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The Apalachicola times
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100380/00147
 Material Information
Title: The Apalachicola times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: H.W. Johnston
Place of Publication: Apalachicola Fla
Apalachicola Fla
Publication Date: 10-06-2011
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1885.
General Note: Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 32911693
lccn - sn 95026907
System ID: UF00100380:00147
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Preceded by: Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by: Apalachicola herald

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xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx 50 WWW.APALACHTIMES.COMP hone: 850-653-8868 W eb: apalachtimes.com E -mail: dadlerstein@star.com Fax: 850-653-8036 C irculation: 800-345-8688 Opinion ............ A4 Society ............ A6 Faith .............. A7 Outdoors ........... A8 Sports ............. A9 Tide Chart ......... A11 Classieds ...... A12-A13 DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK: School News & Society: 11 a.m. Friday Real Estate Ads: 11 a.m. Thursday Legal Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classied Display Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classied Line Ads: 5 p.m. Monday Contact Us Out to see Index By David Adlerstein Times City Editor It is a matter of speculation whether former state inmate Nor man Bill Williams, who absconded Sept. 24 from woods around East point after being left by state pro bation ofcials to camp on govern ment land, will commit the kind of terrible crime that marked him as a sexual predator. It is, however, a matter of fact the 56-year-old ex-con, still at large, has a long record of car thievery, armed burglary and aggravated assault. And had absconded once before when place on conditional release. First imprisoned at age 30 for grand theft auto, six years after being placed on probation for bur glary, Williams spent a big chunk of his adulthood in state prison, rst beginning in 1985 and running through 1993, with fewer than two years free during that time. In addition to car theft, he earned convictions for grand theft, burglary of an occupied dwelling, escape, aggravated assault with a weapon and armed bur glary, all before age 40. After staying out of prison for nearly three years, Williams was back behind bars in 1996, this time on a charge for cocaine possession. He did nearly three years for that. Hes been in trouble his entire life. Hes a dangerous man, said former Franklin County sheriffs deputy A.J. Smith, who remembers the 1987 escape that landed Wil liams back in prison after he was allowed to work as a trusty at the county jail. He drove out in an other deputys personal vehicle. He not only stole the car, he escaped from the jail as well, said Smith, who pursued the eeing prisoner through dirt roads and the BoxR Ranch toward Port St. Joe. I had to threaten to shoot him to get him to stop, he said. He told me if he could get that shotgun hed shoot me with it. Im not criticizing any judges, but he should be locked up. Hes a dangerous person; hes a bad guy, said Smith. The crime that led Williams to be labeled a high-risk sexual pred ator took place in 1994, during the time he was out of prison. But the case was prosecuted more than a decade later, during a seven-year stretch when he was free following his cocaine-related incarceration. A 17-year-old female relative came forward in August 2004 to tell county law enforcement Wil liams sexually assaulted her when she was age 5, in Apalachicola. He would come into her room and ask her to play with him, reads the probable cause afda vit. He wanted her to touch his private parts and he would ask to touch hers. After telling her all kids played this once they got to a certain age, Williams engaged in heavy sexual fondling and petting with the girl, about twice a week, every other week, nearly always at night. No allegations surfaced of sexual in tercourse. Thursday, October 6, 2011 V O L. 126 ISSUE 23 Eds. Note: This is the rst in a series of articles about area cemeteries titled Eter nity at East End. By Lois Swoboda Times Staff Writer The Isle of Rest Cem etery, just east of the Car rabelle city limits, began as an informal burying place for African Ameri cans. How long the site has been in use as a burial ground is unknown. The marker bearing the earliest death recorded memorializes Webster Goosby, who died at 16 in 1906. The stone also bears the names Jane and Queen Debow and Robbie Ward, who died between 1923 and 1937. The next oldest marker belongs to Frank Miller, who died in 1920. The epitaph on the stone reads An American Woodman. The Modern Wood men of America was an insurance and fraternal society founded by Jo seph Cullen Root in 1883 in Iowa, its membership initially limited to white men between 18 and 45 living in the healthi est states; the Dakotas, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Mis souri, Minnesota, Ne braska, Ohio, and Wis consin. A member could not work as a railway brake -By David Adlerstein and Lois Swoboda Times Staff Writers Franklin County com missioners, furious over the county health depart ments sudden decision to temporarily close the Carrabelle clinic, voted unanimously Tuesday morning to freeze the $146,000 they have allo cated to fund the facility. By a 4-0 vote, with Commissioner Smokey Parrish absent due to attendance at a seafood conference, the commis sioners froze the funding as part of a weeklong ef fort to address the clo sure of the Carrabelle fa cility, effective Oct. 11. The commissioners also voted unanimously to approve having County Attorney Michael Shuler write a letter to Florida Surgeon General Dr. Frank Farmer, outlin ing their objections to Commissioners fume over clinic closing Isle of RestBy Lois Swoboda Times Staff Writer On Wednesday, Sept. 29, the Franklin County Re publican Party welcomed Congressman Steve South erland (R-Panama City) to Apalachicola with a gala fundraiser at the Coombs Armory. More than 100 guests dined on crawsh mufns and shrimp and grits from the Hole in the Wall Res taurant, topped off with ba nana pudding from Thats a Moray. Florida State Repre sentative Jimmy Patronis, Rep. District 6, introduced the keynote speaker, prais ing his integrity and cour age. Steve is a person who represents our values and conscience, he said. When he votes, he does it from the heart. He doesnt Southerland rallies county Republicans Absconded sexual predator has long record NORMAN BILL WILLIAMS See PREDATOR A2 Eternity at East End LOIS SWOBO D A | The Times A large crowd attended last weeks delegation hearing.See CLINIC A12 See SOUTHERLAND A5 The oldest resident of Isle of Rest may be Mrs. Sallie Walker, who survived to be almost 104.PHOTOS BY LOIS SWOBO D A | The Times Many tombstones in Isle of Rest are homemade.See ETERNITY A10 LOIS SWOBO D A | The Times Steve Southerland Wild one in Wewa, A9 Eastpoint, Island host Saturday festival The Franklin County Oyster Festival this weekend, Oct. 7-9, in Eastpoint and on St. George Island will highlight the countys seafood heritage. Enjoy educational displays and demonstrations; 5K run; an afternoon of childrens fun and a shing tournament. Seafood will be served, with a concert Friday and Saturday evenings, and two daytime concerts on Sunday. Included in the fun is We Love Eastpoint Day at the new Patton Street pavilion, complete with oysters, a shucking tournament, treasure pit, free hot dogs, information booths, and entertainers on Saturday starting at 10 a.m. and continuing up until the shing tournament weigh-in at 4 p.m. For information, contact the islands visitor center 9277744.Orphaned wildlife benet Saturday On Oct. 8, the third annual Woodstork Festival takes place from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. at 3Y Farm, 195 Harvey Young Farm, Crawfordville, 32327. Admission is $5. Enjoy a silent auction featuring art, theme park admissions and more and a live auction from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Music lineup is Ralph Pelletier, Swingin Harpoon Band, Mimi and the HearnDogs, Sarah Mac Band and Rick Ott Band. All proceeds go for care and feeding of injured and orphaned wildlife. For more information visit www. woodstorkfestival.com. Carrabelle Lions Club golf tourney Oct. 15 On Saturday, Oct. 15, the Carrabelle Lions Club will hold their second annual tournament at St. James Bay Golf Resort to benet the hearing and vision impaired. Shotgun start at 11:30 a.m. Cost is $100 per player; four-player teams with an 18-hole Florida scramble. A silent auction and banquet will follow the tourney. Cost of the banquet is $25. For more information, call 697-9507. Blessing of the Animals Saturday On Sunday, Oct. 9, St. Patricks Catholic Church and Trinity Episcopal Church will hold a Blessing of the Animals ceremony in Gorrie Square at 4 p.m. Everyone welcome.

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Local A2 | The Times Thursday, October 6, 2011 At Vision Bank We continue to offer Quality Bank Products & Services FREE of charge! Checking No balance & No service charge FREE Online Banking FREE Online Bill Pay FREE Use of Your Debit Card* FREE Excellent Service Member FDIC EQUAL HOUSING LENDER 1 (866) 334-2200 www.VisionBank.net Habitat for Human ity of Franklin County elected officers at its Sept. 13 meeting. Pam Ashley, long-serving vice chair, received the votes to become Habitats new chairperson. She replac es Skip Frink, who will remain on the board of directors in other roles. Ella Bond, of Apala chicola, who has served in committee chair ca pacity for family selec tion and family support, received the nod for vice chair. Cliff Butler, trea surer, retained his role, and Lori Switzer will re main in the position of board secretary. Habitats regular monthly meeting in Oc tober will be the annual public general meeting, to be held at the East point Fire House, on the corner of 6th Street and CC Land Road, on Tues day, Oct. 11, from 6-7 p.m. The board will review past performance and forecast the future of its building work in Frank lin County. At this yearly public event, the Habitat board holds an open forum, to discuss past progress, future plans and volun teer opportunities and make nominations to the board of directors. The Franklin County affiliate of the Atlantabased Habitat for Hu manity International has been operating only since 2004. This years general meeting will take place at the East point fire house, on the corner of 6th Street and CC Land Road. Habitat regulars make it clear that their mission is not one of charity to those with open hands. Rather, the catchphrase A hand up, not a hand out explains that the group seeks to assist those who have already been helping themselves to the extent of their tal ents and capabilities. Each family must invest 400 sweat equity hours into the building of Habi tat homes, in addition to qualifying under Habitat guidelines of income, work history and credit history. Interested volunteers may visit www.habitat franklin.org for informa tion and a place to sign up for either construc tion or non-construction assistance to Habitat. The website also has information on how you may make other con tributions, and has info on our events ahead. The ReStore, at the old Apalachicola school lo cation on 14th Street, has bargain-priced goods of all kinds and accepts tax-deductible donations of all kinds of goods. For more information, call 653-3113. Habitat to hold public meeting PREDATOR from page A1 The young woman told the law she never said anything about this moles tation because she was scared of what Mr. Williams may do. She said that when she was 6, Williams told her he was xing to give her a whipping and took her in the room and molested her. When others knocked on the door, suspicious of what was going on, Wil liams told her to make it sound like he was whipping her, reads the afdavit. There were times that Mr. Williams would beat her mother with his st, kick her or beat her with an extension cord and at times would even get a knife and hold it to her in front of them, the young woman told county law enforcement. There was one time that Mr. Williams made her mother sit down in front of them and smoke crack. She said her mother refused but that when she did, Mr. Williams took the can and hit it against her mouth and busted her mouth. The victim of Williams sexual acts said that while she was really scared from witnessing these inci dents, he had never hit her. The allegations surfaced in 2004 after the young wom an conded the details to her counselor, the late Cathy Ake. At the time of his re lease Sept. 24 from Frank lin Correctional Institution, Williams had completed 85 percent of the seven-year sentence, begun Oct. 10, 2006, for this 1994 sexual battery on a victim by one in familial authority. A sec ond charge, sexual battery on a child under age 12, was dropped in exchange for his no-contest plea. First placed on con ditional release supervi sion on April 2, 2010, and assigned to live with the CARE Christian home for men in Tallahassee, Wil liams ed before report ing to his supervising of cer. On June 14, 2010, he was arrested in Morgan City, La., for disturbing the peace. A week later, he was extradited to Flor ida and the Florida Parole Commission returned him to prison. Jo Ellyn Rackleff, a spokeswoman for the Flor ida Department of Correc tions, said the department had no choice last month but to release Williams, even though, shunned by family, he had nowhere to go. So he became one of 99 sexual offenders through out the state unable to nd a residence that conforms with state law, as well as a growing number of city and county ordinances that restrict where they may reside. There are more than 150 separate county and city ordinances in Florida regarding housing for sex offenders that go above what state requires, she said. The state says of fenders can live no closer than 1,000 feet where chil dren congregate, such as in parks, McDonalds, play grounds and schools. Some communities have harsher restrictions, of 2,500 or 3,000 feet. When you draw a circle around where children con gregate, it leaves very, very little space, said Rackleff. He may say I am home less and a probation ofcer will say You have to nd a place to live and that is le gal and where I can check on you for curfew. You cant go to home less shelters because chil dren are there. But they may sleep under a bush with a GPS monitor, she said. Rackleff said the prob lem becomes particularly acute during hurricanes, when sexual offenders can not go to shelters, where there are families. She said the DOC allows them to stay in the visitors area inside of the closest prison to where they reside. Franklin County Un dersheriff Joel Norred said it was actually next to a crooked tree, about a half-mile from the county jail, where state probation ofcials decided Williams could stay. Because of the date when his crime oc curred, probation ofcials were required to place an ankle monitoring bracelet on Williams, which they charged at the county jail. After saying he needed to walk to secure a tent and a sleeping bag, the proba tion ofcials left him, tell ing him to be back at the spot in time for his 7 p.m. to 7 a.m. curfew, part of the terms of his conditional, supervised release. He was going to pitch a tent as he sought perma nent shelter, said Rackleff. That would be the place where we would check to see he was during curfew hours. But by 6:30 p.m., the GPS transponder had ceased emitting a signal, and a visit to the site indi cated Williams had van ished. The charging stand was located at the site, but the monitored tracking device and ankle bracelet have not been located, said Rackleff. To Norred, Williams prison history should have been a clear signal he might ee. If someone has a con ditional release and they are worried about him ab sconding, why would you release him to somewhere where there is no physical address? he said. Why not one of the conditions be you have to have a perma nent address or a sponsor before we can release you? Why not send him to a half way house? I know that may be the law but its not right, said Norred. People are calling us and worried about this guy being in the area and I dont blame them. They released him within a quar ter of a mile of an ofcers house who put him in jail for that charge. And he has kids. The undersheriff also expressed concern that leaving a sexual offender at an unidentiable loca tion undermines the very reason for offender regis tration. If we have a crime in an area, we can go check the sex offenders, where they are, he said. Thats the reason they make them register, so they can keep tabs on them. How are we going to go do that if we dont know where they are in the county? Norred said state proba tion ofcials had the option of registering Williams as a sexual predator when they attached his ankle bracelet. Instead, they afforded him the 48 allowable hours that sexual offenders have until they must register at an approved site, which can include a sheriffs ofce, or with their probation ofcer. They could have asked us to register him when they brought him up here but they didnt, said Nor red. They could have done it the day they him walked out of the gate. Because Williams did not meet the deadline to register, he is being sought on warrants for failing to register and for abscond ing. Hes done this all of his life, said Smith. He com mits a crime, runs away and comes back after it cools off. Hes very smart and very shrewd and I wouldnt put anything past him.

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Local The Times | A3 Thursday, October 6, 2011 Carrabelles new EDC meets today The Carrabelle Economic Development Council will hold its rst public meeting on Thursday, Oct. 6 at 4:30 pm. at the Carrabelle City Complex. This inaugural meeting will establish EDC council procedures and organize for accomplishment of its primary mandate, jobs creation. Everybody is encouraged to attend and share concerns and ideas. For more information, call 697-3618. Friday hearing to address South Shoals settlement The Franklin County Board of County Commissioners will hold a special public hearing on Friday, Oct. 7 at 9 a.m. in the third oor court room of the Franklin County Courthouse, to consider terms and conditions for a potential settlement of a condemnation lawsuit led by Franklin County against Capital City Bank. The hearing will address property in Alligator Point commonly known as the South Shoal subdivision. The county also plans to hold a private meeting with its attorney to discuss settlement negotiations or strategy sessions related to litigation expenditures prior to any public consideration or public vote on the potential settlement. Interested parties may also submit comments in writing to the Franklin County Board of County Commissioners, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, FL 32320. Persons with disabilities requiring special accommodations in order to participate should contact Michael Moron at 6538861, Ext. 100, by 5 p.m. on Thursday, Oct. 6 in advance of the public hearing to request accommodations. The courthouse is handicap accessible Seafood workers to meet Monday The Franklin County Seafood Workers will meet Monday, Oct. 10 at the Eastpoint rehouse, 24 Sixth Street in Eastpoint, at 5 p.m. For more info, call Shannon Hartseld at 6152454. Full Moon Climb at Cape St. George Lighthouse The October Full Moon Climb at the Cape St. George Lighthouse on St. George Island will be held Wednesday, Oct. 12. The Sunset/Full Moon Climb will take place from 6:308 p.m. and will include light hors doeuvres and a sparkling cider toast to the full moon. Cost is $15 for the general public and $10 for members of the St. George Lighthouse Association. The recently opened Lighthouse Museum and Gift Shop will be open from 6-7 p.m. on the evening of the Full Moon Climb. The sun will set at 7:12 p.m. and the moon will rise at 7:23 p.m. on Oct. 12. The October Hunters Moon should be a spectacular sight from the top of the lighthouse. After sunset, people are invited to climb to the top of the lighthouse for a breathtaking view of the full moon, as space and time permit. Cost is $10 for the general public and $5 for SGLA members. The Cape St. George Light is located in St. George Lighthouse Park at the center of St. George Island, where Island Drive (the road off the bridge) ends at Gulf Beach Drive. Parking is available in lots at either side of the park. Because space is limited, reservations are recommended. For reservations or more information, please contact the St. George Island Visitor Center at 850-927-7744 or toll free at 888-927-7744. Gulf-Franklin hosts Medicare seminar When it comes to Medicare coverage and choices, how do you decide? Mainstay Financial Group will present a free seminar to help you learn more on Thursday, Oct. 13 at 10 a.m. at the Gulf Coast State College Gulf Franklin Center in Port St. Joe. Join this seminar to learn the difference between Original Medicare, Supplements, Medicare Advantage Health Plans and Drug Coverage. This seminar is part of the monthly series of free education programs sponsored by Sacred Heart Senior Spirit, a free program for persons 55 and older. Benets include free screenings, seminars, special in-patient benets such as free guest meal tickets and a monthly calendar of events detailing all Senior Spirit events and containing health and event information. For more information or to register for this free seminar, please call (850) 229-5627 or visit www. sacredheartonthegulf.org. Panhandle Players announce new season The Panhandle Players, Inc. is pleased to announce its 2011-12 theatre season. Work, Play, Love An Evening of One-Acts will be at the Dixie Theater in Apalachicola Nov. 18-20. The one-acts are as follows: The Temp written by Roy Friedman and directed by Tom Loughridge; At Half Time written by Art Shulman and directed by Ed Tiley and Caroline Ilardi; and Mark Twains Diaries of Adam & Eve, adapted by David Birney and directed by Dan Wheeler. The second production of the season will be Murder at the Howard Johnson, written by Ron Clark and Sam Bobrick, and directed by Ed Tiley, will be Feb. 3-5, 2012 at the Eastpoint Firehouse. The following weekend, Feb. 10-12, the show will be performed as dinner theater at the Crooked River Grille, St. James Bay Country Club. The Panhandle Players third production, Sex Please, Were Sixty, written by Michael & Susan Parker and directed by Margy Oehlert, will be at the Dixie Theater April 20-22, 2012. Season tickets may be purchased from any Panhandle Players board member, the Butler Agency at 43 Island Drive or by calling 670-5064. Visit the new website at www. panhandleplayers.com. Spooky stories? Times staff writer Lois Swoboda is seeking ghost stories set on the east end of Franklin County, as well as pictures of the cemetery that was once located at the end of Third St. in the area called Popes Mill. If you have pictures or would like to share a story, please contact her at 653-5857 or 653-1819. Your privacy will be protected. We want to share some fantastic news with you about a very important and meaningful youth outreach program that was launched in Franklin County on Wednesday September 28th called FranklinCounty FutureNow. There are not many opportunities to connect with EVERY TEENAGER IN OUR COMMUNITY at one event. The FutureNow daytime assembly was a wake up call to our teens with a message. A clear vision for your life will inspire you to keep from destructive decisions, and help you reach for your dreams and goals! It was well received by the youth, their teachers and school administrators. On Wednesday Night, the Fellowship of Christian Athletes along with your local churches and FutureNow shared with our youth an eternally important message wrapped in an unforgettable presentation. Over 500 were in attendance as students, their families and community folk joined together in a high-energy worship celebration. The FutureNow daytime assembly was made possible through the generous support of our Sponsors! Sincerely, The FranklinCounty FutureNow Team THE NEXT FAITHFUL STEP In these dicult times, there is no investment that could be more important than the hearts, minds and souls of our young people. Everyone in Franklin County can be involved in making FranklinCounty FutureNow an ongoing success through donations and planning for 2012. We feel very strongly that our community and the lives of the students will be changed for the better. Together, we can work to make a lasting impact in the lives of our local teens. Meeting this goal is well within our reach! We are still accepting donations toward our youth program. Our long term goal following our 2011 event is to have our own annual event each fall here in Franklin County. We thank you for joining us in this great cause, because our future is being made NOW! Please send any donations to: FranklinCounty FutureNow P.O. Box 476, Apalachicola Fl, 32329. If you have questions, comments or input please contact one of our FutureNow Team Leaders. Robert Murray 850-210-4129 Themo Patriotis 850-323-0816 Scott Shiver 850-653-6905 Robert C. Bruner Attorney Personal & Business Bankruptcy Over 30 Years Legal Experience 850-670-3030 We are a debt relief agency. We can The hiring of a lawyer is an im News BRIEFS

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Thursday, October 6, 2011 Opinion A4 | The Times USPS 027-600 Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 VP/Publisher: Karen Hanes Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola Times During a recent sleepless night, a John Denver song played softly on the radio while I tried to doze. In todays musical market, it isnt always easy to listen to lyrics, or to appreciate their message or their imagery. But one of the Denver phrases drew a vivid, special picture for me. I know hed be a poorer man if he never saw an eagle y. Those words, from the Rocky Mountain High song and lyrics written by Denver (together with Mike Taylor) reminded me of the natural beauty of the coastal area we call home. How many times have I seen the Eastpoint eagles soar over the highway and waters edge, or wait patiently in the tree watching for me to pass? The sight of them never fails to bring me joy. And I remember other times and places where I have seen far-distant cousins of these local neighbors. In Alaska, we were told to watch through the tour bus windows, hoping to catch a glimpse of a fardistant brown blob with a Styrofoam cup-sized white head perched in a tree. We were never sure we saw anything! Our Eastpoint eagles are so near that viewing is not a challenge but a frequent privilege of that route! Along the upper Mississippi River between Wisconsin and Minnesota, we have seen more than two dozen mature and young eagles at one time, sitting atop melting ice oes feeding in spring. We had traveled north to spend Easter with old friends. We left our southwest Wisconsin home after closing our restaurant business, and traveled through the night. It was just daybreak when we turned a curve and witnessed the truly awesome spectacle of the huge ock on the icy water. Ill carry that spectacular memory with me forever. And then there was yesterdays story, told by a Carrabelle friend, of looking out past her front porch to see four bears walking together down the road in front of her home. Four bears! What a visual gift it was. Our bear sightings on that Alaska trip were at great long distances instead. Too often we see such creatures as nuisances, getting into garbage or bird food we have made too easily available for a bruin smorgasbord. But my friend saw them for the vision of nature that they were, parading by for her eyes only. Have you seen dolphins along our shorelines break water and jump for joy or just to display their presence? Have you seen sharks chase schools of eeing sh? The egrets, herons, cranes and shorebirds that call our sands home bring color and variety and interest for real birdwatchers as well as for we amateurs who just watch them hunt and parade to their march cadence! Fox families live near our Carrabelle home, and although we chose not to feed them, they continue to visit our yard as if to make sure we havent changed our philosophy. And they are reminders of encroachment into territories that were once exclusive to the wildlife, but where now homes and people grow instead. Here in our Wisconsin yard, deer are frequent visitors, and by the color of their coats, we acknowledge the changing of the seasons. The beautiful tawny red of summer has given way to the dull dun of grey brown now, and we all know the chills of night lead into the snows of winter. And so, beauty is there for the visual taking, wherever we nd ourselves in life and passing through. Indeed, I would be poorer had I not seen an eagle y. Thanks for the reminder, John! Mel Kelly is a frequent contributor to the Apalachicola and Carrabelle Tim es. Lifes beauty is there for the taking THOUGHTS FOR THE TIMES Mel Kelly Additional contribution would ensure new library I write in response to Dr. Photis Nichols letter in your Sept. 29 issue concerning the Margaret Key bequest to be used for a larger library in Apalachicola. I, too, had the pleasure of knowing Margaret and her love for the library and the Historical Society. In no way should the bequest made by Margaret Key be used for general city expenses. It may be that her bequest of $400,000 would be inadequate to build a larger new library today or make an addition to the present library. Therefore, I offer this as a possible alternative. Upon myself or Dr. Photis Nichols being assured that the bequest of Margaret Key would be used as she intended, I will contribute an additional $125,000 to her bequest, and then, call upon the more afuent citizens in the area to join with me in to ensure the goal of a better library is accomplished. Yours truly, J. Ben WatkinsCelebrate Residents Rights Month with a visit Floridas Long-Term Care Ombudsman Program is joining Gov. Rick Scott in celebrating Residents Rights Month this October. Residents Rights Month emphasizes the fundamental rights of long-term care facility residents to be treated with dignity and respect, and to have a say in decisions affecting their care. In nursing homes, these special rights range from the right to choose a physician and pharmacy to the right to a 30-day written notice prior to discharge. Residents in assisted living facilities and adult family-care homes have rights that range from unrestricted private communication to reasonable opportunity to exercise and go outdoors at regular intervals. Residents Rights Month is a valuable opportunity not only to educate our communities on the specic set of rights given to residents when they enter long-term care facilities, but also to inform Floridians of the services available through the Ombudsman Program and our team of volunteers. If a long-term care resident ever feels his or her rights are being violated, a volunteer ombudsman can investigate on the residents behalf and seek a resolution. Anyone may contact the Ombudsman Program to submit a complaint or concern on behalf of a long-term care resident. All program services are free and condential. In Florida, there are over 160,000 residents living in long-term care settings. As we celebrate Residents Rights Month, I encourage you to visit someone you know in a long-term care facility, volunteer in a facility, participate in Residents Rights Month events, or inquire about becoming a volunteer ombudsman. Your assistance and attention helps to ensure that the voices of long-term care facility residents do not go unheard and demonstrates to residents that they have not been forgotten. Let us take the time to give something back to a generation that has given so much. Individuals interested in volunteering, learning more about the Ombudsman Program, or learning about scheduled Residents Rights Month activities throughout Florida may call toll-free 1-888-831-0404 or visit http://ombudsman.myorida.com online. Sincerely, Jim Crochet State Ombudsman Department of Elder Affairs (850) 414-2323 www.ombudsman.myorida.com LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Special to the Times The Apalachicola Riverkeeper is among seven member organizations of Save Our Gulf, a collaborative initiative of Waterkeeper Alliance, that Monday released The State of the Gulf: A Status Report from the Save Our Gulf Waterkeepers in the Wake of the BP Oil Disaster. The Save Our Gulf coalition of Waterkeepers also includes Texas Galveston Baykeeper, Lousianas Atchafalaya Basinkeeper, Lower Mississippi Riverkeeper and Louisiana Bayoukeeper, Alabamas Mobile Baykeeper and Floridas Emerald Coastkeeper. The new report documents the progress, current conditions, actions of the Gulf Waterkeepers, and makes recommendations for restoration efforts after the Gulf Coast region experienced the worst environmental disaster in the history of the United States, caused by the fatal blowout on the Deepwater Horizon oil rig. The State of the Gulf highlights the oil contamination found in the water, sediment, seafood, and sea life across the Gulf Coast in the aftermath of the BP Spill. One troubling nding is that contamination in some seafood species may be increasing over time, said Renee Blanchard, Waterkeeper Alliances Save Our Gulf coordinator. We are using this report to hold the oil industry and government accountable for a thorough Gulf Coast restoration. Key ndings of the report indicate: Long-term environmental monitoring is needed The BP oil disaster is ongoing This disaster affects both the nation and the Gulf Coast states There is a critical need for citizen participation in the restoration decision-making process The growing public health concerns in Gulf Coast communities must be addressed All Clean Water Act nes must be dedicated to Gulf Coast restoration The Gulf Region must show leadership by rebuilding, recovering, and restoring sustainability Topics and discussions raised by the report include: Citizen Monitoring: According to the testing results collected and analyzed by the Save Our Gulf Waterkeepers, the proclamation from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration that the Gulf seafood was and continues to be safe for regular consumption may have been premature. Health Concerns in the Communities: Residents who live and work on the water, particularly people in shing communities and the rst responders to the BP oil disaster, are increasingly falling ill. They are being ignored by the BP Victims Compensation Fund and denied health claims by Kenneth Feinberg and the GCCF (Gulf Coast Compensation Fund). These victims are being dismissed and told to seek help elsewhere, without any referrals, suggestions, or support. BPs Public Relations Machine: The great disappearing oil trick: now you see it now you dont! Through a strategic and very expensive public relations campaign, BP has managed to magically convince much of the country into believing the oil is gone. The reality is the oil is not gone, and the long-term impacts are still largely unknown. Leading scientic studies demonstrate that three-fourths of the oil still lingers on the bottom of the Gulf of Mexico, creating an unprecedented and unknown new environmental reality for the Gulf Coast. Where Do We Go from Here? Creating an Action Plan for Recovery & Preventing Future Spills: After a short off-shore oil drilling moratorium, permits are being issued with no signicant technological procedures adopted to prevent future spills of this magnitude from happening again. The BP oil disaster proved the industry and the federal and state government agencies regulating and monitoring these permits were not, and are still not, prepared for oil spills of national signicance. Lessons not learned are bound to happen again. Save Our Gulf believes comprehensive long-term environmental monitoring will be essential to understanding, protecting, and restoring the Gulf Coast ecosystem going forward. To reach the Apalachicola Riverkeeper, call Dan Tonsmeire at 653-8936 or email to dan@ apalachicolariverkeeper.org. Waterkeeper Alliance, a global environmental movement uniting more than 190 Waterkeepers around the world, focuses on citizen advocacy on issues that affect waterways, from pollution to climate change. Follow Waterkeeper Alliance on Twitter at @Waterkeeper and on Facebook. Save Our Gulf releases BP oil spill report Special to the Times Flu season is here, and the Florida Department of Health (DOH) urges residents and visitors to take precautions to help limit their risk of exposure to infection. Compared to most other viral respiratory infections, such as the common cold, seasonal inuenza often leads to a more severe illness, causing approximately 36,000 individuals in the U.S. to die from this infection and its complications each year. The most effective measures we can use to ght this illness and safeguard our communities are getting vaccinated and practicing good hygiene habits, said State Surgeon General Dr. Frank Farmer. Floridians can do simple things to minimize their own risk of exposure to the virus and to prevent its transmission to others if they become ill. If you do these things, you contribute to both your own health and your communitys health. Symptoms of the u that should be monitored include headache, fever, severe cough, runny nose or body aches. Contact your health care provider immediately if symptoms appear. DOH urges the following preventive steps: Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze. Throw the tissue in the trash after you use it. Wash your hands often with soap and water. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer. Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth. Germs spread this way. Try to avoid close contact with sick people. If you or your children are sick with ulike illness, stay home for at least 24 hours after your fever is gone, except if you need medical care. Get re-vaccinated EVERY YEAR because u viruses change. The 2011-2012 u vaccine will protect against inuenza A, B and H1N1. Individuals six months of age and older should get a u vaccination, especially young children, pregnant women, those with chronic health conditions like asthma, diabetes or heart and lung disease and people 65 years and older who are at increased risk for severe u complications. It is also important for health care workers and other people who live with or care for high risk people to be vaccinated. Since children younger than six months are too young to receive the vaccine, people who care for them should be vaccinated instead. To locate available u vaccine in your community contact your healthcare provider or visit the DOH website at www.doh.state..us. Health department urges u vaccine

