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The Apalachicola times
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100380/00154
 Material Information
Title: The Apalachicola times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: H.W. Johnston
Place of Publication: Apalachicola Fla
Apalachicola Fla
Publication Date: 11-24-2011
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1885.
General Note: Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 32911693
lccn - sn 95026907
System ID: UF00100380:00154
 Related Items
Preceded by: Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by: Apalachicola herald

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xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx 50 WWW.APALACHTIMES.COMP hone: 850-653-8868 W eb: apalachtimes.com E -mail: dadlerstein@star.com Fax: 850-653-8036 C irculation: 800-345-8688 DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK: School News & Society: 11 a.m. Friday Real Estate Ads: 11 a.m. Thursday Legal Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classied Display Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classied Line Ads: 5 p.m. Monday Contact Us Out to see Index By David Adlerstein Times City Editor Franklin Countys jobless rate dropped again in October, falling for the second straight month by 0.3 percentage points. According to preliminary num bers released Friday by the Florida Department of Economic Oppor tunity (DEO), the countys unem ployment rate fell to 7.5 percent last month, from 427 people without jobs to 411. The drop comes as the labor force shrank by 56 workers, from 5,550 in September to 5,449 last month. The countys labor force re mains larger than it was one year ago, when it comprised 5,252 work ers, and the jobless rate was higher, at 8.2 percent. Franklin Countys jobless picture put it at seventh best in the state, better than both the national aver age of 9 percent, and the state aver age of 10.3 percent. Monroe and Lib erty counties had the states lowest rate, each at 6.3 percent, followed by Walton 6.8, Okaloosa 7 and Alachua and Lafayette counties, each at 7.4 percent. Many of the counties with the lowest unemployment rates are those with relatively high propor tions of government employment. There were 34 Florida counties with double-digit unemployment rates in October. The unemployment rate in the Gulf Coast Workforce region (Bay, Franklin, and Gulf counties) was 9.4 percent in October, 0.9 percent age points below the state rate, and 1.1 percentage points lower than the regions year ago rate of 10.3 percent. Bay County was at 9.5 per cent, and Gulf County at 9.6 percent. Out of a labor force of 101,229, there were 9,498 unemployed Gulf Coast residents. Bay Countys unemployment Thursday, November 24, 2011 By David Adlerstein Times City Editor Davie Lloyd has left her position as hospital CEO, although ofcials at Weems Memorial Hos pital are not conrming whether she was removed or voluntarily stepped down. Staff at the hospital were notied Friday of Lloyds departure. Hos pital ofcials said Cindy Drapal, the hospitals chief nursing ofcer (CNO), will take over as chief administrative of cer. Lloyd, 39, was hired in July, at an annual salary of $145,000, to succeed Weems CEO Chuck Col vert. She most recently served as CEO of Flem ing County Hospital, a 52bed not-for-prot county hospital in Flemingsburg, Ky., that was managed at that time by Quorum Health Resources, a hos pital management rm headquartered in Brent wood, Tenn. County Commission er Cheryl Sanders, who was critical last month of Lloyds initial perfor mance, said she was noti ed last week of Lloyds departure. Sanders had asked for Lloyds removal dur ing the commissioners Oct. 18 questioning of Mark OBryant, CEO of Tallahassee Memorial HealthCare. TMH has an afliation agreement with Weems, which employs the hospitals CEO and CNO, although both sala ries come from Weems operating revenue. Sanders said Friday she had no further dis cussions with TMH of cials since last months county commission meet ing, when she agreed to amend her motion for Lloyds removal so as to grant TMH until Jan. 3, 2012, to satisfy the com missioners concerns about Lloyds perfor mance. TMH said it plans to provide support to Drapal as part of an afliation agreement with Weems to provide manage ment oversight for the Davie Lloyd out as Weems CEOLOIS SWO B O D A | The Times Davie Lloyd By Lois Swoboda Times Staff Writer Tourist Development Council funds received from BP are being used to fund such things as social media campaigns, contests and compiling a database of email addresses of visitors who have shown interest in the county. At the county commis sions Nov. 1 meeting, Helen Spohrer, who was chosen to administer the TDC mar keting funds, said BP had approved her third quar ter marketing plan with no changes. She said because it is for the off-season, the budget for the campaign is the smallest of the year 18 percent of the total $1.67 million BP fund. She said 39 percent of the total funds were spent this summer during the second quarter campaign, and that the county is at the midpoint of the current BP market ing grant. We want to come back strong in the spring when everybodys booking, she said. We are up 13 per cent for summer over last year and 15 percent over 2009. Thats huge, Spohrer said the TDC is targeting potential visitors by specic area of the coun ty and recreational activity, such as shing, birding and ecotourism. She said the campaign also targets small niches such as geocaching (see Page A10 ), and that in most cases, the most targeted marketing brings the great est return. Spohrer said her market ing group is also exploring new publications that serve niche markets, such as bird ing and shing, to advertise local activities. The campaign includes T-shirts and bumper stick ers and highlights lodging specials over the upcoming quarter. The TDC is also sponsoring online contests, including one where three vacations will be given away. That contest requires en trants to name a rental com pany they wish to work with, part of a strategy to encour age potential visitors to look TDC broadens marketing campaign See TDC A7 V OL 126 I SS U E 30 Opinion ............ A4 Society ............ A8 Faith .............. A9 Outdoors .......... A10 Sports ............ A11 Tide Chart ......... A13 Classieds ......... A14 See LLOYD A7 County jobless rate still improving See JOBLESS A12 Poles Apart Apalachicola funeral protests transmission lines Pal Rivers, a former Navy pilot, addresses the protest against Progress Energy putting giant transmission lines thrown the downtown. By David Adlerstein Times City Editor The effort to thwart a Progress Energy plan to erect giant trans mission lines through the heart of Apalachicola picked up steam last weekend. A symbolic funeral procession of about 100 mourners plodded through Apalachicolas down town streets Saturday in protest of Progress Energys impending construction of the lines. Then on Monday morning, where one of the new poles is slated to be erected in the rightof-way in front of photographer Richard Bickels home at 96 Sixth St., a small early-morning gather ing of about 20 activists greeted Progress workers at about 7:30 a.m. The group had parked their cars along the curb, making work impossible, and brandished signs deploring the project. The funeral procession moves through the downtown Saturday. Richard Bickel made his feeling known Monday as a pole was about to be erected in front of his home.P hotos by DAVI D AD LE R STEI N The Times See POLES A2 Crazy for geocaching, A10 Thanksgiving on St. George Island There will be a community Thanksgiving lunch at 12:30 p.m. at the St. George Island United Methodist Church, 201 E. Gulf Beach Drive. Turkey and ham provided, bring covered dish. There will also be a community Thanksgiving dinner at Eddy Teachs Raw Bar at 4 p.m. Bring covered dish or dessert if you can. Band begins around 7 p.m.Apalachicola Christmas celebration The Apalachicola Christmas Celebration will light up Apalachicola from 4 to 8 p.m. Nov. 25, the day after Thanksgiving. Santa arrives on shrimp boat at 4 p.m. at the City Dock on Water Street, and will hear childrens Christmas wishes. On Saturday, Nov. 26, city celebration continues with afternoon holiday programs, caroling, and Santa. On Sunday, Nov. 27 the Tree of Remembrance Ceremony takes place at Riverfront Park at 3 p.m., a nondenominational activity to honor loved ones during the holidays. Reception follows. For info, call 653-9419.Eastpoint Christmas celebration Dec. 1 Santa will be in Eastpoint at the Eastpoint Pavilion on Patton Drive on Thursday, Dec. 1 from 6-8 p.m. For information, call 653-5596.Island Lights The annual Island Lights festivities begin at 5 p.m. Friday, Dec. 2, at mid-island in the St. George Lighthouse Park. The one-mile Jingle Jog starts at 5 p.m. on the bike path in front of Lighthouse Park and proceeds through the business district. No fee. Come a little before 5 p.m. to sign in. For more information, see www. SGILights.com or call 9277744.Holiday Fresh Market The Holiday Fresh Market featuring handmade, fresh products, locally made baked goods and natural creations takes place on Dec. 3 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. in downtown Apalachicola. For information call 653-9419.

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Local A2 | The Times Thursday, November 24, 2011 By 8:20 a.m., the crowd had moved their vehicles, after Police Chief Bobby Varnes requested that they abide by the law. Every thing ended quietly, and without incident, but the anger that had been voiced in polite, formal terms Saturday was clearly evi dent and more acute in the morning air. Moving to the sounds of a melancholy dirge, and led by a horse-drawn carriage bearing a black wooden casket, Saturdays protest marked the high point of a growing, but 11th hour, push by activists to pre vent the energy company from erecting the poles, 75to 90-feet tall and weighing 30,000 pounds, through the downtown. Were not here to bury our community; were here to save our community. This towns a historic treasure, said Tom Daly, president of the Apalachicola Area His torical Society, which has championed opposition to the poles for more than a year. Against a backdrop of shrimp boats, Daly spoke from a dais erected in Riverfront Park, before it set a casket draped in the citys ag. Speaker af ter speaker deplored the enormous concrete trans mission lines, and urged Progress Energy to come to the table and consider ways of either burying the lines underground, or rerouting them around the downtown, where a once bustling seafood industry has gradually given way to an expanding tourist mar ket. Today, the tallest struc tures in town are shrimp boat masts. These poles will dwarf the buildings along the waterfront, said Bickel, whose acclaimed works have preserved in black-and-white Franklin Countys seafood heritage. They (Progress) have no consideration for visual in tegrity or living things. He noted that he had just returned from a photo as signment in Albania, one of the poorest countries in the world. But theyre able to bury their power lines un derground, he said. They can put enough money to prevent this blight. The mock funeral fol lowed less than a week af ter a unanimous decision by Apalachicola city com missioners Nov. 15 to ask Progress Energy to halt for at least 90 days construc tion of the lines through the downtown. Work on the new line is ongoing from both Port St. Joe to the west, and from Eastpoint, across the Apalachicola River, to the east. Commissioner Jimmy Elliott, who had made the motion to request the moratorium, was given a warm welcome Saturday as he addressed the crowd, recalling how the decision in his youth to get away from this town and ght in Vietnam had given way decades later to a strong desire to defend it. No one who possessed a great work of art would want somebody to pour paint on it and ruin it, he said. He likened the protest ers, many of whom are comparative newcomers in contrast to local families such as his who go back four and ve generations, to the work of American soldiers abroad. Youve come here to defend it, he said. Allies come and help native peo ple keep what they have. The protestors also heard from former Clerk of Court Pal Rivers, a retired Navy pilot who once gave ight training to astronaut Neil Armstrong, who would later become the rst man to walk on the moon. The goal of these new power lines are not to serve us, its a pass-through to some other area, said Riv ers, 88. Were unique and we need to preserve this, noting that the town boasts of about 900 historic homes and buildings. Progress has shown a disregard for our efforts to preserve historic am bience, he said. He also mentioned that on a recent visit to Istanbul, one of the most historic cities in the world, he had noticed that they had managed to bury their electric lines so as not to mar the landscape. The crowd also heard words of encouragement from several people active in the anti-pole movement, including Susan Richard son, Leslie Coon, and Bill Spohrer, who added the only note of raw politics to the afternoon. Wheres our mayor, and why isnt he here? he asked. Stay strong and keep at it, Richardson urged the crowd. Dont stop. With the clock ticking, and ongoing uncertainty what legal avenues are open to the SaveApalach group, they have enlisted the help of Arthur Buddy Jacobs, a prominent land use attorney out of Fer nandina Beach who was instrumental in defeating the planned construction of a Walmart there. We just want 90 days to sit down and talk about it, he said. Were hopeful theyll give that to us. Jacobs, who in recent days has taken the towns case to U.S. Sen. Bill Nel son, former U.S. senator and Progress board mem ber Mel Martinez, Attorney General Pam Bondi and other state ofcials, said Apalachicolas preserva tion should be of concern to both the state and nation. You are a United States of America town, a state treasure, he said. The state of Florida needs to step up. Actor Ed Tiley, dressed in the attire of a 19th cen tury preacher, closed the protest with the reading of a prayer he penned for the occasion. Let us pray that the almighty power company repents, let us pray that they see the error of their ways, he intoned. For they have come unto this city butchering our land scape, for they are engaged in carving a scar through the middle of history. All in the name of Progress. POLES from page A1 Photos by DAVI D | The Times Attorney Buddy Jacobs addresses the crowd on Saturday. Actor Ed Tiley glances at the symbolic casket, before later reciting a poem he penned for the occasion. Commissioner Jimmy Elliott speaks out against the proposed transmission lines.

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Local The Times | A3 Thursday, November 24, 2011 2 nd Annual Forgotten Coast Warrior Weekend A 501-C3 Non Prot Corporation To all of our 2011 Patriotic Business and Organization Sponsors: SILVER SPONSORS Capital City Bank Centennial Bank Dockside Caf Dover Foundation EdgeWater Yamaha El Governor Motel Harts Marine & Outdoor MainStay Suites Sunset Coastal Grill BRONZE SPONSORS 98 Real Estate Group Bill Cramer Chevrolet Calcutta City of Mexico Beach Express Lane FairPoint Communications Joe Mamas Wood Fired Pizza Ladies Auxiliary VFW Post 10069 Port St. Joe Ling Ding 2011 Scallop Cove Semper Fi Sisters Sikorsky SPECIAL CONTRIBUTORS FRIENDS OF THE EVENT GOLD SPONSOR Gulf County TDC PLATINUM SPONSOR BlueWater Outriggers VFW Post 10069 Port St. Joe Thank you all those who volunteered time and talent. We would like to sincerely thank all the individuals and businesses who participated in bringing this most worthwhile event to our area. Tax deductible contributions can be made to Forgotten Coast Warrior Weekend, P.O. Box 1022, Port St. Joe, FL 32457. If your business or organization donated and we failed to list your name, please contact our organization.

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At-large voting a must in 2012 Recognizing that many of our Franklin County voters want the county to return to at-large voting, we feel that the time has come to renew our efforts. Last year, the Franklin County Voters CountyWide Voting Political Action Committee (PAC), a 501(c)(4) grassroots endeavor, asked voters who want to see this change to sign a petition to demand that the question be placed on the 2010 general election ballot. For various reasons for example, some voters signed the petition twice and some signatures were illegible our effort fell short of the required number of signatures needed in order for the petition to be placed on the ballot. Again, we are striving to have our petition placed on the next ballot. This time, we have more volunteers, and voters can go to the same sites to sign up as before. In order to avoid the main problems that our last effort suffered, we are using single sheets for each voter and we are asking that they sign using the signature that they use when voting. New voters can call either of the phone numbers listed here to nd out where they can go to sign: 653-7013 or 653-9081. Cora L Russ, Secretary Franklin County Voters County-Wide Voting PAC Gag grouper needs regional management plan Editors note: The following letter was written to the commissioners of the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission. My name is Alan Lamarche, and I am a retired deputy director of law enforcement for the old Florida Game and Fresh Water Fish Commission. I addressed you at last years meeting at the Pat Thomas Law Enforcement Academy, concerning the abundant gag grouper and red drum populations in the northeastern Gulf. I have over 40 years of rsthand knowledge and experience with both species in this part of the world. In my later years, I have devoted much of my life to introducing youngsters to the wonders of saltwater sport shing, especially to gag grouper as our local populations are so accessible in the spring and fall months. I support the Beau Turner Youth Conservation Center and volunteer there. Needless to say, I am distressed to learn that NOAH Fisheries is proposing a permanent gag grouper recreational season from July 1 through Oct. 30. These hot summer, thunderstorm months are the worst shing time for us because gag grouper are living in the deep, cool waters that are 50-plus nautical miles from our shores. In the Big Bend, we sh for gags from April through mid June and again from late October through December, because the gags come into our shallow, near shore waters in 20-40. During the spring and fall months, we dont have to face the daily dangers of getting caught well off shore in summer afternoon storms. I will not take youngsters on a 100mile round trip to bring them back in lightning and rough seas. There are few grouper shers left in the Big Bend. The hundreds of folks from south Georgia who, only a few years ago, came down for weekly gag grouper trips have stopped coming, sold their boats, beach houses and sh camps. The Big Bend Grouper waters are barren of shermen. I have taken kids out to prime territory, on weather perfect days, where I had historically seen 15 to 20 boats and not seen a single grouper shing boat all day. Its not because the gag grouper arent there! We have more gags now than we have ever had, especially in the spring. These gags migrate to deep water in the summer, and they are only accessible to long-range charters, overnight head boats and commercials. There are no head boats and fewer than a hand full of grouper charters or commercial grouper shers out of Franklin, Wakulla, Jefferson and Taylor counties. If you accept this summertime gag grouper season, your actions will sound the nal death knell for what remains of the recreational gag grouper shers who once enjoyed Apalachee Bay and its magnicent shallow water gag grouper shery. The only answer is for FWC to regionally manage gag grouper, just like you already do for trout and red drum. I have given up on NOAH Fisheries, as Im convinced that their mission is to eliminate recreational shers. I still have hope for and faith in my FWC commissioners and believe that your wisdom and passion for Floridas abundant, renewable natural resources will prevail. Respectfully Submitted, Major Alan Lamarche, Retired No progress visible here Rambling the miles from Joe to home I suddenly slowed to breathe again Aghast at that before me. Unwitnessed in absence a journey North, The rampage had barreled in Like plague besetting land. This my favorite to the City, The approach wild in eld and forest, Scathed and scarred now In barren monuments Idols to unimaginative advance. Fearing future mileage I stopped and gazed At another universe real, As if some distant, lifeless time. Home now, weeks later: Fiercely and unremittingly They still cut and claw And another frozen sentinel Of might without mind arises. Us devoid men Are digging deeper Dichotomous existence To the centuries of hand-hewn And mortared might. Laid in miles of history, I disenchanted wind streets North And East to water, Watching one then another Of the ugly bulwarks thrust. What value mindless growth? I say no progress visible here. H. Melicent Remy Thursday, November 24, 2011 Opinion A4 | The Times USPS 027-600 Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 VP/Publisher: Karen Hanes Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola Times LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Special to the Times State Rep. Leonard Bembry (D-North Florida) on Nov. 17 announced his candidacy for United States Congress from Floridas Second District, which includes Franklin County. Bembry has led the necessary paperwork with the Federal Election Commission and will begin traveling the district and building a campaign immediately. A formal announcement tour will follow. The priorities of this Congress couldnt be more wrong for north Florida and our nation, Bembry said. While politicians in Washington ght with each other and refuse to address the big issues we face, real people everywhere continue to struggle with a stalled economy and poor job market that need a jolt charge and a runaway budget that needs to be responsibly controlled. Steve Southerland has not delivered on the political promises he made in 2010 to create jobs, change Washington, D.C., and bring practical solutions that will put Floridians back to work and tackle the tough challenges we face. Bembry was elected to the Florida House of Representatives in 2008 and was re-elected last year. He is one of the most independent members of the legislature and perhaps the most conservative Democrat in the Florida House. In the Legislature, Bembry quickly earned a reputation as an expert on budget, economic development and agriculture issues. He believes that creating new and better jobs, supporting small businesses by cutting taxes and regulations, protecting our seniors and Veterans, and preserving traditional values are the biggest issues facing America. Bembry will energetically and faithfully serve the remainder of his term in the Florida House and looks forward to a busy and productive 2012 legislative session. I was a farmer and businessman for almost 40 years before I decided that it was my responsibility to pursue public service. I am grounded in north Florida because its always been my home. It is where I was raised and where Susan and I have chosen to raise our family. We love it here, said Bembry. I am concerned about the kind of future we are leaving for our children and grandchildren. The country is not on the right track and our elected leaders in Washington, D.C., are failing the test of true citizenship by playing politics instead of solving problems. If elected, I will go to Washington as a commonsense, honest, hardworking, conservative problem solver who believes that a dose of north Florida values and can-do spirit is what we need to get this country moving again, Bembry said. Bembry and Susan, his wife of 44 years, have three children and nine grandchildren. The Bembry family spans four generations in north Florida. Bembry seeks Congressional seat LEONARD BEMBRY Special to the Times Tallahassee resident Jay Liles has announced his intention to run for the second Congressional District in the Big Bend. The citizens of District 2 know that Congress isnt working for them. Too much time and energy is spent on issues that divide rather than unite. Our elected representatives should be working together to nd solutions rather than tearing down our country and each other, said Liles, 59, in making his announcement. A policy consultant for the Apalachicola Riverkeeper and the Florida Wildlife Federation, Liles has served in both the private and public sectors and said he understands that our country was built on the strength of our working families. As the congressman for District 2, Liles said he plans to work with both Democrats and Republicans in true job creation that rewards hard work and fair play, not millionaires or Wall Street. While Congress talks about jobs they are actually stiing opportunity and impeding our economic recovery, he said. Sadly, Congress seems more interested in political maneuvering and gamesmanship than addressing the concerns of the citizens they represent. With a professional background in banking and insurance, advocate for clean energy and environmental stewardship and eight years as a state employee, Liles believes there is a balance between business and government. Too much government interference can hamper business development, but insufcient government oversight can lead to public health and safety issues, lack of consumer protections, and as America experienced with a deregulated banking industry an economic crisis, he said. Government isnt the bad guy. In fact, Im always amazed to hear elected ofcials tear down government and government employees. They seem to have forgotten that they ARE the government. When they attack and blame the government that they are a part of, these elected ofcials demonstrate short-sightedness and a lack of basic civics education, Liles said. My candidacy will be about working toward solutions that make our state and nation stronger. This campaign is not about issues that divide us; it is not about a narrow and mean-spirited political ideology that blinds its followers from seeking creative opportunities. We can disagree, but we must do so respectfully and remember that we are all Floridians and Americans. Too many are still unemployed; too few jobs have been created, and too many are on the verge of losing hope for a better future, Liles said. As your congressman, I will focus on ways to create real jobs and help our economy recover and thrive. District 2 constituents need a congressman who listens and takes action on the issues that are important to them. They need a congressman who serves them, rather than outside special interests and partisan agendas, he said. From Apalachicola to Live Oak and Panama City, to Cross City and everywhere in between, we are fortunate to live in one of the best and most beautiful places in the country and it would be my privilege to represent all of the citizens in District 2. Married to wife Christy, Liles is a registered Democrat. Born in Gainesville and raised in Plant City, he earned a degree in political science from the University of Florida in 1974. Jay Liles to seek Congressional seat JA Y LILES Our traditional Thanksgiving dinner, at the Senior Center, was very good. Lots of good food, good friends and lots of fellowship. It was our last lunch for the year. The center will be closed until Thursday, Jan. 5, 2012. Have a good holiday season, and thank you for your support. Chillas Hall will open at 5:30 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 30, for Bingo for the Bus. Come over and join us. Bingo starts at 6:30 p.m. Cookies, coffee and soft drinks available. Who knows you might win! Fore! Members of the Lanark Village Golf Club will prepare and serve a pancake breakfast and other goodies on Saturday, Nov. 26. A donation of $5 will be collected at the door. The breakfast and Christmas bazaar will begin at 8 a.m. Lots of Christmas decorating and gift items for you to choose from. See ya there! For more information, you can call Pat at 697-2798 or Gay at 702340-3161. Betty Roberts and Mercy Henderson and all our villagers who are in St. James Rehab said hello. I go about three times a week. Surprise, surprise, surprise! The speed limit on the streets in Lanark Village is 15 miles per hour, not the other way around! On Highway 98, it is 45 mph. While you are cruising down the highway, be sure and glance up at the rearview mirror from time to time. There might be red and blue lights flashing, trying to get you to pull over so they can get by. Be kind to one another, check on the sick and housebound and when you come to a traffic light, remember: Red is stop, Green is go, and never go on the in-between. Until next time, God Bless America, our troops, the poor and the hungry.Golfers host Christmas bazaar breakfast Saturday LANARK NEWS Jim Welsh

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Local The Times | A5 Thursday, November 24, 2011 INV I TAT I ON TO B I D: Franklin County Library Build-out T he Friends of the Franklin County Library as funded by US DA through a rural development grant requests bids from State of Florida registered licensed General and/or Building Contractors (as required by Florida Law) for the following project site located on Bayshore D rive with access on Hickory D ip D rive, Eastpoint, Florida. PR O JEC T D ESCRIP T I ON : Franklin County Library Build O ut T he 5,000 SF building shell is a pre-engineered steel frame built on a concrete slab on grade. T he building shell has a steel roof and siding, with storefront doors and windows. Electrical service, in slab plumbing and conduit is in place. T he scope of work required under this bid includes the nishing of the building and site. Plans completed by Johnson Peterson A rchitects and Prebble-Rish Engineering include but are not limited to the following: T he building interior will feature steel stud and drywall partitions with the required insulation in exterior walls. D oors will be solid core wood in hollow metal frames. Cabinets and counter tops are plastic laminate. Floor covering will be either vinyl tile or commercial carpet. Ceilings will be lay-in acoustical tile. Lighting and plumbing xtures will be commercial grade for low maintenance and durability. Storm water ponds are in place and working. A lthough the entry drive is graded, nal grading, topsoil, sod and landscaping, limestone base and asphalt paving will be required to nish the site work. BI D O PE N I N G DAT E: D ecember 12th at 10am at Franklin County Public Library at 29 Island D r., Eastpoint, FL 32328 (850) 670-8151 MANDATORY P RE BI D MEE T I N G: Monday N ovember 28th, 2011 at 10am at the project site. ANT ICIP AT E D PR O JEC T BU D GE T : $325,000 Questions to the architect/engineer must be received not later than D ecember 2, 2011 5pm. F O R PURCH A SI N G O F BI D DO CUME NT S, AND SUBMI TTA L REQUIREME NT S Y O U MUS T C ONTA C T SEMI NO LE BLUEPRI NT AT (850) 671-2714 ON O R A F T ER NOV EMBER 14, 2011. US DA and the Friends of the Franklin County Library reserve the right to reject any and all submissions, or accept minor irregularities in the best interest of the library. P O I NT O F C ONTA C T : John Lane, Project Manager, Johnson Peterson A rchitects (850) 224-9700 jlane@jparchitects.com FORGOTTEN COAST T V IS NOW ON MEDIA C O M CHANNEL 3 www.ForgottenCoast T V.com www.pulse-sgi.com By Lois Swoboda Times Staff Writer From humble beginnings, the Lanark Village Gumbo Cook-Off has hit its stride. This year, ve teams competed at the Nov. 12 event but the real news was the crowd. An estimated 350 people passed through the doors of the Lanark Boat Club and sampled gumbo from across the county. Two years ago, just three teams from the Eastpoint and St. George Island volunteer re department and Franklin County sheriffs ofce competed in the rst cook-off and only about 75 people attended. The cook-off benets the Lanark Village/St. James Volunteer Fire Department. Mike Rundel, president of the board that oversees the department, said the money this year will be used to install much-needed storm proof doors on the rehouse. Hardworking volunteers inside the boat club this year sold 150 chicken or shrimp gumbo dinners, and the two volunteer re departments from Eastpoint and St. George Island raised an additional $250 by selling their extra eats. Also participating this year were teams from the Crooked River Grill, the Cooking Academy from Franklin County High School and Nick and Carol Daddona, the rst-ever independent entrants in the competition. The sheriffs ofce was slated to cook but did not attend, in part due to the teams captain and chief cook, John Solomon, enduring exhaustion following his role overseeing the Florida Seafood Festival the weekend before. New this year was a live auction with over 25 items, which raised around $1,500 for the re department. Hugh Stovall was the auctioneer who cajoled a crowd of about 30 into spending their spare sawbucks. Highlighting the offerings were a gorgeous quilt handcrafted by Donna Briesacker; a Miracle Strip tour aboard a helicopter with Panama City Helicopter; a day of golf and overnight stay at St. James Bay Golf Resort, a baseball bat autographed by Hall of Fame catcher Johnny Bench and donated by Briesacker, and a gift basket of Paul Newman products, with a handwritten recipe, from Carrabelles Jackie Gay. By special invitation, Gay served on the judging panel this year. She was the winner of the Good Housekeeping/ Paul Newman/Gumbo Contest in 1997, which had Newman awarding $50,000 to the building fund for the Carrabelle Library. When the steam had cleared and the judges had spoken, taking home the top prize was the Daddona team. The Crooked River Grill nished in second place and Eastpoint Volunteer Fire Department in third place. The student team from the Franklin County School received a Just Because We Wanted To plaque for their hard work. Rundel said the event cleared about $3,000 for six hours work, which he said will be enough to buy new doors for the rehouse, the departments highest priority. He said he believes the re department can build on this success and stage an even bigger festival next year. Gumbo gusto stirs in Lanark Village Above: Members of the St. George Island Fire Department gumbo team confer on the preparation of the Hurricane Gumbo. Jay Abbott mans the spoon as Bud Hayes samples a secret ingredient and Fletcher offers to add his opinion. Above Right: Carol and Nick Daddona took rst place in the third annual Lanark Village Gumbo Cook-Off. Right: Deputy Chief Jim Joyner, left, and Chief George Pruett man Eastpoints booth with their collection of lucky green frogs. P hotos by LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Gumbo Crooked River Grill Style with sea scallops. Richard McLean and Jackie Gay cogitated on the relative merits of the ve gumbo entries.

