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Group Title: Apalachicola times
Title: The Apalachicola times
ALL ISSUES CITATION PDF VIEWER THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100380/00069
 Material Information
Title: The Apalachicola times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: H.W. Johnston
Place of Publication: Apalachicola Fla
Apalachicola Fla
Publication Date: March 11, 2010
Copyright Date: 2008
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1885.
General Note: Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00100380
Volume ID: VID00069
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 32911693
lccn - sn 95026907
 Related Items
Preceded by: Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by: Apalachicola herald

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Table of Contents
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        Page A 5
        Page A 6
        Page A 7
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    Section B
        Page B 1
        Page B 2
        Page B 3
        Page B 4
        Page B 5
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Judge wnts ecison o eahf rBod


Economic woes coula close Timner Islana marina


DON)T FORGET!
Spnng forward
this weekend


I


YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER FOR MORE THAN 120 YEARS


VOL. 124 ISSUE 46


By David Ad erstein
TimesCityEditor
A Franklin County judge is
urging prosecutors of Mari-
anne Bordt, the German grand-
mother accused of murdering
her grandson in the bathtub of
a St. George Island resort vaca-
tion home to move quickly on
whether they plan to seek the
death penalty.
In his ruling 'lliesday after-
noon on a defense motion re-
garding shielding evidence from
public scrutiny, Circuit Judge


James Hankinson encouraged
the state "to decide as soon as
possible" regarding whether
to pursue the death penalty
against Marianne Bordt, 71.
"It saves everybody time
and energy and the taxpayers a
good deal of money," Hankinson
said.
Assistant State Attorney
Robin Myers, who is prosecut-
ing the case on behalf of Willie
Meggs, state attorney for the
2nd Judicial Circuit, said a de-
cision on the death penalty "is
in the process of being worked


On Feb. 25, a 21-person
grand jury indicted Bordt on
charges of first-degree mur-
der, which can carry the death
penalty, and aggravated child
abuse in connection with the
drowning death of her 5-year-
old grandson, Camden Hiers,
on St. George Island on Jan. 4.
Bordt's husband, Heinz, was
flown in from Germany by pros-
ecutors to testify against his
wife. Also appearing before the

See BORDT AS


Marianne Bordt
has been indicted
on charges of first-
degree murder
and aggravated
child abuse in
.
connection with the
drowning death
of her 5-year-old
grandson on St.
George Island on
Jan. 4.
DAVID ADLERSTEIN
Therimes


Two months before his four-year
employment contract was set to end,
owners of the Eastpoint Medical
Center have decided
not to renew the con-
tract with Dr. Lionel
Catlin, the physician
who has staffed the
center since April
2006.
The office man-
ager, Mary Ann Dur- DR. LIONEL
rer, also has been let CATLIN
go by North Florida
Medical Centers Inc. (NFMC), the
multi-county medical practice that
has operated Franklin County's only
. federally qualified health center
(FQHC) since 2003.
Dr. Lionel Catlin said he has
been in talks with the county health
department and Weems Memorial
Hospital about future employment,
after leaving the Eastpoint practice
Feb. 16. Catlin said he was provided
no reason for North Florida's deci-
sion not to renew his contract, other
than a communication from CEO
Joel Montgomery that indicated it
was not for disciplinary reasons.
In April, the 53-year-old family
practitioner would have completed a
four-year stint as a National Health
Service Corps Scholar, a program
that because the county is a medi-
cally underserved population pays
the cost of Catlin's physician edu-
cation and training. Catlin studied
at Medical College of Pennsylvania-
Hahnemann University from which
he graduated in 1999 at the age of
42.


By Lois Swoboda
Times Staff Writer
Each year, in honor of Camp
Gordon Johnston (CGJ) Days, to
be held this weekend, Friday and
Saturday, in Carrabelle, the Times
recounts a story of one of the sol-
diers who trained there. This tale is
special because it concerns both a
CGJ veteran and the Carrabelle girl
who stole his heart. In my research
writing historical features over the
past three years, Ihave heard many
accounts of how the young visitors
who came to train at CGJ carried
off Franklin County girls as brides.
This is one such story, provided
courtesy ofMelonia Anderson, Kan-
cy Brannan's daughter,

Kansas "Kancy" Belle Brannan
was born in Carrabelle on Sept. 24,
1927 to James William and Mary
(Molly) Brannan. She grew to be an
exceptionally bright and lovely girl.
After high school, she took a job with
a local photographer in 1944 to help
support her family.
It was at the studio that she met
Thomas William Phillips, born Feb.
22, 1923 to Glen and Mary Phillips in
Oval, N.C., on the site of what is now
West Jefferson.
Around 1942, Phillips went to
Portsmouth, Va. to apprentice in the
Navy yard building wooden boats.
He was called up for World War II
about 1944 and went through the in-
takeprocessexpectingtogointothe
Navy. He flunked the vision test be-
cause he was color-blind to red and
green, and would not be able to read
Navy signal flags.
He was sent to Camp Gordon


Johnston in the summer of 1944 to
train as a harbor craft worker He
always was amused by this because
the job still required hini to read sig- -
nal flags.
In the fall of 1944, he \\as in Car-
rabelle during free time Looking s .
around for something to do. he no- '
ticed a photographer's shop next
door to Burda's Drugs and decided
to have his picture taken to send
to his mama in North Carolina H
walked in and saw an astonishingl
pretty girl behind the counter
"Wow, I had to go
back outside to put
my eyeballs back
in," he said.
After the photo
was taken, he asked
Kancy, the photog-
rapher, if he could .
walk her home. Be- 1
cause she noticed
he had had a couple
of beers, she de-
clined. .
"Come back an-
Other time without
that," she told him.
"And I'll think about
He returned a few '


days later when the
pictures were ready and was allowed
to walk her home. That was the be-
ginning.
Because her father, brother and
several uncles were all named Wil-
liam, Kancy called her new friend
PhillipandlaterShugie.Phillipcame
to see Kancy whenever he could, and
got to know her family.

See KANCY A6


PHOTOS FROM THE COLLECTION OF
WILLIAM PHILLIPS
Clockwise from top, newlyweds
Will 'Philli Ph ill d
iam p ips an
Kansas 'Kancy' Brannan.
Kansas Belle Brannan born in
Carrabelle Sept. 24, 1927. Part
of Kancy's job was to hand tint
photographs. This picture of
her beloved Phillip shows she
became quite an artist.


"I still have two months to make
up," Catlin said. "I'm kind of looking
at my choices; I've interviewed lo-
cally and out of state. I'm looking to
stay, and into the option of starting
my own practice."
Also gone from the center is of-
fice manager Mary Ann Durrer, who
also left last month. She declined
--= eptionist at the office said
acting office manager Brenda Posey
is commuting from NFMC's Wakul-
la office. Dr. Patrick Brown, the
NFMC's chief medical officer, is tem-
porarily staffing the physician slot at
the Eastpoint office on Wednesdays
and Fridays.
"He's from the corporate office,"
the receptionist said. "He works in
11 different centers, and he's filling
in until we get a full-time provider."
Advanced registered nurse prac-
titioner Sena Smith continues to see
patients at the Island Drive clinic on
a full-time basis.

See EASTPOINT AS


By Lojs Swoboda
Times Staff Writer
Dockside Marina on
Timber Island could close
Its doors as early as June
1, but it would be the econ-
omy, and not the landlord,
who is to blame.
David Allen, who has
operated the business for
the last five years, said a
combination of factors led
to his decision to close.
Despite rumors to the con-
trary, Allen and his wife,


Dockside
Marina's
lift, the only
one between
Panama City
and Tarpon
S rin s that
P t Sk
can ea
commercial
fishing boat
out of the
water, has
been sold.
SPECIAL TO
THE TIMES


Gail, both said the St. Joe
Co., from whom they lease
the marina, tried hard to
help them keep the busi-
ness open.
"I am no fan of big busi-
ness, but they have been
more than fair and made it
clear they want to keep the
property open," Allen said.
Late Tuesday after-
noon, Allen said that he
had spoken to Eric Pfeufer,
who owns Marine Systems

See MARINA A6


Phone: 850-227-1845 TABLE OF
Website:apalachtimes.com LettertotheEditor ................... A4
E-mail:timesnews@starfl.com orts Al
Sp .............. .............
Fax:850-653-8036 SocietyNews......................... B2


DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK:
it'. ?'::-:'1-11"..
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CONTENTS
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Apa lachicola


Eastpoint

chmc opts

not to renew

doctor

synovidamerstein
Times City Editor


A LovE STORY FROM THE GREATEST GENERATION


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SEVEN'S A CHARM:
Nashville's finest, most talented
songwriters come to the Dixie
Theatre this weekend to perform
the hits they wrote for music
legends like George Strait, The
Dixie Chicks, Reba McEntire,
Rascal Flatts the list is endless.
Nashville's Universal Music
Publishing once again brings the
cream of their crop in this seventh
installment of one of the theater's
most popular events. Delight in
your chance to experience these
extraordinary, magical evenings.
On Friday, March
12, at 8 p.m., Trent
Summer, Jeremy
Spillman and Brent
Anderson will grace
the Dixie stage
with their talent.
On Saturday, March
JEREMY 13, also at 8 p.m.,
SPILLMAN Phillip White and
Marcel will wow
the audience. Don't miss it; it only
happens once a year.
For more info, call the box office
at 653-3200 or 653-3456 or e-mail
info@dixietheatre.com.
AN ISLAND GETAWAY: The
Supporters of St. Vincent Island,
a not-for-profit organization, are
sponsoring their annual open
house on Saturday, March 13, to
provide a day of easy access to
Franklin County's St. Vincent
Island. People are invited to enjoy
a free full day, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.,
of nature-related activities. $10
per person, with children younger
than 8 free, covers transportation
to and from the island, which will
be provided hourly. Guided tours
and exhibits will allow people to
learn about the island's protected
wildlife, diverse ecosystems
and history, as well as enjoy the
unspoiled beauty of this unique
pristine uninhabited refuge. These
services include educational
talks and discussions provided
by numerous volunteers from the
Supporters and various community


organizations. The guided tours
will be both walking and vehicular.
Light snacks and bottled water will
be available. Rain date is April 10.
For more info, call Audrey Schmidt
at 850-899-3033.
SWEET VOICES: The 22nd
season of the Ilse Newell FLmd
for the Performing Arts will
present one of the most varied
and satisfying concerts of the year
when it presents a program of
Florida State University students
majoring in voice performance.
The concert will be on Sunday,
March 14, at 4 p.m. at Trinity
Episcopal Church.
Under the
direction of
Matthew Lata,
professor and
director of opera
at FSU, the five
~ students will
6 present a program
MATTHEW including selections
LATA from Verdi's
"Rigoletto" and
"Macbeth," Mozart's "Le Nozze
di Figaro" and "Cosi Fan Tutte,"
Rossini's "Il Barbiere di Siviglia,"
Donizetti's "L'Elisor D'Amore,"
Bizet's "Carmen," Delibes'
"Lakme," Puccini's "La Rondine"
and "La Boheme," Tehaikovsky's
"Eugene Onegin," Dvorak's
"Rusalka" and Strauss's "Die
Fledermaus."
Works by American composers
to be performed include selections
from Floyd's "Of Mice and Men,"
Bernstein's "Trouble in Tahiti" and
"West Side Story," Sondheim's "A
Little Night Music," Rodgers and
Hammerstein's "Carousel" and
Kern's "Showboat."
Performing will be soprano
Nichole Nordschow, mezzo-
soprano Rebecca Fadell, tenor
Joshua Baumgartner, baritone
Alexander Elliott and bass/baritone
Ryan Green, with Edward Rothmel
on piano.
This concert performance is
provided through the Apalachicola


we -
-:
.-
LOIS SWOBODA | The Times

Wandering Star
.
Quilt Show March 27
Sped0 10 The Times
A quilt show will be held in Lanark Village on
March 27.
The women of the Wandering Star Quilt Guild
invite everyone to attend their biannual quilt show.
The event will take place at Chillas Hall. Organizer
Peggy Kight said they expect about 50 entries.
In addition to the handicrafts on display, there will
be vendors, door prizes and food available as well as
a huge yard sale. A professional knife and scissor
sharpener will be available to service blades.
Attendees will be asked to vote for their favorite
quilt. There will be a drawing at 3:30 p.m. for the
beautiful "daisy dance" quilt pictured above. Raffle
tickets cost $1, or six for $5, and are available from
guild members or at the office of the Carrabelle
Chamber of Commerce.
For more information, call 697-2329 or 697-8872.
.
TDC signs advertising contract
with Panama City Beach airport


Area Historical Society and the
generosity of its many donors.
Suggested donation is $3. For more
information, call 370-6201.

On the Horizon
RIB-TICKLING GOODNESS:
The ninth annual Eastpoint
Volunteer Fire Department
Charity Rib Cookoff gets under
way Saturday, March 20, at the
fire house m Eastpoint, at the
corner of Sixth Street and CC
Land Road, one block north of
U.S. Highway 98. This year's event
promises to be the biggest ever,
with our competitors cooking more
ribs than ever. In addition to the
cooking competition, there will
be a car show, silent auction, live
entertainment featuring "Twice
Daily!" and, back by popular
demand, the Liars' Contest.
Rides and face-painting for the
kids. Admission is free, and the
gates open at 9 a.m. Barbecue
dinners will be served from 11
a.m. till it's all gone. For more
information or to enter the cookoff
or be a sponsor, contact George
Pruett at 670-9000 or by e-mail at
pru911@gtcom.net. Or visit our
Web site, www.eastpointribcookoff.
com.
Come on out and enjoy a day
of food, fun and music with the
firefighters. All proceeds go to
benefit the Eastpoint Volunteer
Fire Department.


The county commission
voted unanimously March
2 to instruct the Tourist De-
velopment Council to dis-
play tourism information in
the new Northwest Florida
Beaches International Air-
port in Panama City Beach.
The TDC will sign a 10-
year contract for a pair of
displays in the baggage re-
trieval area, at a cost of $580
per month.
The TDC already buys
advertising space in the
existing Panama City and
Tallahassee airports. TDC
Chair Helen Spohrer said
those displays only require
a two- or three-year com-
mitment, and that by com-
mitting to 10 years, the TDC


saves $85 per month at the
new airport. She said the
deal enables the TDC to pig-
gyback advertising dollars
onto the $5 million to $10
million being spent by Bay
and Walton counties to pro-
mote the airport and tourist
industry.
Spohrer said the new air-
port, larger than Atlanta's
Hartsfield International
Airport, is the first major air-
port constructed since the 9-
11 terrorist attacks and only
the third "green" airport,
with LEED certification.
She said Southwest Airlines
will fly out of the new venue
and has begun to advertise
bargain flights to Orlando.
By Lois Swoboda


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Thursday, March 11, 2010


Local


The Times | A3


SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Gulf Coast Community College's Encore program visits the Crooked River Lighthouse.


