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Group Title: Apalachicola times
Title: The Apalachicola times
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100380/00056
 Material Information
Title: The Apalachicola times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: H.W. Johnston
Place of Publication: Apalachicola Fla
Apalachicola Fla
Publication Date: December 10, 2009
Copyright Date: 2008
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1885.
General Note: Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00100380
Volume ID: VID00056
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 32911693
lccn - sn 95026907
 Related Items
Preceded by: Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by: Apalachicola herald

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Photos by DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times
James Jones, left, and Willie Gene Dasher listen at the oyster rule workshop.



oyster men face more ha r vest r estr actions


.


I


YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER FOR MORE THAN 120 YEARS


VOL. 124 ISSUE 33


By Lois Swoboda
Times Staff Writer
A poor housing market has temporarily
halted operations at Carrabelle's Green-
Steel Homes manufacturing facility, leav-
ing workers unemployed with Christmas
approaching.
On Nov. 20, Hexaport Building Systems
of Florida, owner of the GreenSteel fac-
tory, filed a voluntary petition for Chapter
11 reorganization in the Northern Florida
District of the U.S. Bankruptcy Court.
Chapter 11 allows individuals or com-
panies facing bankruptcy to reorganize
their finances and in most instances, con-
tinue to run the business under the super-
vision of the court. Creditors are ordered
to cease attempts to collect debt until the
reorganization is complete.
A debtor then may "emerge" from


Chapter 11 through the use of a bankrupt-
cy plan. Tony Attalla, owner of Hexaport,
said he is in the process of creating such a
plan to bring before the court. He and his
Tallahassee attorney, Robert Bruner, have
until March 22, 2010, to present the reor-
ganization plan.
Attalla appeared before the Carrabelle
city commission Dec. 3 to discuss the com-
pany's financial situation. He told commis-
sioners that while he continues to employ
a few workers with his own money, the as-
sembly line at the factory is shut down. He
said all employees' wages have been paid
up to date.
The commission agreed to refrain from
taking any action regarding Hexaport for
at least 30 days.
"Currently we only have one house
See GREENSTEEL AS


--
S


~i~Ba,


LOIS SWOBODA | The Times


Former partner


DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times
Gen. Jim Livingston addresses
the American Legion Veterans
Appreciation dinner.


'Don't



give up

Medal of Honor

recipient urges vets
10 d 8 8 nd SO CF } I Ce
By David Adlerstein
Times City Editor

tio nhleit rp nesi nttO:=
any Republican by name, one of the
nation's 92 living Medal of Honor
recipients served up a sharp cri-
tique of the nation's direction last
week at a veterans appreciation
dinner at the Fort Coombs Armory
in Apalachicola.
Speaking at the Dec. 3 dinner
hosted by American Legion Post
106, retired Marine Corps Maj. Gen.
James Livingston urged veterans
to defend the sacrifices they have
made for the country by standing
up to present-day social and politi-
cal changes.
"That sacrifice you made, don't
turn it over to Washington," he said
with a soft Southern drawl."We have
to redefine ourselves; we have to re-
commitourselves.Thisisadefining
point in our country's history."
Early on in his remarks, af-
ter thanking many local veterans
for their years of community ser-
vice, Livingston signaled that he
wouldn't be walking a fine line and
shying away from partisan subject
matter in his remarks.
"I'm not happy to be political,"
he said. "But I can be doggone po-
litical."
Livingston, who received the
nation's highest military decoration
See VETS AS


By Dayjd Aderstejn
Times City Editor
No sooner have federal regulators
backed off a plan to ban raw oyster sales
during summer months than Gulf of Mex-
ico oyster harvesters and processors now
face a series of new rules that will affect
their livelihoods during those same sum-
mer months.
Speaking before an unhappy but po-
lite oyster industry audience Dec. 2 in the
courthouse annex, David Heil, the state's
chief aquaculture regulator of the oyster
industry, outlined a series of rule changes
now on the table.
If enacted into law next year before the
May 1 start of the summer season, the new
rules will mean harvesters who do not
have on-board cooling systems can work
on the bay only between sunrise and 10:45
a.m. between May and October.
In addition, processors will be required
to drive down the internal temperature of
shellstock oyster to 55 degrees Fahrenheit
within eight hours of the moment the har-
vester removes his first oyster from the
water and starts a new bag.
Heil stressed that the new rules are a
work in progress, still subject to final ap-
proval by state officials, and have nothing
to do with the recent Food and Drug Ad-
ministration actions to mandate, and then


reduced by 60 percent, was not met, with
the four reporting states, Florida, Texas,
Louisiana and Alabama, instead achieving
a 35.2 percent illness reduction rate.
As a result, Heil said, Gulf states have
agreed to put into place additional regula-
tory controls by May 2010, based on a time-
temperature modeling tool developed by
the FDA. The modeling tool gives states
leeway in devising plans, which may in-
clude anything from shutting down the en-
tire bay for several weeks to cutting back
hours or mandating on-board cooling sys-
tems.
"If we don't meet it (the illness reduc-
tion rate), we're going to come back and
tighten the regulations," he said.

'Thebi est irritation
I V6 OVer brought'
Whatever Florida eventually decides,
members of the local industry voiced their
widespread displeasure with the proposal.
uThis is a disaster," one man said, echo-
ing the sentiments of the audience. "This
is going to destroy Franklin County. It's go-
ing to destroy a lot of places."
Heil was questioned on several details
of the plan, with the veteran regulator

See RULES A6


' '


postpone, post-harvest processing of raw
half-shell oysters from May to October.
Instead, the rules are prompted by con-
ditions of the National Shellfish Sanitation
Program, which had mandated five goals
to be met by this year. One of the goals, that
the rate of Vibrio vulnificus illnesses be


Phone: 850-227-1845


DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK:
it'. ?'::-:'1-11"..
LegalAds-Fridaysilla.m
ClassifiedDisplayAds-Fridayai11a.m.
Classified Line Ads Monday at 5 p.m.


Letters to the Editor ... ........ A4


Sheriff's Report. .......... ... B4


Apa lachicola


06alWay In' 0 hit, hi


NEW RULES, MORE WORRIES


DAVID HEIL


TABLE OF CONTENTS


~FREEDOM


0




























FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF
Tobacco Free
HEALT Florida
.COm




Franklin County Health Department '

H1N1 Influenza (Swine Flu) Update p


Clinic Location: 155 Avenue E, Apalachicola, FI 32320
Clinic Location: 106 NE 5th Street, Carrabelle, FL 32322
WHO WE WILL VACCINATE: The Franklin County Health Department is
offering the 2009 H1N1 Influenza (Swine Flu) vaccinations as long as supplies
permit at two locations: Apalachicola and Carrabelle. Clinics are on a walk-in basis
no appointment necessary. The vaccine is free of charge. You do not need to
bring any documentation with you. We are currently offering the vaccine to:
Pregnant women
Children 6 months through 24 years
Household contacts & caregivers for infants less than 6 months of age
Healthcare workers & emergency personnel with direct patient contact
People with chronic health conditions ages 25 to 64 years
Beginning November 30, 2009, H1N1 Vaccine will be available to the general
public during regular clinic hours.
LOCATION: Franklin County Health Department
155 Avenue E, Apalachicola, FL 32320
CLINIC DATES/HOURS:
o Regular Clinic Hours are Monday-Friday, 9:00 A.M. 4:00 RM.
o A Special H1N1 Clinic will be offered on Saturday, December 5th
from 8 A.M. 12 RM.
LOCATION: Franklin County Health Department
106 NE 5th Street, Carrabelle, FL 32322
CLINIC DATES/HOURS:
o Regular Clinic Hours are Monday-Thursday, 9:00 A.M. 4:00 RM.
and Friday 9:00 A.M. 12 R M.
o A Special H1N1 Clinic will be offered in Carrabelle on Friday,
December 11th from 1 RM. 4 RM.
CONTACT INFO: For more information about the clinics, call 850-653-2111 or
697-4121.
Dates for vaccination clinics to provide the second dose of H1N1 in the


Franklin County School District will be announced in the near future.


Thursday, December 10, 2009


AS2 I The Times





find us on facebook !
"Become a fan and get our
12 lays of Christmas daKy special
or caK us!
Starting friday, 'December 11 Christmas'Eve











www.persnicketystyle.com
PORT ST. JOE
229 REID AVE.

(850) 227-7194
APALACHICOIA
85 MARKET ST.

(850) 653-1900


Thursday, December 10, 2009


Local


The Times | A3


Foot clinic hosts annual holiday shoe drive
The Coastal Foot and Ankle Clinic is hosting its ninth annual
shoe drive. Dr. Tamara Marsh said folks can drop off shoes that
are in reasonable condition at her podiatry office at 221 Ave. E in
Apalachicola.
There is a bin in the lobby and outside if the office is closed.
Drop off shoes anytime between Thanksgiving and Christmas.
For more information, call the clinic at 653-3338.

Community Garden hosts holiday photo contest
The City Square Community Garden is hosting a Holidays in
the Garden and Nature photography contest.
Photos must use plant life, such as foliage, flowering plants,
vegetables or fruits, to express a holiday sentiment, or a general
garden landscape.
Photos may address any recognized holiday that falls between
Oct. 1 and Jan. 20. Submission must be made between Jan. 2 and
8 at the Apalachicola Bay Chamber of Commerce, 122 Commerce
St. in Apalachicola.
Judging will take place Monday, Jan. 18. For details, visit the
City Square Community Garden Facebook page.

LanarkVillageAssociationelectsnewboard
On Monday night, the Lanark Village Association held annual
elections for the governing board. Carl Updike will continue
as chairman. Kathy Swaggerty is secretary, and Dot Bless is
treasurer. At-large governors are Carole Daddona, Jim Mills,
Joann Bleimeyer and Harriett Beach.

Parrish to remain commission chairman
On Nov. 17, the county commission held its annual election to
appoint a chairman and vice chairman.
The board voted unanimously to keep Smokey Parrish as
chairman for a second term. Commissioner Noah Lockley will
replace Commissioner Bevin Putnal as vice chairman.

