The Apalachicola times
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100380/00134
 Material Information
Title: The Apalachicola times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: H.W. Johnston
Place of Publication: Apalachicola Fla
Apalachicola Fla
Publication Date: 07-07-2011
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1885.
General Note: Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 32911693
lccn - sn 95026907
System ID: UF00100380:00134
 Related Items
Preceded by: Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by: Apalachicola herald

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SAPALACHICOLA

CARRABELLE


-I -.


CELEBRATING 125 YEARS AS YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER


State softball tourney, All


Thursday, July 7,2011 WWW.APALACHTIMES.COM VOL. 126 ISSUE 10 50C


Free movie in
Carrabelle Friday
The Franklin County Sheriff's
Office S.A.F.E. (Student and
Family Events) program
presents a film on Friday, July
8 in Carrabelle in Kendrick
Field, after the last tournament
game. The film will be shown
for free on a brand-new
16' screen and begins at
8:30 p.m. Popcorn, hot dogs
and drinks free to children.

King Buster fishing
tournament Saturday
On Saturday, July 9, C-
Quarters Marina, 501 St.
James Ave. in Carrabelle will
host day two of three days
of King Buster tournaments,
held over the course of
three months, each with a
guaranteed $5,000 payout.
Sponsored by Millard Collins,
dockmaster of C-Quarters
Marina, the tourney's net
proceeds go to Make-A-Wish
Foundation of Central and
Northern Florida.
For more information, call
697-8400 or visit www.
c-quartersmarina.com.

Last chance for
Ocean Splendor
This weekend is the last
chance to view "Ocean
Splendor," a breathtaking
display of underwater beauty
in photographs taken by
scuba diver Nancy S. Mueller.
The exhibit runs through
Saturday at the Apalachicola
Museum of Art, 96 5th St.,
with hours daily from
1-4 p.m. For information,
contact Marie Marshall at
marieq@mchsi.com and 850-
899-2614; contact Michaelin
Watts at naturalcolordesign@
sbcglobal.net and
650-464-7833; or visit
apalachicolamuseumofart.org.

Bingo on the island
Every Tuesday evening until
Labor Day, come and play
Summer Bingo upstairs at the
St. George Island fire station,
324 E. Pine Ave. beginning
at 7 p.m. Cost is 25 cents
per card. Sponsored by the
St. George Island Civic Club.
Everyone welcome.

Tell me a story
Friday at the Franklin
County Public Libraries in
Eastpoint and Carrabelle, join
the Summer Reading Program
from 10 a.m to noon for ages
5- 11. For information, call
670-8151 or 697-2366.


Letter to the Editor.
Sheriff's Report. . .


....A4
. . . .A6


Society News . . . . . . . .A8
Faith News .......... A9
Tide Chart ......... All
Classifieds ......... A13



Phone: 850-653-8868
Web: apalachtimes.com
E-mail: dadlerstein@starfl.com
Fax: 850-653-8036
Circulation: 800-345-8688

FREEDOM
SL_ 0 I ID A.
NEWSPAPERS-INTERACTIVE
DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK:
School News & Society: 1 1 a.m. Friday
Real Estate Ads: 1 1 a.m. Thursday
Legal Ads: 11 a.m. Friday
Classified Display Ads: 11 a.m. Friday
Classified Line Ads: 5 p.m. Monday


Weems hires new CEO


By David Adlerstein
Times City Editor
The board of directors of
George E. Weems Memo-
rial Hospital has turned to
the former CEO of a Ken-
tucky not-for-profit hospital
to succeed Chuck Colvert


at Weems' helm.
Tallahassee Memorial
Hospital (TMH), which han-
dled the executive search
from among more than 60
applicants for the post, said
last week Davie Lloyd had
accepted the Weems' board
offer and would begin her


* By David Adlerslein picnics slated at both
,iin - u'i l.lht,,i ends ot the county The
* ,Apalachicola V:oilunteer
* ^ U ith a tIhree- Fire Department ser-ed
* ~day weekend up BBQ lunItches and
* :, to ,'ork \ith. \\ hole butt roasts all day at
� Franklin CoIunti Riert'ront Park. \Ithl a tree
Scelelbrated the Fourtll ot concert, teaturin thlIe land
SJuly In fine taslhion Kornlbread, closing ouit the
S The excitemllent l [ eatellnino


llunderl.\aV in earnest[
SSatiurday. \tith outdoor01
*


See BOOM A12


new job July 25.
Lloyd, like her prede-
cessor, will be answerable
to the Weems board but
will serve under an em-
ployment contract with
TMH, which has an affilia-
tion with the 25-bed Apala-
chicola hospital. TMH


O 'ee n-.:::.r
p o-,.:::.I.:::. ts:ro n,
Ir,.per,.:rc e D.:y
.:::.r, Page A12 -ind cil
www.apalachtimes.
comn

O Photo by DAVID ADLERSTEIN
I i! . h, ** !
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.:::*.ver C,:rr r,,belle


000.0e0.0000000000000000000000000


officials declined to disclose
the salary terms; Colvert
earned in the $150,000 per
year range.
"The board of directors
is pleased to have found
an administrator who we

See WEEMS A5




School



board



seeks



cuts

By David Adlerstein
Times City Editor
Representatives from
the administration brought
with them a proposal for
about $1.5 million in budget
cuts, as negotiations began
last week between school
employees and the Frank-
lin County School District.
The proposed cuts, ap-
proved in principle by the
school board at a special
meeting June 23, include a
call for teachers to accept a
freeze on step increases for
the upcoming fiscal year,
six furlough days during
the year and the elimina-
tion of dental coverage.
Following the opening
of the negotiations June 27
and a subsequent session
June 30, both sides agreed
to review a series of legisla-
tive changes brought about
by the Florida legislature's
passage of Senate Bill 736,
the Student Success Act.
"We have not addressed
any specific cuts at this
point," said Denise Roux,
president of the Franklin
County Teachers Associa-
tion (FCTA). "We're very
aware of the financial hard-
ship the district faces, but
at this point everything is
still on the table."
Alongside Roux at the
negotiating table are Eli-
nor Mount Simmons, trea-
surer of the FCTA; Cathy
Wood, former FCTA presi-
dent, Josh Wright, Frank-
lin County School athletic
director and high school
football coach; and Rik Mc-
Neill, union representative
from the Florida Education
Association.

See CUTS A14


Apalachicola Bay Charter School earns a 'B'


By David Adlerstein
Times City Editor
Hampered by a drop in
performance on the writ-
ing portion of the FCATs,
and a leveling off of learn-
ing gains in reading and
math, the Apalachicola
Bay Charter School
stopped just short of earn-
ing its third consecutive
'A' grade when the state
announced results last
week.


Instead, the charter
school's 511 total points
means it will have to set-
tle for a 'B,' 14 points shy
of an 'A.' After struggling
with a 'C' and a 'D' grade
when it opened a decade
ago, the school has posted
four 'A's and two 'B's in the
past seven years.
"I'm extremely proud
that we are a 'B,' " said
Principal Chimene John-
son. "We will continue to
make improvements so


we can maintain an 'A'
next year."
Because it is a con-
solidated kindergar-
ten through 12th grade
school, Franklin County
School will not receive its
grade until this fall. Unlike
grades for elementary and
middle schools, which are
entirely based on results
of the Florida Compre-
hensive Assessment test
and learning gains, half
of a high school's grades


relies on non-FCAT based
components, such as
graduation rate, post-
secondary readiness,
accelerated coursework
performance and other
factors.
Superintendent Nina
Marks said the consolidat-
ed school's grade appears
likely to be a 'C' this year,
a drop from last year's
'B,' with local educators
studying data and deter-
mining what the weakest


competencies are before
the return of students in
the fall.
"I am not willing to
settle for average when
it comes to the education
of Franklin's children,"
Marks said Monday. "Our
district educators work
diligently to impart core
knowledge, and some-
times we have children
that might need a little

See ABC SCHOOL Al14


*


NE






A2 I The Times


Environmental activists join



Hands Across the Sand


By Lois Swoboda
Times Staff Writer
Once again, environ-
mentalists met on Frank-
lin County beaches to pro-
test oil wells in the Gulf. It
has been more than a year
since the Deepwater Hori-
zon began spilling oil into
the waters of the Gulf of
Mexico, but for many, the
memory is clear.
Dozens gathered on


St. George Island and in
Carrabelle on June 25
to show solidarity with
Hands Across the Sand,
a movement its website
says is "made of people of
all walks of life supporting
the use of clean renewable
energy and protesting the
practice of offshore oil
drilling."
At the protest, orga-
nizers also circulated a
petition calling for a ban


on oil wells in the Gulf of
Mexico. The protesters
asked beachgoers to join
the line, and though about
a half dozen joined hands
in Carrabelle, there was
still disagreement about
offshore drilling.
"They've got to drill
somewhere," said one St.
George Island visitor.
Florida surfer and res-
taurateur Dave Rausch-
kolb founded Hands
Across the Sand in Octo-
ber 2009 in response to a
bill passed in the Florida
House of Representatives
to lift the ban on near-
shore drilling. With the
support of sponsor orga-
nizations, he rallied more
than 10,000 Floridians
to join hands on Feb. 13,
2010, covering the state's
coastlines, to show a
united opposition to near-
shore drilling.
This year's Hands
Across the Sand protest
was the third in Franklin
County. About 200 people
participated in the first
gathering in February
2010; a second, in June
2010, protested the BP oil
spill.
To sign the petition
against offshore drilling,
contact Ada Long at 927-
3776.


DAVID ADLERSTEIN I The Times
Traci and Chad Conklin, with Daniel Register, right, were visiting from Monticello
and decided to join the line on Carrabelle Beach.


LOIS SWOBODA I The Times


About 25 people joined hands on St. George Island.


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Thursday, July 7, 2011


Local


I ' li , , > '


-Wh I
-� _






Thursday, July 7, 2011


Local


The Times I A3


Community works together to save osprey chicks


By Lois Swoboda
Times Staff Writer
Last week, a group of
nature lovers banded to-
gether to help an island
family overcome adversity.
On Monday night, June
27, a strong storm passed
through the county slow-
ing efforts to restore power
to St. George Island, but
Susan Pruitt was less con-
cerned with electricity than
with a nearby family she
had befriended. For weeks,
she had watched a pair of
ospreys build their nest
and hatch and care for a
trio of chicks.
After the storm passed,
Pruitt was horrified to see
that the dead pine tree
supporting the nest had
fallen.
She put in a call to East-
point veterinarian Hobson
Fuilmer, who contacted the
Apalachicola National Es-
tuarine Research Reserve
(ANERR). Wildlife educa-
tor and avid birder Erik
Lovestrand sprang into
action organizing a rescue
mission for the ospreys.
ANERR employees
Meagan Lamb and Jenna
Wanat were dispatched to
the island the next morn-
ing and waded through
the swamp to retrieve the
chicks from the remains
of their home. Lovestrand
contacted Chris Beatty, di-
rector of the Florida Wild
Mammal Association, who
contacted the National
Audubon Society.
Raptor experts told Be-
atty the best hope for the
chicks was to get them back
into a nest at the original
site and allow the parents
to take over.
That evening,
Lovestrand brought the
chicks to Beatty for inter-
im care. By this time, he
had recruited volunteers
to help reunite the osprey
chicks with their parents.
"The best location for
the nest is too far from the
road, across a marsh, to
reach with any lift truck, 40
yards at least," he wrote.
"The nest is pretty much
broken to smithereens.
Other existing trees in the
area are in bad condition."
Lovestrand recom-
mended that a box built by
Ted Ruffner be mounted on
the tallest timber nearby.
Late Thursday afternoon,
with help from Kenny Pi-
otrowski, Lauren Levi,
Barry Townsend, Ricky
Hathcock and Matthew
Anderson, the nest box
was mounted, raised and
braced with timbers. The
crew then placed as much
of the original nest as could
be retrieved on the plat-
form.
Lovestrand picked up
two of the chicks early the
next morning and carried
them back to Eastpoint.
The third chick was small-
er than its siblings and in-
jured slightly, so it remains
in Beatty's care, responsive
and eating.
At 8 a.m. Friday,
Lovestrand carefully re-
stored the other chicks to
the nest. Before the rescu-
ers finished loading equip-
ment back into their truck,
an adult osprey appeared
carrying a fish and seemed
to be studying the nest but
did not stop.
Lovestrand and crew
watched nervously from
a porch across the street.
A half-hour later, an adult

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osprey with a fish appeared,
made about three banking
turns around the platform
and then landed, depositing
the fish in the nest. It stayed
with the chicks a while and
then flew to a nearby tree
and began calling.
By 9:30 a.m., a second
adult appeared, and the
happy parents resumed
the normal tasks of chick
rearing as if nothing had
changed.
Anderson said the pair
did rework the nest, appar-
ently not satisfied with the
rescuers' handiwork, add-
ing sticks and soft material
for the lining.
A number of folks were
already watching the nest
before it fell, so the family's
situation will be well moni-
tored.
Beatty had high praise
for the volunteers, espe-
cially Lovestrand, who she
said organized the reunion
with remarkable efficiency.
"Prognosis looks good
right now," Lovestrand
wrote in a July 1 email.


CHRIS BEATTY I
Special to The Times
This osprey chick
remained at the
Florida Wild Mammal
Association because it
was slightly injured.

"Thanks again for every-
body's help and concern. All
of the locals are extremely
grateful for the efforts and
love their local ospreys."


