would be happy to make a presentation and share my research. Hartman suggested the board advertise a joint meeting of the city commission and planning and zoning. McMillan said the new ordinance should be voted down on the second reading, and demanded to know where commissioners stood on the ordinance. Hartman said the board was not voting at that time and vote counting would be improper. The commission voted unanimously to table discussion on new ordinance until the joint meeting of the board and planning and zoning on the third Thursday of the month, Feb. 16. BOTTLE from page A1 LOIS SWOBODA | The TimesAn aerial photograph, enhanced by Katherine Milla, shows sections of Carrabelles commercial district that are closed to businesses serving alcohol under the current ordinance. Restricted areas are designated in light green.

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Great Emancipator earned a nations admirationThis is in honor of Abraham Lincolns birthday. Born Feb. 12, 1809, the Great Emancipator was our 16th president, serving from 1861 to 1865. This brief allegory is a more fact-than-ction story about the young, self-educated Abraham Lincolns struggle from humble beginnings in a little log cabin in Springeld, Ill., to the pinnacle of success as president of our nation, and historys legendary Emancipator. However, the road to the White House was a grueling journey against bitter competition to thwart his ambitions to become president. Regardless of his fate in the race, he didnt lower his Christian standards to retaliate to false accusations and participate in his opponents character assassination contest. He continued to conduct an honorable campaign, and gained the nations admiration, an acclaimed victory and the complimentary name, Honest Abe. He took the oath of ofce fully committed to his promise to abolish the injustice of discrimination and grant freedom from oppression to all those bound as possessions in human bondage. His unorthodox mission to implement cultural change met stiff opposition to change the thinking of a mindset generations lifelong practice of segregation. In a matter of time, constant friction from irreconcilable differences exploded into an uncontrolled re of hostile resistance that divided the nation, and pitted brother against brother on opposite sides. Four years of bloody battles, tragic loss of life and depleted supplies compelled the Confederate rebels to concede defeat to the Union army, and end the strife. The Proclamation of Emancipation abolishing slavery became law overnight, to be enforced as a violation of the Constitutions Bill of Rights. The mandate denied any exception to comply, and the restrictions were considered an underhanded scheme to destroy their way of life; adding fuel to the smoldering embers of resentment at the infringement of their rights like salt in the open wounds that started the ght. After many give-andtake confrontations, time began to ease the tension of fractured feelings with less self-seeking and more sound reasoning ; and the healing process of recovery gradually spread across the land, re-uniting the war-torn nation with an outstretched hand of friendship, without malice toward any man. It was like a soulcleansing drink from the Holy Grail; closing the door on turbulent times and opening the door of freedom to all mankind. The saddest part of the story, this compassionate man known as the Great Emancipator died for the cause he never saw fully accepted by his generation.Mary WestbergQuestions raised on school critics motivesI am writing in response to John M. Comers letter in the Feb. 2 issue of the Apalachicola and Carrabelle Times. As a Franklin County graduate, a parent and an educator, I am obviously offended. As condescending as some of the comments in Mr. Comers letter were, they were actually not as abhorrent in nature as his previous communications with the school administrators of Franklin County. In one of the communications in which he gives the subject FCSD is an archetype of community cannibalism, he describes himself as an outsider whose educational experience, qualications and references are far superior to anyone in FCSD, and that FCSD staff members are cannibalizing the children of Franklin County. He goes on to question whether something is in the Franklin County water that is dumbing-down Franklin County students and nishes by asking faculty members how do you sleep at night after spending the day cannibalizing your students, their parents, and your community? For starters, I have never eaten a student I promise. I had to ask myself what Mr. Comers motive was in sending such communication. It quickly became apparent: He would like to offer a program to turn x our students and make them all Level 4 performers. What a great idea! Although Franklin County has made great strides in educating its students, there is always room for improvement and those of us who dedicate our lives to that very mission would be very anxious to learn of any program that could produce such results, particularly from a man who claims to have his home phone on the Harvard Admissions Ofce speed dial and evidently is a very important person in the Channel Islands. So, I visited one of Mr. Comers websites, www. SchoolingForAllStudents. com, which has some fabulous charts and graphics, but does not give any references from those who have used and improved because of this program. On another of Mr. Comers websites, www. retrac.com, he expresses his discontent with public schools, stating that U.S. schools have created a whole new segment of American society Professional Parasites and again offers his program as a solution. I just had to nd out more information about this program. So, in this digital age, I Googled it. Alas, I only found the same two websites already mentioned, so I amended my search asking for information on places where this program has been used and found to be effective. I got the same two websites. So, I looked, and I looked and I looked some more. You get the picture. Well, as one who always gives the benet of the doubt, I attempted to contact Mr. Comer directly. I called the number given in his previously mentioned correspondence and was greeted by a female who identied herself as Mr. Comers wife. I told her that I was intrigued on several levels about Mr. Comers comments and statistics and asked for references. She said that she was unable to provide any. I said that I didnt understand and asked her for assistance. She stated that Franklin County was asked to try something new and that if it was something new then there wouldnt be any references, now would there? She was not able to provide me with the name of a single school district, school, or individual student who could attest to this program. Not one single letter of praise, not one single testimonial from a school district. Does anyone else reading this feel like this is too much to ask under the circumstances? I left both my personal and work phone numbers, as well as my email address, and was promised that Mr. Comer would contact me soon to answer my questions. To date, I have had no response. Now, Mr. Comer may be quite the intellectual. He follows his name with EA-4. Again, Google doesnt recognize it. Self-created? Who knows. But to state that the socioeconomic status of a student has little to do with student achievement is ludicrous. Both the American Psychological Association and Health Services Research by PubMed Central go to considerable lengths to describe many of the differences experienced by students on the high end and on the low end of the spectrum. Are there exceptions to any rule or generalization? Of course there are, but to suggest that students in regions where average incomes are very high as opposed to regions where they are not have the same experiences, and often expectations, is questioning common sense. The bottom line is that I work diligently every day to help to make up those differences for my students, as do my colleagues, administrators, and many of my students parents. Franklin County schools have graduated many professional, successful people and will continue to do so. Will every one of our students go to college? Probably not, but many do. In addition, many are happy, healthy, productive members of society who have taken paths different than college. Im not a Pollyanna; I do, however, question Mr. Comers motives and his refusal to acknowledge the positive things taking place in Franklin County Schools. As if I could possibly end this letter on a better note, I just had to pause to read a text from my son telling me about the 101 that he just made on his college math exam. Yes, he is a Franklin County graduate. Respectfully,Donna BarberAll students deserve chance at successIn regards to Mr. John Comers letter in the Feb. 2 Apalachicola and Carrabelle Times, I cannot comprehend how he can justify that graduates of Franklin County, whether past or present are deemed illiterate, unprepared or poverty bound. I am a 2006 graduate of Carrabelle High School. I am neither illiterate nor poverty bound. In fact, when I graduated from Carrabelle High School I received a total of ve scholarships and was more prepared than most students who enter college. Unprepared students do not obtain scholarships, nor do they attempt to obtain scholarships. Illiterate students do not complete four college level classes before he/she graduates high school either. In later months, I attended Gulf Coast Community College. I obtained my rst college degree, an Associates of Arts degree in Elementary Education. When I graduated in 2010 within the top 15 percent of my class, was named to the Deans List several semesters, it was no stopping point for me. I had higher ambitions, higher dreams, to prove that I was more than a statistic who was destined for failure before I had a chance to even prove that I was worthy of obtaining such a goal. In my last semester of Gulf Coast, I applied and was accepted to Florida State University. Florida State University is among the top 10 state universities in the nation. A top ten nationally ranked university does not accept students who are ill equipped, but rather those students who obtain excellence and high academic achievements! Today, I am proud to say that on April 29, 2012, I will become an FSU alumna. I am among the top 10 percent of the 2012 Florida State University graduates. I currently have a grade point average of 3.677 and have been named to the Deans List every semester while at Florida State. I have received scholarships from the university and worked full time while obtaining my bachelors degree in Elementary Education. Less than six weeks ago, I was sworn into multiple honor societies. The rst honor society chapter is sponsored by Florida State and is called the Garnet Key society. This honor is awarded to the top 10 percent of Florida State students who maintain a grade point average of 3.5 or higher, possess professional levels of leadership and academic excellence. The second honor society is a national chapter founded by Gold Key. Gold Key honor society has a select group of students that is chosen by a committee and individuals may join by invitation only. Once again, illiterate (aka un-trainable) students do not get the privilege of having these honors. Graduates of Franklin County High School deserve more than to be told that a job at McDonalds is above them and that they are unprepared for college. ALL students deserve the chance to achieve their dreams and ambitions no matter who they are or where they come from. We can all change. We can all be great inventors, writers, teachers, explorers and so much more! It only takes one person to believe in us. Thats exactly what the teachers of Franklin County do; they believe in their students! On an ending note, I am here to inform you that the educators of Franklin County are of the highest profession. The teachers educate students to excel in life, academics, and their extracurricular activities. My teachers were there to mentor and educate me. They were my advocates, friends and supporters. I am looking forward to earning the title of a Franklin County School teacher! I will even go as far to say that the members of the Franklin County community are blessed to have such excellent teachers and a continually improving public school system! With best regards, Natasha Pennycuff OpinionA4 | The Times Thursday, February 9, 2012 USPS 027-600Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 Publisher: Rick Martin Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six monthsHome delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERSIn case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola Times LeETTeERS TO THeE eEDITORThe Apalachicola Municipal Library has the pleasure of providing library services to a lot of visitors passing through. Many use public libraries to connect briey with the rest of their world, through email or Facebook. Free public access computers are a very important part of our services for locals and visitors alike. I should mention that all six of our public computers are now two years old or less, thanks to the Gulf Coast Workforce Board and our endowment from Margaret Key. Some of these visitors truly become friends as was the case with Cynthia Berger and Bill Carlsen, passing through in the solar canal boat, the Dragony. Cynthia and Bill are Loopers following Americas Great Loop (Americas Great Loop Cruisers Association at greatloop.org) from the Great Lakes, down the Mississippi to New Orleans or the Tombigbee River to Mobile, Alabama. A portion of the gulf intercoastal waterway runs east to Apalachicola. They head offshore east of here, to the Keys or in some cases through Lake Okeechobee, and up the East Coast. At New York they head back into the sweet water up the Hudson River. The yearlong Berger/Carlsen odyssey is documented on slowboatcruise.com, and SlowBoatCruise on Facebook. He is a professor of science education at Penn State, with training in the biological sciences and electrical engineering and she works for the local public radio station, WPSU, where she has won numerous awards. Loopers are not uncommon at the library as are other seafaring adventurers, who pause in before heading into blue water (a sailors term for open seas). Sailors jump off from here headed for Clearwater, 174 miles away. Others, like paddler Bill Nedderman, in his 20-year-old handmade canoe, continue to stay close to shore around the Big Bend. He photocopied Gazetteer maps at the library, to plot his course along the Big Bend Saltwater Paddling Trail (information at the FWC website). He plans to do the Loop in his canoe, probably a rst. He is based out of Des Moines, Iowa, and has been on the road for three months. He kayaked the Lewis and Clark expedition trail on its 200th anniversary. He recommended Undaunted Courage by Stephen Ambrose, which was on the library shelf. Denitely an off the grid devotee, he is a different breed of Looper. The State of Florida sponsors the Florida Circumnavigational Saltwater Paddling Trail Extensive maps and text are available at the Florida Department of Environmental Protection web site www.dep. state..us, but the library plans to put them into a book form for reference. Kayaking in Florida and especially in Northwest Florida is well covered by Doug Alderson in Waters Less Traveled; A Canoeing and Kayaking Guide to the Streams of Florida, Vol. 1, North Central Peninsula and Panhandle by Elizabeth Carter and John Pearce; and Sea Kayaking in Florida by David Glickman. The library has just bought Aldersons newest book, Wild Florida Waters. As usual patrons of the Apalachicola library and all visitors are encouraged to come look at our always expanding collection of Florida books. Caty Greene is the librarian for the Apalachicola Municipal Library. To reach her, call 653-8436.Loopers and other adventurers welcome@THeE lLIBRaARY Caty Greene SS Pe E CIal AL TO THe E TT IMe E SThe solar canal boat, the Dragony