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Local The Times | A5 Thursday, October 6, 2011 care if he votes 436-to-1. Republican County Com missioner Pinki Jackel also welcomed Southerland. He has the great principles he was raised with, she said. He has wonderful humility. What you see is what you get. When Southerland came to the podium, he began by thanking former Republi can Executive Committee chair Joyce Estes and cur rent chair Kristy Banks for their support. The rest of his speech focused on family values and the importance of the upcoming presidential election. I grew up in the exact environment God intends every child to grow up in a home where a husband and wife love each other even more than they love the children, he told a rapt audience. The perfect en vironment to birth and raise and grow little people is in a home and I dont mean a house. Southerland called for accountability and service from elected ofcials. Ser vant leaders are the highest form of leadership, he said. He said he is optimistic about the future of the Unit ed States. As I travel around the Second District, what I nd amazing is how en gaged the American people are in the workings of their government, said Souther land. People are waking up to the fact that you cannot trust your government. He urged his audience to be involved in government and seek out accountable representatives. Evil is alive and well. The only way that evil will triumph is if good people do nothing, he said. Next year is a crossroads. There will be a mighty clash in November 2012. You must look inward and ask Am I going to do all I can do to pass along the blanket of freedom as a fam ily heirloom to pass along? Southerland asked if there were Democrats in the room. I know some of you are southern Demo crats, he said. The nation al Democratic Party doesnt represent you. Winning new members for the Republican Party was an ongoing theme in Southerlands speech and for the evening. There were copies of instructions on how to change party aflia tion and voter registration forms available at the door. At the end of the evening, Southerland was presented with a framed copy of a sketched portrait, created by artist Leslie Wallace Coon for the evenings program. A gallery of photos from the fundraiser is online at www.apalachtimes.com This is a FREE EVENT Brought to you by the Apalachicola Municipal Library and PALS, supported in part by the Franklin County Tourist Development Council www.anaturalescape.com MULLET DINNERS Donation Only FRIDAY, OCTOBER 7 TH 11AM 1PM First Baptist Christian School 46 Ninth Street, Apalachicola Call 653 540 for deliveries in Apalachicola. LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Liz Sisung presented Congressman Steve Southerland with a framed copy of the evenings program featuring a caricature of Southerland created by Apalachicola artist Leslie Wallace Coon. SOUTHERLAND from page A1 The Apalachicola Municipal Li brarys Friends group PALS (Patrons of the Apalachicola Library Society) is presenting a free day-long program: Autumn Authors in Apalachicola, this Saturday, Oct. 8. The event features Florida Pan handle authors who write about the area through ction and non-ction, and a noted historical ction au thor whose characters would t into Apalachicola circa 1860. Authors will include Apalachicola and Forgotten Coast authors Dawn Radford, Betsy James, Ellen Ash down, Glynn Marsh Alam, Leo Lovell, Beverly Mount-Douds, Michael List er, Jan Aninno, Jack and Ann Rudloe, Richard Bickel and others. In the morning, authors and writ ers will gather at Apalachicolas Raney House to offer their books for sale and autographing. The reprinted Island Light by beloved Apalachic ola author Alexander Key will be for sale by Forgotten Coast Books Susan Wolfe. At 1 p.m. the Apalachicola Mu seum of Art, 95 Fifth St. will feature Robert N. Macomber offering a pro gram: Getting into Character Re searching and Writing Novels around the World. He is an award-winning author, international lecturer, TV commentator, magazine writer, and independent consultant, specializing in maritime subjects. His Honor Series, with protagonist Peter Wake, begins in Civil War Florida and por trays Florida from the 1860s to the turn of the century. He is popular in his native southwest Florida, and his books are a hit at the Apalachicola Municipal Library. He will be preceded by local sto rytellers, and followed by a local writ ers forum, a short program with Mi chael Lister, and an overview of the Florida Book Awards, by winner and childrens author Jan Annino. This portion of the event will end around 5 p.m. The Orman House State Park, 177 5th Street, will host an early evening (around 5:30 p.m.) reception with the authors. Beer and wine will be served with food. There is no entry cost, but donations are requested for bever ages. For information, contact Caty Greene, librarian, at the Apalachicola Municipal Library 653-8436 amlib@ fairpoint.net or p.a.l.s.apalach@gmail. com. Authors in Apalach is sup ported in part by the Franklin County Tourist Development Council. Authors in Apalach set for Saturday Amateur radio op erators from Georgia will transmit worldwide from the Cape St. George Light during the Franklin County Oyster Festival on Columbus Day weekend, adding a special attraction to the event celebrating Apalachicola Bay oysters with food, music, exhibits and childrens activities. An 11-member team from the Kennehoochee Amateur Radio Club near Atlanta will hold their sec ond Lighthouse Expedi tion at the Cape St. George Lighthouse with a goal of making contact with 5,000 HAM radio stations from all over the world. According to team lead er Ricky DeLuco, an ad vance team was slated to arrive on St. George Island on Tuesday, Oct. 4, to begin antenna placement and set up their operations center. A team member will climb to the top of the lighthouse and tie a 5-foot line to the lantern room railing, to which will be attached a wire antenna that will con nect to a nearby high point. The primary antenna will support multiple lines to accommodate additional antennas for round-theclock radio operations. An operations tent will be set up on the lawn next to the lighthouse and visi tors will be welcome to view the activities, listen in on the broadcasts, and learn about HAM radio commu nications. The broadcasts will transmit off special frequencies worldwide. As potentially thousands of HAM operators listen in and respond, their calls will be logged toward the goal of 5,000 contacts. The tent will be accessible as long as weather permits. A 24-hour communica tions center will also be set up in the conference room of the Keepers House, which will be open to the public during normal open hours for the Museum and Gift Shop. The Keepers House is open from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Wednesday, Friday and Saturday, and is closed on Thursday. Operations were to be gin Wednesday, Oct. 5 and continue through Satur day, Oct. 8. The purpose of this event is to promote public awareness of lighthouses and lightships, to publicize the contribution they and their keepers have made to maritime safety, to empha size the need to preserve and restore light beacons as a historical necessity, to promote amateur radio, and to foster international goodwill, DeLuco said. He said that thousands of HAM operators make a special hobby of chasing lighthouses and islands. A website accessible to HAM operators will in clude extensive historical information on the Cape St. George Light, acces sible under the event call sign of K4L. The rst Lighthouse Expedition sponsored by the organization was held in 2010 at the Sapelo Is land Lighthouse on the Georgia coast. The event generated 2,600 radio con tacts and 70,000 hits to the event website, from both amateur and shortwave listeners who also heard the HAM transmissions. The HAM event is be ing held in conjunction with the Franklin County Oyster Festival, which will include festivities on St. George Island and at the Community Pavilion on Patton Drive in Eastpoint. The festival opens with a free concert at St. George Lighthouse Park Friday evening. The Saturday schedule includes a 5K run at St. George Island State Park, a shing tourna ment, food and educational booths in Lighthouse Park and at the Eastpoint Pavil ion, activities and games for children, and a second free concert in Lighthouse Park Saturday evening. The festival concludes with a day of music in Light house Park on Sunday. For more information, visit www.oysterfestivalfc. com or call the SGI Visi tor Center at 927-7744. For more information about the HAM Lighthouse Ex pedition, please call Jim Kemp at 927-2000 or Ricky DeLuco at 770-833-2290. Hams join oysters at island festival

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Y PET OF THE WEEK Franklin County Humane Society Fresh Baked Bread Cheeses Wine Micro Brews Seasonings and Sauces Open Daily 9:00 AM to 7:00 PM (850)927-5039 112 E. Gulf Beach Dr., St. George Island Qualications: Expertise in: Now Accepting Appointments Call Toll Free 888-681-5864 For more info www.seclung.com Lung Disease Specialist Rob Garver, MD Now Seeing Patients in Port St. Joe NOW BCBS-FL I N -NETWORK PROV I DER Megan and Trey tying the knot Saturday The parents of Meagan Segree and Trey Millender are pleased to announce the wedding of their children on Saturday, Oct. 8. The wedding ceremony will be held at Lafayette Park in Apalachicola, beginning at 5:30 p.m. A reception will follow at the Fort Coombs Armory. All family and friends are invited to help celebrate their special day. Happy birthday, Ms. D Sharon Denice Rochelle will celebrate her birthday on Friday, Oct. 7 :-) Happy birthday, and many, many more. Love always, Poppie and GiGi Grandkids Donate and Kyera, aunt Jessie Mae and family Brett Gloner turns 2 Brett Bentley Gloner celebrated his 2nd birthday with a pony party with family and friends. Brett, the son of Michael Gloner of Apalachicola, turned 2 on Saturday, Sept. 24, 2011. He is the brother of Bradley Page and nephew to Aunt Lena, and Ashley, Jelly Bean and Hunter Butler. Paternal grandmother is Judy Hicks of Apalachicola. Happy birthday from Nanny, Daddy and aunt Lena and family. Happy 5th birthday, RJ Raymond Devon West, Jr. turns 5 years old today, Oct. 6, 2011. He is the son of Brandy E. Austin of Apalachicola and grandson of Tammie Croom of Apalachicola and the late James D. Austin. RJ is the brother of Quan Mack and Amontaye Austin, and special nephew to Anthony Croom Jr., Antonio Croom, Antiuania Croom, Regg James and Ann Richards. He is a special godson to Claudette Hamilton of Pensacola and special god-grandson of Madolyn Wallace. We love you, RJ, and wish you many more blessed birthdays to come. Lonnie ONeal turns 6 The parents of Lonnie B. ONeal are proud to announce their son is turning 6 today, Oct. 6, 2011. Lonnie started kindergarten this year and is a happy student in Mrs. Dempseys class. He enjoys spending time with his friends, Christian, Joseph and Anthony. He likes the Seminoles, so he is in the minority in his family of Gators. He looks forward to playing football as a Seahawk when hes old enough. We love you, Lonnie Bear. Jimmy and Peggy Higgins celebrate golden anniversary Jimmy and Peggy Higgins celebrated 50 years of marriage on Saturday, Sept. 24. They were married Sept. 24, 1961, at Carrabelle Methodist Church in Carrabelle by the Rev. Louis Patmore. The Higgins both enjoy shing and beaching with family and friends at their second home on Carrabelle Beach. They have two sons, Jim (Kelly) Higgins, Bainbridge, Ga., and Jack Higgins, Panama City. They are blessed with four grandchildren, Cody, Ryan, Lena and Alex. The family celebrated at Carrabelle Beach. Happy BIRTHDAY Society A6 | The Times Thursday, October 6, 2011 Wedding ANNOUNCEMENTS Enjoying the cool mornings? Makes you feel like getting up and doing something, and the cool weather gives the electric meter a rest. A good, hot breakfast would be nice, and you can get one every Tuesday at the Franklin County Senior Center, 201 Avenue F, in Carrabelle. Serving begins at 7:30 a.m., and ends at 9 a.m. Donations accepted. On Thursdays, we enjoy a good lunch, also at the senior center. Serving begins at noon. When you see a place set up with owers, please do not sit there. The place is in memory of one of our deceased regular guest. Thank you. Its time we gave our faithful volunteers a round of applause. You will see them at the food bank, Lanark Boat Club, the senior center, Chillas Hall, and the thrift shop in the village, and at other functions throughout the county. Yes its true, folks Volunteers Make It Happen! Become one today. Be kind to one another, check on the sick and housebound and smile, Jesus loves you! Until next time, God bless America, our troops, the poor, homeless and hungry. Volunteers make it happen LANARK NEWS Jim Welsh

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Over 100 people gathered on Saturday to remember wildlife biologist Thom Lewis of St. George Island who died in a small plane crash on June 23. The memorial was led by Themo Patriotis, pastor of the United Methodist Churches of Apalachicola and St. George Island. In attendance were Lewis cousin, Charlie Lewis, and wife Michele, with twin daughters Carlee and Chelsea; Lewis younger sister Sally Lewis Seen, and older sister Cathy Thiemens; and his brother Chuck Lewis and wife Patty, with children Tommy, Caitlin and Chucky III. Thoms mother Thela could not attend because she was in the hospital with a broken ankle. During a brief ceremony, friends and family took their place on a bayside sand dune to share stories of Lewis love of Halloween, hunting and nature and sense of humor. A buffet was provided afterwards at the home of Lana and JR Heady who organized the gathering. Terry Kemp of St. George Island acted as cruise director. Lana Heady said they chose the beachside spot for the memorial because Thom spent a lot of time here, mostly with his dogs that he loved so much, Tia and Chessie. When you heard the whistle, you knew Thom was down here. A gallery of the bayside memorial can be viewed online at www. apalachtimes.com. By Lois Swoboda The United Methodist Churches of Franklin County Welcome You First United Methodist Church of Apalachicola Worship Service 11:00 a.m. every Sunday Sunday School 10:00 a.m. 75 5 th St. Apalachicola 653-9530 fumcapalach@gtcom.net Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis Carrabelle United Methodist Church Worship Services 10:45 a.m. Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Celebrate Recovery Mondays 7-9 p.m. 102 NE Ave. B Carrabelle 697-3672 Pastor: Julie Stephens Eastpoint United Methodist Church Worship Service 10:00 a.m. every Sunday Healing service every fourth Monday at 7:00 p.m. 317 Patton Dr. (corner of David St.) 670-8825 Pastor: Rev. Beth White St. George Island United Methodist Church 9:00 a.m. Worship Service 10:00 a.m. Fellowship Hour 201 E. Gulf Beach Dr. 9274635 www.sgiumc.org Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis First Pentecostal Holiness Church 379 Brownsville Road Apalachicola Were excited about what Gods doing!!! Sunday School 9:45 am Sunday Morning Worship 10:45 am Sunday Evening Service 6:00 pm Monday, Youth Group 6:30 pm Wednesday, Royal Rangers, G.A.P. 7:00 pm Wednesday Worship & Word 7:30 pm Nursery Provided during regular church services 7:00 7:00 First Baptist Church St. George Island 501 E. Bayshore Drive 927-2257 R. Michael Waley, Pastor Join us as we praise and worship the living Christ. Great is the Lord and most worthy of praise. Psalm 145:3 Sunday Bible Study ................................................ 10:00am Worship Praise ........................................................ 11:00am Sunday Night ............................................................ 7:00pm Wednesday Power Hour ...................................... 7:00pm Wednesday Youth at S.P.L.A.S.H ....................... 7:00pm Walking in Christ R. Michael Whaley, Pastor WELCOMES YOU Church of the Ascension 101 NE First Street Carrabelle SUNDAY 10:00 AM WELCOMES YOU Church THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH (850) 274-4490 WELCOMES YOU Trinity Trinity Episcopal Church est. 1836 Welcomes You Hwy. 98 & 6th St. Apalachicola 850-653-9550 Sunday Worship Services 8 & 10:30 a.m. Wednesdays Healing Service 11 a.m. Centering Prayer 4 p.m. Faith The Times | A7 Thursday, October 6, 2011 Services for Ricky Eugene Busby, 48, of Eastpoint, were held Friday morning, Sept. 30, graveside in Greenwood Cemetery, in Cairo, Ga. The Rev. Charles Barwick and Rev. Bobby Shiver officiated. Mr. Bus by passed away Monday, Sept. 26, 2011, at his home in Eastpoint. Mr. Busby was born Aug. 31, 1963, in Cairo, Ga., to Eunice Pearl Mulford Busby and the late Joseph (J.C.) Busby. He was a carpenter and served in the United States Marines. He is survived by his mother, Eunice M. Busby, of Eastpoint; children, Amber and Brandon Shiver, of Apalachicola, and Karah Busby, of Car rabelle; granddaughter, Madilynn Brannan, of Carrabelle; sisters and brothers-in-law, Rhonda and Ray Butler, of Carra belle, and Sheila and Ross Chambers of Eastpoint. He was preceded in death by his father, J. C. Busby, maternal grand parents, Troy and Eulila Mulford; and paternal grandparents, Ben and Olene Busby. The family received friends at the Clark Fu neral Home, Cairo, Ga., on Thursday evening, Sept. 29. Guest may sign the online register at www. clarkfuneral.com. Ricky Eugene Busby Danny Walton Segree was born Aug. 14, 1960, in Apalachicola. He died Thursday, Sept. 27, 2011, at the age of 51 at his home in Apalachicola. Danny was a United States Navy veteran and worked in the hospitality industry. He is survived by his mother, Bonnie Segree, of Eastpoint; sisters, Nina Segree, Ginger Coulter (Earl), and Wendy Smith, all of Eastpoint; grand mother, Laureen Langley, of Eastpoint; nieces and nephews, Kristen Coulter, Logan Smith, Brittney Smith, and Lett Smith; and many other relatives and friends. A celebration of Dan nys life was held Friday afternoon, Sept. 30, at Kelley Funeral Home Chapel in Apalachicola. Danny Walton Segree Family and friends gathered Saturday afternoon in Apalachicolas Lafayette Park to celebrate the life of Robert Frank Grifn, known affectionately as Napa Bob. Born June 17, 1959 in Fort Valley, Ga., Grifn passed away Thursday, Sept. 22, 2011, at his home in Apalachicola after a long illness. Grifns friend, Harvey Robinson, offered his remembrances as well as a Biblical teaching to open the service, held at the bandstand, which was decorated with balloons. Others offered their memories of Grifn, known for his wry humor as a self-proclaimed manatee hunter, and his willingness to lend others a hand. Ricky Jones, general manager of the Gander Auto Parts stores in Apalachicola and Eastpoint, and store owner Jimmy Gander recalled Grifns work as a longtime employee at the Napa store, his keen understanding of automobile mechanics and his buoyant approach to life. Grifn is survived by his brother, Marvin Grifn, III (Martha); sisters, Joyce Virginia McKenzie (Bob) and Judith Ann Clark; girlfriend, Micki Flores; numerous nieces and nephews, aunts, uncles and other family. Following the celebration service, mourners walked to the end of the pier, where Grifns sisters committed his ashes, and a owered wreath, to the bay. By David Adlerstien DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times Robert Grifns sisters cast his wreath and ashes to the waters. Thom Lewis remembered Thank you, dearest friends and family, for all your loving support, your prayers and for all the love you have shown these last few days. As you know the Master Potter has taken his cre ation home to a special place among His mas terpieces. Vincent Earl Raffield loved life. He started his journey Jan. 28, 1957 and passed away at his home on Wednes day, Sept. 28, 2011. He did not simply exist, he embraced every day as a treasure and cre ated many treasures of laughs, love and smiles for us all to enjoy. An accomplished art ist, retired fisherman, oysterman and mariner, a loving husband, family man, friend and blessing to all who knew him, he will be missed. He leaves behind wife, Linda Rafeld; mother, Lora Rafeld Haddock; brothers Chuck Rafeld, Larry Charlton Rafeld and Terry Lee Rafeld; and sisters, Sheila Rafeld Clevenger and MiChelle Rafeld Andrews. A memorial service was held on Saturday af ternoon, Oct. 1 at the Fort Coombs Armory, attended by many friends and family. We hope you will enjoy his greatest gift to us all, the memories that remain, and know that his message to us all was to love each other and remember Gods Love Always! Family & Friends weep not for me, for I am waiting in heaven for thee. Vincent Earl Rafeld VINCENT RAFFIELD William James Billy Howell, 82, of Ocala passed away Saturday, Oct. 2, 2011. Billy was born to Ma bel and Robert L. Howell, Jr. on Feb. 28, 1929, in Apalachicola. A 1947 grad uate of Chapman High School in Apalachicola, Billy joined the Florida Power Corporation as a groundman in January 1948. He retired in Dec. 1992, as vice-president after 44 years of dedicated ser vice. While in high school, Billy was an All-State athlete in both football and basketball. In 1950 he was offered a professional baseball contract to play in the Chicago White Sox organization, which he declined because of his commitment to Florida Power and his soon-to-be bride, Sally FitzGer ald. Sally and Billy married in 1952, and spent 59 won derful years to gether. They had two children, William, Jr. (Bill) and Holly, and three wonderful grandchil dren, Lacy and Hunter Townsend and William Howell III. Billy served his coun try as a member of the Florida Army National Guard for 22 years from 1948 until 1970. He retired as a captain. Billy lived in Apala chicola from his birth in 1929 until he was pro moted by Florida Power to a man agement position in Crawfordville in 1958. While in Apalachicola he was treasurer of the Methodist Church, scout master of the local Boy Scout troop, company com mander of the Franklin County National Guard unit, a member of the Apalachicola town base ball team and a member of the Masonic Lodge. Billy is predeceased by his parents, Mabel and Robert Howell, and his twin brother, Robert L. Howell, III (Bobby). He is survived by his wife, Sally, of Ocala, his daughter Holly Townsend (Neil) of Ocala, his grand children Lacy Townsend of Gainesville, Hunter Townsend of Ocala, and William Howell III of Miami Shores, his son, William Jr., also of Miami Shores, and his sister, Frances Anne Monroe of Shellman, Ala. Funeral services will be Saturday, Oct. 8 at 2 p.m. at First United Meth odist Church of Apala chicola. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville is in charge of arrange ments. In lieu of flowers, do nations may be made to Hospice of Marion Coun ty, the First Presbyterian Church of Ocala or the First United Methodist Church of Apalachicola. William James Billy Howell WILLIAM BILL Y HOWELL Obituaries Mourners celebrate Napa Bob Thom Lewis nephew, Tommy, changed his name to Thom at the beginning of the school year to honor his uncle. He is seen here sharing a story about a prank his uncle played on him.L O IS SW O B O DA The Times Faith BRIEFSF irst Baptist offers mullet sh fry F riday Mullet sh fry dinners will be offered this Friday, Oct. 7, at the First Baptist Christian School on 46 9th Street. These dinners, by donation only, will be served in the church fellowship hall from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. You may eat-in or take-out. Dinner includes coleslaw, hush puppies, baked beans and a homemade desert. Please call 653-9540 to place an order to be delivered (Apalachicola only).Y owell benet Saturday in Eastpoint There will be a benet for Tony Yowell, Sr., on Saturday, Oct. 8, at Taylors Building Supply in Eastpoint. The benet is being held to raise money to help offset the medical expenses of Yowell, who is being treated for leukemia at the Moffett Cancer Center in Tampa. Seafood dinners will be available for $6 each, including drinks. For more information, call 850-348-9926.F aircloth-Phillips reunion Saturday in Quincy Friends and family of the late Dempsey Faircloth and his descendants will hold their 37th annual reunion on Saturday, Oct. 8 at Pat Thomas Park in Quincy. The business meeting will start at noon, and lunch will be served at 1 p.m. Those attending are asked to bring a covered dish/basket lunch, as well as information and photographs relating to the Faircloth/Phillips family history. There will be shing and games for the kids. Lots of fun for all; please plan to see us there. For more information, call Pat Hayes at 850627-2340 or email to jwphayes3@tds.net. United Baptist homecoming Sunday in Eastpoint The United Baptist Church, 37 Brian Street, Eastpoint, will host its 28th annual Homecoming this Sunday, Oct. 9. Guest speaker will be Brother Mike Traylor, of Powder Springs, Ga. Morning worship begins at 10:45 a.m. Lunch immediately following service, with a Gospel Sing featuring local singers after lunch. Please come join us in a day of praise and fellowship. For more info, call Bobby Shiver at 6708451. Narcotics Anonymous group meets Sunday evenings A Narcotics Anonymous group, providing group support for anyone beset by a drug problem, has begun meeting in Eastpoint. Meetings are open to anyone and are held Sunday evenings, at 6 p.m., at the United Methodist Church, 317 Patton Drive.

