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The Apalachicola times
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100380/00113
 Material Information
Title: The Apalachicola times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: H.W. Johnston
Place of Publication: Apalachicola Fla
Apalachicola Fla
Creation Date: February 3, 2011
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1885.
General Note: Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 32911693
lccn - sn 95026907
System ID: UF00100380:00113
 Related Items
Preceded by: Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by: Apalachicola herald

Full Text




APALACHICOLA

CARRABELLE











CELEBRATING 125 YEARS AS YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER


Painting oystermen, A2


Thursday, February 3, 2011



Pas de Vie Ballet
On Friday, Feb. 4, The
Dixie Theatre presents its
14th professional season
with Tallahassee's Pas de
Vie Ballet. Come enjoy an
evening of romantic dance,
a Valentines treat from 8 to
10 p.m. For information, call
653-3456 or to reserve a
seat, call 653-3200.

Snowbird Day Tuesday
Tuesday, Feb. 8, is
Snowbird Day, sponsored
by the St. George Island
Business Association. Winter
visitors are invited to spend
the day on St. George Island.
Events will include a raffle
"run" to the local businesses,
fishing tournament, lighthouse
climb, state park entry and
hike, island tour, bridge walk,
bingo and dinner with a cash
bar.
Register at any St. George
Island vacation management
company or inn. Registration
includes filling out a short
questionnaire, obtaining
your name tag and bag and
paying an $8 per person
registration fee.
Details: SGI Visitor Center,
927-7744.

Sweethearts Dance
Franklin County Literacy
will host a Sweethearts Dance
from 7 p.m. to midnight Feb.
12 at Fort Coombs Armory
in Apalachicola. Bring a
date or come stag and enjoy
a cash bar, snacks and a
raffle. DJ and music by Hi-Fi
Entertainment. Tickets $10.
Details: 670-4481.
Tickets are available in
advance at the Apalachicola
and Carrabelle chambers
of commerce and at the
Literacy office in Eastpoint
at 85 School Road. Details:
Literacy at 670-4481; Maxine
Creamer, Literacy director,
566-3782; Liz Sisung, Literacy
board president, 670-8261;
or Anna Carmichael, 370-
6763.

Milne to appear Feb. 9
Bob Milne is considered the
best ragtime/boogie-woogie
pianist in the world. He'll
return to the Dixie Theatre for
his 12th year. Bob delights
audiences with his piano-
playing pyrotechnics and
his infectious enthusiasm for
the music and the history
behind it. Bob's schedule
this February is 3 p.m.
Wednesday, Feb. 9, evening
performances Feb. 10-12 and
then a matinee Feb. 13.
For information, call 653-
3456 or to reserve a seat,
call 653-3200.


Letter to the Editor.
Society News ....
Faith ..........
Law Enforcement. .
Classifieds ......
Tide Chart ......


. . . .A4
. . . .A8
. . . .A9
. . A13
.A14-15
... . A16


WWW.APALACHTIMES.COM


VOL. 125 ISSUE 40


State parks on chopping block


Proposed cuts

would affect

county attractions

By David Adlerstein
Times City Editor
With Gov. Rick Scott poised to
unveil a much leaner state budget
next week, legislators are bracing
for cuts sure to affect Franklin
County, in ways that could mean
everything from closure of two


state parks to layoffs of wildlife
officers to a curtailment of public
hunting opportunities.
State Rep. Leonard Bembry,
ranking Democrat on the House
Agriculture and Natural Resourc-
es Appropriations Committee,
heard details at the Jan. 26 com-
mittee meeting on how Florida's
Department of Environmental
Protection and Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission pro-
pose to achieve a 15 percent re-
duction in their annual operating
budgets, as requested at the start
of the budgeting process for the


2011-12 fiscal year.
Some cuts he said he could
go along with, and others he had
problems with, but topping Bem-
bry's list of bad choices would
be the closing of public access
to 53 state parks, including the
John Gorrie Museum and Orman
House in Apalachicola and the
Constitution Convention Museum
in Port St. Joe.
In addition, proposed for clo-
sure are the Letchworth-Love
Mounds, Lake Jackson Mounds
See STATE PARKS A14


WARREN JONES I Special to the Times
Carrabelle accountant Paul Marxsen, left, and Ajax Building Corporation Vice President Jay
Smith speak at the dedication of Weems Medical Center East in Carrabelle.




A promise kept


Weems dedicates

new Carrabelle clinic

By David Adlerstein
Times City Editor
The first major capital expenditure of the coun-
ty's one-cent health care sales tax was unveiled
Friday, as Weems Medical Center East in Carra-
belle was dedicated in style.
Coming in just under its $1.29 million price tag,
the 5,000-square-foot, one-story clinic swung open
its doors to existing patients Jan. 20, with a prom-
ise to expand hours and bring in more specialty
care in the months ahead.
"This is a great day for Franklin County," Coun-
ty Commission Chairman Noah Lockley told the
crowd, who gathered under the covered pick-up
and drop-off in front that will shield patients from
the elements.
"It's amazing to see what a penny can do, and
the good thing about it, we've done it together, ev-
erybody.
"I want to thank ev-
eryone in Franklin
County, and a
special thanks


Phone: 850-653-8868
Web: apalachtimes.com
E-mail: dadlerstein@starfl.com
Fax: 850-653-8036
Circulation: 800-345-8688

O FREEDOM '
NEWSPAPERS-INTERACTIVE
DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK:
School News & Society: 11 a.m. Friday
Real Estate Ads: 11 a.m. Thursday
Legal Ads: 11 a.m. Friday
Classified Display Ads: 11 a.m. Friday
Classified Line Ads: 5 p.m. Monday


to the hospital board and the hospital founda-
tion," he said. "This is the beginning of a new era.
There's better things to come."
Carrabelle accountant Paul Marxsen, who
chairs Weems Memorial Hospital's board of direc-
tors, emceed the brief ceremony, stressing how
the new clinic marks the fulfillment of a promise
made to Carrabelle and the eastern end of the
county when voters were asked to approve the
sales tax in 2009.
"This is just one step on our journey to pro-
vide the best care possible, in the most modern

See WEEMS Al 0


Ii,
~


-,


'Ithink
it's utterly
absurd...
To basically .
lock the


gates on " '
these parks where we
don't get any return at
all is unconscionable."
State Rep. Leonard Bembry



SCounty


Swilling


to sublet


Armory

Businessmen
eyeing building for
destination weddings,
other large events

By Lois Swoboda
Times Staff Writer
At Tuesday's meeting,
the county commission
voted unanimously to issue
a request for proposals to
sublet the Fort Coombs Ar-
mory in Apalachicola.
In April 2009, the county
leased the historic building
from the state for 50 years
at a cost of $300 per year.
Although military opera-
tions in the building ceased
more than a decade ago,
the Armory has served as
a venue for weddings, re-
unions, dances and more
for decades.
The request for propos-
als (RFP) was triggered by
a request from two busi-
nessmen to lease the build-
ing as a site for destination
weddings and other large
functions.
Steven Goodman and
Carl Holliday have run a
successful event planning
operation in New Albany,
Ind., since 1997. Goodman
said before that, they ran a
bed-and-breakfast in Lou-
isville, Ky., while working
day jobs.
In New Albany, not far
from Louisville, Ky, they
stage large events, notably
weddings, at Culbertson
West, a historic mansion
that is the 10th in a series
of structures the pair has
renovated. They said the
mansion welcomes 15,000
guests annually.
Holliday told commis-
sioners the Armory is an
"ideal transfer" for their
Indiana business because
it is similar in size and con-
figuration.
In April 2007, Holliday
and Goodman bought "the
Porches," also known as the
"Steamboat House," a his-
toric home next to Gorrie
Square. They have carried
out extensive renovation
on the house and now hope
to relocate permanently to
Franklin County.
Part of their plan is to


See ARMORY Al 0


-,*






A2 I The Times


Local


Thursday, February 3, 2011


"And My Father Before Me"


By Lois Swoboda
Times Staff Writer


A Carrabelle family
I is the subject of a
painting by Florida
P all of Fame artist,
Christopher Still.
The Evans family works
on the bay. Oystering is
their sole source of income.
Sons Colton, 11, and John
Eric, 20, join Heather and
Eric on the water tonging
and culling, come rain or
shine.
This summer was
unusual for the Evans in
many ways. The Deepwater
Horizon oil spill brought
fear, confusion and anger
and a celebrated artist
chose the little family
to typify his vision of
traditional Florida.
Painter Christopher
Still, a native Floridian, was
inducted into the Florida
Artists Hall of Fame last
year. He was chosen in a
nationwide competition to
create 10 murals depicting


Florida's history and
natural beauty that now
hang in the Florida House
of Representatives.
Still grew up loving the
beach and much of his work
deals with Florida's coast.
He currently lives in
Tarpon Springs but, when
word reached him of the
Deepwater Horizon oil spill,
he rushed to the Panhandle
to catch a last glimpse of
the sugar sand and record
what he feared was a
vanishing landscape.
He spent weeks at
Bay City Lodge going out
daily in his boat to prepare
studies of the coastline and
the seafood workers for use
in later paintings. He visited
the oyster bars and seafood
houses.
On Jan. 21, Still opened
a major exhibit at the
Appleton Museum of Art in
Ocala.
About half of the
paintings on display are
from the body of work
created here last summer.


One small painting simply
depicts an oyster on the
half shell. Other, larger
paintings, record sunset
on Cape San Blas and
oystermen tonging.
The centerpiece of the
show is a 24" by 48" oil
on linen painting entitled
"And My Father Before
Me." It is a portrait of the
Evans family of Carrabelle
showing two generations
of oystermen working
together on a single boat.
Still came upon the
family early one July
morning. "It was 5 a.m. and
I was crossing Apalachicola
Bay," he said. "The light
was rising over Eastpoint
and a family was oystering
together. Light was raking
across them like a golden
painting that was timeless."
Still approached the
family and asked if he could
paint them.
They agreed. Heather
Evans said the family was
honored, that they had past
experience with the art


~-~--~--.--


LOIS SWOBODA I The Times


Eric and Heather Evans


CHRISTOPHER STILL
"Sunset Pines" captures
the splendor of dusk on
Cape San Bias. RIGHT,
Still developed his own
specialized equipment
that allows him to paint
under water.

world when they appeared
in Richard Bickel's "The
Last Great Bay."
"When they agreed, they
didn't realize I'd be circling
their boat for a week," said
Still, "I actually cut their
buoy rope.
"This painting is not
really about oil or about
oyster fishing," Still said
at the opening show. "It's
about us as Floridians and
the modern things that are
thrown at us."
Heather and Eric Evans
were honored guests at
the January opening.
The couple was both
handsome and modest,
drawing attention from
prominent reviewers and
art collectors.
Heather looked little


older than her oldest son. In
a telephone interview, she
said her family was thrilled
by the show, and that Still
presented them with a copy
of the portrait which now
hangs in her living room.
Still told the Appleton
audience Florida fishermen
are among his heroes and
he hopes his paintings
will draw attention to the
fact Florida is surrounded
completely by water, a
resource we must work
hard to preserve.
In an e-mail following
the show, Still said there
was tremendous interest in


the Forgotten Coast among
Appleton patrons. "I was
surprised at how many
people had never visited the
Panhandle," he said.
The Appleton is
currently holding a major
fund drive to purchase
the Evans portrait for its
permanent collection.
The exhibit ends
on March 20. Other
Still paintings are on
display closer to home
at the Florida House
of Representatives in
Tallahassee, and the Gulf
Specimens Marine Lab in
Panacea.


" B go go g o o @'l n * FA


i Please GCall Toda
da


NE ~*I





Thursday, February 3, 2011


Local


The Times I A3


Pine Log Creek next in



Tate's Hell restoration


Special to The Times
Natural surface water
drainage will be improved
in Pine Log Creek basin
following action by the
Northwest Florida Water
Management District Gov-
erning Board this month.
As part of the Hydrologic
Restoration Plan for Tate's
Hell State Forest approved
last year by the board, this
project will enhance qual-
ity and timing of surface
water runoff to Pine Log
Creek and East Bay and
restore lost wetland func-
tions in the Apalachicola
River and Bay system.
In November 2010, the
district governing board
issued an invitation to bid
on the project, and 24 bids
were received. The bids
were opened Dec. 9, 2010,


and the low bidder was
Panhandle Contracting
Inc. at $190,051. Linda D.
Chaisson, PE., a hydrolo-
gist with the district, said
plans are to sign the con-
tract within the next two
weeks and for the project
to be completed within
nine months.
The private contractor
is to eliminate about three
miles of dirt logging roads
and adjacent ditches by
pushing road fill material
into ditches to reestablish
natural grade. The project
also includes construct-
ing 11 hardened low water
crossings, 30 earthen ditch
plugs, one flashboard riser
and 22 culvert modifica-
tions.
This restoration project
will also enhance wetland
function, restore historic


wet savannas and improve
fish and wildlife habitat
within Tate's Hell State
Forest and Apalachicola
Bay. Funding for construc-
tion is through Florida
Forever capital improve-
ment funds.
"Restoring Tate's Hell
natural hydrology will ben-
efit one of the most diverse,
productive and economi-
cally important estuaries
in the U.S.," said Douglas
Barr, executive director
of the water management
district. "The Apalachicola
River watershed is a dis-
trict priority, and Tate's
Hell was a district-initiated
state purchase in 1994 and a
district wetland restoration
priority site since 1996."
Ron Bartel, director
of the district's resource
management division said


that since the state forest
covers more than half of
Franklin County, "Restor-
ing drainage patterns from
gridded pine plantation to
natural overland flow will
enhance groundwater
recharge, benefit criti-
cal aquatic nurseries and
offset regional wetland
losses."


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---~--~~----


I WWW--











Opinion


A4 I The Times


Thursday, February 3, 2011


The point of a pencil sharpener


When we moved r
into the new school, I
the classrooms were
uniformly outfitted with .
various supplies and �.
furniture. One of the most --..
questionable purchase
decisions was those RE
enormous, blue plastic AN
electric pencil sharpeners. D
I packed mine away for
awhile and used the ones
I had bought in previous years.
They dulled, so I hauled out that
bad boy and then listened to
a year's worth of complaining
students. "Ms. Roux, this thing
doesn't work right. My pencil is
still dull!" They were right, but
to be honest, making sure their
writing instruments had a fine
point wasn't particularly high on
my priority list.
I was wrong.
Rummaging through one
of the myriad drawers in my
classroom I found a brand new,
shiny black, manual hand-
cranked model. A quick memo
to the maintenance crew and it
was mounted the next day. As
the students have discovered
it one by one, their heartfelt
expressions of delight have been
universal. "Hey, I remember
these from elementary school!"


ED
ND
en


Some purport to have
a first-time experience.
j I wish you could see
af the smiles as they
hold their pencils at
w eye level and lovingly
a admire the finely honed
WHITE points. When a person
writes all day, that is
D ROUXA important. It's the little
ise Roux things, but every task is
easier with the proper
tools.
This has led to discussion
about how easily things break.
We are in agreement that our
pencil sharpener probably has
many good years ahead of it,
dutifully performing a simple,
yet essential, task. Since all
of us are used to hunkering
down during hurricanes, we
have discussed other homely
requirements that work without
electricity. We like can openers
that require only elbow grease,
and I have taken pains to explain
the advantages of land-line
phones.
I feel compelled to point out
here that I am the last one to
think the old ways were better
or the old days superior. A
recent vocabulary word was
"ubiquitous." The example
sentence read: "Computers


are now more
ubiquitous than
typewriters."
I thought to
ask, "How 0
many of you (|
have ever
even seen a '
typewriter?"
To be fair, most
had glimpsed
an electric
model in an
office corner
here and there.
They were simply disbelieving
when I explained about the
manual models that had metal
rods striking a cloth ribbon. You
should have seen the eyes rolling
when I talked about laboriously
correcting typos and starting,
over time and time again, when
paragraphs needed to be moved
around. The thought of a 30-page
paper with footnotes was simply
beyond comprehension.
At my age, I am constantly
confronted with examples of
then and now. I try to stay open
minded.
For me, it's mostly about
observing, not judging.
Comparing and contrasting
is one of the Sunshine State
Standards for English, and so


these class discussions
fit right in to the
curriculum. I want
them to be active
participants in
their changing
world, and I try
to encourage
a knowledgeable
perspective, not an
automatic sense
of superiority that
newer is better.
We teachers, and that
means all of us, must nurture
a healthy skepticism in our
young. Questions are good. "Am
I being manipulated by clever
marketing?" "Is the source of
this information to be believed?"
Most importantly, I want them
to be curious and care about a
world beyond Franklin County.
They know how to text and play
games with participants from all
over the world. Many of them are
part of the 500-million member
Facebook universe.
Lately, I have asked them
to think about how social
networks are transforming
not only communication, but
governments. We are watching
events in Tunisia and Egypt very
closely. Every day I ask, "So,
what's new? What's happening


out there?" Are my kids tuning
into world events? Some of them
are, and all of them can relate
to the news that the Egyptian
government shut down cell
phones and the Internet to try
and suppress a revolution. That
more than made my point about
land-line telephones.
We are living in transformative
times. Even if Wikileaks is shut
down, and Julian Assange goes
to prison, there will be similar
sites springing up. Tunisia and
Egypt could well just be the first
dominoes to fall as repressive
governments are toppled by
Twitter. I want my students to be
aware of the social, cultural and
political history being made right
now.
I remember the day John
E Kennedy was shot. Maybe
they will remember our class
discussions about how social
networking began to change the
world. Their awareness must go
beyond, "Wht ru doin after skl?"
Together, we will look at today,
and, eyes wide open, gaze into
the future.
Denise Roux is a regular
columnist for the Apalachicola
and Carrabelle Times. Tb reach
her, e-mail her at rouxwhit@
mchsi.com


Garcia files


'dangerous dog' bill


Special to The Times

State Representative
Luis R. Garcia, Jr. (D-Mi-
ami) has filed legislation
to stop the arbitrary eutha-
nizing of innocent canines
simply because the dogs
had the terrible misfortune
of being confiscated from a
property where illegal dog
fighting took place.
House Bill 4075 would
assist canines that are vic-
tims of cruelty once they
have been taken from prop-
erties where animal fight-
ing has taken place. Under
the legislation, a seized
canine would have a bet-
ter chance of adoption and
survival. A companion bill
is expected to be filed soon
in the state Senate.
Current law states that
dogs seized from a prop-
erty used for illegal fighting
are to be deemed danger-
ous, which makes adoption
of these dogs nearly impos-
sible.
HB 4075 would repeal
the arbitrary dangerous
designation and allow lo-
cal authorities the option to
conduct behavioral evalua-
tions to determine if any of
the dogs can be adopted or
rehabilitated. Most states
do not arbitrarily deem vic-
tims of cruelty as danger-
ous.