NOW Speed limits on Alligator Drive
On Dec. 1, the county commission voted unanimously to
approve the following changes to the speed limit along Alligator
Drive. The limit will be lowered to 45 miles per hour from the cell
tower to Bald Point Road.
The speed limit will be lowered to 35 mph from Bald Point
Road to the end of Alligator Drive. The speed limit will be
lowered to 25 mph at the following addresses on Alligator Drive
to accommodate crosswalks and children at play: 1421 Alligator
Drive, 1380 Alligator Drive, 1648 Alligator Drive, and from 1561 to
1600 Alligator Drive.




m II m
" *
www.a pa la c hf l mes.com


County Commissioner Bevin Putnal DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times




05tpoint cemetery wants


h db
tetapturne acon


By Lois Swoboda
Times Staff Writer
The water supply to Eastpoint
Cemetery has been cut off, and
the county commission wants to
know why.
At the past two county com-
mission meetings, the topic of
water for the Eastpoint Cem-
etery has been discussed.
At the Dec. 1 meeting, Com-
missioner Bevin Putnal asked
County Planner Alan Pierce
to write a letter to the East-
point Water and Sewer District
requesting that the water be
turned back on.
Putnal said he believed the
water had been shut off after a
water main running under Ave-
nue A was damaged. He said he
thought the water company did
not wish to fix the damage.
Pierce said he believed all
other county cemeteries re-
ceived free water.
Putnal said he planned to at-
tend the next Eastpoint Water
and Sewer board meeting.
"The water was not cut off


due to damage to a pipe run-
ning under the road," said Hank
Garrett, the water and sewer
district's field manager, in a later
interview. "It's true a force main
running under Avenue A broke,
and we had to close off Otter
Slide Road in the middle of the
night and fix it, but that's not
why the water to the cemetery is
shut off."
Garrett said his company
originally supplied the cemetery
with free water but because of
numerous leaks, decided to shut
the water off.
"We just didn't have anybody
who would be responsible for
the bill at the cemetery," he said.
"And the leaks were not being
reported in a timely fashion."
He said one leak resulted in
the loss of more than 100,000
gallons of water. "The problem
is that the water system within
the cemetery is piecemeal and
has some inherent problems as
a result," Garrett said.
He said people often ran
over some of the many spigots
and pipes running through the


cemetery, or broke underground
pipes, before driving away with-
out reporting the damage.
Cindy Summerhill, treasur-
er for the Eastpoint Cemetery
Board, said earlier this week
that the water has been shut off
foratleastayear.
"There was no leak that big,"
she said. "We paid the only bill
we received, and it was for about
$60. They never turned the water
back on. Every water system in
the county supplies the cemeter-
ies with free service. We can't af-
ford to pay a monthly bill. If they
would let us know there is a leak,
we'll fix it."
Garrett agreed the $60 bill had
been paid but stressed that "the
problem is that nobody is willing
to sign a service agreement. No-
body wants to be responsible for
leaks and damage."
In a later interview, Pierce
said, "Common sense would be
to disconnect the piecemeal sys-
tem and just set up one or two
spigots on the edge of the cem-
etery. People could carry water
in buckets or bring a hose."


News BRIEFS

















We had communists, but whom do today's kids fear?


* 'Y


SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
This symbol told everyone
where to find shelter in the
event of a nuclear blast'
communists; I was afraid of
annihilation.
When I was really little, I had
heard Mama refer to folksinger
Burl Ives as a Red. That didn't
quite jive with my Nana's
description of him. He frequently
visited Marsh Harbor, Abaco,
and stayed aboard his sailboat,
the Nippy Dunbar, in the same
marina as Nana and Papa. The
thought of him didn't frighten me
and neither did Life magazine,
which Mama also said was a
communist publication. I liked


Thursday, December 10, 2009


A4 | The Times


A meeting at school
and a recent young
adult novel have revived
long-ago memories and
paranoia I would just as
soon forget.
During a teacher
planning day in October' RE
we received training
designed by Homeland AN
Security on formulating De
and implementing
emergency and crisis response
plans. This was not about
diffusing a fight in the cafeteria.
The military model we were
instructed to follow featured a
strict chain of command with
separate units of responsibility
and staging areas. The class
took hours, and there was a test.
The presentation itself was
the most boring PowerPoint
ever, but the content and
purpose were relevant. From
tornadoes to bombs, from lone
shooters to chemical spills,
Franklin County School has a
plan in place for rapid response
and communication.
Thinking about worst-case
scenarios took me back to the
days of the Cold War and the
icy fear that daily gripped my
pre-adolescent heart. It began
during the Cuban Missile Crisis
of 1962. I had seen the worried


faces of Mama and
Daddy before I went to
school. When I arrived,
the silly boy students
were whooping and
r hollering, "There's
--- gonna be a war!" My
WHITE knees still get a weak,
nervous sensation
ROUX thinking about it now. We
e Roux questioned our teachers,
anxiously looking for
answers and reassurance.
I remember being aware
when the worst of the threat was
over for the moment, but the
anxiety stayed with me for years.
I spent the summer of 1963
on Great Abaco, Bahamas, with
my grandparents. Papa liked to
listen to the radio when he came
home for lunch. I was petrified of
hearing the news. I constructed
elaborate schemes to keep
him from turning on the radio.
I would earnestly engage him
in conversation I hoped would
provide a diversion. I had an art
project he had to see or a story
about home I knew he wanted
to hear. I couldn't stand the
thought of international events
interrupting our quiet island
lives. It was almost as though a
war couldn't happen if I didn't
know about it.
As a kid, I wasn't afraid of


looking at the pictures.
It was much later that I
gained a larger understanding of
an era that featured the Bay of
Pigs, the McCarthy hearings and
the execution of the Rosenbergs.
Only as an adult have I come to
understand the paralyzing fear
of communism that gripped this
country in the '50s.
As I grew older into the '60s, I
read "Fail Safe," "On the Beach,"
and "Alas Babylon," books that
all envisioned global nuclear
war. The latter offered some
comfort because it centered on
a resourceful Florida family that
not only survived but flourished.
I had put those times out of
my head until I read "Fallout"
by Trudy Krishner. This young
adult novel is set in 1954 on the
North Carolina coast. Along
with normal teenage angst,
the protagonist has a father
obsessed with building a fallout
shelter in the backyard. There is
even a wretched scene in which
Dad uses his hunting rifle to
deny extended family members
access to the underground
bunker.
Images came flooding back.
We actually had duck-and-
cover drills in school along
with plastic blackout curtains
on the windows. Americanism


versus Communism was a state-
mandated high school class
for more than 20 years. Sturdy
public buildings sported the
ubiquitous civil defense symbol
designating them as shelters.
The threat of World War III
was ever present. Armageddon
seemed inevitable.
I am unable to pinpoint when
I eased up on the constant worry.
It may have had something to
do with being more concerned
about boys than bombs. My
nightmares shifted. Being silly
and embarrassed trumped
finding safety in the apocalypse.
I think the hippie years were
a direct response to the fears
of our childhood. We naively
believed peace and love would
erase decades of us-versus-them
mentality.
What about today's kids?
What are their fears?
I don't think worldwide
destruction is on their radar.
They live with the uncertainty
of random violence that could
erupt at any moment or any
place. With 9/11, they knew our
borders were not safe.
What are their nightmares?
Denise Roux is a regular
columnist for the Apalachicola
and Carrabelle Times. Her e-
mailis rouxwhit@mchsi.com.


D


Animal cruelty
incidents call f or
creative solution
I read with interest the
recent articles involving
alleged dog fighting and
the attack by two pit bulls
on a household pet in
Eastpoint. I also found
Undersheriff Joel Norred
and Director of Animal
Control Van Johnson's
response to the most
recent incident interesting.
Director Van Johnson
stated, "We probably
receive more calls for
fighting on the weekends
than any other time." With
all due respect, if this is
the case, would it not be
prudent to schedule an
animal control officer to
be on duty when the need
is greatest (weekends
and evening hours)? I'm
sure Undersheriff Norred
schedules his deputies
according to the needs of
the community and the
number of calls for service.
Deputies work
weekends and evenings;
why not schedule an
animal control officer
to work weekends and
evenings if that is when
the most calls for fighting
are received? And why not
cross-train one or more
deputies (minimum of one
on each shift) on how to
handle future situations
similar to the above? After


an'cdepudes muin yd
dogs and other animals
r22 w en
responding to citizen
complaints
The sheriff's office has
or had canine deputies
who would be excellent
candidates for this type of
training and post-incident
investigations. This type
of animal cruelty should
not be allowed in Franklin
County, and it would not
be tolerated in other
jurisdictions
g g g
rule ornes
.
%000 MOre ( OSOfVIng
to be Carrabelle
librarian
I was so pleased to read
in the Dec. 3 Times that
our county commissioners
voted unanimously to
appoint Tonia Granger
branch manager for
Carrabelle Library.
No one is more
deserving or more
qualified than Tonia. She
stepped up to the plate
immediately in spite of her
own (and our) great loss,
grief and sadness over the
passing away of Carolyn
Sparks.
Thank you'
commissioners, for doing
the right thing.
Penny 1.. Anderson
Carrabelle


In a few weeks, we will
usher in 2010, not only a
new year but also a brand
new decade. When you work
in health care as I do, you
already have seen the sign
posted about the future,
"Buckle your seat belt; could
be jolts ahead." I have noted
the message but want to be
part of the ride and hope


adequately, we will need more
young people (and middle-
age folks) to choose to train
for human services careers.
These trained people will be
highly sought and well paid.
The future opportunities
CK to achieve a stable and
ERT satisfying career in health
F d care are almost limitless.
or war Even today, with 10 percent
unemployed in our country,
Weems is seeking to hire a number of
licensed personnel: RNs, respiratory
and X-ray technicians, EMTs and
paramedics.
We have very desirable
communities in Franklin County in
which to work and a close, supportive
group of colleagues to join at our
clinic in Carrabelle and our hospital
in Apalachicola. Our clinical alliance
with Tallahassee Memorial is helping
to bring quality "best practices" and
increased services to Weems and its
clinic.
Technology will mean better health
care in the future for the patient in
Franklin County, as well. In June,
the governor's office announced a
Rural Infrastructure Rmd grant
totaling $1.12 million to help connect
nine rural Panhandle hospitals,


including Weems, to Tallahassee
Memorial Hospital (TMH), Sacred
Heart in Pensacola and Bay Medical
in Panama City. This is in addition to
$9.6 million the federal government
already has contributed to this same
broadband network project that will
connect Weems in real time to the
large number of specialists at TMH.
Once the digital network is
completed, if you are our patient
and we need to consult a specialist
immediately so your medical
condition can be quickly and
dramatically improved, we will be
able to do so with the skilled use of
telemetry medicine in the next 10
years.
With two new medical buildings
on the horizon in Carrabelle and in
Apalachicola because of the passage
of a one-cent sales tax increase
in 2007, the view I see in Franklin
County going forward is dynamic for
the health care employee and positive
for the patient. We invite you to join
us. If you have a medical license and
wish to pursue opportunities within
our system, please call me or our
Human Resources Director Ginny
Griner at 653-8853.
Chuck Colvert is the CEO of
Weems Memorial Hospital.