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E-mail outdoors news to times outdoors@star.com O UTD OO RS www.apalachtimes.com Section A Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL (next to Piggly Wiggly) www.BWOsh.com Your Hunting Headquarters TI T ANIUM SLIPCAM T HREE PA C K W I T H FREE PRA CT I C E HEAD 100 GRAIN, 2B LADE, 2.0 C U TT ING DIAME T ER W A S $79.99 N OW $69.99 Thursday, October 6, 2011 By Frank Sargeant franksargeant@bellsouth.net Sharks bite a few people each year in Florida, while people bite thousands of sharks. Some sharks, its true, are very good to eat and some of us just cant resist the urge to mess with something that cannot only defend itself but actually eat us given the right circumstance. Some nearshore species thrive in U.S. waters, where at least some protection has been around for decades. There are good numbers of bull sharks all over the Gulf Coast, fair populations of great hammerheads lots of blacktips the favorite target of recreational shermen and one of the better-tasting sharks along with the mako, which is an offshore species and rare. Catching sharks generally is a pretty simple operation. You put out a large, bloody chunk of an oily sh like bonito, add a bit of chum in the form of chopped threadns or menhaden and wait until the current takes the scent to any nearby sharks. When they smell food, they trace the scent back to the source, sometimes from hundreds of yards away. Obviously, you dont want to be shark shing on the sugar-sand beaches of Panhandle tourism centers, even though there are quite a few sharks cruising these waters from spring through late fall. Better is to head for the jetties around the major passes, if youre shorebound, or maybe out to a nearshore reef if you have a boat. Where baitsh gather, youll nd sharks with them. Of course, in the case of larger sharks, larger sh qualify as bait. Great hammerheads, which reach 14 to 15 feet with some frequency, consider nothing tastier than a 6-foot-long tarpon. At Boca Grande during the height of the tarpon season there from mid-May through June, its common for these monsters to inhale several hooked tarpon every day, and some giant bull sharks also get in on the feast. Bulls are also a common species around Panhandle inlets and in the lower bays, as well as along the beaches. Theyre easily identied by the blunt snout and chunky-looking body. They are among the most aggressive of sharks and are the species most commonly identied in attacks on humans. Smaller sharks, such as blacktips, often follow the mullet migrations; when these sh swarm out of the passes with the rst big cold fronts, the sharks come from every direction to get in on the feed. Blacktips average 40 to 50 pounds but sometimes exceed 100 pounds. They are jumpers, and they are good to eat a good target for any beginning shark sher. Blacktips are easily distinguished by the black tips on the dorsal n. The smallest sharks youre likely to see are bonnet sharks, which never reach lengths much more than 3 feet and weights of 10 to 15 pounds. These look somewhat like a hammerhead, but with less extended lobes on the head. Theyre often seen on the ats where redsh and trout cruise, and they can be caught on shrimp or a piece of cut sh with ease. The mako is one of the most awesome sharks found in the Gulf of Mexico; its usually found at the edge of the continental shelf, where it feeds on tuna and swordsh. Makos have a horric set of jaws; they look like a smaller version of the great white, which is a real rarity in the Gulf because its preference for chilly water. Makos reach more than 10 feet long and are spectacular jumpers, reportedly leaping more than 10 feet above the water at times when hooked. Theyre not much of a danger to humans because theyre so rarely found inshore. Catching one is a rare accident, usually accomplished by swordsh or marlin anglers slowtrolling big live baits. All the larger sharks are real sluggers, and whipping one more than 200 pounds is likely to be all the sharking youll want for a while; it sometimes takes a tag-team of anglers to bring the larger ones to the boat. SHARK TACKLE Though shing for offshore sharks takes huge reels and heavy lines testing 80 pounds or more, most smaller editions found near shore can be caught on standard grouper tackle; an 8-foot rod, 4/0 reel and 40to 60-pound test will readily whip sharks to 150 pounds. Microber line is a great choice for sharking because it gives much more leverage to wear them down; mono stretches and makes the ght harder on sher as well as sh. Large shark or small, youll need a wire leader as long as the shark if you really want to get one in for a photo otherwise, the rough hide of the creature likely will wear through your line. Size 10 or heavier wire is a must. Its also wise to use circle hooks, typically in sizes 10/0 and larger, which set themselves, and which also make it possible to release the shark with minimal damage because the hook likely will set in the jaw rather than being swallowed. HANDLING SHARKS Sharks have a exible spine that allows them to turn around and bite objects near their own tail including your hand if you are careless. Many sharks continue to ght once they are boated, snapping at anything that comes within reach its probable more people have been bitten by sharks out of the water than in. The safe way to grip small sharks for dehooking is to grab them rmly just behind the head. This keeps both them and you safe long enough for you to use a dehooking tool to get the hook clear. For larger sharks, hook removal is not a safe option on most; its best to clip the leader at the hook and release the sh; the hook will soon wear a hole and fall out. Though the hook in the jaw is surely a bother to a shark, its probably not a huge annoyance; commercial shark shermen often catch them with dozens of stingray barbs imbedded in jaw, mouth and throat. Last but not least, just remember the line in Jaws where they decide they must have a bigger boat; big sharks readily take out their anger on the boats of shermen who hook them, and if you are out there in a 10-foot jonboat, it might not end well for you. Some shermen just cant wait to bite into a shark Freshwater Gag grouper are being found and caught in all depths of water from 65 to 200 feet. Leave the docks early for the best bite, and make sure you have plenty of live bait. Big AJs are on the Bridge spans and around the B sites and can be caught on live bait and diamond jigs. Inshore Offshore October is off to a good start as the I.C.W. canal here in St. Joe is holding great trout and red sh. Try shing the T for good action on live bait or grubs and jigs. Big mullet are easily found in St. Joe Bay behind Blacks Island and around Fire Tower area. Anglers in Gulf County are enjoying the ne shing lately. Rivers, creeks and streams are holding good sh throughout the county. Lots of good-sized sheepshead are being caught around Howard Creek and in the big river. Good bass reports from are coming in from Kennedy Creek, and the Brothers is producing coolers full of catsh. SP ONSORED B Y BUDS N BUGS: BEAUTYBERR Y By Lois Swoboda Times Staff Writer Fall is here, and beautyberry is glowing purple on the road sides. Beautyberry, or Callicarpa Americana, is one of a group of shrubs and small trees in the verbena family. Depending on which botanist you ask, there are anywhere from 40 to 150 spe cies of Callicarpa. The majority is found in Southeast Asia, but species also occur in Australia and Central and North America. C. Ameri cana is the one found locally, al though some plant experts split this into two species. Beautyberry grows to be 3 to 5 feet tall and thrives in condi tions ranging from damp to dry. It is heatand salt-tolerant, re quires little watering and makes an excellent native garden plant with delicate pink owers in the summer and beautiful fuchsiacolored berries in the fall and winter. There is also a white form available. Shrubs may be propagated by softwood cuttings, but they are usually grown from seed. The seeds do not require pretreatment for germination. The berries of beautyberry are an attractive addition to ower arrangements. The fruit and seeds are eaten and dispersed by more than 40 species of songbirds, deer, rac coons, opossums, armadillos and numerous small rodents. The leaves are also a common food source for white-tailed deer. Because the berries are not a highly favored food, they are generally eaten late in the win ter so the plant provides a touch of color when little is in bloom. The roots, leaves and branch es of this plant were used by the Alabama, Choctaw, Creek, Koa sati, Seminole and other Native American tribes to make into a decoction used in sweat baths to treat malarial fevers, rheu matism, dizziness and stomach aches. The roots were used to make an infusion to treat dysen tery. The roots and berries were boiled and drunk to treat colic. The bark was used to treat itchy skin. A tea from the root bark was taken to treat urine stopped-up sickness. Another traditional use of beautyberry is as an insect re pellent. Floridas early settlers would tuck the leaves under a mules harness to discourage biting ies. Fresh green leaves, crushed and rubbed on people or pets, reportedly repel insects for a couple of hours. In 2006, researchers at the U.S. Department of Agricul tures Natural Products Utiliza tion Research Unit in Oxford, Miss., found that extracts from beautyberry leaves could match DEET for repelling mosquitoes. Later studies found it is also ef fective against black-legged ticks and re ants. Researcher Charles Cantrell said toxicity testing is needed be fore beautyberry extract is used on human beings but added, Plants containing these com pounds have long been used as folk remedies with no ill effects that we know of, so I would not anticipate any harmful effects when plants are used in the tra ditional way. M ARK GORE | Special to Florida Freedom Bull sharks are one of the more common inshore sharks and one of the most aggressive most of the rare shark attacks on humans in U.S. waters come from this species, which sometimes prowls far into large bays and even will swim up coastal rivers. L O IS SW O B O DA | The Times Page 8

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Photos by DANA WHALEY | Special to The TimesABOVE Sophomore Dwayne Griggs rushes for some of his 200 yards against Wewa. LEFT Junior kicker Elton Olvera prepares to boot the ball. BELOW Seahawk senior quarterback Zach Armistead, left, and junior fullback Cole Lee, right, escort injured senior running back Chris Granger from the eld. By Tim Croft Florida Freedom Newspapers During last Fridays game in which the teams scored a combined 105 points and more than 800 offensive yards, the host Wewahitchka Gator defense provided the decisive swing. Wewahitchka (3-2) won its third straight game after its defense came up with three critical stops early in the fourth quarter as the Gators overcame a 41-22 halftime decit by scoring the nal 29 points for a wildly entertaining 57-48 win over the Franklin County Seahawks. On successive series in the early minutes of the nal period, the Gators stopped the Seahawks (2-4) twice on downs, recovered a fumble and converted each defensive stand into points to wipe out a 48-36 Franklin County lead in the nal 11 minutes. Theryl Brown led the way, rushing for 255 yards and four touchdowns on just 12 touches, returning a kickoff 65 yards to set up another touchdown and icing the game with a 5yard touchdown dash and two-point conversion with 1:49 left. What can you say after a game like that? said Wewahitchka coach Dennis Kizziah. We just played better in the second half. We knew they probably couldnt stop us and I think we kind of wore them out at the end there. I think you could see that. But this was all by the kids. These guys just battle. There is no quit in this team. The Seahawks provided plenty of reason to quit throughout the track meet that was the rst half. Behind the running of sophomore Dwayne Griggs (19 carries for 200 yards and three touchdowns) and senior Brennan Walden (12 carries for 132 yards and a touchdown), the Seahawks came out blazing and answered every salvo from the Gators. Wewahitchka helped dig their early hole on special teams. The Gators twice fumbled away kickoffs, both turnovers converted into Seahawk points, and Griggs responded to a Justin Flowers rst quarter touchdown by taking the ensuing kickoff 80 yards for a score. Franklin County got off to a tremendous start behind the sensational special teams kicks of junior kicker Elton Olvera, who was able to kickoff for two coverage recoveries, said Seahawks coach Josh Wright. The Seahawks were up 28-14 with 5:02 still remaining in the rst period. Griggs ran 8 and 9 yards for touchdowns the rst answered immediately by a 64-yard touchdown scamper by Brown and the second by Browns long kickoff return which set up Flowers score. After Griggs returned the ensuing kick for a touchdown, Wewahitchka fumbled away a second kickoff and Seahawk senior Chris Granger (eight carries for 17 yards) made it count with a 23yard touchdown reception of senior quarterback Zach Armisteads pass. Armistead was 2-for-2 on the night, for 32 yards. Armistead hit a touchdown pass early in the second period from 9 yards and Flowers responded on the ensuing drive when he found Jayln Addison (63 rushing yards and two touchdowns) in stride along the left sideline on fourth-and-12 from the Franklin 36 to make it 35-22. But Walden rumbled down the left sideline slipping away from a pile of would-be tacklers for a 47-yard score just before the half ended to make it 41-22 at intermission. The third period seemed more of the same as Brown sprinted 33 yards for a touchdown in the early minutes only to have Griggs answer with a 65-yard touchdown dash through the right side of the Gator defense. But the Seahawks would not nd the end zone again and the Gator defense turned the tide in the early minutes of the fourth quarter, scoring four unanswered touchdowns to keep their winning streak alive. Wright said the Seahawks chose to concede the nal touchdown in an effort to get the ball back with some time remaining, as well as to gamble to stop the two-point conversion and stay within a onetouchdown striking distance. However, the Gators scored the two points on what looked to be an obvious illegal cut block on Brennan Walden, said Wright. The loss left the Seahawks both shocked and disappointed. I knew we played hard enough to win and that we had our most productive game we have had all year. This one is tough to swallow. The difference was, we could not stop what they did and they got some stops on what we did. I am not going to blame the kids. This is the responsibility of the coaches to put them in a position to win and we did not do that, he said. I take full responsibility for the loss, said the Seahawks coach. We cant undo the outcome and we give major credit to the players and staff at Wewahitchka. They have improved immeasurably since last year, and running back Theryl Brown turned out to be as good as we thought he was. Wright said the game also led to two major setbacks that proved difcult to overcome, the loss of junior tight end/ defensive end Ladarius Rhodes and senior fullback and strong safety Chris Granger. Ladarius suffered a mild concussion in the second quarter and Chris suffered a serious knee injury, said Wright. Both players continue to be evaluated and their return to action is unknown until Friday. Wright said the team is busy prepping for rival week against the other Gulf County squad, the Port St. Joe Tiger Sharks. The Sharks are coming off back-to-back losses, but will be ready to showcase their program this Friday as they are hosting the Seahawks for Homecoming, said the Seahawks coach. They are very impressive on lm and are as good as anybody that we play. We have got to forget that we have never beaten them, and realize that the team who plays the best the longest wins. Last Fridays game came down to a similar test with the Wewa Gators simply playing better longer. Friday nights kickoff is set for 7:30 p.m. in Port St. Joe. Thursday, October 6, 2011CARRABELLE A PALA C HI C OLA SP O RT S www.apalachtimes.com A Page 9 Section Seahawks fall to Wewa in wild one James Wineld, a 2010 graduate of Franklin County High School, is a member of the 2011-12 Muskingum University football team. A 6 foot, 189pound defensive back, Wineld is competing on the Muskingum JV squad and is adding depth to the Muskie team. The JV squad has a 3-2 record, defeating Marietta College 14-7, Otterbein University 23-16 and Capital University 21-12, while falling to Bethany College 12-7 and Wittenberg University 27-14. The varsity squad, which competes in the Ohio Athletic Conference, is undefeated under the direction of Coach Al Logan and off to its best start since 1996, now ranked 36th in the nation in NCAA Div. III. WINFIELD PLAYS FOR MUSKINGUM UNIVERSITY

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Local A10 | The Times Thursday, October 6, 2011 man, railway engineer, re man, and switchman, min er, mine inspector, pit boss, jockey or race car driver, in a gunpowder factory, or in any job associated with alcoholic beverages, aero naut, sailor, plough polisher, brass nisher, professional baseball player, profes sional reman, submarine operator, or soldier in regu lar army in time of war. All religions were welcome, in cluding atheists. By the 1920s, the Wood men had welcomed women into their midst in the form of an auxiliary, the Royal Neighbors of America, and apparently Southern ers and African Americans were allowed to join as well. Several generations of matriarchs and midwives from a prominent Carra belle family are interred at Isle of Rest. Classie Lowery was mother to 20 children and adopted several more. She was matriarch to 42 grandchildren, 18 greatgrandchildren and five great-great-grandchil dren. Classie Lowery Park was dedicated to her in 2008, after a poll of the African American com munity named her as the most respected historical figure. Her mother, Savannah Brown, is buried nearby and possibly her grand mother, Aunt Laura Wig gens, as well. Wiggens is reputed to have been halfCherokee and is said to have reached the ripe old age of 111. Another Isle of Rest res ident, Mrs. Sallie Walker, passed away in 1997, three months shy of her 104th birthday. Lowerys husband, Henry Lowery, who left her after the birth of their 20th child, is also buried in Isle of Rest but his grave is at the opposite end of the graveyard. Isle of Rest is located on land that once belonged to The St. Joe Company. Mayor Curley Messer said St. Joe gave the land to Carrabelle for use as a cemetery in 1971, while he was mayor. The company received a $10,000 reduc tion in taxes in exchange for the gift. Isle of Rest contains graves of veterans from World War I and II, Korea and Vietnam. A number of plots are marked with seashells and coral. According to the Carrabelle Historic Preservation Survey, On African American graves, the use of seashells rep resents the body of water that the deceased travels over in their journey to the afterlife. Is Aunt Laura Wiggins buried in Isle of Rest? Do you have more informa tion about this cemetery? Please contact Lois Swo boda at 653-1819. Next week: The largest cemetery in Carrabelle is Evergreen. It contains graves of immigrants from a half-dozen nations and is the resting place of vet erans of as many wars. dbutler@coastalcoverage.com Locally owned and operated to meet all your insurance needs An ornately inscribed headstone from the mid-20th century. ETERNITY from page A1 PHOTOS BY LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Classie Lowery and her mother Savannah Brown, both midwives, are buried at Isle of Rest.

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Special to The TimesOf cials from the Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) are gearing up to hold three public hearings across the Panhandle, on the department's tentative ve year work program. The hearings will be held throughout the district to present and receive input on the work program for scal years July 1, 2012 through June 30, 2017 and consider the necessity of making changes to the program. The hearing on projects in Franklin, Gadsden, Liberty, Jefferson, Leon and Wakulla counties will be held Monday, Oct. 10, from 11 a.m. to noon in the FDOT Midway Operations Center Conference Room, 17 Commerce Blvd, Midway. Personnel will discuss and receive input on projects in these six counties. These hearings are conducted pursuant to Section 339.135(4)(c), Florida Statutes. The purpose of the public hearings is to consider the department's Improved Tentative Work Program for District Three, for the period 2012/2013 through 2016/2017, and to consider the necessity of making any changes to the program. Public participation is solicited without regard to race, color, national origin, age, sex, religion, disability or family status. Persons wishing to express concerns about Title VI may do so by contacting: Florida Department of Transportation District 3 Title VI Coordinator John Smith, 1074 Highway 90, Chipley, FL 32428 or at telephone (850) 415-9520 or email to john.smith@ dot.state. .us. Or contact Statewide Title VI Administrator, Charlotte Thomas, Equal Opportunity, 605 Suwannee Street Tallahassee, FL 32399-0450 or at telephone (850) 414-4747 or email to charolotte. thomas@dot.state. .us Persons who require special accommodations under the Americans with Disabilities Act or persons who require translation services (free of charge) should contact Regina Battles at (850) 415-9270 at least seven days prior to the meeting. Written comments from TPOs/ TPAs and other interested parties will be received by the Department at the Public Hearings and within 10 days thereafter. Comments should be addressed to Mr. James T. Bar eld, P.E., District Secretary, FDOT, District Three, Post Of ce Box 607, Chipley, FL 32428. Trades & Services CALL TODAY!653-8868 GET YOUR AD INTrades & Services Laban Bontrager, DMD Monica Bontrager, DMD 12761 Pea Ridge Road Bristol, Florida 32321TELEPHONE (850) 643-5417 Bristol Dental ClinicDENTURE LAB ON PREMISESSame Day Service on repairs and Relines Don Lively General Contractors C Visa, Discover, and American Express Honored at Participating Ace Stores JACKSONS Building Supplies & Auto Repair Carrabelle 697-3333 We Deliver Anywhere J Hardware and Paint Center PILE DRIVING FOUNDATION/PILING REPAIR DOCK/MARINE WORK MOORING BOUYS OFFICE: 850.227.1709FAX: 850.762.2552 CELL: 850.527.5725 HOWARD227FAIRPOINT.NET ROBERTS APPLIANCE REPAIR ALL MAJOR BRANDS 18 Shadow Lane Apalachicola, FL 32320 Phone: (850) 653-8122 Cell: (850) 653-7654 JOES LAWN CARE NO JOB TOO BIG!! SINCE 2002, DOINGBUSINESSINTHISCOMMUNITY LAWN CARE, TREE & PALM TREE TRIMMING AND REMOVAL, DEBRIS AND JUNK REMOVAL, or whatever your yard needs are CALL JOE @ 850-670-5478 E-MAIL @ joes_lawn@yahoo.com Early detection means more lives saved. If you havent already done so, call Weems Memorial Hospital to schedule your screening mammogram. Franklin Needs, Inc. provides free screening mammograms at Weems Memorial Hospital for Franklin County residents, aged 35 to 64, with no health insurance. Encourage those you love to schedule theirs as well. Just call 653-8853extension 119 to make your appointment today! October is Breast Cancer Awareness Mont h AFFORDABLE ST. GEORGE ISLAND INTERIOR HOME3 BR /2 BA h o m e on 1/3 a c re lot in q uiet area on Ba y s h ore D r Co zy wood interior wit h f reestanding “ repla c e large de ck s G ood f ull ti m e resident or v a c ation h o m e !MLS# 243422.................$288,000 T ra v is Stanle y 850.653.6477 G ra y son S h epard 850.653.6718 Ki m D a v is 850.653.6875 L eon T eat 850.653.5656 Ja ck ie G olden 850.899.8433 Ja m ie Cru m 850.370.0835 Sand y M it ch e m 850.899.8300 AFFORDABLE CARRABELLE BEACHOwn a pie c e o f Carrabelle h istor y! Th e original lig h t h ouse k eepers h ouse h as 3 BR / 1 BA on 1.3 pea c e f ul a c res ba ck ing up to T ates Hell Hi k ing T rail L o v el y por ch es MLS# 243618.ƒ..........$269,000 C ARRABELLE B EAC H GREATER APALACHICOLAE n j o y q uiet c ountr y li v ing on 3.75 a c res L o v el y c usto m built 3 BR /2.5 BA h o m e wit h m an y upgrades … Ja c u zz i de ck, large wal k in c loset 1600 s q.f t outbuilding on c on c rete pad .MLS#244666 ..............$275,000NEW LOW PRICE! VACANT LOT ST. GEORGE ISLANDPLANTATIONOne a c re interior lot a c ross t h e street f ro m S GI airport ne x t to bu ff er propert y f or m ore pri v a cy. State owned land a c ross t h e street on t h e ba y, rig h t on bea ch a cc ess !MLS# 243448.................$75,000 G REA T A ER NEW LOW PRICE! EASTPOINT3 BR /2 BA h o m e on pri v ate 3 a c res L ow m aintenan c e m etal roo f, v in y l siding and great f ront por ch. Ba ck s up to state land .MLS# 244269ƒƒƒƒ$120,000 N EWLOW P RICE! NEW LOW PRICE! BAYVIEW VACANT LOT ST. GEORGE ISLANDBan k owned v a c ant lot in q uiet area a c ross t h e street f ro m t h e ba y! Hig h and dr y wit h oa k trees and m ature pines .MLS# 242005.ƒ..........$ 59,000 N EWLOW P RICE! BANK OWNED BILL MILLER REALTY850-697-3751 (3310) 570-0658WOW! 1BDR FURNISHED APT $15,000 $29,500 $2,500 DOWN BUYS 2 BED APT. 2 6 GULF VIEW & ACCESS 3 BDR 2 BA 2006 M/H 16 X 80 $89,000 $500DOWN CHOICE OF 3 CITY LOTS $180.00/MONTH OR $17,500/EACH MIH 2 CRNRLOTS BLK. $ STORE REDUCED $49,500 3DOOR NICE 2 B/R MH 2CRNR. LOTS $47,500 The following report is provided by the Franklin County Sheriff's Of ce. Arrests are made by of cers from the following city, county, and state law enforcement agencies: Apalachicola (APD), Carrabelle (CPD), Florida Highway Patrol (FHP), Franklin County Sheriff's Of ce (FCSO), Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC), Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP), Florida Department of Corrections (FDOC), Florida Division of Insurance Fraud (DIF) and Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (FLDACS). All defendants are considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law.Sept. 26Jeremy R. Nowling, 34, Apalachicola, criminal mischief (FCSO) Mandy A. Creamer, 33, Eastpoint, two counts introduction of contraband into a correctional facility (FCSO) Sheri M. Mann, 33, Eastpoint, domestic battery (FCSO)Sept. 27Kenneth May, 47, Carrabelle, battery (CPD) Leon W. Irvin, 47, Eastpoint, failure to appear (FCSO) Jessica M. Billetter, 31, Savannah, Ga., seven counts of possession of a controlled substance and possession of paraphernalia (FCSO) Sept. 28Kayla R. Langley, 27, Eastpoint, violation of probation (FCSO)Sept. 29Lawrence Troy, 62, St. George Island, trespass on property after warning (FCSO)Sept. 30Thomas E. Cooper, 21, Eastpoint, failure to appear (FCSO) Frederick R. Wilsey, 46, Eastpoint, failure to appear (FCSO) Shane Z. Creamer, 26, Apalachicola, disorderly intoxication (FCSO) Oct. 1Willie E. Pelt, 29, Port St. Joe, violation of a domestic violence injunction (FCSO) Mary R. Nowling, 23, Eastpoint, domestic battery and no valid drivers license (FCSO) Oct. 2Christal Wallace, 35, Carrabelle, two counts of passing worthless bank checks (FCSO) Joe B. Blan III, 30, Apalachicola, Bay County warrant for failure to appear (APD)Oct. 3Robert D. New, Jr., 37, Eastpoint, violation of probation (FCSO) David D. Hartman, 33, Eastpoint, disorderly intoxication (FCSO) Taylor C. Bailey, 23, Apalachicola, reckless driving (APD)Arrest REPORTDOT to take input on 5-year plan Law EnforcementThe Times | A11Thursday, October 6, 2011

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A12 | The Times Thursday, October 6, 2011 A12 | The Times Thursday, October 6, 2011 CLASSIFIEDS 35663T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2nd JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY The Bank of New York, as Trustee for TBW Mortgage-Backed Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2006-2 Plaintiff, -vs.Anthony L. Gelch; Defendant(s) Case #: 2010-CA-000230 Division #: AMENDED NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated September 15, 2011, entered in Civil Case No. 2010-CA-000230 of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein The Bank of New York, as Trustee for TBW MortgageBacked Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2006-2, Plaintiff and Anthony L. Gelch are defendant(s), I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, AT THE WEST FRONT DOOR OF THE FRANKLIN COUNTY COURTHOUSE, LOCATED ON HWY 98, IN APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA, AT 11:00 A.M., October 19, 2011, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit: BEGIN AT A POINT 646 FEET EAST AND 12.5 FEET SOUTH FROM THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 32, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 6 WEST, RUN THENCE SOUTH 36 DEGREES EAST 200 FEET TO THE 100 FOOT U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 319, THENCE RUN NORTHEASTERLY ALONG RIGHT OF WAY OF SAID HIGHWAY, A DISTANCE OF 50 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 36 DEGREES WEST 200 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 54 DEGREES WEST 50 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. THUS FORMING A TRACT PARTLY IN THE NW 1/4 OF SAID SECTION 32 AND PARTLY IN THE SW 1/4 OF SECTION 29, FRONTING 50 FEET ON THE NORTHERN SIDE OF HIGHWAY AND RUNNING BACK 240 FEET. ALSO KNOWN AS: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 32, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 6 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND RUN EAST 646.00 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 12.50 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261) LYING ON THE NORTHEASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF 2ND STREET SAID POINT ALSO BEING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN SOUTH 36 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 200.42 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #7160), LYING ON THE INTERSECTION OF SAID 2ND STREET WITH THE NORTHWESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 98, THENCE RUN NORTH 54 DEGREES 28 MINUTES 47 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE NORTHWESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 98 A DISTANCE OF 50.00 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #7160), THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY RUN NORTH 35 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 58 SEC35602T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CITIMORTGAGE, INC. Plaintiff, v. DEBORAH RUSSELL A/K/A DEBORAH Y. RUSSELL; DOUG RUSSELL A/K/A DOUGLAS W. RUSSELL; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT (S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS. Defendant(s). CASE NO.: 19-2009-CA-000714 SEC: NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order to Reschedule Foreclosure Sale dated August 31, 2011, entered in Civil Case No. 19-2009-CA-000714 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest bidder for cash on the 12th day of October, 2011, at 11:00 a.m. on the Front steps of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida 32320, relative to the following described property as set forth in the Final Judgment, to wit: LOTS 1 AND 2 AND THE SOUTHWESTERLY OF LOT 3 IN BLOCK 15, IN LANARK VILLAGE, UNIT NO. 3, A SUBDIVISION IN FRACTIONAL SECTION 12, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 4 WEST, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, AT PAGE 19 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance, Please contact: Court Administrator Phone: (850) 577-4401. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call Florida Relay Service, hearing 800-955-8771, voice 800-955-8770. DATED AT APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA, THIS 12th DAY OF September, 2011. MARCIA JOHNSON CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk September 29, October 6, 2011 the temporary closure, and specifically target ing Dr. Karen Chapman, the interim director of the health department. Chapman has been the target of withering criti cism from Commissioners Cheryl Sanders and Bevin Putnal, who represent the eastern end of the county. This is it. I want this woman out of Franklin County, a tearful Sand ers told the legislative del egation meeting Sept. 28. If that lady at the health department dont want to do what is the will of the people, I want her moved out of Franklin County. Amidst an air of confu sion and concern, details of the clinic closing first emerged at the delegation hearing, through a letter from Farmer presented by delegation chairman State Rep. Leonard Bem bry (D-Monticello), and State Senator Bill Mont ford (D-Tallahassee). Also attending the delegation meeting was State Rep. Jimmy Patronis (R-Pan ama City), who has been less involved in the clinic issue since his district extends east only to the Apalachicola River. Farmers Sept. 29 letter to Montford and Bembry followed up on a hastily scheduled Sept. 28 meet ing the legislators had with Farmer and his staff. We were as embarrassed and shocked as any of you, he told the meeting, packed largely with Carra belle-area residents angry over the closure. Farmers letter indi cated that as of Sept. 27, the Carrabelle clinic has been without an available health care provider to deliver primary care ser vices at the Carrabelle clinic. The surgeon gen eral declined any further comment on the status of Dana Whaley ARNP, who had been providing care at the clinic and whose ser vices and reputation have been strongly defended by Putnal and Sanders. The Department of Health is not in a posi tion to comment on the circumstances that gave rise to that reality (the absence of a primary care provider), wrote Farmer. He wrote that the health department was committed to ensuring appropriate access to care as well as fiscal integrity during the time it temporarily finds itself without an available pri mary care provider. Farmer said that be cause there are two doctors at the adjacent Weems East Urgent Care Clinic and former Weems physician Dr. Lio nel Catlin has opened his own practice in Carra belle at the Phoenix Fam ily Health Care Center at 1581 West U.S. 98 the department made the de cision..that it was in the best interest of all parties to temporarily close the Carrabelle clinic on Oct. 11 for services during the time no primary care pro vider was available. Farmer stressed the closure would be tempo rary, and the clinic would continue to remain open every Wednesday, staffed by a physician who pro vides family planning and sexually transmitted dis ease services, immuni zations and other public health functions. In addi tion, the Carrabelle clinic will be open the first Friday afternoon of each month, as previously scheduled, for medical appointments with Dr. Eugene Charbon neau, wrote the surgeon general. The health depart ments decision regarding Whaley, and the temporary closure, met with stiff op position at the delegation hearing. It hurts peoples feel ings and it really messes up some peoples lives, said Putnal. Weve got some special needs clients who have built a relation ship with Dana, little blind kids who dont want to go to anybody else, and 80to 90-year-old patients who wont go anywhere else. This is devastating when you take something like that away from them. I dont know whos be hind it but theres some evil going on with this sit uation and it has been for a long time, he said. We need to get to the bottom of it and find out what it is. Whoever is behind all this evil needs to be hunted down and tended to. Putnal said he did not believe Danas profession al services were the issue. Whether they say it is or not, you can doctor up pa pers that she turns in and changing them will make her look like an idiot. And I know shes not an idiot because shes treated me many times, he said. Im telling you we need that health department for these folks when they are sick. Sanders also staunchly defended Whaley, whose career has included earn ing an advanced regis tered nurse degree from Florida State University. Shes born and raised in Franklin County. Shes one of our own, said the coun ty commissioner. Shes come back to help the people of Franklin County and all thats been done has been a witch hunt on her. You dont mess with my people and thats what theyve done. The legislators also heard from several other Carrabelle-area residents, who spoke in favor of re taining Whaley and keep ing open the Carrabelle clinic. Dr. Chapman has a personal vendetta against her because people call her Dr. Whaley, said Wan da Whaley, Dana Whaleys mother-in-law. To us, shes our doc tor and knows our health and personal histories. That health department wont open again, feared Nita Millender. Carrabelle Mayor Cur ley Messer too voiced concern that this tempo rary closure could mean the end of the clinics op erations. If you close one, close them all, because they dont treat the peo ple on the east side of the river. If you close it, close the one in Apalachicola, he said. Putnal told the three state legislators that the adjacent Weems East ur gent care clinic, which Weems CEO Davie Lloyd has promised to beef up in terms of hours and pro viders, is not the answer. Even if we get our urgent care clinic going at full strength, we cant handle all those patients. Thats for urgent care patients. Thats what people voted for, he said. It works out perfect; its a perfect solu tion. We dont even have a doctor out there now (at Weems East). We need that thing going at fullstrength for people who have heart attacks and who need urgent care. At Tuesdays meeting, Sanders voiced angry con cerns that the matter of the sudden closure had not been properly handled by county staff. She said she learned of the closure at 9 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. Cheryl Sanders CLINIC from page A1 PHOTOS BY LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Nita Millender See CLINIC A14 Local | Classieds

