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Group Title: Apalachicola times
Title: The Apalachicola times
ALL ISSUES CITATION PDF VIEWER THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100380/00062
 Material Information
Title: The Apalachicola times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: H.W. Johnston
Place of Publication: Apalachicola Fla
Apalachicola Fla
Publication Date: January 21, 2010
Copyright Date: 2008
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1885.
General Note: Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00100380
Volume ID: VID00062
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 32911693
lccn - sn 95026907
 Related Items
Preceded by: Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by: Apalachicola herald

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    Section B
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        Page B 3
        Page B 4
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Thursday, JANUARY 21, 2010 w w w apalach times com 50<




James elected to lead seafood workers


Eastpoint woman is first female president in association's history


I


Inspiration in San Miguel


YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER FOR MORE THAN 120 YEARS


VOL. 124 ISSUE 39


By Lojs Swoboda
Times Staff Writer
Taunya James, of Eastpoint,
was chosen as the Franklin Coun-
ty Seafood Workers Association's
first woman president at its Jan,
7 meeting. She succeeds Johnny
Richards.
In addition, Billy Dalton was
selected as first vice president
and Robbie Dale Butler as sec-
ond vice president, while Karen
Sanders was elected treasurer
and Heather Maxwell secretary.
"We are starting with a new
group of officers and a lot of en-
thusiasm," James said. "It will
be a challenge to accomplish the
needs of the association and its
members without resources and
extensive hands-on participation
from workers and our commu-
nity.


The Franklin County Seafood
Worker's Association (FCSWA)
was founded in 1982, with the
original purpose being to promote
good working conditions for sea-
food workers and good conserva-
tion practices for Apalachicola
Bay, as well as to promote the
sale of local seafood and to foster
cooperation between shrimpers,
crabbers, oystermen and "other
persons who earn their livelihood
on Apalachicola Bay."
Recent amendments to the
FCSWA's incorporation some-
what altered the organization's
purpose, which now seeks to sup-
port seafood workers and their
families when the bay is closed,
in addition to promoting good
working conditions and environ-
mental conservation.
James, a working oysterman
with her husband Joseph for sev-


en years, was previously the FC-
SWA's treasurer. A master natu-
ralist, she worked for the Apala-
chicola Riverkeeper for two years
and has remained involved with
environmental concerns. James
said she believes in education as
a tool for protecting and presery-
ing the watershed, estuary, river
system and most importantly the
Apalachicola Bay area.
James has promoted the idea
of obtaining seeding oysters for
replanting the bay in many dif-
ferent areas to provide work for
interested seafood workers. Part
of the oyster relaying teams that
move oysters to more produc-
tive areas during the summer
months, James said she intends
to promote these state-funded
shell relays to a greater extent
this year if possible.
Dalton, also a working oyster-


man, has joined the Apalachicola/
Chattahoochee/Flint Stakehold-
ers and attended his first meet-
ing last month on behalf of local
oystermen. Long active with the
FCSWA, he said his greatest con-
cern is making progress in the
seafood industry and making it
possible for the county to remain
a working seafood community.
Butler, a lifelong oysterman
on the Apalachicola Bay, grew up
and attended school in Franklin
County. He first went to work as
an oysterman with his father and
mother and enjoys it as a way of
life. Butler said he would like to
make improvements to the shell-
ing and relay program now in
place, particularly working with
the state to find harder bottoms


LOIS SWOBODA | The Times
Taunya James, seen here
manning a booth at the
2009 Oyster Spat Festival,
was elected the first woman
president of the Seafood
Workers Association.


LOIS SWOBODA | The Times
George Jackson and Jim Lawlor display the
fruits of their labor at the Senior Center.

By Lois Swoboda
Times StaffWriter
A group of Carrabelle citizens and State Rep.
Leonard Bembry, D-Greenville partnered to
bring a truckload of food to the county earlier
this month.
On Jan. 9, Farm Share delivered 42,000
pounds of food to the Franklin County Senior
Center in Carrabelle for distribution throughout
the county.
The shipment included cantaloupes, toma-
toes, bread and pastry, and bottled drinks, such
as iced tea and lemonade.
Jim Lawlor, treasurer of the center, said he
believed about 500 people had taken advan-
tage of the giveaway. In addition to individuals,
a number of churches sent trucks to receive a
share of the food.
"At one point we had 18 pick-up trucks wait-
ing to be loaded," Lawlor said.
Numerous volunteers helped unload the
truck on Jan. 9 despite of the bitter cold. Offi-
cers Mark Goodwin and Jay Wallace brought six
inmates from the Franklin Correctional Institu-
tion who operated a forklift and helped with the
heavy lifting.
Wayne Todd, who worked for 20 years as the
sergeant-at-arms for the Florida Senate, is now
a consultant for Farm Share. He was on hand to
oversee the delivery.
Todd said the Senior Center was a natural
partner for the food distribution organization.
Established in 1991, Farm Share is a 501(c)(3)
non-profit organization, dedicated to the recov-
ery, sorting, packing and distribution of nutri-
tious foods for people in need. Farm Share ad-
ministers a combination of U.S. Department of
Agriculture commodity programs and produce
recovery operations from a packinghouse pro-
vided by Charles H. Bronson, commissioner of
the Florida Department of Agriculture and Con-


See FOOD DISTRIBUTION A2


Phone: 850-227-1845


DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK:


Sports............................A5-A6


Casifi~yeds......................... B6-7


Apa lachicola


See F(SWA A2


Farm Share and


TABLE OF CONTENTS


~FREEDOM


-












Girl Scouts prepare for annual CO KIE SALE

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A2 | The Times


Local


PHOTOS BY LOIS SWOBODA | The Times


Lois Swobod0
Times StaffWriter
For the first time in years,
Franklin County has Girl
Scouts.
The county is now home to
two troops that meet at the
First United Methodist Church
at 75 Fifth St. in Apalachicola.
Daisy Troop 200, for girls
Kindergarten through First
Grade meets with troop leader
B.J. Terhune of Eastpoint on
the second and fourth Friday
of each month. Candy Var-
nes of Apalachicola heads up
Troop 333 for Brownies, Sec-
ond and Third Grade girls,
and Juniors, girls attending
Grades Four and Five. They
meet on the second and fourth
Sunday.
Terhune said there are cur-
rently 11 registered Daisies
and more than 20 members of
Troop 333.
Parents wishing to enroll a
daughter can call Terhune at


all-time favorites: Thin Mints,
Samoas, and Tagalongs; Do-
Si-Dos, Trefoils, and Lemon
Chalet Crimes are also avail-
able.
New to the cookie line up
this year is the Thank U Berry
Munch cookie, with premium
cranberries that provide a
sweet tartness to accompany
creamy white fudge chips.
Cookies can be ordered at
any bank, at the Apalachicola
Bay and Carrabelle Chambers
of Commerce offices and at the
Apalachicola Times office.
On Jan. 15, "cookie mother"
Heather Friedman was busily
schooling her charges on how
to make a sale.
"Never go house to house
alone," she told them. "When
someone says they want to
buy cookies remember to ask
them; How many boxes would
you like?"
The girls receive all sorts of
prizes for cookie sales and the
grand prize for selling 2,000


670-1150 or Varnes at 728-0601.
There is a $12 registration
fee, however, parents unable
to pay can fill out an Opportu-
nity Grant and the fee will be
waived. Uniforms are simple
and not required for participa-
tion.
Scouts are now accepting
preorders for their 2010 Cookie
Sale. Girl Scouts from across
the 19 counties of the Pan-
handle will take preorders for
cookies through Jan. 25. Cook-
ies will be delivered to custom-
ers starting Feb. 13. The price
is $3.50 per box.
Preordering guarantees
customers the availability of
their favorite cookies. Girl
Scout cookie booths will be
open Feb. 21 through March
21.
This year's cookie theme
"Inspired By U..." will contin-
ue the tradition of providing a
quality cookie while teaching
effective skills to girls. This
year's cookie line includes the


"Cookie Mother" Heather Friedman tells a group of Daisies


boxes is a Nethook computer.


local troops will donate a por-


sumer Services.
Todd said that 75 percent of
USDA commodities are distributed
to the elderly and 50 percent of that
is sent to Florida.
Farm Share operates the only
charitable produce packinghouse
in the eastern United States. While
most food distribution charities fo-
cus on canned and processed food
donations, Farm Share specializes
in re-packing fresh fruits and veg-
etables that would otherwise be
thrown away. It costs more to handle
this kind of food, but fresh produce
is more nutritious than canned, and
there is a nearly unlimited supply of
it being thrown out every year.
Farm Share receives food in bulk
and has the resources to sort, pack,
store and ship tractor-trailer loads
of fresh food. Farm Share distrib-
utes food at no charge and with-
out fees, to end recipients or to
agencies, such as soup kitchens,
homeless shelters, food banks and
churches.
Lawlor and Todd said much of
the credit for the Jan. 9 food ship-
ment goes to George Jackson of
CarrabelleandRep.Bembry.
Bembry said Todd has been a
great help in fundraising before the
state legislature.
"Last year they gave us $200,000
and this year we plan to ask for
$600,000," Bembry said. "There is
food available. We need funds to ship
it from south Florida to needy peo-
ple in the northern part of the state.
It cost $1,200 to bring the truckload
of supplies to Carrabelle last week.


so the seed oysters are not
dumped in mud where they
sink and die.
Sanders grew up around
oysters. Her mother
shucked, and her father
and stepfather were both
oystermen. At age 15,
she started shucking and
bought her first oyster li-
cense in 1993. An oyster-
man with a passion for the
betterment of the seafood
industry, Sanders said she
is excited about her new
position and intends to help
make FCSWA's mission
statement a reality. She
has contributed many good
ideas for fundraising, grant
proposals, environmental
issues and work programs
for seafood workers in
times of crisis.
Maxwell, a new mom
who is married to an oys-
terman, is no newcomer to
the seafood industry. Her


family has been seafood
workers for generations,
with her great-grandfa-
ther, Capt. Woodruff Butler,
being the first person to
receive an oyster license.
There are currently three
generations of Maxwell's
family hard at work on the
bay, so she is extremely in-
terested in preserving the
history and heritage of the
oyster industry.
The FCSWA currently
is in need of an office and a
place to hold monthly meet-
ings, but its Web site, www.
FCSWA.com, has weekly
updates about upcoming
events, information and
fundraisers. The FCSWA's
first fundraiser will be a
yard sale and the associa-
tion is accepting donations.
For information, contact
Taunya James at 387-5982
or Karen Sanders at 653-
6197.


LOIS SWOBODA | The Times
On hand to help unload the tractor trailer behind them are, from
|eft, the Rev. Julie Stevens; Hershell Blanchette, president of the
Franklin County Senior Center; Carrabelle Mayor Curley Messer;
Bob Connors; State Rep. Leonard Bembry, D-Greenville; Mary Ann
Shields and Wayne Todd, a consultant for Food Share.


There is no reason people should go
hungry or homeless in the United
States."
Jackson, an ongoing contribu-
tor of funds to the Senior Center,
worked with Farm Share to arrange
for the delivery.
"I have been working on this
for over a year," he said. "We are in


hopes we can carry through with
this project. If we can, it will be a big
help to the people of Franklin Coun-
ty. We have state representative
Bembry working with us and he's a
big help. He was here this morning,
helping to unload the truck. He has
promised we'll get more food and I
think he will."


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Thursday, January 21, 2010


Local


The Times | A3


tian Soldiers."
Elder Eddie Joseph III
gave the opening prayer,
followed by Bishop Robert
Davis reading from Psalm
90: 1-12, which closes with
"So teach us to number our
days that we may present
to You a heart of wisdom."
The Love Center's In-
spirational Voices choir,
which included School
Board member Teresa
Ann Martin, sang "Arise,
Oh God."
Other government of-
ficials in the audience
included Tax Collector
Jimmy Harris, Sherriff
Skip Shiver, Superinten-
dent Nina Marks, Principal
George Oehlert, Apala-
chicola Police Chief Bobby
Varnes, Apalachicola City
Commissioner Brenda
Ash, County Health De-
partment Administrator
Wesley Tice and Florida
Highway Patrol Trooper
Clara Condo-Varner.
Host Pastor L.D. Martin
welcomedallinattendance,
focusing on the day's pur-
pose to give "a platform for
equality and social justice"
in King's honor.
"If Dr. Martin Luther
King were here today, he
would be well-pleased,"
Martin said. "Let's contin-
ue the dream."
The service focused less
on the historical details of
the civil rights struggle,
and more on the spirit to
guide the future. In addi-
tion to performing a dance
to "Lord, You're Holy,"
the Love Center's Chosen
Generation Youth did a
recitative to "And I Quote,"
in which youth stepped for-
ward to voice quotations
from many of Dr. King's
speeches and writings.
Also presenting were
Covenant Word Youth, who
performed "Don't Give
Up," and the Inspirational
Voices choir, featuring so-
loist Angelita Stevens, who
sang "Hold On" and "Show


PHOTOS BY DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times


Ministers Joel Williams, left, and Damien Davis,


Morgan Martin, front, was among the Chosen


Yourself Mighty."
Evangelist Angeline
Stanley gave an enthusias-
tic introduction of the guest
speaker, veteran educator
Elinor Mount-Simmons.
"I know that she prays
and she seeks God's face,"
Stanley said. "She fights
for your children. She is a
warrior, for the rights and
equality of all."
Mount-Simmons
stressed the importance
of remembering Dr. King's
legacy on what would have
been his 81st birthday, not-
ing that the "majority of
my educational colleagues
can't seem to revamp their
lesson plans" to teach
about the holiday.
"Our children must be
informed," she said. "His
legacy continues and it is
imperative that it be told in
generations to come."
She then focused on
the theme of her remarks,
which were derived from
a phrase she had heard in
the film "Rudy."


The four words she ad-
dressed were "Character,
courage, contribution and
commitment," and one by
one, she explained how Dr.
King's life and works had
exemplified these themes.
"We are all unique in-
dividuals," she said. "No
two of us are the same ex-
actly."
Mount-Simmons com-
pared her own experi-
ences as a 12-year-old girl,
confronting integration in
Panama City, to the consol-
idation effort in the county
of a few years ago, in both
cases feeling that she had
God at her back to lean on.
She stressed the im-
portance of contributing
back to the community
and urged local people to
volunteer on behalf of the
schools or other civic proj-
ects.
"You just got to give
back," she said. "And it
does not matter your age.
Each of us has a skill to of-
fer."


Educator Elinor Mount-Simmons speaks at the Dr. King Day service at the Love


She also urged the lo-
cal churches to become
involved in the needs of
their communities. "Our
churches have a purpose,"
said Mount-Simmons, who
is active at Friendship Mis-
sionary Baptist Church.
"For people of color, the
church has always been
our refuge. Our commu-
nity churches must be the
driving force behind our
county."
She closed with a poem
she had written some


years ago about King, and
challenged the audience
to make a difference in the
days to come.
"Celebrate. Act," she
said. "Tomorrow, what are
you going to do?"
Prior to the end of the
service, officials and cler-
gy were invited to take
part. Pastor Barry Hand
of Mount Zion Baptist
Church, offered up one of
the few directly political
statements of the service,
noting that a local citizens


movement was percolat-
ing for "dismantling single
member districts" and that
this should be opposed in
the interest of ensuring Af-
rican-American represen-
tation.
"Let's educate our con-
gregations about these
single member districts,"
he said.
Following the service, a
motorcade wound through
to downtown, followed by
light refreshments at the
church.


