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Group Title: Apalachicola times
Title: The Apalachicola times
ALL ISSUES CITATION PDF VIEWER THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100380/00073
 Material Information
Title: The Apalachicola times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: H.W. Johnston
Place of Publication: Apalachicola Fla
Apalachicola Fla
Publication Date: April 8, 2010
Copyright Date: 2008
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1885.
General Note: Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00100380
Volume ID: VID00073
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 32911693
lccn - sn 95026907
 Related Items
Preceded by: Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by: Apalachicola herald

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Table of Contents
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    Section B
        Page B 1
        Page B 2
        Page B 3
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ipThusaARL8 00www plc ie o 0


ELIZABETH COOK | Special to the Times
Elizabeth Cook shares memories of the Sprite with owner
Steve Coleman.


I


YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER FOR MORE THAN 120 YEARS


VOL. 124 ISSUE 50


By David Adlerstein
Times City Editor

Urgedonbythemayorwhosaidhe
hasreceivedaslewofcomplaints, the
Apalachicola city commission Tues-
day night took steps to lighten the
golf cart registration requirements
being implemented this month.
Golf cart owners are still required
to register their vehicles before the
end of the month, and pay the $12.50
fee, but city officials plan to revise
the operating license form by cutting
back on some of the mandatory infor-
mation that applicants must provide.
As it stands now, applicants must


provide their name and address, land-
line and cellular telephone numbers,
e-mail address, and date of birth, and
must show a copy of their driver's
license. In addition, this information
is required for every other individual
who uses the golf cart.
The application form also asks for
a description of the golf cart, plus its
identification number and make, with
a photograph to be attached to the
application.
All of this seemed a bit too much
for Mayor Van Johnson.
"That's more information than
they need to show to drive an auto-
mobile on the streets," he said. "I


can't even get in my door without
people stopping me."
Johnson then quizzed his fellow
commissioners and with the excep-
tion of Commissioner Frank Cook,
each one said they had gotten calls
regarding the new rules.
"Why do we need a copy of their
license?" asked the mayor. "It (the
application) needs to be a little sim-
pler."
In January, the city commission
revised the golf cart ordinance to
stipulate that all golf cart operators

See GOLF {ARTS AS


Apalachicola
City Clerk Lee
Matches holds up
the city's new golf
cart registration
tags, that include
a space for a new
decal to be added
each year.

DAVID ADLERSTEIN
TheTintes


By Lois Swoboda
Times Staff Writer
A classic race car made a
side trip to Apalachicola last
month to visit an old friend.
On March 15, the county
had a special visitor, a classic
Austin Healey Sprite, one of 11
Le Mans/Sebring Sprite Proto-
types built by Goeff and Donald
Healey between 1960 and 1968.
The vehicle traveled from Bush
Creek, Texas to Sebring for the
annual American LeMans Se-
ries race, a 12-hour endurance
ent testingthroad-racing cars

The Sprite appeared at Se-
bring in a display of restored
racing legends. On the way,
the Sprite stopped off to visit
Billy Cook, of Apalachicola,
who once gave this little beauty
her first fancy paint job in prepa-
ration for the 1969 Sebring race.
The Sprite debuted at the
1968 Grand Prix of Endurance,
held every year since 1923 in Le
MansFrance.
Un t w enb o oBtahe
er's Ring-Free Racing Team.
At his Atlanta business, "The
World Famous Atlanta Body and
Fender Shop," Cook adorned
her with the Blue and Orange
n Ring-Free colors and No. 73.
= .. She then raced in the 12 Hours
. -; of Sebring in January 1969, with
American drivers Paul Rich-
ards and Jim Baker, the team
owner, and British great, Clive
Baker. The Sprite gridded 48th
at the start of the race and fin-
ished 20th overall in a field of 98
world-c driwrs atnh sea .rite

: returned to the 12 Hours of Se-
bring with the continued spon-
sorship of Ring-Free Oil and
Baker Racing. Their guns were
loaded with more experience
and a new all-female driver
team, featuring Janet Guthrie,


Rosemary Smith, Judy Kondra-
tieff and Sharlene Seavey.
Surprisingly, Guthrie said
in a telephone interview last
week, this was not the first all-
female racing team at Sebring.
That honor went to Denise Mc-
Cluggage, a writer for Road and
Track magazine, and Ruth Levy.
The team participated at Se-
bring in 1958, but did not finish.
a
Back then, women in sports
car racing really weren't that
big a deal, except maybe to the
media, which we couldn't have
cared less about," Guthrie said.

it nFsr asda t t
24-Hour and then at the Sebring
12-Hour since 1966, but the Se-
bring Sprite was the first car we
had our hands on that had ac-
tually been properly prepared.
This was most refreshing."
Even so, Cook said the team's
success represented a break-
through for women in racing.
The women and the Sprite
placed first in the prototype
class and 19th overall in a grid
of more than 90 world-class
marques like Ferrari, Porsche
and Yenko, and drivers such a
Gurney, Andretti, Yenko and
Steve McQueen.
"What makes this car unique
from all prior Le Mans Sprites
is the engine and transmis-
sion package," according to the
Sprite's current owner Steven
Coleman. "This car was fitted
with Lucas mechanical fuel in-
jection and a special head. The
gearbox was an MGB-based
transmission with a special
housing for a fifth gear in a com-
partment behind the main box."
Coleman said a friend of

71sr aendd rk nn to
more than 10 years before suc-
cumbing to cancer. Coleman

See SPRITE AS


*

-ge.











FLORIDA PHOTOGRAPHIC ARCHIVES
Special to The Times
Alva Hinckley. Neel's
father cirover.ed cler.r.q a
rest run of this racing E:.col
consirecial by Rudolph
Marshall


DONNIE MCLEOD COLLECTION
Special to The Times
Neel Hinckley as a younq
mar, or, the porch as
Moma Sue s


ST. VINCENT ISLAND NATIONAL
WILDLIFE REFUGE COLLECTION
Specialty The Times
Elgin oral Eugenia Webr.q
in the Tumbler a clock
bear construed by Neel
Hnckl*)


.
0)' CREDid fi ikin MS extraordinary craftsman
... =
:A . ::....::...... .. :- ....:: = ..........
--: m::-::::::-...... .. ....... . .............. -.. --::::::.......,,::: .
== :
"" -..
By 10idwoboda bear budder His his onel ,, -
Talain start wait, I death re-.el-.ed around : .


Y


I


boaIs
Neel s larher owned a
successful harcivare more
or the corner of Commerce
greer and Avenue E H.s
famly was secure and pros-
parous unal wagecly struck on
January 1925
Dur.ng the 1.rst half of the
201h cenlury bear rac.ng
was an ,mporrani past.,
en the county Racing bears
ball here compelecl in com-
pshilons all across rhe more
Rudolph Marshall of
Apalach.cola bull rac.ng
boals rhaI compered on rhe
nal.anal level He raced
aqainsI Go Lombardo
Gar Wood and Chr.slopher
Col...nab..s in..th lot.nder of
Chris-Crall all quanis in bear
racing in rhe hrs! half of rhe
2018 canary


I 5 -
mosI .U years
ago Neel Hnc k-
ley boal builder
exIraordinaire, chael al age
40 bu71 he Isj1::1I',rgarter'
a war ar9
le never mac e much a can
impress.on but here ,n h's
home lov..n, hes e..ell re.
memberal and rhere are sill
Iraces of Neel if you knov-'
where 10 look
He was born Dec 10
1920 10 Alva E anel Susan
Victoria Mama Sue Hinck-
lay and was namel for his
greal-grandfather William'
H Neel a former sheriff of
Franklin Cour"Y
The house v..here he gree.
up sull slancis on US High-
way 98 on rhe wesI enci of
Apalachicola and behind II
is a big moral building thaI
was once his workshop
Neel Hinckley ,,as a


_ il


Phone: 850-227-1845


DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK:
it'. ?'::-:'1-11"..
LegalAds-Fridaysilla.m
ClassifiedDisplayAds-Fridayai11a.m.
ClassifiedLineAds-Mondaysi5p.m.


Letter to the Editor ................... A4


phrhes ................... ..... B


Apa lachicola


Hg@ r.Seus


Historic race car


See HINCKLEY AS


TABLE OF CONTENTS


~FREEDOM


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IIAN IUNSWillKE|3pecialtothellme:

,
8 3
\DO CKS ID E
\ MARINE
: y $HC.



-- ...,




MARINA YARD SALE
April 23,24 &25 at 8:00 A.M.

Here are a few of the items that
.
W111 be up for sale.

* Office equipment
* Air compressor
* Chest freezer
* Upright chest freezer
.
* 3 door true commercial cooler
* Kawasaki 660 mule
* Golf cart
* 150cc scooter
* Welder
* Tools
* Jackstands
* Boat parts & supphes
* Frozen bait
-
* Christmas decorations
* TC 30 tractor; with front end
bucket & fimsh mover (2 years old)
* Bookcases


.
A an.) youp 1om McDonough, GA will be
.
Jan 111 Fi 1J0.. hp in the Joy Abbott Firehouse
loc 011 rh e nd a [' ne Ave., St. George Island, at
ni I h she 15 livited to this free and unique
p .11,011 Sponsored by the
FusI tel bit in II or ST. GEORGE ISLAND


Help seniors in your community:

Answer Medicare Questions

and Resolve Problems

Make Informed Choices

About Their Health Insurance

Save Money on Their
- -
Prescription Medications

InfOrm Them of Prog rams

They May be Eligible


FLORIDA APRIL 10-11


Open House
Open Doors to Your Dreamsy
11:00 to 4:00
To preview the Open Houses visit www.RAFGC.com
or for additional information call one of our
participating Brokerage Firms.
Beach Realty of Cape San Blas 850-229-9000

Blue Water Realty 850-229-6100

Burke & Company 850-229-1018

Century 21 Gulf Coast Realty 850-648-5683

Coastal Realty Group 850-227-7770

Fickling & Company 850-927-2255

Forgotten Coast Realty 850-648-3000
Hambrick Realty 850-648-1102

Jeff Galloway Real Estate 850-927-2596

Keller Williams Town & Country 850-201-4663

Millennia Realty 850-222-3500

Port St. Joe Realty 850-229-4500

Pristine Properties 850-229-1700

Prudential Shimmering Sands 850-927-2666

Robinson Real Estate 850-653-1653

Sandy Beach Properties 850-697-5300
Sea Crest Real Estate 850-697-9604

Shaun S. Donahoe 850-653-8330

Southern Beach Realty 850-227-6297
The Land Group Real Estate 850-700-5063


6544 Hwy 77
Southport, FL 32409
(850) 441-4156
NOW M8ttr0 SSOS


Thursday, April 8, 2010


A2 | The Times


Local


Special to The Times
Everyone is invited to celebrate
the maiden voyage of the Apala-
chicola Riverkeeper's newest ad-
dition on Friday, April 16, from
4-6 p.m. at the Battery Park Boat
Ramp.
After more than a year of fund-
raising, the group has purchased
a custom-designed 21-foot welded


aluminum riverboat designed and
constructed by Ralph White of
Blountstown. She's a beauty, and
the Riverkeeper wants to show her
off and maybe find her a name. Join
them for refreshments, fellowship
and river trips.
Thanks to these and other spe-
cial supporters/sponsors, Progress
Energy of Florida, Norcross Wild-
life Foundations, and Wefing's Ma-

Out to SEE


rine of Eastpoint, who helped with
the motor purchase.
"We're still looking for support-
ers to help with all the little neces-
sary extras like Bimini top, personal
flotation devices, maintenance and
fuel costs, etc.," said Andy Smith,
Riverkeeperdirector.
For more information, or to be-
come a sponsor, call Smith or Kayd
Selden at 653-8936.


ARTISTIC DREAMS:
The Green Door Gallery,
at the corner of Avenue
D and Market Street, will
open its "She Dreams of
Apalach" special show with
an artist cocktail reception
Friday, April 9, from 6-9
p.m. The gallery will stay
open late showcasing a
great new collection of
works from guest artists,
Kate Merritt Davis, of
Birmingham, Ala., Chelsea
DeVillez, of St. Louis,
and Tracy Kuzminsky, of
Atlanta. Come meet and
mingle with the artists.
Join Amy Friedman and
the team with cocktails


and hors d'oeuvres for
what promises to be an
enchanting evening. The
show continues through
the end of May. For
more info, go to www.
amysgreendoor.com or call
653-1424.
MARITIME
EXHIBITION: The first
Marine Art and Maritime
History Exhibition will
run from Friday, April 9,
through Sunday, April 25,
on Thursday to Sundays.
There will be an opening
reception Saturday, April
10, from 6-8 p.m. at the
Cotton Exchange, 86
Water St. The reception


is an opportunity to meet
some of the artists, and
refreshments will be
provided. There will be
paintings, color pencil
drawings, watercolors,
photography, ceramic
wall murals, woodworks
and model boats.
There are artists from
Tallahassee, Port St. Joe,
Apalachicola, St. George
Island, Bainbridge,
Panama City and more.
In conjunction with the
Classic and Antique Boat
Show, additional models
will be on display April 24.
Fore more info, call Katie
McFarland at 407-421-1604.
HOMES FOR
SALE: The Realtors
Association of Franklin
and Gulf Counties will be
participating in the Florida
Realtors statewide Open
House on Saturday and
Sunday, April 10 and 11.
There will be 58 homes
from Carrabelle to Mexico
Beach that will be open
for viewing from 11 a.m.
to 4 p.m. Information will
also be set up at various


locations. If you would like
to preview the homes, visit
www.rafgc.com.

On the Horizon
ROCK BY THE SEA:
Proceeds from Rock By
The Sea IV held on St.
George Island from April
15 to 18, benefit University
of Florida's Pediatric
Brain Tumor Program,
Lyrics For Life and the
Franklin County Humane
Society. Hosted by Harry
A's Restaurant and Bar,
the weekend of music
features such artists as
Corey Smith, Wideawake,
Jackson Rohm, Sam
Hacker, Tim Brantley,
Hightide Blues, B-Liminal,
Brian Fechino, Keith Kane
& Chardy McEwan, Sarah
Mac Band, Christopher
Jak, Stephen Hunley,
Lani Daniels and Charlie
Walker. Music, raffles and
a silent auction added
to the beautiful island
setting makes for a great
weekend! For more info, go
to www.rockbythesea.org.