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Local A6 | The Times Thursday, November 24, 2011 CITY OF CARRABELLE PROPOSED ENACTMENT OF CITY ORDINANCE The City Commission of the City of Carrabelle, Florida, proposes to enact the following ordinance: CITY OF CARRABELLE ORDINANCE 451 ORDINANCE AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF CARRABELLE, FLORIDA, PROVIDING FOR AMENDMENT OF ORDINANCE 434 PERTAINING TO WATER SERVICE RATES AND CHARGES; PROVIDING FOR AN INCREASE IN WATER SERVICE RATES; ESTABLISHING A TIERED CONSERVATION RATE STRUCTURE; PROVIDING FOR REPEAL OF ORDINANCES OR PARTS OF ORDINANCES, IN CONFLICT HEREWITH, TO THE EXTENT OF SUCH CONFLICT; AND ESTABLISHING AN EFFECTIVE DATE The proposed Ordinance may be inspected during regular hours at Carrabelle City Hall between 8 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., 1001 Gray Ave., Carrabelle, FL Monday through Friday, or call 850-697-2727. The proposed Ordinance will be considered for enactment during a public hearing to be held 6:00p.m., Thursday December 1, 2011 at the Carrabelle City Hall located at 1001 Gray Ave, Carrabelle, FL. Interested parties may appear at the hearing and be heard with respect to the proposed Ordinance. If an individual decides to appeal any decision made by the City Commission with respect to this meeting, a verbatim transcript may be required. If so, the individual should make provision for a transcript to be made at the meeting, (RE: Florida Statute 286.0105). Pursuant to the provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act, any person requiring special accommodation to participate in this meeting is asked to advise the city at least 48 hours before the meeting by contacting Keisha Smith at the above address or phone number. Robert C. Bruner Attorney Personal & Business Bankruptcy Over 30 Years Legal Experience 850-670-3030 We are a debt relief agency. bankruptcy relief under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon advertisements. Before you decide, ask us to send you free written information experience. A-1 Quality Docks & Boatlifts Qualied Marine Contractor, Since 1967 Why Settle For Less 850-653-7633 Environmental Permitting www.A1QualityDocks.com Docks Marinas Piers Bulkheads Boardwalks Boatslips Pile Driving Sea Walls Boat Lifts Retaining Walls Boathouses Floating Docks Larry Joe Colson Lic # 12-104 Res./Com. & Ins. By Lois Swoboda Times Staff Writer A local couple have reached out to military families stationed at Tyndall Air Force Base and welcomed them into their home. Ken and Brigette Schroeder wanted to share their happiness with those who ght for freedom. The owners of the Bryant House Bed and Breakfast decided the best way to do this was to open their home and hometown with soldiers and their families. On Veterans Day weekend, the rst of seven families being treated to a retreat came to Franklin County for a little peace and quiet. In January, Master Sgt. Marc Neubert will deploy overseas for his sixth tour of duty. He was rst sta tioned abroad in 2000, the Year of the Family, when his oldest son was two months old. Before leaving to undergo train ing in Texas next month, he is spend ing as much time as possible with his wife, Virginia, and their three young sters. The couple was delighted when, during a Family Recognition Day celebration at Tyndall, their names were drawn to receive a free week end visit to Apalachicola. The Neuberts are the rst of seven military families that will be honored with a weekend getaway to Franklin County. The retreats are the brainchild of the Schroeders, although since conceiving the notion, the couple has enlisted the help of other local businesses. Helen Tudor and Tony Phillips have both agreed to provide lodging for visiting soldiers and their families. Caf Floridita, Caf Con Leche, Papa Joes, Captain Snooks, The Sea food Grill and Charles Wilson have all provided gift certicates for meals to be used by the families. Captains Tony Phillips and AJ Smith are also on board to provide boat tours for the visitors during their stay and Ah La Carte will sup ply the families with transportation around town. Over dinner at the Bryant House, Brigette Schroeder told the Nue berts her family had survived after World War II only because of care packages received from American GIs. This year, she said, I wanted to give something back. The Schroeders say they plan to continue to honor military families and hope to bring even more Ameri can heroes to Apalachicola. While in town the Neuberts visit ed the ice museum, the Apalachicola National Estuarine Research walk and the Three Soldiers Detail at Vet erans Plaza, and were greeted by Mayor Van Johnson. The Neuberts said they were im pressed with how much there was to do in Apalachicola and that they appreciated the peace and quiet. Its much better than Panama City Beach, said Virginia Neubert. Special to the Times Community Bancorp merged its banking subsid iaries, Superior Bank, N.A. and Cadence Bank, N.A., into a regional bank Nov. 11 to form the new Cadence Bank, N.A. Superior Bank has a branch in Apalachicola, as well as in Gulf County and Mexico Beach. With nearly $4.1 bil lion in assets, the new Ca dence Bank will employ 1,200 people at more than 100 branches throughout Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, Tennessee and Texas, with headquarters in Birmingham, Ala. and cor porate ofces in Starkville, Miss. and Houston, Texas. The merger introduces a strong and energized competitor to the market place, said Paul Murphy, chairman of the new Ca dence Bank and chief ex ecutive ofcer of Cadence Bancorp, the successor to Community Bancorp. Some of the most expe rienced professionals in the banking industry have come together to create a best-of-class bank. These are bankers who are dedi cated to making Cadence an exceptional banking ex perience for customers and an unrivaled work environ ment for our employees. Customers of the cur rent Cadence and Superior banks will experience no interruption in service dur ing transition to the new Cadence Bank. Customers will notice a fresh in-branch experience as employees highlight new products and services over the coming months and as branches feature new signage and collateral material in the coming weeks. Tailoring the custom ers experience by listening to their needs will be the central focus of our efforts, noted Sam Tortorici, chief executive ofcer of the new Cadence Bank. Building on Cadences 126-year his tory and through a focus on localized customer service and commitment to engag ing the community, we hope to enhance our customers business and personal nancial results by hearing their needs and crafting sound nancial solutions. Ofcials said the wellcapitalized union will re sult in improvements to technology, including intro duction of mobile banking to Superior customers in Alabama and Florida, as well as enhanced treasury management services for businesses. Cadence Bancorp, LLC (CBC), formerly Communi ty Bancorp, LLC, is a bank holding company head quartered in Houston, Tex as. CBC has raised equity capital commitments of $1 billion for the purpose of making investments in the U.S. banking sector, with a particular focus on com munity banks that are well positioned to benet from the equity capital, manage ment and industry exper tise CBC can provide. For additional informa tion, visit SuperiorBank. com or CadenceBank.com. Superior Bank now Cadence Bank Bryant House reaches out to military family LOIS SWOBODA | The Times The Neubert family, from left dad Marc, son Logan, daughter Erica and mom Virginia, and son Mason on the far right, joined Ken and Brigitte Schroeder for dinner at Caf Floridita during their weekend in Apalachicola.

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Local The Times | A7 Thursday, November 24, 2011 AFFORD A BLE GRE A TER AP A L A CHICOL A 3 BR/2BA 1142 sq.ft home with large fenced back yard, storage building. Great condition at a great price! M L S# 244700.................$115,000 Travis Stanley 850.653.6477 Grayson Shepard 850.653.6718 Kim Davis 850.653.6875 N E W LI S TI NG! ST. GEOR G E IS L AN D Bayview home nestled on a private lot. 3BR/2Ba with open deck, expansive windows, sun room, screened porch, very tidy. M L S# 245514...........$299,000 C O MM ERCI A L AP A L A CHICOL A Two commercial lots for sale in Apalachicola on the corner of Commerce and Penton St. Great location, one block of Hwy 98, near all the best shops and restaurants in Apalach! M L S# 244870..............$150,000 N E W LI S TI NG! ST. GEOR G E IS L AN D Beachview just half a block to the beach! 3 BR/2 BA, classic beach cottage with great decks, loft, widows walk. Right on beach access, popular rental! M L S#245466..................$349,000 CH A R M I NG PRE CO NS TR U CTIO N ST. GEOR G E IS L AN D Gulf view 3 BR/2BA, lovely front porch, bead board cabinets, granite countertops, hardiboard, metal roof. Built by Galloway Construction M L S# 245564.................$289,000 GRE A TER AP A L A CHICOL A Enjoy quiet country living on 3.75 acres. Lovely custom built 3BR/2.5 BA home with many upgrades Jacuzzi, deck, large walk in closet. 1600 sq.ft. outbuilding on concrete pad. M L S# 244666.................$275,000 Leon Teat 850.653.5656 Jamie Crum 850.370.0835 Sandy Mitchem 850.899.8300 THE BOYS ARE BACK IN TOWN Weems is proud to announce the return of Southland ER Physicians. J. Plum, MD Joda Lynn, MD Patrick Conrad, MD Paul Hart, MD Timothy Adamcryk, MD Garrett Chumney, MD Vincent Ivers, MD Nathaniel Hawkins, MD 24 hour Emergency Services, Acute In-Patient Care, Swingbed Rehabilitation Program, Diagnostic and Surgical Services 135 Avenue G Apalachicola, Fl 32320 (850) 653-8853 Our mission is to improve the health status of the residents and visitors to Franklin County, by providing quality, compassionate, cost effective and convenient health care through community leadership and in collaboration with other healthcare organizations which serve our communities. closely at the websites. There will also be a contest for the most cre ative use of a Were Salty bumper sticker. Spohrer presented each commis sioner with a Were Salty T-shirt. She said the Facebook account for the TDC is be ing visited by 4,000 to 5,000 visitors each month. Some of the investments funded by BP money will be long-term amenities. Spohrer said. An improved county map will hit the streets in April, and visitor centers will receive ve brochures, each dealing with a differ ent area of the county. Ini tially, the brochures will not contain advertising, but it will be possible to insert pages dealing with season al activities in the center, she said. TDC board member Paul Parker has suggested an audio map of the county. Two-minute recorded mes sages accessed by phone are also under consider ation. In addition, Franklin County is a sponsor of Springtime Tallahassee this year, which Spohrer said draws visitors statewide. Commissioner Pinki Jackel said more than 250,000 at tended the opening parade last year. Spohrer said another important resource being compiled by the TDC is an email database of prospec tive visitors. She said the group has already collected more than 13,000 entries. Those addresses will still be available once the BP money is gone, she said. TDC from page A1 LLOYD from page A1 hospital. The Weems board of directors will meet Dec. 1 at the hospital to de velop a plan for selection of new leadership for the hospital. In a prepared state ment, the Weems board said it is focused on immediate resolution of important strategic ef forts that will strength en the quality of patient care and the nancial success of the hospital. Warren Jones, a TMH spokesman, said TMH administrators are assisting in review ing nancial systems at Weems and in develop ing plans to improve ac counting processes. Were working with the Weems board and the county commission to determine what the next steps are, and what we do with the leader ship with Weems, said Jones. Theres a lot of communication that has gone on and I think that communication bodes well for the future, that there will be open lines of communication. The hospital remains without a chief nancial ofcer, after Kim Davis was let go shortly after Lloyd came on board. But nancial experts from TMH have been taking a hands-on role in preparing Weems for a nancial audit due by the end of January. At the Nov. 15 county commission meeting, Geri Forbes, administra tor of regional develop ment for TMH, reported that TMH ofcials had become more involved on a daily basis with the hospitals nances, with the upcoming audit their highest priority. I dont want to pay off stiff penalties on this, warned Sanders, and Forbes reassured her the work was proceed ing ahead of schedule. Weve gotten great cooperation from staff at Weems, said Forbes. The technical deadline is several months away, and the level of reports and schedules being prepared will be of great ease of use. Clerk of Courts Mar cia Johnson report ed Weems has about $481,000 in funds, al though most of that is in certicates of deposit, money market accounts and grant funds, with less than $60,000 in cash on hand. In her Nov. 15 report to the county commis sion, Lloyd said there was great concern among rural hospitals that if the Congressio nal supercommittee charged with decit re duction failed to reach consensus, there would be an automatic 2 per cent reduction in Medi care payments. She said the hospi tal was moving forward with implementing new rules requiring a transi tion to electronic health records (EHR) by 2015, or risk reductions in Medicare payments. We must start it in 2012 because if we dont have a system in place, we re duce reimbursements, said Lloyd. She said Weems had received a $25,000 grant to help with the pharma cy dispensing part of the transition, but that the overall cost of the EHR transition, to an Inter net-based system, would be more than $400,000. She said Weems has made an initial payment of $50,000 to Razor In sights, a certied pro vider that the hospital board selected to imple ment the EHR project over a four-year contract. Weems will pay $96,000 annually after the hos pital has reached the government-mandated threshold of meaning ful use. Lloyd estimated that Weems should be realis tically able to recoup be tween 70 and 75 percent of the cost of the entire EHR project. Most contracts are for one year so because it is for four years it shows commitment, that they have skin in the game, she said. Whether they will stick around (after that) de pends on whether they are making money. Lloyd said Razor will not require payment until Weems receives its incentive payments. Theyve met with staff to assure they were com fortable because if you dont have buy-in from staff, it doesnt matter how much money you spend, said Lloyd, not ing the company plans to conduct through training in the new technology. Dr. Pat Conrad, from the group that staffs the emergency room, has replaced Dr. Stephen Miniat as the medical staff representative on the Weems board, Lloyd reported. Apalachicola cardiologist Shezad Sanaullah serves as the hospitals chief of staff. Lloyd also reported the hospitals average daily inpatient census is three patients, with an average of 15 people visiting the emergency room each day and 10 re ceiving outpatient care. LOIS SWOBODA | the Times Helen Spohrer presented each county commissioner with a Were Salty T-shirt.

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PET OF THE WEEK Franklin County Humane Society Qualications: Expertise in: Now Accepting Appointments Call Toll Free 888-681-5864 For more info www.seclung.com Lung Disease Specialist Rob Garver, MD Now Seeing Patients in Port St. Joe NOW BCBS-FL I N -NETWORK PROV I DER dbutler@coastalcoverage.com Locally owned and operated to meet all your insurance needs Society A8 | The Times Thursday, November 24, 2011 Panhandle Players played to packed audiences last weekend at the Dixie Theatre, as they performed their trio of one-act plays Work, Play, Love. First up was the work: The Temp, a comedy by Roy Friedman. Veteran actress Gina Vicari showed her skills doing slapstick physical comedy as a hapless temporary worker, thoroughly annoying administrative assistant Sharon Solomon and newcomer Katie Maxwell in this show, directed by veteran Tom Loughridge with help from stage manager, Beverly Kelley. The subject was play in At Half Time, by Art Shulman, a comedy about an over-60 womens basketball team who are being crushed by the Little Sisters of Mercy, a team of silent nuns who opened the play with a lively dance performance of their own. Their coach, played by Players regular Jeff Ilardi, and players Elaine Kozlowsky, Laura Baney, Bobbi Seward, Judy Loftus and Barbara Hartseld, were brought comically alive under the guiding hand of directors Ed Tiley and Caroline Ilardi. Poignancy was the touch in the third play, Mark Twains Diaries of Adam and Eve adapted by David Birney is and directed by Dan Wheeler. Stars Hank Kozlowsky as Adam and Stephaney Provenzano as Eve, gave the audience a funny, at times painful understanding of what it means to love. By David Adlerstein PANHANDLE PLAYERS TO HOLD AUDITIONS Panhandle Players will be holding auditions for their next production Murder at the Howard Johnson. There are roles for two men and one woman, for ages 35 to 55. Also needed are stage hands and backstage crew. Auditions will be held at the Raney Carriage House on Wednesday, Nov. 30 and Thursday, Dec. 1 at 7 p.m. For more information, contact Ed Tiley 6536951 or Margy Oehlert 653-7774. Panhandle Players one-acts delightful Left starring in the play At Half Time are, from left, Bobbi Seward, Elaine Kozlowsky, Laura Baney, Barbara Hartseld, Judy Loftus and their frustrated coach, Jeff Ilardi. Bottom left Bringing to life Mark Twains Diaries of Adam and Eve were Stephaney Provenzano as Eve, and Hank Kozlowsky as Adam. Bottom right Appearing in The Temp were, from left, Gina Vicari, Katie Maxwell, and Sharon Solomon. Photos by ED TILEY | Special to The Times Special to the Times The Gulf Coast Workforce Board celebrated 15 years of providing workforce services to the region at its annual meeting and luncheon Nov. 16 at Florida State Universitys Panama City Campus Holley Center. At the meeting, Executive Director Kim Bodine reviewed the local workforce system performance over the last year. She said this included assisting 526 employers recruit and hire workers, serving 52,006 walk ins at the Workforce Center, connecting 5,336 individuals to employment, providing in-demand training and/or employment services to 1,014 adults, dislocated workers, and youth under the Workforce Investment Act, and helping 216 families transition from welfare to self sufciency. We owe our great performance to our hardworking staff, our dedicated volunteer board members and our service providers, Bodine said. Service providers for the workforce board include Friends of the Franklin County Library, TIGERS Program, Bay District Schools, Bay STARS; Haney Workforce Training Center;; Gulf Coast State College, Workforce Center; and Royal American Management. Individuals from each of the service providers, along with their case manager were recognized for successfully completing their workforce program. From Franklin County, Shary Monroe was recognized for her participation in the On the Job Training Program at the Butler Insurance Agency, and Cody Daniels and Jimmy Goggins for their participation in the Friends of Franklin County Public Library TIGERS program. At the meeting the board also voted on a new slate of ofcers for 2011. Gary Ross from Gulf County was appointed to serve his second term as chairman of the board. We will focus on increasing the publics awareness and understanding of the services available through the workforce system. Our goal is to do an even better job of bringing employers and job seekers together, Ross said. Other board members elected as 2011 ofcers include vice-chair Tommy Ward (Bay County), and executive committee members Alisa Kinsaul (Bay County), Ruth Phillips (Gulf County) and Betty Croom and Ted Mosteller (Franklin County). The Gulf Coast Workforce Board is a public/private partnership chartered by the State of Florida to administer workforce development programs in Bay, Gulf, and Franklin counties. Its mission is to provide leadership, oversight, guidance, and assistance to institutions and agencies delivering training and workforce services in order to meet the economic and employment needs of these three counties. Workforce Board marks 15-year anniversary SP ECIAL TO THE T IMES Jimmy Goggins, left, Bonnie Ball, case manager for the TIGERS program, center, and Cody Daniels were recognized as success stories for their participation in the Friends of the Franklin County Public Library TIGERS program. Army E-4 Casey Golden and his wife, Taylor, are stationed at Ft. Campbell, Ky. with the United States Army 101st Airborne. The Goldens will be home from Kentucky from Monday, Nov. 28 until Friday, Dec. 2. Their rst child, son Kiowa Louis Golden, is due Jan. 28, 2012, at Fort Campbell, Ky. All family and friends are invited to a baby shower on Tuesday, Nov. 29, at 6 p.m. at the Eastpoint Church of God Fellowship Hall. Refreshments will be served. The shower is being hosted by Alisha Golden, Rose Messer and Eary Worthy. For more information, call 697-2849. Shower Tuesday for baby boy Golden

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The Times | A9 Thursday, November 24, 2011 The United Methodist Churches of Franklin County Welcome You First United Methodist Church of Apalachicola Worship Service 11:00 a.m. every Sunday Sunday School 10:00 a.m. 75 5 th St. Apalachicola 653-9530 fumcapalach@gtcom.net Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis Carrabelle United Methodist Church Worship Services 10:45 a.m. Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Celebrate Recovery Mondays 7-9 p.m. 102 NE Ave. B Carrabelle 697-3672 Pastor: Julie Stephens Eastpoint United Methodist Church Worship Service 10:00 a.m. every Sunday Healing service every fourth Monday at 7:00 p.m. 317 Patton Dr. (corner of David St.) 670-8825 Pastor: Rev. Beth White St. George Island United Methodist Church 9:00 a.m. Worship Service 10:00 a.m. Fellowship Hour 201 E. Gulf Beach Dr. 9274635 www.sgiumc.org Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis First Pentecostal Holiness Church 379 Brownsville Road Apalachicola Were excited about what Gods doing!!! Sunday School 9:45 am Sunday Morning Worship 10:45 am Sunday Evening Service 6:00 pm Monday, Youth Group 6:30 pm Wednesday, Royal Rangers, G.A.P. 7:00 pm Wednesday Worship & Word 7:30 pm Nursery Provided during regular church services 7:00 7:00 First Baptist Church St. George Island 501 E. Bayshore Drive 927-2257 R. Michael Waley, Pastor Join us as we praise and worship the living Christ. Great is the Lord and most worthy of praise. Psalm 145:3 Sunday Bible Study ................................................ 10:00am Worship Praise ........................................................ 11:00am Sunday Night ............................................................ 7:00pm Wednesday Power Hour ...................................... 7:00pm Wednesday Youth at S.P.L.A.S.H ....................... 7:00pm Walking in Christ R. Michael Whaley, Pastor WELCOMES YOU Church of the Ascension 101 NE First Street Carrabelle SUNDAY 10:00 AM WELCOMES YOU Church THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH (850) 274-4490 WELCOMES YOU Trinity Trinity Episcopal Church est. 1836 Welcomes You Hwy. 98 & 6th St. Apalachicola 850-653-9550 Sunday Worship Services 8 & 10:30 a.m. Wednesdays Healing Service 11 a.m. Centering Prayer 4 p.m. Faith My Granny You always cared for me and shared love, you are a special gift sent from above. You are always on my mind whatever I do. I really do love you its true. Time spent with you was so nice, when I had a problem you always gave me advice. Having you in my life and so close to me, will make my life easier you shall see. I open my eyes realizing youre gone, but you will always be in my heart and keep me strong. Thinking of you makes me cry, but then I think you are in that heavenly sky. You will always be in my heart and I will love you and that shall never part. Love you always and forever Granny Love, Ashley The primary responsibility of raising a child is preparing them for the independence associated with adulthood. Wild animals instinctively train their young to survive on their own. Carnivores teach their babies through a systematic training process. They rst bring dead prey to the young, then they kill prey in front of the young and allow them to eat it. Next, they bring the live prey for the young to catch and kill with assistance. Eventually the mothers assistance is limited to preventing the prey from escaping as the young become more procient at killing. Elephant mothers are known to be the best teachers of all species. Baby elephants learn by watching, much like humans. While learning to use their trunks, they swing, step on and suck them just as a baby would its thumb. When they are about 6 months old, they learn to use their trunk to eat and drink. The mother teaches the baby to use its trunk to cover itself with mud to prevent sunburn and to grasp food. Elephant mothers even teach their daughters how to behave during their menses, showing them how to walk and where to urinate. Seals ride on their mothers backs to learn how to swim. Baby bears are taught what berries they can eat and how to snatch sh out of streams. Otters teach their babies to oat on their backs with a rock on their stomach for the use of cracking open shellsh. When mammals bring their young into the world, they commit their entire lives to them. They assist their youngs development through the four steps of example, training, supervision and testing. Likewise, parents are responsible for preparing their children to function in the world using the same steps. However, these steps are sometimes omitted, ultimately affecting the development process. A true teacher is one who modies their own behavior in the presence of others, even at a cost to their self, in order to set examples that may be emulated. Parents are missing valuable teaching opportunities when they are absorbed in their own lives. Any time a parents TV programs, extracurricular activities, habits and personal activities take precedence over time with their children, valuable interaction is wasted. Parenting requires a tremendous amount of sacrice and dedication; however the process of making the baby only requires a seed and fertilizer. The greatest inuence in a childs life is the parent. The parent who is self-indulgent fails the child in the example course. We are designed by God to glean from our mother and father; when either is absent, the example that should be learned from both sexes is disrupted. We establish boundaries for our children as we teach them with consistency. Parents impede the development timetable when they fail to give age-appropriate responsibilities and hold their children accountable to accomplish the task set before them. Doing everything for your children will merely teach them how to be dependent. We transfer responsibility and independence through teaching and testing, with all failed tests being repeated. If the training course is not accomplished, it is equivalent to building a house with no foundation on sand. Luke 6:48 teaches that building a house on a strong foundation allows it to prevail against storm waters. Proverbs 24:3 says A house is built by wisdom and becomes strong through good sense. When a child is not required to follow through with chores and verbal orders, a pattern of irresponsibility will result. They do not learn to stay on task, they have difculty in controlling impulsive behaviors, and they learn to think only of themselves. The child will inevitably have little training for those pressing responsibilities of maturity. The supervision course increases the childs security through the experience of independence while the parent closely observes. Toddlers are supervised through sight and sound. Children and adolescents should be in sight or sound at all times, not only to reiterate boundaries but also for their own safety. Teens should at least be within phone range, and their location should always be known. The parent should conduct an occasional follow-up to ensure they are where they say they are. Your desire for harmony should never outweigh good common sense. If they pass the responsibility test, more freedom should be awarded. Despite their pleading it should never be the other way around. We need to prepare our children to survive in a world that is ruthless to inexperienced, young adults. If we do our job correctly, our children will be independent, productive adults who support themselves and are prepared for the obligations and freedom that accompany adulthood. After all, it is a jungle out there. We welcome all suggestions and hope you enjoy this weekly article. Please send all emails to Scott Shiver at frontline247@mac.com. Service of Remembrance As part of its holiday outreach, Big Bend Hospice will host the 2011 Service of Remembrance at 3 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 27, at Riverfront Park, 90 Water St. in Apalachicola. This special service gives families and friends an opportunity to remember and honor those they have lost. The service includes music, words of comfort and a special time to speak a name and honor a loved one. The Service of Remembrance is a timeout in a busy season to remember those we love and have lost to death, said the Rev. Candace McKibben, hospice services manager. Whether the loss is distant or recent, it is important to our spiritual well-being to acknowledge the grief we feel and to summon hope to live life enriched by cherished memories and lessons learned. This service is a safe and healing place to do both. There will be fellowship time and refreshments immediately following the service, which is free and open to everyone, regardless of whether they have used hospice for a loved one. For more information about the service, please contact Pam Allbritton at 508-8749. Ormans Christmas tea Once again, the ladies of Trinity Episcopal Church and the Orman House Historic Site will ring in the holidays with a high tea featuring music by the Tom Adams quartet. The party is scheduled for 2-4 p.m. Dec. 4. Attendance is limited, so make reservations by calling Carrie Kienzle at 370-5155. Tickets are available at the church ofce or from members of Trinitys congregation. Funds go to support the annual Tour of Homes. Kienzle promises an expanded agenda for the 20th annual tour in 2012, including a Friday symposium on historic Apalachicola led by architect and historian Willoughby Marshall, a cocktail party and a golf cart tour of the town. Playhouse rafe for toy drive Rafe tickets are now on sale for a chance to win a playhouse. Constructed by inmates at Bay City Work Camp, the playhouse is fullsize and painted red, white and blue. Tickets are $5 each or three for $10, with all proceeds going to the countys annual toy drive for needy children. The drawing will be Dec. 23. Tickets are available at Centennial Banks in Eastpoint, Apalachicola, Carrabelle and St. George Island, Handmade in Apalach, the Butler Agency in Eastpoint, and Franklins Promise at the Community Service Center in Apalachicola. For more information, call 6533930. The Franklin County Public Library offers another opportunity for children to learn a skill that they will use for the rest of their lives: cooking. The Eastpoint branch is offering cooking with Suzanne Creamer from 3:30-4:30 p.m. Thursdays, for ages 5 to 12. The last two weeks of lessons included learning to read a recipe, measurements, place settings and cleanliness in the kitchen along with creation of a personal snack. Children will experience rsthand what they will need to know to function properly in a kitchen and to make healthy choices. This cooking class is free to participants; it offers a new dimension for libraries in the lives of the children living in the county. New childrens cookbooks are available for both parents and children to check out and try some new recipes at home. Why not sign your child up for the classes? It will encourage the child to become more independent in the kitchen, and learn the need for clean and nutritious snacks and meals. They will even learn how to wash dishes. The Carrabelle branch started a six-week smoking cessation class sponsored by the Big Bend Area Health Education Center. These classes are intended for adults from 5-6 p.m. Wednesdays at no cost to participants. The curriculum was developed by ex-smokers for those who want to stop smoking. Dont forget all the other activities including harmonica lessons, yoga, small group basic computer classes, adult and children Wii and storytime. Please call for more details, the Eastpoint branch, 670-8151, or the Carrabelle branch at 697-2366. Melissa Gail Missy Smith passed from this life into the presence of the Lord on Thursday, Nov. 3, 2011. She was born in Port St. Joe on March 7, 1966. Missy was preceded in death by her brother, Tony Smith. She is survived by her mother, Shirley Smith of Niceville; father, Gayle Smith of Apalachicola; daughter Brittany Booth of Niceville; and many other loving family members. Missy faithfully attended First Baptist Church of Niceville and Nancys Ladies Sunday School class and the Wednesday night Bible study. Missy enjoyed life and was a blessing to all who knew her. Her pride and joy was her daughter Brittany, who is a senior student at Rocky Bayou Christian School. Missy was also a staunch Florida State University football fan. There was a celebration of her life, Monday afternoon, Nov. 7, at Heritage Gardens Funeral Home in Niceville. You may sign a guest book and offer the family condolences at www. heritagegardensfuneral home.com. Heritage Gardens Funeral Home is entrusted with arrangements. Melissa Gail Missy Smith MELISSA GAIL MISSY SMITH Marie Maxie Gray Carroll, born March 10, 1936, went to be with the Lord on Friday, Nov. 18, 2011. She is survived by her husband, Willie F. Carroll; three sons, Mike Rucker, Kenny Rucker and Paul Carroll (Delores); and two daughters, Pam Moore (Rocky) and Sandy Williams (Mark). She has six grandchildren, Jason Rucker (Brenee), Melinda Long (Chris), Kevin Ward (Tara), Ashley Causey (Victor), Paula Harlow (Henry) and Katie Moore. She has nine greatgrandchildren. She has one surviving brother, Harry Gray (Brenda), and one surviving sister, Mayme Millender (Jesse). She was preceded in death by her father, Herman Gray (Granny Gray), her mother Marie Reet Karpinsky (Papa Walt) and one brother Fred Gray. The pallbearers are Buddy Shiver, Buddy Braxton, Tiny Carroll, Lee Roy Langley, Coy Shiver, Chester Creamer, Alvin Banks and Lanny Toones Hardman. The alternate pallbearers are Danny Rose and Robert Hogan. Maxie was loved by all who knew her and gave herself to her family and community. She was a member of the Eastpoint Church of God. Interment was in Eastpoint Cemetery. The funeral service was held Monday morning at the Eastpoint Church of God with the Rev. Robert Kimberling and the Rev. Ronald Crum ofciating. Funeral under the direction of Kelleys Funeral Home. Maxie G. Carroll MAXIE G. CARROLL Obituaries In MEMOR Y A good example conquers the jungle YOUTH MATTERS Scott and Pamela Shiver Church BRIEFS Your County LIBRAR Y

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Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL (next to Piggly Wiggly) www.BWOsh.com Your Hunting Headquarters WAS $69.99 BLACK FRIDAY SPECIAL $46.99 L IMITED ST O CK OPEN @ 6:00 A.M. E ASTERN TIME MO ULTRIE 6.5 HANGING GAME F EEDER W ITH DIGITAL TIMER Thursday, November 24, 2011 Freshwater Shoreline shing is about to become the norm for the winter months and leading the surf shing now is big bull red sh still. Great reports from the sea wall and under the George Tapper Bridge have been coming in along with a few ounder catches around Pig Island as well. We now have bull minnows in stock, so go ounder shing after Thanksgiving Dinner Thursday! Inshore Surf The trout bite is starting to heat back up in St. Joe Bay. Live shrimp has been the go-to bait with lots of slot size sh being caught mid to late morning. Pig Island and Towns beach have produced most of the reported catches. The Towers in St. Joe Bay are producing lots of yellow trout, Bass shing in the I.C.W. and in lake Wimico continue to be the hot topic in shing right now. This years freshwater shing has improved and with the hot weather on the way again this week, the bite should be steady. Large numbers of sheepshead and red sh are coming in daily from these waters as well. SPONSORED BY Email outdoors news to times outdoors@star.com Page 10 O UTD OO RS www.apalachtimes.com Section A By Stan Kirkland FWC Just a few decades ago, a segment of the hunting population who wanted to extend their time to hunt deer purchased a muzzleloader. However, the models used in the 1970s and s are a far cry from most of the muzzleloaders sold today. Early models were generally side-hammer, percussion cap models and used either black powder or a black powder substitute as the propellant. Granted, some purists in those days still used intlock models but intlocks were tricky to operate on good days and virtually impossible to shoot on rainy, inclement days. The side-hammer, percussion cap models were a lot simpler to re. Assuming the user rst poured powder down the barrel and then seated a lead ball or projectile (hence the name muzzleloader), the gun was almost ready to re. To make it ready for ring the hunter had to place a small percussion cap on a metal nipple outside the barrel. If everything worked correctly, the hunter pulled the trigger, dropping the hammer on the percussion cap, which then sent sparks and re into the barrel. That caused the black powder to instantly burn and turn to gas, which sent the bullet out the barrel and toward a waiting deer. Almost all of the older muzzleloaders had iron sights and were effective up to 75 yards. In the hands of a knowledgeable and skilled muzzleloading hunter, the side-hammer muzzleloaders worked well, and many, many deer were harvested with them. However, they sometimes failed to re, for a variety of reasons, and many deer ran off to live another day. Since the 1990s, a new and different muzzleloader, referred to as an inline, has become the standard for muzzleloading hunters. While inlines still load the same as other muzzleloaders, they are radically different. They use a modern shotshell primer thats in line with the barrel, so less can go wrong and result in a misre. Todays inlines are precision guns and many come pre-tapped for scopes. These guns are effective up to 200 yards. A hunter with an inline can cover distances on a eld or a food plot that years ago would have only been possible with a centerre hunting rie. Today, Florida is divided into four zones for hunting purposes. Most of the Panhandle is in Zone D and deer can be hunted with muzzleloaders during the designated muzzleloading, general gun and the late archery/ muzzleloading seasons. Information about Florida hunting regulations, seasons and permit costs is available at MyFWC.com, or by contacting any FWC Regional Ofce. Muzzleloading hunters have seen a radical change in guns Buds n BUGS Peas, please By Lois Swoboda Times Staff Writer Many of the wild owers found in our area are actually legumes, members of the same family as peas and beans. A legume in botanical writing is a plant in the family Fabaceae, or a fruit of these specic plants. Legumes thrive in our poor sandy soil because a bacteria living in their rood system is able to extract nitrogen from the air and x it in their root system. This means they are able to make their own fertilizer. When you look at a bag of fertilizer, you will notice three numbers for example, 6-6-6, on the label. These are the NPK ratio, the rst number represents nitrogen, the second phosphorus and the third potassium. If the numbers read 20-10-10, the there is twice as much nitrogen in the mix as potassium or phosphorus. While sandy soil is very low in nitrogen, nitrogen is the most plentiful element in the air we breathe although most plants and animals cant make use of it. Legumes are the exception to this rule. Farmers take advantage of this ability by rotating crops. A legume like alfalfa or soybeans is planted during the off-season to restore soil depleted by crops that remove nitrogen from the soil, such as corn and cotton. The legume family is extremely large and diverse including peanuts, clover, mimosa, acacia and sweet peas, just to name a few. Another organism that can acquire nitrogen from the atmosphere is termites. Wood is very low in nitrogen but termites have bacteria living in their digestive tract that can take nitrogen from the air and use it to build tissue. Legumes were an important food source for primitive man because they provide protein when meat is in short supply. Peas and beans contain relatively low quantities of some amino acids. To compensate, vegetarians serve legumes along with grains, which contain the missing components. This creates a complete balanced protein. Common examples of such combinations are beans with corn tortillas, tofu with rice, and peanut butter with whole grain bread. To learn more about combining grains and beans, check out Diet for a Small Planet by Frances Moore Lappe. LOI S S WO B ODA | The Times Buttery Pea By Lois Swoboda Times Staff Writer The Franklin County Tourist Development Council is sponsoring a contest to promote geocaching to attract tourists to the area. Geocaching, which combines the terms geographical and cache, is an outdoor adventure that sends seekers on a treasure hunt for containers of trinkets and prizes. Participants use a Global Positioning System receiver (GPSr) to hide and seek containers called geocaches. A typical cache is a waterproof container containing a logbook. According to Groundspeak, the organizer of the game, (www. geocaching.com), there are nearly 200 geocache sites in our forests and towns and dotting the coast between Alligator Point and the western edge of Franklin County. Around the world, there are more than 1.2 million geocaches registered with Groundspeak, including ve in Antarctica and two on Easter Island. The contest launched on Halloween. Heres how it works: Hidden somewhere in Franklin County is a puzzle cache (GC369DD) containing 100 coupons, each good for a Salty geocoin. The oyster-shaped coins were minted especially for the Franklin County contest. Geocoins are collected by geocachers and retail for anywhere from $10 to $40, with some rare coins selling for signicantly more. The coins are awarded to winners at local visitor centers. Contestants must nd geographical coordinates hidden in the lids of geocaches in the county to locate the nal container. As of Monday, the puzzle had been solved by 15 searchers and all but one has collected their coins. First to solve the puzzle was Sheila Walaszek, of Orlando, who was staying on St. George Island when she learned of the contest in an article in Forgotten Coastline magazine. Walaszek said she was thrilled to be rst to solve the puzzle. It was the rst time Ive ever really won anything, she said. Walaszek said she visits the area annually to bicycle, rollerblade and spend time on the beach with her dog Daisy. When I come here I always plan on caching, she said. You see so many things you wouldnt otherwise see. The contest was organized by Lois Swoboda and funded with BP grant money. The idea is to lure visitors to the area for the rst time. So far it seems to be working. A couple who drove to the county to attempt the challenge wrote, Completed this today after our visit to Tallahassee. We had no idea that there was this big festival going on. We wrote one of the numbers down wrong, which led us on a wild goose chase for the nal. No regrets. We got out of the truck and a mother bear and her two cubs went running across the street in front of us. As we were driving away, we spotted a gray fox. Rechecked our numbers and made the nd. The coin dealer was closed so we didnt get our coins yet. Great excuse to come back and explore some more without the crowds. This is a good way to introduce people to the area. We didnt have any plans to visit otherwise, and really like the area. Thanks for the fun, wrote the couple. The contest will continue until April or until all of the coins have been claimed. geocaching craze TDC embraces A view of the coveted geocoin. Photos by LOI S S WO B ODA | The Times Above Sheila Walaszek, right, accepts the rst prize awarded in the Salty Geocoin Challenge from Cindy Steiger at the Apalachicola Visitor Center.