Carrabelle committee



focuses on tounsm


GCCC's Encore
prOg FO FT1 VIS OS
;
Cl & P OCES
of interest

S ecial to The Times
On Feb. 11, 52 visitors
from Gulf Coast Communi-
ty College's ENCORE Pro-
gram visited Carrabelle
from Panama City. Every
spring session, the classes
vote on where they would
like to visit as a field trip,
and Carrabelle won out of
50 other places of interest
in Florida.
Cam Gordon Johnston
was the first stop on the
tour, where Linda Minichi-
ello gave a synopsis of
troops training at Camp
Carrabelle for the Nor-
mandy invasion. Visitors
watched videos of training
methods and viewed items
from the war.
The tour continued to
the St. James Golf Course,
where a delicious buffet
was served at the Crooked
River Grill. After lunch,
Marketing Director John
Hosford led the group on
golfeartsfor the grand tour
of the world-class course
and five-star accommoda-
tions at their condominium
complex. Hosford pointed
out natural highlights of
the beautiful course and
the wildlife-rich areas of
the property.
The tour continued
down Marine Street with
the bus stopping down-
town, allowing the occu-
pants a chance to shop
with local merchants and
have photos taken at the
World's Smallest Police
Station. Many found de-
light in going back in time
with ice cream cones,


malts and hot cocoa from
the Carrabelle Junction.
The final stop was the
Crooked River Light-
house. About a third of the
group took on the 139-step
hike up the second-tallest
lighthouse in Florida, the
tallest being in St. Augus-
tine. Throughout the day,
visitors gave praise of the
quaintness of Carrabelle
and the locations they vis-
ited.
This tour was the result
of hard work and exten-
sive networking by Sheila
Hauser, president of the
Carrabelle Chamber of
Commerce.Sheilawasable
to coordinate the tour with
the ENCORE Program's
Director Jim Barr and Ad-
viser Susan Bernhard.
In the fall of 2009, Haus-
er implemented a commit-
tee formed to stimulate
nature-based tourism and
economic development in
the Carrabelle area. Mem-
bers of this committee have
focused on enhancing the
appeal of the city through
promoting its natural sur-
roundings and historical
sites to increase revenue
for local merchants. With
the recent approval of U.S.
Highway 98 being regis-
tered as a National Scenic
Highway, members feel
that Carrabelle should
take advantage of traffic
flow that possibly will in-
crease because of its na-
tional recognition.
Committee members
are Hauser, Suzanne Zim-
merman, Pat Bragdon,
John Hosford, Courtney
Dempsey, Keisha Smith,
Kimberly Harrington,
Paula Caruthers, Chester
Reese, Linda Minichiello,
Tony Minichiello, Lesley
Cox, Arlene Oehler, Jon
Johnson, Steve Allen, Ta-


mara Allen, Lee Norris,
Curt Frensle Robin Hil-
ton and Rama BenBaruch,
Beth LaCivita and Paul
and Linda Sanfillippo.
The above members
represent local media,
Carrabelle CARES, Carra-
belle Waterfront Partner-
shiptheCityofCarrabelle'
Crooked River Lighthouse
Association, Carrabelle
Chamber of Commerce,
St. James Golf Course,
Camp Gordon Johnston,
Environmental Consult-
ing & Technology Inc.,
Expeditions in Hell, Natu-
ral World Charters, Les
Hassel Excursions, Car-
rabelle Beach RV Resort
and citizens who feel that
Carrabelle could be more
of a vacation or weekend
retreat.
Sub-committees have
been formed to cover ar-
eas that include beautifi-
cation, gateway signage,
nature and historic tour-
ism, with a continuous
focus on economic devel-
opment. Some of the pro-
posed ideas include nature
tours throughout Carra-
belle, aesthetic improve-
mentsandvariouswaysto
encourage profit gain for
local businesses,
People who feel that
they can contribute to the
ideas and implementation
of proposed projects are
welcome to join this joint
effort to make Carrabelle
a better place for visi-
tors and the citizens. New
members are encouraged
to submit ideas and assist
the committee any way
possible.
Contact Suzanne Zim-
merman with the Carra-
belle Chamber of Com-
merce at 697-2585 if you
are interested and need
more information.


UAVIU AULtKhillN | 111e 11mes
Franklin County students rallied last Friday to prepare for this week's FCAT
testing. At a huge rally at the football stadium, students cheered and sang
and danced, together with a performance by teachers, to help them relax
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Letters to the EDITOR

Who suffers when yOU
had mouth a business?
Franklin County is home to breathtaking
beaches, wonderful historical scenery and some
of the best restaurants and shops that Florida has
to offer. Anyone who has had the honor to visit or
reside here knows of the beauty that this county
possesses,
It is puzzling however, that such a beautiful
place could be filled with so many unattractive peo-
ple. The main allure of this county is the fact that
it has not yet been overrun by large corporations,
and still has feel of "Small Town, USA." The prob-
lem is that some Franklin County residents forget
this, and their actions prove this.
When one small business bad mouths another,
they are failing to realize that they are not encour-
aging patrons to be their customers, but are simply
portraying themselves as unfriendly, mean-spirited
people who lack basic customer service skills. The
most disheartening consequence of their actions is
that not just the business owner is affected. I tend
to have more faith in humanity than is reasonable
and want to believe that these culprits have not
completely considered the results of their actions
My hopes are that the next time they decide to
discourage other small businesses for selfish rea-
sons, they remember a child of Franklin County.
The kids whose mother works full-time as a wait-
ress and even though she's overworked and under-
paid, she smiles at every customer.
You do not think of her missing out on valuable
time with her child. You do not think of her willing-
ness and determination to do anything to put food
on that child's plate, and you MUST not be thinking
of her when you send customers away from her
place of employment. All YOU see is a smile.
I am not this waitress. I'm just fortunate enough
to see past the smile to the human being under-
neath. You know her as well. She is at every restau-
rant, every bar, and every shop that you frequent.
Angela McElroy

No place f or unethical blood sport
On the subject of the cruel nature of fox and
coyote penning, the Humane Society of the United
States says, "Fox penning is a blood sport in which
dozens of dogs compete in a fenced-in area to
chase and sometimes rip apart foxes and coy-
otes. Trapped in the wild and sold to fox pens, often
in other states, the fox or coyote must run for his
life inside fences where there is no hope of getting
away."
The county commissioners were wrong to unan-
imously vote for supporting the blood sport of fox
and coyote penning in Florida. Florida law already
has an answer for this wrong thinking:

Florida Statutes Chapter 828.12
*A person who intentionally commits an act
to any animal which results in the cruel death, or
excessive or repeated indication ofunnecessary
pain or suffering, or causes the same to be done,
is guilty of a felony of the third degree, punishable
as provided in s. 775.082 (...by a term of imprison-
ment not exceeding 5 years.) or by aJne of not
more than $10,000, or both,
*A person convicted of a violation of this sub-
section, where the fnder of fact determines that
the violation includes the knowing and intention-
al torture or torment of an animal that injures,
mutilates, or kills the animal, shall be ordered
to pay a minimum mandatory Jne of $2,500 and
undergo psychological counseling or complete an
anger management treatment program.

I applaud the temporary ban placed on fox and
coyote penning by the Flonda Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission (FWC) this February,
bringing to light this unethical blood sport.
I strongly urge and will support the FWC to
enact a complete and absolute ban on all penning
when it revisits the issue in June.
George loon
Apalachicola



A palachicola
( urrabelle


THE

SPS 02U 7-
Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St.
Apalachicola, FL 32329
VP/Publisher: Karen Hanes
Editor: Tim Croft


PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE TIMES


Thursday, March 11, 2010


We just upgraded the
computer with a new, flat-
screen monitor that has
great quality. Combine
that with Netflix streaming
video, and you have found
my new default viewing
scenano.
We have also discovered
the NBC
series "30
Rock." I can
sit in my
office chair
and watch
episodes se-
quentially at
whim. With-
out com- DENISE ROUX
mercials Red White and Roux
they run
about 21 minutes. It might
not seem so comfortable to
watch TV on a computer
screen, and I haven't done
a whole movie yet, but this
seems to be working for me.
Previously, I only
watched short videos posted
by my friends on Pacebook
or clips Ifound on The Huff-
ington Post. On Saturday
mornmgs, l use my extra
computer time to watch
vanous comedy snippets. If
I really need a laugh I go to
Youhbe for funny animal
videos.
We also added a plain
vanilla DVD player ($39.95)
to the television in the living
room. Now we aren't limited
to the bedroom for watching
movies. I have basic cable,
so I really only watch Food
Network on regular TV
As my f lanc6, Mark, was
installing the new monitor,
I started thinking about the
media transitions we have
all had to make over the past
40 years or so.
I don't remember a time
without television. We re-
ceived only two broadcast
signals via outside anten-
nae and the reception was
problematic. I learned how
to cuss listening to Daddy
trying to get a clear picture
during a baseball game. We
had to get up off the couch
to change channels. That
is quite simply beyond the
imagining oftoday's kids.
We listened to AM radio
(mostly WLCY from Tampa)
from pint-sized transistor
models. Found my little
black number still in its
leather case when I was go-
ing through a box of old stuff
recently.


When I was about 12,
Mama ditched the suitcase-
style record player and
switched to a turntable with
separate speakers. Very
sixties. We listened to music
as we cleaned house on Sat-
urday mornings Al Hirt,
Herb Alpert and the Tijuana
Brass, Andy Williams and
soundtracks from "My Fair
Lady" and "The Sound of
Music." I still know all of the
words from those last two
albums.
Eight-tracks ruled when
I was a teen, and we bought
them at the Tastee Freez
along with our 19-cent ham-
burgers.
Cassette tapes and al-
bums seemed to run neck-
and-neckfor me for many
years. My husband was in
radio and we accumulated
hundreds of records. I can't
play eight-tracks anymore,
but I have a fairly new turn-
table, and the current stereo
can still handle cassettes. I
rarely play a record, but the
collection stays. It is a com-
fort to know that I can play
a cut from "The Supremes
Greatest Hits" whenever I
want. No way could I ever
have bought cassettes for all
the albums and then once
again reproduce the cas-
settes on CD. There are just
so many times one can bow
to technology and buy a new
copy of "Abbey Road."


I have a feeling that from
here on out I will always be
behind the media consump-
tion curve. I don't like things
in my ears so MP3 players
are out. I can happily leave
my cell phone at home and
function perfectly well. I
don't need state-of-the-art
sound in the car because
I only listen to NPR any-
way. My two televisions
are big, bulky models with
small screens by today's
standards. I am perfectly
comfortable not possessing
the latest and greatest. I am
enjoying "30 Rock" though. I
do love the Internet.
And I did experience
a bit of media envy when
my old friend Bob Ross in
Tampa described his set-up.
We were instant messaging
about ideas for this column
when I started asking ques-
tions. He wrote that he had


a laptop in the recliner with
five remotes (cable, televi-
sion, receiver, VCR, and
DVD) and a BlackBerry
at the end of the table. He
watches on a 42-inch Sony
LCD screen. I hate multiple
remotes and just shoot me
now if I ever consider a
BlackBerry. Then I asked
about cable. He gets the
usual HBO, Showtime, Cin-
emax, Movie Channel lineup
but, in addition, Independent
Movie Channel, Sundance,
Arner Classics and Encore.
He got me there.
Maybe I am not as con-
tent as I thought I was. Sun-
dance? Independent Movie
Channel? I thought I had
plenty; now I want more.
Denise Roux is a regular
columnist for the Apala-
chicola and Carrabelle
Times. 'lb reach her e-mail
rouxwhit@mchsi.com.


Q. How can a
criminal record
be sealed or ex-
punged?
A. There are
certain steps to fol-
low to qualify for a
record to be sealed
or expunged and
very strict criteria.


Bar, Department of
Children and Pam-
ily Services, Depart-
ment of Education,
Department of Ju-
venile Justice, etc.).
Case numbers and
party names can be
revealed on sealed
cases.


Justice or in a sensitive
position having direct
contact with children, the
developmentally disabled,
the aged or the elderly as
defined by law;
6) is seeking to be em-
ployed or licensed by the
Department of Education,
any district school board,
any university lab school,
any charter school, any
private or parochial school
or any local governmental
entity that licenses child
care facilities;
7) is attempting to pur-
chase a firearm; and
8) is seeking authoriza-
tion from a Florida seaport
for employment or access.
The subject ofan ex-
punged record might law-
fully deny or fail to acknowl-
edge the arrests covered
by the expunged record,
except when the subject of
the record is as listed above
except that No. 7 is not ap-
plicable.
Before a record can be
sealed or expunged, the ap-
plicant must first apply for
and receive a certificate of
eligibility from the Depart-
ment of Law Enforcement.
To access detailed informa-
tion, go to their web page at
www.fdle.state.fl.us and look
under their A-Z index for
sealed/expunged records.
To procure the certifi-
cate, you must first com-
plete an application form,
be fingerprinted by autho-
rized law enforcement, and
provide a certified disposi-
tion of the case to be sealed


or expunged, and a non-
refundable money order
or cashier's check for $75
payable to FDLE. If you're
requesting expungement,
the state attorney or state-
wide prosecutor must also
complete a section of your
application. Application
forms and general informa-
tion packets are available
from the Clerk's Office,
and you can also receive
the certified dispositions of
cases in the county in which
the charge was brought for
a fee.
After you receive your
certificate of eligibility, you
will have to file a Petition
to seal or expunge with the
Clerk's Office. The filing
fee is currently $42. The
petition must be accompa-
nied by the certificate and
include sworn statements
that you have never been
adjudicated guilty or delin-
quent of specified violations
or the acts stemming from
the arrests to which the
petition pertains, that you
have never secured a prior
sealing or expunction, and
that you are eligible. The
file will be forwarded to the
court for action.
Ifyouhave questions
or comments about this
column, forward them to:
Marcia Johnson, Clerk of
the Court, 33 Market St.,
Suite. 203, Apalachicola, FL
32320, or by e-mail to mm-
johnson@franklinclerk.
com. Visit the Clerk's Web
site at www.franklinclerk.
com.


Some of the requirements
are 1) You have been
charged, but not convicted
ofa misdemeanor or felony
offense because adjudica-
tion was withheld or 2) the
state attorney declined to
prosecute, and 3) you have
not had any other court re-
cord sealed or expunged in
the State of Florida. There
are also certain charges
that cannot be sealed or
expunged regardless of
whether adjudication was
withheld.
When a criminal history
record is sealed, the public
will not have access to it;
however, certain govern-
mental or related entities
do have access. A sealed
record could be opened for
inspection by the applicant
or the applicant's attorney;
by criminal justice agencies
for their respective crimi-
nal justice purposes which
include conducting back-
ground checks for approval
of firearms purchases or
transfers; by judges for
the purpose of assisting
them in their case-related
responsibilities or by agen-
cies listed in ES. 943.059 for
their licensing and employ-
ment purposes (the Florida


An expunged record
would no longer exist as
the file and any references
to that file are destroyed in
the Clerk's Office. No in-
formation can be revealed
by the Clerk's Office on ex-
punged cases, not even to
the defendant. Staff would
state the Clerk's applica-
tions do not reveal any such
case.
The subject of a sealed
record might lawfully deny
or fail to acknowledge the
arrests covered by the
sealed record, except when
the subject of the record is:
1) a candidate for em-
ployment with a criminal
justice agency;
2) a defendant in a crimi-
nal prosecution;
3) concurrently or sub-
sequently petitions for relief
under this section or the
expungement section;
4) is a candidate for ad-
mission to the Florida Bar;
5) is seeking to be em-
ployed, licensed or con-
tract with the Department
of Children and Family
Services, the Agency for
Health Care Administra-
tion, the Agency for Per-
sons With Disabilities, the
Department of Juvenile


POSTMASTER:
Send address change to:
The Apalachicola Times
P.O. Box 820
Apalachicola, FL 32329
Phone 850-653-8868


PERIODICAL RATE


SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
IN COUNTY
$24.15 year $15.75 six months
OUT OF COUNTY
$34.65 year $21 six months


TO ALL ADVERTISERS
In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers
do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount
received for such advertisement,
The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is
thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word
thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains.