Saud10200al :O


Apalachicola Riverkeeper to launch new boat


1-800-96-ELE LE





**cALL TODAY, cLF.aNr TODAY
LOCLL OWED&OPRAE
SEIRCP MECHNCLARSRIE-SrigTeGl os
ACTIVE OR
INACTIVE
6A-PMMNDYTROG SNAYfryorcovnine


Mold can cause health problems. Inhaling
or touching mold or mold spores may cause
> allergic reactions or fungal infections.
National Institutes of Health
YOU MAY BE SUFFERING FROM:
Asthma Nausea Allenjies Headaches Eye Irritation
Sinus Problems Nasal Congestion Respiratory Issues













AIR DUCT CLONING
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Thursday, April 8, 2010


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The Times | A3


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~"11~1~1"


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Curious public, come on by and visit a classroom


11 111111~ 11-1


'sPrar.~urrrmru~~~Y;ru *Ib~~~~LLajk


* 'Y


Thursday, April 8, 2010


A4 | The Times


Finished grading
papers a couple of hours
ago and then set up my
hard-copy grade book
for the last quarter of the
year. We have a computer
program at school, but
administration has asked


about the draconian mea-
sures of pending law (SB6
and HB7189). The new
legislation would base half
ofa teacher's evaluation
on student performance,
and would eliminate con-
tinuing contracts, also
known as tenure, for new
hires. It would do away
Roux with additional pay for ad-
vanced degrees. We have
been urged repeatedly to call and
protest.
I have.
I honestly believe the bills will
do more harm than good, but
after much thought, I am pon-
dering just why the Republicans
have launched such a vitriolic at-
tack on teachers and why teach-
ers are so afraid of evaluations
based on student performance.
Does the right-wing really
believe that teachers are the
problem? I wish I could engage
in a thoughtful dialogue with
a conservative I respect. Just
what, exactly are we doing
wrong? Is it because our union
donates money to Democratic
candidates? Puhleeze. With-
out the right to strike, we have
little enough clout as it is. Our
three-year district contract was
ignored this year because of bud-
get restraints. We finally ended
up with a deal that was more
than fair, and I'm not complain-
ing; I'm just saying.


True, proposed legislation
would eviscerate the negotia-
tion process even further. No
monetary acknowledgment for
advanced degrees or National
Board Certification strikes me as
unwise and short-sighted.
I get the feeling there is a
great deal of sentiment out there
to make firing ineffective teachers
easier. Under the current sys-
tem, teachers are supposed to be
regularly observed and evaluated.
With proper documentation, the
procedure in place should be suf-
ficient to upgrade teacher perfor-
mance or get rid of the had ones.
Annual contracts for career
teachers? Bring it on, as long as
the evaluation process is fair.
Ah, there 'tis.
If half of my evaluation (read
"job security and salary") is based
on student achievement, then
I have to ask how the folks who
teach subjects other than English,
math, and science will be judged?
Did your cake rise this time? Did
your art project explode in the
kiln? Did you finally figure out
that World War I was after the
Civil War?
But, hey, that's only half of the
picture. Any professional evalua-
tion is only as good as the check-
off form used and the objectivity
of the person observing and doing
the checking.
Will I be dinged because I am
not using manipulative (reading


and literature tasks that require
motor skills)? Will I get a black
mark for doing whole-group
instruction on the days they
visit? Wait, wait! I do small-group
instruction, too. You just didn't
come by then. Am I evaluated
more often because I teach 10th
Grade English and the crucial
reading and writing skills needed
to pass FCAT?
Politicians, parents, adminis-
trators, curious public come
on down. Spend some extended
time in the classroom. You will be
invigorated and educated. You will
have some real fun, and you will
be bone-tired exhausted at the
end of the day. My children will
amaze you with both their curios-
ity and their take on the world.
I want you to see why, despite
burgeoning paperwork and puni-
tive proposed law, I keep at it.
People don't enter this profession
because it entails an easy job.
Despite the heavy psychological
and emotional toll, we regularly
make a meaningful difference in
the lives of young people
Are there had teachers? Yes.
Can we all do a better job? Yes. I
just wish the so-called reformers
from the outside would come take
a look from the inside.
Denise Roux is a regular col-
umnistfor the Apalachicola and
Carrabelle Times. 'lb reach her
e-mail her at rouxwhit@mchsi.
com.


Ifhalfofmy*
BUGlHGliOn (read
cc*
JOb security
d la ")
based on student
achievement, then
Ihave to ask how

the folks who teach
.
subjects other than
English, math,
and science will be

judged? Did your
cake rzse this time?

Dod your art project
BZplOde in the kiln?
Did you finally
gUTC Out that
Orld War I was

af er the Civil War?


Drn ~n


e


that we keep a paper trail
for attendance.
Then I reread "Night" Deni
s
by Elie Wiesel because
I want to teach it to my regular
10th Grade students. I am listen-
ing to my old ink-jet printer churn
out pages of supplementary
educational materials, including
a glossary and teaching guide
from the Holocaust Museum. I
even double-checked pronun-
ciation for Wiesel's name. I am
planning on "The Importance of
Being Earnest" for the Honors
kids, perhaps accompanied by
"All Quiet on the Western Front."
I'm thinking about how I might
draw a line from the lavish lives
of the wealthy late Victorians into
the horror of World War I. I have
taught "Earnest" before, but not
"Night" or "All Quiet on the West-
ern Front."
Did I mention that I was on
Spring Break?
I am becoming weary of the
irony and the juxtaposition of my
vacation labors with the antics of
the Florida Legislature. My e-
mail inbox is filled with dire warn-
ings from the teachers' union


rr%'~~T ',:-~ ~clB"I"; T I I:'~~~' ~l~rrn~l-~- ~-*


ITSi-~rF.I~: I~-ili~''r ~~171i


Sounding the alarm
against thieves
It is with a sad heart that I sound this alarm.
Having been a citizen of this community for many
decades, my feelings of security were shattered in the
early morning hours of this last day of March.
While we were sleeping, with a bright yard light
burning, thieves drove their vehicle past our back
door to the tool shed and stole over a thousand dollars
worth of tools.
A thoughtful, courteous police sergeant helped us
itemize the stolen tools the following morning. He
commented on the increased level of burglaries in our
community.
So I sound this caution to all of you, lock your
sheds and tool shops. Turn on your night lights, if you
have them,. And quickly call the police if you have the
slightest indication of a burglary/
Lois Bouy
St. George Island


Le


s The Apalachicola
and Carrabelle Times
approaches its 125th
anniversary at the end of this
month, we are reaching out to th
community to help us bring loca
history alive for our readers.
The Times has introduced
a new feature on our Web site,
www.apalachtimes.com. This photo
gallery "Old Times" showcases
photographs, some more than
century old and some as recent


as two or three decades ago, for
our readers to enjoy.
With more than 120 photos to
start and more coming in every
day, The Times has enlisted
the support of the Apalachicola
Area Historical Societ the


submit their favorite photos
for posting, either by e-mailing
dadlerstein@starfl.com or dropping
by the office, 129 Commerce
St., at the corner of Commerce
Street and Avenue F, to have their
hard-co hotos scanned and


y, py p
Carrabelle Historical Society, returned. It's a great opportunity
the chambers of commerce, to preserve the county's rich
history buffs and our loyal history and share its images with
readers to bring "Old Times" to the world.
a vivid life. For more information, call 653-
Readers are encouraged to 8868, and we'll be glad to help.


rlll IY3.hl


h lolla (


TH- - -

USPS 027-600
Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St.
Apalachicola, FL 32329
VP/Publisher: Karen Hanes
Editor: Tim Croft


There is a man who
sometimes lives in Washington
D.C.
He is a large man who did an
amazing thing for me.
He listened graciously and
attentively to everything I had to
say.
It is my belief he does this for
an honest man each and every
day.
He lives not far from my family
in a town call Monticello.
He loves to hunt turkeys and
can call them as well as any
fellow.
Followed him across the
street in order for him to cast his
vote.
The Floor seems to have no
order, but it keeps the House
afloat.

He sits on the House Floor
with Blue-Dogs, of which there
are too few.
He whispers things that the
men across the aisle wish they
knew.


It looked liked systematic
chaos until he explained how it
works.
The voters are very
knowledgeable, thanks to their
honest clerks.

The Members cast their votes
using a card he even let me touch.
By doing this little thing for
me, it pleased me so very much.
He took me to the private
Democrat Club and bought my
dinner.
The food was delicious, and
the crab cake was certainly a
winner.

When a colleague asked how
he knew me; he said, "Jim has
just become my friend."
By having this respect for me,
no amount of words can ever
transcend.
We came as commercial
fishermen and he found a solution
to our problems
We talked into the night and
he never showed any signs of
boredom.


Congressman Boyd is a man
who conveys the wishes of his
people.
By standing up for his beliefs,
his heart is as tall as a church
steeple.
Anyone who doubts his
abilities should put themselves
in his shoes.
His love for his fellow man
is something one should never
confuse.

Thank you Congressman
Boyd, for helping a fisherman
from Carrabelle.
I now have your friendship; to
my grandchildren, I can proudly
tell.
I will try to follow your path
of honesty; the pleasure will be
all mine.
What a lovely beginning of a
journey, traveled through the
eternity of time.

This poem was written
by Jim Clements, a
barefoot fisherman from
Carrabelle.


POSTMASTER:
Send address change to:
The Apalachicola Times
P.O. Box 820
Apalachicola, FL 32329
Phone 850-653-8868


PERIODICAL RATE


SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
IN COUNTY
$24.15 year $15.75 six months
OUT OF COUNTY
$34.65 year $21 six months


TO ALL ADVERTISERS
In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers
do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount
received for such advertisement.

thou eful o erbword is giveok w aes is er ted word
thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains.


* *


Letter to the


o 9







Aubrey Marks, who was age
- 19 at the time, stands with his
|nd ian motorcycle and friends in
front of the Owl Cafe in 1919.
From left are, Luke Moren, Buck
Boylston, Aubrey Marks, Dallas
Reynolds, two unidentified men'
V. G. Sangaree, Jr., Ferris Wing
and unidentified man.
PHOTO COURTESY OF POLLY MARKS WHITLEY
Special to The Times


CORRECTION
In last week's April 1, 2010, front-
page story "Fire leaves Carrabelle family
homeless," it was incorrectly reported that
Gathana Parmenas was a first responder.
Parmenas was on the scene at the March 29
Thompson house fire on 1 30 West Drive, in
.
Carrabelle, but is neither a first responder nor
a firefighter. She serves as a volunteer with the
Red Cross, which provides short-term help to
victims of fires and other disasters. The Times
regrets the error.


:


A THANK-YOU TO CONGRESSMANN BOYD





TIDE TABLES MONTH LY AVERAGES
To find the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times
from these given for APALACHICOLA:
HIGH LOW
Cat Point Minus 0:40 Minus 1:17
East Pass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27
To find the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated timeS
from those given for CARRABELLE:
BaldPoint i s9:16 nWs0:03
APALACHICOLA


Thursday, April 8, 2010


Local


The Times | AS


Freddie Buck Sawyer, ofApala-
chicola, said Marshall was mentor to
his father, Fred Sawyers Jr., and that
he can remember Marshall's boats
being loaded on the train to travel to
northern racing meets.
"Rudolph Marshall put a Liberty
aircraft engine into a boat," recalled
Joe Barber, who grew up in Apala-
chicola. "It was the fastest thing in its
class, in the world, at the time. The
torque of the propeller flipped the
boat. Alva Hmckley and John Thomas
were both killed in the accident."
The tragedy was front-page news.
According to an account published
in the Times on Jan. 24, 1925, "The
boat had only been recently completed
for Mr. W.B. Harbeson by Mr. Rudolph
Marshall and was launched Sunday.
Several trips had been made and num-
bers of persons had enjoyed the thrill
of riding in a boat capable of making a
speed of 60 miles an hour.
"Wednesday afternoon, Messrs.
R.R. Rice, J.P Thorne and Alva E.
Hinckley were passengers. Mr. Rice
driving her, while the builder stood on
Brown's pier to watch. When the boat
got just beyond the pier, she swerved
to one side, throwing her occupants
into the river," read the news account.
Only Rice survived. Hinckley and
Thorne were swept away by the rain-
swollen Apalachicola and, despite a
massive search effort, their bodies
were never recovered.
"It was not only the loss of a father;
it meant a tremendous loss of income
from his business," Marilyn Oberhau-


acquired the car after his
death and completed the
restoration.
"The restoration of
this 1968 Prototype Sprite
has been a 10-year pro-
cess involving many tal-
ented craftsmen and
Sprite enthusiasts," Cole-
man said. "Approximately
60 percent of the car's
original Birmabright Alloy
body has been reformed or
replaced."
Cook said the condition
of the car was like new and
the paint work completely
accurate.
Cook, who lives in Apala-
chicola with his wife, Emma
Elizabeth, designed and
executed the original body
work and paint job. He was
alSO 8 CreW member dur-
ing the Sebring race and a
strategist for the Ring Free
team.
"Norris Swain and I
took that car to more than


20 races," he said. "Crews
then weren't like they are
now. Most times, there
were only two or three of
us. That little car was so
good; we didn't have to do
anything to it."
Last month, he signed
the car's fender next to an
inscription that read: Paint
by Billy Cook.
Coleman said, "We feel
like we are caretakers of
these cars. They're meant
to be on the track, but in the
right environment. We don't
want to damage them."
He said he would race
the car on the classic rac-
ing circuit where beauti-
fully restored antiques are
put through their paces be-
fore cheering crowds.
"I was happy to reunite
Billy with the car," he
said. "It was wonder-
ful to see him go from 82
to 20 years old in a few
seconds."


** *
** *


FROM THE COLLECTION OF V0NCILE MCLEOD | Special to The Times


sen, Neel's niece said. "It had a dra-
matic impact on the family."
Neel's mother supported the fam-
ily by dividing her house in two and
taking in renters. Oberhausen remem-
bers her Uncle Neel's workshop.
"My recollection of Uncle Neel was
that he was not very talkative and
not social," she said. "I never really
saw him laugh. He was really bright
mechanically and capable of invention
and such. He absolutely spent his time
in his workshop. I loved going there. It
was full of machinery. Sometimes, the


entire room would be filled by a big
boat hull Uncle Neel was working on. I
remember too he had girlie calendars.
They were the first I ever saw and I
was fascinated by them.
"He didn't spend a lot of time with
us children, but one year he built a
child-sized table and four chairs as
a Christmas present for us. It was
wonderful. The top was beveled and it
had trim on the side. It was our table
and sat on the porch at Mama Sue's
See H INCK LE Y A6


have a driver's license, and that there
be a $25 registration fee per each golf
cart.
City Clerk Lee Mathes said that
after ordering the registration cards
and decals, and drafting the applica-
tion form, the city decided to charge
golf cart owners $12.50 for a permit
that expires Sept. 30, which is the end
of the fiscal year. After that everyone
will have to pay the entire annual fee.
Police Chief Bobby Varnes said
that if and when an officer has reason
to stop a golf cart for a possible viola-
tion, such as driving after dark or be-
ing younger than the minimum age
16, "when we check, we're going to
ask them for their driver's license."
Commissioner Mitchell Bartley
raised the question whether the city
was entitled to have an ordinance
that is stricter than state law, which
sets a minimum age of 14.
City Attorney Pat Floyd said he
is researching the legal question
and that at least two legal opinions
by the Florida Attorney General ar-
gue against municipalities enacting
rules tougher than state laws. Floyd
said it was possible he would recom-
mend next month that the city refine
the ordinance further by lowering the


1818 WOTS

iR/Ormation than they
need to show to drive
88 GECOmobile on the
4 yggg "

Apalachicola Mayor
Van 30llnSOH
driving age to 14 and eliminating the
driver's license provision.
Varnes pressed the mayor as to
how his officers should enforce the
current law. "Enforce it until we do
something different," Johnson said.
"Bobby, use good judgment."
Floyd said the section of the form
that requires a photo and identifi-
cation number of the golf cart was
designed to prevent operators from
transferring the registration among
different vehicles.
City Administrator Betty Taylor-
Webb asked the commissioners to
consider a waiver of the driver's li-
cense provision, with Wilbur Bellew,
who oversees the public works de-
partment, providing an illustration as


to why such a waiver is needed.
He said his mother is 77 years old,
and has never had a driver's license,
but enjoys traveling in a golf cart. He
said she has been studying up for a
driver's license, which she doesn't
plan to otherwise use, in order to
meet the golfeartrequirements.
Matches said golf cart owners have
until April 30 to register their ve-
hicles, and that based on last year's
registrations, which were free, there
were in the neighborhood of about
200 carts in the Apalachicola area.
"This is all new to folks so we're
giving them a little bit of time," she
said.
Lisa Hooker has secured per-
mission from the city commission
to become the first entrepreneur to
rent golf carts in Apalachicola. After
several appearances before planning
and zoning and the city commission
at the end of last year and early in
2010, she convinced the city to allow
for rentals, after the original legisla-
tion had disallowed them.
Hooker was granted the right to
rent up to 10 carts, and she plans to
open her business in the weeks ahead
in a garage behind the Hays House at
Avenue D and Fourth Street.


