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Group Title: Apalachicola times
Title: The Apalachicola times
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100380/00070
 Material Information
Title: The Apalachicola times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: H.W. Johnston
Place of Publication: Apalachicola Fla
Apalachicola Fla
Publication Date: March 18, 2010
Copyright Date: 2008
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1885.
General Note: Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).
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Bibliographic ID: UF00100380
Volume ID: VID00070
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 32911693
lccn - sn 95026907
 Related Items
Preceded by: Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by: Apalachicola herald

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Thursday, MARCH 18, 2010 w w w apalach times com 50<




Bordt case stuns small German town

Member of parliament speaks out against death penalty | so


LOIS SWOBODA | The Times
This chute, being built at Seafood
Landing Park, will help deliver loads of
oyster shells into boats and eventually out
to the bay to fortify overworked bars.

g y y

*
*

By David Adlerstein
Times City Editor
The long-awaited shelling program,
aimed to help bring badly needed work to be-
leaguered oyster harvesters, is set to begin
this week at the county's Seafood Landing
Park at Two Mile, west of Apalachicola.
The program is planned to start Fri-
day at 7 a.m., but it could start as early as
today if the setup is complete and weather
cooperates.
See SHELLING AS


I


YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER FOR MORE THAN 120 YEARS


VOL. 124 ISSUE 47


Editor's note:
The Gaeubote (www.
gueubote.de) is the
daily newspaper in
Herrenberg, Germany,
near Nufringen, where
Heinz and Marianne
Bordt live. Marianne
Bordt has been charged
with ferst-degree mur-
der and aggravated
child abuse in the Jan.
4 drowning of the cou-
ple'sgrandsonCamden
Hiers, in the bathtub
of a vacation home on


St. George Island. She
faces the possibility of
the death penalty as the
case proceeds through
Circuit Judge James
Hankinson's courtroom
in Apalachicola.
Gaeubote staff writ-
er Jochen Stumpf and
his colleague Konrad
Buck have shared their
coverage of the Bordt
case, just as a German
translationoftheTimes
coverage has appeared
in their newspaper Be-


low is an English trans-
lation of their content.

Goeubote staff reports
Special to The Times
The people of Nufrin-
gen, population 5,400,
are stunned. This small
German town in the dis-
trict of Boeblingen, just
south of Stuttgart, is af-
fluent, free from debt
and so far without any
noteworthy crimes. But
Marianne Bordt and


the murder of grandson
Camden in Florida, with
which she is charged,
have shaken all.
"This was a totally
inconspicuous family,"
one neighbor said. "I
only knew that one
daughter lived in Amer-
ica. This incident came
as a total surprise."
Marianne Bordt's
daughter Karin Hiers is
Camden'smother.
See BORDT AS


JutrinL )Iumn I Speial to the lintes


Photos by LOIS SWOBODA | The Times
Al described himself as an elder of the Rainbow Gathering at the Apalachicola National Forest.


By Lois Swoboda
Times Staff Writer
Deep in the Apalachicola
National Forest, a diverse
group has gathered to re-cre-
ate the innocence of a bygone
era.
As you drive down the road
toward Wright's Lake, bear to
the left and you will start to
see parked cars. Farther on,
there are tents and campfires,
heaps of neatly bagged trash
and even RVs, but motor vehi-
cles were not allowed beyond
a set point in the camp.
The Rainbow Tribe has
come to Franklin County.
The group holds a permit
allowing them to camp from
March 7-28.
Rainbow Gatherings and
the Rainbow Family of Living
Light, as they are properly
known, are a form of modern-
day hippie culture, with roots
traceable to the '60s counter-
culture. Participants say they
believe modern lifestyles and
government systems are out
of harmony with the planet's
natural systems and are un-


healthy. The original Rainbow .
Gathering was in 1972, and
the event has been held an- .
nually in the U.S. in early July I -
on national forest land. Other .
regional and national gather-
ings are held throughout the .
year in America and other
countries. IP
Around 11 a.m. Monday,
about 100 people inhabited
scattered tents at the site. But
A.V, who was "semi-hosting"
the gathering, said more than
400 people had been on site
Saturday.
Midmorning campers were
walking dogs, shaving and
enjoying a late breakfast. Sev- : -
eral people strolled through
the campground playing mu-
sical instruments. A pretty
girl named Moonbeam stud- ...--.
ied a deck of cards displaying
animal figures, and a serene
young mother fed a happy
baby swathed in tie-dye.
The campground was .
quiet, even peaceful.
Although some of the -
campers were craftsmen who Silver and Blackjack with their dog, Gucci. The
couple, who are carnival workers in the summer,
See RAINBOW A6 said Gucci was rescued from dog fighters.


Phone: 850-227-1845


DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK:


Letter to the Editor ................... A4


sClassifed s ........................ B6-7


Apa lachicola


COunty hopes


tourism will


brighten jobs

outlook

By David Adlerstein
Times City Editor
Franklin County's jobless rate soared
into double-digit territory in January, rising
from 9.2 percent at year's end to 11.1 percent
to start out 2010.
The numbers, released last week by the
Florida Agency for Workforce Innovation,
mean that at least one of every nine work-
ers in Franklin County was without a job in
January, as the county posted its highest
unemployment rate since April 1996, when it
was 11.8 percent.
According to Rebecca Rust, chief econo-
mist for the AWI, the number of initial claims
for unemployment benefits in the county
nearly doubled from December to January,
with 47 initial claims filed in January, up
from 26 a montSeee S AS


MODERN-DAY HIPPIE CULTURE


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For the 2010-2011 School Year
March 15-26, 2010

Eindergarten Round-up
(Marcla 19, 20 SO Call for a solaedsaled tiane)
ABC Elementary School for Grades PreH 5
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Thursday, March 18,2010


A2 | The Times


Local


from 11 a.m. 'till it's all gone. For more
information or to enter the cookoff or
be a sponsor, contact George Pruett
at 670-9000 or by E-mail at pru911@
gtcom.net. O visit our web site at www.
eastpointribcookoff.com
Come on out and enjoy a day of food,
fun and music with the firefighters. All
proceeds go to benefit the Eastpoint
Volunteer Fire Department.

ON THE HORIZON

PROVOCATIVE PREHISTORY:
The Apalachicola Area Historical
Society will meet on Thursday, March
25 at 5:30 p.m. in the Carriage House
of the Raney House at 128 Market
Street in Apalachicola. The program
will be presented by Craig Dengel,
the archaeologist at Tyndall Air Force
Base, on the prehistory of the area. He
holds a bachelor's in anthropology from
Metropolitan State College in Denver
and a master's in geography from
Florida State University. He has worked
at Tyndall Air Force Base since Oct.
2008 through a grant from Oak Ridge
Institute for Science and Education
(ORISE). He has also worked for the
National Park Service's Southeastern
Archeological Center in Tallahassee.
His current research is looking at the
settlement patterns of Middle Woodland
(A.D.100- A.D.1000) archaeological sites
on and around Tyndall. He has worked
throughout the southeastern US and
also on two sites in the Denver, Col.
area, and spent the summer of 2006
digging in Northern Peru at a pre-Incan


site complete with human and animal
sacrifices. Dengel plans to give an
overview of the prehistory of Florida,
then talk about the mound builders of the
Woodland period in Northwest Florida.
"We have excavated five village sites and
relocated four burial mounds (originally
excavated in the early 1900's) on
Tyndall," he said. I will finish by talking
about some uses of technology in locating
and recreating archaeological sites."
For more info, call 370-6201.
GALAFARCE: The Gulf Alliance for
Local Arts's GALA Community Theater
presents its first production of the 2010
theater season, the local premiere of
"The Farndale Avenue Housing Estate
Townswomen's Guild Dramatic Society
Murder Mystery." The show, first of four
productions scheduled for 2010, will be
offered in dinner theater performances
at the St. Joseph's Bay Country Club
on March 26, 27 and 28. The show is a
murder mystery farce written by David
McGillivray and Walter Zerlin, Jr., and
directed by Dan Wheeler. Tickets are $35
each and include an Original Butler's
Cuisine dinner with choice of 12 oz.
Ronnie Ribeye; 8 oz. Ronnie Ribeye & six
sauteed shrimp; or baked crab-stuffed
grouper. Each meal includes Butler's
wild rice or baked potato, whole green
beans, garden salad, yeast rolls, iced tea,
coffee and apple pie or hot brownie ala
mode. Performance-only tickets are also
available for $15. For more information
and to purchase tickets visit www
GulfAlliance.org or call 850-229-2748.
Seating is limited and on a first-come
first-served basis.


or any other hyphen-blues. The band
features guitar, harp, organ/keys, bass
and drums no frills, just fine soulful
ensemble blues playing.
Shows both nights are at 8 p.m.
Tickets are available at 653-3200 or info@
dixietheatre.com.
RIBTICKLING GOODNESS: The
ninth annual Eastpoint Volunteer Fire
Department Charity Rib Cookoff gets
underway Saturday, March 20 at the
fire house in Eastpoint, located at the
corner of 6th St and CC Land Road, one
block north of US 98. This year's event
promises to be the biggest ever, with our
competitors cooking more ribs than ever.
In addition to the cooking competition
there will be a car show, silent auction,
live entertainment featuring "Twice
Daily!" and back by popular demand, the
Liars' Contest.
Rides and face painting for the kids.
Free admission and the gates open
at 9 a.m. BBQ dinners will be served


SLIM FATZ
BLUES AT THE DIXIE: The
Apalachicola Sponge Company and the
Dixie Theatre present Blues in the Lot
on Friday, March 19 with the Dixie going
country with Mickey Cash and Lick N'
Grave. Yeah, that's Johnny's grandniece
with the very talented Lick N' Gravey
band; you won't want to miss 'em. "Cash
shows off those pipes in a prototype
country ballad, leaving you wanting to
hear a lot more," said T J Royal. On
Saturday, March 20, Blues performers
Slim Fatz gets us started, and then
Memphis-based blues band Brandon
Santini & Delta Highway. This band's
music is pure living blues for modern
times; it's not rock-blues, soul-blues


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WATCH OUT FOR BEARS
At the request of Maria Williams, a regional
outreach specialist with the Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation Commission, the Florida
Department of Transportation has authorized
bear crossing signs to be placed at six locations
around the county. Signs like the one at right will
be installed on eastbound U.S. Highway 98 east
of the Apalachicola causeway; on State Road 65
north of Wright Lake Road; on eastbound U.S. 98
near Cape Road; on U.S. Highway 319 west of
the Ochlockonee River Bridge; on westbound U.S. 98 near the Wakulla
County line; and on Island Drive south of Patton Drive in Eastpoint. The
signs are designed to draw attention to the possibility of bears on or
beside the road.
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Interpretations abound of ongoing Rainbow Gathering


Different strokes apply to basketballers ait FCHS


Thursday, March 18, 2010


"Yes, I like to watch."
Chance Gardener
From "Being
There" by Jerzy Kosin-
ski

My sophomore stu-
dents have been quite
abuzz with the Chili
Cook-off and the Rain-
how Gathering. They
have talked of little else


Volunteer Fire Depart-
ment. In fact, that was
really the point, not al-
cohol-driven public dis-
plays. I hope that with
additional information,
the kids experienced a
HITE tiny, mental reality shift.
There is another
ROUX unfolding event garner-
Roux ing the interest of the
teen set. The people
attending the Rainbow Gather-
ing have been congregating in
the national forest up the road
from Wright Lake. Estimates
range from 450 to 1,000. My kids
have reported Rainbow People
sightings all over the county. A
significant number have visited
the campsite area, and many
have driven through just to
watch.
My theory is that our local
children, unlike those in the
city, are rarely part of a large
group of people for any event,
anywhere. The simple as-
sembly of folks is sufficient to
entertain.
Chili Cook Off is history,
but Rainbow Gathering is still
happening and generating
observations, judgments, and
questions.
"We are stardust.
We are golden.
And we've got to get our-
selves back to the garden."
From Woodstock" by Joni
Mitchell

There is quite a bit that can
be said about the participants


there are some cognitive and
communication lessons to be
learned here. Too many people
get their exercise leaping to
conclusions.
I want my students to gather
information and impressions
before they form any hard, fast
judgment. The world isn't just
black and white, right or wrong,
but rather full of nuance.
I called a friend who attended
Rainbow Gatherings during the
'80s and early '90s in Florida,
West Virginia, and Colorado.
She said they were vast, with
the most decent and wonderful
people to the most crippled and
confused. She spoke of Krishnas,
Sufi Dancing, and fairy camps
as well as special tents for the
alcoholics. Many artists would
bring crafts to trade. Two young
women were murdered in West
Virginia. Locals brought picnic
baskets and watched the antics
of the campground from afar.
Beauty, violence, and voyeur-
ism.
Life isn't simple enough to
rush to judgment and feel com-
fortable there. There is always
a back story and a different ver-
sion for every single observer
and participant.
Everyone at the Chili Cook
Off was not young and drunk
and every Rainbow is not a
smelly, panhandling druggie.
Life just isn't like that.
Denise Roux is a regular
columnist for the Apalachicola
and Carrabelle Times. To reach
her, email her at rouxwhit@
mchsi.com.


