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Group Title: Apalachicola times
Title: The Apalachicola times
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100380/00065
 Material Information
Title: The Apalachicola times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: H.W. Johnston
Place of Publication: Apalachicola Fla
Apalachicola Fla
Publication Date: February 11, 2010
Copyright Date: 2008
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1885.
General Note: Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00100380
Volume ID: VID00065
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 32911693
lccn - sn 95026907
 Related Items
Preceded by: Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by: Apalachicola herald

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Table of Contents
    Section A
        Page A 1
        Page A 2
        Page A 3
        Page A 4
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        Page A 6
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    Section B
        Page B 1
        Page B 2
        Page B 3
        Page B 4
        Page B 5
        Page B 6
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~Bordtcase rema~~insoent pbi


I


I


YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER FOR MORE THAN 120 YEARS


VOL. 124 ISSUE 42


prosecutors and the Franklin County
Sheriff's Office.
The judge did leave open some
room for restricting access to further
revelations as Bordt's trial moves
forward.
"I'm not attempting to cut off that
certain matters should not be made
public," he said after listening to de-
fense attorney Maria Ines Suber ar-
gue against Assistant State Attorney
Robin Myers and two attorneys rep-
resenting media interests.
co "Idon'tkn wh outHhe thoan
said. "There may well be items of dis-
covery that should not be released."
Bordt, 71, is charged with drown-
ing her5-year-old grandson Camden
Hiers in a bathtub Jan. 4 while her


husband was away on an errand. Her
husband, Heinz Bordt, told investiga-
tors his wife confessed to killing their
grandson "because she didn't want
to see him grow up in a divorced
home."
The grandfather said he had re-
turned from Apalachicola to find his
grandson dead in the bathtub and his
wife in long underwear and a jacket,
soaking wet, on the beach.
Those bizarre details of the boy's
death made international news,
which Suber said sp e comments
Bordt's right to a fair trial.
Hankinson commenced his
decision by refusing to close the
See BORDT AS


DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times
Marianne Bordt, shackled and wearing the blue
coveralls of the Leon County Jail, waits for her
hearing Monday in the Franklin County courthouse.


LOIS 5WOBODA | The Times
Commissioner Pinki Jackel talks
with Ricky Banks, of Eastpoint,
who dressed in an oyster sack to
make a point at Thursday's FCSWA
meeting.


Limited aId


for oystermen


trickles in

By Lois Swoboda
Times StaffWriter
Seafood workers are receiving care
packages and financial aid from sev-
eral sources, but the future continues
tol kh I haritiesBigBendDisas-
ter Animal Response Team (DART)
and Second Harvest have chipped in
with help for seafood workers strug-
gling after weeks of bay closures and
inclement weather, but resources re-
main woefully limited.
On the morning of Feb. 4, Catholic
Charities of Northwest Florida sent
representatives to St.Patrick's Church
in Apalachicola. The group promised
aid with rent and utility bills. Counsel-
ing was scheduled from 10 a.m. until 2
p.m., but by 11 a.m. the line at the fel-
lowship hall had to be turned away.
"We didn't want people to wait in
line for no reason," said Deborah Her-
re:As:T:"'st::::n:'sof:::'t
"Our aim is to intervene in a crisis and
prevent a family from being evicted or
having their utilities turned off. Giving
everybody a little money won't accom-
plish that. We help as many people as
we can with the money we have avail-
able."
The counselors brought a single
group of 24 into the hall seeking aid
and dispensed the entire $10,000 al-
lotted for the outreach to Franklin
County.
One recipient reportedly came
out and announced she had received
$2,400. The other 23 people admitted
received smaller stipends.
See AID A6


ED TILEY | Special to the Times


By David Adlerstein
Times City Editor
A two-story, turn-of-the-cen-
tury wooden home in Apalachic-
ola's historic district burned to
the ground Monday night.
No one was injured in the
blaze, as the home, owned by
Elizabeth Card and Jeff Bower,
of 'Itoy, Pa., was unoccupied.
Assisted by firefighters from


EastpointandSt.Georgelsland,
a crew from the Apalachicola
Volunteer Fire Department met
with some delays in fighting the
blaze, but was able to spare the
adjacent homes at the intersec-
tion of 16th Street and Avenue B
from damage.
Known as the Wright House,
the 3,137-square-foot structure
was believed to have been built
by John Marshall around 1890.


According to Vivian Marshall
Sherlock, the historian whose
father was born there in 1892,
the builder owned Marshall
Works, a lumber store in the
Bowery section of town.
John Marshall's first son,
Dwight Marshall, was born
there in 1892, and John Marshall
Jr., Willoughby Marshall's fa-
ther, in 1895. Other sons fol-
lowed Joe, Will and George


Marshall, who is credited with
the building of many structures
in Apalachicola's Historic Dis-
trict.
The house was the longtime
residence of Gordon and Lou-
ise Wright, who for many years
owned the five-and-dime store
at the corner of Market Street
and Avenue D. Mrs. Wright
See FIRE AS


By ggyji Ad|erstein
Times City Editor
One young woman who wants to become
a doctor will share valedictorian honors for
the Seahawks' Class of 2010 with a young
man who plans to pursue computer science
and the Navy.
In making the announcement last week,
Franklin County High School guidance
counselor Diane McGrath said only five-
thousandths of one point separated co-vale-
dictorians Heather Lynne Kemper, 17, and
Russell Wayne Simmons, 18.
Kendyl Catherine Hardy, 17, was named
salutatorian.
"This is the first time we've had a tie two


State University or the University of West
Florida, and then attend medical school.
She has already earned 24 credit hours
over the past two school years through dual
enrollment courses at Gulf Coast Commu-
nity College and Gulf-Franklin Center.
A member of all the honor society orga-
nizations, such as National Honor Society,
Beta Club and Mu Alpha Theta, she has
been active in student government and vice
president of her senior class. She also plans
to be part of the track team this spring.
Simmons, 18, son of Ellis Simmons, of
Carrabelle, and Jeanne Sorrell, of Sopchop-
py, has applied for the Navy ROTC program
See SCHOOL AS


HEATHER RUSSELL KENDYL
KEMPER SIMMONS HARDY
co-valedictorian co-valedictorian salutatorian
years in a row. This year it was even closer,"
McGrath said. "They're all very deserving.
All three worked very hard."
Kemper, daughter of James and Sybil
Kemper, of Apalachicola, plans to study bi-
ology as a pre-med major at either Florida


Phone: 850-653-8868


DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK:
it'. ?'::-:'1-11"..
LegalAds-Fridaysilla.m
ClassifiedDisplayAds-Fridayai11a.m.
ClassifiedLineAds-Mondaysi5p.m.


Opinion .............. .... .......... A4


Sheriff's Report. .......... ... B6


Apa lachicola


A 510f IS born, A8


Ud 6 I'U OS 0 OinSt defenSe
* *
motion to shield evidence

By David Adlerstein
Times City Editor
The case against a German grand-
mother accused of drowning her
grandson on St. George Island will
remain open to the public for now, a
Franklin County judge ruled Mon-
dayCircuit Judge James Hankinson
denied all three requests from Mari-
anne Bordt's defense attorney to
close Monday's probable cause hear-
ingtothepublicshieldevidencefrom
the media and issue a gag order on


FIRE IN APALACHICOLA HISTORIC DISTRICT


Franklin County High selects co-valedictorians


TABLE OF CONTENTS


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Thursday, February 1 1, 2010


A2 | The Times


Local


By David Adlerstein
Times City Editor
Apropertyappraiserhas
estimated the market value
of the 1.1-acre parking lot in
front of the former Chap-
man School at $750,000,
about $350,000 less than the
$1.1 million being offered to
the School Board by devel-
opers of a proposed phar-
macy.
Members of the Frank-
lin County School Board
received in their packets
Thursday the summary
appraisal report prepared
by Gus Bert, a state-certi-
fied general real estate ap-
praiser with the Northridge
Appraisal Company of Tal-
lahassee.
In December, acting on
a request from an agent for
the CVS pharmacy chain,
the School Board agreed
to secure two appraisals
and advertise for bids on
the property, both legal re-
quirements if the district is
to dispose of surplus prop-
erty worth more than a
half-million dollars.
An Atlanta-based retail
developer, MetroGroup De-
velopment II LLC, has pro-
posed buying the northwest
corner of Avenue E and


12th Street, site of the for-
mer Chapman High School,
and placing a freestanding
CVS pharmacy, complete
with drive-thru, where the
parking lot now sits.
Parking would be relo-
cated for the existing por-
tion of the old Chapman
School, which now houses
temporary space for the
county health department
as well as the auditorium
for the Apalachicola Bay
Charter School, to the front
lawn area that runs along
Avenue E between 12th and
14thstreets.
Barbara Sanders,
school board attorney, told
the School Board last week
that when the district in
2005 received $300,000 in
state grants to renovate
the historic Art Deco build-
ing, it agreed to adhere to
covenants that could pre-
clude any change to the site
through the year 2015. The
board gave her permission
to look into seeing about
getting a release from that
obligation not to alter the
premises,
Bert noted several
times in his appraisal that
his conclusion, that "the
highest and best use (of the
property) is for commercial


Bert chose to compare
the Chapman site with 122
Market Street, near the
northwestcornerofMarket
Street and Avenue E; with
117 Avenue E, just west of
downtown; with 113 Monu-
ment Ave., in downtown
Port St. Joe; and with 1600-
1604 U.S. 98 in Carrabelle,
just inside the western city
limits.
The appraisal outlined
how the Market Street
property, the equivalent
of two city lots, had sold
for $305,000 in December
2005, while the Avenue E
property sold for $400,000
in July 2005. A Buy-Rite
drugstore has since been
added to the property,
which was re-sold as im-
proved for $844,400.
The downtown Port St.
Joe property, which sold
for $500,000 in April 2008,
consisted of five com-
mercial lots that were im-
proved with an old service
station/retail building at
the time of sale. The Car-
rabelle property, which
sold for $335,000 in Octo-
her 2007, had an older resi-
dential structure on site at
time of sale, but is slated
for commercial develop-
ment.


Because of the real es-
tate downturn, marketing
times are longer, and resi-
dential property values
have dropped between 10
and 20 percent per year,
with commercial falling
5 to 15 percent annually in
the last three years, Bert
wrote in the appraisal.
But, he contended, the
Highway 98 corridor in
Apalachicola has been less
affected, because of lim-
ited supply of developable
commercial property.
Bert based his final
value estimate on ad-
justed comparable sales
that ranged from $2,888
to $3,600 per front foot,
and $17.25 to $36.12 per
square foot. Bert gave the
price per front foot unit in
his comparisons the most
weight in his analyses, and
said that a value in the
$3,200 to $3,600 per front
foot range was applicable.
Because the Chapman
site is a prime corner lo-
cation, Bert calculated
the 210 front feet at $3,500
per, for a total of $735,000,
and the 48,000 square feet
at $17.50 per, for a total of
$840,000. But he gave the
square footage less weight,
and settled on $750,000.


DAVID ADLERSTEIN |The Times


retail use and correlates to
avalueopinionof $750,000,"
is contingent on a zoning
change.
The land would have to
be rezoned from R-1, single
family residential, to C-2, or
a similar commercial zon-
ing designation, to allow for
retail use. No request for
the zoning change has been
submitted as yet to the
Apalachicola Planning and
Zoning board, which would
advise the city commission
on any zoning change.
Bert wrote in his report
that because the intersec-
tion is the only one with a
traffic light in the county, it
has "good market appeal"
in an area which has seen
a real estate slowdown be-


ginning at the end of2005.
"Commercial values
in the downtown area and
along Highway 98 'in-town'
in Apalachicola appear to
be fairly stable (as a result)
of limited supply of develop-
able property in this down-
town area and the over-
all appeal of this historic
coastal community," reads
Bert's report. "There con-
tinues to be a demand for
reasonably priced property
in good locations."
To reach his conclusion
regarding the land's value,
Bert compared the site
with four similar parcels, in
terms of size, configuration
and highway location, that
have transferred owner-
ship in the last few years.


Year-end bed tax collec-
tions indicate that Franklin
County's tourism industry
dipped only slightly during
2009, with preliminary 2010
fiscal year figures showing
positive growth.
According to figures
compiled by the Florida De-
partment of Revenue and
recently released by the
Franklin County Tourist De-
velopment Council (TDC),
county hotels and vacation
rentals collected $750,890
in bed tax revenues during


fiscal year 2009, a drop ofap-
proximately 3 percent from
the previous fiscal year 2008
in which $774,166 was col-
lected.
The beginning of the 2010
fiscal year posted gains,
with the first month of the
2009-2010 fiscal year seeing
an increase of nearly $1,000
in bed tax revenues over the
previous year.
"Franklin County con-
tinues to be a reasonably
priced eco-adventure and
beach destination," Helen


Spohrer, TDC chairman
said."Ournaturalamenities,
combined with our historical
and cultural attractions, of-
fer an experience not found
in other parts of Florida."
At the statewide level, the
numbers are similar.
Year-to-date estimates
from VISIT FLORIDA re-
search show that 60.8 million
visitors came to Florida dur-
ing the first nine months of
2009, a 2.3 percent decrease
from the same period in
2008.


Florida tourism officials
report more visitors are opt-
ing to travel to closer, less
expensive destinations with-
in the state.
That statewide trend
toward shorter trips is mir-
rored in Franklin County
where hotel and vacation
rental company owners re-
port visitors traveling short-
er distances and looking for
more budget-conscious ac-
tivities. With this in mind, the
TDC shifted its marketing
efforts last year to boost its


grant award budget to help
more local nonprofit groups
promote low cost tourism-
related events in Franklin
County. Over the next year,
the TDC will spend $88,000 to
help promote 27 events and
festivals, five more events
than were funded in 2008.
TDC leaders believe this
decision to provide more
funding for more frequent
smaller events will pay offby
providing visitors more rea-
sons to return to the county
and spend money locally.


"We have noticed that a
growing number of visitors
are coming from shorter dis-
tances and booking rooms
on a shorter notice," Spohrer
said. "If we focus on these
trends and offer visitors in-
expensive ways to visit more
frequently, our visitor traffic
will continue to increase and
the local economy will ben-
efit."
For a complete list of
Franklin County activities
and events, visit www.anatu-
ralescape.com.


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Chapman School lot appraised at $750,000


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Kathy Ingersoll and her
friend from Rochester '
New York, Evelyn
Ranches, were on the
Riverwalk in Carrabelle
Feb. 3 when the folks
finished putting up the
new Carrabelle sign.
Ingersoll snapped this
picture, causing works
to exclaim the She is
the first official tourist to
get her picture taken in
front of the new sign.
.. - And she is.
e... KATHY INGERSOLL
.r SpecialtotheTimes


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Thursday, February 11, 2010


Local


The Times | A3


By David Adlerstein
Times City Editor

Supporters of a move to
bring countrywide voting to
Franklin County are step-
ping up their effort to put a
binding referendum on the
2010 ballot.
Incorporated as a not-
for-profit in Oct. 2009, the
Franklin County Voters
County-Wide Voting Politi-
cal Action Committee Inc.
(FCPAC) has begun circu-
lating petitions, which if
eventually certified by the
Supervisor of Elections of-
fice, could go before the
county commission for an
upordownvoteonplacing
the referendum on the bal-
lot.
"The Board of County
Commissionersdidnotobey
the court nor honor the will
of the electors," Cora Russ,
secretary of FCPAC, said.
"The fact that 69 percent-
plus of the electors in a No-


member 2006 non-binding
referendum voted to return
to at-large elections, made
it abundantly clear that the
voters of Franklin County
no longer want elections
conducted on a single dis-
trict basis.
"Now we have to make
it clear once more to this
Board of County Commis-
sioners that the electors
are determined to have
at-large voting in Franklin
County," she said. "This
petition for a binding refer-
endum on the 2010 ballot is
the way to do it.,,
FCPAC also contends
that a May 31, 1986 deci-
sionbyUnitedStatesDis-
trict Court Judge William
Stafford ordering Franklin
County to conduct elec-
tions on a single district ba-
sis has been changed.
They argue that on Oct.
30, 2003, the county com-
missioners, taking into
consideration the increase


districts, which were first
instituted as a civil rights
measure to ensure African-
American representation
on the commission.
Directors of FCPAC
also include Van Johnson,
chairman; Dolores Roux,
vice chair; and Kenneth
Osborne, treasurer. Ted
Ruffner serves as member
at large.
FCPAC is taking pains to
address concerns about the
bindingreferendumstress-
ing that five voting districts
will remain in place under
countrywide voting, with
candidates continuing to
run in the specific district
inwhichtheymustlive.
"Currently, only the vot-
ers in each specific district
can vote for the candidates
running in their specific
district," Russ said. "Under
countrywide voting, all vot-
ers in all the districts can
vote for their chosen can-
didate in each of the five


districts."
FCPAC leaders say
there is no worry that all
five county commissioners
can come from one district
or area of the county, creat-
ing an imbalance of power.
"All five districts must
and will still be represent-
ed, since all candidates
and elected commission-
ers must live in the district
in which they are elected,"
Russ said.
Petitions are available
at Superior Bank, Buy-
Rite Drugs, Dolores' Sweet
Shoppe and Apalachicola
Seafood Grill, in Apalachic-
ola; the office of attorney
Kristy Branch Banks, in
Eastpoint; and Some Like
It Hotter, on St George Is-
land.
The group can be mailed
to FCV C-WV PAC, Inc. PO.
Box 702, Apalachicola FL
32329.
For more info, call Cora
Russ at 653-7013.


DAVIDADLERSTEIN|TheTimes
Directors of effort to put a binding referendum for
.
countrywide voting on the ballot in 2010 are, from
left, Dolores Roux, Ken Osborne and Cora Russ.


in population indicated by
the 2000 Census, filed a
motion before Stafford that
allowed the court to enter
an order allowing the im-
plementation of a changed
district plan. The changed
plan adjusted the districts'
boundaries, but did not or-
der a return to countrywide
voting.


