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The Apalachicola times
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100380/00152
 Material Information
Title: The Apalachicola times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: H.W. Johnston
Place of Publication: Apalachicola Fla
Apalachicola Fla
Publication Date: 11-10-2011
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1885.
General Note: Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 32911693
lccn - sn 95026907
System ID: UF00100380:00152
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Preceded by: Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by: Apalachicola herald

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xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx 50 WWW.APALACHTIMES.COMP hone: 850-653-8868 W eb: apalachtimes.com E -mail: dadlerstein@star.com Fax: 850-653-8036 C irculation: 800-345-8688 DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK: School News & Society: 11 a.m. Friday Real Estate Ads: 11 a.m. Thursday Legal Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classied Display Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classied Line Ads: 5 p.m. Monday Contact Us Out to see Index By David Adlerstein Times City Editor Weems Memorial Hospital debuted a new 16-slice CT scan ner last month, enabling doctors to secure far better computer ized imagery than was available from the previous, single-slice CT scanner. Purchased for $319,000 out of capital improvement funds, the refurbished GE high-speed CT (short for computerized tomog raphy) scanner takes multiple X-ray images of the body, or parts of the body, and uses a computer to construct from these images cross-sectional views. We had the oldest CT scan technology you can have, said Cindy Drapal, the hospitals chief nursing ofcer. It came over on Noahs ark. The new purchase, set in motion by former CEO Chuck Colvert, was prompted in part by the fact that images from a single-slice CT scanner would no longer be reimbursable by Medi care beginning next year. Drapal said the company that leased the scanner to the hospital, at $5,000 per month, picked it up, although she doubts they will nd a new home for it. Nobody wants it, she said. Originally, Weems planned to place the new CT scanner in the room that had been Colverts of ce, but the new administration decided the cost of renovation, especially in light of plans to build a new hospital, was not justied. Instead, the new CT scanner is in a trailer adjacent to the hos pital, with plans to put in a cov ered walkway with vinyl rolldown shades and a galvanized roof along the short path between them. Drapal said the new CT scan ner is very appropriate for a ru ral facility, eclipsed only by more Thursday, November 10, 2011 VOL. 126 ISSUE 28 Opinion ............ A4 Society ............ A6 Faith .............. A7 Outdoors ........... A8 Sports ............. A9 Classieds ...... A12-A13 Weems unveils new CT scan, replaces old technology By David Adlerstein and Lois Swoboda Times Staff Writers Thousands of residents and tourists in Apalachic ola last weekend for the Florida Seafood Festival on Saturday took notice of a small plane carrying a big message: Stop Giant Poles! With a clear blue sky as the backdrop, the banner was part of an 11th-hour effort to urge Progress Energy to spare the city from what citizen activ ists say is a scar that new, taller utility towers will leave on the heart of the downtown district. But whether anything can be done before work is expected to begin along Water Street in early De cember remains unclear. The Apalachicola Area Historical Society, which has been ghting Prog ress over its planned placement of the concrete poles through downtown for more than a year, has retained the services of a prominent Florida at torney to help in the ght with Progress. A decade ago, Arthur Buddy Jacobs success fully battled Wal-Mart to keep the corporate gi ant from building a Su percenter in Fernandina Beach, fearing that such a transformation would harm small businesses and detract from the com munitys character. Citizens rally to stop power polesE D TILE Y | Special to the Times A giant banner ies over the seafood festival. See SCAN A2 See POLES A2 Tritt lights up Seafood Festival GREAT DAY TO BE ALIVE P hotos by D A V I D A D LE R STEI N | The Times Travis Tritt By David Adlerstein Times City Editor Crisp weather and an enormous crowd, topped off with a full-throated performance by a country music su perstar, wrote last weekends Florida Seafood Festival into the calendar as a red letter couple of days. With nonprot organizations re cording big smile-producing sales at their food booths, and Travis Tritt singing and strutting to an overow crowd a memorable two-hour concert Presenting the new pavilion plaque, held up by Michael Allen, was John Solomon, left. Riding a oat as a former Miss Florida Seafood are Melissa Bloodworth, left, and Elizabeth Zingarelli, Micah Patriotis holds the crucier during the Blessing of the Fleet. See more photos of the festival at apalachtimes.com See FESTIV AL A10 First Baptist to host Veterans Day event The First Baptist Christian School in Apalachicola would like to say thank you by inviting all area veterans and the community to their annual Veterans Day program on Friday, Nov. 11, at 9 a.m. in the church sanctuary, 46 Ninth Street, in Apalachicola. Fall Festival, parade Saturday in Carrabelle This Saturday, Carrabelle will celebrate Veterans Day with a parade followed by the rst-ever fall festival, hosted as a fundraiser by the Franklin County Senior Center. Breakfast at the center from 7:30-9:30 a.m., followed by the parade downtown at 10 a.m., and then a tribute to veterans at the center including retiring of an American ag. Live auction from1:30-3:30 p.m. Event free and open to the public.Lanark Village Gumbo Cook-off Saturday The St. James/Lanark Volunteer Fire Department is hosting a Gumbo Cook-off this Saturday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Lanark Village Boat Club, 2364 US 98. Rafes, auctions, gumbo for here and to-go, and more. Funds raised will go towards retrotting new roll-up doors and storm shutters for Lanark Village rehouse. Still room for three gumbo teams. Contact Mike Rundel at 370-6576.Register for Camp Gordon Johnston golf tourney On Nov. 18 and 19, St. Joseph Bay Golf Club, 700 Country Club Road, Port St. Joe will host the Camp Gordon Johnston Golf Tournament to benet the museum. Kickoff Friday at 6 p.m. with silent auction and hors doeuvres reception with cash bar, for $10 admission. Saturday afternoon tourney commences with a tribute to veterans with tee-off at 1 p.m. Scramble, shotgun start, 4player best ball format; $60 per player. World War II vets play free. Prizes are $400 for rst place team; $350 for second place and $200 for third place. Banquet and awards ceremony to follow. For more information, call Tony Minichiello at 528-2125. Running the Redsh, A9

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Local A2 | The Times Thursday, November 10, 2011 state-of-the-art, and expen sive, 32-slice and 64-slice scanners, used mainly by specialists for more inten sive procedures. Use of the new scanner is overseen by Charlotte Williams, director of radi ology, and her staff, who include full-time radiation techs Jeanie Sorrell and Ed Ringer, and part-tim ers Shirley Smith and Ray Johnson. Williams said CT scans are used mostly for inter nal injuries, for such things as ruling out a hemor rhagic stroke, which in volves a leakage of blood, as opposed to an ischemic stroke, which is caused by a blockage of blood ow. Such a determination can inuence whether clot buster medications are used. Problems with the ap pendix, gall bladder and other soft organs can also be detected, Williams said, noting that Weems rst use of the new equipment was to ascertain additional information surrounding a migraine headache. The new CT scanner also takes less time to com plete than the old one, as little as ve minutes, said Williams. The scans are relayed digitally to the Panama City radiology group that reads them for Weems, Drapal said. This enhances the physicians ability to see a ner detail, she said. It provides a better quality image, and better quality patient care. Drapal said the price of a CT scan, not includ ing the radiologists fees, ranges from $663 to $2,834, depending upon the com plexity of the exam being performed. Weems offers a 30 per cent cash discount for all elective procedures paid in full at the time of service. We also have the abil ity to provide sliding scale pricing based upon in come levels established by the federal government, Drapal said. We use the same sliding scale that the county health department uses. 117 Hwy 98, Apalachicola, FL (850) 653.8825 218 Hwy 71, Wewahitchka, FL (850) 639.2252 302 Cecil G Costin Sr Blvd, Port St. Joe, FL (850) 227.7099 FRANKLIN COUNTY LANDFILL HOSTS HOUSEHOLD HAZARDOUS WASTE ROUNDUP www.pulse-sgi.com Tom Daly, president of the historical society, said residents concerns werent being heard, so the nonprot group ramped up the message. The two-hour yover directed viewers to a website, www. saveapalach.com, where visitors were encouraged to contact Vincent Dolan, chief executive of Prog ress Energy Florida, to request the power lines be run underground. The site had nearly 300 hits in its rst two days. The group has also cre ated a Facebook page that is gaining friends and a Twitter account, which is sending regular blasts of information about the situation. This is about pride in our community, Daly said, noting that Apalachicolas existence predates the state of Florida. We are a unique location, and we have an international reputation with visitors. These industrial poles do not have a place in our community. The massive power poles have already been erected in residential ar eas of Apalachicola ad jacent to the downtown district. One of the 100foot towers now looms over the playground at the Apalachicola Bay Charter School near Avenue G and 12th Street, and another of the 30,000-pound poles was installed near the he licopter pad at Weems Me morial Hospital. Weve worked hard to balance the aesthetics with the energy needs of the entire community, said Progress spokes man Rob Sumner, noting the project is part of the rebuild of a transmission line rst built in 1934. We are constantly maintaining and improv ing the line. We are also charged by the state to storm harden the lines, he said. You have experi enced some severe weath er in the last few years. The new poles will make the entire system through there more dependable. In December, the city commission unani mously voted to support the recommendations of a citizens committee led by Robert Lindsley, who owns commercial prop erty downtown with busi nesses near the planned location of one of the tow ers. The committee was appointed to examine Progresss placement of the poles, including a spe cic request the company work with the city to nd a way to bury the trans mission lines along Water Street. Sumner said Progress made changes to the de sign after meeting with the committee, including agreeing to dye some of the poles brown as a con cession to aesthetics. He said the 145-foot transmission tower with a 15-feet by 15-feet base at the river crossing has been replaced with single 135-foot pole with a 5-foot base, for a net loss of one transmission pole. He said distribution poles with cross beams will be elimi nated, along with the old bucket-type transformers, and that some pole and line relocation was done to provide a view of the river. But citizens main re quest, that the lines be rerouted around the down town, has gone unheeded. Sumner declined to pro vide an estimated cost for moving the transmission line north to run along the old railroad easement. Abandoning the decades old transmission lines will bring additional cost and permitting issues, he said. Sumner said the cost of burying transmission lines is roughly $10 million per mile and requires that a 16-foot trench be dug. He said less than 3 percent of transmission lines nation wide are subterranean. Concerns over the economic impact of the new poles are paramount among citizen concerns. In fact, tourism is an increasingly important contributor to a vibrant lo cal economy, a creator of jobs and healthy growing businesses, said Linds ley. No one can dispute that tourism will continue to be a very important part of the local real estate re covery, which is so impor tant to both our economy and the city and county tax base. A line of these incred ible oversized poles com ing through the heart of the district, down our sce nic waterfront, is a blight on the aesthetic beauty of our charming historic city, he said. Citizens say the con crete posts for the trans mission lines will tower over the tallest buildings downtown, which are lim ited to a 35-foot height re striction under countywide rules. They say they will even dwarf the booms on the shrimp boats docked at Riverfront Park along Water Street, where sev eral of the poles are slated to be installed. All were asking them to do is pause and give us the exact cost and some time to come up with the money, said local busi nessman Mark Friedman. Jacobs and other at torneys consulted on the matter do not dispute Progress has a 30-year easement along the wa terfront with the city, and therefore doesnt need city permission to place the poles. Progress Energy may have the right to do this, but its not the right thing to do, Lindsley said. SCAN from page A1 POLES from page A1 DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times Cindy Drapal, Weems director of nursing, shows where patients will recline as Charlotte Williams, director of radiology, prepares to demonstrate the new CT scanner.

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Local The Times | A3 Thursday, November 10, 2011 Special to The Times The Panhandle Players are hard at work rehearsing for Work, Play, Love: An Evening of One-Act Plays that will be presented at the historic Dixie Theatre in Apalachicola Nov. 18-20. The evening will include three short plays, The Temp, At Half Time, and Mark Twains Diaries of Adam and Eve as well as several short scenes between the plays. The Panhandle Players truly bring the community together in this presentation which showcases both veteran actors, performers new to the stage, and crew from all over two counties including Mexico Beach, Port St. Joe, Carrabelle, Apalachicola, Eastpoint, and St. George Island. First, the Work: The Temp is a comedy by Roy Friedman. Set in a modern day ofce, a temp worker played by Gina Vicari arrives to complete an important report. The ofce exec, portrayed by newcomer Katie Maxwell, and administrative assistant, Sharon Solomon, must deal with this picky, difcult to please temp and try to get the job done for their boss. Veteran Tom Loughridge directs this cast with help from his able stage manager, Beverly Kelley. Next, Play in At Half Time by Art Shulman, another comedy about an over-60 womens basketball team who are losing a tough game to the Little Sisters of Mercy, a team of silent nuns who play in their skirts! Their coach, played by Players regular Jeff Ilardi, tries to motivate his players during half time. His team, depicted by Elaine Kozlowsky, Laura Baney, Bobbi Seward, Judy Loftus, and Barbara Hartseld, just cant understand why theyre losing. These ladies antics will have you rolling with laughter into intermission. Ed Tiley and Caroline Ilardi direct this entertaining pageant of characters. The evening concludes with Love. Mark Twains Diaries of Adam and Eve adapted by David Birney is directed by Dan Wheeler. This play stars Hank Kozlowsky as Adam and Stephaney Provenzano as Eve, returning to the stage after a several-year absence. At times funny, at times poignant, this creatively produced play will leave you smiling and pondering the fall of the Garden of Eden, otherwise known as Niagara Falls. Performances are Friday and Saturday, Nov. 18 and 19 at 7:30 p.m. and Sunday, Nov. 20 at 3 p.m. at the Dixie. Season tickets which include dinner discounts at local restaurants for all three shows of the Panhandle Players 2011-12 season are also available. For tickets to the show and more information please call 670-5064, email PanhandlePlayers@ gmail.com, or visit www. Panhandle Players.com. Tickets are also being sold at the Butler Agency in Eastpoint, Downtown Books in Apalachicola, and Carrabelle Junction. THE BOYS ARE BACK IN TOWN Weems is proud to announce the return of Southland ER Physicians. J. Plum, MD Joda Lynn, MD Patrick Conrad, MD Paul Hart, MD Timothy Adamcryk, MD Garrett Chumney, MD Vincent Ivers, MD Nathaniel Hawkins, MD 24 hour Emergency Services, Acute In-Patient Care, Swingbed Rehabilitation Program, Diagnostic and Surgical Services 135 Avenue G Apalachicola, Fl 32320 (850) 653-8853 Our mission is to improve the health status of the residents and visitors to Franklin County, by providing quality, compassionate, cost effective and convenient health care through community leadership and in collaboration with other healthcare organizations which serve our communities. BAYFRONT EASTPOINT 1.2 acres on Hwy 98 with $850/month rental income from mobile home, also machine shop. Great home site and already has dock approval. ML S # 243415.................$149,000 Travis Stanley 850.653.6477 Grayson Shepard 850.653.6718 Kim Davis 850.653.6875 Leon Teat 850.653.5656 Jackie Golden 850.899.8433 Jamie Crum 850.370.0835 Sandy Mitchem 850.899.8300 C O MME R C IA L ST GE OR GE IS L AN D Excellent location for 1500 square feet of commercial space in the heart of the island. Currently has indoor pool but will ML S # 244926...........$339,000 CO MME R C IA L A PA L A C HI C O L A Two commercial lots for sale in and Penton St. Great location, one block of Hwy 98, near all the best shops and ML S # 244870..............$150,000 N EW L ISTIN G! ML S #245466..................$349,000 A FFOR D A BLE GR E AT E R A PA L A C HI C O L A ML S # 244700.................$115,000 GR E AT E R A PA L A C HI C O L A ML S # 244666.................$275,000 Robert C. Bruner Attorney Personal & Business Bankruptcy Over 30 Years Legal Experience 850-670-3030 We are a debt relief agency. bankruptcy relief under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon advertisements. Before you decide, ask us to send you free written information experience. DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times Starring in the play At Half Time are, standing, from left, Judy Loftus, Jeff Ilardi and Barbara Hartseld, and seated, from left, Laura Baney, Elaine Kozlowsky and Bobbi Seward. Panhandle Players prepare to Work, Play, Love Dems host reception at Crooked River Grill The Franklin County Democratic Executive Committee is hosting a reception at the Crooked River Grill in St. James Bay beginning at 5:30 p.m. on Thursday, Nov. 10. All interested Democrats in Franklin County are invited to attend. The reception will run from 5:307 p.m., said Committee Chair Curt Blair. Several elected state and county Democratic ofcials will be present at the reception to share a few remarks. Ofcials slated to be on hand include State Sen. Bill Montford, State Rep. Leonard Bembry, County Commissioner Cheryl Sanders, Franklin Countys Tax Collector Jimmy Harris and County Clerk Marcia Johnson. In addition to Blair, ofcers of the executive committee are Mercedes Updyke, vice chair; Beth Blair, secretary; Brenda Ash, treasurer and Past Chair Barbara Sanders. Betty Croom is the state committeewoman. The committee decided at its last meeting in July to hold quarterly gatherings at different places in the county. This meeting, which brings Democrats to the eastern end of Franklin County, will feature an opportunity for local Democrats to speak with several of their elected ofcials. The committee is looking for a large attendance, said Curt Blair. Refreshments will be served. Free state park admission for vets The Florida Department of Environmental Protections Florida Park Service will offer free day-use entry to all state parks on Friday, Nov. 11 in recognition of Veterans Day. All other use fees, such as overnight accommodations, tours or special events, will be charged as usual on Friday, Nov. 11. Florida State Parks honor American veterans and active-duty service members throughout the year. Honorably discharged veterans, active-duty service and reserve members receive a 25 percent discount on the purchase of a state parks annual entrance pass. The discount provides a savings of $15 on an individual pass and $30 on a family pass, which allows up to eight people in a group to access most of Floridas 160 state parks. In addition, honorably discharged veterans with service-connected disabilities and surviving News BRIEFS See NEWS BRIEFS A11

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Opinion A4 | The Times USPS 027-600 Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 VP/Publisher: Karen Hanes Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola Times Thursday, November 10, 2011 Special to the Times Can you even imagine what it mu St. be like to lose your home, family pictures, clothes, kitchen utensils, tools, toothbrush, books, pets, even your underwear to an all-consuming re? What mu St. it be like to have such deva St.ation take over your life? Ill never forget seeing the face of a dear friend when she held out her 50year-old daughters chri St.ening dress in her own hands lovingly saved for generations to come and watched it crumble from the intense heat of their terrible house re. The things that surround us may be lo St. forever in such a tragedy, but when lives and property can be saved, it is often volunteer community remen who make that happen. Here in our small communities, where budgets and personnel are often too limited for full-time professional teams, it is the dedication and commitment of volunteer reghters who St.and between property damage or de St.ruction. Often side-by-side with local paid police and crisis r St. responders, volunteer reghting teams give their time, talent, heartfelt efforts and sometimes even their very lives as they try to help save the lives and property of those they have promised to serve. This Saturday, Nov. 12 at the Lanark Boat Club, at 2364 U.S. Highway 98, a seaside community fundraising event will be held to help raise nancial support for the equipment and training needs of local LanarkSt. James volunteer reghting teams. Beginning at 10 a.m., the cooking of prize-winning seafood gumbo will ll the air with wonderful smells and provide challenges for each area-wide participating reghting team. The Franklin County School will also enter a cooking crew. At 2 p.m., experienced judges will declare the winner of the ta St.e te St. conte St. Mrs. Jackie Gay of Carrabelle, herself a prize-winning gumbo maker, will be one of this years judges. You may remember that Mrs. Gay won the grand prize of $50,000 from the Good Housekeeping/Paul Newman charity conte St. for her winning recipe, Franklin County Floridas Own Frankly Fanta St.ic Seafood Gumbo. At that time, she generously designated that her entire winnings be donated to support the Carrabelle Branch Library building fund in order to help fulll her dream of the con St.ruction of the new Carrabelle library. In addition to serving as a judge in this years conte St., Mrs. Gay has prepared a handwritten book of her own prized seafood recipes which includes favorites like corned grouper, shrimp and grits, seafood quiche, sh chowder and her prize-winning gumbo. The one-ofa-kind book will be featured together with a basket of Newmans own products as a highlight of this important local fundraising effort. Beginning at 12:30 p.m., as the competing gumbo recipes simmer, items to be auctioned include a helicopter ride donated by Panhandle Helicopter, day of golf with a complimentary overnight St.ay at St. James Bay, a gorgeous handmade quilt and a four-hour kayak ride donated by Journeys of St. George. A rafe will be held following the 2 p.m. gumbo judging featuring signed Richard Bickel prints, re St.aurant dinners, oil change, tackle box and more. There will be music and food throughout the day, adding to the entertainment and excitement of this third vital fundraising effort for our own local reghters. Admission is free, everyone is invited to attend and participate actively in the auction and rafe on behalf of equipment and training purchases for our own volunteers. Mike Rundel, president of the LanarkSt. James volunteers, asks that area residents intere St.ed in serving with the volunteer reghting team are encouraged to submit their names and regi St.er their intere St. in joining the vital community service group. Mel Kelly is a frequent contributor to the Apalachicola and Carrabelle Times. Support your reghters, enjoy gumbo Saturday THOUGHTS FOR THE TIMES Mel Kelly Editors note: The following is an excerpt from an interview that educator Ron Clark did with CNN called What Teachers Really Want to Tell Parents. Clark was the American Teacher of the Year in 2001 and the founder of the Ron Clark Academy in Atlanta. Franklin County High School Principal George Oehlert said the schools entire faculty is involved in a book study of Clarks most recent book The End of Molasses Classes Getting our kids unstuck. For starters we are educators, not nannies. We are educated professionals who work with kids every day and often see your child in a different light than you do. If we give advice dont ght it. Take it, and digest it in the same way you would consider advice from a doctor or lawyer .... Trust us. If you really want to help your children be successful, stop making excuses for them .... Some parents will make excuses regardless of the situation, and they are raising children who will grow into adults who turn toward excuses and do not create a strong work ethic. If you dont want your child to end up 25 and jobless, sitting on your couch eating potato chips, then stop making excuses for why they arent succeeding. Instead, focus on nding solutions. Its OK for your child to get into trouble sometimes. It builds character and teaches life lessons. As teachers, we are vexed by those parents who stand in the way of those lessons; we call them helicopter parents because they want to swoop in and save their child every time something goes wrong. This one may be hard to accept, but you shouldnt assume that because your child makes straight As that her/she is getting a good education. The truth is, a lot of times its the bad teachers who give the easiest grades, because they know by giving good grades everyone will leave them alone In all honesty, its usually the best teachers who are giving the lowest grades, because they are raising expectations. Yet, when your child receives low scores you want to complain and head to the principals ofce. We know you love your children. We love them, too. We just ask-and beg of you-to trust us, support us and work with the system, not against it. We need you to have our backs, and we need you to give us the respect we deserve. Lift us up and make us feel appreciated, and we will work even harder to give your child the best education possible. At the Oct. 4 Port St Joe city commissions public hearing, city ofcials approved a development order to allow the building of a polluting biomass incinerator which will have a far reaching negative and devastating impact on the sh, oyster, scallop and crab seafood industries in the northwest region of Florida within a 50-mile radius. This incinerator will burn 930 tons of trees/ wood residue every day, which will release 607 tons of pollution per year, including dioxins, lead, mercury, arsenic, particulate matter and many other cancer causing chemicals. The American Lung Association and many medical associations in Florida and nationwide oppose such biomass incinerators for this reason. Dioxin is said to be the most toxic chemical known to man and it will be emitted as a byproduct of incineration via the smokestacks to nd its way into our water and soil. In the water, dioxin binds to small particles or plankton which is the rst level of the food chain for sh and aquatic organisms and when we eat these products, the dioxin accumulates in our bodies. The Food and Drug Administration has stated there are NO safe and effective treatments to rid dioxins now in humans and the best way is to reduce dietary exposure, which will be difcult for all of us because we live in coastal communities that thrive on seafood. Another major threat to the seafood industry in Port St. Joe, Apalachicola, Eastpoint and Carrabelle is the potential for a decrease in the water ow volume into the Apalachicola River which will initially threaten the oyster beds in the region. This could happen as a direct result of huge amounts of water withdrawals occurring at the incinerator site as this type of incinerator demands approximately one million gallons of water every day which will be taken from the Chipola River, the major tributary for the Apalachicola River. The water will be used in the incinerators cooling down process. This decrease in water volume from the Chipola River has the potential to interfere with the ow of necessary nutrients to the Apalachicola Bay from the Apalachicola River. This can only undermine the water levels required to sustain our sensitive oyster beds. Furthermore, a diminishing water ow will eventually have a negative impact on all aquatic organisms and species in the region that depend on this crucial balance of water and nutrients. Any major change or adjustment could destroy our fragile ecosystem. What I do not understand is that in these difcult environmental and political times of interstate water wars, it seems odd to me the citizens and politicians of Florida, Alabama and Georgia are not outraged by the ippant and careless plan of Port St. Joe to throw away one million gallons of fresh water daily to a hungry polluting incinerator that will evaporate approximately 85 percent of the water into no mans land. Luckily, for now, the developer has no private funding and they have been notied that there is no current public funding for this project thank the Lord! There is still time to prevent this monstrosity from ruining our beautiful coastal region and our way of life and I, for one, refuse to say goodbye to seafood yet! Barbara RutherfordDorris, RN Special to the Times Representative Steve Southerland, II took the Obama Administration to task last month for misleading the American people in an attempt to increase its regulatory control over our oceans and coastal industries. In a House Natural Resources Committee hearing on Oct. 26, Southerland highlighted the unmistakable conict between the Obama administrations National Ocean Policy, which includes new regulatory and enforcement authority, and the public assurances of administration ofcials who maintain that no new regulations will take effect due to this executive order. While it should come as no surprise to anyone that the Obama Administration is angling for more federal control of our oceans, their blatant bait-and-switch tactics should alarm us all, Southerland said. By burying language that permits new requirements, regulations, and enforcement 30 pages deep in their National Ocean Policy and then disavowing any intention to increase their control over our coasts, the administration is exhibiting Washington at its worst. Its time to stop the political doublespeak and start helping coastal industries that are sinking under the weight of crippling Washington regulations. The Obama administrations new ocean policy bureaucracy would be administered by a 27-member National Ocean Council, a vemember steering committee and two policy committees. Special to the Times Florida has the potential to save millions in healthcare costs annually while maintaining highquality healthcare delivery by removing administrative and legislative barriers for Advanced Registered Nurse Practitioners (ARNPs) and Physicians Assistants (PAs), a new Florida TaxWatch study nds. Florida TaxWatch says that ARNP prescribing will save Floridians approximately $339 million a year, said State Senator Mike Bennett (R-Manatee), a champion for ARNP prescribing in the Florida Senate. I dont think the Legislature can ignore savings like that. The doctors and the nurses need to come to agreement on this important issue and focus on the best and most cost-effective way to treat patients. Dominic M. Calabro, Florida TaxWatch president and CEO said Florida ARNPs and PAs are capable of taking on a signicant amount of primary care functions for Floridians, without needing to work directly under a physician. Across the country, medical clinics in which ARNPs provide the majority of care have reported substantial cost savings in healthcare delivery. The two main recommendations in the TaxWatch report are allowing ARNPs and PAs to prescribe controlled substances either collaboratively with a physician or independently, and bill Medicaid and insurance providers directly, allowing for a lower overall reimbursement rate for primary care services. Florida has the opportunity to signicantly reduce healthcare costs for taxpayers, Calabro said. This report reveals that up to $46 million in savings for Medicaid and state-sponsored health insurance could be realized through these changes. We can no longer afford to under-utilize these medical professionals, who are fully capable of providing quality primary care services to Floridians at a lower cost than physicians must charge. Brian Keeley, CEO, Baptist Health South Florida, commented on the report, Miami-Dade County and the state as a whole suffer a severe shortage of access to primary care physicians, especially for Medicaid patients. The time has come for intelligent and fundamental change in the primary care delivery model. TaxWatchs report validates Keeleys longtime advocacy for ARNP prescribing. ARNPs as physician extenders are cost effective, efcient and provide safe, quality health care, particularly in underserved areas. We live in a world where patients routinely seeking primary care come in the emergency room. ER treatment averages four to ten times the cost of primary, non-emergent care. The state of Florida should join the other 48 states that currently allow ARNP prescribing which TaxWatchs report demonstrates will save money and efciencies through the entire health care system. To read the entire report, visit www. oridataxwatch.org Kiss your local Florida seafood goodbye? Southerland decries ocean policy Remove costly barriers to ARNPs, PAs STEVE SOUTHERLAND What teachers really want to tell parents

