The Apalachicola times
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100380/00143
 Material Information
Title: The Apalachicola times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: H.W. Johnston
Place of Publication: Apalachicola Fla
Apalachicola Fla
Publication Date: 09-08-2011
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1885.
General Note: Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 32911693
lccn - sn 95026907
System ID: UF00100380:00143
 Related Items
Preceded by: Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by: Apalachicola herald

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xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx 50 WWW.APALACHTIMES.COMP hone: 850-653-8868 W eb: apalachtimes.com E -mail: dadlerstein@star.com Fax: 850-653-8036 C irculation: 800-345-8688 DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK: School News & Society: 11 a.m. Friday Real Estate Ads: 11 a.m. Thursday Legal Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classied Display Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classied Line Ads: 5 p.m. Monday Contact Us Out to see Index Thursday, September 8, 2011 VOL. 126 I SS UE 19 New excavation examines the Pierce moundsBy L ois Swoboda Times Staff Writer A South Florida archeologist is delving into some ancient remains near Apalachic ola. Apalachicola businessman George Mahr invited Dr. Nancy White to investigate re mains of an ancient settlement on his Bluff Road property adjacent to Magnolia Cem -LOIS SWO B O D A | The Times Above, graduate student Chris Hunt uses a spray bottle to moisten the wall of an excavation to reveal hidden treasure. Below these images from Certain Aboriginal Remains of the NW Florida Coast show a clay vessel, at left, excavated from one of the Pierce mounds by Clarence Bloomeld Moore, and, at right, a pottery vessel believed to be an efgy of a grub worm, which was important in the diet of the Swift Creek people. V oters return mayors to ofce By David Adlerstein Times City Editor Voters in Franklin Countys two cities returned their may ors to ofce on Tuesday. Apalachicola Mayor Van Johnson, 51, swept to victory over challenger Tom Daly, 59, by a nearly two-to-one margin, winning with 489 votes (62.4 percent) to 295 (37.6 percent). In Carrabelle, Mayor Wil burn Curley Messers mar gin was far thinner in a threeway race, as he gathered 186 votes (45.2 percent) to top challengers Charles Shawn Oxendine, 52, with 145 votes (35.3 percent) and Christopher Massey Rose, 29, with 80 votes (19.5 percent) Oxendine wasnt ready to concede as of Tuesday night, saying he understood a candi date had to secure at least 50 percent of the vote to avoid a run-off. I dont know the law, but I was told that going in, and I was kind of dreading a runoff deal, he said. City Attorney Dan Hartman was expected to review the ap plicable rules today under the city ordinance and state elec tion law. If the ofcial tallies from Supervisor of Elections Ida Elliotts ofce do not lead to a runoff. Messer, 87, will have se cured his sixth term. I want to thank the people for all the years theyve had to Electrical problems force school closure By David Adlerstein Times City Editor Trouble with a main breaker forced the closure of the Franklin County School campus on Wednesday. Superintendent Nina Marks said she was condent school would resume today as scheduled. She said a eld techni cian from Cutter-Hammer, manufacturer of the breaker system, was dispatched from the Eaton Corporation out of Mobile Ala., and arrived on campus Tuesday evening. He advised ofcials electric ity would be fully restored Wednesday. The recommendation is to add an internal motor to the system so it will auto matically reset and we will not have to manually reset it, Marks said. It will create a awless system. Principal George Oehlert said seven of the new FWC OKs weeklong oyster harvest By David Adlerstein Times City Editor Florida seafood regulators last week initiated a policy that enables oyster harvest ers to work seven days a week, rather than ve, at least through next May, and perhaps eventually yearround. With an Aug. 30 order that took effect Sept. 1, Nick Wiley, executive director of the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, approved the seven-day-aweek harvest through Nov. 16. An existing rule already allows seven-day-a-week har vest from Nov. 16 though May 31, 2012. Christopher Brooks, act ing bureau chief for the states Division of Aqua culture, said ofcials plan ELECTION 2012 VAN JOHNSON CURLEY MESSER etery after consultants from Post, Buckley, Schuh and Jernigan advised him the area had archeological significance. Many Apalachicola residents remember digging for artifacts at the site during the mid-20th century. White, a professor of archeology at the University of South Florida, centers her work on the relationship of humans and their environment, American prehistory and women in archeology and in prehistoric America. She has published widely on both history See MAYORS A11 See SCHOOL A11 See HARVEST A5 See DIGGING A5 Opinion ............ A4 Society ............ A6 Faith .............. A7 Outdoors ........... A8 Sports ............. A9 Classieds ....... A12-13 Tide Chart ......... A14 Turtles in peril, A2 Blues on the Dock concert Saturday Blues on the Dock, a benet concert for the Franklin County Food Pantry, will be at 8 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 10, on the waterfront in Apalachicola. Come hear the soulful sounds of Pepper Drive Blues Band. Hamburgers, hot dogs and cold beverages will be available by donation. Please help the food pantry kick off the Holiday Food Drive by bringing a nonperishable food item. Bring your chairs, or reserve a table by making a donation. Call 653-3930.ANERR to host Green Living Day Saturday The Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve in Eastpoint will host its rst Green Living Day from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 10. The day will feature exhibits on green products from local suppliers, energy conservation, solid waste reduction and recycling, eco-friendly and green home practices, sustainable landscaping and more. Learn about practical ways to green your lifestyle and home. This event is free and open to the public. To sign up, call Matthew Anderson at 6707702. Veterans dinner to be Saturday Franklin County veterans will hold their annual dinner at noon Saturday, Sept. 10, at Battery Park in Apalachicola. All food and drink will be provided, and all veterans are invited. Come as early as you like, and enjoy the brotherhood, fellowship and remembrance. For more info, call John Sack at 670-8375 or Charles Wilson at 653-6482.St. George Full Moon Climb to be Monday The September Full Moon Climb at the Cape St. George Lighthouse on St. George Island will be 7-8:30 p.m. Monday, Sept. 12. Cost is $15 for the general public and $10 for members of the St. George Lighthouse Association. Sun will set at 7:49 p.m., and the moon will rise at 7:45 p.m.Reservations are recommended and can be made by calling the St. George Island Visitor Center at 927-7744 or toll-free at 888-927-7744.

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Local A2 | The Times Thursday, September 8, 2011 By Lois Swoboda Times Staff Writer More than half of the sea turtle hatchlings that have emerged this year have become disoriented due to lights, a signifi cant increase over recent years. Property owners and businesses identified as contributing to the disori entations have received letters from sea turtle preservationists as well as county officials. But so far, no one has been penal ized. Bruce Hall, spokesper son for Sea Turtles at Risk, Inc. (STAR) said the loss to disorientation in recent years hovered around 30 percent but this summer has grown to 50 percent, with hatchlings from 35 of the 70 nests disoriented, a grim fact documented in reports by Bruce Drye, who holds St. George Is lands state-issued turtle permit. Last summer, the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) partnered with the Florida Fish and Wild life Conservation Commis sion (FWC) and NOAAs National Marine Fisheries Service to relocate thou sands of sea turtle eggs to protect them from the effects of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. This year, none of these government agencies is pressing for enforcement of existing laws to protect hatchlings from noncom pliant lighting, which is considered the primary cause of disorientation and death. Franklin County has an ordinance mandat ing properties seaward of the Coastal Construction Control Line must not il luminate the beach dur ing turtle season. These misdemeanor violations carry the same penalty as other forms of animal cruelty, a maximum fine of $500. Under the ordi nance, each night a busi ness or property owner is in violation is considered a separate offense, so that over the course of a hatch ing season, May 1 through Oct. 31, a home or busi ness could accumulate as much as $92,000 in fines. As an endangered spe cies, sea turtles also are protected by the federal Endangered Species Act of 1973 (ESA). Since improper light ing can lead to the death, or taking, of an endan gered species, each vio lation or wrongful death would be punishable by a $50,000 fine, a year in pris on or both. A civil penalty of up to $25,000 could also be assessed. Any federal hunting or fishing permits issued to a person who violates the ESA can be canceled or suspended for up to a year. No criminal charges may be brought under the ESA if an animal or plant is killed accidentally, but given that several island homeowners and busi nesses have been notified repeatedly they are in vio lation of county and feder al law, offenses would be unlikely to be viewed by the courts as accidental. Cats, raccoons and fire ants In a telephone inter view, Dr. Robbin Trindell, a biological administrator who serves as FWCs sea turtle management coor dinator, said her agency favors education rather than enforcement of the Endangered Species Act. She met last month with County Planner Alan Pierce, and several prop erty managers on St. George Island to investi gate why this year there is such a high rate of disori entations. One aspect that we did discuss, is that it has been a number of years since the island has been af fected by a hurricane and in that time the profile of the beach has built up so that the beach is higher, Pierce told county com missioners Tuesday. A turtle hatchling is able to see more lights from more houses. To what degree this is increasing the dis orientation is unknown. Hall said the problem is enforcement. A county code enforcement officer would pay for itself, she said. For 10 years we have offered free fixtures, free lighting evaluation and help with retrofits. I get grant money for this every year. It just hasnt been enough. We kept it down to about 30 percent disorientation till this year. Everythings gone to hell. Disoriented turtles are consumed by feral cats, crabs, raccoons and fire ants. Now that coyotes have arrived on the is land, they too consume the small turtles. Lighted swimming pools present another hazard. Turtles trapped in a pool usually drown be fore they are discovered. While the commercial district is not covered by the county ordinance, Hall said, the glow from the business district is an increasing problem. She said the county is doing nothing to enforce exist ing code requirements for beach properties. At Tuesday mornings county commission meet ing, Pierce said that the county has issued more than 50 letters to hom eowners this year regard ing improper lighting. STAR has also sent letters to owners of prop erties cited in Dryes re ports as having caused one or more turtle disori entations, Hall said, not ing that most home and business owners failed to respond. The letters offer help in bringing lighting into compliance. So far this year, STAR has posted letters to Klaus and Ute Lagenbach, of Cologne, Germany; Frost Investment Holdings Ltd. of Spring, Texas; Pinnacle House LLC of Tallahassee; Progressive Axle and Tire c/o Joseph Slayton Burke in Milledgeville, Ga.; Dar rel A. Rye of Montezuma, Ga.; Alan Pierce and the Franklin County Commis sioners for the glow from the commercial district; 101 Franklin Boulevard LLC; The St. George Is land Trading Post, which the report said displays more than 30 fluores cent lights in its windows nightly; Steven R Macchi arella, of Cordova, Tenn.; G. B. Investment Group, LLC of Tifton, Ga.; Walter W. and James E. Strom of Albany, Ga.; the Stephen H. Noel Trust of Dakota Dunes, South Dakota; G. Leroy and Mary S. Noel, of North Liberty, Iowa, Patrick H. Aucoin Jr. of Spring, Texas; the Buc caneer Inn of St. George Inc.; and Steven C. Rash, owner of the Blue Parrot Ocean Front Caf. Hall said Darrell Rye called to say he would like to fix his lighting prob lem. The Ryes recently purchased the house and told Hall they were not informed of the ongoing problem with the lighting. Hall said Patrick Aucoin also called her to ask for help fixing the problem at his house. There is a problem with disclosure, Hall said. Nobody is telling buyers and homeowners they are not in compliance. Hall said Resort Realty has been cooperative in getting lights extinguished this year. She said some of the rental companies have also referred homeowners to her for help with light ing. Susan Ficklen, of Col lins Vacation Rentals, said her company posts stick ers concerning lighting during turtle season on all seaward windows and provides literature to visi tors and homeowners con cerning the problem. I am sure that all of the rental companies are anxious to cooperate, said Ficklen. Some of our guests dont want to keep the houselights dark at night. We are always try ing to work with our ho meowners to help them comply with the lighting code. Jamie Crum, of Fick ling Vacation Rentals, said his company also displays stickers on appliances and seaward windows that re mind guests to keep light off the beach. Fickling in cludes literature on sea turtles in their welcome bags for visitors. STAR has received a $12,000 grant from USFWS and will purchase turtlecompliant fixtures at Ace Hardware in Apalachicola and Taylors Hardware in Eastpoint. Homeown ers can get these fixtures at no cost by filling out a form at one of the hard ware stores. The fixtures should be available in about two weeks, and will be distributed on a first come, first served basis. We deliver up to 100 miles 3408 E. Hwy. 98 872-0008 (Corner of Bus. 98 & Hwy 22) Visit our website: furnitureoutletpc.com Recliner $ 189 + up No Credit Check 90 Days Same as Cash F urniture O utlet Living Room Set $ 599 + up 3408 E. Bus. 98 872-0008 Free Delivery for Bay County Visit our website: furnitureoutletpc.com Matching all competitors prices. Guaranteed Robert C. Bruner Attorney Personal & Business Bankruptcy Over 30 Years Legal Experience 850-670-3030 We are a debt relief agency. We can The hiring of a lawyer is an im Sign up now for a free account and receive a towards your deal purchase. Expires October 12, 2011 ROSE D R YE | Special to the Times Sea turtle volunteers found this new house still under construction shines its round, unshielded lights about the same size as car headlights towards the Gulf. Disorientations peak for islands sea turtles