many of you will want to jump
on board, too.
Here's why: I believe the next 10
years will be a dynamic and exciting
time for health care workers in
Franklin County, bringing many
positive gains for the patient. Just as
tectonic plates deep within the earth
slide past each other to create vast
changes in the landscape, society's
rapidly increasing older population is
slipping past younger generations to
claim a larger relative presence.
By 2030, it is projected that one-
third of all Americans will be 55 or
older. Soon, one in five people will be
65 and older, and these aging people
will require more health care services
than at any other time in their
lives, even more the case in a rural
retirement county like ours.
To care for these many patients


YB Don Tonsmeire
Special to the Times
The President's Council on
Environmental Quality (CEQ) draft
water resources planning guidance
released last week represents a vital
first step in modernizing our nation's
water policies to protect communities
dependent on healthy ecosystems.
Planning for the Apalachicola-
Chattahoochee-Flint Basin water
basin's needs could also become more
sustainable as a result of this effort.
During the election campaign of
2008, then-presidential candidate
Obama promised to help resolve
the ACF Water Wars when he
issued a statement that said he
and Joe Biden "would direct the
National Research Council (NRC) to
conduct a study to assess the water
availability, supply options, and
demand-management alternatives
that factor into ACF River System
usage, as well as the impact of
freshwater flow on the ecology of the
Apalachicola River and Bay.
"The study would provide the
scientific basis for reaching an
equitable solution; a solution that
protects the drinking water of
Atlanta's citizens and provides
sustainable flows for productive
agriculture in South Georgia and
Alabama, and for the fish and wildlife
that inhabit Florida's Northwest
region and the industries they
support."
Last week's draft set of Principles
and Guidelines offers a positive
beginning for following up on
that commitment. The Obama
administration has taken a vital
step toward recognizing the critical


importance of the Apalachicola
River, Floodplain and Bay and
setting the stage for the changes
needed to protect these types of vital
resources all over the country.
"For too long, our nation's water
resources have been steered by
outdated guidelines that favored
development over all else," said
Dave McLain, senior policy advisor
for Apalachicola Riverkeeper. "With
clear support from Congress, the
Obama administration is beginning
to ensure those rules prioritize
21st century approaches to water
management that work with nature
rather than against it. These
Principles and Guidelines should
provide a clear and mandatory
direction to federal agencies
that healthy rivers, wetlands and
floodplains are at the heart of safe
and economically sustainable
communities. With the looming
threat of greater and more intense
storms due to global warming, this
cannot happen at a more important
time. We greatly appreciate the
administration's efforts to this point."
The draft guidance recognizes
that healthy waters are vital to
human health and the natural
environment, and requires federal
agencies to account for these values
in water resource planning. Healthy
streams, wetlands and coasts
provide clean and abundant supplies
of water, protect communities by
reducing flood and storm damage
and provide essential habitat for fish
and wildlife that are crihcal to local
economies.
The draft also begins to set out
clear direction to agencies that they
must confront the profound impact


of climate change on water resource
management.
Billy Dalton, vice president
for the Franklin County Seafood
Workers Association, urged the
administration to establish clear
directives for the U.S. Army Corps
of Engineers and other agencies
regarding protection of natural
resources. Such protections are
needed to ensure a healthy flow
regime with seasonal peaks and lows
within the context of floods, drought,
storms and increasing sea levels
fueled by climate change.
Losing the high productivity
and biodiversity of the Apalachicola
ecosystem would be a devastating
environmental loss of a national
treasure renowned for its commercial
fishing and oyster industry.
Just weeks ago, a U.S. District
Judge ruled that the Corps'
authority to manage for purposes
not provided specifically by
Congress was inappropriate and
illegal. Andy Smith, executive
director of Apalachicola Riverkeeper,
praised the CEQ draft document,
saying, "This renewed opportunity
to provide guidance that creates
a more balanced perspective of
the value of ecosystem services
provided by large functional
ecosystems such as the Apalachicola
is critical and timely in the ACF
Water Wars."
The new guidance could do this
by establishing clear directives, such
as requiring federal agencies to
utilize nonstructural and restoration
approaches whenever practicable.
Dan Tonsmeire is the riverkeeper
with the Apalachicola Riverkeeper
group. To reach him, call 850-508-7787.


alachicola (
Carrabelle


T I ? _

USPS 027-600
Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St.
Apalachicola, FL 32329
VP/Publisher: Karen Hanes
Editor: Tim Croft
Circulation: James Meadors


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* *


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IV


Thursday, December 10, 2009


Local


The Times | AS


under construction and are op-
erating with a skeleton crew,"
Attalla said in a later interview.
"Hopefully, we can have the as-
sembly line back up and running
in 10 days. I would like nothing
better than to give out a paycheck
before Christmas."
Attalla, who is now a Florida
resident, said the company has a
possible order from Florida State
University in January.
"I live in Carrabelle, not Tal-
lahassee or St. Joe," he said. "I
consolidated all my operations
into this factory. I put all of my
eggs in one basket, and now I am
hoping for Easter."
Attalla said Hexaport, in addi-
tion to reorganizing debt, is work-
ing on acquiring more contracts.
He said the firm has numerous
inquirieseveryweekbut"turning
those into sales is a lot of work."
He said bringing in additional


VETS from page Al


equipment has allowed him to
set up for commercial projects
as well as residential units. The
Carrabelle factory will now be fit-
ted to produce trusses and walls
as well as finished cottages.
"We are actively pursuing
large projects now and seeking
additional investors," he said.
"The bright side is that, if the
market turns even slightly, the
factory will be successful."

Chiles helped bring plant,
then sold his interest
The GreenSteel plant was the
brainchild of Attalla, formerly of
New Hampshire, and Lawton
"Bud" Chiles III of Tallahassee,
son of the late Florida governor.
The factory was built to pro-
duce houses based on the "Ka-
trina Cottages" designed by To-
lar Denmark Architects for con-


destruction in post-Katrina Louisi-
ana and Mississippi. Nicknamed
GreenSteel because they are
both tough and environmentally
friendly, GreenSteel structures
are resistant to hurricane-force
winds, fire and mold.
Hexaport broke ground on the
Carrabelle factory in June 2007.
Carrabelle applied for and
received a Community Develop-
ment Grant to help pay for the
project and provided a 99-year
lease for the 21-acre factory site
at $10 a year. Carrabelle invested
about $1.5 million in infrastruc-
ture to support the project.
The hope was the plant would
provide much-needed jobs for
the community. A job fair held in
Sept. 2007 attracted more than
100 applicants for 50 possible
jobs, and another 88 applications
were turned in at City Hall before
the factory opened its doors.


At the groundbreaking, Chiles
said GreenSteel would initially
employ 50 people but promised
it could provide work for as many
as 350 when operating at full ca-
pacity.
In reality, the plant has never
employed more than two dozen
workers.
At the job fair, Chiles said, "I
think there will be four or five
developments in Carrabelle that
will be exclusively GreenSteel.
We want to give priority to local
developments. We are commit-
ted to providing affordable local
housing."
When completed, the Hexaport
facility was to cover 1.5 acres and
would have the capacity to manu-
facture up to 400 houses a year.
Chiles claimed to have orders
waiting to be filled when the fac-
tory opened, but the specific
number was unclear.


At the 2007 job fair, Chiles said,
"One of our first contracts is a
six-story hotel on Marathon Key.
We're going right into hurricane
alley on a little spit of land be-
tween the Atlantic and the Gulf."
He repeatedly claimed at that
time to have standing orders for
125 houses.
Chiles and GreenSteel parted
ways in Oct. 2008 in what Attalla
earlier this week called "a sur-
prising turn of events." Attalla
said he bought Chiles' share of
the factory after Chiles attempt-
ed to buy him out.
Attalla said that the breakup
occurred around the time the
first model home left the assem-
bly line, and that at the time of
the purchase, there were no out-
standing orders for houses. He
said he knows nothing about the
Marathon project to which Chiles
repeatedly referred.


for a daring rescue effort in
Vietnam in 1968, began by
recounting the state's many
contributions in defense of
the country, citing Florida's
21 Medal of Honor recipi-
ents. He noted that nearly a
quarter-million Florida vet-
erans served in World War
II, and more than 3,500 were
killed in the war, including
valiant members of the U.S.
CoastGuard.
He mentioned Gen. Ed-
mund Kirby Smith, the last
Confederate field general
to surrender; Colin Kelly,
of Madison, who received
the Distinguished Service
Cross for his actions as a
bomber pilot in the Philip-
pines; Army Gen. Joseph
"Vinegar Joe" Stilwell, who
served as chief of staff to
Chiang Kai-Shek; and Air
Force Brig. Gen. Paul Tib-
bets, who dropped the first
atomic bomb on Hiroshima.
"He probably saved a
half-million lives," Livings-
ton said. "We're in debt to
him and his service."


Livingston, who part-
nered with the late histo-
rian Stephen Ambrose in
helping found the National
D-Day Museum in New Or-
leans, bestowed praise on
the "Greatest Generation"
as well as veterans of the
Korean War. "When you're
out in the snow and it's 60
degrees below zero, think of
their commitment," he said.

'Well come
,
il0M0 OS WinnerS
Livingston stepped up
the tenor of his remarks in
recounting Florida's contri-
bution to the Vietnam War,
which included nearly 2,000
soldiers whose names are
now engraved on the Viet-
nam Veterans Memorial
Wall.
"That war was lost in
Washington. They screwed
it up in Washington," he
said.
"When you look at these
young Americans who are
involved in this war, your leg-


he said. "We have to believe
in them, and we have to sup-
port them. We're at a cross-
roads, and it's time to step
up to the plate again.
"We're prepared to fight
again and to make some
sacrifices," Livingston said.
"America's greatness is yet
to come, and that greatness
is on your back."