"As we have seen from
the Michael Vick case, as
well as other cases, many
dogs seized in these busts
can make good pets. Some
former fighting dogs have
even gone on to be therapy
dogs for nursing homes
and hospice centers," said
Garcia, sponsor of the bill.
The legislation is sup-
ported by Best Friends
Animal Society, a national
companion animal res-
cue and advocacy group.
Ledy Vankavage, senior
legislative attorney for
Best Friends, stated "The
automatic deeming of all
dogs seized from property
used for fighting penal-
izes the canine victims.
This means that all pup-
pies, bait dogs and breed-
ing dogs that are seized
are destroyed. All dogs are
individuals and should be
judged by their behavior,
not breed or where they
are housed. Florida is one
of only a handful of states
that automatically declares
these victims as danger-
ous, resulting in a death
sentence."
Many Florida animal
control agencies have ex-
pressed support for HB
4075, as it will allow those
agencies to take a more
humane approach with
abused dogs.


THE TIMES

USPS 027-600
Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St.
Apalachicola, FL 32329
VP/Publisher: Karen Hanes
Editor: Tim Croft


POSTMASTER:
Send address change to:
The Apalachicola Times
P.O. Box 820
Apalachicola, FL 32329
Phone 850-653-8868


PERIODICAL RATE
POSTAGE PAID AT
APALACHICOLA, FL 32329
WEEKLY PUBLISHING
Circulation:
1-800-345-8688


SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
IN COUNTY
$24.15 year - $15.75 six months
OUT OF COUNTY
$34.65 year - $21 six months

TO ALL ADVERTISERS
In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers
do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount
received for such advertisement.
The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is
thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word
thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains.


Now is the time to stop the poles


I am encouraged
and pleased with
the support we
are receiving
to convince ' -.
Progress Energy , -
to reroute their -0
transmission lines.
There is however TC
ambivalence, and Gu
perhaps a lack of
understanding, of the real
impact this issue has in
Apalachicola.
Let us consider the
Water Street area and
the transformation that
has occurred in the past
20-plus years. This area
was our "industrial" work
place. Until the 1940s,
we even had our own
power plant, right on
the water. Seafood was
king and seafood loading
and processing was our
industry. Shrimp boats
lined the docks; seafood
was our mainstay and the
lifeblood of our economy.
Times have changed, and
although we still cherish
our seafood industry,
we must recognize that
era will likely not return.
Power poles were not
a consideration then;
they were just another
facet of our industrial
neighborhood.
We are now in an
entirely different time and


a very different
city. Yes, seafood
processing still
S^. exists on our
. f waterfront, but
- the cash cow is
S� : now tourism.
DM DALY People from all
st Column over the country,
est Column from all over
the world, flock
to our scenic downtown
streets. Think of the tens
of millions of dollars
that have been invested,
privately and publicly, to
transform Apalachicola
to this unique tourist
destination. With the
backdrop of our natural
beauty of river and
marshes, parks, unique
restaurants and historic
renovations, we provide
a visually sumptuous
experience for our visitors.
Removal of all power poles
would vastly improve this
vista; this should be our
goal!
Now let us consider
other by-products of the
planned Progress Energy
pole placement. Everyone
who would like one of
these poles in their front
yard and lines overhead,
please raise your hand. If
you had the means, how
much would you pay to
not have an 80-foot, three-
foot-wide pole in your


yard? What about property
values? Does everyone
understand EMF (Electro-
Magnetic Frequency)
radiation? High voltage
lines such as these radiate
huge amounts of EMF
radiation to the point that
trees have to be severely
trimmed so that they will
not burst into flames! Now,
please raise your hand if
you want to be bombarded
24 hours a day by radiation
powerful enough to
cause trees to burst into
flames. There are serious
health questions here
folks. The route of these
of these planned lines is
directly through the heart
of historic residential
Apalachicola. This not
acceptable!
Very wisely, our local
governments have adopted
ordinances that limit new
structures to a height
of 35 feet. Now envision
this, as you are entering
Apalachicola, at the top
of the bridge you look at
the vista of our beautiful
city. The largest, most
distinctive structures will
be Progress Energy's
power poles, enshrined
and forever dominating
the skyline of historic
Apalachicola. This is not
acceptable!
What can we do? The


LETTER TO THE EDITOR


Carrabelle's Centennial

Bank needs to be friendlier


To the big bank in the sky:
Please send a friendly and
concerned bank to Carrabelle.
Centennial Bank's Donnie Gay
keeps telling us that Centennial
wants to be our bank forever
and is there for us.
Mr. Gay apparently doesn't
know what's going on in his
Carrabelle branch - an
unfriendly, hateful attitude and
only one or two clerks working
- resulting in having to stand in


line for service, and charging $2
to copy a single page.
Fortunately, friendly service
still exists in the Crawfordville
branch where the copying
is free. Therefore, I will be
doing my banking there, but
something is wrong when I have
to drive to find a friendly bank.


David Baker
davidbakerusmc@yahoo.com


Have something you want to say?


The Apalachicola and
Carrabelle Times welcomes
Letters to the Editor. Just be sure
they are not obscene, or attack
individuals personally, and try
to keep them to no more than a
couple hundred words at most.
Also, you must include your name
and telephone number so we can
contact you if necessary. Your


telephone number will not be
published.
Just email them to Times
City Editor David Adlerstein
at Dadlerstein@starfl.com or
mail to The Times, PO. Box 820,
Apalachicola, FL 32329. Or drop
them off at 129 Commerce Street
in Apalachicola.
Any questions, call 653-8894.


City of Apalachicola
has agreed to engage
Robert Scheffel "Schef"
Wright, an attorney with
exceptional credentials
and a background dealing
with utility easements. In
addition, he has a deep
appreciation of this area.
Negotiations, political and
public pressure are the
objectives, not litigation.
However, the City has
very limited resources
and we need everyone's
help to fund this endeavor.
The Apalachicola Area
Historical Society, a non-
profit 501c(3) entity will
accept any donations
(on the city's behalf)
and convey membership
to keep you advised of
pending efforts. Donations
should be sent to PO.
Box 75, Apalachicola, FL
32329. Please share with
us (if desired) your name,
mailing address, e-mail
and telephone number. In
addition, write or contact
any or all elected officials
and let them know that this
is crucial issue.
Please, everyone, let's
get behind this effort!

Tom Daly is president
of the Apalachicola Area
Historical Society. He can
be reached at thmsdaly@
aol.com.


REACHING YOUR FLORIDA
LEGISLATORS

Senator Bill Montford
208 Senate Office Building
404 South Monroe Street
Tallahassee, FL 32399-1100
Phone: (850) 487-5004
E-mail: montford.bill.web@
flsenate.gov

Representative
Leonard L. Bembry
District Office:
304 NW Crane Ave.
Building 36
Madison, FL 32340-1423
Phone: (850) 973-5630
E-mail: Leonard.Bembry@
myf loridahouse.gov
Laura Jersey assists Rep.
Bembry. Laura.Jersey@
myflorida house.gov>

Representative
Jimmy Patronis
Suite A 455 Harrison Avenue
Panama City, FL 32401-2775
Phone: (850) 914-6300
E-mail: Jimmy.Patronis@
myfloridahouse.gov


*


NE






Thursday, February 3, 2011


Local


The Times I AS


Nearly $28 million paid in BP-related claims


By David Adlerstein
Times City Editor
In the past two months, the
Gulf Coast Claims Facility has
paid out about $4.3 million in oil
spill related claims in Franklin
County, bringing to nearly $22.2
million in payouts since the
government took over handling
claims from BP in Nov. 2010.
This total is on top of about
$5.68 million in claims paid out
to county individuals and busi-
nesses by BP directly in the af-
termath of the spill.
According to statistics re-
leased this week from the Gulf
Coast Claims Facility (GCCF),
between the start of the program
Aug. 23 up through its Jan. 29,
the program paid out just short
of $22.2 million on a total of 1,605


claims to Franklin County resi-
dents impacted by BP's Deep-
water Horizon Oil Spill April 20
in the Gulf of Mexico.
Of this total, 1,373 claims, to-
taling about $18.6 million, were
paid to claimants who both live
in Franklin County and whose
losses of income/profits are
from business activity in the
county.
A total of 180 claims, totaling
almost $3 million, were paid to
others who could claim a loss
of income/profits from business
activity in Franklin County. A
total of 52 other claims, total-
ing $627,300, was paid to county
residents with claims in other
counties or states.
Franklin County's total
claims are a portion of the $1.19
billion paid out on 92.378 claims


in Florida during the same pe-
riod. The Franklin County to-
tal ranks it as the eighth larg-
est recipient of GCCF money
in the state. The largest chunk
went to Okaloosa County, with
$246.3 million, followed by Bay
with $224.5 million, Escambia
with $136.3 million, Walton with
$126.9 million, Santa Rosa with
$81 million, Monroe with $67.2
million and Pinellas with 37.4
million.
Florida is now the lead-
ing state in claim volume, with
Louisiana second, which has
received about $1.1 billion on
about 5,000 fewer claims. Ala-
bama has received about $552
million, Mississippi $275 million
and Texas $94 million, for a total
claims payout of more than $3.3
billion.


Lost earnings or profits is far
and away the largest single basis
for these claims, with loss of real
or personal property the second
largest, followed by removal and
clean-up costs, physical injury
or death and loss of subsistence
use of natural resources.
In terms of individual pay-
ments nationwide, more than 60
percent of them are for under
$5,000, and about 20 percent are
for between $5,000 and $10,000.
About 15 percent are between
$10,000 and $25,000; fewer than
3 percent are for more than
$25,000.
More than half of these in-
dividual claims are in the food,
beverage and lodging industry,
and about 35 percent are in re-
tails, sales and service. Claims
by fishermen make up only


about 5 percent of the total, and
seafood processing and distri-
bution jobs about 3 percent.
In terms of payments on
business claims nationwide,
nearly 46 percent are between
$10,000 and $25,000, with about
20 percent between $25,000 and
$100,000 each. About 17 percent
of them are for under $5,000, and
about 13 percent are for between
$5,000 and $10,000. Just short of
5 percent of these claims are for
more than $100,000 each.
About 40 percent of these
business claims are in retail,
sales and service, and about 27
percent of them for rental prop-
erties. The fishing industry rep-
resents about 20 percent of the
claims total, and seafood pro-
cessing and distribution fewer
than 2 percent.


'The Housekeeper' a hilarious delight


You want funny? You
want energy? Then run,
don't walk, to this weekend's
Panhandle Players' comedy
"The Housekeeper," slated
for a special dinner theater
performance at the Crooked
River Grille, at St. James Bay
Golf Club.
Margy Oehlert, pictured
at right in photo, stars as
Annie Dankworth, a bag lady
determined to get off the street
by posing as a housekeeper for
Ed Tiley's Manley Carstairs,
a "famed" writer whose male
spinsterhood is challenged in the
wake of his mother' death.
A veteran actress,
Oehlert gives one of her


best performances ever as
Dankworth, moving across the
stage with zest as she keeps on
her toes while Carstairs slowly
figures out her deceptions. An
experienced actor as well, Tiley's
irate impatience is the perfect
foil for Annie, and together
the two keep the audience in
stitches.
This comedy by James
Prideaux, under the direction of
Dan Wheeler, with Laura Baney
as stage manager, will run Friday
and Saturday evenings, Feb. 4
and 5, at 7:30 p.m., and Sunday,
Feb. 6 at 3 p.m. at the grille.
Call 670-8200 for tickets,
which are just $25 and include a
delicious meal.


DAVID ADLERSTEIN I The Times


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A6 I The Times


Local


Thursday, February 3, 2011


f]IVIi IDMI LD S LJH oW ITM MIUn MMTM l


By David Adlerstein
Times City Editor

The Franklin County
Seahawks Band is flourishing
these days.
All they need is a little
bigger boost from the parents.
After a delightful winter
concert Dec. 15, band
instructor Karl Lester made an
appeal to start a parent booster
organization, especially since
the band program has grown to
encompass 63 students.
The beginning band, made
up of sixth graders, meets each
day for a class period. Each
student managed to do a solo at
the concert, on such numbers
as "Au Claire De La Lune,
"Good King Wenceslas," and
"Jolly Old St. Nicholas."
Beginners include Abigail
Harris, Ellie Weldon, Dylan
Lance, Thomas Copley, Marty
Sawesky, Ann Reeder, Jackson
Copley, Haley Edgecomb,
Matthew Alvarado, Reese
Hersey, Myranda McLeod,
Sierra McAnally, Zack May,
Cash Creamer, Melody Hatfield,
Chelsea Register, Kayla Pilger,
Adriana Butler, Scout Segree,
Bobby Kilgore, Charles Petty,
Bryan Boyd, Levi Spruill, Sarah
Lake, Tyanna Townsend and
Shane Bellew.
The advanced band is made
up of seventh through 12th
graders and they studies every
day for one class period, and
then twice a week after school.
In addition, last year's drum
band has expanded into a


fledgling marching band, with
sparking new uniforms funded
by the school district. The
marching band performed at
all the home football games this
past season, under the direction
of drum major Carla Lewis.
Members of the Advanced
Band performed "Train
Heading West and Other
Outdoor Scenes," by Timothy
Broege; "Ancient Voices" by
Michael Sweeney; "Variations
On A French Carol," by James
Curnow; and "Trombones
On The Housetop," by Mark
Williams, featuring soloist
Morgan Martin on trombone.
Band members include on
flute, Macey Hunt, Samantha
Marxsen and Ursula
Countryman; on clarinet,
Carla Lewis, Kendall Meyer,
Jacob Montgomery and Cayce
Daniels; on trumpet, Michael
Lowe and Jessica Schmidt;
on bass clarinet, Stephanie
Marxsen; on alto sax, Billy
Johnson and Cheyenne Martin;
on tenor sax, Deanna Quick;
on baritone sax, Aaliyah West;
on French horn, Mikael Lewis;
on trombone, Morgan Martin;
on tuba, Rahkeim Pierce; and
percussionists Fa'Letta Davis.
Bryce Tobin, Cody Quick, Leil
Spruill and Bryan Boyd.
For more information, call
Karl Lester at 670-2800 or e-mail
to seahawkband, a
\vahoo con ,-'I


Trumpet players, from left, are Sierra McAnally, Melody Hatfield, Myranda McLeod, Adrianna Butler
and Dylan Lance, Charles Petty and Bobby Kilgore.


- --.


'You CouldaBe IAWinn' rThis Valentine'sl Dav

- 4 IoQlow


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ONE LUCKY WINNER WILL RECEIVE
OUR VALENTINE PRIZE PACKAGE
9 SUNSET GRILL - Dinner Certificate
9 CUT N UP - Free Haircut
9 BEACHED NAILS - Manicure & Pedicure
9 FISHING XPRESS - $20 off Day Trip for 2


Name:
IAdd ress: __
I I
SCity/State/Zip:
Daytime Phone:___
IE-mail:__
Please drop off completed
entry form at
participating merchants
to win or mail to:

The Star
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MeORchantRS


CONTEST RULES
1. All entries must be received
by noon on February 11,
2011 to qualify.

2. Contest is open to
participants 21 and
older. Relatives of Freedom
Communications and
participating sponsors are
not eligible to win.
3. Entry form must be original.
Copies not accepted.
4. Random drawing will take
place February 11 at 4 p.m.
Winner will be notified to
pick up prize packaged.

[HE SIR ITHE TIMES


Photos by DAVID ADLERSTEIN I The Times
Macey Hunt performs on flute. LEFT, Morgan Martin
performs a solo on trombone.


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Thursday, February 3, 2011


CORETTA SCOTT KING


Library honors African-

American history


By Caty Greene
Special to the Times
For February I
want to start a series
of articles to celebrate
African American
History Month. I
thought I would
start with books at
the Apalachicola
Municipal Library THE LI
for the youngest Caty
readers, which
would include Coretta
Scott King Award books.
The Coretta Scott
King Award is given
to African-American
authors and illustrators
for "outstanding
inspirational and
educational contributions,
promoting understanding
and appreciation of the
culture of all peoples and
their contribution to the
realization of the American
dream of a pluralistic
society." The award
honors Mrs. King for her
courage and determination
to continue the work
for peace and world
brotherhood, according
to the American Library
Association. Begun
informally in the late 1960s,
it was formally recognized
in 1982 by the association.
The 2011 recipients are
listed on the ALA web site.
The library does not yet
own any of these books,
but we do have a number
of them from previous
years. The 2009 recipient of
both author and illustrator
awards is "We Are the
Ship: The Story of Negro
League Baseball," written
and illustrated by Kadir
Nelson. The library got this
book, and several others
listed here in 2010 through
the Libri Foundation of
Eugene, Ore.
Our collection also
includes "Becoming Billie
Holiday" by Carole Boston
Weatherford, who received
an author award in 2009.
The 2008 Illustrator Award
went to "Let it Shine"
written and illustrated
by Ashley Bryan. This is
a charming large format
book with three favorite
spirituals - "This Little
Light of Mine," "Oh, When
the Saints Go Marching In"
and "He's Got the Whole
World in His Hands." The
2007 Author Winner was
Sharon Draper for "Copper
Sun." I think we also have
"November Blues" (Award
2008) by the same author.
The King Awards
include special awards
like the Coretta Scott King
- Virginia Hamilton Award
for Lifetime Achievement,
which recognizes an
African-American author,
illustrator, or author/
illustrator for a body of
his or her published books
for children and/or young
adults who has made a
significant and lasting
literary contribution. To be
honest, I don't know what
we have of Ms. Hamilton,
but you can be sure I will
check. Walter Dean Myers
was the winner of the first
King -Hamilton award in
2010. He is the author of
"The Harlem Hellfighters:
When Pride Met Courage"
(2005) and "Jazz" (2008),
both in the library
collection.
While these award-
winning books are
impressive, the library
owns many more
spectacular junior books
written by or about


African-Americans. One
of my favorites is called
"Black Stars" (2002) about
African-American women
scientists and inventors,
shelved under Dewey
J608.9. The authors
j of this title have
written a number of
others which I want
o to buy.
BRARY All these books
Greene and those for adults
will be available
at the library table at
HCOLA's Festival and at
our reading events on
Feb. 12 and 26, 11 a.m. at
the library. Come by and
check them out.

Caty Greene is
librarian for the
Apalachicola Municipal
Library. To reach her, call
653-8436.


