• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Section A
 Section B














Group Title: Apalachicola times
Title: The Apalachicola times
ALL ISSUES CITATION PDF VIEWER THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100380/00075
 Material Information
Title: The Apalachicola times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: H.W. Johnston
Place of Publication: Apalachicola Fla
Apalachicola Fla
Publication Date: April 22, 2010
Copyright Date: 2008
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1885.
General Note: Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00100380
Volume ID: VID00075
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 32911693
lccn - sn 95026907
 Related Items
Preceded by: Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by: Apalachicola herald

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:

00004-22-2010 ( PDF )


Table of Contents
    Section A
        Page A 1
        Page A 2
        Page A 3
        Page A 4
        Page A 5
        Page A 6
        Page A 7
        Page A 8
        Page A 9
        Page A 10
    Section B
        Page B 1
        Page B 2
        Page B 3
        Page B 4
        Page B 5
        Page B 6
        Page B 7
        Page B 8
Full Text





















Thursday, April 22, 2010 W WW.A PA LA(H TIM E S. (0M VOL. 124 ISSUE 52 50(


""""

CELEBRATE THE
EARTH: The 40th
anniversary of Earth
Day will be celebrated
at City Square
Community Garden
in Apalachicola on
Thursday April 22 at
5:30 .m. Ma or Van
Johnson will make
some opening remarks,
fo owed by readings
about gardening and
Earth Day by children
from Bring Me a Book
Franklin. Additionally,
the Bring Me a Book
Franklin organization
II d ch
wi provi e ea
child in attendance
an age-appropriate
book, compliments of
Michaelin Watts and


h ney roa garde ners
compost bins and will
be on hand to explain
how they are made
and how they work.
Students of Carol Harris
Wombat Music will
provide music. Many
I I h I h..
oca sc oo c Ildren
have submitted posters
for a contest, which
will be on dis play
that afte Th
rnoon.
contest winners will
be awarded prizes
that day. Refreshments
will be offered. The
t de
en ire gar n grouP
invites everyone in the
community to loin in
the festivities and tour
the garden they have
worked so hard to make
area ify.

NEWSPAPER
HISTORY: The
Apalachicola Area
Historical SoclefY
will hold its monthly
meeting on Thursday,
April 22 at 5:30 p.m.
at the Carriage House
alongside the RaneY
House, 128 Market
St., in Apalachicola.
Featured speaker will be
David Adlerstein, city
editor of the Times, who
will speak on the history
of the newspaper of
Apalachicola.
For more info, ca
370-6201.


I '
Phone: 850-653-8868
Web: apalachtimes.com
E-mail: dadlerstein@starfl.com
Fax: 850-653-8036


O FREEDOM
\ vroax DA
NEWSPAPERS*INTERACTIVE
DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK:
School News & Society: 1 1 a.m. Friday
Real Estate Ads: 1 1 a.m. Thursday
LegalAds:11 a.m. Friday
classified Display Ads: 1 1 a.m. Friday
Classified Line Ads: 5 p.m. Monday


Zoning change could put


M1 [fL00


German Foreign Ministry monitoring Bordt case


Festivals Galore! BI


YOUR HMTW ESAE O OETA 2 ER


By David Adlerstein
Times City Editor
The Franklin County School
Board has approved the sale
of a 1.1-acre lot at the corner
of Apalachicola's only four-way
traffic light to a development
group that wants to turn the
parking lot there into a CVS
pharmacy, complete with drive-
through.
However, the path between
last week's approval and the
eventual construction of a phar-


macy at the northwest corner of
U.S. Highway 98 and 12th Street
does not promise to be a smooth
one.
With School Board member
Teresa Ann Martin the lone op-
position, the board voted 4-1 at
an April 15 special meeting to
approve the sale for $900,000 of
the lot where the former Chap-
man High School stood.
An Atlanta-based retail devel-
oper, MetroGroup Development
See LAND SALE A6


DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times
Richard Liberto, right, shows site plans for the new CVS to,
clockwise from lower left, school board members Teresa Ann
Martin, Jimmy Gander, David Hinton and Carl Whaley.


0 1 1 1 1
DCHOO1 DORYG


] dismisses Pear1man

frOm finance job

By David Adlerstein
TimesCityEditor
With little further discussion, the Franklin
County School Board voted unanimously at a
special meeting April 14 to dismiss Jay Pearl-
man, the school district's newly-hired finance
chief, from his post.
The board had tabled the motion from Super-
intendent Nina Marks a week earlier after Pearl-
man argued that Marks needed to show cause for
her decision to release him. He said that while
he was still within the initial 97-day probationary
window for the director of financial services posi-
tion, the law did not allow the institution ofa sec-
ond probationary window beyond the one he had
fulfilled last fall when he was hired on as a social
services teacher.
| The Times On Dec. 17, the 52-year-old St. George Island
behind resident was approved by the board to replace
ile Sam Carnley, by a 3-1 vote of the board, and a
Y' probationary window established for the $65,808
r per year finance position,
In beginning the April 14 discussion, school
board attorney Barbara Sanders said she had re-
ng, ceived word from Shay Alexander, the Tallahas-
de oys- see attorney representing Pearlman, that ques-
that toned whether proper notice had been provided
be too
some, See PEARL MAN AS
urgency
e out of
rule,"
to be
do, and


Changes to summer
.
OyStering StOff 80y 1
.
By David Adlersteln
Times City Editor
he summer of 2010 prom-
ises to be a memorable
one for Franklin County's
oyster industry, as new rules
affecting both harvesters and
processors will shake things up
beginning May 1.
At a March 19 public hear-
ing at the courthouse annex.
- the last in a series of pubhc
education efforts that began last
winter Alan Peirce, bureau
chieffor the state's division of
aquaculture, outlined the rules'
which govern oyster harvesting,
handling, and labeling from now
through October.
These rules are a wide-
ranging series of regulations
demanded by the National Shell-
fish Sanitation Program as a
means to reduce the incidence
of Vibrio vulnificus.
The inability of the Gulf
states to reduce vibrio ill-
nesses by 60 percent in 2007-08
prompted the new rules. Gulf
states achleted a reduction at a
little more than halt that target,
and regulators are savine that it
these measures don't work.elo.
sure or the summer bars looms
as a torecone conclusan


DAVID ADLERSTEIN
Coy Shiver II, front, and
him Cr stal and Josh Ba
listen to the new summe
harvesting rules
At last month's heari
Peirce sought to persua
termed and processors
the new rules would not
heavy-handed or burden
while emphasizing the u
of thorough compliance.
"Nobody's going to b
business because of this
he said "Thei're going
limited in what the.\ can


T\ h e n e\ rue r "eyt


DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times


Opinion..........
hN rt
Society News . . .
TideChart........
Classified . . . .


.......A4

Bi
. . . .B2
.......A9
. . .B6-B7


Editor's note: The 170-year-old Gaeubote
(www.gaeubote.de) is the daily newspaper
in Herrenberg, a neighboring town ofNufrin-
gen, where Heinz and Marianne Bordt live.
Marianne Bordt, 71, has been charged with
forst degree murder and aggravated child
abuse, stemming from the Jan. 4 drowning of
the couple's grandson, Camden Hiers, in the
bathtub ofa vacation home on St. George Is-
land. At present she faces the death penalty,
as the case proceeds through Circuit Judge
James Hankinson's courtroom in Apalachic-
ola.
The Gaeubote newspaper serves the
southern part of the district of Boeblingen,
and reaches about 60,000 people each day,
with a circulation of 13,000. The following
story, written by Konrad Buck and translat-
ed by Jochen Stumpf appeared in the Gaeu-


extradition remains open.
Marianne Bordt is imprisoned in Leon
County Jail. The German Foreign Ministry,
and the general consulate in Miami, consult
with her and are in touch with Bordt's defense
attorney Maria Ines Suber.
g "Currently there are talks between the
state prosecution and the defense about the
RICHARD
possibility of the death penalty," said a repre-
PITTERLE tentative of the Foreign Ministry.
It is up to the state prosecutors in Stutt-
gart, Germany, to request the extradition. The
Foreign Ministry and the Ministry of Justice
is getting would then pass it on to the United States.
Bordt from If granted, such a request would put Bordt
under German jurisdiction. Germany does
owned her not impose the death penalty. The Stuttgart
residence.
calls for an See BORDT Al


bote on Saturday.
The German Foreign Ministry
involved in the case of Marianne
Nufringen, Germany.
She is accused of having dr
grandson in a Florida vacation
Whether the German government


APA ~LAC H I C OLA


LAND SALE FOR NEW PHARMACY APPROVED


ULRIKE FOIN





































































Your Health



Yo urFuture . .


Are Important to


FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF


Thursday, April 22, 2010


A2 | The Times


Local


BTS 2

The settlement of the American
West brought with it conflicts over
land no less passionate than the wars
over water raging these days between
Florida, Georgia and Alabama.
Farmers and ranchers fought over
land use, and where the fence posts
should go, not unlike the modern-day
dispute over lawn-watering and how
many cubic feet per second of fresh-
water can flow through the Jim Wood-
ruffdam.
Those bygone struggles, and the
community spirit that triumphed,
came to poignant, aching life last
weekend, as the Panhandle Play-
ers completed their most ambitious
production in recent memory, a fully-
stagedproductionofoneofAmerica's
greatest musicals, Rodgers and Ham-
merstein's"Oklahoma!"
Director Merel Young and stage
manager Melonie Inzetta oversaw a
wondrous production that managed
to corral a herd of challenges facing
it. Bedford Watkins's piano mastery
covered for the absence of a complete
orchestra, and the set design and
construction by John Inzetta and Ed
Springer conveyed in its simplicity the
homey, prairie feel of the turn-of-the-
century Oklahoma Territory. Even
Young, a veteran of directing "Okla-
homa" in his native Iowa over the
years, had to surmount a challenge
of his own, when he ably stepped into
the role of Judge Andrew Carnes, af-
ter Tom Loughridge took ill following
Friday's opening performance.
The cast of talented group of most-
ly middle-aged actors and actresses
showed how to bring off the spirit and
subtleties of the musical, a tale of how
love makes fools of us all, and how we
manage to step up to meet our limi-
tations, whether they be the pain of
rejection, the pull of desire, the frus-
trations of fickleness or the pitfalls
of insincerity. There was no better
example of how age is no barrier to
comic success than in the hilarious
performance of Frances Campbell,
herself a grandmother, as the giddy
coquette Ado Annie. And there was
no better match for her youthful en-
ergy than in Joe Shield's exuberant
portrayal of Will Parker, a lovestruck
simpleton who, luckily, can see past
Annie's dalliances with other men.


By 1015 SW0i)080
TimesStaffWriter

A dog with a history of ag-
gressive behavior mauled an
Eastpoint woman on April
14.
A bull mastiff belonging
to Penny and Paron Bry-
ant of Eastpoint, attacked
Penny Bryant's sister, Vir-
ginia "Jean" Creamer and
inflicted serious wounds on
her left leg.
The dog, Moe, attacked
two people in 2004 and came
one step away from being
euthanized.
On July 2, 2004, Moe
"nipped" health care worker
Lynda Adair when she ap-
proached the St. George
Island home of Teresa
Spohrer, who was caring for
Moe at that time. An article
in the Times described the
injuries inflicted on Adair as
"not serious."
Adair wrote thatshe"self-
treated" the puncture, but, in
accordance with the law, the
attack was reported to coun-
ty animal control.
Moe struck again Aug. 21,
2004, this time ripping the
arm of Janet White, a visitor
to the Spohrer house. The in-
jury required 51 stitches and
later plastic surgery.
White said Spohrer told
her she was keeping the dog
because her son, Nick, the
animal's owner, was afraid to
have it in the house with his
newborn son.
"I would like to state this
was violent, vicious attack,"
White wrote, in her state-
ment concerning the attack.
"I would put the dog down if
it were my decision. He is a
dangerous animal and will
bite again."
After the attack on White,
the three-member county
animal control board de-
clared the dog dangerous
and ordered it euthanized,
but the Spohrers appealed


FRANKLIN COUNTY ANIMAL CONTROL
The dog now being held
at Animal Control inflicted
serious cuts in a April 14
biting incident.
the order.
CountyJudgeVanRussell
upheldthedogs"dangerous"
status, but ruled that it could
not be euthanized because
there was not clear docu-
mentation of two separate
biting incidents. At the time,
there was some question as
to whether the first woman
attacked had been bitten or
scratched.
Last week, Moe struck
for a third time, mauling
Creamer.
"I followed my sister Pen-
ny through the front door
to the back door," Creamer
told investigators. "I was on
the back doorstep. The dog
came out of nowhere. With
no barking, he suddenly bit
my upper leg. He locked on
shaking and pulling with all
his strength. Paron pried
his jaws apart to get the dog
off."
She told investigators she
believed the dog would have
killed her if her brother-in-
law had not been present.
Paron Bryant, who had
obtained the dog a few years
ago from Spohrer, volun-
tarily surrendered the dog to
be euthanized. Link Carroll,
of the animal control office,
said the dog will be held for
10 days of observation and
euthanized on April 26.


At top, the entire cast of
"Oklahoma!" At bottom left,
DavidBowenasthemenacing
Jud Fry, left, talks with Curly,
played by Randy Mims, in
this scene that recedes the
memorable song "Pore Jud is
Daid." At bottom nght, Liz
Sisung, as Aunt Eller, works her
butter churn as Laurey, played by
Megan Lamb, and Curly, played
by Randy Mims, bicker in the
bac kg round.
Also deserving of special mention
were both one of the youngest, and
one of the oldest, members of the cast.
David Bowen's controlled portrayal as
the bitter, scorned hired hand, Jud Fry,
was fiery in the pathos it engendered,
a memorable gut check of this com-
plex character. And veteran actress
Liz Sisung as Aunt Eller, the glue that
holds the warring factions of farmer
and cowmen together, brought a zest-
ful and tangy energy to the role.
Perhaps the most difficult assign-
ment fell to the two leads, Megan
Lamb as Laurey, a young farm girl
secure in her independence but stuck
on the boisterous cowboy, Curley,
played by Randy Mims. Both sang
wonderfully, and acted their parts
ably, Laurey all peeved and impatient
while Curley is swaggering and care-
free. Together, they made it easy for
the audience to hold a willing disbe-
lief in the age gap of a couple decades
between them. Once again, a chal-
lenge surmounted, to the delight of
the audience.
Donnie Denig, as the clever, and


.
El ,PiM
PHOTOS BY ROYCE ROLSTAD III |
Special to the Times


horny, peddler Ali Hakim, captured
the shrewdness of this comic fool,
just as Ann Cowles, as Laurey's ri-
val Gertie Cummings, added just the
right flourishes to make her annoying
character complete.
Fred Genter as Ike Skidmore,
Gary Niblack as Slim, Jeff Ilardi as
Cord Elam, together with an ensem-
ble that included David Davis, Janyce
Loughridge. Bill Hamilton, Virginia
Harrison, Barbara Hartsfield, Janis
Ramos, Leslie Coon, Kristin Ander-
son. and Young, together generated
the substance, in song as well as
dance, that made this show the suc-
cess it was.
By the end of Friday's show the
audience was on feet, including
Apalachicola's Bill Spohrer, whose
father, he recalled, used to say he
wasn't born in America, since he was
born in the Oklahoma Territory in
1906, a year before statehood.
It's a small world, but it's a hopeful
world, and that point was memorably
established in last weekend's "Okla-
homa!"


& Future


'0 klahoma!' tames a fr ontier of challenge e5


Third time's a harm


Our Community's Health


banklin Is Staying HeahM

A Community Wellness Outreach
Franklin County Health Department



community pen House



April 23, 2010


2:00 P.M~. 6:00 P.M~.





You can save up to 30% on your UWity BZ this summer!
Your attic will get very hot in the summer, so replacing old insulation
will greatly reduce cooling costs during the summer.

We specialize in removing old, dirty inefficient insulation


GO
GREEN


Mold can cause health problems. Inhaling or touching
mold or mold spores may cause allergic reactions or
fungal infections. National Institutes of Health
, YOU MAY BE SUFFERING FROM:
Asthma Nausea Allergies Headaches Eye Irritation
5 Sinus Problems Nasal Congestion Respiratory Issues


tlR DUCT CLEANING


Thursday, April 22, 2010


Local


The Times | A3


Egwar Includes:10 Vents,
ne Main and One Return
(Single Furnace Homes)
One Coupon Per Household. Cannot be combined with any other offer
mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm
WE ALSO OFFER
UV Light Air-purifiers Mold Removal Sanitizer Maintenance Programs* Outside Condenser Cleaning
Dryer Vent Cleaning Electrostatic Filters With Lifetime Warranty Workmanship Guaranteed
Vents $10, Returns $15, And Mains $50 Each. Multiple Systems Will Vary.
Written Work Order And Complete System Inspection Included With This Offer


Benefits of Replacing Cellulose Insulation
* Stops air infiltration
* Makes homes safer from fires
* Guaranteed NO Settling
* Is a naturally recycled product
* Is safe & non-toxic
* Cellulose is made primarily of recycled
newspaper, making cellulose insulation a wise choice
for the environment.


- -
-
*
e -
Our FREE Inspection Includes: Written Estimate for AII Recommended Work


pmmmmmmmmmm mmm mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmg



E 250 0 FF
. LIMITED TIME OFFER! .
* ANY WRITTEN ESTIMATE WITH MENTION OF THIS AD *

"CALL TODAY, CLF..AN TODAV"
LOCALLY OWNED & OPERATED
Licensed, Insured & Bonded For Your Protection. Let Our Experience And Knowledge Work For You & Your Family
CP MECHANICAL AIR SERVICES-Serving The Gulf Coast

S 1-850-650-8781m
ACTIVE OR
INACTIVE


OP MECHANICAL uIc#cACO58040


6AM-9PM MONDAY THROUGH SUNDAY for your convenience.





* 'Y


Thursday, April 22, 2010


I had a hankering for an egg sandwich
the other night. Bacon, mayo, white
bread and a fried egg with the yolk
broken but not overly cooked. As I
cracked the egg into the
pan and gazed on its
surprising perfection, I
m had a revelation. I knew
this was the ultimate of
eggness because I once
was trained to judge eggs.
It's true.
RED WHITE During my high
AND ROUX school years in 4-H,
Denise Roux I participated in
competitive judging. To
whit we had a local team that trained
us to be picky consumers, and then we
were graded on how well we graded
the entries. Through the years I recall
scoring kitchen plans (we had been well-
versed on the all-important work triangle
of fridge, oven and sink), carving knives
(the blade running through the length
of the handle and three bolts please, not
two) and much, much more.
I was taught by a professional home
economist, actually by several, both in
4-H and in high school. These women
were at the top of their game in food and
nutrition, sewing, entertaining, budgeting
and every kind of consumer awareness
for any household item.
They were the librarians of everything
that had anything to do with managing
daily life, and they were way ahead of
the curve when it came to knowledge
of fine dining and cuisine in general. I
just pulled out a cookbook I've hauled
through numerous moves for more than
40 years: "The Favorite Recipes of Home
Economics Teachers Foreign Foods."
This was before we had even heard of
pita bread or whole milk mozzarella.
Olive oil came in a tiny bottle that stayed
on the spice shelf for years at a time.
Italian was what we ate on Sunday at Joe
and Madeline Taranto's. Mexican was
chili. Chinese was chop suey made with
pork chops and canned bean sprouts.
Sushi was raw oysters. This cookbook
has two recipes for egg rolls, and they
both contain instructions for making the
wrappers. Home economists pushed
the envelope when it came to thinking
creatively about food.
They didn't just talk the talk, though;
they walked the walk, with hands-on
demonstrations of everything from folding
a fitted sheet to making Danish pastry.
They were respected, and it was an
honorable profession. Before the days of
Rachael Ray, there was Sara Patrenos,
home demonstration agent for Florida
Power, who was showing audiences how to
make the best of their new electric ovens.