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LocalThe Times | A5Thursday, February 9, 2012Segree noticed both bedrooms had re ective material covering the walls, wooden tables built for holding plants, holes both in the ceiling for ventilation and in the oor for water supply lines, tracks on the ceiling for UV lights and drying lines in the living room, as well as a circuit box rewired to control the UV lights, according to the af davit. Debbie Brett said the house was one of two she and her husband rented to Jake Wheeless in case he and his wife got into an argument and he needed a place to stay. She said Wheeless was several months behind in rent, and that she had discovered the grow house when she stopped by for the rst time in nine months. Debbie Brett produced two itemized estimates for the repair work, one for $27,913 from Salty Dog Construction and another for $28,319 from Gary Fritz Contracting. Wheeless, who was then living in Crawfordville, was arrested May 16, 2011, by deputies from the Wakulla County Sheriffs Ofce, and charged with criminal mischief, a third degree felony. But the case was just beginning. Johnson said Sgt. R.J. Shelley and Segree told investigators they had been conducting surveillance of the property and had evidence that Thad and Debbie were involved in growing marijuana. The af davit said videos showed Thad at the residence a few times a week during the time Jake is renting and growing marijuana. In a Nov. 21, 2011, interview by Shelley and Johnson, Wheeless said he had met the Bretts when Debbie Brett was working at Carrabelles Tiki Bar. He said he began smoking marijuana with Debbie and they became close, according to the report. Evidently, that closeness had become frayed by March 9, 2011, about the time Debbie Brett sought the criminal mischief charges against Wheeless. It was then she was able to secure a temporary injunction for protection against repeat violence from Jake Harris, presumably Wheeless, who is listed as Jake Harris Wheeless in several of the court lings. When interviewed by investigators in November 2011, Wheeless said that after he met the Bretts Thad Brett found out about his (Wheelesss) expertise in growing marijuana and began hinting around about going into business together. Wheeless said Thad Brett got his wifes permission to set up a grow house, and that he and Brett tore up carpet, set up lights and that Thad Brett used a Sawzall to cut holes in the oor of the rental home,. Jake advised that Thad and Debbie were aware of everything that went on inside the house and Thad bought most of the materials used for the growing process, Wheeless told investigators, noting that Thad Brett would stop by the house several times a week to pick up tools he kept underneath the house. Wheeless said he paid the Bretts rent in marijuana, up until about the time Thad Brett called him up with a dire warning. Near the end of the grow process, Thad called to warn him that the cops were watching the house, Johnson wrote in his report. Jake thought he was trying to rip him off, so Jake had a couple of friends clean out the house and take the marijuana plants. On Nov. 22, 2011, Johnson interviewed Donna Castor, who Wheeless said would con rm his story. Castor said she too had met Debbie Brett at the Tiki Bar, and that she knew about the grow house because her son was a friend of Wheeless. Castor said she used to buy marijuana for $150 an ounce from Wheeless. On Jan. 12, 2012, Mike Smith, an investigator with the Florida Department of Law Enforcement, and Johnson interviewed Castors son, who said he met the Bretts ve years ago and they drank and smoked weed together. The son said he worked for the couple and was paid half in cash, half in pot. Castors son said he met Wheeless three years ago and moved in with him for about a month, after he was kicked out of the house by his mom due to not having a job, read the report. He said during that month Jake and Thad Brett talked about growing marijuana together. The son told investigators he witnessed Thad Brett and Wheeless enter the house and return with pounds of marijuana in Ziploc bags while Debbie Brett was waiting outside. In early 2011, Johnson said Castor was angered at the treatment her son was receiving from the Bretts, and confronted Debbie Brett. On May 10, 2011, Castor was arrested for aggravated assault with a deadly weapon and ordered to have no contact with Thad and Debbie Brett or their son at their Alligator Drive residence, a different location than the alleged grow house. On Nov. 15, 2011, Castor pleaded no contest and Dempsey withheld adjudication. Castor was ned, given credit for time served and placed on probation. After Castor and her son appeared to verify Wheeless account, investigators contacted the Bretts attorney Richard Smith, who said his clients declined any further interviews with law enforcement. Johnson said Paula John, senior claim representatives from ASI Assurance, con rmed the Bretts had received two checks totaling $33,353 for the property damage they initially reported. Johnson said that because there were no marijuana plants left in the house, and no direct evidence of cannabis cultivation, no one would be charged with growing pot. Also, on Jan. 6, the states attorneys of ce decided not to prosecute Wheeless on the criminal mischief charge. Smart LensesSMCan produce clear vision without glasses, at all distances "Freedom from Eye Glasses, Now a reality for many." 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Coupon Expires: 2-29-12 FREEEYE EXAMCODE: AP00Darren Payne, M.D.Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract SurgeonLee Mullis, M.D.Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract SurgeonTodd Robinson, M.D.Board Certified Eye Physician and Cataract Surgeon WEEKLY ALMANAC APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE TIDE TABLES MONTHLY AVERAGESTo nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from these given for APALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW Cat Point Minus 0:40 Minus 1:17 East Pass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27 To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from those given for CARRABELLE: HIGH LOW Bald Point Minus 9:16 Minus 0:03 Sponsor the WEEKLY ALMANACCall Today!653-8868Date HighLow% Precip Thu, Feb 968 4320% Fri, Feb 1067 5020% Sat, Feb 1165 4320% Sun, Feb 1261 4710% Mon, Feb 1365 5410% Tues, Feb 1470 5630% Wed, Feb 1572 5730% On behalf of my staff and I, we would like to thank all our loyal patients for the honor of being selected for the multiple awards that we have received over the last 12 months; including voted most compassionate Dr. and Patients Choice Award. It is a great honor and we will continue to strive for the very best medical care for our patients.VINCENTIVERS, M.D.301TwentiethStreet Port St. Joe, FL 32456850-227-7070www.iversmd.com On behalf of my staff and I, we would like to thank all our loyal patients for the honor of On behalf of my staff and I, we would like to On behalf of my staff and I, we would like to court division. This could help eventually make more types of court records available to the public online and is a step toward directives to become paperless. She is in the process of updating her case management software to a new system called CLERICUS that will provide a state-of-art upgrade to the existing case maintenance applications and will streamline the clerks processes. Third, Clerk Johnson stressed there can be no disputing the importance of experience as it relates to her constitutional duties. Her career in the clerks of ce spans over a period of 37 years. Mrs. Johnson said she is proud of the achievements accomplished during her tenure including efforts to scan and digitize older paper records including marriage licenses, probate, plats, county commission minutes and ordinances, of cial property records, and some court records. The protection of the of cial records was the driving factor, she said. She has installed a data protection system allowing for storage and back-up of records and networkbased disaster recovery offsite. She also expressed pride regarding the records that she has made available for public access and improvements to her website, www.franklinclerk. com. She reported she accepted the challenge to keep up with modern technology and changing legislation. She has put a program in place that provides the audio of the county commission meetings immediately following the meetings, and she writes her own monthly column for the paper to keep her constituents informed of clerk-related procedures.. When it comes to her of ce, Mrs. Johnson stated she knows she has used transparency, accountability and strong scal leadership as her guide. I maintain an open door policy, and Im always available to anyone who walks into my of ce, she added. When I rst ran for election, I emphasized what mattered to me was that people received the help they needed from the clerk, and I can always be found at my of ce, and I have given that help. Johnson has served on various committees with the Florida Association of Court Clerks and the Clerks of Courts Operations Corporation. She is serving her third year as chair of the Best Practices committee of the association which is geared toward helping clerks improve ef ciency and performance while reporting reliable data and meeting statutory requirements as well as increasing standardization between clerks of ces statewide. She is active in her community as well as a member of St. Patricks Catholic Church and the Philaco Womans Club. She has been married for 37 years to her husband, Robbie. They have three sons and ve grandchildren which she said completes her time when shes not working. JOHNSON from page A1 FRAUD from page A1

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LocalA6 | The Times Thursday, February 9, 2012 Weems Medical Center East provides primary care services, urgent care services and rotating specialty care services. Ofce hours are 8a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday.Call 850-697-2345 for an appointment today! Walk-ins are welcome.Our mission is to improve the health status of the residents and visitors to Franklin County, by providing quality, compassionate, cost effective and convenient health care through community leadership and in collaboration with other healthcare organizations which serve our communities. Join us Friday, February 10, 2012 at 5:30pm for a discussion on Menopause to be hosted by Terrie Tullos, ARNP-C from North Fl Womens Care. BAYVIEW ST. GEORGE ISLANDhome nestled on a private lot. 3BR/2Ba with open deck, expansive windows, sun room, screened porch, very tidy.MLS# 245514.................$299,000 Travis Stanley 850.653.6477 Grayson Shepard 850.653.6718 BEACHFRONT CONDO ST. GEORGE ISLAND 2BR/2BA with two balconies in Villas of St. George. Established rental history! Community pool, beach boardwalk, 2 blocks to lighthouse! MLS# 246110..............$319,500CHARMING PRE-CONSTRUCTIONSt. George Island. Gulf view 3 BR/2BA, approx. 1200 sq. ft., lovely front porch, bead board cabinets, granite countertops, hardiboard, metal roof. Built by Galloway ConstructionMLS#245564.................$289,000GULF VIEW ST. GEORGE ISLANDJust half a block to the beach! 3 BR/2 BA, classic beach cottage with great decks, loft, widows walk. Right on beach access, popular rental!MLS# 245466...............$349,000 B EA CHFRONT C ONDO BAYVIEW CH A R MI N G GU LF VIEW LF VIEW LF Leon Teat 850.653.5656 Jamie Crum 850.370.0835 Sandy Mitchem 850.899.8300 NEW LISTING! GREATER APALACHICOLA4BR/2BA on 1/3 acre lot with above ground pool. Many upgrades and new features tankless water heater, new plumbing, city water, updated kitchen, new carpet, windows, doors.MLS# 245923..............$139,500 GR EA T EA T EA E R A PA L A CH I COL A AFFORDABLE ST. GEORGE ISLANDInterior home 3BR/2BA home on 1/3 acre lot in quiet area on Bayshore Dr. Cozy wood interior with freestanding resident or vacation home!MLS#243422..............