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SUSAN PRUITT I Special to The Times
At left is the original osprey nest shortly before Monday's storm. At right, workers
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A4 I The Times


Opinion


Thursday, July 7,2011


When Greek families ruled the church picnic


I arrived home from the beach
on Saturday to find a small box
nestled next to the philodendron
by the front door. Nothing had
been ordered, so my sense of
expectation was
heightened.
� The sender?
Photis Nichols,
;- M.D., now retired
b in Jacksonville,
S* _ but also a
B respected career
RED WHITE physician from
AND ROUX Apalachicola. I
Denise Roux would venture
that every native
of a certain age has been seen by
him professionally at some point
in their lives.
It was a delightful surprise.
He had previously unexpectedly
called me before my knee
surgery last year. He offered
advice and calming words. I quite
appreciated the interest.
This time it was four cans


of corned beef with a cordial
letter. It seems that after my
mention of a severe shortage
of the product, he and his wife,
Frosso, noted a similar situation
in their groceries. By lucky
happenstance, they finally
encountered a well-stocked shelf
and loaded up. He wrote, "With
hurricane season at hand, we are
taking the liberty of sending you a
few cans because we do not want
you to be without at that critical
time."
He offered up the homely
combination of scrambled eggs
and corned beef, noting that
it was delicious despite the
cholesterol implications. We had
it for breakfast this morning. He
was right.
Dr. Nichols is a very good
writer, with an erudite style not
often seen these days. I enjoyed
the short letter as much as the
corned beef. I also took real
pleasure locating my stationery


and good pen to write a proper
thank-you letter.
I started thinking about the
Nicholses and all of the other
Greek families in this town.
Since we lack a Greek Orthodox
church, many of them attended
my church, Trinity Episcopal.
Believe me, you did not want to
miss a picnic or a covered-dish
supper. Can you just imagine
what riches Isabel, Frosso and
Olga Nichols brought to the
table? When I was young, I didn't
know the names of the dishes. I
just knew I loved the seasoning
for the beefy casseroles. Later
on, I came to understand that
cinnamon and maybe a bit of
clove came into play. Back then, I
just knew it was a taste imported
here from Greece. My recipe for
pastichio is a constant work in
progress because I have a taste
memory I am trying to create. I
think I've got the baklava down
pat, thanks to Miss Isabel's


advice to use only real butter,
Tupelo honey and homegrown
pecans.
My thoughts then drifted to
medical care back in the '50s
and '60s. Along with Dr. Nichols,
there was Dr. Mabrey in Apalach
and Dr. Sand in Carrabelle.
Back then, we didn't rush off
to Panama City, Tallahassee,
Dothan or Mayo Clinic. I can
only imagine a typical day in a
medical practice back in the day.
I suspect there are many stories
there. Even though we made
many office visits for earaches,
impetigo, ringworm and the
like, I also distinctly remember
Dr. Nichols paying a house call
checking on me at bedside in my
own room. I am not going to say
it. You supply the comment about
caring physicians today.
All things change, and I don't
bemoan this swift world we now
live in; however, like many of my
generation, I do like to look back,


wallow around in some nostalgia
and then try to trace patterns
that help us understand the path
we seem to be on today. Honestly,
I am befuddled a good bit of the
time, but I keep trying.
Life lessons considered here,
well, there is the enormous
appreciation for the influences
the Greek community has had
on our town. There is the sure
knowledge that many of us
value the well-considered kind
gesture. There is reassurance
that witty discourse is still alive
and well in snail mail. There is
the realization that writing a real
letter brings real pleasure.
And there is the great
reassuring knowledge that my
cupboard is replete with corned
beef in time for the next big blow.

Denise Roux is a regular
columnist for the Apalachicola
and Carrabelle Times. Email her
at rouxwhit@mchsi.com.


Florida State professor

to evaluate Bright Futures


By Kate Campbell
Special to The Times
Since 1997, the Florida
Bright Futures Scholar-
ship Program has pro-
vided academic scholar-
ships to thousands of the
state's highest-achieving
high school seniors. Now
a Florida State University
professor has received a
major grant that will en-
able him to evaluate the
effectiveness of the pro-
gram.
Shouping Hu, a profes-
sor of higher education in
FSU's College of Educa-
tion, received a $780,000
three-year grant from
the U.S. Department of
Education's Institute of
Education Sciences. With
it, he will lead a research
study titled "State Merit
Aid Program and Student
College Choice and Suc-
cess: Evaluating the Ef-
ficacy of Florida's Bright
Futures Program."
"The grant cannot
come at a better time,"
Hu said. "As a scholar who
has longstanding inter-
est in college access and
student success in higher
education, this grant will
allow me to continue to
do cutting-edge research
in that direction and ex-
amine whether and how a
high-profile state program
can make a difference in
student postsecondary
educational opportuni-
ties."
Bright Futures scholar-
ships are awarded to Flor-
ida high school seniors
who have demonstrated







TIL�Er
USPSC
Published every Thursc
Apalachico
VP/Publish
Editor
POSTMASTER:
Send address change to:
The Apalachicola Times
P.O. Box 820
Apalachicola, FL 32329
Phone 850-653-8868
Formerly The A

SUBSCRIPTIONS P
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The spoken word is given scar
thoughtfully weighed. The spoken
thoroughly convinces. The spoken


SHOUPING HU
"academic merit" and who
plan to attend a public col-
lege or university within
the state. Hu said he is ex-
cited to begin evaluating
the scholarship program
and plans to hire several
research assistants over
the course of the grant.
"My project collabora-
tor and I have laid out a
concrete plan for the ex-
ecution of the project and
expected project outputs,"
he said. "We are confident
that we will be able to
generate most rigorous
empirical evidence on the
efficacy of the Bright Fi-
tures program on educa-
tional outcomes in individ-
ual students, the state and
the country as a whole."
The Institute of Edu-
cation Sciences works to
improve education in the
U.S. by funding top educa-
tional researchers nation-
wide who seek answers on
what works for students.
It also conducts evalua-
tions of large-scale federal
education programs and
educational projects.







FIMES
027-600
day at 129 Commerce St.
ola, FL 32329
er: Karen Hanes
: Tim Croft


PERIODICAL RATE
POSTAGE PAID AT
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,palachicola Times


AYABLE IN ADVANCE
COUNTY
$15.75 six months
F COUNTY
- $21 six months
charged a higher rate for holiday editions.
ADVERTISERS
in advertisements, the publishers
r damage further than the amount

nt attention; the printed word is
word barely asserts; the printed word
word is lost; the printed word remains.


Honesty in government tarnishes before our eyes


What kind of behavior standards
do we expect from our politicians
here in the U.S.? And how do we
want - and expect - our state
and local leaders to
behave in matters of
ethics and morality?
Should we start
with the generally
accepted precepts
outlined in the Ten
Commandments
THOUGHTS and insist there
FOR THE TIMES be no killing, no
Mel Kelly dishonoring, no
coveting or adultery,
no lying or stealing? How about
adding the "no false idols" part?
And should we expect our elected
leaders to follow the same rules that
we, the electorate, must heed?
What makes elected officials
different from those who elected
them? Is it only the power of
office or is the absolute arrogance
of power itself that sets double
standards for so many in lead roles
today?
For example, a recent story
told of monetary fines imposed by
the Florida Ethics Commission
but allowed to expire unpaid after
more than 10 years for some. In a
state that cries "deficit" and cuts
back service programs to many of
the most needy, more than $200,000
in ethics fines went uncollected.
That money, legitimately owed by
politicians or office seekers, was
never added to the state treasury
after all. Those who owed the fines
for failing to file accurate election
reports or for filing incomplete
reports or no reports at all kept
their money, and the state lost


legitimate revenue.
How do you suppose it happened
that public figures were allowed to
ignore or personally dismiss their
legitimate debts? In this state and
country, we have procedures in
place to withhold wages awarded
in child support cases. We can
withhold taxes for Social Security
and Medicare payments as well
as the right number of dollars
to accommodate the number of
dependants claimed by wage
earners. We can subtract pre-
arranged contributions made from
wages to charities or retirement
accounts or union memberships.
We can have utility or TV service
or credit card payments withdrawn
automatically from our bank
accounts. We are expected to pay
our bills and meet our obligations.
But politicians and wannabes
have failed to properly file
constitutionally mandated financial
disclosure forms. Appropriate fines
were then levied, but no one seems
to be able to collect the money
owed! More than $191,000 in debts
have now been ruled "uncollectible"
and have been written off as such
by the Florida Ethics Commission.
Although $191,000 may be just a
drop in the deficit pot of the state,
why is it uncollectible? Didn't the
commission know where these
people worked if they were elected
to office, or where they lived if they
weren't? Why was the money that
was legitimately owed to the state
by public figures not collected by the
state?
It is now well-known a grand
jury recently ranked Florida as
No. 1 in the nation. Sadly, we are in


first place because of our statewide
corruption. What a distinction!
Florida judges are accused of
undue influence in the "Taj Mahal"
courthouse case; Justice Clarence
Thomas ignores conflict of interest
concerns. Yet another former
Illinois governor crashes and burns
over ethical questions about "even
though I may have said what you
thought you heard, I really
meant... "
State leaders close down parks
- as well as the government -
over the Fourth of July holiday
weekend in Minnesota. Party
leaders at the national level act like
spoiled children. Politicians publicly
preach family values while privately
enjoying extramarital affairs. Built-
in cost escalators that are excessive
and inexcusable are hidden in
hastily approved government
contracts awarded to private firms.
And such ugly examples go on and
on and on.
It would seem that those
Ten Commandments have been
forgotten or ignored by too many
who have become our leaders.
The practice of honesty, integrity,
ethics and morals in local, state and
national government continues to
tarnish before our eyes. Perhaps
our only hope can be found in the
warning of writer John Gardner:
"The citizen can bring our political
and governmental institutions back
to life, make them responsive and
accountable and keep them honest.
No one else can."

Carrabelle resident Mel Kelly
is a frequent contributor to The
Apalachicola and Carrabelle Times.


Letter to the EDITOR


Chapman School should
benefit all people
I am writing with reference to
your recent article referencing the
leasing of the old Chapman High
School building for private use as
a physician's office by the county
commission.
Mentioning Chapman High
School brings a lot of nostalgia to
me. This old historical building is
dear to my heart for many reasons.
I was in elementary school at the
old Chapman School when the new
classroom addition and auditorium
were under construction in
the early 1930s under the WPA
(Works Progress Administration)


government program. During what
we called a "recess" in the school
day that was set aside for play and
exercise, we were asked to dig
holes on the playground to bury
the debris from the new building
construction.
In 1941, I was a member
of the graduating class of 21
seniors, including the late Cleve
Randolph and Elmo Maxwell. Colin
English, the state superintendent
of public education, gave the
commencement address, warning
us of the impending entry of
the U.S. in World War II. The
graduation ceremony was held in
the new auditorium. Our class was
one of the first to hold this affair in


the new building.
In light of the above, it is my
studied opinion that this edifice
remains a public building for the
benefit of all the people.
It was my privilege to practice
medicine in Apalachicola for over
50 years. I started out renting
space in the old A & P building
on Market Street across from
Buzzett's Pharmacy and later built
my own 4,000-square-foot office. I
did not receive any help from the
city or the county, and they both
benefitted from the taxes I paid
them over the years.
Sincerely and respectfully,
Photis Nichols, M.D.
Jacksonville


Too many fiscal plans to track? Not anymore


Special to The Times
The Committee for a Responsible
Federal Budget launched a Deficit
Reduction Plan Comparison Tool
(http://crfb.org/compare), provid-
ing side-by-side comparisons of the
many deficit reduction plans that
have been developed.
The committee said it is thrilled
with the many plans that have
sprung up over the past several
months and that its new website can
track and compare all the compre-
hensive plans. The comparison tool
joins the Stabilize the Debt budget
simulator created by the Commit-


tee for a Responsible Federal Bud-
get (CRFB), http://crfb.org/stabilize
thedebt, an educational tool to en-
courage Congress and the public to
get specific about how they would fix
the budget.
The comparison tool allows us-
ers to view specifics of each plan
and how they would affect each area
of the budget - including domestic
discretionary programs, defense,
health care programs, Social Securi-
ty and taxes. The grid features more
than 30 plans and will be updated on
a regular basis.
"Less than a year ago, it was
nearly impossible to point to a com-


prehensive plan to deal with our
massive deficits. Now we have plans
covering all parts of the political
spectrum. We have come a long way.
Now it's time to move on to the hard
work of compromising and enacting
a plan into law. But as hard as that
will be, we shouldn't lose sight of how
far we've come," said Maya Mac-
Guineas, president of CRFB. "This
comparison tool gives the public the
chance to see how there's no lack of
solutions out there for our mount-
ing debt, and that there's quite a
lot of overlap between plans. The
ideas are out there. Now it's time for
action."


*


NE






Thursday, July 7, 2011


Local


The Times | AS


Franklin County gets grant to study health care


Special to the Times

Franklin County is one of
three rural American coun-
ties to participate in a year-
long program to help assess
and revitalize local health
care delivery systems.
On June 8, the Nation-
al Association of Coun-
ties (NACo) announced
the technical assistance
awards, which will also be
received by Pacific County,
Wash., and Refugio County,
Texas.
The three counties, se-
lected through a competi-
tive and comprehensive
review process, will work
with NACo and consultants


from the National Center
for Rural Health Works
throughout 2011 to identify
local health care needs and
factors affecting the local
delivery of health care. The
program also seeks to as-
sess the economic impact
of the local health care sec-
tor and determine how the
health care system can bet-
ter meet community needs.
The goal is to strengthen re-
lationships with community
partners to improve local
health care delivery.
County Planner Alan
Pierce said he applied for
the grant after Commis-
sioner Pinki Jackel brought
the technical assistance


program to the attention
of commissioners in April.
At the June 7 commission
meeting, Jackel was ap-
pointed to act as liaison to
NACo consultants.
The plan includes two
community meetings facili-
tated by the National Center
for Rural Health Works con-
sultants, as well as analysis
of local health indicator data
and community surveying.
Jackel said the value of the
analysis, which will be pro-
vided to the county for free,
is $30,000 to $50,000.
The technical assistance
being offered to the select-
ed counties is especially
important in light of the


requirement in the Patient
Protection and Affordable
Care Act, signed into law by
President Obama on March
23, that nonprofit hospitals
conduct periodic commu-
nity health needs assess-
ments to demonstrate they
are taking on uncompen-
sated care.
"America's health care
systems serving rural com-
munities are facing enor-
mous challenges to provide
adequate care," said NACo
President Glen Whitley,
a county judge in Tarrant
County, Texas. "Counties
believe that access to qual-
ity health care is critical to
the physical and mental


well being of their resi-
dents. The technical assis-
tance will help these coun-
ties strengthen their health
care systems.
"County involvement in
community health needs
assessments is very impor-
tant to help ensure that the
health care safety net bur-
den is shared among local
providers," Whitley said.
The technical assistance
program is funded through
the Office of Rural Health
Policy of the U.S. Depart-
ment of Health and Human
Services. For more on this
program, visit www.naco.
org/ruralhealth
The National Association


of Counties, the only nation-
al organization that repre-
sents county governments
in the United States, was
founded in 1935. NACo pro-
vides essential services to
the nation's 3,068 counties,
including advancing issues
with a unified voice before
the federal government,
improving the public's un-
derstanding of county gov-
ernment, assisting counties
in finding and sharing in-
novative solutions through
education and research,
and providing value-added
services to save counties
and taxpayers money.
For more about NACo,
visit www.naco.org.


