Group Title: Apalachicola times
Title: The Apalachicola times
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100380/00060
 Material Information
Title: The Apalachicola times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: H.W. Johnston
Place of Publication: Apalachicola Fla
Apalachicola Fla
Publication Date: January 7, 2010
Copyright Date: 2008
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1885.
General Note: Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00100380
Volume ID: VID00060
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 32911693
lccn - sn 95026907
 Related Items
Preceded by: Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by: Apalachicola herald

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Sheriff: Woman dowe grandson


I


YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER FOR MORE THAN 120 YEARS


VOL. 124 ISSUE 37


By David Adlerstein and Andrew Gant
FloridaFreedomNewspapers
A German translator's voice crackled
eerily from a speakerphone in the Franklin
County courtroom Tuesday afternoon as it
made clear to the grandmother, shackled in
an orange jumpsuit, she was being charged
with first degree murder.
Marianne Bordt, a 71-year-old German
national vacationing with her husband on St.
George Island, is accused of drowning her 5-
year-old American grandson, Camden Hiers,
of Roswell, Ga., in the bathtub of their rental


Marianne Bordt
awaits a hearing
while in custody
Tuesday. Bordt'
71, a German
tourist, is accused
of murdering her
grandson Monday
in a St. George
Island home.
DAVID ADLERSTEIN |
The Times


unit Monday afternoon.
She then tried but failed to drown herself
in the frigid Gulf of Mexico while her hus-
band was shopping in Apalachicola, investi-
gators said.
'"Yes, I understood,' she said," the trans-
lator repeatedly relayed to County Judge
Van Russell after having translated into the
woman's native tongue the judge's outline of
the charge and her right to remain silent, to
have an attorney and to call someone follow-
ing the first appearance.
See DROWNING 6


First :
.
* *
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roug new
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Of Ill@ :
.
Waterhorits :
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grant .


By David Adlerstein
Times City Editor
Apalachicola has become the first
Florida city to draw on a newly desig-
nated state grant program created to
preserve working waterfronts.
On Dec. 29, the city partnered with
the Florida Communities Trust (FCT) to
purchase waterfront land for the Apala-
chicola Boat Works, representing the
first property to be acquired through


the Stan Mayfield Working Waterfronts
Florida Forever Grant Program.
FCT awarded $814,703 in Florida For-
ever funds to Apalachicola for this acqui-
sition, with $800,000 going to property
owner Charles D. Williamson, $6,633 in
closing costs through Tarpon Title and
the rest in other environmental assess-
ment and related expenses.
The acquisition is intended to ex-
pand the Apalachicola Maritime Mu-
seum and establish an educational


commercial seafood boat building and
restoration facility in the community.
City Administrator Betty Webb said
terms of the deal with the museum are
being discussed.
"That has not been finalized at this
point. We're working on a contract and
hoping to have it in place by the end of
February," she said. "It's going to be-
come a part of the museum operation,
See GRANT 10


By Lois Swoboda
Times StaffWriter
A controversial plan to build a
central sewage treatment system
on St. George Island that began
with a bang in April has ended the
year with a fizzle.
On Dec. 17, state regulators
closed the docket on a request by
Wastewater Management Services
and CEO Gene Brown for a vari-
ance to construct a wastewater


treatment plant in the island's busi-
ness district.
Brown and his company with-
drew the request before the state
Public Service Commission (PSC)
after receiving a letter from the
county commission asking that the
project be abandoned until a scien-
tific study of groundwater on the
island could be conducted.
Commissioners voted unani-
mously on Nov. 3 to request the
project be put on hold, largely in


response to aggressive criticism of
the project at both a public hearing
and regular commission meetings.
The PSC also was bombarded by
phone calls and mail protesting the
plantoconstructthecentralsewer
plant.
Although some island residents
argued the treatment plant was
necessary to prevent pollution of
the bay and Gulf, others countered
See SEWER 10


Phone: 850-227-1845


DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK:


Apa lachicola


NIew atltchadok


State funds Apolachicola Boat Works buy


State puts central sewer for island on hold


Schools seek ways to



By David Adlerstein
TimesCityEditor
Franklin County school officials are taking a clos-
er look at the reasons for the district's persistently
high dropout rate, which last year was the highest in
the state.
See SCHOOLS 6


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Thursday, January 7, 2010


A2 | The Times


Local


By Lois Swoboda
Times StaffWriter
On Dec. 14. the Carra-
belle city commission held
a ceremony to unveil a
granite monument thank-
ing the county school
board for donating the old
Carrabelle School Build-
ing to the city for use as a
municipal complex.
In the winter of 2008,
city offices and the po-


lice department moved
from downtown to the old
school building at 1001
Gray Avenue. The school
was vacated after the new
Franklin County School
opened its doors.
The Carrabelle school
building passed to the
city for a nominal fee un-
der a long-term agree-
ment with the school
board. The structure has
been renovated and the


library is now the city
meeting room.
The public has great-
ly benefited from Car-
rabelle's acquisition of
the building which now
houses the Boys and
Girls Club, Weems Pri-
mary Care Clinic East,
the Camp Gordon John-
ston Museum and the
Franklin County Literacy
Program. The Carrabelle
Artists Association will be


moving soon into space
in the complex provided,
free of charge, by the
city.
Brown, who over-
saw the mounting of the
plaque in front of the mu-
nicipal complex, did the
actual unveiling and he
and Messer each gave a
short speech. About two
dozen people attended the
ceremonyincludingmem-
bers of the school board.


RO GAt~ebSHE|SeialoteTms


Special to The Times
The Dixie Theatre will
open 2010 with a Florida
Humanities Council pro-
gram with Betty Jean
Steinshouer, who portrays
Harriet Beecher Stowe,
author of "Uncle Tom's
Cabin.
The show is on Thurs-
day, Jan 7, at 7:30 p.m. and
is free.


eb St ea talsoa cee
known for "Uncle
Tom's Cabin,"
drawing on her ex-
perience with slay-
ery, the antislavery
movement and the
underground rail-
road.


WillanCatheSatur-

day, Jan. 9,
Randall "Big
Daddy" Webster,
who has lived
and breathed
the blues for
more than 25
years, brings
two blues work-


By DesPina Williams
FloridaFreedomNewspapers
Whether you're a retiree
looking to invest your nest
egg or a snowbird wanting
to spread your wings, Gulf
Coast Community College's
Education Encore program
has something for you.
Aprogramofthecollege's
Office of Lifelong Learning,
Education Encore provides
non-credit enrichment
classes to "active adults"
desiring to learn new skills
or sharpen old ones.
Since 2001, Education
Encore has been a popular
addition to courses offered
at GCCC's Gulf/Franklin
Center in Port St. Joe.
The program returns for
:::.::.""<::::-:ooth
utive FridaysfromJan.20to
Feb.24.
A $60 fee buys entrance
into three classes. The fee is
the same whether a student
attends one, two or three
classes.
The Spring semester
brings two new courses,
Art-Collage/Mixed Media
and Basic Home Repair II-
Advanced, along with sev-
eral returning favorites.
"I think we have a nice
selection, a good variety of
classes this time," said Jim
Barr, GCCC's coordinator
of education programs and
partners.
Introduced last fall, Ba-
sic Home Repair, taught by
Landy Luther, allows stu-
dents to channel their inner
Bob Vila, with tips on clear-
ing a jammed sink and fix-


camera-Beginning, Digital

oapgeEEe s nhdPPh
Safari for Photography En-
thusiasts.
Encore enthusiasts will
recognize a familiar name
in the spring roster,
Bill Barker, who teaches
three computer courses
- Basics, Advanced and
Internet/E-mail has been
teaching at the Gulf/Frank-
lin Center since 2001.
Barr has also found a
promising newhie instruc-
tor in Jennifer Mercori, a
yoga instructor eager to
share her knowledge.
"I was very impressed
(with her)," said Barr. "She
is a certified yoga instructor
with an abundance of teach-

ing i utthespring
catalogue are courses in in-
vesting, Tai Chi and home
decorating.
Barr expects an enroll-
ment of about 100 this term,
with a mix of residents and
Snowbirds.
He encourages all En-
core newcomers to attend
the college's Jan. 13 recep-
tion and registration event.
Those still on the fence
may be encouraged by the
Encore motto: "No Stress!
No Tests! No Grades! Just
Flin!"
"Mostadultsdon'tlikethe
idea of going back to school
and being tested," Barr said,
"but his is an opportunity for
them to take special inter-
est classes where they can
learn but have no pressure
as far as their performance
is concerned."


Registration event
Interestedadultsare
invited to attend a special
reception and registration
event for Gulf Coast
Community College's
Education Encore sprinG
semester on Wednesday,
Jan. 13, at 1 p.m. at the
GCCC Gulf/Franklin Center
in Port St. Joe.
The reception, in room
A-101, will allow students to
meet instructors and discuss
course offerings.
Individuals may also
register by returning the
completed registration form,
inserted in this week's paper,
to the college by Jan. 20.
To view course
descriptions and registration

itt c re
edu/ContinuingEd or call the
college at 850-872-3823.

ing a leaky toilet.
The advanced home re-
pair course builds on this
knowledge, with instruction
in cabinet hardware, win-
dow screening and drywall.
Thecollage/mixed-media
course is a two-hour course
that will help artists create
masterworks out of layered
tissue paper and other me-
dia.
Instructor Jennifer Bo-
naventura, a Panama City
artist, will also teach a draw-
ing course.
Those handy with a cam-
era can benefit from three
photography courses led by
Cape San Blas resident Sue
Bull.
Bull teaches Digital


Steinshouer


shops and a concert. The
first workshop is sched-
uled for 1:30 p.m., with
the second at 3 p.m. The
concert will be at 7:30.
Season tickets are
now available at the box
office. Call 653-3200.


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(arrabelle dedicates thank-you to schools


Dixie Theatre opens 2010 season


Education Encore begins spring semester


.


BETTY JEAN
STEINSHOUER


























Community CALENDAR


Thank YOU
Dr. Marsh and the to Franklin's Promise
staff at Coastal Foot And for distributing the shoes.
Ankle Clinic would like We collected 364 pairs of
to say "Thank You" to shoes that are being dis-
everyone who partici- tribute to those in need.
pated in our 9th annual COASTAL FOOT
shoe drive. It was a great ANI) ANKLE CLINIC
success! We would also 221HIGHWAY98
like to give a big thanks APALACHICOLA

THE
THE
EPISCOPAL EPISCOPAL CHURCH
WELCOMES YOU
CHURCH

++ ++





m *
WELCOMES YOU 1nmty
? EST. 1836
I
$ *I- R Hwy. 98 & 6th St.
I L.1 1
Apalachicola
As cens io n SUNDAY: 8:00 AM 10:30 AM
101 NE First Street LIBRARY HOURS:
Carrabelle SUNDAY 12:00 2:00 PM
MONDAY 11:00 AM 1:00 PM
SUNDAY WEDNESDAY 12:00 2:00 PM
10:00 AlVI THURSDAY 3:30 5:30 PM



The United Methodist Churches
Of Franklin County Welcome You

First United Methodist Church of Apalachicola
Worship Service 11:00 a.m. every Sunday
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
75 56 St. Apalachicola 653-9530 fumcapalach@gtcom.net
Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis
Carrabelle United Methodist Church
Worship Services 10:45 a.m. Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
"Celebrate Recovery" Mondays 7-9 p.m.
Healing service first Tuesday each month-? p.m.
102NEAve.B a abelle 697-3672

Eastpoint United Methodist Church
Pr Worship Serviceal0:00 m.i 1 .m.
Healing Service every first Fridays of the Month at 6:30 p.m.
317 Patton Dr. (corner of David St.) 670-8825
Pastor: Rev. Beth White
St. George Island United Methodist Church
9:00 a.m. Worship Service
10:00 a.m. Fellowship Hour
201 E. Gulf Beach Dr. 927- 4635 www.sgiumc.org
Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis


First Pentecostal Holiness Church
379 Brownsville Road Apalachicola


Sunday School 9:45 am
Sunday Morning Worship 10:45 am
Sunday Evening Service 6:00 pm
Monday, Youth Group 6:30 pm
Wednesday, Royal Rangers, G.A.P. 7:00 pm
Wednesday Worship & Word 7:30 pm
Nursery Provided during regular church services


Local BR IE F S


St. Patrick Catholic Church
Ave C & Sixth Street in Apalachicola, FL 32329 or
The Islander (Across from the Blue Parrot)

(850) 65 9 3G* aiPs pch i point.net
PASTOR: FATHER ROGER LATOSYNSKI
WWW.stpatricksmass.com
APALACHICOLA MASS SCHEDULE
SATURDAY................. .................5 PM
SUNDAY ................ ................ 10 AM
ST. GEORGE ISLAND MASS SCHEDULE
SUNDAY ................ .................8:30 AM


IV


Thursday, January 7, 2010


Local


The Times | A3


So how are you doing
with your resolution list for
the new year? Farther along
than I am, I hope.
How about those shrimp
New Year's morning? Had a
nice show of support. Went
ready to enjoy the shrimp,
goodies and the company.