FCPACargueshowever,
thatonDec.3,2003,Stafford
made clear he was remov-
ing any impediment to the
county's implementation
of a new districting plan.
County Attorney Michael
Shuler has told the com-
mission that it is not clear
Stafford intended by his or-
der to end single-member


The U.S. Census Bureau is gearing
up for the 2010 Census and it needs
help to ensure everyone is counted.
Hundreds of thousands of tempo-
rary workers are needed to fill a va-
riety of census positions across the
country. The hourly rate of pay is
basedontheposition.
Hours are flexible from part time
hours up to 40 hours per week with
evening and weekend hours as well.
The mileage rate is the current gov-
ernment allowed 58.5 cents per mile.
Hiring has begun for several posi-
tions.
2010 Census job applicants must
be at least 18 years old, have a valid
Social Security number and be able
to pass a background check and take
an employment test that measures
knowledge, skills and abilities re-


quired to perform a variety of census
jobs.
Census takers are needed to up-
date address lists to ensure that all
residents receive the 2010 Census
questionnaire and to conduct in-per-
son interviews with community resi-
dents who do not return a question-
naire by mail.
In addition, the Census Bureau
needs crew leaders to train and su-
pervise employees and clerks to staff
Local Census Offices.
For more information on tempo-
rary employment with the Census
Bureau, or to schedule an appoint-
ment to take an employment test
and submit an application, call the
toll-free 2010 Census Jobs Line at 1-
866-861-2010. More information also is
available at www.2010censusjobs.gov.


(ountywide voting petition moves forward


2010 Census bringing

















Clerks face possible adverse effects from budget shortfall


LeMieux seeks to protect Ag riculture's future: A fa rmer's fa ntasy

fisheries from long closures


* 'Y


Thursday, February 11, 2010


Q. I read an article in The
News Herald recently about
the Clerk's Office facing
budget shortfalls. Is your office
being affected?


pays court budgets statewide,
is subject to an 8 percent fee,
which will total about $39 million
statewide. This fee is to be
diverted from the clerks
to the Department
of Revenue. Clerks
throughout the state
feel the fee is unfair
'1 because the department
is really not doing ve"
much administrative


elsewhere, but we were able
to deal with it. If my office
experienced a cut of $32,000, I
hypothetically said I would have
to consider shutting down my
annex operations in Carrabelle.
This would be devastating.
My court budget the
money the state makes available
for my court operations was
sliced 11 percent from the 2008-
09 budget to the 2009-10 budget.
Through diligent oversight, my
finance clerks have reduced our
expenditures for office supplies,
overtime and equipment.
Clerks probably won't get an
answer on whether cuts need
to happen until well into the
next legislative session, which
starts March 2. That won't give
us much time to make cuts in
this budget cycle, which ends
June 30. Our workload has
certainly increased in many
areas because of the poor


economy, yet we can't expect to
receive our approved budgets to
ensure our operations meet our
performance measures.
Since March 2009, my hours
of operation increased to
attempt to accommodate the
workload. My staff continually
is being cross-trained, and our
Web site is updated regularly so
we can guide the public toward
online services. I intend to
continue to strive to meet the
needs of the citizens of Franklin
County.

If you have any questions
or comments about this
column, please forward them
to Marcia Johnson, Clerk of
the Court, 33 Market St., Ste.
203, Apalachicola, FL 32320,
or by e-mail to mmjohnson@
franklinclerk.com. Visit the
clerk's Web site at www.
franklinclerk.com.


ifWy O CC
7
experiences a
CHt Of$32,000, I
.
hypothetically sazd
1 WOuld have to
CORA'lder Shutting <
down my anneZ

Operations in
L 4 77
*


base figure of 10,000, while the
State of Florida cut 600 positions
from a base of 140,000. Our
fees were increased; however,
this office didn't receive any
additional revenue. In fact, part
of our funding was diverted


A. My office will be
impacted if the court
budget is cut. In clerks'
offices throughout
the State, the court
budgets are state-funded
and overseen by the
Florida Clerk of Courts
Operations Corporation
(CCOC). We received


work. As clerks are


MAIKIA


surveys in January
asking how cuts would affect our
operations. I was told to predict
the impact of a budget cut of
approximately $32,000.
A new state administrative
fee set by law to be collected
on trust funds is to blame for
the potential cut. A new Clerk
of Courts Trust IRmd, which


this fee which could
cause the loss of more than
1,000 positions in clerk's offices
across the state.
Because of legislation passed
last year, clerks' funding was
cut, our budget process was
changed, and more than 1,200
employees lost their jobs in
clerks' offices statewide from a


y o n o c
Special to the Times
As president of the
state's largest agricultural
organization, I'm pleased
to present a tale that must
never come true. The
Farm Bureau, the Florida
Department ofAgriculture,
UF/IFAS and Florida


p
Washington imposed
because the bureaucrats
said his cows were belching
too much methane. The
cattle's absence leaves
his pastures teeming with
weeds, some of which are
likely considered invasive.
Nature, he thinks ruefully,
can be a bad mother to land


recharging the aquifer. Now, he
hopes for long, dry spells because
EPAs Numeric Nutrient Criteria
call for nutrient levels that are
actually lower than most rainfall.
Still, Baffington is a farmer, so
the idea of putting in a new crop
appeals to him. He could convert
part of his land to crops and maybe
raise the seed money by developing
another tract.
Oh, wait. He had forgotten
about Amendment 4, "Hometown
Democracy," the constitutional
amendment voters passed in 2010.
Can he afford a strong enough
political campaign to convince his
neighbors and the voters in the
rest of the county that they should
allow him to change his zoning?
Will they care, faced as they are
with 150 other amendments on the
ballot?
He feels pains return to his
chest. He should see the doctor
tomorrow. He isn't sure he wants to
go on. Yet he dare not die. Not now.
The Death Tax has returned, full-
force, threatening to impoverish
his family should he join the
departed. Head down, he kicks
disconsolately at the dirt.
"Dear, stop kicking," says his
wife, lying beside him on the bed.
"You have been so restless lately."
Baffington sits up, startled, and
gazes at the clock glowing on the
nightstand.
It's 3 a.m. The date is Feb.
14, 2010, he remembers. It's
Valentine's Day. A Sunday, and in a
few hours he will prepare breakfast
and serve it with a bouquet to the
woman he has loved for more than
30 years. His mood brightens as
he remembers their first meeting
at a Farm Bureau Young Farmer
conference so long ago.
Baffington smiles, his
confidence returning. Agriculture
is a community and its people,
organizations and institutions are
interwoven into his family's life,
one of their strongest connections
to people of like mind.


U.S. Senator
George LeMieux,
R-Florida, on Jan.28
urged colleagues to
amendfederallaw
to allow for more
flexible and science-
based timelines for
fisheries closures SEN.
in an effort to reduce the
negative economic impacts
felthy the recreational
fishing industry.
The effort that LeMieux
publicly endorsed requires
fisheries rebuilding to be
completed on a timeline that
allows fish stocks to recover
without unnecessarily
harming the livelihood of
recreational fishermen
and the fishing industry in
general.
"Fishing communities
are losing millions of dollars
each year because of rigid
laws requiring the closure
of entire fisheries for
extended periods of time
-regardless of whether the
fish stock has recovered,"
LeMieux said. "Basing
closure decisions on sound
science and environmental
conditions will ensure
that fisheries are rebuilt
in a way that helps to
keep fishing communities
economically viable, without
compromising the goal of
protecting fish stocks."
Senate Bill l255, the
Flexibility in Rebuilding
American Fisheries Act
authoredby Senator Charles
Schumer, D-New York,
will amend the Magnuson-
Stevens Act to allow fishery
management plan managers
to specify a time period for
rebuilding fisheries that is
both practical and efficient.
The bill maintains the


requirement that
overfishing be
ended within one
year but it gives
regulators the
option of allowing
fishing for strong
^ species in fishery
LEMIEUX that is currently
barred to protect the
weakest stock.
The proposed bill also:
Amends the
Magnuson-Stevens
Fishery Conservation and
Management Act to allow
fishery management plans
the flexibility to specify a
time periodforrebuilding
the fishery that is as short as
practicable.
Maintains the
requirement that overfishing
be ended within one year.
Allows exceptions to the
requirement that fisheries
be rebuilt in 10 years based
on the biology of the stockof
fish or other environmental
conditions.
Allows exemptions
to the requirement that
fisheries be rebuilt in 10
years when the rebuilding
program cannothe effective
only by limiting fishing
activities or when such
exemptions will minimize
the economic impacts on
fishing communities.
Requires consideration
of factors other than
commercial and recreational
fishing, such as commercial,
residential, and industrial
development, predator/
prey relationships and
other environmental and
ecological changes to the
marine conditions, when
evaluating progress to end
overfishing and rebuild
overfished stocks.


JOHN HOBLKK
FloridPr rm Bureau


commodity organizahons are
working to make sure this jZight
into fantasy will never reflect
reality. I believe it demonstrates
how scary life could be without
our agricultural organizations
and institutions:
Five years into the second
decade of the 21st century, farmer
Frank Baffington is shaking his
head. His farm, a blessing to his
family for the better part of 100
years, is driving him to distraction.
Not that he and his family
haven't faced challenges.
Hurricanes, freezes, droughts
and bad markets generations
of Baffingtons faced them all
down, displaying the adaptability,
toughness, character and
determination that characterize
Florida farmers and ranchers.
Now, he thinks he might give
up the land his grandfather began
working back when FSU was still
a girls school. Canker and citrus
greening have taken a toll on the
groves. He thinks that if UF/IFAS
researchers hadn't had their
funding cut by the Legislature back
in 2010, the industry could have
defeated or at least arrested
those diseases. As it is now, the
door is closing on Florida's citrus
industry.
The family beef operation is
likewise curtailed. Activist groups
passed a constitutional initiative
effectively outlawing commercial
marketing of animals and animal
products.
That's OK, though. He couldn't
have afforded to keep the cattle
anyway because of the costly Title


that isn't managed.
He's been entertaining the idea
of planting another crop. New
grass cultivars that can be used to
produce energy might hold some
promise, if scientists finally find a
way to produce energy from them
that makes economic sense. And
maybe he can find a niche in local
markets for some of the designer
vegetables that are more and more
prized by the locavores.
But, putting pencil to paper, he
doesn't see how he can make a
profit because he can barely fill his
tractor with fuel or his tanks with
fertilizer. The new cap-and-trade
law has driven prices of petroleum-
based products to alarming
heights.
The sweet iced tea he is sipping
leaves a bitter taste in his mouth as
he remembers how the politicians
promised to save the world by
curbing carbon dioxide emissions.
At one point, it seemed as if
American politicians thought the
United States could fix the problem
all by itself by discouraging the use
of fossil fuels. They failed to heed
the cries of rural America and now
Baffington wonders if he can work
his way out of the problem.
He would like to chuck it all for a
few days. Maybe clear his head by
going fishing; that's always helped
him to work through things. But
now his favorite farm pond is under
the jurisdiction of the EPA and the
Clean Water Restoration Act and
off limits to rod and reel.
Once he welcomed rain storms,
convinced that he and his property
performed a public service by


By Dr. Mark A. Jamison and
Op. Jonjee |-|ouge
Special to the Times
Dumb is better? That is what net
neutrality advocates would have us
believe. Their basic belief is that
broadband networks should be pipes
that differently pass information
packets from one location to another,
allowing content providers and
customers equal opportunity to do
whatever they want. Who could be
against that? People interested in
innovation and customer welfare.
Remember Al Gore calling the
Internet the Information Super
Highway? The metaphor wasn't and
isn't perfect, but it is instructive.
Suppose we applied net neutrality to
our transportation system there
would be no high occupancy vehicle
lanes during rush hour, no car only
lanes on interstates, and no toll road
as an alternative to Interstate 95 in
South Florida. Transportation would
be more costly and provide less
Value.
Forcing net neutrality would
have similar results. Time sensitive


information, such as stock market
transactions, would wait in line
behind football game highlights.
Financial dealings that could benefit
from extra security would be given
no better treatment than a Twitter
from Taylor Swift's E! interview.
If you are thinking that it
sounds like net neutrality restricts
innovation and hurts customers,
you're right. Our research has
shown that net neutrality limits
innovation, contrary to the claims
of the net neutrality proponents.
How can this be? Imagine a one
dimensional network one that
does nothing but carry information
from point to point, which is how
the old Internet has worked. What
kinds of content providers flourish
in that context? Those big enough to
distribute their software across the
net and those whose software takes
advantage of the great bandwidth
that they don't have to pay for.
Now suppose that the network
can offer enhancements that
improve customers' experiences.
Content providers whose sites would
not benefit from such enhancements


could ignore the offering. But there
will be some content providers who
could improve their services by
buying the enhancements, such as
priority packet delivery. These sites
become better without net neutrality
and offer customers more service.
In other words, there is more
innovation and greater customer
welfare without net neutrality than
with it.
Today's successful Internet sites
face greater competition if we move
beyond net neutrality principles.
That probably explains why they are
net neutrality's strongest advocates.
But moving beyond a dumb network
is better for customers, sites that
find new opportunities and networks.
It should be no surprise that
dumb isn't better. In an innovation
driven economy, restrictions don't
make us better. They hold us back.
Dr Mark A. Jamison is director
Public Utility Research Centes
University ofFlorida, and Dr
Janice Hauge is associate
professor Department of
Economics, University ofNorth
Texas.


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received for such advertisement.
The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is
thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word
thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains.


*



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Thursday, February 11, 2010


Local


The Times | AS


eughnye e oh t
mostly at Chapman but for a
time in Carrabelle, and fol-
lowing her death, the house
passed into the hands of her
niece, Elizabeth Card.
Bobby Miller, who lives
next door at 34 16th St., was
among the first to detect a
problem at his neighbor's
house.
"All I saw was thick,
thick black smoke," he said.
"There were no flames leap-
ing from anywhere. I heard
glass break, and smoke was
billowing out everywhere."
It was then Miller no-
ticed the glow of flames in
the home's living room.
With the help of his wife,
Valerie, Miller grabbed his
garden hose and started to
wet the side of the house
down in an attempt to chill
the fire's advance.
"We were just trying to
hold it down until the fire
department got there," he
said.
Miller also called Apala-
chicola fire chief George
Watkins, at 6:33 p.m., just
moments after Watkins had
received word of the blaze
from the sheriff 's office.
"You need to bring ev-
erything you got," the dis-
patcher told him.
The department's newer
fire truck, about 10 years
old, began to shoot water
from its tank as Watkins
and fellow fighters James
McCall and Jimmy Lashley
looked to hook up a hose to
the nearest hydrant, at 17th
Street and Avenue C.
"The flames were inside,
and it was just starting to
break windows," Watkins
said. "It looked like the bot-
tom floor all the way up to
the second floor was burn-
ing. It looked like it had been
smoldering for a while."
When the firemen se-
cured the hose to the hy-
drant, they were surprised
to learn no water was forth-
coming.
"He said it's on, but it's
no good," Watkins said.
"Somebody in the city had
cut it off.
The firefighters scram-
bled to hook up to another
hydrant, at 15th Street and
Avenue C, but it was farther
away, with a weaker spray.
"Once you go 700 feet, you
don't get a lot of pressure
kom that distance," Wat-
kins said.
Meanwhile, the crew
Rom Eastpoint had arrived
to spray from their tanker,
and the fire began to be un-
der control. Also, William
Cox, from the city's water
and sewer department, had
arrived to restore flow to
the nearest hydrant.
"The hydrant was shut
down for repair. That's
going to come out in the
wash," Watkins said. "We
needed a hydrant real close
by where we could hook two
hoses to it. There was none


thA B all the way to
The chief saidhe was glad
the three crews were able to
save the Miller home, Carl
Dennis' house and other
nearby structures. Watkins
said he wasn't sure what ef-
feet the hydrant delay had
on the fire's progress.
"It could have preserved
it(thehouse),buttomealot
of the damage already was
done," he said. "Whether it
would have been savable or
not, I don't know."
Miller said the house
was ravagedby flames even
before firefighters arrived,
and he was unsure what
might have been had hy-
drant delays not developed.
"I don't believe they
couldhavesavedthatifthey
had the truck parked here
and when I called 911 they
said, 'Go,' he said.
Miller dispelled rumors
the fire could have been set
by people trespassing in-
side the house. He said the
house was fully furnished
and had timers to turn the
inside lights on and off at
set times, as well as a secu-
rity system that included a
high-temperature alarm.
"The house was ready to
walk in and live in; it wasn't
abandoned," Miller said.
Hesaidtheownerswould
come down to do mainte-
nance and had a hired hand
to tend to the lawn and oth-
er chores.
Joe Steadman, from the
state fire marshal's office,
came to examine the re-
mains for a possible cause.
Firefighters said state in-
vestigators are considering
the possibility the fire began
with a short in an electrical
panel.
Watkins said the blaze
was under control within
about 90 minutes, but not
fully extinguished for an-
other 12 hours.
"It wasn't completely out
until 9 a.m. this morning,"
he said Tuesday. "We left at
1 a.m., and it flared back up
at 5 a.m., so we came back
out and stayed until 9 a.m.
Finally it rained and we put
enough water on it; it finally
went out."
The chief said he re-
mains concerned that with
fewer hydrants to work
with, future problems could
arise in other situations.
"There used to be a lot
more hydrants in the town,"
he said. "There used to be
a hydrant on 16th Street,
at 16th and C, one on every
block, every corner, where
they intersected."
Watkins estimated that
half the hydrants were re-
moved about 10 years ago
as part of a revamping of
the city's water system.
"My opinion is they took
about half the hydrants," he
said. "We don't have good
hydrant pressure anymore,
even when everything
works right."