WEEMS from page Al


believe will successfully
navigate our staff and com-
munity through the process
of continuing to improve
our services, our quality of
care and guide us through
the steps to bring a new
hospital online in the near
future," said Carrabelle
accountant Paul Marxsen,
chair of the Weems' board.
"During the interview
process, we were im-
pressed by not only her
work in rural hospitals,
but by her communication
skills, especially as she dis-
cussed her vision for her
family, her career and the
positive influence she could
have on Weems Hospital,"
said Mark O'Bryant, Talla-
hassee Memorial president
and CEO.
Lloyd, 39, most recently
served as CEO of Fleming
County Hospital, a 52-bed
not-for-profit county hospi-
tal in Flemingsburg, Ken-
tucky, in the north-central
portion of the state, not far
from the Ohio border. At
that time, Lloyd worked for
Quorum Health Resources,
a hospital management firm


headquartered in Brent-
wood, Tenn. that has a man-
agement contract with the
Fleming County Hospital.
During her 18-month
tenure at Fleming, accord-
ing to the TMH release,
Lloyd helped plan and de-
velop an 8,000-square-foot
medical office building and
was active in recruiting new
physicians, which in turn
improved access to care for
patients and increased rev-
enue for the hospital.
In late March, Lloyd re-
signed her position; hospital
officials at the time said only
that she had left "to pursue
other career interests."
With the construction
of a multi-million dollar
replacement hospital al-
ready on the drawing board
for Weems, Lloyd will be
relied upon to apply les-
sons learned from her ex-
perience in Flemingsburg.
Before her arrival there,
county officials replaced
an almost 50-year-old debt-
free county facility with a
new 100,000-square-foot
hospital opened in August
2008, at a cost of more than


$32 million.
Following that, accord-
ingto a report in the Ledger-
Independent newspaper,
the hospital experienced
growing pains in the form
of a $1.4 million per year
debt load in addition to nor-
mal operational expenses.
During Lloyd's tenure at
the hospital, a 5 percent cut
in wages and hiring freeze
was instituted in January
2011 for non-contract em-
ployees, officials told the
Ledger Independent, with
cuts sought in every area
from overtime to cleaning
supplies to ensure financial
reserves were maintained.
A report issued by the
hospital a month ago indi-
cated low patient volume
would result in between
a $1.7 million to $3 million
loss for the year.
Lloyd, who holds a bach-
elor's in business adminis-
tration from Montana State
University - Billings, and a
master's in health admin-
istration from the Univer-
sity of Maryland, began her
health care career with a
three-year stint as the head


of the Billings Clinic, and in
2007 went to work for Quo-
rum.
She takes over from Col-
vert, who stepped down in
late May to return to his
family in Alabama.
TMH officials said the
gap between Colvert's de-
parture and Lloyd's arrival
is being filled by interim
administrator Geri Forbes,
who oversees regional de-
velopment for Tallahas-
see Memorial HealthCare.
Forbes, who is providing
support and direction dur-
ing this period, recently
filled the same role as
interim administrator at
Doctor's Hospital in Perry.
"Chuck Colvert will be
remembered for stepping
into his role during a pe-
riod of great uncertainty
over the future of Weems
Hospital," Marxsen said.
"His ability to keep Weems
Hospital moving forward,
and open our new Weems
East Urgent Care Clinic, is
a testament to his skill as
an administrator. The board
sincerely appreciates his
stewardship of Weems Hos-
pital, and we wish Chuck


the best in the future."
On Tuesday morning,
county commissioners
heard a report from Alan
Pierce, the county's direc-
tor of administrative ser-
vices, who said the hospi-
tal had received a $24,000
grant from the Office of Ru-
ral Health for upgrades in
the way pharmaceuticals
are dispensed.
In addition, Pierce said,
the Weems board amended
its governing policies to in-
clude checks and balances
that called for all contracts
or agreements for the pur-
chase of equipment, goods,
or services be reviewed by
the CEO, chief nursing of-
ficer or chief financial of-
ficer, the county attorney,
and the board before final
execution. In addition,
any items paid for using
sales tax funding must re-
ceive approval from both
the Weems board and the
county commissioners.
The board also secured
the commissioners' bless-
ing to spend $34,680 for a
dual die injector for the new
CT scanner, and $14,000
to replace the engine and


transmission in one of the
ambulances. "I advised the
hospital board of the high
rate of consumption that
was currently going on with
the capital outlay portion of
the sales tax," Pierce said.
"The board understood
the ramifications but be-
lieve both expenditures are
warranted.
The commissioners
unanimously agreed ap-
proved the spending but
said they wanted to meet
with the hospital board to
review the situation.
"We only have so much
money available," said
Commissioner Cheryl
Sanders. "If we keep nick-
el and diming the capital
outlay funds, we are going
to wind up with too little
money to do what we told
the people statutorily we
would do."
The commissioners also
accepted the resignation of
Curt Blair from the Weems
board and accepted the
board's recommendation to
appoint Jim Bachrach, who
also resides in Commis-
sioner Smokey Parrish's
district.


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A6 I The Times


Thursday, July 7, 2011


Law Enforcement

Arrest REPORT


The following report is
provided by the Franklin
County Sheriff's Office.
Arrests are made by
officers from the following
city, county, and state law
enforcement agencies:
Apalachicola (APD),
Carrabelle (CPD), Florida
Highway Patrol (FHP),
Franklin County Sheriff's
Office (FCSO), Florida Fish
and Wildlife Conservation
Commission (FWC),
Florida Department of
Environmental Protection
(FDEP), Florida


Department of Corrections
(FDOC), Florida Division
of Insurance Fraud (DIF)
and Florida Department of
Agriculture and Consumer
Services (FLDACS).
All defendants are
considered innocent until
proven guilty in a court of
law.

June 29
Derek Stulsky, 28,
Carrabelle, possession of a
controlled substance (CPD)
Donald D. Page, 37,


Carrabelle, withholding
child support (FCSO)
Dustin S. Godwin, 17,
Tallahassee, burglary of a
structure and grand theft
(FCSO)

June 30
Carol A. Finch, 48,
Apalachicola, burglary of
a dwelling and grand theft
(FCSO)
David E Daniels, 26,
Carrabelle, driving while
license revoked - habitual,
grand theft, resisting


officer without violence and
criminal mischief CPD)
Jonathan G. Pace, 33,
Eastpoint, possession of
paraphernalia, possession
of a controlled substance
and violation of probation
(FCSO)
Timothy C. Register,
19, Eastpoint, disorderly
intoxication (FCSO)
Tr-acy S. Wilson, 35,
Apalachicola, possession of
a controlled substance with
intent to sell or dispense,
possession of a controlled
substance, maintaining


place where controlled
substance is used,
possession of paraphernalia
and tampering with physical
evidence (FCSO)


July 1
Billy D. Dalton, 36,
Eastpoint, domestic battery
(FCSO)
Benjamin G, O'Neal, 31,
Hosford, Gadsden County
warrant for failure to appear
(FCSO
Alan D. O'Neal, 49,


Tallahassee, two counts
of sale of a controlled
substance (FCSO)


July 2
James M. Nelson, 43,
Apalachicola, disorderly
intoxication and resisting
without violence (FCSO)
Robert L. Smith, 52,
Apalachicola, resisting
officer with violence,
disorderly intoxication
and battery on a law
enforcement officer (APD)


AHS Class of '76 seeks
missing classmates
The Apalachicola Class of 1976
is planning its 35th class reunion.
While making preparations, no
address or phone numbers could
be found for eight graduates.
The following are the names
of these "missing" classmates:
Jeffery Byrd, Darlene Churchill,
Carol Edwards, Karen Fleeman,
Cynthia Passalacqua, Kevin
Randall, Anthony Sanders and
Jimmy Themis.
If anyone has any information
on these people please email
Cindy Rowell at crowell58@
bellsouth.net or to Rachel Ward at
2wards@gtcom.net
In addition, there are several


former classmates that organizers
would like to include in the
reunion.
Their names are: Ricky
Abercrombie, Ellen Booth, Violet
Buzier, Ruby Cambell, Pam
Collins, Mary Estes, Christina
Hines, Mike Howard, Jerry
Huckebea, Sharon Jenkins,
Connie Kaczmarek, Billy Glass,
Bill Lunsford, George Needer,
Donna Orr, Cheryl Richards, Stan
Siprell, Willie Smith, Gloria Spatch,
Joe Thompson, Vashtyre Thomas,
Virginia Varnes Thomas, Donna
Watkins, Rita Wilkerson, Fred
Thompson and Tammy Marshall.
If you have any information on
these classmates, please email to
Cindy Rowell or Rachel Ward as
well.


News BRIEFS

Full Moon Climb at Cape
St. George Lighthouse
The July iull Moon Climb at
the Cape St. George Lighthouse
on St. George Island will take place
Friday, July 15, The Sunset/FuRll
Moon Climb will take place from
8 to 9:30 p.m. and will include light
hors d'oeuvres and a sparkling
cider toast to the full moon. Cost
is $15 for the general public and
$10 for members of the St. George
Lighthouse Association.
After sunset, people are invited
to climb to the top of the lighthouse
for a breathtaking view of the full
moon, as space and time permit.
Cost is $10 for the general public
and $5 for SGLA members.


The Cape St. George
Lighthouse is located in St. George
Lighthouse Park at the center of
St. George Island, where Island
Drive (the road off the bridge) ends
at Gulf Beach Drive. Parking is
available
Because space is limited,
reservations are recommended.
For reservations or more
information, please contact the St.
George Island visitor center at 927-
7744 or toll free at 888-927-7744.

Searching for Mr. Laine
Alan Pierce, county director
of administrative services,
reported Tuesday morning that
the supervisor of elections office
has contacted the Planning and


Zoning office to say they have
been unable to locate Bill Laine,
a Planning and Zoning board
member, who has been delinquent
in filing his financial disclosure forms.
Pierce said Laine called him
several weeks ago to say he was in
North Carolina, but did not provide
any address or phone number.
"Laine does not have a current
valid Franklin County address as
all our correspondence with him
has been returned 'No forwarding
address,'" Pierce said.
The commissioners passed a
motion unanimously to remove
Laine from the post and to have
Commissioner Noah Lockley,
who originally appointed Laine,
search for a replacement.


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Thursday, July 7, 2011


Local


The Times | A7


Organizations jostle for offseason TDC money


By David Adlerstein
and Lois Swoboda
Times Staff Writers
A large number of local
organizations have filed
40 applications, seeking
$143,250 in Tourist Devel-
opment Council offsea-
son grant funding, about
double the $72,000 that is
available.
But Curt Blair, the TDC
administrator, told county
commissioners Tuesday
morning that some of the
requests may be eligible
for funding from separate
BP money. Even so, this
would leave an estimated
shortfall of more than
$40,000.
The TDC is expected to
award grant funding Tues-
day, July 12, at its 3 p.m.
meeting.
A new request comes
from the Apalachicola Area
Historical Society, which is
asking for $7,000, $2,000 for
the Ghostwalk on Oct. 30,
and $5,000 for the Ilse New-
ell Concert Season, which
runs from Dec. 4, 2011, to
May 20, 2012.
The Apalachicola Volun-
teer Fire Department Aux-
iliary is also making a new
request, seeking $2,000 for
the second annual Oyster
Cook-Off, Jan. 13-14, 2012.
The Apalachicola River-
keeper is asking for $5,000,
the same amount as was
funded last year, for the
Wild & Scenic Film Festi-
val, Oct. 18 -21, 2012.
The Apalachicola Area
Chamber of Commerce is
seeking $10,000, the same
as it received last year, for
three events: $2,000 for the
Art Walk March 24, 2012;
$4,000 for the Boat Show,
April 20 and 21, 2012; and
$4,000 for the Historic


Apalachicola Holiday Cel-
ebration, Nov. 25 to Dec. 3,
2011.
Camp Gordon John-
ston Days is again seeking
$4,000 for the March 10-11,
2012, World War II training
camp's commemoration
event.
The Carrabelle Area
Chamber of Commerce is
seeking $4,000, the same as
last year, for the Holiday on
the Harbor/Boat Parade of
Lights, Dec. 9-10, 2011.
Carrabelle Cares is
seeking $4,000, $1,000 less
than was funded last year,
for the 22nd annual Car-
rabelle Riverfront Festival,
April 28-29, 2012.
Carrabelle Lighthouse
Association wants $4,000,
double what it received last
year, for the Lantern Fest,
expanded to two days, Oct.
28-29, 2011.
The City of Apalachicola
Center for History, Culture
and Art wants $5,000, $1,000
more than it received last
year, for the Apalachic-
ola School of Art 2011-12
Workshop Series, from
Oct. 1, 2011, through Sept.
30, 2012. It also is seeking
$5,000, $1,000 more than
received last year, for the
2011-12 Exhibition Series,
held throughout the year.
C-Quarters Marina's
King Busters Tournament,
to be May 12 to July 7, 2012,
wants $2,550, while the C-
Quarters Marina Kingfish
Shoot-out Tournament,
Aug. 5-7, 2012, is seeking
$4,700. Last year, the ma-
rina received $5,000 for a
grouper-kingfish event, but
organizers dropped the
grouper this year and ex-
panded the event.
The Defenders of Wild-
life Inc. is seeking a new
grant of $2,000 for the For-


gotten Coast Black Bear
Festival, Oct. 15 in Carra-
belle.
The Dixie Theatre Foun-
dation is seeking $10,000,
the same as it received last
year, but is asking it be di-
vided into four parts, $3,000
each for the January, Feb-
ruary and March profes-
sional seasons, and $1,000
for "Pearls for the King,"
Sept. 30 to Oct. 1, 2011.
The Eastpoint Volun-
teer Fire Department Inc.
has a new request in for
$4,000 for the llth annual
Eastpoint Rib Cook-Off,
March 16-17, 2012.
The Forgotten Coast
Cultural Coalition again
wants $5,000 for the Plein
Air - America's Great Paint
Out, May 3-14, 2012.
Franklin's Promise
Coalition has two new re-
quests, for $5,000 for the
Apalachicola Wine & Jazz
Festival, May 24-27, 2012,
and $4,000 for the Blues,
Jazz and BOOs concert,
Oct. 29-30, 2011.
The Friends of Apala-
chicola Tour of Homes is
asking for $5,000, up from
$2,000 last year, for an ex-
panded 20th annual His-
toric Apalachicola Home
& Garden Tour May 3-5,
2012.
Habitat for Humanity of
Franklin County Inc. is ask-
ing for a first-time grant of
$4,000 for the ninth annual
Apalach Mardi Gras, Feb.
3-4, 2012.
The Hillside Coalition
of Laborers for Apalachic-
ola is once again seeking
funds, this time $5,000 for
the eighth annual African-
American History Festival,
Feb. 17-19, 2012.
Historic Apalachicola
Inc. has two grant re-
quests, seeking $5,000, up


from $2,000 last year, for
the Water Street Festival
of Ice, August 2012, and a
first-time grant of $5,000
for the yearlong Second
Saturday program.
The Panhandle Play-
ers are seeking $6,000, up
from $4,000 last year, bro-
ken down into three $2,000
grants for the fall, winter
and spring productions.
The Patrons of the
Apalachicola Library Soci-
ety have a new request in
for $2,000 for the Autumn
- Authors in Apalachicola
program on Oct. 8, 2011.
Rock By The Sea Inc.


has a new request in for
$2,000 for the Rock By The
Sea concert in Lanark Vil-
lage and St. George Island
on Sept. 21-23, 2012.
The St. George Island
Business Association is
seeking $5,000 for the
Franklin County Oyster
Festival, a revival of the
former Oyster Spat Festi-
val, on Oct. 7-8, 2011. The
association is also asking
for $2,000, the same as last
year, for the third annual
St. George Island Snow-
bird Day on Feb. 7, 2012.
The 30th annual St.
George Island Chili Cook


Off has a request in for
$5,000 for the March 1-3,
2012, event.
The St. George Island
Lighthouse Association is
seeking $4,000 for a newly
created Beach Home Tour
of St. George Island slated
for Feb. 3-4, 2012. The as-
sociation also is seeking
$4,000 for the Florida Pan-
handle Lighthouse Chal-
lenge, April 21-22, 2012.
Supporters of St. Vin-
cent is seeking $2,000, the
same as it received last
year, for the St. Vincent Is-
land Open House, March
30, 2012.