-
RED W
AND
Denise


over the past couple of weeks.
FCAT? Bah, just a flash in
the pan as far as conversation
goes.
I have been asking ques-
tions, listening, and drawing
some interesting (at least to
me) conclusions.
They were excited about
the annual Chili Cook Off on
St. George Island, held on the
first Saturday in March for over
the past 30 years. I don't know
exactly what they expected, but
what they got was an eyeful of
scantily-clad young ladies and
plenty of outrageous drunken
behavior. I wasn't there so I
can't give an eyewitness report.
I can say that I have noted
much the same scenario in
recent years when I did attend.
My students couldn't wait to tell
me about the crowds of people
and all the things they saw.
I asked, "Who won?" They
were nonplussed. Seems the
idea of an internationally sanc-
tioned chili cooking competition
was under the radar. I pointed
out that thousands of much-
needed dollars were being
raised for the St. George Island


LOIS SWOBODA | The Times


of the Rainbow Gathering.
Google will give you thousands
of updates on happenings all
over the world. There is no
central command center or
home webpage. A quick bit of
research reveals a shared phi-
losophy of back to the land, bar-
ter instead of money, peace and
love instead of war and hate.
No wonder my kids are call-
ing the visitors hippies.
Hippies are history to them
and watching the Rainbows
is equivalent to some sort of
elaborate reenactment. The


students are making numer-
ous interesting inferences and
gross generalizations.
"They stink. They are beg-
ging on the streets and in park-
ing lots. They will trade pot for
anything you offer them. One
got arrested for food stamp
fraud. They have been shoplift-
ing at the store in Sumatra."
I always ask for the anteced-
ent to the pronoun "they." Who
exactly are you talking about?"
Is it the small number you actu-
ally saw or is this all complete
hearsay? I have a feeling that


Letter to the EDITOR


Waste haulers could curtail bears in
garbage
At a recent Franklin County Commission
meeting, an idea was pitched by Maria Wil-
liams, bear specialist with the Florida Fish
and Wildlife Conservation Commission. She
proposed that the county commission, be-
fore signing off on the contract, require any
corporate waste removal service to supply a
bear-proofcanister or dumpster option at no
extra charge to any resident who requests
one.
Why would a big corporation be willing
to absorb such an expense? Perhaps there
are several reasons. It makes good business
sense to be concerned about the safety of its
customers. This could provide good press
for their signing up new customers in other
areas in the future. It could settle, once and
for all, the had press relating to bears in gar-
bage, and they'd get the credit.
The bears will be warming up and on
the move again very soon. They will head
to their favorite "fast food" source (regular
cans) or, if those "restaurants" are closed,
return to the woods for their traditional diet.
Please let your county commissioners know
if you agree to their use of power in choosing
any corporate waste removal company that
will work with us to limit bear-human con-
tact caused by garbage.
Caroline Weiler


- This hoto at left, taken in
P.
the mid 1950s, shows one
of the first block homes ever
built on St. George island.
Constructing the home
was a work crew from the
4 Apalachicola construction
* company Falk and Donato,
owned by Harry Falk, and
Rocky Donato, Margie's
brother, who is standing
? On the roof. Materials were
loaded every morning on the
ferry, and the work crews
ferried them over and after a
day's work, ferried home.
es
submit their favorite photos for
posting, either by e-mailing dadler-
stein@starfl.com or dropping by
the office, 122 Commerce St., at the
corner of Commerce Street and
Avenue F to have their hard-copy
photos scanned and returned. It's
a great opportunity to preserve the
county's rich history and share its
images with the world.
For more information, call 653-
8868, and we'll be glad to help.


COURTESY OF MARGIE SOLOMON | The Tim
three decades ago, for our readers
to enjoy.
With more than 100 photos to
start and more coming in every
day, The Times has enlisted the
support of the Apalachicola Area
Historical Society, the Carrabelle
Historical Society, the chambers
of commerce, history buffs and our
loyal readers to bring "Old Times"
to vivid life.
Readers are encouraged to


As The Apalachicola and Car-
rabelle Times approaches its 125th
anniversary in April, we are reach-
ing out to the community to help
us bring local history alive for our
readers.
The Times has introduced a
new feature on our Web site, www.
apalachtimes.com. This photo gal-
lery"Old Times"showcasesphoto-
graphs, some more than a century
old and some as recent as two or


Editor's note: The follow-
ing column concerns the
transfer by Seahawks sopho-
more Carlos Morris to Jack-
sonville Arlington Country
Day. Franklin County High
School has complained to the
Florida High School Athletic
Association that Country
Day is guilty of a recruiting
violation which, if upheld,


basketball is what put our
school on the map. Do you
hear other counties brag-
ging about our football or
baseball team? The answer
is no because basketball is
what the kids of Apalachicola
dream about. Why try to ruin


percent of the basketball is black stu-
dents, so they throw many stumbling
blocks in our path. They complained
about the basketball players' baggy
pants and say things such as that we
walk around campus like we own it.
Why not get on to the baseball team
for chewing tobacco in the restrooms
or skipping class two days a week.
Through it all the basketball team
learned to take our anger out on the
court and blow out our opponents.
Carlos Morris is a great person,
and I hope he lives his dream to play
pro basketball and remembers the
ones who tried to stop him, and by
that he will always be inspired to do
better at every task. No man can stop
what God has planned for Carlos's
future.
From a true friend.
Zachary Jones is a senior player
on the Seahawks varsity basket-
ball team and works part-time at
the Times as part of his business
courses. 'lb reach him, e-mailhim at
zeezy032003@yahoo.com.


POSTMASTER:
Send address change to:
The Apalachicola Times
P.O. Box 820
Apalachicola, FL 32329
Phone 850-653-8868


PERIODICAL RATE


I


{HIT-
AND C
You-Kno


HC A
T the future of your former stu-
HEW dent? Some schools would be
w-Who happy that one of their for-
mer students moved on to better his
or her future. Isn't that what we want
for our students anyway?
This isn't just a sport to Carlos
Morris; it is what he lives and dies
by. Basketball might be just a sport
to some, but it's his future, his life
and it's what pumps in his veins. You
all make it seems as if he betrayed
FCHS and offended you all, but didn't
he only want what was best for his fu-
ture and if that means moving away
then so be it? But some can't seem to
accept that.
.
The school makes it seem as
though it is a racial issue because 98


could cost Morris a year of athletic
participation. Morris was aca-
demically ineligible at the time of
his decision to transfer to Country
Day, having failed to maintain a 2.0
grade point average.
I understand that Carlos Morris
flunked off the team because of his
own actions of not doing his required
schoolwork, but why try to destroy
this young man's future? Would you
have reported this recruiting viola-
tion if he was a baseball or football
player?
In case you haven't noticed,


SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
IN COUNTY
$24.15 year $15.75 six months
OUT OF COUNTY
$34.65 year $21 six months


TO ALL ADVERTISERS
In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers
do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount
received for such advertisement,
The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is
thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word
thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains.


* *


A4 | The Times


-4/>alachicola
( urrabelle


THE
USPS 027-600
Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St.
Apalachicola, FL 32329
VP/Publisher: Karen Hanes
Editor: Tim Croft



























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TIDE TABLES MONTH LY AVERAGES
.
To find the tides of the following areas, subtract the Indicated times
from these given for APALACHICOLA:
HIGH LOW
CatPoint Minus0:40 Minus1:17
East Pass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27
To find the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times
from those given for CARRABELLE:
HIGH LOW
Bald Point Minus 9:16 Minus 0:03

APALACHICOLA


CARRABELLE


p ..... ..gygiggggiggg.........
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* *
* *


Thursday, March 18,2010


Local


The Times | AS


Mayor Ulrike Binninger, wife
of conservative parliament mem-
her Clemens Binninger for the
district of Boeblingen, is conster-
nated, like her citizens. "Our com-
passion is with the parents of the
dead child," she said.
She doesn't know the Bordt
family personally. At any rate, the
Bordts seem to have led a seclud-
ed life. Only few neighbors ever
got in touch with them.
"We haven't spoken for years. I
only knew that Karin lives in the


USA. I have known her since she
was a child," one neighbor said.
"This is unimaginable."
Wilhelm Weimer was closer
in touch with the Bordts. He de-
scribed the relationship among
the neighbors: "Heinz Bordt
sometimes helped me; I some-
times helped him." He recalled
the grandchild, as Camden was
in Nufringen just last year. Dur-
ing the winter, Weimer said, 71-
year-old Marianne and Heinz
Bordt regularly flew to the U.S.


and spent three months with their
daughter and their grandson.
The crime Marianne Bordt
is accused of is inconceivable to
Weimerandhiswife."Iwouldhave
never thought so," Weimer said.
"She was a very reserved woman,
nothing striking. She loved her
grandson, who was sometimes
here for weeks."
In addition to conservative
Clemens Binninger, the district
of Boeblingen also sends liberal
Florian Toncar and left-wing so-


cialist Richard Pitterle to Ger-
many's parliament in Berlin. In
a press release, Pitterle speaks
out against the death penalty for
Marianne Bordt. It reads: "I don't
have the words to describe the ac-
tions of this citizen from Nufrin-
gen. But we mustn't allow this old
woman to be executed, no matter
what she did. We Europeans have
done away with the death penalty
for good reasons. The grief should
prompt us to demand that the USA
also abolish the death penalty."


The district of Boeblingen is
known for its industry. Daimler
produces the popular Mercedes
Benz C class and other luxury
cars in Sindelfingen, only 10 miles
from Nufringen. In the town of
Boeblingen, both Hewlett-Pack-
ard and IBM have their German
headquarters. Nufringen's big-
gest employer is Ensinger, a com-
panyproducinghigh-performance
plastics. Ensinger also has U.S.
divisions in Pennsylvania, Con-
necticut, New Jersey and Texas.


"Theunemploymentrate
in this county always goes
up from December to Janu-
ary, so most of the over-the-
month increase can be at-
tributed to normal seasonal
factors," Rust said. "Given
that the number of claims
filed increased consider-
ably over the month, it is
not surprising that the un-
employment rate increased
as well."
Kim Bodine, executive
director for the Gulf Coast
Workforce Board, said the
numbers reflected seasonal
layoffs from tourism and
temporary holiday jobs.
"We're hoping this is our
peak unemployment and
anticipate the rate improv-
ing over the next couple of
months as the tourism sea-
son kicks off," she said.
While the number of
people collecting unem-
ployment benefits is a fac-
tor in calculating jobless
rates, the estimated num-
ber of unemployed workers
in a county is not limited
to those people. Rust said
a person does not have
to be collecting benefits
in order to be considered
unemployed, because the
U.S. Department of Labor's
Bureau of Labor Statistics
determines the jobless rate
using household surveys.
Other groups included
in the total unemployment
estimate are those who
have exhausted their ben-
efitsbutcontinuetolookfor
work; people who are look-
ing for a job after having
been out of the labor force
for some time; people who
are looking for a job for the
first time; and others, such
as oystermen, who might
not be eligible for unem-
ployment benefits.
"In Franklin County, the
closure of oyster beds due
to the rain in December
negatively impacted oyster-


men and seafood proces-
sors," Bodine said.
The jobless rate in De-
cember indicated that 442
people out of a labor force of
4,828 workers in the county
could not find work. In Jan-
uary, 92 more people were
without work, with 534 job-
less out of a labor force of
4,816.
In contrast, in January
2009, Franklin's workforce
was much smaller, at 4,662
workers, and only 336 were
out of work, for a jobless
rate of 7.2 percent, still high
for the county over the past
several years.
The rate this January
was worse than the nation-
al average of 9.7 percent. It
was better than the state's
11.9 percent but lagged be-
hind 19 other Florida coun-
ties, including Miami-Dade,
Broward, Santa Rosa,
Calhoun, Jackson, Walton,
Wakulla, Leon and Liberty.
The unemployment rate
in the Gulf Coast Workforce
region (Bay, Franklin and
Gulf counties) was 11.9 per-
cent in January, with Bay at
11.9 and Gulf County at 12.2.
"Some people are tak-
ing part-time positions or
jobs that they are overquali-
fied for while others rely on
unemployment compensa-
tion," said Wilson Hair, co-
ordinator for the Workforce
Center. "We have been in
this recession for more
than a year, and job-seek-
ers have been frustrated
and discouraged, especially
during the winter months;
however, we are seeing
some optimism and confi-
dence now that the tourist
season has begun."
Bodine said, "Although
some people find that they
make just as much money
from unemployment as they
would at an entry-level job,
we encourage them to go
back to workif they have the


opportunity. No one knows
just how long this recession
will last, and we don't want
people to exhaust all of their
unemployment compensa-
tion benefits."
The annual job growth
rate in professional and
business services, 10.5 per-
cent; trade, transportation,
and utilities, 3.1 percent;
and leisure and hospitality,
2.1 percent, was positive in
the region but declined in
the state. All metro areas
in the state except the Pan-
ama City-Lynn Haven-Pan-
ama City Beach area lost
jobs since January 2009;
it gained 200 jobs, for a 0.3
percent growth rate over
the year.
On the first day of Flor-
ida's Legislative Session
last week, lawmakers and
Gov. Charlie Crist approved
a bill to bring much-needed
tax relief to Florida's busi-
nesses by reducing the
minimum rate of unemploy-
ment tax businesses owe,
from $100.30 to $25.50 per
employee.
The bill also extended
until Feb. 27, 2010, Florida's
Extended Benefits program
for unemployment compen-
sation customers who have
exhausted all state and fed-
erally funded Emergency
Unemployment Compen-
sation benefits. Extended
Benefits will immediately
provide benefits to nearly
20,000 Floridians for up
to eight additional weeks.
Those who believe they
may be eligible may apply
online at www.floridajobs.
org or by mail or fax using
the application they receive
from the AWI.
"Florida businesses will
benefit from a dramatically
reduced employer tax rate
that will help companies
avoid layoffs and support
economic growth," said
AWI Director Cynthia R.
Lorenzo.