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CARRABELLE A PALA C HI C OLA SP O RT S www.apalachtimes.com A Section Thursday, November 24, 2011 Page 11 By Joe Shields Special to the Times On Nov. 17, the Seahawks boys varsity soccer team played their second home match at the Mikel Clark Complex, against the Mari anna Bulldogs. A sizable crowd, which had earlier watched the Lady Seahawks run roughshod over the Mar ianna girls 4-1, was keyed up to watch more of the same from the boys team. The boys did not disap point. Initially, Marianna was the aggressor, seeking goals through chip passes to their eet of foot forwards. Defensemen Tanner Klink, Javeion Wineld, Julio Ramirez and Billy Harris blew up most of their scor ing opportunities and the four shots that got through were stied by net minder, Daniel Carrino. An opportunistic, coun terattacking Seahawk of fense had several opportu nities in the rst half, even while overall play of both teams started to become a little chippy. Rough play was called on several players, resulting in free kicks from both teams. Both Elton Olve ra and Zach Howze earned yellow cards for their parts in apparent rough play. The aggressive play notwithstanding, a single goal for the Seahawks was scored by Graham Kirvin, from a crossing pass assist by rst-year player Stefan DeVaughn. The Seahawks took a slim 1-0 lead into the locker room at the half. The second half of play was even better than the rst with the Bulldogs try ing to acquire the equalizer and the Seahawks trying to add to their lead. The Bulldogs pressed the issue even harder and forced the Seahawks into multiple har rowing defensive situations. The play of Klink as sweeper and Wineld as stopper was outstanding and led to mul tiple dispossessions in the Seahawks defensive third. Additionally, with the Bulldogs seemingly attack ing in waves, Carrino was forced to make 12 saves in the second half, with one be ing, a stunning, jumping kick save. The Seahawk offense continued to utilize their eld-switching counterat tack and in so doing created multiple opportunities. How ze had a shot on goal, while James Newell and Olvera had two shots on goal; with one of those opportunities being a go-ahead goal by Ol vera off a 30-yard shot which unfortunately was nullied by a questionable call from the referee. As time ticked off the clock it looked as if the Se ahawks would win by the slimmest of margins, but Julio Ramirez, coming from his backeld position, ac quired a long ball pass from Howze, dribbled to his right and launched a 35-yard, high arching ball over the head of the Marianna goalie and into the top corner of the far post, putting the game out of reach 2-0. Final stats showed Mari anna had 22 shots on goal, 10 more than the Seahawks, and eight corner kicks, two more than Franklin County. The Bulldogs dominated time of possession, with 58 percent, were offsides six time, two more than the Seahawks, and had eight fouls, two less than Franklin County. The Seahawks were served two yellow cards. The Seahawks rst two games (have been two very solid defensive performanc es, said coach Jono Wil liams. We showed much improvement last year, and it is obvious we are picking up where we left off. The Seahawks, now 1-01, play at West Gadsden on Wednesday, Nov. 30. Player of the Match went to Klink, a senior, who had an immediate impact defen sively in both the rst and second half with his great eld of vision. He was instru mental in acquiring dispos sessed passes, steals and headers out of the 18-yard box. He held the defensive third against the onslaught of offensive attempted by Marianna and provided a boost to the teams counter attacking efforts. Opener scoreless draw vs. Rickards The Seahawks boys var sity soccer team cruised into the Marianna match after playing out a goall ess draw against Rickards High School two nights ear lier, on Nov. 15 at the Nest. The Rickards Raiders poured forward from the start in a bid to put the hosts under pressure, with four shots red in the rst half. Each shot, off of a through ball to their quick forwards, was squelched by Seahawks net minder Car rino. His best save: a bonejarring stop, from a shot red straight on, at roughly 25-yards out, in the waning minutes of the half. Resorting to shots from long range early in the match, Kirvin, Olvera and Newell each red an errant shot, with each breaking wide of the goal. Chances were more forthcoming af ter the break, with the Se ahawks forcing the action into Rickards nal third. The Seahawks looked much the more likely to break the deadlock, with Kirvin and Olvera each getting a cou ple of opportunistic shots and the busy Howze seeing his shot from the right ank blocked by a Rickards de fender in the box. With the Seahawk fans beginning to cheer every move, the hosts werent con tent to play down the clock and continued to press, But a winning goal was not to be found by either team and the game ended in a 0-0 deadlock. Final stats showed Rick ards had 14 shots on goal, to the Seahawks eight. The Raisers committed 10 fouls, two more than the Se ahawks, with neither team receiving any yellow or red cards. The Seahawks were off sides ve times, one more than the Rickards team. Franklin County had seven corner kicks, one more than the visitors, and possessed the ball 54 percent of the time. Player of the Match went to Carrino, a junior, who by all indications, started where he left off last year and has improved greatly in his duties as goalie. His six saves, one quite dif cult, preserved the tie and in addition, his direction of the defensive backs on numerous occasions was instrumental in thwarting the onslaught of Rickards shot takers. Joe Shields is assistant coach of the Seahawk boys soccer team. Seahawks soccer boys off to strong start P hotos by DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times Julio Ramirez prepares to score the second Seahawks goal against Marianna. By David Adlerstein Times City Editor Jeremy Turrell, a 2008 Apalachicola High School grad who helped lead the Sharks to a 20-4 regu lar season mark, sank 41 points to lead the White team to a 109-99 overtime victory Saturday night in an alumni game at Frank lin County High School. Turrells trey from the corner with four seconds left in regulation knotted the game at 99-all after four quarters. Leading scorer for the Red team was Marcus Al len, a 2010 Franklin County High School grad, who sank 22 points. Alumni who participat ed also included Anthony Franklin, Carl Bankston, Chad AJ Gillikin, Jeremy Man-Man Williams, Adri an Jones, Tydron Wynn, Zach Jones, Patrick Jones, Ray Butler, Freddie Mof fett, Nahshon Bankston, DAndre Robinson, Willie McNair, and Kristopher Stanley. Guest referees were Granville Croom and James Stanley. Winner of the split-thepot was Rhonda Butler, who took a valiant halfcourt shot at halftime but fell short. Coach Mike Sweatt, who oversees the Frank lin County basketball pro gram, sent special thanks to Dolores Croom who was the greeter and gatekeeper, and to Sonja Buffkin who managed the buffet food area and money. Thanks to all those par ents and players who par ticipated and helped with donating everything, said Sweatt. All proceeds and donations went directly to the basketball program. By David Adlerstein Times City Editor The Lady Seahawks soc cer team earned their rst win of the season by domi nating the Marianna Lady Bulldogs 4-1 at home Nov. 17. The team burst out to a 10 lead with a goal by Gracyn Kirvin, which was followed up later by an 18-yard score by Katie Seger, as the Lady Seahawks built a 2-1 lead in the second half. Marianna scored its goal on a penalty kick after Jessica Shields was called for a foul in the box. In the second half an as sist from Emmy Norris led to a Megan Newell score. Kirvin put a cap on the scor ing when she drove home a Shields assist, for her second goal of the night. Freshman goalie Macy Hunt posted 12 saves for the game. We came out strong in the rst half, said coach Kelli Maggio, whose squad moved to 1-1 on the year. In the second half we came out and played much better and dominated, but we still had plenty of chances to score in the second half. We still have lots of room for improve ment. Were still learning how to play together as a team. Maggio said she was impressed by Kirvins play in the game. She showed an ability to get the ball to people and nish, said the coach. Girls soccer downs Marianna Turrell sinks 41 in alumni game DAVID ADLERSTEIN | the Times Willie McNair drives for the basket as he is guarded by Nahshon Bankston in the alumni game. Goalie Daniel Carrino scoops up the ball as Javieon Wineld, center, and Tanner Klink, right, get in position against Marianna.

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Local A12 | The Times Thursday, November 24, 2011 Dont park on the Carrabelle sidewalks At their Nov. 3 meeting, Carrabelle city commissioners reminded drivers once again that it is illegal to park on the sidewalk in Carrabelle. They instructed City Administrator Courtney Millender to post signs prohibiting sidewalk parking. Mayor Curley Messer said a warning ticket will be issued to rst-time offenders, followed by a citation. Carrabelle park to be named for Tamara Allen On Nov. 3, Carrabelle city commissioners voted unanimously to name the fountain park on U.S. 98, at the site of the old water treatment plant, after Tamara Allen in consideration of her public service. City Administrator Courtney Millender said a formal dedication ceremony will take place at a later date, probably in conjunction with a ceremony to dedicate the newly purchased Moore House as a public property. Apalachicola to open Christmas season Friday On Friday, Nov. 25, Apalachicola will light up with cheer the day after Thanksgiving. Shops will be open late, and the streets of downtown will be lined with luminaries and lled with holiday spirit. The sounds of carolers will echo through the streets, lling the evening with the Christmas spirit. Santa will arrive on a shrimp boat at 4 p.m. at the City Dock on Water Street. He will hear childrens Christmas wishes while carolers sing. In addition, the historic Orman House and Raney House will be open late and trimmed in holiday nery. Docents in period costumes will lead visitors through the early history of the town. On Saturday, the celebration continues from 1-4 p.m. Santa arrives by re truck and will see the kids, and bring your favorite furry, four-legged friends to visit him too. On Sunday, the Tree of Remembrance ceremony will be held at 3 p.m. This respectful, nondenominational activity draws visitors riverside to remember loved ones during the holidays. Join us for an oldfashioned Christmas celebration! For more information, contact the Apalachicola Bay Chamber ofce at 6539419. TDC committees to meet Tuesday Due to a conict with Thanksgiving week, the Tourist Development Council has changed its committee meeting date. Originally scheduled for Tuesday, Nov. 22, the committees will now meet Tuesday, Nov. 29. The meeting will be held in the City of Apalachicola Community Room, 1 Bay Ave., and will begin at 1:30 p.m. for the grants committee and 2:30 p.m. for the marketing committee. Sam the cat is home A chocolate and cream Himalayan cat lost on St. George Island for more than a week has been found safe and sound. Sam, focus of an ongoing search by the St. George Island Trash Patrol, was found at the island center six blocks from the vacation rental where his human is vacationing. The owner said he was loaded with sandspurs but otherwise healthy. He really wasnt even dehydrated, she said. Sam was rescued when the Martinez family, visiting from Vermont, found him on their porch. They contacted their rental agents at SunCoast and told Jan Grey about the friendly, and obviously not feral, cat. Grey said she and her coworkers had just read about Sam in the Times and knew he was lost, so she offered to bring Martinez a can of cat food and he accepted. The Martinez couple are vegetarians and had nothing for the cat to eat. Grey said Sams owner tried to reward her, as well as the Martinez couple, but they refused to accept. The owner said she will give the money, $250, to the Franklin County Humane Society, and thanked everyone who helped locate Sam. This is the work of angels, she said. Mitigation task force to meet Wednesday Franklin County Emergency Management would like to invite the public to participate in a meeting to discuss and update the Franklin County Local Mitigation Strategy (LMS). Hazard mitigation is any action taken to permanently reduce or eliminate longterm risk to people and their property from the effects of hazards. The LMS should be revised at least annually to ensure that it remains current and reects changing conditions within the community. The LMS meeting is scheduled for Wednesday, Nov. 30, at 3 p.m. in the Franklin County Emergency Operations Center, 28 Airport Road, Apalachicola. This will be an opportunity for all parties to voice their concerns, review the status of old projects and consider new initiatives. If there are any questions, please contact Mike Rundel, Franklin County emergency management coordinator at 370-6576 or email to em2frank@gtcom.net Santa to visit Eastpoint Dec. 1 Santa will be in Eastpoint on Thursday, Dec. 1, from 6-8 p.m. at the Pavillion in Eastpoint on Patton Drive. Come decorate the Christmas tree, enjoy some holiday cheer, treats for the kids and see Santa. For more info, call 6535596. Holiday Fresh Market in Apalach Dec. 3 On Saturday, Dec. 3, the Holiday Fresh Market in features handmade, fresh products, locally made baked goods and natural creations. Hasslefree holiday shopping where youll nd unique handmade gifts. NOTICE OF INTENT IS GIVEN THAT FRANKLIN COUNTY WILL HOLD A PUBLIC HEARING TO CONSIDER ADOPTING AN ORDINANCE RESCINDING ALL COUNTY ORDINANCES AND REGULATIONS OF FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION House Bill 45 was enacted by the 2011 Florida Legislature and is Codied at Chapter 2011-109, Laws of Florida. The Law became effective October 1, 2011. This law amends .33, Florida Statutes, entitled Field of Regulation of Firearms and Ammunition Preempted, and drastically expands the States preemption of the eld of regulation of rearms and ammunition, and provides severe penalties should an elected or appointed local government ofcial enact or cause to be enforced, an ordinance or regulation relating to rearms and ammunition. Therefore, notice is hereby given that on December 6, 2011 at 10:15 a.m. (ET) at 34 Forbes Street, Apalachicola, Florida, at the Courthouse Annex, the Franklin County Board of County Commissioners will hold a public hearing to consider adopting an ordinance captioned as follows: AN ORDINANCE RESCINDING ALL COUNTY ORDINANCES AND REGULATIONS OF FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION, PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY AND AN EFFECTIVE DATE. A copy of the proposed ordinance is on le with the Clerk of Courts, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida and may be viewed there. Interested Persons may appear at the meeting and be heard with respect to the proposed ordinance, or you may submit comments in writing addressed to Marcia Johnson, Clerk of Courts, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, Florida 32320. PURSUANT TO SECTION 286.0105, FLORIDA STATUTES, IF ANY PERSON DECIDES TO APPEAL ANY DECISION MADE BY THE COUNTY COMMISSION WITH RESPECT TO ANY MATTER CONSIDERED AT THE PUBLIC HEARING, SUCH PERSON WILL NEED A RECORD OF THE PROCEEDINGS AND FOR SUCH PURPOSE, SUCH PERSON MAY NEED TO ENSURE THAT A VERBATIM RECORD OF THE PROCEEDING IS MADE, INCLUDING THE TESTIMONY AND EVIDENCE UPON WHICH THE APPEAL IS TO BE BASED. Those persons requiring special assistance to attend the meeting shall contact Deputy Clerk Michael Moron at 850-653-8861 x100 no later than three days before the meeting to make arrangements to attend the meeting. PUBLIC NOTICE The Franklin County Board of County Commissioners and Weems Memorial Hospital is asking for participation from the community in the Community Health Assessment. Those interested in health care, social services, education, and other community leaders are urged to participate in a steering committee. There will be two meetings: The rst is to be held on November 3, 2011 Carrabelle Municipal Complex 1001 Gray Avenue, Carrabelle, FL 11:30 a.m. until 1:30 p.m. est. The second is to be held December 1, 2011 Coombs Armory 66 4th Street, Apalachicola, FL 11:30 a.m. until 1:30 p.m. est. For additional information call Alan Pierce at 850-653-9783, ext 161 PUBLIC NOTICE The Carrabelle Economic Development Council will meet on the rst Thursday of every month at 4:30 pm at Carrabelle City Hall, 1001 Gray Avenue, Carrabelle, FL 32322. This is a public meeting and everyone is invited to attend. BILL MILLER REALTY 850-697-3751 (3310) 570-0658 WOW! 1 B D R FU R N I SH E D AP T $15,000 $29,500 $2,500 D OWN BU Y S 2 B E D AP T 2 6 GU L F V IE W & A CC E SS 3 BD R 2 BA 2006 M /H 16 X 80 $89,000 $500 D OWN C HO I C E OF 3 CITY LO T S $180.00/ M ON T H O R $17,500/ EA CH MI H 2 CR N R L O T S BLK. $ ST O RE RE DUC E D $49,500 3 D OO R NI C E 2 B/R M H 2 C R N R. L O T S $47,500 See BRIEFS A13 News BRIEFS JOBLESS from page A1 rate has held steady the last couple of months and were down three percent age points since January, said Kim Bodine, executive director of the Gulf Coast Workforce Board. Typically the unemployment rate creeps up as we move into the winter months and tour ism slows down; however, some of those losses are off set by hiring for the holiday shopping season, which be gins in October. The states unemploy ment rate for October, 10.3 percent, is the lowest since January 2009, when it was 10.2 percent. The states job less rate is down 0.3 percent age point from September, and 1.5 percentage points lower than the October 2010 rate of 11.8 percent. Floridas steady job growth and lower unem ployment numbers are en couraging, said DEO Ex ecutive Director Doug Dar ling. The continues to work closely with our partners at Enterprise Florida to create jobs, as well as Workforce Florida and the states 24 regional workforce boards to match job seekers with employers and help ensure a well-trained workforce for our states current and fu ture labor needs. Gov. Rick Scott also had high praise for the num bers. As we head into the holiday season, its great to see we continue to move in the right direction when it comes to job creation and getting people back to work, said Scott. The busi nesses in our state have cre ated more than 100,000 jobs so far this year. Im going to do everything I can to keep attracting businesses here and help those here already thrive so we can continue to see this growth. The number of jobs in Florida in October is 7.27 million, up 93,900 jobs com pared to a year ago, and the 13th consecutive month with positive annual job growth. The industry gaining the most jobs is leisure and hos pitality (+39,400 jobs, +4.2 percent). Other industries gaining jobs in Florida include pri vate education and health services (+29,200 jobs, +2.7 percent); professional and business services (+26,600 jobs, +2.6 percent); trade, transportation, and utilities (+20,500 jobs, +1.4 percent); nancial activities (+2,700 jobs, +0.6 percent); and manufacturing (+1,900 jobs, +0.6 percent). These industry job gains are partially due to in creases in food services and drinking places; ambulatory health care services; em ployment services; clothing and accessory stores; real estate; and fabricated metal product manufacturing. Attorneys from Legal Services of North Florida, Inc. (LSNF) will host a free legal clinic this Monday, Nov. 28, to assist low-in come residents and small business owners who want advice on the BP oil spill claims process. The clinic will be held from 10 a.m. to noon at the Franklin County court house annex, 34 Forbes St., Apalachicola. Walk-ins are welcomed, but attendees with appointments will be given rst priority. To re quest an appointment, call 769-3581. All participants in the clinic will have an opportu nity to discuss their claim with an attorney unless a conict of interest is found. Free full representation may follow if the claimants meet eligibility require ments. While LSNF attor neys may not be able to ful ly represent every claim ant in their claim, this is a great opportunity to get legal advice and direction. For claimants unable to attend the clinic, advice and counsel can be ob tained by calling the state wide legal help hotline at (855) 299-1337. Free legal clinic for those affected by spill

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Local The Times | A13 Thursday, November 24, 2011 WEEKLY ALMANAC APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE TIDE TABLES MONTHLY AVERAGES To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from these given for APALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW Cat Point Minus 0:40 Minus 1:17 East Pass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27 To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from those given for CARRABELLE: HIGH LOW Bald Point Minus 9:16 Minus 0:03 Sponsor the WEEKLY ALMANAC Call Today! 653-8868 Date High Low % Precip Thu, Nov 24 72 48 0 % Fri, Nov 25 69 56 0 % Sat, Nov 26 75 59 20 % Sun, Nov 27 70 41 40 % Mon, Nov 28 61 45 0 % Tues, Nov 29 68 52 0 % Wed, Nov 30 70 45 10 % 11/24 Thu 12:54AM 1.7 H 09:23AM -0.5 L 05:01PM 1.4 H 08:42PM 1.2 L 11/25 Fri 01:33AM 1.7 H 10:11AM -0.6 L 05:53PM 1.4 H 09:24PM 1.3 L 11/26 Sat 02:17AM 1.8 H 10:58AM -0.5 L 06:39PM 1.4 H 10:06PM 1.2 L 11/27 Sun 03:04AM 1.7 H 11:45AM -0.5 L 07:18PM 1.3 H 10:53PM 1.2 L 11/28 Mon 03:55AM 1.7 H 12:30PM -0.4 L 07:53PM 1.3 H 11:47PM 1.1 L 11/29 Tue 04:48AM 1.6 H 01:14PM -0.2 L 08:24PM 1.2 H 11/30 Wed 12:53AM 1.0 L 05:47AM 1.4 H 01:56PM 0.0 L 08:52PM 1.2 H 11/24 Thu 07:10AM -0.8 L 03:36PM 2.2 H 06:29PM 1.9 L 11/25 Fri 12:08AM 2.7 H 07:58AM -1.0 L 04:28PM 2.2 H 07:11PM 2.1 L 11/26 Sat 12:52AM 2.9 H 08:45AM -0.8 L 05:14PM 2.2 H 07:53PM 1.9 L 11/27 Sun 01:39AM 2.7 H 09:32AM -0.8 L 05:53PM 2.1 H 08:40PM 1.9 L 11/28 Mon 02:30AM 2.7 H 10:17AM -0.6 L 06:28PM 2.1 H 09:34PM 1.8 L 11/29 Tue 03:23AM 2.6 H 11:01AM -0.3 L 06:59PM 1.9 H 10:40PM 1.6 L 11/30 Wed 04:22AM 2.2 H 11:43AM 0.0 L 07:27PM 1.9 H 11:56PM 1.3 L CITY OF CARRABELLE PROPOSED ENACTMENT OF CITY ORDINANCE The City Commission of the City of Carrabelle, Florida, proposes to enact the following ordinance: ORDINANCE NUMBER 450 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF CARRABELLE, FLORIDA AMENDING ORDINANCE NO.: 443 WHICH IS AN ORDINANCE PERTAINING TO THE SALE AND CONSUMPTION OF ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES WITHIN THE CITY LIMITS BY: PROHIBITING THE SALE AND CONSUMPTION OF ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES WITHOUT PROPER LICENSES; PROSCRIBING THAT THE LOCATION FOR CONSUMPTION OF ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES MUST BE APPROVED BY THE CITY COMMISSION; REGULATING THE HOURS OF BUSINESS FOR THE SALE AND CONSUMPTION OF ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES; ESTABLISHING ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS FOR SALE OF ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES FOR ON-PREMISES CONSUMPTION; REMOVING THE REQUIREMENT THAT A SPECIFIC DISTANCE BETWEEN SAID POINT OF SALE AND CONSUMPTION OF ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES AND CHURCHES; PROVIDING FOR PENALTIES; PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY AND PROVIDING AN EFFECTIVE DATE. The proposed Ordinance may be inspected during regular hours at Carrabelle City Hall between 8 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., 1001 Gray Ave., Carrabelle, FL Monday through Friday, or call 850-697-2727. The proposed Ordinance will be considered for enactment during a public hearing to be held 6:00p.m., Thursday December 1, 2011 at the Carrabelle City Hall located at 1001 Gray Ave, Carrabelle, FL. Interested parties may appear at the hearing and be heard with respect to the proposed Ordinance. If an individual decides to appeal any decision made by the City Commission with respect to this meeting, a verbatim transcript may be required. If so, the individual should make provision for a transcript to be made at the meeting, (RE: Florida Statute 286.0105). Pursuant to the provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act, any person requiring special accommodation to participate in this meeting is asked to advise the city at least 48 hours before the meeting by contacting Keisha Smith at the above address or phone number. Ashbrook to chair Cain campaign in Franklin County Debbie Ashbrook, a former state committeewoman for the Republican Party of Florida from Gulf County, has been named by the Friends of Herman Cain in Florida to chair Cains Franklin County campaign. County chairpersons will be responsible for the day-to-day operations of the campaign in their respective counties, including the recruitment of volunteers, event coordination, get out the vote efforts and further grassroots activities. These experienced and seasoned political grassroots activists will ensure that Herman Cains message to restore our country will resonate and be heard throughout the state, said State Rep. and Statewide Co-Chair Scott Plakon. We are honored to have them on our team, working to ensure Herman Cains victory in Florida. Bean bests bean counters at biz bash On Nov. 10, Roberson and Associates of Apalachicola celebrated its 10th year in business by hosting the Nov. 10 Business After Hours for the Apalachicola Bay Chamber of Commerce. There was live music and lots of food from local restaurants. As part of the festivities, the accounting rm offered a $100 prize to the person who could come closest to guessing the number of beans in a glass jar without going over the number. Island realtor Mason Bean came closest to the actual number 1,003, with his guess of 879. He then donated his prize to Habitat for Humanity. Register for Carrabelles Christmas boat parade Get your boat registered in the 19th annual Boat Parade of Lights. Register online at www.carrabelle. org or stop by the Carrabelle Chamber of Commerce ofce and pick up an application. The Boat Parade of Lights and Holiday on the Harbor will take place Saturday, Dec. 10. For more information call 697-2585. The following report is provided by the Franklin County Sheriffs Ofce. Arrests are made by ofcers from the following city, county, and state law enforcement agencies: Apalachicola (APD), Carrabelle (CPD), Florida Highway Patrol (FHP), Franklin County Sheriffs Ofce (FCSO), Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC), Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP), Florida Department of Corrections (FDOC), Florida Division of Insurance Fraud (DIF) and Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (FDACS). All defendants are considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law. Nov. 12 Richie D. Golden, 26, domestic battery (FCSO) Nov. 14 Dajuana S. Wynn, 36, Quincy, violation of probation (FCSO) Curtis A. Baucham, 49, Apalachicola, criminal mischief (FCSO) David A. Rigdon, 23, Crawfordville, failure to appear (FCSO) Nov. 15 Dominic A. Lockley, 22, Apalachicola, battery, burglary of a dwelling person assaulted, trespass on property and two counts of sale or possession of a controlled substance (FCSO) Carlos E. Russell, Jr., 39, Eastpoint, battery (FCSO) Nov. 16 Jeri C. Pool, 33, Panama City, violation of probation (FCSO) CoLela M. Jones, 26, Apalachicola, violation of probation (FCSO) Nov. 17 Joshua D. Taylor, 30, Panacea, failure to appear (FCSO) Danny R. Wallace, 38, Apalachicola, assault, improper exhibition of a dangerous weapon and violation of probation (FCSO) Nov. 18 Mary R. Nowling, 23, Eastpoint, no tag, reckless driving, resisting without violence and driving while license suspended or revoked (FCSO) Kimberly A. Parker, 37, Apalachicola, withholding child support (FCSO) Nov. 19 Julia C. Starkey, 41, Eastpoint, DUI, Dui with property damage and leaving the scene of an accident with property damage (FHP) Nov. 20 Miguel J. Dejuan, 32, Apalachicola, no valid drivers license (FCSO) Cathrine V. Thompson, 27, Eastpoint, violation of probation (FCSO) Arrest REPOR T BRIEFS from page A12