$275,000 A FFORD AB L E NEW LOW PRICE! dbutler@coastalcoverage.com Locally owned and operated Home Business Auto Health Workers Comp Qualications: Expertise in: Now Accepting AppointmentsCall Toll Free 888-681-5864 For more info www.seclung.com Lung Disease SpecialistRob Garver, MDNow Seeing Patients in Port St. Joe NOW BCBS-FL IN-NETWORK PROVIDER Robert C. Bruner Attorney Personal & Business BankruptcyOver 30 Years Legal Experience850-670-3030 bankruptcy relief under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon advertisements. Before you decide, ask us to send you free written information The following report is provided by the Franklin County Sheriffs Of ce. Arrests are made by of cers from the following city, county, and state law enforcement agencies: Apalachicola (APD), Carrabelle (CPD), Florida Highway Patrol (FHP), Franklin County Sheriffs Of ce (FCSO), Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC), Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP), Florida Department of Corrections (FDOC), Florida Division of Insurance Fraud (DIF) and Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (FDACS). All defendants are considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law.Feb. 1Dwight A. Spencer, Jr. 33, Parker, violation of probation (FCSO)Feb. 2Edward W. Lively, 27, Carrabelle, burglary of a dwelling and grand theft (FCSO)Feb. 3Bobby J. Bullock, Jr., 43, Eastpoint, domestic battery and violation of probation (FCSO) Timothy L. Custer, 24, Carrabelle, violation of probation (CPD) Marjorie L. Boozer, 50, Carrabelle, burglary of a dwelling and grand theft (CPD)Feb. 4Richard A. Echols, 40, Havana, driving while license suspended or revoked and DUI (FHP) Julian S. Collins, 48, Carrabelle, domestic battery (FCSO) Angelee M. Fender, 35, Norman, Ga., domestic battery (CPD)Feb. 5Michael T. Scott, 37, Carrabelle, domestic battery and Wakulla County violation of probation (CPD)Feb. 7Benjamin K. Jones, 22, Tallahassee, violation of probation (FCSO) Darren L. Wallace, 43, Apalachicola, violation of probation (FCSO) Arrest REPORT FRANKLIN COUNTY SHERIFFS OFFICE Inspections continue across island bridgeMotorists traveling in the northbound lanes of State Road 300 across the Bryant Patton Bridge between Eastpoint and St. George Island will encounter intermittent lane closures through Friday, Feb. 10. Trans eld Services Bridge inspectors are performing a routine inspection and repairs on the structure. Motorists can expect intermittent lane restrictions between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. daily. Routine inspections are a tool the Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) uses to provide a safe and ef cient transportation system. Drivers are reminded to pay attention to the speed limit when traveling through the construction area, and to use caution, especially at night when driving in work zones. For more FDOT District 3 information, follow us on twitter @myfdot_nw Enjoy the Chef Sampler this SundayThe 16th annual Forgotten Coast Chef Sampler, featuring the nest in local cuisine prepared by chefs from the areas nest restaurants will be Sunday, Feb. 12 from 6 9 p.m. at the Fort Coombs Armory. Tickets are $40 $50. Table reservations are available. Call the Apalachicola Bay Chamber of Commerce at 653-9419 or email info@ apalachicolabay.org.Seafood workers to meet MondayThe Franklin County Seafood Workers will be holding a meeting on Monday, Feb. 13 at 5 p.m. at the Eastpoint Fire House. The FCSWA will be discussing the shelling program. Also, the FCSWA will be giving out shelling numbers to those who have signed up and giving another opportunity for people to register. Also up for discussion and voting will be the possibility of doing away with the AP Card that is purchased through the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services at the cost of $50. Additional board members will be discussed along with Progress Energy Bay closures due to power pole placement. For more information, call Jennifer Millender, FCSWA secretary, at (850) 597-0787.Juvenile Justice to meet MondayFranklin County Juvenile Justice Council will be meeting on Monday, Feb. 13 at Water Street Hotel from noon until 1:30 p.m. All are welcome to attend. For further information please contact Carol Bar eld, chairperson, at 653-2784Aid to neuter pets availableThe Franklin County Humane Society has received a $2,000 grant from the Bif e Foundation to help fund the spay/neuter voucher program. The spay/ neuter program is designed to assist Franklin County citizens in getting their pets spayed and neutered. The cost is $20 and the service includes a rabies vaccination. This service is for people who cant otherwise afford to have their pets spayed or neutered. Come by the Humane Society, ll out an application and if you qualify, receive a voucher to have your pets altered. This is not a program for feral cats.For more information, please call 670-8417.FCHS offers GED classesGED classes are now being offered at the Franklin County School on Monday and Tuesday evenings from 4 8 p.m. Sign up during class meetings to prepare for next months GED test. Classes are being held in Building 1100 (Vocational Building) in Room 1111. If you need your GED, come out to the Franklin County School on Monday and Tuesday nights to sign up for the test and to get any help that you may need so that you can successfully pass the test and receive your high school diploma. Contact Linda Bradley at 670-2800 during class hours or call 370-6569 for more information.Franklin School plans Saturday FCAT campsThe Franklin County Schools FCAT camps have been designed speci cally for students in grades 3-5 who are preparing to take the FCAT Writing Test on Feb. 28 and FCAT Reading/ Math/Science in April. The camps will be held on Saturdays, from 9 a.m. to noon at Franklin County School. Mrs. King and Ms. Clark will provide fourth graders with some awesome writing strategies and ne tune what they have already learned. Mrs. Creamer, Mrs. Gay, Mrs. Dykes, Mrs. King and Mrs. Clark will provide students with additional instruction in reading, math, and science. The writing camp will be held this Saturday, Feb. 11 and Feb. 25. The reading and math/science camp will be Saturday, Feb. 11 and Feb. 25, and March 3, 10, 17, 24 and 31. The science camp is limited to fth graders only. For more information, call Harolyn Walker at 670-2800 ext. 1402, or your childs teacher. News BRIEFS

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LocalThe Times | A7Thursday, February 9, 2012 Valentines Day MenuSunset Rainbow Garden Salad Lobster and Crab Stuffed Mushrooms with a Champagne Cream Sauce Grilled Filet Mignon with a Tarragon, Rose Butter Florette Lovers Red Velvet Cupcakes with a Crme Cheese Icing850.227.7900Reservations RecommendedFor your Dining PleasureSUNSET SPECIAL DINNER FOR THE ENTIRE WEEK Reservations Recommended 850.227.7900 Reservations Recommended Overlooking Romantic St. Joe Bay The Sun Sets at 6:30 PM on Valentines Day TheClipper BALLOON POP DISCOUNT BALLOON BALLOON BALLOON BALLOON BALLOON BALLOON BALLOON BALLOON BALLOON BALLOON PO PO PO PO PO PO PO P P DISCOUNT DISCOUNT DISCOUNT DISCOUNT DISCOUNT DISCOUNT DISCOUNT DISCOUNT DISCOUNT DISCOUNT DISCOUNT DISCOUNT DISCOUNT DISCOUNT DISCOUNT DISCOUNT DISCOUNT DISCOUNT DISCOUNT DISCOUNT DISCOUNT DISCOUNT DISCOUNT T T T T h h h T h T T h T e e h e h C C l l l C l C i i l i l p p p p i p i p p p p p p p p p p e e e p e p p e p r r r r e r e e r e e r e p r BALLOON BALLOON BALLOON BALLOON BALLOON BALLOON BALLOON BALLOON BALLOON BALLOON BALLOON BALLOON BALLOON BALLOON BALLOON BALLOON BALLOON BALLOON BALLOON BALLOON BALLOON BALLOON BALLOON BALLOON BALLOON BALLOON BALLOON BALLOON BALLOON BALLOON BALLOON BALLOON BALLOON BALLOON BALLOON PO PO PO PO PO PO PO P P P P P ShoppeCOLOR SPECIAL*BRANDI BRANNAN HORST *DOROTHY COOPER10%-25% Andreas Nails & TanningACRYLICS MANICURES PEDICURES MAKEUP TANNINGDONT FORGET GIFT CERTIFICATES FOR VALENTINES DAY! REGISTER WITH ANDREA FOR GIFT BASKET DRAWING! VALUED AT $75.00 BALLOON BALLOON BALLOON BALLOON BALLOON BALLOON BALLOON BALLOON BALLOON By David AdlersteinTimes City Editor A quiet prayer breakfast Saturday morning, and a rousing concert Saturday night, kicked off a monthlong celebration of AfricanAmerican History Month in Apalachicola. AJs Restaurant was the site for the breakfast, which concluded with a brief Scriptural lesson from Pastor David Walker, of Covenant Word, and a prayer circle led by Apalachicola Mayor Van Johnson. Elinor Mount-Simmons, president of HCOLA (Hillside Coalition of Laborers for Apalachicola), outlined the month-long series of events, all under a partnership between HCOLA, the city and the Tourist Development Council. Saturday evenings concert at New Life Church, featuring the Boys Choir of Tallahassee, had the audience on its feet, with an exuberant performance by the young men, ages 8 to 18, all students from the Tallahassee area. Under the direction of conductor Earle Lee, Jr., the choir offered a varied program, ranging from America, The Beautiful and the West Point alma mater to renaissance choral music to Irving Berlins Whatll I Do? and Oh, What A Beautiful Mornin from the musical Oklahoma. The program also featured the choirs smaller Show Choir and Praise Team in performance as well as solos by Tallahassee gospel singer Anita Franklin. The evening included an introduction of all the musical accompanists, and their academic work, as well as the adult backers of the community-based outreach program. A moving series of gospel songs, including There is A Balm in Gilead, and Precious Lord, and an inspiring message closed the evening. A list of the months upcoming activities includes:Saturday, Feb. 11Celebrating African American History Month with Readings for Kids with Apalachicola Mayor Van Johnson, at 11 a.m. at the Apalachicola Municipal Library Florida Highwaymen exhibit, presentation and reception, 6-8 p.m. at the Apalachicola Center for History, Culture and Art, 86 Water Street, presented by Historic Apalachicola Main Street and the city.Monday, Feb. 13Mondays Moment: How We Got Over: A timeline from then to now 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at the Franklin Square Recreation Center, on 6th StreetFriday, Feb. 17Holy Family Center Of cial Dedication and Ribbon Cutting 1 p.m. Holy Family Center Grand Opening 6 p.m. followed by a semi-formal Legends Ball from 8-11 p.m., where the unveiling of the newest panels of local historical AfricanAmerican gures will take placeSaturday, Feb. 18Ninth annual AfricanAmerican History Festival, at Franklin Square Festival parade 10 a.m. Festival opens 11 a.m. Festival closes 11 p.m.Sunday, Feb. 19Ninth annual AfricanAmerican History Festival, at Franklin Square Church service in the open Noon Festival closes 4 p.m.Saturday Feb. 25Celebrating African American History Month with Readings for Kids with Val Webb, at 11 a.m. at the Apalachicola Municipal LibrarySunday, Feb. 26Apalachicolas Sundays Best Celebration at 3 p.m. Location to be announced Monday, Feb. 27Mondays Moment: Words of Wisdom from those with Wisdom 6:30 to 8 :30 p.m. at the Historic Holy Family CenterAfrican-American History Month kicks off PHOTOS BY DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The TimesParticipants in Saturdays prayer breakfast at A.J.s link hands Earle Lee, Jr. leads the Boys Choir of Tallahassee Members of the Show Choir and Praise Team

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PETOFTHEWEEK Franklin County Humane Society Over 35Years Experience.208 Reid Avenue, Downtown Port St. Joe850.229.1111www.BaysideFloristPSJ.comYour Full Service Wedding and Event Florist Deliveries Available Daily to Apalachicola with minimum order Your Full Service Your Full Service SocietyA8 | The Times Thursday, February 9, 2012 BIRTHS Max Bridges bornMax Breaux Bridges was born at 7:51 a.m. Thursday, Jan. 26, 2012, at Kona Community Hospital in Kona, Hawaii. He weighed 8 pounds, 12.5 ounces and was 21 inches long. He is the son of Chris and Renae Bridges of Kailua Kona, Hawaii. Paternal grandparents are Denise Johnson of Bristol and Bernarr Bridges of Blountstown. Maternal grandparents are Alvin and Kathy Martina of Apalachicola. Paternal great-grandparents are the late William J. and LoraAnne Bar eld and Bruce Bridges and the late Quinnon Bridges. Maternal great-grandparents are Red Hilton and the late Betty Hilton of Eastpoint and the late Buddy and Evelyn Martina. BIRTHDAYS Sisters celebrate birthdaysAdrian Nicole turned 10 years old on Tuesday, Feb. 7, and her sister, Hannah Elizabeth, will turn 17 years old on Friday, Feb. 24. Happy birthday to my beautiful girls! I love you both, Mom ENGAGEMENTS Rachel Oliver, Sean Wheeler engagedMr. Elmer Ellis Oliver Jr. and Mrs. Karla Sue Oliver, former residents of Wakulla Station, are pleased to announce the engagement of their daughter, Miss Rachel Abigail Oliver, to Mr. Sean Thomas Wheeler, son of Mr. Bill Noland Wheeler and Mrs. Charlotte Ann Wheeler, former residents of Tallahassee. A September wedding in Tallahassee is planned. Rachel is the granddaughter of the late Mr. Elmer Oliver Sr. of St. Marks and Mrs. Leth Oliver Revell of St. Marks and Sopchoppy, and Mr. Matthew Dice MD Raker and Mrs. Eva Pearl Ruth Raker of Crawfordville. Rachel graduated from Wakulla High School in 2001 and the St. Johns River Academy at St. Augustine in 2007. Sean is the grandson of Mr. Edward Carl Finuff and Mrs. Vera Jean Finuff of Telogia, and the late Mr. Elbert Cat sh Jackson and Mrs. Bernice Lorene Jackson of Carrabelle. Sean graduated from Lincoln High School in 1998. He graduated from Florida State University and the Pat Thomas Law Enforcement Academy in 2006. The couple shares the same career eld, law enforcement. Layla Burke turns 3Layla Burke celebrated her third birthday on Wednesday, Feb. 1, 2012. Burke, daughter of Jeremy Burke of Apalachicola and Tina Burke of Thomasville, Ga., joined in the celebration with her older sister, Iolana. Maternal grandparents are John and Sonya Bellew of Apalachicola. Paternal grandparents are David and Beverly Burke of Apalachicola. Paternal greatgrandparents are Belvin and Johnnie Bryant of Apalachicola. Your County LibraryGaming Day was a novel experience for the many families that attended the Franklin County Public Library event on Saturday, Jan. 28 at the Carrabelle Branch. This free annual event was well-attended with interactive games like Wii Sport resort and Mario Kart while board games of all variety were enjoyed by every age group. The county library is not just the place for books and public access computer use, but a place for families to play together. Reading instructions and learning rules offer children the ability to practice good sportsmanship and handle defeat. Many library volunteers helped to register, assist, and join in the library fun with the staff and participants. Refreshments were provided for the hard-playing attendees who joined in the library fun. Door prizes were won by the attendees thanks to the generosity of local donors to make this event more memorable. A special library thank you to the following merchants for their generosity; Crooked River Lighthouse, Red Pirate, Carrabelle Junction, Picnic Basket, 2 Als, Carrabelle Dollar General, Hog Wild, Carrabelle Express Lane, Marker 30 Restaurant, and Carrabelle IGA. For more details about library programs please call the Eastpoint branch 670-8151 or the Carrabelle branch 697-2366. Gail Mathes, right, and great-grandson Brandon Tarantino, 3, play Candyland.