One of the last
to evacuate Saig0H
Following Livingston's
remarks, Legionnaire Larry
Hale, who was instrumental
in inviting the general to
come speak, presented to
Post Commander Al Mira-
bella an American flag sent
to Hale from Iraq. The flag
came from former Army sol-
dier Rob Robinson, a mem-
her of the Legion post who
now works in a civilian ca-
pacity in Iraq. Robinson had
flown on Sept. 11 at Camp
Taji, from the 155th Heavy
Brigade Combat Team gar-
rison command element de-
ployed in support of Opera-
tion Iraqi Freedom.
The evening also includ-
ed the singing of patriotic
songs by Charles Thomp-
son, as well as the present-
ing of the colors by five
Marines from Tallahassee's
Echo Company anti-terror-
ism battalion. They included
1st Sgt. Daniel Barnes, Staff
Sgt. Alvin Figueroa, Sgt.
Daniel Conner, Cpl. Ben
Feldman and Cpl. Nathaniel
Frances.
Mirabellaalsoannounced
that2010 wall calendars, fea-
turing Apalachicola's Three
Servicemen Statue Detail,
are now available for $15.
For information, call him at
653-5838.
In an interview following
the potluck dinner, Livings-
ton, 70, said he has returned
three times to Vietnam and
has "met some of the guys I
fought against.
"The kids there love
America. We left a very last-


ing legacy there," he said.
A native of McRae, Ga., a
town about 100 miles north
of Jacksonville, Livingston
left behind the Vietnam War
in April 1975, when he was
serving as an operations of-
ficer.
Livingston was on the
last helicopter to leave Gen.
William Westmoreland's
MACV compound in Sai-
gon, part of an evacuation
of 16,000 Vietnamese that he
called"averysuccessfulbut
sadoperation."
After leaving the military
having commanded a series
of units in the field, Livings-
ton entered the corporate
world, working in the ATM
and real estate fields.
His return trips to Viet-
nam have included support
for a project to plant "Peace
'lkees" in Dong Ha, and as-
sistance to a kindergarten
in Dai Do, the same place
where on April 30, 1968, he
had led Echo Company as
it charged through a rice
paddy raked by extremely
heavy fire from .50-caliber
machine guns and rocket-
propelled grenades. Car-
rying an M-2 grease gun,
Livingston led the assault
and was wounded twice by
grenade blasts but refused
treatment.
With a remaining force
of only 35 able-bodied men
from the original 100, Liv-
ingston led two more as-
saultsontheNorthVietnam-
ese, much by hand-to-hand
fighting, in which he killed
25 of the enemy. Hit in the
thigh by an enemy machine-
gun round during a phased
withdrawal, he continued to
fire from a prone position.
When he ordered his men
to go on without him, telling
them he would cover them,
two Marines disobeyed and
picked him up and dragged
him to safety.
Livingston was awarded
the Medal of Honor on May
14, 1970, by President Rich-
ard Nixon.


- -- -- -- ---- -
DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times
Tallahassee Marines attend the American Legion's
veterans appreciation dinner.


acy is well-intact," Livings-
ton told the 80 veterans at
the dinner, gesturing to the
five Marines in attendance
from Tallahassee to present
the colors. "And if Washing-
ton doesn't screw this one
up, they'll win this thing and
they'll come home with their
heads held high. We'll come
home as winners."
Livingston offered mild
approval of the president's
speech the previous night
on stepping up troops to Af-
ghanistan, but said it wasn't
enough.
"I didn't hear anything
about 'winning' this war,"
he said. "They (terrorists)
are here, and we don't know
in What numbers, but they
are here. This is probably
the most serious situation
this country's been in since
World War II. We have that
same commitment in our
crosshairs. Let's not kid
ourselves; we are in a fight
for our lives."
Referring to those who
either want to pull out of
the Middle East now or set
a date for withdrawal, Liv-
ingston said, "It's almost as
if they want to give up. That
is not America. We believe
in America. We're not giv-
ing up on America, and if
you do, we're out of here."
The retired general, who
served in the Marines from
1961 to 1995 before entering
the corporate world, then
addressed the problems he


saw with allowing homosex-
uals to serve openly in the
military.
"It just makes me mad
as hell," he said, elaborat-
ing in a later interview that
"as long as they're willing
to suppress it (homosexu-
ality), I can live with 'Don't
ask, don't tell.
"To me, it's very clear.
Anything that impacts the
readiness of the force, it's
not worth it," he said. "The
military is not the place to
deal with a social agenda."
In his speech, Livingston
focused on what he called
"serious issues with the
morality of our country"
and spoke of a backlash on
the horizon.
"You can't even sing
Christmas songs on Christ-
mas Day," he said. "It just
makes me mad. They're try-
ing to destroy our economy.
America is tired listening to
this stuff.
"I think there's going to
be some major happenings
in the groundswell," Liv-
ingston said. "We're going
to see the people of America
say 'Enough is enough' un-
til this attitude comes to an
end and we remember the
attitudes we're all about."
In closing his remarks,
Livingston recalled a young
Marine he had met who was
readying for his fifth deploy-
ment overseas.
"He's not stutter-step-
ping. There's no hesitation,"


Glenn


Jolean


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Thursday, December 10, 2009


A6 | The Times


Local


patiently outlining possibil-
ities for partial or complete
on-board cooling systems
that could extend harvest-
ing hours, stricter labeling
requirements and plant op-
eration rules.
"It breaks my heart to
do my job," he said. "I'm
trying to be the least irri-
tation to you. This is prob-
ably the biggest irritation
I've ever brought to you."
Johnny Maxwell, an
oysterman, said reduc-
tion in harvesting hours
will cut significantly into
the money to be made in
summer months, particu-
larly since many oyster-
men prefer to work in the
afternoons or can't be out
on the water at the crack
of dawn because of family
commitments.
"Right now, you can't
hardly find a job even if
you wanted to," one man
said. "People are going to
lose everything they own.
At some point, we can't
take it any more.
Lt. Charlie Wood, of the
Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commis-
sion, which enforces oys-
ter regulations on state
waters, said current law
does not allow harvesters
to be out with tongs on
their boat before dawn, as
some have sought. He said
that law might be changed
through the normal rule-
making process.
"If something changes
with that law, then we'll
change," he said.
Audience reaction to
the proposed rule chang-
es featured a widespread
complaint that while
reducing illness was a
worthwhile goal, this sort
of industry restriction ran
contrary to Americans'
notion of freedom and in-
dividual responsibility.
"Isn't that what this
whole country is based
on? Didn't we fight for our
freedom and our right to
be fishermen?" one man


DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times
ABOVE:Johnny Richards, left, and Johnny Maxwell, right, listen at the workshop together with their fellow oystermen.
BELOW: FWC Lt. Charlie Wood


asked.
"At some point, we are
going to have to take up
arms against the federal
government in some fash-
ion," attendee Bobby Mill-
er said.
After hearing the min-
ute details of the rule
changes, shown overhead
in a PowerPoint presenta-
tion, several in the audi-
ence suggested it might
be wiser and less costly to
just shut down the entire
bay for several weeks in
the summer.
"It's going to be more
than one month, but it
may not be two," Heil said,
mentioning August and
September as the likely
target for possible clo-
sure.
"That would be better
than this," said seafood
processor David Barber.
Another idea, voiced by
seafood processor Steve
Rash, was to restrict the


sale of oysters during
those summer months to
within Florida only, since
the FDA lacks power over
intrastate shipment and
sale of oysters. But Heil
cautioned that the FDA
had long arms and could
affect different aspects of
the year-long sale of oys-
ters.
He said that in the
event the industry prefers
complete closures during
some summer periods, the
state would not be willing
to modify areas in which it
allows harvesting.
"It would be difficult for
us to allow you to harvest
summer areas in winter
months," he said.

COOIng Of gO I' b ?
Another idea, voiced
by County Commissioner
Bevin Putnal, was to con-
sider a "cooling barge,"
centrallylocatedonthebay


welcomes written input on
the proposed rule changes.
The office is at 1203 Gover-
nors Square Blvd., Fifth
Floor, Tallahassee, FL
32301, and can be reached
by phone at 850-488-5471 or
by fax at 850-410-0893.
This week, Heil's de-
partment finishes the last
in a series of workshops
around the state. It will
then compile input from
the seafood community
into a report. Once the
proposed rule is in its final
draft form, a hearing will
be held early next year in
which citizens will be able
to voice their views.
Heil urged those who
want to comment to do
so in the next two weeks,
so regulators will have a
chance to consider their
suggestions.
State Rep. Leon Bem-
bry (D-Greenville) was
also in attendance, and
he urged constituents to
share their views with his
office so he can advocate
for them.
"Get as involved as you
can," he said. "I can't be
a good representative un-
less I hear from you."


during summer months,
in which harvesters could
drop off their oysters so as
to be able to work longer
on the water.
"We're just trying to fig-
ure out a way to make a liv-
ing," he said.
Heil said his office
would consider any and
all suggestions for further
tailoring the proposal, but
cautioned against any at-
tempt to leave rules vague
or open-ended.
"We can always pro-
pose," he said. "But if it
(the rule) is not crystal
clear, you're not telling the


regulated industry what
they have to do."
University of Florida
food science professor
Steve Otwell urged the
local industry to work to-
gether in the weeks and
months ahead in shaping
the state policy.
"This is the time to put
your differences aside and
all pull together," he said.
"If they can divide and con-
quer, they will."
Heil, assistant direc-
tor of aquaculture for the
FloridaDepartmentofAg-
riculture and Consumer
Services, said his office


1 1,11 II.. l....sis ....d stockings of families and
e nd.ud....I of. rn d this holiday season with joy,
cheer and hope. Donate to the Empty Stocking
Fund and bring a little holiday happiness to local
...rnes in Bay and surrounding areas.

I ..ch year, the generous donations of good people,
like you, make it possible to provide food baskets
irid toys to thousands of needy families through
Fll..- Empty Stocking Fund.

I he Salvation Army expects to deliver up to
11100 food and toy baskets to families in Bay,
UnifFranklinHolmesandWashingtoncounties.
\\an't you open your hearts to extend relief to the
many families in need during the holiday?


The News Herald and Bill Cramer Chevrolet Cadillac Buick Pontiac GMC
challenges our communities to raise $175,000 for the Empty Stocking Fund.
Joining us are The Holmes County Times Advertiser,
The Washington County News, The Star and The Times.
When donations reach the goal, Bill Cramer Chevrolet Cadillac Buick Pontiac GMC
willcontributeanadditional$5,000tobringthetotalfundsto$180,0001


Name
Address
City_
Phone


Please open your hearts to extend relief to


State


Emmi


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Thursday, December 10, 2009 w w w. apalach times com Page 7


Lady Seahawk hoopsters

'E 'TA down Wewa in opener


Junior Sami Coulter was the girls soccer team's top defensive
player this past week, exhbitin0 smart and strong play from
n the center fullback position. Sami flew to every ball.