Local


The Times | A7


CELEBRATING FRANKLIN COUNTY'S BLACK HEROES



Early days of Carrabelle's Condor


By Lois Swoboda
Times Staff Writer
In the Feb. 18, 2010, issue, the
Times carried an article about Col.
John C. Robinson, a distinguished
African-American aviation pioneer
and first commander of the
Ethiopian Air Force. He is known
as the "Black Lindbergh" and the
"Brown Condor" and was born in
Carrabelle.
In December, Beth Jenkins, of
New York, who is Robinson's niece,
contacted the Times. Jenkins'
whose mother was Robinson's
sister, affirmed that Margaret
Herndon mentioned in the 1900
Carrabelle census (where it
likely was misspelled "Heardon")
was her grandmother, known as
"MaMargaret."
She also confirmed 20-year-old
John Robinson, mentioned in
the same census, was Col.
Robinson's father. Robinson's
mother was Celeste Huff from
Pascagoula, Miss.
Raised on a large turkey farm
by parents who had been slaves;
Huff likely met her first husband,
a stevedore, when he visited
Mississippi for work. They traveled
back to Carrabelle after they
married. John Robinson, Sr. was
killed on the docks, when the
future Col. Robinson was a babe in
arms.
According to Jenkins, after his
death, Celeste Robinson returned to
Pascagoula to live with her father,
and left baby John in the care of
MaMargaret.


COL. JOHN C ROBINSON


Celeste later married Clarence
Cobb, a mechanic. Jenkins said
Celeste returned to Carrabelle for
her son after her second marriage.
Cobb raised John C. Robinson
as his own son. The family lived in a
fine two-story house in Gulfport.
Celeste built a house for
MaMargaret, and for a time she
lived next door to the Cobb family.
Eventually MaMargaret moved
back to Carrabelle.
Jenkins said, contrary to
published accounts, Celeste Cobb
did not run a boarding house but
maintained a layover house for
railroad employees and ran a
laundry business in her back yard.
Since the first Times' article
appeared, Col. Robinson has gained
additional notoriety, and further
information about his life has
become available.


This month, a new book was
published about Robinson, "Father
of the Tuskegee Airmen, John
C. Robinson" by Phillip Thomas
Tucker.
Tom Simmons, author of "The
Brown Condor," the first
biography of Robinson, said he too
is about to release an expanded
biography, "The Man Called Brown
Condor," based of 32 years of
research.
Work is under way to finance
construction of the John C.
Robinson Mississippi Aviation
Heritage Museum in Gulfport,
where he spent most of his
childhood. On Nov. 11, a bronze bust
of Robinson, which will eventually
greet visitors to the new museum,
was unveiled and temporarily put
on display in the Gulfport-Biloxi
International Airport.
A second, smaller museum
containing only Robinson
memorabilia has opened its doors
in Robbins, Ill., the site of the
nation's first airport to be owned
and operated by African-Americans,
an enterprise Robinson shared
with Bessie Coleman and Cornelius
Coffey. The Robbins Airport was
also site of the first flight school to
for African-Americans and served
as a model for the training program
at Tuskegee University.
Robinson is considered by
many to be the father of the
Tuskegee Airmen, although he
never taught there. He attended
Tuskegee and landed the first
airplane on the campus at his 10th
class reunion.


WINTER BAY DAY

Saturday, February 5, 2011
Shrimp Boil 11 a.m.- 2 p.m. EST

At the St. Joseph Bay Preserves Center
3915 State Road 30-A
Port St. Joe, FL 32456
42 miles south of Port St. Joe


Tower Dedication by Anne
author of Priceless


Rudloe, Ph.D.,
Florida


Live Music


Open House
Photo Exhibits 4
Raffles '
View Bay from
Observation Tower
Guided Trips 9 to 4:
Birding Walks
Backwoods Tram Tours
Eagle Harbor Tours


F Buy
Tickets
S for
Cape Tour,
of
Homes**


View Schedule of Events at stjosephbaypreserves.org
*Shrimp Boil to benefit
Friends of St. Joseph Bay Preserves, Inc.
stjosephbaypreserves.org (850)229-1787
RIEN **Tour of Homes to benefit
Friends of St. Joseph Peninsula State Park
Facebook: CapeTourofHomes (850)227-1353


WE ARE COMMITTED

TO BUILDING A

BETTER COMMUNITY.


We knowthe most important part of a bank is its people. However,
we also know some buildings can have a lot of *..,o!,. i,.c -
especially the one you see here.

This corner of downtown had been the center of banking in
Apalachicola for almost a century before fire destroyed the
building in 2008. It was important to not only rebuild on this site,
but to do it in a way to reflect the location's history. Which is why,
when your bank reopens in April, you will see architecture paying
tribute to the site's original structure. We hope it will be a worthy
addition to such an important part of town.

All of us at Centennial look forward to serving you in our new
location in the spring.


mylOObank.com
850-653-8805


NE *I


EASTPOINT WATER AND

SEWER DISTRICT

PUBLIC NOTICE



In an effort to provide continued


quality Customer Service in an


economical way, the Eastpoint Water


and Sewer District will consolidate


its Customer Service office hours to


12:30 p.m. until 4:30 p.m.


Monday thru Friday.


New Customer Office Hours will


become effective


Monday, February 7,2011.


1
I
I
1
I






A8 I The Times


Kayden Drake turns 1
Kayden Amari Drake
celebrated his 1st
birthday on Monday, Jan.
31, 2011.
Family and friends
are invited to a
party from 4-6 p.m.
Saturday, Feb. 5, at the
Apalachicola Community
Center at Battery Park.
Drake is the son
of Jasmine Lewis
of Apalachicola and
Frederick Drake of
Columbus, Ga.
Maternal
grandparents are Trina
Ford of Apalachicola
and Freddie Lewis of
Port St. Joe. Maternal
great-grandparents
are Rose Tolliver and
Marion Green, both of
Apalachicola.
Godparents are
Barbara and Raymond
Lockley of Apalachicola.


Ashoni Fennell turns 1
Ashoni "Miracle" Fennell will celebrate her 1st birthday on
Wednesday, Feb. 9,2011. Family and friends are invited to a party from
4-6 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 5, at the Apalachicola Community Center at
Battery Park.
Ashoni is the daughter of Tomeika Ford and Ashley Fennell of
Apalachicola.
Maternal grandparents are Trina Ford of Apalachicola and Roderick
Robinson of Apalachicola.
Paternal grandparents are Lisa Quinn of Port St. Joe and Steve
Fennell of Port St. Joe.


Kendra O'Neal turns 3


The parents of
Kendra Marie O'Neal
are happy to announce
their daughter turned
3 on Wednesday, Feb. 2,
2011.
Her favorite color is
purple, and she loves
to sing and watch Dora
the Explorer. Many
angels look down today
and wish her a happy
birthday.
Her three brothers,
Dalyn, Shaun and
Lonnie, her aunt
Debbie, three uncles,
cousin Brandi and
numerous other cousins
all wish her a happy
birthday. We love you.


Hannah Sweet turns 9
Hannah Ra'shell Sweet will celebrate her
9th birthday on Friday, Feb. 4,2011.
She is the daughter of Rosamae
Cummings and Marshall Sweet Sr. of
Apalachicola.
Maternal grandparents are Jackie
Houston and Robert Cummings of
Apalachicola. Paternal grandparents are the
late Diane Sweet and Marshall Malveaux.
Godparents are Olivia and Adrian Wynn
of Apalachicola.


Layla Burke turns 2
Layla Burke celebrated her 2nd
birthday on Tuesday, Feb. 1, 2011.
Layla, daughter of Jeremy Burke,
of Apalachicola, and Tina Burke,
of Thomasville, Ga., joined in the
celebration with her older sister, Iolana.
Maternal grandparents are John and
Sonya Bellew of Apalachicola.
Paternal grandparents are David and
Beverly Burke of Apalachicola. Paternal
great-grandparents are Belvin and
Johnnie Bryant of Apalachicola.


PET OF THEH
PET WEEK
Franklin County Humane Society


IMeet

� F Maia

Maia is a very sweet
and social 8-month-old
hound. She is pretty as
a picture and gentle as
I'. , can be. Unlike many


hounds, she
spending time
people and will


loves
with
make


a wonderful family pet.
Please consider this exceptional hound dog and come
meet her in person at the Adoption Center.
Volunteers are desperately needed to socialize Maia and
all the other dogs and cats. We are always looking for
people willing to bring one of our animals into their home
to be fostered for various needs. Any time you can spare
would be greatly appreciated.
Call Karen at 670-8417 for more details or visit the
Franklin County Humane Society at 244 State Route
65 in Eastpoint. You may log onto the website at www.
forgottenpets.org to see more of our adoptable pets.


Plein Air Paint-out unveils plans


By Lois Swoboda
Times Staff Writer
The dining room of the Indian
Pass Raw Bar was packed Monday
evening as more than 50 art
enthusiasts turned out to hear
details of the upcoming fourth
annual Plein Air Paint-out to be held
May 12-22.
The paint-out is a 10-day event
coordinated by the Forgotten Coast
Cultural Coalition, a nonprofit
organization established to produce
regional multi-community cultural
events that improve the quality
of life for the coastal area. The
communities of Mexico Beach,
WindMark Beach, Port St. Joe, Cape
San Blas, Indian Pass, Apalachicola,
Eastpoint, St. George Island,
Carrabelle and Alligator Point join
forces to produce the art event
along the coast.
Communities from Mexico Beach
to Lanark Village were represented
at the kickoff on Monday. Organizer
Joe Taylor told the crowd this year
the wet room will be located in Port
St. Joe, which also will host the
Grand Patron's party and Art in the
Afternoon.
A group of paintings from
previous paint-outs will be displayed
at the former Cotton Exchange
on Water Street in Apalachicola,


renamed the Apalachicola Center
for History, Culture and Art.
Other exhibits will be staged at
the Carrabelle History Museum, the
St. George Island Visitor Center and
the WindMark Village Center. Times
will be announced.
This year's "Quickdraw" event
is scheduled for May 14 in Mexico
Beach. Artist Harold Frontz will
present a program on the plein air
process at the Carrabelle History
Museum on May 17. On May 18,
Eastpoint will host its first major
plein air event when the new
Apalachicola Estuarine Research


Reserve headquarters welcomes
Student Art Day.
Other events including
several workshops and artists
demonstrations are in the works.
For more information, visit www.
pleinairfl.com.
Joe Taylor told the audience that
organizers are seeking sponsors for
plein air events and hosts to provide
housing for visiting artists. If you
wish to contribute, contact Libia
Taylor at 227-7891 or Joe Taylor at
323-0176.
Visiting artists this year are
Harold Frontz, of Lexington, N.C.;
Natalia Andreeva of Tallahassee;
Morgan Samuel Price of Altamonte
Springs; Greg Barnes of Charlotte;
Brett Weaver of Dechard, Tenn.;
Luke Buck of Nineveh, Ind.; Tracey
Frugoli of East Peoria, Ill.; Lori
Putnam of Franklin, Tenn.; Ken
Dewaard of Viroqua, Wis.; Diane
Scott of Chatham, N.H.; Katie
Dobson-Cundiff of Sarasota; Bill
Farnsworth of Venice; Charles
Dickenson of St. Augustine; James
Richards of Athens, Ga.; Frank
Bruckmann of New Haven, Conn.;
Hodges Soilea of Venice; James
Hempe of Milwaukee, Wis.; Don
Demers of Eliot, Maine; West Fraser
of Bluffton, S.C.; Mitch Kolbe of
Palm Harbor; and Mary Erickson of
Marshville, N.C.


. DIXIETHEATRE.COM
ME"YT 850.653.3200
i THEATRE
APALACHICOLA, FLA.
FEBRUARY 4 TH
. PAS DE VIE BALLET
FEBRUARY 9TH-13TH T
BOB MILNE


NE *I


WINTER BAY DAY
Saturday, February 5, 2011
11 a.m.- 2 p.m. EST
At the St. Joseph Bay Preserves Center
3915 State Road 30-A
Port St. Joe, FL 32456
4f miles south of Port St. Joe
Buy Tickets for Shrimp Boil*
Buy Tickets for Annual Cape Tour of Homes**
FREE Activities:






Guided Trips 9 to 4
Raffles
*Shrimp Boil to benefit
Sandy of St. Joseph Bay Preserves, Inc.
aon o:ephbaypreserves.org (850)229-1787
**Tour of Homes to benefit
Fr.er.,s of St. Joseph Peninsula State Park
F oeDook: CapeTourofHomes (850)227-1353


Thursday, February 3, 2011


Society






Thursday, February 3, 2011


Phyllis M. Haddock, of
Crawfordville, died in Apalachicola
on Monday, Jan. 24, 2011, after
cancer called her home to be with
her mother.
She was the daughter of Loran
and the late Betty Haddock of
Medart.
She is also survived by


Margaret Holloman Squires
passed away Thursday, Jan. 27,
2011, at St. Augustine Plantation,
in Tallahassee.
Margaret was born Sept. 26,
1922, in Tuscaloosa, Ala. She
moved to Tallahassee in 1967 after
the death of her husband, Lt. Col.
Charles W Squires Sr. She was a
faithful military wife for 34 years
by following him in his career as a
pilot in Strategic Air Command.
After moving to Tallahassee,
she was employed by the Florida
Department of Health and
Rehabilitative Services, where
she worked until her retirement
in 1987.
She was preceded in death by
her siblings, John Otis Holloman
Jr., James E Holloman, Eloise
H. Foster, Charles B. Holloman
and Minnie H. Hood; and her son


Catherine Austin
Buzzett, 81, of St. George
Island passed away
Monday, Jan. 31, 2011, in 6 1
Tampa. t
Cathy Buzzett was
born Feb. 1, 1929, to the L
late Loretta and Eugene CATI
Austin in Apalachicola. CAT
She graduated from BU;
Florida State University
in 1950 and married Lt. Harry
A. Buzzett later in that year.
She was a devoted wife and
mother to six children. She was
an active member of St. Patrick
Catholic Church and served
many volunteer organizations
throughout her life.
She is survived by her beloved
husband of 60 years, Col. Harry A.
Buzzett; children Ellen E. Mackay
and husband, Steve, of Andover,
Mass., William A. Buzzett and wife,
Kelly, of Seagrove Beach, Lisa M.
Tanjuatco and husband, Ferdie,
of Atlanta, Cecilia A. Lovett and
husband, Perrin, of Augusta, Ga.,


daughter and son-in-law Dina
Raffield and Jewayne Oneal of
Apalachicola; son and daughter-
in-law Lee and Heather Raffield
of Paden, Okla.; and daughter,
Latasha Haddock, of Medart;
five grandsons and three
granddaughters; and one sister
and four brothers, all of Medart.


Charles W Squires Jr.
She is survived by her sister
Johnnye Faye Eysvogel (Fred);
her daughter Peggy Higgins
(Jimmy); grandsons Jim Higgins
(Kelly) and Jack Higgins and
Charles W Squires III; several
great-grandchildren, nieces,
nephews, cousins and loyal
friends.
The family would like to express
their deepest gratitude to the staff
of St. Augustine Plantation and Big
Bend Hospice for their devoted
care of Margaret and her family.
In lieu of flowers, donations
may be made to Big Bend
Hospice, 1723 Mahan Center Blvd.,
Tallahassee, FL 32308-5248 or
Elder Care Services Inc., 2518 W
Tennessee St., Tallahassee, FL
32304. A memorial service will be
held at a later date.


*,. and Joseph G. Buzzett and
1 wife, Jennifer, of Tampa;
10 grandchildren, Tricia,
Daniel, Ryan, Austin,
Wells, Trey Gabrielle,
"J Alexandria, Jacqueline
- ' and Jordan; and numerous
HERINE nieces and nephews.
HERINE She was preceded in
ZZETT death by her son, Michael
A. Buzzett; and sisters
Jean Elizabeth Atchison and Mary
Marjorie Austin.
Funeral services will be held
at 10 a.m. on Friday, Feb. 4, at
St. Patrick Catholic Church in
Apalachicola with Father Roger
Latosynski officiating, with
interment to follow in Magnolia
Cemetery.
The family will receive friends
Thursday, Feb. 3, with a rosary at
7 p.m. at Kelly Funeral Home in
Apalachicola.
In lieu of flowers, donations
may be made to St. Patrick
Catholic Church, Sixth Street,
Apalachicola, FL.


Faith


The Times I A9


Property appraiser John James dies


Margaret Holloman Squires


Special to The Times
A popular public official 1
with a beaming smile for all,
longtime Franklin County
Property Appraiser John
James Jr. died Wednesday,
Jan. 26, at Tallahassee
Memorial Hospital at age 72.
James passed away at
5:30 p.m. from natural causes
as he was recovering from
complications that followed a
bout of pneumonia.
James was one of the
county's longest office
holders, having first won
election as property appraiser
in November 1972. He was
re-elected six times before
retiring in 2000, when he was
succeeded by Doris Pendleton,
who had worked under him for
24 years. John James
"He was a person who Apalachicol
taught me to be a person that takes the wh
I can say I feel proud to be,"
Pendleton said. "John, thank
you for all you did for me. memories ar
Keep laughing." the way from
James' reputation for he gave out r
warmth and friendliness was for Hallowee
known throughout the county, when I work'
"Apalachicola will miss (Pharmacy).
his great smile! But now in "I could b
heaven shine," wrote one day and he xw
reader on the Times website, and crack mi
signing his or her name only stories of Ap
as "Empty Bench," in tribute in the day. I c
to the bench next to the hours," she
Battery Park Marina where will be great]
James would often enjoy a James wa
cigar with friends in his later 12, 1938, in A
years. Voncile and J
"Heaven has one more star and later wa:
in the sky," wrote the reader, grandmother
"I will never forget that smile; He gradual
he always seemed happy Chapman Hi
and joyful. The bench on the 1956 and ser
marina will miss him, and so He attended
will I." College and 1
Carolyn Branch Hill Florida.
recalled James' great James we



Card o

Alfia Mi
The family of Alfia Mirabella Sr. would
like to express our gratitude to the entire
community for the many kindnesses we
have received, with special thanks to the
Apalachicola Volunteer Fire Department and
American Legion Post 106.
We were blessed to have Alfia's love and


id laughs "all
n childhood when
real candy bars
n to adulthood
ed at Laniers

e having a crappy
tould bring a joke
e up. He would tell
alachicola back
could listen for
wrote. "Mr. James
ly missed."
as born July
palachicola to
John James Sr.
s raised by his
r Annie James.
ated from
gh School in
ved in the Army.
Chipola Junior
the University of

ed the former


Frances Chumney on June
6, 1969, and the couple was
married for 42 years. The
family is a member of St.
Patrick Catholic Church.
He is survived by wife,
Frances James; daughter
Jessica Dykes; and sons
Michael James and Demetrius
James, all of Apalachicola;
four grandsons, Devin
Creamer, Christopher James,
Matthew James and Nicholas
James; great-granddaughter,
Trinity Creamer; sister Miki
Peddie of Apalachicola; and
brother Manuel James of
Orlando.
James was preceded in
death by a sister, Ava Jean
Barber.
No funeral services are
planned. Kelley's FRneral
Home is in charge of
arrangements.


