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The Apalachicola times
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100380/00136
 Material Information
Title: The Apalachicola times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: H.W. Johnston
Place of Publication: Apalachicola Fla
Apalachicola Fla
Publication Date: 07-21-2010
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1885.
General Note: Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 32911693
lccn - sn 95026907
System ID: UF00100380:00136
 Related Items
Preceded by: Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by: Apalachicola herald

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PHOTO COURTESY S ANDRA R ICKARDS Inset Joseph Rickards, on his graduation from Gretchen Everhart School. Left Joseph Rickards uses his cane to maneuver through the shelves of the hardware store together with Bertha Hyche, from the Division of Blind Services. Above Joseph Rickards, at Jacksons Ace Hardware, with his dad, Ricky. Photos by DA V ID AD L ERSTEIN | The Times xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx Thursday, July 21, 2011 50 WWW.A P A L ACHTIMES.COM VOL. 126 ISSUE 12 Phone: 850-653-8868 W eb: apalachtimes.com E -mail: dadlerstein@star.com Fax: 850-653-8036 C irculation: 800-345-8688 Sheriffs Report ....... A3 Society News ........ A8 Obituaries .......... A9 Church News ........ A9 Outdoors .......... A10 Classieds ...... A13-A15 DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK: School News & Society: 11 a.m. Friday Real Estate Ads: 11 a.m. Thursday Legal Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classied Display Ads: 11 a.m. Friday Classied Line Ads: 5 p.m. Monday Contact Us Out to see Index Roadside beauty, A10 By David Adlerstein Times City Editor A family in Carrabelle has a newlybuilt home of their own on land thats been in the family for generations, thanks to Habitat for Humanity. Seven months after they began construction, members of Habitat for Humanity of Franklin County marked the completion of the home with a June 25 dedication ceremony. A small crowd gathered at 519 SE Ave A, on the corner of 5th Street, to bless the new 1,150 square foot, three-bedroom, two-bath home of Kenny Griswold and Becky Bergstrom and their son, Jarrad. Amongst the attendees were Peggy and Jerry Macklin, leaders of the Wakulla County Habitat chapter, and Boze and Betty Godwin, kin to former First Lady Rosalyn Carter back in Plains, Ga. Carrabelle Christian Center Senior Pastor Don Carroll, and the Rev. John Sink, a member of the Habitat board, led the gathering in prayer, as tears welled up in the eyes of Becky, holding tightly the family Bible. Im very excited. Im ready to move in, she said. Im thankful, not just for the Bible, but for the Lord helping this take place. The single city lot, 50 x 100 sq. ft., has been in her family for three generations, and once housed a mobile home that Kenny later relocated to 212 Avenue D, as the family awaited their new home. Its been three-and-one-half years since the new home building project was rst approved by city ofcials, when Habitat leadership began the work of providing a no-interest loan and favorable mortgage payments to the family. It wasnt always easy for Becky to be patient, as the rezoning process and Habitat work plan moved forward slowly. I told her things dont happen in your time, they happen in Gods time, Kenny said. Dont lose faith. The good Lord opened His door and no mans TDC divvies up off-season grants Family keeps faith with Habitat home DA V ID AD L ERSTEIN | The Times Kenny Griswold and Becky Bergstom, stand in the kitchen of their new home. By David Adlerstein Times City Editor L ast spring, smartly dressed in a blue cap and gown, Joseph Rick ards celebrated his graduation like so many hundreds of other young people did throughout the region. He did well for himself, too, at the Elks Lodge ceremony that night on Magnolia Street in Tallahassee, taking home a music department award. Not long after that, Joseph caught a lucky break, landing a part-time job at Jacksons Ace Hardware in Carrabelle, helping out a couple hours a week. A pretty good start in his hometown, a chance to venture out on his own, to wear the bright red Ace Hardware smock and be a member of the team. Still, joining the workforce has been an adjustment for his son, said dad Robert Ricky Rickards, whos worked for the county road department for the past 30 years. Its hard to change from one world to another, he said, standing behind his 24-year-old son. Theyre used to routine and it takes them a while to adjust to a new routine. It isnt always easy for us to understand the world of they, the world of the blind and disabled, such as is Joseph. Hes not quite developmentally there for gainful employment, said his mother Sandra Rickards. Hes receiving a small Making a way Joseph Rickards graduates to a job By Lois Swoboda Times Staff Writer In the face of an un precedented volume of offseason grant requests, the Tourist Development Coun cil singled out six events for full funding and awarded all other organizations 80 per cent of their requests. The TDC received 40 applications for the 2011-12 grant cycle, totaling over $140,000, almost double the $72,000 earmarked for offseason grants. To meet the needs of grant seekers as fully as possible, the TDC took cre ative measures. At the July 5 meeting, Curt Blair, TDC adminis trator, told county commis sioners that Helen Spohrer, head of the FCTV market ing entity hired to adminis ter $1.6 million in BP money, identied several events she believed were eligible for this BP funding. In addition, the TDC di verted $20,000 of its regular funding for out-of-county advertising to the off-sea son grant money, raising the pot to $92,000. Blair said the TDC decided it could safely cut back on out-ofcounty advertising because of the countys increased advertising presence fueled by BP funds administered by Spohrer. During her report, Spohrer said that based on gures from May of this year, hits to the TDC web site have increased on the average by over 120 percent daily. Based in part on these results, individual events normally required to spend 50 percent of the grant on out-of-county advertising, will only be required to dedicate 30 percent of the money this grant cycle. The six BP funded events announced by the TDC at its July 12 meet ing were $5,000 each for the eighth annual AfricanAmerican History Festival; the Apalachicola School of Art 2011-2012 Workshop Season; Apalach Second Saturdays, a new event or ganized by Hand the Frank lin County Oyster Festival, a project of the St. George Is land Business Association, also funded, technically, for the rst time. The Lantern fest at the Crooked River Light and the Florida Pan handle Lighthouse Chal lenge each received $4,000, for a total of $28,000 in BP funding. Spohrer said criteria for receiving these BP grants were unclear, except for the stipulation that all funds must be spent by April 30, 2012. She said she was con dent that all grants re quested would be awarded by BP, and that the upcom ing University of Florida Oyster School would also be eligible for funding. There are some activi ties that probably are in appropriate for BP, Blair said. BP doesnt see the BP grant as a means of Its hard to change from one world to another. Theyre used to routine and it takes them a while to adjust to a new routine. Ricky Rickards, Josephs dad See MAKING A WAY A12 See HABITAT A12 See GRANTS A7 Movies in the Park continues Friday The Franklin County Sheriffs Ofce S.A.F.E. (Student and Family Events) program presents the animated lm Ice Age 3 / Dawn of the Dinosaurs, on Friday, July 22 at Lighthouse Park on St. George Island on the basketball court. The lm, part of the summer-long Movies in the Park series, will be shown on a brand-new 16 screen, and begins at roughly 8:30 p.m. Popcorn, hot dogs and drinks free to children. New musical to premier Friday night The musical adaptation of Crossing Jordan, a novel for young adults written by Tallahassee author, Adrian Fogelin, will be rst performed on Thursday, July 21 at 3 p.m. at the City Municipal Complex. The world premier, by students in the Project Impact program, will be performed on Friday, July 22 at 7 p.m. in the Chapman Auditorium at 155 Avenue E, Apalachicola. Admission is free. For more information, call 850-370-0145 or check it out online at www. crossingjordanonstage. wordpress.com. Y outh shing tourney Saturday in Carrabelle On Saturday, July 23, kids age 16 and younger are invited to attend the seventh annual Youth Fishing Tournament, based at C-Quarters Marina, 501 U.S. 98, Carrabelle. Registration is required on-site, at C-Quarters, beginning July 16. On Friday evening, prior to Saturday, July 23 is shing day, all entrants must attend a shing clinic taught by the Dock Master Millard Collins, where they are instructed how to tie knots, tie on hooks and overall safety while shing. At completion of the clinic, each child receives a rod and reel, a tee shirt, hat and bait. For more information, call 697-8400 or visit www. c-quartersmarina.com. Carrabelle Speed Festival July 30 The rst Carrabelle Speed Festival will be held at the Carrabelle-Thompson Airport, 296 Airport Rd., on Saturday, July 30. Participants race on an open runway for a full half mile of open throttle acceleration. There will be a DJ and food venders on hand. For information, call 850-5855168.

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Local A2 | The Times Thursday, July 21, 2011 -CongratulationsThey want to thank their patients for 10 successful years on the Forgoen Coast. 221 Avenue E. Apalachicola, FL 32329 (850) 653.3338 Aaron Farnsley, AIF CFP MBA Farnsley & Johnston 505 Reid Avenue Port St. Joe, FL 32456 850.227.3336 aaron.farnsley@farnsley.com 1.26 1.01 By Lois Swoboda Times Staff writer At their July 7 meet ing, Carrabelle city com missioners voted unani mously to approve a re port recommending the Northwest Florida Water Management District undertake a phased pro gram to connect the city with other water systems on the eastern end of the county. Lynne Putnam, of CDM Engineering, shared re sults of the study, funded by the water management district, which found that, with the exception of St. Teresa, the countys east ern communities have ac cess to sufficient water to meet their needs for some years. St. Teresa requires about 160,000 gallons of water per day but pro duces only about 100,000 gallons, all from private wells. Putnam reported peo ple with weekend houses at St. Teresa bring bottled drinking water with them when visiting. She said St. Teresa firefighters would have insufficient water to control a large fire. The eastern end of the county, as a whole, uses 2.11 million gallons of water daily and produces 4.63 million gallons. The predicted consumption by the east end in 30 years, about 2.47 million gallons, is still well below produc tion capacity. Putnam said the chal lenge will be transport ing processed water from water-rich Carrabelle and Lanark Village to Alliga tor Point, SummerCamp, St. Teresa and St. James Bay. Carrabelle produces 2.33 million gallons of wa ter daily and uses 930,000. Lanark produces 1 million gallons per day and uses 470,000. St. James Bay gets 180,000 gallons of water daily from Lanark, and produces 430,000 gallons of untreated water not suitable for drinking. Putnam advised the water management dis trict begin upgrading the water distribution system by adding a parallel line to the existing 6-inch water line that connects Car rabelle and Lanark Vil lage. Even though Lanark and St. James Bay dont need additional water, this would be a first step to extending the system to SummerCamp and St. Teresa. The CDM report rec ommends Carrabelle de velop an interconnection with the SummerCamp system. Putnam said she believes SummerCamp, which has its own water treatment system, is inter ested in negotiating with Carrabelle for water opera tion services. She said proposed ex tensions of the existing wa ter line should run parallel to U.S. 98, which is not the shortest route, but pro vides access to the maxi mum number of potential customers. Putnam estimated the cost of adding an additional pipeline between Carra belle and Lanark would be around $675,000. Phase 2 of the CDM plan would provide a new con nection between Lanark and St. James Bay at an es timated construction cost of $405,000. Phase 3 connects St. James Bay to the Alligator Point Resource Manage ment District (APWRD), also potentially providing service to SummerCamp and St. Teresa. Estimated construction cost for Phase 3 is over $3.35 million, plac ing the total construction cost of the three phases at $4.42 million. In addition, bond and engineering expenses are estimated at around $3 mil lion for a total project cost of roughly $7.5 million. Input in creating the re port included three meet ings with water use stake holders including APWRD staff, the Alligator Point Taxpayers Association, Al ligator Point Volunteer Fire Department, St. Joe Land Company, Franklin County, St. Teresa Dock Associa tion and the City of Carra belle. Putnam said projects of this nature routinely take 20 to 30 years to imple ment. LYNNE PUTNAM Report: Carrabelle key to east end water needs

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The following report is provided by the Franklin County Sheriffs Ofce. Arrests are made by ofcers from the following city, county, and state law enforcement agencies: Apalachicola (APD), Carrabelle (CPD), Florida Highway Patrol (FHP), Franklin County Sheriffs Ofce (FCSO), Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC), Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP), Florida Department of Corrections (FDOC), Florida Division of Insurance Fraud (DIF) and Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (FLDACS). All defendants are considered innocent until proven guilty in a court of law. July 12 Kristopher J. Stanley, 24, Apalachicola, violation of probation (FCSO) July 14 Ernest Grifn, 56, Apalachicola, retail theft and violation of probation (APD) Cody E. Diorio, 20, Lanark Village, two counts of dealing in stolen property (FCSO) July 15 Curtis Lake IV, 36, Gainesville, Alachua County warrant for felony battery (APD) Thomas A. Parker, 25, Eastpoint, possession of a controlled substance with intent to sell or deliver, and possession of paraphernalia (FCSO) Bobby J. Bullock, Jr., 43, Eastpoint, DUI, driving while license suspended or revoked, refusal to submit to breath test and resisting arrest without violence (FCSO) July 16 Gail B. James, 58, St. George Island, reckless driving (FCSO) July 17 John M. Davis, 46, Carrabelle, use of monolament net (FWC) Claude F. Banks, Jr., 26, Apalachicola, aggravated battery on a pregnant victim and introduction of contraband into a correctional facility (APD) Brittney C. Herndon, 26, Apalachicola, three counts of sale of a controlled substance within 1,000 feet of a church (APD) July 18 Steve R. Hicks, 40, Eastpoint, resisting ofcer without violence (FCSO) Lawyer gets 6 months for tax evasion Paul A. Lehrman, an attorney in Tallahassee, was sentenced July 13 to six months in federal prison for ling false income tax returns. Lehrman, 58, had been awarded attorneys fees in connection with his successful suit against the city of Apalachicola in 2003. The city paid Lehrman more than $118,200 in yearly installments between 2004 and 2006. In ling his 2004 Individual Tax Return, Lehrman failed to declare the citys payment of $36,959. He also failed to declare $6,266 of the $39,546 he received from the city on his 2005 return. In his 2006 return, Lehrman failed to list as income the $42,315 payment he received from the city that year. Lehrmans conduct led to his indictment on three counts of ling false income tax returns for the 2004, 2005, and 2006 tax years. He pled guilty to those charges in April. As part of his sentence, Lehrman will also be required to pay a $10,000 ne, as well as $28,832 in restitution. Get Re-Entry Tags now to save the hassle Last year, Franklin County, in conjunction with local law enforcement instituted a Re-Entry Tag program to benet citizens after an evacuation by providing security, safety, and a method to return to their homes with a minimum of problems. The county is divided into ve areas, with each tag color coded to indicate where a person resides, so as to make it easier for law enforcement, until the situation stabilizes, to secure property from persons who do not belong in the area. Law enforcement will be monitoring all major entrances into the county after a major disaster, and those who already have a tag will be permitted to enter once it is safe. Without the tag, people will be asked to furnish such information to establish they are a resident, and this takes up time during a stressful situation. To get a tag, before you need it, a simple process can be completed at the Emergency Operations Center in person, or online at home or ofce. The tag covers the period from 2010 to 2015. Call 653-8977, ext. 2. To have a re-entry tag mailed to you, visit www. franklinemergency management.com/Re Entry.aspx, ll out the form and press the submit button at the bottom of the page. Scan a copy of your driver license and e-mail to em1frank@fairpoint.net or fax to 850-653-3643. In the e-mail or on the fax, state the address where you want the storm re-entry tag mailed. If you rent your home, the physical address must be on your driver license, or you must also mail a document, such as a utility bill, which shows your name and physical address where you live for proof of residence. If you own a business and have employees who live outside the county or out of your business zone, you can obtain Re-Entry tags for those employees. Call Pam Brownell or Joyce Durham at 653-8977. 2 nailed for oxycodone in Eastpoint On June 30, the Franklin County Sheriffs Narcotics Unit arrested two men as part of a drug investigation in Eastpoint. Deputies seized a 1995 GMC Truck; $2,642 in US currency; 22 Roxicodone prescription pills and drug paraphernalia. Tracy S. Wilson, 35, of 241 Rex Buzzett St., Apalachicola, was charged with possession of a controlled substance with the intent to sell or distribute; introduction of contraband into a correctional facility; possession of a controlled substance; tampering with physical evidence; possession of drug paraphernalia and maintaining a structure for the use or sale of controlled substances. Wilson was released on $15,000 bond from the Franklin County Jail. Jonathan Pace, 34, of 45 Begonia S., Eastpoint, was charged with possession of a controlled substance; possession of drug paraphernalia and two counts of violation of probation. Pace is being held in the Franklin County Jail on a $5,500 bond. Additional charges are pending investigation. 2 jailed for crack cocaine in Carrabelle On July 5, the Franklin County Sheriffs Narcotics Unit, along with members of the uniform patrol division, arrested two men for sale and possession of crack cocaine following a drug investigation in the Carrabelle area. Derick Menual Ahrent, 22,of 1209 Southern Drive, Tallahassee, was charged with possession of a controlled substance with the intent to distribute; possession of a controlled substance and possession of drug paraphernalia. He is also on bond for previous charges of aggravated battery with a deadly weapon and child abuse. Ahrent is being held in the Franklin County Jail on a $55,000 bond. Ricardo Rivera, Arrest REPORT Law Enforcement The Times | A3 Thursday, July 21, 2011 Law BRIEFS TRACY WILSON JONA THAN PACE See LAW BRIEFS A6 DERICK AHRENT RICARDO RIVERA