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NE ~*I


I






A8 I The Times


Warwick to speak on bears at marine lab


Special to The Times
The Coastal & Marine Conser-
vation Lecture Series, open to the
public, features a lecture on "Bears
of the Forgotten Coast" on Thursday,
July 14, at 7 p.m. in the auditorium of
the Florida State University Coastal
and Marine Lab.
Speaking will be Adam Warwick,
wildlife biologist with the Tate's Hell
forestry office.
In 1994, the Florida Fish and Wild-
life Conservation Commission pro-
hibited hunting of the Florida black
bear (Ursus americanus floridanus),
and since then, bears have rebound-
ed to more than 3,000 bears statewide
and probably more than 1,000 in the
Apalachicola population.


Florida's human population has
concurrently grown from 5 million
residents in 1960 to close to 18 million
today and is projected to reach almost
36 million by 2060. Urban sprawl is en-
croaching on traditionally remote ar-
eas, bringing people into prime bear
habitat. As a result, bears and people
are encountering each other more
than ever. More than 1 million acres
of public land on the Forgotten Coast
together has allowed bears ample
room to thrive, but the potential for
problems with stepped-up develop-
ment exists.
"Florida's bear population de-
serves our best efforts in conserv-
ing and managing our wild lands,"
Warwick said. "The many interest-
ing characteristics of bears includ-


ing their intellect have presented me
with some unique interactions, and I
will share some of these. I will discuss
some characteristics and behaviors
of the Forgotten Coast bears, where
the most bears currently exist in this
area, and the conservation challeng-
es we will face in the future."
The marine lab, in association
with Second Harvest of the Big Bend,
part of The Nation's Food Bank Net-
work, is collecting nonperishable food
items at each monthly lecture. If you
plan to attend a lecture, please bring
an item or two and help solve hunger
in our community.
The marine laboratory is at 3618
Coastal Highway 98 in St. Teresa. For
more information, call 697-4120 Mon-
day-Friday, or 591-0224 on weekends.


SPECIAL TO THE TIMES


Adam Warwick and a furry friend.


Annah Olivia Har-
ris turns "Sweet 16" on
Wednesday, July 13.
She is the daughter
of Connie M. and James
A. Harris, Jr., of Apala-
chicola. She is the sister
of Weston Griner Harris.
Paternal grandpar-
ents are James and Ann


Harris, of Apalachicola.
Paternal great-grandpar-
ents are Alma Harris and
the late Albert B. Harris.
Maternal grandpar-
ents are Vernon and Julia
Griner, of Panama City.
Maternal great-grandpar-
ents are the late Clifford
and Tiny Griner.


V Apalachicola Museum of Art 'i
96 5th Street, Apalachicola, Florida
www.apalachicolawuseuwofart.org
Hosted by the Historic Apalachicola Foundation
, 1 and ring Me A Sook Franklikn I
a-. COPIES OF SHOW PRINTS FOR SALE A&


Women educators attend state convention


By Arlene Oehler
Special to The Times
Babs Bailey, Missy
Cumbie, Beverly Kelley,
Arlene Oehler and Myra
Ponder, representing Delta
Kappa Chapter, attended
the Delta Kappa Gamma
Society International Flor-
ida State Convention from
April 29 to May 1 at the Mar-
riott Orlando Airport.
The conference theme
was "Moving Forward with
Spirit and Vision." Several
workshops were available,
including Strategic Plan-
ning for Chapters, Eat by


Color for Better Health, and
an exhibition of arts and
crafts.
Cumbie
was one of
the pages
for the Sat-
urday busi-
ness meet-
ing. State
MISSY Committee
CUMBIE 2009-11 as-
signments
were held by Kelley, who
was a member of the Awards
Committee, and Bailey, who
served on the Finance Com-
mittee. Martha Plant, a 50-
plus-year member of Delta


Kappa Gamma, was recog-
nized with a certificate for
her years of service to the
organization. She maintains
her membership in the Del-
ta Kappa Chapter.
The Saturday banquet
included an introduction
of chapter presidents, who
included Oehler, the 2010-
12 Delta Kappa president.
Ponder, state treasurer, was
approved for another two-
year term.
Other state officers
elected for the 2011-13 bien-
nium were President Carrie
Frye; First Vice President
Merle Jones; Second Vice


President Gerry Hacker;
Recording Secretary Peg
Dunn-Snow; and Corre-
sponding Secretary Nancy
Henning.
The concluding activ-
ity on Sunday was a Cer-
emony of Remembrance for
members who died during
the biennium. Kelley sang
in the state chorus for the
ceremony and Saturday's
banquet.
The Delta Kappa Gam-
ma Society International
promotes professional and
personal growth of women
educators and excellence in
education.


Rotary
District
Gov. Sylvia
White
presents
Jim Miller
with a
lapel pin
as part of
the June
14 awards
ceremony.
LOIS SWOBODA
The Times


Rotary International honors Jim Miller


In Loving MEMORY

'Papa' Glen Buffkin
Aug. 17, 1941 - July 9, 2007

Nothing can ever take away
The Love a Heart holds dear,
Fond Memories linger every day
Remembrance keeps you near.

We love and miss you, "Papa"

Judy and Children


By Lois Swoboda
Times Staff Writer
On June 14, Jim Miller of
Apalachicola was honored by
Rotary International.
Sylvia W White, Rotary dis-
trict governor for 2010-11 for the
Panhandle, was on hand to see
Miller receive a lapel pin and
crystal recognition piece hon-
oring him as a major donor, one
who has contributed $10,000 to
Rotary.
John Sink, president of the
local chapter, presented the
crystal piece to Miller. "You
make our club proud," he said.
White congratulated Sink
and the entire club for their
outstanding achievements over
the past year.
She said 68 percent of Ro-


tary Clubs received a presiden-
tial citation last year, but the
Franklin County chapter was
one of only 12 percent that went
beyond that and received a gov-
ernor's citation.
White, who is leaving office
June 30, said, "This has been an
amazing year, I promise you."
Chimene Johnson, principal
of the Apalachicola Bay Char-
ter School, was also on hand
to thank Rotary for funding the
eighth-grade class trip to North
Carolina. The students visited
Asheville's Biltmore Estate and
the Great Smoky Mountains
National Park and went white-
water rafting.
"Thank you for making the
trip possible," she said. "You
have helped provide these kids
with so many experiences."


PET OF THE iHWgDB
PET WEEK

Franklin County Humane Society

S Meet ..
Norman!...
Norman is a three-

monthold Dachshund/
S""Labrador mix.... don't
ask! He is squatty
with big feet and long
ears, pretty much
irresistible. He is
very social and loves
' attention from people
and other dogs. He
will be a medium size dog and you won't see another
like him. If you are looking for a unique puppy, please
let Norman come stormin' into your life.
VOLUNTEERS are desperately needed to socialize
Norman and all of the other dogs and cats. We are
always looking for people willing to bring one of our
animals into their home to be fostered for various
needs. Any time you can spare would be greatly m t ablisie
appreciated. BetioBy0
Call Karen at 670-8417 for more details or visit the ARtit heillB
Franklin County Humane Society at 244 State Road
65 in Eastpoint. You may log onto the website at www. 7 3
forgottenpets.org to see more of our adoptable pets. . *rs h


218 Hwy 71, Wewahitchka
850.639.2252
302 Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd., Port St. Joe
850.227.7099
117 Hwy 98, Apalachicola
850.653.8825


See store for details and list of drugs


I


Birthday


Annah Harris turns 'Sweet 16'


Now Offering


Prescriptions

Start Saving Today
Come in and Sign up for the
Buy-Rite

Drugs

Rewards Program
(Offer not valid with any portion of prescription if paid for by
a government program)


'TV
J[rD�rive-
rS S rvi
Thru
e m ]ice..


Thursday, July 7, 2011


Society






Thursday, July 7, 2011


Faith


The Times I A9


Parents can be no match for teenage hormones


Nothing could
have prepared me
for the challenges L
that lay ahead
when I entered my
second marriage
with two kids and
merged my life PA
with a man who PA
also had two kids. SH
Financial stress, Youtl
crowded living
arrangements and
adversity surrounded
us on all sides but we
were determined we
could overcome anything
together.
A product of my
father, I have always
been a stickler for rules
and order. Order was
exchanged for chaos and
not everyone in the house
saw the necessity for rules
or the necessity to abide
by them. The mutiny was
soon overthrown when
mom declared Martial
Law. We managed to
organize our lives around
Little League games,
school projects and any
other activity our children


M

h N


volunteered us
for. Scott and I
worked like a
team through
homework,
suppertime, baths
and bedtime,
.ELA which was all
ELA on a schedule
VER according to age.
Matters After bedtime
prayers were said
and the kids were in bed,
we would spend the rest
of the evening picking up
after them and catching
up on the never-ending
mountain of laundry.
The task of mothering
this clan was grueling yet
I loved every minute of it.
Our oldest loved to do hair.
She would work on my
hair for hours braiding and
twisting it into different
styles, as the tears would
stream from my squinted
eyes as she pulled it ever
so tightly. She loved to
surprise me by doing
special things like extra
cleaning or organizing a
skit with her siblings for
our entertainment.


Our second oldest, the
only boy, was very tender-
hearted and had a talent
for drawing and sports.
Once he drew a family
portrait of stick people
that was the conversation
piece of our fridge for
months. It had everyone
from daddy to the dog
in detail down to the m-
shaped arches on daddy's
head (anyone who knew
Scott then was familiar
with his 1980's style
"wings").
Our third child was
very skilled in the art of
communication, although
she sometimes had
difficulty in controlling her
skills during school. She
was very thoughtful and
would frequently stop on
the side of the road on her
way home from the bus
stop and pick a handful of
wildflowers for me. She
still picks flowers for me
to this day. Our youngest
child was gifted with the
ability to articulate her
words through poem and
stories. She also had a


very beautiful singing
voice that she entertained
us with incessantly.
We would enjoy family
outings to the park or the
beach. Sometimes we
would go berry picking
and ditch fishing or take
a ride to the ice cream
shop. We did not have a
lot of money to blow so we
kept it simple. We coached
their Little League teams
and went on almost all of
their field trips. Sunday,
we attended church as a
family. Of course, there
was always bickering as
siblings do and plenty
of interference from the
outside to disrupt the
harmony of our home but
overall, we were a happy
family and we enjoyed our
children.
Then one day, Bam!
Our precious children
turned into teenagers
one by one. They became
aliens and we became
the archenemy. Suddenly
we did not understand
how they felt and our IQ
level dropped 50 points,


therefore we became
incapable of having an
intelligent conversation
with them without an eye
roll or impatient sigh,
signaling that we had
infringed on their time.
How we brought them up
to this point I will never
know. Their rooms became
their sanctuary from
their obnoxious family.
Their friends were the
relationship gurus with all
of their years of wisdom
and experience.
The things that once
were effective in reaching
our kids no longer
worked. If we were too
permissive, an inch would
lead to a mile setting the
precedents for the younger
siblings. If we pushed
too hard, then rebellion
was the price to pay. If we
showed disapproval for
the crowd that they were
migrating to, then we were
being judgmental and they
wanted to be around them
even more. As parents
we felt like we were in
uncharted territory. We


were no match to the
hormones that provoked
impulsive emotion like
Texas tumbleweed
bursting into spontaneous
combustion on a hot
August day. One teenager
was a challenge, but four
was playing on our sanity.
To up the ante, we picked
up one more teenager to
raise for three years.
We are survivors and
through trial and error,
we learned some very
valuable things during
these trying years. 1)
Unconditional love, 2) This
too shall pass, 3) Anger
management, 4) That
hoodoo that mom put on
me about "when you have
kids..." came to pass, 5)
They will grow up and out
of it, just as I did and 6)
Prayer is key to survival
and the best stress
reliever.
We welcome all
suggestions and hope
you enjoy this weekly
article. Please send all
emails to Scott Shiver at
frontline247C@mac.com.


A great weekend


of healthy


celebrations


Wow,
what a great
weekend!
Went
to Camp
Gordon
Johnston
American LAI
Legion
Post 82 on
Saturday, July 2. L
of food, fellowship.
fun. The bright spo
of the afternoon wa
when our beloved
Mary Britz came ii
the room. The soui
of applause filled ti
room. Mary looked
great after what sh
went through health
wise. We're glad sh
back and feeling be
Had a nice crow
at the Lanark Villa
Boat Club on Mon


C


July 4. More food
and fellowship.
Don't know about


Eyou, but my
stomach thinks
I'm mad at it.
Thanks to all
MARK NEWS who supported
Jim Welsh and worked
hard to put both
ots celebrations together.
and Things will be
At quiet for a while now,
as so hang in there and
enjoy the rest of the
nto summer.
nd Be kind to one
he another, check on the
I sick and housebound,
ie and remember- ASAP
th- stands for Always Say
ie is a Prayer.
better. Until next time,
vd God bless America,
ige our troops, the poor,
day, homeless and hungry.