ELIZABETH COOK | Specialto the Times.
Billy Cook signs the fender of the fully restored Sprite.



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Thursday, April 8, 2010


A6 | The Times


Local


house," said Oberhausen.
Neel and his mother
were close. He never left
home after the war.
When Oberhausen's
family moved to Pensacola,
Mama Sue would visit the
week before Christmas,
but she always took the bus
home to be with Neel on
Christmas Day.
Of01 MCI.00d
and the 'Trouble'
Carol McLeod, late hus-
band of Voncile McLeod,
was Neel's best friend. To-
gether they built the "Wou-
ble," a sleek pleasure boat
they shared for fishing and
trips to the barrier islands.
"They named that boat
the 'Wouble' because, in-
stead of coming straight
home from work, Carol
would go and work on her
with Neel and that caused
trouble," said Voncile.
The McLeods' son, Don-
nie, said Hinckley was his
father's best friend. "My
dad was a jokester and
Neel was his straight man "
he said. "A fairly quiet ma/,
he always seemed very
smart no matter what he
did. Dad asked him ques-
tions. When he ran the
radio shop and he came
across a radio or TV he
couldn't fix, he'd call Neel
and they'd talk about it and
usually Neel would come
up with the answer."
Freddy Buck Sawyer
said his father, then pro-
prietor of the Sawyer Boat
Works, was a close friend
of Neel's. They traded
tools back and forth and
consulted with each other
about boat construction and
repair.
Lee "Pal" Rivers of
Apalachicola remembers
that Neel walked to work
every day. Rivers' wife, Lau-
rie McLeod Rivers, Carol
McLeod's sister, said Neel
would join the other men
at the Grill each morning
for coffee, and Carol would
come over from his shop to
talk about problem repairs.
The McLeod family
was extremely close to the
Hinckleys. Mama Sue was
Laurie River's godmother
and Laurie's father, attor
ney R. Don McLeod, helped
look after the Hinckley
children after their father's

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death. She remembers one
Christmas when her father
brought young Neel a shot-
gun as a gift.
Lee Rivers said Neel
got his early training in
woodworking in high school.
Barber said the high school
installed its first wood shop
while Neel was a student
and he almost immediately
started making beautiful
furniture.
While in high school, he
also found time to earn a
letter for football.
In spite of his early
death, he was a healthy
young man, "strong as a
horse" remembered Donnie
McLeod.
Neel and Carol built
Carol's house across from
Battery Park. Laurie Rivers
said the beautiful breakfast
nook was one of Neel's pet
projects.
"He didn't want to go to
college," said Laurie," He
wanted to stay here."
Myrtle Buzbee was the
love of his life and, accord-
ing to friends, the only girl
he ever kept company with.
Until recently, she resided
in Mama Sue's house with
her sister, the late Dona
Austin.
When Neel left to join the
service during World War
II, Myrtle followed him to
Jacksonville.
"He was an aviation
mechanic during the war,"
she remembered in an
interview last month. "He
made the second highest
grade in his class. He said
he could have made the
highest if he hadn't been so
homesick and lonesome for
me. When his unit shipped
out, there was a letter from
Washington saying for him
to be kept in Jacksonville. At
the end of the war, he got a
letter from the Secretary of
the Navy, wishing him well.
Not everybody got one of
those."
The Navy misspelled his
name as Neal Hinckley, an
error that followed him for
the rest of his life. His first
name is misspelled on his
tombstone.
A machine to drill
Square holes
Myrtle also remembered
his amazing ability with
machines. "If I told you


over the country, but they
couldn't get it to work. This
went on for 10 days," he
said. "Finally somebody
said, 'Why don't you go ask
Neel?' He went down to Ten
Foot Hole and looked it over,
asked for the schematic,
and he had it working in
three or four hours.
"Another time a tug boat
had to reverse the polar-
ity of its electrical system.
Somebody said to go get
Neel. He had that boat on its
way in a little bit," Barber
said.
"I had bought an engine
and put it in a boat when I
was fishing in Pensacola. I
installed it myself. I would
start it one time and it
would start fine, then it
would show a dead charge.
Neel came along and looked
at it for a feW minutes. He
noticed that I had covered
some wires with a piece of
copper and driven a nail
through a wire so it was
shorting out. I had been
working on it for hours," he
said. "Neel wasn't there 15
minutes and he pointed to
the problem and said, 'Look
right here and see what you
see.
Wouldn't allow
.Is
IBMCI H S
WOrkshop
Neel's forte was boat
building "You would go to
his worl shop there was
one thing you wouldn't see
there. You wouldn't find a
pencil. He didn't allow them.
Neel ascribed his wood with
a steel point. He wouldn't
use a pencil because the
line came out too wide "
said Pal Rivers. '
"He would reject a board
if it didn't suit him and
throw it away," said Barber.
"He could take a board out
of a boat, measure it and get
all of the curves and angles
and make notations, then
go back to his shop and cut
it and send it to us to nail in
place. It would fit perfectly."
Rivers agreed. "When
he put something together,
it was a perfect fit. If he
wanted to do something, he
did it."
Neel constructed many
boats. Dan Sangaree, of
Apalachicola, remembered
the "Teal," a 16-foot river
boat with a roof on four


posts high enough to walk
under.
Barber said Neel built a
35-foot cabin cruiser for sea-
food dealer Ikey Wade, and
two big pogie boats at the
beginning of World War II.
He repaired the legend-
ary "Sadie J," the first
motorized vessel on Apala-
chicola Bay, for Bunks Por-
ter after she was damaged
in a storm.
The only known Hinckley
boat still in existence is the
"Ambler," a duck boat he
built for Elgin Wefing. The
craft is currently housed
at the Apalachicola Mari-
time Museum at 125 Water
Street.
Louis VanVleet of Apala-
chicola described unique
features of the boat. "The
engine is housed in the
front of the 'Ambler' and
connected to the propeller
by a long steel drive shaft
to make the flat-bottomed
boat sit perfectly level in
the water. That engine had
a unique firing system.
Most engines have a built-
in ignition. This boat had a
long propeller shaft. About
halfway back, he put a cam
on the shaft and that was
what opened and closed the
points to fire the coil. The
coil was a set in a manufac-
tured wooden box. At that
time, they used that type of
coil on a lot of engines."
Sawyer said the 'Am-
bler' featured a weedless
propeller and could run in 6
inches of water.
Neel died while work-
ing on a shrimp boat for
George.
"The boat he was work-
ing on was almost finished.
It was huge. The wheel-
house was beautiful. It
looked like something out
of a factory," said Myrtle
Hinckley. "He got off of the
boat and went to his boss
and said, 'Take me to the
hospital.' Two blocks from
the shop he took a deep
breath and died."
On Feb. 1, 1961, Neel
Hinckley died of a ruptured
artery in his heart.
He now lies in the Mag-
nolia Cemetery on Bluff
Road, but almost 50 years
later, the memory of the
Wizard of Water Street is
fresh in the minds of those
who knew him.


MYRTLE HINCKLEY COLLECTION | Special to The Times


the things he could do you
wouldn't believe me," she
said. "He built a machine to
drill square holes. He could
build a record player or a
radio from scratch. People
used to say 'Neel Hinckley
could make a man; he just
can't put the breath in him.'
"He didn't want to go
to college," she said. "He
said he didn't learn noth-
ing there, but how to steal
chickens."
Neel worked for sea-
food dealer George Demo
George. He did radio work,
woodwork, wiring, welding
and diesel engine repair.
Sometimes he traveled to
Panama City to service
large boats in dry dock.
Lawrence Sangaree, of
Apalachicola, remembered
making the journey with
him on many occasions.
Neel built boats on the side,
maintained the city trucks
and did repairs at the hos-
pital.
"Neel could fix any-
thing," Pal Rivers said.
"One time in 1950, four of
us flew into Apalachicola in
TBMs, the world's largest
single-engine plane. They
were torpedo bombers and
used to drop depth charges.
The battery in one of the
planes went dead and we
had failed to bring a cable
that would have allowed one
of the other planes to jump
start it. A car battery was


,,
not powerful enough.
Eventually, Neel was
called. He rigged up a series
of car batteries and the
plane was aloft in no time.
"If I ever knew a genius,
it was Neel Hinckley," Bar-
her said. "He used to solve
everybody's problems. I
think he could have taken
your appendix out if he
wanted to.
"You could bring him
anything to fix. I've seen
him take a nickelodeon
apart and have it scattered
all over the place and put it
back together and it would
work," he said. "People
would say, 'Go ask Neel.'
He didn't want any money.
He was the kind of person
who wasn't happy unless he
was doing something and
he didn't like to be messed
with. If he was busy and you
asked him what he was do-
ing, he would say, 'I'm build-
ing a rudder for a duck's
butt.'
"You'd try to pay him
and he wouldn't take it. You
could leave your money on
the work bench and come
back in a week and it would
still be there," said Barber.
"He could read any
schematic but he wasn't
formally trained. One time
they brought a barge over
from Tyndall Air Force Base
to track drones. The track-
ing equipment broke. They
brought experts in from all


By $USOn 10menf50n
Specialty the Times
I think that I must have
asked for a playhouse, perhaps
even more than once.
One Christmas, when I must
have been about 7 or 8, Santa
brought one to my little sister
and me. It was a beauty!
Its facade mirrored the front
of our cottage-style house,
though I didn't recognize that
at the time. Nor did I realize
that it had been built by the
local master craftsman, Neel
Hinckley.
It was white, as was our
house, had a peaked overhang
over the front door, which had
a glass pane, just like our real
front door. It had three real win-
dows, which went up and down.
The interior was painted light
blue, and the floor was painted


brown. It had a tiny front porch.
We moved the small table and
chairs right in, as well as the
doll bed, and our mother's an-
tique child-size stove. We were
all ready to play house!
I actually did play house
there, probably a few times, but
not nearly as much as I used it
for other activities. You see, I
was an organizer and instigator,
and my friends and I used it for
club meetings, an office for our
newspaper, "The Daily Blah,"
and for probably its most dubi-
ous use, a chicken pen.
You see, my friend Kathy
and I had spotted those Easter
chickens (you know, the dyed
kind) in the window of the gro-
cery store that was where the
Piggly Wiggly stands today. We
asked our mothers if we could
have one, and the answer was


a resounding, "No!" from each,
before which they had asked
where we would keep said
chickens, our answer, "the play
house!"
Times were different then;
children had a bit more free-
dom, so after school one day, we
took our savings, and walked
straight to Mr. Callaway's store.
Kathy got a blue chicken and
I got a pink one. We brought
them home in paper bags, and
put them right in the playhouse.
My little sister had a fit, so
my mother bought her an or-
ange one.
A little time passed, and
Kathy's cat Big Pig had a small
orange chicken for lunch. Alice,
Kathy's mother, certainly no
fool, and wanting to be rid of
a chicken, insisted that Kathy
give Lee (little sister) her blue


chicken. The chickens grew.
Kathy and I lost interest.
The playhouse smelled like
chicken feed. Chickens, even
little ones, are messy!
Lee, however, did not lose
interest. She LOVED the
chickens. She also LOVED
the playhouse, and used it for
its intended purpose, a REAL
playhouse -for years actually.
It did, however, always have the
slight odor of chicken feed for
the rest of its days.
In 2002, we refurbished the
family home, removing the
additions that detracted from
its original appearance. Over
the front door, the contractor
fashioned an overhang that
matched the one on the play-
house, just as Mr. Hinckley had
done when he built the one on
the playhouse.


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Thursday, April 8, 2010 wIww. ap ala cht i mes.c om Pag~e


STAT E BAN K 1897
A Division of Coastal Commnunity Bank

Apalachicola Carrabelle Eastpoint St. George Island
22 Avenue E 612 N Avenue A 5 Jefferson Street 1200 Franklin Blvd
653-8805 697-4500 670-8501 927-2561


* Traditional


By David Adlerstein
Times City Editor
The Seahawks varsity
baseball team, weathering
a losing streak as they head
down the home stretch of
the 2010 season, had a bright
spot at the start of spring
break, when they downed
Jefferson County 11-1 at
home March 29.
Sophomore Austin Larkin
went 3-for-4 with three RBIs,
with junior Caden Barber go-
ing 2-for-3 with three RBIs.
Senior Gary Larson was
2-for-4, and senior Dustin
Putnal 2-for-3 in the victory,
while sophomore Colton
Sheridan was 1-for-1.
On March 26 at Munroe,
the Seahawks took a shel-
lacking 15-3, as freshman
Cole Lee was 1-for-3 with
one RBI. Sophomore Zack
Armistead took the loss
.
On April 2 at Rutherford,
the Seahawks fell to East
Jessamine, Ky. 11-1, with
freshman Skylar Hutchinson


going 1-for-1 and banging in
the lone RBI. Sophomore
Marcus Dalton, the losing
pitcher, went 1-for-1, while se-
nior Jason Thompson went
1-for-2 and Putnal 1-for-2.
On Saturday at home,
Franklin County again lost
to Munroe, this time 11-1.
Hutchinson took the loss on
the mound. Lee went 3-for-3
at the plate, and Thompson
2-for-3
On 'lliesday night at
home, the Seahawks fell 15-
2 to Port St. Joe. Armistead
took the loss at the plate,
while freshman Seth Rog-
ers went 1-for-3 with a home
run. Seniors AJ Arnold and
Dustin Putnal each went
was 1-for-2.
"This game was a lot clos-
er than the score showed,"
said Coach Mike Emerson.
"We gave up two big in-
nings due to errors. I am
very proud of how my team
played last night and we are
getting a lot better as the
season goes on."