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Local The Times | A5 Thursday, November 10, 2011 Thank You for your service to our country and for making the sacrices you have made in your life to keep America Free! Without you, America would not be the great country it is today! God Bless the USA!! Blake Hutchison President WE SALUTE OUR V eterans 11-11-11 First Baptist Christian School Honors Our Veterans In recognition of Americas nearly 25 million living, wounded and handicapped Veterans, those that have given their lives, their widows, and the MIAs/POWs, the First Baptist Christian School would like to say Thank You by inviting all area Veterans and the community to their annual Veterans Day Program Friday, November 11th at 9am in the church sancutuary located at 46 Ninth Street in Apalachicola. BILL MILLER REALTY 850-697-3751 (3310) 570-0658 WOW! 1 B D R FU R N I SH E D AP T $15,000 $29,500 $2,500 D OWN BU Y S 2 B E D AP T 2 6 GU L F V IE W & A CC E SS 3 BD R 2 BA 2006 M /H 16 X 80 $89,000 $500 D OWN C HO I C E OF 3 CITY LO T S $180.00/ M ON T H O R $17,500/ EA CH MI H 2 CR N R L O T S BLK. $ ST O RE RE DUC E D $49,500 3 D OO R NI C E 2 B/R M H 2 C R N R. L O T S $47,500 NOTICE OF SPECIAL MEETING The Board of Commissioners of the Northwest Florida Regional Housing Authority will hold a Special Meeting on November 15, 2011, at the Holiday Inn & Suites, 2725 Graves Road, Tallahassee, Florida. Meeting will begin at 1:00 p.m. E.S.T. The meeting will be open to the public. By Lois Swoboda Times Staff Writer Forgotten Coast TV is back on cable television and relocated to Eastpoint, in a new home that Helen Spohrer said is everything she could have hoped for. On June 28, FCTV coowners John and Helen Spohrer purchased from federal bank regulators at auction for $455,000 the for mer branch ofce of Gulf State Community Bank, at 258 U.S. Highway 98. Helen Spohrer said the facility was purchased after sever al prospective owners bid on the property. Some appraisers were surprised the bank building brought so much money but we did not purchase it as an investment, she said. We purchased it as end users. She said the building was really move-in ready when they bought it, includ ing several features that make it ideal for the sta tions needs. It came wired for the latest high-tech equipment, possibly be cause of the banks security needs, and now features a dedicated tech room with air conditioning, as well as a full kitchen. There are large bright ofces, an editing room, conference room and a studio set up with three permanent sets. We like the new studio because it is centrally located in the county and we like the pro grammable sign in front for announcements, said John Spohrer. Beginning Nov. 1, FCTV began broadcasting on Me diacom Channel 3, although not as a public access chan nel, which it had been in the past. The Spohrers said the cable television pres ence could yield as many as 30,000 new viewers to add to its broadcast on St. George Cable Channel 9 and at www.forgottencoast tv.com. FCTV is a video produc tion and recording compa ny focused on educational and environmental pro gramming, local govern ment, and local businesses. Helen Spohrer said FCTV is shooting new episodes dealing with shing, cook ing, outdoor life and local history, with the newest project being a weekly beach report with upcom ing events featuring host Pandora Schlitt. Although the studio is already in full swing, the Spohrers said a grand opening is planned for Dec. 2. FCTV in new HQ and back on air By Lois Swoboda Times Staff Writer Women and seniors are signicantly more active in Franklin County elections than other voters. In an Oct. 20 talk on women in politics, Super visor of Elections Ida Coo per Elliott told the Philaco Womens Club that women regularly vote in greater numbers than men in the county. In 1964, this was not so. That year, 79 percent of registered male voters came to the polls, but only 64 percent of registered women. In 2004, only 61 per cent of registered women voted, while registered men appearing at the polls dropped to 56 percent. Elliot said older voters are also more likely to come to the polls than young ones. Young people just dont seem to understand the importance of voting, she said. They think one vote cant change anything, but it can. Elliott said she visits the Franklin County School at least twice a year to encour age students to register. She said there will be a change in the next election. In the past, early voting ran 10 days before Election Day. In the Jan. 31 presidential preference primary, early voting will take place from Saturday, Jan. 21 through Saturday, Jan. 28. Voters must be regis tered by Jan. 3 to vote. Elliott said some voters are switching party aflia tion from Democrat to Re publican, possibly because only Republicans can vote in the January election. The 2012 primary elec tion will take place July 16 and the general election on Nov.. 6 with early voting from Oct. 27 to Nov. 3. Dead line for voter registration for the general election is Oct. 9, 2012. Countys women voters more active than men LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Ida Elliott addressed the Philaco Womens Club Oct. 20. JOHN SPOHRER | Special to the Times. 258 U.S. Highway 98 in Eastpoint

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A6 | The Times Thursday, November 10, 2011 Jean Sewell, Betty Roberts honored What a picnic! Two great ladies were honored, also; our park is now named Jean Sewell Park, and our pavilion is now Betty Roberts Pavilion. We enjoyed a lot of food, many friends and neighbors. Betty is still in Bay St. James and felt she shouldnt go. We still have coffee at Chillas Hall, from 9 to 11 a.m., and on Thursdays, the coffee is free. Come on by and have a cup or two, and visit with your friends and neighbors. The Thrift Shop is open on Thursdays, again! You can shop til you drop Monday through Saturday, from 8 a.m. to noon. Come by and shop, and have a cup of coffee; Betty, Sharon and Mary will be glad to see you. We all can enjoy Friday night hamburgers, and Sunday pizza, at our American Legion Post 82. These two meals are served from 5 to 7 p.m. Besides the good food, we also have pool, shufeboard, bar bingo and of course, your favorite beverage. Come join us; everyone welcome! Breakfast will be served Saturday, Nov. 12, from 7:30 to 9 a.m. at the Senior Center, then its off to the parade. Step-off is at 10 a.m. Then, back to the Senior Center, 201 Ave. F in Carrabelle, to enjoy the Veterans Day Festival. Dont forget to visit the Child Protection Booth, sponsored by members of the Curfew Masonic Lodge. Your childs picture will be taken, and their ngerprints taken and given to the parents for safekeeping. Come and enjoy the day with us! Be kind to one another, check on the sick and housebound, and remember, contrary to popular opinion, Gods last name is not Damn. Until next time, God Bless America, our troops, the poor and the hungry. PET OF THE WEEK Franklin County Humane Society Qualications: Expertise in: Now Accepting Appointments Call Toll Free 888-681-5864 For more info www.seclung.com Lung Disease Specialist Rob Garver, MD Now Seeing Patients in Port St. Joe NOW BCBS-FL I N -NETWORK PROV I DER Aubrey Rafeld born Aubrey Gracelyn Rafeld was born Thursday, Oct. 6, 2011, at Gulf Coast Medical Center. She weighed 8 pounds and was 19 inches long. She is the daughter of Kimberly Denney and Rodney Rafeld of Eastpoint. She is welcomed home by big brother Jacob and big sister Kassidy. Maternal grandmother is Donna Motes of Carrabelle. Paternal grandparents are Verdell Haddock of Eastpoint and the late Rodney Rafeld Sr. Brantlee Charles Martina born Brantlee Charles Martina was born Friday, Aug. 12, 2011, at Tallahassee Memorial Hospital. He weighed 6 pounds, 4 ounces and was 20 inches long. He was welcomed home by proud parents Jody Martina and Tiffany Millender and big brother Chason Martina. Maternal grandparents are Travis and Caramelle Millender. Maternal great-grandparents are Danny and Danna Rose, the late Bert and Molly Millender and Fred and Elois Knauss. Paternal grandparents are Kevin and Patty Martina. Paternal great-grandparents are Bill and Burnell Martina and the late John and Betty Gay. Buziers celebrate 30th wedding anniversary David and Penni Buzier celebrated their 30th wedding anniversary on Sunday, Oct. 2, 2011. They were married at the Calvary Cathedral in Panama City, with the Rev. J.B. Davis ofciating at the Oct. 2, 1981, ceremony, with many relatives and friends attending. Penni is the daughter of Eddie and Dora (Morris) Curti. David is the son of Betty (Kemp) Hicks and Cubie Hicks of Panama City and Adolph Buzier Sr. of Apalachicola. The couple makes their home in Panama City, where they have two children, David Aaron Buzier and Laura Buzier. Tomilee Dowden, Steven Babb to wed Mr. Tommy Jack Massey is pleased to announce the upcoming marriage of his granddaughter, Tomilee Melissa Dowden to Steven Hunter Babb. The wedding is to take place on Saturday, Nov. 19, 2011, at 5 p.m. at First Assembly of God Church in Carrabelle, with a reception to immediately follow at Lanark Village Boat Club in Lanark Village. Tomilee is the daughter of Connie Massey of Carrabelle and Mr. and Mrs. Terry Dowden Sr. of Birmingham, Ala. Steven is the son of Fred and Tina Babb of Eastpoint. Maternal grandparents are Tommy Jack Massey and the late Barbara Ann Massey of Carrabelle, and the late Mr. and Mrs. William T. Dowden of Tallahassee. Paternal grandparents are Mrs. Betty Armistead of Sumatra and Mr. Larry Hicks of Eastpoint, and Mrs. Evelyn Babb and the late Mr. Fred Babb II of Apalachicola. Although no invitations are being sent, all family and friends are invited to attend and witness the joining of two genuinely wonderful people in marriage. John Talon Mathes turns 2 John Talon Mathes celebrated his 2nd birthday on Saturday, Oct. 22, 2011, with family and friends. He is the son of Parrish Johnson and Justin Mathes. John Talons party was a motorcross theme and was held at the Lighthouse Park on St. George Island. He received his very own kid-friendly dirt bike to ride! The guests enjoyed hamburgers, hot dogs and a dirt bike-themed cake. Toddler friends took home personalized gift treats. Maternal grandparents are Darren and Chimene Johnson of Eastpoint. Paternal grandparents are Riley and Joyce Mathes of Carrabelle. On Saturday, Nov. 12, the Center for History, Culture and Art, 86 Water St., will close the Women Folk art exhibit with a gala reception from 6-8 p.m. Folk artists Joan Matey, Mary Lou Athorn, Clarice Powell and Nanci Kerr, whose work includes the mixed media sculpture at right, will be present to speak about their art and answer questions, plus entertainment by Sopchoppy folk singer Frank Lindamood. This thought-provoking show will leave the center on Sunday. The center is open on Thursday, Friday and Saturday from noon to 5 p.m. The event is organized by Historic Apalachicola Main Street Inc., designated as a National Trust for Historic Preservation Main Street program. For more information, call 855APALACH. LOIS SWOBODA | The Times LANARK NEWS Jim Welsh Births and BIRTHDA YS Weddings & ANNIVERSARIES WOM EN FOL K E X H IBIT R E C E PTIO N Society

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The Times | A7 Thursday, November 10, 2011 The United Methodist Churches of Franklin County Welcome You First United Methodist Church of Apalachicola Worship Service 11:00 a.m. every Sunday Sunday School 10:00 a.m. 75 5 th St. Apalachicola 653-9530 fumcapalach@gtcom.net Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis Carrabelle United Methodist Church Worship Services 10:45 a.m. Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Celebrate Recovery Mondays 7-9 p.m. 102 NE Ave. B Carrabelle 697-3672 Pastor: Julie Stephens Eastpoint United Methodist Church Worship Service 10:00 a.m. every Sunday Healing service every fourth Monday at 7:00 p.m. 317 Patton Dr. (corner of David St.) 670-8825 Pastor: Rev. Beth White St. George Island United Methodist Church 9:00 a.m. Worship Service 10:00 a.m. Fellowship Hour 201 E. Gulf Beach Dr. 9274635 www.sgiumc.org Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis First Pentecostal Holiness Church 379 Brownsville Road Apalachicola Were excited about what Gods doing!!! Sunday School 9:45 am Sunday Morning Worship 10:45 am Sunday Evening Service 6:00 pm Monday, Youth Group 6:30 pm Wednesday, Royal Rangers, G.A.P. 7:00 pm Wednesday Worship & Word 7:30 pm Nursery Provided during regular church services 7:00 7:00 First Baptist Church St. George Island 501 E. Bayshore Drive 927-2257 R. Michael Waley, Pastor Join us as we praise and worship the living Christ. Great is the Lord and most worthy of praise. Psalm 145:3 Sunday Bible Study ................................................ 10:00am Worship Praise ........................................................ 11:00am Sunday Night ............................................................ 7:00pm Wednesday Power Hour ...................................... 7:00pm Wednesday Youth at S.P.L.A.S.H ....................... 7:00pm Walking in Christ R. Michael Whaley, Pastor WELCOMES YOU Church of the Ascension 101 NE First Street Carrabelle SUNDAY 10:00 AM WELCOMES YOU Church THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH (850) 274-4490 WELCOMES YOU Trinity Trinity Episcopal Church est. 1836 Welcomes You Hwy. 98 & 6th St. Apalachicola 850-653-9550 Sunday Worship Services 8 & 10:30 a.m. Wednesdays Healing Service 11 a.m. Centering Prayer 4 p.m. Faith Veterans Day at First Baptist In recognition of Americas 25 million living, wounded and handicapped veterans and those who have given their lives, their widows and those missing in action or prisoners of war, First Baptist Christian School would like to say Thank you by inviting area veterans and the community to its annual Veterans Day program at 9 a.m. Friday, Nov. 11, in the church sanctuary, 46 Ninth St. in Apalachicola. dare 2b different conference Mt. Zion Womens Ministry will host Womens Conference dare 2b different at 7 p.m. Friday and Saturday, Nov. 11-12. Speakers will be Prophetess Shantel Randolph and Prophetess Yalonda Wood, from Tallahassee. Renowned saxophonist Chris Godber, from Panama City, will be featured on Friday night. Come, enjoy praise and worship and let the word of God build you up! For further info, please call 323-2665. Liberty Counsel to conduct Nov. 19 seminar By invitation of Franklin County Fellowship of Christian Athletes, Liberty Counsel will conduct a workshop covering students rights, teachers rights and prayer in schools at the Eastpoint Church of God on Saturday, Nov. 19, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. The seminar is free to the public; literature will be available for purchase. All school administration, faculty and parents are encouraged to attend Liberty Counsel is an international nonprot litigation, education and policy organization dedicated to advancing religious freedom, the sanctity of life and the family since 1989 by providing pro bono assistance and representation on these and related topics. Have you ever stopped to consider the plight of the modern church? Will it ever cease to exist, or is it the one institute that will stand the test of time? Occasionally, I notice a rundown old church with the windows boarded up when I ride through small towns and backwoods areas. I cannot help but wonder what happened and where did the people go. I can imagine an old pastor sitting on the porch steps on Sunday morning with his overalls on, waiting for someone to pull up in the parking lot. He probably imagines a time when he could hear the children gasp as the Sunday school teacher dramatizes a story from the Bible. He can almost smell Miss Johnsons homemade apple pie and Mrs. Browns famous fried chicken that was prepared for every fifth Sunday dinner. The sound of the wind in the trees brings Amazing Grace and Sweet Hour of Prayer to his recollection. Suddenly, a car swishing by on the highway startles him, and it brings him back to reality. This story might seem dramatized, but it has been predicted we are just one generation away from a Godless society. All it will take is enough people to stop teaching their children about God for it to come to pass. Sunday school is 156 years old and is now being eliminated in many churches. As a last resort, some churches only have one Sunday service and no midweek service because of a drastic decline in attendance. A slow fade has taken place while the church takes a back seat to social activities. Our young people are indifferent because they have little or no Bible knowledge in them. They replace the void with adverse pastimes, showing no regard for the life-altering truth the Word contains. Some people would view this as a victory for the atheistic society or the antiChristian movement in general. The problem that is not taken into account by these individuals is the increase in evil taken place because of the decrease of righteousness being instilled in them. The good news is that it only takes a spark to get a re going. In II Kings, it was prophesied Josiah would be placed on the throne of David to realign Israel with God. Many generations of people passed until no one remembered the things of God anymore. The kings before him had turned to strange gods and the people embraced all of them. Sound familiar? Josiah was 8 years old when he became king, and he reigned in Jerusalem 31 years. II Kings 22:1 He did what was right in the eyes of the Lord and walked in all the ways of his father David, not turning aside to the right or to the left. This is a noteworthy statement because we know distractions can cause you to take your eyes off the road for just a second and cause a wreck. The diversion of insignicant possessions and leisure time is taking the place of desire for knowledge. When we are distracted by worldly things, we lose sight of the purpose we were created for. The Kelly Family My husband Tom and I, and our son Tom (aka K.B. Kims brother ) are very grateful to new and old friends at C Quarters Marina and throughout Carrabelle who made our Kims Oct. 28 birthday very special for her. Sadly, because her beloved husband of 14 years is still living in Holland trapped in immigration hell, dear and special Carrabelle friends made sure she had several happy celebrations to assure her she was not alone and is indeed loved, appreciated and wished very well for her new year ahead. There was a delicious, one of a kind, home-crafted gourmet German chocolate cake and another special cake from a young friend deliberately selected as her winning prize at church in order to share it with her friend Miss Kimmie. There were wonderful munchies, fresh fruit, many serious and fun gifts, cards, photographs, hugs and several choruses of Happy Birthday. Our daughters special day and evening became much more festive than she ever expected or anticipated, thanks to some of the people in Carrabelle who wanted her to know how much they care about her. She couldnt know her dad and I would make the surprise trip down from northwest Wisconsin to be with her on her birthday. We came to share hugs with her because we didnt want her to be alone! Little did we know other people who love and care about her here in Carrabelle would take the initiative to make sure her special day was highlighted and commemorated in her honor. I know Kim was deeply touched, and more grateful than she could openly express, for the attention and efforts on her behalf. She is a very loving and thoughtful person; her heartfelt smile is the sunshine for many of us. But because she didnt see herself as deserving of any such special treatment, it made the surprise and embellishments provided by friends, and family, even more wonderful for her. For all you real parents, you well understand it doesnt matter what age your child may be. They will always be your child, and you will always love and worry and care about them and their welfare and happiness. To those of you who understand how much she means to us as your children undoubtedly mean to you you also understand how we wanted her special day to be happy, even under her current difcult circumstances. We drove 3,000 miles to make sure our beloved daughter would not be alone on her special day. We learned we need not have worried! Lots of us are transplants to this area, as were Kim and Harold. But many, many of you have made us all feel welcome and appreciated and cared about. The gift of friendship you give is both very rare and very rich. We are all very grateful and very humbled by it. In giving Kim her surprise parties and gifts, you gave her whole family a wonderful present as well. You showed her, and us, she has been important in your lives, and that you care enough about our child within your own world to make such special efforts on her behalf. You and your caring helped her smile through another day of a tough and challenging time. All of our family extends a very special thank you for your loving birthday gifts of care and thoughtfulness. You may never understand how much your gift of love meant to her, to her father, brother and me, and her husband who can only be at her side in spirit just now. But I promise, we will never forget it, or you. Gratefully, Kim Kelly Reijers and Harold, Mel, Tom and KB Kelly There will be a memorial service in honor of Wesley Papa Gene Wilson to be held Saturday, Nov. 12, 2011, at United Baptist Church in Eastpoint, beginning at 11 a.m. Born Nov. 24, 1951, Mr. Wilson passed away Monday, Oct. 31, 2011, at his home in Chipley. A native of Houston, Texas, he had been a resident of Chipley for the past 15 years, coming from Eastpoint. A self-employed contractor, he was extremely proud of being in the drafting class at Washington-Holmes Vocational Technical School and was a member of the United Baptist Church in Eastpoint. He is predeceased by sisters Vicki Wilson Perry and Paula Wilson Walls. Survivors include his mother and father, Celia and R.D. Segree of Carrabelle; wife, Debrah (Mathis) Wilson of Chipley; son Chad Horton of Chipley; daughter, Jadena Wilson-Horton and friend, Greg Terrell, of Chipley; one brother, Wayne Segree; two sisters, Peggy Andrews and Mary Beth Segree; and two grandchildren, Kris Wilson and Max Horton. The family received friends Friday morning, Nov. 4, at the Country Oaks Baptist Church in Chipley. Funeral services followed in the church with the Rev. Bobby Shiver and Dr. Paul Joyner ofciating. Private interment was in the Wilson Family Cemetery in Chipley. Wesley Papa Gene Wilson Martha Moses, 92, of Apalachicola passed away Monday, Oct. 31, 2011, in Port St. Joe after an extended illness. She was born in Alabama and was a longtime resident of Apalachicola, where she worked in the seafood business, and she loved to sh. She was a member of the Highland Park Community Church. She was preceded in death by her husband, Jim Moses; and two sons, Jimmy and Lovett Moses. She is survived by two sons, Lonnie Moses and wife, Sandra, and Eddie Joe Moses and wife, Wanda; and two daughtersin-law, Oleta and Glenda Moses, all of Apalachicola; one sister, Retha Adkins of Calhoun County; 12 grandchildren; 24 greatgrandchildren; and seven great-great-grandchildren. Funeral services were held Friday morning, Nov. 4 at Highland Park Community Church in Apalachicola with the Rev. Ray Creamer ofciating. Interment followed in Pleasant Rest Cemetery, Overstreet. The viewing was held at the church on Thursday evening, Nov. 4. All services under the direction of the Comforter Funeral Home. Martha Ellen Moses William Doug Kimbrel, age 60, departed this world peacefully at his home on Friday, Oct. 28, 2011. Mr. Kimbrel was born and raised in Calhoun County, although he made Apalachicola his home for the past 34 years. He leaves behind his ance, Pam Burns of Apalachicola; three daughters, Renea Kimbrel OBryan of Bristol, Chastity Kimbrel Sandusky of Marianna and Pamala Kimbrel of San Diego, Calif.; stepson Billy Riley of Panama City; grandsons Christian Kimbrel and wife, Tiffany, of Marianna, and Michael Lowe of San Diego, Calif.; granddaughters Saige Kent of Blountstown and Kymberly Kent of Bristol; sisters Louise Dean and husband, Ed, of Greensboro and Sara Alday and husband, Steve, of Altha; brother James Charles Kimbrel, Jr. and wife, Christy; stepsisters Janet OPry of Greenwood and Elaine Williams of Eastpoint; stepbrothers Alton and Earl Mears; and countless aunts, uncles, cousins, nieces and nephews. He was preceded in death by his parents, James Charles and Dorothy Kimbrel of the Red Oak community. At his request, a private family service will be held at a later date. In lieu of owers, the family welcomes donations to the American Heart Association, 800-242-8721 or online at https://donate. americanheart.org/. Those wishing to extend a word of condolence may do so at www.heritagefhllc. com. Heritage Funeral Home of Panama City is in charge of arrangements. William Doug Kimbrel Danny Holton, 41, of Carrabelle, passed away Sunday, Nov. 6, 2011, in Franklin County. Danny was born in Carrabelle, the son of Reedy and Charlene Holton. He was a lifelong citizen of Carrabelle and loved to sh, hunt and spend time outdoors. His proudest accomplishments were his daughters Christin and Katie. He is survived by his parents, Reedy and Charlene Holton; daughters Christin and Katelynn Holton; brother Michael (Beth) Holton; and sister Amber Holton, all of Carrabelle. He was preceded in death by a daughter, Magan Dawn Holton. Funeral services were held Wednesday, Nov. 9, at 4 p.m. at the Carrabelle Christian Center with Pastor Don Carroll ofciating. Interment followed at Evergreen Cemetery. Arrangements were under the care and direction of Forbes Funeral Home. Please sign the online guestbook at www. forbesfuneralhome.net. Danny Holton Obituaries Card of THANKS Faith BRIEFS Are churches doing a slow fade? YOUTH MA TTERS Scott and Pamela Shiver See YOUTH A10