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O WayS Online | apalachtimes.com


* 'Y


Thursday, January 21, 2010


A4 | The Times


Since the
only deliveries
at Weems
these days are
either floral
arrangements,
lab test results
or FedEx
packages, we DAVID
here in Franklin ADLERSTEIN
County are Times City Editor
denied the
excitement that goes with the
"the first baby of2010."
No bassinets for the new
mom, no cigars for the dad, no
year's supply of diapers from the
IGA.
Still, it seems unfortunate to
think Apalachicola's hospital will
not have some "first" for the new
year it can boast about.
First heart attack? Too scary.
Plus the recipient of such an
honor may not feel comfortable
with all the excitement. Forget
that.
First stitches? Probably a
child's arm or leg, from playing
with knives or skateboarding.
Turning this into a special
community event might add
insult to injury. Scratch that too.
First uncontrollable
hiccoughing fit? Definitely a
possibility, but I'm not holding
my breath that a winner can be
found. Or tolerated.
I do have a suggestion,
though, for a first.
This is because I remember
well, until I was put to sleep, the
events of Jan. 3 and 4, 2010.
Those days were when I
prepared for and received
my first colonoscopy, which
because it was the first one that
particular morning, on the first
Monday of the month, in the first
month of the year, also qualifies
as Weems' first of 2010.
Isn't that amazing? The very
first one.
Break out the confetti and the
horns. I am speechless.
Luckily I have jotted down
just a few thank-yous for the
many people without whom none
of this would be possible.
And so, in receiving this
award, for the hospital's first


better doctor, his family will do
better and his patients will do
better."
Perhaps most importantly
for us, though, Stockwell has
inspired volunteer physicians
though the "We Care" project,
and now that he's retired, has
carried on that commitment
towards going the extra mile.
Recognizing that small, rural
hospitals often have to struggle
with funding, and the ability to
bring in top-notch specialists,
Stockwell has reached out
to Madison County, and now
Franklin, to bring his services
to bear on drawing a greater
number of patients.
"These hospitals are to
be commended because they
are doing something for their
community," he said. "By
keeping people here, you're
capturing some of the revenue
that could be spent elsewhere,
and that's good economically.
"All health care is local. It's
just like your roads or your
stoplight," he said. "A healthy
community is an economically
viable community."
The doctor also wants to beat
the drum for colon screenings,
and so far is doing anywhere
from a couple to a half-dozen
each Monday, with hopes of
boosting the number of these
and other procedures up to
about a dozen.
"Colon cancer is a largely
preventable disease or, if caught
early, a largely controllable
disease," he said.
When I awoke, the doctor
stopped by my bed and gave me
the reassuring news that he had
found no polyps. I was pleased.
At least I know that, for the next
five years anyway, there is no
indication I will have to face the
type of cancer that my father
has triumphed over, thanks to
surgery and chemotherapy.
I also am proud to have
received this "Weems First
Colonoscopy of 2010" award. It
would have been nice to have
woken from anesthesia wrapped
in a bright blue bow, but I guess
I can live without that.


DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times


intestinal scoping of the new
year, I would like to first mention
my registered nurse, Fran
Bauer, who helped prepare me
for my assignment by carefully
outlining how the day before
I would have to drink a gallon
of GoLYTELY, an odd-tasting
polyethylene glycol electrolyte
solution, with four fruit-flavored
packets to choose from.
In this solution lies a chemical
with the wondrous power to turn
the bowels into a mighty stream
which, like righteousness, rolls
down and out of your bottom like
waters and makes you want to
just stand up and shout.
And sit down, and stand up
and shout again. Hallelujah.
Fran used to be an air
traffic controller in Atlanta, but
retired from that and now is
on her second career living a
quieter life with her husband in
Apalachicola. I guess you could
say she is now a rear water
traffic controller.
She's very good at what she
does, covers the bases and
answers your question, and
has a bedside manner that
made me feel like the liquid diet
and ongoing cleansing was all
worthwhile, because someone
really cared about doing an


endoscopic examination of my
bowels.
And who is that someone? Dr.
James Stockwell, a Tallahassee
gastroenterologist, retired
from the well-known Digestive
Disease Clinic practice he
founded 35 years ago.
But before we get to him,
don't let me forget to thank
Jesse Pendergrast, the certified
registered nurse anesthetist
from Panama City who made
sure I snoozed through the
entire wondrous medical
procedure that lets a doctor
examine with fiber optics the
lining of the colon to see if
there's a polyp or two that could
be the first sign of a cancer.
Plus there's Tammy Quinn,
a licensed practical nurse who
works as Stockwell's assistant,
fiddling with the controls of a
top-flight piece of equipment.
And there's receptionist Joanna
Page at the front desk, who
showed a remarkably chipper
bearing even as the clock was
just striking 7 a.m.
I owe it all you.
Still, my biggest appreciation
for receiving the "Weems First
Colonoscopy of the Year Award"
has to go to the 68-year-old
doctor who made it all possible.


Lucky for us we have a 40-
year veteran of the medical arts
working every Monday here
at Weems, a former medical
officer in the Navy who served
in Vietnam during the height of
the war, and still keeps in touch
with some of his corpsmen.
Attached at the time with a
Marine unit, Lt. Stockwell got a
piece of training in a war zone
that had to be more challenging
than the quiet corridors of a
rural Panhandle hospital.
After completing a fellowship
in gastroenterology at the
University of Miami in 1974,
Stockwell, an Ohio native,
moved to Tallahassee and
started a practice that would
blossom into one of the region's
largest and best. He also
became involved in shaping
Leon County's health care
policies, and worked to create
a wellbeing project for medical
students.
"We don't take good care of
our colleagues or ourselves,"
he said, noting that up to one-
third of medical residents are
diagnosed with depression. "We
need to help young physicians
avoid those things that would
cause problems for them or
their families. If he can be a


This column has been writing
itself since I got the news that Allie
Zingarelli had died. I processed
the information with resignation.
We all knew the end was coming; it
just came too soon. Her husband,
Jiggs, left us only a short time ago.
Her nephew, Tich, was buried only
recently.
Few of the friends my age have
their parents anymore. We envy
those who do. Each time another of
that generation leaves us, we feel
the loss as keenly as if it were our
own.
I knew Allie as the mother of
my good friend, John, and as my
fifth grade reading teacher. Her
daughter, Elizabeth, is the same
age as my sister. Allie and I were
not close friends. She was more a
comforting lifelong presence.
we most often ran into each
other at the grocery store. I joked
that we must be on the same
shopping schedule. She said,
"No, honey, I am always here."
She worried constantly about her
weight, but didn't stop cooking.
In fact, she gave me one of my
most prized recipes. Her lemon
cheese cake was legendary. One
evening when I was a dinner guest,
I summoned up my courage and
asked for the recipe. She didn't
hesitate. Looking around for a
piece of paper, she finally found
her purse, ripped out a blank
check, and grabbed a red pen. As
she scribbled out the ingredients
and instructions for the fillmg,
she advised me to use the 1-2-3-4
cake recipe from the Philaco Club
cookbook for the layers.

Allie Zingarelli's
LOMON (110050 Fillini
1% cups sugar
1 cup water


% cup lemon juice
grated rind of one lemon
if you wish
6 egg yolks
6 tablespoons flour
dash of salt
% stick butter
Mix sugar, salt, flour
and lemon juice. Add water RED
and beaten egg yolks. Add AND
butter and cook over double Deni
boiler until thick..

?|111000 (IUb Cookbook
1-2-3-4 Cake
Courtesy Mrs. C.M. Chancy
1 cup butter or margarine
2 cups sugar
3 cups sifted cake flour
4 large eggs
3 teaspoon baking powder
1 cup liquid (milk or orange
juice)
2 teaspoons vanilla extract
Cream butter and sugar
well. Add eggs, one at a time,
beating well after each. Add dry
ingredients alternately with liquid,
beginning and ending with dry
ingredients. Add flavoring. Put in
pans that have been greased and
dusted with flour and bake at 375
degrees for thirty minutes.
I could offer more step-by-step
instructions, but I have faithfully
reproduced the recipes as they
were given to me. Novice cooks
might want to ask questions. Just
call; we of a certain generation will
walk you through it.
From e-mails and telephone
calls, I know the Times has readers
all over the world.
Right now they are thinking,
"Why is this called a lemon cheese
cake when there is no cheese?"
Good question. Some cookbook
authors and historians posit that


cheese is a corruption
of the word chess, which
is basically a cooked
) mixture of eggs, sugar and
flavoring. Rest assured.
This is a prototype Southern
--- recipe with an impeccable
provenance.
HITE On the subject of food,
OUX I have another memory. I
Roux was at a shower, or tea, or
coffee, at Allie's home. The
mind simply boggles at the
number of events she hosted over
the years. The table featured tiny,
flaky biscuits stuffed with thin
slices of ham. She explained that in
her home state of North Carolina
no event was complete without
ham biscuits. I still think of her
whenever I eat one.
Allie arrived here as a teacher
in 1947 fresh out of college. Her
lifelong friend, Jean Gander told
me they came in the same year
and were even roommates. Allie
married Jiggs on July 21, 1948, and
Jean married Bubba on July 22 the
same year. Jean said they talked on
the telephone every day.
What wealth! A marriage
of 60 years, a friendship for
even longer, four children who
recognize the riches of their
childhood, grandchildren and great-
grandchildren.
I am sad in a good way. I talked
to my old friend Renn Randolph
Edenfield as she drove home from
the funeral and luncheon. We
agreed that we were supposed to
feel a great loss, because it is. Our
grief, our recollections, and our
recognition that we aren't children
make for lives rich with experience.

Denise Roux is a regular
columnist for the Apalachicola and
Carrabelle Times. 'lb reach her,
email her at rouxwhit@mchsi.com


W


ELIZABETH ZINGARELLI| SpecialtotheTimes
The Zingarelli children stand with their parents, Allie
and Jiggs Zingarelli, who were married 60 years.

alachicola ( |
Carrabelle I


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Frankly FRANKLIN


Just like the first baby born in the new year


The riches of family, friends and flaky ham biscuits



















Sea hawks top B''ay, fll o W.0adsden


Richards nominated for Red Zone award
Special to The Times
Coach Josh Wright has nominated
Seahawk senior Chase Richards as
an Old Spice Red Zone Player of the
Year.
As a result of this nomination, Rich-
ards is among a select group of play-
ers eligible to be selected as a national
Red Zone Player of the Year and hon-
ored in a full-page feature in a national
rint publication
For the ninth straight year, Old
Spice is recognizing high school foot-
ball players who go above and beyond =
the call of duty, particularly in the Red .7 .
Zone. The program honors athletes
able to elevate their play and step up 0
when the heat is really on. These ath-
letes embody leadership, performance
and desire, and serve as examples to
their teammates on and off the field.
High school coaches across the
country are naming one player from
their team as their Player of the Year,
with each receiving a certificate to ac-
knowledge his accomplishment. Rich-
ards is also eligible to be named one of
50 national Players of the Year, each of
whom will receive a plaque and other
awards.
The Red Zone Player of the Year
program is nationally sponsored by
Procter & Gamble, makers of Old
Spice Red Zone Deodorant. The pro-
gram is created and managed by 360 SPEGAL TO THE TIMES
Youth LLC, an Alloy company. CHASE RICHARDS



g g

I L
STATE BAN K 897
A Division of Coastal Community Bank

Apalachicola Carrabelle Eastpoint St. George Island
22 Avenue E 612 NAvenue A 5 Jefferson Street 200 Franklin Blvd
653-8805 697-4500 670-8501 927-2561


*Traditional


By [)gyjd Ad|gstejn
Times City Editor
The Franklin County
Seahawks boys basketball
team lost its second district
game last week, to West
ARRON Gadsden, before bouncing
PRINCE back to beat Bay High.
Preparing to face dis-
home Saturday night, before
what is sure to be the larg-
trict leader Port St. Joe at
est crowd so far this season,
coach Fred Drake's squad
is focusing more on the
post-season than a regular
CARLOS season district title, which
has grown increasingly un-
MORRIS likely.


"I told them before the
season, we're going to play
them (St. Joe) four times
this year, twice in the regu-
lar season, once in the dis-
trict tournament and then
again in the regionals,"
Drake said. "We have to win
No. 3 and 4; they're the ones
that count."
After enduring a heart-
breaking 72-69 overtime loss
Jan. 9 at Port St. Joe, the Se-
ahawks faced off the follow-
ing Tuesday at West Gads-
den and lost a cliffhanger
57-56.
"I felt as a coach, the kids
left it all at St. Joe Drake
said. "You could just tell


they were so emotionally
and mentally drained."
The coach said the team
also had heard stories about
West Gadsden's sometimes
"rowdy and crazy fans," so
this first visit to Greensboro
had the team on edge.
"We were intimidated by
the fact we were thinking
something bad was going to
happen," Drake said. "Emo-
tionally, we lost the game be-
fore it even started."
The Seahawks broke out
to an 11-2 run in the second
quarter, but West Gadsden
tied it at 27 at the half.
See SEA HAWKS A6


JAN. 14 VS. BAY HIGH
Ba 10 15 18 15 58
Franklin (o.16 8 25 16 65
SEAHAWKS: Arron Prince 2/7 2s, 0/1
3s, 0/1 FTs, 4 pts.; Carlos Morris 10/16
2s, 3/9 3s, 2/2 FT, 31 pts.; Dalin Modican
5/6 2s, 10 pts.; Adam Joseph 1/3 2s, 2
pts.; Austin O'Neal 8/15 2s, 2/3 FE, 18
pts.
Totals: 26/47 2s, 3/10 3s, 4/6 FTs
Rebounds: Morris 12, O'Neal 8, Joseph
7, Modican 6, Prince 3, James Winfield 2 '
Michael Turner
Steals: Joseph 3, Prince, Modican, 2,
Winfield
Assists: Prince 7, Modican 6, O'Neal 4,
Joseph 2, Morris


JAN. 12 @ W. GADSDEN
Franklin Co.12 15 16 13 56
W. Godsden 17 10 14 16 57
SEAHAWKS: Prince 3/5 2s, 1/6 3s, 9
pts.; Morris 6/13 2s, 1/16 3s, 4/6 FT, 19
pts.; Modican 2/3 2s, 4 pts.; Winfield 1/1
2s, 2 pts.; Joseph 1/2 2s, 2 pts.; O'Neal
7/14 2s, 0/2 3s, 5/10 FTs, 19 pts.; Zach
Jones 1/2 FTs, 1 pt
Totals: 20/38 2s, 2/26 3s, 10/18 FTs
Rebounds: O'Neal 11, Morris 1, Joseph
6, Modican 5, Prince 4, Winfield 2, Allen,
Jones
Steals: Morris 4, Prince 5, O'Neal 3,
Winfield 2

See STATS A6


By Kelli Maggio
Special to the Times
The Lady Seahawks
played their final two soc-
cer matches Jan. 11 and 12,
against the home-standing
Leon Lady Lions and as
host to the visiting Mari-
anna Lady Bulldogs.
We fell to Leon 2-0 and
defeated Marianna 6-0. De-
spite missing several key
players against Leon, we
put forth great effort on a
freezing cold night in Tal-
lahassee. Once again, we
just could not finish our
attacks and put the ball in
the net. The game was 1-0
at halftime, and we sur-
rendered the final goal in
the second half. All in all,
we played well defensively
against Leon under the cir-
cumstances.
To the delight of the
home fans, we had no prob-
lems finishing our attacks
with goals by five different
players in the season finale
against the Lady Bulldogs.
Macey Hunt, Megan Mc-
Clain and Gracyn Kirvin,
who played a key role in
executing the offense, each
scored their first goals of
the season, while Megan
Newell tallied her ninth


MAttT MtuAN
HUNT McCLAIN
and Whitney Vause scored
a pair to lift her season to-
tal to five.
Assistingonfourofthese
electric goals was Newell,
while Maggie Langston re-
corded the game's last as-
sist on a savvy pass to New-
ell. The corner kick assist
by Newell was a perfectly
placed soccer ball, which
Vause punched in the net.
Every goal was executed
beautifully and almost ex-
actly like we had drawn it
up.
This offensive execution
is what we have been work-
ing toward all season long.
Our defense finished the
season strong with a shut-
out, largely due to strong
goalie play by Emily Hat-
field. I am extremely proud
of the progress and the im-
provement that have taken
place between the begin-
ning of the season and the
end of the season.