I want to thank everyone wloet onu.


both days. It would really be


See you there!
Be kind to one another,
and check in on the sick and
housebound, and remember
- volunteers make it
happen!
Until next time, God Bless
America, our troops, the
poor, homeless and hungry.


for the cards, gifts and phone
calls. I had a great birthday!
Members of the Lanark
Village Golf Club will be
serving biscuits and gravy
this Saturday, Jan. 9, at
Chills Hall. Doors open
at 8:30 a.m., and you are


Tuesday breakfasts and appreciated.
Thursday lunches will start Bingo for the Bus also
up again this week, breakfast started up for the season.
from 8-10 a.m. and lunch on Doors to Chillas Hall open
Thursday at noon. We will at 5 p.m., and bingo begins
be glad to see and serve you! at 6:30 p.m. Soft drinks,
They really could use some coffee and of course
more help in the kitchen on homemade cookies on tap.


LANIARK NEWS


Thursday, Jan. 7
Microsoft Word II at Carrabelle
library. 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. For
more info, call 697-2366.
Microsoft Excel II at Carrabelle
library. 1:30-4:30 p.m. For more info,
call 697-2366.
Yoga at Carrabelle library. 4:30-
5:30 p.m. For more Info, call 697-2366.
Individual computer mstruction
at Eastpoint library from 10 a.m. to
noon. For more info, call 670-8151.
Wandering Star Quilting Club.
Chills Hall Lanark Village. 1-3 p.m.
Call Christine Hinton 697-2551.
Community luncheon and in-
formation specials at the Franklin
County Senior Center in Carrabelle.
Noon. $3 donation. Call 697-3760.

Friday, Jan. 8
Apalachicola History, Culture
and Arts board meets at 8:30 a.m. at
City Hall. For info, call 653-9318
Computer Basics I at Eastpoint
library. 10 a.m. to noon. For more info,
call 670-8151.
Parent-child reads at Eastpoint
library. 2:15 p.m., for infant to 4 years.
For more info, call 670-8151.
Story Hour at Eastpoint library.
3:30 p.m., for ages 5-8. For more info,
call 670-8151.
Exercise class at Chillas Hall in
Lanark Village. 9-10 a.m. Open to all
and free
Alcoholics Anonymous will meet
at 7:30 p.m. at the Church of the
Ascension 101 NE First St. in Carra-
belle. For ore info, call 697-2837 '
Saturd J 9
SYr CH*
Introduction to Adobe Photo-
shop at Carrabelle library. 10 a.m. to
1 p.m. For more info, call 697-2366.


Carrabelle History Museum, 106
B St., SE, will be open every Friday
and Saturday during January from
10 a.m. to 4 p.m. For more info, call
Tamara Allen at 697-2141.

M0nda Jan. 11
fr
Apalachicola Planning and Zon-
ing meets at 6 p.m. at City Hall. Call
653-9319.
Harmonica at Carrabelle library.
10 a.m. For more info, call 697-2366.
WILD meeting at Carrabelle li-
brary at 1:30 p.m. For more info, call
697-2366.
Yarn Junkies will meet 7-9 p.m.
The newly formed group is for knit-
ters, crocheters and others addicted
to yarn. The group meets each Mon-
day night at an alternate location. For
info, call Kathy Robinson at 653-7196.
Exercise class at Chillas Hall in
Lanark Village. 9-10 a.m. Open to all
and free.
Al-Anon meets at 5:30 p.m. at Trin-
ity Episcopal Church's Benedict Hall,
at Sixth Street and Ave. D. For more
info, call 850-222-2294.
Bingo at the Franklin County
Senior Center in Carrabelle. Early
bird at 6 p.m., regular bingo at 7 p.m.
Cards begin at $4. Call 697-3760.

TUOSday, Jan. 12
Apalachicola Community Gar-
dens meets at 5 p.m. at Seafood Grill.
For info, call 653-9419.
Carrabelle Historical Society, 6
p.m. at Carrabelle Library. For info,
contact Tamara Allen at 697-2141.
Harmonica at 10 a.m. at Carra-
belle library. For info, call 697-2366.
Kids Wii at Carrabelle library. 4:15
p.m. For info, call 697-2366.
Breakfast at the Franklin


County Senior Center in Carrabelle.
Coffee at 7:30 a.m., meal at 8 a.m. $2
suggested donation. Call 697-3760.
Winter Bingo. 7 p.m. St. George
Island Fire Department. $1 per card.
Everyone welcome. Proceeds go to
St. George Island Civic Club. Call 927-
3001.
Alcoholics Anonymous will meet
at 7:30 p.m. at the Church of the
Ascension, 101 NE First St., in Carra-
belle. For more info, call 697-2837.

Wednesday Jan. I3
WILD Bookmobile will be at
the Lanark Village Post Office, 156
Heffernan Drive, 1-2:15 p.m.; at Car-
rabelle Cove Apartments, 807 Gray
Ave., 3-4:15 p.m.; and at the Burger
King/Gulfside IGA in Apalachicola'
421 U.S. Highway 98, 5:15-6:30 p.m.
For info, call 850-556-1556.

9-1Adult FWiiiat Ca abelle library.
'
Friends of the Library meet at
5:30 p.m. at Eastpoint Library. For
info, call 670-8151.

filUfSday, Jan. I 4
Wandering Star Quilting Club.
Chills Hall Lanark Village. 1-3 p.m.
Call Christine Hinton 697-2551.
Community Luncheon and in-
formation specials at the Franklin
County Senior Center in Carrabelle.
Noon. $3 donation. Call 697-3760.

Frida Jan. I5
ft
WILD Bookmobile will be at the
ABC School, 98 12th St., 1-2:45 p.m.;.
at Eastpoint Apartments, 45 Begonia
St., 4-5 p.m.; and at the Piggly-Wiggly,
130 U.S. Highway 98 in Apalachicola,
5:30-6:30 p.m. For more info, call 850-
556-1556.


It's 2010, and the Frank-
lin County Public Library
continues to place in the
collection some of the best
books from 2009 and now
2010. The No. 1 best-seller
according to a big-box book
store is Dan Brown's "The
Lost Symbol." Other top
favorites this past year were
"The Twilight Saga," by
Stephenie Meyer, and a first
novel for Kathryn Stockett,
"The Help." "Scarecrow," by
John Connelly, was right up
there as well.
The Eastpoint and Car-
rabelle libraries each have a
new edition section to help
patrons locate the library's
newest editions. The library
also carries audiobooks of
the many newhest-sellers.
Free computer classes
begin this week at both li-
brary locations. Just call the
Carrabelle branch at 697-
2366 or the Eastpoint library
at 670-8151 to register.
Thursday, Jan. 7
*Microsoft Word II, Win-
dows user and familiarity
with the functions of Word
in the Word Level I class,
Carrabelle, 9:30 a.m. to 12:30
p.m.
*Microsoft Excel II,
Window users and famil-
iarity with the functions of
Excel covered in the Excel
Level I class, Carrabelle,
1:30-4:30 p.m.
Friday, Jan. 8
*Computer Basics I:


Getting Started, for first-
time, beginning-level users,
Eastpoint, 2-5 p.m.
Saturday, Jan. 9
*Intro to Adobe Photo-
shop Elements 7,
for beginner and intermedi-
ate digital photographers,
Carrabelle, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Wednesday, Jan. 13
*Creating Resumes and
Cover Letters using Mi-
crosoft Word, need to know
Window basics, Carrabelle,
2-3:30 p.m.
*Online Job Resources.
Musthe able to use the
Internet, Carrabelle, 4-5:30
p.m.
Thursday, Jan. 21
*Microsoft Word II, Win-
dows user familiarity with
the functions of Word in the
Word Level I class, East-
point, 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
*Microsoft Excel II,
Window users and famil-
iarity with the functions of
Excel covered in the Excel
Level I class, Eastpoint,
1:30-4:30 p.m.
Saturday, Jan. 23
*Building Websites with
Dreamweaver Part II, Know
Dreamweaver Part I, Car-
rabelle, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
All classes are taught by
the staff of the Wilderness
Coast Public Library and
are made possible by a Li-
brary Service and Technol-
ogy Act grant administered
by the State Library of
Florida.


clergy in Leon, Jefferson, Madison,
Taylor, Wakulla, Franklin, Liberty
and Gadsden counties.
Please RSVP to Candace McKib-
ben as soon as possible at 878-5310,
ext. 250, or candace@bighendhos-
pice.org. Feel free to invite other
clergy or leaders.

(10ral Societ seeks voiCOS
10r spring concert
The Bay Area Choral Society,
sponsored by the Ilse Newell Rind
for the performing arts, is soon to
begin rehearsals for the March 28
performance of Handel's "Messiah,"
parts II and III.
The rehearsal on 'lliesday, Jan.
19, at 7 p.m. in Trinity Episcopal
Church of Apalachicola marks the
first of 10 rehearsals leading to the
Palm Sunday performance.
Area singers who are interested
in joining the chorus for this spring
concert, under the direction of Merel
Young, may call him at 927-4731 for
more information. There are openings
for about 10 more chorus members.

Auditions set for Panhandle
Pl 'Oklah !,
Cy0f S OMO
Auditions are next week for the
spring production of "Oklahoma" by
the Panhandle Players of Franklin
County.
Monday and Tuesday, Jan. 11
and 12, are set as the days for au-
ditioning for this American clas-
sic musical. Auditions will be held
between 6 and 8 p.m. in the former
Apalachicola High School building
on 14th Street.
Those auditioning should be
prepared to sing a song of their own
choice lus one of the songs from
the show "Oklahoma!" Also required
will be a short reading of a scene or
two from the script. Those who want


to be in the chorus will only need to
sing.
There are speaking/singing parts
for seven men and four women prin-
cipals. There is an additional need
for six to eight men and eight to 10
women for the chorus.
Rehearsals for the April 16 and 17
production will begin Feb. 11.
Questions about the production
may be answered by calling the
director, Merel Young, at 927-4731,
or Panhandle Players President Liz
Sisung at 670-8261.

$00 S60ftiling
.
10f Ost 'Stupid' dog
John Davis is seeking his dog,
"Stupid Dog Davis" who disappeared
from Simmons' Bayou on New Year's
Day. Stupid is a 1-year-old yellow
lab wearing a red collar with Davis'
phone numbers and a small choke
collar.
Davis believes the dog may have
been taken by a young man in a
truck. He thinks Stupid may be in
the Indian Pass or Cape San Blas
area. Stupid is friendly and loves
people.
If you have any information about
Stupid, please call 340-1252 or 229-
8781.

Flea market Saturday
at senior center
An indoor flea market will be held
this Saturday, Jan. 9, from 9 a.m. to
2 p.m. at the Carrabelle Senior Cen-
ter, 201 Ave. F on the corner of First
Street and Avenue F in downtown
Carrabelle.
Everyone is welcome to come by
for bargain hunting or to set up a
table and sell their own items.
For more information, call Caro-
line Smith at 323-0713 or go to www.
CarrabelleSeniorCenter.com.


LANARK NEWS


Library HAPPENINGS


Farm Share to deliver fresh
produce to elderly
Farm Share Inc. is kicking off
the new year by providing Frank-
lin County's senior citizens with
fresh produce and lemonade free of
charge.
On Saturday, Jan. 9, Farm Share
will deliver 20,000 pounds of fresh
cantaloupes, tomatoes and lemon-
ade to the Carrabelle Senior Center
of Franklin County, 201 Northwest
Ave. F in Carrabelle.
Farm Share's tractor-trailer is
scheduled to arrive at 8 a.m. More
than 200 families are expected to
benefit from this special delivery.
Farm Share, a nonprofit organiza-
tion based in Homestead, feeds the
hungry throughout Florida by dis-
tributing tractor-trailer loads of fresh
produce donated by farmers as well
as USDA commodities. For more
info, go to www.FarmShare.org.