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Opinion A4 | The Times Thursday, July 21, 2011 USPS 027-600 Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St. Apalachicola, FL 32329 VP/Publisher: Karen Hanes Editor: Tim Croft POSTMASTER: Send address change to: The Apalachicola Times P.O. Box 820 Apalachicola, FL 32329 Phone 850-653-8868 PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT APALACHICOLA, FL 32329 WEEKLY PUBLISHING SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE IN COUNTY $24.15 year $15.75 six months OUT OF COUNTY $34.65 year $21 six months Home delivery subscribers may be charged a higher rate for holiday editions. TO ALL ADVERTISERS In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount received for such advertisement. The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains. Circulation: 1-800-345-8688 Formerly The Apalachicola Times By Mr. Bill Special to the Times Back during World War II, Dad was in Africa, Mom was an Air Raid Warden in Dallas, Texas no less. We were all safe as the Luftwaffe never got past her. There was a beautiful White Rock Creek across from house with three or four dams upstream, which ran all the way down about eight blocks to zoo. Lots of catsh, bream and clear, large crawsh. I shed cane pole style and was mad when older boys reached their whole arms up a hole and pulled out catsh. I never had enough undercarriage to do dat. Was called grabbin them. A small allotment check, a victory garden, sh, crawdads, a funny bookstore that sold cigarettes to the kids, and we emerged from World War II. Other than that, maybe up thru 1960, I shed about 10 times on Lake Dallas and Possum Kingdom, where I received my Eagle Scout and Order of the Arrow. Fast forward to November 1960, Dallas cowboy makes home in Carrabelle nally, after nishing with Navy department. First shing experience was with Mike Harless, who taught me to ounder. Now seeing all those creatures in the night water, along with the stingrays, an occasional curious sand shark, I learned rather quickly. My kids hardly ever ate sh, didnt like it, would not eat at rst. But when you get hungry enough, it starts to taste great. And as I added variety of crabs, shrimp and other unmentionables I dont want them to know about, we made our rst year. Mike showed me the freshwater places to go, along with ditch shing, my favorite. Mike introduced me to Pren Crum, Sr., who asked me to go gator gigging with him. Adventuresome, I agreed. We waded out in this slough off the river, him with a big long sh pole with nothing on it, a knife, and me behind him with a lantern, to our armpits. He rams that pole down a hole in the bank, took the pole between his teeth, started grunting sound that chilled me to the bone. Needless to say, it really teed off the gator and out his ass came, really mad. I am ready to go! Pren says. Hold the light. Well I did, cause I didnt want him to see me. Well, he was about 5-6 long and Pren rassled and stabbed and nally got him ready for the fry. Well, I was glad we were in the water, cause it was easier to clean my pants. First and last trip. I have eaten gator lots of times since. But its not my bag, or wallet. Mr. Frank Ell, founder of Ells Court, introduced me to troll shing for mackerel and I have loved it ever since. I love to keep moving on that water, cooler, keeps the bugs away. I have had a lot of good times catching those jewels easy to clean good fried or broiled. I used to see Mr. Grice, who owned the two-story rooming house, just east of Fathom Grill on U.S. 98. He would be out there in a little ol boat trolling with a hand line. If you asked if he was catching, he would always just hold up one nger. You had to look close to see which one. The s, s were good for head boats, party sounds better, of which we had a bunch: Cooks Cavalier I and II, Rhyne Williams, Azalea Queen, Capt. Hall and his lovely wife Kangaroo with the Queen of Queens, and as of this writing all doing well. Boat still sailing in Gulf Shores, Ala. Capt. Cuz Jackson on Miss Carrabelle, Capt. Leon Langston, founder of Town Inn and what is now The Old Carrabelle Hotel, and shed the Billy and Bebee, Capt. Riley Akers, with the Georgia Boy. When mostly loaded, we had 300 shermen out. Those were fun days. But my last and probably my favorite was my pontoon boat, named Bars and Stars. It sailed every Sunday, barring weather, to put me out there in my church of nature with the sh, the birds, country music on the radio, cold beer, wife or buddy. It just dont get better than that. But back in 2008, as in the Confederacy, we lost her. Couldnt nd anyone to go shing one Sunday, so at 75, dummy here goes by himself. It was a nice day, mackerel were biting about 400-500 yards off front side of Dog Island. The wind came up slightly. I thought, sh moved into beach. I was trolling two rods, had sh on boat, when a big wave slammed into side, and right pontoon left, and another one hit, and left did the same. Motor weight took it down in about 8 of water. I left and went to the beach and forgot it. Now I am in Book of Records, as the only one to sink a pontoon boat. I sure do miss her. Mr. Bill is the pen name of Bill Miller. Recollections: A cowboys sh tales PHOTO COURTESY OF BILL MILLER Bill Miller and friends on the Bars and Stars. We Boomers have reached the stage where we are really good at a whole bunch of things that dont really matter anymore. I was an ace at producing short television spots for a major television station in the late 70s. I was even on-air for a short movie review gig once a week. I later went into advertising and stayed pretty current on media issues. I understood radio, outdoor, television, bulk mail, magazine, newspaper, and free ink as the means of conveying any sort of message. After entering teaching, I had to develop an entirely different skill set. It took about five years before I really started feeling confident instead of overwhelmed. There was ample professional development training available, and much of it was really good. Most importantly, I watched the good teachers, and did of lot of reading and research on my own. If a lesson I thought a sure-fire hit turned into a slow, agonizing death spiral in the classroom. I yanked myself up and tried something else. After 16 years I think Ive pretty much got it figured out. I work hard, have fun, and enjoy my children. Thats all good, but sometimes I miss the media. I liked being good at that and, frankly, those days are long gone. Maybe that mind-set is what has sent me into social media, specifically Facebook, I dont love everything about it. There are frequent glitches, confusing advertising, occasional messages that seem to appear from nowhere, a post from you popping up when you didnt click on anything, weird people asking to be your friend, and annoying political video clips. There are also grandmothers showing off new baby pictures (often entire albums), young mothers tracking the milestones in their childrens lives, music and video snippets from real friends, a pretty cool search engine, and the unlimited opportunity to catch up with folks from your past. You know the kind of people Im talking about. One time, same place, maybe for only a short period. When the separation came you stayed in touch for a while, or maybe not. But thinking back, you remember the conversations, the laughs, the easy feeling of conviviality. You wonder how to find them. Dont try looking in the phone book. Most people are giving up landlines for cells these days. Talking to mutual friends helps, but often they are spread about all over the place as well. Facebook gets more hits than Google. It is the biggest networking tool ever. More and more people of all ages are discovering the joys of checking in frequently to see what little happenings are lling the lives of others. Some people post daily some tidbit about their dog, their owers, their mood. Others, like me, rarely post. I have spent some time nding people. It is way easier if they have a distinctive last name. Someone like John Riley would be pretty had to pin down, but you do have some regional options to use as a lter. Some people have found me. I am pretty easy to locate on the web with quite a few Google hits, and my name is somewhat rare. To be honest, I did search my name one night and the number of results was staggering. So many Denise Rouxs out there. Who knew? Often, friends from 20-30 years ago are online at the same time and we instant message. Mostly its mundane, but sometimes we share stories of work or kids. I really like doing this. Lately, I have discovered Skype. Its like being Captain Kirk on the bridge of the Enterprise. You talk to a live streaming image on the screen. I only do it with a few friends, but it is as close to being in the same room as it gets. The web cam can be harsh, so comb your hair and adjust the lighting. My computer is so old that I had to buy a separate webcam. I ordered it from Amazon for about $60. Newer PCs and laptops have cameras built in. I kind of like mine, though, because I can move it around and adjust the tilt. So Im feeling pretty hip. I stream Netex to my television, I watch YouTube music videos, I have great computer radio stations that sort music into what their algorithm tells them I might like. The algorithm does a great job. Conversely, I dont text and have a cheap cell I only use for emergency calls. I rarely post comments on news stories or blogs. I did post the pets story on Garden & Guns Facebook wall. I got two likes from people I dont know. That was nice. This is all just one girls experience. Im just saying that if you arent plugged in as much as the average bear, you might want to rethink that position. Denise Roux is a regular columnist for the Apalachicola and Carrabelle Times. To reach her, email her at rouxwhit@mchsi. com. Feeling pretty hip in a Facebook age RED WHITE AND ROUX Denise Roux By Kevin Concannon Special to the Times As someone with decades of experience in anti-poverty programs, I have witnessed the important role government plays in helping families living from paycheck to paycheck. The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), formerly known as food stamps, helps millions of responsible, hardworking Americans put food on the table for their families. SNAP helps support jobs and provides a boost to the economy. SNAP has a good story to tell when it comes to using taxpayer funds responsibly, one that does not get told enough. It is so disappointing when abuses of SNAP by a few tarnish the image of this critical program. You would think lottery winners and criminals are the only Americans receiving SNAP benets. This couldnt be further from the truth. Abuses overshadow record achievements in SNAP and do a disservice to the overwhelming majority that truly need the benets and are playing by the rules. A record 44 million Americans more than half of whom are children, elderly and the disabled participate in SNAP as we recover from the worst economic collapse since the Great Depression. We know it is in everyones best interest to help them get back on their feet. Research shows that every $5 in new SNAP benets generates as much as $9 in economic activity, strengthening local communities. Benets move quickly into local economies, supporting and creating jobs for Americans who grow, process, pack, ship, shelve and sell food. Rooting out waste, fraud and abuse is a top priority for this administration. We do not tolerate fraud in SNAP, and prosecute those who game the system. USDA partners with State agencies to ensure responsible stewardship of taxpayer resources. Selling SNAP benets for cash or trafcking fell signicantly over the last two decades to roughly 1 cent on the dollar. Our fraud detection system has more advanced technology to identify those who break the law and abuse the program. Additionally, payment accuracy is at an all-time high. USDA is committed to ensure benets are targeted to those most in need. We proactively urge states to use their current authority to change state policies so that millionaires or those receiving substantial windfalls do not receive SNAP benets. As the economic recovery continues, we must support hard-working Americans who struggle to meet their most basic nutritional needs. SNAP must be part of those efforts, to stimulate the economy and help grow a stronger nation for all Americans. Kevin Concannon is USDAs Under Secretary for Food, Nutrition and Consumer Services. Food stamps help feed hardworking Americans KEVIN CONCANNON

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Local The Times | A5 Thursday, July 21, 2011 I m p r e s s i v e S a l e s E a r n C E N T U R Y 2 1 C o l l i n s R e a l t y S a l e s A s s o c i a t e s O n e o f t h e C E N T U R Y 2 1 S y s t e m s T o p H o n o r s M a s o n & M a r i l y n B e a n E a r n # 1 S a l e s T e a m A w a r d F o r S o u t h l a n d R e g i o n 2 0 1 0 S t G e o r g e I s l a n d F L J u n e 1 4 2 0 1 1 C E N T U R Y 2 1 C o l l i n s R e a l t y I n c i s p l e a s e d t o a n n o u n c e t h a t C E N T U R Y 2 1 R e a l E s t a t e L L C r e c e n t l y r e c o g n i z e d s a l e s a s s o c i a t e s M a s o n a n d M a r i l y n B e a n a s t w o o f t h e S y s t e m s t o p p r o d u c e r s n a t i o n w i d e T h e y w e r e h o n o r e d w i t h t h e c o v e t e d e m e r a l d l e v e l C E N T U R Y 2 1 M a s t e r s A w a r d a s w e l l a s t h e # 1 T e a m f o r t h e S o u t h l a n d R e g i o n M a s o n a n d M a r i l y n p l a c e t h e i r r e a l e s t a t e w i s d o m a n d p a s s i o n M a s o n a n d M a r i l y n p l a c e t h e i r r e a l e s t a t e w i s d o m a n d p a s s i o n f o r l i f e i n t o t h e i r e v e r y d a y b u s i n e s s h e l p i n g t o m a k e c l i e n t s m o r e c o m f o r t a b l e w i t h t h e r e a l e s t a t e t r a n s a c t i o n a s t h e y m a k e w h a t m a y b e t h e m o s t s i g n i f i c a n t p u r c h a s e o f t h e i r l i v e s s a i d A l i c e C o l l i n s b r o k e r / o w n e r o f C E N T U R Y 2 1 C o l l i n s R e a l t y M a s o n a n d M a r i l y n a r e a v a l u e d a n d t r u s t e d r e a l e s t a t e r e s o u r c e f o r t h e S t G e o r g e I s l a n d c o m m u n i t y a n d m a j o r c o n t r i b u t o r s t o t h e o v e r a l l s u c c e s s o f C E N T U o v e r a l l s u c c e s s o f C E N T U R Y 2 1 C o l l i n s R e a l t y a n d t h e C E N T U R Y 2 1 S y s t e m a s a w h o l e 2 0 1 1 C E N T U R Y 2 1 R e a l E s t a t e L L C C E N T U R Y 2 1 I s A R e g i s t e r e d T r a d e m a r k L i c e n s e d T o C e n t u r y 2 1 R e a l E s t a t e L L C A n E q u a l O p p o r t u n i t y C o m p a n y E q u a l H o u s i n g O p p o r t u n i t y E a c h C E N T U R Y 2 1 O f f i c e i s I n d e p e n d e n t l y O w n e d a n d O p e r a t e d By Lois Swoboda Times Staff Writer Three women have spearheaded local programs to attack roadside garbage on a grassroots level. Van Johnson, the countys solid waste director, has had high praise for the work of Ada Long, Joan Matey and Anna Carmichael for their tireless efforts to keep Franklin County beautiful. These are people who working hard to make a difference in the communities where they live and we should all thank them, he said. I hope they will be an example for residents of other communities in Franklin County. Longs service dates back to 2009, when she, Bob Pruitt, and Barbara Sanders founded the St. George Island Trash Patrol. They gridded the island and assigned sections to volunteers, who police their tracts daily. The program has been wildly successful and Long has taken the helm. She also has organized Coastal Clean-up and Hands Across the Sand events in the area, and last month announced that an Anheuser-Busch group headed by Josh Whiteld will provide recycling receptacles at 17 boardwalk locations on St. George Island. These were delivered to the island in time for the Fourth of July, and placed next to the existing trash receptacles at the foot of each boardwalk, to be serviced by the Franklin County Landll at no cost. At the June 21 county commission meeting, Commissioner Pinki Jackel congratulated Long on acquiring the receptacles and asked that the solid waste department request bins for other areas of the county. Johnson said later he believed AnheuserBusch had already offered to supply additional containers. Anna Carmichael, of Eastpoint, is another waste warrior. She has spearheaded a movement to clean up Eastpoints roadside and shore, leading monthly work days since January. Carmichael is grateful for the support of Johnson, assistant Fonda Davis and other management from the countys recycling and solid waste department, as well as inmates at Franklin Correctional Institution. The Eastpoint Trash Patrol had a dream and Waste Management made it come true. Carmichael wanted to see public trash receptacles in Eastpoint in areas with high-foot trafc like the new pavilion, so she went to Johnson with her request. I only had to ask once, she said. The inmates built the boxes that hold the trash cans. We didnt even have to pay for the materials. Waste Management provided the cans and is emptying them for free. Carmichael said Eastpoint has embraced the new amenity, and told how a man approached the cans at the pavilion shortly after their installation, carrying two six-packs of beer bottles and planning to deposit them. But a woman seated in the pavilion shouted, Dont you dare put those in there. Dont dirty them up. Theyre brand new. In a spirit of cooperation, the man placed the bottled on the ground beside the new cans and left. Sadly, on the evening of June 23, somebody embraced two of the cans a little too closely. The pair of cans placed in front of Seaquest Seafood has already been stolen. If you know their whereabouts, you can report it anonymously at 670-8167. If you have the stolen cans, please return them and no questions will be asked. The stolen cans, valued at $70 each, are Franklin County property. To date, the cans are still missing and the fence encasing the station was removed. In Lanark Village, where the small size of housing units in the village makes curbside pickup a problem, Matey and David Butler are working together to improve a trashy situation. With no trash pickup required, piles of trash on the roadside were a constant eyesore and, even worse, bears were frequent visitors to the trash seeking household garbage. Matey decided to clean up the mess. She began making signs, with funding from the Lanark Village Association, to encourage community pride and discourage trash heaps. She and Barber established a central site for yard and construction waste on Oak Street where debris would be less visible. Matey said that, thanks to Johnson, the village will soon have a tow-away bin for large trash items like building supplies and yard waste, but not garbage. Matey has also been proactive in educating her neighbors about good waste disposal practices. She created a postcard, which the county helped print and distribute, with information on what local garbage services are available; how to produce less garbage by recycling; encouraging landlords to adjust their rent to include the garbage service fee (as little as $17 /month in some cases) and asking residents to take action to end the mountains of trash on our streets. She plans to produce an updated yer for distribution by members of the newly formed Village Clean-up Patrol who plan to go door-to door with the information. Butler and Matey worked with the county tweaking the village recycle center adding a concrete buffer around the base of the fence to discourage bears. Help with garbage disposal is in the works too. The clean-up patrol snatched up a dumpster Butler discovered was available for free from the nearby St James Bay development. He has contracted with SMS Garbage Service to pick up household garbage from this locked dumpster. The plan is to get the word out that those who come to the village for just a short stay, or those who dont generate enough garbage to purchase regular service, can pay a small, per-bag fee and use the dumpster. Think of it as a garbage club. Garbage must be in sturdy, tied bags. An exact location for the dumpster and method of payment are still being discussed. If you visit or live in the village and think this plan for garbage disposal would suit you, leave a message at Chillas Hall 697-9626 or come by the hall for 156-A Heffernan Drive, for coffee 8 -11 a.m. weekdays.PHOTOS BY L O I S S W OBO DA | The Times This is one of the new trash stations in Eastpoint. Inset Joan Matey created these signs to raise awareness about the trash problem in Lanark Village. Waste warriors get tough on trash