By David Adlerstein
Times City Editor
At least one out of every 11
workers in Franklin County was
without a job in December, and
likely even more than that, as the
unemployment rate hit the 9 per-
centmark.
The increase in joblessness,
two-tenths of 1 percent over the
8.8 percent rate in November,
kicked the county down to 12th
best in the state, as it moved
slowly toward the 9.7 percent na-
tional average.
According to preliminary la-
bor market statistics released
last month by the Florida Agency
for Workforce Innovation, the job-
less rate in December meant 401
people out of a labor force of 4,469
workers could not find work.
The jobless rate in November
showed 399 people were looking
for employment out of a larger la-
bor force of 4,544.
In December 2008, Franklin's
workforce was even larger, at




SCHOOL fr om pa ge Al


4,572 workers, and its jobless rate
smaller, at 5.5 percent, with only
252 jobless.
Franklin's current jobless rate
was better than that of the two
other counties in the Gulf Coast
Workforce region, Bay and Gulf,
which were at 11.5 and 11.2 per-
cent, respectively. The last time
the Gulf Coast region's unem-
ployment rate was this high or
higher was in January 1994, when
the three counties averaged 11.8
percent.
"Walk-in traffic from job seek-
ers at the Workforce Center is
still up, even when compared to
last December, when we had the
wave of company layoffs," said
Kim Bodine, executive direc-
tor for the Gulf Coast Workforce
Board. "I anticipate that our un-
employment rate will continue
to make fits and starts until our
economy recovers from the re-
cession."
Florida's seasonally adjusted
unemployment rate for Decem-
her 2009 rose by three-tenths of 1


percentage point to 11.8 percent,
making it the highest since May
1975, when it was 11.9 percent.
The state's rate is 1.8 percentage
points higher than the national
unemployment rate of 10.0 per-
cent.
Private education and health
services is the only sector gain-
ing jobs among Florida's major
industries, with all of the increase
due to health care and social as-
sistance, primarily in nursing and
residential care facilities. Private
education declined by 1,200 jobs
over the year.
Liberty County has the state's
lowest unemployment rate, at 6.0
percent, followed by Monroe, Ala-
chua, Jackson and Leon counties,
all below 8 percent; Holmes and
Okaloosa counties, both below 8.5
percent; and Bradford, Lafayette
and Wakulla counties, all below
9 percent. Many of the counties
with the lowest unemployment
rates are those with relatively
high proportions of government
employment.


and wants to attend either Florida
A&M University or Florida State Uni-
versity.
He then would major in computer
sciences, and after graduation, serve
as a naval officer for at least four
years.
Also a member of the honor soci-
eties, he takes part in the Free Fire
expressive dance ministry at Carra-
belle Christian Center as well as the


BORD T fr om as Al
afternoon's scheduled adversary pre-
liminary hearing, which is needed to
establish probable cause for going
ahead with charges.
"Not a close question," he said,
noting that the trial likely would not
be soon. "We're probably talking
about not less than a year from now."
Hankinson denied the gag order
and encouraged the state attorney
and sheriff's offices, including all
their personnel, to avoid any miscon-
duct that "could conceivably cause a
problem in keeping the trial in Frank-
lin County" or result in disciplinary
action on a professional level.
During the 90-minute hearing,
Hankinson questioned Michael
Glazer, the attorney representing the
Tallahassee Democrat in its motion
to intervene, as to what procedure
should be followed when the defense
feels that a piece of evidence is ex-
empt from Sunshine Law provisions.
In her argument, Suber had men-
tioned autopsy photos, which are not
automatically required to be made
public, or statements made between
a husband and wife, which may be in-
admissible in court.
Much of the discussion hinged on
past cases with shielded evidence -
such as the 2007 case of Gary Hilton,
accused of killing Cheryl Dunlap, who
had been the focus of a highly publi-
cized search before her body was dis-
covered in the Apalachicola National
Forest. The judge told Glazer he had
read Leon County Circuit Judge
Terry Lewis's decision in that case,
which allowed for some shielding of
sensitive evidence from the media.
"It's a tricky area to deal with,"
Hankinson said, urging attorneys on
both sides to find a creative solution
to share information before it be-
comes public as part of the Clerk of
Courts' record keeping.
Both media attorneys contended
the issues in the Bordt case were not
comparable with Hilton's or the high-


One Love drama, mime and puppet
ministry.
He played some high school foot-
ball early on and has volunteered at
the Boys and Girls Club.
Hardy, daughter of Brian and Tam-
mi Hardy, of Carrabelle, has mapped
out a plan to attend Tallahassee Com-
munity College, earn an associate de-
gree and then transfer to Florida State
to study English literature en route to


becoming an English teacher.
A member of the honor societies,
she has played Lady Seahawks soft-
ball throughout her high school years
and has been chosen as Miss FCHS.
A member of the Carrabelle Chris-
tian Center, Hardy is active in the
Free Fire dance and drama ministry.
Graduation exercises are slated
for Friday evening, June 4, at the high
school.


profile Rachel Hoffman murder case,
in which the 23-year-old Florida State
graduate was killed during her coop-
eration as a police informant.
Hankinson said Suber failed to
prove that intense publicity, includ-
ing online comments, jeopardized
Bordt's rights. At one point, the judge
told Christopher Ellrich, an inves-
tigator with the public defender's
office testifying about the extent of
publicity, that it is "stretching any
credibility what impact that has on a
jury in Franklin County," referring to
coverage in Russia, Germany and the
Far East.
"I'm struggling a little bit to see
the relevance of that," Hankinson
said.
The judge agreed with Glazer and
Elizabeth Bevington, an attorney rep-
resenting Tallahassee television sta-
tion WCTV that extensive reporting,
sensational details or the celebrity of
a defendant are insufficient grounds
to close a trial.
"There's no evidence the jury
pool has been tainted. This pales by
comparison," Glazer said, noting that
most of the coverage has been lim-
ited to a three-day span following the
murder.
"I do not find that there has been
an extensive amount of publicity,"
Hankinson said in his ruling. "All mur-
ders are certainly terrible things."
The judge said he also took into
consideration the effect that wide-
spread media reports have had on
Franklin County.
"This is a small county, and I have
weighed that in the balance," he said.
"Neither are people (Bordt or Hiers)
who would be viewed as local resi-
dents."
After the decision, Suber said she
planned to launch an appeal, and
Hankinson granted her request to
cancel the day's preliminary hearing.
Myers, the assistant state attorney,
groused that his witnesses were on


hand, ready to testify, but he did not
formally oppose the cancellation,
Waiting in the courtroom were Bri-
gitte Schroeder, a possible German
translator, Sheriff's Office Lt. Ronnie
Degree, who filed the arrest warrant,
St. George Island Fire Chief Jay Ab-
bott, Florida Department of Law En-
forcement Special Agents Tom Mc-
Graw and Dave Wilson, crime scene
analyst Sean Yao, and Dr. Anthony
Clark, a forensic pathologist.
Hankinson granted a continuance
until the case resumes March 9.
On Wednesday, Feb. 10, a hearing
was scheduled to impanel a grand
jury, and Suber has been allowed to
submit written questions that the
judge may ask potential grand ju-
rors. Once seated, the grand jury is
set to meet Feb. 23 to decide whether
to seek first-degree murder charges,
which could carry the death penalty.
Presently, prosecutors have
charged Bordt with second-degree
murder, the most severe crime they
can charge in the absence of a grand
jury decision, and aggravated child
abuse with a deadly weapon.
Escorted by a deputy from the
Leon County Jail, where she remains
in custody, Bordt was in tears when
she entered the courtroom, and had
to be consoled by Suber. She grew
more composed after meeting her
court-appointed German translator,
Michael Alsentzer, of Tallahassee.
He sat by her throughout the hear-
ing and translated the proceedings as
they were occurring, as Hankinson
had ordered.
At the end of the hearing,
Alsentzer told the judge he occasion-
ally had problems because "listening
and speaking at the same time is very
difficult."
Hankinson replied that he would
address any concerns as they come
up.
"Just raise your hand and I will
slow the proceedings down," he said.


FIRE from paoe Al


County jobless rate hits 9 percent


**(1101* ILile Luled
.. Irites tons.*nows
anc e stand in \..in it. 1
s in share lot insti
te .and u ndidennal
ed ar:
. Panama Cir Beach
all:
6-9435
















































AID from page Al


Seafood workers filled out forms requesting aid from Catholic Charities on Feb. 4.


Thursday, February 1 1, 2010


A6 | The Times


Local


By Lois Swoboda
Times StaffWriter
A well-known local sea-
food worker must leave
his longtime home in East-
point.
James "Teeny Boy" Cain
received notoriety in his
youth when he won a Gold-
en Gloves Award as a pro-
fessional boxer in Birming-
ham, Ala. More recently, his
image was made famous by
local photographer Richard
Bickel, who immortalized
Cain with oyster tongs lifted
working on the bay*
"Cain is the quintessen-
tial Franklin County fish-
erman, tough, self-reliant
and uncomplaining," Bickel
said.
Cain cannot remember
how long he has lived in his
trailer in Eastpoint. Lately,
he has had a run of bad luck,
and now, he must leave his
home.
In December, he was vis-
iting his wife, Mary Ruth, at
the St. James Rehabilita-
tion Center when his trailer
caught on fire.


paying rent until recently
to someone who he now be-
lieves did not own the prop-
erty.
He has now stopped pay-
ing rent but has no claim to
the lot where his trailer has
remained for many years.
Cain must find a new
site, and friends say it is
questionable whether his
trailer can even be moved
in its current state of disre-
pair.
Andy Buchleitner, pro-
gram director of Hope To-
day, a Tallahassee-based
charity that can help low-
income seniors with finan-
cial and especially housing
problems, has been work-
ing with Cain,
He said one solution to
Cain's problem would be
to relocate him to a travel
trailer; Cain said he would
happily move to a smaller
home.
"I don't need so much
room with my wife gone,"
he said. But, he said, he
would like to remain close
to the water and close to
downtown Eastpoint.


PhotosbyLOISSWOBODA|TheTimes
Clarice Powell of Franklin's Promise, center, tells a disappointed crowd outside
St. Patrick's fellowship hall that the money from Catholic Charities has run out.


JAMES {nAIN


His son, David, who
lives next door, alerted the
fire department, and the
trailer was saved, but Cain's
kitchen was a total loss.
Two weeks later, Cain's wife
died.
Since then, Cain, 81, has
been struggling to repair
the damage to his home.
Using power tools and at-
tempting to heat the poorly
insulated structure through
January's record cold, he


has amassed an electric bill
of over $800.
The latest blow to Cain's
world came when Cham-
bers Bank, of Fayetteville,
Ark., who took posses-
sion through foreclosure
last year of the land where
Cain's trailer sits, informed
him he would have to move.
The bank helped finance
the now-defunct Porthaven
project.
Cain said he had been


LOIS SWOBODA | The Times


Buchleitner is seeking
funds to purchase a travel
trailer or move Cain's cur-
rent home to a new site.
He is also looking for a new
location for Cain's small
household. The site will


need to have existing hook-
ups for electricity, water
and sewer.
If you can offer any help,
please call Buchleitner at
559-0525 or Lois Swoboda at
653-5857.


More than 200 people
had joined the line when
the announcement came
that there was no more
money. They left in a quiet,
orderly fashion.
Herman said her group
may return in two to three
weeks with additional
funds, but added that re-
sources are very limited.
Father Roger Latosyn-
ski said he was shocked by
the level of need.
"The governor needs to
come down here and see
this," he said.
That evening, at a
scheduled meeting of the
Franklin County Seafood
Workers Association (FC-
SWA), more than 20,000
pounds of food was distrib-
uted to about 800 seafood
workers.
The food was donated
by Tallahassee's Second
Harvest Food Bank and
transported by Execu-
tive Office Supply. Care
packages included fresh
fruit and vegetables, Vi-
enna sausage, juice and
canned staples. DART
kicked in with a truck-
load of dog and cat food as
well.
At the same meeting,
seafood workers were able
to fill out a request for aid
to be faxed to Florida Sen.
Bill Nelson's office. FC-
SWA President Taunya
James said she has be-
gun faxing more than 300
completed forms from the
meeting to Nelson. She is
not sure exactly what form
of aid the applicants can
expect.
Brian Gulley, a spokes-
man for Nelson, said the
seafood workers filled out
a standard release form
that is requested from any
constituent seeking help.
He said requests will be
considered on a case-by-
case basis.
Nelson's office is work-
ing with the U.S. Depart-
ment of Agriculture to de-
termine whether seafood
workers are eligible for aid
because Franklin is one of
60 counties declared agri-
cultural disaster areas be-
cause ofJanuary's record
cold. Gulley said he did not
know of any specific pro-
gram that might provide
help.


Pat Carroll, of the Capital Area Community Action


should have come from the
governor. We're not going
to get any money from on
high. This is going to be a
grassroots effort."
He said anyone wish-
ing to make a donation can
send it to Bay Aid Franklin,
78 11th St., Apalachicola, FL
32320.
Pam Brownell, the coun-
ty's emergency manage-
ment director, said The Sal-
vation Army is processing
aid forms that she faxed to
them last week, but warned
that available funds are very
limited.
She urged all seafood
workers to file unemploy-
ment claims, even if they
believe they are ineligible
for aid under these pro-
grams. Because seafood
workers are self-employed,
they rarely file for jobless
benefits, so there is no pa-
per trail documenting the
higher level of unemploy-
ment in the county.
"If we can document that
people are unemployed, it
may make us eligible for
some programs we can't ac-
cess now," Brownell said.
Herman said allocations
of funds from the Homeless-
ness Prevention Program,
available from the federal
government, are based
partly on the level of unem-
ployment in the county.
People wishing to apply
for unemployment can do
so online (https://www2.my
florida.com/fluid) at home,
at any branch of the public
library or at the Literacy
Center on Island Drive in
Eastpoint.


Retired Eastpoint oysterman seeks new home


if0WHON UfgOS
S60f00d workers
10 0 UROMD Ovment
'
Pastor Casey Smith, of
the Eastpoint Church of
God, said his church is part-
nermg with the food pantry
in Apalachicola. The first
step is an intake form that
people needing help can fill
out Monday through Thurs-
day from 9 a.m. until 4 p.m.
We review forms on a
case-by-case basis. As funds
are available, we give them
out," he said. "We will not
turn anybody who is hungry
away. When hunger is not a
big issue, we have helped
with utility bills, but right
now, there are so many hun-
gry people we are focused
on that. We also distributed
over 30 heaters during Jan-
uary. We can only give out
one heater per household,
and we screen to make sure
it's a legitimate need."
The Rev John Sink, a
member of the Franklin's
Promise board, said the
group has written letters
to all 44 county churches
and all of Franklin County's
state and federal represen-
tatives requesting aid. He
said nobody has responded.
Sink said some local
churches have requested
aid from nationwide gov-
erning bodies but, so far, no
one has offered to help.
"Since the state didn't
give us a major disaster
declaration, we aren't eligi-
ble for small-business loans
or any kind of federal aid,"
he said. "That declaration














Thursday, February 11, 2010 w w w. ap ala cht ti me s. com Pag~e 7


STATE BAN K 1897
A Division of Coastal Community Bank

Apalachicola Carrabelle East point St. George Island
22 Avenue E 612 NAvenue A 5 Jefferson Street 200 Franklin Blvd
653-8805 697-4500 670-8501 927-2561


.

111


~gl UUfa


By David Adlerstein
Times City Editor
Led by their five graduating
seniors, all honored before the
game, the Seahawks closed out
their regular season with a re-
sounding 46-41 win against Flori-
da High Feb. 4.
They now face district foe West
Gadsden in the tournament Fri-
day night in Bristol, but coach
Fred Drake doesn't like what he's
seeing being done by tourney of-
ficials.
He has protested the fact that
the Franklin County game, which
pits the second- and third-seeded
teams, has been scheduled as the
second game of the night at 7:30
p.m., highly unusual in area-wide
district play. Generally, the top
seeded team, in this case Port St.
Joe, plays the nightcap.
"IknowandunderstandPortSt.
Joe is the district coordinator, but
Liberty County is the host site,"
he wrote in an e-mail to Athletic
Director Mike Todd. "It's not fair
and right that we play the second
game. It serves us as an advan-
tage to play the first game while
there is not that many people in
attendance, and that we hurry up
and get our game over with. Then,
that gives us a chance to scout
them with less pressure off of us.
"Port St. Joe will have the ad-
vantage to scout us more since
their first game will be complet-
ed," Drake wrote. "Also, it serves
as an intimidation factor for them
to sit in the stands behind us,
maybe while they hope and cheer
for West Gadsden to win. They re-
ally don't want to play us a third
time."
It was not clear whether a
change could be made before Fri-
day for the Seahawks game to be
switched to 6 p.m. "I have never
seen a tournament where the No.
1 seed is playing the first game,"
wrote Drake. "That is unheard of.
It is not in our best interest to play
the second game. Nobody contact-
ed me nor asked my opinion on
this. Also, this was not discussed
at the district team meeting last
spring."
HonoredbeforelastThursday's


antee on either side. Somebody's
s on is going to end Friday
Drake said the team is motivat-
ed by the loss of their star sopho-
more Carlos Morris, who has left
the team, and possibly Franklin
County High School, for another
school.
"We are 4-1 without Carlos. A
lot of people would have folded,"
said Drake. "The kids want to
prove they're a pretty decent
team without him."

Feb. 2 vs. Blountstown
Blountstown 9 6 12 20 47
Franklin Co. 19 14 12 14 59
SEAHAWKS: Arron Prince
2/13 2s, 0/2 3s, 0/2 FTs, 6 pts.; Da-
lin Modican 3/6 2s, 0/2 FT, 6 pts.;
James Winfield 4/6 2s, 1/3 FTs, 9
pts.; Adam Joseph 6/10 2s, 1/1 FTs,
13 pts.; Austin O'Neal 10/20 2s, 3/7
FTs, 23 pts.; Zach Jones 2/4 2s, 0/1
FTs, 4 pts.
Totals: 28/62 2s, 0/4 3s, 5/16
(31%) FTs.
Rebounds: Joseph 12; O'Neal
11; Winfield 6; Modican, Prince 4;
Tre'kale Turrell 3; Michael Turner
2.
Steals: O'Neal, Prince 3; Jo-
seph, Jones 2; Winfield, Modican,
Turner, 'llIrrell.
Assists: Prince 4; O'Neal 3; Jo-
seph 2; Winfield, Modican, Jones.
Blocks: Joseph 2.

Feb. 4 vs. Florida High
Florida High 6 10 10 15 41
Franklin Co. 9 11 8 18 46
SEAHAWKS: Prince 0/1 2s, 4/7
3s 4/6 FTs, 16 pts.; Modican 4/5 2s, 8
pts.; Winfield 2/4 2s, 1/4 FTs, 5 pts.;
Tydron Wynn 0/2 3s; O'Neal 3/16 2s,
0/2 3s, 5/8 FTs, 11 pts.; Jones % 2s,
6 2 pts.
Totals: 12/31 2s, 4/11 3s, 10/20
(50%) FTs.
Rebounds: Jones 13; O'Neal
10; Winfield 8; Prince 7; Joseph 5;
Modican 4.
Steals: Prince 4; O'Neal 2; Jo-
seph.
Assists: Prince, O'Neal 4; Jo-
seph.
Blocks: Joseph, Modican, Win-
field, Jones.