DEC.1 ATWEWAHITCHKA
FranklinCo. 8 5 6 14-33
Wewa 1 1 6 4 1 O 31
SEAHAWKS: Tasia Simmons 1/9 2s, O/5 3s, 1/4 FTs, 3
pts.; Drue Chisholm 1/7 2s, O/1 3s, O/1 FT, 2 pts.; Shelby
Myers 2/12 2s, 1/1 3s, 3/4 FTs, 10 pts.; Oneika Lockley
4/10 2s, O/6 3s, 4/8 FTs, 12 pts.; Anna Lee 2/6 2s, O/3
3s, 4 pts.; Desirae Cummings 1/2 FTs;, 1 pt.; Harley
Tucker 1/2 FTs, 1 pt
Totals: 10/49 2s, 1/17 3s, 10/21 FTs

7 0 1 1
LR DERHRWKS SO CCCT


STATE BAN K 1897
A Division of Coastal Community Bank

Apalachicola Carrabelle Eastpoint St. George Island
22 Avenue E 612 N Avenue A 5 Jefferson Street 200 Franklin Blvd
653-8805 697-4500 670-8501 927-2561


Led by a sophomore
and a freshman, the Lady
Seahawks girls basketball
team edged Wewahitchka
33-31 in an away game
Dec.1 for their opening win.
With seven girls suited
up for the contest, the Lady
Seahawks were forced to
play with only four players
on the court for the end
of the fourth quarter after
freshmen Tasia Simmons
and Anna Lee both fouled
out.
Sophomore Oneika
Lockley led the girls with 12
pointsfollowedbyfreshman
Shelby Myers, with 10. Lee
added four, will Simmons
had three, junior Drue Ch-
isholm 2 and sophomores
Desire Cummings and
Harley Tucker each one.
Coach Angeline Stanley,
said she expects a building
year, as the team features
mainly freshman, sopho-
mores and juniors.


The fol-
lowing are
the team's
remaining
seven dis-
trict games.
Thurs-
day Dec.
10 at home
ONEIKA vs. Liberty
LOCKLEY County, be-
ginning at 4:30 p.m.
Friday, Dec. 18 at home
vs. West Gadsden, begin-
ning at 6:30 p.m.
Resday, Jan. 5 at home
vs. Wewahitchka beginning
at 4:30 p.m.
Saturday, Jan. 9 at Port
St Joe beginning at 6 p.m.
Resday, Jan. 12 at West
Gadsden beginning at 6:30
p.m.
Resday, Jan. 19 at Lib-
erty County, beginning at
4:30 p.m.
SaturdayJan.23athome
vs. Port St Joe, beginning at
6 p.m.


DAVID ADLERSTEIN |The Times
(Above) the Seahawks cheerleaders will rouse the home fans Thursday and Saturday nights.



h 1 llWS 6 R SS RM R R



1 71 38W
RT RE eS -


By [)avid Adlerstein
EmesCityEditor
The Franklin County Seahawks
were true to their word Friday night
in Crawfordville, avenging a rare
opening season loss by trouncing
the Wakulla War Eagles 71-38.
With a score of 35-18 at intermis-
sion, the Seahawks kept the pres-
sure on the second half; secure in
the need to show that a home court
defeat to Wakulla last month was a
fluke, large due to the absence of the
team's premier starters.
Internetcommentsthatbordered
onbraggingbytheWakullateamhad
angered the Seahawks squad, and
with wing men senior Austin O'Neal
and sophomore Carlos Morris back
in the lineup, the stage was set for a
robust win.
"It gave them a chance just to
swagger," coach Fred Drake said.
"The kids felt good about themselves
going into it. They wanted it bad."


The team was led
by a 24-point perfor-
mance from O'Neal '
including a dazzling
10-of-16 from the
field, while Morris
chipped in 18. Both
had nine rebounds.
Drake saidhewas CARLOS
disappointedthatthe MORRIS
Wakullateamwalked
off the court before the final whistle,
but stressed that his team kept their
composure.
"My guys are not thugs, they're
not had kids," he said. "But if we
ever lose a game, we're going to
come back and try to get revenge."
Drake said his team has been
goaded into fighting by frustrated
opponents, but has not taken the
bait.
"Nobody on my team has thrown
a punch," he said. "They know how
to win with pride and they know how
to lose with pride. We haven't tried to


fight everybody
"Idon't want any-
body to think we're
a big bad team," he
said. "If you can win,
you have to know
how to lose too."
Drake has settled
AUSTIN onastartingSeahawk
O'NEAL five, which will also
include senior point
guard Arron Prince, junior low post
player Adam Joseph and junior high
post player Dalin Modican.
Junior forward Marcus Allen is a
sixth man, but plenty of other play-
ers will see playing time as Drake
tries to make maximum use of his
talent.
Franklin County fans will have a
chance to see the Seahawks in back-
to-back action beginning Thursday,
Dec. 10, when they face off at home
against district foe Liberty County.
See BASKET ALL AS


00 kJ 0 J U
responded
thua ownl
when Whit-
ney Vause
netted a
rebound off
of a Megan
Newell shot
WHITNEY on goal.
VAUSE Vause was
Our Offensive Player of the
Week, showing great offen-
sive effort and producing
her third goal of the season,
See LADY SEA HAWKS AS


U 0
By Kelli Mo iO
M
Special to the Emes
Surprised, yet not com-
pletely, the Lady Seahawks
soccer squad met a pretty
well prepared and skillful
Port St. Joe last Thursday,
Dec. 3 at their home field.
The temperature was not
too cold when we started, but
turned colder as we played.
This weather change was
somewhat of a reflection on
our playing style. St. Joe
scored four minutes into the
contest, but shortly after, we


readies for three-game home stand
goal is minutes into the first
half. Elton Olvera scored, on
a free kick, to deadlock the
Th S awks continued
to play with passion and co-
hesiveness throughout the
an dw it notts orda
ing goals, off of corner kicks
ELTON JAVELIN
See SOCCER AS OLVERA WINFIELD


CA RRA BE L LE APA LA CH ICO LA


A


Seahawks soccer
By Joe Shields
Special to the Times

si On 3 the boyst var-
faced the varsity Port St. Joe
Sharks in a Thursday night
thd d up and raring to go
from the opening whistle,
the Seahawks matched the
Sharks intensity, with a tying


OJF


Saini Coulter


Adlam Joseph









LADY SEAHAWKS from page A


SVLLER I f 0 mpage Al


F KU
C& Y

A Full Service Real Estate Company
me. .r warn r usu


L 0


Thursday, December 10, 2009


Local


"Nobody knows what to expect out of
Liberty," Drake said. "Liberty is the team
I'm worried about because I don't know any-
thing about them."
On Saturday night, the Seahawks face
the Class 4A Mosley Tornadoes at home,
sure to be a barn burner.
Drake said he is the process of putting
finishing touches on the team's trip to Co-
lumbus, GA. Dec. 28-30, when he and as-
sistant coach Carlos Hill will accompany a
dozen players to the 10-team tournament.
A Parents Support Group, led by Gran-
ville Croom, isin the process of raising mon-
ey to help with hotel, food and fuel costs for
the trip to the Christmas tournament. Call
Croom at 653-7643 or visit Superior Bank
and make a donation with the help of Olivia
Wynn.
"This is the best competition we'll see all
year," Drake said. "The college scouts will
he there. It's a chance to get looked at.


"We can compete with those teams," he
said. "We get a lot of respect there."
If the Seahawks make it to the champi-
onship game, they'll play at Columbus State
University.
Dec. 4 vs. Wakulla
Franklin Co. 15 20 20 16 71
Wakulla. 11 7 8 12 38
SEAHAWKS: Arron Prince 4/6 2s, 1/ 2 3s,
11 pts.; Carlos Morris 5/14 2s, 1/10 3s, 5/6 FT,
18 pts.; Dalin Modican 3/5 2s, 0/2 FTs, 6 pts.;
Adam Joseph 5/5 2s, 10 pts.; Austin O'Neal
10/16 2s, 1/2 3s, 1/4 FTs, 24 pts.; Zach Jones
1/2 2s, 2 pts.
Totals: 28/48 2s, 3/14 3s, 6/12 FTs
Rebounds: Joseph 11, Morris, O'Neal 9,
Prince 7, Modican 5, Tyrdon Wynn 3, Marcus
Allen, Michael Allen, Jones
WAR EAGLES: Willoughby 13, Robin-
son 10, Holmes 6, Knight 4, Randolph 3, Kil-
patrick 2


all rebound goals offmissed
shots.
After that tying score, we
felt as if we had completely
gained our composure and
played with more zeal.
That zeal lasted about five
minutes as we surrendered
relatively easy scores lead-
ing to a 1-4 halftime deficit.
Following halftime the
Lady Seahawks played
with a more concerted ef-
fort yielding only one more
score with under 10 min-


utes left in the contest. We
had much better control of
the ball and the game in
the second half, yet failed
to produce any points off
of the several scoring op-
portunities. We played a
much better second half
and were able to roll ev-
eryone into the contest.
We learned that we can
compete with St. Joe and
others like them, but we
will not win any games un-
til we start competing for


every ball.
We will try to improve
our efforts and overall re-
cord of 1-3-1 on Saturday,
Dec. 12 as we host Marian-
na Lady Bulldogs at 1 p.m.
at the Mikel Clark sports
complex.
KelliMaggio, member
of the University of Mobile
Lady Rams undefeated
1997 national champion
soccer team, coaches the
Lady Seahawks soccer
team.


by the Sharks; the game was
actually much closer than
the final score indicated. In
the end, the Sharks overall
experience began to take
over the game and the Se-
ahawks finally succumbed
to a 5-1 defeat.
Javeion "Worm" Winfield
carried a large bulk of the
load during offensive and
defensive transitions and
earned Player of the Week
honors. Daniel "Bam-Bam"
Carrino was superb in goal
and the combination of Der-


ick "D-Fib" Rhodes, William
"Maximus" Sapp, Graham
Kirvin and Olvera pres-
sured the Shark defense as
no first year soccer team
should have been able to.
A neutral observer was
quoted as saying he could
see the Seahawks mature as
a team before his eyes. The
Seahawks have increased
the number of defensive
stops, number of attempted
shots on goal, and number
of ball dispossessions; they
continue to improve on ev-


ery level, every game. With
such a young team, the
future of men's Franklin
County soccer is bright.
The Seahawks travelled
to Leon on Thesday, and
John Paul on Wednesday.
Their first of a three-game
home stand series begins
Saturday, Dec. 12 against
Mariannawithgametimeat
3 p.m. Come out and support
the Seahawks on Saturday.
Joe Shields is the coach
of the Seahawks soccer
team.


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A8 | The Times


BASKETBALL from paoe Al












Thursday, December 10, 2009 w w w. apalach times .com Page 1


B


Dominic Feliciano
of Eastpoint
a ..... sported rain gear
- . and a sweater as
.;- he climbed onto
..
Santa's lap on
Saturday night.
The cold and
windy weather
couldn't dim his
BETH BRINKLEY | Specialtothe Times smile.