AWI, in partnership with
the Florida Department
of Children and Families,
Workforce Florida Inc. and
the state's Regional Work-
force Boards, will receive
its first installment of $61.2
million from the U.S. De-
partment of Health and
Human Services in the
$200 million Florida Back to
Work initiative. Distribution
of the remaining funds will
follow. Once these funds are
released, Florida is ready
to begin implementing the
program statewide and
putting Floridians back to
work.
Florida Back to Work
will employ Floridians who
receive, or are eligible to
receive, Temporary Assis-
tanceforNeedyFamilies.To
date, the AWI has received
more than 1,100 proposals
from businesses around the
state. Participating employ-
ers will post job openings on
the Employ Florida Market-
place atwww.employflorida.
com as positions become
available.
The Census Bureau, as
part of the 2010 count of U.S.
residents, is in the process
of hiring thousands of em-
ployees between now and
September to assist with
the count in Florida. The
state anticipates that the
bureau will employ more
than 63,700 Floridians over
the duration of the census,
with salaries in the $9-$16
per hour range. 14111- and
part-time census openings
are posted on the Employ
Florida Marketplace site.
These positions will be
critical to the state's ef-
fort to ensure an accurate
count so that Floridians
receive their fair share of
funding and representation
in Washington, D.C., during
the next decade. For more
information on the census,
visit www.sunshinecensus
2010.com.


Taunya James, presi-
dent of the Franklin County
Seafood Workers Associa-
tion (FCSWA), said at least
300 oystermen have signed
up to take part in the state
program, which will trans-
port shells to overworked
areas of the Apalachicola
Bay to set the stage for a
solid growing season next
year.
At Tuesday night's coun-
ty commission meeting,
commissioners approved a
series of resolutions to cov-
er the financial administra-
tion of the program, which
will infuse $100,000 from a
Florida Department of Ag-
ricultural and Consumer
Services grant into the lo-
cal economy.
The money, gleaned
from unused federal di-
saster relief money for
hurricanes, will be divided
between the cost of paying
oystermen to shell, $90,000,
and $10,000 earmarked for
administrative tasks.
The administrative
costs will be split between
the FCSWA, which will get
$7,500, and the Oyster and
Seafood Task Force, which
will receive $2,500.
Kevin Begos, chair-
man of the task force, has
workedcloselywithFCSWA
leaders and the state to
help coordinate the shell-
ing program, which initially
was set to begin earlier
this month. The admin-
istrative costs will cover
materials and labor for
building a wooden chute
at Seafood Park that will
be used to load shells onto
boats.
The administrative ex-
penses also cover the cost
of the FCSWA overseeing
the operation, including
FCSWA Treasurer Karen
Sanders writing checks to
the oystermen, for a fee of
$150 per day. Receipts will
be provided to the state,


the FCSWA and each oys-
terman.
At Tuesday's meeting,
commissioners agreed to
advance the FCSWA$20,000
to cover initial shelling ex-
penses, with the county
then receiving reimburse-
ment from the state on a
weekly basis.
The shells have been
bought by the state from
Gulf of Mexico seafood
processors and donated to
the program. They will be
loaded onto the boats, with
the optimal amount being
two cubic yards per boat.
Oystermen will be paid
$125 for depositing an en-
tire boatload of shells in the
clearly marked area in the
bay. If a boat will not hold
a full load, oystermen will
be paid $62.50 for one cubic
yard of shell.
James estimates that
it will take five minutes to
load each boat, which will
be done in a pre selected or-
der based on a lottery.
The boats will then tray-
el to a marked area over
Dry Bar, off St. Vincent Is-
land, and will have to scat-
ter the shells as the boats
drift, because they cannot
anchor. The area will be
marked off by buoys and
patrolled by a safety watch
boat and monitors.
James said the plan is
to put out about 200 cubic
yards of shell out per day,
with the Dry Bar portion
of the project taking about
four days.
From there, the plan is
to move the operation to
the Cat Point and Platform
oyster bars, off Eastpoint,
using a different loading
location.
James said a system
has been designed to give
all eligible oystermen a
chance to participate, with
each getting a chance to
shell until the money, and
the shells, run out.


Date
ThuMar l8
FriMar l9
Sat, Mar 20
sunMar 21
MonMar22
TueMar 23
WedMar 24


High
640
670
680
660
630
640
670


% Precip
30 %
0 %
20 %
40 %
0 %
10 %
20 %


3/18 Thu 12:09AM
11:46AM
3/19 Fri 12:42AM
12:08PM
3/20 Sat 01:22AM
12:33PM
3/21 Sun 02:14AM
12:55PM
3/22 Mon 03:28AM


0.0
0.7
-0.1
0.8
-0.1
1.0
-0.2
1.0
-0.1


06:53AM
05:23PM
07:49AM
05:48PM
08:57AM
06:20PM
10:25AM
06:58PM
07:46PM


617 W 23rd Street


General Dentist


NO APPOINTMENT
NECESSARY
EMERGENCY
EXTRACTION
SERVICES


* SAME DAY SERVICE
IF IN BEFORE 9A.M.
FIRST-TIME
DENTURE
WEARER PACKAGES


ON-SITE
LAB
FELINES
AND
REPAIRS


MARCH 10'"-


BOOMTOWN (ASINO 5 HR STAY
.,,3.,4....,::: :.1,2, .11,,,,,4,:,, i
BEAU RIVAGE 5 HR STAY
allia : ...,rr :,
520 P/P FOLEY, AL. (SHOPPING TRIP)
Al. TIVAl.0f fl.0WERS


3/23 Tue 05:03AM -0.1 L

3/24 Wed M MM L


08:PM 1.5H


MAR(H 24- 25'" 589P/P DBL STAYING THE BEAU RIVAGE (ASINO
""
APRILl9-20'" 575 I HElP(ASINO
in or...
fil

JUNE24-27'" 5WEETHOMEALABAMA

SEPT 2""-14'" 5149900P/PDBL-MIDWE5TTOUR


n
IIII
JAN 24 28'" KEY WEST 5599 00 P/P DBL : fr set.,
Call to make reservations 588-8338
7151 W. HWY 98 (in the old ne's World Center)
PANAMA CITY BEACH FL. 32407


3/18 Thu 05:28AM 1.9
03:58PM 2.4
3/19Fri 06:24AM 1.9
04:23PM 2.6
3/20 Sat 07:32AM 1.8
04:55PM 2.6
3/21 Sun 12:01AM -0.3
10:42AM 1.6
3/22 Mon 01:15AM -0.2

3/23 Tue 02:50AM -0.2

3/24 Wed 04:16AM -0.2
03:22PM 1.8


H 09:33AM 1.1 L
H 10:29PM -0.2 L
H 09:55AM1.3L
H 11:09PM -0.2 L
H 10:20AM 1.6 L
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L 05:33PM 2.6 H
L 06:21PM 2.6 H

L 07:28PM 2.4 H

L 01:24PM 1.9 H
L 08:59PM 2.2 H


FLORIDACODEREOUIRESTHEFOLLOWINGSTATEMENT
THETREATMENTREQUIREDTHEPATIENTANDANYOTE
DANCELPAYMENIORBEREIMBURSEDFORPAYMENTF(
TOFANDWITHIN72HOURSOFRFSPONDING


aRE MINIMUMFIEES AND CHARGES MYINCREI


BORDT from paoeAl


SHELLING from paae Al




































































































Girl's game starts at 11AM BOy's game starts at 1PM
$4 for adults $2 for children (5-17)
Children under five are FREE
Tickets may be purchased at the door
Billy Harrison Field House located at Gulf Coast Community College on US Highway 98


Potential Candidates must possess a Florida Teacher's Certificate and willing
to teach In addition to serving as basketball coach. Job description and
application may be obtained from Franklin County School Board Finance
Office. Applications must include (1) a high school diploma, (2) college
transcripts if applicable, and (3) three letters of recommendation. Successful
applicants must agree to a criminal history check (includes FDLE processing
fee) and a drug screening.

Please return applications to the attention of Morna Smith, Personnel
Specialist.
Franklin County School Board is an Equal Opportunity Employer.



Open for Bid:


M


u a 1 * a -* -


Thursday, March 18,2010


A6 | The Times


Local


sell their goods, no vendors
are allowed at this gather-
ing. There was an area des-
ignated as the trade circle,
where people with goods to
barter could do so.
Katy, who, like most
campers, declined to give
a last name, said candy is
used as money at the gath-
ermgs.
Near the entrance to the
campground, Al, who de-
scribed himself as an elder,
sat with a circle of friends.
He said he attended his
first Rainbow Gathermg
in the early '70s after leav-
ing the Army. He attended
his second Rainbow Gath-
ering in 1990 following an
interlude of "normal life"
during which he worked as
a nurse and raised a fam-
ily. Al came to Apalachicola
from a gathering held last
month in Ocala and said he
will leave here and go to
the VA hospital in Gaines-
ville for treatment.
John and Sandra Da-
vis, who are self-employed,
traveled from Seattle to
attend the Ocala Rainbow
Gathering and camped at
Wright's Lake on their way
home.
John pointed out a large
pile of trash next to a col-
orful bus and said the bus
owners hauled out refuse
for other campers.
"That's not the way it's
supposed to work," Sandra
said. "Everybody's sup-
posed to take out their own
garbage."
The pile of garbage was
eventually sorted for re-
cycling and removed from


. (


.

Samantha Shiver, of Eastpoint and Tallahassee,
feeds her 6-month-old son, Phoenix Light. Shiver's
husband, A.V., said they considered not attending
the gathering because of their son's age but he has
adapted well to his surroundings.


Photos by LOIS SWOBODA | The Times


the site.
Jason Flowers, Frank-
lin County's environmental
health director, visited the
gathering last week and ex-
pressed concern over sani-
tation. He was concerned
about the amount of refuse
produced by campers and
the lack of sanitary facili-
ties on the site.
"The national forest is-
sued permits for the group
and then locked the bath-
rooms," he said.
Campers dig trenches
to use as toilets and spread
ashes over the waste be-
fore burying it.
There was no odor even


within a few feet of a trench
on the site; however, the
trench was within 100 feet
of the river. After the week-
end's heavy rains, there
was no sign the trench had
flooded or overflowed.
Several campers de-
scribed themselves as un-
employed, and one man
said he lives in a short bus
after losing his house be-
cause of medical expenses
and a debilitating accident.
Certainly, some of the
campers were in need of
a shower, and some ap-
peared to be intoxicated,
even at 11 a.m., but there
was no belligerent or de-


structive behavior.
A.V, of Tallahassee, at-
tended the event with his
wife, Samantha Shiver,
originally of Eastpoint, and
his baby son.
"What we do is kind of
like a family reunion," he
said. People run into old
friends or even relatives at
these gatherings."
Rabbit, a Delaware In-
dian, plans to leave the
gathering and visit an
old acquaintance, Mama
Copper.
"She was the love of my
life," he said. "I met her
14 years ago at a Rainbow
Gathering and lost track,
but a guy I met camping
here knows where she is,
and I am going to Georgia
to find her."
Rabbit said he does not
consider himself to be a
Rainbow, but camps with
them and helps with cook-
ing or cutting wood.
A middle-age camper
who did not sport the col-
orful dress popular with


Moonab~ealm, o Tpampa said, "I kind of lve all over.


the Rainbows and did not
give his name said Ocala
was his first gathering. He
said he found the event on
the Internet and decided
to attend. He followed the
Rainbows to Wright's Lake
but said he does not plan to
attend another gathering.
"I didn't know what to
expect. It was wilder than
I thought," he said.


Lt. Bobby Shiver, of the
Franklin County Sheriff's
Office, has visited the gath-
ering several times since
the Rainbows arrived.
"These are very nice
people," he said. "We sent
in undercover agents, but
they were not able to buy
any drugs. Except for pan-
handling, there hasn't re-
ally been a problem."


COUNTY SCHOOL


ANNOUNCEMENT OF POSITION


PosITIoNS :


timinstructional pstin


LOCATION:FrnlnCutScos


SALARY:


FCSB Salary Schedule


CONTRACT:2001ScolYa


DEADLINE :


March 22, 2010, noon


RAINBOW from page Al


FRANKLIN


BOARD


Ge ad fAr} the 20,1g


A
(---

featuring outstanding youth from across the
east and west of the Panhandle.

Saturday, April 3, 2010

Gulf Coast Community College


NORTHWEST FLORIDA













Thursday, March l8, 2010 w w w. apalach times com Page ?


Local runners fare well

at Red Pepper Run


a


HOMETOWN NAME AGE TIME ADDITIONAL
INFO
Apalachicola T. Michael Shuler 45 23:44
St. George Island Nathan Landrum 32 23:52 (1st, M SGI resi-
dents)
Apalachicola Becky Blanchard 3 23:54 (2nd, F 35-39)
St. George Island Nick Yonclas 66 24:51 (1st, M 65-69)
Apalachicola J. Gordon Shuler 48 24:51
Carrabelle Kris Tomes 33 25:03 (2nd, M 30-34)
St. George Island Alane Kadel 40 26:00 d(est F SGI resi-

St. George Island Barbara Yonclas 62 27:35 (1st, F 60-64)
St. George Island John Culbertson 63 27:35 (2nd, M 60-64)
Carrabelle Skip Frink 60 27:39 (3rd, M 60-64)
Apalachicola Russell Gary 57 27:51 (2nd, M 55-59)
St. George Island Shonnie Baker 53 28:04 (1st, F 50-54)
Eastpoint Neil Braswell 55 28:25 (3rd, M 55-59)
Carrabelle Rama BenBaruch 54 28:57 (2nd, F 50-54)
Carrabelle Katie Herzog 59 29:43 (1st, F 55-59)
Apalachicola Liz Hernandez 39 29:54
Apalachicola Shawn Donahoe 66 30:06 (3rd, M 65-69)
Carrabelle Daniel Martin 23 31:30 (3rd, M 20-24)
Crawfordville John Nicholson 54 32:02 (1st, M 50-54)
Carrabelle 11tess Anderson 34 33:01
Apalachicola Leigh Coble 41 33:12 (3rd, F 40-44 tie)
Apalachicola Ladonna Ingram 44 33:12 (3rd,FP40-44 tie)
St. George Island Joe Sparks 26 33:23
St. George Island Megan Lamb 27 33:52 (2nd, F 25-29)
St. George Island UPS Bob 65 35:14
Port St. Joe Barb Sowers 48 37:57 (1st, F 45-49)
Dothan, Ala. Polly Glass 9 42:20 (2nd, F 9-14)
St. George Island Jody Plummer 73 44:42 (2nd, F 70+)
St. George Island Barbara Sanders 55 45:00 (3rd, F 55-59)
St. George Island Diane Sparks 45 46:23 (2nd, F 45-49)
St. George Island Catherine Hanley 19 46:23 (1st, F 15-19)
Apalachicola Nicole Selly 29 46:23 (3rd,FP25-29)
Apalachicola Donielle McKinley 31 46:23
St. George Island Jennifer Landrum 32 48:55
St. George Island Bruce Krueger 62 50:51
St. George Island Megan Sparks


spring SPORTS


YOUNG HUNTERS
Tony Yowell Ill, 12, and his brother Sean
Yowell, both of Howard's Creek killed
their first deer this year on an exciting
January trip to Alabama with their dad,
Ross Yowell, Uncle Mark "The Buck
Luck" Yowell, of Eastpoint, and PePaw,
Tony Yowell, Sr., of Sumatra. The 12-
year-old, left, bagged an 1 1-point from
160 yards, and his younger brother,
a seven-point from about 150 yards
away Thanks to Reau Berry, owner,
and Kenneth Crimm, manager, of the
Owl Creek Lodge, in Aliceville, Ala.
ROSS YOWELL | Special to the Times






STATE BAN K 1897
A Division of Coastal Community Bank

Apalachicola Carrabelle Eastpoint St. George Island
22 Avenue E 612 N Avenue A 5 Jefferson Street 200 Franklin Blvd
653-8805 697-4500 670-8501 927-2561


Hewrney~rdy ielghnwand PLAYER OF THE WEEK


* Tadtina


At the March 6 SK Red Pepper Run,
103 runners registered and 97 completed
the race. Female winner was Kristen
Merrill of Gainesville, with a time of 23:24.
Male winner was David Shearon of Pana-
ma City, with a time of 18:23.
First place female finisher from St.


