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Group Title: Apalachicola times
Title: The Apalachicola times
ALL ISSUES CITATION PDF VIEWER THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100380/00064
 Material Information
Title: The Apalachicola times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: H.W. Johnston
Place of Publication: Apalachicola Fla
Apalachicola Fla
Publication Date: February 4, 2010
Copyright Date: 2008
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1885.
General Note: Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00100380
Volume ID: VID00064
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 32911693
lccn - sn 95026907
 Related Items
Preceded by: Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by: Apalachicola herald

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00002-04-2010 ( PDF )


Table of Contents
    Section A
        Page A 1
        Page A 2
        Page A 3
        Page A 4
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        Page A 6
        Page A 7
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    Section B
        Page B 1
        Page B 2
        Page B 3
        Page B 4
        Page B 5
        Page B 6
        Page B 7
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(0UN. RAtLLIE AROUND 0 5ERMN


County's

kindergarten


preparation

best in state


Franklin County kindergartners are
tops in the state when it comes to entering
school with the skills needed to succeed as
they embark on their next dozen years in
the classroom.
According to data released last month
by the Florida Department of Education,
results of last year's screening of public
school kindergartners showed that Frank-
lin County had more than 83 percent of its
entering class of kindergartners considered
ready for reading success based on a mea-
surement of their ability to name letters and
to be aware of the different sounds associ-
ated with them.
This percentage was nearly 20 per-
centage points higher than the state aver-
age of 65 percent for this Florida Assess-
ments of Instruction of Reading (FAIR)

See KINDERGARTEN AS


Security hampers
* *


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FROM THE COLLECTION OF CAROLYN VAUSE | sp.....I:.. I1.. 1....
Island.


I


GRANDMOTHER PLEADS


YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER FOR MORE THAN 120 YEARS


VOL. 124 ISSUE 41


By David Adlerstein
TimesCityEditor
Eastpoint's Robert Baxley
is among a growing number of
Franklin County oystermen who
havestoppedfeelingthepinchof
a bad economy.
Now, they're facing the bite,
and government, social service
and charitable organizations are
stepping in to see about fending
off the wolf at their doors.
Carrying a sheaf of past due
rent and utility notices, Baxley
was among about three dozen
other seafood workers who took
time away from, what these days
has become a much less lucra-


tive occupation, tonging oysters
to confront the county commis-
sioners Friday morning at a spe-
cial meeting.
The meeting followed a
Thursday conference call be-
tween emergency management
officials and social service pro-
viders from around the region to
discuss the worsening economic
conditions wrought on the indus-
try by cold weather, bay closures
and overworked bars.
"Even if they opened the
whole bay, they're not going to be
able to catch up," Commissioner
Bevin Putnal said. "It's going to
be hard to make it until the sum-
mer bars open. It's going to be a


struggle just to survive.
"I do know people about to
lose their house," he said. "We
have families living in one house
just to survive. It's a horror sto-
ry."
The oystermen in the audi-
ence didn't have to step forward
to the podium to recount their
difficulties, as the degree of fi-
nancial hardship caused by the
double whammy of frigid weath-
er and bay closures in the last
several weeks was clear from
the outset of the meeting.
Because of heavy rains, sev-
eral of the six winter bars have
See 0YSTERMEN AS


J


Times Staff
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JAY BROSNAN | Special to The Times
NUrse Tommy Chiasson, from Houma,
La., Cradles a Haitian infant.
By Lois Swoboda
TimesStaffWriter
Tight security requirements are interfer-
ing with efforts to dispense aid in Haiti ac-
cording to a returning rescue worker,
Vince Bishop is back from Haiti. The
Cape San Blas resident and logistic chief for
the Northwest Florida FloridaOne Disaster
Medical Assistance Team was deployed on
See HAITI A6


Phone: 850-227-1845


DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK:


Red, White and Roux. ................. A4


Tid~e Chart.......................... BS


Apa lachicola


CATHOLIC CHARITIES, FCSWA HOLD OUTREACHES
Both the Franklin County Seafood Workers Association,
and the Catholic Charities of Northwest Florida, will be
busy Thursday, Feb. A trying to help struggling seafood
workers.
Beginning at 10 a.m., at St. Patrick's Catholic Church in
Apalachicola, Catholic Charities will be on hand to meet
with struggling seafood workers and see if they can help
with a variety of aid
And then at 6 .m., at the East oint Firehouse, the
P P .
Franklin County Seafood Workers Association (FCSWA)
will hold its monthly meeting. In addition to discussions
about new federal rules, cooling units on boats and oyster

See OUTREACH AS


AT


Zl~li~


TABLE OF CONTENTS


~FREEDOM


-




























































A Full Service Real Estate Company 2.avs875


A Call To All Vendors:


tasteofhome *
COOKING SCHOOL
fresh picked
favorites
ComineMarchl1th.2010


The Franklin County Board of County
Commissioners will be accepting separate
sealed Request for Proposals for the following:

D.W. WILSON SPORTS COMPLEX BASEBALL FIELD LIGHTING
PROJECT

Specifications are on file in the office of the Franklin County Board of County
Commissioners, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, Florida 32320.

Proposals must be received in the office of the Franklin County Clerk of
the Court 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, Florida 32320 by 4:30
P.M., EST, on February 15, 2010. Each proposal must be sealed and clearly
labeled. The sealed proposals will be publicly opened and read aloud at 10:30
A.M. EST, on February 16, 2010, in the County Commission Meeting Room
located in the Franklin County Courthouse Annex. For further information,
contact Van W. Johnson, Sr., Director Franklin County Parks & Recreation
Department, at (850) 670-8167. Email: fcswd@fairpoint.net.

Bidder shall provide an original and one copy of each proposal in a
sealed envelope or container, plainly marked "D.W. WILSON SPORT
COMPLEX BASEBALL FIELD LIGHTING PROJECT".

The owner reserves the right to waire any informality or to reject any or all
proposals.

ATTENTION BIDDERS: Franklin County is an equal opportunity employer
and encourages participation with certified minority enterprises and women's
business enterprises.

BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA
JOSEPH R4RRISH, CHAIRMAN


Get on the Mlenu


Thursday, February d, 2010


A2 | The Times


Local


By Lois Swoboda
Times StaffWriter

An eagle rescued at
Odena the day after Christ-
mas is recovering well.
The female bald eagle,
injured by another bird in
a battle over territory, is
expected to live and to fly
again, but may be unable to
perch.
Due to severe damage
to her right leg, the bird,
named Awahili by her care-
givers, may not be fit for re-
lease into the wild.
The good news is, even
if she cannot be released,
wildlife sanctuaries are
scrambling to offer her a
home. Her options range
from a love nest in Pensac-
ola with an injured male, to
a facility on the east coast
of Florida where damaged
birds are glove-trained so
they can be allowed to fly
under supervision.
For the last three weeks,
Awahili has been under the
care of Dr. Carla Hubbard,
who operates a mobile vet-
erinary clinic in the Altha
area.
Betsy Knight, director
of Big Bend Wildlife Sanc-
tuary, said the eagle looks
wonderful in spite of her
ordeal.
"(Awahili) has lost a
portion of her breast bone,
a portion of her pelvis and
her right leg is massively
damaged," wrote Hubbard
in a Jan. 18 e-mail. "We be-


The St. George Island Civic club named, at left,
Dennis Barnell Man of the Year and, at right,
Susan Kearney was named Woman of the Year
on Jan. 22

(* fl I II
IVIC LIUD praises itearney I

fllB
01ne 01 SO1VI(6


Special to the Times
On Jan. 22, the St.
George Island Civic Club
named Susan Kearney
and Dennis Barnell Man
and Woman of the Year.
Barnellwas lauded for
his tireless work as pres-
ident of the St. George
Lighthouse Association.
After the Cape St. George
lighthouse toppled in
Oct. 2005, Barnell told
interviewers "It was our
beacon of hope, and we
will make it good again,"
and then rallied volun-
teers and contributors to
the campaign to "Rescue
the Light." Three years
later, the light was re-


constructed at the heart
of St. George Island and
itsbeamsshownforthfor
the first time in decades.
Kearney, a former
magistrate judge and
staff assistant to Geor-
gia Congressman John
Flynt (D-Griffin), won
kudos for her current
service as president of
the Franklin County Hu-
mane Society. She has
worked tirelessly as a
fundraiser and coordina-
tor for the group and was
nominated for her loving
spirit and driving leader-
ship of such a valuable
service to the County
residents, especially on
St. George Island.


JAMIE HUBBARD|ISpecial to the Times


lieve we have saved the leg,
but there is a large chance
that she will lose function
of her talons. The tissue
that was lost on her right
leg was almost the entire
circumference of the area
that would be our calf and
shin.
Originally, Knight and
Hubbard had hoped to ar-
range for reconstructive
surgery for Awahili, but
the cost of the procedure
proved to be prohibitive.
Knight said there is still a
possibility that the leg may
regenerate well enough for


the eagle to regain use of
her talons.
Hubbard said, "She is a
very strong-willed bird to
even have survived what
she has been through.
What we and rehabilitators
such as Mrs. Knight (who
brought Awahili to me) do
for raptors and other wild-
life is a labor of love. No one
gets paid for this care. It
doesn't matter. These crea-
tures are so majestic, so
phenomenal that it is an
absolute honor to be able to
help them."
Knight said she is await-


ing instructions from the
US Fish and Wildlife office
in Atlanta about what lies
in the future for Awahili.
She hopes the bird can re-
main in the panhandle.
Knight cares for a pair of
damaged eagles that have
formed a bond and nest to-
gether in captivity, which is
extremely unusual.
Donations to the Big
Bend Wildlife Sanctuary
are tax deductible. Anyone
wishing to help can send
donations of money or fish
to 9287 NW Felix Flanders
Road, Altha, FL 32421.


Travs Stnley Leon Teat


Grayson Shepard


Jackie Golden
850.899.8433
Jamie Crum
850.899.8758

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[]] 809725


Injured bald eagle recovering well


~F IoKH ~2~












































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Thursday, February d, 2010


Local


The Times | A3


By David Ad erstein
Times City Editor

Prosecutors have lessened
the charges against a 71-year-
old German woman accused
of drowning her 5-year-old
grandson in a bathtub on St.
George Island on Jan. 4.
After initially charging
her with first degree murder,
whichcancarrythedeathpen-
alty, the state attorney's office
has charged Marianne Bordt
with second degree murder
along with aggravated child
abuse with a deadly weapon.
Bordt's Tallahassee attor-
ney, Maria Ines Suber, who
handles capital cases for the
Second Judicial Circuit's Of-
fice of the Public Defender,
said she expects that pros-


sectors will empanel
a grand jury next week
in the case. A grand
-
jury is required if pros-
ecutors want to seek
a first degree murder
charge.
"If the case is taken
to a grand jury, it could MAR
be first-degree (mur-
O
der), second degree or B
something less, or no charg-
es," Suber said.
AssistinginBordt'sdefense
is Kevin Steiger, who handles
cases for the public defender's
office in Apalachicola.
Suber has filed a not guilty
plea on behalf of Bordt, who
is incarcerated at the Leon
County Jail as she awaits Cir-
cuit Judge James Hankinson
to hear her case in the Frank-


linCounty Courthouse.
The lawyer said the
transfer was made for
medical reasons.
Bordt is accused of
drowning her grand-
son, Camden Hiers,
of Roswell, Ga., while
IANNE she and her husband,
Heinz Bordt, were va-
RDT cationingonSt.George
Island at 641 East Gorrie Dr..
She then claimed to her hus-
band to have tried to drown
herself in the Gulf of Mexico
just before he returned home
from an errand in Apalachico-
la, and discovered the body.
The case has been exten-
sively reported around the
globe, and was the topic of a
talk show on CNN.
Hankinson has granted a


motion to allow a transcript
to be provided to Suber of the
grand jury proceeding. In ad-
dition, the attorney is seeking
the right to voir dire, or ques-
tion, the jury at the grand jury
proceeding.
Suber said she is seek-
ing the right to interpose any
challenges to the jurors due
to the extensive publicity of
the alleged crime. "(To con-
sider) that their minds will be
tainted," she said. "There has
been publicity all the way to
Germany."
A hearing has been sched-
uled before Hankinson on
Monday, Feb. 8 at 1:30 p.m.,
withanarraignmentslatedfor
'lliesday, Feb. 8 at 10:30 a.m.
Both are in the main court-
house in Apalachicola.


INSPECTIONS THIS WEEK & NEXT SEE BELOW FOR DATES & TIMES



























5,966 -1- SF commercial Building (Former Honda De ersh
100 West 15th Street (Intersection on HWY 231 & W 15th St) Panama City, FL
Inspection: Tues. Feb. 9, 12-3pm CST or call for private showing
Inspection: Wed. Feb. 10. 12-3pm CST














, 4 Commercial Buildings Next to Walmart
a 207, 214-A&B, 215-A&B Business Park Dr. Lynn Haven, FL
*** ** *** Inspection: Mon. Feb. 8, 12-3pm CST or call for private showing


Special to the Times
Students from the Friends
of the Franklin County Public
Library TIGERS program are
extending an invitation to par-
ticipate in a talent show Satur-
day, Feb. 6 from 3 to 6 p.m. at


the Carrabelle City Complex
auditorium.
Stop by the Library branch-
esortheApalachicolaProgram
Center to pick up an applica-
tion and guidelines. All ages
are welcome to participate or
to come and enjoy the show.


The first public showing of
"Kitville," the unique clay ani-
mation filming project created
by the students of the Friends
of the Franklin County Public
Library's KIT Program will be
shown Saturday.
Light refreshments will be


served and homemade des-
serts are welcome. There will
be awards and recognition.
Tickets are available at the
door with a suggested fund-
raising donation of $2.
For more information and
details, call Bonny at 697-9216.


r/


w- .
to far Emp-r-r. -


, *
www.iversmd.net or www.iversmd.com Panama City, FL (850) 872-1777


Grandmother pleads not guilty in drowning death


Nobles named

new manager of

Carrabelle Airport
On Jan. 7 the Carrabelle
city commission voted unani-
mously to appoint Mark No-
bles the first-ever manager .
of the Carrabelle Airport.
Born in Tallahassee, Nobles
is a long-time county resident
who retired from the Florida ... .
Fish and Wildlife Conserva- MARK
tion Commission where he NOBLES
was employed as a pilot.
He has been flying since
1989. "I have logged a little over 9,000 hours in
the air, so that's just over a year with my feet
off the ground," he said.
The new manager said he is looking for-
ward to his job.
"I want to see to it that monies that have

b nshnapeestpeod ImNai costs mmaitnsin tahp
to-day maintenance job. Recently, 67 of the 88
lights marking the runway were burned out.
That's a liability issue. A pilot unfamiliar with
the airport might misinterpret what he is see-
mg.
Nobles will receive an annual salary of
around $15,000, taken from revenue gener-
ated by the airport. By Lois Swoboda


Looking for talent: Library youth plan Saturday talent show


. elsft noe uc vst


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Thebers re


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Thursday, February 4, 2010


When teachers only got paid 10
months out of the year, summers
couldgetabitlean.Ipickedupsome
much-needed extra bucks working
for my aunt who
owns Dolores's Sweet
Shop. I didn't work
every day, and only
filled in if one of her J
regular employees *
needed some time
off. Sometime was

telephone would ring RED WHITE
in the early morning, AND ROUX

a el wouldtbail out Denise Roux
Comfortable shoes
were a must since I would be on my
feet for a good eight hours.
We served breakfast, made tuna,
potato and chicken salad, sliced up
ham, turkey and roast beef, made
chili, and washed and chopped lettuce
andtomatoes.MelanieZingarelli
orDoloresdidthe baking.We took
a break around 10:30 a.m. between
breakfast and lunch to eat and rest
before we got slammed at noon. In the
restaurant business we do everything
we can to be ready for the folks who
pour through the door, but when the
rush comes, it is all about moving
quickly and keeping the customers
happy.
At the end of the day I went home
bone tired with tips in my pocket.
Feeding people and working in a
kitchen was a very good way to pass
the time.
There is the love of her homemade
chicken salad, and the family
connection, that keeps me caring
about Dolores' Sweet Shop. She also
feeds me Christmas dinner every year
at her house, doesn't allow help with
clean-up, and sends leftovers home.
In fact, I first heard about her move
at Christmas. We debated the forced
change of venue from every angle
and ultimately decided that it was
a good thing. She has joined Gerry
Garlic in the Buck-Brash-Hays-Dan
Garlic Environmental Associates
house across the street from the old
A & P-Lanier Pharmacy building that
currently houses Apalachicola Fitness
Center,
Dolores gave me a call after
her first day of business in the new


Special to the Times
As a seventh
generation Northwest
Floridaunative, I've

bear country.
I 1
c e t
you, and your
child, and want
to give you
the very best
information I MA
can on how to WILLI
live safely near
Floridablackbears..
The bear safety tip
I would like to cover
today pertains to
something I hear from
a lot of people, "The
bears are so skinny;
they are just starving
out there." Well
they actually are not
starving
Imagine I am a bear
that was raised by my
mother in the forest.
My mother only raised
me on salad and water,
my natural foods. I
grow up and wander
into a community
and find little buffet
boxes (we call trash
cans) on every
corner. I discover
soda, burgers, fried
chicken, pizza, candy,
Mexican food, Chinese
food and I'm now
cony ted! I can't
resist this great stuff
I know sometimes I
could use a lock on
my refrigerator to
keep me out of some
tempting high calorie


foods that are creating
bad habits for me.
A bear that roots
around in our trash
needs us todock o

or a bear-proof
trash can, to help

dbteeatr p i ns

nneloulrborhoods

dk too having
IA their natural
MS foods in the

Wildbw a in,
natural foods will
always look more
slender and fit than
those eating foods they
get from people.
For more
information on how to
keep bears wild and
in the woods and out
of our neighborhoods,
log on to www.myfwc.
com, or for a complete
bear presentation
with safety tips and
more, contact me at
mariafwc@gmail.com.
As always stay
calm, back away
slowly, don't make eye
contact and I will see
you next time with
more Bear Safety Tips.
Take care.