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Local A6 | The Times Thursday, July 21, 2011 By David Adlerstein Times City Editor Franklin Countys un employment situation changed little in May, with the jobless rate stuck at 7.7 percent. According to prelimi nary numbers released June 17 by the Agency for Workforce Innovation (AWI), the countys job less rate, identical in April and May, is worse than the 7.3 percent rate one year ago. The labor force, now at 5,436, now has 61 more workers than it did one year ago, and 42 more than it had in April. Two more people joined the jobless rolls in May, which now number 416. Franklin Countys job less picture put it at 12th best in the state, better than both the national av erage of 9.1 percent, and the Florida average of 10.6 percent. Monroe County has the states lowest unemployment rate at 6.3 percent, followed by Liberty at 6.5, Walton 6.6, Okaloosa 6.9, Lafayette 7.1, Alachua 7.2, Jackson and Holmes 7.4, Leon 7.5 and Sumter County at 7.6 percent. Most of the counties with the lowest unemploy ment rates are those with relatively high propor tions of government em ployment. There were 32 Florida counties with double-digit unemployment rates in May. The unemployment rate in the Gulf Coast Workforce region, which comprises Bay, Franklin, and Gulf counties, was 9.3 percent in May, 0.2 per centage point higher than the regions 9.1 percent jobless rate one year ago. Out of a labor force of 102,993, there were 9,571 unemployed Gulf Coast residents. Bay Countys jobless rate remained at 9.4 per cent, while Gulf Countys dropped a hair, from 9.9 to 9.8 percent. With tour ism season well underway we expected our rate to go down but were happy with it holding steady, said Kim Bodine, execu tive director of the Gulf Coast Workforce Board. Floridas seasonally adjusted unemployment rate in May was 10.6 per cent, the lowest since Au gust 2009 when it was also 10.6 percent. This represents 980,000 jobless out of a labor force of 9.25 million. The states unemploy ment rate is down 0.2 per centage point from the April rate of 10.8 percent and is 0.7 percentage point lower than one year ago. Floridas total nonag ricultural employment in May was 7.23 million, an increase of 28,000 jobs from April. The number of jobs in the state is up 24,900 over the year, an in crease of 0.3 percent from May 2010. The industry gaining the most jobs is leisure and hospitality, up 4.9 percent. Other industries gaining jobs include private edu cation and health servic es; trade, transportation, and utilities; professional and business services; and other services. These industry job gains are partially due to increases in food services and drinking places; am bulatory health care ser vices; motor vehicle and parts dealers; employ ment services; and repair and maintenance. Industries losing jobs over the year include total government; construc tion; information; finan cial activities; and manu facturing. These industry job losses are partially due to weakness in federal gov ernment which employed temporary census work ers last year; construction of buildings; telecommu nications; insurance carri ers and related activities; and miscellaneous dura ble goods manufacturing. That unemployment continues to drop and businesses continue to add thousands of jobs shows Floridas economy is moving in the right di rection, said Agency for Workforce Innovation Di rector Cynthia R. Loren zo. Our unemployment rate is now the lowest it has been in 21 months, and we can expect our states heightened focus on economic recovery to spur additional job growth in the months ahead. Since the official end of the recession in June 2009, online job demand in Florida has increased by 88,584 jobs. Major occupational groups with the most online ads in May were healthcare practitioners and technical occupa tions, sales and related occupations, office and administrative support occupations and manage ment occupations. Governor Rick Scott last month signed Sen ate Bill 2156, creating a more unified approach and rapid response to job creation by consolidating the states economic de velopment functions into the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity. The new law enhances the states ability to quick ly react to business devel opment opportunities and speed up job creation. For more information, please visit www.florida jobs.org County jobless rate stays at LAW BRIEFS from page A3 26, of 17 Lilly Lane, Crawfordville, was charged with possession of a controlled substance; tampering with physical evidence; possession of drug paraphernalia and violation of felony probation. He is being held in the Franklin County Jail on a $5,500 bond. Carrabelle bust yields 288 pills On July 8, the Franklin County Sheriffs Narcotics Unit, along with members of the uniform division and the Carrabelle Police Department, arrested two individuals from Austell, Ga. as part of a drug investigation in the Carrabelle area. During the investigation, deputies seized a 1994 Jeep Cherokee; $2,628 in US currency; 288 prescription pills, including Roxicodone and Soma, and drug paraphernalia. Melissa M. Kimmons, 41, of 1972 Cardell Road, Austell, Ga., was charged with introduction of contraband into a correctional facility; sale of a controlled substance; possession of a controlled substance with the intent to distribute; possession of drug paraphernalia and possession of a legend drug without a prescription. Kimmons posted a $33,500 bond and was released from the Franklin County Jail. Michael Shane Kilgore, 39, of 1972 Cardell Road, Austell, Ga., was charged with sale of a controlled substance; possession of a controlled substance with the intent to distribute and possession of a legend drug without a prescription. Kilgore is being held in the Franklin County Jail under a $31,000 bond. Additional charges are pending investigation. MELISSA KIMMONS MICHAEL KILGORE

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Local The Times | A7 Thursday, July 21, 2011 replacing what our local ef fort is, so we have to be a lit tle careful of the projects we suggest to BP. We wont know until January whether BP is going to consider another round of funding. County commissioners repeatedly expressed con cern about what would hap pen when the BP funds dry up and the county has to draw entirely on its bed tax revenue. In addition to the grants, the Florida Seafood Festi val planned for Nov. 4 and 5 will receive a lump sum of $27,500 taken from monthly promotions funds of the BP grant. Chairman Noah Lockley asked whether any event could apply for $27,000 fund ing without writing a grant and receive it. Blair said the festival submitted a pro posal rather than apply for a grant. I would like to see the Seafood Festival funded, said Commissioner Pinki Jackel. I dont know of an other event that brings in more people. Theres all sorts of funds generated by it that benet the entire county. In the end, the board vot ed to fund the festival, with Lockley opposed. Jackel and Lockley also clashed over funding for The Franklin County Oyster Festival. Lockley questioned whether the Oyster Festival, held on St. George Island a month before the Seafood Festival, was trying to revive an event that had been un successful in the past. My concern is that festi val on the island, they came and asked for $50,000-$60,000 and it was a op, and now they changed the name and want more funding. Jackel said that the pre vious three-day spat festival had drawn a crowd of about 10,000 people, which, if con rmed, would indicate it had drawn about twice the crowd of a typically well-attended chili cook-off. Its a pretty strong event, she said. I am a Franklin County com missioner and I love my dis trict. But I love this county. It really bothers me when I hear my district picked on by members of this board publicly, she said. It is very unfair to set out one area of this county. A lot of these festivals, you have an idea, you have a vision, you hope for the best. But you cant guarantee how its going to play out, weather plays a part and things dont pan out as you plan for them sometimes. Jackel also questioned whether the Spat Festival had received a $50,000 grant. Spohrer said that few people had applied for grants the very rst cycle four or ve years ago, and that Spat Festival had received a large grant. Lockley also questioned whether the Apalachicola Center for History, Culture and the Arts brought in visi tors. Do we have any way of nding out how many people come in for these, to get a number for it? he asked. We dont have any specif ic mechanism to determine how many people an event attracts, Blair said.. There are some big multiple day events we think intuitively bring more people. Its a little hard to know how many beds are lled by an event. County Planner Alan said, Thats why we need some quantiable information. Grant committee Chair person Diana Prickett said, One day were going to have to put things on the chopping block and somebody wont get money. This year we have the money and we may get some wonderful new events out of these grants. At the same meeting, the TDC announced that, after rating all of the remaining events, it would award all competing events 80 percent of the funds requested. The TDC published a list of grant applicants show ing points received and the amount of money requested. Camp Gordon Johnston Days was number one with 429 out of a possible 500 points, and will receive $3,200 of a requested $4,000. The St. George Island Chili Cook-off was a close second with 427 points, and will receive $4,000 of a re quested $5,000. Holiday on the Harbor, the Carrabelle Christmas Celebration, was rated third with 423 points and will receive $3,200. An other Carrabelle event, the Riverfront Festival was number four with 420 points and Apalachicolas Christ mas Celebration was a close fth with 419 points and will receive $3,200. The lowest rated event was the new St. George Is land Beach Tour of Homes, which received 338 points and will receive $3,200. Two Halloween events, Franklins Promises Blues Jazz and Boos, and the Apalachicola Historical Societys Ghost walk were tied for number 39 with 340 points. Boos was awarded $3,200 and the Ghostwalk will receive $1,600. The Panhandle Players applied for separate fund ing for their fall, winter and spring productions. They requested $2,000 per produc tion and will receive $1,600 per show for a grand total of $4,800. They tied for 38th place with a rating of 341 of a possible 500 points for each production. The Apalachicola Area Historical Society also re quested $5,000 for the Ilse Newell Concert Season, and will receive $4,000. The Apalachicola Volun teer Fire Department Aux iliary also made a rst-time request, seeking $2,000, for the second annual Oyster Cook-Off, and will receive $1,600. The Apalachicola River keeper asked for $5,000 for the Wild & Scenic Film Festi val, and will receive $4,000. In addition to the Holiday Celebration, Apalachicola Area Chamber of Com merce asked for $2,000 for the Art Walk and $4,000 for the Boat Show, and were granted $1,600 and $3,200 re spectively. In addition to funding from BP for the Workshop Series, the City of Apalachic ola Center for History, Cul ture and Art was awarded $4,000 for the 2011-12 Exhibi tion Series. C-Quarters Marina King Busters Tournament will receive $2,000 of the $2,500 requested and C-Quarters Marina Kingsh Shoot-out Tournament was awarded $3.760 of $4,700 requested. The Defenders of Wildlife Inc. will receive $1,600 for the Forgotten Coast Black Bear Festival in Carrabelle. The Dixie Theatre Foun dation was awarded $8,000 for four requests totaling $10,000; $3,000 each for the January, February and March professional seasons, and $1,000 for Pearls for the King. The Eastpoint Volunteer Fire Department Inc. will get $3,200 for the 11th annual Eastpoint Rib Cook-Off. The Forgotten Coast Cultural Co alition received $4,000 for the Plein Air Americas Great Paint Out. In addition to the money earmarked for the Blues, Jazz and Boos concert, Franklins Promise Coali tion requested $5,000 for the Apalachicola Wine and Jazz Festival, and will receive $4,000. The Friends of Apalachic ola Tour of Homes asked for $5,000, and will receive $4,000 for an expanded 20th annual Historic Apalachicola Home & Garden Tour. Habitat for Humanity of Franklin Coun ty Inc. asked for a rst-time grant, of $4,000, for the ninth annual Apalach Mardi Gras and will receive $3,200. In addition to funding from BP for their Second Saturdays program, Historic Apalachicola Inc. will receive $4,000, for the Water Street Festival of Ice. The Patrons of the Apala chicola Library Society will receive $1,600 for the Autumn Authors in Apalachicola, a new event. Rock By The Sea Inc. will receive $1,600 for the Rock By The Sea concert in La nark Village and St. George Island, a rst-time request. In addition to funding for The Franklin County Oyster Festival, St. George Island Business Association will receive $1,600 for the third annual St. George Island Snowbird Day. The Supporters of St. Vin cent will receive $1,600, for the St. Vincent Island Open House. CHARMING PRE-CONSTRUCTION S T G EORGE I S L AN D. Gulf view 3 BR/2BA, lovely front porch, bead board cabinets, granite countertops, hardiboard, metal roof. Built by Galloway Construction M L S# 243960.................$289,000 Travis Stanley 850.653.6477 Grayson Shepard 850.653.6718 Kim Davis 850.653.6875 Leon Teat 850.653.5656 Jackie Golden 850.899.8433 Jamie Crum 850.370.0835 Sandy Mitchem 850.899.8300 B A YF RONT E ASTPOINT 1.2 acres on Hwy 98 with $850/ month rental income from mobile home, also machine shop. Great home site and already has dock approval. M L S# 243415...........$149,000 NEW L OW PRICE! BA Y VIEW S T G EORGE I S L AN D 3BR 3BA located in the heart of the island, walking distance to all shops/restaurants. Screened porches, hot tub, great bay views! M L S# 240643.......$275,000 F ANTASTIC OPPORTUNIT Y Grand southside Apalach, 5BR/4.5 Bath, 4000 square feet completely renovated on two city lots. Short sale but this is a BANK APPROVED PRICE! M L S# 237033...........$425,000 NEW L ISTING! 3 BR/2BA home on private 3 acres! Low maintenance metal roof, vinyl siding and great front porch. Backs up to state land. M L S# 244269.......$149,000 HISTORIC APA L ACH SOUTH SI D E! Lovely cypress home with 3 BR/2 BA, large porches/balconies. Short sale but this is a BANK APPROVED PRICE! M L S# 236808.......$349,000 An Equal Opportunity Employer/Program. Auxiliary aids are available upon request to individuals with disabilities. Florida Relay 711. GEOR G E E WEEMS M EMORIAL HOSPITAL is afliated with T allahassee M emorial Healthcare, a 25-bed critical access hospital that offers 24-hour service to our community and its visitors. O ur hospital is fully staffed with a warm, caring and professional team 365 days a year. A ny time, day or night, you will nd our medical staff ready to assist you when you need it the most! When life-saving, rapid transport for higher level medical services are required, a helipad is located on site. Weems M emorial Hospital. Were Here For You. W eems offers 24 hour emergency services, inpatient acute care services and a swing-bed program. We offer diagnostic imaging to include: x-ray, C T scan and screening mammogrphy. O ur on-site laboratory provides service to our in-patients, as well as out-patients. O ur ambulatory services include colonscopy and endoscopy exams and procedures, cardiology out-patient surgery, podiatry out-patient surgery, and more to come! www.weemsmemorial.com 135 Avenue G, Apalachicola 850-653-8853 Email : Info@weemsmemorial.com THIS IS MY H OME THIS IS MY H OSPI T AL Stan Siprell Please check out my website at www.sunriseconstructioncompany.com, and see some of my residential and commercial building under the projects tab. Recent and current jobs include ONeill/Pennington, Wolfe, Piper and Breyne. I think you will nd me very easy to work with to customize the home you are dreaming of. BILL MILLER REALTY 850-697-3751 (3310) 570-0658 $29,500 $2,500 DOWN BU Y S 2 B ED AP T 2 6 C ITY LO T W/ W ATER S E W ER R E N T $200.00 M ON T H 3BDR 2BA 3 CO R N ER L O T S O N LY $69,500 $500 DOWN C HO I C E OF 3 CITY LO T S $180.00/ M ON T H O R $17,500/ EA CH C O MM BLDG AT U S .98 2 CR N R L O T S -1,400 S/F $92,500 MI H 2 CR N R L O T S BLK. $ ST O RE $69,500 1 BR AP T ., F U R N. $29,500 2 BR AP T ., 3 RD ROW $34,500 GRANTS from page A1

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A8 | The Times Thursday, July 21, 2011 Franklin County Seafood Workers Association President Shannon Hartseld, left, and Vice President Randy Banks appeared before the county commission July 19. LOIS SWOBODA The Times PET OF THE WEEK Franklin County Humane Society 218 Hwy 71, Wewahitchka 850.639.2252 302 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe 850.227.7099 117 Hwy 98, Apalachicola 850.653.8825 Qualications: Expertise in: Now Accepting Appointments Call Toll Free 888-681-5864 For more info www.seclung.com Lung Disease Specialist Rob Garver, MD Now Seeing Patients in Port St. Joe NOW BCBS-FL I N -NETWORK PROV I DER Averie Johnson turns 3 Averie Elisabeth Johnson turns 3 on Friday, July 22, 2011. She is the daughter of Brett and Carrie Johnson, of Apalachicola, and big sister to Easton Brice Johnson. Maternal grandparents are Beckie Jones, of Apalachicola, the late Scott A. McDaniel, and Chris and Judy Grifn, of Phenix City, Ala. Paternal grandparents are Robbie and Marcia Johnson, of Apalachicola. Her great-grandparents are Red and Jo McDaniel, of Columbus, Ga.; Bill and Burnell Martina, of Apalachicola; the late Steve and Elisabeth Freeman; and the late Paul and Inez Johnson. Ajaylen Lewis to turn 4 Ajaylen Lewis will turn 4 on Sunday, July 24, 2011. He is the son of Jasmine Lewis, of Apalachicola. Maternal grandparents are Trina Ford and Freddie Lewis, of Apalachicola. Maternal great-grandparents are Rosa Tolliver and Marion Green, of Apalachicola. Godparents are Evelyn and Freddie Williams, of Apalachicola. Alonna Brown turns 5 Alonna Brown turns 5 on Friday, July 22, 2011. She is the daughter of Santana Myers and Shawn Brown, of Apalachicola. Maternal grandparents are Loretta and Garry Myers, of Apalachicola. Maternal great-grandparents are the late Carrie and C.W. Davis, of Apalachicola. Paternal grandparents are Darlene Pugh and Jerome Collins, of Apalachicola. Paternal greatgrandparents are Irestine and the late Jigs Bouie, of Apalachicola. Godparents are Sonny and Bobbie Gail Turrell. Alonna will celebrate her fth birthday on Saturday, July 23, at 6 p.m. at Battery Park. Family and friends are cordially invited. Maleah Croom turns 4 Maleah Amya Croom turned 4 on Wednesday, July 20, 2011. She is the daughter of Tanicia Pugh and Lowery Croom, Jr., of Apalachicola. Maternal grandparents are James and Alma Pugh, of Apalachicola. Paternal grandparents are Lowery Croom, Sr., of Miami, and Freda Williams, of Port St. Joe. Godparents are Shirley and Harold Byrd, Elinor Mount-Simmons and Jeremy Williams. Maleah will celebrate her birthday on Friday, July 22, at 6 p.m. at the Apalachicola Community Center at Battery Park with her brother Jamal. Friends and family are cordially invited to attend. Society Happy 32nd anniversary! Michael and Terrie Almond, of Carrabelle, will be celebrating their 32nd wedding anniversary on Thursday, July 21, 2011. They were married in Covington, Ga., by the justice of the peace in 1979. They have two children, Steven Almond, of North Carolina, and Michelle (Michael) Joiner, of Carrabelle. They have one grandchild, Lilianna Joiner, and a grandchild expected in September. Chumney completes basic training Navy Seaman Recruit Christopher Wayne Chumney graduated July 1 from U.S. Navy basic training at Recruit Training Command, Great Lakes, Ill. During the eight-week program, Chumney completed training that included classroom study and practical instruction on naval customs, rst aid, reghting, water safety and survival, and shipboard and aircraft safety. An emphasis was also placed on physical tness. The capstone event of boot camp is Battle Stations, an exercise that gives recruits the skills and condence they need to succeed in the eet. It is designed to galvanize the basic warrior attributes of sacrice, dedication, teamwork and endurance in each recruit through the practical application of basic Navy skills and the core values of honor, courage and commitment. While in boot camp, Chumney, a 2010 graduate of Franklin County High School, was selected to go to Washington, D.C., to be part of the Ceremonial Guards for the next two years. He is the son of Mitch and Kim Griner, of Apalachicola, and brother to Brandon, Kaitlin and MaKenzie. He is the grandson of Wayne and Kathy Cox, and Lynn and Ginny Griner, and nephew to DeWayne and Tammy Lewis, and Stacy Cox, all of Apalachicola, and a very special aunt, Pat Debord, of Washington state. We are all very proud of our sailor. Hooyah, Go, Navy! Happy 19th anniversary! Happy 19th anniversary on Monday, July 25, 2011, to Perry and Becky Floyd. May you be blessed to have many more! Happy 28th anniversary, James and Alma Pugh James and Alma Pugh will celebrate their 28th wedding anniversary on Sunday, July 24, 2011. Happy anniversary, Mom and Dad. We love you! Your kids, Micheal, Tanicia and Mario Thomas and Clara Bell Sapp to mark anniversary Saturday Thomas and Clara Bell Sapp will celebrate 50 years of marriage on Saturday, July 23, at 4 p.m. at the Living Waters Fellowship Hall. Mr. and Mrs. Sapp were married June 1, 1961, in Apalachicola by the Rev. O.B. Harris at the First Assembly of God Church. The Sapps three daugh ters, Sybil (Jim) Kemper, of Apalachicola; and Kathy (Chris) Jones and Loretta (Timmy) Davis, both of East point; would like to invite all friends and family to help cele brate this wonderful occasion. Staff report There will be a meeting Monday, Aug. 1, at 5 p.m. at the Eastpoint Firehouse to discuss the shelling pro gram. Those wishing to par ticipate can sign up at this meeting. You must own a 20-foot commercial vessel to participate. On Tuesday morning at the county commission, Franklin County Seafood Workers Association Presi dent Shannon Hartseld said shelling will be on a rst-come, rst-served ba sis. He said there are suf cient funds for 780 loads of shell. For more information, call Hartseld at 653-5190. Anniversaries Military NEWS CHRISTOPHER W A YNE CHUMNEY Seafood workers to discuss shelling Birthdays