East boys' Austin O'Neal (#21)
City on Saturday.
By Travis Downey
Florida Freedom Newspapers
It took about 30 minutes early
Saturday afternoon, but once
the Freedom West boys all-stars
found their groove there was little
the East could do to stop them.
That was especially true in the
case of Demetrius Moore,
Paxton's standout forward fin-
ished with a game-high 16 points
and 11 rebounds to take MVP
honors as the West rolled to a 93-
72 win in the sixth annual Free-
dom All Star Classic at Gulf Coast
Community College. For Moore,
it was another day at the office.
"Being physical on the boards
is just a big part of winning,"
Moore said. "We knew that's
what we had to do to win, so I just
tried to help out and get a couple
ofrehounds."
West center Nate Terry of
Niceville had 14 points, while
guards Kody Williams of Nicev-
ille and Chris Pickett of Crest-
view each had 12. It was Walton's
James Towery, however, that had


ANDREW WARDLOW | FloridaFreedomNewspapers
drives to the basket during the Freedom AII-Star Classic in Panama


East coach Fred Drake, skipper
of the Franklin County Seahawks,
shaking his head in mock dis-
gust.
Tower made a pair of 3-point-
ers in a tightly contested first
half. He honed his stroke in the
second to finish with 14 points
and spark a West run that essen-
tially sealed the win.
"They hit alot of3-point shots,"
Drake said. "They lived and died
by the 3-pointers and today they
made them. (3-point shooting)
and rebounding was the differ-
ence."
The West win not only evened
the series at three games apiece,
but completed a sweep as the
West girls won earlier in the day,
67-65. It marked the third time in
six years that the West has swept
the two games.
"We came here to win the
game," West coach Jerome
Strutchen said. "We talked all
week about how we wanted to
get everybody in the game, but
not at the expense of winning the
game. In the second half, they


began to gel as a team."
Marianna's Tre' Long, who
along with Cottondale's Marcus
Humose had 14 points, tried to
rally the East early in the second
half. Long's ability to drive and
hit on several acrobatic layups
helped the East trim the West
lead to 55-52 with 10 minutes
left.
That's when the West began to
turn rebounds into scoring runs.
"That was the biggest key,"
Strutchen said, "getting re-
bounds and pushing the ball up
the floor."
Walton's sharpshooter was
right in the middle of it.
Tower buried an NBA-range
3-pointer to give the West a com-
manding 80-67 lead. He followed
with a medium-range jumper
and another long 3-pointer in
consecutive offensive trips to
stretch the lead to 85-67 and ef-
fectively quash any hopes of an
East comeback.
Austin O'Neal, the All Star se-
lected from the Seahawks squad,
finished with seven points.


On Saturday, the Lanark
Village Golf Club hosted
their annual golf tourna-
ment, featuring 20 golfers,
on five teams of four. About
50 people turned out for the
chicken luncheon that pre-
ceded the golf match.
The club honored Mary
Croley and Angie Hearl,
of Tallahassee, who have
been the angels behind
the lunch and tournament
for several years. The two
women received gift bags,
after which Hearl read off
a list of donations to the
club totaling over $1,000. In


photo below, club president
Joe Manzanares presents
Mary Croley with a gift and
Angie Hearl receives her
present from past presi-
dent Ward Godburn.
The winning team in this
year's tournament finished
two over par. Prior to the
tournament, a drawing was
held for a beautiful stained
glass window the club
raffled off as an additional
fundraiser. The winning
ticket belonged to Annelle
Blanchett, of Tallahassee
and Carrabelle. By Lois
Swoboda


Lady Sea hawks
varsity sof th all
Friday, April 9 at 6 p.m. @ West Gads-
den (District game)
Monday, April 12 at 6 p.m. vs. Munroe
(Senior Night)
Thursday, April 15 at 6 p.m. @ Godby


Seahawks varsity baseball
Thursday, April 8 at 6 p.m. @ West Gads-
den (District game)
Monday, April 12 at 6 p.m. @.John Paul II
Wednesday, April 14 at 4 p.m. vs. Jeffer-
son Co.
Friday, April 16 at 7 p.m. @ Liberty Co.
(District game)


CA RRA BE L LE APA LA CH ICO LA


A


Seahawks down Jefferson


Lanark Village golf tourney draws crowd


Springf SPORTS


18800n8~ Sh


$8tlr 0gerS PLAYER OF THE WEEK


Landon Nash, 10, belted a three-run homer on opening

Day of Baseball for the Eastpoint Sluggers, sponsored
by the Hut and Barber's Seafood. Nash's dad, Sgt.
Wayne Nash, an assistant coach with the team, was
on hand to witness the game, but has since left for

Afghanistan where he serves with a military police
unit specializing in investigating crime scenes.


Freshman Seth Rogers smacked a home run, and went
1-for-3 at the plate, on Tuesday night at home, in the
Seahawks loss to Port St. Joe. Coach Mike Emerson

I said Rogers has been playing good ball ever since


moving into the varsity ranks.


Manipulation





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Thursday, April 8, 2010


Local


By Lois Swoboda
Times Staff Writer
On Saturday, March 27,
local art was the theme in
Carrabelle and beyond.
The Wandering Star
Quilt Club's biannual quilt
show inspired artists on
the county's east end to
display their skills and
their creations. The quilt
show, always a popular
event, featured more than
30 examples of textile art
this year and filled Chillas
Hall with scores of visitors
Outside, there was a


cookout and yard sale.
Raffle tickets were on
sale for a quilt, to ben-
efit Wandering Star; for
stained glass in support
of the Lanark Village
Golf Club' and for a bass
boat to buy a new roof for
Sacred Heart Catholic
Church.
Club members voted to
rank this year's challenge
project, a quilt or hanging
featuring gay star-pat-
terned cloth.
Visitors voted to choose
best of show and award
prizes for the best wall-


hanging, baby quilt and
bed quilt.
First place for wall-
hangings went to Donna
Briesaker for her "Vase of
Flowers" on black. Joyce
Manzanares took second
with her hanging titled
"Sister-in-Law," and "Pi-
ano Lessons" by Carole
Lawlor was ranked third.
First place for baby and
lap quilts went to Jackie
Course for her baby quilt
depicting bunnies. Man-
zanares was a winner
again for her "Love Bug"
lap quilt and Chris Rob-


erts took third for "Um-
brellas."
In the bed quilt catego-
ry, Briesaker took another
first place for "Threads for
the Heartland." Her win-
ning entry will be raffled
off to benefit Habitat for
Humanity. Genie Sewell's
offering, "Butterflies in
Flight" took second. Aline
Craig's hand-quilted
Christmas quilt took third
in the bed quilt category
and won best of show.
Once again, the Wan-
dering Stars are to be con-
gratulated on producing
an outstanding array of
needlework at this year's
show.
A little to the west,
Carrabelle's arts commu-
nity took advantage of the
good weather and spring
break visitors to host a
series of three art shows.
Perpender's Gallery
on County Road 67 was
the first stop on the art
trail. At the Franklin
County Senior Center, the


PHOTOS BY LOIS SWOBODA | The Times


Carrabelle Artist's As-
sociation held court for
several dozen visitors and
displayed their technique
with art demonstrations
as well as their sketches,
and pottery.
Further to the west on
U.S. Highway 98, Moore
Treasures had a display of
paintings in the front, and


inside a delightful mix of
art and mineralogy. The
shop contains rocks and
semiprecious stone of all
kinds.
Highlighted by perfect
weather, this year's east
end art show showcased
the works of local artisans
against the natural beauty
of Franklin County.


156 Cove Road
MLS #239373
Nestled within 1 block of
the community boat
launch which offers access
to both saltwater and
freshwater, and within
7 min from pristine
white beaches. The
three bedroom home is
surrounded by
chain link fence (5ft
hioh), offers stora e shed
and mature trees which
provide great shade. Metal
Roof is 5 yrs old. Property
is connected to sewer

$199,000


156 Charles
Avenue
MLS #239307
Cute, Cute, Cute!! Charming two
bedroom Cape SanBlasbayfront
cottage with dock on St. Joseph
Bay. Approx. 300' to the pristine
white sandy beaches of the Gulf
with deeded access via gated
boardwalk. Like new, turn key
including aH furnishings, linens
and kitchen necessities.
Gross rental income approx
$20,000+for 2009. Sewertap
has been paid and will convey.
Guest contact info, pending
reservations and 2010 advertising
websites included. New HVAC
in d0e dd wn rs na)isng wcrlbed

$75,000


210 Sandlewood
MLS #239071
Family home or
family retreat, thiS
5 bedroom, 3 bath
home on Cape
San Blas offers it
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A8 | The Times


Art blossoms on toe east end


m.'i O





y-" 4 ,
Above, showing off their
hats at the luncheon are,
from left, Dianne Duncan;
4 - her daughter Donna
Duncan; and Donna's
mother-in-law, Charlotte
4 Gander, who chaired the
committee that planned
the event. At left, one
of the prettiest hats at the
luncheon was worn by
Sissy Siprell.
Photos by DAVID ADLERSTEIN |
TheTimes


B


www. apalachtimes. com


Thursday, April 8, 2010


Page l


Franklin County pre-kindergartners marked Dr. Seuss' birthday
last month in a way that would have made the great author proud:
by celebrating the stories and characters he gave the world.
In a special celebration on March 18, sponsored by Michae-
lin and David Watts of the Bring Me a Book program, the young
people were treated to a morning filled with reading and arts and
crafts, all in homage to the great children's book author.
Several readers from the community, including David Volk,
Caty Green, Anna Marie Cannatella, Ricky Jones, Anna Feil, Anna
Season and Bonnie IRilmer, took time to tell Seuss stories to the
pre-K students, as well as to those in the Head Start program. The
pre-K teachers include Tammy Sasnett, Valerie Miller, Mary Wil-
liams, Patty Kulick and Lisa Murray, and they got assistance from
paraprofessionals Brandi Horst, Marcia Thomas, Alfred Smith,
Eileen Boatwright, Abby Shiver and Dorothy Woolf.
The Bring Me a Book program provided Seuss books and book-
shelves to each of the classrooms, so each child could enjoy these
fanciful tales.


By David Adlerstein


Photos by DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times


St. George Island's David Volk reads to pre-kindergartners
in Mary Williams' class as part of the Dr. Seuss birthday
celebration.


Michaelin Watts, dressed as a L)r. beuss
character for the occasion, prepares to give
away raffle prizes as pre-kindergartner Zack
Libby, son of Kari Libby, picks out the winning
numbers at the Dr. Seuss birthday celebration.


With teacher assistant Jennifer Edwards seated
in the back and teacher Patty Kulick at right,
pre-kindergartners hold their pipe cleaner
versions of the speck of dust on the clover that
is part of the story of "Horton Hears a Who."


Pre-kindergarten teacher Patty Sasnett, left, and para-


The Methodist women
went mad last month.
A Mad Hatter's lun-
cheon, at which all the
ladies sported zany hats
of their own devising, was
held March 13 at the First
United Methodist Church
ofApalachicola.Hostedby
Charlotte Gander and her
committee, the luncheon
benefited the Apalachic-
ola and St. George Island
Methodist churches' Gua-
temala Mission Team.
Eighteen members
will travel to Panajachel,
Guatemala, from June 12
to 19. The team will work
in the Mayan Indian vil-
lages surrounding Lake
Atitlan, hosting medical
clinics, constructing a
house and conducting a
Bible school. This is the
fourth year the churches
have sent a team to Pana-
jachel.
A delicious lunch was
served, and entertain-
ment was provided by


& .
Jeri Turner shows off
the afternoon's funniest
hat, an oil funnel turned
matrimonial veil.
Scott Kinkead and Ta-
mara Marsh. The award
for Funniest Hat went to


COUS6

Jeri Turner, who decorat-
ed a plastic oil funnel for
the occasion. "We were
shopping, and we needed
a funnel for oil grease. I
just stuck it on my head
in the grocery store," she
said. "It's a bridal hat. You
can get married in it, and
if you break down on the
way, you can use it to put
oil in the car."
The most Unique Hat
awards went to Francine
Wells, for her masterful
use of a chicken strainer,
and Rita Sawyer, "who
stuck all the bits from her
junk drawer" to complete
her chapeau. The Pret-
tiest Hat awards went to
Jean Fitzgerald and Ama-
na Wilson.
Donations for the mis-
sion trip may be sent to
SGI United Methodist
Church, 201 E. Gulf Beach
Drive, St. George Island,
FL 32328.
-ByDavidAdlerstein


LIFE


TI~ES


Students celebrate Dr. Seuss' birthday





Jackson Williams turns 5
Jackson Williams turned 5 on 'lliesday, March 30.
He celebrated his birthday at school the day of, and
on that weekend with a Transformers party with family
and friends.
Jackson is the son of Dewey and Jessica Williams, of
Keystone Heights, and formerly of Carrabelle.



PET OF TH E
WEE K
~ -
88
Locant
2*> *
Logan is a very
handsome 1-year-
old Labrador
Retriever. He is
gentle, smart and
mellow... a real
lover. He would
make a great pet
for a family with
children. Come
by the Adoption Center to meet Logan. He
will make some lucky family very happy.
Volunteers are desperately needed to socialize
Logan and all of the other dogs and cats. We
are always looking for people willing to bring
one of our animals into their home to be
fostered for various needs. Anytime you can
spare would be greatly appreciated.
Call Karen at 670-8417 for more details or
visit the Franklin County Humane Society at
244 State Route 65 in Eastpoint. You may log
onto the website at www.forgottenpets.org to
see more of our adoptable pets.


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Benefit dinner Saturday
I.r e...i. L..:.. x
There will be a benefit dinner for Connie Lemieux on Saturday, April 10 at the
13 Mile Seafood Market in downtown Apalachicola, on Water Street.
It will start at 11 a.m. and there will be a $6 donation. Menu is fried mullet or
grilled chicken, potato salad or cole slaw, baked beans, roll, dessert, and tea.
All proceeds are going to the family to help with medical costs and travel.
For more information, please contact Fannie Partridge at 670-5743 or Teresa
Kelly at 653-8522.


Thursday, April 8, 2010


B2 | The Times


Society


Rodgers and Hammerstein's
classic Broadway musical "Okla-
homa!" will be presented at the
Dixie Theatre, April 16 and 17, at
7:30 p.m., and April 18, at 3 p.m.
The final production in The
Panhandle Players' 2009-10 com-
munity theatre season, "Oklaho-
ma!" directed by Merel Young, of-
fers singing, dancing, drama and
comedy for the whole family.
Tickets are $12 adults, $10 stu-
dents and $5 for children 12 and
under. Call 670-8200 to order, or
purchase at the door one hour be-
fore curtain,
The Pulitzer Prize winning
show is set in western Indian
territory at the turn of the 20th
century before Oklahoma state-
hood, when cattlemen and farm-
ers were fighting over fences and


water rights. In the middle of that
controversy are two more rival-
ries.
One between an upstanding
cowboy called Curley (Randy
Mims) and a darkly menacing
hired hand named Jud (David
Bowen). Both are in love with
independent-minded, farmer's
daughter Laurey (Megan Lamb).
The second rivalry occurs be-
tween rodeo cowboy Will (Joe
Shields) and womanizing peddler,
Ali Hakim (Donnie Denig), over
Ado Annie (Francis Campbell),
a slightly promiscuous, but well-
meaning girl. This trio will pro-
vide plenty of laughs and comic
relief to the intense drama of the
other love triangle.
Adding to the mix of conflict
and resolution are Laurey's pro-


tective Aunt Eller (Liz Sisung),
farmers and cowboys Ike (Fred
Center), Slim (Gary Niblack),
Andrew (Tom Loughridge), Cord
(Jeff Ilardi), and pioneer woman
Gertie (Ann Cowles).
Accomplished pianist Bedford
Watkins will accompany the so-
loists' and cast's singing of such
evergreen songs as "Oh, What
A Beautiful Mornin'," "The Sur-
rey With The Fringe On Top," "I
Can't Say No," and, of course,
the rousing, spirited "Oklahoma,"
among others.
The Panhandle Players' pro-
duction of "Oklahoma!" is pre-
sented through special arrange-
ment with R & H Theatricals, and
is funded in part by the Franklin
County Tourist Development
Council.