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A14| The Times Thursday, November 24, 2011 CLASSIFIEDS 36557T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No. 10 000600 CA WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., successor by merger to WACHOVIA BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, a national banking association, Plaintiff, v. THE MOORINGS AT CARRABELLE, INC., a Florida corporation, MOORINGS DEVELOPMENT, INC., a Florida corporation, MOORINGS SECOND LIEN LENDER, LLC, a Florida limited liability company, and RCS GROUP, INC., a Florida corporation, Defendants AMENDED NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the Summary Final Judgment entered in the above-captioned action, the Clerk will sell the property situated in Franklin County, Florida described on Exhibits A and B attached hereto and by this reference made a part hereof, at public sale to the highest bidder for cash, beginning at 11:00 a.m. EDT on December 7, 2011, at the front door of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida, in accordance with the bidding and sale procedures specified on the Franklin County Clerk of Court’s website located at www.franklinclerk.com/fore closures.aspx. Persons with disabilities requesting reasonable accommodations to participate in this proceeding should contact (850) 653-8861, ext. 106 or Florida Relay Service at 800-955-8771. MARCIA JOHNSON Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk Exhibit A (the “Property”) PARCEL “A” Commence at a point where the extension of the West side of 11th Street intersects the South side of Avenue “A”; thence run North 89 degrees 13 minutes 40 seconds West along said Southerly boundary line of Avenue “A” for a distance of 580.00 feet to a concrete monument; thence leaving said right of way run South 00 degrees 35 minutes 24 seconds West 132.52 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING; thence from said POINT OF BEGINNING run South 03 degrees 06 minutes 12 seconds West 41.58 feet to a “X” in a headwall, said point lying on the approximate mean high waterline of the Carrabelle River; thence run along said waterline and said headwall as follows: South 89 degrees 49 minutes 10 seconds West 92.06 feet to a “V” in said headwall; thence South 08 degrees 00 minutes 26 seconds West 163.18 feet to a “X” in said headwall; thence South 60 degrees 38 minutes 09 seconds West 103.99 feet to a “X” in said headwall; thence North 80 degrees 18 minutes 37 seconds West 51.41 feet; thence leaving said headwall run South 75 degrees 21 minutes 37 seconds West 41.95 feet; thence North 89 degrees 55 minutes 23 seconds West 73.67 feet to a point lying on said headwall and said approximate mean high waterline; thence run along said headwall and said waterline as follows: North 89 degrees 55 minutes 23 seconds West 116.22 feet; thence North 83 degrees 30 minutes 30 seconds West 160.02 feet; thence North 77 degrees 11 minutes 10 seconds West 292.04 feet; thence continue along said approximate mean high waterline as follows: North 78 degrees 36 minutes 16 seconds West 32.41 feet; thence North 76 degrees 09 minutes 03 seconds West 21.92 feet; thence North 75 degrees 54 minutes 53 seconds West 18.32 feet to a point marking the intersection of said waterline with the Southeasterly right of way of Avenue”A” said point being the point of curve to the right having a radius of 646.20 feet; thence Northeasterly along said curve and said right of way for 281.32 feet, thru a central angle of 24 degrees 56 minutes 37 seconds, chord of said arc being North 49 degrees 03 minutes 16 seconds East 279.11 feet to a re-bar; thence continue along said right of way as follows: North 57 degrees 38 minutes 23 seconds East 110.73 feet to a re-bar; thence North 72 degrees 51 minutes 50 seconds East 190.50 feet to a rod and cap; thence South 89 degrees 07 minutes 27 seconds East 223.44 feet to a rod and cap; thence South 89 degrees 13 minutes 40 seconds East 150.15 feet to a rod and cap; thence leaving said right of way run South 00 degrees 46 minutes 20 seconds West 134.11 feet to a rod and cap; thence South 89 degrees 47 minutes 06 seconds East 145.27 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. Above lands subject to a 20 foot wide drainage easement recorded in Official Records Book 111, Page 319, Public Records of Franklin County, Florida, lying over and across the Northeasterly portions thereof. And PARCEL “B” Commence at the intersection of the centerline of 11th Street West in Picketts addition to the City of Carrabelle, a subdivision as per map or plat thereof recorded Plat Book 2, Page 20, of the public records of 36379T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION: CASE NO.: 19-2009-CA-000286CAXXXX BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, L.P. F/K/A COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, L.P., Plaintiff, vs. LESLIE E. BIAGINI A/K/A LESLIE BIAGINI; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF LESLIE E. BIAGINI A/K/A LESLIE BIAGINI; IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order setting Foreclosure Sale dated the 23rd day of August, 2011, and entered in Case No. 19-2009-CA000286-CAXXXX, of the Circuit Court of the 2ND Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, L.P. F/K/A COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, L.P. is the Plaintiff and LESLIE E. BIAGINI A/K/A LESLIE BIAGINI and UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF LESLIE E. BIAGINI A/K/A LESLIE BIAGINI N/K/A LESLIE BIAGINI IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY are defendants. The Clerk of this Court shall sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the, FRONT STEPS OF THE FRANKLIN COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 33 MARKET STREET, APALACHICOLA, FL 32320, 11:00 AM on the 21st day of December, 2011, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOTS NINE (9) AND TEN (10), OF BLOCK ONE HUNDRED NINETEEN (119), IN THE CITY OF APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT OF SAID CITY IN MOST COMMON USE. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. Dated this 31st day of October, 2011. MARCIA JOHNSON Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk Law Offices of Marshall C. Watson, P.A. 1800 NW 49th Street, Suite 120 Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33309 Telephone: (954) 453-0365 Facsimile: (954) 771-6052 Toll Free: 1-800-441-2438 09-16986 November 17, 24, 2011 36377T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE. No.: 19-2010-CA-000572 RBC BANK (USA) Plaintiff’, VS. KIRSCHNER, RONALD S., et al. Defendants, NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order or Final Judgment entered in Case NO.19-2010-CA-000572 of the Circuit Court of the 2ND Judicial Circuit in and for FRANKLIN County, Florida, wherein RBC bank (USA), is Plaintiff, and, KIRSCHNER, RONALD S., et al., are Defendants, I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at, 33 MARKET STREET, FRONT STEPS OF THE COURTHOUSE, STE 203, APALACHICOLA, FL 32320, at the hour of 11:00 AM, on the 7th day of December, 2011, the following described property: LOT 19 OF PLANTATION BEACH VILLAGE, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 5, PAGE(S) 10 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 1852 PLANTATION PASS, ST. GEORGE ISLAND, FLORIDA 32328. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. DATED this 25th day of October, 2011. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk, Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Clerk of the Court’s disability coordinator at 301 MONROE STREET ROOM 225, TALLAHASSEE, FL 32301, 850-577-4401 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. November 17, 24, 2011 36375T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE. No.: 19-2009-CA-000229 BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. Plaintiff’, VS. RADAKOVICH, MARK WILLIAM, et al. Defendants, RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order or Final Judgment entered in Case NO.19-2009-CA-000229 of the Circuit Court of the 2ND Judicial Circuit in and for FRANKLIN County, Florida,where BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., is Plaintiff’, and, RADAKOVICH, MARK WILLIAM, et al., are Defendants, I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at, 33 MARKET STREET, FRONT STEPS OF THE COURTHOUSE, STE 203, APALACHICOLA, FL 32320, at the hour of 11:00 AM, on the 7th day of December, 2011, the following described property: LOT 27 OF CARRABELLE LANDING, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 8, PAGE(S) 47, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. DATED this 24th day of October, 2011. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk, Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Clerk of the Court’s disability coordinator at 301 MONROE STREET ROOM 225, TALLAHASSEE, FL 32301, 850-577-4401 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. November 17, 24, 2011 36371T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO.: 2009-000694-CA SUNTRUST BANK, Plaintiff, vs. GUY N. MAULDIN, et al., Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure filed October 25, 2011 entered in Civil Case No. 2009-000694-CA of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Eastpoint, Florida, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320 in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes on the 7th day of December, 2011 at 11:00 a.m. on the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit: LOT 52, TREASURE BEACH VILLAGE, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 5, AT PAGE 25 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 25th day of October, 2011. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT As Clerk of the Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of Court Administration at (850) 577-4401, or at the Leon County Courthouse, Room 225, 301 S. Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 within 2 working days of receipt of a notice compelling you to appear at a court proceeding; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. MCCALLA, RAYMER, LLC Attorney for Plaintiff 225 E. Robinson St. Suite 660 Orlando, FL 32801 (407) 674-1850 November 17, 24, 2011 36044T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 192009CA000657CA XXXX HSBC BANK USA, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION AS TRUSTEE FOR MORTGAGEIT SECURITIES CORP. MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST, SERIES 2007-1, MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, Plaintiff(s). vs. ALBERTO F. ARAUJO; et al, Defendant(s) NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Sale will be made pursuant to an Order or Final Summary Judgment. Final Judgment was awarded on September 27, 2010 in Civil Case No. 192009CA 000657CAXXXX, of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for FRANKLIN County, Florida, wherein, HSBC BANK USA, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION AS TRUSTEE FOR MORTGAGEIT SECURITIES CORP. MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST, SERIES 2007-1, MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES is the Plaintiff, and ALBERTO F. ARAUJO; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF ALBERTO F. ARAUJO, CASA DEL MAR SUBDIVISION ASSOCIATION, INC.; ONEWEST BANK, FSB, SUCCESSORIN-INTEREST TO INDYMAC FEDERAL BANK FSB, SUCCESSOR-IN-IN-TEREST TO INDYMAC BANK FSB, AND UNKNOWN TENANT(S) IN POSSESSION are Defendants. The clerk of the court will sell to the highest bidder for cash on the Front Steps of the Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320 at 11:00 am on December 14, 2011 on the following described real property as set forth in said Final summary Judgment, to wit: LOT 9, CASA DEL MAR SUBDIVISION PHASE 1, A SUBDIVISION AS PER PLAT OR MAP THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 6, AT PAGE 2, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. WITNESS my hand and the seal of the court on November 8, 2011. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of the Court Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk Attorney for Plaintiff(s) Aldridge Connors, LLP 7000 West Palmetto Park Rd., Suite 307 Boca Raton, FL 33433 (561) 392-6391 (561) 392-6965 Nov 24,Deckc 1, 2011

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, November 24, 2011 The Times | A15 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322850-697-9604 850-323-0444 www.seacrestre.com PROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND RENTALSRENTALS2 BR 1 BA UNFURNISHED HOUSE Downtown, LR, DR, Storage Room .................$6501 BR 1 BA UNFURNISHED HOUSE .....$500DOWNTOWN RIVER CONDO, BOAT SLIP3 Night Minimum .......................$105 PLUS DAILYPIRATES LANDING 1 BR CONDO/POOL3 Night Minimum .......................$105 PLUS DAILY3 BR 3 BA FURNISHED CONDOLong Term, Pool..............................................$8502 BR 1 BA FURNISHED APARTMENTDen & Living Area ..........................................$5503 BR 2 BA FURNISHED CONDO Boat & Car Parking ..............................$850 WKLY3 BR 1 BA FURNISHED APARTMENTPet Friendly ...................WKLY & MONTHLY RATES FRANKLIN COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD85 School Road, Suite 1 Eastpoint, FL 32328 (850) 670-2810 ANNOUNCEMENT OF POSITIONPOSITIONS: Non-Instructional: Director of Special Programs LOCATION: Franklin County School District O ce SALARY: Administrative Salary Schedule (Please call Finance Of ce for salary)CONTRACT: 2011-12 School Year DEADLINE: December 1, 2011Applications may be obtained form the Franklin County School Board Finance Of ce or on-line at www.franklincountyschools.org. *Minimum Quali cations: Master's Degree from an accredited educational institution. Certi cation in Educational Leadership. Administration and Supervision or School Principal. Five (5) years teaching/ administrative experience. Knowledge of local, state and national policies which impact education. A complete description of job description is available at the Franklin County School Board Of ce.Please return applications to the attention of: Morna Smith, Personnel Specialist Franklin County School Board 85 School Road, Suite 1 Eastpoint, Florida 32328Franklin County School Board is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Apartment avail. Lanark Village, Can be a 1 or 2 br, with sunroom $450 mo + $250 dep. lease req. 509-2460 Publisher’s NoticeAll real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on a equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. Studio Apt. Furnished Upstairs studioQuiet location, water & electric incl. Walk to downtown. $700 mo + dep. No pets. For appt 653-9116 or 320-1174 St. George Island $160 wk, Electric, Satellite, Garbage incl. pool tble. 12’X65’ deck w/Beautiful view 850-653-5114 Apalachicola Condo. 2 br, 2 bath, with newer paint, tile, carpet $750 per month with 700 + credit score or $800 per month below 700 credit score. *Ref Checked* Quint 865-693-3232 1 or 3 BRCH/A in Apalachicola, FL. 850-643-7740. Apalachicola, FL Property11th Street Lot 4, Block 150, $24,000 or $4,000 Down Payment, Financed at $445/Mo., R-1 Zoning Call 850-264-6239 or 850-566-2273 Text FL83345 to 56654 Mobile Home lots with w/s $10,000 with Mobile home that needs work $13,000. Also Mobile home with lot in good shape $25,000. Owner Financing available 806-618-1977 Text FL84594 to 56654 3 br, 2 ba, all appliances included W/D, CH&A, on 1 acre. $75,000 OBO. Call 850-653-5111 Text FL85503 to 56654 Education Part time positions at Eastpoint After school programSite DirectorMust be organized, computer literate, capable of managing staff and students, and able to multi-task in fast-paced environment. Bachelor’s degree in education, business or related field required. Previous managerial experience preferred. $23/hr, 4 hours/day.Parent LiaisonResponsible for coordinating student check-in/out, maintaining data spreadsheets, coordinating parent nights and serving as sub when needed. Experience in Excel required. Bachelor’s degree preferred. $13/hr, 3.5 hrs/day. Visit www.franklin countynest.org for employment application. Deliver to Franklin County District Offices, ATTN: Despina Williams/ The Nest, 85 School Rd, Ste. 1, Eastpoint, FL 32328. Questions, (850) 670-2810 x4131 or dwilliams@franklin.k12.fl .us HospitalityRESORT VACATION PROPERTIESAccepting applications* Housekeeping Office Clerk-Full-time, requires good customer service skills & prior office experience. Team player, works well under pressure. Great benefits, weekend work required. Inspectors-Part-time, inspect properties after they are cleaned. Must be available weekends. Apply in person 9-5 weekdays at 123 W Gulf Beach Dr St. George Island 1 bedroom, Apalachicola, quiet, 2 blks from boat ramp, screen porch W/D, AC, pet OK, $600 month + first, last & deposit. Please Call 850-697-5000 Other homes available. Text FL85610 to 56654 1 br, 1 ba with full kitchen and living room Call for information 850-653-6103 Heritage Villas and Southern Villas of Apalachicola ApartmentsAccepting applications for 1, 2, & 3 br HC & non-HC accessible units. Some rental assistance may be available. HUD vouchers accepted. Call (850) 653-9277. TDD/TTY 711. This institution is an equal opportunity provider, and employer. Publisher’s Notice “SCAM “To avoid possible scams, it is recommended that consumers should verify caller information when receiving calls regarding credit card payments. Consumers should also contact the local company themselves instead of giving this information to individuals who are contacting them directly. Coin & Stamp ShowDecember 3rd & 4th Fairgrounds PC Opens 9:am Free admission. 850-215-8565 Wanting to Buy House trailer FRAMES 60’ to 70’ long. with or without axels. Call 850-653-5114 Bi Athlete looking for training partner. No Pseudo athletes. 850-447-0691 36647T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL. CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 192009CA000525 XXXXXX THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS CWALT, INC., ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-HY13, MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-HY13, Plaintiff, VS. JUDITH D. HENDERSON; et al., Defendants. RE-NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order or Summary Final Judgment of foreclosure dated June 29, 2010 and an Order Resetting Sale dated October 24, 2011, and entered in Case No. 192009CA000525XXXXXX of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS CWALT, INC., ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-HY13, MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-HY13 is Plaintiff and JUDITH D. HENDERSON; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 1; UNKNOWN TENANT NO, 2; and ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST A NAMED DEFENDANT TO THIS ACTION, OR HAVING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE ANY RIGHT, TITLE OR INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY HEREIN DESCRIBED, are Defendants, l will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at at the Front Door of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320 at Franklin County, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on the 7th day of December, 2011, the following described property as set forth in said Order or Final Judgment, to-wit: LOTS 4 AND 5, BLOCK 8, CITY OF APALACHICOLA, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT OF THE CITY OF APALACHICOLA IN COMMON USE. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons needing special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the Clerk of the Court not later than five business days prior to the proceeding at the Franklin County Courthouse. Telephone 850-653-8861 or 1-800-955-8770 via Florida Relay Service. DATED at Apalachicola, Florida, on October 24, 2011. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of Court By: Michele Maxwell As Deputy Clerk SMITH, HIATT & DIAZ, P.A. Attorneys for Plaintiff PO BOX 11438 Fort Lauderdale, FL 33339-1438 Telephone: (954) 564-0071 November 24, December 1, 2011 Incorrect Insertion PolicyFor Classified In-column AdvertisersAll ads placed by phone are read back to the advertiser to insure correctness. The newspaper will assume correctness at the time of the read-back procedure unless otherwise informed. Please your ad. Advertisers are requested to check the advertisement on the first insertion for correctness. Errors should be reported immediately. Your Florida Freedom newspaper will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion, nor will it be liable for any error in advertisements to a greater extent than the cost of the space occupied by the error. Any copy change, during an ordered schedule constitutes a new ad and new charges. We do not guarantee position of ANY ad under any classification. 36429T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA FRANCES HOWELL MONROE and KENNETH W. MONROE Plaintiffs, vs. WILLIAM JAMES LOVETT, SR., if alive, and if dead or not known to be dead or alive, their several and respective unknown spouses, heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors, and all parties natural, corporate, or otherwise claiming interests by, through, under or against them, WILLIAM JAMES LOVETT, SR. Defendant(s) CASE NO.: 11-00427-CA NOTICE OF ACTION To: WILLIAM JAMES LOVETT, SR., if alive, and if dead or not known to be dead or alive, their several and respective unknown spouses, heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors, and all parties natural, corporate, or otherwise claiming interests by, through, under or against them, WILLIAM JAMES LOVETT, SR. YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to Quiet Title the following property in Franklin County, Florida: LOT SIX (6) IN BLOCK FORTY (40), IN THE CITY OF APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF IN MOST GENERAL USE has been filed against you. You are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Donna Duncan, plaintiffs’ attorney, whose address is Sanders and Duncan, P.A., P.O. Box 157, Apalachicola, FL 32329, on or before the 30th day of December, 2011, and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on plaintiffs’ attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint of the petition. Dated this 7th day of November, 2011. MARCIA M. JOHNSON As Clerk of the Court By: Michele Maxwell As Deputy Clerk November 17, 24, December 1, 8, 2011 Franklin County, Florida with the centerline of U.S. Highway Number 98 (State Road Number 30), said point being the point of curve, to the left having a radius of 716.20 feet; thence Southwesterly along said curve and said centerline of U.S. Highway Number 98 (State Road Number 30) for 552.29 feet, thru a central angle of 44 degrees 10 minutes 59 seconds, chord of said arc being South 44 degrees 03 minutes 37 seconds West 538.27 feet; thence continue along said centerline South 21 degrees 57 minutes 00 seconds West 100.59 feet; thence leaving said centerline run. South 68 degrees 00 minutes 45 seconds East 147.67 feet to a point lying on the Easterly right of way of said U.S. Highway Number 98; thence run along said right of way South 21 degrees 57 minutes 00 seconds West 56.02 feet to a point marking the intersection of said right of way with the approximate mean high waterline of the Carrabelle River for the POINT OF BEGINNING; thence from said. POINT OF BEGINNING run along said approximate mean highwater line as follows: South 41 degrees 15 minutes 17 seconds East 12.13 feet; thence South 31 degrees 21 minutes 04 seconds West 42.82 feet; thence South 19 degrees 31 minutes 44 seconds West 63.89 foot; thence South 20 degrees 43 minutes 07 seconds West 77.55 feet; thence South 18 degrees 13 minutes 40 seconds West 54.08 feet; thence South 18 degrees 49 minutes 33 seconds West 67.17 feet; thence South 65 degrees 03 minutes 43 seconds East 23.06 feet; thence South 66 degrees 00 minutes 22 seconds East 35.99 feet; thence North 71 degrees 21 minutes 17 seconds East 80.82 feet; thence North 88 degrees 41 minutes 52 seconds East 93.43 feet; thence South 82 degrees 44 minutes 57 seconds East 61.70 feet; thence South 70 degrees 51 minutes 28 seconds East 42.57 feet; thence South 82 degrees 20 minutes 37 seconds East 29.02 feet; thence North 82 degrees 24 minutes 51 seconds East 51.85 feet; thence South 40 degrees 27 minutes 04 seconds East 22.75 feet; thence South 08 degrees 48 minutes 52 seconds East 35.89 feet; thence South 31 degrees 51 minutes 57 seconds West 48.01 feet; thence South 32 degrees 18 minutes 59 seconds West 25.56 feet; thence South 03 degrees 41 minutes 31 seconds East 42.49 feet; thence North 83 degrees 10 minutes 45 seconds West 26.24 thence South 64 degrees 17 minutes 00 seconds West 28.44 feet; thence South. 89 degrees 45 minutes 45 seconds West 52.03 feet; thence South 89 degrees 06 minutes 40 seconds West 44.97 feet; thence North 85 degrees 17 minutes 18 seconds West 67.69 feet; thence South 88 degrees 21 minutes 43 seconds West 53.34 feet; thence North 75 degrees 32 minutes 45 seconds West 81.07 feet; thence North 73 degrees 36 minutes 16 seconds West 43.95 feet; thence North 85 degrees 24 minutes 05 seconds West 33.71 feet; thence North 84 degrees 55 minnutes 29 seconds West 25.63 feet; thence South 27 degrees 47 minutes 04 seconds West 22.19 feet; thence South 01 degrees 10 minutes 48 seconds East 15.80 feet; thence North 87 degrees 31 minutes 56 seconds East 22.89 feet; thence South 05 degrees 44 minutes 03 seconds East 14.09 feet; thence North 88 degrees 06 minutes 29 seconds West 25.51 feet; thence North 65 degrees 44 minutes 12 seconds West 20.73 feet; thence North 67 degrees 47 minutes 43 seconds West 8.36 feet to a point Iying on the Easterly right of way of said State Road Number 30; thence Ieaving said approximate mean high waterline, run along said right of way North 21 degrees 57 minutes 00 seconds East 510.65 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. And PARCEL “C” Commence at the intersection of the centerline of 11th Street West in Picketts addition to the City of Carrabelle, a subdivision as per map or plat thereof recorded Plat Book 2, Page 20, of the public records of Franklin County, Florida with the centerline of U.S. Highway Number 98 (State Road Number 30), said point being the point of curve to the Left having a radius of 716.20 feet; thence Southwesterly along said curve and said centerline of U.S. Highway Number 98 (State Road Number 30) for 552.29 feet, thru a central angle of 44 degrees 10 minutes 59 seconds, chord of said arc being South 44 degrees 03 minutes 37 seconds West 538.27 feet; thence continue along said centerline South 21 degrees 57 minutes 00 seconds West 180.89 feet; thence leaving said centerline Run North 68 degrees 00 minutes 45 seconds West 100.00 feet to a point lying on the Westerly right of way of said U.S. Highway Number 98 (State Road Number 30), said point being the point of curve to the left having a radius of 7739.44 feet; thence Southwesterly along said curve and said right of way for 88.83 feet, thru a central angle of 00 degrees 39 minutes 27 seconds, chord of said arc being South 22 degrees 57 minutes 22 seconds West 88.82 feet to a point marking the intersection of said right of way with the approximate mean high waterline of the Carrabelle River, said point also being the POINT OF BEGINNING; thence from said POINT OF BEGINNING and leaving said right of way run along said approximate mean high waterline as follows: North 55 degrees 59 minutes 28 seconds West 36.30 feet; thence North 89 degrees 32 minutes 04 seconds West 73.61 feet; thence South 67 degrees 18 minutes 24 seconds West 63.00 feet; thence North 75 degrees 44 minutes 59 seconds West 56.23 feet; thence North 67 degrees 13 minutes 01 seconds West 52.63 feet; thence North 54 degrees 44 minutes 52 seconds West 38.68 feet; thence North 78 degrees 50 minutes 19 seconds West 51.81 feet; thence North 89 degrees 14 minutes 20 seconds West 52.92 feet; thence South 62 degrees 28 minutes 15 seconds West 44.10 feet; thence South 80 degrees 56 minutes 02 seconds West 35.34 feet; thence South 50 degrees 36 minutes 30 seconds West 47.83 feet; thence South 70 degrees 37 minutes 48 seconds West 51.59 feet; thence South 77 degrees 37 minutes 23 seconds West 53.13 feet; thence South 54 degrees 48 minutes 10 seconds West 48.07 feet; thence South 48 degrees 34 minutes 56 seconds West 28.10 feet; thence South 53 degrees 46 minutes 52 seconds East 32.44 feet; thence South 62 degrees 17 minutes 35 seconds East 95.93 feet; thence South 52 degrees 59 minutes 06 seconds East 195.71 feet; thence North 89 degrees 24 minutes 37 seconds East 84.58 feet; thence North 36 degrees 05 minutes 16 seconds East 76.68 feet; thence South 86 degrees 21 minutes 52 seconds East 54.51 feet; thence South 45 degrees 26 minutes 57 seconds East 96.14 feet; thence North 85 degrees 23 minutes 17 seconds East 52.06 feet to a point lying on the Westerly right of way of said State Road Number 30, said point being the point of curve to the right having a radius of 7739.44 feet; thence leaving said waterline run Northeasterly along said curve and said right of way for 271.83 feet, thru a central angle of 02 degrees 00 minutes 45 seconds, chord of said arc being North 21 degrees 37 minutes 16 seconds East 271.82 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. Exhibit B (the “Submerged Land Lease”) The sovereign lands that are the subject of the Submerged Land Lease recorded on February 22, 2000 in public records Book 634, Page 99, et seq., Official Records of Franklin County, Florida, more particularly described as follows: A parcel of sovereign submerged land in Section 19 and 30, Township 07 South, Range 04 West, in Carrabelle River, Franklin County, containing 118,058 square feet, more or less, as is more particularly described and shown on Attachment A, dated December 4, 1989. November 17, 24, 2011 36583T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 2009-000364 CA SUNTRUST BANK, Plaintiff, vs. NORTBERT W. KOZIATEK, et al., Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure filed October 24, 2011 entered in Civil Case No. 2009-000364 CA of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, St. George Island, Florida, the Clerk of Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Appalachicola, FL. 32320 in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes on the 6th day of December, 2011 at 11:00 AM on the following described property as set forth in said Summary Final Judgment, to-wit: Lot 9, of Sea Pine Village, according to the plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 4, Page 28, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if anv, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. I HEREBY CERTIFY that a true and correct copy of the foregoing was mailed this 4th day of November, 2011, to all parties on the attached service lifit. Danielle N. Parsons, Esq. McCalla Raymer, LLC ATTORNEYS FOR PLAINTIFF 225 East Robinson Street, Suite 660 Orlando, FL 32801 Phone: (407) 674-1850 Fax: (321) 248-0420 Florida Bar No.: 0029364 If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of Court Administration at (850) 577-4401, or at the Leon County Courthouse, Room 225, 301 S. Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 within 2 working days of receipt of a notice compelling you to appear at a court proceeding; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 11. The ADA Coordinator for the courts in Leon County is Doug Smith. He may be reached at (850) 577-4444 or through the Florida Relay Service, TDD at 1-800-955-8771. The address for the Office of Court Administration is: Leon County Courthouse, 301 S. Monroe Street, Room 225, Tallahassee, FL 32301. In all other counties in the circuit please contact the Clerk of the Circuit Court’s office and ask for the ADA Coordinator. The Clerk’s number is included on each county page. November 24, December 1, 2011 Earn College Degree Online *Medical Business, *Criminal Justice. Job Placement Assistance. Computer available. Financial aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 866-467-0054 www.CenturaOnline.com Security + Clean UpsBy Appointment only. Call (850) 670-1567 Airlines are hiring Train for hands on Aviation career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified. Job Placement Assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-206-9405 Honest and DependableService. Let me do your Holiday cleaning. 850-381-7746

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A16 | The Times Thursday, November 24, 2011 Our local real estate experts have identied what they feel are the best values around and are oering them to you in Real Estate Picks! (In this section), Discover the best real estate values in Mexico Beach, Port St. Joe, Apalachicola, Cape San Blas, St. George Island, Carrabelle and surrounding areas. Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Real Estate Picks John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.com MLS#244767 $675,000 St. George Island QUALITY HOME FOR T H E DISCERNING BUYER Architect designed 4 BR, 4.5 BA, 2nd living area could be 5th BR, Secluded Pool & waterfall, Outstanding Kitchen, Fireplace, Cherry ceilings in LR, Tile Floors, Beautiful Decor, Anderson Windows, Elevator Shaft, Speakers throughout, Landscaping, high lot in the exclusive Plantation on Elm Ct. John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.com MLS#244625 $129,900 Lanark Village WELL BUILT HOME 2 BR, 2 BA, master has walk-in closet, New paint throughout, new ceiling fans, new range & washer, covered front porch, huge screen porch with view of Bay (2 blks away), large private yard with storage bldg, mature fruit bearing citrus trees, California Street Listed by Janie Burke All As 1st Grade Aani Carltons class: Ali sha Arroyo, Mason Moses, Kendall Hill, Jackson Seg ree, Mahaley Shuler, River Sheridan, Rainey Smith, Bri anna Stephens, Kevin Sul livan, John-Michael Thomp son, Trinity Taylor Miriam Triscrittis class: Miranda Diaz, Eric Lau, Jabara Pearson, Kylah Ross, Colin Weng, Mark Willis 2nd Grade Jenny Mallons class: Ca leb Abel, Meredith Alford, Andrew Monod, Dominic Feliciano, Genevieve Mont gomery, Sophie Salman Stacey Herringtons class: Weston Bockelman, Kendall Meloche, Gracie Smith, Ella Friedman, Alex Itzkovitz, Jasmine Richards, Myia Maxwell, Gavin Lash ley 3rd Grade Whitney Martinas class: Camille Davis, Livia Monod, Abby Johnson, Lyndsey Stiefel Traci Moses class: Mar tina Granger, Kaylee Hicks, Alex Joanos, Gillian Ter hune, Caden Turell 4th Grade Lindsey Bockelmans class: Camille Williams, Alyssa Robinson, Jayden Justice Marie Lees Class: Cade Juno, Paige Pullen 5th Grade Teri Williams class: Kevin Flores, Alexus John son Brooke Linanes class: Adria Valenzuela, Grayson Constantine, Chloe Davis, Scout McLemore, Rebecca Willis A/B 1st Grade Aani Carltons class: Caleb Cassidy, Shanna Cogburn, Daisy Jimenez, Trenton McClain, Jayden Nichols, Gabie Register Miriam Triscrittis class: Amontaye Austin, Johna than Carter, Arav Patel, Ripley Pouncey, Nathan Richards, Austin White, Leah Wren 2nd Grade Jenny Mallons class: Lanie Allen, Carson Davis, John Sanders, Wil Varnes Stacey Herringtons class: Jamal Robinson, Lauren Conway, Torin Spohrer, Jeremy Shuler, Zach Riccard 3rd Grade Whitney Martinas class: Colin Amison, Cody Cassidy, Leslie Escobar, Dorian Fleming, Stanley Gay, Elizabeth McAnally, Avery Scott Traci Moses class: Skye Huber, Jon Michael Cates, Devin Daniels, Nathan For ster, Jadyn Luberto, Ava Neill, Eli Weiler 4th Grade Lindsay Bockelmans class: Tanner Amison, Summer Granger, Emily Hicks, Kalahn Kent, Allison Register Marie Lees Class: Matthew Gay, Bailey Her rington, Alyssa Martina 5th Grade Teri Williams class: Janacia Bunyon, Steven Craig, Jaiden Hill, Bryce Kent, Sophia Kirvin, Daijon Penamon, Trenady Queen, Brandon Taranto Brooke Linanes class: Jan-Michael Lowe, Conner Messer Perfect Attendance Lena Allens Kindergar ten: LeLand Flowers, Pey ton Blackburn, Maya Itz kovitz, Will Luberto, Malic ONeal, Landon Schoelles, Weston Taranto Heather Friedmans Kin dergarten: Alonna Brown, Caelyn Constantine, CJ Conway, Taylor Pendleton, Jhamere Rhodes, Aubrie Thompson, Josalyn Ward, Jayla White 1st Grade: Alisha Arroyo, Daisy Jimenez, Mahaley Shuler, River Sheridan, Gabbie Register, Shyanna Cogburn, Miranda Diaz, Joycelyn Escobar, Faline Everitt, Emily McAnally, Arav Patel, Ripley Pouncey, Nathan Richards, Colin Weng, Mark Willis 2nd Grade: Meredith Al ford, Shondell Bass, Sevryn Everitt, Dominic Feliciano, Eulalia Gregurio, Andrew Monod, Genevieve Mont gomery, Sophie Salman, Austin Taunton, Wil Var nes, Lauren Conway, Lo gan Freeman, Alex Itzko vitz, Gavin Lashley, Myia Maxwell, Zach Riccard, Jasmine Richards, Jeremy Shuler, Gracie Smith, Ken dall Meloche, 3rd Grade: Colin Amison, Cody Cassidy, Liv ia Monod, Leslie Escobar, Dorian Fleming, Cecil Gay, Abby Johnson, Elizabeth McAnally, Michael Mckee, Avery Scott, Austin Shiver, John Michael Cates, Devin Daniels, Lamarius Martin, Gillian Terhune 4th Grade: Summer Granger, Levi Rowland Bil bo, Allison Register, Jayden Justice, Vincent Guidry, Matilee Robinette, Tanner Amison, Emily Hicks, Ja than Proctor, Krista Kel ley, Matthew Gay, Hannah Sweet 5th Grade: Grayson Constantine, Ian Lash ley, Conner Messer, Kevin Flores, Damien Freeman, Angel Henning, Steven Hicks, Alexus Johnson, Bryce Kent, Sophia Kirvin, Christopher Newell, Daijon Penamon, Gabriel Smith, Brandon Taranto By Michaelin Watts Special to the Times On Nov, 17, the Learning Center in Eastpoint hosted Gobble Up for Books, partnering with Bring Me A Book (BMAB) Franklin for the prekindergarten and Eastpoint HeadStart children and their families. Dr. Kathleen Cadwallader and her pre-K staff and students created beautiful art celebrating books and Thanksgiving. The art adorned the cafeteria walls and was the backdrop for the BMAB Franklin parent education program and a delicious Thanksgiving lunch prepared by the Learning Center cafeteria staff. Michaelin and Dave Watts and Carol Bareld led the program that focused on teaching parents and caregivers the importance of reading aloud to children from birth. The highlight of the training program featured pre-kindergarten parent Michelle Creek, in photo at right, capturing the attention and delight of the attending family members, old and young alike, through reading aloud with great expression the childrens book, Are You My Mother? Meanwhile BMAB Franklin volunteers Caty Greene, Carrie Kienzle, Tom Siculiano, Despina Williams and Sally Crown read aloud to the prekindergarten and HeadStart children in their classrooms. Each child was given a gift of a childs book to bring home for their very own. Participating Learning Center teachers were Val Miller, Tammy Sasnett, Mary Williams, and Cathy Wood with their staff: Nancy Sewell, Aileen Boatwright, Carol Wolff, Marcia Thomas, Mary Sewell, Ruby Benjamin, Jeannie Wood and Joy Townes. A B C Elementary The following is the Honor Roll for the ABC Schools rst nineweeks period Pre-schoolers gobble up books for Thanksgiving Schools More Honor Rolls next week!



