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Group Title: Apalachicola times
Title: The Apalachicola times
ALL ISSUES CITATION PDF VIEWER THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100380/00061
 Material Information
Title: The Apalachicola times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: H.W. Johnston
Place of Publication: Apalachicola Fla
Apalachicola Fla
Publication Date: January 14, 2010
Copyright Date: 2008
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1885.
General Note: Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00100380
Volume ID: VID00061
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 32911693
lccn - sn 95026907
 Related Items
Preceded by: Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by: Apalachicola herald

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Table of Contents
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    Section B
        Page B 1
        Page B 2
        Page B 3
        Page B 4
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Gulf State copes with new consent order


Apa lachicola


I


YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER FOR MORE THAN 120 YEARS


VOL. 124 ISSUE 38


By David Adlerstein


On April 22, the FDIC
handed Coastal Commu-
nityBankacease-and-de-
sist order which, despite
the tougher sounding ti-
tle, is a regulatory action
similar to what Gulf State
received seven weeks
ago. Headquartered in
LER Panama City Beach,
Coastal Community has
branch offices throughout Frank-
lin County, including Apalachico-
la State Bank.
"In my whole banking career
I've never seen times like we're
seeing now," said Cliff Butler,
president of Gulf State, Frank-
lin County's only locally owned
bank, headquartered in Carra-
belle. "We're into our fourth year
of trying economic times for our
Customers. We've never seen


economic times like what we're
seeing now. I'm having to deal
with things I've never seen in 30
years of banking experience."
Togetherwithothersharehold-
ers, Butler's father, Joe, founded
the privately-held bank on Jan. 6,
1971, with Cliff joining the bank
in January 1977 and his brother,
David, not long after that.
The government's consent or-
der lays down requirements for
acquiring fresh capital, address-
ing non-performing loans and
formulating written plans as to
how Gulf State will weather the
current economic crisis.
Butler stressed that while
changes might be in store for
the bank, none of its customers
should fear losing a dime to the
See STATE AS


Gulf State Commu-
nity Bank has become the
second area bank to be
placed under a consent
order by federal regula-
tors, requiring the finan-
cial institution to tread BU
carefully as it copes with
a glut of foreclosures and shrink-
ing property values.
On Nov.20, the Federal Depos-
it Insurance Corporation (FDIC)
issued a 16-page order of strin-
gent regulatory guidelines for
Gulf State as it seeks to stanch
the flow of red ink that has welled
up ever since the real estate cri-
sis washed over Florida coastal
regions especially hard, begin-
ning in 2005.


SPECIAL TO THE TIMES


LOIS SWOBODA | The Times
Former partner Bud Chiles stands in the Carrabelle
GreenSteel factory in summer 2008.


Carrabelle puts

Green Steel on notice

Times StaffWriter
The Carrabelle Commission voted to put GreenSteel
on notice that the company is in violation of its lease
agreement.
..':_o:o,\hDC 1pCm bHetatpopnIdpf anod e
ect and leased the building and 21 acres of land to Green-
Steelfor$10ayearfor99years.Carrabelleinvestedabout
$1.5 million in infrastructure to support the project.
The GreenSteel factory was designed to manufacture
low cost, durable, energy efficient homes. Due to poor
market conditions, the plant shut down in December. Un-
der the lease agreement with the city, GreenSteel should
have employees.
On Nov. 20, Hexaport Building Systems of Florida,
owner of the GreenSteel factory in Carrabelle, filed Chap-
ter 11 to reorganize its debt in the face of a deteriorating
marketfornewhomes.
on Jan. 7, the Carrabelle Commission voted three
to one to inform GreenSteel CEO Tony Attalla and Gulf
State Bank that the city believes Hexaport is in violation
of its grant agreement because, as the company is not
in operation, it currently does not employ the required
number of workers. Commissioner Cal Allen cast the dis-
sentingvote.CommissionerRichardSandsdidnotattend
Thursday'smeeting.
Gulf State Community Bank, which has a $1.5 million
claim against GreenSteel, the largest claim in the Chap-
ter11filinghasa"Rightto Cure"leaseagreementonthe
progirst agreement allows the bank to arrange for pay-
ments to keep the lease on the property if Hexaport fails.
Hartman said the agreement could conceivably allow the
bank to sublease the property to a third party and collect
rent on the building without sharing the revenue with the
city and not providing employment for local people.
Hartman said, "The incentive for city, for whole shoot-
ing match is tax revenue and 19 jobs. The $10 per year is
notwhatwe'relookingfor."
In a telephone interview, Jack Davis, chief credit of-
ficerfor GulfState saidthebankhasreceivedtheletterof
notification from Carrabelle.
Davis said, "The lease on the building is part of the

See NOTICE A6


LoisSwoboda
Times Staff Writer

The New Year blew into Franklin County
on a gust of arctic air.
Undoubtedly, everyone is aware that it's
been cold. Since Jan. 1, temperatures have
been hovering near record lows.
There's been ice on the Apalachicola
Bay for the first time since the 1980s and
Emergency Management partnered with the
Eastpoint Church of God to open a shelter
for people in need of a warm place to stay.
.
Emergency management director Pam
Brownell said that, as of Sunday, eight
people, including a family with a young
child have been sheltering in a Sunday
school classroom. She said the Red Cross
provided cots and blankets and the church
has provided food for the weather refugees.
The only actual record temperature this
month was set on Jan. 10 when a low of
23 degrees Fahrenheit broke the previous
record of 25 degrees set in 1978.
.
However, in a telephone Interview,
meteorologist Tim Barry at the National
Oceanographic and Atmospheric
Administration's Tallahassee office said,
"Although we didn't break a lot of daily
records, the duration is probably a record.
I believe this is the coldest first 11 days of a


new year we've ever seen."
Barr said the su er cold weather
resulted from the jet stream dipping all the
way down to the Gulf of Mexico, which
allowed cold air that has been accumulating
in Canada over the last few months to
enter the Deep South, including the Florida
Panhandle.
According to records, the average
monthly high for the county in January is 62
degrees and the average low is 43 degrees,
So far this year, the average high
temperature has been 43 degrees and the
average low was 29 degrees.
This means the average daily temperature
for the month so far was 40 degrees, 13
degrees below the normal January average
of 53 degrees.
Barry said, "If the month ended today
and we looked at the daily averages
this would be the coldest January on
record. Even thought the month is not
ending, this may still average out to be the
coldest January on record unless we get
unseasonably warm temperatures in the last
two weeks of the month."
The good news is the pattern is about to
break.
Barry said we can expect temperatures to
start to rise on Friday and hopefully things
will be back to normal by next week.


Phone: 850-227-1845


DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK:


T


Record low set in first days of the year


TABLE OF CONTENTS


-





Thursday, January 1 d, 2010


A2 | The Times


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Thursday, January 1 d, 2010


Local


The Times | A3


The Dixie Theatre is
delighted to announce the
schedule of plays, music
and programs for 2010.
New this year to the
theater is a Featured Art-
ist Series. In January, Anna
Feil will be the featured art-
ist. Back from Hawaii, this
Apalachicola native is a re-
markable talent.
Pattie Maney covers
February with her fabulous
Pet Art, and March will
bring Anna back with her
photo art, sure to enlighten
you. Each month, these
artists will be displaying
the incredible art they pro-
duce.
On Jan. 15, 16 and 17,
Margo Anderson delivers
"A Tribute to Patsy Cline."
Margo was a sell-out hit
on her 2008 and 2009 vis-
its, so she has been booked
for three performances in
2010. Her clear, powerful
voice will captivate, as will
her warm, sensitive imper-
sonation of Patsy with her
down-home wit and time-
less songs.
Also in January will be
two shows in rotating rep-
ertory.
First up is "Our Life in
the Theatre A Journey,"
whichfollowsCleoHolladay
on a joy filled ride with the
last great gentleman of the
theater, Rex Partington. Be
sure to leave your troubles
at the stage door. "Our Life
in the Theatre" plays Jan,
20, 23, 29 and 31.
Next up on Jan. 22, 24,
27 and 30 is "Love Letters,"
A. R. Gurney's unique and
imaginative theater piece
composed of letters ex-
changed during a lifetime
between two people who
grew up together, went
their separate ways, but
continued to share con-
fidences. An evocative,
touching, frequently funny
but always telling pair of
character studies, "Love
Letters" was produced by


present to Don's memories
of the annual, torturous va-
cations of his childhood.
"Elvis & Friends Do the
Dixie" on March 5 is aLas
Vegas-style tribute by art-
ist Todd Allen Herendeen,
who brings Elvis, Johnny
Cash, Roy Orbison and oth-
ers with his "Follow That
Dream Band" to Apala-
chicola. His versatility has
led him to perform as the
opening act for such rock
'n' roll legends as Jerry
Lee Lewis, Chuck Berry,
Chubby Checker, The Four
Tops, The Platters, Leslie
Gore, The Beach Boys, B.J.
Thomas and The Drifters,
as well as Tim McGraw and
Faith Hill.
"The Dixie Does Nash-
ville 7" on March 12 and
13 once again will bring
Nashville's finest, most tal-
ented writers to perform
the hits they wrote for mu-
sic legends, such as George
Strait, the Dixie Chicks,
Reba McEntire and Rascal
Flatts; the list is endless.
Nashville's Universal Mu-
sic Publishing once again
brings the cream of their
crop to the stage for the
seventh installment of one
of the theater's most popu-
lar events.
"Blues at the Dixie" on
March 19 and 20 will fea-
ture Jerry Garlick bring-
ing his "Blues in the Lot"
to the Dixie stage. Friday,
March 19, goes country,
Mickey Cash and Lick N'
Grave, featuring Johnny
Cash's granddaughter with
the very talented Lick N'
Grave band. On Saturday,
March 20, popular blues
performers Slim Fatz will
be back along with Mem-
phis-based blues band
"Delta Highway."
On March 26 is the "Bo
Spring Band," featuring
Bo Spring (acoustic guitar,
vocals), Randon Hicks (up-


right bass, vocals), Zach


















Ferrell375 (conga, trjonetc.
and6 Art Long (sa), s if-
fACeren asth anygenres
fro wic thy olec
their musca influe Onces




"The Sara MEacL Band"10
pefom Mac 27, ON9 / f eatu
ing exetonalvoalsan




aleraive. Sarah4- MacsT
voice attiesha te ul


Margo Anderson will perform "A Tribute to Patsy Cline" on Jan. 15, 16 and 17


the Dixie back in the '90s,
as well as 2001.
Celebrate Black His-
tory Month on Feb. 4 at 7:30
p.m. with one of the best
storytellers around. Mary
Fears specializes in telling
stories based upon historic
documents, rather than
fictionalized versions of
African-American history.
She is committed to telling
African-American history
stories for the education
of all listeners. This is a
Florida Humanities Coun-
cil program and is free to
the public
Back for his 11th year at
the Dixie, Bob Milne per-


forms Feb. 12, 13 and 14.
The top ragtime/boogie-
woogie pianist today and
one of the finest musicians
of all time, Bob delights
audiences with his piano-
playing pyrotechnics and
his infectious enthusiasm
for the music and the histo-
ry behind the music. Some
audience members have
heard him every time he's
graced the Dixie stage; his
following is remarkable.
Feb. 17, 19, 20, 21, 24, 26,
27 and 28 brings the Dixie
Theatre's big show of the
season, "Leaving lowa -
the comedy about Family
Vacations" by Tim Clue and


Spike Manton. The story is
a toast to the "greatest gen-
eration," their idealism and
character, and a little roast
of their undying dedication
to the classic family road
trip. Don Browning returns
home and decides to finally
take his father's ashes to
his childhood home, as re-
quested.ButwhenDondis-
covers Grandma's house is
now a grocery store, he be-
gins traveling across lowa
searching for a proper rest-
ing place for his father. This
father-and-son road trip
shifts smoothly from the


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Thursday, January 14~, 2010


A4 | The Times


Next week, the nation pauses
to celebrate the life of the Rev.
Martin Luther King Jr. and, more
important, the ideals for which
he stood.
How difficult it seems now
to look in the rearview mirror
and consider a Birmingham jail
cell or a march from Selma or a
Memphis garbage workers strike
for King, especially with the first
African-American in the White
House.
King would be in his 80s
had he not been cut down in
his prime, and he might still be
around to see what the move-
ment he helped lead and mold
had produced, a president of
color.
He would also see in too much
of the dialogue of today that we
still have a long way to go in race
relations.
But King was more than a civil
rights advocate, and the times we
face now, with economic troubles
and people in desperate need,
call out for the kind of words he
wrote more than 30 years ago.
Following are portions of an
essay King wrote in 1958 titled
"The Dimensions of a Complete
Life." It is one essay in the book
"The Measure of a Man" and pro-
vides insight into the philosophi-
cal and faith-based underpin-
nings of King's work.
The book, a mere 60 pages,
was given to me by my father,
who was before his time in advo-
cating for civil and social justice


while writing for the
newspaper at which he
spent much of his career.
I have treasured it for
sentimental reasons and
look back at the words for
reasons not easily cap-
tured in words.
King wrote, "Many, TIM
many centuries ago, out Times
on a lonely, obscure island
called Patmos, a man by the
name of John caught a vision of
the new Jerusalem descending
out of heaven from God. One of
the greatest glories of this new
city of God that John saw was
its completeness. It was not
partial and one-sided, but it was
complete in all three of its dimen-
sions. And so, in describing the
city in the twenty-first chapter of
the book of Revelation, John says
this:'The length and the breadth
and the height of it are equal.'
In other words, this new city of
God, this city of ideal humanity, is
not an unbalanced entity but it is
complete on all sides,
"Now John is saying some-
thing quite significant here ...
What John is really saying is this:
that life as it should be and life at
its best is the life that is complete
on all sides.
"There are three dimensions
of any complete life to which we
can fitly give the words of this
text: length, breadth and height.
The length of life as we shall
think of it here is not its dura-
tion or its longevity, but it is the


push of a life forward
to achieve its personal
ends and ambitions. It
is the inward concern
for one's own welfare.
The breadth of life is the
outward concern for the
welfare of others. The
CROFT height of life is the up-
news editor ward reach for God.
"These are the three
dimensions of life, and without
the three being correlated, work-
ing harmoniously together, life is
incomplete ...
"Now let us notice first the
length of life ... Some years ago
a learned rabbi, the late Joshua
Liebman, wrote a book entitled
Peace of Mind. He has a chapter
in the book entitled 'Love Thyself
Properly.' In this chapter he says
in substance that it is impossible
to love other selves adequately
unless you love your own self
properly ... So every individual
has a responsibility to be con-
cerned about himself enough
to discover what he is made for.
After he discovers his calling he
should set out to do it with all the
strength and power of his be-
ing ... No matter how small one
thinks his life's work is in terms
of the norms of the world and the
so-called big jobs, he must realize
that it has cosmic significance if
he is serving humanity and doing
the will of God.
"To carry this to one ex-
treme, if it falls your lot to be a
street-sweeper, sweep streets


as Raphael painted pictures, as
Michelangelo carved marble, as
Beethoven composed music, as
Shakespeare wrote poetry ... In
the words of Douglas Mallock: 'If
you can't be a highway, just be a
trail; If you can't be the sun, be a
star; For it isn't the size that you
win or you fail Be the best of
whatever you are.'
"But don't stop here; it is dan-
gerous to stop here ...
"The breadth of life is that
dimension of life in which we
are concerned about others. An
individual has not started living
until he can rise above the nar-
row confines of his individualistic
concerns to broader concerns of
all humanity.
"So often racial groups are
concerned about the length of
life, their economic privileged
position, their social status. So
often nations of the world are
concerned about the length of
life, perpetuating their nation-
alistic concerns and their eco-
nomic ends. May it not be that
the problem in the world today is
that individuals as well as nations
have been overly concerned with
the length of life, devoid of the
breadth? ...
"As long as there is poverty
in the world I can never be rich,
even if I have a billion dollars. As
long as diseases are rampant and
millions of people in this world
cannot expect to live more than
twenty-eight or thirty years, I can
never be totally healthy even if


I just got a good checkup at the
Mayo Clinic. I can never be what
I ought to be until you are what
you ought to be ... No individual
or nation can stand out boasting
of being independent. We are
interdependent ... When we dis-
cover this, we master the second
dimension of life.
"Finally, there is the third di-
mension. Some people never get
beyond the first two dimensions
of life. They master the first two.
They develop their inner powers;
they love humanity, but they stop
right there ... They seek to live
life without a sky.
"But if we are to live the
complete life we must reach up
and discover God. H.G. Wells
was right:'The man who is not
religious begins at nowhere
and ends at nothing.' ... In a real
sense everything that we see is
a shadow cast by that which we
do not see. Plato was right:'The
visible is a shadow cast by the
invisible.'
"Love yourself, if that means
rational, healthy and moral self-
interest. You are commanded to
do that. That is the length of life.
Love your neighbor as you love
yourself. You are commanded
to do that. That is the breadth of
life. But never forget that there
is a first and even greater com-
mandment, 'Love the Lord thy
God with all thy heart and all thy
soul and all thy mind.' This is the
height of life. And when you do
this you live the complete life."