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Local The Times | A3 Thursday, September 8, 2011 EASTPOINT! 3 BR/2BA home on private 3 acres! Low maintenance metal roof, vinyl siding and great front porch. Backs up to state land. MLS# 244269.................$149,000 Travis Stanley 850.653.6477 Grayson Shepard 850.653.6718 Kim Davis 850.653.6875 Leon Teat 850.653.5656 Jackie Golden 850.899.8433 Jamie Crum 850.370.0835 Sandy Mitchem 850.899.8300 CREEKFRONT Ft. Gadsden, one acre lot on the edge of Natl Forest. Hunting/ Fishing retreat with direct access to the Apalachicola River in a small boat. MLS# 238435...........$37,500 V ACANT L OT S T G EORGE I SLAN D P LANTATION One acre interior lot across the street from SGI airport next to buffer property for more privacy. State owned land across the street on the bay, right on beach access! MLS# 243448..............$80,000 G REATER A PALAC H ICOLA Enjoy quiet country living on 3.75 acres. Lovely custom built 3BR/2.5 BA home with many upgrades Jacuzzi, deck, large walk in closet. 1600 sq.ft. outbuilding on concrete pad. MLS# 244666.................$275,000 B A Y FRONT E ASTPOINT 1.2 acres on Hwy 98 with $850/ month rental income from mobile home, also machine shop. Great home site and already has dock approval. MLS# 243415...........$149,000 C OMMERCIAL LOT E ASTPOINT Excellent location on the corner of Hwy 98 and Begonia St., just one block west of Island Dr. 1.75 acres zoned C-2, full commercial! MLS# 242256...........$289,000 NEW LISTING! Notice to all Franklin County Veterans We will hold our annual Franklin County Veterans Dinner on Saturday, September 10, at Battery Park in Apalachicola. All Veterans are invited and encouraged to attend. All food and drink will be provided, and will be served at 12 oclock. Any person or merchant wishing to sponsor this event, please contact John Sack 670 8375, or Charles Wilson 653 6482. All sponsors will be recognized at the dinner, and also in the Apalachicola Times in the week following the dinner. Come as early as you like and enjoy the brotherhood, fellowship and rememberance. The following report is provided by the Franklin County Sheriffs Ofce. Arrests are made by ofcers from the following city, county, and state law enforcement agencies: Apalachicola (APD), Carrabelle (CPD), Florida Highway Patrol (FHP), Franklin County Sheriffs Ofce (FCSO), Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC), Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP), Florida Department of Corrections (FDOC), Florida Division of Insurance Fraud (DIF) and Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (FLDACS). All defendants are considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law. Aug. 30 Johnny C. Jones, 37, Apalachicola, grand retail theft and introduction of contraband into correctional facility (APD) Sam F. Revell, 38, Apalachicola, grand theft and dealing in stolen property (FCSO) Anthony C. Franklin, 22, Apalachicola, two counts of possession of a controlled substance with intent to sell or deliver (FCSO) Jeremy J. Turrell, 24, Apalachicola, possession of a controlled substance with intent to sell or deliver, and possession of less than 20 grams of cannabis (FCSO) Amanda C. Topham, 30, Eastpoint, child neglect (FCSO) Aug. 31 James T. Estes, 45, Apalachicola, violation of restrictions to drivers license (FCSO) Sept. 1 James D. Lemmond, 58, Carrabelle, domestic battery (CPD) I Love Eastpoint postponed The inaugural I Love Eastpoint celebration was postponed Saturday after a brief but severe squall passed through Eastpoint at about 3 p.m. Organizers Anna Carmichael and April Dalton said the storm blew over chairs and tables set up in the Eastpoint Pavilion and blasted people who had come for the party with rain and sand. Carmichael said no new date has been set for the celebration, but one will be announced soon. ANERR to host Green Living Day The Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve is hosting its rst Green Living Day from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 10. The day will feature exhibits on green products from local suppliers, energy conservation, solid waste reduction and recycling, eco-friendly and green home practices, sustainable landscaping and more. The free event is open to the public. To sign up, contact Matthew Anderson at Matthew.r.anderson@dep.state..us or 670-7702. Spaghetti throw down Saturday Mrs. D and the TIGERS youth program from the county library will throw down a homemade spaghetti dinner, complete with garlic bread, tossed salad and sweet tea this Saturday, Sept. 10, from 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. at Dolores Sweet Shop, Fourth Street and Avenue D in Apalachicola. For $8, enjoy the culinary excellence of Dolores Roux and the TIGER students she has mentored over the last few years. Dine-in and delivery are available. Call 653-9081 to order. Full Moon Climb to be Monday The September Full Moon Climb at the Cape St. George Lighthouse on St. George Island will be 7-8:30 p.m. Monday, Sept. 12, and will include light hors doeuvres and a sparkling cider toast to the full moon. Cost Arrest REPOR T News BRIEFS See BRIEFS A10

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Opinion A4 | The Times USPS 027-600 Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 VP/Publisher: Karen Hanes Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola Times Thursday, September 8, 2011 By Eileen Annie Ball Special to the Times In 1998, the Franklin County Public Library received a State Library Born to Read grant focusing on reading to children before and after birth. GED, health and parenting training were interagency components. Ellie Tullis, from Healthy Families, and I planned the rst innovative baby shower while participants decorated a beach umbrella adorned in pink and blue that eventually got tossed from the library bathroom. I was working closely with one particular pregnant teen who had an almost 2-year-old and was living with her boyfriend in a tiny, unthinkable teardrop trailer in Eastpoint. I assigned her to the library to cover and label books. When she didnt show up, my husband/volunteer or I would go get her from that hot trailer. Last I saw of her was when she came to introduce her new baby. She moved out of the county and off my radar. I ran into her in Panama City last week. The 2-year-old is now 14. She and her boyfriend are still together they have four children and bought a xer-upper with four acres and a pond. She told me she always read to her kids and they were readers and good students. In the library more than 12 years ago, I had asked her if she ever read to her daughter not to mention her unborn. She looked at me oddly and said, No, I aint going to lie to you. I just never thought of it. Immediately, we made reading part of her day covering books and reading to her daughter. Thats one! Born to Read did make a difference! Sometime after my 2006 retirement, my successor, Judi Rundel, rented a storage unit to pack away old records. A few weeks ago, the librarys current director, Glenda Ondracek, told me she was emptying the storage and there were boxes of unrelated program materials. I picked up 20 dusty boxes dating from 1994-2006 now perched in my dining room demanding attention. This all is having a profound effect on me. First, why am I still dealing with this when I retired nearly ve years ago? These boxed Friendsadministered programs were library history. Second, they are shrouded in memories much like the serendipitous meeting with my Born to Read friend it is really only tting that I review and sort out what is needed for audit or other purposes. When I came to serve the library in 1993, a limited operating budget and lack of governing support prompted me to seek grants to reach the community, introduce the library, promote lifelong learning, and provide literacy, family and youth projects. State, federal and other funding was received from foundations and councils, library, literacy, social service, education, juvenile justice, workforce, and health agencies programs with odd names that became as familiar as bread WINGS, FROG-Families, LEAPFROG, TEENSPEAK, WITHIT, KIT, BEST, TIGERS. The Friends was scal administrator as the county would not entertain additional staff (then barely considering library staff!), and Wilderness Coast (WILD) only administered State Library projects. Yet, the Advisory Board, WILD, the Friends and I considered all programs to be part of the library no matter which way they were funded. Overall, a lot of work and effort for a lot of years. Certainly instrumental in building and sustaining our library system. I realized when I retired that not everyone who sat in my chair would take on the additional job of writing and administering grants, so I agreed to continue managing the two existing Friends youth programs. I thought six months, maybe a year; its now going on ve. The KIT program ended December 2010, now leaving only TIGERS to continue providing exceptional youth services. Closing in on 19 years, the Library is established and thriving. As it has efciently moved in new directions under new management, the county library entity and Friends grant programs became separated. What was created in its place is more of a positive working partnership. Old needs replaced. Bringing reasoning around to boxes. That being said, I came across our rst newsletter, written in late 1996, three years after I started and four years after our humble beginnings. An array of accomplishments far exceeding years. One director. One assistant. County budget merely $75,700. Secured nine grants. Received Public Library Association Award of Excellence for outstanding community service. Listed as one of nations best in American libraries. Secretary of State Sandra Mortham presented plaques to county commissioners. Friends received national award for library support. Volunteer tarred leaking roof in Carrabelle gym location. Eightytwo children received daily meals through summer food grant. Sixty youths attended poetry reading by Dr. Maya Angelou. Pam Amato rode an elephant through Eastpoint. That summer alone, 45 county citizens had jobs because of our library system grant efforts. And in 1996 we were only in our infancy! On behalf of the community, I thank the Friends of the Library and the Advisory Board for the lifeline, the support, the guidance now and for the many years until now. I am incredibly grateful to be part of our ongoing history. Eileen Annie Ball, the former county librarian, originally presented these remarks to the Franklin County Public Library Advisory Board. Two decades later, library still thrives By Mel Kelly Special to the Times My friend works hard to help ensure social justice in her metropolitan suburb. As a direct result of her conscientious leadership, both city and county commissioners have responded positively to the voiced expectations of their constituents and regularly vote to make the most socially conscientious decisions. Another friend leads a food bank service in her community. A third friend volunteers regularly in another local food pantry. For more than 20 years, still another has been the chair of the huge annual ea market which benets the building fund for her church. Another counsels jailed alcoholics on their path to recovery. One friend donated a large prize-winning sum to begin a community library. The enrichment of a reading program for local children would not exist without the volunteer initiative of two other friends. Local museums survive with the dedicated personpower provided by those who donate their time and effort to make history come alive and relevant for visitors and residents alike. But what do such invaluable free labor service contributions really mean within a community? And why are such generous-with-theirtime-and-effort-people vanishing? What do people want from their community today? What are people willing to give to their community? The word community stems from the bonding together of those who have a special common interest, whether it be in a location, an industry, transportation, religious, commercial or educational bonds. Derived from the Latin communitas (cum, with/ together + munus, gift) it generally refers to people with common interests and concerns who interact with each other to achieve the societal ends they see as most desirable. But today, thousands of words have been written attempting to explain what happened to, and within, communities that have lost or even obliterated those necessary common bonds and interactions. In many places, once settled because of special needs and interests, people share little or none of that commonality today. And in losing their sense of community, they have lost their touchstone which helped to quantify and measure the quality of life they sought. What does the phrase quality of life mean to you? According to a dictionary, Quality of life may be seen as your personal satisfaction (or dissatisfaction) with the cultural or intellectual conditions under which you live (as distinct from material comfort.) My friends have made their communities better for themselves and others by adding to the quality of life where they live. Because they saw a challenge, a need for change or protection or preservation, they chose to volunteer, and to become involved in a special cause. Because they did, the environment of life was improved for all, even if indirectly. In todays world, the idea of self has become pre-eminent. We see it all around us, in every aspect of life. For example, both the business and political worlds clearly demonstrate examples of the me-rst theory of being. Whether done in the name of success or conviction, in todays world the belief in, and pursuit of, personal entitlement reigns supreme. Ill get mine whether the mine is money, power or fame. But for the friends I mentioned, their mine became a library, a museum, a food pantry, social justice improvements and the enrichment of the quality of life in their community. None received money or fame for their volunteer activism. By their interactions voluntarily demonstrated and practiced on behalf of others my friends each and personally made their own community a better place to live, to worship, to work and to learn. They truly understood the gift they could give within the coming together of community bonds. Mel Kelly, former mayor of Carrabelle, prepared this column in commemoration of the National Day of Service, which will be recognized on Sunday, Sept. 11. The gift of community The Bureau of the Public Debt has announced that as of Jan. 1, 2012, paper savings bonds will no longer be sold at nancial institutions. This action, which supports the U.S. Department of the Treasurys goal to increase the number of electronic transactions with citizens and businesses, will save American taxpayers approximate ly $70 million over the rst ve years. But savings bonds, introduced in 1935, are not going away. Electronic savings bonds in Series EE and I will remain available through purchase in TreasuryDirect, a secure, web-based system operated by Public Debt where investors have been purchasing savings bonds, available 24/7, since 2002. Savings bonds are very much a part of this countrys history and culture, and will remain a part of Americas future but in electronic form, said Public Debt Com missioner Van Zeck. Its time for us to take a 1935 model and make it a 21st century investment tool. Ending over-the-counter (OTC) sales of paper sav ings bonds at nancial institutions is a continuation of Treasurys all-electronic initiative announced in April 2010. As part of the initiative, Treasury stopped the sale of paper bonds through traditional payroll plans, effec tive Dec. 31, 2010. It is estimated that ending the sales of paper payroll and new issues of OTC bonds will save a total of $120 million over the next ve years in areas such as printing, mailing, storing bond stock and fees paid to nancial institutions for processing bond applications. Through TreasuryDirect, investors have an easy and convenient way to purchase and manage their bonds free of charge, Zeck said. Investors will no longer have to worry about misplacing, losing or stor ing paper savings bonds. Opening a TreasuryDirect account is free, and, once established, investors can: Buy, manage, and redeem Series EE and I electronic savings bonds. Convert Series EE and I paper savings bonds to electronic through the SmartExchange feature. Purchase electronic savings bonds as a gift. Enroll in a payroll savings plan for purchas ing electronic bonds. Invest in other Treasury securities such as bills, notes, bonds, and TIPS (Treasury Inflation-Pro tected Securities). Those currently holding paper savings bonds can continue to redeem them at financial institutions. Bonds which have not matured, but were lost, stolen or destroyed, can be reissued in paper or electronic form. Series I paper savings bonds remain available for purchase using part or all of ones tax refund. For more information on this feature, visit www.irs.gov. For more information about the elimination of paper savings bonds and how to enroll in Treasury Direct, visit www.treasurydirect.gov. Over-the-counter sale of savings bonds to end Letter to the Editor My wife and I just spent a long weekend on the Forgotten Coast to celebrate our 30th wedding anniversary. We had visited a year ago and became attached to the areas charm and thought it would be a good choice to escape the trials of our usual workweeks. Much of the appeal of Apalachicola, Carrabelle, Eastpoint and the other towns along your coast is the feeling of stepping back in time. We enjoy shopping for local creations, antiques and assorted treasures while sampling the local cuisine. One cant deny the economic distress that is evident in the area. Nearly every other beach home that we passed was either for sale or up for auction. Restaurants and shops were vacant and the locals were lamenting the downturn in business. With all of the despair, we were surprised that most shop owners continually opt to close up shop on Sunday and Monday and at 5 p.m. during the week. For visitors, Sunday is likely the last day in town, certainly if one is visiting over a weekend. For a community that relies on visitors, read: tourism, the local businesses dont seem to be much in tune with their potential customers. I get it that when one is self-employed they want less hours and an easier life but when your business is catering to visitors, well, by golly, youd better be prepared to cater to visitors! People that have money to spend are typically working through the week, so when do they spend their money? On the weekend, of course! The local radio station was promoting the Water Street Ice Festival which was drawing to a close on the Saturday that we were in town so we planned on spending the afternoon there enjoying the small-town charm. Imagine our surprise when we arrived on Water Street and there were no signs of any festivities. We asked a couple of merchants about the festival and nobody seemed to know anything about it. Wrong weekend we assumed. Later we found out that it was the correct weekend but the Water Street festival was actually not on Water Street but rather at the museum. Unfortunately it was over when we found it. I read recently that Apalach had just enrolled in the Main Street program in an effort to promote the local attractions and businesses. I submit that until the local merchants and community leaders (in all of the coastal towns) are committed to accommodating the desires and needs of a visiting public, the program wont help. In the meantime, well continue to cherish the area, just not on Sunday or Monday or after 5 p.m., which will likely curb our future visits since we have to work during the week. Harry Graham Deltona Businesses need to tune in to tourists Eileen Annie Ball MEL KELLY Thoughts for the Times