.
Photos by DAVID ADLERSTEIN |The Times
Above, Coach Fred Drake,
right, works to convince refs not
to eject Sea hawks senior Arron
Prince during the second half
against Florida High. At right,
junior Dalin Modican goes up
for a shot in action against
Florida High

game were seniors Arron Prince,
AustinO'NealDerickRhodesTy-
dron Wynn and Zach Jones.
Jones then went on to score
the first six points of the game,
which had the Seahawks leading
20-16 at the half. Prince led the
team with 16 points, while O'Neal
added 11.
"It was good for these seniors
to carry us for this last regular-
season game," said Drake.
After the Seahawks trailed
31-28, Prince nailed consecutive
treys early in the third quarter
to put the team up 34-31. He then
had an assist to O'Neal, which
brought the crowd to its feet.
"I think my best coaching job
that night was helping him stay in
the game," said Drake, referring
to a technical foul for fighting that
might have had Prince ejected.
"They wanted to put both players
out of the game. I told the ref 'This
is this kid's senior night, the last
home game, and that was just one
isolated incident.'"
The Seahawks continued to
lead, but the game got close until


Drake executed the stall with less
than a minute to play.
O'Neal hit four free throws in
the last minute, and Jones snared
a key rebound to secure the win.
Drake said the team is excited
about proving themselves Friday
night. "We split during the regu-
lar season; they beat us by one at
their home," he said. "It's going to
be a good game. It's going to be a
tough game, and there's no guar-


Lady Varsity softball
Friday, Feb. 12, at home
vs. Godby High at 6 p.m.
Tuesday, Feb. 16, at
home vs. Altha at 5 p.m.
Wednesday, Feb. 17, @
Port St. Joe at 5 p.m. (JV).
Thursday, Feb. 18, at
home vs. Liberty County
at 5 p.m. JV and 7 p.m. var-
sity.


Varsity baseball
Thursday, Feb. 11, pre-
season game at 4 p.m. @
Rickards.
Friday, Feb. 12, pre-sea-
son game at 7 p.m. @ Rick-
ards.
Tuesday, Feb. 16, at 7
p.m. vs. Arnold at home.
Thursday, Feb. 18, at 6:30
p.m. @ FAMU.


Lady Middle school softball
Monday, Feb. 15, at home
vs. Tolar at 4 p.m.
TuesdayFeb.16,@Hos-
ford at 4 p.m.
Middle school baseball
Monday, Feb. 15, at home
vs. Tolar at 4 p.m.
Tuesday, Feb. 16, @ Hos-
ford at 4 p.m.


*Traditional


CA RRA BE L LE APA LA CH ICO LA


A


Sea hawks win r eg ula r-season closer


Dixie

Youth


L
eague
*
S17H-UITS
O p
.
CO 6U1H

Applications are be-
ing taken for the 2010
Franklin County Dixie
Youth League season,
encompassing every-
thing from T-ball for the
littlest ones to baseball
and softball for the old-
er boys and girls.
To be eligible for the
2010 season, which be-
gins with "Day of Base-
ball" slated for Satur-
day, March 27, at East-
point's Vrooman Park,
a child must be age 5
before May 1, 2010.
Participation fees
are $50 for the first
child and $45 for each
child after that.
Late registration
fee, after March 1, will
be $60.
Sign-ups are being
held in Apalachicola at
the D.W. Wilson Sports
Complex, in Eastpoint
at Vrooman Park and in
Carrabelle at the Will
Kendrick Sports Com-
plex.
The sign-ups will be
held on Thursday, Feb.
11, from 6:30 to 7:30
p.m. and on Saturday,
Feb. 13, from 10:30 a.m.
to noon.
Parents are asked to
bring a birth certificate
of their child or chil-
dren to the sign-ups.
The league also
is seeking energetic
adults to serve as
coaches or volunteers
for the upcoming sea-
son,
For more informa-
tion, call Bob or Toni
Eddy at 653-8940.


Seahawks SPRING SPORTS


Zachary Jones
Senior Zachary Jones
scored the first three
buckets, and went
on to pace the team
with 13 rebounds, as
the Seahawks topped
Florida Hi0h to end the
regular season at 15-8.


Arron prince


Senior Arron Prince
hit 4-of-7 three-
pointers, including two
consecutive ones that
helped turn the Came
around in the third
quarter, in the Seahawks'
victory over Florida Hi0h
to close out the regular
SOSSOn.


-liHgarolli's Tree Servil
a If we cut your tree, we grind
your stump for FREE!
Richard Zingarelli


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Thursday, February 1 1, 2010


Local


Master gardener seminars,
home & garden demonstrations,

& g UGSt speakers.
.
New location this year!

The Panama City Mall
Linens-n-Things former location

More space, more vendors, more activities
for the entire family!








PANAMA CITY
NE HER LD KNOjpQY News a
on your side


There appears to be damage to the
eaglet's right eye, which Alan Knothe, as-
sistant biologist for the Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC),
said might be avian pox, a slow developing
disease of birds caused by a virus and of-
ten spread by mosquitoes.
Knothe said the only course now is to
observe the bird.
When the time for the eaglet to fledge
(grow adult feathers) approaches, the
FWC might choose to place the infant with
a wildlife rehabilitation if there is still a
problem with the eye.
Knothe said only three out of 10 eaglets
survive their first year.
Robin Vroegop said the eaglet appears
to be gaining in strength and size. It has
become more active and has begun to call
to its parents.


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American Red Cross


COW O


A8 | The Times


<
It sa r


By Lois Swoboda
Times Staff Writer
A pair of eagles nesting in the historic
district of Apalachicola has hatched out a
7 youngster.
For a number of years, an eagle's nest
has graced a tall pine on 12th Street in
Apalachicola.
) Although the parents persistently have
worked to fill the nest with chicks, they
rarely have succeeded. This year, the nest
is home to an eaglet.
Robin and Mike Vroegop, who live across
the street, were among the first to notice the
blessed event, but they say the neighbors
are all watching with interest now.
Nature photographer John Spohrer
has made several trips to view the young-
ster and photograph it,


.

TWELFTH STREET EAGLET


Real ~ ~ ~ Ki EsaeCopn avis


E~P~


SUN~s TRUS


I
Hancock
Bank.





ThursdayFebruaryll 010 www.apalachtimes.com Pagel

4














appearing in "Seeing Stars in D RoYCERotsWill specialtotheTimes
zetta, Megan Lamb, Hank Koz skarab e ieM onn e.







DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times
Cleo Holladay Partington closes her one-woman show,
as a photo of the Dixie Theatre, a forlorn movie theatre
her late husband lovingly restored, is projected behind
her.











Megan Lamb, right, keeps the drovanotsmoullSpecialtotheTimes
Stars in Dixie," together with au ience floored, in "Seeing
and Hank Kozlowsky. cast members Laura Baney, left,


B


MARDI
Saturday night at the Dixie Theatre
was more than just a good time.
The seventh annual Mardi Gras
celebration brought in about $6,000, and
after expenses, should bring more than
$2,000 for Habitat for Humanity, and
$2,000 for Franklin's Promise Coalition.
With David Butler as emcee, Skip
Frink as host and Pam and Don Ashley as


organizers, the party was a superb time,
with a delicious dinner from Tamara's
Cafe, steamed shrimp from Buddy Ward,
fish dip from The Grill and Ella Bond's
cupcakes for dessert, plus a clam bar from
Van Lewis and local gumbo from Jeff Ilardi.
Dixie Partington and Jerry Hall, second
from right, reigned as Princess Pea and
King Rex, and kicked off the party with


the grand march. Entertainment featured
musicians Carol Harris and Randy Mims
and friends, with quiet music to start out,
and then came raucous music from blues
guitarist Slim Fatz, second from left, and
the Tate's Hell Blues Band. Even former
Rockette Alice Jean Gibbs, and Ted
Ruffner, at right, got in the act, by dancing
the night away.


LIFE


TI~ES


GRAS A~ HIT










LOWERY TOP FOI EMPLOYEE IN JANUARY


PETOF TH E
WEEK

Lucy
Did you know that black dogs
. take the longest to adopt and are
often overlooked because many
people believe them to be plain and
Ordinary? All you have to do is
spend a little time with one of our
black dogs to realize that there is
ll..... 01 e anadboh vteh ir They
personahty. / ., ,,,1;,, 1,,'
be perfect for your home and tamily
Please come by the Adoption Center
inrea e tcht to y ida lad
YOLUNTEERS are desperately needed to socialize Lucy and all of the
other dogs and cats. We are always 1;,,. for people ,ll.... to bring one of
our animals into their home to be fostered tor various needs. Any time you can
spare would be greatly appreciated.
Call Karen at 6"O-841" for more details or visit the Franklin County
Humane Society at 244 State Route 65 in Eastpoint. You may log onto the
vebsite at \vivivforgottenpets.org to see more of our adoptable pets.

,






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Next week LEAVING IOWA
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_ _ _____________ __ _____n___ ____ _ _ ____I ____________ _ _ ____


1


L


Thursday, February 1 1, 2010


Society


SPEGAL TO THE TIMES
Franklin Correctional Institution has selected Talitha Lowery as employee of the month for January.
Lowery has been employed since July 2008 at FC|, where she is assigned to the classification
department. She was nominated for the award by fellow employee Sarah Laughton, who described
her as a person of high moral character and a very dedicated employee and diligent worker. These
attributes have not gone unnoticed by the FCI administration either, as Lowery was recently promoted
from classification officer to senior classification officer. Lowery lives in Apalachicola with her son,
Nehemiah Robinson, and fiance, Omega Robinson. Pictured are classification supervisor Pam Grice,
left, Lowery and FCI Warden Duffie Harrison.


TDC considers next step in regional marketing


Harmony Jones turns 1
Harmony
Love Jones
celebrated her
first birthday
on Thursday,
Feb. 11.
Harmony
is the daugh-
ter of Co'Lela
Jones and
Sedric Jones,
of Apala-
chicola, and
little sister
to Ca'Layia
Jones.
Her ma-
ternal grand-
parents are
Harrison and
Bonnie Jones,
of Apalachic-
ola.
Her pater-
nal grandpar-
ents are Be-
linda Preston,
of Baconton, Ga., and the late James Daniels, of Albany,
Ga.
Maternal great-grandparents are Eugene Russ, of
Apalachicola, and the late Lela Mae Russ, and Louis and
Harrison Jones, Sr., of Albany, Ga.


Jimmy Sadler turns 16
Happy 16th birthday, Jimmy Sadler, on 'lliesday,
Feb. 9.
Love, Mom, sisters, cousin and Thumper


Development Councils is
the next logical step in pro-
moting the area, now that
Southwest Airlines service
is a reality."
Coastal Vision 3000 was
instrumental in bringing
the airline to Panama City's
Northwest Florida Beaches
InternationalAirport.South-
west will begin flying out of
the new airport in May.
Dedicated to building
Northwest Florida's tourism
industry, Coastal Vision 3000
successfully created a re-
gionalbrand,"THEBEACH"


to unify a seven-county
coastal area. The organiza-
tion's structure and assets,
including a comprehensive
Web site, will remain intact,
with coordination shifting to
the Walton County Chamber
of Commerce.
The TDC now has direct
access to the organization's
media contacts, database
and marketing materials.
As a founding member of
Coastal Vision 3000, the TDC
placed Franklin County on
the marketing maps, provid-
ing continued international


exposure. Southwest's deci-
sion to locate service at the
Panama City airport rather
than at locations farther
west was impacted in a sig-
nificant way by the involve-
ment of the Franklin County
TDC.
"Our TDC's involvement
in combined marketing ef-
forts has been a win-win for
everyone," Spohrer said.
"We're looking forward to
continuing this work direct-
ly with the tourism councils
across the region in the fu-
ture."


Christopher and Miran-
da Litton are very proud to
announce the birth of their
daughter, Khrissa Lynn
Litton.
She was born Thursday,
Dec. 3, 2009, and weighed 8
pounds, 2 ounces and was
20 inches long.
Paternal grandparents
are Danny and Ruby Litton,
of Carrabelle.
Paternal great-grand-
parents are Mary Fordham,
of Carrabelle, the late Roy


Fordham and Alice Card,
of Mississippi, and the late
Gene Litton, of Carrabelle.
Maternal grandparents
are Bert and Molly Mil-
lender, of Eastpoint, and
Cleveland Adams, of Cot-
tonwood, Ala.
Maternal great-grand-
parents are Kinie Reeder,
of Eastpoint, and the late
Oliver Reeder, and Betty
Adams, of Cottonwood,
Ala., and the late Herbert
Adams.


Don t miss this fun-filled. scrumptious evening of
On-stage cooking demonstrations, goodie bags lots of raffle
priZGS, plus exhibits and booths!

Thursday, March 11th
Marina Civic Center, Panama City
Tickets: $10 in advance at The News Herald or online / $12 at the door*
Show starts at 6:30 p.m.
DO0fS Open at 4:30 p.m. to visit booths
Limited quantity; availability not guaranteed. All ticket prices include sales tax.


F^^^^ M "


Buy your tickets at The News Herald!


Buy your tickets online!


dl outsth forn bekmwand send iNe pcehec hr onunore


Name
a


1 Add
I ress
I COOKINGS.CHOOL
1 City State Zip freshpid I twomes
I
I Daytime Phone
Make checks payable to the News Herald. Send order #of Tickets
form with payment and a self-addressed, stamped Pnce Per
envelope to:Taste of Home Cooking School Advance Ticket*
I clo The News Herald x$10
I P.O. Box 1940 Total Amount
I Panama City, FL 32402
" - - - -
The price of tickets includes sales tax. Please send in your ticket order prior to 3/01/10.
d eviecers redroI JA after 3/01/10 are not guaranteed for mail delivery We will do our best to fulfill all orders


I
g
g
g
I


B2 | The Times


Births & BIRTHDAYS


Special to The Times
When Coastal Vision 3000
closed its doors, it opened a
window for direct marketing
communications between
tourism boards stretching
from Franklin County to Es-
cambia County. The Frank-
lin County Tourist Develop-
ment Council will continue
to participate in the effort to
market a unified region.
According to Helen
Spohrer, chairman of the
TDC, "regional marketing
through the area's Tourist


ALWAYS ONLINE:
APALACHTIMES.COM


BILL MILLER REALTY
850-697-3751 (3310) 570-0658

116 VW
$27,500m
GULF LOT FOR 10% DOWN!
50'X140'-HIGHLOT-TREES
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2400 S/F RETAIL STORE 100'
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MIH 2 CRNR LOTS BLK.$
STORE $89,500
MIH'94 28872-4-2 MUST
MOVE $14,500

*
Horse Lnument

Erases Pain
HIALEAH, FL -An ingredi-
ent often used to treat inflamma-
tion in racehorse's legs, is now
back on the market in its original
doctor recommended formula.
According to a national drug
store survey. the formula at one
time became so popular that it rose
p 1 an le eT.a t eo
any m tmhetpoerm I d atj

'r"A"" a2e oen co^
It back to the market under the
trade name ARTH ARREST and
sa t TureH eEp nRurnus"g
dual mechanism whereby one in-
gredient relieves pain immediately.
while a second ingredient seeks out
and destroys the pain messenger
Signal before it can be sent to the
brain. Considered a medical
miracle by some, the ARTH AR-
REST formula is useful m the
treatment of painful disorders rang-
ing from minor aches and pains to
more serious conditions such as ar-
thritis, bursitis, rheumatism, ten-
donitis, backache and more,
ARTH ARREST is available in
a convenient roll-on applicator at
pharmacies without a prescription
or call 1-800-339-3301. Now at:
BUY RITE DRUGS #8
117 Avenue E .* 653-8825


Khrissa Litton born


OOKUZING SCHOOL


NEWSHERALD.,,,


Order by Mail









Obituaries


The United Methodist Churches

Sof Franklin County Welcome You
First United Methodist Church of Apalachicola
Worship Service 11:00 a.m. every Sunday
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
75 5" St. Apalachicoal 653-9 01 funwapalach@gtcom.net

Carrabelle United Methodist Church
Worship Services 10:45 a.m. Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
"Celebrate Recovery" Mondays 7-9 p.m.
Healing service first Tuesday each month-7 p.m.
102 NEA e. B Canabelle 697-3672

Eastpoint United Methodist Church
PrWorshi Serviceal e0s0 am every 1Sunda .m
Healing Service every first Fridays of the Month at 6:30 p.m.
317 Patton Dr. (corner of David St.) -670-8825
Pastor: Rev. Beth White
St. George Island United Methodist Church
9:00 a.m. Worship Service
10:00 a.m. Fellowship Hour
201 E. Gulf Beach Dr. 927- 4635 www.sgiumc.org
Pastor: Rev. Them Patriotis


St. Patrick Catholic Church
Ave C & Sixth Street in Apalachicola, FL32329 or
The Islander (Across from the Blue Parrot)
on St. George Island, FL 323 28
(850) 653-9453 Email: stpatcath@fairpomt.net
PASTOR: FATHER ROGER LATOSYNSKI
www.stpatricksmass.com
APALACHICOLA MASS SCHEDULE
SATURDAY................. .................5 PM
SUNDAY ................ ................ 10 AM
ST. GEORGE ISLAND MASS SCHEDULE
SUNDAY ................ .................8:30 AM


First Pentecostal Holiness Church
379 Brownsville Road Apalachicola


Sunday School 9:45 am
Sunday Morning Worship 10:45 am
Sunday Evening Service 6:00 pm
Monday, Youth Group 6:30 pm
Wednesday, Royal Rangers, G.A.P. 7:00 pm
Wednesday Worship & Word 7:30 pm
Nursery Provided during regular church services


IV


Thursday, February 11, 2010


Local


The Times | B3


Born on Sept. 4, 1912 in Ocala, Winni-
fred Hardesty, or Winnie, as she liked to
be called, went to heaven to meet Jesus
on Sunday, Feb. 7, 2010.
There in heaven to greet her are her
mother and father, Thomas Spencer and
Alice Odie Wishart. Also, she will again
meet her six brothers, T.S. Jr., Robert,
Red, Faye, Billy and Raleigh Wishart,
plus her only sister, Clifford "Cinda" HAR
Flinkstrom.
Those left behind to remember her
great life are four loving nieces, Martha Falgout,
Miami; Cinda Parrell, Tampa; Fran Sanders, At-
lanta; and Jo Alice (James) Tarwater, Pensacola.
Also, to mourn, but celebrate her long and ac-
tive life are numerous other nieces and nephews,
great-nieces and nephews, and great-great-nieces
and nephews.
Blessings to Bridges of St. Joe Nursing Home's
staff, and to Louis VanVleet, her loyal friend, and to
her many neighbors, who also loved her.
Winnie was an active member for most of her
life in First United Methodist Church ofApala-
chicola.