* *


A4 | The Times


I rarely play records, but collection stays


YOur Pubhei TRUSTEE


MARCIA













O. O-


PI -
... .


O
9 ... .



This photo,
taken bY
Karl Holland
in Sept.
1965. shows
the former
.-- .7 1 Maude's
Cafe and Bar,
1 Located at the
,L east end of the
1 d
Gorrie Bri ge
in Eastpoint.
FLORIDA
PHOTOGRAPHIC
COLLECTION

As The Apalachicola and Carrabelle Times approaches its 125th

anniversary in April, we are reaching out to the community to help us
bring local history alive for our readers.
The Times has introduced a new feature on our Web site, www.
apalachtimes.com. This photo gallery "Old Times" showcases
photographs, some more than a century old and some as recent as two or
three decades ago, for our readers to enjoy.
With more than 100 photos to start and more coming in every day, The
Times has enlisted the support of the Apalachicola Area Historical Society,
.
the Carrabelle Historical Society, the chambers of commerce, history buffs
and our loyal readers to bring "Old Times" to vivid life.
Readers are encouraged to submit their favorite photos for posting,
.
either by e-mailing dadlerstein@starfl.com or dropping by the office, 122
Commerce St., at the corner of Commerce Street and Avenue F, to have
their hard-copy photos scanned and returned.
.
It's a great opportunity to preserve the county's rich history and share its
images with the world.
For more information, call 653-8868, and well be glad to help.


r


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Thursday, March 11, 2010


Local


. ....g....


Following Dr. Nancy Chorba's
departure from the Eastpoint
clinic in March 2005, about two
years after ownership of the pri-
mary care practice was handed
over from Tallahassee Memo-
rial Hospital to NFMC, the clinic
lacked a permanent physician
presence for an entire year until
Catlin's arrival.
An African-American physi-
cian, with a voice unmistakably
from New England, Catlin be-
came popular over the last four
years, said Grayson Shepard, a
local real estate agent who has
served on NFMC's board of di-
rectors since 2003.
"I think Dr. Catlin was em-
braced by the community. To
come from the north into a ru-
ral Southern community and
come down and be embraced
like that, that spells volumes,"
Shepard said. "I'm really disap-
pointed that his contract wasn't
renewed. I don't know why. I felt
like Dr. Catlin did a fantastic
job. I was shocked when I found
out."
Shepard, who became a mem-
her of the NFMC board while
still attending Florida State Uni-
versity, said the board oversees
long-range strategic planning,
but does not have an active hand
in personnel matters, which are
largely up to Montgomery.
He said the board members
review the doctors' productiv-
ity data, in terms of number of
patients seen per day, and that
Dr. Catlin's numbers were mid-
range. "We weren't at the top of
the list," Shepard said.
Catlin said he didn't think pa-
tient numbers were behind Mont-
gomery's decision. Montgomery
declined numerous telephone
requests for comment.
"They came to me and said
your contract is up soon, and
what would you like to do," Catlin
said."I said I'd like to stay."
While he did ask for a raise,
beyond the NFMC's regular in-
centive program, Catlin said he
had no further discussions on the
matter before learning he would
not be renewed.


"They don't really care about
Franklin County patients as far
as I can see," he said. "They have
a constant turnover."
Catlin said Carrabelle resi-
dent Anna Purkey, ARNP was
let go from the office a year or so
ago, and has since gone to work
for Shands in Gainesville.
"If they can't control you,
they're going to get rid of you one
way or another," he said. "There's
a lot of micromanagement going
on with the providers. They're
interested in the 'numbers.' They
spread providers real thin."
Shepard, who worked himself
up from the board secretary and
finance committee chairman to
the board chairmanship, has de-
cided to retire from the board, but
stressed that his decision was not
connected to Catlin's departure.
He said the commitment to
traveling to monthly meetings in
Tallahassee, as well as a week-
long conference over the summer,
all on a volunteer basis, has taken
its toll on his work schedule.
"Being on the board was cost-
ing me financially," he said. "It
was becoming more and more
of a financial drain. I had to back
out. It's a good company. I think
they're doing a good thing."
While expressing disappoint-
ment with Montgomery's deci-
sion, Shepard stopped short of
criticizing the CEO, who he said
has been instrumental in ex-
panding NFMC and putting it on
a sound financial footing. As an
FQHC, the medical center group
is heavily subsidized by federal
funding, but still relies on insured
and other paying patients to bal-
ance their books.
"It's his ship and he runs it,"
Shepard said. "He's grabbed the
reins and he turned it around."
Shepard said he had heard
word that NFMC plans to soon
announce a new doctor for the
Eastpoint clinic, but had no fur-
ther information.
Meanwhilethereceptionistat
the office echoed the sentiment of
several patients regarding Catlin.
"We're sad that he's gone," she
said.


grand jury was Florida Depart-
ment of Law Enforcement Spe-
cial Agent Tom McGraw.
In the charge of aggravated
child abuse, a first-degree fel-
ony, the prosecution left open
the manner of whether Bordt
harmed the grandson. The count
asserts that Bordt committed
a battery on the boy "by cutting
with a knife, or did torture or ma-
liciously punish a child by drown-
ing."
Marianne Bordt's defense at-
torney, Maria Ines Suber, with
the public defender's office, has
submitted a written plea of not
guilty to the new charges.
She said following Tuesday's
hearing that she did not believe
the case calls for the death pen-
alty, which she said is reserved
"for the most egregious of cir-
cumstances." At the hearing
she pressed for a decision on
whether the prosecution would


pursue the death penalty, which
would call for her to prepare for
the penalty phase of the delibera-
tions throughout the trial.
"Obviously, the murder of a
child is very serious, but that
doesn't mean every murder of
a child means the state has to
put the person to death," Suber
said. "I don't think in this case
it's pressing, but the state could
request it even with one aggrava-
tor."
The defense attorney refused
to say whether she planned to
lodge an insanity defense. "It's
hard to say what the defense is
before you have the whole dis-
covery," she said.
Suber said death penalty
specifications would add further
to the cost of the trial, which she
said would likely involve several
trips to Germany to investigate
Bordt's background.
On Tuesday, Hankinson de-


lined to shield further evidence
from the media, as Suber had
sought in a broad motion that in-
dicated she intends to try to keep
evidence of an alleged "confes-
sion" from Bordt out of the public
eye.
According to the sheriff's
office's probable cause affidavit,
Heinz Bordt, who was on a shop-
ping trip to Apalachicola when
the alleged murder took place,
told investigators his wife told
him that she killed the boy be-
cause she didn't want him grow-
ing up in a divorced home. Hiers
was the son of Karin and David
Hiers, who live separately in sub-
urban Atlanta and who shared
custody of the boy ever since di-
vorcing in 2006.
Hankinson asked the attor-
neys at Tuesday's hearing, who
also included Michael Glazer, ar-
guing on behalf of the Tallahas-
see Democrat, about the legal


precedents regarding the "sub-
stance of a confession." The sub-
stance of a confession is a type of
discovery, like an autopsy report,
that is not protected by the pub-
lic records law.
Hankinson asked whether the
exemption from the Sunshine
Law related just to custodial in-
terrogation when a defendant is
in police custody, or to any man-
ner of incriminating statement
made to others by a defendant.
The judge said he would leave
it to prosecutors to decide what
evidence in discovery related to
the substance of a confession,
and that if a matter arises calling
for guidance from the court, he
would review the matter behind
closed doors. The parties could
then decide whether to seek a
public hearing, the judge said.
Hankinson set the next case
management hearing for May 11
at 1:30 p.m.


DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times


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The Times | AS


EASTPOINT from paae Al


BORDT from pane Al


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MARINA from page Al


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Thursday, March 11, 2010


A6 | The Times


Local


KANCY from page Al
Lillian Smith of Carrabelle was friend
of Kancy's. She remembers CGJ well and
said, "It was different in those days. All
those boys were sent here. They could be
sent overseas any time and you just didn't
know if they'd ever come back."
In Dec.1944, Kancy and Phillip learned
that he might be on the list to ship out.
His sergeant said if anyone "fell out of the
boat," he was next to go.
At 11 p.m. on Dec. 8, 1944, Phillip asked
Kancy if she would marry him. She re-
plied, "Let's go ask Mama." They woke
up Molly Brannan and asked if they could
marry.
"OK, but if you can't be good to her
like you should, bring her on back home,"
Mama said.
Kancy's brother-in-law, Wade Corley,
came in about then and they asked him
to go with them to the judge's house to be
a witness.
They woke up Judge R.M. Wither-
spoon and were married. By this time, it
was after midnight, so their wedding date
was Dec. 9, 1944.
PhillipreportedtoCampGordonJohn-
ston that morning, but no one fell out, so
he did not have to leave. He was able to
stay for about a year.

100 MOnths in the Philippmes
After going through the harbor craft
training, there was no assignment for
Phillip. He and others went through the
training again. Still having no assign-
ment, he acted as sergeant for a group of
new recruits during their training.


mountain boy, he didn't know much about
mosquitoes. He soon found out about
them.
After a couple of weeks with still no of-
ficial assignment, he became a clerk for
the medic's office in Manila because he
had taken typing in high school.
Later, when personnel who had been
deployed longer were sent home, he was
reassigned as medical assistant to the
doctor, handing him supplies and helping
with whatever was asked.
Once when the doctor was not in, a
group of GIs brought in a soldier with a cut
on his head. They had braked suddenly in
their truck and he had been thrown out.
Phillip cleaned the wound and stitched it
up himself. He had watched how the doc-
tor had done it, noting how he pulled the
edges of skin together to make a neat,
straight line. He told the patient to come
back in about 10 days to get the stitches
out. When he returned, the doctor asked
him, "Did you do that?"
Phillip admitted he had and the doctor
praised his good work.
He was in the Philippines for 10
months. When his tour was over, Phillip
returned to Statesville, N.C. where his
parents had moved while he was in the
service.
Kancy was waiting for him there. The
family didn't know exactly when he would
arrive. When he came in the front door,
Kancy, who was ironing, tossed aside her
work and flew into his arms.
"If you knew my Mom," daughter Me-
lonia Anderson said, "you would know
that was amazing. She was very neat. I


used to say we did spring cleaning every
Saturday morning."
The couple spent some time in States-
ville, and then moved to Louisville, Ky. so
Phillip could attend a radio and television
repair training program.
He worked days in a cabinet shop
and went to school at night. Their first
child, Debbie, was born there. Later,
they returned to Carrabelle where Phil-
lip worked with Kancy's father as a boat
builder. Business was good, but collecting
payment was difficult.
On a visit to Statesville, Phillip was of-
fered a job with a woodworking business,
Blanton and Moore. He worked there for
more than 30 years, rising to be general
manager.
Kancy was a homemaker and very
talented seamstress. She made all of her
"church clothes" and most of her daugh-
ters' clothing, including Melonia's wed-
ding dress. She worked in sewing mills
and fabric shops to earn extra money. For
two years, she co-owned a fabric shop
with a friend. In the 1980s, she taught
sewingclassesaspartofthecontinuing
education program of Mitchell Commu-
nity College.
Phillip still lives in the house he built
and moved the family into in 1963. Kancy
moved to assisted living in February. Her
sweetheart visits her everyday.
The couple had three children, Debo-
rah, Victor, who was killed in an accident
in 1976 while serving in the Navy, and Me-
lonia. They also have three grandchildren
and one great-grandchild, Phillip, who is
now 1-year-old.


FROM THE COLLECTION OF WILLIAM PHILLIPS
Phillip and Kancy in 2002
Eventuallyhecompletedtheharbor
craft training three times.
Finally, he was sent to San Francisco
and put on a ship to the South Pacific.
Ten days out to sea, the Japanese surren-
dered. Phillip was left in limbo. He and
his crewmates floated around the Pacific
for 30 days before being sent to the Phil-
Ippmes.
His first night in Manila, he was sent
to bed down in a building with part of
the roof missing. Being a North Carolina


in Carrabelle, a Caterpil-
lar engine dealer, and that
a deal is in the works to
keep the marina open.
"He told me he has
reached a verbal agree-
ment with the St. Joe Co.
to keep the marina open.
I'm waiting on a call from
St. Joe," said Allen. "They
have not signed anything
yet, though."
The Allens said there
is no truth to the rumor
St. Joe forced Dockside to
close as revenge against
the county for rescinding
zoning changes previously
granted to St. Joe land on
St. James Island.


In 2005, the commis-
sioners rezoned four
parcels of St. Joe land in
the eastern part of the
county from agricultural
to mixed-use residential.
The company proposed
to develop the St. James
Island parcels and were
allowed as many as 7,400
houses to be built, but
since that time develop-
ment has stalled.
Two of the future land-
use maps, which encom-
passed 1,704 acres west of
U.S. 98, and a 2,500-acre
tract along the Ochlock-
nee Bay, were rescinded
in April 2009. Those two


land use maps would have
allowed about 1,000 addi-
tional homes to be built in
the county, but were never
officially adopted into the
comprehensive plan be-
cause of legal action taken
by Don and Pamela Ash-
ley, who live on St. James
Island.
In mid-December, af-
ter listening to dueling
land-use lawyers present
conflicting opinions about
the risks involved, county
commissioners voted 4-1
to shut the door entirely
on St. Joe's plans for two
additional mixed-use proj-
ects. Chairman Smokey


Parrish was the lone vote
in opposition, contend-
ing that the risk of a law-
suit threatened by St. Joe
could prove too costly.
Rumors have persisted
that St. Joe ordered the
Aliens and others with
boats stored at Dockside
to remove their property
immediately or forfeit it.
David Allen insisted
there has been no ultima-
tum or sweeping change
in policy on the part of St.
Joe. He said he initially
had a two-year lease on
the marina, with an auto-
matic renewal each year.
He said both he and St.