By Lois Swoboda
Times StaffWriter
Santa brought the arctic
wind with him during this
year's lighting of the lights
at island center.
Amid blustery winds
and cold rain a few hardy
souls turned out to light
the Christmas lights
on St. George Island on


Saturday night.


bacs, he ig an rriedin red velvet was attended


Organizers scrambled by fire truck.
to set up tents and propane When Santa's original
heaters for the event and helper Chris Giametta fell
volunteers from Resort Va- ill, Resort employee Chris
cation Properties and Col- Griggs stepped in to fill his
lins Vacation Rentals and shiny black boots.
served up home made co- In spite of the miserable
coawithmarshmallowsand weather, a handful of chil-
an assortment of cookies to dren did brave the wintry
shivering merrymakers. winds so ask Santa for a
In spite of several set- special favor and the guy


by Haleigh Ming and Josie
Turner.
The St. George Island
Lighthouse Association
decorated Lighthouse Park
and the St. George Island
Business Association deco-
rated the trees at island
center to provide a spectac-
ular vista for tourists visit-
ing over the holidays.


LIFE


TI~ES


Santa Claus blows onto the island, crowds merry despite cold








Birthdays


Young F(l's employee

Of Ile BOnd1
Franklin Correctional Institution has selected Bob-
bie Young as its Employee of the Month for November
2009.
Young, who has worked at FCI since December
2007, is assigned to the medical department where she
serves as the secretary to the chief health officer.
In nominating Young, Kim Clark, FCI's health ser-
vices administrator, said, "Ms. Young is always willing
to learn and help. She is a well-rounded employee with
a happy disposition at all times."
Young resides in Carrabelle. Pictured above, from
left, are Clark, Young and FCI Warden Duffie Harrison.




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Eastpoint, FL 32328
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PET OF THE
WEEK
Petunia
Petunia, a 6-year-old
poodle mix, arrived at
the Adoption Center
a 2 V2 Weeks ago.
She is an adorable,
affectionate, sweet
girl who unfortunately
has tested positive for
heartworms. We are
..i in need of sponsors
so she can begin her
treatment. Please call if you can help.
VOLUNTEERS are desperately needed to socialize
Petunia and all of the other dogs and cats. Any time
you can spare would be greatly appreciated.
Call Kam at 670-8417 for more details or visit the
Franklin County Humane Society at 244 State Route
65 in Eastpoint. You may log onto the website at www
forgottenpets.org to see more of our adoptable pets.
Remember, when you adopt a friend for life, you not
only save the life of that pet, you make room for us to
save the life of one more abandoned dog or cat!
MMER

Saves YOU S100 a year!
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ig
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FILL OUT AND MAIL WITH YOUR CHECK (540.00 PER BRICK) TO:


Thursday, December 10, 2009


B2 | The Times


Society


Lanie Allen, daughter of Wanda and John Allen, of
Apalachicola, turns 6 on Thursday, Dec. 10.
She is the granddaughter of Roxie and Johnny Al-
len, ofApalachicola, and Pam and Gene Webb, of East-
point.
Happy birthday, Lanie!
We love you,
Mom, Dad and Logan


Tim and Aila Rawlins
of Tallahassee proudly an-
nounce the birth of their son,
Ovid Collivee Rawlins, on
Saturday, Nov. 21, at Talla-
hassee Memorial Hospital.
He weighed 8 pounds, 4
ounces, and measured 19 %
inches in length.
Maternal grandparents
are Dewayne and Beth Mc-
Clain, of Sopchoppy. Pater-
nal grandparent is Lisa Raw-


lins, of Fort Lauderdale.
Maternal great-grand-
parents are Collivee Mc-
Clain and the late Rosie
McClain, of Apalachicola;
Janice Wasmund Braxton,
of Valpraiso; and the late
Charles Barksdale, of Craw-
fordville.
Paternal great-grandpar-
ents are Billie Kay Rawlins
and the late Frank Rawlins,
of Crawfordville.


Your Penny's Worth, consignment and thrift store, has been serving the needs of Franklin County since 1991
and wishes to thank the many wonderful people who bring donations on a regular basis and the customers
who buy them. We cannot operate without your help. However, it is very important donations be brought
during hours of operation. The picture you see above shows what happens when donations are left on the
porch after closing hours. Surely, no one wants their very nice items to be strewn all over to the point they're
unsellable. Please note donations should be brought on Tuesdays and Wednesdays from 10 a.m. until 4
p.m. and on Saturdays from 10 a.m. until 3 p.m. If you need to bring donations at another time, then please
call 653-9457, 653-9297 or 670-8755, and a time will be set up to meet you. Presently, Your Penny's
Worth has an extensive selection of Christmas decorations. Come see them at 195 Ave. E no later than
Saturday, Dec. 19, when the store will close for Christmas.


Sive a I, tig g~4~i tlsu season Ag Ionoting a loved one


Pave the pathways at our Airtoric


'Vou can Alghlig/st your business,


Flappy Ist birthday, Brayden
Brayden Matthew Babbs will celebrate his first birth-
day on Tuesday, Dec. 8, 2009.
Brayden is the son of Bobby Babbs and Helen Mat-
thews, of Panama City.
Brayden's grandparents are Lisa and Cecil Babbs,
of Eastpoint, and Bob and Karen Matthews, of Panama
City.
Brayden's great-grandparents are the Rev. Marvin
and Joy Moore, of Eastpoint.
Mommy and Daddy love you, Big Boy!


L.00Ie Ale 00 10 Urn 6


Births









Obituaries


Lnrk NEW


The United Methodist Churches

Sof Frankhin County Welcome Youl
First United Methodist Church of Apalachicola
Worship Service 11:00 a.m. every Sunday
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
75 5" St. Apalachicola 653-9530 fumcapalach@gtcom~net
Pastor: Rev. Them Patriotis
Carrabelle United Methodist Church
Worship Services 10:45 a.m. Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
"Celebrate Recovery" Mondays 7-9 p.m.
Healing service first Tuesday each month-7 p.m.
102 NE Ave. B Ca abell n697-3672

Eastpoint United Methodist Church
PrWorship erviceal0:e0s0 a.m i t 1 m.
Healing Service every first Fridays of the Month at 6:30 p.m.
317 Patton Dr. (corner of David St.) 670-8825
Pastor: Rev. Beth White
St. George Island United Methodist Church
9:00 a.m. Worship Service
10:00 a.m. Fellowship Hour
201 E. Gulf Beach Dr. 927- 4635 www~ursgiumc.org
Pastor: Rev. Them Patriotis


'
St. Patrick Catholic Church
Ave C & Sixth Street in Apalachicola, FL 32329 or
The Islander (Across from the Blue Parrot)
on St. George Island, FL 32328
(850) 653-9453 Email: stpatcath@fairpoint.net
PASTOR: FATHER ROGER LATOSYNSKI
www.stpatricksmass.com
APALACHICOLA MASS SCHEDULE
SATURDAY................. .................5 PM
SUNDAY ................ ................ 10 AM
ST. GEORGE ISLAND MASS SCHEDULE
SUNDAY ................ .................8:30 AM


First Pentecostal Holiness Church
379 Brownsville Road Apalachicola


Sunday School 9:45 am
Sunday Morning Worship 10:45 am
Sunday Evening Service 6:00 pm
Monday, Youth Group 6:30 pm
Wednesday, Royal Rangers, G.A.P. 7:00 pm
Wednesday Worship & Word 7:30 pm
Nursery Provided during regular church services


IV


Thursday, December 10, 2009


Local


The Times | B3


Church BRIEFS
the Methodist churches during
office hours.

Raffle to benefit Franklin
.
COUnty Toy Connection
Resort Vacation Properties is
sponsoring a raffle drawing for a
three-day, two-night stay on St.
George Island. Tickets will be sold
at Resort Vacation Properties,
check-in center and are one ticket
for $5 and six for $20.
Monies raised will be used
to purchase toys for Franklin
County Toy Connection, for
children right here in Franklin
County. Distribution of the toys
will take place on Dec. 17 and 18
at the Eastpoint and Carrabelle
firehouses and Benedict Hall at
Trinity in Apalachicola.

Carrabelle Love Center
hOlds youth rally Dec. I3
The Carrabelle Love Center
will hold a Youth Rally on Sunday,
Dec. 13 at 3 p.m.
Participating churches include
the youth ministries of the Love
& Worship Center Church,
Covenant Word, and Mount Zion,
all in Apalachicola; and Eastpoint
Church of God.
Guest speaker will be Jr.
Minister R. Damien J. Davis, of the
Love & Worship Center Church.
Guest vocalists will be Eric Comer
and Joyce Dixson, of Panama City.


The church is located on U.S.
98 East in Carrabelle. Bishop
Robert L. Davis is host pastor and
Apostle Shirley C. White general
overseer.
For more information
call 653-5089 or e-mail at
chellelovecenter@aol.com

First Pentecostal hosts
'tib d Wail Wall'
erate ing
Come hear the Liberated
Wailing Wall of Jews for Jesus on
Wednesday, Dec. 16 at 7:30 p.m. at
the Apalachicola First Pentecostal
Holiness Church, located at 379
Brownsville Road.
The Liberated Wailing Wall will
tell the story of Jews coming to
believe in Jesus through music,
drama and personal testimony.
For more information, please
call 653-8690 or 653-9372.

Philace Club hosts
Christmas program Dec. 10
The Philaco Woman's Club
will host their annual Christmas
musical at Trinity Episcopal
Church on Thursday, Dec. 10 at 4
p.m.
This is a community
affair. Everyone is invited.
Refreshments will be served
after the concert at a reception in
Benedict Hall.
For more information call 670-
8088.


Richard Rentz "Tich"
Zingarelli died at his
Apalachicola home Sunday,
Dec. 6, 2009.
Viewing is Wednesday
evening, from 6 to 8 p.m.


at Kelly kneral Home
Rosary is at 8 p.m.
kneral services will be
held Thursday, Dec. 10 at 10
a.m. at St. Patrick Catholic
Church in Apalachicola.


Ouida Tucker Cumbie
went home to be with
her Heavenly Father on
Wednesday, Nov.25, 2009.
Born April 3, 1916, Mrs.
Cumbie was a lifelong
resident of Apalachicola.
Miss Ouida was a
housewife and nurse's
aide.
She will be missed
by all who knew her as
mother, grandmother,
aunt, cousin and friend.
She was very faithful
in her faith and an
inspiration to others.
She is survived by
four children, Russell
Cumbie (Missy), Carolyn


Smith (Charles), Wallace
Cumbie (Mary) and
Barbara Bloodworth,
11 grandchildren, 27
great-grandchildren
and three great-great-
grandchildren.
She was preceded in
death by her husband,
Earl Cumbie, her parents
George and Carrie Tucker
and three sisters, Winona
(Nonie) Barber, Eva
Rhine and Carol Tucker.
kneral services were
held Nov. 28 at Kelly
General Home, with
Donald Keith officiating.
Burial was at Magnolia
Cemetery in Apalachicola.