George Island was Alane Kadel and first
place male finisher from St. George Island
was Nathan Landrum.
People from 10 states participated in
the run: Florida, Georgia, Michigan, New
York, Tennessee, Alabama, Virginia, Ohio,
Minnesota, and Kentucky.


.


DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times
Seahawks coach Mike Emerson has senior AJ Arnold hold up on third during
action earlier this season at home against FAMU.







10 10 St. J oe


By David Adlerstein
Times City Editor
On Saturday, the Seahawks traveled to
Tallahassee to face the FAMU Baby Rat-
tlers. The middle school played first, and
won 12-2, Michael Allen was the winning
pitcher, hurling three innings and giving
up two runs on one hit, and striking out
five. Colton Sapp came in to finish the
game. He faced 5 batters and struck out 3.
Dwayne Griggs went 2-for-3.
The varsity played next, winning 20-9.
Starting pitcher was Seth Rogers, who
pitched six innings and gave up nine runs
on seven hits. He had nine strikeouts and


faced 32 batters. Colton Sheridan came in
to finish the game in the seventh inning,
striking out three of the four batters he
faced.
Jason Thompson was 3-for-4 with a
triple and 4 RBIs. Caden Barber was 1-1
with a double
On Monday night the Seahawks played
Port St. Joe, and fell 8-0. AJ Arnold start-
ed and gave up seven runs on five hits.
Zack Armstead came in the third and fin-
ished the game. He gave up one run on
two hits.
Thompson was 1-for-2, Barber was 1-
for-3, Sheridan was 1-for-3 and Rogers
was 1-for-2.


Lady Seahawks varsity softball
Thursday, March 18 vs. Port St. Joe
7 p.m.
Friday, March 19 @ Lincoln 4 p.m.
(JV only)
Tuesday, March 23 @ Bay 7 p.m.
Thursday, March 25 vs. North Florida
Christian 5 p.m.


Seahawks varsity baseball
Friday, March 19 at 7 p.m. vs. Wewa-
hitchka (District game)
Friday, March 26 at 6 p.m. @ Munroe
Lady Seahawks middle school softball
Thursday, March 18 vs.Wewa 4 p.m.
Seahawks middle school baseball
Thursday, March 18 vs. Wewa 4 p.m.


*Decorat~liveC Paint pots'


* **


CA RRA BE L LE APA LA CH ICO LA


A


Coach Christy Thompson would like to hiOh the 2010 Lady Seahawk varsity
softball team's two seniors, first baseman Kendyl Hardy and catcher LeiOh
Redmond. These Oirls have been a part of the Seahawk family since the
school's consolidation and both serve important roles as teammates.

LeiOh is more aggressive of the two and has done a Oreat job trying to
keep her team in the game. She is a leader behind the plate and tries
her best to keep the game positive for the Seahawks. Kendyl is more the
encouraOer and less aOOressive on the field. She is a hard worker and
always strives to learn more on and off of the field.

The Lady Seahawks play district rival Port St. Joe this week for the first
time. This will be a bi0 0ame for us and I know that these seniors would
like to have a win against St. Joe for the memory books. I hope that we
can deliver a strong challenOe and play to our abilities.





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Thursday, March 18,2010


Local


lAl entries must be re-
rnehd hTheentSrykforms
by 5 p.m. ET on Thursday,
March 25.
be Tfe tu ndnii o r 1
edition and on our Web site.
Do your love handles a
favor: enter today!


creative muscles or dust off
that old copy of Abs of Steel.
The choice, dear friends, is
yours '
And now for a little re-
fresher course on the rules.
The contest requires en-
trants to construct scenes
of Panhandle living using
marshmallow Peeps as all


in a box, shoebox or other
enclosure and participants
can work solo or in teams.
The categories are as fol-
lows:
*5 and under
*6-10
*11-16
*17 and up
*Business
Entrants in the business
category must depict their
workplace, employees or


some aspect of their busi-
We will award first, sec-
ond and third prizes in each
cat es will base their
decision on the diorama's
design, quality of execu-
tion and resemblance to


and


human


Travis Stanley

F 850.653.6477
ICK LING Grayson Shep
850.653.6718

C& Y Mike Howze
850.653.5112


Leon Teat
850.653.5656
ard Jackie Golden
850.899.8433
Jamie Crum
850.899.8758


Broker
BlueWater Realty
of Gulf County

, ..2350 227 5566 m
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BEST DEAL IN EASTPOINT! SECOND TIER/GULF VIEW SECOND TIER OVATION, Cape
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of a cul de sac. Paved roads, steps to a beach access point on to the beachfront pool club and
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.-

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A8 | The Times


Last call for entries



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LOCAL















Thursday, March 18, 2010 w w w. apalach times .com Page I


- -- -C-- -~-..---


B


By Lois Swoboda
Times Staff Writer
Editor's note: In recent years, there has been
much discussion about the state of the fshery in
the Gulf of Mexico. At the February Florida Fish
and Wildlife Conservation Commission meeting,
charter captains and sportfshermen testified the
snapper population is robust, but other species
might be in decline. The federal government's
way of monitoring the number of food f sh in the
Gulf has been criticized by theNationalResearch
Foundation. Joe Barber said he believes the num-
ber of fsh in the Gulf has declined dramatically
since he was a commercial fsherman. He wor-
ries about reports of dead zones scattered across
the Gulf Perhaps we should listen to the voice of
experience.
Joe Barber says fishing in the Gulf of Mexico
has changed.
Retired boatman and experienced fisherman,
the 88-year-old Joseph "Snookie" Barber of Apala-
chicola and Carrabelle shared memories ofhis fish-
ing career.
He began at age 10. "I came from a busted fami-
ly," he said. "My father ran a turpentine business up
in Howard Creek. During the Depression, he lost
his business and started drinking. The sad thing
was he was quite capable of making a living in sev-
eral ways. He died at 50, and my mother died two
years later, almost to the day, of double pneumonia.
"When the family first broke up, my mother went
down to Tampa," Barber said. "To this day, I don't
know why. I didn't see her again for five years."
When Barber was 10, he and his brother, George
Ellis, were sent to live with County Judge Frank
Wakefield and his wife, Ethel, at the big house that
still stands at 99 Avenue C in Apalachicola.
"We had a place to eat and sleep," Barber said.
"We had to buy our own clothes and get them
washed. I took clothes to the washwoman, and my
brother paid for them and brought them home.
"We did what we could to earn money," he said.
"We threw papers and hunted and fished. We could
make about 25 cents a pound floundering and trout
fishing. You couldn't give mullet away; people want-
ed to know ifit was already cleaned."
At the time, shrimp was a penny a pound.
Barber was a commercial fisherman on the Gulf
from 1948 to 1958. "I fished out of Pensacola for 10
years. They say a rolling stone gathers no moss. I
was a rolling stone. My wife, Erma, was expecting
our first child when I started, so I went over without
her.Shestayedwithhersister,"hesaid.
Barber began his commercial fishing career
working with Earl Marshall, son of an Apalachicola
boat builder. Barber fished with him for five years
and then bought his own boat, the 42-foot "Captain
Bennie."
Many fishermen worked only when they needed


that, it amazes me.
"When it was foggy, we'd do it by time and
course. Fog never stopped me from going fishing.
You have to trust the instruments you have," Bar-
her said. "When you get lost in the woods, the best
thing to do is sit down and think. If you panic when
you are on the water, your chances of getting back
aren't good."
He said he sometimes used cues, such as the
smell or the color of the water, to aid in navigation.
An experienced waterman can spot the plume of
silt from the Apalachicola River far offshore.
Boats often fished in pairs for safety. Still, there
was one time Barber made it home, but his boat
and crew did not.
"There was a front coming through, and we
were almost in. We were at the first sea buoy.
It was the hardest rain I'd ever seen, and I was
afraid to try and come in further, so we circled the
buoy for two solid hours," he said. "The boat sank
at nine minutes after midnight. I know because a
clock in the cabin stopped.
"I think we were hit by a tornado. I say that
because people say it gets really light when you
are inside of a tornado. It got real light, and the
boat began to shake. I swam out of the hull; I didn't
jump," Barber said.
"We all went initeanny fishermen'sboots.They
make it hard to swim I managed to kick mine off,"
he said --This happened so tast; we were all in
the cabin, and I said -Get the lackets The.\ were
hanging nght there, but we didn't hale time to get
them
"A wooden boat, unless it gets a lot of \ on it, doesn't go down right away," Barber said --I
rode the hull until 9 a.m. when a pilot boat picked
me up.
"I never saw the two men who were with me
again. When we sank, 1,500 pounds of fish \tent
into the water, and the sharks were always there.
he said. "On the same night my boat went down.
something knocked a military plane out of the slo
about 10 miles away. It had blown off course, and it
was carrying classified information. There was a
huge search to find it. I think it got caught by what-
ever hit me."
Barber's wife, Erma, met him at the Coast
Guard station when he got ashore. "I told her:
'Don't even start on me; I don't want to hear it "
She said, 'If you can stand it, I guess I can.'"
Barber's boat eventually was raised and sal-
vaged. He fished for two more years but eventu-
ally gave up fishing to please Erma. "It was glie
up my boat or my wife," he said.
The couple returned to Apalachicola, and, al-
though his life as a commercial fisherman ended,
a new chapter in his life on the water had just be-
gun. He would pilot many boats and work as a ter-
ryman, fishing guide, and help design and man a
research vessel for Florida State University, but
that's another story.


LOIS 5WOBODA | The 11mes
Joseph "Snookie" Barber shares a fish story
about what he used to catch back in the day.

money, but Barber had a strong work ethic. Each
Sunday night, he left port and did his running be-
fore sunrise. It was important to travel far offshore
because three big party boats loaded with sport
fishermen ran out of Pensacola daily and cleared
out the near shore waters.
"We did it like a regular job," said Barber. "We'd
go out for three or four days at a time. We hardly
ever came back with under 1,500 pounds with three
men working. I caught 500 pounds a week for 10
years, so I caught 300,000 pounds of fish during my
career.
"One time, three of us in a little 36-foot boat
caught 4,270 pounds of snapper in less than 24
hours," he said. "We marked the place with a buoy
and came back the next week and caught 3,900
pounds of mixed grouper and snapper.
"One time, we came across a little stick sticking
up out of the water. I guess it was a coral tree. We
caught 5,800 pounds of snapper there. It was the
biggest trip I ever had," Barber said.
He said he routinely caught black grouper that
tipped the scales at more than 45 pounds. His big-
gest weighed 72 pounds.
Even then, fishing was not easy work. Some-
times Barber and his crew worked all day with
nothing to show for it.

A narrow escape
bd th
in 0 WOO Of
Equipment was more primitive. He fished with
a homemade reel that had a bicycle brake fitted
to it to control the play of the line. The line was
wound by pedaling.
His engine was a Chrysler Crown 115-horse-
power that ran on gasoline. When he went off-
shore, he carried 4,000 pounds of ice and 100 gal-
lons of fuel.
Barber said the advent of diesel was a great
boon to fishermen because it was safer than gaso-
line and half the price. "One thing we didn't have
was navigational gear. All we had was a magnetic
compass," he said."We'd go 30 to 40 miles offshore.
When we got ready to go in, we'd have to guess the
way back. We mostly made it. When I thinkbackon


f\


~~ll~llE~*1"


1


~"


"I~ '"`


LIFE


TI~ES


memories of a gulf fisherman


I~


1









Anniversaries, Births, Birthdays and WEDDINGS


PET OF THE
WEEK

Baby
Meet BABY! Baby is
a Maltese/Poodle mix and
is about a year and a half
old. She is sweet, happy and
very social. She gets along
well with people, dogs and
cats! She has been spayed, is
housebroken and up-to-date
on her vaccinations. If you
have been looking for a small breed dog to add to your
home, look no further. Baby is here!
VOLUNTEERS are desperately needed to socialize
Baby and all of the other dogs and cats. We are always
looking for people willing to bring one of our animals
into their home to be fostered for various needs. Any
time you can spare would be greatly appreciated.
Call Karen at am-s-il" for more details or visit the
Franklin County Humane Society at 244 State Route
65 in Eastpoint. You may log onto the website at www.
forgottenpets.org to see more of our adoptable pets.
.