She will be remembered for her
vibrant spirit and her witty demeanor.
Living in Apalachicola for most of her
later life, she was a co-captain for years
a of the shrimp boat "Little Stinker." If any
ofApalach's fishing community remem-
hers her, they will remember her as a
hardworking, successful contributor to
the fishing scene.
ESTY At heaven's gate to meet her will
be her wonderful life companions and
mates, Jake Barber, Leonard'Ibcker
and Ted Hardesty.
Kelley Phneral Home at 16th Street and Avenue
H, are in charge of arrangements. Graveside
services will be held at 10 a.m. Thursday, Feb. 11
at Magnolia Cemetery, with Brother BillPlazarin
conducting the service.
Winnie was a devoted animal lover, especially
of cats, and her family requests that any tributes to
her be made to your local Humane Society in her
name. That will please her.
"My flesh and my heart faileth, but God is the
strength ofmy heart, and my portion forever"
Psalm 73:26


Mrs. Avis Inez Popwell, 78, of
Carrollton, Ga. died Saturday,
Feb. 6, 2010.
Mrs. Popwell was born in Car-
roll County on Oct. 26, 1931 to Wil-
liam Grady Gentry and Clara Inez
Williams Gentry.
She was a loving mother of
five children and had worked as
a secretary at Poinelco Company
owned by she and her husband
Forrest Popwell.
Surviving are daughters,
Kathy Popwell and Mark Craw-
ford of Heflin, Ala., and Tammy
White and John Austin of Bow-
don, Ga.; sons and daughters-in-
law, Steven and Italia Popwell of
Augusta, Ga., Joseph and Kathy
Popwell of Newnan, Ga., and
Craig and Patricia Popwell of
Guntersville, Ala.; 13 grandchil-
dren; 11 great-grandchildren; and
one great-great-grandchild; and
sisters, Brenda Holcomb of Ara-


gon, Ga., and Joanne Eagle.
Besides her parents she was
preceded in death by her hus-
band, Forrest Popwell, and sister,
Bonnell Sprewell.
Grave side funeral services
were at Carrollton City Cemetery,
Monday, Feb. 8 at 2 p.m. with
Dennis Sprewell and Dr. Kenneth
Bunting officiating.
The family received friends
at the funeral home Sunday
afternoon, Feb. 7. Pallbearers in-
cluded Edward Popwell, Michael
Popwell, Barnabas Born, Bradley
Barfield, Mark C. Woods and
Brett Osting.
Interment was in the Carroll-
ton City Cemetery. Messages of
condolences can be expressed to
the family online at www.almonfu-
neralhome.com
Almon Flmeral Home of Car-
rollton in charge of arrange-
ments.


A very special THANK YOU to the
Apalachicola Fire Department, Eastpoint Fire
Department, St. George Island Fire Department,
Franklin County Sheriff's Office, Apalachicola
Police Department, Franklin County Emergency
Management, Progress Energy and ALL the First
Responders, friends and neighbors who raced to
our side and worked tirelessly and endlessly to
help save our home on Monday night. If not for
the dedication, professionalism and hard work of
these men and women, we would have lost our
house and everything we own.
We are so proud to be from a community
where neighbors still help neighbors and friends
will drop everything to assist during a time of
need. Our family can't say enough to express
Our gratitude to EVERYONE who came out to
help and for how quick the response was.
We are deeply saddened to have lost one of our
community's historic homes, but appreciate all
that was done in an effort to save it.


We, the family of the late mother
Essie Mae Brown Wyles, wish to give
special recognition to Bishop Horace
Solomon, and the New Life Tabernacle
by the Sea church family, in addition to
the community, for your acts of kindness
during the passing away of our mother.
We appreciate all prayers, flowers,
cards, food, phone calls, labor of love,
and your presence.
Thanks as well as to the following
local churches who presented a
resolution, New Life Tabernacle by
the Sea, Love and Worship Center,
Mount Zion Baptist Church, FriendshiP
Missionary Baptist church, St. Paul AME
church and to Battles Memorial Funeral
Home from Panama City for all the
arrangements.
We pray that God will continue to
bless you and your family.
Thank you! Thank you! Thank you!
The children of the
late Mother Essie Moe Brown Wyles


We are eternally grateful.


Many thanks,


Special to The Times
Dr. Frank D. May of Port St. Joe
has a unique Valentine's Day pres-
ent for the needy of this area.
For the past 10 years, May has
provided free dental treatment on
Valentine's Day at his office. This
year, his office will provide this valu-
able service on Wednesday, Feb. 24.
The office will schedule appoint-
ments with those in need of treat-
ment. To schedule an appointment,
you will need to send or bring a let-
ter to Dr. May's office giving a brief
description of your dental needs.
Please describe the situation and


detail what makes you a good candi-
date for this benefit.
Send the letter to Dr. May's office
at 319 Williams Ave., in Port St. Joe,
FL 32456. The office will not accept
phone calls.Be sure to include your
telephone number so the office can
contact you to schedule an appoint-
ment.
Dr. May will see 20 patients in
need of dental treatment, and the
hygienists Anealia Bush and Linda
Wright will each see eight to 10 pa-
tients who wish to have their teeth
cleaned. The office hopes to serve as
many as 40 patients.
Patients must be at least 12 years


f age, and accompanied by a parent
r guardian if under the age of 18.
Treatments provided will include
leaning, X-rays, fillings, extractions,
diagnosticss and pain control.
Dr. May and his staff participate
2 the "Dentist With a Heart" pro-
ram because they wish to help peo-
le who otherwise could not afford to
ee a dentist, and help those people
ave their teeth, as well as relieve
bem of any discomfort they may be
.aving.
May's office cares about this
community and would like to give
bose in need of dental services their
miles back.


Tnmty plans

pancake

Supper
Trinity Episcopal
Church in Apalachicola
will host its annual Pan-
cake Supper on Shrove
Tuesday, Feb. 16 from 5-7
p.m. The menu will include
pancakes and a choice of
bacon, smoked sausage or
sausage patties, and bev-
erage.
A contribution of $5 per
plate is suggested. The
proceeds of this year's
event will go toward a new
roof for Trinity's Benedict
Fellowship Hall.
On Ash Wednesday, Feb.
17, Lent begins. Trinity will
hold services at noon and
6 p.m
Consider making a com-
mitment this Lent to give
something more, instead
of giving something up.


THE
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
WELCOMES YOU


THE


will start playing at 6:30 p.m.

Thhl reYowillab snacks ainail-
squeeze have a good time,
At 2 p.m. on Sunday,
Feb. 14, the doors will open
and at 2:30 p.m. we will be
served a prime rib dinner.
Hope you got your ticket!
Members of Sacred Heart


Trinity
EST. 1836

Hwy. 98 & 6th St.
Apalachicola
SUNDAY: 8:00 AM 10:30 AM
LIBRARY HOURS:
SUNDAY 12:00 2:00 PM
MONDAY 11:00 AM 1:00 PM
WEDNESDAY 12:00 2:00 PM
THURSDAY 3:30 5:30 PM


LANIARK NEWS


from 1-4 p.m. Just go in and
sign up. They are very good and
helpful.
I am getting to the point when
I can get out to do a little more
each day. Keep me in your prayers,
please.
It was warmer in Vancouver than
it was here over the weekend. The
Olympic Games start on Friday!
Hope things change between now
and then,
Everybody's favorite band will be
at Chills Hall on Saturday, Feb. 13
for your dancing and listening plea-
sure. The Not Quite Ready band


of Jesus Catholic Church
will prepare and serve the dinner.
Proceeds go towards the roof fund.
Thank you for your support.
Can't believe that Tuesday,
Feb. 16 is Fat Tuesday, and Wednes-
day, Feb. 17 is Ash Wednesday.
Where does the time go?
Meanwhile, be kind to one an-
other, and check in on the sick and
housebound and keep smiling. You
won't feel any better, but everyone
else will wonder what you're up to!
Until next time, God bless Amer-
ica, our troops, the poor, homeless
and hungry.


Winnifred Hardesty


Avis Inez Popwell


Hospice plans

'Share the Journey'
1
Benefit concert

LocalfavoritesLowFlyingPlanestheSarahMac
Band and Del Suggs will come together for the "Share
the Journey" benefit concert Friday, March 5 from 8-11
p.m. at the American Legion Hall, 229 Lake Ella Drive,
Tallahassee.
The concert is being staged to benefit Big Bend Hos-
pice and single tickets are $25 or $40 per couple. Randy
Hock, band member of Low Flying Planes, is spear-
heading this event in an effort to give back to Big Bend
Hospice
"Hospice care came into our lives five years ago
when my mother-in-law, Jerry Lee Krause, was diag-
nosed with COPD, a terminal lung disease," Hock said.
"Every day someone from hospice assisted Jerry and
made her life and ours more manageable.It seems like
everyone I talk to has been touched by the caring people
at Hospice. They became like family to us. It wasn't just
that they cared; they were experts in every way -medi-
cally, emotionally, spiritually, or just being a companion.
Hospice was there for our family for so long, that I felt I
needed to give back and help hospice share the journey
with other families."
Hock hopes the concert will become an annual event
to support patient care. For more information, call
Laura Glenn at Big Bend Hospice at 850-701-1341 or lau-
rag@bighendhospice.org.

estck sm ll hbl n eBs nCd H ep d T wn
www.lowflyingplanes.com/bbh.


.
Always Online
APALACHTIMES.COM


(ARDS OF THANKS


'Dentist with a Heart' provides free dental care


Lanark NEWS


WELCOMES YOU
Ch urch

.
^ R I ^ R
f"\ 0 )
101 NE First Street
Carrabelle
SUNDAY
10:00 AlVI


Have a hQ
Valentine's pDpay!

Them Saints went march-
ing in. That was a good
game. Had a good party,
hope you did, too.
The AARP tax men are
at our library on Tuesdays,



























NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS
Florida Department of Transportation Project

Letters of qualification will be received by the District Three
Headquarters until 4:00 P.M. local time on Friday, February 19,
2010, for Proposal ID E3I36. The work specified in this contract
consists of design build sidewalk construction on the south side
of Oak Street in Lanark Village from Arizona Street to Carlton
Avenue. The total project length is approximately 1.263 miles.
The project limits include the following roadway section numbers:
49900002 from CMP 0.00 to CMP 0.499; 49591002 from CMP
0.188 to CMP 0.694; & 49900003 from CMP 0.00 to CMP
0.258. New 5' sidewalk construction should include clearing
and grubbing, any required earthwork, sodding, extending
sidedrains and/or crossdrains if necessary, installation of handrail
as necessary, erosion control and any additional items needed to
construct the sidewalk within the limits listed above. Utilization
of the FDOT Plans Preparation Manual Volume 1 and FDOT
Design Standards are required for sidewalk design to specifically
include constructing 4" and 6" thick sidewalk as appropriate. No
additional right-of-way will be required for this project. Complete
project advertisement and submittal requirement information for
this project is available on our website at http://www2.dot.state.
fl.us/procurement/ads/advdbld.htm by calling Ranae Dodson at
(850) 415-9333, or is available for viewing at 1074 Highway 90,
Chipley, Florida 32428.


SE M


Thursday, February 1 1, 2010


Local


(j10fS Samnler
*
slated for Feb. 21
The Apalachicola Bay
Chamber of Commerce will host
the 14th annual Forgotten Coast
Chefs Sampler from 6-9 p.m.
Sunday, Feb. 21.
Chefs from all over the
Forgotten Coast will prepare
their most creative dishes at the
historic Fort Coombs Armory,
located on Fourth Street and
Avenue D in Apalachicola.
Sample an array of restaurants.
Our talented shopkeepers and
local designers give the event
an extraordinary touch and add
creative flair by decorating each
table individually. The tables
range from elegant to artistic


and funky.
Tickets are $50. For
more information, call the
Apalachicola Bay Chamber
at 653-9419 or e-mail to info@
apalachicolabay.org.

Carrabelle Lions Club
Seeks interested people
The Carrabelle Chapter of the
International Lions Club invites
interested people to attend one
of its monthly meetings.
The meetings are held at the
Crooked River Grill at the St.
James Bay Golf Club at 6 p.m.
the second and fourth Thursdays
of each month. A buffet is
available for about $12.
We welcome all interested


News BRIEFS
persons to come learn more
about this worthy organization.

Old Salt open for drinks
On Feb. 4, the Carrabelle
city commission reversed an
earlier stand and voted 3-2 to
allow the Old Salt Restaurant on
Tallahassee Street to serve wine
and beer.
Commissioners Jim Brown
and Frank Mathes opposed the
motion.

Island gets new
Chili St t
ree
On Feb. 2, the county
commission voted unanimously
to rename a short street on St.


George Island Chili Street. The
short street borders the eastern
end of the grounds of the annual
Chili Cook-off. It is currently
called Franklin Avenue, although
it is not contiguous with Franklin
Boulevard, the road running
between the bridge and the park
at the island's center.

(1100@95 planned for
80ftil 6 Claili Cook-off
The St. George Island Chili
Cook-off, highlighted by the
27th annual Gulf Coast Regional
competition, is just around the
corner, with this year's event
slated for Saturday, March 6.
Island Fire Chief Jay Abbott
and Sheriff Skip Shiver told the


county commission earlier this
month that the cook-off will be
fenced in and toned down this
year. The cook-off is the premier
event every year to benefit the
St. George Island Volunteer
Fire Department and First
Responders.
A $5 admission will be
charged, and some of the roads
surrounding the cook-off will
be closed or routed for one-way
traffic the day of the festival.
Visitors to the cook-off will
be prohibited from carrying
cooler food or drink onto festival
grounds.
As always, there will be a 5K
run and viewing of auction items
on Friday evening before the day
of the festival.


B4 | The Times


Dixie Youth is hosting a Baseball

Umpire certification clinic on
February 20, 2010 in Marianna

Florida. The clinic will be at the

Marianna High School. Registration

fee and transportation provided by the

Franklin County Parks & Recreation

Department. To register for the clinic
or for further information contact

Franklin County Parks & Recreation

Department at 850-653-8277.


Deadline to Register is

February 12, 2010 by Noon





Thursday, February 11, 2010


The Times I B5


rl


_i:.,i:


~


r.~+E':


s
































FISH AND WILDLIFE REPORT


FO NAMES MASSEY OFFICER OF THE MONTH
Franklin Correctional
Institution has selected
Officer Preston Massey
as its officer for the
month of Jan. 2010.
Massey, at left, has
been em I ed at
p oy
Franklin Correctional
Institution since
September 2008, and
is assigned to the Main
Unit where he works the
third (evening) shift. He
was nominated for the
award by his supervisor,
Capt. Craig Holmes,
right, who cited his
dili ence, dedication '
determination, and
punctuality as reasons
for his nomination.
Massey resides in
Carrabelle.
SPEGAL TO THE TIMES


The Franklmn County Board of County
Commissioners will be accepting separate
sealed Request for Proposals for the following:

D.W. WILSON SPORTS COMPLEX BASEBALL FIELD LIGHTING
PROJECT

Specifications are on file in the office of the Franklin County Board of County
Commissioners, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, Florida 32320.

Proposals must be received in the office of the Franklin County Clerk of
the Court 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, Florida 32320 by 4:30
P.M., EST, on February 15, 2010. Each proposal must be sealed and clearly
labeled. The sealed proposals will be publicly opened and read aloud at 10:30
A.M. EST, on February 16, 2010, in the County Commission Meeting Room
located in the Franklin County Courthouse Annex. For further information,
contact Van W. Johnson, Sr., Director Franklin County Parks & Recreation
Department, at (850) 670-8167. Email: fcswdefairpoint.net.

Bidder shall provide an original and one copy of each proposal in a
sealed envelope or container, plainly marked "D.W. WILSON SPORT
COMPLEX BASEBALL FIELD LIGHTING PROJECT".

The owner reserves the right to waire any informality or to reject any or all
proposals.

ATTENTION BIDDERS: Franklin County is an equal opportunity employer
and encourages participation with certified minority enterprises and women's
business enterprises.

BOARD OF COUNTY CON IMISSITONERS
FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA
JOSEPH R4RRISH, CHAIRMAN


VVrietbands on sale now at ABC School & local banke ...
ALL childrenFOMr n5fo la c70m anied by adult




FRANKLIN COUNTY BOARD OF
COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
NOTICE OF SOLICITATION REQUEST
FOR QUALIFICATIONS FOR
DESIGN PHASE FOR CARRABELLE
MULTI-USE PATH

Notice is hereby given that the Franklin County Board of County
Commissioners is seeking Proposals for Qualifications for the Design
phase of the Carrabelle Multi-Use Path. The project consists of the
design of a multi-use path along the north side of SR. 30 (US 98) from
.
the Carrabelle Beach RV Resort to the Crooked River Lighthouse Park
in Franklin County. The FPID No. is 425740-1-38-01.

Qualified applicant must be a FDOT pre-qualified consultant in "3.1
,,
Minor Highway Design.

No additional right of way will be required for the project.

Proposals of Qualification are due on February 26, 2010 at 4 PM
local time. At a minimum the Proposals should include the following
information:
a. Project Name/ DOT FPID NO: 425740-1-38-01
b. Consultant's name and address
.
c. Proposed responsible office for consultant
d. Contact person, phone number and email address
e. Statement regarding previous experience of consultant in
advertised type of work.
-
f. Proposed key personnel and their proposed roles.
g. Sub-consultants that may be used for the project.
h. Indication as to whether the prime firm and/or sub-
consultants are disadvantaged business enterprises (DBE)

Please submit (5) copies to:
Franklin County Board of County Commissioners
34 Forbes St., Suite 1
Apalachicola, FL 32320

Proposals will be opened and read aloud at the regularly scheduled
.
March, 2, 2010 Franklin County Commission meeting in Franklin
County Courthouse Annex located at 34 Forbes St., Apalachicola. FL.

The County retains the right to reject any or all proposals.

For additional information, contact Alan Pierce, Director of
Administrative Services, Franklin County, 34 Forbes St., Suite 1,
Apalachicola, FL 32320. Telephone 859-653-97783, ext. 161.