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The United Methodist Churches of Franklin County Welcome You First United Methodist Church of Apalachicola Worship Service 11:00 a.m. every Sunday Sunday School 10:00 a.m. 75 5 th St. Apalachicola 653-9530 fumcapalach@gtcom.net Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis Carrabelle United Methodist Church Worship Services 10:45 a.m. Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Celebrate Recovery Mondays 7-9 p.m. 102 NE Ave. B Carrabelle 697-3672 Pastor: Julie Stephens Eastpoint United Methodist Church Worship Service 10:00 a.m. every Sunday Healing service every fourth Monday at 7:00 p.m. 317 Patton Dr. (corner of David St.) 670-8825 Pastor: Rev. Beth White St. George Island United Methodist Church 9:00 a.m. Worship Service 10:00 a.m. Fellowship Hour 201 E. Gulf Beach Dr. 9274635 www.sgiumc.org Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis First Pentecostal Holiness Church 379 Brownsville Road Apalachicola Were excited about what Gods doing!!! Sunday School 9:45 am Sunday Morning Worship 10:45 am Sunday Evening Service 6:00 pm Monday, Youth Group 6:30 pm Wednesday, Royal Rangers, G.A.P. 7:00 pm Wednesday Worship & Word 7:30 pm Nursery Provided during regular church services 7:00 7:00 First Baptist Church St. George Island 501 E. Bayshore Drive 927-2257 R. Michael Waley, Pastor Join us as we praise and worship the living Christ. Great is the Lord and most worthy of praise. Psalm 145:3 Sunday Bible Study ................................................ 10:00am Worship Praise ........................................................ 11:00am Sunday Night ............................................................ 7:00pm Wednesday Power Hour ...................................... 7:00pm Wednesday Youth at S.P.L.A.S.H ....................... 7:00pm Walking in Christ WELCOMES YOU Church of the Ascension 101 NE First Street Carrabelle SUNDAY 10:00 AM WELCOMES YOU Church THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH (850) 274-4490 WELCOMES YOU Trinity Trinity Episcopal Church est. 1836 Welcomes You Hwy. 98 & 6th St. Apalachicola 850-653-9550 Sunday Worship Services 8 & 10:30 a.m. Wednesdays Healing Service 11 a.m. Centering Prayer 4 p.m. Faith The Times | A9 Thursday, July 21, 2011 Do not just pretend to love others, really love them. Hate what is wrong, hold tightly to what is good. (Romans 12:9). This could apply to people who are attempting to make a blended family work as well as the ones who live day to day in these troubled times. Unlike my wife Pam, I came from an unbroken home and I knew very few people who came from a divorced home. I never even heard my Mom and Dad ght. Surely they had disagreements, but they were respectful enough to never let my two sisters and I hear, or see, it. I was fortunate to grow up in a Christian home where you prayed about everything and you showed respect for everyone including my aggravating sisters. My parents taught me unconditional love, and that marriage is a forever word. One of the lines in the vow for the marriage ceremony is, till death do us part. The best way to avoid the blended family issue altogether is through choosing the right life partner. I speak through experience because I have been divorced twice, and married three times. Each marriage was entered with full intentions of growing old with that person yet the rst two failed primarily because of incompatibility. After my second divorce, I knew there would be tough times ahead for my girls and I realized that it would take a special person to love my two daughters and me unconditionally. At the ripe old age of 30 it was likely that I would meet someone with children of their own. Romans 12:9 in the King James Version says, Let love be without dissimulation. The word dissimulation means to conceal or disguise (ones thoughts, feelings, or character.) It also means to fake, deceive, or duplicate. I needed someone who was not going to pretend to be a Mom to my two girls but would love them as if they were her esh-and-blood children. I realize now that Pam was searching for a good husband and someone who would love her two children as if they were his. On our rst date, she must have asked me a hundred questions. At some point in the conversation I stopped her and said, What you see is what you get. That pretty much ended the interrogation. I am guessing she must have liked what she saw since we have been together for 18 years. As for her, she only lacked one thing on my checklist, a relationship with God. One week after our rst date she accepted Christ into her heart. We both felt that a Christcentered marriage would be our only chance of enduring the impending hardships that we would face. If we both put our trust in Him we could overcome any obstacle in our future. Sometimes our kids expressed that they thought that the step parent was being unfair and I am sure there were times we both did struggle with it. Each Christmas we would always try to get each of them the same number of gifts because they were counting each one, and still do. Every three months the kids would draw from a hat to see which chore would be theirs for the next quarter. We feel every effort was made to make things fair across-the-board and sometimes they still felt slighted. Ironically, all of our children expressed their feelings of being mistreated or slighted mostly during their teen years. I came from my idea of a perfect home and I remember feeling mistreated and slighted by my parents at times. Some things get pinned on the blended family that is merely family issues. There are many formulas that could help blended families nd success, the only ingredient that cant be left out of them all is, LOVE. (First Corinthians 13:4-8) Love is patient, love is kind. It does not envy, it does not boast, it is not proud. It is not rude, it is not self-seeking, it is not easily angered, and it keeps no record of wrongs. Love does not delight in evil but rejoices with the truth. It always protects, always trusts, always hopes, always perseveres. Love never fails. We welcome all suggestions and hope you enjoy this weekly article. Please send all emails to Scott Shiver at frontline247@mac.com Love helps blended families success YOUTH MATTERS Scott Shiver Obituaries Mary Faith Bingham died peace fully Sunday, July 17, 2011 in Tallahassee. Faith was born March 30, 1936, in Bainbridge, Ga. to Mary Alice Sapping ton Cullifer, of Lynn Haven, and the late Joseph Hayes Sap pington, of Havana. She lived in the South all of her life, mostly in Florida and south Georgia. She rst attended Florida International University in Miami, and then Florida State University in Tallahas see where she received a masters degree in home economics. She retired in 1996 from a long tenure as a math, business, and vo cational teacher. Her rst teaching job was with the English as a Sec ond Language pro gram in Miami, at the English Center in the 1970s. When her family moved to Apalachicola in 1977, she taught at Apala chicola High School. She nished her career teaching DCT at Lincoln High School in Tallahassee, and prior to that at Godby High School. Faith wrote a cookbook after retirement called Faith in the Kitchen, and opened a cooking store by the same name with her daughters in Tallahassee. She co-authored a book with her mother entitled Bea cons, about her mothers life growing up in the South, and another entitled Light houses along Floridas Coastline, featuring brief histories about Florida light houses accompanied by her mothers paintings. Faith is survived by her children Chris Whiteside, of Torrance, Calif., Wayne Robison of Mandeville, La., Andrew Whiteside, of Tus caloosa, Ala., and Catherine Sam Walker, Robin In gram and Brian Whiteside, all of Tallahassee; her hus band of 10 years, Dr. Frasier O. Bingham, Tallahassee, and his children, Charles P. Bingham, of Lighthouse Point, and Britt Bingham Springer, of Boone, N.C.; 13 grandchildren and ve great-grandchildren. Funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon, July 19 at Trinity Episcopal Church in Apalachicola, with burial at Magnolia Cemetery. In lieu of owers, the family requests dona tions to Big Bend Hospice, 1723 Mahan Center Blvd., Tallahassee, FL 32308 (www.bigbendhospice.org), and the National Ovarian Cancer Coalition, P.O. Box 11809, Pleasanton, CA 94588 (www.ovarian.org). Condolences may be submitted or viewed at www.southerlandfamily. com. Southerland Family Funeral Home, Port St. Joe, handled arrange ments. Mary Faith Whiteside Bingham MAR Y FAITH BINGHAM Julia McAlpin was born June 16, 1946 in Apalachicola. She passed away at her home on Sat urday, June 25, 2011 at the age of 65. She was a homemaker and a lifelong resident of Apalachicola. She is survived by her children: Lamar Hardy, Julia Nabors and Patricia Watson; brother, Wesley Smith; sisters, Patricia Williams, Carolyn Smith and Bonnie Strickland; four grandchildren; and two great-grandchildren. Memorialization by cremation. Julia McAlpin On Friday, July 15, 2011, on her birthday, Pam Thomas, formerly of Car rabelle, was buried at sea in keeping with her wishes. Her ashes were returned to the waves she loved, sur rounded by a bed of rose petals. A popular employee of the Two Als restaurant, Pam was well-known in Carrabelle. She passed away on April 21, 2011 af ter a battle with cancer. In August 2010, she was diagnosed with a brain tumor while visit ing her family in Georgia and remained there until her death. She is survived by three daugh ters, Brandy Bracket, Aimie Sorrentino and Samantha Thom as; two brothers, David Giddens, of Eastpoint, and Dale Gid dens, of Temple, Ga.; her parents, Dick and Mildred Giddens, of Carrabelle; and ve grandchildren. She was predeceased by a brother, Danny Gid dens. In lieu of owers, dona tions may be made to the American Cancer Society or the Ocean Conser vancy. Pam Thomas PAM THOMAS Herbert Miller, 58, died Wednesday morning, June 29, 2011 at Tallahassee Memorial Hospital after a short illness. A lifelong resi dent of Apalachico la, he was born Aug. 25, 1952, the young est of ve children. He was a former em ployee of St. Joe Paper Co. and remained a faithful employee of the Franklin County School District up until his recent retirement. When he was not working, you would most likely nd him enjoying one of his favorite hobbies, shing, or the company of his family and friends to share in love and laughter. He was preceded in death by his parents, Leon Miller, Sr. and Inez Hol land Miller; brothers Leon Miller, Jr. and Elijah Brown, Sr.; and sister Annie Laura Brown. He is survived by his loving wife, Carolyn Miller; three children, Maurice, Sr. (Jackie), Demetrius Egg and LaKedra; and a special son, Joshua J-wash, all of Apalachicola; nine grand children, Shakira, Haleigh, Maurice, Jr., Amani, Trey, JaMichael, Marissa, Mariah, and Malei ka; and one brother, Freddie (Mary) Brown, and sister Rosa Tolliver, both of Apalachicola. Also surviving are Mr. Millers in-laws, James J. and Pinkie Myers, of Wewahitchka; four sis ters-in-law Emma Dawson, of Panama City, Elaine (Wayne) Hollingshed, of Memphis, Tenn., and Betty (Daniel, Jr.) Sims, and An nie (Mike) Riley, both of Wewahitchka; four brothersin-law Jesse Ray (Delores) Myers, of Castleberry, and Willie (Valerie) Myers, Le roy (Eleanor) Myers, and Lewis (Pamela) Myers, all of Panama City; aunts Betty Simmons, of Simpsonville, S.C., and Erma DeLarge, of Linden, N.J.; special and devoted friend, Elaine Wil liams, of Apalachicola; and a host of nieces, nephews, cousins and friends. Homegoing services were Thursday afternoon, July 7 at St Paul AME Church in Apalachicola, with burial at Magnolia Cemetery. Richardsons Family Funeral Care of Tallahassee handled arrangements. Herbert Miller Herbert Miller family The family of the late Herbert Miller: Carolyn, Lakedra, Demetrius and Maurice wish to express their warmest love and appreciation for everything bestowed on them during the loss of their loved one; the prayers, visits, food, cards, emotional support, etc. Herbert, we love and miss you. You are gone but never forgotten. We had big plans for you, but God has even bigger plans for you. Rest in peace. HERBERT MILLER Cards of THANKS Now hear this! Starting this Friday, July 22, we will be able to enjoy those huge hamburgers and fries once again. Thats right, folks, everyone is welcome to Camp Gordon Johnston American Legion Post 82 for fun, fellowship and hamburgers and fries from 5 to 7 p.m., and still only a $6 donation. See ya there! Breaking News: Tuesday, July 19 was the opening of the newly renovated Village Mart. Fully stocked with food items, shing tackle and beverages. There is a place to wash off your boat, and a shower for you. Enjoy the convenience! We here in the Village sure will! Sure do enjoy those columns from former Mayor Mel Kelly, and our Clerk of Courts Marcia Johnson. I hope you do too. The Fishermans Wife, Pam Lycett, has relocated her restaurant to the former home of the late Mayor Myers Metarie and his wife Pitt, across from the IGA. Very nice! The walk to the front door is a little difcult for those on walkers, canes and wheelchairs. And another thing! When there is a righthand turn, like the ones in downtown Carrabelle, and youre making a turn, get in the lane as quickly as possible. Dont wait to get to the corner. This way you wont tie up trafc,. Be kind to one another, check on the sick and housebound, and keep smiling you may not feel better, but everyone will wonder what youre up to. Until next time, God bless America, our troops, the poor, homeless and hungry. No need to tie up downtown trafc LANARK NEWS Jim Welsh The family of Debra Elliott would like to thank the many friends of our community for the love and compassion bestowed upon us during our time of loss. The wonderful food, cards, owers and visits have been a great comfort. God Bless you all. Debra Elliott family