By Stu Hutson
Special to the Times
It might be easy for the
casual beachgoer to write
off sea oats as mere weeds.
However, the lanky grass
holds the soil of beach
dunes, making it a key-
stone of the natural barrier
between land and water
- and University of Florida
researchers are using cut-
ting-edge techniques to
keep that barrier in place.
"The 2004 hurricane sea-
son showed us exactly how
importantitistohave effec-
tive ways of rebuilding our
coastal dunes," said Mike
Kane, a UF environmen-
tal horticulture professor.
Plants are an essential
part of that rebuilding."
The researchers from
UF's Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences are
not only developing new
ways to grow the plants un-
der laboratory and green-
house conditions, but are
building a cryogenically
stored library of genetically
varied sea oats samples.
Four major hurricanes
and a tropical storm dam-


as micropropagation, small
samples in the form of shoot
buds are grown in nutrient-
rich gels that contain plant-
derived chemicals to spur
rapid development. They
are then moved to a green-
house, where they contin-
ue to grow in preparation
for their final move to the
beach.
However, some varia-
tions of these delicate plants
"crash" when they are
moved to the greenhouse,
said Sandra Wilson, a re-
searcher at the UF/IFAS
Indian River Research and
Education Center in Fort
Pierce.
Kane, Wilson and oth-
er UF researchers have
worked for years to refine
the process fine-tuning
conditions such as humidity,
temperature, growth pro-
moters and food sources.
In this month's issue of
Plant Growth Regulation,
they report that research
led by former UF doctoral
student Carmen Valero-
Aracama showed that using
the growth promoter meta-
topolin can cut the number
of sea oats that crash in half


for some difficult-to-grow
varieties.
"Sea oats are extraordi-
narily genetically diverse,"
Kane said. "This is an im-
portant finding in that it
could really help improve
production for almost all
genotypes. Before this dis-
covery was made, often
what worked for one type of
sea oat might kill another."
In fact, this diversity pos-
es another major problem
when it comes to re-estab-
lishing the plants. Beaches
can have very different con-
ditions, andit'simportantto
try to plant the kinds of sea
oats best adapted to local
conditions.
Kane will begin next
monthusinga$140,000grant
to develop methods to cryo-
genically freeze thousands
of sea oats samples from
all major populations along
Florida's coasts. The col-
lection will be used to give
plant micropropagation lab-
oratories types of sea oats
native to specific areas. The
funds come from Florida
Sea Grant, which works to
enhance practical use and
conservation of coastal and


marine resources to create
a sustainable economy and
environment.
"There is a need for mil-
lions of these plants, and
this is the sort of work that
is going to allow us to fill
that need," said Gary Hen-
nen, president of Oglesby
Plants International, an
Altha-based business that
uses micropropagation
to commercially produce
plants. The company hopes
to be one of many that put
the UF research to good
use. "That's not only going
to be good for our beaches,
but it's potentially a major
boon for a lot of businesses,
as well."
The University of Flor-
.
Ida is one of the nation's
largest public universities.
A member of the Associa-
tion of American Universi-
ties, UF receives more than
$550 million annually in
sponsored research fund-
ing. Through its research
and other activities, UF
contributes more than
$6 billion a year to Florida's
economy and is responsible
for generating more than
77,000 jobs statewide.


University of Florida environmental horticulture
professor Mike Kane demonstrates how to insert a
plant sample into a cryogenic storage container. He
and his UF/IFAS colleagues hope to store thousands
of genetically diverse sea oats samples.


aged more than 800 miles
of Florida shoreline in 2004,
leaving 360 miles of beach
critically eroded. Nearly
$200 million in state and fed-
eral funding was allocated
to rebuild.
Planting sea oats along
reconstructed beaches isn't
easy or cheap. The 22,000 sea
oats plants required to popu-
late one mile ofrebuiltheach
cost more than $40,000.


One of the biggest hur-
dles is producing enough
plants that will thrive in the
area being rebuilt. Many of
the natural sea oats popu-
lations that serve as seed
sources were damaged or
destroyed during the 2004-
2005 hurricane seasons,
leaving researchers looking
for ways to produce sea oats
other than by seed.
Using a process known


By loty Greene
Special to the Times
Unfortunately, I feel I
have to take time away
from talking about books
to report that in Decem-
her, the library was bro-
ken into for the second
time since I started work-
h Ma
Ing ere in re -an
I am hopping mad.
The first time, they
got a11ilttle hb t since
removing money from
the library at night, they
got a handful of change
this time but it's the
damage that they do that
really hurts. Two windows
were broken, glass all
over, and a sense of viola-
tion happens when some-
one violently invades your
space.
Patrons of the Apala-
chicola Municipal Library
are confused. They say,
"Who would break into a


library?" or, know-
ing the tightness of
our budget, "Why
would they think
there was money
here?


2009 taxes. Please
come by to get your
copies. Please take
only what you think
you will use, and
leave the rest for


there are other patrons
waiting. If you have a
special use like filling out
applications or taking
tests online, please tell
the staff, and we will be
happy to try to accommo-
date you.

A wonderful staff
Speaking of staff, I
would like to thank Bar-

an n amfoke trhe
library open six days per
week.
Next week, I want to
go back to talking about
books. I plan to review
some of the new nonfic-
tion books the library has
gotten recently.
Happy New Year from
the Apalachicola Munici-
pal Library!
Caty Greene is library
ian for the Apalachicola
Municipal Library. 'lb
reach her call 653-8436.


Reluctantly, the
library is now examining
security options but has
already purchased and
installed one camera so
we can see who thinks
they can get money from
the library. Please let
people know that we are
not a good target for a
"smash and grab" or
whatever they call it and
that we are very inter-
ested in catching the next
thief who comes into the
library at night.

IM f0fMS OffiV6
The Apalachicola
Municipal Library has
received numerous forms
from the Internal Rev-
enue Service for filing


others.
We still have a thick
spiral-bound book of
forms from 2008, which
can be photocopied. I
expect a similar book
will be provided for this
year's forms. The public
computers are also set up
with shortcut to the IRS
forms online.

COMDUters
.
in ( gagn(
Speaking of the public
computers, they are get-
ting more in demand all
the time. You do not need
to have a library card on
file to use these comput-
ers. A time limit of 30
minutes is only applied if


POSTMASTER:
Send address change to:
The Apalachicola Times
P.O. Box 820
Apalachicola, FL 32329
Phone 850-653-8868


PERIODICAL RATE


SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
IN COUNTY
$24.15 year $15.75 six months
OUT OF COUNTY
$34.65 year $21 six months


TO ALL ADVERTISERS
In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers
do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount
received for such advertisement.
The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is
thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word
thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains


* *


Kevboard KLATTERINGS


A lesson in a life


UF research improves production of sea oats


Break-ins prompt surveillance


te :



USPS 027-600
Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St.
Apalachicola, FL 32329
VP/Publisher: Karen Hanes
Editor: Tim Croft
Circulation: James Meadors


THE LIBRARY































































































TIDE TABLES MONTHLY AVERAGES
To find the tides of the following areas,subtract the indicated times from


CA RRABELLE
1/14 Thu 12:00AM 2.1 H 07:59AM -1.0 L
04:02PM 1.8 H 07:15PM 1.3 L
1/15 Fri 12:51AM 2.1 H 08:29AM -0.8 L
04:16PM 1.8 H 07:53PM 1.1 L
1/16 Sat 01:38AM 2.1 H 08:53AM -0.6 L
04:28PM 1.8 H 08:31PM 1.0 L
1/17 Sun 02:23AM 1.9 H 09:12AM -0.5 L
04:40PM 1.8 H 09:09PM 0.8 L
1/18 Mon 03:09AM 1.8 H 09:28AM -0.3 L
04:54PM 1.8 H 09:50PM 0.6 L
1/19 Tue 03:57AM 1.6 H 09:44AM -0.2 L
05:09PM 1.9 H 10:33PM 0.5 L
1/20 Wed 04:52AM 1.4 H 10:04AM 0.2 L
05:28PM 1.9 H 11:23PM 0.3 L


$ e a 9 e


fttt7tfitarr7 Avaiffe
--- Natural Sponge & Soaps
Nationally Acclaimed Business
(We help Apalach to be a place
where people come to visit.)
48 Ave D "Hay's House"


www apalachspongecompany com


IV


Thursday, January 1 d, 2010


Local


The Times | AS


Lois Swoboda
Times Staff Writer
New owners are giving the
Carrabelle Palms Resort an up-
grade.
In a time when most business
news is bad, the renovation of
the Carrabelle Palms RV Resort
on U.S. 98 is a bright spot on a
rather bleak horizon.
On Sept. 12, 2009, RVC Out-
door Destinations of Memphis,
Tenn. purchased the property
form Paul Osterbye and a com-
plete facelift of the property is
currently in progress.
Chicago native Paul San
Filippo and his wife Linda
moved down from Georgia to
act as co-managers.
In a telephone interview, San
Filippo said, "We are replac-
ing the entire infrastructure on
original side of park. Most of it
has been in the ground for 30
yearsormoresoitwastimefora
change. We will install up to date
water and sewer lines, electrical
hook ups and cable TV"
He said the old septic system
has been removed and the re-
sort is now hooked into Carra-
belle's water and sewer system
at the lift station at the corner of
Beacon Road and US 98.
When the work is complete,
all of the trailer sites will have


STATE from page Al


Mountain, Ga., Hot Springs,
Ark. on Lake Catherine, along
the intercoastal waterway in
Freeport, in Gulfport, Ala. and
Ashville N.C.
Aside from the upgrade, San
Filippo said RVC plans to keep
the park much as it is.
He said he expects all of the
work on the existing site to be
completed by March.
"It's not quite right to call
it and RV park," he said. "The
amenities are elevated quite
a bit above a typical camp-
ground."
The park is currently about
35 percent occupied even with
the ongoing construction and
San Filippo is optimistic about
the future,
"You have to keep a positive
thought," he said. "Eventually
the economy has to turn around
and, in the meantime, people
adjust and accept their situa-
tion. The whole experience is
reasonably priced and we put
package deals together."
Currently, the park offers
planned escapes featuring
meals at local eateries like 2 Als,
the Magnolia Grill and Tamara's
along with planned activities
like paddling in Tate's Hell, an
evening at the Dixie Theatre or
a tour of the estuary with Cap-
tain Larry Colvert.


LOIS SWOBODA | The Times


Work is underway on the Carrabelle Palms Resort in Carrabelle.


concrete pads and the roads will
be paved.
Initially the resort will keep
the same number of campsites,
79, although some RV sites will
become cabins. When the proj-
ect is complete there will be
about 15 cabins along the west
fence and half a dozen cabins
will be added to the existing


eight cabins on the east end of
the property.
San Fillippo expects the first
eight cabins to arrive within the
next six weeks.
Eventually, RVC plans to
construct an additional 25 cab-
ins on a three acre plot of land
they own across Beacon from
the existing park.


San Fillippo said all of the
buildings are receiving a face-
lift and a new 30 foot-by-40 foot
deck has been installed adja-
cent to the pool.
An apartment above the
camp store has been renovated
and San Filippo is looking for a
long-term tenant to occupy it,
RVC has other resorts in Pine


downturn. Also, he said,
there are no plans to lay
off any of the 70 or so em-
ployees, at the bank's five
branches in Apalachicola,
Eastpoint, St. George Is-
land, Carrabelle and Craw-
fordville.
"We've had people re-
tiring, things like that,
and people who have left
through attrition," Butler
said. "We're trying to hold
down expenses, ever since
we started tightening the
budget in 2008.
"At this point in time we
have no plans to close any
branches, and no plans
to lay people off," he said.
"There have never been
any funds lost in a FDIC-
insured account, and we
have always worked with
customers to provide them
maximum coverage avail-
able."
Topping the list of chal-
lenges for the bank is rais-
ing capital, to offset losses
as more and more Gulf
State loans have become
non-performing because
of property owners either
unable, or unwilling, to pay
on them. As their real es-
tate values dip below the
remaining loan balances,
these property owners, now
in a so-called "under wa-
ter" situation, sometimes
opt to turn their properties
back to the bank, or allow
them to be foreclosed, fur-
ther adding to Gulf State's
financialwoes.
I think that's one thing
you see in coastal areas
with absentee owners,"
said Butler. "There's more
of a feeling 'I'll just give it
back and walk.

or th relxpaectag ohos5
he said. "We have tried to
work with as many people
as possible. We will need to
continue to work with our
customers to have their
commitment to pay their
loans as promised.

A search for
new capital
The consent order spec-
ifies that Gulf State must
achieve and maintain,
within three months of the
order, Tier 1 capital equal
to or more than 8 percent
of its total assets, and to-
tal risk-based capital of at
least 12 percent of its total


risk-weighted assets.
These ratios of capital
to assets, similar to what
the bank posted at the end
of 2008, have steadily de-
clined during the first nine
months of last year. During
the quarter ending Sept. 30,
2009, Gulf State had a Tier 1
capital ratio of a little more
than 5 percent, and a total
risk-based capital ratio of
slightly over 8 percent.
Based on that third
quarter report, the bank's
total equity capital, of about
$11.3 million at the end of
2008, had fallen by about
$4.6 million, to roughly $6.7
million.
How these declines are
calculated, and precisely
what they represent about
a bank's solvency, can be
complex, but what is sim-
ple here are the reasons
for the decline a drop in
property values.
"In Eastpoint, in one
subdivision I know of, lots
are selling for 15 percent
of what they sold for during
the heyday of the market,"
said Butler. "Now more
people are trying to sell
land than buy land, and it's
become a buyers market.
As values come down, if we
have to foreclose, we have
to write down property val-
ues, and that's a direct hit
to capital."
The consent order does
not allow Gulf State to sim-
ply reduce its loan losses,
and thus improve its per-
centage capital percentag-
es. Rather, it specifies that
the bank can sell common
stock, seekdirectcontribu-
tions from its shareholders,
or present other strategies
acce ablteotorceugul s,

sion of capital.
Butler said Gulf State is
busy looking for a financial
boost, but that it's not easy
in these tight and trying
times.
"It could come through
existing shareholders; oth-
er investors can buy stock
as well," he said. "Most of
the times the investment
hastocomefromyourbusi-
ness community. Those
who want to, in the long
run, keep viable commu-
nity banks in their commu-
nity need to look forward
in investing in the banks
serving their community,"
Butler said.


"The amount we need
to raise somewhat depends
on how fast things turn
around," he said. "We're
not out in the market every
days selling stock, like big
banks constantly paying
dividends to shareholders.
We're having to start from
scratch. We're doing our
best, but the smaller you
are the harder it is to raise
capital. The smaller you
are, the fewer people want
to talk with you.
"As a community bank
we gave back to the com-
munity to build capital.
We've always supported
Our growth internally, al-
ways retained our earn-
ings," said Butler. "We in-
vested to build capital for a
rainy day. Unfortunately we
did not plan to have a mon-
soon on us."
Butler said the large,
outside banks contributed
to the local problem by opt-
ing to cut and run when the
real estate crisis began to
roil.
"Before we had national
crisis I started seeing prob-
lems start in 2005 after
(Hurricane) Dennis," he
said. "It was a makeup call
because of that storm and
insurance scare. But about
the time we were getting
over soaring property
taxes and insurance prob-
lems, property became less
attractive.
"The big banks, they
wereveryveryaggressive-
ly making loans down here,
lendinginsomecasesupto
100 percent," Butler said.
"These same banks that
were making these high
loan-to-value loans, when
the market went had they


have been dumping these
on the market and driving
property values.
"(We were) both caught
in a bigger, nationwide
problem, where bigger
banks helped drive proper-
ty values up, and then drive
them down as they dumped
property," he said. "We try
to not dump it on the mar-
ket at distressed prices,
which in some cases re-
sults in additional loss,"
Butler said. "Any decrease
in return ends up eroding
our capital."
The Gulf State Bank
president said the chal-
lenges the bank faces are
no different than those of
other local businesses, and
that Franklin County resi-
dents should make it a pri-
ority to support local busi-
ness interests.
"I'm concerned each
time I see a business close
in this community. I think
we need to support all of
our local business as much
as we can," he said. "We
also have a group of em-
ployees who also give back
to the community as well.
"If you take it (shopping)
to Panama City, you're not
helping your community
here at home," Butler said.