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Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL (next to Piggly Wiggly) www.BWOsh.com Your Hunting Headquarters SIG SAUER 22 AR R IFLE W A S $519.99 N OW W HILE S UPPLIE S LA S T $399.99 W ITH HARD CA S E I N CLUDED Thursday, November 10, 2011 Freshwater Offshore shing will soon be a memory for 2011. As gag grouper season comes to a close this weekend, anglers will resort to the smaller inshore species for the next 6 months. Black sea bass will make up most of the action and can be caught on most inshore wrecks to the east. Small pieces of cut bait and chicken rigs will produce not only sea bass, but b-liners and rubies as well. Inshore Offshore Inshore shing has slowed down. Most reports from the bay this past week were still big bull reds. Eagle Harbor and the tip of the cape have been hot spots for big bulls in the surf. A few pompano are around in the surf, and the whiting are starting to bite on Mexico Beach. Shari at the Fishermans Landing reports this week from How ard Creek with good numbers of bass, but they are on the small side. Crappie, shellcracker, painted bream and channel cats are coming back to the dock in good number. Big sheeps head are still being caught in the big river on shrimp. SPONSORED BY By Lois Swoboda Times Staff Writer If you notice some unusual spider eggs on your porch or under a shelf, watch out. They might be the eggs of a brown widow spider, which have been abundant in the county this year. These interesting egg cases are round with tiny protruding spikes reminiscent of the head of a medieval mace. Everyone is familiar with black widow spiders, whose bite can sometimes be fatal, but Florida is home to three other widow spiders, the southern widow spider, red widow spider and brown widow spider. Although the venom of these spiders is not as toxic as the black widow, they are very painful and can cause serious injury if not treated. If you have a brown widow spider infestation, you will probably notice the eggs before you see the spider. Brown widows are reclusive and hide in cracks and dark corners. Some typical sites include inside old tires, empty containers such as buckets and nursery pots, mailboxes, entryway corners, under eaves, stacked equipment, cluttered storage closets and garages, behind hurricane shutters, recessed hand grips of plastic garbage cans, undercarriages of motor homes, underneath outside chairs, branches of shrubs and screened porches. Brown widow spiders (latrodectus geometricus) can vary from light tan to dark brown or almost black, and like the black widow, might have colorful markings white, black, yellow, brown and even orange on the their abdomen. Although the bite of widow spiders is much feared, these spiders are generally shy and nonaggressive and will retreat when disturbed. Bites usually occur when a spider becomes accidentally pressed against the skin of a person putting on clothes or sticking their hands in recessed areas or dark corners. According to experts, the brown widow venom is twice as potent as black widow venom, but they inject less, are very timid and do not defend their web. The brown widow is also slightly smaller than the black widow Routine cleaning is the best way to protect your home from widow spiders. Wear gloves in areas where these spiders might be present. A thorough vacuuming is an effective way to removes spiders, egg sacs and webbing. The vacuum bag should be removed when you are nished and placed in a sealed plastic bag for disposal. Where spiders are numerous, spot treatment of a residual insecticide to small areas can be effective. Perimeter sprays around the foundation might provide some relief but rapidly degrade in sunlight and do not minimize pesticide exposure to people and nontarget organisms. Children, the elderly and anyone who has a compromised immune system are at risk from brown widow spider bites. The two major symptoms of a brown widow bite are pain and a red mark at the site. Occasionally, a strong reaction to these bites requires hospitalization. Symptoms of a severe reaction include pain, rigidity in the muscles of the abdomen and legs, swelling, nausea, vomiting and a sharp rise in blood pressure. If you exhibit these symptoms, seek medical help immediately. By Frank Sargeant franksargeant@bellsouth.net Fishing for sea trout, red sh and mangrove snapper in freshwater rivers and creeks seems an endeavor doomed to success because both are saltwater sh. But for a few months each year, there are many locations miles from the Gulf where the briny species are not only possible but likely catches. No one is sure why the coastal species move into the rivers in winter. Some theorize that springs keep these ows warmer than the salt ats, and others suggest that the tannin stain of most Florida rivers acts as a heat sink on sunny days. Theres also a theory that the cold-blooded sh move into the river to get away from warmblooded bottle-nose dolphins, which can easily run down the lethargic sh during cold weather on the ats. Whatever the reason, the sh do migrate to the rivers, usually beginning around the 1st of November and remain ing there into March. The movement is not limited to the Panhandle; coastal sh all the way down into the Everglades make the migration. But its most pronounced from Tarpon Springs north and west because of the colder winters here. Panhandle waters noted for pro ducing good winter action, moving east to west, include the St. Marks River, Ochlocknee River and the Apalachicola River. Off West Bay, Crooked Creek and West Bay Creek sometimes hold sh. And the long stretch of the dredged Intracoastal Canal all the way to Choctawhatchee Bay is all worth probing. At Choctawhatchee Bay, the feeder rivers in the east end are all winter possibilities, including Black Creek, Indian Creek, Mitchell River and Choctawhatchee River. Farther west on the bay, Lafayette Creek and Alaqua Creek, Basin Creek, Rocky Bayou and Garnier Creek are worth checking. And at Pensacola Bay, both Blackwater Bayou and Escambia Bayou are likely. On all these waters, the sh tend to settle into deep, rocky holes. They gradually push inland with succeed ing cold fronts; the rst hole near the mouth might be smoking hot af ter the rst big November front but might be empty a few weeks later as the sh move farther upriver. Its not uncommon for saltwater species to be found ve miles or more from the nearest saltwater by Christmas, and there theyll stay un til the rst bright days of spring. Dredged canals, spring seeps, ship turning basins and other deep holes also attract winter sh, as does the deep water under some residential docks. Its a matter of prospecting until you catch that rst sh, then anchoring down to work the schools. On the bayous, the cuts where creeks ow in often produce. Winter sh tend to be lethargic, and running down fast-moving arti cial lures, as they will in summer, is not on the program. Live shrimp are the universal tender for winter reds, trout and snapper; tail-hooked on a size 1 or smaller hook, with a small split shot added to get it to bottom, this bait is shed at a crawl. Adding a sliver of fresh-cut shrimp to a quarter-ounce jig with a paddle-tail plastic grub can also work well. Keep the cut shrimp small, just enough to add scent; a piece about the size of a pencil eras er is all it takes, thus one shrimp can provide a dozen tips. Shrimp imitations can also be ef fective. The DOA shrimp does the job when shed just like the real thing, as do many versions of Berk ley GULP!, also shed dead slow so that the scent can reach the sh. The advantage of these lures is that they will not be nipped off the hook by the many pinsh and crabs also in the rivers in winter. Its also possible to catch trout, sometimes very large trout, by sh ing a slow-sinking plug like a 52M Mirrolure very slowly through the holes. Slow in winter is a whole new dimension, though. A slight twitch every 5 seconds or so, just enough to indicate life as the bait slowly drifts downward, is all it takes. Its a good idea to sh these lures on braid with a two-foot clear uorocarbon leader; the braid will help you feel the very faint tick thats all the indication you might get of a strike from these lethargic but hungry sh. On Escambia and Blackwater bayous, some anglers do well on trout by shing soft jerkbaits on lightly weighted hooks in the creek channels that cut through the bayou ats. Winter shing is a matter of pros pecting until you strike gold. Once youre in the right spot, shing is generally fast and easy, so keep moving, and eventually your bait will land in shy soup. Spas for sh The cooling water from power plant outows, which might stay close to 80 degrees all winter, is an other winter sh magnet; the plume might extend for over a mile and cre ate a shy spa that draws sh so long as bay waters are chilly. The best-known of these areas in the Panhandle is the Steam Plant Canal at Warren Bayou, a famed winter spot for West Bay anglers, producing ev erything from trout, jacks and reds to the occasional tarpon throughout the winter. Its a catch-and-release-only area from Nov. 1 to the end of Feb ruary, but well worth the visit. The Crystal River Nuclear Plant draws anglers from all over the West Coast on the rst big cold fronts of the year, and the waters there are jammed with everything from blacktip sharks, sheeps head, jacks and tarpon to the more common reds, trout and mangrove snapper. And the TECO plant on Tampa Bay is a noted win ter spot for cobia and also holds winter Spanish mack erel, snook and permit all warm-weather species. In all these locations, its hard to beat a section of fresh shrimp shed on a quarter to three-eighths-ounce jig head with a wide-gap hook. Bounce the jig across bot tom for reds, trout and jacks, or crawl it for sheepshead. Panfish of water Silver trout and sand trout are species largely ignored for most of the year be cause there are larger and more prestigious species easily caught during the temperate months. In winter, though, silvers and sands can sometimes be the only game in town. Even on the day after an icy cold front blows through a time when most species hunker down on bottom and seem to wait for the wind to stop blowing these pan sh continue to bite. And because theres no size limit and no bag limit, anglers who want a sh fry have good reason to target these little guys. Silvers look much like a spotted sea trout without the spots. They are closely related to the sand trout, which also has no spots, and are sometimes found in the same areas in winter. Dr. Bob Shipp, author of Guide to Fishes of the Gulf Of Mexico, notes that silvers are usually found in deeper water than sand sea trout and run a bit smaller silvers rarely exceed 12 inches, while sand sea trout often reach 15 inches. Silver or sand, they both eat shrimp like crazy, and both tend to school up in the bottom of dredged channels inshore the deeper the better during winter. You can often nd them on a depthnder. They look like a ball of bait huddled close to bottom. All it takes to catch them is a piece of fresh-cut shrimp, about an inch long, on a size 2 hook, plus enough weight to quickly get the bait to bottom. Some anglers hang three hooks on one rig and reel them up three at a time. Its also possible to catch both species by vertical jigging with a Hopkins Shorty spoon, half-ounce or heavier; simply drop it down into the sh, ip it up a couple feet, let it drop again and reel up your catch. Cleaning these sh is a matter of a couple of quick passes with a llet knife. Trim off the rib cage, strip off the skin by working the knife at between skin and meat on the cleaning board and youre done. Theyre usually just the right size to create instant sh ngers; dip them in seasoned meal and drop in hot cooking oil until they turn golden brownthey are ten der, light and delicious, really one of the best-eating sh in the Gulf, and yet largely ignored by most anglers. Fish head inland in cooler months MEL KELLY | Special to the Times Brown widow spider eggs BUDS N BUGS Beware of brown widows Page 8 S PE CIA L TO TH E T I MES From top, redsh are one of the primary winter targets for winter anglers. They often enter back bays, slougs, coastal rivers and creeks and settle into deep, rocky holes where water is warmer than that they can nd on the ats. Live shrimp are the universallyuseful winter bait, available at bait shops when catching your own baitsh may be difcult. And nearly all sh that enter panhandle bays and creeks in winter readily eat shrimp. Sand trout and the similar silver trout are also frequent winter catches, particularly in deeper channels. A small piece of fresh shrimp is usually the best bait. Email outdoors news to times outdoors@star.com O UTD OO RS www.apalachtimes.com Section A

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Thursday, November 10, 2011CARRABELLE A PALA C HI C OLA SP O RT S www.apalachtimes.com A Page 9 Section By David Adlerstein Times City Editor The Seahawk varsity football team will conclude its 2011 season this Friday at South Walton eld, where theyll battle a team also known as the Seahawks. We encourage all of our faithful fans to travel to watch the game this Friday night, on U.S. 331 just minutes north of U.S. 98, said Franklin County coach Josh Wright. Kickoff is set for 8 p.m. EST. Wright said the football team used the much-needed bye week to heal and return to fundamentals. The coach and staff spent several days in full gear working the key elements to play winning football, that is blocking, tackling and running. The workouts were high energy and the players responded well to the physical challenges of the drills we presented, said Wright. One of the drills entitled escape from Baghdad pitted teams of three against other teams of three in a game of blocking, avoiding blocks and avoiding being tackled. The drill is also limited to a 5-by-10 yard area and made for many big hits and aggressive maneuvers. The team of Chase Golden, Ladarius Rhodes, Cole Lee and Brennan Walden were the top performers for obvious reasons, said Wright. These guys have been the strong side line and the strong downhill runner a major part of the season. The coach said South Walton has a collection of hard-nosed ballplayers, though they have struggled to collect their rst win. Their single wing offense, similar to the one that gave our squad ts against Wewa, will be challenging to slow down and our goal is to make them punt more than we have to punt, said Wright. Our team is looking at this game as a onegame season and a chance to nish out on a high note. We have challenged our players to bring their A game Friday night and defeat a hungry team at their place in front of their fans, he said. Our staff is proud of how our players have regrouped and get ready to play our nal game of the season. Seahawks eye win in season nale Some 44 golfers turned out the weekend of Oct.2930, at St James Bay Golf Course for the Battle of the Bay 2011 golf Tournament sponsored by St James Bay Golf Resort, Must See Magazine, Centennial Bank and other local businesses. Twosome rst place winners of the four ights, from left, are Let it Fly ight: Charlie Jackson, Calvary, Ga., top, and Mitch Stephens, Havana, front, with 143; Tee It High ight: Ben Holland, Panama City, top, and Bobby Cooley, of Mobile, Ala., front, with 140; The Players Flight: Larry Dempsey, top, and Bert Smith, front, both of Panama City, with 144, and the top scoring twosome of The Dogs Flight: Chris Hanna, top, and Jason Steel, front, both of Tallahassee, with 128. Golfers compete in Battle of the Bay By David Adlerstein Times City Editor Saturday mornings 5K Redsh Run was t for a king. A King Retsyo, that is. In red, owing cape, and Tshirt and gym trunks to match, Ottice Amison, 39, became the rst king in history to run in the race that begins and ends near the front of the Gibson Inn and winds through the historic neighborhoods of the city. He didnt do badly, running a 28:20, after last competing, sans cape, three years ago. But the crown of victory went to two Tallahassee runners who nished atop the eld. Joel Piotrowski, 42, a control room operator at Florida State Universitys National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, nished with a time of 18:11 to lead the eld of about 120 runners. Leading the eld of female runners was 20-year-old Sam Fortunas, who posted a time of 21:29. This cold air has got my lungs burning, Piotrowski said, as he cooled down following the race. It was good, perfect weather. This is like the rst cold run of the year for us. The bodys not quite used to it. Piotrowski, who last ran two years ago in the Redsh Run, stayed on St. George Island with his brother, Kenny, and Lauren Levi, a scientist at the Apalachicola Rational Estuarine Research Reserve. Piotrowki pulled away from runner-up Charlie Taylor, 52, of Nashville, Tenn., to secure the win. The victory came after a strong performance in his rst Boston Marathon, where he ran a 3:13:40. Fortunas, a Florida State senior who stayed on the island all summer, ran part of the way with Eastpoint running enthusiast Hobson Fulmer, until the very end, when he pulled away. A major in international affairs, art history and Arabic, Fortunas is a top mountain biker at FSU, after running cross country and the 400 meters at Lincoln High School. Shes the daughter of Jody and Steven Fortunas, and the granddaughter of Joseph and Mary Fortunas, from Apalachicola, part of a long legacy dating back to Greek sponge divers who immigrated here. In fact, her grandfather was born in the building that now houses Up the Creek restaurant. Its really great to have heritage here, she said. Its a good feeling to come from a small town. Fortunas said the race was awesome. It was cold, but I felt strong. Now Ive started winning races, so Im really happy. Also pleased with her performance was Apalachicolas Cassie Gary, who set a personal best with a 27:56, two minutes under her goal of beating 30 minutes. Dr. Nancy Chorba, who now lives in Tallahassee, ran a 29:45, but was topped by daughter Marena Benoit, 12, who ran a 24:26. Benoit nished tops among girls age 12 and under, just as Ryan Putz, grandson of Cliff and Denise Butler, did among the boys age 12 and under. Fulmer was the top local male nisher, with Lindsey Bockelman best among the local women runners. Charlie Taylor was best male in the Masters division, and Judy Graham was the best female. Crisp morning greets Redsh runners Photos by DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times Winners of the Redsh Run were Joel Piotrowski and Sam Fortunas, right. Below The 2011 Redsh Run eld. Bottom right King Retsyo nears the nish line.

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Local A10 | The Times Thursday, November 10, 2011 Monticello, Ga., novelist Ted M. Dunagan will sign copies of his three youngadult books at Downtown Books from 1-3 p.m. this Saturday, Nov. 12. Dunagan was named 2009 Geor gia Author of the Year for A Yellow Watermelon, his debut novel about Ted and Poudlum, a white boy and a black boy who live in the rural, segregated South of the 1940s. The fol lowing year, Watermelon appeared on the Georgia Center for the Books list of Great Books Young Georgians Should Read, and its sequel, Secret of the Saltifa, was published by New South Books. In Trouble on the Tom bigbee, the friends cross paths with the Ku Klux Klan and accidentally learn the identi ties of prominent Klansmen. Tal lahassee author Adrian Fogelin writes that with deft and precise language, Ted tells a story that is both beautifully wrought and unsparing in its portrayal of all that was good and bad in Dixie. Downtown Books is at 67 Commerce St. For more information, call the book store at 653-1290. By Caty Greene Special to the Times The Apalachicola Municipal Library has just nished another successful book sale at the 48th annual Florida Seafood Festival, and PALS, the Friends of the Library, netted over $500. Books are donated to the library all the time. Some are added to the collection, others are stored for this annual sale. Weeding out the collection, the removal of older, low-circulating books creates additional books to be put up for sale. Now that the sale is over, the library has decided, for the second year, to make the remaining books available for free. Close to 30 boxes of books are now in front of the library and are free. Patrons and community members are welcome to come and take a bag or two while they last. It is our strong belief that there is a reader for almost every book, no matter the subject, and while some may be a little older, they all deserve a home. There are audio books too, in both cassette and CD formats, so come by and check them out! It would not be possible to earn this money or appropriately dispose of all these donated books without the help of staff and especially volunteers. Board members of PALS, who invested their time and effort, include President Butch Foust and secretary Gail Carpenter. Library board members chairwoman Susan Clementson, previous chair Denise Roux and Fred Flowers were also essential. Others who helped this year include Polly Holmes (representing the family), Celia Winterringer (who also volunteers on the automation project), Deborah Miller and Lorraine Ford on Friday. Saturday volunteers included Carol and Mark Goodwin, Michael Billings and Iain Brown. Also thanks go to Tracey Stanley and his crew from the Bay City Work Camp who moved the books last week to the festival grounds, and of course all the kind friends of the library who constantly donated books. Keep them coming. One last thanks to those who bought the books, both locals and festival visitors. The booth was busy almost all day for two days. So be sure to come by and take advantage of these free books, and think about volunteering for our next sale. We may try to have another one the weekend of Tour of Homes in May stay tuned. Caty Greene is the librarian for the Apalachicola Municipal Library. To reach her, call 6538436. @ THE LIBRARY Caty Greene Acclaimed novelist to sign books Did I mention we have free books? TED DUNAGAN YOUTH from page A7 Josiah sent his servants with the nances needed to rebuild the temple of the Lord, which indicates it had become rundown and ill-repaired. While they were rebuilding the temple, they found the Book of the Law. The high priest gave the book to Shaphan, the secretary, and he read from it to the king. When the king heard the words of the Book of the Law, he tore his robes. II Kings 22:10-11 says He gave them these orders. Go and inquire of the Lord for me and for the people and for all Judah about what is written in this book that has been found. Great is the Lords anger that burns against us because our fathers have not obeyed the words of this book; they have not acted in accordance with all that is written there concerning us. Josiah was a young man who knew nothing of Gods Word because it had been hidden from his people for many years. It is hard to imagine the Bible not being readily available yet it only takes one Godless generation to change the outcome of our country. In Romans 1:2832, we are given a clear picture of the consequence of not choosing to retain the knowledge of God. With much power comes much responsibility and we are accountable for preserving and relaying this information to our youth. It behooves us, then, to humble ourselves before the offended Power, to confess our national sins, and to pray for clemency and forgiveness. President Abraham Lincoln, 1863. We welcome all suggestions and hope you enjoy this weekly article. Please send all emails to Scott Shiver at frontline247@mac.com. Saturday night, festival or ganizers were satised their gamble to ante up a signi cantly bigger chunk for enter tainment this year paid off. We were very, very, very pleased, said John Solomon, president of the all-volunteer festival board. Its exactly what we expected. With nal attendance and revenue gures still rolling in, Solomon estimated more than 30,000 people attended the two-day affair, up from last year by about 5,000 and just a hair more than a few years ago. It seemed as if everything was high-class and smooth sailing, with no incidents to speak of, as national oystershucking champion Mike Mar tin repeated as the festivals shucking champ, and the oys ter eaters again guzzled down their dozens, and the newly expanded crab race track rumbled with the banging of boisterous kids for each heat. It was, by all accounts, a fabulous affair, especially since high winds blew over two tents Thursday night, and readjust ed a couple of others. We had fun Thursday night, said Solomon. We were down there until 3:30 a.m. By Friday morning, though, all was ready for local day, a slow-moving, lazy day of home towners hanging out, to spend time together more than lots of money. The shrimp boat Buddys Boys from Wards and Sons Seafood again led the after noons Blessing of the Fleet, with this years Miss Florida Seafood Christina Paterit sas and King Retsyo Ottice Amison looking ravishing, and regal, respectively, as they waved from the bow. Giving voice to the bless ings were Dr. John Sink, a retired Methodist pastor and Navy captain, and the Revs. Craig Hicks, from Living Wa ters Assembly of God, Martha Harris, rector of Trinity Epis copal, and Themo Patriotis, from First United Methodist Church, his son Micah bear ing the crucifer. Chris Clark played bagpipes. Apalachicola Mayor Van Johnson welcomed the king and queen, who signaled the start of the festivities. He then received on the citys behalf the dedication of a newly refur bished Battery Park pavilion provided by the festival board. Solomon presented the mayor a plaque to afx to the 20-by-20 feet illuminated structure. On Saturday morning, fol lowing the Redsh Run (see story, Page A9), a crowd lined U.S. 98 to watch the passing of the magnicent, motley parade that has marked each of the 48 consecutive annual festivals. This year there were about 90 entries, pictures of which can be viewed by visit ing the photo gallery at www. apalachtimes.com. Shuck em fast, eat em slow Fresh from a record-setting performance at the St. Marys Oyster Festival in Maryland, the festivals 2010 shucking champ Mike Martin made it look easy, as he cruised to a win, edging out longtime fes tival champion Scotty OLear, who pocketed $100 for sec ond, and Jordan Todd, from the Indian Pass Raw Bar, who earned $50 for third place. Martin dropped one and picked it up and still nished it before everyone else, said Solomon. Thats who you want representing you. Local Earl Solomon, who nished out of the money, was awed by the professionals prowess. I just shuck em for fun, he said. Martins victory, which earned him a second straight trip to the internationals in Galway, Ireland, came just a few weeks after he set a na tional record in Maryland, shucking 24 oysters in under two minutes, and then with penalty time added on, nish ing with a 2:17.05 time. The oysters here today were big, and when the oys ters are bigger they are tough er to get into than the smaller ones, he said. Its totally FESTIVAL from page A1 See FESTIVAL A14 D AVID A DLER S TEIN | The Times The Carrabelle Church of God handled shucking duties.

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Trades & Services CALL TODAY!653-8868 GET YOUR AD INTrades & Services Laban Bontrager, DMD Monica Bontrager, DMD 12761 Pea Ridge Road Bristol, Florida 32321TELEPHONE (850) 643-5417 Bristol Dental ClinicDENTURE LAB ON PREMISESSame Day Service on repairs and Relines Don Lively General Contractors C Visa, Discover, and American Express Honored at Participating Ace Stores JACKSONS Building Supplies & Auto Repair Carrabelle 697-3333 We Deliver Anywhere J Hardware and Paint Center PILE DRIVING FOUNDATION/PILING REPAIR DOCK/MARINE WORK MOORING BOUYS OFFICE: 850.227.1709FAX: 850.762.2552 CELL: 850.527.5725 HOWARD227FAIRPOINT.NET ROBERTS APPLIANCE REPAIR ALL MAJOR BRANDS 18 Shadow Lane Apalachicola, FL 32320 Phone: (850) 653-8122 Cell: (850) 653-7654 spouses and parents of military members who have fallen in combat, can receive a free lifetime family annual entrance pass. “This recognition is but a small token of the appreciation due to those who have sel essly served this country and its citizens.” said Florida Park Service Director Donald Forgione.Don’t miss Fall Festival, Veterans Day parade SaturdayDouble the fun, with a fall festival and Veterans Day parade this Saturday, Nov. 12. Participate in children’s and family games or just relax and enjoy the never-ending array of foods plus listen to live entertainment, featuring CR 67 Band, Not Quite Ready Band, Greg Kristofferson, Evelyn McAnally, Shirley Cox and Chuck Spicer plus various local singers singing you love most — gospel, country, pop and the 50’s. The Free Fire dance team will also be performing. Discover the talent of local artists and crafters. Don’t miss the auction! And get your arms in shape for the horseshoe, bocce and shuf eboard tournaments. There will be a fun cake walk, 50/50 cash drawing and a Thompson muzzleloader raf e plus more. And let’s not forget this is a day to honor our veterans for their sacri ces. Breakfast will be served from 7:30-9:30 a.m. at the Carrabelle Senior Center. The parade starts at 10 a.m. on Highway 98 and the festival starts at 9 a.m. at the Senior Center. For more information call 697-4195 or shirleycox210@gmail. com. Sponsored by the Franklin County Senior Citizens Council, this event is funded in part by the Franklin County Tourist Development Council, Progress Energy and Centennial Bank.Juvenile Justice Council to meet MondayThe Juvenile Justice Council will meet Monday, Nov. 14 from noon to 1:45 p.m. at Water Street Marina. All are welcome to attend: For further information please contact Chairperson Carol Bar eld at 653-2784,Apalachicola Legionnaires to host veteran’s dinnerAmerican Legion Post 106 will host a covered dish dinner at 6 p.m. on Thursday, Nov. 17 at the Post headquarters, 801 U.S. 98, in Apalachicola. All veterans are invited to come and enjoy. For more information, call Larry Hale at 653-5817.Are you ready to quit smoking?If you’re ready to quit smoking now, then attend the Big Bend Area Health Education Center’s free class/support group here in Franklin County. “Quit Smoking Now” offers a curriculum developed by ex-smokers for those who want to become ex-smokers themselves. There is no cost to attend, and free nicotine patches are offered, while supplies last. The six Apalachicola sessions begin Monday, Nov. 14 and run through Monday, Dec. 19, at the George E. Weems Memorial Hospital Conference Room, 135 Ave. G. The sessions meet weekly on Mondays at 6 p.m. The six Carrabelle sessions begin Wednesday, Nov. 16, and run through Wednesday, Dec. 21, at the Franklin County Public Library Carrabelle Branch, 311 Saint James Ave. These sessions meet weekly on Wednesdays at 5 p.m. For more information, please contact Jowita Cichy at 850-509-6614 or Calandra Portalatin at 850-224-1177 and at cportalatin@bigbendahec. orgall (850) 229-5600. NEWS BRIEFS from page A3Law EnforcementThe Times | A11Thursday, November 10, 2011 DRIVER UNHURT IN AIRPORT RD. MISHAP By Lois SwobodaThe Times On Sunday, Oct. 30 at about 4:50 p.m., a 2008 GMC Yukon driven by Laurie Varnes of Apalachicola left the southbound lane of Airport Road near Cleve Randolph Field, just north of Brownsville Road, and traveled about 15 feet in a southwesterly direction before falling nose rst into a ditch and hitting a sandbar eight feet down at the bottom, according to the report by Florida Highway Patrol Trooper Thomas Stone. Varnes told investigators she was returning home from a walk on the track at Donnie Wilson Field when she began to feel lightheaded, and pulled on to the grassy shoulder and blacked out, waking up only after being tended to by rst responders. Varnes, who was treated and released at Weems Memorial Hospital, was not cited in the incident. Pictured above, at left, is Deputy Alan Ham. The following report is provided by the Franklin County Sheriff’s Of ce. Arrests are made by of cers from the following city, county, and state law enforcement agencies: Apalachicola (APD), Carrabelle (CPD), Florida Highway Patrol (FHP), Franklin County Sheriff’s Of ce (FCSO), Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC), Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP), Florida Department of Corrections (FDOC), Florida Division of Insurance Fraud (DIF) and Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (FDACS). All defendants are considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law.Nov. 1Richard L. Holley, 38, Carrabelle, Alachua County warrants (CPD)Nov. 3Victoria L. Estes, 25, Eastpoint, violation of probation (FCSO) John E. Evans, 44, Carrabelle, grand theft of a motor vehicle (FCSO) Bradley R. Cardin, 18, Eastpoint, violation of a pre-trial release injunction (FCSO) James R. Yancey, 31, Tallahassee, two counts of Bay County failure to appear (FCSO) Asia N. Whitley, 18, Port St. Joe, violation of probation (FCSO)Nov. 4Daniel Page, 34, Apalachicola, domestic battery (APD) Jessica R. Cumbie, 21, Port St. Joe, battery (FCSO)Nov. 5Teressa M. Nunnery, 41, Lynn Haven, DUI and refusal to submit to breath test (FCSO) Laura J. O’Neal, 34, Carrabelle, disorderly intoxication (FCSO) Robert Z. Thompson, 28, Eastpoint, failure to appear (FCSO Lawrence E. Nowling, 26, Eastpoint, violation of probation (FCSO)Nov. 6Henry A. Shiver, 29, Eastpoint, driving while license revoked – habitual (APD)Nov. 7Christopher D. Parmele, 45, Carrabelle, Gulf County warrant for withholding child support (FCSO) Robert F. Millender, 23, Carrabelle, domestic battery (CPD) Heather L. Hicks, 24, Apalachicola, grand theft (APD) Amaury A. Peral, 27, Yonkers, N.Y., domestic battery and failure of a sexual offender to report (FCSO) Amy A. Putnal, 18, Carrabelle, domestic battery (CPD) Arrest REPORT

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A12| The Times Thursday, November 10, 2011 CLASSIFIEDS ToPlace Your Classified ad inCall Our New Numbers Now!Call: 850-747-5020 Toll Free: 800-345-8688 Fax: 850-747-5044 Email: thestar@pcnh.com thetimes@pcnh.com theAPALACHICOLA & CARRABELLETIMES CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW 35898T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.: 2009-CA-000404 BANKUNITED, AS SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO BANKUNITED FSB, Plaintiff, vs. LUCIA A. GLEATON A/K/A LUCIA ANN GLEATON; JEREMY J GLEATON JR; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; THE TOWNHOMES OF ST. GEORGE HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC; UNKNOWN TENANT #1 IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY; UNKNOWN TENANT #2 IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY; Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated September 27, 2011, and entered in Case No. 2009-CA-000404, of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for FRANKLIN County, Florida. BANKUNITED, AS SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO BANKUNITED FSB, is Plaintiff and LUCIA A GLEATON A/K/A LUCIA ANN GLEATON; JEREMY J GLEATON JR; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; UNKNOWN TENANT #1 IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY; THE TOWNHOMES OF ST. GEORGE HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC; are defendants. I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at ON THE FRONT STEPS OF THE COURTHOUSE, AT 33 MARKET STREET, APALACHICOLA IN FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, at 11:00 am, on the 16th day of November, 2011, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 8, BLOCK 1 OF THREE HUNDRED OCEAN MILE, PHASE 2, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 5, PAGE (S) 32, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. A person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 11th day of October, 2011. Marcia M. Johnson As Clerk of said Court By: Michele Maxwell As Deputy Clerk This notice is provided pursuant to Administration Order No. 2.065. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to provisions of certain assistance. Please contact the Court Administration at 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, FL 32320, Phone No. (904) 653-8861, Extension 106 within 2 working days of your receipt of this notice or pleading, if you are hearing impaired, call 1-800955-8771 (TDD); if you are voice impaired, call 1-800-995-8770 (V) (Via Florida Relay Services). Submitted By: Kahane & Associates, P.A. 8201 Peters Road Suite 3000 Plantation, FL 33324 (954) 382-3486 Fax: (954) 382-5380 Nov 3, 10, 2011 35659T FRANKLIN COUNTY LANDFILL HOSTS HOUSEHOLD HAZARDOUS WASTE ROUNDUP Friday, November 18, 2011 Franklin County Central Landfill will hold it’s Fall household hazardous waste roundup located at 210 Highway 65 Eastpoint. Items allowed Paint, household chemicals, fluroescent tubes, oil, batteries, electronics and computers will be collected and disposed of at no charge.” ConditionallyExempt small quantity generators (Small Businesses, Schools, Growers, and Etc.) Will be accepted at a reduced rate. Hours of Collection 9:00 a.m. til 12:00 p.m. For more information contact: Franklin County Solid Waste & Recycling Department 850-670-8167. October 27, November 10, 2011 35940T IN THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 07-436-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, Plaintiff, vs. STEPHANIE HOWARD SANDERS and JOEY EUGENE SANDERS, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pusuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated October 24, 2011, and entered in Civil Action No. 07-436-CA of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein the parties were the Plaintiff, CENTENNIAL BANK, and the Defendants, STEPHANIE HOWARD SANDERS and JOEY EUGENE SANDERS, I will sell to the highest and best bidder, for cash, at 11:00 a.m. (Eastern Time) on the 6th day of December, 2011, at the front steps of the Franklin County Courthouse, Apalachicola, Florida, the followingdescribed real property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: Lots 1, 2, & 3, Block 232 of Greater Apalachicola, a subdivision of the City of Apalachicola, Florida, as per map or plat thereof in most common use in the Office of the Clerk of Court, Apalachicola, Florida. The successful bidder at the sale will be required to place the requisite state documentary stamps on the Certificate of Title. DATED this 24th day of October, 2011. Hon. MARCIA JOHNSON Clerk of the Court Franklin County, FL By: Michele Maxwell As Deputy Clerk Nov 3, 10, 2011 35960T IN THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 11-68-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, Plaintiff, vs. THOMAS M. LEWIS and ANN M. LEWIS, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated October 24, 2011, and entered in Civil Action No. 11-68-CA of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein the parties were the Plaintiff, CENTENNIAL BANK, and the Defendants, THOMAS M. LEWIS and ANN M. LEWIS, I will sell to the highest and best bidder, for cash, at 11:00 a.m. (Eastern Time) on the 6th day of December, 2011, at the front steps of the Franklin County Courthouse, Apalachicola, Florida, the following-described real property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: Lots 1 and 2, Block 64, St. George Island Gulf Beaches, Unit No. 5, a subdivison as per map or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 3 at Pages 16 and 17 of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida; and Lot 34, Block 10 West, St. George Island Gulf Beaches, Unit No. 1, a subdivision as per map or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 2 at Page 7 of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. The successful bidder at the sale will be required to place the requisite state documentary stamps on the Certificate of Tide.