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The Times Outdoors E-mail outdoors news to timesoutdoors@star.com More coverage online at apalachtimes.com Corner of Marina Drive next to Piggly Wiggly Port St. Joe, FL www.BWOsh.com Everything for your Outdoor Adventure WEVE GOT IT! WEVE GOT WHAT YOU NEED TO WORK ON YOUR BOAT & TRAILER OR GO SCALLOPING, FISHING, SNORKELING BOATING, CRABBING, SWIMMING, CAMPING, HUNTING OR JUST OUT FOR THE EVENING! Freshwater Not much to say about the offshore shing, as it is now closed to red snapper, gag grouper and amberjacks. Kingsh will make up most of the shing the rest of summer. Good reports the Mexico Beach Articial Reef Association sites are producing king sh and Spanish makerel. Inshore Offshore With so much rain lately, the bays are muddy and full of freshwater. Good reports from Blacks Island of mullet and trout being caught, but not in great numbers. Red sh have been spotted on the Eagle Harbor side of the bay, and nice schools with good-sized sh. Freshwater shing should improve with all the rain weve had the past week. River levels are on the rise, and the catsh bite will be red-hot. Lake Wimico and the big river have produced some bass this week; however, expect them to be on the move. SPONS ORED B Y Page A10 Thursday, July 21 Special to The Times A science-based partnership to help conservation agencies respond to climate change and other 21st century challenges received a major boost this summer with the hiring of Tim Breault, former director of the Florida Fish and Wildlife Con servation Commissions Divi sion of Habitat and Species Conservation. Breaults new title is co ordinator for the Peninsular Florida Landscape Conser vation Cooperative (LCC). Partners in the cooperative include state and federal agencies, nonprot groups and academic in stitutions. Two years of funding for Breaults position is being shared by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) and the Florida Fish and Wild life Conservation Commission (FWC). FWC also is providing Breault ofce space in Tallahassee. Tim understands the value of partnerships, said FWS Southeast Regional Director Cindy Dohner. He also knows how to engage mul tiple parties with sometimes diver gent priorities to create a powerful consensus. We are excited to give him the LCC baton and stand ready to pro vide the support needed to succeed. Florida is unique and di verse but has some compli cated issues, said FWC Ex ecutive Director Nick Wiley. Tim has been a tremendous asset to our state balancing the needs of people and wildlife. While the com mission is sorry to lose him, the state of Florida will continue to benet from his abilities as he takes on this new role. The Peninsular Florida LCC is one of 21 across the nation being ini tiated by the U.S. Department of In terior since 2009. The purposes are to gain efciencies through shared knowledge; guide research to the places and topics where it can make the most difference; and give land management agencies the scientic tools they need to tackle major con servation challenges across large landscapes. The most confounding issue confronting wildlife and habi tats is climate change, but the LCCs are also working on threats related to water scarcity, habitat fragmentation and invasive species. I look forward to building the LCC partnership and working with the entire conservation community in Florida, said Breault, who worked 36 years for FWC. For more information about the Peninsular Florida LCC, go to http:// peninsularoridalcc.org/. For more information on LCCs in general, go to www.fws.gov/science/shc/lcc.html. By Lois Swoboda Times Staff Writer During the height of tourist season, the Florida Panhandle shows off some of its prettiest posies. Right now, even a casual observer cant help but catch a glimpse of hot pink at the roadside. Three of our most exotic wildowers are the source. Salt marsh mallow, Kosteletzkya virginica is a close relative of hibiscus. According to the Lady Bird Johnson Wildower Center, this small shrub is also known as seaside mallow or Virginia fen rose, which underscores its fairly cold hardy nature, according to The Audubon Society Field Guide to North American Wildowers, Eastern Region. This striking species might be mistaken for swamp rose mallow, which is larger and has a red or purple throat. The owers are attractive nectar sources for a variety of pollinators and bloom from late spring through fall. Because it is native to this area, it is a great choice for a garden plant and thrives during the time when most garden owers fade. Salt marsh mallow needs wet soils to prosper but can be a handsome addition to a mixed wildower planting. It is highly salt-tolerant, according to numerous gardening guides. Because of this, in my opinion, it can be used as an accent within a pond or marsh edge planting. The other pink beauty blazing en masse at roadsides and on our barrier islands is the salt marsh pink or sabatia, Sabatia grandiora The foliage of this ower is grassy in appearance, and though common locally, this plant is considered rare by the Institute for Regional Conservation. Botanists classify it as an annual, meaning it grows from seed and lives a single season. These exotic little owers are members of the gentian family. Many gentians are brightly colored, although they are most often blue. The edelweiss, beloved of the Swiss, is a gentian. A kissing cousin of the salt marsh pink, known as ten-petal sabatia ( S. dodecandra ) is in bloom now as well. This is a darker pink and a larger ower. It has 10 petals instead of ve and is not seen in the massive clumps sometimes produced by salt marsh pinks. It grows in ditches and wet areas in Tates Hell Swamp and can be found in standing water. Sea turtle nests still available for adoption Like the rest of the Forgotten Coast, St. Vincent Island has settled into another summer season. The wildlife refuge is alive with the births of new birds, mammals and amphibians. Spring breeding season is marked by some movement of alligators, marine and land turtles, snakes, frogs and lizards. St. Vincent alligators have been known to swim across to Indian Pass to look for a mate in the lagoon. Sambar deer, white-tailed deer, wild hogs, wolves, raccoons and other mammals living on St. Vincent Island have their young during the spring and raise them in the warmer weather. Not to be outdone, the bird population has produced hundreds of uffy hatchlings that have been hopping around the nesting areas on the island. Wood ducks, bald eagles, gulls, terns, plovers, oystercatchers and many other species of water birds, shorebirds and ducks nest on St. Vincent Island. Nesting areas are posted and closed to the public, so please honor these signs if you are visiting the island. Turtle season began May 15. The supporters group is once again looking for donors to adopt a specic sea turtle nest. Thirty nests will be available for adoption at a cost of $25 per nest. Donors will receive a certicate of adoption, photo of the nest, complete activity report at the end of the nesting season and recognition in the supporters newsletter The $25 donation fee will help pay for the cost of wire cages and other supplies to protect the nests and fuel for the patrol vehicles. An adoption will make a wonderful gift for friends of any age who are interested in protecting sea turtles. Your support will be greatly appreciated by the mother sea turtles, volunteers and staff of St. Vincent Island and sea turtle lovers everywhere, To adopt a nest, call 229-6735 or email supportstvin@hotmail.com. Projects that are going on during the summer months are short-staffed and in need of volunteers. The turtle patrol needs more help checking the coastline for turtle crawls, conrming and marking the nests and recording the data about each nest. The wolf program needs volunteers who can spend time on the island tracking the wolves (they are wearing tracking collars) and helping the staff determine if a litter of pups has been produced this season. Shorebird surveys are also being conducted on the island, and volunteers can assist with those surveys. Right now, FWC is assisting with these surveys. If you would like to help, please call Shelley Stiaes, refuge manager, at 653-8808. Speaking of volunteers, let me introduce another outstanding woman who has given so many hours of her time to St. Vincent National Wildlife Refuge. Before retiring in Franklin County, Denise Williams spent 20 years of active duty service in the U.S. Public Health Service Commissioned Ofcers Corps, where she served in numerous duty stations around the U.S. and a few international assignments. Denise has been a volunteer with St. Vincent NWR since 2005. She served on the steering committee to start the Supporters of St. Vincent and served as president of the supporters group for three years. She is still an active member of the turtle patrol, leads island tours and is surveying the archeology sites on St. Vincent Island. During her non-refuge hours, she volunteers at the Franklin County library, kayaks, gardens and enjoys living in this special paradise. Our hats are off to Denise and all the hours of volunteering she has done for St. Vincent NWR. During the summer months, there are no scheduled tours of the island because of the extreme heat and bugs. You are still welcome to visit the island, and the shuttle operates almost every day from the Indian Pass Boat ramp (229-1065). Bring everything you need, including drinking water and sunscreen, and leave only your footprints behind. Island tours will resume again in the fall when tour conditions improve. This monthly column is provided by the Supporters of St. Vincent Island National Wildlife Refuge. Please visit www.stvincentfriends.com for more information and volunteer opportunities. Special to The Times Matthew Gore, who will be stationed aboard the Gulf Sentry in Carrabelle, was among 20 new ofcers to graduate Friday in the Fish and Wildlife Conser vation Commissions 16th ofcer class. Patrol, protect, pre serve, the motto for the FWCs Division of Law Enforcement, was on the minds of the graduates at a ceremony at the Florida Public Safety Institute, near Tallahassee. They pledged their efforts to patrol Flor idas lands and waters and protect and preserve its people and resources. Col. Jim Brown, direc tor of the FWCs Division of Law Enforcement, men tioned how FWC ofcers are the rst point of contact most people have with the agency. This privilege car ries great responsibility, Brown said. As they inter act with the public, I know these new ofcers will up hold our values: integrity, professionalism, dedication and adaptability. As FWC ofcers, the graduates will patrol Flori das lands nearly 54,000 square miles of it as well as Floridas nearly 6,000 square miles of water. These ofcers will be protecting the Fishing Cap ital of the World and one of the largest public hunting systems in the country, said FWC Chairman Kathy Barco, guest speaker at the ceremony. The new ofcers began their training in January. The beginning part of each FWC academy teaches re cruits basic law enforce ment information and skills. During the nal eight weeks of each academy, we focus on the unique infor mation and skills it takes to be an FWC ofcer, said Maj. Mark Warren, head of the FWCs training sec tion. The specialized training involves rearms procien cy, wildlife identication, vessel operation, defensive tactics, all-terrain vehicle operation, detection for boating and driving under the inuence and a focus on state and federal wildlife and sheries laws. The graduates will now spend three months with a eld-training ofcer. Gore will be reporting for duty in aboard the FWCs largest vessel, the Gulf Sentry. TIM BREAUL T BIRDS-EYE VIEW FROM ST. VINCENT ISLAND Breault to lead Peninsular Florida cooperative TIM DONOVAN | FWC Pictured with Ofcer Matthew Gore are, from left, FWC Assistant Executive Director Greg Holder, FWC Chairman Kathy Barco, Gore, FWC Col. Jim Brown and FWC Major Mark Warren. Gulf Sentry ofcer among new FWC grads BUDS N BUGS PHO T OS B Y LOIS S W O B O D A | The Times Salt marsh mallow (left) and ten-petal sabatia

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CARRABELLE A PALA C HI C OLA SP O RT S www.apalachtimes.com A Section By David Adlerstein Times City Editor Theres a horse named Carrabelle Harbor, and on Sunday, she won big in Washington state. According to a story by Scott Hanson in the Seattle Times, the horse captured the $50,000 Kent Handi cap at Emerald Downs in Auburn, Wash., for 3-yearold llies, by turning back the challenge of favored Class Included to win by a length. Carrabelle Harbor went straight to the lead in the 1-1/16 miles race. Trained by Doris Harwood, she had only raced longer than 6 furlongs once in her ca reer, losing by 21 lengths in a 1-mile stakes last year. After repelling early competition Sunday from Elusive Noise, Carrabelle Harbor was confronted by Class Included, who had been sent wide and took a brief lead. Just when it seemed Class Included would win easily, Carrabelle Harbor dug in and won a lengthof-the-stretch battle. She increased her lead in the nal yards. My lly just gives it her all on race day. said jockey Gallyn Mitchell, who rode the winner. The horse paid $15 to win, in a time of 1 minute, 42.73 seconds. Now, you may be won dering how the horse got her name. No, I have never been to Carrabelle Harbor but I love the name, said owner Pam Christopher son, who owns the Bar C Racing Stables in Herm iston, Ore., with her hus band, K. Neal. The Christophersons own the llys sire, Har bor The Gold, and so are always on the lookout for pretty Harbor names. I really liked Carra belle Harbor and thought it would be a pretty llys name, Pam Christopher son said. Shes done quite well racing here in the Northwest. The Washing ton Breeders did a cute article on her stating she was named after the hurricane-riddled Car rabelle Harbor, home to the worlds smallest police station. The Christophersons purchased their 40-acre farm in October 1981 and for the past 10 years have been centered around the thoroughbred breeding in dustry. The couple stand four stallions and keep approximately 15 mares year-round, and breed, raise and sell thorough bred race prospects at the Washington and Oregon sales. In 2006, they were voted Oregons Leading Breeders and represented Oregon at the Thorough bred Owners and Breed ers awards banquet in Lexington, Ky. WEEKLY ALMANAC APALACHICOLA CARRABELLE TIDE TABLES MONTHLY AVERAGES To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from these given for APALACHICOLA: HIGH LOW Cat Point Minus 0:40 Minus 1:17 East Pass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27 To nd the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times from those given for CARRABELLE: HIGH LOW Bald Point Minus 9:16 Minus 0:03 Sponsor the WEEKLY ALMANAC Call Today! 653-8868 Date High Low % Precip Thu, July 21 92 77 30 % Fri, July 22 88 76 30 % Sat, July 23 88 76 30 % Sun, July 24 89 77 30 % Mon, July 25 90 78 30 % Tues, July 26 90 78 40 % Wed, July 27 89 77 40 % 7/21 Thu 01:46AM 0.6 L 08:15AM 1.6 H 03:26PM 0.6 L 09:07PM 1.2 H 7/22 Fri 02:06AM 0.8 L 08:41AM 1.7 H 04:35PM 0.5 L 10:43PM 1.1 H 7/23 Sat 02:27AM 1.0 L 09:12AM 1.7 H 05:50PM 0.4 L 7/24 Sun 09:49AM 1.8 H 07:00PM 0.2 L 7/25 Mon 10:33AM 1.8 H 08:00PM 0.1 L 7/26 Tue 11:26AM 1.8 H 08:52PM 0.0 L 7/27 Wed 05:03AM 1.5 H 07:23AM 1.4 L 12:26PM 1.8 H 09:37PM -0.1 L 7/21 Thu 06:50AM 2.6 H 01:13PM 1.0 L 07:42PM 1.9 H 11:53PM 1.3 L 7/22 Fri 07:16AM 2.7 H 02:22PM 0.8 L 09:18PM 1.8 H 7/23 Sat 12:14AM 1.6 L 07:47AM 2.7 H 03:37PM 0.6 L 7/24 Sun 08:24AM 2.9 H 04:47PM 0.3 L 7/25 Mon 09:08AM 2.9 H 05:47PM 0.2 L 7/26 Tue 10:01AM 2.9 H 06:39PM 0.0 L 7/27 Wed 03:38AM 2.4 H 05:10AM 2.2 L 11:01AM 2.9 H 07:24PM -0.2 L Ad vertise. It Works. C A LL TOD A Y. KARI FORTUNE 227-7847 OR JOEL REED 370-6090 Page 11 Thursday, July 21, 2011 AA All-Stars play tough at state By David Adlerstein Times City Editor The AA All-Stars won some dra matic games on the eld last week at the state tournament, including a one-run game that went into ex tra innings. But in the end, it was archrival Port St. Joe that bumped them from the 16-team tournament. With parents, grandparents and brothers and sisters in tow, the team made the ve-hour trip to Brooksville, near Tampa, beginning with a July 8 spaghetti banquet. Unfortunately, rain forced cancel lation of the home run derby. On July 9, it was time to take on hometown favorite Brooksville, with the team under the leadership of manager Bob Eddy and assis tant coaches Justin Odom, Mark Daniels and Jennifer Daniels. It was time to get down to busi ness for pitcher Devin Daniels, shortstop Clint Rester, rst base man Lamarius Martin, center elder Caden Turrell, left elder Josh Farmer, second baseman Josh Odom, catcher Kelson Smith, third baseman Alex Joa nos, pitcher Bennett Rash, right elder Jordan Millender, catcher Colin Amison and right elder Gage Boone. Tied 11-11 after six innings, the boys went to an extra seventh in ning and got two men on base, Millender on third and Rash on second, when Rester stepped up to the plate. He then whacked a hit to drive home Millender for the winning run and a 12-11 opening victory. In game two on July 10, the team lost 11-3 to Paxton, falling into the losers bracket. Then on July 11, the boys ex ited the tournament following an 18-16 loss to Port St. Joe. The boys trailed 10-2 and then scored eight runs, the maximum allowable, in the fourth to tie things up. St. Joe came back in the fth inning and scored ve runs, but the Franklin County crew came roaring back with six runs, inching ahead 16-5. But then St. Joe scored three unanswered runs in the last inning to seal the victory. The tournament was excit ing, said one parent, noting that she and other fans joked with St. Joe fans that we had to travel 500 miles to face St. Joe all over again. The tourney was won by West Seminole, with Bushnell as run ner-up. And the boys were re warded for their hard work with a poolside pizza party at the Holiday Inn Express. Eddy said the tourney was an exciting one. I had a great time with the kids, he said. They played very hard, and we enjoyed the trip down there. The St. Joe game was very exciting, and we both fought hard for that game. Carrabelle Harbor makes a splash at Emerald DownsCOURTE S Y OF E M ER ALD D O WNSC A RR A BE LL E H A RBOR Photos by 2KL P H OTOGR APH Y | Special to The Times Franklin County coach Bob Eddy, right, shakes the hand of the Port St. Joe coach as Justin Odom and Clint Rester, left, shake hands with Port St. Joe players. Pitcher Devin Daniels stands by the pitching machine during the tourney. Caden Turrell handled center eld for the Franklin County All-Stars.

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Local12 | The Times Thursday, July 21, 2011stipend and he puts in one day a week, a few hours at a time. Perhaps in the future he can put in more.” Sandra knows as well as anyone what her son is capable of, a boy born ve months premature, weighing 1 pound, 4 ounces, so small he could sit in the palm of her husband’s hand. “His survival was very sketchy and he spent pretty close to a year in the hospital,” she said, recalling how he had to be own to Shands for surgeries on his heart and his eyes, to try to save his sight. By age 6, when most parents are shopping for crayons and pencils to send off with their eagerly chattering children to school, the challenges of Joseph’s condition had become clear. Living in a rural school district, with limited services available to the disabled, and as workingclass people, unable to easily relocate to Tallahassee, the Rickards had to make choices. “There were years and years of occupational and physical and speech therapy, and services not available in the county,” Sandra said. “I left the job that I was working, and being his mom, it was my duty to do whatever I needed to do for my son. “We couldn’t sell our house, we don’t have a fancy house, and we’re not considered professional college people,” she said. “The services we got were primarily centered in Tallahassee.” The Rickards worked out an arrangement between the Franklin and Leon County schools that enabled Joseph to attend the highly respected Gretchen Everhart School in Tallahassee. Because regular transportation to the school was not yet a reality in the county 18 years ago, the Franklin County Schools arranged to reimburse the Rickards for Sandra’s mileage costs. “We truly appreciated the nancial help the school board gave to us; and that we were let to continue our routine until our son graduated,” Sandra said. “By doing this, our son’s therapy, doctor’s appointments, etc. were not disturbed and our son did not miss many days of valuable classroom time. “For this, my husband and I were very grateful,” she said, sharing her appreciation to the administrators at the time, Superintendent C.T. Ponder, Assistant Superintendent Mike Clark and Rose McCoy, who is in charge of special education and helped make it happen.An eager, and constant, learnerWith a little prompting from his dad Joseph, who calls himself Joey, shares a lot about what he learned over the past 18 years at Gretchen Everhart. He can make clear how he’s learned to oat on his back in the swimming pool on campus, and to dress and how he’s learning through a new hippatherapy program of horseback riding to develop balance and trunk strength as he works to loosen the tightened grip of cerebral palsy. “Do you know the horse’s name?” asks his father. “Sugar Bear!” shouts Joey. Ricky said his son has advanced considerably since he rst began schooling at age 6, physically, as well as mentally. “When he rst started he was scared of the water,” said dad, who has worked to adapt to Joey’s limits as he expands his world, teaching his son how to grip and throw a ball so he can excel at the Special Olympics, to go out on a boat with Joey and sh, walk on the beach or ride together on a doubleseated, three-wheel bicycle they both can pedal. “It’s taken a lot of work, a lot of therapy,” Ricky said. “He still has a long way to go. But they’re working with him.” Joey’s participation at Gretchen Everhart, and now in a new life skills program, focuses on a steady regimen of tasks, from learning Braille to mastering how to wash dishes, to lifting weights and working with squeeze balls, even handling an electric razor; all of those mundane tasks that give us independence. “He’s limited verbally and with his ne motor skills, but he’s developing because of what we’re giving him; the social stimulation,” said mom. “We take him everywhere and do everything with him. His advancement is far more than what they thought it was going to be. “The window of opportunity closes at a certain point of development, but we have not found that to be true of our son,” Sandra said. “He’s constantly learning because we’re explaining things to him and he’s very eager to learn. He’s absorbed so much more than we thought he was going to.” Of all the learning Joey’s absorbed, it is music where he has found his greatest pleasure. At the May 26 commencement, Brenda Rice and Jen Reece from the music department presented Joey with the Adams Music Award, in recognition of his love for music, chorus and interest in the keyboard, which he has further developed with Trish Baker at Michelle Snow’s School of Music. “He has to be coaxed to start, but she’ll put his hands on the keyboard and he’ll take off,” Ricky said. “I like to listen to the Monkees,” Joey said. He could tick off a list of his likes, from Adam Sandler’s “Turkey Song,” to the Beatles, the Backstreet Boys, Elvis, the Christian rock group “Skillet” and even talk radio. Church, too, is a part of Joey’s life, whether it’s been learning Sunday school lessons from Bobby Winchester or listening to Pastor Mark Mercer at the First Baptist Church. “He’ll sit there for the whole hour, and listen to the preacher,” his dad said. Now that Joey has graduated, Sandra has enrolled him in the Life Links UCP (United Cerebral Palsy) Day Program in Buford Court in Tallahassee, where he can continue his learning and life skills training, interact with friends, and will be taught by knowledgeable staff. He also receives help through Florida’s Division of Blind Services, where he is a popular client. “Everybody in our of ce loves Joey. They all know him,” said Bertha Hyche, who supervises Joey’s care and is hoping to assist in securing him a computer. “He’s a very well-liked young man.” As proud as they are of their son, the Rickards reserve a special place in their hearts for the welcome that George, Ronnie and David Jackson have extended to Joey to work at their store. “This is an awesome gesture on their part. What they are letting Joseph do is so wonderful,” Sandra said. “Joseph just loves working there. He feels welcome, and is treated with respect.” Jenna Jackson, who works with her dad, David Jackson, and uncle, Ronnie, at the store, can vouch for Joey’s positive attitude, curiosity and willingness to share. She watches as her daughters, Jada, 5, and Jerzy, 4, chat and giggle with the friendly man they have come to know well. “They’ll talk to him all day long,” Jenna said. “They’ll talk his ears off.” Trades & Services CALLTODAY!653-8868 GET YOUR AD IN Trades & Services CALLTODAY!653-8868 GET YOUR AD INTrades & Services May I Help You? Housekeeping Handyman Lawn care Shopping Personal Care Call: (850) 519-8640 Laban Bontrager, DMD Monica Bontrager, DMD 12761 Pea Ridge Road Bristol, Florida 32321TELEPHONE (850) 643-5417 Bristol Dental ClinicDENTURE LAB ON PREMISESSame Day Service on repairs and Relines Don Lively General Contractors C Visa, Discover, and American Express Honored at Participating Ace Stores JACKSONS Building Supplies & Auto Repair Carrabelle 697-3333 We Deliver Anywhere J Hardware and Paint Center Burrell Concrete Construction Burrell Concrete Construction WILLIAMS HOME MAINTENANCEWILL PICK UP YOUR UNWANTED METALS AND HAUL THEM OFF FOR FREE ROBERTS APPLIANCE REPAIR ALL MAJOR BRANDS 18 Shadow Lane Apalachicola, FL 32320 Phone: (850) 653-8122 Cell: (850) 653-7654 JOES LAWN CARE NO JOB TOO BIG!! SINCE 2002, DOINGBUSINESSINTHISCOMMUNITY LAWN CARE, TREE TRIMMING AND REMOVAL, DEBRIS AND JUNK REMOVAL, or whatever your yard needs are CALL JOE @ 370-6911 OR 850-670-5478 E-MAIL @ joes_lawn@yahoo.com Robert C. Bruner Attorney Personal & Business BankruptcyOver 30 Years Legal ExperienceOf“ce located at:19 Island Drive, Eastpoint, FL850-670-3030We are a debt relief agency. We can help people “le bankruptcy relief under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code.Ž The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that should not be based solely upon advertisements. Before you decide, ask us to send you free written information about our quali“cations and experience.Ž MAKING A WAY from page A1HABITAT from page A1able to close it. It will happen in due season.” Eventually, Kenny would work out a deal with a friend to hand over to him the family’s mobile home, which meshed perfectly with the completion of seven months of construction, the most rapid completion of any Habitat house in Franklin County and the second in Carrabelle. During the planning period, Kenny and Becky had enlarged the living room and removed a bedroom, to best accommodate their needs, especially their two grandsons and one granddaughter who will soon be visiting from Virginia. As importantly, Kenny, who works putting in underground utility lines for Royal American, Becky and Jarrad put in more than the 400 hours of “sweat equity” required of the family. The family helped frame it, paint it, put felt on the roof, “pretty much helped do everything,” as they worked alongside the many local volunteer citizens and companies who pitched in. Now they’re focusing on taking care to water the newlysodded lawn during this dry period, with streetside parking soon to be complete. On July 7, the family, along with Habitat board members and builder met at the law of ces of volunteer Kristy Branch Banks in Eastpoint to close the loan on their new home. “The Lord God knew what He had bestowed upon us,” said Kenny. “Everything happens for a reason.” Interested volunteers may visit www. habitatfranklin.org for information and a place to sign up for either construction or nonconstruction assistance to Habitat. Soon building will start on one or both of two Eastpoint lots recently donated by the banking community.DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The TimesJoey Rickards, right, spends time talking with Jada Allen, 5, at left, and Jerzy Jackson, 4.