Joe had the right to cancel
the agreement, which he
ultimately decided to do.
"Rumors about this
are running rampant," he
said. "Even with a longer
lease, I could not have
justified spending $250 to
$500 to really spruce the
place up with business the
way it is now," he said.
Allen said his business
has been off 20 percent for
the last four or five months
and he had no reason to
believe things would im-
prove in the foreseeable
future. He said the poor
economy was only part of
the problem. He believes


fishing regulations also
had a major adverse effect
on the marina.
""People aren't us-
ing their boats. Many are
trying to sell their boats.
There are no new boats be-
ing sold, now," he said.
Carrabelle shrimper
Jim Lycette echoed Allen's
dire assessment. In a tele-
phone interview, he called
the marina a "casualty of
regulatory enforcement."
He said people won't rent
a charter boat to catch two
snapper, which is the cur-
rent limit imposed by the
Gulf of Mexico Fisheries
Management Council. He
also said that the Florida

a single day to check for il-
'"'tissh.not their fault.
They are just enforcing the
laws on the books," he said.
"But the laws are based on
bad information."
"When fishermen call
down to book a char-
ter they ask about three
things now, the weather,
the fishing and Marine Pa-
trol activity," he said.
"I don't believe people
realize how important
that marina is to the lo-
cal economy," Lycette
said. "That's the only lift
='-= abiet
Panama City and Tarpon
Springs. Times are hard
for the local seafood in-
dustr y. Wecan ttak ean -
:her bodandbl IcH k
::dSt.o e r wi
see what they can do to
keep Dockside open."
Allen said the boat lift
has been sold to a firm
in St. Mary's, Ga. and is
scheduledfordeliveryMay
1. He said anyone needing

rusegehee udstsmake
fore the last week in April.
Allen said Pfeufer has in-
dicated he is looking into
plans to acquire another
netAllen said he is try-
ing to seH as much of his
equipment and inventory
as possible. There will be
a closing sale at Dockside
Friday, April 23.
has I nei a not ert
iah no ga Ten and
"':wherl ve doing this
end mM hn aro
who works here will be all
right. We want to thank
the community. We have
received nothing but sup-
port from our neighbors
but we don't foresee things
getting better in the near
future," Allen said.
To inquire about the
sale or the marina, call
697-3337.


PLAY TO WIN!

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NEWS HERALD


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Thursday, March 11, 2010 wIww. ap ala cht i mes.c om Pag~e


g &
STATE BAN K 1897
A Division of Coastal Community Bank

Apalachicola Carrabelle Eastpoint St. George Island
22 Avenue E 612 N Avenue A 5 Jefferson Street 200 Franklin Blvd
653-8805 697-4500 670-8501 927-2561


SPRING SPORTS
Lady Seahawks Seahawks varsity Lady Seahawks
varsity softball baseball middle school softball
Thursday, March 11, Friday, March 12, vs. Thursday, March 18,
@ Altha, 6 p.m. vs. Wewa, 4 p.m.
Friday, March 12, vs. West Gadsden, 6 p.m.
West Gadsden, 6 p.m. (district game) Seahawks middle
(district game) Monday, March 15, school baseball
Monday, March 15, @ Port St. Joe, 7 p.m. Thursday, March 18,
@ Sneads, 6 p.m. (district game) vs. Wewa, 4 p.m.


I I


'I


By Christy Thompson
Special to the Times
The Lady Seahawks
showed no mercy against
district rival Wewahitchka
on March 2 with a 17-0
romping at home.
Morgan Newell led the
Seahawks at bat with two
singles and a home run,
which tallied a total of
five RBIs for the starting
third baseman. It was all
Seahawks as the defense
shut the Gators out com-
pletely in five innings. Ju-
nior pitcher Shelby Shiver
struck out seven to record
the district win.
Up next was the battle
with Blountstown at home,
which we really wanted
badly since the loss 8-7 on
their field one week ago. It
was a great game, but they
just hit the ball more than
we did, and it finished with a
score of 9-5. We played hard
defensively, but some of our
top hitters just weren't con-
necting for us that night.
After a cold loss at
home, we traveled to face
the top district team, the
Bulldogs of Liberty County.
We dressed out, rode the
bus, took the field, dressed
down and rode the bus
back home. We lost 11-0,
and there is nothing else to
mention about that game!


Photos by DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times
. .
Top finishers in Saturday's Red Pepper Run were, from left, winner David
Shearon, top female finisher Kristen Merrill, top St. George Island female runner
Alane Kadel, in front, and top St. George Island male runner Nathan Landru


O SI I0 StOfIT If St I0 T IlllS
J


Coach Christy Thompson, center, huddles with her


I am happy to be able to
write about the return of
the Lady Seahawks as we
won against Quincy Mun-
roe this past'Ibesday night.
The girls played an out-
standing game offensively
and defensively at home. It
was a very positive evening
at the nest as freshman
shortstop Chena Segree
took full control at bat. She
hit 4-for-4, leveling off two
singles and two triples to
bring home four players
to score. She also had one
of her best games for the
Seahawks as she brought
down nine Munroe batters
defensively on the night.
Shelby Shiver pitched
strong through five innings,


sitting down six batters be-
fore sophomore Morgan
Newell came in to close
the deal as she retired four
batters. It was a total team
effort tonight, and it is nice
to see the girls playing to
their abilities. These girls
are much better than has
been displayed lately, and it
finally clicked against Mun-
roe with both offense and
defense. The girls played
tough through seven in-
nings to win 9-4 at home.
Next up, Altha and dis-
trict rival West Gadsden.
Christy Thompson is
the coach of the Lady Se-
ahawks varsity softball
team.


By DWihierStein
Times City Editor
Panama City's David Shearon was
delayed by a bathroom break at the
start of Saturday morning's SK Red
Pepper Run.
No matter.
Despite the late start, he topped the
field of about 60 competitors and was
first to finish, with a time of 18:23 along
the 3.1-mile course.
"I started about 35 seconds late,"
said Shearon, 40, a home health physi-
caltherapist.
Suffering a bout of laryngitis, Shearon
had been asked by his doctor not to com-
pete, but he decided not to let down his
friends, who had caravaned for the
weekend cook-off. They had finished
first, third and fourth last year.
Shearon said that about halfway
through the race, he caught the front-
runner, pulled head and never looked
backs he glided to the win.
This was the veteran triathlete's first
time running on the island. "It's beauti-
ful sroeru m 50r the first time in the
Red Pepper Run was top female finisher
Kristen Merrill, 24, of Gainesville. She
finished with a time of23:44.
Merrill was at the cook-off to be a
part of her family's booth. "It was a
great race, really fun," she said. "The


Dueling lawyers Gordon Shuler,
of Apalachicola, right, and Nick
Yonclas, of St. George Island, race
to the finish in Saturday's 5K Red
Pepper Run.
weatherwasfun."
Topping the field among St. George
Island residents in the race were Na-
than Landrum, 32, who ran a 23:42, and
Alana Kadel, who ran a 26:00.


Cole Lee
Freshman Cole Lee,
who plays first and
third base, had a
grand slam for the
Seahawks against
AF MU on March


team's 17-0 win at 3, and a three-run
home over district homer against
rival Wewahitchka Aucilla on March 8.
March 2.



L'" p uo [aat on \ e ."

Digital X-rays Decorative path pots
Presure Washing
a We do it ALL! Free estimates!
Full insured! On time. EVERY lime!


CA RRA BE L LE APA LA CH ICO LA


A


Lady Seahawks slam Wewa, Munroe


HOW SWEET IT IS
Franklin CountY
Sea hawk
senior Gary
Larson, left,
relaxes in
I the dugout
4 last Thursday
after belting a
rand slam in
h 24-2
oveer FAMwin
At center is-
Chance Buffkin;
at right, Zach
Howze.
DAVID ADLERSTEIN
The Times


Morgan Newell
Third baseman
Morgan Newell hit - .
two singles and a .
home run, for five ,;;,
RBIs, in the Lady
Seahawks softball





Thursday, March 11, 2010


Local


By Lois Swoboda
Times Staff Writer
An injured turtle has been
taken to Gulf World in Pana-
ma City for treatment.
On Valentine's Day, Mary
Kay Clyburn of Alligator
Point was surprised to find
a green turtle on the beach
across from her house.
She called Alligator Point
turtle licensee Bill Wargo,
who took the animal to Jack
Rudloe, operator of the Gulf
Specimens Marine Labora-
tory in Panacea. The turtle
was placed in a heated tank
and examined and medi-
cated by Dr. Norm Griggs
and a visiting veterinarian,
The pair determined the ani-
mal was in need of intensive
care, possibly suffering from
pneumonia, and on Feb. 17,
Wargo brought the turtle to
Apalachicola where a rescue
team from Gulf World Marine
Park was waiting to take it to
Panama City.
Wargo said the animal had
suffered injury to the face
and right eye and was very
dried out. He said the cold
weather may have contrib-
uted to its poor condition.
Michelle Erwin, assistant
supervisor of marine mam-
mals at Gulf World, said the


male turtle had an infection
and was given antibiotics. "If
the antibiotics do their job,
he should be fine," she said.
"He is eating and he's diving
but he's still having some is-
sues leveling out. So we're
still working on that. We have
the veterinarian taking blood
and doing what she needs to
do to make sure he's reha-
bilitating properly."
Rudloe said the animal
would not have survived if it
had remained in the wild.
This winter has been
particularly hard on Florida
wildlife. Record cold tem-
peratures have caused the
deaths of millions of fish,
birds, reptiles and mammals
across the state.
At the Feb. 17-18 meet-
ing of the Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation Com-
mission in Apalachicola,
commissioners learned that
thousands of sea turtles
were cold stunned across
the state.
Hundreds of volunteers
joinedabattletorescuethese
creatures and about 80 per-
cent survived. FWC thanked
a number of businesses and
Organizations for their res-
cue work including Ryder
Trucks, which provided free
transportation to many of


the stricken animals.
Wargo said there were no
reported turtle standings
in Franklin County during
January's bitter cold but
about 1,700 were rescued in
the Panhandle, many in St.
Joe Bay.
Rudloe's facility provided
a rehabilitation site for 63
green turtles and two Kemp's
ridley turtles brought to him
from St. Joe Bay.
Wargo said the bay is ex-
ceptionally dangerous for
sea turtles because it has no
southern outlet. Turtles in-
stinctively head south when
the temperature drops and
are trapped.
Rudloe said he could have
accommodated twice as
many cold-stunned turtles.
"Four years ago we received
a grant from the turtle per-
mit people to upgrade our
system to control water
temperature better. We use
geothermal energy to heat
and cool our tanks," he said.
"This year we got to use the
system for its intended pur-
pose. We didn't lose a single
turtle. They were trans-
ported to Panama City on
a Coast Guard vessel and
safely released."
Erwin said Gulf World re-
ceived more than 1,000 cold


stunned turtles. Most have
been released but some that
were emaciated are being
held until their weight is
back to normal, she said.
In addition to turtles,
manatees were hard-hit
statewide although the north
Florida population was rela-
tively unscathed.
Rudloe speculated they
were less affected because
they are used to colder wa-
ter. Further south, manatees
that survived the cold are
still at risk from respira-
tory infections and other
maladies in their weakened
state.
The FWC report said hun-
dreds of thousands of native
fish were killed by the cold
snap. Tarpon, bonefish and
snook suffered massive kills.
The report said harvest of
these species will probably
be sharply curtailed or even
forbidden in the immediate
future.
Another animal badly in-
jured by the freeze was the
already endangered Florida
crocodile.
The only silver lining to
the story is that many inva-
sive non-native plants and
animals, including escaped
aquarium fish, were killed
by the cold as well.


,,r
*







.


DEAN NEWMAN | Spec
Bill Wargo with the rescued turtle.


Special to the Times
Little Sea Hawkers (pre-
kindergarten students) and
their parents are invited to visit
the "nest" at Franklin County
School (FCS) in Eastpoint in
March.
Pre-kstudentswillbevisiting
the school on 'Ibesday, March23
for kindergarten orientation for
the 2010-11 school ar.
They will be at the facility
from 9:15 until 10:15 a.m. that


morning. Their parents are
invited to tour the facility and
meet with kindergarten teach-
ers from 5:30 until 6:30 p.m. that
evening.
Those who would like to reg-
ister their children for the 2010-
11schoolyearshouldbringtheir
child's birth certificate, health
records, shot records and Social
Security card.
For more information, con-
tact FCS Guidance Counselor
Wanda Teat at 670-2800.


0


Mt"
American veterans:



(srrmWerir sCGJ)
Viet Nam War
Desert Storm
All Active Duty
Reservists

FRIDAY
* Register at the CGJ WWII
Museum.
Take a boat trip to Dog Island.
Tour the USCG Cutter
Seahawk.
Attend social hour and the
"official CGJ welcome" at the
American Legion Post 82 in
Lenark. Have refreshments
and listen to live music by the
"Not Quite Ready" band.

SATURDAY
* Have breakfast hosted by the
Masonic Lodge (tickets $6)
* Watch the parade march down
Hwy. 98 includes the U.S.
Army Marching Band.
' tEae aifi frCarmh heos dEb)y
* Vie the display of military

* Go to the dinner dance
at Chills Hall in Lanark
(advanced tickets $15). Listen
to live music by the "Not Quite
Ready" band.


A8 | The Times


Marine animals suffered during cold snap


School hosts kindergarten


. .
Orion replaces J.J. Brown during repairs

At the Feb. 17 meeting of the Florida Fish and
Wildlife (FWC) Conservation Commission
held in Apalachicola, commissioners were
introduced to the crew of the Orion stationed
at the new Carrabelle office. The Orion
-, temporarily replaces the J.J. Brown, the FWC
"' "' boat normally assigned to this area, while
she undergoes a complete refurbishment.
4 6 Pictured from left are Officer Ben Barnard,
a native of Navarre Beach, Officer Jason
Carroll, of Carrabelle and Lt. Scott Pierce, of
Crawfordville. By Lois Swoboda
LOIS SWOBODA | The Times


Camp G


March l2 and 13


----me -For mor0 110181101IHIormatl0H, visit Our Web site at:


A nra~cY1~ Ew~


W W W Ww s W .





B






























PUB LIC NO TIC E

The owner of the historic structure located at
159 Avenue B, Apalachicola, Fl. have applied
for a demolition permit for this structure.
This structure is listed in the Apalachicola
Historic Register as a contributing structure.
If this structure is not sold and relocated by
June 6, 2010, a permit for demolition will
.
be issued. For information on purchasing
and relocating this structure, Please contact
Hollis Vail at 850-653-6459.


Apalachicola Bay
Charter School


RENDEROARTEN


OR UND UP

M ar ch 19, 2 O 10

Beginning March 15 call or come by for registration foun
and to schedule an appointment forFkiday, March 19 to
meet teachers and visit classrooms.
Please bwing birth certificate, social security card ancI
Iananunt:m:ation records

'TAe FISC Selwlisa fami
A earnings communi workny at a
unif fo a soifandfug/sfer
dura 7fles seializein a viln*anf,
agag{z{g ,40 are
ffeeffo asfron
un dian w or e ill
Outstanding Charter School pride
Low student to teacher ratio
Well designed and functional campus
Individualized educational program for all students
98 12th Street, Apalachicola, FL
653-1222 (phone) 653-1857 (tax)


MY MOTHER

.Kaath an oB.MR ebhn,200
I thought I saw her face today
In the sparkle of the morning sun.
And then I heard the angel say
-" "Her work on earth is done."

I thought I heard her voice today
Then laugh her hearty laugh,
And then I heard the angel say
"There's peace little one at last."

I thought I felt her touch today
In the breeze that rustled by,
- An then I heard the angel say
4 The spirit never dies.
4. I thought thatsshe had leoft me
And then I heard the angel say
"She left you with her love."
I thought that I would miss her
And never find my way.
And then I heard the angel say
"She's with you every day."
-c By Megan Stokes
Happy Heavenly Birthday!
Love,
Kathi Wynn and Patricia Lane


Thursday, March 11, 2010


B2 | The Times


Local


It is with great pride
and anticipation that Gulf
Alliance for Local Arts
(GALA) announces GALA
Community Theater's first
production of the 2010 the-
ater season, the local pre-
miere of "The Farndale
Avenue Housing Estate
Townswomen's Guild Dra-
matic Society Murder Mys-
tery."
The show, first of four
productions scheduled for
2010, will be offered in din-
ner theater performances
at the St. Joseph's Bay


Country Club on March 26,
27 and 28.
The show is farce writ-
ten by David McGillivray
and Walter Zerlin, Jr., and
directed by Dan Wheeler.
Every drama group has
experienced the horrors of
what can go wrong on open-
ing night and the ladies of
the EA.H.E.T.G. Dramatic
Society are no different,
with the possible exception
that almost everything that
could happen does. The
scenery collapses, cues
are missed, lines forgotten,


and the sound effects take
on a strange note at times,
as the ladies present their
ambitious evening's en-
tertainment with the cun-
ning whodunit, "Murder at
Checkmate Manor." And
just in case the audience
should get bored there's a
film and fashion show and
murder mystery quiz com-
plete with prize.
"This should be a very
interesting endeavor," said
Blake Denton, the alli-
ance's community theater
chairman."It is a play with-

BILL MILLER REALTY
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in a play and a drama that
becomes a comedy. It is a
unique concept that should
provideforathoroughlyen-
joyable theater experience.
Couple that with the over-
whelming feedback we had
from "Halfway Inn" dinner
theater performances last
winter, we are very excited
about this project."
Tickets are $35 each and
include an Original Butler's
Cuisine dinner with choice
of 12 oz. Ronnie Ribeye;
8 oz. Ronnie Ribeye & six
sauteed shrimp; or baked
crab-stuffed grouper. Each
mealincludesButler'swild
rice or baked potato, whole
green beans, garden salad,
yeast rolls, iced tea, coffee
and apple pie or hot brown-
ie ala mode. Performance-
only tickets are also avail-
able for $15.
There will be three
shows, Friday and Satur-
day, March 26 and 27 start-
ing at 6 p.m. and Sunday
brunch starting at 12:30
p.m.


SPECIAL TO THE TIMES


Director Dan Wheeler
"We have barely even
started promoting the
shows, and the perfor-
mances are starting to fill
up," said Denton. "So if you
want to attend one of the
performances, the sooner
you make reservations, the
better."
The local premiere of


this outrageous comedy
is proudly presented by
GALA Community Theater
and Gulf Alliance for Local
Arts. For more information
and to purchase tickets vis-
it www.GulfAlliance.org or
call 850-229-2748. Seating is
limited and on a first-come
first-servedbasis.


Are YOU at risk'?

Did you know that colorectal
cancer, the second leading
cancer killer in the U.S., is
curable 90% of the time when
detected early? That it is often
prel entable? And that it affects
as many women as men?

That's why everyone 50 or older
.
should be rested, and people with
. .
risk actors, like family history
of the disease, might need to be
screened earlier.

Encourage your loved ones to
get rested.


If you are 50 or oldes: talk
to your doctor today about
having a colonoscopy done
locally at George E. Weems
Memorial Hospital in
Apalachicola. (850) 653-8853

WEEMS
n c
.
www.weemsmemonal.com


GALA Theater to present murder mystery force


Births and BIR TH DAY S


,

Jaelyn Allen marks first birthday



A year of precious moments, new
and fun,
Our beautiful angel is turning 1!
Jaelyn Grace Allen who turned
1 year old on Wednesday, March 10, will
celebrate with a birthday party on Sat-
urday, March 13 at 1:30 p.m. at Battery
Park in Apalachicola.
Jaelyn is the daughter of Dwayne
and Sandra Allen, of Eastpoint.
Paternal grandparents are Harley
and Margaret Allen, of Apalachicola.
/ ( Maternal grandparents are Selma
Shiver Roberts, and the late George
Braswell, of Eastpoint.
All family and friends are invited.






YOdy Johnson born

Brody Drake Johnson was born at
6:18 p.m. On Monday, Jan.25, 2010 at
r Gulf Coast Medical Center in Panama
Cit .
He weighed 7 pounds and 4 ounces
and was 19% inches long.
He is the son of Kim and Brock
Johnson, and younger brother to
Alexus and Abby, all of Apalachicola.
Maternal grandparents are Tom
and Nedy Leavins, of Austin, Col.
Paternal grandparents are Robbie and
Marcia Johnson, of Apalachicola.
Great-grandparents are Ada
Leaving of Panama City, Inez and the
late Paul Johnson of Apalachicola,
and Bill and Burnell Martina of
Apalachicola.


COH CanCeT OItCH







































(ARD OF THANKS

ISland Trash Patrol
The St. George Island Trash Patrol sends out
a huge round of gratitude to the people who
hauled out 35 big, heavy bags of post-Chili
Cookoff trash from the center of the island on
Sunday morning: John Olander, Bob Pruitt, Anna
Carmichael, Dail Mullins, Betty Sellers, John and
Dee Grinenko, Fran and Ann Giknis, Jim Dunkin
(our anchorman), and Marty Beech and her sister
and brother-in-law.
Thanks also to the more than 50 volunteers
who regularly clean up their neighborhoods. If
you would like to help keep the island clean and
beautiful, you can also volunteer by contacting me
at adalong@uab.edu and/or by cleaning up your
own trash (please).
Ada LOM



ACF Stakeholders
The Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint
Stakeholders, working together to share a
common resource, would like to thank the many
generous sponsors who helped make the Feb. 25
and 26 governing board meeting in Apalachicola
0 SUCCeSS.
Our thanks to the Franklin County Tourist
Development Council, City of Apalachicola,
Apalachicola Bay Chamber of Commerce,
Apalachicola National Estuarine Research
Reserve, Liberty County, Buddy Ward & Sons
Seafood, Water Street Seafood, Lee Garner,
June & Dick Dosik, Andrew Smith, Beacon Villa,
Apalachicola Riverkeeper, Neal Land & Timber
Company Philip McMillan, RiverWay South-
Apalachicola Chad Taylor, Lake Seminole
Association, Apalachicola Maritime Museum and
Wayne Thomas Construction.


SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Yoga is happening in Carrabelle. Every week there is yoga with video and
friends at the Carrabelle Library on Mondays and Thursdays at 4:30 p.m.
No experience necessary. Yoga with Cass on Tuesdays at 5 p.m. at the
Senior Center in Carrabelle. Call 294-9664 or 850-567-0879 for more info.



NOWS BRIEFS


The United Methodist Churches

SOf Franklin County Welcome Youl
First United Methodist Church of Apalachicola
M orship Service 11:00 a.m. every Sunday
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
75 5" St. Apalachicola 653-9530 fumcapalach@gtcom~net
Pastor: Rev. Them Patriotis
Carrabelle United Methodist Church
Worship Services 10:45 a.m. Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
"Celebrate Recovery" Mondays 7-9 p.m.
Healing service first Tuesday each month-7 p.m.
102 NE 1ve B Ca rabell n697-3672

Eastpoint United Methodist Church
Prorship Serviceal0:e0s0 a.m i 1 Sudm.
Healing Service every first Fridays of the Month at 6:30 p.m.
317 Patton Dr. (corner of David St.) 670-8825
Pastor: Rev. Beth White
St. George Island United Methodist Church
9:00 a.m. Worship Service
10:00 a.m. Fellowship Hour
201 E. Gulf Beach Dr. 927- 4635 wviviv~sgiumc.org
Pastor: Rev. Them Patriotis


First Pentecostal Holiness Church
379 Brownsville Road Apalachicola


Sunday School 9:45 am
Sunday Morning Worship 10:45 am
Sunday Evening Service 6:00 pm
Monday, Youth Group 6:30pm
Wednesday, Royal Rangers, G.A.P. 7:00 pm
Wednesday Worship & Word 7:30 pm
Nursery Provided during regular church services


St. Patrick Catholic Church
Ave C & Sixth Street in Apalachicola, FL 32329 or
The Islander (Across from the Blue Parrot)
on St. George Island, FL 32328
(850) 653-9453 Email: stpatcathCafairpoint.net
R4STOR: RATHER ROGER L4TOSYNSKI
WWW.stpatricksmass.com
AR4L4CHICOL4 MASS SCHEDULE
SATURDAY................ .................5 Phi
SUNDAY ................ ................ 10 AM
ST. GEORGE ISLAND MASS SCHEDULE
SUNDAY ................ .................8:30 Ahi


IV


Thursday, March 11, 2010


Local


The Times | B3


On Saturday
night, March 13,
run your clocks
ahead one hour.
Daylight Say-
ings Time begins.
While you're at it,
check the batter-
ies in your smoke
alarms.


your favorite bev-
erage. We have
shuffleboard, pool,
bar bingo, and live
music. Hamburger
and fries are $6.
Friday and
Saturday ar camp
Gordon Johnston
Days. Welcome


By Lois hoboda
Times StaffWriter
At their Feb. 16 meeting, the
county commission voted unani-
mously to declare April 3, 2010
"Tonya's Hope Day."
Tonya's Hope is a Franklin Coun-
ty charity to benefit residents who
have been diagnosed with cancer.
The organization is based at Ameri-
can Legion Post 92 on Oak Street in
Lanark Village.
The fund was created to honor
Tonya Bridges of the village, who
died of cancer in 2007.
This year there will be a fund-
raiser held at the Legion Hall on
Saturday, April 3 with a pig roast,
silent auction, yard sale and live
entertainment. Tonya's F\md Chair-
woman Kathy Ingersoll said the sale
will start at 9 a.m., with a religious
service at noon, followed by lunch.
The auction begins at 3 p.m.
The pig roast will be prepared by
Thomas Lee Brannon of Carrabelle.
Kenny Pigg and Evelyn McAnally,
both of Carrabelle, will perform live
music at the event.
Ingersoll is seeking donations of
cash, as well as of items for the sale
and auction. If you wish to make a
donation, you can call her at 697-
9533 or call the Legion Hall at 697


LANIARK NEWS


Had good sup-
port for the Golf Club
breakfast last Friday. Ev-
erything was very good.
The members thankyou
for coming out.
The Golf Club banquet
is being held at the Lanark
Boat Club on Thursday,
March 11. Social hour at 6
p.m., dinner at 7 p.m. Hope
you can make it.
Join your friends at
the Legion on Friday
night and enjoy a huge
hamburger and fries, and


party at the Le-
gion, Friday March 12.
Breakfast Saturday, March
13 at Curfew Lodge in
Carrabelle, and the big
parade. Breakfast at the
Lodge starts at 8 a.m., pa-
rade steps off at 10 a.m.
Be kind to one another,
check in on the sick and
housebound smile, Je-
sus loves you.
Until next time, God
Bless America, our troops,
the poor, homeless, and
hungry.


LOIS SWOBODA | The Times


9998 after 4 p.m.
New this year is a raffle for a
Carnival Cruise. Tickets for the
raffle cost $5 and are available by
calling Ingersoll or the Legion Hall.
The drawing is 6 p.m. at the cel-
ebration.
Ingersole told the commission


Sh BR IE FC U
rent diet. Start off slowly and make
changes to work towards a healthier
lifestyle. Try getting the most nutri-
tion out of your calories. Choose foods
packed with vitamins, minerals, fiber
and other nutrients and lower in
calories.
Healthy eating tips.
*Emphasize fruits, vegetables,
whole grains and fat-free or low-fat
milk and milk products.
*Include lean meats, poultry, fish,
beans, eggs and nuts.
*Eat foods low in saturated fats,
trans fats, cholesterol, salt (sodium)
andaddedsugars.
*Be aware of portion sizes.
For more tips on building your


that Tonya's Hope tries to provide
money for expenses that may not be
covered by other charities like bab-
ysitters, gas for travel and house-
keeping for shut-ins.
She said this year the fund drive
will go countrywide and the goal is to
raise $12,000.


BUild a healthy diet frOM
d
gf0UN Up
The Franklin County Health De-
partment is celebrating March as
National Nutrition Month and Regis-
tered Dietitian Day on March 10. Na-
tional Nutrition Month is sponsored
each year by the American Dietetic
Association to encourage people to fo-
cus on eating better.
This year's theme is "Nutrition
from the Ground Up," a great remind-
er for eating fruits, vegetables, grains,
nuts and beans to create a healthy
diet.
National Nutrition Month is a good
time to take a good look at your cur-


healthy diet from the ground up, con-
tact the Leon County Health Depart-
ment at 850-606-8300 and ask to speak
to a nutritionist or visit www.eatright.
org or www.mypyramid.gov to make
your own healthy plan.

Degree family to hold March
13 f0Uni0H
The Segree family of Eastpoint
would like to announce that this year's
family reunion will be held on Satur-
day, March 13 at Eastpoint Fire De-
partment. The party begins at 11 a.m.
Bring a covered dish and old pic-
tures. For more information call Inez
Degree at 670-1115.


THE
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
WELCOMES YOU


THE


Hwy. 98 & 6th St.
Apalachicola
SUNDAY: 8:00 Ahi lo:30 AM
LIBRARY HOURS:
SUNDAY 12:00 2:00 Phi
MONDAY 11:00 AM 1:00 Phi
WEDNESDAY 12:00 2:00 Phi
TIRTRSDAY 3:30 5:30 Phi


Mosteller said.
He said work on the han-
gar has been hampered by
bad weather and the site is
currently "a muddy mess."
The commission voted
unanimously to advertise
for bids when the project is
nearer to completion.
By Lois Swoboda

(0unty corresponds
h k
Wit Nauti prO
County planner Alan
Pierce has exchanged let-
ters with Nautikpro, a Ger-
manboathrokerinresponse
to a Request for Proposals
published by Enterprise
Florida. The company is a


dealership for several lines
of inflatable vessels often
used as dinghies for large
pleasure craft.
Nautikpro is seeking 200
square feet of office space
located near an airport and
a variety of water features
where they can test their
products.
Pierce said he listed the
hangars at the Apalachicola
Regional Airport currently
available for lease. He said
Nautikpro has responded
to his letter expressing in-
terest but the response was
in German. He said he may
seek a local translator to aid
in future exchanges.
-By Lois Swoboda


80 bids for neW
.
0190rt hangar
At their March 2 meeting,
the county commission was
disappointed not to receive
a single proposal to lease
the new hangar currently
under construction.
Ted Mosteller said the
property was advertised in
the Times and in Hangar
11-ader, an international In-
ternetbasedpublication.He
said he received calls from
England and other parts of
Europe about the lease.
"He said there were two
or three people who were
interested but couldn't get
a proposal together in time,


April 3 declared 'Tonya's Hope Day'


Lanark NEWS


Obituary

Rebecca Lee
Jackson
Rebecca "Beckey"
Lee Jackson was
born April 15, 1953
in Port St. Joe, to the
now late Darlene and
Fred Massey.
She passed away
Sunday, March 7,
2010, in Tallahassee
after a long and
brave battle with
cancer.
Beckey was the
former Clerk of the
City of Carrabelle
and a member of the
First Baptist Church
of Carrabelle.
She is survived
by her husband,
Ronnie Jackson;
children, Michelle
Meyer, Heather
Cordova, and Ellis
Jackson; sisters,

:rneMH l and
brother, Cliff Massey;
grandchildren,
Kendall Meyer,
Jackson Meyer,
Hayleigh Cordova,
Jordan Jackson,
and Brady Jackson;
and her father and
mother-in-law,
George and Virginia
Jackson.
Services were
held on Wednesday,
March 10 at First
Baptist Church with
burial in Evergreen
Cemetery.
All arrangements
under the direction
of Kelley-Riley
Flmeral Home, 309
Tallahassee St.,
Carrabelle.


STAY HEALTHY WITH YOGA


Trnmty


WELCOMES YOU
Church

1-' " .
an gan
FT CII I L) II
101 NE First Street
Carrabelle
SUNDAY
10:00 AlVI





L


SWAT is making a strong effort to have a presence here in Franklin County. SWAT
recognizes the negative effects of the use of tobacco products and actively works
to encourage our youth, young adults, and adults to never become involved with
this addictive influence through education, prevention, and fun activities. SWAT
is a part of the Tobacco Free Franklin Partnership Coalition.

If you are a teen between the ages of 11 years of age and older and would like
to join the Franklin County SWAT Program, please see our SWAT Advisors listed
below to help make a positive change in Franklin County.

Lt. Pamela Lewis at ABC School, Project Impact and Apalachicola Boys & Girls Club
Mrs. Felicia O'Neal at the Carrabelle Boys & Girls Club
Mrs. Delores Croom at Franklin County School

If you would also like to join the Tobacco Free Franklin Partnership, please
attend our next meeting scheduled for March 17, 2010 at 5:30 p.m. at the
Franklin County Health Department.


Thursday, March 11, 2010


B4 | The Times


Local


FRANI{LIN COI NTY
SWAT NEEDS YOI !
What is SWAT? SWAT is Students Working Against Tobacco













































































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697-2783 or Mobile 566-26


ontractors


I


I I


Thursday, March 11, 2010


Local


The Times | B5


The following report is provided
by the Franklin County Sheriffs
Office. Arrests are made by officers
from the following city, county, and
state law enforcement agencies:
Apalachicola (APD), Carrabelle
(CPD), Florida Highway Patrol
(FHP), Franklin County Sheriffs
Office (FCSO), Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation Commission
(FWC), Florida Department of En-
vironmental Protection (FDEP),
Florida Division of Insurance
Fraud (DIF) and Florida Depart-
ment of Agriculture and Consumer
Services (FLDOACS).
All defendants are considered
innocent until proven guilty in a
court of law.
March 4
Christopher B. Buzbee, 40,


Sheriff's REPORT
Apalachicola, five counts of uttering
a forged document (APD)
Mildred Siples, 51,
Apalachicola, disorderly intoxica-
tion (APD)
March 6
Kendrah W. Hurd, 23, Apala-
chicola, two counts of domestic
battery, battery on a law
enforcement officer, criminal mis-
chief and violation of probation
(APD)
Glenn D. Buffkin, 48, Carrabelle,
driving while license suspended
(CPD)
Jonathan S. Schricker, 25, Tal-
lahassee, DUI and refusal to submit
to a breath test (FHP)
John M. Grant, 20, Monticello,
DUI, possession of less than 20


grams of cannabis and possession
of paraphernalia (FHP)
Jonathan E Lindlau, 27, Talla-
hassee, DUI (FHP)
March 7
James A. Reeves, 28, Moultrie,
Ga., DUI and refusal to submit to a
breath test (FCSO)
Terrance T. Newsham, 50, Talla-
hassee, battery (APD)
March 8
Carlo Daugherty, 23, Clearwa-
ter, preventing or obstructing extin-
guishment of fire (FCSO)
March 9
Justin L. Mathis, 21. Crawford-
ville, Leon County violation of pro-
bation (FCSO)


L* I Eg(


fiVOFS UnilUrt in U.S. 98 mishap
A two-car collision on U.S. 98 west of Apalachic-
ola Friday morning spared injury to the drivers,
but damaged both of their vehicles.
According to the report by Florida Highway
Patrol Trooper Brian Speigner, Lois Swoboda, 58,
of Apalachicola, was stopped on the north shoulder
of the highway about 3.5 miles west of Apalachicola
when she initiated a U-turn in her 2003 Nissan
truck at around 11:09 a.m.
As it crossed the westbound lane, and prepared
to head east, the front end of Swoboda's truck
struck the driver's side of a 2004 Toyota van being
driven east by Lucretia Ann Meeth, 68, of Kalama-
zoo, Mich.
Both women were wearing their seat belts and
alcohol was not a factor in the crash. Meeth suf-
fered minor injuries and was treated on the scene
by Weems Memorial EMS personnel.
Swoboda was cited for improper U-turn, and
expired tag less than six months. Damage to her
vehicle was estimated at $4,000, and to Meeth's
$8,000.

alachicola olice
Ap p ,
SilenH staff sobriety checkpoints
The Apalachicola Police Department, assisted
by the Franklin County Sheriff's office, is con-
ducting vehicle safety and sobriety checkpoints
throughout the city, including Market Street, U.S.
98 West and State Route 384, during March.
Dates for the checkpoints are Friday, March 19;
Sunday, March 21; Monday, March 22; and Friday,
March 26.
Drivers suspected of intoxication will be given
roadside standard field sobriety exercises to deter-
mine intoxication levels, and confirmed drunk driv-
ers will arrested. Drivers not identified as drinking
drivers will be allowed to proceed with minimal
delay.
While some area motorists might be slightly
inconvenienced by these checkpoints, citizen pa-
tience and cooperation will assist in this important
safety effort.

Apalachicola to conduct saturation patrols
The Apalachicola Police Department will be
conducting saturation patrols throughout March in
Apalachicola, from 7 p.m. to 4 a.m. nightly. Check-
points will also be conducted in March, the dates to
be posted soon.
The saturation patrols or "wolf packs" will be
concentrating on impaired drivers. Realizing the
dangers of impaired driving, the police department
wants to educate the public, remove impaired div-
ers from the roadways and help ensure a safe driv-
ing environment for all citizens.

If00ners continue vehicle inspection stons
C F F
Members in Troop H, Quincy district, of the
Florida Highway Patrol continue to conduct driver
license/vehicle inspection checkpoints through
Wednesday, March 31 during daylight hours at the
following locations in Franklin County: State Route
30, SR 30A, SR 65, SR 384, SR 67, SR 377, SR 385,
County Road 370, CR 157, CR 59, CR 374, CR 30A
and SR 300 (St. George Island Causeway).
All personnel participating in the checkpoints
will be responsible for following the procedures
outlined in Chapter 17.12 of the Florida Highway
Patrol Policy Manual regarding driver license
and vehicle inspection checkpoints, said Lt. Mark
Brown.


HAPPENINGS
The Carrabelle Social Club is honored to host
author Robert Beard at the Carrabelle branch of
the Franklin County Public Library, on Thursday,
March 11 from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. Beard, a New Or-
leans native and graduate of Georgia Tech and
Louisiana State University, is the author of the
Shawn Barton Adventures, with his first in the
series titled "The Runaway," a novel set in the Pa-
cific islands. Beard, along with his wife has sailed
the Caribbean and uses his sailing experiences
to enrich and enhance his novels. Come and hear
this experienced sailor tell tales of adventures on
the high seas, and how he brings it all together
into prose. Beard's books are available at Down-
town Books in Apalachicola, Carrabelle Pharmacy,
Amazon, Borders, Barnes & Noble and other book
stores.
The Friends of the Franklin County Public Li-
brary will hold a Soup and Book Sale from 10 a.m.
to 2 p.m., Saturday, March 13 in the parking lot of
Taylor's Hardware on U.S. 98 in Eastpoint. Deli-
cious homemade soups will be available in large
and small quantities, along with books for all ages
for sale. All proceeds support the new library build-
ing. Stop by and browse the books and then take
home a quart or two of soup.
Free computer classes continue throughout
March at the Carrabelle branch and the Eastpoint
Library. Both sites provide computers for class use,
helpful handouts and qualified instructors through
the Wilderness Coast Library.
Course offerings at the Carrabelle branch are
"Computer Basics III," on Saturday, March 13, from
10 a.m. to 1 p.m., "Microsoft Outlook" scheduled for
Friday, March 19, from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. and
later that same day "eBay: Buying Guide" from 1:30
to 4:30 p.m
If you're in Eastpoint drop by the library on Fri-
day, March 12, from 2 to 5 p.m. and participate in
uComputer Basic III: Getting the most from your
computer." On Thursday, March 18, from 9:30 a.m.
to 12:30 p.m., Deanna Ramsey will teach "Microsoft
Excel III."
The following week, on Thursday, March 18,
Deanna will offer "Microsoft PowerPoint II." Learn
how to customize a presentation for your next
meeting.
To register for any of the above mentioned com-
puter classes call the Carrabelle library at 697-2366
or the Eastpoint library at 670-8151.


LUSTER FO'S FEBRUARY
OFFER OF THE MONTH



1
R. A DEPAR
RRECTI
9 -- c -














SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Franklin Correctional Institution has selected
Officer Thomas Luster as its officer of the month
for February 2010. Employed at FCI since Oct.
2006, Luster is assigned to Bay City Work Camp
where he heads up the institution's farming
operation. He has overseen the farming program
since it was reinstituted this past spring. Under his
supervision the operation has produced thousands
f d f bI h h ollardpoun so vegeta es, suc as squas c s
and cucumbers, all of which have been used to
supplement the inmate meals at Bay City Work
Camp and Franklin CI. This has resulted in a
tremendous savings to the State of Florida. Luster
was nominated for the award by Lt. Richard Hicks,
who cited that Luster is a loyal and dedicated
employee who is a true team player. Luster, at
right, above with Lt. Shelia Watson, resides in
Apalachicola with wife Scarlyn


* Roofi


Law BRIEFS


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(Herelnafter collectively the


Franklin County's source of news for more than a century


| 1100
Dated this 10th day of Feb-
ruary, 2010.
In accordance with the
Americans with Disabilities
Act, persons needing a
reasonable accommoda-
tlon to participate in this
proceeding should, no
later than seven (7) days
prior, contact the Clerk of
the Court's disability coor-
dinator at 8506972112,
PO. BOX 340, APALACHI-
COLA FL, 32320. If hearing
Impaired, contact (TDD)
8009558771 via Florida
Relay System.
Ben-Ezra & Katz, PA.
Attorneys for Plaintiff
2901StirlingRoad,
Sulte 300
Fort Lauderdale, Florida
33312
Telephone: (305) 770-4100
Fax: (305) 653-2329
March 4, 11, 2010
6072T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE SECOND JUDI-
CIAL CIRCUIT OF FLOR-
IDA IN AND FOR FRANK-
LIN COUNTY
WACHOVIA MORTGAGE
CORPORATION,
Plaintiff,
Vs.
NATHAN NEWELL; HOLLY
NEWELL A/K/A HOLLY C.
NEWELL; PAUL NEWELL;
JOYCE NEWELL; UN-
KNOWN TENANT #1; UN-
KNOWN TENANT #2,
Defendants.
CASE NO. 08-000473 CA
NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN pursuant to a Final
Judgment of Foreclosure
dated February 8, 2010,
and entered in Case No.
08-00473 CA. of the Circuit
Court of the Second Judl-
clal Circuit in and for
Franklin County, Florida,
wherein WACHOVIA
MORTGAGE CORPORA-
TION, is a Plaintiff and NA-
THAN NEWELL; HOLLY
NEWELL A/K/A HOLLY C.
NEWELLPAULNEWELL;
JOYCE NEWELL; UN-
KNOWN TENANT #1;
UNKNOWN TENANT #2
are the Defendants. MAR-
CIA M. JOHNSON as The
Clerk of the Circuit Court
will sell to the highest and
best bidder for cash at, at
11:00 AM on March 17,
2010, the following de-
scribed property as set
forth in said Final Judg-
ment, to wit:
LOT 6, BLOCK C, ST
JAMES ISLAND PARK,
UNIT NO. 1, A SUBDIVI-
SION, AS PER MAP OR
PLAT THEREOF RE-
CORDED IN PLAT BOOK
1, PAGE 19, OF THE PUB-
LIC RECORDS OF FRANK-
LIN COUNTY FLORIDA.

Any person claiming an In-
terest in the surplus from
the sale, If any, other than
the property owner as of
the date of the Ils pendens
must file a claim within 60
days after the sale.
Dated this 10th day of Feb-
ruary, 2010.
MARCIA M. JOHNSON


Oyster Tongs, build new
ones and do repairs. Port-
able welding service. Call
Tommy 850-653-6208


| 1100
run North 41 degrees 18
minutes, 24 seconds East
of 100.00 feet to a rod and
cap lying on the South-
westerly right of way of 5th
Street; thence run along
said right of way South 48
degrees 44 minutes 15
seconds East 90.00 feet to
a rod and cap; thence
leaving said right of way
run South 41 degrees 18
minutes 24 seconds West
100.00 feet to a rod and
cap lying on the Northeast-
erly right of way of said 30
foot roadway; thence run
along said right of way
North 48 degrees 44 mln-
utes 15 seconds West
90.00 feet to the POINT OF
BEGINNING.
Has been filed against you
and you are required to
serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, If any, to it,
on Marshall C. Watson,
PA. Attorney for Plaintiff,
whose address is 1800
NW 49th STREET SUITE
120, FL LAUDERDALE FL
33309, within thirty (30)
days after the first publica-
tion of this Notice and file
the original with the Clerk
of this Court either before
service on Plaintiffs attor-
ney or immediately there-
after; otherwise a default
will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in
thecomplaint.
In accordance with the
Americans with Disabilities
Act (ADA), disabled per-
sons who, because of their
disabilities, need special
accommodation to particl-
pate in this proceeding
should contact the ADA
Coordinator at 33 Market
Street, Sulte 203, Apalachl-
cola, FL 32320, or Tele-
phone Volce/TDD (904)
643-8861 prior to such
proceeding.
WITNESS my hand and
seal of this Court on this
28th day of January, 2010.
Marcla Johnson
As Clerk of the Court
By: Terry E. Creamer
As Deputy Clerk
March4,11,2010

5969T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
FRANKLIN COUNTY
FLORIDA
RBC CENTURY BANK,
Plaintiff
vs.
WATFORD, NEVA J., et al.,
Defendants
CASE No.
19-2009-CA-000313
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO:
NEVA J. WATFORD
239 CROSS CREEK
COURT
EASTPOINT FL 32328
NEVA J. WATFORD
908 WEST GORRIE DRIVE
SAINT GEORGE ISLAND,
FL 32328
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
NEVA J. WATFORD
239 CROSS CREEK
COURT
EASTPOINT FL 32328
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
NEVA J. WATFORD
908 WEST GORRIE DRIVE
SAINT GEORGE ISLAND,
FL 32328
AND TO: All person claim-
Ing an Interest by, through,
under, or against the
aforesaid Defendant(s).
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action to fore-
close a mortgage on the
following described prop-
erty located in Franklin
County, Florida:
LOT 11, BLOCK B, MAG-