THANKS

rabella family
presence in our lives, and we are blessed to
have your love and support during this difficult
time. We would also like to recognize Alfia's
godsons Michael Stanley and Barron Broker,
who were important figures in his life.

The family of Alfia Mirabella Sr.


Faith BRIEFS


Help available for
those fighting cancer
The Tonya's Hope
Cancer Foundation is
reminding folks in Franklin
County that if you are
being treated for cancer
and are in need of help
with non-medical bills
such as gasoline, groceries
or utilities, to please call
us at 697-9533 and get an
application to fill out.
We are here to help you
and would love to hear
from you.

Thrifty Sisters to
benefit Relay for Life
The grand opening of
the Thrifty Sisters shop will
be 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday,
Feb. 5, at the shop, just past
the Red Pirate Family Grill
at 236 U.S. 98 in Eastpoint.
Proceeds will go to the
2011 Relay for Life, the
annual fundraiser for the
American Cancer Society
slated for April 8-9 at the
Franklin County School.
Please stop by and
show your support. Details:
Sandy at 630-6492.

Saturday prayer
walks to conclude
On Saturday, Feb. 5, the
First Baptist Church of
Eastpoint will host its last
Prayer Walk. These walks
have been held throughout
the county, with members


of all denominations
invited to participate.
For those physically
unable to walk, groups
will be assembling at the
church for prayer support.
All members of all the
churches in the county are
urged to participate.

Covenant Word offers
free meals, clothing
The Filling Station,
Covenant Word's Outreach
Ministry, is on the move
again. The next stop will
be 3:30-5:30 p.m. Feb. 11
on the corner of Sixth
Street (across from the
Recreation Center) in
Apalachicola. We will be
giving out hot, delicious
meals in the community,
as well as clothing and
shoes. Please come out
for something warm and
nourishing for your body,
something good for your
soul, something uplifting
for your spirit. All are
welcome, and everything
is free!

Dr. May a 'Dentist
with a Heart'
For the last 11 years,
Dr. Frank D. May of Port
St. Joe has provided free
dental treatment for
Valentine's Day at his
office. This year, his office
will provide this valuable
service Feb. 14.
The office will schedule


appointments with those
in need of treatment. To
schedule an appointment,
send or bring by a letter
to May's office, 319
Williams Ave., Port St. Joe,
FL 32456, giving a brief
description of your dental
needs and what makes you
a good candidate for this
benefit. Please, no phone
calls, but be sure to include
your telephone number
so we can contact you to
schedule an appointment.
The office hopes to
serve as many as 40
patients. Patients must be
at least 12 years of age and
accompanied by a parent
or guardian if under age
18. Treatments provided
will include cleaning, x-
rays, fillings, extractions,
diagnostics, and pain
control.

'3 of Our Own'
benefit Feb. 19
A raffle and benefit
dinner for "3 Of Our Own"
will be Feb. 19 at the
Apalachicola Volunteer
Fire Department station
on Avenue E, across from
the Piggly Wiggly.
The benefit will raise
money to offset the high
costs of medical treatment
for Franklin County middle
school teacher Stephanie
Howze, Franklin County
solid waste worker Link
Carroll and Franklin
County forest staffer


Jonathan McAnally.
The benefit will begin
at 11 a.m. and will feature
shrimp and fish dinners,
with baked beans, coleslaw
or potato salad, hush
puppies, soft drinks and
dessert, each for $8. Also
available will be hamburger
or hotdog dinners,
including chips, soft drink
and dessert, each for $5.
A 30-item "blind"
raffle drawing will be
held at 2 p.m. and will
include photographs by
Richard Bickel and John
Spohrer; gift certificates

Trinity Episcopal
Church
est. 1836


Welcomes You
Hwy. 98 & 6th St.
Apalachicola
850-653-9550
Sunday Worship Services
8 & 10:30a.m.

Winter Visitors' Reception
after the 10:30 service.


All are welcome.


for haircuts, manicures,
restaurants and oil
changes; two rods and


reels; a tool box and more.
For tickets or info, call
Ashley Teat at 653-6955.


St. Patrick Catholic Church
Ave C & Sixth Street in Apalachicola, FL 32329 or
The Islander (Across from the Blue Parrot)
on St. George Island, FL 32328
(850) 653-9453 * Email: stpatcath@fairpoint.net
PASTOR: FATHER ROGER LATOSYNSKI
www. stpatricksmass.com
APALACHICOLA MASS SCHEDULE
SA T U R D A Y ............................................ ................. 5 PM
SU N D A Y .............................................. ................... 10 A M
ST. GEORGE ISLAND MASS SCHEDULE
SU NDAY ................ ...................... 8:30 A M

First Baptist Church
St. George Island
501 E. Bayshore Drive
927-2257
R. Michael Waley, Pastor
Join us as we praise and worship the li. 'l 'i
"Great is the Lord and most worthy of praise." Psalm 145:3
Sunday Bible Study ............. ................. 10:00am
W orship Praise .... ....... ...... ............. 11:00am
Sunday N ight..................................... ................. 7:00pm
Wednesday - "Power Hour".................................... 7:00pm
Wednesday - "Youth at S.P.L.A.S.H"....... ..........7:00pm
"Walking in Christ"


I The United Methodist Churches

of Franklin County Welcome You

First United Methodist Church of Apalachicola
Worship Service 11:00 a.m. every Sunday
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
75 5th St. Apalachicola - 653-9530 - fumcapalach@gtcom.net
Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis
Carrabelle United Methodist Church
Worship Services 10:45 a.m. - Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
"Celebrate Recovery" Mondays 7-9 p.m.
Healing service first Tuesday each month-7 p.m.
102 NE Ave. B Carrabelle - 697-3672
Pastor: Aaron Batey
Eastpoint United Methodist Church
Worship Service 9:00 a.m. every Sunday
Sunday Brunch 10 a.m.
Youth Group Tuesdays 6 p.m.
317 Patton Dr. (corner of David St.)
Pastor: Aaron Batey
St. George Island United Methodist Church
9:00 a.m. Worship Service
10:00 a.m. Fellowship Hour
201 E. Gulf Beach Dr. 927-4635 www.sgiumc.org
Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis


NE ~*I


Obituaries

Phyllis M. Haddock


DAVID ADLERSTEIN I The Times
enjoys an Independence Day parade in
a as his great-granddaughter Trinity Creamer
heel of his golf cart.


Catherine Austin Buzzett


First Pentecostal Holiness Church
379 Brownsville Road * Apalachicola


Sunday School 9:45 am
Sunday Morning Worship 10:45 am
Sunday Evening Service 6:00 pm
Monday, Youth Group 7:00 pm
Wednesday, Royal Rangers, G.A.P. 7:00 pm
Wednesday Worship & Word 7:00pm
Nursery Provided during regular church services


THE WELCOMES YOU
EPISCOPAL Church
CHURCH of the

E Ascension
101 NE First Street
Carrabelle
SUNDAY
10:00 AM
(850) 274-4490






Al 1 I The Times


Local


Thursday, February 3, 2011


ARMORY from page Al

move their event planning business to the
Armory.
"We know it takes time and work, but
we're not afraid of that," Goodman said in
a telephone interview.
The partners said they have visited the
area for about five years. "We've seen a lot
of restoration in that time, but not at the
Armory," Goodman said.
Commissioner Pinki Jackel expressed
reservations about the pair's proposal.
"I am very concerned about keeping this
available to local county people," she said.
Commissioner Smokey Parrish shared
her concern about maintaining public ac-
cess to the Armory.
Goodman said the Armory would re-
main a county facility.
"You will still have title," Holliday said.
"We will be subleasing the building."
The partners said they propose to offer
a two-tiered pricing system with special
consideration for county residents.
"I believe they pay about $400 now, and
we will try to keep the rent at that level for
locals," Goodman said. "We want to pro-
vide them with access, at the same rate, to
a much better building.
"Destination weddings can afford to
pay more. We have discovered they often
have generous budgets, and weddings are
kind of recession-proof because parents
know they have a daughter who will some-
day marry, and they save," he said.
Goodman and Holliday promised to
provide jobs locally.
"We will use local contractors for the
renovation, and local vendors for lodging,
catering photography and flowers," Good-
man said.
He said they propose to install heat
and air conditioning, fix the roof and the
acoustics, and upgrade the kitchen. The
partners estimate their business will bring
$1.2 million into the county annually.
"We will honor the veterans more by
using that building to its full extent and
preserving it than by letting it just go into
the ground," Goodman said. "We want to
honor the veterans, honor the building
and leave it better at the end of lease."
The two men asked the commission to
issue the RFP
"Somebody else may come up with a
better idea after it's opened up," Goodman
said. "We just want to see it opened up for
bids."

Now operating at annual deficit
Goodman pointed out the armory oper-
ates at a deficit, a statement supported by a
summary of profits and expenditures for the
2009-10 fiscal year distributed at the meet-
ing by Clerk of Courts Marcia Johnson.
The balance sheet showed the cost of
maintaining utilities at the building was
$10,375. An additional $6,430 was spent on
insurance. Balanced against $5,700 in rev-
enue, the net loss for a year of operation
was more than $11,100.


LOIS SWOBODA | The Times
Carl Holliday, left, and Steven
Goodman are interested in converting
the Fort Coombs Armory into a venue
for destination weddings and other
large-scale events.
County Planner Alan Pierce told the
board the county has applied for a state
historic restoration grant that would re-
pair the roof and install air conditioning
but would provide no funding to upgrade
the kitchen or other amenities. He said the
grant had ranked 24 out of 48 proposals.
"I think it's a long shot," Pierce said.
"We should know if we will be funded by
the end of the legislative session."
Pierce said proposed renovations must
be approved by the state, and there was
no need to be concerned about loss of the
historic integrity of the building. He said
the state has provided his office with two
possible drafts for sublease agreements.
Several citizens spoke in support of the
plan to sublease.
"I am totally in favor of subleasing the
Armory," said Beverly Hewitt, owner of
the Apalachicola Seafood Grill. "I believe
it will benefit my businesses. The county
can't afford it (the Armory) and can't af-
ford to do anything with it."
Apalachicola resident Ed Tiley, long
active in local arts, said "the Armory has
long seemed to me a really good venue for
cultural affairs, and with the renovations,
it will be even better."
American Legion Post 106 Command-
er Larry Hale said the post last year had
three Marine Corps generals speaking
there, "and you could hardly hear them
because of acoustics. We need to do some-
thing. I hope they realize they're getting a
tiger by the tail."
Pierce said to get state permission to
sublease, the county must submit a pro-
posal about how the building will be used.
County Attorney Michael Shuler said
he could put an RFP together for the Feb.
15 meeting. He said he could incorporate
specific requirements if the commission-
ers wished.
Pierce said, following the required ad-
vertising, the soonest the RFP could be
issued would be the commission's March
15 meeting.


A Call To All Vendors:







COOKING SCHOOL
Coming March 1, 2011
Tickets no on anle Feb. 1. nt The News Hramid andn online


WEEMS from page Al


facilities available in
Franklin County," Marx-
sen said.
Unity was a theme of
the ceremony, perhaps
best put by Carrabelle
Mayor Curley Messer,
who reminded everyone
that "we didn't build it.
All of us built it. We have
a penny down the road in
it."
Messer also made
clear that he was proud
of the new clinic and the
existing county health de-
partment annex that ad-
jacent to it. "I hope people
will use it and the county
facility," he said. "It's an
asset to have both places
next to each other."
Construction of the
new clinic was handled
by Ajax Building Corpo-
ration of Tallahassee,
represented by Ajax Vice
President Jay Smith, Op-
erations Manager Allan
Wooden and Superinten-
dent Glen Jager. Also on
hand was Rex Champany,
construction administra-
tor for Clemons, Ruther-
ford & Associates Inc., ar-
chitects on the project.
In his remarks, Smith
stressed there had been
79 percent local partici-
pation in the project and
then ticked off a list of
local firms involved in
the work. Included were
Coastline, which handled
site work; G and H Con-
crete, concrete and block
masonry; Oxendine,
framing and exterior sid-
ing; Bobby James, roof-
ing; Craig of All Trades,
interior and exterior
painting; King Plumb-
ing; Alternative Electric;
Willson Septic, which pro-
vided temporary port-a-
potty facilities; Marshall
Marine, Taylor Building
Supplies and Jackson
Ace Hardware, which
each provided materials,
equipment and supplies;
and the Fisherman's Wife
and The Wharf Express,
which provided food.
On Tuesday morning,
the county commission
approved an amendment
to its contract with Ajax
that reduces the $1.29
million guaranteed maxi-
mum price by $19,180.
Smith also noted that
through $300,000 in di-
rect purchase, the county
saved the 6 percent sales
tax on its purchases.


Still just weekday
business hours
The center's physician,
Dr. Lionel Catlin, and his
staff, nurse Caty Marks
and receptionist Katrina
Dixon, began seeing pa-
tients last month at the
center, which features six
exam rooms, a procedure
room and a radiology
room overseen by Char-
lotte Williams that fea-
tures a Del Medical EV-
650 X-ray unit, purchased
new for about $40,000.
In addition to a wait-
ing room and a separate
children's play area, staff


DAVID ADLERSTEIN | the Times
From left, Weems East nurse Caty Marks, Dr. Lionel
Catlin and receptionist Katrina Dixon stand in the
exam room.


areas include reception
with a work area, man-
ager's office, break room,
helicopter pad and medi-
cal records.
Catlin told the crowd
that while current hours
are weekdays 8 a.m. to 5
p.m., the goal is to expand
them into the evenings
and weekends.
"We are committed to
providing quality and con-
tinuity of care," he said.
"Any suggestions, feel
free to say so. That's what
community participation
is all about. Our goal is
not to be stagnant."
In keeping with a clini-
cal affiliation begun in
2008 with Tallahassee
Memorial HealthCare,
Weems plans to add spe-
cialty services. Weems
CEO Chuck Colvert said
physicians from Derma-
tology Associates of Tal-
lahassee will begin vis-
iting the facility in July.
Talks with North Florida
Women's Care in Talla-
hassee, which would pro-
vide obstetrician and gy-
necological services, are
in the discussion stage.
These physicians would
join gastroenterologist
Dr. James Stockwell, who
is providing endoscopy
care at Weems in Apala-
chicola.
With all five commis-
sioners in attendance,
Commissioners Smokey
Parrish and Bevin Put-
nal each shared brief re-
marks.
"I'm just glad we got
this clinic here to help
folks," Putnal said, noting
that it could create badly
needed jobs in the area.
"We do appreciate the
county coming together,"
Parrish said. "It's the
first project we promised,
and we're standing here
today and here it is. As we
build new facilities, they
(TMH) are our partners,
and they are stepping for-
ward. This is a very mo-
mentous occasion."
Warren Jones, a TMH
vice president, and TMH


CEO Mark O'Bryant,
were both on hand for
the ceremony, but neither
spoke.
"Mr. O'Bryant believes
the best health care is
that health care that is
locally delivered," Jones
said afterward. "The
community must support
the hospital, and they will
support their local hospi-
tal and make it as strong
as it can be, and that's the
goal here."
Also speaking briefly
was Jonathan Hayes,
district director for Rep.
Steve Southerland (R-
Panama City). In addition
to scattered members of
the board of trustees and
hospital foundation, in
the audience were Clerk
of Courts Marcia Johnson
and Dr. Ivan Backerman,
a physician with the coun-
ty health department.
The ceremony also in-
cluded prayers of grati-
tude for the new center,
beginning with the in-
vocation by Pastor Dan
Carroll of the Carrabelle
Christian Center. "Thank
you for the vision that
began in the heart and
minds of good men and
women," he said.
The Rev. John Sink,
head of the volunteer
chaplain program at
Weems, offered the clos-
ing prayer.
"Lord, we give you
thanks and praise for all
that has brought us to this
time and place. We rejoice
in the 'new beginning,'
and we pray that what we
begin here today will give
you glory," he said.
"By your grace we now
open the doors of this
clinic as a special place of
healing, love and mercy.
May the clinic's medical
staff tend to their patients
wisely and with great skill
and professional care.
May all who come here for
treatment leave restored
in body and spirit. For at
Weems, we don't just care
for our patients. We truly
care about them."


While you're away, we'll put your News Herald in a safe place - the hands
of a student enrolled in our Newspaper In Education program. Classrooms
use this unique educational tool to broaden student's learning horizon.
It's an easy way to help bring newspapers to local classrooms all year long.