NOW FUleS COUld
affect lending
.
One of the stipulations
in the consent order is
that by the middle of this
month, Gulf State will have
to draw up a written plan
to reduce its risk exposure
in each asset. This meanS
that regarding all banking
relationships in excess of
a half-million dollars, and


classified as "substandard"
or "doubtful," Gulf State
must describe how it plans
to collect, charge off, or im-
prove the quality of an asset
so it can be removed from
"adverse classification."
The regulators want
Gulf State to steadily re-
duce the amount of assets
considered "substandard"
or "doubtful" in the next
two years, until three-quar-
ters of such assets are re-
duced by the end of 2011.
The bank has hired an out-
side consultant to help it
comply with numerous re-
porting requirements
"Because of some of
these policies we have to
adopt, we may revise our
policies," said Butler. "If
you have a loan that was
classified doubtful or loss, I
absolutely can not lend you
any more money. That's
cast in stone."
He said lending to av-
erage customers may be-
come more challenging
as well, because as capital
shrinks due to loan losses,


so do lending limits. "At this
time point we may have to
turn it down because it
exceeds our legal lending
limit," Butler said.
"The problem we have
is we have always worked
very hard with consumers,"
he said. "A lot of consumers
have credit problems. Now
that we're having to adopt
new loan policies, a person
in the past who we would
have made an exception for
we may not be in a position
to make the exception go-
ing forward."
Butler said he continues
to be optimistic the worst
is behind the bank, but de-
clined to forecast the fu-
ture.
"I think I quit making
forecasts early in 2008,
when we had numerous
times when I truly felt we
were at the bottom of it,"
he said. "So much depends
on the overall economy,
and the pipeline of proper-
ty being foreclosed. We are
struggling to work through
this."


Date
Thu, Jan 14
FriJan 15
Sat, Jan 16
Sun, Jan 17
Mon, Jan 18
TueJan 19
Wed, Jan 20


High
580
630
620
63.
580
590
590


% Precip
20 %
20 %
10 %
50 %
20 %
10 %
10 %


HIGH


LOW


Bald Point


APALACHICOLA
01:25AM 1.3 H 10:12
05:27PM 1.1 H 09:28
02:16AM 1.3 H 10:42
05:41PM 1.1 H 10:06
03:03AM 1.3 H 11:06
05:53PM 1.1 H 10:44
03:48AM 1.2 H 11:25
06:05PM 1.1 H 11:22
04:34AM 1.1 H 11:41
06:19PM 1.1 H
12:03AM 0.4 L 05:22
11:57AM -0.1 L 06:34
12:46AM 0.3 L 06:17
12:17PM 0.1 L 06:53


I I I



The following channel
lineup changes will take plBCB
On or around February 8, 2010:

a WEWA (IND) will be added on channel 17.
a Inspiration will remain on channel 65 but will move
tO Digital Broadcast Basic (converter required).
5 You may receive a free digital converter (DTA) for
12 months by calling us at 888-847-6228 or by
visiting your local Mediacom office. Find more
details at www.mediacomtoday.com.

All of us at Mediacom look forward to providing
you with exciting, new services in the future! If
you have any questions, feel free to walk in to
your local office or contact our Customer Care
Representatives at 888-847-6228.


1/14 Thu

1/15 Fri

1/16 Sat

1/17 Sun

1/18 Mon

1/19 Tue

1/20 Wed


AM -0.6
PM 0.8
AM -0.5
PM 0.7
AM -0.4
PM 0.6
AM -0.3
PM 0.5
AM -0.2


AM


Carrabelle Palms turns a new


Medi~nA











































































Black











Inrcgiio fBakHistory MnhAtrts&Ifso etr



speialhal-pae hg Afrhicn h pAmerican-Aeia inventors ta


aoccupah nations. Nevrthdeless, ahc small numbe of Texeptonll tealetd
AfianAericn were d a bl to obtsainb and Feduca 5tio ndmk


p


ARTHRITIS AND
Email INFUSION CENTER

S 1 Im tT KNOLOGY'
RO. Box 1940,
Panama City, FL 32402 HULON E. CRAYON, M.D.
Fax: 850.763.4636 NE LD 2917 Hi C PC, FL
For questions call: 850.747.5008 850.873.6748


Thursday, January 14, 2010


NOTICE

from page Al
security on our loan. The
bank and Hexaport are
trying to work with the
city to keep this company
going and we feel what the
city has done is unneces-
sary. Hexaport can't be
held totally responsible for
the economic conditions
that have happened over
the last two years. If they
can work things out with
the bankruptcy court, they
plan to reopen. Franklin
County needs jobs. We
need Hexaport."
Davis said the bank's
attorney is drafting a re-
sponse to the letter from
the city.
On Jan. 7, Hartman
told the commission, "As
a legal matter, we own
the building, but there are
people who feel their mon-
ey went into it. A $600,000
grant applied for by Carra-
belle went into the ground
out there."
In a later telephone in-
terview, Hartman said a
$650,000 grant was used
for infrastructure includ-

partial payment for the




At the Jan. 7 meeting
Attalla told commission-
ers he hoped to have the
factory open by Jan. 16.
He said, "We are work-
ing on mezzanine financ-
ing and we are close
to closing a number of
contr ts bu Imingmoh T
from up north and we
closed our first contract
for that last week. We have
a lender waiting. We need
to use as much duct tape
as we can to hold things
,,
tog Curley Messer
asked Attalla to keep him
informed on the situation
at the factor
"I'm inter sted in jobs,"
Messier said.
Attalla and the attorney
for Hexaport could not be
reached for comment af-
ter the meeting.


A6 | The Times


Local


By Shannon Winslow-Claunch
Florida Freedom Newspapers
One of the oldest US Coast Guard ves-
sels, built in 1877, is in port at St. Andrews
Marina through February.
The Governor Stone, which had been
homeported in Apalachicola until it was
handed over to South Walton County in
April 2003, is a 69-foot wooden coastal
schooner with a distinguished and di-
verse history.
Used as a freight carrier, rum-runner,
fishing vessel and oyster boat; commis-
sioned as a training vessel in World War
II and used for pleasure by various U.S.
yacht clubs., the Governor Stone is now
used as for historic and ecological educa-
tion and to bolster tourism.
It has been beached by hurricanes
twice. The first time in 1878, then in 1906,
it sunk and was recovered and repaired
for $600. The vessel was built and re-
mains a two-masted, gaff-rigged, center-
board equipped schooner,


It was named a National Landmark
in 1990 and is currently on loan by the
Friends of the Governor Stone. The
group is a unique organization that pre-
serves and maintains the vessel. The an-
tique vessel travels from port to port to
those communities which purchase an-
nual membership.
Shawna Beji, St Andrews CRA pro-
gram manager, said the Governor Stone
has a designated slip at the marina. "It
has become a treat for the community to
host the boat as a traveling sailing mu-
seum," she said.
Ferry boats carrying tourists have
added the Governor Stone to their tours
and the public can view the historic ves-
sel docked near the ramp on Bayview
Ave.
Nancy Weigel, St. Andrews history
committee member, is part of the group
exhibiting Governor Stone. She says
feedback from shop merchants has been
enthusiastic as their customers comment
about this unique addition to the port.


The St Andrews Waterfront Partner-
ship is recruiting port crew members to
monitor the vessel while it is docked in
Panama City as well as during sailing
trips from port to port. For more infor-
mation visit www.govstone.com or call
850-763-9816
The historic schooner Governor Stone,
has more recently found a new home at
Eden State Gardens. South Walton Coun-
ty took possession of the vessel in April
of 2003 and sent her immediately into
dry dock for painting and maintenance.
When completed the National Historic
Landmark will be put to work once more
as an educational tool and tourist attrac-
tion. After the Apalachicola Maritime
Museum was no longer able to afford
the upkeep of the Governor Stone, Eden
State Gardens was competing with Tam-
pa and Pensacola for possession of the
historic vessel. The major requirement
from the state was that "she" always be
with a not-for-profit organization and be
used for educational purposes


~Miedicalenter


.

Ed water 'j
Beach Resore


SURRY 08.5
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PLUS MANY OTHER WAYS TO
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Name


# of copies per delivery


eleT hone


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~j~e~l~~LI~ ~C~a o e~oxow o w~ n~ox~xc~ ~roJ ocb~


on e n a5me


KNOLOGY


--



















Was my super grouper a big blooper?


Junior James Winfield has been rebounding well and playing strong
defense for the Seahawks. "He's playing more aggressive than some
of the other post players," said Coach Fred Drake. "He wants to make
rebounding his specialty. He just needs to do his role."


STATE BAN K 1897
A Division of Coastal Community Bank

Apalachicola Carrabelle Eastpoint St. George Island
22 Avenue E 612 N Avenue A 5 Jefferson Street 200 Franklin Blvd
653-8805 697-4500 670-8501 927-2561



C,%..I Ag Franklin County: (850) 670-5555
Leon County: (850) 926-9602
Toll Free: (888) 831-6754
O o>
MS M EDS Helping Hands Make The Difference


as av R 0 FT War~i C.


*Traditional


By James E. "Red" Butler
Special to the Times
When I was a 12-year-old
wharf rat in Apalachicola in
1938, I was already a well-
trained fisherman, thanks to
my father, George W. Butler,
who had fished the rivers and
bays of Franklin County since
his arrival in 1925. I had of-
ten met the Mosconis snapper
boats "Eumorphia," skippered
by Capt. George, and the "As-
pasia," later, skippered by his
older son, Capt. Nick.
Sometimes, if the seafood
dealer was shipping dressed
fish, I was allowed to remove
the cheeks from the grouper
heads. They are delightfully fla-
vored, and tender medallions
averaging 2 to 4 inches in diam-
eter and 2 inches thick.
I wanted to go deep-sea fish-
ing, and with the aid of George
Egbert, a family friend, and
Capt. George's mate, I was
hired on as a Boat Boy at one-
half share for a 10-day trip to the
'banks," far out in the Gulf, on
the ex-sponge boat, the "Emor-
phia" with the captain, six-man
crew and a Boat Boy.
There was a two-part story
in the Times on Nov. 11 and 18,
2004 under Jimmie Nichols' by-
line. "Apalach Diary: Ten Days
Before the Mast" was one of
several short to extra-short
stories that I submitted and
were printed thanks to Jim-
mie. I miss Jimmie, whom I
have known since childhood.
The story in the Times by Da-
vid Adlerstein on July 19, 2009,
about the Warsaw/Goliath grou-
per jarred my old memory back
70 years to what was my third
largest lifetime catch, a 512-
pound jewfishh" or Warsaw
grouper. Goliath was only a Bib-
lical name back then and wasn't


fish-related to me.
On our last of a 10-day run,
we were ready to secure the
boat for an overnight run into
Apalachicola. When Captain
George yelled "Up lines! Up
lines!" I was ready for home
and family after 10 days of day-
light to dark pulling fish from
deep water, beside other Boat
Boy duties and staying wet and
damp 24/7.
As I began to retrieve my
hand line (about 3/16" diameter
of 3-strand twisted cotton), it
stopped coming. I yelled "Bot-
tom! Bottom!" which was the
signal for the captain to disen-
gage the clutch and stop for-
ward motion.
Mate George Egbert came
forward with "nippers" on his
hands and set back on the line
and after a few pulls he handed
the line back to me and said,
"Red, you've got a biggun." He
then went and spoke with the
captain,
While I went with a longtime
fight with an unknown "monster
of the deep," the crew and cap-
tain went about their normal
duties of preparing the boat for
homeward-bound, occasion-
ally stopping to laugh about the
fight the "boy" was having.
How long did I fight that
fish? No one really knew 'cause
the only timepiece was in the
engine compartment where
the skipper slept, and anyway,
landing time wasn't important
on a commercial boat; get 'em
up and off, bait up and get back
down.
Afterwards, I was told that
normally, large jewfish were
cut loose because of the low
sale value and the huge amount
of ice necessary to preserve
the fish, as well as the lost time
landing one.
Finally, the fish began to rise


couldn't visualize what I was
going to see. The first thing was
a huge mouth filed with some-
thing, and an enormous head
with rather small eyes staring
at me.
I turned away exhausted and
sat down to rest. George Egbert
went over the side of the boat
and secured a rope through the
mouth and gills while the crew
rigged the line through pulleys.
My monster fish was lowered to
the deck and I was given the job
of drawing (removing the intes-
tines) while the boat headed for
home. The jewfish was lowered
to the floor of the hold and cov-
ered with our remaining ice and
an old tarp.
Capt. George estimated the
caught weight as "'bout 500
pounds." My weight was 90
pounds. In later years I found
a handwritten note I had made
giving the dock weight at 512
pounds at a price of 3 cents
a pound. I cannot remember
how it was weighed but I have
a flicker of memory of cotton-
bale scales? Does anyone know
of such scales that would have
weight a 512-pound grouper on
the dock in 1938? Can anyone
give me a ratio of body weight
to entrails of a large grouper?
My previous reference to
"my third largest catch" refers
to a couple times while trawl-
ing from a USAF Crash Rescue
Boat off Panama City in 1950.
I had inadvertently hooked
up with a 30-foot Whale Shark
which I released boat side, and
again another accidental hook-
up with a Manta Ray with an es-
timated 10-foot wing span. The
ray was towed into Tyndall Air
Force base and turned over to
some branch of the state fisher-
ies.
At 83 years old, I'm no longer
looking for a record breaker.


FLORIDA PHOTOGRAPHIC COLLECTION


and all the fight was gone; just
the heavy load on my line. I fi-
nally heard the lead weight on
my line striking the boat's hull.
I took a couple of turns around


the rail with the line so I could
look down and whatever I had
hooked. Not having caught any-
thing larger than a 20-pound
black drum with hand lien, I


Tim n ditor
Despite 28 points from
Carlos Morris and 22 from
Austin O'Neal the Franklin
County Seahawks lost in
overtime at Port St. Joe last
Saturday night.
The Seahawks fell be-
hind early as they opened
the game cold from the floor,
falling behind 16-6 after one
period.
However, behind Morris
and O'Neal the Seahawks
chipped away at the margin
in the second quarter and
closed to within 27-26 at the
half.
The Tiger Sharks pushed


A


p roi alnc M di eih


and Adam Joseph four be-
hind the scoring of Morris
and O'Neal.
Lady Sharks 44, Lady
Seahawks 27
In the girls' game that
O'NEAL preceded the overtime
thriller, the Lady Seahawks
points after simply could not overcome


MORRIS


three quarters but Morris
and O'Neal led a late charge
that knotted the score at 58-
all at the end of regulation.
The Tiger Sharks hot
shooting proved the differ-
ence in the extra period as
Port St. Joe squeezed out the
victory before a boisterous
home crowd.


the lead to three i


a slow start and lost to host
Port St. Joe.
The Lady Sharks were up
17-9 after one period as they
raced out of the gate and be-
gan to wear down Franklin
County, which did not match
their point total from the first
period in any of the remain-
ing three quarters.