KARL HOLLAND | Florida Photographic Collection
ABOVE: Barbara McCann holds a tray of fish at a July 1959 cooking demonstration
at Florida State University in Tallahassee. She was a home economist for the
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. BELOW: This photo from the 1940s shows Louietta
Dowdell and Ida Pemberton, both from Leon County. Pemberton was the longest-
tenured home demonstration agent in Florida.


taught and trained hundreds of us with
lessons we still use every daY
Home economists have now gotten
really scarce around here, or they (at
least the ones in the school system) have
been retrained. Rather than showing
a 14-year-old how to turn a hem, they
are teaching what is now called life
management. Health teachers and
coaches also teach life management. The
course is a decent introduction to adult
responsibilities in the real world.
Many children are missing something,
though. As a quick-write mini-lesson, I
recently asked my students to draw a
picture of a simple table setting plate,
knife, fork, spoon, napkin and beverage.
Later I queried as to what one does with
the napkin at the beginning and end of the
meal.
Do I even have to tell you the results?
I'm really starting to miss those home
economists and the dignity they brought
to managing a household. Maybe you
think the whole idea belongs in another
era. Maybe it was even a sexist thing, but
we didn't really think about it. I just know
modern society could use somebody to
help us take charge of our lives and remind
the children not to point with their forks.
Denise Roux is a regular columnist
for the Apalachicola and Carrabelle
Times. 'lb reach her e-mail her at
rouxwhit@mchsi.com.


FLORIDA PHOTOGRAPHIC COLLECTION
Betty Zorn, Phyllis Wefing and Retha
McCaskill presided over the high school,
and Carolyn Tew, Bernice Shuler and
Toni Taranto worked for the University
of Florida extension service, which was
responsible for the 4-H program. They


By (athy Keen
Special to the Times
The Sunshine State has
an untapped industry close
to home, says a University
of Florida researcher
studying how rural areas
can attract Floridians
hungry for relaxation away
from the hustle and bustle
of the big cities.


Other states have
developed prosperous
tourist trades by enticing
city dwellers to natural
and historical places, said
Tina Gurucharri, a UF
landscape architecture
professor, who is leading
a team that is exploring
similar prospects in
Florida.
"Rural tourism is


popular because with so
many people living in cities
today, there are lots of kids
who have never been on
a farm, ridden a horse or
even picked fresh fruit,"
she said. "Florida hasn't
really developed this new
emerging form of tourism,
but other parts of the
country have been very
successful at it."
The Midwest has
its "farm days," where
children milk cows and
feed chickens, and the
Rocky Mountains its
"cowboy weekends"
where families ride horses
and round up cattle,
Gurucharri said. In North
Florida, rural tourism
could make a splash in
riverside communities,
with opportunities to
kayak, canoe and paddle;
bicycle on tree-lined
country roads; and
walk through historic
downtown, she said.
Rural tourism offers an
economic boost to small
communities struggling to
survive as young people
leave for jobs elsewhere
by luring urbanites in
the opposite directions
and by protecting local
"mom and pop" businesses
against encroaching mega
corporations, she said.
With an anonymous
donation, UF's School of
Natural Resources and
Environment surveyed
Hamilton County residents
and businesses for an
economic analysis.
Students and faculty in


UF's College of Design,
Construction and
Planning, working with
their colleagues in the
Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences, then
prepared comprehensive
proposals for the county,
with its thousands of
acres of undisturbed
public lands; three
pristine rivers; and many
cemeteries. Suggestions
include an eco-lodge on
the banks of the Suwannee
River; a welcome center
combining a farmer's
market, bike rental shop
and restaurant that could
feature Southern home
cooking; and a 425-acre
historic district in the town
of Jasper,
"Our design approach
was to take advantage
of the area's rural
character because they
have amazing cultural,
historical and natural
assets," Gurucharri said.
"There are Victorian
homes, old cemeteries
and live oak trees that are
really beautiful."
The area draws
thousands to the annual
Florida Folk Festival at
the Stephen Foster Folk
Cultural Center State
Park in White Springs,
Gurucharri said. But
few concertgoers stay
overnight because
accommodations are
limited to cabins and
camping, she said.
To capture those tourist
dollars, the UF design
team proposed an eco-


lodge next to the state
park along the river bank,
with elevated trails to
protect soil and vegetation.
"Especially as the baby
boomers age, while some
people like camping along
the river, there is another
group who want a different
experience and can afford
to stay in a lodge with
hot showers and meals,"
Gurucharri said.
Raising the visibility
of Jennings, another
Hamilton County town,
is the aim of one team
proposal to renovate
an empty historical
brick building along the
Interstate 75 corridor at
the city's entrance into
a welcome center where
visitors could sample fresh
produce and Southern
cooking and rent bicycles,
Gurucharri said. The
idea is modeled after the
old orange stops along
the highway, befitting
Jennings' location near the
Florida-Georgia border,
she said.
The most extensive
revitalization plans are
suggested for the town of
Jasper, where UF students
inventoried 150 historical
buildings, many of them
old Victorian homes,
and proposed creating
a pedestrian-friendly
residential and commercial
historic district.
A redesigned central
park would be the civic
heart of the community,
with arts and crafts fairs
and blackberry festivals,


around which sidewalk
cafes and retail shops
could be built, Gurucharri
said. Running through
the park would be a
greenway along an old
railroad corridor that
bisects downtown, with
nearby countrywide biking
trails, walking paths and a
driving path for parades of
old cars, she said.
With extensive efforts
from local citizens, the
city is moving ahead
with some of the UF
suggestions and obtained
a $500,000 Department
of 'Itansportation grant
for roadside trees,
sidewalks, planters and
various central park
improvements, Gurucharri
said. The first blackberry
festival, one of 12 in the
United States, is scheduled
for June.
Cindy Eatmon, co-
owner of Bass Fbrniture
and a lifetime Jasper
resident whose roots date
back to when the area was
homesteaded, praised
the UF team's efforts to
maintain the town's rural
character and said the
timing could not have been
better.
"Our town was dying,"
she said. "It used to be a
booming community, but
if you drive through town,
you see a lot of empty
buildings."
Cathy Keen is a writer
from the University of
Florida News Desk. You
can reach her at ckeen@
up.edu.


POSTMASTER:
Send address change to:
The Apalachicola Times
P.O. Box 820
Apalachicola, FL 32329
Phone 850-653-8868


PERIODICAL RATE


SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
IN COUNTY
$24.15 year $15.75 six months
OUT OF COUNTY
$34.65 year $21 six months


TO ALL ADVERTISERS
In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers
do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount
received for such advertisement

thou eful o erbword is giveok w aes is er ted word
thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains.


* *


A4 | The Times


Once upon a time, home


New chapters


await seafood


T ( [@
IM J 1 VIL V

I've been proud to serve seafood
workers and dealers for the past
three years but have
made the decision to leave the
Seafood Task Force, effective at the
end of April, and go
back to writing full
time, and to finish
the book about local
fishermen I've been
working on for so
long.
Soon after I took
KEVIN BEGOS the job, the severe
Guest columnist drought hit just as
the "Water Wars"
with Georgia entered a critical
phase. Then last fall the U.S.
Food and Drug Administration
announced the terrible plan to ban
the sale of traditional raw oysters
for much of the year.
I want to thank all the people in
the community and throughout the
region who responded to the Web
site and Facebook page I set up to
fight back against the FDA. You
made a difference.
Just last week, for the first
time, the FDA acknowledged in
writing that they may not be able
to go ahead with the oyster ban
as they had originally planned.
The fight isn't over, but in working
with the Gulf Oyster Industry
Council, we've been able to
organize significant support from
Democrats and Republicans in
Congress and put the FDA plans
on hold.
Seafood workers and dealers
on the Task Force have asked me
to continue to represent them in
the fight against the FDA, as a
member of the Interstate Shellfish
Sanitation Conference, and I'll do
that.
When I joined the Task Force,
it had no formal legal status,
checking account or bylaws; now
we have all three as a registered
Florida nonprofit corporation. My
work was just one chapter in the
history of the Task Force; I'm sure
there will be new chapters in the
future.
Thank you again to everyone
who has supported our work.
Kevin Begos is the executive
director of the Franklin County
Oyster & Seafood Task Force, Inc.


Rural tourism can create jobs for Florida towns


USPS 027-600
Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St.
Apalachicola, FL 32329
VP/Publisher: Karen Hanes
Editor: Tim Croft












































CCooaacs aels

APRIL12 IP (ASINO 5 HR STAY $15 FREE PLAY
APRIL 21 BEAU RIVAGE (ASINO -5 HR STAY $15 FREE PLAY
APRIL 27 HARD ROCK (ASINO 5 HR STAY $15 FREE PLAY
MAY 1 IP (ASINO 6 HR STAY $15 FREE PLAY

JUNE 24-27 "SWEET HOME ALABAMA"
INCLUDES:BIRTHPECEOF HELEN KELLER W/0UTDOORDRAMA"THEMIRACLEWORKER"
ALA MUSIC HALL OF FAME -TOUR BELLE MONT MANSION TOUR & LUNCH AT SHOALS
CULINARY CENTER & HUNT F OR TREASURE @ A WORLD WIDE UNMIMED BAGGAGE CENTER
SEPT.2 14 $1499.00 P/P DBL MIDWEST TOUR
INCLUDES:GRANDCANYON-DALES-AMARILLO-0KLAHOMACITY-PETRIFIEDFORESTAND
LAS VEGAS AWESOME TOUR THROUGH THE HEART OF THE MIDWEST AMERICA

JAN.16-23 70AY EASTERNCARIBBEANover Introsecovenoresonatevvouns
JAN.24- 28 KEY WEST $599.00 P/P DBL SELLING FAST RESERVE EARLY!
Call to make reservations 588-8338
7151 W. HWY 98 (in the old Wayne's World Center)
PANAMA CITY BEACH FL. 32407






APRIL 18 25


STOP WASTNG


TIDE TABLES MONTHLY AVERAGES
To find the tides of the following areassubtract the indicated times
from these given for APALACHICOLA:
HIGH LOW
Cat Point Minus 0:40 Minus 1:17
East Pass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27
To find the tides of the following areassubtract the indicated times
from those given for CARRABELLE:
HIGH LOW
Bald Point Minus 9:16 Minus 0:03
APA LACH ICO LA


Hustler FasTI'aks get the job done lasti
rhe homeowner mowers built like a commercial mower, the f hustler
FasTrak" and Mini fasTrak am the most productive, toughest-lutilt
mowers ....e....I l... II.. in... ....... r market
Powerful, reliable Kawasaki. Honda. or Kohler engines
36 41, 48" or ss" ..... ... 1.,,... ,,,,,1..1,,,, .l., i ,
\velded-stee decks, not stamped
Hest warranties m the business



I $=(RE ERggy





I *
* ^ *




' I ' s

I I I I I I


** *


Thursday, April 22, 2010


Local


The Times | AS


f te eam n A
expander, however, indicat-
ed she did not want to try to
postpone the meeting.
The school board was
represented by two attor-
neys provided through the
Panhandle Area Education
Consortium, Jim Dean and
Richard Akin with Messer,
Caparello & Self, PA.
At the April 8 meeting,
Pearlman had contended
that he could not be dis-
missed because his job
was protected by Florida's
"whistle blower" statute.
He said that late last month,
he had learned from the
district's Blue Cross/Blue
Shield representative that
Marks Insurance Agency,
owned by Nina Marks'
husband, had been named
by the superintendent as
agent of record for the dis-
trict.
Pearlman said he was
not aware that the school
board had voted to grant
such a status to the insur-
ance agency and had asked
thesuperintendentaboutit.
While suggesting that the


supe n end n ighthave
acted improperly in nam-
ing her husband's firm as
the agent of record, Pearl-
man told the school board
he did not intend to pursue
the matter if he were kept
on in the job.
Dean said he was not
aware that Pearlman had
filed a whistle-blower law-
suit, and said nothing fur-
ther on the matter. Mem-
bers of the school board
did not comment on Pearl-
man's allegation at either
meeting.
"The only issue is
whether to approve Nina
Marks' recommendation,"
Dean told the school board.
"There is no requirement
that there be a showing of
cause."
Sanders said she was
comfortable with the legal-
ity of dismissing Pearlman,
without showing cause dur-
ing the 97-day probation-
ary window, noting that the
prohibition against having

See PEARL MAN Al


pe no beTnies
The Franklin County
ScahmolofBoa spoh redua
dents to represent Frank-
lin County in the Commis-
sioner's Academic Chal-
lenge, a state high school
academic tournament held
April 15-17 at the Contem-
porary Convention Center
at Walt Disney World in
Lake Buena Vista.
Florida counties were
divided into three districts
with the competition test-
ing a team's knowledge in
mathematics, science, lan-
guage arts, social studies,
world languages, technol-
ogy, fine arts and humani-
ties The students who
competed exhibited great
skill, focus, knowledge,
precision and endurance.
Each game consists of
or eraocuh Stuode s
be the first team to buzz in
and answer the questions
correctly to gain points.
The students stayed at
the Disney Contemporary
Resort and enjoyed Park
Hopper passes to the Dis-
ney Parks in the afternoons
after competitions. Team


Picure ae tammemers fontroPHOTO C RTE5Y OF COMMISSI(HIElS ACDsEMIC CH LENGE


members included fresh-
man Carla Lewis; juniors
Maggie Langston, Lakota
Humble and Nick Koch;
and seniors Russell Sim-
mons and Lane Roberts.


Priscilla Tucker was their
coach.
"Franklin County was
very well-represented by
our students at the Com-
missioner's Academic


Challenge," she said. "This
competition was both a fan-
tastic opportunity for our
academic students to show
off their abilities and a re-
ward for their hard work."


pr22
Sat, Apr 24
Sun, Apr 25
MonApr26
TueApr 27
Wed, Apr 28


h

780
790
790
790
790


%Prect
30 %
40 %
30 %
10 %
40 %


ON PAINTS AND STAINS
(WITHCOUPON)
----------------------------------------------------
SHERMN
SAVE25 """"
ON PAINTS AND STAINS
.au Ma r 9


,,, .
........................................ .....11..
sHERMN
SA VE *4
CS SOFT WOVEN3-PACK
-- --
RALLER CO VERS 9 x 3/8



---------------------------------------- -----------
SHERMN
BUY 7, GET 7 FREE
.4 MIL PLASTIC OROP CLOTH
9'x 12
so
., , , ,, ,, ,, ,
'. ' . '.'


Visit your Port St. Joe Sherwin-Williams at: a
102 TRADE CIRCLE WEST
850.229.2910
Mon. En ?am 6 pm Sat.8am 5pm +-
Sun. Closed E'.
l


1/22 Thu 05:45AM
06:02PM
1/23 Fri 06:49AM
5/24 Sat 39AMM
01:51PM
1/25 Sun 02:15AM
02:10PM
1/26 Mon 03:39AM
02:29PM
5/27 Tues 04:50AM
02:49PM
1/28 Wed 05:52AM
03:13PM


01:06PM


07:44AM 0.4
08:18PM 0.5
08:31AM 0.6
09:10PM 0.2
09:13AM 0.8
09:57PM 0.0
09:49AM 1.0
10:41PM-0.2
10:21AM 1.1
11:24PM -0.3


CAR
4/22 Thu 03:32AM
03:49PM
4/23 Fri 04:36AM
05:06PM
4/24 Sat 05:31AM
06: 05PM
4/25 Sun 12:50AM
12:45PM
4/26 Mon 02:14AM
01:04PM
4/27 Tue 03:25AM
01:24PM
4/28 Wed 04:27AM
01:48PM


06:18AM 1.0
06:57PM 0.3
07:00AM 1.3
07:44PM 0.0
07:36AM 1.6
08:28PM -0.3
08:08AM 1.8
09:11PM -0.5


PEBRLAN fom p~e 0


Quilt raffle benefits island's VFD
Photos and story
special to The Times
The St. George Island 2010 quilt ,....
by the St George Island Quilters,
raffled at the March 6 Chili Cook-
off, was won by Joanne Harmon of
St. George Island. It was a queen- . 4
size hand-quilted one-of-a-kind do....W. '.
quilt of the Cape St. George Light-
house. All the quilts are unique
because the design is made only
once. Next year's quilt is titled "Is-
land Lagoon." All proceeds go to
the island's volunteer fire depart-
ment and first responders, with the
check usually presented in the fall.
The quilters include Shirley
Adams, Penny Angel, Pat Black-
burn, Caryl Collier, Jane Cook,
Judy Crawford, Jean Crozier,
Jane Davis, Maggi Estes, Eileen -.
Fleck, Lois Fleck, Dolores Gal-
lagher, Ruth Guernsey, Stephanie -
Guernsey, Joanne Harmon, Eunice
Hartmann, Louise Hejnosz, Anna . e so
Inzetta, Mary Keasler, Audrey Kru-
ger, Helen Marsh, Anita Ohear,
Kathy Olander, Jean Poggi, Marty
Resotko, Sherri Roberts, Lola Sea- ..."
ger, Sue Shadel, Glen Siler, Movita ,,
Toomey and Celeste Wall.


S~tuet (0mpete in Academic Challenge at Disney


S~AV


RABELLE
0.2 L 11:41AM 2.1
1.6 L 09:14PM 2.1
0.3 L 12:05PM 2.1
1.3 L 11:08PM 2.1
0.6 L 12:26PM 2.2


a

sherwin williams.com
02010TheSherwinWilliamsCompany













































6 GI I


Blue Water


:
essage (25 words or lo

I


From


SECOND TIER OVATION BAYOU VIEW THREE ACRES
Cape San Blas. Great location in lot Carrabelle at the old Julia tnoearhWep itchbkea hon 1M es
premier Ovation subdivision. 200' Mae's restaurant with community Beach. 185' creek frontage on
to the beachfront pool club and dock and pool. Right next to the a private three acre lot. Partially
includes access to the bayfront C'belle Boat Club- keep your boat cleared with some woods around
beach club with dock, fitness close and wake up to the sunrise the creek. Privacy but quick to
room and lookout tower. over Poston Bayou! the beach!
MLS# 238825...............$179,000 MLS# 238839.................$47,000 MLS#238982..................$99,000
Please call us for a complete selection of properties for
Sale in the Apalachicola Bay area! St. Glelo2nF n F 2328

www.ficklingofflorida.com 0 850.927.2255


Thursday, April 22, 2010


A6 | The Times


Local


II LLC, is buying the cor-
ner lot, conditioned on a
zoning change by city offi-
cials that will allow for the
creation of a freestanding
pharmacy. Although a re-
quest to change the zon-
ing from R-1, single fam-
ily residential, to C-2, or
a similar commercial zon-
ing designation, has yet to
be placed before the Plan-
ning and Zoning board, at
least one city commission-
er has signaled opposition
to the idea.
In her opening re-
marks, School Board at-
torney Barbara Sanders
said MetroGroup's bid,
first opened April 8, was
"technically a non-con-
forming bid," because the
$900,000 offer was lower
than the $1.1 million pro-
posal the company made
to the school board late
last year.
Sanders told the school
board it could accept the
bid, reject it or negotiate
its terms, including the
price.
She noted the bid in-


dictated the school board
would work with the CVS
architect to come up with
an acceptable design
for the pharmacy, which
would be placed alongside
the historic art deco build-
ing that still stands, and
diagonal from the former
Chapman Elementary
School, which now hous-
es the Apalachicola Bay
Charter School.
The bid also stipulated
the developers would pay
for the cost of creating a
replacement parking lot
along U.S. 98, between
12th and 14th streets, to
serve the existing Chap-
man Building, which is
now owned by the county.
School Board Chair-
man Jimmy Gander ques-
tioned Richard Liberto, of
Pensacola's Retail Sites
LLC, which represents
Metro Group, as to why his
firm's bid was below the
initial $1.1 million propos-
al. Gander noted that he
and Liberto had initially
talked about a $1.2 million
price tag last fall.