Faith BRIEFS


Eastpoint's First
Baptist holds
Bible school
Come join us for
Vacation Bible School at
First Baptist Church of
Eastpoint from Monday,
July 11, through Friday,
July 15, 5:30 to 8 p.m.
nightly.
The school will have
classes for all ages, from
newborns to adults. Bring
your family and come for
some good nights of fun,
crafts and learning. Snacks
will be provided.
There will be a special
kickoff on Sunday night,
July 10, 6 p.m. at the
church, 447 Avenue A in
Eastpoint.
For more information,
call 670-8469.


Covenant Word
shares Eastpoint
outreach
The Filling Station,
the outreach ministry of
Covenant Word church in
Apalachicola, will reach
out to the Eastpoint
community on Thursday,


July 21, to fill spirits, souls
and bodies.
Please come out and
join us, next to the Big Top
Supermarket at 375 U.S.
98, from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m.
for a hot, tasty dinner of
baked chicken, mashed
potatoes, green beans
and bread, fellowship and
prayer.
All are welcome and
everything is free. The
outreach will also be giving
away clothing and shoes.


Jehovah's Witnesses
host convention in
Gainesville
Jehovah's Witnesses are
inviting all in the area to
attend a program focusing
on a government that
millions, perhaps billions,
pray for. God's Kingdom
government, requested in
the world-famous model
prayer taught by Jesus
Christ, will be the focus
of the 2011 "Let God's
Kingdom Come!" district
convention at the Stephen
C. O'Connell Center, in
Gainesville.
The three-day event
begins Friday, July 29


Obituaries


Debra Elliott


Debra Gort-
man Elliott was
born Jan. 1, 1956 in
Wewahitchka. She
passed away on Sat-
urday, July 2,2011
in Little Rock, Ark.
after a brave battle
with cancer. D
She was a librar- ELI
ian at the Apalachic-
ola Bay Charter School. She
was member of St. Patrick
Catholic Church.
She is survived by her
husband, Apalachicola
City Commissioner Jimmy
Elliott; daughters, Allison
Castillo (Carlos), Celeste
Elliott and Jarrett El-
liott; mother, Dora Jean
Gortman; sisters, Diane

Debbi
Debbie Ryan, 50, of
Apalachicola, originally
from Norwalk, Ohio, passed
away Monday, June 20, 2011
at her home.
She is survived by her
longtime companion and
friend, Jim Grimm; her son,
Jerry Ryan; her daughter,


W Gortman and Pam
Gortman; mother-
in-law, Adrienne
I Elliott; grand-
children, Adriane
Elliott, Jasmine
Richards, Nathan
Richards and Sadie
EBRA Castillo; and a host
.IOTT of nieces, nephews
and cousins.
Visitation will be held
Wednesday, July 6 at Kel-
ley Fineral Home from
6-7 p.m. with Rosary being
said at 7 p.m. FRneral mass
will be held Thursday, July
7, at 10 a.m. at St. Patrick
Catholic Church and burial
in Magnolia Cemetery.
Kelley Fineral Home is
handling all arrangements.

ie Ryan
Elisha Ryan; and her broth-
ers, Tim, Rusty, Jeff and
Steve Ryan.
Debbie loved the gulf
and solitude. She enjoyed
fishing, boating and motor-
cycling. Debbie will truly
be missed by all of us she
touched. We Love You.


Dale Lewis
Bedell, 41, of
Eastpoint,
passed away
Sunday after-
noon, June 19,
2011, of a sud-
den unknown
heart condi-
tion.


Dale Lewis Bedell
stucco crew.
Dale will be
missed greatly by
his longtime friend,
U . Betty Jo Allen, of
Eastpoint, and her
children. Dale is
DALE LEWIS survived by his
BEDELL mother and step-
BEDELL father Dennis and


He was
born in Orlando on May
4, 1970, and lived in Flor-
ida his entire life. He
lived in the Eastpoint
area for over five years
and recently worked for
Fisher Stucco of East-
point.
Dale was loved by his
family and friends. He
loved to do things for his
family and friends and
was always the life of
the party. He always had
a smile on his face and
a laugh to share with
those around him. Dale
was a master craftsman
in the world of stucco;
it was said he and his
friend John alone could
do the work of an entire


Sharon Poston, of
Ocala; father Howard
Bedell, of Valparaiso,
Ind.; brothers Tim Be-
dell, Ocala, Jeff Bedell,
Austin, Texas, and Greg
Bedell, Houston, Texas;
sisters Debby Graves,
Indianapolis Ind., Sheryl
Abrams, Chicago, and
Michelle Grossnickle,
Valparaiso Ind.; and
many nieces and neph-
ews.
A memorial was held
at the chapel in Kelley's
Funeral Home in Apala-
chicola on Saturday
afternoon, June 25. A
memorial service is also
planned for family and
friends in Ocala some-
time in July.


at 9:20 a.m. The daily
themes are based on
passages of Scripture
including Matthew 4:17,
Matthew 6:33, and 2 Peter
1:11. Strengthening one's
faith in the reality of that
Kingdom will be the focus
of the program. There is no
admission fee; conventions
of Jehovah's Witnesses
are supported entirely by
voluntary donations.
Starting this weekend,
and continuing for the next
three weeks, Jehovah's
Witnesses will put forth
extra effort to extend a
personal invitation to
everyone from the area to
attend the convention with
them.
Locally, the
congregation of Jehovah's
Witnesses in Apalachicola
will be supporting the
activity of distributing
printed invitations to the


Trinity Episcopal
Church
est. 1836


Welcomes You
Hwy. 98 & 6th St.
Apalachicola
850-653-9550
Sunday Worship Services
8 & 10:30 a.m.
Wednesday
Healing Service 11a.m.
Centering Prayer 4 p.m.


convention. An estimated
6,500 will come to
Gainesville for the Bible-
based programs.
Jehovah's Witnesses
believe the request for
God's Kingdom in the
model prayer, recorded in
the Bible at Matthew 6:10
(also known as the Lord's
Prayer or the Our Father),
has profound meaning.
They also believe the
answer to that prayer will
bring significant changes
to the earth and mankind.
The Witnesses' convention
program promises
intriguing details from the
Bible's explanation of such
developments.
Throughout United
States, there will be 381
conventions in 98 cities.
Worldwide, there are
over 7.5 million Witnesses
in more than 107,000
congregations.


THE
EPISCOPAL
CHURCH


WELCOMES YOU

Church
of the
Ascension
101 NE First Street
Carrabelle
SUNDAY
10:00 AM
(850) 274-4490


IThe United Methodist Churches

of Franklin County Welcome You

First United Methodist Church of Apalachicola
Worship Service 11:00 a.m. every Sunday
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
75 5t St. Apalachicola - 653-9530 - flumcapalach@gtcom.net
Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis
Carrabelle United Methodist Church
Worship Services 10:45 a.m. - Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
"Celebrate Recovery" Mondays 7-9 p.m.
Healing service first Tuesday each month-7 p.m.
102 NE Ave. B Carrabelle - 697-3672
Pastor: Aaron Batey
Eastpoint United Methodist Church
Worship Service 9:00 a.m. every Sunday
Sunday Brunch 10 a.m.
Youth Group Tuesdays 6 p.m.
317 Patton Dr. (corner of David St.)
Pastor: Aaron Batey
St. George Island United Methodist Church
9:00 a.m. Worship Service
10:00 a.m. Fellowship Hour
201 E. Gulf Beach Dr. 927-4635 www.sgiumc.org
Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis


NE *I


First Baptist Church
St. George Island
501 E. Bayshore Drive
927-2257
R. Michael Waley, Pastor
Join us as we praise and worship the li. n,; 'h i
"Great is the Lord and most worthy of praise." Psalm 145:3
Sunday Bible Study ............. . .................... 10:00am
W orship Praise ...... .................... .................... 11:00am
Sunday N ight...................................... ................. 7:00pm
Wednesday - "Power Hour".................................... 7:00pm
Wednesday - "Youth at S.P.L.A.S.H".....................7:00pm
"Walking in Christ"


First Pentecostal Holiness Church
379 Brownsville Road * Apalachicola


Sunday School 9:45 am
Sunday Morning Worship 10:45 am
Sunday Evening Service 6:00 pm
Monday, Youth Group 7:00 pm
Wednesday, Royal Rangers, G.A.P. 7:00 pm
Wednesday Worship & Word 7:00pm
Nursery Provided during regular church services


li














E-mail outdoors news
to timesoutdoors@starfl.com


BUDS 'N' BUGS


Ants vs. termites


By Lois Swoboda
Times Staff Writer
On Saturday, a number
of people were disturbed to
find large numbers of flying
insects clinging to the walls
of their home or business.
Many feared it was a swarm
of termites.
That was a possibility,
but this time, the swarm-
ers were ants; fire ants to be
specific.
Ants and termites are
not closely related and differ
in many ways. Ants are near
relatives of wasps and bees;
termites are closely related


to cockroaches.
But ants and termites are
both social insects, meaning
that they live in an extended
family group or colony.
Only a few members of
the colony reproduce, and
most are workers. Termite
workers are mostly young
insects that still have a pos-
sibility of developing into
reproductive known as
queens and kings. Ant work-
ers are adults.
Most ants are sterile fe-
males, but the few female
ants that can lay eggs are
called queens. All male ants
are capable of reproduction,


ut


oors


Page A10


More coverage
The Times online at apalachtimes.com


Thursday, July 7








Termite Ant

PROVIDED BY THE CENTERS FOR DISEASE CONTROL


but not of much else, includ-
ing feeding themselves.
Male ants are called drones,
not kings.
Within a healthy ant or
termite colony, immature
reproductive develop at
certain times of year de-
pending on the species.
They remain unmated for
weeks or months waiting
for a chance to leave the


nest and start a new colony.
These young reproductive
have wings, which they lose
after mating.
Once they reach matu-
rity, they wait for a rainy
day to make the ground soft.
Within 24 hours after the
rain, the workers open up
the nest and the reproduc-
tives emerge and fly away,
looking for a mate.


SID RICE I Contributed photos
White marlin are one of the billfish present in offshore waters of the Panhandle. Blue water fishing is prime from
May through October. Tuna up to 150 pounds show up in big schools offshore in the Gulf of Mexico throughout
the summer.





Ote water dreasr

Offshore big game action marks Panhandle summers


By Frank Sargeant
franksargeant@bellsouth.net
In the dreams of every angler,
there leaps a 1,000-pound blue
marlin.
For most of us, that will remain
a dream. But for those fortunate
enough to finance an offshore
trip in Florida's Panhandle
waters anytime between May and
October, it's always a possibility.
We know because Capt. Tom
Browning and crew, fishing out
of Destin, proved it few years
back with a monster billfish that
scaled 1,046 pounds. Though that
blue remains the biggest ever for
Florida, several fish in the 700-
pound range have been caught
since.
The offshore fish are what
biologists call "pelagics," or ocean
roamers. They ride the Gulf loop
current out of the Caribbean
in May, stay in the DeSoto
Canyon and off the Mississippi
Delta through the summer, and
complete the loop in fall as water
temperatures start to fall back into
the 70s offshore.
In addition to the blue marlin,
there are white marlin, sailfish,
wahoo, yellowfin tuna and
dolphin in the mix, as well as
swordfish - mostly caught at
night by specialists - all marking
Panhandle waters as some of the
best big game fishing territory in
the nation.
The fishing begins about 50
miles offshore most of the time,
around the 100-fathom (600-foot)
curve. Basically, skippers run
south until they hit the clear


blue of offshore water. The edge
where it meets the green inshore
water often is a great spot to start
trolling for weedline species such
as dolphin.
The fishing areas are well-
known despite being so far
from land; the Elbow, the Spur,
the Nipple, the Steps and the
Squiggles all are part of the
lexicon of offshore skippers,
each named for unique bottom
characteristics.
Needless to say, this is
not small boat country. Most
experienced offshore anglers
consider a 35-footer the
minimum for safety. Twin engines
are a must, as are satellite
communications gear and a life
raft.
Because very few of us can
afford boats of that size and
equipage, charters are the way
to go for most. Fortunately,
Panhandle ports have plenty of
options, with Destin one of the
most active bluewater towns in the
nation.
It is not cheap to go blue water
fishing. Because of the staggering
costs of fuel, charter fees typically
are $1,200 to $1,500 per day. On
top of which you generally are
expected to tip the crew 10 to 15
percent.
The cost of a day's charter
can be split by up to six anglers
on most boats. That cuts the
tally back to a reasonable level
for those who can stand to share
"chair time," or hours spent
actually sitting in the fighting chair
and waiting for the strike.
Billfishing is a game of


patience, and more often than not,
those who can spend only a single
day chasing marlin or sails will
be disappointed. However, if you
can be satisfied with 100-pound
yellowfin tuna, 50-pound wahoo
and 40-pound dolphin - all highly
edible creatures -you're likely
to feel richly rewarded for the
offshore adventure.
Getting far offshore is a treat
in itself. You may see a school
of hundreds of oceanic dolphin
driving tuna, or sit on the
bowsprit and watch these black-
and-white mammals play in the
bow wake just a few feet below.
You might see a whale shark
lazing along at the surface,
sucking in hundreds of gallons
of plankton at each gulp. Flying
fish sail away like transparent
butterflies. And just looking into
water so clear that you can see a
100 feet straight down is a treat for
landlubbers.
If you do luck into a marlin,
don't expect to tie it to the roof
of the station wagon for the trip
home. Billfish usually are released
after a few photographs. They
are scarce, mostly because of
incidental commercial long-line
kills and highly valued by the
charter skippers who depend on
them as the poster children of
their advertising.
One of the best online sources
for info on blue water fishing
in the Panhandle is Capt. John
Holley's site, www.catchbigmarlin.
com. There are numerous other
skippers at Panhandle fishing
centers who offer blue water trips,
as well.


LOIS SWOBODA I The Times


Male ants, also called drones.