CA RRA BE L LE APA LA CH ICO LA


A


Seahawks, Lady Seahawks fall at Port St. Joe


James Winfie





Thursday, January 1 d, 2010


Local


Special to The Times
A bald eagle is struggling to
survive severe injuries sustained
in a battle for territory.
On Dec. 26, Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation Commission
Officer Hal Webb received a call
that an eagle was on the ground
beside U.S. Highway 98 near the
Franklin/Gulf countyline.
He arrived at dusk to find the
bird huddled in the weeds. When
he approached it in an attempt to
assess her condition, the bird fled
flyinglow.
Because he was not trained to
handle raptors, he called falconer
Tommy Smith of Apalachicola,
who hurried to the scene.
Stevens brought a cast net and
heavy gloves. He first attempted
to net the bird, but that proved
impossible, and, to make matters
worse, the eagle flew into a ditch
full of water attempting to avoid
hi concerned about the bird's
condition and especially the ef-
fect of cold on the wet eagle,
Stevens disregarded the bird's
talons and beak and grabbed it.
He was able to subdue the bird
and place it into a pet carrier in
Webb's truck.
Webb took the bird to Betsy
Knight at the Big Bend Wildlife
Sanctuary in Altha where it was
given first aid and medication for
pain,
"She is a magnificent female,"
said Knight. "She was completely
down when he brought her in, but
after we warmed and dried her,
she was sitting up by the time he
left. I didn't know the officer; he
did everything I asked him to do.
I had high hopes for her then, but
now infection has set in, and we
can only pray.
Webb described the experience
of helping Knight with a bit of awe
saying, "I had to hold her like a
child while Betsy Knight adminis-
tered first aid."
He said if the bird lives, then
she owes her life to Stevens. "He
definitely gave the bird a fighting
chance," said Webb.
Initially, Knight thought the
bird had been shot, but after view-
ing x-rays and consulting with
avian hospitals in Minnesota and
Chicago, she believes the damage
was the result of a territorial dis-
pute with another eagle.
She described the damage to
the bird's leg and breast as the
worst she had seen resulting from
a fight between birds.
She said the eagle has no bro-
ken bones but is struggling against
an infection.
"She's a sweetheart. She lets
us work on her and seems to know
we're trying to help her," said
Knight.
The eagle is under the care of
a veterinarian and is housed in a
temperature-controlled 4'by 6' en-
closure where she receives extra
oxygen.
Knight said the doctor takes
her out into the sunshine during
the warmest part of the day, and,
although gravely ill, the bird is still


LOIS SWOBODA | The Times
"Trees like to have kids
climb on them, but
trees are much bigger
than we are and much
more forgiving," wrote
television writers Diane
Frolov and Andrew
Schneider of "Northern
Exposure."
*



OUR

Students

celebrate
A L
luUOr Day

Franklin County
School's students will be
planting several oak trees
along with 1,000 container-
ized Long Leaf Pine seed-
lings on school grounds
to celebrate this year's
Arbor Day. They will be
assisted by the Division of
Forestry's Wakulla/Frank-
lin County Forester Daniel
Stevens.
On April 10, 1872, the
first Arbor Day was held
in Nebraska City, Neb.,
through the efforts of J.
Sterling Morton. More than
1 million trees were plant-
ed in Nebraska during that
Arbor Day. Each state's
Arbor Day celebration date
differs and was established
depending on climate and
suitable planting times. In
Florida, Arbor Day is cel-
ebrated on the third Friday
in January each year.
For more information,
you can call the Wakulla/
Franklin County forester
at 850-421-3101, or to find
more information on Arbor
Day, you can visit www.ar-
borday.org


ALWAYS ONLINE




0 Olilll
,
*In 6 S. COm


ALWAYS ONLINE


TAMMY STEVENS |
SpecialtotheTimes
At left,
Tommy
Stea h ola
struggles
with the bird.
Below, the
eagle was
badly injured
On the right
hand side.


eating.
Anyone wishing to help can
send donations of money or fish
to 9287 N.W. Felix Flanders Road,
Altha, Florida 32421.
Donations to the sanctuary are
tax deductible.
Knight also sent her thanks to


everyone who helped provide for a
pair of orphaned bear cubs found
during a controlled burn earlier
this year.
Knight successfully reared the
pair. Yogi and Booboo recently
were released in a site near where
they were discovered last month.


Yogi weighed 129 pounds at the
time of his release, and Booboo
tipped the scales at 140 pounds.
"People were so wonderful to
bring food up here," she said and
added that her freezer seemed
empty now that the pair have been
released.


Tues COUNTRY CROSSING 4hr. Stay 510.00 PP
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Call to make reservations 588-8338
7151 W. HWY 98 (in the old Waynes World Center)
PANAMA CITY BEACH, FL. 32407
SELLER OF TRAVEL #37701


A8 | The Times


Bald Eagle rescued on county line













Thursday, January 14~, 2010 w w w. apalach times .com Page 1


PHOTO COURTESY OF ST. VINCENT NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE
George and Elizabeth Hatch on the porch
of their home on St. Vincent with visiting
hunters Majors Parmer and Hendrie seated
on the steps.
At top, a Model T Ford used on St.
Vincent


* 'Y


B


Marilyn Oberhausen of Dahlonega, GA shared this account of life on St. Vincent Island written by her father; the late Charles E: Markcs Jr


By Charles Marks
Special to The Times
I lived on St. Vincent Island as a small boy. It
was a subtropical paradise. The gulf beach was
as white as snow, with undulating sand dunes
covered with waving sea oats edging right up
to a wall of evergreen forest, primarily pine and
live oak and yaupon.
The hunting and fishing was fabulous in
that virgin wilderness. You wouldn't believe
the number of deer that roamed the island in
those days. One afternoon late, as my father and
mother and I rode down the nine mile stretch of
gulf beach in our Model T Ford, we counted 127
deer in the edge of the woods.
On that same gulf beach it was easy on
moonlight nights in the summer to find ten to
15 turtle crawls in an evening each containing
100 to 200 eggs. These big sea turtles, up to four
feet long and 500 pounds, would crawl up the
beach to the dunes and scoop out a neat round
hole with their flippers into which they laid their
eggs.
My parents often held an arm to balance
me as I rode on the turtle's back down to the
water's edge.
In the lakes, ponds and marshes, ducks
abounded by the thousands: mallards, black
ducks, pintails, gadwells, widgeons, both green
and blue winged teal, shoveler, red head,
canvasback, ring neck, bluebill and countless
coots. I recall crawling through the marsh
grass with my father and uncle to a pond.
Peering through the reeds, all I could see were
duck heads. Just before they shot twice each
with their double-barrels, the pond seemed to
explode ducks and the sun was shut out. They
picked up 26 pintails (well within the laws of that
day, when each hunter was allowed 50 ducks per
day).
One morning, my father, Elgin Wefing and
I were in a duck blind in First Lake. Suddenly,
eight widgeons decoyed to our blind. Now, most
people would shoot at the nearest duck first,
but that allows the more distant ones to escape.
But Elgin watched those ducks as they circled
and came in. With the five shots in his 12-gauge
automatic, he got all eight of those widgeons as
they whizzedby at 40 miles per hour; the duck
farthest out on the first shot, two more as their
paths converged on the second shot, two more
on the third shot, one more at long range on the
fourth shot and whirling around got the eighth
duck at maximum range on the last shot. A
fantastic piece of duck shooting.
St. Vincent was owned by Dr. Ray V Pierce of
Buffalo, NY in the mid twenties, and my father
was in charge of its preservation. The Pierces
used it as a winter resort and had a large home
in the west pass area, replete with butler, maid
and cook. I can still remember each morning
precisely at 8, the butler would come out on the
veranda and blow a full course of reveille with
a five foot trumpet, the kind used in the middle
ages.
We had quite a settlement, with a Delco
generator that produced electricity for the big
house, as well as for our family and two black
families that lived and worked there too.


C*M T -n n


s o,-


PHOTO COURTESY OF ST. VINCENT NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE


sl


ao, ali~eew?2


FROM THE COLLECTION OF MARILYN OBERHAUSEN
Charles Marks' drawing of the settlement on
St. Vincent where he lived as a child.
.
"Ileved on St. Vzncent Island
as a small boy. It was a
subtro vical paradise The "ulf
1 1 CS
beach was as white as snow,
.
esth undulating sand dunes
COvered with wavin sea oats
c
edging right up to a wall of
.
BUCTgT8BR Orest, premardy
IT 7 7
ptW8 880, 108 ORK 880
I 01/ DON/
I


PHOTO COURTESY OF ST. VINCENT NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE


The home of R.V. Pierce on St. Vincent Island.


LIFE


TI~ES


eJ St


Vincent


then and


- Charles Marks


See ST. VINCENT BS


PHOTO COURTESY OF ST. VINCENT NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE
















































































'
OF THE

FL 1 WEEK

Minnie & Micky
Minnie and her brother
Mickie were abandoned by our
front door on a freezing cold
December night. They were
found in the morning cold, scared
and very hungry.
Since their time here at
the Adoption Center they have
become social, healthy, playful
puppies and we feel sure will
make wonderful pets for anyone
willing to open their heart and
fr home to either or both of these
ML. . I adorable and deserving puppies.
Please won t you consider giving them a forever home?
Volunteers are desperately needed to socialize Minnie and her
sibling Mickie and all of the other dogs and cats. Any time you can
spare would-be greatly appreciated.
Call Karen at 670-8417 for more details or visit the Franklin
County Humane Society at 244 State Route 65 in Eastpoint. You
may log onto the website at a as as f......Ila.el..... to see more of our
adoptable pets.
Remember, when you adopt a friend for life, you not only save
the life of that pet, you make room for us to save the life of one more
abandoned dog or cat


P


for residential accounts


av ma mme


Thursday, January 1 d, 2010


B2 | The Times


Society


Lois Swoboda
Times StaffWriter
Franklin County is home to
many fine craftsmen; among
them is Ron Vice of Carrabelle
who listens to the leather he
uses to sculpt fantasies.
Ron Vice and his better half
Carol are familiar faces around
town.
Vice, a musician by trade,
has taken over the position of d-
jay for the Saturday night dance
held .once a month at the Frank-
lin County Senior Center and he
and some friends recently cut a
CD of Christmas carols, but Vice
has hidden talents as well.
He is a master leather worker
whose art is currently on display
at Pretenders Gallery on Ma-
rine Street in Carrabelle.
For 20 years, he has crafted
masks for Mardi gras, Fantasy
Fair at Key West and other cel-
ebrations.
While there are many mask
makers, most work in cloth, pa-
pier-mich6 or feathers, very few
work in leather.
Vice said the process of pro-
ducing the whimsical creations
requires a number of steps.
Each mask begins with aform
created from an actual woman's
face. When preparing a mask for
a particular person, Vice chooses
a form made from a face similar
in shape to the subject.
Creating a form
The forms themselves are
works of art created from leath-


PHOTOS BY LOIS SWOBODA | The Times


Clothes
pins hold a pair of
pleats in place as damp leather


Vice is unsure of how many
masks he has produced over the
course of his career, but said he
remembers a single Mardi gras
show where he offered up 400 for
sale.
In addition to masks, Vice
also sculpts sea creatures from
leather to use as wall hangings
or wearable art.
"The leather will tell you what
you're going to do. You see it un-
fold right in front of you. It tells
you what to do. You just have
to let your imagination run its
course," he explained.


hardens into it's final form.
becomes moldable."
.Using fingertips and the
pointed handle of a paintbrush,
Vice molds the mask around the
facial features of the form.
Once the basic mask is
shaped and dry, he adds all sorts
of embellishments ranging from
horns and cat's eyes to ruffled or
filigree headdresses all created
of leather.
He may further embellish it
by covering it with cloth or spar-
kling glass and feathers or by
painting it with brilliant acrylic
paints.


er and papier-mich6.
Thesubject'sfacewascoasted
with Vaseline. Straws are insert-
ed in to the nostrils to facilitate
breathing and plaster of Paris is
daubed on the face and allowed
to dry. This creates a hollow im-
pression of the features, like the
negative of a photograph.
Next leather is worked into
the form and then lined with lay-
ers of the paper mixture until a
hard positive copy of the image
is produced.
When Vice sets to work on
a mask, he forms it over one of


these copies of a human face.
How to make a mask
He begins a mask by cutting
a mask, much like the simple
ones worn by children, freehand
from a sheet of vegetable tanned
cowhide.
He places the rough shape
on one of his forms and sprays it
with water.
He explains, "When the leath-
er is first wet, you can't work
with it. It's limp, but as it ab-
sorbs the water and loses some
of it to evaporation, it cases and


By Valerie Miller
Special to the Times
On Wednesday, Dec. 16, the
Prekindergarten children from
the Franklin County Learning
Center performed their Christ-
mas program, "Christmas
Morning."
Dr. Kay Cadwallader, direc-
tor of the Learning Center, be-
gan the program by welcoming
the packed house of excited
parents, grandparents and
friends.
Marcia Thomas narrated
the program, which featured
the children singing Christmas
songs and playing musical in-
struments.
Mrs. Miller's class began
the program with "Rudolph the
Red Nose Reindeer. Mrs. Wil-
liams' class danced and sang
"The Reindeer Pokey." Mrs.
Sasnett's class jingled all the
way with "Jingle Bells" and Mrs.


Kulick's class sang "Frosty the
Snowman. For the finale, all
classes sang "We Wish You a
Merry Christmas."
At the end of the program,
Santa Claus made a surprise


visit. He reminded the children
to be nice and listen to their
teachers. He told them that
he would visit their houses on
Christmas Eve.
Refreshments were provided


Births and BIRTHDAYS


'PENINGS


Pelt birth
WilliePeltandMaryRaeNowlingofPortStJoearevery
proud to announce the birth of their daughter. Ruby Alina
Marie Pelt was born Friday, Oct. 23, 2009 in Panama City.
She weighed 6 pounds and 11 ounces and was 20 inches
long. She has one sister Shirah Pelt, who is 5.
Hergrandparentsare WilliamandRuby AlinaMurrayof
Eastpoint; Wendell Shiver Buster and Mary Pelt of Port St.
Joe; and the late Wayne Nowling. Great grandparents are
Charles and Mary Lou King of Eastpoint. Johnny and Joan
Shiver, Kenneth Shiver all of Eastpoint, and the late Nance
and Olay Dalton and the late Ottis Russell II. Ruby and Bill
Murray of Carrabelle and Blanch Caldwell of Maryland.


Library
y HA


Sped0 10 The Times
The WILD (Wilderness Coast Pub-
lic Library) Bookmobile is back in
Franklin County Wednesdays and Fri-
days through the month of March. The
bookmobile's winter-spring schedule
of times and stops are available in the
Times, or at the Carrabelle branch or
the Eastpoint library.
Check out period for bookmobile
books is one month, and there are no


overdue fines for bookmobile books. So
make it a point to use the WILD book-
mobile whenever you can't make it to
the library or when you see the book-
mobile near your neighborhood.
Free computer class schedules are
available at each library with class-
es continuing through the month of
March. You can register over the phone
or in person, just leave your name,
phone number, and class of interest,
we will call you back to confirm.


It's almost here Gaming Day 2010
at the Carrabelle Library. Yes, gam-
ing day will be Saturday, Jan. 16, from
10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Bring the family and
play all day, choose any number of
board games, Wii stations and numer-
ous card games. Refreshments will be
served to help the game weary.
The Franklin County Public Library
Advisory board will meet at the East-
point library, Thursday, Jan. 21 at 5:30
p.m. The public is invited to attend.


Love of leather not a fetish for talented Ron Vice


Christmas morning at the Franklin County Learning Center


WRITING ABOUT
STAYING SAFE IN THE SUN














Fourth grade students in Laura King's writing
c asses at the Franklin County School were
among the local winners of the Florida Society
of Dermatology 2010 Sun Defense Essay
Contest. The purpose of the contest is to educate
elementary school-age children and their parents
about the importance of sun safety and to
promote literacy.
Pictured, from left, are third place William
Lee, fourth place Harper Westbrook, first place
.
Myah Hunnings and second place Emily Owens.
Five overall winners will be selected from Florida
schools. Each of the awardees will receive one
sun shade structure for their school.


,
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(ARD OF THANKS
Thanks to the wonderful people of
Franklin County for all the cards, flowers,
food and monetary gifts prayers and words
of encouragement at the the death of my
Freddie. It is great to live in such a caring
community. God Bless everyone


The United Methodist Churches

Sof Franklin County Welcome Youl
First United Methodist Church of Apalachicola
Worship Service 11:00 a.m. every Sunday
75 5" St. Apalach cuol 65393 fmaalach@gtcom~net
Pastor: Rev. Them Patriotis
Carrabelle United Methodist Church
Worship Services 10:45 a.m. Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
"Celebrate Recovery" Mondays 7-9 p.m.
Healing service first Tuesday each month-7 p.m.
102 NE Ave. B Ca abell n697-3672

Eastpoint United Methodist Church
PrWorship erviceal0:e0s0 a.m it 1 .m.
Healing Service every first Fridays of the Month at 6:30 p.m.
317 Patton Dr. (corner of David St.) 670-8825
Pastor: Rev. Beth White
St. George Island United Methodist Church
9:00 a.m. Worship Service
10:00 a.m. Fellowship Hour
201 E. Gulf Beach Dr. 927- 4635 www~ursgiumc.org
Pastor: Rev. Them Patriotis


Margaret V. Jackson
May 17, 1930 April 19, 2009
Your smile
though your smile is gone forever
and your hands I can not touch
I still have many memories of the one I loved
so much
your memory is my keepsake with which Ill



First Pentecostal Holiness Church
379 Brownsville Road Apalachicola


Sunday School 9:45 am
Sunday Morning Worship 10:45 am
Sunday Evening Service 6:00 pm
Monday, Youth Group 6:30 pm
Wednesday, Royal Rangers, G.A.P. 7:00 pm
Wednesday Worship & Word 7:30 pm
Nursery Provided during regular church services


never part
God has you in his keeping
I have you in my heart
sadly missed but never forgotten.
We miss you Aunt Margaret every day of oUr
life until we meet again some sweet day knoW
that we love you God BleSS
Charles and Mary Lou King and family



St. Patrick Catholic Church
Ave C & Sixth Street in Apalachicola, FL 32329 or
The Islander (Across from the Blue Parrot)
on St. George Island, FL 32328
(850) 653-9453 Email: stpatcath@fairpoint.net
PASTOR: FATHER ROGER LATOSYNSKI
WWW.stpatricksmass.com
APALACHICOLA MASS SCHEDULE
SATURDAY................. .................5 PM
SUNDAY ................ ................ 10 AM
ST. GEORGE ISLAND MASS SCHEDULE
SUNDAY ................ .................8:30 AM


Thursday, January 1 d, 2010


Local


The Times | B3


I'm


PHOTOS BY JONATHAN FARMER


Before


After


This is Marbeth Farmer's
story ofhow she rescued her best
friend and traveling compan-
ion, Lucky. When you consider
adopting a homeless pet, it's
always easy to think of reasons
not make the plunge, but this sto-
ry reminds us that obstacles are
made to be overcome.

