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The Apalachicola times
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100380/00146
 Material Information
Title: The Apalachicola times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: H.W. Johnston
Place of Publication: Apalachicola Fla
Apalachicola Fla
Publication Date: 09-29-2011
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1885.
General Note: Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 32911693
lccn - sn 95026907
System ID: UF00100380:00146
 Related Items
Preceded by: Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by: Apalachicola herald

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xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx 50 WWW.APALACHTIMES.COM P hone: 850-653-8868 W eb: apalachtimes.com E -mail: dadlerstein@star.com Fax: 850-653-8036 C irculation: 800-345-8688 DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK: School News & Society: 11 a.m. Friday Real Estate Ads: 11 a.m. Thursday Legal Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classied Display Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classied Line Ads: 5 p.m. Monday Contact Us Out to see Index Concerns raised about Carrabelles urgent care clinic By David Adlerstein Times City Editor September turned into an un certain month for Franklin County health care, as county commis sioners gave mixed reviews to a new collaborative arrangement between Weems Memorial Hospi tal and the health department. After hearing details of the col laboration from new Weems CEO Davie Lloyd and health depart ment interim administrator Dr. Karen Chapman, the two commis sioners who represent the eastern of the county, Cheryl Sanders and Bevin Putnal, both indicated at the commissions Sept. 6 meeting they would oppose any attempt to scale back primary care services at the Carrabelle health department an nex. Two weeks later, Commission ers Noah Lockley, Pinki Jackel and Smokey Parrish added a series of fresh concerns regarding hospital operations. The board unanimous ly approved a request to meet with Lloyd, the Weems hospital board and representatives of Tallahas see Memorial Hospital at the Oct. 18 meeting (See story, A6). The month began with the Sept. 6 appearance before commission ers by Lloyd and Chapman, both of whom assumed their jobs in late July, and Marcia Lindeman, ad ministrator from the Gulf County Health Department, which works in concert with St. Joseph Care Inc., a federally qualied health center in Port St. Joe. As an FQHC, St. Joseph Care is similar to the North Florida Medi cal Center in Eastpoint, in that both receive hundreds of thousands of dollars annually in federal funds to serve poor, uninsured populations. Lindeman said the Port St. Joe FQHC is intended to serve patients as far east as the Apalachicola Riv er and has seen a steady increase in Franklin County patients since 2003. The numbers topped out in 2010, when 508 medical patients and 313 dental patients made 1,305 medical visits and 841 dental visits, comprising 10 percent of the cen ters volume. You all doing more than the one in Eastpoint, Lockley said, al though he did not provide specic numbers to bolster his assertion. I wish you all would take over that one in Eastpoint. Chapman told commissioners no one from the Eastpoint FQHC Rare hummingbird spotted, banded in Eastpoint By Lois Swoboda Times Staff Writer A rare broad-billed hummingbird was spot ted in Eastpoint on Saturday. The broad-bill, properly called Cynanthus latirostris, is only the fourth to be spotted in Florida and the third to be banded. Broad-bills normally are found only in Sonoma, Mexico, and southern Texas, New Mexico and Arizona. Sheila Klink had just cleaned and lled her hummingbird feeders for the season at the re quest of her granddaughter. She heard a strange noise and went outside to investigate. What she found was a bird she couldnt identify. Last year, Fred Bassett of Asheville, N.C., had banded another rare hummer in Klinks yard, so she took some pictures of the bird at dusk and emailed them to Bassett. He received the pictures at 1 a.m., and after calling his birding colleague, Fred Dietrich in Tallahassee, he jumped in his car and headed to Franklin County. In a telephone interview, Dietrich said the sighting is the talk of the birding community right now. He said 20 years ago, birding guides Commission stares down threat of lawsuit By Lois Swoboda Times Staff Writer Franklin County commission ers have refused to back down in the face of The St. Joe Companys threat to sue over a zoning dis pute. At their Sept. 20 meeting, com missioners voted 4-1 to stand pat on their December 2009 decision to rescind a 2005 land-use change that could have enabled St. Joe to build thousands of new homes on St. James Island. Commissioner Smokey Parrish voted no, in keeping with his origi nal opposition to rescinding the fu ture land-use maps. At that time, he advocated a different path to ward undoing the land-use chang es, saying he feared the countys liability could be too great. In 2005, when the company pro posed to develop four land parcels on St. James Island to build as many as 7,400 new housing units, the commissioners redesignated parcels of St. Joe land in the east ern part of the county from agri cultural to mixed-use residential. This preliminary change to a comprehensive plan is called a FLUM (future land-use map) and is pronounced oom. In return for the change, St. Joe promised to include low-cost housing in the developments, allow for continued public access to the coastline and donate several parcels of land for public use. When the housing market failed, development of the par cels stalled, and St. Joe took no By David Adlerstein Times City Editor A high-risk sexual predator, left Saturday by state ofcials to live in the woods near East point, ed within hours and is being sought by law enforcement ofcials in Franklin and surround ing counties. Jo Ellyn Rackleff, a spokes woman for the Florida Depart ment of Corrections, said Nor man Bill Williams, 56, was released Saturday near Bear Creek Road in Eastpoint, after telling authorities he intended to live in the woods, with no physical address. Williams had complet ed 85 percent of a sevenyear sentence, begun Oct. 10, 2006, for sexual battery on a victim under age 12, a crime that occurred Jan. 1, 1994. Legally, we couldnt hold him beyond that, said Rackleff. When the release date is hit, we have to release. Because of his prison record, spent mostly at Century Correc tion Institution, Williams was con sidered a ight risk and was re quired to wear an ankle bracelet as a condition of his supervised release. Also as part of the terms of his probation, Williams was un der a curfew from 7 p.m. to 7 a.m. In prior experience with this offender, he had been put on a bus and got off early and ed, so we knew he was a risk, Rackleff said. Wanting to be near his home town, Williams was transferred on Sept. 21 from the Northwest Florida Reception Center in Washington County to Franklin Correctional Institution in Car rabelle. On Saturday, two probation of cers charged an ankle bracelet, complete with GPS transponder, at the Franklin County Sheriffs Ofce on State Road 65 and NORMAN BILL WILLIAMS County debates health care Sexual predator, left in woods, ees Eastpoint FR E D D EIT R ICH | Special to the Times This broad-billed hummingbird, rarely seen in Florida, was banded in Eastpoint on Saturday. RARE HUMMINGBIRD IN EASTPOINT QUITE AN HONOR See HUMMINGBIRD A7 See LAWSUIT A7 See PREDATOR A7 INSIDE TMH, Weems deal under scrutiny, A6 See HEALTH CARE A5 Opinion ............ A4 Society ............ A8 Faith .............. A9 Outdoors .......... A10 Sports ............ A11 Tide Chart ......... A12 Classieds ...... A14-A15 Thursday, September 29, 2011 Humane Society annual meeting Saturday Franklin County Humane Societys annual membership meeting will be 10-11 a.m. Saturday, Oct. 1, at the adoption center, followed by an open house for the public. A new play yard will be dedicated at 11 a.m., followed by activities for the whole family including fourlegged family members. For more info, call 670-8417. Oysters and Elvis at the Dixie Friday and Saturday, Sept. 30 and Oct. 1, Todd Alan Herendeen will return to the Dixie Theatre as Elvis Presley, along with the Follow That Dream band, at 8 p.m. nightly. Apalachicola Bay oysters will be served. For information, call 653-3200. Apalachicola Bay Chamber golf tourney From 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 5, St. James Golf Course will host the eighth annual Apalachicola Bay Chamber of Commerce golf tournament, a ighted four-man scramble. Cost per team is $400, $100 per player. Proceeds go toward the chambers building fund. For info call 653-9419 or email info@apalachicolabay. org. W e Love Eastpoint and oyster festival The Franklin County Oyster Festival will be Oct. 7-9 in Eastpoint and on St. George Island, highlighting the countys seafood heritage. Enjoy a 5K run; childrens fun; a shing tournament; seafood; and concerts. Included in the fun is We Love Eastpoint Day at the Patton Street pavilion, complete with oysters, a shucking tournament, treasure pit and more. For information, call 9277744, or Charolette Bacher at 927-5039. W oodstork benets mammal association The third annual Woodstork Festival will be 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Oct. 8 at 3Y Farm, 195 Harvey Young Farm in Crawfordville. Admission is $5. All proceeds go for care and feeding of injured and orphaned wildlife. For more information visit www. woodstorkfestival.com. VO L 126 I SS U E 22 Seahawk royalty, A11

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Local A2 | The Times Thursday, September 29, 2011 BUDGET SUMMARY ALLIGATOR POINT WATER RESOURCES DISTRICT FISCAL YEAR 2011/2012 MILLAGE PER $1,000 1.9439 GENERAL FUND CAPITAL FUND TOTAL BUDGET CASH BALANCES BROUGHT FORWARD $ 98,978 $ 678,062 $ 777,040 ESTIMATED REVENUE Ad Valorem Taxes 1.9439 Millage per $1000 $ 265,002 $ 265,002 Water Sales $ 165,000 $ 165,000 Out of District Surcharge $ 38,000 $ 38,000 Miscellaneous Revenue $17,500 $ 17,500 TOTAL REVENUE AND OTHER SOURCES $ 220,500 $ 265,002 $ 485,502 TOTAL ESTIMATED REVENUES AND BALANCES $ 319,478 $ 943,064 $ 1,262,542 EXPENDITURES/EXPENSES Water Operations and Expenses $ 381,050 $ 381,050 Capital Improvements $ 106,000 $ 106,000 Debt Service $ 132,000 $ 132,000 TOTAL EXPENDITURES AND EXPENSES $ 381,050 $ 238,000 $ 619,050 Reserves ($ 61,572) $ 705,064 $ 643,492 TOTAL APPROPRIATED EXPENDITURES AND RESERVES $ 319,478 $ 943,064 $ 1,262,542 NOTICE OF BUDGET HEARING The Alligator Point Water Resources District has tentatively adopted a budget for Fiscal Year 2011-2012. A public hearing to make a FINAL DECISION on the budget AND TAXES will be held on: Saturday, October 1, 2011 10:00 A.M at Alligator Point Water Resources District Ofce 1378 Alligator Drive Alligator Point, Florida 32346 By David Adlerstein Times City Editor Progress Energy has begun installing a new 69kilovolt (kV) line from the Apalachicola substation, across the river through to the Eastpoint substation. A nal segment will also con nect to St. George Island. Construction for this $10.6 million segment of a larger project began in midSeptember and is expected to be completed by June 2012. Company ofcials said this transmission project is needed to better address the threat of severe weather and continue to meet acceptable levels of year-round reliabil ity for the entire area. Progress Energy spokes man Rob Sumner said that once this work is complet ed, the company will move forward on erecting new transmission lines through the Apalachicola downtown, to hook up to the line that runs from Port St. Joe to the city limits. These down town lines have drawn con troversy because the large poles are considered an eye sore that will mar the look of Apalachicola as a historic community and tourist des tination. As it stands right now the line will travel the exist ing route, said Sumner. We respect the historical nature of that area but Progress Energys main goal is to pro vide reliable electricity to all of our customers. Sumner estimated that placing the lines under ground would cost at least $3 million, with additional costs and permitting issues also likely. The portion of the line constructed on land will be single concrete or steel poles, 60 feet to 90 feet above ground. Poles may be taller when crossing roadways, waterways, or other electri cal equipment. Where the line crosses the Apalachicola River and Apalachicola Bay, struc tures will be either single, self-supporting steel poles or H-frames. Most poles will be replaced at or near their current locations and the majority of the existing foun dations within Apalachicola Bay will be reused. Installing transmission structures and lines is simi lar to a typical construction project, with numerous crews, trucks and other equipment. There may be lulls between the phases of activity, but in general, ho meowners can expect these stages of construction: Clearing and grading. Probably the most notice able portion of construction is clearing and grading, which is the earliest step. The right of way must be clear during the construc tion process. Foundations and install ing poles. Property owners can expect large trucks with drilling equipment or a con crete mixer in the right of way. The concrete is poured at the bottom of a deep hole to form the foundation. The poles arrive in sections and may be assembled on the ground before being in stalled. Stringing lines. Trucks carrying large reels of wire are typically used, with a winch to pull the wire through. Linemen attach the wires to the structures. Later, crews install ground rods to the structures. Property owners power is not affected when the line is energized. Helicopters. Due to the unique aspects of construc tion activities within the bay, helicopters will be utilized for installation of the struc tures in the water. If you have questions about this project, please contact at (888) 272-8133 or email Apalachico laProgress@pgnmail.com. We also encourage you to visit us online at www.prog ress-energy.com. Work begins on transmission line over river ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! # # # U S 9 8 / U S 3 1 9 / S R 3 0 e A p a l a c h i c o l a S u b s t a t i o n E a s t P o i n t S u b s t a t i o n A P A L A C H I C O L A B A Y S R 3 0 0 E A S T B A Y A P A L A C H I C O L A T O E A S T P O I N T T R A N S M I S S I O N L I N E R E B U I L D T O T A L P R O J E C T O V E R V I E W ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! # # # # # P o r t S t J o e S u b s t a t i o n G U L F G U L F C O U N T Y C O U N T Y F R A N K L I N F R A N K L I N C O U N T Y C O U N T Y e L A K E W I M I C O A p a l a c h i c o l a S u b s t a t i o n I n d i a n P a s s S u b s t a t i o n E a s t P o i n t S u b s t a t i o n S t G e o r g e I s l a n d S u b s t a t i o n A P A L A C H I C O L A B A Y L e g e n d # S u b s t a t i o n L o c a t i o n P r o p o s e d R o u t e ! T r a n s m i s s i o n L i n e R e b u i l d P r o j e c t ! E x i s t i n g T r a n s m i s s i o n L i n e R a i l r o a d M a j o r R o a d C o u n t y B o u n d a r y M A P N O T T O S C A L E

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Local The Times | A3 Thursday, September 29, 2011 franklin county family o utdoor d ay with spe c ial gue s t l emuel m iller! brin g your d eer m ount, a ntler s or h o g h ead to put on our bi g bu c k board! HUMANE SOCIETY ANNUAL MEETING AND OPEN HOUSE The Franklin County Humane Society would like to invite the public to our annual, general meeting on Saturday, October 1, 2011. It will be held at the Adoption Center located at 244 Highway 65, Eastpoint, Florida. The meeting will take place from 10:00am to 11:00am, followed by an Open House from 11:00am to 2:00pm and there will be a dedication of the new play area for our doggie residents. Hotdogs, refreshments and dessert will be served and there will be tours of our newly refreshed Adoption Center. Bring the kids and enjoy the day with us and of course the event is pet friendly for friendly pets. The Humane Society is proud to serve the Franklin County community with the help of caring, concerned citizens like yourselves. It would not be possible to continue to help our less fortunate 4 legged citizens without you. Come join us for a fun day and show your support for the Franklin County Humane Society! Thank you! Apalachicola Bay Charter School A Public School of Choice Board of Directors This is a voluntary position and provides a Franklin County resident the opportunity to play an important role in the education of 340 PreK 8th grade students. The ABC Board seeks representation from various factions of the community including parents, clergy, business people, professional and trade group members. Interested persons should send a resume and/or letter of Interest to Jim Bachrach, ABC School, 98 12th Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320. Apalachicola Bay Charter School 98 12th Street, Apalachicola, Florida 32320 653 1222 (phone) 653 1857 (fax) The following report is provided by the Franklin County Sheriffs Ofce. Arrests are made by ofcers from the following city, county, and state law enforcement agencies: Apalachicola (APD), Carrabelle (CPD), Florida Highway Patrol (FHP), Franklin County Sheriffs Ofce (FCSO), Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC), Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP), Florida Department of Corrections (FDOC), Florida Division of Insurance Fraud (DIF) and Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (FLDACS). All defendants are considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law. Sept. 21 Justin E. McCalpin, 23, Eastpoint, failure to appear and domestic battery (FCSO) Cliff O. Hunter, 37, Sneads, violation of probation (FCSO) Sept. 22 Kami C. Orton, 25, Lanark Village, child abuse (CPD) Byron B. Butler, 30, Wewahitchka, violation of probation (FCSO) Darren L. Wallace, 43, Apalachicola, grand theft, introduction of contraband into a correctional facility and violation of probation (APD) Sept. 23 Judith S. Colson, 52, Tallahassee, DUI (CPD) Misty D. Bareld, 23, Bristol, aggravated battery on a pregnant victim and burglary of a dwelling person assaulted (FCSO) Dominic Rotella, 26, Eastpoint, grand theft (FCSO) Eric Hathaway, 29, Apalachicola, grand theft (APD) Sept. 24 Nolle E. King, 22, Tallahassee, failure to appear (FCSO) Sept. 25 Gary A. Simmons, 21, Crawfordville, DUI (FHP) Robbie D. Butler, 42, Apalachicola, DUI (FHP) Willie E. Pelt, 29, Port St. Joe, violation of a domestic violence injunction (FCSO) Arrest REPORT Yowell benet in E astpoint O ct. 8 There will be a benet for Tony Yowell, Sr., on Saturday, Oct. 8 at Taylors Building Supply in Eastpoint. The benet is being held to raise money to help offset the medical expenses of Yowell, who is being treated for leukemia at the Moffett Cancer Center in Tampa. Seafood dinners will be available for $6 each, including drinks. For more information, call 348-9926. Seafood workers to meet O ct. 10 The Franklin County Seafood Workers will meet Monday, Oct. 10 at the Eastpoint rehouse, 24 Sixth Street in Eastpoint, at 5 p.m. For more info, call Shannon Hartseld at 6152454. Church to host yard sale Saturday Trinity Episcopal Church will host its second annual yard sale this Saturday, Oct. 1 from 8 a.m. to noon. All proceeds will benet the historic church campus buildings at the corner of U.S. 98 and Sixth Street, at 79 Sixth Street in Apalachicola. The church is hosting the sale in partnership with Big Bend Hospice. Offered will be bicycles, clothes, collectables, furniture, books, lamps, bric-a-brac, washer and dryer, tools, ornaments, linens, speakers and dinnerware. Coffee and yummy treats for sale. For more info, call 653-9550 or email trinitychurch@mchsi. com. Forgotten Coast yard sale Saturday Join us anywhere along U.S. 98 or in downtown Apalachicola for the Forgotten Coast Community Yard Sale this Saturday, Oct. 1. Merchants, businesses and individuals from Mexico Beach to Panacea are planning to participate in the areas biggest yard sale. Carrabelle location is the east side of the library, under the trees. Participants will be there at 8 a.m. until 2 p.m. All items will be sold for donations only and with proceeds to benet the Carrabelle Food Pantry. For info call 653-9419. Community BRIEFS

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Opinion A4 | The Times USPS 027-600 Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 VP/Publisher: Karen Hanes Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola Times Special to the Times At the end of August, a large, disgusting algae outbreak slimed Old Tampa Bay. Two months earlier, an algae outbreak in the Caloosahatchee River near Fort Myers turned the river bright green, smelled like raw sewage, and made thousands of sh go belly up. Water with algae outbreaks like this is so toxic that health authorities say you shouldnt touch it, much less drink it or swim in it. It can give you rashes, respiratory problems, and even kill you. U.S. Sen. Jim Inhofe, R-Oklahoma, found that out the hard way. He swam in the same type of toxic algae outbreak in Grand Lake, Oklahoma, in June and said he became deathly sick that night with an upper respiratory illness. There is no question, Ihhofe told the Tulsa World, that his illness came from the toxic algae in the lake. Oklahoma health ofcials had warned people not to touch the water, swim in the popular lake, or eat sh from it. Like Floridas outbreaks, the one in Grand Lake was fueled by the so-called nutrients, nitrogen and phosphorus, which come from inadequately treated sewage, fertilizer, and manure. After years of seeing nauseating algae outbreaks on popular Florida tourist beaches like Sanibel Island and at shing meccas like the St. Johns River, we citizens nally got the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Florida Department of Environmental Protection to start setting limits on the sewage, fertilizer and manure pollution thats threatening our drinking water and our health. This type of pollution is preventable. We can combat it at its source by upgrading old sewer plants, using modern manure management on agricultural operations and being smarter about applying fertilizer. Cleaning up our waters is a good thing, but you wouldnt know it by reading the distortions and inated cost estimates that highly paid polluter-lobbyists are peddling to scare people. They will spend whatever it takes to make sure they can keep using our public waters as their private sewers. The truth is that meeting Floridas new limits for these contaminants is likely to cost a few dollars extra per person per month phased in over many years. In Chesapeake Bay, for example, advanced wastewater treatment cut pollution at a cost of only $2.50 per household per month. Not a bad price for clean water. The Florida DEP is in the process of setting new statewide standards for phosphorus and nitrogen pollution. Unfortunately, the rules that state regulators have proposed so far are inadequate to protect public health and clean up the waters. It is critical that the states polluters, now emboldened by the current anything-goes mentality in Tallahassee, dont end up writing the DEPs water-pollution rules. It is critical that our state regulators protect the public, not the polluters. Tourism, shing, and boating are our economic lifeblood in Florida. When visitors come here and see dead sh and No Swimming signs, they wont come back, and that affects our state budget and our jobs. David Guest is an attorney in the Tallahassee ofce of Earthjustice, a public-interest law firm. We can combat it at its source by upgrading old sewer plants, using modern manure management on agricultural operations and being smarter about applying fertilizer. Thursday, September 29, 2011 Special to the Times A while ago the Apalachicola Municipal Library began adding books to its collection on how to write ction, inspired in part by the writers group that is meeting here at the library on Monday nights. They toyed with the idea of calling themselves The Bay Scribblers, but I dont know if that caught on. One book we bought was Write Away: One Novelists Approach to Fiction and the Writing Life by Elizabeth George. George is a prolic ction writer. The library owns all of her Inspector Lynley series except a few of the very early ones. A book by a successful writer seemed like a good place to start and the writers group members have had it checked out constantly. Earlier this month, Michael Lister, instructor in writing at Gulf Coast State College, and a notable invitee to the Authors in Apalach event coming up on Saturday, Oct. 8, had his annual Gulf Coast Writers Conference. His keynote speaker was John Dufresne, who teaches in the masters of ne arts creative writing program at Florida International University. He was a great speaker, outlining creative ction writing in 13 questions, posed by a would-be writer. He used catchy phrases like make a life, not a living. He talked about criticism, saying dont write a complaint, write another story. One area he covered, which was new to me, was the writers who write on their smart phones. It turns out there are a number of young Japanese writers who use only their phones, have published electronically, and become nancially successful. All this is an era where eBooks are not yet available in the municipal or county libraries in Franklin County. Dufresne has two books the library is going to purchase: The Lie That Tells a Truth: A Guide to Writing Fiction and Is Life Like This? A Guide to Writing Your First Novel in Six Months. Selecting appropriate books on this topic is quite daunting. The State of Floridas FirstSearch, an access point to electronic library catalogs around the world, produces a list of 1596 books in the Dewey Decimal number 808.3, where creative writing books are found. I checked the county librarys online catalog, and they have two books in 808.3. Whats your story? A young persons guide to writing ction by Marion Dane Bauer, is geared to young aspiring authors. I think this is another area to explore. FirstSearch again offers 83 books covering juvenile ction writing. Its a big world of books out there, but the Apalachicola Municipal Library wants to bring some of them into our collection to inspire future writers, young and old. Maybe they can be part of our Authors in Apalach event in years to come. Caty Greene is the librarian for the Apalachicola Municipal Library. To reach her, call 653-8436. Special to the Times It seems theres an online data breach or scam in the headlines almost daily. Meanwhile, cyber threats continue to grow in sophistication. National Cyber Security Awareness Month aims to bring light to cyber threats and help people safeguard themselves online. The Department of Homeland Security offers tips to help people stay safe online. Theyre not much different from the words of wisdom your parents imparted: Dont trust candy from strangers: Youre not going to get a free computer just for filling out a survey; the IRS didnt email to tell you that youre entitled to a refund; youre not going to turn $47 into $300,000 just by forwarding a link; and a foreign dignitary isnt looking to split his fortune with you if you help him get his millions out of his country. If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is. Enough said. Dont advertise that youre away from home. Announcing to your 700 Facebook friends that youre on vacation for a week is just an open invitation for thieves to strike. And be careful with how you word your email autoresponders. Lock up your valuables. If a hacker can access your personal information, he or she can then compromise or steal the information. Keep your firewalls and anti-virus up-to-date, use strong passwords, install all software updates and be careful when surfing the Internet and using email. Have a backup plan. Make regular backups of your information in case something goes wrong. Store these backups in a secure location. If your computer has been infected, remove the infection before resuming your work. But keep in mind that if you didnt realize that your computer was infected, your backups might also be compromised. DHS also recommends minimizing access to your information: Lock your computer when you step away, even if its only for a few minutes. Those few minutes can be all it takes for someone to destroy, corrupt or steal your information. Disconnect your computer from the Internet when youre not using it. While its convenient to stay online constantly, it could provide access to hackers. Evaluate your security settings. Certain features that increase convenience or functionality might leave you more vulnerable. And of course, protect your equipment from power surges and back up all your data in case the worst happens. For additional information and advice you can trust, start with the Better Business Bureau at www.bbb.org or call 800-729-9226. Sept. 23 marks the first day of autumn. As the weather cools this time of year, warm thoughts come to mind. Many of my fondest family memories center on the traditions of the fall especially time spent around the campfire. A recent advertisement for family camping equipment noted that campsites were the original social-networking site. I couldnt agree more. Whether youre interested in making some great family memories, longing for a trip to get the kids all back together or simply looking to take a break from your busy lives, Floridas state parks offer the perfect setting for your autumn endeavors. Regardless of your interests if youre fond of fall, youll love Florida State Parks. Among Floridas 160 state parks, more than 3,200 family campsites, 230 tent campsites, 60 youth campsites, 67 group camp areas and 95 equestrian camp sites await. Many state parks with family campgrounds often host evening campfire programs. If you join one of these, you might learn about the history of the park or hear a tall tale of a character that once inhabited the surrounding land. Florida Park Service rangers are a wealth of information, and the campfire circle is a great place to catch them at their best. Sitting together watching the flame of the campfire dance in the moonlight is a special experience that brings people closer together. Not only does it provide a comfortable atmosphere for recounting fond memories and a fun place to create new ones, it also provides a space to plan the following day in the park. Camping, hiking, paddling, bike riding, museum hopping, Christmas shopping weve got it all. As the director of the Florida Park Service, Im honored to remind all of Floridas citizens and visitors of the jewel in your own backyard. I encourage you to spend time around a campfire this autumn and get back in touch with each other and Florida State Parks. Sincerely, Donald V. Forgione Director. Florida Park Service Good morning! I am writing in reference to an article concerning the late Margaret Keys endowment to the Apalachicola library in your Sept. 15 issue. I had the privilege of knowing Margaret Key over the years that I practiced medicine in Apalachicola and I unequivocally recall her love of the local library. Her endowment of about $400,000 for the library seems to have been to fulfill her desire to build a new library to serve the people. It is my understanding that the present library, built in 1959, has outgrown the needs of the community. I do not know if a large library can be built for $400,000, but I bet it will have to be larger than the present one. If pinch came to squeeze, the money could be used to enlarge the present facility or to buy a larger facility and renovate it to accommodate a larger library. There must be other options. Perhaps the city can purchase the old Chapman Schools building on Avenue E and 12th Street and spend some money for renovation. It is a historic building and would fit the needs, it seems. There must be other options, but I do not believe spending the money to balance the citys budget ever crossed Margaret Keys mind. I think it is prudent for the city to reconsider this matter before the fund is squandered for other uses. It is of the utmost urgency that this matter be revisited and the citizens of Apalachicola who use this facility need to speak up and make their voices heard, loud and clear. Respectfully, Photis Nichols, M.D. Jacksvonville State parks offer perfect family setting Dont let polluters write water rules Consider National Cyber Security Awareness Month Key money should go for larger library Writers and writing in Apalachicola @ THE LIBRARY Caty Greene DA VID GUEST Guest column LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