UKALTN WilllNET
KIRVIN VAUSE
We willenterdistrictplay
next year, and it is very im-
portant that this improve-
mentcontinuesandcarries
over. Our Lady Seahawks
soccer season began with
a 2-2 tie against Florida
High and finished with a
6-0 victory over the Mari-
anna Lady Bulldogs. This
year, the offense scored
18 goals while allowing 19,
and the final record of2-5-2
will serve as the foundation
that these young ladies can
build upon.
It was inspiring to see
how much they have im-
proved in one short season,
and we are extremely ea-
ger to see what the future
holds with so many of the
players returning.
Kelli Maggio, a member
of the University of Mobile
LadyRamsundefeatedl997
national champion soccer
team, is coach of the Lady
Seahawks soccer team.


Spe(jg| to The Times
The Franklin County High School
Fall Sports Banquet will be held at 6:30
p.m. today, Jan. 21, in the school's cafeto-
rium.


It will be catered by AJ's Neighborhood
Bar & Grill.
Tickets are on sale for the event now.
Contact Seahawks football coach Josh
Wright or Boosters President Monica Mo-
ron. Players and coaches eat free.


CA RRA BE L LE APA LA CH ICO LA


A


GAME STATS


Lady Seahawks soccer


Fall spor-ts banquet today at FCHS


Megan Newell
Lady Seahawk
sophomore Megan
Newell scored one
goal, and had four
assists, as the girls
soccer team closed
out its 2009-10
season with a 6-0
defeat of Marianna.


Balin M~dican


Seahawk junior Dalin Modican had 10 points against Bay High, and is





STATS from page AS

Assists: O'Neal 2, Prince 4, Morris 4, Winfield
Blocks: Joseph, O'Neal, Turner

JAN. 9 @ PSJ
Franklin (o. 6 20 17 15 11 69
P5J 16 11 19 12 14 12
SEAHAWKS: Prince 1/6 2s, 1/1 3s, 3/4 FTs, 8
pis.; Morris 6/11 2s, 4/10 3s, 4/1 FT, 28 pts.; Modican
3/8 2s, 1/2 FTs, I pts.; Joseph 1/4 2s, 2/2 FTs, 4 pts.;
O'Neal 9/15 2s, 0/1 3s, 4/1 FTs, 22 pts.
Totals: 20/45 2s, 5/12 3s, 14/22 FTs
Rebounds: Morris 9, Modican 1, O'Neal, Winfield,
Joseph 5, Prince 3
Steals: Joseph 3, Morris, Modican 2, Prince, O'Neal
Assists: O'Neal 4, Prince 3, Morris 2, Modican


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. -


Thursday, January 21, 2010


A6 | The Times


Sports


Franklin County opened
a 33-27 lead with 6:22 left in
the third quarter, but the
Panthers clawed back into
a 37-all tie. The Seahawks
led43-41goingintothefinal
frame, but it was nip and
tuckfromthenon.Withless
than a minute left, the Pan-
thers held a slim 57-56 lead.
But Franklin County
couldn't secure the win,
with senior guard Austin
O'Neal missing two free
throws, and then his team-
mates unable to capitalize
on two Panther turnovers
and a jump ball in the wan-
ing seconds.
Sophomore Carlos Mor-
ris, who led the team with 19
points, had two free throws
at the end of the game but
missed them both.
"We play good against
teams we shouldn't beat,
and we lay it down against
ones we should," Drake


said. "They're unpredict-
able, full of growing pains.
You never know what to ex-
pect from these guys now."
On Jan. 14 at home
against Bay High, the Se-
ahawksre-establishedtheir
poise on their home court,
winning 65-58 behind a 31-
point effort from Morris.
The Seahawks opened
with a 12-2 run, but the
Tornadoes whirled back to
knot it at 20 with 1:33 left in
the half and then stepped
ahead with a 25-24 lead go-
ing into the locker room.
The two teams battled
it close in the third quarter,
but the Seahawks seized
the advantage, holding a
49-43 lead going into the
last stanza. The Tornadoes
managed to get within two
points, 53-51, about half-
way through the quarter,
but the Seahawks opened
a 10-point lead and held on


for their second victory this
season against Bay.
The Seahawks now
stand at 9-6, with a 3-2 re-
cord in the district.
Senior point guard Ar-
ronPrincehasrejoinedthe
squad, after conveying to
Drake in a heart-to-heart
talk the personal reasons
that prompted him to miss
the last four games of 2009
and the first of2010.
"Everybody deserves a
second chance, especially a
senior," Drake said. "I see
a kid that's a senior, and I
know I can help get him out
of here and into college. I'm
looking at the kids' well-
being.
"I'm going to base my
success on how many kids
I get into college," he said.
"That's my No. 1 goal, to
get these kids out of Frank-
lin County on some type of
scholarship."


Blocks: Morris

JAN.5 VS. WEWAHITCHKA
Wewa 10 13 14 14 51
Franklin (o. 20 23 20 23 86
SEAHAWKS: Marcus Allen 2/6 2s, 0/3 3s, 4 pts;
Morris 8/16 2s, 5/8 3s, 3/4 FT, 34 pis.; Modican 5/8
2s, 1/2 FTs, 11 pts.; Winfield 1/2 2s, 2 pts.; Turner 1/3
2s, 2 pts.; Tydron Wynn 2/2 3s, 6 pts.; Joseph 2/3 2s, 4
pts.; O'Neal 9/18 2s, 1/3 3s, 2/2 FE, 23 pts.
Totals: 28/57 2s, 8/18 3s, 6/8 FTs
Rebounds: Morris 10, O'Neal 9, Winfield, Turner 1,
Joseph 6, Allen 5, Modican, Trekale Turrell 3, Wynn
Steals: O'Neal, Modican, Allen 3
Assists: O'Neal 9, Turrell 1

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SEAHAWKS from page As


(0DY WALKER AWARD
Charles Collins won the Cody
Walker award at the Rutherford
High School football banquet.
This award is presented to one
senior from Rutherford every
year in memory of Walker,
who played for Rutherford in
the '70s and went on to play
for Troy State. Collins, son of
Kim Creamer and grandson of
Charles and Carolyn Wilson
all of A alachicola, won the'
award for his dedication to
the game in playing offense,
defense and special teams for
Rutherford, which finished its
season 6-4.
SPECIAL TO THE TIMES


l~b8~~1~9~ ~


BAY MEDICAL
One Life. Onc Heart. Onc Hospital


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SURRIY 08.5


V














Thursday, January 21, 2010 w w w. apalach times .com Page 1


B


By [015 Swoboda
Tinn \taft lijits 1.
local painter has just returned from
launching has drst international show in
Aletito
Nial Smith-Hillow is a familiar figure
to St. George Islanders, cruising the ba.\
on his bike nea ring a straw fedora, but not e1ery-
one realizes he is a prominent artist
In June of last year. Smith-Hillow opened his
first solo international exhibition at the Red Door
Galleri in San Allouel de Allende a historic town
in eastern Mexico wounded in 1542.
The painter had Illed in San Miguel in 1969
Snd 1970'as a student at the Instituto Allende.
During his latest visit, Smith-Hillow made
contactwithEdOshmanwhoroughthem: lears
ago. Though 83 years old, Oshman continues to
paint daily.
During his 6rst sojourn in Mexico, Smith-Wil-
low hung out w illiexpatriate GIs in the local can-
tinas and the.\ became his mentors.
"I wanted to go back to see what kind of an im-
pression it would make on me after all that time.
I visited last year and enj<:tied it-but, this time I
took a lot at long \talks and lots of photographs,"
he said
Smith-Hilloit paints from photos, often mix-
ing images from diverse places to form a scene.
Some of his San Miguel pictures display local
faces against the exotic backdrop of this charm-
my Mexican town, know n for its beautiful colonial
architecture
Af ter" Horld llar II, man,\ American bl., al-
tended art school in San Miguel \t here the 011-
mate was milder and the Illing cheaper than in
North American cities


In the 196*, San Miguel became a
center for American expatriates and
was a popular destination for Ken
Keseyandthe Merry Prankstersas
recorded in Tom Holte's nolel --The
Electnc Kool-Aid Acid Test
The scenery and people at San
Miguel were the focus at Smith-ll'll-
low's latest body at work He said it
took him about a year to create the
paintings displayed in his Mexican
show.
The exhibit showed 1001Smith- .
Hilloit's paintings and seen of
these sold. He said most were
purchased b.1 11sitors from the
western U.S
Smith-Willow said that this
group of pictures is a httle ditter-
ent from his other work
-:\ll of the paintings Idid were
narrative," he said -- There \\as
a story going through each im-
age that you had to pick up on to
understand the painting IMAGES
The artist said change has COURTESY OF NI
come to San Miguel. This is Harr
"The gringo community has be more fa
grown considerably. Nott .\ou
see peasants with cell phones," ^ "
he said. "Some people are still in traditional cos-
tumes but thy.1 wear running shoes instead of
huarache sandals."
He said the cost of Illing in San Miguel is about
two-thirds that of the US.
"Nobody drives," Smith-Hillow said "The city
has decreedthatyou can go agiat here within the
city limits for 20 pesos and there's a good bus


y's Bar in San Miguel but one of the patrons may
milias from Harry As on the island.
system
Smith Hillow said many of his friends tried to
discourage him from visiting Mpxico because of
the dangers associated with drug trafficking but
he found his inland destination to be tranquil and
visitor friendly.
"The drug trade seems to be coastal and along
the borders," he observed. "I didn't see gangs or
tagaine in central Mexico."


Young~~~~~~ lovers pr::..d th acdo frpasn omni agn


An old doll seller accompanied by one of the many
sirwl d.:::.gs 5.moth-W.II.:::..*, sold hauni rhe alleys .:::.1 rhe
oan Miguel People seem 10 cooperate to take care
.. of them and feed them They re very friendly," he
said.


I~~~~~~~~~~~~ "rm ~*!PCPI~: hli


LIFE


TI~ES


& we exit&*



Four decades later, painter returns to artistic inspiration



































































~~u.i ifkE i


I


PETOF TH E
WEE K

Honey
Honey is our veteran
office dog. She has been our
loyal friend since 10arch 2()()6
and she is now about 6 years
old. It is time for her to retire
and go to a real home with a
real family She is a loving and
street dog but she needs to be
the only dog in the household.

r room nd our
.
dog, please consider her She
would be a wonderful friend
and companion.
VOLUNTEERS are desperately needed to socialize Cagney
and all of the other dogs and cats. Any time you can spare would
be .-:<.ol appreciated.
Call Karen at 67()-8417 for more details or visit the Franklin
County
Humane Society at 244 State Route 65 in Eastpoint. You
may log onto the website at invitforgottenpets.org to see more
of our adoptable pets.
Remember, when you adopt a friend for life, you not only
save the life of that pet, you make room for us to save the life of
one more abandoned dog or cat!
J DON'T PAY TOO MUCH!
$50 Quarterly
Saves YOU $100 a year!
forresidentialaccounts

AIoha BulsPost Manalement

-


(Audrey Schmidt, CE4, Ralph Roberson, CE4, Susan Pruitt, Betty Jean Baker)

Announcing a Name Change
The same familiar eo le, Audrey Schmidt, CPA, Betty Jean Baker and
Susan Pruitt, at the same location, 219 Avenue E in Apalachicola are
now Roberson & Associates, P.A. (formerly Roberson & Friedman
P.A.). All of us along with the principal member of our firm, Ralph C.
Roberson, CPA, appreciate all of our clients and friends that continue
to make us the largest Certified Public Accounting firm in Franklin and
Gulf counties. Our commitment to professional friendly service and
resources to meet the needs of our clients remains constant.

Individual Tax Corporate and Partnership Tax E-File Services IRS Issues
- Business Accounting and Payroll Financial Statements QuickBooks
Advisor and Support Auditing Business Consulting, Organization and
Start Up Trust and Estate Accounting and Taxes Non-Profit Accounting,
Set Up, and Tax Services Business Services, including Business Analysis
Reports, Performance Comparisons to Averages in your Business Segment,
Business Valuation Reports, Bank Loan Analysis Reports to assist you and
your banker.
Serving Our Clients and Community


gaa ROBERSON &
I ASSOCIATESPA.
CERTIFIED PUBLIC ACCOUNTANTS
219 Avenue E Apalachicola, FL 32320
Telephone 850/653-1090 Fax 850/653-1091
www.rapacpas.com


Thursday, January 21, 2010


B2 | The Times


Society


Special to the Times
"Seeing Stars in Dixie," the upcoming production by the Panhandle Play-
ers, promises an evening of Southern charm and colorful characters.
The show will be produced from Jan.29-31 at the Eastpoint Firehouse's
Little Theatre on 6th Street.
Come sit a spell in Clemmie's Tea Room down Natchez way Natchez,
Miss., that is around the mid-1950s to 1956 to be exact. Hollywood has just
come to town with Elizabeth Taylor and Montgomery Clift to film a Civil War
romance. You'll find Clemmie's Zany friends trying to get her ready for her
chance of a lifetime to audition for a small role in the movie.
But look out for Ms. Marjorie, socialite extraordinaire, who is also vying
for the same role. As the competition ensues, relationships are challenged
and secrets are revealed. Y'all come enjoy this hilarious and heartwarming
comedy.
The cast includes Laura Baney, Henry Kozlowsky, Megan Lamb, and
newcomers Melonie Inzetta and Melanie Humble, with Margy Oehlert as
director.
For tickets, call 670-8200. For additional information, visit www.panhan-
dleplayers.com
The Panhandle Players' season is funded in part by the Franklin County
Tourist Development Council.


cast
members
rehearses
for "Seeing
Stars in
Dixie to be
performed
Jan. 29-31 at
the Eastpoint
Fire house
Little Theatre.