Marbeth Former
Specialtothe Times
The phone rang, and it was my
friend Bruce Hall. "How'd you
like to take a ride with me to the
Shelter over in Eastpoint? I hesi-
tated, "I can't go to shelters. I am
just not ready for another dog."
So, Bruce said, "I just want to
check on this little dog I took out


there I need to go see how she's
doing."
That was the first of four trips
I made to the Franklin County
Animal Shelter.
No. 1: This pitiful looking
little black dog with matted hair
clumps the size of my fist, some
shaved areas and a load of fleas
came bounding into the recep-
tion area. She had no hair around
her eyes, and sores on her ears.
A red scrape over one eye arched
like eyebrow, and her sores were
open and infected. She obviously
had no idea how sad she looked;
she bounced around the room
happily, rolled onto her back for
tummy rubs, and licked our fac-
es, apparently unaware that she
was such a mess. The folks at the


shelter were bathing her daily in
an effort to rid her of fleas, and
trying to take care of her prob-
lems. Bruce was satisfied that
she would be OK; I was able to
walk away.
No. 2: I went back out to the
shelter carrying a piece of bacon
from breakfast. She didn't look
much better, but she was happy
to have my attention and the
treat.
No. 3: My son Jonathan ar-
rived and I took him to meet her.
I went over the pros and cons of
adopting with him. His response
was, "if you want her, just get
her." Wow, that was simple!
I called the shelter on a Mon-
day. "I want to adopt Lucky. And I
want to take her with me when I


leave for NH a week from today."
The deed was done! She was tak-
en to the vet to be spayed.
'Itip #4 I picked her up Satur-
day morning. Our first stop was
for a "clean-up." Penelope met us
at her shop and provided a compli-
mentary "salon treatment," turn-
ing my little waif into a princess.
She is overly friendly but once
greeted and petted, she settles.
She seems to know instinctively
what I expect of her and how to
behave. She will beg for food, but
not when un-approving people
are present; she senses that it
would not be a good thing to do!
She never makes a peep when we
are traveling by plane, or when I
am taking her, inside a bag, into a
store. She won my heart because


she is an adorable, loving and
well behaved dog who converses
with me; she uses body language
and I use words and cuddles.
We know each other well. When
Bruce brought her to the shelter,
the staff asked Bruce to name
her.
Laughing Bruce said, "I really
don't know! Just call her Lucky!
She's lucky
I got her little butt up out of
the road."
Yes, Bruce, she is lucky and
I am lucky, too. She couldn't be
more perfect had I "designed"
her myself What kind of dog is
she?" There's a lot of specula-
tion, but in reality, she is simply
the best kind, a dog in need of
love and a home.


Allie Weinel
Zingarelli, 83,
ofApalachicola,
died Tuesday,
Jan. 5, 2010, at
her home after a
courageous battle
with cancer.
Mrs. Zingarelli
was born Oct. ZINGARELLI
8, 1926, in
Lynchburg, Va.'
and grew up in Spencer, N.C., where
her father was a railroad engineer.
She graduated from the Women's
College of North Carolina (now UNC
Greensboro) in 1947. That same year
she moved to Apalachicola, where
she taught elementary school until
1980.
She met and married Genaro
"Jiggs" Zingarelli in July 1948
and they celebrated 60 years of
marriage in 2008 before he died in
September of that year.
Mrs. Zingarelli is survived by
three sons, Dr. William (Amy) of
Gainesville, Esquire John (Julie)
of Hartselle, Ala., and Dr. Robert of
Bay St. Louis, Miss.; one daughter,
Elizabeth (Admiral Mark) of
Arlington, Va.; 10 grandchildren;
and five great-grandchildren.
She also is survived by a


THEp:"z


THE


Hwy. 98 & 6th St.
Apalachicola
SUNDAY: 8:00 AM 10:30 AM
LIBRARY HOURs-
SUNDAY 12:00 2:00 PM
MONDAY 11:00 AM 1:00 PM
WEDNESDAY 12:00 2:00 PM
THURSDAY 3:30 5:30 PM


brother, Dr. William Weinel Jr. of
Wilmington, N.C.; and sister-in-law,
Helen Zingarelli of Apalachicola.
Funeral Mass will begin at 10
a.m. Friday, Jan. 8 at St. Patrick



IN LOVING MEMORY


Catholic Church. Visitation will be
from 5 to 6 p.m. today, Jan. 7 with a
rosary being said at 6 p.m. at Kelley
Funeral Home, 149 Avenue H,
Apalachicola.


Happy endings


She'.


lucky and


Obituar


Trillit


WELCOMES YOU
Church
$ *I** n
| L 0
As cens io n
101 NE First Street
Carrabelle
SUNDAY
10:00 AM




































































































REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS
LEASE OF COMMERCIAL-USE AIRCRAFT HANGAR/OFFICE
E4CILITY @ FRANKLIN COUNTY/AR4LACHICOLA REGIONAL
AIRPORT

The Franklin County Board of County Commissioners (Owner) is requesting
proposals from firms interested in entering into a long-term lease of a new
approximately 11,489 sf commercial-use aircraft hangar plus a minimum of
1,600 sf office facility at Franklin County/Apalachicola Regional Airport.
The multi-use facility is currently under construction with anticipated tenant
occupancy by June 2010-the successful applicant can have input on final
completion of the facility.

The Proposal should include a detailed Business Plan of proposed use, job
creation and financial responsibility.

Additional information is available at the Franklin County P & Z Office or
contact Alan Pierce at (850) 653-9783, Ext. 161.

Sealed proposals shall be submitted to the following address by 4:00 PM.
(EST) on Monday March 1, 2010:

Franklin County Clerk of Court
Attn: Michael Moron'- Board Secretary
33 Market Street, Suite 203
Apalachicola, FL 32320

Sealed Proposals shall be clearly labeled--indicating firm name and
"PROPOSAL-LEASE COMMERCIAL USE AIRCRAFT HANGAR/
,,
OFFICE E4CILITY. -To be opened at the regular scheduled Commission
meeting on March 2, 2010.


Big River Rider's Open Horse Show Jan. 16


IV


Thursday, January 1 d, 2010


Local


call 670-8151.
Story Hour at Eastpoint li-
brary at 3:30 p.m. for ages 5 to 8.
For more info, call 670-8151.
Exercise class at Chillas Hall
in Lanark Village. 9 to 10 a.m.
Open to all and free.
Alcoholics Anonymous will
meet at 7:30 p.m. at the Church
of the Ascension, 101 NE First
Street, in Carrabelle. For more
info, call 697-2837.
saturday, Jan. I6
Library Gaming Day at Car-
rabelle library. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
For more info call 697-2366.
Carrabelle History Mu-
seum, 106 B Street, SE, will
be open every Friday and
Saturday during January
from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. For
more info contact Tamara
Allen at 697-2141.
MOnday, Jan. I8
NO SCHOOL: DR. MARTIN


ly bird at 6 p.m., regular bingo at
7 p.m. Cards begin at $4. Call 697-
3760.
TUOSda Jan. 19
CarrabelleLibraryclosedfor
Martin Luther King Jr. birthday.
Breakfast at the Franklin
County Senior Center in Carra-
belle. Coffee at 7:30 a.m., meal
at 8 a.m. $2 suggested donation.
Call 697-3760.
Winter Bingo 7 p.m. St.
George Island Fire Dept. $1 per
card. Everyone welcome. Pro-
ceeds go to St. George Island
Civic Club. Call 927-3001.
Alcoholics Anonymous will
meet at 7:30 p.m. at the Church
of the Ascension, 101 NE First
Street, in Carrabelle. For more
info, call 697-2837.
Wedn da J 20
es y, an.
Apalachicola Tkaffic Safety
Team meets at noon at City Hall.
For more info, call 653-9319.


Adult Wii at Carrabelle li-
brary. 9 to 11 a.m. For more info
call 697-2366.
Sea Oats Garden Club at
Carrabelle library. 11:15 a.m. to 1
p.m. For more info call 697-2366.
TilUfSday, Jan. 21
Apalachicola Community
Redevelopment Agency meets
at 8:30 a.m. at City Hall. For more
info call 653-9319.
Waterfront Partnership
Meeting at Carrabelle library.
1:30 to 3:30 p.m. For more info call
Georgia Russell at 697-2141.
Wandering Star Quilting
Club, Chillas Hall Lanark Vil-
lage. 1 to 3 p.m. Call Christine
Hint 697-2551
Community Luncheon and
Information Specials at the
Franklin County Senior Center
in Carrabelle. Noon. $3 donation.
Call 697-3760.


LUTHER KING JR. BIRTHDAY
APALACHICOLA CITY OF-
FICES CLOSED
Harmonica at Carrabelle li-
brary at 10 a.m. For more info,
call697-2366.
Yoga at Carrabelle library
from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. For more
info, call 697-2366.
Yarn Junkies will meet at 7 to
9 p.m. The newly formed group is
for knitters, crocheters and oth-
ers addicted to yarn. The group
meets each Monday evening at
an alternate location. For infor-
mation, call Kathy Robinson at
653-7196.
Exercise class at Chillas Hall
in Lanark Village. 9 to 10 a.m.
Open to all and free.
AlcoholicsAnonymousmeets
at 5:30 p.m. at Trinity Episcopal
Church's Benedict Hall, at Sixth
Street and Avenue D. For more
info, call 850-222-2294.
Bingo at the Franklin County
Senior Center in Carrahelle. Ear-


Kuwika Bailey
Southern Operations
Administrator
Tate's Hell State Forest
Special to the Times
Tate's Hell State For-
est plans to prescribe burn
65,000 acres during the 09-
10FiscalYear.
Exact dates of pre-
scribedburns are unknown
because prescribed burn-
ing is highly dependent on
good weather conditions
and available personnel.
Caution is always exer-
cised to prevent a public
safety or health hazard
from the smoke of any pre-
scribed burn. Smoke signs
will routinely be placed on
the highways if any time
smoke from a prescribed
fire threatens to reduce
visibility on a main road
or highway. If you are an
adjacent landowner con-
cerned about smoke from
a prescribed burn, please
contact the Tate's Hell
State Forest staff in ad-
vance at 697-3734, so that
you may be notified before
a prescribe fire is imple-
mented.
A common question and
comment this time of year
is, "Why does the Division
of Forestry burn? I thought
the Division of Forestry
puts fires out" Another
question is, "Why does the
Division of Forestry har-
vest timber? I thought they
plant and protect trees, not
cut them down."
The mission of the Flor-
ida Division of Forestry
(DOF) is to protect Florida
and its people from the
dangers of wildland fires
and manage the forest re-
sources through a steward-
ship ethic to assure they
are available for future
generations.
DOF land managers are


stewards with the respon-
sibility to care for forested
lands. Their job is to en-
sure that our children have
.
an opportunity to enjoy the
same benefits derived from
forestlands as we currently
do.
Some strategies used to
meetourresponsibilitiesin-
clude; protecting life, prop-
erty, and natural resources
from destructive wildfires;
perpetuating Florida's for-
ests and managing public
lands to retain their unique
character while providing
multiple public benefits.
Tate's Hell State For-
est is located in Franklin
County, between the Apala-
chicola and Ochlocknee
Rivers. The forest extends
into the southeast corner of
Liberty County, southofthe
Apalachicola National For-
est and 1.5 miles northwest
of the town of Carrabelle.
To protect the Apala-
chicola Bay from severe
freshwater run-off, the
state began purchasing
the majority of the prop-
erty with Conservation
and Recreation Lands Pro-
gram funds in 1994 and has
continued to purchase ad-
ditional lands.
Today, Tate's Hell is one
continuous tract of land
comprising over 202,000
acres. The state forest
has been managed by the
Division of Forestry using
the multiple-use concept,
which balances environ-
mental, recreational, and
resource use needs.
At one time Tate's Hell
supported at least 12 ma-
jor community types which
included: wet flatwoods,
wet prairie, seepage slope,
baygall, floodplain forest,
floodplain swamp, basin
swamp, upland hard-
wood forest, sandhill, pine
ridges, dense titi thickets


and scrub.
During the 1960s and
1970s, water tables in the
forest were substantially
altered in an attempt to
establish extensive tracts
of pine plantations and to
enhance the production of
pine timber. These altera-
tionsinvolvedtheconstruc-
tion of roads and associat-
ed ditches. The network of
roads has increased public
access to the area, making
it a popular location for lo-
cal residents to hunt and
fish.
Water levels and quality
in Tate's Hell can positively
or negatively affect our wa-
ter resource.
Now, a primary man-
agement objective is to re-
store plant communities to
a more natural condition.
Restoration efforts are in-
tended to positively impact
the Apalachicola Bay and
other surrounding water
bodies and the plant and
animal communities within
them.
Fire and timber harvest-
ing can be used as restor-
ative tools in Tate's Hell.
Fire is a natural part of
Florida's environment.
Spring or summer light-
ning storms often set the
woods on fire. It is also be-
lieved that native Indians
once burned the woods.
Without seasonal fires,
upland sandhills would
transition from pine/wire-
grass communities into
oak forest.
When the forests
change, plants and animals
living in the forest change
too. Fox squirrels, gopher
tortoises, scrub jays, red
cockaded woodpeckers,
wiregrass and longleaf
pinesareallfiredependant
species.
Prescribed fire is used
on Tate's Hell to mimic the


role of lightning fires in
maintaining the diversity
of plant and wildlife habi-
tat. The wise use of fire
can restore and maintain
natural communities and
reduce the destructive-
ness of future wildfires by
reducing fuel buildup.
Fire also cycles nutri-
ents through the environ-
ment; controls tree diseas-
es and opens scenic vistas
within the forest.
According to the North
Florida Prescribed Fire
Council, "The use of pre-
scribed fire is necessary
in Florida to maintain the
variety of plant communi-
ties and their associated
animal life, to approximate
natural conditions and
to reduce the chances of
damaging wildfire."
Well timed and execut-
ed timber harvest play an
integral role in the health
of the forest ecosystems as
well.
Removing non-native
tree species allows the
establishment of native
ones. Thinning dense for-
est stands removes a por-
tion of the thick overstory
and pushes down titi. This
allows more sunlight and
benefits wildlife by promot-
ing the growth of grasses
and leafy plants to provide
food and shelter.
Thinning also reduces
fuel loads to minimize dam-
age from both prescribed
and naturally occurring fu-
ture burns. Prescribed fire
and timber harvesting are
essential tools for meeting
the Division of Forestry's
mission.
Do you have questions?
Please come see us at
Tate's Hell State Forest
Headquarters at 290 Air-
port Road, Carrabelle, FL
32322 or give us a call at
850-697-3734.


The Big River Rider's
4-H Horse Club will begin
2010 with an Open Horse
Show on Saturday, Jan. 16
at Michael Traylor Arena
at T.L. James Park in We-
wahitchka.
Registration starts at 1
p.m. CT with show starting
at 2 p.m. Events will in-
clude barrels, poles, cones,
arena race, hairpin, key-
hole, and stake race.