Big Bend Hospite
il0sts clergy luncheon
Big Bend Hospice Chaplains in-
vite area clergy and other leaders in
the congregation to attend a special
luncheon at noon on Thursday, Jan.
21, at Big Bend Hospice, 1723 Mahan
Center Blvd., Tallahassee.
Come enjoy a complimentary
meal and fellowship with community
clergy.
"We invite clergy to be present
at this luncheon to hear and share
ideas of how to help congregants
who are providing care for others,"
said Rev. Candace McKibben, Big
Bend Hospice pastoral care man-
ager.
Julian Sollohub, LCSW, Big Bend
Hospice social worker, will be the
speaker for this quarterly meeting,
and his topic will be "Care of Care-
givers." The meeting is open to all



















What endures, and what faldes into memory?


Letter to the EDITOR


palachicola
( ulTabelle


T HE
USPS 027-600
Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St.
Apalachicola, FL 32329
VP/Publisher: Karen Hanes
Editor: Tim Croft
Circulation: James Meadors


Thursday, January 7, 2010


A4 | The Times


'Tis the time of year
for lists. Many writers are
taking the opportunity to
expound about the best and
worst of 2009 and the decade
as well.
I have been taking notes.
Bits of paper surrounding
my computer contain
scribbled book titles to check
out, Web sites to visit and
movies to put on the Netflix
queue. So much media, so
little time.
Along with all the stories
of recommendations and
pontifications, I read an
article on the Huffington
Post about 12 things that
became obsolete this
decade. I began thinking
about what endures and
what fades into memory.
According to the story,
calling is giving way to
testing. (When exactly
did THAT word enter the
lexicon?) Not
for me


my texts
are virtually
unreadable
because I don't
have a keyboard
phone, and there *
are no personal
plans to upgrade. RED W
My students
send hundreds of AND R
messages using a Denise
language shorthand
that makes me cringe. They
would probably agree that
testing trumps talking.
The article also asserted
that CDs were on the way
out because of the ease of
downloading music from
the Internet. It is now
easy to pick and choose
favorites and package them
all together on the iPod. I
think there is a larger loss
here. Producers of albums
have traditionally invested
their artistry in arranging
the order of tunes. Would
Carol King's "Tapestry"
or the Beatles' "White
Album" pack
be the same
wallop if the
songs were
in random
order? I
know, I
know, we
have all put
together
our own
tape
collections
of personal
favorites.
There is
nothing wrong
with that. I just


believe there is
still a place for
a professionally
organized sequence of
music selections.
An interesting side
note here is that the
Beatles' remastered
new release "Beatles
UX I," is the No. 1-selling
oux album of the decade.
Take that, Lady
Gaga and Eminem.
The Huffpost 1
article also predicts
the demise of wires,
newspaper classified
ads, address books,
the Yellow Page and
handwritten letters. Yay!
Maybe in dailies. No way.
I doubt it. Probably, but it
makes me sad.
The spaghetti mess of
computer cords needs to
disappear. It can't happen
too soon, as far as I am
concerned. Craig's List
may be replacing classified
ads for the big papers, but I
guarantee that weeklies like
The Times will still feature
classified we want to read.
My handwritten address
books are the history of my
life, and they aren't going
anywhere. I will not transfer
the entire contents to my
online version (which has
been known to crash with
alarming frequency). Who
knows? I might want to get
in touch with my college
boyfriend's mother one day.
Yellow pages? Hmmmm.
Dunno. I still use them.
Handwritten letters? Ah,
there's the rub. Even I wrote


H
O
R


some thank-
you notes by
e-mail this year.
I did make time to write to
my students who gave me
gifts, trying to set a good
example. I think the value of
old-fashioned snail mail will
increase as the frequency
decreases.
I have saved the
worst prediction for last
- the death of land-line
telephones. Hello? Does
anyone out there live in a
hurricane zone?
I keep an old rotary dial
phone beside my bed. No
electricity required. The
jack plugs in the wall, and
it works when the power
is out. How cool is that?
Memo to young folks:
Telephones don't necessarily
require electricity. Your cell
does. The wireless does.
Addendum to memo: It is not
unusual in times of disaster
to be without power for days.
It can be fun in a


survivalist kind of way.
Neighbors help each other
out, we cook all the steaks
in the freezer, we talk and
play cards and board games,
We feel a bit of a shock and
loss when the lights come
back on. Nonetheless, we
still have people who want
to know we are OK. That's
when we are happy to have a
phone that works.
So I guess it comes down
to this: Obsolescence is
personal. We get to pick and
choose what we keep and
what we throw away.
I should go write a letter
while I listen to "Abbey
Road," but I'll probably log
onto Facebook instead.

Denise Roux is a
regular columnist for
the Apalachicola and
Carrabelle Times. To
reach her e-mailher at
rouxwhit@mchsi.com.


would help me out by
sending any pictures,
postcards, used license
plates, facts, products, etc.
from their state, it would
be greatly appreciated!

Sincere 7'
Griffin Grubb
Fifth grade
Cascade Christian School
6019TH Ave. S.E.
PuyallupWA98372


I visited a friend's
home recently and was
overwhelmed by the
collection of personal
treasures and memorabilia
taking up nearly every inch
of vacant space in each
room and outbuilding.
These were not the
stereotypical piles of old


achievements and years
of treasured accumulation
take over shelves, then
drawers, then boxes and
huge amounts of storage
space ... what's to be done
with such things?
In my own case, it is file
folders and paper history
of each organization in
which I play a role. For book
lovers, world travelers,


action on behalf of our heirs and
our own clutter of treasures.
But then, why should we have
to get rid of the things of our life?
Who is to say when a house is
"cluttered" or just "lived in" when
it is overflowing with memories
and memorabilia that can be
enjoyed from each vantage point?
How could my friend be expected
to discard a family case filled
with polished gemstones that
had motivated future interests
and a path following the same
enthusiasm? Who is to make a
value judgment that a wall of
Picasso prints is more treasured
than a collection of childhood
items? Should a collector's custom
train layout be eliminated because
it takes up too much floor space?
Literary first editions, clocks,
taxidermy trophies, plants, paint-
by-number scenes, generations
of family pictures, antique radios
or tables or jewelry, Snow Babies,
holiday villages, crystal pieces, dog
or cat statues, owls, salt and pepper
shakers, musical instruments, keys,
spoons, bottles, commemorative
plates, beer steins, dolls, heirloom
toys, Disney items, music boxes,
Precious Moments or Lladro
pieces, sheet music, NASCAR
items and so many other things
are saved by people to show others
who we are. Those things display
an intimate look at our personal
histories, both of our past even as
they help others see pictures of our
lives and interests today.
I loved seeing my friend's
collections of treasures and felt
privileged to share them! I didn't
think of the boxes and cases and
shelves as clutter, but rather
saw cherished memories and
keepsakes. It made a wonderful
picture!


Mel
newspapers or junk articles
or magazines or twine or
tinfoil. Rather, they were rocks from
everywhere, and sea creatures
of all kinds, china keepsakes and
zunis and crystals and mastodon
teeth and fossilized manatee bones
and fabrics from the Far East.
There were books and pictures
and wood carvings, family
paintings and even an old car.
There were boxes of photo slides
and carefully placed display cases
featuring incredibly beautiful
pieces of nature's artwork. It was
a wonderful insight into who my
friend had been in the past and had
become in the world of today.
I have another friend who talks
of growing up in a sterile household
where furniture was purchased
for its antique value. Collector
paintings and rugs became the
highlights of the house rather than
those who dwelled within. And the
dramatic contrast between those
two homes made me think about
what it means to make room in our
lives and homes for our own very
personal treasures.
It seems that New Year's
resolutions always include "getting
organized" and "cleaning up the
house" and "throwing stuff out!"
But how can that be done when the
"stuff" is a reflection of a lifetime
of travels and memories? When
boxes of children's keepsakes,
drawings, school pictures, special


sports fans and collectors of
all manner of unique items, it
becomes increasingly difficult to
acknowledge that our things begin
to own us, instead of the reverse.
I attended an outdoor sale several
months ago at which a middle-
aged woman was trying to sell at
least four full sets of china which
had special meaning to her now-
deceased mother and aunt. The
seller couldn't use them, didn't
like the patterns and just wanted
to dispose of them, although they
had been highly valued by her own
family members!
Is that what must happen?
Does it take our death to permit
our treasures to be discarded or
sold or given away? In my second
friend's case mentioned above,
the expensive furniture, rugs and
paintings were claimed by a greedy
relative for their monetary value,
having no relation to the keepsake
values.
How many of us have had the
bittersweet responsibility to clean
out a parent's home and dispose
of the contents? For many, that
obligation becomes a reminder that
"someone will have to do this for
me." Perhaps it is only then that we
can look at our own collections with
a different perspective. Perhaps the
"who will do this for me" viewpoint
encourages us to take more drastic


POSTMASTER:
Send address change to:
The Apalachicola Times

ApalaP 0 I 8L 2329
Phone 850-653-8868


PERIODICAL RATE


Special to The Times
On Dec. 24, Miramar Beach resident
Raymond Netherwood declared his in-
tention to run for the U.S. House of Rep-
resentatives, District 2 seat.
Netherwood, a retired Air Force
health care administration officer, is
making his first run for public office.
"Mr. Boyd has been in Washington
too long," Netherwood said in explain-
ing wh he sMh en ing incumbent Al-
"Voting for the first stimulus bill and


then later cap-and-trade taxation shows
a disconnect with his constituents and
disregard for wasteful spending in
Washington. My specialty is providing
big-picture fixes and moving issues for-
ward," he said.
Currently a registered Republican,
Netherwood is running as an Indepen-
dent candidate. He has temporarily set
up his campaign office at his home and
is planning several events in the new
yeanor more information on his candi-
dacy, visit www.netherwood2010.com.


SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
IN COUNTY
$24.15 year $15.75 six months
OUT OF COUNTY
$34.65 year $21 six months


TO ALL ADVERTISERS
In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers
do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount
received for such advertisement.


e p n e a s.


RAYMOND NETHERWOOD


* *


:
R. c L.


One woman's mess another woman's memories


Washing ton
f. ifth-grader needS
yOUr help
Each member of our
class is working on a
project called "Parade
of States." We are
responsible for gathering
as much information as we
can. I have Florida for my
state.
If any of your readers


THOUGHTS
FOR THE TIMES


ly lle


A\AY SONLINE


Nether wood to challenge Boyd as Independent









Engfagement


Anniversary


4:::';




.
(fyStal Smith, Stephen Millentler

en g Og ed 10 ma rr y

Crystal Smith, of Crawfordville, and Stephen
Millender, of Carrabelle, have announced they are
engaged to be married in the spring.
The wedding ceremony is planned for Saturday,
April 10, 2010, at 4 p.m. at Fellowship Baptist Church
in Carrabelle.
Miss Smith, daughter of Ray and Terry Smith,
of Crawfordville, is a 2004 graduate of Wakulla High
School. She will graduate from American Intercon-
tinental University in February 2010 with an associ-
ate's in business. She is employed by Score Federal
Credit Union in Crawfordville.
Mr. Millender, son of Vance and Dale Millender,
of Carrabelle, graduated in 2000 from Carrabelle
High School. In 2003, he graduated with a general
associate's degree from Gulf Coast Community Col-
lege and is one class away from a pre-engineering
degree. He is self-employed, affiliated with Millen-
der's Seafood in Carrabelle.






.
P&TSonal & Bustness

Bankruptcy

38 Years Legal Experience


850-670-3030
Office located at: Point Mall, Eastpoint, FL
"We are a debt relief agency. We can help people file
bankruptcy relief under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code."
"The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that
should not be based solely upon advertisements.
Before you decide, ask us to send you free written
information about our qualifications and experience."


, 7 .

.
n n r itn n
7 ** "Y
I I *
B O1K SIlV01 0 0 n IV6150 ly

Billy and Serita Gay, of Apalachicola, celebrated their
25th wedding anniversary on Tuesday, Dec. 15.
After a trip out of state, a surprise reception was given
by their children at Living Waters church fellowship hall,
which included a wedding cake and dinner.


ggttiCAg Toll Free:
(888) 831-6754
Franklin County:
(gggy aggggs
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$fR MEDS (850) 926-9602
Helping Hands Make The Difference




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Securities offered through Tnad Advtsors, Inc. Member FINRA/SIPC,
Investment advisory services offered through Famsley Fmancial consultants ILC,
ARegisteredInvestmentAdvisor


ST ID E BLE
MONTHLY AVERAGES
To find the tides of the following areassubtract the indicated times
from these given for APALACHICOLA:
HIGH LOW
Cat Point Minus 0:40 Minus 1:17
East Pass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27
To find the tides of the following areassubtract the indicated times
from those given for CARRABELLE:
HIGH LOW
BaldPoint Minus9:16 Minus0:03

APALACHICOLA


In recognition of Black History Month Arthritis & Infusion Center and
The News Herald are providing an educational special half-page highlighting the top
African-American inventors, along with activities for students, which will run in
The N~ews Herald every Tuesday & Thursday, Feb. 2nd Feb. 25th.