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The Times | A13 Thursday, July 21, 2011 CLASSIFIEDS Thursday, July 21, 2011 The Times | B13 3120T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 19-2008-CA-000590 BANK OF NEW YORK AS SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A. AS TRUSTEE SAMI 2005-AR4, Plaintiff, GARY C PANGUS, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated June 21, 2011, and entered in Case No. 19-2008-CA-000590 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida in which Bank of New York as Successor In Interest to JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A. as Trustee SAMI 2005AR4, is the Plaintiff and Gary C. Pangus, Jane Doe, n/k/a Angela Garmley, are defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in/on, Franklin County, Florida at on the 10th day of August, 2011, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: LOTS I AND 2, IN BLOCK 208 OF THE CITY OF APALACHICOLA, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF NOW IN COMMON USE. A/K/A 316 12TH STREET APALACHICOLA FL Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated in Franklin County, Florida this 27th day of June, 2011. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons needing special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the Clerk of the Courts, Marcia M. Johnson, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, FL 32320; telephone number (850) 653-8861, not later than seven (7) days prior to this proceeding. If you are hearing or voice impaired, please call (850) 577-4400. To file response please contact Franklin County Clerk of Court, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, FL 32320, Tel: (850) 653-8861; Fax: (850) 653-9339. July 14, 21, 2011 3132T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File # 2011-000034-CP IN RE: ESTATE OF MARIE KELLEY ALLEN Deceased. NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION AND NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of MARIE KELLEY ALLEN, deceased, File number 2011000034-CP, is pending in the Circuit Court for Franklin County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is the Franklin COunty Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, Franklin County, Florida 32320. The estate is testate, and the date of the will is February 5, 2004. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT: Any interested person on whom a copy of this notice of administration is served must file on or before the date that is 3 months after the date of service of a copy of the notice of administration on that person any objection that challenges the validity of the will, the quaifications of the personal representative the venue or jurisdiction of this Court. Persons who may be entitled to exempt property under Section 732.402 Florida Statutes will be deemed to have waived their rights to claim that property as exempt property unless a petition for determination of exempt property is filed by such persons or on their behalf on or before the later of the date that is 4 months after the date of service of a copy of this notice of administration on such persons or the date that is 40 days after the date of termination of any proceedin involving the construction, admission to probate, or validity of the will or involving any other matter affecting any part of the exempt property. An election to take an elective share must be filed on or before the earlier of the date that is 6 months after the date of service of a copy of the notice of administration on the surviving spouse or an attorney in fact or a guardian of the property of the surviving spouse, or the date that is 2 years after the date of the decedents death. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file claims against the estate with the Court during the time periods set forth in Section 733.702 Florida Statutes, or be forever barred. ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. The date of the first publication of this Notice is July 14, 2011. Personal Representative: RONALD WILLIAM THOMAS, SR. 1920 Alban Avenue Tallahassee, FL 32301 J. GORDON SHULER of J. GORDON SHULER, P.A. Post Office Drawer 850 Apalachicola, Fl 32329 (850) 653-9226 Florida Bar Number 0700959 Attorney for Personal Representative July 14, 21, 2011 3158T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO: 11-00097-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, an Arkansas banking corporation, successor in interest to Coastal Community Bank, Plaintiff, vs. Mary Lou Patmore, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure dated June 29, 2011. in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Front Door of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market St., Apalachicola, FL 32320 at 11:00 a.m. on August 10, 2011 the following described property: Lot 42, Block 6, Lanark Village Unit No. 1, according to the map or plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 2, Page 14-14a, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. Dated: July 5, 2011 Marcia Johnson Clerk of Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk July 14, 21, 2011 3159T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO: 11-000103-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, an Arkansas banking corporation, successor in interest to Apalachicola State Bank, a division of Coastal Community Bank, Plaintiff, vs. WILLIAM J. LUBERTO, JR., Defendant. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Final Summary JudgAttend College Online from Home. *Medical *Business *Paralegal *Criminal Justice. Job Placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 866-467-0054. www.Centura.us.com Airlines are hiring Train for a high paying Aviation Career. FAA approved program. Financial Aid if qualified. Job Placement Assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-206-9405 ment of Foreclosure dated June 29, 2011 in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Front Door of the Franklin County Courthouse, 13 Market St., Apalachicola, FL 32320 at 11:00 a.m. on August 10, 2011, the following described property: Commence at a 6 inch by 6 inch concrete monument marking the Northeast corner of Section 30, Township 8 South, Range 6 West, Franklin County, Florida; thence run South Classieds Local | Classieds Jackel, Parrish earn ACC designation Special to The Times The Florida Association of Counties (FAC) presented Frank lin County Com missioners Pinki C. Jackel and Jo seph Smokey Parrish with the Advanced County Commissioner (ACC) designa tion following their completion of a comprehensive study pro gram developed by the associa tion. Janet Taylor, president of the Florida Counties Foundation, presented Jackel and Parrish with the designation, along with 28 other county commissioners, during an awards ceremony at the FAC annual conference June 21-24 at the Hilton Orlando Bonnet Creek in Orange County. More than 350 county ofcials and 300 exhibitors were in attendance. Launched by the FAC in 2006, the ACC educa tion program, The Florida Fo rum for County Leaders, is an advanced leadership program designed for graduates of the Certied County Commissioners (CCC) program. This year, the program has been held in Hills borough and saw 12 commission ers graduate in June, with a total of 106 graduating since the incep tion of the program in 2006. The ACC program is orga nized as a series of three semi nars, with 27 hours of course work. The course content focuses on leadership with an overarch ing theme of growth and devel opment in Florida. Participating commissioners must commit to fully participate in all three seminars in order to graduate. Seminars include Leadership Skills in Floridas Growth Envi ronment, Strategic Visioning & Implementing that Vision and Understanding and Working with Stakeholders in Floridas Growth Environment. This year, the University of Florida/Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences Extension sponsored the program in Ala chua County. This certication allows our citizen electorate to become ex perts in county government, im proving their communities, FAC Executive Director Chris Holley said. Through FACs education programs, we are able to teach commissioners how to advance their policies through the com plexities of government bureau cracies. For more information about the ACC program and courses, visit the FAC website at www.counties.com. For 80 years, the FAC has rep resented the diverse interests of Floridas counties, emphasiz ing the importance of protecting home rule the concept that government closest to the people governs best. The FAC helps counties effectively serve and represent Floridians by strength ening and preserving county home rule through advocacy, ed ucation and collaboration. 2-1-1 Big Bend launches new website 2-1-1 Big Bend Inc., the areas leading gateway for community resources, launched a new website this week, www.211BigBend.org, to better engage people who need help or access to human services in the Big Bend area. The sites fresh look makes it easier to search 2-1-1 Big Bends database of more than 1,500 programs. The value of our services is only as strong as our ability to reach people who need help, said 2-1-1 Big Bend President Randy Nicklaus. During our last 41 years, weve never lost sight of the importance to adapt and grow with the changing needs of the people in our commu nity. 2-1-1 Big Bend, a United Way Agency, answers more than 40,000 calls each year through its seven hot line programs. The regional Helpline 2-1-1 program assisted more than 24,000 callers during the past year. Thousands of people have sought help for unemployment, utilities, food, housing and mental health concerns. For more information about 2-1-1 Big Bend, visit www.211BigBend.org. Southerland staff to host ofce hours July 25 The Florida staff of U.S. Rep. Steve Southerland II will be hosting mobile ofce hours in Franklin Coun ty on Monday, July 25, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Community Center in Apalachicola, 1 Bay Ave. Residents of Franklin County and the surrounding area are invited to join Southerlands district director and constituent services specialist to ask questions or request assistance with a federal agency on issues in cluding Social Security, Medicare, Housing and Urban Development, Veterans Affairs, and Immigration. For questions, please contact Bethany Boggs at 850-785-0812 or Bethany.Boggs@mail.house.gov. Florida Seafood festival pageant July 30 The 2011 Miss Florida Seafood Festival Pageant will be held Sat urday, July 30, at 7 p.m. at Franklin County High School. Special to The Times If you have not visited the Franklin County Public Library recently, you might not know about the services available to you. Now that many government agencies have consolidated or relocated, applications for food stamps and the unemployment ofce require that users register online. Job seekers also might need to use the public access computers for career opportu nities and other resources. The latest featured website is www. BigBendworks.com, where you will nd local information on jobs, career opportunities, nancial resources, training and retraining possibilities, hu man services, unemployment compensation and the Social Security Administration. This site even offers information for nancial and housing assis tance for this specic region as opposed to sites that are for all over the state. For people who might have weak computer skills, staffs at both branches in Carrabelle and Eastpoint are trained to assist with e-government appli cations. Free basic computer lessons are also offered to teach how-to for those afraid of a computer mouse. 2-1-1 Bid Bend offers local and state hotlines for support ive counseling, crisis interven tion, information and reference to social service agencies. There are volunteer opportuni ties here such as hotline coun selors, program volunteers, student intern placements and work-study for your university at 2-1-1 Big Bend. For any questions or infor mation, please call the Car rabelle branch 697-2366 or the Eastpoint branch at 670-8151. PINKI JACKEL SMOKEY PARRISH Your County LIBRARY T ONIA CREAMER | Special to The Times The Carrabelle librarys summer reading program, which ends July 29, recently focused on the Hawaiian Islands, as shown by Martina and Summer Granger and Shalyn Massey doing the limbo. News BRIEFS