On Wednesday, Nov.
18, 2009, Edgar R. "Ed"
Lee, Sr., our Dad, Papa
and friend passed away.
His good-hearted, kind
nature touched many
along the way.
A soft-spoken
Southern gentleman he
was born Jan. 9, 1938
and raised in Franklin
County. He served a
short time "proudly" with
the US Air Force and
spent the last 30 years as
a truck driver, which he
truly loved.
He was preceded in
death by his parents;
O.B. Lee Sr. and Helen
Ross; and three brothers
William "Billy" Lee,
Thomas "Gene" Lee and
Oscar Lee.
Surviving are one
brother O.B. Lee Jr., of
Apalachicola, and four


children Tana Stillwagon,
of Pittsburgh, Ross
Lee (and wife Debbie),
of Southport, Shane
Lee (and wife Marie),
of Apalachicola, and
Mike Lee (and wife
Lavelle), of Carrabelle;
eight grandchildren,
Alan, Billy, Chris, Dylan,
Christina, Heather,
Austin and Rebecca; nine
great-grandchildren;
and one loyal friend and
sister-in-law Nadine Lee.
A private memorial
service was held
Thursday, Nov. 19.
The Lee family would
like to thank Big Bend
Hospice for their care
and kindness; Daddy
appreciated you so much,
especially Diane, Deanna
and Dr. Chorba. Thank
you also to Franklin Elder
Care and Mrs. Ganaway.


Our Christmas dinner,
for members of the Lanark
Village Association, will
be held Sunday, Dec.20.
We will gather at Chillas
Hall, and serving will begin
at 1 p.m. Bring a dish to
share, and have a nice time
with us. The meat will be
furnished, with tea and
coffee. See ya there!
Hope you enjoyed the
variety show.Didn't get
over there myself, and
haven't heard anything.
Hope the show was a


Riverside Motel downtown.
There were six boats, and it
was great.
Hope to get inkon New
Year's Eve goings-on.
On Christmas Day at
the Hall, smoked turkey
and other goodies will be
available from 8 to 11 a.m.
Come and enjoy. Thanks to
Bob and Carol Dietz and
friends.
They will also host New
Year's Day at the Hall, with
boiled shrimp and other
taste pleasures.


And don't forget the
Hamburgers and Fries
at the American Legion,
every Friday night. What
a deal! A huge hamburger,
and plenty of French fries,
for $5 donation. Eat in or
take out.
Be kind to one another,
and checking on the sick and
housebound and remember
The Reason for the Season.
Until next time, God
Bless America, our troops,
the poor, homeless, and
hungry.


success.
Should
have a big
crowd for
the Parade
of Lights
on the
river this
LANARK NEWS Saturday.
]im Welsh Food will
be served
at 5 p.m.,
parade at 7 p.m. and
fireworks at 8 p.m. Enjoy!
I enjoyed the first boat
parade from the deck of the


Minnie L. Clark is gone, she has
moved on.
But I'll see her again and it won't
be long.
It'll be all right.... How do I
know?
Because the Bible tells me so!

Just as Jesus Christ raise
Lazarus from the dead,
So He'll do for Minnie, upon her
sleeping bed.
The thing that you have to realize
is, if you are not right with Jehovah
God,
Then you will have no part of this
reward.

If you know Minnie, then you
know this to be true,
She loved, worshiped and
cherished her God Jehovah.
She lived for Jehovah. She died


for Jehovah.
Minnie made me take an oath
that under no circumstances was to
be broken,
Because her savior, my savior,
her God, my God, had SPOKEN!

So friends and family straight
from the Bible,
Which you know is 100 percent
Reliable.
In 1 Corinthians 13: 4-7... take
the word "Love" and "It"
And replace them with "Minnie"
and this is what you get:
"Minnie is long-suffering and
kind. Minnie is not jealous. Minnie
does not brag, does not get puffed up.
Minnie does not behave indecently,
does not look for her own interests,
Minnie does not become provoked.
Minnie does not keep account of the
injury. Minnie does not rejoice over

*
Christmas BRIEFS


unrighteousness, but rejoices with
the TRUTH. Minnie bears all things,
believes all things, hopes all things,
endures all things."

Mom, the last Scripture that I
hear coming from you is Psalms
83:18 and that's no Lie,
Telling everyone that loves
Jehovah to serve him Faithfully 'till
the day they Die.
And then one day soon, we'll ALL
look each other in the EYE
And even though at that time we
may again Cry
But "oh" Boy
That will be tears of JOY!
written by Paul Bankston, son
of Minnie Clark, who passed away
Dec. 13, 2008.

From the husband, children and
grandchildren ofMinnie Clark


THE
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
WELCOMES YOU


THE


Christmas oratorio opens
llSe Newell series Sunday
The Ilse Newell And for the
Performing Arts concert series
will begin its 2009-10 season with
a Christmas concert on Sunday
afternoon, Dec. 13, at 4 p.m. in the
sanctuary of 'IYinity Episcopal Church.
Highlighting the concert will be
a performance of the Christmas
portion of the "Messiah" oratorio,
a popular work by the 18th century
composer George Frederic Handel.
The Bay Area Choral Society
of 35 voices will perform, under
the direction of Merel Young, with
piano accompaniment by R. Bedford
Watkins along with area soloists.
Part I of "Messiah" has the
choruses of "For unto Us a Child Is
Born," "O, Thou That Tellest Glad
Tidings to Zion" and "And the Glory


Lamb and Carla May. .
The Ilse Newell And is
funded primarily by the generous
contributions of committed
sponsors, patrons, associates and
friends. A suggested donation of
$3 is asked of concert-goers to
support the series, administered by
The Apalachicola Area Historical
Society, a not-for-profit organization
dedicated to preserving the rich
history of Apalachicola and the
surrounding area.

Catholic cliurdi hosts
.
Christmas bingO
St. Patrick Catholic Church will
host a Christmas Bingo in the Church
Hall on Thursday, Dec. 17, at 6 p.m.
Come and enjoy bingo and
fellowship.
For more information, call 653-2100.


Hwy. 98 & 6th St.
Apalachicola
SUNDAY: 8:00 AM 10:30 AM
LIBRARY HOURS:
SUNDAY 12:00 2:00 PM
MONDAY 11:00 AM 1:00 PM
WEDNESDAY 12:00 2:00 PM
THURSDAY 3:30 5:30 PM


DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times
The Bay Choral Society will
perform the "Messiah" oratorio on
S da
un ya ternoon.
of the Lord." Soloists will sing such
songs as "Every Valley Shall Be
Exalted," "He Shall Feed His Flock"
and "Rejoice Greatly."
Soloists will be Scott Kinkead,
Gordon Adkins, Tamara Marsh,
Don West, Leslie Coon, Sharon
Philyaw, Virginia Harrison, Megan


Richard "Tich" Zingarelli


1110 (ilflStmas Gift' runs
SE* 00 2
The third annual Christmas
program of the Methodist
Churches of Apalachicola and St.
George Island will be presented
Friday, Dec. 11 and Saturday, Dec.
12 at the Chapman Auditorium in
Apalachicola.
Performance of "The
Christmas Gift," begins at 7 p.m.
each evening.
additionala, country and
modern Christmas music has
been woven into the show written
and directed by Scott Kinkead,
the churches' director of creative
ministries, and April Patriotis.
The story focuses on two radio
disk jockeys as they host a call-in
show and discuss Christmas with
listeners.
Members of the two church
choirs, along with singers from
the community, will make up
the chorus. Highlights include
songs featuring The Divas of
Country Music, a children's
chorus, the Bay Area Choral
Society and numerous solos.
Area children will be featured in
several numbers throughout the
evening, especially the Frosty the
Snowman scene.
Tickets are $10 for adults and
$5 for children 12 and under,
and on sale at the Chamber of
Commerce office in Apalachicola.
Tickets may also be purchased at


Ouida Cumbie


Edgar R. Lee, Sr.


IN LOVING MEMORY OF MINNIE (LARK


(ARD OF THANKS
The family of Ouida Cumbie would like to
gratefully acknowledge the love and support,
beautiful flowers, and the wonderful food provided
for our family upon the loss of our Mother. Your
thoughtfulness and prayers have been a great
comfort to us during this time.
The Ouida Cumbie family


Trinity


WELCOMES YOU
Church
flf *I** R
L} I Lil

As pension
101 NE First Street
Carrabelle
SUNDAY
10:00 AlVI






































































































COASTAL
FOOT AND ANKLE CLINIC



9th Annual

Shoe Drive


Help those in need!




shoes to Coastal Foot and Ankle Clinic
located at 221 Hwy. 98 in Apalachicola.
Donations will go to Franklin's Promise
and will be distributed at St. Patrick
Catholic Church located at 27 6th
Street in Apalachicola. Distribution
will be December 22 from 9:00am to 12:00pm.


YI oul anl cal 653-FETT~ (3338) for more information.


Thursday, December 10, 2009


Local


Equark Village filled with Christmas spirit
The ladies from the American Legion Auxiliary Unit 82 in Lanark Village were filled with the Christmas spirit on Thursday,
Dec. 3. Not only did they decorate the Legion for the holiday, they donated a check to Pastor Julie Stephens for the
Carrabelle Food Pantry, above, center. Pastor Julie was very surprised when she received the check given to her by Auxiliary
President Mary Crain, along with some of the other lovely members. The Auxiliary will also be making a donation to the VA
nursing facility in Panama City. Every year at Christmas time the Auxiliary takes its earnings from the previous 12 months and
makes charitable donations to the community. Merry Christmas to all and God bless these angels.
Over 50 people attended a variety show
held at Chillas Hall on Saturday. Organizer : ': a
Aileen Benson said a number of acts cancelled ,
due to illness but there was still plenty of a
fun, fellowship, food and entertainment. The
Carrabelle Library Harmonica Band, led by
maestro Don MacLean performed early in the
afternoon. Susan Roth presented a program .
of carols on piano. The crowd sang along to
a karaoke show of patriotic favorites. Pictured
in the photo are the Lanark Village Christmas
Ensemble, from left, Aileen Benson on fiddle,
Don MacLean and Mikael Lewis on harmonica,
Bob Franklin on guitar, Randy Mims on
recorder, Carol Harris and Cal Allen on fiddle.