CARRABELLE


_


________________________________


Thursday, January 7, 2010


Society


The Times | AS


American Legion Post 106 is offering a memorable and

that visited last year. "We tried to get as many people
in this calendar as we could," said Post Commander
Al el .e"Th is so to be a eps eafor yearget

yours, call Mirabella at 653-5838, see any legionnaire
or drop by the Tin Shed in Apalachicola.


* *
* * *


Spec. Brian C. Lolley,
a 2001 Apalachicola High
School graduate, began
serving his country in the
U.S. Air Force. After three
years, he transferred to the
Army, where he served in
Korea and is now stationed
FortnRiky Kands the
Brian will be welcomed
home soon by his family,
mom, Frances, and Steve
James; dad, John W., and
Sheila Lolley Jr.; brother,
Steven James; and sis-
ter, Cecillia James, all of


Apalachicola.
Lolley will be deployed
March 2010 to Operation
Iraqi Freedom for a year
and will be returning in
2011.
Our prayers go out to
him, along with the men
d pmoendwho 1alsoth i
families. May our men and
women have a safe return
home as they proudly serve
our country in the U.S. mili-
tary. We are proud of all of
you and wish you and your
families well.


High
570
430
430
460
520
580
560


%Precip
10%
30%
10%
0%
10%
10%
20%


Date
ThuJan O7
Fri, Jan 08
Sat, Jan 09
Sun, Jan 10
Mon, Jan 11
Tue, Jan 12
Wed, Jan 13


1/07 Thu 03:33AM
02:10PM
1/08 Fri 04:54AM
02:06PM
1/09 Sat 06:08AM


0.1
0.5
-0.1
0.7
-0.3


09:26AM
08:33PM
12:17PM
09:04PM
9:43PM


1/1 Su 0:12M -.5 L


1032M .3H


1/11 Mon 08:06AM
06:40PM
1/12 Tue 08:54AM
07:54PM
1/13 Wed 09:36AM
05:10PM


-0.6
1.0
-0.6
1.0
-0.6
1.1


04:42PM


10H


12:29PM 13H


1/07 THU 01:20AM
11:57AM
1/08 FRI 02:41AM
11:53AM
1/09 SAT 03:55AM


0.1
0.8
-0.2
1.1
-0.5


08:01AM
07:08PM
10:52AM
07:39PM
08:18PM


|
|
I
I
| N


1 would like to order the 4-week Black History Inventor special.
(lf you already receive papers on Tuesday & Thursday you do not need to order)
I would like ONLY to receive more information on the Essay Contest.

ame School


1/10 S 45A 07L


9:07PM 21H


1/11 MON 05:53AM
04:27PM
1/12 TUE 06:41AM
05:41PM
1/13 WED 07:23AM
0 6:34PM


-0.9
1.6
-0.9
1.6
-0.9
1.5


03:17PM
10:04PM
03:29PM
11:04PM
03:45PM


# of copies


_


ARTHRITIS AND
INFUSION CENTER



savong, ON, M.D.
2917 Highway 77 PC, FL
aso.873.6748


I Email


I Drop off, fax, or mail to:
News Herald NIE Dept.
P.O. Box 1940,
Panama City, FL 32402
Fax: 850.763.4636
For questions call: 850.747.5008


BRIANI C. LOLLEY


Lolley to return home


LE GION POST 0 OFFERS


g



African-American inventors that changed our lives.
During slavery, most black slaves were denied a formal education. This
limited education and training meant, for the most part, African-Americans
were shut out of professional occupations. Nevertheless, a small number of
exceptionally talented African-Americans were able to obtain an education
and make significant contributions to American life. Many of these ideas
were inventions that we could not live without today!


PANAMA CT











































DROWNING from page 1


0 JACKSON'S


ALWAYS ONLINE
WWW.Opalachtimes.com


ALWAYS ONLINE




'ncy OF THE
a aH WEEK

Cayley
Cagney is a playful,
affectionateandsmartSchnauzer/
Terrier mix. She arrived at the
Adoption Center with three
siblings three months ago. The
puppies had been left in a box

!v'ehni fnt sr adandbw e
The puppies responded

oeaeu lyrectevthe areatan
Adoption Center and all but
Cagney have been adopted.
Won t you please consider giving this sweet, adorable and deserving
pup her forever home?
VOLUNTEERS are desperately needed to socialize Cagney and
all of the other dogs and cats. Any time you can spare would be greatly
appreciated.
Call Kam at 670-8417 for more details or visit the Franklin County
Humane Society at 244 State Route 65 in Eastpoint. You may log onto
the subole .11 as as as Innnilw ispel...., to see more of our adoptable pets.
Remember, when you adopt a friend for life, you not only save the life
of that pet, you make room for us to save the life of one more abandoned


ID


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TELEPHONE (850) 643-5417


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I I


IV


Thursday, January 7, 2010


A6 | The Times


Local


In a Florida Depart-
ment of Education report
issued in November on the
data from the state's 67
counties, Franklin County
schools posted a dropout
rate of 5.4 percent, more
than double the state's 2.3
percent average.
This means that about
one in every 18 high school
students withdrew from
school last year, without
transferring to another
school, home education or
adult education program.
This can include with-
drawal due to court action,
expulsion, nonattendance
or medical reasons.
The dropout rate
marks an increase from
the previous year's 2.0
percent rate and is just
slightly worse than the 4.6
percent dropout rate five
years ago. Still, during
that five-year interval, the
rate has been as high as
13.3 percent.
"In the past, I've had
students tell me, 'There's
nothing here for me to


work towards,'" said Su-
perintendent Nina Marks.
"They're not making the
connection that to transi-
tion into adult life, they
need the piece of paper
that they have completed
a basic education.
"It's a very real con-
cern for me, and we are
working on trying to recti-
fy the situation," she said.
An examination of the
numbers shows that the
dropout percentage last
year was slightly worse
among whites, at 5.8 per-
cent, than it was among
African-Americans, at 4.9
percent.
But, in terms of the
percentage of incoming
freshmen who eventually
earn some type of high
school diploma, whether
it be a standard diploma,
special diploma or GED,
the numbers were slightly
worse among African-
Americans than among
whites.
In its report, the Flor-
ida Department of Edu-


cation provided data on
three ways of measuring
graduation rates: one
used by the federal No
Child Left Behind pro-
gram for reporting pur-
poses, one used by the
state of Florida since 1998
and a third established by
the National Governors
Association (NGA).
The NGA formula,
which factors in standard
and special diplomas but
excludes GEDs, was ad-
opted by the Florida State
Board of Education as its
calculation rate in Sep-
tember 2009. This will
mean that the district's
graduation rate, not in-
cluding any students who
later earn GEDs, will be a
factor in the new formula
used to grade Florida high
schools.
The three graduation
rate calculations showed
that Franklin County stu-
dents are graduating at a
rate anywhere from 1 to
8 percent better than the
state average.


And it showed that the
district's graduation rate
last year, which was be-
tween 78 and 86 percent
depending on which cal-
culation was used, was
the highest percentage in
the past five years.
In fact, the calculations
showed a vast improve-
ment from last year's
numbers, of anywhere
from about 24 to 28 per-
cent, depending on the
measurement.
The reason for this is
that although too many
Franklin County students
are dropping out of school,
an increasing number are
returning to earn their
GED degrees through the
county's literacy program
or other means.
Marks said the dis-
trict's attendance officer,
Karen Smith, follows up
on students who drop out
when they turn 16, with
guidance counselor Di-
ane McGrath having them
provide more detailed in-
formation on their plans.


Smith said any student
between ages 16 and 18
must have a parent's sig-
nature in order to with-
draw from school. Stu-
dents are asked whether
theyplantopursueaGED,
homeschooling or some
other educational alterna-
tive, and in the event they
later do not have proof of
enrollment, Smith can tag
their driver's licenses,
which can prevent them
from driving. The law
does not apply to students
age 18 or older.
"I give them maybe two
weeks at the very most to
prove to me they have en-
rolled in some kind of pro-
gram," said Smith.
Marks said that al-
though McGrath is able
to glean information from
students who withdraw,
she would like to do more
in terms of exit interviews.
"Habitually, they turn
16, and we don't ever see
them anymore," said
Marks. "Maybe what we
need to do is go straight


to the source and find out
from the kids what they
think. We don't under-
stand it."
Marks, a former mid-
dle-school teacher and
dean, said one reason for
students dropping out is
that some, having failed in
an early grade, are two or
three years behind their
classmates by the time
they get through middle
school.
"They mature faster,
and they're older than
Other students, and for
whatever reason, they
lose interest," she said.
"We are also addressing
that. We're trying to docu-
ment why they feel like
they don't need to come to
school."
Marks said a stepped-
up effort will be made this
month, talking to students
individually and deter-
mining what type of acad-
emies or vocational offer-
ings, such as health care
and construction, might
need to be expanded.


Bordt's husband,
Heinz, who said he fran-
tically tried to get help
for his grandson when he
returned to 641 E. Gorrie
Drive from his Monday
afternoon errand, was not
present at the hearing.
He told investigators
that his wife confessed
to killing their grandson
"because she didn't want
to see him grow up in a di-
vorced home," according
to the arrest affidavit.
Heinz Bordt told sher-
iff's office investigator Lt.
Ronnie Segree that he had
asked his wife to join him
on his errand before he
left about 2 p.m., but she
said she preferred to stay
with her grandson on the
island.
When he returned


about 4:30 p.m., "he no-
ticed the front door was
standing open and his wife
coming from the beach
wearing a red jacket and
female long underwear,"
a deputy wrote. She ap-
parently was wet from the
neck down.
When he asked his wife
what was wrong, "she
said that she tried to kill
herself in the ocean," the
report said.
Heinz Bordt said he
went into the house and
saw Camden partially
submerged, face-down
in the bathtub. He pulled
him out, put him on the
living room floor and left
to drive to the local fire
station for help.
Marianne Bordt tried
to run from the parking lot


at that point, according to
the report, but Heinz Bor-
dt forced her into his back
seat, and she scraped her
knee in the struggle.
When EMS and law en-
forcement made it to the
house, Camden was pro-
nounced dead.
A spokesman for the
Florida Department of
Law Enforcement, which
is investigating the case
jointly with the sheriff's
office, said the boy resides
with his mother in Ro-
swell, a suburb of Atlanta.
The Bordts are from Nu-
fringen, Germany.
A 2005 birth announce-
ment from the Georgia
Tech Alumni Association
listed Camden and his par-
ents as living in Alpharet-
ta, Ga., near Roswell.


The boy's parents had
joint custody of Camden
after they divorced in 2006,
but he lived mostly with
his mother in Roswell.
Camden's father, David
Hiers, lives nearby and is
on his way to Florida, ac-
cording to his attorney,
who released a statement
Tuesday on behalf of the
family.
"David Hiers is ex-
tremely distraught and
overwhelmed with grief
over this incident," said
Alpharetta, Ga., attorney
J. Thomas Salata. "He
and his family ask only
for thoughts and prayers
during this very difficult
time."
A phone call to the
boy's mother, Karin Hiers,
was not answered Tues-


day afternoon. Marianne
Bordt is her mother.
An autopsy was per-
formed Tuesday afternoon
by the Leon County medi-
cal examiner's office.
Marianne Bordt, who
is listed as 5'6" tall and
weighing 135 pounds, said
little during Tuesday's
3:30 p.m. hearing. She
spoke briefly with Kevin
Steiger, her court-ap-
pointed public defender,
as courthouse employees
worked to ensure commu-
nication with the transla-
tor on the speakerphone.
Also assisting Steiger was
Christopher Ellrich, capi-
tal defense investigator
with the Second Judicial
Circuit's office of the pub-
lic defender.
Assistant State Attor-


ney Jarred Patterson's re-
quest that the defendant
be held without bail did
not meet with an objection
from Steiger, although he
did challenge Patterson's
request that Marianne
Bordt surrender her pass-
port. Russell asked that
she place it in the custody
of the sheriff's office while
she remains in jail.
The German consulate
in Washington, D.C., has
been notified of the case,
but Steiger would not
comment whether his cli-
ent had spoken to anyone
there.