ROYCE ROLSTAD III
Specialty
The Times


Sara Ward, Gulf Coun-
ty's Junior Miss, will par-
ass::,mo sor;
Saturday, Jan. 23 in Winter
Garden. The Apalachicola
native was selected to rep-
resent the Gulf County area
.
at the Florida Junior Miss
program Oct. 17.
The young woman se-
lected during the state
program will travel to Mo-
bile, Ala., to participate in
the AJM National Finals
where she will have an op-
portunity to win the title
of America's Junior Miss,
a share of $125,000 in cash
scholarships, and college
scholarships to more than
200 colleges and universi-
ties across the nation.
Ward, a senior at Port
St. Joe High School, is the
daughter of Tommy and
Patty Ward; sister to Kevin
and T.J., and Tara; aunt to
Kate Ward; granddaugh-
ter of Martha Pearl Ward
and the late Buddy Ward,
and Verna Shiver and the
late Dallas Shiver; and
the great-granddaughter
of Carmi Ward and Delcie
Shiver.
She is currently a mem-
ber of the Junior Varsity
cheerleading squad, where
she serves as captain, Key
Club, National Honor So-
ciety, Senior Executive
Board, Mu Alpha Theta,
and is senior senator of the
Student Government Asso-


Kassidy Bianca Noelle Denney cel-
ebrated her third birthday on 'lliesday,
Jan. 12, 2010.
She is the daughter of Kimberly Den-
ney and Shawn Carpenter both of East-
point, and little sister to Jacob.
Her maternal grandparents are Don-
na Motes and Bill Millender. Her paternal
grandparents are Charles Carpenter, Sr.,
and Sandra Davis, of Prattville, Ala.
Happy birthday, Kass.
Love, Moma, Bubba and Nana


KEVIN WARD | Special to the Times


student at Pam Nobles Stu-
dio, where she has taken
dance classes for the past
14 years.
Upon graduation, Sara
plans to attend Flagler Col-
lege where is will earn a
bachelor's in business ad-
ministration. She hopes to
one day establish her own
business, where she plans
to take a portion of her prof-
its to found an organization
for local children.
Florida's Junior Miss
is an official preliminary
of America's Junior Miss
(AJM), the oldest and larg-
estscholarshipprogramfor
high school senior females
of its type. Since 1958, AJM
has awarded more than $92
million in cash scholarships
and provided thousands of
young women with college
granted scholarships to
colleges and universities
across the nation. Each
year, AJM makes avail-
able more than $52 million
in scholarship opportuni-
ties to high school senior
wo e edition to providing
scholarships, AJM chal-
lenges each participant to
share its national outreach
program, Be Your Best Self
(BYBS), with young people
across the nation. Through
BYBS, Junior Misses en-
courage self esteem and
excellence in all young peo-
ple through the program's
five principles: Be healthy,
Be Involved, Be Studious,
Be Ambitious, and Be Re-
sponsible.


Sara Ward


citation.
She has previously
served as the Junior Class
president, the vice-presi-
dent of the National Honor
Society, co-captain of her
Junior Varsity cheerlead-
ing squad, and sophomore
and junior senators of the
Student Government.
Sara is a Hugh O'Brien
Leadership Ambassador, a
member of the 2009 Home-
coming Court, and cho-
sen as the 2008-2009 Miss
Florida Seafood. She is a


BABY
SHOWER
There will be a
show ro


:"d nMnu sday

all fitPeontmire
Station.
This event will be
hosted by Haze,

gaa HeCnerra AII
family and friends
are invited.


Panhandle Players ready for Southern comedy, 'Seeing Stars in Dixie'


Birthdays and WEDDINGS


Ward to compete Saturday


Kassidy


Ciera Carlson,

Justin Massey

to marry
Ciera
Carlson
and Jus-
tin Massey
would like
to announce .,
their upcom-
ing wedding ,
on Sunday, .
Feb. 14, 2010 =
at the Car-
rabelle Boat ,...
Club on Tim- -
her Island.
Ciera is the daughter of Barbara and
Kelly Butler, and Bert Carlson. Her grand-
parents are Carl and Sharon Carlson, and
Martha and Milton Strickland, of Apala-
chicola
Justin is the son of Olivia and Spence
Massey. His grandparents are Plez and
Francess Messer, Karen and Jep Smith,
and Curley and Audrey Messer of Carra-
belle, and the late Percy and Pat Mock.
The ceremony will begin at 5 p.m. No in-
vitations will be sent out so we are inviting
all friends and family to attend.













_RAr, _Y p;,r' t -- f


Obituaries


(ARD OF THANKS
ChriStmas Toy Collection
The Franklin Toy Connection project was a smash-
ing success this year thanks to the hard work of our
coalition. The Sheriff's Office, the county health de-
partment, Resort Realty, St. George Island Volunteer
Fire Department, Trinity Episcopal Church, Cindy
Clark, Franklin's Promise, Gulf State Community
Bank, Apalachicola Bay Chamber of Commerce,
Kmart and others came together to plan and imple-
ment the fund raising, purchasing and distribution
of gifts to over 321 families with a total of 676 chil-
dren.
Thank you, thank you wonderful people! We
have already begun to plan for Christmas 2010.
Kay Wheeler, Chair


The United Methodist Churches

SOf Franklin County Welcome You
First United Methodist Church of Apalachicola
Worship Service 11:00 a.m. every Sunday
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
75 5" St. Apalachicola 653-9530 fumcapalach@gtcom.net
Pastor: Rev. Them Patriotis
Carrabelle United Methodist Church
Worship Services 10:45 a.m. Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
"Celebrate Recovery" Mondays 7-9 p.m.
Healing service first Tuesday each month-7 p.m.
102 NE Ae. B Canabelle 697-3672

Eastpoint United Methodist Church
Worship Service 10:00 a.m. every Sunday
Prayer 9:15 a.m. Waffles & Wisdom 11:15 a.m.
Healing Service every first Fridays of the Month at 6:30 p.m.
317 Patton Dr. (corner of David St.) -670-8825
Pastor: Rev. Beth White
St. George Island United Methodist Church
9:00 a.m. Worship Service
10:00 a.m. Fellowship Hour
201 E. Gulf Beach Dr. 927- 4635 www.sgiumc.org
Pastor: Rev. Them Patriotis


First Pentecostal Holiness Church
379 Brownsville Road Apalachicola


Sunday School 9:45 am
Sunday Morning Worship 10:45 am
Sunday Evening Service 6:00 pm
Monday, Youth Group 6:30 pm
Wednesday, Royal Rangers, G.A.P. 7:00 pm
Wednesday Worship & Word 7:30 pm
Nursery Provided during regular church services


St. Patrick Catholic Church
Ave C & Sixth Street in Apalachicola, FL32329 or
The Islander (Across from the Blue Parrot)
on St. George Island, FL 32328
(850) 653-9453 Email: stpatcath@fairpoint.net
PASTOR: FATHER ROGER LATOSYNSKI
WWW.stpatricksmass.com
APALACHICOLA MASS SCHEDULE
SATURDAY................. .................5 PM
SUNDAY ................ ................ 10 AM
ST. GEORGE ISLAND MASS SCHEDULE
SUNDAY ................ .................8:30 AM


Thursday, January 21, 2010


Faith


The Times | B3


Mary Ann Shields, of Carra-
belle, was honored with the pre-
sentation of the Diocesan Medal
of Honor for Lifetime Achieve-
ment by Bishop John Riccard
at a Sunday, Dec. 13, 2009 Mass
celebrated at the San Luis Mis-
sion Church in Tallahassee.
The Diocesan Medal of Hon-
or is given to those outstand-
ing parishioners who, over an
extended period of time, have
demonstrated outstanding zeal
for their Catholic faith by their
unselfish and untiring service
to the Church in their parish
and in the diocese. During two
ceremonies, 41 parishioners in
the Diocese of Pensacola-Tal-
lahassee received this Medal of
Honor.
Part of Mary Ann's recogni-
tion was based on the following
commentary from her pastor,
Father Joseph-B. Ssemakula, at
Sacred Heart of Jesus Parish,
Lanark Village, "Mary Ann has
been this exceptional soft-spo-


ken woman who, for close to 15
years, quietly volunteered to do
the bookkeeping of our parish
without any compensation.
"We noticed in her sacrificial
self-giving to the church how
many important things in the
day-to-day running of the mate-
rial needs of the church can be
done while keeping a low pro-
file.
"It is like that silent foun-
dation on which every church
stands, which is often ignored,
but without which no church
can be. Mary Ann was like that
silent church foundation for our
parish for many years."
In the almost 20 years that
Mary Ann has lived in Franklin
County after moving here with
her husband Tom from Pitts-
burgh, she has dedicated her
life as an untiring volunteer.
She has worked with Carra-
belle's Parks and Recreation
committee, with organizations
assisting abused women and


children, and with programs for
the needy. She was a long-time
member of the Sea Oats Garden
Club, a pioneer since 1999 in
the preservation of the Crooked
River Lighthouse, building
chair for the construction of the
Carrabelle library and member
of the library advisory board.
Mary Ann also makes time
for art, the love of her life. She
is an avid exerciser and loves to
read, sew, garden and fish. And
she loves this area so much and
considers it a blessed place.
In response to a personal
question about where she finds
inspiration to enliven her spirit,
she said her spiritual strength
has always rested in the secu-
rity and blessing found in her
church. She has long been a
devotee of the Blessed Mother.
A recent widow, Mary Ann
continues to demonstrate the
strength she relies on and in the
process will be an inspiration to
herfriends.


MARGARITA PILKINTON | Special to the Times


Leo **Bie
AI" Perry on
a parade
float durin 9
the CamP
Gordon
Johnston
veteran
reunion
weekend in
March 2006.
Perry served
in the Navy
in the Pacific
theater during
World War II.
SKIP FRINK
SpecialtotheTimes


Arthur Leo Perry, Sr.,
age 83, of Birmingham,
Ala., passed away Sunday,
Jan. 10, 2010.
He was a member of
First Lutheran Church of
Birmingham.
For the last five years
he was the co-owner
of 2 Al's at the Beach
Caf6 in Carrabelle
Beach.
Services were Wednes-
day afternoon, Jan. 13
in the chapel with burial
in Jefferson Memorial
Gardens East. Rev. Barry
Hallman officiated. A


Navy honor guard per-
formed the folding of the
American flag and pre-
sentation to the family;
the flag will be displayed
at the restaurant in Car-
rabelle.
He is survived by his
children, Kathleen (Skip)
Frink, Donna (Doug)
Byers, Arthur L. Perry
Jr., and Renee (Mark)
Holley; grandchildren Na-
than, Rachael, Jill, Jamie,
Leslie, Nicholas, Alexan-
der, Josef, Jonathon and
Reanna; and 14 great-
grandchildren.


Willie Belle Akers, 93,
of Carrabelle, passed
away Friday, Jan. 15, 2010
in Crawfordville.
She was a resident of
Carrabelle since 1950.
She was of the Baptist
faith.
She owned and oper-
ated Riley's Bait and
Tackle in Carrabelle for
more than
40 years.
Graveside services
were held at 3 p.m. on
Tuesday, Jan. 19 at Ever-
green Cemetery in Car-
rabelle.


She is survived by
two sons, John Riley Ak-
ers and wife, Ilene, of
Crawfordville, and James
Denton, of Carrabelle;
a daughter, Nancy Faye
Murray and husband,
Franklin, of Carrabelle;
a devoted niece, Nettie
Lou Barron, of Pensacola;
eight grandchildren, 15
great-grandchildren and
seven great-great-grand-
children.
She is preceded in
death by her husband
of 55 years, Riley D.
Akers.


Big Bend Hospite
OS Ofgy UN 000
Big Bend Hospice Chaplains in-
vite area clergy and other leaders in
the congregation to attend a special
luncheon at noon on Thursday, Jan.
28 at Big Bend Hospice, 1723 Mahan
Center Blvd., Tallahassee.
Come enjoy a complimentary
meal and fellowship with commu-
nity clergy. "We invite clergy to be
present at this luncheon to hear
and share ideas of how to help con-
g gants who ep d c eK

ben, Big Bend Hospice pastoral care
manager. "While targeted to congre-
gant caregivers, clergy offer care to
many and will learn and share ideas
for self-care as well."
Julian Sollohub, LCSW, Big Bend
Hospice social worker, will be the
speaker for this quarterly meeting,
and his topic will be "Care of Care-


Church BRIEFS

givers." The meeting is open to all
clergy in Leon, Jefferson, Madison,
Taylor, Wakulla, Franklin, Liberty
and Gadsden counties.
Please RSVP to Candace McKib-
ben as soon as possible at 878-5310,
extension 250 or candace@bighend-
hospice.org.Please feel free to invite
Other clergy or leaders.

(11 11 I 00d UFC OS 0 OrganiZO
HaitI relief effort
The Highland View and East-
point Churches of God, along with
Operation Compassion, are col-
lecting the following supplies to be
shipped to the victims and families
of those devastated by the earth-
quake in Haiti: dried and nonperish-
able meats, non-perishable canned
goods, canned milk, water, blankets,
shampoo, soap, toothbrushes, tooth-
paste, Band-aids, gauze and rubbing


alcohol.
You can drop these items off at
the following locations in Franklin
County: IGA Gulfside Store in Apala-
chicola, 425 U.S. 98, 653-9526; or the
Eastpoint Church of God in East-
point, 379 Ave. E, 670-8704.
In Gulf County, items can be
dropped off at the lobby of the El
Governor Motel, 1701 U.S.98 in Mex-
ico Beach, 648-5757; Highland View
Church of God in Port St. Joe, 450
pompano St., 229-6235; Piggly Wig-
gly Grocery Store in Port St. Joe, 125
U.S. 98, 229-1100 (Bluewater Outrig-
gers); and Rich's IGA Store in Wewa-
hitchka, 201 W. River Rd., 639-5343.
For additional information con-
tact 229-6235 or 670-8704. You can
also contact Operation Compassion
directly at www.operationcompas-
sion.org or 423-728-3932 or by mail at
114 Stuart Rd. NE, Suite 370, Cleve-
land, TN 37312.


THE
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
WELCOMES YOU


THE


Friends of Library host
.
Jan. 23 Latin dmner
The Friends of the Eastpoint
Library Building Project are gath-
ering at 6 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 23 at
the Oyster Bay Bar and Grill on St.
George Island for a Latin dinner
featuring paella, wine and music.
Cost per person is $50. Guest
space is limited due to the special
menu. Please RSVP to Susan Hof-
fritz at 670-8424.