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Local The Times | A5 Thursday, September 29, 2011 took part in a recent meet ing among the three women to discuss details of a rural health collaboration. We know you have not had maybe the best of expe riences with prior health de partment or hospital leader ship, she said. Before you stand three women who bring to you a great deal of experience, a great deal of passion for health care and a great deal of passion for improving the health care system here in Franklin County. We really felt quite for tunate that both of us (Chap man and Lloyd) are new pretty much at the exact same time, Chapman said. Its also a new day, and one of the things we came to dis cover is that our predeces sors really hadnt worked closely together, and we felt it was just natural that there should be a partnership to leverage the resources that we have. If were not working to gether we might be redun dant and duplicative, and that would not be in the best interest of the community, she said. Chapman said she se cured $25,000 from the state to make repairs to the health departments Carra belle annex. In addition, the department is looking to buy smaller, more fuel-efcient vehicles to replace those that have broken down or exceed mileage or safety standards, and which will be surplused to the county, she said. Jason Flowers, who oversaw the departments environmental health com ponent, resigned in August, Chapman said, and has been replaced by Sean May, from the Okaloosa County Health Department, where Chap man is the full-time director. He worked here six years ago, so he is familiar with the septic tank issues, she said. I also hold him in great regard, and hes work ing hard to realign our envi ronmental health ofce here in Franklin County. Health department wants focus on reproductive health Though the new collabo ration outlined shortand long-term plans to improve community access to pro viders and eliminate gaps in services, what drew the greatest attention were plans to transition patients over the next six months from the Carrabelle health department annex to the Weems East urgent care clinic next door. Are you all trying to get the people to quit using the health department and start using the hospital? Sand ers asked. Chapman said that with about 1,300 adult and 500 child primary care patients, she is under direction from Tallahassee to reduce our primary care footprint as county health departments and work with other provid ers and FQHCs to collabora tively serve the community. We have two clinics side by side, she said. Neither one can be successful if both are doing exactly the same thing. Chapman said Weems plans to implement a sliding fee scale, will see both unin sured and insured patients and will extend its hours within the next six months. Lloyd said Weems is in the process of being able to ac cept Medipass patients. Sanders made it clear that keeping the existing nurse practitioner, Dana Whaley, should be a top con cern. The reason why you have the large majority of that (patient base) in Car rabelle area, its all because of the nurse practitioner that youve got, she said. If Weems does not have that nurse practitioner, theyre not going to go to Weems. This is a community of families we go to who we think can take good care of us, Sanders said, If Weems has a doctor from wherever coming in there and they dont feel comfortable, and yet they feel comfortable with the nurse practitioner at the health department, (theyll see her). Unless you all are sharing the same nurse practitioner or doctor, youre going to always have this problem. Chapman said the hope is that over time, we can build a cadre of health pro fessionals the community respects and trusts. We cant have dual systems competing with each other in the community, or were not going to be effective and were going to waste our scarce resources. She said it remains a top health department goal to focus on the countys alarming rates of sexually transmitted diseases and teen pregnancies. From most indicators, we fall in the bottom 25 percent as far as rates of disease, she said. These diseases are very devastating to young women in causing future re productive health problems and difculties with concep tion in the future when you have multiple and repeated STD infections. Sanders acknowledged the importance of that fo cus but continued to urge preserving the annexs sta tus quo. People with heart problems or respiratory problems or people with dia betes are just as important as that, she said. Thats what my other problem with the other administrator was. Im looking at you in the eye and telling you, every time you turned around, he was wanting to close the prima ry care in Carrabelle, and Im telling you, youre going to have this room so packed out with people its going to be pitiful. Chapman said the health department and hospital intend to remain exible. We have to handle this carefully; you dont want to disrupt a patient-provider relationship. Over time, I will denitely take that into consideration. None of us like to leave our providers, she said. My phone will ring, Sanders said. These people get particularly upset if the health care provider they have (is gone). Im forewarn ing you a little bit because its going to happen. Chapman said with the reopening of the health de partment building in Apala chicola, Whaley is back to her previous schedule of working three days in Carra belle and two in Apalachico la, while Dr. Ivan Backer man works two days a week in Apalachicola and one day in Carrabelle. A registered nurse in on hand ve days a week at both locations, she said. Theyre still seeing her (Whaley), said Chapman. Its just at a different loca tion. Putnal reminded the three women that because uninsured seafood workers have limited funds, theyll be almost dead before they go to doctor. Whoever is the closest, thats where theyre going to. Because of the recession, it will get worse this year. I dont know what were go ing to do about it, he said. Indigent care is vitally im portant to Franklin County, more so than other counties because theres so many of them that cant afford insur ance. You cant turn them down because theyre not going to be able to make it if you do. I appreciate you all coming together to work out solutions because we have major problems with health care in this county, Putnal said. You all are on the right track. Be careful about shift ing people around; we got to be careful how we do it. Lloyd vows longer hours, new de-stafng policy Lloyd told commission ers her goal is to begin keep ing Weems East open from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. weekdays, and probably four hours on Saturday. The access to care is very disturbing in many ways, she said. Our goal is tor provide the right ser vices to the right people at the right time and in the right location. We want to make sure we are each pro viding the resources that we should be providing, but we certainly dont want to be in competition with each other because thats at a great cost to the citizens of Frank lin county. She said a major thrust of the new collaboration is to focus on linking patients with health care providers. We dont have the agencies in Franklin County that can really help residents access resources that are available to them, Lloyd said. What happens now is a patient will come to the hospital emergency room and theyll get a follow-up letter from the Medicaid ofce, but that follow-up never happens be cause theres nobody here in Franklin County to assist those individuals. She said the collabora tions lofty goal is to have people on either end of the county who can help access charity care and Medicaid. We have identied some grants for getting that pro gram up and going, Lloyd said. She said health care leaders will work to ensure that an upcoming needs as sessment, funded by a Na tional Association of Coun ties grant, receives input from throughout the entire county. In addition, the col laboration has discussed the amount of lab services provided by Quest and plans to transition as much of that work as possible to the Weems lab and create multi ple draw sites and extended hours, Lloyd said. Parrish asked that Weems try to have a physi cian visit the bedridden el derly at an assisted living fa cility in Carrabelle, perhaps twice weekly for a couple of hours. We just need to enter into an agreement with the facility to comply with state and federal regulations, Lloyd said. Commissioners also voiced displeasure regard ing North Florida Medical Center in Eastpoint, with Lockley asking whether Weems could take over that FQHC designation. Ive been trying to get rid of them ever since they got here, he said. Only the federal govern ment can make changes to that, Lloyd said. You could talk to the congressman to intervene on our behest. There is nothing more that we can do as far as estab lishing another one. Putnal said he felt our local physicians should have been given that money. They (North Florida) are not doing what they should be doing because that mon ey should be coming to this county. Theyre not using near $600,000; that moneys being used in some other county. Parrish said he thought that given the large num ber of patients being seen in Gulf County, weve been provided some ammunition here. That should not be happening; they should be seen by their local FQHC. PUBLIC NOTICE FCTDC 2011-12 MEETING SCHEDULE Board meetings are held on the Second Tuesday of each month beginning at 3:00 pm Board Meetings October 11, 2011 Board, Franklin County Courthouse Annex, 3:00 p.m. November 8, 2011 Board, Franklin County Courthouse Annex, 3:00 p.m. Carrabelle 3:00 p.m. January 10, 2012 Board, Franklin County Courthouse Annex, 3:00 p.m. February 14, 2012 Board, Franklin County Courthouse Annex, 3:00 p.m. Carrabelle 3:00 p.m. April 10, 2012 Board, Franklin County Courthouse Annex, 3:00 p.m. May 8, 2012 Board, Franklin County Courthouse Annex, 3:00 p.m. Carrabelle 3:00 pm July 10, 2012 Board, Franklin County Courthouse Annex, 3:00 p.m. August 14, 2012, Board, Franklin County Courthouse Annex, 3:00 p.m. Carrabelle 3:00 pm ALL COMMITTEE MEETINGS ARE HELD ON THE FOURTH TUESDAY OF EACH MONTH AT THE CITY OF APALACHICOLA COMMUNITY ROOM, 1 BAY AVENUE, APALACHICOLA, BEGINNING AT 1:30 PM FOR GRANTS (IF SCHEDULED) AND BEGINS AT 2:30 PM FOR MARKETING. Committee Meetings September 27, 2011 Grants and Marketing Committees, beginning at 1:30 pm October 25, 2011, Grants and Marketing Committees, beginning at 1:30 pm November 22, 2011, Grants and Marketing Committees, beginning at 1:30 pm December 27, 2011 Grants and Marketing Committees, beginning at 1:30 pm January 24, 2012, Grants and Marketing Committees, beginning at 1:30 pm February 28, 2012, Grants and Marketing Committees, beginning at 1:30 pm March 27, 2012, Grants and Marketing Committees, beginning at 1:30 pm April 24, 2012, Grants and Marketing Committees, beginning at 1:30 pm May 22, 2012, Grants and Marketing Committees, beginning at 1:30 pm June 26, 2012 Grants and Marketing Committees, beginning at 1:30 pm July 24, 2012, Grants and Marketing Committees, beginning at 1:30 pm August 28, 2012, Grants and Marketing Committees, beginning at 1:30 pm September 25, 2012, Grants and Marketing Committees, beginning at 1:30 pm THIS IS A PUBLIC MEETING AND TWO OR MORE FRANKLIN COUNTY COMMISSIONERS MAY ATTEND. ATTENTION FORD F-250 POWER STROKE DIESEL ENGINE IF YOU OWN OR LEASE A FORD SUPER DUTY TRUCK OR AN EXCURSION VEHICLE FOR MODEL YEARS 2003 2007 EQUIPPED WITH FORDS 6.0L DIESEL ENGINE, COMMONLY KNOWN AS FORDS POWER STROKE DIESEL ENGINE, YOU MAY HAVE LEGAL RIGHTS IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO DISCUSS YOUR POSSIBLE CLAIM FOR DAMAGES, CALL: Lovelace Law Firm, P.A. 12870 US Hwy 98 West Suite 200 Miramar Beach, FL 32550 Telephone: 850-837-6020 Toll free: 1-888-837-2281 Fax: 1-850-837-4093 dml@lovelacelaw.com www.lovelacelaw.com HEALTH CARE from page A1

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Local A6 | The Times Thursday, September 29, 2011 By David Adlerstein Times City Editor County commissioners were not happy last week about being the last to know whats going on at Weems Memorial Hospital, and they plan to talk to hospital ofcials about it. On Sept. 20, all ve com missioners Noah Lock ley, Cheryl Sanders, Smokey Parrish, Pinki Jackel, and Bevin Putnal voiced fresh concerns regarding hospi tal operations, prompting them to unanimously ap prove a request to meet with Weems CEO Davie Lloyd, the Weems hospital board and representatives of Tal lahassee Memorial Hospital at the commissions Oct. 18 meeting. The request came two weeks after a pointed but amicable exchange of views from Lloyd and interim heath department director Dr. Karen Chapman. After reviewing changes in primary care delivery emerging from a new rural health collaboration (see story, A1), the commission ers heard Lloyd outline a de-stafng policy that has cut into working hours of several hospital employees. Lloyd said she is devel oping a new policy to better address what is required when the hospital census is anywhere from zero to 15 patients. That really makes an easy matrix for the staff to follow, Lloyd said. The policy wasnt being followed consistently, and it wasnt being followed by all departments. There were some departments who it seemed as though the same staff members were being sent home every day. The new policy will spell out who works if X number of pa tients are hospitalized. Lloyd said current rules call for full-time employ ees with benets to have priority over part-time em ployees who work on an as-needed basis. She said she plans assure de-stafng affects day and night staff equally. What triggers this is the number of patients in the hospital, she said. Lloyd said forecasted nancial data compiled by BKD, the auditing rm helping to prepare the ap plication for a federal loan to build a new hospital in Apalachicola, also affect the situation. She said data for full-time employees per adjusted oc cupied beds, a common pro ductivity measure, shows that in 2006, there were 6.9 FTEs; in 2007 6.3; in 2008 5.7; in 2009 4.9; and in 2010 5.7. This compares to a na tional benchmark of from 3.0 to 4.0. We have been have been consistently overstaff ing, she said. When we are overstafng, we are not being good stewards of the resources we have been en trusted. Lockley said, People making decisions to go home dont never go home. Some individuals by law and by job description are required to be at the hos pital, Lloyd said. Those decisions are based on job description. We dont make decisions on an individual basis. She stressed that we are not de-stafng to the point where it interferes in any way, shape or form with patient care. Commission urges communication As cordial as the Sept. 6 meeting had been, Sept. 20 was a different story. Concerns began with Clerk of Court Marcia John sons report that showed Weems had $54,270 in its op erating account at the end of August. Back-up funds include certicates of de posit, money market funds of $354,000, a grant account of $93,380 and a capital ac count of $495,717. Im still concerned with the direction that were go ing on this, Sanders said. We really didnt want them to touch the CDs and money market for paying operation al accounts and paychecks. I dont want a repeat of whats happened in the past. Parrish voiced frustra tion as well, citing an ap parent snub from Lloyd, who had declined to meet with him. Im very aggra vated with it myself. When I call someone and ask for a meeting (and) they tell me they dont have time to meet with me, I have a problem. County Planner Alan Pierce, hospital spokesman and commission liaison, said after the meeting that Lloyd had chosen not to meet with Parrish because the subject of discussion concerned a pending personnel matter. Each commissioner voiced displeasure at being kept out of the loop on hospi tal operations. During County Attorney Michael Shulers report, Jackel was adamant the commission needed to be informed earlier on deci sions being made by Lloyd and the hospital board. This is another one of these hospital items that to me is vague in informing the board whats going on, she said. I have yet to see a copy of the application for the new hospital. I dont know how much money were paying upfront in the loan application pro cess. Im very uncomfort able with this, she said. I dont want my comments to be construed that we dont need a better hospital facil ity. Id like to see us have a new hospital, but we need to be in the loop on all of this. ... When push comes to shove, the boards going to be asked to guarantee this loan. Theres a lot of in formation that has to come down the pike before we can even touch that subject. Later in the meeting, Sanders went even further. I think we need to seri ously look at the delegation of authority we have given that hospital board, she said. Im real concerned with the new CEO going to football games in presidents boxes and everything and here we have sacriced and worked so hard to keep this hospital going. I thought the salary of the CEO was going to be one thing and come to nd out its another thing, and TMH was all be hind it. Im concerned with them going in and hiring people and Ive never seen the advertisement. Pierce said afterward that Lloyd had attended a Florida State University football game as the guest of a friend. Shuler has yet to respond to a request from the Times, made in July, for Lloyds sal ary, citing an exemption in the Sunshine laws that ap plies to private companies that manage public hospi tals. Sanders voiced concern over TMHs overall role in the local hospital. They need to under stand that the one driving that ship over here is the one that pays the bills and thats the people of Franklin County, she said. Theyre putting out too much money on a lot of salaries, money that the hospital can not sustain. Somewhere down the line, theyve got to get the message that when this hospital account reaches zero, theyre going to run down here, theyre not go ing to run to Tallahassee. And yet they want commis sioners to have no input. Lockley agreed. I dont see where Tallahassees do ing that much myself, (but) they want to tell us who to hire and how to run it. PUBLIC NOTICE THE FRANKLIN COUNTY ADVISORY BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT WILL HOLD A PUBLIC HEARING ON WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 5, 2011, AT 10:00 A.M. IN THE COUNTY COMMISSION MEETING ROOM OF THE FRANKLIN COUNTY COURTHOUSE ANNEX TO CONSIDER THE FOLLOWING VARIANCES, APPEALS AND SPECIAL EXCEPTIONS: 1. CONSIDERATION OF A REQUEST FOR A VARIANCE TO CONSTRUCT A SINGLE FAMILY DWELLING 23 FEET INTO THE CRITICAL HABITAT ZONE AND 12 FEET INTO THE FRONT SETBACK LINE, AND THE ENCROACHMENT OF 25 FEET INTO THE 75 FT SETBACK LINE FOR A PERFORMANCE BASED ON SITE SEWAGE DISPOSAL SYSTEM ON PROPERTY DESCRIBED AS 841 WEST PINE STREET, LOT 18, BLOCK 74, UNIT 5, ST. GEORGE ISLAND, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. REQUEST SUBMITTED BY GARLICK ENVIRONMENTAL ASSOCIATES, INC., AS AGENT FOR PHILLIP AND MARY JANE PULLAM, OWNERS. 2. CONSIDERATION OF A REQUEST FOR A VARIANCE TO CONSTRUCT A SINGLE FAMILY DWELLING 5 FEET INTO BOTH SIDE SETBACK LINES ON PROPERTY DESCRIBE AS LOT 12, BLOCK 9 WEST, UNIT 1, 215 WEST GORRIE DRIVE, ST. GEORGE ISLAND, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. REQUEST SUBMITTED BY PAUL MAURER,(BUYER), AS AGENT FOR JIM KINMAN, SELLER (OWNER). THE BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS ACTING AS THE BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT WILL ADDRESS THIS REQUEST AT THEIR MEETING ON OCTOBER 18, 2011. *Persons wishing to comment may do so in person or in writing to the Franklin County Planning & Zoning Department, 34 Forbes Street, Suite 1, Apalachicola, FL 32320. Transactions of this hearing will not be recorded, persons wishing to record the proceedings must make the necessary arrangements for recording. THIS PROJEC T RECEIVED FINANCIAL ASSIS T ANCE FROM VISI T FLORIDA www.BlastontheBay.com P AR T IAL FUNDING FOR T HIS EVEN T PROVIDED BY T HE GULF COUN T Y T OURISM DEVELOPMEN T C OUNCIL 3026382 ATTENTION DARVON/DARVOCET/ PROPOXYPHENE IF YOU HAVE USED DARVON/DARVOCET PAIN MEDICATION, YOU MAY HAVE LEGAL RIGHTS. THIS IS NOT A CLAIM AGAINST YOUR DOCTOR. THIS IS A CLAIM AGAINST THE MANUFACTURER OF THIS DRUG. IF YOU HAVE USED THIS DRUG, AND WOULD LIKE TO DISCUSS YOUR POSSIBLE CLAIM, CALL: Lovelace Law Firm, P.A. 12870 US Hwy 98 West Suite 200 Miramar Beach, FL 32550 Telephone: 850-837-6020 Toll free: 1-888-837-2281 Fax: 1-850-837-4093 dml@lovelacelaw.com www.lovelacelaw.com TMH, Weems deal under scrutiny by county

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Local The Times | A7 Thursday, September 29, 2011 1930 W. hwy 98, Port St. Joe, FL 32456 Downtown Highland view TUESDAY FRIDAY 9-6 SATURDAY 9-2 10% OFF EVERYTHING IN STOCK www.weemsmemorial.com 135 Avenue G, Apalachicola 850-653-8853 Email : Info@weemsmemorial.com THIS IS MY H OME THIS IS MY H OSPI T AL Our mission is to improve the health status of the residents and visitors to Franklin County, by providing quality, compassionate, cost effective and convenient health care through community leadership and in collaboration with other healthcare organizations which serve our communities. George E Weems M emorial H ospital is afliated with Tallahassee Memorial Healthcare, a 25-bed critical access hospital that offers 24-hour service to our community and its visitors. Our hospital is fully staffed with a warm, caring and professional team 365 days a year. Any time, day or night, you will nd our medical staff ready to assist you when you need it the most! When life-saving, rapid transport for higher level medical services are required, a helipad is located on site. Weems M emorial H ospital. Were H ere For Y ou. W eems offers 24 hour emergency services, inpatient acute care services and a swing-bed program. We offer diagnostic imaging to include: x-ray, CT scan and screening mammogrophy. Our on-site laboratory provides service to our in-patients, as well as out-patients. Our ambulatory services include colonoscopy and endoscopy exams and procedures, cardiology out-patient surgery, podiatry out-patient surgery, and more to come! VACANT LOT APALACHICOLA Nice corner lot at 12th St. and Ave L 60 x 100. Old home on lot but no value given to structure. MLS# 244889.................$25,000 Travis Stanley 850.653.6477 Grayson Shepard 850.653.6718 Kim Davis 850.653.6875 Leon Teat 850.653.5656 Jackie Golden 850.899.8433 Jamie Crum 850.370.0835 Sandy Mitchem 850.899.8300 B A YFR ONT E ASTPOINT 1.2 acres on Hwy 98 with $850/ month rental income from mobile home, also machine shop. Great home site and already has dock approval. MLS# 243415...........$ 149,000 VACANT COMME R CIAL LOT APALACHICOLA On the corner of 8th St. and Ave. I zoned C2 neighborhood commercial single family, MLS# 244962..............$45,000 C OMME R CIAL A PALACHICOLA Two commercial lots for sale in Apalachicola on the corner of Commerce and Penton St. Great location, one block of Hwy 98, near all the best shops and restaurants in Apalach! MLS# 244870.................$290,000 AFF O RD ABLE GR EATE R A PALACHICOLA 3 BR/2BA 1142 sq.ft home with large fenced back yard, storage building. Great condition at a great price! MLS# 244700$115,000 COMME R CIAL ST. GEO R GE ISLAN D Excellent location for 1500 square feet of commercial space in the heart of the island. Currently has closing. Also available for LONG TERM LEASE call for details. MLS# 244926...........$339,000 attached it to Williams. This offender had no place to go, he was homeless and he had conditions of where he could live, Rackleff said. The rst place he said he wanted to stay (fell through) because it was too close to plac es where children congregate. He said he could stay in the national forest, so of cers accompanied him to a spot in the forest. He said he needed to walk and get a tent and a sleeping bag, and he went down the road to do that. Probation ofcials received notice late in the afternoon that Williams location could not be detected by the GPS unit, Rackleff said. The ofcers went at about 6:30 p.m. to the location where Williams was to be and found he had vanished. The ofcers immediately notied area departments to be on the lookout for Wil liams, who is 6 feet, 4 inches, weighs 245 pounds and has extensive tattoos. He was free to go before curfew, and that is when he got away from us, Rack leff said. We had good cooperation from law enforcement and the prison. It was done the best we know how to do. Franklin County Undersheriff Joel Norred said the ankle bracelet was found near Bear Creek Road. Thats when they determined that he had cut it, he said. We have information that he was taken to Bay County that night, Norred said. He said the department is seeking a warrant for Williams arrest for failing to register as a sexual predator. Rackleff said state ofcials are seek ing a warrant for absconding. Law enforcement ofcials also are pursuing leads that Williams might have left the state. Individuals should contact their local law enforcement agency if they believe they know his whereabouts. PREDATOR from page A1 listed the more common ruby-throated hummingbird as the only species found east of the Rocky Mountains. Since then, 14 species have been spotted east of the Rockies. Why the change? Dietrich said the less common birds might always have been present, but fewer people were watching. Birding has become one of the fastest growing hob bies in the US, he said, and the number of bird feeders has increased, so foreign visitors like the broad-bill might have a higher survival rate. Dietrich headed to Eastpoint rst thing Saturday morning, and as he ap proached the Klink home, he spotted his friend Bassett in the rear-view mirror. The men were able to capture and band the rare visitor. He let me band it, Dietrich said. Its the rst time Ive band ed that species. It was quite an honor. Dietrich said the broad-bill is larger than the common ruby-throat and one of the most beautiful of the jewel-like hum mingbirds. He and Bassett observed the bird defending the bird feeder from rubythroats, and it appeared to be vocalizing, but they couldnt hear its song. He said the high-pitched sound made by hum mers is outside the range for most men but is audible to women. Dietrich said long journeys are not out of the ordinary for hummingbirds. A bird he banded in Tallahassee turned up in Alaska ve months later. If you consider the size of the bird, thats the longest mi gration of any bird, he said. More pictures and information about sighting are online at http://digest.sialia. com/?rm=message;id=299028. HUMMINGBIRD from page A1 apparent steps to fulll any further con ditions of the FLUMs. But, according to County Commissioner Bevin Putnal and environmental activist Don Ashley, who originally sued St. Joe, both say public access to Turkey Point, a popular spot for net shing and launching small craft, was blocked shortly after the new FLUMs were created. In addition, titles to several parcels of land, said to be promised by St. Joe for various public uses, were not forth coming. County Planner Alan Pierce said these promises were part of a gentlemens agreement and were not formalized in a legal agreement. After commissioners squabbled with St. Joe over water access, alleged zoning violations and other issues, they voted on Dec. 15, 2009, to rescind two FLUMs granting St. Joe the right to build 1,600 residences in two developments on St. James Island: Marina Village and Car rabelle East Village. Commissioners ear lier reversed their approval of two other St. Joe FLUMs, known as Rural Village, which encompassed 1,704 acres west of U.S. 98, and Conservation Residential, a 2,500-acre tract along the Ochlocknee Bay, where 1,000 additional homes would have been be built. In December 2010, St. Joe sent the county a letter stating that the change to the comprehensive plan eliminating Ma rina Village and Carrabelle East Village had inordinately burdened the company by interfering with its plans to develop the land. St. Joe threatened to sue the county for violating the Bert Harris Act, a 2004 state law that bars government entities from actions that prevent property own ers from proting from real property. In a telephone interview, David Theri aque, a consulting attorney for the county who is handling the dispute with St. Joe, said the county was legally required to respond to the notice from St. Joe with a determination of ripeness and a settle ment offer. The determination of ripeness is a statement of what St. Joe can do un der the current comprehensive plan and ordinances. Theriaque said the county had a num ber of options for the settlement offer, ranging from offering alternative devel opment options to standing pat on their decision to rescind. At their Sept. 20 meeting, he presented commissioners with a 10-page settlement offer and nine-page ripeness determina tion to consider, but they chose to stand by their original decision to rescind with out further review. On Sept. 21, Theriaque sent Bryan Duke, the attorney representing St. Joe, a letter that states the commission will make No changes to the action of the government entity. St. Joe now has un til March 2014 to bring a lawsuit against Franklin County. Theriaque contends St. Joe has no re course to the Bert Harris Act because the company never formally applied for de velopment approvals from the county, and none of the property had been developed. He said the land always has been zoned a Forestry Agricultural District, and this zoning would not have allowed for a large-scale, mixed-use development of the type proposed by St. Joe. He said St. Joe bought the land as a tree farm, and they can continue to use it for that pur pose. When he was hired, Theriaque told commissioners St. Joe had no grounds to sue under the Bert Harris Act and de scribed the companys threats as saber rattling. They threaten and threaten but a lot of time they dont do anything about it. There is low to remote risk and low to remote nancial responsibility, Theri aque said. Nobody can say theres zero risk. At the Sept. 20 hearing, he reiterated this belief. It is still my opinion that St. Joes claim has no merit, he said. Ross Burnaman, an attorney repre senting the Ashleys, said he concurred with Theriaque. I think St. Joes claim is frivolous, he said. They are a bad corpo rate actor in my opinion. Burnaman pointed out that a Franklin County jury would hear the case if it came to trial. He urged commissioners to take no action and not to offer St. Joe a settle ment of any kind. Don Ashley also spoke in support of the no action position. No action is a bet ter option at this point, he said. Com munity consensus has always been Lets maintain the rural shing village lifestyle of Franklin County. If the Florida Keys had done this in the 1950s, they wouldnt be struggling now. He slammed St. Joe for breaking prom ises concerning water access, low income housing and land donations. How can the St. Joe Company give 25 acres to Gulf County for a hospital and put up the rst two or three million dollars for operation and were struggling to keep an urgent care center in Carrabelle today? Its not part of any discussion, is it? Yet were talking 1,200 new units. To me its not balanced, he said. I dont think we need to blow it this time, said Commissioner Cheryl Sand ers, referring to the original decision to grant the FLUMs. There is some things that needed to happen that has never hap pened. The water access and the low-in come housing is a slap in the face of the people of Franklin County. This is a Godgiven opportunity to put it right. She moved that the county stand pat on its decision to rescind the FLUMs and not offer St. Joe any further settlement. LAWSUIT from page A1 PHOTOS BY LOIS S WOBODA | The Times From left are David Theriaque, a consulting attorney for the county; Don Ashley, an environmental activist who originally sued St. Joe; and Ross Burnaman, an attorney representing the Ashleys.

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A8 | The Times Thursday, September 29, 2011 PET OF THE WEEK Franklin County Humane Society Fresh Baked Bread Cheeses Wine Micro Brews Seasonings and Sauces Open Daily 9:00 AM to 7:00 PM (850)927-5039 112 E. Gulf Beach Dr., St. George Island DIXIETHEA T RE.COM 850.653.3200 Presents PEARLS for the KING! OY S T ERS & E L V IS A T TH E D I X IE 8 P M FRI D AY & SA T UR D AY SE PT EMBER 30 & O C T OBER 1 Qualications: Expertise in: Now Accepting Appointments Call Toll Free 888-681-5864 For more info www.seclung.com Lung Disease Specialist Rob Garver, MD Now Seeing Patients in Port St. Joe NOW BCBS-FL I N -NETWORK PROV I DER This is a FREE EVENT Brought to you by the Apalachicola Municipal Library and PALS, supported in part by the Franklin County Tourist Development Council www.anaturalescape.com By Lois Swoboda Times Staff Writer The Apalachicola Riverkeepers reported that workers at the 2011 Coastal Cleanup held Saturday bagged more than 2,500 pounds of trash. This year, teams toiled from Bald Point to Apalachicola. The Riverkeeper sends its thanks to all of the volunteers, but especially to Ada Long of St. George Island for organizing a banner event. The biggest turnout of volunteers was 20 in Carrabelle. Four of the cleanup sites Lafayette Park, Abercrombie Landing, the Eastpoint Pavilion and St. George Island State Park had no volunteers other than the site coordinator. A crew of kids from the Franklin County School cleaned up Marion Millender Park. In the business district on the island, Tony Robinette was the youngest volunteer, and the hardest-working was Bob Pruitt. At Ten Foot Hole, the hardest worker was Fred Vogt and the youngest volunteer Cina Duggan Smith. At Abercrombie Landing, Meg Nelson voted herself the hardest worker and gave her standard poodle Josee Nelson the prize for youngest volunteer. One of the attractions of the Fall Festival this year will be the child protection program. This program is being offered by the Masons from Curfew Lodge in Carrabelle. Free photos and ngerprints. These will be given to the parents for safekeeping. See you at the Franklin County Senior Center on Saturday, Nov. 12, right after the parade. On Tuesday, Sept. 27, family and friends gathered at the Camp Gordon Johnston American Legion Post 82, for the memorial service for Gordie Meloche. Gordie passed away last Tuesday, Sept. 22. Pray for his eternal peace and comfort for the family. On Monday, Oct. 3, we will have our monthly meeting at the Lanark Village Association. Gavel falls at 7 p.m. The snowbirds will start drifting in next week. Be good to see them. Be kind to one another, check on the sick and housebound Jesus is with you through it all! Until next time, God bless America, our troops, the poor, homeless and hungry. Jamie Daniels, Brad Johnson to wed Oct. 15 Jamie Leigh Daniels and Randall Bradley Johnson will be joined in holy matrimony at the Riverfront Park in Apalachicola on Saturday, Oct. 15, at 6 p.m. Jamie is the daughter of Greg and Evie Daniels of Carrabelle. She is the granddaughter of Julia Thompson of Carrabelle and the late Vernon Thompson; and Bill and Pat Daniels of Perry. Brad is the son of Robbie and Marcia Johnson of Apalachicola. He is the grandson of Bill and Burnell Martina of Apalachicola and the late Paul and Inez Johnson. Please come join us in celebration of the beginning of their lives together. LANARK NEWS Jim Welsh Masons to offer child protection photos at festival Engagement Coastal Cleanup bags a ton of trash Photos by R OD G AS CH E | Special to the Times At left is the Lanark Village Coastal Cleanup crew. Below, Eugenia and David Butler were crowned hardest workers in Carrabelle. Society