Northwest Florida
Daily News Writer 'lbm
McLaughlin and the As-
sociated Press contrib-
uted to this report.


J.J.


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| stoo
Judgment of Mortgage
Foreclosure dated Decem-
ber 14, 2009 and entered
in Case No. 19-2008-CA-
148 of the Circuit Court of
the SECOND Judicial Cir-
cult in and for FRANKLIN
County, Florida wherein
SUNTRUST BANK, is the
Plaintiff and CLYDE OLl-
VER A/K/A CLYDE N.
OLIVER; THE UNKNOWN
SPOUSE OF CLYDE
OLIVER A/K/A CLYDE N.
OLIVER N/K/A MARION
OLIVER; KENNETH
FRIENDLY A/K/A KEN-
NETH L. FRIENDLY; THE
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
KENNETH FRIENDLY;
A/K/A KENNETH L.
FRIENDLY; N/K/A DEB
FRIENDLY; SUNTRUST
BANK; SUNSET BEACH
OWNERS' ASSOCIATION,
INC.;aretheDefendantsI
will sell to the highest and
best bidder for cash at the
FRONT DOOR OF THE
FRANKLIN COUNTY
COURTHOUSE, 33 MAR-
KET STREET APALACHI-
COLA, FLORIDA at 11:00
rchon20t1 t1h hfo in
described property as set
forth in said Final Judg-
ment:
LOT 39, SUNSET BEACH,
PHASE NO. 2, A SUBDIVI-
SION AS PER MAP OR
PLAT THEREOF AS RE-
CORDED IN PLAT BOOK
6, PAGE 17, OF THE PUB-
R ORDSFLOOF FDRANK-

A/K/A 1902 SUNSET
DRIVE, ST GEORGE IS-
LAND, FL32328
Any person claiming an In-
terest in the surplus from

8 s3ef ny otherPtshnan
ens mu6s file a la witth
sale.
WITNESS MY HAND and
the seal of this Court on
December 15, 2009.
Marcla M. Johnson
Cr ch leeCMr Court
Deputy Clerk
Florida Default Law Group,
PL.
PO. Box 25018
Tampa, Florida
33622-5018
FO8015261
January 7, 14, 2010
5351T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE SECOND JUDI-
CIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY
FLORIDA
CAPITAL CITY BANK,
Plaintiff
vs.


Franklin County's source of news for more than a century


I zzoo |
SOUND TO A POINT
FROM WHICH A LINE
RUN NORTH 300 WEST
, a WILL BE 210 FEET FROM
AND PARALLEL TO SAID
ANNGUNCEMENIS LAST DESCRIBED LINE;
1100 Legal Advertising THENCE RUN NORTH 300
1110 Classified Notices WEST ALONG A LINE 210
1120 Public Notices/ FEET FROM AND PARAL-
Announcements LEL TO SAID LAST DE-
1125-Cwpois& ASCRIBED LINE TO A
1130 Adoption POINT WHICH IS NORTH
1140 Happy Ads 600 EAST OF THE POINT
1150 Personals OF BEGINNING; THENCE
1160 Lost RUN SOUTH 600 WEST
1170 Found 210 FEET TO THE POINT
OF BEGINNING; LESS
AND EXCEPT 66 FOOT
1100 RIGHT OF WAY OF STATE
ROAD NO. 30. SAID LAND
5214T BEING SITUATE IN
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FRANKLIN COUNTY,
OF THE SECOND JUDI- FLORIDA.
CIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY LESS AND EXCEPT
FLORIDA
Lot 3, One Particular Har-
GULF STATE COMMU- bor, a subdivision re-
a tE3ANK, corded in Plat Book 10,
Page 7, Public Records of
Franklin County, Florida.
vs
at Public Sale, to the high-
DONnRd t ASHOLTZ, tshand tbestst dsder f
CASE NO.: 09-000336-CA Franklin County Court-
house, Apalachicola, Flor-
Ida, at 11:00 a.m. on Janu-
NOTICE OF SALE ary 20, 2010.

NhOTICuEs anheretbhy Iven Any person claiming an In-
at, p terest in the surplus from
e InalFSr marre Jutdh* the sale, If any, other than
the property owner as of
caus InFtrhek cu Coud the date of the Ils pend-
Florida, I will sell to the entsIn mustd s aftecla
opertyu situat orin Fra sale.
scribedas: WITNESS my hand and
the of this Court this 14th
A PARCEL OF LAND IN dayof December,2009.
THE NORTH HALF OF
28 TCOT NNSAHLIP 8S T OHN CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT
BED AS FWEL WSDE- YU ThC erkMaxwell

NOMTMH ECSET ACTOR R Steve M. Watkins, Ill
OF SAID FRACTIONAL FBN: 0794996
ICOEN SANDLORN pa cm TFSLtr3e2 20
THE SECTION LINE A DIS- (850) 653-1949
TANCE OF 1675 FEET TO January 7, 14, 2010
A POINT MARKED BY A 5249T
CONCRETE MONUMENT IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
THENCE RUN SOUTH 300 OF THE SECOND JUDI-
EAST 1347 FEET TO A CIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
POINT THENCE RUN FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY
NORTH 600 EAST 840 FLORIDA
FEET TO A POINT WHICH CIVIL ACTION
IS THE POINT OF BEGIN-
NING OF THE LAND TO THE BANK OF NEW YORK
BE DESCRIBED; FROM MELLON FKA THE BANK
SAID POINT OF BEG- INN- OF NEW YORK AS TRUS-
ING RUN THENCE SOUTH TEE FOR THE CERTIFl-
300 EAST 836.5 FEET TO CATE HOLDER OF
THE NORTHERLY BOUN- CWMBS 2004-18,
DARY OF THE 66 FOOT Plaintiff,
RIGHT OF WAY OF STATE
ROAD NO. 30, AND CON- vs.
TINUING ON THE SAME
BEARING ACROSS SAID TERESA R. SMITH, et al'
HIGHWAY TO THE WA- Defendantss.
TERS OF ST GEORGE
SOUND; THENCE NOR- CASE NO.:
THEASTERLY ALONG 19-2009-CA-000590
THE WATER OF SAID DIVISION:


| stoo |
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: BURTON L. CLARK
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS:
1520 Senola Road
Street C,
Tyrone, GA 30290
CURRENTADDRESS:
UNKNOWN
TO: DEBBIE CLARK
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS:
1520 Senola Road
Street C,
Tyrone, GA 30290
CURRENT ADDRESS:
UNKNOWN
ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN
PARTIES CLAIMING BY
THROUGH, UNDER, AND
AGAINST THE HEREIN
NAMED INDIVIDUAL
DEFENDANTS) WHO ARE
NOT KNOW TO BE DEAD
OR ALIVE, WHETHER
SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES
MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST
AS SPOUSE, HEIRS, DE-
VISEES, GRANTEES, OR
OTHERCLAIMS
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS:
UNKNOWN

MENWTNADDRESS:
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action to foreclose a
mortgage on the following
property in FRANKLIN
County Florida:

LOOTR BLO 74, ASC
GEORGE ISLAND GULF
BEACHES UNIT 5, AC-
CORDING TO THE MAP
OR PLAT THEREOF RE-
CORDED IN FRANKLIN
ATOPUANGTYS RAATNDBOOK 3

d been ed aeqa dyn
serve a copy of your writ-
tdeanys teerntsheesfirwtit nblic3a0
tlon, If any, on Florida De-
fault Law Group, PL.'
Plaintiffs attorney, whose
address is 9119 Corporate
DF aS3 34,3a0n%
file e on Inal with this
Court either before service
on Plaintiffs attorney or Im-
mediately thereafter, other-
wise a default will be en-
tered against you for the
relief demanded in the
Complaint or petition.
This notice shall be ub-
Ilshed once a week for two
consechult e weeks in The

WITNESS m hand and
the seal of this Court on
this 25th day of November
2009 '
M M. Joh
Cla af Courtnson


| zzoo |
By: Terry E. Creamer
Deputy Clerk
Florida Default Law Group,
PL.
PO. Box 25018
Tampa, Florida
33622-5018
FO9100690
January7,14,2010
5250T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL
COURT IN AND FOR
FRANKLIN COUNTY
FLORIDA
RBC CENTURY BANK,
Plaintif
vs.
WRIGHT AMY E., et al.'
Defendants
CASINO.
19-2009-CA-00311
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO
AMY E. WRIGHT
A0R LLTE FM3 2
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
AMY E. WRIGHT
A0R LLTE FM 3 2
AND TO: All persons
cla ng an n rrea al
the aforesaid Defendant(s).
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
RED that andat oen to forhee

follow atdesenbedrapn
CountyFlorida:

MES8 BBALOCAKSU DISVI

OOA DEADST PE EL A
RPDPS39-406)PUFBUCNE
COUNTY FLORIDA.
has been filed against you,
and you are required to
serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, If any, to this
action, on Greenspoon
Murder, PA., Default De-
partment, Attorneys for
Plaintiff, whose address is
Trade Centre South, Sulte
700, 100 West Cypress
Creek Road, Fort Laud-
erdale, FL 33309, and the
file original with the Clerk
within 30 days after the
first publication of this no-
tice; otherwise a default
and a judgment may be
entered against you for the
relief demanded in the
Complaint.
WITNESS MY HAND AND
SEAL OF SAID COURT on
this 30th day of November,
2009.
MarclaM. Johnson,


zzoo |
Clerk of Court
By: Terry E. Creamer
As Deputy Clerk
This is an attempt to
collect a debt. Any
Information obtained will
be used for that purpose.
January 7, 14, 2010

OMECIRCUITCOURT
OF THE SECOND JUDI
CIAL CIRCUIT OF FLOR-
IDA IN AND FOR FRANK-
LIN COUNTY
SUNTRUST BANK D/B/A
SUNTRUST MORTGAGE
INC '
'
Plaintif'
vs.
WISDOM MINISTRIES.
SNUCNTRNUASSIRMRDAD '
'
INC., SUNSET BEACH
ONW ERNSKNAO NO AON
#1; UNKNOWN TENANT
#2
Defendants
CASENO.08000518CA
NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY
VENepursuantoota)Rnae
chitedeDecember se20N
08000518CA, of the Sec-
ond Judicial Circuit in and
for FRANKLIN County,
Fln UST BANKwh M
SNUC PTalMtd AWG
DOM MINISTRIES, INC.;
NASIR K. SIDDIKl;
SUNTR NSMTORTBGEAAGCE


NSN OSSNNOC O
# AC MHE DHe nOdanta
The Clerk of the Circuit
C cturt will ttobitdhe hl r
cash at 11:00 AM on Janu-
ary 26, 2010, the following
described property as set
forth in said Final Judg-
menttowit
LOT 34, SUNSET BEACH,
PHASE 2, A SUBDIVISION
AS PER MAP OR PLAT
THEREOF RECORDED IN
PLAT BOOK 6 AT PAGE
17 OF THE PUBLIC REC-
ORDS OF FRANKLIN
COUNTY FLORIDA.