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Thursday, March 18, 2010


B2 | The Times


Local


Trinity Barron to turn 7
Trinity Barron is turning 7 on Monday'
March 22.
A birthday party will be held for her on
Saturday, March 20 at 2 p.m. in the Kiddie
Park in Carrabelle. All family and friends
are invited.
Trinity is the daughter of Rachel Ben-
jamin of Carrabelle, and stepdaughter of
Jabbar Alexander of Port St. Joe. She is
the granddaughter of Classie Benjamin of
Carrabelle, and Marvin and Necie Benja-
min of Apalachicola.


Taylen Kendrick turns 3
Taylen Kendrick turned 3 on Saturday,
Feb. 27, 2010.
He celebrated his birthday at school
the day before with an ice cream party,
and on that Saturday with a John Deere
party with family and friends.
Taylen is the son of Sterling and Tana
Kendrick of Apalachicola.
Maternal grandparents are Patches
McLaurin and Brian Sendecki of Apala-
chicola, and Michael and Brenda Flowers
of Eastpoint. Paternal grandparents are
Will and Connie Kendrick, of Carrabelle.


Madden Kendrick born
Big brother Taylen is proud to an-
nounce the birth of his baby brother, Mad-
den Sterling Kendrick, on Thursday, Feb.
18, 2010.
He weighed 9 pounds and 5.3 ounces
and was 20.5 inches long.
Maternal grandparents are Patches
McLaurin and Brian Sendecki of Apala-
chicola, and Michael and Brenda Flowers
of Eastpoint.
Paternal grandparents are Will and
Connie Kendrick, of Carrabelle.


BritOS0n Drake Davis turns 6
Briceson Drake Davis turned 6 years
old on Sunday, Feb. 14, 2010.
He is the son of Tim and Angela Davis,
ofWewahitchka.
Maternal grandparents are Jerry and
Gloria Jackson, and the late Angelo Qui-
nones, of Apalachicola.
Paternal grandparents are Roger and
Rita Beasley, and the late Gary Davis, of
Wewahitchka.


JOhn and Ouida Sack
to mark golden anniversary
Mr. and Mrs. L. John Sack of Eastpoint will celebrate
their 50th wedding anniversary with friends and family
at the Fort Coombs National Guard Armory on Saturday,
March 27.
They were married in Cairo, Ga. on March 25, 1960.
John and Ouida have lived in Eastpoint for 20 years
and have owned several businesses in the area, includ-
ing Papa John's Pizza and the Seahorse Gift and Florist
Shop. John was also the emergency management direc-
tor for Franklin County for two years. They now own "A
Country Place" Gift Shop in Eastpoint.
They have six daughters, Vicki Abbonizio of Goose
Creek, S.C., Susan Stansell of Montgomery, Texas, Bever-
ly Strickland of Port St. Joe, Anna Barber of Shreveport,
La., Christina Crain of Lufkin, Texas, and Kimberly Pelt
ofWhitesburg, Ga.; 12 grandchildren, 19 great-grandchil-
dren and one great-great-grandchild expected in July.


TOffeSs Fairclotli, Tyler Martina
to wed Saturday
I
Terry Faircloth, ofApalachicola, and Tammie Cline, of
Apalachicola, are pleased to announce the union of their
daughter, Terress Faircloth, to Tyler Martina, son of Key-
in and Patty Martina ofApalachicola.
The wedding will be held Saturday, March 20, 2010 at
6 p.m. at the Living Waters Assembly of God Church, at
1580 Bluff Road, in Apalachicola. Reception to follow at
the Fort Coombs Armory.
No local invitations have been sent. We invite all fam-
ily and friends to join us in this special celebration.


"'
4 p
L


Amontaye Austin
turns 5
Amontaye (Tay Tay) Trev-
ian Austin celebrated his fifth
birthday on Friday, March 12,
2010.
He is the son ofBrandi Aus-
tin and a special son to Larry
and Brenda Cummings. We
love you very much.
Maternal grandparents
are Tammy and Jerome
Rooms of Apalachicola. Pa-
ternal grandparents are Lisa
Austin of Ocala, and the late
James Austin.
Maternal great-grand-
mother is Crystal Ford of
Apalachicola. Paternal great-
grandparents are the late
Mary "Big Mama" and Wil-
lie smith, both formerly of
Apalachicola.


Noah Sullivan turns 2
Noah Sullivan turned 2
on Friday, March 5, 2010.
Noah is the son of Hen-
ry Sullivan, Jr., and Pa-
mela Smith, both of Apala-
chicola.
Noah celebrated his
second birthday on Sun-
day, March 7 with a cam-
ouflage birthday cake, hot
dogs, chips and lots of silly
string for his family and
friends to get messy with,
It was a beautiful day!
Happy birthday to you.
We love you very much.
Love,
Mom, Dod, big sisters Emily
Smith and Emily Sullivan '
and big brothers
Stephen Smith and
Jeremy Sullivan



































































(ARD OF THANKS
Annie Mae Flowers
A great "Thank you" to my friends of Franklin
and Gulf counties for the lovely flowers, beautiful
cards, and good food you have sent to me during my
recovery. A special "Thank you" to Bruford for al-
ways being there for me, and to my children for the
love they have always shown. What a great family!
Eastpoint Church of God, you are my church
family, but I feel as if I have been adopted by the
Apalachicola Trinity Episcopal Church. Thank you
and God Bless.
Annie Moe Flowers


bO
ituarles


(ARD OF THANKS
Johnn Richards Famil
Long overdue, but never forgotten are my family's thanks
for what all the community did for us during my illness and
stay in the hospital. Your acts of love and kindness touched
me and my family deeply. We couldn't have made it through
without all of you standing behind us with your prayers and
love. And we couldn't ask for a better community to live in,
Guess that's one of the many reasons we've loved liv-
ing and raising our children here in Franklin County When
someone is in need, this community knows how to come to-
gether and show their love, whether by taking and putting gas
in your car or by fixing a meal. Not forgetting the monetary
gifts from churches and benefit (Especially now during these
troublesome times.)
You'll never know how much this all meant and was much
appreciated. God bless and keep you always in his loving
care. We love you all!
Johnny and Janice Richards and family


Church BRIEF
Evening to remember
IVOS 0 SUIC lost t cle
The Caring 11ee Program of Big Bend Hospice
will host a special event "Lighting the Darkness"
on Monday, March 22, from 6 to 7 p.m. at the Talla-
hassee Museum, 3495 Museum Drive. This event,
to remember lives lost to suicide, will feature infor-
mational tables, luminary lighting and a remem-
brance ceremony including music by Illuminare,
a vocal ensemble from Tallahassee Community
College.
Guest speaker and survivor June Berlinger will
share her story about the death of her adult son
several years ago. She plans to share the poignant
lessons she and her family have learned in mourn-
ing his death and remembering his life. This event
is a free community outreach of Big Bend Hospice.
For more information, contact Pam Mezzina at
878-5310, ext. 799 or pam@bighendhospice.org.


The United Methodist Churches

SOf Franklin County Welcome You
First United Methodist Church of Apalachicola
Worship Service 11:00 a.m. every Sunday
75 5" St. Apalach cuol 65-30 fmaalach@gtcom.net
Pastor: Rev. Them Patriotis
Carrabelle United Methodist Church
Worship Services 10:45 a.m. Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
"Celebrate Recovery" Mondays 7-9 p.m.
Healing service first Tuesday each month-7 p.m.
102 NE Ae. B Calabell n6s97-3672

Eastpoint United Methodist Church
Worship Service 10:00 a.m. every Sunday
Prayer 9:15 a.m. Waffles & Wisdom 11:15 a.m.
Healing Service every first Fridays of the Month at 6:30 p.m.
317 Patton Dr. (corner of David St.) -670-8825
Pastor: Rev. Beth White
St. George Island United Methodist Church
9:00 a.m. Worship Service
10:00 a.m. Fellowship Hour
201 E. Gulf Beach Dr. 927- 4635 www.sgiumc.org
Pastor: Rev. Them Patriotis


First Pentecostal Holiness Church
379 Brownsville Road Apalachicola


Sunday School 9:45 am
Sunday Morning Worship 10:45 am
Sunday Evening Service 6:00 pm
Monday, Youth Group 6:30pm
Wednesday, Royal Rangers, G.A.P. 7:00 pm
Wednesday Worship & Word 7:30 pm
Nursery Provided during regular church services


St. Patrick Catholic Church
Ave C & Sixth Street in Apalachicola, FL 32329 or
The Islander (Across from the Blue Parrot)
on St. George Island, FL 32328
(850) 653-9453 Email: stpatcath@fairpoint.net
PASTOR: FATHER ROGER LATOSYNSKI
WWW.stpatricksmass.com
APALACHICOLA MASS SCHEDULE
SATURDAY................. .................5 PM
SUNDAY ................. ................ 10 AM
ST. GEORGE ISLAND MASS SCHEDULE
SUNDAY ................. .................8:30 AM


Thursday, March 18,2010


Local


The Times | B3


The pastor began his words
of comfort with the reminder
that this memorial service
was intended as a celebration
of a life well-lived. He urged
the hundreds of mourners as-
sembled to understand that the
gathering of friends and family
should not dwell on the tragedy
of a seemingly unfair, too-early
and too-painful death,
Instead, the commemoration
was intended to be a testimony
about the kind of life lived, not
about what the deceased had
done in life. Sadly, too many
important and vital members of
our Carrabelle community have
died in these past sad weeks.
But through family pictures and
stories and descendants and
recollections of good times and
bad, each has left their mark
in the hearts and memories of
our world they called home. It
is from them we can learn that
"what mattered most ... the
dash between the years."

Excerpts from "The Dash"
by Linda Ellis:
There was a man who stood
to speak


At the funeral of a
friend ...
He noted that ferst
came ... birth
And spoke the follow-
ing date with tears
But he said what THO
mattered most of all FOR T
Was the dash be- Me
tween those years

For that dash stands for all
the time
... spent alive on earth.
And now only those who
loved ...
Know what that little line is
worth..."

I believe that, in our close-
knit, small-town Florida church
last week, this minister was
teaching us that our lives are
not to be lived, nor remembered
by others, in the light of our
career choice, or our economic
status, or our family troubles or
our final illness. Rather, each
of us should live at our best for
ourselves and especially for oth-
ers. It is not our career or job
that we do, no matter how im-


portent it may seem, but
rather who we were dur-
ing the precious lifetime
given to us on this earth
that mourners should
remember.
At one of this week's
GHTS services, there was a
E TIMES picture projected high
Kell on the church wall. It
Y showed a vivacious,
beautiful and life-loving
Beckey Jackson who had been
a beloved and devoted wife,
mother, church member, vital
municipal employee and cheer-
leader for the school team mem-
hers she knew as friends. She
was so important to the com-
munity that in the '70's, she had
been named Miss Carrabelle.
When she took on the important
city clerk job in the late '90's, an
extra dimension of her responsi-
bility included carefully reading
each important document to
the mayor. In the course of her
traditional job role, she pursued
funding grants that ultimately
would support the acquisition of
the local historic lighthouse.
She understood her com-
munity, the needs and wants


and possibilities. She worked
hard, making a difference for
many residents and visitors
who came to the Avenue B City
Hall for help with questions or
concerns. She had grace and
diligence, both in her work and
throughout her illness. Sadly,
that woman whom we had all
come to mourn in death was
no longer that happy, laughing
picture on the wall. But she was
remembered and cherished for
what parts she had played so
well in our Carrabelle lives. We
each remembered her for who
she "was" to us.
Also that week, Sandra
Massey, a mother, sister, daugh-
ter and friend was forever lost
to her community. She too had
struggled for years with serious
health issues, and finally she
was overwhelmed. But at her
visitation and service, the faces
of those who loved and cared
about her were stricken with
mourning and grief, remember-
ing "who she was" to them.
"... What matters is how we
live and love ... And how we
spend our dash."


It is painful to say "goodbye."
Each time, we are reminded of
the realization that there is no
more time. A Carrabelle friend
confided that just last month
she spoke to her husband before
she left work but when she ar-
rived home 20 minutes later,
he was dead. A lifelong friend
of mine missed the moment of
her husband's death because
she was making the cup of tea
he requested. And just outside
of Carrabelle last Saturday
afternoon, high winds blew a
tree onto a car causing a wreck
and deaths. It is tragically true
that we may never be given one
more moment with our loved
ones. The last moment we had
together may indeed be our last
moment.
And so, for those who will be
left behind to mourn, "... What
matters is how we live and
love ... And how we spend our
dash."

Carrabelle resident Mel
Kelly's column "Thoughts for
the Times" appears frequently
in the Times.


U
H
l


Howaboutlast
weekend! Hope you
hadachancetogo
out and enjoy the
parade, and see the
restoftheCamp
Gordon Johnston
activities.
From the pro-
ceeds of our annual


) Besuretojoinus
on 'lliesday morn-
ingsforbreakfastat
the Senior Center,
from 8-10 a.m., and
onThursdaysat
noonforlunch.Be
NEWS good to see you!
elsh And another
thing.. We built the
Senior Center with donated
labor and materials, and
money from individuals.No
government money, and the
improvementswemakeare
also from citizens like you.
UntilnexttimeGod
Bless America, our troops,
the poor, homeless and
hungry


LANARK


spaghetti dinner, we de-
cided to donate $500 to Sa-
cred Heart of Jesus Church
toward the new roof. We
Knightswillbearound
the area. We will have the
tootsierolldrivefor2010.I
will be around the area, and
at Sacred Heart Church, on
Sunday, March 21.