W.-miuma ..'1
ROYCEROLSTADIII|SpecialtotheTimes
A coyly cautious kiss sparks romance between rodeo
cowboy Will (Joe Shields) and Ado Annie (Francis
Campbell), the girl who "can't say no," in Rodgers and
Hammerstein's musical "Oklahoma!" at the Dixie Theatre,
April 15, 17 and 18.


Ashley Creamer and Richard Zingarelli wed
Ashley Creamer and Richard Zingarelli, both ofApala-
chicola, are pleased to announce their wedding.
The ceremony took place in Key West on Thursday,
March 18.
Creamer is the daughter of Diane and Joey Creamer,
of Apalachicola. Zingarelli is the son of Kimberly Ingram,
of Cairo, Ga., and the late Richard "Tich" Zingarelli, of
Apalachicola.


Lauren Reynolds, Tony Shiver
marry in Bahamas
In front of family and friends, Mr. Tony A. Shiver Jr.
and Ms. Lauren A. Reynolds exchanged wedding vows on
Saturday, March 27 in the Bahamas.
Tony is the son of Tony Shiver (JoAnn), Sr., of St.
George Island, and Christine (Pat) Holmes, of Carra-
belle. Lauren is the daughter of Lauren (Rob) Dehaan,
of Jacksonville.
Tony and Lauren now reside in Jacksonville.


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The application deadline is April l6.


,


*


n ~l~o~


Classic Broadway musical 'Oklahoma!' to play Dixie


Bir-thdays and WEDDINGS


Fa~-s
























































Obituaries


(ARDS OF THANKS

JOhn and Pam Va this
Never will there be enough words to express our
thanks and gratitude for the support and effort ev-
eryone put forth on our behalf by doing the fish fry
benefit. We're very grateful to live in this little com-
munity where we can rely on each other for help to
get through difficult times as these.
Going the extra mile by those catching and clean-
ing the fish and preparing this food, this generosity
adds to the flavor of the closeness of our community.
Thanks again to everyone,
John and Pam Vathis

Annie Austin
I give Honor to God, who is first in my Life. I would
like to take this time to thank each of you who came
out to the Dry Bones' first event. God asked Ezekiel
the question "Can these bones live?" Ezekiel said 'I
don't know, but you do Lord."
I would like to see you on my next event. My goal
is to help the Homeless, the Elderly, the Sick and the
Shut-in.
So please mark your calendar dates for April 17,
May 15, June 19, July 24, Aug. 7, Sept. 4, Oct. 30, Nov
20 and Dec. 18. Each event is on Saturday, at 1 p.m. at
the Sixth Street Recreation Center.
Special thanks to Brenda Benjamin, Terry Tipton,
Bobby Clay, Brenda Cumming and Cynthia Rhodes.
May God bless you all:
Evangelist Annie Louise Austin
Not by the Hours We Live
But How Much We Give


First Ba tist Church
St. George Island
501 E.9B2 re Drive

R. Michael Waley, Pastor
Join us as we praise and worship the living Chris .
"Great is the Lord and most worthy of praise." Psalm 145:3
Sunday Bible Study ................ ................ 10:00am
Worship Praise... .. 11:00am
Sunday Nigh ................... .................7:00pm
wera ".....
"Walking in Christ"
Th United Meth dist Chu h
6 O TC OS
Of Franklin County Welcome You

First United Methodist Church of Apalachicola
Worship Service 11:00 a.m. every Sunday
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
75 56 St. Apalachicola 653-9530 fumcapalach@gtcom.net
Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis
Carrabelle United Methodist Church
Worship Services 10:45 a.m. Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
"Celebrate Recovery" Mondays 7-9 p.m.
Healing service first Tuesday each month-? p.m.
102NEAve.B a abelle 697-3672

Eastpoint United Methodist Church
Worship Service 10:00 a.m. every Sunday
Prayer 9:15 a.m. Waffles & Wisdom 11:15 a.m.
Healing Service every first Fridays of the Month at 6:30 p.m.
317 Patton Dr. (corner of David St.) 670-8825
Pastor: Rev. Beth White
St. George Island United Methodist Church
9:00 a.m. Worship Service
10:00 a.m. Fellowship Hour
201 E. Gulf Beach Dr. 927- 4635 www.sgiumc.org
Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis


'
St. Patrick Catholic Church
Ave C & Sixth Street in Apalachicola, FL 32329 or
The Islander (Across from the Blue Parrot)
on St. George Island, FL 32328
(850) 653-9453 Email: stpatcath@fairpoint.net
PASTOR: FATHER ROGER LATOSYNSKI
www.stpatricksmass.com
APALACHICOLA MASS SCHEDULE
SATURDAY................. .................5 PM
SUNDAY ................ ................ 10 AM
ST. GEORGE ISLAND MASS SCHEDULE
SUNDAY ................ .................8:30 AM


First Pentecostal Holiness Church
379 Brownsville Road Apalachicola


Sunday School 9:45 am
Sunday Morning Worship 10:45 am
Sunday Evening Service 6:00 pm
Monday, Youth Group 6:30 pm
Wednesday, Royal Rangers, G.A.P. 7:00 pm
Wednesday Worship & Word 7:30 pm
Nursery Provided during regular church services


IV


Thursday, April 8, 2010


Local


The Times | B3


By Lois Swoboda
Times Staff Writer
Saturday's benefit for Tonya's
Hope was a huge success, but orga-
nizers are already planning a second
fundraiser.
Chairperson Kathy Ingersoll
said Tonya's Hope raised more than
$7,000, with volunteers serving more
than 150 lunches.
There was also a yard sale and an
auction, in addition to a raffle for two
Carnival Cruise tickets. Mary Lynn
Nature, of Howardsville, Va., who
winters in Lanark Village, won the
cruise.
Ingersollsaidthe public donations
were so generous, some items never
even reached the auction block, so
a second yard sale and auction is


planned for Saturday, April 17.
The fundraiser will take place at
the Camp Gordon Johnston Ameri-
can Legion Hall on Spring Street in
Lanark Village and will begin at 4
p.m. There will also be a roast chick-
en dinner available for $7 a plate.
Ingersoll said that she and
Tonya's Hope wish to thank all of the
"angels" who made the fundraiser a
great success.
Tonya's Hope is a charity that pro-
vides support for county residents
stricken with cancer. The groups
seekstofundnontraditionalservices
likegasmoneyfortraveltoandfrom
doctor's appointments, housekeep-
ing for those too ill to clean and child
care services.
This year, their fundraising goal
is $12,000.


Lanark NEWS
Inez Bowen had passed away.
A memorial service was held
Wednesday morning, April 7 at
Lanark Community Church,
Lanark Village. Inez and her
late husband, Flash, had lived
here for a long time. Inez al-
ways attended and supported
K NEWS all village functions. She was
Welsh also a regular at the Thursday
lunches at the Senior Center
and Resday breakfasts.
Pray for Father Cregan and Inez's
eternal peace.
Members of Sacred Heart Parish
will have a low country boil, yard sale
and much more. We will hold it on the
church grounds; there will also be a
silent auction. Hope you can make in!
See you Saturday, April 17.


Four generations and
15 family members
honored Tonya Bridges
on Saturday. The
oldest family member
present was her
mother, Zonie Aplin
d th
Fruge an e youngest
was granddaughter
Britney Cone, who
traveled from Louisiana
to celebrate her
grandmother's memory.
LOIS SWOBODA | The Times


Thanks for your support,
Saturday, for Tonya's Hope
yard sale, lunch and auction.
It was a successful day. I didn't
get to the sale. God knows I
didn't need any more stuff; I
need to have a sale myself.
Saturday I was on the
R
phone and letting people LANA
know that Father Cregan had ]im
passed away. Our Friday daily
Mass, April 9, will be for Father. Those
that attend his funeral in Tallahas-
see are welcome. The Friday service
will be at 9:30 a.m. at Sacred Heart
Church, in Lanark Village.
Saturday's Mass will be at Blessed
Sacrament in Tallahassee at 11 a.m.
Father will be laid to rest in Pensacola.
Later Saturday, I got a call that


Members of the Lanark Boat
Club had planned to have a breakfast
tomorrow; however, because of the
service for Ather Cregan, it has been
cancelled.
George is still short on volunteers
at the Resday breakfasts and Thurs-
day lunches. Please drop by and sign
up, or call the center at 697-3760.
Thankyou!
You are getting a little lax on
walking your dogs without a leash or
plastic bag and paper towel to pick up
after. Tighten up out there!
Be kind to one another. Check in on
the sick and housebound. Volunteers
make it happen!
Until next time, God bless America,
our troops, the poor, homeless and
hungry.


Kenneth B. Wheeler, 88,
of 17533 Maxon Lane, died
Wednesday, March 31, at
the Samaritan Keep Home,
Watertown, N.Y, where he
had been a resident for a
short time.
Born Dec. 4, 1921, at the
home of his maternal grand-
parents, Herman and Ella
Peck Baldwin, on Baldwin
Road in the town of Ellis-
burg, Ken later moved with
his parents, Moreau and
Theodate Baldwin Wheeler
to a farm on Dingman Road.
After the death of his father
in 1929, he moved to the
Village of Mannsville with
his mother and two sisters,
Kathryn and Keitha.
Ken graduated from
Mannsville High School in
1939.
He was a seaman on
the Great Lakes working
on ore freighters from 1941


until 1944, when
he was drafted
into the Army.
He served during
World War II with
the 377th Harbor
Craft in the South
Pacific, and was
discharged in 1946
with the rankof


ters in Florida. He
enjoyed hunting
and especially
enjoyed travel-
ing throughout
the United States
to his Army re-
unions.
Surviving are
*LER his wife; daughter
' Tammy, and her
husband, Greg
Plant, of Watertown; son,
Moreau, and his wife, Pa-
mela Wheeler, of Adams; 10
grandchildren; nine great-
grandchildren; and several
nieces and nephews.
Two sisters, Kathryn
(Kenneth) Reardon and
Keitha (Alvin) Thomas, died
before him.
Ken was affiliated dur-
ing his life with the follow-
ing: Emmanuel Episcopal
Church, Adams, Charter
Member of South Jeff Li-


ons Club, Rodman Lodge
F+AM #506, past master
of the Rising Sun Lodge
F+AM #234, past high
priest RAM #68 of Sackets
Harbor, Member of Jeff-
Lewis Square Club, Past
Member and Past Worthy
Patron Cecelia Chapter
OES #755, Life Member of
the Don Rounds American
Legion, Adams Post #586
(he was acknowledged by
the Post in 1997 as a more
than 50 year member and
an original member of the
Post), and life member of
Adams VFW Post #5344.
Donations can be made
to the South Jeff Rescue
Squad, Adams, New York, or
to the Camp Gordon John-
ston Assoc. Museum End,
PO Box 1334, Carrabelle, FL
32322. Online condolences
can be made at www.
carpenterstoodley.com.

Inez Bowen
Inez Heath Bowen passed
away Saturday, April 3 in Car-
rabelle.
She had been in this area
since 1985, coming from Geor-
gia and was very active in the
area where she lived. She was
a member of the Red Hat So-
ciety. She loved having break-
fast at the Boat Club.
In lieu of flowers, dona-
tions can be made to Franklin
County Humane Society, 244
U.S. Highway 65, Eastpoint,
FL 32328.
She is survived by one
grandson, Kenneth Farrell, of
Jenkingsburg, Ga.
A memorial service was
held Wednesday morning,
April 7, at Lanark Community
Church, Lanark Village.


THE
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
WELCOMES YOU


After his dis-
charge, he operated the
Atlantic Service Station in
Adams, N.Y until 1963 and
then purchased and oper-
ated Wheeler Oil Co. until
his retirement in 1983.
On Nov 28, 1947, at St.
John's Cathedral in Ogdens
-
burg, N.Y, Ken married
Arlie Hutchins of North
Bangor, N.Y, with Rev
George A. Palmer officiat-
ing.
During their retirement,
Ken and Arlie spent 23 win-


THE


Hwy. 98 & 6th St.
Apalachicola
SUNDAY: 8:00 AM 10:30 AM
LIBRARY HOURS:
SUNDAY 12:00 2:00 PM
MONDAY 11:00 AM 1:00 PM
WEDNESDAY 12:00 2:00 PM
THURSDAY 3:30 5:30 PM


Ather James Cregan, a native of
Limerick, Ireland, died Saturday, April 3
at the rectory in Lanark Village.
He was former pastor of Sacred
Heart Parish, Lanark Village. A Catholic
priest for 46 years, Ather Cregan served
Blessed Sacrament, Tallahassee, and
parishes in Montgomery, Ala., Pensaco-
la, Starke and Quincy. He also served as
Catholic chaplain in the Florida National
Guard and in Florida State Prison.
He is survived by three brothers,
Joseph Cregan (Maud), Patrick Cregan
(Ann) and John Cregan (Ann); sister-
in-law, Alice Cregan; and 12 nieces and
nephews.
He is predeceased by his brother, Mi-
chael Cregan,
In lieu of flowers, Father Cregan
asked that donations be made to his par-
ish church: Sacred Heart Church, PO.
Box 729, Lanark Village, FL 32323.


The vigil and funeral mass will be
held at Blessed Sacrament Church, 624
Miccosukee Road, in Tallahassee. The
Vigil Service will be Friday, April 9 at 7:30
p.m. The Mass of Christian Burial will
be Saturday, April 10 at 11 a.m. Father
Cregan's last wish was to invite anyone
who would like to experience the joy of a
genuinely spirit-filled Catholic funeral to
attend.
Burial will be in Holy Cross Cemetery,
Pensacola.
The Friday, April 9 daily Mass at Sa-
cred Heart Church, in Lanark Village,
will be for Ather Cregan, and will begin
at 9:30 a.m.
Thank you to Big Bend Hospice for all
the comfort each of you gave him the last
18 months.
Bevis kneral Home, Harvey-Young
Chapel in Crawfordville is in charge of
arrangements.