6


NEWS HERALD


NE *I







SCARRABELLE APALACH COLA





PORTS


Thursday, February 3, 2011


www. apalachtimes. com


FRANKLIN COUNTY HIGH SCHOOL SOCCER




Seahawks fall in soccer's 1st district semis


By Joe Shields
Special to the Times

On Friday, Jan. 28, the
Franklin County High
School boys soccer team
squared off against the
South Walton Seahawks in
the Seahawks' first district
semi-final game in school
history. Excessive
rainfall had pushed !
this game forward
from its originally #P
scheduled Tuesday t
date. This year's '
district tourna- v
ment, for both girls SU
and boys teams, JO
was at Port St. WILL
Joe. The seeding
in the tournament
had South Walton
and our Seahawks
seeded No. 1 and
No. 4, respectively,
with the winner of
this game to play in
the district cham-
pionship Saturday J
against the victor SHII
of the late game,
No. 2 W. Gadsden v. No. 3
Port St. Joe
With limited success
slowing down opponents at
the end of the regular sea-
son, Coach Jono Williams
and Assistant Coach Joe
Shields made multiple de-
fensive adjustments prior


I
LIh


I

El


to the district tournament.
An aggressive, middle-clog-
ging, defensive philosophy
was adopted; wherein, all
11 Seahawks compressed
and "tucked-in" once the
ball crossed into their de-
fensive third of the field.
This style of play, while
limiting offensive produc-
tivity, did squelch
.7 multiple opportu-
^:,. * nities for oppos-
ing offenses. In
0 fact, the Seahawks
had responded
so well with a 2-0
win over Bozeman
10 High School in the
AMS quarter-finals Mon-
day night, Jan. 24
that the defensive
scheme was further
tweaked and imple-
mented before the
Friday game.
In their previ-
ous two matches,
South Walton had
E defeated Franklin
LDS County, 9-1 and 5-1.
This, coupled with
their long drive to Port St.
Joe, saw an overconfident
Walton County team get off
their bus just 35 minutes
prior to kickoff. The stifling
FCHS defense seemed to
somewhat surprise the
South Walton team and
they were unable to gener-


DANIEL
CARRINO


TANNER
KLINK


ate any goals in the first 20
minutes of the game.
Tanner Klink, Julio
Ramirez, Andrew Waller
and Javeion "Worm" Win-
field were responsible for
thwarting South Walton's
offensive efforts inside the
18-yard box and Elton 01-
vera and James Harris did
an outstanding job control-
ling the middle of the field.
They were aggressive and
had multiple disposses-
sions, quickly turning from
defense to offense. Addi-
tionally, with Alex Causey
and Zack Howze, playing
outstanding on the mid-
field wings, the Seahawks
ball distribution in the
middle of the field made it
difficult for South Walton
to maintain any sort of mo-
mentum. Graham Kirvin
and James Newell, playing
the forward positions and
in the new defensive forma-
tion, harassed the oppos-
ing fullbacks into hurrying


JULIO
RAMIREZ


JAVEION
WINFIELD


passes and disrupted their
play. Goalkeeper Daniel
"Bam-Bam" Carrino, had
seven saves in the first
half. Despite the unparal-
leled defensive effort by the
Seahawks, South Walton
managed to get off a cou-
ple of quality shots on goal
and so the Seahawks were
down, 2-0, after 40 minutes
of play.
At the beginning of the
second half, South Walton
relaxed just long enough for
an uncontested Ramirez to
launch a 40-yard shot which
slid in between the cross
bar and the outstretched
arms of their goalie, bring-
ing the score to 2-1. As mo-
mentum swung towards
Franklin County, South
Walton pressed its attack
but was unable to get off
any clean shots.
The tenacity of the Se-
ahawks defense and one of
the highlights of the year
came with 19 minutes left


in the game. Carrino had
come out of the net in order
to make a diving save, but
in a rare misstep, he failed
to collect the ball and was
out of position as another
shot was taken. Winfield
and Klink each stepped
in front of the goal and
deflected this shot, and a
third shot, while Carrino
got back into position. The
crowd screamed with de-
light at their efforts, until
the fourth shot unluckily
found the back of the net
and South Walton went up
3-1.
In spite of this third
goal, the biggest plus for the
coaching staff was that the
Seahawks never gave up. In
the waning minutes, Kirvin
had two shots on goal;
Casey Sapp, coming off the
bench, lent himself to the
attacking forwards position
and collected multiple balls
out of the air; Olvera was
all over the field making
outstanding plays; James
Harris played superbly;
and Carrino ended up mak-
ing six saves in the second
half. Time became the real
opponent and despite their
epic performance, the Se-
ahawks finally succumbed
to a 3-1 loss.
The coaches agreed
the Seahawks played with


maximum effort and were
really proud of each and ev-
ery one of them. The future
is bright as the Seahawks
are loaded with talent and
lose only two senior players
to graduation. We have a lot
to look forward to next sea-
son with this increasingly
maturing team. Congratu-
lations to the Seahawks on
their first season of being a
Florida High School Athlet-
ic Association accredited
boys' varsity soccer team.
Man of the Match for the
final game of the season
was Carrino, who exhibited
every single positive attri-
bute of a young goalie dur-
ing this game. Diving saves,
punching-the-ball saves
and generally controlling
the tempo of the game
were just a few of his high-
lights. His 13 saves brought
his total saves made for
the season to 146. His goal
against average (GAA) for
the season was under four
(3.77) and almost every op-
posing coach has said that
he could become all-district
next year.

Joe Shields is assistant
head coach, together with
head coach Jono Williams,
of the Franklin County
High School boys soccer
team.


FRANKLIN COUNTY HIGH SCHOOL BOYS BASKETBALL




Seahawks edge West Gadsden, fall to Port St. Joe


By David Adlerstein
Times City Editor

The Seahawks showed they could
win the close ones last week, but Port
St. Joe proved to be too much.
In a nailbiter at home Jan. 25, the
Seahawks played 32 minutes against
district opponent West Gadsden, but
it was the final three minutes that
decided the game. After a tight first
half which saw the score go back and
forth, the Seahawks trailed by four
at half time 25-29. The third quar-
ter wasn't much different as the Se-
ahawks fell behind by as much as 13
points and had few positives to feed
off of.
But then, with just under three
minutes left in the game, a switch
turned on and the Seahawks came
alive with junior Chance Buffkin hit-
ting a three-pointer and a lay-up,
senior Dalin Modican hitting two lay-
ups, and senior Marcus Allen scoring
eight points in the final 2:30. Allen had
11 points in the fourth quarter,, three
of which were on a 3-pointer to take
the lead with 5.9 seconds left.
Leading the Seahawks in the vic-
tory was Allen and Modican with 15
points each. They were followed by
seven from senior Adam Joseph,
five from Buffkin, three points each
for seniors James Winfield and Dre
Robinson, and two for senior Michael
Turner. Leading the Seahawks with
six assists was Robinson and Turner


SiL
MARCUS CHANCE DA
ALLEN BUFFKIN MOD

with eight rebounds.
Another great scene was set for
a high school basketball rival game
Saturday night as the Seahawks trav-
eled to Port St. Joe to play in "The
Dome." The packed house was on
hand for an exciting evening as the
Seahawks, minus Winfield, offered a
limited roster on the road to face the
top-seed in the district and No. 8 2A
Team in Florida.
The game starting off exciting as
Modican stole the jump ball and took
it in for a lay-up. It was back and forth
the entire quarter with Allen finding
seven points and the quarter ending
with the Seahawks trailing 13-17.
The second quarter was the same
as the team traded baskets that were
hard to come by. Each team scored
eight points, six of the Seahawk points
in the quarter coming from Modican.
In the second half the Seahawks
defense kept playing tough but the of-
fense slowed down a little due to sev-
en turnovers in the quarter, 23 on the
game. The third quarter ended with


LIN DRE MICHAEL
ICAN ROBINSON TURNER

the Seahawks down eight points but
looking a little tired. The Seahawks
stayed in the game by hitting four
three-pointers in the final quarter,
cutting the lead to five at one point.
Robinson hit three of the deep balls,
with the other coming from Bufflkin.
Unfortunately, due to fouling late in
the game and the Sharks hitting free
throws, the Seahawks never could
pull ahead and lost 43-55.
For the Seahawks Modican lead
with 14 points, seven rebounds, and
five assists. Also in double figures
for the Seahawks was Robinson with
11 points, five rebounds, and five as-
sists. Playing hard on the boards
were Turner with nine and Joseph
with eight rebounds.
The Seahawks play their final
regular season game against non-
conference opponent Florida High
at home Thursday, Feb. 3 at 6 p.m.
This game will also be Senior Night,
for both the boys and girls teams,
and the presentations will be done at
halftime.


Sports BRIEFS


Dixie Youth League
begins sign-ups
Registrations are
now being taken for the
Franklin County Dixie
Youth League, which is
accepting applications
for the 2011 season.
Sign-ups will be at
the concession stand at
the Apalachicola fields
at D.W. Wilson Sports
Complex, with Eastpoint
sign-ups at Vrooman
Park and in Carrabelle
at Will Kendrick Sports
Complex.
The dates are
Thursday, Feb. 3,


Tuesday, Feb. 8, and
Thursday, Feb. 10, from
5:30 to 7 p.m. and on
Saturday, Feb. 12 from
10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
To be eligible in
the 2011 season, your
child must be 5 years
old on or before May 1,
2011. Participation fee
will be $50 for the first
child and $45 for each
additional child in a
family. For your child to
be eligible to participate,
we must receive a
completed registration
form and a copy of
his/her birth certificate
and nonrefundable


participation fee.
Late registration fee
after March 1 will be $60.
Please, no exceptions.
No registrations will be
accepted after March 21.
Also, there will be
an Umpire Clinic on
Saturday, Feb. 26 for
anyone interested in
umpiring for the 2011
season. Registration
will be that morning at
Marianna High School at
9:30 a.m. The clinic will
start approximately at
10 a.m. and run to 4 p.m.
EST.
Cost will be $25,
and this will include


lunch, test, your patch
and instruction from
two Pro Umpires.
Help with funding and
transportation may be
available.
For more information,
call Franklin County
Parks and Recreation
at 653-8277 or e-mail
fcprd@gtcom.net.

Don't miss district
tourney hoops
Franklin County High
School is hosting this
year's District 3-2A girls
and boys basketball
tournaments, with nine


games in 11 days at "The
Nest."
The girls tourney
got under way Tuesday
night, with Franklin
County squaring off
against Wewahitchka.
On Thursday, Feb. 3
the Franklin County
boys will close out their
regular season against
Florida High at 6 p.m.
with Senior Night for
both the girls and boys
teams.
On Friday, Feb. 4,
in girls games, West
Gadsden will play Wewa
at 6 p.m., and Port St.
Joe will take on Liberty


County at 7:30 p.m.
The girls district
championship is on
Saturday, Feb. 5.
Boys action begins
Tuesday, Feb. 8 with
Wewa taking on Liberty
County at 6 p.m.
On Friday, Feb. 11,
Port St. Joe takes on
the winner of the Wewa
- Liberty County games,
with Franklin County
squaring off against West
Gadsden at 7:30 p.m.
On Saturday, Feb. 12
will be the boys district
championship game.
For more information,
call 670-2800.


*M~


A
Section


Page 11


GAME STATS

Jan. 25 vs. West Gadsden
W. Gadsden 10 19 16 7 - 52
Franklin Co. 14 11 10 18 - 53
SEAHAWKS: Adam Joseph 2/5 2s, 1/1 3s, 0/2 FTs, 7
pts.; Marcus Allen 2/6 2s, 4/10 3s, 0/2 FTs, 16 pts.;
Modican 5/15 2s, 0/0 3s, 5/7 FTs, 15 pts.; James
Winfield 1/2s, 0/2 3s, 1/2 FTs, 3 pts.; Chance Buffkin
1/2 2s, 1/4 3s, 0/1 FTs, 5 pts.; Turner 2/3 2s, 4 pts.;
Robinson 1/2 3s, 3 pts.
Totals: 13/33 (39%) 2s, 7/19 (37%) 3s, 6/14
(43%) FTs
Rebounds: Modican, Winfield 7, Joseph, Robinson,
Allen, Turner 4, Buffkin
Blocks: Modican 5, Allen 2, Joseph, Winfield, Turner
Assists: Modican, Robinson 4, Joseph, Winfield,
Turner 2, Allen, Buffkin
Steals: Allen, Winfield, Robinson 2, Modican

Jan. 29 @ Port St. Joe
Franklin Co. 13 8 8 14 - 43
Port St. Joe 17 8 12 18 - 55
SEAHAWKS:Joseph 2/5 2s, 0/1 FTs, 4 pts.; Allen 2/3
2s, 1/4 3s, 0/2 FTs, 7 pts.; Modican 6/12 2s, 2/6
FTs, 14 pts.; Buffkin 1/1 3s, 3 pts.; Turner 2/2 2s, 4
pts.; Robinson 1/2 2s, 3/5 3s, 11 pts.
Totals: 13/24 (41%) 2s, 5/10 (50%) 3s, 2/9 (73%)
FTs
Rebounds: Joseph, Turner 5, Allen, Modican, Robinson
3, Buffkin 2
Blocks: Joseph, Turner
Assists: Robinson 6, Turner 3, Modican 2, Allen,
Joseph
Steals: Allen 3, Modican, Joseph
L


NE






Al 2 I The Times


Local


Thursday, February 3, 2011


News BRIEFS


Second Eastpoint trash Mardi Gras fundraiser for
pick-up successful Habitat for Humanity


A dozen volunteers met
Saturday at Seaquest Seafood in
Eastpoint for the monthly clean-
up, led by Anna Carmichael. The
group spent about three hours, a
total of 36 man hours, collecting
1,360 pounds of refuse.
Van Johnson, director of the
county's department of solid
waste and recycling, and his
crew picked up an unspecified
amount of additional trash on
Monday, including propane gas
tanks, rusty machinery and tin
and the bow of a boat.
"When you all see Van,
thank him for his help with
the Eastpoint trash patrol,"
Carmichael said. "Thanks to all
who helped this second pick-up
be a success."
The next pick-up is scheduled
for Feb. 26. Workers will start
on the west side of Seaquest
and continue west down U.S. 98.
More detailed information will
appear later this month.

Arts in Medicine holds
grant writing workshop
Weems Memorial Hospital's
Arts in Medicine program will
hosts a grant writing workshop
from 9 a.m. to noon Friday, Feb.
4, at the Apalachicola Center
for History, Culture and Art on
Water Street.
The workshop is part of
the Arts in Rural Healthcare
training being held Wednesday
through Friday at the center.
Community leaders are invited
to attend the workshop, which
will be taught by Jill Sonke,
co-founder and director of the
Center for the Arts in Healthcare
Research and Education at the
University of Florida.
Cost is $15 per person.
To attend or for more
information, call 323-
0176 or e-mail mail@
franklinspromisecoalition.org.


The eighth annual Habitat for
Humanity Mardi Gras fundraiser
will be Saturday, Feb. 5 at the
Dixie Theatre in Apalachicola.
A great show is scheduled
with Big Daddy's & the Tangled
Roots Band (Blues), Korn Bred
(dance), Slim Fatz and John
Ramsden (dinner set). Wayne
and Mary Ann Thomas will reign
in 2011 as King Rex and Princess
Pearl. David Butler will again
emcee with dedicated Habitat
builder Rob Peterson minding
the bar.
Reserved table seating is $30
and includes reserved seating
for the 6:30 p.m. dinner and
show. General admission of
$20 includes the 7:30 p.m.
entertainment only.
Call 653-3113 for tickets or
697-8997 for sponsorships.

Carrabelle seniors host
Saturday evening dance
Carrabelle Senior Center, 201
N.W Avenue F, on the corner
of First Street and NW Avenue
F in downtown Carrabelle, will
host a dance at 5 p.m. Saturday,
Feb. 5.
Admission is free. Music will
be provided by local disc jockey
Ron Vice, serving up a lively
mix of Big Band dance tunes
and mellow pop hits.
For more information on the
dance and other activities, visit
www.CarrabelleSeniorCenter.
com.

African-American history
to be marked all month
H'COLA is reminding
businesses, local charities and
individuals that they can take
part by sponsoring or hosting
an event or exhibit to help with
the month-long celebration
of African-American history


Special to The Times
Franklin County Public
Library held its second annual
Game Day @ the library in
Carrabelle on Saturday, Jan.
22. Wii tournaments, board
games, refreshments and door
prizes were enjoyed by all. A
special thanks is in order to the
businesses in Franklin County
who contributed food and
prizes to the event.
Gaming Day focuses on the
social and recreational side of
gaming. Gaming at the library
encourages patrons of all ages
to interact with diverse peers,
share expertise and develop
new strategies for gaming and
learning. Kids can socialize
with friends and play board and
Wii games while surrounded
by books, librarians and a real
world of knowledge.

throughout the city of
Apalachicola. Ravena Ramsey
at Apalachicola City Hall is
keeping a calendar with events
planned so far, and there will be
much more to come.
To be a part of the citywide
celebration, contact H'COLA's
Tami Ray-Hutchinson at 653-
7515 or at tamirh68@yahoo.
com, or call Ramsey at 653-
1522.

Chefs Sampler
set for Feb. 20
The Apalachicola Bay
Chamber of Commerce will host
the 15th annual Forgotten Coast
Chefs Sampler from 6-9 p.m. Feb.
20 at the Fort Coombs Armory
on Fourth Street and Avenue D
in Apalachicola.
Chefs from all over the
Forgotten Coast will prepare
their most creative dishes.
Sample an array from our


Remember, both library
branches offer Wii game
activities on a weekly basis
for all ages, toddlers and
up. There is Wii fit, bowling,
tennis, golf, canoeing, archery,

area restaurants. Our talented
shopkeepers and local
designers give the event an
extraordinary touch and add
creative flair by decorating
each table individually. The
tables range from elegant to
artistic and funky. Tickets are
$50. For more information, call
the Apalachicola Bay Chamber
at 653-9419 or e-mail info@
apalachicolabay.org.

Mexico Beach seeking the
region's best gumbo
It's time to put on the boas,
string up the beads and drag
out the pots because it's gumbo
time, and we're bringing
Brunswick stew back!
The 13th annual Mexico
Beach Gumbo Cook-Off will
swing into action at 10 a.m. Feb.
19 at Sunset Park, and we'll be
celebrating till everything is
gone.


baseball, boxing and Mario
Kart, just to name a few.
For details, call the
Eastpoint Branch @ 670-8151
or the Carrabelle Branch @
697-2366.

Registration is open to
any and all restaurants and
individuals who love to cook
and enjoy fun competition. Cash
prizes will be awarded in three
categories: gumbo amateur
division, gumbo restaurant
division and Brunswick stew
division.
There is no entry fee, and
applications are available at the
Mexico Beach Welcome Center
or www.mexico-beach.com.
Deadline is Monday, Feb, 14.
Mardi Gras will be in full
swing for this Gumbo Festival
with beads, live entertainment
and, of course, gumbo and stew.
There will also be barbecue
and beverages available for
purchase. Monies raised will go
toward the July 4 firework show.
For more information,
contact the Mexico Beach
Community Development
Center at 648-8196 or visit www.
mexico-beach.com.


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Thursday, February 3, 2011


Local


Arrest REPORT


The following
report is provided by
the Franklin County
Sheriff's Office. Arrests
are made by officers
from the following city,
county, and state law
enforcement agencies:
Apalachicola (APD),
Carrabelle (CPD),
Florida Highway Patrol
(FHP), Franklin County
Sheriff's Office (FCSO),
Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation
Commission (FWC),
Florida Department
of Environmental
Protection (FDEP),
Florida Division of
Insurance Fraud (DIF)
and Florida Department
of Agriculture and
Consumer Services
(FLDOACS).
All defendants are
considered innocent
until proven guilty in a
court of law.