Maria Williams
is an outreach
specialist for the
Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation
Commission's
Bear Management
Program.


DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Til
Gerry Garlick, front, his wife, Joyce, and restaurateur Dolores Roux,
back, have transformed the former Hays House into an antique shop,
complete with a cafe.


location. She said things went fairly
smoothly and that the kitchen is great.
She didn't make any changes to the
menu, but the cooks in the back still
had to get used to new storage spots
for pots, pans and utensils. Her tables
are set up in the home's original
dining room and the outside porch
is available for those who want an al
fresco experience.
The other half of the downstairs
houses Gerry Garlick's business that
was formerly in the Sponge Exchange
building downtown. Gerry said he can
really spread out in his four rooms and
hallway with lots of space for his rugs,
furniture, specialty soaps and jewelry.
In addition he noted, "Ijust have to
holler for lunch."
The history of this house and
the Gibson Inn are inextricably
linked. According to Dolores, South
Carolinlan James Alton Buck
built both of them in the early 1907,
although the Gibson was originally
called the Franklin Hotel. The house's
next owners were Mannie Brash Jr.
and his wife Ethel. Her brothers were
Willis and Chauncey Glass who ran
the local dairy on what is now Prado
Street.
Next in line to run the Gibson and


later live in the house were Edward
"Pat" Hays and family when, in 1923,
his mother, Annie Gibson Hays and
aunt Mary Ella "Sunshine" Gibson,
bought the hotel and changed the
name to the Gibson.
Pat Hay's eldest daughter, Patsy
Hays Philyaw, remembers living in
the family apartment in the hotel and
eating around a table in the restaurant
kitchen which was in a separate
building at the time. That came to an
end when the hotel was pressed into
use for a brief period by the military
during World War II and the Hays
family moved into the house Mr. Buck
had built. Dan Garlick bought the
house from Kathleen Hays in 1996.
There was a time before its
renovation that the Gibson fell into
disrepair, not so for the big white
house on the corner. I remember it as
being lovingly maintained throughout
the years. Houses get a lonely,
downtrodden look when they are
empty. I'm so glad this one has found
some happy tenants.

Denise Roux is a regular
columnist for the Apalachicola and
Carrabelle Times. 'lb reach hes e-mail
her at rouxwhit@mchsi.com


Special to the Times
Thousands of Floridians from
all walks of life will gather on
beaches from Pensacola to Key
West, and Miami to Jacksonville
on Saturday, Feb. 13, 2010, in
a massive, statewide coastal
protest against legislative
proposals to open Florida's
waters to offshore oil drilling.
Plans are underway for two
locations in Franklin County
to hold a "Hands Across the
Sands" protest event, on St.


George Island at the public
beach behind the lighthouse,
and in Carrabelle at Carrabelle
Beach State Park. The
Carrabelle beach event is being
organized by Lesley Cox, who
can be reached at 697-5555 or
dan-lesley@att.net
Anyone can join in to be part
of "Hands Across the Sand,"
which is the brainchild of Dave
Rauschkolb, who owns Bud &
Alley's restaurant in Seaside.
"This is a simple, nonpartisan
way for Floridians to join hands


in an effort to protect our
state's most important asset
- our waterways and beaches,"
Rauschkolb said. "Our goal is
to convince legislators and Gov.
Charlie Crist to drop the folly of
offshore oil drilling. All it takes
is one accident one oil spill
- and it is just not worth the
risk to our environment and our
coastal tourism industry."
Here's all participants have
to do: Go to their local beach
at 1 p.m. for an hour, rain or
shine. At 1:30 p.m., hold hands


creating human lines in the
sand protesting oil drilling in
Florida's waters. That's it! To
find out what's being organized
in your area, visit www.
handsacrossthesand.org
Among those who have
joined Hands Across the
Sand to oppose drilling of
Florida's beaches are the
Apalachicola RiverKeeper,
Florida Restaurant and Lodging
Association, Audubon Society,
the county commissions of Bay,
Broward, Collier, Escambia, Lee,


Manatee, Pinellas, Sarasota,
Wakulla and Walton counties,
the chambers of commerce in
Bay County, Destin, Panama
City Beach, Tampa Bay and
the Walton area; the cities of
Clearwater, Gulfport, Indian
Rocks, Indian Shores, Key
West, Miami Beach, Pensacola,
Redington Beach, Redington
Shores, Safety Harbor, Sarasota,
Seminole, St. Petersburg,
Tampa, Tarpon Springs,
Treasure Island; and many other
not-for-profit organizations.


Special to the Times
On Feb. 25 and 26,
Apalachicola will host
the second meeting of
the Governing Board
of the Apalachicola-
Chattahoochee-Flint (ACF)
Stakeholders, Inc.
ACFS, Inc. was founded
last year by consensus
charter to seek common
ground and grassroots
stakeholder solutions
among ACF interests
basin-wide. As before, the
Apalachicola meeting,
open to public observers,
will be facilitated by a
representative of the
Environmental Conflict
Resolution agency of the
US Department of the
Interior.
The ACFS mission is
to change the operation
and management of the
ACF Basin to achieve
equitable solutions among
stakeholders that balance


economic, ecological,
and social values, as well
as viable solutions that
ensure the entire ACF
Basin is a sustainable
resource for current and
future generations.
The ACFS's first
governing board meeting
was held in Albany, Ga.
on Dec. 10, 2009. Over
50 representatives from
diverse water users of the
ACF watershed attended,
from Lake Lanier and
Atlanta in the north,
through downstream
communities in Georgia
and Alabama, and the rural
and coastal communities
of Florida. The governing
board is comprised
of 14 Stakeholder
representatives from
each of the sub-basins
of the ACF the Upper
Chattahoochee, the Middle/
Lower Chattahoochee, the
Flint and the Apalachicola
- for a total of 56


board members.
As called for in the
charter, the governing
board at its first
meeting formed five
standing committees
-Intergovernmental
Relations, Finance,
Education and Outreach,
Issues Development and
Membership to organize
and conduct the ACFS's
ongoing business. Over
the upcoming two-day
meeting, each of these
committees will propose a
functional-area workplan
for Governing Board
discussion and approval for
the way ahead.
Dan Tonsmeire,
Apalachicola Riverkeeper
and one of the four-
member executive
committee, is busily
organizing the schedule
and logistics to host the
upstream visitors over
the two-day period. He
has had the active help of


local merchants, to include
Ward Seafood, Waterstreet
Seafood and the Tourist
Development Council to
make all Stakeholders
welcome.
Reflecting on the results
of the first ever meeting of
ACFSInc in Albany, Betty
Webb, city administrator
for Apalachicola and a
governing board member
said, "My expectation of
the ACF Stakeholders
effort is simple: A group of
intelligent, hard working,
dedicated individuals
working in harmony
toward a common goal for
the betterment of the ACF
systems. The members
appointed can make this
a winning organization
with a multitude of positive
outcomes."
For more information
on the ACFS and its goals
and membership, please go
to: WWW.ACFstakeholders.
org.


POSTMASTER:
Send address change to:
The Apalachicola Times
P.O. Box 820
Apalachicola, FL 32329
Phone 850-653-8868


PERIODICAL RATE


SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
IN COUNTY
$24.15 year $15.75 six months
OUT OF COUNTY
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TO ALL ADVERTISERS
In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers
do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount
received for such advertisement

thou eful o erbword is giveok w aes is er ted word
thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains.


*



A4 | The Times D1810 H


Nothing brings to life a


R
A


Local events set for 'Hands Across the Sand' protest


te:?: n s
q

THE IME
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Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St.
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Apalachicola to host ACF stakeholders meeting



















































































































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Thursday, February d, 2010


Local


The Times | AS


OUTREACH from page Al
relaying plans and procedures, the meeting will include
a food distribution earmarked for seafood workers and
their families.
The food has been secured thanks to Apalachicola
businessman Harry Arnold, who arranged to transport
a truckload of food from the Second Harvest Food
Bank. Both the Apalachicola and Carrabelle food
pantries, as well as local churches, continue to provide
food for local families. For info call Franklin's Promise
at 653-3930.
FCSWA President Taunya James said she also has
forms for possible rent and mortgage assistance from
Salvation Army. She can be reached at 387-5982, or
FCSWA Treasurer Karen Sanders at 653-6197.
The Catholic Charities outreach earlier in the
day will be overseen by Maury Hopkins, program
coordinator for emergency assistance for Catholic
Charities of Northwest Florida, together with two
assistants.
Hopkins said the outreach will run from 10 a.m.
to 2 p.m. "Well go as hard as we can," he said.
"The clients will be required to complete our standard
intake form and there will be some paperwork for the
caseworkers so that is why we will cut it off at 2 p.m.
so as to get ourselves organized. Well take care of
these issues as quickly as we can."
He asked that seafood workers, if at all possible,
to be sure to bring a photo identification and Social
Security card with them, for all persons in the family or
household. "Whatever the 've of that identifies them
as a member of their household," he said.
Hopkins said clients need to show that they're
behind in their bills, as such, past due notices are
important to verify urgency. "I'm going to focus on
rent, utilities and perhaps some limited prescription
assistance, providing I can get a pharmacy to work
with me on it," he said. "We're probably going to
focus on the ones I can help the most the quickest. We
need to deal with most serious issues first."
Ho kins asked that individuals brin a formal
P
eviction notice as well as their lease, along with a most
current utility bill. For prescriptions, bring the original
script or a refill bottle with script numbers on it.
"I can possibly do mortgages, but it is more difficult
and time consuming as we are usually working with out
of town landlords and mortgage companies," Hopkins
said. "It's not that it can't be done."


... --
DAVID MEYER | Special to the Times
Pictured at last month' school board meeting are, from left, Dr. Kay Cadwallader, pre-K coordinator;
Patty Kulick, pre-K teacher; Marcia Thomas, pre-K paraprofessional; Valerie Miller, pre-K teacher;
Vickie Segree, pre-K paraprofessional; Tammy Sasnett, pre-K teacher; Mary Williams, pre-K teacher;
Alfred Smith, pre-K paraprofessional; Abbie Shiver, pre-K paraprofessional; Lisa Murray, pre-K
paraprofessional; Sara Broker, Kindergarten teacher; Ina Margaret Meyer, Kindergarten teacher;
and Barbara Bloodworth, Kindergarten teacher. Not pictured is Patty Dempsey, Kindergarten
teacher.


screening. The FAIR screening
uses two measures, one for letter-
naming and sound awareness, and
the other for listening comprehen-
sion and vocabulary.
A second screening for literacy
skills, the Early Childhood Obser-
vation System (ECHOS), showed
that nearly 96 percent of Franklin
County's 94 kindergartners were
deemed ready for the classroom
based on this observation screen-
ing.
This was second best in the
state, second only to Sumter Coun-
ty's slightly better than 96 percent
results. Franklin County's per-
centage for readiness was about
8 percentage points better than
the state average of 88.5 percent
deemed "ready for kindergarten."
The screenings are adminis-
tered within the first 30 days of


kindergarten, and measure a stu-
dent's knowledge and understand-
ing in seven areas: language and
literacy, mathematics, science,
social studies, social and personal
skills, physical health and fitness,
and the creative arts. The screen-
ing results are used to determine
student readiness, inform class-
room instruction and provide
useful information to parents and
teachers.
"Early learning is essential for
future success and I'm thrilled
that more students are entering
school better prepared and ready
to learn," Education Commission-
er Dr. Eric J. Smith said. "Flori-
da's parents and prekindergarten
teachers have dedicated countless
hours to educating our students at
an earlier age, ensuring that our
success today is not short-lived,


but rather an enduring trend that
will pave the way for more stu-
dents to be successful throughout
their education career.
At January's meeting, Super-
intendent Nina Marks presented
to the school board the many pre-
Kindergarten and kindergarten
teachers and paraprofessionals
who had been instrumental in pre-
paring the students for classroom
success.
Introduced were Dr. Kay Cad-
wallader, pre-K coordinator, pre-
K teachers Patty Kulick, Valerie
Miller, Tammy Sasnett and Mary
Williams, Kindergarten teachers
Sara Broker, Ina Margaret Meyer,
Barbara Bloodworth, and Patty
Dempsey, and pre-K paraprofes-
sionals Marcia Thomas, Vickie
Degree, Alfred Smith, Abbie Shiver
and Lisa Murray.


been closed off and on since
early December, and on the
days the bars are open, the
extremely cold weather
has added to the difficulty
of tonging healthy, legal-
size oysters.
"Three people on a boat
are sometimes getting 10
bags of oysters," one wom-
an said. "Let them know,
we do not have oysters."
Another man spoke up
from the audience, telling
the commissioners that
he and his wife are work-
ing all day and bringing
in $100, not very good for
what should be a busy time
of year.
Three years ago we
caught 25 bags together,"
he said. "Now we can't
catch six."
Industry regulators are
well aware of the stress
on the oyster bars, but ad-
here to a strict regimen of
seasonal closures so as to
maximize the production of
a healthy product.
"They're going to pull
whatever they can from the
few areas we have open,"
said David Heil, assistant
director of the Florida De-
partment of Agriculture
and Consumer Service's
Division of Aquaculture.
"That's when the times are
really difficult for them."
Just how difficult the
times are was seen in
the presentation by Pam
Brownell, the county's
emergency management
director, to the commis-


signers.
She said the week start-
ed with a call from Taunya
James, the president of
the Franklin County Sea-
food Workers Association,
who wanted people to be
"aware of how bad it was in
our county."
A Jan. 28 conference
call, coordinated by the
seven-county Big Bend
Community Organizations
Active in Disaster group,
brought together repre-
sentatives from a diverse
group of 28 social service
organizations, from Weems
Memorial Hospital to the
Salvation Army, Franklin's
Promise, Sen. Bill Nelson's
office, Progress Energy
and the United Way.
The conference call
hammered out ideas, be-
ginning with 211 Big Bend
providing telephone coun-
seling and referrals to the
proper agencies.
Big Bend Hospice
agreed to provide rent,
mortgage and utility as-
sistance to its current hos-
pice clients, while Progress
Energy promised to work
with customers to negoti-
ate utility payments so as
not disconnect electricity.
Brownell shared Progress'
toll-free number 800-700-
8744 at last week's special
meeting.
The Salvation Army had
provided 316 food boxes to
families as of last week,
along with limited rent,
mortgage and utility assis-


tance. Weems has provided
free emergency care.
Two of the most promi-
nent organizations have
each scheduled a local
outreach. The Department
of Children and Families
was the emergency man-
agement office on Feb. 3,
while Catholic Charities
of Northwest Florida will
be St. Patrick's Catholic
Church today, Thursday,
Feb. 4 from 10 a.m. until 2
p.m. (See sidebar)

OMMISSIOHOFS
pf0miSe help, but

The commissioners
all voiced sympathy for
the plight of the workers,
and agreed unanimously
to seek to have Franklin
County declared among 60
Florida countIes affected
by the recent frigid weath-
er.
They approved such a
resolution, due last Fri-
day to Gov. Charlie Crist.
Alan Pierce, director of
administrative services,
said he provided the state
with numbers indicating
that the county had zero
reported oyster landings
in December and January,
compared to about $493,000
worth in Dec. 2008, and
about $710,000 in Jan. 2009.
If eventually approved
by Agriculture Secretary
Thomas Vilsack, Franklin
County's oystermen could


be eligible for federal emer-
gency loans and assistance
payments. The Farm Ser-
vice Agency said each ap-
plication will be considered
"on its own merit by taking
into account the extent of
losses, security available,
and repayment ability."
Pierce stressed that
seafood workers will have
to provide documentation
to show their lost income.
Voicing support for help-
ing the oystermen, Com-
missioner Cheryl Sanders
said she wanted to be sure
public and private help
also went to crabbers and
shrimpers who have been
impacted. "I don't want to
pick and choose it. It's for
everybody," she said. "I
believe in helping yourself.
But there comes a time
when you can't go no fur-
ther."
On several occasions,
shouts from the audience
indicated the oystermen
were ready, willing and able
to work for the money that
could spell the difference
between a warm hearth
and homelessness.
"We're workers. We'll do
it,"onemansaid."Wedon't
mind working for it. Not at
all.,,
After Commissioner
Pinki Jackel outlined sev-
eral options for local food
pantry assistance to the
needy, Commissioner Noah
Lockley urged the county
to pressure elected officials
to find a long-term solution


for the oyster industry, es-
pecially as production is
dropping, while there are
more than 1,400 licensed
oystermen, among the
highest total in the last 15
years.
"The problem goes fur-
ther than this," Lockley
said. "They done worked
them (the oyster bars) out.
There's nothing there. Peo-
ple have to eat, but there
not going to have anything
to cook it on," he said, as
shouts of "That's right!"
could be heard from the au-
dience.
Jackelsaidtheparticipa-
tion in the conference call
indicated that there's "a lot
of folks concerned about us,
and y'all, in Franklin Coun-
ty." But, she added, "there
are limited funds and their
hands are tied.
"I know you can't put
people caring about you
in the bank," Jackel said.
"These things take a little
time. I know you've been
hurting and I see it on your
faces "
Putnal offered a few
politically tinged remarks
as he spoke out for sea-
food workers, "If they can
spend more than $1 billion
on a railroad track, he
said, referring to recently


approved plans to build a
high-speed rail service be-
tween Tampa and Orlando,
"they could spend some
money helping the seafood
workers out."
"We're taking up hun-
dreds of millions of dollars
for Haiti," Putnal said. "I'm
glad because they need it
but we have people at home
suffering just as bad "
Brownell echoed Put-
a
nal's sentiments, This
is not going to go away,
she said. "America needs
to take care of Americans
first.
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HAITI from page Al


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HE ARING


REQUEST TO EXTENT THE HOURS FOR SALE
OF ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES


The City of Apalachicola has received a request to
extend the hours for the sale of alcoholic beveraneS
in bars, taverns, lounges and other commercial
establishments within the corporate limits of the City

of Apalachicola to 2:00 am on Friday and Saturday
.
mghtS.