Liberty said that after
an appraisal came out in
late January indicating
the property was worth
$750,000, the developer's
attorney "raised a red
flag" that MetroGroup
would be paying more
than the land was worth.
Liberty said Metro-
Group's initial proposal
did not include putting
in a new parking lot, al-
though Gander differed on
the point, and said Metro-
Group's paying for a new
lot was always part of the
deal.
At the Dec. 10, 2009,
meetingwhenLibertofirst
outlined the CVS plans, he
said, "We think the natu-
ral entrance for that (new)
building is on 12th Street.
We'd put in a parking lot
and landscape it."
At last week's meeting,
Liberty indicated he might
be mistaken about what
was promised. "I may be
at fault, but I thought it
was just a net number," he
said. "The thing is we're
paying almost 40 percent


more than the appraised
price. From the time we
started this thing to to-
day, there's an immense
change in the market."
He said that at about
$25 a square foot, the price
is "very high for that mar-
ket," and that a new phar-
macy would yield new jobs
as well as more revenue
for the city's tax base.
"I've done the best I
can," Liberto said, noting
that the next step, once
the school board gave
its blessing, would be to
get the deal approved by
CVS' regional office in
Charlotte, N.C., and its
corporate headquarters in
Woonsocket, R.I.
"If I have to go back to
them, they may delay it,"
he said.
Liberty said the archi-
tect plans to construct
a "stucco-type building"
that would match the ex-
terior of the Chapman
Building, and that the
building would be moved
close to the corner to cre-


ate ample room for cus-
tomers to enter off 12th
Street, and either park
or use the drive-through
and then exit on to U.S. 98.
Such a plan would require
the blessing of the Florida
Department of Transpor-
tation, whose rules con-
trol the flow of traffic onto
the federal highway.
"We're going to scoot it
to the road," he said. "It's
going to look nice."
Gander reminded Lib-
erto that "they'll be other
boards that will make the
decision whether or not
to let you build," adding
that "personally, I'd like
to have the $1.2 million
we talked about out of the
chute."
Board member David
Hinton, who made the mo-
tion to approve the sale,
described the deal as a
"controversial opportu-
nity. We're probably get-
ting a good dollar for the
land. I think we ought to
consider this opportunity,
to raise some capital for


the school."
After board member
George Thompson sec-
onded the motion, Martin
signaled her opposition.
"I'd like to see us get the
$1.1 million," she said.
"I think it's a historical
district. I know we need
the money, but I think we
should hold on to it, and
not do it at this time."
Liberty said he could
"understand your wanting
to hold on to it," and added
that his clients "will spend
what they need to spend
to get where they need to
be."
Despite his candid
admission, which drew
laughter from the audi-
ence, the board made no
further attempt to negoti-
ate a better price for the
land. Liberty noted that
his clients would initially
be tripling their rental
costs, as they would still
owe money to Mike Wil-
lis, who owns the current
building where CVS is now
located, one block away, at
139 Ave. E.
"There is a (price) point
where it doesn't make
sense," Liberto said.
Sanders noted in
phrasing the motion that
the buyers would be re-
sponsible for covering the
cost of title insurance and
closing costs, as well as
the $4,000 price tag for the
original appraisal.

See LAND SALE Al


156 Charles

MLAswnu 07
Nestled within 1 block of
the community boat

lautno o hhis offers access
freshwater, and within 7
min from pristine white
beaches. The three bedroom
home is surrounded by
chain link fence (5ft high)'
offers storage shed and
mature trees which provide
great shade. Metal Roof
is 5 yrs old. Property is
connected to sewer
system.
$75,000


210 Sandlewood

FMmLS #h 0e7 r
family retreat, this
5 bedroom, 3 bath
home on Cape
San Blas offers it
all unbelievable
sunsets, beautiful
sugary white sandy
beaches, the perfect
place to make your
Special memories
and only minutes
to St. Joseph State
Park
$285,000


.,,,",kS # 3 n two
bedroom Cape San Blas bayfront

p 000 toont p t nhe
whhehsandy beaacches he Gulf
boardwalk. Like new, turn key
including all furnishings, linens
and kitchen necessities.
oss rento c0o9meeapip
has been paid and will convey.
Guest contact info, pending
reservations and 2010 advertising
websites included. New HVAC
in 2008. Owner financing will be
considered. One sellers licensed
Horida Real Estate Broker.
$199,000


Leon Teat


TravisStanley
850.653.6477
Grayson Shep

C 850.653.6718
Y Mike Howze
850.653.5112

A Full Service Real Estate Company 2.avis


ard Jackie Golden
850.899.8433
Jamie Crum
850.899.8758
na mm3


'





FT. GADSDEN CREEK FRONT LOT! TWO ACRES EASTPOINT!
One acre located on the south bank Great lots off N. Bayshore Dr. on
ofthecreekonForestRd.143,north TwinLakesRd. Bushhoggedand
of the trestle. Gorgeous lot, mostly easy to see. 200" road frontage.
high then sloping down to the creek.
Surveyonfile-idealprivacy!
MLS#238435................ $49,000 MLS# 238852.................$39,900


LAKE TALQUIN
Ultimate sportsman getaway!
20.5 acres near Lake Talquin.
Perfect for single family residence
or development opportunity!
MLS# 235325.................$75,000


Unique Gift ideas
Restaurant Specials

Mother's Day Message


Our May 6 issue will feature a
special Mother's Day section.
Put into words how much
you appreciate the
special lady in your life.




SO N LY 5
Your Mother's Day greeting must be
25 words or less. Additional words 25c each.
ar--------------*I


LAND SALE from page Al


a Ik ul \ll 14


PORT ST.


J OE M ARaI N A


227-9393


These 5 mbols
for 52More *


:;~ ~~palHh STla TH IE





Help seniors in your community:

Answer Medicare Questions

and Resolve Problems

Make Informed Choices

About Their Health Insurance


Save Money on Their

Prescription Medications

Inform Them of Programs

They May be Eligible









CALL THE

ELDER

HELPLINE

TODAY!


SH-ING


1-800-96-ELDER
(1-800-963-5337)


Thursday, April 22, 2010


Local


The Times | A7


have a significant economic im-
pact on both harvesters and pro-
cessors, although the state has
yet to provide a firm estimate of
what that effect will be.
In their printed materials,
regulators wrote that "shellfish
industry representatives have
suggested the proposed rule may
lead to a 20-to-40 percent reduc-
tion in their harvests. A written
comment received by an oyster-
man association (representing
approximately 20 fishermen and
three wholesalers) indicated the
proposed regulations may reduce
their landings by a minimum of
50 percent. Shellfish processors
unable to comply with the pro-


posed regulations using their cur-
rent cooling systems may incur
significant costs to modify their
systems."
Speaking more plainly, Peirce
said that the new rules will likely
diminish summer oyster produc-
tion.
"We're pretty sure we're going
to reduce harvest from Apala-
chicola Bay," he said during a
telephone interview last week.
"We're going to see a reduction
in harvest and sales and that of
course has an economic impact.
There's not going to be a way to
accurately quantify that yet. We
have to see the reaction of
industry."


two probationary windows was
found only in the collective bar-
gaining agreement, which does
not govern administrative posts.
She also noted that Pearlman
had approved of the probationary
period when he was hired for the
financial services job in Decem-
her.
Dean told the school board, "It
is my understanding there are
valid reasons for the superinten-
dent's decision." He said com-
plaints had been made against


Pearlman by both school staffers
and the general public.
"There are other issues related
to poor performance by Jay Pearl-
man in his position," Dean said.
Speaking as "a concerned citi-
zen and a neighbor," Mason Bean,
ofSt. George Island, rose to speak
on Pearlman's behalf.
"Jay's intention is only to save
the school system some money,"
Bean said, citing a number of
instances where Pearlman had
tried to save money, such as when


he was "outraged" that a coach
had chartered a luxury bus for
$1,200 when a more affordable op-
tion was available, or when new
uniforms are bought every year
rather than pass down perfectly
good used one.
"His love is athletics," Bean
said, recounting a story of how
Pearlman had arranged for and
funded the cost of dental work for
a high school athlete to ensure
he would make a crucial tryout
opportunity in Tallahassee that


could lead to a college athletic
scholarship.
Pearlman, who holds a bach-
elor's from Harvard College and
a law degree from New York Uni-
versity, produced radio broad-
casts for Harvard and North-
eastern from 2004-2008, and last
season did color commentary for
Seahawks basketball games for
Oyster Radio.
"He doesn't want to be fired,"
Bean said. "He just wants to go to
work."


prosecutors have started their
own investigation, but it cannot
continue because the crime was
committed abroad and the defen-
dant is in jail there.
"It is in our interest to see
this woman punished by Ger-
man law," said Claudia Kraut,
spokeswoman for the Stuttgart
prosecutors. According to her,
the extradition process usually
takes years as a number of insti-
tutions have to be involved. Her
office "is currently checking" the
case. The possible death penalty
is no criterion for an extradition
request.
"The Foreign Ministry and the
state prosecution work together
on the penal law side," Kraut
said. "Beyond that, the ministry


can also get involved to take care
of the German citizen."
The Foreign Ministry is said
to follow the case attentively. It
does, however, choose to wait and
see how the state prosecution in
Florida proceeds. In comparable
cases, the ministry has checked
how the death penalty can be
averted and turned into incareer-
ation in Germany and not in the
United States, where relatives
and friends are remote.
Even child murder is not man-
datorily punished by death in the
United States, explained a minis-
try law expert, but the risk, how-
ever, remains.
Bordt could only be moved to
Germany after a valid verdict.
This procedure is based upon a


treaty between Germany and the
USA on the extradition of sen-
tenced persons from March 21,
1983. It remains doubtful wheth-
er Bordt would get moved.
"Upon Germany's request,
the U.S. federal states rarely ap-
prove," said the foreign ministry
expert.
Parliament members from the
district of Boeblingen, in which
Nufringen is situated, have held
back comments. Conservative
Clemens Binninger, husband to
Nufringen's Mayor Ulrike Bin-
ninger, did not want to comment
and referred to the ministries in-
volved.
LiberalFlorianToncarsaid:"It
is totally normal for any country
to perform full jurisdiction on its


territory." Moving Bordt to Ger-
many, he said, might be possible,
but an entitlement does not exist.
According to his knowledge, the
Foreign Ministry is working on
the case "with high intensity."
Left wing socialist Richard
Pitterle was the first to speak out
and demand that "grief should
prompt us to demand that the
USA abolish the death penalty."
Nufringen's Mayor Ulrike
Binnger has kept herself out of
the matter so far.
"I don't think it is time to do
something," she said. "A German
court would like it just as little. It
could be counterproductive."

All photos courtesy of Gaeu-
bote.


if0m page A6
A core group of Apala-
chicola residents, con-
cerned about aesthetic
effect such a building
would have on the historic
structure next to it, have
signaled their intent to op-
pose any zoning change.
Back in December, when
Liberty first approached
the school district about
the idea, the school board
moved to secure a re-
lease from provisions put
in place in 2005 when the
district received $300,000
in state grants to renovate
the historic art deco build-
ing. If left unchanged,
theadbloe7ed towo denh e
that would preclude any
change to the site through
the year 2015.
City Commissioner
Frank Cook said at the
April w6 regular meeting
of the city commission
that he planned to oppose
any attempt to change the
residential zoning into C-
2, or another commercial
zoning, to allow the free-
standing pharmacy. In ad-
dition, several residents
have questioned whether
a new CVS would be able
todsoeH b er ando n an
elementary and middle
school.
"We have a heckuva
battle in front of us," Lib-
erto said.
Following the vote, as
Liberty was about to re-
turn to his seat, Thomp-
son pointedly wished him
good luck.
"You think I need it?"
Liberty asked.
"Yes sir," Thompson
replied. "I deliver mail in
Apalachicola."


20TH ANNUAL


RIVERFRONT FESTIVAL

APRIL 24-25, 2010


SAT 10-6 PM, SUN 10-4 PM


FREE ADMISSIONI-

Sponsored By:
Pepsi of Tallahassee, St. James Bay Golf Course, WCTV6,
Forgotten Coast TV, Franklin County TDC, Eveready Gas,
St. James Bay Health & Rehab


LAND SALE | OYSTERS from pageAl


SEAFOOD
WORKERS
MEETING
The Franklin
County Seafood
Workers
Association wil
hold a meeting at
6 p.m. on Friday,
A ril 23 in the
pa icolach I
Community Center
to discuss the new
summer oystering
rules. For more
information, cal
850-387-5982.


TIMO 00 Water depends on
COOling method
In understanding the new
regulations, it is first important
to see what is not being imple-
mented.
Peirce said that while many
harvesters throughout the state
favored nighttime, or early morn-
ing pre-sunrise harvesting, law
enforcement officials were unwill-
ing to accommodate that idea.
"We specifically asked FWC
(the Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission) and

See OYSTERS A8


PEARLMAN from page AS


BORDT from pane Al

























































Wanted: A HELPING HAND


HELP SPRUCE UP
THE HAWKS' NEST MAY 1
On Saturday May 1, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., mem-
hers of the Franklin County School community will
be planting trees around the campus, especially in
the islands of the parking areas and the elemen-
tary school playgrounds.
The event, called "Sprucing up the Seahawk
Nest," is sponsored by the Franklin County Parent
Teacher Organization.
The trees and plating materials are being pur-
chased from a grant awarded the school from the
Lowe's Toolbox for Education fund.
Lunch and water will be provided.
Bring a shovel and gloves and join in whenever
and for as long as you can.
If you have any questions, please call Dana
Whaley at 697-8639.


,
SW S
DOC KS ID E

,, MARINE
$HC,









MARINA YARD SALE
April 23,24 &25 at 8:00 A.M.
292 Graham Dr., Carrabelle, FL
(850) 697-3337

Here are a few of the items that
will be up for sale.

* Office equipment

: 'es.'""""'
* Upright chest freezer
* 3 door true commercial cooler
* Kawasaki 660 mule
* Golf cart
* 150cc scooter

Welldser
* Jackstands
* Boat parts & supplies
* Frozen bait
* Christmas decorations
* TC 30 tractor; with front end
.
bucket & fimsh mover (2 vears old)
kB
oo caseS


Antiques
"""""""'"
Collectables
Located at 994 CC Land Road, Eastpoint, FL 32328 Yankee Candles
Ouida Sack -Owner Baby Qutts
(850)670-1073, Home (850)670-8375, Cell (850)228-2220





CU M K

STR A BERRIES
No INSECTICIDES$1.89 Ib.


N EPO DAILY 8:00 AM
When Fruit is Available
Please call


*" "
(
RANCH .

722-4819

17 Miles N. of P.C. Mall
Off Hwy 231 On Veal Road
(When fruit is available Please call)
Bay County's only U-Pick Strawberries


.



M
PCTSonal & Business

Bankruptcy

38 Years Legal Experience


850-670-3030

Office located at: Point Mall, Eastpoint, FL
"We are a debt relief agency. We can help people file
bankruptcy relief under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code."
"The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that
should not be based solely upon advertisements.
.
Before you decide, ask us to send you free written
information about our qualifications and experience."


IV


Thursday, April 22, 2010


Local


they expressed no interest in going
down that road," he told the work-
shop.
Jimmy Shiver, who said he had oys-
tered for 25 years, requested that state
regulators continue to pursue that op-
tion, especially as the cool nights both
keep the hot sun from beating down on
harvesters, and the waters from heat-
ing up to the point where the vibrio
bacteria multiply to harmful levels.
"It would be nice to put the option
in, that we could oyster at night, before
we can't oyster at all," he said. "It's a
good option to think about."
Lt. Charlie Wood said the FWC
fears that problems with harvesting
in restricted waters would worsen if
nighttime harvesting were allowed.
"We feel there may be a problem if we
turn the lights out," he said.
FWC has agreed to allow oyster
boats to have their tongs on deck, on
the water, as they prepare to begin
harvesting at sunrise, but there has
been no change in the starting time
for that harvesting, which remains at
sunrise.
In outlining the new rules, Peirce
noted that for those harvesters who
want to stick closely to traditional
harvesting methods, and not adopt
any further cooling methods
on their boats, the only change
will be a shortened harvesting
time. From May through July,
these "traditionalists" will
have to get their oysters to a
certified dealer by 11:30 a.m.,
and from August through Octo-
her, by noon. AL
Most oystermen, though, to PEI
keep their production high will
opt for one of three cooling op-
tions: complete on-board cooling, par-
tial on-board cooling or rapid cooling
at the processor to which they sell.
With the two on-board options, oys-
ters can remain outside the cooling
system for no more than one hour. The
complete system must reduce internal
temperatures of the oysters to 55 de-
grees within no more than nine hours,


~bR~I


LICENSED SEAFOOD PROCESSORS
The following are a list of all licensed
seafood processors in Franklin County who
are subject to the new summer processing
rules:
1. Barber's Seafood, Eastpoint
2. Glass Seafood, Eastpoint
3. Best Seafood, Inc., Eastpoint
.
4. R.D.'s Seafood, Eastpoint
5. Mark Hicks Seafood, Eastpoint
6. Coulter Midway Seafood &
Market, Eastpoint
7. Sea Quest Seafood, LLC, Eastpoint
8. Webb's Seafood II, Eastpoint
9. Lynn's Quality Oysters, Eastpoint
10. Buddy Ward & Sons Seafood &
Trucking, Apalachicola
1 1. Two Mile Shrimp & Oyster
Company, Apalachicola
12. Boss Oyster, Inc., Apalachicola
13. Water Street Seafood, Inc.,
Apalachicola
14. Harley Allen Seafood, Inc.,
Apalachicola
15. Allen Brothers Seafood & Trucking,
Inc., Apalachicola


DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times


and if can be certified to do that, the
oystermen have until 4 p.m. to deliver
their catch to a dealer.
The partial systems must bring
the oysters to 65 degrees within seven
hours or less, and if certified as such,
will enable the oystermen to
harvest on the water until
3 p.m.
Harvesters will have two
months to subject their cooling
systems to initial validation
testing to demonstrate that the
systems used are capable of
AN meeting the cooling require-
RCE ments in the rule. The Univer-
sity of Florida-Oyster Industry
Lab, together with extension
agent Bill Mahan and staff from the
state aquaculture department, will
provide assistance with validation
testing upon request.
By June 30, all cooling systems will
be required to have an initial valida-
tion, with a final validation between
July 1 and Aug. 31.
The third type of cooling option, in


which processors commit themselves
to having the ability to cool oysters
down to 55 degrees within two hours,
will enable harvester to stay on the
water until 2 p.m. during the summer
months. It does not require an on-
board cooling system, so harvesters
can keep oysters on their boats for up
to six hours without being placed in a
cooling system.
But harvesters will have to have a
firm commitment that the oysters they
harvest are earmarked for a particular
dealer who is committed to bringing
down the internal temperatures of the
oysters rapidly. Also the processors'
cooling methods will be subject to both
initial and final validation, at the risk
of violating HACCP (Hazard Analysis
and Critical Control Points) regula-
tions.
"Some dealers that have cooler
with lesser capacity may have to or-
ganize pallets different, and may have
to do differently than burlap," Peirce
said. "Some will be fine, others are
not. The pain is shared between har-


1 6. Leavins Seafood Too,


Apalachicola
17. Apalachicola Bay Seafood, Inc.
pa icolach I
1 8. Davis Seafood, Apalachicola
19. Leavins Seafood, Inc.,
Apalachicola
20. Bill's Seafood, Carrabelle
21. Stinger's Oyster House, Carrabelle

testers and dealers and certainly some are more
ready for this than others."
At the workshop, despite the complaints, there
were several hopeful pleas for unity.
"We have to come together to do this right, or
everybody will be out of a job," said Darren Guil-
lotte, from Leavins Seafood. "It's going to be a
hard process, in my opinion."
Commissioner Pinki Jackel urged cooperation,
"We've got to figure it out," she said. "It's critical
to the economy of Franklin County."