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Local The Times | A5 Thursday, September 8, 2011 TANNING, WAXING, EAR PI E RCING, F E A T H E RS, FASHION EX TE NSIONS & U P DOS. BRING A FRI E ND & M E N T ION T HIS AD & R E C E IV E 10% O FF A S E RVIC E N o A ppointment N ecessary Walk-ins Welcome dbutler@coastalcoverage.com Locally owned and operated to meet all your insurance needs Qualications: Expertise in: Now Accepting Appointments Call Toll Free 888-681-5864 For more info www.seclung.com Lung Disease Specialist Rob Garver, MD Now Seeing Patients in Port St. Joe NOW BCBS-FL I N -NETWORK PROV I DER SAVE 40% KINCAID UPHOLSTERY Sofa, Sectionals and Sleepers in Your Choice of Fabric HARRISON HOUSE FURNITURE EST. 1979 Best of Bay 2011 A+ Rating by the BBB 11 Harrison Ave. Downtown Panama City Closed Sun. & Mon. Great designs at 850-763-4918 to seek a rule change in February that would pre vent harvesting rules to revert back to ve days a week in June 2012. The plan is to recommend to FWC for seven-daysa-week harvest yearround, he said. Brooks said the longer weekly harvesting season was implemented to bal ance a series of additional restrictions on daily har vesting that became effec tive Aug. 31. These rules, drafted to help Florida reduce its rate of illness caused by the bacteria vibrio vulnicus, call for oysters to be in a proces sors cooler no later than 4 p.m. in April and 5 p.m. in November. From May through July, harvesters must have oysters to a certied dealer by 11:30 a.m., and in August through Octo ber, no later than noon. The only exceptions are when a harvester has partial onboard cooling, which can extend the de livery deadline to 3 p.m., or when the processor uses a rapid cooling meth od, which can extend the deadline to 2 p.m. Wileys order stipu lates that if production falls below 300 bags (the equivalent of bushels) per acre on the bars at Cat Point and East Hole, the weekend harvest will end. Joe Shields, environ mental administrator for the Florida Department of Agriculture and Con sumer Services facility in Apalachicola, said when last surveyed Cat Point was producing 572 bush els per acre, and East Hole 460. It (dropping below 300) has never happened before, but that doesnt mean it couldnt happen this time, he said. It vacillates from year to year, depending on previ ous harvesting, growth rates, the weather, a slew of things. and archeology and is author of Ar cheology for Dummies, part of a popular how to series. Together with graduate students Deena Woodward and Chris Hunt, White worked at the Mahr site from July 23 through Aug. 3. In addition to the initial fieldwork of mapping and small test excavations, White and company researched the site in the archives and artifact collections in Tallahassee and at the Smithson ian Institutions National Museum of the American Indian in Washing ton, D.C. The five Pierce mounds, originally investigated in 1901 by Clarence Bloom field Moore, take their name from Alton Pierce, who owned the land at that time. Moore was a colorful figure dur ing the golden age of archeology and a world traveler who visited nearly every part of Eu rope and Asia Minor. He traveled in Egypt, crossed the Andes, went down the Amazon River in 1876 and made a trip around the world in 1878-79 before returning home when his father died. For nine years after his fathers death, Moore ran the family busi ness, Jessup & Moore Paper Com pany, and earned millions of dol lars. Around 1889, he outfitted a pri vate steamboat, The Gopher, and began four decades of archeological exploration. Dr. Milo G. Miller, his secretary, physician and friend, was his constant companion. He also worked with Mary Louise Baker, a talented illustrator. Moore never married and had few female acquaintances. He re putedly once told Baker, I never call on the ladies! They might ask me to call again! Moore traveled the rivers and coast of the southeastern U.S. dig ging for artifacts at the sites of In dian settlements during the fall, winter and early spring. He spent the summer at his home in Philadelphia writing reports on his research for the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia. He was an award-winning photog rapher, and his reports were pub lished in lavishly illustrated largeformat books. His field notebooks are now housed in the rare book collection at Cornell University. Early excavations found more than 130 skeletons Moores work at the Bluff Road site is described in Certain Ab original Remains of the Northwest Florida Coast, Part II, originally published in 1902 and republished in 2010 by General Books LLC. During the summer, while Moore wrote, his steamboat pilot explored locating new excavation sites and ob taining permission from landowners for the next seasons digging. Moore worked in Franklin County around the turn of the century. He wrote of one of the Pierce mounds, Seldom have we found a mound so full of promise as to yield artifacts at the start, and so disap pointing during the remainder of the investigation. In addition to the Pierce mounds, two of which have completely van ished, Moore excavated Cemetery Mound, which was once located in the new part of Magnolia Cemetery. Moore wrote that the county board happily gave him permission to erad icate that mound. Pierce found more than 130 skel etons in the Pierce mound complex, plus other artifacts including ceram ic vessels, slate, copper and silver jewelry, pearls, shell beads, sheets of mica, shell cups, stone tools and ar rowheads and wolf and puma teeth. The artifacts found in the mounds belong to the Swift Creek culture of the Middle Walton period, which thrived here around 300 to 500 A.D. Swift Creek pottery is character ized by highly complex and ornate stamped designs. The Swift Creek people built mounds but were largely nomadic and supported themselves by sh ing, hunting and foraging for wild foods like shellsh and berries. Fish was probably the mainstay of their diet. The 1940 report on a Smithson ian survey of the Moore excava tions said, The delta country of the Apalachicola was undoubtedly one of the most favorable and most densely populated areas for prehistoric peo ples. Moores artifacts, including those collected at the Pierce mounds, orig inally were housed at the Academy of Natural Sciences in Philadelphia and later moved to the Museum of the American Indian in New York City, which recently merged with the Smithsonian Institute. During their initial excavations at the Pierce mound site, Whites team unearthed a chipped quartz crystal; sheepshead teeth; pottery, some of which was decorated by pressing coarse cloth into the clay; charcoal; and a subway token circa 2000 A.D. White said the Pierce mound was much closer to the riverbank when Indians inhabited the site. According to anthropologist Dr. Judith Bense, president of University of West Flori da, most Swift Creek sites are coastal encampments. Mahr said he plans to use the Bluff Road site for gardening proj ects and that at some point, he might open some of the land to public ex cavation. White plans to return to the site for further eld work during the next year. We are now processing the arti facts, soils and other materials and data we obtained so as to include ev erything in one large comprehensive report, she said. For every day of eldwork, this next stage of the inves tigation takes many weeks, so it will be several months until the report is nished. I am not sure when we will be back, but it will be sometime later this year or early next year, depend ing on what work is needed. DIGGING from page A1 LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Dr. Nancy White, left, photographs a small excavation pit while graduate student Deena Woodward takes notes. CLARENCE BLOOMFIELD MOORE HARVEST from page A1

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A6 | The Times Thursday, September 8, 2011 PET OF THE WEEK Franklin County Humane Society WALTER SMITH announces at Aaron Farnsley, AIF CFP MBA Farnsley & Johnston 505 Reid Avenue Port St. Joe, FL 32456 850.227.3336 aaron.farnsley@farnsley.com Society Panhandle Players kick off season The Panhandle Players kicked off the 2011-12 season in ne style Aug. 25 with a get-together at the Raney Houses Carriage House. When they arrived, the nearly 50 attendees each picked out a colorful hat from berets to hard hats which each wore throughout the night. In addition, the ice was broken when board members Margy Oehlert and Caroline Ilardi pinned the names of ctional characters on individuals backs, which then had to be guessed with 20 questions in a spirited game. The season opens Nov. 18-20 at the Dixie Theatre in Apalachicola with Work, Play, Love An Evening of OneActs. Auditions for this production will be held Sunday, Sept. 11, and Monday, Sept. 12, at 7 p.m. at the Eastpoint Firehouse. The three plays are The Temp, directed by Tom Loughridge; At Half Time, co-directed by Ed Tiley and Caroline Ilardi; and Diaries of Adam and Eve, directed by Dan Wheeler. There are roles for nine females and two or three males. The second show of the season will be Murder at the Howard Johnson, directed by Tiley. The show will be performed at the Eastpoint Firehouse on Feb. 2-4, as well as part of a dinner theater Feb. 9-11 at the Crooked River Grille. The third show of the season, Sex Please, Were Sixty, will be at the Dixie Theatre April 20-22 and will be directed by Oehlert. For more information on auditions and shows, call Oehlert at 670-8874. David Adlerstein Heather Newell, Jody Fichera to wed The parents of Heather Newell and Jody Fichera are proud to announce the upcoming marriage of their daughter and son. The bride, daughter of Alvin and Linda Newell, of Apalachicola, and the groom, son of Joe Fichera, of Apalachicola, and Ann Hunt, of South Carolina, are planning to unite together in marriage in a month. Happy birthday, Jason Dillon We love you, daddy. Love, Autom and Bradley Welcome to the world, Ally Kate! Anthony Coulter and Kristen Tarantino are proud to announce the birth of their daughter, Allison Kate Coulter. Ally Kate was born at Tallahassee Memorial Hospital on Friday, June 3. She weighed 7 pounds, 1 ounce and was 19 inches long. Maternal grandparents are Richard and Stacey Herrington, and Tommy Tarantino, all of Apalachicola. Paternal grandparents are Arthur and Dora Coulter, of Apalachicola. Maternal greatgrandparents are John Stanley Anders, of Lake City, and Sara Land, of St. James, and Faye and the late Ferris Tarantino, of Apalachicola. Paternal greatgrandparents are Johnnie Maude and the late Willie Dykes, of Apalachicola, and Fannie Peterson, of Apalachicola. Ally Kate was also welcomed by her big sister, Samantha Coulter, and uncle Bailey Herrington. DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times Margy Oehlert, left, president of the Panhandle Players, addresses the get-together while, from left, Robbie Johnson, Beverly Kelley and Gina Meizner listen. Birth Birthday Engagement Carrabelle plans Nov. 12 Veterans Day parade At their Sept. 1 meeting, Carrabelle city commissioners voted unanimously to close U.S. Highway 98 at 10 a.m. Nov. 12 for a Veterans Day parade. Caroline Spivey said the parade is part of a fall festival planned by the Franklin County Senior Center, 201 N.W. Ave. F in Carrabelle. The riverfront festival brought in visitors from Canada, Sweden, Alabama and Georgia this year, she said. This can be a good thing for the whole community. Spivey said it had been a long time since the senior center had sponsored an event. Plans for the celebration include a cake walk, arts and crafts, a Fun Korner for Kids, live entertainment and food. The festivals planning committee is seeking donations to support its efforts and to support all of the senior centers programs. To donate or for more information, call Shirley Cox at 6974195. Lois Swoboda

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The United Methodist Churches of Franklin County Welcome You First United Methodist Church of Apalachicola Worship Service 11:00 a.m. every Sunday Sunday School 10:00 a.m. 75 5 th St. Apalachicola 653-9530 fumcapalach@gtcom.net Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis Carrabelle United Methodist Church Worship Services 10:45 a.m. Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Celebrate Recovery Mondays 7-9 p.m. 102 NE Ave. B Carrabelle 697-3672 Pastor: Julie Stephens Eastpoint United Methodist Church Worship Service 10:00 a.m. every Sunday Healing service every fourth Monday at 7:00 p.m. 317 Patton Dr. (corner of David St.) 670-8825 Pastor: Rev. Beth White St. George Island United Methodist Church 9:00 a.m. Worship Service 10:00 a.m. Fellowship Hour 201 E. Gulf Beach Dr. 9274635 www.sgiumc.org Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis First Baptist Church St. George Island 501 E. Bayshore Drive 927-2257 R. Michael Waley, Pastor Join us as we praise and worship the living Christ. Great is the Lord and most worthy of praise. Psalm 145:3 Sunday Bible Study ................................................ 10:00am Worship Praise ........................................................ 11:00am Sunday Night ............................................................ 7:00pm Wednesday Power Hour ...................................... 7:00pm Wednesday Youth at S.P.L.A.S.H ....................... 7:00pm Walking in Christ R. Michael Whaley, Pastor First Pentecostal Holiness Church 379 Brownsville Road Apalachicola Were excited about what Gods doing!!! Sunday School 9:45 am Sunday Morning Worship 10:45 am Sunday Evening Service 6:00 pm Monday, Youth Group 6:30 pm Wednesday, Royal Rangers, G.A.P. 7:00 pm Wednesday Worship & Word 7:30 pm Nursery Provided during regular church services 7:00 7:00 WELCOMES YOU Trinity Trinity Episcopal Church est. 1836 Welcomes You Hwy. 98 & 6th St. Apalachicola 850-653-9550 Sunday Worship Services 8 & 10:30 a.m. Wednesdays Healing Service 11 a.m. Centering Prayer 4 p.m. WELCOMES YOU Church of the Ascension 101 NE First Street Carrabelle SUNDAY 10:00 AM WELCOMES YOU Church THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH (850) 274-4490 Faith The Times | A7 Thursday, September 8, 2011 Failing (forward) is a concept that has led many great people to a successful life. Failure develops maturity, prompts innovation, inspires, reinforces the need for risk, makes you aware of human frailty, builds courage and opens other opportunities As parents, we attempt to motivate, but the desire to excel depends solely on the child. It is hard to allow your child to fail, especially when they are making decisions that are life-altering. Permitting them to make decisions (even when you know it will lead to failure) gives them the ability to learn from their own mistakes. When they experience the result of their behavior, actions and attitude, they will learn more than by hearing a thousand lectures. Cleaning up their mess and coming to their rescue when they get in trouble will only prolong the learning process. Consequences are the prime motivator for making right choices. Teaching them at a young age that disobedience and poor choices result in consequences will help them to develop self-discipline, and the parent suffers less heartache. We tend to feel as though we are not being there for our children when we do not come to their rescue. When I asked one child if he feared the discipline action he was facing at school, he replied that he did not care because his mother would be there soon to get him out of trouble. That same child is in big boy time-out quite often since adulthood. Sometimes we enable them in our attempt to save them. Mistakes are the best instructor and will lead us to success if we are allowed to learn from them. I love my husbands grannys quote, Bought wit aint too bad if you dont pay too dear for it. There are ways to develop skills that will prepare your child for living a successful life. We categorize success as being nancially secure or having high stature when actually success is achieving a goal that was set by an individual. Sometimes we have to face the fact that our goals for our children are not their personal goals. The keys to success are faith, courage and enthusiasm. Hebrews 11:1 denes faith as the substance of things hoped for, the evidence of things not seen. In order to develop faith, you have to believe. If you tell a toddler to jump into your arms, the child trusts you to catch him. Drop him once, and his condence wavers. It is hard to build condence in a child who has no comprehension of what it means because there is no representation of it in their lives. Inconsistent parenting erodes their condence and weakens their faith. Their faith in God, prayer and the Scriptures will help them to overcome any battles they face in life; therefore make it a family practice to teach your children. Psalm 119:11: Your word have I hid in my heart, that I might not sin against you. If you want your children to be guided morally when they are beyond your reach and after they are grown, you should begin teaching lifebuilding passages to them when they are young. Courage is the ability to face danger, uncertainty, difculty or pain without being deected from a chosen course. Fear of failure or the unknown will never drive anyone to excel. Children develop courage through accomplishing their own tasks and overcoming fears. Creating fear in them by introducing the bogeyman or subjecting them to a lifestyle of uncertainty weakens their courage. Courage is not the absence of fear; it is the confrontation and control of it. Enthusiasm is a sincere passion or desire to do something. To be enthusiastic requires working and stretching your expectations. The difference between a successful person and others is not a lack of strength, not a lack of knowledge, but rather in a lack of will. Vincent T. Lombardi. No one ever attains very eminent success by simply doing what is required of him; it is the amount and excellence of what is over and above the required that determines the greatness of ultimate distinction. Charles Kendall Adams. Lazy people are not successful people. Keeping a youthful mind and hands occupied will head off many potential problems. Giving responsibilities to children is almost obsolete by todays standards, but it is crucial to raise your child to work. God gave us the responsibility of preparing them for life, not enabling them to be dependent. Teaching your children household responsibility, nancial independence and good work ethics will develop contributors. It hurts me more than it hurts you is a common phrase used by parents who have to punish their children. It hurts our hearts to watch our children make mistakes. But mistakes they learn from today will bring them success tomorrow. We welcome all suggestions and hope you enjoy this weekly article. Please send all emails to Scott Shiver at frontline247@ mac.com. A childs mistake today brings success tomorrow YOUTH MATTERS Pamela Shiver Mona Creamer Erickson, 77, passed away on Sunday, Sept. 4, 2011, with her fam ily by her side in Valencia, Calif. A memorial ser vice will be held at St. Charles Borro meo Church, North Hollywood, Calif. on Monday, Sept. 12, at 4 p.m. with Msgr. Bob Gallagher ofciating. Mrs. Erickson will be laid to rest in the Eastpoint Cemetery in Eastpoint. Interment service will be held Friday, Sept. 16, at 4 p.m. with the Rev. Scotty Lolley ofciating. The family deeply ap preciates the attendance of friends and acquaintances who attend the services at St. Charles Borromeo Church and at the East point Cemetery. Mona was born Oct. 6, 1933 in Eastpoint to George Wilbern and Mary Segree Creamer who owned and oper ated a grocery and general mer chandise store in Eastpoint from the late 1940s through the early 1970s. In her teens, Mona loved working in the store with her dad and spent many happy hours behind the counter at Creamers General Mer chandise. Graduating from Carra belle High School in 1951, Mona attended nurses training at Jackson Me morial Hospital in Miami, where she earned her registered nurse certica tion. Following graduation, Mona worked as a nurse on a passenger train, the Silver Meteor, on its route between Miami and New York City. In later years, Monas early sales training in the family grocery business served her well when she joined Ramsey-Shilling Realty and became a suc cessful real estate brokersalesperson whose exper tise was known throughout the Los Angeles area. She met and married Alexander John Erickson, Jr., M.D., fondly known as Jack in 1958, following which they moved to To luca Lake, Calif. where Dr. Erickson practiced medi cine at St. Joseph Medical Center in Burbank. Mona and Jack had three sons, Alexander John Erickson, III, Paul Stokes Erickson, and James Thomas Erick son. An accomplished bridge player, Mona was a Life Master in duplicate bridge and a member of the American Contract Bridge League. She was a mem ber of the American Stage Theatre of St. Petersburg, and enjoyed many tours with the group in both the U.S. and abroad. Mona was a dedicated lifetime mem ber of the Providence St. Joseph Hospital Guild and diligently supported the Guilds projects and fund raising efforts over several years. She devoted much time and energy as caregiver to family members, includ ing her mother-in-law, Zohe Stokes Erickson; her father-in-law, Alexander John Erickson; and her aunt, Lilac Segree Muncill. Mona is survived by three sons, Alexander John Erickson, III, of Va lencia, Calif., Paul Stokes Erickson, of Valencia, Calif., and James Thomas Erickson, of Aurora, Colo.; their father, Alexander John Erickson, Jr., M.D.; eight grandchildren, Chris topher and Jennifer Erick son, Nicholas and Danielle Erickson, and Tyler, Ryan, Brenden and Ian Erickson; a sister, Fay Creamer Bur ton, of Monroe, Tenn. and three brothers, George W. Creamer, Jr.,. of Eastpoint, Gregory L. Creamer, of St. Petersburg, and Douglas I. Creamer, of Eastpoint.Mona Creamer Erickson MONA CREAMER ERICKSON Obituary Special to The Times A national movement of churches across America, Back to Church Sunday, will be held in Franklin County on Sunday, Sept. 18. Everyone is invited and welcome to attend High Calling Church, in Eastpoint, and Living Waters Assembly of God, in Apalachicola, who have partnered to invite the community back to church. Back to Church Sunday (www. backtochurch.com) is an initiative that seeks to reach the un-churched and de-churched people who once attended church, but dont any more and invite them to return for a special Sunday. It was launched three years ago in response to a survey of 15,000 adults in the United States which showed a personal invitation from a family member would prompt 67 percent of Americans to visit a church, and 63 percent said an invitation from a friend or neighbor would cause them to attend a service. Love is building our church and we are reaching our community with that same love. It is the love of Jesus, said Ron Crum, Jr., lead pastor of High Calling Church. Since its inception, National Back to Church Sunday participants have invited more than three million family members, friends and neighbors to their churches. About 10,000 churches are expected to participate this year, inviting more than one million visitors. In 2008, the American Religious Identication Survey showed 83 percent of American adults identify themselves as Christians. In contrast, another survey that same year by the Barna Group indicated only about 20 percent of Americans attends church on any given Sunday. This suggests that almost eight million people 150,000 a week are leaving churches each year. For more information about High Calling Church, visit www. highcallingchurch.org, or call Living Waters Assembly of God at 6533321. Local churches take part in Back to Church Sunday The kitchen crew really did a good job on the lunch last Thursday at the Senior Center. We had spaghetti with meat sauce, fresh garden salad, garlic bread and of course dessert. Yum, yum. Come join us for lunch every Thursday. Serving begins at noon. It will be good to see you. I set a place, and flowers, where our late friend, Frank Rush, always sat. Keep him in your prayers. The Fall Festival at the Senior Center is coming together nicely. They could use more vendors and more help. The festival will be held Saturday, Nov. 12. We will have a parade, arts and crafts, cake walk, Kids Korner, and a few surprises! Call for more info, or to sign up, at 6973760 or 697-4195. Sure glad the rain held off until late afternoon so we could enjoy the Labor Day picnic at the Lanark Village Boat Club. Had a big crowd, fellowship and food, food, food. It was a great afternoon. Thanks to all who came and enjoyed the afternoon, and thanks to those who prepared the food. The Thrift Shop in the village sure could use some small appliances and furniture donations. Drop them off during regular business hours: Weekdays, except Thursday, and Saturdays from 8 a.m. to noon. Closed Thursdays, for now. Thank you! Be kind to one another, check on the sick and housebound and remember, Volunteers Make It Happen become one today! Until next time, God bless America, our troops, the poor, homeless and hungry. Thrift shop could use appliances and furniture LANARK NEWS Jim Welsh A big thank you goes out from all the family and friends of Curtis Monroe for everything everyone has done and all the prayers and donations. The road to recovery has been a long one with a long way to go. With that said, there will be another benet held on Saturday, Sept. 10 at Taylors Building Supply in Eastpoint. Menu will consist of fried mullet, smoked mullet, boiled shrimp, sides, drinks and dessert. Again, a big Thank You for such a wonderful community we live in! Card of THANKS