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In memory of Thom Lewis who lost his life in a plane crash on June 23, a celebration of his life will be held at the home of Lana and J.R Heady, 849 E. Pine Street, St. George Island, on Saturday, Oct. 1. The gathering will be from 4 to 6:30 p.m., beginning with a gathering at the house and then walking a short distance to the bay where the Rev. Themo Patriotis will lead this celebration. Thom spent a lot of time in this spot, especially with the two hunting dogs that he loved so much, Teah and Chessie. All persons who would like to speak about Thom are cordially invited to do so. There will be refreshments served after returning from the bay. Please dress casual as we will be in the sand. As this is a celebration of Thoms life and his many contributions to this beautiful place, bright colors and beach attire are very acceptable. All persons who knew and loved Thom and also love Jo are invited to attend. Please bring a lawn chair or blanket to sit on and insect spray. If you have difculty walking from parking, please turn on your lights and someone will transport you to the Headys house by golf cart. If there are any pictures or items of interest that anyone would like to share for display please call 9273337. Lemuel Miller to lead revival at Eastpoint of God Lemuel Miller will be in Revival on Sunday, Oct. 2 at 11 a.m. and 6 p.m., and Monday through Wednesday, Oct. 3 through 5 at 7 p.m., at the Eastpoint Church of God, 379 Ave A, Eastpoint. Miller serves the body of Christ as evangelist, pastor and psalmist. A former Gaither vocal band member, he presently serves as pastor of China Hill Community Church, Jacksonville, Ga. Join us for the Word of God demonstrated in power and authority! For more information, call 850-323-1206 and 6708704. The United Methodist Churches of Franklin County Welcome You First United Methodist Church of Apalachicola Worship Service 11:00 a.m. every Sunday Sunday School 10:00 a.m. 75 5 th St. Apalachicola 653-9530 fumcapalach@gtcom.net Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis Carrabelle United Methodist Church Worship Services 10:45 a.m. Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Celebrate Recovery Mondays 7-9 p.m. 102 NE Ave. B Carrabelle 697-3672 Pastor: Julie Stephens Eastpoint United Methodist Church Worship Service 10:00 a.m. every Sunday Healing service every fourth Monday at 7:00 p.m. 317 Patton Dr. (corner of David St.) 670-8825 Pastor: Rev. Beth White St. George Island United Methodist Church 9:00 a.m. Worship Service 10:00 a.m. Fellowship Hour 201 E. Gulf Beach Dr. 9274635 www.sgiumc.org Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis Lemuel Miller will be in Revival Sunday, October 2 nd at 11:00 a.m. and 6:00 p.m. and Monday through Wednesday, October 3 rd through 5 th at 7:00 p.m. at: East Point Church of God 379 Ave A Eastpoint, FL 32328 Ph 850-323-1206 & 850-670-8704 Lemuel Miller serves the body of Christ as Evangelist, Pastor and Psalmist. Lemuel Miller, former Gaither Vocal Band Member pres ently serves as Pastor of China Hill Community Church, Jacksonville, G.A. Join us for the Word of God demonstrated in Power and Authority! Salvation, Healing and Deliverance! Join us! A Book of Acts Church Believing A Book of Acts God! First Pentecostal Holiness Church 379 Brownsville Road Apalachicola Were excited about what Gods doing!!! Sunday School 9:45 am Sunday Morning Worship 10:45 am Sunday Evening Service 6:00 pm Monday, Youth Group 6:30 pm Wednesday, Royal Rangers, G.A.P. 7:00 pm Wednesday Worship & Word 7:30 pm Nursery Provided during regular church services 7:00 7:00 First Baptist Church St. George Island 501 E. Bayshore Drive 927-2257 R. Michael Waley, Pastor Join us as we praise and worship the living Christ. Great is the Lord and most worthy of praise. Psalm 145:3 Sunday Bible Study ................................................ 10:00am Worship Praise ........................................................ 11:00am Sunday Night ............................................................ 7:00pm Wednesday Power Hour ...................................... 7:00pm Wednesday Youth at S.P.L.A.S.H ....................... 7:00pm Walking in Christ R. Michael Whaley, Pastor WELCOMES YOU Church of the Ascension 101 NE First Street Carrabelle SUNDAY 10:00 AM WELCOMES YOU Church THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH (850) 274-4490 WELCOMES YOU Trinity Trinity Episcopal Church est. 1836 Welcomes You Hwy. 98 & 6th St. Apalachicola 850-653-9550 Sunday Worship Services 8 & 10:30 a.m. Wednesdays Healing Service 11 a.m. Centering Prayer 4 p.m. Faith The Times | A9 Thursday, September 29, 2011 Faith BRIEFS I remember the different lessons that we were required to master when I was in kindergarten. Almost every lesson centered around respect for others, including keeping your hands to yourself, raising your hand before speaking, taking turns, sharing, etc. The golden rule, do onto others as you would want them to do onto you, from Matthew 7:1, was the center of all values we once lived by. The golden rule is found in nearly every religion and culture around the world, including Christianity, Confucianism, Buddhism, Judaism and Hinduism to name a few. Regardless of age, color or creed, treating others with respect is a part of the moral ber of our nation, yet that teaching is futile if it is absent from Gods principles. A gentleman opens a door for a young lady and she walks past him without extending him the courtesy of eye contact. How often do you hear a child say, may I have, please, or thank you? What I hear most frequently is mine, give me, I wanted that one, not this one. There is obviously something amiss about how children are being taught in a society that reects the absence of character. The solutions to how our children learn values are elusive, but ultimately the responsibility of the parent. One thing that was constant in my life as a child was the reinforcement of respect and integrity at home and at school. Anyone considered an elder was addressed as maam and sir. Nothing was given unless you said the magic word please, and respect was demanded, not earned. Politeness, appreciation and respect are common courtesies that separate us from the rest of the animal kingdom. Seldom does a child say, excuse me, when cutting through a conversation, burps aloud or when requesting attention anymore. Appreciation is merited only by topping the last toy or event. Todays parent tends to equate buying things for their children with caring for them. We learn the art of appreciation by placing a high value on things so if everything in a childs life is viewed as disposable and replaceable they never learn how to take care of their own toys, furniture and clothing. How much more will they appreciate the use of someone elses belongings? I frequently hear parents who say things like I give her everything and she gives me no respect in return. Here is a tip: Appreciation goes hand-inhand with earning. We tend to respect and care for the things we work hard for and appreciate the tangible and non-tangible things we regard highly. By todays standard, you would be scoffed at for preferring others over yourself since the name of the game is to be the one that winds up with the most toys in the end. Never mind the rules, just play to win. Doing things for the greater good is unheard of when getting the biggest piece of pie takes precedence. Teaching a child to share is an act of sacrice. Being stingy is common for a toddler, but it is only through consistent teaching and by the parents example that the child learns to share. In the early 1950s, elementary school teachers from across the United States were asked to list the top ve problems in their school. They replied: Talking out of turn, chewing gum, making noise, running in the hall and cutting in line. In the early 1990s, the same question was asked of teachers. Their replies were profoundly different: drug and alcohol abuse, guns and knives in school, pregnancy, suicide and rape, according to the 1998 Report Card on the Ethics of American Youth Survey Data on Youth Violence. Many things changed in those four decades. God was expelled from school, divorce rates increased, the American dream started to seem more like a nightmare, things that used to be wrong are acceptable, and the responsibility of raising children is forced on everyone but the one who gave birth to them. Americans are making up their own moral codes. How ironic that secularism emerged in the public schools around the 1960s; anyone see a pattern? How to treat others, take care of things, and give more than we take are ethics we learn as children by observing our parents. Most importantly, we learn the art of treating others as we would like to be treated and not how we have been treated. If every parent taught those principles, I believe our entire country would be healed. We welcome all suggestions and hope you enjoy this weekly article. Please send all emails to Scott Shiver at frontline247@mac.com. Teach manners, morals to heal the nation YOUTH MATTERS Pamela Shiver Justin Wesley Wilson, 37, of Apalachicola, passed away Friday, Sept. 23, 2011. Justin was a native and lifelong resident of Apalachicola. A commercial sherman by trade, he enjoyed hunting and recreational shing, and was an avid Florida Gator. He was a member of Apalachicola First Baptist Church and attended the First Pentecostal Holiness Church. Survivors include his mother, Brenda Crowson Wilson, of Apalachicola; his daughter, Kara Richards, of Apalachicola; his brother, Wesley Anderson Wilson, of Apalachicola; four sisters, Donna Crum, Stacie DeVaughn and Samantha Jones, all of Apalachicola, and Christy Ziemba, of Sante Fe, N.M.; and his maternal grandmother, Madelyn Crowson of Sopchoppy. He was preceded in death in 2003 by his father, Donald Wesley Wilson. The funeral service was held Monday afternoon, Sept. 26, at the First Pentecostal Holiness Church, 379 Brownsville Road in Apalachicola. Burial followed at Magnolia Cemetery in Apalachicola. The family received friends at the church, one hour prior to the service. In lieu of owers, gifts in memory of Justin may be made to the Panama City Rescue Mission, P.O. Box 2359, Panama City, FL 32402. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel of Crawfordville assisted the Wilson family. Justin Wesley Wilson Obituary Celebration of life for Thom Lewis Saturday

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By Frank Sargeant franksargeant@bellsouth.net Not long ago, kayaks were the province of the Inuit peoples beyond the Arctic Circle plus a few whacked-out whitewater enthusiasts with more nerve than sense. But what a difference a few years can make. Today, paddle-powered boats are by far the fastest growing segment of an otherwise stagnant boating market, both because of the environment-rst attitude of millions of young people and because they are simply very useful, costefcient little boats. These paddlepowered cockleshells offer swift, silent access to water so shallow that powerboats cant even think of invading it. For the nature photographer and wildlife watcher, theres no watercraft that can compare; shore birds, marine mammals and sh simply ignore a yak as if its a log oating past. For shing in shallow bay areas like those that abound throughout the Panhandle, there also are big benets. Kayaks put the angler so low to the water that the sh cant see him or her, and the approach is dead silent. They cruise over water only inches deep, across mud bottoms too soft to wade, and they theyre light enough to launch anywhere, including off a seawall in the middle of town if thats where the sh happen to be. Intrepid anglers even take them off the beach and head out to sea to do battle with king mackerel and tarpon. Plus, when the day ends, you can store your boat standing on end on the porch of your walk-up apartment. And theres no environmental footprint paddle power is simple, clean muscle-power. Kayaks are light enough for one angler, man or woman, to hoist to a rack on the top of a car or slide into the bed of a pickup, SUV or station wagon. Theyre typically 10 to 14 feet long, and weights for kayaks rigged for shing are usually less than 60 pounds. Theyre available in sit-on-top versions as well as the more traditional models where the legs go under a bow deck. Many anglers like the sit-on-top models because theyre easier to get in and out of; a typical day in kayak country includes a good bit of wade-shing as well as shing from the boat, so the ease of entry can be important. Most kayak makers designate various models for various duties; those who intend to use their boats for shing probably will want a recreational or general use version, said Ian Joyce, spokesman for Wilderness Systems Kayaks, one of the leading shing kayaks. These are wider and more stable than some of the sport models, Joyce said. The trade-off is that the wider the beam, the harder the kayak is to paddle, and the slower it goes for a given amount of effort. Wider kayaks also are somewhat heavier, though not enough so that this should become a factor in getting the boats in and out of the water in most areas. Most anglers set their kayaks up with back rests to ease the pressure on the spine over long hours in the boat. They also are likely to add small anchors, sometimes on a roller that allows dropping it without moving from the seat in the kayak; paddle keepers that prevent the double-ended paddle from drifting away should it fall overboard; slip-in tackle boxes that t premolded slots in the deck; ice chests; and of course waterproof bags for anything that doesnt like saltwater, including electronic car keys, cellphones and wallets one of the facts of life in kayaking is that nearly everything gets wet. And, of course, you need rod holders. Most opt for at least two, allowing them a quick choice of lures for varying depths. By law and by common sense, it also is wise to carry and wear a personal otation device any time you are in a kayak. Sooner or later, you probably will turn the boat over. Often, in the backcountry, the remedy is simply to stand up. But in deeper water, the boat might quickly drift away, and a life preserver can make all the difference. Many opt for the belt-pack or suspender-type inatable, which offers more freedom of movement for paddling and casting than the vest type. Many resorts throughout the Panhandle now offer kayaks for rent, giving a great opportunity to try before you buy. And most boat dealers now have at least a few yaks somewhere in their inventory. Expect to spend about $800 minimum for a kayak equipped to sh, about $2,000 for a fully equipped rig. If you just want a sport-yak to play with, some are available for as little as $450. Ocean, Hobie, Old Town, Wilderness Systems, NuCanoe and others offer a wide variety of models suitable for Panhandle yakking. Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL (next to Piggly Wiggly) www.BWOsh.com Your Hunting Headquarters LIMITED QUANTITIES A VAI L A BL E QUEST HEAT B OW B Y G5 $499.99 Freshwater Grouper shing is red hot now since the re-opener of gag grouper. Most sh are being caught in the 60-150ft range and good reports from the M.B.A.R.A. sites out of Mexico Beach are producing sh. Hard bottom or offshore wrecks will be holding bigger sh, and as always take some live pin sh or mullet for red hot shing! Inshore Offshore Trout and red sh have made their way into the I.C.W. canal here in St. Joe. Most anglers are using grubs and jigs here, but live bait will certainlynd sh as well. Some ounder are caught here are on the large size, and with the right tide, you should do well with live bull minnows. Lakes and streams are very productive freshwater hsing right now in our area. Fall feeding patterns are starting to emergeand shing will continue to improve. Lake Wimico is still a hot spot for all that swims. Good bass, nice sheepshead, and nicebream catches are being reported daily. SPONSORED BY Email outdoors news to times outdoors@star.com Page 10 Thursday, September 29, 2011 O UTD OO RS www.apalachtimes.com Section A FRANK SARGEANT | Special to The Times Kayaks rigged for shing usually have rod holders, padded seats with backrests, and dry storage boxes for gear. Paddle-power comes from the double-ended kayak paddle, though some anglers add electric motors for easier operation against wind and tide. Kayaks nd new home on the ats The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) reminds event organizers and other Floridians about a law prohibiting the release of more than nine lighter-than-air balloons within a 24-hour period. While releasing balloons is often a sign of groups wishing to honor an event or lost loved one, the FWC encourages the public to choose more environmentally responsible actions for their events. Balloons released in Florida almost inevitably end up in the Gulf of Mexico or Atlantic Ocean. Wildlife, especially sea turtles, mistake balloons for food, and strings attached to balloons can entangle birds and other animals. The release into the atmosphere of large numbers of balloons inated with lighterthan-air gases poses a danger and nuisance to the environment, particularly to wildlife and marine animals. Violators could incur $250 in nes according to Florida law. There are exceptions for scientic or meteorological balloons released by a government agency or under government contract, hot air balloons that are recovered after launching and balloons released indoors. The law also allows for the release of balloons that are biodegradable or photodegradable under FWC rules. Since 1989, the FWC has received only one such balloon design for review, and that balloon was not approved. Balloons take a toll on wildlife

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CARRABELLE A PALA C HI C OLA SP O RT S www.apalachtimes.com A Section By David Adlerstein Times City Editor The Liberty County Bull dogs made a powerful case Friday they will be the team to beat in Class 1A District 4 as they overwhelmed the Franklin County Seahawks 49-7. Though a large part of the outcome was due to the strength and smashmouth style of football that the Bulldogs play, a small portion of it was the result of unfortunate miscues, said Seahawks coach Josh Wright. We felt we had a chance to compete with Liberty, but we knew that we would have to play just about perfect. It seemed like the early game miscues of getting tripped up, mishandling the ball and barely missing a fumbled punt return made us doubt our ability to com pete, said the coach. They have a stingy defense that has only given up 27 points on the year and they at came off the ball better than we did. Hopefully, we learn from this and react by com mitting to win the line of scrimmage against Wewa hitchka this Friday night. On the second play from scrimmage on their open ing drive, Bulldog senior quarterback Daniel Dea son tossed a 55-yard scor ing strike to senior Brenton Bailey. Senior Trey Johnson followed with the rst of his seven extra points. The rest of the rst quar ter proved scoreless for both sides, but in the sec ond quarter, the Bulldogs tallied ve unanswered touchdowns, as junior Alex Marlowe scored twice, on a quarterback sneak and from eight yards out, and connected with senior Blake Baggett on a 32-yard passing touchdown. Junior Terryall Jenkins ran it in from ve yards out, as the Bulldogs went into the lock er room with a 41-0 lead. Watching from the stands, most fans saw the Seahawks play great at times defensively and open the gate at other times, said Wright. Liberty Coun tys offense is patterned af ter Georgia Tech and Navy and was hitting on all cylin ders at times in the rst half. Unfortunately, the Bulldogs were able to start every drive on a short eld which made the task of stopping them even tougher. The second half was a better outing for the Se ahawks as they moved the ball down the eld. With 5:19 left in the third quarter, sophomore Dwayne Griggs, back for the rst time from a back injury in the open ing game, rambled down the sidelines for a 34-yard score. Senior Paul Ander son nailed the extra point. That score was set up by a great block by se nior running back Bren nan Walden, said Wright. Griggs played sparingly on both sides of the ball, as this was his rst game back from what we thought was a season-ending injury. We have gelled as a team in Dwaynes absence as we all realize that the show must go on. Getting him back in the lineup is certainly a boost to the pro gram, as it gives another running back and another defender that can get the ball carrier on the ground, he said. He has been a pos itive energy on the sideline at our games and has been at every practice since the injury on Aug. 26. He was very excited to get back on the eld and be a contribu tor to his team. The Bulldogs added a safety with 6:31 left in the game when the snap sailed over the head of Seahawks sophomore punted Leon ard Green and into the end zone. The Bulldogs wrapped up their scoring when Dea son ran it in from 12 yards out as the game neared a close. The Seahawks travel to Wewahitchka this Friday, to face a 2-2 Gator squad sport ing an offense that has put up big numbers in terms of yardage and scoring. Their top threat is running back Theryl Brown who nearly averages 200 yards a game of offense, said Wright. They also have a bruising quarterback by the name of Justin Flowers that recently returned from a broken arm he received in the Aug. 26 jamboree. They are a physi cal team that is getting bet ter each week and moves the pile when they run their single wing offense. Wright said this game is crucial to the 2-2 Seahawks and encouraged every Franklin County sports fan to make the trip and bring the county pride to the visi tors stands. Kickoff is set for 8 p.m. ET. Buffkin, Wynn honored at halftime Two seniors, Adreenah Aupril Wynn and Chance De witt Buffkin, were crowned at halftime as the fth an nual Mr. and Miss Franklin County High School, the most coveted title to be be stowed upon a senior. The Student Govern ment Association, repre sented by sponsors Roder ick Robinson and Stephanie Howze, and president Ja veion Wineld, conducted the election of whom stu dents feel best embodies the spirit of Franklin County High School. When consid ering candidates, the vot ing student body takes into consideration academics, athletics, character, leader ship, and of course school spirit. The 2010 Mr. and Miss Franklin County High School, Shelby Shiver and Milan Mullins, assisted with the crowning. Wynn, daughter of Olivia and Adron Sparky Wynn, of Apalachicola, was accom panied by her mom and old er brother, Tydron. She is the granddaughter of Julia Mae Fisher of Apalachicola, Willie Cook of Spring Val ley New York, and the late Ocea and Tom Wynn, both of Apalachicola. Active in extracurricular activities and dual-enrolled at Gulf Coast State College, she plans to attend ether the University of Florida or University of Central Flor ida to become a graphics designer. Buffkin, accompanied by his mother, Sonja Buffkin, is the grandson of the late Marvin and Pansy Bras well, of Carrabelle, and the late Glen Buffkin of Car rabelle. Active in varsity athletics, both baseball and basketball, Buffkin signed his enlistment papers on June 14 for a six-year active duty term with the Army, on the day of the 236th an niversary of the founding of the U.S. Army. After basic training at Fort Jackson in South Caro lina, he will report to Fort Eustis in Virginia for train ing in CH-47 helicopter re pair. Seahawks eye Wewa win after Bulldog loss DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times Performing with the Flag Corps, from left, are Brook Pittman, Deborah Dempsey and Jennifer Stratton. DANA WHALEY | Special to the Times Seahawk sophomore Leonard Green (14) carries the ball against Liberty County By David Adlerstein Times City Editor The Lady Seahawks volleyball team has had its thrill of victories, and its agony of close defeats, as it moves to a 5-6 record on the year. The team lost in three games, 25-22, 25-13 and 2519, at Florida A&M Univer sity High on Sept. 20, with the junior varsity losing in two games, 25-11 and 25-20. But later last week, in a doubleheader against Jef ferson County, the varsity swept, winning the opener 25-17, 25-22 and 25-23. In the nightcap, the Seahawks won 25-17, 25-15 and 25-15. Chena Segree led the team with kills with 14, while Anna Lee had 10, Morgan Mock seven, and Karli Tucker ve. The team had 42 total kills. Setters Segree and Mor gan Newell combined for 35 assists. Segree and Lee led the team in aces, combin ing for 17 points. The Se ahawks had 30 total aces. Gracyn Kirvin and Maegan Andrews held down the de fense for the girls. Overall it was a great improvement and much needed success for the var sity volleyball team, said Sally Wheeler, head volley ball coach. On Friday, the Seahawks hosted Altha and lost in three close games, 25-20, 25-17 and 25-19. At Port St. Joe on Tuesday, the team fell again in three close games, 25-19, 25-21 and 2523. We are making im provements everyday and eventually we are going to bring all the elements needed in the same day, said Wheeler. The team remains win less in district play. To night, Sept. 29, the team plays host to Blountstown. On Oct. 6 the team travels to Liberty County. Lady Seahawks volleyball team sweeps doubleheader Thursday, September 29, 2011 Page A11 Eastpoint church hosts Franklin Outdoor Day The Eastpoint Church of God is host ing Franklin Outdoor Day with special guest Lemuel Miller sharing hunting tips and life lessons from the eld. The event will be held Saturday, Oct. 1, at the church, 379 Ave. A in Eastpoint. Bow shoot registration begins at 8 a.m. Activities for the whole family, including inatables and games for the kids, begin at noon. Free seafood lunch and chances to win more than $1,000 in door prizes will be offered. For more information, call 323-1206. Sports BRIEF DANA WHALEY | Special to the Times Miss Franklin County High School Adreenah Wynn, smiles as her mom looks on. DANA WHALEY | Special to the Times Mr. Franklin County High School Chance Buffkin with his new crown, as mom looks on.

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Local A12 | The Times Thursday, September 29, 2011 2010-2011 Annual Franklin County School District Report The promotion and retention policies in the new 2011-2012 Student Progression Plan for Franklin County School District remain the same as the previous year except for the following revisions: Grades K-5 must pass 4 core courses in math, reading, language arts, social studies and science to be promoted to the next grade level. Students will be retained if the nal grade in two or more core subjects is 59 or below. Grades 6-8 Due to change from 7 to 6 periods in a school day, students are required to pass 4 out of 6 courses to be promoted to grades 7 and 8. Grades 9-12 Due to change from 7 to 6 periods in a school day, students must earn 5 or more credits including a credit in English, Math & two other required courses to be classied as a sophomore; a total of 12 credits including 2 credits in English and Math and one each in Social Studies & Science to be classied as a junior; and a total of 18 credits with a GPA of 2.0 including 3 credits in English to be classied as a senior. A complete copy of the 2011-12 Student Progression Plan can be found on the district website at franklincountyschools.org. WEEKLY ALMANAC APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE TIDE TABLES MONTHLY AVERAGES To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from these given for APALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW Cat Point Minus 0:40 Minus 1:17 East Pass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27 To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from those given for CARRABELLE: HIGH LOW Bald Point Minus 9:16 Minus 0:03 Sponsor the WEEKLY ALMANAC Call Today! 653-8868 Date High Low % Precip Thu, Sep 29 88 68 30 % Fri, Sep 30 87 62 0 % Sat, Oct 1 82 59 0 % Sun, Oct 2 79 61 0 % Mon, Oct 3 80 65 0 % Tues, Oct 4 82 67 0 % Wed, Oct 5 83 66 0 % 9/29 Thu 04:39AM 1.9 H 12:04PM 0.1 L 07:03PM 1.8 H 11:53PM 1.3 L 9/30 Fri 05:07AM 2.0 H 12:57PM 0.1 L 08:12PM 1.7 H 10/1 Sat 12:20AM 1.4 L 05:41AM 2.0 H 01:57PM 0.1 L 09:30PM 1.6 H 10/2 Sun 12:49AM 1.5 L 06:22AM 2.0 H 03:08PM 0.2 L 11:02PM 1.5 H 10/3 Mon 01:27AM 1.4 L 07:12AM 1.9 H 04:28PM 0.3 L 10/4 Tue 12:32AM 1.5 H 02:49AM 1.4 L 08:16AM 1.8 H 05:46PM 0.4 L 10/5 Wed 01:21AM 1.5 H 04:57AM 1.4 L 09:44AM 1.7 H 06:52PM 0.4 L 9/29 Thu 03:14AM 3.0 H 09:51AM 0.2 L 05:38PM 2.9 H 09:40PM 2.1 L 9/30 Fri 03:42AM 3.2 H 10:44AM 0.2 L 06:47PM 2.7 H 10:07PM 2.2 L 10/1 Sat 04:16AM 3.2 H 11:44AM 0.2 L 08:05PM 2.6 H 10:36PM 2.4 L 10/2 Sun 04:57AM 3.2 H 12:55PM 0.3 L 09:37PM 2.4 H 11:14PM 2.2 L 10/3 Mon 05:47AM 3.0 H 02:15PM 0.5 L 11:07PM 2.4 H 10/4 Tue 12:36AM 2.2 L 06:51AM 2.9 H 03:33PM 0.6 L 11:56PM 2.4 H 10/5 Wed 02:44AM 2.2 L 08:19AM 2.7 H 04:39PM 0.6 L dbutler@coastalcoverage.com Locally owned and operated to meet all your insurance needs St. George Island Sheriffs Patrol is looking for residents who will volunteer to help keep our island safe. Volunteers who qualify will be issued identication cards, caps and uniform shirts and take their turn patrolling the island in a marked Sheriffs Patrol car. Qualications include a background check, two four-hour classroom sessions, and other designated training from the Franklin County Sheriffs ofce. As a volunteer, you can schedule yourself to patrol when and as often as you like. You will not confront violators, but will add presence to law enforcement on the island by patrolling and radioing suspicious activity and infractions to the Sheriffs Ofce, who will promptly dispatch deputies to investigate and address problems. An additional marked Sheriffs car patrolling the island will help discourage unlawful activities! To participate, volunteers must ll out a Law Enforcement Auxiliary Application and Authority for Release of Information. The background investigation waiver must be notarized. These forms can be dropped off at Fickling and Company for the attention of Sandy Mitchem, who is coordinating the Sheriffs Patrol volunteer program with the Sheriffs Ofce. For your convenience, Sandy is a notary, as is Shelly at Fickling. Centennial Bank will also notarize the forms for you. Please drop the completed forms off at Fickling, Monday-Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. as soon as you can, and no later than Friday, October 14, so they can be processed before training begins. Mandatory training sessions will be in two parts, and participants can choose either the moring or afternoons session, provided they attend both days. Day One is Thursday, Oct. 27 from 8 a.m. to noon or from 15 p.m. Day Two is Monday, Oct. 31 from 8 a.m. to noon or from 15 p.m. Training will take place at the Franklin County Sheriffs Department, located at 270 State Road 65. At the end of the training hats, shirts and ID cards will be given out. Everyone is strongly encouraged to sign up for an optional Sheriff Ride-Along, which, after classroom training, can be scheduled through the Sheriffs Ofce. Sheriffs Patrol coverage will kick-off in November. Patrols will start with four days a week during the off-season, moving to seven days a week at peak times. For more information, call Mitchem at 899-8300 or email her at sandy. mitchem@gmail.com. By Lois Swoboda Times Staff writer A call for proposals for burial of unclaimed human remains has produced no reduction in current costs to the county. At a Sept. 20 public hear ing on the countys policy on unclaimed human re mains, county commission ers opened a single proposal package on transportation and burial cost of remains. The proposal, from Kelly Fu neral Home in Apalachicola, offered an interment rate of $850, the same as the rate under existing county policy. This is not surprising since in 2008, when the cur rent policy was approved, Kelly staffers collaborated on its crafting. Kelly proposed a $700 round-trip fee for transport ing bodies to and from the State Medical Examiners ofce in Tallahassee. Body bags would run $125, an in crease of $20. Commissioners request ed the bids after Steven George Brown died at St. James Bay Health and Re habilitation Center earlier this year and Kelly declined to take custody of the body. Bevis Funeral Home of Wakulla County took posses sion of the remains. County Attorney Michael Shuler said the county is having problems getting free burial plots from the cities, which control the countys public cemeteries. If we are required to start purchasing the burial site, and opening and closing the plot, it could double the cost. Shuler said he is negotiating with the cities and wants to rotate unclaimed burials so no cemetery is unduly bur dened. Clerk of Court Marcia Johnson said unclaimed bodies are rare and that the county had to handle only four since 2008. Shuler told commission ers it was possible unclaimed remains might become more common since St. James Bay, which is larger than the existing Harbor Breeze retirement center, opened in Carrabelle. He said if costs could not be kept low, com missioners might have to consider a policy of crema tion. I am hesitant to do that in case somebody comes for ward to claim the body in the future, he said. Under Florida law, un claimed bodies are de livered to the anatomical board at the University of Florida Health and Science Center for post-mortem ex amination. After that, the remains are returned to the county where the death oc curred for burial at county expense. The law stipulates that burials are arranged by the funeral home, no ser vices take place, visitation or viewing at the funeral home is not available, and friends or relatives are not allowed to be present at the time of the burial. Commissioners instruct ed Shuler, County Planner Alan Pierce and Clerk of Courts Marcia Johnson to consider the proposal by Kelly and return with sug gestions at their Oct. 4 meet ing. No cost savings for county burials St. George Island sheriffs patrol planned

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LocalThe Times | A13Thursday, September 29, 2011 Trades & Services CALL TODAY!653-8868 GET YOUR AD INTrades & Services CALL TODAY!653-8868 GET YOUR AD INTrades & Services Laban Bontrager, DMD Monica Bontrager, DMD 12761 Pea Ridge Road Bristol, Florida 32321TELEPHONE (850) 643-5417 Bristol Dental ClinicDENTURE LAB ON PREMISESSame Day Service on repairs and Relines Don Lively General Contractors C Visa, Discover, and American Express Honored at Participating Ace Stores JACKSONS Building Supplies & Auto Repair Carrabelle 697-3333 We Deliver Anywhere J Hardware and Paint Center PILE DRIVING FOUNDATION/PILING REPAIR DOCK/MARINE WORK MOORING BOUYS OFFICE: 850.227.1709FAX: 850.762.2552 CELL: 850.527.5725 HOWARD227F AIRPOINT.NET ROBERTS APPLIANCE REPAIR ALL MAJOR BRANDS 18 Shadow Lane Apalachicola, FL 32320 Phone: (850) 653-8122 Cell: (850) 653-7654 JOES LAWN CARE NO JOB TOO BIG!! SINCE 2002, DOINGBUSINESSINTHISCOMMUNITY LAWN CARE, TREE & PALM TREE TRIMMING AND REMOVAL, DEBRIS AND JUNK REMOVAL, or whatever your yard needs are CALL JOE @ 850-670-5478 E-MAIL @ joes_lawn@yahoo.com County OKs street closure for Oyster FestAt the Sept. 20 meeting, county commissioners voted unanimously to close Chili Boulevard on St. George Island for the Franklin County Oyster Festival on St. George Island, Oct. 7-9. Director of Administrative Services Alan Pierce said the parking lot adjacent to Lighthouse Park at the Island Center will also be closed so it can be used as a dance oor. He said the county will remove recently installed traf c bumpers from the lot. Festival organizer Elaine Rosenthal said the bumpers would only be removed from the center of the lot. "I don't want anybody to trip while they are dancing," she said. "We're going to have a big stage and lots of bands all day long." Anna Carmichael, organizer of "I Love Eastpoint Day" said celebration has been rescheduled for the same weekend as the Oyster Festival. She said the weighin for the Oyster Festival Fishing Tournament will take place at the Eastpoint Pavilion, also the site of children's activities and music. "I Love Eastpoint Day" was originally planned for Sept. 3 but was cancelled after a severe squall blew through Eastpoint.FEMA funds ght ooding in Franklin CountyAt the county meeting on Sept. 20, Emergency Management Director Pam Brownell said that her of ce is using FEMA funds for two ood mitigation projects. She said emergency management obtained approximately $40,000 to install culverts at McIntyre Road, Crooked River Road, Jeff Sanders Road, New River Road, and Mill Road. The county will provide an in-kind match of $13,000 by installing the culverts. Brownell said emergency management is also preparing to install "citizen ood gauges" at Bloody Bluff, Abercrombie Ramp, and Rio Vista boat ramp, on Crooked River in the Hickory Hammock area. Emergency Management Coordinator Mike Rundel said the poles will not be placed in the navigable waterway. The gauges, which cost approximately $400 each, will consist of an aluminum scale af xed to a light pole. Brownell said that she is waiting on light poles to be delivered by Progress Energy. She said the new gauges will allow her staff and any citizen to see how fast the water is rising and will help determine when evacuations are needed.County workers get Pictometry trainingOn Aug. 11, representatives of the Franklin County Sheriff's Of ce, Franklin County Emergency Management and the Property Appraiser's Of ce received training in Pictometry at the Emergency Operations Center. Pictometry is a computer-based visual intelligence program designed and marketed by Pictometry International Corporation that can be used in damage assessment. Images of landscapes and buildings are captured by low- ying airplanes and referenced using the Global Positioning System. Because the areas are photographed in high de nition from up to 12 angles, structures and geographic features can be magni ed and examined from all sides. After a disaster, the planes return and do another y over, allowing public safety of cials to initially assess the damage without visiting the scene, which might be dangerous or inaccessible. Measurements can be made directly on Pictometry imagery including area, distance, height, elevation, pitch, and bearing. Similar images were seen on the Internet and on television, following the March 11 earthquake and tsunami in Japan, showing landscapes before and after the disaster. Emergency Management Coordinator Mike Rundel said there was no cost for the Pictometry software or the original y over of the county, which has already been completed. Director Pam Brownell said there would be a charge for the y over following a disaster, the cost dependent on the area to be photographed. According to the Pictometry website, most of the inhabited world has been photographed by Pictometry.Veterans of cer seeks new assistantOn Sept. 20, Director of Administrative Services, Alan Pierce told commissioners that Charlie Galloway had submitted a letter of resignation as the Assistant Veteran Service Of cer, effective Sept. 30. Pierce said Galloway is willing to work beyond that date to ensure a smooth transition. The board voted unanimously to allow Veteran's Service Of cer William Scott to ll the position, which is budgeted as part-time with no bene ts.County gets landscape fundingDirector of Administrative Services, Alan Pierce told county commissioners he has received an unexpected windfall. At the Sept. 20 meeting, he said on behalf of Commissioner Pinki Jackel, he made a phone call requesting Florida Department of Transportation funding to landscape the junction of Franklin Blvd. and Gulf Beach Drive on St. George Island. This month, he was surprised to learn the county had been awarded $10,000 for the project, although no paperwork had been submitted. The board voted unanimously to accept the grant already awarded, and they instructed Pierce to pursue more money. He said he has learned there might be funds available in 2013 for more beauti cation, since the county is on the list for an additional $10,000. He said money from the landscaping grant must be used right of way. Commissioner Smokey Parrish said he believed the approach to the bridges might be eligible for landscape funding.Reduction in ood insurance premium earnedCounty Planner Alan Pierce told commissioners on Sept. 20 that the county has passed its two-year Flood Mitigation Review. He said every ood insurance policy holder is entitled to at least a 10 percent reduction of their premium. He said Rachel Ward, of the Planning and Building of ce, is attempting to increase the county's score so that there could be a 15 percent reduction. Commissioner Smokey Parrish asked Pierce to thank Ward for her diligent efforts.Septic tank variance deniedIn spite of a recommendation by County Attorney Michael Shuler and County Planner Alan Pierce, the commission refused to allow a variance to the 2005 septic tank ordinance. On Sept. 20, Shuler told commissioners a county inspector had determined the drain eld for a septic tank on Alligator Point had failed. "It is outside the critical habitat zone and may be replaced under your ordinance without requiring the landowner to purchase an aerobic system," said Shuler, noting that while the existing tank, installed in the 1950s, was still operational, it was too small under the county's current ordinance. "In my opinion, since your ordinance will allow the failed drain eld to be replaced, and as the present tank is operational, that the landowner can replace the septic tank with another (larger) septic tank. Mr. Pierce agrees with this interpretation," said the attorney. Commissioners said they were hesitant to allow a variance to the existing code, and voted unanimously to require the owner to install an aerobic system.A panel discussion on Econ na CreekA panel discussion on Econ na Creek "Preserving Water Resource History: Civil War ruins of Adam's Mill" will be held from 1011:30 a.m. on Friday, Sept.30 at Pitt Spring and U.S. Highway 20, seven miles west of State Road 231) The discussion will feature Archaeologist Greg Mikell, Florida State University history professor Andrew Frank, settler descendants Brian Chambless and Faye Gainer Matthews and Northwest Florida Water Management District Lands Director Bill Cleckley. There will be refreshments, unveiling of historic exhibits, tour of Pitt and Sylvan springs renovations, and an optional driving tour presented by the district. Funding was provided through a grant from the Florida Humanities Council (FHC) with funds from the National Endowment for the Humanities. For more info, call Faith Eidse, 539-5999 ext. 275. News BRIEFS