Volunteering is the
practice of people work-
ing on behalf of others
or a particular cause
without payment for
their time and services.
Volunteering is generally
considered an altruistic
activity, intended to im-
prove human quality of
life, but people also vol-
unteer for their own skill
development, to meet oth-
ers, to make contacts for
possible employment, to
have fun, and a variety of
Other reasons that could
be considered self-sery-
zng.
No matter why one vol-
unteers, there is scientific
evidence that the act of
helping makes people feel
good and even has physi-
g:::3,d emotional health
As a service to the
community, the Times
publishes "Wanted: A
helping hand" to connect
potential volunteers with
situations where they can
be of service.


animals at local events as
part of the adoption cen-
ter's ongoing outreach.
The Humane Society
also has the following
items on their wish list:
wall-mounted sink, wash-
ing machine, air condi-
tioner/heater window
unit, plantation shutters
for four windows, kennel
mounted dryer, garden
wagon, picnic table, toy
chest, non-skid concrete
floor paint and a low-pile
area rug.
If you can help, call
Karen Martin at 670-8417.

Bring Me a Book
Bring Me a Book
Franklin (BMAB), a non-
profit organization focused
oon)gnq eeisieone,
Franklin County, has nu-
merous opportunities for
volunteers to interact with
ildren and theibparents
Directed toward
dramatically improving
literacy and success in
school, BMAB Franklin
supplies quality books and
open-faced bookcases to
Settings that serve chil-
dren and teaches parents,
siblings, teens and com-
munity members.
BMAB Franklin col-
laborates with the county
schools, health depart-
ment, libraries, churches,
museums, state correc-
tional facilities and sev-
eral other non-prof its and


groups serving children
and their developmental
needs.
Volunteers are needed
right now for The Franklin
County Learning Center
celebration scheduled for
10 a.m. on Friday, April 30.
On May 2, at 6 p.m.
BMAB Franklin needs vol-
unteers to represent the
program at St. Patrick's
Church in Apalachicola for
the Day of the Child cel-
ebration.
BMAB Franklin also
needs several volunteers
to attend Project Impact
get-togethers on May 11
and 13, with times and lo-
cations to be announced.
To get involved in liter-
acy, call 370-0126 or e-mail
BMAB at bringmeabook-
franklin@fairpoint.net.

Franklin County
3Ublic libraries
Joyce Estes and the
Franklin County Library
system are seeking volun-
teers to help with Boogie
for Books, a musical bar-
becue and fundraiser for
the proposed Eastpoint Li-
brary to be held on Satur-
day, May 8 from 4 to 8 p.m.
on the lawn at Taylor's
Building Supply, 268 U.S.
Highway 98, Eastpoint.
Workers are needed to
man booths, serve food,
judge the gumbo contest
and collect money at the
gate. Assignments are
limited.


A8 | The Times


0YSTERS from paoe A


St. Vincent Island
This week, the Su ort-
ers of
St. Vincent are looking for
helping hands to partici-
pate in a beach clean-up
on St. Vincent Island, .
planned for Monday, April
26 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
I've been told Ta-
hiti Beach is in desperate
need of a clean-up, how-
ever, this is also the time
of year we like to clean
up the turtle beaches,"
said organizer Denise Wil-
liams.
If you've never visited
the island, this could be a
unique opportunity to do
so. For more information,
call Williams at 653-5020.

Franklin County
Humane Society
Volunteers are always
needed by the Franklin
County Humane Society
to socialize and exercise
dogs and cats and help
showcase adoptable
5 H
4 & 4 &
Adirondak Chairs
&Accessories















Thursday, April 22, 2010 \Iwww. apala cht i me s.c om Page 9


School board adopts revision to athletic handbook


as

STATE BAN K 1897
A Division of Coastal Community Bank

Apalachicola Carrabelle Eastpoint St. George Island
22 Avenue E 612 NAvenue A 5 Jefferson Street 200 Franklin Blvd
653-8805 697-4500 670-8501 927-2561


Sophomore Marcus Dalton, coming back from a
two-year absence, has been pitching well lately
for the Seahawk varsity baseball team. "He's
probably md most improved player this year,"
said coac ike Emerson. "He came in this year
and has found a spot on the team. He's very
diligent in what he does."

Sophomore Morgan Newell had an outstanding
performance against Godby last week for the Lady
Seahawk softball team. She pitched outstanding
and played tree deous defense from the mound to






ee * Digital X-rayS STATE BAN K 1897
A Division of Coastal Community Bank

.1pnInchicola Carrabelle East point SI. George Island

: I I II : I I I 653-8805 697-4500 670-8501 917-1561


By Christy Thompson
Special to the Times
I should be writing about the
previous games that followed
our "Senior Night" debut, but I
promise that I have something
more important to begin with.
On Tuesday April20, the Lady
Seahawks beat Port St. Joe 6-5
in the semi-finals to march into
the district championship for the
second year in a row! We have
played some great softball over
the past week against Munroe,
Godby and North Florida Chris-
tian. Those games prepared us
well for this game.
These girls worked so hard
for this win and the end result
was positive. We had a crowd
watching this one and thank you
fellow community members for
supporting the Seahawks. We
were the underdog coming into
this one, but you couldn't tell
from the attitudes our girls dis-
played. There wasn't an ounce
of defeat in their eyes at any mo-
ment in the game.
We were down 5-3 in the top
of the sixth inning, when fresh-
man Anna Lee (Twinkle-Toes)
stomped across the plate to
score for the Seahawks. Seniors
Leigh Redmond and Kendyl
Hardy made crucial contact with
theballtomoveAnnaaroundthe
bases. We turned up the defen-


sive mode a notch and stopped
the Sharks from converting any-
more runs in the bottom of the
sixth inning. We had one more
shot to make it happen and boy
did we ever make it happen to-
night.
Junior pitcher Shelby Shiver
was up to bat as we entered our
last at-bat for the game. As if
pitching weren't enough stress
already, she absolutely roped one
to right center field and stood tall
on second base. We sent backup
catcher Ally Millender in to run
for Shelby as we began to gear up
our biggest threat of the night.
Senior catcher Leigh caught
a foul ball and Shelby stuck the
last two batters out. Game over,
Seahawks win! We are back in
the game that we belong in, the
district championship against
Liberty County. I am so proud of
ourLadySeahawksandthework
they have put in for this one. It
took all l2 of our girls to pull this
one off. Let's go Seahawks!
By the way, in earlier action
last week, the Lady Seahawks
downed Munroe 7-5 in an away
game, and then split an April 15
doubleheader at Godby, losing
the opener 8-0 and then winning
6-4. On Friday, the Seahawks fell
5-3 to North Florida Christian,
Christy Thompson is the
coach of the Lady Seahawks
varsitysoffballteam.


ZACH CDN


AUSTIN


4..
PHOTOS BY DAVID ADLERSTEIN
The Times
Anna Lee, left, who scored
a crucial run in Tuesday's
win over St. Joe, and
Megan Newell, right, who
smacked a game-tying RBI
th th fell Lad
join wi eir ow y
Sea hawks in prayer before
a game. At left, Pitcher
Shelby Shiver, left, shown
with the other half of her
battery, catcher Leigh
Redmond, was Player of
the Game against Port St.
I def
Joe, paying great ense
and whacking a double
in the top of the seventh
inning which led to the
game-tying run.


By David Adlerstein
TimesCityEditor
The Franklin County
School Board has approved
a revised athletic handbook
that will implement more
detailed rules for student
participation in athletics,
including the requirement
they maintain at least a 2.2
grade point average.
The board approved the
rules at its April 8 meeting by
a 4-1 vote, with only George
Thompson voting no.
The new handbook takes
effect at the beginning of the
2010-2011 school year. Stu-
dents who will be coming
out for spring football need
to know about these changes
and additions that will be in
effect next school year. In ad-
dition, all students and their
parents are required to sign
off on the new rules.
Principal George Oehlert
toldtheschoolboardthatthe
new rules specify that any
student who quits a sport can
not go out for another sport
that year until the season is
entirely completed for the
sport form which they quit.
In addition, the new


rules specify that an athlete
receives an out-of-school
suspension for a Class III
or Class IV infraction, then
that athlete may not partici-
pate with their team in any
fashion for two games or all
games during the period of
the suspension, whichever
is greater. A second out-of-
school suspension prevents
an athlete from continuing to
participate as a member of
the team they were on at the
time of the infraction, and
prevents that athlete from
starting another sports until
that sport he or she has been
suspended from has com-
pleted play. This rule applies
to middle school, junior var-
sity, and varsity athletes.
"The original intent of the
handbook is to have some-
thing for all student-athletes
and their parents explaining
and clarifying policies and
procedures for participants
in our athletic programs,"
said Oehlert, noting that it
has been supported by all
school and district adminis-
trators.
Thompson said he sup-
ported many of the provi-
sions, and the overall intent,


but said he as concerned
the tougher grade point re-
strictions, above the state's
2.0 minimum grade point
average, could discourage
student-athletes, or even
prompt them to transfer to
other schools.
"I'm for the education, but
I feel it's another way to run
the kids off;" said Thompson.
He urged Oehlert to consid-
er drafting a handbook for
coaches, that would specify
their responsibilities and
hold them to high standards
of involvement with the
team.
Oehlert said the school
plans to generate more de-
tailed job descriptions for
the coaching supplemental
contracts.
Speaking out for the new
rules was Cherry Rankin,
who oversees the after-
school tutoring program
in Carrabelle.. "I'm glad to
seethisbeingputinplace,"
she said. "I think it's a good
opportunity to encourage
(student-athletes) to take ad-
vantage of tutoring. Frank-
lin County can stop being at
the bottom of the totem pole
when it comes to athletics."


George Thompson,


CA RRA BE L LE APA LA CH ICO LA


A


Lady Sea hawks top St. Joe in thrilling district semis


]


0 A
10 50y M D0

By DOVid Ad Of510in
Times City Editor
The Seahawks varsity baseball team
are gelling as a young, promising team,
but it's still too early, as they lost twice last
week, at home to Bay High Saturday after-
noon and at Arnold Tuesday night.
The team lost 9-4 to a tough Bay High
squad Saturday, but coach Mike Emerson
had nothing but praise for his team gutsy
play.
"We played good," he said. "They hung
in there and they hit the ball well. Playing
a bigger team like this is always kind of
scary but they did very well. I was proud
of them."
The team banged out seven hits, led by
freshman Cole Lee, who went 2-for-3, with
two RBIs, junior Caden Barber, who went
2-for-4, with one RBI, and sophomore Aus-
tinLarkinwhowent2-for-4."
Emerson wentwithsophomore Marcus
Dalton as the starter, and he showed good
form, but was bounced off the mound after
h ega u adhlr nucn h ctuhM s
well," said Emerson. "He got in trouble
early but the worked out of it."
Emerson followed with sophomore
Colton Sheridan, freshman Cole Lee and
senior Dustin Putnal sharing relief duties.
On Tuesday, the Seahawks lost to Ar-
nold 11-1 in six innings, banging out just
two hits in the loss.
"We just didn't hit very well," said the
coach.
Freshman Zach Howze hit a single to
score Putnal in the second inning, but that
was it for Franklin County. Putnal ended
up going 1-for-3, and Howze 1-for-3 with
one RBI.
The team was set to play John Paul II at
home Wednesday in a make-up game, with
seniors set to be honored for Senior Night.
On Friday, the Seahawks travel to Bay
High, as they prepare for the post-season
tourney.



























* -
SPECIAL TO THE TIMES


(The first 500 kids who register will receive a Rod, Reel, Tackle Box, T-shirt & Goodie Bagl)
Species eligible for trophies in 2 divisions: "Small Fry" Ages 3-10 & "Junior" Ages 11-16
This is an "In-Shore"/"Near-Shore"/"InterCoastal Waterway" fishing event (no more than
threemilesfromanyshoreand toincludefishcaughtinthelCW).Kidscanfishaoneor with
an adult, but the "child must reel-in the fish." Fishing can be from a boat, dock, bridge, pier,
wading, beach, or shore.

Eligible fish species include:
Catfish Speckled Trout Ladfish Flounder Pompano Spanish Mackerel

For more Information on -he exciting event... Cal:
Port St. Joe Marina:850.227.9393, Seahorse Water Solora 850-227-1099
or go online at www.KidsWinFishing.com

Register at the Port St. Joe Marina anytime from April 5th through May 13th. Gear pick-up
3:00 pm (ET) until 6:30 pm (ET), Friday, May 14th. Ru es meeting @ 6:30pm(ET) May
14th at the Port St. Joe Marina. Actual fishing begins @7:00 am (ET) on Saturday, May
15th. Fishing ends by Noon. Final weigh-in begins @ 10:00 am (ET) on May 15th at the
Port St. Joe Marina with trophy presentation @ 1:00 pm (ET).


Thursday, April 22, 2010


Al 0 1 The Times


Local


L MOREgTHAN 50%%<
OF RESPONDENT949AID THAT IF' THEYgfAW
A NEWSPAPER AD FOR A PRODUCT'THEY
ALREADY l<'NEG/ ABOUT''fROM THE-INTERNET
THESWERE MORE Lll<'ELYfCTPURCHASE
VVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVV


Hillside

Community

Cleanup Planned


Come join with Apalachicola City
Commissioner Brenda Ash on
Saturday, April 24, 2010, at 2:00PM at
the 6th Street Recreation Center for a
"Meet and Greet" and to learn about
the weeklong cleanup planned for the
Hillside community which starts on
Monday, April 26, and ends on
Saturday, May 1, with a May Day Fun
Fest from 9:00AM 6:00PM also at
the 6th Street Recreation Complex.

The Cleanup and Fun Fest are both
VISions of Project HOPE's coordinator
Myrtis Wynn.

For more information, contact either Wynn at
wynnm@yahoo.com or Apalachicola City
Commissioner Brenda Ash at (850) 323-0590.


Jacob and Jabin Thompson collected 171


pounds of garbage on March 27.


Special to the Times
The Carrabelle Water-
front Partnership with as-
sistancefromtheFrank-
lin County Waste Man-
agement organized a
watershed cleanup on
Saturday, March 27.
Nineteen eager clean-
up crew members, in-
cudingteensandelders,
full of garbage along the
river and in the favorite
trash spots around town.
Several visitors on vaca-
tion joined in the clean-
up.
The workers collected
atotalof640poundsofre-
cyclables and 120 pounds
household garbage. This


cleanup started off the
City of Carrabelle's cam-
paign to "Clean-up, Car-
rabelle."
Carrabelle CARES
sponsored the first an-
nual Kid's Recycling
Contest. The team with
the most plastic, the one
with the most aluminum
and the most glass team
eachcouldwincashpriz-
Team Thompson,
made up of Jacob
Thompson, 7, and his
little brother, Jabin, 4,
won in all categories and
got the best overall prize.
The boys brought in 171
pounds of recycling, and
walked away with $40 in
cash and left their com-


unity a lot cleaner. Ja-
cob and Jabin are the
sons of Marcie and Jay
Thompson, of Carra-
belle.
City Commissioner
Cal Allen gave out the
awards and the Carra-
belle CARES gave out
the cash prizes.
Organized Leslie Cox
s athecnounmatr ofTn\
plastic bags collected
along the shoreline was
very troubling, since
these materials cannot
be recycled and are not
biodegradable.
People need to be
aware of how big a prob-
lem these items are,"
she said.


Hosted By:


Po T S o


M 1 RIn


Port St. Joe Lions Club


e


0 ill v


2 es y


Florida


For more details, visit


AL &
couwry stomon


Team Thompson prevails


8TH ANNUAL


FISHING


weavistTsutFCOUNTY.com
Funded in part by tim

WMBB-
News
on your elde


I


Celebrate Florida o 9

Lighthouse Day 2010

FOrgot ten Coast

Lighthouse Challenge

Ap ril 24-25 10 am -5 pm
.
$10.00 per ticket

$25 per family (up to 5 persons)


9 '.i
























































.<.w -
-
-


luent...


B


w w w. a xal ac ht i me s.c o m


Thursday, April 22, 2010


Pagfe


DAVIDADLERSTEIN|TheTimes
Fred Sawyer, right, will be among
the local boatbuilders who will
demonstrate techniques for building
and repairing boats this Friday at
the annual Apalachicola Antique &
Classic Boat Show.