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xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx 50 WWW.APALACHTIMES.COMPP hone: 850-653-8868W W eb : apalachtimes.comE E -m ail: dadlerstein@star.com Fax: 850-653-8036C C ir culation: 800-345-8688 DEAEADLILINESES FOOR NEEXTT WEEWEEK:S School News & SSociety: 11 a.m. Friday Real EE state AAds: 11 a.m. ThursdayL Legal A Ads: 11 a.m. FridayC Classied Display A Ads: 11 a.m. FridayC Classied L Line AAds: 5 p.m. Monday CContact Us OOut to see IIndex By David AdlersteinTimes City Editor Franklin Countys jobless rate dropped again in October, falling for the second straight month by 0.3 percentage points. According to preliminary numbers released Friday by the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity (DEO), the countys unemployment rate fell to 7.5 percent last month, from 427 people without jobs to 411. The drop comes as the labor force shrank by 56 workers, from 5,550 in September to 5,449 last month. The countys labor force remains larger than it was one year ago, when it comprised 5,252 workers, and the jobless rate was higher, at 8.2 percent. Franklin Countys jobless picture put it at seventh best in the state, better than both the national average of 9 percent, and the state average of 10.3 percent. Monroe and Liberty counties had the states lowest rate, each at 6.3 percent, followed by Walton 6.8, Okaloosa 7 and Alachua and Lafayette counties, each at 7.4 percent. Many of the counties with the lowest unemployment rates are those with relatively high proportions of government employment. There were 34 Florida counties with double-digit unemployment rates in October. The unemployment rate in the Gulf Coast Workforce region (Bay, Franklin, and Gulf counties) was 9.4 percent in October, 0.9 percentage points below the state rate, and 1.1 percentage points lower than the regions year ago rate of 10.3 percent. Bay County was at 9.5 percent, and Gulf County at 9.6 percent. Out of a labor force of 101,229, there were 9,498 unemployed Gulf Coast residents. Bay Countys unemployment Thursday, November 24, 2011 By David AdlersteinTimes City Editor Davie Lloyd has left her position as hospital CEO, although ofcials at Weems Memorial Hospital are not conrming whether she was removed or voluntarily stepped down. Staff at the hospital were notied Friday of Lloyds departure. Hospital ofcials said Cindy Drapal, the hospitals chief nursing ofcer (CNO), will take over as chief administrative ofcer. Lloyd, 39, was hired in July, at an annual salary of $145,000, to succeed Weems CEO Chuck Colvert. She most recently served as CEO of Fleming County Hospital, a 52bed not-for-prot county hospital in Flemingsburg, Ky., that was managed at that time by Quorum Health Resources, a hospital management rm headquartered in Brentwood, Tenn. County Commissioner Cheryl Sanders, who was critical last month of Lloyds initial performance, said she was notied last week of Lloyds departure. Sanders had asked for Lloyds removal during the commissioners Oct. 18 questioning of Mark OBryant, CEO of Tallahassee Memorial HealthCare. TMH has an afliation agreement with Weems, which employs the hospitals CEO and CNO, although both salaries come from Weems operating revenue. Sanders said Friday she had no further discussions with TMH ofcials since last months county commission meeting, when she agreed to amend her motion for Lloyds removal so as to grant TMH until Jan. 3, 2012, to satisfy the commissioners concerns about Lloyds performance. TMH said it plans to provide support to Drapal as part of an afliation agreement with Weems to provide management oversight for the Davie Lloyd out as Weems CEOLOISLOIS SWOSWO BO O DA A | The TimesDavie Lloyd By Lois SwobodaTimes Staff Writer Tourist Development Council funds received from BP are being used to fund such things as social media campaigns, contests and compiling a database of email addresses of visitors who have shown interest in the county. At the county commissions Nov. 1 meeting, Helen Spohrer, who was chosen to administer the TDC marketing funds, said BP had approved her third quarter marketing plan with no changes. She said because it is for the off-season, the budget for the campaign is the smallest of the year 18 percent of the total $1.67 million BP fund. She said 39 percent of the total funds were spent this summer during the second quarter campaign, and that the county is at the midpoint of the current BP marketing grant. We want to come back strong in the spring when everybodys booking, she said. We are up 13 percent for summer over last year and 15 percent over 2009. Thats huge, Spohrer said the TDC is targeting potential visitors by specic area of the county and recreational activity, such as shing, birding and ecotourism. She said the campaign also targets small niches such as geocaching (see Page A10 ), and that in most cases, the most targeted marketing brings the greatest return. Spohrer said her marketing group is also exploring new publications that serve niche markets, such as birding and shing, to advertise local activities. The campaign includes T-shirts and bumper stickers and highlights lodging specials over the upcoming quarter. The TDC is also sponsoring online contests, including one where three vacations will be given away. That contest requires entrants to name a rental company they wish to work with, part of a strategy to encourage potential visitors to look TDC broadens marketing campaignSee TdD C A7 Vol OL 126 Iss SS Ue E 30Opinion. . . . . . ............A A4 Society . . . . . . ............A A 8 Faith. . . . . . . . .............A A 9 Outdoors. . . . . ..........A A 10 Spor ts. . . . . . ............A A 11 T ide Chart. . . . . .........A A 13 Classieds. . . . . ........A A 14See LLOYdD A7 County jobless rate still improvingSee JObB LESS A12 Apalachicola funeral protests transmission lines Pal Rivers, a former Navy pilot, addresses the protest against Progress Energy putting giant transmission lines thrown the downtown. By David AdlersteinTimes City Editor The effort to thwart a Progress Energy plan to erect giant transmission lines through the heart of Apalachicola picked up steam last weekend. A symbolic funeral procession of about 100 mourners plodded through Apalachicolas downtown streets Saturday in protest of Progress Energys impending construction of the lines. Then on Monday morning, where one of the new poles is slated to be erected in the rightof-way in front of photographer Richard Bickels home at 96 Sixth St., a small early-morning gathering of about 20 activists greeted Progress workers at about 7:30 a.m. The group had parked their cars along the curb, making work impossible, and brandished signs deploring the project. The funeral procession moves through the downtown Saturday. Richard Bickel made his feeling known Monday as a pole was about to be erected in front of his home.PP hotos by DA VId D AdAD LEr R STEIn N The TimesSee POLES A2Crazy for geocaching, AA10TThanksgiving on SSt. George IIslandThere will be a community Thanksgiving lunch at 12:30 p.m. at the St. George Island United Methodist Church, 201 E. Gulf Beach Drive. Turkey and ham provided, bring covered dish. There will also be a community Thanksgiving dinner at Eddy Teachs Raw Bar at 4 p.m. Bring covered dish or dessert if you can. Band begins around 7 p.m.AApalachicola C Christmas celebrationThe Apalachicola Christmas Celebration will light up Apalachicola from 4 to 8 p.m. Nov. 25, the day after Thanksgiving. Santa arrives on shrimp boat at 4 p.m. at the City Dock on Water Street, and will hear childrens Christmas wishes. On Saturday, Nov. 26, city celebration continues with afternoon holiday programs, caroling, and Santa. On Sunday, Nov. 27 the Tree of Remembrance Ceremony takes place at Riverfront Park at 3 p.m., a nondenominational activity to honor loved ones during the holidays. Reception follows. For info, call 653-9419.EEastpoint CChristmas celebration Dec. 1Santa will be in Eastpoint at the Eastpoint Pavilion on Patton Drive on Thursday, Dec. 1 from 6-8 p.m. For information, call 653-5596.IIsland LLightsThe annual Island Lights festivities begin at 5 p.m. Friday, Dec. 2, at mid-island in the St. George Lighthouse Park. The one-mile Jingle Jog starts at 5 p.m. on the bike path in front of Lighthouse Park and proceeds through the business district. No fee. Come a little before 5 p.m. to sign in. For more information, see www. SGILights.com or call 9277744.HHoliday Fresh MMarketThe Holiday Fresh Market featuring handmade, fresh products, locally made baked goods and natural creations takes place on Dec. 3 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. in downtown Apalachicola. For information call 653-9419.

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LocalA2 | The Times Thursday, November 24, 2011 By 8:20 a.m., the crowd had moved their vehicles, after Police Chief Bobby Varnes requested that they abide by the law. Everything ended quietly, and without incident, but the anger that had been voiced in polite, formal terms Saturday was clearly evident and more acute in the morning air. Moving to the sounds of a melancholy dirge, and led by a horse-drawn carriage bearing a black wooden casket, Saturdays protest marked the high point of a growing, but 11th hour, push by activists to prevent the energy company from erecting the poles, 75to 90-feet tall and weighing 30,000 pounds, through the downtown. Were not here to bury our community; were here to save our community. This towns a historic treasure, said Tom Daly, president of the Apalachicola Area Historical Society, which has championed opposition to the poles for more than a year. Against a backdrop of shrimp boats, Daly spoke from a dais erected in Riverfront Park, before it set a casket draped in the citys ag. Speaker after speaker deplored the enormous concrete transmission lines, and urged Progress Energy to come to the table and consider ways of either burying the lines underground, or rerouting them around the downtown, where a once bustling seafood industry has gradually given way to an expanding tourist market. Today, the tallest structures in town are shrimp boat masts. These poles will dwarf the buildings along the waterfront, said Bickel, whose acclaimed works have preserved in black-and-white Franklin Countys seafood heritage. They (Progress) have no consideration for visual integrity or living things. He noted that he had just returned from a photo assignment in Albania, one of the poorest countries in the world. But theyre able to bury their power lines underground, he said. They can put enough money to prevent this blight. The mock funeral followed less than a week after a unanimous decision by Apalachicola city commissioners Nov. 15 to ask Progress Energy to halt for at least 90 days construction of the lines through the downtown. Work on the new line is ongoing from both Port St. Joe to the west, and from Eastpoint, across the Apalachicola River, to the east. Commissioner Jimmy Elliott, who had made the motion to request the moratorium, was given a warm welcome Saturday as he addressed the crowd, recalling how the decision in his youth to get away from this town and ght in Vietnam had given way decades later to a strong desire to defend it. No one who possessed a great work of art would want somebody to pour paint on it and ruin it, he said. He likened the protesters, many of whom are comparative newcomers in contrast to local families such as his who go back four and ve generations, to the work of American soldiers abroad. Youve come here to defend it, he said. Allies come and help native people keep what they have. The protestors also heard from former Clerk of Court Pal Rivers, a retired Navy pilot who once gave ight training to astronaut Neil Armstrong, who would later become the rst man to walk on the moon. The goal of these new power lines are not to serve us, its a pass-through to some other area, said Rivers, 88. Were unique and we need to preserve this, noting that the town boasts of about 900 historic homes and buildings. Progress has shown a disregard for our efforts to preserve historic ambience, he said. He also mentioned that on a recent visit to Istanbul, one of the most historic cities in the world, he had noticed that they had managed to bury their electric lines so as not to mar the landscape. The crowd also heard words of encouragement from several people active in the anti-pole movement, including Susan Richardson, Leslie Coon, and Bill Spohrer, who added the only note of raw politics to the afternoon. Wheres our mayor, and why isnt he here? he asked. Stay strong and keep at it, Richardson urged the crowd. Dont stop. With the clock ticking, and ongoing uncertainty what legal avenues are open to the SaveApalach group, they have enlisted the help of Arthur Buddy Jacobs, a prominent land use attorney out of Fernandina Beach who was instrumental in defeating the planned construction of a Walmart there. We just want 90 days to sit down and talk about it, he said. Were hopeful theyll give that to us. Jacobs, who in recent days has taken the towns case to U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson, former U.S. senator and Progress board member Mel Martinez, Attorney General Pam Bondi and other state ofcials, said Apalachicolas preservation should be of concern to both the state and nation. You are a United States of America town, a state treasure, he said. The state of Florida needs to step up. Actor Ed Tiley, dressed in the attire of a 19th century preacher, closed the protest with the reading of a prayer he penned for the occasion. Let us pray that the almighty power company repents, let us pray that they see the error of their ways, he intoned. For they have come unto this city butchering our landscape, for they are engaged in carving a scar through the middle of history. All in the name of Progress. POLES from page A1 Photos by DAVId D | The TimesAttorney Buddy Jacobs addresses the crowd on Saturday. Actor Ed Tiley glances at the symbolic casket, before later reciting a poem he penned for the occasion. Commissioner Jimmy Elliott speaks out against the proposed transmission lines.

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LocalThe Times | A3Thursday, November 24, 2011 2nd Annual Forgotten Coast Warrior WeekendA 501-C3 Non Prot CorporationTo all of our 2011 Patriotic Business and Organization Sponsors: SILVER SPONSORSCapital City Bank Centennial Bank Dockside Caf Dover Foundation EdgeWater Yamaha El Governor Motel Harts Marine & Outdoor MainStay Suites Sunset Coastal Grill BRONZE SPONSORS98 Real Estate Group Bill Cramer Chevrolet Calcutta City of Mexico Beach Express Lane FairPoint Communications Joe Mamas Wood Fired Pizza Ladies Auxiliary VFW Post 10069 Port St. Joe Ling Ding 2011 Scallop Cove Semper Fi Sisters SikorskySPECIAL CONTRIBUTORS FRIENDS OF THE EVENT GOLD SPONSORGulf County TDCPLATINUM SPONSORBlueWater Outriggers VFW Post 10069 Port St. Joe Thank you all those who volunteered time and talent.We would like to sincerely thank all the individuals and businesses who participated in bringing this most worthwhile event to our area. Tax deductible contributions can be made to Forgotten Coast Warrior Weekend, P.O. Box 1022, Port St. Joe, FL 32457. If your business or organization donated and we failed to list your name, please contact our organization.

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At-large voting a must in 2012Recognizing that many of our Franklin County voters want the county to return to at-large voting, we feel that the time has come to renew our efforts. Last year, the Franklin County Voters CountyWide Voting Political Action Committee (PAC), a 501(c)(4) grassroots endeavor, asked voters who want to see this change to sign a petition to demand that the question be placed on the 2010 general election ballot. For various reasons for example, some voters signed the petition twice and some signatures were illegible our effort fell short of the required number of signatures needed in order for the petition to be placed on the ballot. Again, we are striving to have our petition placed on the next ballot. This time, we have more volunteers, and voters can go to the same sites to sign up as before. In order to avoid the main problems that our last effort suffered, we are using single sheets for each voter and we are asking that they sign using the signature that they use when voting. New voters can call either of the phone numbers listed here to nd out where they can go to sign: 653-7013 or 653-9081.Cora L Russ, SecretaryFranklin County Voters County-Wide Voting PACGag grouper needs regional management planEditors note: The following letter was written to the commissioners of the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission. My name is Alan Lamarche, and I am a retired deputy director of law enforcement for the old Florida Game and Fresh Water Fish Commission. I addressed you at last years meeting at the Pat Thomas Law Enforcement Academy, concerning the abundant gag grouper and red drum populations in the northeastern Gulf. I have over 40 years of rsthand knowledge and experience with both species in this part of the world. In my later years, I have devoted much of my life to introducing youngsters to the wonders of saltwater sport shing, especially to gag grouper as our local populations are so accessible in the spring and fall months. I support the Beau Turner Youth Conservation Center and volunteer there. Needless to say, I am distressed to learn that NOAH Fisheries is proposing a permanent gag grouper recreational season from July 1 through Oct. 30. These hot summer, thunderstorm months are the worst shing time for us because gag grouper are living in the deep, cool waters that are 50-plus nautical miles from our shores. In the Big Bend, we sh for gags from April through mid June and again from late October through December, because the gags come into our shallow, near shore waters in 20-40. During the spring and fall months, we dont have to face the daily dangers of getting caught well off shore in summer afternoon storms. I will not take youngsters on a 100mile round trip to bring them back in lightning and rough seas. There are few grouper shers left in the Big Bend. The hundreds of folks from south Georgia who, only a few years ago, came down for weekly gag grouper trips have stopped coming, sold their boats, beach houses and sh camps. The Big Bend Grouper waters are barren of shermen. I have taken kids out to prime territory, on weather perfect days, where I had historically seen 15 to 20 boats and not seen a single grouper shing boat all day. Its not because the gag grouper arent there! We have more gags now than we have ever had, especially in the spring. These gags migrate to deep water in the summer, and they are only accessible to long-range charters, overnight head boats and commercials. There are no head boats and fewer than a hand full of grouper charters or commercial grouper shers out of Franklin, Wakulla, Jefferson and Taylor counties. If you accept this summertime gag grouper season, your actions will sound the nal death knell for what remains of the recreational gag grouper shers who once enjoyed Apalachee Bay and its magnicent shallow water gag grouper shery. The only answer is for FWC to regionally manage gag grouper, just like you already do for trout and red drum. I have given up on NOAH Fisheries, as Im convinced that their mission is to eliminate recreational shers. I still have hope for and faith in my FWC commissioners and believe that your wisdom and passion for Floridas abundant, renewable natural resources will prevail. Respectfully Submitted, Major Alan Lamarche, RetiredNo progress visible hereRambling the miles from Joe to home I suddenly slowed to breathe again Aghast at that before me. Unwitnessed in absence a journey North, The rampage had barreled in Like plague besetting land. This my favorite to the City, The approach wild in eld and forest, Scathed and scarred now In barren monuments Idols to unimaginative advance. Fearing future mileage I stopped and gazed At another universe real, As if some distant, lifeless time. Home now, weeks later: Fiercely and unremittingly They still cut and claw And another frozen sentinel Of might without mind arises. Us devoid men Are digging deeper Dichotomous existence To the centuries of hand-hewn And mortared might. Laid in miles of history, I disenchanted wind streets North And East to water, Watching one then another Of the ugly bulwarks thrust. What value mindless growth? I say no progress visible here.H. Melicent Remy Thursday, November 24, 2011 OpinionA4 | The Times USPS 027-600Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 VP/Publisher: Karen Hanes Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six monthsHome delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERSIn case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola Times LETTERS TO THE EDITORSpecial to the TimesState Rep. Leonard Bembry (D-North Florida) on Nov. 17 announced his candidacy for United States Congress from Floridas Second District, which includes Franklin County. Bembry has led the necessary paperwork with the Federal Election Commission and will begin traveling the district and building a campaign immediately. A formal announcement tour will follow. The priorities of this Congress couldnt be more wrong for north Florida and our nation, Bembry said. While politicians in Washington ght with each other and refuse to address the big issues we face, real people everywhere continue to struggle with a stalled economy and poor job market that need a jolt charge and a runaway budget that needs to be responsibly controlled. Steve Southerland has not delivered on the political promises he made in 2010 to create jobs, change Washington, D.C., and bring practical solutions that will put Floridians back to work and tackle the tough challenges we face. Bembry was elected to the Florida House of Representatives in 2008 and was re-elected last year. He is one of the most independent members of the legislature and perhaps the most conservative Democrat in the Florida House. In the Legislature, Bembry quickly earned a reputation as an expert on budget, economic development and agriculture issues. He believes that creating new and better jobs, supporting small businesses by cutting taxes and regulations, protecting our seniors and Veterans, and preserving traditional values are the biggest issues facing America. Bembry will energetically and faithfully serve the remainder of his term in the Florida House and looks forward to a busy and productive 2012 legislative session. I was a farmer and businessman for almost 40 years before I decided that it was my responsibility to pursue public service. I am grounded in north Florida because its always been my home. It is where I was raised and where Susan and I have chosen to raise our family. We love it here, said Bembry. I am concerned about the kind of future we are leaving for our children and grandchildren. The country is not on the right track and our elected leaders in Washington, D.C., are failing the test of true citizenship by playing politics instead of solving problems. If elected, I will go to Washington as a commonsense, honest, hardworking, conservative problem solver who believes that a dose of north Florida values and can-do spirit is what we need to get this country moving again, Bembry said. Bembry and Susan, his wife of 44 years, have three children and nine grandchildren. The Bembry family spans four generations in north Florida.Bembry seeks Congressional seat LEOnaNARD BEMbBRY Special to the TimesTallahassee resident Jay Liles has announced his intention to run for the second Congressional District in the Big Bend. The citizens of District 2 know that Congress isnt working for them. Too much time and energy is spent on issues that divide rather than unite. Our elected representatives should be working together to nd solutions rather than tearing down our country and each other, said Liles, 59, in making his announcement. A policy consultant for the Apalachicola Riverkeeper and the Florida Wildlife Federation, Liles has served in both the private and public sectors and said he understands that our country was built on the strength of our working families. As the congressman for District 2, Liles said he plans to work with both Democrats and Republicans in true job creation that rewards hard work and fair play, not millionaires or Wall Street. While Congress talks about jobs they are actually stiing opportunity and impeding our economic recovery, he said. Sadly, Congress seems more interested in political maneuvering and gamesmanship than addressing the concerns of the citizens they represent. With a professional background in banking and insurance, advocate for clean energy and environmental stewardship and eight years as a state employee, Liles believes there is a balance between business and government. Too much government interference can hamper business development, but insufcient government oversight can lead to public health and safety issues, lack of consumer protections, and as America experienced with a deregulated banking industry an economic crisis, he said. Government isnt the bad guy. In fact, Im always amazed to hear elected ofcials tear down government and government employees. They seem to have forgotten that they ARE the government. When they attack and blame the government that they are a part of, these elected ofcials demonstrate short-sightedness and a lack of basic civics education, Liles said. My candidacy will be about working toward solutions that make our state and nation stronger. This campaign is not about issues that divide us; it is not about a narrow and mean-spirited political ideology that blinds its followers from seeking creative opportunities. We can disagree, but we must do so respectfully and remember that we are all Floridians and Americans. Too many are still unemployed; too few jobs have been created, and too many are on the verge of losing hope for a better future, Liles said. As your congressman, I will focus on ways to create real jobs and help our economy recover and thrive. District 2 constituents need a congressman who listens and takes action on the issues that are important to them. They need a congressman who serves them, rather than outside special interests and partisan agendas, he said. From Apalachicola to Live Oak and Panama City, to Cross City and everywhere in between, we are fortunate to live in one of the best and most beautiful places in the country and it would be my privilege to represent all of the citizens in District 2. Married to wife Christy, Liles is a registered Democrat. Born in Gainesville and raised in Plant City, he earned a degree in political science from the University of Florida in 1974. Jay Liles to seek Congressional seat JaA Y LIlL ESOur traditional Thanksgiving dinner, at the Senior Center, was very good. Lots of good food, good friends and lots of fellowship. It was our last lunch for the year. The center will be closed until Thursday, Jan. 5, 2012. Have a good holiday season, and thank you for your support. Chillas Hall will open at 5:30 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 30, for Bingo for the Bus. Come over and join us. Bingo starts at 6:30 p.m. Cookies, coffee and soft drinks available. Who knows you might win! Fore! Members of the Lanark Village Golf Club will prepare and serve a pancake breakfast and other goodies on Saturday, Nov. 26. A donation of $5 will be collected at the door. The breakfast and Christmas bazaar will begin at 8 a.m. Lots of Christmas decorating and gift items for you to choose from. See ya there! For more information, you can call Pat at 697-2798 or Gay at 702340-3161. Betty Roberts and Mercy Henderson and all our villagers who are in St. James Rehab said hello. I go about three times a week. Surprise, surprise, surprise! The speed limit on the streets in Lanark Village is 15 miles per hour, not the other way around! On Highway 98, it is 45 mph. While you are cruising down the highway, be sure and glance up at the rearview mirror from time to time. There might be red and blue lights flashing, trying to get you to pull over so they can get by. Be kind to one another, check on the sick and housebound and when you come to a traffic light, remember: Red is stop, Green is go, and never go on the in-between. Until next time, God Bless America, our troops, the poor and the hungry.Golfers host Christmas bazaar breakfast S Saturday LanaANARK nNEWSJim Welsh

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LocalThe Times | A5Thursday, November 24, 2011 INVITATION TO BID: Franklin County Library Build-outThe Friends of the Franklin County Library as funded by USDA through a rural development grant requests bids from State of Florida registered licensed General and/or Building Contractors (as required by Florida Law) for the following project site located on Bayshore Drive with access on Hickory DipDrive, Eastpoint, Florida. PROJECTDESCRIPTION: Franklin County Library Build Out The 5,000 SF building shell is a pre-engineered steel frame built on a concrete slab on grade. The building shell has a steel roof and siding, with storefront doors and windows. Electrical service, in slab plumbing and conduit is in place. The scope of work required under this bid includes the nishing of the building and site. Plans completed by Johnson Peterson Architects and Prebble-Rish Engineering include but are not limited to the following: The building interior will feature steel stud and drywall partitions with the required insulation in exterior walls. Doors will be solid core wood in hollow metal frames. Cabinets and counter tops are plastic laminate. Floor covering will be either vinyl tile or commercial carpet. Ceilings will be lay-in acoustical tile. Lighting and plumbing xtures will be commercial grade for low maintenance and durability. Storm water ponds are in place and working. Although the entry drive is graded, nal grading, topsoil, sod and landscaping, limestone base and asphalt paving will be required to nish the site work. BIDOPENINGDATE: December 12th at 10am at Franklin County Public Library at 29 Island Dr., Eastpoint, FL 32328 (850) 670-8151 MANDATORY PRE-BID MEETING: Monday November 28th, 2011 at 10am at the project site. ANTICIPATED PROJECT BUDGET: $325,000 Questions to the architect/engineer must be received not later than December 2, 2011 5pm. FOR PURCHASINGOF BIDDOCUMENTS, AND SUBMITTAL REQUIREMENTS YOU MUST CONTACT SEMINOLE BLUEPRINTAT (850) 671-2714 ONORAFTERNOVEMBER 14, 2011. USDA and the Friends of the Franklin County Library reserve the right to reject any and all submissions, or accept minor irregularities in the best interest of the library. POINTOF CONTACT: John Lane, Project Manager, Johnson Peterson Architects (850) 224-9700 jlane@jparchitects.com FORGOTTEN COAST TV IS NOW ON MEDIACOM CHANNEL 3www.ForgottenCoastTV.com www.pulse-sgi.com By Lois Swoboda Times Staff Writer From humble beginnings, the Lanark Village Gumbo Cook-Off has hit its stride. This year, ve teams competed at the Nov. 12 event but the real news was the crowd. An estimated 350 people passed through the doors of the Lanark Boat Club and sampled gumbo from across the county. Two years ago, just three teams from the Eastpoint and St. George Island volunteer re department and Franklin County sheriffs ofce competed in the rst cook-off and only about 75 people attended. The cook-off benets the Lanark Village/St. James Volunteer Fire Department. Mike Rundel, president of the board that oversees the department, said the money this year will be used to install much-needed storm proof doors on the rehouse. Hardworking volunteers inside the boat club this year sold 150 chicken or shrimp gumbo dinners, and the two volunteer re departments from Eastpoint and St. George Island raised an additional $250 by selling their extra eats. Also participating this year were teams from the Crooked River Grill, the Cooking Academy from Franklin County High School and Nick and Carol Daddona, the rst-ever independent entrants in the competition. The sheriffs ofce was slated to cook but did not attend, in part due to the teams captain and chief cook, John Solomon, enduring exhaustion following his role overseeing the Florida Seafood Festival the weekend before. New this year was a live auction with over 25 items, which raised around $1,500 for the re department. Hugh Stovall was the auctioneer who cajoled a crowd of about 30 into spending their spare sawbucks. Highlighting the offerings were a gorgeous quilt handcrafted by Donna Briesacker; a Miracle Strip tour aboard a helicopter with Panama City Helicopter; a day of golf and overnight stay at St. James Bay Golf Resort, a baseball bat autographed by Hall of Fame catcher Johnny Bench and donated by Briesacker, and a gift basket of Paul Newman products, with a handwritten recipe, from Carrabelles Jackie Gay. By special invitation, Gay served on the judging panel this year. She was the winner of the Good Housekeeping/ Paul Newman/Gumbo Contest in 1997, which had Newman awarding $50,000 to the building fund for the Carrabelle Library. When the steam had cleared and the judges had spoken, taking home the top prize was the Daddona team. The Crooked River Grill nished in second place and Eastpoint Volunteer Fire Department in third place. The student team from the Franklin County School received a Just Because We Wanted To plaque for their hard work. Rundel said the event cleared about $3,000 for six hours work, which he said will be enough to buy new doors for the rehouse, the departments highest priority. He said he believes the re department can build on this success and stage an even bigger festival next year.Gumbo gusto stirs in Lanark Village Above: Members of the St. George Island Fire Department gumbo team confer on the preparation of the Hurricane Gumbo. Jay Abbott mans the spoon as Bud Hayes samples a secret ingredient and Fletcher offers to add his opinion. Above Right: Carol and Nick Daddona took rst place in the third annual Lanark Village Gumbo Cook-Off. Right: Deputy Chief Jim Joyner, left, and Chief George Pruett man Eastpoints booth with their collection of lucky green frogs. P hotos by LOIS SWOBODA | The TimesGumbo Crooked River Grill Style with sea scallops. Richard McLean and Jackie Gay cogitated on the relative merits of the ve gumbo entries.