There will also be Jack-
pot Cloverleaf classes
(participants must ride in
at least three other events
to ride Jackpot class).
Divisions will be Ju-
nior/Intermediate, Senior,
Adults and Exhibition.
Participants 18 years and
under must wear an SEI
or SEI/ASTM approved
helmet. Current negative
coggins is required for all


equine on the show ground
premises.
There will be conces-
sions on the grounds and
raffles. So whether you are
a participant or specta-
tor come out and join the
fun while supporting local
youth.
For more information
or directions contact 850-
639-3200, 227-6696, or 348-
2902.


The first pageant pre-
liminaries for the 2010 Miss
Franklin County High Point
of the Year winner will be
held next month.
Participants will ac-
cumulate points through
the year, and the delegate
with the most points will be
titled and crowned at the
Franklin County Pageant
Dec. 4.
"This is the year for The
Forgotten Coast Pageant to
expand," said pageant or-
ganizer Georgette Colson.
"There will be three mini-
pageants during the year,
and the high point. Then
what we have all been wait-


ing for, the National Pag-
eant will be held in October,
at the 2010 Miss America's
Royal Beauties."
The Miss Franklin
County Sweetheart Prelim
Pageant will be held Sun-
dayFeb.7at10a.m.atl001
Gray Ave., in the former
Carrabelle School Audito-
rium. Door admission is $5.
This is for Franklin
County residents, work and
school only and will feature
girls, boys and women of
all ageswith fair age divi-
sions.
Beauty fee entry is $50,
with one overall winner at
no extra fee. Optional $25


Valentine's wear.
In the afternoon, the
Miss Florida Forgotten
Coast Valentines Mini Na-
tional Pageant will be held
at 3 p.m. This is an open
state pageant.
Beauty fee entry is $75
and includes Beauty &
Valentines Wear. Ultimate
Titles $125 includes Beauty
Entry and five optional side
events.
Georgette Colson invites
everyone to be a part of this
excitingnewyear.
For info package please
e-mail frankllincounty
pageantCa yahoo.com or
call Colson at 653-7634.


B4 | The Times


Community CALENDAR


Thursday, Jan. I4
Yoga at Carrabelle library
from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. For more
Info, call 697-2366. .
Individualcomputeranstruc-
tion at Eastpoint library from 10
a.m. to noon. For more info, call
670-8151. .
Wandering Star Quilting
Club, Chillas Hall Lanark Vil-
lage. 1 to 3 p.m. Call Christine
Hinton 697-2551.
Community Luncheon and In-
formation Specials at the Frank-
lin County Senior Center in Car-
rabelle. Noon. $3 donation. Call
697-3760.
Friday, Jan. I5
.
Individual/group computer
instruction at Eastpoint library
from 10 a.m. to noon. For more
info, call 670-8151.
Parent-child reads at East-
point library at 2:15 p.m. for in-
fant to 4 years old. For more info,


Division Of Forestry t0 burn 65,000 acres


News BRIEFS


Friends of Library to host Jan. 23 Latin dinner
The Friends of the Eastpoint Library Building Project
are gathering at 6 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 23 at the Oyster
Bay Bar and Grill on St. George Island for a Latin dinner
featuring paella, wine and music.
Cost per person is $50. Guest space is limited due to

thel om un Hoffritz at 670-8424 no later than Jan.
15

Chamber offers free tix to motivation seminar
Need motivation to kick start your new year?
The Get Motivated Seminar is coming to the Tallahas-
see Civic Center and the Apalachicola Chamber of Com-
merce has free tickets for Chamber members.
Among the speakers' topics will be "How to Stay
Motivated," by legendary motivator Zig Ziglar; "The
Tenacity to Persevere: How to Make It Through Any
Crisis," by former New York City Mayor Rudolph Giu-
liani; "How to Manage, Lead and Succeed," by Rick
Belluzzo, president of Microsoft; "How to Lead Your
Team to Victory," by Florida State head football coach
Bobby Bowden; "How to Perfect Your Communications
Skills," by communications expert Krish Dhanam; and
"How to Strengthen Your Sales and Negotiation Skills"
by Tamara Lowe, top sales expert and author of "Get
Motivated."
The day-long presentation will take place Monday,
Jan. 25 from 8 a.m. to 4:45 p.m.
An entire office of people can attend this day of train-
ing, inspiration and motivation for a total investment of
only $4.95 per person and $19 for an entire office. To take
advantage of this limited-time offer, call 1-800-217-1339.
Admission at the door if attending singly will be $225.
The Chamber has several free tickets for Chamber
members. Call the Chamber at 653-9419 to see how you
can win these free tickets.

Chamber hosts workshop on Windows 7
Microsoft is has released its new operating system
Windows 7. The Apalachicola Chamber of Commerce will
host a PowerPoint workshop on Thursday, Jan. 28 at 6
p.m. to demonstrate this new system.
The workshop is free and will be held at the Apala-
chicola Community Center/City Hall in Battery Park in
Apalachicola.
For more information call the chamber at 653-9419.

MISS FOrtiotten Coast
*
Valentine's Pageant Feb. 7
The Miss Florida Forgotten Coast Valentines Pageant
will be held at 2 p.m. on Sunday, Feb. 7 at the former Car-
rabelleHighSchool.
Please call or e-mail Georgette Colson, director and
owner, at 653-7634 or infoca A1BeachPhotography.com for
all questions and entry forms.


MISs Franklin County pageants to be Feb. 7










































































STATE OF FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF
ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION
NOTICE OF INTENT TO ISSUE PERMIT
Permit File No. 0080018-004
The Department of Environmental Protection gives notice of its intent to issue a permit to Eastpoint Mater
& Sewer District to construct improvements to the public water system. The proposed system improvements
would include new Well No. 3 with an 800 gallon per minute (gpm) pumping system, a gas chlorination
disinfection system, a 500,000-gallon prestressed concrete ground storage tank complete with a 1,900 gpm
cascade aerator, a high service pumping station, a 200 KM' diesel engine-driven generator, and connecting
ductile iron, PYC, and HDPE water pipe.
These proposed public water system improvements will be located on a 3+ acre parcel in Eastpoint, Franklin
County. From US Highway 98 319 at 4th Street, go north on 4th Street past Avenue A (4th Street becomes
Otterslide Road): continue north on Otterslide Road past Wilderness Road and Ridge Road; continue around
the bend to the west where Otterslide Road becomes Twin Lakes Road. The proposed well and water
treatment plant are to be constructed at the termination of the bend on the north side of the road.
The intent to issue and application file are available for public inspection during normal business hours, 8:00
a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, except legal holidays, at the Florida Department of Environmental
Protection, 160 Governmental Center, Pensacola, Florida, 32502-5794.
The Department will issue the permit with the attached conditions unless a timely petition for an administrative
hearing is filed under Sections 120.569 and 120.57, Florida Statutes, within fourteen days of receipt of notice.
The procedures for petitioning for a hearing are set forth below.
A person whose substantial interests are affected by the Department's proposed permitting decision may
petition for an administrative proceeding (hearing) under Sections 120.569 and 120.57, Florida Statutes. The
petition must contain the information set forth below and must be filed (received by the clerk) in the Office
of General Counsel of the Department at 3900 Commonwealth Boulevard, Mail Station 35, Tallahassee,
Florida 32399-3000.
Under Rule 62-110.106(4), Florida Administrative Code, a person may request enlargement of the time for
filing a petition for an administrative hearing. The request must be filed (received by the clerk) in the Office
of General Counsel before the end of the time period for filing a petition for an administrative hearing.
Petitions filed by any persons other than those entitled to written notice under Section 120.60(3), Florida
statutes, must be filed within fourteen days of publication of the notice or within fourteen days of receipt of
the written notice, whichever occurs first. Under Section 120.60(3), Florida Statutes, however, any person
who has asked the
Department for notice of agency action may file a petition within fourteen days of receipt of such notice,
regardless of the date of publication.
The petitioner shall mail a copy of the petition to the applicant at the address indicated above at the time of
filing. The failure of any person to file a petition or request for enlargement of time within fourteen days of
receipt of notice shall constitute a waiver of that person's right to request an administrative determination
(hearing) under Sections 120.569 and 120.57, Florida Statutes. Any subsequent intervention (in a proceeding
initiated by another party) will be only at the discretion of the presiding officer upon the filing of a motion in
compliance with Rule 28-106.205, Florida Administrative Code.
A petition that disputes the material facts on which the Department's action is based must contain the
.
following Information:

(a) The name, address, and telephone number of each petitioner; the name, address, and telephone number
of the petitioner's representative, if any: the Department permit identification number and the county in
which the subject matter or activity is located:
(b) A statement of how and when each petitioner received notice of the Department action:
(c)A statement of how each petitioner's substantial interests are affected by the Department action:
(d) A statement of all disputed issues of material fact. If there are none, the petition must so indicate:
(e) A statement of facts that the petitioner contends warrant reversal or modification of the Department
aenon:
(f) A concise statement of the ultimate facts alleged, as well as the rules and statutes which entitle the
petitioner to relief: and
(g) A statement of the relief sought by the petitioner, stating precisely the action that the petitioner wants
the Department to take.
Because the administrative hearing process is designed to formulate final agency action, the filing of a petition
means that the Department's final action may be different from the position taken by it in this notice. Persons
whose substantial interests will be affected by any such final decision of the Department have the right to
petition to become a party to the proceeding, in accordance with the requirements set forth above.
Mediation under Section 120.573, Florida Statutes, is not available for this proceeding.


DEPARTMENT N OTICE DR59.80
OF REVENUE
TAX IMPACT OF VALUE

ADJUSTMENT BOARD


Fran mi County Tax Year >><}

SIII I i7 I 0
Honorable Pinki Jackel Board of County Commissioners, District No. 1
Honorable Bevin Putnal Board of County Commissioners, Distric No. 5
Honorable Teresa Martin School Board, District No. 3

Citizen Member Mary Friedman Business owner within the school district
Citizen Member Walter Armistead Homestead property owner

The Value Adjustment Board (VAB) meets each year to hear
petitions and make decisions relating to property tax assessments,
exemptions, classifications, and tax deferrals.

Summary of Year's Actions
Number of ParcelS Reduction in
Type of Exem >tosAsses aments Both County Taxable Sfttinon
Value Due to .
Pro ert Grntd Rqueted Reuce ReuesedWithdrawn Board Actions Actions

Residential 101 44 $ 0 $ 0
Commercial $ $

Industrial and $ $
miscellaneous
Agricultural or 2 $ 222,418 1$ 1,784
cl ssified use
Higlilater $ $

HilstOlic COmmercial $ $
or nonprfit
Business maclunery $ $
and eculpmet
Vacant lots and $ $

TOTALS 103 $ 222,418 1$ 1,784

All values should be county taxable values. School and other taxing
authority values may differ
*Include transfer of assessment difference (portability) requests.



Chair's name Honorable Pinki Jackel Phone 850-653 -8861

Clerk's name Honorable Marcia Johnson Phone 850-653 -8861


Thursday, January 1 d, 2010


Law Enforcement


The following report is provided
by the Franklin County Sheriffs
Office. Arrests are made by officers
from the following city, county, and
state law enforcement agencies:
Apalachicola (APD), Carrabelle
(CPD), Florida Highway Patrol
(FHP), Franklin County Sheriffs
Office (FCSO), Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation Commission
(FWC), Florsda Department of En-
vironmental Protection (FDEP),
Florida Division of Insurance
Fraud (DIF) and Florida Depart-
mentofAgriculture and Consumer
Services (FLDOACS).
All defendants are considered
innocent until proven guilty in a
court of law.

Jan. 5
Joseph Green, Jr., 22, Havana,
violation of probation (FCSO)
Dennis L. Beebe, 30, Carrabelle,
DUI, driving while license suspend-
ed and refusal to submit to breath
test (CPD)

Jan. 6
Ramon Reneker, 34, Columbus,
Ga., driving while license suspend-
ed, leaving the scene of a crash
with damages and reckless driving
(APD)
Preston Garcia, 36, Carrabelle,
driving while license revoked ha-
bitual (FCSO)
Mitchell J. DeWitt, 46, St. Marys,
GA, grand theft (FCSO)
Jan. 7
Robert S. Parks, 26, Carrabelle,
violation of probation (FCSO)

Jan.9
JoshuaR.Collins,25,LanarkVil-
lage, violation of probation (FCSO)
Peggy Beasley, 43, Carrabelle,
possession of less than 20 grams of
cannabis, and possession of para-
phernalia (CPD)
Jeremy J. Mixon, 22, Apalachico-
la, bond revocation (FCSO)
Carlos E. Aponte, 42, Eastpoint,
violation of repeat violence injunc-
tion (FCSO)

Jan.10
Phillip A. Jackson, Jr., 26, Carra-
belle, aggravated domestic battery
(CPD)


Taking part in last week's graduation
ceremonies at FC| are, from left, GED
teacher Melonie Inzetta, County School
Superintendent Nina Marks, teacher's
aide Joyce 1setts, Region 1 Educational
Program Administrator Gwen Brock
and Dewey Smith, supervisor of the
plumbing program.


The 6 imats wo recent cmplted The 17 inmates who last week received


Franklin Correctional Insti-
tution held graduation ceremo-
nies on Jan. 8 for 17 inmates
who successfully completed
the GED program and received
their high school diplomas.
Five of the 17 graduates
come from Bay City Work
Camp in Apalachicola, which
is a satellite facility of Franklin
Correctional Institution (FCI).
The program is overseen by the
prison's education department,
teacher Melonie Inzetta and
teacher's aide Joyce Isetts.
In addition, 16 inmates re-
cently completed the Vocation-
al Plumbing Program at FCI


and received their certificates.
This course, which teaches ba-
sic principles such as plumb-
ing math, water distribution,
blueprints, basic rigging, etc.,
takes approximately 20 weeks
to complete during which the
inmates receive 600 hours of
core curricular in Level 1 and
Level 2 plumbing. The plumb-
ing program is supervised by
Dewey Smith.
Pastor Julie Stephens, of
Carrabelle United Method-
ist Church, was the keynote
speaker for the ceremony.
Also present for the event was
Franklin County School Su-


superintendent Nina Marks, who
assisted Inzetta in handing out
diplomas, and Region 1 Educa-
tional Program Administrator
Gwen Brock.
During the last two years,
129 inmates received their
high school diplomas, and
156 inmates completed the Vo-
cational Plumbing Program at
FCI and received their plumb-
ing certificates.
These programs are part
of the Florida Department of
Corrections' ongoing re-entry
initiative to reduce inmate re-
cidivism rates. Statistics have
shown that inmates who re-


ceive their GED while in prison
are 7.9 percent less likely to re-
turn to prison and inmates who
receive a vocational certificate,
like the plumbing certificate
offered at FCI, are 14 percent
less likely to return to prison.
"The administration and
staff at Franklin C.I. are com-
mitted to the re-entry initiative
as we know it helps make our
communities safer," Warden
Duffie Harrison said.
For more information about
the programs at FCI or to visit
a program, please contact the
Office of Public Affairs at 850-
488-0420.


The Times | B5


Sheriff's


InHERMS earn GEDs, plumbing certificates


HAMILTON NAMED F(I'S TOP
OFFICER FOR DECEMBER

Franklin Correctional Institution has selected
Sgt. Clyde Hamilton as the officer of the
month for December 2009. Hamilton has
been employed at FCI since November
2007, and is assigned to the third shift, in
the evenings, at the main unit. Following
.
his retirement from the Florida Department
of Corrections as a captain, after 28 years
of service, Hamilton came out of retirement
to work at FCL He was nominated for the
award by the entire third shift who cited his
leadership and knowledge of the department.
Hamilton, pictured at right, with Warden
Duffie Harrison, lives in Crawfordville with
wife Margie.