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, October 6, 2011 The Times | A13 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322850-697-9604 850-323-0444 www.seacrestre.comRENTALS2 BR 11/2 BA UNFURNISHED HOME Country Living Eastpoint Area ......................$800 2 BR 1 BA UNFURNISHED HOUSE Downtown, LR, DR, Storage Room .................$650 1 BR 1 BA UNFURNISHED HOUSE ............$500 DOWNTOWN RIVER CONDO, BOAT SLIP 3 Night Minimum .......................$105 PLUS DAILY PIRATES LANDING 1 BR CONDO/POOL 3 Night Minimum .......................$105 PLUS DAILY 3 BR 3 BA FURNISHED CONDO Long Term, Pool..............................................$850 2 BR 1 BA FURNISHED APARTMENT Den & Living Area ..........................................$550 3 BR 2 BA FURNISHED CONDO Boat & Car Parking ..............................$850 WKLY 3 BR 3 BA FURNISHED CONDO Pool, Downtown ..........................$700 WKLY PLUS 3 BR 1 BA FURNISHED APARTMENT Pet Friendly ...................WKLY & MONTHLY RATES Classifiedcan!If you’re ready to move up or are just starting out Classified can help you open the door to home ownership. We’ve got properties at every price, with locations all over town! And if you’re planning to sell, Classified can introduce you to the market’s best prospects. Airlines Are Hiring Train for high paying Aviation Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-206-9405 Attend College Online from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Paralegal, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 866-467-0054 www.Centura.us.com ATV, Dirtbike Motorcycle RepairI am a dealer trained, and factory certified ATV and Motorcycle technician. Call me for any repair or service needs for your ATV, Motorcycle, Dirtbike, or Personal Watercraft. Tuesday-Saturday 9:am-6:pm. Sea-N-Say Powersports in Apalachicola 850-370-1089 Text FL79471 to 56654 Full Service Turn Key restaurant for lease at Commerce Street and Avenue E in downtown Apalachicola. For more info call 850-653-8801 Text FL79133 to 56654 1 br, 1 ba with full kitchen and living room Call for information 850-653-6103 Heritage Villas and Southern Villas of Apalachicola ApartmentsAccepting applications for 1, 2, & 3 br HC & non-HC accessible units. Some rental assistance may be available. HUD vouchers accepted. Call 850-653-9277. TDD/TTY 711. This institution is an equal opportunity provider, and employer. Publisher’s NoticeAll real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on a equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. Studio Apt. Furnished Upstairs studioQuiet location, water & electric incl. Walk to downtown. $700 mo + dep. No pets. For appt 653-9116 or 320-1174 St. George Island $160 wk, Electric, Satellite, Garbage incl. pool tble. 12’X65’ deck w/Beautiful view 850-653-5114 1 or 3 BRCH/A in Apalachicola, FL. 850-643-7740. 2 br, 1 bath house on St George Island. $650 month. 229-824-7493 or 229-942-0329 Text FL77072 to 56654 Lanark, 2 br, 1 ba, w/ lg fenced yard, separate LR & den, covered parking & storage, $575 mo, 2529 Florida Ave., Call 850-528-0716 Install/Maint/RepairCleanerCheerful, detailed person for various household duties. Indian Pass area. 4 hours daily. Excellent references required. (850) 227-7234 Medical/HealthCNA’sCaring people needed. Join a team of people who make a difference in the lives of the elderly. Provide non medical companionship, in home help and personal care for the elderly. Flexible day, evenin & weekend hours. Positions available in the Apalachicola area.Home Instead Senior CareCall Mon-Thur 9-3pm 850-640-1223 or toll free 1-866-301-1919 Web ID#: 34179682 Text FL79682 to 56654 Sales/Business Dev Aggressively growing Insurance company is in search of the following:CSR/ Insurance AgentApalachicolaThe ideal candidate must: *Currently hold a Florida 4-40 Insurance License *Be able to navigate multi-insurance company web rating programs *Have excellent communication skills Submit applications to: my100bank.com /careers EOE M/F/V/D 95% Success Chance. No Direct Sales. Test This Easy Home Business. $69.95 Risk-Free, Limited-Time Offer. 1-888-835-6822; 1-800-447-0503 Accounting/Finance Franklin County Health Department is accepting applications for the following Career Service position:Accountant IIIReference Requisition #64080005-51262181-2 0110919160029 Salary: $29,344.38 Applications will be accepted through 10/21/11 Minimum qualifications: a bachelor’s degree from an accredited college or university with a major in accounting and two years of professional accounting experience; or two years of professional accounting experience with the State of Florida. A master’s degree from an accredited college or university in accounting or possession of a Certified Public Accountant (CPA) certificate and one year of professional accounting experience. Professional or nonprofessional accounting experience or any combination of this experience and up to 60 semester or 90 quarter hours of college education provided such education includes two courses in accounting can substitute on a year-for-year basis for the required bachelor’s degree. Experience with Medicaid/Medicare and 3rd party insurance billing is preferred. Apply online at https://jobs.myflorida.com or contact People First at 1-877-562-7287. ONLY online applications submitted through the People First website will be accepted for this position. Background check including fingerprinting required. The successful candidate will be required to complete the Form I-9 and that information will be verified using the E-Verify system. E-Verify is operated by the Department of Homeland Security in partnership with the Social Security Administration to verify employment eligibility. Minorities strongly encouraged to apply. EO/AA/VP Employer. Administrative/ClericalNOTICEThe Franklin County Board of County Commissioners, Franklin County, Florida will consider applications for the following position: *Temporary-Part Time Veteran’s Affairs Assistant* Veteran’s Affairs Office Requirements Include: Two year College Degree, and serve as a member of the Armed Forces of the United States during a period of war, Valid Driver’s license, Administrative and Clerical skills, excellent communications skills, computer knowledge with experience in Excel. Applicants must be able to properly handle confidential records, be able to multi-task, and must be able to work in a stressful environment. Veteran’s with knowledge about VA benefits and procedures preferred. Applications may be obtained from and submitted to the Board Secretary, Michael Moron in the Clerk’s Office, Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, Florida 32320. (850) 653-8861, Ext. 100. Applications must be submitted by Thursday, October 13, 2011 by 4:00 p.m. Cage Bird MenagerieParakeets, Canaries, Finches, Cages. Breeder supplies, toys, & gift boutique. 850-708-1536 Apalachicola: Hwy 98 across from the Burger King Friday & Saturday 8:am-until Lots of nice things, too much to list! Eastpoint, 302 Highway 98, Friday and Saturday 8:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m.; tools, light fixtures, furniture, clothes, and household items. Mexico Beach 42nd St, Saturday Oct,8th 8am CST 9 EST, Huge Sale inside & out, Antiques, etc Port St. Joe : 506 8th St. Friday and Saturday 8am til 4pmYard SaleTools, saws, hand carved fishing lures, walking canes, glassware, a lot more good things! Text FL80322 to 56654 GUN SHOWSanta Rosa County Auditorium, Milton, FL Oct 22 & 23rd 9am -5pm call (850) 957-4952 or (850) 261-8407 General Admission $6 Come visit the Old Stuff Shoppe. We have a little of all. From old bottles to cast iron, fishing to glass cookware. Old tables, old pictures. We believe Older IS Better. 252 Water Street or call 850-653-5425 DIABETIC TEST STRIPS NEEDEDI Buy sealed, unexpired Boxes (850)710-0189 Tri Athlete looking for training partner. No Pseudo athletes. 850-447-0691 35765T NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED Notice if hereby given that, FREDERICK CARTER JOHNSON, the holders of the following certificate have filed said certificate for tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property and the name in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate Number: 940 Year of issuance: 2009 Description of property: Lot 3 Anglers Point f/k/a/ Lots 14 & 15 Emerald Point et al Full Legal Description can be viewed at Clerk of the Circuit Court’s Office PARCEL NO: 23-08s-06w-1005-0000-00 30 Name is which assessed: S & P N B, L.L.C. All of said property being in the State of Florida, Franklin County. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the Courthouse door on the first (1st) Monday in the month of November 2011, which is the 7TH day of NOVEMBER 2011 at 11:00 a.m. Dated this 26TH day of SEPTEMBER 2011. MARCIA M. JOHNSON CLERK OF COURTS FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Cassie B. Sapp Deputy Clerk October 6, 13, 20, 27, 2011 Incorrect Insertion PolicyFor Classified In-column AdvertisersAll ads placed by phone are read back to the advertiser to insure correctness. The newspaper will assume correctness at the time of the read-back procedure unless otherwise informed. Please your ad. Advertisers are requested to check the advertisement on the first insertion for correctness. Errors should be reported immediately. Your Florida Freedom newspaper will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion, nor will it be liable for any error in advertisements to a greater extent than the cost of the space occupied by the error. Any copy change, during an ordered schedule constitutes a new ad and new charges. We do not guarantee position of ANY ad under any classification. AKC Silver Weimarana rPups. Health Cert. & Ready to go $500/850 234-7780 35751T STATEMENT OF OWNERSHIP, MANAGEMENT, AND CIRCULATION Publication: Apalachicola & Carrabelle Times 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32320 Publication Number: 027-600 Filing Date: October 6, 2011 Issue Frequency Weekly (Thursday Morning) Published Annually: 52 Weeks Annual Subscription Price: $34.65 Contact Person: Rod Menzel (850) 747-5042 Complete Mailing Address of Known Office of Publication and General Business Office of Publisher: P.O. Box 1940 Panama City, FL 32402 Publisher: Karen Hanes P.O. Box 1940, Panama City, FL 32402 Editor: Tim Croft 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32320 Managing Editor: N/A Owner: Florida Freedom Newspaper, Inc. (a Florida Corporation) P. O. Box 1940 Panama City, FL 32402 Freedom Newspapers, Inc. (a Delaware Corporation) P. O. Box 19549 Irvine, CA 92713 Known Bondholders, Mortgages, and Other Security Holders Owning or Holding 1 Percent or More of Total Amount of Bonds, Mortgages, or Other Securities: Freedom Newspapers Acquisitions, Inc 17666 Fitch, Irvine CA 92614 Freedom Communications, Inc. 17666 Fitch Irvine, CA 92614 Publication Title: Apalachicola & Carrabelle Times Issue Date for Circulation Data: October 6, 2011. Extent and Nature of Circulation; Average No. Copies Each Issue During Preceding 12 Months; Actual No. Copies of Single Issue Published Nearest to Filing Date. Total Number of Copies: Average: 2887 Actual: 2467 Paid Circulation Mailed Outside-County Paid Subscriptions Stated on PS Form 3541: Average: 584 Actual: 516 Mailed In-County Subscriptions Stated on PS Form 3541: Average: 268 Actual: 327 Paid Distribution Outside the Mails Including Sales Through Dealers and Carriers, Street Vendors, Counter Sales, and Other Paid Distribution Outside USPS: Average: 1601 Actual: 1578 Paid Distribution by Other Classes of Mail Through the USPS: Average: 0 Actual: 0 Total Paid Distribution: Average: Actual: Total Free or Nominal Rate Distribution: Average: 8 Actual: 10 Total Distribution: Average: 2457 Actual: 2426 Copies not Distributed: Average: 430 Actual: 41 Total: Average: 2887 Actual: 2467 Percent Paid: Average: 99.8% Actual: 99.7% Publication of Statement of Ownership: October 6, 2011 Karen E. Hanes Vice President September 22, 2011 I certify that all information furnished on this form is true and complete. I understand that anyone who furnishes false or misleading information on this form or who omits material or information requested on the form may be subject to criminal sanctions (including fines and imprisonment) and/or civil sanctions (including civil penalties.) October 6, 2011 35763T NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED Notice if hereby given that, Watkins Children’s Trust/Steve Watkins, the holders of the following certificate have filed said certificate for tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property and the name in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate Number: 193 Year of issuance: 2004 Description of property: Lots 5 & 5A Block 1 Dog Island Gulf Beaches Unit 3 et al Full Legal Description can be viewed at Clerk of the Circuit Court’s Office PARCEL NO: 06-08s-04w-5263-0001-00 50 Name is which assessed: Muriel Arcuri All of said property being in the State of Florida, Franklin County. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the Courthouse door on the first (1st) Monday in the month of November 2011, which is the 7TH day of NOVEMBER 2011 at 11:00 a.m. Dated this 26TH day of SEPTEMBER 2011. MARCIA M. JOHNSON CLERK OF COURTS FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Cassie B. Sapp Deputy Clerk October 6, 13, 20, 27, 2011 35721T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CENTENNIAL BANK, an Arkansas banking corporation, as successor in interest to Coastal Community Bank, Plaintiff, Vs. H & H INVESTMENTS LLC, an Alabama Limited Liability company, EVERETT HAWKER, a/k/a MAXWELL E. HAWKER, and PAUL E. HAWKER, Defendants. CASE NO.: 11-000117-CA CLERK’S NOTICE OF SALE UNDER F.S. CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure dated September 27, 2011, in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Front Door of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market St., Apalachicola, Florida 32456, at 11:00 a.m. (Eastern Standard Time) on November 8, 2011, the following described property: Lots 33 and 34, Block B, Unit 3, St. James Island Park Subdivision, being in Section 5, Township 7 South, Range 3 West of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. Dated: September 27, 2011. Franklin County Clerk of Court By; Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk October 6, 13, 2011 35711T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA PREMIER BANK, Plaintiff, vs. JIMMY W. MEEKS, SR., and SIDNEY GRAY, Defendants. CASE NO. 2009-461-CA NOTICE OF JUDICIAL SALE PURSUANT TO SECTION 45.031(1) OF THE FLORIDA STATUTES TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: Notice is hereby given that pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered on September 14, 2011, in Case No. 2009-461-CA, of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit for Franklin County, Florida, in which PREMIER BANK is the Plaintiff, and JIMMY W. MEEKS, SR., and SIDNEY GRAY are the Defendants, that the undersigned, Clerk of Circuit Court, Franklin County, Florida, will sell at public sale the following described real property: Commence at a 5 inch by 5 inch concrete monument marking the Southeast corner of the Northeast quarter of Section 36, Township 8 South, Range 7 West, Franklin County, Florida and run North 00 degrees 04 minutes 26 seconds East 409.10 feet to a 5 inch by 5 inch concrete monument lying on the Northerly right-of-way boundary of U.S. Highway No. 98, thence run South 86 degrees 53 minutes 00 seconds West along said Northerly right-of-way boundary of 726.12 feet to a re-rod (marked no. 4261) marking the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING continue South 86 degrees 53 minutes 00 seconds West along said right-of-way boundary 98.24 feet to a re-rod (marked no. 4261), thence leaving said right-of-way boundary run North 00 degrees 04 minutes 18 seconds East 200.30 feet to a re-rod lying on the Southerly right-of-way boundary of a 100 foot wide Florida Power Corporation Powerline Easement, thence run North 86 degrees 57 minutes 05 seconds East along said Southerly right-of-way boundary 98.43 feet to a re-rod, thence leaving said right-of-way boundary run South 00 degrees 07 minutes 47 seconds West 200.19 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. The sale will be held on October 19, 2011, at 11:00 a.m., to the highest bidder for cash, at the door of the Franklin County Courthouse, Apalachicola, Florida, in accordance with Section 45.031, Florida Statutes. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated September 22, 2011. MARCIA JOHNSON Franklin County Clerk of Court Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk October 6, 13, 2011 ONDS WEST 200.76 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #7160), THENCE RUN SOUTH 54 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 27 SECONDS WEST 50.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING CONTAINING 0.23 ACRES, MORE OR LESS. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. DATED at Apalachicola, Florida, this 15th day of September, 2011. Michele Maxwell CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT Franklin County, Florida ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF: SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACHE, LLP 4630 Woodland Corporate Blvd. Suite 100 Tampa, FL 33614 (813) 880-8888 10-171359 FC01 September 29, October 6, 2011 35693T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR MARM 2007-3, Plaintiff, vs. CHRISTOPHER W. BATES; THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF CHRISTOPHER W. BATES; KRISTEN SHOESMITH; THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF KRISTEN SHOESMITH; IF LIVING, INCLUDING ANY UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SAID DEFENDANT(S), IF REMARRIED, AND IF DECEASED, THE RESPECTIVE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS, AND TRUSTEES, AND ALL OTHER PERSONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THE NAMED DEFENDANT (S); UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2; Defendant(s) CASE NO. 19-2009-CA-000219 NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above styled cause, in the Circuit Court of Franklin County, Florida, I will sell the property situate in Franklin County, Florida, described as: LOT 4, BLOCK C, PENINSULAR POINT, UNIT NO. 1, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 20, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 1267 ALLIGATOR DRIVE ALLIGATOR POINT, FL 32346 at public sale, at Front steps of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street Apalachicola, FL 32320 at 11:00 AM, on the 2nd day of November, 2011. Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk In accordance with the American with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the ASA Coordinator no later than seven (7) days prior to the proceedings. If hearing impaired, please call (800) 955-9771 (TDD) or (800)955-8770 (voice), via Florida Relay Service. Law Offices of Daniel C. Consuegra 9204 King Palm Drive Tampa, FL 33619-1328 September 29, October 6, 2011

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Local A14 | The Times Thursday, October 6, 2011 Our local real estate experts have identied what they feel are the best values around and are oering them to you in Real Estate Picks! (In this section), Discover the best real estate values in Mexico Beach, Port St. Joe, Apalachicola, Cape San Blas, St. George Island, Carrabelle and surrounding areas. Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Real Estate Picks John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.com MLS#244406 $286,500 St. George Island BAY VIEW HOME Located in the quiet area of the Island, only 3 lots from Bay, 4 BR, 2 BA, large fenced yard, balcony for each upstairs BR, galley kitchen with serving window, separate dining room, large living area, Florida room, inside washer & dryer, large deck, large ground level storage or shop, circular driveway. Brown Street John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.com MLS#242038 $249,000 St. George Island ONE ACRE 1 ST TIER LOT 18 ft dune near road, all of the adjacent beachfront lots already have houses in place. With 256 ft of depth & 166 ft of width behind 100 ft wide beachfront lots, siting your house for the best Gulf access and view is a cinch. East End of SGI. WEEKLY ALMANAC APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE TIDE TABLES MONTHLY AVERAGES To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from these given for APALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW Cat Point Minus 0:40 Minus 1:17 East Pass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27 To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from those given for CARRABELLE: HIGH LOW Bald Point Minus 9:16 Minus 0:03 Sponsor the WEEKLY ALMANAC Call Today! 653-8868 Date High Low % Precip Thu, Oct 6 85 63 0 % Fri, Oct 7 85 64 0 % Sat, Oct 8 83 65 20 % Sun, Oct 9 80 65 30 % Mon, Oct 10 82 65 60 % Tues, Oct 11 81 64 60 % Wed, Oct 12 82 62 40 % 10/6 Thu 01:52AM 1.5 H 06:34AM 1.2 L 11:33AM 1.6 H 07:47PM 0.5 L 10/7 Fri 02:16AM 1.5 H 07:42AM 1.0 L 01:15PM 1.6 H 08:32PM 0.6 L 10/8 Sat 02:36AM 1.6 H 08:34AM 0.8 L 02:32PM 1.6 H 09:10PM 0.7 L 10/9 Sun 02:53AM 1.6 H 09:19AM 0.6 L 03:32PM 1.6 H 09:42PM 0.9 L 10/10 Mon 03:07AM 1.6 H 09:58AM 0.5 L 04:23PM 1.6 H 10:08PM 1.0 L 10/11 Tue 03:20AM 1.7 H 10:34AM 0.4 L 05:09PM 1.6 H 10:30PM 1.1 L 10/12 Wed 03:35AM 1.7 H 11:06AM 0.3 L 05:53PM 1.6 H 10:49PM 1.2 L 10/6 Thu 12:27AM 2.4 H 04:21AM 1.9 L 10:08AM 2.6 H 05:34PM 0.8 L 10/7 Fri 12:51AM 2.4 H 05:29AM 1.6 L 11:50AM 2.6 H 06:19PM 1.0 L 10/8 Sat 01:11AM 2.6 H 06:21AM 1.3 L 01:07PM 2.6 H 06:57PM 1.1 L 10/9 Sun 01:28AM 2.6 H 07:06AM 1.0 L 02:07PM 2.6 H 07:29PM 1.4 L 10/10 Mon 01:42AM 2.6 H 07:45AM 0.8 L 02:58PM 2.6 H 07:55PM 1.6 L 10/11 Tue 01:55AM 2.7 H 08:21AM 0.6 L 03:44PM 2.6 H 08:17PM 1.8 L 10/12 Wed 02:10AM 2.7 H 08:53AM 0.5 L 04:28PM 2.6 H 08:36PM 1.9 L THIS PROJEC T RECEIVED FINANCIAL ASSIS T ANCE FROM VISI T FLORIDA www.BlastontheBay.com P AR T IAL FUNDING FOR T HIS EVEN T PROVIDED BY T HE GULF COUN T Y T OURISM DEVELOPMEN T C OUNCIL 27, from a caller; Putnal said he also learned of the closure that evening, and had been unable to sleep worrying about its effects. County Planner Alan Pierce said Chapman, accompanied by an at torney, had shown up in his ofce at the end of the workday Sept. 27 to inform him of the closure. Also in Pierces ofce at the time was Commission Chairman Noah Lockley. It is very much need ed to make sure the com munications line is open, said Sanders. I have a problem that nobody said to Dr. Chapman to hold on. This would have war ranted a special meeting. I feel like Mr. Noah and Alan was caught in the middle of something. Its disrespectful to you and its disrespectful to us. In the future, when something like this should come down, I want us all to be informed, said Sanders. I am not gonna sit still and let that health department be shut down. Lockley said there was little anyone could do. When (Chapman) come with the lawyer it was knock-off time. Peo ple was walking out the door, he said. We asked and they said there wasnt anything could be done. It was her and a lawyer. Commissioner Pinki Jacket, who voiced sup port at the legislative del egation hearing for keep ing open the Carrabelle clinic, said Tuesday that more communication should have been done. It had been in the works before, they told you, she said. There was plenty of opportu nity for them to talk to this board prior to slam ming the door in the face of Carrabelle. What Ive seen in the past 30 days, we are in a health care crisis in this county. CLINIC from page A12 On Wednesday, Sept. 28, the Future Now team came to the Franklin County high school campus, bringing hope and high expectations with all of its hype. The program consisted of a band that rocked the house, a drama team that performed with thought-provoking dramas and emotional testimonials from various members of the group. The group brought a unique, highimpact message by way of an assembly held during school hours addressing drugs, alcohol and teen pregnancy while motivating teens to strive for successful lives. However, the night service had a completely different atmosphere. Like the old Paul Harvey radio show, you had to come back that night to get the rest of the story. All of the dramas performed in the evening took on a lifechanging gospel message. Each of the young men returned to the video screen to nish the story the students viewed in the day assembly. They each shared their testimony of how things in their lives had turned around after receiving the Lord. The next day after the event, several students approached me, stating that they could relate to the testimonies given. There were roughly 600 students, including the ABC middle school of Apalachicola, who attended the assembly during the school day. Approximately 425 students, parents, and supporters returned for the evening service. The keynote speaker, Chris Musgrove delivered an on-time message to the students sharing experiences of rough years as a high school student and how his life changed after nding Jesus. Chris served as a youth pastor for 18 years, and now he carries the message as he travels all over the U.S. into any high school that will open its doors and allow his team to come in. The Future Now team performed in Perry the week before they came to Franklin County where 200 students gave their lives to Christ. There were 165 professions of faith last week in Franklin County. These young people were convinced that if they continued in the direction they were headed, they too would nd themselves in similar situations as the young men who shared their testimonies. Each child who made a confession of faith was equipped with a Bible before leaving. Volunteers from around the county helped with the collection of data that will be essential for the follow-up process that is intended to connect the youth with the church of their choice. Connection to a local congregation of believers is essential to prevent the students from slipping back into a life of self-destruction. You may not agree that Christ is the ultimate answer to the evil that seems to be snatching our kids right out of our hands everyday through drugs and alcohol, but I am a living testimony of a life that was changed through Jesus. For almost a decade, I fell into the trap that almost destroyed my life, yet I am alive today because of deliverance from anything you can imagine. I am a believer not only because someone told me about Jesus, but also through a personal experience with the Almighty. Statistics show Christian teens, although far from perfect, are less prone to try drugs and alcohol in comparison to those that have nothing to do with church at all. We should never condemn anything that has such an undeniable positive inuence on our kids lives. We would like to say thank you to every person and business that made Franklin County Future Now successful. The event would not have been victorious without the generous gifts from heroes who believe in this generation of youth, for intercessors who battled spiritual strongholds on its behalf, and for every volunteer that played a part in seeing this event through to the end. Thank you to Franklin County School and its leaders for allowing Fellowship of Christian Athletes (FCA) to bring this very important event to our area. May God richly bless you all and remember, youth matter. We welcome all suggestions and hope you enjoy this weekly article. Please send all emails to Scott Shiver at frontline247@mac.com. YOUTH MATTERS Scott Shiver Future Nows message rocks the house Construction crews began a 122-day project Monday to add left-turn lanes at the northbound, eastbound and west bound approaches of the U.S. 98 and S.R. 300 (Is land Drive) intersection in Eastpoint. The $601,000 project also includes sidewalk construction, drainage improvements, signage and pavement markings. Motorists are reminded to use caution while travel ing through the construc tion zones and that trafc violations double when workers are present. Construction begins at U.S. 98 and Island Drive