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LocalA6 | The Times Thursday, November 24, 2011 CITY OF CARRABELLE PROPOSED ENACTMENT OF CITY ORDINANCEThe City Commission of the City of Carrabelle, Florida, proposes to enact the following ordinance: CITY OF CARRABELLE ORDINANCE 451 ORDINANCE AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF CARRABELLE, FLORIDA, PROVIDING FOR AMENDMENT OF ORDINANCE 434 PERTAINING TO WATER SERVICE RATES AND CHARGES; PROVIDING FOR AN INCREASE IN WATER SERVICE RATES; ESTABLISHING A TIERED CONSERVATION RATE STRUCTURE; PROVIDING FOR REPEAL OF ORDINANCES OR PARTS OF ORDINANCES, IN CONFLICT HEREWITH, TO THE EXTENT OF SUCH CONFLICT; AND ESTABLISHING AN EFFECTIVE DATE The proposed Ordinance may be inspected during regular hours at Carrabelle City Hall between 8 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., 1001 Gray Ave., Carrabelle, FL Monday through Friday, or call 850-697-2727. The proposed Ordinance will be considered for enactment during a public hearing to be held 6:00p.m., Thursday December 1, 2011 at the Carrabelle City Hall located at 1001 Gray Ave, Carrabelle, FL. Interested parties may appear at the hearing and be heard with respect to the proposed Ordinance. If an individual decides to appeal any decision made by the City Commission with respect to this meeting, a verbatim transcript may be required. If so, the individual should make provision for a transcript to be made at the meeting, (RE: Florida Statute 286.0105). Pursuant to the provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act, any person requiring special accommodation to participate in this meeting is asked to advise the city at least 48 hours before the meeting by contacting Keisha Smith at the above address or phone number. Robert C. Bruner Attorney Personal & Business BankruptcyOver 30 Years Legal Experience850-670-3030We are a debt relief agency. bankruptcy relief under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon advertisements. Before you decide, ask us to send you free written information experience. A-1 Quality Docks & Boatlifts Qualied Marine Contractor, Since 1967 Why Settle For Less850-653-7633 Environmental Permitting www.A1QualityDocks.com Docks Marinas Piers Bulkheads Boardwalks Boatslips Pile Driving Sea Walls Boat Lifts Retaining Walls BoathousesFloating Docks Larry Joe Colson Lic # 12-104 Res./Com. & Ins. By Lois Swoboda Times Staff Writer A local couple have reached out to military families stationed at Tyndall Air Force Base and welcomed them into their home. Ken and Brigette Schroeder wanted to share their happiness with those who ght for freedom. The owners of the Bryant House Bed and Breakfast decided the best way to do this was to open their home and hometown with soldiers and their families. On Veterans Day weekend, the rst of seven families being treated to a retreat came to Franklin County for a little peace and quiet. In January, Master Sgt. Marc Neubert will deploy overseas for his sixth tour of duty. He was rst sta tioned abroad in 2000, the Year of the Family, when his oldest son was two months old. Before leaving to undergo train ing in Texas next month, he is spend ing as much time as possible with his wife, Virginia, and their three young sters. The couple was delighted when, during a Family Recognition Day celebration at Tyndall, their names were drawn to receive a free week end visit to Apalachicola. The Neuberts are the rst of seven military families that will be honored with a weekend getaway to Franklin County. The retreats are the brainchild of the Schroeders, although since conceiving the notion, the couple has enlisted the help of other local businesses. Helen Tudor and Tony Phillips have both agreed to provide lodging for visiting soldiers and their families. Caf Floridita, Caf Con Leche, Papa Joes, Captain Snooks, The Sea food Grill and Charles Wilson have all provided gift certicates for meals to be used by the families. Captains Tony Phillips and AJ Smith are also on board to provide boat tours for the visitors during their stay and Ah La Carte will sup ply the families with transportation around town. Over dinner at the Bryant House, Brigette Schroeder told the Nue berts her family had survived after World War II only because of care packages received from American GIs. This year, she said, I wanted to give something back. The Schroeders say they plan to continue to honor military families and hope to bring even more Ameri can heroes to Apalachicola. While in town the Neuberts visit ed the ice museum, the Apalachicola National Estuarine Research walk and the Three Soldiers Detail at Vet erans Plaza, and were greeted by Mayor Van Johnson. The Neuberts said they were im pressed with how much there was to do in Apalachicola and that they appreciated the peace and quiet. Its much better than Panama City Beach, said Virginia Neubert.Special to the TimesCommunity Bancorp merged its banking subsid iaries, Superior Bank, N.A. and Cadence Bank, N.A., into a regional bank Nov. 11 to form the new Cadence Bank, N.A. Superior Bank has a branch in Apalachicola, as well as in Gulf County and Mexico Beach. With nearly $4.1 bil lion in assets, the new Cadence Bank will employ 1,200 people at more than 100 branches throughout Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, Tennessee and Texas, with headquarters in Birmingham, Ala. and cor porate ofces in Starkville, Miss. and Houston, Texas. The merger introduces a strong and energized competitor to the marketplace, said Paul Murphy, chairman of the new Ca dence Bank and chief ex ecutive ofcer of Cadence Bancorp, the successor to Community Bancorp. Some of the most expe rienced professionals in the banking industry have come together to create a best-of-class bank. These are bankers who are dedi cated to making Cadence an exceptional banking ex perience for customers and an unrivaled work environment for our employees. Customers of the cur rent Cadence and Superior banks will experience no interruption in service dur ing transition to the new Cadence Bank. Customers will notice a fresh in-branch experience as employees highlight new products and services over the coming months and as branches feature new signage and collateral material in the coming weeks. Tailoring the customers experience by listening to their needs will be the central focus of our efforts, noted Sam Tortorici, chief executive ofcer of the new Cadence Bank. Building on Cadences 126-year his tory and through a focus on localized customer service and commitment to engag ing the community, we hope to enhance our customers business and personal nancial results by hearing their needs and crafting sound nancial solutions. Ofcials said the wellcapitalized union will result in improvements to technology, including intro duction of mobile banking to Superior customers in Alabama and Florida, as well as enhanced treasury management services for businesses. Cadence Bancorp, LLC (CBC), formerly Community Bancorp, LLC, is a bank holding company headquartered in Houston, Tex as. CBC has raised equity capital commitments of $1 billion for the purpose of making investments in the U.S. banking sector, with a particular focus on community banks that are well positioned to benet from the equity capital, manage ment and industry exper tise CBC can provide. For additional informa tion, visit SuperiorBank. com or CadenceBank.com.Superior Bank now Cadence Bank Bryant House reaches out to military family LOIS SWOBODA | The TimesThe Neubert family, from left dad Marc, son Logan, daughter Erica and mom Virginia, and son Mason on the far right, joined Ken and Brigitte Schroeder for dinner at Caf Floridita during their weekend in Apalachicola.

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LocalThe Times | A7Thursday, November 24, 2011 AFFORDABLE GREATER APALACHICOLA3 BR/2BA 1142 sq.ft home with large fenced back yard, storage building. Great condition at a great price!MLS# 244700.................$115,000 Travis Stanley 850.653.6477 Grayson Shepard 850.653.6718 Kim Davis 850.653.6875NEW LISTING! ST. GEORGE ISLAND Bayview home nestled on a private lot. 3BR/2Ba with open deck, expansive windows, sun room, screened porch, very tidy. MLS# 245514...........$299,000 COMMERCIAL APALACHICOLATwo commercial lots for sale in Apalachicola on the corner of Commerce and Penton St. Great location, one block of Hwy 98, near all the best shops and restaurants in Apalach!MLS# 244870..............$150,000NEW LISTING! ST. GEORGE ISLAND Beachview just half a block to the beach! 3 BR/2 BA, classic beach cottage with great decks, loft, widows walk. Right on beach access, popular rental! MLS#245466..................$349,000CHARMING PRE-CONSTRUCTION ST. GEORGEISLANDGulf view 3 BR/2BA, lovely front porch, bead board cabinets, granite countertops, hardiboard, metal roof. Built by Galloway Construction MLS# 245564.................$289,000GREATER APALACHICOLAEnjoy quiet country living on 3.75 acres. Lovely custom built 3BR/2.5 BA home with many upgrades Jacuzzi, deck, large walk in closet. 1600 sq.ft. outbuilding on concrete pad.MLS# 244666.................$275,000 Leon Teat 850.653.5656 Jamie Crum 850.370.0835 Sandy Mitchem 850.899.8300 THE BOYS ARE BACK IN TOWNWeems is proud to announce the return of Southland ER Physicians. J. Plum, MD Joda Lynn, MD Patrick Conrad, MD Paul Hart, MD Timothy Adamcryk, MD Garrett Chumney, MD Vincent Ivers, MD Nathaniel Hawkins, MD24 hour Emergency Services, Acute In-Patient Care, Swingbed Rehabilitation Program, Diagnostic and Surgical Services135 Avenue G Apalachicola, Fl 32320 (850) 653-8853Our mission is to improve the health status of the residents and visitors to Franklin County, by providing quality, compassionate, cost effective and convenient health care through community leadership and in collaboration with other healthcare organizations which serve our communities. closely at the websites. There will also be a contest for the most creative use of a Were Salty bumper sticker. Spohrer presented each commissioner with a Were Salty T-shirt. She said the Facebook account for the TDC is being visited by 4,000 to 5,000 visitors each month. Some of the investments funded by BP money will be long-term amenities. Spohrer said. An improved county map will hit the streets in April, and visitor centers will receive ve brochures, each dealing with a different area of the county. Initially, the brochures will not contain advertising, but it will be possible to insert pages dealing with seasonal activities in the center, she said. TDC board member Paul Parker has suggested an audio map of the county. Two-minute recorded messages accessed by phone are also under consideration. In addition, Franklin County is a sponsor of Springtime Tallahassee this year, which Spohrer said draws visitors statewide. Commissioner Pinki Jackel said more than 250,000 attended the opening parade last year. Spohrer said another important resource being compiled by the TDC is an email database of prospective visitors. She said the group has already collected more than 13,000 entries. Those addresses will still be available once the BP money is gone, she said. TDC from page A1 LLOYD from page A1hospital. The Weems board of directors will meet Dec. 1 at the hospital to develop a plan for selection of new leadership for the hospital. In a prepared statement, the Weems board said it is focused on immediate resolution of important strategic efforts that will strengthen the quality of patient care and the nancial success of the hospital. Warren Jones, a TMH spokesman, said TMH administrators are assisting in reviewing nancial systems at Weems and in developing plans to improve accounting processes. Were working with the Weems board and the county commission to determine what the next steps are, and what we do with the leadership with Weems, said Jones. Theres a lot of communication that has gone on and I think that communication bodes well for the future, that there will be open lines of communication. The hospital remains without a chief nancial ofcer, after Kim Davis was let go shortly after Lloyd came on board. But nancial experts from TMH have been taking a hands-on role in preparing Weems for a nancial audit due by the end of January. At the Nov. 15 county commission meeting, Geri Forbes, administrator of regional development for TMH, reported that TMH ofcials had become more involved on a daily basis with the hospitals nances, with the upcoming audit their highest priority. I dont want to pay off stiff penalties on this, warned Sanders, and Forbes reassured her the work was proceeding ahead of schedule. Weve gotten great cooperation from staff at Weems, said Forbes. The technical deadline is several months away, and the level of reports and schedules being prepared will be of great ease of use. Clerk of Courts Marcia Johnson reported Weems has about $481,000 in funds, although most of that is in certicates of deposit, money market accounts and grant funds, with less than $60,000 in cash on hand. In her Nov. 15 report to the county commission, Lloyd said there was great concern among rural hospitals that if the Congressional supercommittee charged with decit reduction failed to reach consensus, there would be an automatic 2 percent reduction in Medicare payments. She said the hospital was moving forward with implementing new rules requiring a transition to electronic health records (EHR) by 2015, or risk reductions in Medicare payments. We must start it in 2012 because if we dont have a system in place, we reduce reimbursements, said Lloyd. She said Weems had received a $25,000 grant to help with the pharmacy dispensing part of the transition, but that the overall cost of the EHR transition, to an Internet-based system, would be more than $400,000. She said Weems has made an initial payment of $50,000 to Razor Insights, a certied provider that the hospital board selected to implement the EHR project over a four-year contract. Weems will pay $96,000 annually after the hospital has reached the government-mandated threshold of meaningful use. Lloyd estimated that Weems should be realistically able to recoup between 70 and 75 percent of the cost of the entire EHR project. Most contracts are for one year so because it is for four years it shows commitment, that they have skin in the game, she said. Whether they will stick around (after that) depends on whether they are making money. Lloyd said Razor will not require payment until Weems receives its incentive payments. Theyve met with staff to assure they were comfortable because if you dont have buy-in from staff, it doesnt matter how much money you spend, said Lloyd, noting the company plans to conduct through training in the new technology. Dr. Pat Conrad, from the group that staffs the emergency room, has replaced Dr. Stephen Miniat as the medical staff representative on the Weems board, Lloyd reported. Apalachicola cardiologist Shezad Sanaullah serves as the hospitals chief of staff. Lloyd also reported the hospitals average daily inpatient census is three patients, with an average of 15 people visiting the emergency room each day and 10 receiving outpatient care. LOIS SWOBODA | the TimesHelen Spohrer presented each county commissioner with a Were Salty T-shirt.

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PETOFTHEWEEK Franklin County Humane Society Qualications: Expertise in: Now Accepting AppointmentsCall Toll Free 888-681-5864 For more info www.seclung.com Lung Disease SpecialistRob Garver, MDNow Seeing Patients in Port St. Joe NOW BCBS-FL IN-NETWORK PROVIDER dbutler@coastalcoverage.com Locally owned and operated to meet all your insurance needs SocietyA8 | The Times Thursday, November 24, 2011Panhandle Players played to packed audiences last weekend at the Dixie Theatre, as they performed their trio of one-act plays Work, Play, Love. First up was the work: The Temp, a comedy by Roy Friedman. Veteran actress Gina Vicari showed her skills doing slapstick physical comedy as a hapless temporary worker, thoroughly annoying administrative assistant Sharon Solomon and newcomer Katie Maxwell in this show, directed by veteran Tom Loughridge with help from stage manager, Beverly Kelley. The subject was play in At Half Time, by Art Shulman, a comedy about an over-60 womens basketball team who are being crushed by the Little Sisters of Mercy, a team of silent nuns who opened the play with a lively dance performance of their own. Their coach, played by Players regular Jeff Ilardi, and players Elaine Kozlowsky, Laura Baney, Bobbi Seward, Judy Loftus and Barbara Hartseld, were brought comically alive under the guiding hand of directors Ed Tiley and Caroline Ilardi. Poignancy was the touch in the third play, Mark Twains Diaries of Adam and Eve adapted by David Birney is and directed by Dan Wheeler. Stars Hank Kozlowsky as Adam and Stephaney Provenzano as Eve, gave the audience a funny, at times painful understanding of what it means to love. By David Adlerstein PANHANDLE PLAYERS TO HOLD AUDITIONSPanhandle Players will be holding auditions for their next production Murder at the Howard Johnson. There are roles for two men and one woman, for ages 35 to 55. Also needed are stage hands and backstage crew. Auditions will be held at the Raney Carriage House on Wednesday, Nov. 30 and Thursday, Dec. 1 at 7 p.m. For more information, contact Ed Tiley 6536951 or Margy Oehlert 653-7774.Panhandle Players one-acts delightful Left, starring in the play At Half Time are, from left, Bobbi Seward, Elaine Kozlowsky, Laura Baney, Barbara Hartseld, Judy Loftus and their frustrated coach, Jeff Ilardi. Bottom left, Bringing to life Mark Twains Diaries of Adam and Eve were Stephaney Provenzano as Eve, and Hank Kozlowsky as Adam. Bottom right, Appearing in The Temp were, from left, Gina Vicari, Katie Maxwell, and Sharon Solomon.Photos by EDED TILEYTILEY | Special to The TimesSpecial to the TimesThe Gulf Coast Workforce Board celebrated 15 years of providing workforce services to the region at its annual meeting and luncheon Nov. 16 at Florida State Universitys Panama City Campus Holley Center. At the meeting, Executive Director Kim Bodine reviewed the local workforce system performance over the last year. She said this included assisting 526 employers recruit and hire workers, serving 52,006 walk ins at the Workforce Center, connecting 5,336 individuals to employment, providing in-demand training and/or employment services to 1,014 adults, dislocated workers, and youth under the Workforce Investment Act, and helping 216 families transition from welfare to self sufciency. We owe our great performance to our hardworking staff, our dedicated volunteer board members and our service providers, Bodine said. Service providers for the workforce board include Friends of the Franklin County Library, TIGERS Program, Bay District Schools, Bay STARS; Haney Workforce Training Center;; Gulf Coast State College, Workforce Center; and Royal American Management. Individuals from each of the service providers, along with their case manager were recognized for successfully completing their workforce program. From Franklin County, Shary Monroe was recognized for her participation in the On the Job Training Program at the Butler Insurance Agency, and Cody Daniels and Jimmy Goggins for their participation in the Friends of Franklin County Public Library TIGERS program. At the meeting the board also voted on a new slate of ofcers for 2011. Gary Ross from Gulf County was appointed to serve his second term as chairman of the board. We will focus on increasing the publics awareness and understanding of the services available through the workforce system. Our goal is to do an even better job of bringing employers and job seekers together, Ross said. Other board members elected as 2011 ofcers include vice-chair Tommy Ward (Bay County), and executive committee members Alisa Kinsaul (Bay County), Ruth Phillips (Gulf County) and Betty Croom and Ted Mosteller (Franklin County). The Gulf Coast Workforce Board is a public/private partnership chartered by the State of Florida to administer workforce development programs in Bay, Gulf, and Franklin counties. Its mission is to provide leadership, oversight, guidance, and assistance to institutions and agencies delivering training and workforce services in order to meet the economic and employment needs of these three counties.Workforce Board marks 15-year anniversary SpSP ECIAL TO THE TT IMES Jimmy Goggins, left, Bonnie Ball, case manager for the TIGERS program, center, and Cody Daniels were recognized as success stories for their participation in the Friends of the Franklin County Public Library TIGERS program. Army E-4 Casey Golden and his wife, Taylor, are stationed at Ft. Campbell, Ky. with the United States Army 101st Airborne. The Goldens will be home from Kentucky from Monday, Nov. 28 until Friday, Dec. 2. Their rst child, son Kiowa Louis Golden, is due Jan. 28, 2012, at Fort Campbell, Ky. All family and friends are invited to a baby shower on Tuesday, Nov. 29, at 6 p.m. at the Eastpoint Church of God Fellowship Hall. Refreshments will be served. The shower is being hosted by Alisha Golden, Rose Messer and Eary Worthy. For more information, call 697-2849. Shower Tuesday for baby boy Golden

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The Times | A9Thursday, November 24, 2011 The United Methodist Churches of Franklin County Welcome You First United Methodist Church of ApalachicolaWorship Service 11:00 a.m. every Sunday Sunday School 10:00 a.m. 75 5th St. Apalachicola 653-9530 fumcapalach@gtcom.net Pastor: Rev. Themo PatriotisCarrabelle United Methodist ChurchWorship Services 10:45 a.m. Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Celebrate Recovery Mondays 7-9 p.m. 102 NE Ave. B Carrabelle 697-3672 Pastor: Julie StephensEastpoint United Methodist ChurchWorship Service 10:00 a.m. every Sunday Healing service every fourth Monday at 7:00 p.m. 317 Patton Dr. (corner of David St.) 670-8825 Pastor: Rev. Beth WhiteSt. George Island United Methodist Church9:00 a.m. Worship Service 10:00 a.m. Fellowship Hour 201 E. Gulf Beach Dr. 9274635 www.sgiumc.org Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis First Pentecostal Holiness Church379 Brownsville Road Apalachicola Were excited about what Gods doing!!!Sunday School 9:45 am Sunday Morning Worship 10:45 am Sunday Evening Service 6:00 pm Monday, Youth Group 6:30 pm Wednesday, Royal Rangers, G.A.P.7:00 pm Wednesday Worship & Word 7:30 pmNursery Provided during regular church services 7:00 7:00 First Baptist ChurchSt. George Island 501 E. Bayshore Drive 927-2257 R. Michael Waley, Pastor Join us as we praise and worship the living Christ. Great is the Lord and most worthy of praise. Psalm 145:3 Sunday Bible Study................................................10:00am Worship Praise........................................................11:00am Sunday Night............................................................7:00pm Wednesday Power Hour......................................7:00pm Wednesday Youth at S.P.L.A.S.H.......................7:00pm Walking in Christ R. Michael Whaley, Pastor WELCOMES YOUChurch of the Ascension101 NE First Street CarrabelleSUNDAY10:00 AM WELCOMES YOUChurch THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH (850) 274-4490 WELCOMES YOU Trinity Trinity Episcopal Churchest. 1836Welcomes YouHwy. 98 & 6th St. Apalachicola 850-653-9550Sunday Worship Services 8 & 10:30 a.m. Wednesdays Healing Service 11 a.m. Centering Prayer 4 p.m. FaithMy GrannyYou always cared for me and shared love, you are a special gift sent from above. You are always on my mind whatever I do. I really do love you its true. Time spent with you was so nice, when I had a problem you always gave me advice. Having you in my life and so close to me, will make my life easier you shall see. I open my eyes realizing youre gone, but you will always be in my heart and keep me strong. Thinking of you makes me cry, but then I think you are in that heavenly sky. You will always be in my heart and I will love you and that shall never part. Love you always and forever GrannyLove, AshleyThe primary responsibility of raising a child is preparing them for the independence associated with adulthood. Wild animals instinctively train their young to survive on their own. Carnivores teach their babies through a systematic training process. They rst bring dead prey to the young, then they kill prey in front of the young and allow them to eat it. Next, they bring the live prey for the young to catch and kill with assistance. Eventually the mothers assistance is limited to preventing the prey from escaping as the young become more procient at killing. Elephant mothers are known to be the best teachers of all species. Baby elephants learn by watching, much like humans. While learning to use their trunks, they swing, step on and suck them just as a baby would its thumb. When they are about 6 months old, they learn to use their trunk to eat and drink. The mother teaches the baby to use its trunk to cover itself with mud to prevent sunburn and to grasp food. Elephant mothers even teach their daughters how to behave during their menses, showing them how to walk and where to urinate. Seals ride on their mothers backs to learn how to swim. Baby bears are taught what berries they can eat and how to snatch sh out of streams. Otters teach their babies to oat on their backs with a rock on their stomach for the use of cracking open shellsh. When mammals bring their young into the world, they commit their entire lives to them. They assist their youngs development through the four steps of example, training, supervision and testing. Likewise, parents are responsible for preparing their children to function in the world using the same steps. However, these steps are sometimes omitted, ultimately affecting the development process. A true teacher is one who modies their own behavior in the presence of others, even at a cost to their self, in order to set examples that may be emulated. Parents are missing valuable teaching opportunities when they are absorbed in their own lives. Any time a parents TV programs, extracurricular activities, habits and personal activities take precedence over time with their children, valuable interaction is wasted. Parenting requires a tremendous amount of sacrice and dedication; however the process of making the baby only requires a seed and fertilizer. The greatest inuence in a childs life is the parent. The parent who is self-indulgent fails the child in the example course. We are designed by God to glean from our mother and father; when either is absent, the example that should be learned from both sexes is disrupted. We establish boundaries for our children as we teach them with consistency. Parents impede the development timetable when they fail to give age-appropriate responsibilities and hold their children accountable to accomplish the task set before them. Doing everything for your children will merely teach them how to be dependent. We transfer responsibility and independence through teaching and testing, with all failed tests being repeated. If the training course is not accomplished, it is equivalent to building a house with no foundation on sand. Luke 6:48 teaches that building a house on a strong foundation allows it to prevail against storm waters. Proverbs 24:3 says A house is built by wisdom and becomes strong through good sense. When a child is not required to follow through with chores and verbal orders, a pattern of irresponsibility will result. They do not learn to stay on task, they have difculty in controlling impulsive behaviors, and they learn to think only of themselves. The child will inevitably have little training for those pressing responsibilities of maturity. The supervision course increases the childs security through the experience of independence while the parent closely observes. Toddlers are supervised through sight and sound. Children and adolescents should be in sight or sound at all times, not only to reiterate boundaries but also for their own safety. Teens should at least be within phone range, and their location should always be known. The parent should conduct an occasional follow-up to ensure they are where they say they are. Your desire for harmony should never outweigh good common sense. If they pass the responsibility test, more freedom should be awarded. Despite their pleading it should never be the other way around. We need to prepare our children to survive in a world that is ruthless to inexperienced, young adults. If we do our job correctly, our children will be independent, productive adults who support themselves and are prepared for the obligations and freedom that accompany adulthood. After all, it is a jungle out there. We welcome all suggestions and hope you enjoy this weekly article. Please send all emails to Scott Shiver at frontline247@mac.com.Service of RemembranceAs part of its holiday outreach, Big Bend Hospice will host the 2011 Service of Remembrance at 3 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 27, at Riverfront Park, 90 Water St. in Apalachicola. This special service gives families and friends an opportunity to remember and honor those they have lost. The service includes music, words of comfort and a special time to speak a name and honor a loved one. The Service of Remembrance is a timeout in a busy season to remember those we love and have lost to death, said the Rev. Candace McKibben, hospice services manager. Whether the loss is distant or recent, it is important to our spiritual well-being to acknowledge the grief we feel and to summon hope to live life enriched by cherished memories and lessons learned. This service is a safe and healing place to do both. There will be fellowship time and refreshments immediately following the service, which is free and open to everyone, regardless of whether they have used hospice for a loved one. For more information about the service, please contact Pam Allbritton at 508-8749.Ormans Christmas teaOnce again, the ladies of Trinity Episcopal Church and the Orman House Historic Site will ring in the holidays with a high tea featuring music by the Tom Adams quartet. The party is scheduled for 2-4 p.m. Dec. 4. Attendance is limited, so make reservations by calling Carrie Kienzle at 370-5155. Tickets are available at the church ofce or from members of Trinitys congregation. Funds go to support the annual Tour of Homes. Kienzle promises an expanded agenda for the 20th annual tour in 2012, including a Friday symposium on historic Apalachicola led by architect and historian Willoughby Marshall, a cocktail party and a golf cart tour of the town.Playhouse rafe for toy driveRafe tickets are now on sale for a chance to win a playhouse. Constructed by inmates at Bay City Work Camp, the playhouse is fullsize and painted red, white and blue. Tickets are $5 each or three for $10, with all proceeds going to the countys annual toy drive for needy children. The drawing will be Dec. 23. Tickets are available at Centennial Banks in Eastpoint, Apalachicola, Carrabelle and St. George Island, Handmade in Apalach, the Butler Agency in Eastpoint, and Franklins Promise at the Community Service Center in Apalachicola. For more information, call 6533930. The Franklin County Public Library offers another opportunity for children to learn a skill that they will use for the rest of their lives: cooking. The Eastpoint branch is offering cooking with Suzanne Creamer from 3:30-4:30 p.m. Thursdays, for ages 5 to 12. The last two weeks of lessons included learning to read a recipe, measurements, place settings and cleanliness in the kitchen along with creation of a personal snack. Children will experience rsthand what they will need to know to function properly in a kitchen and to make healthy choices. This cooking class is free to participants; it offers a new dimension for libraries in the lives of the children living in the county. New childrens cookbooks are available for both parents and children to check out and try some new recipes at home. Why not sign your child up for the classes? It will encourage the child to become more independent in the kitchen, and learn the need for clean and nutritious snacks and meals. They will even learn how to wash dishes. The Carrabelle branch started a six-week smoking cessation class sponsored by the Big Bend Area Health Education Center. These classes are intended for adults from 5-6 p.m. Wednesdays at no cost to participants. The curriculum was developed by ex-smokers for those who want to stop smoking. Dont forget all the other activities including harmonica lessons, yoga, small group basic computer classes, adult and children Wii and storytime. Please call for more details, the Eastpoint branch, 670-8151, or the Carrabelle branch at 697-2366. Melissa Gail Missy Smith passed from this life into the presence of the Lord on Thursday, Nov. 3, 2011. She was born in Port St. Joe on March 7, 1966. Missy was preceded in death by her brother, Tony Smith. She is survived by her mother, Shirley Smith of Niceville; father, Gayle Smith of Apalachicola; daughter Brittany Booth of Niceville; and many other loving family members. Missy faithfully attended First Baptist Church of Niceville and Nancys Ladies Sunday School class and the Wednesday night Bible study. Missy enjoyed life and was a blessing to all who knew her. Her pride and joy was her daughter Brittany, who is a senior student at Rocky Bayou Christian School. Missy was also a staunch Florida State University football fan. There was a celebration of her life, Monday afternoon, Nov. 7, at Heritage Gardens Funeral Home in Niceville. You may sign a guest book and offer the family condolences at www. heritagegardensfuneral home.com. Heritage Gardens Funeral Home is entrusted with arrangements.Melissa Gail Missy Smith MELIssSSA GAIL MIssSSY SmMITH Marie Maxie Gray Carroll, born March 10, 1936, went to be with the Lord on Friday, Nov. 18, 2011. She is survived by her husband, Willie F. Carroll; three sons, Mike Rucker, Kenny Rucker and Paul Carroll (Delores); and two daughters, Pam Moore (Rocky) and Sandy Williams (Mark). She has six grandchildren, Jason Rucker (Brenee), Melinda Long (Chris), Kevin Ward (Tara), Ashley Causey (Victor), Paula Harlow (Henry) and Katie Moore. She has nine greatgrandchildren. She has one surviving brother, Harry Gray (Brenda), and one surviving sister, Mayme Millender (Jesse). She was preceded in death by her father, Herman Gray (Granny Gray), her mother Marie Reet Karpinsky (Papa Walt) and one brother Fred Gray. The pallbearers are Buddy Shiver, Buddy Braxton, Tiny Carroll, Lee Roy Langley, Coy Shiver, Chester Creamer, Alvin Banks and Lanny Toones Hardman. The alternate pallbearers are Danny Rose and Robert Hogan. Maxie was loved by all who knew her and gave herself to her family and community. She was a member of the Eastpoint Church of God. Interment was in Eastpoint Cemetery. The funeral service was held Monday morning at the Eastpoint Church of God with the Rev. Robert Kimberling and the Rev. Ronald Crum ofciating. Funeral under the direction of Kelleys Funeral Home.Maxie G. Carroll MAXIE G. CArroRROLL Obituaries In MEmorMOR Y A good example conquers the jungle YoYOUTH MATTErsRS Scott and Pamela Shiver Church BrRIEFsS Your County LLIBrRArR Y

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Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL(next to Piggly Wiggly)www.BWOsh.comYour Hunting Headquarters WAS $69.99 BLACK FRIDAY SPECIAL $46.99LIMITED STOCKOPEN @ 6:00 A.M. EASTERN TIME MOULTRIE 6.5 HANGING GAMEFEEDERWITH DIGITAL TIMER Thursday, November 24, 2011 FreshwaterShoreline shing is about to become the norm for the winter months and leading the surf shing now is big bull red sh still. Great reports from the sea wall and under the George Tapper Bridge have been coming in along with a few ounder catches around Pig Island as well. We now have bull minnows in stock, so go ounder shing after Thanksgiving Dinner Thursday!Inshore SurfThe trout bite is starting to heat back up in St. Joe Bay. Live shrimp has been the go-to bait with lots of slot size sh being caught mid to late morning. Pig Island and Towns beach have produced most of the reported catches. The Towers in St. Joe Bay are producing lots of yellow trout, Bass shing in the I.C.W. and in lake Wimico continue to be the hot topic in shing right now. This years freshwater shing has improved and with the hot weather on the way again this week, the bite should be steady. Large numbers of sheepshead and red sh are coming in daily from these waters as well. SpPONsSOREdD bBY Email outdoors news to times outdoors@star.com Page 10 O UTDoo OO RS www.apalachtimes.comSection A By Stan KirklandFWC Just a few decades ago, a segment of the hunting population who wanted to extend their time to hunt deer purchased a muzzleloader. However, the models used in the 1970s and s are a far cry from most of the muzzleloaders sold today. Early models were generally side-hammer, percussion cap models and used either black powder or a black powder substitute as the propellant. Granted, some purists in those days still used intlock models but intlocks were tricky to operate on good days and virtually impossible to shoot on rainy, inclement days. The side-hammer, percussion cap models were a lot simpler to re. Assuming the user rst poured powder down the barrel and then seated a lead ball or projectile (hence the name muzzleloader), the gun was almost ready to re. To make it ready for ring the hunter had to place a small percussion cap on a metal nipple outside the barrel. If everything worked correctly, the hunter pulled the trigger, dropping the hammer on the percussion cap, which then sent sparks and re into the barrel. That caused the black powder to instantly burn and turn to gas, which sent the bullet out the barrel and toward a waiting deer. Almost all of the older muzzleloaders had iron sights and were effective up to 75 yards. In the hands of a knowledgeable and skilled muzzleloading hunter, the side-hammer muzzleloaders worked well, and many, many deer were harvested with them. However, they sometimes failed to re, for a variety of reasons, and many deer ran off to live another day. Since the 1990s, a new and different muzzleloader, referred to as an inline, has become the standard for muzzleloading hunters. While inlines still load the same as other muzzleloaders, they are radically different. They use a modern shotshell primer thats in line with the barrel, so less can go wrong and result in a misre. Todays inlines are precision guns and many come pre-tapped for scopes. These guns are effective up to 200 yards. A hunter with an inline can cover distances on a eld or a food plot that years ago would have only been possible with a centerre hunting rie. Today, Florida is divided into four zones for hunting purposes. Most of the Panhandle is in Zone D and deer can be hunted with muzzleloaders during the designated muzzleloading, general gun and the late archery/ muzzleloading seasons. Information about Florida hunting regulations, seasons and permit costs is available at MyFWC.com, or by contacting any FWC Regional Ofce. Muzzleloading hunters have seen a radical change in guns Buds n BUGSPeas, pleaseBy Lois SwobodaTimes Staff Writer Many of the wild owers found in our area are actually legumes, members of the same family as peas and beans. A legume in botanical writing is a plant in the family Fabaceae, or a fruit of these specic plants. Legumes thrive in our poor sandy soil because a bacteria living in their rood system is able to extract nitrogen from the air and x it in their root system. This means they are able to make their own fertilizer. When you look at a bag of fertilizer, you will notice three numbers for example, 6-6-6, on the label. These are the NPK ratio, the rst number represents nitrogen, the second phosphorus and the third potassium. If the numbers read 20-10-10, the there is twice as much nitrogen in the mix as potassium or phosphorus. While sandy soil is very low in nitrogen, nitrogen is the most plentiful element in the air we breathe although most plants and animals cant make use of it. Legumes are the exception to this rule. Farmers take advantage of this ability by rotating crops. A legume like alfalfa or soybeans is planted during the off-season to restore soil depleted by crops that remove nitrogen from the soil, such as corn and cotton. The legume family is extremely large and diverse including peanuts, clover, mimosa, acacia and sweet peas, just to name a few. Another organism that can acquire nitrogen from the atmosphere is termites. Wood is very low in nitrogen but termites have bacteria living in their digestive tract that can take nitrogen from the air and use it to build tissue. Legumes were an important food source for primitive man because they provide protein when meat is in short supply. Peas and beans contain relatively low quantities of some amino acids. To compensate, vegetarians serve legumes along with grains, which contain the missing components. This creates a complete balanced protein. Common examples of such combinations are beans with corn tortillas, tofu with rice, and peanut butter with whole grain bread. To learn more about combining grains and beans, check out Diet for a Small Planet by Frances Moore Lappe. LOIS S SS WOB B ODA | The TimesButtery Pea By Lois SwobodaTimes Staff Writer The Franklin County Tourist Development Council is sponsoring a contest to promote geocaching to attract tourists to the area. Geocaching, which combines the terms geographical and cache, is an outdoor adventure that sends seekers on a treasure hunt for containers of trinkets and prizes. Participants use a Global Positioning System receiver (GPSr) to hide and seek containers called geocaches. A typical cache is a waterproof container containing a logbook. According to Groundspeak, the organizer of the game, (www. geocaching.com), there are nearly 200 geocache sites in our forests and towns and dotting the coast between Alligator Point and the western edge of Franklin County. Around the world, there are more than 1.2 million geocaches registered with Groundspeak, including ve in Antarctica and two on Easter Island. The contest launched on Halloween. Heres how it works: Hidden somewhere in Franklin County is a puzzle cache (GC369DD) containing 100 coupons, each good for a Salty geocoin. The oyster-shaped coins were minted especially for the Franklin County contest. Geocoins are collected by geocachers and retail for anywhere from $10 to $40, with some rare coins selling for signicantly more. The coins are awarded to winners at local visitor centers. Contestants must nd geographical coordinates hidden in the lids of geocaches in the county to locate the nal container. As of Monday, the puzzle had been solved by 15 searchers and all but one has collected their coins. First to solve the puzzle was Sheila Walaszek, of Orlando, who was staying on St. George Island when she learned of the contest in an article in Forgotten Coastline magazine. Walaszek said she was thrilled to be rst to solve the puzzle. It was the rst time Ive ever really won anything, she said. Walaszek said she visits the area annually to bicycle, rollerblade and spend time on the beach with her dog Daisy. When I come here I always plan on caching, she said. You see so many things you wouldnt otherwise see. The contest was organized by Lois Swoboda and funded with BP grant money. The idea is to lure visitors to the area for the rst time. So far it seems to be working. A couple who drove to the county to attempt the challenge wrote, Completed this today after our visit to Tallahassee. We had no idea that there was this big festival going on. We wrote one of the numbers down wrong, which led us on a wild goose chase for the nal. No regrets. We got out of the truck and a mother bear and her two cubs went running across the street in front of us. As we were driving away, we spotted a gray fox. Rechecked our numbers and made the nd. The coin dealer was closed so we didnt get our coins yet. Great excuse to come back and explore some more without the crowds. This is a good way to introduce people to the area. We didnt have any plans to visit otherwise, and really like the area. Thanks for the fun, wrote the couple. The contest will continue until April or until all of the coins have been claimed. geocaching craze TDC embraces A view of the coveted geocoin.Photos by LOIS S SS WOB B ODA | The TimesAbove, Sheila Walaszek, right, accepts the rst prize awarded in the Salty Geocoin Challenge from Cindy Steiger at the Apalachicola Visitor Center.