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, November 10, 2011 The Times | A13 Earn College Degree Online *Medical Business, *Criminal Justice. Job Placement Assistance. Computer available. Financial aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 866-467-0054 www.CenturaOnline.com Security + Clean UpsBy Appointment only. Call (850) 670-1567 5 days wk, 24 hrs day Valid DL. Clean bkgrnd & references. Will provide Elderly Care/Child Care. 850-593-0007 Airlines are hiring Train for hands on Aviation career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified. Job Placement Assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-206-9405 RowellAuctions.com BALLROOM215 BankForeclosed PropertiesONLINE BIDDING AVAILABLE!Alabama, Georgia, Florida & South CarolinaMany Selling Absolute! 1347 Alligator Drive Alligator Point, FL Unit C-429 of the Carrabelle Boat Club Ass.at 1570 Hwy 98 W.,Carrabelle, FL 438 Mill Road, Carrabelle, FLSelling from St. James Golf Resort 151 Laughing Gull Rd, Carrabelle, FLNovember 15 -:6:00 p.m.Rowell Realty & Auction Co., Inc. 10% Buyers PremiumAU 479, AB 296 800-323-8388 2042252 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322850-697-9604 850-323-0444 www.seacrestre.com PROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND RENTALSRENTALS2 BR 1 BA UNFURNISHED HOUSE Downtown, LR, DR, Storage Room .................$6501 BR 1 BA UNFURNISHED HOUSE .....$500DOWNTOWN RIVER CONDO, BOAT SLIP3 Night Minimum .......................$105 PLUS DAILYPIRATES LANDING 1 BR CONDO/POOL3 Night Minimum .......................$105 PLUS DAILY3 BR 3 BA FURNISHED CONDOLong Term, Pool..............................................$8502 BR 1 BA FURNISHED APARTMENTDen & Living Area ..........................................$5503 BR 2 BA FURNISHED CONDO Boat & Car Parking ..............................$850 WKLY3 BR 1 BA FURNISHED APARTMENTPet Friendly ...................WKLY & MONTHLY RATES 1 br, 1 ba with full kitchen and living room Call for information 850-653-6103 Studio Apt. Furnished Upstairs studioQuiet location, water & electric incl. Walk to downtown. $700 mo + dep. No pets. For appt 653-9116 or 320-1174 St. George Island $160 wk, Electric, Satellite, Garbage incl. pool tble. 12’X65’ deck w/Beautiful view 850-653-5114 1 or 3 BRCH/A in Apalachicola, FL. 850-643-7740. Apalachicola, FL Property11th Street Lot 4, Block 150, $24,000 or $4,000 Down Payment, Financed at $445/Mo., R-1 Zoning Call 850-264-6239 or 850-566-2273 Text FL83345 to 56654 Mobile Home lots with w/s $10,000 with Mobile home that needs work $13,000. Also Mobile home with lot in good shape $25,000. Owner Financing available 806-618-1977 Text FL84594 to 56654 3 br, 2 ba, all appliances included W/D, CH&A, on 1 acre. $75,000 OBO. Call 850-653-5111 Text FL85503 to 56654 1 bedroom, Apalachicola, quiet, 2 blks from boat ramp, screen porch W/D, AC, pet OK, $600 month + first, last & deposit. Please Call 850-697-5000 Other homes available. Text FL85610 to 56654 Heritage Villas and Southern Villas of Apalachicola ApartmentsAccepting applications for 1, 2, & 3 br HC & non-HC accessible units. Some rental assistance may be available. HUD vouchers accepted. Call (850) 653-9277. TDD/TTY 711. This institution is an equal opportunity provider, and employer. Publisher’s NoticeAll real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on a equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. CITY OF APALACHICOLA JOB OPPORTUNITYThe City of Apalachicola is now accepting applications for one position in the Water and Sewer Department. This position includes, but is not limited to, working with the eld workforce focused on maintenance of the City's water distribution and sewer collection infrastructure. Salary $28,000+ with good bene t package. Applications can be obtained from and should be returned to City Hall, 1 Bay Avenue, Apalachicola, Florida. Contact City Hall at 850-653-9319 for further information. Position is open until lled. Fax and Email applications will not be considered. The City of Apalachicola is an equal opportunity, fair housing employer and drug free work place. The Apalachicola Bay Charter School (ABC School) is accepting applications for the following position:Teacher AssistantPlease send resume to: Chimene Johnson, Principal ABC School 98 12th Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320 or email to abcschool@live.comEqual Opportunity Employer HELP WANTED Warehouse /Delivery BADCOCK & MORE Eastpoint, FL(850) 670-4334 DATED this 24th day of October, 2011. Hon. MARCIA JOHNSON Clerk of the Clerk Franklin County, FL By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk Nov 3, 10, 2011 36000T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 10-28-CA FLORIDA BANK, a florida banking corporation, Plaintiff, vs. GULF PINES, LLC, a Florida limited liability company, JEFFERY WYATT CROOMS, aka JEFFREY W. CROOMS, an individual, STANLEY N. CROOMS, an individual, MICHAEL HUTTO, an individual, and UNKNOWN OWNERS/ TENANTS IN POSSESSION, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that, pursuant to that certain Amended Final Summary Judgment as to Counts I, II and IV of Plaintiff’s Complaint and for Attorney’s Fees and Costs against Defendants entered in the above-styled cause on October 31st, 2011, the Clerk shall sell the property situated in Gulf County, Florida, described as: Exhibit “A” Lot 16, Fico 1, according to the map or plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 6, Page 9, of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. Lot 16, Gulf Creek Phase 1, according to the map or plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 7, Page 1 and 2, of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. Lot 21, Gulf Creek Phase 1, according to the map or plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 7, Page 1 and 2, of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida Lot 13, Fico 1, according to the map or plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 6, Page 9 of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida, a portion of which was replatted as Gulf Creek Phase I, recorded in Plat Book 7, Page 1 and 2, of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. at public sale held at the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr., Boulevard, Port St. Joe, Florida 32456, at 11:00 a.m., on December 8, 2011, to highest and best bidder for cash, except as set forth herein. DATED on 31st day of October, 2011. REBECCA L. NORRIS As Clerk of the Court By: BA Baxter As Deputy Clerk IF THIS PROPERTY IS SOLD AT PUBLIC AUCTIONS, THERE MAY BE ADDITIONAL MONEY FROM THE SALE AFTER PAYMENT OF PERSONS WHO ARE ENTITLED TO BE PAID FROM THE SALE PROCEEDS PURSUANT TO THIS FINAL JUDGMENT. IF YOU ARE A SUBORDINATE LIENHOLDER CLAIMING A RIGHT TO FUNDS REMAINING AFTER THE SALE, YOU MUST FILE A CLAIM WITH THE CLERK NO LATER THAN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU FAIL TO FILE A CLAIM, YOU WILL NOT BE ENTITLED TO ANY REMAINING FUNDS. IF YOU ARE THE PROPERTY OWNER, YOU MAY CLAIM THESE FUNDS YOURSELF. YOU ARE NOT REQUIRED TO HAVE A LAWYER OR ANY OTHER REPRESENTATION AND YOU DO NOT HAVE TO ASSIGN YOUR RIGHTS TO ANYONE ELSE IN ORDER FOR YOU TO CLAIM ANY MONEY TO WHICH YOU ARE ENTITLED. PLEASE CHECK WITH THE CLERK OF THE COURT LOCATED AT 1000 CECIL G. COSTIN SR. BLVD., PORT ST. JOE, FL 32456; (850) 229-6112, WITHIN TEN (10) DAYS AFTER THE SALE TO SEE IF THERE IS ADDITIONAL MONEY FROM THE FORECLOSURE SALE THAT THE CLERK HAS IN THE REGISTRY OF THE COURT. IF YOU DECIDE TO SELL YOUR HOME OR HIRE SOMEONE TO HELP YOU CLAIM THE ADDITIONAL MONEY, YOU SHOULD READ VERY CAREFULLY ALL PAPERS YOU ARE REQUIRED TO SIGN, ASK SOMEONE ELSE, PREFERABLY AN ATTORNEY WHO IS NOT RELATED TO THE PERSON OFFERING TO HELP YOU, TO MAKE SURE THAT YOU UNDERSTAND WHAT YOU ARE SIGNING AND THAT YOU ARE NOT TRANSFERRING YOUR PROPERTY OR THE EQUITY IN YOUR PROPERTY WITHOUT THE PROPER INFORMATION. IF YOU CANNOT AFFORD TO PAY AN ATTORNEY, YOU MAY CONTACT LEGAL SERVICES OF NORTH FLORIDA AT 2119 DELTA BOULEVARD, TALLAHASSEE, FL 32303, (850) 385-9007, TO SEE IF YOU QUALIFY FINANCIALLY FOR THEIR SERVICES. IF THEY CANNOT ASSIST YOU, THEY MAY BE ABLE TO REFER YOU TO A LOCAL BAR REFERRAL AGENCY OR SUGGEST OTHER OPTIONS. IF YOU CHOOSE LEGAL SERVICES OF NORTH FLORIDA FOR ASSISTANCE, YOU SHOULD DO SO AS SOON AS POSSIBLE AFTER RECEIPT OF THIS NOTICE. NOTICE TO PERSONS NEEDING SPECIAL ACCOMMODATIONS AND TO ALL HEARING IMPAIRED PERSONS: Persons with a disability needing special accommodation in order to participate in a court preceeding at any courthouse or court program, should within two (2) days of receipt of notices, contact Court Administration to request such an accommodation. Please contact the following: Court Administration, P.O. Box 826, Marianna, Florida 32447; Phone: 850-718-0026; Hearing & Voice Impaired: 1-800955-8771; Email: ADA Request@jud14.fl courts.org. Nove 10, 17, 2011 36187T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CENTENNIAL BANK, as successor in interest to GULF STATE COMMUNITY BANK, Plaintiff, vs. MARK M. CARRELL and KELLEY S. CARRELL, husband and wife, LINTON B. EASON and JENNY C. EASON, husband and wife, Defendant(s). CASE NO.: 11-000130-CA NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE is hereby given that, pursuant to the Order of Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure in this cause, in the Circuit Court of FRANKLIN County, Florida, I will sell the property situated in FRANKLIN County, Florida described as: Lots 4, 5, 6, 7, 19 and 20 in Block 3 Gulf Terrace, a subdivision as per map or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 3, Page 3, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. AND Lot 3, in Block 4 East, of St. George Island Gulf Beaches, Unit No. 1, according to the plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 2, at Page 7, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. at Public Sale, to the highest bidder, for cash, at the steps of the Franklin County Courthouse, Apalachicola, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on December 6, 2011. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court this 24th day of October, 2011. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk Steve M. Watkins, III FBN: 0794996 41 Commerce Street Apalachicola, FL 32320 (850) 653-1949 November 3, 10, 2011 36327T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 11-135-CA CAPITAL CITY BANK, Plaintiff, vs. BARBARA STOKES; VILLAGE GREEN BY THE SEA SUBDIVISION PROPERTY OWNERS ASSOCIATION; and UNKNOWN TENANTS, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-styled cause, in the Circuit Court of Franklin County, Florida, I will sell the property situate in Franklin and Gulf Counties, Florida, described as: Franklin County Properties: Lot 41, VILLAGE GREEN BY THE SEA-PHASE II, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 8, Page(s) 17, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. Lot 40, VILLAGE GREEN BY THE SEA-PHASE II, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 8, Page(s) 17, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. Gulf County Property: Lot 18 and a portion of Lot 19, Block 4, WARD RIDGE FLORIDA UNIT TWO according to the plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 2, Page 4, In the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida, being more particularly described as follows: Begin at the North corner of Lot 19, Block 4, WARD RIDGE FLORIDA UNIT TWO; thence along the North boundary line of Lot 18, N8411’12”E, 127.87 feet to the iron rod and cap marking the Northeast corner of said Lot 18; thence along the East boundary line of said Lot 18, S2058’22”E, 105.34 feet to an iron rod marking the Southeasterly corner of said Lot 18, said corner being on the Northerly right of way line of Ramsey circle and a non tangent curve concave to the Southeast; thence Westerly along said right of way line, along said curve, having a radius of 40.00 feet, a central angle of 11630’41” for an arc length of 81.34 feet (chord to said curve bears S6543’18”W, 68.03 feet); thence leaving said right of way line S8753’39”W, 102.47 feet to a point on the West line of Lot 19; thence along said West line N0000’00”E, 117.17 feet to the Point of Beginning. at public sale, to the highest bidder, for cash, at the front door of the Franklin County Courthouse, Apalachicola, Florida at 11:00 a.m., on December 6, 2011. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, other than the property owner, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Marica M. Johnson Clerk of Circuit Court By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk November 10, 17, 2011 36237T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CENTENNIAL BANK, as successor in interest to WAKULLA BANK, Plaintiff, vs. TIMOTHY D. SMITH Defendant(s). CASE NO.: 11-000168-CA NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE is hereby given that, pursuant to the Order of Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure in this cause, in the Circuit Court of Franklin County, Florida, I will sell the property situated in Franklin County, Florida described as: Lot 45, Block “A”, Lanark Beach, Unit No.1, a subdivision as per map or plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 2, at Page 13 of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. at Public Sale, to the highest bidder, for cash, at the steps of the Franklin County Courthouse, Apalachicola, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on December 7, 2011. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court this 25th day of October, 2011. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk Steve M. Watkins, III FBN: 0794996 41 Commerce Street Apalachicola, FL 32320 (850) 653-1949 November 3, 10, 2011 36299T LEGAL NOTICE Notice is given pursuant to Florida Self-Storage Facility Act, Florida Statutes, Chapter 83, Part IV that Franklin Mini Storage will hold a sale on: NOVEMBER 19, 2011 at 10:00 at 1627 US 98, Carrabelle, Florida 32322 of the contents of mini-warehouse(s) containing personal property of: Terry Proctor Angela Yearwood Martin Raulerson Nicole Carpenter Before the sale date of November 19, 2011, the property may be redeemed by payment in cash or money order of the outstanding balance and cost by mailing it to Post Office Box 139, Carrabelle, Florida 32322, or by paying in person. November 3, 10, 2011 36393T Notice for Early Public Review of a Proposal to Support Activity in the 100-Year Floodplain and Wetland November 10, 2011 Responsible Entity: City of Apalachicola 1 Avenue E, Apalachicola, FL 32320 Telephone Number 850-653-9319 To: All Interested Agencies, Groups, and Individuals This is to give notice that the City of Apalachicola received a Community Development Block Grant (CDBG funds) from the Florida Department of Community Affairs/Department of Economic Opportunity (DEO). The funding is provided by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and will be used to construct “streetscape” improvements and a public restroom in the downtown area. This notice is required by Section 2(a)(4) of Executive Order 11988 for Floodplain Management, and by Section 2(b) of Executive Order 11990 for the Protection of Wetlands, and is implemented by HUD Regulations found at 24 CFR 55.20(b) for the HUD action that is within and/or affects a floodplain or wetland. Construction will be undertaken in the 100 year floodplain. The City of Apalachicola is interested in alternatives and public perceptions of possible adverse impacts that could result from the project as well as potential mitigation measures. Proposed improvements located within the floodplain area include construction of a public restroom, sidewalk and landscaping improvements, lighting, and burying electric underground on Market Street, Commerce Street, Avenue E, and 8th Street, and possibly Water Street, Avenue F and Avenue G. These locations are already developed, with the exception of some sidewalk and lighting locations on Water Street, 8th Street, and Avenues G and F. The additional impervious surface resulting from the possible construction of new sidewalks is minimal. The proposed improvements will enhance local business and tourist use of the downtown area, and will improve pedestrian safety. Written comments must be received by Deborah Belcher, Grant Administrator, at 5378 Carisbrooke Lane, Tallahassee, FL 32309 or debroumelis@earthlink.net on or before November 28, 2011. Additional information may be obtained by contacting Ms. Belcher as above, or by telephoning 850-893-0694. Van W. Johnson, Sr., Mayor Environmental Certifying Official November 10, 2011 Incorrect Insertion PolicyFor Classified In-column AdvertisersAll ads placed by phone are read back to the advertiser to insure correctness. The newspaper will assume correctness at the time of the read-back procedure unless otherwise informed. Please your ad. Advertisers are requested to check the advertisement on the first insertion for correctness. Errors should be reported immediately. Your Florida Freedom newspaper will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion, nor will it be liable for any error in advertisements to a greater extent than the cost of the space occupied by the error. Any copy change, during an ordered schedule constitutes a new ad and new charges. We do not guarantee position of ANY ad under any classification. Publishers Notice “SCAM “To avoid possible scams, it is recommended that consumers should verify caller information when receiving calls regarding credit card payments. Consumers should also contact the local company themselves instead of giving this information to individuals whom are contacting them directly. English Bulldog PuppyAkc Register, 11 weeks old, has all shots, health certificate, health guarantee, vaccines up to date & all worming, ready for new home. Cost $800. More info: candows@live.com (941) 585-0554 Kittens free to good home, Call (301) 377-2128 or (850) 697-2453 Apalachicola 352 Brownsville Rd, Friday 8:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. Saturday 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.; Clothes, TV, Recliner, entertainment center, treadmill, Ab Lounger, and junk!!! Mexico Beach 42nd St. Hwy 98 from Tyndall, right on 42nd sSr. Nov 12th, 9 Eastern 8 CentralHuge clearing out saleAntiques, 50’s porcelain enamel kitchen table, Books, Clothing, dishes, yard & home, art, drafting table, truck, nautical, John Perry, toys, furniture, Christmas Wanting to Buy House trailer FRAMES 60’ to 70’ long. with or without axels. Call 850-653-5114 Bi Athlete looking for training partner. No Pseudo athletes. 850-447-0691 Install/Maint/Repair Part Time position available forGeneral Maint/Techposition for 32 Unit apt complex in Carabelle. Must have own tools and pass background & drug test. General knowledge of HVAC, plumbing, and electrical req. Painting a plus. Apply at 807 Grey Ave. #33, Mon, Tue, Thur, Fri. 8-5pm. Or call 697-2017 EOE/DFWP

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Local A14 | The Times Thursday, November 10, 2011 different in Ireland the oysters are about the same size as ours, but theyre re ally thin and theyre really brittle. OLear, 44, whos been shucking for 30 years and been at 19 festivals, bristled at the suggestion his years of winning national champi onships were over. I dont think Im washed out, he said. Im helping them set the mark for what they need to be. We try to give oysters a good reputation. In the oyster-eating con test, it was Apalachicola native, now Mississippi resident, Gaston Pace who took the crown by gorging 23 dozen oysters, and then slipping away afterwards to settle things with his stom ach. In second place, with 13 dozen and two eaten, was Charles Simpkins, from In dian Valley, Va., who inched out third place Eric Merrill, from Morgantown, N. C. who downed 12 dozen and seven. In the womens division, six-time champion Angie Harnage, from Conyers, Ga., gobbled to victory by eating 10 dozen and three, pulling ahead of runnerup Judy Smith, of Dothan, Ala., who ate eight dozen and two. It was well short of her record of nearly 15 dozen, but Harnage said her style of slow, slow again served her well. Let everybody else throw them up, she joked. As the crowd grew, the food booths kept doing well. The sheriffs ofce sold out its smoked mullet and dip by mid-afternoon, as the Car rabelle Church of God was a non-stop shucking crew of half-shell delights. The Eastpoint Church of Gods gumbo was again a hit, as they doubled their stock from last year, sold it out, and then had to cook more in their tent. Living Waters church fried up more than 700 pounds of mullet, and the high schools junior class made a pretty penny on their fried shrimp and oysters. The fourth grade class did Lowcountry boil, the Methodist churches oyster stew and shrimp corn chow der, the Band of Sisters soft ball team chicken strips and chili cheese fries, each do ing well. As did the smaller booths, which included Weems hospital and the schools baseball, softball and nutrition programs. At the ve crab races, Amison handled tonging duties of wayward crusta ceans, while the entrants in the new expanded track smacked the wood to help propel their crab down the track to be rst to the nish line. Ashley Thornton, from Trenton, was tops among the 400 votes in the new photo contest, her picture of the St. George Island sunset taking top honors. No T-R-O-U-B-L-E at concert The festival came to an enthusiastic conclusion with Tritts show. From the mo ment he burst on stage in skintight black leather, fol lowing a taped introduction by Larry the Cable Guy, to his return for an encore 90 minutes later in sleeveless T-shirt and a hand-thrown leather hat, he showed the style and versatility that has him on a trajectory towards legendary. Switching seamlessly from electric to acoustic guitar, he went well beyond his repertoire of the hits he made famous, including TR-O-U-B-L-E, Heres A Quarter (Call Someone Who Cares), Foolish Pride, Its A Great Day To Be Alive, and Country Club among others. Backed up a superb band of musicians, Tritt also cov ered several well-known songs: the Eagles hit Take It Easy that he rst re corded for a tribute album in 1993; Sam and Daves soul ballad When Something Is Wrong with My Baby; John ny Cashs Folsom Prison Blues, and, as part of his en core, Willie Nelsons Mam mas Dont Let Your Babies Grow Up to Be Cowboys, complete with a gleeful imi tation of Nelsons trademark nasal tone. The show had the crowd begging to be tossed guitar picks, drumsticks or even, as Tritt concluded, one of a pair of sweat-soaked T-shirts he hurled to the clamoring fans. Whether the festival will be able to continue to afford such big-name entertain ment remains to be seen. We want to continue with the good concerts but we dont want to put anything out there, said Solomon. We want to bring in the best we can with the amount we can afford. Our local real estate experts have identied what they feel are the best values around and are oering them to you in Real Estate Picks! (In this section), Discover the best real estate values in Mexico Beach, Port St. Joe, Apalachicola, Cape San Blas, St. George Island, Carrabelle and surrounding areas. Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Real Estate Picks John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.com MLS#238697 $84,000 Lanark Village WATERFRONT LOT IN LANARK 50 ft water frontage directly on the St. George Sound. Close to Lanark Boat Club & launch area as well as all Lanark amenities are available, St. James Golf Course & Restaurant are close by. Nows the time to buy! Listed by Janie Burke John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.com MLS#245456 $139,000 St. George Island ST. GEORGE PLANTATION One of the best one acre 2 nd tier lots in the Plantation. Good elevation. One story house is in place on 1st tier lot in front of this one. Located in Pebble Beach Village on Forsythia Court, its adjacent to a lovely sand path leading to a boardwalk to the Gulf. Truly a beautiful lot! dbutler@coastalcoverage.com Locally owned and operated to meet all your insurance needs WEEKLY ALMANAC APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE TIDE TABLES MONTHLY AVERAGES To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from these given for APALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW Cat Point Minus 0:40 Minus 1:17 East Pass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27 To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from those given for CARRABELLE: HIGH LOW Bald Point Minus 9:16 Minus 0:03 Sponsor the WEEKLY ALMANAC Call Today! 653-8868 Date High Low % Precip Thu, Nov 10 68 39 20 % Fri, Nov 11 66 44 0 % Sat, Nov 12 68 54 0 % Sun, Nov 13 74 56 0 % Mon, Nov 14 76 58 10 % Tues, Nov 15 77 56 30 % Wed, Nov 16 75 56 30 % 11/10 Thu 01:35AM 1.7 H 09:53AM -0.1 L 05:15PM 1.5 H 09:18PM 1.3 L 11/11 Fri 02:03AM 1.7 H 10:25AM -0.2 L 05:54PM 1.5 H 09:47PM 1.3 L 11/12 Sat 02:34AM 1.7 H 10:55AM -0.2 L 06:33PM 1.5 H 10:19PM 1.3 L 11/13 Sun 03:10AM 1.7 H 11:27AM -0.2 L 07:13PM 1.5 H 10:55PM 1.3 L 11/14 Mon 03:50AM 1.7 H 12:01PM -0.1 L 07:53PM 1.4 H 11:40PM 1.3 L 11/15 Tue 04:34AM 1.6 H 12:41PM -0.1 L 08:34PM 1.4 H 11/16 Wed 12:36AM 1.2 L 05:26AM 1.6 H 01:27PM 0.0 L 09:13PM 1.4 H 11/10 Thu 12:10AM 2.7 H 07:40AM -0.2 L 03:50PM 2.4 H 07:05PM 2.1 L 11/11 Fri 12:38AM 2.7 H 08:12AM -0.3 L 04:29PM 2.4 H 07:34PM 2.1 L 11/12 Sat 01:09AM 2.7 H 08:42AM -0.3 L 05:08PM 2.4 H 08:06PM 2.1 L 11/13 Sun 01:45AM 2.7 H 09:14AM -0.3 L 05:48PM 2.4 H 08:42PM 2.1 L 11/14 Mon 02:25AM 2.7 H 09:48AM -0.2 L 06:28PM 2.2 H 09:27PM 2.1 L 11/15 Tue 03:09AM 2.6 H 10:28AM -0.2 L 07:09PM 2.2 H 10:23PM 1.9 L 11/16 Wed 04:01AM 2.6 H 11:14AM 0.0 L 07:48PM 2.2 H 11:37PM 1.8 L FESTIVAL from page A10 Photos by DAVI D AD LERSTEI N | The Times The crab races drew boisterous children. Enjoying a carnival ride. ABOVE: A food vendor serves up crawsh. RIGHT: Travis Tritt closes the festival with a rockin concert. Tritt sang from his wide repertoire of hits, including T-R-O-UB-L-E, Heres A Quarter (Call Someone Who Cares), Its A Great Day To Be Alive, and Country Club, and then sang some older, more classic tunes.