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A14| The Times Thursday, July 21, 2011 CLASSIFIEDS ToPlace Your Classified ad inCall Our New Numbers Now!Call:850-747-5020 Toll Free:800-345-8688 Fax:850-747-5044 Email:thestar@pcnh.com Email:thetimes@pcnh.com theAPALACHICOLA & CARRABELLETIMES CALLOURNEWNUMBERSNOW 3212T NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Writ of Execution issued in the Circuit Court of Franklin County Florida, on the 8th day of June, 2011, in the cause where Capital City Bank was plaintiff and Michael Lamar Clayton and Denise C. Clayton were defendant, being Case No. 2010-000494-CA in said court I, Skip Shiver, as Sheriff’ of Franklin County, Florida, have levied upon all the right., title and interest of the defendants Michael Lamar Clayton and Denise C. Clayton in. and to the following described property, to-wit: 2002 Coast Guard Registered Cabin 42 ft. tin. Fiberglass Inboard Motorboat, VIN# EGH42107I102, Documented # DOI 125201, Decal #10230440, Commercial Fishing. and on the 15th day of August, 2011 at the Franklin County Sheriff’s Office, located at 270 State Rd 65, Eastpoint, FL 32328, Franklin County, Florida, at the hour of 11:00 a.m., or as soon thereafter as possible, I will offer for sale all of the said defendants’ Michael Lamar Clayton and Denise C. Clayton, rights, title and interest in aforesaid property at public outcry and will sell the same, subject to all prior liens, encumbrances and judgments, if any, to the highest and best bidder or bidders for CASH, the proceeds to be applied as far as may be to the payment of costs and the satisfaction of the above described execution, Note: In accordance with the American with Disabilities Act, persons with disabilities needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact Debbie Mock no later than seven days prior to the proceeding at Franklin County Sheriff’s Office at (850)-670-8519. Boat can be viewed prior to sale at Scipio Creek farina located at 301 Market Street Apalachicola, FL 32320 Skip Shiver Sheriff of Franklin County, Florida By: Debbie Mock Deputy Sheriff July 14, 21, 28, Aug 4, 2011 3163T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY Case No 11-000073-CA VISION BANK, a Florida banking corporation, Plaintiff, vs. GULF BLACK GOLD, INC., a dissolved Florida corporation, and LARRY R. WITT, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned Clerk of the Circuit Court of Franklin County, pursuant to a Final Judgment entered in this cause, will on the 10th day of August 2011, at 11:00 o’clock A.M., on the front steps of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida, 32320, offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash, the following described property located in Franklin County, Florida: 2576 Hwy. 98 West Carabelle, FL 32322 Legal Description: Lot 1, Block ‘W’, City of St. George, A Subdivision as per map or plat thereof recorded in the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. Together with all the appurtenances thereto belonging and appertaining. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. DATED this 27th day of June, 2011. MARCIA M. JOHNSON By: Michele Maxwell As Deputy Clerk 3222T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO: 2009-CA-000252 JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Plaintiff vs. RUBEN NAVA LOPEZ, Defendant. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Clerk of the Circuit Court for Franklin County, Florida, under and pursuant to the Final Judgment heretofore entered on the 24th day of June, 2011, in that certain cause pending in the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit, in and for Franklin County, Florida, being Civil Action No. 2009-CA-000252, in which the Plaintiff is JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION (“Chase”), and the Defendant is RUBEN NAVA LOPEZ (“Lopez”), and under and pursuant to the terms of the said Final Judgment will offer for sale at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash, on the front of the courthouse steps of the Franklin County Courthouse, located at 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, Florida, on the 10th day of August, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 am., the same being a legal sales day and the hour a legal hour of sale, the real and personal property situated in Franklin County, Florida and legally described as follows: Real Property COMMENCE AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF FRACTIONAL SECTION 35, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN SOUTH ALONG THE EAST LINE OF SAID SECTION 35, A DISTANCE OF 1315.29 FEET TO A POINT ON THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 98, SAID POINT BEING ON A CURVE TO THE SOUTHEASTERLY, THENCE RUN SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY AND ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 1399.48 FEET THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 47 DEGREES 10 MINUTES 38 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 1152.33 FEET, THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING SOUTH 53 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 42 SECONDS WEST 1120.05 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 29 DEGREES 43 MINUTES 23 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 392.04 FEET TO THE POINT or BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE SOUTH 29 DEGREES 43 MINUTES 23 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 275.16 FEET TO A RE-BAR, THENCE RUN SOUTH 44 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 17 SECONDS EAST 17.56 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 26 DEGREES 22 MINUTES 20 SECONDS EAST 97.56 FEET TO A RE-BAR, THENCE RUN SOUTH 63 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 45 SECONDS EAST 91.27 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 44 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 37 SECONDS EAST 77.11 FEET TO THE APPROXIMATE MEAN HIGH WATERLINE OF ST. GEORGE SOUND, THENCE RUN NORTH 51 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 14 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID APPROXIMATE MEAN HIGH WATERLINE 73.90 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 51 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 04 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID APPROXIMATE MEAN HIGH WATER LINE 32.81 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 20 DEGREES 40 MINUTES 06 SECONDS WEST 392.73 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING CONTAINING 1.35 ACRES, MORE OR LESS. SUBJECT TO A 12.00 FOOT INGRESS AND EGRESS EASEMENT OVER AND ACROSS THE ABOVE DESCRIBED PROPERTY. ALSO: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF FRACTIONAL SECTION 35, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN SOUTH ALONG THE EAST LINE OF SAID SECTION 35, A DISTANCE OF 1314.29 FEET TO A POINT ON THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 98, SAID POINT BEING ON A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE SOUTHEASTERLY, THENCE RUN SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID RIGHTOF-WAY BOUNDARY AND ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 1399.48 FEET THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 47 DEGREES 10 MINUTES 38 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 1152.33 FEET, THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING SOUTH 53 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 42 SECONDS WEST 1120.05 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 29 DEGREES 43 MINUTES 23 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY 236.04 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE SOUTH 29 DEGREES 43 MINUTES 23 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 156.10 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 20 DEGREES 40 MINUTES 06 SECONDS EAST 392.73 FEET TO THE APPROXIMATE MEAN HIGH WATERLINE OF ST. GEORGE SOUND, THENCE RUN NORTH 51 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 04 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID APPROXIMATE MEAN HIGHWATER LINE 78.51 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 15 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 27 SECONDS WEST 470.59 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING CONTAINING 0.93 OF AN ACRE, MORE OR LESS. FOR INFORMATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY: THE APN IS SHOWN BY THE COUNTY ASSESSOR AS R35-07S05W-0000-0050-0000; AND THE SOURCE OF TITLE IS 0200301119 (RECORDED 2/20/2003). Together with all improvements, appurtenances, hereditaments and tenements pertaining thereto. The property aforesaid, together with all improvements, buildings, fixtures, tenements, hereditaments and appurtenances thereto belonging, or in anywise appertaining, is being sold to satisfy Chase’s claims under said Judgment. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. DATED thsi 27th day of June, 2011. Marcia Johnson Clerk of the Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk July21, 28, 2011 3240T IN THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 10-480-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, as successor in interest to COASTAL COMMUNITY BANK, d/b/a APALACHICOLA STATE BANK, a division of Coastal Community Bank, Plaintiff, vs. AUTREY REALTY AND INVESTMENT CO., INC., and WALTER G. AUTREY, JR., Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated April 25, 2011, and entered in Civil Action No. 10-480-CA of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein the parties were the Plaintiff, CENTENNIAL BANK, as successor in interest to COASTAL COMMUNITY BANK, d/b/a APALACHICOLA STATE BANK, a division of Coastal Community Bank, and the Defendants, AUTREY REALTY AND INVESTMENT CO., INC., and WALTER G. AUTREY, JR., I will sell to the highest and best bidder, for cash, at 11:00 a.m. (Eastern Time) on the 10th day of August, 2011, at the front steps of the Franklin County Courthouse, Apalachicola, Florida, the following-described real property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: COMMENCE at the southwest corner of Section 26, Township 8 South, Range 8 West, and extend a line North along the West line of said Section 26 for 2357.85 feet to a concrete monument; then extend a line North 75 degrees 49’ East for 127.26 feet to a concrete monument on the Western right of way line of State Road S 384 A for a point of beginning; from this point of beginning extend a line South 75 degrees 49’ West for 127.26 feet to a concrete monument on the West line of Section 26, Township 8 South, Range 8 West; then extend a line North along the West line of said Section 26 for 200.0 feet; then extend to a line North 76 degrees 13’ 30” East for 123.53 feet to a concrete monument on the western right of way line of State Road S 384 A; then turn right along the right of way line of a 12 degree 00’ curve to the right for 200.0 feet to the point of beginning; the above-described parcel of land is in Section 26, Township 8 South, Range 8 West, Franklin County, Florida; EXCEPTING therefrom a certain undivided one-half () interest in and to all of the oil, gas and minerals as set forth in that certain Mineral Deed recorded in Deed Book “LL” on pages 444-446, public records of Franklin County, Florida; and EXCEPTING and reserving therefrom an additional one-half () of one-half (), making 1/4th interest, in and to all of the oil, gas and minerals as set forth in that certain deed recorded in Deed Book “PP” on page 315, public records of Franklin County, Florida. The successful bidder at the sale will be required to place the requisite state documentary stamps on the Certificate of Title. DATED this 8th day of July, 2011. Hon. MARCIA JOHNSON Clerk of the Court Franklin County, FL By:/s/ Michelle Maxwell As Deputy Clerk July 21, 28, 2011 3264T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 19-2009-CA-000231 DIVISION: SUNTRUST BANK N.A., Plaintiff, vs. ROBERT A. CARRINO, et al, Defendant(s) NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated and entered in Case No. 19-2009-CA000231 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for FRANKLIN County, Florida wherein SUNTRUST BANK N.A. is the Plaintiff and ROBERT A. CARRINO; BRENDA CARRINO; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at FRONT DOOR OF THE FRANKLIN COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 33 MARKET STREET, APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA at 11:00AM, on the 10th day of August, 2011, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT 12, BLOCK 10 EAST OF ST. GEORGE ISLAND GULF BEACHES UNIT NO. 1, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE(S) 7, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA A/K/A 216 GORRIE DRIVE, ST. GEORGE ISLAND, FL 32328 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on June 27, 2011 Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk If you a person with disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Mr. Doug Smith, Office of Court Administration, Leon County Courthouse, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 Phone: 850-577-4401, Fax: 850-487-7947 July 21, 28, 2011 3241T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 3266T IN THE CIRCUIT CIVIL COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY CIVIL DIVISON Case No.: 08000526CA Division: SUNTRUST MORTGAGE, INC. Plaintiff, vs. SUSAN T. GLADSTONE A/K/A SUSAN TURNER GLADSTONE, STEVEN G. GLADSTONE A/K/A STEPHEN G. GLADSTONE A/K/A STEPHEN G. GLADSTONE, SUNTRUST BANK, AND UNKNOWN TENANTS/ OWNERS, Defendants, NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given, pursuant to Final Judgment of Foreclosure for Plaintiff entered in this cause on June 24, 2011, in the Circuit Court of Franklin County, Florida, I will sell the property situated in Franklin County, Florida described as: PARCEL I COMMENCING AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF FRACTIONAL SECTION 19, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH RANGE 6 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA (MARKED BY AN 6” X 6” CONCRETE MONUMENT); THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 32 MINUTES 40 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARY OF FRACTIONAL SECTION 19,810.30 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT ON THE EAST RIGHT OF WAY OF NORTH BAYSHORE DRIVE (STATE ROAD NO. 65), THENCE NORTH 30 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE EAST RIGHT OF WAY OF NORTH BAYSHORE DRIVE2006.20 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE NORTH 59 DEGREES 53MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST, 80.00 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT ON THE WEST RIGHT OF WAY OF NORTH BAYSHORE DRIVE (THE RIGHT OF WAY OF NORTH BAYSHORE DRIVE NARROWS FROM 100 FEET TO 60 FEET AT THIS POINT);THENCE NORTH 30 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE WEST RIGHT OF WAY OF NORTH BAYSHORE DRIVE, 690.00 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT ON THE NORTH RIGHT OF WAY OF A 60 FOOT ROADWAY: THENCE NORTH 59 DEGREES 53 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE NORTH RIGHT OF WAY OF AFORESAID SIXTY FOOT ROADWAY 392.30 FEET; THENCE NORTH 30 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST 630.00 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE AND THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE NORTH 59 DEGREES 53 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST. 375.49 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE ON THE EAST RIGHT OF WAY OF EAST BAY DRIVE; THENCE NORTH 31 DEGREES 34 MINUTES 30 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE EAST RIGHT OF WAY OF EAST BAY DRIVE 140.02 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 59 DEGREES 53 MINUTES 09 SECONDS EAST 371.94 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 30 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 139.91 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL II COMMENCING AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF FRACTIONAL SECTION 19, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 6 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA (MARKED BYAN OLD 6” X 6” CONCRETE MONUMENT); THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 32 MINUTES 40 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARY OF FRACTIONAL SECTION 19,810.30 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT ON THE EAST RIGHT OF WAY OF NORTH BAYSHORE DRIVE (STATE ROAD NO. 65); THENCE NORTH 30 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE EAST RIGHT OF WAY OF NORTH BAYSHORE DRIVE 2006.20 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, TTHENCE NORTH 59 DEGREES 53 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 80.00 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT ON THE WEST RIGHT OF WAY OF NORTH BAYSHORE DRIVE, (THE RIGHT OF WAY OF NORTH BAYSHORE DRIVE NARROWS FROM 100 FEET TO 60 FEET AT THIS POINT); THENCE NORTH 30 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE WEST RIGHT OF WAY OF NORTH BAYSHORE DRIVE 690.00 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT ON THE NORTH RIGHT OF WAY OF A 60 FEET ROADWAY; THENCE NORTH 59 DEGREES 53 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE NORTH RIGHT OF WAY OF AFORESAID SIXTY-FOOT ROADWAY 392.30 FEET; THENCE NORTH 30 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST, 769.91 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE NORTH 59 DEGREES 53 MINUTES 09 SECONDS WEST 371.94 FEET TO A POINT ON THE EAST RIGHT OF WAY OF EAST BAY DRIVE; THENCE NORTH 31 DEGREES 34 MINUTES 30 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE. EAST RIGHT OF WAY OF EAST BAY DRIVE 140.01 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 59 DEGREES 52 MINUTES 37 SECONDS EAST 368.32 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 30 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 139.9] FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SITUATE, LYING AND BEING IN FRACTIONAL SECTION 19, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 6 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. PARCEL III COMMENCING AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF FRACTIONAL SECTION 19, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 6 WEST, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 32 MINUTES 40 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARY OF FRACTIONAL SECTION 19 (AS MONUMENTED),A DISTANCE OF 810.30 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT LYING ON THE EASTERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY OF NORTH BAYSHORE DRIVE; THENCE RUN NORTH 30 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY 2006,20 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID EASTERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY RIJN NORTH 59 DEGREES 53 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 80.00 FEET TO THE WESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY OF SAID NORTH BAYSHORE DRIVE, THENCE RUN NORTH 30 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID WESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY 690.00 FEET TO THE INTERSECTION WITH THE NORTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY OF ROSE DRIVE. THENCE RUN NORTH 59 DEGREES 53 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID NORTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY 392.30 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE, THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY RUN NORTH 30 DEGREES 08 MINUTES 52 SECONDS EAST 209.82 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED NO. 679), THENCE RUN NORTH 30 DEGREES 06 MINUTES 27 SECONDS EAST 279.96 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED NO. 426]) MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN NORTH 59 DEGREES 52 MINUTES 13 SECONDS WEST 379.15 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED NO. 4261) LYING ON THE EASTERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY OF EAST BAY DRIVE, THENCE RUN NORTH 31 DEGREES 34 MINUTES 30 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY 139.97 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY RUN SOUTH 59 DEGREES 52 MINUTES 49 SECONDS EAST 375.56 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE, THENCE RUN SOUTH 30 DEGREES 06 MINUTES 27 SECONDS WEST 139.99 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. and commonly known as: 362 EAST BAY DR, EASTPOINT, FL 32328; including the building, appurtenances, and fixtures located therein, at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, at the front door steps of the Courthouse, at 33 Market St., in Apalachicola, Florida, on August 10, 2011, 11:00 A.M. EST. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 27th day of June, 2011. Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk July 21, 28, 2011 3265T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 19-2009-CA-000118 RBC CENTURA BANK, Plaintiff, vs. HAWKER, PAUL E. et, al., Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order or Final Judgment entered in Case No. 19-2009-CA000118 of the Circuit Court of the 2ND Judicial Circuit in and for FRANKLIN County, Florida, wherein, RBC CENTURA BANK, Plaintiff, and HAWKER, PAUL E. et, al., are Defendants, I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at, 33 MARKET STREET, FRONT STEPS OF THE COURTHOUSE, STE 203, APALACHICOLA, FL 32320, at the hour of 11:00 A.M. on the 10th day of August, 2011, the following described property; LOT 8, BLOCK “W” LANARK BEACH UNIT NO. 1, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2 AT PAGE 13 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. To be published on July 21 and 28, 2011. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. DATED this 27th day of June, 2011. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk Submitted By: Greenspoon Marder, P.A. Trade Centre South Suite 700 100 West Cypress Creek Road Fort Lauderdale, FL 33309 If you are a person with disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance, Please contact the Clerk of the Court’s disability coordinator at 301 S MONROE STREET ROOM 225, TALLAHASSEE, FL 32301, 850-577-4401 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. July 21, 28, 2011 3271T NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW PURSUANT TO SECTION 865.09, FLORIDA STATUTES NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of THE BEACH PIT, located at 49 West Pine Avenue, in the County of Franklin, in the City of St. George Island, 00 degrees 45 minutes 08 seconds West 659.56 feet to an iron pipe lying on the Southerly right of way boundary of Twin Lakes Road; thence run North 89 degrees 29 minutes 28 seconds West along said right of way boundary 655.94 feet to an iron pipe; thence run North 89 degrees 33 minutes 06 seconds West 660.66 feet to an iron pipe marking the Point of Beginning. From said Point of Beginning, run North 89 degrees 30 minutes 19 seconds West along said right of way boundary 329.22 feet to a re-rod (marked #6475); thence leaving said right of way boundary run South 00 degrees 26 minutes 27 seconds West 990.42 feet to an iron pipe; thence run South 89 degrees 35 minutes 45 seconds East 329.57 feet to an iron pipe; thence run North 00 degrees 25 minutes 13 seconds East 989.90 feet to the Point of Beginning. Dated: July 5, 2011 Marcia Johnson Clerk of Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk 08-000084-CA SUNTRUST MORTGAGE, INC., Plaintiff, vs. DAVID A. TITSCH, LINDA S. TITSCH, UNKNOWN TENANT #1, UNKNOWN TENANT #2. Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated August 26, 2010, entered in Case No. 08-000084CA of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida wherein SUNTRUST MORTGAGE, INC. is the Plaintiff and DAVID A. TITSCH, LINDA S. TITSCH, UNKNOWN TENANT #1, and UNKNOWN TENANT #2. are the Defendants, that MARCIA JOHNSON as The Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, 2nd Floor, Apalachicola, Florida, at 11:00 A.M. on the 26th of July, 2011, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 69, SEA PALM VILLAGE, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGES 30 AND 31 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA a/k/a 1464 Blueberry Road, Eastpoint, FL 32328. DATED this 8th day of July, 2011 MARCIA JOHNSON Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell As Deputy Clerk July 21, 28, 2011