The Plannino and Zonino Board will hold a Public
Hearing to consider this request on Monday, February
8th, 2010 at 6:00 pm. The Public Hearing will be held
at the City Hall/Community Center building located at
.
1 Bay Avenue, Battery ParkApalachicola, Florida.


The City of Analachicola encourages all interested

parties to attend and be heard with respect to this
matter.


I I I


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Thursday, February d, 2010


A6 | The Times


Local


COURTESY OF VINCE BISHOP


TAWNI PRICE | Special to The Times


A Haitian infant recovers from injuries.


A tent
city in
Haiti
COURTESY OF
VINCE BISHOP


Jan. 13 and returned home
on Jan. 29.
FloridaOne, established
by the federal government,
is under the United States
Department of Health and
Human Services, National
Disaster Medical System
Section. This system pro-
vides a cooperative part-
nership between public and
private entities that work
with communities to pro-
vide emergency health and
medical services in times of
a crisis.
Bishop said his team
arrived in Haiti with in-
sufficient equipment, but
ready to work, and were
frustrated to find their ef-
forts thwarted over and
over again by security and
transportation require-
ments imposed by the U.S.
government.
FloridaOne workers are
volunteers until deployed
and then become paid fed-
eral employees for the du-
ration of the mission.
Bishop and his col-
leagues were deployed in
the U.S. Embassy, which
he described as one of the
very few undamaged struc-
tures in Port-au-Prince.
He described the recently
constructed embassy as
"almost decadent in view of
what surrounded it."
He said he believes


much of the damage to
buildings was because of
poor construction prac-
tices, with many buildings
consisting of stacked block,
some without mortar.
"They haven't had an
earthquake in 200 years, so
I guess nobody expected
it," Bishop said.
He expressed disap-
pointment in the U.S. gov-
ernment's rescue mission
in Haiti.
I felt it was all a big
press show for the military.
They brought in all this stuff
and treated like it was an
armed mission," he said.
"The soldiers were
great, they helped move
rubble and in other ways,
but I felt bringing in all of
those armed people sent
the wrong message. I don't
believe we needed the kind
of security they provided,"
he said. "I was more afraid
in New Orleans after Hurri-
cane Katrina."
Bishop said that con-
trary to media reports, he
never saw any rioting or
aggressive behavior among
Haitians.
"We'd hear gunshots at
night sometimes," he said.
"We'd hear people chanting
in the streets outside the
embassy walls at 4:30 a.m.,
but it wasn't a riot. The
Haitians are very spiritual
people. The chanting is part
of that."
Bishop said his team
found it impossible to coor-
dinate both transportation
and security to reach out to
the people in need.
"There was no one or-
ganization in charge," he
said. "It was chaotic. There
were helicopters coming
and going constantly at the
airport, but we were trans-
ported in dump trucks be-
longing to a U.S. construc-
tion firm or state trucks
1:"'-"-'1:====-:":
portation at all. I saw a U.S.
h Hecotptearnlaondc rd i era
other cargo."
He said most North
American cell phones did
nlo it aanvecea spghnale bu the
was operational.
waBis roe tesaido t uepam
clinic outside the embassy
walls to provide care for
the 700 embassy employ-
ees, mostly Haitian nation-
alasoaned hei a HtesntFlori
morning and broke them
down the same day when
the effort was called off be-
cause of a lack of available
security forces.
bec'Eventuall adfrustrat d
sion, we made our own,"
Bishop said. "We began
treating people who came
to the embassy seeking vi-
sas to the U.S. If you want-
edtoleavethecountryand
you had a U.S. passport,
the U.S. State Department
Would fly you home."
Bishop said processing
people who wanted to leave
was complicated because
citizens were often accom-
panied by non-citizens who


had to obtain visas to enter
the U.S.
He said that when preg-
nant women are near de-
livery, they try to visit rela-
tives in the U.S. to deliver,
so that the child will be a
U.S. citizen. Now some of
those women are attempt-
ing to return to the U.S.
with their children, but the
mothers are not citizens
and must obtain visas.
He said other Haitians
are lying about citizenship
in an attempt to reach safe-
ty. "There were thousands
of people in line waiting to
get visas trying to leave the
country," he said. "They
waited in line for up to four
days and some of them
spent two more days in the
building."
Bishop said the long
wait was because embassy
employees, many of whom
had lost their homes, were
not available to process
forms. Eventually, the em-
bassy set up tents on em-
bassy grounds for employ-
eesandthevisaprocessing
operation was moved to the
airport.
Bishop might return to
Haiti for a second deploy-
ment next week.
"I will go if they ask me.
I'm worn out and I've got
some kind of respiratory is-
sue. There was stuff burn-
ing constantly, debris and
bodies. We were constantly
inhaling smoke. We were
issued a months supply
of antibiotics as a prophy-
lactic against malaria," he
said.
Bishop said the Haitian
people are very strong and
they are survivors.
"You have to remember
that half the population is
under 18. There are almost
no old people and no fat
people."
Bishop said, if you want

1::'t-t:":-J"-il:
He advises donating to one
fsteh nlsns standing faith
Organizations one might
wish to investigate include
the Baptist Haiti Mission
uln sin 1 4 ,uHa t 0
Children's Medical Mission
e indehdd1s9 N th
sionfoundedl977andHaiti
Christian Mission founded
1983.
Bishop also recom-
n nder th out atBngd orsDoac-
international team of medi-
cal professionals who vol-
unteer to work in disaster
areas around the globe. He
said nobody should attempt
to visit the disaster on their

"If you don't bring your
own fuel, food and water,
you will become an addi-
tional burden," he said.
He also said that dona-
tions of food, clothing and
toiletries are not useful at
this time because they can-
not be distributed. He said
these items are already
available in street markets.
"Food is available," he
said, "but people have no
money to buy it."


g













Thursday, February 4, 2010 w w w. ap ala cht ti me s. com Pag~e 7


SPRING SPORTS


:g.,gh ak aa ie 54 aStea ddse school
pre-season tourney @ Arnold High s Friday, Feb. 5, @ Port St Joe at 4
School p.m.
Wednesday, Feb. 10, at home vs.
h Seahawks middle school
Bay Hig at 7 p.m. baseball
Seahawks varsity baseball Friday, Feb. 5, @ Port St. Joe at 4
Thursday, Feb. 1 1, pre-season p.m.


STATE BAN K *1897
A Division of Coastal Comrmunity Bank
Apalachicola Carrabelle Eastpoint St. George Island
22 Avenue E 612 N Avenue A 5 Jefferson Street 1200 Franklin Blvd
653-8805 697-4500 670-8501 927-2561


ma atR 0JF TRi~E C/e


111


I


Traditional
IVIanipulation
g g
Digital X-rayS
" '
** p apfa
: e I so : e I e Ag e gun


By David Ad erstein
Times City Editor
Despite the loss of its star post
player, the Seahawks varsity boys
basketball team rallied last week to win
three of four games, defeating West
Gadsden, Florida High and Blountstown
before losing at home to district rival
Jefferson County.
School officials say sophomore Carlos
Morris has been declared academically
ineligible for the second semester.
"We've had a parent meeting with the
entire varsity team about team issues
and team concerns, and we've dealt
with it internally," coach Fred Drake
said. "It was a positive meeting with the
administration.
"Even though there's been a change,
we're still headed on course. That
doesn't stop our show," the coach said.
"We still have team goals and team
expectations, and different people just
have to step up. Now roles have shifted,
and were still playing good ball."
The regular season closes today
athomeagainstFloridaHighwhen
the seniors and their parents willbe
recognized as part of Senior Night. The
ceremony will take place at the break
between the junior varsity contest and
the varsity tip-off, which should be
sometime around 7 p.m. Five Seahawk
seniors, Arron Prince, Austin O'Neal,
Derrick Rhodes, Tydron Wynn and Zach
Jones, will be honored.
The Seahawks began the week on
Jan. 26 at home vs. district rival West
Gadsden and came away with a 58-50


-
DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times
Coach Fred Drake, kneeling, and JVcoach Carlos Hill, talk to Seahawks
during a break in Friday's game against Jefferson County.


win. O'Neal's 25 points and Prince's
22 paced the team, as the Seahawks
outscored West Gadsden 25-13 in the
last quarter to secure the win.
Junior Adam Joseph led the team
with 13 rebounds, with junior Dalin
Modican pulling down a dozen.
The Seahawks will open the post-
season Feb. 12 at Liberty County, where
they are expected to face West Gadsden


in their district openers.
"We know we have to win that game
to make the state playoffs, and that will
be three years in a row," Drake said.
"We got to win to get in. That's one
that we're definitely preparing for and
thinking about."
The coach said he plans to bring up
See SEAHAWKS A8


Special to The Times
They may never have navigat-
ed Apalachicola Bay, but three
of the world's most recognizable
commercial fishing personalities
are promoting Apalachicola's
Working Waterfront and Flori-
da's commercial fishing industry
as part of a new statewide cam-
paign to increase awareness of
Florida's fishing heritage.
Captains Sig Hansen and
Johnathan and Andy Hillstrand
- well known to viewers of the
Discovery Channel's wildly pop-


ular "Deadliest Catch" series have been designated as Working Throughout the county, there
about Alaskan crab fishing in the Waterfront Communities since is a heightened sense of protec-
Bering Sea began appearing the program's inception in 1997. tiveness for the area's commer-
in TV spots and other media this Apalachicola is the state's cial fisherman. Directed by the
month promoting Florida's fish- first Working Waterfront Com- Franklin County Board of Com-
ing industry. unity to be funded out of a new missioners, the Franklin County
Apalachicola is one of eight program created to preserve Tourist Development Council
Working Waterfront communities those working waterfronts. The (FCTDC) is working with local
to be highlighted in the statewide city will use an $800,000 grant business and seafood leaders to
promotion. The other Working from the Department of Commu- formulate a countrywide market-
Waterfront communities to be nity Affairs (DCA) Stan Mayfield ing campaign designed to pro-
highlighted include Sebastian, Working Waterfront Program to mote Franklin County seafood
Destiny, Miami, Keys, Cortez, Tar- purchase waterfront land for an as "caught wild and kept fresh."
pon Springs and Jacksonville. educational commercial seafood The FCTDC has already pro-
There are a total of 23 commu- boat building and restoration fa- duced a documentary-style video
cities, including Carrabelle, that cility in the community. about the area's seafood industry


and heritage. It can be viewed at
www.anaturalescape.com.
The TDC's involvement in the
seafood campaign was borne out
of an emergency situation that
occurred late last year when fed-
eral officials from the Food and
Drug Administration (FDA) were
threatening to shut down Apala-
chicola Bay's oyster industry
for much of the year over water
bacteria concerns. Since then,
the FDA has backed off threats
against the industry. However,
See CATCH A8


)i


CA RRA BE L LE APA LA CH ICO LA


A


Dixie Youth

League

S1Ell-UDS 062111
O K O
Special to The Times
Even with the chilly weather, it's time
to think of spring and the joys of Ameri-
ca's pastime.
Applications are being taken for the
2010 Franklin County Dixie Youth League
season, encompassing everything from
T-ball for the littlest ones to baseball and
softball for the older boys and girls.
To be eligible for the 2010 season,
which begins with a Day of Baseball slat-
ed for Saturday, March 27, at Eastpoint's
Vrooman Park, a child must be age 5 be-
fore May 1, 2010.
Participation fees are $50 for the first
child and $45 for each child after that.
Late registration fee, after March 1, will
be $60.
Sign-ups are being held in Apalachic-
ola at the D.W. Wilson Sports Complex, in
Eastpoint at Vrooman Park and in Car-
rabelle at the Will Kendrick Sports Com-
plex.
The sign-ups will be held today from
6:30-7:30 p.m.; Saturday, Feb. 6, from 10
a.m. to noon; Tuesday, Feb. 9, from 6:30-
7:30 p.m.; Thursday, Feb. 11, from 6:30-7:30
p.m.; and Saturday, Feb. 13, from 10:30
a.m. to noon.
Parents are asked to bring a birth cer-
tificate of their child or children to the
sign-ups.
The league is also seeking energetic
adults to serve as coaches or volunteers
for the upcoming season.
For more information, call Bob or Toni
Eddy at 653-8940.


Sea hawk hoopsters wmn 3 of 4


'Deadliest Catch' captains promote fishing industry


Austin O'Neal
Senior Austin O'Neal has
been the leading scorer
for the boys basketball
team, hitting 25 points
against West Gadsden,
25 against Florida Hi0h,
21 against Jefferson
County and 23 against
Blountstown.


Balin Medican
Junior Dalin Modican
has become a consistent
force under the basket,
consistently performing
among the team's top
rebounders. He also has


be0un scoring in double
digits, nailing 13 against
Florida Hi0h and a
dozen against Jefferson
County.


-liHgarolli's Tree Servil
a If we cut your tree, we grind
your stump for FREE!
Richard Zingarelli


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TICKETS:


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at the door


SHOW ONLY
7:30 9:30
Beer and Wine

$2.00 Tickets
Donation at door


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$ ENTE RT AINMENT $


Thursday, February d, 2010


Sports


five junior varsity players,
D'Andrea Robinson,
Leonard Green, Chance
Buffkin, A.J. Allen and
Zach Peters, for the post-
season roster of 15 players.
The Seahawks traveled
to Florida High on Jan,
28 and came away with
a 52-46 win, outscoring
their opponents 15-10 in
the fourth quarter to pull
away. O'Neal led the team
with 25 points and eight
rebounds, while Modican
kicked in 13 points and
eight rebounds and Prince
added 10 points.
On Friday night at
home, the Seahawks
lost their one game of
last week, falling 74-67 to
Jefferson County. O'Neal


and Prince both scored
21 points, but Jefferson
County, who led 19-14 after
the first quarter, kept the
game out of reach.
The Seahawks pulled
within two, 55-53 at the
start of the final stanza,
but that's as close as they
would get.
"Jefferson County had
their whole starting lineup
coming back," Drake said.
"They have one of the best
guards in the Big Bend,
Chris Mays. I knew it was
going to be a tough game."
The Seahawks won
Tuesday night at home,
downing Blountstown
59-47, led by O'Neal's 23
points. Their record is now
14-8.


Seahawk Tre'kale Turrell, right, one of the shortest
members of the team, is towered over by a Jefferson
County player as they await a free throw in Friday
night's game. At left is Seahawk Dalin Modican.
DAVIDADLERSTEIN|TheTimes


SOCCER GIRLS HONORED



















ANDREAREGISTER|SpecialtotheTimes
Seahawks Booster President Monica Moron
hangs a medallion around the neck of
Apalachicola Bay Charter School eighth-grader
Gracyn Kirvin during the Jan. 21 fall sports
banquet in the high school cafetorium. Kirvin
was named by coach Kelli Maggio as the Best
AI| Around on the team, while Most Improved
honorswenttosophomoreEmmyNorrisBest
Defensive Player to sophomore Sami Coulter
and Best Offensive Player to sophomore Megan
Newell. Also honored were teammates Kayla
Carter, Deborah Dempsey, Jessica Dempsey,
Laura Gallegos, Emily Hatfield, Macy Hunt,
Carla Lewis, Haley Lemieux, Megan McClain'
Stephanie Marxsen, Haley Mathes, Adrian
Reeder, Jessica Shields, Whitney Va use, Brianna
Whittmgton and Maggie Langston.