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xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx 50 WWW.APALACHTIMES.COMPP hone: 850-653-8868W W e b: apalachtimes.comE E mail: dadlerstein@star.com Fax: 850-653-8036C C i rculation: 800-345-8688 DEAEADLILINESES FOOR NEEXTT WEEWEEK:S School News & SSociety: 11 a.m. Friday Real E Estate AAds: 11 a.m. ThursdayL L egal AAds: 11 a.m. FridayC C lassied Display AAds: 11 a.m. FridayC C lassied LLine AAds: 5 p.m. Monday CContact Us OOut to see IIndex By David AdlersteinTimes City Editor Weems Memorial Hospital debuted a new 16-slice CT scanner last month, enabling doctors to secure far better computerized imagery than was available from the previous, single-slice CT scanner. Purchased for $319,000 out of capital improvement funds, the refurbished GE high-speed CT (short for computerized tomography) scanner takes multiple X-ray images of the body, or parts of the body, and uses a computer to construct from these images cross-sectional views. We had the oldest CT scan technology you can have, said Cindy Drapal, the hospitals chief nursing ofcer. It came over on Noahs ark. The new purchase, set in motion by former CEO Chuck Colvert, was prompted in part by the fact that images from a single-slice CT scanner would no longer be reimbursable by Medicare beginning next year. Drapal said the company that leased the scanner to the hospital, at $5,000 per month, picked it up, although she doubts they will nd a new home for it. Nobody wants it, she said. Originally, Weems planned to place the new CT scanner in the room that had been Colverts ofce, but the new administration decided the cost of renovation, especially in light of plans to build a new hospital, was not justied. Instead, the new CT scanner is in a trailer adjacent to the hospital, with plans to put in a covered walkway with vinyl rolldown shades and a galvanized roof along the short path between them. Drapal said the new CT scanner is very appropriate for a rural facility, eclipsed only by more Thursday, November 10, 2011 VOL. 126 ISSUE 28Opinion. . . . . . ............A A 4 Society . . . . . . ............A A 6 Faith. . . . . . . ..............A A 7 Outdoors. . . . . . ...........A A 8 Sports. . . . . . . .............A A 9 Classieds. . . ......A A 12-AA13 Weems unveils new CT scan, replaces old technologyBy David Adlerstein and L Lois SSwobodaTimes Staff Writers Thousands of residents and tourists in Apalachicola last weekend for the Florida Seafood Festival on Saturday took notice of a small plane carrying a big message: Stop Giant Poles! With a clear blue sky as the backdrop, the banner was part of an 11th-hour effort to urge Progress Energy to spare the city from what citizen activists say is a scar that new, taller utility towers will leave on the heart of the downtown district. But whether anything can be done before work is expected to begin along Water Street in early December remains unclear. The Apalachicola Area Historical Society, which has been ghting Progress over its planned placement of the concrete poles through downtown for more than a year, has retained the services of a prominent Florida attorney to help in the ght with Progress. A decade ago, Arthur Buddy Jacobs successfully battled Wal-Mart to keep the corporate giant from building a Supercenter in Fernandina Beach, fearing that such a transformation would harm small businesses and detract from the communitys character.Citizens rally to stop power polesEE D TILETILE Y | Special to the TimesA giant banner ies over the seafood festival. SSee SCAn N A2S S ee POLES A2 Tritt lights up Seafood FestivalGREAT DAY TO BE ALIVEPP hotos by DA A VI I D AA DLE LE RSTEI STEI N | The TimesTravis TrittBy David AdlersteinTimes City Editor Crisp weather and an enormous crowd, topped off with a full-throated performance by a country music superstar, wrote last weekends Florida Seafood Festival into the calendar as a red letter couple of days. With nonprot organizations recording big smile-producing sales at their food booths, and Travis Tritt singing and strutting to an overow crowd a memorable two-hour concert Presenting the new pavilion plaque, held up by Michael Allen, was John Solomon, left. Riding a oat as a former Miss Florida Seafood are Melissa Bloodworth, left, and Elizabeth Zingarelli, Micah Patriotis holds the crucier during the Blessing of the Fleet. See more photos of the festival at apalachtimes.com. SSee fF ESTIvV AL A10 First Baptist to host Veterans Day eventThe First Baptist Christian School in Apalachicola would like to say thank you by inviting all area veterans and the community to their annual Veterans Day program on Friday, Nov. 11, at 9 a.m. in the church sanctuary, 46 Ninth Street, in Apalachicola.Fall Festival, parade S Saturday in CCarrabelleThis Saturday, Carrabelle will celebrate Veterans Day with a parade followed by the rst-ever fall festival, hosted as a fundraiser by the Franklin County Senior Center. Breakfast at the center from 7:30-9:30 a.m., followed by the parade downtown at 10 a.m., and then a tribute to veterans at the center including retiring of an American ag. Live auction from1:30-3:30 p.m. Event free and open to the public.LLanark Village Gumbo C Cook-off SSaturdayThe St. James/Lanark Volunteer Fire Department is hosting a Gumbo Cook-off this Saturday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Lanark Village Boat Club, 2364 US 98. Rafes, auctions, gumbo for here and to-go, and more. Funds raised will go towards retrotting new roll-up doors and storm shutters for Lanark Village rehouse. Still room for three gumbo teams. Contact Mike Rundel at 370-6576.Register for CCamp Gordon Johnston golf tourneyOn Nov. 18 and 19, St. Joseph Bay Golf Club, 700 Country Club Road, Port St. Joe will host the Camp Gordon Johnston Golf Tournament to benet the museum. Kickoff Friday at 6 p.m. with silent auction and hors doeuvres reception with cash bar, for $10 admission. Saturday afternoon tourney commences with a tribute to veterans with tee-off at 1 p.m. Scramble, shotgun start, 4player best ball format; $60 per player. World War II vets play free. Prizes are $400 for rst place team; $350 for second place and $200 for third place. Banquet and awards ceremony to follow. For more information, call Tony Minichiello at 528-2125. Running the Redsh, A A9

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LocalA2 | The Times Thursday, November 10, 2011state-of-the-art, and expensive, 32-slice and 64-slice scanners, used mainly by specialists for more intensive procedures. Use of the new scanner is overseen by Charlotte Williams, director of radiology, and her staff, who include full-time radiation techs Jeanie Sorrell and Ed Ringer, and part-timers Shirley Smith and Ray Johnson. Williams said CT scans are used mostly for internal injuries, for such things as ruling out a hemorrhagic stroke, which involves a leakage of blood, as opposed to an ischemic stroke, which is caused by a blockage of blood ow. Such a determination can inuence whether clot buster medications are used. Problems with the appendix, gall bladder and other soft organs can also be detected, Williams said, noting that Weems rst use of the new equipment was to ascertain additional information surrounding a migraine headache. The new CT scanner also takes less time to complete than the old one, as little as ve minutes, said Williams. The scans are relayed digitally to the Panama City radiology group that reads them for Weems, Drapal said. This enhances the physicians ability to see a ner detail, she said. It provides a better quality image, and better quality patient care. Drapal said the price of a CT scan, not including the radiologists fees, ranges from $663 to $2,834, depending upon the complexity of the exam being performed. Weems offers a 30 percent cash discount for all elective procedures paid in full at the time of service. We also have the ability to provide sliding scale pricing based upon income levels established by the federal government, Drapal said. We use the same sliding scale that the county health department uses. 117 Hwy 98, Apalachicola, FL (850) 653.8825 218 Hwy 71, Wewahitchka, FL (850) 639.2252 302 Cecil G Costin Sr Blvd, Port St. Joe, FL (850) 227.7099 FRANKLIN COUNTY LANDFILLHOSTS HOUSEHOLD HAZARDOUS WASTE ROUNDUP www.pulse-sgi.com Tom Daly, president of the historical society, said residents concerns werent being heard, so the nonprot group ramped up the message. The two-hour yover directed viewers to a website, www. saveapalach.com, where visitors were encouraged to contact Vincent Dolan, chief executive of Progress Energy Florida, to request the power lines be run underground. The site had nearly 300 hits in its rst two days. The group has also created a Facebook page that is gaining friends and a Twitter account, which is sending regular blasts of information about the situation. This is about pride in our community, Daly said, noting that Apalachicolas existence predates the state of Florida. We are a unique location, and we have an international reputation with visitors. These industrial poles do not have a place in our community. The massive power poles have already been erected in residential areas of Apalachicola adjacent to the downtown district. One of the 100foot towers now looms over the playground at the Apalachicola Bay Charter School near Avenue G and 12th Street, and another of the 30,000-pound poles was installed near the helicopter pad at Weems Memorial Hospital. Weve worked hard to balance the aesthetics with the energy needs of the entire community, said Progress spokesman Rob Sumner, noting the project is part of the rebuild of a transmission line rst built in 1934. We are constantly maintaining and improving the line. We are also charged by the state to storm harden the lines, he said. You have experienced some severe weather in the last few years. The new poles will make the entire system through there more dependable. In December, the city commission unanimously voted to support the recommendations of a citizens committee led by Robert Lindsley, who owns commercial property downtown with businesses near the planned location of one of the towers. The committee was appointed to examine Progresss placement of the poles, including a specic request the company work with the city to nd a way to bury the transmission lines along Water Street. Sumner said Progress made changes to the design after meeting with the committee, including agreeing to dye some of the poles brown as a concession to aesthetics. He said the 145-foot transmission tower with a 15-feet by 15-feet base at the river crossing has been replaced with single 135-foot pole with a 5-foot base, for a net loss of one transmission pole. He said distribution poles with cross beams will be eliminated, along with the old bucket-type transformers, and that some pole and line relocation was done to provide a view of the river. But citizens main request, that the lines be rerouted around the downtown, has gone unheeded. Sumner declined to provide an estimated cost for moving the transmission line north to run along the old railroad easement. Abandoning the decades old transmission lines will bring additional cost and permitting issues, he said. Sumner said the cost of burying transmission lines is roughly $10 million per mile and requires that a 16-foot trench be dug. He said less than 3 percent of transmission lines nationwide are subterranean. Concerns over the economic impact of the new poles are paramount among citizen concerns. In fact, tourism is an increasingly important contributor to a vibrant local economy, a creator of jobs and healthy growing businesses, said Lindsley. No one can dispute that tourism will continue to be a very important part of the local real estate recovery, which is so important to both our economy and the city and county tax base. A line of these incredible oversized poles coming through the heart of the district, down our scenic waterfront, is a blight on the aesthetic beauty of our charming historic city, he said. Citizens say the concrete posts for the transmission lines will tower over the tallest buildings downtown, which are limited to a 35-foot height restriction under countywide rules. They say they will even dwarf the booms on the shrimp boats docked at Riverfront Park along Water Street, where several of the poles are slated to be installed. All were asking them to do is pause and give us the exact cost and some time to come up with the money, said local businessman Mark Friedman. Jacobs and other attorneys consulted on the matter do not dispute Progress has a 30-year easement along the waterfront with the city, and therefore doesnt need city permission to place the poles. Progress Energy may have the right to do this, but its not the right thing to do, Lindsley said. SCAN from page A1 POLES from page A1DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The TimesCindy Drapal, Weems director of nursing, shows where patients will recline as Charlotte Williams, director of radiology, prepares to demonstrate the new CT scanner.

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LocalThe Times | A3Thursday, November 10, 2011Special to The TimesThe Panhandle Players are hard at work rehearsing for Work, Play, Love: An Evening of One-Act Plays that will be presented at the historic Dixie Theatre in Apalachicola Nov. 18-20. The evening will include three short plays, The Temp, At Half Time, and Mark Twains Diaries of Adam and Eve as well as several short scenes between the plays. The Panhandle Players truly bring the community together in this presentation which showcases both veteran actors, performers new to the stage, and crew from all over two counties including Mexico Beach, Port St. Joe, Carrabelle, Apalachicola, Eastpoint, and St. George Island. First, the Work: The Temp is a comedy by Roy Friedman. Set in a modern day ofce, a temp worker played by Gina Vicari arrives to complete an important report. The ofce exec, portrayed by newcomer Katie Maxwell, and administrative assistant, Sharon Solomon, must deal with this picky, difcult to please temp and try to get the job done for their boss. Veteran Tom Loughridge directs this cast with help from his able stage manager, Beverly Kelley. Next, Play in At Half Time by Art Shulman, another comedy about an over-60 womens basketball team who are losing a tough game to the Little Sisters of Mercy, a team of silent nuns who play in their skirts! Their coach, played by Players regular Jeff Ilardi, tries to motivate his players during half time. His team, depicted by Elaine Kozlowsky, Laura Baney, Bobbi Seward, Judy Loftus, and Barbara Hartseld, just cant understand why theyre losing. These ladies antics will have you rolling with laughter into intermission. Ed Tiley and Caroline Ilardi direct this entertaining pageant of characters. The evening concludes with Love. Mark Twains Diaries of Adam and Eve adapted by David Birney is directed by Dan Wheeler. This play stars Hank Kozlowsky as Adam and Stephaney Provenzano as Eve, returning to the stage after a several-year absence. At times funny, at times poignant, this creatively produced play will leave you smiling and pondering the fall of the Garden of Eden, otherwise known as Niagara Falls. Performances are Friday and Saturday, Nov. 18 and 19 at 7:30 p.m. and Sunday, Nov. 20 at 3 p.m. at the Dixie. Season tickets which include dinner discounts at local restaurants for all three shows of the Panhandle Players 2011-12 season are also available. For tickets to the show and more information please call 670-5064, email PanhandlePlayers@ gmail.com, or visit www. Panhandle Players.com. Tickets are also being sold at the Butler Agency in Eastpoint, Downtown Books in Apalachicola, and Carrabelle Junction. THE BOYS ARE BACK IN TOWNWeems is proud to announce the return of Southland ER Physicians. J. Plum, MD Joda Lynn, MD Patrick Conrad, MD Paul Hart, MD Timothy Adamcryk, MD Garrett Chumney, MD Vincent Ivers, MD Nathaniel Hawkins, MD24 hour Emergency Services, Acute In-Patient Care, Swingbed Rehabilitation Program, Diagnostic and Surgical Services135 Avenue G Apalachicola, Fl 32320 (850) 653-8853Our mission is to improve the health status of the residents and visitors to Franklin County, by providing quality, compassionate, cost effective and convenient health care through community leadership and in collaboration with other healthcare organizations which serve our communities. BAYFRONT EASTPOINT1.2 acres on Hwy 98 with $850/month rental income from mobile home, also machine shop. Great home site and already has dock approval.MLS# 243415.................$149,000 Travis Stanley 850.653.6477 Grayson Shepard 850.653.6718 Kim Davis 850.653.6875 Leon Teat 850.653.5656 Jackie Golden 850.899.8433 Jamie Crum 850.370.0835 Sandy Mitchem 850.899.8300COMMERCIAL ST. GEORGE ISLANDExcellent location for 1500 square feet of commercial space in the heart of the island. Currently has indoor pool but will MLS# 244926...........$339,000 COMMERCIAL APALACHICOLA Two commercial lots for sale in and Penton St. Great location, one block of Hwy 98, near all the best shops and MLS# 244870..............$150,000NEW LISTING! MLS#245466..................$349,000AFFORDABLE GREATERAPALACHICOLA MLS# 244700.................$115,000GREATER APALACHICOLA MLS# 244666.................$275,000 Robert C. Bruner Attorney Personal & Business BankruptcyOver 30 Years Legal Experience850-670-3030We are a debt relief agency. bankruptcy relief under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon advertisements. Before you decide, ask us to send you free written information experience. DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The TimesStarring in the play At Half Time are, standing, from left, Judy Loftus, Jeff Ilardi and Barbara Hartseld, and seated, from left, Laura Baney, Elaine Kozlowsky and Bobbi Seward.Panhandle Players prepare to Work, Play, Love Dems host reception at Crooked River GrillThe Franklin County Democratic Executive Committee is hosting a reception at the Crooked River Grill in St. James Bay beginning at 5:30 p.m. on Thursday, Nov. 10. All interested Democrats in Franklin County are invited to attend. The reception will run from 5:307 p.m., said Committee Chair Curt Blair. Several elected state and county Democratic ofcials will be present at the reception to share a few remarks. Ofcials slated to be on hand include State Sen. Bill Montford, State Rep. Leonard Bembry, County Commissioner Cheryl Sanders, Franklin Countys Tax Collector Jimmy Harris and County Clerk Marcia Johnson. In addition to Blair, ofcers of the executive committee are Mercedes Updyke, vice chair; Beth Blair, secretary; Brenda Ash, treasurer and Past Chair Barbara Sanders. Betty Croom is the state committeewoman. The committee decided at its last meeting in July to hold quarterly gatherings at different places in the county. This meeting, which brings Democrats to the eastern end of Franklin County, will feature an opportunity for local Democrats to speak with several of their elected ofcials. The committee is looking for a large attendance, said Curt Blair. Refreshments will be served.Free state park admission for vetsThe Florida Department of Environmental Protections Florida Park Service will offer free day-use entry to all state parks on Friday, Nov. 11 in recognition of Veterans Day. All other use fees, such as overnight accommodations, tours or special events, will be charged as usual on Friday, Nov. 11. Florida State Parks honor American veterans and active-duty service members throughout the year. Honorably discharged veterans, active-duty service and reserve members receive a 25 percent discount on the purchase of a state parks annual entrance pass. The discount provides a savings of $15 on an individual pass and $30 on a family pass, which allows up to eight people in a group to access most of Floridas 160 state parks. In addition, honorably discharged veterans with service-connected disabilities and surviving News BriefsRIEFSSee neNE WsS BriefsRIEFS A11

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OpinionA4 | The Times USPS 027-600Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 VP/Publisher: Karen Hanes Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six monthsHome delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERSIn case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola TimesThursday, November 10, 2011Special to the TimesCan you even imagine what it mu St. be like to lose your home, family pictures, clothes, kitchen utensils, tools, toothbrush, books, pets, even your underwear to an all-consuming re? What mu St. it be like to have such deva St.ation take over your life? Ill never forget seeing the face of a dear friend when she held out her 50year-old daughters chri St.ening dress in her own hands lovingly saved for generations to come and watched it crumble from the intense heat of their terrible house re. The things that surround us may be lo St. forever in such a tragedy, but when lives and property can be saved, it is often volunteer community remen who make that happen. Here in our small communities, where budgets and personnel are often too limited for full-time professional teams, it is the dedication and commitment of volunteer reghters who St.and between property damage or de St.ruction. Often side-by-side with local paid police and crisis r St. responders, volunteer reghting teams give their time, talent, heartfelt efforts and sometimes even their very lives as they try to help save the lives and property of those they have promised to serve. This Saturday, Nov. 12 at the Lanark Boat Club, at 2364 U.S. Highway 98, a seaside community fundraising event will be held to help raise nancial support for the equipment and training needs of local LanarkSt. James volunteer reghting teams. Beginning at 10 a.m., the cooking of prize-winning seafood gumbo will ll the air with wonderful smells and provide challenges for each area-wide participating reghting team. The Franklin County School will also enter a cooking crew. At 2 p.m., experienced judges will declare the winner of the ta St.e te St. conte St. Mrs. Jackie Gay of Carrabelle, herself a prize-winning gumbo maker, will be one of this years judges. You may remember that Mrs. Gay won the grand prize of $50,000 from the Good Housekeeping/Paul Newman charity conte St. for her winning recipe, Franklin County Floridas Own Frankly Fanta St.ic Seafood Gumbo. At that time, she generously designated that her entire winnings be donated to support the Carrabelle Branch Library building fund in order to help fulll her dream of the con St.ruction of the new Carrabelle library. In addition to serving as a judge in this years conte St., Mrs. Gay has prepared a handwritten book of her own prized seafood recipes which includes favorites like corned grouper, shrimp and grits, seafood quiche, sh chowder and her prize-winning gumbo. The one-ofa-kind book will be featured together with a basket of Newmans own products as a highlight of this important local fundraising effort. Beginning at 12:30 p.m., as the competing gumbo recipes simmer, items to be auctioned include a helicopter ride donated by Panhandle Helicopter, day of golf with a complimentary overnight St.ay at St. James Bay, a gorgeous handmade quilt and a four-hour kayak ride donated by Journeys of St. George. A rafe will be held following the 2 p.m. gumbo judging featuring signed Richard Bickel prints, re St.aurant dinners, oil change, tackle box and more. There will be music and food throughout the day, adding to the entertainment and excitement of this third vital fundraising effort for our own local reghters. Admission is free, everyone is invited to attend and participate actively in the auction and rafe on behalf of equipment and training purchases for our own volunteers. Mike Rundel, president of the LanarkSt. James volunteers, asks that area residents intere St.ed in serving with the volunteer reghting team are encouraged to submit their names and regi St.er their intere St. in joining the vital community service group. Mel Kelly is a frequent contributor to the Apalachicola and Carrabelle Times.Support your reghters, enjoy gumbo Saturday THOUGHtTS FOR tTHE TIMESMel Kelly Editors note: The following is an excerpt from an interview that educator Ron Clark did with CNN called What Teachers Really Want to Tell Parents. Clark was the American Teacher of the Year in 2001 and the founder of the Ron Clark Academy in Atlanta. Franklin County High School Principal George Oehlert said the schools entire faculty is involved in a book study of Clarks most recent book The End of Molasses Classes Getting our kids unstuck. For starters we are educators, not nannies. We are educated professionals who work with kids every day and often see your child in a different light than you do. If we give advice dont ght it. Take it, and digest it in the same way you would consider advice from a doctor or lawyer .... Trust us. If you really want to help your children be successful, stop making excuses for them .... Some parents will make excuses regardless of the situation, and they are raising children who will grow into adults who turn toward excuses and do not create a strong work ethic. If you dont want your child to end up 25 and jobless, sitting on your couch eating potato chips, then stop making excuses for why they arent succeeding. Instead, focus on nding solutions. Its OK for your child to get into trouble sometimes. It builds character and teaches life lessons. As teachers, we are vexed by those parents who stand in the way of those lessons; we call them helicopter parents because they want to swoop in and save their child every time something goes wrong. This one may be hard to accept, but you shouldnt assume that because your child makes straight As that her/she is getting a good education. The truth is, a lot of times its the bad teachers who give the easiest grades, because they know by giving good grades everyone will leave them alone In all honesty, its usually the best teachers who are giving the lowest grades, because they are raising expectations. Yet, when your child receives low scores you want to complain and head to the principals ofce. We know you love your children. We love them, too. We just ask-and beg of you-to trust us, support us and work with the system, not against it. We need you to have our backs, and we need you to give us the respect we deserve. Lift us up and make us feel appreciated, and we will work even harder to give your child the best education possible. At the Oct. 4 Port St Joe city commissions public hearing, city ofcials approved a development order to allow the building of a polluting biomass incinerator which will have a far reaching negative and devastating impact on the sh, oyster, scallop and crab seafood industries in the northwest region of Florida within a 50-mile radius. This incinerator will burn 930 tons of trees/ wood residue every day, which will release 607 tons of pollution per year, including dioxins, lead, mercury, arsenic, particulate matter and many other cancer causing chemicals. The American Lung Association and many medical associations in Florida and nationwide oppose such biomass incinerators for this reason. Dioxin is said to be the most toxic chemical known to man and it will be emitted as a byproduct of incineration via the smokestacks to nd its way into our water and soil. In the water, dioxin binds to small particles or plankton which is the rst level of the food chain for sh and aquatic organisms and when we eat these products, the dioxin accumulates in our bodies. The Food and Drug Administration has stated there are NO safe and effective treatments to rid dioxins now in humans and the best way is to reduce dietary exposure, which will be difcult for all of us because we live in coastal communities that thrive on seafood. Another major threat to the seafood industry in Port St. Joe, Apalachicola, Eastpoint and Carrabelle is the potential for a decrease in the water ow volume into the Apalachicola River which will initially threaten the oyster beds in the region. This could happen as a direct result of huge amounts of water withdrawals occurring at the incinerator site as this type of incinerator demands approximately one million gallons of water every day which will be taken from the Chipola River, the major tributary for the Apalachicola River. The water will be used in the incinerators cooling down process. This decrease in water volume from the Chipola River has the potential to interfere with the ow of necessary nutrients to the Apalachicola Bay from the Apalachicola River. This can only undermine the water levels required to sustain our sensitive oyster beds. Furthermore, a diminishing water ow will eventually have a negative impact on all aquatic organisms and species in the region that depend on this crucial balance of water and nutrients. Any major change or adjustment could destroy our fragile ecosystem. What I do not understand is that in these difcult environmental and political times of interstate water wars, it seems odd to me the citizens and politicians of Florida, Alabama and Georgia are not outraged by the ippant and careless plan of Port St. Joe to throw away one million gallons of fresh water daily to a hungry polluting incinerator that will evaporate approximately 85 percent of the water into no mans land. Luckily, for now, the developer has no private funding and they have been notied that there is no current public funding for this project thank the Lord! There is still time to prevent this monstrosity from ruining our beautiful coastal region and our way of life and I, for one, refuse to say goodbye to seafood yet! Barbara RutherfordDorris, RNSpecial to the TimesRepresentative Steve Southerland, II took the Obama Administration to task last month for misleading the American people in an attempt to increase its regulatory control over our oceans and coastal industries. In a House Natural Resources Committee hearing on Oct. 26, Southerland highlighted the unmistakable conict between the Obama administrations National Ocean Policy, which includes new regulatory and enforcement authority, and the public assurances of administration ofcials who maintain that no new regulations will take effect due to this executive order. While it should come as no surprise to anyone that the Obama Administration is angling for more federal control of our oceans, their blatant bait-and-switch tactics should alarm us all, Southerland said. By burying language that permits new requirements, regulations, and enforcement 30 pages deep in their National Ocean Policy and then disavowing any intention to increase their control over our coasts, the administration is exhibiting Washington at its worst. Its time to stop the political doublespeak and start helping coastal industries that are sinking under the weight of crippling Washington regulations. The Obama administrations new ocean policy bureaucracy would be administered by a 27-member National Ocean Council, a vemember steering committee and two policy committees.Special to the TimesFlorida has the potential to save millions in healthcare costs annually while maintaining highquality healthcare delivery by removing administrative and legislative barriers for Advanced Registered Nurse Practitioners (ARNPs) and Physicians Assistants (PAs), a new Florida TaxWatch study nds. Florida TaxWatch says that ARNP prescribing will save Floridians approximately $339 million a year, said State Senator Mike Bennett (R-Manatee), a champion for ARNP prescribing in the Florida Senate. I dont think the Legislature can ignore savings like that. The doctors and the nurses need to come to agreement on this important issue and focus on the best and most cost-effective way to treat patients. Dominic M. Calabro, Florida TaxWatch president and CEO said Florida ARNPs and PAs are capable of taking on a signicant amount of primary care functions for Floridians, without needing to work directly under a physician. Across the country, medical clinics in which ARNPs provide the majority of care have reported substantial cost savings in healthcare delivery. The two main recommendations in the TaxWatch report are allowing ARNPs and PAs to prescribe controlled substances either collaboratively with a physician or independently, and bill Medicaid and insurance providers directly, allowing for a lower overall reimbursement rate for primary care services. Florida has the opportunity to signicantly reduce healthcare costs for taxpayers, Calabro said. This report reveals that up to $46 million in savings for Medicaid and state-sponsored health insurance could be realized through these changes. We can no longer afford to under-utilize these medical professionals, who are fully capable of providing quality primary care services to Floridians at a lower cost than physicians must charge. Brian Keeley, CEO, Baptist Health South Florida, commented on the report, Miami-Dade County and the state as a whole suffer a severe shortage of access to primary care physicians, especially for Medicaid patients. The time has come for intelligent and fundamental change in the primary care delivery model. TaxWatchs report validates Keeleys longtime advocacy for ARNP prescribing. ARNPs as physician extenders are cost effective, efcient and provide safe, quality health care, particularly in underserved areas. We live in a world where patients routinely seeking primary care come in the emergency room. ER treatment averages four to ten times the cost of primary, non-emergent care. The state of Florida should join the other 48 states that currently allow ARNP prescribing which TaxWatchs report demonstrates will save money and efciencies through the entire health care system. To read the entire report, visit www. oridataxwatch.orgKiss your local Florida seafood goodbye?Southerland decries ocean policyRemove costly barriers to ARNPs, PAs StTEVE SOUtTHERLaANDWhat teachers really want to tell parents