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A14| The Times Thursday, September 29, 2011 CLASSIFIEDS 35648T STATE OF FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION NOTICE OF INTENT TO ISSUE PERMIT The Department of Environmental Protection gives notice of its intent to issue an environmental resources permit, File No.: 19-0304982 -001-EI, to Florida Power Corporation d/b/a Progress Energy Florida, Inc. at Post Office Box 14042; PEF 903 St. Petersburg, Florida 33733. The purpose of the permit is to authorize the rebuild and partially relocate an existing dilapidated 7.5 miles long power transmission line by installing 60 new steel and concrete poles, new conductor wire, the removal of the existing pole and wire, installing and removing temporary air bridge matting, installing and removing a temporary trestle to access the work barges, and installing two guardrail/dolphin pile structures. This project is located in the surface waters and wetlands of the St. George Sound, Class II, Approved for Shellfish Harvesting, Outstanding Florida Waters between the tap in at Power Drive and Norvell Street in Eastpoint and the existing St. George Island Substation at 3rd Street and East Pine Avenue on St. George Island, Sections 6, 29, and 31, Township 9 South, Range 6 West, Franklin County. Based on all the above, and with the application of general and limiting specific conditions of the permit, the Department has reasonable assurance the project, as proposed, fully meets the environmental resources permitting requirements of Chapter 62-346, Florida Administrative Code, and will not harm the environment. A person whose substantial interests are affected by the Department’s action may petition for an administrative proceeding (hearing) under Sections 120.569 and 120.57 of the Florida Statute. The petition must contain the information set forth below and must be filed (received by the clerk) in the Office of General Counsel of the Department at 3900 Commonwealth Boulevard, Mail Station 35, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-3000. Because the administrative hearing process is designed to re-determine final agency action on the application, the filing of a petition for an administrative hearing may result in a modification of the permit, or even a denial of the application. Accordingly, the applicant will not commence construction or other activities under this permit until the deadlines below for filing a petition for an administrative hearing, or request for an extension of time, have expired. Under subsection 62-110.106(4) of the Florida Administrative Code, a person whose substantial interests are affected by the Department’s action may also request an extension of time to file a petition for an administrative hearing. The Department may, for good cause shown, grant the request for an extension of time. Requests for extension of time must be filed with the Office of General Counsel of the Department at 3900 Commonwealth Boulevard, Mail Station 35, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-3000, before the applicable deadline. A timely request for extension of time shall toll the running time period for filing a petition until the request is acted upon. If a request is filed late, the Department may still grant it upon a motion by the requesting party showing that the failure to file a request for an extension of time before the deadline was the result of excusable neglect. In the event that a timely and sufficient petition for an administrative hearing is filed, other persons whose substantial interests will be affected by the outcome of the administrative process have the right to petition to intervene in the proceeding. Intervention will be only at the discretion of the presiding officer upon the filing of a motion in compliance with Rule 28-106.205 of the Florida Administrative Code. In accordance with subsection 28-106.111(2) and subparagraph 62-110.106(3)(a).4, Florida Administrative Code, petitions for an administrative hearing by the applicant must be filed within 21 days of receipt of written notice. Petitions filed by any persons other than the applicant, and other than those entitled to written notice under Section 120.60(3) of the Florida Statutes, must be filed within 21 days of publication of the notice. Under Section 120.60(3) of the Florida Statute, however, any person who has asked the Department for notice of agency action may file a petition within 21 days of such notice, regardless of the date of publication. The petitioner shall mail a copy of the petition to the applicant at the address indicated above at the time of filing. The failure of any person to file a petition for an administrative hearing within the appropriate time period shall constitute a waiver of those rights. A petition that disputes the material facts on which the Department’s action is based must contain the following information: (a) The name and address of each agency affected and each agency’s file or identification number, if known; (b) The name, address, and telephone number of the petitioner; the name, address, and telephone number of the petitioner’s representative, if any, which shall be the address for service purposes during the course of the proceeding; and an explanation of how the petitioner’s substantial interests are or will be affected by the agency determination; (c) A statement of when and how the petitioner received notice of the agency decision; (d) A statement of all disputed issues of material fact. If there are none, the petition must so indicate; (e) A concise statement of the ultimate facts alleged, including the specific facts that the petitioner contends warrant reversal or modification of the agency’s proposed action; (f) A statement of the specific rules or statutes that the petitioner contends require reversal or modification of the agency’s proposed action; and (g) A statement of the relief sought by the petitioner, stating precisely the action that the petitioner wishes the agency to take with respect to the agency’s proposed action. A petition that does not dispute the material facts on which the Department’s action is based shall state that no such facts are in dispute and otherwise shall contain the same information as set forth above, as required by Rule 28-106.301, Florida Administrative Code. Under Sections 120.569(2)(c) and (d) of the Florida Statute, a petition for administrative hearing must be dismissed by the agency if the petition does not substantially comply with the above requirements or is untimely filed. This action is final and effective on the date filed with the Clerk of the Department unless a petition is filed in accordance with the above. Upon the timely filing of petition this order will not be effective until further order of the Department. This permit, when issued, constitutes an order of the Department. The applicant has the right to seek judicial review of the order under Section 120.68 of the Florida Statute, by the filing of a notice of appeal under Rule 9.110 of the Florida Rules of 35537T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 2009CA000101CA U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE ON BEHALF OF GSR MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2005-AR4 Plaintiff. vs. STEPHEN S. FOSTER a/k/a STEPHEN F. FOSTER a/k/a STEPHEN FOSTER; MARILYN TOLENTINO a/k/a MARILYN M. TOLENTINO a/k/a MARILYN N. TOLENTINO a/k/a MARILYN J. TOLENTNO, et. al.; Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated August 23, 2011, and entered in Case No. 09-CA-101, of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for FRANKLIN County, Florida. U.S. BANK, N.A. is Plaintiff and STEPHEN S. FOSTER a/k/a STEPHEN F. FOSTER a/k/a STEPHEN FOSTER; MARILYN TOLENTINO a/k/a MARILYN M. TOLENTINO a/k/a MARILYN N. TOLENTINO a/k/a MARILYN J. TOLENTNO, HIS WIFE; ROBERT TOLENTINO and; ____ TOLENTINO, unknown spouse of ROBERT TOLENTINO, if married; JANE DOE; JOHN DOE; are defendants. I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at ON THE FRONT STEPS OF THE COURTHOUSE., AT 33 MARKET STREET, APALACHICOLA IN FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, at 11:00 am., on the 12th day of October, 2011, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 8 OF SEA PALM VILLAGE, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE (S) 30, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. A person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim with 60 days after the sale. Dated this 12th day of September, 2011. Marcia M. Johnson As Clerk of the Court By: Michele Maxwell As Deputy Clerk This notice is provided pursuant to Administrative Order No.2.065. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to provisions of certain assistance. Please contact the Court Administrator at 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, FL 32320, Phone No. (904)653-8861, Extension 106 within 2 working days of your receipt of this notice or pleading; if you are hearing impaired, call 1-800-955-8771 (TDD); if you are voice impaired, call 1-800-995-8770 (V) (Via Florida Relay Services). Kahane & Associates, P.A. 8201 Peters Road, Ste. 3000 Plantation, FL 33324 Telephone: (954) 382-3486 Telefacsimile: (954) 382-5380 10-10626 BOA September 22, 29, 2011 35512T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CADENCE BANK, N.A. Plaintiff, VS. STEVEN R. MACCHIARELLA a/k/a STEVE R. MACCHIARELLA; ST. GEORGE PLANTATION OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., a Florida corporation Defendants. CASE NO.: 2010 000046 CA NOTICE OF SALE COUNTS III & IV 1600 GUAVA TRAIL & 1408 BAYBERRY LANE NOTICE is hereby given pursuant to the Final Judgment entered in the above noted case that I will sell the following property in Franklin County, Florida, described as: Lot 30, PEBBLE BEACH VILLAGE, a subdivision as per map or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 4, Page 34 and 35, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida, and Lot 3, SEA PALM VILLAGE, according to the plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 4, Pages 30 and 31, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. At public sale, to the highest and best bidder for cash at 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida 32320, at 11:00 a.m. on the 5th day of October, 2011. The highest bidder shall immediately post with the Clerk, a deposit equal to 5% of the final bid. The deposit must be cash or cashier’s check payable to the Clerk of the Circuit Court. Final payment must be made on or before 11:00 a.m., the next business day after of the date of sale by cash or cashier’s check. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the Clerk Administration Office at Clerk of Court. If hearing impaired call (TDD) (800) 955-8771 or 800 955 877 (V) via Florida Relay Service. IF YOU ARE A PERSON CLAIMING A RIGHT TO FUNDS REMAINING AFTER THE SALE, YOU MUST FILE A CLAIM WITH THE CLERK NO LATER THAN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU FAIL TO FILE A CLAIM, YOU WILL NOT BE ENTITLED TO ANY REMAINING FUNDS. AFTER 60 DAYS, ONLY THE OWNER OF RECORD AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MAY CLAIM THE SURPLUS. Dated: 8th day of September, 2011. Clerk of Courts By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk September 22, 29, 2011 35511T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CADENCE BANK, N.A. Plaintiff, VS. STEVEN R. MACCHIARELLA a/k/a STEVE R. MACCHIARELLA; ST. GEORGE PLANTATION OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., a Florida corporation Defendants. CASE NO.: 2010 000046 CA NOTICE OF SALE COUNTS I & II 32 EAST GORRIE DRIVE NOTICE is hereby given pursuant to the Final Judgment entered in the above noted case that I will sell the following property in Franklin County, Florida, described as: Lot 46, in Block 10 East, of ST. GEORGE ISLAND GULF BEACHES UNIT NO. 1, according to the Plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 2, Page 7, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. At public sale, to the highest and best bidder for cash at 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida 32320, at 11:00 a.m. on the 5th day of October, 2011. The highest bidder shall immediately post with the Clerk, a deposit equal to 5% of the final bid. The deposit must be cash or cashier’s check payable to the Clerk of the Circuit Court. Final payment must be made on or before 11:00 a.m., the next business day after of the date of sale by cash or cashier’s check. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the Clerk Administration Office at Clerk of Court. If hearing impaired call (TDD) (800) 955-8771 or 800 955 877 (V) via Florida Relay Service. IF YOU ARE A PERSON CLAIMING A RIGHT TO FUNDS REMAINING AFTER THE SALE, YOU MUST FILE A CLAIM WITH THE CLERK NO LATER THAN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU FAIL TO FILE A CLAIM, YOU WILL NOT BE ENTITLED TO ANY REMAINING FUNDS. AFTER 60 DAYS, ONLY THE OWNER OF RECORD AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MAY CLAIM THE SURPLUS. Dated: 25th day of August, 2011. Clerk of Courts By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk September 22, 29, 2011 35491T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA IN RE: ESTATE OF EDWARD STEPHAN DACHTERA, Deceased CASE NUMBER: 11000043 CP NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION The administration of the estate of EDWARD STEPHAN DACHTERA, deceased, Case Number 11000043 CP is pending in the Circuit Court for Franklin County, Florida, the address of which is 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320. The name and address of the personal representative and the personal representative’s attorney are set forth below. All persons having claims against this estate who are served with a copy of this notice are required to file with this court such claim within the later of three months after the date of the first publication of this notice or 30 days after the date of service of a copy of this notice on that person. Persons having claims against the estate who are not known to the personal representative and whose names or addresses are not reasonably ascertainable must file all claims against the estate within three months after the date of the first publication of this notice. ALL CLAIMS AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is September 22, 2011. Personal Representative: TAMMIE KELLEY 151 17th Street P.O. Box 401 Apalachicola, FL 32329 RACHEL CHESNUT Attorney for Personal Representative P.O. Box 501 Apalachicola, FL 32329 (850) 653-4611 Florida Bar No. 0048331 September 22, 29, 2011

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, September 29, 2011 The Times | A15 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322850-697-9604 850-323-0444 www.seacrestre.comRENTALS2 BR 1 BA MOBILE HOME Fenced Yard ....................................................$500 3 BR 1 BA UNFURNISHED APARTMENT Clean, W/D, Includes, Water, End Unit ............$565 2 BR 2 BA MOBILE HOME 2 Lots ..............................................................$500 3 BR 3 BA FURNISHED CONDO Long Term, Pool..............................................$850 2 BA 1 BA FURNISHED APARTMENT Den & Living Area ..........................................$550 3 BR 2 BA FURNISHED CONDO Boat & Car Parking ..............................$850 WKLY 3 BR 3 BA FURNISHED CONDO Pool, Downtown ....................................$700 WKLY 2 BR 1 BA APARTMENT Water View, Water Included, End Unit ............$500 3 BR 1 BA FURNISHED APARTMENT Pet Friendly, Wkly & Monthly Rates See emeraldcoastjobs.com/monster to nd a job at the intersection of both.Wouldn’t you like a job that ful lls you both professionally and personally? With Monster’s new ltering tools, you can quickly hone in on the job that’s right for you. So visit emeraldcoastjobs.com/monster, and you might nd yourself in the middle of the best of both worlds. Apartment avail. Lanark Village, Can be a 1 or 2 br, with sunroom $450 month + $250 deposit (850) 509-2460 Publisher’s NoticeAll real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on a equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. Studio Apt. Furnished Upstairs studioQuiet location, water & electric incl. Walk to downtown. $700 mo + dep. No pets. For appt 653-9116 or 320-1174 St. George Island $160 wk, Electric, Satellite, Garbage incl. pool tble. 12’X65’ deck w/Beautiful view 850-653-5114 Apalachicola Condo. 2 br, 2 bath, with newer paint, tile, carpet $825 month. *Ref Checked* Quint 865-693-3232 1 or 3 BRCH/A in Apalachicola, FL. 850-643-7740. 2 br, 1 bath house on St George Island. $650 month. 229-824-7493 or 229-942-0329 Text FL77072 to 56654 Lanark Village 3 br, 2 ba, house, screened porch, view of gulf, $650 month lease. Call 850-545-8813 One Acre for Sale only a few blocks from the Bay on one side and a few blocks from river on the other side. 553 Ridge Rd, $28,000. Call 850-899-1148 14 ft Fiberglass fishing boat w/trailer and small motor. Electric trolling motor, 2 gas cans, 14 ft aluminum Johnboat is also included in deal. $500 for everything. Licensed & Titled. Call 850-653-4788 Text FL79212 to 56654 90 HPOutboard Motor runs good. $1500. Call 850-763-1924 Install/Maint/RepairCleanerCheerful, detailed person for various household duties. Indian Pass area. 4 hours daily. Excellent references required. (850) 227-7234 HospitalityRESORT VACATION PROPERTIESHiring part-time inspectors to inspect properties after they are cleaned. Weekend work required. Apply in person weekdays between 9am-5pm at 125 W Gulf Beach Dr, St. George Island Install/Maint/Repair Part Time position available forGeneral Maint/Techposition for 32 Unit apt complex in Carabelle. Must have own tools and pass background & drug test. General knowledge of HVAC, plumbing, and electrical req. Painting a plus. Apply at 807 Grey Ave. #33, Mon, Tue, Thur, Fri. 8-5pm. Or call 697-2017 EOE/DFWP 95% Success Chance. No Direct Sales. Test This Easy Home Business. $69.95 Risk-Free, Limited-Time Offer. 1-888-835-6822; 1-800-447-0503 Full Service Turn Key restaurant for lease at Commerce Street and Avenue E in downtown Apalachicola. For more info call 850-653-8801 Text FL79133 to 56654 1 br, 1 ba with full kitchen and living room Call for information 850-653-6103 Heritage Villas and Southern Villas of Apalachicola ApartmentsAccepting applications for 1, 2, & 3 br HC & non-HC accessible units. Some rental assistance may be available. HUD vouchers accepted. Call 850-653-9277. TDD/TTY 711. This institution is an equal opportunity provider, and employer. Administrative/ClericalNOTICEThe Franklin County Board of County Commissioners, Franklin County, Florida will consider applications for the following position: *Temporary-Part Time Veteran’s Affairs Assistant* Veteran’s Affairs Office Requirements Include: Two year College Degree, and serve as a member of the Armed Forces of the United States during a period of war, Valid Driver’s license, Administrative and Clerical skills, excellent communications skills, computer knowledge with experience in Excel. Applicants must be able to properly handle confidential records, be able to multi-task, and must be able to work in a stressful environment. Veteran’s with knowledge about VA benefits and procedures preferred. Applications may be obtained from and submitted to the Board Secretary, Michael Moron in the Clerk’s Office, Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, Florida 32320. (850) 653-8861, Ext. 100. Applications must be submitted by Thursday, October 13, 2011 by 4:00 p.m. Biotech/Science Franklin County Health Department is accepting applications for the following Career Service position in our Apalachicola location:EnvironmentalSpecialist IReference Requisition # 64002982-5134905020110923104505 Salary: $30,988.62 $35,788.32 Applications will be accepted through 10/2/2011 Applicant must have graduated from an accredited 4-year college or university with 30 semester or 40 quarter hours in public health, environmental health, environmental science, or a physical or biological science. Apply online at https://jobs.myflorida.com or contact People First at 1-877-562-7287. ONLY online applications submitted through the People First website will be accepted for this position. Background check including fingerprinting required. The successful candidate will be required to complete the Form I-9 and that information will be verified using the E-Verify system. E-Verify is operated by the Department of Homeland Security in partnership with the Social Security Administration to verify employment eligibility. Applicant must have a valid Florida driver’s license and access to transportation. Minorities strongly encouraged to apply. EEO/AA/VP Employer Apalachicola Hwy 98 across from Burger King Friday & Saturday 8:am-until Nice Things, To much too list! Come see. Come visit the Old Stuff Shoppe. We have a little of all. From old bottles to cast iron, fishing to glass cookware. Old tables, old pictures. We believe Older IS Better. 252 Water Street or call 850-653-5425 Accounting/Finance Franklin County Health Department is accepting applications for the following Career Service position:Accountant IIIReference Requisition #64080005-51262181-2 0110919160029 Salary: $29,344.38 Applications will be accepted through 10/21/11 Minimum qualifications: a bachelor’s degree from an accredited college or university with a major in accounting and two years of professional accounting experience; or two years of professional accounting experience with the State of Florida. A master’s degree from an accredited college or university in accounting or possession of a Certified Public Accountant (CPA) certificate and one year of professional accounting experience. Professional or nonprofessional accounting experience or any combination of this experience and up to 60 semester or 90 quarter hours of college education provided such education includes two courses in accounting can substitute on a year-for-year basis for the required bachelor’s degree. Experience with Medicaid/Medicare and 3rd party insurance billing is preferred. Apply online at https://jobs.myflorida.com or contact People First at 1-877-562-7287. ONLY online applications submitted through the People First website will be accepted for this position. Background check including fingerprinting required. The successful candidate will be required to complete the Form I-9 and that information will be verified using the E-Verify system. E-Verify is operated by the Department of Homeland Security in partnership with the Social Security Administration to verify employment eligibility. Minorities strongly encouraged to apply. EO/AA/VP Employer. Incorrect Insertion PolicyFor Classified In-column AdvertisersAll ads placed by phone are read back to the advertiser to insure correctness. The newspaper will assume correctness at the time of the read-back procedure unless otherwise informed. Please your ad. Advertisers are requested to check the advertisement on the first insertion for correctness. Errors should be reported immediately. Your Florida Freedom newspaper will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion, nor will it be liable for any error in advertisements to a greater extent than the cost of the space occupied by the error. Any copy change, during an ordered schedule constitutes a new ad and new charges. We do not guarantee position of ANY ad under any classification. Cage Bird MenagerieParakeets, Canaries, Finches, Cages. Breeder supplies, toys, & gift boutique. 850-708-1536 Apalachicola 80 Waddell Rd, 3+ miles from Red Light on 12th Street, look for signs, Friday and Saturday 8:00 a.m.-?; household items, clothes (from infants to plus sizes), shoes, some furniture, appliances, TVs, exercise equipment, some tools and fishing tackle, and much more. 35607T PUBLIC NOTICE FRANKLIN COUNTY LANDFILL WINTER HOURS OF OPERATION THE FRANKLIN COUNTY LANDFILL WINTER HOURS OF OPERATION WILL BE FROM OCTOBER 1, 2011-MARCH 21, 2011, WILL BE 9:00 A.M. 4:30 P.M. IF YOU HAVE ANY QUESTIONS PLEASE CONTACT THE LANDFILL AT 850-670-8167. September 29, 2011 35693T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR MARM 2007-3, Plaintiff, vs. CHRISTOPHER W. BATES; THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF CHRISTOPHER W. BATES; KRISTEN SHOESMITH; THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF KRISTEN SHOESMITH; IF LIVING, INCLUDING ANY UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SAID DEFENDANT(S), IF REMARRIED, AND IF DECEASED, THE RESPECTIVE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS, AND TRUSTEES, AND ALL OTHER PERSONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THE NAMED DEFENDANT (S); UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2; Defendant(s) CASE NO. 19-2009-CA-000219 NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above styled cause, in the Circuit Court of Franklin County, Florida, I will sell the property situate in Franklin County, Florida, described as: LOT 4, BLOCK C, PENINSULAR POINT, UNIT NO. 1, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 20, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 1267 ALLIGATOR DRIVE ALLIGATOR POINT, FL 32346 at public sale, at Front steps of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street Apalachicola, FL 32320 at 11:00 AM, on the 2nd day of November, 2011. Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk In accordance with the American with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the ASA Coordinator no later than seven (7) days prior to the proceedings. If hearing impaired, please call (800) 955-9771 (TDD) or (800)955-8770 (voice), via Florida Relay Service. Law Offices of Daniel C. Consuegra 9204 King Palm Drive Tampa, FL 33619-1328 September 29, October 6, 2011 35675T STATE OF FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION NOTICE OF PROPOSED AGENCY ACTION The Department of Environmental Protection gives notice of its intent to issue a Formal Determination of the Landward Extent of Waters of the State (File No. FD-19-0219279-001) to The City of Carrabelle, c/o Ted Murray, URS Corporation Southern, for an 88-acre tract located in Section 24, 25, and 26 Township 7S, Range 5N, Franklin County, located at the end of Airport Road in Carrabelle. The Department’s file on this matter is available for public inspection during normal business hours, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, except legal holidays, at the Department of Environmental Protection, Wetlands Evaluation and Delineation Section, Mail Station 2500, Room 530, Bob Martinez Center, 2600 Blair Stone Road, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-2400. Persons whose substantial interests are affected by the above proposed agency action have a right pursuant to Section 120.57, Florida Statutes, to petition for an administrative determination (hearing) on the proposed action. The petition must contain the information set forth below and must be filed (received) in the Department’s Office of General Counsel, 3900 Commonwealth Boulevard, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-2400, within 21 days of publication of this notice. A copy of the petition must also be mailed at the time of filing to the formal determination petitioner at the address indicated. Failure to file a petition within the 21 days constitutes a waiver of any right such person has to an administrative determination (hearing) pursuant to Section 120.57, F.S. The petition shall contain the following information: (a) The name and address, and telephone number of each petitioner, the petitioner’s name and address, the Department’s File Number and the county in which the project is proposed; (b) A statement of how and when each petitioner received notice of the Department’s action or proposed action; (c) A statement of how each petitioner’s substantial interests are affected by the Department’s action or proposed action; (d) A statement of material facts disputed by petitioner, if any; (e) A statement of facts which petitioner contends warrant reversal or modification of the Department’s action or proposed action; (f) A statement of which rules or statutes petitioner contends require reversal or modification of the Department’s action or proposed action; and (g) A statement of the relief sought by petitioner, stating precisely the action petitioner wants the Department to take with respect to the Department’s action or proposed action. If a petition is filed, the administrative hearing process is designed to formulate agency action. Accordingly, the Department’s final action may be different from the position taken by it in this Notice. Persons whose substantial interests will be affected by any decision of the Department with regard to the formal determination have the right to petition to become a party to the proceeding. The petition must conform to the requirements specified above and be filed (received) within 21 days of publication of this Notice in the Office of General Counsel at the above address of the Department. Failure to petition within the allowed time frame constitutes a waiver of any right such person has to request a hearing under Section 120.57, F.S., and to participate as a party to this proceeding. Any subsequent intervention will only be at the approval of the presiding officer upon motion filed pursuant to Rule 28-5.207, F.A.C. September 29, 2011 35602T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CITIMORTGAGE, INC. Plaintiff, v. DEBORAH RUSSELL A/K/A DEBORAH Y. RUSSELL; DOUG RUSSELL A/K/A DOUGLAS W. RUSSELL; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT (S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS. Defendant(s). CASE NO.: 19-2009-CA-000714 SEC: NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order to Reschedule Foreclosure Sale dated August 31, 2011, entered in Civil Case No. 19-2009-CA-000714 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest bidder for cash on the 12th day of October, 2011, at 11:00 a.m. on the Front steps of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida 32320, relative to the following described property as set forth in the Final Judgment, to wit: LOTS 1 AND 2 AND THE SOUTHWESTERLY OF LOT 3 IN BLOCK 15, IN LANARK VILLAGE, UNIT NO. 3, A SUBDIVISION IN FRACTIONAL SECTION 12, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 4 WEST, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, AT PAGE 19 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance, Please contact: Court Administrator Phone: (850) 577-4401. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call Florida Relay Service, hearing 800-955-8771, voice 800-955-8770. DATED AT APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA, THIS 12th DAY OF September, 2011. MARCIA JOHNSON CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk September 29, October 6, 2011 35663T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2nd JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY The Bank of New York, as Trustee for TBW Mortgage-Backed Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2006-2 Plaintiff, -vs.Anthony L. Gelch; Defendant(s) Case #: 2010-CA-000230 Division #: AMENDED NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated September 15, 2011, entered in Civil Case No. 2010-CA-000230 of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein The Bank of New York, as Trustee for TBW MortgageBacked Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2006-2, Plaintiff and Anthony L. Gelch are defendant(s), I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, AT THE WEST FRONT DOOR OF THE FRANKLIN COUNTY COURTHOUSE, LOCATED ON HWY 98, IN APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA, AT 11:00 A.M., October 19, 2011, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit: BEGIN AT A POINT 646 FEET EAST AND 12.5 FEET SOUTH FROM THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 32, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 6 WEST, RUN THENCE SOUTH 36 DEGREES EAST 200 FEET TO THE 100 FOOT U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 319, THENCE RUN NORTHEASTERLY ALONG RIGHT OF WAY OF SAID HIGHWAY, A DISTANCE OF 50 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 36 DEGREES WEST 200 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 54 DEGREES WEST 50 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. THUS FORMING A TRACT PARTLY IN THE NW 1/4 OF SAID SECTION 32 AND PARTLY IN THE SW 1/4 OF SECTION 29, FRONTING 50 FEET ON THE NORTHERN SIDE OF HIGHWAY AND RUNNING BACK 240 FEET. ALSO KNOWN AS: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 32, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 6 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND RUN EAST 646.00 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 12.50 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261) LYING ON THE NORTHEASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF 2ND STREET SAID POINT ALSO BEING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN SOUTH 36 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 200.42 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #7160), LYING ON THE INTERSECTION OF SAID 2ND STREET WITH THE NORTHWESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 98, THENCE RUN NORTH 54 DEGREES 28 MINUTES 47 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE NORTHWESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 98 A DISTANCE OF 50.00 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #7160), THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY RUN NORTH 35 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 58 SECONDS WEST 200.76 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #7160), THENCE RUN SOUTH 54 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 27 SECONDS WEST 50.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING CONTAINING 0.23 ACRES, MORE OR LESS. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. DATED at Apalachicola, Florida, this 15th day of September, 2011. Michele Maxwell CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT Franklin County, Florida ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF: SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACHE, LLP 4630 Woodland Corporate Blvd. Suite 100 Tampa, FL 33614 (813) 880-8888 10-171359 FC01 September 29, October 6, 2011 Appellate Procedure with the Clerk of the Department in the Office of General Counsel, 3900 Commonwealth Boulevard, Mail Station 35, Tallahassee, Florida, 32399-3000; and by filing a copy of the notice of the appeal accompanied by the applicable filing fees with the appropriate district court of appeal. The notice of appeal must be filed within 30 days from the date when the final order is filed with the Clerk of the Department. The application is available for public inspection during normal business hours, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, except legal holidays, at the Department of Environmental Protection, Northwest District Branch Office, 3800 Commonwealth Boulevard, Suite 115, Tallahassee, Florida. September 29, 2011 The Key to Savings Start here in Classifieds.

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Local A16 | The Times Thursday, September 29, 2011 Our local real estate experts have identied what they feel are the best values around and are oering them to you in Real Estate Picks! (In this section), Discover the best real estate values in Mexico Beach, Port St. Joe, Apalachicola, Cape San Blas, St. George Island, Carrabelle and surrounding areas. Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Real Estate Picks John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.com MLS#242223 $299,000 St. George Island FIRST TIER DUPLEX stairway connects both units, garage/work shop, storage building, outside shower & sink, covered screen porch. East Gorrie Drive John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.com MLS#239231 $349,900 St. George Island BAY FRONT BARGAIN Attractive home with 2 spacious BRs & 1 BA, cedar paneled ceiling & some walls in kitchen & DR, laundry room, DOCK, one acre in the East End of the island, furnished, Short Sale Y BILL MILLER REALTY 850-697-3751 (3310) 570-0658 WOW! 1 B D R FU R N I SH E D AP T $15,000 $29,500 $2,500 D OWN BU Y S 2 B E D AP T 2 6 GU L F V IE W & A CC E SS 3 BD R 2 BA 2006 M /H 16 X 80 $89,000 $500 D OWN C HO I C E OF 3 CITY LO T S $180.00/ M ON T H O R $17,500/ EA CH MI H 2 CR N R L O T S BLK. $ ST O RE RE DUC E D $49,500 3 D OO R NI C E 2 B/R M H 2 C R N R. L O T S $47,500 Robert C. Bruner Attorney Personal & Business Bankruptcy Over 30 Years Legal Experience 850-670-3030 We are a debt relief agency. We can The hiring of a lawyer is an im By Lois Swoboda Times Staff Writer On Friday, Sept. 23, the Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve (ANERR) celebrated Estuaries Day at their new Eastpoint headquarters for the rst time. Organizer Lisa Bailey said about 800 people attended. In addition to the ANERR exhibits, there were those sponsored by the Audubon Society, Florida State Universitys Saturday by the Sea and the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission. There were also about 10 nature-oriented activities for children of all ages, covering everything from snakes and birds to net making and a hands-on reptile experience. Visitors were also treated to tours of the new $9 million research and education center. Bailey said about 60 volunteers and ANERR staff members planned and manned the event. Estuary Day comes to Eastpoint Mother Nature provided a spectacular nale for an afternoon at the bay. Photos by LOIS SWOBODA | The TimesTOP LEFT Camille Williams and Maxwell Davis, of Apalachicola, volunteered to help with childrens activities. TOP RIGHT Patrick Millender, of Eastpoint, teaches Donna McKenzie of Panacea the ne art of net casting. Millender, a former employee of the estuary, said, This park was named after my daddy. LEFT Amantaye Austin, left, Jhamere Rhodes, center, and Elliot Taylor, all of Apalachicola, learned to look at the world from a bugs point of view.