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Island church plans spaghetti dinner SaturdayThe St. George Island United Methodist Church, 201 E. Gulf Beach Drive, will have its annual Valentine spaghetti dinner on Saturday, Feb. 11, beginning at 6:30 p.m. The cost per ticket is $10 and tickets will be available at the door. Takeout is also available. Door prizes, great food and live entertainment! C ome  celebrate Valentines Day! For more info, call Mary Lou Short at 927-2569.Millender reunion set for Feb. 19The Millender reunion will be Sunday, Feb. 19 at the Eastpoint Fire Station. We will begin with a covered dish lunch at 1 p.m. There will be live music and prizes. Come join us for a fun afternoon. For more info, call Janice Tindell at 670-8280.Weatherization help now availableMany Franklin County families are struggling with the high utility bills. Capital Area Community Action Agencys Weatherization Assistance Program may be able to help. This program provides permanent solutions to keep homes cooler in the summer and warmer in the winter. Services are provided to low-income residents whose income does not exceed 200 percent of the poverty level: $21,780 for a household of one; add $7,640 for each additional household member. Homeowners and renters may apply, but renters must have permission of the property owner. Singlefamily homes, mobile homes, and duplexes qualify. For more information, call Capital Area Community Action Agencys ofce in Apalachicola, open Monday to Thursday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. at 653-8057.Domestic violence counseling availableDomestic violence group counseling is now being held in Franklin County, in conjunction with Refuge House. For further information please call Carol Bareld, domestic violence advocate at 653-3313.Disadvantaged transportation board meets WednesdayThe Franklin County Transportation Disadvantaged Coordinating Board will meet on Wednesday, Feb. 15 at 10 a.m. at the Franklin County Courthouse Annex Courtroom, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola. In addition to iregular business, the agenda will include adoption of the Transportation Disadvantaged Service Plan, and rates and review of the Federal Transit Administration applications. For additional information, a copy of the agenda, or if you require special accommodations at the meeting because of a disability or physical impairment, contact Vanita Anderson at the Apalachee Regional Planning Council, 20776 Central Avenue East, Suite 1, Blountstown, FL 32424 at least ve working days before the meeting date.Bingo prizes needed for St. JamesResidents of St. James Health and Rehabilitation Center, at 239 Crooked River Road in Carrabelle, play bingo several times a week, where they win small prizes such as socks, lotion, jewelry, etc. Donations of items suitable as prizes are always needed. Items can be dropped off at the Times ofce at 129 Commerce Street in Apalachicola. The door at St. James Health and Rehabilitation is always opened for volunteers, churches and other organizations to come over and run programs. To volunteer, call 697-2020.Narcotics Anonymous meets Sunday eveningsA Narcotics Anonymous group, providing group support for anyone beset by a drug problem, has begun meeting in Eastpoint. Meetings, open to anyone, are held Sunday evenings at 6 p.m. at the United Methodist Church, 317 Patton Drive. The United Methodist Churches of Franklin County Welcome You First United Methodist Church of ApalachicolaWorship Service 11:00 a.m. every Sunday Sunday School 10:00 a.m. 75 5th St. Apalachicola 653-9530 fumcapalach@gtcom.net Pastor: Rev. Themo PatriotisCarrabelle United Methodist ChurchWorship Services 10:45 a.m. Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Celebrate Recovery Mondays 7-9 p.m. 102 NE Ave. B Carrabelle 697-3672 Pastor: Julie StephensEastpoint United Methodist ChurchWorship Service 10:00 a.m. every Sunday Healing service every fourth Monday at 7:00 p.m. 317 Patton Dr. (corner of David St.) 670-8825 Pastor: Rev. Beth WhiteSt. George Island United Methodist Church9:00 a.m. Worship Service 10:00 a.m. Fellowship Hour 201 E. Gulf Beach Dr. 9274635 www.sgiumc.org Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis First Pentecostal Holiness Church379 Brownsville Road Apalachicola Were excited about what Gods doing!!!Sunday School 9:45 am Sunday Morning Worship 10:45 am Sunday Evening Service 6:00 pm Monday, Youth Group 6:30 pm Wednesday, Royal Rangers, G.A.P.7:00 pm Wednesday Worship & Word 7:30 pmNursery Provided during regular church services 7:00 7:00 First Baptist ChurchSt. George Island 501 E. Bayshore Drive 927-2257 R. Michael Waley, Pastor Join us as we praise and worship the living Christ. Great is the Lord and most worthy of praise. Psalm 145:3 Sunday Bible Study................................................10:00am Worship Praise........................................................11:00am Sunday Night............................................................7:00pm Wednesday Power Hour......................................7:00pm Wednesday Youth at S.P.L.A.S.H.......................7:00pm Walking in Christ R. Michael Whaley, Pastor WELCOMES YOUChurch of the Ascension101 NE First Street CarrabelleSUNDAY10:00 AM WELCOMES YOUChurch THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH (850) 274-4490 (850) 545-2578 Trinity Episcopal Churchest. 1836 Sunday Worship Services 8 & 10:30 a.m. Shrove Tuesday Pancake Supper February 21st, 5 7 p.m. All You Can Eat for $5 Ash Wednesday Services Noon & 7 p.m WELCOMES YOU Trinity Welcomes You Welcomes You Welcomes YouHwy. 98 & 6th St. Apalachicola 850-653-9550 Selsh indulgence always affects othersBy Pamela and Scott ShiverSpecial to The Times Last week we disclosed Mahatma Gandhis description of the seven deadly social sins: Politics without principal Wealth without work Commerce without morality Pleasure without conscience Education without character Science without humanity In continuation of Gandhis points, commerce without morality is an issue that is so common that we take very little notice of it. Many Americans have accepted the idea they will not prosper with honesty. Cheating on taxes, lying about living arrangements, falsifying documents and being deceitful about our income seems permissible because there are so many doing it. Crooked businesspeople deceive in order to make a prot that probably will not be reported as income. Prosperity is the condition of enjoying wealth, success, or good fortune. It is hard to enjoy wealth when you are continually looking over your shoulder or not sleeping at night because of your conscience. Proverbs 11:1 says, The Lord detests the use of dishonest scales, but he delights in accurate weights. We should remember that right is right even if no one is doing it, and wrong is wrong if everyone is doing it. The one who has no remorse for dishonesty is in serious danger, according to I Timothy 4:2. When I analyzed pleasure without conscience as a social sin, I thought about the many people who indulge in addictions, never considering the loved ones and friends they hurt nancially and emotionally, believing they are hurting no one but themselves. Hurting relatives are helpless as their loved ones destroy their lives with the progression of the habit. My heart goes out to children born to parents who feel their pleasures, desires and habits are more important than the child that resulted from their pleasure. I thought of the young people indulging in sex, giving no thought to the consequences that are attached to fornication physically, emotionally and spiritually. I thought of the unborn that are sacriced because they do not t into the lifestyle of the parent. I thought of all the undetected communicable diseases that are shared with others in the name of pleasure. I pondered the many broken hearts that result from some Johnnie-come-lately who tells her he loves her only to get what he wants. Ironically, selsh indulgence or pleasure without conscience always affects others. I was a little bafed about what Gandhi meant by education without character. He may have been referring to the fact that education and character should be taught hand in hand. Character building by itself is equally as important as an education. It is built when you realize that you do not have to always understand why or how and that challenging life events make us stronger. Resistance training drives us to achieve our potential instead of taking the easiest course possible. As a result, daily stressors become much lighter to carry. We each have a destiny to fulll in life and some of us never reach it because we do not push ourselves to be stretched beyond the comfortable. Without character, an education is knowledge without purpose or direction. Science without humanity seems far-fetched to us because of the regulations we have in America governing studies. While my grandfather was in World War II, my grandmother collected paper clippings that reported war happenings. I found hideous stories in some of the clippings of scientic experiments that were performed on prisoners of war. and captives of war. It was so disturbing and inhumane that I was haunted by the thought of it for days after I read it. Science always attempts to reason away the possibility of creation. The assumption that we evolved from sludge or a monkey makes me question the sensibility of science. Question: If this is true, and there is still sludge and monkeys, where are the links in between? Why has the evolution process stopped? We need to give credit where credit is due, to the creator. Ethical behavior has gone so far into the gray areas that it is hard to dene its boundaries any longer. Christians need to read the Word and teach it to their children so that they will know the difference. If we truly desire to see our country healed, it will take self-examination and change on the part of the individual. No politician is capable of xing the brokenness of our country. The solution is found in 2 Chronicles 7:14: If my people, who are called by my name, will humble themselves and pray and seek my face and turn from their wicked ways, then will I hear from heaven and will forgive their sin and will heal their land. We welcome all suggestions and hope you enjoy this weekly column. Please send all emails to Scott Shiver at frontline247@ mac.com. YOUTH MaA TTERsSScott and Pamela Shiver ObiBITUaARy YEva Mae Coatney was born June 9, 1953, to the now late Alma and Otis Newell in Apalachicola. Eva Mae passed away surrounded by her family Tuesday, Jan. 31 at her home in Apalachicola at the age of 58. Eva Mae was a longtime seafood worker and member of the First Pentecostal Church in Apalachicola. She is survived by her husband, Ronnie Coatney; daughter, Cindy Carpenter (Scott); siblings, Jimmy Newell (Heidi), Betty (John) Nash, John Newell (Debbie), Alvin Newell (Linda), Gladys Newell and Edna Stanley (Tracy); brothers-in-law, Jimmy Coatney (Laura), Kenneth Coatney ,  and Donnie Coatney (Gail); numerous nieces, nephews, other family and friends. Funeral services were held Friday afternoon, Feb. 3 at the First Pentecostal Church with burial in Magnolia Cemetery. Visitation was Thursday evening, Feb. 2 at the First Pentecostal Church. Kelley Funeral Home is handling arrangements.EEva Mae Coatney FaithThe Times | A9Thursday, February 9, 2012 Faith bBRiIEfsFS Saturdays lled with lots to do this monthBy Jim WelshSpecial to the Times Sure hope to see you Saturday, Feb. 11 and we can enjoy soup and salad together at Chillas Hall. Serving begins at 10 a.m. Members will make a donation of $6, and those of you who are not yet members will donate $7. There also might be a book signing. Enjoy! Then, Saturday evening is the Valentine Steak Dinner at Camp Gordon Johnston American Legion Post 82. Men members will make a donation of $11, women members are free. Call the Legion to order your steak at 697-9998, or drop by the Legion after 4 p.m. and sign up. See ya there! Members of the Lanark Village Boat Club will prepare and serve your sugar x, Saturday, Feb. 18. Your breakfast will be served from 9 a.m. to noon. A donation of $5 will be collected at the door. Yum, yum! Also on Saturday, Feb. 18, members of the Lanark Village Golf Club will prepare and serve a spaghetti dinner at Chillas Hall. Serving begins at 5 p.m. Donation is $6 per person. Our 20th annual Community Breakfast will be at Chillas Hall, on Saturday, Feb. 25 from 8 to 11 a.m. Great breakfast, great service, great fellowship! After your breakfast, saunter on over to the bake sale table, and pick out something to top off your lunch. Your donation of $6 will be collected at the door. Be watching for you! On Saturday evening, Feb. 25, Chillas Hall will be jumping! Members of the Lanark Village Association will sponsor a Mardi Gras Dance Party. Greg K and Krew will start playing at 7 p.m. the fun starts when you come in the room. A donation of $5 be collected at the door. Bring your favorite beverage, a snack to share, your dancing shoes, and your main squeeze. Party hardy! And of course, the third Sunday of each month we have our covered dish dinner. All you need is your favorite dish, a donation, and your empty stomach. We line up at 1 p.m., right after the blessing. Be kind to one another, check on the sick and house-bound, and remember our little prayer God grant me patience and I want it right now! Until next time, God Bless America, our troops, the poor, homeless and hungry. LanaANARK nNEwsWSJim WelshDonation gets you food, dance and much more

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E-mail outdoors news to times outdoors@star .com OUTDOORSwww.apalachtimes.comSection Section A It is kind of hard to believe January is gone and February is here. With the passing of January, so go some fish laws. Remember years back when it was almost impossible to catch a redfish because there were none? Well, those days are long gone, and I hope they stay gone. The state stopped the keeping of redfish for several years. It also stopped the selling of wild redfish. Redfish have been one of the most successful comeback stories next to red snapper. For many years, an angler has been able to catch and keep one redfish per day. If there were 10 people in the boat they could keep 10 redfish. All that has changed. There has been a push to keep two redfish per angler either in a boat or on the beach. The state held several meetings for the public to voice its opinion on raising the limit, and I suppose the unanimous decision was to raise it. So now you can keep two redfish per day with one exception; only eight redfish can be caught and brought to the shore in a boat. Sort of like ling. Only six ling can be brought to the dock no matter how many anglers are in the boat. This is sort of good and sort of bad. At least now only eight fish can be caught and kept. But now, four anglers can catch as many as eight anglers could before. Another change that seems to be confusing speckled trout fishermen is the number of trout an angler can keep. In our part of the state all you need to know is the number five. Five speckled trout is all you can keep. Starting Feb. 1 there is no closed season on speckled trout with the exception of the Lansing Smith Steam Plant canal. That area always will be closed from Nov. 1 until March 1 to the keeping of fish with no exceptions. Hooked on Outdoors Outdoor LifeScott Lindseycaptainlindsey@ knology.netRETURN OF THEBy Stan KirklandFlorida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission During the past few months, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission received a number of calls from the motoring public about dead striped skunks on the roadways of Northwest Florida. Seeing road-killed wildlife is nothing to be happy about but it does tell us something important. In its most base sense, it means skunks still are out there in the wildlife world. For a period of time that didnt seem to be the case. In the 1980s and even early 90s, calls and reports of skunks were almost nonexistent across much of North Florida. Even though striped skunks are nocturnal animals and move about mostly at night, their absence was noteworthy. During those days if we got a call about a (striped) skunk, you made a note of it. They were that rare, said Dr. Jeff Gore, a wildlife biologist with the FWC. Gore said it is only conjecture, but he believes its possible that a rabies or distemper outbreak in the 1980s had a devastating impact on the skunk population. Both diseases are highly infectious and easily spread among wildlife such as skunks, fox and raccoons. By the late 1990s, skunk numbers were apparently on the rebound. More than 2,000 Floridians responded to a 2002 FWC survey asking people to respond if they saw a skunk. The majority of the sightings were in the northern half of Florida. Florida actually is home to two species of skunks. The striped skunk is about the size of a house cat and the species with which most people are familiar. Striped skunks have short, powerful legs and are adept at digging. The species is an omnivore and will eat plant and animal matter, including insects, small reptiles and bird eggs. Perhaps the most notorious character of the striped skunk is its ability to spray predators with a strong-smelling and clinging oily fluid. Spotted skunks, which are smaller and more agile than striped skunks, are also found in Florida and in much of the Eastern United States. For more than 100 years Eastern spotted skunks have been bred in captivity and the furs sold in the fur trade. Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission received a number of calls Northwest Florida. Seeing road-killed They are making a resurgence SKUNK FACTSSkunk spray causes no real damage to its victims, but it sure makes them uncomfortable. It can linger for many days and defy attempts to remove it. As a defensive technique, the spray is very effective. Predators typically give skunks a wide berth unless little other food is available. Type Mammal Diet Omnivore Average life span in the wild 3 years Size Head and body, 8 to 19 inches; tail, 5 to 15 inches Weight 7 ounces to 14 pounds Group name Surfeit Source: nationalgeographic.com SKUNKSpecial to the TimesFlorida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) leadership announced Feb. 3 that Capt. Bruce Cooper will take over for retiring Maj. Dave Pridgen as regional commander for the FWCs Northwest Region. This new leg of his career began with the traditional pinning ceremony in the FWCs Panama City of ce, when gold oak leaves were pinned to his shirt and he became a major. The Northwest Region covers 16 counties in the Florida Panhandle, from Jefferson County west. The area boasts a range of hunting and shing opportunities, including commercial marine shing communities all along the coast. Cooper will oversee all law enforcement efforts there as FWC of cers patrol Floridas woods and waters. Cooper began his conservation law enforcement career in 1985 as a wildlife of cer in Broward County. Since then, he has worked his way through the ranks across the FWCs Northeast, North Central and Northwest regions as an investigator, training lieutenant, investigative lieutenant, patrol supervisor and captain. Most recently, as an area captain in Bay County, Cooper oversaw investigations for the entire Northwest Region. Capt. Cooper has been a valuable asset to the agency throughout his career, said Col. Jim Brown, director of the FWCs Division of Law Enforcement. In each position, he has furthered the FWCs mission to protect Floridas people and its natural resources. We are looking forward to what he will accomplish in this next role. Cooper received his bachelor of science in resource management from Auburn University. He has also attended the Florida Department of Law Enforcements Leadership Academy. Cooper and his wife, Amy, reside in Panama City Beach. They have two daughters; one attends Emory Law School, and the other recently graduated from Troy University with a degree in psychology.FWC selects new Northwest Region commander Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL(next to Piggly Wiggly)www.BWOsh.comYour Hunting Headquarters Corner of Marina Drive, (next to Piggly Wiggly) Your Hunting Headquarters Corner of Marina Drive, (next to Piggly Wiggly) Your Hunting Headquarters REG $1149.99SALE $849.99 REG $1149. 99 REG $1149. 99 SIG SAUER C3 1911 COMPACTFeatures CRIMPSONTRACE LASERGRIPS SIG SAUE R C3 1911 C R C3 1911 C R O MPA C T SIG SAUE R C3 1911 C R C3 1911 C R O MPA C T BWOExclusiveGET THEM WHILEYOU CAN! SALE $849. WOW! WOW! Freshwater InshoreBelieve it or not, the Spanish mackerel have been showing up on the beaches and in the St. Joe Marina. Most of the sh are small, however, some 20 sh have been reported. Silver spoons and Got-cha lures will produce Spanish and also any thing else that swims. Trout have invaded the marina last week also. Gulp and jigs will put you in the game! Unusually warm weather and water temps have improved the freshwater bite. Good reports from Depot Creek have been the talk of the town. Good sized crappie and shellcraker with an occasional cat sh have all been reported. No good word from Howard Creek or the big river this week. SPONSORED BY PHOTOS BY FWCSpotted skunks are smaller than striped skunks but just as adept as keeping away predators. Apalachtimes.com Thursday, February 9, 2012 Page 10 BRUCE COOPER

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CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE APALACHICOLA SP O RTS www.apalachtimes.comThursday, February 9, 2011 APage 11SectionBy Joe ShieldsSpecial to the Times A soccer season marked by vast improvement for the Franklin County High School boys varsity team came to a close in the regional quarter nal Wednesday night, Feb. 1 as the Seahawks played the Marauders of Maclay High School. Thirty-two teams entered the state playoffs last week, for a chance to play for the state championship. The Seahawks earned the right to be a part of that elite group when they nished runner-up in the 1-1A district championship to Port St. Joe Jan. 27. Boasting six more regular season wins than in the 2010-11, Franklin County entered this tilt at 7-6-2 and looked to pull an upset against the highly-touted Marauders, one of the Final Four teams looking at a state championship last season. In the opening minutes, the Seahawks were a little apprehensive but once they saw their team defense was as effective against Maclay as it had been against other opponents throughout the season, the Seahawks calmed down and began to play their game. Taking a bend-but-dont-break defensive position, the Seahawks were pushed into defending their defensive third of the eld for the majority of the rst half. The back liners senior Tanner Klink, Javeion Win eld, Julio Ramirez and Billy Harris were joined by midelders Alex Causey, James Harris, Elton Olvera and Zack Howze, in an attempt to further solidify the Seahawk defense. Through the rst 40 minutes, the stingy Seahawks team defense allowed only one goal, at the 11minute mark, off of a uky noncalled hand ball which paused the Seahawk defense long enough waiting for a whistle, and enabling a Marauder to successfully acquire the rebound and score. An additional nine shots on goal were all saved by net minder, Daniel Carrino. Offensively, the Seahawks were limited to a nite number of counter-attacking opportunities but Olvera and Klink (free kick) managed to generate one shot on goal apiece. Into the break, the Marauders held a 1-0 advantage. At the half, the Seahawks made some adjustments in both team play and the psyche of the players, acknowledging the Marauders might in fact be a little overrated this season. In the second half of play the game began to tilt towards the Seahawks as the Marauders became frustrated at their lack of nishing, and errant passes being dispossessed. The Seahawks wouldnt go down quietly. Although the majority of play moved to the middle third of the eld, the Seahawks were unable to nd any consistency with their passing game. With the offense reduced to through balls which didnt materialize into scoring opportunities, only Olvera was able to add to his totals with one shot on goal. The Seahawks defense continued to play fantastic ball and held off all scoring opportunities, with Carrino making an additional nine saves. In a play which encapsulated the resolve of the Seahawk defense this season, Carrino came out of the net to make a sliding save, but was unable to secure the loose, wet ball. The ball was then recovered by a Marauder who looked to score on the now empty net. As the shot was taken, a blur of red streaked across the eld to the open net, as Klink positioned himself between the ball and the net and was able to redirect the shot out of the air with a swift kick that sent the soccer ball harmlessly out of the defensive third. With 15 minutes left in the game, head coach Jono Williams had the Seahawks midelders push up into the offensive third of the eld, in a last-ditch effort to score by overloading the Marauders back line. Unfortunately, the Seahawks were unable to obtain the equalizer and the Marauders scored again on the then thinlystretched Seahawk back line, and eked out a 2-0 victory. We played hard and never gave up, Williams said. Our boys should be very proud of their season and the improvements they have made. Maclay is a very solid team, and we were competitive with them until the nal whistle. The Seahawks nished the season 7-7-2, the best record in school history for boys varsity soccer, and laid the groundwork for what could be an even better season next year. The entire Seahawks team was awarded Player of the Match for their combined efforts. Their stingy, cohesive, team defense was due in large part to each team member on the eld knowing their job based on their distance from the opposing ball carrier and executing their individual jobs. This was all done via communication and knowledge of the other teammates skills and abilities. The Seahawk team as a whole controlled the Marauder offense during their multiple offensive attacks by acquiring dispossessed passes, stepping up and stealing the ball off of the opponents dribble and procuring headers out of the air. Joe Shields serves as assistant to coach Jono Williams of the Seahawk boys soccer team. JOSH WRIGHT | Special to the TimesThe 2011-12 Seahawk boys soccer team, front row, from left, are junior defenseman Julio Ramirez, freshman defenseman Chase Taranto, sophomore mid elder James Harris, junior mid elder Elton Olvera, sophomore forward Graham Kirvin, sophomore mid elder Stefan DeVaughn, junior mid elder Zach Howze, and seventh grade defenseman Jonathan Whitcomb and sixth grade defenseman Matthew Turner. Back row, from left, assistant coach Joe Shields, senior goalkeeper Stephen Jackson, freshman defenseman Austin Carter, junior mid elder Billy Harris, sophomore forward James Newell, senior defenseman Tanner Klink, junior forward Casey Sapp, sophomore mid elder Alex Causey, senior defenseman Javeion Win eld, junior goalkeeper Daniel Carrino, and coach Jono Williams.Seahawks complete best soccer season Three members of the district champion Lady Seahawks soccer team have been named to the Class 1A girls soccer AllDistrict 1 team, based on coaches nal balloting for this past season. Senior defensive back Jessica Dempsey, senior forward Megan Newell and sophomore mid elder Gracyn Kirvin were all named to the all-district team. During the regular season, in which the Lady Seahawks nished 8-5-3, Dempsey, as sweeper and fullback, was highly regarded for her erce play in opponents territory. Newell nished with 11 goals and four assists during the regular season, and 43 shots on goal. Kirvin posted 13 goals and seven assists, and 44 shots. Also named to the All District 1-1A girls rst team-were Rocky Bayou senior goalkeeper Christiana Serban, junior forward Kelly Sambenedetto, eighth grader mid elder Suzi Sober, sophomore forward Amber Smith, and senior defensive back Katrina Jammer. Port St. Joe placed senior mid elder Rachel Jones, and sophomore forwards Christian Laine and Allie Strippling on the team. Given Honorable Mention honors were Franklin County sophomore forward Jessica Shields and freshman goalkeeper Macey Hunt. Shields had 13 goals, ve assists and 44 shots on goal during the regular season, while Hunt gave up 27 goals and had 216 saves, and posted four shutouts. Also named Honorable Mention were senior defensive back Elizabeth Sober from Rocky Bayou; freshman goalkeeper Shannon Pridgeon from Port St. Joe; and junior defensive back Bri Ross and senior goalkeeper Madelyn Jackson from Freeport. David AdlersteinDAVID ADLERSTEIN | the TimesMembers of the Lady Seahawks squad are, front row, from left, sophomore mid elder Adrianna Reeder, sophomore mid elder Brooke Pittman, eighth grade fullback Jessica Schmidt, senior sweeper Jessica Dempsey, sophomore mid elder Gracyn Kirvin, and sophomore fullback Laura Gallegos. Back row, from left, are assistant coach Ramon Valenzuela, senior forward Megan Newell, senior fullback Emmy Norris, sophomore mid elder Deborah Dempsey, freshman goalkeeper Macy Hunt, freshman forward Katie Seger, sophomore forward Jessica Shields, sophomore fullback Stephanie Marxsen, and coach Kelli Maggio. Not pictured are Kitana Peralta and Lea Venable.3 named to all-district girls soccer team By David AdlersteinTimes City Editor At the Feb. 1 signing day, inside Franklin County High Schools new multi-purpose room, former Seahawk standout Dalin Modican was proudly welcomed as a member of Florida Techs inaugural program, set to take the eld in fall 2013. Josh Wright, high school athletic director and head football coach, announced that Modican, a wide receiver, had signed his national letter of intent and scholarship award to play football for the Panthers. About 50 friends and family were gathered for the occasion. Florida Tech is a Division II program located in Melbourne, and member of the Gulf South Conference. Wright praised Modicans work ethic and scholastic abilities, and said his standard for discipline, cooperation and teamwork was a model for other students. After graduating in 2011, Modican went to Independence Community College in Kansas, and took part in the football program, but decided that his desire to remain in Florida compelled him to return. During his Seahawk career, Modican posted 195 carries for 1,522 rushing yards, and scored 27 rushing touchdowns and seven receiving touchdowns. As quarterback, he threw for 1,134 passing yards and 11 touchdowns. Defensively, Modican had ve interceptions, and caused 13 fumbles. He scored seven defensive touchdowns, and two kick return touchdowns. Modican will take part in a new program directed by coach Steve Englehart, who just announced his rst recruiting class for the Panthers. We worked really hard to put this class together, Englehart said. Overall it is a good class. It was exciting to get my rst class locked in place. I think theyll blend in really well with the 48 student-athletes we have on campus that are working hard and doing everything weve asked. The new student-athletes have a lot of competition when they arrive. When Florida Tech takes the gridiron for its rst Gulf South Conference (GSC) game in fall 2013, it will line up against six-time league champion Delta State University in Cleveland, Miss. The game is the rst of six on the Panthers inaugural conference schedule. The Gulf South Conference has some of this countrys top athletes and we are excited to bring this high level of football to the Space Coast, Director of Football Operations John Thomas said. After opening GSC play, the Panthers will host the University of West Alabama in their rst conference home game the following week. As the calendar turns to October, they will prepare for a trip to play two-time national champion Valdosta State University. Florida Tech will welcome Shorter University to the Space Coast in the middle of October. In their second to last conference game, the Panthers will travel to the University of West Georgia before concluding the conference portion of their schedule at home against the University of North Alabama, currently coached by Terry Bowden, son of legendary coach Bobby Bowden.Modican signs with Florida TechLOIS SWOBODA | The TimesPictured at last weeks signing are, from left, Dalin Modicans mom Claudine KelloggWilson, Modican, stepfather, Kenny Wilson and grandmother, Maxine Kellogg. Not pictured at far left is younger brother Kalin Wilson.