All of the reproductive
of a species in a given area
will emerge on the same
day, and around the same
time, increasing the likeli-
hood of them finding a mate
from another nest.
It's relatively simple to
tell the difference between
winged ants and termites.
Ants have a distinct waist,
termite do not. Ants have
elbowed antennae, while
termites have antennae
that look like a string of
beads. And all four termite
wings are the same size
and shape, while ants have
large forewings and small
triangular rear wings.
The insects many people
saw resting on walls across
the county were male fire
ants that had completed
their flight and would soon
die.
If you looked closely, the
queens could be seen run-
ning around on the ground
nearby, appearing to be very
large ants.
Fire ant queens and
drones cannot sting al-
though a queen is probably
capable of biting.
Male ants die after the
"wedding flight" whether or
not they succeed in mating.
Queen ants store enough
sperm to create a lifetime
of offspring. In fire ant col-
onies, there are multiple


queens and older ones that
cease to reproduce are re-
moved.
Termite kings pair up
with their queen and help
her to raise the first litter of
offspring, after which they
remain a mated pair and
never work again. Queen
termites need a male on
hand. They are among the
most fertile insects known
producing tens of millions of
eggs in a lifetime. A top pro-
ducer may lay an egg every
15 seconds for 10 to 12 years
at the peak of her fertility.
Both termite and ant
queens can live over 30
years.
The little Argentine ants
or "pissants" so common in
Apalachicola have a slightly
different way of mating than
most ants species. Unlike
fire ants, Argentine ants
mate within the nest. The
queens then pop off their
wings without taking a wed-
ding flight and the workers
push the males from the
nest, after which the drone
flies away and dies.
The young queen may re-
main within her home nest,
Argentines have multiple
queens in a colony, or she
may rest a bit after mating
and then leave home with
an entourage of workers to
care for her and seek a new
site to raise her family.


TENTACLED SPECTACLE


LARRY APPLEBEE I Special to the Times
Fisherman Jeff Ilardi got a huge surprise over the
Fourth of July weekend when he was out fishing about
20 miles southwest of Apalachicola. He pulled up
his line only to find a sea bass in the embrace of an
octopus. He released the octopus and kept the bass.


FISH REPORT SPONSORED BY

LLU E WATER

OUTRIGGERS &-

Freshwater
Top water baits fished early in the morning or late in the evening
are producing good trout. Redfish have starting to show up in the
bay along town's beach. Scallop season is in full swing in St. Joe
Bay. Early reports are that the shells are small, but the meat is
good-sized and everywhere in the bay.

Inshore

Red snapper and king fish are still red hot. Live bait is catching
bigger fish. Red snapper have moved offshore because of
the rising water temps. Try fishing the 80- to 200-foot range
to maximize your limit. Good numbers of Spanish and king
mackerel can be found along the buoy line out of Mexico Beach.

Offshore
Large shellcraker and bream are still being caught in the river
systems and in Howard Creek. The new moon from last Friday
has the bite heating up. Surface poppers and crickets are local
baits of choice. Bass fishing is hit or miss right now, but we have
had good reports from lake Wimico bass fishing at first light.






S CARRABELLE - APALACHICOLA




PORTS


A
Section


Thursday, July 7,2011 ww w. a pal a ch t i mes.com Page 11




Welcome, state softball tourney teams!


By David Adlerstein
Times City Editor

teams, 465 players and coaches,
will compete for a chance to be the
softball champion of Florida.
Five Franklin County softball teams, featur-
ing girls from age 7 to 16, will play host to this
weekend's Florida Dixie All-Stars state tourna-
ment, set to open tonight with a huge banquet
and continue daily through Monday at the Will
S. Kendrick Sports Complex, at 1601 Kenneth B.
Cope Avenue, in Carrabelle.
They'll be coming from Belleview, Sneads,
Wahneta, Okeechobee, Ponce De Leon, Spring
Hill, Marianna, Wesley Chapel, Paxton, Holmes,
Pasco and Hernando counties to compete, and it
should be exciting.
Nikki Millender, the county's parks and rec-
reation coordinator, was busy Tuesday with in-
mates from the Bay City Work Camp, stuffing
goody bags with everything from sweat towels
and water bottles to sunscreen and lip balm.
With hotels, motels and vacation cottages
slam full for the weekend; it should be busy
throughout the county. "I'm excited," Millender
said. "I think it's going to be great."
Hog Wild is catering tonight's July 7 banquet
at 6 p.m. at the Carrabelle Christian Family Life
Center, 142 River Road, to start the ball rolling
for the tournament's many players and coaches.
Featured speaker will be Florida State softball
standout Tiffany Brown, with remarks from
Florida Dixie District Director Jeff Faircloth,
State Director Danny Brookes, Dixie Softball
President Obie Evans and County Commission-
er Cheryl Sanders.
With help from the tourist development coun-
cil and county recreation department, local busi-
nesses have pitched in to offer a slew of prizes
and giveaways to the players, including weekend
vacation packages and gift certificates.
The action starts Friday at 9:30 a.m. and runs
until 5:30 p.m. On Saturday the games will go to
dark, beginning at about 8:30 p.m.
A special Sunday morning service at the
church is scheduled for tourney participants,
with play starting at 1 p.m. and running to about
6 p.m. On Monday, the finals will start at 9:30 a.m.,
with times to be announced.
Gate prices are $5 for a day pass, and $15 for
a four-day pass. Parents and players from the
Dixie Youth League are helping staff the tourna-
ment, and will split the process from concessions
and the gate.
"That's one reason we brought the tourna-
ment here," Millender said. "To boost the econ-
omy and to keep our players here and give them
a fundraiser."
Any questions, call Millender at 653-8277.




Date High Low % Precip
Thu, July 7 92� 75� 30 %
Fri, July8 89� 75� 40 %
Sat, July 9 89� 75� 40 %
Sun, July 10 91� 75� 40 %
Mon, July 11 90 760 40 %
Tues,July12 91� 72� 30 %
Wed, July 13 900 760 60 %
TIDE TABLES MONTHLY AVERAGES
To find the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times
from these given for APALACHICOLA:
HIGH LOW
Cat Point Minus 0:40 Minus 1:17
East Pass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27
To find the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times
from those given for CARRABELLE:
HIGH LOW
Bald Point Minus 9:16 Minus 0:03
APALACHICOLA


7/7 Thu 02:31AM
04:14PM
7/8 Fri 03:OOAM
05:38PM
7/9 Sat 12:07AM
10:07AM
7/10 Sun 10:47AM
7/11 Mon 11:36AM
7/12 Tue 12:34PM
7/13 Wed 06:07AM
01:35PM


09:05AM
09:54PM
09:33AM


03:21AM 1.0
06:57PM 0.1
08:05PM -0.1
09:04PM -0.2
09:56PM -0.3
08:32AM 1.4
10:42PM -0.3


CARRABELLE


7/7 Thu 12:18AM
02:01PM
7/8 Fri 12:47AM
03:25PM
7/9 Sat 01:08AM
04:44PM
7/10 Sun 09:22AM
7/11 Mon 10:11AM
7/12 Tue 11:09AM
7/13 Wed 04:42AM
12:10PM


07:40AM
08:29PM
08:08AM
10:42PM
08:42AM


05:52PM -0.2
06:51PM -0.3
07:43PM -0.5
06:19AM 2.2
08:29PM -0.5


o r t EE A ANA


The Belles, for ages
1 3-15, are, back row,
from left, Coach Gary
Martina, Summer
Medley, Savannah
Boone, Stephanie
Marxsen, Coach Jim
Mcwhinnie, Haleigh
Ming, Macey Hunt,
Maryln Lee and Coach
Link Carroll. Front row,
from left, are Krista
Martina, Vanessa
Simmons, Ashley
Carroll, Krystal Butler
and Madison Newell.
JAMIE MARTINA I
Special to the Times


The Angels, for ages 9-1 0, include, top row, from
left, coaches Ward Kirvin and Brock Johnson. Middle
row, from left, are Sophia Kirvin, Camilla Shiver,
Michaela Cassidy, Morgan Ray, Madison McAnally
and Sara Gibbs. Front row, from left, are Casey
Riley, Natalie Terhune, Rosie Davis, Madison Smith,
Morgan Vaughn and Alexus Johnson.


KIM JOHNSON I Special to the Times
The Darlings, for ages 7-8, include top tow, from
left, coaches Chad Terhune, Kim Johnson and Eric
Register. Middle row, from left, are Gillian Terhune,
Aaliyah Moran, Scout McLemore, Allison Register,
Eden Rash, Rebeeca Willis and Leslie Escobar. Front
row, from left, are Brooklyn O'Neal, Alyssa Martina,
Gracie Smith, Kelsey Griffin and Abby Johnson.


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Housekeeping
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PersonalCare
Call: (850) 519-8640




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Apalachicola, FL 32320
Phone: (850) 653-8122
Cell: (850) 653-7654


*


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LLIIIIIIIII~ Y


NE


w






A 12 I The Times


Local


Thursday, July 7, 2011


Progress Electric replaces poles


After several steamy
days, Progress Energy
completely restored regu-
lar electrical service to St.
George Island at 6:30 a.m.
on Sunday.
Suzanne Grant, a
spokeswoman for Prog-
ress, said work on the dam-
aged power poles in the
bay, in photo at left, was
completed on Saturday af-
ternoon.
But work crews waited
until early morning to make


the final switchover so that
the brief accompanying
power outage would affect
visitors less.
The island lost power af-
ter a water spout damaged
two power poles at around
8 p.m. on Sunday, June 26.
Eight generators were de-
ployed around the island
and power was restored in
stages, and to all residents
by 10 p.m. on Thursday.
At the Tuesday morn-
ing county commission


meeting, Commissioner
Pinki Jackel expressed
concern that other power
poles crossing the bay had
been damaged. The com-
mission voted unanimously
to send Progress a letter
asking for a timeline on
the upcoming replacement
of the old poles. In spite of
the inconvenience of living
without electricity, rental
companies said few visitors
had opted to leave the is-
land during the outage.


FOURTH OF JULY CELEBRATION CONTINUES


Photos by LOIS SWOBODA I The Times
A float protesting budget cuts to public broadcasting highlighted the St. George island parade. Right, Abby Wagoner, granddaughter of former Apalachicola
football coach Pop Wagoner, prepares for a water fight at the St. George Island parade.


BOOM from page Al


A fish fry and covered dish dinner was the
order of the day at American Legion Post 82 in
Lanark Village. The Camp Gordon Johnston
World War II museum benefitted from a fish fry
at the Carrabelle Palms RV Park, where Merle
Brannan's huge coconut crdme pie, so big it took
two people to lift, was auctioned off, with Rhonda
Skipper taking home the delicacy.
On Sunday, the Red, White and Blue Parade,
a newly created event that has swelled into a
popular tradition, featured decorated bicycles,
golf carts, scooters and pedestrians all parading
from Apalachicola's Lafayette Park down
Avenue B to Riverfront Park. It was there that
a social distributed free cups of chocolate and
vanilla ice cream to young and old alike, followed
by a performance by Kenny Turner and Mexico
Joe that kept the music alive well into the
evening.
On Monday, July 4, a parade sponsored by the
St. George Island Business Association wound
through the island, led by Grand Marshal John
Ficklen, an aviation enthusiast and renowned
model builder.
Amidst the water fights and the gaily
decorated bicycles and cars, a float with a giant
sign "Don't kill Sesame Street" and featuring
Big Bird and his friends protested the budget
cuts to public broadcasting that have been levied
by Florida Governor Rick Scott's veto pen. The
parade was led by Boy Scout Troop 22 / Venture
Crew, and the Marine Corp Color Guard from
Pensacola.
In the evening, a brilliant fireworks display lit
up the night sky over Carrabelle, with smaller
private displays along the beach in St. George
Island, in Eastpoint and in Apalachicola.


.I




k


Photos by DAVID ADLERSTEIN I The Times
Left column, from top, Apalachicola's Alice Jean Gibbs celebrates the America she has known for 94
years. Andrew Holstein, 2, in the hands of his mom Steffanie Holstein, from Georgia, gets into the spirit of
the holiday. Cynthia Rhodes, with her cocker spaniel "Precious" enjoys the parade. Right column, from
top, Lilly Willis, 2, right, blows her horn while Javana Pearson, 1, watches at the fountain at Apalachicola's
Riverfront Park. Ed and Candace Springer capture the American mood. Robby Johnson has a special guest
on the back of his motorcycle. Susan Buzzett Clementson has a red, white and blue bonnet for the ice cream
social. Left, red, white and boom over Carrabelle.


NE ~*I


''







Thursday, July 7, 2011


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The Times I Al 3


COVERING MILTON TO APALACHICOLA


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I 1100

2845T
IN THE SECOND JUDI-
CIAL CIRCUIT IN
FRANKLIN COUNTY
FLORIDA

CENTENNIAL BANK,
as successor in interest
to COASTAL COMMU-
NITY BANK,
Plaintiff,

vs.

JAMES A. DURHAM
and PATRICIA DUR-
HAM,
Defendants.

CASE NO.
10-000502-CA

NOTICE OF SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN pursuant to a Fi-
nal Judgment of Fore-
closure dated June 27,
2011, and entered in
Civil Action No. 10-
000502 CA of the Cir-
cuit Court of the Sec-
ond Judicial Circuit in
and for Franklin Cou-
nty, Florida, wherein
the parties were the
Plaintiff, CENTENNIAL
BANK, as successor in
interest to COASTAL
COMMUNITY BANK,
and the Defendants,
JAMES A. DURHAM
and PATRICIA DUR-
HAM, I will sell to the
highest and best bid-
der, for cash, at 11:00
a.m. (Eastern Time) on
the 17th day of August,
2011, at the front steps
of the Franklin County
Courthouse, Apalachi-
cola, Florida, the foll-
owing-described real
property as set forth in
said Final Judgment of
Foreclosure:

Parcel 1: Lots 9, 10, 11,
12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17,
18, 19, and 20, Block
225, Greater Apalachi-
cola, in the City of
Apalachicola, Franklin
County, Florida, now in
common use; and

Parcel 2: Commence
at the Northeast corner
of Section 25, Town-
ship 4 South, Range 2
West, Wakulla County,
Florida, and thence run
South 00 degrees 11
minutes 16 seconds
West 643.89 feet,
thence run North 72
degrees 56 minutes 13
seconds East along the
South boundary of Lot
90 of the Hartsfield Sur-
vey of Lands in Wakulla
County, Florida, a dis-
tance of 1773.08 feet to
the southeasterly right-
of-way boundary of U.
S Highway No. 98,
thence run North 30
degrees 14 minutes 21
seconds East along
said right-of-way boun-
dary 717.12 feet to the
Point of Beginning;
From said Point of Be-
ginning thence run
North 30 degrees 10
minutes 46 seconds
East along said right-
of-way boundary 396.
04 feet, thence run
South 73 degrees 42
minutes 16 seconds
East 1212.94 feet,
thence run South 16
degrees 47 minutes 05
seconds East 88.21
feet, thence run South
72 degrees 56 minutes
13 seconds West 38.91
feet, thence run North
86 degrees 01 minutes
41 seconds West 1354.
84 feet to the Point of
Beginning.