Any person claiming an In-
terest in the surplus from
the sale, If any, other than
the property owner as of
the date of the Ils pendens
must file a claim within 60
days after the sale.
Dated this 15th day of De-
cember, 2009.


| stoo |
MARCIA M. JOHNSON
As Clerk of the Court
By: Michele Maxwell
As Deputy Clerk
IMPORTANT
In accordance with the
Americans with Disabilities
Act, persons needing a
reasonable accommoda-
tlantoparticipatelnthis
proceeding should, no
later than seven (7) days
prior, contact the Clerk of
the Court's disability coor-
dinator at 8506972112, PO
BOX 340, APALACHICOLA
FL, 32320. If hearing Im-
paired, contact (TDD)
8009558771 via Florida
Relay System.
Ben-Ezra & Katz, PA.
AttorneysforPlaintif
2901 Stirling Road,
Sulte300
Fort Lauderdale, Florida
33312
Telephone: (305) 770-4100
Fax: (305) 653-2329
December 31, 2009
January 7, 2010


FEIRSCECTONIDN
FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY
FLORIDA
COASTAL COMMUNITY
a f,
Vs
NATHAN DONAHOE,
Defendant.
CASE NO. 09-000224-CA
NOTICEOFSALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY
VENMpursuant to aoRn
e r d2 4e c 9

udC IdCore enSaen
for Franklin County Flor
e where the P f
COASTAL COMMUNITY
BANK, and the Defendant,
NATHAN DONAHOE, I will
sell to the highest and best
bidder, for cash, at 11:00
a.m. (Eastern Time) on the
27th day of January, 2010,
at the front steps of the
Franklin County Court-
house, Apalachicola, Flor-
Ida, the
following-described real
property as set forth in
said Final Judgment of
Foreclosure:
Lots 11 and 12, Block 2,
River Bluff Subdivision, an
unrecorded subdivision of
lands in Section 21, Town-
ship 8 South, Range 8
West, Franklin County,
Florida; said lands being
conveyed in that certain
deed from River Bluff Sub-
division, Inc., as grantor to


| zzoo |
Gerald Greenway, as
granted, dated October 20,
1972, and recorded in
Franklin County OHicial
Records Book 111 at page
293; said Lots 11 and 12,
Block 2 are more particu-
larly described as follows:
Commence at the Intersec-
tion of the line dividing
Sections27and28,Town-
ship 8 South, Range 8
West, Tallahassee Merid-
lan, and the Northerly
right-of-way line of State
Road S-384; run thence
Northwesterly along the
right-of-way line of State
Road S-384 a distance of
1,590.3 feet to the POINT
OF BEGINNING and from
said POINT OF BEGINN-
ING run North 26 degrees
50 minutes 00 seconds
East a distance of 125 feet;
thenceNorth63degrees
10 minutes 00 seconds
West a distance of 137.1
feet to Intersection with the
Easterly line of Canal
Drive; thence South 36 de-
grees 03 minutes 00 sec-
onds West a distance of
in et nm eo ertr
right-of-way of State Road
S-384; thence Southeast-
erly along said right-of-way
ne of State Rola5d S7-3tet
more or less, to the POINT
OF BEGINNING.
The successful bidder at
the sale will be required to
d ac7mtehnearrequ Ite state
the Certificate of Title.
DATED this 16th day of
December, 2009.
Hon. MARCIA JOHNSON
Clerk of the Court

Fra pn Cu Ida
Decemb 2009

5343T
F THHE_ RECCU DC
CIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY
FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
INDYMAC FEDERAL
BANK, F.S.B F/K/A
INDYMAC BANK, FS.B,
Plaintiff,
Vs
NOLAN M. LASSITER, et
al,
Defendantss.
CASE NO.
19-2008-CA-000427
NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN pursuant to a Final
Judgment of Mortgage
Foreclosure dated Decem-


zzoo |
ber 15, 2009 and entered
In Case No. 19-2008-CA-
000427 of the Circuit Court
of the SECOND Judicial
Circuit in and for FRANK-
LIN County, Florida
wherein INDYMAC FED-
ERAL BANK, FS.B F/K/A
INDYMAC BANK, ES.B., is
thePlaintiffandNOLANM.
LASSITER; MELINDAB.
LASSITER; are the Defend-
ants, I will sell to the high-
est and best bidder for
cash at FRONT DOOR OF
THE FRANKLIN COUNTY
COURTHOUSE, 33 MAR-
KET STREET APALACHI-
COLA, FLORIDA at 11:00
AM, on the 27th day of
January, 2010, the follow-
Ing described property as
set forth in said Final Judg-
ment:
LOT 51, BALD POINT
PROPERTIES, A SUBDIVI-
SION AS PER MAP OR
PLAT THEREOF RE-
CORDED IN PLAT BOOK
2, PAGE 1 OF THE PUB-
LIC RECORDS OF FRANK-
LIN COUNTY FLORIDA.
A/K/A 802 BALD POINT
ROAD, ALLIGATOR
POINT FL 32346

Aesnrsmeclaml anc
the sale, If any, other than
the property owner as of
the date of the Lls Pend-
ens must file a claim within
sixty (60) days after the
sale.
TNESSofMtYhisHAC rta
Decemberl5,2009.
MarclaM.Johnson
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By Michelle Maxwell

Fleo aD kult Law Group,
Box 25018
Tampa, Florida
05501108
January 7, 14, 2010
5344T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE SECOND JUDI-
CIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY
FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
SUNTRUST BANK,
Plaintiff,
Vs
CLYDE OLVER A/K/A
CLYDE N. OLIVER, et al,
Defendantss.
CASE NO.
19-2880-CA-148
NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN pursuant to a Final


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| 10 | 100 | 1100 ||O 1100 | 1100 | 3220| 3250| 6100 | 64
for cash, to the highest Attorneys for Plaintiff 11:00 a.m. on January 20, Sulte 3001,b
DAE ANDERSON, bidder, the contents of the PO BOX 11438 2009, the following de- Fort Lauderdale, Florida FrLaeAaahclF
GLDS ANDERSON, following storage units, on Fort Lauderdale, FL scribed property as set 33312 C 0| all85-64-740
SVETLDA~adNA NDROWN, Jutean~uary a~r 16 00 h 3339-1438 frt i saidr Fna Judg Teehoe(05)7-100mtrs e.Uue nAIO a a Ommercia
FRNLN COUNTYr public sale will be con- Telephone: (954) 564-0071 ment, to wit: Fax: (305) 653-2329 $159 Queen Pillow-top Bidn r a nryefcn
FLORDA, nd NKNON dutedat Buff oadStor 134-4333 Jnuay 7,14, 010 mattessset.Unusd i AllYou an at Apro 110 sq t. ome.Carpt, ice ard
TENANT(S), age, 1005 Bluff Road, Apa- January 7, 14, 2010 LOT 34, SUNSET BEACH sealed plastic w/ warranty. *SNOW CRABS* Available now WDIcd ml eswl
Defenants.lachicola, Florida at 9:00 PHASE 2, A SUBDIVISION 222-9879 Delivery Avall. $15.99 at UP THE CREEK Core of Hw 98 & cml$0m $0
a.m. Owner may redeem I AS PER MAP OR PLATRABASttnga5:0 onhtet dpvalow6314
CASE NO.: 09-366-CA uitecontentst pm r tC sl 38T EONYCUT HETREBOF RE60ARDEPD I every Monday In Apalachl- 850-653-9788 or 5b,4bdpe,3b
NOTICE OF SALE PUR- ONLY Bluff Road Storage IN AND FOR FRANKLIN 17 OF THE PUBLIC REC- 6 523Wtr~ 56508 b,$0 1 a1 0
SUANT TO CHAPTER 45 reserves the right to bid. COUNTY FLORIDA ORDS OF FRANKLIN Beer ae dbc
GENERAL JURISDICTION COUNTY FLORIDA. 100% Leather sofa & love.$80frbt.Laeu
NOTICE Is given pursuant Unit #44-Lin Brightly DIVISION No vinyl. Never used. Still h ble. Call
to a Final Judgment of Contents: Household Any person claiming an In- In crates. List, $2749. cs os 44
Foreclosure dated Decem- Unit #54-Jim Whittle ST GEORGE PLANTA- terest In the surplus from MECAsking $675. 425-8374, 2606
ber 15, 2009, In Case No. Contents: Household TION OWNERS ASSOCl- the sale, If any, other than can deliver Hi Fori Rpnent -~ ~ E E
09-366-CA, of the Circuit January 7, 14, 2010 ATION, INC.., a Florida not the property owner as of 310Atiues Hisor SpongeE
Court of the Second Judl- 5368T for profit corporation the date of the Ils pendens 3120 Alis &I Crafts Oyster Tongs, New, and change building, Corner Apalacicola-3br2ba
ar nc Ao IFNORTHFER CIUITCCOURT Plitfmy rh eihn6 pisrepai on8 ued tons Call .f 5-58 58&Commerce house for rent center

BANK Is the Plaintiff and Fp igplowo atCVLORIDAIO Dated this 15th day of De- 3160 Business 3cKnplowpmatsun deck, shady fncd In
DAE ANDERSON, CII IIINM. BOWIE KOTRLA, member, 2009. 310 Iimes e.Ban e n rpe yard, work shed, ample
ANA RO ARRALANSR Defendant. MACI M JHNO Coempt ts $9 78 Can deliver parking $80 ImB,$0
and FRANKLIN COUNTYr CELaLCf CASE NO. As Clerk of the Court 3200 Firewood | 61 2-30
FLORIDA are the Defend- 2008-000215-CC By: Michele Maxwell 3210 Free Pass it On
ants,alnwillbseel to tdhde hi Vs NTCOFSLPU-As Deputy Clerk e2 ardni ales 2bc, n2 bna,h2s story w/
cash atd thefot bdoor fof LD LIE;KN SUNOTIC TOF CHALPTER 4 aehs15hdyoe 3250 Goo hngst a town Apalachicola. W/D
the Franklin County Court- NTFREDYeta.cember, 2009. 3260 Health & Fitness BEAUTIFUL CHERRY * Icl, furn, orunrnAplcioa2br1a6
hueIn Apalachicola, 'eedat NOTICE IS HEREBY 3270 Jeweiry/Clothing solid wood sleigh bed & $0m.1t at eu ot rIe 75m
Franklin County, Florida at DeednsGIVEN pursuant to a Final IMPORTANT 320-Eahnl/ mattress. NEW $369. EMLYET rity dep., 850-323-0599. $0 de.Cl(8)
11:00 a.m. on January 27' CASE NO. Judgment of Foreclosure In accordance with the 320-Megic1quipment 2297 10-Hl atd6387
2010, the property set forth 192008CA000001XXXXXX dated December 14, 2009, Americans with Disabllties 3300 -Miscellaneous 4130 Employment Furnished Loft Apt, In his-
In the Final Judgment of and entered In Case No. Act, persons needing a 3310- Musicallnstmments Information toric district. Cbl/wtr Incl
Foreclosure and more par- RE-NOTICE OF SALE 2008-000215-CC of the reason bale accommoda- 3320 Plants & Shrubs 1100s high etacellings Pn-k
ticularly described as fol- PURSUANT TO CHAP- County Court In and for tlon to participate In this 330-uplersn/tevaenrncaddckCrble-3r2a
lows. ~~TER 45 Franklin County, Florida, proceeding should, no 3340 RSpourating ood 20N sk/pt.$50m.sree prh wo
LOT6,LOG EA SB werinSt Gore Pana-laerthtas thn 1rday3350 Tickets (Buy & Sell) 4130 +$750 dep. 850-653-3838 Gl.$5 o+$5 e
DIVISION (UNRECORDED) NOICE purun o HE RE- onW.I Pantiff soc t he Curt' dlsblt 97cloo@ d POSTAL &GOYT JOB 80 028r a

Comencncreat a ovuern- Judgment of foreclosure fendant, I will sell to the PO. Box 340, APALACHI- 3220 GU HWINFO FORSALE? copely rmded
men cncetemoumntdated June 23, 2008 and highest and best bidder for COLA, FL 32320. If hearing larg prvae ar $5
markn the Setoutheas orn- an Order Resetting Sale cash In Front Steps of the Impaired, contact (TDD) Panama City Lanark Village mnh20N s t
nerofSetin 0,Ton-dated December 14, 2009. Franklin County Court- 80009558771 via Florida FAIR GROUNDS Caution 1 br, 1 ba, Renovated/ fur- LaePrhs osbe
ship 5 South, Range 7 and entered In Case No. house at 33 Market Street, Relay System. Jan 9th & 10th nished end unit,ne Cal4-2607
West, Frnklinhn County 192008CA000001XXXXXX Sulte 203, Apalachicola, 5 piece bedroom set. SAT. 9-5 & SUN. 104 kitchen & bath, minimum 4
Floidaandthece unof the Circuit Court of the FL. 32320, Franklin Ben-Ezra &Katz, PA. Brand NEW In boxes. FREE PARKING You NEVER have to pay month lease $495/mo +
Norh 8 dgres 6 mn-SecndJudcil Crcit n ounyFlorida, at 11:00 Attorneys for Plaintiff $449. Can deliver Info (407) 275-7233 for Information about dep., no smoking, pet con-
0ot 89.6f dreoo P6 Ns eord Jdfo Fani Cocu nt am n e202 edalo an 2901 Stirling Road, 425-8374 flondaaunshows com federal or postal jobs. I sidered. (850) 653-3838 EatonOnheBy3b


r e-ro ING ono y IN SSE SICA aeasurbed visone as per purontecti on agecy. 85 -9-78 fie hsein e
the~ ~ ~ ~ La A aloatec CPTLAVIcSOR, LLC, coddi ltBo a wItso/osam al686041
rund PON O EIN north 05dges 6MNN Pgs36and 3ofia theg 1-77FT-HL Smnall Stuioe Ap.fo a
alG ong sad rght-fwy ONE CHALETO County,Florida. Apubliservicrae nlude al unutnilites nu-fndyspaaeL
grees 16 minutes 35 sec- KRINOWN; TENAT N. anar,200 Classifiddesiong 2529A Flord Ave., Call
tonds East S701u 600ede UNKOW TEAN NO. SIG ONnl BONUS -I $1,200M D~elBparment 850-528-076lar~
ond W h tT1338.1B7 TEONRDEESRT ESOB TGHNO SUGH e, sbch erkaxwel if yeu areeci ag y C.8woisp sso at bo tSt d o p t G ogeIlad 2b