Thursday, February 11, 2010


Local


The following reports provided by the
Franklin County Sheriffs Offtee. Arrests
are made by officers from the following
city, county, and state law enforcement
agencies: Apalachicola (APD), Carra-
belle (CPD), Florida Highway Patrol
(FHP), Franklin County Sheriffs Office
(FCSO), Florida Fish and Wildlife Con-
servation Commission (FWC), Florida
Department of Environmental Protec-
tion (FDEP), Florida Division of Insur-
ance Fraud (DIF) and Florida Depart-
ment of Agriculture and Consumer Ser-
vices (FLDOACS).
All defendants are considered in-
nocent until proven guilty in a court of
law.
Feb. 2
Charles C. Galbreath, 26, Mexico
Beach, driving while license suspended
or revoked (FCSO)
Marco Francisco, 28, Apalachicola,


disorderly intoxication (APD)
Feb. 3
Melissa A. Estes, 41, Eastpoint, retail
theft (FCSO)
Juan Denise Jones, 22, Port St. Joe,
seven counts of uttering a false instru-
ment (FCSO)
Feb. 4
Antonio Fantauzzi Jr., 39, Eastpoint,
domestic battery and violation of a do-
mestic violence injunction (APD)
Feb. 5
Donald D. Page, 36, Carrabelle, disor-
derly intoxication (FCSO)
Feb. 6
Pamela E Collins, 53, Carrabelle, DUI
(CPD)
Benjamin K. Jones, 20, Apalachicola,
failure to appear (FCSO)
Feb.7
David E Daniels, 25, Carrabelle, dis-
orderly intoxication (CPD)


FWC sniffs out illegal hait site
A hunter in Tate's Hell has been
charged with hunting over bait in
a management area.
Travis Huckeba, an officer
with the Resource Protection Unit
of the Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission's
Division of Law Enforcement, was
working information of an illegal
bait site given to him by uniform
patrol when he and Capt. Craig
Duval located the suspect's truck in
Tate's Hell Wildlife Management
Area.


Once there, Huckeba posed
as another hunter and closed
the distance on the suspect
who was in a tree stand. While
approaching the bait site, the
hunter yelled to him, "Hey man,
you didn't see my truck parked
in the road?" thinking he was
another hunter,
At this point, Huckeba identified
himself and ordered the suspect
to unbolt his gun and come down
from the tree stand. The hunter
complied and was charged with
the hunting violation.


Adrenaline Rush Obetacle Course
Slide Bounce Houses Maze
Face & Hair Painting
Cake Walk & Karaoke
SGI Beach House Raffle


B6 | The Times


Sheriff's REPORT




































































































































9 Years Service in Area
(850) 653-8795
" Gerald Garlick
12761 Pea Ridge Road Bristol, Florida 32321
TELEPHONE (850) 643-5417 ?.@653-8868


IV


Thursday, February 11, 2010


Local


The Times | BY


By (aty Greene


lives where in the U.S. and infor-
mation about them, as the gov-
ernment is able to compile with
the consent of its citizens. I hope
RARY that all Franklin County residents
will participate, not only because
many government programs
which assist persons in need are based
on the statistics provedby this once-per-
decade count, but also because 72 years
from now that data can be viewed by
your family members.
I didn't know that the actual census
records, the details I saw, are kept
secret for 72 years and then released.
Seventy-two years is the expected lifes-
pan of an American and therefore those
names and details will be held as private
during the anticipated lifetime of most
citizens.
I know I'm talking about an experi-
ence that you can only have, right now,
at the county library, but I think I would
like to see if I can get a grant, or fund-
raise the money, to have AncestryLi-
brary.com at the Apalachicola Municipal
Library, too. In the meantime, coopera-
tion across the mouth of the Apalachic-
ola River is important, as we probably
have, in contrast, the best historical book
collection in the county. I hope residents
and visitors alike will take advantage of
the resources of both libraries.
Caty Greene is librarian for the
Apalachicola Municipal Library. 'lb
reach her call 653-8436.


With the help of a
$154,000 Growing Green
Grant from Workforce
Florida, Inc., the Gulf Coast
Workforce Board is offering
local training opportunities
for green jobs.
Gulf Coast Community
College and the Florida
Solar Energy Center are
partnering to provide
training in three focus
areas: energy efficiency
through residential and
commercial energy audit
and weatherization train-
ing; Leadership in Energy
and Environmental Design
(LEED) credential train-
ing; and alternative energy
application, starting with
solar design and installa-
tion and electric vehicle
conversion,
"We want to prepare our
workforce to respond to
current and future needs
by employers related to
energy efficiency and re-
newable energy," said Kim
Bodine, executive director
of the Gulf Coast Work-
force Board. "Not only is it
better for the environment,
but it will help our local


businesses become more
competitive as we move
into the green economy."
Keeping businesses
competitive and growing a
green workforce are prom-
inent aspects of state-level
workforce efforts to boost
talent cultivation and in-
crease employment.
"Workforce Florida's
No. 1 priority is getting
Floridians back to work
and helping those who are
employed grow in their
careers," said Chris Hart
IV president/CEO of Work-
force Florida and interim
director of the Governor's
Office of Tourism, Wade
and Economic Develop-
ment. "Developing the tal-
ent to support the alterna-
tive energy industry and
bolstering its potential to
bring meaningful work op-
portunities and increased
economic diversity to our
state aligns perfectly with
that goal."
Some of the training will
focus on new and emerg-
ing green occupations,
such as energy auditor,
energy manager, hybrid


and fuel engineer, carbon
trader, and environmental
compliance specialist. The
majority of the focus will
be on upgrading the skills
of existing workers in tra-
ditional occupations, such
as: electricians, HVAC
contractors/installers,
carpenters, construction,
construction managers,
building inspectors, engi-
neers, and architects, who
will need additional skills,
knowledge, and credentials
to meet the environmental
needs and standards of the
future.
The Gulf Coast Work-
force Board anticipates
providing industry recog-
nized green training to at
least 60 individuals by June
2010. Waiting will be held
at Gulf Coast Community
College between now and
March 2010. Scholarships
will be available to those
who qualify.
For more information
on green training opportu-
nities and the scholarships
available, contact Rebek-
kah Heaton at 769-1551,
ext. 3321.


brary branch in Carrabelle to take
the Genealogy I course.
The county library, unlike our
freestanding Apalachicola Municipal
Library, has the benefit of being part of
Wilderness Coast, the local library con-
sortium, which has a Library Services
and Technology Act (LSTA) grant that
pays for a subscription to AncestryLi-
brary.com, the library version of Ances-
try.com.
I have never been a genealogy buff;
even though I have famous ancestors
like Gen. Nathanael Greene, who was
in command of the southern efforts in
the Revolutionary War and was born in
Rhode Island, but buried in Savannah,
Ga. I guess it's because I was surround-
ed by it all through my childhood.
This being said, I really got a kick
out of seeing the documentation of
my grandfather and family in the 1930
census. The household included his
wife, my mother and aunt, and two Irish
"servants," whose names were familiar
to me from my mother's stories of her
childhood.
Anyway, AncestryLibrary.com has
an actual picture of the document. The
United States Census, happening this
year, is as full a documentation of who


Jamie Fowler, computer instruc-
tor with the Wilderness Coast
Library, returned to the Eastpoint
Library, Wednesday afternoon, Feb.
10 to teach a free computer class
on creating resumes and cover let-
ters for employment, and then to
conduct a free class where partici-
pants were introduced to the mul-
titude of job and career resources
available online and at the library.
Charlie Sawyer, another Wil-
derness Coast Library computer


instructor, will instruct users in
"Computer Basic II: E-mail and
the Web" on Friday, Feb. 12, from
2-5 p.m. at the Eastpoint Library.
Learn how to set up a free e-mail
account; how to use basic e-mail,
and how to open and attach docu-
ments. If you miss Charlie's Friday
class in Eastpoint, you can attend
the same class on Saturday, Feb.
13, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. in Car-
rabelle.
All classes are free and comput-


ers are provided for each class ses-
sion. Call the Carrabelle Library at
697-2366 or the Eastpoint Library
at 670-8151 to register.
It's tax time and the Carrabelle
library is holding free tax help ses-
sions each Tuesday from 1-4 p.m.
through April 15. Help sessions
are free for taxpayers with low and
middle incomes, with special atten-
tion to those ages 60 and older. The
service is confidential and provided
by the AARE


Thursday, Feb. 11
Wandering Star Quilt-
ing Club. Chills Hall La-
nark Village. 1-3 p.m. Call
Christine Hinton 697-2551.
Community Luncheon
and Information Specials
at the Franklin County Se-
nior Center in Carrabelle.
Noon. $3 donation. Call
697-3760.
Individual/group com-
puter instruction at East-
point library from 10 a.m.
to noon. For more info, call
670-8151.
Yoga. 4 p.m. Carrabelle
library. For info call 697-
2366.
Book social. 5:30 p.m.
Carrabelle library. For info
call 697-2366.
Friday, Feb. 12
Bob Milne performs
ragtime piano at the Dixie
Theatre. 7:30 p.m. For
more info call 653-3200.
Apalachicola History,
Culture and Arts board
meets at 8:30 a.m. at the
old Cotton Warehouse at
corner of Avenue E and
Water Street. For more
info, call 653-9319.
Census testing. 2:30-
4:30 p.m. Carrabelle li-
brary. For more info call
697-2366.
Parent-child reads at
Eastpoint library at 2:15
p.m. for infant to 4-years-
old. For more info, call
670-8151'
Story Hour at East-
point library at 3:30 p.m.
for ages 5 to 8. For more
info, call 670-8151.
Computer Basics II
at Eastpoint library 2 to
5 p.m. For more info, call
670-8151.
Exercise class at Chill-
as Hall in Lanark Village.
9 to 10 a.m. Open to all and
free.
Alcoholics Anonymous
will meet at 7:30 p.m. at the
Church of the Ascension,
101 NE First Street, in Car-
rabelle. For more info, call
697-2837.
Saturday, Feb. I3
Apalachicola Commu-
nity Gardens meets at 10
a.m. at the Seafood Grill.
For more info call 653-8715.
Computer Basics II at
Carrabelle library 10 a.m.
to 1 p.m. For more info, call
697-2366
Bob Milne performs

rahgtirne piano at th I)ixie
more info call 653-3200.
Sunday, Feb. 14

VALHEA HNE'S DAY
Bob Milne performs
ragtime piano at the Dixie
Theatre. 3 p.m. For more
info call 653-3200

AM0nda ,oFech. 15
(Community Redevelop-


ment Agency) meets at
5:30 p.m. at City Hall. For
more info call 653-9319.
Yoga. 4 p.m. Carrabelle
library. Also, Carrabelle
new library hours begin.
For info call 697-2366.
Yarn Junkies will meet
at 7 to 9 p.m. The newly
formed group is for knit-
ters, crocheters and oth-
ers addicted to yarn. The
group meets each Monday
evening at an alternate
location. For information,
call Kathy Robinson at 653-
7196.
Exercise class at Chill-
as Hall in Lanark Village.
9 to 10 a.m. Open to all and
free
Al-Anon meets at 5:30
p.m. at Trinity Episcopal
Church's Benedict Hall, at
Sixth Street and Avenue
D. For more info, call 850-
222-2294.
Bingo at the Franklin
County Senior Center in
Carrabelle. Early bird at
6 p.m., regular bingo at 7
p.m. Cards begin at $4. Call
697-3760 -
TUOSday, Feb. 16
Franklin County Com-
mission meets at 9 a.m.
in the courthouse annex.
For more info call 653-8861,
ext. 100
.
Apalachicola Commu-
nity Pride meets at 6 p.m.
at City Hall. For more info
call 653-8715.
Breakfast at the Frank-
lin County Senior Center
in Carrabelle. Coffee at
7:30 a.m., meal at 8 a.m. $2
suggested donation. Call
697-3760.
Winter Bingo 7 p.m. St.
George Island Fire Dept.
$1 per card. Everyone wel-
come. Proceeds go to St.
George Island Civic Club.
Call 927-3001.
Census testing. 11 a.m.
to 1 p.m. Carrabelle library.
For more info call 697-2366.
Alcoholics Anonymous
will meet at 7:30 p.m. at the
Church of the Ascension,
101 NE First Street, in Car-
rabelle. For more info, call
697-2837.
Wednesday, Feb. 17
The Sea Oats Garden
Club will meet at 11:30
a.m. Please call as our
location changes each
month. 697-8571,
Apalachicola 'Itaffic
Safety1commitHeellineets

more info call 653-8715.
Thursday, Feb. 18

ing nderin asstar Quilt-
nark Village. 1-3 p.m. Call
Christine Hinton 697-2551.
Community Luncheon
and Information Specials
at the Franklin County Se-
nior t in coarm ne.

697-3760.


850-229-9663
Steam Cleaning & Remediation
24 Hour Water Extraction
IICRC Certified Technicians
Mold Remediation, Tile & Grout Cleaning,
Carpet & Upholstery
LAA A Licensed & Insured


LAB ON PREM IS ES


Laban 20Kfrager, 9 9~


Workforce Boa rd of fers


Tale of two libraries, but one county


THE LIB


Library H APP ENIN GS


Community





YOU"- RDA FREEDOM CLASSIFIED CONNECTION I


| 1100
VEYED; FROM SAID
POINT OF BEGINNING
RUN NORTHEASTERLY
AT A RIGHT ANGLE TO
THE ALLIGATOR POINT
ROAD TO A POINT ON
THE SOUTH BOUNDARY
OF THE 100 FOOT RIGHT
OFWAYOFSAIDROAD,
THENCE RUN NORTH-
WESTERLY ALONG SAID
RIGHT OF WAY BOUND-
ARY 80 FEET THENCE
RUN SOUTHWESTERLY
AT A RIGHT ANGLE TO
SAID ROAD TO THE
SHORE OF ALLIGATOR
BAY TO THE POINT OF
BEGINNING, SAID LANDS
BEING LOT NO. 4 OF UN-
RECORDED PLAT OF
PROPERTY OF R.E.
KESTNER LOCATED IN
SECTION 32, TOWNSHIP
6 SOUTH, RANGE 1
WEST AND IN SECTION
5, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH,
RANGE 1 WEST IN
FRANKLIN COUNTY
FLORIDA, PREPARED BY
L.G. FLANAGAN OF DATE
OF APRIL 17, 1953.

ALSEOETAHSETF LO NGOF
LOT NO. 5 OF AN UNRE-
CORDED PLAT OF PROP-
ERTY OF R.E. KESTNER
PREPARED BY L.G. FLAN-
AGAN ON APRIL 17, 1953
AND BEING MORE PAR-
TICULARLY DESCRIBED
AS FOLLOWS; COM-
MENCE AT THE NORTH-
EAST CORNER OF SEC-


O D TNOA EDN O
SOUTH ALONGOTFHE EAAST
SECTION 1320 FEET;
LEENLCERUNWESNTOPRATRH
BOUNDARY OF SAID
NR2E5L EF TALTLO
GATOR BAY; THENCE
RUN NORTHWESTERLY
A1L8 GE THSEHNOCREE N
NORTH 34 DEGREES 45
MINUTES 06 SECONDS
EAST 320.6 FEET TO A 3
INCH IRON PIPE FILLED
WITH CONCRETE ON
THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT
OF WAY BOUNDARY OF
THE ALLIGATOR POINT
R5 E RTEHEESN1C4EMNNOU S
00 SECONDS WEST
ALONG SAID RIGHT OF
WAY 319.39 FEET TO A
SET IRON ROAD AND
CAP (LB 7017) FOR THE
POINTOFBEGINNING.
FROM SAID POINT OF
BEGINNING CONTINUE
NORTH 55 DEGREES 14
MINUTES 00 SECONDS
WEST 24.92 FEET TO A
1-1/2 INCH IRON PIPE-
GEHNTCEOLFEAVWNG SRAd
SOUTH 34 DEGREES 48
MINUTES 11 SECONDS
WEST 31&14 EE E A


Franklin County's source of news for more than a century


| 1100
Lot 5, Block G, Range
Twelve of Pickett's Addl-
tion to Carrabelle, of the
Public Records of Franklin
County, Florida.
The successful bidder at
thesalewillberequiredto
place the requisite state
documentary stamps on
the Certificate of Title.
DATED this 27th day of
January, 2010.
Hon. MARCIA JOHNSON
Clerk of the Court
Franklin County, Florida
By: Michele Maxwell
As Deputy Clerk
February 4, 11, 2010
5778T
NPOPT CEAOFON
FOR TAX DEED
Notice if hereby given that,
r t Pr e r E. t
low cceedrtifortefoMae
deed to be issued thereon
The certificate number and
year of Issuance, the de-
scription of the property
and the name in which it
was assessed are as fol-
lows:
CertificateNumber:492
Year of Issuance: 2005
o r



of the Circuit Courts Office.
PARCEL NO.
36-08S-07W0000-0330-00
50
Namelswhichassessed:
Fighting Chair Partners'
LLC
All of said property being
in the State of, Florida'
Franklin County.
Unless such certificate
shall be redeemed accord-
Ing to law the property de-
scribed in such certificate
will be sold to the highest
dr nh ferstC ou
the month of April 2010
which is the 5th day of
April 2010 at 11:00 a.m.
Dated this 1st day of Feb-
ruary2010.
MARCIA. M. JOHNSON
CLERK OF COURTS
FRANKLIN COUNTY
FLORIDA
By: Cassle B. Sapp
bputbCliel 18,25,2010
March 4, 2010
5782T

ORT FDRAA IUITCOO


| 1100
Ing special accommoda-
tlon to participate in this
proceeding should contact
the Clerk of the Court not
later than five business
days prior to the proceed-
Ing at the Franklin County
Courthouse. Telephone
850-653-8861 or 1-800-
955-8770 via Florida Relay
Service.
DATED at Apalachicola,
Florida, on January 27,
2010.
Marcla M. Johnson
Clerk of Court
As Clerk, Circuit Court
By: Michele Maxwell
As Deputy Clerk
SMITH, HIATT & DIAZ,
PA.
AttorneysforPlaintiff
PO BOX 11438
Fort Lauderdale, FL 33339-
1438
Telephone: (954)564-0071
February 11, 18, 2010

5N80 E CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
FRANKLIN COUNTY
FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
DB STRUCTURED PROD-
UCTS,1NC
PLAINTIFF
VS



N NN N ALLS N
KNOWN PARTIES CLAIM-
IDNEGR, BA DTHARGOA GSH UH
HEREIN NAMED INDIVID-
UAL DEFENDANTS) WHO
E NOT KONROWN IVB
WHETHER SAID UN-
KNOWN PARTIES MAY
UMSEASN I IERRESDE -
SEES, GRANTEES OR
OTHER CLAIMANTS;
JOHN DOE AND JANE
DOE AS UNKNOWN TEN-
ANTS IN POSSESSION.
DEFENDANTS)
CASE NO:2007000378CA
NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN pursuant to a Sum-
mary Final Judgment of
ForeclosuredatedJanuary
25, 2010 entered in Civil
Case No. 2007 000378 CA
of the Circuit Court of the
2nd Judicial Circuit in and
for FRANKLIN County, AP-
ALACHICOLA, Florida, I
sts tder r2 taO1
THE FRONT STEPS OF
THE COURTHOUSE at the
s a tE 0 E


| 1100
In APALACHICOLA, Flor
Ida, at 11:00 a.m. on the
25th day of March, 2010
the following described
property as set forth in
said Summary Final Judg-
ment, to-wit:
LOT4,BLOCK43,ST
GEORGE ISLAND GULF
BEACHES, UNIT NO. 4,
ACCORDING TO THE
PLAT THEREOF AS RE-
CORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3
AT PAGES 14, OF THE
PUBLIC RECORDS OF
FRANKLIN COUNTY
FLORIDA.