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xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx 50 WWW.APALACHTIMES.COMPP hone: 850-653-8868W W e b: apalachtimes.comE E mail: dadlerstein@star.com Fax: 850-653-8036C C i rculation: 800-345-8688Opinion. . . . . . ............A A 4 Society . . . . . . ............A A 6 Faith. . . . . . . ..............A A 7 Outdoors. . . . . . ...........A A 8 Sports. . . . . . . .............A A 9 Tide Chart. . . . . .........A A 11 Classieds. . . ......A A 12-AA13 DEAEADLILINESES FOOR NEEXTT WEEWEEK:S School News & SSociety: 11 a.m. Friday Real E Estate AAds: 11 a.m. ThursdayL L egal AAds: 11 a.m. FridayC C lassied Display AAds: 11 a.m. FridayC C lassied LLine AAds: 5 p.m. Monday CContact Us OOut to see IIndex By David AdlersteinTimes City Editor It is a matter of speculation whether former state inmate Norman Bill Williams, who absconded Sept. 24 from woods around Eastpoint after being left by state probation ofcials to camp on government land, will commit the kind of terrible crime that marked him as a sexual predator. It is, however, a matter of fact the 56-year-old ex-con, still at large, has a long record of car thievery, armed burglary and aggravated assault. And had absconded once before when place on conditional release. First imprisoned at age 30 for grand theft auto, six years after being placed on probation for burglary, Williams spent a big chunk of his adulthood in state prison, rst beginning in 1985 and running through 1993, with fewer than two years free during that time. In addition to car theft, he earned convictions for grand theft, burglary of an occupied dwelling, escape, aggravated assault with a weapon and armed burglary, all before age 40. After staying out of prison for nearly three years, Williams was back behind bars in 1996, this time on a charge for cocaine possession. He did nearly three years for that. Hes been in trouble his entire life. Hes a dangerous man, said former Franklin County sheriffs deputy A.J. Smith, who remembers the 1987 escape that landed Williams back in prison after he was allowed to work as a trusty at the county jail. He drove out in another deputys personal vehicle. He not only stole the car, he escaped from the jail as well, said Smith, who pursued the eeing prisoner through dirt roads and the BoxR Ranch toward Port St. Joe. I had to threaten to shoot him to get him to stop, he said. He told me if he could get that shotgun hed shoot me with it. Im not criticizing any judges, but he should be locked up. Hes a dangerous person; hes a bad guy, said Smith. The crime that led Williams to be labeled a high-risk sexual predator took place in 1994, during the time he was out of prison. But the case was prosecuted more than a decade later, during a seven-year stretch when he was free following his cocaine-related incarceration. A 17-year-old female relative came forward in August 2004 to tell county law enforcement Williams sexually assaulted her when she was age 5, in Apalachicola. He would come into her room and ask her to play with him, reads the probable cause afdavit. He wanted her to touch his private parts and he would ask to touch hers. After telling her all kids played this once they got to a certain age, Williams engaged in heavy sexual fondling and petting with the girl, about twice a week, every other week, nearly always at night. No allegations surfaced of sexual intercourse. Thursday, October 6, 2011 Vo O L. 126 ISSUE 23Eds. Note: This is the rst in a series of articles about area cemeteries titled Eternity at East End. By LLois SSwobodaTimes Staff Writer The Isle of Rest Cemetery, just east of the Carrabelle city limits, began as an informal burying place for African Americans. How long the site has been in use as a burial ground is unknown. The marker bearing the earliest death recorded memorializes Webster Goosby, who died at 16 in 1906. The stone also bears the names Jane and Queen Debow and Robbie Ward, who died between 1923 and 1937. The next oldest marker belongs to Frank Miller, who died in 1920. The epitaph on the stone reads An American Woodman. The Modern Woodmen of America was an insurance and fraternal society founded by Joseph Cullen Root in 1883 in Iowa, its membership initially limited to white men between 18 and 45 living in the healthiest states; the Dakotas, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Missouri, Minnesota, Nebraska, Ohio, and Wisconsin. A member could not work as a railway brake-By David Adlerstein and LLois S SwobodaTimes Staff Writers Franklin County commissioners, furious over the county health departments sudden decision to temporarily close the Carrabelle clinic, voted unanimously Tuesday morning to freeze the $146,000 they have allocated to fund the facility. By a 4-0 vote, with Commissioner Smokey Parrish absent due to attendance at a seafood conference, the commissioners froze the funding as part of a weeklong effort to address the closure of the Carrabelle facility, effective Oct. 11. The commissioners also voted unanimously to approve having County Attorney Michael Shuler write a letter to Florida Surgeon General Dr. Frank Farmer, outlining their objections to Commissioners fume over clinic closingIsle of RestBy LLois SSwobodaTimes Staff Writer On Wednesday, Sept. 29, the Franklin County Republican Party welcomed Congressman Steve Southerland (R-Panama City) to Apalachicola with a gala fundraiser at the Coombs Armory. More than 100 guests dined on crawsh mufns and shrimp and grits from the Hole in the Wall Restaurant, topped off with banana pudding from Thats a Moray. Florida State Representative Jimmy Patronis, Rep. District 6, introduced the keynote speaker, praising his integrity and courage. Steve is a person who represents our values and conscience, he said. When he votes, he does it from the heart. He doesnt SSoutherland rallies county RepublicansAbsconded sexual predator has long record nNOrRMAnN BILL WILLIAMS SSee Pr REdDATOrR A2Eternity at East End LOISLOIS SWOBOSWOBO DA A | The TimesA large crowd attended last weeks delegation hearing.SSee CLIn NIC A12 SSee SOu UTHErRLAndND A5 The oldest resident of Isle of Rest may be Mrs. Sallie Walker, who survived to be almost 104.PHOTOS BY LOISLOIS SWOBOSWOBO DA A | The TimesMany tombstones in Isle of Rest are homemade.SSee ETErn RNITY A10 LOISLOIS SWOBOSWOBO DA A | The TimesSteve SoutherlandWild one in Wewa, AA9EEastpoint, IIsland host S Saturday festival The Franklin County Oyster Festival this weekend, Oct. 7-9, in Eastpoint and on St. George Island will highlight the countys seafood heritage. Enjoy educational displays and demonstrations; 5K run; an afternoon of childrens fun and a shing tournament. Seafood will be served, with a concert Friday and Saturday evenings, and two daytime concerts on Sunday. Included in the fun is We Love Eastpoint Day at the new Patton Street pavilion, complete with oysters, a shucking tournament, treasure pit, free hot dogs, information booths, and entertainers on Saturday starting at 10 a.m. and continuing up until the shing tournament weigh-in at 4 p.m. For information, contact the islands visitor center 9277744.OOrphaned wildlife benet SSaturday On Oct. 8, the third annual Woodstork Festival takes place from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. at 3Y Farm, 195 Harvey Young Farm, Crawfordville, 32327. Admission is $5. Enjoy a silent auction featuring art, theme park admissions and more and a live auction from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Music lineup is Ralph Pelletier, Swingin Harpoon Band, Mimi and the HearnDogs, Sarah Mac Band and Rick Ott Band. All proceeds go for care and feeding of injured and orphaned wildlife. For more information visit www. woodstorkfestival.com. CCarrabelle LLions CClub golf tourney OOct. 15 On Saturday, Oct. 15, the Carrabelle Lions Club will hold their second annual tournament at St. James Bay Golf Resort to benet the hearing and vision impaired. Shotgun start at 11:30 a.m. Cost is $100 per player; four-player teams with an 18-hole Florida scramble. A silent auction and banquet will follow the tourney. Cost of the banquet is $25. For more information, call 697-9507. BBlessing of the AAnimals S SaturdayOn Sunday, Oct. 9, St. Patricks Catholic Church and Trinity Episcopal Church will hold a Blessing of the Animals ceremony in Gorrie Square at 4 p.m. Everyone welcome.

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LocalA2 | The Times Thursday, October 6, 2011 At Vision Bank We continue to offer Quality Bank Products & Services FREE of charge! Checking Nobalance & Noservice charge FREE Online Banking FREE Online BillPay FREEUseofYour Debit Card* FREE Excellent Service Member FDIC EQUAL HOUSING LENDER 1 (866) 334-2200 www.VisionBank.net Habitat for Humanity of Franklin County elected officers at its Sept. 13 meeting. Pam Ashley, long-serving vice chair, received the votes to become Habitats new chairperson. She replaces Skip Frink, who will remain on the board of directors in other roles. Ella Bond, of Apalachicola, who has served in committee chair capacity for family selection and family support, received the nod for vice chair. Cliff Butler, treasurer, retained his role, and Lori Switzer will remain in the position of board secretary. Habitats regular monthly meeting in October will be the annual public general meeting, to be held at the Eastpoint Fire House, on the corner of 6th Street and CC Land Road, on Tuesday, Oct. 11, from 6-7 p.m. The board will review past performance and forecast the future of its building work in Franklin County. At this yearly public event, the Habitat board holds an open forum, to discuss past progress, future plans and volunteer opportunities and make nominations to the board of directors. The Franklin County affiliate of the Atlantabased Habitat for Humanity International has been operating only since 2004. This years general meeting will take place at the Eastpoint fire house, on the corner of 6th Street and CC Land Road. Habitat regulars make it clear that their mission is not one of charity to those with open hands. Rather, the catchphrase A hand up, not a handout explains that the group seeks to assist those who have already been helping themselves to the extent of their talents and capabilities. Each family must invest 400 sweat equity hours into the building of Habitat homes, in addition to qualifying under Habitat guidelines of income, work history and credit history. Interested volunteers may visit www.habitatfranklin.org for information and a place to sign up for either construction or non-construction assistance to Habitat. The website also has information on how you may make other contributions, and has info on our events ahead. The ReStore, at the old Apalachicola school location on 14th Street, has bargain-priced goods of all kinds and accepts tax-deductible donations of all kinds of goods. For more information, call 653-3113.Habitat to hold public meeting PREDATOR from page A1The young woman told the law she never said anything about this molestation because she was scared of what Mr. Williams may do. She said that when she was 6, Williams told her he was xing to give her a whipping and took her in the room and molested her. When others knocked on the door, suspicious of what was going on, Williams told her to make it sound like he was whipping her, reads the afdavit. There were times that Mr. Williams would beat her mother with his st, kick her or beat her with an extension cord and at times would even get a knife and hold it to her in front of them, the young woman told county law enforcement. There was one time that Mr. Williams made her mother sit down in front of them and smoke crack. She said her mother refused but that when she did, Mr. Williams took the can and hit it against her mouth and busted her mouth. The victim of Williams sexual acts said that while she was really scared from witnessing these incidents, he had never hit her. The allegations surfaced in 2004 after the young woman conded the details to her counselor, the late Cathy Ake. At the time of his release Sept. 24 from Franklin Correctional Institution, Williams had completed 85 percent of the seven-year sentence, begun Oct. 10, 2006, for this 1994 sexual battery on a victim by one in familial authority. A second charge, sexual battery on a child under age 12, was dropped in exchange for his no-contest plea. First placed on conditional release supervision on April 2, 2010, and assigned to live with the CARE Christian home for men in Tallahassee, Williams ed before reporting to his supervising ofcer. On June 14, 2010, he was arrested in Morgan City, La., for disturbing the peace. A week later, he was extradited to Florida and the Florida Parole Commission returned him to prison. Jo Ellyn Rackleff, a spokeswoman for the Florida Department of Corrections, said the department had no choice last month but to release Williams, even though, shunned by family, he had nowhere to go. So he became one of 99 sexual offenders throughout the state unable to nd a residence that conforms with state law, as well as a growing number of city and county ordinances that restrict where they may reside. There are more than 150 separate county and city ordinances in Florida regarding housing for sex offenders that go above what state requires, she said. The state says offenders can live no closer than 1,000 feet where children congregate, such as in parks, McDonalds, playgrounds and schools. Some communities have harsher restrictions, of 2,500 or 3,000 feet. When you draw a circle around where children congregate, it leaves very, very little space, said Rackleff. He may say I am homeless and a probation ofcer will say You have to nd a place to live and that is legal and where I can check on you for curfew. You cant go to homeless shelters because children are there. But they may sleep under a bush with a GPS monitor, she said. Rackleff said the problem becomes particularly acute during hurricanes, when sexual offenders cannot go to shelters, where there are families. She said the DOC allows them to stay in the visitors area inside of the closest prison to where they reside. Franklin County Undersheriff Joel Norred said it was actually next to a crooked tree, about a half-mile from the county jail, where state probation ofcials decided Williams could stay. Because of the date when his crime occurred, probation ofcials were required to place an ankle monitoring bracelet on Williams, which they charged at the county jail. After saying he needed to walk to secure a tent and a sleeping bag, the probation ofcials left him, telling him to be back at the spot in time for his 7 p.m. to 7 a.m. curfew, part of the terms of his conditional, supervised release. He was going to pitch a tent as he sought permanent shelter, said Rackleff. That would be the place where we would check to see he was during curfew hours. But by 6:30 p.m., the GPS transponder had ceased emitting a signal, and a visit to the site indicated Williams had vanished. The charging stand was located at the site, but the monitored tracking device and ankle bracelet have not been located, said Rackleff. To Norred, Williams prison history should have been a clear signal he might ee. If someone has a conditional release and they are worried about him absconding, why would you release him to somewhere where there is no physical address? he said. Why not one of the conditions be you have to have a permanent address or a sponsor before we can release you? Why not send him to a halfway house? I know that may be the law but its not right, said Norred. People are calling us and worried about this guy being in the area and I dont blame them. They released him within a quarter of a mile of an ofcers house who put him in jail for that charge. And he has kids. The undersheriff also expressed concern that leaving a sexual offender at an unidentiable location undermines the very reason for offender registration. If we have a crime in an area, we can go check the sex offenders, where they are, he said. Thats the reason they make them register, so they can keep tabs on them. How are we going to go do that if we dont know where they are in the county? Norred said state probation ofcials had the option of registering Williams as a sexual predator when they attached his ankle bracelet. Instead, they afforded him the 48 allowable hours that sexual offenders have until they must register at an approved site, which can include a sheriffs ofce, or with their probation ofcer. They could have asked us to register him when they brought him up here but they didnt, said Norred. They could have done it the day they him walked out of the gate. Because Williams did not meet the deadline to register, he is being sought on warrants for failing to register and for absconding. Hes done this all of his life, said Smith. He commits a crime, runs away and comes back after it cools off. Hes very smart and very shrewd and I wouldnt put anything past him.

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LocalThe Times | A3Thursday, October 6, 2011Carrabelles new EDC meets todayThe Carrabelle Economic Development Council will hold its rst public meeting on Thursday, Oct. 6 at 4:30 pm. at the Carrabelle City Complex. This inaugural meeting will establish EDC council procedures and organize for accomplishment of its primary mandate, jobs creation. Everybody is encouraged to attend and share concerns and ideas. For more information, call 697-3618.Friday hearing to address South Shoals settlementThe Franklin County Board of County Commissioners will hold a special public hearing on Friday, Oct. 7 at 9 a.m. in the third oor court room of the Franklin County Courthouse, to consider terms and conditions for a potential settlement of a condemnation lawsuit led by Franklin County against Capital City Bank. The hearing will address property in Alligator Point commonly known as the South Shoal subdivision. The county also plans to hold a private meeting with its attorney to discuss settlement negotiations or strategy sessions related to litigation expenditures prior to any public consideration or public vote on the potential settlement. Interested parties may also submit comments in writing to the Franklin County Board of County Commissioners, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, FL 32320. Persons with disabilities requiring special accommodations in order to participate should contact Michael Moron at 6538861, Ext. 100, by 5 p.m. on Thursday, Oct. 6 in advance of the public hearing to request accommodations. The courthouse is handicap accessible.Seafood workers to meet MondayThe Franklin County Seafood Workers will meet Monday, Oct. 10 at the Eastpoint rehouse, 24 Sixth Street in Eastpoint, at 5 p.m. For more info, call Shannon Hartseld at 6152454.Full Moon Climb at Cape St. George LighthouseThe October Full Moon Climb at the Cape St. George Lighthouse on St. George Island will be held Wednesday, Oct. 12. The Sunset/Full Moon Climb will take place from 6:308 p.m. and will include light hors doeuvres and a sparkling cider toast to the full moon. Cost is $15 for the general public and $10 for members of the St. George Lighthouse Association. The recently opened Lighthouse Museum and Gift Shop will be open from 6-7 p.m. on the evening of the Full Moon Climb. The sun will set at 7:12 p.m. and the moon will rise at 7:23 p.m. on Oct. 12. The October Hunters Moon should be a spectacular sight from the top of the lighthouse. After sunset, people are invited to climb to the top of the lighthouse for a breathtaking view of the full moon, as space and time permit. Cost is $10 for the general public and $5 for SGLA members. The Cape St. George Light is located in St. George Lighthouse Park at the center of St. George Island, where Island Drive (the road off the bridge) ends at Gulf Beach Drive. Parking is available in lots at either side of the park. Because space is limited, reservations are recommended. For reservations or more information, please contact the St. George Island Visitor Center at 850-927-7744 or toll free at 888-927-7744.Gulf-Franklin hosts Medicare seminar When it comes to Medicare coverage and choices, how do you decide? Mainstay Financial Group will present a free seminar to help you learn more on Thursday, Oct. 13 at 10 a.m. at the Gulf Coast State College Gulf Franklin Center in Port St. Joe. Join this seminar to learn the difference between Original Medicare, Supplements, Medicare Advantage Health Plans and Drug Coverage. This seminar is part of the monthly series of free education programs sponsored by Sacred Heart Senior Spirit, a free program for persons 55 and older. Benets include free screenings, seminars, special in-patient benets such as free guest meal tickets and a monthly calendar of events detailing all Senior Spirit events and containing health and event information. For more information or to register for this free seminar, please call (850) 229-5627 or visit www. sacredheartonthegulf.org.Panhandle Players announce new seasonThe Panhandle Players, Inc. is pleased to announce its 2011-12 theatre season. Work, Play, Love An Evening of One-Acts will be at the Dixie Theater in Apalachicola Nov. 18-20. The one-acts are as follows: The Temp written by Roy Friedman and directed by Tom Loughridge; At Half Time written by Art Shulman and directed by Ed Tiley and Caroline Ilardi; and Mark Twains Diaries of Adam & Eve, adapted by David Birney and directed by Dan Wheeler. The second production of the season will be Murder at the Howard Johnson, written by Ron Clark and Sam Bobrick, and directed by Ed Tiley, will be Feb. 3-5, 2012 at the Eastpoint Firehouse. The following weekend, Feb. 10-12, the show will be performed as dinner theater at the Crooked River Grille, St. James Bay Country Club. The Panhandle Players third production, Sex Please, Were Sixty, written by Michael & Susan Parker and directed by Margy Oehlert, will be at the Dixie Theater April 20-22, 2012. Season tickets may be purchased from any Panhandle Players board member, the Butler Agency at 43 Island Drive or by calling 670-5064. Visit the new website at www. panhandleplayers.com.Spooky stories?Times staff writer Lois Swoboda is seeking ghost stories set on the east end of Franklin County, as well as pictures of the cemetery that was once located at the end of Third St. in the area called Popes Mill. If you have pictures or would like to share a story, please contact her at 653-5857 or 653-1819. Your privacy will be protected. We want to share some fantastic news with you about a very important and meaningful youth outreach program that was launched in Franklin County on Wednesday September 28th called FranklinCounty FutureNow. There are not many opportunities to connect with EVERY TEENAGER IN OUR COMMUNITY at one event. The FutureNow daytime assembly was a wake up call to our teens with a message. A clear vision for your life will inspire you to keep from destructive decisions, and help you reach for your dreams and goals! It was well received by the youth, their teachers and school administrators. On Wednesday Night, the Fellowship of Christian Athletes along with your local churches and FutureNow shared with our youth an eternally important message wrapped in an unforgettable presentation. Over 500 were in attendance as students, their families and community folk joined together in a high-energy worship celebration. The FutureNow daytime assembly was made possible through the generous support of our Sponsors!Sincerely, The FranklinCounty FutureNow TeamTHE NEXT FAITHFUL STEPIn these dicult times, there is no investment that could be more important than the hearts, minds and souls of our young people. Everyone in Franklin County can be involved in making FranklinCounty FutureNow an ongoing success through donations and planning for 2012. We feel very strongly that our community and the lives of the students will be changed for the better. Together, we can work to make a lasting impact in the lives of our local teens. Meeting this goal is well within our reach! We are still accepting donations toward our youth program. Our long term goal following our 2011 event is to have our own annual event each fall here in Franklin County. We thank you for joining us in this great cause, because our future is being made NOW! Please send any donations to: FranklinCounty FutureNow P.O. Box 476, Apalachicola Fl, 32329. If you have questions, comments or input please contact one of our FutureNow Team Leaders. Robert Murray 850-210-4129 Themo Patriotis 850-323-0816 Scott Shiver 850-653-6905 Robert C. Bruner Attorney Personal & Business BankruptcyOver 30 Years Legal Experience850-670-3030We are a debt relief agency. We can The hiring of a lawyer is an imNews BRIefsEFS

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Thursday, October 6, 2011 OpinionA4 | The Times USPS 027-600Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 VP/Publisher: Karen Hanes Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six monthsHome delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERSIn case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola TimesDuring a recent sleepless night, a John Denver song played softly on the radio while I tried to doze. In todays musical market, it isnt always easy to listen to lyrics, or to appreciate their message or their imagery. But one of the Denver phrases drew a vivid, special picture for me. I know hed be a poorer man if he never saw an eagle y. Those words, from the Rocky Mountain High song and lyrics written by Denver (together with Mike Taylor) reminded me of the natural beauty of the coastal area we call home. How many times have I seen the Eastpoint eagles soar over the highway and waters edge, or wait patiently in the tree watching for me to pass? The sight of them never fails to bring me joy. And I remember other times and places where I have seen far-distant cousins of these local neighbors. In Alaska, we were told to watch through the tour bus windows, hoping to catch a glimpse of a fardistant brown blob with a Styrofoam cup-sized white head perched in a tree. We were never sure we saw anything! Our Eastpoint eagles are so near that viewing is not a challenge but a frequent privilege of that route! Along the upper Mississippi River between Wisconsin and Minnesota, we have seen more than two dozen mature and young eagles at one time, sitting atop melting ice oes feeding in spring. We had traveled north to spend Easter with old friends. We left our southwest Wisconsin home after closing our restaurant business, and traveled through the night. It was just daybreak when we turned a curve and witnessed the truly awesome spectacle of the huge ock on the icy water. Ill carry that spectacular memory with me forever. And then there was yesterdays story, told by a Carrabelle friend, of looking out past her front porch to see four bears walking together down the road in front of her home. Four bears! What a visual gift it was. Our bear sightings on that Alaska trip were at great long distances instead. Too often we see such creatures as nuisances, getting into garbage or bird food we have made too easily available for a bruin smorgasbord. But my friend saw them for the vision of nature that they were, parading by for her eyes only. Have you seen dolphins along our shorelines break water and jump for joy or just to display their presence? Have you seen sharks chase schools of eeing sh? The egrets, herons, cranes and shorebirds that call our sands home bring color and variety and interest for real birdwatchers as well as for we amateurs who just watch them hunt and parade to their march cadence! Fox families live near our Carrabelle home, and although we chose not to feed them, they continue to visit our yard as if to make sure we havent changed our philosophy. And they are reminders of encroachment into territories that were once exclusive to the wildlife, but where now homes and people grow instead. Here in our Wisconsin yard, deer are frequent visitors, and by the color of their coats, we acknowledge the changing of the seasons. The beautiful tawny red of summer has given way to the dull dun of grey brown now, and we all know the chills of night lead into the snows of winter. And so, beauty is there for the visual taking, wherever we nd ourselves in life and passing through. Indeed, I would be poorer had I not seen an eagle y. Thanks for the reminder, John! Mel Kelly is a frequent contributor to the Apalachicola and Carrabelle Times.Lifes beauty is there for the taking THOUGHtTS FOR tTHE TIMESMel KellyAdditional contribution would ensure new libraryI write in response to Dr. Photis Nichols letter in your Sept. 29 issue concerning the Margaret Key bequest to be used for a larger library in Apalachicola. I, too, had the pleasure of knowing Margaret and her love for the library and the Historical Society. In no way should the bequest made by Margaret Key be used for general city expenses. It may be that her bequest of $400,000 would be inadequate to build a larger new library today or make an addition to the present library. Therefore, I offer this as a possible alternative. Upon myself or Dr. Photis Nichols being assured that the bequest of Margaret Key would be used as she intended, I will contribute an additional $125,000 to her bequest, and then, call upon the more afuent citizens in the area to join with me in to ensure the goal of a better library is accomplished. Yours truly,J. Ben WatkinsCelebrate RResidents RRights MMonth with a visitFloridas Long-Term Care Ombudsman Program is joining Gov. Rick Scott in celebrating Residents Rights Month this October. Residents Rights Month emphasizes the fundamental rights of long-term care facility residents to be treated with dignity and respect, and to have a say in decisions affecting their care. In nursing homes, these special rights range from the right to choose a physician and pharmacy to the right to a 30-day written notice prior to discharge. Residents in assisted living facilities and adult family-care homes have rights that range from unrestricted private communication to reasonable opportunity to exercise and go outdoors at regular intervals. Residents Rights Month is a valuable opportunity not only to educate our communities on the specic set of rights given to residents when they enter long-term care facilities, but also to inform Floridians of the services available through the Ombudsman Program and our team of volunteers. If a long-term care resident ever feels his or her rights are being violated, a volunteer ombudsman can investigate on the residents behalf and seek a resolution. Anyone may contact the Ombudsman Program to submit a complaint or concern on behalf of a long-term care resident. All program services are free and condential. In Florida, there are over 160,000 residents living in long-term care settings. As we celebrate Residents Rights Month, I encourage you to visit someone you know in a long-term care facility, volunteer in a facility, participate in Residents Rights Month events, or inquire about becoming a volunteer ombudsman. Your assistance and attention helps to ensure that the voices of long-term care facility residents do not go unheard and demonstrates to residents that they have not been forgotten. Let us take the time to give something back to a generation that has given so much. Individuals interested in volunteering, learning more about the Ombudsman Program, or learning about scheduled Residents Rights Month activities throughout Florida may call toll-free 1-888-831-0404 or visit http://ombudsman.myorida.com online. Sincerely,Jim Crochet State Ombudsman Department of Elder Affairs (850) 414-2323 www.ombudsman.myorida.com LEttTTERS tTO tTHE EDItTORSpecial to the TimesThe Apalachicola Riverkeeper is among seven member organizations of Save Our Gulf, a collaborative initiative of Waterkeeper Alliance, that Monday released The State of the Gulf: A Status Report from the Save Our Gulf Waterkeepers in the Wake of the BP Oil Disaster. The Save Our Gulf coalition of Waterkeepers also includes Texas Galveston Baykeeper, Lousianas Atchafalaya Basinkeeper, Lower Mississippi Riverkeeper and Louisiana Bayoukeeper, Alabamas Mobile Baykeeper and Floridas Emerald Coastkeeper. The new report documents the progress, current conditions, actions of the Gulf Waterkeepers, and makes recommendations for restoration efforts after the Gulf Coast region experienced the worst environmental disaster in the history of the United States, caused by the fatal blowout on the Deepwater Horizon oil rig. The State of the Gulf highlights the oil contamination found in the water, sediment, seafood, and sea life across the Gulf Coast in the aftermath of the BP Spill. One troubling nding is that contamination in some seafood species may be increasing over time, said Renee Blanchard, Waterkeeper Alliances Save Our Gulf coordinator. We are using this report to hold the oil industry and government accountable for a thorough Gulf Coast restoration. Key ndings of the report indicate: Long-term environmental monitoring is needed The BP oil disaster is ongoing This disaster affects both the nation and the Gulf Coast states There is a critical need for citizen participation in the restoration decision-making process The growing public health concerns in Gulf Coast communities must be addressed All Clean Water Act nes must be dedicated to Gulf Coast restoration The Gulf Region must show leadership by rebuilding, recovering, and restoring sustainability Topics and discussions raised by the report include: Citizen Monitoring: According to the testing results collected and analyzed by the Save Our Gulf Waterkeepers, the proclamation from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration that the Gulf seafood was and continues to be safe for regular consumption may have been premature. Health Concerns in the Communities: Residents who live and work on the water, particularly people in shing communities and the rst responders to the BP oil disaster, are increasingly falling ill. They are being ignored by the BP Victims Compensation Fund and denied health claims by Kenneth Feinberg and the GCCF (Gulf Coast Compensation Fund). These victims are being dismissed and told to seek help elsewhere, without any referrals, suggestions, or support. BPs Public Relations Machine: The great disappearing oil trick: now you see it now you dont! Through a strategic and very expensive public relations campaign, BP has managed to magically convince much of the country into believing the oil is gone. The reality is the oil is not gone, and the long-term impacts are still largely unknown. Leading scientic studies demonstrate that three-fourths of the oil still lingers on the bottom of the Gulf of Mexico, creating an unprecedented and unknown new environmental reality for the Gulf Coast. Where Do We Go from Here? Creating an Action Plan for Recovery & Preventing Future Spills: After a short off-shore oil drilling moratorium, permits are being issued with no signicant technological procedures adopted to prevent future spills of this magnitude from happening again. The BP oil disaster proved the industry and the federal and state government agencies regulating and monitoring these permits were not, and are still not, prepared for oil spills of national signicance. Lessons not learned are bound to happen again. Save Our Gulf believes comprehensive long-term environmental monitoring will be essential to understanding, protecting, and restoring the Gulf Coast ecosystem going forward. To reach the Apalachicola Riverkeeper, call Dan Tonsmeire at 653-8936 or email to dan@ apalachicolariverkeeper.org. Waterkeeper Alliance, a global environmental movement uniting more than 190 Waterkeepers around the world, focuses on citizen advocacy on issues that affect waterways, from pollution to climate change. Follow Waterkeeper Alliance on Twitter at @Waterkeeper and on Facebook.Save Our Gulf releases BP oil spill report Special to the TimesFlu season is here, and the Florida Department of Health (DOH) urges residents and visitors to take precautions to help limit their risk of exposure to infection. Compared to most other viral respiratory infections, such as the common cold, seasonal inuenza often leads to a more severe illness, causing approximately 36,000 individuals in the U.S. to die from this infection and its complications each year. The most effective measures we can use to ght this illness and safeguard our communities are getting vaccinated and practicing good hygiene habits, said State Surgeon General Dr. Frank Farmer. Floridians can do simple things to minimize their own risk of exposure to the virus and to prevent its transmission to others if they become ill. If you do these things, you contribute to both your own health and your communitys health. Symptoms of the u that should be monitored include headache, fever, severe cough, runny nose or body aches. Contact your health care provider immediately if symptoms appear. DOH urges the following preventive steps: Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze. Throw the tissue in the trash after you use it. Wash your hands often with soap and water. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer. Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth. Germs spread this way. Try to avoid close contact with sick people. If you or your children are sick with ulike illness, stay home for at least 24 hours after your fever is gone, except if you need medical care. Get re-vaccinated EVERY YEAR because u viruses change. The 2011-2012 u vaccine will protect against inuenza A, B and H1N1. Individuals six months of age and older should get a u vaccination, especially young children, pregnant women, those with chronic health conditions like asthma, diabetes or heart and lung disease and people 65 years and older who are at increased risk for severe u complications. It is also important for health care workers and other people who live with or care for high risk people to be vaccinated. Since children younger than six months are too young to receive the vaccine, people who care for them should be vaccinated instead. To locate available u vaccine in your community contact your healthcare provider or visit the DOH website at www.doh.state..us.Health department urges u vaccine