AMVETS Post 107
to meet Jan. 28
AMVETS Post 107, Carrabelle,
will hold its next meeting at the
Franklin County Senior Center, 201
Ave F in Carrabelle on Thursday,
Jan. 28, at 7 p.m.
All honorably discharged or re-
leased Veterans are invited to at-
tend.
Leader since 1944 in reservin
the freedoms secured by America's
armed forces, AMVETS provides


support for veterans and the active
military in procuring their earned
entitlements, as well as community
service and legislative reform that
enhances the quality of life for citi-
zens and veterans alike.
AMVETS is one of the largest
congressionally-chartered veter-
ans' service organizations, and in-
cludes members from each branch
of the military, including the Na-
tional Guard and Reserves.
For more info call Jim Lawlor,
post commander, at 697-2329 or
by e-mail to AMVETSDF107@aol.
com, or visit www.amvets.org

( lambert hosts
ksh Wind
W0r op on ows
Microsoft is releasing their new
operating system Windows 7. The
Apalachicola Bay Chamber of Com-
merce will host a PowerPoint work-
shop on Thursday, Jan. 28 at 6 p.m.
to demonstrate this new system.
The workshop is free and will be
held at the Apalachicola Communi-


ty Center/City Hall in Battery Park
in Apalachicola.
For more information call the
chamber at 653-9419.

World War II author tO
address AAHS Jan. 28
Eastpoint native and World War
II veteran Kenneth Tucker will be
the featured speaker at the Apala-
chicola Area Historical Society's
monthly meeting on Thursday, Jan.
28
Tucker, who authored the "Last
Roll Call," with the help of his
daughter, Wanda Goodwin, will
speak about growing up in Franklin
County and about the subject of his
memoir, service as a tail gunner
aboard a B-17 bomber flying out of
Italy during the war.
The event is free and open to the
public and will be held at 5:30 p.m,.
at Camelia Hall, 80 Fifth Street in
Apalachicola.
For more info, call David at 370-
6201.


*
Tnmty
J
EST. 1836

Hwy. 98 & 6th St.
.
Apalachicola
SUNDAY: 8:00 AM 10:30 AM
LIBRARY HOURs-
SUNDAY 12:00 2:00PM
MONDAY 11:00 AM 1:00 PM
WEDNESDAY 12:00 2:00 PM
THURSDAY3:30-5:30PM


WELCOMES YOU
Church

Of the

As cension
101 NE First Street
Carrabelle
SUNDAY
10:00 AM


Shields honored with Diocesan Medal of Honor


Arthur Leo Perry


Willie Belle Akers


News BRIEFS





Library

HAPPENINGS
Need to refresh or learn Microsoft Word II
and Microsoft Excel II? The Eastpoint branch
of the Franklin County Public Library will be
offering both of these classes on Thursday,
Jan. 21 beginning at 9:30 a.m. All computer
classes are free and computers for the class
are provided.
On Saturday, Jan. 23, at the Carrabelle
branch, beginning at 10 a.m. Building Websites
with Dreamweaver Part II will be offered. All
classes are taught by the staff of the Wilder-
ness Coast Public Library. A phone call to ei-
ther library will register you! Call 697-2366 in
Carrabelle or 670-8151 in Eastpoint.
The Friends of the Franklin County Public
Library will host a building fundraiser on Sat-
urday, Jan. 23, at 6 p.m. at the Oyster Bar and
Grill on St. George Island. For $50 guests will
enjoy Spanish wine, food, and entertainment.
Call 670-8424 before Friday, Jan. 22, to reserve
a seat.
Tax time is here and the public library has
six public access computers in Eastpoint and
even more available in Carrabelle. The 2009
tax forms are available online and can be
printed out for 10 cents a copy at either library
branch. At this time we do not have printed
copies available for the public.


American I
"'
I R??
Red Cross hel


EX P O
CALL TO VENDORS
Marcia 5,6,7, 2010
in time Panama City Mall
(Linens-n-Things former location)
After seven successful years, we have outgrown
Our home and moved to the former Linens-n-
Things at the Panama City Mall. This means
10,000 more square feet, better parking, security,
and a brand new look!

Register now for booth space at the 2010 Home &
Garden Expo in Panama City, FL. Share your home
improvement products, services, and enhancements
with thousands of families in the Bay area looking to
renovate, decorate, and landscape their homes.
All vendors receive a FREE quarter-page ad in the
official 2010 Home & Garden Expo program,
reaching more than 80,000 adults in Bay and sevell
surrounding counties.
For vendor application or information on the
show: Call: 850.763.8618 or
email: expostradeshows@aol.com
LAST YEAR'S SHOW SOLD OUT!
Space Is Limited, So Reserve Yours NOW!
For sponsorship information call:
850.763.6587
For additional advertising information in the official
program of the 2010 Home and Garden Expo,
contact The News Herald at 850-258-4163.


""" "' "' 1-1 y
Incorporate this i
spring serial story . ;i ',
into your classroom .
for a unique reading .g
experience! '

Beginning Friday, a
January 29, .21MtWAA '9-
The News Herald will
publish 12 weekly fM
r
chapter installments -- ---1
of Lewis Carroll's original: "Alice's Adventures in Wonderland".

A novel written in 1865 by English author Charles Lutwidge Dodgson under
the pseudonym "Lewis Carroll". "One normal summer day. Alice is sitting
on the riverbank when a big, white, talking rabbit runs past. He pops into
a big rabbit hole, and Alice follows him down, down, down into a strange
magical land. Alice has many exciting adventures in this extraordinary
place called Wonderland. Here, anything can happen: All the animals talk,
a deck of cards comes to life, and everything gets curiouser and curiouser.
What other odd things are in store for Alice in Wonderland?"
* - - - - - - - - - - - *
Teachers: deadline to order is Wed., Jan. 20!
Sign me up! (You will receive Friday newspapers Jan. 29 April 30)
(lf you already receive papers on Friday you do not need to order)

Name # of copies per delivery -
School Email

Drop off, fax, or mail to:

N oHxe1ral4d NIE Dept. NE PAN Aif i LD
Panama City, FL 32402 4 .
Fax: 850.763.4636
For questions call: 850.747.5008


Thursday, January 21, 2010


Local


publishedbyPineapplePressand
authored by Gil Nelson. A "Road-
side Geology of Florida" book has
just come in too.
We also have a couple of new
books on the Seminole Wars,
"Florida's Seminole Wars
1817-1858" by Joe Knetsch
(the Making of America
Series); and "History of the
BRARY second Seminole War 1835-
1842 (Revised Edition)," by
John K Mahon


chicolaRiverkeeper).Glennonis
a legal scholar and passionate wa-
ter advocate. With our own water
issues this should be a very inter-
esting book.
"The Third Chapter: Passion,
Risk and adventure in the 25 Years
after 50" by Sara Lawrence-Light-
foot. This book explores the trans-
formation of several individuals'
lives between age 50 and age 75.
While interesting, I thought she
concentrated too much on indi-
viduals from the same socio-eco-
nomic background.
"Living with the Dead: A mem-
oir" by Ellen Ashdown. Her tale


encompasses her experiences
living in a house in Tallahassee
which adjoined a cemetery where
she walked, met family members
of the departed and absorbed all
manner of experiences. Ellen
lives on St George Island.
Healthcare
"The Healing of America: A
Global Quest for Better, Cheaper,
and Fairer Health Care" by T. R.
Reid. The author looks at models
of healthcare delivery in other
countries, looking at what inter-
national models could work here
at home.
Andrew Weil, MD has writ-


ten "Why Our Health Matters:
A Vision of Medicine that can
Wansform Our Fliture." He is the
bestselling author of "Healthy Ag-
ing." He covers issues of medical
education as well as the health
insurance and pharmaceutical
industries,
My favorite is "The End of
Overeating," by David Kessler
about the way the food industry
has hooked us on foods heavy in
sugar, salt and fat. I'll tell you more
about this in the next column.
Caty Greene is librarian for
the Apalachicola Municipal Li-
brary. 'lb reach her call 653-8436.


BylatyGreene
Special to the Times
The Apalachicola Municipal
Library realizes that the majority
of its patrons read fiction, but we


also purchase non-fiction
on contemporary topics, or
topics of particular interest
to the community and this
area.


clude field guides: "The Ferns of "Unquenchable: America's
Florida, Shrubs and Woody Vines Water Crisis and What To Do
of Florida and Wees of Florida," About It" by Robert Jerome Glen-
all Reference and Field Guides, non (recommended by the Apala-


Florida Books
Recent acquisitions in-


TilUfSday, Jan. 21
Apalachicola CRA
(Community Redevelop-
ment Agency) meets at
8:30 a.m. at City Hall. For
more info call 653-9319.
Carrabelle Waterfront
Partnership meeting at
Carrabelle library. 1:30 to
3:30 p.m. For more info call
Georgia Russell at 697-
2141.


Yoga at Carrabelle li-
brary from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m.
For more info, call 697-
2366.
Microsoft Word II at
Eastpoint Library. 9:30 a.m.
to 12:30 p.m. For more info
call 670-8151.
Microsoft Excel at
Eastpoint Library. 1:30 to
3:30 p.m. For more info call
670-8151.


Wandering Star Quilt-
ing Club, Chillas Hall La-
nark Village. 1 to 3 p.m. Call
Christine Hinton 697-2551.
Community Luncheon
and Information Specials
at the Franklin County Se-
nior Center in Carrabelle.
Noon. $3 donation. Call 697-
3760.
Frida Jan. 22
Individual/group com-
puter instruction at East-
point library from 10 a.m.
to noon. For more info, call
670-8151.
Parent-child reads at
Eastpoint library at 2:15
p.m. for infant to 4-years-
old. For more info, call 670-
8151.
Story Hour at Eastpoint
library at 3:30 p.m. for ages
5 to 8. For more info, call
670-8151.


Exercise class at Chill-
as Hall in Lanark Village.
9 to 10 a.m. Open to all and
free.
Alcoholics Anonymous
will meet at 7:30 p.m. at the
Church of the Ascension,
101 NE First Street, in Car-
rabelle. For more info, call
697-2837.
Saturday Jan. 23
Dreamweaver II at
Carrabelle library. 10 a.m.
to 1 p.m. For more info call
697-2366.
CarrabelleHistoryMu-
seum, 106 B Street, SE, will
be open every Friday and
Saturday during January
from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. For
more info contact Tamara
Allen at 697-2141.
MOnday Jan. 25
Harmonica at Carra-


belle library at 10 a.m. For
more info, call 697-2366.
Yoga at Carrabelle li-
brary from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m.
For more info, call 697-
2366.
Yarn Junkies will meet
at 7 to 9 p.m. The newly
formed group is for knit-
ters, crocheters and oth-
ers addicted to yarn. The
group meets each Monday
evening at an alternate
location. For information,
call Kathy Robinson at 653-
7196.
Exercise class at Chill-
as Hall in Lanark Village.
9 to 10 a.m. Open to all and
free.
Alcoholics Anonymous
meets at 5:30 p.m. at Trinity
Episcopal Church's Bene-
dict Hall, at Sixth Street
and Ave. D. For more info,
call (850) 222-2294.-


Bingo at the Franklin
County Senior Center in
Carrabelle. Early bird at
6 p.m., regular bingo at 7
p.m. Cards begin at $4. Call
697-3760.
T da Ja 26
UOS y, H.
Breakfast at the Frank-
lin County Senior Center in
Carrabelle. Coffee at 7:30
a.m., meal at 8 a.m. $2 sug-
gested donation. Call 697-
3760.
Harmonica at Carra-
belle library at 10 a.m. For
more info, call 697-2366.
Story Time at Carra-
belle library at 4:15 p.m. For
more info, call 697-2366.
Apalachicola Commu-
nity Garden will meet at
5 p.m. at Seafood Grill. For
more info, call 653-9419.
Winter Bingo 7 p.m. St.
George Island Fire Dept.
$1 per card. Everyone wel-
come. Proceeds go to St.
George Island Civic Club.
Call 927-3001.
Alcoholics Anonymous
will meet at 7:30 p.m. at the
Church of the Ascension,
101 NE First Street, in Car-
rabelle. For more Info, call
697-2837.
Wednesday, Jan. 27
..
Adult WH at Carrabelle
library. 9 to 11 a.m. For
more info call 697-2366.
Thursday, Jan. 28
ApalachicolaAreaHis-
torical Society will meet at
5:30 p.m. at Camelia Hall ,
80 5th Street in Apalachic-
ola. Guest speaker will be
Eastpoint native Kenneth
lickere, author of "Last Roll
Call," a memoir of his ser-
vice as a tail gunner during
World War II. For more info,
call David at 370-6201.
Individual/group com-
puter instruction at East-
point library from 10 a.m.
to noon. For more info, call
670-8151.
Wandering Star Quilt-
ing Club, Chillas Hall La-
narkVillage.1to3p.m.Call
Christine Hinton 697-2551.
Community Luncheon
and Information Specials
at the Franklin County Se-
nior Center in Carrabelle
Noon. $3 donation. Call 697-
3760.
Yoga at Carrabelle li-
ary from :300,to 5:30 p.m.
2366.
Carrabelle Chamber of
Commerce meets at Car-
rabelle library 6 p.m.


+


PANAMA CITY MALL


B4 | The Times


Books on Florida among new non-fiction


THE LI


EVER SEEN
THIS SAWYER?


Does anyone recognize
this craftsman, pictured
working off of Water Street
in Apalachicola? The photo
was sent to us by Anita
Grove. Contact the Times at
Iswoboda@starfl.com or call
653-8868.

SPEGAL TO THE TIMES


Community CALENDAR


1


cIo


NEA A RLD


KNOS OGY
-- em















































































Franklin Correctional Institution has select-
ed Doug Fordham as employee of the month for
December 2009.
Fordham has been employed at Franklin CI
since April 2007, where is assigned as a voca-
tional instructor in the maintenance depart-

In nominating him, Col. Steve Roddenberry
said, "Mr. Fordham is always willing to report
to the institution at any time, day or night, to
handle maintenance emergencies."
Fordham also accepted the added respon-
sibility of filling in as the acting maintenance
superintendent during this position's vacancy.
He resides in Carrabelle.


Request for Proposals
Compensation and Classification Study

The Franklin County Board of County
commissioners is seeking proposals from
qualified firms to conduct a compensation
and classification study for approximately 60
positions.

Firms interested in submitting proposals should
contact Alan Pierce at the address below for
proposal specifications:

Alan C. Pierce
Director of Administrative Services
34 Forbes Street
Apalachicola, Florida 32320
(850) 653-9783, ext 161

Proposals shall be submitted to the Clerk's
Office by 4:00 p.m., Monday, February 15, 2010.
Proposals shall be clearly marked on outside
"Compensation and Classification Study"

Franklin County Clerk"s Office
33 Market Street, Suite 203
Apalachicola, Florida 32320

The Board reserves the right to reject any and all
proposals. The decision by the Board is final.


REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS
LEASE OF COMMERCIAL-USE AIRCRAFT HANGAR/OFFICE
E4CILITY @ FRANKLIN COUNTY/AR4LACHICOLA REGIONAL
AIRPORT

The Franklin County Board of County Commissioners (Owner) is requesting
proposals from firms interested in entering into a long-term lease of a new
approximately 11,489 sf commercial-use aircraft hangar plus a minimum of
1,600 sf office facility at Franklin County/Apalachicola Regional Airport.
The multi-use facility is currently under construction with anticipated tenant
occupancy by June 2010-the successful applicant can have input on final
completion of the facility.

The Proposal should include a detailed Business Plan of proposed use, job
creation and financial responsibility.

Additional information is available at the Franklin County P & Z Office or
contact Alan Pierce at (850) 653-9783, Ext. 161.

Sealed proposals shall be submitted to the following address by 4:00 PM.
(EST) on Monday March 1, 2010:

Franklin County Clerk of Court
Attn: Michael Moron'- Board Secretary
33 Market Street, Suite 203
Apalachicola, FL 32320

Sealed Proposals shall be clearly labeled--indicating firm name and
"PROPOSAL-LEASE COMMERCIAL USE AIRCRAFT HANGAR/
OFFICE E4CILITY."-To be opened at the regular scheduled Commission
meeting on March 2, 2010.


I I


Thursday, January 21, 2010


Local


The Times | B5


BOoisSwoboda
Times Staff Writer

An Apalachicola man
has been charged with
animal cruelty after the
county confiscated a pair
of pit bulls in his care
about three months ago.
On Dec. 30, Richard
Duncan, of 1122 Bluff

Rloard A ao co n
animal cruelty as a result
of a Sept. 19 raid on his

upsrormpp dod
fights there. According
to the police report, Dun-
can was arrested at 1:30
a.m. and released on bond
40 minutes later.
The September 19 raid
that led to the arrest was
spearheaded by Norred
and Associates, an Atlan-
ta-basedndrisea ri is

that maintains a toll-free
dog fighting hot line.
Phil Gallacher, a retired
Atlanta police officer, said
his firm, which has no con-
nection to Undersheriff
Joel Norred, was told by a
confidential informant the
Bluff Road address was a
possible pit bull training
and fighting site.
Gallacher said af-
ter investigators found
two severely wounded
pit bulls being kept on
short chains, he went to
the home of Sheriff Skip
Shiver, who promptly dis-
patched investigators and
animal control officers. On
hand with Gallacher were
Lee Adams, an investiga-
tor with the Florida De-
partment of Law Enforce-
ment's Panama City office;
Lt. Ronald Crum, from the
sheriff's office; and Albert
Floyd and Fonda Davis,
both with animal control.
"We have been investi-
gating dog fighting cases
for years," Gallacher. "Of
the over 250 dogs our team
has rescued, these dogs
here were in the worst
condition of any we've
seen to date."
Duncan, owner of the
dogs, told animal control


he had left
home a few
days ear-
lier and,
when he
came back,
the dogs
had broken
loose and RKHARD
appeared to DUNCAN
have been

I ghting each other.
I doctored them the
best I could and staked
them back out," he said.
After examining the
animals, Dr. Hobson Flil-
mer of Apalachicola Bay
Animal Clinic wrote that
both dogs were eight to
10 pounds underweight
with dozens of old scars.
He counted 32 puncture
wounds on the face, head
and front limbs of one of
the dogs and over 70 on
the other dog. He wrote
that the injuries were con-
sistent with fighting activ-
it?-
The arrest was greeted
with enthusiasm by many
ammallovers.
"I'm glad that Duncan
has been arrested," said
Susan Kearney, president
of the Franklin County
Humane Society. "Now
we will just have to keep
phoning the prosecutor to
see that he follows through
with the case."
Shiver said that "some
people were disappointed
that the arrest took so
long but we wanted to do
things right. We wanted to
make sure we had all our
ducks in a row before we
brought him in. We want
the charges to stick."
Animal cruelty is a
first-degree misdemeanor
punishable by up to a year
in prison and a fine of up
to $5,000.
In a telephone inter-
view, Gallacher said the
two confiscated dogs,
now in the care of Norred
and Associates, are doing
well. The animals have
received medical care,
including facial surgery
and are enrolled in a reha-
bilitation program. Both


PHOTO COURTESY OF THE FRANKLIN COUNTY ANIMAL CONTROL


dogs are now up to opti-
mum weight, happy and
healthy.
Rescue workers
changed the names of the
confiscated dogs, "Taz"
and "Seiko" to "Phil," for
Phil Gallacher, and "Sim-
mons."
"We wanted to give
them names with better
associations," said Judy
Landry, publicist for Gal-
lacher's firm.
Phil may have suffered
brain damage as a result
of abuse but is reported to
be cooperative and friend-
ly. "Everybody who comes
in contact with Phil falls in
love with him," Gallacher
said.
Simmons is friendly
to human beings but re-
mains fearful of dogs.
If you are aware of
dog fighting you can file
a report with Norred and
Associates by calling toll-
free 877-215-2250. You may
remain anonymous. A re-
ward of up to $5,000 is of-
fered for information lead-
ing to the arrest or convic-
tion ofa dogfighter.


JUDY LANDRY | Special to the Times
pictured last month with Phil


A healthier


Phil the dog,


Fordham

r
Duffie
Harrison.

SPECIAL TO
THE TIMES


Bluf ROad man charged with animal cruelty


Sheriff's

REPORT
The following re-
port is provided by
the Franklin County
Sheriff's Office. Ar-
rests are made by of-
ficers from the follow-
ing city, county, and
state law enforcement
agencies: Apalachico-
1(CI D oC rab
way Patrol (FHP),
Franklin County Sher-
iff 's Office (FCSO)
Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation
Commission (FWC),
Florida Department
of Environmental
Protection (FDEP),
Florida Division of In-
surance Fraud (DIF)
and Florida Depart-
ment of Agriculture
and Consumer Ser-
vices (FLDOACS).
All defendants are
considered innocent
until proven guilty in
a court of law.

Jan. 11
Dustin C. Shahan,
Jr. 20, Carrabelle
violation of probation
(FCSO)
Jesse J. Thomp-
son, 26, Apalachicola,
violation of probation
(FCSO)
Melissa R. Fos-
ter, 38, Eastpoint
violation of probation
(FCSO)
Howard W. Eller-
son, 20, Marianna, two
counts of sale or pos-
session of a controlled
substance with intent
to sell, deliver or dis-
tribute, and sale of a
controlled substance
within 1000 feet of a
church (FCSO)

Jan. 12
Kenneth M. Parker,
20 Carrabelle, failure
to appear (FCSO)
Shawn A. Bunnell,
40, Carrabelle, pass-
ing worthless bank
checks (FCSO)
Timothy W. Finley,
41, Apalachicola, do-
mestic battery (APD)

Eh e cne sFeo3eo 374
- habitual (FCSO)

Jan. I 3
Willie L English,
49, Carrabelle, failure
to aGpl c ards,
Jr., 20, Eastpoint, deal-
ing in stolen property,
attempted burglary of
dwelling while armed
and grand theft
(FCSO)
Michael L. Lott, 35,
Sopchoppy, DUI, driv-
ing while license sus-
pended or revoked,
refusal to submit to
breath test and cor-

sn a bpyublichs
vant (FCSO)

Jan. I 4
Tanya V Griggs,
45, Apalachicola, two
counts sale of a con-
trolled substance
within 1000 feet of a
church (FCSO)

Jan. I 6
William S. Phillips,

,CSSopchoppy, DUI
Aymar A. Gomaz,
28, Apalachicola, DUI
(FHP)
Joseph D. Rich-
ards, 29, Eastpoint,
attempted burglary of
a dwelling (APD)

Jan. 17
William H.
Hoffmire, 48, East-
point, aggravated as-
u th a deadly


e o (]CSO)

Jan. I 8
Terry L. Denig, 51,
Carrabelle, domestic
assault (CPD)


Fordham FCI's Dcme mlyeo h ot































OLOTORIS & $04
Michael & Anthony S
O ... .......111 .........I~12......2...=
,,,.l, a ,,, ns, a n,,....,,ssa
1
850-229-6751 850-227--5666


9 Years Service in Area
(850) 653-8795
Gerald Garlick
12761 Pea Ridge Road Bristol, Florida 32321

P.AM653-8868 TELEPHONE (850) 643-5417



C OJ A K NS
Building Supplies TPMaleN & $@rVICOM
& Auto Repair ,e CALL TODAY,
Carrabelle 697-3333
We Deliver Anywhere W ,

Hardware and w VisaDiscoverand m
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Participating Ace Stores


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NOTICE OF PUBLIC

HEARING

APALACHICOLA BOARD

OF ADJUSTMENT


The Apalachicola Board of Adjustment will
hold a public hearing on Thursday February
4, 2010 at 6:00 PM at City Hall, 1 Bay
Avenue to discuss the following variance

request.


The property owner of 63 Avenue C (Block
10 V2 Of Lot 9 and V2 Of Lot 10) is requesting
a Variance of the existing side and rear
Setback requirements and the maximum
-
allowed lot coverage. The Apalachicola
Land Development Code allows for the

granting of variances if adhering to the
current codes and regulations will result in
an undue hardship upon the property owners.
Variances may only be granted after public
notice and a public hearing. Any questions
should be directed to Cindi Giametta
at 1 Avenue E, Apalachicola Florida, at
cindigiametta@cityofapalachicola.com or

by calling 850-653-9319.


| 1100
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN pursuant to a Final
Judgment of Foreclosure
dated the 16th day of De-
cember 2009, and entered
in Case No. 08-00061, of
the Circuit Court of the
2ND Judicial Circuit in and
for Franklin County, Flor-
Ida, wherein SUNTRUST
MORTGAGE, INC. Is the
Plaintiff and LARRY L.
STONE, SR. A/K/A LARRY
STONE: UNKNOWN
SPOSUE OF LARRY L.
STONE, SR. A/K/A LARRY
STONE: JOHN DOE: JANE
DOE AS UNKNOWN
TENANTS) IN POSSES-
SION OF THE SUBJECT
PROPERTY are defend-
ants. I will sell to the high-
est and best bidder for
cash at the ON FRONT
STEPS OF COURTHOUSE
at the Franklin County
County Courthouse in Ap-
alachicola, Florida, at
11:00 a.m. on the 20th day
of January 2010, the fol-
lowingdescribedproperty
as set forth in said Final
Judgment to wit:
LOT 10, BLOCK 52, ST
GEORGE ISLAND GULF
BEACHES UNIT NO. 5,
ACCORDING TO THE
PLAT THEREOF AS RE-
CORDED IN PLAT BOOK
3, PAGES 16 AND 17, OF
THE PUBLIC RECORDS
OF FRANKLIN COUNTY
FL.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING


W ELIZABETH M. MAIGE:
JIMMY MAIGE: ANY AND
ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES
CLAIMING BY THROUGH,
UNDER, AND AGAINST
MM9 THE HEREIN NAMED IN-
DIVIDUAL DEFENDANTS)
WHO ARE NOT KNOWN
TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE,
WHETHER SAID UN-
1100 | KNOWN PARTIES MAY
5485T CLAIM AN INTEREST AS
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVI-
OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL SEES, GRANTEES, OR
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR OTHER CLAIMANTS
FRANKLIN COUNTY DEFENDANTSS.
FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION CASE NO.:
DIVISION 09CA000353CA
BANK OF AMERICA N.A NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY
| GIVEN pursuant to a Sum-
) *, I mary Final Judgment of
ForeclosuredatedDecem-
ber 15, 2009 entered in
Civil Case No.
19-2009-CA-000353 of the
Circuit Court of the 2ND
Judicial Circuit in and for
FRANKLIN County, APA-
Affordable Roofin Re- LACHICOLA, Florida, I will
dell & Gu t sell to the highest and best
mo ng, ering bidder for cash at on the
Free Estimates Comm- Front Steps of the Court-
II 96- d96/Re dert8al house at the FRANKLIN
Lic#RC 29027242 & County Courthouse lo-
CGC 1506283 cated at 33 MARKET
STREET In APALACHI-
COLA, Florida, at 11:00


Thursday, January 21, 2010


Local


Stands Hospital started
Weems AIM through a grant
from Shands and Florida's
Division of Cultural Affairs
in 2008.
Griner said Jill Sonke,
the program's mentor from
Stands, was at a Florida
Agency for Healthcare Ad-


ministration meeting a few
months ago, and she began
describing the Weems AIM
"out-of-the-box" start-up in
our rural county.
"All of a sudden," Sonke
told Griner, "everybody's
head shot up, and everyone
began asking, 'How can we
help?'"includingfolksfrom
Florida's Rural Economic
Development Council and
officials from the National
Endowment for the Arts.
Sonke then told Griner
she didn't think sustaining
the Weems program would
be much of a problem when
current grant funds run out
because of all the interest
fromthesegroups.
The interest in Weems
AIM has resulted in two
upcoming meetings, which
will include a focus on the
Weems program. The first,
scheduled for Jan. 28 at
the Water Street Hotel in
Apalachicola, is an "Arts in
Healthcare Forum."
Sponsored by Shands
Healthcare, the Florida
Division of Cultural Affairs
and Weems, the workshop
is free and open to com-
munity leaders in the state,
health care and human ser-


vices professionals, artists
and arts organization lead-
ers.
According to Griner, the
workshop will explore the
arts in health care move-
ment in rural America and
take a look at key issues
relevant to reducing health
disparities through the
arts.
Griner says you also can
learn more about imple-
menting an AIM initiative
in your community. Call Gri-
ner at 653-8853 to find out
more information and how
to register for the event.
The second meeting,
which will include a focus
on Weems AIM, will take
place on the national level.
Griner will fly to Minneapo-
lis, Minn., in April to make
a presentation on Weems
AIM, the first program in
Florida based in a rural
hospital and surround-
ing rural communities, at
the 21st annual meeting of
the Society for the Arts in
Healthcare.
"I'll be absolutely petri-
fied before my presenta-
tion," Griner said, "but I'll
be so honored to speak
about our program."


Recently, Ginny Griner,
Weems Memorial Hospi-
tal's program director, told
a local steering group that
Weems Arts in Medicine
(AIM) has attracted the
attention of officials from
state and federal agencies


LIZ SISUNG | Special to the Times
The Take Two Players, sponsored by Weems Arts
in Medicine, perform at St. James Health and
Rehabilitation Center. From left are Donny Denig, Ann
Cowles, Eric Springer, Jan Sheddan and Tom Adams.