SB The Times Thursday, January 14, 2010


I


Franklin County's source of news for more than a century


| 1100
41 of Final Summary Judg-
ment of Foreclosure in this
cause, In the Circuit Court
a of the Franklin County,
Florida, I will sell to the
ANNOUNCEMENIs property situated in Frank-
1100-LegalAdvertising Iln County, Florida de-
1110 Classified Notices scrlbed as:
1120 Public Notices/
Announcements A PARCEL OF LAND IN
1125 Carpools & THE NORTH HALF OF
1130 R es oa FRACTIONAL SECTION
1140 Happy Ads 28, TOWNSHIP 8 SOUTH,
1150 Personals RANCH 6 WEST DE-
1160 Lost ASCRIBED AS FOLLOWS:
1170 Found
COMMENCE AT THE
NORTHWEST CORNER
| 1100 | OF SAID FRACTIONAL
SECTION 28 AND RUN
5214T THENCE EAST ALONG
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT THE SECTION LINE A DIS-
OF THE SECOND JUDI- TANCE OF 1675 FEET TO
CIAL CIRCUIT IN AND A POINT MARKED BY A
FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY CONCRETE MONUMENT
FLORIDA THENCE RUN SOUTH 300
GULF STATE COMMU EAST 1347 FEET TO A
POINT THENCE RUN
TY BANK, NEOERTTTHO POlEN WH8C

IS THE POINT OF BEGIN-
vs NING OF THE LAND TO
BE DESCRIBED; FROM
CONRAD SEASHOLTZ, SAID POINT OF BEG- INN-
Defendant(s). ING RUN THENCE SOUTH
CASE NO.: 09-000336-CA 300 EAST 836.5 FEET TO
THE NORTHERLY BOUN-
DARY OF THE 66 FOOT
NOTICE OF SALE RIGHT OF WAY OF STATE
ROAD NO. 30, AND CON-
NOTICE Is hereby given TINUING ON THE SAME
that, pursuant to the Order BEARING ACROSS SAID


| 1100
HIGHWAY TO THE WA-
TERS OF ST GEORGE
SOUND; THENCE NOR-
THEASTERLY ALONG
THE WATER OF SAID
SOUND TO A POINT
FROM WHICH A LINE
RUN NORTH 300 WEST
WILL BE 210 FEET FROM
AND PARALLEL TO SAID
LAST DESCRIBED LINE;
THENCE RUN NORTH 300
WEST ALONG A LINE 210
FEET FROM AND PARAL-
LEL TO SAID LAST DE-
SCRIBED LINE TO A
POINT WHICH IS NORTH
600 EAST OF THE POINT
OF BEGINNING; THENCE
RUN SOUTH 600 WEST
210 FEET TO THE POINT
OF BEGINNING; LESS
AND EXCEPT 66 FOOT
RIGHT OF WAY OF STATE
ROAD NO. 30. SAID LAND
BEING SITUATE IN
FRANKLIN COUNTY
FLORIDA.
LESS AND EXCEPT:
Lot 3, One Particular Har-
bor, a subdivision re-
corded in Plat Book 10,
Page 7, Public Records of
Franklin County, Florida.
at Public Sale, to the high-
est and best bidder, for
cash, at the steps of the
Franklin County Court-
house, Apalachicola, Flor-


| 1100
Complaint or petition.
This notice shall be pub-
Ilshed once a week for two
consecutive weeks in The
Apalachicola Times.
WITNESS my hand and
the seal of this Court on
this 25th day of November,
2009.
Marcla M. Johnson
Clerk of Court
By: Terry E. Creamer
Deputy Clerk
Florida Default Law Group,
PL.
PO. Box 25018
Tampa, Florida
33622-5018
FO9100690
January 7, 14, 2010
5250T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL

ROOAURN LININ ANCDOU
RBC CENTURY BANK
Plaintiff
vs.
WRIGHT AMY E., et al. '
Defendants
CASE NO.
19-2009-CA-00311


| 1100
700, 100 West Cypress
Creek Road, Fort Laud-
erdale, FL 33309, and the
file original with the Clerk
within 30 days after the
first publication of this no-
tice;otherwiseadefault
and a judgment may be
entered against you for the
relief demanded in the
Complaint.
WITNESS MY HAND AND
SEAL OF SAID COURT on
this 30th day of November,
2009.
Marcla M. Johnson,
Clerk of Court
By: Terry E. Creamer
As Deputy Clerk
This is an attempt to
collect a debt. Any
Information obtained will
be used for that purpose.
January7,14,2010

F TTHEE RETONDC
CIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY
FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
INDYMAC FEDERAL
BANK FS.B F/K/A
INDYMAC BANK, ES.B,
'
Vs


| 1100
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO:
AMY E. WRIGHT
120ROYALTERMWAY
CARRABELLE, FL 32322
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
AMY E. WRIGHT
120 ROYAL TERM WAY
CARRABELLE, FL 32322
AND TO: All persons
claiming an Interest by,
through, under, or against
the aforesaid Defendant(s).
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FlED that an action to fore-
close a mortgage on the
following described prop-
erty located in Franklin
County, Florida:
LOT 8 BLOCK A, ST.
JAMES BAY A SUBDIVI-
SION AS PER MAP OR
PLAT THEREOF RE-
COPRP 9D4 PPU BROEO
ORDS OF FRANKLIN
COUNTY FLORIDA.
has been filed against you,
and you are required to
serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, If any, to this
action, on Greenspoon
Murder, PA., Default De-
partment, Attorneys for
Plaintiff, whose address is
Trade Centre South, Sulte


COVERING MILTON TO APALAC


0

YOUR FLORIDA FREEDOM,&BASg


TO PLACE AN AD


BUY ALMOST


Ca II Us:


OR


Visit Us Online:


emeraldcoastmarketplace.com


| 1100
Ida, at 11:00 a.m. on Janu-
ary 20, 2010.
Any person claiming an In-
terest in the surplus from
the sale, If any, other than
thepropertyownerasof
the date of the Ils pend-
ens, must file a claim
within 60 days after the
sale.
WITNESS my hand and
the of this Court this 14th
day of December, 2009.
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT
COURT
BY: Michele Maxwell
Deputy Clerk
Steve M. Watkins, Ill
FBN: 0794996
41 Commerce Street
Apalachicola, FL 32320
(850) 653-1949
January7,14,2010

N2F4 HEECSRECCU DCO
CIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY
FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
THE BANK OF NEW YORK
MELLON FKA THE BANK
TOEFEN RYORKEACSETRRTUF
CATE HOLDER OF
C'NMBS 2004-18'


| 1100
vs.
TERESA R. SMITH, et al,
Defendantss.
CASINO.:
19-2009-CA-000590
DIVISION:
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: BURTON L. CLARK
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS:
1520 Senola Road
Street C,
TyroneGA30290
CURRENT ADDRESS:
UNKNOWN
TO: DEBBIE CLARK
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS:
1520 Senola Road
Street C,
Tyrone, GA 30290
CURRENTADDRESS:
UNKNOWN
ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN
PARTIES CLAIMING BY
THROUGH, UNDER, AND
AGAINST THE HEREIN
NAMED INDIVIDUAL
DEFENDANTS) WHO ARE
NOT KNOW TO BE DEAD
OR ALIVE, WHETHER
SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES
MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST
AS SPOUSE, HEIRS, DE-
VISEES, GRANTEES, OR


| 1100
OTHER CLAIMS
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS:
UNKNOWN
CURRENT ADDRESS:
UNKNOWN
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action to foreclose a
mortgage on the following
property in FRANKLIN
County, Florida:
LOT 11 IN BLOCK 74, AC-
CORDING TO ST
GEORGE ISLAND GULF
BEACHES UNIT 5, AC-
CORDING TO THE MAP
OR PLAT THEREOF RE-
CORDED IN FRANKLIN
COUNTY PLAT BOOK 3
AT PAGES 16 AND 17.
has been filed against you
and you are required to
serveacopyof yourwrit-
ten defenses within 30
days after the firstorplub|
fault Law Group, PL.,
Plaintiffs attorney, whose
address is 9119 Corporate
Lake Drive, Sulte 300,
Tampa, Florida 33634, and
file the original with this
Court either before service
on Plaintiffs attorney or Im-
mediately thereafter, other-
wise a default will be en-
tered against you for the
relief demanded in the







Franklin County's source of news for more than a century The Times Thursday, January 14, 2010 7B


|~~iO 110 || zo | 10 | 110 | 1100 || 2so || 410 || 610 | 64
NOANM.LASIER e GADS NDRSNPROPERTY HEREIN DE- MORTGAGE, INC.; SUN- Ing a special accommoda- Oyster Tongs, New, and POTL&G\TJB Furnished Loft Apt, In his- 1, br
al, VETLNA NDERONSCRIBED, are Defendants, SET BEACH OWNERS AS- tron should contact repair onused tongs. Call PNOSA & OYT JOBE toric district. Cbl/wtr Incl Aalachicoal FL.
Defedan~s) FRAKLI CONTYI wll sell to the highest and SOCIATION, INC.; UN- COURT ADMINISTRA- Tom,806360 NOFRSL. 1100sf high ceilings, Pnl- C~all 850-643-7740
FLRIAan UKNWNbest bidder for cash at the KNOWN TENANT #1; TION, at the FRANKLIN vate entrance and deck.
CASENO. ENAN(S),Front Door of the Franklin UNKNOWN TENANT #2 County Courthouse at No smkg/ pets. $750 mo. 3 br 2 ba, DW 1600 s ft.
19-208-A-00427 Defndats.County Courthouse, 33 are the Defendants. MAR- 904-653-8861, 1-800-955- Caution +$750 dep. 50653-3838 wth utillroom fire lace
Market Street,Aplc- CIA M. JOHNSON as The 8771 (TDD) or 1-800-955-
NOTCE F CSENO. 09366CA cola, FL 32320 In Franklin Clerk of the Circuit Court 8770, via Florida Relay L kVla and jacuzzl, secluded on
NTCOFSLPU-a.m. on the 20th day of best bidder for cash at, at frIfrainaotIrlaRnvtdfr ulcbah
NOTIE IS HERBY SANT O CAPTE 45 January 2010, the follow- 11:00 a.m. on January 20, LAW OFFICES OF DAVID federal or postal jobs. If nished end unit, new Carrabelle & Apalachicola.
GIVE pusuat toa FnalIng described property as 2009, the following de- J. STERN, PA. (, ( you see a job kitchen &bath, minimum 4 Newly Renovated, $575
Judmen o Motgge OTCE s ive prsuntset forth In said Order or scribed property as set 900 SOUTH PINE ISLAND guarantee contact the month lease $495/mo + mo, neg. 1st & sec. Call
FoecosredaedDeem t aFialJugmntofFinal Judgment, to-wit: forth In said Final Judg- ROAD, SUITE 400 EMLYEP FTC. dep., no smoking, pet con- 954-816-7004
ber15,209 ad nteedForclour daedDecm-ment, to wit: PLANTATION, FL 410-Hl atdThe Federal Trade sidered. (850) 653-3838 3br2baengyffct
inCaeNo 1-00-C-be 5,209 I Cs N.LOT 43, BLOCK 10 33324-3920410-EpymtComson "h Cad
0042 o te irui Cur 0-36-Aofth Crcit(WEST), ST GEORGE IS- LOT 34, SUNSET BEACH (954)233-8000 Information isAmrcas osue Lanaurk ilaed, 1D br omeIcl. rmllpet, nie ya
ofth SCOD udcil ortofth Scod ud-LAND GULF BEACHES, PHASE 2, ASUBDIVISION 09-62080 NATB protection agency. Ip.ufrihd /,WDIcd ml eswl
Cirui i ad or RAK-cll irclt i ad orUNIT 1, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT January 14, 1, 010 C/Ht~ovjbcms I~~/a-8A, ar $450 Jmo comepAl $80o +80
LI out, lriaFrnln ontFlrda nAS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN ww~t~o/osas 1t& last. AkfrJm dpAalnw6354
whren NDMA FD wic CPIALCIYTHEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 6 AT PAGE 4100 1-877-FTC-HELP 8 6728 gAaahcl-2b,1b
ERL AKF.BF// BN I hePlitifan LAT BOOK 2, PAGE 7, 17 OF THE PUBLIC REC- mo to 1 yr Ise. $725 mo +
INDYMAC~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ BNS.. sDL ANESNOFTEPBIRE-OD OFFAKNApublic service Small Studio Apt. for ma- $500 dep. Cl 80
the ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ O Plinif andI NOA M LAY ADRSN ORDS OF FRANKLINCONYFRIA message from the FTC ture, single person, $500 653-8074
LASIE; ELNA VTLNAADESOCOUNTY FLORIDA. and The News Herald Includes all utllties Unfur-
LASSTER ar th Deend-andFRAKLI CONTYAny person claiming an In- Education/Training ClassifiedAdvertising nished, 850-697-8623 or Apalach cola
ansIwil el oth hg- LOIA r te een-ANY PERSON CLAIMING terest In the surplus from Department 545-6904
es ndbstbddrfo ntI il el oth ig-AN INTEREST IN THE the sale, If any, other than 3 br, 2 ba house for rent,
csatFOTDOOFetadbsbddrfrSURPLUS FROM THE the property owner as of M10atqERC 8""!Gu"lCoa Studio A t. s dCH&sad nd nHA, fireplce, W/D, D/W,
THE RANLINCOUTY ash t te fontdoo ofSALE, IF ANY, OTHER the date of thelts pendens 30-niuscmuncle.p u ek hd ndi
CORTOUE,3 MR-th rakln ont Cur-THAN THE PROPERTY must file a claim within 60 3110 -Appliances Furnished yard, work shed, ample
KE SRET PAACI-hoseinAplahiolOWNER AS OFTHE DATE days after the sale. 3120 Arts & Crafts Upstairs studio parking $800 mo, $600
COA FOID t110 FaklnCuny Foid tOF THE LIS PENDENS 310-A tiotnsmWoe' Qutlcaonwtr& sec dep. Brenda 227-5380
AMonth 27h ayof11:0 ~m o Jauay 7,MUST FILE A CLAIM Dated this 15th day of De- 3150 -Building Supplies Volleyball, electric Incl'd. Walk to Carabelle- 3 br, 2b
Jauay 210 hefolw-200 te rpetyst orhWITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER cember, 2009. 3160 Business downtown. $650 mo. plus screened porch, view of
In dsciedprprt a n heFna Jdmet fTHE SALE. Equipment Head Coach * de oit 850-653-9116 Gl $5 30 e
se frt i sidFialJug-turlosd a mopf In accordance with the MsA rkftelrA r M. SO Ilpctlers (P/T) RELESTATE FRRN 850p-74-7178 for appt.or al .8 -1m $30 de
lows Amricas wth Dsablites B: Mchel Mawel Ee tron cs general responsibility for 6100 Business/ Very nice 1br apartment In
LOT 51 BALDPOINTAmrct n of t 1990,persons need As DeptClerkxwl 3210 Firee as tO n the volleyball program ac- Commercial
PRPETISA UDII-LO 6 ON LAFSU-Ing special accommoda- 3220 Furniture cording to all guidelines. 0110- Apartments Carrabelle. Fully furnished,a crot Ms x5
SION S PERMAP O DIVIION (NRECODED)tron to participate In this Dated this 15th day of De- 3230 Garage/Yard Sales Some duties Include: re- 6120 Beach Rentals paondcrot!Ms
CORED N PAT OOKComene a a oven-the Clerk of the Court not 3250 -Good Thmgs to Ea nate academic advising, 6140 -House Rentas' month, Includes dish net- completely remodeled, ap-
2,~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~~~~20 PG1OFTEPBmetcnrtmouetltrtafvebsnsIMOTN Health tt develop game/pracice Rununte te work & all util. $300dep, pliances. Included large
LICRECRDSOF RAK- arkng heSouheat cr-days prior to the proceed- In accordance with the 3280 -Machinery/ schedules, plan travel, 6170 Mobile Home/Lot MiiumrdCl of-6mo eaer-34 priat yad$50mot
LIN OUNY FLRID. ne ofSecton 0, Twn-Ing at the Franklin County Americans with Disabilities Equipment maintain Inventory, coordl- 6180 Out-of-Town Rentals qle.Cl 5-9-2620 N s t
shi 5 ouh, ang 7Courthouse, Telephone Act, persons needing a 3290 Medical Equipment nate officials/ score keep- 610 Timeshare Rentals Lease/Purchase Possible,
A/KA 02 AL PINTWet, rakln Cuny,850-653-8861 or reason bale accommoda- 3300 -Miscellaneous ers/ statisticians, attend 6200 -Vacation Rentals :Call 404-266-0067
ROAD, LLIGAOR Floida ad thene run1-800-955-8770 via Florida tron to participate In this Musi-PalntSsthnnbes meigcoraeta
POIT L 236 Nrt 8 dgres 6 m-Relay Service. proceeding should, no Supplies community service activl- .. | 12
utes 5 seondsWestlater than seven (7) days 3330 Restaurant/Hotel ties, and promote the pro-
Anyperonclamig a I- 23966 ee toth PONTDATED at Apalachicola, prior, contact the Clerk of 3340 Spotting Goods gram. Requires BS + 1 yr | 6100 gyq
terst n he urlusfrm O BGININ. FomFlorida, on December 21, the Court's disabllty coor- 3350 Tickets(Buy &Sell) head coach experience at ISland Crael r a u
th sle I ay ohe tansadPONTOFBEIN-2009. dinator at 8506972112, high school + level For Leaseplxor3b,2a $02
the roprtyownr asof NG ontnue ort 89de-PO. Box 340, APALACHI- (Intercolleglate coaching Commercial $160 wk, elec, Satellite, b,2b,$0,nwpit
th dteofth lsPed-gres1 mnues35se-Marcla M. Johnson COLA, FL 32320. If hearing exp. preferred). Salary Garbage Included. pooltlektcnarefcd
ensmut flea lai wthn odsWet 54.2 eettoa ler o Curtimaiedcotat (DD | 3220 $12k/yr Position Is Open Building table. 12'X65' deck withbakyr.$0fobth
sixy 60 das ftr he e-odontheEatelyAs Clerk, Circuit Court 80009558771 via Florida Until Filled. Additional Info: Approx 1100 sq ft. Beutfu vew al Las prhae osibe
sale riht-o-wa boudar ofBy: Michele Maxwell Relay System. htp://wwwgulfcoast.edu/hr/em Available noW 806351 al(0)2606
th &NRaloathneAs Deputy Clerk ployment.htm GCCC Corner of Hwy 98 &
WITNSS Y HAD ad rn Noth 5 deree 06Ben-Ezra & Katz, PA. $29NwQenTIKIs an EA/EO/M/F/Vet em- 12th StreetStGere Espi OthBa3br
th saloftisCorto mnues50scodsWetSMITH, HIATT & DIAZ, AttorneysforPlaintiff PlotpMtrsSe player. 850-653-97880or2baCHD Mtr
Deemer15 209 aon sidrihtofwa.PA. 2901 Stirling Road, Sealed Plastic, Warranty WbI 3029 850 615 0058 Iln ope$5 o+dp
bondry 135.4 eeAttorneys for Plaintiff Sulte 300 Can Deliver. 222-9879 '2 br, 1 ba, bar, satellite, N m kn r pt
Macl ohsn hnc rnSoth8 d-PO BOX 11438 Fort Lauderdale, Florida util Incl. 12 x 50' deck. 806086
Clr o h Crut or ges 6mnue 5 e-Fort Lauderdale, FL 33312 For Rent $20w,8-6351
ByMihel Mxwl odsEst71.6 ee,33339-1438 Telephone: (305) 770-4100 Hitoi ,pn E atont b ba td
DeputyClerkthenc run outh 0 de-Telephone: (954) 564-0071 Fax: (305) 653-2329ITSfwrDelo-bd eoreivd r$9 o
Flria eful Lw ropnees mO 7 4r43573 14,200uary 7, 14, 2010 $19)p uewiuho ment of Ave 5E8 58 mmerceOCal684081
PO.N Box 25018N IN 5388T NOTICE OF tic w/ warranty Can De- Computer Net-I