Sandra Jean Massey
Sandra Jean Massey was born Jan. 3, 1964
in Carrabelle. She passed away Sunday, March
7, 2010 in Carrabelle.
She was a homemaker and attended the
Carrabelle Assembly of God.
She is survived by her children; Alicia
Golden (Chris) and Jennifer Smith (Mark);
goddaughter, Sherry Warren; mother, Shirley
Massey; siblings, William H. Massey Jr., Selena
lickerr (Steven), Michelle Massey and Renee
Brannan; brother-in-law, Royce Johns; grand-
children, Casey Golden, Levi Thompson, Chase
Golden, Charles Golden and Cheyenne Smith;
nephews, Royce Johns Jr. and Billy Jack
Johns; and four nieces and three nephews.
She was preceded in death by her father,
William H. Massey.
Rineral services were held Friday after-
noon, March 12 at the Carrabelle Assembly of
God with burial in Evergreen Cemetery.
Viewing was held Thursday evening, March
11 at Kelley-Riley Rineral Home.
All arrangements under the direction of Kel-
ley-Riley Rineral Home, 309 Tallahassee St.,
Carrabelle.


Jeanette Raes
Sheddan, of St. George
Island, passed away
unexpectedly Wednes-
day, Feb. 24, 2010. She
was born Sept. 3, 1946
to Omer and Ruby
Raes.
Jeanette grew up in
Orion, Ill. and gradu- SHE
ated there in 1964. She
had enjoyed recon-
necting with her former class-
mates on a recent trip home
and through the internet. She
furthered her education with a
degree at Memphis State Uni-
versity and a master's of busi-
ness administration in aviation
from the University of Daytona.
She retired from her career at
FedEx and moved to St. George
Island permanently with the love
of her life, Terry Sheddan. He
passed away just last November.


Jeanette is survived
by her brother, William
(Emily) Raes of Orion;
her sister Marilyn
"Mickie" Gibbons of
Cambridge, Ill.; sisters-
in-law Sharon Raes of
New Windsor, Ill. and
Nancy Raes of Rock
DDAN Island, Ill. There are
a host of loving nieces
and nephews. Not to be
forgotten are her fur-babies, Cal-
lie, Van Gogh and Shadow.
She was preceded in death by
her parents, husband, brothers
James and Donald, and fur-ba-
bies Sugarbear and Miss Kitty.
Jeanette will be missed by her
dear friends on the Island. Her
family would like to thank Janie
and Martha for their devotion.
Memorials at the Island and
Illinois will be announced at a
future date.


THE
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
WELCOMES YOU


THE


?
1 in
EST. 1836

Hwy. 98 & 6th St.

SUNDAY : 0:30AM
LIBRARY HOURS:
SUNDAY 12:00 2:00 PM
MONDAY 11:00 AM 1:00 PM
WEDNESDAY 12:00 2:00 PM
THURSDAY 3:30 5:30 PM


Precious moments we share together may be our last


Lanark NEWS


BENEFIT LUNCH FRIDAY FOR VATHIS
Come and join John Vathis and family
and friends in his fight against cancer.
Fried mullet lunches will be served
Friday, March 19, beginning at 11
a.m. for only $6 per person at the
former Pendleton's Citgo service station,
at 53 Market Street in Apalachicola. AII
.
proceeds and donations will be used
? to help John and Pam, shown fishinG
above, offset the living expenses and
medical bills he continues to incur as he
travels back and forth to H. Lee Moffitt
Cancer Center in Tampa for treatments.
Give without remembering; receive
without forgetting. For more info, call
AJ Smith at (850-251-9021 or Johnny
Turner 850-599-5995.
SPECIAL TO THE TIMES


Jeanette Sheddan


WELCOMES YOU
P

of the

Ascension
101 NE First Street
Carrabelle
SUNDAY
10:00 AM





NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING FOR THE
ADOPTION OF THE EVALUATION AND
APPRAISAL REPORT ON THE CITY OF
CARRABELLE COMPREHENSIVE PLAN

The City Commission of the City of Carrabelle will conduct a public meeting,
hold a reading of the Resolution, the title of which is set forth below, in the
Commission Chambers, Carrabelle City Hall, 1001 Gra Avenue, Carrabelle,
Florida 32322 on Thursday, April 1, 2010 at 6:00 p.m. or as soon thereafter
as the issue may be heard, to consider the adoption of an Evaluation and
Appraisal Report on the City of Carrabelle Comprehensive Plan. The title of
the Resolution to be considered for adoption is as follows:

RESOLUTION NO. 01-10

A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY OF CARRABELLE, FLORIDA, TO
ADOPT AN EVALUATION AND APPRAISAL REPORT ON THE CITY
OF CARRABELLE COMPREHENSIVE PLAN; REPEALING ALL
RESOLUTIONS AND ORDINANCES OR PORTIONS THEREOF TO THE
EXTENT OF ANY CONFLICT; PROVIDING A SEVERABILITY CLAUSE;
AND PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE.

The purpose of the public hearings is to receive comments and make decisions
regarding the above matter. The Board of Commissioners may continue the
public hearings to other dates and times as it deems necessary. An interested
party shall be advised that the dates, times, and places of any continuation of
this or continued public hearings shall be announced during the hearing and
that no further notices regarding these matters will be published.

All interested parties are invited to attend the public hearings and comment
upon the Evaluation and Appraisal Report and the resolution or submit their
comments in writing to the Board of Commissioners. Further information
concerning the report can be obtained from the City Clerk at City Hall, at 1001
Gray Ave., Carrabelle, Florida, 32322, or by calling (850) 697-2727, between
the hours of 8:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday, excluding
holidays.

Please be advised that if a person decided to appeal any decision made by the
City Commission with respect to any matter considered at this hearing, such
person will need a record of the proceedings, and for this purpose such person
may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which
record includes testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is based. The
City of Carrabelle does not provide or prepare such record pursuant to F.S.
Section 286.0105

In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons with disabilities
needing a special accommodation to participate in these proceedings should
contact the city Clerk at 1001 Gray Ave., Carrabelle, Florida, 32322, or by
calling (850) 386-2727, no later than three days prior to the proceedings.


Website abac.vetsuite.com



PUBLIC HEARING

.
The Flonda Department of Agriculture and
-
Consumer Services will be holding a pubhc
hearing for input on the Proposed Rules Which
Impact Commercial Harvesting and Processing
of Oysters for the Summer Harvesting.

This hearing will take place Friday, March
19, 2010 at 4:00 p.m. E.S.T. at the Franklin
County Courthouse Annex, Commission
Meeting Room located at:

34 Forbes Street
.
Apalachicola, Flonda 32320

If you have any questions please contact
Chris Brooks at (850) 488-4033.


IV


Thursday, March 18,2010


Local


The following report is provided by
the Franklin County Sheriffs Offece.
Arrests are made by officers from the
following city, county, and state law
enforcement agencies: Apalachicola
(APD), Carrabelle (CPD), Florida
Highway Patrol (FHP), Franklin Coun-
ty Sheriffs Offece (FCSO), Florida
Fish and Wildlife Conservation Com-
mission (FWC), Florida Department
of Environmental Protection (FDEP),
Florida Division of Insurance Fraud
(DIF) and Florida Department of Ag-


riculture and Consumer Services (FL-
DOACS).
All defendants are considered inno-
cent until proven guilty in a court of law.
March 9
Denetria R. Robinson, 21, Apalachic-
ola, failure to appear (FCSO)
March 10
James E. West, 48, Apalachicola, do-
mestic battery (APD)
Dustin A. Carmichael, 28, Eastpoint,
failure to appear (FCSO)


March 11
Keith A. Williams Jr., 19, Boynton
Beach, violation of probation (FCSO)

March 12
John E. Nunez, 21, Eastpoint, battery
(FCSO)
Dylan E. Nunez, 18, Eastpoint, bat-
tery (FCSO)
Patricia A. Demko, 43, Apalachicola,
DUI (APD)
Cody E Harrell, 18, Eastpoint, battery
(FCSO)


March 14
JamesE.Pilotti,24,Apalachicoladis-
orderly conduct (FCSO)

March 15
Marshall L. Sweet, 37, Apalachic-
ola, Marion County warrant for with-
holding child support (FCSO)
Harrison Jones, 51, Apalachicola,
felony battery (FCSO)
James E. McCord, Sr., 54, Carra-
belle, two counts of domestic battery
(CPD)


gus billing scheme during
construction of the con-
solidated school.
Ethan Way, the attor-
ney representing Leon-
ard Martin, 48, said his
client pled not guilty at a
March 9 arraignment be-
fore Circuit Judge James
Hankinson.
Also pleading not
guilty to 43 grand theft
charges related to the al-
leged scheme was Casey
Kelley, 32, of Wewahi-
tchka, the former project
manager for Peter R.
Brown Construction. Kel-

osd -wifeTLa Nicole
who used to work as of-
fice manager for Martin's
security and temporary
employment cumpani ,
as pd theno cE tY
gran arges.
The judge set the next
case management hear-
i fordMay ntosr all

State invest ators
all e Martin Kelle and
Wood worked in concert
to engineer the theft of
nearly $1 million when
Martin was a subcontrac-
tor during construction
in 2007 and 2008 of the
$45 million consolidated
Franklin County School.
"I believe when all
the evidence is out that
Mr. Martin's going to be
exonerated," Way said. "I
feel confident when ev-
erything sees the light of
day it will become pretty
apparent there has been
a profound misunder-
standing as to my client's
involvement in this whole
scenario."
Way said he expected
it "will take significant
amount of time to go
through the entire dis-
covery process, through


summer I expect" as the
case moves forward.
All three individuals
have been charged under
same charging instru-
ment, said Way, and so
it is possible all three
could be tried together,
although there could be a
later request for separate
jury trials. "It's too early
to tell," he said.

Wireless emergency
HOtification system
test Friday

ShT Fran in un%
a testEof the WKNS

Notification System) on
Friday March 19, start-
ing at approximately 10
a.m. All Fairpoint Com-
munications customers
who have traditional
phone service in Franklin
County have been placed
in the WENS and will be
notified during this test.
The system will be able
to determine if the cus-
tomer received the test
notification and will also
determine if the test was
successful.
Anyone who wishes
to receive emergency
alerts on wireless phones
or e-mail accounts must
opt into the system by
going to www.franklin-
sheriff.com and follow
the Franklin County
Emergency Notification
link to enter their cell
phone and/or e-mail ad-
dress information. Once
entered into the system,
WENS will notify wire-
less or internet e-mail
participants of emer-
gency notifications such
as, but not limited to,
evacuation and re-entry
notifications, Amber


Alert notifications, road
closure notifications and
NOAA severe weather
warnings in any specific
area of Franklin County
when issued.
The Sheriff's Office
and Franklin County
Emergency Management
Office encourage all
county residents to en-
ter their wireless and/or
e-mail information into
the WENS. If you have
questions or require
additional information
regarding WENS, please
call the Sheriff's Office at
670-4829.

Carrabelle man
uninjured in truck
MIShap
A 28-year-old Car-
rabelle man avoided
injury last week when he
swerved his truck and
boat trailer to avoid strik-
ing a dog crossing
U.S. 98.
According to report
by Florida Highway Pa-
trol Trooper S.T. Wilson,
Michael Ray Messer was
driving a 2006 Chevro-
let truck, and towing a
boat around 5:22 p.m. on
Wednesday, March 10
when the accident oc-
curred as he was headed
eastbound just past Ham-
mock Cove Road.
Messier said he took
evasive action to avoid
hitting the dog by turn-
ing the steering wheel
to the right. The trailer
then came unattached,
causing the boat and
trailer to travel across
the westbound lane onto
the north shoulder before
striking a tree.
Messier, who was
wearing his seatbelt, was


unhurt and the truck did
not sustain damage. The
trooper said alcohol was
not a factor in the crash.

F WC b USts oyster men
il0fVOSting
*n cl
OS9 WO OFS
A plainclothes patrol
by officers with the Flori-
da Fish and Wildlife Con-
servation Commission's
Division of Law Enforce-
ment netted citations
earlier this month for two
oystermen.
wa Offic ngohndAllben
sened we individsu Is

closed wate on Cat
Point in A alachicola
Bay. Allenpwas able to get
close enough to take pic-
t fo d
urTffic\en e ce.
Huckeb ded .
markedau condnua
ed a vessel stop on the
suspect vessel. The two
.
individuals were cited for
taking oysters in a condi-
tionally closed area. The
oysters were returned to
the bay.

Highway winds lift
C bellarra e cruiser
High winds believed
to be a tornado lifted a
Carrabelle police cruiser
off the ground Thursday
morning, March 11 and
split a tree in two, but no
injuries were reported.
Carrabelle Police Of-
ficer Charles Richards
said he was checking the
Weather Channel on his
computer, when debris
began flying around
his car, in the vicinity of
Airport Road, around


7:41 a.m.
He said the high
winds lifted the car off
the ground slightly and
turned it. "I could feel
the tires bumping on
the ground, so I knew
I wasn't high up," said
Richards, who was un-
injured. "I just hoped it
wouldn't take me up any
higher."
Aside from a bent
antenna, the car was not
damaged.
Heavy rains caused
flooding over the road-
way at U.S. 98 near
Turkey Point, said Pam

Finn n Couec o er-
gency Management.
The National Weather
Service reported about
2.5 inches of rain in
Franklin County on
Thursday, March 11, with
wind speeds gusting as
high as 38 miles per hour.
.
Sheriff hosts annual
Easter Egg hunt
A ril 3
)
The Franklin County
Sheriff's Office will hold
its annual Easter Egg
Hunt on Saturday, April 3
at noon, located adjacent
to the Sheriff's Office on
US 65 in Eastpoint.
All kids are invited to
come out and participate
in a wonderful day of
egg hunting, with lots of
prizes to be given away.
The Sheriff's Office will
be serving grilled hot
dogs and soft drinks for
the occasion. Come out
and enjoy the fun!
For more information
on this event, please con-
tact Sgt. Ryan Sandoval
at 670-2831.
BILL MILLER REALTY
850-697-3751 (3310) 570-0658
1.16AC.LOT-GULFVIEW
& ACCESS27,LAN RK BCH.