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Corner of Marina Drive next to Piggly Wiggly Port St. Joe, FL www.BWOsh.com Everything for your Outdoor Adventure 151 WEST HIG HW AY 98, P. S .J A LL S W I MW EA R UP T O 50 % OFF R EG UL A R PR I C E COME SEE US! Freshwater Gag grouper season will reopen Sept. 16, and many anglers are eager to get back to shing. Inshore wrecks and bridge rubble sites should see good sh early on. Live bait such as small pinsh and even nger mullet will get you in the action. Inshore Offshore Scallop season continues until Sept. 27, and we still have good reports from Pig Island and in Scallop Cove. Most of the bigger shells are now in 6 to 10 feet of water, and a boat is a must. With the high surf and strong winds from the last weekend. As the storms and winds move on out of town, shing should improve over the next few days. Heavy rains mean swift water catshing. Setting bush hooks in the river for channel cats should be very productive this week. SP ONS ORED BY By Lois Swoboda Times Staff Writer This week well look at a pair of garden owers that come to our perennial beds basically unchanged from their wild sisters; blanket ower and rose mallow. In my experience, both are excellent candidates for Florida gardens because they are showy, bloom for much of the year and they belong here. According to many gardening books, Indian blanket (Galliarda pulchella) also known as rewheel and sundance, is a member of the sunower family. It blooms eight months out of the year in our area, although spring and fall are the showiest seasons from what I have seen. It is drought and salt tolerant, wants full sun and grows happily at the side of the road across Florida. Dont over water or you will rot the core. In its native state, the plant is red with a yellow fringe to the petals but the color varies to include blooms that are completely red or yellow. According to gardening catalogues, recently cultivars have appeared on the market ranging in color from peach to orange. Rose Mallow, (Hibiscus coccineus) is also known as scarlet hibiscus and swamp hibiscus, according to the National Audubon Society Field Guide to North American Wildowers Eastern Region and other sources. According to Florida Wild Flowers and Roadside Plants, this native grows to six feet tall with owers that measure up to seven inches across. It blooms in summer and fall. Many gardening guides say it likes wet feet. Being a native, it is salt and drought tolerant and loves the sun based on the experience of several local gardeners. During dry periods, watering will increase the number and size of blooms, according to some garden guides. Pink and white forms are also available, according to gardening catalogues. This is a favorite ower of hummingbirds, according to the Georgia Wildlife Federation. Every garden ower began as a weed somewhere. John Tradescant the elder and his son, John Tradescant the younger, were both gardeners to King Charles I of England, according to www.musaeum. org/ History texts report the pair traveled extensively during the 1600s and are responsible for introducing many, if not most, of the most beloved owers into English gardens, and subsequently into our own. Their botanic garden at South Lambeth became the centre of horticultural interest in Britain. Historians tell us the elder Tradescant went on collecting trips to Europe, while the younger voyaged as far as Virginia. John the Elder also was employed on a number of diplomatic or military missions. In 1618 he traveled to Russia, leaving a fascinating account of the journey; two years later he joined an expedition to Algiers against the Barbary pirates. Based on public records, both men bore the title Keeper of his Majestys Gardens, Vines and Silkworms. It is common knowledge among people who have studied gardening history that Florida wildower bears the name of this intrepid pair. Tradescantia or spiderwort (Tradescantia sp.) is a lovely little roadside blossom that thrives under the harshest conditions. There are about 70 New World species with owers that range from purple to white, but most are blue, according to many botanical sources. Tradescantias are monocots like lilies and iris. According to Wikipedia, the rst species described was Virginia Spiderwort, a native of the eastern United States. It was introduced to Europe in 1629 by the younger Tradescant, where it is cultivated as a garden ower. I grew up calling this old mans love, because the ower is a bruised and broken heart and the buds are a trail of tears. When I was working as a nurseryman in the early 1980s, showy cultivars of this plant also appeared in the United States and I used to sell them. According to many botanical resources, several house plants including wandering jew, Moses in the cradle and Hawaiian wedding veil are tradescantias. All of these are known to produce allergic reactions in some dogs and cats. Scallop season runs late this year By Frank Sargeant franksargeant@bellsouth.net For those who love to chase the tasty shellsh, it always seems to take forever for the opening of the scallop season to arrive then its over before you know it. This year, forever will last a little longer than usual. The season opened July 1 and will continue to Sept. 25, 15 days longer than in past seasons, in an effort to stimulate the economy of small coastal ports affected by last years oil spill. Open waters extend from the Pasco/Hernando county line to the Mexico Beach Canal and so far this season the harvest has been good. Some of the largest scallops of the year will be captured in the last few weeks. The shellsh are fast-growers and those harvested in early July are signicantly smaller than those taken in September. The prime scalloping area in the Panhandle is St. Joe Bay, where clear water and lots of eel grass provide ideal habitat for the swimming shellsh. Theyre also abundant on the ats off Steinhatchee and Suwannee as well as at Homosassa and Crystal River. Scallops are an annual crop. They hatch live spawn and die in a single year, like most types of shrimp, and so the annual take by recreational divers is thought to have minimal impact. The tiny larvae develop into shellsh up to three inches across by July and August of each year and thousands of Florida families turn out to pursue these strange little animals, the only shellsh that can swim. Unlike most shellsh that afx themselves to the bottom, bay scallops can swim by clapping their shells together. Admittedly, its a slow, crazy dance, but they do manage to move from place to place and with the help of the tides can sometimes travel for miles. Bay scallops only survive where there is clear water and abundant grass. Fortunately, waters of the eastern Panhandle and Big Bend area have plenty of both, and thus plenty of scallops. The shellsh are typically found in water from 4-to-10 feet deep over turtle grass, the long-leaved greenery that sprouts abundantly from the bottom in the open areas. Because theyre lethargic swimmers, scallops are easy for a snorkeler to capture by hand and theyre a favorite target for young swimmers. Many families plan their annual summer vacation with the kids for the opening of the scallop season. Once things get rolling, nding the scallops is simply a matter of looking for the eet. Where the shellsh are abundant there will be dozens of boats drifting over them. On days when other boats are scarce, you can usually nd the shellsh by motoring slowly and looking for them on the bottom. The shells are white to gray-white and easily seen against the grass. Scalloping is a relatively safe activity, but one danger is that divers may get too far from an anchored boat and then not be able to swim back against the tide. To avoid the issue, many put divers out behind a drifting boat. The boat and the divers progress across the at at about the same rate, and one adult remains in the boat ready to pick up any divers who need a lift. The favorite scalloping ports include Steinhatchee, Crystal River, Homosassa and Bayport. Guides who specialize in scallop trips are available at all these locations, for those just getting started. A saltwater license is required to harvest scallops and the limit is two gallons whole or a half-pint, shucked, per harvester, up to 10 gallons whole and a half-gallon shucked per boat. The only part of a scallop considered edible is the adductor muscle, the white piece of esh that opens and closes the shell. Cleaning the catch is a bit of an issue. All the workings of the creature must be scooped away, leaving only the muscle, which is then severed from the shell halves with a teaspoon or an oyster knife. Some have made use of shop vacuums to clean out the entrails, which is fast, but which leaves a very smelly mess in the vacuum. Once the meat is processed, it can be used in all sorts of delicious recipes, but the best is simply to drop the bits briey into a pan of sizzling butter, scoop them out and drain. Its one of the real delicacies of the sea. For details on scalloping, visit www.myfwc.com. PHOTOS COURTESY OF T AM P A BAY WATCH BUDS N BUGS Wild in the garden L O I S S W O B ODA | The Times Virginia Spiderwort L O I S S W O B ODA | The Times Indian Blanket L O I S S W O B ODA | The Times Rose Mallow E-mail outdoors news to times outdoors@star.com Page 8 Thursday, September 8, 2011 O UTD OO RS www.apalachtimes.com Section A

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CARRABELLE A PALA C HI C OLA SP O RT S www.apalachtimes.com A Section Page 9 Thursday, September 8, 2011 The Franklin County Seahawks volleyball team, under the direction of new coach Sally Wheeler, has opened at 2-1 as it debuts in Class 1A, for rural schools. The team opened with a loss in three games at Altha Aug. 30, with the JV losing 2-1. The Seahawks then bounced back in their home opener Sept. 1 against Florida A & M High, winning in three games, 25-23, 25-12 and 2520. On Friday at Rickards, the varsity girls won 3-1. The team is in Region 2, District 4, which also includes Blountstown, Liberty County, Port St. Joe and West Gadsden. Varsity teammates include seniors Maegan Andrews, Megan Newell, Morgan Newell and Tiffany Varnes; juniors Christina Collins, Codee Crum, Anna Lee Chena Segree, Karlie Tucker and Kerri Williams; and sophomores Gracyn Kirvin, Morgan Mock and Kristen Putnal. Junior varsity players include sophomore Ashley Moore, freshmen Faith Harrell and Robyn Segree; eighth graders Bre Barrack, Anna Riley, Vanessa Simmons, Cheyenne Davis and Casey Tucker; and seventh grader Scout Segree. Middle school teammates are Myranda McLeod, Kimmie Boone, Anne Reader, Christy Russell, Amberly Moseley and Alyssa Haney. By David Adlerstein DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times Junior Codee Crum, right, and sophomore Kristen Putnal take part in the opening practice of the 2011 Seahawk volleyball season. Seahawk volleyball team opens 2-1 SEAHA WK VOLLEYBALL The following is the remaining 2011 schedule of the Seahawk volleyball team. The times indicate the approximate starts of the JV and varsity games. An asterisk denotes a district game. Date Opponent Time Friday, Sept. 9 vs. Wewahitchka 5/6 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 13 vs. Liberty County 6/7 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 15 @ Blountstown* 6/7 p.m. Monday, Sept. 19 vs. Munroe 5 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 20 @ Florida A&M 5:30/6:30 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 22 @ Taylor 5/6:30 p.m. Friday, Sept. 23 vs. Altha 6/7 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 27 @ Port St. Joe* 6/7 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 29 vs. Blountstown* 6/7 p.m. Monday, Oct. 3 vs. Taylor 6/7 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 6 @ Liberty County* 6/7 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 11 vs. Port St. Joe* 6/7 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 13 @ West Gadsden* 6/7 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 18 @ Wewahitchka 5/6 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 20 vs. Rickards 5/6 p.m. By David Adlerstein Times City Editor Sneads junior wingback Tre Keys red up the engine Friday night, igniting for three touchdowns to lead the Pirates to a 33-14 victory over Franklin County. With junior Jalon Daniels, the other side of the Wing T offense, contributing two more scores, Sneads swept over the Seahawks beginning with a 62-yard run by Keys with 8:30 left in the rst quarter. The time was largely a ballpark estimate, since the scoreboard at the Mikel Clark Sports Complex was out throughout the game due to electrical malfunctioning. An unrelenting Sneads defense early on pressured Seahawks senior quarterback Zach Armistead and junior running back Skyler Hutchinson, forcing each to fumble deep in their own territory on back-to-back drives. Midway through the rst quarter, Keys ran around end for seven yards for his second score of the night, en route to 170 yards on the night. Senior kicker Coty Lanphere nailed both extra points, but the 14-0 Sneads lead was short-lived. Armistead, who was 8 of 14 passing for 96 yards in a revised offense to accommodate the loss of sophomore tailback Dwayne Griggs out for three weeks with a back injury, ran it in from two yards out with seconds left in the rst half. He also ran in the two-point conversion, and the Seahawks headed to the locker room with renewed hope victory was within reach. But Sneads punched its opening drive of the second half steadily downeld, capped by a two-yard run from Daniels, and a Lanphere extra point. Sophomore Leonard Greens punts averaging 45 yards kept the Seahawks shaky hopes alive all evening, highlighted by a Sneads bobbled punt reception scooped up by Seahawks Dillon Grant at mideld. But the Seahawks couldnt capitalize, and Keys handed Sneads a 27-8 lead midway through the third quarter when he ran in from ve yards out. With two minutes left, after Daniels had scored from six yards out for Sneads nal points, the Seahawks added a second touchdown when Armistead hit Green with a 10-yard pass. Green snagged four passes on the night, for 56 yards. Junior Cole Lee led with seven rushes for 30 yards, followed by Hutchinsons 10 rushes for 27 yards. Senior Brennan Walden ran six times for 13 yards. Defensively, senior Chris Granger led with seven solo tackles, with Hutchinson adding six and Lee ve. Coach Josh Wrights Seahawks travel to Graceville Friday for an 8 p.m. start against the Pirates, who fell 39-0 to Liberty County Friday. Senior Chris Granger tackles Sneads Tre Carr. Sneads spoils Seahawks home opener PHO T O S BY DANA WH ALE Y | Special to the Times Sophomore Holden Foley, left, and freshman Kelsey Jones tackle a Sneads runner.