Any person claiming an In-
terest in the surplus from
the sale, If any, other than
the property owner as of
the date of the Ils pend-
ens, must file a claim
within 60 days after the
sale.
Dated this 27th day of Jan-
uary, 2010.
Marcla M. Johnson
Clerkof Court

:pM hC erkMaxwell
IN ACCORDANCE WITH
THE AMERICANS WITH
DISABILITIES ACT per-
sons with disabilities need-
Ing a special accommoda-
tion should contact
COURT ADMINISTRA-
TION, at the FRANKLIN
County Courthouse at
5 1 D8F rIld


THE LAW OFFICES OF
DAVID J. STERN, PA.,
ATTORNEY FOR PLAIN-
900 South Pine Island
aa F4L 3324-3920
(954)233-8000
07-06008 (GMAP)
February 11, 18, 2010
5805T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
FRANKLIN COUNTY FLO-
RIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
THE BANK OF NEW YORK
MELLON F/K/A THE BANK
OF NEW YORK AS SUC-
CESSOR TRUSTEE TO
JPMORGAN CHASE
BANK, N.A. AS TRUSTEE
FORSTRUCTUREDAS-
SET MORTGAGE INVEST-
MENTS II TRUST 2005-
AR1 MORTGAGE PASS-
THROUGH CERTIFICAT-
ES SERIES 2005-AR1
PLAINTIFF
VS.
NOLAN MADDOX LASSI-

KA AL


| 1100
KNOWN PARTIES CLAIM-
ING By THROUGH, UN-
DER, AND AGAINST THE
HEREIN NAMED INDI-
VIDUAL DEFENDANTS)
WHO ARE NOT KNOWN
TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE,
WHETHER SAID UN-
KNOWN PARTIES MAY
CLAIM AN INTEREST AS
SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVI-
SEES, GRANTEES OR
OTHER CLAIMANTS;
MORTGAGE ELECTRO-
NIC REGISTRATION SYS-
TEMS, INC.; WAKULLA
BANK; JOHN DOE AND
JANE DOE AS UNKNOWN
TENANTS IN POSSES-
SION
DEFENDANTS)
CASE NO:
19-2008-CA-000416
RE-NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN pursuant to an Or-
der Granting the Motion to
Reset Foreclosure Sale
dated January 25, 2010
r0e0d8-In Civ0104ClasedNhoe
Circuit Court of the 2ND
Judicial Circuit in and for
FRANKLIN County, APA-
LACHICOLA, Florida, I will
sell to the highest and best
bidder for cash at on the
FRONT STEPS of the
Courthouse at the FRANK-
LIN County Courthouse lo-
cated at 33 MARKET


nT2FOt1 dtah a
fdoedscrhedalpdroSpeas sFet
nal Judgment, to-wit:
COMMENCE AT THE
NORTHEAST CORNER OF
C HON NTGOEWPW ST
RUN THENCE SOUTH
ALONG THE SECTION
ST13P2A0R LEE TTHOE E
NORTH LINE OF SAID
SECTION 5 A DISTANCE
OF 2503 FEET TO THE
POINT WHERE SUCH
LINE INTERSECTS THE
SHORE OF ALLIGATOR
BAY THENCE NORTH-
WESTERLY ALONG SAID
qORE LINRE 18.N30FRETEH
EASTERLY AT A RIGHT
ANGLE TO THE ALLIGA-
TOR POINT ROAD A DIS-
TANCE OF 320.6 FEET TO
A POINT ON THE SOUTH
BOUNDARYOFTHE100
FEET RIGHT OF WAY OF
SAID ROAD, THENCE
RUN NORTHWESTERLY
ALONG SAID RIGHT OF
WAY BOUNDARY 240
FEET THENCE RUN
TGUHTTHWE ER OASTAIA
ROAD TO THE SHORE OF
ALLIGATOR BAY WHICH

AON REElPOINTb


| 1100 |
BARRED.
The date of first publica-
, a tlon of this notice in the
Apalachicola Times is 4th
ANNOUNCEMENIS day of February, 2010.
1100 Legal Advertising
1110 Classified Notices Personal Representative:
1120-PublicNotices/ CecllLangley
Announcements 663 Ridge Road
1125-Carpools& EastpointFL32328
1130 Tea Attorney for Personal Rep-
1140 Happy Ada resentative:
1150 Personals A. Clay Milton
1160 Lost Florida Bar No. 13185
1170 Found MIlton & Rhodes, PLLC
2863 Jefferson Street
PO. Box 1591
1100 Marianna, FL 32447
Telephone: (850) 482-2330
5685T February 4, 11, 2010
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE SECOND JUDI- 5738T
CIAL CIRCUIT IN AND IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
ORRIFDRAANKLIN COUNTy OlFALTHCEIRSECONIN AUN
FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY
IN RE: ESTATE OF FLORIDA
BILLY RAY LANGLEy PROBATE DIVISION
Deceased. IN RE: The Estate of

eN OD 00018-CP NE [1dHALL
NOTICE TO CREDITORS CASE NO. 2009-CP-0058
The administration of the NOTICE OF
estate of Billy Ray Langley, ADMINISTRATION
deceased, whose date of
death was November 20, The administration of the
2008, is pending in the Cir- estate of ANNE D. HALL'
cult Court for Franklin deceased, File Number
County, Florida, Probate 2009-CP-0058, is pending
Division, the address of in the Circuit Court for
which is 33 Market Street, Franklin County, Florida,



2 ad 3 r re
representative s attorney the personal representa-
are set forth below t resaenndatl es aet nne
All creditors of the dece- aresetforthbelow
dent and other persons
vil tclae orntdsematn ALLNSINTEREEST TI E
on whom a copy of this THAT:
notice has been served
tmustc rthe I Ims Tw tl rsso r dwwhhoomhta
LATER OF 3 MONTHS AF- objections that challenge
TER THE DATE OF THE the validity of the will, the
FIRST PUBLICATION OF qualifications of the per-
THIS NOTICE OR 30 sonal representative,
DAYS AFTER THE TIME venue, or jurisdiction of
OF SERVICE OF A COPY this Court are required to
OF THIS NOTICE ON file their objections with
THEM. this Court WITHIN THE
All other creditors of the LMAO TRHS OAFFTERTH E
decedent and other per- DATE OF THE FIRST PUB-
sons having claims or de- LICATION OF THIS NO-
mands against decedent's TICE OR THIRTY DAYS
estate must file their claims AFTER THE DATE OF
with this court: WITHIN 3 SERVICE OF A COPY OF
MONTHS AFTER THE THISNOTICEOFTHEM.
DATE OF THE FIRST PUB-
LICATION OF THIS NO- All creditors of the dece-
TICE. dent and other persons
having claims or demands
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO against decedent's estate
FILED WILL BE FOREVER on whom a copy of this
ARNRDEINGTHENO ITP tnh emc th af rdthew
RIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, of the first publication of
ANY CLAIM FILED TWO this notice must file their

YEETAHROSFODREDC06EN EsEN NTb EARC


COASTAL


COMMUNITY


vs.
ROBERT R. MILLENDER,
JR.,
Defendant
CASE NO.: 09-000413-CA
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN pursuant to a Final
Judgment of Foreclosure
dated January 26, 2010,
and entered in Civil Action
Ot9-000413ofCtAheofStehce
ond Judicial Circuit in and
for Franklin County, Flor-
Ida, wherein the parties
were the Plaintiff'
COASTAL COMMUNITY
BANKandtheDefendant,
ROBERT R. MILLENDER'
JR., I will sell to the highest
and best bidder f or cash at
11:00 a.m. (Eastern Time)
on the 18th day of March,
2010, at the front steps of
thhoeuFanAk ICcTc aCourt-
Ida, the
following-described real

nu


BB The Times Thursday, February 11, 2010


COVERING MILTON-


=OLA


Find & Post


job related items:
77
> resumes & career opportunities <

relevant to the Florida panhandle


To place an ad, call 850.747. 5020/800.345. 8688


| 1100
THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF
SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the
decedent and persons
having claims or demands
againstthedecedent'ses-
tate must file their claims
with this Court WITHIN
THREE MONTHS AFTER
THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS
AND OBJECTIONS NOT
SO FILED WILL BE FOR-
EVER BARRED.
The date of the first publl-
cation of this Notice is
February 11, 2010
Personal Representative:
Karen L. Hall
4729 East Sunrise Dr.
PO. Box 137
Tucson, AZ85718
Attorney for Personal Rep-
O sllHOMSFON
Thompson, Crawtord &
Smiley
Attorneys at Law
1330 Thomasville Road
Tallahassee, FL 32303
(850) 386-5777
FloridaBarNo.890596
February 11, 18, 2010
5744T

RLT FR C ITNNCDNO


| 1100
CIVIL DIVISION
AURORA LOAN SER-
VICES, LLC.,
Plaintiff,
vs
CLYDE OLIVER; KENN
ETH FRIENDLY; et al.
Defendants
CASE NO.
192008CA000043XXXXXX
RE-NOTICE OF
SALE PURSUANT
TO CHAPTER 45
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN pursuant to an Or-
der or Summary Final
Judgment of foreclosure
dated July 30, 2008 and
an Order Resetting Sale
dated January 26, 2010,
and entered in Case No.
192008CA000043- XXXXXX
of the Circuit Court of the
Second Judicial Circuit in
and for Franklin County
Florida, wherein AURO
LOAN SERVICES, LLC. Is
P tiff and CLKYEDNENEO -
FRIE NDLY; CASA DEL
MAR SUBDIVISION ASSO-
CIATION, INC.: FRANKLIN
COUNTY; UNKNOWN
TENANT NO. 1; UN-
KNOWN TENANT NO. 2;
andALLUNKNOWNPAR-
TIES CLAIMING INTER-
ESTS By THROUGH, UN-
DER OR AGAINST A

GSE

RO RE RN TDHE
SCRIBED, are Defendants,
lbwd Id rather ta
Front Door of the Franklin
ty Courtho ac
cola, FL 32320 In Franklin
County, Florida, at 11:00
a.0m otnhetheoll Irch
scribed t as set
forth in sa o r or Final
Judgment, to-wit.
LOT 36, LOCATED IN
CASA DEL MAR SUBDI-
VISION, PHASE 1, A
SUBDIVISION AS PER
MACPOORRDEPDLAT ITHERPEL%
BOOK 6, PAGE 2 OF THE
PUBLIC RECORDS OF
FRANKLIN COUNTY
FLORIDA
ANYPERSONCLAIMING
AN INTEREST IN THE
SURPLUS FROM THE
SALE, IF ANY OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY
OWNER AS OF THE DATE
OF THE LIS PENDENS
WUSHb OLEDAYAS AF
THE SALE


cm c nd0 s d





g *
Janalyn Dowden

Carrab0e 1 FElo 3A2322.
www.seacrestre.com
2 BR 1 B Mobile Home
Unfurnished, large lot ....................... $575.00
2 BR 1 B Duplex
Remodeled, Fenced Back Yard......... $600.00
3 BR 1 B End Unit Apt
Front & Back Porch, unfurnished ..... $525.00
3 BR 3 B Condo
Unfurnished Pool........................... $750.00
2 BR 1.5 BA
170 N. Bayshore Dr. Eastpoint ......... $750.00
3 BR 3 B Condo
Furnished Pool...........................$500.00 wk

RishEend Un t.......................... $525.00
Furnished ReAecorated ................... $500.00
f r1i h Apt................................$500.00
3 BR 1 BAt
FurRis1hed redecorated ...................$500.00
FurnishedA 3 Day Min) ..............$650.00 wk
RR 1 BV en r Front Hous ......... $900.00


P S L 9 -a9t 4
OR 850-323-0444 FOR RENTALS.


I


Can ears r en c cA

Call Gwen 850-653-6279


For Lease
COmmercial
Building
Approx 1100 sq ft.


II


I


; \

PROPERTIES

REAL ESTATE SALES & MANAGEMENT
Vacation, Short & Loney Term Rentals

i.Ong Term Rentals in Carrabelle
147 Delaware St. 2BR/1BA $550
Fumished MH with carport, workshop and boat shed

2526 Palmetto Terrace 2BR/2BA $600
Fenced yard, large porch, just blocks from the bay

710-C Mariners View 3BR/3BA $800
Nearly new condo with river view & pool

1302 Picketts Landing Court 4BR/3.5BA $1500
Gorgeous new TH w/ hardwood floors, elevator, pool & dock


FO R SALE
Let Us Be Your Buyer's Edge

Bank Short Sales @Pirates Landing on Timber Island
One Bedroom Condos in unique riverfront community Starting at $100,000

Bank Short Sales @ the Sands of Carrabelle
3BR/2BA Town homes with 1500sf & Community Pool $149,000

Waterfront home on Poston Bayou
3BR/2BA on One Acre with Dock & Elevator in Private Location $300,000

Bank Owned Homes on the Carrabelle River
Fabulous 4BR/4BA w/ 3800sf Dock, Elevator & Gulf View $550,000


850-697-5300
www.MySandyBeach.com


| 6130
2 br, 2 ba, 1200sf Twnhm,
C r0abe e I ge deck
Avaltla 0-5 4 11 for an

-


61bo
Apalachicola, FL.
Call 850-643-7740.

2 br, 2 ba St. George Is-
land furn d ground level w/
easy beach access. Sun
ock p8 5 71$975



3 br, 2 ba
Carabelle: $700 month.
Pets ok. fenced back yard.
850-766-8942

3 br, 2 ba, new home for
lease/sale in Carabelle.
Energy effic, Ig master,
open floor plan. Must see
$850mo/$165K deposit
neg. 850-528-2299
Apalachicola- 2 br, 1 ba 6
mo to 1 yr Ise. $725 mo +
$500 dep. Call (850)
653-8074
Carabelle- 3 br, 2 ba
screened porch, view of
Gulf. $650 mo + $350 dep
Call 850-510-2888

r

Carrabelle 5 br, 4 ba, du-
4
e oac)r ewcnpaintpole
sible. Call (404) 266-0067

Eastpoint, 2br, 2ba, study
office Whispering Pines
Sub-Div, db| gar, $850 mo,
Call 678-640-4810
St. George Island Bayview
Large 1 br 1 ba All utilities
Incl. 6 mo to 1 yr lease.
$800 mo + $500 dep. Call
850-653-8074



Carrabelle, Large MH. 2
2rl r w/dbe tfuln
renovated w/ carpet and
t5le $6850 mo + $300 dep.







AUMM NE
8100 Antique&CO lectibles
8110 Cars
8 0 Sp utility Vehicles


comomp
8170 Auto Parts
& Accessories
8210 Boats
8220 Personal watercraft
8230 Sailboats
8240 Boat & Marine
8245 Boua I s & Docks
8310 Aircraft/Aviation
8320 ArV/Off Road Vehicles
8330 Campers & Trailers
8340 Motorhomes


I 8130


1992 E-1t ks AC ro

,6Ldned d superande,


| 8340
2 Park Models
fOr Sale!
ewideuts3pe d
Ing Each unit has bath,
avehea Iranfn
beds. Asking $12K as Is.
You haul if you purchase.
S eRats Carra IleH a
West in Carrabelle. Call
850-697-2638


REGISTERED NURSES (ER and PERIOD) -
Port St.Joe, FL
Full-timeandpart-timep05iti005. A Shift5.Gladuate0fan
accredited RN program. Prior ER and/or surgery clinical

peijent q5uireddACLuareeNtur icenseinthe5tateof FL


J T CARE MANAGER (ER) Port St*
Full4ime.Days. Graduateof an accredited RN program. BSN
required. MSN preferred. Five years progressive clinical
management experience in a health care environment required.
B(L5ACLSPALSTNCCENP(andNALSrequired.

OCCUPATIONAL THERAPIST -
Port St.Joe, FL
Full4ime.Days. Graduate of an accredited 0.T.program. Current
Occupational Therapy License in the5tate of Florida; B(LS
required or must be obtained within one year of employment.


Affordable Roofing, Re- Tax Ref d
m el@tim tesGutt n Get your tax r unnd in
ercial, and Residential, as little as 10 days.
CallL5c96-1C1950596-2138 JohnCHoon td T nS rvice.
CGC 1506283 850-653-4313/566-7127


6100 Business/
commercial
6110 Apartments
6120 Beach Rentals
6130 CondoRownhouse
6140 House Rentals
6150 roommate wanted
6160 Rooms for Rent
t feT w als
6190 Timeshare Rentals
62oo vacation Hentals


6100

Appalachicola:Downtown
1000 sf open space with
handicap access / bath-
room additional office
space available $1000 mo
Call Helen 850-323-0123


Franklin County's source of news for more than a century


The Times Thursday, February 11, 2010 9B


| 1100 |
WATER LINE OF ALLIGA
RTH B7A EG EESN
M UTEASLOO8G SECONDS
PROXIMATE HIGH WATER
LINE 25.17 FEET TO A
SET IRON ROAD AND
CAP (LB 7017); THENCE
AATVE GLINESA ORTHIGH
DEGREES 48 MINUTES 11
SECONDS EAST 321.69
FEET TO THE POINT OF
BEGINNING CONTAINING
0.18 ACRES, MORE OR
LESS.

Ae snrsTecl m sancinn
the sale, If any, other than
the property owner as of
the date of the Ils pend-
ens, must file a claim
within 60 days after the
sale.
Dated this 27th day of
January 2010.
Marcla M. Johnson
Clerk of Court
By: Michele Maxwell
Deputy Clerk
IN ACCORDANCE WITH
THE AMERICANS WITH
DISABILITIES ACT per-
sons with disabilities need-
Ing a special accommoda-
tlon should contact
COURT ADMINISTRA-
TION, at the FRANKLIN
County Courthouse at
(850)653-8861, 1-800-955-
8771 (TDD) or 1-800-955-
8770, via Florida Relay
Service.
THE LAW OFFICES OF
DAVID J. STERN, PA.,
torn forhPI Island

aa F4L 3324-3920
(954)233-8000
08-87155 EMC
February 11, 18, 2010


5807T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE SECOND JUDI-
CIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY
FLORIDA
Fi L CITY BANK,



LIA L. CUNNINGHAM
A/K/A JULIA CUN-
N NOWNERLSAKASS
ON THE BLUFE INC., and
UNKNOWN TENANTSS.