STATS
Jan. 28 @ Florida High
Franklin (o. 11 13 13 15 52
FloridaHigh 15 9 12 10 46
SEAHAWKS: Prince 5/1 2s, 0/5 Ss, 10 pls.; Modican
5/5 2s, 3/4 FT,13 pts.; James Winfield 0/1 2s; Tydron
nn30/ll03sdo ph21/2 2sTr2 p Ne 822s,
2 pts pts.; s,
Totals:18/34 2s, 1/9 Ss, 13/19 (68%) FTs
Rebounds: O'Neal, Modican 8; Turrell 5; Prince, Joseph
3; Wy Rhode
Steals: Prince s4; Turrell 3; Joseph, Modican, Winfield
2; O'Neal
Assists:0'Neal, Prince 4; Turrell 3; Modican 2; Winfield,
Joseph


Jan. 26 vs. West Gadsden
West Gadsden 10 9 18 13 50
Franklin(o. 18 9 6 25 58
SEAHAWKS: Arron Prince 6/16 2s, 1/4 Ss, 1/14 FTs,
22 pts.; Dalin Modican 0/2 2s, 2/2 FT, 2 pts.; Michael
Turner 1/2 2s, Adam Joseph 4/12s, 8 pts.; Austin
O'Neal 8/19 2s, 0/1 Ss, 8/13 FTs, 25 pts.; Zach Jones
0/1 2s
Totals:19/47 2s, 1/5 Ss, 11/20 .'.."... FTs .
Rebounds: Joseph I3; Modican 12; O'Neal 9; Pnnce,
Winfield 8; Turner 5; Tre'kale Turrell 4; Tydron Wynn
Steals: Modican, Prince 3; Turrell, O'Neal 2; Joseph,
Winfield
Assists: Turrell, O'Neal 3; Modican 2; Winfield

CATCH from page Al


Jan. 29 vs. Jefferson Co.
Jefferson (o. 19 20 16 19 74
Franklin(o. 14 1916 18 67
SEAHAWKS: Prince 6/11 2s, 3/11 Ss, 0/3 FTs, 21
pts; Modican 4/10 2s, 4/6 FT, 12 pts.; Winfield 4/6 2s,
0/1 FTs, 8 pls.; Joseph 1/1 2s, 0/2 FTs, 2 pts; O'Neal
1/19 2s, 0/1 Ss, 1/7 FTs, 21 pts.; Turrell, 1/2 2s,
1/2 FTs, 3 pls.; Jones 0/1 2s
Totals: 23/50 2s, 3/12 Ss,12/30 .ill"... FTs
Rebounds: O'Neal 7; Modican 6; Prince, Winfield 4
Joseph, Turner, Jones 3 '
Steals: Prince, O'Neal 4; Joseph, Modican, Winfield
Assists: Prince 4; O'Neal, Jones 2; Joseph, Modican,
Turner, Turrell, Wynn


the state, as well as local seafood
and tourism leaders, are continu-
ing regulatory and promotional
efforts to improve seafood han-
dling safety and public awareness
of the importance of the commer-
cial seafood industry to the state.
Florida Agriculture Com-
missioner Charles H. Bronson,
whose department promotes the
state's agriculture and seafood in-
dustries and helps administer the
state's Working Waterfronts Pro-
gram, said he hopes that as the


public learns more about Florida
fishermen and the struggles they
face to supply consumers with
quality products, the more they
will ask for domestically harvest-
ed seafood when shopping or din-
ing out.
"In recent years, hurricanes
have damaged fishing fleets,
equipment and processing infra-
structure, cheap seafood imports
have flooded U.S. markets, and
soaring fuel prices have drasti-
cally increased our fishermen's


cost of doing business," Bronson
said. "But, even when faced with
this 'perfect storm' of adversity,
our state's fishermen persevere.
Consumers can help by always
asking for Florida-harvested sea-
food products."
In addition to promotions fea-
turing the three fishing celebri-
ties, the Department of Agricul-
ture and Consumer Services is
producing a series of documen-
taries about Apalachicola and
several of Florida's other work-


ing waterfronts. The videos will
detail the historical development
of each area's commercial fishing
industry, promote tourism and
spotlight the fishermen who bring
home Florida's "Tastiest Catch."
The first video, titled "Florida's
Fishing 'Itaditions: Sebastian,"
wasreleasedlatelastyear.Riture
videos will feature Apalachicola/
Destiny, Miami/Keys, Cortez, Tar-
pon Springs and Jacksonville.
According to Department of
Agriculture figures, Florida's


commercial fishermen annu-
ally harvest more than 83 million
pounds of quality seafood and
fishery products with a dockside
value of more than $168 million.
Florida leads the U.S. in the num-
her of seafood processing busi-
nesses, with 500. Another 800
businesses buy and sell seafood
as dockside fish buyers, whole-
sale brokers, importers or export-
ers. Retail and restaurant sales of
Florida products total $24 billion
annually.


A8 | The Times


SEAHAWKS from page Al


Dixie Youth is hosting a Baseball

Umpire certification clinic on
February 20, 2010 in Marianna

Florida. The clinic will be at the

Mananna High School. Registration

ee and transportation provided by te

Frankhn County Parks & Recreation

Department. To register for the clinic
or for further information contact

Franklin County Parks & Recreation

Department at 850-653-8277.


Deadline to Register is

February 12, 2010 by Noon


All proceeds
benefit HFH
and Franklin's
Promise Coalition

Volunteers toll:
(850)653-3113














Thursday, February 4, 2010 w w w. apalach times com Page 1
' * * * regregreersers es es es r 9 * 9 e 1 e 1 e 1 * 1 * 1 * * '
* *


FLORIDA PHOTOGRAPHIC COLLECTION | Special to The Times
Above, this photo, taken between Feb. 11 and 15, 1915, shows the G.M. Counts
Boat in the Apalachicola Mardi Gras parade. Middle, Sara Jane Nedley, Elizabeth
Marshall Porter and Myrtl Theobald are in this car, decorated for the Mardi Gras
Carnival in Apalachicola in 1915. At top, taken onstage during one of the
early years of Habitat for Humanity's revival seven years ago of the Apalachicola
Mardi Gras, this photo shows emcee David Butler, at left, along with the late Rex
Partington, founder of the "modern" Dixie Theatre, and daughter Dixie Partington,
at right. Topmost, taken between March 2 and 4, 1916, this photo of the Mardi
Gras carnival in Apalachicola shows the "Minute Men" with flags leaving boat at
dock and being greeted by children's band and large crowd.


et set set set set ses >** >** >** >** >**;** **


B


*
*
*
*
*
*
*
* *

** (

* MARIA FERRANTE
*



: Opera


= singer to


Special to The Times
*
* Opera singer Maria Fer-
rante, performing a pro-
* gram entitled "Sea Tides
* and Time" will be the spe-
cial guest of the Ilse New-
ell for the Performing Arts
concert on Sunday, Feb. 7,
at 4 p.m. at Trinity Episco-
pal Church.
Trained in America,
Germany and Italy, Ferran-
5.h as do o
throughout the world and
on five recordings.
"Maria Ferrante broke
a my heart Sunday night.
4 Or, through her, Puccini's
'Madama Butterfly' did,"
e wrote Richard Dyer of the
Boston Globe in January
a 2003. Her "combination of
* delicacy and intensity .
brought tears to my eyes
* ... In her honesty, imagina-
* tion and investment, she
* was infinitely superior to
* the last 'Butterfly' I saw at
e the Met."
' The petite soprano's
* operatic roles range from
* the great stage heroines,
* such as Violetta in Verdi's
* "La Traviata," Pamina in
* Mozart's "Magic Flute"
and Desdemona in Ver-
di's "Otello," to serving
a girls, such as Despina in
a Mozart's "Cosi Fan Tutte"
a and Barbarina in Mozart's
"Marriage of Figaro."
e Equally at home on the
* concert stage, Maria has
' appeared in concert with
* such world renowned art-
* ists as Lincoln Mayorga
and Gilbert Kalish. The
* world's two most eminent
* solo clarinetists, Julian
Milkis (a Sony recording
e artist) and Richard Stolz-
* man (who has recorded on
all the major labels) have
* performed with her. Inter-
* nationally touring solo vio-
linists Ayako Yoshida and
* Colin Jacobsen; cellist Dor-
* othy Larson (a Deutsche
Gramaphon recording
artist); and pianists Abba
Bogin, Alys Terrien-Queen
e and John McGinn have ac-
a companies Ferrante.
Ferrante's most recent-
* ly released CD, "Sea Tides
* and Time," received a rave
review from the Boston
* Herald, "[Ferrante] known
* for her lilting soprano voice
and probing mind ... brings
* a supple and colorful ap-
* preach to a broad variety of
repertoire."
* This concert perfor-
* mance by this accom-
, polished artist promises
a to be the highlight of Ilse
Newell's 22nd season,
* "hhicAh a dA ra
* topical Society. Suggested
a donation is $3.
e For more information,
, call370-6201.


.
Special to The Times
he seventh annual Mardi
Gras celebration this Satur-
day night at the Dixie The-
atre is sure to provide some
much-needed merriment for these
troubling times.
It also will provide some much-
needed financial support for the cause
of bringing affordable housing oppor-
tunities to county residents.
Once again, this event is the only
a yearly fundraiser by the local Habi-
a tat for Humanity affiliate. This year,
a for the first time, Franklin's Prom-
e ise Coalition has joined with Habi-
a tat to put on this event and better
* serve those in need.
" The $20 admission will cover
* dinner and live band entertain-
* ment, with a $2 donation for beer,
wine and other beverages.
The evening begins at 6:30
p.m. Dinner will be prepared and -
served by local restaurant volun-
teers who will present a little "taste of
Franklin County" for the event. A Ta-
mara's Cajun buffet, steamed shrimp
from Buddy Ward, fish dip from The
Grill and Ella's cupcakes for dessert
and for the first time, there will be
a clam bar from Van Lewis and local
gumbo from Jeff IlardI.
a David Butler, of Gulf State Com-
a unity Bank, again will emcee and
begin the silent auction during din-
a ner. Many local individuals and busi-
* nesses have contributed valuable
items, and the highest bid takes them
* home.
* This year's auction items so far
include donations from The Old Car-
* rabelle Hotel; hand-painted wine
glasses from Kathy Kouck; Dixie
Theatre tickets; jewelry from the
Gem Collection; artwork from Joyce
Estes, Joan Matey and Marilyn
Bean, The Consulate, John Spohrer
the Ilardi family; Century 21 Collins
Realty and Resort Vacation Proper-
ties; and more to arrive during the
* week.
Leading off the evening's enter-
, tainment at 7:30 p.m. will be Randy
a Mims and Friends, followed by blues
guitarist Slim Fatz, vocalist Candida
a Robertson and the ever-popular
e Tate's Hell Blues Band, all orches-
trated again by the amazing Wayne
* Thomas on the sound and light
* board.

* by D IssA hretyoej ats d c bt-ed
* Gras, as "Jazzy to Snazzy".
For information or to volunteer for
this event, Habitat for Humanity or
Franklin's Promise, call 653-3113.


**L **< **< **L **<**L s


LIFE


TI~ES


Dixie Theatre readies for
















































































PETOFTHE
WE E K


VOLUNTEERS are desperately needed to socialize Charlie and all of the
other dogs and cats. We are always lool .... I I I I. .ll.... II ..... ... E our
animals into their home to be fostered for various needs. Any time you can spare
1 .,111 ., 1, a tpT 8e4 7 for more details or visit the Franklin County
Humane Society at 244 State Route 65 in Eastpoint. You may log onto the
website at www.forgottenpets.org to see more of our adoptable pets.
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$ 0 0 15 carter y
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FLORIDA ,
IXIE Humanitieg
:, . CO UN CIL
THEATRE
afor
APALACHICOlA, FIA. Horns & m

C eRBI EH oln"'
Thursday 2/4 7:30 PM FHC program FREE to the public
850-653-3200 ~ www.DixieTheatre.com


Affiliated with Tallahassee Memorial HealthCare


Thursday, February d, 2010


B2 | The Times


Society


Tristan Reid Howard celebrated this third birthday
on Sunday, Jan. 17, 2010.
Tristan is the son of Reid Howard of Eastpoint, and
Kady Howard of Lynn Haven.
His paternal grandparents are Chris and Teresa
Howard of Eastpoint.
His maternal grandparents are Tony and Lucy Tin-
dell of Lynn Haven.
Tristan's paternal great-grandparents are Buford
and Mary Jo Jones of Eastpoint, and the late W.T. and
Irene Moses.
His maternal great-grandparents are Harry Papa-
dopolous and Eva Papadopolous of Carrabelle; Gean-
nie Tindell of Eastpoint, and the late "Curley" Tindell.
Tristan, we love you very MUCH!


Layla Burke celebrated her first birthday on Mon-
day, Feb. 1, 2010.
Burke, daughter of Jeremy Burke, of Apalachicola,
and Tina Burke of Thomasville, Ga., joined in the cel-
ebration with her older sister, Loni.
Maternal grandparents are John and Sonya Bellew
of Apalachicola.
Paternal grandparents are David and Beverly
Burke, of Apalachicola. Paternal great-grandparents
are Belvin and Johnnie Bryant of Apalachicola.



Khrissa Litton born


Thursday, Feb. 4
One of Apalachicola's own is another year old ...
She's turning 85 and even more divine!
So on this special day, with all the love we've got
We're excited to say ... HAPPY BIRTHDAY, DOT!

Happy 85th Birthday to Dorothy Rolstad!
We Love You! E.O.T.
~ Your Family


p
*
'..


Christopher and Miranda Litton are very proud to an-
nounce the birth of their daughter, Khrissa Lynn Litton.
She was born Thursday, Dec. 3, 2009 and weighed
8 pounds, 2 ounces and was 20 inches long.
Paternal grandparents are Danny and Ruby Litton, of
Carrabelle. Paternal great-grandparents are Mary Ford-
ham of Carrabelle, and the late Roy Fordham and Alice
Card of Mississippi.
Maternal grandparents are Bert and Molly Millender,
of Eastpoint, and Cleveland Adams of Cottonwood, Ala.
Maternal great-grandparents are Kinie Reeder of East-
point, and the late Oliver Reeder; and Betty Adams of
Cottonwood, Ala. and the late Herbert Adams.


Charlie


.
old la /hha d mi 2e ior a3s?"
affectionate, playful dog that has
been at the Adoption Center since
tSheap embegoHeorloveaslknoth g cm
sticks. When play time is over he
wants to stay in close contact by
leaning against your legs to have
his ears scratched. He would make
a wonderful companion for anyone
looking for a devoted, adoring pet.
Please consider adopting this sweet
boy. He would add so much happiness
to your home.


90010YS' DISCOVery
*
S habeha
PHILADELPHIA A team of
doctors has found that a new for-
mulation ofexotic sounding ingre-
dients gives new hope to diabetic
patients.
The formula, called Cinnatrolm
promotes healthy blood sugar ley-
els by effectively metabolizing
glucose into energy. In a research
study, all patients taking just one

lb u ad In t npsri d
study found that an ingredient in
Cinnatrol made insulin 20 times
more capable of converting blood
sugar to energy.
While individual results vary,
one patient in the first study low-
eredhisbloodsugarfrom220-245
to the 100-130 range in only 28
days, despite being instructed not
to change his dietary habits or
physical activity. Some patients,
under their doctors care, have been
able to reduce or eliminate their
need for diabetic drugs. Scientists
say that Cinnatrol helps diabetic
drugs to work more efficiently.
CinnRITO1 is available without a

REE:E-

,", EED U6 25


:===<


Births and BIRTHDAYS


Tristan Howard


Layla Burke


Kelson

Smith

turns 7


Kelson Tyler Smith
celebrated her seventh
birthday on Friday,
Jan. 8, 2010.
Happy birthday, Kel-
son. We love you very
much.
Love,
Mom, Hunter, Kylee
and Kaydence


Wood baby shower postponed
A baby shower for Cheree Walden Wood,
planned for Saturday, Feb. 6, has been postponed
temporarily.
The new date will be given in a future an-
nouncement.
For more information, call 697-2899.


~""%"?
~~m:,


MEEMOIL









Obituaries


News BRIEFS
Free clothes giveaway Saturday at Mount Zion
There will be a free clothes giveaway at Mount Zion
Church on U.S. 98 in Apalachicola on Saturday, Feb. 6 at 10
a.m. Both adult and children's' clothes will be distributed.
Free lunch will also be served.
For more information please call 370-5033.