Jan. 26
Nixon L. Shiver,
71, Eastpoint, felony


trespass by projectile
and shooting a firearm
from the road right-of-
way (FWC)
Jan. 27
Ricky D. Johnson,
Jr., 20, Crawfordville,
violation of probation
(FCSO)
Linda J. Goggins,
50, Bristol, disorderly
intoxication (FCSO)

Jan. 28
Tonya C. Seamon, 37,
Carrabelle, violation of
probation (CPD)
Kristopher G. Kelley,
35, Apalachicola, dealing
in stolen property
(APD)
Joseph D. Richards,
30, Eastpoint, disorderly
intoxication and
indecent exposure
(FCSO)
Tamara Griggs, 17,
Apalachicola, violation
of probation (FCSO)
Joseph L. Swinney,
Jr., 47, Apalachicola,
violation of probation
(FCSO)


Claude Banks, Jr.,
26, Apalachicola, Leon
County warrant for
violation of probation
(FCSO)
Harry J. Hall,
31, Apalachicola, no
valid driver's license
and possession of
paraphernalia (CPD)

Jan. 30
Jimmy H. Topham,
29, Eastpoint, driving
while license revoked
- habitual (FHP)
Eric A. Tatum, 30,
Carrabelle, disorderly
intoxication (FCSO)
Ruby A. Murray,
41, Eastpoint, driving
while license revoked
- habitual (FCSO)

Jan. 31
Phillip B. Montero,
20, Tallahassee,
violation of probation
(FCSO)
Carlous E. Russell,
38, Eastpoint, disorderly
intoxication (FCSO)


The Times I A1 3


State to unveil new oyster


rules at Monday workshop


Special to The Times


The Apalachicola Bay
seafood industry will
be able to provide its
input to likely changes to
oyster harvesting rules
at a workshop slated for
Monday, Feb. 7 at the
county courthouse annex in
Apalachicola.
The Division of
Aquaculture, Florida
Department of Agriculture
and Consumer Services will
host the workshop at 4 p.m.
in the commission meeting
room, in the annex at 33
Market St.
The workshop is slated
to discuss the requirements
of the National Shellfish
Sanitation Program (NSSP)
as it relates to Vibrio
vulnificus. Requirements
of the NSSP will be directly
shared with affected
industry members,
statewide, at a series of
workshops that began


Tuesday in Crawfordville
and Cedar Key, and
continued Wednesday in
Oak Hill and Ponte Vedra
Beach, and Friday in
Panama City and Milton.
The Apalachicola
workshop is the last to
be held in this series of
workshops.
Input received from
harvesters, processors and
interested


persons in regards to the
NSSP requirements will be
used to shape the
potential rule amendments
which are likely to impact
commercial harvesting and
processing of oysters.
A copy of the agenda may
be obtained by contacting
Chris Brooks at (850) 410-
0858.


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NOTICE OF ADOPTION OF
CITY ORDINANCES


The City Commission of the City of Apalachicola will hold two public hearings for
the purpose of receiving citizen's comments on the following proposed ordinances:

ORDINANCE NO. 2011-01

AN ORDINANCE BY THE CITY COMMISSION OF THE CITY OF
APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA ADOPTING A TREE ORDINANCE; PROVIDING
FOR ITS INCLUSION IN THE LAND DEVELOPMENT CODE OF THE CITY
OF APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA; PROVIDING FOR THE REPEAL OF ALL
ORDINANCES IN CONFLICT HEREWITH; AND PROVIDING FOR AN
EFFECTIVE DATE.

ORDINANCE NO. 2011-02

AN ORDINANCE BY THE CITY COMMISSION OF THE CITY OF
APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA ADOPTING THE CITY OF APALACHICOLA
WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES WORK PLAN (WORK PLAN); AUTHORIZING
THE WORK PLAN TO BE INCORPORATED AS AN AMENDMENT TO THE
APALACHICOLA COMPREHENSIVE PLAN, AS ADOPTED PURSUANT
TO ORDINANCE NUMBER 91-7 AND ALL SUBSEQUENT AMENDMENTS
THEREOF; PROVIDING FOR THE REPEAL OF ALL ORDINANCES IN
CONFLICT HEREWITH; AND PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE.

The Public Hearing for Ordinance No. 2011-01 will begin at 6:00 PM with the Public
Hearing for Ordinance No. 2011-02 immediately following. Public Hearings will be
held in the Apalachicola Community Center, #1 Bay Avenue, Apalachicola, Florida
on Tuesday, February 8, 2011. All interested parties are encouraged to appear and be
heard with respect to these proposed ordinances.


NE *I


868


IG ET Y O U A DINTradii l v i







Local I Classifieds


STATE PARKS from page Al


and Lake Talquin parks in Talla-
hassee; Camp Helen State Park
in Panama City Beach; San Mar-
cos de Apalache Historic State
Park in St. Marks; and Cedar
Key State Museum State Park.
"I think it's utterly absurd,"
said Bembry, following the hear-
ing. "State parks aren't there
to make a profit; we knew that
when we began creating state
parks. They (the state) take
land off our tax rolls, and then to
basically lock the gates on these
parks where we don't get any re-
turn at all is unconscionable."
At Tuesday's county commis-
sion meeting, the board unani-
mously approved writing a let-
ter asking that these parks not
be closed.
"I am not in favor of shutting
down two visitor places in Apala-
chicola, and now they haven't
opened the building for the DEP
in Eastpoint," said Commission-
er Cheryl Sanders,
"There's a lot of talk of gov-
ernment wanting to diversify
the economy. Tourism is our
diversification," said Commis-
sioner Smokey Parrish. He said
both parks serve as off-season
draws and have economic ef-
fects greater than what can be
measured in attendance fig-
ures.
"There's no way to know
how many people visit some at-
tractions," he said, noting the
Veteran's Memorial Plaza, with
the Three Servicemen Statue
Detail, sees visitors without
admission. "These things have
far-reaching effects that I don't
think are understood."
According to Kristin Lock,
spokeswoman for the DEP the
department came up with its
proposed closures based on
visitation numbers during fiscal
year 2009-10.
"They reflect the parks with
the lowest visitation that do not
offer camping or other over-
night accommodations," she
said, noting that because Scott
has neither released his budget,
nor the Legislature acted on it,
the proposed closures are still
just that, proposed.
Lock said last year's atten-
dance numbers indicated the
Orman House drew 3,744 visi-
tors, while the Gorrie Museum


saw 2,906 and the Constitution
Convention Museum 2,676.
The DEP has estimated the
53 park closures would save
about $6.5 million in a state
where the entire budget short-
fall is likely about $3.62 billion.
"People who are drawn to
these parks spend money in
our communities," Bembry
said. "Our counties need that
income from people ... Look at
what a contribution Gorrie was
to our society. And I've taken
my nine grandchildren to the
Constitutional Convention Mu-
seum; I think it's a worthwhile
experience. It's kind of unique
in that our state constitution
was signed there. I think that's
important to our schoolchildren.
Are we robbing our children of a
good balanced education?"
Bembry said he prefers to
see cuts spread across the en-
tire state by trimming opera-
tions or by allowing counties to
step in.
"I would like to look at every
park we have and look at mini-
mal operation factors," he said.
"In other words, how far can
you cut it? Can you cut back on
hours or operate only on week-
ends? Can some of the counties
take some of them over cheaper
than you could just lock it up?"
Bembry said he expects
some, but not all, of the proposed
cuts to be eventually approved.
"I expect state parks are go-
ing to be cut very severely," he
said. "I would hope we wouldn't
cut any."

Wildlife officers, public
hunting could be cut
In his agency's proposal, Nick
Wiley, FWC's executive director,
outlined a $4.3 million cut in gen-
eral revenue and a $24.4 million
cut in trust funds that he said
would be spread across various
functions, preserve most critical
functions and maximize federal
funding opportunities.
With the Division of Law
Enforcement taking up a little
more than one-third of FWC's
$281 million base budget, the
agency would eliminate 169 full-
time law enforcement officer po-
sitions. Per officer, savings were
estimated at $61,245, including


salaries & benefits.
"The reduction would result
in reduced high-visibility pa-
trols in manatee areas, panther
areas, wildlife management
areas and popular boating and
fishing areas, currently serv-
ing as a deterrent to illegal
activities," read the FWC pro-
posal. "The agency's ability
to respond rapidly to calls for
service from the public would
be reduced, and remaining offi-
cers would have to cover larger
patrol zones. The health and
safety of the public would be
jeopardized if these positions
were eliminated."
Bembry said he is concerned
about "overkill" in the depart-
ment cuts. "If we could cut 50 or
30 (officers), but to go out there
and cut that deeply, it makes
me wonder if our state was that
far out of balance. That's not
good."
Bembry said he had particu-
lar concern about an $8 million
cut in funds dedicated to man-
aging invasive plants. "That
does not make any sense to me
whatsoever," he said. "If you go
out there and have a plant that's
been controlled all these years,
that plant will get totally out of
hand. We have to protect our en-
vironment, and these will take
over lakes, rivers and streams."
FWC said as much in its re-
port, noting that delaying or
canceling plant control projects
can cause "geometric increas-
es" in growth of invasive plants,
which could leaded to adverse
effects on fishing, hunting, boat-
ing, swimming, ecotourism and
beneficial native habitat critical
for the management of fish and
wildlife.
"These impacts would ad-
versely affect the economy of
communities in close proxim-
ity to these resources," reads
the report, which notes that "a
significant portion" of the plant
control projects are conducted
by private sector contractors,
so reduced funding would di-
rectly affect their "economic
situation."
The FWC proposal also calls
for a reduction in public hunt-
ing opportunities, but does not
mention specific areas beyond
the elimination of public dove


fields. It says most of these cuts
in hunting would occur because
of reduction in department ef-
forts for "public involvement
outreach and human-dimen-
sions inquiries, which are used
to base hunting regulations
decisions; and reduced com-
munication and coordination
with hunters and other affected
stakeholders concerning rule
changes and other wildlife man-
agement decisions."
Scores of printed materials
put out by FWC would be elimi-
nated, and large cuts would be
sustained in the alligator mar-
keting and stipend program,
but Bembry said he doesn't
think that would deter alligator
hunters. "Alligator hunters will
still hunt, and we'll get the same
results," he said.
Bembry stressed he is not
against cuts in principle but is
concerned about the criteria
used in deciding them.
"I'm not saying let's per-
petuate the situation we're in,"
he said. "I think it's time for a
new direction. I think it's evi-
dent that we're going to have
to make some cuts. What I'm
against is to go at it without re-
gard to how it affects the people
of our state.
"I understand that a lot of
this stuff is going to be tough
to live with. The question is will
it be any significant savings to
our people, and at the end of the
day, is it going to make proper
sense to do anything like that?"
Bembry said he expects
about one-half to two-thirds of
the cuts will remain and esti-
mated the final budget would
be trimmed in the 7 or 8 percent
range.
"I would hope that it would
get to a much better number
when we get through this pro-
cess, through negotiations and
through a better realization of
what we could cut," he said. "By
the end of the day, they're going
to find the absolutely least hurt-
ing way to meet their require-
ments.
"We don't need to do things
that cause us to lose opportuni-
ties, and our economy hurts be-
cause of it. And then we have a
further problem, and that's what
I don't want to happen."


A1 4 I The Times


COVERING MILTON TO APALACHICOLA


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WE'RE AVAILABLE 24 / 7

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85 A4752 :ii-35888o Astu oln a t mea'.dcosmre tp4 14.C


1100
given that, pursuant to
the Order of Final Sum-
Smary Judgment of
Foreclosure in this
cause, in the Circuit
SEN Court of Franklin
1100 - Legal Advertising County, Florida, I will
1110 - Classified Notices sell the property situ-
1120 - Public Notices/ ated in Franklin
Announcements County, Florida de-
1125- Carpools & scribed as:
Rideshare
1130 - Adoptions
1140 - Happy Ads PARCEL 1
1150 - Personals 5.03 ACRES
1160 - Lost PARCEL'C"
1170 - Found
f I hereby;certify that this
is a true and correct
[ 1100 representation of the
following described
1446 property and that this
IN THE CIRCUIT description substan-
COURT OF THE SEC- tially meets the mini-
OND JUDICIAL CIR- mum technical stand-
CUlT, IN AND FOR ard for land surveying
FRANKLIN COUNTY (Chapter 61017, Florida
FLORIDA Administrative Code,).
CENTENNIAL BANK, Commence at the
as successor in interest Northwest corner of the
to GULF STATE COM- East half of the North-
MUNITY BANK, east Quarter of the
Plaintiff, Northwest Quarter of
Section 23, Township 6
vs South; Range 8 West,
Franklin County, Flor-
SARAH BROKER and ida: thence run South
MIKE BROKER, 89 degrees 49 minutes
Husband and wife, 01 seconds East
Defendant(s) 826.60 feet to a rod
and cap thence South
CASE NO.: 270.46 feet to a rod
10-000055-CA and cap for the POINT
OF Beginning thence
NOTICE OF SALE from said POINT OF
BEGINNING continue
NOTICE is hereby South 168.62 feet to a


1100
rod and cap; thence
South 74 degrees 13
minutes 07 seconds
West 1014.55 feet to
the approximate waters
edge of the Apalachi-
cola River, thence run
along said approximate
waters edge North 21
degrees; 05 minutes 44
seconds West 191.75
feet; thence North 17
degrees 09 minutes 25
seconds West 63.34
feet; thence leaving
said approximate wa-
ters edge run North 79
degrees 05 minutes 17
seconds East 1083.60
feet to the POINT OF
BEGINNING. contain-
ing 5.03 acres more or
law.
Together with a 20
wide access easement
being more particularly
described as follows:
Commence at the
Northwest corner of the
East half of the North-
east Quarter of the
Northwest Quarter of
Section 23; Township 6
South. Range 8 West,
Franklin County, Flor-
ida; thence run 89 de-
grees 49 minutes 01
seconds East 826.60
feet to a rod and cap;
thence, South 127.72
feet to a rod and cap
for the POINT OF BE-
GINNING; thence from
said POINT OF BEGIN-
NING run South 84 de-


1100
grees 43 minutes 35
seconds West 20.09
feet; thence South
296..22 feet; thence
South 74 degrees 13
minutes 07 seconds
West 611.68 feet
thence South 44 de-
grees 34 minutes 22
seconds East 22.82
feet; thence North 74
degrees 13 minutes 07
seconds East 615.82
feet: thence North
313.19 feet to the
POINT OF BEGINN-
ING.
PARCEL 2
7.74 ACRES
I hereby certify that this
is a true and correct
representation of the
following described
property and that this
description substan-
tially meets the mini-
mum technical stand-
ard for land surveying
(Chapter 61017, Florida
Administrative Code).
Commence at an old
axle marking the North-
west corner of the East
half of the Northeast
Quarter of the North-
west Quarter of Section
23, Township 6 South,
Range 8 West, Franklin
County, Florida; thence
run South 89 degrees
49 minutes 01 seconds
East 1976.60 feet to a
old axle; thence South
526.20 feet to a rod


1100
and cap for the POINT
OF BEGINNING;
thence from said
POINT OF BEGINNING
continue South 864.16
feet to a rod and cap;
thence North 42 de-
grees 13 minutes 08
seconds West 1085.05
feet to a rod and cap
marking the approxi-
mate centerline of a 20
foot wide access ease-
ment; thence run along
said approximate cen-
terline North 65 de-
grees 11 minutes 54
seconds East 196.27
feet; thence North 62
degrees 10 minutes 47
seconds East 25.53
feet to a rod and cap;
thence leaving said ap-
proximate centerline
run South 80 degrees
36 minutes 53 seconds
East 179.79 feet;
thence East 351.77 feet
to the POINT OF BE-
GINNING, containing
7.74 acres more or
less.
at Public Sale, to the
highest bidder, for
cash, at the steps of
the Franklin County
Courthouse, Apalachi-
cola, Florida, at 11:00
a.m. on March 1,2011.
Any person claiming an
interest in the surplus
from the sale, if any,
other than the property
owner as of the date of


S 1100
the lis pendens, must
file a claim within 60
days after the
sale.
WITNESS my hand and
the seal of this Court
this
CLERK OF THE CIR-
CUIT COURT
By: Michelle Maxwell
Deputy Clerk
Steve M. Watkins, III
FBN: 0794996
41 Commerce Street
Apalachicola, FL 32320
(850)653-1949
February 3, 10, 2011
1369T
IN THE CIRCUIT CIVIL
COURT OF THE SEC-
OND JUDICIAL CIR-
CUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR FRANKLIN
COUNTY
CIVIL DIVISION
THE BANK OF NEW
YORK AS TRUSTEE
FOR THE CERTIFI-
CATE HOLDERS
CWALT, INC. ALTER-
NATIVE LOAN TRUST
2006-45T1,MORTGAGE
PASS-THROUGH
CERTIFICATES,
SERIES 2006-45T1
Plaintiff,
vs.
STEVEN E. FLING,
MORTGAGE ELEC-
TRONIC REGISTRA-


I 1100
TION SYSTEMS, INC.,
AND UNKNOWN
TENANTS/OWNERS,
Defendants.
Case No. 08-00171
Division
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given,
pursuant to Final Judg-
ment of Foreclosure for
Plaintiff entered in this
cause on October 27,
2008, in
the Circuit Court of
Franklin County, Flor-
ida, I will sell the prop-
erty situated in Franklin
County, Florida de-
scribed as: COM-
MENCE AT THE
SOUTHEAST CORNER
OF THE SOUTHWEST
QUARTER OF THE
SOUTHWEST QUAR-
TER OF SECTION 32,
TOWNSHIP 6 SOUTH,
RANGE 1 WEST, AND
RUN THENCE NORTH
00 DEGREES 50 MIN-
UTES WEST 95.16
FEET ALONG THE
EASTERN BOUNDARY
OF THE SOUTHWEST
QUARTER OF THE
SOUTHWEST QUAR-
TER OF SAID SEC-
TION 32 TO A POINT
ON THE SOUTH SIDE
OF STATE ROAD #370
(OR ALLIGATOR
POINT ROAD)
THENCE NORTH 55
DEGREES 14 MIN-
UTES WEST 1144.84


I 1100
FEET ALONG THE
SOUTH SIDE OF SAID
ROAD TO A POINT
WHICH IS THE POINT
OF BEGINNING OF
THE LAND TO BE DE-
SCRIBED AND CON-
VEYED; FROM SAID
POINT OF BEGINNING
RUN THENCE SOUTH
30 DEGREES 36 MIN-
UTES WEST A DIS-
TANCE OF 276 FEET,
MORE OR LESS, TO
THE WATERS OF ALLI-
GATOR BAY, THENCE
RUN IN A NORTH-
WESTERLY DIREC-
TION, MEANDERING
THE WATERS OF ALLI-
GATOR BAY, TO A
POINT WHICH IS
NORTH 55 DEGREES
14 MINUTES WEST 85
FEET FROM SAID
LAST POINT, THENCE
RUN NORTH 30 DE-
GREES 36 MINUTES
EAST 276 FEET, MORE
OR LESS, TO THE
SOUTHERN BOUND-
ARY LINE OF SAID
ROAD, THENCE RUN
SOUTH 55 DEGREES
14 MINUTES EAST
ALONG THE SOUTH-
ERN BOUNDARY OF
SAID ROAD 85 FEET
TO THE POINT OF BE-
GINNING, BEING A
PARCEL OF LAND
FRONTING 85 FEET
ON SAID STATE ROAD
#370 (OR ALLIGATOR
POINT ROAD) AND
RUNNING BACK TO
THE SAME WIDTH TO