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LocalThe Times | A5Thursday, October 6, 2011 care if he votes 436-to-1. Republican County Commissioner Pinki Jackel also welcomed Southerland. He has the great principles he was raised with, she said. He has wonderful humility. What you see is what you get. When Southerland came to the podium, he began by thanking former Republican Executive Committee chair Joyce Estes and current chair Kristy Banks for their support. The rest of his speech focused on family values and the importance of the upcoming presidential election. I grew up in the exact environment God intends every child to grow up in a home where a husband and wife love each other even more than they love the children, he told a rapt audience. The perfect environment to birth and raise and grow little people is in a home and I dont mean a house. Southerland called for accountability and service from elected ofcials. Servant leaders are the highest form of leadership, he said. He said he is optimistic about the future of the United States. As I travel around the Second District, what I nd amazing is how engaged the American people are in the workings of their government, said Southerland. People are waking up to the fact that you cannot trust your government. He urged his audience to be involved in government and seek out accountable representatives. Evil is alive and well. The only way that evil will triumph is if good people do nothing, he said. Next year is a crossroads. There will be a mighty clash in November 2012. You must look inward and ask Am I going to do all I can do to pass along the blanket of freedom as a family heirloom to pass along? Southerland asked if there were Democrats in the room. I know some of you are southern Democrats, he said. The national Democratic Party doesnt represent you. Winning new members for the Republican Party was an ongoing theme in Southerlands speech and for the evening. There were copies of instructions on how to change party afliation and voter registration forms available at the door. At the end of the evening, Southerland was presented with a framed copy of a sketched portrait, created by artist Leslie Wallace Coon for the evenings program. A gallery of photos from the fundraiser is online at www.apalachtimes.com This is a FREE EVENTBrought to you by the Apalachicola Municipal Library and PALS, supported in part by the Franklin County Tourist Development Council www.anaturalescape.com MULLET DINNERSDonation OnlyFRIDAY, OCTOBER 7TH11AM 1PMFirst Baptist Christian School46 Ninth Street, Apalachicola Call 653 540 for deliveries in Apalachicola. LOIS SWOBODA | The TimesLiz Sisung presented Congressman Steve Southerland with a framed copy of the evenings program featuring a caricature of Southerland created by Apalachicola artist Leslie Wallace Coon. SOUTHERLAND from page A1The Apalachicola Municipal Librarys Friends group PALS (Patrons of the Apalachicola Library Society) is presenting a free day-long program: Autumn Authors in Apalachicola, this Saturday, Oct. 8. The event features Florida Panhandle authors who write about the area through ction and non-ction, and a noted historical ction author whose characters would t into Apalachicola circa 1860. Authors will include Apalachicola and Forgotten Coast authors Dawn Radford, Betsy James, Ellen Ashdown, Glynn Marsh Alam, Leo Lovell, Beverly Mount-Douds, Michael Lister, Jan Aninno, Jack and Ann Rudloe, Richard Bickel and others. In the morning, authors and writers will gather at Apalachicolas Raney House to offer their books for sale and autographing. The reprinted Island Light by beloved Apalachicola author Alexander Key will be for sale by Forgotten Coast Books Susan Wolfe. At 1 p.m. the Apalachicola Museum of Art, 95 Fifth St. will feature Robert N. Macomber offering a program: Getting into Character Researching and Writing Novels around the World. He is an award-winning author, international lecturer, TV commentator, magazine writer, and independent consultant, specializing in maritime subjects. His Honor Series, with protagonist Peter Wake, begins in Civil War Florida and portrays Florida from the 1860s to the turn of the century. He is popular in his native southwest Florida, and his books are a hit at the Apalachicola Municipal Library. He will be preceded by local storytellers, and followed by a local writers forum, a short program with Michael Lister, and an overview of the Florida Book Awards, by winner and childrens author Jan Annino. This portion of the event will end around 5 p.m. The Orman House State Park, 177 5th Street, will host an early evening (around 5:30 p.m.) reception with the authors. Beer and wine will be served with food. There is no entry cost, but donations are requested for beverages. For information, contact Caty Greene, librarian, at the Apalachicola Municipal Library 653-8436 amlib@ fairpoint.net or p.a.l.s.apalach@gmail. com. Authors in Apalach is supported in part by the Franklin County Tourist Development Council.Authors in Apalach set for SaturdayAmateur radio operators from Georgia will transmit worldwide from the Cape St. George Light during the Franklin County Oyster Festival on Columbus Day weekend, adding a special attraction to the event celebrating Apalachicola Bay oysters with food, music, exhibits and childrens activities. An 11-member team from the Kennehoochee Amateur Radio Club near Atlanta will hold their second Lighthouse Expedition at the Cape St. George Lighthouse with a goal of making contact with 5,000 HAM radio stations from all over the world. According to team leader Ricky DeLuco, an advance team was slated to arrive on St. George Island on Tuesday, Oct. 4, to begin antenna placement and set up their operations center. A team member will climb to the top of the lighthouse and tie a 5-foot line to the lantern room railing, to which will be attached a wire antenna that will connect to a nearby high point. The primary antenna will support multiple lines to accommodate additional antennas for round-theclock radio operations. An operations tent will be set up on the lawn next to the lighthouse and visitors will be welcome to view the activities, listen in on the broadcasts, and learn about HAM radio communications. The broadcasts will transmit off special frequencies worldwide. As potentially thousands of HAM operators listen in and respond, their calls will be logged toward the goal of 5,000 contacts. The tent will be accessible as long as weather permits. A 24-hour communications center will also be set up in the conference room of the Keepers House, which will be open to the public during normal open hours for the Museum and Gift Shop. The Keepers House is open from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Wednesday, Friday and Saturday, and is closed on Thursday. Operations were to begin Wednesday, Oct. 5 and continue through Saturday, Oct. 8. The purpose of this event is to promote public awareness of lighthouses and lightships, to publicize the contribution they and their keepers have made to maritime safety, to emphasize the need to preserve and restore light beacons as a historical necessity, to promote amateur radio, and to foster international goodwill, DeLuco said. He said that thousands of HAM operators make a special hobby of chasing lighthouses and islands. A website accessible to HAM operators will include extensive historical information on the Cape St. George Light, accessible under the event call sign of K4L. The rst Lighthouse Expedition sponsored by the organization was held in 2010 at the Sapelo Island Lighthouse on the Georgia coast. The event generated 2,600 radio contacts and 70,000 hits to the event website, from both amateur and shortwave listeners who also heard the HAM transmissions. The HAM event is being held in conjunction with the Franklin County Oyster Festival, which will include festivities on St. George Island and at the Community Pavilion on Patton Drive in Eastpoint. The festival opens with a free concert at St. George Lighthouse Park Friday evening. The Saturday schedule includes a 5K run at St. George Island State Park, a shing tournament, food and educational booths in Lighthouse Park and at the Eastpoint Pavilion, activities and games for children, and a second free concert in Lighthouse Park Saturday evening. The festival concludes with a day of music in Lighthouse Park on Sunday. For more information, visit www.oysterfestivalfc. com or call the SGI Visitor Center at 927-7744. For more information about the HAM Lighthouse Expedition, please call Jim Kemp at 927-2000 or Ricky DeLuco at 770-833-2290. Hams join oysters at island festival

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Y PETOFTHEWEEK Franklin County Humane Society Fresh Baked Bread Cheeses Wine Micro Brews Seasonings and SaucesOpen Daily 9:00 AM to 7:00 PM (850)927-5039 112 E. Gulf Beach Dr., St. George Island Qualications: Expertise in: Now Accepting AppointmentsCall Toll Free 888-681-5864 For more info www.seclung.com Lung Disease SpecialistRob Garver, MDNow Seeing Patients in Port St. Joe NOW BCBS-FL IN-NETWORK PROVIDER Megan and Trey tying the knot SaturdayThe parents of Meagan Segree and Trey Millender are pleased to announce the wedding of their children on Saturday, Oct. 8. The wedding ceremony will be held at Lafayette Park in Apalachicola, beginning at 5:30 p.m. A reception will follow at the Fort Coombs Armory. All family and friends are invited to help celebrate their special day.Happy birthday, Ms. DSharon Denice Rochelle will celebrate her birthday on Friday, Oct. 7 :-) Happy birthday, and many, many more. Love always, Poppie and GiGi Grandkids Donate and Kyera, aunt Jessie Mae and familyBrett Gloner turns 2Brett Bentley Gloner celebrated his 2nd birthday with a pony party with family and friends. Brett, the son of Michael Gloner of Apalachicola, turned 2 on Saturday, Sept. 24, 2011. He is the brother of Bradley Page and nephew to Aunt Lena, and Ashley, Jelly Bean and Hunter Butler. Paternal grandmother is Judy Hicks of Apalachicola. Happy birthday from Nanny, Daddy and aunt Lena and family.Happy 5th birthday, RJRaymond Devon West, Jr. turns 5 years old today, Oct. 6, 2011. He is the son of Brandy E. Austin of Apalachicola and grandson of Tammie Croom of Apalachicola and the late James D. Austin. RJ is the brother of Quan Mack and Amontaye Austin, and special nephew to Anthony Croom Jr., Antonio Croom, Antiuania Croom, Regg James and Ann Richards. He is a special godson to Claudette Hamilton of Pensacola and special god-grandson of Madolyn Wallace. We love you, RJ, and wish you many more blessed birthdays to come.Lonnie ONeal turns 6The parents of Lonnie B. ONeal are proud to announce their son is turning 6 today, Oct. 6, 2011. Lonnie started kindergarten this year and is a happy student in Mrs. Dempseys class. He enjoys spending time with his friends, Christian, Joseph and Anthony. He likes the Seminoles, so he is in the minority in his family of Gators. He looks forward to playing football as a Seahawk when hes old enough. We love you, Lonnie Bear.Jimmy and Peggy Higgins celebrate golden anniversaryJimmy and Peggy Higgins celebrated 50 years of marriage on Saturday, Sept. 24. They were mar ried  Sept. 24, 1961,  at Carrabelle  Methodist  Church in Carrabelle by the Rev. Louis Patmore. The Higgins both  enjoy shing and beaching  with family and friends at their second home on Carrabelle Beach. They have two sons, Jim (Kelly) Higgins, Bainbridge, Ga.,  and Jack Higgins, Panama City. They are blessed with four grandchildren, Cody, Ryan, Lena and Alex. The family celebrated at Carrabelle Beach. Happy bBIrthdRTHDAY SocietyA6 | The Times Thursday, October 6, 2011 Wedding AnnoNNOUnNCEmMEntsNTS Enjoying the cool mornings? Makes you feel like getting up and doing something, and the cool weather gives the electric meter a rest. A good, hot breakfast would be nice, and you can get one every Tuesday at the Franklin County Senior Center, 201 Avenue F, in Carrabelle. Serving begins at 7:30 a.m., and ends at 9 a.m. Donations accepted. On Thursdays, we enjoy a good lunch, also at the senior center. Serving begins at noon. When you see a place set up with owers, please do not sit there. The place is in memory of one of our deceased regular guest. Thank you. Its time we gave our faithful volunteers a round of applause. You will see them at the food bank, Lanark Boat Club, the senior center, Chillas Hall, and the thrift shop in the village, and at other functions throughout the county. Yes its true, folks Volunteers Make It Happen! Become one today. Be kind to one another, check on the sick and housebound and smile, Jesus loves you! Until next time, God bless America, our troops, the poor, homeless and hungry. Volunteers make it happen LAnNArRK nNEWsSJim Welsh

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Over 100 people gathered on Saturday to remember wildlife biologist Thom Lewis of St. George Island who died in a small plane crash on June 23. The memorial was led by Themo Patriotis, pastor of the United Methodist Churches of Apalachicola and St. George Island. In attendance were Lewis cousin, Charlie Lewis, and wife Michele, with twin daughters Carlee and Chelsea; Lewis younger sister Sally Lewis Seen, and older sister Cathy Thiemens; and his brother Chuck Lewis and wife Patty, with children Tommy, Caitlin and Chucky III. Thoms mother Thela could not attend because she was in the hospital with a broken ankle. During a brief ceremony, friends and family took their place on a bayside sand dune to share stories of Lewis love of Halloween, hunting and nature and sense of humor. A buffet was provided afterwards at the home of Lana and JR Heady who organized the gathering. Terry Kemp of St. George Island acted as cruise director. Lana Heady said they chose the beachside spot for the memorial because Thom spent a lot of time here, mostly with his dogs that he loved so much, Tia and Chessie. When you heard the whistle, you knew Thom was down here. A gallery of the bayside memorial can be viewed online at www. apalachtimes.com. By Lois Swoboda The United Methodist Churches of Franklin County Welcome You First United Methodist Church of ApalachicolaWorship Service 11:00 a.m. every Sunday Sunday School 10:00 a.m. 75 5th St. Apalachicola 653-9530 fumcapalach@gtcom.net Pastor: Rev. Themo PatriotisCarrabelle United Methodist ChurchWorship Services 10:45 a.m. Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Celebrate Recovery Mondays 7-9 p.m. 102 NE Ave. B Carrabelle 697-3672 Pastor: Julie StephensEastpoint United Methodist ChurchWorship Service 10:00 a.m. every Sunday Healing service every fourth Monday at 7:00 p.m. 317 Patton Dr. (corner of David St.) 670-8825 Pastor: Rev. Beth WhiteSt. George Island United Methodist Church9:00 a.m. Worship Service 10:00 a.m. Fellowship Hour 201 E. Gulf Beach Dr. 9274635 www.sgiumc.org Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis First Pentecostal Holiness Church379 Brownsville Road Apalachicola Were excited about what Gods doing!!!Sunday School 9:45 am Sunday Morning Worship 10:45 am Sunday Evening Service 6:00 pm Monday, Youth Group 6:30 pm Wednesday, Royal Rangers, G.A.P.7:00 pm Wednesday Worship & Word 7:30 pmNursery Provided during regular church services 7:00 7:00 First Baptist ChurchSt. George Island 501 E. Bayshore Drive 927-2257 R. Michael Waley, Pastor Join us as we praise and worship the living Christ. Great is the Lord and most worthy of praise. Psalm 145:3 Sunday Bible Study................................................10:00am Worship Praise........................................................11:00am Sunday Night............................................................7:00pm Wednesday Power Hour......................................7:00pm Wednesday Youth at S.P.L.A.S.H.......................7:00pm Walking in Christ R. Michael Whaley, Pastor WELCOMES YOUChurch of the Ascension101 NE First Street CarrabelleSUNDAY10:00 AM WELCOMES YOUChurch THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH (850) 274-4490 WELCOMES YOU Trinity Trinity Episcopal Churchest. 1836Welcomes YouHwy. 98 & 6th St. Apalachicola 850-653-9550Sunday Worship Services 8 & 10:30 a.m. Wednesdays Healing Service 11 a.m. Centering Prayer 4 p.m. FaithThe Times | A7Thursday, October 6, 2011Services for Ricky Eugene Busby, 48, of Eastpoint, were held Friday morning, Sept. 30, graveside in Greenwood Cemetery, in Cairo, Ga. The Rev. Charles Barwick and Rev. Bobby Shiver officiated. Mr. Busby passed away Monday, Sept. 26, 2011, at his home in Eastpoint. Mr. Busby was born Aug. 31, 1963, in Cairo, Ga., to Eunice Pearl Mulford Busby and the late Joseph (J.C.) Busby. He was a carpenter and served in the United States Marines. He is survived by his mother, Eunice M. Busby, of Eastpoint; children, Amber and Brandon Shiver, of Apalachicola, and Karah Busby, of Carrabelle; granddaughter, Madilynn Brannan, of Carrabelle; sisters and brothers-in-law, Rhonda and Ray Butler, of Carrabelle, and Sheila and Ross Chambers of Eastpoint. He was preceded in death by his father, J. C. Busby, maternal grandparents, Troy and Eulila Mulford; and paternal grandparents, Ben and Olene Busby. The family received friends at the Clark Funeral Home, Cairo, Ga., on Thursday evening, Sept. 29. Guest may sign the online register at www. clarkfuneral.com.Ricky Eugene BusbyDanny Walton Segree was born Aug. 14, 1960, in Apalachicola. He died Thursday, Sept. 27, 2011, at the age of 51 at his home in Apalachicola. Danny was a United States Navy veteran and worked in the hospitality industry. He is survived by his mother, Bonnie Segree, of Eastpoint; sisters, Nina Segree, Ginger Coulter (Earl), and Wendy Smith, all of Eastpoint; grandmother, Laureen Langley, of Eastpoint; nieces and nephews, Kristen Coulter, Logan Smith, Brittney Smith, and Lett Smith; and many other relatives and friends. A celebration of Dannys life was held Friday afternoon, Sept. 30, at Kelley Funeral Home Chapel in Apalachicola.Danny Walton SegreeFamily and friends gathered Saturday afternoon in Apalachicolas Lafayette Park to celebrate the life of Robert Frank Grifn, known affectionately as Napa Bob. Born June 17, 1959 in Fort Valley, Ga., Grifn passed away Thursday, Sept. 22, 2011, at his home in Apalachicola after a long illness. Grifns friend, Harvey Robinson, offered his remembrances as well as a Biblical teaching to open the service, held at the bandstand, which was decorated with balloons. Others offered their memories of Grifn, known for his wry humor as a self-proclaimed manatee hunter, and his willingness to lend others a hand. Ricky Jones, general manager of the Gander Auto Parts stores in Apalachicola and Eastpoint, and store owner Jimmy Gander recalled Grifns work as a longtime employee at the Napa store, his keen understanding of automobile mechanics and his buoyant approach to life. Grifn is survived by his brother, Marvin Grifn, III (Martha); sisters, Joyce Virginia McKenzie (Bob) and Judith Ann Clark; girlfriend, Micki Flores; numerous nieces and nephews, aunts, uncles and other family. Following the celebration service, mourners walked to the end of the pier, where Grifns sisters committed his ashes, and a owered wreath, to the bay. By David Adlerstien DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The TimesRobert Grifns sisters cast his wreath and ashes to the waters.Thom Lewis remembered Thank you, dearest friends and family, for all your loving support, your prayers and for all the love you have shown these last few days. As you know the Master Potter has taken his creation home to a special place among His masterpieces. Vincent Earl Raffield loved life. He started his journey Jan. 28, 1957 and passed away at his home on Wednesday, Sept. 28, 2011. He did not simply exist, he embraced every day as a treasure and created many treasures of laughs, love and smiles for us all to enjoy. An accomplished artist, retired fisherman, oysterman and mariner, a loving husband, family man, friend and blessing to all who knew him, he will be missed. He leaves behind wife, Linda Rafeld; mother, Lora Rafeld Haddock; brothers Chuck Rafeld, Larry Charlton Rafeld and Terry Lee Rafeld; and sisters, Sheila Rafeld Clevenger and MiChelle Rafeld Andrews. A memorial service was held on Saturday afternoon, Oct. 1 at the Fort Coombs Armory, attended by many friends and family. We hope you will enjoy his greatest gift to us all, the memories that remain, and know that his message to us all was to love each other and remember Gods Love Always! Family & Friends weep not for me, for I am waiting in heaven for thee.Vincent Earl Rafeld VinINCentENT RaAFFieldIELDWilliam James Billy Howell, 82, of Ocala passed away Saturday, Oct. 2, 2011. Billy was born to Mabel and Robert L. Howell, Jr. on Feb. 28, 1929, in Apalachicola. A 1947 graduate of Chapman High School in Apalachicola, Billy joined the Florida Power Corporation as a groundman in January 1948. He retired in Dec. 1992, as vice-president after 44 years of dedicated service. While in high school, Billy was an All-State athlete in both football and basketball. In 1950 he was offered a professional baseball contract to play in the Chicago White Sox organization, which he declined because of his commitment to Florida Power and his soon-to-be bride, Sally FitzGerald. Sally and Billy married in 1952, and spent 59 wonderful years together. They had two children, William, Jr. (Bill) and Holly, and three wonderful grandchildren, Lacy and Hunter Townsend and William Howell III. Billy served his country as a member of the Florida Army National Guard for 22 years from 1948 until 1970. He retired as a captain. Billy lived in Apalachicola from his birth in 1929 until he was promoted by Florida Power to a management position in Crawfordville in 1958. While in Apalachicola he was treasurer of the Methodist Church, scoutmaster of the local Boy Scout troop, company commander of the Franklin County National Guard unit, a member of the Apalachicola town baseball team and a member of the Masonic Lodge. Billy is predeceased by his parents, Mabel and Robert Howell, and his twin brother, Robert L. Howell, III (Bobby). He is survived by his wife, Sally, of Ocala, his daughter Holly Townsend (Neil) of Ocala, his grandchildren Lacy Townsend of Gainesville, Hunter Townsend of Ocala, and William Howell III of Miami Shores, his son, William Jr., also of Miami Shores, and his sister, Frances Anne Monroe of Shellman, Ala. Funeral services will be Saturday, Oct. 8 at 2 p.m. at First United Methodist Church of Apalachicola. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville is in charge of arrangements. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Hospice of Marion County, the First Presbyterian Church of Ocala or the First United Methodist Church of Apalachicola.William James Billy Howell WilliaILLIAM BillILL Y HOwellWELL ObituariesMourners celebrate Napa BobThom Lewis nephew, Tommy, changed his name to Thom at the beginning of the school year to honor his uncle. He is seen here sharing a story about a prank his uncle played on him.LO O IS SWO O BO O DA The Times Faith brieBRIEFsSFF irst Baptist offers mullet sh fry F F ridayMullet sh fry dinners will be offered this Friday, Oct. 7, at the First Baptist Christian School on 46 9th Street. These dinners, by donation only, will be served in the church fellowship hall from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. You may eat-in or take-out. Dinner includes coleslaw, hush puppies, baked beans and a homemade desert. Please call 653-9540 to place an order to be delivered (Apalachicola only).YY owell benet Saturday in EastpointThere will be a benet for Tony Yowell, Sr., on Saturday, Oct. 8, at Taylors Building Supply in Eastpoint. The benet is being held to raise money to help offset the medical expenses of Yowell, who is being treated for leukemia at the Moffett Cancer Center in Tampa. Seafood dinners will be available for $6 each, including drinks. For more information, call 850-348-9926.FF aircloth-Phillips reunion Saturday in QuincyFriends and family of the late Dempsey Faircloth and his descendants will hold their 37th annual reunion on Saturday, Oct. 8 at Pat Thomas Park in Quincy. The business meeting will start at noon, and lunch will be served at 1 p.m. Those attending are asked to bring a covered dish/basket lunch, as well as information and photographs relating to the Faircloth/Phillips family history. There will be shing and games for the kids. Lots of fun for all; please plan to see us there. For more information, call Pat Hayes at 850627-2340 or email to jwphayes3@tds.net.United Baptist homecoming Sunday in EastpointThe United Baptist Church, 37 Brian Street, Eastpoint, will host its 28th annual Homecoming this Sunday, Oct. 9. Guest speaker will be Brother Mike Traylor, of Powder Springs, Ga. Morning worship begins at 10:45 a.m. Lunch immediately following service, with a Gospel Sing featuring local singers after lunch. Please come join us in a day of praise and fellowship. For more info, call Bobby Shiver at 6708451.Narcotics Anonymous group meets Sunday eveningsA Narcotics Anonymous group, providing group support for anyone beset by a drug problem, has begun meeting in Eastpoint. Meetings are open to anyone and are held Sunday evenings, at 6 p.m., at the United Methodist Church, 317 Patton Drive.