ISland Methodist host 'Souper Bowl Sunday'
The St. George Island United Methodist Church, 2011
East Gulf Beach Drive, will have a soup sale this Sunday,
Feb.7 from 10 a.m. to noon. Come sample for purchase a
variety of homemade soups. A quart is $6 and a pint is $3.
For more information, call Mary Lou Short at 927-2569.

Carrabelle High School reunion set for Feb. 13
The Carrabelle High School Reunion, for students from
years 1965-1980, is being planned for Saturday, Feb.13 at 6
p.m. The reunion will be held at the Carrabelle Municipal
Complex Building, site of the former Carrabelle High
School. Please bring finger foods and memorabilia. There
will be a $5 beverage fee at the door.If you would like to
help please contact Pam Young McKenzie at 210-2242.

Carrabelle Methodist church
to host Valentine dinner
The Carrabelle United Methodist Church will host
a Valentine Dinner on Saturday, Feb.13 at 6 p.m., with
proceeds going to the Carrabelle Food Pantry.
The church, chef Georgia Russell and numerous sous-
chefs will be serving gourmet delights with an "Italian"
flair. Soup, salad, entree' and desert will be served. Tickets
are $10 per person or $15 per couple. Please contact
Russell at 697-9876, 697-2141, or cell 469-358-6703 or the
church office and speak with Sandra at 697-3672.
All tickets must be paid for on or before Feb. 10.

(0mp GOrdon Johnston
Starts sponsor 'S Soldier'
Active duty soldiers will be returning for this year's
annual Camp Gordon Johnston Days held the second
weekend of every March. During their stay, the museum
feeds and lodges these soldiers. For a donation of $15, you
have the opportunity to join us in showing our appreciation
for their dedication and service by providing a breakfast
and dinner for one soldier. Please make your donation
to CGJ Days 2010 "Sponsor a soldier" and drop it by the
museum or mail it: CGJA, PO. Box 1334, Carrabelle, FL
32322.



T LM EtAIC
LARRTIL us L VW J

How was the soup and
sandwich? I hear things went
well. We appreciate your
continued support.
You did place your order for
Valentine's Day dinner at Chillas
Hall, didn't you? Doors open at 2
p.m. on Sunday, Feb. 14. Serving
at 2:30 p.m. Hope to see you LANARK NhEWS
there. No sales at the door. Jim We
Be kind to one another, and
check in on the sick and housebound Got
Jesus?
Until next time, God Bless America, our
troops, the poor, homeless, and hungry.


CARD OF THANKS
Perhaps you sent a lovely card,
or sat quietly in a chair.
Perhaps you sent a floral piece;
if so, we saw it there.
Perhaps you spoke the kindest words,
as any friend could say;
Perhaps you were not there at all,
just thought of us that day.
Whatever you did to console our hearts,
We thank you so much, whatever the part.
The family of Phyllis Willis 'lblliver


The United Methodist Churches

SOf Frankhin County Welcome Youl

First United Methodist Church of Apalachicola
Worship Service 11:00 a.m. every Sunday
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
75 5" St. Apalachicola 653-9530 fumcapalach@gtcom~net
Pastor: Rev. Them Patriotis
Carrabelle United Methodist Church
Worship Services 10:45 a.m. Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
"Celebrate Recovery" Mondays 7-9 p.m.
Healing service first Tuesday each month-7 p.m.
102 NE Ave. B Ca abelle 697-3672

Eastpoint United Methodist Church
Worship Service 10:00 a.m. every Sunday
Prayer 9:15 a.m. Waffles & Wisdom 11:15 a.m.
Healing Service every first Fridays of the Month at 6:30 p.m.
317 Patton Dr. (corner of David St.) -670-8825
Pastor: Rev. Beth White
St. George Island United Methodist Church
9:00 a.m. Worship Service
10:00 a.m. Fellowship Hour
201 E. Gulf Beach Dr. 927- 4635 www.sgiumc.org
Pastor: Rev. Them Patriotis


'
St. Patrick Catholic Church
Ave C & Sixth Street in Apalachicola, FL 32329 or
The Islander (Across from the Blue Parrot)
on St. George Island, FL 32328
(850) 653-9453 Email: stpatcath@fairpoint.net
PASTOR: FATHER ROGER LATOSYNSKI
www.stpatricksmass.com
APALACHICOLA MASS SCHEDULE
SATURDAY................. .................5 PM
SUNDAY ................ ................ 10 AM
ST. GEORGE ISLAND MASS SCHEDULE
SUNDAY ................ .................8:30 AM


First Pentecostal Holiness Church
379 Brownsville Road Apalachicola


Sunday School 9:45 am
Sunday Morning Worship 10:45 am
Sunday Evening Service 6:00 pm
Monday, Youth Group 6:30 pm
Wednesday, Royal Rangers, G.A.P. 7:00 pm
Wednesday Worship & Word 7:30 pm
Nursery Provided during regular church services


IV


Thursday, February d, 2010


The Times | B3


Chester Nathaniel Lane, son of
the late Herbert and Jessie Lane,
was born Oct. 25, 1918 in Apalachic-
ola. He is the last of nine children
born to this union.
He received an early education
at Dunbar High School in Apala-
chicola. During his teenage years,
he joined Mt. Zion Baptist Church.
In 1938, he moved with his par-
ents to Pensacola to work for the
Florida Bureau of Fisheries on the
Island in Pensacola Bay. He made
Pensacola his permanent home.
He was united in holy matrimo-
ny to Helen Daniel, who preceded
him in death. Into this union, one
niece was loved, accepted and ad-
opted at the age of 4 as their own
daughter, named Delores "Lolo"
Bunyon.
In 1942, Lane completed his first
electronics course from National
Radio Institute.
In 1952, he was the first Afri-
can-American to be hired at the
Pensacola Naval Air Station as an
electronics equipment repairman,
He worked at the base in electron-
ics repair until his retirement in


1974. He earned several honors; his
most prized was the "Zero Defects
Production Award" for September
'65 to September '66.
In addition to his business activ-
ity in radio, television and sound
equipment, Lane was also active in
the real estate arena. On Dec. 12,
1997, the city of Pensacola honored
him as the "Landlord of the Year."
This honor was in competition with
more than 700 other landlords of
multiple units, and was especially
prized because he was nominated
by his tenants for this prestigious
award.
Brother Lane was an active and
faithful member of Mt. Zion Baptist
Church and the Benevolentians
Social Club. He enjoyed life, shar-
ing and caring for others and living
to live again. He will always be re-
membered in his home church and
his community, for his friendliness,
generosity, love of family and busi-
ness acumen.
On Saturday, Jan. 30, 2010 he
was called from labor to reward.
Leaving to cherish his loving
memory and missing his depar-


ture are a dedicated and devoted
daughter, Delores (Isolo) Robinson
(Wilford) of Apalachicola; children
of his three deceased sisters, four
nieces, and seven nephews; loyal
and dedicated nieces, Evelyn Wil-
liams, Pearl M. Perry, Marilyn
Jones and Jessie Mae Jones, all of
Apalachicola; nephews, Rev. James
Bunyon, Apalachicola, Francis Bu-
nyon (Mary) of Sanford, N.C., Jerry
Bunyon (Doris) of Capitol Heights,
Md., James C. Hawkins (Gloris)
of West Hyannis Port, Mass., Lt.
Col. (Ret.) Cephus S. Rhodes (Re-
becca) of El Paso, Texas, Chester
J. Rhodes (Myrtle) of Panama City;
and Herbert D. Rhodes (Mary) of
Panama City.
Uncle Bud is also mourned by
another echelon with legions of
great-nieces, great-nephews, in-
laws and friends.
kneral services will be held
today, Thursday, Feb. 4 at noon at
Mt. Zion Baptist Church, 528 West
Jackson Street, Pensacola, FL.
Burial will be at Holy Cross
Cemetery with Benboe kneral
Home directing.


Susie Mae Al-
len Cummings
was born on
March 15, 1920, to
the late Ceasar Al-
len and was raised
by her grandmoth-
er Della Dell in
Bainbridge, Ga.
In 1939, she {UN
united with the
late Moses Cum-
mings Sr. in marriage, and
into that union eight chil-
dren were born.
Cummings passed away
Saturday, Jan.24,2010.
She is preceded in death
by four of her children,
George Cummings, Hay-
ward Cummings, Leon
Cummings, and Lorine
McLemore.
She is survived by four


children, Moses
Cummings Jr.,
Mr. Robert Cum-
mings, Mary
James, and Bea-
trice Washington
(Donald); 27
grandchildren, 62
great-grandchil-
IINGS dren, 12 great-
great grandchil-
dren, and a host
of nieces and nephews and
sorrowing friends. She had
three dear friends, Margie
Kelly, Essie Mae Woodyard
and Annie Mae Mitchell.
Rineral services were
held Saturday, Jan. 30, at St.
Paul A.M.E. Church with
burial in Snowhill Cemetery.
All arrangements were
under the direction of Kelley
Rineral Home.


Mary Reeves,
77, passed away
peacefully at
Tallahassee Me-
morial Hospital
early Friday
morning, Jan. 22,
2010.
She was
born in 1932 RE
and raised in
Apalachicola,
where she graduated high
school and later attended
Florida State University.
She then moved to Port St.
Joe where she raised her
family and has been a long
time resident.
Reeves was employed
at Boyles Dept. Store as a
sales clerk for many years
and then later worked at
the Senior Citizens Cen-
ter.
She was survived by
her four children, Geary
Reeves (Diane), Pam
DeFelice (David), Les
Reeves (Shelly) and Steve
Reeves (Debbie); five
grandchildren, Christo-
pher DeFelice, England
Reeves, Amber Reeves,
Jade Reeves and Leslie
DeFelice; several other
close relatives Marie
Wentworth, Alden and
Lisa Wentworth, Jean and
Edward Nabors, Dorothy


Rolstad and fam-
ily, Brandi and
Brittany Smith,
and extended
Lichardello fam-
ily; and special
friends, Evelyn
Babb, Betty Jean
Godwin, Jerry
and Lid Stokoe,
Debbie and Karl


EVS


Bowman,
She was devout Catho-
lic by faith and held strong
to her beliefs and of her
love for the Lord where
she attended church at St.
Patrick Catholic Church.
She loved being surround-
ed by all kinds of different
flowers and spent many
hours gardening and
keeping them so pretty.
Playing bingo and
shopping on QVC were
her other pastime favor-
ites. .
Services were held
at St Patrick's Catholic
Church in Apalachicola at
10 a.m. Monday, Jan. 25
with burial at Magnolia
Cemetery. A viewing was
held Sunday evening, Jan.
24, with a Rosary said
afterwards, at Kelley RI-
neral Home, 149 Avenue
H, Apalachicola.
Always a loving mother
and now a loving soul.


EPISCOPTAHLECHURCH
WELCOMES YOU


THE


Special to the Times
The American Asso-
ciation of Retired People
(AARP) Tax-Aide will once
again be serving taxpayers
in Franklin County, helping
them to file their 2009 fed-
eral income taxes.
This is the second year
this service has been avail-
able at the Franklin County
Library in Carrabelle. The
Tax-Aide site is open on
'lliesdays from 1 to 4 p.m.,
continuing through April 13.
AARP Tax-Aide is the
nation's largest free, volun-
teer-run tax assistance and
preparation service avail-
able to all taxpayers with
low and moderate income,
with special attention to
those aged 60 and older.
More than 33,000 volun-
teers, trained in coopera-
tion with the Internal Rev-
enue Service GRS), now
help more than two million
taxpayers file their federal,
state and local tax returns
each year at nearly 7,000
AARP Tax-Aide sites na-
tionwide.
This free, confiden-
tial service is provided
by volunteers, who have


Security cards or other of-
ficial documentation for
the taxpayer and all depen-
dents, W-2 forms from each
employer, all 1099 forms
(SSA-1099, 1099-INT, 1099-
Div, 1099-Mise, 1099-R, etc.),
unemployment compensa-
tion statements, documen-
tation on any self-employ-
ment income and expenses,
sales and original purchase
information for any assets
sold, all forms showing any
federal income tax paid, evi-
dence of property taxes paid,
sales tax information on any
vehicle purchased, closing
statement on new home if
taking the first time home-
buyer credit, dependent
care information (name,
address, employer ID or
SSN), all receipts, cancelled
checks and other support-
ing documents if itemizing
deductions.
You will also need check
or other bank documen-
tation showing the bank
routing number for direct
deposit of any refund, and a
copy of last year's tax return
would be helpful.
For more information,
call Darrel Acker, 850-349-
9593.


been trained, certified and
equipped by the IRS and the
AARP Foundation. Volun-
teers are trained to assist in
filing the 1040 tax form and
basic schedules. Taxpayers
with complex tax returns
are advised to seek paid tax
assistance.
A number of new de-
ductions and tax credits are
available for 2009 includ-
ing: Economic Recovery
Program (ERP) payment.
If you received retirement
benefits from Social Securi-
ty, Veteran's Administration,
or Railroad Retirement, you
most likely received a $250
ERP
Making Work Pay
Credit 6.2 percent of earned
income up to $400.
First-time home buyer
credit is expanded to $8000
for first time home buyers
and $6,500 for long-time ho-
meowners buying a replace-
ment principal residence.


Deduction for motor
vehicle taxes. If you pur-
chased a brand new vehicle,
the sales tax on it is deduct-
ible, even if you don't itemize
deductions.
American Opportunity
Education Credit expands
Hope credit to 4 years.
Temporary waiver of
minimum distribution rules
Credit for non-business
energy property and an ex-
panded residential energy
credit
Exclusion for qualified
principal residence indebt-
edness income reported on
a 1099-A or 1099-C resulting
from foreclosure or cancel-
lation of debt on your prin-
cipal residence may qualify
for this exclusion.
AARP TaxAide volun-
teers have been trained to
handle all these new credits
and deductions.
Please bring with you a
valid picture ID, and Social


Trinity
J
EST. 1836
Hw 98 & 6th St
Apalachicola
SUNDAY: 8:00 AM 10:30 AM
LIBRARY HOURS:
SUNDAY 12:00 2:00 PM
MONDAY 11:00 AM 1:00 PM
WEDNESDAY 12:00 2:00 PM
THURSDAY 3:30 5:30 PM


Church


Susie Cummings


Mary Reeves


Free tax help available in Carrabelle


AARP TAX-AIDE


WELCOMES YOU
Church

0 fthe.

As pension
101 NE First Street
Carrabelle
SUNDAY
10:00 AlVI













































SHERIFF'S REPORT


Public Notice


You are hereby notified that your eligibility

to vote is in question.



Daniel Walton Se ree
PO BOX 245

Eastpoint, FL 32328


Rhonda M. BankS
PO BOX 112

Apalachicola, FL 32320


Dallis B. Barber
PO BOX 744
Carrabelle, FL 32322


Travis W. Hill
227 Paradise Ln
A alachicola, FL 32320


Samuel L. Loos
24 Island Dr

Eastpoint, FL 32328


George Ward II
235 Paradise Lane
.
Apalachicola, FL 32320



You are required to contact the Supervisor of
. .
Elections, m Apalachicola, Florida no later

than (30) days after the date of this publishing.

Failure to respond will result in a determination

of ineligibility by the Supervisor and your

name will be removed from the statewide voter

registration system.


Always Online | APALACHTIMES.COM


ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS
THE FRANKLIN COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY CON IMISSIONERS
WILL RECEIVE BIDS FOR THE FOLLOWING:

LITTER COLLECTION ON THE ST. GEORGE ISLAND BRIDGE AND
APPROACHES AND THE EASTPOINT AR4LACHICOLA BRIDGE AND
CAUSEWAY THREE TIMES A WEEK BETWEEN MARCH 1 AND
SEPT. 30, 2010

Notice is hereby given that the Franklin County Board of County
commissioners will receive sealed bids at the Franklin County Office of
Clerk of the Court, 33 Market St. Suite 203 Apalachicola, FL 32320 (office
850-653-8861) until 4:00 Phi local time on February 12, 2010. All bids will
be publicly opened and read aloud in the regularly scheduled meeting of the
Board of County Commissioners on Tuesday, Feb. 16, 2010. Bids must be
submitted in a sealed envelope clearly marked "LITTER COLLECTION."

The project generally includes, but is not necessarily limited to, the collection
of litter an debris that is blown or falls out of vehicles or trailers driving on
the St. George Island Bridge and Approaches, and the Eastpoint Apalachicola
Bridge and Causeway system. The contract term for collection is 3 times a
week, March 1 through Sept. 30, 2010. The winning bid will have to have
persons on site with valid MOT certifications and they will have to abide
by the Florida Dept. of Transportations 2010 Design Standards for proper
MOT set up. The successful bidder must have $1 Million dollars in general
liability insurance, $1 Million dollars in auto insurance, and add the county
as an additional insurer on both policies. The appropriate workmen's comp
insurance is also required.

Franklin County reserves the right to reject any and all bids.