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LocalA12 | The Times Thursday, February 9, 2012 Gun ShowFebruary 11th & 12th Panama City Panama City Fairgrounds Fairgrounds2077256Sat 9 -5 Sun 10-4C o n c e a l e d W e a p o n s C l a s s S a t / S u n 1 1 o r 2 Floridagunshows.com FREE PARKING Certied Medical Electrologist Electrolysis is the only proven method of PERMANENT hair removal.(Licensed & approved by the Board of Medicine)1137 Harrison Ave. Suite 7(850) 522-4884 By David AdlersteinTimes City Editor Habitat for Humanity revived Apalachicolas Mardi Gras parade in ne fashion Friday and topped it off with a fabulous soiree Saturday night at the Armory. In doing so, the ninth annual Mardi Gras festivities brought in more than $13,000, said Pam Ashley, chair of the county Habitat chapter, which is about to embark on a new house in Eastpoint, the fth home it has built in the county. Don Ashley, chair of the fundraising committee, said he expected the weekend to net more than the $6,000 brought in last year. Its building, he said. Were happy; I think it went real well. We got a lot of good feedback. An exuberant golf cart parade Friday afternoon, complete with a bevy of beloved canines, wound from the Bowery to the courthouse and back to Riverfront Park, for a dinner and concert by Brian Bowen, and Orlandos Beth McKee Band. The trumpet sounds of Don Fortner and his band, Aura, wafted from the balcony of the Owl Caf. Led by King Rex and Princess Pearl, St. George Islands Mason and Marilyn Bean, the parade came about thanks to a wealth of volunteers, including a pet Krewe brought together by Caroline Ilardi, and golf carts from Gary and Lisa Hooker from Ah La Cart, the Water Street Hotel and St James Bay Golf Club. Faye Johnson from Project Impact helped bring a bevy of young people to lend excitement, while Caty Greene and members of Habitat board helped bring the event to life. Winning for the best themerelated oat was Harriet Beachs Yellow Crested Pooper Scooper with Chicks a cart of pups pretending to be parakeets. Winning for the best themerelated dog was Queen Lizzie, escorted by owner Kayd Selden. The judges choice went to Sir Elton George and Joan Nevitt, with their dog Lucy. Cited for best decorated carts were the vehicles decorated by Marisa Getter and friends, and Clarice Powell and her admirers. Concertgoers enjoyed seafood gumbo made by Jeff Ilardi and chicken gumbo created by Fran Edwards, while Lane Gerking baked up scrumptious cupcakes to help with the fundraiser. On Saturday night, about 160 people lled an elegantly decorated Armory; complete with curtains on loan from the Tallahassee Civic Center, to enjoy the food provided by Tamaras Caf, and the jazzy sounds of the Beth McKee Band. David Butler once again served as the emcee while Wayne Thomas and Mark Rodgers handled lighting and sound for the two concerts. Pam Nobles brought out her Hot Flashes to bring the party alive, and Smokey Parrish sang. It was truly a Mardi Gras for the record books. 2-day Mardi Gras twice the fun 2-day Mardi Gras twice the fun 2-day Mardi Gras twice the fun ON THE WEBTo see more photos, visit www. apalachtimes.com. King Rex and Princess Pearl, St. George Islands Mason and Marilyn Bean The Beth McKee Band. Left, Guess who? Bottom, Queen Lizzie, escorted by owner Kayd Selden. Photos by DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times

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LocalThe Times | A13Thursday, February 9, 2012freelance work and four years at Leon High School. But he returned when the consolidated school was open, and has since grown the marching and performing band to 33 members strong. His rst year began with just six members of a percussion band, and now its a full-scale performing band for seventh through 12th graders, offering two concerts a year. And the marching band performs regular halftime shows, and appears in parades. Lester married to wife, Patti, with one stepson, earned a bachelors degree in piano performance from Jacksonville State in Jacksonville, Ala., and a masters in music education from Florida State. He said students face a challenge when they embark on studying music, but the rewards are tremendous. The kids are interested in music but they have no clue what it is, he said. They really dont know what theyre in for. They just know that theyve heard something and they like it. Its not like a football game, he added. You want to play football, you pretty much know what youre getting into. Lester said his challenge as a music educator is getting them through that initial excitement period and to realize that this really is a course of study that takes a lot of dedication and determination and discipline and sometimes it takes a lot of hard work. And getting them on that path where they see their progress in daily little amounts. McIntyre, accompanied by her husband Freddie, was the picture of joyful exuberance when her name was read. She won a two-night stay on St. George Island for the honor, courtesy of Resort Vacation Properties. Now the custodian at the Learning Center, McIntyre was praised as being a consistent, friendly presence to students. Theres a smile on her face all day long, said Louise Chipman, who was informally named last years School-Related Employee of the Year. Franklin County School Volunteer Coordinator Dolores Croom worked to implement a new plan by Superintendent Nina Marks, who sought to have school-related employees recognized just as teachers are. She asked that I draft the forms took it to the school board and they passed it last term, Croom said. It has never been of cially done until last term, on a very small scale, and now the actual nominating and voting process has been established. Reading coach Harolyn Walker and I consolidated the two events, and the attendance as well as the participation was great. Chipman was given a $50 Walmart gift certi cate for her selection last year as the countys School RelatedEmployee of the Year. There were ve nominees for the SchoolRelated Employee of the Year award. Chipman began by introducing Mary Brown, who has worked fulltime in food service at the Learning Center for the past seven years. Every day the students grow a little bit more with her encouragement, she said. Principal George Oehlert introduced his secretary, Sharon Browning, who is in many ways the face of the administration to students and parents, well-respected for her knowledge, ef ciency and friendly manner. Shes awesome, Oehlert said. Roy Carroll, the director of nance, introduced Joy Towns, currently the of ce manager at the Learning Center after assuming a variety of roles within the system. Carroll praised her dependability, versatility and abilities David Meyers, the districts information technology guru, introduced Charles Justice, a young, fairly new employee and spoke warmly of his professionalism and willingness to tackle new challenges in his role with the increasingly complex world of computers and communications. Its a hard job and Charles is committed, Meyers said. There were three other nominees for the Teacher of the Year honor including Audrey Gay from the elementary school, Andrea Keuchel from the middle school and Sharon Solomon from the Learning Center. Melanie Humble introduced Gay, who teaches fth grade, and outlined the many contradictions in the beloved teachers personality. A proud Southern lady who busts out on bongos, and a softspoken, religious woman who has been known to burst into dance in a relentless push to motivate her students to excel. Laura Baney introduced Keuchel, who teaches middle school English, and described her quiet perseverance and integrity in getting the most from her students. Angeline Stanley introduced Solomon, who teaches reading at the Learning Center, and used the occasion to burst into sweet song in praise of her colleague. High school teacher Paul Marxsen introduced Lester. The band director now moves on to state competition, and will receive an expenses-paid trip to Atlanta to attend the Ron Clark Academy. After a welcome from Barbara Lee, last years Teacher of the Year, and from Chipman, the gathering were led in prayer by pastor David Walker, husband of Harolyn Walker, the 2009 Teacher of the Year/ Oehlert then introduced the three staffers who plan to retire this year, each with at least 30 years of professional service. These include high school attendance of cer Karen Smith, elementary school teacher Lois Shirley, and Cheryl Creek, director of the schools, culinary arts program. As a support staffer, Smith will receive a $50 gift certi cate from the Grady Market. After a dinner created and served by Creeks students, the audience watched a video presentation created by Justice. Missy Cumbie presented each of the teachers with a $50 gift certi cate, courtesy of Delta Kappa, the fraternal organization of retired teachers. Each of the nominees also received gift baskets provided courtesy of donations from staffers and area businesses. The high schools SWAT anti-tobacco organization also gave each of the nominees a gift bag. INVITATION TO BID St. George Plantation Owners Association, Inc., (SGPOA) is seeking candidates for a Landscape Architect to design a Master Landscaping Plan for the Plantation. The goal of the Master Plan is to achieve a harmonious and consistent ow of natural-looking and appropriate landscaping through the common areas of the Plantation, based on the Plantation Design Guide, the Florida-Friendly Landscaping Guidance by the University of Florida/IFAS, the Wildre Risk Reduction in Florida by the Florida Division of Forestry, and other guidance appropriate for coastal communities. The Landscape Architect will seek broad input from property owners and staff of the Plantation, including use of Plantation website as well as face to face meetings. The Landscape Architect must be licensed in the state of Florida and have relevant experience in Coastal communities. A bidders conference will be held on Friday, February 24, 2012, at 2 pm at the Plantation Clubhouse to answer questions related to this project and to provide a site visit. Candidates are encouraged to contact the General Manager at (850) 9272312 to indicate intent to bid before submitting a proposal and receive a detailed description of the project. Proposals and statements of qualications must be submitted at our ofces by noon Monday, March 5, 2012. Proposals will be opened 1 p.m., Monday, March 5, 2012. Selected candidate interviews will be conducted at a date certain to be determined. It is anticipated that the SGPOA will award this contract no later than March 19, 2012. SGPOA reserves the right to reject any and all proposals not deemed to be in the best interest of the SGPOA, or to accept that proposal which appears to be in the best interest of the SGPOA. SGPOA reserves the right to waive any informalities in or reject any or all proposals, or any part of any proposal. Proposals should be submitted in sealed envelopes to General Manager and marked in the lower left hand corner Landscape Architect Proposal. Submit to General Manager, St George Plantation Owners Association, 1712 Magnolia Road, St George Island, FL 32328. NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING PLANNING & ZONING CITY OF APALACHICOLA, FLORIDAThe Apalachicola Planning & Zoning will hold a Public Hearing on Monday, February 13th 2012 at 6:00 PM at City Hall, Community Center Meeting Room, 1 Bay Avenue, Apalachicola, Florida to discuss and receive citizen comments on a special exception request relating to proposed business use of the structure on the parcel located at the corner of Hwy 98 and 12th St (C-2 Neighborhood Commercial), more specically described as Block 77, Lots 8 10 pursuant to the ofcial zoning map of the city. A Special Meeting will immediately follow. The following special exception request item will be discussed and considered: a) The applicant is interested in opening a Bed & Breakfast as well as apartments within the C-2 (Neighborhood Commercial) zoned area. The Apalachicola Land Development Code allows for such use if special exception approval is granted. All interested parties are encouraged to attend and be heard with respect to this request. For further information, contact the Apalachicola Administrative and Community Development Ofce, 1 Avenue E, Apalachicola, Florida 850-653-9319. BILL MILLER REALTY850-697-3751 (3310) 570-06583/2 DBL WD -3 FENCED COR. LOTS-2 CAR GAR $60,000 $29,500 $2,500 DOWN BUYS 2 BED APT. 2 6 ORRENT $500/MTH GULF VIEW & ACCESS 3 BDR 2 BA 2006 M/H 16 X 80 $89,000 3/B-D/W-3COR. LOTS DBL GARAGE $59,500 MIH 2 CRNRLOTS BLK. $ STORE REDUCED $49,500 COMM. BLDG-98 ON GULF-RENT $600/MTH Laura Baney introduced in getting the most from her MARY BROWN SHARON BROWNING JOY TOWNS CHARLES JUSTICE introduced Lester. The band Franklin County Elementary Teacher of the Year Audrey Gay, center, with her family, seated from left, Warren Smith and Lois Long Smith, Gays mother; Robert and Audrey Gay; and granddaughters Hannah and Haley Smith, and Alison Gay; daughter-in-law Kellie Wood, and grandson Bobby Gay, Jr. Standing are Gays brother Randal Long and his wife Mary. Left Franklin County Learning Center Teacher of the Year Sharon Solomon, with brother John, and parents Margie and Roy Solomon. Bottom Left Franklin County Middle School Teacher of the Year Andrea Keuchel, center, with daughters Amelia, left, and Katie. Standing are her parents Edward and Mary Keuchel.Photos by DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times LEADER from page A1

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A14| The Times Thursday, February 9, 2012 CLASSIFIEDS 76482 IN THE CIRCUIT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY CASE NO:2007-000102-CA The Bank of New York as Trustee for the Certificateholders CWABS, Inc. Asset-Backed Certificates, Series 2002-03 Plaintiff, vs. Richard Sand ad Crystal Sand, his wife; United States of America; Lighthouse Pointe Estates Homeowners Association, Inc. Defendant(s). AMENDED NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order rescheduling foreclosure sale dated January 23, 2012, and entered in Civil Case No.: 2007-000102-CA of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein The Bank of New York as Trustee for the Certificateholders CWABS, Inc. Asset-Backed Certificates, Series 2002-03, Plaintiff and Richard Sand and Crystal Sand, his wife are defendant(s), I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, AT THE WEST FRONT DOOR OF THE FRANKLIN COUNTY COURTHOUSE, LOCATED ON HWY 98, IN APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA, AT 11:00 A.M., March 14, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit: LOT 36, LIGHTHOUSE POINTE ESTATES (UNRECORDED): COMMENCE AT AN OLD TERRA COTTA MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 35, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 39 MINUTES WEST ALONG THE SECTION LINE 2505.40 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 50 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 55 SECONDS EAST 291.01 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE SOUTH 50 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 55 SECONDS EAST 250.00 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 31 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 18 SECONDS EAST 1226.16 FEET TO THE SOUTHWESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF 60 FOOT RAILWAY, THENCE, RUN NORTH 62 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 47 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 220.00 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 33 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 11 SECONDS WEST 1177.80 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH A 2002 GENERAL JAGUAR 3 MOBILE HOME, ID# GMHGA4130229116A, AND ID# GMHGA4130229116B ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. DATED at Apalachicola, Florida, this 25th day of January, 2012. MARCIA M. JOHNSON CLERK OF COURT MICHELE MAXWELL CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT Franklin County, Florida ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF: SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACHE, LLP 4630 Woodland Corporate Blvd. Suite 100 Tampa, FL 33614 (813) 880-8888 Feb 9, 16, 2012 76436 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 2007-CA-000376 ARCH BAY HOLDINGS, LLC -SERIES 2010B Plaintiff, vs. JEFFREY GALLOWAY A/K/A JEFFREY S. GALLOWAY; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF JEFFREY GALLOWAY A/K/A JEFFREY S. GALLOWAY; IF LIVING, INCLUDING ANY UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SAID DEFENDANT(S), IF REMARRIED, AND IF DECEASED, THE RESPECTIVE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS, AND TRUSTEES, AND ALL OTHER PERSONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THE NAMED DEFENDANT(S); JOHN DOE; JANE DOE; Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-styled cause, in the Circuit Court of Franklin County, Florida, I will sell the property situated in Franklin County, Florida, described as: LOT 31, BAY COVE VILLAGE, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 5 AT PAGE 18 AND 19 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, Front steps of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320 at 11:00 a.m., on March 14, 2012. DATED THIS 24th DAY OF January, 2012. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Witness, my hand and seal of this court on the 24th day of January, 2012. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk THIS INSTRUMENT PREPARED BY: Law offices of Daniel C. Consuegra 9204 King Palm Drive Tampa, FL 33619-8660 Phone: 813-915-8660 Attorneys for Plaintiff Feb 2, 9, 2012 77279 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 2011 CA 439 AMERIS BANK, a Georgia Bank 2628 Crawfordville Hwy P.O. Box 1240 Crawfordville, Florida 32326-1240 Plaintiff, vs. DONALD GRISWOLD, KATHRYN GRISWOLD, and THE UNKNOWN TENANT IN POSSESSION OF 1002 NE 2nd Street, Carrabelle, Florida 32322, Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: DONALD GRISWOLD, KATHRYN GRISWOLD, and THE UNKNOWN TENANT IN POSSESSION OF 1002 NE 2nd Street, Carrabelle, Florida 32322: YOU ARE NOTIFIED that a civil action has been filed against you in the Circuit Court, County of Franklin, State of Florida, to foreclose certain real property described as follows: LOTS 1 AND 2, BLOCK 47 (210), KEOUGHS SECOND ADDITION TO THE CITY OF CARRABELLE, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA; TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN 1995 SKYL DOUBLEWIDE MOBILE HOME BEARING VIN# 6H630502HA/ 6H630502HB AND TITLE #S 69123651/ 69123652. Commonly known as 1002 NE 2nd Street, Carrabelle, Florida 32322 You are required to file a written response with the Court and serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Timothy D. Padgett, Plaintiff;s attorney, whose address is 2878 Remington Green Circle, Tallahassee, Florida 32308, at least thirty (30) days from the date of first publication, and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter, otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. Dated this 24th day of January, 2012,. Marcia M. Johnson CLERK OF COURT By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk Attorney for Plaintiff: Timothy D. Padgett, Esq. Timothy D. Padgett, P.A. 2878 Remington Green Circle Tallahassee, FL 32308 (850) 422-2520 Fax: (850) 422-2567 February 9, 16, 2012 76961 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case No.: 2010-CA-000518 CitiMortgage, Inc. Plaintiff, vs. Timothy Ray Davis a/k/a Timothy R. Davis a/k/a Timothy Davis and Loretta S. Davis a/k/a Loretta Davis, Husband and Wife, Atlantic Credit & Finance Inc., as Assignee of HSBC Card Services; Franklin County, Florida; Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order of Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated January 23, 2012 entered in Civil Case No. 2010-CA-000518 of the Circuit Court in the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein CitiMortgage, Inc., Plaintiff and Timothy Ray Davis a/k/a Timothy R. Davis a/k/a Timothy Davis and Loretta S. Davis a/k/a Loretta Davis, Husband and Wife are defendant (s), I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash AT THE WEST FRONT DOOR OF THE FRANKLIN COUNTY COURT-HOUSE, LOCATED ON HWY 98, IN APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA, AT 11:00 A.M. on March 7, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit: ALL OF LOTS 19, 20, AND 21, OF BLOCK 243, IN GREATER APALACHICOLA, IN THE CITY OF APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, IN COMMON USE. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator; 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, Florida 32301; (850) 577-4430 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification of the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of the Circuit Court Franklin County, FL Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk Submitted By: ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF: SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACHE, LLP 4630 Woodland Corporate Blvd. Suite 100 Tampa, FL 33614 (813) 880-8888 (813) 880-8800 February 9, 16, 2012 76418T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 19-2008-CA-000508 THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS OF THE CWABS, INC., ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-4 Plaintiff, vs. MICHAEL FORSLUND et. al., Defendant(s). RE-NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order or Final Judgment of Foreclosure date January 9, 2012, and entered in Case No. 19-2008-CA-000508 of the Circuit Couurt of the 2ND Judicial Circuit in and for FRANKLIN County, Florida, wherein THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS OF THE CWABS, INC., ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-4 is the Plaintiff and MICHAEL FORSLUND; and UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF MICHAEL FORSLUND; and ANGLERS HARBOR HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, LLC; and FIRST TENNESSEE BANK, F/K/A FIRST HORIZON HOME LOANS CORPORATION are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash are held at the front steps of the Franklin County Courthouse 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on the 15th day of February, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Order of Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 15, ANGLERS HARBOR, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 8, PAGE 8, AS REVISED BY THAT CERTAIN REPLAT RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 8, PAGE 32, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. IF YOU ARE A PERSON CLAIMING A RIGHT TO FUNDS REMAINING AFTER THE SALE, YOU MUST FILE A CLAIM WITH THE CLERK OF COURT NO LATER THAN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU FAIL TO FILE A CLAIM, YOU WILL NOT BE ENTITLED TO ANY REMAINING FUNDS. AFTER 60 DAYS, ONLY THE OWNER OF RECORD AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MAY CLAIM THE SURPLUS. DATED at FRANKLIN County, Florida, this 10th day of January, 2012. MARCIA M. JOHNSON Clerk FRANKLIN County, Florida By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk GILBERT GARCIA GROUP P.A. Attorney for Plaintiff(s) 2005 Pan Am Circle, Suite 110 Tampa, Florida 33607 (813) 443-5087 Fla. Bar# 438405 469549.001296TST Feb 2, 9, 2012 76484T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA BRANCH BANKING AND TRUST COMPANY, Plaintiff, vs. PHILLIPP A. SPENCER, et al., Defendant(s)., CASE NO. 2011-CA-000126 NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order or Final Judgment Scheduling Foreclosure Sale entered on January 24, 2012 in this case now pending in said Court, the style of which is indicated above. I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash on the front steps of Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida 32320, at 11:00 a.m., on the 7th day of March, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Order or Final Judgment, to-wit: LOT 12, HOLIDAY BEACH, UNIT 1, A SUBDIVISON AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 12, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. a/k/a: 9 CAROUSEL TERRACE, ALLIGATOR POINT, FLORIDA 32346 ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. ENTERED at FRANKLIN County, Florida, this 25th day of January, 2012. MARCIA M. JOHNSON As Clerk, Circuit Court FRANKLIN, Florida By: Michele Maxwell As Deputy Clerk SPEAR & HOFFMAN P.A. Dadeland Executive Center 9700 South Dixie Highway, Suite 610 Miami, Florida 33156 Telephone: (305) 670-2299 BBH-C-2432/mac Feb 9, 16, 2012 76486T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CURCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY CASE NO: 2011-CA-000419 PNC Bank, National Association, Plaintiff, vs. Vera M. Snider and Vera S. Dudley; Unknown Tenants in Posession #1, If living and all Unknown Parties claiming by, through, under and against the above named Defendant(s) who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said Unknown Parties may claim an interest as Spouse, Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, or Other Claimants; Unknown Tenants in Possession #2, If living, and all Unknown Parties claiming by, through, under and against the above named Defendant(s) who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said Unknown parties may claim an interest as Spouse, Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, or Other Claimants Defentant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION FORECLOSURE PROCEEDINGS PROPERTY TO:Vera S. Dudley; ADDRESS UNKNOWN BUT WHOSE LAST KNOWN ADDRESS IS: 155 River Road, Carabelle, FL 32322 Residence unknown, if living, including any unknown spouse of the said Defendants, if either has remarried and if either or both of said Defendants are dead, their respective unknown heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, creditors, lienors, and trustees, and all other persons claiming by, through, under or against the named Defendant(s); and the aforementioned named Defendant(s) and such of the aforementioned unknown Defendants and such of the aforementioned unknown Defendant(s) and such of the aforementioned Defendants as may be infants, incompetents or otherwise not sui juris. YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action has been commenced to foreclose mortgage on the following real property, lying and being and situated in Franklin County, Florida, more particularly described as follows: COMMENCE AT THE ABUTMENT OF THE SOUTH APPROACH OF THE CARRABELLE RIVER BRIDGE WITH THE CENTERLINE OF STATE ROAD NO: 30 (U.S. HIGHWAY NO:98) AND RUN SOUTH 21 DEGREES 57 DEGREES 00 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID CENTERLINE 100.00 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID CENTERLINE RUN NORTH 63 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 68.00 FEET TO THE WESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF STATE ROAD NO: 30 (U.S. HIGHWAY NO: 98), THENCE RUN SOUTH 21 DEGREES 75 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 351.90 FEET TO THE INTERSECTION OF SAID WESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY WITH THE NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF STATE ROAD NO: S-379 (RIVER ROAD), THENCE RUN NORTH 76 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 1230.40 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (MARKED #4261) MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE NORTH 76 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 127.81 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919), THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY RUN NORTH 13 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 39 SECONDS EAST 114.09 FEET TO A POINT LYING ON THE APPROXIMATE MEAN HIGH WATER LINE OF THE CARRABELLE RIVER, THENCE RUN SOUTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID APPROXIMATE MEAN HIGH WATER LINE AS FOLLOWS: SOUTH 74 DEGREES 08 MINUTES 52 SECONDS EAST 76.71 FEET, SOUTH 86 DEGREES 42 MINUTES 11 SECONDS EAST 6.26 FEET, SOUTH 76 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 24 SECONDS EAST 12.15 FEET, SOUTH 70 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 18 SECONDS EAST 18.64 FEET, SOUTH 76 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 03 SECONDS EAST 19.85 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID APPROXIMATE MEAN HIGH WATER LINE RUN SOUTH 15 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 01 SECONDS WEST 109.27 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. more commonly known as 155 River Road, Carrabelle, FL 32322. This action has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defense, if any, uponSHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACHE, LLP, Attorneys for Plaintiff, whose address is 4630 Woodland Corporate Blvd., Suite 100, Tampa, Florida 33614, within thirty (30) days after the first publication of this notice and file the original with the clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately there after; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. WITNESS my hand and seal of this Court on the 25th day of January, 2012. MARCIA M. JOHNSON Clerk of Court By:Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator; 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, Florida 32301; (850) 577-4430 at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification of the time before the scheduled appearance is less than seven (7) days. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Feb 9, 16, 2012 76865T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 19-2009-CA-000266 DIVISION: BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. DEBORAH CALIANNO A/K/A DEBORAH J. CALIANNO, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated January 9, 2012 and entered in Case NO. 19-2009-CA-000266 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for FRANKLIN County, Florida wherein BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., is the Plaintiff and DEBORAH CALIANNO A/K/A DEBORAH J. CALIANNO; VITO A. CALIANNO A/K/A VITO ANTHONY CALIANNO A/K/A VITO CALIANNO; CAPITAL CITY BANK; KELLYS LANDING HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC.; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at FRONT DOOR OF THE FRANKLIN COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 33 MARKET STREET, APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA at 11:00AM, on the 15th day of February, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT 1 OF KELLYS LANDING, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 9 AT PAGE 4 OF THE OFFICIAL RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA A/K/A LOT 1 KELLYS LANDING, CARRABELLE, FL 32322 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on January 10, 2012. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Mr. Doug Smith, Office of Court Administration Leon County Courthouse, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301, Phone: 850-577-4401, Fax: 850-487-7947. F09047577 February 2, 9, 2012 76917T IN THE COUNTY COURT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 19 2010 CC 000051 ST. GEORGE PLANTATION OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., a Florida not for profit corporation Plaintiff, vs. TERESA L. JACOB, et al, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated January 24, 2012 and entered in Case No. 19 2010 CC 000051 of the County Court in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein St. George Plantation Owners Association, Inc. is Plaintiff, and TERESA L. JACOB and the UNKNOWN PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE, SPOUSE, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIE76915T IN THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 11-260-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, Plaintiff, vs. TIMOTHY C. POLORONIS and LEE ANNE POLORONIS Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated January 24, 2012, and entered in Civil Action No. 11-260-CA of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein the parties were the Plaintiff, CENTENNIAL BANK, and the Defendants, TIMOTHY C. POLORONIS and LEE ANNE POLORONIS, I will sell to the highest and best bidder, for cash, at 11:00 a.m. (Eastern Time) on the 14th day of March, 2012, at the front steps of the Franklin County Courthouse, Apalachicola, Florida, the following-described real property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure. Lot 8, Block 119, City of Apalachicola, Franklin County, Florida. The successful bidder at the sale will be required to place the requisite state documentary stamps on the Certificate of Title. DATED this 25th day of January, 2012. Hon. MARCIA JOHNSON Clerk of the Court Franklin County, FL By: Michele Maxwell As Deputy Clerk February 2, 9, 2012