GULF LOT FOR 10% DOWN!
50'X 140'- HIGH LOT-TREES
$195,000"WATER&SEWER
AVAIL.
3BDR-2BA-3 CORNER LOTS
ONLY $79,500
2400 S/F RETAIL STORE 100'
X 175'ON 98 W/GULF VIEW.
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COMM.BLDG-ATU.S.98
2 CRNR LOTS-1,400 S/F
$159,500
MIH 2 CRNR LOTS BLK.$
STORE $89,500
MI H '94 28872-4-2 MU ST
MOVE $14,500

*
Horse Lnument

Erases Pain
HIALEAH, FL -An ingredi-
ent often used to treat inflamma-
tion in racehorse's legs, is now
back on the market in its original
doctor recommended formula.
According to a national drug
store survey, the formula at one
timebecameso opularthatitrose
to the top of p armacy sales for
topicalpainrelievers.Butthecom-
pany marketing the product at the
timechangedtheformulaandsales
pl ne nalone ofltah asn rato
it back to the market under the
aay itna eAeR aAn liliansd
ARTH AIUtEST works by a
dual mechanism whereby one in-
gredientrelievespainimmediately,
ssecoy t pea n e
signal before it can be sent to the
brain. Considered a medical
mr cTle b olin ,sthe T
treatmentofpainfuldisordersrang-
ingfromminorachesandpainsto
moreseriousconditionssuchasar-
thritis, bursitis, rheumatism, ten-
donitis, backache and more.
ARTH ARREST is available in
phcao icesq o tnaapprer to
or call 1-800-339-3301. Now at:
BUY RITE DRUGS #8
117 Avenue E .* 653-8825


In response to the troubled financial timeS
many in our community are going through,
we have lowered our prices on basic pet
health care including:
* Spays and Neuters
* Puppy, kittenadult and senior pet wellness visits
* Boarding
* Bathing
* Microchipping
* Flea, heartworm and other medications (we match
1800Petmedxx'prices)
No need to go out of town or shop on the internet
Shop local, support local businesses in your cominity!
Hobson Fulmer DVM
187 Highway 98 Eastpoint


670-8306


B4 | The Times


Sheriff's REPORT


Law BRIEFS


Father, son killed
When tree
GUSheS Car
A Tallahassee man
and his son were killed
Saturday afternoon when
a tree fell on their vehicle
as they were traveling
along U.S. 98 in the St.
James Bay area, just
east of Lanark Village.

wriAccordi to ar o
way Patrol Trooper S.T.
Wilson, David T. Hollister'
57, was driving west-
dookn dU .v reao d

TohoetthaesrC ohl tse 22,
also of Tallahassee.
At about 1:18 p.m. dur-
ing conditions with wind
gusts as high as 38 miles
per hour, a tree fell from
the north tree line and
hit the roof of their 2003
Toyota, forcing their car
to veer into a ditch on the
north side of the road.
The Franklin County
Sheriff's Office, St
James-Lanark Vohinteer
Fire Department, Weems
Emergency Medical Ser-
vice and Carrabelle Po-
lice Department assisted
the Florida Highway Pa-
trol with the crash scene
No hospital transports
were reported. Both men
were wearing seatbelts
and alcohol is not be-
lieved to be related to the
accident.

Martin pleads
HOt guilty in
Stil001 billing case
An Apalachicola pastor
and former sheriff's dep-
uty has pleaded not guilty
to 43 grand theft charges
related to an alleged bo-


*
*
















































































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I


I


Thursday, March 18,2010


Local


The Times | B5


By (aty Greene
Special to the Times
Sometimes a do-
nation to the library
becomes a real trea-
sure. I have to say
honestly, I don't know


triguing commonality,
such as a great flood,
told in myth by vastly
different cultures.
Myths worldwide
demonstrate a convic-
tion that those denied
a proper burial will


Native American,
Oceanian, Persian,
Slavic, South Ameri-
can, Tibetan and
Mongolian and finally
Viking and German.
The dust jacket of
"The Great Themes"
says that there are
"a repository of
thousands of years of
thought and experi-
ence, celebrating and
preserving the best of
who we are and what
we have dreamed." I
have to agree.
I have decided not
to catalogue them
by topic which splits
them up. Instead they
will be together cata-
logued under "myth"
(Dewey 200s) and will
be found in the Junior
section of the library,
so we can hopefully
capture young minds
and introduce them
to these many won-
derful legends from
around the world.
Caty Greene is
librarian for the
Apalachicola Mu-
nicipal Library.
'lb reach her, call
653-8436.


when the first
volumes of this
series were do-
nated, but who-
ever gave them
should come


roam the earth
as restless
ghosts. Myths
explore the
bond between
animals and


and see me so I
can say thank you.
In the process of
"accessioning" them
I realized that there
were more volumes,
20 in all, and I went
to work on eBay to
make the set com-
plete. In the mean-
time, I fell in love. I
could fill this whole
page with the topic
of myths. Myths are
the memory bank of
the human imagina-
tion. How the world
was made? Where did
we come from? Who
are the "tricksters
and troublemakers?"
What is the meaning
of death?
Myths have in-


humans. Myths
speak frequently
about guardians of
hearth and home,
the divine drama of
the seasons and the
power of spirit.
These volumes
offer culture-by-cul-
ture examination of
world myths and their
historic roots. And
the pictures-photo-
graphs of sacred sites,
art and mystic figures
and illustrations'
such as those in the
Slavic Myth volume
titled "Forests of the
Vampire," looking like
batiks, sacred artifacts
from so many cul-
tures, beautiful, spell-
binding and ancient.


SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
This image of Loki Laufeyjarson, the mythical
being of mischief in Norse mythology, is
from an 1 8th century Icelandic manuscript
in the care of the Arni Magnisson Institute in
Iceland. Here Loki, known as the "contriver
f all f d h th h fish rau is s own wi is ing net.


I have to list the
topics of these Time-
Life Series volumes:
African, Arctic, Aztec
and Maya, Celtic,


Chinese, Egyptian,
Greek and Roman
(two volumes), In-
dian, Japanese, Me-
dieval, Middle East,


Special to The Times
The Franklin County
Public Library Advisory
Board will meet hold
its monthly meeting on
Thursday, March 18 at
5:30 p.m. at the Carra-
belle Branch. The public
is welcome to attend each
monthly meeting.
Free computer train-
ing for the month of March
ends with four different
classes at two different li-
brary sites. On Thursday,
March 18, in Eastpoint
Deanna Ramsey will
teach Microsoft Excel III
andMicrosoftPowerPoint
II starting at 9:30 a.m.
On Friday, March
19, starting at 9:30 a.m.
Ramsey will teach a class
on Microsoft Outlook, and
later in the day a class
on eBay: Buying Guide.
Keep reading the library
happenings to catch the
schedule for other free
computer classes to be
offered in April and May
at both library sites.


The library staff and
volunteers would like
to say thank you to all
of our local patrons and
our winter visitors who
visited the Carrabelle
branch and the Eastpoint
Library. Attendance for
the month of February
was record breaking, as
the staff recorded more
than 2000 visitors. Triple
that number in books bor-
rowed and other essen-
tial community services'
such as faxing, copying,
scanning, and computer
usage. Wow, what a re-
cord!
The library's DVD col-
lection continues to grow
with oldies but goodies,
and Oscar winning films.
The staff asks patrons
to remember that DVDs
are checked out for seven
days, and will no longer
be renewable. Overdue
DVDs are fined at $1 a
day and there is a limit
of three DVDs per check-
out. We want everyone to
enjoy a movie.


Have Grinder Will Travel





The R lde wR TmEver
GARLIC
Exterior souse cleaning
Low Pressure MildicideTramn
9 Years Service in Area
(850)65G c95


F(1 NAMES (LARK
TAD [aaDI AVEE EAD EEDDI IADV
I VI LIVII LU 1 LL FUR F LDRURR I
MI
14

q / : .
a

1. .



FO I Specialto The Times
Franklin Correctional Institution has selected Mrs.
Kim Clark as employee of the month for Feb. 2010.
Employed at Franklin Cl since July 2005, she is a
15-year veteran with the Florida Department of
Corrections. She came here from Mayo CI, and
is currently assigned to the medical department at
FC| as a health services administrator, where she
directs administrative activities of the health services
department. Mrs. Clark, center, with Warden Duffie
Harrison, left, was nominated for the award by
supervisor, Dr. Benjamin Moreno, rig t, wo sai e is
a devoted and hardworking employee who cares about
everyone both inside and outside of her department.
She lives in Crawfordville, with her husband Danny and
their two daughters, Mackenzie and Reagan,


DON WILLSON'S
SEPTIC TANK
SERVICE
Serving all of Franklin
County Residential/
Commerical
Septic Tanks &
Grease Traps Pumped
Call day or night
653-9406


'S


Building Supplies
& Auto Repair
Carrabelle 697-3333
We Deliver Anywhere

LM HPaa n eenan


MytilS Wil (apture young imaginations


Oyster School

returns next month

Special to The TimeS
The Franklin County Tourist Development
Council recently approved a $500 request to
bring "Oyster School" back to Apalachicola
next month,
The event, scheduled for April 28-29, is ex-
pected to bring key food retailers to the area
to learn about the harvest and processing of
fresh oysters. The event is also designed to
promote the culinary desirability of the Apala-
chicola Bay oyster.
Bill Mahan, director of the county's Uni-
versity of Florida-Institute of Food and Ag-
ricultural Sciences Extension Program, re-
quested the assistance to help fund the school
which has been held in Apalachicola twice be-
fore. Mahan is working with members of the
Franklin County Oyster Seafood Task Force,
Franklin County Seafood Workers Association
and the Apalachicola Bay Oyster Dealers' As-
sociation to coordinate this year's school on
behalf of UF-IFAS and the Florida Sea Grant
Program.
The first Oyster School, held in Apalachic-
ola in October 2007, was a collaborative effort
between the University of Florida, Florida Sea
Grant Program and the local oyster industry.
The school educates major seafood buyers,
shippers and restaurateurs from around the
country about shellfish harvesting, manage-
ment, nutrition, product safety and new prod-
uct forms. In 2008, the TDC helped support
a similar event called "Shellfish School" that
educated shellfish shippers and buyers about
both clam and oyster shellfish issues.
Attendees will head out on the bay for
a hands-on oyster-tonging demonstration
aboard an oyster boat; tour a dockside pro-
cessing facility; and spend time learning tech-
niques to evaluate the taste, texture and ap-
pearance of fresh oysters.
"In our first two schools, we have had buy-
ers from Outback restaurants, Red Lobster,
Winn-Dixie, Walmart, Publix, and Disney
World attend to learn about our oysters and
clams," Mahan said.
He said this year's session will feature pre-
sentations on "Shellfish as Food," "What You
Need to know About Shellfish Resources,"
"The Sensory Profile of Oysters," "Oyster
Harvesting" and "Handling and Sensory Eval-
uation of Local Seafood." In addition, Mahan
said new advances in post-harvest process-
ing (PHP) methods will be discussed. PHP
oysters are processed using methods like
freezing, high-pressure, low-temperature pas-
teurization and irradiation to reduce normally
occurring bacteria like Vibrio vulnificus to un-
detectable levels.
Helping raise awareness of seafood indus-
try safety and culinary marketing through
events like "Oyster School" recently became
one of the priorities of the TDC. Directed by
the Franklin County Board of Commissioners,
the TDC is working with local business and
seafood leaders to finalize a countrywide mar-
keting campaign designed to promote Frank-
lin County seafood as "Caught Wild and Kept
Fresh."
The TDC has produced a documentary-
style video about the area's seafood industry
and heritage, which can be viewed at www.
anaturalescape.com.


THE LIBRARY


LiErarV H PEIG


~. Al


JACKSON


Tralles
& Services
pg g g
ests..m.