For additional information please contract Alan C. Pierce, Director of
Administrative Services, at 850-653-9783, ext. 161.


Thursday, February d, 2010


Law Enforcement


By Toni McLaughlin
Florida Freedom Newspapers
Sabra Thornton was
found guilty Friday in
Pensacola of six counts of
theft.
After seven days of tes-
timony, a six-member jury
returned the verdict after
nearly eight hours of de-
liberation that began Jan.
21. After recessing for the
night, the panel resumed
its discussion Friday morn-
ing and reached the verdict
about 2 p.m.
Thornton is the es-
tranged wife of Bruce
Barnes, of St. George Is-
land, who ran twice as a
Republican, in 2004 and
2008, for Franklin County
Sheriff.
"This is a great victory
for the taxpayers of Oka-
loosa County and for all
law enforcement officers
who do their duty, serve the
public and risk their lives
every day," prosecuting at-
torney Russ Edgar said fol-
lowing the decision.


Thornton spoke briefly
to reporters outside the Es-
cambia County Courthouse
after the verdict. She de-
clared her innocence and
claimed that the public
will eventually learn things
"that didn't come out at the
trial."
Thornton, who worked
as chief of staff for former
Okaloosa County Sheriff
Charlie Morris, faces a
minimum sentence of 25
months in prison and could
be sentenced to as long as
61 years.
Although Edgar argued
that she should be remand-
ed to custody, Circuit Judge
Linda Nobles allowed
Thornton to be released on
her own recognizance until
sentencing.
A sentencing date will
be determined March 17 or
at a later date, depending
on when a pre-sentencing
investigation is completed.
Thornton was the third
person in Morris' admin-
istration to be convicted
of theft, and was the first


Sheriff's Office equipment
she wasn't entitled to.
The six counts of theft
against Thornton were:
One count for a salary
she didn't work to earn;
One count for an $8,400
lease payment buyout ob-
tained from Morris;
One count for $40,000
Morris gave her to pay off
credit card debt;
One count for use of
Sheriff's Office vehicles
she wasn't entitled to use;
One count for use of
a Sheriff 's Office fuel card
she wasn't entitled to use;
and
One count for use of
firearms, a laptop com-
puter and a cell phone she
wasn't entitled to use.
Her attorney, Mark
Welton, called the verdict
'completely unexpected.
"I believe that Ms.
Thornton handled it with
grace and poise, Welton
said.
It was an honor to rep,,
resent Sabra Thornton,
added Brad Stewart, Wel-
ton's co-counsel.
Welton said an appeal
of the verdict will be dis-
cussed.
Trials for Morris, Ad-
ams and three others for-
merChiefDeputyMichael
Coup, former Finance Di-
rector Sandra Norris and
former Information Tech-
nology Specialist David
Yacks are scheduled to
begin June 1. They all are
charged with racketeering
and face a maximum sen-
tence of 30 years in prison.

80meS testifies
at trial
Barnes testified Jan.
25 that he'd met Thornton
in 1981 and married her in
1986. She is 14 years young-
er than he is, he said.
The two have two chil-
dren, share finances and


live in the same home
when both are in Tallahas-
see or at their second home
on St. George Island, said
Barnes, who is battling
throat cancer.
"We have a great per-
sonal relationship," he said.
But he also testified that he
and Thornton had not been
romantically involved for
many years.
Barnes told the court
that he knew Mike McHar-
gue, a Florida Department
of Law Enforcement em-
ployee who has been iden-
tified as Thornton's lover,
"Our estranged relation-
ship came a long time be-
fore Mike McHargue came
along," Barnes testified.
Under Welton's ques-
tioning, Barnes portrayed
his wife as an intelligent
person and qualified em-
ployHeee. said he was wor-
ried when, in March 2008
Thornton took a job wit/
the Okaloosa County

ShdetritH ()ffi .rH said I
have the same security as
the position she was leav-
ing at the Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation Com-
mission,
Atwo-timecandidatefor
sheriff in Franklin County,
Barnes made it clear he
doesn't trust most of those
holding the office. He said
he'd only met Charlie Mor-
ris once, at a birthday din-
ner for his wife, and found
him to be "arrogant" and
"boisterous."
Edgar pressed Barnes
about his relationship to
his wife. He asked if there
were other "Mike McHar-
gues" in her life. Barnes
said he didn't think so.
He testified he did not
know if Thornton was living
with McHargue when she
was residing in Okaloosa
County.


DEVON RAVINE | Florida Freedom


one found guilty on state
charges.
Morris and his former
administrative director,
Teresa Adams, are serving
federal prison sentences
for fraud, theft and money


laundering. They also face
state charges of racketeer-
ing.
Morris, who testified at
Thornton's trial, is serving
a 71-month prison term in
Arkansas. However, Edgar
confirmed Friday that he
has remained in Florida
while plea negotiations are
under way.
Thornton was the only
one of five Morris employ-
ees who wasn't charged
with racketeering conspir-
ing to carry on a criminal
enterprise and was never
formally accused of partici-
pating in the employee bo-
nus kickback scheme that
led to Morris' downfall.
She was charged with
five counts of grand theft
and one count of theft as
the primary beneficiary of
Morris' theft of taxpayers'
money.
He used most of those
funds to pay Thornton's
bills and buy her gifts. He
gave her an $80,000 job
that didn't require her to
work, prosecutors said,
and equipped her with


The following re-
port is provided by
the Franklin County
Sheriffs Offece. Arrests
are made by officers
from the following city,
county, and state law
enforcement agencies:
Apalachicola (APD),
Carrabelle (CPD), Flor-
ida Highway Patrol
(FHP), Franklin County
Sheriffs Offece (FCSO),
Florida Fish and Wild-
life Conservation
Commission (FWC),
Florida Department of
Environmental Protec-
tion (FDEP), Florida
Division of Insurance
Fraud (DIF) and Flori-
da Department ofAgri-


culture and Consumer
Services (FLDOACS).
All defendants are
considered innocent
until proven guilty in a
court of law.

Jan. 26
Ryan L. Sage, 30,
Tallahassee, failure to
appear (FCSO)
Christopher E.
Everitt, 23, Apalachico-
la, battery (APD)
Jan. 27
Charles A. Cooper,
20, Apalachicola, DUI
(APD)

Jan. 31
Michael R. Down-


ing, 40, Boaz, Ala.,
driving while license
suspendedorrevoked
(FCSO)
Robert J. Reg-
ister, 23, Eastpoint,
violation of probation
(FCSO)

Feb. I
James R Granger,
51, Robertsdale, Ala.,
violation of probation
(FCSO)
Jeromy A. Shiver,
25, Carrabelle, driving
while license revoked
(FHP)
Juli T. Jones, 27,
Apalachicola, Gulf
County warrant for fail-
ure to appear (FCSO)


Officers from the Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation Commission's Di-
vision of Law Enforcement took two days
last month to inspect oyster boats.
FWC said Officers Woody Cook, Car-
mon Brownell, Steven Cook, Travis
Huckeba, John Allen, Chasen Yarbor-
ough and Joshua Waite conducted a two-
day oyster detail in Apalachicola Bay.
Forty-four vessels were boarded with 108
commercial harvesters being inspected.
Three misdemeanor citations were
issued for possession of undersize oys-
ters (the percentage of undersize oys-
ters ranged from 65 to 79 percent). Four
misdemeanor citations were issued for
no saltwater products license and no
Apalachicola Bay oyster harvest permit.
one infraction citation was issued for in-


sufficient boating safety equipment. Ten
written warnings were issued for various
resource and boating safety violations.
Officers Woody Cook and Brownell
conducted a decoy deer detail in the
Tate's Hell Wildlife Management Area
in an effort to enforce the forked antler
rule. At approximately 5:40 p.m., a truck
occupied by two hunters approached the
area where the decoy was positioned.
The truck stopped and one of the hunt-
ers exited the vehicle and shot the illegal
deer.
The officers then left their positions
of concealment and stopped the hunters.
The hunter was issued a misdemeanor
citation for attempting to take an illegal
deer. The hunter's rifle and scope were
seized as evidence.


B4 | The Times


Thornton found guilty of theft from Okaloosa County


FWC officers inspect 44 oyster boats





Community CALENDAR


JACKSON'S '4










F.Hv 653-8868 .

Hayseu $ oWill ravel ,. S. Bristol
Reduced to chips. (
No job too small or large. e e
celyggw,"ede 4 Dental Clime
697-2562
FREE ESTIMATES
ROBERTS APPLIANCE DENTURE

ALL MRE ERRANDS LAB ON PREM IS ES
-... Same Day Service on Repairs and Relines

IR6RN BORfTaper, 9 9

Nonica Bontraaer DND
18 Shadow Lane 0 &
Apalachicola, FL 32320
Phone: (850) 653-8122 4
Cell: (850) 653-7654 g g
The Mildew Remover 12761 Pea Ridge Road Bristol, Florida 32321
Exter r o aning TELEPHONE (850) 643-5417
Low Pressure Mildew
9 Years Service in Area *
(850) 653-8795 Don Live General Contractors
Gerald Garlick
- LICENSED AND INSURED 20 YEARS EXPERIENCE
DON WILLSON'S
SEPTIC TANK Plumbing New Construction Roofing
SERVICE Pressure Washing Additions Vinyl Siding
Serving all of Franklin
County Residential/ Painting and More No Job Too Small
Se Tn & P.O. Box 439 66
Grease Traps Pumped
Call day or night Carrabelle, FL 32322
653-9406 697-2783 or Mobile 566-2603

loronis ag
JO Michael & Anthony
4 State Certified Electrician ESI2000204
& Finish Carpentry RG006883 .
TODAY! aso-22e-ever aso-227-sees


== e


OEXP

CALL TO VENDORS
March 5,6,7, 2010
in time Panama City Mall
(Linens-n-Things former location)
After seven successful years, we have outgrown
our home and moved to the former Linens-n-
Things at the Panama City Mall. This means
10,000 more square feet, better parking, security,
and a brand new look!
Register now for booth space at the 2010 Home &
Garden Expo in Panama City, FL. Share your home
improvement products, services, and enhancements
with thousands of families in the Bay area looking to
renovate, decorate, and landscape their homes.
All vendors receive a FREE quarter-page ad in the
official 2010 Home & Garden Expo program'
reaching more than 80,000 adults in Bay and seven
surrounding counties.
For vendor application or information on the
show: Call: 850.763.8618, or
visit www.exposandtradeshows.com or
email: expostradeshows@aol.com
LAST YEAR'S SHOW SOLD OUT!
Space Is Limited, So Reserve Yours NOW!
For sponsorship information call:
850.763.6587
For additional advertising information in the official
program of the 2010 Home and Garden Expo,
contact The News Herald at 850-258-4163.


Thursday, February d, 2010


Local


The Times | B5


Need a presentation for your next
meeting or project? How about using
a PowerPoint presentation to impress
and get your message across? The
Franklin County Public Library, Car-
rabelle, is offering a Microsoft Power-
Point II computer class on Thursday,
Feb. 4, from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
Learn to customize a presentation for
your meeting, add/coordinate anima-
tion, control timing, add video/sound
clips, and insert linked data. Call
the Eastpoint library at 670-8151 or
the Carrabelle library at 697-2366 to
register. That same afternoon at 1:30
p.m., the Carrabelle library will pres-
ent Genealogy I: Ancestry Edition,
discover online genealogy resources
and learn how to use online databases
such as Ancestry, Heritage Quest, and
Rootsweb.
The Eastpoint library continues
to offer free computer instruction
through the month of February.
Classes in creating resumes, online
job resources, computer basis, Mi-
crosoft PowerPoint, and eBay, buying
guide will all be available to visitors
and Franklin County citizens. If you
can't make a class in February, several


classes on the same subject will be of-
fered in March at either branch.
Visitors to Franklin County are
welcome to become a member of the
Franklin County Public Library. Tem-
porary memberships are available at
both branches. You will need a driver's
license, home address and address of
where you are residing while in the
area. Temporary memberships are
good for one year and can be renewed
upon return to the library. There is no
charge to become a member of the
Franklin County Public Library, but we
do ask patrons to observe library pro-
cedures for checking out and return-
ing materials.
The library in Carrabelle welcomes
new library assistant, Eugenia Butler,
who will be working throughout the
library assisting patrons with library
requests and processing materials
for checkout. She will also provide
outreach to the adult community en-
riching lives with a variety of literary
materials and programs.
For more information about the
library and/or its programs call 670-
8151 in Eastpoint, and 697-2366 in Car-
rabelle.


By (aty Greene


of the "E" section, in the Children's
area. Newbery winners are books
chosen by the American Library
Association as "most distinguished
BRARY American children's book published
in the previous year." The Calde-
cott Metal is for "distinguished
picture book." Many familiar reads from
childhood were winners, including "The
Polar Express" by Chris Van Allsburg,
"The Little House" by Virginia Lee Bur-
ton, and "Where the Wild Things Are" by
Maurice Sendak. I have just purchased,
from Downtown Books, one of my favor-
ites, "Blueberries for Sal" by Caldecott
winner Robert McCloskey. I'll donate it to
the library after it spends a little time on
my coffee table.
An additional award, the Coretta Scott
King, will have to be the subject of a fu-
ture article.
One correction: Robert Urich was the
star of "Spenser for Hire." "Jesse Stone,"
another Parker character, became a TV
vehicle for Tom Selleck. Thanks to my
careful readers.
Caty Greene is librarian for the Apala-
chicola Municipal Library. To reach her,
call 653-8436.


Where the old meets the new
- lifelong patron Myra Ponder is THE LI
checking out children's books and
reading them to her grandchildren
- not earth-shattering news, but she's
doing it online with Skype!
Each week she comes in and checks
out books specifically to read aloud. Now
I am not a user of Skype but it and other
online video communications are certain-
ly becoming part of our culture.
Reading aloud to children of all ages is
not new, but it is very important. The new
"Bring Me A Book Franklin" program is
working to teach parents, grandparents
and siblings to take time to read to those
who are young and whose minds are
thirsting for all types of stimulation. They
have also provided bookcases stocked
with new books to numerous day care,
pre-K and other locations throughout the
county.
Myra especially likes books which have
won Newbery and Caldecott Awards, and
the Apalachicola Municipal Library has
a number of these separated out on top


Thursday, Feb. 4
FranklinCountySchool
Board. 6 p.m. Willie Speed
Board Room in Eastpoint.
For info call 670-2810.
Carrabelle City Com-
mission 6 p.m. Carrabelle
Municipal Building. For
Info call 697-3618.
Apalachicola Board of
Adjustment public hearing
d om nea61p5mj
8715.
Professional storytell .
er and genealogist Mary
Fears will help celebrate
Black History month by
sharing a program of telling
stories based upon historic
documents, rather than fic-
tionalized versions of Afri-
can-American history. 7:30
p.m. at the Dixie Theatre,.
itshepmgramHsu nt
Council, is free and open to
the public,. For more info,
call 653-3200.
Individual/group com-
puter instruction at East-
point library from 10 a.m.


to noon. For more info, call
670-8151.
PowerPoint class. 1:30
to 4:30 p.m. Carrabelle
library. For info call 697-
2366.
Genealogy I. 9:30 a.m.
to 12:30 p.m. Carrabelle
library. For info call 697-
2366.
Yoga. 4:30 p.m. Carra-
belle library. For info call
697-2366.
Wandering Star Quilt-
ing Club. Chills Hall La-
nark Village. 1 to 3 p.m. Call
Christine Hinton 697-2551.
Community Luncheon
and Information Specials
at the Franklin County Se-
nior Center in Carrabelle.
Noon. $3 donation. Call 697-
3760.
Friday, Feb. 5
Individual/group com-
puter instruction at East-
point library from 10 a.m.
to noon. For more info, call
670-8151.
Parent-child reads at
Eastpoint library at 2:15


p.m. for infant to 4 years
old. For more info, call 670-
8151.
StoryHouratEastpoint
library at 3:30 p.m. for ages
5 to 8. For more info, call
670-8151.
Exercise class at Chill-
as Hall in Lanark Village.
9 to 10 a.m. Open to all and
free.
Alcoholics Anonymous
will meet at 7:30 p.m. at the
Church of the Ascension,
101 NE First Street, in Car-
rabelle. For more info, call
697-2837.
Saturday, Feb. 6
Habitat for Humanity
Mardi Gras celebration
Dixie Theatre. 6:30 p.m For
info call 653 3113 -
Sunday, Feb. 7
Ilse Newell concert


series. Featuring Maria
Ferrante, soprano soloist
of opera and oratorio, do-
ing a program "Sea Tides
and Time." For more info
call 370-6201.
M da Feb. 8
00 y'
Apalachicola Plan-
ning and Zoning regular
meeting 6 p.m. City Hall.
For info call 653-8715.
Yarn Junkies will meet
at 7 to 9 p.m. The newly
orme group is r -
ters, crocheters and oth-
ers addicted to yarn. The
group meets each Monday
evening at an alternate
location. For information,
call Kathy Robinson at
653-7196.
Exercise class at Chill-
as Hall in Lanark Village.
9 to 10 a.m. Open to all and
free.