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Local A10 | The Times Thursday, September 8, 2011 FRANKLIN COUNTY BOARD O F COUNTY COMMISSIONERS R EQUEST F OR Q UALI F I C ATIONS FOR L AND F ILL O PERATION, M ANAGEMENT AND M AINTENAN C E T he Franklin County Board of County Commissioners is requesting NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT CITY OF APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA The Apalachicola Board of Adjustment will hold a Public Hearing on Wednesday, September 14, 2011 at 5:00 PM at City Hall, Community Center Meeting Room, 1 Bay Avenue, Apalachicola, Florida to discuss and receive citizen comments on a variance request relating to proposed new construction on the parcel located at the corner of Hwy 98 and 6Th Street (O/R Ofce Residential), more specically described as Block 22, Lots 1 & 2 pursuant to the ofcial zoning map of the City. A Special Meeting will immediately follow. The following variance request items will be discussed and considered: The Apalachicola Land Development Code allows for variance when special circumstances, conditions and/or undue hardships are determined. All interested parties are encouraged to attend and be heard with respect to this request. For further information, contact the Apalachicola Administrative and Community Development Ofce, 1 Avenue E, Apalachicola, Florida 850-653-9319. a) A 20-ft wide, one-story section of a proposed new structure to be constructed 7.5-ft from the westerly property line, no closer than 25-ft to the nearest edge of the service alley driveway and 35-ft from the line of the cemetery boundary fence. b) A 28-ft wide, one-story section of a proposed new structure to be constructed 17-ft from the westerly property line and no closer than 34.6-ft from the nearest edge of the service alley driveway and 44.5-ft from the line of the cemetery boundary fence. c) The construction of a 9.5-ft by 28-ft covered garden entry area to the west of item B above, constructed 7.5-ft from the westerly property line aligned with item A above. d) Site coverage to be 40.53%. www.weemsmemorial.com 135 Avenue G, Apalachicola 850-653-8853 Email : Info@weemsmemorial.com THIS IS MY H OME THIS IS MY H OSPI T AL Our mission is to improve the health status of the residents and visitors to Franklin County, by providing quality, compassionate, cost effective and convenient health care through community leadership and in collaboration with other healthcare organizations which serve our communities. George E Weems M emorial H ospital is afliated with Tallahassee Memorial Healthcare, a 25-bed critical access hospital that offers 24-hour service to our community and its visitors. Our hospital is fully staffed with a warm, caring and professional team 365 days a year. Any time, day or night, you will nd our medical staff ready to assist you when you need it the most! When life-saving, rapid transport for higher level medical services are required, a helipad is located on site. Weems M emorial H ospital. Were H ere For Y ou. W eems offers 24 hour emergency services, inpatient acute care services and a swing-bed program. We offer diagnostic imaging to include: x-ray, CT scan and screening mammogrophy. Our on-site laboratory provides service to our in-patients, as well as out-patients. Our ambulatory services include colonoscopy and endoscopy exams and procedures, cardiology out-patient surgery, podiatry out-patient surgery, and more to come! is $15 for the public and $10 for members of the St. George Lighthouse Association. The recently opened Lighthouse Museum and Gift Shop will be open from 6:30-7:30 p.m. The sun will set at 7:49 p.m., and the moon will rise at 7:45 p.m., an almost simultaneous sunset and moonrise that should be a spectacular sight from the top of the lighthouse. After sunset, people are invited to climb to the top of the lighthouse for a view of the full moon, as space and time permit. Cost is $10 for the general public and $5 for association members. The Cape St. George Light is located in Lighthouse Park at the center of St. George Island, where Island Drive ends at Gulf Beach Drive. Parking is available in lots at either side of the park. Reservations are recommended and can be made by calling the St. George Island Visitor Center at 927-7744 or tollfree at 888-927-7744. Open enrollment for Dream Girls A new club for girls ages 11-17, Dream Girls, is enrolling. Activities for the new group include pageants, eld trips, tutoring and career fairs. Enrollment will be at 5 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 13, at the Community Center in Battery Park. For more information, call Alisa Hendels at 323-2665. Museum Day Sept. 24 The Camp Gordon Johnston World War II Museum will mark National Museum Day on Sept. 24. The museum will be open from 10 a.m. until 5 p.m.; admission is by donation. Come see the new exhibits and gift shop, and enjoy live music from the 40s. Documentaries will be shown throughout the day, with free refreshments. The museum is in the Carrabelle Municipal Complex, 1001 Gray Ave. For directions, visit www. campgordonjohnston.com. Learn more at www.smithsonianmagazine/museumday. Southerland to address GOP dinner The Franklin County Republican Party will host a dinner at 5:30 p.m. Sept. 29 at the Armory in Apalachicola. Honorary guest and speaker will be Rep. Steve Southerland, R-Panama City. Tickets for the dinner, including beverages, are available for $35. For tickets or more information, call Kristy Banks at 653-5043. Capital Area Community Services to trim ofce hours At the Aug. 16 county commission meeting, Dorothy Inman Johnson, director of Capital Area Community Services, said because of severe cuts in federal funding, the agency will reduce services and ofce hours. She said both the Apalachicola ofce in the old Apalachicola High School and the Carrabelle ofce in the old Carrabelle School will remain open but no longer will be staffed full-time, beginning Oct. 1. She said the new hours will be announced later. She asked commissioners to write letters of support for continued funding to the organization to Rep. Steve Southerland and Sen. Bill Nelson. They voted unanimously to do so. Emergency transportation policy Franklin Countys emergency management ofce has had several inquiries recently concerning the countys emergency transportation policy. The policy breaks down into two major categories: special needs or medical and transportation disadvantaged. This excludes the hospital, which has its own policy. In the case of a potential storm, when tropical storm winds are projected to strike in 48 hours, those with special needs will be relocated to shelter areas. These people mainly will be picked up at their residences by Crooms Transportation Service of Apalachicola, though several cases will require EMS ambulance. Those with transportation issues are divided into two groups. If they have any method to get to the designated pickup areas, such as riding with friends, neighbors, walking, etc., they are asked to use it. People with no method to get to the pickup areas will be picked up by one of several local churches and transported to designated pick-up areas. Once there, they will be transported to designated shelters via school buses. These people are in a database at the Emergency Operations Center, maintained by Joyce Durham, special needs coordinator, who can be reached at 653-8977, ext. 2. To be part of this program, individuals must have lled out the required form in person, by phone, by email or at www. franklinemergencymanagement.com. If you know of anyone who ts either of these categories, check with them and be sure they have completed the necessary paperwork, Durham said. We dont want to miss anyone. Carrabelle EDC proposal At Carrabelles Sept. 1 city commission meeting, David Butler presented a draft of proposed guidelines for the Economic Development Council he has been tasked with forming. According to the draft, the EDC will promote opportunities for business growth that increases employment and strengthens the existing economic base. The EDC will act as an advisory board for the commissioners. Butler proposed the EDC be a board with six members and one seat lled by a representative of the St. Joe Company. Butler said the St. Joe representative would provide the board with important business contacts. Commissioner Charlotte Schneider and City Administrator Courtney Millender were tapped to join the board at Thursdays meeting. Carrabelle Thrift Shop approved On Sept. 1, the Carrabelle City Commission voted unanimously to allow Donna and Gary Mathes to open a thrift shop off 12th Street in an area zoned residential. Commissioner Frank Mathes, who is Garys uncle, recused himself from the discussion. Commissioner Cal Allen said the Matheses plan to sell odds and ends out of a trailer on their property. He said the location was off the beaten track, and he did not believe the shop would pose a problem for neighbors. Carrabelle sidewalk parking At Carrabelles Sept. 1 meeting, city commissioners discussed the problem of drivers parking on pedestrian sidewalks. The commission asked City Administrator Courtney Millender to create a typed warning for the police department, to be placed on cars blocking the sidewalk. Commissioners said after a warning, cars improperly parked will be ticketed by the Carrabelle Police Department. BRIEFS from page A3

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Local The Times | A11 Thursday, September 8, 2011 Eastpoint campus 12 buildings, all completed in August 2008, were with out power when school ofcials arrived Tuesday morning. Oehlert said a problem with the main breaker shut off power to Build ings 1200, 800, 700, 600, 500 and the cafeteria and gymnasium. Spared was the building housing the middle school. The middle school carried on as normal, Oehlert said. Some class es doubled up, and we opened all the windows and some of the elemen tary classes met outside because we were blessed today and the weather was good. For elementary students it was an excit ing day. The teachers were up teaching, maybe not under the best condi tions. Marks said the district ofce did not receive any negative comments from the faculty or the public. I was really pleased with the patience and profes sionalism that was exhib ited today, she said. School personnel made immediate repairs to the generator for caf eteria refrigeration, the outside freezer and emer gency lighting. They got repaired right away, Oe hlert said. We didnt lose any food product. When the problem rst developed over the threeday weekend is unclear, although Terry Hilton, an administrator with the food service program, told Oehlert she noticed noth ing amiss when she left the campus after 6 p.m. Monday night. The principal said a quick assessment by Progress Energy work ers Tuesday indicated the problem was not with their power lines, but rested within the electri cal system of the threeyear-old campus, which was built at a cost of about $50 million. Bathrooms in the buildings remained in working order, but light ing inside them is an is sue, Marks said. Water fountains are not work ing in these buildings because current controls this function. Marks said she plans to investigate why there is no emergency genera tor to serve a large por tion of the campus. Although school of cials discussed dismiss ing students early Tues day, they decided the at mosphere at the school did not warrant it. Principal Oehlert walked every building this morning and documented that education was taking place in the affected high school classrooms or on the elementary school grounds, Marks wrote in an email Tuesday after noon. She said based on the attendance policy in the school boards Code of Conduct, school authori ties do not consider this an emergency. Students leaving campus today (Tuesday) will have an un excused absence unless they return with a note from a parent or guardian to Mrs. Karen Smith. The superintendent asked that questions be directed to the districts emergency number, 6702850. put up with me, he said. I want to thank them for four more years. Its just over whelming. I just love them with all my heart, I love the people of Carrabelle, whether they voted for me or not, he said. Im ready to go back at it. Im ready to get things going again and try to get some work in Carrabelle for the people to do, and I think its going to be good. Johnson, re-elected to a second term, said jobs would be his top priority as well. It was not my victory, it was the city of Apalachico las, he said. The people spoke, and they spoke clear ly. They want change, but they want gradual change. But what they want more is jobs, opportunities for their families, Johnson said. Those are the things I heard on the campaign trail. Johnson said his rst priority would be to unify a city beset by divisions over the new Main Street desig nation, which has been wel comed by many, but not all, of the downtown commer cial interests. We have had a divided community over the last couple years, and I dont like that, Johnson said. I want to bring people togeth er. I want everybody on the same page, working for the same goal. In Apalachicola, incum bent city commissioner Mitchell Bartley, 64, coasted to a fourth term in the non partisan city-wide election, winning 519 votes (66.7 per cent) to defeat challenger Jerry Hall, 64, with 259 votes (33.3 percent). I appreciate everyone who turned out for me to to day and trusted me to lead the city for the next four years. God bless them all, Bartley said. To have that trust of your constituents is a great honor, and I appreci ate it. In Carrabelle, in the race to complete the last two years of a four-year term, newcomer Brenda La Paz, 56, surprised incumbent Jim Brown, 87, by garner ing 220 votes to his 190. Im excited, she said. I got a lot to prepare for, a com prehensive plan to read and the city charter and Roberts Rules of Order, of course. La Paz, sister of Carra belle restaurateur Ken La Paz, said she won because she offered a new and ob jective voice, with an eye toward responsible growth in her campaign. I talked a lot to people about keeping health care in this area, she said. I dont want our health de partment to be closed down or limited any more. And the Weems clinic to be truly urgent care. In the race for a full four-year term, incum bents Frank Mathes, 76, and Charlotte Schneider, 49, with 252 and 229 votes respectively, edged out challenger Gene Spivey, 71, with 223 votes. Schneider promised to continue to pursue the mar keting of local businesses and the city as a vacation destination. Jobs are number one, and keeping businesses in business, she said. Were a place you can really get next to and really know someone. Elliott said turnout was 46 percent in Carrabelle and 47 percent in Apala chicola, typical for an offyear, municipal election. MAYORS from page A1 SCHOOL from page A1 MITCHELL BARTLEY FRANK MATHES CHARLOTTE SCHNEIDER BRENDA LA PAZ Eastpoint VFD Pork-O-Thon sells out early The Eastpoint Volunteer Fire De partment sold out within less than an hour of opening shop at the rst ever Pork-O-Thon Saturday. At 12:30 p.m., the sale, scheduled to run until 4 p.m., was over, and As sistant Chief Jim Joyner and Joshua Pruett were turning customers away empty-handed. Joyner said the reghters cooked and sold 80 racks of ribs and 70 Bos ton butts. We cooked all the pork we could buy, he said, noting they or dered cases of meat and then bought up everything they could nd avail able in local stores. Pruett said the sale raised enough money to purchase two sets of light weight protective equipment for the rehouse, costing roughly $5,000. He said it took 16 hours to cook the meat. This was very much a blessing, he said. We thank everybody who turned out. We could have sold a lot more. He said reghters received some generous donations in addition to the revenue from sales. Just as the last ribs were sold, we received a re call from 573 Ridge Road for a smoking electric box, said Richard Radford, adding that re ghters checked the box and found no damage to the trailer or residents. Joyner said the re department plans to make the sale an annual event. LOIS S W O B ODA | The Times Jim Joyner, left, and Joshua Pruett display order slips for ribs and butts at Saturdays Pork-O-Thon.