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xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx 50 WWW.APALACHTIMES.COM PP hone: 850-653-8868 WW eb: apalachtimes.com EE -mail: dadlerstein@star.com Fax: 850-653-8036 CC irculation: 800-345-8688 DEAEADLILINESES FOOR NEEXTT WEEWEEK: SSchool News & SSociety: 11 a.m. Friday Real EEstate AAds: 11 a.m. Thursday LLegal AAds: 11 a.m. Friday CClassied Display AAds: 11 a.m. Friday CClassied LLine AAds: 5 p.m. Monday CContact Us OOut to see IIndex Concerns raised about Carrabelles urgent care clinicBy David AdlersteinTimes City Editor September turned into an un certain month for Franklin County health care, as county commis sioners gave mixed reviews to a new collaborative arrangement between Weems Memorial Hospi tal and the health department. After hearing details of the col laboration from new Weems CEO Davie Lloyd and health depart ment interim administrator Dr. Karen Chapman, the two commis sioners who represent the eastern of the county, Cheryl Sanders and Bevin Putnal, both indicated at the commissions Sept. 6 meeting they would oppose any attempt to scale back primary care services at the Carrabelle health department an nex. Two weeks later, Commission ers Noah Lockley, Pinki Jackel and Smokey Parrish added a series of fresh concerns regarding hospital operations. The board unanimous ly approved a request to meet with Lloyd, the Weems hospital board and representatives of Tallahas see Memorial Hospital at the Oct. 18 meeting (See story, A6). The month began with the Sept. 6 appearance before commission ers by Lloyd and Chapman, both of whom assumed their jobs in late July, and Marcia Lindeman, ad ministrator from the Gulf County Health Department, which works in concert with St. Joseph Care Inc., a federally qualied health center in Port St. Joe. As an FQHC, St. Joseph Care is similar to the North Florida Medi cal Center in Eastpoint, in that both receive hundreds of thousands of dollars annually in federal funds to serve poor, uninsured populations. Lindeman said the Port St. Joe FQHC is intended to serve patients as far east as the Apalachicola Riv er and has seen a steady increase in Franklin County patients since 2003. The numbers topped out in 2010, when 508 medical patients and 313 dental patients made 1,305 medical visits and 841 dental visits, comprising 10 percent of the cen ters volume. You all doing more than the one in Eastpoint, Lockley said, al though he did not provide specic numbers to bolster his assertion. I wish you all would take over that one in Eastpoint. Chapman told commissioners no one from the Eastpoint FQHC Rare hummingbird spotted, banded in EastpointBy Lois SwobodaTimes Staff Writer A rare broad-billed hummingbird was spot ted in Eastpoint on Saturday. The broad-bill, properly called Cynanthus latirostris, is only the fourth to be spotted in Florida and the third to be banded. Broad-bills normally are found only in Sonoma, Mexico, and southern Texas, New Mexico and Arizona. Sheila Klink had just cleaned and lled her hummingbird feeders for the season at the re quest of her granddaughter. She heard a strange noise and went outside to investigate. What she found was a bird she couldnt identify. Last year, Fred Bassett of Asheville, N.C., had banded another rare hummer in Klinks yard, so she took some pictures of the bird at dusk and emailed them to Bassett. He received the pictures at 1 a.m., and after calling his birding colleague, Fred Dietrich in Tallahassee, he jumped in his car and headed to Franklin County. In a telephone interview, Dietrich said the sighting is the talk of the birding community right now. He said 20 years ago, birding guides Commission stares down threat of lawsuitBy Lois SwobodaTimes Staff Writer Franklin County commission ers have refused to back down in the face of The St. Joe Companys threat to sue over a zoning dis pute. At their Sept. 20 meeting, commissioners voted 4-1 to stand pat on their December 2009 decision to rescind a 2005 land-use change that could have enabled St. Joe to build thousands of new homes on St. James Island. Commissioner Smokey Parrish voted no, in keeping with his original opposition to rescinding the fu ture land-use maps. At that time, he advocated a different path to ward undoing the land-use chang es, saying he feared the countys liability could be too great. In 2005, when the company pro posed to develop four land parcels on St. James Island to build as many as 7,400 new housing units, the commissioners redesignated parcels of St. Joe land in the east ern part of the county from agri cultural to mixed-use residential. This preliminary change to a comprehensive plan is called a FLUM (future land-use map) and is pronounced oom. In return for the change, St. Joe promised to include low-cost housing in the developments, allow for continued public access to the coastline and donate several parcels of land for public use. When the housing market failed, development of the par cels stalled, and St. Joe took no By David AdlersteinTimes City Editor A high-risk sexual predator, left Saturday by state ofcials to live in the woods near East point, ed within hours and is being sought by law enforcement ofcials in Franklin and surround ing counties. Jo Ellyn Rackleff, a spokeswoman for the Florida Depart ment of Corrections, said Nor man Bill Williams, 56, was released Saturday near Bear Creek Road in Eastpoint, after telling authorities he intended to live in the woods, with no physical address. Williams had completed 85 percent of a sevenyear sentence, begun Oct. 10, 2006, for sexual battery on a victim under age 12, a crime that occurred Jan. 1, 1994. Legally, we couldnt hold him beyond that, said Rackleff. When the release date is hit, we have to release. Because of his prison record, spent mostly at Century Correc tion Institution, Williams was con sidered a ight risk and was re quired to wear an ankle bracelet as a condition of his supervised release. Also as part of the terms of his probation, Williams was un der a curfew from 7 p.m. to 7 a.m. In prior experience with this offender, he had been put on a bus and got off early and ed, so we knew he was a risk, Rackleff said. Wanting to be near his home town, Williams was transferred on Sept. 21 from the Northwest Florida Reception Center in Washington County to Franklin Correctional Institution in Car rabelle. On Saturday, two probation of cers charged an ankle bracelet, complete with GPS transponder, at the Franklin County Sheriffs Ofce on State Road 65 and NOrRMAnN BILL WWILLIAMS CCounty debates health care Sexual predator, left in woods, ees Eastpoint FRE E D DEIT EIT RICH ICH | Special to the TimesThis broad-billed hummingbird, rarely seen in Florida, was banded in Eastpoint on Saturday. RAAREE HHUMMIMMINGBIIRD IIN EASTPOIEASTPOINTT QUITE AN HONOR See HHUMMIMMINGBIIRD A7 See LAWSLAWSUITIT A7 See PPREEDATOATOR A7 IINSISIDEE TMH, Weems deal under scrutiny, A6See HEALTHHEALTH CACAREE A5Opinion . . . . . . ............ AA4 Society . . . . . . ............ AA8 Faith . . . . . . . .............. AA9 Outdoors . . . . . .......... AA10 Sports . . . . . . ............ AA11 Tide Chart . . . . . ......... AA12 Classieds . . . ...... AA14-AA15 Thursday, September 29, 2011 HHumane SSociety annual meeting SSaturday Franklin County Humane Societys annual membership meeting will be 10-11 a.m. Saturday, Oct. 1, at the adoption center, followed by an open house for the public. A new play yard will be dedicated at 11 a.m., followed by activities for the whole family including fourlegged family members. For more info, call 670-8417. OOysters and EElvis at the DixieFriday and Saturday, Sept. 30 and Oct. 1, Todd Alan Herendeen will return to the Dixie Theatre as Elvis Presley, along with the Follow That Dream band, at 8 p.m. nightly. Apalachicola Bay oysters will be served. For information, call 653-3200. AApalachicola Bay CChamber golf tourney From 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 5, St. James Golf Course will host the eighth annual Apalachicola Bay Chamber of Commerce golf tournament, a ighted four-man scramble. Cost per team is $400, $100 per player. Proceeds go toward the chambers building fund. For info call 653-9419 or email info@apalachicolabay. org. WW e LLove EEastpoint and oyster festivalThe Franklin County Oyster Festival will be Oct. 7-9 in Eastpoint and on St. George Island, highlighting the countys seafood heritage. Enjoy a 5K run; childrens fun; a shing tournament; seafood; and concerts. Included in the fun is We Love Eastpoint Day at the Patton Street pavilion, complete with oysters, a shucking tournament, treasure pit and more. For information, call 9277744, or Charolette Bacher at 927-5039. WW oodstork benets mammal associationThe third annual Woodstork Festival will be 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Oct. 8 at 3Y Farm, 195 Harvey Young Farm in Crawfordville. Admission is $5. All proceeds go for care and feeding of injured and orphaned wildlife. For more information visit www. woodstorkfestival.com. VOl L 126 Iss SS Ue E 22 Seahawk royalty, AA11

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LocalA2 | The Times Thursday, September 29, 2011 BUDGET SUMMARYALLIGATOR POINT WATER RESOURCES DISTRICT FISCAL YEAR 2011/2012MILLAGE PER $1,000 1.9439 GENERAL FUNDCAPITAL FUNDTOTAL BUDGET CASH BALANCES BROUGHT FORWARD$ 98,978 $ 678,062$ 777,040 ESTIMATED REVENUE Ad Valorem Taxes 1.9439 Millage per $1000 $ 265,002$ 265,002 Water Sales $ 165,000 $ 165,000 Out of District Surcharge$ 38,000 $ 38,000 Miscellaneous Revenue$17,500 $ 17,500 TOTAL REVENUE AND OTHER SOURCES$ 220,500 $ 265,002$ 485,502 TOTAL ESTIMATED REVENUES AND BALANCES $ 319,478 $ 943,064$ 1,262,542 EXPENDITURES/EXPENSES Water Operations and Expenses $ 381,050 $ 381,050 Capital Improvements $ 106,000 $ 106,000 Debt Service $ 132,000$ 132,000 TOTAL EXPENDITURES AND EXPENSES$ 381,050 $ 238,000$ 619,050 Reserves ($ 61,572) $ 705,064$ 643,492 TOTAL APPROPRIATED EXPENDITURES AND RESERVES $ 319,478 $ 943,064$ 1,262,542 NOTICE OF BUDGET HEARINGThe Alligator Point Water Resources District has tentatively adopted a budget for Fiscal Year 2011-2012. A public hearing to make a FINAL DECISION on the budget AND TAXES will be held on:Saturday, October 1, 2011 10:00 A.M at Alligator Point Water Resources District Ofce 1378 Alligator Drive Alligator Point, Florida 32346 By David AdlersteinTimes City Editor Progress Energy has begun installing a new 69kilovolt (kV) line from the Apalachicola substation, across the river through to the Eastpoint substation. A nal segment will also connect to St. George Island. Construction for this $10.6 million segment of a larger project began in midSeptember and is expected to be completed by June 2012. Company ofcials said this transmission project is needed to better address the threat of severe weather and continue to meet acceptable levels of year-round reliability for the entire area. Progress Energy spokesman Rob Sumner said that once this work is completed, the company will move forward on erecting new transmission lines through the Apalachicola downtown, to hook up to the line that runs from Port St. Joe to the city limits. These downtown lines have drawn controversy because the large poles are considered an eyesore that will mar the look of Apalachicola as a historic community and tourist destination. As it stands right now the line will travel the existing route, said Sumner. We respect the historical nature of that area but Progress Energys main goal is to provide reliable electricity to all of our customers. Sumner estimated that placing the lines underground would cost at least $3 million, with additional costs and permitting issues also likely. The portion of the line constructed on land will be single concrete or steel poles, 60 feet to 90 feet above ground. Poles may be taller when crossing roadways, waterways, or other electrical equipment. Where the line crosses the Apalachicola River and Apalachicola Bay, structures will be either single, self-supporting steel poles or H-frames. Most poles will be replaced at or near their current locations and the majority of the existing foundations within Apalachicola Bay will be reused. Installing transmission structures and lines is similar to a typical construction project, with numerous crews, trucks and other equipment. There may be lulls between the phases of activity, but in general, homeowners can expect these stages of construction: Clearing and grading. Probably the most noticeable portion of construction is clearing and grading, which is the earliest step. The right of way must be clear during the construction process. Foundations and installing poles. Property owners can expect large trucks with drilling equipment or a concrete mixer in the right of way. The concrete is poured at the bottom of a deep hole to form the foundation. The poles arrive in sections and may be assembled on the ground before being installed. Stringing lines. Trucks carrying large reels of wire are typically used, with a winch to pull the wire through. Linemen attach the wires to the structures. Later, crews install ground rods to the structures. Property owners power is not affected when the line is energized. Helicopters. Due to the unique aspects of construction activities within the bay, helicopters will be utilized for installation of the structures in the water. If you have questions about this project, please contact at (888) 272-8133 or email ApalachicolaProgress@pgnmail.com. We also encourage you to visit us online at www.progress-energy.com.Work begins on transmission line over river ! !!!!! !!!!!!! !!!! !!!!!! !!!! !! !!!!!!! !!!!!!!!! !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! !!!! !!!!!! !!!! !! !!!!!!! !!!!!!!!! # # #U S 9 8 / U S 3 1 9 / S R 3 0e Apalachicola Substation EastPoint SubstationAPALACHICOLABAYS R 3 0 0EASTBAY APALACHICOLATOEASTPOINT TRANSMISSIONLINEREBUILD TOTALPROJECTOVERVIEW !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! !!! !! !! !!! !!!!! !!! !! !! !!!!! # # # # # PortSt.Joe SubstationGULF GULF COUNTY COUNTY FRANKLIN FRANKLIN COUNTY COUNTYeLAKE WIMICO Apalachicola Substation IndianPass Substation EastPoint Substation St.GeorgeIsland Substation APALACHICOLABAY Legend#SubstationLocation ProposedRoute !!TransmissionLineRebuildProject !!ExistingTransmissionLine Railroad MajorRoad CountyBoundary MAPNOTTOSCALE

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LocalThe Times | A3Thursday, September 29, 2011 franklin county family outdoor daywith special guest lemuel miller! bring your deer mount, antlers or hog head to put on our big buck board! HUMANE SOCIETY ANNUAL MEETING AND OPEN HOUSEThe Franklin County Humane Society would like to invite the public to our annual, general meeting on Saturday, October 1, 2011. It will be held at the Adoption Center located at 244 Highway 65, Eastpoint, Florida. The meeting will take place from 10:00am to 11:00am, followed by an Open House from 11:00am to 2:00pm and there will be a dedication of the new play area for our doggie residents. Hotdogs, refreshments and dessert will be served and there will be tours of our newly refreshed Adoption Center. Bring the kids and enjoy the day with us and of course the event is pet friendly for friendly pets. The Humane Society is proud to serve the Franklin County community with the help of caring, concerned citizens like yourselves. It would not be possible to continue to help our less fortunate 4 legged citizens without you. Come join us for a fun day and show your support for the Franklin County Humane Society! Thank you! Apalachicola Bay Charter SchoolA Public School of Choice Board of DirectorsThis is a voluntary position and provides a Franklin County resident the opportunity to play an important role in the education of 340 PreK -8th grade students. The ABC Board seeks representation from various factions of the community including parents, clergy, business people, professional and trade group members. Interested persons should send a resume and/or letter of Interest to Jim Bachrach, ABC School, 98 12th Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320.Apalachicola Bay Charter School 98 12th Street, Apalachicola, Florida 32320 653-1222 (phone) 653-1857 (fax) The following report is provided by the Franklin County Sheriffs Ofce. Arrests are made by ofcers from the following city, county, and state law enforcement agencies: Apalachicola (APD), Carrabelle (CPD), Florida Highway Patrol (FHP), Franklin County Sheriffs Ofce (FCSO), Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC), Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP), Florida Department of Corrections (FDOC), Florida Division of Insurance Fraud (DIF) and Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (FLDACS). All defendants are considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law.Sept. 21Justin E. McCalpin, 23, Eastpoint, failure to appear and domestic battery (FCSO) Cliff O. Hunter, 37, Sneads, violation of probation (FCSO)Sept. 22Kami C. Orton, 25, Lanark Village, child abuse (CPD) Byron B. Butler, 30, Wewahitchka, violation of probation (FCSO) Darren L. Wallace, 43, Apalachicola, grand theft, introduction of contraband into a correctional facility and violation of probation (APD)Sept. 23Judith S. Colson, 52, Tallahassee, DUI (CPD) Misty D. Bareld, 23, Bristol, aggravated battery on a pregnant victim and burglary of a dwelling person assaulted (FCSO) Dominic Rotella, 26, Eastpoint, grand theft (FCSO) Eric Hathaway, 29, Apalachicola, grand theft (APD)Sept. 24Nolle E. King, 22, Tallahassee, failure to appear (FCSO)Sept. 25Gary A. Simmons, 21, Crawfordville, DUI (FHP) Robbie D. Butler, 42, Apalachicola, DUI (FHP) Willie E. Pelt, 29, Port St. Joe, violation of a domestic violence injunction (FCSO) Arrest REPORTYowell benet in E E astpoint O O ct. 8There will be a benet for Tony Yowell, Sr., on Saturday, Oct. 8 at Taylors Building Supply in Eastpoint. The benet is being held to raise money to help offset the medical expenses of Yowell, who is being treated for leukemia at the Moffett Cancer Center in Tampa. Seafood dinners will be available for $6 each, including drinks. For more information, call 348-9926.Seafood workers to meet O O ct. 10The Franklin County Seafood Workers will meet Monday, Oct. 10 at the Eastpoint rehouse, 24 Sixth Street in Eastpoint, at 5 p.m. For more info, call Shannon Hartseld at 6152454.Church to host yard sale SaturdayTrinity Episcopal Church will host its second annual yard sale this Saturday, Oct. 1 from 8 a.m. to noon. All proceeds will benet the historic church campus buildings at the corner of U.S. 98 and Sixth Street, at 79 Sixth Street in Apalachicola. The church is hosting the sale in partnership with Big Bend Hospice. Offered will be bicycles, clothes, collectables, furniture, books, lamps, bric-a-brac, washer and dryer, tools, ornaments, linens, speakers and dinnerware. Coffee and yummy treats for sale. For more info, call 653-9550 or email trinitychurch@mchsi. com.Forgotten Coast yard sale SaturdayJoin us anywhere along U.S. 98 or in downtown Apalachicola for the Forgotten Coast Community Yard Sale this Saturday, Oct. 1. Merchants, businesses and individuals from Mexico Beach to Panacea are planning to participate in the areas biggest yard sale. Carrabelle location is the east side of the library, under the trees. Participants will be there at 8 a.m. until 2 p.m. All items will be sold for donations only and with proceeds to benet the Carrabelle Food Pantry. For info call 653-9419. Community BRIEfsFS

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OpinionA4 | The Times USPS 027-600Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 VP/Publisher: Karen Hanes Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six monthsHome delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERSIn case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola TimesSpecial to the TimesAt the end of August, a large, disgusting algae outbreak slimed Old Tampa Bay. Two months earlier, an algae outbreak in the Caloosahatchee River near Fort Myers turned the river bright green, smelled like raw sewage, and made thousands of sh go belly up. Water with algae outbreaks like this is so toxic that health authorities say you shouldnt touch it, much less drink it or swim in it. It can give you rashes, respiratory problems, and even kill you. U.S. Sen. Jim Inhofe, R-Oklahoma, found that out the hard way. He swam in the same type of toxic algae outbreak in Grand Lake, Oklahoma, in June and said he became deathly sick that night with an upper respiratory illness. There is no question, Ihhofe told the Tulsa World, that his illness came from the toxic algae in the lake. Oklahoma health ofcials had warned people not to touch the water, swim in the popular lake, or eat sh from it. Like Floridas outbreaks, the one in Grand Lake was fueled by the so-called nutrients, nitrogen and phosphorus, which come from inadequately treated sewage, fertilizer, and manure. After years of seeing nauseating algae outbreaks on popular Florida tourist beaches like Sanibel Island and at shing meccas like the St. Johns River, we citizens nally got the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Florida Department of Environmental Protection to start setting limits on the sewage, fertilizer and manure pollution thats threatening our drinking water and our health. This type of pollution is preventable. We can combat it at its source by upgrading old sewer plants, using modern manure management on agricultural operations and being smarter about applying fertilizer. Cleaning up our waters is a good thing, but you wouldnt know it by reading the distortions and inated cost estimates that highly paid polluter-lobbyists are peddling to scare people. They will spend whatever it takes to make sure they can keep using our public waters as their private sewers. The truth is that meeting Floridas new limits for these contaminants is likely to cost a few dollars extra per person per month phased in over many years. In Chesapeake Bay, for example, advanced wastewater treatment cut pollution at a cost of only $2.50 per household per month. Not a bad price for clean water. The Florida DEP is in the process of setting new statewide standards for phosphorus and nitrogen pollution. Unfortunately, the rules that state regulators have proposed so far are inadequate to protect public health and clean up the waters. It is critical that the states polluters, now emboldened by the current anything-goes mentality in Tallahassee, dont end up writing the DEPs water-pollution rules. It is critical that our state regulators protect the public, not the polluters. Tourism, shing, and boating are our economic lifeblood in Florida. When visitors come here and see dead sh and No Swimming signs, they wont come back, and that affects our state budget and our jobs. David Guest is an attorney in the Tallahassee ofce of Earthjustice, a public-interest law firm. We can combat it at its source by upgrading old sewer plants, using modern manure management on agricultural operations and being smarter about applying fertilizer. Thursday, September 29, 2011Special to the TimesA while ago the Apalachicola Municipal Library began adding books to its collection on how to write ction, inspired in part by the writers group that is meeting here at the library on Monday nights. They toyed with the idea of calling themselves The Bay Scribblers, but I dont know if that caught on. One book we bought was Write Away: One Novelists Approach to Fiction and the Writing Life by Elizabeth George. George is a prolic ction writer. The library owns all of her Inspector Lynley series except a few of the very early ones. A book by a successful writer seemed like a good place to start and the writers group members have had it checked out constantly. Earlier this month, Michael Lister, instructor in writing at Gulf Coast State College, and a notable invitee to the Authors in Apalach event coming up on Saturday, Oct. 8, had his annual Gulf Coast Writers Conference. His keynote speaker was John Dufresne, who teaches in the masters of ne arts creative writing program at Florida International University. He was a great speaker, outlining creative ction writing in 13 questions, posed by a would-be writer. He used catchy phrases like make a life, not a living. He talked about criticism, saying dont write a complaint, write another story. One area he covered, which was new to me, was the writers who write on their smart phones. It turns out there are a number of young Japanese writers who use only their phones, have published electronically, and become nancially successful. All this is an era where eBooks are not yet available in the municipal or county libraries in Franklin County. Dufresne has two books the library is going to purchase: The Lie That Tells a Truth: A Guide to Writing Fiction and Is Life Like This? A Guide to Writing Your First Novel in Six Months. Selecting appropriate books on this topic is quite daunting. The State of Floridas FirstSearch, an access point to electronic library catalogs around the world, produces a list of 1596 books in the Dewey Decimal number 808.3, where creative writing books are found. I checked the county librarys online catalog, and they have two books in 808.3. Whats your story? A young persons guide to writing ction by Marion Dane Bauer, is geared to young aspiring authors. I think this is another area to explore. FirstSearch again offers 83 books covering juvenile ction writing. Its a big world of books out there, but the Apalachicola Municipal Library wants to bring some of them into our collection to inspire future writers, young and old. Maybe they can be part of our Authors in Apalach event in years to come. Caty Greene is the librarian for the Apalachicola Municipal Library. To reach her, call 653-8436.Special to the TimesIt seems theres an online data breach or scam in the headlines almost daily. Meanwhile, cyber threats continue to grow in sophistication. National Cyber Security Awareness Month aims to bring light to cyber threats and help people safeguard themselves online. The Department of Homeland Security offers tips to help people stay safe online. Theyre not much different from the words of wisdom your parents imparted: Dont trust candy from strangers: Youre not going to get a free computer just for filling out a survey; the IRS didnt email to tell you that youre entitled to a refund; youre not going to turn $47 into $300,000 just by forwarding a link; and a foreign dignitary isnt looking to split his fortune with you if you help him get his millions out of his country. If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is. Enough said. Dont advertise that youre away from home. Announcing to your 700 Facebook friends that youre on vacation for a week is just an open invitation for thieves to strike. And be careful with how you word your email autoresponders. Lock up your valuables. If a hacker can access your personal information, he or she can then compromise or steal the information. Keep your firewalls and anti-virus up-to-date, use strong passwords, install all software updates and be careful when surfing the Internet and using email. Have a backup plan. Make regular backups of your information in case something goes wrong. Store these backups in a secure location. If your computer has been infected, remove the infection before resuming your work. But keep in mind that if you didnt realize that your computer was infected, your backups might also be compromised. DHS also recommends minimizing access to your information: Lock your computer when you step away, even if its only for a few minutes. Those few minutes can be all it takes for someone to destroy, corrupt or steal your information. Disconnect your computer from the Internet when youre not using it. While its convenient to stay online constantly, it could provide access to hackers. Evaluate your security settings. Certain features that increase convenience or functionality might leave you more vulnerable. And of course, protect your equipment from power surges and back up all your data in case the worst happens. For additional information and advice you can trust, start with the Better Business Bureau at www.bbb.org or call 800-729-9226. Sept. 23 marks the first day of autumn. As the weather cools this time of year, warm thoughts come to mind. Many of my fondest family memories center on the traditions of the fall especially time spent around the campfire. A recent advertisement for family camping equipment noted that campsites were the original social-networking site. I couldnt agree more. Whether youre interested in making some great family memories, longing for a trip to get the kids all back together or simply looking to take a break from your busy lives, Floridas state parks offer the perfect setting for your autumn endeavors. Regardless of your interests if youre fond of fall, youll love Florida State Parks. Among Floridas 160 state parks, more than 3,200 family campsites, 230 tent campsites, 60 youth campsites, 67 group camp areas and 95 equestrian camp sites await. Many state parks with family campgrounds often host evening campfire programs. If you join one of these, you might learn about the history of the park or hear a tall tale of a character that once inhabited the surrounding land. Florida Park Service rangers are a wealth of information, and the campfire circle is a great place to catch them at their best. Sitting together watching the flame of the campfire dance in the moonlight is a special experience that brings people closer together. Not only does it provide a comfortable atmosphere for recounting fond memories and a fun place to create new ones, it also provides a space to plan the following day in the park. Camping, hiking, paddling, bike riding, museum hopping, Christmas shopping weve got it all. As the director of the Florida Park Service, Im honored to remind all of Floridas citizens and visitors of the jewel in your own backyard. I encourage you to spend time around a campfire this autumn and get back in touch with each other and Florida State Parks. Sincerely, Donald V. Forgione Director. Florida Park Service Good morning! I am writing in reference to an article concerning the late Margaret Keys endowment to the Apalachicola library in your Sept. 15 issue. I had the privilege of knowing Margaret Key over the years that I practiced medicine in Apalachicola and I unequivocally recall her love of the local library. Her endowment of about $400,000 for the library seems to have been to fulfill her desire to build a new library to serve the people. It is my understanding that the present library, built in 1959, has outgrown the needs of the community. I do not know if a large library can be built for $400,000, but I bet it will have to be larger than the present one. If pinch came to squeeze, the money could be used to enlarge the present facility or to buy a larger facility and renovate it to accommodate a larger library. There must be other options. Perhaps the city can purchase the old Chapman Schools building on Avenue E and 12th Street and spend some money for renovation. It is a historic building and would fit the needs, it seems. There must be other options, but I do not believe spending the money to balance the citys budget ever crossed Margaret Keys mind. I think it is prudent for the city to reconsider this matter before the fund is squandered for other uses. It is of the utmost urgency that this matter be revisited and the citizens of Apalachicola who use this facility need to speak up and make their voices heard, loud and clear. Respectfully, Photis Nichols, M.D. JacksvonvilleState parks offer perfect family settingDont let polluters write water rulesConsider National Cyber Security Awareness MonthKey money should go for larger libraryWriters and writing in Apalachicola@THE LIBRaARY Caty Greene DaA VIdD GUESTGuest column LLETTERS TO THE EdDITOR