Alcoholics Anony-
mous meets at 5:30 p.m.
at Trinity Episcopal
Church's Benedict Hall,
at Sixth Street and Ave.
D. For more info, call 850-
222-2294.
Bingo at the Franklin
County Senior Center in
Carrabelle. Early bird at
6 p.m., regular bingo at
7 p.m. Cards begin at $4.
Call 697-3760.
TUOSday, Feb. 9
Carrabelle Historical
Society. 6 p.m. Carrabelle
Library. For more info, call
Tamara Allen at 697-2141
Breakfast at the
Franklin County Senior
Center in Carrabelle. Cof-
fee at 7:30 a.m., meal at 8
a.m. $2 suggested dona-
tion. Call 697-3760.
Winter Bingo 7


p.m. St. George Island
Fire Dept. $1 per card.
Everyone welcome. Pro-
ceeds go to St. George Is-
land Civic Club. Call 927-
3001.
Alcoholics Anony-
mous will meet at 7:30
p.m. at the Church of
the Ascension, 101 NE
First Street, in Carra-
belle. For more info, call
697-2837.
Thursday, Feb. 11
Wandering Star Quilt-
ing Club. Chills Hall La-
nark Village. 1 to 3 p.m.
Call Christine Hinton 697-
2551.
Community Luncheon
and Information Specials
at the Franklin County Se-
nior Center in Carrabelle.
Noon. $3 donation. Call
697-3760.


O
PANAMA CITY MALL


Reading to the grandkids,


LIBRARY HAPPENINGS


+


1


IN


NE D


SuffRU KNOLOGY
FOUNDATION ST





YORT RIA REDO LASIIE CNNCTO


To place an ad, call 850.747.5020/800. 345. 8688


Franklin County's source of news for more than a century


L11


Any person claiming an In-
terest in the surplus from
the sale, If any, other than
the property owner as of
the date of the Ils pendens
must file a c|alm within 60
days after the sale.
Dated this 12th day of Jan-
uary, 2010.
Marcla M. Johnson
As Clerk of the Court
By Terry E. Creamer
As Deputy Clerk
Dated this 12th day of Jan-
uary, 2010.
IMPORTANT
In accordance with the
Americans with Disabilities
Act, persons needing a
reasonable accommoda-
tion to participate in this
proceeding should, no
later than seven (7) days
prior, contact the Clerk of
the Court's disability coor-
dinator at 850-697-2112,
PO. BOX 340, APALACHI-
COLA FL, 32320. If hearing
Impaired, contact (TDD)
800-955-8771, via Florida
Relay System.
Ben-Ezra & Katz, PA.
Attorneys for Plaintiff
2901 Stirling Road,
Sulte 300
Fort Lauderdale, Florida
33312
Telephone: (305) 770-4100
Fax: (305) 653-2329
January 28, February 4,
2010
5620T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
FRANKLIN COUNTY
VORIDD ISION
ND MAFCS.FEDERAL


vs.
JACQUELINE E. GOLDEN
A/K/A JACQUELINE H.
GOLDEN; JOHN H. GOL-

TN;S);UINNKNOWSNESTON-

f n SUBJECT PROP-
CASENO.:09-00223
RE-NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN pursuant to an Or-
der Resetting Foreclosure
Sale Date dated the 6th
day of January, 2010, and
entered in Case No.
09-00223, of the Circuit
Court of the 2ND Judicial
Circuit in and for Franklin
County, Florida, wherein


INDYMAC FEDERAL
BANK, FS.B. Is the Plain-
tiff and JACQUELINE E.
GOLDEN A/K/A JAC-
QUELINE H. GOLDEN;
JOHN H. GOLDEN; UN-
KNOWN TENANTSS;
JOHN DOE; JANE DOE
AS UNKNOWN TEN-
ANT(S) IN POSSESSION
OF THE SUBJECT PROP-
ERTY are defendants. I will
sell to the highest and best
bidder for cash at the ON
FRONT STEPS OF
COURTHOUSE at the
Franklin County Court-
house in Apalachicola,
Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on
the 18th day of February,
2010, the following de-
scribed property as set
forth in said Final Judg-
ment, to wit:
West half of Lot 94, Tarpon
Shores, Unit 2, (Unrec-
orded) and being more
particularly described as
follows:
Commence at the South-
east corner of Section 20,
Township 8 South, Range
6 West, Franklin County,
Florida and thence run
North 02 degrees 20 mln-
utes 00 seconds East
along the East line of Sec-
tion 20, a distance of
222.89 feet to the South-
erly right-of-way boundary
of Wilderness Road,
thence run South 63 de-
grees 44 minutes 00 sec-
ands West along said
Southerly right-of-way
boundary 2438.08 feet to a
point of curve to the right,
thence run Southerly along
said right-of-way boundary
and along said curve with
a radius of 5070.80 feet
through a central angle of
06 degrees 12 minutes 00

tsaeecnoeneds r5an arccud
n South 69 ee

of-way boundary 1910.83
feettoanlronpipehence
continue South 69 degrees
estm essa S hs

hatr d #r id0630 a
G.PF saOdFP NG ON-
BEdGISN tNhGrlya ht[ v g
bound run South 20 de
grees 1 minutes 48 sec-
onds East 419.80 feet to
an Iron rod and c
(marked #7160), then
run South 69 degrees 47
minutes 13 seconds West
103.04 feet to a concrete
monument, thence run
North 20 de ees 19 mln-
utes 11 seconds West

d apeetm rkand Ir 4ro5d


lying on the Southerly
right-of-way of said Wil-
derson Road, thence run
North 69 degrees 56 mln-
utes 00 seconds East
along said right-of-way
boundary 103.70 feet to
the POINT OF BEGINN-
ING.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING
AN INTEREST IN THE
SURPLUS FROM THE
SALE, IF ANY OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY
OWNER AS OF THE DATE
OF THE LIS PENDENS
MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER
THE SALE.
In accordance with the
Americans with Disabilities
Act (ADA), disabled per-
sons who, because of their
disabilities, need special
accommodation to particl-
pate in this proceeding
should contact the ADA
Coordinator at 33 Market
Street, Sulte 203, Apalachl-
cola, FL 32320 or Tele-
phone Volce/TDD (904)
653-8861 prior to such
proceeding.
Dated this 11th day of Jan-
uary, 2010.
Marcia Johnson
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Terry E Creamer
Deputy Clerk
Law Office of
Marshall C. Watson
1800 NW49th Street
Sulte 120
Fort Lauderdale, FL 33309
Telephone: (954)453-0365
Facsimile: (954)771-6052
Toll Free: 1-800-441-2438
January 28, February 4,
2010


FR TEC CdU O
ANDNHFOR FRANKLIN
JPMorgan Chase Bank,
NationalAssociation
Plaintiff,
-vs.-

toonhnM Ru M dyd Washing-
Defendant(s).
Case #:
19-2008-CA-000091
Division #:
UNC:
AMENDED NOTICE OF
SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVENpursuanttoanOr-
der rescheduling foreclo-
sure sale dated January 6,
2010 entered in Civil Case
No. 19-2008-CA-000091 of


the Circuit Court of the 2nd
Judicial Circuit in and for
Franklin County, Florida,
wherein JPMorgan Chase
Bank, National Assocla-
tlan, Plaintiff and John R.
Moody are defendantss, I
will sell to the highest and
best bidder for cash, AT
THE WEST FRONT DOOR
OF THE FRANKLIN
COUNTY COURTHOUSE,
LOCATED ON HWY 98, IN
APALACHICOLA, FLOR-
IDA, AT 11:00 A.M., Febru-
ary 18, 2010, the following
described property as set
forth in said Final Judg-
ment, to-wit:
LOT 10, BLOCK A, SEA
DUNE VILLAGE AS PER
MAP OR PLAT THEREOF
RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK 4 AT PAGE 21 OF
THE PUBLIC RECORDS
OF FRANKLIN COUNTY,
FLORIDA.
TOGETHER WITH ALL
BUILDINGS AND OTHER
IMPROVEMENTS SITU-
ATED THEREON OR AT-
TACHED THERETO AND
ALL TENEMENTS, HER-
EDITAMENTS, IMPROVE-
MENTS, APPURTE-
NANCES, RIGHTS, EASE-
MENTS, LICENSES, BEN-
EFITS AND RIGHT-OF-
WAY THERETO BELONG-
ING OR IN ANYWISE AP-
PERTAINING HEREINAF-
TER TO THE "PROPERTY"
ANY PERSON CLAIMING
AN INTEREST IN THE
SURPLUS FROM THE
SALE IF ANY OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY AS
OF THE DATE OF THE LIS
PENDENS MUST FILE A
CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS
AFTER THE SALE.


5nTED atis0Alp acdh 01

MIarcladMdohnson
Terry E. Creamer
ATTORNEY FOR PLAIN-
TIH PIRO & FISHMAN,

04 NbD1alle Mabry High-
1m abFL83 18
ary 28, February 4,

5622T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
FRANKLIN COUNTY
FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
BANK OF AMERICA NA
AS TRUSTEE FOR WAMU
MORTGAGE PASS-THR-
OUGH CERTIFICATES


the validity of the will, the
qualifications of the per-
sonal representative,
venue, or jurisdiction of
this Court are required to
file their objections with
this Court WITHIN THE
LATER OF THREE
MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUB-
LICATION OF THIS NO-
TICE OR THIRTY DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF
SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All creditors of the dece-
dent and other persons
having claims or demands
against decedent's estate
on whom a copy of this
notice is served within
three months after the date
of the first publication of
this notice must file their
claims with this Court
WITHIN THE LATER OF
THREE MONTHS AFTER
THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS
AFTER THE DATE OF
SERVICE OF A COPY OF
THIS NOTICE ON THEM.

Any person entitled to ex-
empt property is required
to file a petition for deter-
mlnation of exempt prop-
erty with this Court WITHIN
THE LATER OF FOUR
MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUB-
LICATION OF THIS NO-
TICE OR WITHIN FORTY
DAYS FROM THE DATE
OF TERMINATION OF
ANY PROCEEDING IN-
VOLVING THE CON-
STRUCTION, ADMISSION
TO PROBATE, OR VALID-
ITY OF THE WILL OR IN-
VOLVING ANY OTHER
MATTER AFFECTING ANY
PART OF THE ESTATE

2EBJECTFLTOORID CST N

Angsurvj tivsep e
file an election to take
electivesharewithinthe
time provided by law
All other creditors of the

lens m d ene eds
3eo elrW
DEATMOONFT EAFF R
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS
AND OBJECTIONS NOT
SO FILED WILL BE FOR-
EVER BARRED.
Thedateoftheflrstpubll-
cation of this Notice is
January 28, 2010.
Personal Representative:


SERIES 2005-AR7,
Plaintiff,
vs.
GUY N. MAULDIN; THE
TOWNHOMES OF ST
GEORGE HOMEOWNERS
ASSOCIATION, INC.; THE
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
GUY N. MAULDIN A/K/A
SHARON MAULDIN; UN-
KNOWN TENANTSS; IN
POSSESSION OF THE
SUBJECT PROPERTY
Defendants.
CASE NO.: 09-00070
RE-NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN pursuant to an Or-
der Resetting Foreclosure
Sale Date dated 12th day
of January, 2010, and en-
tered in Case No.
09-00070, of the Circuit
Court of the 2ND Judicial
Circuit in and for Franklin
County, Florida, wherein
BANK OF AMERICA NA
AS TRUSTEE FOR WAMU
MORTGAGE PASS-
THROUGH CERTIFl-
CATES SERIES 2005-AR7
Is the Plaintiff and GUY N.
MAULDIN; THE TOWN
HOMES OF ST GEORGE
HOMEOWNERS ASSOCl-
ATION, INC.: THE UN-
KNOWN SPOUSE OF GUY
N. MAULDIN A/K/A
SHARON MAULDIN; UN-
KNOWN TENANTSS;
JOHN DOE; JANE DOE
AS UNKNOWN TENANT
(S) IN POSSESSION OF
THE SUBJECT PROP-
ERTY are defendants. I will
sell to the highest and best
bidder for cash at the ON
FRONT STEPS OF
COURTHOUSE at the

undk n C1 pa

11bl8 da f Fe u
forth in said Final Judg-
menttowit:

HOUTN REBDOOKEHANTHMR
A C ERR

BHOEOK PCAGRE OR
OFORF NKLIN COUNTY
ANY PERSON CLAIMING
AN INTEREST IN THE
SURPLUS FROM THE
SALE, IF ANY OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY
OWNER AS OF THE DATE
OF THE LIS PENDENS
MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER
THE SALE.
In accordance with the


Americans with Disabilities
Act (ADA), disabled per-
sons who, because of their
disabilities, need special
accommodation to particl-
pate in this proceeding
should contact the ADA
Coordinator at 33 Market
Street, Sulte 203, Apalachl-
cola, FL, 32320 or Tele-
phone Volce /TDD (904)
653-8861 prior to such
proceeding.
Dated this 12th day of Jan-
uary, 2010.
Marcla Johnson
Clerk Of The Circuit Court
By: Terry E. Creamer
Deputy Clerk
Law Office of
Marshall C. Watson
1800 NW49th Street,
Sulte 120
Fort Lauderdale,
Florida 33309
Telephone (954)453-0365
Facsimile (954)771-6052
Toll Free: 1-800-441-2438
January 28, February 4,
2010
5659T
NOTICE
OF SHERIFF'S SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY
tTf u rns se la
the Circuit Court of Frank-
n Countyof F rida, on t1he
ay ry
athew uP In f edHR bs
ert D.(Bob) Allen, Edda Al-
len and R & E Allen Prop-
ertles, Inc. a Florida Cor-
poration, were Defendants,
being Case
No.05-000338-CA In said
court, 1, Skip Shiver, as
SI I aofh Fran nedCouu

a hr c

n e Ahl ol'rustee n
to-wit:
700 Randolph Street, St.
Ge3o2r8ge Island, Florida.

wpneertdes ncR) & E Allen

Lot r10d BIThn66 ofG
Beaches, Unit no. 5, ac-
cording to the Plat thereof
as recorded in Plat Book
3, Pages) 16 and 17, of
the Public Records of
Franklin County, Florida.
And on the 1st day of
March, 2010 at the north
frontdooroftheFranklin
County Sheriffs Office, In
the city of Eastpoint,
Franklin County, Florida, at
the hour of 11.00 a.m., or


as soon thereafter as pos-
slble, I will offer for sale all
of the said Defendant's R &
E Allen Propertles, Inc., a
Florida Corporation
(Robert Allen, Trustee)
rights, title and Interest in
aforesaid real property at
public outcry and will sell
the same, subject to all
prior liens, encumbrances
and judgments, If any, to
the highest and best bid-
der or bidders for CASH,
the proceeds to be applied
as far as may be to the
payment of costs and the
satisfaction of the above
described execution. Note:
In accordance with the
American with Disabilities
Act, persons with disabill-
ties needing a special ac-
commodation to particl-
pate in this proceeding
should contact Debble
Mock no later than seven
days prior to the proceed-
Ing at Franklin County
Sheriffs Office at
(850)-,670-8519.
Skip Shiver,
Sheriff of Franklin County,
Florida
By: Debble L. Mock
Deputy Sheriff
January 28, February 4,
11, 18, 2010
5662T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OFALTHCEl SECONIN N
ORRIFDRAANKLIN COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ALBERT RUSSELL ALDAY
JR.'
Deceased.