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, September 8, 2011 The Times | A12 35348T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY Case No.: 11-000019-CA STATE BANK AND TRUST COMPANY, Plaintiff, vs. DANIEL B. COWART and UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF DANIEL B. COWART, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment in Foreclosure dated the 23rd day of August, 2011, entered in Case No. 11000019-CA in the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit of the State of Florida, in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein STATE BANK AND TRUST COMPANY, is Plaintiff, and DANIEL B. COWART and KRIS COWART are Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street in Apalachicola, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on the 5th day of October 2011, the following described Real Property situated in Franklin County, Florida, and set forth in said final judgment, to-wit: BEGIN AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER (BEING THE MOST NORTHERLY CORNER) OF LOT 7, BLOCK AA@ OF THE CORRECTIVE REPLAT NO. 1 OF COCHRAN’S BEACH RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 11, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN SOUTH 20 DEGREES 06 MINUTES 36 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE EASTERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID LOT 7 A DISTANCE OF 200.00 FEET TO THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SAID LOT 7, THENCE RUN SOUTH 70 DEGREES 00 MINUTES WEST 59.68 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 20 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 09 SECONDS WEST 200.00 FEET TO THE SOUTHERLY OF BOUNDARY OF ST. TERESA AVENUE, THENCE RUN NORTH 70 DEGREES 00 MINUTES EAST 59.42 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. AND BEING FURTHER DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGIN AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919) MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 7, BLOCK AA@ OF COCHRAN BEACH UNIT 1, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 14 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, SAID POINT ALSO LYING ON THE SOUTHEASTERLY RIGHT-OFWAY BOUNDARY OF ST. TERESA AVENUE. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN SOUTH 70 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 21 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY A DISTANCE OF 59.26 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919), THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHTOF-WAY BOUNDARY RUN SOUTH 20 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 33 SECONDS EAST 200.09 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #7160), THENCE RUN NORTH 70 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 57 SECONDS EAST 60.0 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #7160), 35347T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 09-000045-CA HSBC BANK USA, N.A., AS TRUSTEE FOR THE REGISTERED HOLDERS OF RENAISSANCE HOME EQUITY LOAN TRUST 2006-1 Plaintiff, vs. JOHN M. THOMPSON A/K/A JOHN THOMPSON; BRITTANIE M. THOMPSON A/K/A BRITTANIE THOMPSON; FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, THROUGH ITS STATE HOUSING INITIATIVE PARTNERSHIP PROGRAM; MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR FIDELITY MORTGAGE, A DIVISION OF DELTA FUNDING CORPORATION; UNKNOWN PERSON(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY; Defendants. RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated August 9, 2011, and entered in Case No. 09-000045-CA, of the Circuit Court of the 2ND Judicial Circuit in and for FRANKLIN County, Florida. HSBC BANK USA, N.A., AS TRUSTEE FOR THE REGISTERED HOLDERS OF RENAISSANCE HOME EQUITY LOAN TRUST 2006-1 is Plaintiff and JOHN M. THOMPSON A/K/A JOHN THOMPSON; BRITTANIE M. THOMPSON A/K/A BRITTANIE THOMPSON; UNKNOWN PERSON(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY; FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, THROUGH ITS STATE HOUSING INITIATIVE PARTNERSHIP PROGRAM; MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR FIDELITY MORTGAGE, A DIVISION OF DELTA FUNDING CORPORATION; are defendants. I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash ON THE FRONT STEPS OF THE COURTHOUSE., at 33 MARKET STREET, APALACHICOLA in FRANKLIN County, FLORIDA, at 11:00 a.m., on the 27 day of September, 2011, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: ALL THAT CERTAIN LAND SITUATE IN FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, VIZ: LOTS 7 AND 8 IN BLOCK 224, GREATER APALACHICOLA, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL MAP NOW IN USE OF THE CITY OF APALACHICOLA, STATE OF FLORIDA. A person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim with 60 days after the sale. Dated this11th day of August, 2011. KENDALL WADE As Clerk of said Court By: Terry E. Creamer As Deputy Clerk This notice is provided pursuant to Administrative Order No.2.065. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to provisions of certain assistance. Please contact the Court Administrator at 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, Fl 32320, Phone No. (904)653-8861, Extension 106 within 2 working days of your receipt of this notice or pleading; if you are hearing impaired, call 1-800955-8771 (TDD); if you are voice impaired, call 1-800-995-8770 (V) (Via Florida Relay Services). Submitted by: Kahane & Associates, P.A. 8201 Peters Road, Suite 3000 Plantation, FL 33324 (954) 382-3486 Fax: (954) 382-5380 Sept 8, 15, 2011 35302T IN THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 10-593-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, Plaintiff, vs. HELEN TOWNSEND SPOHRER, Defendant. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated August 22, 2011, and entered in Civil Action No. 10-593 CA of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein the parties were the Plaintiff, CENTENNIAL BANK, and the Defendant, HELEN TOWNSEND SPOHRER, I will sell to the highest and best bidder, for cash, at 11:00 a.m. (Eastern Time) on the 27th day of September, 2011, at the front steps of the Franklin County Courthouse, Apalachicola, Florida, the followingdescribed real property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: Begin at the Southeast comer of Lot 20, Block E-2 (corner of Market Street and Avenue D) in the City of Apalachicola, Florida, and run Easterly along the boundary line of said Lot, 72 feet to a point, then turn left 90 degrees and run 37 feet to a point, then turn right 90 degrees and run 8 feet to a point, then tun left 90 degrees and run 13.5 feet to a point, then turn left 90 degrees and run 80 feet, more or less, through a party wall to a point on the boundary line of Lot 19 in said Block E2 (facing Market Street); then turn left 90 degrees and run 50.5 feet, more or less, along boundary of Lots 19 and 20 to the Point of Beginning; being a parcel 50.5 feet on Market Street and 72 feet on Avenue D, in Lots 19 and 20 in Block E-2, and 8 feet by 13.5 feet additional Lot 19; together with all improvements thereon; and subject to a party wall agreement recorded in Franklin County Deed Book “R” on page 203; and subject to other party walls and party wall agreement, if any, which are not reimposed hereby. The successful bidder at the sale will be required to place the requisite state documentary stamps on the Certificate of Title. DATED this 22nd day of August, 2011. Hon. MARCIA JOHNSON Clerk of the Court Franklin County, Florida By: Terry E. Creamer As Deputy Clerk Sept 1, 8, 2011 35293T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2009-212 CA CITIZENS BANKWAKULLA, Plaintiff, vs. SIDNEY E. GRAY, JIMMY W. MEEKS, SR., MARINERS LANDING HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION PHASE 1, LLC, WAKULLA BANK, a Florida Banking Company, and FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF DECATUR COUNTY, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT, pursuant to the Amended Stipulated Final Summary Judgment for Re-Establishment and Foreclosure of Note and Mortgage entered in the above-captioned action, I will sell the property situated in Franklin County, Florida, described as follows, to wit: LOT 5, BLOCK 1, OF CARRABELLE RIVER SUBDIVISION, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 21 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. and LOT 4, MARINERS LANDING, PHASE I, AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 7, PAGE 38 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, except as set forth herein after, at public sale on September 27, 2011, at 11:00 a.m. (Eastern Standard Time), or as soon thereafter as the sale may proceed, to the highest bidder for cash, except as prescribed in paragraph 7, at the the front of the courthouse steps at 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida 32320. If you are a subordinate lien holder claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the Clerk of Court no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim, you will not be entitled to any remaining funds. Notice to Persons With Disabilities: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Court Administrator’s office not later than seven days prior to the proceeding. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk Sept 1, 8, 2011 35290T IN THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 10-000564-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, as successor in interest to COASTAL COMMUNITY BANK, Plaintiff, vs. BEACH BUILDERS OF NORTHWEST FLORIDA, INC., DALE ANDERSON, and ANDERSON & SONS CONSTRUCTION, INC., Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated Aug 22, 2011, and entered in Civil Action No. 10-564 CA of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein the parties were the Plaintiff, CENTENNIAL BANK, as successor in interest to COASTAL COMMUNITY BANK, and the Defendants, BEACH BUILDERS OF NORTHWEST FLORIDA, INC., DALE ANDERSON, and ANDERSON & SONS CONSTRUCTION, INC., I will sell to the highest and best bidder, for cash, at 11:00 a.m. (Eastern Time) on the 5th day of October, 2011, at the front steps of the Franklin County Courthouse, Apalachicola, Florida, the following-described real property as set forth in said Judgment of Foreclosure: Lot 6, Block 1, David Brown Estates, a subdivision as per map or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 3, Page 4, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. The successful bidder at the sale will be required to place the requisite state documentary stamps on the Certificate of Title. DATED this 22nd day of August, 2011. Hon. MARCIA JOHNSON Clerk of the Court Franklin County, Florida By: Terry E. Creamer As Deputy Clerk Sept 1, 8, 2011 35291T IN THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 2010-455-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, as successor in interest to COASTAL COMMUNITY BANK, Plaintiff, vs. FISERV TRUST COMPANY, as trustee for the benefit of JANET L. GOOD IRA, DAVID L. GOOD, individually, and JANET L. GOOD, individually, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated August 22, 2011, and entered in Civil Action No. 2010-455 CA of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein the parties were the Plaintiff, CENTENNIAL BANK, as successor in interest to COASTAL COMMUNITY BANK, and the Defendants, FISERV TRUST COMPANY, as trustee for the benefit of JANET L. GOOD IRA, DAVID L. GOOD, individaully, and JANET L. GOOD, individually, I will sell to the highest and best bidder, for cash, at 11:00 a.m. (Eastern Time) on the 5th day of October, 2011, at the front steps of the Franklin County Courthouse, Apalachicola, Florida, the followingdescribed real property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Fore-closure: Lot 4, Block 52, St. George Island Gulf Beaches, Unit 5, a subdivision as per map or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 3, Page 17, located in the public records of Franklin County, Florida. The successful bidder at the sale will be required to place the requisite state documentary stamps on the Certificate of Title. DATED this 23rd day of August, 2011. HON. MARCIA JOHNSON Clerk of the Court Franklin County, Florida By: Michele Maxwell As Deputy Clerk Sept 1, 8, 2011 35280T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2010-000607-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, as successor in interest to COAST COMMUNITY BANK, a Florida banking corporation, Plaintiff, vs. RUSSELL S. DOSTER, DIANE T. DOSTER and MATTHEW E. DOSTER, Defendants, NOTICE OF JUDICIAL SALE PURSUANT TO SECTION 45.031 OF THE FLORIDA STATUTES TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure of Mortgage and Ordering Sale entered on August 23, 2011, in Case Number 2010-000607CA of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit for Franklin County, Florida, in which CENTENNIAL BANK is Plaintiff, and RUSSELL S. DOSTER, DIANE T. DOSTER and MATTHEW E. DOSTER are Defendants, I, Marcia M. Johnson, Clerk of Circuit Court, will sell at public sale the following described real property: As to Count I: Lot 8, Block 65, as per the Official Map of the City of Apalachicola, as recorded in Deed Book M, Page 438, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. As to Count II: Lot 10, Block 65, as per the Official Map of the City of Apalachicola, as recorded in Deed Book M, Page 438, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida The sale will be held on October 19, 2011, at 11:00 A.M. (Eastern Time) to the highest and best bidder for cash, at the front door of the Franklin County Courthouse in Apalachicola, Florida, in accordance with Section 45.031 of the Florida Statutes. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 23rd day of August, 2011. MARCIA M. JOHNSON Clerk of Court By: Michele Maxwell As Deputy Clerk Sept 1, 8, 2011 35194T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 08-000084-CA SUNTRUST MORTGAGE, INC., Plaintiff, vs. DAVID A. TITSCH, et al Defendants. AGREED ORDER RESCHEDULING FORECLOSURE SALE THIS CAUSE having come before the Court upon Plaintiff, SUNTRUST MORTGAGE, INC.’s (“STM”) Motion to Reschedule Expedited Foreclosure Sale, and the Court having reviewed the Motion and the Court file, and being otherwise fully advised in the premises it is hereby: ORDERED AND ADJUDGED ad follows: 1. STM’s Motion is hereby GRANTED. 2. The foreclosure sale is this action is hereby rescheduled for the next available sale dated September 21, 2011, at 11a.m. 3. The Clerk is instructed to issue Certificate of Title ten (10) days from the sale date. DONE AND ORDERED on this 8th of August, 2011. Angela Dempsey Circuit Court Judge Sept 8, 15, 2011 35269T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 19-2008-CA-000590 BANK OF NEW YORK AS SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A. AS TRUSTEE SAMI 2005-AR4, Plaintiff, vs. GARY C PANGUS, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated Aug 8, 2011, and entered in Case No. 19-2008-CA-000590 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida in which Bank of New York as Successor In Interest to JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A. as Trustee SAMI 2005AR4, is the Plaintiff and Gary C. Pangus, Jane Doe, n/k/a Angela Garmley, are defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in/on, Franklin County, Florida at on the 27th day of September, 2011, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: LOTS I AND 2, IN BLOCK 208 OF THE CITY OF APALACHICOLA, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF NOW IN COMMON USE. A/K/A 316 12TH STREET APALACHICOLA FL Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated in Franklin County, Florida this 23rd day of Aug, 2011. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of the Circuit Court Franklin County, Florida By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons needing special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the Clerk of the Courts, Marcia M. Johnson, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, FL 32320; telephone number (850) 653-8861, not later than seven (7) days prior to this proceeding. If you are hearing or voice impaired, please call (850) 577-4400. To file response please contact Franklin County Clerk of Court, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, FL 32320, Tel: (850) 653-8861; Fax: (850) 653-9339. Sept 1, 8, 2011 3494T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 09-000342-CA ONEWEST BANK, FSB, AS SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO INDYMAC FEDERAL BANK, FSB, SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO INDYMAC BANK, F.S.B Plaintiff, vs. SUSAN GEORGETTE COLSON; LARRY JOE COLSON; JIMMY C. CREAMER; CAROLYN T. CREAMER; MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR FINANSURE HOME LOANS, LLC; UNKNOWN PERSON (S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated July 6, 2011, and entered in Case No. 09-000342CA, of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for FRANKLIN County, Florida. ONEWEST BANK, FSB, AS SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO INDYMAC FEDERAL BANK, FSB, SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO INDYMAC BANK, F.S.B is Plaintiff and SUSAN GEORGETTE COLSON; LARRY JOE COLSON; JIMMY C. CREAMER; CAROLYN T. CREAMER; UNKNOWN PERSON(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY; MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR FINANSURE HOME LOANS, LLC; are defendants. I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at ON THE FRONT STEPS OF THE COURTHOUSE., AT 33 MARKET STREET, APALACHICOLA IN FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, at 11:00 a.m., on the 26th day of October, 2011, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 35, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST, AND RUN SOUTH ALONG THE SECTION LINE 1200 FEET TO A POINT WHICH IS THE POINT OF BEGINNING OF THE LAND TO BE DESCRIBED; THENCE RUN EAST 660 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 190 FEET, THENCE RUN WEST 660 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 190 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, LESS AND EXCEPT THEREFROM A STRIP OF LAND APPROXIMATELY 45 FEET WIDE, MORE OR LESS, ALONG THE WEST SIDE OF SAID LAND NOW IN THE RIGHT OF WAY OF STATE ROAD 384. A person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim with 60 days after the sale. Dated this 28th day of July, 2011. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of Court As Clerk of said Court By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk This notice is provided pursuant to Administrative Order No.2.065. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to provisions of certain assistance. Please contact the Court Administrator at 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, Fl 32320, Phone No. (904) 653-8861, Extension 106 within 2 working days of your receipt of this notice or pleading; if you are hearing impaired, call 1-800955-8771 (TDD); if you are voice impaired, call 1-800-995-8770 (V) (Via Florida Relay Services). Submitted by: Kahane & Associates, P.A. 8201 Peters Road, Ste.3000 Plantation, FL 33324 Telephone: (954) 382-3486 Telefacsimile: (954) 382-5380 09-16447 OWB Sept 1, 8, 2011 35229T PUBLIC NOTICE FRANKLIN COUNTY SOLICITS BIDS FOR THE PROVISION OF FUNERAL SERVICES FOR THE DISPOSITION OF UNCLAIMED DEAD BODIES PURSUANT TO Part II, CH. 406, FLORIDA STATUES, INCLUDING TRANSPORTATION OF BODIES WHICH ARE UNCLAIMED OR AT THE REQUEST OF LAW ENFORCEMENT OR THE MEDICAL EXAMINER Notice is hereby given that Franklin County, a political subdivision of the State of Florida, requests bids for funeral services for the disposition of unclaimed dead bodies pursuant to Ch. 406, Florida Statutes, including, but not necessarily limited to, burial and transportation. Bidders are required to bid on all services required by Part II, Ch. 406, Florida Statutes and shall bid on all transportation costs. The bids shall at a minimum set forth an itemization of all of the costs for disposition, transportation of unclaimed dead bodies or transportation at the request of law enforcement and/or the medical examiner, interment of the body, body bags and all associated costs for such services. There shall be no additional fees or expenses paid except such as are specifically set forth in the bid. All bids shall be delivered to the Clerk of Court no later than September 16, 2011 at 4:00 p.m. (ET), at the Franklin County Clerk’s Office, Suite 203, Apalachicola, Florida 32320. All bidders are required to submit seven copies of their bid in a sealed envelope marked “Funeral Services.” All bidders shall also submit a statement that they have reviewed all the requirements of Part 11, Ch. 406, Florida Statute, and that the bid submitted contains all expenses for funeral services, interment and all transportation services. All bids shall be opened on September 20, 2011 at 11:00 a.m. (ET). at 34 Forbes Street, Apalachicola, Florida in the County Commission Meeting Room. Franklin County reserves the right to reject any and all bids. Sept 1, 8, 2011 35365 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 08-000364-CA U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, SUCCESSOR TRUSTEE TO BANK OF AMERICA N.A. (SUCCESSOR TO LASALLE BANK N.A.), AS TRUSTEE, ON BEHALF OF THE HOLDERS OF THE THORNBURG MORTGAGE SECURITIES TRUST 2005-3 MORTGAGE LOAN PASSTHROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-3, Plaintiff, vs. JEFFREY S. GALLOWAY a/k/a JEFFREY GALLOWAY a/k/a JEFF GALLOWAY; APALACHICOLA STATE BANK, A DIVISION OF COASTAL BANK; ROSPERITY BANK; RBC BANK (USA) f/k/a RBC CENTURA BANK; UNKNOWN SPOUSE n/k/a SHELLIE GALLOWAY; UNKNOWN TENANT(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE is hereby given that the undersigned, Marcia Johnson, Clerk of the Circuit Court of Franklin County, Florida, will on the 5th day of October 2011, at 11:00 o’clock A.M., EST, in the Civil Division of the Franklin County Clerk’s Office, Main Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida in accordance with Chapter 45, FS., offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash, the following described property situated in Franklin County, Florida, to wit: Lot 2, SCHOONER LANDING PHASE 1, according to the Plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 6, Page 5, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida pursuant to the Consent Final Judgment entered in a case pending in said Court, the style and case number of which is set forth above. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the office of Sirote & Permutt, 1115 E. Gonzalez Street, Pensacola, Florida 32503, (850) 462-1500, within two (2) working days of your receipt of this Notice of Foreclosure Sale; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 1-800-955-8771. WITNESS my hand and official seal of this Honorable Court, this 26th day of August, 2011. MARCIA JOHNSON Clerk of the Circuit Court of Franklin County, Florida By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk Submitted By: Sirote & Permutt, PC Attorneys for Plaintiff 1115 E. Gonzalez St. Pensacola, FL 32503 850-462-1500 Fax: 850-462-1599 Sept 8, 15, 2011