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LocalThe Times | A5Thursday, September 29, 2011took part in a recent meet ing among the three women to discuss details of a rural health collaboration. We know you have not had maybe the best of expe riences with prior health de partment or hospital leader ship, she said. Before you stand three women who bring to you a great deal of experience, a great deal of passion for health care and a great deal of passion for improving the health care system here in Franklin County. We really felt quite for tunate that both of us (Chap man and Lloyd) are new pretty much at the exact same time, Chapman said. Its also a new day, and one of the things we came to dis cover is that our predeces sors really hadnt worked closely together, and we felt it was just natural that there should be a partnership to leverage the resources that we have. If were not working to gether we might be redun dant and duplicative, and that would not be in the best interest of the community, she said. Chapman said she se cured $25,000 from the state to make repairs to the health departments Carra belle annex. In addition, the department is looking to buy smaller, more fuel-efcient vehicles to replace those that have broken down or exceed mileage or safety standards, and which will be surplused to the county, she said. Jason Flowers, who oversaw the departments environmental health com ponent, resigned in August, Chapman said, and has been replaced by Sean May, from the Okaloosa County Health Department, where Chap man is the full-time director. He worked here six years ago, so he is familiar with the septic tank issues, she said. I also hold him in great regard, and hes work ing hard to realign our envi ronmental health ofce here in Franklin County.Health department wants focus on reproductive healthThough the new collabo ration outlined shortand long-term plans to improve community access to pro viders and eliminate gaps in services, what drew the greatest attention were plans to transition patients over the next six months from the Carrabelle health department annex to the Weems East urgent care clinic next door. Are you all trying to get the people to quit using the health department and start using the hospital? Sand ers asked. Chapman said that with about 1,300 adult and 500 child primary care patients, she is under direction from Tallahassee to reduce our primary care footprint as county health departments and work with other provid ers and FQHCs to collabora tively serve the community. We have two clinics side by side, she said. Neither one can be successful if both are doing exactly the same thing. Chapman said Weems plans to implement a sliding fee scale, will see both unin sured and insured patients and will extend its hours within the next six months. Lloyd said Weems is in the process of being able to ac cept Medipass patients. Sanders made it clear that keeping the existing nurse practitioner, Dana Whaley, should be a top con cern. The reason why you have the large majority of that (patient base) in Car rabelle area, its all because of the nurse practitioner that youve got, she said. If Weems does not have that nurse practitioner, theyre not going to go to Weems. This is a community of families we go to who we think can take good care of us, Sanders said, If Weems has a doctor from wherever coming in there and they dont feel comfortable, and yet they feel comfortable with the nurse practitioner at the health department, (theyll see her). Unless you all are sharing the same nurse practitioner or doctor, youre going to always have this problem. Chapman said the hope is that over time, we can build a cadre of health pro fessionals the community respects and trusts. We cant have dual systems competing with each other in the community, or were not going to be effective and were going to waste our scarce resources. She said it remains a top health department goal to focus on the countys alarming rates of sexually transmitted diseases and teen pregnancies. From most indicators, we fall in the bottom 25 percent as far as rates of disease, she said. These diseases are very devastating to young women in causing future re productive health problems and difculties with concep tion in the future when you have multiple and repeated STD infections. Sanders acknowledged the importance of that fo cus but continued to urge preserving the annexs sta tus quo. People with heart problems or respiratory problems or people with dia betes are just as important as that, she said. Thats what my other problem with the other administrator was. Im looking at you in the eye and telling you, every time you turned around, he was wanting to close the prima ry care in Carrabelle, and Im telling you, youre going to have this room so packed out with people its going to be pitiful. Chapman said the health department and hospital intend to remain exible. We have to handle this carefully; you dont want to disrupt a patient-provider relationship. Over time, I will denitely take that into consideration. None of us like to leave our providers, she said. My phone will ring, Sanders said. These people get particularly upset if the health care provider they have (is gone). Im forewarn ing you a little bit because its going to happen. Chapman said with the reopening of the health de partment building in Apala chicola, Whaley is back to her previous schedule of working three days in Carra belle and two in Apalachico la, while Dr. Ivan Backer man works two days a week in Apalachicola and one day in Carrabelle. A registered nurse in on hand ve days a week at both locations, she said. Theyre still seeing her (Whaley), said Chapman. Its just at a different loca tion. Putnal reminded the three women that because uninsured seafood workers have limited funds, theyll be almost dead before they go to doctor. Whoever is the closest, thats where theyre going to. Because of the recession, it will get worse this year. I dont know what were go ing to do about it, he said. Indigent care is vitally im portant to Franklin County, more so than other counties because theres so many of them that cant afford insur ance. You cant turn them down because theyre not going to be able to make it if you do. I appreciate you all coming together to work out solutions because we have major problems with health care in this county, Putnal said. You all are on the right track. Be careful about shift ing people around; we got to be careful how we do it.Lloyd vows longer hours, new de-stafng policyLloyd told commission ers her goal is to begin keep ing Weems East open from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. weekdays, and probably four hours on Saturday. The access to care is very disturbing in many ways, she said. Our goal is tor provide the right ser vices to the right people at the right time and in the right location. We want to make sure we are each pro viding the resources that we should be providing, but we certainly dont want to be in competition with each other because thats at a great cost to the citizens of Frank lin county. She said a major thrust of the new collaboration is to focus on linking patients with health care providers. We dont have the agencies in Franklin County that can really help residents access resources that are available to them, Lloyd said. What happens now is a patient will come to the hospital emergency room and theyll get a follow-up letter from the Medicaid ofce, but that follow-up never happens be cause theres nobody here in Franklin County to assist those individuals. She said the collabora tions lofty goal is to have people on either end of the county who can help access charity care and Medicaid. We have identied some grants for getting that pro gram up and going, Lloyd said. She said health care leaders will work to ensure that an upcoming needs as sessment, funded by a Na tional Association of Coun ties grant, receives input from throughout the entire county. In addition, the col laboration has discussed the amount of lab services provided by Quest and plans to transition as much of that work as possible to the Weems lab and create multi ple draw sites and extended hours, Lloyd said. Parrish asked that Weems try to have a physi cian visit the bedridden el derly at an assisted living fa cility in Carrabelle, perhaps twice weekly for a couple of hours. We just need to enter into an agreement with the facility to comply with state and federal regulations, Lloyd said. Commissioners also voiced displeasure regard ing North Florida Medical Center in Eastpoint, with Lockley asking whether Weems could take over that FQHC designation. Ive been trying to get rid of them ever since they got here, he said. Only the federal govern ment can make changes to that, Lloyd said. You could talk to the congressman to intervene on our behest. There is nothing more that we can do as far as estab lishing another one. Putnal said he felt our local physicians should have been given that money. They (North Florida) are not doing what they should be doing because that mon ey should be coming to this county. Theyre not using near $600,000; that moneys being used in some other county. Parrish said he thought that given the large num ber of patients being seen in Gulf County, weve been provided some ammunition here. That should not be happening; they should be seen by their local FQHC. PUBLIC NOTICE FCTDC 2011-12 MEETING SCHEDULE Board meetings are held on the Second Tuesday of each month beginning at 3:00 pmBoard MeetingsOctober 11, 2011 Board, Franklin County Courthouse Annex, 3:00 p.m. November 8, 2011 Board, Franklin County Courthouse Annex, 3:00 p.m. Carrabelle, 3:00 p.m. January 10, 2012 Board, Franklin County Courthouse Annex, 3:00 p.m. February 14, 2012 Board, Franklin County Courthouse Annex, 3:00 p.m. Carrabelle, 3:00 p.m. April 10, 2012 Board, Franklin County Courthouse Annex, 3:00 p.m. May 8, 2012 Board, Franklin County Courthouse Annex, 3:00 p.m. Carrabelle, 3:00 pm July 10, 2012 Board, Franklin County Courthouse Annex, 3:00 p.m. August 14, 2012, Board, Franklin County Courthouse Annex, 3:00 p.m. Carrabelle, 3:00 pm ALL COMMITTEE MEETINGS ARE HELD ON THE FOURTH TUESDAY OF EACH MONTH AT THE CITY OF APALACHICOLA COMMUNITY ROOM, 1 BAY AVENUE, APALACHICOLA, BEGINNING AT 1:30 PM FOR GRANTS (IF SCHEDULED) AND BEGINS AT 2:30 PM FOR MARKETING.Committee MeetingsSeptember 27, 2011 Grants and Marketing Committees, beginning at 1:30 pm October 25, 2011, Grants and Marketing Committees, beginning at 1:30 pm November 22, 2011, Grants and Marketing Committees, beginning at 1:30 pm December 27, 2011 Grants and Marketing Committees, beginning at 1:30 pm January 24, 2012, Grants and Marketing Committees, beginning at 1:30 pm February 28, 2012, Grants and Marketing Committees, beginning at 1:30 pm March 27, 2012, Grants and Marketing Committees, beginning at 1:30 pm April 24, 2012, Grants and Marketing Committees, beginning at 1:30 pm May 22, 2012, Grants and Marketing Committees, beginning at 1:30 pm June 26, 2012 Grants and Marketing Committees, beginning at 1:30 pm July 24, 2012, Grants and Marketing Committees, beginning at 1:30 pm August 28, 2012, Grants and Marketing Committees, beginning at 1:30 pm September 25, 2012, Grants and Marketing Committees, beginning at 1:30 pm THIS IS A PUBLIC MEETING AND TWO OR MORE FRANKLIN COUNTY COMMISSIONERS MAY ATTEND. ATTENTION FORD F-250 POWER STROKE DIESEL ENGINE IF YOU OWN OR LEASE A FORD SUPER DUTY TRUCK OR AN EXCURSION VEHICLE FOR MODEL YEARS 2003 2007 EQUIPPED WITH FORDS 6.0L DIESEL ENGINE, COMMONLY KNOWN AS FORDS POWER STROKE DIESEL ENGINE, YOU MAY HAVE LEGAL RIGHTS IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO DISCUSS YOUR POSSIBLE CLAIM FOR DAMAGES, CALL: Lovelace Law Firm, P.A. 12870 US Hwy 98 West Suite 200 Miramar Beach, FL 32550 Telephone: 850-837-6020 Toll free: 1-888-837-2281 Fax: 1-850-837-4093 dml@lovelacelaw.com www.lovelacelaw.com HEALTH CARE from page A1

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LocalA6 | The Times Thursday, September 29, 2011 By David Adlerstein Times City Editor County commissioners were not happy last week about being the last to know whats going on at Weems Memorial Hospital, and they plan to talk to hospital ofcials about it. On Sept. 20, all ve com missioners Noah Lock ley, Cheryl Sanders, Smokey Parrish, Pinki Jackel, and Bevin Putnal voiced fresh concerns regarding hospi tal operations, prompting them to unanimously ap prove a request to meet with Weems CEO Davie Lloyd, the Weems hospital board and representatives of Tal lahassee Memorial Hospital at the commissions Oct. 18 meeting. The request came two weeks after a pointed but amicable exchange of views from Lloyd and interim heath department director Dr. Karen Chapman. After reviewing changes in primary care delivery emerging from a new rural health collaboration (see story, A1), the commission ers heard Lloyd outline a de-stafng policy that has cut into working hours of several hospital employees. Lloyd said she is devel oping a new policy to better address what is required when the hospital census is anywhere from zero to 15 patients. That really makes an easy matrix for the staff to follow, Lloyd said. The policy wasnt being followed consistently, and it wasnt being followed by all departments. There were some departments who it seemed as though the same staff members were being sent home every day. The new policy will spell out who works if X number of pa tients are hospitalized. Lloyd said current rules call for full-time employ ees with benets to have priority over part-time em ployees who work on an as-needed basis. She said she plans assure de-stafng affects day and night staff equally. What triggers this is the number of patients in the hospital, she said. Lloyd said forecasted nancial data compiled by BKD, the auditing rm helping to prepare the ap plication for a federal loan to build a new hospital in Apalachicola, also affect the situation. She said data for full-time employees per adjusted oc cupied beds, a common pro ductivity measure, shows that in 2006, there were 6.9 FTEs; in 2007 6.3; in 2008 5.7; in 2009 4.9; and in 2010 5.7. This compares to a na tional benchmark of from 3.0 to 4.0. We have been have been consistently overstaff ing, she said. When we are overstafng, we are not being good stewards of the resources we have been en trusted. Lockley said, People making decisions to go home dont never go home. Some individuals by law and by job description are required to be at the hos pital, Lloyd said. Those decisions are based on job description. We dont make decisions on an individual basis. She stressed that we are not de-stafng to the point where it interferes in any way, shape or form with patient care.Commission urges communicationAs cordial as the Sept. 6 meeting had been, Sept. 20 was a different story. Concerns began with Clerk of Court Marcia John sons report that showed Weems had $54,270 in its op erating account at the end of August. Back-up funds include certicates of de posit, money market funds of $354,000, a grant account of $93,380 and a capital ac count of $495,717. Im still concerned with the direction that were go ing on this, Sanders said. We really didnt want them to touch the CDs and money market for paying operation al accounts and paychecks. I dont want a repeat of whats happened in the past. Parrish voiced frustra tion as well, citing an ap parent snub from Lloyd, who had declined to meet with him. Im very aggra vated with it myself. When I call someone and ask for a meeting (and) they tell me they dont have time to meet with me, I have a problem. County Planner Alan Pierce, hospital spokesman and commission liaison, said after the meeting that Lloyd had chosen not to meet with Parrish because the subject of discussion concerned a pending personnel matter. Each commissioner voiced displeasure at being kept out of the loop on hospi tal operations. During County Attorney Michael Shulers report, Jackel was adamant the commission needed to be informed earlier on deci sions being made by Lloyd and the hospital board. This is another one of these hospital items that to me is vague in informing the board whats going on, she said. I have yet to see a copy of the application for the new hospital. I dont know how much money were paying upfront in the loan application pro cess. Im very uncomfort able with this, she said. I dont want my comments to be construed that we dont need a better hospital facil ity. Id like to see us have a new hospital, but we need to be in the loop on all of this. ... When push comes to shove, the boards going to be asked to guarantee this loan. Theres a lot of in formation that has to come down the pike before we can even touch that subject. Later in the meeting, Sanders went even further. I think we need to seri ously look at the delegation of authority we have given that hospital board, she said. Im real concerned with the new CEO going to football games in presidents boxes and everything and here we have sacriced and worked so hard to keep this hospital going. I thought the salary of the CEO was going to be one thing and come to nd out its another thing, and TMH was all be hind it. Im concerned with them going in and hiring people and Ive never seen the advertisement. Pierce said afterward that Lloyd had attended a Florida State University football game as the guest of a friend. Shuler has yet to respond to a request from the Times, made in July, for Lloyds sal ary, citing an exemption in the Sunshine laws that ap plies to private companies that manage public hospi tals. Sanders voiced concern over TMHs overall role in the local hospital. They need to under stand that the one driving that ship over here is the one that pays the bills and thats the people of Franklin County, she said. Theyre putting out too much money on a lot of salaries, money that the hospital can not sustain. Somewhere down the line, theyve got to get the message that when this hospital account reaches zero, theyre going to run down here, theyre not go ing to run to Tallahassee. And yet they want commis sioners to have no input. Lockley agreed. I dont see where Tallahassees do ing that much myself, (but) they want to tell us who to hire and how to run it. PUBLIC NOTICETHE FRANKLIN COUNTY ADVISORY BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT WILL HOLD A PUBLIC HEARING ON WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 5, 2011, AT 10:00 A.M. IN THE COUNTY COMMISSION MEETING ROOM OF THE FRANKLIN COUNTY COURTHOUSE ANNEX TO CONSIDER THE FOLLOWING VARIANCES, APPEALS AND SPECIAL EXCEPTIONS: 1.CONSIDERATION OF A REQUEST FOR A VARIANCE TO CONSTRUCT A SINGLE FAMILY DWELLING 23 FEET INTO THE CRITICAL HABITAT ZONE AND 12 FEET INTO THE FRONT SETBACK LINE, AND THE ENCROACHMENT OF 25 FEET INTO THE 75 FT SETBACK LINE FOR A PERFORMANCE BASED ON SITE SEWAGE DISPOSAL SYSTEM ON PROPERTY DESCRIBED AS 841 WEST PINE STREET, LOT 18, BLOCK 74, UNIT 5, ST. GEORGE ISLAND, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. REQUEST SUBMITTED BY GARLICK ENVIRONMENTAL ASSOCIATES, INC., AS AGENT FOR PHILLIP AND MARY JANE PULLAM, OWNERS. 2.CONSIDERATION OF A REQUEST FOR A VARIANCE TO CONSTRUCT A SINGLE FAMILY DWELLING 5 FEET INTO BOTH SIDE SETBACK LINES ON PROPERTY DESCRIBE AS LOT 12, BLOCK 9 WEST, UNIT 1, 215 WEST GORRIE DRIVE, ST. GEORGE ISLAND, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. REQUEST SUBMITTED BY PAUL MAURER,(BUYER), AS AGENT FOR JIM KINMAN, SELLER (OWNER). THE BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS ACTING AS THE BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT WILL ADDRESS THIS REQUEST AT THEIR MEETING ON OCTOBER 18, 2011.*Persons wishing to comment may do so in person or in writing to the Franklin County Planning & Zoning Department, 34 Forbes Street, Suite 1, Apalachicola, FL 32320. Transactions of this hearing will not be recorded, persons wishing to record the proceedings must make the necessary arrangements for recording. THIS PROJECT RECEIVED FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE FROM VISITFLORIDA www.BlastontheBay.comPARTIAL FUNDING FOR THIS EVENT PROVIDED BY THE GULF COUNTY TOURISM DEVELOPMENTCOUNCIL 3026382 ATTENTIONDARVON/DARVOCET/ PROPOXYPHENEIF YOU HAVE USED DARVON/DARVOCET PAIN MEDICATION, YOU MAY HAVE LEGAL RIGHTS. THIS IS NOT A CLAIM AGAINST YOUR DOCTOR. THIS IS A CLAIM AGAINST THE MANUFACTURER OF THIS DRUG. IF YOU HAVE USED THIS DRUG, AND WOULD LIKE TO DISCUSS YOUR POSSIBLE CLAIM, CALL: Lovelace Law Firm, P.A. 12870 US Hwy 98 West Suite 200 Miramar Beach, FL 32550 Telephone: 850-837-6020 Toll free: 1-888-837-2281 Fax: 1-850-837-4093 dml@lovelacelaw.com www.lovelacelaw.com TMH, Weems deal under scrutiny by county

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LocalThe Times | A7Thursday, September 29, 2011 1930 W. hwy 98, Port St. Joe, FL 32456Downtown Highland viewTUESDAY FRIDAY 9-6 SATURDAY 9-2 10% OFFEVERYTHING IN STOCK www.weemsmemorial.com 135 Avenue G, Apalachicola850-653-8853 Email : Info@weemsmemorial.com THIS IS MY HOME THIS IS MY HOSPITALOur mission is to improve the health status of the residents and visitors to Franklin County, by providing quality, compassionate, cost effective and convenient health care through community leadership and in collaboration with other healthcare organizations which serve our communities.George E. Weems Memorial Hospitalis afliated with Tallahassee Memorial Healthcare, a 25-bed critical access hospital that offers 24-hour service to our community and its visitors. Our hospital is fully staffed with a warm, caring and professional team 365 days a year. Any time, day or night, you will nd our medical staff ready to assist you when you need it the most! When life-saving, rapid transport for higher level medical services are required, a helipad is located on site.Weems Memorial Hospital. Were Here For You. Weems offers 24 hour emergency services, inpatient acute care services and a swing-bed program. We offer diagnostic imaging to include: x-ray, CT scan and screening mammogrophy. Our on-site laboratory provides service to our in-patients, as well as out-patients. Our ambulatory services include colonoscopy and endoscopy exams and procedures, cardiology out-patient surgery, podiatry out-patient surgery, and more to come! VACANT LOT APALACHICOLANice corner lot at 12th St. and Ave L 60 x 100. Old home on lot but no value given to structure.MLS# 244889.................$25,000 Travis Stanley 850.653.6477 Grayson Shepard 850.653.6718 Kim Davis 850.653.6875 Leon Teat 850.653.5656 Jackie Golden 850.899.8433 Jamie Crum 850.370.0835 Sandy Mitchem 850.899.8300 BAYFRONT EASTPOINT1.2 acres on Hwy 98 with $850/ month rental income from mobile home, also machine shop. Great home site and already has dock approval.MLS# 243415...........$ 149,000 VACANT COMMERCIAL LOT APALACHICOLAOn the corner of 8th St. and Ave. I zoned C2 neighborhood commercial single family, MLS# 244962..............$45,000COMMERCIAL APALACHICOLATwo commercial lots for sale in Apalachicola on the corner of Commerce and Penton St. Great location, one block of Hwy 98, near all the best shops and restaurants in Apalach!MLS# 244870.................$290,000 AFFORDABLE GREATER APALACHICOLA3 BR/2BA 1142 sq.ft home with large fenced back yard, storage building. Great condition at a great price! MLS# 244700$115,000 COMMERCIAL ST. GEORGE ISLANDExcellent location for 1500 square feet of commercial space in the heart of the island. Currently has closing. Also available for LONG TERM LEASE call for details.MLS# 244926...........$339,000 attached it to Williams. This offender had no place to go, he was homeless and he had conditions of where he could live, Rackleff said. The rst place he said he wanted to stay (fell through) because it was too close to plac es where children congregate. He said he could stay in the national forest, so of cers accompanied him to a spot in the forest. He said he needed to walk and get a tent and a sleeping bag, and he went down the road to do that. Probation ofcials received notice late in the afternoon that Williams location could not be detected by the GPS unit, Rackleff said. The ofcers went at about 6:30 p.m. to the location where Williams was to be and found he had vanished. The ofcers immediately notied area departments to be on the lookout for Williams, who is 6 feet, 4 inches, weighs 245 pounds and has extensive tattoos. He was free to go before curfew, and that is when he got away from us, Rack leff said. We had good cooperation from law enforcement and the prison. It was done the best we know how to do. Franklin County Undersheriff Joel Norred said the ankle bracelet was found near Bear Creek Road. Thats when they determined that he had cut it, he said. We have information that he was taken to Bay County that night, Norred said. He said the department is seeking a warrant for Williams arrest for failing to register as a sexual predator. Rackleff said state ofcials are seek ing a warrant for absconding. Law enforcement ofcials also are pursuing leads that  Williams  might have left the state. Individuals should contact their local law enforcement agency if they believe they know his whereabouts. PREDATOR from page A1listed the more common ruby-throated hummingbird as the only species found east of the Rocky Mountains. Since then, 14 species have been spotted east of the Rockies. Why the change? Dietrich said the less common birds might always have been present, but fewer people were watching. Birding has become one of the fastest growing hob bies in the US, he said, and the number of bird feeders has increased, so foreign visitors like the broad-bill might have a higher survival rate. Dietrich headed to Eastpoint rst thing Saturday morning, and as he ap proached the Klink home, he spotted his friend Bassett in the rear-view mirror. The men were able to capture and band the rare visitor. He let me band it, Dietrich said. Its the rst time Ive band ed that species. It was quite an honor. Dietrich said the broad-bill is larger than the common ruby-throat and one of the most beautiful of the jewel-like hummingbirds. He and Bassett observed the bird defending the bird feeder from rubythroats, and it appeared to be vocalizing, but they couldnt hear its song. He said the high-pitched sound made by hummers is outside the range for most men but is audible to women. Dietrich said long journeys are not out of the ordinary for hummingbirds. A bird he banded in Tallahassee turned up in Alaska ve months later. If you consider the size of the bird, thats the longest migration of any bird, he said. More pictures and information about sighting are online at http://digest.sialia. com/?rm=message;id=299028. HUMMINGBIRD from page A1apparent steps to fulll any further con ditions of the FLUMs. But, according to County Commissioner Bevin Putnal and environmental activist Don Ashley, who originally sued St. Joe, both say public access to Turkey Point, a popular spot for net shing and launching small craft, was blocked shortly after the new FLUMs were created. In addition, titles to several parcels of land, said to be promised by St. Joe for various public uses, were not forthcoming. County Planner Alan Pierce said these promises were part of a gentlemens agreement and were not formalized in a legal agreement. After commissioners squabbled with St. Joe over water access, alleged zoning violations and other issues, they voted on Dec. 15, 2009, to rescind two FLUMs granting St. Joe the right to build 1,600 residences in two developments on St. James Island: Marina Village and Car rabelle East Village. Commissioners ear lier reversed their approval of two other St. Joe FLUMs, known as Rural Village, which encompassed 1,704 acres west of U.S. 98, and Conservation Residential, a 2,500-acre tract along the Ochlocknee Bay, where 1,000 additional homes would have been be built. In December 2010, St. Joe sent the county a letter stating that the change to the comprehensive plan eliminating Ma rina Village and Carrabelle East Village had inordinately burdened the company by interfering with its plans to develop the land. St. Joe threatened to sue the county for violating the Bert Harris Act, a 2004 state law that bars government entities from actions that prevent property own ers from proting from real property. In a telephone interview, David Theri aque, a consulting attorney for the county who is handling the dispute with St. Joe, said the county was legally required to respond to the notice from St. Joe with a determination of ripeness and a settle ment offer. The determination of ripeness is a statement of what St. Joe can do un der the current comprehensive plan and ordinances. Theriaque said the county had a num ber of options for the settlement offer, ranging from offering alternative devel opment options to standing pat on their decision to rescind. At their Sept. 20 meeting, he presented commissioners with a 10-page settlement offer and nine-page ripeness determina tion to consider, but they chose to stand by their original decision to rescind with out further review. On Sept. 21, Theriaque sent Bryan Duke, the attorney representing St. Joe, a letter that states the commission will make No changes to the action of the government entity. St. Joe now has un til March 2014 to bring a lawsuit against Franklin County. Theriaque contends St. Joe has no re course to the Bert Harris Act because the company never formally applied for de velopment approvals from the county, and none of the property had been developed. He said the land always has been zoned a Forestry Agricultural District, and this zoning would not have allowed for a large-scale, mixed-use development of the type proposed by St. Joe. He said St. Joe bought the land as a tree farm, and they can continue to use it for that pur pose. When he was hired, Theriaque told commissioners St. Joe had no grounds to sue under the Bert Harris Act and de scribed the companys threats as saber rattling. They threaten and threaten but a lot of time they dont do anything about it. There is low to remote risk and low to remote nancial responsibility, Theri aque said. Nobody can say theres zero risk. At the Sept. 20 hearing, he reiterated this belief. It is still my opinion that St. Joes claim has no merit, he said. Ross Burnaman, an attorney repre senting the Ashleys, said he concurred with Theriaque. I think St. Joes claim is frivolous, he said. They are a bad corpo rate actor in my opinion. Burnaman pointed out that a Franklin County jury would hear the case if it came to trial. He urged commissioners to take no action and not to offer St. Joe a settle ment of any kind. Don Ashley also spoke in support of the no action position. No action is a bet ter option at this point, he said. Com munity consensus has always been Lets maintain the rural shing village lifestyle of Franklin County. If the Florida Keys had done this in the 1950s, they wouldnt be struggling now. He slammed St. Joe for breaking prom ises concerning water access, low income housing and land donations. How can the St. Joe Company give 25 acres to Gulf County for a hospital and put up the rst two or three million dollars for operation and were struggling to keep an urgent care center in Carrabelle today? Its not part of any discussion, is it? Yet were talking 1,200 new units. To me its not balanced, he said. I dont think we need to blow it this time, said Commissioner Cheryl Sand ers, referring to the original decision to grant the FLUMs. There is some things that needed to happen that has never hap pened. The water access and the low-in come housing is a slap in the face of the people of Franklin County. This is a Godgiven opportunity to put it right. She moved that the county stand pat on its decision to rescind the FLUMs and not offer St. Joe any further settlement. LAWSUIT from page A1 PHOTOS BY LOIS SS WOBODA | The TimesFrom left are David Theriaque, a consulting attorney for the county; Don Ashley, an environmental activist who originally sued St. Joe; and Ross Burnaman, an attorney representing the Ashleys.

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A8 | The Times Thursday, September 29, 2011 PETOFTHEWEEK Franklin County Humane Society Fresh Baked Bread Cheeses Wine Micro Brews Seasonings and SaucesOpen Daily 9:00 AM to 7:00 PM (850)927-5039 112 E. Gulf Beach Dr., St. George Island DIXIETHEATRE.COM 850.653.3200 Presents PEARLSfor the KING! OYSTERS & ELVISAT THE DIXIE8 PM FRIDAY & SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 30 & OCTOBER 1 Qualications: Expertise in: Now Accepting AppointmentsCall Toll Free 888-681-5864 For more info www.seclung.com Lung Disease SpecialistRob Garver, MDNow Seeing Patients in Port St. Joe NOW BCBS-FL IN-NETWORK PROVIDER This is a FREE EVENT Brought to you by the Apalachicola Municipal Library and PALS, supported in part by the Franklin County Tourist Development Council www.anaturalescape.com By Lois SwobodaTimes Staff Writer The Apalachicola Riverkeepers reported that workers at the 2011 Coastal Cleanup held Saturday bagged more than 2,500 pounds of trash. This year, teams toiled from Bald Point to Apalachicola. The Riverkeeper sends its thanks to all of the volunteers, but especially to Ada Long of St. George Island for organizing a banner event. The biggest turnout of volunteers was 20 in Carrabelle. Four of the cleanup sites Lafayette Park, Abercrombie Landing, the Eastpoint Pavilion and St. George Island State Park had no volunteers other than the site coordinator. A crew of kids from the Franklin County School cleaned up Marion Millender Park. In the business district on the island, Tony Robinette was the youngest volunteer, and the hardest-working was Bob Pruitt. At Ten Foot Hole, the hardest worker was Fred Vogt and the youngest volunteer Cina Duggan Smith. At Abercrombie Landing, Meg Nelson voted herself the hardest worker and gave her standard poodle Josee Nelson the prize for youngest volunteer. One of the attractions of the Fall Festival this year will be the child protection program. This program is being offered by the Masons from Curfew Lodge in Carrabelle. Free photos and ngerprints. These will be given to the parents for safekeeping. See you at the Franklin County Senior Center on Saturday, Nov. 12, right after the parade. On Tuesday, Sept. 27, family and friends gathered at the Camp Gordon Johnston American Legion Post 82, for the memorial service for Gordie Meloche. Gordie passed away last Tuesday, Sept. 22. Pray for his eternal peace and comfort for the family. On Monday, Oct. 3, we will have our monthly meeting at the Lanark Village Association. Gavel falls at 7 p.m. The snowbirds will start drifting in next week. Be good to see them. Be kind to one another, check on the sick and housebound Jesus is with you through it all! Until next time, God bless America, our troops, the poor, homeless and hungry. Jamie Daniels, Brad Johnson to wed Oct. 15Jamie Leigh Daniels and Randall Bradley Johnson will be joined in holy matrimony at the Riverfront Park in Apalachicola on Saturday, Oct. 15, at 6 p.m. Jamie is the daughter of Greg and Evie Daniels of Carrabelle. She is the granddaughter of Julia Thompson of Carrabelle and the late Vernon Thompson; and Bill and Pat Daniels of Perry. Brad is the son of Robbie and Marcia Johnson of Apalachicola. He is the grandson of Bill and Burnell Martina of Apalachicola and the late Paul and Inez Johnson. Please come join us in celebration of the beginning of their lives together. LANARK NEWSJim WelshMasons to offer child protection photos at festival Engagement Coastal Cleanup bags a ton of trash Photos by RR OD GAS A S CHE E | Special to the TimesAt left is the Lanark Village Coastal Cleanup crew. Below, Eugenia and David Butler were crowned hardest workers in Carrabelle. Society