The successful bidder
at the sale will be re-
quired to place the req-
uisite state documen-
tary stamps on the Cer-
tificate of Title.

DATED this 27th day of
June,2011.

Hon. MARCIA JOHN-
SON
Clerk of the Court
Franklin County, Flor-
ida
By: Michele Maxwell
As Deputy Clerk

FRANK A. BAKER, AT-
TORNEY AT LAW
4431 Lafayette Street
Manranna, FL 32446
July 7, 14, 2011

2967T
IN THE CIRCUIT
COURT OF THE SEC-
OND JUDICIAL CIR-
CUIT IN AND FOR
FRANKLIN COUNTY
FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION

U.S. BANK, NATIONAL
ASSOCIATION, AS
TRUSTEE FOR THOR-
NBURG MORTGAGE
SECURITIES TRUST
2006-6,
Plaintiff,

vs.


1100

JOHN D. DANIELS,
A/K/A DENNIS DAN-
IELS, et al,
Defendantss.

CASE NO.:
19-2009-CA-000426
DIVISION:

NOTICE OF
RESCHEDULED SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN Pursuant to an
Order Rescheduling
Foreclosure Sale dated
July 29th, 2011, and
entered in Case No.
19-2009-CA-000426 of
the Circuit Court of the
Second Judicial Circuit
in and for Franklin
County, Florida in
which U.S. Bank, Na-
tional Association, as
Trustee for Thornburg
Mortgage Securities
Trust 2006-6, is the
Plaintiff and John D.
Daniels a/k/a Dennis
Daniels, Morgan Stan-
ley Credit Corporation
f/k/a Morgan Stanley
Dean Witter Credit Cor-
poration, are defend-
ants, I will sell to the
highest and best bid-
der for cash in/on ,
Franklin County, Flor-
ida at on the 13th day
of July, 2011, the fol-
lowing described prop-
erty as set forth in said
Final Judgment of
Foreclosure:

LOT 2, IN BLOCK 71,
OF ST. GEORGE IS-
LAND GULF BEACHES
UNIT 5, ACCORDING
TO THE MAP OR PLAT
THEREOF, RECOR-
DED IN PLAT BOOK 3,
PAGE 16, OF THE
PUBLIC RECORDS OF
FRANKLIN COUNTY,
FLORIDA.

A/K/A 873 WEST BAY
SHORE DRIVE, SAINT
GEORGE ISLAND, FL
32328

Any person claiming an
interest in the surplus
from the sale, if any,
other than the property
owner as of the date of
the Lis Pendens must
file a claim within 60
days after the sale.

Dated June 17, 2011.

Marcia Johnson
Clerk of Court
By: Michele Maxwell
Deputy Clerk

Albertelli Law
Attorney for Plaintiff
PO. Box 23028
Tampa, FL 33623
(813) 221-4743
June 30, July 7, 2011





2973T
REQUEST FOR
PROPOSALS/BIDS

Airport Equipment and
Rehab work at
FRANKLIN COUNTY/
APALACHICOLA
REGIONAL AIRPORT

The Franklin County
Board of County Com-
missioners is request-
ing proposals/bids
from qualified firms in-
terested in supplying
the following off-the-
shelf or custom built
equipment and "Design
Build" Rehab-Piece
Work Construction for
FRANKLIN COUNTY/
APALACHICOLA RE-
GIONAL AIRPORT.

Item #1). Herbicide
Spraying Equipment.
(components/kits)

A) Custom built herbi-
cide spraying unit. Skid
mount 500 gal. tank
unit. 8 hp electric start
Honda engine Hypro
1502 XL Pump


B) 26' folding,
away" dry boom.

C) 36 TeeJet
nozzle kits,
hose, etc.


"break


e-Chem
EPDM


D) 7' x 20' DOT equip-
ment/utility 5,000 #
tandem axel trailer.

E) Spare parts kit

Item #2). Heavy Duty
20' "Flex Wing/Bat
Wing" Rotary Cutter.

Item #3). "Design
Build" Rehab-piece
work construction:

A) FBO facility-Person
safety door, roof rehab,
roof insulation, HVAC
(pending), hangar door
repair.


1100

B) FBO emergency
generator rehab/install,
etc.

C) County hangar- Fin-
ish work (drywall con-
struction, etc.) of the
restroom, 15' x 60'
roughed in 2nd floor of-
fice area, etc. Add 20' x
60' lean-to storage
area.

D) Construct ADA rest-
room lean-to onto
T-Hangar facility

Item #4) Runway Re-
Marking/Signage and
possible tree removal
services.

Additional information
and specifications are
available at the Franklin
County Planning Office,
34 Forbes St. Apalachi-
cola , FL , or contact
Mr. Alan C. Pierce, Di-
rector of Administrative
Services, at 850-653-
9783, ext. 161 or con-
tact the Airport Mana-
ger-Ted Mosteller at
850-653-5115.

Proposals bids shall be
sealed and delivered to
the following address
by 4:00 PM (EDT) Mon-
day, July 18, 2011:

Franklin County
Clerk of Court
Attn: Michael Moron,
Board Secretary
33 Market St, Suite 203
Apalachicola, FL 32320

Please clearly identify
on the exterior of the
sealed envelope-the
item number or part
thereof for which
bidding/proposing-to
be opened at the Com-
mission meeting July,
19,2011

The County reserves
the right to award the
contracts) to the quali-
fied firm(s) or indivi-
dual(s) submitting a re-
sponsive proposals)
with a resulting negoti-
ated agreement which
it deems the most ad-
vantageous and in the
best interest of FRANK-
LIN COUNTY and to
waive any irregularity or
technicality in propos-
als received. FRANK-
LIN COUNTY shall be
the sole judge of the
proposal and the re-
sulting negotiated
agreement that is in its
best interest and its de-
cision will be final.
June 30, July 7, 2011


2986T
IN THE CIRCUIT
COURT OF THE SEC-
OND JUDICIAL CIR-
CUIT IN AND FOR
FRANKLIN COUNTY,
FLORIDA

CASE NO.:
19-2009-CA-000426

U.S. BANK, NATIONAL
ASSOCIATION, AS
TRUSTEE FOR
THORNBURG MORT-
GAGE SECURITIES
TRUST 2006-6,
Plaintiff,

vs.

JOHN D. DANIELS,
A/K/A DENNIS DAN-
IELS, et al,
Defendants.

NOTICE OF
RESCHEDULED SALE

NOTICE IS GIVEN pur-
suant to a final judg-
ment of Foreclosure
dated July 29, 2011,
and entered in Case
No. 19-2009-CA-
000426 of the Circuit
Court of the Second
Judicial Circuit in and
for Franklin County,
Florida, in which U.S.
Bank, National Associ-
ation as Trustee for
Thornburg Mortgage
Securities Trust 2006-6,
is the Plaintiff, and
John D. Daniels, A/K/A
Dennis Daniels, and
Morgan Stanley Dean
Witter Credit Corpora-
tion, are defendants, I
will sell to the highest
and best bidder for
cash at the Front Door
of the Franklin County
Courthouse, 33 Market
St., Apalachicola, FL
3230 at 11:00 a.m. on
July 13, 2011, the fol-
lowing described
property:

LOT 2, BLOCK 71, OF
ST. GEORGE ISLAND
GULF BEACHES, UNIT
5, ACCORDING TO


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www.Centura.us.com


1 1100
THE MAP OR PLAT
THEREOF, RE-
CORDED IN PLAT
BOOK 3, PAGE 16, OF
THE PUBLIC REC-
ORDS OF FRANKLIN
COUNTY FLORIDA.
A/K/A 873 WEST BAY
SHORE DRIVE, SAINT
GEORGE ISLAND, FL
32328.

Any person claiming an
interest in the surplus
from the sale, if any,
other than the property
owner as of the date of
the Lis Pendens must
file a claim within 60
days after the sale.

Dated: June 17, 2011.

Marcia Johnson
Clerk of Court
By: Michele Maxwell
Deputy Clerk

Albertelli Law Attorney
for Plaintiff, PO. Box
23028 Tampa, FL
33623 (813)221-4743
June 30, July 7, 2011


3032T
LEGAL NOTICE

Notice is given pursu-
ant to Florida
Self-Storage Facility
Act, Florida Statutes,
Chapter 83, Part IV,
that Seminole Safe N
Secure Storage will
hold a sale by sealed
bid on: July 30, 2011 at
10:00 a.m. at 162 US
98, Eastpoint, Florida
32328 of the contents
of mini-warehouse(s)
containing personal
property of:

COASTAL BUILDING
SUPPLY
ANDREW BUTLER
CANDACE WEBB
ALICE JOSEPH
BABARA SINGER

Before the sale date of
July 30, 2011, the prop-
erty may be redeemed
by payment in cash or
money order of the out-
standing balance and
cost by mailing it to
Post Office Box 1054,
Eastpoint, Florida
32328, or by paying in
person.
July 7, 14, 2011


3033T
LEGAL NOTICE

Notice is given pursu-
ant to Florida
Self-Storage Facility
Act, Florida Statutes,
Chapter 83, Part IV,
that Franklin Mini Stor-
age will hold a sale on:
August 6, 2011 at 10:00
a.m. at 1627 US 98,
Carrabelle, Florida
32322 of the contents
of mini-warehouse(s)
containing personal
property of:

MARTIN RAULERSON
COURTNEY GILMORE
TERRY PROCTOR

Before the sale date of
August 6, 2011, the
property may be re-
deemed by payment in
cash or money order of
the outstanding bal-
ance and cost by mail-
ing it to Post Office Box
139, Carrabelle, Florida
32322, or by paying in
person.
July 7, 14, 2011


3081 T
IN THE SECOND JUDI-
CIAL CIRCUIT IN
FRANKLIN COUNTY
FLORIDA
CASE NO.
10-000502-CA

CENTENNIAL BANK,
as successor in interest
to COASTAL COMMU-
NITY BANK,
Plaintiff,


1100
vs.

JAMES A. DURHAM
and PATRICIA DUR-
HAM,
Defendants.

NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN pursuant to a Fi-
nal Judgment of Fore-
closure dated June 27,
2011, and entered in
Civil Action No.
10-000502 CA of the
Circuit Court of the
Second Judicial Circuit
in and for Franklin
County, Florida,
wherein the parties
were the Plaintiff, CEN-
TENNIAL BANK, as
successor in interest to
COASTAL COMMU-
NITY BANK, and the
Defendants, JAMES A.
DURHAM and PATRI-
CIA DURHAM, I will sell
to the highest and best
bidder, for cash, at
11:00 a.m. (Eastern
Time) on the 17th day
of August, 2011, at the
front steps of the
Franklin County Court-
house, Apalachicola,
Florida, the following-
described real property
as set forth in said Final
Judgment of Foreclo-
sure:

Parcel 1: Lots 9, 10,
11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16,
17, 18, 19, and 20,
Block 225, Greater Ap-
alachicola, in the City
of Apalachicola, Frank-
lin County, Florida, now
in common use; and

Parcel 2: Commence at
the Northeast corner of
Section 25, Township 4
South, Range 2 West,
Wakulla County, Flor-
ida, and thence run
South 00 degrees 11
minutes 16 seconds
West 643.89 feet,
thence run North 72
degrees 56 minutes 13
seconds East along the
South boundary of Lot
90 of the Hartsfield Sur-
vey of Lands in Wakulla
County, Florida, a dis-
tance of 1773.08 feet to
the southeasterly right-
of-way boundary of U.
S Highway No. 98,
thence run North 30
degrees 14 minutes 21
seconds East along
said right-of-way
boundary 717.12 feet
to the Point of Beginn-
ing; From said Point of
Beginning thence run
North 30 degrees 10
minutes 46 seconds
East along said
right-of-way boundary
396.04 feet, thence run
South 73 degrees 42
minutes 16 seconds
East 1212.94 feet,
thence run South 16
degrees A7 minutes 05
seconds East 88.21
feet, thence run South
72 degrees 56 minutes
13 seconds West 38.91
feet, thence run North
86 degrees 01 minutes
41 seconds West
1354.84 feet to the
Point of Beginning.

The successful bidder
at the sale will be re-
quired to place the req-
uisite state documen-
tary stamps on the Cer-
tificate of Title.

DATED this 27th day of
June, 2011.

Hon. MARCIA
JOHNSON
Clerk of the Court
Franklin County,
Florida
By: Michele Maxwell
As Deputy Clerk
July 7, 14, 2011


___________________________I


These tiny ads
sell, hire, rent
and inform for
thousands of
families each
week. Let a little
Classified ad do a
big job for you.
Emerald Coast
Marketplace
747-5020


Incorrect
Insertion
Policy

For Classified
In-column Ad-
vertisers

All ads placed by
phone are read back
to the advertiser to
insure correctness.
The newspaper will
assume correctness
at the time of the
read-back procedure
unless otherwise in-
formed.


Please 2 your ad.

Advertisers are re-
quested to check the
advertisement on the
first insertion for cor-
rectness. Errors
should be reported
immediately.

Your Florida Free-
dom newspaper will
not be responsible
for more than one in-
correct insertion, nor
will it be liable for
any error in adver-
tisements to a
greater extent than
the cost of the space
occupied by the er-
ror.

Any copy change,
during an ordered
schedule constitutes
a new ad and new
charges.

We do not
guarantee position
of ANY ad under
any classification.








REWARD
OFFERED
I For stolen 60' LCD I
Sharp TV with Sur-
round sound stereo
system. Stolen from'
Some on St. George
iIsland. $500. for its,
undamaged and
Safe return. Please
ICall with any infor-
Smation
: 407-221-4340
.---------- .1




GUN SHOW
Santa Rosa County
Auditorium, Milton,
FL July 9th/10th
9am - 5pm call
(850) 957-4952 or
(850) 261-8407
General
Admission $6.


I nstall/Maint/Repair

I Maintenance I
iAt Buccaneer Inn oni
St George Island.
I Must be able to work
i weekends. Call (850) I
927-2163
L -- -----------A


1 4100




Food Svs/Hospitality

Papa Joe's
Oyster Bar & Grill
Now Hiring
Experienced
*Line Cooks & other
kitchen staff.
*Walt staff
*Oyster bar staff.
Apply in person only

rFood Svs/Hospitaiity

I Desk Clerk I
I Needed I
|At Buccaneer Inn on
St George Island.
Must be able to work'
I weekends and
Nights. Call (850)
927-2163
L.--- 2-3- - - - A.1




General

The
Apalachicola
Maritime
Museum
Seeking volunteers for
reception/gift shop,
wooden boat school,
administrative, ac-
counting, grant writing,
and more. Join the
crew and enjoy special
benefits. For more in-
formation, please call
653-2500




Hospitality

Housekeeping
Part Time weekend
help needed for all po-
sitions, apply in per-
son, 4693 Cape San
Bias Rd or 1200 Hwy
98 Mexico Beach


Housekeeper
Seeking:
*Smiling
*Pleasant
*Dependable
*Drama free
*Experienced appli-
cant
Must have telephone
and reliable
transportation.
References required
Join the Gibson Inn
team. 51 Avenue C
850-653-2191


Medical/Health


,\ ll,11|ltl,\l

Weems
Memorial
Is now hiring for the
following positions:

e.il J!P or PA
r 1.-.:ical Lab Tech.