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, September 8, 2011 The Times |A13 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322850-697-9604 850-323-0444 www.seacrestre.comRENTALS2 BR 1 BA MOBILE HOME Fenced Yard ....................................................$500 3 BR 1 BA UNFURNISHED APARTMENT Clean, W/D, Includes, Water, End Unit ............$565 2 BR 2 BA MOBILE HOME 2 Lots ..............................................................$500 3 BR 3 BA FURNISHED CONDO Long Term, Pool..............................................$850 2 BA 1 BA FURNISHED APARTMENT Den & Living Area ..........................................$550 3 BR 2 BA FURNISHED CONDO Boat & Car Parking ..............................$850 WKLY 3 BR 3 BA FURNISHED CONDO Pool, Downtown ....................................$700 WKLY 2 BR 1 BA APARTMENT Water View, Water Included, End Unit ............$500 3 BR 1 BA FURNISHED APARTMENT Pet Friendly, Wkly & Monthly Rates RENTAL RESERVATIONISTFickling Vacation Rentals is looking for an experienced rental reservationist, F/T or P/T. Must have good customer service and computer skills. Pick up application at Fickling office on Island. Crooms Inc is accepting applications for full-time and part-time drivers. Successful applicants: € Be at least 25 (twenty-“ ve) years of age € Have an valid drivers license (CDL preferred but not required) € Provide a 3-year driving history with no more than 3 points on your license € Undergo a criminal background check € Pass a DOT (Dept. Of Transportation) mandated physical & drug screening Applications are available at Crooms Inc., 133 Highway 98, Apalachicola, FLCrooms, Inc is an equal opportunity employer. ToPlace Your Classified ad inCall Our New Numbers Now!Call: 850-747-5020 Toll Free: 800-345-8688 Fax: 850-747-5044 Email: thestar@pcnh.com thetimes@pcnh.com theAPALACHICOLA & CARRABELLETIMES CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW 1 br, 1 ba with full kitchen and living room Call for information 850-653-6103 Apartment avail. Lanark Village, Can be a 1 or 2 br, with sunroom $450 month + $250 deposit (850) 509-2460 Eastpoint ApartmentsAccepting applications for 1, 2 & 3 bedroom handicap and non-handicap units. Rental assistance is available to qualified applicants. 45 Begonia Street, Eastpoint, FL 32328. Call (850) 670-4024, TDD/TTY 711. “This institution is an equal opportunity provider and employer” Publisher’s NoticeAll real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on a equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. St. George Island $160 wk, Electric, Satellite, Garbage incl. pool tble. 12’X65’ deck w/Beautiful view 850-653-5114 Apalachicola Condo. 2 br, 2 bath, with newer paint, tile, carpet $825 month. *Ref Checked* Quint 865-693-3232 1 or 3 BRCH/A in Apalachicola, FL. 850-643-7740. Apalachicola2 br, 1 ba 6 mo to 1 yr lse. $725 mo + $500 dep. Call (850) 653-5441 Vegetables U pick! We pick!peas, black eyes, pink eyed purple hull, zipper and white acre. Also Okra and green boiling peanuts. Raker Farms 1087 Lonnie Raker Lane. Crawfordville Fl 32327 850-926-7561 GeneralInfant/ Toddler Caregiversare needed to provide quality early care and education to children ages 0-3 yrs. AA/AS preferred; FCCPC (CDA) accepted with a willingness to further education. Experience working with preschool children is a must. Excellent benefits package! Apply at: Early Education and Care, Inc. 162 Avenue “E” Apalachicola, FL 32320 EOE M/F/V/D DFWP Web-Id 34174311 Medical/HealthWeems MemorialIs now hiring for the following positions: Controller ARNP or PA RN Lab Technician EMT Dietician Applications are available atwww weemsmemorial.com and may be submitted to Ginny Griner, WMH HR Director, ggriner@ weemsmemorial.com or FAXED to 850-653-1879 Web ID 34173429 Movie Extras to stand in background for major film. Earn up to $300 per day. Experience not required. 877-824-6274 35371T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 09-000395-CA DIVISION: AURORA LOAN SERVICES, LLC, Plaintiff, vs. LISA A. GLOVER A/K/A LISA ANN GLOVER, et al., Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated August 23, 2011, and entered in Case No. 09-000395-CA of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida in which Aurora Loan Services, LLC, is the Plaintiff and Lisa A. Glover, Tim L. Glover, Sunset Beach Owners’ Association, Inc., are defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in/on, Franklin County, Florida at on the 12th day of October, 2011, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: LOT 30, SUNSET BEACH, PHASE 1, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF OF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 6, PAGE 6, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 1884 SUNSET DR., EASTPOINT, FL 32328 Any person claiming an interest in this surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated in Franklin County, Florida this 26th day of August, 2011. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Attorney for Plaintiff Albertelli Law P.O. Box 23028 Tampa, FL 33623 (813) 221-4743 MAT-10-65441 In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons needing special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the Clerk of the Courts, Marcia M. Johnson, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, FL 32320; telephone number (850) 653-8861, not later than seven (7) days prior to this proceeding. If you are hearing or voice impaired, please call (850) 577-4400. To file response please contact Franklin County Clerk of Court, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, FL 32320, Tel: (850) 653-8861; Fax: (850) 653-9339. Sept 8, 15, 2011 Incorrect Insertion PolicyFor Classified In-column AdvertisersAll ads placed by phone are read back to the advertiser to insure correctness. The newspaper will assume correctness at the time of the read-back procedure unless otherwise informed. Please your ad. Advertisers are requested to check the advertisement on the first insertion for correctness. Errors should be reported immediately. Your Florida Freedom newspaper will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion, nor will it be liable for any error in advertisements to a greater extent than the cost of the space occupied by the error. Any copy change, during an ordered schedule constitutes a new ad and new charges. We do not guarantee position of ANY ad under any classification. YORKIE AKC Beautiful Female Puppy10 weeks old, 1st shots and comes with a health certificate $500 Own mom & dad. Call 850-554-0320 Panama City 35228T PUBLIC NOTICE FRANKLIN COUNTY SOLICITS BIDS FOR THE SALE OF REAL PROPERTY IN LANARK VILLAGE Franklin County desires to sell a parcel of real property and hereby solicits bids for the sale of real property located in Lanark Village, Florida, whose address is 160 Arizona Street, Lanark Village, Florida. The parcel identification number is 14-07S04W-3131-0000-0050 and is described as Unit 1, Block D, Lot 5, Lanark Beach. Subject to the bid minimum of $50,000.00, the property will be sold to the highest and best bidder in its “AS IS” condition by quit claim deed. Closing to occur within 60 days of bid award. The buyer shall, in addition to the bid, pay all costs of closing, including all past due assessments and taxes. The successful bidder shall enter into the standard Florida Bar “AS IS” contract for the purchase and sale of real estate. The minimum bid shall be $50,000.00. All bids shall be delivered to the Clerk of Court, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, Florida in a sealed enveloped marked “Lanark Village Property Bid” and must be received by the Clerk no later than 4:00 p.m. (ET) September 16, 2011. Seven copies of your bid must be contained within the envelope. The bids shall be opened on September 20, 2011 at 11:10 a.m. at the Franklin County Commission Meeting Room located at 34 Forbes Street, Apalachicola, Florida. Franklin County reserves the right to reject any and all bids. Sept 1, 8, 2011 35369T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2nd JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY Case No.: 2009-CA-000401 Division #: BAC Home Loans Servicing, L.P. f/k/a Countrywide Home Loans Servicing L.P. Plaintiff, vs. Debora F. Silva a/k/a Deborah Silva, an Unremarried Widow and Surviving Spouse of James F. Silva a/k/a James Silva, Deceased; Unknown Parties in Possession #1; Unknown Parties in Possession #2; If living, and all Unknown Parties claiming by, through, under and against the above named Defendant(s) who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said Unknown Parties may claim an interest as Spouse, Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, or Other Claimants Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order of Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated August 23, 2011, entered in Civil Case No. 2009-CA-000401 of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida wherein BAC Home Loans Servicing, L.P. f/k/a Countrywide Home Loans Servicing, L.P., Plaintiff and Debora F. Silva a/k/a Deborah Silva, an Unremarried Widow and Surviving Spouse of James F. Silva a/k/a James Silva, Deceased are defendant(s), I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash AT THE WEST FRONT DOOR OF THE FRANKLIN COUNTY COURTHOUSE, LOCATED ON HWY 98, IN APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA, AT 11:00 A.M. on October 26, 2011, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit: BEGIN AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 4, BLOCK “14”, OF GULF COLONY INC.. UNIT ONE, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 25 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA AND THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 10 MINUTES 55 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE EASTERLY RIGHT-OFWAY BOUNDARY OF APALACHEE STREET 175.05 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261) MARKING A POINT OF CURVE TO THE RIGHT, THENCE RUN NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY AND SAID CURVE HAVING A RADIUS OF 24.68 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 90 DEGREES 43 MINUTES 25 SECONDS, FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 39.09 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261) MARKING THE POINT OF TANGENCY, SAID POINT LYING ON THE SOUTHERLY RIGHTOF-WAY BOUNDARY OF BAY SHORE DRIVE, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 51 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 125.01 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261) SAID POINT BEING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 5, BLOCK “14” OF SAID GULF COLONY INC., SUBDIVISION, THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT-OFWAY BOUNDARY RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 12 SECONDS EAST 190.51 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261), THENCE RUN SOUTH 86 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 51 SECONDS WEST 1.99 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261) LYING ON THE EAST BOUNDARY OF LOT 4, BLOCK “14” OF SAID SUBDIVISION, THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 16 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID EAST BOUNDARY OF SAID LOT 5 A DISTANCE OF 9.20 FEET TO A RE-ROD MARKING THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SAID LOT 5, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 15 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARY OF SAID LOT 5 A DISTANCE OF 150.31 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of the Circuit Court Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk of Court Submitted By: ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF: SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACHE, LLP 4630 Woodland Corporate Blvd. Suite 100 Tampa, FL 33614 (813) 880-8888 (813) 880-8800 Sept 8, 15, 2011 35352T PUBLIC NOTICE FRANKLIN COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISIONERS REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATIONS For LANDFILL OPERATION, MANAGEMENT AND MAINTENANCE The Franklin County Board of County Commissioners is requesting statements of qualifications from any qualified person or firm interested in contracting with Franklin County for landfill operation, management and maintenance. Qualifications must be submitted to the Franklin County Clerk of Court, Franklin County Courthouse, Suite 201, 33 Commerce Street, Apalachicola, Florida, 32320 no later than Friday, September 30, 2011, at 4:30 p.m., E.T. Submissions should be in a sealed envelope marked “Landfill Qualifications” and “Name of Person or Firm”. Bids will be opened on Tuesday, October 4, 2011 at the regular meeting of the FCBCC. At a minimum, qualifications required by the FCBCC for landfill provider(s) are as follows: Provision of proof of Liability Insurance One (1) original and seven (7) copies of the response to the RFQ must be submitted Submittal must be signed by the person or authorized person (if firm submits). Submittal must include at a minimum: Name, address, telephone number of the person or firm submitting qualifications. *Qualifications, certifications and educational professional resume(s) of all persons that would provide services under this contract. *A straight forward, concise description of capabilities. *References: The Franklin County Board of County Commissioners reserves the right to reject any or all bids deemed in the best interest of the County. FRANKLIN COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COIMNIISSIONERS Sept 8, 22, 2011 35357T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 19 2009 CA 000338 WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. AS SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO WACHOVIA BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Plaintiff, vs. MARVIN JACK DAVIDSON A/K/A MARVIN DAVIDSON, ET AL Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to the Summary Final Judgment in Foreclosure dated APRIL 26, 2010 and entered in Case No. 19 2009 CA 000338 of the Circuit Court of the 2ND Judicial Circuit in and for FRANKLIN County, Florida, wherein WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. AS SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO WACHOVIA BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION is Plaintiff and MARVIN JACK DAVIDSON A/K/A MARVIN DAVIDSON; PRISCILLA KAY DAVIDSON A/K/A PRISCILLA DAVIDSON; _____, AS THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF MARVIN JACK DAVIDSON A/K/A MARVIN DAVIDSON, IF ANY; JOHN DOE OR ANY OTHER PERSON IN POSSESSION; ____, AS THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF PRISCILLA DAVIDSON A/K/A PRISCILLA KAY DAVIDSON, IF ANY; are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the ON THE FRONT STEPS OF THE COURTHOUSE. of the FRANKLIN County Courthouse, in FRANKLIN County, Florida, at 11:00 am, on the 5th day of OCTOBER, 2011, the following described property as set forth in said Order or Final Judgment, to wit: SEE EXHIBIT “A” ATTACHED HERETO. EXHIBIT “A” Lot 15, Gulfview Acres, more particularly described as follows: Commencing at the Northwest corner of Section 7, Township 7 South, Range 3 West and run thence S 89 23’ 30” E along North line of said section 2,543.08 feet to a concrete monument on the Southeasterly boundary of a 60.0 foot street (known as Third Street); then run S 62 58’ 20” W long Southeasterly boundary of said street, 1.221.5 feet to an angle point; then run S 62 29’ 00” W long Southeasterly boundary of said street 1,391.2 feet to a point intersecting the Westerly boundary of “H” Street, said point of intersection marked by a permanent concrete monument; then run S 27 37’ E along Westerly boundary of said “H” Street, 699.0 feet to the Point of Beginning; from said Point of Beginning continue S 27 37’ E along Westerly boundary of said “H” Street 244.35 feet to a point intersecting the Northerly boundary of Second Street; then run S 62 29’ W along Northerly boundary of said Second Street 356.52 feet; then run N 27 37’ W, 244.35 feet; then run N 62 29’ E 356.52 feet to the point of beginning. Being in the West half of Fractional Section 7, Township 7 South, Range 3 West, Franklin County, Florida. Street Address: 130 HINTON STREET, CARRABELLE, FL 32322 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS my hand and the seal of the Court this 26 day of August, 2011. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of Court By: Terry E. Creamer This notice is provided pursuant to Administrative Order No. 2.065. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to provisions of certain assistance. Please contact the Court Administrator at 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, FL 32320, Phone No. (904) 653-8861, Extension 106 within 2 working days of your receipt of this notice or pleading; if you are hearing impaired, call 1-800955-8771 (TDD); if you are voice impaired, call 1-800-995-8770 (V) (Via Florida Relay Services). Submitted by: MOSKOWITZ, MANDELL, SALIM & SIMOWITZ, P.A. 800 Corporate Drive, Suite 500 Fort Lauderdale, FL 33334 Sept 8, 15, 2011 35349T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY Case No.: 11-000025-CA UNITED COMMUNITY BANK, Plaintiff, vs. STANLEY B. ROBERSON and UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF STANLEY B. ROBERSON, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment in Foreclosure dated the 23rd day of August, 2011, entered in Case No. 11000025CA in the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit of the State of Florida, in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein UNITED COMMUNITY BANK, is Plaintiff, and STANLEY B. ROBERSON and UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF STANLEY B. ROBERSON n/k/a Shirley B. Roberson, are Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street in Apalachicola, Florida, at 11:00 a.m., Eastern Time, on the 5th day of October, 2011, the following described Real Property situated in Franklin County, Florida, and set forth in said final judgment, to-wit: Lot 8 of RIVER BLUFFS, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 6, Page(s) 18, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS my hand and the official seal of this Honorable Court, on this 24th day of October, 2011. MARCIA JOHNSON Clerk of Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk In accordance with the Americans With Disabilities Act, persons needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact MARCIA JOHNSON, Clerk of Circuit Court, Franklin County not later than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding at Telephone 850/ 653-8861. Sept 8, 15, 2011 THENCE RUN NORTH 20 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 17 SECONDS WEST 200.14 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS my hand and the official seal of this Honorable Court, on this 24th day of August, 2011. MARCIA JOHNSON Clerk of Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk In accordance with the Americans With Disabilities Act, persons needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact MARCIA JOHNSON, Clerk of Circuit Court, Franklin County not later than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding at Telephone 850/ 653-8861. Sept 8, 15, 2011 35303T IN THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 11-137-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, as successor in interest to COASTAL COMMUNITY BANK, Plaintiff, vs. BEACH BUILDERS OF NORTHWEST FLORIDA, INC., and DALE ANDERSON, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated August 22, 2011, and entered in Civil Action No. 2011-137-CA of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein the parties were the Plaintiff, CENTENNIAL BANK, as successor in interest to COASTAL COMMUNITY BANK, and the Defendants, BEACH BUILDERS OF NORTHWEST FLORIDA, INC., and DALE ANDERSON, I will sell to the highest and best bidder, for cash, at 11:00 a.m. (Eastern Time) on the 5th day of October, 2011, at the front steps of the Franklin County Courthouse, Apalachicola, Florida, the following-described real property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: Lot 13, Block B, MAGNOLIA RIDGE, PHASE I, according to the plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 7, at Page 26, in the Office of the Clerk of the Circuit Court, Franklin County, Florida. The successful bidder at the sale will be required to place the requisite state documentary stamps on the Certificate of Title. DATED this 22nd day of August, 2011. Hon. MARCIA JOHNSON Clerk of the Court Franklin County, Florida By: Terry E. Creamer As Deputy Clerk Sept 1, 8, 2011