Special to The Times


Ihe first Forgotten Coast
Lighthouse Challenge
on Saturday, April 24 and
Sunday, April 25 will cel-
ebrate the four historic light-
houses in the area Cape
St. George Light, Crooked
River Lighthouse, St. Marks
Lighthouse, and Cape San
Blas Lighthouse.
The festive weekend will
also showcase the comple-
tion of St. George Lighthouse
Park.
IRmded with a $175,000
grant through the State of
Florida Department of Envi-
ronmental Protection, Light-
house Park will be showing
off new sod, new bottlebrush
b Id el in epal s'
pathways that wind around
the recently-reconstructed
Cape St. George Light. The
exterior construction of the
Lighthouse Keeper's House
Museum, next to the light-
house, will be substantially
finished, allowing for com-
pletion of park work before
the grant deadline of April
30.
The Lighthouse Chal-
lenge will bring lighthouse
enthusiasts from all over the
country to "meet the chal-
lenge" of climbing or visiting
the four historic lighthouses.
For the price of a Challenge
ticket, participants will be
able to climb a total of more
than 400 steps into the mari-
time history of the Forgotten
Coast!
Climb 131 stairs to the top
of the Cape San Blas Light-
house and take in panoramic
views of the Gulf of Mexico
and St. Joe Bay. Make the
trek up 92 wooden stairs
and an eight-rung ladder
into the lantern room of the
Cape St. George Light, for
spectacular views of the Gulf
and the bridge to the island
over beautiful Apalachicola
Bay. Climb 138 stairs up the
Crooked River Lighthouse
in Carrabelle to the open-air
gallery offering breath-tak-
ing vistas of the wooded area
around the lighthouse and
the Gulf beyond. A special
treat will be the opportu-
nity to climb in the masonry
tower of the St. Marks Light-
house, which reaches 82 feet
over Apalachee Bay and is
rarely open for climbing.
Miss Florida USA 2010,
Megan Clementi, will be
participating in the Chal-
lenge as part of the "Climb
for the Cure" to raise money
and support for the Susan G.
Komen Breast Cancer Foun-
dation. Clement will also
be promoting the "Visit our
Lights" license plate, spon-
sored by the Florida Light-
house Association to help


Crooked River Lighthouse


NANCY WENGEL I Special to The Times

fund preservation of Flori-
da's historic lighthouses.
After a full day of climbing
lighthouses, join Clementi at
the "After the Climb Bash"
at Sometimes It's Hotter
Seasoning Company at 112
East Gulf Beach Drive on
St. George Island. The fund-
raiser event to benefit the
Lighthouse Keeper's House
Museum will feature shrimp,
chicken wings, oysters and
more, with beer and wine,
and live music.
The Forgotten Coast
Lighthouse Challenge is
timed to commemorate
Florida Lighthouse Day on
April 24.
Challenge tickets will be
available at any of the par-
ticipating lighthouses on the
days of the event. Tickets are
$10 for an individual (anyone
over 10 years of age). Family
tickets for $25 for up to five
people will also be available.
Each admission price (in-
dividual or family) includes
one commemorative tote
bag (while supplies last) and
one raffle ticket, and entitles
participants to visit the four
lighthouses at no charge.
There is an additional entry
fee at the St. Marks National
Wildlife Refuge.
Each of the lighthouses
will offer raffle prizes, as well
as other activities during the
Challenge. Food, music, arts
and crafts, and living history
presentations will be part
of the fun-filled weekend.
Hours for the Challenge are
10 a.m. to 5 p.m. both days.
The Forgotten Coast
Lighthouse Challenge is sup-
ported in part by grants from
the Franklin County Tourist
Development Council, the
Gulf County Tourist Devel-
opment Council, and the
Florida Lighthouse Associa-
tion. For more information,
visit www.stgeorgelight.org/
challenge or call Terry Kemp
at 927-2000.


Governor Stone's
.
retUTI1 10 7 I I

antique boat show
Sped0 10 The Times
Apalachicola will host the 12th annual
Apalachicola Antique & Classic Boat Show
Friday and Saturday, April 23 and 24, on
Water Street, between Avenues D and E, in
front of Riverfront Park
The event begins Friday morning at 8:30
a.m. and runs throughout the day: Two local
boat builders, Fred Sawyer and Roger Pen-
holster, will demonstrate techniques and
tools used in traditional boat building. The
two will be working on an 8-foot pram that is
in need of major repairs, such as a new how
and stern, to completely restore it.
From 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. there will be an
expanded Marine Art and Maritime History
exhibit at the Cotton Warehouse, 86 Water
Street. The exhibit, which continues all day
Saturday, will feature expert model boat
builders, alongside the continuing exhibit
of paintings, drawings, photography, and ce-
ramic wall murals.
The 1877 schooner the "Governor Stone"
will arrive in town Friday evening and dock
at Riverfront Park for the festival, with walk-
on tours. The Governor Stone is a 65-foot,
two-masted, gaff-rigged Gulf coastal schoo-
ner, built in Pascagoula, Miss. She spent 13
of her 133 years in Apalachicola, and the
present owners, the nonprofit Friends of the
Governor Stone Inc. are pleased to be shar-
ing her with so good a friend.
After her stay in Apalachicola, she will
return for a brief stay in Panama City and
will soon be traveling to other communities.
On Saturday at 10 a.m., the festival be-
gins. Antique boats, examples of classic
and traditional vessels, workboats, and fi-
berglass and aluminum classics will all be
on display until 4 p.m. Special highlights
include authentic oyster boats, workboats,
and home-built boats by skilled craftsmen,
antique outboard engines, plus a bevy of an-
tique automobiles and art booths.
A kids art booth will be set up by Apala-
chicola Bay Community School and will of-
fer hands-on children's art activities. The
Coast Guard Auxiliary unit, from St. Marks,
will share information on boating safety.
The Apalachicola National Estuarine Re-
search Reserve will have displays about the
Apalachicola River and its flora and fauna,
plus the Franklin County Seafood Workers
Association will demonstrate oyster tong-
ing.
The Apalachicola RiverKeeper will pro-
vide informative trips on the river with their
boat.
Archaeologist Kevin Porter will speak
about the Apalachicola leaderss' Canoe,
a hand-built 50-foot vessel used between
1750-1850, recovered from the Apalachicola
River,
For information, call 653-9419 or send an
e-mail to info@apalachicolabay.org or visit
www.antiqueboatshow.org.


. ~s


. -


Cape San B as Lighthouse


4 DOWN BY THE CARRABELLE RIVER: The 20th annual
Carrabelle Riverfront Festival will take place Saturday,
April 24, from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Sunday, April
25, from 1 0 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission is free, and the
event along the river will feature regional and award
winning artists with original works and prints, authentic
custom-designed pottery, stained glass, sculpture, unique
metal art, wood carvings, yard art and more. The
festival is located downtown on scenic Marine Street
along Carrabelle's beautiful River walk. Don't miss the
greof Off, Seafood, maritime exhibits, sand sculpture,
Kid's Zone and live music. For more information, call the
Carrabelle Area Chamber of Commerce at 697-2585.


hance to climb the rock DAVIDADLERSTEIN|TheTimes
rabelle Riverfront Festival.


COASTALCULTURE


W0 0 k0 Rd





0 I I
0 OW


i


First Lighthouse Challenge comes to Forgotten Coast


. '





Apalachicola Maritime Museum Educational Tours

Vessel Tour description

Starfish Enterprise
36'Powercatomaran WorkingWaterfrontHeritage
Nature Alive Eco Educational
Sunset and Dinner Maritime Appreciation

Chattahoochee Round trip with meals, bev-
erages and overnight accommodations
Legacyeducationaltripwithcanoe&kay-
aks. AIImealsbeveragesovernightaccom-
modations and entertainment
Heritageof Apalachicola
58'WoodenHerreschoffKetch Historicalcoastalandrivertripwithmeals,
beverages and overnight accommodations



Canoe, Kayak, Paddle Board Beginner & Intermediate training
Guided paddle tour
individualfishingorexcursion

Rowing Beginner & Intermediate training
Guidedpaddletour
Individualfishingorexcursion

Dorysailing Beginner&Intermediatetraining
Guided sail tour
Individualexcursion

Seafood Harvest Education Oyster Tour
Tours Crabbing Tour
Shrimping Tour
Call 850-653-2500 for schedules & fees.
TOURS STARTING AT $15


Thursday, April 22, 2010


B2 | The Times


Local


A local scout troop is making a
difference for homeless animals.
Daisy 'Itoop 200 of Franklin
County generously donated part
of their cookie proceeds to the
Franklin County Humane Society.
The girls wanted to help improve
the lives of homeless pets, so they
voted to share their earnings with
the adoption center. The troop
gathered at Forgotten Coast TV
on Friday to present the check for
$100 to Karen Martin, new direc-
tor at the animal shelter. Daisies
Meredith Alford, Lanie Allen,
Nadia Etheridge, Ella Friedman,
Kelsey Griffin, Genevieve Mont-
gomery, Jasmine Richards, Ra-


chel Rudd, Gillian Terhune and
Alaina Wilson were all on hand for
the presentation.
Being on TV was exciting but
not nearly as much fun as going
to the shelter and holding pup-
pies. What's better than puppies?
Thankyou, Daisies, for your hard
work and generosity. The Hu-
mane Society and the homeless
pets that live there appreciate
your donation.
Martin encourages everyone
to donate to the Humane Society.
The Franklin County Adoption
Center is small, but it makes a
big difference in the lives of many
homeless animals.


KAREN MARTIN|ISpecial to the Times


ELIZABETH RODGERS


.

Happy birthday, Kaydence Bartley

Kaydence Elizabeth Bartley celebrated
her 1st birthday on Saturday, April 3, 2010.
She is the daughter of Hunter Bartley and
m. Jessica Ard, of Eastpoint. She is the little sis-
ter of Kelson and Kylee Smith, of Eastpoint.
Her grandparents are Duane Bartley and
L 54 Barbara Proctor, of Apalachicola; Michelle
Bartley and Kurt Vey, of Clermont; Dennis
*, andMicheleTuggleofCrestview;andWayne
Ard, of Eastpoint.
Great-grandparents are Carl and Eunice
Ard, of Eastpoint; Mike and Irene Pridgen, of
Sumatra; Kenny and Maryann Keagle, ofSt.
4 Petersburg; Mary and the late John McKib-
ben, of Clermont; Joe and Wanda Grawet, of
Clermont; and the late Archie and Margaret
Bartley, ofApalachicola.
Kaydence celebrated her big day with a
big birthday bash. Thanks to all friends and
KAYDENCE ELIZABETH BARTLEY family who attended.


Birth


2

a 6


")S
t.1E!. PIA[HOSHIAL


. I / it178(! It '///lL ///t lit ISSee A IflilOlia



I ]IIIIIII L._stillit presities 111101.11111.( 5011.(5 [hroutil\\(01115
Hospill jo ille resultials in.1 s ailiers 01 Ille =:0tillit 100 kitallC(
illit*I.Illia.:es--one 511110.10.1 la Lillicl \dlife 111.1One anchoredI
Sellers I'll:1-- are Itall\ 511110.1 1-1 1101.115 1.111 seven del\s a neel(
ERIT5 111.1 prillie.11.:5 sills 1111 Ilills 10 ].;III(\( .1 respollSC title
-

Reecial Collectus 4.01.11.1ca 1...15 on II.csc anit*I..l.1...:es liiglilight
1651.161115 10 1.III.1015i III.1 01 la Ille shotal.1.:111 91 I ,111.1 feQLle5t (
111101.11 III. ( El11. ( \II Illip 1[ IIII I.II.1(hile is (111 101 311 alillbul
laise 1.1.1 1 51.1.1.10.1 1110.11.:11 Oilers in.;\ nhell 101.11 liellfil is ill 56
111.1 0hell act1 50.:..II.1.:.Diallis he pretend 1..1.11 Ilelli fron1 gettil

Follonalls Ale.11.:1ce inal.jelines \\(ellis ERIS Williperts all patiff
sincesi Approprille 11.;Illij re it.lless GI dific 11.51.11,111. ( Or Millity

ille 51111( sertis (5 Ale.11. ice 5 pl\llielli AIll be 0150.1Oil [heI121]
.:loses[ 1pproprille 11.;Ihis $1101.11.1 101.1 Illid 111\ 01.105110115 or 11e4
IIdorallilical plast ill \\(ellis RICITIOrill Hosplill 1653-3353),



g
\VIVIV. WeillSillelllOf la l.COIT


~ lir~


I


50-somethings


fhtSO 9 OU
I Vn Ln J


SUmmer (0 m e0y

5 I to The T.pe nes
The Gulf Alliance for Local Arts will
hold auditions next week for its upcoming
summer production of "Sex Please We're
Sixty!" an American farce written by Mi-
chael and Susan Parker and directed by
Eastpoint's Margy Oehlert.
The three performances are sched-
uled for Friday, Saturday and Sunday,
July 9, 10 and 11.
The farce takes place at Mrs. Stan-
cliffe's Rose Cottage Bed & Breakfast,
a successful B&B for many years. Her
guests (nearly all women) return year
after year. Her next door neighbor, the el-
derly, silver-tongued Bud "Bud the Stud"
Davis believes they come to spend time
with him in romantic liaisons. The prim
and proper Mrs. Stancliffe steadfastly
denies this but really doesn't do anything
to prevent it. She reluctantly accepts the
fact that "Bud the Stud" is, in fact, good
for business.
Her other neighbor and would-be
suitor Henry Mitchell is a retired chem-
ist who has developed a blue pill called
"Venusia," after Venus, the goddess of
love, to increase the libido of menopausal
women. The pill has not been tested. Add
to the guest list three older women, Vic-
toria Ambrose, a romance novelist whose
sees gsHlif rse sstonb 1 Mn f n:

ry's who has agreed to test the Venusia;
and Charmaine Beauregard, a "southern
belle" whose libido does not need to be
increased.
Bud gets his hands on some of the Ve-
nusia pills, and the f un begins as he at-
tempts to entertain all three women. The
women mix up Bud's Viagra pills with
the Venusia, and we soon discover that
it has a strange effect on men: It gives
them all the symptoms of menopausal
women, complete with hot flashes, mood
swings, weeping and irritability. When the
mayhem settles down, all the women find
their lives moving in new and surprising
directions.
When the director first approached
us with just the title, I must admit a few
eyebrows were raised," said Blake Den-
ton, GALA Community Theater chair.
"But after reading it and its reviews
from across the country, we realized it
was not inappropriate as the title may

sugTg st."are six roles to be cast, four
women and two men, all age 50 and older.
There are also crew positions available
for those who wish to participate but not
be on stage.
It will be open audition. Those wanting
to audition or seek crew positions simply
have to show up Tuesday, April 27, at 7
p.m. EST at the Cape San Blas Firehouse,
off C-30, just after you turn on the Cape
Road.
"I had never attempted acting at all
until last year. I had absolutely no experi-
ence whatsoever. It ended up being one
of the most enjoyable and fulfilling things
I have ever done. I encourage anyone to
give it a try," said Denton.
For more information about the "Sex
Please We're Sixty!" auditions, rehearsal
schedule and performances, please con-
tact Oehlert at 670-8874.
To find out more about GALA Commu-
nity Theater and Gulf Alliance for Local
Arts, as well as sponsorship and volun-
teer opportunities for this and other proj-
ects, please visit www.gulfalliance.org, or
contact Don Ouellette at 850-229-2748.


Daisies to the rescue


Birthdays


.
Happy birthday
; J )
*
Ehzabeth
1
Oagers
Elizabeth Rodgers will turn 93 years
old on Thursday, April 29, 2010.
Happy birthday, sister,


,,"';:"-~":,,P C ~


Kati-Morgan

JOhnson Ricky

Hathcock to wed

Mr. and Mrs. Darren Johnson, of
Eastpoint, are proud to announce the
engagement of their daughter, Kati-
Morgan Johnson, to Ricky Wayne Hath-
cock
Mr. Hathcock is the son of Rick Ha-
thcock and Cindy Summerhill, of East-

,ot'iss Johnson is the granddaughter
of Mr. and Mrs. John Paul Jones and Mr.
and Mrs. Rodney Fickel, of Leesburg,
Ga., and Mr. and Mrs. John K. Johnson,
of Arlington, Texas.
The bride-elect is a 2007 graduate of
Apalachicola High School. She attended
the University of Florida for two years
and currently is pursuing a degree in
nursing at Gulf Coast College.
Mr. Hathcock is the grandson of Mr.
and Mrs. Jesse J. Polous, of Eastpoint,
and Mr. and Mrs. Ferris Hathcock, of
Apalachicola.
A 2001 graduate of Apalachicola High
School, Mr. Hathcockis employedby the
Florida Department of Environmental
Protection as an environmental special-
ist.
The couple will exchange wedding
vows in a 3 p.m. ceremony, Friday, May
14, 2010, on Makapu'u Beach, Oahu, Ha-
waii.
A reception will be held for the cou-
ple on Saturday, August 7, 2010, at the
Eastpoint Church of God. All family and
friends are invited.


LINDA LUCILLE DILLON


T 1
LInda Lucille Dillon born Feb. z

Misty Dillon, of Eastpoint, and Zachary Paul, of Apalachicola, are proud to an-
nounce the birth of their daughter, Linda Lucille Dillon.
Luci was born on Monday, Feb. 22, 2010. She is the granddaughter of Daniel Dil-
lon and the late Linda Dillon, of Eastpoint.
We are so proud that our baby girl finally has joined us.
Mommy and Daddy love you, Luci!