Bernice Lorene Jackson, 86, of
Carrabelle, passed away Friday, April
2 at St. James Rehabilitation Center.
She was born in Vilas and lived
in Carrabelle for the past 80 years.
She was a member of the Carrabelle
United Methodist Church. She was a
member of the Order of Eastern Star,
where she served as past matron of
Dorcus Chapter #36 (now affiliated
with Crawfordville Chapter #242).
She was also past president of the


Bernice Jackson
American Legion Auxiliary #0082.
She was preceded in death by her
parents, Albert Sidney McAnally and
Nicie Viola McAnally, and her son,
Otis Eugene Wheeler.
She is survived by her son, Bill
Nolan Wheeler Sr. and his wife,
Charlotte, of Hosford; daughter
Vilma Lanelle Driver (Bambi) and
her husband, Charles, of Monticello;
daughter-in-law, Blanche Wheeler, of
Carrabelle; eight grandchildren; 11


great-grandchildren; two great-great-
grandchildren; numerous nieces and
nephews; and a host of other family
and friends.
General services were held on
Resday afternoon, April 6 at Car-
rabelle United Methodist Church
with Rev Julie officiating. Interment
followed in Evergreen Cemetery with
Eastern Star Rites.
Kelley-Riley kneral Home, Carra-
belle, is handling all arrangements.


Organizers begin planning second fundraiser for Tonya's Hope


Trv e 1


WELCOMES YOU

Church

Of the
C 8 negan
0 T- IIDI UII
101 NE First Street
Carrabelle
SUNDAY
10:00 AlVI


Father James Cregan











































Library HAPPENINGS


1 b llC
ean up arra ee


The City of Carrabelle is asking everyone to
cleanup your yards.
Rubbish, trash, junk, debris, abandoned material,
excessive accumulation of untended growth of
weeds, unsafe structures, abandoned, discarded,
unused objects or equipment such as automobiles,
boats, furniture, stoves, refrigerators, feezers,

cans, or containers are a violation of City
Ordinance 389 and a fine of$250.00 per day can
be imposed.
Place items (not household garbage) on the right

of way and we will pick it up. Need someone to
haul off those old vehicles? We know someone
that will help.
Take pride in the community that you live in and

help cleanup Carrabelle.


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www.ficklingofflorida.com []] 850.927.2255


Thursday, April 8, 2010


Local


"The Lightning Thief is the
first book in a series called "Percy
Jackson & the Olympians." The
library has just received the set of
five volumes and they have been in THE L
hot demand. Author Rick Riordan Caty
taught English and history in mid-
dle school in California and Texas.
In 2002, he was honored with a Master
Teacher Award. The books are listed for
Grades 5-9, but Ibegan reading this first
volume and wanted to stay up past my
bedtime.
The plot centers on Percy Jackson, a
12-year-old boy with dyslexia and ADHD
(Attention Deficit Hyperactive Disorder).
After going on a field trip and being at-
tacked by his math teacher, who is actu-
ally a Bry in disguise, he finds out that he
is the son of a Greek god. He is brought
to Camp Half-Blood (a camp for children
with a Greek god as a parent). Poseidon,
the sea god, claims Percy as his son. Per-
cy is accused of stealing Zeus' masterbolt,
the model for every lightning bolt made.
He and his two friends Annabeth, 12-year-
old daughter of the goddess Athena, and
Grover, a satyr (Webster's Dictionary says
this is a deity in Greek mythology), are
given 10 days to return the thunderbolt
to Mount Olympus and rectify a feud be-
tween Zeus, Hades, and Poseidon. Along


the way they must cope with the
Aries, Medusa, motorcycle thug
Aires, and various other immortals.
Percy reaches New York City to
RARY give the master bolt to Zeus at the
reene 600th floor of Empire State Building
where Olympus is now located.
"Percy Jackson & the Olympi-
ans: The Lightning Thief was recently
adapted into film by 20th Century Fox. It
was released in February of this year. You
can watch trailers on YouTube.com.
In the series. Book2, "The Sea of
Monsters" has won the 2009 Mark Twain
Readers Award; Book 3, "The Titan's
Curse" made the series a New York Times
best-seller, and Book 4, "The Battle of
the Labyrinth" had a first printing of one
million copies. Book 5, called "The Last
Olympian," has received acclaim from
major reviewers.
Riordan's adult fiction has won the
top three national awards in the mystery
genre the Edgar, the Anthony and the
Shamus. I don't know about you but I
studied the Greeks, and their mythology a
long time ago, and it was a favorite. I'm a
little rusty about who was who and think
this series might just be a great refresher.
Caty Greene is librarian for the Apala-
chicola Municipal Library. 'lb reach her
call 653-8436.


Mayor Van
Johnson, left, and
Census Regional
Director Eviline
Ramirez are
partnering to make
the 2010 Census a
success.

LOIS SWOBODA
The Times

cent, well below Florida's rate of 69 per-
cent and the national rate of 72 percent.
So far, half the nation has returned their
census form. The Census Bureau is chal-
lenging all communities to achieve a
higher rate in 2010 than they did in 2000.
If everyone across the nation mailed
their forms back, taxpayers could reduce
the cost of taking the census by about
$1.5 billion.
Census data help determine how more
than $400 billion in federal funds are dis-
tributed to state, and local communities
each year. A complete count of everyone
in Franklin County will help ensure the
communities get their fair share of cen-
sus-based funding for the next 10 years.


With a 47 percent return rate com-
pared to the national average, Apala-
chicola so far has a failing grade for cen-
sus participation, said regional director
Eviline Ramirez. "We need to raise the
response rate," she said.
In addition, County Commissioner
Cheryl Sanders led the charge at Tues-
day's meeting to have all county resi-
dents return their forms, and asked Alan
Pierce, director of administrative servic-
es, to look into a large number of census
forms mailed to incorrect addresses in
the Alligator Point and Lanark Village
areas.
During the 2000 U.S. Census, Apala-
chicola's participation rate was 54 per-


A schedule of free computer classes,
in April, May and June, is available at the
Carrabelle and the Eastpoint libraries. All
classes are held in the computer labs and
computers are provided. Previous class
recordings and course handouts are avail-
able online at www.wildernesscoast.org
The library offers additional classes and
training not always listed on the schedule,
contact the Carrabelle branch at 697-2366
or the Eastpoint library at 670-8151 or visit
www.franklin.1ib.fl.us for more informa-
tion.
Computer Basis I: Getting Started will
be offered Friday, April 9 at the Eastpoint
Library from 2 to 5 p.m. and again on Sat-
urday at the Carrabelle branch from 10
a.m. to 1 p.m. This class is for first timers
and will teach you how to create and save a


documentusethestartmenuandconnect
with the internet.
Later classes this month, and the May
and June classes, will round out any com-
puter user with intermediate and advanced
computer instruction, check out the sched-
ule to see what suits your needs.
April Showers bring May flowers along
with colorful, interesting children's litera-
ture, presented each Friday during story
hour, beginning at 3:30 p.m., at the East-
point library. If you're in Carrabelle, Kids
Story time is at 4:15 p.m. with Miss Tonia
every other Tuesday, and Kids Wii every
other Tuesday.
The Franklin County Public Library
advisory board meeting will be held at the
Eastpoint library on Thursday, April 15 at
5:30 p.m., the public is invited to attend.


All during the week of
April 11 through 17, library
patrons will be recognized
for their efforts to support
the Franklin County Pub-
lic Library and libraries in
general. It's National Li-
brary Week, a time to cel-
ebrate the contributions
of libraries, librarians and
library workers in schools,
campuses and communi-
ties nationwide.
The county library is
celebrating by recogniz-
ing our loyal patrons each
day of the week. Tuesday
is "Lollipops for Libraries"
day, Wednesday is "Librar-
ies are Lifesavers," Thurs-
day is "Patrons are Worth
a Mint," and Friday, "Pa-
trons take the Cake," that
is cupcakes.
Libraries are the heart


of every community and
our library helps our com-
munity thrive," said Glenda
Ondracek, county library
director. "At our libraries,
people of all backgrounds
come together for com-
munity meetings, lectures
and programs, to do re-
search with the assistance
of a trained professional, to
get help finding a job or to
find homework help. The
library provides access to
computers, printers, copi-
ers and fax."
First sponsored in 1958,
the week is a national ob-
servance sponsored by the
American Library Asso-
ciation and libraries across
the country each April.
To continue to recog-
nize library patrons, Ond-
racek also has declared the


week of April 11 through
17 as Amnesty Week. This
means all fines on books
or other library materials
will be forgiven during this
week. Search your house,
car, dog house and bring
in those late materials and
not be charged an overdue
fee.
For more information,
visit the Eastpoint or Car-
rabelle library, call 670-8151
in Eastpoint or 697-2366
in Carrabelle, or see the
library's Web site at www.
franklin.1ib.fl.us.
Libraries' hours are
Monday through Friday,
10 a.m. to 6 p.m., in Carra-
belle, and Tuesday through
Friday, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. in
Eastpoint. Both librar-
ies are open on Saturdays
from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.


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B4 | The Times


'Lightning Thief' in hot demand


BE SURE TO MAIL IN YOUR (ENSUS FORMS


BI
G


celebratee National Library Week in Franklin


TravisStanley

F 850.653.6477
KU Grayson Shepard

C 850.653.6718
& Y Mike Howze
850.653.5112


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IV


Thursday, April 8, 2010


Law Enforcement


The Times | B5


The Franklin County leg of
the27thanniversaryFloridaLaw
Enforcement Torch Run for Spe-
cial Olympics is today, Thursday,
April 8.
The run will begin at 11 a.m.
at the Burger King parking lot
west of Apalachicola and move
east on U.S. 98 before it ends at
aroundnoonatBatteryParkwith
a cookout where all are invited to
attend.
For 26 years, the Special
Olympics "Flame of Hope" has
traversed Florida in an intrastate
relay of simultaneous routes
throughout the state, covering
countless thousands of miles.
The torch is carried by local and
state law enforcement officers all
the way to the opening ceremo-
ny of the annual State Summer
Games, at Disney's Wide World
of Sports Complex May 14.
The Torch Run is the largest
awareness and fund raising event
amongst Special Olympics Flor-


ida and law enforcement agen-
cies. Statewide, participating
chiefs, officers, sheriffs, deputies,
agents and cadets from virtually
every branch of federal, state,
county and municipal law en-
forcement represent more than
300 different agencies that serve
as"Guardians of the Flame."
The Torch Run began its ex-
istence as the SOME (Special
Olympics Mileage Event) Run,
when a handful of officers ran
the "Flame of Hope" throughout
the state in an exhausting, non-
stop run. Soon, law enforcement
agencies throughout Florida
became involved and the SOME
Run would go on to become the
"Florida Law Enforcement Torch
Run."
Public Super Markets serves
as premier sponsor of the Torch
Run. To learn more, visit www.
specialolympicsflorida.org or call
Lt. Bobby Shiver at the sheriff 's
office at 670-8500.


The following report is pro-
vided by the Franklin County
Sheriffs Offece. Arrests are
made by offers from the fol-
lowing city, county, and state
law enforcement agencies:
Apalachicola (APD), Carra-
belle (CPD), Florida Highway
Patrol (FHP), Franklin County
Sheriffs Offece (FCSO), Florida
Fish and Wildlife Conservation
Commission (FWC), Florida
Department of Environmental
Protection (FDEP), Florida Di-
vision of Insurance Fraud (DIF)
andFloridaDepartmentofAgri-
culture and Consumer Services
(FLDOACS).
Alldefendantsareconsidered
innocent until proven guilty in a
court of law.
March 23
Willie C. Lake, 31, Gaines-
ville, withholding child support
(FCSO)
Curtis A. Baucham, 47, Apala-
chicola, aggravated battery with
great bodily harm (FCSO)


March 24
Paula B. Nedley, 30, Apala-
chicola, possession of a controlled
substance (APD)
Allaya Panguy, 18, Apalachico-
la, possession of a controlled sub-
stance (APD)
Norman G. Imlay, 43, Car-
rabelle, violation of probation
(CPD)
Henry E. Cooper, 45, Apala-
chicola, trespass on property af-
ter warning (FCSO)
Tanya V Griggs, 45, Apalachic-
ola, violation of probation (FCSO)
James C. Yon, 43, Eastpoint,
resisting officer without violence
(FCSO)
March 25
Larodo Rogers, 29, Lanark
Village, DUI (CPD)
March 26
Curtis Nowling, 18, Eastpoint,
possession of paraphernalia and
possession of less than 20 grams
of cannabis (FWC)
Justin R. Griggs, 21, Apala-


chicola, two counts of sale or
possession of a controlled sub-
stance within 1000 feet of a church
(FCSO)
Louis J. Jones, 30, Apalachic-
ola, false report to a law enforce-
ment officer and resisting officer
without violence (FCSO)
William R. Johnson, 29, Car-
rabelle, violation of probation
(FCSO)
March 27
Carlton L. Good son, 56,
Eastpoint, three counts of sale of
a controlled substance, posses-
sion of a controlled substance
more than 20 grams of cannabis,
possession of a controlled sub-
stance with intent to distribute
and possession a firearm by a
convicted felon (FCSO)
March 28
Pedro Virves, 30, Apalachico-
la, loitering or prowling (FCSO)
March 29
Clarence D. Williams, 34,


Apalachicola, Alachua County
warrant for withholding child
support (FCSO)
Phillip B. Montero, 19, Tal-
lahassee, possession of less
than 20 grams of cannabis
and possession of a controlled
substance with intent to sell
(FCSO)
Abigail Correa, 20, West
Palm Beach, violation of proba-
tion (FCSO)
Kevin B. Furtney, 38, Holi-
day, violation of probation
(FCSO)

AA
Larry Butler, 54, Apalachic-
ola, two counts of sale of a con-
trolled substance within 1,000
feet of a church (FCSO)
Lowery M. Croom, 36, Apala-
chicola, two counts of posses-
sion of a controlled substance
with intent to sell within 1,000
feet of a church, possession
of a controlled substance co-
caine, possession of less than
20 grams of cannabis and sale


of a controlled substance within
1000 feet of a church (FCSO)
Tami M. McDowell, 40, Tal-
lahassee, felony passing worth-
less bank checks (FCSO)
William B. Galbreath, 65,
Old Town, battery on a law en-
forcement officer and disorderly
conduct (FCSO)
Steve Seger, 55, St. George
Island, domestic battery
(FCSO)

AM
William C. Woodberry, 31,
Carrabelle, Madison County
warrant for violation of proba-
tion (FCSO)

AM
Antron D. Turrell, 22, Apala-
chicola, criminal mischief and
violation of probation (APD)
Charlene Mullin, 54, Apala-
chicola, domestic battery
(APD)
Carlos H. Daniels, 68, Car-
rabelle, aggravated assault with
a deadly weapon (CPD)


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F{I PICKS DEGREE TOP OFFICER FOR MARCH

07 Franklin Correctional Institution has
C I selected Sgt. Randall Segree as
officer of the month for March 2010.
Segree, employed at FC| since its
O Opening in 2005, was promoted to
sergeant in 2008, and is currently
assigned to the first (midnight) shift.
Segree was nominated by officers on
k his shift who noted his willingness to
help the younger officers. Degree is a
success story himselfas he dropped
out of school in the eighth grade. His
sister, Marie, tried for many years
before finally convincing him to go
back to school, and at age 40 he
received his high school diploma,
allowing him to apply for and obtain
a job at FCI where he is valuable
asset to the institution. Degree lives
in Eastpoint with his wife, Kim. He
is shown at left, in the center, with
Warden Duffie Harrison, at left, and
Capt. John Summerhill at right.
SPEGAL TO THE TIMES


B fstol
































































































| 1100 |
centerline of State Road
No. 300 the following three
courses: N71 22'41 E
416.89 feet, thence along
the arc of a curve to the
right (radius of 5729.58
feet, chord of 599.03 feet,
chord bearing of
N74 22'28 E) 599.31 feet,
thence N77 22'16 E
2334.90 feet, thence run
S12 37'44 E 315.00 feet,
thence run N77 22'16 E
55.57 feet to the Point of
Beginning. From said
Point of Beginning con-
tinue N772216E 111.01
feet, thence run
S12 37'44 E 407.00 feet to
a point on the mean high
water line of the Gulf of
Mexico, thence run
S73 14'57 W along said
mean high waterline
111.30 feet, thence run
N12 37'44 W 415.00 feet to
the Point of Beginning.
Including and subject to a
20.00 foot access ease-
ment and a 5.00 foot
beach access easement
as shown on plat.