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5344T ANDACROSSAPRTION Bluff~oad~o Illsel servicecompanyseek- 2 br, 2ba, 2ndstory w/ $650 mo $5 e le edt v le
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thesaeIfany ohe t a in i, p bic sa e wil be con- Certifications preferred. 112Lxr ahwt
CIVIL ACTION the prperty owner as of V ducte d0 Roadd StoExcellent opportunity for deptbNwKtcna-
SUNTRUSTBANK, theI daeof ls e l cla lod a 0 BRAND New Innerspring vanment Ealteo !3~ i t p~u~s tilea
Plantff wthn ixy 60 dysafer OWEKOaTRL, amcnetsorem Full Mattress Set, $139 or careers@bluemanta- Carrabelle ta fplcbe.NPts
the~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~~~dt sale.e, AS Twin set $125 w/warranty. group.com bAtnLarVlag osmkgIsdeI-
Y D E O L E R / K A D 0T E D : D e e m b r 5 C OA S 8E ON O 1 5 -C C B nu f R o a SoS a 5 4 5 7 1 1 2 D e l iv e r y A v a ll w p o r c h & s na l l y hd; 3 b or0 2 b oa H $ 1 s d ed e a g e p

D ea~t VE, t l, MACI M JHNON NOTICE OF SALE PUR- Unit#88-Deborah Lolley I lvuhmrs a tdt.5e0 -2H4 1 hel080 nas l o
CASENO ler oftheCiruitCout SANTTO HAPER 5 en t1-Keonun t stes Sectional Living Room I Other bebtee wt aeI
19-880CA-48 y: ichle axwll NOTICE IS HEREBY Contents: Household Set. New 2 Tone micro fl- the ar o eat n
Deputy ClerkGIVEN pursuant to a Final Unit#122-Robert Bauchem ber, stain resistant, Let go EBRO ca.nrgnoa
NOTCE F Grvi B.BowenEs Judgment of Foreclosure Contents: Household for $899, delivery availa- GRYON Gnm Reamksate al c.
FORCLSUE AL Grder Bst WenrdatedeDecember 14,e2009 January 14, 21, 2010 ble. 222-9879 PARK ie L ~s2a e 5056-993

OV ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ I NCpr ttE aTwot ~wdn 8-0C t~ dto FHEECIRNCDUIT CD R I Frontoh gat Asitnce, ed aG8 e n. 2t. es
Judmen o Motgge allhaseTo a 3 8 Franklin County, Florida, CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR | 20KitC enoI Sep alh ts Carble lna332 nl ot rIe
FoecosredaedDeem Jnury7,14 210 wherein St. George Planta- FRANKLIN COUNTYr p, s w.er'srIom$10m 50dp
ber 14, 009 andenteredtron Owners Association, FLORIDA All You Can Eat IWalt Staff, Lead outs. 2 BR 1 B Mobile HolleCal806307
In aseNo.19200-CA 531TInc. Is Plaintiff, and M. GEEA UIDCIN& plctoscnb nfurnished, large lot ....................... $575.00
148 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~~EEA ofIDITO th ici or fNTC FBWE ORAi e IIINSNOW CRABS* II filed out at 2 BR 1B Dulex
theSEON Jdiia Cr-PULICSAE enan, wllsel t te 1599atUPTH CEE Ebro Greyhound Park Remodeled, Fenced Back Yard......... $600.00
cul i ad orFRNKINhighest and best bidder for BNOFAEIAN..RWARSatnat50 BuesOfce 3 BR 1 B End Unit Apt
Cont, loid werinUnerFlria tauts as i Fon Sep o tePLAINTIFF every Monday In Apalachl- btenFront & Back Porch, unfurnished ..... $525.00 S
SUTRSTBAKisth "el SrvceStrae acl-Franklin County Court- cola at 313 Water St. I 10:00 AM &8:00 PM. 3 BR 3 B Condo t og
Plinif ad LYE ~l Iy ct8380-8.89,house at 33 Market Street, VS. 850-653-2525. $1.00 Draft Call 850-535-4048. Unfurnished Pool ............ .... $750.00 IsadPntio
VE AKA LYEN.Blf RadSorgewllselSulte 203, Apalachicola, Beer We bI 34 72 88. R15B ee r ahm
OLVE; HEUNNWNfo csh o hehihetFL 332, rnkinELZAEH AIE 70N Bysor D.Eatpin ......$70.0 In fll frised grae


PO. Box25018 TIOMINSEYESTFEOMRSPIRqA NOTICEOF dpraTe yt nlesr n if0m Franklin County School Administrative Bank Short Sales @Pirates Landing on Timber Island
mpa, Fllo81da CAPITAL ADVISORS, LC, FORECLOSURE SALE ens, must file a claim Office, Applications must include (1) a high school One Bedroom Condos in unique riverfront community Starting at $100,000

114, 2010 0 2293-300HOA0R2LOE6S3T9 NOTINCEpurs nt tH w n 60 days after the ilpd0ma, 2)ee(0 gtee fanOS{fl bot Bank Short Sales @ the Sands of Carrabelle
5351T PLACE HOMEOWNERS Judgment of Foreclosure Dated this 16th day of De- 3BR/2BA Town homes with 1500sf & Community Pool $149,000
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT ASSOCIATION, INC.; UN- dated December 14, 2009, member, 2009. $U{{855fU ap@KantS BUSt agree 10 3 (flmlia
OF THE SECOND JUDI- KNOWN TENANT NO. 1; and entered in Case No. bl510fy de(k (includes FDLE processing fee) and Waterfront home on Poston Bayou
CIAL CIRCUIT IN AND UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 08000518CA of the Circuit Marcla M. Johnson 3BR/2BA on One Acre with Dock & Elevator in Private Location $300,000
FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY 2; and ALL UNKNOWN Court of the Second Judl- ClerkofCourt adfug5{feenlig.
FLORIDA PARTIES CLAIMING IN- clal Circuit in and for ClerkoftheCircultCourt BankOwnedHomesontheCarrabelleRiver
TERESTS By THROUGH, FRANKLIN County, Flor- By: Michele Maxwell 2 8350 feturn ap@Katl005 10 the attentl00 Of
CAPITAL CITY BANK, UNDER OR AGAINST A Ida, wherein SUNTRUST Deputy Clerk 00fia imlth, 20f50nnel 5 edalist Fabulous4BR/4BA w/3800sf, Dock, Elevator & GulfView $550,000
Plaintiff NAMED DEFENDANT TO BANK D/B/A SUNTRUST P '
THIS ACTION, OR HAV- MORTGAGE, INC., is a IN ACCORDANCE WITH
vs. ING OR CLAIMING TO Plaintiff and WISDOM MIN- THE AMERICANS WITH Franklin County School Board is an 850-697-5300
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IV


Thursday, January 1 d, 2010


Local


The Pierces had an
outdoor "bath tub," which
was like a swimming pool
to me. It had a high wall
around it for privacy, and
clear running artesian
water flowing through it
warm enough to use in
winter. I learned to swim
in that pool during the
summer.
I remember being
shocked to learn that the
Pierces walked over to the
pool in robes and then went
in naked. My folks made me
wear a bathing suit; it had
shorts down to the knees,
and a top all the way up to
the neck.
There was a big barn, in
which was kept a Model T
Ford.
There were cattle on
the island, and horses were
used in rounding them up
twice a year for dipping
against ticks. It was quite
exciting to see my Dad
driving the cattle into the
corral waving his big hat
and yelling "yi, yi, yippie
kiyea."
He wore a gun and
holster used in the round
up to assist in moving the
cattle.
Dipping them was
intriguing. They were
driven along a narrow
chute until they reached
a metal slide at one end of
the vat. Once their front
feet hit the slide, they slid
right in. The cattle swam to
the other end and walked
up an inclined board into a
holding corral. What with
Tom Mix and Hoot Gibson
movies, for several years,
I asked Santa Claus for
cowboy suits and two gun
holsters.
Once, when the horses
were in the barn feeding at
their stalls, a fire broke out.
The hay was burning and
smoking everywhere. My
Dad was returning in the
car. He saw all the smoke.
He sped straight through
the barn door through all
the smoke and flames out


artificial light whatsoever
to spoil it. My Dad told me
how to find the North Star
and I served our crew well
as chief navigator. .
Until 1940, the island
retained its pristine
beauty. Dr. Ray V Pierce
was one ofFlorida's first
genuine conservationists.
He imported the great
Sambar deer from India,
and my father had helped
to protect them. They
had grown from a herd to
hundreds. But his brother,
later managing the estate
felt the resources were
going to waste. An oyster
lease was granted, giving
outside access to the fine
oysters in Big Bayou.
A contract was sold to a
lumber company to remove
20 million board feet of
virgin timber. A temporary
bridge was built across
the sound for hauling
the timber out. Long
straight roads were built to
accommodate this. Like a
grid, they criss-crossed the
island, ultimately about
20 running the length of the
island from west to east,
and about 10 running north
to south.
This had a devastating
effect. Denuded of so
many trees, the balance
of nature was broken. In
the dry season, with so
many moisture holding
trees gone, and with a
corresponding loss of
shade, the mulch on the
forest floor was dry tinder.
Forest fires swept the
island, further denuding
the land, and preventing
new growth from starting.
Then in the rainy
season, with both trees
and mulch gone, the water
flowed in torrents into the
lakes, ponds and marshes,
carrying with them tons
of silt. From a time when
the waters were so clear
one could tell heads or tails
on a dime at a depth of six
feet, the waters were now
muddy and roily. As the
various sediments swept
in, the banks filled in, and
grasses began growing
farther into the lakes.
This decreased their sizes
and further reduced the
quantities of water on the
Island.
In 1948, Alfred Loomis
ndh b otohmeHen etor
of the Voice of America,
bought the island. They
used the island as a private
playground and hunting
area. They introduced
zebras, elands, black
bucks, pheasants and
Asian jungle fowl.
Twenty years later,
the exotic animals were
removed; the new owners
sought a buyer who
might continue it as a
wild undeveloped island.
Fortunately, in 1968, the
Nature Conservancy
bought the island.
Wil fe eSd ra id the
Nature Conservancy with
money from Duck Stamp
sales; and in July 1968 the
island was established
as St. Vincent National
Wildlife Refuge, as it
remains today. It seems
most appropriate that
ind hp n et d
regain some of its former
grandeur.
In four trips to the
island in eight years,
I was happy to note
improvements. The many
roads at least serve as
br sksanrd e e.
Wildlife populations are
increasing. There are now
an estimated 250 deer on
the island, about a tenth as
many as when I lived there.
A happy herd of Sambar
deer is also thriving.
Panthers roamed the
island too, when I lived
there. The cry of the
Sambar deer is much like
that ol nth3. On

still recall the chills that
ran up my back as a small
boy when those cries


inched closer and closer
to my bedroom window ...
Sambar or panther? I have
often wondered which it
really was.


PHOTO COURTESY OF ST. VINCENT NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE


Uncle Dick's house.


PHOTO COURTESY OF ST. VINCENT NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE


FKUM IMC LULLCTIlUN UP MAKILTN UIIhKHAUSCN


Charles Marks' Jr.


through the rear door into
the corral. With the help of
Tom and Uncle Dick, he led
the horses out and put out
the fire.
Mrs. Pierce said, "Oh,
that was the bravest thing
I ever saw. He drove right
through all that smoke and
flame to get at the horses
as quick as he could. He
should have a medal!"
He said, "The first thing
tomorrow morning we
have to get those brakes
fixed."


Uncle Dick and his wife
were an older couple who
lived and worked there,
no relation to the rest of
us. Uncle Dick was very
knowledgeable about the
critters who lived on the
island.
He had been stung by
a stingray some years
before and he told us it
hurt so much a red hot
wire would feel good to it.
When we went floundering,
thereafter, I made sure it
was not a stingray we had


gigged before we picked
it up. The two look almost
alike as they lie slightly
buried in the mud.
The flounders on St.
Vincent in those days were
up to three feet across the
back, a size that could feed
us for several days.
Tom and his wife had
three children, two girls
and a boy, which were my
only playmates. Our color
difference did not matter
at all. I enjoyed playing
with them as much as with


other playmates later on,
an indication to me that
racial prejudice is carried
along by adult attitudes.
There was a telephone
system that connected with
two other points on the
island at Big Bayou and at
Indian Pass. A family lived
at each of those locations
too.
Adam was located
at the settlement,
maintaining full water
levels in a chain of five
lakes. Below the dam in
the half mile of creek to the
bay, mullet, speckled trout
and redfish abounded.
Above the dam, bass,
bream and pickerel were in
bountiful supply. One
morning, my Dad threw
a cast net into a bend of
the creek and caught 75

th dh s pm e
dad merely stepped to the
dam and cast. He hardly
ever had to cast three
times to get two fish.
If my mother wanted
oysters, she asked for
three. We could step out on
one of the oyster bars in
Big Bayou at low tide and
pick up oysters that were
int a iece. That's all we
needed for one sitting, and
I never could finish mine
it was so big. Naturally
they were fried as nobody
wanted a pint of oyster in
one gulp. Of course, there
m srmb icer ,' oimy
for the gold." We ate the
big ones.
Uncle Dick told
me about one of his
experiences. He said he
turned around from the
edge of Fifth Lake one day
and there, coming back to

'tiakeewasrtsh ests
between the gator and the
lake and the only thing
near was a tree with a limb
about 15 feet up. The gator
charged. I asked him if he
caught that limb and he
said, "No, I missed it, but I
""nontheswa Mn!"
sound at night was an
inspiring thing. The
phosphorous in the water
illuminated the oars and
created fascinating streaks
as they moved through the
water. Fish did likewise,
leaving phosphorescent
trails Later, in high
school, I sent an entry to
Ripley's "Believe It or
t which was print dein

phosphorescent glow from
a dead shrimp is bright
enough to read time on a
watch."
Rowing on moonless
nights, the sky was a
Stunning display. Unlike
tOday, there was no


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