SOLDRWHYRS (


ISUNSETDINNER CRUISE









Obituaries


Church BR IE F S


First Baptist Church
St. Geo Island
rge
501 E. Bayshore Drive
927-2257
R. Michael Waley, Pastor
"GreJolin ua praise nd wo hipf 145:3
Sunday Bible Study ................ ................ 10:00am
Worship Praise................ ................ 11:00am
Sunday Nigh ................... ................7:00pm
Wednesday Power Hour ............. ................7:00pm
Wednesday Youth at S.EL.A.S.H .......................7:00pm
"Walking in Christ"


The United Methodist Churches
Of Franklin County Welcome You

First United Methodist Church of Apalachicola
Worship Service 11:00 a.m. every Sunday
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
75 56 St. Apalachicola 653-9530 fumcapalach@gtcom.net
Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis
Carrabelle United Methodist Church
Worship Servi etse10:45 a m. S nday Scho :30 a.m.
Healing service first Tuesday each month-? p.m.
102NEAve.B a abell n697-3672

Eastpoint United Methodist Church
Pr Worshi erviceal0:e0s0 i 1 m.
Healing Service every first Fridays ofthe Month at 6:30 p.m.
317 Patton Dr. (corner of David St.) 670-8825
Pastor: Rev. Beth White
St. George Island United Methodist Church
9:00 a.m. Worship Service
10:00 a.m. Fellowship Hour
201 E. Gulf Beach Dr. 927- 4635 www.sgiumc.org
Pastor: Rev. ThemoPatriotis


'
St. Patrick Catholic Church
Ave C & Sixth Street in Apalachicola, FL 32329 or
The Islander (Across from the Blue Parrot)
on St. George Island, FL 32328
(850) 653-9453 Email: stpatcath@fairpoint.net
PASTOR: FATHER ROGER LATOSYNSKI
www.stpatricksmass.com
APALACHICOLA MASS SCHEDULE
SATURDAY................. .................5 PM
SUNDAY ................ ................ 10 AM
ST. GEORGE ISLAND MASS SCHEDULE
SUNDAY ................ .................8:30 AM


First Pentecostal Holiness Church
379 Brownsville Road Apalachicola


Sunday School 9:45 am
Sunday Morning Worship 10:45 am
Sunday Evening Service 6:00 pm
Monday, Youth Group 6:30 pm
Wednesday, Royal Rangers, G.A.P. 7:00 pm
Wednesday Worship & Word 7:30 pm
Nursery Provided during regular church services


Thursday, April 22, 2010


Local


The Times | B3


Jean Ellen Sanders (Johnson)
Lolley passed away Saturday, April
17, at her residence in Carrabelle.
She was born Sept. 16, 1939, in
Moultrie, Ga., to the late Pate J.
and Gertrude Sanders. She lived
in Carrabelle for 35 years and was
a respected cook, homemaker and
lifetime member of the Ladies Aux-
iliary of American Legion Post 82 in
Lanark Village.
She loved gardening, travel-
ing, her grandchildren and will be
missed by all who met, loved and
knew her.
She was preceded in death by her
parents; brother, Pate Sanders Jr.;
sisters, Mary Lou Bullington and
Bertha Hampton; first husband, Wil-
liam (Billy) Johnson; son, William
(Pete) Johnson; and granddaughter,
Sarah Jean Johnson.
She is survived by her much be-
loved husband, William (Billy) Lol-
ley, of Carrabelle; daughters, Nancy

Mary Gee Lev


Johnson, of Crawfordville, Ellen
Johnson, of Carrabelle, and Susan
(Duke) Green, of Sopchoppy; daugh-
ter-in-law, Angie Johnson; sons,
Wesley Johnson, (Scott Youghn), of
Orlando, and Johnny (Millie) John-
son Sr., ofCarrabelle; stepdaugh-
ter, Megan (Junior); and brothers,
Ralph (Elaine) Sanders, of Nacog-
doches, Texas, and James (Annette)
Sanders, of Adel, Ga.
She is also by grandchildren,
Michelle (Tony) Murray, Lee (Shan-
non) Venable, Crystal (Richie) Sand,
James (Erin) Keith, Jason (Donna)
Keith, Ellen (Pete Folsom) Keith,
Alicia (Stevie Bebee) Green, Duke
(Jamie Cumbie) Green, Pedro
Johnson, Jessica (Dewey) Williams,
Denim Johnson, Johnny Jr. (Jen-
nifer) Johnson and Popeye Johnson,
and Tania and Denis; great-grand-
children, Randall Bentley, Stacey
(Brent) Franeway, Lea Venable,
Tucker Venable, Lucas Keith,


JD Keith, Anthony Land, Kyron
Wheeler, Kyler Bebee, Hailey Green,
Jade Johnson, Bruce Keith, Blake
Johnson, Blair Johnson, Haven
Johnson and Joli Johnson, great-
great-grandson Tanner Franeway;
plus nieces and nephews and their
families too numerous to list.
Mother was a very strong and
well-liked member of the community
and all those who knew her as Ms.
Jean or Mama will have many fond
memories to carry on.
There will be a family viewing
at the Kelley-Riley Funeral Home
in Carrabelle from 4 to 5 p.m. and
a public viewing from 5 to 8 p.m.
Wednesday, April 21.
Graveside services will be at
3 p.m. Thursday, April 22 at Ever-
green Cemetery in Carrabelle with
Brother Ronald Barks officiating.
In lieu of flowers, the family re-
quests that donations be made to
The Disabled Veterans of America.


Mary Gee Levi, 85, of
Mount Dora, passed away
on April 8 at The Bridge at
Bay St. Joe, in Port St. Joe.
She was born May
10, 1924, in Elmira, N.Y.,
daughter of Charles and
Eva Gee.
She resided in Addison,
N.Y., for many years, and
later moved to Venice,
and then to Mount Dora
in 1997. Mrs. Levi was a
Fifth Grade teacher at Ad-
dison Central School for
more than 20 years. During
World War II she worked
for Ingersoll Rand, after
which she attended both
Albany and Geneseo teach-
ers colleges. She was an
Episcopalians, and a mem-
her of Tuscarora Woodhull


Order of the Eastern Star.
Mrs. Levi was recently
predeceased by her hus-
band of57 years, Charles
W. Levi. She is survived by
her daughter, Lauren K.
Levi of St. George Island.
She was also predeceased
by her two brothers, Ken-
neth Gee and Gordon Gee.
Mrs. Levi was an avid
and talented quilter. She
also had a concern and
love for animals and
had rescued numerous
dogs and cats over the
years.
Those desiring may
direct memorials, in her
name, to the Franklin
County Humane Society,
EO. Box 417, Eastpoint, FL
32328.


Shameshame,
shame on the persons)
who is stealing things
from outside the Thrift
Shop in Lanark Village.
Betty and Sharon now
eputoutss B
sure to say cheese, and LAN] m
fix your hair.
Well, this will be an-
Other great weekend! Hope you
can make it down to the River-
front Festival. All along Marine
Street, in Carrabelle, will be
craft booths, kids area, sand
sculpture, food booths, music,
music, music and fun, fun!
Saturday, April 24, and Sunday,
April 25, the festival begins at
10 a.m. See ya there!
Thanks to all who supported
the low country boil, yard sale,
and the 50/50 last Saturday at
Sacred Heart of Jesus Catholic
Church. We had a good crowd
and perfect weather. Thanks
also to all the helpers! The roof
fund got a big shot in the arm!


lamsogladtosee
that ElderCare has
moved back to 302 Av-
enue F in Carrabelle.
The building was built
for the Yaupon Garden

luob u o Se-
nior Center. Check out
the services they have


THE
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
WELCOMES YOU


THE


eK a W


for seniors.
Well, at lunch last Wednes-
day at the Senior Center, we
got a big surprise. Our friend,
Debbie Bachman, came by
and played hymns for us on
her harp. Very good, Debbie!
Debbie and her late husband,
Clyde, lived in the area for a
while.
Be kind to one another.
Check in on the sick and
housebound, and remember
- Friends are like stars. You
won't always see them, but you
know they are there!
Until next time, God Bless
America, our troops, the poor,
homeless, and hungry


Te< aa +
1 11111L
EST. 1836

Hwy. 98 & 6th St.
Apalachicola
SUNDAY: 8:00 AM 10:30 AM
LIBRARY HOURS:
SUNDAY 12:00 2:00 PM
MONDAY 11:00 AM 1:00 PM
WEDNESDAY 12:00 2:00 PM
THURSDAY 3:30 5:30 PM


LOIS SWOBODA | The Times
Jay and Marcia Thompson
A fish fry to benefit the Thompson family, of
Carrabelle, was a sell-out success Saturday, as
the seafood worker community banded together
to help their own.
A fish fry, held at Taylor's Building Supply,
sold out of food. In addition, there was a raffle for
a hand-tied cast net, which was won by Charles
Odom, of Eastpoint and Sumatra.
do T mowere al a number of beautiful cakes
Marcie Thompson said she and her husband,
Jay, are waiting on a check from the insurance
company and searching for a trailer, probably a
repo, to replace their home that burned on March
29. The fire at 130 West Drive off of County Road

16e7Rdtehs cont etfh i lu se an1d
4 and 7, and a 4-month-old daughter homeless.
She said the family has plenty of clothing and
some furniture and household items. They are
currently staying in a house belonging to Paula
Mauney, ofCarrabelle.
Once the Thompsons find a new home, they
may need additional household items and furni-
ture.
Thompson said she wished to thank Barber's
Seafood, Hicks Seafood and Lynn's Oysters for
their donations to the benefit. She also thanked
many family members and friends who contrib-
uted their time, skill and prayers to make the fish
fry a success, and J.J. Thompson, who tied the
cast net.
An account has been set up at Gulf State Com-
munity Bank to receive donations. To help the
Thompsons, contact victim's advocate Clarice
Powell at 370-6086.
-By Lois Swoboda


Thu sday May 6 at 6hpem I the

C. Bartelt Hospice Center, 1723
Mahan Center Blvd., in Tal-
lahassee. This special service
will feature music, reflection

dl c h sg An
lighting ceremony will close the
service and the names of loved
ones may be spoken at that
time if desired.
Attendees are invited to
bring a photo of their loved one
to display during the service if
they wish. The Remembrance
Quilt will be available if anyone
wishes to write a message in
memory ofa loved one. Special
children's activities will be
provided by the Caring Tree.
Following the service, light re-
freshments will be served.
For additional informa-
tion about the service, please
contact Laurie Ward at 850-
878-5310, ext. 752, or laurie@
bighendhospice.org.


(ARD OF THANKS

Ouida and John Sack
We would like to take this opportunity
to thank all the people who shared in our
50th wedding anniversary celebration.
We thank you all for all your cards, gifts
and prayers. We extend a special thanks
to our six daughters, Vicki, Sue, Bev, Ann,
Chris and Kim for their tireless efforts to
make this a treasured memory. Again, our
heartfelt thanks to all, and thanks for the
memories.
Ouide and John Sock
Wall Hill
ace
My family and I would like to take
this opportunity to thank all the people
who were part of the recent blood drive
hosted by Southeastern Community Blood
Center and Bay Medical Blood Center last
month. As you know, blood is a precious
gift and saves many lives, so thanks to
all of those who took the time to donate
blood especially on my behalf. We are
truly grateful for your time, effort and
generosity.
A very special thanks to all the
volunteers that worked so hard organizing
and advertising such a successful event.
Thanks to all of you for your prayers,
friendship and well wishes. We are truly
blessed to live in such a giving and caring
community and I thank all of you for your
continued prayers, support, love and
concern.
Sincerely,
Wallace Hill and family

Frigad5 lip Baptist Church
We, the members of the Friendship
Baptist Church, would like to express
our wholehearted appreciation to the
community, the Open Door Male Choir
from Quincy, and the Ingrid Brothers
Quartet, from Enterprise, Alabama, for the
success of the first Men's Day at Friendship
Missionary Baptist Church on Sunday,

Ap el .0uld also like to thank Deacon
Henry Brown, our chairperson, for
dedicated services.


.
Dekie Shiver
Delcie Faircloth Shiver, 90, passed away
Thursday, April l5, at her home.
She was born May 31, 1919, in Rock Bluff in
Liberty County.
She and her late husband, Elzie Shiver, along
with their family moved to Eastpoint in the 1940s.
She was a member of the First Baptist Church of
Eastpoint.
Services were held Sunday afternoon, April
18 at the First Baptist Church of Eastpoint with
interment at the Eastpoint Cemetery. Family
received friends Sunday afternoon until service
time, at the church.
She is survived by sons, Lloyd and Elzie
"Buddy" Shiver, of Eastpoint, and Larry Shiver,
of Crawfordville; daughter, Evelyn Shiver Carroll,
of Eastpoint; 21 grandchildren; and several great-
and great-great-grandchildren.
She was predeceased by her husband, Elzie
Shiver; sons, Allen and Dallas Shiver; anddaugh-
ter Joan Shiver.
Charles McClellan Rmeral, Quincy, is in
charge arrangements.


Lanark NEWS


Successful

fish benefits

d* 1 1 P *
ISDIRC6G TRIIll


WELCOMES YOU
II PC
1 1 0 1 6 1 1

Of the .
an I #1 n
ry T- II I UII
101 NE First Street
Carrabelle
SUNDAY
10:00 AlVI


Knights of Columbus host
Relay for Life fundraiser
The Knights of Columbus
Council 1648 will sponsor a
Bingo night on Thursday, April

hr 6 r tt c
Avenue C, in Apalachicola, be-
ginning at 6 p.m. All proceeds
will go to the American Cancer
Society and be used toward the
team's financial goal to assist
in the effort of fighting cancer.
The donation is $20 per
person, which includes eight
games of Bingo.Prizes will be
provided and there will also be
a final jackpot game. Refresh-
ments will be available.

Hospice to host Mother'S
Day Remembrance
Big Bend Hospice invites
the Franklin County com-
munity to a Mother's Day
Remembrance Service on









































































p -r
= 1

WEE K

COME R *
Corey is one of six 8-
week-old Bea le/Pointer
mtxes. He and all of his
littermates are social and
playful. They won't be big
dogs so if you are looking
to add a medium size,
gentle, sweet dog to your
family, Corey or one of his
siblings might be the perfect fit. One has already
been adopted so don't wait too long to come and
meet this adorable litter!
VOLUNTEERSaredesperatelyneededtosocialize
Corey and all of the other dogs and cats. We are
always looking for people willing to bring one of
Our animals into their home to be fostered for
various needs. Anytime you can spare would be
greatly appreciated.
Call Karen at 670-8417 for more details or visit
the Franklin County Humane Society at 244 State
Route 65 in Eastpoint. You may log onto the
website at www.forgottenpets.org to see more of
Our adopt able pets
DON'T PAY TOO MUCH!
$50 Q t l
Saves YOU $100 a year!
forresidentialaccounts

AIoha Buls Post Manatement
Franklin County s ONLY LOCAL Pest control company
Call Lois at (850) 653-5857


STATE OF FLORIDA
DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION
NOTICE OF INTENT TO ISSUE PERMIT
(FLA010065-004-DW2R/RA)
The D ....... ... I 0.. ... ...... ... .1 I.. .. ... ..:. ... .... I .. ..... nt to issue a permit to Eastpoint Water & Sewer DistrictJoyce Estes, Post Office Box 610,
Eastpo.... I I. .. 1. ..I ..... .I .... 1.1.. .... .. ...... .. .1.. wastewater treatment plants reuse site for the addition ofan off site 10 acre sprayfield site (12
spray zones at an applicatiory rate of0.61 inches per week for an additional O.024 MGD . ..: 1 n. 11 1,,, 1 1,. non .. n, TI,. .. .1
reusecapacitywillincreasefrom0.300MGD u......l ...-. inI II. (AADF)toO.32 1 l* .I ...1 1 ll.. }......... 1 11 4 ...., .II...
MGD MADE
Construction includes the following:
.Installationofanewpumpin 1,. ; ,;na... .. .11,,,1,. WWTE
. Construction of 510 LF 6-inch diameter reuse force main to connect to the existing reuse force main (at the WWTP site).
* Construction of 6,230 LF (1.2 miles) 6-inch reuse force main on County Road 65.
. Construction ofa pump station, fixed head irrigation system, chain link perimeter . l....1 1 ..11 -. ... ... 1. ... I ..... ..... ....: well ar the new sprayfield site.
The proposed new sprayfield site is located on the east side of County Road 65 about 1.0 mile north of the intersection of U.S. Highway 98 & County Road 65 in
Franklin County Florida. The site is adjacent and north ofthe existing Franklin County Jail. The property lies in Section 15, Township E I ...:. .,W

On D. n n... n, 1,, .,,,,;n a,; ,,,,; 1;.,;. ...... 1.. Chapter 403.087, Florida Statutes, and Florida Administrative Code Rules 62-4, 62-520, 62-600, 62-601,
6 Il: . _= = . is 1 . -= = ... 1. . * I 1.. project is not exempt from pennittingprocedures. The Deparnnent has determined that a wastewater permit is
requiredfortheproposedwork.
Theintentroissueand*Ill;.n;.nn1.,,. .,;1,11.1:=1-11;.;**1...:...1...:..:........1businesshours,8:002.m.to5:00p.m., 1...1. .l.....:1,F,;1, ..grl.ol
holidays, at the Depamnents Northwest Distnct Uttice, 16U Governmental Center, Suite 308, Pensacola, Florida 32502-5794 .. I I.. .
The Department will issue the pennit with the attached conditions unless a timely petition for an administrative hearing is filed under Sections 120.569 and 120.57,
Florida Statutes, within fourteen days of receipt of notice. The procedures for petitioning for a hearing are set forth below.
Apersonwhosesubstantialinterestsareaffectedb-theD I ==******** I l- l - 11-== **71........l.. ... in... in.-.l.. .....-.....i.,
Sections l20.569 2nd l20.57, Florid2 Statures. ine petition must contain the intonnation set torth befor ... 1..... 1 1.1. 1... .. . 11 s l.. lu l ... .l.. *l l.. of
General Counsel of the Department at 3900 Commonwealth Boulevard, Mail Station 35, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-3000.
UnderRule62-1111Ill.:1 1l...i. .i.............-Codea ersonm, ..,,,. .,n. ..,,;.n.1.1,.,;,,,.1:,11;**:*I..;::...l .anadministrativehear The
requestmustbefiled(receivedbytheClerk) intheOfficeofPGenerall...... II. l.... .l.. ....i..I ll.. ...... .......i l..i ld...: ....rionforanadministratiTeanng.
Petitions filed by er sons other than those entitled to written notice under Section 120.60(3), Florida Statutes, must be filed within fourteen days of publication
of the nonce or w hapfourteen days of receipt of the written notice, whichever occurs first. Section 120.60(3) F1. ,; 1, C, .1 ,11. .1, n n, rson
who has asked the Deparnnent for notice of agency action may file a petition within fourteen days of receipt< I ... L ... .... .. : n il. I .1.. 1... I ..I 1.. ..
The petitioner shall mail a copy of the petition to the applicant at the address indicated above:,, ,1,. ,;,,,. I 11;,,:. The failure of any person to file a petition or
request for an extension of time within fourteen days of receipt of ,,. ,;. 1, ,11. n ,;n ... ,; . I ,1, n ., n ,;:1,, ... request an administrative detennination
... i. Sections 120.569 and 120.57, Florida Statutes. Any ...I ,... ... 11 .... .1.. ... .11 I . ..1 .r the
discrenonot l.. l. .in.:. ll.....4....l.. hl...:. l .............compi n... ,,1,1,,1. Ill.- _11- f l...i. .1.....
A petition that disputes the material facts on which the Deparnnents action is based must contain the following information, as indicated in Rule 28-106.201,
Florida Administrative Code:
Thenameandaddressof ..1, ,:...-. ,11:....1 ,,,.1. ..1, ,a n. 01. .., ,.1. nun. .... o.n.n.,1., ,11.n.>wn;
The name, address, andrelephonenumber of the petitioner; the name, address, ....1 u l- 1 1. *** *******1 '1** 1 *** ul n. n; ;i n, 1,;. 1, 1,,11
eaddressforservicepurposesduringthecourseoftheproceeding;andanexpl......... II.. .1..1.......... ..I .......In..... .Ill. .il.... 11 .1..
detennination:
A statement ofwhen and how the petitioner received notice ofthe Depamnents decision:
A statement of all disputed issues of material fact.If there are none, the petition must so indicate;
A concise statement of the ultimate facts alleged, including the specify ic facts the petitioner contends warrant reversal or modif ication of the Departments
osedaction:
A statement of the specific rules or statutes the petitioner contends require reversal or modification of the Deparnnents proposed action; and
A statement of the relief sought by the petitioner, stating precisely the action petitioner wishes the Deparnnent to take with respect to the Depamnents proposed
2CtlOn.
.,1,. ,1,,,,,n.,n..1,.,,n.; .... 1. ,;,,.1,. [,,,,,,1,,.0,,,1,;.,,.- ..,,.,,,1,.11;n:.1, .,;.ionmeansthattheDepamnentsfinalactionmaybe
1.il......l......In t. ...l...1, ......In ....... 0..... 1.. ..I .......In..... .Ill. .ll... il;ranysuchfinaldecisionoftheDepamnenthavetheright
to pennon to become a party to the proceeding, in accordance with the requirements set forth above.
Mediation under Section 120.573, Florida Statutes, is not available for this proceeding.


........ . .