DENTURE

LAB ON PREMISES
Same Day Service on Repairs and Relines


IGhaH BORLTRyeT, 9 9

OHiCR WORLTRyeT, 9W9


| 1100
a.m. on the 27th day of
January, 2010 the follow-
Ing described property as
set forth in said Summary
Final Judgment, to-wit:
LOT 10 BLOCK 7 ADDI-
TION TO MAGNOLIA
BLUFFS, ACCORDING TO
THE PLAT THEREOF RE-
CORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2
PAGE 17 OF THE PUBLIC
RECORDS OF FRANKLIN
COUNTY FLORIDA.
Any person claiming an In-
terest in the surplus from
the sale, If any other than
the property owner as of
the date of the Ils pend-
ens, must file a claim
within 60 days after the
sale.
Dated this 16th day of De-
cember 2009.
Marcla M. Johnson
Clerk of Court
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By:MicheleMaxwell
Deputy Clerk
IN ACCORDANCE WITH
THE AMERICANS WITH
DISABILITIES ACT per-
sons with disabilities need-
Ing a special accommoda-
tlon should contact
COURT ADMINISTRA-
TION, at the FRANKLIN
County Courthouse at
904-653-8861, 1-800-955-
8771 (TDD) or 1-800-955-
8770, via Florida Relay
Service.


| 1100
LAW OFFICES OF DAVID
J. STERN, PA.
900 SOUTH PINE ISLAND
ROAD, SUITE 400
PLANTATION, FL
33324-3920
(954)233-8000
09-62080 NATB
January 14, 21, 2010
5547T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE SECOND JUDI-
CIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY
FLORIDA
CIVILACTION
SUNTRUST BANK, N.A.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
HORACE E. FRINK, et al,
Defendants)
CASE NO.:
19-2009-CA-000623
NOTICEOFACTION
TO: HORACE E. FRINK
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS:
1859 W HIGHWAY 98,
CARRABELLE, FL 32322
CURRENT ADDRESS: UN-
KNOWN
TO: MARY E. FRINK
LASTKNOWNADDRESS:
1859 W HIGHWAY 98,
CARRABELLE, FL 32322
CURRENT ADDRESS: UN-


| 1100
KNOWN
ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN
PARTIES CLAIMING BY
THROUGH, UNDER, AND
AGAINST THE HEREIN
NAMED INDIVIDUAL
DEFENDANTS) WHO ARE
NOT KNOW TO BE DEAD
OR ALIVE, WHETHER
SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES
MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST
AS SPOUSE, HEIRS, DE-
VISEES, GRANTEES, OR
OTHER CLAIMANTS
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS:
UNKNOWN
CURRENT ADDRESS: UN-
KNOWN
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
any action to foreclose a
mortgage on the following
property in FRANKLIN
County, Florida:
COMMENCE AT THE IN-
TERSECTION OF SEC-
TION25,26,35AND36,
TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH,
RANGE 5 WEST FRANK-
LIN COUNTY FLORIDA,
AND THENCE RUN
SOUTH 89 DEGREES 20
MINUTES EAST ALONG
THE SOUTH BOUNDARY
OF SAID SECTION 25, A
DISTANCE OF 3054.39
FEET TO THE CENTER-
LINE OF STATE ROAD
NO. 30, THENCE RUN
NORTH 57 DEGREES 25
MINUTES 30 SECONDS
EAST ALONG SAID


| 1100
CENTERLINE 272.15
FEET THENCE RUN
NORTH 32 DEGREES 34
MINUTES 30 SECONDS
WEST 50.00 FEET TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING.
FROM SAID POINT OF
BEGINNING CONTINUE
NORTH 32 DEGREES 34
MINUTES 30 SECONDS
WEST 383.00 FEET
THENCE RUN NORTH 57
DEGREES 25 MINUTES 30
SECONDS EAST 100.00
FEET THENCE RUN
SOUTH 32 DEGREES 34
MINUTES 30 SECONDS
EAST 383.00 FEET
THENCE RUN SOUTH 57
DEGREES 25 MINUTES 30
SECONDS WEST 100.00
FEET TO THE POINT OF
BEGINNING
has been filed against you
and you are required to
serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses within 30
days after the first publica-
tlan, if any, on Florida De-
fault Law Group, PL.
Plaintiffs attorney, whose
address is 9119 Corporate
Lake Drive, Sulte 300
Tampa, Florida 33634, and
file the original with this
Court either before service
on Plaintiffs attorney or Im-
mediately thereafter; other-
wise a default will be en-
tered against you for the
relief demanded in the
Complaint or petition
WITNESS MY HAND and
the seal of this Court on


| 1100
this 25th day of November
2009.
Marcla M. Johnson
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Terry E Creamer
Deputy Clerk
Florida Default Law Group
PL.
PO. Box 25018
Tampa, Florida
33622-5018
January 21, 28, 2010
5559T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
FRANKLIN COUNTY
FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
SUNTRUST MORTGAGE
INC
Plaintiff
vs
LARRY L. STONE, SR
A/K/ALARRYSTONE;UN-
KNOWN SPOUSE OF
LARRY L. STONE, SR.
A/K/A LARRY STONE.
JOHN DOE: JANE DOE
AS UNKNOWN
TENANTS) IN POSSES-
SION OF THE SUBJECT
PROPERTY
Defend ants.
CASENO.:08-00061
RE-NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE


| 1100
AN INTEREST IN THE
SURPLUS FROM THE
SALE, IF ANY OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY
OWNER AS OF THE DATE
OF THE LIS PENDENS
MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER
THE SALE.
In accordance with the
Americans with Disabilities
Act of 1990 (ADA), disa-
bled persons who, be-
cause of their disabilities,
need special accommo-
dation to participate in this
proceeding should contact
the ADA Coordinator at 33
Market Street, Sulte 203,
Apalachicola, FL 32320 or
Telephone Volce/TDD
(850) 747-5141 not later
than five business days
prior to such proceeding.
Dated this 21st day of De-
cember 2009.
Marcla Johnson
ClerkOfTheCircultCourt
Marcla M. Johnson
Clerk of Court
Deputy Clerk
Law Office of Marshall C.
Watson
1800 NW 49th Street,
Sulte 120
Fort Lauderdale, Florida
33309
Telephone:(954)453-0365
Facsimile: (954) 771-6052
Toll Free: 1-800-441-2438
07-30136
January 21, 28, 2010


B6 | The Times


SArts in Medicine g-ains state and national attention


, Spcialto he Tmes and a national association.


Dental Clinic


1100
PLAINTIFF
VS









| iO itoo | 1oo | 1100 | to to | as 6120 6140
5567T 5514T Carabelle- 3 br, 2 ba
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT N0OFEHTNDE064COFClerk of the Court PUBLIC NOTICE AUTO t ere sree ocview of
OFTH SCOD UD-GREES 40 MINUTES PUBLIC SALE By: Terry E. Creamer 3320 CR 386 IsadGulf. $650 mo +$5 e
CIA CRCIT N NDWEST A DISTANCE OF As Deputy Clerk Notice Is hereby given that Overstreet $160 wk, elec, Satellite,Cal805-88
~ORRIFDRAANKLIN COUNTY 409N83 OFEEBEGONNTNHG Snedfer F toria Satu c Flrd eal a ruweetlidgo TheNr s Stra1/34pmes-ERESTATE O RN Gabag Icludedk potoh Eastpoint Onthe Bay 3br,
CIVIL CTIONBEING SHOWN AS LOT Ity" Act 83.801-83.09 PL. tlon Corridor Authority will ern, antiques, glass, pot- aloo Business/ euiu ve. Cl 2 ba, CHA, DW, Mature
12 N LOK O A Buf RadStrae il sllPO. Box 25018 be held on Thursday, Jan- tery, etc. 4 ml off 98 at Commercial 806351Ve Couple $750 mo + dep.
SUNTRUST BANK, N.A., UNECRODCEKD ALAOTNPRAEN fo c ad Sto ge hwilhe Tampa, Florida uary 28, 2010 at 10:00 Mexico Beach. Preview 1 sl- ham als 806351 No smoking or pets
Plaintiff, PARED BY R.C. BAN- bidder, the contents of the 33622-5018 a.m. CST located In Bay hour prion Bay Co Auction 6130 BeCo ndtowhose 850-670-8266
VS. NEEREMDANSUJR.RRE ISD Joalowing st rage01units,To 5 2858 2010unty at theCPanama Cit9 0-2 AB9 4-AU1P6 oCa 64 mouemR nt antdb.Go Eastpoinhl2br r2ba, sud

MELANIE JANE TURNER, ESD NATETDIOAS TDOOGN dputecd sal BIwl can Hard In32A in1n8aam AuctionZpcom. M etals 2 br, 1 ba satellite, Cal68-604a8r10$5mo
et al, 4. age, 1005 Bluff Road, Apa- requiring special accom- 610-TmsaeRnas util Incl. 12 x 50' deck.
Defendant(s). lachicola, Florida at 9:00 5569T modations to participate In ,,a e620 Vacation Rentals $250/wk, 850-653-5114
has been filed against you a.m. Owner may redeem IN THE CIRCUIT COURT this meeting Is asked to
C9 OEN- A-00627 an youc are requiredwtto uitecontentstlprlear tC al OFRCTHTE 2NNDANUDDICOAL advel seteC~orlor Authorr 20Lvl ec ot
DVSO:ten defenses within 30 ONLYI Bluff Road Storage FRANKLIN COUNTY to the meeting ety contact Al ouCnEa oo Very clean, gulfview wth
NOTICErn OFATON dy ater the firsoridub reseve th ht EONREDRAL JURISDICTION 850-215-4081 or by emall *SNOW CRABS* eso Iaccess. 2 br, 2 ba, A/C,
fault Law Group, P L., Unit#88-Deborah Lolley DIVISION a t $15.99 at UP THE CREEK For Lease 2 br, 2 ba, 1200sf Twnhm, f nrda room, taled floors,
TO: ~Plaintiffs attorney, whose Contents: Household Amber.Perryman@hdrinc.c RAW BAR Starting at 5:00 Commercial Carrabelle, large deck kitchs, cur ains, anerw
MELNI JNE URERaddress Is 9119 Corporate Unit#113-Kenneth Estes NATIONAL CITY MORT- om. every Monday In Apalachl- $650 mo. $650 dep. klcen, carport, ludy
LAS KNWN DDRSS:Lake Drive, Sulte 300, Contents: Household GAGE, ADIVISION OFNA- January 14, 2010 cola at 313 Water St. Building Available nowCallfor an room with was rclamd
130IEUC STREE Tampa, Florida 33634, and Unit#122-Robert Bauchem TIONAL CITYBANK85-322.$10Drf Approx 1100 sq ft. appt. 850-562-4996. I yer se rgeed biheautfa
SUIT 209file the original with this Contents: Household PLAINTIFF 5562T Ber Aalbl o lns ed, d.rg ba fL k
ATLANTA, GA 30342 Court either before service January 14, 21, 2010 NOTICE Conro w 8& In= = = = = =* n 98ca$e 50 rd ,Incau s
CURRENT ADDRESS: on Plaintiffs attorney or Im- VS. OF PUBLIC SALE 12th Street LKU R water/garbage. Available
mediately thereafter; other- 5568T Oyster Tongs, New, and 850-653-9788 or Crael 02/01/10. Call 697-3115
130 WI~EUCA STREETwsadealwllbenINTECRUTORT RHONDA A. WALLEY; UN- Under Florida Statutes rpi nue og.Cl 850 615 0058 Carbel day or night.
SUITE 209tered against you for the OF THE SECOND JUDI- KNOWN SPOUSE OF "Self Service Storage Facil- Tommy, 850-653-6208 13 br 2ba TH pool side,
ATLANTA, GA30342 relief demanded In the CIAL CIRCUIT IN AND RHONDA A. WALLEY IF Ity" Act 83.801-83.809, Ap- 150s.f.Wo losiS ueS rgtS
THEUNKOWNSPOSEComplaint or petition. FORRIFDRANKLIN COUNTr AY WANNYPA DEALCL UN alchaella SelfheSth get o Rn I hr ug outis $80 8Par Comfortable oMust Sacl
OF MELAI JN This notice shall be pub- CIVIL ACTION ING BY THROUGH, UN- bidder for cash, the con- Historic Sponge Ex- It~4~b~562-1478 o 51-082 where. O RENT tor FOR e
TURNER ~Ilshed once each week for DER, AND AGAINST THE tents of the following stor- change building, Corner -----.1SLOlChrng2o3
LAS KOW ADRES:two consecutive weeks In SUNTRUST BANK, N.A., HEREIN NAMED INDIVID- age units, on February 10, of Ave E & Commerce bAedroom apartment with
130WIECASTRETthe The Apalachicola Plaintiff, UAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO 2010 at 10:00 a.m. The ISt. 305-588-5885 *BAYoo VIEWS, 2nd wtieLn
SUITE 209 Times. ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE public sale will be con- 'ark Beach, Lanark Village.
ATLANTA, GA 30342 VS. DEAD OR ALIVE, ducted at Apalachicola 6140 1-1/2 Luxury Baths, with

CU0RRENTE ~ th DRERET of tis C urtao FRANK A. BRICKOWSKl,NOHAPTSM ca, ar EM NTplahcaFLunuw0 a

ANYAN W UAL UNKNOWN ClrkfteIur 1920-A004 O N DO TEE T AND J ANE ale ateoand toime, CASH town Apaacicla W/Ds Alo v ilabl e s fo sor
PARTIES CLIIN 2By eryE Cr ame DIISON DOEl ASlah a UN N W E O L plahcl ef-Ic, un r ufrtrm @ $50 e ie
UTHR U H UN E, N s euy lr ANS INPOUSES, ESRS, EION Stoagnc reere thep W a $900mo. 1stlast,&. secu $100.00 mln. F or Saefor
AGAINSTDcem r THE9 HRINOIE FAC ONDEFENDANT(S) rgtt i.| 4 0 iydp,803309. 3b a W10 q t 9,0.Tnnswl o
FMENDANT(, NDIH4 D E FodaDfutLwGop TO RAK A CSEES RNO:0800040-C Unit#3-Mchnet ay el Ah rn -49-mlyet 2b a d zroomel drela tbheeybaor d with neala

SPOUSEMrcl HERS DEVI-o SANJSE CA. 9524 GIEN pursu ant S tome anO-Jna y 21, e 28, o 201 I8forma iVof valou Inher s ac icp.5926 954-81- 70 St e orge Islgrand- 2 br 1
SEES GAN TEES, UK ORN derN Gratn the Motin to l neede tod provide qual- ban Canallca vi l uiite
INRIE THEMN CIRUI COUR UNKOW datedW Jaur ,21,en- eductio tolhcl chlre 110mo+$00dp
LAS KNWN DDES : OF rr T E. SCONDe J DI- I N tered inrn Civi Casern No.m 1 2 ags-3r.al 5 .0-653-8074
THO GUNKNOW N D CAL e tC eRCUI INT AN N N ALU K O N 08-000400-C ofrae the. Cir-ve AA/A preferred Fr ished Loft, in heu 100 i.FrS
FORNS FRAKLI COUNTY PARTIESTS CLAIMIN By cult Court ofy the. 2N Jdl FCP (DA o HghAps 3 br, 2 ba, new homesq for St990. Georgewil