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CARRABELLE A A PALAc C HIc C OLA SP O RTs S www.apalachtimes.com ASection Thursday, November 24, 2011 Page 11By Joe ShieldsSpecial to the Times On Nov. 17, the Seahawks boys varsity soccer team played their second home match at the Mikel Clark Complex, against the Mari anna Bulldogs. A sizable crowd, which had earlier watched the Lady Seahawks run roughshod over the Mar ianna girls 4-1, was keyed up to watch more of the same from the boys team. The boys did not disap point. Initially, Marianna was the aggressor, seeking goals through chip passes to their eet of foot forwards. Defensemen Tanner Klink, Javeion Wineld, Julio Ramirez and Billy Harris blew up most of their scor ing opportunities and the four shots that got through were stied by net minder, Daniel Carrino. An opportunistic, coun terattacking Seahawk of fense had several opportu nities in the rst half, even while overall play of both teams started to become a little chippy. Rough play was called on several players, resulting in free kicks from both teams. Both Elton Olve ra and Zach Howze earned yellow cards for their parts in apparent rough play. The aggressive play notwithstanding, a single goal for the Seahawks was scored by Graham Kirvin, from a crossing pass assist by rst-year player Stefan DeVaughn. The Seahawks took a slim 1-0 lead into the locker room at the half. The second half of play was even better than the rst with the Bulldogs try ing to acquire the equalizer and the Seahawks trying to add to their lead. The Bulldogs pressed the issue even harder and forced the Seahawks into multiple har rowing defensive situations. The play of Klink as sweeper and Wineld as stopper was outstanding and led to mul tiple dispossessions in the Seahawks defensive third. Additionally, with the Bulldogs seemingly attack ing in waves, Carrino was forced to make 12 saves in the second half, with one be ing, a stunning, jumping kick save. The Seahawk offense continued to utilize their eld-switching counterat tack and in so doing created multiple opportunities. How ze had a shot on goal, while James Newell and Olvera had two shots on goal; with one of those opportunities being a go-ahead goal by Ol vera off a 30-yard shot which unfortunately was nullied by a questionable call from the referee. As time ticked off the clock it looked as if the Se ahawks would win by the slimmest of margins, but Julio Ramirez, coming from his backeld position, ac quired a long ball pass from Howze, dribbled to his right and launched a 35-yard, high arching ball over the head of the Marianna goalie and into the top corner of the far post, putting the game out of reach 2-0. Final stats showed Mari anna had 22 shots on goal, 10 more than the Seahawks, and eight corner kicks, two more than Franklin County. The Bulldogs dominated time of possession, with 58 percent, were offsides six time, two more than the Seahawks, and had eight fouls, two less than Franklin County. The Seahawks were served two yellow cards. The Seahawks rst two games (have been two very solid defensive performanc es, said coach Jono Wil liams. We showed much improvement last year, and it is obvious we are picking up where we left off. The Seahawks, now 1-01, play at West Gadsden on Wednesday, Nov. 30. Player of the Match went to Klink, a senior, who had an immediate impact defen sively in both the rst and second half with his great eld of vision. He was instru mental in acquiring dispos sessed passes, steals and headers out of the 18-yard box. He held the defensive third against the onslaught of offensive attempted by Marianna and provided a boost to the teams counter attacking efforts.Opener scoreless draw vs. RickardsThe Seahawks boys var sity soccer team cruised into the Marianna match after playing out a goall ess draw against Rickards High School two nights ear lier, on Nov. 15 at the Nest. The Rickards Raiders poured forward from the start in a bid to put the hosts under pressure, with four shots red in the rst half. Each shot, off of a through ball to their quick forwards, was squelched by Seahawks net minder Car rino. His best save: a bonejarring stop, from a shot red straight on, at roughly 25-yards out, in the waning minutes of the half. Resorting to shots from long range early in the match, Kirvin, Olvera and Newell each red an errant shot, with each breaking wide of the goal. Chances were more forthcoming af ter the break, with the Se ahawks forcing the action into Rickards nal third. The Seahawks looked much the more likely to break the deadlock, with Kirvin and Olvera each getting a cou ple of opportunistic shots and the busy Howze seeing his shot from the right ank blocked by a Rickards de fender in the box. With the Seahawk fans beginning to cheer every move, the hosts werent con tent to play down the clock and continued to press, But a winning goal was not to be found by either team and the game ended in a 0-0 deadlock. Final stats showed Rick ards had 14 shots on goal, to the Seahawks eight. The Raisers committed 10 fouls, two more than the Se ahawks, with neither team receiving any yellow or red cards. The Seahawks were off sides ve times, one more than the Rickards team. Franklin County had seven corner kicks, one more than the visitors, and possessed the ball 54 percent of the time. Player of the Match went to Carrino, a junior, who by all indications, started where he left off last year and has improved greatly in his duties as goalie. His six saves, one quite dif cult, preserved the tie and in addition, his direction of the defensive backs on numerous occasions was instrumental in thwarting the onslaught of Rickards shot takers. Joe Shields is assistant coach of the Seahawk boys soccer team.Seahawks soccer boys off to strong start P hotos by DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The TimesJulio Ramirez prepares to score the second Seahawks goal against Marianna. By David AdlersteinTimes City Editor Jeremy Turrell, a 2008 Apalachicola High School grad who helped lead the Sharks to a 20-4 regu lar season mark, sank 41 points to lead the White team to a 109-99 overtime victory Saturday night in an alumni game at Frank lin County High School. Turrells trey from the corner with four seconds left in regulation knotted the game at 99-all after four quarters. Leading scorer for the Red team was Marcus Al len, a 2010 Franklin County High School grad, who sank 22 points. Alumni who participated also included Anthony Franklin, Carl Bankston, Chad AJ Gillikin, Jeremy Man-Man Williams, Adrian Jones, Tydron Wynn, Zach Jones, Patrick Jones, Ray Butler, Freddie Mof fett, Nahshon Bankston, DAndre Robinson, Willie McNair, and Kristopher Stanley. Guest referees were Granville Croom and James Stanley. Winner of the split-thepot was Rhonda Butler, who took a valiant halfcourt shot at halftime but fell short. Coach Mike Sweatt, who oversees the Franklin County basketball pro gram, sent special thanks to Dolores Croom who was the greeter and gatekeeper, and to Sonja Buffkin who managed the buffet food area and money. Thanks to all those par ents and players who par ticipated and helped with donating everything, said Sweatt. All proceeds and donations went directly to the basketball program.By David AdlersteinTimes City Editor The Lady Seahawks soc cer team earned their rst win of the season by domi nating the Marianna Lady Bulldogs 4-1 at home Nov. 17. The team burst out to a 10 lead with a goal by Gracyn Kirvin, which was followed up later by an 18-yard score by Katie Seger, as the Lady Seahawks built a 2-1 lead in the second half. Marianna scored its goal on a penalty kick after Jessica Shields was called for a foul in the box. In the second half an as sist from Emmy Norris led to a Megan Newell score. Kirvin put a cap on the scor ing when she drove home a Shields assist, for her second goal of the night. Freshman goalie Macy Hunt posted 12 saves for the game. We came out strong in the rst half, said coach Kelli Maggio, whose squad moved to 1-1 on the year. In the second half we came out and played much better and dominated, but we still had plenty of chances to score in the second half. We still have lots of room for improve ment. Were still learning how to play together as a team. Maggio said she was impressed by Kirvins play in the game. She showed an ability to get the ball to people and nish, said the coach. Girls soccer downs Marianna Turrell sinks 41 in alumni game DAVID ADLERSTEIN | the TimesWillie McNair drives for the basket as he is guarded by Nahshon Bankston in the alumni game. Goalie Daniel Carrino scoops up the ball as Javieon Wineld, center, and Tanner Klink, right, get in position against Marianna.

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LocalA12 | The Times Thursday, November 24, 2011 Dont park on the Carrabelle sidewalksAt their Nov. 3 meeting, Carrabelle city commissioners reminded drivers once again that it is illegal to park on the sidewalk in Carrabelle. They instructed City Administrator Courtney Millender to post signs prohibiting sidewalk parking. Mayor Curley Messer said a warning ticket will be issued to rst-time offenders, followed by a citation.Carrabelle park to be named for Tamara AllenOn Nov. 3, Carrabelle city commissioners voted unanimously to name the fountain park on U.S. 98, at the site of the old water treatment plant, after Tamara Allen in consideration of her public service. City Administrator Courtney Millender said a formal dedication ceremony will take place at a later date, probably in conjunction with a ceremony to dedicate the newly purchased Moore House as a public property.Apalachicola to open Christmas season FridayOn Friday, Nov. 25, Apalachicola will light up with cheer the day after Thanksgiving. Shops will be open late, and the streets of downtown will be lined with luminaries and lled with holiday spirit. The sounds of carolers will echo through the streets, lling the evening with the Christmas spirit. Santa will arrive on a shrimp boat at 4 p.m. at the City Dock on Water Street. He will hear childrens Christmas wishes while carolers sing. In addition, the historic Orman House and Raney House will be open late and trimmed in holiday nery. Docents in period costumes will lead visitors through the early history of the town. On Saturday, the celebration continues from 1-4 p.m. Santa arrives by re truck and will see the kids, and bring your favorite furry, four-legged friends to visit him too. On Sunday, the Tree of Remembrance ceremony will be held at 3 p.m. This respectful, nondenominational activity draws visitors riverside to remember loved ones during the holidays. Join us for an oldfashioned Christmas celebration! For more information, contact the Apalachicola Bay Chamber ofce at 6539419.TDC committees to meet TuesdayDue to a conict with Thanksgiving week, the Tourist Development Council has changed its committee meeting date. Originally scheduled for Tuesday, Nov. 22, the committees will now meet Tuesday, Nov. 29. The meeting will be held in the City of Apalachicola Community Room, 1 Bay Ave., and will begin at 1:30 p.m. for the grants committee and 2:30 p.m. for the marketing committee.Sam the cat is homeA chocolate and cream Himalayan cat lost on St. George Island for more than a week has been found safe and sound. Sam, focus of an ongoing search by the St. George Island Trash Patrol, was found at the island center six blocks from the vacation rental where his human is vacationing. The owner said he was loaded with sandspurs but otherwise healthy. He really wasnt even dehydrated, she said. Sam was rescued when the Martinez family, visiting from Vermont, found him on their porch. They contacted their rental agents at SunCoast and told Jan Grey about the friendly, and obviously not feral, cat. Grey said she and her coworkers had just read about Sam in the Times and knew he was lost, so she offered to bring Martinez a can of cat food and he accepted. The Martinez couple are vegetarians and had nothing for the cat to eat. Grey said Sams owner tried to reward her, as well as the Martinez couple, but they refused to accept. The owner said she will give the money, $250, to the Franklin County Humane Society, and thanked everyone who helped locate Sam. This is the work of angels, she said.Mitigation task force to meet WednesdayFranklin County Emergency Management would like to invite the public to participate in a meeting to discuss and update the Franklin County Local Mitigation Strategy (LMS). Hazard mitigation is any action taken to permanently reduce or eliminate longterm risk to people and their property from the effects of hazards. The LMS should be revised at least annually to ensure that it remains current and reects changing conditions within the community. The LMS meeting is scheduled for Wednesday, Nov. 30, at 3 p.m. in the Franklin County Emergency Operations Center, 28 Airport Road, Apalachicola. This will be an opportunity for all parties to voice their concerns, review the status of old projects and consider new initiatives. If there are any questions, please contact Mike Rundel, Franklin County emergency management coordinator at 370-6576 or email to em2frank@gtcom.netSanta to visit Eastpoint Dec. 1Santa will be in Eastpoint on Thursday, Dec. 1, from 6-8 p.m. at the Pavillion in Eastpoint on Patton Drive. Come decorate the Christmas tree, enjoy some holiday cheer, treats for the kids and see Santa. For more info, call 6535596.Holiday Fresh Market in Apalach Dec. 3On Saturday, Dec. 3, the Holiday Fresh Market in features handmade, fresh products, locally made baked goods and natural creations. Hasslefree holiday shopping where youll nd unique handmade gifts. NOTICE OF INTENT IS GIVEN THAT FRANKLIN COUNTY WILL HOLD A PUBLIC HEARING TO CONSIDER ADOPTING AN ORDINANCE RESCINDING ALL COUNTY ORDINANCES AND REGULATIONS OF FIREARMS AND AMMUNITIONHouse Bill 45 was enacted by the 2011 Florida Legislature and is Codied at Chapter 2011-109, Laws of Florida. The Law became effective October 1, 2011. This law amends .33, Florida Statutes, entitled Field of Regulation of Firearms and Ammunition Preempted, and drastically expands the States preemption of the eld of regulation of rearms and ammunition, and provides severe penalties should an elected or appointed local government ofcial enact or cause to be enforced, an ordinance or regulation relating to rearms and ammunition. Therefore, notice is hereby given that on December 6, 2011 at 10:15 a.m. (ET) at 34 Forbes Street, Apalachicola, Florida, at the Courthouse Annex, the Franklin County Board of County Commissioners will hold a public hearing to consider adopting an ordinance captioned as follows: AN ORDINANCE RESCINDING ALL COUNTY ORDINANCES AND REGULATIONS OF FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION, PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY AND AN EFFECTIVE DATE. A copy of the proposed ordinance is on le with the Clerk of Courts, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida and may be viewed there. Interested Persons may appear at the meeting and be heard with respect to the proposed ordinance, or you may submit comments in writing addressed to Marcia Johnson, Clerk of Courts, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, Florida 32320. PURSUANT TO SECTION 286.0105, FLORIDA STATUTES, IF ANY PERSON DECIDES TO APPEAL ANY DECISION MADE BY THE COUNTY COMMISSION WITH RESPECT TO ANY MATTER CONSIDERED AT THE PUBLIC HEARING, SUCH PERSON WILL NEED A RECORD OF THE PROCEEDINGS AND FOR SUCH PURPOSE, SUCH PERSON MAY NEED TO ENSURE THAT A VERBATIM RECORD OF THE PROCEEDING IS MADE, INCLUDING THE TESTIMONY AND EVIDENCE UPON WHICH THE APPEAL IS TO BE BASED. Those persons requiring special assistance to attend the meeting shall contact Deputy Clerk Michael Moron at 850-653-8861 x100 no later than three days before the meeting to make arrangements to attend the meeting. PUBLIC NOTICEThe Franklin County Board of County Commissioners and Weems Memorial Hospital is asking for participation from the community in the Community Health Assessment. Those interested in health care, social services, education, and other community leaders are urged to participate in a steering committee. There will be two meetings: The rst is to be held on November 3, 2011 Carrabelle Municipal Complex 1001 Gray Avenue, Carrabelle, FL 11:30 a.m. until 1:30 p.m. est. The second is to be held December 1, 2011 Coombs Armory 66 4th Street, Apalachicola, FL 11:30 a.m. until 1:30 p.m. est. For additional information call Alan Pierce at 850-653-9783, ext 161 PUBLIC NOTICEThe Carrabelle Economic Development Council will meet on the rst Thursday of every month at 4:30 pm at Carrabelle City Hall, 1001 Gray Avenue, Carrabelle, FL 32322. This is a public meeting and everyone is invited to attend. BILL MILLER REALTY850-697-3751 (3310) 570-0658WOW! 1BDR FURNISHED APT $15,000 $29,500 $2,500 DOWN BUYS 2 BED APT. 2 6 GULF VIEW & ACCESS 3 BDR 2 BA 2006 M/H 16 X 80 $89,000 $500DOWN CHOICE OF 3 CITY LOTS $180.00/MONTH OR $17,500/EACH MIH 2 CRNRLOTS BLK. $ STORE REDUCED $49,500 3DOOR NICE 2 B/R MH 2CRNR. LOTS $47,500 See BRIefsEFS A13 News BRIefsEFS JOBLESS from page A1rate has held steady the last couple of months and were down three percentage points since January, said Kim Bodine, executive director of the Gulf Coast Workforce Board. Typically the unemployment rate creeps up as we move into the winter months and tourism slows down; however, some of those losses are offset by hiring for the holiday shopping season, which begins in October. The states unemployment rate for October, 10.3 percent, is the lowest since January 2009, when it was 10.2 percent. The states jobless rate is down 0.3 percentage point from September, and 1.5 percentage points lower than the October 2010 rate of 11.8 percent. Floridas steady job growth and lower unemployment numbers are encouraging, said DEO Executive Director Doug Darling. The continues to work closely with our partners at Enterprise Florida to create jobs, as well as Workforce Florida and the states 24 regional workforce boards to match job seekers with employers and help ensure a well-trained workforce for our states current and future labor needs. Gov. Rick Scott also had high praise for the numbers. As we head into the holiday season, its great to see we continue to move in the right direction when it comes to job creation and getting people back to work, said Scott. The businesses in our state have created more than 100,000 jobs so far this year. Im going to do everything I can to keep attracting businesses here and help those here already thrive so we can continue to see this growth. The number of jobs in Florida in October is 7.27 million, up 93,900 jobs compared to a year ago, and the 13th consecutive month with positive annual job growth. The industry gaining the most jobs is leisure and hospitality (+39,400 jobs, +4.2 percent). Other industries gaining jobs in Florida include private education and health services (+29,200 jobs, +2.7 percent); professional and business services (+26,600 jobs, +2.6 percent); trade, transportation, and utilities (+20,500 jobs, +1.4 percent); nancial activities (+2,700 jobs, +0.6 percent); and manufacturing (+1,900 jobs, +0.6 percent). These industry job gains are partially due to increases in food services and drinking places; ambulatory health care services; employment services; clothing and accessory stores; real estate; and fabricated metal product manufacturing. Attorneys from Legal Services of North Florida, Inc. (LSNF) will host a free legal clinic this Monday, Nov. 28, to assist low-income residents and small business owners who want advice on the BP oil spill claims process. The clinic will be held from 10 a.m. to noon at the Franklin County courthouse annex, 34 Forbes St., Apalachicola. Walk-ins are welcomed, but attendees with appointments will be given rst priority. To request an appointment, call 769-3581. All participants in the clinic will have an opportunity to discuss their claim with an attorney unless a conict of interest is found. Free full representation may follow if the claimants meet eligibility requirements. While LSNF attorneys may not be able to fully represent every claimant in their claim, this is a great opportunity to get legal advice and direction. For claimants unable to attend the clinic, advice and counsel can be obtained by calling the statewide legal help hotline at (855) 299-1337. Free legal clinic for those affected by spill

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LocalThe Times | A13Thursday, November 24, 2011 WEEKLY ALMANAC APALACHICOLA CARRABELLETIDE TABLES MONTHLY AVERAGESTo nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from these given for APALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW Cat Point Minus 0:40 Minus 1:17 East Pass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27 To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from those given for CARRABELLE: HIGH LOW Bald Point Minus 9:16 Minus 0:03 Sponsor the WEEKLY ALMANACCall Today!653-8868Date HighLow% Precip Thu, Nov 2472 48 0% Fri, Nov 2569 56 0% Sat, Nov 2675 5920% Sun, Nov 2770 41 40% Mon, Nov 2861 45 0% Tues, Nov 2968 52 0% Wed, Nov 3070 4510%11/24Thu12:54AM 1.7 H09:23AM -0.5L 05:01PM 1.4 H08:42PM 1.2L 11/25Fri01:33AM 1.7 H10:11AM -0.6L 05:53PM 1.4 H 09:24PM 1.3L 11/26Sat02:17AM 1.8 H10:58AM -0.5L 06:39PM 1.4 H10:06PM 1.2L 11/27Sun03:04AM 1.7 H11:45AM -0.5L 07:18PM 1.3 H10:53PM 1.2 L 11/28Mon 03:55AM 1.7 H12:30PM -0.4L 07:53PM 1.3 H 11:47PM 1.1L 11/29Tue04:48AM 1.6 H01:14PM -0.2L 08:24PM 1.2 H 11/30Wed 12:53AM 1.0 L05:47AM 1.4H 01:56PM 0.0 L08:52PM 1.2H 11/24Thu07:10AM -0.8 L03:36PM 2.2H 06:29PM 1.9 L 11/25Fri 12:08AM 2.7 H07:58AM -1.0L 04:28PM 2.2 H07:11PM 2.1 L 11/26Sat 12:52AM 2.9 H08:45AM -0.8L 05:14PM 2.2 H07:53PM 1.9L 11/27Sun 01:39AM 2.7 H09:32AM -0.8L 05:53PM 2.1 H 08:40PM 1.9L 11/28Mon 02:30AM 2.7 H10:17AM -0.6L 06:28PM 2.1 H09:34PM 1.8L 11/29Tue03:23AM 2.6 H 11:01AM -0.3L 06:59PM 1.9 H 10:40PM 1.6L 11/30Wed 04:22AM 2.2 H11:43AM 0.0L 07:27PM 1.9 H11:56PM 1.3L CITY OF CARRABELLE PROPOSED ENACTMENT OF CITY ORDINANCEThe City Commission of the City of Carrabelle, Florida, proposes to enact the following ordinance: ORDINANCE NUMBER 450 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF CARRABELLE, FLORIDA AMENDING ORDINANCE NO.: 443 WHICH IS AN ORDINANCE PERTAINING TO THE SALE AND CONSUMPTION OF ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES WITHIN THE CITY LIMITS BY: PROHIBITING THE SALE AND CONSUMPTION OF ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES WITHOUT PROPER LICENSES; PROSCRIBING THAT THE LOCATION FOR CONSUMPTION OF ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES MUST BE APPROVED BY THE CITY COMMISSION; REGULATING THE HOURS OF BUSINESS FOR THE SALE AND CONSUMPTION OF ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES; ESTABLISHING ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS FOR SALE OF ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES FOR ON-PREMISES CONSUMPTION; REMOVING THE REQUIREMENT THAT A SPECIFIC DISTANCE BETWEEN SAID POINT OF SALE AND CONSUMPTION OF ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES AND CHURCHES; PROVIDING FOR PENALTIES; PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY AND PROVIDING AN EFFECTIVE DATE. The proposed Ordinance may be inspected during regular hours at Carrabelle City Hall between 8 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., 1001 Gray Ave., Carrabelle, FL Monday through Friday, or call 850-697-2727. The proposed Ordinance will be considered for enactment during a public hearing to be held 6:00p.m., Thursday December 1, 2011 at the Carrabelle City Hall located at 1001 Gray Ave, Carrabelle, FL. Interested parties may appear at the hearing and be heard with respect to the proposed Ordinance. If an individual decides to appeal any decision made by the City Commission with respect to this meeting, a verbatim transcript may be required. If so, the individual should make provision for a transcript to be made at the meeting, (RE: Florida Statute 286.0105). Pursuant to the provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act, any person requiring special accommodation to participate in this meeting is asked to advise the city at least 48 hours before the meeting by contacting Keisha Smith at the above address or phone number. Ashbrook to chair Cain campaign in Franklin CountyDebbie Ashbrook, a former state committeewoman for the Republican Party of Florida from Gulf County, has been named by the Friends of Herman Cain in Florida to chair Cains Franklin County campaign. County chairpersons will be responsible for the day-to-day operations of the campaign in their respective counties, including the recruitment of volunteers, event coordination, get out the vote efforts and further grassroots activities. These experienced and seasoned political grassroots activists will ensure that Herman Cains message to restore our country will resonate and be heard throughout the state, said State Rep. and Statewide Co-Chair Scott Plakon. We are honored to have them on our team, working to ensure Herman Cains victory in Florida.Bean bests bean counters at biz bashOn Nov. 10, Roberson and Associates of Apalachicola celebrated its 10th year in business by hosting the Nov. 10 Business After Hours for the Apalachicola Bay Chamber of Commerce. There was live music and lots of food from local restaurants. As part of the festivities, the accounting rm offered a $100 prize to the person who could come closest to guessing the number of beans in a glass jar without going over the number. Island realtor Mason Bean came closest to the actual number 1,003, with his guess of 879. He then donated his prize to Habitat for Humanity.Register for Carrabelles Christmas boat paradeGet your boat registered in the 19th annual Boat Parade of Lights. Register online at www.carrabelle. org or stop by the Carrabelle Chamber of Commerce ofce and pick up an application. The Boat Parade of Lights and Holiday on the Harbor will take place Saturday, Dec. 10. For more information call 697-2585. The following report is provided by the Franklin County Sheriffs Ofce. Arrests are made by ofcers from the following city, county, and state law enforcement agencies: Apalachicola (APD), Carrabelle (CPD), Florida Highway Patrol (FHP), Franklin County Sheriffs Ofce (FCSO), Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC), Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP), Florida Department of Corrections (FDOC), Florida Division of Insurance Fraud (DIF) and Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (FDACS). All defendants are considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law.Nov. 12Richie D. Golden, 26, domestic battery (FCSO)Nov. 14Dajuana S. Wynn, 36, Quincy, violation of probation (FCSO) Curtis A. Baucham, 49, Apalachicola, criminal mischief (FCSO) David A. Rigdon, 23, Crawfordville, failure to appear (FCSO)Nov. 15Dominic A. Lockley, 22, Apalachicola, battery, burglary of a dwelling person assaulted, trespass on property and two counts of sale or possession of a controlled substance (FCSO) Carlos E. Russell, Jr., 39, Eastpoint, battery (FCSO)Nov. 16Jeri C. Pool, 33, Panama City, violation of probation (FCSO) CoLela M. Jones, 26, Apalachicola, violation of probation (FCSO)Nov. 17Joshua D. Taylor, 30, Panacea, failure to appear (FCSO) Danny R. Wallace, 38, Apalachicola, assault, improper exhibition of a dangerous weapon and violation of probation (FCSO)Nov. 18Mary R. Nowling, 23, Eastpoint, no tag, reckless driving, resisting without violence and driving while license suspended or revoked (FCSO) Kimberly A. Parker, 37, Apalachicola, withholding child support (FCSO)Nov. 19Julia C. Starkey, 41, Eastpoint, DUI, Dui with property damage and leaving the scene of an accident with property damage (FHP)Nov. 20Miguel J. Dejuan, 32, Apalachicola, no valid drivers license (FCSO) Cathrine V. Thompson, 27, Eastpoint, violation of probation (FCSO) Arrest rREPOrR T BRIEFS from page A12