I





I <


Thursday, April 22, 2010


Mark this date on your calendar.
The Friends of the Franklin County
Public Library is hosting "Boogie
for Books," a family-oriented event
planned for Saturday, May 8 from 4
to 8 p.m. in the lot next to Taylor's
Hardware. Boogie to the sounds of
three great hands, participate in
fun games for adults and kids, enjoy
local cuisine, and try out the Gum-
bo. Admission is $5 and all proceeds
go toward the new library building
in Eastpoint.
Charlie Sawyer, a Wilderness
Coast Library computer instructor,
returns to the Eastpoint Library on
Friday, April 23, from 2 to 5 p.m. to
teach, Computer Basics II: E-mail


and the Web. Learn how to set up
a free e-mail account; and how to
open and attach files to e-mails.
Learn how to safely and securely
access the World Wide Web.
On Saturday, April 24, Charlie
will be at the Carrabelle branch,
from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. teaching Mi-
crosoft Publisher. Learn how to get
started creating professional busi-
ness cards, newsletters, brochures,
flyers and other print publications.
The next series of free computer
classes at the Eastpoint library
and Carrabelle branch begin May
13 in Eastpoint. Call 670-8151 in
Eastpoint or 697-236 in Carrabelle
to register.


Both the Eastpoint and Carra-
belle branches continue to highlight
the newest additions to the collec-
tion by keeping them out in front of
the public for easy access. The 2009
and 2010 additions are marked for
quick identification and are placed
in a book case with other new
DVDs, large print, and non-fiction
editions.
Holds can be placed on all mate-
rial if your favorite is not available
when you are ready to check out;
just ask a staff or volunteer to place
it for you. The library staff will call
you when hold materials have been
returned and are once again ready
for checkout.


I always loved
the phrase, "Why
call it tourist
season if we can't
shoot them?" or
something like that,
but really, here at
the Apalachicola
Municipal Library
we love the tourists,
visitors, snowbirds
and other seasonal
folks.
They come in and
are so grateful to be
able to use the public
computers, to check


regions (thanks
to the Chamber of
Commerce for
their great
RARY marketing).
Vermont and
reene other New

England states,
as well as Michigan
and Minnesota are well
represented. Canadians
by far outnumber
Other countries on
the international list.
Yesterday, a young man
from Louisiana, who
is bicycling across the
South, stopped in to e-
mail his parents to tell
them of his progress.
He wrote "A Lifesaver"
in the book. Two weeks
ago, after helping some
visitors with genealogical
resources, I got a
check in the mail for
$50 with a very sweet
thank you.
Librarians who are
travelling are compelled to
check out the local library.
Many are amused by our
old-fashioned card catalog,
something which exists in
few places in the modern
world of computers.
We swap stories about
small libraries, and they
often reminisce about
their childhood library
experiences.
I know merchants
and other businesses in
Apalach direct visitors to
us, and the Chamber's
Visitor Center certainly
tells me that they get lots
of requests for services we
can provide.
The Apalachicola
Municipal Library thanks
you all, it makes the
library more vibrant and
fun.
Caty Greene is
librarian for the
Apalachicola Municipal
Library. To reach her, call
653-8436.


e-mail, keep in touch with
family at home, print
boarding passes, develop
itineraries, check their
Facebook or just find out
what's going on in the big
world out there.
In addition to using our
public computers, our Wi-
Fi allows visitors to bring
in their own laptops and
get on the internet,
even sitting at the park
bench out under the oak
tree.
One couple "RVing"
through the area asked
if they could trade out
paperbacks, which
they had already read,
for ones on our rack.
Visitors staying longer
get temporary cards and
borrow books.
Lately, I have been
trying to remember to
ask visitors to sign our
guestbook, and I am just
amazed at the number
and variety of places
they call home. More
than half of the 50 states
are represented as well
as numerous foreign
countries and that's just
since January.
While we get our share
of fellow southerners,
Apalachicola seems
to attract a good
number of folks who are
escaping from colder


By Lois Swoboda
Times StaffWriter
Celeste Wall, of
St. George Island, is the
new District Two director
for the Florida Federation
of Women's Clubs (FFWC).
At the April meeting of
Philaco, the women's club
voted on a new set of offi-
cers and heard a report on
the FFWC convention held
in Orlando this month.
Wall, Jackie Bell and
Marilyn Hogan attended
the convention, which in-
cluded a Florida Board of
Directors meeting. Wall
was appointed to the board
for the district encompass-
ing clubs in Panama City,
Marianna, Chipley, Blount-
stown, Chattahoochee,
Wewahitchka, and Apala-
chicola. There are only 14
districts in the state, so
Wall's appointment is a
great honor.
At the same meeting,
Hogan was formally named
to the Strategic Planning
Committee for FFWC.
Philaco received two
statewide awards for ser-
vice projects: A third place
award for literacy and a
second place award for


and island resident Adele
Colston are the vice presi-
dents. Connie McKinley, of
Apalachicola, continues as
treasurer, and Shirley Tay-
lor, of Eastpoint, and Bell,
of St. George Island, are
recording secretary and
corresponding secretary,
respectively.
The new board will be
officially installed at the
May Philaco meeting.
April's luncheon, hosted
by the Philaco conservation
committee, was a break
from the usual for the club
with seafood lasagna, pre-
pared by Susan Hoffritz, of
Eastpoint, served al fresco
at Lighthouse Park on the
island. The keynote speak-
er was Kawicka Bailey, of
the Florida Division of For-
estry, who spoke on pre-
scribed burning. Bailey was
accompanied by coworkers
Tiffany Vickery and Opal
IRilton, who took time to
display and discuss several
pieces of heavy equipment
they operate regularly as
professional foresters and
firefighters.
The club was enthralled
by Bailey's talk and asked
many questions of the three
foresters.


LOIS SWOBODA | The Times


domestic violence preven-
tion.
Members of the Philaco
reading sorority, always
a winner at the statewide
meeting, took a third place
ribbon for the most books
read by any club in the
state and Dawn Radford
was presented the winning
certificate for most books
read by an individual, with
270 to her credit.
Competing against arts
and crafts entries that filled


an entire conference hall,
Philaco member Mary Har-
rell won second prize for
her original family cook-
book in the scrapbook cat-
egory and, once again, Wall
took honors. Her distinctive
needlepoint entry received
a third place award.
New officers for Philaco
for 2010-2012 were chosen
at last Thursday's meeting.
Hogan, anEastpointres-
ident, is the new president.
Judy Cook of Apalachicola


Florida's Coastal Seas," and
will be presented by Loren
McClenachan, who earned
a doctorate in marine biol-
ogy in 2009 from the Scripps
Institution of Oceanogra-
phy. McClenachan now
serves as a postdoctoral
associate in the department
of biological science at The
Florida State University.
Her research is focused on


the fields of historical ma-
rine ecology and marine en-
vironmental history.
To learn more about
this public lecture, or about
future lectures planned
as part of the monthly se-
riescontactthelaboratory
at 697-4095, or via e-mail
at sthomanca fsu.edu; or
visit the website at www.
marinelab.fsu.edu/.


The FSU Coastal and
Marine Laboratory collects
non-perishable food at each
monthly lecture, in associa-
tion with Second Harvest of
the Big Bend, part of "The
Nation's Food Bank Net-
work." Lecture attendees
are encouraged to bring a
non-perishable food item
and help solve the commu-
nity's hunger crisis.


B4 | The Times


Local


Tourists among the


Library HAPPENINGS


THE LIB
Cat G y


Philaco Club enthusiastic about new officers, awards


April 22 lecture focuses on history of coastal communities


Special to the Times
The Florida State Uni-
versity Coastal and Marine
Laboratory, at 3618 Coastal
Hwy 98 in St. Teresa, will
hold a free public lecture on
ThursdayApril22,from7to
9 p.m. Light refreshments
will be served after the talk.
Topic of the lecture is
"Environmental History of






























.
The City of Carrabelle is asking everyone to
CleaHMp JOur yards.
Rubbish, trash, junk, debris, abandoned material,
8XCBSsive accumulation of un tended growth of
.
weeds, unsafe structures, abandoned, discarded,
NHMSed objects or equipment such as automobiles,
boats, furniture, stoves, refigerators, feezers,
CGHS, or containers are a violation of City
.
Ordinance 389 and a fine of$250.00 per day can
be i osed
MP
Place items (not household garbage) on the right

Of way and we will pick it up. Need someone to
.
haul off those old vehicles? We know someone


S line


CITY OF CARRABELLE
PROPOSED ENACTMENT OF
CITY ORDINANCE

The City Commission of the City of Carrabelle, Florida, proposes
to enact the following ordinance:

ORDINANCE 445

AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF CARRABELLE, FLORIDA,
PROVIDING FOR THE ADOPTION OF LAND USE REGULATIONS;
PROVIDING FOR FINDINGS OF FACT; PROVIDING FOR CHANGES
IN THE PERMITTED, CONDITIONAL OR PROHIBITED USES WITHIN
THE VARIOUS ZONING DISTRICTS/CATEGORIES; PROVIDING FOR
GENERAL PROVISIONS; PROVIDING FOR ZONING DISTRICTS;
PROVIDING FOR SPECIAL DISTRICTS; PROVIDING FOR NATURAL
RESOURCES; PROVIDING FOR ADEQUATE PUBLIC FACILITIES;
PROVIDING FOR DEVELOPMENT OPTIONS; PROVIDING FOR
DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS; PROVIDING FOR REGULATION OF
SIGNS; PROVIDING FOR OPERATING STANDARDS; PROVIDING
FOR AGENCIES; PROVIDING FOR ADMINISTRATION; PROVIDING
FOR INTERPRETATIONS; PROVIDING FOR DEFINITIONS;
PROVIDING FOR AUTHORITY TO PROMULGATE RULES AND
REGULATIONS IMPLEMENTING AND INTERPRETING LAND
USE REGULATIONS; PROVIDING FOR REPEAL OF ORDINANCES
OR PARTS OF ORDINANCES, IN CONFLICT HEREWITH, TO THE
EXTENT OF SUCH CONFLICT; PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY;
AND ESTABLISHING AN EFFECTIVE DATE.

The proposed Ordinance may be inspected during regular hours at Carrabelle
City Hall between 8 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., 1001 Gray Avenue, Monday through
Friday, or call 850-697-2727.
The proposed Ordinance will be considered for enactment during a public
hearing to be held 6:00, Thursday May 6,2010 and June 3, 2010 at the City
of Carrabelle Meeting Room located at 1001 Gray Avenue, Carrabelle, FL.
Interested parties may appear at the hearing and be heard with respect to the
proposed Ordinance.
If an individual decides to appeal any decision made by the City Commission
with respect to this meeting, a verbatim transcript may be required. If so, the
individual should make provision for a transcript to be made at the meeting,
(RE: Florida Statute 286.0105). Pursuant to the provisions of the Americans
with Disabilities Act, any person requiring special accommodation to
participate in this meeting is asked to advise the city at least 48 hours before
the meeting by contacting Keisha Smith at the above address or phone
number.

Wilburn Messer, Mayor

Attest:
Keisha Smith, City Clerk


IV


Thursday, April 22, 2010


Law Enforcement


The Times | B5


The following report is
provided by the Franklin
County Sheriffs Offece.
Arrests are made by
officers from the following
city, county, and state
law enforcement
agencies: Apalachicola
(APD), Carrabelle
(CPD), Florsda Highway
Patrol (FHP), Franklin
County Sheriffs Offece
(FCSO), Florsda Fish and
Wildlife Conservation
Commission (FWC),
Florsda Department
ofEnvironmental
Protection (FDEP),
Florida Division of
Insurance Fraud (DIF)
and Florida Department
ofAgriculture and
Consumer Services
(FLDOACS).
All defendants are

u ss n censtn a
court of law.

AA
Charles B. Allen Jr.
61, Eastpoint, Ga., felony-
iknsg worSt ess bank
James C. Taunton
Jr., 41, Apalachicola,
possession of less than
20 grams of cannabis
(FCSO)
Betty L. Lashley,
48, Apalachicola, two
counts sale of a controlled
substance within 1,000
feet of public housing
(FCSO)
Gerald D. Glenn, 47,
Pensacola, violation of
probation (FCSO)
Jimmy W. Lashley
Sr., 56, Apalachicola, five
counts sale of a controlled
substance within 1,000
feet of public housing,
and possession of more
than 20 grams of cannabis
(FCSO)

Agitifi
Dwight A. Spencer
Jr., 32, Eastpoint,
trespass after warning
(FCSO)
Heather A. Millender,
30, Eastpoint, failure to


appear (FCSO)
Jimmy R. Smith,
44, Eastpoint, resisting
arrest without violence
(FCSO)

Agrill6
Robert C. Baxley,
28, Apalachicola, grand
theft of a motor vehicle
and driving while license
suspended (FCSO)
AgrillI
Michello D. Daniels'
32, Apalachicola, DUI
(FHP)
Richard Williams, 19,
Eastpoint, DUI (FHP)
Rachel L. Bateman,
24, Lanark Village, failure
to appear (FCSO)
Bernard S. Simmons,
III, 27, Tallahassee
violation of probation
(F S ica M. Tatum, 20,

Eastpoint, battery (FCSO)
Jordan C. Kelley, 21
Apalachicola, battery '
(FCSO)

RoberA ney, 52,
Lake Odessa, Mich., DUI
(FHP)
Tammy D. Quinn, 38,
Port St. Joe, DUI (FHP)
Jamie N. Osorio, 25,
Apalachicola, DUI (FHP)
Wayne M. O'Neal, 51,
Apalachicola, disorderly
intoxication and resisting
without violence (APD)
Joseph C. Ward, 18,
Apalachicola, failure to
appear (FHP)
Waveney N. Irving, 22,
Apalachicola, failure to
appear (FCSO)

Agligg
Preston W. Smith, 30,
Carrabelle, possession of
counterfeit cocaine with
intent to sell (FCSO)
Connie E Massey, 46,
Carrabelle, three counts
of sale of a controlled
substance within 1,000
feet of a church (FCSO)
Steven R. Bedford, 30,
Apalachicola, violation of
probation (FCSO)


open container,

Harry A's offers
d
FOW0f in
$40,000 theft
Harry A's Restaurant
& Bar, at 28 West
Bayshore Drive on
St. George Island, is
continuing to offer a hefty
reward for information
leading to the arrest and
conviction of the person
or persons responsible for
theft of about $40,000 from


the business safe over
the annual chili cook-off
weekend.
The reward money
had grown to $10,000 last
week as the investigation
continued into the March
6 grand theft.
According to the
Franklin County Sheriff's
Office, a sheriff's deputy
reported on Sunday
morning, March 7 that
Terry Brewer, manager of
Harry A's, told authorities
that someone had stolen


about $40,000 from the
business safe the night
before. Investigators have
taken fingerprints from
a master safe key, and
flashlight, that may have
been used in the theft.
In addition, the Florida
Department of Law
Enforcement has pursued
lie detector testing on all
individuals who may have
had access to the safe.
If you have information
on the case, call the
sheriff's office at 670-8500.


th t will h 1p


Tarke pride


AIRPORT ACCESS ROAD


PROJECT # 007.090


NOTICE TO RECEIVE SEALED BIDS
.
The Frankhn County Board of County Commissioners will receive
sealed bids from any qualified person, company or corporation
interested in constructing:

AIRPORT ACCESS ROAD

Project is located in Franklin County, Florida and consists of
approximately 700 linear feet of roadway construction.

Plans and specifications can be obtained at Preble-Rish, Inc., 324
Marina Drive, Port St. Joe, Florida 32456, (850) 227-7200. The bid
must conform to Section 287.133(3) Florida Statutes, on public entity
crimes.

All bidders shall be FDOT qualified per Section 2-1 of the FDOT
Standard Specifications for Road and Bridge Construction, latest
edition.

Completion date for this project will be 60 days from the date of the
Notice to Proceed presented to the successful bidder.

Liquidated damages for failure to complete the project on the specified
date will be set at $250.00 per day.

Please indicate on the envelope that this is a sealed bid, for the
"Airport Access Road".

Bids will be received until 4:00 p.m. (EDT), on May 17, 2010, at
the Franklin County Clerk's Office, Franklin County Courthouse, 33
Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, Florida 32320-2317, and will
be opened and read aloud on May 18, 2010 at the County Commission
meeting at 34 Forbes Street, Apalachicola, FL.

Cost for Plans and Specifications will be $50.00 per set and is non-
refundable. Checks should be made payable to PREBLE-RISH, INC.

The Board of County Commissioners reserves the right to waive
informalities in any bid, to accept and/or reject any or all bids, and
to accept the bid that in their judgment will be in the best interest of
Franklin County. All bids shall remain firm for a period of sixty days
after the opening.

All bidders shall comply with all applicable State and local laws
concerning licensing registration and regulation of contractors doing
business to the State of Florida.