(the "Property )
Any person claiming an In-
terest in the surplus from
the sale, If any other than
the property owner as of
the date of the Ils pendens
must file a claim within
sixty (60) days after the
sale.
WITNESS my hand and
the official seal of this Hon-
orable Court, on this 22nd
day of March, 2010.
In accordance with the
Americans With Disabilities
Act, [persons needing a
special accommodation to
participate in this proceed-
Ing should contact Marcla
Johnson, Clerk of Circuit
Court, Franklin County not
later than seven (7) days
prior to the proceeding at
Telephone850/653-8861.
MARCIA JOHNSON
Clerk of Circuit Court
By: Michele Maxwell
rplu8ty er2k010
062T
IN THE SECOND JUDI-
ARL FC RNCKULllT INOU D
FLORIDA
SUPERIOR BANK,
Plaintiff,
vs.
JOHN L. MILLER, Ill, ME-
ISASP MILLMEEROan MS
ASSOCIATION OF FRANK-
LIN COUNTY INC.,
Defendants.
CASE NO. 09-419-CA
NOTICE OF SALE


In the United States last year,
there were 19 attacks in Florida,
four in California, three in Ha-
waii, and one each in Texas and
Georgia.
"More than half the attacks -
33 out of 61 were surfers, and
this continues a trend that we've
been seeing for quite a while,"
Burgess said.
Swimmers were the second
largest group of victims, account-
ing for 10 of the attacks. The re-
maining incidents involved scuba
diving, paddle boarding, body
surfing, boogie boarding, kite
surfing, snorkeling, spear fishing,
wading, floating and entering the
water, he said.
Within Florida, the county
with the largest number of at-
tacks was Volusia, eight, followed
by Brevard, four; Palm Beach,
three; Pinellas, two; and Lee and
Monroe, one each.
Volusia County has the du-
bious distinction of being the
world's shark bite capital as a
esultna etra vet ceesnoffaN

lantic coast that are popular with
surfers, he said.
"As always, Volusia County
was the bell winner," Burgess
said. "Year in and year out, there
have been more attacks there
than anywhere else in Florida.
This turned out to be a low year
for Volusia County, and I'm sure
the chamber of commerce was
very happy about that."
In 2009, there were 14 fewer
attacks in Volusia County than
the previous year, he said.
If the recession contributed
to a decrease in shark attacks,
then that likely would show up
in Volusia County's visitor statis-
tics, which draws surfers to its
beaches and tourists to Daytona
Beach, he said.


so a
ANNOUNCEMENT%
1100 Legal Advertising
1110 Classified Notices
1120 -Public Notices/
Announcements
1125-Carpools&
1130 A are
1140 Happy Ads
1150 Personals
1160 Lost
1170 Found
-
| 1100
6612
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE SECOND JUDI-
CIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY
FLORIDA
IN RE: ESTATE OF
JEANETTE RAES SHED-
ceaseN, d.
CASE NO. 2010-012 CP
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the
estate of Jeanette Raes
Sheddan, deceased,
whose date of death was
February 24,th201CO{rc
urtingr anklin County
Florida, Probate Division,
F Num s 2010 12hCR
Franklin County Court-
house, 33 Market Street,
Sulte 203, Apalachicola,
Florida 32320. The names
and addresses of the per-
sonal representatives and
the personal representa-
t attorney are set forth

All creditors of the dece-
dent and other persons
havin claims or demands
a aln t decedent's estate
o whom a copy of this
notice is required to be
served must file their
claims with this court
WOT NdHEA TERR OF 3
TOOFNTHOEFFIRH% PU
TICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER
THE DATE OF SERVICE
TIAE PTYHEOF THIS

cotheert ca Itortshe
sons having claims or de-
mands against decedent s
es te must filetthe clams
MONTHsScoAFTER THE
DATAETOFNTHEFFIRH PNU
TICE.

THCNE NI E
ODS SET FORTH IN SEC-
LONID7A R BATOEFCT
WILL BE FOREVER


KRIS NKHOLS | UFNews Bureau
In this file photo taken Feb. 17, 2009, University of Florida shark expert George Burgess sits
amid his collection of shark aws, mcluding the large jaw of a tiger shark in the foreground.
Burgess maintains the International Shark File and issues an annual report on shark attacks
worldwide.


previous year. Except for a death
in New Caledonia, the fatalities
occurred in South Africa, where
white sharks congregate in cooler
waters, Burgess said. One of the
victims was body surf ing, anoth-
er paddle boarding and the other
three were surfing, he said.
The United States led the
world with 28 attacks, followed by
Australia, 20, and South Africa,
six. There were two attacks in
Egypt and one each in Ecuador,
Indonesia, Mozambique, New
Caledonia and Viet Nam.
Perhaps more telling than the
annual figures is the number of


shark attacks in a 10-year period,
which rose to unprecedented lev-
els between 2000 and 2010, Bur-
gess said.
"As scientists, we don't get so
excited about individual years
and tend to look at things in
terms of decades," he said. "The
first decade of the 21st century
continues a 100-year trend of
each decade having more attacks
than the previous one, the result
of increases in human population
and the amount of time spent in
recreational activity."
Conversely, fatality rates have
declined sharply. "These first 10


years of the new century have the
all-time lowest fatality rate for
any decade," Burgess said.
At the beginning of the 20th
century, 60 percent of all shark
attacks were f atal, compared
with only 7 percent between 2000
and 2010, he said.
"The number of people who
died relative to the number of
attacks was so high at the begin-
ning of the 20th century in large
part because of poor at-the-scene
care, no lifeguards and obviously
a much more rudimentary ability
of medical science to save severe
trauma victims," he said.


| 1100
TIMOTHY LEE EVANS:
UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVI-
SEES, GRANTEES, AS-
SIGNEES, CREDITORS,
LIENORS, TRUSTEES
TIMOTHY LEE EVANS:
THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE
OF TIMOTHY LEE EVANS:
IF LIVING, INCLUDING
ANY UNKNOWN SPOUSE
OF SAID DEFENDANTSS,
IF REMARRIED, AND IF
DECEASED, THE RE-
SPECTIVE UNKNOWN
HEIRS, DEVISEES,
GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES,
CREDITORS, LIENORS,
AND TRUSTEES, AND ALL
OTHER PERSONS CLAIM-
ING BY THROUGH, UN-
DER OR AGAINST THE
NAMED DEFENDANTSS.
Defendants.
CASE NO.: 09-000165-CA
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE Is hereby given
that, pursuant to the Order
of Final Summary Judg-
ment of Foreclosure in this
cause, In the Circuit Court
of Franklin County Florida,
I will sell the property situ-
ated in Franklin County,
Florida described as:
Lot 9, Block 5, Lanark Vil-
lage, Unit One, according
to the plat thereof re-
corded in Plat Book 2,
Page 14, of the Public
Records of Franklin
County, Florida.
at Public Sale, to the high-
est bidder for cash, at the
steps of the Franklin
County Courthouse, Apa-
Iachicola, Florida, at 11:00
a.m. on May 20, 2010.

Any person claiming an in-
terest in the surplus from
the sale, If any, other than
the property owner as of
the date of the Ils pend-
ens, must file a claim
within 60 days after the
sale.
WITNESS my hand and
the seal of this Court this
23rd day of March, 2010.
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT
COURT
By: Michele Maxwell
Deputy Clerk
Steve M. Watkins, Ill
FBN: 0794996
41 Commerce Street
Ap5al)a la FL 32320
April 1, 8, 2010
6556T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
COND THUEDI ECORF
FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
FRANKLIN COUNTY
SUPERIOR BANK f/k/a The
Bank, successor by
g rstoBCitizer sPF e
Joe,


| 1100
George Island Gulf
Beaches, Unit 2, a Subdivi-
slan recorded in Plat Book
2 at Page 15 of the Public
Records of said county,
thence run along the east-
erly boundary of said Unit
2 the following three
courses: N18 37'19 W
150.00 feet, S71 22'41 W
20.00 feet, and
N18 3719 W410.00feet to
the centerline of State
Road No. 300the following
three courses: N71 2241 E
416.89 feet, along the arc
of a curve to the right
(radius if 5729.58 feet,
chord of 599.03 feet, chord
bearing N74 22'28 E)
599.31 feet, N77 22'16 E
2334.90 feet, thence run
S12 37'44 E 50.00 feet to a
point on the southerly
right-of-way line of State
Road No. 300, thence con-
tinue S12 37'44 E 265.00
feet, thence N77 22'16 E
55.57 feet to the Point of
Beginning. From said
Point of Beginning con-
tinue N77 22'16 E 111.01
feet, thence S12 37'44 E
407.00 feet to a point on
the mean high water line of
the Gulf of Mexico, thence
along said mean high
water line run S73 14'57 W
111.30 feet, thence leaving
said mean high water line
run N12 37'44 W 415.00
feet to the Point of Beginn-
mg.
Including and subject to a
20.00 foot access ease-
ment and a 5.00 foot
beach access easement
as shown per plat.
More Particularly de-
scribed by a recent survey
dated August 24, 1995, By
Edwin G. Brown & Assoc.,
Inc., bearing drawing num-
ber 94-148 (PSC-12279) as
follows:
Lot No. 5 of Tract 11, East
End
A arcel of land on St
Geprge Island lying and
being in Partlal Section 23,
Township 9 South, Range
61 W tb nank reC
ularly described as fol-
lows:
Commence at the most
easterly corner of St.
George Island Gulf
Beaches, Unit 2, a Subdivi-
ts eas r orr p or Pp
Book 2, Page 15 of the
Public Records of Franklin
County, Florida, and
tehen u aao edea
20u es: followl8 37 eW
150.00 feet thence
tS71n '41"WN ife
00Sfeet tRoo ce


| 1100
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN pursuant to a De-
fault Final Judgment of
Foreclosure dated March
22, 2010, and entered in
Civil Action No. 09-000419
CA of the Circuit Court of
the Second Judicial Circuit
In and for Franklin County,
Florida, wherein the parties
were the Plaintiff, SUPE-
RIOR BANK, and the De-
fendants, JOHN L.
MILLER, Ill, MELISSA P
MILLER, and LAS BRISAS
HOMEOWNERS' ASSOCl-
ATION OF FRANKLIN
COUNTY INC., I will sell to
the highest and best bid-
den for cash, at 11:00 a.m.
(Eastern Time) on the 13th
day of May, 2010, at the
front steps of the Franklin
County Courthouse, Apa-
lachicola, Florida, the
following-described real
property as set forth in
said Default Final Judg-
ment of Foreclosure:
Lot 40 of LAS BRISAS, ac-
cording to the Plat thereof,
as recorded in Plat Book
6, at page 15, of the Public
Records of Franklin
County, Florida.
The successful bidder at
the sale will be required to
place the requisite state
documentary stamps on
the Certificate of Title.
DATED this 24th day of
March, 2010.
Hon. MARCIA JOHNSON
Clerk of the Court
Franklin County, Florida
By: Michele Maxwell
As Deputy Clerk
FRANK A. BAKER,
ATTORNEY AT LAW
4431 Lafayette Street
Marlanna, FL 32446
April 8, 15, 2010
MAT
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE SECOND JUDI-
CIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY
FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION

B GHOLMPE UKANSCSOEURNV
TRYWIDE HOME LOANS
SERVICING, L.P.
Plaintiff,
vs.
WILLIAM R. ALMOND, et
al,
Defendantss.
CASE NO.
19-2010-CA-000070
DIVISION:
NOTICE OF ACTION

LIAM R. ALMOND
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS:
st nHigFhLw 39288


Thursday, April 8, 2010


B6 | The Times


Local


Shark attacks sharply decline in Florida


By (athy Keen
Special to the Times

Despite the recent fatality off
the Florida coast, the number
of shark attacks in the United
States continued its downward
trend by taking a plunge in the
latest recorded year, according to
a new report from the University
ofFlorida.
There might not be a sea
change in the violent encounters
because attacks worldwide edged
up from 60 in 2008 to 61 in 2009,
said George Burgess, director of
the International Shark Attack
File at UE
"The big story is that the num-
ber of attacks in the United States
dropped dramatically from 41 in
2008 to 28 in 2009," he said. "Con-
sidering there were 50 attacks in
2007, we may have a bit of a trend,
but only time will tell."
Florida led the way in the de-
crease in attacks, which fell from
32 in both 2007 and 2008 to 19 in

IsaidtBur ss, whho*kel sek
figures. The file is housed in the
Florida Museum of Natural His-
tory on the UF campus.
Burgess said the rate of at-
tacks is dictated by the number
of sharks and people in the same
waters, and yearly variations are
common.
A possibility for the decrease
of assaults in American waters
might be the influence of the re-
cession reducing the number of
beach-going bathers, Burgess
said. "Florida's population hasn't
gone down, so I suppose the
economy could have had an ef-
fect on how many times people
can afford to put gas in their cars
and go to the beach."
Worldwide, victims died in five
attacks, compared with four the


COVERING MILTON TO APALACHICOLA


850-747-5020


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| 1100 |
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE
TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY
CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER
THE DECEDENT'S DATE
OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publica-
tlon of this Notice is April
8, 2010.
Personal Representatives:
Manlyn S. Gibbons
PostOfficeBox3
Cambridge, Illinols 61238
William E. Raes
13 Sunny Hill Drive
Orlon, Illinols 61273
Attorney for Personal Rep-
resentatives:
Terrence1Darlotis
Attorney at Law
Florida Bar No. 190057
Post Office Box 16005
Tallahassee, Florida
32317-6005
(850) 523-9300
April 8, 15, 2010

6 E CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE SECOND JUD-
ICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY
FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION

DE REUSRAUSN
FOR THE REGISTERED
NOTEHOLDERS OF REN-
AISASNA E HOME EQUITY
Plaintiff
vs.
CLYDIE MAE RUSS A/K/A
CLYDIA MAE RUSS: UN-
KNOWN SPOUSE OF
C E MAE RRUUSSSS;A/