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In memory of Thom Lewis who lost his life in a plane crash on June 23, a celebration of his life will be held at the home of Lana and J.R Heady, 849 E. Pine Street, St. George Island, on Saturday, Oct. 1. The gathering will be from 4 to 6:30 p.m., beginning with a gathering at the house and then walking a short distance to the bay where the Rev. Themo Patriotis will lead this celebration. Thom spent a lot of time in this spot, especially with the two hunting dogs that he loved so much, Teah and Chessie. All persons who would like to speak about Thom are cordially invited to do so. There will be refreshments served after returning from the bay. Please dress casual as we will be in the sand. As this is a celebration of Thoms life and his many contributions to this beautiful place, bright colors and beach attire are very acceptable. All persons who knew and loved Thom and also love Jo are invited to attend. Please bring a lawn chair or blanket to sit on and insect spray. If you have difculty walking from parking, please turn on your lights and someone will transport you to the Headys house by golf cart. If there are any pictures or items of interest that anyone would like to share for display please call 9273337.Lemuel Miller to lead revival at Eastpoint of GodLemuel Miller will be in Revival on Sunday, Oct. 2 at 11 a.m. and 6 p.m., and Monday through Wednesday, Oct. 3 through 5 at 7 p.m., at the Eastpoint Church of God, 379 Ave A, Eastpoint. Miller serves the body of Christ as evangelist, pastor and psalmist. A former Gaither vocal band member, he presently serves as pastor of China Hill Community Church, Jacksonville, Ga. Join us for the Word of God demonstrated in power and authority! For more information, call 850-323-1206 and 6708704. The United Methodist Churches of Franklin County Welcome You First United Methodist Church of ApalachicolaWorship Service 11:00 a.m. every Sunday Sunday School 10:00 a.m. 75 5th St. Apalachicola 653-9530 fumcapalach@gtcom.net Pastor: Rev. Themo PatriotisCarrabelle United Methodist ChurchWorship Services 10:45 a.m. Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Celebrate Recovery Mondays 7-9 p.m. 102 NE Ave. B Carrabelle 697-3672 Pastor: Julie StephensEastpoint United Methodist ChurchWorship Service 10:00 a.m. every Sunday Healing service every fourth Monday at 7:00 p.m. 317 Patton Dr. (corner of David St.) 670-8825 Pastor: Rev. Beth WhiteSt. George Island United Methodist Church9:00 a.m. Worship Service 10:00 a.m. Fellowship Hour 201 E. Gulf Beach Dr. 9274635 www.sgiumc.org Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis Lemuel Miller will be in Revival Sunday, October 2nd, at 11:00 a.m. and 6:00 p.m. and Monday through Wednesday, October 3rd through 5that 7:00 p.m. at:East Point Church of God379 Ave A Eastpoint, FL 32328 Ph 850-323-1206 & 850-670-8704Lemuel Miller serves the body of Christ as Evangelist, Pastor and Psalmist. Lemuel Miller, former Gaither Vocal Band Member presently serves as Pastor of China Hill Community Church, Jacksonville, G.A. Join us for the Word of God demonstrated in Power and Authority! Salvation, Healing and Deliverance! Join us! A Book of Acts Church Believing A Book of Acts God! First Pentecostal Holiness Church379 Brownsville Road Apalachicola Were excited about what Gods doing!!!Sunday School 9:45 am Sunday Morning Worship 10:45 am Sunday Evening Service 6:00 pm Monday, Youth Group 6:30 pm Wednesday, Royal Rangers, G.A.P.7:00 pm Wednesday Worship & Word 7:30 pmNursery Provided during regular church services 7:00 7:00 First Baptist ChurchSt. George Island 501 E. Bayshore Drive 927-2257 R. Michael Waley, Pastor Join us as we praise and worship the living Christ. Great is the Lord and most worthy of praise. Psalm 145:3 Sunday Bible Study................................................10:00am Worship Praise........................................................11:00am Sunday Night............................................................7:00pm Wednesday Power Hour......................................7:00pm Wednesday Youth at S.P.L.A.S.H.......................7:00pm Walking in Christ R. Michael Whaley, Pastor WELCOMES YOUChurch of the Ascension101 NE First Street CarrabelleSUNDAY10:00 AM WELCOMES YOUChurch THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH (850) 274-4490 WELCOMES YOU Trinity Trinity Episcopal Churchest. 1836Welcomes YouHwy. 98 & 6th St. Apalachicola 850-653-9550Sunday Worship Services 8 & 10:30 a.m. Wednesdays Healing Service 11 a.m. Centering Prayer 4 p.m. FaithThe Times | A9Thursday, September 29, 2011 Faith BRIeEFSI remember the different lessons that we were required to master when I was in kindergarten. Almost every lesson centered around respect for others, including keeping your hands to yourself, raising your hand before speaking, taking turns, sharing, etc. The golden rule, do onto others as you would want them to do onto you, from Matthew 7:1, was the center of all values we once lived by. The golden rule is found in nearly every religion and culture around the world, including Christianity, Confucianism, Buddhism, Judaism and Hinduism to name a few. Regardless of age, color or creed, treating others with respect is a part of the moral ber of our nation, yet that teaching is futile if it is absent from Gods principles. A gentleman opens a door for a young lady and she walks past him without extending him the courtesy of eye contact. How often do you hear a child say, may I have, please, or thank you? What I hear most frequently is mine, give me, I wanted that one, not this one. There is obviously something amiss about how children are being taught in a society that reects the absence of character. The solutions to how our children learn values are elusive, but ultimately the responsibility of the parent. One thing that was constant in my life as a child was the reinforcement of respect and integrity at home and at school. Anyone considered an elder was addressed as maam and sir. Nothing was given unless you said the magic word please, and respect was demanded, not earned. Politeness, appreciation and respect are common courtesies that separate us from the rest of the animal kingdom. Seldom does a child say, excuse me, when cutting through a conversation, burps aloud or when requesting attention anymore. Appreciation is merited only by topping the last toy or event. Todays parent tends to equate buying things for their children with caring for them. We learn the art of appreciation by placing a high value on things so if everything in a childs life is viewed as disposable and replaceable they never learn how to take care of their own toys, furniture and clothing. How much more will they appreciate the use of someone elses belongings? I frequently hear parents who say things like I give her everything and she gives me no respect in return. Here is a tip: Appreciation goes hand-inhand with earning. We tend to respect and care for the things we work hard for and appreciate the tangible and non-tangible things we regard highly. By todays standard, you would be scoffed at for preferring others over yourself since the name of the game is to be the one that winds up with the most toys in the end. Never mind the rules, just play to win. Doing things for the greater good is unheard of when getting the biggest piece of pie takes precedence. Teaching a child to share is an act of sacrice. Being stingy is common for a toddler, but it is only through consistent teaching and by the parents example that the child learns to share. In the early 1950s, elementary school teachers from across the United States were asked to list the top ve problems in their school. They replied: Talking out of turn, chewing gum, making noise, running in the hall and cutting in line. In the early 1990s, the same question was asked of teachers. Their replies were profoundly different: drug and alcohol abuse, guns and knives in school, pregnancy, suicide and rape, according to the 1998 Report Card on the Ethics of American Youth Survey Data on Youth Violence. Many things changed in those four decades. God was expelled from school, divorce rates increased, the American dream started to seem more like a nightmare, things that used to be wrong are acceptable, and the responsibility of raising children is forced on everyone but the one who gave birth to them. Americans are making up their own moral codes. How ironic that secularism emerged in the public schools around the 1960s; anyone see a pattern? How to treat others, take care of things, and give more than we take are ethics we learn as children by observing our parents. Most importantly, we learn the art of treating others as we would like to be treated and not how we have been treated. If every parent taught those principles, I believe our entire country would be healed. We welcome all suggestions and hope you enjoy this weekly article. Please send all emails to Scott Shiver at frontline247@mac.com.Teach manners, morals to heal the nation YOUTH MATTeERSPamela Shiver Justin Wesley Wilson, 37, of Apalachicola, passed away Friday, Sept. 23, 2011. Justin was a native and lifelong resident of Apalachicola. A commercial sherman by trade, he enjoyed hunting and recreational shing, and was an avid Florida Gator. He was a member of Apalachicola First Baptist Church and attended the First Pentecostal Holiness Church. Survivors include his mother, Brenda Crowson Wilson, of Apalachicola; his daughter, Kara Richards, of Apalachicola; his brother, Wesley Anderson Wilson, of Apalachicola; four sisters, Donna Crum, Stacie DeVaughn and Samantha Jones, all of Apalachicola, and Christy Ziemba, of Sante Fe, N.M.; and his maternal grandmother, Madelyn Crowson of Sopchoppy. He was preceded in death in 2003 by his father, Donald Wesley Wilson. The funeral service was held Monday afternoon, Sept. 26, at the First Pentecostal Holiness Church, 379 Brownsville Road in Apalachicola. Burial followed at Magnolia Cemetery in Apalachicola. The family received friends at the church, one hour prior to the service. In lieu of owers, gifts in memory of Justin may be made to the Panama City Rescue Mission, P.O. Box 2359, Panama City, FL 32402. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel of Crawfordville assisted the Wilson family.Justin Wesley Wilson Obituary Celebration of life for Thom Lewis Saturday

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By Frank Sargeantfranksargeant@bellsouth.net Not long ago, kayaks were the province of the Inuit peoples beyond the Arctic Circle plus a few whacked-out whitewater enthusiasts with more nerve than sense. But what a difference a few years can make. Today, paddle-powered boats are by far the fastest growing segment of an otherwise stagnant boating market, both because of the environment-rst attitude of millions of young people and because they are simply very useful, costefcient little boats. These paddlepowered cockleshells offer swift, silent access to water so shallow that powerboats cant even think of invading it. For the nature photographer and wildlife watcher, theres no watercraft that can compare; shore birds, marine mammals and sh simply ignore a yak as if its a log oating past. For shing in shallow bay areas like those that abound throughout the Panhandle, there also are big benets. Kayaks put the angler so low to the water that the sh cant see him or her, and the approach is dead silent. They cruise over water only inches deep, across mud bottoms too soft to wade, and they theyre light enough to launch anywhere, including off a seawall in the middle of town if thats where the sh happen to be. Intrepid anglers even take them off the beach and head out to sea to do battle with king mackerel and tarpon. Plus, when the day ends, you can store your boat standing on end on the porch of your walk-up apartment. And theres no environmental footprint paddle power is simple, clean muscle-power. Kayaks are light enough for one angler, man or woman, to hoist to a rack on the top of a car or slide into the bed of a pickup, SUV or station wagon. Theyre typically 10 to 14 feet long, and weights for kayaks rigged for shing are usually less than 60 pounds. Theyre available in sit-on-top versions as well as the more traditional models where the legs go under a bow deck. Many anglers like the sit-on-top models because theyre easier to get in and out of; a typical day in kayak country includes a good bit of wade-shing as well as shing from the boat, so the ease of entry can be important. Most kayak makers designate various models for various duties; those who intend to use their boats for shing probably will want a recreational or general use version, said Ian Joyce, spokesman for Wilderness Systems Kayaks, one of the leading shing kayaks. These are wider and more stable than some of the sport models, Joyce said. The trade-off is that the wider the beam, the harder the kayak is to paddle, and the slower it goes for a given amount of effort. Wider kayaks also are somewhat heavier, though not enough so that this should become a factor in getting the boats in and out of the water in most areas. Most anglers set their kayaks up with back rests to ease the pressure on the spine over long hours in the boat. They also are likely to add small anchors, sometimes on a roller that allows dropping it without moving from the seat in the kayak; paddle keepers that prevent the double-ended paddle from drifting away should it fall overboard; slip-in tackle boxes that t premolded slots in the deck; ice chests; and of course waterproof bags for anything that doesnt like saltwater, including electronic car keys, cellphones and wallets one of the facts of life in kayaking is that nearly everything gets wet. And, of course, you need rod holders. Most opt for at least two, allowing them a quick choice of lures for varying depths. By law and by common sense, it also is wise to carry and wear a personal otation device any time you are in a kayak. Sooner or later, you probably will turn the boat over. Often, in the backcountry, the remedy is simply to stand up. But in deeper water, the boat might quickly drift away, and a life preserver can make all the difference. Many opt for the belt-pack or suspender-type inatable, which offers more freedom of movement for paddling and casting than the vest type. Many resorts throughout the Panhandle now offer kayaks for rent, giving a great opportunity to try before you buy. And most boat dealers now have at least a few yaks somewhere in their inventory. Expect to spend about $800 minimum for a kayak equipped to sh, about $2,000 for a fully equipped rig. If you just want a sport-yak to play with, some are available for as little as $450. Ocean, Hobie, Old Town, Wilderness Systems, NuCanoe and others offer a wide variety of models suitable for Panhandle yakking. Corner of Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, FL(next to Piggly Wiggly)www.BWOsh.com Your Hunting HeadquartersLIMITED QUANTITIES AVAILABLEQUEST HEAT BOWBY G5$499.99 FreshwaterGrouper shing is red hot now since the re-opener of gag grouper. Most sh are being caught in the 60-150ft range and good reports from the M.B.A.R.A. sites out of Mexico Beach are producing sh. Hard bottom or offshore wrecks will be holding bigger sh, and as always take some live pin sh or mullet for red hot shing!Inshore OffshoreTrout and red sh have made their way into the I.C.W. canal here in St. Joe. Most anglers are using grubs and jigs here, but live bait will certainlynd sh as well. Some ounder are caught here are on the large size, and with the right tide, you should do well with live bull minnows. Lakes and streams are very productive freshwater hsing right now in our area. Fall feeding patterns are starting to emergeand shing will continue to improve. Lake Wimico is still a hot spot for all that swims. Good bass, nice sheepshead, and nicebream catches are being reported daily. SPoONsoSORED BY Email outdoors news to times outdoors@star.com Page 10 Thursday, September 29, 2011 OUTDoo OO RSwww.apalachtimes.comSection A FRANK SARGEANT | Special to The TimesKayaks rigged for shing usually have rod holders, padded seats with backrests, and dry storage boxes for gear. Paddle-power comes from the double-ended kayak paddle, though some anglers add electric motors for easier operation against wind and tide. Kayaks nd new home on the atsThe Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) reminds event organizers and other Floridians about a law prohibiting the release of more than nine lighter-than-air balloons within a 24-hour period. While releasing balloons is often a sign of groups wishing to honor an event or lost loved one, the FWC encourages the public to choose more environmentally responsible actions for their events. Balloons released in Florida almost inevitably end up in the Gulf of Mexico or Atlantic Ocean. Wildlife, especially sea turtles, mistake balloons for food, and strings attached to balloons can entangle birds and other animals. The release into the atmosphere of large numbers of balloons inated with lighterthan-air gases poses a danger and nuisance to the environment, particularly to wildlife and marine animals. Violators could incur $250 in nes according to Florida law. There are exceptions for scientic or meteorological balloons released by a government agency or under government contract, hot air balloons that are recovered after launching and balloons released indoors. The law also allows for the release of balloons that are biodegradable or photodegradable under FWC rules. Since 1989, the FWC has received only one such balloon design for review, and that balloon was not approved.Balloons take a toll on wildlife

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CARRABELLE A A PALAc C HIc C OLA SP O RTs S www.apalachtimes.com ASectionBy David AdlersteinTimes City Editor The Liberty County Bulldogs made a powerful case Friday they will be the team to beat in Class 1A District 4 as they overwhelmed the Franklin County Seahawks 49-7. Though a large part of the outcome was due to the strength and smashmouth style of football that the Bulldogs play, a small portion of it was the result of unfortunate miscues, said Seahawks coach Josh Wright. We felt we had a chance to compete with Liberty, but we knew that we would have to play just about perfect. It seemed like the early game miscues of getting tripped up, mishandling the ball and barely missing a fumbled punt return made us doubt our ability to compete, said the coach. They have a stingy defense that has only given up 27 points on the year and they at came off the ball better than we did. Hopefully, we learn from this and react by committing to win the line of scrimmage against Wewahitchka this Friday night. On the second play from scrimmage on their opening drive, Bulldog senior quarterback Daniel Deason tossed a 55-yard scoring strike to senior Brenton Bailey. Senior Trey Johnson followed with the rst of his seven extra points. The rest of the rst quarter proved scoreless for both sides, but in the second quarter, the Bulldogs tallied ve unanswered touchdowns, as junior Alex Marlowe scored twice, on a quarterback sneak and from eight yards out, and connected with senior Blake Baggett on a 32-yard passing touchdown. Junior Terryall Jenkins ran it in from ve yards out, as the Bulldogs went into the locker room with a 41-0 lead. Watching from the stands, most fans saw the Seahawks play great at times defensively and open the gate at other times, said Wright. Liberty Countys offense is patterned after Georgia Tech and Navy and was hitting on all cylinders at times in the rst half. Unfortunately, the Bulldogs were able to start every drive on a short eld which made the task of stopping them even tougher. The second half was a better outing for the Seahawks as they moved the ball down the eld. With 5:19 left in the third quarter, sophomore Dwayne Griggs, back for the rst time from a back injury in the opening game, rambled down the sidelines for a 34-yard score. Senior Paul Anderson nailed the extra point. That score was set up by a great block by senior running back Brennan Walden, said Wright. Griggs played sparingly on both sides of the ball, as this was his rst game back from what we thought was a season-ending injury. We have gelled as a team in Dwaynes absence as we all realize that the show must go on. Getting him back in the lineup is certainly a boost to the program, as it gives another running back and another defender that can get the ball carrier on the ground, he said. He has been a positive energy on the sideline at our games and has been at every practice since the injury on Aug. 26. He was very excited to get back on the eld and be a contributor to his team. The Bulldogs added a safety with 6:31 left in the game when the snap sailed over the head of Seahawks sophomore punted Leonard Green and into the end zone. The Bulldogs wrapped up their scoring when Deason ran it in from 12 yards out as the game neared a close. The Seahawks travel to Wewahitchka this Friday, to face a 2-2 Gator squad sporting an offense that has put up big numbers in terms of yardage and scoring. Their top threat is running back Theryl Brown who nearly averages 200 yards a game of offense, said Wright. They also have a bruising quarterback by the name of Justin Flowers that recently returned from a broken arm he received in the Aug. 26 jamboree. They are a physical team that is getting better each week and moves the pile when they run their single wing offense. Wright said this game is crucial to the 2-2 Seahawks and encouraged every Franklin County sports fan to make the trip and bring the county pride to the visitors stands. Kickoff is set for 8 p.m. ET.Buffkin, Wynn honored at halftimeTwo seniors, Adreenah Aupril Wynn and Chance Dewitt Buffkin, were crowned at halftime as the fth annual Mr. and Miss Franklin County High School, the most coveted title to be bestowed upon a senior. The Student Government Association, represented by sponsors Roderick Robinson and Stephanie Howze, and president Javeion Wineld, conducted the election of whom students feel best embodies the spirit of Franklin County High School. When considering candidates, the voting student body takes into consideration academics, athletics, character, leadership, and of course school spirit. The 2010 Mr. and Miss Franklin County High School, Shelby Shiver and Milan Mullins, assisted with the crowning. Wynn, daughter of Olivia and Adron Sparky Wynn, of Apalachicola, was accompanied by her mom and older brother, Tydron. She is the granddaughter of Julia Mae Fisher of Apalachicola, Willie Cook of Spring Valley New York, and the late Ocea and Tom Wynn, both of Apalachicola. Active in extracurricular activities and dual-enrolled at Gulf Coast State College, she plans to attend ether the University of Florida or University of Central Florida to become a graphics designer. Buffkin, accompanied by his mother, Sonja Buffkin, is the grandson of the late Marvin and Pansy Braswell, of Carrabelle, and the late Glen Buffkin of Carrabelle. Active in varsity athletics, both baseball and basketball, Buffkin signed his enlistment papers on June 14 for a six-year active duty term with the Army, on the day of the 236th anniversary of the founding of the U.S. Army. After basic training at Fort Jackson in South Carolina, he will report to Fort Eustis in Virginia for training in CH-47 helicopter repair. Seahawks eye Wewa win after Bulldog loss DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The TimesPerforming with the Flag Corps, from left, are Brook Pittman, Deborah Dempsey and Jennifer Stratton.DANA WHALEY | Special to the TimesSeahawk sophomore Leonard Green (14) carries the ball against Liberty CountyBy David AdlersteinTimes City Editor The Lady Seahawks volleyball team has had its thrill of victories, and its agony of close defeats, as it moves to a 5-6 record on the year. The team lost in three games, 25-22, 25-13 and 2519, at Florida A&M University High on Sept. 20, with the junior varsity losing in two games, 25-11 and 25-20. But later last week, in a doubleheader against Jefferson County, the varsity swept, winning the opener 25-17, 25-22 and 25-23. In the nightcap, the Seahawks won 25-17, 25-15 and 25-15. Chena Segree led the team with kills with 14, while Anna Lee had 10, Morgan Mock seven, and Karli Tucker ve. The team had 42 total kills. Setters Segree and Morgan Newell combined for 35 assists. Segree and Lee led the team in aces, combining for 17 points. The Seahawks had 30 total aces. Gracyn Kirvin and Maegan Andrews held down the defense for the girls. Overall it was a great improvement and much needed success for the varsity volleyball team, said Sally Wheeler, head volleyball coach. On Friday, the Seahawks hosted Altha and lost in three close games, 25-20, 25-17 and 25-19. At Port St. Joe on Tuesday, the team fell again in three close games, 25-19, 25-21 and 2523. We are making improvements everyday and eventually we are going to bring all the elements needed in the same day, said Wheeler. The team remains winless in district play. Tonight, Sept. 29, the team plays host to Blountstown. On Oct. 6 the team travels to Liberty County.Lady Seahawks volleyball team sweeps doubleheaderThursday, September 29, 2011 Page A11Eastpoint church hosts Franklin Outdoor DayThe Eastpoint Church of God is hosting Franklin Outdoor Day with special guest Lemuel Miller sharing hunting tips and life lessons from the eld. The event will be held Saturday, Oct. 1, at the church, 379 Ave. A in Eastpoint. Bow shoot registration begins at 8 a.m. Activities for the whole family, including inatables and games for the kids, begin at noon. Free seafood lunch and chances to win more than $1,000 in door prizes will be offered. For more information, call 323-1206. Sports briefBRIEFDANA WHALEY | Special to the TimesMiss Franklin County High School Adreenah Wynn, smiles as her mom looks on. DANA WHALEY | Special to the TimesMr. Franklin County High School Chance Buffkin with his new crown, as mom looks on.

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LocalA12 | The Times Thursday, September 29, 2011 2010-2011 Annual Franklin County School District ReportThe promotion and retention policies in the new 2011-2012 Student Progression Plan for Franklin County School District remain the same as the previous year except for the following revisions: Grades K-5 must pass 4 core courses in math, reading, language arts, social studies and science to be promoted to the next grade level. Students will be retained if the nal grade in two or more core subjects is 59 or below. Grades 6-8 Due to change from 7 to 6 periods in a school day, students are required to pass 4 out of 6 courses to be promoted to grades 7 and 8. Grades 9-12 Due to change from 7 to 6 periods in a school day, students must earn 5 or more credits including a credit in English, Math & two other required courses to be classied as a sophomore; a total of 12 credits including 2 credits in English and Math and one each in Social Studies & Science to be classied as a junior; and a total of 18 credits with a GPA of 2.0 including 3 credits in English to be classied as a senior. A complete copy of the 2011-12 Student Progression Plan can be found on the district website at franklincountyschools.org. WEEKLY ALMANAC APALACHICOLA CARRABELLETIDE TABLES MONTHLY AVERAGESTo nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from these given for APALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW Cat Point Minus 0:40 Minus 1:17 East Pass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27 To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from those given for CARRABELLE: HIGH LOW Bald Point Minus 9:16 Minus 0:03 Sponsor the WEEKLY ALMANACCall Today!653-8868Date HighLow% Precip Thu, Sep 2988 6830% Fri, Sep 3087 62 0% Sat, Oct 182 59 0% Sun, Oct 279 61 0% Mon, Oct 380 65 0% Tues, Oct 482 67 0% Wed, Oct 583 66 0%9/29Thu04:39AM 1.9 H 12:04PM 0.1L 07:03PM 1.8 H11:53PM 1.3L 9/30Fri05:07AM 2.0 H12:57PM 0.1L 08:12PM 1.7 H 10/1Sat12:20AM 1.4 L05:41AM 2.0H 01:57PM 0.1 L09:30PM 1.6H 10/2Sun12:49AM 1.5 L06:22AM 2.0H 03:08PM 0.2 L11:02PM 1.5H 10/3Mon01:27AM 1.4 L07:12AM 1.9H 04:28PM 0.3 L 10/4Tue12:32AM 1.5 H02:49AM 1.4L 08:16AM 1.8 H05:46PM 0.4L 10/5Wed01:21AM 1.5 H 04:57AM 1.4L 09:44AM 1.7 H 06:52PM 0.4L 9/29Thu03:14AM 3.0 H09:51AM 0.2L 05:38PM 2.9 H09:40PM 2.1L 9/30Fri 03:42AM 3.2 H 10:44AM 0.2L 06:47PM 2.7 H10:07PM 2.2L 10/1Sat 04:16AM 3.2 H11:44AM 0.2L 08:05PM 2.6 H10:36PM 2.4L 10/2Sun 04:57AM 3.2 H12:55PM 0.3L 09:37PM 2.4 H11:14PM 2.2 L 10/3Mon 05:47AM 3.0 H02:15PM 0.5L 11:07PM 2.4 H 10/4Tue12:36AM 2.2 L06:51AM 2.9H 03:33PM 0.6 L11:56PM 2.4 H 10/5Wed 02:44AM 2.2 L08:19AM 2.7H 04:39PM 0.6 L dbutler@coastalcoverage.com Locally owned and operated to meet all your insurance needs St. George Island Sheriffs Patrol is looking for residents who will volunteer to help keep our island safe. Volunteers who qualify will be issued identication cards, caps and uniform shirts and take their turn patrolling the island in a marked Sheriffs Patrol car. Qualications include a background check, two four-hour classroom sessions, and other designated training from the Franklin County Sheriffs ofce. As a volunteer, you can schedule yourself to patrol when and as often as you like. You will not confront violators, but will add presence to law enforcement on the island by patrolling and radioing suspicious activity and infractions to the Sheriffs Ofce, who will promptly dispatch deputies to investigate and address problems. An additional marked Sheriffs car patrolling the island will help discourage unlawful activities! To participate, volunteers must ll out a Law Enforcement Auxiliary Application and Authority for Release of Information. The background investigation waiver must be notarized. These forms can be dropped off at Fickling and Company for the attention of Sandy Mitchem, who is coordinating the Sheriffs Patrol volunteer program with the Sheriffs Ofce. For your convenience, Sandy is a notary, as is Shelly at Fickling. Centennial Bank will also notarize the forms for you. Please drop the completed forms off at Fickling, Monday-Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. as soon as you can, and no later than Friday, October 14, so they can be processed before training begins. Mandatory training sessions will be in two parts, and participants can choose either the moring or afternoons session, provided they attend both days. Day One is Thursday, Oct. 27 from 8 a.m. to noon or from 15 p.m. Day Two is Monday, Oct. 31 from 8 a.m. to noon or from 15 p.m. Training will take place at the Franklin County Sheriffs Department, located at 270 State Road 65. At the end of the training hats, shirts and ID cards will be given out. Everyone is strongly encouraged to sign up for an optional Sheriff Ride-Along, which, after classroom training, can be scheduled through the Sheriffs Ofce. Sheriffs Patrol coverage will kick-off in November. Patrols will start with four days a week during the off-season, moving to seven days a week at peak times. For more information, call Mitchem at 899-8300 or email her at sandy. mitchem@gmail.com.By Lois SwobodaTimes Staff writer A call for proposals for burial of unclaimed human remains has produced no reduction in current costs to the county. At a Sept. 20 public hearing on the countys policy on unclaimed human remains, county commissioners opened a single proposal package on transportation and burial cost of remains. The proposal, from Kelly Funeral Home in Apalachicola, offered an interment rate of $850, the same as the rate under existing county policy. This is not surprising since in 2008, when the current policy was approved, Kelly staffers collaborated on its crafting. Kelly proposed a $700 round-trip fee for transporting bodies to and from the State Medical Examiners ofce in Tallahassee. Body bags would run $125, an increase of $20. Commissioners requested the bids after Steven George Brown died at St. James Bay Health and Rehabilitation Center earlier this year and Kelly declined to take custody of the body. Bevis Funeral Home of Wakulla County took possession of the remains. County Attorney Michael Shuler said the county is having problems getting free burial plots from the cities, which control the countys public cemeteries. If we are required to start purchasing the burial site, and opening and closing the plot, it could double the cost. Shuler said he is negotiating with the cities and wants to rotate unclaimed burials so no cemetery is unduly burdened. Clerk of Court Marcia Johnson said unclaimed bodies are rare and that the county had to handle only four since 2008. Shuler told commissioners it was possible unclaimed remains might become more common since St. James Bay, which is larger than the existing Harbor Breeze retirement center, opened in Carrabelle. He said if costs could not be kept low, commissioners might have to consider a policy of cremation. I am hesitant to do that in case somebody comes forward to claim the body in the future, he said. Under Florida law, unclaimed bodies are delivered to the anatomical board at the University of Florida Health and Science Center for post-mortem examination. After that, the remains are returned to the county where the death occurred for burial at county expense. The law stipulates that burials are arranged by the funeral home, no services take place, visitation or viewing at the funeral home is not available, and friends or relatives are not allowed to be present at the time of the burial. Commissioners instructed Shuler, County Planner Alan Pierce and Clerk of Courts Marcia Johnson to consider the proposal by Kelly and return with suggestions at their Oct. 4 meeting.No cost savings for county burialsSt. George Island sheriffs patrol planned

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LocalThe Times | A13Thursday, September 29, 2011 Trades & Services CALL TODAY!653-8868 GET YOUR AD INTrades & Services CALL TODAY!653-8868 GET YOUR AD INTrades & Services Laban Bontrager, DMD Monica Bontrager, DMD 12761 Pea Ridge Road Bristol, Florida 32321TELEPHONE (850) 643-5417 Bristol Dental ClinicDENTURE LAB ON PREMISESSame Day Service on repairs and Relines Don Lively General Contractors C Visa, Discover, and American Express Honored at Participating Ace Stores JACKSONS Building Supplies & Auto Repair Carrabelle 697-3333 We Deliver Anywhere J Hardware and Paint Center PILE DRIVING FOUNDATION/PILING REPAIR DOCK/MARINE WORK MOORING BOUYSOFFICE: 850.227.1709FAX: 850.762.2552 CELL: 850.527.5725 HOWARD227F AIRPOINT.NET ROBERTS APPLIANCE REPAIR ALL MAJOR BRANDS 18 Shadow Lane Apalachicola, FL 32320 Phone: (850) 653-8122 Cell: (850) 653-7654 JOES LAWN CARE NO JOB TOO BIG!! SINCE 2002, DOINGBUSINESSINTHISCOMMUNITY LAWN CARE, TREE & PALM TREE TRIMMING AND REMOVAL, DEBRIS AND JUNK REMOVAL, or whatever your yard needs are CALL JOE @ 850-670-5478 E-MAIL @ joes_lawn@yahoo.com County OKs street closure for Oyster FestAt the Sept. 20 meeting, county commissioners voted unanimously to close Chili Boulevard on St. George Island for the Franklin County Oyster Festival on St. George Island, Oct. 7-9. Director of Administrative Services Alan Pierce said the parking lot adjacent to Lighthouse Park at the Island Center will also be closed so it can be used as a dance oor. He said the county will remove recently installed traf c bumpers from the lot. Festival organizer Elaine Rosenthal said the bumpers would only be removed from the center of the lot. I dont want anybody to trip while they are dancing, she said. Were going to have a big stage and lots of bands all day long. Anna Carmichael, organizer of I Love Eastpoint Day said celebration has been rescheduled for the same weekend as the Oyster Festival. She said the weighin for the Oyster Festival Fishing Tournament will take place at the Eastpoint Pavilion, also the site of childrens activities and music. I Love Eastpoint Day was originally planned for Sept. 3 but was cancelled after a severe squall blew through Eastpoint.FEMA funds ght ooding in Franklin CountyAt the county meeting on Sept. 20, Emergency Management Director Pam Brownell said that her of ce is using FEMA funds for two ood mitigation projects. She said emergency management obtained approximately $40,000 to install culverts at McIntyre Road, Crooked River Road, Jeff Sanders Road, New River Road, and Mill Road. The county will provide an in-kind match of $13,000 by installing the culverts. Brownell said emergency management is also preparing to install citizen ood gauges at Bloody Bluff, Abercrombie Ramp, and Rio Vista boat ramp, on Crooked River in the Hickory Hammock area. Emergency Management Coordinator Mike Rundel said the poles will not be placed in the navigable waterway. The gauges, which cost approximately $400 each, will consist of an aluminum scale af xed to a light pole. Brownell said that she is waiting on light poles to be delivered by Progress Energy. She said the new gauges will allow her staff and any citizen to see how fast the water is rising and will help determine when evacuations are needed.County workers get Pictometry trainingOn Aug. 11, representatives of the Franklin County Sheriffs Of ce, Franklin County Emergency Management and the Property Appraisers Of ce received training in Pictometry at the Emergency Operations Center. Pictometry is a computer-based visual intelligence program designed and marketed by Pictometry International Corporation that can be used in damage assessment. Images of landscapes and buildings are captured by lowying airplanes and referenced using the Global Positioning System. Because the areas are photographed in high de nition from up to 12 angles, structures and geographic features can be magni ed and examined from all sides. After a disaster, the planes return and do another y over, allowing public safety of cials to initially assess the damage without visiting the scene, which might be dangerous or inaccessible. Measurements can be made directly on Pictometry imagery including area, distance, height, elevation, pitch, and bearing. Similar images were seen on the Internet and on television, following the March 11 earthquake and tsunami in Japan, showing landscapes before and after the disaster. Emergency Management Coordinator Mike Rundel said there was no cost for the Pictometry software or the original y over of the county, which has already been completed. Director Pam Brownell said there would be a charge for the y over following a disaster, the cost dependent on the area to be photographed. According to the Pictometry website, most of the inhabited world has been photographed by Pictometry.Veterans of cer seeks new assistantOn Sept. 20, Director of Administrative Services, Alan Pierce told commissioners that Charlie Galloway had submitted a letter of resignation as the Assistant Veteran Service Of cer, effective Sept. 30. Pierce said Galloway is willing to work beyond that date to ensure a smooth transition. The board voted unanimously to allow Veterans Service Of cer William Scott to ll the position, which is budgeted as part-time with no bene ts.County gets landscape fundingDirector of Administrative Services, Alan Pierce told county commissioners he has received an unexpected windfall. At the Sept. 20 meeting, he said on behalf of Commissioner Pinki Jackel, he made a phone call requesting Florida Department of Transportation funding to landscape the junction of Franklin Blvd. and Gulf Beach Drive on St. George Island. This month, he was surprised to learn the county had been awarded $10,000 for the project, although no paperwork had been submitted. The board voted unanimously to accept the grant already awarded, and they instructed Pierce to pursue more money. He said he has learned there might be funds available in 2013 for more beauti cation, since the county is on the list for an additional $10,000. He said money from the landscaping grant must be used right of way. Commissioner Smokey Parrish said he believed the approach to the bridges might be eligible for landscape funding.Reduction in ood insurance premium earnedCounty Planner Alan Pierce told commissioners on Sept. 20 that the county has passed its two-year Flood Mitigation Review. He said every ood insurance policy holder is entitled to at least a 10 percent reduction of their premium. He said Rachel Ward, of the Planning and Building of ce, is attempting to increase the countys score so that there could be a 15 percent reduction. Commissioner Smokey Parrish asked Pierce to thank Ward for her diligent efforts.Septic tank variance deniedIn spite of a recommendation by County Attorney Michael Shuler and County Planner Alan Pierce, the commission refused to allow a variance to the 2005 septic tank ordinance. On Sept. 20, Shuler told commissioners a county inspector had determined the drain eld for a septic tank on Alligator Point had failed. It is outside the critical habitat zone and may be replaced under your ordinance without requiring the landowner to purchase an aerobic system, said Shuler, noting that while the existing tank, installed in the 1950s, was still operational, it was too small under the countys current ordinance. In my opinion, since your ordinance will allow the failed drain eld to be replaced, and as the present tank is operational, that the landowner can replace the septic tank with another (larger) septic tank. Mr. Pierce agrees with this interpretation, said the attorney. Commissioners said they were hesitant to allow a variance to the existing code, and voted unanimously to require the owner to install an aerobic system.A panel discussion on Econ na CreekA panel discussion on Econ na Creek Preserving Water Resource History: Civil War ruins of Adams Mill will be held from 1011:30 a.m. on Friday, Sept.30 at Pitt Spring and U.S. Highway 20, seven miles west of State Road 231) The discussion will feature Archaeologist Greg Mikell, Florida State University history professor Andrew Frank, settler descendants Brian Chambless and Faye Gainer Matthews and Northwest Florida Water Management District Lands Director Bill Cleckley. There will be refreshments, unveiling of historic exhibits, tour of Pitt and Sylvan springs renovations, and an optional driving tour presented by the district. Funding was provided through a grant from the Florida Humanities Council (FHC) with funds from the National Endowment for the Humanities. For more info, call Faith Eidse, 539-5999 ext. 275. News BRIEFS