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Local A14 | The Times Thursday, September 8, 2011 Our local real estate experts have identied what they feel are the best values around and are oering them to you in Real Estate Picks! (In this section), Discover the best real estate values in Mexico Beach, Port St. Joe, Apalachicola, Cape San Blas, St. George Island, Carrabelle and surrounding areas. Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Real Estate Picks John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.com MLS#244767 $675,000 St. George Island QUALITY HOME FOR THE DISCERNING BUYER Architect designed 4 BR, 4.5 BA, 2nd living area could be 5th BR, Secluded Pool & waterfall, Outstanding Kitchen, Fireplace, Cherry ceilings in LR, Tile Floors, Beautiful Decor, Anderson Windows, Elevator Shaft, Speakers throughout, Landscaping, high lot in the exclusive Plantation on Elm Ct. John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.com MLS#244722 $409,000 St. George Island VINTAGE BEACH HOME 3 BR, 2 BA, Great room, Spacious kitchen, Immaculately maintained, Easy beach access just across the street, Ample parking and room for a boat/trailer, Outdoor shower & downstairs storage area, Decks front & back. West Gorrie Dr. Listed by Michael Billings INVITATION TO BID PROJECT: FRANKLIN COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD BAYSIDE ENVIRONMENTAL LAB LOCATION: Eastpoint, Florida P.S.B.I., Lic. #CGC1516731, the Construction Manager, invites your rm to submit a sealed bid for the above referenced project in accordance with the plans, specications, bid packages and other applicable documents. BID PACKAGES BP#2.1 Fences & Gates BP#3 Concrete Walkways BP#3.1 Concrete Pilings BP#5 Miscellaneous Structural Steel BP#7 Rough Carpentry Materials BP#7.1 Rough Carpentry Labor Only DRAWINGS & BID PACKAGES: Drawings & Bid packages are available from the Construction Manager after August 29, 2011. To request a bid package please call Justin Dennington or Jane Scott at the Construction Managers oce at (850) 576-7189 or e-mail justindennington@psbionline.com or janescott@psbionline.com BID SECURITY AND BOND REQUIREMENTS: Bid Bond and Performance Bond required for all packages over $100,000.00 BID OPENING: Sealed bids shall be received & publicly read aloud on the following date and location: Date: ursday, September 27, 2011 Time: 2:00 P.M. (EST) Location: Eastpoint Church of God 379 Avenue A Eastpoint, Florida 32328 SUBCONTRACTOR WORKSHOPS: One (1) non-mandatory subcontractor workshops will be held on the date, time and location indicated below. Representation by all subcontractors desiring to bid the project is highly encouraged to a minimum of one (1) of the workshops. WORKSHOP #1 Date: Tuesday, September 13, 2011 Time: 5:30 P.M. (EST) Location: Willie Speed Board Room 85 School Road Eastpoint, Florida 32328 e Construction Manager reserves the right to waive any irregularities and to reject any and all bids in the best interest of the owner. WEEKLY ALMANAC APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE TIDE TABLES MONTHLY AVERAGES To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from these given for APALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW Cat Point Minus 0:40 Minus 1:17 East Pass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27 To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from those given for CARRABELLE: HIGH LOW Bald Point Minus 9:16 Minus 0:03 Sponsor the WEEKLY ALMANAC Call Today! 653-8868 Date High Low % Precip Thu, Sep 8 82 69 10 % Fri, Sep 9 82 69 40 % Sat, Sep 10 84 74 40 % Sun, Sep 11 84 74 30 % Mon, Sep 12 85 73 30 % Tues, Sep 13 85 74 30 % Wed, Sep 14 87 75 60 % 9/8 Thu 03:41AM 1.5 H 07:46AM 1.3 L 12:59PM 1.8 H 09:17PM 0.3 L 9/9 Fri 03:58AM 1.6 H 08:44AM 1.2 L 02:15PM 1.8 H 09:55PM 0.4 L 9/10 Sat 04:14AM 1.6 H 09:31AM 1.0 L 03:14PM 1.8 H 10:27PM 0.5 L 9/11 Sun 04:26AM 1.6 H 10:12AM 0.9 L 04:04PM 1.8 H 10:52PM 0.7 L 9/12 Mon 04:36AM 1.6 H 10:49AM 0.7 L 04:49PM 1.7 H 11:12PM 0.8 L 9/13 Tue 04:46AM 1.7 H 11:23AM 0.6 L 05:33PM 1.7 H 11:28PM 0.9 L 9/14 Wed 04:58AM 1.8 H 11:54AM 0.5 L 06:18PM 1.7 H 11:43PM 1.0 L 9/8 Thu 02:16AM 2.4 H 05:33AM 2.1 L 11:34AM 2.9 H 07:04PM 0.5 L 9/9 Fri 02:33AM 2.6 H 06:31AM 1.9 L 12:50PM 2.9 H 07:42PM 0.6 L 9/10 Sat 02:49AM 2.6 H 07:18AM 1.6 L 01:49PM 2.9 H 08:14PM 0.8 L 9/11 Sun 03:01AM 2.6 H 07:59AM 1.4 L 02:39PM 2.9 H 08:39PM 1.1 L 9/12 Mon 03:11AM 2.6 H 08:36AM 1.1 L 03:24PM 2.7 H 08:59PM 1.3 L 9/13 Tue 03:21AM 2.7 H 09:10AM 1.0 L 04:08PM 2.7 H 09:15PM 1.4 L 9/14 Wed 03:33AM 2.9 H 09:41AM 0.8 L 04:53PM 2.7 H 09:30PM 1.6 L Special to The Times The Dollar General Literacy Foundation has awarded the Apalachicola Bay Charter School with a $4,000 back-to-school grant to fund programs, equipment, materials or software for the schools library or literacy pro gram. The Dollar General Literacy Foundation is proud to support Apala chicola Bay Charter Schools literacy initia tives, said Rick Dreiling, Dollar Generals chair man and CEO. They are preparing students for a bright future by teaching them to read and instill ing in them a love of learn ing. Since its founding, Dol lar General has commit ted to supporting literacy and education. To further this support, the company founded the Dollar General Literacy Foundation in 1993 to im prove the functional lit eracy of adults and fami lies by providing grants to nonprofit organizations dedicated to the advance ment of literacy. The foundation has awarded more than $61.7 million in grants to non profit organizations, help ing more than 3.7 million individuals take their first steps toward literacy, a general education diploma or English proficiency. For more information on the Dollar General Lit eracy Foundation or for a complete list of grant re cipients, visit www.dglit eracy.org. Dollar General, a lead ing discount retailer, has more than 9,600 neigh borhood stores in 35 states, offering consum able basic items such as food, snacks, health and beauty aids and cleaning supplies, as well as basic apparel, housewares and seasonal items. On Sunday, Aug. 21, Bill Roberts, author of Light houses and Living Along the Coast was on hand to autograph books at the soft opening of the St. George Island Lighthouse Keepers House and Mu seum. More than 100 peo ple attended the opening. The Keepers House in cludes a gift shop and ex hibits related to the Cape St. George Light including a timeline dedicated to the memory of lighthouse vol unteer Penny Angel. The rst phase of the museum exhibits focuses on the need for a lighthouse on St. George Island and the history of the lighthouse, rst built in 1833 and re constructed in 1848, 1852 and 2008. Tickets for climbing the lighthouse are now avail able at the gift shop. The museum and gift shop will be open the same hours as the Cape St. George Light house: Monday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Sunday from noon to 5 p.m., and closed on Thursdays. For more information, please contact Terry Kemp at 927-2000. LOIS SWOBODA | The Times Bill Roberts signs copies of his book Lighthouses and Living Along the Coast Aug. 21 at the soft opening of the St. George Island Lighthouse Keepers House and Museum. Author signs books at lighthouse Dollar General gives grant to ABC School Jim and Juanita Browns goat Oreo has found a new home. Jim Brown said she has relocated to a home outside Tallahassee where she will join 18 other goats in a fenced 14-acre compound. He said when Oreo arrived at her new home, the new owner called the other goats over. When they had gathered, Oreo stood on her back legs as if to say, Here I am. The other goats just stood there, and eventually all of them, including Oreo, wandered away, Brown said. When he and his wife, Juanita, checked on Oreo a few days later, she was happily grazing with the herd. I wish you could have seen it, said Jim Brown. Now she will be safe from bears. Oreos mother, Coco, was killed by a bear in Carrabelle on Aug. 23. (See Black bear kills pet goat, Sept. 1 Times.) Many thanks to everyone who called the Apalachicola/ Carrabelle Times and the Browns to ask about Oreo. Photo and Story By Lois Swoboda ORPHANED GOA T FINDS NEW HOME


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