1100
ALLIGATOR BAY
BEING MORE PARTIC-
ULARLY DESCRIBED
BY SURVEY PRE-
PARED BY THURMAN
RODDENBERRY AND
ASSOCIATES NC. JOB
# 04-269 AS FOL-
LOWS:
COMMENCE AT THE
SOUTHEAST CORNER
OF THE SOUTHWEST
QUARTER OF THE
SOUTHWEST QUAR-
TER OF SECTION 32,
TOWNSHIP 6 SOUTH,
RANGE 1 WEST,
FRANKLIN COUNTY
FLORIDA AND RUN
NORTH 00 DEGREES
50 MINUTES 00 SEC-
ONDS WEST 95.16
FEET TO A POINT LY-
ING ON THE SOUTH-
W E ST E R LY
RIGHT-OF-WAY
BOUNDARY OF STATE
ROAD NO. 370,
THENCE RUN NORTH
55 DEGREES 14 MIN-
UTES 00 SECONDS
WEST ALONG SAID
RIGHT-OF-WAY
BOUNDARY 1144.84
FEET TO AN IRON
PIPE MARKING THE
POINT OF BEGINN-
ING. FROM SAID
POINT OF BEGINNING
AND LEAVING SAID
RIGHT-OF-WAY
BOUNDARY RUN
SOUTH 30 DEGREES
26 MINUTES 47 SEC-
ONDS WEST 309.63


NE *I


Thursday, February 3, 2011


Lanark Village elections
to be held Monday
Had a big crowd for the
Thursday lunch, and it was
cooked and served by the fine
folks from The Wharf Restaurant
at SummerCamp. Of course, our
faithful volunteers were their help.
Hope to see you next Thursday at
the Franklin County Senior Center,
201 Avenue E, in Carrabelle.
Don't forget
- we have breakfast
every Tuesday at
the Senior Center
from 7:30 to 10 a.m.
George, Sarge and
our volunteers will
be there to prepare
LANARK NEWS and serve your full
Jim Welsh breakfast. Thanks
to all our volunteers, and to you who
support the breakfast and lunch.
Had one of those huge
hamburgers with fries Friday
night. Yum, yum! You can enjoy one
each Friday at the Camp Gordon
Johnston American Legion Post
82, 2316 Oak St., here in the village.
Even though they bumped up the
price, it is still a deal at $6.
The celebration of life for Jackie
Gura was beautiful. It was at the
Community Church on Wednesday,
Feb. 2. Keep Jackie in your prayers,
and pray for strength for her family.
Election of officers for the
Lanark Village Association will
be held at our monthly meeting,
Monday, Feb. 7. Gavel falls at 7 p.m.
Please try to be there!
Did you make it to the spaghetti
dinner last Sunday? I rode over
with Jim and Mary Ann Bove and
Rich Lasher. Had a very good meal,
and a good time visiting. It was our
annual spaghetti dinner, prepared
and served by the members of
Bishop O'Sullivan Council 1648
of the Knights of Columbus.
Thanks, fellow Knights, and all who
supported the dinner.
March will start our annual
Tootsie Roll Drive for the
handicapped and mentally
impaired. I and my fellow Knights
will be around the county in our
yellow and red aprons, and tootsie
rolls, collecting for this cause.
Thank you in advance.
Be kind to one another, and
check on the sick and housebound
- and remember, God's last name is
not damn.
Until next time, God bless
America, our troops, the poor,
homeless and hungry.







Thursday, February 3, 2011


CLASSIFIED


The Times I Al 5


| 1100
FEET TO THE AP-
PROXIMATE MEAN
HIGH WATER LINE OF
ALLIGATOR HARBOR,
THENCE RUN NORTH-
WESTERLY ALONG
SAID APPROXIMATE
MEAN HIGH WATER
LINE AS FOLLOWS:
NORTH 30 DEGREES
59 MINUTES 06 SEC-
ONDS WEST 36.31
FEET, NORTH 52 DE-
GREES 50 MINUTES
33 SECONDS WEST
33.60 FEET, NORTH
74 DEGREES 25 MIN-
UTES 36 SECONDS
WEST 19.36 FEET,
THENCE LEAVING
SAID APPROXIMATE
MEAN HIGH WATER
LINE RUN NORTH 30
DEGREES 17 MIN-
UTES 07 SECONDS,
EAST 299.72 FEET TO
A CONCRETE
MONUMENT(MARKED
#2919) LYING ON THE
SOUTHWESTERLY
RIGHT-OF-WAY
BOUNDARY OF STATE
ROAD NO. 370,
THENCE RUN SOUTH
55 DEGREES 14 MIN-
UTES 00 SECONDS
EAST 85.05 FEET TO
THE POINT OF BEGIN-
NING CONTAINING
0.58 ACRES OR LESS.

and commonly known
as: 676 ALLIGATOR
DRIVE, ALLIGATOR
POINT, FL 32346; in-
cluding the building,
appurtenances, and fix-
tures located therein, at
public sale, to the high-
est and best bidder, for
cash, at the front door
steps of the Court-
house, at 33 Market St.,
in Apalachicola, Flor-
ida, on FEBRUARY 16,
2011 at 11:00 A.M. Any
persons claiming an in-
terest in the surplus
from the sale, if any,
other than the property
owner as of the date of
the lis pendens must
file a claim within 60
days after the sale.

Clerk of the Circuit
Court
By:Deputy Clerk

Laura E. Noyes
(813) 229-0900 x1515
Kass, Shuler, Solomon,
Spector, Foyle &
Singer, PA.
RO. Box 800
Tampa, FL 33601-0800
January 27,2011
February 3, 2011
1389T
IN THE SECOND JUDI-
CIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR FRANK-
LIN COUNTY FLORIDA

SUPERIOR BANK,
Plaintiff,

vs.

RONALD BLOOD-
WORTH, BEACH
COMMUNITY BANK,
BILL THOMAS,
and APALACHICOLA
BAY COLONY
HOMEOWNERS AS-
SOCIATION, INC.,
Defendants.

CASE NO.
10-000246-CA

NOTICE OF SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN pursuant to a Fi-
nal Judgment of Fore-
closure dated January
13, 2011, and entered
in Civil Action No.
10-000246 CA of the
Circuit Court of the
Second Judicial Circuit
in and for Franklin
County, Florida,
wherein the parties
were the Plaintiff, SU-
PERIOR BANK, and
the Defendants,
RONALD BLOOD-
WORTH, BEACH COM-
MUNITY BANK, BILL
THOMAS, and APA-
LACHICOLA BAY COL-
ONY HOMEOWNERS
ASSOCIATION, INC., I
will sell to the highest
and best bidder, for
cash, at 11:00 a.m.
(Eastern Time) on the
1st day of March, 2011,
at the front steps of the
Franklin County Court-
house, Apalachicola,
Florida, the
following-described
real property as set
forth in said Final Judg-
ment of Foreclosure:

Lot 16, Bay Colony, ac-
cording to the plat
thereof recorded in Plat
Book 8, page 5, of the
Public Records of
Franklin County, Flor-
ida; and
Commence at a 4 inch
by 4 inch concrete
monument marking the
Southwest corner of
Lot 19 of Timberwood
Estates, a subdivision
as per map or plat
thereof recorded in Plat
Book 5, Page 30, of the
Public Records of
Franklin County, Flor-
ida and run North 88
degrees 48 minutes 15
seconds West 795.44
feet to a point, thence
run South 01 degrees
11 minutes 45 seconds
West 36.61 feet to a 5/8
inch re-rod (marked
#4261) lying on the
Southerly right-of-way
boundary of Reeves
Road and being the
POINT OF BEGINN-
ING; from said POINT
OF BEGINNING con-
tinue South 01 degrees
11 minutes 45 seconds
West 418.97 feet to a
5/8 inch rod (marked
#4261), thence run


North 88 degrees 43
minutes 24 seconds
West 105.00 feet,
thence run North 00
degrees 11 minutes 45
seconds East 418.82
feet to a point lying on
the Southerly
right-of-way boundary
of said Reeves Road,
thence run South 88
degrees 48 minutes 15
seconds East along
said right-of-way


0,1100 | 1 100 | 1100 7 74 1100 - 41001
boundary 105.00 feet tions eral courts if an action Unless such certificate
to the POINT OF BE- is brought to enforce shall be redeemed ac- Best Western
GINNING; containing The Franklin County responsibilities related cording to law the Housekeepers
1.01 acres, more or Board of County Com- to environmental re- property described in Exp required, Great
less. missioners intends to views, decision mak- such certificate will be Pay, Please Apply in
undertake a project to ing, and action; and sold to the highest bid- Person. 249 Hwy 98
The successful bidder be funded by a Com- that these responsibili- der at the Courthouse Apalachicola, FL.
at the sale will be re- munity Development ties have been satis- door on the first (1St)
quired to place the req- Block Grant (CDBG fled. The legal effect of Monday in the month
ulsite state documen- 10DB-K4-02-29-01-K12).The the certification is that of MARCH 2011, which r - - - - -
tary stamps on the Cer- project involves a upon approval, the is the 7TH day of
tificate of Title. slight elevation of a Franklin County Board MARCH 2011 at 11:00
portion of existing of County Commis- a.m.
DATED this 14th day of County Highway 67 sioners may expend Food Serv.
January, 2011. near the Pine Log CDBG funds and the Dated this 28TH day of
Bridge crossing of State and HUD will JANUARY 2011.
Hon. MARCIA JOHN- Crooked River. The ele- have satisfied their re-
SON vation will decrease the sponsibilities under the MARCIA M. JOHNSON
Clerk of the Court frequency/severity of National Environmental CLERK OF COURTS Line cooks
Franklin County, flooding of the road, Policy Act. FRANKLIN COUNTY Wait Staff
Florida which is a designated FLORIDA Wait ta
evacuation route. Request for Release of Also
By: Michele Maxwell Funds By: Retail Sales
As Deputy Clerk Floodplain/Wetland The County anticipates Cassie B Sapp, Deputy with background in
The road elevation that its Certification and February 3, 10, 17, 24 w a aground n
FRANK A. BAKER, AT- project will be under- Request for Release of plant care or horti-
TORNEYAT LAW taken in a 100 year Funds and Removal of I culture. Full or Part
4431 Lafayette Street floodplain and/or Environmental Condi- Time positions. Ap-
Marianna, FL 32446 wetland. It has been tions will be submitted . ply in person at the
January 27,2011 determined that there is to the Department of Apalachicola Sea-
Febuary 3, 2011 no practicable alterna- Community Affairs 100 Mooarket St a
..-1465T -- -- tive to the proposed (DCA) on or about Feb- 100 Market St.
IN THE SECOND JUDI project. The alternative ruary 21, 2011. DCA T. heOld me Soda
CIAL CIRCUIT IN AND of no project" would will then allow a 15 day The Oud Time Soda
FOR FRANKLIN prevent mitigation of fu- comment period before Fountain at
COUNTY FLORIDA ture flood events when taking any action on 93in Apalachicola.rket St
floodwater covers the the request. Objections 3100 -Antiques i- acco-a.
SUPERIOR BANK, road and prevents use will only be accepted 3110-Appliances
Plaintiff, of this evacuation by DCA if they meet 3120 - Arts & Crafts
route. The rejected al- one of the following 3130-Auctions ,
ternative of re-routing conditions: (1) the certi- 3140- Baby Items
vs. the road to another lo fiction was not exe- 310Bu-ildingSupplies
3160 - Business
KELLY W. McKENZIE cation would require cuted by the County's Equipment Live in
and OLIVER L. extensive land acquisi- environmental certify- 3170- Collectibles man
KEnNON tion and construction of ing officer or another 3180- Computers Handyman
DefendantON another bridge, and officer of the local gov- 3190-Electronics Must have experience
Defenans.would further impact ernment approved by 3200 - Firewood of carpentry, knowl-
CASE NO the environment. Alter- DCA; (2) the ERR indi- 3220 - Furniture edge of elect, small en-
10-000368 CA native design, including cates omission of a re- 3230 - Garage/Yard Sales gine & plumbing. Out-
culverts, will be consid- quired decision, find- 3240- Guns board a plus. Call
NOTICE OF SALE ered during engineer- ing, or step applicable 3250- Good Things to Eat 850-653-5114
Ing. There will be clo- to the environmental re- 3260-Health & Fitness
3270 - Jewelry/Clothing
NOTICE IS HEREBY sure of traffic lanes dur- view process, (c) the 3280- Machinery/
GIVEN pursuant to a Fi- ing construction, but grant recipient has Equipment
nal Judgment of Fore- minimal disruption. The committed funds or in- 3290 - Medical Equipment
closure dated January construction will re- curred costs not au- 3300- Miscellaneous
24, 2011, and entered quire an environmental thorized by 24 CFR 3310- Musical Instulments Maintenance
permit and monitoring Part 58 before approval 3320- Plants & Shrubs/
in-00 Civil Ation No by the Florida Depart- of a release of funds by 3330 estaurant/Hotel Worker
Circuit Court of the ment of Environmental the State; or (d) an- 3340-Sporting Goods Qualifications include
Second Judicial Circuit Protection or the North- other Federal agency 3350 - Tickets (Buy & Sell) carpentry and plumb-
in and for Franklin west Florida Water acting pursuant to 40 ing skills as well as
County, Florida, Management District. CFR Part 1504 has painting, heavy lifting
wherein the partie This regulatory process submitted a written' m - - and yard work. Appli-
were the Plaintiff SU- will ensure compliance finding that the project 3230 cants must pass Back-
PERIOR BANK, and the with floodplain and is unsatisfactory from ground and Drug
Defend sants. KELLY w wetland protection the standpoint of envi- screenings. HS Di-
MDKEfe I dan KLIVY R standards. The pro- ronmental quality.. Ob- ploma required. $9.00/
L KENNON, I wi ER posed action will not af- sections must be pre- hr. Excellent benefits!
to the highest and best fect natural or benefl- pared and submitted in 83 Hwy 98 East Point. Position is located in
bidder, for candy besh t cal floodplain values, accordance with 25 Mannar Realty Building Apalachicola.
11:00 a.m. (Eastern and residents of the C.F.R. 58 within 15 Sat 5th 9:am-4:pm Apply at
Time) on the it day county will benefit from days following DCA's u indoor Early Education
me)h, 201st daythof the project. receipt of the Request Huge ndoor and Care, Inc.
rMarch, 211, at e fo Release of Funds. Sale 450 Jenks Avenue,
Froklin sContep or the No Significant Impact Comments or objec- Antiques, Furniture, Panama City, FL 32401
houseFranklin Count Apay Courth An environmental re- tions should specify clothing and lots of EOE M/F/V/D DFWP
Forida palachicola, view of the project has which action/procedure everything!
following-described been conducted in ac- is being addressed.
real property as set cordance with 24 CFR Objections must be The Market Place
forth in said Final Judg- 58, with various state, submitted to the Flor-

mentofForeclosure: regional and federal ida Department of Now Hiring
agencies included in Community Affairs, Full or Part Time
Commence at the the review process. CDBG Program, 2555 Carrabelle Winter & Summer
Northeast corner of The environmental as- Shumard Oak Boule- Hours.
Section 35, Township 7 sessment determined vard, Tallahassee, Flor- Thifts & GiftS Must be 17 yrs or older,
South, Range 5 West, that the activities will ida 32399-2100 imme- Grand Opening able to work weekends,
Franklin County, Flor- have no significant im- diately to ensure that Friday February 4th reliable, honest & will-
ida and run South 00 pact on the environ- they are received be- 10am - ing to work! Must have
degrees 37 minutes 11 ment. Therefore, an fore the expiration of Next to Neel Auto own reliable transporta-
seconds West 1315.05 Environment Impact the DCA comment pe- Parts on Hwy 98 tion and no drama!!
feet to an iron rod and Statement (EIS), as de- nod. Something For See our Display ad to
cap (marked #6475) ly scribed in the National Everyone apply
Ing on the Southeast- Environmental Policy Alan Pierce, Director of 10% Off with Ad
early right-of-way Act, will not be pre- Administrative Services Business Hours
boundary of U.S. High- pared. Permits for the Franklin County Board 10am until 6pm
way No. 98, said point construction will be ob- of County Commission- Mon-Sat
way no a point tained prior to con- ers 850-370-6507
also lying on a curve struction. No further en- Environmental Certify-
easteCncave tothe South-n vironmental review of ing Officer i lig c
Southwesterly along the project will be con- February 3, 10, 2011 OJIgill:4]l 1X14wl[I C
Sutwemerd alon cluing c
said right-of-way ducted. 1489T needs a person
boundary and said An Envronmenta Re- NOTICE OF APPLICA- 3300 and some coI
curve with a radius of Recordn (ERR)n TION FOR TAX DEED Hog Panels (appr 100).
1399.43 4ein. gxvft.Some a vr Must pass hackgB
1399.40 feet, through a which documents the No34n x 16 ft. Some rustMckg
central angle of 39 de environmental review of tice fat bottom. Good for
greens 41 minutes 19 that, EUGENEPleaseappl
seconds, for an arc dis- the project, is on file at A H EUGEN ATRICIAdog runs or Rebar.
Sb u th e Franklin County AMRHEIN & PATRICIA Make offer. Please ca l
cfihoe3rd ein9FSorthbe7mngand uB ers of the following cer- Text FL42085 to 56654 112F
degrees 42 minutes 00 e 1 A , Apa tificate have filed said
seconds West 950.10 Street, ue, 1. Ap- certificate for tax deed t
feet to an iron rod and lachicola. i ld to be issued thereon.
cap (marked #7160) 32320, and i s available The certificate number
marking the POINT OF or public examination, and year of issuance,
BEGINNING; from said All interested parties the description of the
POINT OFBEGINNING reittenvt comment ubto propertyand the name E m plo
and leaving said Deborah Belcher, 5378 in which it was
right-of-way boundary Carboh Belrooke Lane 8 assessed are as fol-
and said curve run hone 850-893-0694 lows:
South 04 degrees 47 phone 850O8930694loM:
minutes 01 East 316.55 (debroumelis@earthlink.net). Certificate Number: 22
feet, thence run South Specrfy which Of Year of issuance: 2008 4100- Help Wanted
03 degrees 45 minutes these 3 concurrent no- 4130- Employment
04 seconds East 45 minute tices are addressed. All Information

379.03 feet to the ap comments f reFeivedb on oof R.E.Kest ner, The Eastpoint 1
proater lne ofanSt.Ge 2011 will be consid-Section Township Districts Seek
Sou t en er ered, and no adminis- Southm Range 1 West et 4
Souh 50 degr, th ees 58 trative action will be al 410o for an entry leve

minutes 59 seconds taken until comments Full Legal Description i operations and
West along said ap- are resolved. can be viewed in the
proximate mean high The ect described Clerk of the Circuit I I Applications are
water line run North 08 Court's office. Food Sev
degree 31minute25above will be funded Court office. Food eEastpointWa
seconds Westm371.46 with Community Devel- PARCEL NO:*I
feet, thence run North opment Block Grant 0507 01w-0000-0200-00 *Bartenders District Office,4
05 degrees 52 minutes Florida and the U.State 00 *COOks Eastpoint
08261.67 feet to an ronds West Department of Housing Name is which as- *Hosts I
261.67 feet to an irn Dev Name s whch as- during normal
rod and cap (markedand Urban Develop- sessed: NOLAN M. I
#7160) lying on the ment (HUD). Franklin LASSITER & MELINDA BLUE PARROT Monday t
Southeast County is certifying to LASSITER Now HIRING I 8:30 am - 4
right-of-way boundary the State and to HUD Please apply in per- 8:30 am- 4;
gof w hway bound that it, and its chief All of said property be- son between 9a-5pm
and a curve concave to elected official, in hisor ng in the State of Flor- 7 days a week@
thene Sou theasterly cse oto acapacity, ida, Franklin County Blue Parrott
thence run Northeast- content to accept the St. George'slsland
riqht-of-way boundary - , TheEastpointWate


and said curve with a
radius of 1399.40 feet
through a central angle
of 04 degrees 54 min-
utes 09 seconds for an
arc distance of 119.74
feet, chord being North
35 degrees 28 minutes
18 seconds East
119.70 feet to the
POINT OF BEGINN-
ING; containing 1.00
acres, more or less.