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A14| The Times Thursday, September 29, 2011 CLASSIFIEDS 35648T STATE OF FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION NOTICE OF INTENT TO ISSUE PERMIT The Department of Environmental Protection gives notice of its intent to issue an environmental resources permit, File No.: 19-0304982 -001-EI, to Florida Power Corporation d/b/a Progress Energy Florida, Inc. at Post Office Box 14042; PEF 903 St. Petersburg, Florida 33733. The purpose of the permit is to authorize the rebuild and partially relocate an existing dilapidated 7.5 miles long power transmission line by installing 60 new steel and concrete poles, new conductor wire, the removal of the existing pole and wire, installing and removing temporary air bridge matting, installing and removing a temporary trestle to access the work barges, and installing two guardrail/dolphin pile structures. This project is located in the surface waters and wetlands of the St. George Sound, Class II, Approved for Shellfish Harvesting, Outstanding Florida Waters between the tap in at Power Drive and Norvell Street in Eastpoint and the existing St. George Island Substation at 3rd Street and East Pine Avenue on St. George Island, Sections 6, 29, and 31, Township 9 South, Range 6 West, Franklin County. Based on all the above, and with the application of general and limiting specific conditions of the permit, the Department has reasonable assurance the project, as proposed, fully meets the environmental resources permitting requirements of Chapter 62-346, Florida Administrative Code, and will not harm the environment. A person whose substantial interests are affected by the Departments action may petition for an administrative proceeding (hearing) under Sections 120.569 and 120.57 of the Florida Statute. The petition must contain the information set forth below and must be filed (received by the clerk) in the Office of General Counsel of the Department at 3900 Commonwealth Boulevard, Mail Station 35, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-3000. Because the administrative hearing process is designed to re-determine final agency action on the application, the filing of a petition for an administrative hearing may result in a modification of the permit, or even a denial of the application. Accordingly, the applicant will not commence construction or other activities under this permit until the deadlines below for filing a petition for an administrative hearing, or request for an extension of time, have expired. Under subsection 62-110.106(4) of the Florida Administrative Code, a person whose substantial interests are affected by the Departments action may also request an extension of time to file a petition for an administrative hearing. The Department may, for good cause shown, grant the request for an extension of time. Requests for extension of time must be filed with the Office of General Counsel of the Department at 3900 Commonwealth Boulevard, Mail Station 35, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-3000, before the applicable deadline. A timely request for extension of time shall toll the running time period for filing a petition until the request is acted upon. If a request is filed late, the Department may still grant it upon a motion by the requesting party showing that the failure to file a request for an extension of time before the deadline was the result of excusable neglect. In the event that a timely and sufficient petition for an administrative hearing is filed, other persons whose substantial interests will be affected by the outcome of the administrative process have the right to petition to intervene in the proceeding. Intervention will be only at the discretion of the presiding officer upon the filing of a motion in compliance with Rule 28-106.205 of the Florida Administrative Code. In accordance with subsection 28-106.111(2) and subparagraph 62-110.106(3)(a).4, Florida Administrative Code, petitions for an administrative hearing by the applicant must be filed within 21 days of receipt of written notice. Petitions filed by any persons other than the applicant, and other than those entitled to written notice under Section 120.60(3) of the Florida Statutes, must be filed within 21 days of publication of the notice. Under Section 120.60(3) of the Florida Statute, however, any person who has asked the Department for notice of agency action may file a petition within 21 days of such notice, regardless of the date of publication. The petitioner shall mail a copy of the petition to the applicant at the address indicated above at the time of filing. The failure of any person to file a petition for an administrative hearing within the appropriate time period shall constitute a waiver of those rights. A petition that disputes the material facts on which the Departments action is based must contain the following information: (a) The name and address of each agency affected and each agencys file or identification number, if known; (b) The name, address, and telephone number of the petitioner; the name, address, and telephone number of the petitioners representative, if any, which shall be the address for service purposes during the course of the proceeding; and an explanation of how the petitioners substantial interests are or will be affected by the agency determination; (c) A statement of when and how the petitioner received notice of the agency decision; (d) A statement of all disputed issues of material fact. If there are none, the petition must so indicate; (e) A concise statement of the ultimate facts alleged, including the specific facts that the petitioner contends warrant reversal or modification of the agencys proposed action; (f) A statement of the specific rules or statutes that the petitioner contends require reversal or modification of the agencys proposed action; and (g) A statement of the relief sought by the petitioner, stating precisely the action that the petitioner wishes the agency to take with respect to the agencys proposed action. A petition that does not dispute the material facts on which the Departments action is based shall state that no such facts are in dispute and otherwise shall contain the same information as set forth above, as required by Rule 28-106.301, Florida Administrative Code. Under Sections 120.569(2)(c) and (d) of the Florida Statute, a petition for administrative hearing must be dismissed by the agency if the petition does not substantially comply with the above requirements or is untimely filed. This action is final and effective on the date filed with the Clerk of the Department unless a petition is filed in accordance with the above. Upon the timely filing of petition this order will not be effective until further order of the Department. This permit, when issued, constitutes an order of the Department. The applicant has the right to seek judicial review of the order under Section 120.68 of the Florida Statute, by the filing of a notice of appeal under Rule 9.110 of the Florida Rules of 35537T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 2009CA000101CA U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE ON BEHALF OF GSR MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2005-AR4 Plaintiff. vs. STEPHEN S. FOSTER a/k/a STEPHEN F. FOSTER a/k/a STEPHEN FOSTER; MARILYN TOLENTINO a/k/a MARILYN M. TOLENTINO a/k/a MARILYN N. TOLENTINO a/k/a MARILYN J. TOLENTNO, et. al.; Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated August 23, 2011, and entered in Case No. 09-CA-101, of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for FRANKLIN County, Florida. U.S. BANK, N.A. is Plaintiff and STEPHEN S. FOSTER a/k/a STEPHEN F. FOSTER a/k/a STEPHEN FOSTER; MARILYN TOLENTINO a/k/a MARILYN M. TOLENTINO a/k/a MARILYN N. TOLENTINO a/k/a MARILYN J. TOLENTNO, HIS WIFE; ROBERT TOLENTINO and; ____ TOLENTINO, unknown spouse of ROBERT TOLENTINO, if married; JANE DOE; JOHN DOE; are defendants. I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at ON THE FRONT STEPS OF THE COURTHOUSE., AT 33 MARKET STREET, APALACHICOLA IN FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, at 11:00 am., on the 12th day of October, 2011, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 8 OF SEA PALM VILLAGE, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE (S) 30, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. A person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim with 60 days after the sale. Dated this 12th day of September, 2011. Marcia M. Johnson As Clerk of the Court By: Michele Maxwell As Deputy Clerk This notice is provided pursuant to Administrative Order No.2.065. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to provisions of certain assistance. Please contact the Court Administrator at 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, FL 32320, Phone No. (904)653-8861, Extension 106 within 2 working days of your receipt of this notice or pleading; if you are hearing impaired, call 1-800-955-8771 (TDD); if you are voice impaired, call 1-800-995-8770 (V) (Via Florida Relay Services). Kahane & Associates, P.A. 8201 Peters Road, Ste. 3000 Plantation, FL 33324 Telephone: (954) 382-3486 Telefacsimile: (954) 382-5380 10-10626 BOA September 22, 29, 2011 35512T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CADENCE BANK, N.A. Plaintiff, VS. STEVEN R. MACCHIARELLA a/k/a STEVE R. MACCHIARELLA; ST. GEORGE PLANTATION OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., a Florida corporation Defendants. CASE NO.: 2010 000046 CA NOTICE OF SALE COUNTS III & IV 1600 GUAVA TRAIL & 1408 BAYBERRY LANE NOTICE is hereby given pursuant to the Final Judgment entered in the above noted case that I will sell the following property in Franklin County, Florida, described as: Lot 30, PEBBLE BEACH VILLAGE, a subdivision as per map or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 4, Page 34 and 35, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida, and Lot 3, SEA PALM VILLAGE, according to the plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 4, Pages 30 and 31, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. At public sale, to the highest and best bidder for cash at 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida 32320, at 11:00 a.m. on the 5th day of October, 2011. The highest bidder shall immediately post with the Clerk, a deposit equal to 5% of the final bid. The deposit must be cash or cashiers check payable to the Clerk of the Circuit Court. Final payment must be made on or before 11:00 a.m., the next business day after of the date of sale by cash or cashiers check. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the Clerk Administration Office at Clerk of Court. If hearing impaired call (TDD) (800) 955-8771 or 800 955 877 (V) via Florida Relay Service. IF YOU ARE A PERSON CLAIMING A RIGHT TO FUNDS REMAINING AFTER THE SALE, YOU MUST FILE A CLAIM WITH THE CLERK NO LATER THAN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU FAIL TO FILE A CLAIM, YOU WILL NOT BE ENTITLED TO ANY REMAINING FUNDS. AFTER 60 DAYS, ONLY THE OWNER OF RECORD AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MAY CLAIM THE SURPLUS. Dated: 8th day of September, 2011. Clerk of Courts By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk September 22, 29, 2011 35511T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CADENCE BANK, N.A. Plaintiff, VS. STEVEN R. MACCHIARELLA a/k/a STEVE R. MACCHIARELLA; ST. GEORGE PLANTATION OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., a Florida corporation Defendants. CASE NO.: 2010 000046 CA NOTICE OF SALE COUNTS I & II 32 EAST GORRIE DRIVE NOTICE is hereby given pursuant to the Final Judgment entered in the above noted case that I will sell the following property in Franklin County, Florida, described as: Lot 46, in Block 10 East, of ST. GEORGE ISLAND GULF BEACHES UNIT NO. 1, according to the Plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 2, Page 7, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. At public sale, to the highest and best bidder for cash at 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida 32320, at 11:00 a.m. on the 5th day of October, 2011. The highest bidder shall immediately post with the Clerk, a deposit equal to 5% of the final bid. The deposit must be cash or cashiers check payable to the Clerk of the Circuit Court. Final payment must be made on or before 11:00 a.m., the next business day after of the date of sale by cash or cashiers check. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the Clerk Administration Office at Clerk of Court. If hearing impaired call (TDD) (800) 955-8771 or 800 955 877 (V) via Florida Relay Service. IF YOU ARE A PERSON CLAIMING A RIGHT TO FUNDS REMAINING AFTER THE SALE, YOU MUST FILE A CLAIM WITH THE CLERK NO LATER THAN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU FAIL TO FILE A CLAIM, YOU WILL NOT BE ENTITLED TO ANY REMAINING FUNDS. AFTER 60 DAYS, ONLY THE OWNER OF RECORD AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MAY CLAIM THE SURPLUS. Dated: 25th day of August, 2011. Clerk of Courts By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk September 22, 29, 2011 35491T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA IN RE: ESTATE OF EDWARD STEPHAN DACHTERA, Deceased CASE NUMBER: 11000043 CP NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION The administration of the estate of EDWARD STEPHAN DACHTERA, deceased, Case Number 11000043 CP is pending in the Circuit Court for Franklin County, Florida, the address of which is 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320. The name and address of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All persons having claims against this estate who are served with a copy of this notice are required to file with this court such claim within the later of three months after the date of the first publication of this notice or 30 days after the date of service of a copy of this notice on that person. Persons having claims against the estate who are not known to the personal representative and whose names or addresses are not reasonably ascertainable must file all claims against the estate within three months after the date of the first publication of this notice. ALL CLAIMS AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is September 22, 2011. Personal Representative: TAMMIE KELLEY 151 17th Street P.O. Box 401 Apalachicola, FL 32329 RACHEL CHESNUT Attorney for Personal Representative P.O. Box 501 Apalachicola, FL 32329 (850) 653-4611 Florida Bar No. 0048331 September 22, 29, 2011

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, September 29, 2011 The Times | A15 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322850-697-9604 850-323-0444 www.seacrestre.comRENTALS2 BR 1 BA MOBILE HOME Fenced Yard ....................................................$500 3 BR 1 BA UNFURNISHED APARTMENT Clean, W/D, Includes, Water, End Unit ............$565 2 BR 2 BA MOBILE HOME 2 Lots ..............................................................$500 3 BR 3 BA FURNISHED CONDO Long Term, Pool..............................................$850 2 BA 1 BA FURNISHED APARTMENT Den & Living Area ..........................................$550 3 BR 2 BA FURNISHED CONDO Boat & Car Parking ..............................$850 WKLY 3 BR 3 BA FURNISHED CONDO Pool, Downtown ....................................$700 WKLY 2 BR 1 BA APARTMENT Water View, Water Included, End Unit ............$500 3 BR 1 BA FURNISHED APARTMENT Pet Friendly, Wkly & Monthly Rates See emeraldcoastjobs.com/monster to nd a job at the intersection of both.Wouldnt you like a job that ful lls you both professionally and personally? With Monsters new ltering tools, you can quickly hone in on the job thats right for you. So visit emeraldcoastjobs.com/monster, and you might nd yourself in the middle of the best of both worlds. Apartment avail. Lanark Village, Can be a 1 or 2 br, with sunroom $450 month + $250 deposit (850) 509-2460 Publishers NoticeAll real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on a equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. Studio Apt. Furnished Upstairs studioQuiet location, water & electric incl. Walk to downtown. $700 mo + dep. No pets. For appt 653-9116 or 320-1174 St. George Island $160 wk, Electric, Satellite, Garbage incl. pool tble. 12X65 deck w/Beautiful view 850-653-5114 Apalachicola Condo. 2 br, 2 bath, with newer paint, tile, carpet $825 month. *Ref Checked* Quint 865-693-3232 1 or 3 BRCH/A in Apalachicola, FL. 850-643-7740. 2 br, 1 bath house on St George Island. $650 month. 229-824-7493 or 229-942-0329 Text FL77072 to 56654 Lanark Village 3 br, 2 ba, house, screened porch, view of gulf, $650 month lease. Call 850-545-8813 One Acre for Sale only a few blocks from the Bay on one side and a few blocks from river on the other side. 553 Ridge Rd, $28,000. Call 850-899-1148 14 ft Fiberglass fishing boat w/trailer and small motor. Electric trolling motor, 2 gas cans, 14 ft aluminum Johnboat is also included in deal. $500 for everything. Licensed & Titled. Call 850-653-4788 Text FL79212 to 56654 90 HPOutboard Motor runs good. $1500. Call 850-763-1924 Install/Maint/RepairCleanerCheerful, detailed person for various household duties. Indian Pass area. 4 hours daily. Excellent references required. (850) 227-7234 HospitalityRESORT VACATION PROPERTIESHiring part-time inspectors to inspect properties after they are cleaned. Weekend work required. Apply in person weekdays between 9am-5pm at 125 W Gulf Beach Dr, St. George Island Install/Maint/Repair Part Time position available forGeneral Maint/Techposition for 32 Unit apt complex in Carabelle. Must have own tools and pass background & drug test. General knowledge of HVAC, plumbing, and electrical req. Painting a plus. Apply at 807 Grey Ave. #33, Mon, Tue, Thur, Fri. 8-5pm. Or call 697-2017 EOE/DFWP 95% Success Chance. No Direct Sales. Test This Easy Home Business. $69.95 Risk-Free, Limited-Time Offer. 1-888-835-6822; 1-800-447-0503 Full Service, Turn Key restaurant for lease at Commerce Street and Avenue E in downtown Apalachicola. For more info call 850-653-8801 Text FL79133 to 56654 1 br, 1 ba, with full kitchen and living room Call for information 850-653-6103 Heritage Villas and Southern Villas of Apalachicola ApartmentsAccepting applications for 1, 2, & 3 br HC & non-HC accessible units. Some rental assistance may be available. HUD vouchers accepted. Call 850-653-9277. TDD/TTY 711. This institution is an equal opportunity provider, and employer. Administrative/ClericalNOTICEThe Franklin County Board of County Commissioners, Franklin County, Florida will consider applications for the following position: *Temporary-Part Time Veterans Affairs Assistant* Veterans Affairs Office Requirements Include: Two year College Degree, and serve as a member of the Armed Forces of the United States during a period of war, Valid Drivers license, Administrative and Clerical skills, excellent communications skills, computer knowledge with experience in Excel. Applicants must be able to properly handle confidential records, be able to multi-task, and must be able to work in a stressful environment. Veterans with knowledge about VA benefits and procedures preferred. Applications may be obtained from and submitted to the Board Secretary, Michael Moron in the Clerks Office, Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, Florida 32320. (850) 653-8861, Ext. 100. Applications must be submitted by Thursday, October 13, 2011 by 4:00 p.m. Biotech/Science Franklin County Health Department is accepting applications for the following Career Service position in our Apalachicola location:EnvironmentalSpecialist IReference Requisition # 64002982-5134905020110923104505 Salary: $30,988.62 $35,788.32 Applications will be accepted through 10/2/2011 Applicant must have graduated from an accredited 4-year college or university with 30 semester or 40 quarter hours in public health, environmental health, environmental science, or a physical or biological science. Apply online at https://jobs.myflorida.com or contact People First at 1-877-562-7287. ONLY online applications submitted through the People First website will be accepted for this position. Background check including fingerprinting required. The successful candidate will be required to complete the Form I-9 and that information will be verified using the E-Verify system. E-Verify is operated by the Department of Homeland Security in partnership with the Social Security Administration to verify employment eligibility. Applicant must have a valid Florida drivers license and access to transportation. Minorities strongly encouraged to apply. EEO/AA/VP Employer Apalachicola Hwy 98 across from Burger King Friday & Saturday 8:am-until Nice Things, To much too list! Come see. Come visit the Old Stuff Shoppe. We have a little of all. From old bottles to cast iron, fishing to glass cookware. Old tables, old pictures. We believe Older IS Better. 252 Water Street or call 850-653-5425 Accounting/Finance Franklin County Health Department is accepting applications for the following Career Service position:Accountant IIIReference Requisition #64080005-51262181-2 0110919160029 Salary: $29,344.38 Applications will be accepted through 10/21/11 Minimum qualifications: a bachelors degree from an accredited college or university with a major in accounting and two years of professional accounting experience; or two years of professional accounting experience with the State of Florida. A masters degree from an accredited college or university in accounting or possession of a Certified Public Accountant (CPA) certificate and one year of professional accounting experience. Professional or nonprofessional accounting experience or any combination of this experience and up to 60 semester or 90 quarter hours of college education provided such education includes two courses in accounting can substitute on a year-for-year basis for the required bachelors degree. Experience with Medicaid/Medicare and 3rd party insurance billing is preferred. Apply online at https://jobs.myflorida.com or contact People First at 1-877-562-7287. ONLY online applications submitted through the People First website will be accepted for this position. Background check including fingerprinting required. The successful candidate will be required to complete the Form I-9 and that information will be verified using the E-Verify system. E-Verify is operated by the Department of Homeland Security in partnership with the Social Security Administration to verify employment eligibility. Minorities strongly encouraged to apply. EO/AA/VP Employer. Incorrect Insertion PolicyFor Classified In-column AdvertisersAll ads placed by phone are read back to the advertiser to insure correctness. The newspaper will assume correctness at the time of the read-back procedure unless otherwise informed. Please your ad. Advertisers are requested to check the advertisement on the first insertion for correctness. Errors should be reported immediately. Your Florida Freedom newspaper will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion, nor will it be liable for any error in advertisements to a greater extent than the cost of the space occupied by the error. Any copy change, during an ordered schedule constitutes a new ad and new charges. We do not guarantee position of ANY ad under any classification. Cage Bird MenagerieParakeets, Canaries, Finches, Cages. Breeder supplies, toys, & gift boutique. 850-708-1536 Apalachicola 80 Waddell Rd, 3+ miles from Red Light on 12th Street, look for signs, Friday and Saturday 8:00 a.m.-?; household items, clothes (from infants to plus sizes), shoes, some furniture, appliances, TVs, exercise equipment, some tools and fishing tackle, and much more. 35607T PUBLIC NOTICE FRANKLIN COUNTY LANDFILL WINTER HOURS OF OPERATION THE FRANKLIN COUNTY LANDFILL WINTER HOURS OF OPERATION WILL BE FROM OCTOBER 1, 2011-MARCH 21, 2011, WILL BE 9:00 A.M. 4:30 P.M. IF YOU HAVE ANY QUESTIONS PLEASE CONTACT THE LANDFILL AT 850-670-8167. September 29, 2011 35693T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR MARM 2007-3, Plaintiff, vs. CHRISTOPHER W. BATES; THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF CHRISTOPHER W. BATES; KRISTEN SHOESMITH; THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF KRISTEN SHOESMITH; IF LIVING, INCLUDING ANY UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SAID DEFENDANT(S), IF REMARRIED, AND IF DECEASED, THE RESPECTIVE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS, AND TRUSTEES, AND ALL OTHER PERSONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THE NAMED DEFENDANT (S); UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2; Defendant(s) CASE NO. 19-2009-CA-000219 NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above styled cause, in the Circuit Court of Franklin County, Florida, I will sell the property situate in Franklin County, Florida, described as: LOT 4, BLOCK C, PENINSULAR POINT, UNIT NO. 1, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 20, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 1267 ALLIGATOR DRIVE ALLIGATOR POINT, FL 32346 at public sale, at Front steps of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street Apalachicola, FL 32320 at 11:00 AM, on the 2nd day of November, 2011. Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk In accordance with the American with Disabilities Act of 1990, persons needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the ASA Coordinator no later than seven (7) days prior to the proceedings. If hearing impaired, please call (800) 955-9771 (TDD) or (800)955-8770 (voice), via Florida Relay Service. Law Offices of Daniel C. Consuegra 9204 King Palm Drive Tampa, FL 33619-1328 September 29, October 6, 2011 35675T STATE OF FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION NOTICE OF PROPOSED AGENCY ACTION The Department of Environmental Protection gives notice of its intent to issue a Formal Determination of the Landward Extent of Waters of the State (File No. FD-19-0219279-001) to The City of Carrabelle, c/o Ted Murray, URS Corporation Southern, for an 88-acre tract located in Section 24, 25, and 26 Township 7S, Range 5N, Franklin County, located at the end of Airport Road in Carrabelle. The Departments file on this matter is available for public inspection during normal business hours, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, except legal holidays, at the Department of Environmental Protection, Wetlands Evaluation and Delineation Section, Mail Station 2500, Room 530, Bob Martinez Center, 2600 Blair Stone Road, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-2400. Persons whose substantial interests are affected by the above proposed agency action have a right pursuant to Section 120.57, Florida Statutes, to petition for an administrative determination (hearing) on the proposed action. The petition must contain the information set forth below and must be filed (received) in the Departments Office of General Counsel, 3900 Commonwealth Boulevard, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-2400, within 21 days of publication of this notice. A copy of the petition must also be mailed at the time of filing to the formal determination petitioner at the address indicated. Failure to file a petition within the 21 days constitutes a waiver of any right such person has to an administrative determination (hearing) pursuant to Section 120.57, F.S. The petition shall contain the following information: (a) The name and address, and telephone number of each petitioner, the petitioners name and address, the Departments File Number and the county in which the project is proposed; (b) A statement of how and when each petitioner received notice of the Departments action or proposed action; (c) A statement of how each petitioners substantial interests are affected by the Departments action or proposed action; (d) A statement of material facts disputed by petitioner, if any; (e) A statement of facts which petitioner contends warrant reversal or modification of the Departments action or proposed action; (f) A statement of which rules or statutes petitioner contends require reversal or modification of the Departments action or proposed action; and (g) A statement of the relief sought by petitioner, stating precisely the action petitioner wants the Department to take with respect to the Departments action or proposed action. If a petition is filed, the administrative hearing process is designed to formulate agency action. Accordingly, the Departments final action may be different from the position taken by it in this Notice. Persons whose substantial interests will be affected by any decision of the Department with regard to the formal determination have the right to petition to become a party to the proceeding. The petition must conform to the requirements specified above and be filed (received) within 21 days of publication of this Notice in the Office of General Counsel at the above address of the Department. Failure to petition within the allowed time frame constitutes a waiver of any right such person has to request a hearing under Section 120.57, F.S., and to participate as a party to this proceeding. Any subsequent intervention will only be at the approval of the presiding officer upon motion filed pursuant to Rule 28-5.207, F.A.C. September 29, 2011 35602T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CITIMORTGAGE, INC. Plaintiff, v. DEBORAH RUSSELL A/K/A DEBORAH Y. RUSSELL; DOUG RUSSELL A/K/A DOUGLAS W. RUSSELL; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT (S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS. Defendant(s). CASE NO.: 19-2009-CA-000714 SEC: NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order to Reschedule Foreclosure Sale dated August 31, 2011, entered in Civil Case No. 19-2009-CA-000714 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest bidder for cash on the 12th day of October, 2011, at 11:00 a.m. on the Front steps of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida 32320, relative to the following described property as set forth in the Final Judgment, to wit: LOTS 1 AND 2 AND THE SOUTHWESTERLY OF LOT 3 IN BLOCK 15, IN LANARK VILLAGE, UNIT NO. 3, A SUBDIVISION IN FRACTIONAL SECTION 12, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 4 WEST, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, AT PAGE 19 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance, Please contact: Court Administrator Phone: (850) 577-4401. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call Florida Relay Service, hearing 800-955-8771, voice 800-955-8770. DATED AT APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA, THIS 12th DAY OF September, 2011. MARCIA JOHNSON CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk September 29, October 6, 2011 35663T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2nd JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY The Bank of New York, as Trustee for TBW Mortgage-Backed Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2006-2 Plaintiff, -vs.Anthony L. Gelch; Defendant(s) Case #: 2010-CA-000230 Division #: AMENDED NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated September 15, 2011, entered in Civil Case No. 2010-CA-000230 of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein The Bank of New York, as Trustee for TBW MortgageBacked Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2006-2, Plaintiff and Anthony L. Gelch are defendant(s), I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, AT THE WEST FRONT DOOR OF THE FRANKLIN COUNTY COURTHOUSE, LOCATED ON HWY 98, IN APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA, AT 11:00 A.M., October 19, 2011, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit: BEGIN AT A POINT 646 FEET EAST AND 12.5 FEET SOUTH FROM THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 32, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 6 WEST, RUN THENCE SOUTH 36 DEGREES EAST 200 FEET TO THE 100 FOOT U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 319, THENCE RUN NORTHEASTERLY ALONG RIGHT OF WAY OF SAID HIGHWAY, A DISTANCE OF 50 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 36 DEGREES WEST 200 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 54 DEGREES WEST 50 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. THUS FORMING A TRACT PARTLY IN THE NW 1/4 OF SAID SECTION 32 AND PARTLY IN THE SW 1/4 OF SECTION 29, FRONTING 50 FEET ON THE NORTHERN SIDE OF HIGHWAY AND RUNNING BACK 240 FEET. ALSO KNOWN AS: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 32, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 6 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND RUN EAST 646.00 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 12.50 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261) LYING ON THE NORTHEASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF 2ND STREET SAID POINT ALSO BEING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN SOUTH 36 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 200.42 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #7160), LYING ON THE INTERSECTION OF SAID 2ND STREET WITH THE NORTHWESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 98, THENCE RUN NORTH 54 DEGREES 28 MINUTES 47 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE NORTHWESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 98 A DISTANCE OF 50.00 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #7160), THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY RUN NORTH 35 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 58 SECONDS WEST 200.76 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #7160), THENCE RUN SOUTH 54 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 27 SECONDS WEST 50.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING CONTAINING 0.23 ACRES, MORE OR LESS. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. DATED at Apalachicola, Florida, this 15th day of September, 2011. Michele Maxwell CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT Franklin County, Florida ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF: SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACHE, LLP 4630 Woodland Corporate Blvd. Suite 100 Tampa, FL 33614 (813) 880-8888 10-171359 FC01 September 29, October 6, 2011 Appellate Procedure with the Clerk of the Department in the Office of General Counsel, 3900 Commonwealth Boulevard, Mail Station 35, Tallahassee, Florida, 32399-3000; and by filing a copy of the notice of the appeal accompanied by the applicable filing fees with the appropriate district court of appeal. The notice of appeal must be filed within 30 days from the date when the final order is filed with the Clerk of the Department. The application is available for public inspection during normal business hours, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, except legal holidays, at the Department of Environmental Protection, Northwest District Branch Office, 3800 Commonwealth Boulevard, Suite 115, Tallahassee, Florida. September 29, 2011 The Key to Savings Start here in Classifieds.

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LocalA16 | The Times Thursday, September 29, 2011 Our local real estate experts have identied what they feel are the best values around and are oering them to you in Real Estate Picks! (In this section), Discover the best real estate values in Mexico Beach, Port St. Joe, Apalachicola, Cape San Blas, St. George Island, Carrabelle and surrounding areas. Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Real Estate Picks John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.comMLS#242223$299,000St. George IslandFIRST TIER DUPLEX stairway connects both units, garage/work shop, storage building, outside shower & sink, covered screen porch. East Gorrie Drive John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.comMLS#239231$349,900St. George IslandBAY FRONT BARGAINAttractive home with 2 spacious BRs & 1 BA, cedar paneled ceiling & some walls in kitchen & DR, laundry room, DOCK, one acre in the East End of the island, furnished, Short Sale Y BILL MILLER REALTY850-697-3751 (3310) 570-0658WOW! 1BDR FURNISHED APT $15,000 $29,500 $2,500 DOWN BUYS 2 BED APT. 2 6 GULF VIEW & ACCESS 3 BDR 2 BA 2006 M/H 16 X 80 $89,000 $500DOWN CHOICE OF 3 CITY LOTS $180.00/MONTH OR $17,500/EACH MIH 2 CRNRLOTS BLK. $ STORE REDUCED $49,500 3DOOR NICE 2 B/R MH 2CRNR. LOTS $47,500 Robert C. Bruner Attorney Personal & Business BankruptcyOver 30 Years Legal Experience850-670-3030We are a debt relief agency. We can The hiring of a lawyer is an imBy Lois SwobodaTimes Staff Writer On Friday, Sept. 23, the Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve (ANERR) celebrated Estuaries Day at their new Eastpoint headquarters for the rst time. Organizer Lisa Bailey said about 800 people attended. In addition to the ANERR exhibits, there were those sponsored by the Audubon Society, Florida State Universitys Saturday by the Sea and the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission. There were also about 10 nature-oriented activities for children of all ages, covering everything from snakes and birds to net making and a hands-on reptile experience. Visitors were also treated to tours of the new $9 million research and education center. Bailey said about 60 volunteers and ANERR staff members planned and manned the event. Estuary Day comes to Eastpoint Mother Nature provided a spectacular nale for an afternoon at the bay.Photos by LOIS SWOBODA | The TimesTopOP lLEFtT, Camille Williams and Maxwell Davis, of Apalachicola, volunteered to help with childrens activities. Top OP RiIGHtT, Patrick Millender, of Eastpoint, teaches Donna McKenzie of Panacea the ne art of net casting. Millender, a former employee of the estuary, said, This park was named after my daddy. LEFt T, Amantaye Austin, left, Jhamere Rhodes, center, and Elliot Taylor, all of Apalachicola, learned to look at the world from a bugs point of view.