YOU NARES N HOTIFEDta Plaitif DE:FNANT() H ARE toS the-0000C hihstad et NOW Fcamly withr prscoo Noul smg pt.$65m $5m/$6Kdep os n fully furnse od, gearsage
motage on the VE following vs ED O AIE Ses fte RAKI xeleteeis ec cstm kthn

THE NORTH 1/2 OF8 HIDN ABO PO ES, GRWNANTEES : FOR ELSR dayof February,2010the10 CiyL340 Ith $495/ 6170
11,1092 TOWNSHIPnnl 8ode SOUTH TIONe INC., ert asst othi si Carrabelle 3b,1a 2& 3plcloa brm uni stts, aval.2
COUNTYy FLOIDA DE-00 #4 NTC SHREYHueod~os$ CASE NOp Othe prvaewl yoared $550mnt L os 8-6697-318
SPOUTHEARSTCREO NOIE OFATIO DRVED TWEuNTYNE Rowet of Sitk Alaskay 1 GRYHUN I0 Lanahrk Villag 51926 E O Pine Cal404266006 br bw batulve
LOT 3, IRN DOG SLAN YOU ARE NOTIFIED that (229), OFGETE P-o n Dec 12 2009 Thea I A K IS,2b,2bfcn ofo iver, deck ntewl
SUBDIVISAION NITS NO.4, TO HURdden HarborS anse factions tofrelsea LCHC LA N H IT oul wudlietoa- ore ay anlr Crable r 4bu rnvte / ape n
PLAT THREOF RE tHon CInc. I pOr oprt iN n FRANKLI CO nUNT Y OF FRANKLI fis oJsnDrc rntGt sitne 30d Cl 5-2-88 b,2b,40 e an 5028
3,PAE 2-2,OFTH OU ARE SCNOIED that- ACCReD IN O TE 2 In.o Dc 27i 2009. No Kitche Hgelp all yshifts backyar. $00 oroth
FRANKLIRFRNKN COUNTY motaeo h floigSBIVItS nION, PHAE CUITY'IN GE2NERAL. US. onsn Crable A plctons anb l"Lanak Vilage, 15 br Cal(44 266-0067imaia 6140eog
FLORIDA, ANDFROMrel rpetyi Franklin ACCORDIG TO THDER Jame "Rick Kelthi Sr, flle out atl apt. unfurished W/DlaeiaeI Crble
SAI PIN RU N RT Cont, lorda PAGAT THEREO RE-N FAny I per o un y clmng ann- Texas, Mike andigs Robyn Ebrog Greyhoun Par C/H/A,, yardn $450 mo,
48A DEGREES 21N MIUTS ORED IN PLIDAT OO teresta Foin a th surplus fro Jonson Alsa &Mel- uns Ofic 1stg &ast. Ask5 for Jim o$6K dpoi n ul urihd aa
WO AES 298.70FIEET TOa PLot11, BckB OfH d- 6, PAGE S 2 OF TH E PUB the sal hefay the ta a n olt IIt Oregon bretwenc 5069-28
LIEO T GOG spe a rpa hr of LI NCOU N TYF ORD the bidaer fof tahe Ils peond- Calls 850-535-4048.8 ne.85-28299 oenfoo la,1
SON D a T HEN C FO eoddi lt ok7 nms file aos cli Whdeb Id 34728 Sml SuioAt.fr a
mrGWHGe WAT MLE Paloiged43oftriulchsbn fie agans youD wl inVE 60ep day after theKLI D"elnbnft bech cuto " tre snlepesn,$50J
NOTH32DGRES24C ysa naWHTe care drs .AI Ni Ianr udes 0-ues2nf- Caarroa bell,Florda3322
FEEnt TEC OLO-hsbe filedda agans youLNIHOS days after AtheS firs pulia- ke uary, t 2010. 203 BRr a Rnvtd fr 1 B Mobile25m Ho
ING ~ ~ K OW SAIDS MEA HIG andI you areRES reuie tolah a tlana if anye ond Florid De- 4130 Ununse dCargl o ................57 .0
DEGAREES 59 MADINUE tenAL dfnsesf any, totPlantfsE attorney, whose Clerkmm of the Cicuth Courte MER .h POTL&GV' O u nished Reoeld Fece B k ar .....$000
THE NCEH 1 FLOW ING E Plaitiff attorney whseLae Dv, GR ESult 300 Dafeprutry, h Clerk 311 -20 Applance Upsaise studio Frn akPrh +unse .. $52500
SRACID MAN HECIGH WAT YNE ades s PstOffIceBo OHRLIATama lrd 33,ad32 Artswin &ece Crafts Quet. n lmoaion, wate &on 3 rrBRl 3 Br Condo b nisaai.
LINE T NORHI 40 DE- 4128 T alahsee loi, fleth oigna with thi IN t AC ORDANC WITH 31 0-A cin a t o leti nld ak t nfrih d -P o .............. 7 00
RNEAS A DISTA NC DOF day fte r h s d at f nPlitff ttre oATNO N D rES I um- r DIAB LTESA CT pger-, Bul diJonsng S up le depositl 85-5-16o 7 .B yhremdl, p Dr Ea 'stpo inhth ....... $700
PILNT, O BEIN RNKING F oiia ihteCeko ieadfutwl beK W en- Igasei alaco moa 3170 -o C nollectibles for nformation about Fu nish ed o lag .$500.00le~ 7_3 Bg~ wk
C UTHE : FLAN IDS T B DE- ths C ut et e eoe trd g is o o h ln s old c nat 3 8 o p t r e era oriat posta jobs. If2 R En ni t t
SCRIBED:A FR LOM SAI service-00 6 onR N theES Plantff at- reifdeadd nte OR ANDMIITA 3190 -1 Elctonc you se a oA
POINT ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~~o OFBGNIGtonyo medaeyCmlan tt TON tteFANLN30 Fewod "guarantee ,BR cotc the Furniashed Caport...Crrbllg ... $ 250


FEET THE NCEO RULND plaintGEAERA orPeiton te heAplahiol Rla Srvce 36 Healt & Fites prtco agecy se to faprciate $750 3ir BRck 1 Blt
SOUTH~ ~ ~ ~~~~~~O 45E DEGREES 40T37 eer/lohn o nldsdihntokFrihd dcrtd.......... 500
MCORINUTE EATO AH DIS- Dated ths 29th dayfD- Imotaes LAWh olow OFFIALCHCESOF AVI 28 Mauchinrhotely/ wwfcgvjbcm &O alln util $30dp il-2B p
TO THED INORLTHEL theK sea of thsCut n90SUT IEILAD30 -M lneuurd. Call 850)697-23246r 2 BR, 140 B e Wate rnt, House8
LINEOF PR POSE 66 Marla Jonso, Cerk this 22nd da o RAND SUITE 400 3310ID Mu ical lo n 1slmments publice service, ,843654 Bieauktifulag Vi ew................... 900
FOO PGSTREET, O THENCE U As E Clerk IE of a theRIN Court21In Decm,20 LNAIN L 32 Plant & 09 Shrubs essaelp from lthe FT Bach ad.$0 fron housswth wne rts
MRNKINUTSWS ALOUNG~r motAs Depty C olerk l MarclaION M HS ,CTINEE. Johnson 08860GST(N)oaiurant el Classifiled uAdetisn I "nr PLEASEe CALL JOANN426-6 80697-904
SAOIDA RAND A RO DITNEa January 21, 28, kl 2010DI Janar 21, 28,e 200 35-Tck" elts Bu Sell Depatmen | nunid 610 | OR8032-44 O ENAS







14 DlawaeS. B/BA $5
THE ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ Fmse MHA with carport worsho and boata shedso I ECRSO RN-th rpryonraso 00A&:0P.I~I I


SO N H NC OL e Ir e In lt B o ,e s ut fl li e *d *4 8 Fenced yard la rge por ch, ju t bloc s from the ba
T oIGSADMA P ace 43 fte Y olchbefle glsyurwtl C0 da ss if e a ate 609thtN 4BR/2B $800pesn 50 0S..
HIGH~~~~~~~Vr niceR mobil homerd wit 2rnln livingeeqlrdt areas onle larg fencedie lot


NOTH TADGEE 4ConysRveacp fy APALCHI IM E Sed 141 67-6 RoalT rn Carbloura 4R3BA $150
&IUE CARRBEL Fabulou newe home on the golf cors atn St.JaesBa


Bank Short Sales @ the Sands of Carrabelle
Ca II: 850-747-5020 3BR/2BA Town homes with 1500sf & Community Pool $149,000

' Toll Free* 800-345-8688 Waterfront home on Poston Bayou
3BR/2BA on One Acre with Dock & Elevator in Private Location $300,000

Fax: 850-747-5044 Bank Owned Homes on the Carrabelle River
Fabulous 4BR/4BA w/ 3800sf Dock, Elevator & Gulf View $550,000
Email: thestar@penh.com
850-697-5300
Email: thetimes@penh.com www.MySandyBeach.com

































































FRIEDA FINANC % eIAL
Thu, a INVESTMENTS70






WedMar W.n Friedman, CPA

th171 Highwa 98r West, Suite A
East PaEastpint, FL2 323280:2
Sofndtecutides offee th r louigh TadAvsres, Inrct Mhembdiaer F INRA S IPC
Ahs Regitere Invste AdvisorLE


R


Thursday, January 21, 2010


Local


(00ks sought for Road
Runners claili cook-off
Who has the best chili recipe in
the land? If you think it's you, or if
you just want to sample the recipes,
the Road Runners, a group of mo-
torcycle enthusiasts, are throwing
their seventh annual chili cook-off
bash to raise money for a good
cause.
The event will be held at Shuck-
er's Oyster Bar, 4806 Jackson Cove
Road, Tallahassee, on Saturday,
Feb. 6, beginning at 1 p.m., with
judging to begin at 4 p.m.
Pay only $20 to enter your chili
in the contest with a chance to win
a first-prize trophy and $100, a sec-
ond-place prize of $75 and/or $25 for
the Best Decorated Table/Booth!
The deadline to enter the competi-
tion is Jan. 31. The public is invited
for a fee of $8 for adults and $5 for
kids younger than 10 to both sample
and judge the chili, so contestants
are encouraged to cook plenty of
chili for the competition.


For the fifth year in a row, the
proceeds raised will be used for pa-
tient care at Big Bend Hospice.
For more information, call Joann
at 545-0983 or Johnny at 562-0944.
MISs Franklin County
eants to be Feb. 7
PO
The first pageant preliminaries
for the 2010 Miss Franklin County
High Point of the Year winner will
be held next month.
Participants will accumulate
points through the year, and the
delegate with the most points will
be titled and crowned Dec. 4 at the
Franklin County Pageant.
"This is the year for The Forgot-
ten Coast Pageant to expand," pag-
eant organizer Georgette Colson
said. "There will be three mini-pag-
eants during the year, and the high
point. Then what we have all been
waiting for, the National Pageant,
will be held in October at the 2010
Miss America's Royal Beauties."
The Miss Franklin County


Sweetheart Prelim Pageant will be
held at 10 a.m. Sunday, Feb. 7, at
1001 Gray Ave., in the former Car-
rabelle School Auditorium. Door
admission is $5.
This is for Franklin County resi-
dents, work and school only and will
feature Girls/Boys and Women, for
all ages with fair age divisions.
Beauty fee entry is $50, with one
overall winner at no extra fee. Op-
tional $25 Valentine's Wear.
In the afternoon, the Miss
Florida Forgotten Coast Valen-
tines Mini National Pageant will be
held at 3 p.m. This is an open state
pageant.
Beauty fee entry is $75 and
includes Beauty and Valentines
Wear. Ultimate Titles, $125,
includes Beauty Entry and five op-
tional side events.
Georgette Colson invites every-
one to be a part of this exciting New
Year!
For info package, e-mail franklin
countypageant@yahoo.com or call
Colson at 653-7634.


Our local real estate experts have identified what they feel are the best values
around and are offering them to you in Real Estate Picks! (In this section),
Discover the best real estate values in Mexico Beach, Port St. Joe, Apalachicola, JENNIFER DANIELS| SpecialtotheTimes
Cape San Blas, St. George Island, Carrabelle and surrounding areas. This silver cat in a blue collar with a bell appeared
'MLS#237996 $325,000 Lanark Villagel on Tuesday, Jan. 12, at the Shellfish Center at the
YOUR dead end of Dr. Frederick Humphries Street in
Apalachicola. Part of the stomach appears to have
BEST PICK been shaved or there may be a minor in ury It is a
r very friendly, unneutered male. If you recognize him,
, . .. REREy then please call Jennifer Danie s at 850-528-3614.


RER L
s a
BAY MEDICAL
/ FIRST 1000

SUR R Y 08 5 PARTICIPANTS
m.,,,,......"'"' ""' RECEIVE FREE


Ef85811ted by: NE

U ORSt If C ha
Medical Center

1
GgeWaterE 1 .


HIGH


LOW


Bald Point


CANVAS GOODY BAGS!


APALACHICOLA
01:36AM 0.2 L 07:22
12:38PM 0.2 L 07:16
02:35AM 0.1 L 08:48
01:00PM 0.4 L 07:43
03:49AM -0.1 L 10:57
01:11PM 0.6 L 08:15
05:12AM -0.2 L 08:56


1/21 Tu


AM
PM
AM
PM
AM
PM
PM


1/25Mo 0:2A -04


L 09:49PM 1.4 H
L 10:57PM 1.4 H
L 04:40PM 1.1 H


* H1N1 flu shots provided by Bay County Health Dept.
* Free blood pressure check, discounted Angioscreening,
& other screenings provided by Gulf Coast Medical Center
* Free glucose & foot health screenings, and discounted
diabetes supplies provided by Bay Medical Center
* Blood donation mobile provided by
Northwest Florida Blood Services
* Free chair massages provided by The Back Connection


* Tours of Edgewater Beach & Golf Resort
* Door prizes every hour announced by
Clear Channel Radio personalities & donated by:
Spine Care Plus, The Eye Center of North Florida,
Triple J Steak house, Loco's Mexican Restaurant,
Newks Cafe, Golden Corral, and more!
* Health related seminars every 30 minutes with
topics such as: Skin Cancer, Diabetes Education,
Heart Health, Alzheimer's/Dementia, Cosmetic


CAR
1/21 Thu 05:57AM
1/22 Fri MM
10:47AM
1/23 Sat 01:36AM
10:58AM
1/24 Sun 02:59AM


0.6


03L


07:23AM
06:18PM
09:32AM
06:50PM
07:31PM


1/25Mo 041A -06L


08:24PM2. H


* Fee ide Otscoy povied y Glf oas Herin Ceter Surgery and much more!


*Flu and Pneumonia shots provided by Bay Walk-In Clinic


Visit www.newsherald.com for information and


* Met Chnnel? o-airpersnaliiesa complete list of vendors & seminars!


B8 | The Times


AM I YOUR (AT?


News BRIEFS


Beach
Resort

KNO 00Y' --
WJHO Pariama City


VENDORS & SERVICES AVAILABLE TO PARTICIPANTS:


~ABELLE




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