If you have any questions, please call Clay Kennedy at (850) 227-7200


Publication Date: April 22, 2010


Arrest REPORTS


Law BRIEFS


Apalachicola couple
escapes injury in
two-car mishap
An Apalachicola couple
suffered minor injuries
Saturday evening when a
Michigan man turned his
car suddenly in front of
them as he was making a
left turn into an Eastpoint
business.
James M. Register, 71
and his wife, Layvonne
70, were both wearing
their seatbelts in their
2003 Ford van when they
were traveling west on
U.S. 98 just west of Lucius
Cooms Road at about 8:41
p.m. Saturday.
At that time, Robert
C. Haney. 52, of Lake

a u nsfrom
the eastbound lane, in his
2000 Ford sports utility
vehicle into the Badcock
parking lot, at 197 U.S. 98.
According to the report

pH a d doaoper
Brian W. Speigner, Haney
made a direct turn into
the path of the Register's
vehicle.
The driver, James
Register, attempted
evasive action by steering
right towards the north
shoulder but was unable
to avoid the collision,
Speigner wrote.
Both vehicles' left
fronts struck each othe"
with the Registers'
vehicle traveling into
the ditch on the north
shoulder. Haney's SUV
rotated counter-clockwise
before stopping in the
westbound lane, facing
north.
Sheriff's deputies
and Weems emergency
personnel assisted at the
scene.
Haney was charged
with turning left in front
of approaching traffic,
driving while under the
influence and having an





Call: 850-227-5920 or 850-615-1494





CALL g 5 ARRRR

TODAY! UUU UUUU


_ __ _


I


Brightly Computers


.9 4.4Bristol













Laban Bontrag er, DND ~

3~Onica Bontrager, DND




12761 Pea Ridge Road Bristol, Florida 32321

TELEPHONE (850) 643-5417


WE 'RE AVAI LIABLE 2 4 7


| 1100
of which is Franklin County
Courthouse, 33 Market
Street Apalachicola, Flor-
Ida 32329. The names and
addresses of the personal
representative and the per-
sonal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
All creditors of the dece-
dent and other persons
having claims or demands
against decedent's estate
on whom a copy of this
notice is required to be
served must file their
claims with this Court
WITHIN THE LATER OF
THREE (3) MONTHS AF-
TER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY
(30) DAYS AFTER THE
DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE
ON THEM.
All other creditors of the
decedent and persons
having claims or demands
against the decedent's es-
tate must file their claims
with this Court WITHIN
THREE (3) MONTHS AF-
TER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED
WITHIN THE TIME PERl-
ODS SET FORTH IN SEC-
TION 733.702 OF THE
FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
wll I RF RARRFn


1100 Legal Advertising
1110 Classified Nutices
1120 PublIc Notices/
Announcements
1125 carpools &
1130 R es on
1140 Happy Ads
1150 Personals
1160 Lost
1170 Found
*
| 1100 |
6715T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY
FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
IN RE: ESTATE OF
EDGAR R. LEE, SR.
Deceased.
File Number: 10-3 CP
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the
estate of EDGAR R. LEE,
SR., deceased, whose
telof d t0h9wasdNovem-
an ose
social security number Is
***-**-0365, is pending in
the Circuit Court for Frank-
Iln County, Florida, Pro-
bate Division, the address


Thursday, April 22, 2010


B~B~i[ ~i~iO~l


"gatR -
Exterior House Cleaning
Low Pressure Mildicide Treatment

9 YNr5sde6r ednArea
Gerald Garlick
Have Grinder Will Travel
Stump and Root Grinding.
No joRbetdo I Ipas.ge.
call ILa waede

FREE E68 I TES


Don Lively General Contractors
LICENSED AND INSURED 20 YEARS EXPERIENCE

Building Supplies Plumbing New Construction Roofing
& Auto Repair Pressure Washing Additions Vinyl Siding
Carrabelle 697-3333 Painting and More No Job Too Small
RCOO66499
We Deliver Anywhere P.O. Box 439 RGOO65255

g Hardware and wr Carrabelle, FL 32322
n.,am Paint Center a ... 697-2783 or Mobile 566-2603 8


IIUI iI1I Iil~l~ii: i.;' I


Ap Saccdod FLL Se30


| 1100
NOTWITHSTANDING THE
TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY
CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER
THE DECEDENTS DATE
OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publica-
tlon of this Notice is April
15, 2010.
Personal Representatives:
SHANE W LEE
PO. BOX 503
Port St. Joe, Fl. 32457
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
Charles A. Costin
Florida Bar No. 699070
Post Office Box 98
Port St. Joe, FL 32457
Telephone: (850) 227-1159
April 15, 22, 2010
6720T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE SECOND JUDI-
ALINCIARNCDUIT OFF
LIN COUNTY
JPMORGAN CHASE
ANT SOPNUARLCHAASSSEO-
OF THE LOANS AND
OTHER ASSETS OF
WASHINGTON MUTUAL
WN AS FWOARSMHENR
TON MUTUAL BANK, FA
Plaintiff
vs.


| 1100
JAMES R. PAYTON et. al.
Defendants.
CASE NO. 09000094CA
NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN pursuant to a Final
Judgment of Foreclosure
dated and entered in Case
No. 09000094CA, of the
Circuit Court of the Sec-
ond Judicial Circuit in and
for Franklin County, Flor-
Ida wherein JPMORGAN
CHASE BANK, NATIONAL
ASSOCIATION, AS PUR-
CHASER OF THE LOANS
AND OTHER ASSETS OF
WASHINGTON MUTUAL
BANK, FORMERLY
KNOWN AS WASHING-
TON MUTUAL BANK, FA,
Is a Plaintiff and JAMES R.
PAYTON: UNKNOWN
SPOUSE OF JAMES PAY-
TON: DARRELL STANTON
WARD AKA D STANTON
WARD: UNKNOWN
SPOUSE OF DARRELL
STANTON WARD:
JPMORGAN CHASE
BANK, NATIONAL ASSO-
CIATION, AS PURCHASER
OF THE LOANS AND
OTHER ASSETS OF
WASHINGTON MUTUAL
BANK, FORMERLY
KNOWN AS WASHING-
TON MUTUAL BANK, FA;
FIRST COMMERCIAL
BANK;UNKNOWN TEN-
ANT #1; UNKNOWN


| 1100
TENANT #2, are the De-
fendants. MARCIA M.
JOHNSON as The Clerk of
the Circuit Court will sell to
the highest and best bid-
der for cash at at 11:00
a.m. Eastern Time on May,
20, 2010, the following de-
scribed property as set
forth in said Final Judg-
ment, to-wit:
Commence at an old terra
cotta monument marking
the Southeast corner of
Section 21, Township 8
South, Range 8 West,
Franklin County, Florida
and thence run South
182.91 feet to the North-
easterly right-of-way
boundary of Bluff Road,
thence run North 63 de-
grees 10 minutes 00 sec-
ands West along said
right-of-way boundary
612.99 feet to the POINT
OF BEGINNING. From
said POINT OF BEGINN-
ING continue North 63 de-
grees 10 minutes 00 sec-
onds West along said
right-of-way boundary
143.57 feet, thence run
North 1029.20 feet to the
Southerly edge of the Apa-
lachicola RIven thence run
South 72 degrees 23 mm-
utes 14 seconds East
along said river's edge
70.17 feet, thence run
North 80 degrees 20 mm-
utes 25 seconds East
along said river's edge
62.11 feet, thence run


| 1100
South 1067.04 feet to the
POINTOFBEGINNING.
LESS AND EXCEPT the
following described parcel:
Commence at an old terra
cotta monument marking
the Southeast corner of
Section. 21, Township 8
South, Range 8 West,
Franklin County, Florida
and thence run south
182.91 feet to the North-
easterly right-of-way
boundary of Bluff Road,
thence run North 63 de-
grees 10 minutes 00 sec-
ands West along said
right-of-way boundary
612.99 feet to a re-rod for
the POINT OF BEGINN-
ING. From said POINT OF
BEGINNING continue
North 63 degrees 10 mln-
utes 00 seconds West
along said right-of-way
boundary 143.57 feet to a
re-rod, thence run North
340.02 feet to a re-rod,
thence run South 63 de-
grees 10 minutes 00 sec-
ands East 143.57 feet to a
re-rod, thence run South
340.02 feet to the POINT
OF BEGINNING.
Together with a Private
Nonexclusive Ingress,
Egress, and Access Ease-
ment, recorded in Official
Records Vol. 640, Page
496, Public Records of
Franklin County, Florida.


| 1100
Any person claiming an In-
terest in the surplus from
the sale, If any, other than
the property owner as of
the date of the Ils pendens
must file a claim within 60
days after the sale.
Dated this 25th day of
March, 2010.
MARCIA M. JOHNSON
As Clerk of the Court
By: Michele Maxwell
As Deputy Clerk
Dated this 25th day of
March, 2010.
IMPORTANT
In accordance with the
Americans with Disabilities
Act, persons needing a
reasonable accommoda-
tlon to participate in this
proceeding should, no
later than seven (7) days
prion contact the Clerk of
the Court's disability coor-
dinator at 8506972112,
PO. Box 340, APALACHI-
COLA, FL 32320. If hearing
Impaired, contact (TDD)
8009558771 via Florida
Relay System
Ben-Ezra & Katz, PA.
Attorneys for Plaintiff
2901 Stirling Road,
Sulte 300
Fort Lauderdale, Florida
33312
Telephone: (305)770-4100
Fax: (305) 653-2329
April 15, 22, 2010


| 1100
Franklin County, Florida,
wherein BANKTRUST Is
Plaintiff, and CARRAWAY
BAY PLANTATION, LLC, a
dissolved Florida limited II-
ability company,
WESTCOAST LENDING
GROUR INC., a Nevada
corporation, CARRAWAY
BAY PLANTATION
HOMEOWNERS ASSOCl-
ATION, INC., a dissolved
Florida non-profit corpora-
tlan, and UNKNOWN TEN-
ANTS, are Defendants, I
will sell to the highest and
best bidder for cash at the
steps of the Franklin
County Courthouse in Ap-
alachicola, Florida, at
11:00 a.m., EST on the
13th day of May, 2010, the
following described Real
Property situated in Frank-
Iln County, Florida, and set
forth in said final judg-
ment, to-wit:
A portion of Section 19,
Township 7 South, Range
4 West, Franklin County,
Florida, being more partic-
ularly described as fol-
lows:
Commence at the con-
crete monument marking
the point of Intersection of
the South line of said Sec-
tlon 19, with the Westerly
Right-of-Way line of U.S.
Highway 98; thence along
the Westerly Right-of-Way
line of said Highway 98, N
21 5700 E. 140.57 feet to


B6 | The Times


Classifieds


I~


loronis & g
Michael & Anthony 04
O State Certified Electrician ESI2000204 v
& Finish Carpentry RG006883 .
850-229-6751 850-227-5666


cOVERING MILTON TO APALACHICOLA









CO &
YOUR FLORIDA FREEDOM CLASSIFIED CONNECTION


| 1100
6741T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
SECOND JUDICIAL CIR-
CUlT OF THE STATE OF
FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
FRANKLIN COUNTY
BANKTRUST a Florida
banking corporation,
Plaintiff,
vs.
CARAWAY BAY PLANTA-
TION, LLC, a dissolved
Florida limited liability
company, WESTCOAST
LENDING GROUR INC., a
Nevada corporation,
CARAWAY BAY PLANTA-
TION HOMEOWNERS AS-
SOCIATION, INC., a dis-
solved Florida non-profit
corporation, and UN-
KNOWN TENANTS,
Defendants.
Case No.:09-000059-CA
AMENDED
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN pursuant to a
Summary Judgment in
Foreclosure dated the 26th
day of October 2009, and
Order Postponing
Foreclosure Sale and Re-
scheduling for May 13,
2010, entered in Case No.
09-000059-CA, in the Cir-
cult Court of the Second
Judicial Circuit of the State
of Florida, in and for







Missing








































































BILL MILLER REALTY
850-697-3751 (3310) 570-0658
3/4 AC.- ON GULF COURSE
GULF VIEW 4-6 B/R 2
LL 1SHOBAT ,9
REDUCEDTO $295,000

80 91800 M A
was coNN.
$125,000
GULF LOT FOR 10% DOWN
50'X 140'- HIGH LOT-TREES
$195,000" WATER & SEWER
AVAIL

2400 S/F RETAIL STORE 100,
X 175'ON 98 W/GULF VIEW.
MAKE OFFER.


CITY OF CARRABELLE
PROPOSED ENACTMENT OF
CITY ORDINANCE

The City Commission of the City of Carrabelle, Horida,
proposestoenact the following ordinance:

ORDINANCE NUMBER 443

AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF
CARRABELLE, FLORIDA AMENDING
ORDINANCE NO.: 409 WHICH IS AN
ORDINANCE PERTAINING TO THE SALE OF
ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES WITHIN THE CITY
LIMITS BY: PROHIBITING THE SALE OF
ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES WITHOUT PROPER
LICENSES; PROSCRIBINGTHATTHELOCATION
FOR SALE OF ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES MUST
BE APPROVED BY THE CITY CO11111MION;
REGULATING THE HOURS OF BUSINESS
FOR THE SALE OF ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES;
ESIABLISHINGADDITIONALREQUIREMENTS
FOR SALE OF ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES FOR
ON-PREMISES CONSIT PTION; PROVIDING
FOR A SPECIHC DISTANCE BETWEEN SAID
SALE OF ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES AND
CHURCHES; PROVIDING FOR PENALTIES;
PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY AND
PROVIDING AN EFFECTIVE DATE.

The proposed Ordinance may be inspected during
regular hours at Carrabelle
City Hall between a.m. and4:30 p.m., 1001 Gray
Avenue, Ma inds) thiough Friday,
or call 850-697-2727.
The proposed Ordinance will be considered for
enactment during a public hearing to be held 6:00
p.m., Thursday May 6, 2010 at the City of Carrabelle
fleeting Room located at 1001 Gray Avenue,

n ae be hlen es rpe t a ompo dhe
Ordinance.
If an individual decides to appeal any decision made
by the City Commission with respect to this meeting,
a verbatim transcript may be required. If so, the
individual should make provision for a transcript to be
made at the meeting, (RE: Horida Statute
286.0105). Pursuant to the provisions of the Americans
with Disabilities Act, any person requiring special
accommodationtoparticipateinthismeetingisasked
to advise the city at least 48 hours before the meeting by
contactingKeishaSmithattheaboveaddressorphone
number.

M'ilbum lesser, A layor

assaSmithCityClerk

Publication Date: April 22, 2010


JIMMIE CROWDED EXCAVATING & LAND CLEARING, INC-
COMPLETE SITE DEVELOPMENT
RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL INDUSTRIAL
ASPHALT GRADING & PAVING LOT CLEARING
DEMOLITION WORK UTILITY CONTRACTOR
FILL DIRT TOP SOIL GRAVEL MASON SAND DELIVERED
POND BUILDING
C & D DEBRIS ROLL OFF CONTAINERS
FULLY LICENSED & INSURED
SERVING YOU SINCE 1964



L OFFICE ODIE CELL JIMMIE CELL J


II


Is t .1C H H UN I UN sl G
havin the b same pnce as bemg across the
Charming 3 Bedroom 2 Bath
the Beach. Tile Floors. Large
Beachfront Patio. Open hung <.
.-- . 1
St.GeRo3edsland '


Thursday, April 22, 2010


Local


By Lois Swoboda
Times StaffWriter
On Friday April 9, the Apala-
chicola Estuarine Research Re-
serve (ANERR) and the Sixth
Grade students from the Apala-
chicola Bay Charter School joined
forces to clean up an Eastpoint
beach.
Twenty-four students from Ms.
Amison's and Ms. Joanos' classes
worked for over four hours to col-
lect and recycle refuse from the
shoreline in front of Marion Mil-
lender Park and the site of the
new ANERR office building.
The boys and girls collected
over 800 pounds of nonrecyclable
trash. In addition, 585 pounds
of recyclables were taken to the
landfill.
The most common item of
refuse was cigarette butts. The
workers collected 549 of those,
along with 264 drink cans, 237
plastic bags and six tires.
Also on hand were 12 adult vol-
unteers, Four from ANERR, four
staffers from the ABC School, two
parents and two volunteers who
prepared a hot dog lunch for all
the participants. Students finished


By Lois Swoboda
Times Staff Reporter
The St. George Island Plan-
tation Owners Association is
deploying bat boxes to fight mos-
quitoes.
For some time, Plantation
board member Rolf Sherman
has been concerned about the
disappearance of wildlife around
his island home. He noticed few-
er birds, snakes and lizards and
began to wonder if the mosquito
spray truck could be the culprit.
Investigation revealed that
the problem was not so simple.
Animals were being killed on the
road and fire ants, now preva-
lent on the island, had taken a
toll, too.
Once the issue of pesticides
came under discussion, how-
ever, several homeowners said
they would prefer a more en-
vironmentally-friendly
approach to mosquito
control.
Richard Saucer, di-
rector of maintenance,
was browsing the Times
when he came across an FRA
articleonanewhathouse GOES
on St. Vincent Island.
That got him thinking and
Saucer convinced the owners
association to buy materials to
construct five bat houses, which
he and his staff built himself and
placed along Leisure Lane.
The largest is designed to
hold250bats; the otherfourhold
65 each. Saucer said he went on-
line to find plans for the boxes,
which face either due castor due
west to be warmed by the rising
or setting sun.
Saucer said he is watching
and waiting to see if anything
moves into the boxes. Florida is
home to 13 species of bat, but the
Plantation houses will probably
become home to "evening bats,"
the most common species.
If these prototype houses
work, the association hopes
individual homeowners will in-
stall smaller bat shelters of their
own.


LOIS SWOBODA | The Times
One of the new bat houses in
the Plantation
Ultimately, Sherman and
some other members of the as-
sociation would like to bid the
spray truck farewell.
They are investigating
alternatives to tradition-
al mosquito control, in-
cluding spray applied to
the underside of plants
KLIN around the home.
GREEN Theoretically, this
technique, called barrier
spraying, allows fewer applica-
tions of spray and the use of less
poison, while providing better
control to the house and yard.
One advantage is that spray is
only applied to areas in frequent
use by people.
Only time will tell how green
the Plantation can go and still
control mosquitoes, but the
board should be congratulated
for experimenting with ways to
preserve our environment on
this beautiful barrier island. So
many thanks to Dr. Rolf Sher-
man, Richard Saucer and the far-
thinking members of the Planta-
tion board for going green.
Do you or your organization
have a project aimed at creat-
ing a more sustainable environ-
ment? Give us a call at 653-1819
or e-mail anthetty@lycos.com
and you may be the next subject
of Franklin Goes Green


ROSALINDKILCOLLINS|SpecialtotheTimes,
collected on Friday
Seth Blitch, director of AN-
ERR, thanked the students and
said the cleanup went very well.
He was pleased with the coopera-
tive effort.
He said the new ANERR build-
ing is expected to open this fall
and there will be a grand opening
ceremony.


Students pose with the trash they
the day with dinner and games.
Rick Plessinger, of Eastpoint,
whose home adjoins the park
said, "They did a fabulous job. I'd
buy hot dogs for everybody if they
would come back and do this ev-
ery month. This also teaches kids
to pick up the garbage their par-
ents throw away."


NOWS BR IE F S
are a big help in accommodat-
ing the mereased traffic.
She said the museum's goal
is to maintain this pace for the
rest of the year.

JUniOr Achievement needs
.
COMMUnity lielp
Junior Achievement of
Northwest Florida wants to offer
classes at the Franklin County
Schools this year but cannot do
it without the help of the com-
munity. If anyone is interested
in volunteering please contact
Mary Alice Gollwitzer at 850-527-
5490 or jabay@knology.net.
Teachers want classes to
begin in May. It is a very small
time commitment and a very
rewarding opportunity. Junior
Achievement provides all the
materials and training the


N


("OM) Or don Johnston
attendance surpasses 1,100
For the period between
Jan. 1 and March 25, more than
1,100 visitors signed the register
at the Camp Gordon Johnston
World War II Museum located in
Carrabelle's City Complex.
This almost doubles the at-
tendance for the same period
last year, according to CGJ Cu-
rator Linda Minichiello. On Sat-
urday, March 13, during Camp
Gordon Johnston Days, the mu-
seum had 300 visitors, setting a
new one-day record. "The spike
in Franklin County tourism, cou-
pled with the museum's grow-
ing national reputation, is the
main reason for our growth,"
Minichiello said, noting that the
enlarged museum space and
parking area in the city complex


volunteer needs and the time
requirement is only one or two
hours a week, depending on
which grade level the volunteer
is teaching.

Hotline available
to orcler census forms
A 2010 Census Hotline is now
available to order census forms
and answer questions about the
forms and the census.
At the county commission's
April 6 meeting, Cheryl Sand-
ers voiced concern over the
2010 census. She said she had
received numerous phone calls
asking how to obtain census
forms.
Beginning on April 12, people
who have not received a census
form can call 866-872-6868 to
order one.


`1


EONGEIRAND F
In <>n the he street trom the beach! O *
Beach House right on '
Exposed Beams. Cute )
Inning kildren area.
10 dRvt
John Shelby, Broker J *

lil:il:19?? 850-370-6090
www.sgirealty.com,


BS | The Times


ABC School students keep it clean


The Plantation combats


Our local real estate experts have identified what Key feel are the best valueS
. .
around and are offering them to you in Real Estate Picks! (In this section),
Discover the best real estate values in Mexico Beach, Port St. Joe, Apalachicola,
Cape San Blas, St. George Island, Carrabelle and surrounding areas.
A ll R11238128 943 non S .. I Lmay 1
YO UR

B ES T PICK

H EREI
da 0




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs