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Group Title: Apalachicola times
Title: The Apalachicola times
ALL ISSUES CITATION PDF VIEWER THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100380/00067
 Material Information
Title: The Apalachicola times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: H.W. Johnston
Place of Publication: Apalachicola Fla
Apalachicola Fla
Publication Date: February 25, 2010
Copyright Date: 2008
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1885.
General Note: Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00100380
Volume ID: VID00067
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 32911693
lccn - sn 95026907
 Related Items
Preceded by: Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by: Apalachicola herald

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        Page A 6
        Page A 7
        Page A 8
    Section B
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        Page B 2
        Page B 3
        Page B 4
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Shelling prog ram to help a stermen


I


YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER FOR MORE THAN 120 YEARS


Queen of Apalachicola, BI


VOL. 124 ISSUE 44


By David Adlerstein
Times City Editor
Franklin County's oyster har-
vesters will get a much-antici-
pated shot in the arm next week
when they start the county's
first individual boat oyster shell-
ing program in 25 years.
The monthly meeting of the
Franklin County Seafood Work-
ers Association has been moved
up to Monday, March 1, to begin
preparation for the shelling, ten-
tatively slated to begin Friday,
March 5.
Monday'smeetingwillbeheld


at 6 p.m. at the former Carra-
belle High School and is open to
FCSWA members only.
The Florida Department of
Agriculture and Consumer Ser-
vices plans to buy $100,000 in
shucked shell obtained mostly
from local sources, with some
coming from other locales along
the Gulf of Mexico, and then
spend another $100,000 to pay
seafood workers to distribute
the shell on oyster bars in Apala-
chicola Bay.
Taunya James, president
of the FCSWA, said an agree-
ment has been reached to be-


gin shelling Dry Bar off of St.
Vincent Island first, and then
probably move over to Cat
Point.
"I've been discussing it with
numerous oystermen. It has to
be put on the most productive
places so that it's used wisely,"
James said.
"The whole bay is in such had
shape; there are a lot of areas
that need shell planting," said
Kevin Begos, director of the
county's Oyster and Seafood
Task Force, which met Feb. 10 to
review shelling plans.
"I've been out there 40 years,


and it's the worst I've seen it,"
Jerry Williams said at the task
force meeting. "Anywhere you
go is depleted."
Money for the shelling pro-
gram is coming from federal
disaster relief funds that flowed
to the state after the devastat-
ing 2004 and 2005 hurricane sea-
sons.
James said Monday night's
meeting will outline to seafood
workers the shelling process,
which will be initiated from the
county's Seafood Landing Park
at Two Mile west of Apalachico-
la, often called Lombardi's after


the seafood processing plant
that used to be there.
The state plans to haul shell
to the park, and pile it on land.
A front-end loader will dump the
shells onto a platform; they will
then slide down a wooden chute
into the waiting oyster boats.
"They take it out to the dump
site, a designated area, sectioned
off with buoys marking the area,
and when they get there they're
going to have to drift; they won't
be able to anchor out," James
said. "They'll take a shovel and
See SHELLING A6


DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times
FWC commissioner and former Miami Dolphin lineman
Dwight Stephenson, a Hall of Famer, left, shares a
laugh with FWC executive director Nick Wiley.


Apalachicola welcomes

two-day FW(meeting

Fox penning temporarily shut down


By Lois Swoboda
Times Staff Writer
The Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation Com-
mission came to Apalachic-
ola last week for its regular
meeting, giving a much-
neededboosttotourism.
Highlighting the Feb.
17 and 18 meeting and
bringing in more than 60
interested hunters was
a decision by FWC to tem-
porarily ban fox and coyote
penning in Florida.
The FWC members and
staff filled area hotels and
packed restaurants for the
two-day meeting, part of
an outreach by FWC Chair-
man Rodney Barreto to
bring the regular meetings
out of the big cities and into
less-traveled rural areas.
"This has been one of
the best venues we've had.
This community has been


nothing but hospitable
and friendly," FWC Com-
missioner Brian Yablonski
said. "Pass the oysters."
FWC Commission Vice-
Chair Dick Corbett agreed:
"If we have another oyster,
I think we might float."
Barreto said he would
"love to do another meet-
ing here." He outlined a
tour that commissioners
took Feb. 18 to the Leavins
Seafood plant on the Apala-
chicola waterfront.
It's amazing to see
what they're doing," he
said. "I've never seen such
a clean facility. It's impres-
sive."
Barreto said he had
been in talks with oyster
industry leaders from the
area and is looking into
a plan to locate an FWC
employee at the oyster lab
See F WC A6


Tyrell Green, right, and Johnnie Jones share a plate of freshly shucked oysters at Saturday's African-
American History Celebration.


nu event ce rates science sons
5 TP


By David Adlerstein
.
Times City Editor
The importance of education
from the wonders of science to
the glory of the written word, took
center stage Saturday at Franklin
Square as Apalachicola's Hillside
community celebrated its seventh
annual African-American History
Celebration.
Under the watchful eyes of
Grand Marshal Myrtis Wynn-Wil-
liams, on the warmest and sunniest
day in several weeks, the parade
that kicked off the event at the Sixth
reet Park area got under way a
The celebration's sponsor,
H'COLA, the Hillside Coalition of
Laborers for Apalachicola, named
Wynn-Williams to the marshal hon-
or for her work with Project Hope,
a program that she created with
Rosa Tolliver to assist students in
the process of getting into and pre-
paring for college.
With campus visits, test prepa-
ration and career planning, Project
Hope helps supplement the work of
teachersandparentsinthechalleng-
ing process of getting young people
into and staying in college.
"We're not trying to reinvent the
wheel, just support programs that
are already in place. That's where
we sometimes lose it, between the
school and the message getting
home," said Wynn-Williams, one
of nine children born to Ocea and
Thomas Wynn in Apalachicola.


---
Parade Grand Marshal Myrtis Wynn-Williams, in beige suit, center,
snips the ribbon to open Saturday's African-American History
Celebration.


Special to The Times
On Feb. 17, members of
the Franklin County Sher-
iff's Office Narcotics Unit,
assisted by sheriff's depu-
ties and a K-9 unit, executed
a search warrant for a pos-
sible methamphetamine
lab at 99 11th St., Apartment
1-B, in Apalachicola.
Deputies reported find-
ing precursor chemicals,
paraphernalia and equip-
ment used for the manufac-
ture of methamphetamine,
along with four grams of
pure methamphetamine,
and paraphernalia for
smoking it. Also found was


Sister to twin sisters Ocea and
Andrea, twins Thomasina and
Thomas, sister Andrea and broth-
ers Arnold, Van and Adrian, Wynn-
Williams graduated from Chapman
High School in 1971 but then found
herself struggling.
"I couldn't find work," she said.
"I had two kids and was 33, and no
career. So I went into the Army."
For 23 years, from 1984 to 2007,
Wynn-Williams served in the Army,
with stints that included four years
in Germany, four years in South Ko-
rea, two tours of duty in Kuwait, in-
cluding Operation Enduring Free-
dom, and service in Spain.


She also served at Fort Gordon
in Georgia, where, after retiring
as a sergeant first class, she now
teaches basic electronics.
In addition to raising daughter
Sarah and son Kenneth, and now
doting on her three grandchildren,
Wynn-Williams earned three de-
grees, an associate in electrical
engineering from Georgia Military
College, a bachelor's in electron-
ics instruction from Southern Il-
linois University, and a master's in
instructional technology from Troy
University.
See HILL AS


XAVIER BRIAN
RUTHERFORD McDANIEL

evidence of a recent cook,
located in a trash bag in-
side the apartment.
Two subjects located in-
side the residence when the
warrant was executed were
Xavier Michelle Rutherford,
See METH AS


Phone: 850-227-1845


DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK:


Letter to the Editor ................... A4


Classifieds ................... ..... B6-7


Apa lachicola


Hope on the Hill


Meth lab uncovered


TABLE OF CONTENTS


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Thursday, February 25, 2010


A2 | The Times


Local


BRASSY SOUND:
The Tallahassee Brass
.
Quintet will perform
on Sunday, Feb. 28, at 4
.
p.m. at Trinity Episcopal
Church. The quintet will
entertain with a wide
variety of music, from
Baroque, Classical and
romantic to Broadway, Big
Band, Jazz, Dixieland and
popular favorites. This
concert performance will
be a thrilling highlight
ofllse Newell's 22nd
season, which is provided
through the Apalachicola
Area Historical Society.
Suggested donation is $3'
For more information, call
370-6201'
WAR IN
APALACHICOLA:
Mark Curenton, the
newpresidentof the
Apalachicola Area
Historical Society, will
deliver a lecture in the
Carriage House at the
Raney House beginning
at 5:30 p.m. on Thursday,
Feb. 25, on "The 1890 War
in Apalachicola." The
talk will focus on a strike
by the black sawmill
workers in town against
all of Apalachicola's
bustling sawmills, which
led to violence as state
troops were brought in
from Pensacola to quell
the situation. For more
information, call 370-6201.

On the horizon
KILLER CHILI: The
28th annual St. George
Island Regional Charity
Chili Cook-off & Auction
Inc. gets under way
Saturday, March 6. It is an
annual benefit for the St.
George Island Volunteer
Fire Department. More
than 70 contestants are
on the books, including
some past winners and
long-time favorites. This
year, for the first time, the
cook-off grounds will be
fenced and a $5 admission


B David Adlerstein
Times City Editor
Carrabelle'sRayMesser
always knew his deer dogs
had a good set of noses.
What he didn't know
was that they could handle
a shotgun, too.
On the morning of Jan.
26, Messer and his broth-
er, Pleas, and Ray's son,
Michael, were out hunt-
ing north of Carrabelle,
up Highway 67, in Liberty
County.
Their two dozen dogs
were tracking a deer along
County Road 22, the right-
of-way where the power
lines run, when a nice-look-
ing buck crossed the road,
and Michael shot it.
That's when the trouble
started, according to Eric
Johnston, the investiga-
tor with the Florida Fish
and Wildlife Conservation
Commission who took the
report.
Johnston said the dogs
all piled onto the fallen
buck, prompting Ray, Pleas
and Michael to go after
them and try to put them
into their boxes.
"They had laid a Rem-
Ington 870, a l2-gauge pump
shotgun, on the ground,"


said Johnston. "During all
the catching, evidently one
of the dogs stepped on the
trigger assembly of the
shotgun, and it pushed the
safety and the trigger at the
same time and discharged
the firearm."
That sent the nine .36-
inch pellets inside the 00-
buck 2 % -inch shell flying,
one of which struck Ray in
the right hand, about 15 to
20 feet away.
"They're pretty good-
sized pellets, like a ball
bearing," said Johnston.
"One pellet hit him on the
back side of the hand near
the middle and ring fin-
gers and then came out the
palm of his hand. Two of the
Other pellets hit the dog he
was holding, and the other
six are unaccounted for."
Ray bandaged his hand
and called his wife, who
drove him to Tallahas-
see Memorial Hospital,
Johnston said. Doctors
performed three-hour sur-
gery and repaired broken
bones and ligaments, put
in 15 stitches and sent him
home.
The dog that was hit
required $1,500 surgery
to get him fixed back up,
Johnston said.


News BR IE F S


The FWC officer joked
that he considered writing
the dog a ticket for acciden-
tally discharging a firearm
but decided against it. He
did note that although no
law was broken, the hunt-
ers were fortunate there
were no more serious in-
juries.
"It's lucky that's all
that happened," Johnston
said. "It was just a fluke'
just an unusual accident.
What was unusual to me
is that with a gun that's
on safety, it's hard to pull
the trigger. The dog had to
step on it just right so that
trigger would pull. It could
have been more than one
stepped on it."
Ray, who works at
Franklin Correctional In-
stitution, is recovering well
and is set to return to work
March 1. "I'm doing fine;
I'm doing good," he said.
Ray, however, has re-
ceived his fair share of rib-
bingfromfriends, including
an imaginary voice mes-
sage from Ripley's Believe
It or Not. .
The dog's shooting his
pa,' I had one of my bud-
dies say," said Ray. "I had
one tell me 'That dog will
hunt!


mm-mw.amassmaamomananwmarweaum-mi
KELSEY MARTIN | Special to the Times
Performing on Sunday afternoon at Trinity
Episcopal Church will be the Tallahassee Brass
Quintet, clockwise from upper left, Kenneth
Kronholz, trum et; Ben MclIwain, trombone; Scott
Gorman, trumpet; Doyle Smith, tuba; and Jack
Martin, French horn.


fee collected from adults.
Children younger than 12
enter free.
Grayson Shepard,
cook-off coordinator,
said new this year
are Parrotheads
in Perry"dise," the
Apalachicola and Lanark
Village fire departments,
Amanda Kollar of
Garden's Inc., two
teams from the culinary
program of Tallahassee's
Keiser University and
several others. Returning
favorites include Three
Sheets to the Wind,
Just Plane Chili, Bus to
Heaven Chili from Hell,
Panama City Beach
Bums (who won first
place last year), Outlaw
Chili, Laughing Pepper,
19th Bowl, Atlantic Coast
Chili Company, Whack-
A-Moles, Lighthouse
Chili (hometown
favorites), Decent Chili,
Hot Lips, Dead Serious
Chili (bringing four


teams), Team Waterdog,
Team Toilet Bowl, Red
Tail Chili, Bubba and
ChaCha's Chili, Nunn
Better, Atlanta and
Tallahassee Parrothead
Clubs, Chili Charlie,
Swamp Gas, Team Oaf,
Big Belly Chili, Resort
Vacation Properties, Red
Hot Chili Peckers and
EA.R.T, to mention just
a few.
Judges still are
needed; if you would
like to be the decider of
the best entry, then call
Shepherd at 653-6718.
If you want to make a
tax deductible donation
to the silent auction, then
call 927-2753 or simply
stop by the Jay Abbott
Fire House on East Pine
with your item. There will
be a preview of auction
items from 5-7 p.m.
Friday, March 5, at the
firehouse. Wine and beer
will be available at the
preview.


AFB, Naval Surface Warfare Center and
Naval Facilities Engineering Command.
On March 4, "The 8(A) what is it
and do I qualify?" workshop will feature
Laura Subel, PTAC program manager,
explaining the program, qualifications,
applications process and benefits.
To register, call 850-271-1108 or e-mail
name to MDarko@northfloridabiz.com.

Degree family to host reuni0H
The Segree family of Eastpoint
would like to announce that this year's
family reunion will be held on Saturday,
March 13, at Eastpoint Fire Department.
The party begins at 11 a.m. Bring a
covered dish and old pictures. For more
information, call Inez Segree at 670-1115.


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Now that's a hunting dog!


Out to SEE


GCCC to offer free workshe s
The Small Business Development
Center at Gulf Coast Community
College is offering a workshop for small
businesses on doing business with the
government. The workshops are free and
will be from 1 to 4 p.m. on Wednesday,
March 3, and 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. on
Thursday, March 4.
On March 3, the "How to do Business
with..." workshop will feature speakers
with about 30 minutes each to discuss
how to do business with their particular
agency, with a few minutes for Q & A
from the audience. Already confirmed
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Thursday, February 25, 2010


A4 | The Times


By Franklin County
United Fire Fighters Association
Special to the Times
Franklin County is
more than 70 miles long.
The ambulance service
maintains two ambulanc-
es, one in Eastpoint and
one in Lanark Village. The
only way to compensate
for this lack of coverage
is with the reliance on the
fire departments to sup-
ply immediate life-saving
emergency care.
The nationwide recog-
nized EMS emergency re-
sponse time for life saving
aid to be delivered to the
critical patient is five min-
utes or less after the call
for help. Obviously, Frank-
lin County's ambulance
service operates with-
in this time frame on less
than 50 percent emergency
calls. Our fire departments
are at the patient's side
within five minutes or less
on every call except for
some of the far extremes
of the county.
Only with the combina-
tion of county EMS and
our fire departments is
there any semblance of
emergency medical care
in the county. This is a bad
situation, but we have had
to accept it as the reality of
living in Franklin County.
The Franklin County
volunteer fire depart-
ments have purchased
radios enabling our fire
departments to monitor
and communicate with
Franklin County ambu-
lances. While monitoring
the county's ambulance
service some disturbing
and frightening practices
have been discovered. We
feel these practices are not
known by the public or our
government agencies.
On a good day, when
the Lanark ambulance is
at its station, its response
time to Alligator Point is
more than 25 minutes. If
the Lanark ambulance is
on another call, then the
Eastpoint ambulance's
response time to Alligator
Point is more than an hour.
The same scenario
exists on the other end
of the county. If the East-
point ambulance is on a
call, then it will take the
Lanark ambulance more
than 45 minutes to reach
St. George Island or Apala-
chicola.
Franklin County has
a nursing home in Saint
James, the Crooked River
Health, and Rehabilitation


Center and an assisted
living facility in Carrabelle,
Harbor Breeze. On a regu-
lar basis, one, two or even
three times in a 24-hour
time period (our ambu-
lances are on 24- hour
shifts) the ambulance in
Lanark is transporting
patients from one of these
two facilities to either Bay
or Leon County.
In addition to these
transports, the Lanark
ambulance is dispatched to
Weems Memorial Hospital
to transfer patients to Bay
and Leon counties on a
regular basis. These trans-
ports take an average of
three hours. That's three
to nine hours or more
each day that there might
be only one ambulance in
Franklin County. If there
should be an ambulance
call during those trans-
ports, then there is no am-
bulance available for all of
Franklin County.
This situation places
every single person in
Franklin County at risk
and should be addressed
and rectified. The obvious
solution is to put another
ambulance on duty in the
county, increasing the am-
bulances to three on duty
24 hours a day. This is an
emergency life-threaten-
ing situation which needs
immediate correction
and warrants emergency
action by the Franklin
County Board of County
Commissioners.
Your Franklin County
volunteer fire departments
will urge our commis-
sioners to take immedi-
ate action to correct this
life threatening situation
before someone dies need-
lessly.
Please call your com-
missioner and ask him or
her to take the immediate
steps to correct this prob-
lem.
The Franklin County
United Fire Fighters Asso-
ciation encompasses fve
of the county's six fre de-
partments, assisting with
training and grants, and
representing the depart-
ments' needs at the county
level


I have been in quite a dither. I
didn't have a column the last two
weeks because all I could think
about was the FCAT Writing test
and my teacher re-
sponsibilities for next
year.
On Feb. 9, the
writing test was ad-

en tehT
state of Florida. My
RED WHITE students had been
AND ROUX practicing. Dozens of
essays covered my
Denise Roux
dining room table
over the past few
weekends. I had to assign a grade
for each, but more importantly, I had
to make notes and offer suggestions
for better work.
I always wrote in green pen,
never in red. I wanted to encourage
my students to move forward, and
green means go. Red means stop. I
had many "SEE ME" notes attached
to their work for those times when
I had something to discuss in per-
son. Sometimes I wanted to explain
changes in point of view, subject-
verb agreement, the random use of
apostrophes or tense consistency.
I did not sleep the night before
the test.
It went smoothly. My kids worked
hard. Afterward, I felt optimistic.
That's a relief, as Florida school
districts are buying into the latest
federal initiative. It's called "Race to
the Top." Money is there for states
if they agree to follow this program
and win the competition for dol-
lars. My understanding of one key
component is that at least half of
a teacher's job evaluation must be
based on student performance. For
me, that is FCAT Reading and Writ-
ing.
One down and one to go. Tenth
Grade English teachers all over this
great state get to test, and be tested,
again. We have FCAT Reading start-
ing on March 9. We must show that
our students have made significant


teaching phonics instead of Twain,
Dickens, Faulkner or Shakespeare.
I think I might like to take gradu-
ate-level English classes. There is
also the prospect of pursuing my
specialist or doctoral degree. Oops,
wait, that time's already taken. I
think I might have to work on my
reading endorsement. District policy
is n ae Ir s ns e ding

curriculum focuses on phonemic
awareness, word roots, dividing
words into syllables and basic
grammar. How did these kids get
to 10th grade when testing scores
frequently show around a fifth grade
reading level? I have sophomores
who wouldn't recognize a noun if
it smacked them in the face. I can
teach parts of speech, but shouldn't
I be moving on to gerunds and infini-
tives? When our 10th grade students
still don't know a clause from a
phrase, and think "alot" is a word,
we have a problem.
Therein lies the rub. Some kids
obviously need remediation. I fer-
vently wish that the district would
explore hiring a reading teacher
rather than retraining English
teachers.
As a break from this, in my sev-
enth period I get to teach an honors
class, where we have dynamic class
discussions about the book "1984."
These kids get the cultural con-
nection of technological intrusion
and Big Brother, and they certainly
understand the idea of permanent
war. Their minds open up as they
explore Orwell's dystopian vision.
The class has 26 students, and they
deserve every bit of insight and
encouragement I can provide. I
treasure each moment I spend with
them.
I am thankful for the privilege of
being in the classroom, but please
don't make me teach phonics.
Denise Roux is a regular colum-
nist for the Apalachicola and Carra-
belle Times. 'lb reach her e-mail her
at rouxwhit@mchsi.com.


GEORGE MR


gains. We just have to hope the kids
are prepared, and that they care
enough to try their best.
Honestly, I put much of the pres-
sure on myself. The administration
here has always been supportive
and has never once intimated that
my job was on the line.
But still, imagine my dismay
when some of my Intensive Reading
students say that they just "Christ-
mas Tree" the test because the pas-
sages are so boring. I think it means
they decorate the answer sheet, col-
oring in the answer bubbles as they
would a tree.
These are kids who scored so low
on previous tests that they didn't get
to choose their own elective courses,
They were required take Intensive
Reading.
When school administrators try
to put together a master plan for
the year, Intensive Reading drives
the schedule. This year, every high
school English teacher in the district
has had to teach two Intensive Read-
ing classes. In addition, we have
been "strongly encouraged" to take
after-hours training that will lead
to a Reading Endorsement on our
teaching certificate. The district will
give us just more than $500 to take
and complete each 60-hour class
(six of them altogether). That's not
had, but it's a one time deal. Unlike
an upper level degree, a reading en-
dorsement means nothing in terms
of long-term compensation and
getting it is also more likely to doom
a high school English teacher to


palachicola f I
OC Carrabelle '


TH

USPS 027-600
Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St.
Apalachicola, FL 32329
VP/Publisher: Karen Hanes
Editor: Tim Croft


POSTMASTER:
Send address change to:
The Apalachicola Times

ApalaP 0 I 8L 2329
Phone 850-653-8868


PERIODICAL RATE


Time to com promise
00 011 ( F in9

broThis I alSn d-
holding Floridians
stretched across shore-
lines from Pensacola to
Key West to show solidarity
in their opposition of off-
shore oil drilling.
OK, nice. What will they
not oppose? It's fine in
the gulf, but off the shore
of some other state? Only
land-based drilling, even
though the underwater


Letter to the EDITOR


oil weHs could ill or leak

on.

the wa ot
rigs currently off of Loui-
siana (best performance/
least environmental Im-
pact) and use the lessons
learned.
We need to do some-
thing people! Handwring-
ing will not heat or cool our
homes, and it won't propel
you from one place to an-
other.
Roy Nether wood


SUBSCRIPTIO S POYABLE N ADVANCE


reserve might be larger or
easier to extract?
How about a compro-
mise? Fifteen miles off-
shore and not for oil, but
for natural gas? It would
be nice to hear LOUD and
LONG what the official esti-
mates are for oil or gas re-
serves that could be tapped
were a go-ahead given.


Problem is... everyone
has some sort of a dog in
the fight. Solar would take
up a lot of space, wind-
mills kill birds and are
unsightly (current battle in
Massachusetts/Martha's
Vineyard), capturing tides
would create massive
structures in the water and
"disrupt" natural fishing,


TO ALL ADVERTISERS
In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers
do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount
received for such advertisement

thou eful o erbword is giveok w aes is er ted word
thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains.


* *


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TIDE TABLES MONTHLY AVERAGES
To find the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times
from these given for APALACHICOLA:
HIGH LOW
Cat Point Minus 0:40 Minus 1:17
East Pass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27
To find the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times
from those given for CARRABELLE:
HIGH LOW
Bald Point Minus 9:16 Minus 0:03

APALACHICOLA


CARRABELLE
2/25 Thu 07:01AM -1.3 L 03:32PM 1.8 H
06:07PM 1.6 L 11:57PM 2.4 H
2/26 Fri 07:45AM -1.3 L 03:49PM 1.8 H
06:59PM 1.3 L
2/27 Sat 01:04AM 2.4 H 08:24AM -1.1 L
04:04PM 1.8 H 07:48PM 1.0 L
2/28 Sun 02:06AM 2.4 H 09:00AM-0.8 L
04:18PM 1.8 H 08:38PM 0.6 L
3/01 Mon 03:07AM 2.2 H 09:32AM -0.5 L
04:32PM 1.8 H 09:31PM 0.3 L
3/02 Tue 04:09AM 1.9 H 09:59AM 0.0 L
04:48PM 1.9 H 10:27PM 0.2 L
3/03 Wed 05:16AM 1.8 H 10:23AM 0.5 L
05:07PM 1.9 H 11:31PM -0.2 L


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Thursday, February 25, 2010


Local


The Times | AS


Photos by DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times


Active with CROP which
stands for College Reach
Out Program, Wynn-Wil-
liams continues to com-
mute regularly to Apala-
chicola from Georgia as
she prepares to retire to
her hometown. CROP's
monthly meetings expose
students to a variety of
extracurricular learning,
such as studying John Gor-
rie's original ice machine
and visiting medical sci-
ence facilities.
"It's worth it," she said.
"Because I see the ben-
efits."
Taking advantage of


some hands-on learning
Saturday was Dr. Ronald
Williams, a professor of
physics at Florida A & M
University, whose "mad
science" table of gadgets,
gizmos and experiments
drew a crowd of young peo-
ple all day.
"There's a lot of free en-
ergy around us," he told the
young people while show-
ing off a solar-powered car.
"You're going to be living
in world where the energy
comes from the wind and
the sun."
Williams showed a buck-
et of dry ice that chilled fruit


to 320 degrees below zero,
making it easily able to be
shattered into pieces. And
he showed how cold makes
objects contract, and heat
expands them.
ABC School fourth-
grader Sharavia McNair
was one of the students
absorbed in the demon-
strations. She said she had
been learning about the
heart and lungs in science
class, and how red blood
cells carry oxygen.
Also on hand to provide
a learning experience was
Caty Greene, librarian at
the Apalachicola Municipal


Library, who assembled a
table filled with books both
by and about distinguished
African-Americans, as well
as the latest in fiction for
young people.
Following a ribbon cut-
ting with city and county
dignitaries, the day's event
got under way with Maxine
Kellogg singing "Lift Every
Voice and Sing," consid-
ered the Negro National
Anthem.
Young singers Beyla
Walker and Shameika Lake
performed a tribute to
Wynn-Williams, and then
the day got under way in

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earnest, featuring enter-
tainment by young people
from Covenant Word, the
reading of winning essays
and poetry, a mime perfor-
mance by Damien Davis
and Joel Williams, singing
by the NuGulf Coast Gospel
Choir from Panama City,
rap by Courtney Bell, and
rhythm and blues from "Up
Close & In Person."


The county health de-
partment's anti-tobacco
program, a major support-
er of the event, had a busy
outreach on behalf of Stu-
dents Working Against To-
bacco (SWAT). There was
plenty of food, good music,
children's bounce houses,
vendors and an all-around
atmosphere of fun and fel-
lowship.


The Seahawks marching band from Franklin County High School marches in


Date
Thu, Feb 25
Fri, Feb 26
Sat, Feb 27
Sun, Feb 28
Mon, Mar 1
TueMar 2
Wed, Mar 3


High
530
550
530
570
600
580
570


% Precip
0 %
0 %
40 %
0 %
30 %
60 %
10 %


28, and Brian Ray McDan-
iel, 31, both of Apalachicola.
Both are charged with
manufacturing of meth-
amphetamine, possession
of a controlled substance,
possession with intent to
distribute a controlled sub-
stance, possession of listed
chemicals, manufacturing


of drug paraphernalia, pos-
session of drug parapherna-
lia and child neglect.
McDaniel is also
charged with introduction
of contraband into a county
facility.
More charges are pend-
ing following further inves-
tigation.


2/25 Thu 08:05AM
07:21PM
2/26 Fri 12:23AM
03:53PM
2/27 Sat 01:40AM
04:06PM
2/28 Sun 02:48AM
04:18PM
3/01 Mon 03:51AM
04:31PM
3/02 Tue 04:51AM
04:46PM
3/03 Wed 05:53AM
05:04PM


-0.5
1.0
1.5
1.1
1.5
1.1
1.5
1.1
1.5
1.2
1.4
1.3
1.3
1.4


03:40PM 1.2 H

08:53AM -0.5 L
08:18PM 0.8 L
09:34AM -0.4 L
09:07PM 0.6 L
10:10AM -0.2 L
09:54PM 0.3 L
10:42AM 0.0 L
10:41PM 0.1 L
11:09AM 0.3 L
11:29PM 0.0 L
11:32AM 0.5 L


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Thursday, February 25, 2010


A6 | The Times


Local


CONVENTION


kind of fling it across the
bar. It's going to simulate
culling off."
James said only oyster-
men who hold a valid salt-
water products license and
are county residents will be
eligible to take part.
The program plans to
distribute a total of 720
loads, with each load mea-
suring 2 cubic yards of
shell. Each boat that suc-
cessfully distributes will be
compensated at $125 per
load.
James said the FCSWA
is working with the state
to devise a lottery system,
to be introduced Monday,
to ensure that all eligible
oystermen get an equal
chance to take part. Oys-
termen will be hmited to
no more than two loads per
boat per day, with the shell-
ing likely to be spread out
over several days.
"They need to draw a
number," James said, stop-
ping short of offering a num-
her of how many oystermen
are likely to take part.
"There ain't no telling,"
she said. "I underestimated
our last meeting."


will have a stepped-up role
in validating compliance
with the new rules. As it
stands now, funding for the
lab is set to end Dec. 31.
The remaining $500,000
would be split evenly be-
tween the task force and
the FCSWA, with 85 percent
ofit going to help individual
fishermen and dealers ex-
periment with and install
improved refrigeration.
"We're all trying to find a
system that works," Begos,
the task force director, said.
"We're not going to be able
to just give dealers or fisher-
men money, since it's a re-
search grant. Instead, we'll
be buying equipment, test-
ing it and finding out what
works. There's no guaran-
tees; we may get nothing.
County commissioners
on Feb. 16 approved asking
for the federal money, with
a second priority being to
obtain funding for dredging
the Eastpoint channel and
a third to create a federally
subsidized health clinic in
Carrabelle, an FQHC (fed-
erally qualified health cen-
ter) similar to the one in
Eastpoint.


PANAMACIY


Photos by LOIS SWOBODA | The Times
LEFT: Former State Rep. Will Kendrick welcomed the FWC meeting to Franklin
County. RIGHT: Russell Crofton, from St. George Island, spoke in favor or relaxing
ru es governing re snapper, arguing t at t eir pop tion is too rge.


oystermen would have until
4 p.m. from May to October
to have their catch to deal-
ers, who would then have to
reduce temperatures to 55
degrees within nine hours.
For boats that take their
catch to a dealer who plans
to use rapid cooling, oyster-
men would have until 2 p.m.
from May to October to have


their catch to dealers, who
would then have to reduce
temperatures to 55 degrees
within two hours.
All the proposed rules
will be unveiled this week,
and a series of public meet-
ings will be held to take final
input. The one in Apala-
chicola is tentatively set for
Friday, March 19.


In hopes of getting fed-
eral aid to help the industry
handle the new rules, of-
ficials at the University of
Florida, working with the
county, are seeking a three-
year $800,000 grant.
If the grant is obtained,
$300,000 would be ear-
marked to help fund the
county's oyster lab, which


near the Apalachicola air-
port, a move that would
help ensure the economic
viability of the lab, whose
funding runs out at the end
of the year.
While the FWC meeting
handled topics as varied as
snapperclosuresandexot-
ic snakes, the highlight of
the meeting was the deci-
sion to ban fox and coyote
penning.
The decision means that
no Florida fox pen, includ-
ing the single facility still
holding a valid license, can
allow fox/coyote chases or
even run dogs within their
enclosure until the FWC
decides on a new set of
rules to govern the activity.
It is possible that penning
will be completely banned.
On Feb. 17, FWC heard
heated testimony from
animal rights activists
and enthusiastic hunters
about penning. More than
200 people filled the court-


room, and 60 signed up to
comment publicly on the
issue.
State Rep. Debbie Boyd
(D-Newherry) appealed to
the FWC to follow due pro-
cess before making a de-
cision. State Sen. Charlie
Dean (R-Inverness) sent a
letter requesting that com-
pliant facilities be issued
permits, and Gilchrist
County sent a letter in sup-
port of the pastime.
For most people, the
words "fox hunt" conjure
up images of red-coated
aristocrats topping hedg-
es surrounded by rolling
green fields on magnifi-
cent thoroughbred horses.
In the foreground is a pack
of lean and gorgeously col-
ored foxhounds.
In Florida, fox hunters
travel in pickups or four-
wheelers, sport camou-
flage clothing and carry
walkie-talkies. The hunt
takes place not on a vast


plantation but in a pen en-
closing large areas of land,
sometimes approaching
1,000 acres.
Originally, Florida fox
hunting was carried out
in the open, but with in-
creased land development,
packs of hunting dogs be-
came a potential nuisance
in residential areas. Ex-
pensive foxhounds were
also endangered by busy
highways.
In the 1988, the Game
and Freshwater Fish Com-
mission, forerunner of
the FWC, began permit-
ting fox-coyote enclosures
where hunters could pur-
sue their game in safety.
Now people are pro-
testing that the practice of
chasing confined animals,
even within a large pen, is
cruel and poses a health
hazard because confined
game can spread diseases
such as rabies, as well as
parasites including an in-


curable tapeworm that at-
tacks the liver,
Even some hunters
admit the practice is not
hunting in the strictest
sense, because no one car-
ries guns. An FWC study
showed that trapped game
animalsfrequentlyaretorn
to death by dog packs that
can number more than 100
hounds.
Franklin County Sheriff
Skip Shiver has said that
no fox or coyote pens exist
in the county.
FWC Maj. Curtis Brown,
who led a statewide inves-
tigation into penning, told
commissioners his probe
began when Alabama au-
thorities told the FWC that
hundreds of foxes and coy-
otes were being transport-
ed illegally into Florida.
Under current state
regulations, coyotes may
not be transported into
Florida, although they may
be trapped and sold within
the state. Foxes are pro-
tected and musthe trapped
elsewhere and certified
free from rabies before
they can be brought across
state lines. Only permitted
facilities can purchase and
possess either animal. The
state has strict require-
ments for pens that specify
the type of fencing and the
number and location of es-
cape areas for the "game
animals."
Undercover FWC
agents infiltrated the fox
hunting community last
year attempting to sell il-
legal animals. Eight of the
10 pens approached pur-
chased animals. Of these,


three had expired permits,
three were unpermitted,
and two were permitted
but operated by someone
other than the owner.
In all, 12 people re-
ceived citations as a result
of the sting.
At about this same
time, the FWC received a
group of complaints about
the County Line Pen in
Holt. Members of the Tank
family and their neighbors
complained about seeing
coyotes savaged against
the electric fence a few
hundred feet from their
front porch. An investiga-
tion of the facility discov-
ered unauthorized coyotes
confined there.
As a result, the FWC de-
clared a temporary mora-
torium on issuing fox pen
permits; nine pens applied
for new permits in 2009
and were refused.
The Okaloosa County
Running Pen holds a per-
mit through April 2010
but is required to cease
operations as well. The
pen's owner, William Mc-
Murdy, said he adheres
faithfully to FWC regula-
tions and will not allow
unmuzzled dogs to hunt at
his facility.
"l have one coyote that's
been on my property since
2000," he told commission-
ers.
Animal rights activists
argue that McMurdy is the
exception to the rule.
Jennifer Hobgood,
state director for the Hu-
mane Society of the United
States, argued that fox
penners are chronic viola-


tors with a flippant disre-
gard for the law.
William Melvin, of Lynn
Haven, told the commis-
sion he is a pastor, coach
and businessman.
"We are just normal
people," he said. "We don't
want to kill the fox. We
want to run the same fox
this Saturday and again
next Saturday."
Brian Mathey, of Perry,
said fox penning makes an
important economic con-
tribution to his community.
He also argued that fox
penners do not intentional-
ly harm game animals. He
said he purchases 20 coy-
otes a year for $80 each.
The FWC will host a
series of workshops to dis-
cuss fox-coyote penning
and plans to have a set of
provisional rules ready for
its June meeting, when
the commission could ban
the practice altogether. Or
commissioners could ac-
cept the rules, with or with-
out provisions, and vote on
the final legislation at their
September meeting.
"This is not a referen-
dum on hunting," Yablon-
ski said. "We have taken
great pride in trying to
expand hunting whenever
and wherever possible."
Commissioner Dwight
Stephenson said, "I see
this as a terrifying and
cruel situation. Let's stop
the thing and take some
time to look at it. We want
to have the right kind of
person involved in this
- people who have some-
thing to lose if they don't
run a pen right."


American Red Cross


Young Gardeners ActivitieS


Colort cancer often


Are YOU at risk'?

Did you know that colorectal
cancer, the second leading

Imblre ft Ut e 1 en
detected early? That it is often
(ClentableAnd that it affects
as many women as men?

That's why et eryone 50 or older
.
should be tested, and people with
. .
risk factors, like family history
of the disease, might need to be
SCreened Cather.

Encourage your lo1ed ones to
get tested.


roUNDATION


PAAMCTIAL


SHELLING from paoe Al


State to unveil
HOW FUleS
The state is set to unveil
a new set of summer rules
this week regarding oyster
cooling that will go into ef-
feet May 1.
The rules, mandated
by the Interstate Shellfish
Sanitation Conference, are
designed to maintain oys-
ters at a steady, cool tem-
perature, which helps in the
prevention and reduction
of illness from vibrio vulni-
ficus.
State officials told the
task force that the proposed
rules would require oyster-
men with no refrigeration on
boardtohavetheircatchinto
dealers by 11:30 a.m. from
May through July. From Au-
gust through October, they
would have until noon.
For boats with partial
cooling systems, oystermen
would have until 3 p.m. from
May to October to have
their catch to dealers, who
would then have to reduce
temperatures to 65 degrees
within seven hours.
For boats that take their
catch to a cooling barge,


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Thursday, February 25, 2010 w w w. ap ala cht ti me s. com Pag~e 7


M


SEAHAWKS FOOTBALL TEAM HONORED

,






'



ANDREA REGISTER | Special to the Times
The Seahawks football team honored its players for their breakout 4-6
season at the Jan. 21 sports banquet. Coach Josh Wright, second from
left, presented honors to senior Chase Richards, left, as Most Valuable
Player, and to junior quarterback Dalin Modican, second from right, for
Best Offensive Player, and to senior defensive end and punter A.J. Arnold
as Best Defensive Player. AII three were AII-District players. Also receiving
their letters were Adam Joseph, Dale Butler, James Winfield, Tre'kale
Turrell, Skyler Hutchinson, Taylor Hires, Dustin Putnal, Brandon Barnes,
Arron Prince, DJ Lane, Chris Granger, Gary Larson, Elton OIvera, CJ.
Barnes, Kruiz Dickerson, Colton Sharidon, Chase Golden, La darius
Rhodes, Jason Thompson, Andrew Waller, Eric Hicks, Cole Lee, Charles
Fasbenner, Shaq Ray, Tydron Wynn, Karl Sanford and Kris Duncan.





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By David Ad erstein
TimesCityEditor
The Seahawks took it on the
chin last week, falling 76-40 to
Maclay in the opening game of
the regionals Feb. 18 on the Ma-
rauders' home court.
"We hadn't seen any film of
them all year and we learned
Maclay was better than adver-
tised," said Franklin County
High School coach Fred Drake.
"They were physical, fundamen-
tally sound and had talent to go
within.
"Normally somebody lacks
something but that Maclay team
had all the intangibles. I take my
hat off to them," he said.
Drake's squad, which finished
the year at 18-10 and made the
state playoffs for the third con-
secutive year, managed to hold
its own in the opening quarter
against Mike McGrotha's Ma-
rauders (21-4).


Elinor Mount-
Simmons, the
Seahawks'
loyal keeper
of the
basketball
book for the
Past 24 years,
Is considering
stepping
down after
this season.
Her meticulous
keeping of
statistics will
be difficult to
replace.
DAVID ADLERSTEIN
The Times

Steals: Prince, Modican,
O'Neal 2; Joseph, Winfield
Assists: O'Neal, Winfield, Jo-
seph, Prince 2; Wynn, Modican
Blocks: Joseph 2, O'Neal


"We played a perfect quarter says a
and two minutes into the second spond
quarter, but then we had a few saysa
defensive breakdowns in our "We
zone box-and-one," said Drake. along
The breakdown led to an the ex
8-0 Maclay run, forcing the Se- helpful
hawks out of their zone. "Once the lon
you get down you can't sit in a we ha
zone defense," said Drake. "We what w
just got exposed. Some mental Sea
lapses and it went from there." Austin
Drake decided to play all his while
seniors, in their last game. "We 12.
emptied the bench and every-
body played and everybody had
F
some fun," he said.
Despite the loss, Drake said Fra
he was pleased with the team's Ma
showing throughout the year, es-
pecially in overcoming adversity. SE
"How many schools can say they 2/5 2s,
went to the state three years in a Dalin
row and come offa Final Four ap- dron
appearance he said. "We lost four Adam
of our top six guys from last year tin O'N
and we still made a run. That 16 pts.


lot about how the kids re-
ed well to adversity, that
lot.
had some growing pains
the season, but they got
experience that's going to be
l for the next year and in
g run," said Drake. "I feel
d a great season despite
e went through."
hawks' leading scorer
O'Neal led with 16 points,
senior Arron Prince added


eb. I8 at Maclay
nklin 13 9 2 16 40
clay 15 22 15 24 76
AHAWKS: Arron Prince
2/7 3s, 2/4 FTs, 12 pts.;
Modican 2/3 2s, 4 pts.; Ty-
Wynn 0/1 2s, 2/5 3s, 6 pts.;
Joseph 1/4 2s, 2 pts.; Aus-
eal 7/18 2s, 0/5 3s, 2/4 FTs,


Totals: 12/33 2s, 4/18 3s, 4/10
(40%) FTs
Rebounds: Joseph 9; O'Neal,
Modican 7, Winfield 4; Prince 3,
Zach Jones 2, Michael 'll1rner 2


By Brad Miiner
Florida Freedom Newspapers
Three rookies and one veteran
will lead the Freedom All-Star
Classic East teams in the sixth
annual event April 3.
Franklin County's Fred Drake
and Graceville's Thomas Regis- F
R
ter have been chosen to coach DR
the East boys. Arnold's Bryan
Normand and Bay's George Hamilton will
coach the girls team.
The high school basketball showcase
takes place at the Billy Harrison Field
House on the campus of Gulf Coast Com-
munity College.
Hamilton, who led Bay to a 17-5 mark
and one game shy ofa regional berth, will
be making his third appearance in the
game. He first coached the East girls to
their lone win in the series, 90-76, in 2007.
He also was part of the 2008 coaching staff
which fell to the West 74-59.
NormandtookArnoldtonewheightsin
his first season with the program. While an
11-10 mark doesn't sound far-reaching, it
represented the first time a Marlins' girls

Seahawks baseball squads fall
to Arnold
On Feb. 16, Franklin County Seahawks
varsity and junior varsity baseball teams
took on Arnold High School's varsity and
junior varsity. The games did not end the
way the Seahawk wanted.Arnold won the
J.V game 8-0, pounding out six hits while
shutting out the Seahawks on a two-hitter.
In the varsity game, Arnold won 14-0, scat-
tering 10 hits while delivering a one-hitter
against the Seahawks.


basketball team finished a season
with a winning record.
Drake and Register led their
respective teams to the regional
quarterfinals before falling bowing
out last week.
Drake led Franklin County to
an 18-10 record this season. The
ED Seahawks advanced to the Final
AKE Four in his second season at the
school in 2009.
Register will have a homecoming of
sorts being a former Gulf Coast assistant
coach for the men's team. His Graceville
Tigers lost to Pensacola Christian in the
regional in his first season at the school.
The East teams are chosen by the
News Herald sports department from its
coverage area of Bay, Washington, Hol-
mes, Gulf, Liberty, Calhoun, Franklin and
Jackson counties,
The West teams are selected by the
sports department at the Northwest Flor-
ida Daily News from its coverage area of
Walton, Santa Rosa and Okaloosa coun-
ties.
The girls game takes place at 11 a.m.
The boys game is at 1 p.m.

Chili Cookoff seeks golfers
The 2010 St. George Island Chili
Cook-off Golf Tournament is seeking
golfers. The cost of entry is a $100 dona-
tion to the St. George Island Volunteer
Fire Department. The tournament be-
gms with a "shot-gun start" at 9 a.m. on
Thursday, March 4. The St. James Bay
Golf Club on U.S. 98 east of Lanark Vil-
lage will host the event. For more infor-
mation, call Jim Duncan at 653-5038 or
visit SGIchilicookoff.com.


-

.



....


97 4
.


CA RRA BE L LE APA LA CH ICO LA


A


uts an end to Seahawks' tourney hopes


Drake to coach for the East


A. J. Ar uld
Senior A. J. Arnold
pitched well in the
Seahawks' 2010
varsity baseball
outing Saturday
against John Paul II,
allowing just two hits
and one run in four
innings.





Thursday, February 25, 2010


A8 | The Times


Local


cordially invites you
to attend a


OMM ILI


A


It III


Saturday,


March 6th


L/rening~


SACRED HEART HOSPITAL ON THIE GULF


S


Hospital Main Entrance
Located at 3801 E. Hwy 98, Port St. Joe, FL

Come preview the new hospital,
meet our dynamic
healthcare team,
and learn more about
Sacred Heart Health System!

For more information,
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(850) 229-5600.


5 24-Hour Emergency Department
5 Inpatient Acute Care Services
5 Diagnostic & Imaging Services
5 Laboratory Services
5 Surgical Services
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Thursday, February 2;5, 2010 w w w. apalach times .com Page 1


B


Yeste


By Lois Swoboda
IIIIn-startlilital

enjo.ving the pub room at the
Gibson Inn ol" the Roseate
Spoonbill Lounge might notice
a sprightly igure with done-
no blue eyes, a halo of snour hall- and.
This is \oncile McLeod, the reign-
ing queen at .4palachicola
-They called me the queen be-
cause I'm so outgoing," she said. "I
dance with all of them, young and
old They keep a private table for
me at the Spoonbill Lounge and
the Gibson Inn. All the band play-
et's say.'Here comes the queen'
\then I walk in."
( Born \'oncile Sangaree on March
-1. 1910 in .4palachicola, she attend-
ed Chapman School, although her
adientures hale taken her away from
time to time
Her tather: Rhonat, owned the down-
town barbershop with his brother Veto.
She said the shop was a wonderful place.
--Both men and women went there.
There itere lots of chairs and a ra-
dio and all the men
would listen to the
ball games," Voncile
said. "There was a
shoeshine boy, too."
Even as a child,
Voncile loved to
dance. She remem-
hers her stage debut
at age 11 in 1929.
"I was in the big-
gest play they ever
had in the Dixie It


p
oth-
ine could
keep the
\oncile
morned -
.3 -ol
the week
after . M
her high .
school
gradua-
tion.
The
yo I
lived
with Carol's parents for the ticst two-
and-a-half years of their married life. Their
first child, Jimmy, was born in attorney R.
Don McLeod's stately 14-room Victorian with
porches all around.
Carol enchanted his young wife with his
musical ability.
"He could play the organ. He could pick
up any instrument and play it. He could lis-
ten to any song on the radio and come home
and play it," she said. "He had a band called
the Paradise Pals with Reva Cummins and
George Snellgrove. They played at big dances
,,
all over town.
Voncile's grandnephew Rick Bloodworth
remembers hearing Carol play the organ when
he was a child. "We just loved to hear him play.
He played wonderfully and I don't believe he
ever had a lesson," Bloodworth said.


C


was called'Cupid's Six decades in the same house
Up to Date.' It was a ThMcedsomwacntrtd
Broadway musical andnettCao'paet'hueCrldi
I was picked out of the mco h okhmef ie yhsbs
whole school to dance fridNeHicly
In it," she said. "I wore' liehre5yasannvr
white silk satin romp- c athnbrgeVo ilpnig
ters and I was absolute- out liigro captwsntledn

Iig thon0 ein th mddle 1 ao n elas ul ot oehr
lf the stage. Icuigte"rule"apesr rf
Voncile was the te hrd Te ae e h rul
tourth of five e p beaseeyaweCaogtofwrk
sisters woyears hedgtoNe'wokhpowrknhr
.She, Marguerite, isedo oighm, adVnie
C'hristine, Helena and CaorathDieTetefrowr
Ju~anita, the youngest, AlxFrua"svndyawekfrery


a .


ounge1-~t


oot k its toll on the new Ford.
e days, cars had to be broken in
car failed on the way home and


he or cil
ran 7
aro
leelslato
handso
-ecalled
ould ha
a
ie (h
late
Her
\as wi
year-o
us
e -* d
h
the ro
moth
Juan
mer
T
but
PHOTOS FROM "all
OF ILE MGEOD was charg
to carry vo
rom left, a off for Ced
-lelena. At to ous, he sw
. St. Geo to Apalach
ile at the young love
right, Carol In thos
a hol um gently. The


Above,


LIFE


TI~ES


rday's


I ll 0 Sll


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t


I J


, ,


-
.


See VONCILE B4




























































Staging
Drywall repair
Decorative patio pot
Pressure Washing
We do it ALL!
Free estimates!
Fully insured!
On time, EVERY time!

850-532-3200

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OFTHE

WE EK
Scott
Meet Scott. He is a 7-
wheetk I itphupt eeandn leatlittthe
mates. They are all healthy,
happy, social pups that would
F be a wonderful addition to a
home that has plenty of room to
exercise. Scott is going to be a
big boy so if you have the room
and the time, he might be the
perfect choice for you.
VOLUNTEERS are desperately needed to socialize Scott
and all of the other dogs and cats. We are always looking for
people willing to bring one of our animals into their home to
be fostered for various needs. Any time you can spare would be
greatly appreciated.
Call Karen at 670-8417 for more details or visit the Franklin
County Humane Society at 244 State Route 65 in Eastpoint. You
may log onto the website at www.forgottenpets.org to see more of
our adoptable pets.
DON'TPAY TOO MUCH!
$50 Quarterly
Saves YOU $100 a year!
for residential accounts

AIoha Buls Post Manalement
Franklin County s ONLY LOCAL Pest control company
Call Lois at (850) 653-5857
1. .1


Congratulations, Destiny Garrett
Destiny Grace Garrett won Queen in her age group,
age 7 and 8, in the Franklin County Sweetheart Pag-
eant on Feb. 7.
She celebrated her 8th birthday on Monday, Feb. 15,
with a party with her family.
Destiny is the daughter of James and Rhonda Gar-
rett, of Eastpoint. She has two sisters, Selena Coulter
:.4 :. and Brianna Garrett.
We love you and are proud of you.


w- v -,,, ..-..- ,..... .

I ::# *Ci'* 4 *4 :. ". .


Thursday, February 25, 2010


B2 | The Times


Society


It's a boy!
There will be a baby shower for Jessica NeSmith
and Wesley Moore on Saturday, March 6, at the East-
point firehouse beginning at 4 p.m.
All family and friends invited!

It's a boy!
Dorothy Tobin, of Eastpoint, is happy to announce
that she is throwing a baby shower for her daughter,
Susan Stamatinos.
The shower will be held on Saturday, Feb. 27, at the
Eastpoint Fire House beginning at 1 p.m. All friends
invited!


Bridal SHOWER


Assembly of God Church,
1580 Bluff Road, Apala-
chicola.
The bride is registered
at Target and Walmart.
Not all invitations were
sent out in time, so this is
to remind everyone that
all family and friends are
invited to attend.


www. apalachtimes.com


LEN PFLUGLER | Special h ie


By Lois Swobo(10
Times Staff Writer
Adventures in Iowa
are like steep hills, hard
to come by, but at the Di-
xie Theatre, adventure
abounds in the third pro-
duction of their 13th pro-
fessional season.
"Leaving Iowa," by Tim
Clue and Spike Manton, is
built around a minimalist
set, but the actors use a
few props to take the au-


dience back in time to the
family utopia of mid 20th-
century America.
The storyline is built
around Don Browning's
search for a final resting
place for his father. Tom
Weaver is touching as the
wandering Midwesterner.
The family is rounded
out by Dixie Parting-
ton and David Helmsley
Caldwell as Mom and Dad.
Browning shares the back
seat of the station wagon


with Sis, played by the tal-
ented and energetic Sha-
ron Malane.
Exploring caverns
populated by giant bats,
roadside cafes and Amish
quilting bees, the play rec-
reates in microcosm fam-
ily road trips from the hey-
day of our love affair with
the family car.
Cleo Holladay and Ter-
ry Wells make the magic
possible as they morph
from frightening farmers


with super sharp hoes to
stoic grandparents to an
obnoxiously perky wait-
ress and a mullet-topped
cook.
This show is really
good fun with spot-on tim-
ing. The players succeed
in maintaining an energy
level that draws the audi-
ence in. When "Leaving
Iowa" is over, you'll find
yourself wishing for more.
For reservations and
information, call 653-3200.

Local musicians

10 Open 10f 'The
,
Summus Theory

A local band, "Victim
of Conditions," will take
part next week in a Battle
of the Bands competition
in central Florida.
The band features

2ala icolansuitarBlake
vocals and Gabe Gordon
on bass and Carrabelle's
Billy Jack Johns on
drums.
The band will compete
on Tuesday, March 2, at
The Haven in Winter Park
and then on Wednesday,
March 3, at The Dungeon
in Orlando, where they
will open for the national
touring band "The Sam-
mus Theory."
For more information,
visit www.myspace.com/
victimofconditions.
Come and join us if
you can.


FORGOTTEN COAST BUILDER'S ASSOCIATION | Specialty The Times
On Dec. 3, Steve Newman, owner of Big Fish Construction in Apalachicola, received the
prestigious Builder of The Year award from the Forgotten Coast Builder's Association. The
plaque, presented at a gala dinner held at Verandas Bistro in Apalachicola, recognized
Newman for his outstanding performance in the building construction business and commitment
to community causes, as well as the Forgotten Coast Builder's Association. Newman, the
association's 2010 first vice-president, is shown above, at right, with Michael Bloodworth, past
president of the association. The Forgotten Coast Builder's Association is seeking applicants
for its $1,000 college scholarships, presented each year to a Franklin County senior, as well
as to a senior in Gulf County. Students need not pursue careers in construction. Secretary Erin
Rodriguez said last year only two students applied for the funds. "We would like to see more
Participation this year," he said. To apply for a scholarship or to nominate a student, please call
Aaron Watson at 258-0499 or Bloodworth at 323-0079.


couNTvFconlDn


WUU


IXIE


APALACHICOLA, FlA. He
LEAVING IOWA
The Comedy About Family Vacations
by Tim Clue & Spike Manton
February 17 28
850-653-3200 ~ www DixieTheatre.com


Jamal Robinson will celebrate his 6th birthday on Fri-
dayFeb.26.
Jamal is the son of Tanicia Pugh and Brandon Robin-
son, of Apalachicola, and brother to Maleah.
His maternal grandparents are James and Alma
Pugh, of Apalachicola.
Paternal grandparents are Mary Richardson, of Pana-
ma City, and Roderick Robinson, of Apalachicola.
His paternal great-grandparents are Jimmie and Ma-
rie Richardson, of Apalachicola.
Happy birthday; we love you!


Baby SHOWERS


Shower Saturday
'
for Terress Fairclotil
There will be a bridal
shower on Sunday, Feb.
28, for Terress Faircloth,
the fiance of Tyler Mar-
tina.
The shower will be held
at 2 p.m. at Living Waters


NEWMAN NAMED BUILDER OF THE YEAR


Bi 1 1






































Obituaries


The United Methodist Churches

SOf Frankhin County Welcome Youl

First United Methodist Church of Apalachicola
Worship Service 11:00 a.m. every Sunday
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
75 5" St. Apalachicola 653-9530 fumcapalach@gtcom~net
Pastor: Rev. Them Patriotis
Carrabelle United Methodist Church
Worship Services 10:45 a.m. Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
"Celebrate Recovery" Mondays 7-9 p.m.
Healing service first Tuesday each month-7 p.m.
102 NE Ave. B Ca abell n697-3672

Eastpoint United Methodist Church
PrWorship erviceal0:e0s0 a.m i t 1 m.
Healing Service every first Fridays of the Month at 6:30 p.m.
317 Patton Dr. (corner of David St.) 670-8825
Pastor: Rev. Beth White
St. George Island United Methodist Church
9:00 a.m. Worship Service
10:00 a.m. Fellowship Hour
201 E. Gulf Beach Dr. 927- 4635 www~ursgiumc.org
Pastor: Rev. Them Patriotis


'
St. Patrick Catholic Church
Ave C & Sixth Street in Apalachicola, FL 32329 or
The Islander (Across from the Blue Parrot)
on St. George Island, FL 32328
(850) 653-9453 Email: stpatcath@fairpoint.net
PASTOR: FATHER ROGER LATOSYNSKI
www.stpatricksmass.com
APALACHICOLA MASS SCHEDULE
SATURDAY................. .................5 PM
SUNDAY ................ ................ 10 AM
ST. GEORGE ISLAND MASS SCHEDULE
SUNDAY ................ .................8:30 AM


and patience will never family

First Pentecostal Holiness Church
379 Brownsville Road Apalachicola


Sunday School 9:45 am
Sunday Morning Worship 10:45 am
Sunday Evening Service 6:00 pm
Monday, Youth Group 6:30 pm
Wednesday, Royal Rangers, G.A.P. 7:00 pm
Wednesday Worship & Word 7:30 pm
Nursery Provided during regular church services


Thursday, February 25, 2010


The Times | B3


Well, didn't I forget to tell
you about the circle drive in
front of the senior center?
There is also a roof over
it, so you can drop off your
passengers at the front
door.
With your support, mem-
bers of the Lanark Boat
Club served up 75 plates
at the pancake brunch last
Saturday. Thankyou very
much!
Guess you forgot about
our covered dish lunch this
month. Had a small crowd,
and lots of food and fellow-
ship. The covered dish is
on the third Sunday of the
month, at 1 p.m., at Chillas
Hall. Hope you will join
us next month on March
21. Bring a dish to share,
and/or a donation. Be glad
to see ya!
This weekend, all of us,


Lanark NEWS

and our visi-
tors, are in
for a double
treat.
On
Saturday,
Feb. 27 you
can enjoy
LANARK NEWS a good, full
Jim Welsh breakfast.
It's our 18th
annual community break-
fast, at Chillas Hall. Door
opens at 8 a.m. and serving
is until 11 a.m. Good food,
great service and fellow-
ship. Your donation of $6
will be collected at the door.
See ya there!
Then, on Sunday, Feb.
28, you can drive over to St.
Patrick's fellowship hall, in
Apalachicola, for our annual
spaghetti dinner, sponsored
by members of Knights of
Columbus Council #1648.


Serving begins at 11:30 a.m.,
and your donation of$8 will
be collected at the door. You
can enjoy the famous din-
ner inside the hall, or take
home the delicious meal.
Anthony Taranto will be
on hand to guide the ones
making his famous sauce.
St. Patrick's Church and
fellowship hall are on the
corner of Sixth Street and
Avenue C in Apalachicola.
Don't forger the Wednesday
night Bingo for the Bus at
Chills Hall. Doors open at
5 p.m.; bingo begins at 6:30
p.m.
Be kind to one another,
check in on the sick and
housebound -and get a
grip, tie a knot and hang on
to Jesus. Until next time,
God Bless America, our
troops, the poor, homeless,
and hungry.


Sneed limit <1100 0
.
ISland Bridge
Beginning next week
the speed limit on the new
alignment of the St. George
Island Bridge, from north
of West Shore Drive to
north of the old bridge en-
trance, will be posted at 35
miles per hour.
In order to provide a
smooth transition, the
speed limit from the old
bridge to the beginning
of the St. George Island
Bridge will be 45 mph.
The speed limit change
was based on traffic gener-
ated to access the fishing
pier and boat ramps.


News BRIEFS

commissioners have
hired a Carrabelle firm to
keep local bridges clean
over the upcoming tourist
season.
Captain Dave's Lawn
Maintenance of Carra-
belle entered the winning
bid of $33,000 to clean
both the Apalachicola and
St. George Island bridges.
The county had allocated
$31,000 to pay for the
work.
One other company,
RJP Construction Ser-
vices of Apalachicola, bid
$61,000 on the contract.
Trash will be collected
three times a week from
March 1 through Sept. 30.


Fishery Management Plan
for Reef Fish Resources of
the Gulf of Mexico is de-
signed to reduce sea turtle
bycatch.
Comments on the
amendment and pro-
posed rule may be sub-
mitted to Federal e-Rule-
making Portal at www.
regulations.gov.Enter the
following docket num-
her into the "Search"
box: NOAA-NMFS-2008-
0310.
You may also mail
a comment to Cynthia
Meyer, NOAA Fisheries
Service, Southeast Re-
gional Office, Sustain-
able Fisheries Division,
263 13th Avenue South,
St. Petersburg, FL 33701-
5505; or fax it to 727-824-
5308, Attention: Cynthia
Meyer.


The Franklin County


Amenment31tothe


Church BRIEFS
Serving will begin at 11:30 a.m.
and continue until all food is sold
out. Price per ticket is $8, eat-in or
carryout and includes spaghetti
with meat sauce, cole slaw, Italian
bread, and iced tea.
The money raised is used in our
community to support the charita-
ble functions of the Knights.

80610tlist cliurches
.
to offer financial help
The United Methodist Churches
of Franklin County have a limited
amount of funds available for fi-
nancial assistance to help those
who have been directly affected by
the bay closures, and who have not
already received financial assis-
tance from Catholic Charities, The
Salvation Army, Capital Area Com-
munity Action Agency or any other


Cards of THANKS


church/organization.
Applications for assistance will
be received at First United Meth-
odist Church, 75 Fifth Street, in
Apalachicola, from 2 to 5 p.m. on
Monday, March 1.
You must bring the following
documents to support your appli-
cation: seafood workers license;
driver's license; Social Security
card; proof of recent income re-
lated to the bay, such as pay stub,
trip tickets, etc.; sources of house-
hold income for the past year; list
of monthly household expenses;
eviction notice if renting; docu-
mentation of mortgage, utility
bills and other needs. Please note
that all documentation must be
current and in the name of the ap-
plicant.
For more information, call 653-
9530.


Wayne "Skeeter" Neel, a
nativeofCarrabellealoving
husband, father, son, broth-
er, friend and witness for the
Lord, is now with the
Lord.
BornNov28, 1953,
he died Feb. 19, 2010.
Wayne is survived
by his wife Cindy
Neel; mother Wilma
Neel; brother Bodie
Neel; son Justin
Vernon; daughter N
Kristy Henderson;
five grandchildren; nieces,
nephew, grandnephew and
numerous other loved ones
andfriends.
They say it is what you
do with the dash between
the day you were born and
the day you pass. If this is so,
Wayne made the most of his


dash as a daily witness for
theLord.Iflovecouldhave
kept him here he would still
be with us. He will live on in
the many who loved
" him.
There was a view-
ing Monday evening,
Feb. 22 at Carrabelle
Christian Center in
Carrabelle. A Life
Celebration was held
Resday morning,
EEL Feb. 23 at the Carra-
belle Christian Cen-
ter followed by a graveside
service at the Carrabelle
Cemetery. Bevis Rineral
Home, Harvey-Young Cha-
pel in Crawfordville is in
charge of arrangements.
In lieu of flowers you can
donate to Big Bend Hos-
pice.


Sarah Lewis Marxsen
was born in Tallahassee on
Sept. 8, 1926. She passed
away on Saturday, Feb. 20,
2010 at Westminster Oaks in
Tallahassee.
She was a librarian for
20 years in Columbia, South
Carolina. She graduated
from Florida State College
for Women/Florida State
University in 1947. She re-
ceived a master's in theatre
and speech from North-
western University in 1955,
a master's in library science
from FSU in 1970, and a
doctorate in library science
fromFSUinl984.
Herparentswere George
Edward Lewis and Sarah
Davis Lewis. Her husband
of 42 years, James Robert
Marxsen, passed away in
1999.
Her survivors include
daughter Fran Caradonna
(Tony) of St. Louis, Mo.; sons
Paul Marxsen (Kam), of
Carrabelle, and Peter Marx-


sen (Maranda) of Lanark
Village; sister Betty Lewis
Harrison, of Lanark Village;
brothersFrankLewis(Jean)
of St. Teresa, and Bill Lewis,
of Crawfordville; sisters-in-
law Clifton Van Brunt Lewis
and Betty Harrison Lewis,
both of Tallahassee; grand-
children Lewis and Joseph
Caradonna, of St. Louis,
Mo.; and Stephanie and Sa-
mantha Marxsen, of Carra-
belle. She is also survived by
many nieces, nephews and
cousins.
In lieu of flowers, please
make a memorial contri-
bution to Camp Weed, c/o
Episcopal Diocese of Flor-
ida.
The memorial service
will be held on Thursday,
Feb. 25 at 3 p.m. at St. John's
Episcopal Church at 211
North Monroe Street, Tal-
lahassee, FI 32301. Arrange-
ments were handled by Cul-
ley's Riggins Road Rineral
Home.


On behalf of the Florida
Fish and Wildlife Conser-
vation Commission (FWC),
I would like to thank the
City of Apalachicola and
Franklin County for host-
ing our commission meet-
ing this past week. This
was one of five meetings
we hold annually and
Franklin County certainly
lived up to its reputation
for friendly hard-working
people.
From the moment we
arrived in Franklin Coun-
ty, which was a terrific
venue to discuss fish and
wildlife issues, we were


greeted with friendly fac-
es and warm hospitality.
Commissioners and FWC
staff were impressed with
the accommodations and
local fare, especially the
oysters.
I also would like to ex-
press our appreciation to
the Franklin County and
City of Apalachicola staff,
along with the Sheriff 's
Office and City Police De-
partment for welcoming us
and supporting the needs
of our meeting.
As part of our learn-
ing experience, we were
treated to a tour of the


oyster processing plant
at Leaving Seafood. Get-
ting a true glimpse of the
county's culture and way
of life gave further insight
into what was relayed by
Franklin County Commis-
sion Chairman Smokey
Parrish and County Com-
missioner Cheryl Sanders
in their request for oyster
rule changes. The informa-
tion we received allowed
us to take immediate steps
towards adjusting rules

THE
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
WELCOMES YOU


to provide relief for oyster
harvesters.
Again, we truly en-
joyed our experience in
Apalachicola and Franklin
County and appreciate the
hospitality we received.
We look forward to fu-
ture visits to the area and
to maintaining contacts
with residents in Franklin
County.
Sincerely,
Rodney Barreto
Commission Chairman


THE


To the community of
Apalachicola:
On Feb. 8, our home in
Apalachicola was lost due
to a fire. We are so thankful
that no one was hurt in the
heroic efforts of the Apala-
chicola Volunteer Fire
Department and the sur-
rounding community fire
departments to save the
house. We are so grateful
to our wonderful neighbors
who reported the fire and
to everyone who valiantly
fought to save the house
until the firemen arrived at
the scene to take over the
fight.
Although this was a
very personal loss for our


family, it is very evident
that the community of
Apalachicola is saddened
and grieves with us over
the destruction of this
beautiful historical home.
To the wonderful and car-
ing people of Apalachicola
we thank you for the many
kind words of support and
acts of kindness shown to
us since the fire.
As we start cleaning up
after the fire, please know
that we look forward to re-
building in this warm, car-
ing and welcoming com-
munity.
Sincerely,
Jeffrey Bower
Elizabeth Card


Fred Marion Nichols, 59,
of Carrabelle, passed away
on Friday, Feb. 19, 2010 in
Tallahassee.
He is survived by his wife
of 28 years, Carol Nichols, of
Carrabelle.
He was a lifelong resi-
dent of Wakulla and Frank-
lin counties. He was a loving
husband, father and "pa pa".
He was a heavy equipment
operator for Franklin Coun-
ty Road Department. He
was of the Pentecostal faith,
Family received friends
on Sunday evening, Feb. 21
at his home on McIntyre
Road in Carrabelle, and on
Monday afternoon, Feb. 22
at Bevis Rineral Home, Har-
vey-Young Chapel, which is
in charge of arrangements.
Graveside services were
held 'lliesday afternoon,
Feb. 23 at Nichols Cemetery


at 160 Purify Bay Road in
Crawfordville.
He is also survived by
two sons, Fred Nichols II
and wife Angie, of Sopchop-
py, and D.J. Nichols and
wife Holly, of Carrabelle; two
daughters, Anita Nichols, of
Crawfordville, and Andrea
Nichols, of Sopchoppy; two
brothers, Clyde Nichols and
wife Mary, of Crawfordville,
and Rondell Nichols and
wife Peggy, of Crawfordville;
a sister-in-law, Delores Nich-
ols, of Crawfordville; eight
grandchildren, Bryson,
Colton, Cameron, Marissa,
Jay, Britton, Case and Moni;
and many other loving fam-
ily and friends.
He is preceded in death
by his parents, James N.
and Juanita Revell Nichols
and a brother, James Earl
Nichols.


Hwy. 98 & 6th St
'
Apalachicola
SUNDAY: 8:00 AM 10:30 AM
LIBRARY HOURS:
SUNDAY 12:00 2:00 PM
MONDAY 11:00 AM 1:00 PM
WEDNESDAY 12:00 2:00 PM
THURSDAY 3:30 5:30 PM


The family of Mrs. Wil-
lie Belle Akers would like
to take this time to say
thank you to everyone who
offered their sympathy and
condolences during this
difficult time. A special
thanks to the staff of Eden
Springs Nursing and Re-
hab Center. Your kindness


be forgotten.
A special heartfelt
thanks to Pastor Robert
Murray and the Carrabelle
Christian Center family.
Words could never cover
all that you do and have
done for our family.
John and Jimmy Akers,
and Nancy Murray, and


Church


Captain Dave's wins Cmetpro oed


Wayne Neel


Covenant Word hostS
.
benefit for Haiti
Covenant Word Christian Cen-
ter is hosting a Community Benefit
for Haiti on Friday, Feb. 26 at 7 p.m.
called "A Night of Praise and Wor-
ship."
We will take up a monetary do-
nation to send to the victims of the
Haitian earthquake.
Covenant Word is located at 158
12 Street, Apalachicola.

Knights of Columbus host
*
Sunday spaghetti dinner
The Knights of Columbus, Bish-
op O' Sullivan Council #1648 will
hold their annual spaghetti din-
ner on Sunday, Feb. 28 at St. Pat-
rick Catholic Church, 27 6th Street,
Apalachicola.


Sarah Lewis Marxsen


FWC Meeting


Wright House Fire


Fted Ma0i00 NIichlOS


*
11111
EST. 1836


WELCOMES YOU
Church

0 fthe

As pension
101 NE First Street
Carrabelle
SUNDAY
10:00 AlVI


The Akers Family



















































































.
Public Hearing Notice
2nd CDBG Public Hearing
The City of Apalachicola is applying to the Horida Department of Community Affairs (DCA) for a grant
under the Economic Development category for an amount up to $700,000 under the Small Cities Community
Development Block Grant (CDBG-ED) Program. For each activity that is proposed, a minimum of 51 percent of
the beneficiaries will be low to moderate income households. The proposed Scipio Creek Boat Basin project will
construct new dock facilities, provide the infrastructure for the loading of ice and the offloading of seafood, construct
a heavy lift boat haul and repair yard, repairs at the existing facilities, and construct a public retail seafood open air
market and public restrooms. As this project will assist the community in retaining its existing seafood workforce
and allow the creation of additional jobs, this is an Economic Development grant. In addition to CDBG funding, the
Economic Development Administration will contribute up to 75% of the following projected area costs;


NOTICE OF PUBLIC
HEARING

The City of Carrabelle will be holding a
.
Pubhc Hearing to discuss Water Conservation
Rates on March 4, 2010 at 1001 Gray Avenue,
.
Carrabelle Florida at 4:00 Pm 6:00 PM.




PUBLIC NOTICE

THEFRANKLINCOUNTYADVISORYBOARD
OF ADJUSTMENT WILL HOLD A PUBLIC
HEARING ON WEDNESDAY, MARCH 3, 2010,
AT 9:00 A.M., IN THE COUNTY COM\llmlON
NIEETING ROOM OF THE FRANKLIN
COUNTY COURTHOUSE ANNEX TO
CONSIDER THE FOLLOWING 114RIANCES
APPEALS AND SPECIAL EXCEPTIONS:

1. CONSIDERATION OF A REQUEST
FOR A 114RIANCE TO CONSTRUCT
A RIP RAP REVETA IENT WITHIN
THE CRITICAL HABITAT ZONE ON
PROPERTY DESCRIBED AS LOT 6,
BLOCK 61, UNIT 5, ST. GEORGE ISLAND,
FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA.
REQUEST SUBMITTED BY GARLIC
ENVIRONMENTAL ASSOCIATES INC'
AGENT FOR JONATHAN R. LINES,
OWNER.

THE BOARD OF COUNTY CO1111155IONERS
ACTING AS THE BOARD OF
ADJUSTMENT WILL CONSIDER THESE
RECOMMENDATIONS ON MARCH 16, 2010.

*Persons wishing to comment may do so in person
or in writing to the Franklin County Planning and
Zoning Department, 34 Forbes Street, Ste. 1,
Apalachicola, Florida 32320. Transactions of this
hearing will not be recorded, persons wishing to
record the proceedings must make the necessary
arrangements for recording.


The City has an adopted anti-displacement and relocation plan; however, no displacement of persons is
anticipated at this time. If relocation assistance is required as a result of the project, the City will provide assistance
as indicated in the policy.
A public hearing to provide citizens an opportunity to comment on the application will be held at City
Hall, 1Bay Avenue, Apalachicola, FL as a part of the special public hearing to be held on Tuesday, March 2, 2010,
commencing at 6:00pm. A final copy of the application will be made available at the Apalachicola Administrative
Community Development Office, Monda du ough Friday, from 8:00am to 4:00pm upon completion of the application
on or about March 21st. The application will be submitted to DCA on or around March 27th, (or later, if necessary).
To obtain additional information concerning the application and public hearing, contact Cindi Giametta, Grants
Manager at the City's Administrative and Community Development Office, 1 Avenue E, or by phone at (850) 653-
8715.
The public hearing is being conducted in a handicapped accessible location. Any handicapped person
requiring special mobility accommodation at this meeting should contact Cindi Giametta at the City Hall, or by
phone at (850) 653-8715, at least five calendar days prior to the meeting.
Pursuant to Section 103 of the HUD reform act of 1989, the following disclosures will be made to DCA with the
application. The disclosures will be made available by the City ofApalachicola and DCA for the public inspection
upon request. These disclosures will be available on or after the date of the application and shall continue to be
available for a minimum period of five years.
Other government (federal, state and local) assistance to the project in the form of a gift, grant, loan, guarantee,
insurance payment, rebate, subsidy, credit, tax benefit, or any other form of direct or indirect benefit by source and
amount.
1. The identities and pecuniary interests of all developers, contractors, or consultants involved in the application
for assistance or in the planning or development of the project or activity.
2. The identities and pecuniary interests of any persons with a pecuniary interest in the project that can reasonably
be expected to exceed $50,000 or 10 percent of the grant request (whichever is low er).
3. For those developers, contractors, consultants, property owners, or others listed in 2) or 3) above which are
corporations or other entities, the identification and pecuniary interests by corporation or entity of each officer,
director, principle, stockholder, or other official of the entity.
4. The expected sources of all funds to be provided to the project by each of the providers of those funds and the
amount provided; and,
5. The expected uses of all funds by activity and amount.
AE4IR HOUSING/ EQUAL OPPORTUNITY, HANDICAP ACCESS COhfMUNITY


Thursday, February 25, 2010


Library
MA DDE MIM CC
I lHI I L ll I ll VJ

Have you heard? The Carrabelle Li-
brary has new operating hours. The Car-
rabelle library is now open Monday and
through Friday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. and
Saturday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. "Same
great books, and service, but more
hours," Branch Manager Tonia Granger
said.
The Carrabelle branch will continue
through the month of March with free
computer classes offered by the Wilder-
ness Coast Public Library. On Thursday,
March 4 from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.,
Deanna Ramsey will introduce students
to Microsoft Outlook. Students will dis-
cover many time-saving functions as they
learn to maneuver around Outlook. Top-
ics include understanding different icons
in the inbox, setting important levels in e-
mail, creating and sending attachments,
flagging e-mails, setting up signatures,
and using color to differentiate incoming
mail. Later that same day at 1:30 p.m.,
the popular eBay buying guide class will
be offered. Learn how to buy, sell and
ship your eBay goods.
Get ready for "Computer Basic III:
Getting the Most from your Computer"
on Friday, March 12, from 2 to 5 p.m. at
the Carrabelle Branch, Charlie Sawyer
will show users how to personalize their
workplace, how to keep the computer se-
cure, and how to optimize performance,
copy files and create folders.
New digital camera users are invited
to participate in the Carrabelle Library
Class "Digital Photography I: Taking
Better Pictures with Your Digital Cam-
era." Learn how to capture better photo-
graphs using any digital cameras; how to
avoid common problems in photographs;
how to transfer pictures from cameras to
computer, and how to prepare photos for
printing, email, and posting on the web.
Sawyer, an experienced wildlife photog-
rapher, will instruct this class on Satur-
day, March 13, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at
the Carrabelle Library.
For more information about the up-
coming computer classes, or any other
library program or concern, call 670-8151
in Eastpoint or 697-2366 in Carrabelle.


VONCILE from page B1
front grounds and roost on the roof.
"Freddie Buck Sawyer's uncle, Mr.
Duffy, managed the Peabody Hotel. He
got me a room," Voncile said. "I spent six
months in Memphis. Most people were
only allowed to spend the weekend. It
cost $30 a week and that included maid
service. I'd spend the day with Carol.
Mr. Duffy came and got me about 4 p.m.
I'd sit with him in the evenings, in the
lobby."
Voncile received a great deal of at-
tention from the other hotel residents,
most of them Army officers. Mr. Duffy
was her defender and warned the young
men that she was the wife of a wounded
soldier.
After the war, Carol worked for Vitro
Corporation on Cape San Blas, and as
his job sent him around the country, the
McLeod's were out-of-state sometimes
for months at a time. She especially liked
El Paso, Texas where she and Carol
crossed the border to Juarez every
weekend.
When her son Donnie married Ana, a
beautiful Brazilian girl, Voncile spent two
weeks in Rio de Janeiro. "It was wonder-
ful. It's a different world," she said.
After returning from Brazil, Voncile
suffered a heart attack. In 1978, Carol
died tragically young at age 61.
Voncile is still the life of the party. At
her 90-year birthday celebration, she
danced under a starry sky as friends and
family looked on.
Both of her sons were high-ranking
Navy officers. She now has five grand-
children and 11 great-grandchildren.
She remains a beloved member of the
community and she says she is happy to
be 92 years young.
"I've been practically everywhere in
the world and there's no place to come
up to Apalachicola. People know you
here and take care of you," she said.
"Carol used to sing 'Honey We're Back
in Paradise' to me when we'd cross the
bridge coming home."
In a thank-you note to friends follow-
ing her 88th-birthday celebration, she
wrote, "It is said that if a person should
have one true and faithful friend in a life-
time she should consider herself lucky.
Then I must be the most profoundly


LOIS SWOBODA | The Times


FROM THE COLLECTION OF V0NCILE MCLEOD


lucky person in the world to have the


a beautiful and special evening, but


By Lois Swoboda
Times Staff Writer
A lead removal certi-
fication course, required
of contractors by the En-
vironmental Protection
Agency, will be offered in
Apalachicola on Tuesday,
March 9.
The Forgotten Coast
Builders Association is of-
fering the all-day training
session with accredited
teachers from Titan Envi-
ronmental Services.
Cost of the course, which


will be held at the Realtors
Association of Franklin
and Gulf Counties building,
at 78 11th St. in Apalachico-
la, is $150.
After lead, which was
once freely included in
paint and other building
materials, was discovered
to be a poison, the govern-
ment took steps to remove
lead from most products.
As contractors frequently
deal with home and com-
mercial environments that
still feature lead-based
paints, they play a pivotal


role in this process, par-
ticularly when it comes to
work in buildings erected
before 1978.
As of April 2010, any con-
tractor engaged in the ren-
ovation or remodeling of
such buildings must have a
valid EPA certification un-
der the "Lead: Renovation,
Repair and Painting" rule.
Qualifying for this cer-
tification ensures that the
contractor is well-versed in
lead removal and preven-
tion of lead poisoning that
can result from sanding


or other activities that dis-
turb lead paint. To qualify
for and keep the certifica-
tion, the contractor must
understand containment,
exposure prevention and
cleanup safety, and verifi-
cation.
There are still numer-
ous contractors that have
failed to set aside the time
to apply for their certifica-
tion.
While the EPA sets the
federal standard for lead
safety certification, states
can opt to add to the rules.


The National Association
of Home Builders cautions
contractors to stay abreast
of any additional regula-
tions by which they must
abide.
Drywall installers, gen-
eral contractors, landscap-
ers, remodelers, electri-
cians, painters, window in-
stallers, and any specialty
contractor working on ren-
ovations are affected by the
EPA rule. The builders as-
sociation said that even ho-
meowners, do-it-yourself-


ers and parents of young
children would be wise to
obtain this training.
Everyone is welcome.
You need not be an associa-
tion member to attend. The
meeting room accommo-
dates about 40 people.
To register, call Aaron
Watson at 258-0494 or
Bloodworth at 323-0079.
For more information,
visit http://www.brighthub.
com/education/online-
learning/articles/56048.
aspx#ixzz0g0IRYAbr.


Activity

Boat Haul and Repair Yard
Lift Machinery
Piling and Dock Repair
Infrastructure Repair
Retail Market
Ice Loading and Landings Area
d cm rt m


Project Budget
(Approx.)
$489,280
$400,000
$508,160
$232,960
$419,072
$342,020


LMI %
(Approx.)
>51
>51
>51
>51
>51
>51
>


CDBG Cost
(Approx.)
$195,172
$203,264
$93,184
$136,808
$4 000


B4 | The Times


Local


Builders sponsor lead removal certification course for contractors





























NOtice of Public Hearing and Notice of
Intent to Consider Resolution to Transmit
PTOposed Water Supply Plan as a
COmprehensive Plan Amendment
Notice is hereby given that on Tuesday March 2, 2010 the Apalachicola
City Commission will hold a public hearing to consider the transmittal
of the City's Proposed Water Supply Plan to the State Department of
Community Affairs.

The purpose of the hearing is to consider a recommendation to transmit
the proposed plan as an amendment to the Comprehensive Plan. The
Resolution title is as follows:

A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COMMISSION OF THE CITY
OF APALACHICOLA PROPOSING TO INCORPORATE THE
CITY OF APALACHICOLA WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES
WORK PLAN AS AN AMENDMENT TO THE APALACHICOLA
COMPREHENSIVE PLAN, AS ADOPTED PURSUANT TO
ORDINANCE NUMBER 91-7 AND ALL SUBSEQUENT
AMENDMENTS THEREOF; PROVIDING FOR THE REPEAL
OF ALL ORDINANCES IN CONFLICT HEREWITH; AND
PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE.

All interested parties are invited to appear and be heard. Copies of the
proposed amendment are available for inspection at City Hall, 1 Bay
Avenue, Apalachicola, FL 32320 between the hours of 8:00 AM and
4:00 OM Monday through Friday. Any questions pertaining to these
documents should be directed to City Hall (850) 653-9319. Written
comments filed with City Hall will be read and considered at the public
hearing.
.
if.a person decides to appeal any decision made by the City Commission
with respect to any matter consider at such meeting or hearing, he will
need a record of that proceeding, and for such purpose he may need to
ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record
includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be
assessed

If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in
order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, an no cost to
you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact City Hall for
assistance.

Board of City Commissioners, City ofApalachicola


CITY OF CARRABELLE PROPOSED
ENACTMENT OF CITY ORDINANCE
The City Commission of the City of Carrabelle, Florida, proposes to
enact the following ordinance:

Proposed Ordinance 444
AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF CARRABELLE AMENDING AND
MODIFYING THE TERMS AND CONDITIONS OF ORDINANCE
328 ALSO KNOWN AS THE "SUNSET ISLE AND YACHT CLUB
ORDINANCE"; PROVIDING FOR ADDITIONAL USES IN PHASE
2 OF THE PROPERTY; REPEAL OF ORDINANCES OR PARTS OF
ORDINANCES, IN CONFLICT HEREWITH, TO THE EXTENT OF SUCH
CONFLICT; AND ESTABLISHING AN EFFECTIVE DATE.


The proposed Ordinance may be inspected during regular hours at
Carrabelle City Hall between 8 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., 1001 Gray Avenue, Monday
through Friday, or call 850-697-3618 ext. 103.
The proposed Ordinance will be considered for enactment during
a public hearing to be held 6:00 p.m., Thursday March 4, 2010 at the City
of Carrabelle Meeting Room located at 1001 Gray Avenue, Carrabelle, FL.
Interested parties may appear at the hearing and be heard with respect to the
proposed Ordinance.
If an individual decides to appeal any decision made by the City
Commission with respect to this meeting, a verbatim transcript may be required.
If so, the individual should make provision for a transcript to be made at the
meeting, (RE: Florida Statute 286.0105). Pursuant to the provisions of the
Americans with Disabilities Act, any person requiring special accommodation
to participate in this meeting is asked to advise the city at least 48 hours
before the meeting by contacting Kelsha Smith at the above address or phone
number.
Wilburn Messer, Mayor
Attest:
Keisha Smith, City Clerk


1


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Partial Detail: $45.00 (no carpet shampooing)
Complete Car Detail: $55.00
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IV


Thursday, February 25, 2010


Law Enforcements


The Times | B5


The following report is
provided by the Franklin
County Sheriff's Office.
Arrests are made by of-
ficers from the following
city, county, and state law
enforcement agencies:
Apalachicola (APD), Car-
rabelle (CPD), Florida
Highway Patrol (FHP),
Franklin County Sheriff's
FI eand(F Sd fe C ra
ovation Commission (FWC),
Florida Department of En-
vironmental Protection
(FDEP), Florida Division
of Insurance Fraud (DIF)
and Florida Department of
Agriculture and Consumer
Services (FLDOACS).
All defendants are con-
r vreendgu on e couutn
law.

Feb. 16
Paul Z. Sanders, 20,
Eastpoint, aggravated as-
sault with a deadly weap-
on, and shooting at, within
o nSto an occupied vehicle
Horace A. Harris, 35,


Apalachicola, violation of
pretrial release injunction
(FCSO)
Douglas D. Sloan, 22,
Apalachicola, aggravated
battery on a pregnant vic-
tim, and violation of proba-
tion (APD)

Feb. 17

ApBI ic a letu
ing of methamphetamine,
possession of a controlled
suthsta nt to d s sion
wi in ea
controlled substance, pos-
session of listed chemicals'
manufacturing of drug
paraphernalia, possession
of drug paraphernalia, in-
ac ntof c oannad
facility, and child neglect.
(FCSO)
Xavier Michelle Ruth-
erford, 28, Apalachicola,
manufacturing of meth-
amphetamine, possession
of a controlled substance,
possession with intent
to bditstributep a con called
listed chemicals, manufac-


tuning of drug parapher-
nalia, possession of drug
paraphernalia, and child
neglect. (FCSO)
Essence S. Hopkins, 18,
Apalachicola, violation of
probation (FCSO)

Feb. I 8
Keith D. Ray, 25, Apala-
.

m 1 foe tpsoo sr
(FCSO)
Joshua L. Pilotti, 20,
Apalachicola, failure to ap-
pear and resisting arrest
without violence (FCSO)

Feb. 19
Angela Sheridan, 41. Car-
s e ,toDbUIeatndtere
Amber M. Branch, 30,
Eastpoint, battery, and bat-
tery on a person age 65 or
older (FCSO)
Melissa M. Evans, 46,
Valdosta, GA, violation of
probation (FCSO)

Feb. 20
Jimmy R. Shiver, III, 18,


Bristol, three counts of fail-
ure to appear (FCSO)
Robert D. Fewox, 44,
Carrabelle, DUI (CPD)

Feb. 22
Amber M. Branch, 30'
istpointrba o (andS
Terrance I. Walker, 42,
.
or ol in un
Jesse G. Smith, Jr., 44
Eastpoint, arson of a struc'
ture/vehicle, trespass on
property and petit theft
(FCSO)
Cassandra L. Jones, 38,
Apalachicola, child neglect
(APD)


Department will be con-
ducting saturation patrols
starting the last week of
February throughout the
entire month of March in
Apalachicola, from 7 p.m.
to 4 a.m. nightly. Check-
points will also be conduct-
ed in March, the dates to be
posted soon.
The saturation patrols
nee at n I im ir
drivers. Realizing the dan-
gersofimpaireddrivingthe
police department wants to
educate the public, remove
impaired divers from the
roadways and help ensure
a safe driving environment
for all citizens.


g Services The Mildew Remover
. GARLIC
g Exterior House Cleaning
Low Pressure Mildicide Treatment
* ^ 9 Years Service in Area
* ** (aso) 653-8795
I ** I : Gerald Garlick
Have Grinder Will Travel
Stump and Root Grinding.
Reduced to chips.
No job too small or large.
CallClarenceDewade
in Lanark Village
FREE EF@ATE8


RCOO66499


P.O. Box 439


SESPET CVITCAENK
Serving all of Franklin
County Residential/
commercial
Septic Tanks &
Grease Traps Pumped
Call day or niaht


Sheriff's REPORT


Law BRIEFS


Apalachicola police host
.
001ghborhood watch
The Apalachicola Police
Department will host a
neighborhood watch meet-
ing on Tuesday, March 9 at
the Sixth Street Recre-
ation Center.
The meeting will begin
at 6 p.m. Members of the
ntitreictoommunity are
For more info, call the
police department at 653-
9755.

Apalachicola tO
COMIUct patrols
The Apalachicola Police


BrS OlIt


Dental Clnic





W WE'RE AV AIl BLE 24


To place an ad, call 850.747.5020/800.345.8688



or go to emeraldcoasfjobs.com/monster


SB The Times Thursday, February 25, 2010


Franklin County's source of news for more than a century


| 1100
6, A SUBDIVISION AS PER
MAP OR PLAT THEREOF
AS RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK 3, AT PAGES 16
AND 17 OF THE PUBLIC
RECORDS OF FRANKLIN
COUNTY FLORIDA
has been filed against you
and you are required to
serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, If any, on
DAVID J. STERN, ESQ.
Plaintiffs attorney, whose
addressis900SouthPine
Island Road, Sulte 400,
Plantation, FL 33324-3920
no later than 30 days from
the date of the first publl-
cation of this Notice of Ac-
tion and file the original
with the Clerk of this Court
either before service on
Plaintiffs attorney or imme-
diately thereafter; other-
wise a default will be en-
tered against you for the
relief demanded in the
complaint or petition filed
herein.
WITNESS my hand and
the seal of this Court at
FRANKLIN County, Flor-
Ida, this 25th Day of Janu-
ary, 2010.
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT
COURT
BY: Michelle Maxwell
DEPUTYCLERK
IN ACCORDANCE WITH
THE AMERICANS WITH
DISABILITIES ACT
persons with disabilities
needing a special
accommodation should
contact COURT
ADMINISTRATION, at the
FRANKLIN County
Courthouse at
850-653-8861 ext. 100,
1-800-955-8771 (TDD) or
1-800-955-8770, via Florida
Relay Service.
LAW OFFICES OF DAVID
J. STERN PA.


odS teh4 Ine IsFand
Plantation, FL 33324-3920
February 25 March 4,
2010





FA HECE RU NI OAUN
ORRIFDMNKLIN COUNTY


1100 Legal Advertising
1110 Classified Notices
1120 Public Notices/
Announcements
1125 Carpools &
1130 -A are
1140 Happy Ads
1150 Personals
1160-Lost
1170 Found
* *
1100
5829T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OlFRCTUHE 2NDA DICOAR
FRANKLIN COUNTY
FLORIDA


| 1100 |
Shore Drive, thence run
Southeasterly, Northeast-
erly and Northwesterly
along said right-of-way
boundary the following five
(5) courses, South 89 de-
grees 32 minutes 40 sec-
ands East 810.30 feet,
North 30 degrees 07 mm-
utes 00 seconds East
2006.20 feet, North 59 de-
grees 53 minutes 00 sec-
ands West 80.00 feet,
North 30 degrees 07 mm-
utes 00 seconds East
690.00 feet, North 89 de-
grees 53 minutes 00 sec-
onds West 783.27 feet to a
point lying on Intersection
with the Southeasterly
right-of-way boundary of
North Bay Shore Drive and
the Southeasterly right-of-
way boundary of East Bay
Drive, thence leaving said
right-of-way boundary run
North 02 degrees 55 mm-
utes 00 seconds East
126.28 feet to a point lying
on the Northwesterly
right-of-way boundary of
said Easy Bay Drive
thence run North 31 de-
grees 34 minutes 30 sec-
onds East along said
right-of-way boundary
61.70 feet to a concrete
monument (marked
#1266), marking the Point
of Beginning. From said
Point of Beginning and
leaving said right-of-way
boundary run North 59 de-
grees 44 minutes 30 sec-
onds West 518.64 feet to
the approximate mean
high water line of Apalachl-
cola Bay thence run North
10 degrees 57 minutes 08
seconds East along said
mean high water line
101.08 feet, thence leaving
said mean high water line
run South 57 degrees 03
minutes 31 seconds East
a m rkTd r 1r600d
lying on the northwesterly
right-of-way boundary of


thB sa Ighe ea
boundary 69.47 feet to the
Point of Beginning.
commonly known as 347
East Bay Drive, Eastpoint
Florida 32328.
D ed at2 la Icola 0


MARCIA JOHNSON


| 1100 |
timely petition for an ad-
ministrative hearing is filed
under Sections 120.569
and 120.57, Florida Stat-
utes (ES.). The time and
procedure for petitioning
for a hearing are set forth
below. Upon the timely fil-
Ing of a petition, this deter-
mlnation will not be effec-
tive until further order of
the Department. A person
whose substantial Interests
are affected by the Depart-
ment'sdecisionmaypetl-
tion for an administrative
proceeding (hearing) un-
der Sections 120.569 and
120.57, FS. The petition
must contain the Informa-
tion set forth below and
must be filed (received by
the Clerk) In the Office of
General Counsel of the
Department at 3900 Com-
monwealth Boulevard, Mall
Station 35, Tallahassee,
Florida32399-3000.

The petitioner shall also
mail a copy of the petition
to the applicant at the ad-
dress Indicated above at
the time of filing. Petitions
must be filed within 21
days of publication or re-
celpt of this written notice,
except that a petition by
any person entitled to writ-
ten notice under Section
120.60(3), FS., must be
filed within 21 days of re-
celpt of the written notice.
The failure of any person
to file a petition within the
appropriate time period
shall constitute a waiver of
that person's right to re-
quest an administrative de-
termination (hearing) un-
der Sections 120.569 and
120.57, FS. Any subse-
quent Intervention (In a
proceeding Initiated by an-
other party) will be only at
the disofrf rnual the epr

Ing of a motion in compl-
ance with Rule 28-106.205


FACs. A)npet n must co
ber of each petitioner; the
Department permit identifl-
cation number and the
county in which the sub-
ject matter or activity is lo-
cated: (b) A statement of


n a
te s as n Ihne


| 1100
Department action: (d) A
statement of the material
facts disputed by the petl-
tioner if any: (e) A state-
ment of facts that the petl-
tioner contends warrant re-
versal or modification of
the Department action: (f)
A statement of which rules
or statutes the petitioner
contends require reversal
or modification of the De-
partment action; and (g) A
statement of the relief
soughtbythepetitioner
stating precisely the action
that the petitioner wants
the Department to take. A
petition that does not dis-
pute the material facts on
which the Department's
action is based shall state
that no such facts are in
dispute and otherwise
shall contain the same In-
formation as set forth
above, as required by Rule
28-106.301, FA.C. Be-
cause the administrative
hearing process is de-
signed to re-determine the
Department's determina-
tlon, the filing of a petition
means that the Depart-
ment's final determination
may be different from the
determination stated in this
notice. Persons whose
substantial Interests may
be affected by any change
in the Department's de-
termination have the right
to petition to become a
party to the proceeding, in
accordance with the re-
quirements set forth
above. Mediation under
Section 120.573, FS., is
not available for this pro-
ceeding. The application is
available for public Inspec-
tlon during normal busl-
ness hours, 8:00 a.m. to
5:00 p.m., Monday
through Friday, except le-
holida at t all
the Department of Environ-
mental Protection, 630-3
Ca a sC 12e01NortF a



5949T
NOTICE TO BIDDERS
Sealed bids for furnishing
all labor and material and
performing all work neces-


sa Gantd nadlental to the
BID DATEo& TNE:


| 1100 |
amount of $ 125.00. Costs
for postage shall be sepa-
rate and non-refundable.
All checks shall be made
payable to Ajax Building
Corporation.
Pre-Bld Conferences will
be held at 1001 Gray Ave-
nue Carrabelle City Com-
plex, Carrabelle, FL 32322
at the above listed dates
and times.
Dates are subject to
change. Notice will be
given to Pre-Quallfled bid-
ders.
February 25, 2010

5N% E CIRCUIT COURT
OFRCTUHE 2NDANUDDICOAR
FRANKLIN COUNTY
EONREl L JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CITIMORTGAGE, INC
PLAINTIFF
VS
DIRK DU TOIT A/K/A DIRK
DUTOIT ET AL
DEFENDANTS)
CASE NO.
19 2009 CA000256
NOTICE OF ACTION -
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE

A /AAM ADDU
A/K/A AeDU 1TOITLuwhosd
Saint, Alpharetta, GA
30004.
and who is evading service
of process and the un-
a bne s esneds rswdheo
visees, grantees, assign-
ter tee enaonrs, alcrepd ress
claiming an Interest by,


e

right, title, or Interest in the
property described in the
mortgage being foreclosed
herein.


ch


AOCRHGEES, ISN T U R


| 1100 |
BID DATE: 3/15/10
BID PACKAGE NO. & DE-
SCRIPTION:
02.01-Sitework
02.02-Underground Utill-
ties
02.04-Landscaping
03.01-Concrete
08.01-Doors & Hardware
15.01-Plumbing
15.02-HVAC
BID GROUP: 2
PRE-BID DATE & TIME:
3/03/10@10:00a.m.
BID DATE: 3/17/10
BID PACKAGE NO. & DE-
SCRIPTION
02.03-Fencing
04.01-Masonry
05.01-Structural & Miscel-
laneous Metals
06.01-Rough Carpentry
07.01-Roofing & Sheet
metal
16.01 Electrical
BIDGROUP:3
PRE-BID DATE & TIME:
3/05/10@10:00a.m.
BID DATE: 3/19/10
BID PACKAGE NO. & DE-
SCRIPTION:
06.02-Finished Carpentry
08.02-Glass, Glazing &
Windows
09.01-Drywall & Stucco
09.02-Acoustical Cellings
09.03-Resillent Flooring
09.04-Paint
10.01-Misc.Specialtles
12.01-Cabinets
for Weems Memorial Ur-
aent Care Facility Proiect
will be received by Ajax
Building Corporation at
their offices at 1080 Com-
merce Blvd. Midway, FL
32343 until 2:00 p.m. Local
Time, on the above refer-
enced dates.
Interested bidders may ob-
tain pre-qualification forms
by c rap rna 10 a
Only bidders meeting
pre-qualification criteria


o qu dacb rusm ts
from Ajax Building Corpo-
ration at 1080 Commerce
Blvd. Midway FL 32343.
Documents for Weems
Memorial Uraent Care Fa-


a
prowdinc d una ae ee


SUCNTRUST
Plaintiff
vs.
JEFFREY S.
el dant s.


MORTGAGE,


GALLOWAY


SUNTRUST


MORTGAGE


CASE NO: 08-000509-CA
RE-NOTICE OF SALE
NTTO

NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVENe ursuanto cao
judgm
AttedenAu ustn 1C s20N
08-000509-CA of the Cir
cult Court of the Second
Jud C tnt aF ridoa
wherein SUNTRUST MOR
FAFGRE, IN G n a
et. al., are defendants I
Ir sdl to st h tr b
cash at the front of the



Ch ca 10
property as set forth in
said order or final judg-
ment, to-wit
Commence at the South-
west corner of fractional


nn 9 o w6nsh p
rthpdw st of rh -of- y


JEFFERY S. GALLOWAY


RE-NOTICE


OFSAE


RE-NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN pursuant to a final
d t dm7tug st forecl 9e
and entered in Case No.
07000405CA of hedClrc
clal Circuit in and for


Frank G n
ants. I will sell to the high-
est bidder and best bidder
for cash at the front of the
Courthouse, steps at 33
Market Street, Apalachl-
cola, FL 32320, at 11:00


AM)oonoMarcrsh in 010
ment, to-wit:


COVERING MILTON TO APALACHICOLA


1 mmka


Find & Post


job related items:

> resumes & career opportunities <

relevant to the Florida panhandle


| 1100
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Franklin; County, Florida
By: Michele Maxwell
As Deputy Clerk
In accordance with the
Americans with Disabilities
Act, persons in need of a
special accommodation to
participate in this proceed-
Ing, shall, within a reason-
able time prior to any pro-
ceeding, contact the ADA
coordinator at 33 Market
Street, Apalachicola, FL
32320 or telephone
850-653-8861 not later
than five (5) business days
prior to such proceeding.
MINERLEY FEIN, PA.
Attorneys for Plaintiff
980 N. Federal Hwy,
Sulte 412
Boca Raton, FL 33432
561-362-6699
February 11, 18, 2010
5833T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
FRANKLIN COUNTY
FLORIDA


| 1100 |
Lot 8, Block E, of ST
GEORGE ISLAND GULF
BEACHES UNIT NO. 3, ac-
cording to the map or plat
thereof as recorded in Plat
Book, 2, Page 16, Public
Records of Franklin
County, Florida.
Commonly known as 1156
W Gorrie Drive, St.
George Island, Florida
32328.
Dated at Apalachicola,
Florida this February 1,
2010.
MARCIA JOHNSON
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Franklin County, Florida
By: Michele Maxwell
As Deputy Clerk
In accordance with the
Americans with Disabilities
Act, persons in need of a
specialaccommodationto
participate in this proceed-
Ingshallwithinareason-
able time prior to any pro-
ceeding, contact the ADA
coordinator at 33 Market
Street, Apalachicola, FL
32320 or telephone
850-653-8861 not later
than five (5) business days
prior to such proceeding.
MINERLEY FEIN, PA.
AttorneysforPlaintiff
980 N. Federal Hwy
Sulte 412
Boca Raton, FL 33432
561-362-6699
February 11, 18, 2010
5905T
PUBLIC NOTICE
STATE OF FLORIDA DE-
RNTMMEENNTTAL OFPROENE
TION
NOTICE OF GENERAL
PERMIT
TF # -0298924-001 ED2
ronmental Protection gives



hFhn I cS
Florida;Latitude/Longitude:
29 54 59.5 North, 84 30,
45.2" West, St. George
Sound, Class II Waters of
the State, Franklin County
quallfles for the general
u t es2 b hed npder

ment sedetermina n ssha

























































** *

STIMULUS MONEY

NOW AVAILABLE!!!!

IF YOU HAVE A MORTGAGE OR
NOT, AND NEED MONEY FOR HOME
IMPROVEMENTS, CREDIT CARD
DEBT, MEDICAL BILLS OR MONTHLY
EXPENSES. YOU MAY QUALIFY!!!


* * * - *


HUNDREDS OF THOUSANDS
HAVE BEEN HELPED.
*CALL YOUR LOCAL ADVISOR FOR
A FREE BENEFIT ANALYSIS


TOLL FREE { 888-827-6289 }
SENIOR BENEFIT SERVICES
PANAMA CITY, FL.
WE HELP SENIORS RECEIVE THE
INFORMATION THEY NEED
AND DESERVE


CITY OF CARRABELLE PROPOSED
ENACTMENT OF CITY ORDINANCE
The City Commission of the City of Carrabelle, Horida, proposes to enact the
following ordinance:
ORDINANCE NUMBER 443
AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF CARRABELLE, FLORIDA AMENDING
ORDINANCE NO.: 409 WHICH IS AN ORDINANCE PERI4INING TO
THE SALE OF ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES WITHIN THE CITY LIMITS BY:
PROHIBITING THE SALE OF ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES WITHOUT PROPER
LICENSES; PROSCRIBING THAT THE LOCATION FOR SALE OF ALCOHOLIC
BEVERAGES A RTST BE APPROVED BY THE CITY COMMISSION;
REGULATING THE HOURS OF BUSINESS FOR THE SALE OF ALCOHOLIC
BEVERAGES; ESTABLISHING ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS FOR SALE OF
ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES FOR ON-PREMISES CONSUMPTION; PROVIDING
FOR A SPECIHC DISTANCE BETWEEN SAID SALE OF ALCOHOLIC
BEVERAGES AND CHURCHES; PROVIDING FOR PENALTIES; PROVIDING
FOR SEVERABILITY AND PROVIDING AN EFFECTIVE DATE.

The proposed Ordinance may be inspected during regular hours at Carrabelle
City all01xt en287a.m. and 4:30 p.m., 1001 Gray Avenue, Monday through Friday'
The proposed Ordinance will be considered for enactment during a public
hearing to be held 6:00 p.m., Thursday March 4, 2010 at the City of Carrabelle Meeting
Room located at 1001 Gray Avenue, Carrabelle, FL. Interested parties may appear at
the hearing and be heard with respect to the proposed Ordinance.
If an mdividual decides to appeal any decision made by the City Commission
with respect to this meeting, a verbatim transcript may be required. If so, the individual
should make provision for a transcript to be made at the meeting, (RE: Horida Statute
286.0105). Pursuant to the provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act, any
person requiring special accommodation to participate in this meeting is asked to
advise the city at least 48 hours before the meeting by contacting Keisha Smith at the
above address or phone number.
Wilburn Messer, Mayor
Attest:
Keisha Smith, City Clerk


CITY OF CARRABELLE PROPOSED
ENACTMENT OF CITY ORDINANCE

The City Commission of the City of Carrabelle, Horida, proposes to enact
the following ordinance:

ORDINANCE 442
AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF CARRABELLE, FLORIDA, PROVIDING
FOR AMENDMENT OF ORDINANCE 434 PERI4INING TO MATER AND
SEWER SERVICE RATES AND CHARGES; PROVIDING FOR AN INCREASE
IN E14TER AND SEWER SERVICE RATES; ESI4BLISHING A CONSER114TION
RATE STRUCTURE; PROVIDING FOR REPEAL OF ORDINANCES OR E4RTS
OF ORDINANCES, IN CONFLICT HEREWITH, TO THE EXTENT OF SUCH
CONFLICT; AND ESTABLISHING AN EFFECTIVE DATE.

The proposed Ordinance may be inspected during regular hours at Carrabelle
City Hall between 8 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., 1001 Gray Avenue, Monday through Friday,
or call 850-697-2727.
The proposed Ordinance will be considered for enactment during a public
hearing to be held 6:00 p.m., Thursday March 4, 2010 at the City of Carrabelle
Meeting Room located at 1001 Gray Avenue, Carrabelle, FL. Interested parties may
appear at the hearing and be heard with respect to the proposed Ordinance.
If an individual decides to appeal any decision made by the City Commission
with respect to this meeting, a verbatim transcript may be required. If so, the individual
.
should make provision for a transcript to be made at the meeting, (RE: Flonda Statute
286.0105). Pursuant to the provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act, any
person requiring special accommodation to participate in this meeting is asked to
advise the city at least 48 hours before the meeting by contacting Keisha Smith at the
above address or phone number.

Wilburn Messer, Mayor
Attest:
Keisha Smith, City Clerk


Thursday, February 25, 2010


Local


Telephone number:


Category (check one):
- 5 and younger
6-10
1 1-16
- 17 and older
Business
Diorama title:

Brief description:




Tape the entry form to the
back of the diorama and
submit the finished work by 5
.m. Thursday March 25, to
The Star
1 35 W. Highway 98
Port City Shopping Center
Port St. Joe, FL 32457
The Times
129 Commerce St.
Apalachicola, FL 32320
AH entries will be lectured
on www.storfl.com and
www.apolochtimes.com.
just Born Inc. reserves
the right to post winning
diorama images on its
Peeps Web site.


)Prman IU arac Im II


The categories are as follows:
5 and younger
6-10
11-16
17 and older
Business
Entrants in the business category must
depict their workplace, employees or some
aspect of their business.
The Gulf County Health Department
staff took the top prize in last year's busi-
ness category by assembling a massive di-
orama depicting nearly every aspect of the
health department babies, X-rays and
scary needles included.
Last year's entrants set the bar high, so
don't just slap some glue on some Peeps


and call it a day unless you're younger
than 5, then that's perfectly acceptable.
We will award first, second and third
prizes in each category.
Judges will base their decision on the
diorama's design, quality of execution and
resemblance to our area.
All entries must be returned, with entry
forms attached, to The Star or The Times
offices by 5 p.m. ET on Thursday, March
25.
The winning entries will be featured in
our April 1 edition and on our Web site.
We will display the dioramas in our of-
fice as they arrive, so if you're in need of in-
spiration, pay a visit. We'll try to beat back
the ants.


- {850-522-5226 }


B8 | The Times


C Immmmmy


By I)espina Williams
Florida Freedom Newspapers
It's that time of year again.
Valentine's Day is over, the weather has
turned chilly and The Times is stocking up
on ant killer.
Last year, to the delight of our staff and
the industrious four-legged creatures who
know a good thing when they see one,
throngs of marshmallow Peeps invaded our
office.
Theyarrivedonfour-wheelershorseback
and wave runners; some wore sunshades,
and others donned football helmets.
A few chilled out while many stood
poised for action hunters, callers and
oyster suckers enjoying life in the Florida
Panhandle.
Last year, we received a record 42 entries
in the Star/Times Panhandle Peep Show di-
orama contest.
We expect more this year, so it's time to
getbusy.
What's a diorama, you ask?
It's a scene depicting three-dimensional
figures and objects against a painted or
modeled background.
NowpickafamiliarPanhandlesceneand
substitute the human and animal characters
for Peeps, and you've got yourself an entry.
The only rules are all characters must
be Peeps, and all scenes must depict some
aspect of Panhandle living. You can work in
pairs, teams or by yourself.
And, please, don't take the "Peep Show"
literally. This is family newspaper.
We've adjusted our age group categories
to better reflect last year's participation.
Some of our most delightful entries were
created by kids younger than 6, who lacked
a proper category in which to enter. Not so
this year.


L,


Peep Show Diorama Contest


Our local real estate experts have identified what they feel are the best values
around and are offering them to you in Real Estate Picks! (In this section),
Discover the best real estate values in Mexico Beach, Port St. Joe, Apalachicola,
Cape San Blas, St. George Island, Carrabelle and surrounding areas.
SILS# 238547 $28,000 Eastpoint'
YOUR

BEST PICK

HERE!


LOCAL




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