CASE NO.: 09-465-CA
NOTICE OF SALE PUR-
SUANT TO CHAPTER 45
NOTICE Is given pursuant
to a Final Judgment of
Foreclosure dated January

od25 e e has
calnk rcCujbnt Fao afor
which CAPITAL CITY
BANK Is the Plaintiff and
JULIA L. CUNNINGHAM
A/K/A JULIA CUN-
NINGHAM and OWNERS
ATE) FOFN KES
the Defendants, I will sell
to the highest and best
bidder for cash at the front

nty ou us Fran n
alachicola, Franklin
County, Florida at 11:00
a.m. on March 11, 2010,
the property set forth in the
Final Judgment of or I
described as follows:
Lot 32, LAKES ON THE
BLUFE according to the
map or plat thereof as re-
corded in Plat Book 8,
Page 33, Public Records
of Franklin County, Florida.

Any persons claiming an
Interest in the surplus from
sa f an w r atshaon
the date of the Ils pend-
t in ( daysc r
the sale.
DATED: January 27, 2010.
MARCIA M. JOHNSON
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Michele Maxwell
Deputy Clerk
Garvin B. Bowden, Esq.
Gardner, Blst, WIener,
Wadsworth & Bowden,
PA.
--he oPddan 8
February 11, 18, 2010


5835T
STATE OF FLORIDA
DEPARTMENT OF COM
MUNITYAFFAIRS
NOTICE OF INTENT TO
FI PFRREAHNEKNLINVCO
A NDMENT IN COMPLl-

DOCKET NO.
09-2-NOl-1901-(A)-(1)

ot artmeentt e h
Amendment to the Com-
prehensive Plan for Frank
Un County ad20p 1 a
2009-17 on December 15,
2009, IN COMPLIANCE,
1 3.31Sectj


Oyeste Tongso buildew
abe weldln sera P al
Tommy, 850-653-6208


3300


10+ Channels.FRE
4-om Install. FRE
H-V. Plus $60
Sg-p BONUS.Cal
Nowl 1-888-794-7558








4100 Help Wanted
410 Employment
Information


| 4100 |
Food Serv/Hospitality












APleas apyIn person Th

Srd t. Georges Islnd




9th St. Port St. Joe, FI
32456 850-229-8244
Web Id 34078294


6110
PLanark Village,1br
lap unfuanishe4, OWmD

0-t 9 8atAsk for Jim

ept amoI.b I


furnished with pool. $800
per month, Including util.
See at Carrabelle Beach
RV Resort, 1843 HWY 98
West Carrabelle, Florida.
Call 850-697-2638 for Info.
SrmllsStudio Apto for ma0
Includes all utllties Unfur-
nished, 850-697-8623 or
545-6904


|6120
St. Geor e
ISland
$160 wk, elec, Satellite,
Garbage Included. pool
table. 12'X65' deck with
Beautiful view. Call
850-653-51 14

f 0f6


| 6100 | 6110
For Rent
Histanc Sponge Ex
cha ee bu di mCmo n Publisher's
St. 305-588-5885 NOtice


All real estate advertising in
this newspaper Is subject to

a re e Aa I
or discrimination based on
race, color, religion, sex,
handicap, familial status or
national origin, or an Inten-
ton, to make any such pref-
II tio lalorsta ss

8 te etnhte
nant women and people se-
curing custody of children
underl8.
This newspaper will not
knowingly accept any ad-
vehrt ng ovolrael n estt
law. Our readers are hereby
Informed that all dwellings
advertised in this newspa-
per are available on a equal
opportunity basis. To com-
plain of discrimination call
HUD toll-free at
1-800-669-9777. The
tholl-free number for the
12n927-921mpaire is


Spacious 3 br 1 ba,
kitchen w/d heat & air 2nd
stor, flat on river for rent or
lease call Gwen
850-653-6279


| 6110
1 bedroom furnished with
Florida room. $350 month.
$200 dep. Lanark Village.
(48-2 Pine St.). Also have a
2 bedroom unfurnished
with Florida room. $450
month. $225 dep. Lanark
Village (26-6 Parker St.)
1 bedroom efficiency in
Carabelle. Includes water
and electric, unfurnished,
nice deck. $600 month,
$300 deposit. Please Call
510-2888. Leave message
w/name & phone number.



Apalachicola effic apt
available. Overlooking bay.
Water, cable, Internet Incl.
$550mo. 850-294-6914
Appalacilicola:Downtownnice
open space 1000 si
available now $625 mo +
utiltles Call Helen
850-323-0123
Heritage Villas &
Southern Villas
Of Apalachicola
Apartments
Accepting applications for
1, 2, & 3 BR, HC and
non-HC accessible units.
Some rental assistance
may be available. HUD
vouchers accepted. Call
850-653-9277. TDD/TTY
711. This Institution is an
equal opportunity provider
and employeE



Lanark Village 51 E Pine
u2s ayfacjdGo
d 8550 mo-28383000
864-356-5949
Lanark Village
1 ei ba, Renovated/ fur

cp os un
sidered. (850) 653-3838


3 BR/3 BA Beachfront Home
1824 Plantation Pass, St George Island, FL
1 BR/1 BA Beachfront Home
1804 E. Gulf Beach Dr, St George Island, FL
.55 Acre Commercial Lot
119 Market St., Apalachicola FL
1.12 Acre Residential Lot
2956 Creek Side Dr, Carrabelle FL

ROWell Really SE Aliction CO., 1110.
CallforDetails

EI.I. 800-323-8388
AUCTIONs 10% Buyers Premium AU479 AB296


FRANKLIN COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD
85 School Road, Suite 1

Ea pdi)rbFL283120328

ANNOUNCEMENT OF POSITIONS (2)

POSITION: Non Instructional
(1) Technology-School Site Assistant (0PS Position)
(1) Transition Services/Job Coach
These positions are fully funded by the American
Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), Individual
with Disabilities Act (IDEA), Part B and are
contingent upon these or equitable grant funds.
LOCATION: Franklin County Schools
SALARY: FCSB Salary Schedule
CONTRACT: 2009-10 School Year
DEADLINE: February 23, 2010 Noon
Job duties may be obtained from Franklin
County School Board Special Program
Director, Brenda Wilson. Resume and
proposal must include (1) a high school
diploma, (2) college transcripts and (3) three

aett aoftree tmenedattion.c ory
check (includes FDLE processing fee) and a
drug screening.

PtlteanTore rnr nsdua ias npTppeoc II tPor ams
Director.
Frank ounty School Board is an Equal
Opp y mploy .


'
'



MERCHANDISE

es
3120 Arts & Crafts
3130 Auctions
3140 Baby Items
3150 Building Supplies
3160 Business
3170 C I cmi es
3180 Computers
3190 Electronics
3200 Firewood

e aa Sles
3240 Guns
3250 Good Things to Eat
3260 Health & Fitness
3270 Jeweiry/Clothing
3280 Machinery/
Equipment
3290 Medical Equipment
Miscellannousents
3320 Plants & Shrubs/
Supplies
33 taurant/Hotel
3350-Tickets(Buy&Sell)



| 3220



5 PieceR 100% Mcrofl
w/coffee table set $599,
ALL NEW In boxes. Delly-
850-425-8374 available.


Send resum s to:
Sacred Heart Hospital

On the Emerald Coast
Attn: Human Resources

7800 Highway98
Bramar Beach, FL32550

fax:850.2783061


Ifyouhaveanyquestionsabout
opportunities with the Saced Heart
Health System along the
Eilera d Coastplease visit our
OrgirlizatlOial Webille 3T
Www.sacredheartemerald.org


SACRED HEART IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER


| 1100 |
163.3189, ES.
The adopted Franklin
Pl ntAme om re
Department s Objections,
Recommendations and
Comments Report. (if any),
arc available for public In-
sp t neMo ayfotrhroeugah
holidays, during normal
business hours, at the
Franklin County Planning
and Building Department
34 Forbes Street, Apalach-
Icola, Florida 32320.

f n affecteSe erson,63
184, FS., has a right to
petition for an administra-
tive hearing to challenge
the proposed agency de-
termination that the
Amendment to the Franklin
County Comprehensive
Plan is In Compliance, as
defined in Subsection 163
3184(1), ES. The petition
must be filed within
twenty-one (21) days after
publication of this notice.
and must Include all of the
Information and contents
described in Uniform Rule
28-106,201, F A.C. The pe-
tition must be filed with the
Agency Clerk, Department
of Community Affairs, 2555
Shumard Oak Boulevard,
Tallahassee, Florida
32399-2100, and a copy
mailed or delivered to the
local government. Failure
to timely file a petition shall
constitute a waiver of any
right to request an ad-
ministrative proceeding as
a petitioner under Sections
120.569 and 120.57, FS. If

po nt Inheaplue
arenncewilabe ttespirescent
and forward a recom-
mended order to the De-
partment. If no petition is
filed, this Notice of Intent
shall become final agency
action.
If a petition is filed, other
affected persons may petl-
tion for leave to Intervene
In the proceeding. A petl-
tion for Intervention must
f at b tetcwen ya(2

the Information and con-
tStes sc eddnFUn orA
pebteosh r lea e toaintee
Division of Administrative
Mea gs DepartS vce
1230 Apalachee Parkway

eF n
constitutes a waiver of any
right such a person has to
Teqc o sa ann69 unadned
120.57, ES. or to particl-
pate in the administrative

Aearringan administrative
hearing petition is timely
filed, mediation is available
pursuant to Sub-section
163.3189(3)(a), FS., to
any affected person who is
made a party to the pro-
ceeding by filing that re-
quest with the administra-
tive law judge assigned by
the Division of Administra-
tive Hearings. The choice
of mediation shall not af-
fedct a party shright to an
a ministrative earning.
Mike McDaniel, Chief
Office of Comprehensive
Plannin
part ent of Community
25 rsShumard Oak Boule-
hassee, Florida
32399-2100
February 11, 2010


| 3220



reBransd names een
sealed plastic with war-
ranty, 222-7783



100% Leather sofa & love
No vinyl. Never used. Still
in crates. List, $2749. Ask-
Ing $675. 425-8374, can
deliver



A NEW Queen Luxur 7
Th d MlattressF etWain
se p r-
ranty. Sacrifice $299. Can
deliver 222-7783

I <

Dining Room Set: Queen
Anne Formal table with 6
matching upholstered
chairs-all new In boxes.
$450 Del Avall. 222-7783

.' .
| 3230

I

Carrabelle: Avenue F at
the Carrabelle Senior Cen-
ter, Saturday February 13,
9am til 2pm
Flea Market
Come buy or sell your
treasures. 850-323-0713


| 3250
Recession
S alsle "
25% Off Dine In Food pur
chases Monday. 25% Off
Take out Tuesday. Happy
Hour Mon-Frl 5-7. Free
snacks on Fridayll Up The
Creek Raw Bar


| 4130

PO ALFOG JOB


Ph we
a g g

You NEVER have to pay
er f ma I joabbs
you see a job
guarantee contact the
FTC.
The Federal Trade
Commission
Is America s consumer
protect oov/Jaobes rns

1-877-FTC-HELP

Apublicservice
message from the FTC
and TheNewsHerald
Classified Advertising
Department


APALACHICOI.A BAT

CH RaTE'Re SCHOOL
resmanes for possible
$$*8 teRCiting positions
for tIae 2010- 2011
School year*
Send resumes to:
Don Hungertonl

Apal9a8chil ha e3t2320
or fax to 850-653-1857


FRANKLIN COUNTY SCHOOL
BOARD
85 Scthpo Road,3Suite 1


(850) 670-2810

ANNOUNCEMENT OF POSITION

POSITIONS: Non-Instructional:
School Food Service Manager
LOCATION: Franklin County Schools
SALARY: FCSB Salary Schedule
CONTRACT: 2009-10 School Year
DEADLINE: February 23, 2010, noon

JOb description and application may be
Obtained from Franklin County School
BOard Finance Office. ApplicationS
mUSt include (1) a high school diploma,
(2) college transcripts if applicable, and
(3) three letters of recommendation.
Successful applicants must agree to a
criminal history check (includes FDLE
pf0cessing fee) and a drug screening.

P 68Se return applications to the
attention of Morna Smith, personnel
Specialist.

Franklin County School Board is an
E al O nity
QU ppOrtu mp over.


n rt oe, )Llable All her Ab.Inv re.

pellullII tiltIIIItdIIIIOUI)IU UgitalwfulogItaldild IIIRFU)tupit
pf0(0dUfe5 in One Of BOre laboratory sections. Basic computer
skills preferred. BSdegreein MedicalTechnologyorequivalent
10 meet State of Florida requirements. Must be licensed in the
State of Florida as a Medical Technologist.









RAGTIME PIANIST TO PLAY
DIXIE THEATRE THIS WEEKEND













DIXIETHEATRE|SpecialtotheTimes
Bob Milne, an extraordinary ragtime piano player, returns for his 11th
year to the Dixie Theatre.
He will perform Friday, Feb. 12 and Saturday, Feb. 13 at 7:30 p.m.,
and on Sunday, Feb. 14 at 3 p.m. Reserved seats are $20.
One of the country's favorite performers, Milne is widely known as the
top ragtime/boogie-woogie pianist today, and one of the finest musicians
of all time. He has performed in all types of venues from saloons, early
in his career, to appearances with the Rochester Philharmonic and
the Baltimore Symphony. His tours in Japan have been such fantastic
successes that he was designated a "Musical Ambassador" by the United
States State Department.
He has recorded 10 albums of piano rags and boogies and is author
of four books.


STUDENTS' ART REACHES OUT FOR HAITI













DAVID ADLERSTEIN |The Times
The City of Apalachicola's "Project Impact Afterschool" students
combined their artistic talents with a service learning project to help
support the Haiti relief efforts. Students designed and produced Valentine
cards titled "Hearts for Haiti" that are being sold locally to raise money
to send to Haiti. Students from the Apalachicola Bay Charter School and
the City Municipal Complex participated in the project. In photo above,
Apalachicola City Administrator Betty Webb shows off the cards at the
Feb. 2 city commission meeting.
The cards have been bundled in sets of eight and are available at the
Project Impact site at the Municipal Complex (formerly AHS), the ABC
site, City Hall and participating local merchants. Please call 653-1325 or
370-0145 for more information. Project Impact is a collaborative program
of the City of Apalachicola and the 21st Century Community Learning
Centers of Florida.


He oth and Jacqueline Studle r
1ps312@att.net



Date High Low % Precip
Thu, Feb 11 510 400 10 %
FriFeb 12 470 370 20 %
Sat, Feb 13 520 380 40 %
Sun, Febbl45 o a
Tue, Feb 16 570 440 0 %
WedFeb 17 560 410 0 %
TIDE TABLES MONTH LY AVERAGES
To find the tides of the following areassubtract the indicated times
from these given for APALACHICOLA:
HIGH LOW
Cat Point Minus 0:40 Minus 1:17
East Pass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27
To find the tides of the following areassubtract the indicated times
from those given for CARRABELLE:
HIGH LOW
Bald Point Minus 9:16 Minus 0:03
APALACHICOLA


LOIS SWOBODA | The Times
Preordering of Girl Scout cookies now has been completed for the year, with nothing left to do but
savor the flavors. Deliveries will begin in about a week or so. Look for sale booths between
Feb. 21 and March 21. Above, local Girl Scouts say the Pledge of Allegiance during a recent
meeting. From left, Rachel Rudd, Genevieve Montgomery, Meredith Alford, Nadia Etheridge and
Kelsey Griffin.




TDC to host marketing, grant workshops





Thursday, February 11, 2010


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Special to The Times
The Franklin County Tourism
Development Council (TDC) will
host two grant-related workshops in
February.
The first workshop, scheduled
for Thursday, Feb. 11 from 10 a.m. to
noon at the Water Street Hotel Con-
ference Room, will focus on mar-
keting assistance for existing grant
recipients. The second workshop,


scheduled for 3 p.m. on Tuesday,
Feb. 16 at the Gibson Inn, will focus
on discussing recommended chang-
es to the TDC grant program.
Both workshops are open to the
public.
The Feb. 11 marketing workshop,
led by Helen Spohrer, TDC chair-
man, will outline the marketing as-
sistance available to TDC event-re-
lated grant recipients as well as ree-
ommendations and tips on getting


the most exposure from marketing
efforts.
The Feb. 16 workshop will be a
public forum to gain input and rec-
ommendations for potential changes
to the 2010-11 grant programs.
The TDC meets twice monthly
throughout the year. The TDC full
council meets the first Tuesday of
each month beginning at 3 p.m., with
TDC subcommittees meeting on the
third Tuesday at 1:30 p.m.


2/11 Thu MM
2/12 Fri 01:39AM
04:29PM
2/13 Sat 02:30AM
04:40PM
2/14 Sun 03:16AM
04:49PM
2/15 Mon 04:00AM
04:58PM
2/16 Tue 04:45AM
05:11PM
2/17 Wed 05:33AM
05:26PM


M -
09:47AM -0.3
09:18PM 0.6
10:14AM -0.2
09:55PM 0.5
10:34AM -0.1
10:29PM 0.4
10:49AM 0.0
11:02PM 0.3
11:03AM 0.1
11:35PM 0.2
11:19AM 0.3


go... .Iv
At
,- 4



||lij|'|||1|P|'lll)'llit illiff



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East End home with great curb appeal directly on the Gulf, 104
feet of beach frontage; one acre lot. High celhngs, open floor
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room, upstairs master suite with Gulf front balcony, beautifully
furnished, wrap around decks, storm shutters, standing seam
metal roof, private beach boardwalk & sundeck, 2194 Sq Ft H/C.
Excellent Income


CAR
2/11 Thu 07:02AM
06:24PM
2/12 Fri 12:14AM
03:04PM
2/13 Sat 01:05AM
03:15PM
2/14 Sun 01:51AM
03:24PM
2/15 Mon 02:35AM
03:33PM
2/16 Tue 03:20AM
03:46PM
2/17 Wed 04:08AM
04:01PM


18H


07:34AM -0.5
07:05PM 1.0
08:01AM -0.3
07:42PM 0.8
08:21AM -0.2
08:16PM 0.6
08:36AM 0.0
08:49PM 0.5
08:50AM 0.2
09:22PM 0.3
09:06AM 0.5
09:57PM 0.2


r--


B10 1 The Times


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