TODAY"

653-8868


VSaDI~EOYerand





SB The Times Thursday, March 18, 2010


I


L


Franklin County's source of news for more than a century


| zzoo
DATE OF THE FIRST PUB-
LICATION OF THIS NO-
TICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER
THE DATE OF SERVICE
OF A COPY OF THIS
NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the
decedent and other per-
sons having claims or de-
mands against decedent's
estate, including unma-
tured, contingent or unliq-
uidated claims, must file
their claims with this court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AF-
TER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
The date of first publica-
tion of this Notice is March
11, 2010.
Personal Representative:
Elizabeth Diana Earl
Post OHice Box 337
Carrabelle, Florida 32322
Attorney for Personal Rep-
resentative:
Steve M. Watkins, Ill
41 Commerce Street
Apalachicola, FL 32320
Fla. Bar No.: 0794996
(850) 653-1949
March 11, 18, 2010
6167T
F TTHHEE RETONDC
CIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY
FLORIDA
CAPITAL CITY BANK
Plaintiff,
vs.
VITO A. CALIANNO, II,


F aS T
CASE NO.: 09-359-CA


1120 -Public Notices;
Announcements
1125 Carpools &
113D R po
1140 Happy Ads
1150 Personals
1160 Lost
1170 Found
*
1100

07T91TCE OF
SHERIFF'S SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN That pursuant to a
Writ of Execution issued in
the Circuit Court of Frank-
lin County Florida, on the
19th day of January, 2010,
in the cause where Hans
Barg was Plaintif and Rob-
ert D. (Bob) Allen, Edda Al-
len and R & E Allen Prop-
erties, Inc. a Florida Cor-
poration, were Defendants,
being Case No.
05-0003 -CA Shin said
court, ip Iver, as
S rHa ofh Fran dCounty,
ave upon
all the rights, title and inter
estPof the defendants FRo
.da rope 1 on obert Al
le Tr te in and to the
following described prop-
erty, to-wit:
700 Randolph Street, St
George Island, Florida
n8ed by R & E Allen
Properties, Inc.)


orad oB n G

t3he Pb cd1 d1s


1


-


I zzoo |
Franklin County, Florida.
And on the 5th day of
April, 2010 at the north
front door of the Franklin
County Sheriff's OHice, in
thecityofEastpointFrank-
lin, County, Florida, at the
hour of 11:00 a.m., or as
soon thereafter as possi-
ble, I will ofer for sale all of
the said Defendant's R & E
Allen Properties, Inc., a
Florida Corporation
(Robert Allen, Trustee)
rights, title, and interest in
aforesaid real property at
public outcry and will sell
the same, subject to all
prior liens, encumbrances
and judgments, if any, to
the highest and best bid-
der or bidders for CASH,
the proceeds to be applied
as far as may be to the
payment of costs and the
satisfaction of the above
described execution. Note:
In accordance with the
American with Disabilities
Act, persons with disabili-
ties needing a special ac-
commodation to partici-
pate in this proceeding
should contact Debbie
Mock no later than seven
days prior to the proceed-
ing at Franklin County
Sheriffs Office at
(850)-670-8519.
Skip Shiver,
Sheriff of Franklin County,
Florida
By Debbie L Mack
Deputy Sherif
March 4, 11, 18, 25, 2010

6112T
IN THE SECOND JUDI-
ARL F RNCKULllTN TOUAN
FLORIDA
COA TAL COMMUNITY


Vs.


| stoo |
RAYMOND PAUL JUNO,
Ill, and KATHRYN L.
JUNO,
Defendants.
CASE NO. 09-000412-CA
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN pursuant to a Final
Judgment of Foreclosure
dated February 22, 2010,
and entered in Civil Action
No. 09-000412 CA of the
Circuit Court of the Sec-
and Judicial Circuit in and
for Franklin County, Flor-
ida, wherein the parties
were the Plaintiff,
COASTAL COMMUNITY
BANK, and the Defend-
ants, RAYMOND PAUL
JUNO, Ill, and KATHRYN
L. JUNO, I will sell to the
highest and best bidder,
for cash, at 11:00 a.m.
(eastern Time) on the 8th
day of April, 2010, at the
front steps of the Franklin
County Courthouse, Apa-
lachicola, Florida, the fol-
lowing described real
property as set forth in
said Final Judgment of
Foreclosure:
All of Lot 9, Whispering
Pines Subdivision, Phase 1
& 2, a Subdivision as per
Map or Plat thereof re-
corded in Plat Book 7,
Page 6, Public Records of
Franklin County, Florida
The successful bidder at
the sale will be required to
place the requisite state
documentary stamps on
theCertificateofTitle.
DATED this 23rd day of
February, 2010.


ren CIA JOFHNSDN
By: Michele Maxwell
As Deputy1Cle 010


zzoo |
Bayshore Drive (State
Road No. 65); thence
North 30 degrees 07 min-
utes East along the East
right-of-way of North
Bayshore Drive 2,006.2
feet to a concrete monu-
ment; thence North 59 de-
grees 53 minutes West
80.0 feet to a concrete
monument on the West
right-of-way of North
Bayshore Drive
(right-of-way narrows from
100.00 feet to 60.0 feet at
this point); thence North
30 degrees 07 minutes
East along the West
right-of-way of North
Bayshore Drive 690.0 feet
to a concrete monument
on the North right-of-way
of said roadway 783.27
feet to a concrete monu-
ment on the East
right-of-way of East Bay
Drive; thence run North 02
degrees 55 minutes 14
seconds East 126.28 feet
to a concrete monument
on the West right-of-way of
East Bay Drive; thence
North 31 degrees 34 min-
utes 30 seconds East
along the West
right-of-way of East Bay
Drive 864.25 feet to a
point; thence South 59 de-
grees 53 minutes East 60.0
feet to a point on the East
right-of-way of East Bay
Drive; thence North 30 de-
grees 02 minutes East 100
feet to the POINT OF BE-
GINNING; thence North 59
degrees 53 minutes West
489.83 feet to a point;
thence continue North 59
degrees 53 minutes West
17.0fee apantlneth
Apalachicola Bay; thence
North 51 degrees 50 min-


er n 3 s hE s
17.0 feet to a point; thence
untin South 59 d e


| stoo
feet to a point; thence
South 58 degrees 02 min-
utes West 51.81 feet to a
point; thence South 30 de-
grees 02 minutes West
53.75 feet to the POINT OF
BEGINNING; being a part
of Fractional Section 19,
Township 8 South, Range
6 West, Franklin County,
Florida.
AND
Lots 3, 17, 18 and 19,
Block "R, of Baywood Es-
tates, an unrecorded sub-
division, as more particu-
larly described in the deed
recorded July 24, 1997, at
OR Book 580, page 653,
public records of Franklin
County, Florida (which de-
scription is incorporated
herein by reference).
The successful bidder at
the sale will be required to
place the requisite state
documentary stamps on
the Certificate of Title.
DATED this 24th day of
February, 2010.
Hon. MARCIA JOHNSON
Clerk of the Court
Franklin County, Florida
By: Michele Maxwell
As Deputy Clerk
FRANK A. BAKER, ATTOR-
NEY AT LAW
4431 Lafayette Street
Marlanna, FL 32446
March 18, 25, 2010

6N1 TE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE SECOND JUDI-
CIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
ORRIFDMNKLIN COUNT}'



TNHOeMRAAESdEJO SH TRNENE OF
CASE NO.:10-000004-CP


I noo |
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the
estate of THOMAS JOE
HORNE, deceased, File
Number 10-000004CP is
pending in the Circuit
Court for Franklin County,
Florida, Probate Division,
the address of which is 33
Market Street, Suite 206,
Apalachicola, Florida
32320. The names and ad-
dresses of the personal
representative and the per-
sonal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
All creditors of the dece-
dent and other persons
having or claims or de-
mands against the
decedent's estate, includ-
ing unmatured, contingent
or unliquidated claims, on
whom a copy of this notice
is served must file their
claims with the Court
WITHIN THE LATER OF 3
MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUB-
LICATION OF THIS NO-
TICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER
THE DATE OF SERVICE
OF A COPY OF THIS NO-
TICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the
decedent and other per-
sons having claims or de-
mands against decedent's
estate, including unma-
tured, contingent or unliq-
uidated claims, must file
their claims with this court
WITHIN 3 MONTHS AF-
TER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.

Ohs o ispuMb c


t Personal Representa-


smoo |
Rosemary H. Coleman
9129 Cofee Road
Hahira, GA 31632
Co-Personal Representa-
tive:
Polly H. Hopkins
1867VirginiaAvenue
College Park, GA 30337
Attorney for Personal Rep-
resentative:
Steve M. Watkins, Ill
41 Commerce Street
Apalachicola, FL 32320
FBN: 0794996
(850) 653-1949
March 11, 18, 2010
6164T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE SECOND JUDI-
ARL FRTNCKULll OUT
OOR TAE DIVISION

HARRL S HE ARTTEGIBBSF
Deceased.
CASE NO.:10-000005-CP
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
.
The administration of the
estate of CHARLES HU-
BERT GIBBS, deceased'
File Number 10-000005-CP
a nf rngFr k eCC uit
.
Frd re so whi vi 03]
Market Street, Suite 206,
Ap hTiul mes Flor da
dresses of the personal
representative and the per-
sonal representative's at-
torney are set forth below
All creditors of the dece-
dent and other persons
havin or or dee
decedent s estate, includ-
r s



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| zzoo |
6114T
IN THE SECOND JUDI-
CIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY
FLORIDA
COASTAL COMMUNITY
BANK,
Plaintiff,
vs.
JOHN W HORAN,
Defendant.
CASE NO. 09-000397-CA
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN pursuant to a Final
Judgment of Foreclosure
dated February 22, 2010,
and entered in Civil Action
No. 09-000397 CA of the
Circuit Court of the Sec-
ond Judicial Circuit in and
for Franklin County, Flor-
ida, wherein the parties
were the Plaintiff,
COASTAL COMMUNITY
BANK, and the Defendant,
JOHN W HORAN, I will
sell to the highest and best
bidder, for cash, at 11:00
a.m. (Eastern Time) on the
8th day of April, 2010, at
the front steps of the
Franklin County Court-
house, Apalachicola, Flor-
ida, the
following-described real
property as set forth in
said Final Judgment of
Foreclosure:
Tract #82, NORTH
BAYSHORE ADDITION:
Commencing at the South-
cormr ofoFracht nal
South, Range 6 West,
Franklin County, Florida


t 3 mi hd
onds East 810.3 feet to a
uncr tehmonument on e







Franklin County's source of news for more than a century The Times Thursday, March 18, 2010 7B


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OF THE 60 FOOT STATE THREE MONTHS AFTER Meeting Room located at. THENCE ALONG SAID appointment. sidered. (850) 653-3838 850-697-2638




































































( ["' 2010 ~
RESERVED SEATS AVAILABLE AT , a
THE DIXIE THEATRE BOX OFFICE
CALL 850-653-3200
or info@dixietheatre.com >

"LIVE AND IN CONCERT"
FRIDAY MARCH 19, 2010 8PM
MICKEY CASH & THE LICK N'
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A COUNTRY MUSIC NIGHT WITH
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DAUGHTER OF GORDON CASH OF
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r *







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I 5 I 5 I I 5 II II

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.... : e-. -* *
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a * *** 0


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* Outstanding Charter School pride
* Low student to teacher ratio
* Well designed and functional campus .
* Individualized educational pangram for all students
98 12th Street, Apalachicola, FL
653-1222 (phone) 653-1857 (fax)


Thursday, March 18,2010


Local


BARBARASANDERS|SpecialtotheTimes
The Franklin County School competed in the 2010 Brain Bowl at
Tallahassee Community College on Friday, March 12. Pictured from
left are Nic Koch (captain of Team B), Gary Johnson, Lane Roberts, Jay
Lamb, Maggie Langston (captain of Team A), Car|a Lewis, Brett Barrett,
Savannah Salyer, Russell Simmons, Lakota Humble and faculty coach,
Priscilla Tucker.


Wild Mammal
Association seeks
yard sale donationS
The Florida Wild Mam-
mal Association (FWMA)
is seeking donations for a
giant yard sale to be held


on Friday and Saturday,
April 2 and 3 from 8 a.m.
until 2 p.m. at Nad's Mini
Storage, 59 Shadeville
Road, Crawfordville.
If you wish to make
a donation, contact Lois
Swoboda at 653-5857 or


bring items by the office of
the Times in the High Cot-
ton Building at Commerce
Street and Avenue E
One hundred percent
of all contributions are
retained by the FWMA.
For more information on


FWMA visit www.wakul-
lawildlife.org.

Library students
to liold talent show
April 2 at AHS
The Friends of the
Franklin County Public
Library will host a talent
show given by the TIGERS
and KIT students of Apala-
chicola. This event will
take place on Friday, April


2 at the cafeteria at the
former Apalachicola High
School from 5 to 7:30 p.m.
All are welcome.
For more Info, please
call Apalachicola 653-2784,
or Eastpoint 670-5250 or
Carrabelle 697-9216.

933 COUncils to meet
March 25 at Water
Street marina
The local Department


of Juvenile Justice council
will meet Thursday, March
25 at the Water Street Ma-
rina conference room, with
meeting to begin promptly
at 2:30 p.m.
The Franklin County
YoutthTChouunciaalMoa 111 25
at the Water Street Marina
conference room, with
meeting from 3:30 until 5
p.m.
vor more into earl carol
Barfield at 653-2784.


JIMMIE CROWDED EXCAVATING & LAND CLEARING, INC.
COMPLETE SITE DEVELOPMENT
RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL INDUSTRIAL
ASPHALT GRADING & PAVING LOT CLEARING
DEMOLITION WORK UTILITY CONTRACTOR
FILL DIRT TOP SOIL GRAVEL MASON SAND DELIVERED
POND BUILDING
C & D DEBRIS ROIL OFF CONTAINERS
PULLY LICENSED & INSURED
SERVING YOU SINCE 1964

850-897-8403 850-528-6933 850-528-5122
L OFFICE ODIE CELL JIMMIE CELL


CO1011 CanCCT Often


Are YOU at risk?

Did you know that colorectal
cancer, the second leading
cancer killer in the U.S., is
curable 90% of the time when
detected early? That it is often
preventable? And that it affects
OS manV H'Omen RS men.
That's why et eryone 50 or older
should be tested, and people n th
. .
risk factors, like family history
of the disease. might need to be
screened earlier.

Encourage your lat ed ones to
get lesied


If you are 50 or older, talk
to your doctor today about
having a colonoscopy done
locally at George E. Weems
Memorial Hospital in
Apalachicola. (850) 653-8853


MemortalHealthCare
www.weemsmemonal.com


B8 | The Times


HAVE YOU SEEN ME?



Holly is about 4 months
old. She is very fluffy, soft,
.= playful, and is an inside cat.
She is grey and white. She
belongs to Maxwell and
Carson Davis. She was last
seen Wednesday, March 3

.. ,".::7,@,:'. ha La L dh ceh
and Bluff Road. There
will be a $50 reward for
anyone who finds and
returns her safely home to
her family. Please call 653-
5824. Thank you.
SPEGAL TO THE TIMES


EXERCISING THE INTELLECT


News BRIEFS


.


ApalaChiCOIR Bay
Charter School


HENDE R0 AR TEN


ROUNDUP
March 19, 2010
Pleasehaing your child along with their Rainth costificate,
social security cent ansI lananunization accords
Call or come by for registration form and to schedule an
appointment for FYiday, March 19 to meet teachers, visit
classrooms and have your child screened. Open Enrollment
continues through March 26. After this date (if classes are full)
students will be placed on a waiting list PIFJISE CONTACT
OUR SCHOOL EVEN IF YOf.T HAVE MISSED THESE DEADIJNES




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