rih-fwybudr fNMSNED OFENO PARNTA Becker &Polak hroff PA iigtehghs ult ae Frihd bCnl iwAluiie
UTILIT EASMN OVE OEN E [HTTTT Paadishecred VIllagepoou 7 ato mae ifeene nso enes iepeaeaply Ilaoo, te Cll80-5-87
ERLY CONrh0 E gR e THE EO IN wll sells toteh h s and (850)64-222 P -850 -229 -8244 850774717 fdo r a ppt. |o 617
Ainy pers 5 ond clamin anl In Fon Dord ofth FranklinRyod emn, Jr.e 6100l Business/
teregst in t ihesrpusfrom County CourEthouse 33 ut Florida. Ba #ui 7524Cmervcia nlue l tltlsUfr
e sa ef a re as a M r e teet, A p al chl J an ar 7 ,14 2 10 ml al
theASOIAIN dateU-DAE hi 9a of th Is ndcoae FL330I ranli 610Cotowhoue I2C &ld 3 br unit avall. 2
tens, mu Susfle a cam am onte2th a of 5396 0150 -oo mae N Wseantd Carbel.Ful urihd, Crrble c.Boho
withins xt (6 0 dayu s afte Jaur 1,te flo IN T E CRC I O R 6160ry -00 Rooms f oevr Reint aiad crot!M s Llt. 673 8
the ~ ~ ~ KNW sale.T Ing decie rprya FTESCNDJD--ufTwHtl e oaprcae 70L---- -.
209 Fna Judgent to-wt: IDAt INKOW ANDAN FOR FRANK EOE, Drug Fre Workplac 620 actioentas wr&alut.$30eca.Rlynce2b wh
LINnc COUNT Minimu of 6mo. lease re- whipol at, qie
MARCe 3 IA u M. JH SON- LORT 43, BLOCKIN 10- quired. Callu 850697324 neghohod Unfur-OAGRA ENFT PCAE!
Cerk o the Circuit Cout (WET) STGERG IS SUTRSTB BAENKe D/B/ nised $550 mo 1stkwh &s lastat butSu
By ihel Maxwel LAN GULF- ERST BEACOUHE, SNRS OTAE orn e.6349
puty AS ERMA OR PLAINT Plainutiffr
rvin B.Bwdn erHTREOOFOREORD 17V vs.e&P 6120Agiigtehihs uaiycr, uns
OFME THENN PULI RC
Was ort & N Bodn' ORDSney OFr FRANKLIN WIDO MIISRIS ar ; Carrabelle, Largen MH. 2ota xr ie ptis
PA. ES COUNT FLOIDA INC.; NStIR PK. SIDDIKI b 2oain bae w/batflve
1300 Thoasoo Drive, SUNTRUS MOTGG ofk rier deckenc newlye' ie pes ply lcri n
UTLTalaase Foia20 ANYMEN PERSO CLAIMING INC.; g SUSiET BEC eoae /cre n
Janury? 14 200 A INTEREST IN THE ONR SOITO, i.t O ItainfrS RN 0 0Iln h 60m 30dp
5357 SURPLUS FRO THEIO INC.; NNW TENANT *eh $16 dtwk, elec, Satelle 1-28

86509 FLORIDEAS 324-23209H S OSTAT OFE THE LI PENDENSos 850-653-5114
ERLY~ ~ ~ ~ ITI 60NE DAYSEO AFTER 229P80-2-24 SAE85-7-17frp
GIVENI thatel t the under-t FOECOURSL
in~~~~~~bs buies ne tefct-A ericans with Diabilties NOTICE48 IS HRBY2b b oie oe
tloupeso n laime of FOGO- Acot Dof 1990 pe rsonslned GIVEoN pusun tomaFnal St. Georg Carble $600. o$300
TEN COST USE AND Inglu special acomoa Juordgmn of# 0 FoecosreIlad ep Ufrn 95 o
OUTOFPRNT OOSintlo Sto paticpate n his dated Deeme 14,c 209 eo ea etfe urigAssan r a br aelte pstcS. m2255
th out o rnki, npocedngy should, conactandentredin aseNo
the CaItay, of paahiclh Cek ththe Court r not 00518CA ofteCrui na er SIutlIc.12x5 ek
Floridat 32320, Intsends tor later than fivemen buies Cuto h eodJul 20w,806351
giste thle sai n rp ah don~sty, elr taatn11np 0 Ner it5 C untandalo NUFning Assistants. help caefo hsial o enal il njrddsbld r n


Florida this 29th days of De-AE at Aplahcoa SIDD UI T S OUNRUT fepnil ortkn aietstmeatrplerte eprto rae orbood Carrabelleat ln arget! dek 10 -Hoe
cember, 2009 Flourida, on Deemer 21 OTGGIC. U-$60m.$60dp.Aal 70 pe o
Janar 7,crbe 2010rt 2009 SET BEACHOWNER ASI 6 -plS~e abll om/ot e now alfra appteit $711 ah oe

PUBLC S LE se Clerk, I C airc Court ar e theL Defendat s MAFR- 10q aiyfrth tt x m T et ocuss o hstanig(6 lc hour es) are -etl m0th Inlme nech nas

By:CI Micel Mawll CAM.JHSO sTh 10 oil oesLt
P~eee r~ar~aF A euyCekClerk of the Circuit Court (Wailabl onl atRG the Gulf/Fankli Center Th oelcur lse reofrda ybi ao I71. aes
By lufRadStrae Mawll sell PA. pfgrm SUso a-of-ro.
Deputy~~02 0lr -S TimeshareAT lantf


e as *
-
* *





- o e *

. o o ^





a . o . o



A 4
.


3 br 2 ba, DW 1600 sq. ft.
with utility room, fireplace
an u zl, secludedroon 7100

public beach, between Wewa 109 Maddox DE 2
Carrabelle & Apalachicola. br 1 ba. NC Log Home
Newly Renovated, $575 100x100, refrig, W/D,
mo, neg. 1st & sec. Call CH&A. $49,900 OBO Call
954-816-7004 850-234-4915 or 785-7255




Rest Estate.
Janalyn Dowden
108S.E.Ave.A
Carrabelle, Florida 32322.
www.seac-estre.com
2 BR 1 B Mobile Hol le
Unfurnished, large lot ...................... $575.00
2 BR 1 B Duplex
Remodeled, Fenced Be ck Yard ... ... $600.00
3 BR 1 B End Unit Apt
Fr nt 3& Bacokn rch, u furnished ..... $525.00
Unfurnished Pool.... ...................... $750.00
7BOR .BaB hore Dr. Eastpoint ......... $750.00
3 BR 3 B Condo
Furnished Pool......... .................$500.00 wk

u RishEe nah ArtP... ...................... $525.00
1 BR Interior Apt
Furnished Redecorated ................... $500.00
Bf r1i h Apt......... ...................... $500.00
3 BR 1 B Apt
Furnished Redecorated ................... $500.00
2 BR 1 B Apt
Furnished (3 Day Min) ..............$650.00 wk
2 BR 1 B Water Frort House
Bea i ous i er ra9t00.00

PLEASE AL 7-9604
OR 850-323-0444 FOR RENTALS.


FOr more information about GCCC's Certihed Nursing Assistant program, visit
www.gulfcoast.edu or call Craig at 850.913.3311.


COmplete any of these programs in one year or less:
Central Service Technology

Dental Assistant

Emergency Medical Technician
Paramedic(forlicensedEMTsonly)

SurgicalTechnology
.ilenSed Practical Nurse (only available at GFC*)

Certified Nursing Assistant (only available at GFC*)

. . .C.. .00 C 8 v q ra a n

All the programs listed above are limited access. Request an information packet today.
Visit www.gulfcoast.edu or contact Craig Wise at 850.913.3311.

*Gulf/Franklin Center (GFC) is located in Port St. Joe, Florida. Call 850.227.9670for more information.





Apalachicola Carrabelle Eastpoint S.George Island
22 Avenue E 612 NAvenue A 5 Jefferson Street 1200 Franklin Blvd
653-8805 697-4500 670-8501 927-2561


-
* Traditional

MBR"In I i
P *

* Digital X-rays


I p ZZc


By David Adlerstein
Times City Editor
The Franklin County varsity boys bas-
ketball team split its two games at the
William Henry Shaw Christmas tourna-
ment in Columbus, Ga., last week, paced
by a sizzling hot performance by sopho-
more post player Carlos Morris.
Morris scored 40 points, including sev-
en three-pointers, in the Seahawks' first
game against Columbus (Ga.) Hardaway
on Dec. 29, which ended with Franklin
County falling 78-74.
The Seahawks were up 72-71 with 1:12
left in the game, but two big turnovers
in the end spelled defeat and a bounce
down to the losers' bracket.
"This is the fourth game in two years
where we blew the lead with a minute
left on the clock," said coach Fred Drake.
"That came down to not having that third
ball-handler."
The team has lost the point guard
prowess of senior Arron Prince, who did
not make the tourney trip to Georgia, his
fourth-consecutive missed games. Drake
said he has heard Prince intends to leave
the team for personal reasons.
Despite a revamped lineup, in which
juniors Marcus Allen, Dalin Modican
and Adam Joseph are supporting Morris
and senior Austin O'Neal, the Seahawks
played Hardaway tough, trailing 60-58 af-
ter three quarters.
Morris hit four treys among his 18
points in the third quarter, but it wasn't
enough to overcome Hardaway's advan-
tages in size and strength.
"He basically wowed some heads in
the third quarter," said Drake. "He got to
the point he had some of their fans root-
ing for him. They were just amazed at
how well he was shooting the ball. It was
by far his best game of the season.
"The coaches love him. They were
amazed at how well he shot the ball," he
said.
O'Neal added 14 points, Joseph
eight, Allen six, Modican four and ju-
mor Michael Turner two against Hard-
away.
"Hardaway was better than adver-
tised, better than what the film showed,"


said Drake. "Their post players, at 6' 5"
and 6' 6", were aggressive, physical and
just dominant. I told the kids when we
were watching (film on) the team, 'If we
don't box out and rebound, we're going to
be in for a long night.'"
"We definitely represented well," said
Drake. "Central won the whole tourna-
ment, and Hardaway is just having that
Cinderella year. The game came down to
the wire; both teams deserved to win, but
you can only have one winner.
"They're not hanging their heads;
they played some good guys," said the
coach. "It was by far the best game of the
tournament. People were asking where
we're from."
In the Seahawks game the next day
against Columbus High School, O'Neal
joined Morris in pacing the team with 23
points apiece, as the Seahawks posted a
55-52 win.
"We had a few calls go our way, and
their coach got a technical foul in the
fourth quarter," said Drake. "Later, an
intentional foul call brought Carlos to
the line and hit them, and we got the ball
back. That's a big swing."
In all, Morris hit 10-of-14 free throws
for the game, in keeping with the entire
team's much improved average from the
charity stripe.
"That's at least one bug we got worked
out; we're shooting free throws well,"
said Drake.
Modican added seven points and
James Winfield two in the win.
Drake remains on the lookout for a
replacement to Prince. He's looking at
Allen and sophomore Trekale 'Ibrrell at
point guard and sizing up junior varsity
prospects as the Seahawks eye two away
district games, Saturday at Port St. Joe
and Tuesday at West Gadsden.
"It's like we're having point guard try-
outs," he said.
Dec. 29 in Columbus, Ga., vs. Hardaway
Franklin Co. 19 16 23 16 74
Hardaway 17 20 23 18 78

Dec. 30 in Columbus, Ga., vs. Columbus
Franklin Co. 10 12 10 23 55
Columbus 10 10 13 19 52


DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times
Arguing for adoption of the new athletic handbook in November were, from left,
Principal George Oehlert, Athletic Director Mike Todd and Dean Eddie Joseph.