1100
ney or immediately there-
after; otherwise a default
will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in
the complaint.
ANNOUNCEMENT
1100 Legal Advertising In accordance with the
1110 Classified Notices Americans with Disabilities
1120 Public Notices/ Act (ADA), disabled per-
Announcements sons who, because of their
1125 Carpools & disabilities, need special
1130 Ril oa accommodation to particl-
1140 Happy Ads pate In this proceeding
1150 -Personals should contact the ADA
1160 Lost Coordinator at 33 Market
1170 Found Street, Sulte 203, Apalachl-
cola, FL 32320, or Tele-
a phone Volce/TDD (904)
| 1100 643-8861 prior to such
proceeding.
5960T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT WITNESS my hand and
OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL seal of this Court on this
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR 28th day of January, 2010.
FRANKLIN COUNTY
FLORIDA Marcla Johnson
CIVIL DIVISION As Clerk of the Court
By: Terry E. Creamer
CHASE HOME FINANCE, As Deputy Clerk
LLC, March 4, 11, 2010
Plaintiff,
5961T
vs. IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL
CHESTER N. KRAWCZUK, CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
et al, FRANKLIN COUNTY,
Defendants. FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO.: SUNTRUST MORTGAGE,
19-2009-CA-000707 INC.,
Plaintiff,
NOTICE OF ACTION
vs.
TO:
CHESTER N. KRAWCZUK WILLIAM M. HITSON A/K/A
Last Known Address: 1105 WM. HITSON, et al,
Gray Avenue, Carrabelle, Defendants.
FL 32322
Also Attempted At: 3645 CASE NO.:
Ivy Rd., Apt. 100, Atlanta, 19-2009-CA-000695
GA 30342 and 1031 Merritt
Rd., Marletta, GA 30062 NOTICE OF ACTION
Current Address Unknown
TO:
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that CHARLA KEARCE, HEIR
an action of Foreclosure of OF THE ESTATE OF MAR-
Mortgage on the following ION E. CHASON, DE-
described property: CEASED A/K/A. CHARLA
CHASE KEARCE, HEIR OF
Situated in the City of THE ESTATE OF MARION
Carrabelle, County of E. CHASON, DECEASED
Franklin, and State of Flor-
Ida: Last Known Address: 76
5th Street, Apalachicola,
And known as being com- FL 32320
mence at the Southeast Also Attempted At: 400 S
corner of Section 20, Peachtree Street B,
Township7South, Range Norcross, GA 30071 and
4 West, Franklin County, 440 S Peachtree St. B,
Florida;and NorcrossGA30071
Current Address Unknown
Thence run South 89 deg.
58'45" West along the CHRIS CHASON, HEIR OF
South boundary of said THE ESTATE OF MARION
Section 20, a distance of E. CHASON, DECEASED
1179.95feet;
Last Known Address: 76
Thence run North 00 deg. 5th Street, Apalachicola,
06'54"East592.67feet; FL32320
Also Attempted At: 400 S
Thence run North 89 deg. Peachtree Street B,
57'O8" East 60.00feet; Norcross, GA 30071 and
440 S Peachtree St. B,
Thence run North 00 deg. Norcross, GA 30071
06'54" East 235.55 feet to Current Address Unknown
the point of beginning.
From said point of beginn- LINDA MCKNIGHT HEIR
Ing continue North 00 deg. OF THE ESTATE OF MAR-
06'54" East 234.45 feet to ION E. CHASON, DE-
the Southerly right-of-way CEASED
boundary of Grays Ave-
nue; Last Known Address: 76
5th Street, Apalachicola,
Thence North 89 deg. FL 32320
57'O9" East along said Also Attempted At: 400 S
Southerly right-of-way Peachtree Street B,
boundary 185.80 feet; Norcross, GA 30071 and
440 S Peachtree St. B,
Thence run South 00 deg. Norcross, GA 30071
54' West 234.45 feet; Current Address Unknown
Thence run South 89 deg. YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
57'O9" West 185.80 feet to an action of Foreclosure of
the point of beginning. Mortgage on the following
described property:
Tax ID#: 20-07S-04W-
4150-0010-0040 Lot 3 and West Half of Lot
Tax ID#: 20-07S-04W- 2, Block "16" of the City of
4230-0804-0050 Apalachicola being more
particularly described by
Has been filed against you recent survey as follows:
and you are required to Begin at a rod and cap
serve a copy of your writ- marking the Southwesterly
ten defenses, If any, to it, Corner of Lot 3, Block "16"
on Marshall C. Watson, of the City of Apalachicola,
PA. Attorney for Plaintiff, a subdivision as per map
whose address is 1800 or plat thereof recorded in
NW 49th STREET SUITE Deed Book M, Page 437,
120, FT LAUDERDALE FL of the Official Records Of-
33309, within thirty (30) flce of Franklin County,
days after the first publica- Florida, said point also ly-
tlon of this Notice and file Ing on the Northeasterly
the original with the Clerk right of way of 30 foot wide
of this Court either before roadway; thence from said
service on Plaintiffs attor- POINT OF BEGINNING


SB The Times Thursday, March 11, 2010


COVERING MILTON,


COLA


| 1100
NOLIA BAY ACCORDING
TO THE MAP OR PLAT
THEREOF RECORDED IN
PLAT BOOK 6, PAGE 21,
PUBLIC RECORDS OF
FRANKLIN COUNTY
FLORIDA.
has been filed against you,
an you are required to
serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, If any, to this
action, on Greenspoon
Murder, PA., Default De-
partment, Attorneys for
Plaintiff, whose address is
Trade Centre South, Sulte
700, 100 West Cypress
Creek Road, Fort Laud-
erdale, FL 33309, and the
file original with the Clerk
within 30 days after the
first publication of this no-
tice, otherwise a default
and judgment may be en-
tered against you for the
relief demanded in the
Complaint.
WITNESS MY HAND AND
SEAL OF SAID COURT on
this 25th day of January,
2010.
Marcla M. Johnson
As Clerk of said Court
By: Michelle Maxwell
As Deputy Clerk

A copy of this Notice of
Action, Complaint and Lls
Pendens were sent to the
abo ve named
Defendants) at the last
known address.
This is an attempt to col-
lect a debt. Any Informa-
tlon obtained will be used
for that purpose.
March 4, 11, 2010

6055T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR.FRANKLINCOUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
IN RE: ESTATE OF WILLIE
BELLE AKERS
File No.10000006 CP
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the
estate of Willie Belle Akers
deceased, whose date of
death was January 15
2010; Is pending in the Cir-
cult Court for Franklin
County, Florida, Probate
Division; File Number
10000006-CP; the address
of which is The Franklin
County Courthouse, Apa-
lachicola, Franklin County,
Florida 32320. The names
and addresses of the per-
sonal representative and
the personal
representative's attorney
are set forth below.
All creditors of the dece-
dent and other persons
who have claims or de-
mands against decedent's
estate, including unma-
tured, contingent or un-
Ilquidated claims, and who
have been served a copy
of this notice, must file
their claims with, this court
WITHIN THE LATER OF
THREE (3) MONTHS AF-
TER THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY
(30) DAYS AFTER THE
DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE
ON THEM
All other creditors of the
decedent and other per-
sons who have claims or
demands against the
decedent's estate, includ-
Ing unmatured, contingent
or unliquidated claims
must file their claims with
this court WITHIN THREE
(3) MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUB-
LICATION OF THIS NO-
TICE
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED
NOTWITHSTANDING THE
TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY
CLAIM FILED MO (2)


1100
YEARS OR MORE AFTER
THE DECEDENT'S DATE
OF DEATH IS BARRED.
THE DATE OF FIRST PUB-
LICATION OF THIS NO-
TICE IS: March 4, 2010
Personal Representative
John R. Akers
80 Mill Creek Rd.
Crawfordville, Florida
32327
Attorney for Personal Rep-
resentative
Charles A. Curran,
Florida Bar No. 274380
PO. Box 549
Carrabelle, Florida 32322
(850) 697-5333
Fax: (850) 697-5558
March4,11,2010

6065T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE SECOND JUDI-
CIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY
FLORIDA
CAPITAL CITY BANK,
Plaintiff,
v
SAMMY LAMAR THOMP-
SON, SR., Individually,
BEVERLY SANGAREE
THOMPSON, Individually,
SAMMY LAMAR THOMP-
SON, JR., Individually,
RIVERSIDE GROUR LLC,
RIVER'S EDGE
HOMEOWNER'S ASSOCl-
ATION OF APALACHI-
COLA, INC., a Florida
Non-Profit Corporation,
STATE OF FLORIDA DE-
PARTMENT OF REVENUE
f/k/a STATE OF FLORIDA
DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
AND THE INTERNAL REV-
ENUE SERVICE,
Defendants.
CASE NO.
2009-000506-CA
NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURESALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that pursuant to a
Final Judgment issued in
the Circuit Court of Frank-
Iln County dated February
2, 2010 in the cause
wherein CAPITAL CITY
BANK Is Plaintiff and
SAMMYLAMARTHOMP-
SON, SR., Individually,
BEVERLY SANGAREE
THOMPSON, Individually,
SAMMY LAMAR
THOMPSON, JR., Individu-
ally, RIVERSIDE GROUR
LLC, RIVER'S EDGE
HOMEOWNER'S ASSOCl-
ATION OF APALACHI-
COLA, INC., a Florida
Non-Profit Corporation,
STATE OF FLORIDA DE-
PARTMENT OF REVENUE
f/k/a STATE OF FLORIDA
DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
AND THE INTERNAL REV-
ENUE SERVICE, are De-
fendants, being Case No.:
2009-000506-CA, I will of-
fer to the highest and best
bidder or bidders for cash
at the front steps of the
Franklin County Court-
house, 34 Market Street,
Sulte 203, Apalachicola,
Florida, 32320, at 11:00
am (Central) on the 17th
day of March, 2010, the
following described prop-
erty as set forth in said Fl-
nal Judgment:
Parcel Number:
10-09S-08W-0380-0000-01
90
1494 Bluff Road, Apalachl-
cola, Franklin County, Flor-
Ida
LOT NINETEEN (19), EX-
CEPT 66 FEET IN WIDTH
NEXT TO AND ADJOIN-
ING LOT EIGHTEEN (18)
OF SAID LOT NINETEEN
(19), THE SAID EXCEP-
TION BEING 66 FEET BY
660 FEET NEXT TO LOT
18, IN SOUTHLAND, A
SUBDIVISION IN FRANK-
LIN COUNTY, FLORIDA,
AND BEING IN SECTION
34, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH,
RANGE 8 WEST AC-
CORDING TO THE MAP
OR PLAT THEREOF FILED


| 1100
AND RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK 1, PAGE 4, OF THE
PUBLIC RECORDS OF
FRANKLIN COUNTY
FLORIDA.

(Herinafter collectively the
"Bluff Road Property").

Any person claiming an In-
terest in the surplus from
the sale, If any, other than
the property owner as of
the date of the Lls Pend-
ens must file a claim within
sixty (60) days after the
sale.
WITNESS MY HAND and
the seal of this Court on
the 23rd day of February,
2010.
Marcla M. Johnson
Deputy Clerk of the Frank-
lin County Circuit Court
Michele Maxwell
Deputy Clerk
March 4, 11, 2010

6066T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE SECOND JUDI-
CIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY
FLORIDA
CAPITAL CITY BANK,
Plaintiff,
y
SAMMY LAMAR THOMP-
SON, SR., Individually,
BEVERLY SANGAREE
THOMPSON, Individually,
SAMMY LAMAR
THOMPSON, JR., Individ-
ually, RIVERSIDE GROUR
LLC, RIVER'S EDGE
HOMEOWNER'S ASSOCl-
ATION OF APALACHI-
COLA, INC., a Florida
Non-Profit Corporation,
STATE OF FLORIDA DE-
PARTMENT OF REVENUE
f/k/a STATE OF FLORIDA
DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
AND THE INTERNAL REV-
ENUESERVICE,
Defendants.
CASE NO.
2009-000506-CA
NOTICEOF
FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVENthatpursuanttoa
Final Judgment issued in
the Circuit Court of Frank-
Iln County dated February
2, 2010 In the cause
wherein CAPITAL CITY
BANK Is Plaintiff and
SAMMY LAMAR THOMP-
SON, SR., Individually,
BEVERLY SANGAREE
THOMPSON, Individually,
SAMMY LAMAR
THOMPSON, JR., Individu-
ally, RIVERSIDE GROUR
LLC, RIVER'S EDGE
HOMEOWNER'S ASSOCl-
ATION OF APALACHI-
COLA, INC., a Florida
Non-Profit Corporation,
STATE OF FLORIDA DE-
PARTMENT OF REVENUE
f/k/a STATE OF FLORIDA
DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
AND THE INTERNAL REV-
ENUE SERVICE, are De-
fendants, being Case No.:
2009-000506-CA, I will of-
fer to the highest and best
bidder or bidders for cash
at the front steps of the
Franklin County Court-
house, 34 Market Street,
Sulte 203, Apalachicola,
Florida, 32320, at 11:00
am (Central) on the 17th
day of March, 2010, the
following described prop-
erty as set forth in said Fl-
nal Judgment:
PARCEL 1
(01-09S-08W-8330-00E2-0
140)
87 Seahorse Street, Apa-
lachicola, Franklin County,
Florida
A CERTAIN LOT PARCEL
OR TRACT OF LAND
FRONTING 29 1/2 FEET
ON MARKET STREET AND
EXTENDING BACK 80
FEET TO THE CENTER
LINE OF THE BLOCK AND
COMPRISING 10 3/4 FEET
BY 80 FEET OF LOT 14


| 1100
AND 18 3/4 FEET BY 80
FEET OF LOT 15 OF
BLOCK E MO (2) OF THE
CITY OF APALACHICOLA
IN THE COUNTY OF
FRANKLIN AND THE
STATE OF FLORIDA, AC-
CORDING TO THE OFFl-
CIAL MAP OF SAID CITY
ADOPTED BY THE CITY
COMMISSION SEPTEM-
BER 12, 1946.

(Herelnafter the "Market
Street Property").
PARCEL 2
(27-08S-8W-1001-0000-019
0)
157 Sand Bar Road, Apa-
lachicola, Franklin County,
Florida
LOT 19, RIVERS EDGE,
PHASE II, A SUBDIVISION
AS PER MAP OR PLAT
THEREOF RECORDED IN
PLAT BOOK 7, PAGE 19,
OF THE PUBLIC REC-
ORDS OF FRANKLIN
COUNTY FLORIDA.