CH I
IR-1 p Therapist
*i-i,elician
9i1ouskeeping
+Admissions

Applications are
available at
weemsmemoral corm
and may be submit-
ted to Ginny Griner,
WMH HR Director,

weemsmemorial.com
or FAXED to
850-653-1879
Web ID 3463444


Chief Development Officer
We are a Public Charter School looking for a
highly motivated creative individual with excellent
communication skills. A self starter who has a BA in
Business, Marketing or Public Relations and is interested
in developing and implementing fundraising programs.
* Full Time Position
* Salary/Benefits negotiated
* Develop fundraising goals for the next five years
Equal opportunity employer
Send resumes to:
Apalachicola Bay Charter School
98 12th Street Apalachicola, Florida 32320


AN OPEN LETTER OF APOLOGY FROM THE ECONOMY

I'm sorry
To state the obvious, it hasn't been pretty the last few years, especially for the job market
I'm aware of the anger, and I don't blame you This whole thing got away from me But I think it's time we made
a fresh start
Here's what I propose:
1 If you have a job and you're happy with it, good for you Keep it up
2 If you're not happy in your job, it's time to rethink things I'm not telling you to quit on the spot But maybe
there's a better job out there for you
3 If you've taken a job that under normal circumstances you wouldn't have, my hat's off to you You did what
you had to do But now maybe it's time to go back to doing what you do best
4 If you don't have a job, again, I'm sorry I know looking for a job can be, to put it nicely, challenging
But know this it's not you, it's me And if the recovery is here, I think you can lead the way
So to everyone who's been affected the last few years, which is pretty much everyone, I accept complete
responsibility But now the ball is in your court You have permission to move on with your life
It's time to move forward, find a job you love and get back to work o
Sincerely,






The Economy has made it tough on everyone the last few years. But it's time to move forward.
Visit emeraldcoastjobseast.com/monster to find the right job for you. Let's do this.



o -monster'


| 4100
Gardens Inc
Is now hiring for
Landscape Crew
Positions
Valid DL req. Pickup
applications at 268
Water Street. Apalachi-
cola, Fl.
1-850-653-1777

Sales/Business Dev

Full Time I
Cashier
Needed at Castaway
Liquors on St
George Island. Must
be able to work
Weekends and be at
least 21 years old.
Call (850) 927-2163


oi----------l






B100 - Business/
Commercial
6110 - Apartments
6120 - Bach Rentals
6130 - Condo/Townhouse
140 - House Rentals
6150- Roommate Wanted
6160 - Rooms for Rent
6170-Mobile Home/Lot
6180 Out-of Town Rentals
6190 - Timeshare Rentals
6200 - Vacation Rentals


6110




Heritage
Villas and
Southern
Villas of
Apalachicola
Apartments
Now accepting ap-
plications for 2 br.
Handicap accessible
unit. Some rental
assistance may be
available. HUD
vouchers accepted.
Call 850-653-9277
TDD/TTY 711. This
institution is an
equal opportunity
provider, and em-
ployer.

Publisher's
Notice

All real estate advertis-
ing in this newspaper is
subject to the Fair
Housing Act which
makes it illegal to ad-
vertise "any preference,
limitation or discrimina-
tion based on race,
color, religion, sex,
handicap, familial status
or national origin, or an
intention, to make any
such preference, limita-
tion or discrimination"
Familial status includes
children under the age
of 18 living with parents
or legal custodians,
pregnant women and
people securing cus-
tody of children under
18.
This newspaper will not
knowingly accept any
advertising for real es-
tate which is in violation
of the law. Our readers
are hereby informed
that all dwellings adver-
tised in this newspaper
are available on a equal
opportunity basis. To
complain of discrimina-
tion call HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
toll-free number for the
hearing impaired is
1-800-927-9275.



'OPOHTUMI







$500I
90INMIN

653880


6110-



1 br, Apalachicola,
quiet, 2 blks from boat
ramp, screen porch
W/D, AC, pet OK, $600
month + first, last &
deposit. Please Call
850-697-5000 Other
homes available.
Text FL66715 to 56654



6120
St. George Island $160
wk, Electric, Satellite,
Garbage incl. pool tble.
12'X65' deck w/Beaut-
iful view 850-653-5114
Text FL65716 to 56654



6140
3 br 2 ba ch&a
Apalachicola, FL.
Call 850-643-7740.
Apalachicola: Beautiful
Private 3 br, 2 ba on
large lot, FP, hardwood
floors, covered porch.
$895 mo. 850-323-0259
Carrabelle, 3 br, 2 ba,
$850 month, First
month + deposit.
850-766-4357
Text FL59676 to 56654
Lanark, 2 br, 1 ba, w/
Ig fncd yd, separate LR
& den, covered pking &
storage, $625 mo,
2529 Florida Ave., Call
850-528-0716
Mature older couple
with jobs and pet.
Seeking long term
lease, for home on St.
George Island. call
850-570-9469








REAI.ESIATEFORSALE
7100 - Homes
7105 - Open House
7110 -Beach Home/
Properly
7120 - Commercial
7130 - Condo/Townhouse
7140 - Farms & Ranches
7150 - Lots and Acreage
7160 - Mobile Homes/Lots
7170 - Waterfront
7180 - Investment
Properly
7190 - Oul-of-Town
Real Estate
7200 - Timeshare


7150



North Historic District
5th Street building lot.
$29,000 obo 60 x 100.
Corner lot Brokers pro-
tected, (404) 218-0077




AUTOMOTIVE, MARINE





81 DO - Antique & Collectibles
8110 -Cars
8120 - Sports Utility Vehicles
8130- Trucks
8140 -Vans
8150 - Commercial
8160 - Motorcycles
8170 -Auto Parts
& Accessories
8210 - Boats
8220 - Personal Watercraft
8230 - Sailboats
8240 - Boat & Marine
Supplies
8245 - Boat Slips & Docks
8310- Aircraft/Aviation
8320 - ATV/Off Road Vehicles
8330 - Campers & Trailers
8340 - Motorhomes



Oldsmobile Cutlass
Supreme 1980, 2 Door
Coupe, Good Motor,
great body for
customizing, $900 call
850-210-6014




Ford F250 1989 Less
than 75,000 Miles on
Motor, New Heads,
Good Cab, Rough
Work Body $950,
850-210-6014


45ec Crest
Re-tl Estate.-
108 S. E. AVE. A
CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322
850-697-9604 850-323-0444
vwvw.seacrestre.com
RENTALS-
1 BR 1 / BA CONDO, FURNISHED
On River, Downtown, Boat Slip..... ................$1000
1 BR 1 BA LANARK APT, REMODELED
Water Inc, Street Entrance.......................... $425
1 BR FURNISHED APARTMENT, DEN
Carport, Utilities Incl........................................ $650
3 BR 2 BA DOUBLEWIDE
Back Deck, Nice Location............................. $700
3 BR 1 BA APARTMENT
Front & Back Porch...................................... $600
3 BR 2 BA FURNISHED CONDO
Boat & Car Parking ........................... $850 WKLY
1 BR 1 BA FURNISHED CONDO
Long Term, Includes Utilities ..........................$910
3 BR 3 BA FURNISHED CONDO
Pool, Downtown ....................................$700 WKLY
3 BR 2 BA UNFURNISHED HOUSE
Long Term .................................................... $850
2 BR UNFURNISHED APARTMENT
Lanark ................. .................................. $375
2 BR UNFURNISHED APARTMENT
W/D Pet Friendly ......................................... $500
3 BR 3 B FURNISHED CONDO
Long Term , Pool .............................................. $850






A1 4 I The Times


CUTS from page Al


Representing the school several high-profile retire-
district are lead negotiator ments, are likely to draw
Jerry Copeland, an outside little or no controversy.
consultant hired by the dis- But others, such as
trict, and Roy Carroll, the freezing the step increases
district's finance director, that teachers receive each
"Primarily at this stage year due to longevity and
we are addressing thereby saving
the implications of about $130,000, or
the Student Suc- ' requiring six fur-
cess Act and incor- lough days and
porating language saving almost
that addresses the $200,000, are likely
changes that that to become more
law made," said contentious.
Roux, noting that ROY In reviewing
the new law bases CARROLL Carroll's proposed
half of a teacher's reductions, the
evaluation on student per- school board voted not to
formance. recommend, at the outset
"We're very concerned of the talks, a $30,000 re-
about the necessity for an duction in supplemental
appeals process following contracts, a $50 per month
teacher evaluation," she per employee reduction in


said.
After defeating a cost-
saving measure to shorten
the school year and length-
en the school day, keeping
it at 180 days, the school
board last month approved
a list of possible "deficit
reductions" that it hopes
will stave off an anticipated
$1.4 million shortfall next
year.
By a 4-1 vote, with Board
Member David Hinton vot-
ing no, the board provided
Carroll with what Superin-
tendent Nina Marks called
"a starting point" for nego-
tiations.
Some reductions, such
as drawing on federal funds
to cover $420,000 in sal-
ary costs or saving $342,450
from staff attrition from


the district's subsidy for
health insurance which
would save about $100,000,
or a 2 percent across-the-
board salary cut, which
would save about $136,000.
Nor did the school board
want to call for a cutting off
of the activity bus, a savings
of $40,000, or a reduction in
middle school athletics, at
a savings of $25,000.
But Hinton did not agree
with his colleagues.
"During the budget
committee (discussions),
we continually talked about
reducing everything," he
said. "Athletics seems to
be a holy cow in this sys-
tem, don't touch athletics.
But our school system isn't
here for athletics; it's here
for educating our students


in reading, writing and
arithmetic.
"I would like to see the
activity bus reduced," he
said. "That's a frill that's not
necessary to the education
of a child. I'm not saying
I'm against athletics, but
we can reduce the number
of games we're participat-
ing in. I'm saying to reduce
them, not eliminate them.
I think we need to get our
priority to education."
In addition to supporting
reductions in the activity
bus, middle school athletics
and coaching supplements,
Hinton voiced support for
not harming teachers' pay.
"Three year ago we had
a referendum that was OK'd
2-1, to provide funds to in-
crease salaries for employ-
ees," he said. "This year we
had another vote, (and we
received) almost the same


vote to not include money
for the school system. I
think the community was
telling us they don't mind
our employees receiving
satisfactory salaries."
Because of the Florida
legislature's approval of
Gov. Scott's proposal to re-
quire public sector employ-
ees to contribute 3 percent
annually to their retirement
funds, the district will save
about $177,000.
In addition, the district
is looking to save about
$70,000 by ending den-
tal coverage, $21,000 by
restricting professional
development opportuni-
ties such as seminars and
workshops, $10,000 by not
using general fund money
for field trips, and $6,000
by discontinuing one of two
voluntary pre-Kindergar-
ten bus runs between the


former Brown Elementary
School and the consolidat-
ed school campus.
By hiring five fewer
paraprofessionals than last
year, the board has already
taken a step toward saving
close to $134,000.
One additional expense
that the board did autho-
rize, unanimously, at last
month's meeting was a
plan to hire Sam Carnley,
Carroll's predecessor as
district financial officer,
to serve as a consultant
in preparing the 2011-12
budget.
Carroll said he made
the request to Marks due to
his "relative inexperience"
in budget preparation.
"There's been a significant
transition in the finance
office this year with new
employees, and it's best
for us to have a seasoned


person to guide us through
the process," he said.
Carnley Consulting will
be paid $50 per hour and
will work an unspecified
number of hours between
now and Sept. 30, the end of
the current fiscal year.
Carroll said Carnley
would assist in prepar-
ing the district budget and
long-range work plans,
responding to questions
asked during the audit, and
other tasks that might be
needed.
"Whatever it takes to
make sure it's done right
and the district is repre-
sented well," Carroll said.
"He'd be a guiding person
in this process but not the
hands-on person doing all
the work. Last year he was
doing it and I was watching,
and this year I'll be doing it
and he'll be watching."


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more time to master the
standards set."
The superintendent said
the district added the fifth
and eighth grades to the
required state mandate
for third grade passage
of the FCAT. Third grad-
ers scoring less than a


passing grade are required
to attend a Summer Read-
ing Camp in preparation for
a test that may allowthem to
move on to the next grade.
Marks said this summer,
fifth and eighth graders
are also participating in re-
medial classes, with credit


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recovery classes provided
for grades nine through 12.
"The hope is that an
achievement gap will
shrink and the passing
of the FCAT will produce
more diplomas," Marks
said.
Johnson said she and
her staff are reviewing in
detailing the new FCAT 2.0
test that the students took
this past year and seeing
which areas performed
strongly and which need
more work.


One area that stands out
is a drop of 14 percentage
points of students who met
high standards in writing,
from 81 percent to 67 per-
cent. In reading and math,
students posted among
their strongest perfor-
mances in a decade, with 76
percent of students meet-
ing high standards in math,
1 percentage point better
than last year. In reading,
the percentage of high per-
formance was 71 percent,
only a 4 percentage point


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drop from last year.
Writing is tested in the
fourth and eighth grades,
and the decline was seen
among fourth graders
especially.
"We're asking sec-
ond through eight grade
writing teachers to come
in over summer," said
Johnson, noting that the
school is planning a work-
shop led by Franklin Coun-
ty fourth grade teacher
Laura King.
"We're planning to make


sure our writing starts in
the first and second grade
levels," she said. "The
more they write and are
comfortable in writing, I
think we'll see improve-
ments in our scores.'
Johnson said the ABC
School plans to focus on
ensuring students make
sufficient learning gains,
by working with students
in smaller groups, both
those in the lowest quarter
as well as the highest per-
forming students.


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* Some reductions, such as drawing on federalfunds to cover
$420,000 in salary costs or saving $342,450 from staff attrition
from several high-profile retirements, are likely to draw little or no
controversy.


* But others, such as freezing the step increases that teachers receive
each year due to longevity and thereby saving about $130,000, or
requiring six furlough days and saving almost $200,000, are likely
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Thursday, July 7, 2011


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