The successful bidder
at the sale will be re-
quired to place the req-
uisite state documen-
tary stamps on the Cer-
tificate of Title.

DATED this 24th day of
January, 2011.

Hon. MARCIA JOHN-
SON
Clerk of the Court
Franklin County, Flor-
ida
By: Michele Maxwell
As Deputy Clerk
February 3, 10, 2011
1466T
Floodplain Notice of
Explanation,

Notice of Finding of No
Significant Impact on
the Environment and
Request for Release of
Funds and Removal of
Environmental Condi-


IREJLESTATEFORRENT I
6100 - Business/
Commercial
6110 Apartments
6120- Beach Rentals
6130- Condo/Townhouse
6140- House Rentals
6150 - Roommate Wanted
6160- Rooms for Rent
6170- Mobile Home/Lot
6180 - Out-of-Town Rentals
6190 - Timeshare Rentals
6200 - Vacation Rentals










Carabelle
Cove
Apartments
Now accepting
application for 1, 2,
and 3 bedroom units
and Handicap apart-
ment available.
Laundry facilities on
site, w&s included in
rent, ch&a window
coverings provided.
On site management
Office. Rental assis-
tance available,
Income restrictions
apply, reasonable
accommodation












EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY
Carabelle Cove
Apartments
807 Gray Ave #33
Carabelle, Fl 32322
850-697-2017
This institution is
an equal opportu-
nity provider and
employer
Text FL41753to 56654



Eastpoint
Apartments
Accepting application
for 1, 2, & 3 bedroom
handicap and
non-handicap units.
Rental assistance is
available to qualified
applicants. 45 Begonia
Street, Eastpoint, FL
32328. Call (850)
670-4024, TDD/TTY
711." This institution is
an equal opportunity
provider and employer"






ition Rentals
w/ cust. service
miputer skills.
ound/daig screen.

v in person at

klin Blvd.

ie Island



yment


able



Water and Sewer
ing applications
1 position in field
d maintenance.
e available at the
ter and Sewer
40 Island Drive,
, FL 32328
business hours,
rhru Friday
:30 pm EST.




r and Sewer District


Q[.


From Renovation To
Innovation
Master Craftsman
Carpenter
Dick 850-646-0304


From Renovation To
Innovation
Master Craftsman
Carpenter
Dick 850-646-0304






LPN
Available For
Home Care
850-646-0304


Do you need painting
or handyman jobs
done? Call Herbert
Duggar 653-5281 or
653-9308







Attend College Online
from Home. *Medical,
*Business, *Paralegal,
*Criminal Justice. Job
placement assistance.
Computer available. Fi-
nancial Aid if qualified.
SCHEV certified.Call
8 6 6 - 4 6 7 - 0 0 5 4
www.Centura.us.com


AIRLINES ARE HIRING
Train for high paying
Aviation Career. FA-
approved program. F,
nancial aid if qualified
Job placement assmE
tance. CALL Aviatio,
Institute of Mainte
nance 877-206-9405
Hawaii Bound!
Travel USA with fur.
young company. N:.
experience necessary,
All expenses paid
Pack your bag"'
1-877-305-7735



Oyster Tongs, build
new ones and do re-
pairs. Portable welding
service. Call Tommy,
850-653-6208


148 E. PINE AVE.
ST. GEORGE ISLAND





Must be 1 7 years or older.
able lo work weekends.
reliable, honest & a willing to work!
Musl have own reliable Iransporlalion
and no drama in Iheir lile.
For lull lime employees, we oiler
a 401k program. paid vacation.
ahler 1 yr and 3 holidays paid
ii you re scheduled thal day.

STOP IN TODAY
for an application or
call Carol 850-653-5296
for an interview.


Lanark Village
for rent
1 BR Unfurn, Screened
in porch, end unit w
parking $425/month
call 850 697-9214. Util
not included
Text FL38120 to 56654







St. George Island $160
wk, Electric, Satellite,
Garbage incl. pool tble.
12'X65' deck w/Beaut-
iful view 850-653-5114



6130



1 Townhome 2 br, 2
ba, Upstairs 1200 sf,
Carrabelle, large deck
$550 month $550 de-
posit available now. for
appt call 850-562-4996.

Apalachicola Condo. 2
br, 2 bath, with newer
paint, tile, carpet $850
month. *Ref Checked*
Quint 865-693-3232




Lanark Village, Carlton
St. #5, 1 Br 1 Ba, All
Tile, Walk-in Closet,
Landlord pays Electric
and Water, $525 month
+ $300 deposit. Call
864-356-5949 or
850-728-5219





1 Br
Apalachicola, FL.
Call 850-643-7740.

Apalachicola River -
Intercoastal Waterfront
Home, deep water
dock, 2 covered elec-
tric boat lifts & acces-
sories. 1 br, 1 ba, large
LR area. 12 ft ceilings,
HW floors on 2 acres.
$1800 month, 1st, last
and security deposit
653-8159 or 899-1800
Text FL38974 to 56654

Historic District Home
or Office. 3 br, 2 ba,
$1200 month + first,
last and security.
653-8159 or 899-1800
Text FL38971 to 56654

1 , . Z . it

6170
43 Bayshore Dr. Apa-
lachicola. Really nice 2
br, with whirlpool bath,
quiet neighborhood.
Unfurnished. $550 mo
1st & last mo rent +
dep. 653-4293 after 4
pm. Call on Thurs -
Sun


7100 - Homes
7105 - Open House
7110 - Beach Home/
Property
7120 - Commercial
7130 - Condo/Townhouse
7140 - Farms & Ranches
7150 - Lots and Acreage
7160 - Mobile Homes/Lots
7170 - Waterfront
7180 - Investment
Property
7190 - Oul-ol-Town
Real Estate
7200 - Timeshare


I 7100


ICS Custom
Built Home
Kinaswood Sub: 3
br, 2 ba, 2 cg, 1,9471
sq. ft. 1 + acre, 10ft
ceilings, split floor
plan, dinning and
Separate breakfast I
room, Whirlpool tub,
porcelain tile, cus-
Itom cabinets, water
System, lawn irriga-
tion, above ground
pool. Sacrificing @ I
I$95.00 per sq. ft. |
Call for information I
(850)527-1938







-J-
Carrabelle
For Sale by Owner
Georgian Motel
Water View I
Boats slips avail
$650,000
772-205-5658





7150


New Year
Special
Apalachicola Prop-
erty Block 150 Lot 3
$18,500, R-1 Zoning
Call (850) 566-2273


8100 - Antique & Collectibles
8110-Cars
8120 Sports Utility Vehicles
8130 - Trucks
8140 -Vans
8150 - Commercial
8160 - Motorcycles
8170 -Auto Parts
& Accessories
8210- Boats
8220 - Personal Watercraft
8230 - Sailboats
8240 - Boat & Marine
Supplies
8245 - Boat Slips & Docks
8310- Aircraft/Aviation
8320 - ATV/Of Road Vehicles
8330 - Campers & Trailers
8340 - Motorhomes




-W



Cotton Field Buyers
touring Bus back to
back seating for approx
12. 6 feet wide 13 fett
long. Looks like old
Horse drawn Trolley
Car. Great restoration
project. Defiantly one
of a kind. Asking
$1,200. Call
850-670-8060







Dodge Grand Cara-
van 2002, Tan
minivan, runs well,
automatic trans,,
quad seating, AC,
power windows/
locks, cruise control,
updated brakes,
good tires, $3,200 or
best offer. Eastpoint,
Ph. 317-750-5873
Text FL38820 to 56654


14� Properties
in FL & TN
Ibis Drive, Overstreet (Gulf Co.), FL
Parcel 144, 2.18� Acres
Wetappo Subdivision
In Cooperation with Peter Mock, Fleming & Company, 904 886 9200
Call for Details 800-323-8388

ROWELL REALTY & AUCTION CO, INC.
f 2% Broker Participation 7% Buyer's Premium
AUCTIONS AU 279,AB 296




Cleei Crest
Rel Estate .

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RIENItALS NEEII)EI)
IE It A IAN AGE (. L R PROPER fl
Beach Iroill IlhoIIms uilli %inler rIle%
%Ihorl & long lerinl rentils.
PI. F \F ( \1.1. I10 \NN .%?il-6'-96114
4O)R .xil-323-1l444 FOR RENT Ils.


I I


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Al 6 I The Times


Rare Kingbird spotted during Christmas bird count


By Lois Swoboda
Times Staff Writer
On Dec. 28, six teams of
volunteers traveled almost
170 miles to tally the num-
ber and variety of birds in
Franklin County during the
111th annual Christmas
bird count.
Due to extremely low


+ American
Red Cross
Central Panhandle Chapter


tides, seven volunteers,
slated to survey Little St.
George Island, were un-
able to go ashore, so that
portion of the count was
cancelled. Some of those
birders transferred their
efforts to counts in Apala-
chicola, the Box R Ranch
and the Miles.
The highest number of


1 CONVENTION
1 SERVICES CO.
*--I


CALLING ALL VENDORS











EXPO


March 4-6, 2011
Panama City Square
(Old Walmart Shopping Center)
Better parking, more space,
and a brand new look!

Reserve your booth space now!
There is no better place to share your
products & services with thousands of
potential customers in Northwest Florida

All vendors receive a FREE quarter-page ad
in the official 2011 Home & Garden Expo
program, reaching more than 80,000 adults
in Bay and seven surrounding counties.

For vendor application or information
Call: 850.763.8618, or
visit www.exposandtradeshows.com or
email: expostradeshows@aol.com
LAST YEAR'S SHOW SOLD OUT!

For sponsorship information call:
850.763.6587

For additional advertising information in
the official program of the 2011 Home and
Garden Expo, contact Nicci at
The News Herald at 850-747-5025.
MENE M .76 .=L 6 I I


species in six years, 149,
was recorded in the county,
with more than 10,000 indi-
vidual birds documented.
Organizer Alan Knothe
said the number of birds
counted was similar to pre-
vious years. This year's to-
tal was 10,328, and last year
an estimated 10,681 birds
were observed.
Considering that one-
quarter of the normal sur-
vey area remains uncount-
ed, this year's count may
have been on the high side.
Apalachicola's John
Spohrer observed and pho-
tographed a Western King-
bird, an unusual species
for Florida, later during the
count week.
Knothe said 46 species
were found by only one
team of birders. He said
unusual birds spotted this
year included the Northern
Gannet, American White
Pelican, Snow Goose,
Greater Scaup, Black Sco-
ter, Surf Scoter, White-
winged Scoter, Common
Goldeneye, Peregrine Fal-
con, Clapper Rail, Virginia
Rail, Sora, Piping Plover,
Wilson's Plover, American
Woodcock, Common Tern,
Whip-poor-will, Golden-
crowned Kinglet, Sprague's
Pipit, Black-and-white War-
bler, Nelson's Sharp-tailed
Sparrow, Grasshopper
Sparrow, Henslow's Spar-
row, Seaside Sparrow, Lin-
coln's Sparrow and Rusty
Blackbird.
The bald eagle popu-
lation continues to grow,
Knothe said, with 57


JOHN SPOHRER I Special to the Times
WESTERN KINGBIRD


spotted this year, up from
40 last year.
The most numerous
species observed in the
county was the American
Robin, one of many birds
that migrate through the
county. Unusually plenti-
ful were Killdeers, another
migratory species, which
Knothe said he believes
were pushed south by un-
usually cold weather.
The Christmas Bird


Thirfty .Sisters
238 VUSfwy 98


L c. .r


Count dates back to the
19th century, when peo-
ple engaged in a holiday
tradition known as the
Christmas "Side Hunt,"
during which they would
choose sides and go afield
with their guns; whoever
brought in the biggest pile
of feathered and furred
corpses won.
Around the turn of the
20th century, observers
and scientists became


concerned about declining
bird populations. Begin-
ning in 1900, ornithologist
Frank Chapman, an early
officer in the Audubon So-
ciety, proposed a new holi-
day tradition - a "Christ-
mas Bird Census" - that
would count birds over the
holidays rather than hunt
them.
Originally, 25 Christmas
Bird counts were held on
Christmas Day with 27 dedi-
cated birders participating.
The locations ranged from
Toronto, Ontario, to Pacific
Grove, Calif., with most
counts in or near the popu-
lation centers of northeast-
ern North America. Those
original 27 Christmas Bird
counters tallied around 90
species on all the counts
combined.
The data collected by
observers over the past
century allow researchers,
conservation biologists,
and other interested indi-
viduals to study the long-
term health and status of
bird populations across
North America. When com-
bined with other surveys, it
provides a snapshot of how
the continent's bird popula-
tions have changed in time
and space over the past
hundred years.
The long-term perspec-
tive made possible by the
bird count is vital for con-
servationists, helping them
protect birds and their hab-
itat and identify environ-
mental issues with implica-
tions for people, as well as
wildlife.


NEV ... LD
PANAuisMA CITY


KNOLOGY


Date High Low % Precip
Thu, Feb 3 48� 45� 60 %
Fri, Feb4 58� 47� 60 %
Sat, Feb 5 54� 34� 20 %
Sun, Feb 6 58� 41� 0 %
Mon, Feb 7 610 470 30 %
Tues, Feb 8 570 330 40 %
Wed, Feb 9 510 350 0 %
TIDE TABLES MONTHLY AVERAGES
To find the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times
from these given for APALACHICOLA:
HIGH LOW
Cat Point Minus 0:40 Minus 1:17
East Pass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27
To find the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times
from those given for CARRABELLE:
HIGH LOW
Bald Point Minus 9:16 Minus 0:03
APALACHICOLA
2/3 Thu 02:57AM 1.2 H 10:43AM -0.3 L
05:11PM 1.0 H 10:24PM 0.5 L
2/4 Fri 03:43AM 1.2 H 11:04AM -0.2 L
05:21PM 1.1 H 11:00PM 0.4 L
2/5 Sat 04:28AM 1.1 H 11:20AM -0.1 L
05:32PM 1.1 H 11:37PM 0.3 L
2/6 Sun 05:14AM 1.1 H 11:34AM 0.1 L
05:46PM 1.2 H
2/7 Mon 12:15AM 0.2 L 06:05AM 1.0 H
11:51AM 0.2 L 06:05PM 1.3 H
2/8 Tue 12:57AM 0.1 L 07:03AM 0.9 H
12:10PM 0.4 L 06:28PM 1.3 H
2/9 Wed 01:46AM 0.0 L 08:14AM 0.8 H
12:33PM 0.5 L 06:56PM 1.3 H
CARRABELLE
2/3 Thu 01:32AM 1.9 H 08:30AM -0.5 L
03:46PM 1.6 H 08:11PM 0.8 L
2/4 Fri 02:18AM 1.9 H 08:51AM -0.3 L
03:56PM 1.8 H 08:47PM 0.6 L
2/5 Sat 03:03AM 1.8 H 09:07AM -0.2 L
04:07PM 1.8 H 09:24PM 0.5 L
2/6 Sun 03:49AM 1.8 H 09:21AM 0.2 L
04:21PM 1.9 H 10:02PM 0.3 L
2/7 Mon 04:40AM 1.6 H 09:38AM 0.3 L
04:40PM 2.1 H 10:44PM 0.2 L
2/8 Tue 05:38AM 1.4 H 09:57AM 0.6 L
05:03PM 2.1 H 11:33PM 0.0 L
2/9 Wed 06:49AM 1.3 H 10:20AM 0.8 L
05:31PM 2.1 H
0O 0 A AL


Real Estate Picks


Our local real estate experts have
identified what they feel are the
best values around and are offering
them to you in Real Estate Picks!
(In this section), Discover the best
real estate values in Mexico Beach,
Port St. Joe, Apalachicola, Cape San
Bias, St. George Island, Carrabelle
and surrounding areas.


"MLS# 236168 $95,000 St. George Island


ST. GEORGE PLANTATION
Located in Sea Palm Village, this one acre lot is one of
the lowest priced in the Plantation! A great interior lot on
the south side of Leisure Lane with beautiful pathway
through the wooded dunes to the beach boardwalk and
the Gulf. Tennis Courts, a NEW Club House and Pool
are a few of the amenities available. Bayberry Lane.


/ St. George Island
Realty


John Shelby, Broke
800-344-7570
850-927-4777
www.sgirealty.com


,MLS# 241307 $29,900 Apalachicola

-1 . . .. ,' a,. 2
'' * * ' : ".? * * �. '% *" _


RIVER CREST
This lot measures 100 x 150, is close to the beautiful
community Lodge, private Canal that leads to Scipio
Creek & out to Apalachicola River, and private Boat
Launch. "River Crest" is a private planned community,
perfect for your fishing "get away", this neighborhood is
just off Bay City Road, Short Sale.


St. George Island
Realty


John Shelby, Broker
800-344-7570
850-927-4777
www.sgirealty.com


YOUR BEST

Ii PICK HERE!


Advertise



OR Your Pick

AL for as low


r as $35


Call Toda!
* r ti Call Today!

850-370-6090


NE *I


Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services of Northwest Florida



DJ4+%LS
Connecting Two Worlds


I


apalact'iemesmM


Thursday, February 3, 2011


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