2 0 Om -CP

ND I ORATION

eatad n LratEo ofRU
ceased, File Number
2010-000002-CRispend-
Ing in the Circuit Court for
Fr klin DClount F ri


in 3 M et ISC
Sr tnekll203CoA alacFhjr a
32320. The estate is tes-
tate and the date of the will
is December 31, 2009. The
names and addresses of
the personal representa-
tive and the personal
representative's Attorney
are set forth below ALL IN-
TERESTED PERSONS
ARENOTIFIEDTHAT:

All persons on whom this
notice is served who have
objections that challenge


1100 Legal Advertising
1110 Classified Notices
1120 Public Notices/
Announcements
1125-Carpools&
1130 R o
1140 Happy Ads
1150 -Personals
1160 Lost
1170 Found
*
1100
5619T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE SECOND JUDI-
CIAL CIRCUIT OF FLOR-
IDA IN AND FOR FRANK-
LIN COUNTY
SUNTRUST BANK, SUC-
CESOR BY MERGER TO
SUN BANK/SOUTH FLOR-
IDA, NATIONAL ASSOCIA-
TION,
Plaintiff,
vs.
WISDOM MINISTRIES
Defendants.
CASE NO. 08000425CA
NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE
NO CE IS HER
pursuant to a
Judgment of Foreclosure
dated April 28, 2009 and
entered in Case No.
08000425CA, of the Circuit
Court of the Second Judl-
clal Circuit in and for
FRANKLIN County, Flor
Bd KwheSe C NTRU




DN IEOF UNNNAAKSN W
SADDIKl; SUNSET BEACH
OWNERS'ASSOCIATION,
INC; SUNTRUST BANK;
OWN E ANNTT #

r D asM
sts I ehe hig stha
11:00 AM on February 18
2010, the following de-
scribed property as set
forth in said Final Judg-
menttowit:
LOT 34, SUNSET BEACH,
PHASE 2, A SUBDIVISION
AS PER MAP OR PLAT
THEREOFRECORDEDIN
PLAT BOOK 6 AT PAGE
17 OF THE PUBLIC REC-
ORDS OF FRANKLIN
COUNTY FLORIDA


SB The Times Thursday, February 4, 2010


COVERING MILTON


ICOLA


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110 | 1100 | 3220400 | 60| 610 | 60 | 640 | 60
MARY LEA NEEL ROBERT R. MILLENDER 1 b
.-h 144 Florida d wlbw selldto the highest .S IS oAtn$ ~pac o 74O

32T4RDN SULE of n tea 18h(Easte MrnMT Bedroom Set King Size AP0aahclaDwt ppalachicola:Downtownnce 5ld 4850-697-8623 or 2b,2b t ereI-Crael r a u
SHLE AD HUER 2010, at the front steps of Solid wood doeald Bsns/gt Ihadcpacs ah vi able now O $62 mo -60 + adfr rud ee /peo br, 2 ba $500 2ere
AplahioaFlria house, Apalachicola, Flor- aging. Worth $2600, givel Il space avaiabl $10 o 803302 e ack c ar prtw/. $7 ie celrefne
32329Idathe aay7 13100. Can deliver GU t Cl ee 5-2-13 pp 'mo +dep. 850-566-7170 bakyr.$0 fobth
Flrda Br Nubrproperty as set forth In ap.unfurnished, WD al442606
tevfrPesoaRp rdcalu: Judgment of 15 Goul moas ICHA yr Sk45 rol3 r 2 a, rew home forfcrg

aryLo 2,Fbur4, tl5, Blo k sRag nhrrsleigh Bed,st Id B O eg isoiOf0e x P b h s t G oge a n1 /rln utp5Cl 7-604K1 o
5685T ~~~twlont Crable of Pce t heAdl boxd, $249. Cads ll In business Training change building, Cornerne.805 -29Lo ly bah ctg.
IN HE IRCIT OU To Puli CRraeords of Frankli 85- 25-34 & Marketing I o Ave E & Commerce Notice $160 wk, elec, Satellite,Veycangufewwt
OFTH SCOD UD-County, Florida. Coordinator St. 305-588-5885 Garbage Included. pool acs.2b,2bAC
CIAL CIRC IT IN ANDI responible for:devel- IAll real estate advertising In table. 12'X65' deck with foiaro ,te los
FORFRNKIN OUTY The successful bidder at I pet & marketing .- this newspaper Is subject to Beautiful view. Callblns cutns ne
FLORIDA the sale will be required to ~strategies for Sm l th FarHungAtwch 806351kthe, apotludy
place the requisite state 1Bsn sDe lom t 10makes It Illegal to advertise Apalachicola- 2 br, 1 ba 6 ro ihwse n
documentary stamps on NEW KING Plushtop Mat- I Center + Continuing I any preference, Ilmitationmot1yrIe$75 o+ drrsendfshca-
IB S~dNOLEY the Certificate of Title. tress Set, still In plastic | dcto;shdlnor dsenmmnation basedsexn $500 dep. Cl 80 n hd ag euiul
DeceasedTE w/w rraty $279 priing stffng market-Cn elv handicap, familllal status o ,,6387 adcpdyr.Lnr
DATD hi 2th ayof 22-773.Ca dlivr ngoftraining classes + nabonal origin, or an Inten- o 8 80m ,icue
FlNo09001-P January, 2010. Icodntnof ofe- 1b rom unshdw th ton, to make any such pref- waergabae Avalabl
Probate D ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ Ientesad n~lp~uew Inltla- Florida rom. $350 onth. erece, Ilmiation or dis- ISt.G ore0/0/0 Cl 9731
Ivision Hon. MARCIA JOHNSON tvs eursB n $0 e.Lnr ilg. ciiain aillsau a rngt
Clerk of the Court reae il r x 4- ieS..As aea Includes children under the


n Ad Macu C1Mxer n esn o arme s, wn Fl 6ramernome ano esopl se- $250/wk, 850-653-5114 I 1 Owe fr2
death was November~N 20,e Aplciola4 16th St. a I bn or2/ / 0l Ackiltlon Carbedla j denya This newspaper will not bedroo aprten withele3 r
08, s pendig IntheOr- W Crn a~th a ht/ gulcosted/hre an elctnc funishd Eowingly aceptalanes | 6130 Co ret lyere~mobd led, BA YBIW ,L l
County Florda, Pobate 8amuntilNoon G CC Is an $30 depoit. Pease all whch Isin voationof the 2 br,2 ba,1200sfTwnhm pliaces. Include larg 1-1/2Luxur Bath, wit
Divisin, theaddres of a Multi-Family EA/EO/M/F/Vet em 51-8 .Lav msag law Our readers are hereby Carrabelle, large deck private yard $550 month deptbNwKtc na-
whec 2s33 a tc tc tIndoor Yard Sale ,poe /ae hn ub n a dethat tsl dn llngas able m ow 5 foepn 1 OePNrEhsl ssb m tpustle
Florda 3320-733.TheSaturday, February 6th 1b,1 aEfceny n per are available on a equal t.805249Cal0-6-07tx f plcbe.N Pts
name andaddrssesof 8am until Noon ALL sorts Aacholqet2bks opportunity basis. Tocom- app no soking Insid. In
thepesonl eprseta of things to choose from... fo batrm ,dc A plain of discrimination cal cue sgrbg ikp
tie n te esoa M RCADIE children s, men s an a ptO ,$50m +frt H -6 -97free Tae 1As vial o hr
reprsenttiv s atorey 300 -Antdies clohingand hoe, lat &depoit. leae Cal tll-fee nmbe fortheterm @ $7.00per ite
are et frthbelo 310 ppi ses ousholdgoos, ktchn 85-697500 Othr harin Imaire is* $10.0 mln Fo Sal fo

dentandothe peson 314 aby iem InApalchiola Corer f 3b, At i Lanrk illae, anayn D wde the ar god teant an
haigclisordmnd 10 uldn uple 1t t n veu ) POSTAL &GOYT JOB w/prh&sal r.108S. E. Ave. Acla.OnrAetCro
against decednts estate 310 BusinessINFO FOR SALE? $0 f s ot et!ggg;CraelFoia332 n ilas osa







t~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~~~~~~~~poeto E WNSFEassito eitg ila Re pledBc ar 600
TER HE ATEOF TE 330 GaOe ad slesYouNEVE hae t pa Souher Vilas Seco d Foor 3 B 1 BEndUni Ap



3300~~~~~~~~~~~esg -ro Micelneu Soerna sitac VRsr,183HY9 hd ol$0.0w
Al ohe cedtos fth 310- usca nsmmnt R ce sin isAmria cnsmr ay be avilbl.HU W stCaraele Forda uni..................Iean Panato
decdet ndoter er 330 Pant &Shub/ pecal!!prtetio aeny. voches ccptd.Cal Cll85-67-238fo Ifo Rihinl U itApt$55.0 ewr 3br 35 a om




smn aannad eey 30- eae~n/otl 2% f in nFodpr w~tcgvjosas 5-5397. D/TY1B ItrorA tIn ulyfrisegaae
esat msafiethirclim S o el) est~ nad 2H/ap 1-7 -FC-EL lalhspinittor IanFu~i~h d- ed coatd ............$5 0.0 foousab1 achkt
wlNth~~c T THTNE ou M n-rl5-.Fre pblc eric ad mpoyr t di U funih pt.....................$50.0 120 o 1667-53




BARRED ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 60 NOTWITH-o AUTONBah rn hueswt wne rts




STNDN TETIEPE vesret Strdy2/,4 IH ewok 1.9/o.ktce &bth inmm epst 5-63916 rShr &Lngtrmrntl. araele areMH
RIDSE ORHABV, aten 3cnta, nCR Wy a Mr FrTV no noea l45/mo 5-74718fo pp. PL A E A L O NN80-9-90 b,2 a w eatulve
ANYCLIMFIEDTW 36 4miesfrm exco 100 Canel. RE sdped.(80)65-338OR85032-044FO R NT LS. ofrier dck nwl
(2)~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~e YEAR ORy MOR AF BecOdCls Rd&4Ro ntal RErnvte /cren
TER~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Sre THE63-8 DEEETSres untre ls DDR ls$00tl 60m 30dp
EDOF~ ~ ~ ~~~~~~~~~~~~5 DEAT ISn96 c tol OSCl e o Lnm Vayncd 1


REAL ESTATE SALES & MANAGEMENT
Vacation, short & Long Term Rentals

Long Term Rentals in ':arrabelle
147 Delaware St. 2BR/1BA $550
Fumished MH with carport, workshop and boat shed

2526 Palmetto Terrace 2BR/2BA $600
Fenced yard, large porch, just blocks from the bay

710-C Mariners View 3BR/3BA $800
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1302 Picketts Landing Court 4BR/3.5BA $1500
Gorgeous new TH w/ hardwood floors, elevator, pool & dock

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Bank Short Sales @ Pirates Landing on Timber Island
One Bedroom Condos in unique riverfront community Starting at $100,000

Bank Short Sales @ the Sands of Carrabelle
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B le tO e0Amee hPDO El v o n Private Location $300,000

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Fabulous 4BR/4BA w/ 3800sf Dock, Elevator & Gulf View $550,000


850-697-5300
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BUccaneer Inn I State of Florida-Franklin I State of Florida-Franklin
The Night (lerk is responsible for Cut elhDprmn onyHat eatet
conducting all ni htly audit-related duties JbAnucmn JbAnucmn
checking guests in and out. Your shift is OP InevwigCrkPSntveigClk
from 11 m to lam & you will be re uired Psto ye atTm P oiinTp:Pr ieOS
to work weekends. Pay based upon Strigrtofpy$1pehorSainrtefpy:10erou
experience. Please come see us at the CoigDt:0/01 lsn ae 21/0
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George Island. Applications are available EmrecDuisBakrudsreig mpo r. mreny utsakrud

Cordnae at then FrnlnCunyHat Dprmn.Thscekwilprom


Franklin County's source of news for more than a century


The Times Thursday, February 4, 2010 7B











































Talent abounds at Philaco competition


TIDE TABLES MONTHLY AVERAGES
To find the tides of the following areassubtract the indicated times
from these given for APALACHICOLA:
Cat Point i s 0:40 nW s 1:17
EastPass Minus0:27 Minus0:27
To find the tides of the following areassubtract the indicated times
from those given for CARRABELLE:
HIGH LOW
Bald Point Minus9:16 Minus0:03
APA LAC H ICO LA


Es Pics


Our local real estate experts have identified what ey feel are the best values
around and are offering them to you in Real Estate Picks! (In this section),
Discover the best real estate values in Mexico Beach, Port St. Joe, Apalachicola,
Cape San Blas, St. George Island, Carrabelle and surrounding areas.
LS# 237995 $114,600 St George Islan


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Heath and Jacqueline Studle r
1ps312@att.net


Thursday, February d, 2010


Local


By Lois Swoboda
Times StaffWriter
On Jan. 16, the Carra-
belle branch of the Frank-
lin County Public Library
celebrated its first National
Gaming Day.
A cold and rainy Satur-
day turned a little brighter
for about 50 kids thanks to
the efforts of Library Di-
rector Glenda Ondracek,
her staff and volunteers
from other branches of the
Wilderness Coast Public
Library network. The event
lasted from 10 a.m. to 4
p.m.
Kids of all ages partici-
pated in a range of tradi-
tional and computer-based
games including bingo,
chess, checkers, Monopoly,
Dictionary, Candy Land,
Trivial Pursuit, Guitar
Hero, Crazy Eights, Chutes
and Ladders, and Old
Maid.
There were hourly draw-
ings for games donated by
toy manufacturer Hasbro,


new floor plan is open and,
at the same time, cozy.
Historically, libraries are
well known as key provid-
ers of print resources. With
new digital formats such as
downloadable audio, video,
and board and video games,
libraries continue to create
and promote modern edu-
cational opportunities for
their users.
Wilderness Coast librar-
ies are no exception and
offer free computer and
Internet access, WiFi and
hands-on help from staff
and volunteers. In addi-
tion to books, local art is on
display, public announce-
mentsarepostedandcopy
and fax machines are avail-
able.
People are on hand to
help with any kind of re-
search or to locate forms
for taxes or unemployment
and other types of public
assistance.
For more information on
National Gaming Day, visit
www.ala.org


James Bailey, of Eastpoint, left, enjoys a round of


which cosponsored the
event. Tables, chairs and
many of the games, includ-
ing a Wii console, were
on loan from Wilderness
Coast. Lunch was provided
to all.
This was the first time
Franklin County partici-
pated in "Gaming Day @
Your Library," which be-
gan last year when it drew
hundreds of libraries of all
types across the country.
Most libraries staged


the event on Nov. 13, 2009
but in deference to the late
Caroline Sparks, beloved
Carrabelle librarian who
had recently passed away,
the library delayed the
celebration. Sparks was in-
strumental in planning for
Gaming Day.
National Gaming Day
is promoted by the Ameri-
can Library Association to
celebrate the popularity
of board and video games,
as well as the recreational


Irulee C~reamer, of Lastpoint, becomes a "Cjuitar


and educational value of
play. Gaming teaches lead-
ership, problem solving,
and team-building skills.
Libraries are dynamic
places, continuously offer-
ing innovative programs
and services that educate,
entertain and expand inter-


action with their users.
Ondracek said the
Carrabelle branch of the
Franklin County is chang-
ing too. The library has un-
dergone a face-lift over the
last six months, including a
new sign and a total change
of layout on the inside. The


H h
630
580
570
560
590
570


%Prect
70 %
10 %
10 %
0 %
10 %
60 %


Febo4
FriFeb05
Sat, Feb 06
Sun, Feb 07
MonFeb08
TueFeb09
Wed, Feb 10


Eight of the 17 entries in
thisyear'sPhilacoWomen's
Clubartcontesttookblue
ribbons.
Asalwaystheentriesin
this year's arts and crafts
Competition showed won-
derful creativity and skill.
OnceagainCelesteWahl
stole the show, winning two
blue ribbons, for an abstract
needlepointdesignandfora
needlework representation
of the Three Kings traveling
to Bethlehem'
Other first place win-
ners were Pearl Wood of St.
George Island, and Shirley
Adams of Eastpoint, in the
photography category.
Judy CookofApala-
chicola took first place for
her patchwork Christmas
tree skirt. Shirley Taylor of
Eastpoint took a blue rib-
bon with a lovely, glittering
hand-knit scarf. Mary Har-
rell, of Eastpoint, took a blue
ribbon for her mixed media
memorybookfeaturinghis-
toric pictures and recipes.
Harrell said she created her
book for her children this
Christmas to help them hold
onto their heritage.
This year's judges were
Terry Birchwell of Car-
rabelle, and visiting artists,
Junie and Henry Vyfyinkel.
The winning pieces will go
on to compete for district
awards from the Florida
FederationofWomen's
ClubsinChipley.
-ByLoisSwoboda


This egg decorated in
the traditional Russian
style won a blue ribbon
for Barbara Padget,
of St. George Island.
Padget also entered a
handmade valentine.
She said she makes
1 6 of the cards each
year for members of her
family.


2/04 Thu 01:44AM
12:53PM
2/05 Fri 02:57AM
01:00PM
2/06 Sat 04:20AM


07:59AM
06:56PM
09:44AM
07:25PM
08:03PM


-0.1
0.5
-0.1
0.7
-0.2


2/07 Sun 05:41AM -0.3 L
2/08 Mon 06:51AM -0.3 L


0852M .3H


2/09 Te0:8M


-0.4


03:49PM


1.0 H


CAR
2/04 Thu 06:34AM
05:31PM
2/05 Fri 12:44AM
10:47AM
2/06 Sat 02:07AM


2.1


08:19AM 13


Terry Kemp models a blue ribbon
scarf created by Shirle Taylor, who
knit it with a pair of intertwined
threads, one yarn and the other
sequins strung on dark thread.


2/7 Sun 0:2A -.5


L 0:7M 21H


2/09 Te0:5M


-0.6


02:24PM


PHOTOS BY LOIS SWOBODA | The Times


ST GEORGE PLANTATION
One acre dry lot at the corner of Leisure Lane and Bayberry

geL n tiin theitexc eni iegate3d community c itSt
air strip, pool, tennis and new club house. Adjacent to a
pleasant sandy beach pathway to the Gulf of Mexico.


John Shelby, Broker -


B8 | The Times


countyy kids winners at first Gaming Day celebration


RABELLE


es*0


114


d nd"Y

850-370-6090


.
Island '




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