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E-mail outdoors news to times outdoors@star.com OUTDoo OO RSwww.apalachtimes.comSection A Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL(next to Piggly Wiggly)www.BWOsh.com Your Hunting Headquarters TITANIUM SLIPCAM THREE PACKWITH FREE PRACTICE HEAD 100 GRAIN, 2-BLADE, 2.0 CUTTING DIAMETERWAS $79.99 NOW $69.99 Thursday, October 6, 2011 By Frank Sargeantfranksargeant@bellsouth.net Sharks bite a few people each year in Florida, while people bite thousands of sharks. Some sharks, its true, are very good to eat and some of us just cant resist the urge to mess with something that cannot only defend itself but actually eat us given the right circumstance. Some nearshore species thrive in U.S. waters, where at least some protection has been around for decades. There are good numbers of bull sharks all over the Gulf Coast, fair populations of great hammerheads lots of blacktips the favorite target of recreational shermen and one of the better-tasting sharks along with the mako, which is an offshore species and rare. Catching sharks generally is a pretty simple operation. You put out a large, bloody chunk of an oily sh like bonito, add a bit of chum in the form of chopped threadns or menhaden and wait until the current takes the scent to any nearby sharks. When they smell food, they trace the scent back to the source, sometimes from hundreds of yards away. Obviously, you dont want to be shark shing on the sugar-sand beaches of Panhandle tourism centers, even though there are quite a few sharks cruising these waters from spring through late fall. Better is to head for the jetties around the major passes, if youre shorebound, or maybe out to a nearshore reef if you have a boat. Where baitsh gather, youll nd sharks with them. Of course, in the case of larger sharks, larger sh qualify as bait. Great hammerheads, which reach 14 to 15 feet with some frequency, consider nothing tastier than a 6-foot-long tarpon. At Boca Grande during the height of the tarpon season there from mid-May through June, its common for these monsters to inhale several hooked tarpon every day, and some giant bull sharks also get in on the feast. Bulls are also a common species around Panhandle inlets and in the lower bays, as well as along the beaches. Theyre easily identied by the blunt snout and chunky-looking body. They are among the most aggressive of sharks and are the species most commonly identied in attacks on humans. Smaller sharks, such as blacktips, often follow the mullet migrations; when these sh swarm out of the passes with the rst big cold fronts, the sharks come from every direction to get in on the feed. Blacktips average 40 to 50 pounds but sometimes exceed 100 pounds. They are jumpers, and they are good to eat a good target for any beginning shark sher. Blacktips are easily distinguished by the black tips on the dorsal n. The smallest sharks youre likely to see are bonnet sharks, which never reach lengths much more than 3 feet and weights of 10 to 15 pounds. These look somewhat like a hammerhead, but with less extended lobes on the head. Theyre often seen on the ats where redsh and trout cruise, and they can be caught on shrimp or a piece of cut sh with ease. The mako is one of the most awesome sharks found in the Gulf of Mexico; its usually found at the edge of the continental shelf, where it feeds on tuna and swordsh. Makos have a horric set of jaws; they look like a smaller version of the great white, which is a real rarity in the Gulf because its preference for chilly water. Makos reach more than 10 feet long and are spectacular jumpers, reportedly leaping more than 10 feet above the water at times when hooked. Theyre not much of a danger to humans because theyre so rarely found inshore. Catching one is a rare accident, usually accomplished by swordsh or marlin anglers slowtrolling big live baits. All the larger sharks are real sluggers, and whipping one more than 200 pounds is likely to be all the sharking youll want for a while; it sometimes takes a tag-team of anglers to bring the larger ones to the boat.SHARK TACKLEThough shing for offshore sharks takes huge reels and heavy lines testing 80 pounds or more, most smaller editions found near shore can be caught on standard grouper tackle; an 8-foot rod, 4/0 reel and 40to 60-pound test will readily whip sharks to 150 pounds. Microber line is a great choice for sharking because it gives much more leverage to wear them down; mono stretches and makes the ght harder on sher as well as sh. Large shark or small, youll need a wire leader as long as the shark if you really want to get one in for a photo otherwise, the rough hide of the creature likely will wear through your line. Size 10 or heavier wire is a must. Its also wise to use circle hooks, typically in sizes 10/0 and larger, which set themselves, and which also make it possible to release the shark with minimal damage because the hook likely will set in the jaw rather than being swallowed.HANDLING SHARKSSharks have a exible spine that allows them to turn around and bite objects near their own tail including your hand if you are careless. Many sharks continue to ght once they are boated, snapping at anything that comes within reach its probable more people have been bitten by sharks out of the water than in. The safe way to grip small sharks for dehooking is to grab them rmly just behind the head. This keeps both them and you safe long enough for you to use a dehooking tool to get the hook clear. For larger sharks, hook removal is not a safe option on most; its best to clip the leader at the hook and release the sh; the hook will soon wear a hole and fall out. Though the hook in the jaw is surely a bother to a shark, its probably not a huge annoyance; commercial shark shermen often catch them with dozens of stingray barbs imbedded in jaw, mouth and throat. Last but not least, just remember the line in Jaws where they decide they must have a bigger boat; big sharks readily take out their anger on the boats of shermen who hook them, and if you are out there in a 10-foot jonboat, it might not end well for you.Some shermen just cant wait to bite into a shark FreshwaterGag grouper are being found and caught in all depths of water from 65 to 200 feet. Leave the docks early for the best bite, and make sure you have plenty of live bait. Big AJs are on the Bridge spans and around the B sites and can be caught on live bait and diamond jigs. Inshore OffshoreOctober is off to a good start as the I.C.W. canal here in St. Joe is holding great trout and red sh. Try shing the T for good action on live bait or grubs and jigs. Big mullet are easily found in St. Joe Bay behind Blacks Island and around Fire Tower area. Anglers in Gulf County are enjoying the ne shing lately. Rivers, creeks and streams are holding good sh throughout the county. Lots of good-sized sheepshead are being caught around Howard Creek and in the big river. Good bass reports from are coming in from Kennedy Creek, and the Brothers is producing coolers full of catsh. SPo ONsorSORED bB Y BUdsDS nN bBUgsGS: BeaEAUtTYberrBERR YBy Lois SwobodaTimes Staff Writer Fall is here, and beautyberry is glowing purple on the roadsides. Beautyberry, or Callicarpa Americana, is one of a group of shrubs and small trees in the verbena family. Depending on which botanist you ask, there are anywhere from 40 to 150 species of Callicarpa. The majority is found in Southeast Asia, but species also occur in Australia and Central and North America. C. Americana is the one found locally, although some plant experts split this into two species. Beautyberry grows to be 3 to 5 feet tall and thrives in conditions ranging from damp to dry. It is heatand salt-tolerant, requires little watering and makes an excellent native garden plant with delicate pink owers in the summer and beautiful fuchsiacolored berries in the fall and winter. There is also a white form available. Shrubs may be propagated by softwood cuttings, but they are usually grown from seed. The seeds do not require pretreatment for germination. The berries of beautyberry are an attractive addition to ower arrangements. The fruit and seeds are eaten and dispersed by more than 40 species of songbirds, deer, raccoons, opossums, armadillos and numerous small rodents. The leaves are also a common food source for white-tailed deer. Because the berries are not a highly favored food, they are generally eaten late in the winter so the plant provides a touch of color when little is in bloom. The roots, leaves and branches of this plant were used by the Alabama, Choctaw, Creek, Koasati, Seminole and other Native American tribes to make into a decoction used in sweat baths to treat malarial fevers, rheumatism, dizziness and stomach aches. The roots were used to make an infusion to treat dysentery. The roots and berries were boiled and drunk to treat colic. The bark was used to treat itchy skin. A tea from the root bark was taken to treat urine stopped-up sickness. Another traditional use of beautyberry is as an insect repellent. Floridas early settlers would tuck the leaves under a mules harness to discourage biting ies. Fresh green leaves, crushed and rubbed on people or pets, reportedly repel insects for a couple of hours. In 2006, researchers at the U.S. Department of Agricultures Natural Products Utilization Research Unit in Oxford, Miss., found that extracts from beautyberry leaves could match DEET for repelling mosquitoes. Later studies found it is also effective against black-legged ticks and re ants. Researcher Charles Cantrell said toxicity testing is needed before beautyberry extract is used on human beings but added, Plants containing these compounds have long been used as folk remedies with no ill effects that we know of, so I would not anticipate any harmful effects when plants are used in the traditional way. Mark ARK GOreRE | Special to Florida FreedomBull sharks are one of the more common inshore sharks and one of the most aggressive most of the rare shark attacks on humans in U.S. waters come from this species, which sometimes prowls far into large bays and even will swim up coastal rivers. LO O IS SWO O BO O DA | The TimesPage 8

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Photos by DANA WHALEY | Special to The TimesABOVeE, Sophomore Dwayne Griggs rushes for some of his 200 yards against Wewa. Le EFT, Junior kicker Elton Olvera prepares to boot the ball. BelBEL OwW, Seahawk senior quarterback Zach Armistead, left, and junior fullback Cole Lee, right, escort injured senior running back Chris Granger from the eld.By Tim CroftFlorida Freedom Newspapers During last Fridays game in which the teams scored a combined 105 points and more than 800 offensive yards, the host Wewahitchka Gator defense provided the decisive swing. Wewahitchka (3-2) won its third straight game after its defense came up with three critical stops early in the fourth quarter as the Gators overcame a 41-22 halftime decit by scoring the nal 29 points for a wildly entertaining 57-48 win over the Franklin County Seahawks. On successive series in the early minutes of the nal period, the Gators stopped the Seahawks (2-4) twice on downs, recovered a fumble and converted each defensive stand into points to wipe out a 48-36 Franklin County lead in the nal 11 minutes. Theryl Brown led the way, rushing for 255 yards and four touchdowns on just 12 touches, returning a kickoff 65 yards to set up another touchdown and icing the game with a 5yard touchdown dash and two-point conversion with 1:49 left. What can you say after a game like that? said Wewahitchka coach Dennis Kizziah. We just played better in the second half. We knew they probably couldnt stop us and I think we kind of wore them out at the end there. I think you could see that. But this was all by the kids. These guys just battle. There is no quit in this team. The Seahawks provided plenty of reason to quit throughout the track meet that was the rst half. Behind the running of sophomore Dwayne Griggs (19 carries for 200 yards and three touchdowns) and senior Brennan Walden (12 carries for 132 yards and a touchdown), the Seahawks came out blazing and answered every salvo from the Gators. Wewahitchka helped dig their early hole on special teams. The Gators twice fumbled away kickoffs, both turnovers converted into Seahawk points, and Griggs responded to a Justin Flowers rst quarter touchdown by taking the ensuing kickoff 80 yards for a score. Franklin County got off to a tremendous start behind the sensational special teams kicks of junior kicker Elton Olvera, who was able to kickoff for two coverage recoveries, said Seahawks coach Josh Wright. The Seahawks were up 28-14 with 5:02 still remaining in the rst period. Griggs ran 8 and 9 yards for touchdowns the rst answered immediately by a 64-yard touchdown scamper by Brown and the second by Browns long kickoff return which set up Flowers score. After Griggs returned the ensuing kick for a touchdown, Wewahitchka fumbled away a second kickoff and Seahawk senior Chris Granger (eight carries for 17 yards) made it count with a 23yard touchdown reception of senior quarterback Zach Armisteads pass. Armistead was 2-for-2 on the night, for 32 yards. Armistead hit a touchdown pass early in the second period from 9 yards and Flowers responded on the ensuing drive when he found Jayln Addison (63 rushing yards and two touchdowns) in stride along the left sideline on fourth-and-12 from the Franklin 36 to make it 35-22. But Walden rumbled down the left sideline slipping away from a pile of would-be tacklers for a 47-yard score just before the half ended to make it 41-22 at intermission. The third period seemed more of the same as Brown sprinted 33 yards for a touchdown in the early minutes only to have Griggs answer with a 65-yard touchdown dash through the right side of the Gator defense. But the Seahawks would not nd the end zone again and the Gator defense turned the tide in the early minutes of the fourth quarter, scoring four unanswered touchdowns to keep their winning streak alive. Wright said the Seahawks chose to concede the nal touchdown in an effort to get the ball back with some time remaining, as well as to gamble to stop the two-point conversion and stay within a onetouchdown striking distance. However, the Gators scored the two points on what looked to be an obvious illegal cut block on Brennan Walden, said Wright. The loss left the Seahawks both shocked and disappointed. I knew we played hard enough to win and that we had our most productive game we have had all year. This one is tough to swallow. The difference was, we could not stop what they did and they got some stops on what we did. I am not going to blame the kids. This is the responsibility of the coaches to put them in a position to win and we did not do that, he said. I take full responsibility for the loss, said the Seahawks coach. We cant undo the outcome and we give major credit to the players and staff at Wewahitchka. They have improved immeasurably since last year, and running back Theryl Brown turned out to be as good as we thought he was. Wright said the game also led to two major setbacks that proved difcult to overcome, the loss of junior tight end/ defensive end Ladarius Rhodes and senior fullback and strong safety Chris Granger. Ladarius suffered a mild concussion in the second quarter and Chris suffered a serious knee injury, said Wright. Both players continue to be evaluated and their return to action is unknown until Friday. Wright said the team is busy prepping for rival week against the other Gulf County squad, the Port St. Joe Tiger Sharks. The Sharks are coming off back-to-back losses, but will be ready to showcase their program this Friday as they are hosting the Seahawks for Homecoming, said the Seahawks coach. They are very impressive on lm and are as good as anybody that we play. We have got to forget that we have never beaten them, and realize that the team who plays the best the longest wins. Last Fridays game came down to a similar test with the Wewa Gators simply playing better longer. Friday nights kickoff is set for 7:30 p.m. in Port St. Joe. Thursday, October 6, 2011CARRABELLE A A PALAc C HIc C OLA SP O RTs S www.apalachtimes.com APage 9SectionSeahawks fall to Wewa in wild one James Wineld, a 2010 graduate of Franklin County High School, is a member of the 2011-12 Muskingum University football team. A 6 foot, 189pound defensive back, Wineld is competing on the Muskingum JV squad and is adding depth to the Muskie team. The JV squad has a 3-2 record, defeating Marietta College 14-7, Otterbein University 23-16 and Capital University 21-12, while falling to Bethany College 12-7 and Wittenberg University 27-14. The varsity squad, which competes in the Ohio Athletic Conference, is undefeated under the direction of Coach Al Logan and off to its best start since 1996, now ranked 36th in the nation in NCAA Div. III. WInNFIeldELD playPLAYS FOR MUSKInNGUM UnNIVeERSITyY

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LocalA10 | The Times Thursday, October 6, 2011man, railway engineer, reman, and switchman, miner, mine inspector, pit boss, jockey or race car driver, in a gunpowder factory, or in any job associated with alcoholic beverages, aeronaut, sailor, plough polisher, brass nisher, professional baseball player, professional reman, submarine operator, or soldier in regular army in time of war. All religions were welcome, including atheists. By the 1920s, the Woodmen had welcomed women into their midst in the form of an auxiliary, the Royal Neighbors of America, and apparently Southerners and African Americans were allowed to join as well. Several generations of matriarchs and midwives from a prominent Carrabelle family are interred at Isle of Rest. Classie Lowery was mother to 20 children and adopted several more. She was matriarch to 42 grandchildren, 18 greatgrandchildren and five great-great-grandchildren. Classie Lowery Park was dedicated to her in 2008, after a poll of the African American community named her as the most respected historical figure. Her mother, Savannah Brown, is buried nearby and possibly her grandmother, Aunt Laura Wiggens, as well. Wiggens is reputed to have been halfCherokee and is said to have reached the ripe old age of 111. Another Isle of Rest resident, Mrs. Sallie Walker, passed away in 1997, three months shy of her 104th birthday. Lowerys husband, Henry Lowery, who left her after the birth of their 20th child, is also buried in Isle of Rest but his grave is at the opposite end of the graveyard. Isle of Rest is located on land that once belonged to The St. Joe Company. Mayor Curley Messer said St. Joe gave the land to Carrabelle for use as a cemetery in 1971, while he was mayor. The company received a $10,000 reduction in taxes in exchange for the gift. Isle of Rest contains graves of veterans from World War I and II, Korea and Vietnam. A number of plots are marked with seashells and coral. According to the Carrabelle Historic Preservation Survey, On African American graves, the use of seashells represents the body of water that the deceased travels over in their journey to the afterlife. Is Aunt Laura Wiggins buried in Isle of Rest? Do you have more information about this cemetery? Please contact Lois Swoboda at 653-1819. Next week: The largest cemetery in Carrabelle is Evergreen. It contains graves of immigrants from a half-dozen nations and is the resting place of veterans of as many wars. dbutler@coastalcoverage.com Locally owned and operated to meet all your insurance needs An ornately inscribed headstone from the mid-20th century. ETERNITY from page A1 PHOTOS BY LOIS SWOBODA | The TimesClassie Lowery and her mother Savannah Brown, both midwives, are buried at Isle of Rest.

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Special to The TimesOf cials from the Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) are gearing up to hold three public hearings across the Panhandle, on the departments tentative ve year work program. The hearings will be held throughout the district to present and receive input on the work program for scal years July 1, 2012 through June 30, 2017 and consider the necessity of making changes to the program. The hearing on projects in Franklin, Gadsden, Liberty, Jefferson, Leon and Wakulla counties will be held Monday, Oct. 10, from 11 a.m. to noon in the FDOT Midway Operations Center Conference Room, 17 Commerce Blvd, Midway. Personnel will discuss and receive input on projects in these six counties. These hearings are conducted pursuant to Section 339.135(4)(c), Florida Statutes. The purpose of the public hearings is to consider the departments Improved Tentative Work Program for District Three, for the period 2012/2013 through 2016/2017, and to consider the necessity of making any changes to the program. Public participation is solicited without regard to race, color, national origin, age, sex, religion, disability or family status. Persons wishing to express concerns about Title VI may do so by contacting: Florida Department of Transportation District 3 Title VI Coordinator John Smith, 1074 Highway 90, Chipley, FL 32428 or at telephone (850) 415-9520 or email to john.smith@ dot.state. .us. Or contact Statewide Title VI Administrator, Charlotte Thomas, Equal Opportunity, 605 Suwannee Street Tallahassee, FL 32399-0450 or at telephone (850) 414-4747 or email to charolotte. thomas@dot.state. .us Persons who require special accommodations under the Americans with Disabilities Act or persons who require translation services (free of charge) should contact Regina Battles at (850) 415-9270 at least seven days prior to the meeting. Written comments from TPOs/ TPAs and other interested parties will be received by the Department at the Public Hearings and within 10 days thereafter. Comments should be addressed to Mr. James T. Bar eld, P.E., District Secretary, FDOT, District Three, Post Of ce Box 607, Chipley, FL 32428. Trades & Services CALL TODAY!653-8868 GET YOUR AD INTrades & Services Laban Bontrager, DMD Monica Bontrager, DMD 12761 Pea Ridge Road Bristol, Florida 32321TELEPHONE (850) 643-5417 Bristol Dental ClinicDENTURE LAB ON PREMISESSame Day Service on repairs and Relines Don Lively General Contractors C Visa, Discover, and American Express Honored at Participating Ace Stores JACKSONS Building Supplies & Auto Repair Carrabelle 697-3333 We Deliver Anywhere J Hardware and Paint Center PILE DRIVING FOUNDATION/PILING REPAIR DOCK/MARINE WORK MOORING BOUYSOFFICE: 850.227.1709FAX: 850.762.2552 CELL: 850.527.5725 HOWARD227FAIRPOINT.NET ROBERTS APPLIANCE REPAIR ALL MAJOR BRANDS 18 Shadow Lane Apalachicola, FL 32320 Phone: (850) 653-8122 Cell: (850) 653-7654 JOES LAWN CARE NO JOB TOO BIG!! SINCE 2002, DOINGBUSINESSINTHISCOMMUNITY LAWN CARE, TREE & PALM TREE TRIMMING AND REMOVAL, DEBRIS AND JUNK REMOVAL, or whatever your yard needs are CALL JOE @ 850-670-5478 E-MAIL @ joes_lawn@yahoo.com Early detection means more lives saved. If you havent already done so, call Weems Memorial Hospital to schedule your screening mammogram. Franklin Needs, Inc. provides free screening mammograms at Weems Memorial Hospital for Franklin County residents, aged 35 to 64, with no health insurance. Encourage those you love to schedule theirs as well. Just call 653-8853extension 119 to make your appointment today! October is Breast Cancer Awareness Mont h AFFORDABLE ST. GEORGE ISLAND INTERIOR HOME3BR/2BA home on 1/3 acre lot in quiet area on Bayshore D r Cozy wood interior with freestanding replace, large decks. Good full time resident or vacation h ome!MLS# 243422.................$288,000 T ravis Stanley 850.653.6477 Grayson Shepard 850.653.6718 Kim Davis 850.653.6875 Leon T eat 850.653.5656 Jackie Golden 850.899.8433 Jamie Crum 850.370.0835 Sandy Mitche m 850.899.8300 AFFORDABLE CARRABELLE BEACHOwn a piec e o f Carrabelle histor y! The original ligh t h ouse k eepers h ouse h as 3 BR/ 1 BA on 1.3 peac e f ul a c res backing up to T ates Hell Hik ing T rail. L o v ely porches! MLS# 243618...........$269,000 C ARRABELLE B EAC H GREATER APALACHICOLAEnjoy quiet c ountry living on 3.75 acres. L ovely custo m built 3BR/2.5 BA home with many upgrades Jacuzzi, deck, large walk in closet 1600 sq.ft. outbuilding on concrete pad.MLS#244666..............$275,000NEW LOW PRICE! VACANT LOT ST. GEORGE ISLANDPLANTATIONOne a c re interior lot a c ross t h e street from S GI airport nex t to buff er propert y for more priv a cy. State owned land a c ross t h e street on t h e bay, righ t on beach a ccess!MLS# 243448.................$75,000 G REA T A ER NEW LOW PRICE! EASTPOINT3 BR/2BA ho m e on priv ate 3 a c res! Low maintenan c e metal roof, viny l siding and great front porch. Backs up to state land.MLS# 244269$120,000 N EWLOW P RICE! NEW LOW PRICE! BAYVIEW VACANT LOT ST. GEORGE ISLANDBank owned v acant lot in quiet area across the street from the bay! High and dr y with oak trees and mature pines.MLS# 242005...........$ 59,000 N EWLOW P RICE! BANK OWNED BILL MILLER REALTY850-697-3751 (3310) 570-0658WOW! 1BDR FURNISHED APT $15,000 $29,500 $2,500 DOWN BUYS 2 BED APT. 2 6 GULF VIEW & ACCESS 3 BDR 2 BA 2006 M/H 16 X 80 $89,000 $500DOWN CHOICE OF 3 CITY LOTS $180.00/MONTH OR $17,500/EACH MIH 2 CRNRLOTS BLK. $ STORE REDUCED $49,500 3DOOR NICE 2 B/R MH 2CRNR. LOTS $47,500 The following report is provided by the Franklin County Sheriffs Of ce. Arrests are made by of cers from the following city, county, and state law enforcement agencies: Apalachicola (APD), Carrabelle (CPD), Florida Highway Patrol (FHP), Franklin County Sheriffs Of ce (FCSO), Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC), Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP), Florida Department of Corrections (FDOC), Florida Division of Insurance Fraud (DIF) and Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (FLDACS). All defendants are considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law.Sept. 26Jeremy R. Nowling, 34, Apalachicola, criminal mischief (FCSO) Mandy A. Creamer, 33, Eastpoint, two counts introduction of contraband into a correctional facility (FCSO) Sheri M. Mann, 33, Eastpoint, domestic battery (FCSO)Sept. 27Kenneth May, 47, Carrabelle, battery (CPD) Leon W. Irvin, 47, Eastpoint, failure to appear (FCSO) Jessica M. Billetter, 31, Savannah, Ga., seven counts of possession of a controlled substance and possession of paraphernalia (FCSO) Sept. 28Kayla R. Langley, 27, Eastpoint, violation of probation (FCSO)Sept. 29Lawrence Troy, 62, St. George Island, trespass on property after warning (FCSO)Sept. 30Thomas E. Cooper, 21, Eastpoint, failure to appear (FCSO) Frederick R. Wilsey, 46, Eastpoint, failure to appear (FCSO) Shane Z. Creamer, 26, Apalachicola, disorderly intoxication (FCSO) Oct. 1Willie E. Pelt, 29, Port St. Joe, violation of a domestic violence injunction (FCSO) Mary R. Nowling, 23, Eastpoint, domestic battery and no valid drivers license (FCSO) Oct. 2Christal Wallace, 35, Carrabelle, two counts of passing worthless bank checks (FCSO) Joe B. Blan III, 30, Apalachicola, Bay County warrant for failure to appear (APD)Oct. 3Robert D. New, Jr., 37, Eastpoint, violation of probation (FCSO) David D. Hartman, 33, Eastpoint, disorderly intoxication (FCSO) Taylor C. Bailey, 23, Apalachicola, reckless driving (APD)Arrest REPORTDOT to take input on 5-year plan Law EnforcementThe Times | A11Thursday, October 6, 2011

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A12 | The Times Thursday, October 6, 2011 A12| The Times Thursday, October 6, 2011 CLASSIFIEDS 35663T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2nd JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY The Bank of New York, as Trustee for TBW Mortgage-Backed Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2006-2 Plaintiff, -vs.Anthony L. Gelch; Defendant(s) Case #: 2010-CA-000230 Division #: AMENDED NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated September 15, 2011, entered in Civil Case No. 2010-CA-000230 of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein The Bank of New York, as Trustee for TBW MortgageBacked Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2006-2, Plaintiff and Anthony L. Gelch are defendant(s), I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, AT THE WEST FRONT DOOR OF THE FRANKLIN COUNTY COURTHOUSE, LOCATED ON HWY 98, IN APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA, AT 11:00 A.M., October 19, 2011, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit: BEGIN AT A POINT 646 FEET EAST AND 12.5 FEET SOUTH FROM THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 32, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 6 WEST, RUN THENCE SOUTH 36 DEGREES EAST 200 FEET TO THE 100 FOOT U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 319, THENCE RUN NORTHEASTERLY ALONG RIGHT OF WAY OF SAID HIGHWAY, A DISTANCE OF 50 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 36 DEGREES WEST 200 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 54 DEGREES WEST 50 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. THUS FORMING A TRACT PARTLY IN THE NW 1/4 OF SAID SECTION 32 AND PARTLY IN THE SW 1/4 OF SECTION 29, FRONTING 50 FEET ON THE NORTHERN SIDE OF HIGHWAY AND RUNNING BACK 240 FEET. ALSO KNOWN AS: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 32, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 6 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND RUN EAST 646.00 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 12.50 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261) LYING ON THE NORTHEASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF 2ND STREET SAID POINT ALSO BEING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN SOUTH 36 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST ALONG S AID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 200.42 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #7160), LYING ON THE INTERSECTION OF SAID 2ND STREET WITH THE NORTHWESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 98, THENCE RUN NORTH 54 DEGREES 28 MINUTES 47 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE NORTHWESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 98 A DISTANCE OF 50.00 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #7160), THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY RUN NORTH 35 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 58 SEC35602T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CITIMORTGAGE, INC. Plaintiff, v. DEBORAH RUSSELL A/K/A DEBORAH Y. RUSSELL; DOUG RUSSELL A/K/A DOUGLAS W. RUSSELL; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT (S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS. Defendant(s). CASE NO.: 19-2009-CA-000714 SEC: NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order to Reschedule Foreclosure Sale dated August 31, 2011, entered in Civil Case No. 19-2009-CA-000714 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest bidder for cash on the 12th day of October, 2011, at 11:00 a.m. on the Front steps of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida 32320, relative to the following described property as set forth in the Final Judgment, to wit: LOTS 1 AND 2 AND THE SOUTHWESTERLY OF LOT 3 IN BLOCK 15, IN LANARK VILLAGE, UNIT NO. 3, A SUBDIVISION IN FRACTIONAL SECTION 12, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 4 WEST, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, AT PAGE 19 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance, Please contact: Court Administrator Phone: (850) 577-4401. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call Florida Relay Service, hearing 800-955-8771, voice 800-955-8770. DATED AT APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA, THIS 12th DAY OF September, 2011. MARCIA JOHNSON CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk September 29, October 6, 2011 the temporary closure, and specifically targeting Dr. Karen Chapman, the interim director of the health department. Chapman has been the target of withering criticism from Commissioners Cheryl Sanders and Bevin Putnal, who represent the eastern end of the county. This is it. I want this woman out of Franklin County, a tearful Sanders told the legislative delegation meeting Sept. 28. If that lady at the health department dont want to do what is the will of the people, I want her moved out of Franklin County. Amidst an air of confusion and concern, details of the clinic closing first emerged at the delegation hearing, through a letter from Farmer presented by delegation chairman State Rep. Leonard Bembry (D-Monticello), and State Senator Bill Montford (D-Tallahassee). Also attending the delegation meeting was State Rep. Jimmy Patronis (R-Panama City), who has been less involved in the clinic issue since his district extends east only to the Apalachicola River. Farmers Sept. 29 letter to Montford and Bembry followed up on a hastily scheduled Sept. 28 meeting the legislators had with Farmer and his staff. We were as embarrassed and shocked as any of you, he told the meeting, packed largely with Carrabelle-area residents angry over the closure. Farmers letter indicated that as of Sept. 27, the Carrabelle clinic has been without an available health care provider to deliver primary care services at the Carrabelle clinic. The surgeon general declined any further comment on the status of Dana Whaley ARNP, who had been providing care at the clinic and whose services and reputation have been strongly defended by Putnal and Sanders. The Department of Health is not in a position to comment on the circumstances that gave rise to that reality (the absence of a primary care provider), wrote Farmer. He wrote that the health department was committed to ensuring appropriate access to care as well as fiscal integrity during the time it temporarily finds itself without an available primary care provider. Farmer said that because there are two doctors at the adjacent Weems East Urgent Care Clinic and former Weems physician Dr. Lionel Catlin has opened his own practice in Carrabelle at the Phoenix Family Health Care Center at 1581 West U.S. 98 the department made the decision..that it was in the best interest of all parties to temporarily close the Carrabelle clinic on Oct. 11 for services during the time no primary care provider was available. Farmer stressed the closure would be temporary, and the clinic would continue to remain open every Wednesday, staffed by a physician who provides family planning and sexually transmitted disease services, immunizations and other public health functions. In addition, the Carrabelle clinic will be open the first Friday afternoon of each month, as previously scheduled, for medical appointments with Dr. Eugene Charbonneau, wrote the surgeon general. The health departments decision regarding Whaley, and the temporary closure, met with stiff opposition at the delegation hearing. It hurts peoples feelings and it really messes up some peoples lives, said Putnal. Weve got some special needs clients who have built a relationship with Dana, little blind kids who dont want to go to anybody else, and 80to 90-year-old patients who wont go anywhere else. This is devastating when you take something like that away from them. I dont know whos behind it but theres some evil going on with this situation and it has been for a long time, he said. We need to get to the bottom of it and find out what it is. Whoever is behind all this evil needs to be hunted down and tended to. Putnal said he did not believe Danas professional services were the issue. Whether they say it is or not, you can doctor up papers that she turns in and changing them will make her look like an idiot. And I know shes not an idiot because shes treated me many times, he said. Im telling you we need that health department for these folks when they are sick. Sanders also staunchly defended Whaley, whose career has included earning an advanced registered nurse degree from Florida State University. Shes born and raised in Franklin County. Shes one of our own, said the county commissioner. Shes come back to help the people of Franklin County and all thats been done has been a witch hunt on her. You dont mess with my people and thats what theyve done. The legislators also heard from several other Carrabelle-area residents, who spoke in favor of retaining Whaley and keeping open the Carrabelle clinic. Dr. Chapman has a personal vendetta against her because people call her Dr. Whaley, said Wanda Whaley, Dana Whaleys mother-in-law. To us, shes our doctor and knows our health and personal histories. That health department wont open again, feared Nita Millender. Carrabelle Mayor Curley Messer too voiced concern that this temporary closure could mean the end of the clinics operations. If you close one, close them all, because they dont treat the people on the east side of the river. If you close it, close the one in Apalachicola, he said. Putnal told the three state legislators that the adjacent Weems East urgent care clinic, which Weems CEO Davie Lloyd has promised to beef up in terms of hours and providers, is not the answer. Even if we get our urgent care clinic going at full strength, we cant handle all those patients. Thats for urgent care patients. Thats what people voted for, he said. It works out perfect; its a perfect solution. We dont even have a doctor out there now (at Weems East). We need that thing going at fullstrength for people who have heart attacks and who need urgent care. At Tuesdays meeting, Sanders voiced angry concerns that the matter of the sudden closure had not been properly handled by county staff. She said she learned of the closure at 9 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. Cheryl Sanders CLINIC from page A1PHOTOS BY LOIS SWOBODA | The TimesNita MillenderSee CLINIC A14 Local | Classieds