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LocalThe Times | A5Thursday, November 10, 2011 Thank You for your service to our country and for making the sacrices you have made in your life to keep America Free! Without you, America would not be the great country it is today!God Bless the USA!! Blake Hutchison President WE SALUTE OUR V eterans 11-11-11 First Baptist Christian SchoolHonors Our VeteransIn recognition of Americas nearly 25 million living, wounded and handicapped Veterans, those that have given their lives, their widows, and the MIAs/POWs, the First Baptist Christian School would like to say Thank You by inviting all area Veterans and the community to their annualVeterans Day Program Friday, November 11th at 9amin the church sancutuary located at 46 Ninth Street in Apalachicola. BILL MILLER REALTY850-697-3751 (3310) 570-0658WOW! 1BDR FURNISHED APT $15,000 $29,500 $2,500 DOWN BUYS 2 BED APT. 2 6 GULF VIEW & ACCESS 3 BDR 2 BA 2006 M/H 16 X 80 $89,000 $500DOWN CHOICE OF 3 CITY LOTS $180.00/MONTH OR $17,500/EACH MIH 2 CRNRLOTS BLK. $ STORE REDUCED $49,500 3DOOR NICE 2 B/R MH 2CRNR. LOTS $47,500 NOTICE OF SPECIAL MEETINGThe Board of Commissioners of the Northwest Florida Regional Housing Authority will hold a Special Meeting on November 15, 2011, at the Holiday Inn & Suites, 2725 Graves Road, Tallahassee, Florida. Meeting will begin at 1:00 p.m. E.S.T. The meeting will be open to the public. By Lois SwobodaTimes Staff Writer Forgotten Coast TV is back on cable television and relocated to Eastpoint, in a new home that Helen Spohrer said is everything she could have hoped for. On June 28, FCTV coowners John and Helen Spohrer purchased from federal bank regulators at auction for $455,000 the former branch ofce of Gulf State Community Bank, at 258 U.S. Highway 98. Helen Spohrer said the facility was purchased after several prospective owners bid on the property. Some appraisers were surprised the bank building brought so much money but we did not purchase it as an investment, she said. We purchased it as end users. She said the building was really move-in ready when they bought it, including several features that make it ideal for the stations needs. It came wired for the latest high-tech equipment, possibly because of the banks security needs, and now features a dedicated tech room with air conditioning, as well as a full kitchen. There are large bright ofces, an editing room, conference room and a studio set up with three permanent sets. We like the new studio because it is centrally located in the county and we like the programmable sign in front for announcements, said John Spohrer. Beginning Nov. 1, FCTV began broadcasting on Mediacom Channel 3, although not as a public access channel, which it had been in the past. The Spohrers said the cable television presence could yield as many as 30,000 new viewers to add to its broadcast on St. George Cable Channel 9 and at www.forgottencoasttv.com. FCTV is a video production and recording company focused on educational and environmental programming, local government, and local businesses. Helen Spohrer said FCTV is shooting new episodes dealing with shing, cooking, outdoor life and local history, with the newest project being a weekly beach report with upcoming events featuring host Pandora Schlitt. Although the studio is already in full swing, the Spohrers said a grand opening is planned for Dec. 2.FCTV in new HQ and back on airBy Lois SwobodaTimes Staff Writer Women and seniors are signicantly more active in Franklin County elections than other voters. In an Oct. 20 talk on women in politics, Supervisor of Elections Ida Cooper Elliott told the Philaco Womens Club that women regularly vote in greater numbers than men in the county. In 1964, this was not so. That year, 79 percent of registered male voters came to the polls, but only 64 percent of registered women. In 2004, only 61 percent of registered women voted, while registered men appearing at the polls dropped to 56 percent. Elliot said older voters are also more likely to come to the polls than young ones. Young people just dont seem to understand the importance of voting, she said. They think one vote cant change anything, but it can. Elliott said she visits the Franklin County School at least twice a year to encourage students to register. She said there will be a change in the next election. In the past, early voting ran 10 days before Election Day. In the Jan. 31 presidential preference primary, early voting will take place from Saturday, Jan. 21 through Saturday, Jan. 28. Voters must be registered by Jan. 3 to vote. Elliott said some voters are switching party afliation from Democrat to Republican, possibly because only Republicans can vote in the January election. The 2012 primary election will take place July 16 and the general election on Nov.. 6 with early voting from Oct. 27 to Nov. 3. Deadline for voter registration for the general election is Oct. 9, 2012.Countys women voters more active than men LOIS SWOBODA | The TimesIda Elliott addressed the Philaco Womens Club Oct. 20. JOHN SPOHRER | Special to the Times.258 U.S. Highway 98 in Eastpoint

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A6 | The Times Thursday, November 10, 2011Jean Sewell, Betty Roberts honoredWhat a picnic! Two great ladies were honored, also; our park is now named Jean Sewell Park, and our pavilion is now Betty Roberts Pavilion. We enjoyed a lot of food, many friends and neighbors. Betty is still in Bay St. James and felt she shouldnt go. We still have coffee at Chillas Hall, from 9 to 11 a.m., and on Thursdays, the coffee is free. Come on by and have a cup or two, and visit with your friends and neighbors. The Thrift Shop is open on Thursdays, again! You can shop til you drop Monday through Saturday, from 8 a.m. to noon. Come by and shop, and have a cup of coffee; Betty, Sharon and Mary will be glad to see you. We all can enjoy Friday night hamburgers, and Sunday pizza, at our American Legion Post 82. These two meals are served from 5 to 7 p.m. Besides the good food, we also have pool, shufeboard, bar bingo and of course, your favorite beverage. Come join us; everyone welcome! Breakfast will be served Saturday, Nov. 12, from 7:30 to 9 a.m. at the Senior Center, then its off to the parade. Step-off is at 10 a.m. Then, back to the Senior Center, 201 Ave. F in Carrabelle, to enjoy the Veterans Day Festival. Dont forget to visit the Child Protection Booth, sponsored by members of the Curfew Masonic Lodge. Your childs picture will be taken, and their ngerprints taken and given to the parents for safekeeping. Come and enjoy the day with us! Be kind to one another, check on the sick and housebound, and remember, contrary to popular opinion, Gods last name is not Damn. Until next time, God Bless America, our troops, the poor and the hungry. PETOFTHEWEEK Franklin County Humane Society Qualications: Expertise in: Now Accepting AppointmentsCall Toll Free 888-681-5864 For more info www.seclung.com Lung Disease SpecialistRob Garver, MDNow Seeing Patients in Port St. Joe NOW BCBS-FL IN-NETWORK PROVIDER Aubrey Rafeld bornAubrey Gracelyn Rafeld was born Thursday, Oct. 6, 2011, at Gulf Coast Medical Center. She weighed 8 pounds and was 19 inches long. She is the daughter of Kimberly Denney and Rodney Rafeld of Eastpoint. She is welcomed home by big brother Jacob and big sister Kassidy. Maternal grandmother is Donna Motes of Carrabelle. Paternal grandparents are Verdell Haddock of Eastpoint and the late Rodney Rafeld Sr. Brantlee Charles Martina bornBrantlee Charles Martina was born Friday, Aug. 12, 2011, at Tallahassee Memorial Hospital. He weighed 6 pounds, 4 ounces and was 20 inches long. He was welcomed home by proud parents Jody Martina and Tiffany Millender and big brother Chason Martina. Maternal grandparents are Travis and Caramelle Millender. Maternal great-grandparents are Danny and Danna Rose, the late Bert and Molly Millender and Fred and Elois Knauss. Paternal grandparents are Kevin and Patty Martina. Paternal great-grandparents are Bill and Bur nell Martina and the late John  and Betty Gay.Buziers celebrate 30th wedding anniversaryDavid and Penni Buzier celebrated their 30th wedding anniversary on Sunday, Oct. 2, 2011. They were married at the Calvary Cathedral in Panama City, with the Rev. J.B. Davis ofciating at the Oct. 2, 1981, ceremony, with many relatives and friends attending. Penni is the daughter of Eddie and Dora (Morris) Curti. David is the son of Betty (Kemp) Hicks and Cubie Hicks of Panama City and Adolph Buzier Sr. of Apalachicola. The couple makes their home in Panama City, where they have two children, David Aaron Buzier and Laura Buzier.Tomilee Dowden, Steven Babb to wedMr. Tommy Jack Massey is pleased to announce the upcoming marriage of his granddaughter, Tomilee Melissa Dowden to Steven Hunter Babb. The wedding is to take place on Saturday, Nov. 19, 2011, at 5 p.m. at First Assembly of God Church in Carrabelle, with a reception to immediately follow at Lanark Village Boat Club in Lanark Village. Tomilee is the daughter of Connie Massey of Carrabelle and Mr. and Mrs. Terry Dowden Sr. of Birmingham, Ala. Steven is the son of Fred and Tina Babb of Eastpoint. Maternal grandparents are Tommy Jack Massey and the late Barbara Ann Massey of Carrabelle, and the late Mr. and Mrs. William T. Dowden of Tallahassee. Paternal grandparents are Mrs. Betty Armistead of Sumatra and Mr. Larry Hicks of Eastpoint, and Mrs. Evelyn Babb and the late Mr. Fred Babb II of Apalachicola. Although no invitations are being sent, all family and friends are invited to attend and witness the joining of two genuinely wonderful people in marriage.John Talon Mathes turns 2John Talon Mathes celebrated his 2nd birthday on Saturday, Oct. 22, 2011, with family and friends.  He is the son of Parrish Johnson and Justin Mathes. John Talons party was a motorcross theme and was held at the Lighthouse Park on St. George Island. He received his very own kid-friendly dirt bike to ride! The guests enjoyed hamburgers, hot dogs and a dirt bike-themed cake. Toddler friends took home personalized gift treats. Maternal grandparents are Darren and Chimene Johnson of Eastpoint. Paternal grandparents are Riley and Joyce Mathes of Carrabelle.On Saturday, Nov. 12, the Center for History, Culture and Art, 86 Water St., will  close the Women Folk art exhibit  with a gala reception  from 6-8 p.m.  Folk artists Joan Matey, Mary Lou Athorn, Clarice Powell and Nanci Kerr, whose work includes the mixed media sculpture at right, will be present to speak about their art and answer questions, plus enter tainment by Sopchoppy  folk singer Frank Lindamood.  This thought-provoking show will leave the center on Sunday. The center is open on Thursday, Friday and Saturday from noon to 5 p.m. The event is organized by Historic Apalachicola Main Street Inc.,  designated as a National Trust for Historic Preservation Main Street program. For more information, call 855APALACH. LOIS SWOBODA | The Times LaANarARK NEwsWSJim Welsh Births and BirtIRTHdaDA YsS Weddings & ANNiIVErsariRSARIEsS WOMEN EN FOLK K E E XH H IBIT RE E CE E PTION N Society

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The Times | A7Thursday, November 10, 2011 The United Methodist Churches of Franklin County Welcome You First United Methodist Church of ApalachicolaWorship Service 11:00 a.m. every Sunday Sunday School 10:00 a.m. 75 5th St. Apalachicola 653-9530 fumcapalach@gtcom.net Pastor: Rev. Themo PatriotisCarrabelle United Methodist ChurchWorship Services 10:45 a.m. Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Celebrate Recovery Mondays 7-9 p.m. 102 NE Ave. B Carrabelle 697-3672 Pastor: Julie StephensEastpoint United Methodist ChurchWorship Service 10:00 a.m. every Sunday Healing service every fourth Monday at 7:00 p.m. 317 Patton Dr. (corner of David St.) 670-8825 Pastor: Rev. Beth WhiteSt. George Island United Methodist Church9:00 a.m. Worship Service 10:00 a.m. Fellowship Hour 201 E. Gulf Beach Dr. 9274635 www.sgiumc.org Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis First Pentecostal Holiness Church379 Brownsville Road Apalachicola Were excited about what Gods doing!!!Sunday School 9:45 am Sunday Morning Worship 10:45 am Sunday Evening Service 6:00 pm Monday, Youth Group 6:30 pm Wednesday, Royal Rangers, G.A.P.7:00 pm Wednesday Worship & Word 7:30 pmNursery Provided during regular church services 7:00 7:00 First Baptist ChurchSt. George Island 501 E. Bayshore Drive 927-2257 R. Michael Waley, Pastor Join us as we praise and worship the living Christ. Great is the Lord and most worthy of praise. Psalm 145:3 Sunday Bible Study................................................10:00am Worship Praise........................................................11:00am Sunday Night............................................................7:00pm Wednesday Power Hour......................................7:00pm Wednesday Youth at S.P.L.A.S.H.......................7:00pm Walking in Christ R. Michael Whaley, Pastor WELCOMES YOUChurch of the Ascension101 NE First Street CarrabelleSUNDAY10:00 AM WELCOMES YOUChurch THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH (850) 274-4490 WELCOMES YOU Trinity Trinity Episcopal Churchest. 1836Welcomes YouHwy. 98 & 6th St. Apalachicola 850-653-9550Sunday Worship Services 8 & 10:30 a.m. Wednesdays Healing Service 11 a.m. Centering Prayer 4 p.m. FaithVeterans Day at First BaptistIn recognition of Americas 25 million living, wounded and handicapped veterans and those who have given their lives, their widows and those missing in action or prisoners of war, First Baptist Christian School would like to say Thank you by inviting area veterans and the community to its annual Veterans Day program at 9 a.m. Friday, Nov. 11, in the church sanctuary, 46 Ninth St. in Apalachicola.dare 2b different conferenceMt. Zion Womens Ministry will host Womens Conference dare 2b different at 7 p.m. Friday and Saturday, Nov. 11-12. Speakers will be Prophetess Shantel Randolph and Prophetess Yalonda Wood, from Tallahassee. Renowned saxophonist Chris Godber, from Panama City, will be featured on Friday night. Come, enjoy praise and worship and let the word of God build you up! For further info, please call 323-2665.Liberty Counsel to conduct Nov. 19 seminarBy invitation of Franklin County Fellowship of Christian Athletes, Liberty Counsel will conduct a workshop covering students rights, teachers rights and prayer in schools at the Eastpoint Church of God on Saturday, Nov. 19, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. The seminar is free to the public; literature will be available for purchase. All school administration, faculty and parents are encouraged to attend Liberty Counsel is an international nonprot litigation, education and policy organization dedicated to advancing religious freedom, the sanctity of life and the family since 1989 by providing pro bono assistance and representation on these and related topics. Have you ever stopped to consider the plight of the modern church? Will it ever cease to exist, or is it the one institute that will stand the test of time? Occasionally, I notice a rundown old church with the windows boarded up when I ride through small towns and backwoods areas. I cannot help but wonder what happened and where did the people go. I can imagine an old pastor sitting on the porch steps on Sunday morning with his overalls on, waiting for someone to pull up in the parking lot. He probably imagines a time when he could hear the children gasp as the Sunday school teacher dramatizes a story from the Bible. He can almost smell Miss Johnsons homemade apple pie and Mrs. Browns famous fried chicken that was prepared for every fifth Sunday dinner. The sound of the wind in the trees brings Amazing Grace and Sweet Hour of Prayer to his recollection. Suddenly, a car swishing by on the highway startles him, and it brings him back to reality. This story might seem dramatized, but it has been predicted we are just one generation away from a Godless society. All it will take is enough people to stop teaching their children about God for it to come to pass. Sunday school is 156 years old and is now being eliminated in many churches. As a last resort, some churches only have one Sunday service and no midweek service because of a drastic decline in attendance. A slow fade has taken place while the church takes a back seat to social activities. Our young people are indifferent because they have little or no Bible knowledge in them. They replace the void with adverse pastimes, showing no regard for the life-altering truth the Word contains. Some people would view this as a victory for the atheistic society or the antiChristian movement in general. The problem that is not taken into account by these individuals is the increase in evil taken place because of the decrease of righteousness being instilled in them. The good news is that it only takes a spark to get a re going. In II Kings, it was prophesied Josiah would be placed on the throne of David to realign Israel with God. Many generations of people passed until no one remembered the things of God anymore. The kings before him had turned to strange gods and the people embraced all of them. Sound familiar? Josiah was 8 years old when he became king, and he reigned in Jerusalem 31 years. II Kings 22:1 He did what was right in the eyes of the Lord and walked in all the ways of his father David, not turning aside to the right or to the left. This is a noteworthy statement because we know distractions can cause you to take your eyes off the road for just a second and cause a wreck. The diversion of insignicant possessions and leisure time is taking the place of desire for knowledge. When we are distracted by worldly things, we lose sight of the purpose we were created for.The Kelly FamilyMy husband Tom and I, and our son Tom (aka K.B. Kims brother ) are very grateful to new and old friends at C Quarters Marina and throughout Carrabelle who made our Kims Oct. 28 birthday very special for her. Sadly, because her beloved husband of 14 years is still living in Holland trapped in immigration hell, dear and special Carrabelle friends made sure she had several happy celebrations to assure her she was not alone and is indeed loved, appreciated and wished very well for her new year ahead. There was a delicious, one of a kind, home-crafted gourmet German chocolate cake and another special cake from a young friend deliberately selected as her winning prize at church in order to share it with her friend Miss Kimmie. There were wonderful munchies, fresh fruit, many serious and fun gifts, cards, photographs, hugs and several choruses of Happy Birthday. Our daughters special day and evening became much more festive than she ever expected or anticipated, thanks to some of the people in Carrabelle who wanted her to know how much they care about her. She couldnt know her dad and I would make the surprise trip down from northwest Wisconsin to be with her on her birthday. We came to share hugs with her because we didnt want her to be alone! Little did we know other people who love and care about her here in Carrabelle would take the initiative to make sure her special day was highlighted and commemorated in her honor. I know Kim was deeply touched, and more grateful than she could openly express, for the attention and efforts on her behalf. She is a very loving and thoughtful person; her heartfelt smile is the sunshine for many of us. But because she didnt see herself as deserving of any such special treatment, it made the surprise and embellishments provided by friends, and family, even more wonderful for her. For all you real parents, you well understand it doesnt matter what age your child may be. They will always be your child, and you will always love and worry and care about them and their welfare and happiness. To those of you who understand how much she means to us as your children undoubtedly mean to you you also understand how we wanted her special day to be happy, even under her current difcult circumstances. We drove 3,000 miles to make sure our beloved daughter would not be alone on her special day. We learned we need not have worried! Lots of us are transplants to this area, as were Kim and Harold. But many, many of you have made us all feel welcome and appreciated and cared about. The gift of friendship you give is both very rare and very rich. We are all very grateful and very humbled by it. In giving Kim her surprise parties and gifts, you gave her whole family a wonderful present as well. You showed her, and us, she has been important in your lives, and that you care enough about our child within your own world to make such special efforts on her behalf. You and your caring helped her smile through another day of a tough and challenging time. All of our family extends a very special thank you for your loving birthday gifts of care and thoughtfulness. You may never understand how much your gift of love meant to her, to her father, brother and me, and her husband who can only be at her side in spirit just now. But I promise, we will never forget it, or you.Gratefully, Kim Kelly Reijers and Harold, Mel, Tom and KB Kelly There will be a memorial service in honor of Wesley Papa Gene Wilson to be held Saturday, Nov. 12, 2011, at United Baptist Church in Eastpoint, beginning at 11 a.m. Born Nov. 24, 1951, Mr. Wilson passed away Monday, Oct. 31, 2011, at his home in Chipley. A native of Houston, Texas, he had been a resident of Chipley for the past 15 years, coming from Eastpoint. A self-employed contractor, he was extremely proud of being in the drafting class at Washington-Holmes Vocational Technical School and was a member of the United Baptist Church in Eastpoint. He is predeceased by sisters Vicki Wilson Perry and Paula Wilson Walls. Survivors include his mother and father, Celia and R.D. Segree of Carrabelle; wife, Debrah (Mathis) Wilson of Chipley; son Chad Horton of Chipley; daughter, Jadena Wilson-Horton and friend, Greg Terrell, of Chipley; one brother, Wayne Segree; two sisters, Peggy Andrews and Mary Beth Segree; and two grandchildren, Kris Wilson and Max Horton. The family received friends Friday morning, Nov. 4, at the Country Oaks Baptist Church in Chipley. Funeral services followed in the church with the Rev. Bobby Shiver and Dr. Paul Joyner ofciating. Private interment was in the Wilson Family Cemetery in Chipley.Wesley Papa Gene WilsonMartha Moses, 92, of Apalachicola passed away Monday, Oct. 31, 2011, in Port St. Joe after an extended illness. She was born in Alabama and was a longtime resident of Apalachicola, where she worked in the seafood business, and she loved to sh. She was a member of the Highland Park Community Church. She was preceded in death by her husband, Jim Moses; and two sons, Jimmy and Lovett Moses. She is survived by two sons, Lonnie Moses and wife, Sandra, and Eddie Joe Moses and wife, Wanda; and two daughtersin-law, Oleta and Glenda Moses, all of Apalachicola; one sister, Retha Adkins of Calhoun County; 12 grandchildren; 24 greatgrandchildren; and seven great-great-grandchildren. Funeral services were held Friday morning, Nov. 4 at Highland Park Community Church in Apalachicola with the Rev. Ray Creamer ofciating. Interment followed in Pleasant Rest Cemetery, Overstreet. The viewing was held at the church on Thursday evening, Nov. 4. All services under the direction of the Comforter Funeral Home.Martha Ellen MosesWilliam Doug Kimbrel, age 60, departed this world peacefully at his home on Friday, Oct. 28, 2011. Mr. Kimbrel was born and raised in Calhoun County, although he made Apalachicola his home for the past 34 years. He leaves behind his ance, Pam Burns of Apalachicola; three daughters, Renea Kimbrel OBryan of Bristol, Chastity Kimbrel Sandusky of Marianna and Pamala Kimbrel of San Diego, Calif.; stepson Billy Riley of Panama City; grandsons Christian Kimbrel and wife, Tiffany, of Marianna, and Michael Lowe of San Diego, Calif.; granddaughters Saige Kent of Blountstown and Kymberly Kent of Bristol; sisters Louise Dean and husband, Ed, of Greensboro and Sara Alday and husband, Steve, of Altha; brother James Charles Kimbrel, Jr. and wife, Christy; stepsisters Janet OPry of Greenwood and Elaine Williams of Eastpoint; stepbrothers Alton and Earl Mears; and countless aunts, uncles, cousins, nieces and nephews. He was preceded in death by his parents, James Charles and Dorothy Kimbrel of the Red Oak community. At his request, a private family service will be held at a later date. In lieu of owers, the family welcomes donations to the American Heart Association, 800-242-8721 or online at https://donate. americanheart.org/. Those wishing to extend a word of condolence may do so at www.heritagefhllc. com. Heritage Funeral Home of Panama City is in charge of arrangements.William Doug KimbrelDanny Holton, 41, of Carrabelle, passed away Sunday, Nov. 6, 2011, in Franklin County. Danny was born in Carrabelle, the son of Reedy and Charlene Holton. He was a lifelong citizen of Carrabelle and loved to sh, hunt and spend time outdoors. His proudest accomplishments were his daughters Christin and Katie. He is survived by his parents, Reedy and Charlene Holton; daughters Christin and Katelynn Holton; brother Michael (Beth) Holton; and sister Amber Holton, all of Carrabelle. He was preceded in death by a daughter, Magan Dawn Holton. Funeral services were held Wednesday, Nov. 9, at 4 p.m. at the Carrabelle Christian Center with Pastor Don Carroll ofciating. Interment followed at Evergreen Cemetery. Arrangements were under the care and direction of Forbes Funeral Home. Please sign the online guestbook at www. forbesfuneralhome.net.Danny Holton Obituaries Card of ThHAnkNKS Faith BRIefEFSAre churches doing a slow fade? YOUthTH MAtte TTERSScott and Pamela ShiverSee YOU OUTH A10