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A14| The Times Thursday, November 24, 2011 CLASSIFIEDS 36557T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No. 10 000600 CA WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., successor by merger to WACHOVIA BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, a national banking association, Plaintiff, v. THE MOORINGS AT CARRABELLE, INC., a Florida corporation, MOORINGS DEVELOPMENT, INC., a Florida corporation, MOORINGS SECOND LIEN LENDER, LLC, a Florida limited liability company, and RCS GROUP, INC., a Florida corporation, Defendants AMENDED NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the Summary Final Judgment entered in the above-captioned action, the Clerk will sell the property situated in Franklin County, Florida described on Exhibits A and B attached hereto and by this reference made a part hereof, at public sale to the highest bidder for cash, beginning at 11:00 a.m. EDT on December 7, 2011, at the front door of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida, in accordance with the bidding and sale procedures specified on the Franklin County Clerk of Courts website located at www.franklinclerk.com/fore closures.aspx. Persons with disabilities requesting reasonable accommodations to participate in this proceeding should contact (850) 653-8861, ext. 106 or Florida Relay Service at 800-955-8771. MARCIA JOHNSON Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk Exhibit A (the Property) PARCEL A Commence at a point where the extension of the West side of 11th Street intersects the South side of Avenue A; thence run North 89 degrees 13 minutes 40 seconds West along said Southerly boundary line of Avenue A for a distance of 580.00 feet to a concrete monument; thence leaving said right of way run South 00 degrees 35 minutes 24 seconds West 132.52 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING; thence from said POINT OF BEGINNING run South 03 degrees 06 minutes 12 seconds West 41.58 feet to a X in a headwall, said point lying on the approximate mean high waterline of the Carrabelle River; thence run along said waterline and said headwall as follows: South 89 degrees 49 minutes 10 seconds West 92.06 feet to a V in said headwall; thence South 08 degrees 00 minutes 26 seconds West 163.18 feet to a X in said headwall; thence South 60 degrees 38 minutes 09 seconds West 103.99 feet to a X in said headwall; thence North 80 degrees 18 minutes 37 seconds West 51.41 feet; thence leaving said headwall run South 75 degrees 21 minutes 37 seconds West 41.95 feet; thence North 89 degrees 55 minutes 23 seconds West 73.67 feet to a point lying on said headwall and said approximate mean high waterline; thence run along said headwall and said waterline as follows: North 89 degrees 55 minutes 23 seconds West 116.22 feet; thence North 83 degrees 30 minutes 30 seconds West 160.02 feet; thence North 77 degrees 11 minutes 10 seconds West 292.04 feet; thence continue along said approximate mean high waterline as follows: North 78 degrees 36 minutes 16 seconds West 32.41 feet; thence North 76 degrees 09 minutes 03 seconds West 21.92 feet; thence North 75 degrees 54 minutes 53 seconds West 18.32 feet to a point marking the intersection of said waterline with the Southeasterly right of way of AvenueA said point being the point of curve to the right having a radius of 646.20 feet; thence Northeasterly along said curve and said right of way for 281.32 feet, thru a central angle of 24 degrees 56 minutes 37 seconds, chord of said arc being North 49 degrees 03 minutes 16 seconds East 279.11 feet to a re-bar; thence continue along said right of way as follows: North 57 degrees 38 minutes 23 seconds East 110.73 feet to a re-bar; thence North 72 degrees 51 minutes 50 seconds East 190.50 feet to a rod and cap; thence South 89 degrees 07 minutes 27 seconds East 223.44 feet to a rod and cap; thence South 89 degrees 13 minutes 40 seconds East 150.15 feet to a rod and cap; thence leaving said right of way run South 00 degrees 46 minutes 20 seconds West 134.11 feet to a rod and cap; thence South 89 degrees 47 minutes 06 seconds East 145.27 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. Above lands subject to a 20 foot wide drainage easement recorded in Official Records Book 111, Page 319, Public Records of Franklin County, Florida, lying over and across the Northeasterly portions thereof. And PARCEL B Commence at the intersection of the centerline of 11th Street West in Picketts addition to the City of Carrabelle, a subdivision as per map or plat thereof recorded Plat Book 2, Page 20, of the public records of 36379T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION: CASE NO.: 19-2009-CA-000286CAXXXX BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, L.P. F/K/A COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, L.P., Plaintiff, vs. LESLIE E. BIAGINI A/K/A LESLIE BIAGINI; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF LESLIE E. BIAGINI A/K/A LESLIE BIAGINI; IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order setting Foreclosure Sale dated the 23rd day of August, 2011, and entered in Case No. 19-2009-CA000286-CAXXXX, of the Circuit Court of the 2ND Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, L.P. F/K/A COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, L.P. is the Plaintiff and LESLIE E. BIAGINI A/K/A LESLIE BIAGINI and UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF LESLIE E. BIAGINI A/K/A LESLIE BIAGINI N/K/A LESLIE BIAGINI IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY are defendants. The Clerk of this Court shall sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the, FRONT STEPS OF THE FRANKLIN COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 33 MARKET STREET, APALACHICOLA, FL 32320, 11:00 AM on the 21st day of December, 2011, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOTS NINE (9) AND TEN (10), OF BLOCK ONE HUNDRED NINETEEN (119), IN THE CITY OF APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT OF SAID CITY IN MOST COMMON USE. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. Dated this 31st day of October, 2011. MARCIA JOHNSON Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk Law Offices of Marshall C. Watson, P.A. 1800 NW 49th Street, Suite 120 Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33309 Telephone: (954) 453-0365 Facsimile: (954) 771-6052 Toll Free: 1-800-441-2438 09-16986 November 17, 24, 2011 36377T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE. No.: 19-2010-CA-000572 RBC BANK (USA) Plaintiff, VS. KIRSCHNER, RONALD S., et al. Defendants, NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order or Final Judgment entered in Case NO.19-2010-CA-000572 of the Circuit Court of the 2ND Judicial Circuit in and for FRANKLIN County, Florida, wherein RBC bank (USA), is Plaintiff, and, KIRSCHNER, RONALD S., et al., are Defendants, I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at, 33 MARKET STREET, FRONT STEPS OF THE COURTHOUSE, STE 203, APALACHICOLA, FL 32320, at the hour of 11:00 AM, on the 7th day of December, 2011, the following described property: LOT 19 OF PLANTATION BEACH VILLAGE, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 5, PAGE(S) 10 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 1852 PLANTATION PASS, ST. GEORGE ISLAND, FLORIDA 32328. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. DATED this 25th day of October, 2011. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk, Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Clerk of the Courts disability coordinator at 301 MONROE STREET ROOM 225, TALLAHASSEE, FL 32301, 850-577-4401 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. November 17, 24, 2011 36375T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE. No.: 19-2009-CA-000229 BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. Plaintiff, VS. RADAKOVICH, MARK WILLIAM, et al. Defendants, RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order or Final Judgment entered in Case NO.19-2009-CA-000229 of the Circuit Court of the 2ND Judicial Circuit in and for FRANKLIN County, Florida,where BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., is Plaintiff, and, RADAKOVICH, MARK WILLIAM, et al., are Defendants, I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at, 33 MARKET STREET, FRONT STEPS OF THE COURTHOUSE, STE 203, APALACHICOLA, FL 32320, at the hour of 11:00 AM, on the 7th day of December, 2011, the following described property: LOT 27 OF CARRABELLE LANDING, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 8, PAGE(S) 47, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. DATED this 24th day of October, 2011. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk, Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Clerk of the Courts disability coordinator at 301 MONROE STREET ROOM 225, TALLAHASSEE, FL 32301, 850-577-4401 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. November 17, 24, 2011 36371T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO.: 2009-000694-CA SUNTRUST BANK, Plaintiff, vs. GUY N. MAULDIN, et al., Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure filed October 25, 2011 entered in Civil Case No. 2009-000694-CA of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Eastpoint, Florida, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320 in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes on the 7th day of December, 2011 at 11:00 a.m. on the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit: LOT 52, TREASURE BEACH VILLAGE, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 5, AT PAGE 25 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 25th day of October, 2011. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT As Clerk of the Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of Court Administration at (850) 577-4401, or at the Leon County Courthouse, Room 225, 301 S. Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 within 2 working days of receipt of a notice compelling you to appear at a court proceeding; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. MCCALLA, RAYMER, LLC Attorney for Plaintiff 225 E. Robinson St. Suite 660 Orlando, FL 32801 (407) 674-1850 November 17, 24, 2011 36044T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 192009CA000657CA XXXX HSBC BANK USA, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION AS TRUSTEE FOR MORTGAGEIT SECURITIES CORP. MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST, SERIES 2007-1, MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, Plaintiff(s). vs. ALBERTO F. ARAUJO; et al, Defendant(s) NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Sale will be made pursuant to an Order or Final Summary Judgment. Final Judgment was awarded on September 27, 2010 in Civil Case No. 192009CA 000657CAXXXX, of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for FRANKLIN County, Florida, wherein, HSBC BANK USA, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION AS TRUSTEE FOR MORTGAGEIT SECURITIES CORP. MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST, SERIES 2007-1, MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES is the Plaintiff, and ALBERTO F. ARAUJO; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF ALBERTO F. ARAUJO, CASA DEL MAR SUBDIVISION ASSOCIATION, INC.; ONEWEST BANK, FSB, SUCCESSORIN-INTEREST TO INDYMAC FEDERAL BANK FSB, SUCCESSOR-IN-IN-TEREST TO INDYMAC BANK FSB, AND UNKNOWN TENANT(S) IN POSSESSION are Defendants. The clerk of the court will sell to the highest bidder for cash on the Front Steps of the Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320 at 11:00 am on December 14, 2011 on the following described real property as set forth in said Final summary Judgment, to wit: LOT 9, CASA DEL MAR SUBDIVISION PHASE 1, A SUBDIVISION AS PER PLAT OR MAP THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 6, AT PAGE 2, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. WITNESS my hand and the seal of the court on November 8, 2011. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of the Court Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk Attorney for Plaintiff(s) Aldridge Connors, LLP 7000 West Palmetto Park Rd., Suite 307 Boca Raton, FL 33433 (561) 392-6391 (561) 392-6965 Nov 24,Deckc 1, 2011

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, November 24, 2011 The Times | A15 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322850-697-9604 850-323-0444 www.seacrestre.com PROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND RENTALSRENTALS2 BR 1 BA UNFURNISHED HOUSE Downtown, LR, DR, Storage Room .................$6501 BR 1 BA UNFURNISHED HOUSE .....$500DOWNTOWN RIVER CONDO, BOAT SLIP3 Night Minimum .......................$105 PLUS DAILYPIRATES LANDING 1 BR CONDO/POOL3 Night Minimum .......................$105 PLUS DAILY3 BR 3 BA FURNISHED CONDOLong Term, Pool..............................................$8502 BR 1 BA FURNISHED APARTMENTDen & Living Area ..........................................$5503 BR 2 BA FURNISHED CONDO Boat & Car Parking ..............................$850 WKLY3 BR 1 BA FURNISHED APARTMENTPet Friendly ...................WKLY & MONTHLY RATES FRANKLIN COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD85 School Road, Suite 1 Eastpoint, FL 32328 (850) 670-2810 ANNOUNCEMENT OF POSITIONPOSITIONS: Non-Instructional: Director of Special Programs LOCATION: Franklin County School District O ce SALARY: Administrative Salary Schedule (Please call Finance Of ce for salary)CONTRACT: 2011-12 School Year DEADLINE: December 1, 2011Applications may be obtained form the Franklin County School Board Finance Of ce or on-line at www.franklincountyschools.org. *Minimum Quali cations: Masters Degree from an accredited educational institution. Certi cation in Educational Leadership. Administration and Supervision or School Principal. Five (5) years teaching/ administrative experience. Knowledge of local, state and national policies which impact education. A complete description of job description is available at the Franklin County School Board Of ce.Please return applications to the attention of: Morna Smith, Personnel Specialist Franklin County School Board 85 School Road, Suite 1 Eastpoint, Florida 32328Franklin County School Board is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Apartment avail. Lanark Village, Can be a 1 or 2 br, with sunroom $450 mo + $250 dep. lease req. 509-2460 Publishers NoticeAll real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on a equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. Studio Apt. Furnished Upstairs studioQuiet location, water & electric incl. Walk to downtown. $700 mo + dep. No pets. For appt 653-9116 or 320-1174 St. George Island $160 wk, Electric, Satellite, Garbage incl. pool tble. 12X65 deck w/Beautiful view 850-653-5114 Apalachicola Condo. 2 br, 2 bath, with newer paint, tile, carpet $750 per month with 700 + credit score or $800 per month below 700 credit score. *Ref Checked* Quint 865-693-3232 1 or 3 BRCH/A in Apalachicola, FL. 850-643-7740. Apalachicola, FL Property11th Street Lot 4, Block 150, $24,000 or $4,000 Down Payment, Financed at $445/Mo., R-1 Zoning Call 850-264-6239 or 850-566-2273 Text FL83345 to 56654 Mobile Home lots with w/s $10,000 with Mobile home that needs work $13,000. Also Mobile home with lot in good shape $25,000. Owner Financing available 806-618-1977 Text FL84594 to 56654 3 br, 2 ba, all appliances included W/D, CH&A, on 1 acre. $75,000 OBO. Call 850-653-5111 Text FL85503 to 56654 Education Part time positions at Eastpoint After school programSite DirectorMust be organized, computer literate, capable of managing staff and students, and able to multi-task in fast-paced environment. Bachelors degree in education, business or related field required. Previous managerial experience preferred. $23/hr, 4 hours/day.Parent LiaisonResponsible for coordinating student check-in/out, maintaining data spreadsheets, coordinating parent nights and serving as sub when needed. Experience in Excel required. Bachelors degree preferred. $13/hr, 3.5 hrs/day. Visit www.franklin countynest.org for employment application. Deliver to Franklin County District Offices, ATTN: Despina Williams/ The Nest, 85 School Rd, Ste. 1, Eastpoint, FL 32328. Questions, (850) 670-2810 x4131 or dwilliams@franklin.k12.fl .us HospitalityRESORT VACATION PROPERTIESAccepting applications* Housekeeping Office Clerk-Full-time, requires good customer service skills & prior office experience. Team player, works well under pressure. Great benefits, weekend work required. Inspectors-Part-time, inspect properties after they are cleaned. Must be available weekends. Apply in person 9-5 weekdays at 123 W Gulf Beach Dr St. George Island 1 bedroom, Apalachicola, quiet, 2 blks from boat ramp, screen porch W/D, AC, pet OK, $600 month + first, last & deposit. Please Call 850-697-5000 Other homes available. Text FL85610 to 56654 1 br, 1 ba, with full kitchen and living room Call for information 850-653-6103 Heritage Villas and Southern Villas of Apalachicola ApartmentsAccepting applications for 1, 2, & 3 br HC & non-HC accessible units. Some rental assistance may be available. HUD vouchers accepted. Call (850) 653-9277. TDD/TTY 711. This institution is an equal opportunity provider, and employer. Publishers Notice SCAM To avoid possible scams, it is recommended that consumers should verify caller information when receiving calls regarding credit card payments. Consumers should also contact the local company themselves instead of giving this information to individuals who are contacting them directly. Coin & Stamp ShowDecember 3rd & 4th Fairgrounds PC Opens 9:am Free admission. 850-215-8565 Wanting to Buy House trailer FRAMES 60 to 70 long. with or without axels. Call 850-653-5114 Bi Athlete looking for training partner. No Pseudo athletes. 850-447-0691 36647T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL. CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 192009CA000525 XXXXXX THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS CWALT, INC., ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-HY13, MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-HY13, Plaintiff, VS. JUDITH D. HENDERSON; et al., Defendants. RE-NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order or Summary Final Judgment of foreclosure dated June 29, 2010 and an Order Resetting Sale dated October 24, 2011, and entered in Case No. 192009CA000525XXXXXX of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS CWALT, INC., ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-HY13, MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-HY13 is Plaintiff and JUDITH D. HENDERSON; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 1; UNKNOWN TENANT NO, 2; and ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST A NAMED DEFENDANT TO THIS ACTION, OR HAVING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE ANY RIGHT, TITLE OR INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY HEREIN DESCRIBED, are Defendants, l will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at at the Front Door of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320 at Franklin County, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on the 7th day of December, 2011, the following described property as set forth in said Order or Final Judgment, to-wit: LOTS 4 AND 5, BLOCK 8, CITY OF APALACHICOLA, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT OF THE CITY OF APALACHICOLA IN COMMON USE. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons needing special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the Clerk of the Court not later than five business days prior to the proceeding at the Franklin County Courthouse. Telephone 850-653-8861 or 1-800-955-8770 via Florida Relay Service. DATED at Apalachicola, Florida, on October 24, 2011. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of Court By: Michele Maxwell As Deputy Clerk SMITH, HIATT & DIAZ, P.A. Attorneys for Plaintiff PO BOX 11438 Fort Lauderdale, FL 33339-1438 Telephone: (954) 564-0071 November 24, December 1, 2011 Incorrect Insertion PolicyFor Classified In-column AdvertisersAll ads placed by phone are read back to the advertiser to insure correctness. The newspaper will assume correctness at the time of the read-back procedure unless otherwise informed. Please your ad. Advertisers are requested to check the advertisement on the first insertion for correctness. Errors should be reported immediately. Your Florida Freedom newspaper will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion, nor will it be liable for any error in advertisements to a greater extent than the cost of the space occupied by the error. Any copy change, during an ordered schedule constitutes a new ad and new charges. We do not guarantee position of ANY ad under any classification. 36429T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA FRANCES HOWELL MONROE and KENNETH W. MONROE Plaintiffs, vs. WILLIAM JAMES LOVETT, SR., if alive, and if dead or not known to be dead or alive, their several and respective unknown spouses, heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors, and all parties natural, corporate, or otherwise claiming interests by, through, under or against them, WILLIAM JAMES LOVETT, SR. Defendant(s) CASE NO.: 11-00427-CA NOTICE OF ACTION To: WILLIAM JAMES LOVETT, SR., if alive, and if dead or not known to be dead or alive, their several and respective unknown spouses, heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors, and all parties natural, corporate, or otherwise claiming interests by, through, under or against them, WILLIAM JAMES LOVETT, SR. YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to Quiet Title the following property in Franklin County, Florida: LOT SIX (6) IN BLOCK FORTY (40), IN THE CITY OF APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF IN MOST GENERAL USE has been filed against you. You are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Donna Duncan, plaintiffs attorney, whose address is Sanders and Duncan, P.A., P.O. Box 157, Apalachicola, FL 32329, on or before the 30th day of December, 2011, and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint of the petition. Dated this 7th day of November, 2011. MARCIA M. JOHNSON As Clerk of the Court By: Michele Maxwell As Deputy Clerk November 17, 24, December 1, 8, 2011 Franklin County, Florida with the centerline of U.S. Highway Number 98 (State Road Number 30), said point being the point of curve, to the left having a radius of 716.20 feet; thence Southwesterly along said curve and said centerline of U.S. Highway Number 98 (State Road Number 30) for 552.29 feet, thru a central angle of 44 degrees 10 minutes 59 seconds, chord of said arc being South 44 degrees 03 minutes 37 seconds West 538.27 feet; thence continue along said centerline South 21 degrees 57 minutes 00 seconds West 100.59 feet; thence leaving said centerline run. South 68 degrees 00 minutes 45 seconds East 147.67 feet to a point lying on the Easterly right of way of said U.S. Highway Number 98; thence run along said right of way South 21 degrees 57 minutes 00 seconds West 56.02 feet to a point marking the intersection of said right of way with the approximate mean high waterline of the Carrabelle River for the POINT OF BEGINNING; thence from said. POINT OF BEGINNING run along said approximate mean highwater line as follows: South 41 degrees 15 minutes 17 seconds East 12.13 feet; thence South 31 degrees 21 minutes 04 seconds West 42.82 feet; thence South 19 degrees 31 minutes 44 seconds West 63.89 foot; thence South 20 degrees 43 minutes 07 seconds West 77.55 feet; thence South 18 degrees 13 minutes 40 seconds West 54.08 feet; thence South 18 degrees 49 minutes 33 seconds West 67.17 feet; thence South 65 degrees 03 minutes 43 seconds East 23.06 feet; thence South 66 degrees 00 minutes 22 seconds East 35.99 feet; thence North 71 degrees 21 minutes 17 seconds East 80.82 feet; thence North 88 degrees 41 minutes 52 seconds East 93.43 feet; thence South 82 degrees 44 minutes 57 seconds East 61.70 feet; thence South 70 degrees 51 minutes 28 seconds East 42.57 feet; thence South 82 degrees 20 minutes 37 seconds East 29.02 feet; thence North 82 degrees 24 minutes 51 seconds East 51.85 feet; thence South 40 degrees 27 minutes 04 seconds East 22.75 feet; thence South 08 degrees 48 minutes 52 seconds East 35.89 feet; thence South 31 degrees 51 minutes 57 seconds West 48.01 feet; thence South 32 degrees 18 minutes 59 seconds West 25.56 feet; thence South 03 degrees 41 minutes 31 seconds East 42.49 feet; thence North 83 degrees 10 minutes 45 seconds West 26.24 thence South 64 degrees 17 minutes 00 seconds West 28.44 feet; thence South. 89 degrees 45 minutes 45 seconds West 52.03 feet; thence South 89 degrees 06 minutes 40 seconds West 44.97 feet; thence North 85 degrees 17 minutes 18 seconds West 67.69 feet; thence South 88 degrees 21 minutes 43 seconds West 53.34 feet; thence North 75 degrees 32 minutes 45 seconds West 81.07 feet; thence North 73 degrees 36 minutes 16 seconds West 43.95 feet; thence North 85 degrees 24 minutes 05 seconds West 33.71 feet; thence North 84 degrees 55 minnutes 29 seconds West 25.63 feet; thence South 27 degrees 47 minutes 04 seconds West 22.19 feet; thence South 01 degrees 10 minutes 48 seconds East 15.80 feet; thence North 87 degrees 31 minutes 56 seconds East 22.89 feet; thence South 05 degrees 44 minutes 03 seconds East 14.09 feet; thence North 88 degrees 06 minutes 29 seconds West 25.51 feet; thence North 65 degrees 44 minutes 12 seconds West 20.73 feet; thence North 67 degrees 47 minutes 43 seconds West 8.36 feet to a point Iying on the Easterly right of way of said State Road Number 30; thence Ieaving said approximate mean high waterline, run along said right of way North 21 degrees 57 minutes 00 seconds East 510.65 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. And PARCEL C Commence at the intersection of the centerline of 11th Street West in Picketts addition to the City of Carrabelle, a subdivision as per map or plat thereof recorded Plat Book 2, Page 20, of the public records of Franklin County, Florida with the centerline of U.S. Highway Number 98 (State Road Number 30), said point being the point of curve to the Left having a radius of 716.20 feet; thence Southwesterly along said curve and said centerline of U.S. Highway Number 98 (State Road Number 30) for 552.29 feet, thru a central angle of 44 degrees 10 minutes 59 seconds, chord of said arc being South 44 degrees 03 minutes 37 seconds West 538.27 feet; thence continue along said centerline South 21 degrees 57 minutes 00 seconds West 180.89 feet; thence leaving said centerline Run North 68 degrees 00 minutes 45 seconds West 100.00 feet to a point lying on the Westerly right of way of said U.S. Highway Number 98 (State Road Number 30), said point being the point of curve to the left having a radius of 7739.44 feet; thence Southwesterly along said curve and said right of way for 88.83 feet, thru a central angle of 00 degrees 39 minutes 27 seconds, chord of said arc being South 22 degrees 57 minutes 22 seconds West 88.82 feet to a point marking the intersection of said right of way with the approximate mean high waterline of the Carrabelle River, said point also being the POINT OF BEGINNING; thence from said POINT OF BEGINNING and leaving said right of way run along said approximate mean high waterline as follows: North 55 degrees 59 minutes 28 seconds West 36.30 feet; thence North 89 degrees 32 minutes 04 seconds West 73.61 feet; thence South 67 degrees 18 minutes 24 seconds West 63.00 feet; thence North 75 degrees 44 minutes 59 seconds West 56.23 feet; thence North 67 degrees 13 minutes 01 seconds West 52.63 feet; thence North 54 degrees 44 minutes 52 seconds West 38.68 feet; thence North 78 degrees 50 minutes 19 seconds West 51.81 feet; thence North 89 degrees 14 minutes 20 seconds West 52.92 feet; thence South 62 degrees 28 minutes 15 seconds West 44.10 feet; thence South 80 degrees 56 minutes 02 seconds West 35.34 feet; thence South 50 degrees 36 minutes 30 seconds West 47.83 feet; thence South 70 degrees 37 minutes 48 seconds West 51.59 feet; thence South 77 degrees 37 minutes 23 seconds West 53.13 feet; thence South 54 degrees 48 minutes 10 seconds West 48.07 feet; thence South 48 degrees 34 minutes 56 seconds West 28.10 feet; thence South 53 degrees 46 minutes 52 seconds East 32.44 feet; thence South 62 degrees 17 minutes 35 seconds East 95.93 feet; thence South 52 degrees 59 minutes 06 seconds East 195.71 feet; thence North 89 degrees 24 minutes 37 seconds East 84.58 feet; thence North 36 degrees 05 minutes 16 seconds East 76.68 feet; thence South 86 degrees 21 minutes 52 seconds East 54.51 feet; thence South 45 degrees 26 minutes 57 seconds East 96.14 feet; thence North 85 degrees 23 minutes 17 seconds East 52.06 feet to a point lying on the Westerly right of way of said State Road Number 30, said point being the point of curve to the right having a radius of 7739.44 feet; thence leaving said waterline run Northeasterly along said curve and said right of way for 271.83 feet, thru a central angle of 02 degrees 00 minutes 45 seconds, chord of said arc being North 21 degrees 37 minutes 16 seconds East 271.82 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. Exhibit B (the Submerged Land Lease) The sovereign lands that are the subject of the Submerged Land Lease recorded on February 22, 2000 in public records Book 634, Page 99, et seq., Official Records of Franklin County, Florida, more particularly described as follows: A parcel of sovereign submerged land in Section 19 and 30, Township 07 South, Range 04 West, in Carrabelle River, Franklin County, containing 118,058 square feet, more or less, as is more particularly described and shown on Attachment A, dated December 4, 1989. November 17, 24, 2011 36583T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 2009-000364 CA SUNTRUST BANK, Plaintiff, vs. NORTBERT W. KOZIATEK, et al., Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure filed October 24, 2011 entered in Civil Case No. 2009-000364 CA of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, St. George Island, Florida, the Clerk of Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Appalachicola, FL. 32320 in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes on the 6th day of December, 2011 at 11:00 AM on the following described property as set forth in said Summary Final Judgment, to-wit: Lot 9, of Sea Pine Village, according to the plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 4, Page 28, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if anv, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. I HEREBY CERTIFY that a true and correct copy of the foregoing was mailed this 4th day of November, 2011, to all parties on the attached service lifit. Danielle N. Parsons, Esq. McCalla Raymer, LLC ATTORNEYS FOR PLAINTIFF 225 East Robinson Street, Suite 660 Orlando, FL 32801 Phone: (407) 674-1850 Fax: (321) 248-0420 Florida Bar No.: 0029364 If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of Court Administration at (850) 577-4401, or at the Leon County Courthouse, Room 225, 301 S. Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 within 2 working days of receipt of a notice compelling you to appear at a court proceeding; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 11. The ADA Coordinator for the courts in Leon County is Doug Smith. He may be reached at (850) 577-4444 or through the Florida Relay Service, TDD at 1-800-955-8771. The address for the Office of Court Administration is: Leon County Courthouse, 301 S. Monroe Street, Room 225, Tallahassee, FL 32301. In all other counties in the circuit please contact the Clerk of the Circuit Courts office and ask for the ADA Coordinator. The Clerks number is included on each county page. November 24, December 1, 2011 Earn College Degree Online *Medical Business, *Criminal Justice. Job Placement Assistance. Computer available. Financial aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 866-467-0054 www.CenturaOnline.com Security + Clean UpsBy Appointment only. Call (850) 670-1567 Airlines are hiring Train for hands on Aviation career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified. Job Placement Assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-206-9405 Honest and DependableService. Let me do your Holiday cleaning. 850-381-7746

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A16 | The Times Thursday, November 24, 2011 Our local real estate experts have identied what they feel are the best values around and are oering them to you in Real Estate Picks! (In this section), Discover the best real estate values in Mexico Beach, Port St. Joe, Apalachicola, Cape San Blas, St. George Island, Carrabelle and surrounding areas. Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Real Estate Picks John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.comMLS#244767$675,000St. George IslandQUALITY HOME FOR THE DISCERNING BUYERArchitect designed 4 BR, 4.5 BA, 2nd living area could be 5th BR, Secluded Pool & waterfall, Outstanding Kitchen, Fireplace, Cherry ceilings in LR, Tile Floors, Beautiful Decor, Anderson Windows, Elevator Shaft, Speakers throughout, Landscaping, high lot in the exclusive Plantation on Elm Ct. John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.comMLS#244625$129,900Lanark VillageWELL BUILT HOME2 BR, 2 BA, master has walk-in closet, New paint throughout, new ceiling fans, new range & washer, covered front porch, huge screen porch with view of Bay (2 blks away), large private yard with storage bldg, mature fruit bearing citrus trees, California Street Listed by Janie Burke All As 1st Grade Aani Carltons class: Ali sha Arroyo, Mason Moses, Kendall Hill, Jackson Seg ree, Mahaley Shuler, River Sheridan, Rainey Smith, Bri anna Stephens, Kevin Sul livan, John-Michael Thomp son, Trinity Taylor Miriam Triscrittis class: Miranda Diaz, Eric Lau, Jabara Pearson, Kylah Ross, Colin Weng, Mark Willis2nd GradeJenny Mallons class: Ca leb Abel, Meredith Alford, Andrew Monod, Dominic Feliciano, Genevieve Mont gomery, Sophie Salman Stacey Herringtons class: Weston Bockelman, Kendall Meloche, Gracie Smith, Ella Friedman, Alex Itzkovitz, Jasmine Richards, Myia Maxwell, Gavin Lash ley3rd GradeWhitney Martinas class: Camille Davis, Livia Monod, Abby Johnson, Lyndsey Stiefel Traci Moses class: Mar tina Granger, Kaylee Hicks, Alex Joanos, Gillian Ter hune, Caden Turell4th GradeLindsey Bockelmans class: Camille Williams, Alyssa Robinson, Jayden Justice Marie Lees Class: Cade Juno, Paige Pullen5th GradeTeri Williams class: Kevin Flores, Alexus Johnson Brooke Linanes class: Adria Valenzuela, Grayson Constantine, Chloe Davis, Scout McLemore, Rebecca WillisA/B 1st GradeAani Carltons class: Caleb Cassidy, Shanna Cogburn, Daisy Jimenez, Trenton McClain, Jayden Nichols, Gabie Register Miriam Triscrittis class: Amontaye Austin, Johna than Carter, Arav Patel, Ripley Pouncey, Nathan Richards, Austin White, Leah Wren2nd GradeJenny Mallons class: Lanie Allen, Carson Davis, John Sanders, Wil Varnes Stacey Herringtons class: Jamal Robinson, Lauren Conway, Torin Spohrer, Jeremy Shuler, Zach Riccard3rd GradeWhitney Martinas class: Colin Amison, Cody Cassidy, Leslie Escobar, Dorian Fleming, Stanley Gay, Elizabeth McAnally, Avery Scott Traci Moses class: Skye Huber, Jon Michael Cates, Devin Daniels, Nathan For ster, Jadyn Luberto, Ava Neill, Eli Weiler4th GradeLindsay Bockelmans class: Tanner Amison, Summer Granger, Emily Hicks, Kalahn Kent, Allison Register Marie Lees Class: Matthew Gay, Bailey Her rington, Alyssa Martina5th GradeTeri Williams class: Janacia Bunyon, Steven Craig, Jaiden Hill, Bryce Kent, Sophia Kirvin, Daijon Penamon, Trenady Queen, Brandon Taranto Brooke Linanes class: Jan-Michael Lowe, Conner MesserPerfect Attendance Lena Allens Kindergar ten: LeLand Flowers, Pey ton Blackburn, Maya Itzkovitz, Will Luberto, Malic ONeal, Landon Schoelles, Weston Taranto Heather Friedmans Kindergarten: Alonna Brown, Caelyn Constantine, CJ Conway, Taylor Pendleton, Jhamere Rhodes, Aubrie Thompson, Josalyn Ward, Jayla White 1st Grade: Alisha Arroyo, Daisy Jimenez, Mahaley Shuler, River Sheridan, Gabbie Register, Shyanna Cogburn, Miranda Diaz, Joycelyn Escobar, Faline Everitt, Emily McAnally, Arav Patel, Ripley Pouncey, Nathan Richards, Colin Weng, Mark Willis 2nd Grade: Meredith Al ford, Shondell Bass, Sevryn Everitt, Dominic Feliciano, Eulalia Gregurio, Andrew Monod, Genevieve Mont gomery, Sophie Salman, Austin Taunton, Wil Var nes, Lauren Conway, Lo gan Freeman, Alex Itzko vitz, Gavin Lashley, Myia Maxwell, Zach Riccard, Jasmine Richards, Jeremy Shuler, Gracie Smith, Kendall Meloche, 3rd Grade: Colin Amison, Cody Cassidy, Liv ia Monod, Leslie Escobar, Dorian Fleming, Cecil Gay, Abby Johnson, Elizabeth McAnally, Michael Mckee, Avery Scott, Austin Shiver, John Michael Cates, Devin Daniels, Lamarius Martin, Gillian Terhune 4th Grade: Summer Granger, Levi Rowland Bilbo, Allison Register, Jayden Justice, Vincent Guidry, Matilee Robinette, Tanner Amison, Emily Hicks, Jathan Proctor, Krista Kelley, Matthew Gay, Hannah Sweet 5th Grade: Grayson Constantine, Ian Lashley, Conner Messer, Kevin Flores, Damien Freeman, Angel Henning, Steven Hicks, Alexus Johnson, Bryce Kent, Sophia Kirvin, Christopher Newell, Daijon Penamon, Gabriel Smith, Brandon TarantoBy Michaelin WattsSpecial to the Times On Nov, 17, the Learning Center in Eastpoint hosted Gobble Up for Books, partnering with Bring Me A Book (BMAB) Franklin for the prekindergarten and Eastpoint HeadStart children and their families. Dr. Kathleen Cadwallader and her pre-K staff and students created beautiful art celebrating books and Thanksgiving. The art adorned the cafeteria walls and was the backdrop for the BMAB Franklin parent education program and a delicious Thanksgiving lunch prepared by the Learning Center cafeteria staff. Michaelin and Dave Watts and Carol Bareld led the program that focused on teaching parents and caregivers the importance of reading aloud to children from birth. The highlight of the training program featured pre-kindergarten parent Michelle Creek, in photo at right, capturing the attention and delight of the attending family members, old and young alike, through reading aloud with great expression the childrens book, Are You My Mother? Meanwhile BMAB Franklin volunteers Caty Greene, Carrie Kienzle, Tom Siculiano, Despina Williams and Sally Crown read aloud to the prekindergarten and HeadStart children in their classrooms. Each child was given a gift of a childs book to bring home for their very own. Participating Learning Center teachers were Val Miller, Tammy Sasnett, Mary Williams, and Cathy Wood with their staff: Nancy Sewell, Aileen Boatwright, Carol Wolff, Marcia Thomas, Mary Sewell, Ruby Benjamin, Jeannie Wood and Joy Townes.ABC ElementaryThe following is the Honor Roll for the ABC Schools rst nineweeks period Pre-schoolers gobble up books for Thanksgiving SchoolsMore Honor Rolls next week!