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CLASSIFIEDSThursday, July 21, 2011 The Times | A15 108 S. E. AVE. A CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322850-697-9604 850-323-0444 www.seacrestre.comRENTALS1 BR 1 BA CONDO, FURNISHED On River, Downtown, Boat Slip .....................$1000 1 BR 1 BA LANARK APT, REMODELED Water Incl, Street Entrance .............................$425 1 BR FURNISHED APARTMENT, DEN Carport, Utilities Incl .......................................$650 3 BR 2 BA DOUBLEWIDE Back Deck, Nice Location ................................$700 3 BR 1 BA APARTMENT Front & Back Porch .........................................$600 3 BR 2 BA FURNISHED CONDO Boat & Car Parking ..............................$850 WKLY 1 BR 1 BA FURNISHED CONDO Long Term, Includes Utilities ..........................$910 3 BR 3 BA FURNISHED CONDO Pool, Downtown ....................................$700 WKLY 3 BR 2 BA UNFURNISHED HOUSE Long Term .......................................................$850 2 BR UNFURNISHED APARTMENT Lanark ............................................................$375 2 BR UNFURNISHED APARTMENT W/D Pet Friendly ............................................$500 3 BR 3 B FURNISHED CONDO Long Term, Pool..............................................$850 Im sorry. To state the obvious, it hasnt been pretty the last few years, especially for the job market. Im aware of the anger, and I dont blame you. This whole thing got away from me. But I think its time we made a fresh start. Heres what I propose: 1. If you have a job and youre happy with it, good for you. Keep it up. 2. If youre not happy in your job, its time to rethink things. Im not telling you to quit on the spot. But maybe theres a better job out there for you. 3. If youve taken a job that under normal circumstances you wouldnt have, my hats off to you. You did what you had to do. But now maybe its time to go back to doing what you do best. 4. If you dont have a job, again, Im sorry. I know looking for a job can be, to put it nicely, challenging. But know this: its not you, its me. And if the recovery is here, I think you can lead the way. So to everyone whos been affected the last few years, which is pretty much everyone, I accept complete responsibility. But now the ball is in your court. You have permission to move on with your life. Sincerely, The Economy has made it tough on everyone the last few years. But its time to move forward. Visit emeraldcoastjobseast.com/monster to “nd the right job for you. Lets do this. FRANKLIN COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD85 School Road, Suite 1 Eastpoint, FL 32328 (850) 670-2810ANNOUNCEMENT OF POSITION POSITION: Instructional: Speech & Language Therapist LOCATION: Franklin County Schools SALARY: District Employee or Contracted Services CONTRACT: 2011-12 School Year DEADLINE: July 26, 12:00 noon Please submit: application for district employee proposal for contracted services Current SLP licenseDOE Resume Job description and application may be obtained from Franklin County School Board Finance Of ce. Applications must include (1) a high school diploma, (2) college transcripts if applicable, and (3) Three letters of recommendation. Successful applicants must agree to a criminal history check (includes FDLE processing fee) and a pre-employment drug screening. Please return applications to the attention of Morna Smith, Personnel Specialist. Franklin County School Board is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Publisher’s NoticeAll real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on a equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. Studio Apt. Furnished Upstairs studioQuiet location, water & electric incl. Walk to downtown. $650 mo + dep. No pets. For appt 653-9116 or 774-7178 St. George Island $160 wk, Electric, Satellite, Garbage incl. pool tble. 12’X65’ deck w/Beautiful view 850-653-5114 Text FL65716 to 56654 1, 2, or 3 BRCH/A in Apalachicola, FL. 850-643-7740. Apalachicola3 br, 2 ba house for rent, CH&A, W/D, D/W, $800 mo + Dep. Call Brenda 850-227-5380 Lanark, 2 br, 1 ba, w/ lg fncd yd, separate LR & den, covered pking & storage, $625 mo, 2529 Florida Ave., Call 850-528-0716 Mature older couple with jobs and pet. Seeking long term lease, for home on St. George Island. call 850-570-9469 3 br, 2 baMobile home in Carabelle: $700 month. Pets ok. fenced back yard. 850-766-8942 North Historic District 5th Street building lot. $29,000 obo 60 x 100. Corner lot Brokers protected, (404) 218-0077 Medical/HealthWeems MemorialIs now hiring for the following positions: ARNP or PA Medical Lab Tech. EMT RN Resp Therapist Dietician Houskeeping Admissions Applications are available atwww weemsmemorial.com and may be submitted to Ginny Griner, WMH HR Director, ggriner@ weemsmemorial.com or FAXED to 850-653-1879 Web ID 3463444 Medical/HealthLicensed HHA’s & CNA’sCaring people needed. Join a team of people who make a difference in the lives of the elderly. Provide non medical companionship, in home help and personal care for the elderly. Flexible day, evenin & weekend hours. Positions available in the Apalachicola area.Home Instead Senior CareCall Mon-Thur 9-3pm 850-640-1223 or toll free 1-866-301-1919 Web ID#: 341673955 Text FL73955 to 56654 OtherJUST GRADUATE ?Play in Vegas, Hang in LA, Jet to New York! Hiring 18-24 girls/guys. $400-$800 wkly. Paid expenses. Signing Bonus. Are you energetic and fun? Call 877-259-6983 Web-Id 341668315 Text FL68315 to 56654 In the management area: Well established international heavy equipment company in West Texas has immediate openings. We offer competitive wages and benefit package, paid vacation and 401K. Looking for an experienced HR Manager. For information send resume to inquiries@ciscoeq.com or call Fred Leach at 432-550-9181. Heritage Villas of Apalachicola ApartmentsNow accepting applications for 2 br, Handicap accessible unit. Some rental assistance may be available. HUD vouchers accepted. Call 850-653-9277 TDD/TTY 711. This institution is an equal opportunity provider, and employer. HospitalityHousekeepingPart Time weekend help needed for all positions, apply in person, 4693 Cape San Blas Rd or 1200 Hwy 98 Mexico Beach Quality AssuranceInmate SupervisorClosing: July 28, 2011 Annual Salary: $25,000 Contact Person: Hubert W. Chipman Road Department 376 State Road 65 Eastpoint, FL 32328 Phone: (850) 670-8640 The Franklin County Board of County Commissioners is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action/Drug Free Workplace Employer Knowledge, Skills and Abilities: AN EMPLOYEE IN THIS POSITION WILL SUPERVISE THE WORK OF STATE INMATES, OPERATE VARIOUS SPECIAL HEAVY EQUIPMENT, PERFORMING TASKS ASSOCIATED WITH THE ROAD DEPARTMENT OPERATIONS, OPERATES FRONT END LOADER TO LOAD ROAD MATERIAL OR DEBRIS FOR DUMP TRUCKS, BACK HOE TO DIG OUT DITCHES AND A VARIETY OF TRACTORS, OPERATES VARIOUS EQUIPMENT SUCH AS CHAINSAWS, BLOWERS, WEED EATERS PUSH MOWERS, AND ETC. OTHER DUTIES AS REQUIRED. BACKGROUND INVESTIGATION AND DRUG SCREENING WILL BE COMPLETED ON SELECTED APPLICANT. Minimum Qualifications: Required a high school diploma or an equivalent. Requires knowledge of Florida traffic laws. Requires basic understanding of safety procedures; the ability to drive and operate the above mentioned equipment. Must possess a valid Florida Commercial Class A Driver’s License with a favorable driving record. Must have the ability to meet the Department of Corrections criteria for a certification as an NON-DC Supervisor of State Inmates. Newly hired employees shall obtain such certification within 90 days of hiring. Web ID#: 34167298 Persian Rugs have several large size and Antique pieces. Baby clothes & items. Priced to sell. 850-899-1292 Food Svs/Hospitality The Port Inn is now accepting applications for a 7am-3pmFront Desk Sales AgentWeekends and holidays are required. This is a Full Time position. The ideal candidate will have previous computer and guest service skills, but we’re willing to train the right person. Health insurance is available after 90 days to all full time employees. If you are great with guests, an exceptional problem solver and a desire to be the best-we want you. Come join our Family! EOE/DFWP. Apply in person at The Port Inn 501 Monument Ave PSJ Food Svs/Hospitality*Cooks Dishwashers *Bartenders *Servers *Bus BoysBLUE PARROT Now HIRINGPlease apply in person between 9a-5pm 7 days a week@ Blue Parrott St. George’s Island HospitalityRESORT VACATION PROPERTIESAccepting applications for FT Positions, great benefits, weekend work required. Maintenance TechnicianGeneral maint. experience required. Housekeeping Desk Clerk-Fast pace, office experience required. Requires good customer service skills. Apply in person 9-5 weekdays at 123 W Gulf Beach Dr, St. George Island Florida 32328 intends to register the said name with the Divisions of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, Florida. Dated at Clarkesville, Georgia, this 14th day of July, 2011. Johnny Cadriel July 21, 2011 3280T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2nd JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. CASE NO.: 09-0000010-CA Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as Trustee under Novastar Mortgage Funding Trust, Series 2007-2 Plaintiff, vs. Dennis S. Gay, Jessica R. Gay, Unknown Tenant(s) in Possession #1 and #2, and all other Unknown Parties, et, al. Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE OF SALE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgement of Fore--closure dated June 24, 2011, and entered in Case No. 09-0000010-CA of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as Trustee under Novastar Mortgage Funding Trust, Series 2007-2, is Plaintiff and Dennis S. Gay, Jessica R. Gay, Unknown Tenant(s) in Possession #1 and #2, and all other Unknown Parties, et. al., are Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash on the Front Steps of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. on the 10th day of August, 2011, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: Lot 27, 28, 29 and 30, Block 560 GREATER APALACHICOLA, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA, as per Map or Plat now in common use. Located 176 Jule Road, Apalachicola, FL and all fixtures and personal property located therein or thereon, which are included as security in Plaintiff’s mortgage. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus funds from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated at Apalachicola, Franklin County, Florida, the 27th day of June, 2011. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk of said Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Clarfield & Okon, P.A. Attorney for Plaintiff 500 S. Australian Ave. Suite 730 West Palm Beach, FL 33401 (561) 713-1400 July 21, 28, 2011 3279T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 08000576CA CENTRAL MORTGAGE COMPANY Plaintiff, vs. BRENDA CARRINO, ET AL., Defendant, NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of June 24, 2011 entered in Case No. 0800057CA of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in Franklin County, Florida, wherein Central Mortgage Company is the Plaintiff and BRENDA CARRINO, ROBERT CARRINO, COASTAL COMMUNITY BANK F/K/A APALACHICOLA STATE BANK, A DIVISION OF COASTAL COMMUNITY BANK, are the Defendants, that I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, at the front steps of the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, FL 32320. 11:00 A.M., on August 10, 2011, the following described property, as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure, to wit: TAX ID NUMBER: 29-095-06W-7312000C-0070 LAND SITUATED IN THE COUNTY OF FRANKLIN IN THE STATE OF FL LOT 7, BLOCK “C” ST. GEORGE ISLAND GULF BEACHES UNIT NO. 2, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 15, PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 848 E. GORRIE DR., SAINT GEORGE ISLAND, FL 32328 Dated this 27th day of June, 2011. Franklin County Clerk of Court Clerk, Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accomomdation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of Court Administration at (850) 5774401, or at the Leon County Court-house, Room 225, 301 S. Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 within 2 working days of receipt of a notice compelling you to appear at a court proceeding; if you are haring or voice impaired, call 711. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. Brock & Scott, PLLC 1501 NW 49th Street Suite 200 Fort Lauderdale, FL 33309 954-618-6955 Fax: 954-618-6953 July 21, 28, 2011 3281T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. CASE No. 19-2010-CA-000132 RBC BANK (USA) FKA RBC CENTURA BANK, Plaintiff, vs. WESTBERG, JOHN P. et. al., Defendants NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order or Final Judgment entered in Case No. 19-2010-CA000132 of the Circuit Court of the 2ND Judicial Circuit in and for FRANKLIN County, Florida, wherein, RBC BANK (USA) FKA RBC CENTURA BANK, Plaintiff, and, WESTBERG, JOHN P., et. al., are Defendants, I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at, 33 MARKET STREET, FRONT STEPS OF THE COURTHOUSE, SUITE 203, APALACHICOLA, FL 32320, at the hour of 11:00 AM, on the 17th day of August 2011, the following described property. LOT 7, SHELL HARBOUR, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4 AT PAGES 25 AND 26 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. To be published on July 21 and 28, 2011. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. DATED this 28th of June, 2011. Marcia M. Johnson Clerk Circuit Court By: Michele Maxwell Deputy Clerk GREENSPOON MARDER, P.A. Trade Centre South Suite 700 100 West Cypress Creek Road, Fort Lauderdale, FL 33309 If you are a person with disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance, Please contact the Clerk of the Court’s disability coordinator at 301 S MONROE STREET ROOM 225, TALLAHASSEE, FL 32301, 850-577-4401 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. July 21, 28, 2011 3299T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVI DIVISION: CASE NO.: 09-00636 SUNTRUST MORTGAGE, INC., Plaintiff, vs. DOUGLAS EDWARD DICKINSON; PIRATES LANDING AT TIMBER ISLAND CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION, INC; UNKNOWN TENANT(S); IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY, Defendants. RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HERBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Resetting Foreclosure Sale Date dated the 11th day of July, 2011, and entered in Case No. 09-00636, of the Circuit Court of the 2ND Judicial Circuit in and for Franklin County, Florida, wherein SUNTRUST MORTGAGE, INC. is the Plaintiff and DOUGLAS EDWARD DICKINSON; PIRATES LANDING AT TIMBER ISLAND CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION, INC; UNKNOWN TENANT(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY are defendants. The Clerk of this Court shall sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the, FRONT STEPS OF THE FRANKLIN COUNTY HOUSE, 33 MARKET STREET, APALACHICOLA, FL 32320. 11:00 AM on the 7th day September, 2011, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: THAT CERTAIN CONDOMINIUM UNIT OF PIRATES LANDING AT TIMBER ISLAND COMPOSED OF UNIT NUMBER D-26, AND THE UNDIVIDED 1/48 INTEREST IN THE COMMON ELEMENTS APPURTENANT THERETO, IN ACCORDANCE WITH AND SUBJECT TO THE MASTER DECLARATION OF COVENANTS, CONDITIONS, AND RESTRICTIONS, RECORDED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS VOL. 879, PP. 348-372, AND DECLARATION OF CONDOMINIUM OF PIRATES LANDING AT TIMBER ISLAND, RECORDED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS VOL. 879, PP. 373-541, PUBLIC RECORDS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. ANY. PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. Dated this 12th day of July, 2011. MARCIA JOHNSON Clerk of the Circuit Court By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk Submitted by: Law Offices of Marshall C. Watson, P.A. 1800 NW 49th Street Suite 120 Fort Lauderdale, FL 33309 (954) 453-0365 Fax: (954) 771-6052 Toll Free: 1-800-441-2438 July 21, 28, 2011 3289T IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No. 10-000557-CA BRANCH BANKING AND TRUST COMPANY, Plaintiff, vs. GOLD KEY CONSTRUCTION & DESIGN, INC., ET AL., Defendants. CLERK’S NOTICE OF SALE UNDER F.S. CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated June 27, 2011, in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, at the Franklin County Courthouse, 33 Market Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320 on August 17, 2011 at 11:00 a.m. (EST), or as soon thereafter as the sale may proceed, the following described property: Lots 57, 59, 60 and 61, PHASE 4, WHISPERING PINES SUBDIVISION PHASES 3 AND 4, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 7, Page(s) 32, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated: July 12th, 2011. MARCIA JOHNSON CLERK OF COURT By: Terry E. Creamer Deputy Clerk July 21, 28, 2011 3297T NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR WATER USEPERMIT Notice is hereby given that pursuant to Chapter 373, Florida Statutes, the following application(s) for water use permit(s) has (have) been received by the Northwest Florida Water Management District: Application number 107215 filed 06/30/2011 Water Management Services, Inc., 250 John Knox Road, Suite 4, Tallahassee, FL 32303-4235. Requesting a maximum withdrawal of 1,240,000 gallons per day from the Floridan Aquifer System for Public Supply use by an existing facility. General withdrawal location(s) in Franklin County: TO8S, R06W, Sec. 30D, 31A, 31C: T8S, R6W, Sec. 30 Interested persons may object to or comment upon the applications or submit a written request for a copy of the staff report(s) containing proposed agency action regarding the application(s) by writing to the Division of Resource Regulation of the Northwest Florida Water Management District, attention Terri Peterson, 152 Water Management Drive, Havana, Florida 323339700, but such comments or requests must be received by 5 o’clock p.m. on August 5, 2011. No further public notice will be provided regarding this (these) application(s). Publication of this notice constitutes constructive notice of this permit application to all substantially affected persons. A copy of the staff report(s) must be requested in order to remain advised of further proceedings and any public hearing date. Substantially affected persons are entitled to request an administrative hearing regarding the proposed agency action by submitting a written request according to the provisions of 28-106.201, Florida Administrative Code. Notices of Proposed Agency Action will be mailed only to persons who have filed such requests. July 21, 2011 3227T NOTICE OF INTENDED ACTION FRANKLIN DISTRICT SCHOOL BOARD Purpose and Effect: The Franklin District School Board proposes to amend and adopt polices, as provided in the Administrative Procedures Act for the purpose of bringing said policies into compliance with Florida Statutes and State Board of Education Rules. Summary: The following is a brief description of each proposal change: Franklin County School District *Student Progression Plan *Code of Conduct *Policy Manual *Learning Center Handbook Statutory Authority: Section 230.22(2), Florida Statutes The entire text of the proposed rules will be considered by the Franklin County School Board at a meeting publicly advertised and held in the Willie Speed School Board meeting room in Eastpoint, Florida no earlier than August 04, 2011. Documents may be reviewed at the Franklin County School Board District Office, at 85 School Road, Suite One, Eastpoint, Florida during the hours of 7:30 AM until 5:00 PM, Monday -Thursday. July 14, 21, 28, Aug 4, 2011 Incorrect Insertion PolicyFor Classified In-column AdvertisersAll ads placed by phone are read back to the advertiser to insure correctness. The newspaper will assume correctness at the time of the read-back procedure unless otherwise informed. Please your ad. Advertisers are requested to check the advertisement on the first insertion for correctness. Errors should be reported immediately. Your Florida Freedom newspaper will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion, nor will it be liable for any error in advertisements to a greater extent than the cost of the space occupied by the error. Any copy change, during an ordered schedule constitutes a new ad and new charges. We do not guarantee position of ANY ad under any classification. Apalachicola 172 22nd Ave Saturday 8-until.Multi FamilyNice dishes baby items furniture, designer handbags, clothes, shoes, ect. Don’t miss this! Apalachicola Market Street Avenue G, Friday 2:00 p.m.Yard SaleDesk, middle cabinets, and etc.

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Local A16 | The Times Thursday, July 21, 2011 Our local real estate experts have identied what they feel are the best values around and are oering them to you in Real Estate Picks! (In this section), Discover the best real estate values in Mexico Beach, Port St. Joe, Apalachicola, Cape San Blas, St. George Island, Carrabelle and surrounding areas. Best Values on the Forgotten Coast Real Estate Picks John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.com MLS#243937 $99,900 St. George Island WOODED LOT ON CANAL Offering views of nesting Eagles on the vacant land across the canal. Canal needs to be dredged (kayaks okay), which is why this 1/3 acre lot is priced at a quarter of the last Canal front lot sale. Paved road (West Bayshore Drive) access to Gander Street! BEST BUY! John Shelby, Broker 800-344-7570 850-927-4777 www.sgirealty.com MLS#239766 $599,000 St. George Island ISLAND OASIS dramatic Gourmet kitchen, 4 BR, 5 BA, Private walled POOL and HOT Tub area, elevated deck with Spectacular Gulf view, Handicapped Accessible, 1st tier, Top quality house without stairs! West Gorrie Drive dbutler@coastalcoverage.com Locally owned and operated to meet all your insurance needs T h e C l i p p e r S h o p p e W illiam Shakespeare is returning to Franklin County, but it is not what you might imagine. A hilarious version of Shakespeares plays, cut and compressed and chopped and compacted into a hilarious stew of mirth and mayhem, is returning to the Crooked River Grill at St. James Bay next week, after its debut June 18 at the same locale. The show is the brainchild of director Mark Marple, whose recentlyformed Capital City Playhouse staged The Complete Works of William Shakespeare (abridged) last month at St. James Bay after introducing it at Tallahassee Community College. It let me just redirect it for a smaller stage, said Marple, who teaches dinner theater at Florida State University, and acting and improvisation at Tallahassee Community College. A professional actor for 30-plus years in New York and Los Angeles, Marple has been promotion director for Broadway shows, including a successful USO fundraiser recently at the FSU circus tent. Marple decided to help John Hosford bring to life dinner theater while chatting at the FSU University Center Club, where both are members. The Shakespeare parody features Othello told through rap, the entire history plays condensed into a single football game, and a Julia Childesque cooking show featuring human heads. Its 97 minutes, and the things that are done, if you knew nothing about Shakespeare, it will still blow you away, Marple said. The curtain will go up Friday and Saturday, July 29 and 30, at the Fountain Room and Art Gallery, at St. James Bay Golf Resort, 160 Laughing Gull Lane. The complete buffet dinner starts at 6 p.m., and the show starts at 7 p.m. A full service bar will be open before and during the performance. Tickets are $50, and credit cards are welcome. For reservations, call 697-9507 or visit www. st.jamesbay.com. By David Adlerstein All the worlds a dinner stage THE COMPLETE WORKS OF WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE (ABRIDGED) P hotos by DA V ID ADLERSTEI N | The Times Michael Varde, a sophomore at TCC, left, and Florida State University junior Kyle Davis, have fun. Top, from left, Patrick Vaughan shows off the source of inspiration. Florida State University junior Kyle Davis hugs Elmo during the show. Patrick Vaughan, a senior at TCC, re-invents Hamlet. Kyle Davis demonstrates how to let an opponent.


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