dS *

tO



new at etic an oo


By David Adler stein
Times City Editor
The Franklin County
School Board will consider
a newly drafted seven-
page athletic handbook
at its regular meeting,
tonight, Jan. 7, complete
with a tougher clause that
could keep middle and high
school students from tak-
ing part in sports due to a
disciplinary action,
If approved as drafted,
the handbook would pre-
vent students who have a
Class III or IV infraction,
along with an out-of-school
suspension, from partici-
pating in a team sport.
This would include all
playoff games and would
keep students from start-
ing a subsequent sport un-
til the sport in which they
have been suspended from
has completed its season.
The new rules cover ev-
erything from dress code to
sportsmanship and apply
to all athletics, although not
other extracurricular activi-
ties. They could go into effect
immediately or next school
year, depending on the wish-
es of the school board.
The new handbook re-
ceived a strong vote of en-
dorsement from Principal
George Oehlert, Dean Eddie
JosephandAthleticDirector
Mike Todd back in Novem-
ber, but the board decided
to wait until January to con-
sider the rule change.
The educators said the
new handbook had been


long in the making, includ-
ed input from coaches, and
was needed to provide a
written consistency across
sports for the rules and
responsibilities of being a
student athlete.
"We felt there was a
need for it. It wasn't just a
haphazard thing," Joseph
told the school board.
"There are certain
things that athletes have
to follow," he said. "You are
what they call a 'student
athlete.' You are two peo-
ple. If people don't intend to
follow that, I don't see how
they can expect to be part
of the program."
As it stands now, the
handbook calls for a mini-
mum 2.0 grade point aver-
age, in line with the Florida
High School Athletic As-
sociation, although there
has been talk of raising that
minimum on the local level.
"A student-athlete
should be an example to
others if they're going to be
looked on as getting privi-
leges,"saidSuperintendent
Nina Marks last week. "We
should hold them account-
able for doing a little more.
"These are students
who want scholarships,"
she said. "Well, you're not
going to get a scholarship
with a 2.0. We need to push
them. The vast majority
want scholarships to go to
colleges to continue to play
the sports they love."
Marks said she would not
support a sudden increase
in the minimum grade point


average but backed a grad-
ual hike. "I think we have
to gradually do something;
start with a 2.2 and move up,
maybe semester by semes-
ter," she said. "I don't think
it's anything we should just
jump into."
Because some Class
III violations, such as use
of a cell phone, fall short
of being seriously harmful
infractions, some school
board members, including
Chairman Jimmy Gander,
questioned whether they
should be included. Oehlert
stressed that the violation
would have to be serious
enough to warrant an out-
of-school suspension to ef-
feet student athletes.
"A lot of things in Class
III are avoidable; it's a mat-
ter of choice," said Marks.
"There are a lot of people
on campus who go the extra
mile, and there should be
respect. Quite a few people
in our communities work
volunteer hours, and every
one of these people who
work to make their lives
better deserve respect.
"Poor choices and bad
attitudes are things that
are easy enough to turn
around," she said.
Marks also said she sup-
ported expanding the ath-
letic handbook to encom-
pass all extracurricular
activities.
"The handbook is their
way of getting that started,"
she said. "I think by next
fall, other things are going
to fall into place, also."


CA RRA BE L LE APA LA CH ICO LA


OJF


Junior James Winfield has been rebounding well and playing strong
defense for the Seahawks. "He's playing more aggressive than some
of the other post players," said Coach Fred Drake. "He wants to make
rebounding his specialty. He just needs to do his role."





Our local real estate experts
have identified what they feel
are the best values around and
are offering them to you in Real
Estate Picks! (In this section),
Discover the best real estate
values in Mexico Beach, Port St.
Joe, Apalachicola, Cape San Blas,
St. George Island, Carrabelle
and surrounding areas.


Thursday, January 7, 2010


Sheriff's

R EPOR T


pp T efollowmg r paonr in
County Sheriff's Office.
Arrests are made by of-
ficers from the following
city, county and state law
enforcement agencies:
Apalachicola (APD), Car-
rabelle (CPD) Florida
Highway Patrol (FHP)
Franklin County Sheriff's
Office (FCSO) Florida
Fish and Wildlife Con-
servation Commission
(FWC), Florida Depart-
ment of Environmental
Protection (FDEP), Flor-
ida Division of Insurance
Fraud (DIF), and Florida
Department of Agricul-
ture and Consumer Ser-
vices (FLDOACS).
All defendants are con-
sidered innocent until
proven guilty in a court of
law.

SE* 2
Anthony J. Graham, 49,
Apalachicola, two counts
of sale or possession of a
controlled substance with-
in 1,000 feet of a church
<=so>.

Dec. 30

2 Shanese J. P1ritedha d,
6, rg ,
production of contraband
into a correctional facility
(FCSO).
Richard Duncan, 30,
Apalachicola, cruelty to
animals (FCSO).

Dec. 31
Aaron Brannan, 24, Car-
rabelle, possession of more
than 20 grams of cannabis
(CPD)'

CH*
Robert J. Register, 23,
Eastpoint, public affray
(FCSO).
Robert New, 35, East-
point, battery, public af-
fray and criminal mischief
(FCSO).
JimmyL.Lolley,19,Bris-
tol, public affray (FCSO).
Stephanie D. Adkison,
40, Eastpoint, disorderly in-
toxication (FCSO).

*
Axson R. Cooper Jr.,
53, Apalachicola, resisting
arrest without violence
(FCSO).


Local


GRANT from page 1
basically utilized to teach and dis-
play boat repair and outboard mo-
tor repair.
"We're trying to work with
Franklin County Schools and
Gulf Coast Community College
to set up certification to help
teach what will keep the industry
going," she said.
Webb said the contract likely
will include terms in which the
museum will front the funds to
renovate the building, which
needs a new roof, although most
of the rafters are in good shape;
flooring repair; new restroom
facilities; window replacement;
and dock repair in the back.
"The plan is to leave the ex-
terior with the rusty tin," said
Webb. Originally built as a sea-
food warehouse in 1935, the site
was an outboard repair shop, run
by Junior Abercrombie, before it
was shuttered several years ago.
"Traditional working water-
fronts play an important role in
the cultural and economic fabric
of Florida's coastal communi-
ties," said Department of Com-
munity Affairs Secretary Tom
Pelham. "I congratulate the city
of Apalachicola for receiving this
grant to protect a piece of its her-
itage and provide a much-needed


"4palachicola is well-known for its rich
.
COWWBTCZt! dling heritage, and eywe do not
.
pTOtect and pirserve our maritime industry,
We Will1086 ftJOTBUCT.x

Jimmy PatronlS
state representative


funding during the Stan Mayfield
Working Waterfronts Program's
inaugural grant application cycle
in 2008. The other two projects
are the Sebastian Working Wa-
terfronts Collaborative and Blue
Crab Cove in Brevard County.
In 2009, the Florida Forever
program was not funded by the
state legislature.
"Apalachicola is well-known
for its rich commercial fishing
heritage, and if we do not pro-
tect and preserve our maritime
industry, we will lose it forever,"
said Rep. Jimmy Patronis. "I am
grateful the Department of Com-
munity Affairs recognized the
community with a Stan Mayfield
Working Waterfront grant, there-
by ensuring future generations
continue to preserve Apalachic-
ola's rich traditions."
Florida Communities Trust
serves as part of the Depart-
ment of Community Affairs' mis-
sion to help meet the needs of
Floridians by investing in com-
munities and working with them
to plan and manage growth. For
more information about Florida
Communities Trust or the Stan
Mayfield Working Waterfronts
Program, visit www.dca.state.
fl.us.


service to the community."
The opening of this shop will
provide commercial fishermen
and seafood harvesters with ac-
cess to repair facilities currently
unavailable in the community
and train student-workers in the
craft of historic boat building and
restoration.
"Being raised in the Panhan-
dle commercial fishing indus-
try, it certainly is gratifying to
see that Apalachicola is moving
forward to ensure that working
waterfronts are preserved for
future generations. This grant
program is just one of many
examples of what a tireless ad-
vocate Rep. Stan Mayfield was
for our state," said Rep. Debbie
Mayfield. "This was a priority
for Stan, and he put a lot of ef-
fort into making it a reality. The


Apalachicola project, together
with those in Sebastian and Bre-
vard, will serve to keep the trade
of the commercial fishing indus-
try and the legacy of Florida's
traditional working waterfronts
alive and prosperous."
The Stan Mayfield Working
Waterfronts Florida Forever
Grant Program makes $7.5 mil-
lion in Florida Forever funds
available to local communities
through a competitive grant ap-
plication process. These grants
are used to purchase land that
facilitates commercial fishing
or aquaculture or that promotes
and educates the public about the
economic, cultural and historical
heritage of Florida's traditional
working waterfronts.
Apalachicola Boat Works is
one of three projects awarded


*
Trio

THierBRZlOnale

to perform Sunday
1 III
at SC CWe

The Ilse Newell And for the Per-
forming Arts concert series will pres-
ent its second concert of the 2009-10
season on Sunday, Jan. 10, at 4 p.m.
in the sanctuary of Trinity Episcopal
Church.
Featured will be Trio Internazio-
nale, featuring Martha Gherardi on
violin; her husband, Luciano, on bass;
and Bedford Watkins on piano.
The theme for this year's concert
is "Music Featured in Movies." The
program will include some music com-
posed specifically for movies, as well
as classical selections that have been
used in movies.
Chopin, Grieg, Joplin, Strauss,
Puccini and Mozart are a few of the
composers whose works will be per-
formed.
The Ilse Newell Fund is funded pri-
marily by the generous contributions
of committed sponsors, patrons, as-
sociates and friends. A suggested do-
nation of $3 is asked of concertgoers
to support the series, administered
by The Apalachicola Area Histori-
cal Society, a not-for-profit organiza-
tion dedicated to preserving the rich
history of Apalachicola and the sur-
rounding area.


that waste treatment should
be accomplished through
pods and improved individual
septic systems.
Many residents said they
feared the availability of a
central system would lead to
increased construction den-
sity on the barrier island.
Seth Blitch, director of the
Apalachicola National Es-
tuarine Research Reserve
(ANERR) strongly favored
groundwater testing prior to
the construction of a central
treatment plant and volun-
teered his staff at ANERR to
help with sampling.
But, he said this week, no
testing was done this sum-
mer because no contamina-
tion was detected in water
samples collected on the is-
land during regular health
department testing. Because
the samples were free of con-
tamination, there was no way
to trace pollutants back to
their source.
Earlier this year, a number
of experts collaborated to de-
sign tests to investigate the
source of groundwater con-
tamination on the island. AN-
ERR worked with the Florida
Department of Environmen-
tal Protection, county health
department, Florida Depart-


ment of Agriculture and Con-
sumer Services, and private
individuals including Newt
Colston, who explored the
possibility bird droppings
might contaminate water
samples to design ground-
water tests.
"We had a pretty decent
plan in terms of where we
would sample and what tests
we would do," Blitch said. "We
were going to test water qual-
ity and even do some DNA
prof iling."
Jason Flowers, environ-
mental manager for the
county health department,
said the protocol for testing
and the sample sites had not
changed when samples came
back clean throughout the
summer.
During summer 2008, the
county health department is-
sued dozens of beach adviso-
ries for the island after high
levels of fecal coliform bac-
teria or enterococcus were
detected in Gulf water at four
testing sites on public beach-
es.
"We tested right where
people are swimming. I don't
know why we had no prob-
lems, but I am glad," said
Flowers.
Blitch said he allocated


funds for the groundwater
testing from a grant to AN-
ERR by the Gulf of Mexico
Alliance, a partnership of the
states of Alabama, Florida,
Louisiana, Mississippi and
Texas that seeks to enhance
the ecological and economic
health of the Gulf.
He said that because no
testing was performed this
summer, the money had to be
reallocated to other projects.
"I really think if there's a
detectable problem, we need
to do testing to understand it."
"What will happen next
year is funding-dependent,"
Blitch said, but he believes
support from the alliance will
be available next season.
In a letter to the PSC with-
drawing his request for vari-
ance, Brown, continuing to
argue for the plant, wrote,
"The inconvenient truth is
that, many, if not most, of the
on-site wastewater treatment
systems in the commercial
area simply cannot meet cur-
rent state health standards
because the water table is too
high and the soils are inad-
equate for disposal."
Nevertheless, he did agree
to end his plans for a water
treatment facility, at least for
the time being.


BEACH FRONT ON ST. GEORGE ISLAND
Don't drive all the way here and stop across the street from
the beach. Buy a place right on the beach for the same
price as being across the street from the beach! Charming
3 Bedroom 2 Bath Beach House right on the Beach. Tile
Floors. Large Exposed Beams. Cute Beachfront Patio.
Open living/ <.1.1.... Isole l. area.


John Shelby, Broke


. 's
St.Georgelsland '
Realty


Al 0 1 The Times


SE WE R from paae 1


ALWAYS ONLINE


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Call oda*




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