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, October 6, 2011 The Times | A13 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322850-697-9604 850-323-0444 www.seacrestre.comRENTALS2 BR 11/2 BA UNFURNISHED HOME Country Living Eastpoint Area ......................$800 2 BR 1 BA UNFURNISHED HOUSE Downtown, LR, DR, Storage Room .................$650 1 BR 1 BA UNFURNISHED HOUSE ............$500 DOWNTOWN RIVER CONDO, BOAT SLIP 3 Night Minimum .......................$105 PLUS DAILY PIRATES LANDING 1 BR CONDO/POOL 3 Night Minimum .......................$105 PLUS DAILY 3 BR 3 BA FURNISHED CONDO Long Term, Pool..............................................$850 2 BR 1 BA FURNISHED APARTMENT Den & Living Area ..........................................$550 3 BR 2 BA FURNISHED CONDO Boat & Car Parking ..............................$850 WKLY 3 BR 3 BA FURNISHED CONDO Pool, Downtown ..........................$700 WKLY PLUS 3 BR 1 BA FURNISHED APARTMENT Pet Friendly ...................WKLY & MONTHLY RATES Classifiedcan!If youre ready to move up or are just starting out Classified can help you open the door to home ownership. Weve got properties at every price, with locations all over town! And if youre planning to sell, Classified can introduce you to the markets best prospects. Airlines Are Hiring Train for high paying Aviation Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-206-9405 Attend College Online from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Paralegal, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 866-467-0054 www.Centura.us.com ATV, Dirtbike Motorcycle RepairI am a dealer trained, and factory certified ATV and Motorcycle technician. Call me for any repair or service needs for your ATV, Motorcycle, Dirtbike, or Personal Watercraft. Tuesday-Saturday 9:am-6:pm. Sea-N-Say Powersports in Apalachicola 850-370-1089 Text FL79471 to 56654 Full Service, Turn Key restaurant for lease at Commerce Street and Avenue E in downtown Apalachicola. For more info call 850-653-8801 Text FL79133 to 56654 1 br, 1 ba, with full kitchen and living room Call for information 850-653-6103 Heritage Villas and Southern Villas of Apalachicola ApartmentsAccepting applications for 1, 2, & 3 br HC & non-HC accessible units. Some rental assistance may be available. HUD vouchers accepted. Call 850-653-9277. TDD/TTY 711. This institution is an equal opportunity provider, and employer. Publishers NoticeAll real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on a equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. Studio Apt. Furnished Upstairs studioQuiet location, water & electric incl. Walk to downtown. $700 mo + dep. No pets. For appt 653-9116 or 320-1174 St. George Island $160 wk, Electric, Satellite, Garbage incl. pool tble. 12X65 deck w/Beautiful view 850-653-5114 1 or 3 BRCH/A in Apalachicola, FL. 850-643-7740. 2 br, 1 bath house on St George Island. $650 month. 229-824-7493 or 229-942-0329 Text FL77072 to 56654 Lanark, 2 br, 1 ba, w/ lg fenced yard, separate LR & den, covered parking & storage, $575 mo, 2529 Florida Ave., Call 850-528-0716 Install/Maint/RepairCleanerCheerful, detailed person for various household duties. Indian Pass area. 4 hours daily. Excellent references required. (850) 227-7234 Medical/HealthCNAsCaring people needed. Join a team of people who make a difference in the lives of the elderly. Provide non medical companionship, in home help and personal care for the elderly. Flexible day, evenin & weekend hours. Positions available in the Apalachicola area.Home Instead Senior CareCall Mon-Thur 9-3pm 850-640-1223 or toll free 1-866-301-1919 Web ID#: 34179682 Text FL79682 to 56654 Sales/Business Dev Aggressively growing Insurance company is in search of the following:CSR/ Insurance AgentApalachicolaThe ideal candidate must: *Currently hold a Florida 4-40 Insurance License *Be able to navigate multi-insurance company web rating programs *Have excellent communication skills Submit applications to: my100bank.com /careers EOE M/F/V/D 95% Success Chance. No Direct Sales. Test This Easy Home Business. $69.95 Risk-Free, Limited-Time Offer. 1-888-835-6822; 1-800-447-0503 Accounting/Finance Franklin County Health Department is accepting applications for the following Career Service position:Accountant IIIReference Requisition #64080005-51262181-2 0110919160029 Salary: $29,344.38 Applications will be accepted through 10/21/11 Minimum qualifications: a bachelors degree from an accredited college or university with a major in accounting and two years of professional accounting experience; or two years of professional accounting experience with the State of Florida. A masters degree from an accredited college or university in accounting or possession of a Certified Public Accountant (CPA) certificate and one year of professional accounting experience. Professional or nonprofessional accounting experience or any combination of this experience and up to 60 semester or 90 quarter hours of college education provided such education includes two courses in accounting can substitute on a year-for-year basis for the required bachelors degree. Experience with Medicaid/Medicare and 3rd party insurance billing is preferred. Apply online at https://jobs.myflorida.com or contact People First at 1-877-562-7287. ONLY online applications submitted through the People First website will be accepted for this position. Background check including fingerprinting required. The successful candidate will be required to complete the Form I-9 and that information will be verified using the E-Verify system. E-Verify is operated by the Department of Homeland Security in partnership with the Social Security Administration to verify employment eligibility. Minorities strongly encouraged to apply. EO/AA/VP Employer. Administrative/ClericalNOTICEThe Franklin County Board of County Commissioners, Franklin County, Florida will consider applications for the following position: *Temporary-Part Time Veterans Affairs Assistant* Veterans Affairs Office Requirements Include: Two year College Degree, and serve as a member of the Armed Forces of the United States during a period of war, Valid Drivers license, Administrative and Clerical skills, excellent communications skills, computer knowledge with experience in Excel. Applicants must be able to properly handle confidential records, be able to multi-task, and must be able to work in a stressful environment. Veterans with knowledge about VA benefits and procedures preferred. Applications may be obtained from and submitted to the Board Secretary, Michael Moron in the Clerks Office, Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, Florida 32320. (850) 653-8861, Ext. 100. Applications must be submitted by Thursday, October 13, 2011 by 4:00 p.m. Cage Bird MenagerieParakeets, Canaries, Finches, Cages. Breeder supplies, toys, & gift boutique. 850-708-1536 Apalachicola: Hwy 98 across from the Burger King Friday & Saturday 8:am-until Lots of nice things, too much to list! Eastpoint, 302 Highway 98, Friday and Saturday 8:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m.; tools, light fixtures, furniture, clothes, and household items. Mexico Beach 42nd St, Saturday Oct,8th 8am CST 9 EST, Huge Sale inside & out, Antiques, etc Port St. Joe : 506 8th St. Friday and Saturday 8am til 4pmYard SaleTools, saws, hand carved fishing lures, walking canes, glassware, a lot more good things! Text FL80322 to 56654 GUN SHOWSanta Rosa County Auditorium, Milton, FL Oct 22 & 23rd 9am -5pm call (850) 957-4952 or (850) 261-8407 General Admission $6 Come visit the Old Stuff Shoppe. We have a little of all. From old bottles to cast iron, fishing to glass cookware. Old tables, old pictures. We believe Older IS Better. 252 Water Street or call 850-653-5425 DIABETIC TEST STRIPS NEEDEDI Buy sealed, unexpired Boxes (850)710-0189 Tri Athlete looking for training partner. No Pseudo athletes. 850-447-0691 35765T NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED Notice if hereby given that, FREDERICK CARTER JOHNSON, the holders of the following certificate have filed said certificate for tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property and the name in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate Number: 940 Year of issuance: 2009 Description of property: Lot 3 Anglers Point f/k/a/ Lots 14 & 15 Emerald Point et al Full Legal Description can be viewed at Clerk of the Circuit Courts Office PARCEL NO: 23-08s-06w-1005-0000-00 30 Name is which assessed: S & P N B, L.L.C. All of said property being in the State of Florida, Franklin County. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the Courthouse door on the first (1st) Monday in the month of November 2011, which is the 7TH day of NOVEMBER 2011 at 11:00 a.m. Dated this 26TH day of SEPTEMBER 2011. MARCIA M. JOHNSON CLERK OF COURTS FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Cassie B. Sapp Deputy Clerk October 6, 13, 20, 27, 2011 Incorrect Insertion PolicyFor Classified In-column AdvertisersAll ads placed by phone are read back to the advertiser to insure correctness. The newspaper will assume correctness at the time of the read-back procedure unless otherwise informed. Please your ad. Advertisers are requested to check the advertisement on the first insertion for correctness. Errors should be reported immediately. Your Florida Freedom newspaper will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion, nor will it be liable for any error in advertisements to a greater extent than the cost of the space occupied by the error. Any copy change, during an ordered schedule constitutes a new ad and new charges. We do not guarantee position of ANY ad under any classification. AKC Silver Weimarana rPups. Health Cert. & Ready to go $500/850 234-7780 35751T STATEMENT OF OWNERSHIP, MANAGEMENT, AND CIRCULATION Publication: Apalachicola & Carrabelle Times 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32320 Publication Number: 027-600 Filing Date: October 6, 2011 Issue Frequency Weekly (Thursday Morning) Published Annually: 52 Weeks Annual Subscription Price: $34.65 Contact Person: Rod Menzel (850) 747-5042 Complete Mailing Address of Known Office of Publication and General Business Office of Publisher: P.O. Box 1940 Panama City, FL 32402 Publisher: Karen Hanes P.O. Box 1940, Panama City, FL 32402 Editor: Tim Croft 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32320 Managing Editor: N/A Owner: Florida Freedom Newspaper, Inc. (a Florida Corporation) P. O. Box 1940 Panama City, FL 32402 Freedom Newspapers, Inc. (a Delaware Corporation) P. O. Box 19549 Irvine, CA 92713 Known Bondholders, Mortgages, and Other Security Holders Owning or Holding 1 Percent or More of Total Amount of Bonds, Mortgages, or Other Securities: Freedom Newspapers Acquisitions, Inc 17666 Fitch, Irvine CA 92614 Freedom Communications, Inc. 17666 Fitch Irvine, CA 92614 Publication Title: Apalachicola & Carrabelle Times Issue Date for Circulation Data: October 6, 2011. Extent and Nature of Circulation; Average No. Copies Each Issue During Preceding 12 Months; Actual No. Copies of Single Issue Published Nearest to Filing Date. Total Number of Copies: Average: 2887 Actual: 2467 Paid Circulation Mailed Outside-County Paid Subscriptions Stated on PS Form 3541: Average: 584 Actual: 516 Mailed In-County Subscriptions Stated on PS Form 3541: Average: 268 Actual: 327 Paid Distribution Outside the Mails Including Sales Through Dealers and Carriers, Street Vendors, Counter Sales, and Other Paid Distribution Outside USPS: Average: 1601 Actual: 1578 Paid Distribution by Other Classes of Mail Through the USPS: Average: 0 Actual: 0 Total Paid Distribution: Average: Actual: Total Free or Nominal Rate Distribution: Average: 8 Actual: 10 Total Distribution: Average: 2457 Actual: 2426 Copies not Distributed: Average: 430 Actual: 41 Total: Average: 2887 Actual: 2467 Percent Paid: Average: 99.8% Actual: 99.7% Publication of Statement of Ownership: October 6, 2011 Karen E. Hanes Vice President September 22, 2011 I certify that all information furnished on this form is true and complete. I understand that anyone who furnishes false or misleading information on this form or who omits material or information requested on the form may be subject to criminal sanctions (including fines and imprisonment) and/or civil sanctions (including civil penalties.) October 6, 2011 35763T NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED Notice if hereby given that, Watkins Childrens Trust/Steve Watkins, the holders of the following certificate have filed said certificate for tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property and the name in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate Number: 193 Year of issuance: 2004 Description of property: Lots 5 & 5A Block 1 Dog Island Gulf Beaches Unit 3 et al Full Legal Description can be viewed at Clerk of the Circuit Courts Office PARCEL NO: 06-08s-04w-5263-0001-00 50 Name is which assessed: Muriel Arcuri All of said property being in the State of Florida, Franklin County. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate will be sold to the highest bidder at the Courthouse door on the first (1st) Monday in the month of November 2011, which is the 7TH day of NOVEMBER 2011 at 11:00 a.m. Dated this 26TH day of SEPTEMBER 2011. MARCIA M. JOHNSON CLERK OF COURTS FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA By: Cassie B. Sapp Deputy Clerk October 6, 13, 20, 27, 2011 35721T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CENTENNIAL BANK, an Arkansas banking corporation, as successor in interest to Coastal Community Bank, Plaintiff, Vs. H & H INVESTMENTS LLC, an Alabama Limited Liability company, EVERETT HAWKER, a/k/a MAXWELL E. HAWKER, and PAUL E. HAWKER, Defendants. CASE NO.: 11-000117-CA CLERKS NOTICE OF SALE UNDER F.S. CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure dated September 27, 2011, in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Front Door of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market St., Apalachicola, Florida 32456, at 11:00 a.m. (Eastern Standard Time) on November 8, 2011, the following described property: Lots 33 and 34, Block B, Unit 3, St. James Island Park Subdivision, being in Section 5, Township 7 South, Range 3 West of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. Dated: September 27, 2011. Franklin County Clerk of Court By; Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk October 6, 13, 2011 35711T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA PREMIER BANK, Plaintiff, vs. JIMMY W. MEEKS, SR., and SIDNEY GRAY, Defendants. CASE NO. 2009-461-CA NOTICE OF JUDICIAL SALE PURSUANT TO SECTION 45.031(1) OF THE FLORIDA STATUTES TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: Notice is hereby given that pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered on September 14, 2011, in Case No. 2009-461-CA, of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit for Franklin County, Florida, in which PREMIER BANK is the Plaintiff, and JIMMY W. MEEKS, SR., and SIDNEY GRAY are the Defendants, that the undersigned, Clerk of Circuit Court, Franklin County, Florida, will sell at public sale the following described real property: Commence at a 5 inch by 5 inch concrete monument marking the Southeast corner of the Northeast quarter of Section 36, Township 8 South, Range 7 West, Franklin County, Florida and run North 00 degrees 04 minutes 26 seconds East 409.10 feet to a 5 inch by 5 inch concrete monument lying on the Northerly right-of-way boundary of U.S. Highway No. 98, thence run South 86 degrees 53 minutes 00 seconds West along said Northerly right-of-way boundary of 726.12 feet to a re-rod (marked no. 4261) marking the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING continue South 86 degrees 53 minutes 00 seconds West along said right-of-way boundary 98.24 feet to a re-rod (marked no. 4261), thence leaving said right-of-way boundary run North 00 degrees 04 minutes 18 seconds East 200.30 feet to a re-rod lying on the Southerly right-of-way boundary of a 100 foot wide Florida Power Corporation Powerline Easement, thence run North 86 degrees 57 minutes 05 seconds East along said Southerly right-of-way boundary 98.43 feet to a re-rod, thence leaving said right-of-way boundary run South 00 degrees 07 minutes 47 seconds West 200.19 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. The sale will be held on October 19, 2011, at 11:00 a.m., to the highest bidder for cash, at the door of the Franklin County Courthouse, Apalachicola, Florida, in accordance with Section 45.031, Florida Statutes. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated September 22, 2011. MARCIA JOHNSON Franklin County Clerk of Court Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk October 6, 13, 2011 ONDS WEST 200.76 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #7160), THENCE RUN SOUTH 54 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 27 SECONDS WEST 50.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING CONTAINING 0.23 ACRES, MORE OR LESS. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. DATED at Apalachicola, Florida, this 15th day of September, 2011. Michele Maxwell CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT Franklin County, Florida ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF: SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACHE, LLP 4630 Woodland Corporate Blvd. Suite 100 Tampa, FL 33614 (813) 880-8888 10-171359 FC01 September 29, October 6, 2011 35693T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR MARM 2007-3, Plaintiff, vs. CHRISTOPHER W. BATES; THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF CHRISTOPHER W. BATES; KRISTEN SHOESMITH; THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF KRISTEN SHOESMITH; IF LIVING, INCLUDING ANY UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SAID DEFENDANT(S), IF REMARRIED, AND IF DECEASED, THE RESPECTIVE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS, AND TRUSTEES, AND ALL OTHER PERSONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THE NAMED DEFENDANT (S); UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2; Defendant(s) CASE NO. 19-2009-CA-000219 NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above styled cause, in the Circuit Court of Franklin County, Florida, I will sell the property situate in Franklin County, Florida, described as: LOT 4, BLOCK C, PENINSULAR POINT, UNIT NO. 1, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 20, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 1267 ALLIGATOR DRIVE ALLIGATOR POINT, FL 32346 at public sale, at Front steps of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street Apalachicola, FL 32320 at 11:00 AM, on the 2nd day of November, 2011. Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk In accordance with the American with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the ASA Coordinator no later than seven (7) days prior to the proceedings. If hearing impaired, please call (800) 955-9771 (TDD) or (800)955-8770 (voice), via Florida Relay Service. Law Offices of Daniel C. Consuegra 9204 King Palm Drive Tampa, FL 33619-1328 September 29, October 6, 2011

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LocalA14 | The Times Thursday, October 6, 2011 Our local real estate experts have identied what they feel are the best values around and are oering them to you in Real Estate Picks! (In this section), Discover the best real estate values in Mexico Beach, Port St. Joe, Apalachicola, Cape San Blas, St. George Island, Carrabelle and surrounding areas. Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Real Estate Picks John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.comMLS#244406$286,500St. George IslandBAY VIEW HOME Located in the quiet area of the Island, only 3 lots from Bay, 4 BR, 2 BA, large fenced yard, balcony for each upstairs BR, galley kitchen with serving window, separate dining room, large living area, Florida room, inside washer & dryer, large deck, large ground level storage or shop, circular driveway. Brown Street John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.comMLS#242038$249,000St. George IslandONE ACRE 1ST TIER LOT 18 ft dune near road, all of the adjacent beachfront lots already have houses in place. With 256 ft of depth & 166 ft of width behind 100 ft wide beachfront lots, siting your house for the best Gulf access and view is a cinch. East End of SGI. WEEKLY ALMANAC APALACHICOLA CARRABELLETIDE TABLES MONTHLY AVERAGESTo nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from these given for APALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW Cat Point Minus 0:40 Minus 1:17 East Pass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27 To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from those given for CARRABELLE: HIGH LOW Bald Point Minus 9:16 Minus 0:03 Sponsor the WEEKLY ALMANACCall Today!653-8868Date HighLow% Precip Thu, Oct 685 63 0% Fri, Oct 785 64 0% Sat, Oct 883 6520% Sun, Oct 980 65 30% Mon, Oct 1082 6560% Tues, Oct 1181 6460% Wed, Oct 1282 6240%10/6Thu01:52AM 1.5 H06:34AM 1.2L 11:33AM 1.6 H07:47PM 0.5L 10/7Fri02:16AM 1.5 H07:42AM 1.0L 01:15PM 1.6 H08:32PM 0.6L 10/8Sat02:36AM1.6 H08:34AM 0.8L 02:32PM 1.6 H09:10PM 0.7L 10/9Sun02:53AM 1.6 H09:19AM 0.6L 03:32PM 1.6 H09:42PM 0.9L 10/10Mon03:07AM 1.6 H09:58AM 0.5L 04:23PM 1.6 H10:08PM 1.0L 10/11Tue03:20AM 1.7 H10:34AM 0.4L 05:09PM 1.6 H10:30PM 1.1 L 10/12Wed03:35AM 1.7 H11:06AM 0.3L 05:53PM 1.6 H10:49PM 1.2L 10/6Thu12:27AM 2.4 H04:21AM 1.9L 10:08AM 2.6 H05:34PM 0.8L 10/7Fri 12:51AM 2.4 H05:29AM 1.6L 11:50AM 2.6 H 06:19PM 1.0L 10/8Sat 01:11AM 2.6 H06:21AM 1.3L 01:07PM 2.6 H06:57PM 1.1L 10/9Sun 01:28AM 2.6 H07:06AM 1.0L 02:07PM 2.6 H07:29PM 1.4L 10/10Mon 01:42AM 2.6 H07:45AM 0.8L 02:58PM 2.6 H07:55PM 1.6L 10/11Tue01:55AM 2.7 H 08:21AM 0.6L 03:44PM 2.6 H08:17PM 1.8L 10/12Wed 02:10AM 2.7 H 08:53AM 0.5L 04:28PM 2.6 H08:36PM 1.9L THIS PROJECT RECEIVED FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE FROM VISITFLORIDA www.BlastontheBay.comPARTIAL FUNDING FOR THIS EVENT PROVIDED BY THE GULF COUNTY TOURISM DEVELOPMENTCOUNCIL 27, from a caller; Putnal said he also learned of the closure that evening, and had been unable to sleep worrying about its effects. County Planner Alan Pierce said Chapman, accompanied by an attorney, had shown up in his ofce at the end of the workday Sept. 27 to inform him of the closure. Also in Pierces ofce at the time was Commission Chairman Noah Lockley. It is very much needed to make sure the communications line is open, said Sanders. I have a problem that nobody said to Dr. Chapman to hold on. This would have warranted a special meeting. I feel like Mr. Noah and Alan was caught in the middle of something. Its disrespectful to you and its disrespectful to us. In the future, when something like this should come down, I want us all to be informed, said Sanders. I am not gonna sit still and let that health department be shut down. Lockley said there was little anyone could do. When (Chapman) come with the lawyer it was knock-off time. People was walking out the door, he said. We asked and they said there wasnt anything could be done. It was her and a lawyer. Commissioner Pinki Jacket, who voiced support at the legislative delegation hearing for keeping open the Carrabelle clinic, said Tuesday that more communication should have been done. It had been in the works before, they told you, she said. There was plenty of opportunity for them to talk to this board prior to slamming the door in the face of Carrabelle. What Ive seen in the past 30 days, we are in a health care crisis in this county. CLINIC from page A12 On Wednesday, Sept. 28, the Future Now team came to the Franklin County high school campus, bringing hope and high expectations with all of its hype. The program consisted of a band that rocked the house, a drama team that performed with thought-provoking dramas and emotional testimonials from various members of the group. The group brought a unique, highimpact message by way of an assembly held during school hours addressing drugs, alcohol and teen pregnancy while motivating teens to strive for successful lives. However, the night service had a completely different atmosphere. Like the old Paul Harvey radio show, you had to come back that night to get the rest of the story. All of the dramas performed in the evening took on a lifechanging gospel message. Each of the young men returned to the video screen to nish the story the students viewed in the day assembly. They each shared their testimony of how things in their lives had turned around after receiving the Lord. The next day after the event, several students approached me, stating that they could relate to the testimonies given. There were roughly 600 students, including the ABC middle school of Apalachicola, who attended the assembly during the school day. Approximately 425 students, parents, and supporters returned for the evening service. The keynote speaker, Chris Musgrove delivered an on-time message to the students sharing experiences of rough years as a high school student and how his life changed after nding Jesus. Chris served as a youth pastor for 18 years, and now he carries the message as he travels all over the U.S. into any high school that will open its doors and allow his team to come in. The Future Now team performed in Perry the week before they came to Franklin County where 200 students gave their lives to Christ. There were 165 professions of faith last week in Franklin County. These young people were convinced that if they continued in the direction they were headed, they too would nd themselves in similar situations as the young men who shared their testimonies. Each child who made a confession of faith was equipped with a Bible before leaving. Volunteers from around the county helped with the collection of data that will be essential for the follow-up process that is intended to connect the youth with the church of their choice. Connection to a local congregation of believers is essential to prevent the students from slipping back into a life of self-destruction. You may not agree that Christ is the ultimate answer to the evil that seems to be snatching our kids right out of our hands everyday through drugs and alcohol, but I am a living testimony of a life that was changed through Jesus. For almost a decade, I fell into the trap that almost destroyed my life, yet I am alive today because of deliverance from anything you can imagine. I am a believer not only because someone told me about Jesus, but also through a personal experience with the Almighty. Statistics show Christian teens, although far from perfect, are less prone to try drugs and alcohol in comparison to those that have nothing to do with church at all. We should never condemn anything that has such an undeniable positive inuence on our kids lives. We would like to say thank you to every person and business that made Franklin County Future Now successful. The event would not have been victorious without the generous gifts from heroes who believe in this generation of youth, for intercessors who battled spiritual strongholds on its behalf, and for every volunteer that played a part in seeing this event through to the end. Thank you to Franklin County School and its leaders for allowing Fellowship of Christian Athletes (FCA) to bring this very important event to our area. May God richly bless you all and remember, youth matter. We welcome all suggestions and hope you enjoy this weekly article. Please send all emails to Scott Shiver at frontline247@mac.com. YOUTH MATTERSScott ShiverFuture Nows message rocks the houseConstruction crews began a 122-day project Monday to add left-turn lanes at the northbound, eastbound and westbound approaches of the U.S. 98 and S.R. 300 (Island Drive) intersection in Eastpoint. The $601,000 project also includes sidewalk construction, drainage improvements, signage and pavement markings. Motorists are reminded to use caution while traveling through the construction zones and that trafc violations double when workers are present.Construction begins at U.S. 98 and Island Drive