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, February 9, 2012 The Times | A15 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322850-697-9604 850-323-0444 www.seacrestre.comwww. rst tness.com/carrabellePROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND RENTALSRENTALS1 BR RIVER CONDO, BOAT SLIP3 Night Minimum .......................$105 PLUS DAILY3 BR 1 BA FURNISHED HOUSEMonthly Rate, Carrabelle ................................$8501 BR 1 BA UNFURNISHED APTLanark, Remodeled, Includes Water ...............$4752 BR 1 BA UNFURNISHED APTLanark ............................................................$4501 BR, SUN ROOM/DAYBEDFurnished, Lanark ..........................................$4503 BR 2 BA FURNISHED HOMEOn River, Boat Dock & Lift ............................$10002 BR 1 BA FURNISHED HOUSEOn Bay ..........................................................$10003 BR 3 BA FURNISHED CONDODowntown, 3 Night Minimum ....$105 PLUS DAILYOFFICE SPACE HWY 98 Frontage, Carrabelle ....$550 Plus Utilities See emeraldcoastjobs.com to nd a job at the intersection of both.Wouldnt you like a job that ful lls you both professionally and personally? With Monsters new ltering tools, you can quickly hone in on the job thats right for you. So visit emeraldcoastjobs.com and nd a job that makes everybody happy. Attend College Online from Home. *Medical *Business *Criminal Justice. *Hospitality. Job Placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. 877-206-5165. www. Centura Online.com NORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, AND ALL OTHER PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THE ESTATE OF WILLIAM M. JACOB, DECEASED, AND ALL UNKNOWN PERSONS OR PARTIES HAVING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE ANY RIGHT, TITLE, OR INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY LOCATED IN ST. GEORGE PLANTATION are Defendants, I Will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash on the Front Steps of the Franklin County Courthouse at 33 Market Street, Apalachicola. FL 32320, Franklin County, Florida, at 11:00 am on the 21st day of March, 2012 the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: Lot 16, Nicks Hole, Phase I, a subdivision as per map or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 5 at Page 36 of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Danny Davis, ADA Coordinator, Court Technology Office, Office of Court Administration, 301 S. Monroe St., Rm 225, Tallahassee, FL 32303, (850) 577-3401 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. DATED this 25th day of January, 2012. Marcia M. Johnson, Clerk of Circuit Court By: Terry Creamer Deputy Clerk Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Becker & Poliakoff, P.A. Attorney for Plaintiff 348 Miracle Strip Pkwy SW, Suite 7 Ft. Walton Beach, FL 32548-5253 (850)-664-2229 (850) 664-7882 Fax February 2, 9, 2012 77303T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 11-251-CA PREMIER BANK, a Florida banking corporation, Plaintiff, vs. BOOMTOWN, LLC, a Florida limited liability company, RICKY R. REGISTER, CARLTON JACKSON a/k/a CARLTON L. JACKSON a/k/a CARLTON LEON JACKSON, VILLAGES OF ST. MARKS PROPERTY OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., a Florida non-profit corporation, UNKNOWN TENANT 1 and UNKNOWN TENANT 2, Defendants. NOTICE OF JUDICIAL SALE PURSUANT TO SECTION 45.031(1) OF THE FLORIDA STATUTES TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: Notice is hereby given that pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered on January 26, 2012, in Case No. 11-251-CA, of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit for Wakulla County, Florida, in which PREMIER BANK, a Florida banking corporation, is the Plaintiff, and BOOMTOWN, LLC, a Florida limited liability company, RICKY R. REGISTER, CARLTON JACKSON a/k/a CARLTON L. JACKSON a/k/a CARLTON LEON JACKSON, VILLAGES OF ST. MARKS PROPERTY OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., a Florida non-profit corporation, UNKNOWN TENANT 1 and UNKNOWN TENANT 2 n/k/a STEVEN MARTIN, are the Defendants, that the undersigned, Clerk of Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida, will sell at public sale the following described real property: Wakulla County: Lot 64, Villages of St. Marks, according to the Plat thereof, recorded in Plat Book 3, Page(s) 70, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. and Lot 131, Villages of St. Marks, according to the Plat thereof, recorded in Plat Book 3, Page(s) 70, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Franklin County Lots 1, 2, 3 and 4, Block D (113), Range 11, Picketts Addition to the City of Carrabelle, Florida, said land situate, lying and being in Franklin County, Florida. and All that tract of parcel of land lying and being in Franklin County, Florida, identified as Lot Number (5), Block D (113), Range Eleven (11), Picketts Addition, Carrabelle, State of Florida. The sale will be held on March 1, 2012, at 11:00 a.m., to the highest bidder for cash, at the Front Lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, Crawfordville, Florida, in accordance with Section 45.031, Florida Statutes. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated January 31, 2012. BRENT X. THURMOND Wakulla County Clerk of Court Becky Whaley Deputy Clerk February 9, 16, 2012 Incorrect Insertion PolicyFor Classified In-column AdvertisersAll ads placed by phone are read back to the advertiser to insure correctness. The newspaper will assume correctness at the time of the read-back procedure unless otherwise informed. Please your ad. Advertisers are requested to check the advertisement on the first insertion for correctness. Errors should be reported immediately. Your Florida Freedom newspaper will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion, nor will it be liable for any error in advertisements to a greater extent than the cost of the space occupied by the error. Any copy change, during an ordered schedule constitutes a new ad and new charges. We do not guarantee position of ANY ad under any classification. YORKIE AKC Valentines Puppies8 weeks old, 1st shots and comes w/health certificate Male $650 Female $750 mom & dad are located on premise and come from a loving home.The yorkies will be approx. 8 lbs when full grown. Please Call 850-554-0320 Panama City Eastpoint45 Bagonia St Apt 106 Daily from 12pm-6pmEstate Saleworth $20,000 wants $10,000 Firm from Rolex Watches GUN SHOWSanta Rosa County Auditorium, Milton, FL Feb 25th & 26th 9am -5pm call (850) 957-4952 or (850) 261-8407 General Admission $6 DIABETIC TEST STRIPS NEEDEDCall Bob (850)710-0189 Mobile Home Steps. Steel with treated lumber. 5 steps -30 inches high x 46 inches wide. $75. Apalachicola Call: 727-515-8537 Food Svs/Hospitality*Servers *Cooks Dishwashers *Bartenders *BussersBLUE PARROT Now HIRINGPlease apply in person between 9a-5pm 7 days a week@ Blue Parrot St. Georges Island HospitalityRESORT VACATION PROPERTIESAccepting applications. Full-time positions, great benefits, weekend work required. *Maintenance Technician Requires general maintenance experience, good driving record & good customer service skills. Team player, works well under pressure. *Housekeeping Office Clerk Requires prior office experience & good customer service skills. Team player, works well under pressure. Apply in person 9-5 weekdays at 123 W Gulf Beach Dr, St. George Island Install/Maint/RepairHousekeepersNeeded*Full or part time positions available *Must be able to work weekends. *Have own transportation *Some experience preferred. *Must be able to work under pressure *Must be able to work well with others. *Pay will be based upon experience. Apply in person at the Buccaneer Inn on St. George Island between the hours of 9am to 4pm Monday through Friday. Background check will be performed. AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train for hands-on Aviation Career. FAA Approved Program. Financial Aid if qualified. Job Placement Assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance. 877-206-9405 ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE. *Medical *Business *Hospitality. Job Placement Assistance. Computer available. Financial aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 866-467-0054. wwwCenturaOnline.com Apalachicola: Studio/Efficiency $550 per month + deposit. Includes Murphy bed, appliances & large fenced yard. Call Kathy @ Robinson Real Estate Co. 850-653-7196 Apartment avail. Lanark Village, Can be a 1 or 2 br, with sunroom $450 month + $250 deposit (850) 509-2460 Lanark Village: Clean 2 bedroom, 1 bath, screened porch, AC Long term lease: 7 months min. $500 monthly + $350. security deposit, references required or wkly & wkend rental w/deposit Pets-will consider. Non smoking. 850-212-2063 Text FL95716 to 56654 Publishers NoticeAll real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on a equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. Two Apartments!!1 br & 2br with 1 & 2 ba, 2nd Story with Balcony in Historic Downtown Apalachicola. W/D included furn or unfurn, 1st, last & security. Call 850-323-0599 St. George Island $160 week, Electric, Satellite, Garbage incl. Pool tble. 12 X 65 deck w/Beautiful view 850-653-5114 St. George Island 2Br, 1Ba, Bar, Satellite, Foosball Table 12 x 50 Deck. Only $250/week 850-653-5114 Lanark Village Parker St., 2 Br 1 Ba, All Tile, $550 month + $300 deposit. Please Call 850-927-2838 or 864-356-5949 1 or 3 BRCH/A in Apalachicola, FL. 850-643-7740. Eastpointe/Carrabelle 1bd Cottage, $485 + $200 utils. Direct TV. In forest 800sf, stone FP, W/D gas range & central AC 954-816-7004 Text FL94643 to 56654 Waterfront CondoTwo Bedroom, completely renovated at The Landings on the Carrabelle River. Call: 850-545-0784 for information. Asking $112,000 $37,000 5 Acres near Crystal Lake on Amos Hayes Rd, property has well septic and power pole. Current survey is available. About 1.5 acres of the property is cleared. 850-271-5761 and leave a message. Buell S3 Thunderbolt Motorcycle, Harley Davidson Motor, runs great and garage kept, 17,000 miles. $3,500!! Call 850-271-5761 and leave a message. SELL ALL YOUR ITEMS through classified.CALL 747-5020 Need a helping hand? Advertise in the Help Wanted Section in the Classifieds! 747-5020 ToPlace Your Classified ad inCall Our New Numbers Now!Call: 850-747-5020 Toll Free:800-345-8688 Fax: 850-747-5044 Email: thestar@pcnh.com Email: thetimes@pcnh.com theAPALACHICOLA & CARRABELLETIMES CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW

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LocalA16 | The Times Thursday, February 9, 2012 Laban Bontrager, DMD Monica Bontrager, DMD 12761 Pea Ridge Road Bristol, Florida 32321TELEPHONE (850) 643-5417 Bristol Dental ClinicDENTURE LAB ON PREMISESSame Day Service on Repairs and Relines Don Lively General Contractors LICENSED ANDINSURED 20 YEARSEXPERIENCE P.O. Box 439 Carrabelle, FL 32322 697-2783 or Mobile 566-2603RC0066499RG0065255 Carrabelle Visa, Discover, and American Express Honored at Participating Ace Stores JACKSONSBuilding Supplies Building Supplies & Auto Repair Carrabelle 697-3333 We Deliver AnywhereHardware and Paint Center Electrical & Finish Carpentry850-229-6751850-227-5666Michael & Anthony TonyPoloronis&Sons,Inc. From A to ZPO Box 364Port St. Joe, FL 32457850-340-0756 Gregs Handyman Service & Lawn Maintenance NO JOB TOO BIGPLEASE CALL JOE @ 850-670-5478joes_lawn@yahoo.comJOES LAWN CARE PILE DRIVING FOUNDATION/PILING REPAIR DOCK/MARINE WORK MOORING BOUYSOFFICE: 850.227.1709FAX: 850.762.2552 CELL: 850.527.5725 HOWARD227FAIRPOINT.NET ROBERTS APPLIANCE REPAIR ALL MAJOR BRANDS 18 Shadow Lane Apalachicola, FL 32320 Phone: (850) 653-8122 Cell: (850) 653-7654 Trades & Services Our local real estate experts have identied what they feel are the best values around and are oering them to you in Real Estate Picks! (In this section), Discover the best real estate values in Mexico Beach, Port St. Joe, Apalachicola, Cape San Blas, St. George Island, Carrabelle and surrounding areas. Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Forgotten Coast Real Estate Picks John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.comMLS#245180$41,900St. George IslandLOVELY HIGH & DRY HOME SITELocated in the quiet neighborhood of the Gulf Beaches, Possible Gulf views from the second story of a home. Mature pines & native vegetation. Lot has been recently cleared, so you can see what youre buying! West Bayshore Drive. Listed by Michael Billings John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.comMLS#245456$139,000St. George IslandST. GEORGE PLANTATION One of the best one acre 2nd tier lots in the Plantation. Good elevation. One story house is in place on 1st tier lot in front of this one. Located in Pebble Beach Village on Forsythia Court, its adjacent to a lovely sand path leading to a boardwalk to the Gulf. Truly a beautiful lot! FACTORY DIRECTSpecial $5 OFF each faux window blind Blinds Shades Solar Shades ShuttersGUARANTEED LOWESTCOMPETITIVE PRICESSTORM SHUTTERS Accordian Roll Down Bahama ColonialForAllYour Window Needs, Weve Got YouCovered!American Shield Company(850) 697-3066 or (850)528-9355FREEIn-HomeEstimates 20-30%ALL STORM SHUTTERS By Lois SwobodaTimes Staff Writer More than 300 visitors ocked to the island Saturday to tour homes, artful, elegant and historic. The weather was perfect and the homes were picture perfect the day of the event, which raised funds to bene t the St. George Island Lighthouse Association. Organizer Dani Ray said the initial pre-tour goal of 200 tickets was met a week before the big day. Another 100 tickets were sold on site at Lighthouse Park. One highlight of the tour was Hadden House, the oldest wooden house on the island built in 1955. Owner Sue Mahoney, who purchased the house in 1989, was on hand to regale visitors with tales of storms and renovations. She said that, after she retires next year, she plans to spend a lot more time on the island. Located nearby were Marilyn and Mason Beans home, Sea Wings, and Best Ever, a deceptively modest house from the outside that boasts a table for 12 in the dining area. Further east, visitors were welcomed to Whaley House, a 5,000-square foot beauty featuring exotic woods and a stunning Gulf view. Three additional houses and the Plantation Clubhouse were on display in the gated portion of the west end. Volunteer drivers ferried tour goers from Lighthouse Park to the Plantation sites to avoid complications at the guard gate. The tour offered a unique opportunity for visitors to experience the serenity of the exclusive enclave. Garber House, with its stark modern lines, and fun-loving Rainbow House standing side-by-side could not have been more different or more lovely. The Plantation Clubhouse cant fail to be impressive, but perhaps the best-kept secret of the tour was the Thompson House, located near the cut and surrounded by native foliage. Visitors dubbed it the chefs house. Ray said the new event, which got a boost from funding from the Tourist Development Council, went very well and raised funds beyond her expectations.Tour of island homes a runaway success Right: This water feature at Garber House lends a soothing touch to the great room.Bottom Right: This oyster shell lamp was spotted at Best Ever on East Gorrie.Bottom left: This whimsical chandelier exempli es the spirit of charming Rainbow House.Below: Sea Wings, home of Marilyn and Mason Bean, typi es St. George Island style.LOIS SWOBODA | The Times