OWN
OTHER UNKNOWN PAR-
TIES CLAIMING INTER-
ESTS BY THROUGH, UN-
DER, AND AGAINST A
NAMED DEFENDANTS)
WHO ARE NOT KNOWN
TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE
WHOEWHNERPARTA MUA
CEM AN I ERESDE
SEES, GRANTEES, OR
OTHER CLAIMANTS,
Defendants.
CASE NO.: 08-000459 CA
NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE urs nt tH FE
Summary Judgment dated
Augu ll31C 2009Nente0e
000459 CA, of the Circuit
Court of the Ninth Judicial

tyInF dfor wrhaen
HSBC BANK USA, N.A. AS
IFNODRENTTHUEREREGT
NOTEHOLDERS OF REN-


| 1100
AISSANCE HOME EQUITY
LOAN TRUST 2006-2 Is
Plaintiff, and CLYDIE MAE
RUSS A/K/A CLYDIA MAE
RUSS are Defendants.
I will sell to the highest bid-
der for cash at 11:00 a.m.
In the Civil Division of the
Franklin County Clerks Of-
flce, Main Courthouse, 33
Market Street, Apalachl-
cola, FL 32320 on the 6th
day of May 2010 the fol-
lowing described real
property as set forth in
saidFinalSummaryJudg-
ment, towit:
All of Lot Number Five (5)
of Block Number One
Hundred Fifty-Four (154)
of the City of Apalachicola,
according to the map or
plat thereof in general use.
Being the same property
conveyed to Clydle Mae
Russ from Hilda E Marlar
widow by Warranty Deed
dated September 16, 2003
and recorded on Septem-
ber 17, 2003, In O.R. Book
756, Page 143 and re-
corded among the Land
Records of Franklin
County, Florida.
This property Is located at
the Street address of: 250
10th Street, Apalachicola,
Florida 32320

If you are a person claim-
Ing a right to funds rema-
Ing after the sale, you must
file a claim with the clerk
no later than 60 days after
the sale. If you fall to file a
claim you will not be enti-
tIed to any remaining
funds. After 60 days, only
the owner of record as of
the date of the Ils pendens
may claim the surplus.
WITNESS my hand and
the seal of the court on
March, 2010.
Marcla M. Johnson
Clfhke a I
By: Deputy Clerk
IN ACCORDANCE WITH
TSEABALMTEE C IfW
are a person with a disabil-
Ity who needs any accom-
tmc a oFthiso rc dpna
you are entitled, at no cost
to you, to the provision of
certain assistance. Please
tcontact42CourtOAdrn Istra_
nue, Orlando, Florida
32801, Telephone (407)
836-2303 within 2 working
da of our reaelpthof th

80 8m71alred, call
A1torn r Pl kns
ey
e R. W rn,


| 1100 |
Sulte 307
Deerfleld Beach, FL 33442
Telephone: (954)354-3544
Facsimile: (954)354-3545
April l,8, 2010
6490T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE SECOND JUDI-
CIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY
FLORIDA
GULF STATE COMMU-
NITY BANK
Plaintiff,
vs
DWAYNE D. COULTER
and SELENA COULTER,
husband and wife
Defendants)
CASE NO.: 09-000601-CA
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE Is hereby given
thatFjrsuant to he Ourder
ment of Foreclosure in this
ca nthCeoCirculFICrodua
I will sell the rty situ-
ated in FranpkTnpeCounty,
Florida described as:
Lot 7, Block 125, City of
Apalachicola, according to
hrnc aofothe City fhAphae
Clerk of the Circuit Court,
Franklin County Florida.
at Public Sale, to the high-
est bidden for cash, at the
steps of the Franklin
County Courthouse, Apa-
lachicola, Florida, at 11:00
a.m. on May 13, 2010.

Any persons claiming an
Interest n thensu us frhom

dp eo t Tsr n
ens, must file a claim
within 60 days after the
sale.
WITNESS my hand and
the seal of this Court this
22nd day of March, 2010.
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT

By M hele Maxwell
Deputy Clerk

StBeve M91Natkins, Ill
41 Commerce Street
Ap5aln ol FL 32320
April 1, 8, 2010
W17T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE SECOND JUDI-
ARL FCRIARNCK I OU
FLORIDA
GULF STATE COMMU-
atANK
vs.


| 1100 |
Plaintiff,
vs.
WILLIAM M. JACOB: TE-
RESA L. JACOB, Individ-
ually and as the Executor
of the Estate of WILLIAM
M. JACOB, deceased;
JESSICA JACOB ROB-
ERTS HEARNE: TYLER
MITCHELL JACOB, a ml-
nor: SPENCER COLEMAN
JACOB, a minor: MERE-
DITH GRACE JACOB, a
minor; UNKNOWN HEIRS
OF WILLIAM M. JACOB,
deceased: Unknown Cred-
Itors, Assigns, or Grantees
of WILLIAM M. JACOB, de-
ceased: Unknown Tenants
In possession; and R. W
THOMAS CONSTRUC-
TION, INC., a Florida cor-
poration,
Defendants.
CASE NO.: 09-000082
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN pursuant to a Final
Summary Judgment in
Foreclosure dated the
22nd day of March, 2010,
entered in Case No.
09-000082-CA In the Cir-
cult Court of the Second
Judicial Circuit of the State
of Florida, in ands for
Franklin County, wherein
SUPERIOR BANK f/k/a The
Bank, successor by
merger to Citizens Federal
Savings Bank of Port St.
Joe, is Plaintiff, and WIL-
LIAM M. JACOB: TERESA
L. JACOB Individually and
as the Executor of the Es-
tate of WILLIAM M. JA-
COB, deceased: JESSICA
JACOB ROBERTS
HEARNE: TYLER MITCH-
ELL JACOB, a minor;
SPENCER COLEMAN JA-
COB, a minor: MEREDITH
GRACE JACOB, a minor
and R. W THOMAS CON-
STRUCTION, INC., a Flor
adcorpolrationseareoDh
highest and best bidder for
cash at the Franklin
County Courthouse in Ap-
1 ca (Ea r Tim
on the 13th day of May
2010, the following de-
scrldbed re npanpe ut
Florida, and set forth in
said Final Summary Judg-
ment, to-wit:
Lot No. 5 of Tract 11 East
End

A parcel of land on St.
g Ps nadSI a2n3d
60w Ip F9a C
Florida being more partic-
arly described as fol-


sme n o at rtheof m







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andyo ar rquiedto hi noic shllbe ub FOTH ABOE, ANY Daed hi 24h ay f n Vc entl gmt Fr cmmrc l 575moth t $30 e- paachcoa hus o
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PARTIE CLAIING B faul Law roup, PL., y: Mihele axwel 6160- Roo s forRent rom bat ra p, dek, AC .
THRUGH UNER AN Pliniff atoreywhoe ITNSS y hndand Thedae o fistpubica A DeutyClrk 170- Mbie Hme/ot w/d pe O, $00 o Carab ll
AGANST THE HE EIN addes is911 Copoate the sel o ths C ur on tio o ths N tie i Apil 18 ut-f-ownRenals fistlas &dep sit Plas 4 ed B thpriac
NAM D IDIVDUA Lae Dive Sute 300 ths 1th ay f M rch 8,200. ate ths 2th ay f 690- TmesareRenals Cal 85-69-500 the if d, olhottub+


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CLAIM ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~~~~~epoe AN INTRES ASito wise aprt deal ilb n seuylr 22 cprsn edn l Mny al5-5-75 g,
SPOUSE, ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~~wt HERS DEVI-e tere against yout forire th tonyfr esnlRp raoal comoa eiertenwA&
OTHER ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~~~~nweg CLIMNT Copan o eiin. aiiie c erec aloi rcedn huln rs, hda s, been. renngfr

If yu ae aperon ith Atorny a La latr tan eve (7 da s heo dPanama Cit Aran $qiaet 1 1500/ .o O ie
LAS KN WN DDRSS: Thi noiceshal b pb- isailiy wo nedsany FloidaBarNo 19057 prir, ontct he ler of FT/p all wok, uic $30K, Wil trde or b, 1 bakithen Carablle5 b, 4badu
UNKNWN lshd oce achwee fo acomm daton n oder Pos Ofice ox 600 th Cort' diablty oor 1 aymus be W terront Hom Cll /Dhea & lr,2nd ple, $00,newpait, ile
twoconecuivewees i topariciatein hispro Talahsse, Foria dnatr a 8569211, I 18ys+,hav I 50-37-428 stry laton ive inApa kiche, lrgefened ac
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.
EAST 55.68 FEET RECORDED IN PLAT TICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER Clerk of the Circuit Court 9th St. Port St. Joe, FI I CONTRACT: 2009-10 School Year 2 BR 1 B Mobile Hon e
THENCE LEAVING SAID BOOK 2, AT PAGE 7 OF THE DATE OF SERVICE Ill sell to the hl hest and 32456 850-229-8244 Unfurnished, redecorated, LargeLot $575.00
APPROXIMATE MEAN THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF A COPY OF THIS west bidder for cash at Web ID#34084178 I DEADLINE: April 15, 2010, 4:00 p.m. 3 BR 1 B End Unit Apt

GRHT W ERELINEESRUN OFORERANKLIN COUNTY NOTICE ON THEM. 0200a0 theea Ir M ,, Job description and application may be obtained Unf rni hedtR oreted Por hesch$525.00
MINUTES 00 SECONDS All other creditors of the scribed rt as set from Franklin County School Board Finance Furnished, emodeleE, Pet Friendly
WEST 39.33 FEET TO A has been filed against you decedent and other per- forth in dpeFI al Judg- ) - 0 in .. q.[4ications must include (1) a high school Washer/Dryer Included .. .. $500.00
RE-ROD AND CAP and you are required to sons having claims or de- 1 BR 1 B End Unit Apt
(MARKED NO.7160) LY- serve a copy of your writ- mands against decedent's ment, to wit; ..hpl..II., ab college transcripts if applicable, and Furnished Carport... ... $525.00
ING ON SAID SOUTH- ten defenses within 30 estate must file their claims LOT 3, BLOCK "A", BALD "" I1.1.... Intters recommendation. Successful 1 BR 1 B Interior Apt
ERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY days after the first publica- with this court WITHIN 3 POINT ESTATES, AC- applicants must agree to a criminal history check Furnished, Brightly Redecorated ...... $500.00
BOUNDARY THENCE tlan, if any, on Florida De- MONTHS AFTER THE CORDING TO THE PLAT (includes FDLE processing fee) and a pre- 3 BR 3 B Condo, Poo
CONTINUE NORTH 23 fault Law Group, PL., DATEOFTHEFIRSTPUB- THEREORRECORDEDIN FurnishedDowntownVearRiver$500.00wk
DEGREES 43 MINUTES 00 Plaintiffs attorney, whose LICATION OF THIS NO- PLAT BOOK 5, PAGE 43 employment drug screening. 3 BR 1 B Furnished Apt
SECONDS WEST 100.00 address is 9119 Corporate TICE. 44 AND 45 OF THE PUB Oyster Tongs, build new Please return applications to the attention of Daily & Wkly (3 day min) $150 nite$650.00 wk

EGTNTNON EL TA aD aS3 34,3a0nOci ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED LIC RECORDS OF FRANK bl wdeod resivice. Morna Smith, Personnel Specialist. Beach nt houses twith win r rates.
EXCEPT THE 100.00 file the original with this WITHIN THE TIME PERl- LIN COUNTY FLORIDA. Call Tommy, 850-653-6208 Franklin County School Board is an Equal PLEASE CALLoJ A 0-699-9604
FOOT RIGHT-OF-WAY OF Court either before service ODS SET FORTH IN SEC- Any person claiming an In- Opportunity Employer OR 850-323-0444 FOR RENTALS.





NOTICE OF

ANNUAL

MEETING


The Board of Commissioners of
-
the Northwest Florida Regional
Housing Authority will hold itS
Annual Meeting, April 13, 2010,
at the Holiday Inn & Suites, 2725
Graves Road Tallahassee Florida
Meeting will begin at 1:00 p.m.
E.D.S.T. The meeting will be open
to the public.


ECONOMY FULL SET DENTURE* (D5110,D5120)...............$395
Custom Full Set DentureS (D5110,D5120).....................................$695
Custom Upper or Lower Denture (D5110,D5120)......................$400
Premium Full Set DentureS (D5110,D5120)...................................$995
Reline (each)(D5710,D5711)...................... ......................$150
Simple Extraction (each) (D7140)..................... ......................$70
Full-mouth X-ray (required for extractions) (D330).................................$70
FeeseffectiveJanuary4,2010 4


r - - awarnin:I:1su:15m- - -*u
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FLORIDACODEREOUIRESTHEFOLLOWINGSTATEMENT THESEAREMNIMUMFEESANDCHARGESWYINCREASEDEPENDINGON
THETREATMENTREQUIRED THEPATIENTANDANYOTHERPERSONRESPONSIBLEFORPAYMENTHASARIGHTTOREFUSETOPAY
CANCEL PAY NTORBEREIBURSED FORPAYMENTFORANYOTHERSERVICE EMMINATION ORTRBT NTTHATISPERFORMED
ASARESULTOFANDWITHIN72HOURSOFRESPONDINGTOTHEADVERTISE NTFORTHEFREEDISCOUNTEDFEEORREDUCEDFEE
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NEIGHBORHOOD WATCH IS ON THE MOVE
Mayor Van Johnson and Chief of Police Bobby Varnes will
be hosting the next Neighborhood Watch Meeting

Place: 6th Street Recreation Center
Date: Tuesday, April 13th
Time: 6:00pm

All residence are urged to come out and take part
in this meeting.

We would like to hear your concerns and suggestions.
The neighborhood belongs to you, and it's time for you to
take it back from the criminals

To report a crime in progress please call 670-8500
To report any suspicious activity please call 653-9755 or
Email us at www.apalachicolapolice.com
For all emergencies please call 911


Thursday, April 8, 2010


Local


The Franklin County Humane
Society is hosting the opening
ceremony for the Pet Parade
at the Carrabelle Riverfront
Festival and we want to see just
how creative you can be!
The fourth annual Pet Parade
will kick-off the two-day festival
at 10:30 a.m. Saturday, April 24 at
the Pavilion on Marine Street.
There will be prizes for


best costume, ugliest dog, best
behaved pet and most look-
a-like owner and pet. Cost is
$5 to register your pet or you
can donate a new pet toy or
pet supplies (no food or litter
please). All proceeds go to the
Humane Society to help support
our homeless pets.
Please fill out the form below
and mail it to: Pet Parade, 2100


Messier Road, Carrabelle, FL
32322. Or bring your registration
form and fee to the pavilion
the morning of the parade. All
registrations must be received
by 10:15 a.m. Saturday morning.
We look forward to seeing all
of you there, and having the best
turned out turn out in the history
of the Carrabelle Riverfront
Festival Pet Parade!


KAREN MARTIN | Special to the Times


617 W 23rd Street


General Dentist


NO APPOINTMENT
NECESSARY
EMERGENCY
EXTRACTION
SERVICES


* SAME DAY SERVICE
IF IN BEFORE 9 A.M.
FIRST-TIME
DENTURE
WEARER PACKAGES


ON-SITE
LAB
FELINES
AND
REPAIRS


B8 | The Times


PETS WANTED FOR


ENTRY FORM
Owner's Name

Pet's Name

Address

Phone Number

E-mail

Registration Fee


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