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Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL(next to Piggly Wiggly)www.BWOsh.comYour Hunting Headquarters SIG SAUER 22ARRIFLE WAS $519.99NOWWHILESUPPLIES LAST$399.99WITH HARD CASE INCLUDED Thursday, November 10, 2011 FreshwaterOffshore shing will soon be a memory for 2011. As gag grouper season comes to a close this weekend, anglers will resort to the smaller inshore species for the next 6 months. Black sea bass will make up most of the action and can be caught on most inshore wrecks to the east. Small pieces of cut bait and chicken rigs will produce not only sea bass, but b-liners and rubies as well. Inshore OffshoreInshore shing has slowed down. Most reports from the bay this past week were still big bull reds. Eagle Harbor and the tip of the cape have been hot spots for big bulls in the surf. A few pompano are around in the surf, and the whiting are starting to bite on Mexico Beach. Shari at the Fishermans Landing reports this week from Howard Creek with good numbers of bass, but they are on the small side. Crappie, shellcracker, painted bream and channel cats are coming back to the dock in good number. Big sheepshead are still being caught in the big river on shrimp. SPoONsoSORED BY By Lois SwobodaTimes Staff Writer If you notice some unusual spider eggs on your porch or under a shelf, watch out. They might be the eggs of a brown widow spider, which have been abundant in the county this year. These interesting egg cases are round with tiny protruding spikes reminiscent of the head of a medieval mace. Everyone is familiar with black widow spiders, whose bite can sometimes be fatal, but Florida is home to three other widow spiders, the southern widow spider, red widow spider and brown widow spider. Although the venom of these spiders is not as toxic as the black widow, they are very painful and can cause serious injury if not treated. If you have a brown widow spider infestation, you will probably notice the eggs before you see the spider. Brown widows are reclusive and hide in cracks and dark corners. Some typical sites include inside old tires, empty containers such as buckets and nursery pots, mailboxes, entryway corners, under eaves, stacked equipment, cluttered storage closets and garages, behind hurricane shutters, recessed hand grips of plastic garbage cans, undercarriages of motor homes, underneath outside chairs, branches of shrubs and screened porches. Brown widow spiders (latrodectus geometricus) can vary from light tan to dark brown or almost black, and like the black widow, might have colorful markings white, black, yellow, brown and even orange on the their abdomen. Although the bite of widow spiders is much feared, these spiders are generally shy and nonaggressive and will retreat when disturbed. Bites usually occur when a spider becomes accidentally pressed against the skin of a person putting on clothes or sticking their hands in recessed areas or dark corners. According to experts, the brown widow venom is twice as potent as black widow venom, but they inject less, are very timid and do not defend their web. The brown widow is also slightly smaller than the black widow.Routine cleaning is the best way to protect your home from widow spiders. Wear gloves in areas where these spiders might be present. A thorough vacuuming is an effective way to removes spiders, egg sacs and webbing. The vacuum bag should be removed when you are nished and placed in a sealed plastic bag for disposal. Where spiders are numerous, spot treatment of a residual insecticide to small areas can be effective. Perimeter sprays around the foundation might provide some relief but rapidly degrade in sunlight and do not minimize pesticide exposure to people and nontarget organisms. Children, the elderly and anyone who has a compromised immune system are at risk from brown widow spider bites. The two major symptoms of a brown widow bite are pain and a red mark at the site. Occasionally, a strong reaction to these bites requires hospitalization. Symptoms of a severe reaction include pain, rigidity in the muscles of the abdomen and legs, swelling, nausea, vomiting and a sharp rise in blood pressure. If you exhibit these symptoms, seek medical help immediately.By Frank Sargeantfranksargeant@bellsouth.net Fishing for sea trout, redsh and mangrove snapper in freshwater rivers and creeks seems an endeavor doomed to success because both are saltwater sh. But for a few months each year, there are many locations miles from the Gulf where the briny species are not only possible but likely catches. No one is sure why the coastal species move into the rivers in winter. Some theorize that springs keep these ows warmer than the salt ats, and others suggest that the tannin stain of most Florida rivers acts as a heat sink on sunny days. Theres also a theory that the cold-blooded sh move into the river to get away from warmblooded bottle-nose dolphins, which can easily run down the lethargic sh during cold weather on the ats. Whatever the reason, the sh do migrate to the rivers, usually beginning around the 1st of November and remaining there into March. The movement is not limited to the Panhandle; coastal sh all the way down into the Everglades make the migration. But its most pronounced from Tarpon Springs north and west because of the colder winters here. Panhandle waters noted for producing good winter action, moving east to west, include the St. Marks River, Ochlocknee River and the Apalachicola River. Off West Bay, Crooked Creek and West Bay Creek sometimes hold sh. And the long stretch of the dredged Intracoastal Canal all the way to Choctawhatchee Bay is all worth probing. At Choctawhatchee Bay, the feeder rivers in the east end are all winter possibilities, including Black Creek, Indian Creek, Mitchell River and Choctawhatchee River. Farther west on the bay, Lafayette Creek and Alaqua Creek, Basin Creek, Rocky Bayou and Garnier Creek are worth checking. And at Pensacola Bay, both Blackwater Bayou and Escambia Bayou are likely. On all these waters, the sh tend to settle into deep, rocky holes. They gradually push inland with succeeding cold fronts; the rst hole near the mouth might be smoking hot after the rst big November front but might be empty a few weeks later as the sh move farther upriver. Its not uncommon for saltwater species to be found ve miles or more from the nearest saltwater by Christmas, and there theyll stay until the rst bright days of spring. Dredged canals, spring seeps, ship turning basins and other deep holes also attract winter sh, as does the deep water under some residential docks. Its a matter of prospecting until you catch that rst sh, then anchoring down to work the schools. On the bayous, the cuts where creeks ow in often produce. Winter sh tend to be lethargic, and running down fast-moving articial lures, as they will in summer, is not on the program. Live shrimp are the universal tender for winter reds, trout and snapper; tail-hooked on a size 1 or smaller hook, with a small split shot added to get it to bottom, this bait is shed at a crawl. Adding a sliver of fresh-cut shrimp to a quarter-ounce jig with a paddle-tail plastic grub can also work well. Keep the cut shrimp small, just enough to add scent; a piece about the size of a pencil eraser is all it takes, thus one shrimp can provide a dozen tips. Shrimp imitations can also be effective. The DOA shrimp does the job when shed just like the real thing, as do many versions of Berkley GULP!, also shed dead slow so that the scent can reach the sh. The advantage of these lures is that they will not be nipped off the hook by the many pinsh and crabs also in the rivers in winter. Its also possible to catch trout, sometimes very large trout, by shing a slow-sinking plug like a 52M Mirrolure very slowly through the holes. Slow in winter is a whole new dimension, though. A slight twitch every 5 seconds or so, just enough to indicate life as the bait slowly drifts downward, is all it takes. Its a good idea to sh these lures on braid with a two-foot clear uorocarbon leader; the braid will help you feel the very faint tick thats all the indication you might get of a strike from these lethargic but hungry sh. On Escambia and Blackwater bayous, some anglers do well on trout by shing soft jerkbaits on lightly weighted hooks in the creek channels that cut through the bayou ats. Winter shing is a matter of prospecting until you strike gold. Once youre in the right spot, shing is generally fast and easy, so keep moving, and eventually your bait will land in shy soup.Spas for shThe cooling water from power plant outows, which might stay close to 80 degrees all winter, is another winter sh magnet; the plume might extend for over a mile and create a shy spa that draws sh so long as bay waters are chilly. The best-known of these areas in the Panhandle is the Steam Plant Canal at Warren Bayou, a famed winter spot for West Bay anglers, producing everything from trout, jacks and reds to the occasional tarpon throughout the winter. Its a catch-and-release-only area from Nov. 1 to the end of February, but well worth the visit. The Crystal River Nuclear Plant draws anglers from all over the West Coast on the rst big cold fronts of the year, and the waters there are jammed with everything from blacktip sharks, sheepshead, jacks and tarpon to the more common reds, trout and mangrove snapper. And the TECO plant on Tampa Bay is a noted winter spot for cobia and also holds winter Spanish mackerel, snook and permit all warm-weather species. In all these locations, its hard to beat a section of fresh shrimp shed on a quarter to three-eighths-ounce jig head with a wide-gap hook. Bounce the jig across bottom for reds, trout and jacks, or crawl it for sheepshead.Panfish of waterSilver trout and sand trout are species largely ignored for most of the year because there are larger and more prestigious species easily caught during the temperate months. In winter, though, silvers and sands can sometimes be the only game in town. Even on the day after an icy cold front blows through a time when most species hunker down on bottom and seem to wait for the wind to stop blowing these pansh continue to bite. And because theres no size limit and no bag limit, anglers who want a sh fry have good reason to target these little guys. Silvers look much like a spotted sea trout without the spots. They are closely related to the sand trout, which also has no spots, and are sometimes found in the same areas in winter. Dr. Bob Shipp, author of Guide to Fishes of the Gulf Of Mexico, notes that silvers are usually found in deeper water than sand sea trout and run a bit smaller silvers rarely exceed 12 inches, while sand sea trout often reach 15 inches. Silver or sand, they both eat shrimp like crazy, and both tend to school up in the bottom of dredged channels inshore the deeper the better during winter. You can often nd them on a depthnder. They look like a ball of bait huddled close to bottom. All it takes to catch them is a piece of fresh-cut shrimp, about an inch long, on a size 2 hook, plus enough weight to quickly get the bait to bottom. Some anglers hang three hooks on one rig and reel them up three at a time. Its also possible to catch both species by vertical jigging with a Hopkins Shorty spoon, half-ounce or heavier; simply drop it down into the sh, ip it up a couple feet, let it drop again and reel up your catch. Cleaning these sh is a matter of a couple of quick passes with a llet knife. Trim off the rib cage, strip off the skin by working the knife at between skin and meat on the cleaning board and youre done. Theyre usually just the right size to create instant sh ngers; dip them in seasoned meal and drop in hot cooking oil until they turn golden brownthey are tender, light and delicious, really one of the best-eating sh in the Gulf, and yet largely ignored by most anglers.Fish head inland in cooler months MEL KELLY | Special to the TimesBrown widow spider eggs BUDsS N bBUGsSBeware of brown widowsPage 8 Spe PE CIAl L TO THe E TT Imes MESFrom top, redsh are one of the primary winter targets for winter anglers. They often enter back bays, slougs, coastal rivers and creeks and settle into deep, rocky holes where water is warmer than that they can nd on the ats. Live shrimp are the universallyuseful winter bait, available at bait shops when catching your own baitsh may be difcult. And nearly all sh that enter panhandle bays and creeks in winter readily eat shrimp. Sand trout and the similar silver trout are also frequent winter catches, particularly in deeper channels. A small piece of fresh shrimp is usually the best bait.Email outdoors news to times outdoors@star.com OUTDoo OO RSwww.apalachtimes.comSection A

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Thursday, November 10, 2011CARRABELLE A A PALAc C HIc C OLA SP O RTs S www.apalachtimes.com APage 9SectionBy David AdlersteinTimes City Editor The Seahawk varsity football team will conclude its 2011 season this Friday at South Walton eld, where theyll battle a team also known as the Seahawks. We encourage all of our faithful fans to travel to watch the game this Friday night, on U.S. 331 just minutes north of U.S. 98, said Franklin County coach Josh Wright. Kickoff is set for 8 p.m. EST. Wright said the football team used the much-needed bye week to heal and return to fundamentals. The coach and staff spent several days in full gear working the key elements to play winning football, that is blocking, tackling and running. The workouts were high energy and the players responded well to the physical challenges of the drills we presented, said Wright. One of the drills entitled escape from Baghdad pitted teams of three against other teams of three in a game of blocking, avoiding blocks and avoiding being tackled. The drill is also limited to a 5-by-10 yard area and made for many big hits and aggressive maneuvers. The team of Chase Golden, Ladarius Rhodes, Cole Lee and Brennan Walden were the top performers for obvious reasons, said Wright. These guys have been the strong side line and the strong downhill runner a major part of the season. The coach said South Walton has a collection of hard-nosed ballplayers, though they have struggled to collect their rst win. Their single wing offense, similar to the one that gave our squad ts against Wewa, will be challenging to slow down and our goal is to make them punt more than we have to punt, said Wright. Our team is looking at this game as a onegame season and a chance to nish out on a high note. We have challenged our players to bring their A game Friday night and defeat a hungry team at their place in front of their fans, he said. Our staff is proud of how our players have regrouped and get ready to play our nal game of the season.Seahawks eye win in season naleSome 44 golfers turned out the weekend of Oct.2930, at St James Bay Golf Course for the Battle of the Bay 2011 golf Tournament sponsored by St James Bay Golf Resort, Must See Magazine, Centennial Bank and other local businesses. Twosome rst place winners of the four ights, from left, are Let it Fly ight: Charlie Jackson, Calvary, Ga., top, and Mitch Stephens, Havana, front, with 143; Tee It High ight: Ben Holland, Panama City, top, and Bobby Cooley, of Mobile, Ala., front, with 140; The Players Flight: Larry Dempsey, top, and Bert Smith, front, both of Panama City, with 144, and the top scoring twosome of The Dogs Flight: Chris Hanna, top, and Jason Steel, front, both of Tallahassee, with 128.Golfers compete in Battle of the Bay By David AdlersteinTimes City Editor Saturday mornings 5K Redsh Run was t for a king. A King Retsyo, that is. In red, owing cape, and Tshirt and gym trunks to match, Ottice Amison, 39, became the rst king in history to run in the race that begins and ends near the front of the Gibson Inn and winds through the historic neighborhoods of the city. He didnt do badly, running a 28:20, after last competing, sans cape, three years ago. But the crown of victory went to two Tallahassee runners who nished atop the eld. Joel Piotrowski, 42, a control room operator at Florida State Universitys National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, nished with a time of 18:11 to lead the eld of about 120 runners. Leading the eld of female runners was 20-year-old Sam Fortunas, who posted a time of 21:29. This cold air has got my lungs burning, Piotrowski said, as he cooled down following the race. It was good, perfect weather. This is like the rst cold run of the year for us. The bodys not quite used to it. Piotrowski, who last ran two years ago in the Redsh Run, stayed on St. George Island with his brother, Kenny, and Lauren Levi, a scientist at the Apalachicola Rational Estuarine Research Reserve. Piotrowki pulled away from runner-up Charlie Taylor, 52, of Nashville, Tenn., to secure the win. The victory came after a strong performance in his rst Boston Marathon, where he ran a 3:13:40. Fortunas, a Florida State senior who stayed on the island all summer, ran part of the way with Eastpoint running enthusiast Hobson Fulmer, until the very end, when he pulled away. A major in international affairs, art history and Arabic, Fortunas is a top mountain biker at FSU, after running cross country and the 400 meters at Lincoln High School. Shes the daughter of Jody and Steven Fortunas, and the granddaughter of Joseph and Mary Fortunas, from Apalachicola, part of a long legacy dating back to Greek sponge divers who immigrated here. In fact, her grandfather was born in the building that now houses Up the Creek restaurant. Its really great to have heritage here, she said. Its a good feeling to come from a small town. Fortunas said the race was awesome. It was cold, but I felt strong. Now Ive started winning races, so Im really happy. Also pleased with her performance was Apalachicolas Cassie Gary, who set a personal best with a 27:56, two minutes under her goal of beating 30 minutes. Dr. Nancy Chorba, who now lives in Tallahassee, ran a 29:45, but was topped by daughter Marena Benoit, 12, who ran a 24:26. Benoit nished tops among girls age 12 and under, just as Ryan Putz, grandson of Cliff and Denise Butler, did among the boys age 12 and under. Fulmer was the top local male nisher, with Lindsey Bockelman best among the local women runners. Charlie Taylor was best male in the Masters division, and Judy Graham was the best female. Crisp morning greets Redsh runnersPhotos by DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The TimesWinners of the Redsh Run were Joel Piotrowski and Sam Fortunas, right. Below, The 2011 Redsh Run eld. Bottom right, King Retsyo nears the nish line.

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LocalA10 | The Times Thursday, November 10, 2011 Monticello, Ga., novelist Ted M. Dunagan will sign copies of his three youngadult books at Downtown Books from 1-3 p.m. this Saturday, Nov. 12. Dunagan was named 2009 Georgia Author of the Year for A Yellow Watermelon, his debut novel about Ted and Poudlum, a white boy and a black boy who live in the rural, segregated South of the 1940s. The following year, Watermelon appeared on the Georgia Center for the Books list of Great Books Young Georgians Should Read, and its sequel, Secret of the Saltifa, was published by New South Books. In Trouble on the Tombigbee, the friends cross paths with the Ku Klux Klan and accidentally learn the identities of prominent Klansmen. Tallahassee author Adrian Fogelin writes that with deft and precise language, Ted tells a story that is both beautifully wrought and unsparing in its portrayal of all that was good and bad in Dixie. Downtown Books is at 67 Commerce St. For more information, call the bookstore at 653-1290.By Caty GreeneSpecial to the Times The Apalachicola Municipal Library has just nished another successful book sale at the 48th annual Florida Seafood Festival, and PALS, the Friends of the Library, netted over $500. Books are donated to the library all the time. Some are added to the collection, others are stored for this annual sale. Weeding out the collection, the removal of older, low-circulating books creates additional books to be put up for sale. Now that the sale is over, the library has decided, for the second year, to make the remaining books available for free. Close to 30 boxes of books are now in front of the library and are free. Patrons and community members are welcome to come and take a bag or two while they last. It is our strong belief that there is a reader for almost every book, no matter the subject, and while some may be a little older, they all deserve a home. There are audio books too, in both cassette and CD formats, so come by and check them out! It would not be possible to earn this money or appropriately dispose of all these donated books without the help of staff and especially volunteers. Board members of PALS, who invested their time and effort, include President Butch Foust and secretary Gail Carpenter. Library board members chairwoman Susan Clementson, previous chair Denise Roux and Fred Flowers were also essential. Others who helped this year include Polly Holmes (representing the family), Celia Winterringer (who also volunteers on the automation project), Deborah Miller and Lorraine Ford on Friday. Saturday volunteers included Carol and Mark Goodwin, Michael Billings and Iain Brown. Also thanks go to Tracey Stanley and his crew from the Bay City Work Camp who moved the books last week to the festival grounds, and of course all the kind friends of the library who constantly donated books. Keep them coming. One last thanks to those who bought the books, both locals and festival visitors. The booth was busy almost all day for two days. So be sure to come by and take advantage of these free books, and think about volunteering for our next sale. We may try to have another one the weekend of Tour of Homes in May stay tuned. Caty Greene is the librarian for the Apalachicola Municipal Library. To reach her, call 6538436.@THE LIBRARY Caty GreeneAcclaimed novelist to sign booksDid I mention we have free books? TED DUNAGAN YOUTH from page A7Josiah sent his servants with the nances needed to rebuild the temple of the Lord, which indicates it had become rundown and ill-repaired. While they were rebuilding the temple, they found the Book of the Law. The high priest gave the book to Shaphan, the secretary, and he read from it to the king. When the king heard the words of the Book of the Law, he tore his robes. II Kings 22:10-11 says He gave them these orders. Go and inquire of the Lord for me and for the people and for all Judah about what is written in this book that has been found. Great is the Lords anger that burns against us because our fathers have not obeyed the words of this book; they have not acted in accordance with all that is written there concerning us. Josiah was a young man who knew nothing of Gods Word because it had been hidden from his people for many years. It is hard to imagine the Bible not being readily available yet it only takes one Godless generation to change the outcome of our country. In Romans 1:2832, we are given a clear picture of the consequence of not choosing to retain the knowledge of God. With much power comes much responsibility and we are accountable for preserving and relaying this information to our youth. It behooves us, then, to humble ourselves before the offended Power, to confess our national sins, and to pray for clemency and forgiveness. President Abraham Lincoln, 1863. We welcome all suggestions and hope you enjoy this weekly article. Please send all emails to Scott Shiver at frontline247@mac.com. Saturday night, festival organizers were satised their gamble to ante up a signicantly bigger chunk for entertainment this year paid off. We were very, very, very pleased, said John Solomon, president of the all-volunteer festival board. Its exactly what we expected. With nal attendance and revenue gures still rolling in, Solomon estimated more than 30,000 people attended the two-day affair, up from last year by about 5,000 and just a hair more than a few years ago. It seemed as if everything was high-class and smooth sailing, with no incidents to speak of, as national oystershucking champion Mike Martin repeated as the festivals shucking champ, and the oyster eaters again guzzled down their dozens, and the newly expanded crab race track rumbled with the banging of boisterous kids for each heat. It was, by all accounts, a fabulous affair, especially since high winds blew over two tents Thursday night, and readjusted a couple of others. We had fun Thursday night, said Solomon. We were down there until 3:30 a.m. By Friday morning, though, all was ready for local day, a slow-moving, lazy day of hometowners hanging out, to spend time together more than lots of money. The shrimp boat Buddys Boys from Wards and Sons Seafood again led the afternoons Blessing of the Fleet, with this years Miss Florida Seafood Christina Pateritsas and King Retsyo Ottice Amison looking ravishing, and regal, respectively, as they waved from the bow. Giving voice to the blessings were Dr. John Sink, a retired Methodist pastor and Navy captain, and the Revs. Craig Hicks, from Living Waters Assembly of God, Martha Harris, rector of Trinity Episcopal, and Themo Patriotis, from First United Methodist Church, his son Micah bearing the crucifer. Chris Clark played bagpipes. Apalachicola Mayor Van Johnson welcomed the king and queen, who signaled the start of the festivities. He then received on the citys behalf the dedication of a newly refurbished Battery Park pavilion provided by the festival board. Solomon presented the mayor a plaque to afx to the 20-by-20 feet illuminated structure. On Saturday morning, following the Redsh Run (see story, Page A9), a crowd lined U.S. 98 to watch the passing of the magnicent, motley parade that has marked each of the 48 consecutive annual festivals. This year there were about 90 entries, pictures of which can be viewed by visiting the photo gallery at www. apalachtimes.com.Shuck em fast, eat em slowFresh from a record-setting performance at the St. Marys Oyster Festival in Maryland, the festivals 2010 shucking champ Mike Martin made it look easy, as he cruised to a win, edging out longtime festival champion Scotty OLear, who pocketed $100 for second, and Jordan Todd, from the Indian Pass Raw Bar, who earned $50 for third place. Martin dropped one and picked it up and still nished it before everyone else, said Solomon. Thats who you want representing you. Local Earl Solomon, who nished out of the money, was awed by the professionals prowess. I just shuck em for fun, he said. Martins victory, which earned him a second straight trip to the internationals in Galway, Ireland, came just a few weeks after he set a national record in Maryland, shucking 24 oysters in under two minutes, and then with penalty time added on, nishing with a 2:17.05 time. The oysters here today were big, and when the oysters are bigger they are tougher to get into than the smaller ones, he said. Its totally FEStTIVAL from page A1See FEs STIVAL A14 DD AVID AA DLERs S TEIN | The TimesThe Carrabelle Church of God handled shucking duties.

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Trades & Services CALL TODAY!653-8868 GET YOUR AD INTrades & Services Laban Bontrager, DMD Monica Bontrager, DMD 12761 Pea Ridge Road Bristol, Florida 32321TELEPHONE (850) 643-5417 Bristol Dental ClinicDENTURE LAB ON PREMISESSame Day Service on repairs and Relines Don Lively General Contractors C Visa, Discover, and American Express Honored at Participating Ace Stores JACKSONS Building Supplies & Auto Repair Carrabelle 697-3333 We Deliver Anywhere J Hardware and Paint Center PILE DRIVING FOUNDATION/PILING REPAIR DOCK/MARINE WORK MOORING BOUYSOFFICE: 850.227.1709FAX: 850.762.2552 CELL: 850.527.5725 HOWARD227FAIRPOINT.NET ROBERTS APPLIANCE REPAIR ALL MAJOR BRANDS 18 Shadow Lane Apalachicola, FL 32320 Phone: (850) 653-8122 Cell: (850) 653-7654 spouses and parents of military members who have fallen in combat, can receive a free lifetime family annual entrance pass. This recognition is but a small token of the appreciation due to those who have sel essly served this country and its citizens. said Florida Park Service Director Donald Forgione.Dont miss Fall Festival, Veterans Day parade SaturdayDouble the fun, with a fall festival and Veterans Day parade this Saturday, Nov. 12. Participate in childrens and family games or just relax and enjoy the never-ending array of foods plus listen to live entertainment, featuring CR 67 Band, Not Quite Ready Band, Greg Kristofferson, Evelyn McAnally, Shirley Cox and Chuck Spicer plus various local singers singing you love most gospel, country, pop and the 50s. The Free Fire dance team will also be performing. Discover the talent of local artists and crafters. Dont miss the auction! And get your arms in shape for the horseshoe, bocce and shuf eboard tournaments. There will be a fun cake walk, 50/50 cash drawing and a Thompson muzzleloader raf e plus more. And lets not forget this is a day to honor our veterans for their sacri ces. Breakfast will be served from 7:30-9:30 a.m. at the Carrabelle Senior Center. The parade starts at 10 a.m. on Highway 98 and the festival starts at 9 a.m. at the Senior Center. For more information call 697-4195 or shirleycox210@gmail. com. Sponsored by the Franklin County Senior Citizens Council, this event is funded in part by the Franklin County Tourist Development Council, Progress Energy and Centennial Bank.Juvenile Justice Council to meet MondayThe Juvenile Justice Council will meet Monday, Nov. 14 from noon to 1:45 p.m. at Water Street Marina. All are welcome to attend: For further information please contact Chairperson Carol Bar eld at 653-2784,Apalachicola Legionnaires to host veterans dinnerAmerican Legion Post 106 will host a covered dish dinner at 6 p.m. on Thursday, Nov. 17 at the Post headquarters, 801 U.S. 98, in Apalachicola. All veterans are invited to come and enjoy. For more information, call Larry Hale at 653-5817.Are you ready to quit smoking?If youre ready to quit smoking now, then attend the Big Bend Area Health Education Centers free class/support group here in Franklin County. Quit Smoking Now offers a curriculum developed by ex-smokers for those who want to become ex-smokers themselves. There is no cost to attend, and free nicotine patches are offered, while supplies last. The six Apalachicola sessions begin Monday, Nov. 14 and run through Monday, Dec. 19, at the George E. Weems Memorial Hospital Conference Room, 135 Ave. G. The sessions meet weekly on Mondays at 6 p.m. The six Carrabelle sessions begin Wednesday, Nov. 16, and run through Wednesday, Dec. 21, at the Franklin County Public Library Carrabelle Branch, 311 Saint James Ave. These sessions meet weekly on Wednesdays at 5 p.m. For more information, please contact Jowita Cichy at 850-509-6614 or Calandra Portalatin at 850-224-1177 and at cportalatin@bigbendahec. orgall (850) 229-5600. NEWS BRIEFS from page A3Law EnforcementThe Times | A11Thursday, November 10, 2011 DRIVER UNHURT IN AIRPORT RD. MISHAP By Lois SwobodaThe Times On Sunday, Oct. 30 at about 4:50 p.m., a 2008 GMC Yukon driven by Laurie Varnes of Apalachicola left the southbound lane of Airport Road near Cleve Randolph Field, just north of Brownsville Road, and traveled about 15 feet in a southwesterly direction before falling nose rst into a ditch and hitting a sandbar eight feet down at the bottom, according to the report by Florida Highway Patrol Trooper Thomas Stone. Varnes told investigators she was returning home from a walk on the track at Donnie Wilson Field when she began to feel lightheaded, and pulled on to the grassy shoulder and blacked out, waking up only after being tended to by rst responders. Varnes, who was treated and released at Weems Memorial Hospital, was not cited in the incident. Pictured above, at left, is Deputy Alan Ham. The following report is provided by the Franklin County Sheriffs Of ce. Arrests are made by of cers from the following city, county, and state law enforcement agencies: Apalachicola (APD), Carrabelle (CPD), Florida Highway Patrol (FHP), Franklin County Sheriffs Of ce (FCSO), Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC), Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP), Florida Department of Corrections (FDOC), Florida Division of Insurance Fraud (DIF) and Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (FDACS). All defendants are considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law.Nov. 1Richard L. Holley, 38, Carrabelle, Alachua County warrants (CPD)Nov. 3Victoria L. Estes, 25, Eastpoint, violation of probation (FCSO) John E. Evans, 44, Carrabelle, grand theft of a motor vehicle (FCSO) Bradley R. Cardin, 18, Eastpoint, violation of a pre-trial release injunction (FCSO) James R. Yancey, 31, Tallahassee, two counts of Bay County failure to appear (FCSO) Asia N. Whitley, 18, Port St. Joe, violation of probation (FCSO)Nov. 4Daniel Page, 34, Apalachicola, domestic battery (APD) Jessica R. Cumbie, 21, Port St. Joe, battery (FCSO)Nov. 5Teressa M. Nunnery, 41, Lynn Haven, DUI and refusal to submit to breath test (FCSO) Laura J. ONeal, 34, Carrabelle, disorderly intoxication (FCSO) Robert Z. Thompson, 28, Eastpoint, failure to appear (FCSO Lawrence E. Nowling, 26, Eastpoint, violation of probation (FCSO)Nov. 6Henry A. Shiver, 29, Eastpoint, driving while license revoked habitual (APD)Nov. 7Christopher D. Parmele, 45, Carrabelle, Gulf County warrant for withholding child support (FCSO) Robert F. Millender, 23, Carrabelle, domestic battery (CPD) Heather L. Hicks, 24, Apalachicola, grand theft (APD) Amaury A. Peral, 27, Yonkers, N.Y., domestic battery and failure of a sexual offender to report (FCSO) Amy A. Putnal, 18, Carrabelle, domestic battery (CPD) Arrest REPORT

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A12| The Times Thursday, November 10, 2011 CLASSIFIEDS ToPlace Your Classified ad inCall Our New Numbers Now!Call: 850-747-5020 Toll Free: 800-345-8688 Fax: 850-747-5044 Email: thestar@pcnh.com thetimes@pcnh.com theAPALACHICOLA & CARRABELLETIMES CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW 35898T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.: 2009-CA-000404 BANKUNITED, AS SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO BANKUNITED FSB, Plaintiff, vs. LUCIA A. GLEATON A/K/A LUCIA ANN GLEATON; JEREMY J GLEATON JR; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; THE TOWNHOMES OF ST. GEORGE HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC; UNKNOWN TENANT #1 IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY; UNKNOWN TENANT #2 IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY; Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated September 27, 2011, and entered in Case No. 2009-CA-000404, of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for FRANKLIN County, Florida. BANKUNITED, AS SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO BANKUNITED FSB, is Plaintiff and LUCIA A GLEATON A/K/A LUCIA ANN GLEATON; JEREMY J GLEATON JR; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; UNKNOWN TENANT #1 IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY; THE TOWNHOMES OF ST. GEORGE HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC; are defendants. I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at ON THE FRONT STEPS OF THE COURTHOUSE, AT 33 MARKET STREET, APALACHICOLA IN FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, at 11:00 am, on the 16th day of November, 2011, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 8, BLOCK 1 OF THREE HUNDRED OCEAN MILE, PHASE 2, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 5, PAGE (S) 32, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. A person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 11th day of October, 2011. Marcia M. Johnson As Clerk of said Court By: Michele Maxwell As Deputy Clerk This notice is provided pursuant to Administration Order No. 2.065. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to provisions of certain assistance. Please contact the Court Administration at 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, FL 32320, Phone No. (904) 653-8861, Extension 106 within 2 working days of your receipt of this notice or pleading, if you are hearing impaired, call 1-800955-8771 (TDD); if you are voice impaired, call 1-800-995-8770 (V) (Via Florida Relay Services). Submitted By: Kahane & Associates, P.A. 8201 Peters Road Suite 3000 Plantation, FL 33324 (954) 382-3486 Fax: (954) 382-5380 Nov 3, 10, 2011 35659T FRANKLIN COUNTY LANDFILL HOSTS HOUSEHOLD HAZARDOUS WASTE ROUNDUP Friday, November 18, 2011 Franklin County Central Landfill will hold its Fall household hazardous waste roundup located at 210 Highway 65 Eastpoint. Items allowed Paint, household chemicals, fluroescent tubes, oil, batteries, electronics and computers will be collected and disposed of at no charge. ConditionallyExempt small quantity generators (Small Businesses, Schools, Growers, and Etc.) Will be accepted at a reduced rate. Hours of Collection 9:00 a.m. til 12:00 p.m. For more information contact: Franklin County Solid Waste & Recycling Department 850-670-8167. October 27, November 10, 2011 35940T IN THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 07-436-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, Plaintiff, vs. STEPHANIE HOWARD SANDERS and JOEY EUGENE SANDERS, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pusuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated October 24, 2011, and entered in Civil Action No. 07-436-CA of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein the parties were the Plaintiff, CENTENNIAL BANK, and the Defendants, STEPHANIE HOWARD SANDERS and JOEY EUGENE SANDERS, I will sell to the highest and best bidder, for cash, at 11:00 a.m. (Eastern Time) on the 6th day of December, 2011, at the front steps of the Franklin County Courthouse, Apalachicola, Florida, the followingdescribed real property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: Lots 1, 2, & 3, Block 232 of Greater Apalachicola, a subdivision of the City of Apalachicola, Florida, as per map or plat thereof in most common use in the Office of the Clerk of Court, Apalachicola, Florida. The successful bidder at the sale will be required to place the requisite state documentary stamps on the Certificate of Title. DATED this 24th day of October, 2011. Hon. MARCIA JOHNSON Clerk of the Court Franklin County, FL By: Michele Maxwell As Deputy Clerk Nov 3, 10, 2011 35960T IN THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 11-68-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, Plaintiff, vs. THOMAS M. LEWIS and ANN M. LEWIS, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated October 24, 2011, and entered in Civil Action No. 11-68-CA of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein the parties were the Plaintiff, CENTENNIAL BANK, and the Defendants, THOMAS M. LEWIS and ANN M. LEWIS, I will sell to the highest and best bidder, for cash, at 11:00 a.m. (Eastern Time) on the 6th day of December, 2011, at the front steps of the Franklin County Courthouse, Apalachicola, Florida, the following-described real property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: Lots 1 and 2, Block 64, St. George Island Gulf Beaches, Unit No. 5, a subdivison as per map or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 3 at Pages 16 and 17 of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida; and Lot 34, Block 10 West, St. George Island Gulf Beaches, Unit No. 1, a subdivision as per map or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 2 at Page 7 of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. The successful bidder at the sale will be required to place the requisite state documentary stamps on the Certificate of Tide.

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, November 10, 2011 The Times | A13 Earn College Degree Online *Medical Business, *Criminal Justice. Job Placement Assistance. Computer available. Financial aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 866-467-0054 www.CenturaOnline.com Security + Clean UpsBy Appointment only. Call (850) 670-1567 5 days wk, 24 hrs day Valid DL. Clean bkgrnd & references. Will provide Elderly Care/Child Care. 850-593-0007 Airlines are hiring Train for hands on Aviation career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified. Job Placement Assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-206-9405 RowellAuctions.com BALLROOM215 BankForeclosed PropertiesONLINE BIDDING AVAILABLE!Alabama, Georgia, Florida & South CarolinaMany Selling Absolute! 1347 Alligator Drive Alligator Point, FL Unit C-429 of the Carrabelle Boat Club Ass.at 1570 Hwy 98 W.,Carrabelle, FL 438 Mill Road, Carrabelle, FLSelling from St. James Golf Resort 151 Laughing Gull Rd, Carrabelle, FLNovember 15 -:6:00 p.m.Rowell Realty & Auction Co., Inc. 10% Buyers PremiumAU 479, AB 296 800-323-83882042252 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322850-697-9604 850-323-0444 www.seacrestre.com PROPERTY MANAGEMENT AND RENTALSRENTALS2 BR 1 BA UNFURNISHED HOUSE Downtown, LR, DR, Storage Room .................$6501 BR 1 BA UNFURNISHED HOUSE .....$500DOWNTOWN RIVER CONDO, BOAT SLIP3 Night Minimum .......................$105 PLUS DAILYPIRATES LANDING 1 BR CONDO/POOL3 Night Minimum .......................$105 PLUS DAILY3 BR 3 BA FURNISHED CONDOLong Term, Pool..............................................$8502 BR 1 BA FURNISHED APARTMENTDen & Living Area ..........................................$5503 BR 2 BA FURNISHED CONDO Boat & Car Parking ..............................$850 WKLY3 BR 1 BA FURNISHED APARTMENTPet Friendly ...................WKLY & MONTHLY RATES 1 br, 1 ba, with full kitchen and living room Call for information 850-653-6103 Studio Apt. Furnished Upstairs studioQuiet location, water & electric incl. Walk to downtown. $700 mo + dep. No pets. For appt 653-9116 or 320-1174 St. George Island $160 wk, Electric, Satellite, Garbage incl. pool tble. 12X65 deck w/Beautiful view 850-653-5114 1 or 3 BRCH/A in Apalachicola, FL. 850-643-7740. Apalachicola, FL Property11th Street Lot 4, Block 150, $24,000 or $4,000 Down Payment, Financed at $445/Mo., R-1 Zoning Call 850-264-6239 or 850-566-2273 Text FL83345 to 56654 Mobile Home lots with w/s $10,000 with Mobile home that needs work $13,000. Also Mobile home with lot in good shape $25,000. Owner Financing available 806-618-1977 Text FL84594 to 56654 3 br, 2 ba, all appliances included W/D, CH&A, on 1 acre. $75,000 OBO. Call 850-653-5111 Text FL85503 to 56654 1 bedroom, Apalachicola, quiet, 2 blks from boat ramp, screen porch W/D, AC, pet OK, $600 month + first, last & deposit. Please Call 850-697-5000 Other homes available. Text FL85610 to 56654 Heritage Villas and Southern Villas of Apalachicola ApartmentsAccepting applications for 1, 2, & 3 br HC & non-HC accessible units. Some rental assistance may be available. HUD vouchers accepted. Call (850) 653-9277. TDD/TTY 711. This institution is an equal opportunity provider, and employer. Publishers NoticeAll real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on a equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. CITY OF APALACHICOLA JOB OPPORTUNITYThe City of Apalachicola is now accepting applications for one position in the Water and Sewer Department. This position includes, but is not limited to, working with the eld workforce focused on maintenance of the Citys water distribution and sewer collection infrastructure. Salary $28,000+ with good bene t package. Applications can be obtained from and should be returned to City Hall, 1 Bay Avenue, Apalachicola, Florida. Contact City Hall at 850-653-9319 for further information. Position is open until lled. Fax and Email applications will not be considered. The City of Apalachicola is an equal opportunity, fair housing employer and drug free work place. The Apalachicola Bay Charter School (ABC School) is accepting applications for the following position:Teacher AssistantPlease send resume to: Chimene Johnson, Principal ABC School 98 12th Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320 or email to abcschool@live.comEqual Opportunity Employer HELP WANTEDWarehouse /Delivery BADCOCK & MORE Eastpoint, FL(850) 670-4334 DATED this 24th day of October, 2011. Hon. MARCIA JOHNSON Clerk of the Clerk Franklin County, FL By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk Nov 3, 10, 2011 36000T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR GULF COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 10-28-CA FLORIDA BANK, a florida banking corporation, Plaintiff, vs. GULF PINES, LLC, a Florida limited liability company, JEFFERY WYATT CROOMS, aka JEFFREY W. CROOMS, an individual, STANLEY N. CROOMS, an individual, MICHAEL HUTTO, an individual, and UNKNOWN OWNERS/ TENANTS IN POSSESSION, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that, pursuant to that certain Amended Final Summary Judgment as to Counts I, II and IV of Plaintiffs Complaint and for Attorneys Fees and Costs against Defendants entered in the above-styled cause on October 31st, 2011, the Clerk shall sell the property situated in Gulf County, Florida, described as: Exhibit A Lot 16, Fico 1, according to the map or plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 6, Page 9, of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. Lot 16, Gulf Creek Phase 1, according to the map or plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 7, Page 1 and 2, of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. Lot 21, Gulf Creek Phase 1, according to the map or plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 7, Page 1 and 2, of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida Lot 13, Fico 1, according to the map or plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 6, Page 9 of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida, a portion of which was replatted as Gulf Creek Phase I, recorded in Plat Book 7, Page 1 and 2, of the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida. at public sale held at the Gulf County Courthouse, 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr., Boulevard, Port St. Joe, Florida 32456, at 11:00 a.m., on December 8, 2011, to highest and best bidder for cash, except as set forth herein. DATED on 31st day of October, 2011. REBECCA L. NORRIS As Clerk of the Court By: BA Baxter As Deputy Clerk IF THIS PROPERTY IS SOLD AT PUBLIC AUCTIONS, THERE MAY BE ADDITIONAL MONEY FROM THE SALE AFTER PAYMENT OF PERSONS WHO ARE ENTITLED TO BE PAID FROM THE SALE PROCEEDS PURSUANT TO THIS FINAL JUDGMENT. IF YOU ARE A SUBORDINATE LIENHOLDER CLAIMING A RIGHT TO FUNDS REMAINING AFTER THE SALE, YOU MUST FILE A CLAIM WITH THE CLERK NO LATER THAN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU FAIL TO FILE A CLAIM, YOU WILL NOT BE ENTITLED TO ANY REMAINING FUNDS. IF YOU ARE THE PROPERTY OWNER, YOU MAY CLAIM THESE FUNDS YOURSELF. YOU ARE NOT REQUIRED TO HAVE A LAWYER OR ANY OTHER REPRESENTATION AND YOU DO NOT HAVE TO ASSIGN YOUR RIGHTS TO ANYONE ELSE IN ORDER FOR YOU TO CLAIM ANY MONEY TO WHICH YOU ARE ENTITLED. PLEASE CHECK WITH THE CLERK OF THE COURT LOCATED AT 1000 CECIL G. COSTIN SR. BLVD., PORT ST. JOE, FL 32456; (850) 229-6112, WITHIN TEN (10) DAYS AFTER THE SALE TO SEE IF THERE IS ADDITIONAL MONEY FROM THE FORECLOSURE SALE THAT THE CLERK HAS IN THE REGISTRY OF THE COURT. IF YOU DECIDE TO SELL YOUR HOME OR HIRE SOMEONE TO HELP YOU CLAIM THE ADDITIONAL MONEY, YOU SHOULD READ VERY CAREFULLY ALL PAPERS YOU ARE REQUIRED TO SIGN, ASK SOMEONE ELSE, PREFERABLY AN ATTORNEY WHO IS NOT RELATED TO THE PERSON OFFERING TO HELP YOU, TO MAKE SURE THAT YOU UNDERSTAND WHAT YOU ARE SIGNING AND THAT YOU ARE NOT TRANSFERRING YOUR PROPERTY OR THE EQUITY IN YOUR PROPERTY WITHOUT THE PROPER INFORMATION. IF YOU CANNOT AFFORD TO PAY AN ATTORNEY, YOU MAY CONTACT LEGAL SERVICES OF NORTH FLORIDA AT 2119 DELTA BOULEVARD, TALLAHASSEE, FL 32303, (850) 385-9007, TO SEE IF YOU QUALIFY FINANCIALLY FOR THEIR SERVICES. IF THEY CANNOT ASSIST YOU, THEY MAY BE ABLE TO REFER YOU TO A LOCAL BAR REFERRAL AGENCY OR SUGGEST OTHER OPTIONS. IF YOU CHOOSE LEGAL SERVICES OF NORTH FLORIDA FOR ASSISTANCE, YOU SHOULD DO SO AS SOON AS POSSIBLE AFTER RECEIPT OF THIS NOTICE. NOTICE TO PERSONS NEEDING SPECIAL ACCOMMODATIONS AND TO ALL HEARING IMPAIRED PERSONS: Persons with a disability needing special accommodation in order to participate in a court preceeding at any courthouse or court program, should within two (2) days of receipt of notices, contact Court Administration to request such an accommodation. Please contact the following: Court Administration, P.O. Box 826, Marianna, Florida 32447; Phone: 850-718-0026; Hearing & Voice Impaired: 1-800955-8771; Email: ADA Request@jud14.fl courts.org. Nove 10, 17, 2011 36187T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CENTENNIAL BANK, as successor in interest to GULF STATE COMMUNITY BANK, Plaintiff, vs. MARK M. CARRELL and KELLEY S. CARRELL, husband and wife, LINTON B. EASON and JENNY C. EASON, husband and wife, Defendant(s). CASE NO.: 11-000130-CA NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE is hereby given that, pursuant to the Order of Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure in this cause, in the Circuit Court of FRANKLIN County, Florida, I will sell the property situated in FRANKLIN County, Florida described as: Lots 4, 5, 6, 7, 19 and 20 in Block 3 Gulf Terrace, a subdivision as per map or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 3, Page 3, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. AND Lot 3, in Block 4 East, of St. George Island Gulf Beaches, Unit No. 1, according to the plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 2, at Page 7, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. at Public Sale, to the highest bidder, for cash, at the steps of the Franklin County Courthouse, Apalachicola, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on December 6, 2011. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court this 24th day of October, 2011. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk Steve M. Watkins, III FBN: 0794996 41 Commerce Street Apalachicola, FL 32320 (850) 653-1949 November 3, 10, 2011 36327T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 11-135-CA CAPITAL CITY BANK, Plaintiff, vs. BARBARA STOKES; VILLAGE GREEN BY THE SEA SUBDIVISION PROPERTY OWNERS ASSOCIATION; and UNKNOWN TENANTS, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-styled cause, in the Circuit Court of Franklin County, Florida, I will sell the property situate in Franklin and Gulf Counties, Florida, described as: Franklin County Properties: Lot 41, VILLAGE GREEN BY THE SEA-PHASE II, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 8, Page(s) 17, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. Lot 40, VILLAGE GREEN BY THE SEA-PHASE II, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 8, Page(s) 17, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. Gulf County Property: Lot 18 and a portion of Lot 19, Block 4, WARD RIDGE FLORIDA UNIT TWO according to the plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 2, Page 4, In the Public Records of Gulf County, Florida, being more particularly described as follows: Begin at the North corner of Lot 19, Block 4, WARD RIDGE FLORIDA UNIT TWO; thence along the North boundary line of Lot 18, N84E, 127.87 feet to the iron rod and cap marking the Northeast corner of said Lot 18; thence along the East boundary line of said Lot 18, S20E, 105.34 feet to an iron rod marking the Southeasterly corner of said Lot 18, said corner being on the Northerly right of way line of Ramsey circle and a non tangent curve concave to the Southeast; thence Westerly along said right of way line, along said curve, having a radius of 40.00 feet, a central angle of 116 for an arc length of 81.34 feet (chord to said curve bears S65W, 68.03 feet); thence leaving said right of way line S87W, 102.47 feet to a point on the West line of Lot 19; thence along said West line N00E, 117.17 feet to the Point of Beginning. at public sale, to the highest bidder, for cash, at the front door of the Franklin County Courthouse, Apalachicola, Florida at 11:00 a.m., on December 6, 2011. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, other than the property owner, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Marica M. Johnson Clerk of Circuit Court By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk November 10, 17, 2011 36237T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CENTENNIAL BANK, as successor in interest to WAKULLA BANK, Plaintiff, vs. TIMOTHY D. SMITH Defendant(s). CASE NO.: 11-000168-CA NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE is hereby given that, pursuant to the Order of Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure in this cause, in the Circuit Court of Franklin County, Florida, I will sell the property situated in Franklin County, Florida described as: Lot 45, Block A, Lanark Beach, Unit No.1, a subdivision as per map or plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 2, at Page 13 of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. at Public Sale, to the highest bidder, for cash, at the steps of the Franklin County Courthouse, Apalachicola, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on December 7, 2011. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court this 25th day of October, 2011. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk Steve M. Watkins, III FBN: 0794996 41 Commerce Street Apalachicola, FL 32320 (850) 653-1949 November 3, 10, 2011 36299T LEGAL NOTICE Notice is given pursuant to Florida Self-Storage Facility Act, Florida Statutes, Chapter 83, Part IV that Franklin Mini Storage will hold a sale on: NOVEMBER 19, 2011 at 10:00 at 1627 US 98, Carrabelle, Florida 32322 of the contents of mini-warehouse(s) containing personal property of: Terry Proctor Angela Yearwood Martin Raulerson Nicole Carpenter Before the sale date of November 19, 2011, the property may be redeemed by payment in cash or money order of the outstanding balance and cost by mailing it to Post Office Box 139, Carrabelle, Florida 32322, or by paying in person. November 3, 10, 2011 36393T Notice for Early Public Review of a Proposal to Support Activity in the 100-Year Floodplain and Wetland November 10, 2011 Responsible Entity: City of Apalachicola 1 Avenue E, Apalachicola, FL 32320 Telephone Number 850-653-9319 To: All Interested Agencies, Groups, and Individuals This is to give notice that the City of Apalachicola received a Community Development Block Grant (CDBG funds) from the Florida Department of Community Affairs/Department of Economic Opportunity (DEO). The funding is provided by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and will be used to construct streetscape improvements and a public restroom in the downtown area. This notice is required by Section 2(a)(4) of Executive Order 11988 for Floodplain Management, and by Section 2(b) of Executive Order 11990 for the Protection of Wetlands, and is implemented by HUD Regulations found at 24 CFR 55.20(b) for the HUD action that is within and/or affects a floodplain or wetland. Construction will be undertaken in the 100 year floodplain. The City of Apalachicola is interested in alternatives and public perceptions of possible adverse impacts that could result from the project as well as potential mitigation measures. Proposed improvements located within the floodplain area include construction of a public restroom, sidewalk and landscaping improvements, lighting, and burying electric underground on Market Street, Commerce Street, Avenue E, and 8th Street, and possibly Water Street, Avenue F and Avenue G. These locations are already developed, with the exception of some sidewalk and lighting locations on Water Street, 8th Street, and Avenues G and F. The additional impervious surface resulting from the possible construction of new sidewalks is minimal. The proposed improvements will enhance local business and tourist use of the downtown area, and will improve pedestrian safety. Written comments must be received by Deborah Belcher, Grant Administrator, at 5378 Carisbrooke Lane, Tallahassee, FL 32309 or debroumelis@earthlink.net on or before November 28, 2011. Additional information may be obtained by contacting Ms. Belcher as above, or by telephoning 850-893-0694. Van W. Johnson, Sr., Mayor Environmental Certifying Official November 10, 2011 Incorrect Insertion PolicyFor Classified In-column AdvertisersAll ads placed by phone are read back to the advertiser to insure correctness. The newspaper will assume correctness at the time of the read-back procedure unless otherwise informed. Please your ad. Advertisers are requested to check the advertisement on the first insertion for correctness. Errors should be reported immediately. Your Florida Freedom newspaper will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion, nor will it be liable for any error in advertisements to a greater extent than the cost of the space occupied by the error. Any copy change, during an ordered schedule constitutes a new ad and new charges. We do not guarantee position of ANY ad under any classification. Publishers Notice SCAM To avoid possible scams, it is recommended that consumers should verify caller information when receiving calls regarding credit card payments. Consumers should also contact the local company themselves instead of giving this information to individuals whom are contacting them directly. English Bulldog PuppyAkc Register, 11 weeks old, has all shots, health certificate, health guarantee, vaccines up to date & all worming, ready for new home. Cost $800. More info: candows@live.com (941) 585-0554 Kittens free to good home, Call (301) 377-2128 or (850) 697-2453 Apalachicola 352 Brownsville Rd, Friday 8:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. Saturday 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.; Clothes, TV, Recliner, entertainment center, treadmill, Ab Lounger, and junk!!! Mexico Beach 42nd St. Hwy 98 from Tyndall, right on 42nd sSr. Nov 12th, 9 Eastern 8 CentralHuge clearing out saleAntiques, 50s porcelain enamel kitchen table, Books, Clothing, dishes, yard & home, art, drafting table, truck, nautical, John Perry, toys, furniture, Christmas Wanting to Buy House trailer FRAMES 60 to 70 long. with or without axels. Call 850-653-5114 Bi Athlete looking for training partner. No Pseudo athletes. 850-447-0691 Install/Maint/Repair Part Time position available forGeneral Maint/Techposition for 32 Unit apt complex in Carabelle. Must have own tools and pass background & drug test. General knowledge of HVAC, plumbing, and electrical req. Painting a plus. Apply at 807 Grey Ave. #33, Mon, Tue, Thur, Fri. 8-5pm. Or call 697-2017 EOE/DFWP

PAGE 14

LocalA14 | The Times Thursday, November 10, 2011different in Ireland the oysters are about the same size as ours, but theyre really thin and theyre really brittle. OLear, 44, whos been shucking for 30 years and been at 19 festivals, bristled at the suggestion his years of winning national championships were over. I dont think Im washed out, he said. Im helping them set the mark for what they need to be. We try to give oysters a good reputation. In the oyster-eating contest, it was Apalachicola native, now Mississippi resident, Gaston Pace who took the crown by gorging 23 dozen oysters, and then slipping away afterwards to settle things with his stomach. In second place, with 13 dozen and two eaten, was Charles Simpkins, from Indian Valley, Va., who inched out third place Eric Merrill, from Morgantown, N. C. who downed 12 dozen and seven. In the womens division, six-time champion Angie Harnage, from Conyers, Ga., gobbled to victory by eating 10 dozen and three, pulling ahead of runnerup Judy Smith, of Dothan, Ala., who ate eight dozen and two. It was well short of her record of nearly 15 dozen, but Harnage said her style of slow, slow again served her well. Let everybody else throw them up, she joked. As the crowd grew, the food booths kept doing well. The sheriffs ofce sold out its smoked mullet and dip by mid-afternoon, as the Carrabelle Church of God was a non-stop shucking crew of half-shell delights. The Eastpoint Church of Gods gumbo was again a hit, as they doubled their stock from last year, sold it out, and then had to cook more in their tent. Living Waters church fried up more than 700 pounds of mullet, and the high schools junior class made a pretty penny on their fried shrimp and oysters. The fourth grade class did Lowcountry boil, the Methodist churches oyster stew and shrimp corn chowder, the Band of Sisters softball team chicken strips and chili cheese fries, each doing well. As did the smaller booths, which included Weems hospital and the schools baseball, softball and nutrition programs. At the ve crab races, Amison handled tonging duties of wayward crustaceans, while the entrants in the new expanded track smacked the wood to help propel their crab down the track to be rst to the nish line. Ashley Thornton, from Trenton, was tops among the 400 votes in the new photo contest, her picture of the St. George Island sunset taking top honors.No T-R-O-U-B-L-E at concertThe festival came to an enthusiastic conclusion with Tritts show. From the moment he burst on stage in skintight black leather, following a taped introduction by Larry the Cable Guy, to his return for an encore 90 minutes later in sleeveless T-shirt and a hand-thrown leather hat, he showed the style and versatility that has him on a trajectory towards legendary. Switching seamlessly from electric to acoustic guitar, he went well beyond his repertoire of the hits he made famous, including TR-O-U-B-L-E, Heres A Quarter (Call Someone Who Cares), Foolish Pride, Its A Great Day To Be Alive, and Country Club among others. Backed up a superb band of musicians, Tritt also covered several well-known songs: the Eagles hit Take It Easy that he rst recorded for a tribute album in 1993; Sam and Daves soul ballad When Something Is Wrong with My Baby; Johnny Cashs Folsom Prison Blues, and, as part of his encore, Willie Nelsons Mammas Dont Let Your Babies Grow Up to Be Cowboys, complete with a gleeful imitation of Nelsons trademark nasal tone. The show had the crowd begging to be tossed guitar picks, drumsticks or even, as Tritt concluded, one of a pair of sweat-soaked T-shirts he hurled to the clamoring fans. Whether the festival will be able to continue to afford such big-name entertainment remains to be seen. We want to continue with the good concerts but we dont want to put anything out there, said Solomon. We want to bring in the best we can with the amount we can afford. Our local real estate experts have identied what they feel are the best values around and are oering them to you in Real Estate Picks! (In this section), Discover the best real estate values in Mexico Beach, Port St. Joe, Apalachicola, Cape San Blas, St. George Island, Carrabelle and surrounding areas. Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Real Estate Picks John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.comMLS#238697$84,000Lanark VillageWATERFRONT LOT IN LANARK50 ft water frontage directly on the St. George Sound. Close to Lanark Boat Club & launch area as well as all Lanark amenities are available, St. James Golf Course & Restaurant are close by. Nows the time to buy! Listed by Janie Burke John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.comMLS#245456$139,000St. George IslandST. GEORGE PLANTATIONOne of the best one acre 2nd tier lots in the Plantation. Good elevation. One story house is in place on 1st tier lot in front of this one. Located in Pebble Beach Village on Forsythia Court, its adjacent to a lovely sand path leading to a boardwalk to the Gulf. Truly a beautiful lot! dbutler@coastalcoverage.com Locally owned and operated to meet all your insurance needs WEEKLY ALMANAC APALACHICOLA CARRABELLETIDE TABLES MONTHLY AVERAGESTo nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from these given for APALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW Cat Point Minus 0:40 Minus 1:17 East Pass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27 To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from those given for CARRABELLE: HIGH LOW Bald Point Minus 9:16 Minus 0:03 Sponsor the WEEKLY ALMANACCall Today!653-8868Date HighLow% Precip Thu, Nov 1068 3920% Fri, Nov 1166 44 0% Sat, Nov 1268 54 0% Sun, Nov 1374 56 0% Mon, Nov 1476 5810% Tues, Nov 1577 5630% Wed, Nov 1675 5630%11/10Thu01:35AM 1.7 H 09:53AM -0.1L 05:15PM 1.5 H09:18PM 1.3L 11/11Fri02:03AM 1.7 H 10:25AM -0.2L 05:54PM 1.5 H09:47PM 1.3L 11/12Sat02:34AM 1.7 H 10:55AM -0.2L 06:33PM 1.5 H 10:19PM 1.3L 11/13Sun03:10AM 1.7 H 11:27AM -0.2L 07:13PM 1.5 H 10:55PM 1.3L 11/14Mon 03:50AM 1.7 H12:01PM -0.1L 07:53PM 1.4 H11:40PM 1.3L 11/15Tue04:34AM 1.6 H12:41PM -0.1L 08:34PM 1.4 H 11/16Wed 12:36AM 1.2 L 05:26AM 1.6H 01:27PM 0.0 L09:13PM 1.4H 11/10Thu12:10AM 2.7 H 07:40AM -0.2 L 03:50PM 2.4 H 07:05PM 2.1L 11/11Fri 12:38AM 2.7 H 08:12AM -0.3 L 04:29PM 2.4 H 07:34PM 2.1L 11/12Sat 01:09AM 2.7 H08:42AM -0.3L 05:08PM 2.4 H08:06PM 2.1L 11/13Sun 01:45AM 2.7 H 09:14AM -0.3L 05:48PM 2.4 H08:42PM 2.1L 11/14Mon 02:25AM 2.7 H09:48AM -0.2L 06:28PM 2.2 H09:27PM 2.1L 11/15Tue03:09AM 2.6 H 10:28AM -0.2L 07:09PM 2.2 H10:23PM 1.9L 11/16Wed 04:01AM 2.6 H 11:14AM 0.0L 07:48PM 2.2 H11:37PM 1.8 L FESTIVAL from page A10 Photos by DAVId D AdAD LERSTEIn N | The TimesThe crab races drew boisterous children. Enjoying a carnival ride. ABOVE: A food vendor serves up crawsh. RIGHT: Travis Tritt closes the festival with a rockin concert. Tritt sang from his wide repertoire of hits, including T-R-O-UB-L-E, Heres A Quarter (Call Someone Who Cares), Its A Great Day To Be Alive, and Country Club, and then sang some older, more classic tunes.