(Herelnafter the "Sand Bar
Road Property").
PARCEL 3
(27-08S-08W-0000-0020-05
13)
277 Paradise Lane, Apa-
lachicola, Franklin County,
Florida
COMMENCING AT A
TERRA COTTA MONU-
MENT MARKING THE
SOUTHWEST CORNER
OF SECTION 27, TOWN-
SHIP 8 SOUTH, RANGE 8
WEST FRANKLIN
COUNTY FLORIDA;
THENCE NORTH 00 DE-
GREES 01 MINUTES 22
SECONDS EAST ALONG
THE WEST LINE OF SAID
SECTION27,ADISTANCE
OF 1143.79 FEET TO A
5/8" IRON ROD WITH CAP
#LB6475; THENCE
NORTH 89 DEGREES 19
MINUTES 11 SECONDS
EAST, A DISTANCE OF
449.96 FEET TO A 5/8"
IRON ROD WITH CAP
#LB6475; THENCE
NORTH 00 DEGREES 03
MINUTES 14 SECONDS
WEST A DISTANCE OF
180.13 FEET TO A 5/8"
IRON ROD WITH CAP
#LB6475; SAID POINT
ALSO BEING THE POINT
OF BEGINNING. THENCE
CONTINUE NORTH 00
DEGREES 03 MINUTES 14
SECONDS WEST A DIS-
TANCE OF 110.15 FEET
TO A 5/8" IRON ROD
WITH CAP #LB6475;
THENCE NORTH 89 DE-
GREES 22 MINUTES 53
SECONDS EAST A DIS-
TANCE OF 450.44 FEET
TO A 5/8" IRON ROD
WITH CAP #LB6475;
THENCE SOUTH 00 DE-
GREES 03 MINUTES 51
SECONDS EAST A DIS-
TANCE OF 81.12 FEET TO
A 5/8" IRON ROD WITH
CAP #LB6475; THENCE
SOUTH 89 DEGREES 19
MINUTES 42 SECONDS
WEST A DISTANCE OF
208.63 FEET TO A 5/8"
IRON ROD WITH CAP
#LB6475; THENCE
SOUTH 00 DEGREES 02
MINUTES 42 SECONDS
EAST, A DISTANCE OF
28.62 FEET TO A 5/8"
IRON ROD WITH CAP
#LB6475; THENCE
SOUTH 89 DEGREES 19
MINUTES 42 SECONDS
WEST A DISTANCE OF
241.82 FEET TO A 5/8"
IRON ROD WITH CAP
#LB6475; AND THE
POINT OF BEGINNING.
TOGETHER WITH A
NON-EXCLUSIVE EASE-
MENT FOR INGRESS AND
EGRESS, UTILITIES AND
PURPOSES COMMONLY
ASSOCIATED WITH AC-
CESS WAYS OVER'
ACROSS AND WITHIN, AS
RECORDED IN OFFICIAL
RECORDS VOL. 490,
PAGE 15-17, PUBLIC
RECORDS OF FRANKLIN
COUNTY FLORIDA.


1100
"Paradise Lane Property").

Any person claiming an In-
terest in the surplus from
the sale, If any, other than
the property owner as of
the date of the Lls Pend-
ens must file a claim within
sixty (60) days after the
sale.
WITNESS MY HAND and
the seal of this Court on
the 23rd day of February,
2010.
Marcla M. Johnson
Deputy Clerk of the Frank-
lin County Circuit Court
Michele Maxwell
Deputy Clerk
March4,11,2010

6071T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE SECOND JUDI-
CIAL CIRCUIT OF FLOR-
IDA IN AND FOR FRANK-
LIN COUNTY
WACHOVIA MORTGAGE
CORPORATION,
Plaintiff,
vs.
EUGENE L. LERNER, JR.;
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
EUGENE L. LERNER, JR.;
CARRABELLE LANDINGS
HOMEOWNERS ASSOCl-
ATION, INC.; UNKNOWN
TENANT #1; UNKNOWN
TENANT #2,
Defendants.
CASE NO. 08000505CA
NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN pursuant to a Final
Judgment of Foreclosure
dated February 8, 2010,
and entered in case No.
08000505CA, of the Circuit
Court of the Second Judl-
clal in and for FRANKLIN
County, Florida, wherein
WACHOVIA MORTGAGE
CORPORATION, is a Plain-
tiff and EUGENE L. LER-
NER, JR.; UNKNOWN
SPOUSE OF EUGENE L.
LERNER, JR.;
CARRABELLE LANDINGS
HOMEOWNERS ASSOCl-
ATION, INC.; UNKNOWN
TENANT#1;UNKNOWN
TENANT #2 are the De-
fendants. MARCIA M.
JOHNSON as The Clerk of
the Circuit Court will sell to
the highest and best bid-
der for cash at, at 11:00
AM on March 17, 2010, the
following described prop-
ertyassetforthinsaidFl-
nal Judgment, to wit:
LOT 94, CARRABELLE
LANDING, ACCORDING
TO THE PLAT THEREOF
RECORDED IN THE PUB-
LIC RECORDS OF FRANK-
LIN COUNTY, FLORIDA,
IN PLAT BOOK 8, PAGE
47.

Any person claiming an In-
terest in the surplus from
the sale, If any, other than
the property owner as of
the date of the Ils pendens
must file a claim within 60
days after the sale.
Dated this 10th day of Feb-
ruary, 2010.
MARCIA M. JOHNSON
As Clerk of the Court
By Michele Maxwell
As Deputy Clerk


Th t ds sell
ese iny
hire, rent and inform for
thousands of families
each week. Let a little
Classified ad
do abig jo or you.






Franklin County's source of news for more than a century The Times Thursday, March 1 1, 2010 7B

| 110 | 110 | 100 | 100 110 | 110 | 2304100 | 6110

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NO CEpursluSant t RFE o 11Esquire. AlL 3VOE AS MWA L
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F h3m 3D v0e8 o c es pEa ptrirnia re d practice
Judgment of Foreclosure Telephone: (850) 234-5555 ALLEN'S DOCKSIDE MA- ALL CLAIMS NOT SO 3200 Firewood QU8 ifiC8tiOns: professional I sa4o
Atede Fe a se20 FAX 850)C%4-7B6 ch, FL RINE, INC. LOCATED AT EWILL BE FOREVER 6226T iPuases it On leadership experie ice with strong 2 Park Models
09-460-CAoftheCircuit 32417 TA2RRAGBRE AMFLDRll IFNORTHFERA IUITCC Ga8ge/YardSales interpersonalskills;staffsupervision; forSale!
Court of the Second Judl- Attorney for Plaintiff VESSEL MAY BE VIEWED The date of first publica- FLORIDA 3250 Good Thingsto Eat verbal/written com nunication 12 ft wide by 33 ft long.
clal Circuit in and for March4, 11, 2010 BY APPOINTMENT ONLY tion of this Notice is March 3260 Health & Fitness proficiency; budge management Duplex, 2 units per build-
Frank nC tACHFllC L 6079T March 4, 11, 2010 11, 2010. IN RE: The Estate of: Mea irny/clothing experience; working knowledge of IntchEach h t hasfrbath,
STATE BANK, A DIVISION NOTICE OF Co-Personal Representa- FERRIS B. HARDEE, SR., 3290 EMqe ipomeE uipment COmputers & software applications; micr ave, rand f r
OF COASTAL COMMU- SHERIFF'S SALE 6125T tive: cease 3300 Miscellaneous 2-5 years health care management beds. Asking $12K as Is.
NITY BANK, is the Plaintiff IN THE CIRCUIT COURT Rosemary H. Coleman FILE NO.2010-11-PR 3310 Musicallnstmments experience or college degree. Send You haul if you purchase.
and RICHARD KEY and NOTICE IS HEREBY OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL 9129 Coffee Road 3320 Plants & Shrubs/ See at Carrabelle Beach
OLYMPIA KEY are the De- GIVEN That pursuant to a CIRCUIT IN AND FOR Hahira, GA31632 PROBATE DIVISION Supplies FOSume to HRdepartment@nfmc.org RV Resort, 1843 HWY 98
pendants, I will sell to the Writ of Execution issued in FRANKLIN COUNTY Co-Personal Representa- NOTICE OF Cstaurant/Hotel Or fax (850) 298-6054. West in Carrabelle. Call
highest and best bidder for the Circuit Court of Frank- FLORIDA tive: 3350 Tickets (Buy & Sell) EOE/DF WP/IVI-F 850-697-2638



























TIDE TABLES MONTHLY AVERAGES
To find the tides of the following areassubtract the indicated times
from these given for APALACHICOLA:
HIGH LOW
Cat Point Minus 0:40 Minus 1:17
EastPass Minus0:27 Minus0:27
To find the tides of the following areassubtract the indicated times
from those given for CARH BIELLE: LOW
Bald Point Minus9:16 Minus0:03
APALACHICOLA


Koenig to lecture March 18 on goliath grouper


* *


OFTHE


Domino
This is Domino! He is an
adorable, happy, playful 9-week-
old Blue Heeler He has been
neutered and vaccinated and is
ready to go to a home where he
will be exercised and get plenty
of attention. He will make a
great family pet for a family
looking for a fun loving pup!
.
Volunteers are desperately needed to socialize Domino
and all of the other dogs and cats. We are always looking for
people willing to bring one of our animals into their home to
be fostered for various needs. Anytime you can spare would be
greatly appreciated.
Call Karen at 670-8417 for more details or visit the
Franklin County Humane Society at 244 State Route 65 in
Eastpoint. You may log onto the website at www forgottenpets.
org to see more of our adoptable pets.


9
"-'
,
)
am.
Call Today! .

850-370-6090


Thursday, March 11, 2010


Local


" " " " "


ENTRY FORM


By Despina Williams
Florida Freedom Newspapers
There are two kinds of
people in this world: those
who appreciate Peeps and
those who don't.
We're not saying one's
better than the other, but
we'd prefer to share our
sandbox with the former.
So once again, we in-
vite our fellow Peep aficio-
.
nados to enter the third
annual Panhandle Peep
ShowDioramaContest.
In case you missed it
the first time around, the
contest encourages peo-
eP ha Iserjitngsce s
marshmallow Peeps as all
human and animal char-
acters.
Entriesmusthehoused
in a box, shoebox or other
enclosure, and partici-
pants can work solo or in
teams.
The categories are as
follows: 5 and younger; 6-
10; 11-16; 17 and older; and
Business, whose entrants
must depict their work-
place, employees or some
aspect of their business.
We will award first,
second and third prizes in
each category.
Judges will base their
decision on the diorama's
design, quality of execu-
tion and resemblance to
OUP RPOR.
For the second year
in a row, Just Born Inc.,
the maker of Peeps, has
signed on as a national


Date
u 11
Sat, Mar 13
Sun, Mar 14
MonMar 15
TueMar 16
WedMar 17


High
o
640
630
630
620
630


%Precip

10 %
10 %
20 %
10 %
60 %


Tape the entry form
to the back of the
diorama and submit
the finished work by 5
9 7'.m. Thursday March
25, to:

The Star
135 W. Highway 98
Port City Shopping
Center
Port St. Joe, FL
32457
The Times
129 Commerce St.
Apalachicola, FL
32320

AH entries will be
lectured on www.
storfl.com and www.
opolochtimes.com.
Just Born Inc. reserves
the right to post
winning diorama
images on its Peeps
Web site.


Namess:


Telephone
number:



CategorY
(check one):
5 and younger
- 6-10
11-16
- 17 and older
Business

Diorama title:


Brief description:


-t
*. .
l'
SPECIALTOTHETIMES
Crystal Everritt and David
Freeman took their Peeps
deer hunting last year.

sponsor. The company
has provided its "Sweet
Treats" gift boxes for our
first- and second-place
age group winners.
Third-place winners
will receive goody bags
filled with Peeps and other
mouth-watering delights.
LuLu's Sweet Expecta-
tions in Port St. Joe will
provide gift bags stocked
with goodies for our busi-
ness winners.
All entries must be re-
turned, with entry forms
attached, to The Times of-
fice by 5 p.m. on Thursday,
March 25. The winning
BHtfieS Will be featured in
our April 1 edition and on
our Web site.
We'll see you on the
Peep-side.


3/11 Thu 07:58AM
07:35PM
3/12 Fri 12:46AM
03:02PM
3/13 Sat 01:49AM
03:15PM
3/14 Sun 03:42AM
04:26PM
3/15 Mon 04:30AM
04:35PM
3/16 Tue 05:16AM
04:47PM
3/17 Wed 06:02AM
05:03PM


02:45PM 1.


08:36AM
08:22PM
09:08AM
09:02PM
10:33AM
10:37PM
10:53AM
11:10PM
11:10AM
11:40PM
11:27AM


3/11 Thu 0
0
3/12 Fri 0
0
3/13 Sat 1
0
3/14 Sun 0
0
3/15 Mon 0
0
3/16 Tue 0
0
3/17 Wed 0
0


Special to The Times
The Coastal & Marine Conserva-
tion Lecture Series will present "Go-
liath Grouper: The Return of a Na-
tive Floridian" on Thursday, March
18, from 7 to 9 p.m. in the Florida
State University Coastal & Marine
Auditorium.
The lecture will be presented
by Christopher Koenig, PhD, of the
Florida State University Depart-
ment of Biological Sciences. Light
refreshments will be served after
the lecture.
Goliath grouper (Epinephelus
itajara), a species indigenous to the
southeastern U.S., the Caribbean,
Brazil and the west coast of Africa,
has been overfished to the extent
that the World Conservation Union
has classified it as "critically endan-
gered." The species was protected
in the southeastern U.S. in 1990
through action by the Gulf of Mexico
Fishery Management Council and
the South Atlantic Fishery Manage-
ment Council, the National Marine
Fisheries Service, and the Florida


Southwest Florida, are critical to the
first six years of their development.
However, because of the degraded
state of most South Florida man-
groves, population recovery appears
to depend in large part on the Ten
Thousand Islands and adjacent ar-
eas.
Koenig will present the results of
studies on the patterns of recovery
and the ecology of goliath grouper in
Florida, including regional densities,
habitat characteristics, movements,
diet and spawning biology. He will
contrast his researcher's data with
the current opinions circulating in
the fishing community about the ef-
fects of the increasing goliath grou-
per population on other native spe-
cies.
The FSU marine lab, in asso-
ciation with Second Harvest of the
Big Bend, part of "The Nation's
Food Bank Network," is collecting
non-perishable food items at each
monthly lecture. If you plan to at-
tend a lecture, please bring an item
or two and help solve the hunger cri-
sis in our community.


DR. CHRIS KOENIG


Fish and Wildlife Conservation Com-
mission.
Since that time, there has been a
steady recovery, especially in Flori-
da. Koenig found that high-quality
mangroves, such as exist in the Ten
Thousand Islands, a chain of islands
and mangrove islets off the coast of


Launch Ramp! Huge Living Room and Dining Room with
2 sided Gas fireplace. Large Master Bedroom with separate
tub and shower 3 BR, 3 BA, Florida Room. Screened porch
overlooking the bay and canal. Ground level storage. Double
Garage. Work Room. Unfurnished,


BS | The Times


1her f~r l amALWAYS ONLINE


ALWAYS ONLINE


Enter our 3rd annual Panhandle Peep Show Diorama contest


CARRABELLE
5:45AM -0.2 L 01:20PM
5:22PM 1.3 L 11:21PM
6:23AM 0.0 L 01:37PM
6:09PM 1.0 L
2:24AM 2.1 H 06:55AM
1:50PM 1.9 H 06:49PM
1:17AM 2.1 H 08:20AM
3:01PM 1.9 H 08:24PM
3:05AM 2.1 H 08:40AM
3:10PM 2.1 H 08:57PM
3:51AM 2.1 H 08:57AM
3:22PM 2.2 H 09:27PM
4:37AM 1.9 H 09:14AM
3:38PM 2.2 H 09:56PM


SPONSORED BY


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