Thursday, Dec. 10
The Local Department
of Juvenile Justice
Council will meet from
11:30 a.m. until 12:15 p.m.
at Eastpoint Church of
God. Any questions call
Carol Barfield at 653-2784.
The Franklin County
Community Partnership
for Children and Youth
will meet from 12:30
until 2 p.m. at Eastpoint
Church of God. Any
questions call Carol
Barfield at 653-2784.
Resume writing/Job
and career resources at
Eastpoint library from 10
a.m. to 1 p.m.. For more
info, call 670-8151.
Yoga 4:30 to 5:30 p.m.
Carrabelle library. For info
call 697-2366.
Book Social 5:30 p.m.
Carrabelle library. For info
call 697-2366.
Wandering Star
Quilting Club. Chills Hall
Lanark Village. 1 to 3 p.m.
Call Christine Hinton 697-
2551.
Community Luncheon
and Information
Specials at the Franklin
County Senior Center


in Carrabelle. Noon. $3
donation. Call 697-3760.
Frid D 11
ifr SE*
Apalachicola History,
Culture and Arts board
meets at 8:30 a.m. at City
Hall. For more info, call
653-9219.
Eastpoint Library
Holiday Open House from
11 a.m. to 1 p.m. For more
info, call 670-8151.
Computer Basics III at
Eastpoint library from 2 to
5 p.m. For more info, call
670-8151.
Parent-child reads at
Eastpoint library at 2:15
p.m. for infant to 4-years-
old. For more info, call
670-8151.
Story Hour at
Eastpoint library at 3:30
p.m. for ages 5 to 8. For
more info, call 670-8151.
Exercise class at
Chills Hall in Lanark
Village. 9 to 10 a.m. Open
to all and free.
Alcoholics Anonymous
will meet at 7:30 p.m.
at the Church of the
Ascension, 101 NE First
Street, in Carrabelle. For
more info, call 697-2837.


Saturday Dec. 12
Taking Better Pictures
mth Your Digital Camera.
Carrabelle Library 10 a.m.
to 1 p.m. For more info,
call 697-2366.
Carrabelle Holiday
on the Harbor and Boat
Parade of Lights. Food
will be served at 5 p.m.,
parade at 7 p.m. and
fireworks at 8 p.m. For
more info, call 697-2585.

M0nda Dec. I 4
Apalachicola Planning
and Zoning meets at 5
p.m. at City Hall. For more
info call 653-9319.
Harmonica at
Carrabelle library at 10
a.m. For more Info, call
697-2366.
Yoga at Carrabelle
library from 4:30 to 5:30
p.m. For more info, call
697-2366.
Yarn Junkies will
meet at 7 to 9 p.m. The
newly formed group is
for knitters, crocheters
and others addicted to
yarn. The group meets
each Monday evening at
an alternate location.
For information, call
Kathy Robinson at 653-
7196.
Exercise class at
Chills Hall in Lanark
Village. 9 to 10 a.m. Open
to all and free-


Al-Anon meets at 5:30
p.m. at Trinity Episcopal
Church's Benedict Hall,
at Sixth Street and Ave. D.
For more info, call (850)
222-2294.-
Bingo at the Franklin
County Senior Center in
Carrabelle. Early bird at
6 p.m., regular bingo at
7 p.m. Cards begin at $4.
Call 697-3760.

Tuesday, Dec. I 5
Carrabelle Library
Volunteer Christmas
Breakfast at 2 Al's at
9 a.m. For more info, call
697-2366.
Sea Oats Garden Club
will meet at 11:30 a.m.
Please call President
Arlene Oehler at 697-9790
for meeting location.
Breakfast at the
Franklin County Senior
Center in Carrabelle.
Coffee at 7:30 a.m.,
meal at 8 a.m. $2
suggested donation. Call
697-3760.
Bingo 7 p.m. St. George
Island Fire Dept. 25
cents per card. Families
welcome. Proceeds go to
St. George Island Civic
Club. Call 927-4654.
Alcoholics Anonymous
will meet at 7:30 p.m.
at the Church of the
Ascension, 101 NE First
Street, in Carrabelle. For
more info, call 697-2837.


Wednesday, Dec. I6
Adult Wii at Carrabelle
library. 9 to 11 a.m. For
more info call 697-2366.

TilUfStlay, DO(. 17
Franklin County School
Board will meet at 6 p.m.
at the Willie Speed board
room in Eastpoint. For
more info call 670-2810.
Apalachicola Traffic
Safety committee wiH
meet at noon at City Hall.
For more info call 653-
9319.
Apalachicola
CRA (Community
Redevelopment Agency)
will meet at 8:30 a.m. at
City Hall. For more info
call 653-9319.
Individual computer
instruction at Eastpoint
library from 10 a.m. to
noon. For more info, call
670-8151.
Franklin County
Literacy Open House from
10 a.m. to 2 p.m. For more
info, call 670-8151.
Wandering Star
Quilting Club. Chills Hall
Lanark Village. 1 to 3 p.m.
Call Christine Hinton 697-
2551.
Community Luncheon
and Information
Specials at the Franklin
County Senior Center
in Carrabelle. Noon. $3
donation. Call 697-3760.


B4 | The Times


Sheriff's

REPORT

The following report
is provided by the
Franklin County Sheriff's
Office. Arrests are made
by officers from the
following city, county, and
state law enforcement
agencies: Apalachicola
(APD), Carrabelle
(CPD), Florida Highway
Patrol (FHP), Franklin
County Sheriff's Office
(FCSO), Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation
Commission (FWC),
Florida Department of
Environmental Protection
(FDEP), Florida Division
of Insurance Fraud (DIF)
and Florida Department
ofAgriculture and
Consumer Services

(FTI fC dants are
considered innocent until
proven guilty in a court
of law.

94
Anthony Dever, 29,
Apalachicola, domestic
battery (APD)
Darnell Goings, 37,
Washington, D.C., sexual
battery by custodial
authority (FCSO)

Dec. 3
Roderick Robinson,
42, Apalachicola, sale of
a controlled substance
and violation of probation
(FCSO)
Joseph Swinney, 46,
Apalachicola, sale of a
controlled substance
(FCSO)
Jonathan G. Pace, 32,
Apalachicola, violation of
probation (FCSO)

Dec. 4
Nellie E Evans, 56,
Carrabelle, domestic
battery, battery on
person age 65 or older
and violation of probation
(FCSO)
Micah A. Rapack, 24
Apalachicola, violation of
probation (FCSO)

Dec. 5
Nytasha E Merrell, 21,
Rockledge, introduction
of contraband into state
correctional facility
(FCSO)
Joshua C. Taylor, 21
Carpentersville, IL, felony
criminal mischief and
burglary of a structure
(CPD)

SE*
Christopher A.
Creamer, 20, Tallahassee,
violation of probation
(FCSO)
Daniel W. Degree, 49,
Eastpoint, introduction
of contraband into
correctional facility
(FCSO)


COmmunity CA LE NDAR







































































Library HAPPENINGS


DE NT URE
LAB ON PREMISES
Same Day Service on Repairs and Relines

IR6RN BORfTaper, 9 9

OHiCR WORLTRye7, 9 9


g g
12761 Pea Ridge Road Bristol, Florida 32321
TELEPHONE (850) 643-5417


]II


D_


II





_


18 Shadow Lane
<"'::1I'o- sF5L3- 0
Cell: (850) 653-7654
a ; a
Tracles
& Services
mm
DAY*-
653-8868


NOTICE OF INTENDED
ACTION
FRANKLIN DISTRICT
SCHOOL BOARD

Purpose and Effect: The Franklin District School Board
proposes to amend and adopt polices, as provided in the
Administrative Procedures Act for the purpose of bringing said
policies into compliance with Florida Statutes and State Board
of Education Rules.
Summary: The following is a brief description of each proposal

aannklin County School District
* Code of Conduct (Amend dress code and use of electronic
devices)
* School Board Policy Manual (Athletics & Transportation
Policy)
Statutory Authority: Section 230.22(2), Florida Statutes
These proposed rules will be considered by the Franklin County
School Board at a meeting publicly advertised and held in the
Franklin County Willie Speed School Board meeting room at
85 School Road, Suite One, Eastpoint, Florida no earlier than
January 07, 2010.
The above Policy Manual and/or Code of Conduct may be
reviewed at the Franklin County School Board District Office,
located at 85 School Road, Suite One, Eastpoint, Florida during
the hours of 8:00 AM until 4:00 PM, Monday Friday.


IV


Thursday, December 10, 2009


Local


The Times | B5


Florida high school
seniors: Are you filling
out college applications
and poring over potential
scholarship programs?
Then make plans to enter
the Florida Realtors' 2009-
2010 Scholarship/Essay
Contest for High School
Seniors for a chance to win
up to $6,000 in scholarship
funding.
Entering the contest
is easy. Students write a
typed, double-spaced es-
say 500 words or less
-on the topic, "How Does
a Realtor Professional
Benefit the Community?"
This topic allows students
the freedom to write about
the wide range of Realtor
professionals who work in
a variety of fields, includ-
ing residential brokerage,
commercial brokerage, in-
dustrial and office broker-
age, farm and land broker-


agerealestateappraising,
property management,
land development and real
estate counseling, to name
just a few of the general
specialties. Or essays may
address such points as the
benefits of homeowner-
ship to society, or to fami-
lies on a personal level, or
how the selling of commer-
cialrealestateencourages
economic growth.
"This year marks a
milestone for Florida Re-
altors' scholarship/essay
contest for 10 years now,
we have helped deserving
young people realize their
dreams of a college edu-
cation," says 2010 Florida
Realtors President Wen-
dell Davis, a broker and
regional vice president
with Watson Realty Corp.
in Jacksonville. "Our suc-
cessful scholarship pro-
gram is just one way that


FloridaRealtorsgiveback
to their communities. It is
a privilege to make a dif-
ference in the lives of our
youth by investing in their
future. After all, a better
future for our children is a
better future for all of us."
Flonda Realtors' schol-
arship program benefits
students from across the
state, with first-place win-
nershonoredineachofthe
association's 13 districts in
the state. Students turning
in the top district-winning
essays will each receive a
$1,000 scholarship award.
The 13 district-winning es-
says will go on to compete
to win three $5,000 Florida
Realtors scholarships on
the statewide level, for a
total of $28,000 in scholar-
ship awards.
All essays, along with
an official Essay Cover
Form, must be post-


markedbeforeoronFeb.
8, 2010, and mailed to the
Florida Realtors, 7025 Au-
gusta National Drive, PO.
Box 725025, Orlando, FL
32872-5025.
There are several ways
that you can obtain the
complete application kit
and essay cover form for
FlondaRealtor's2009-2010
Scholarship/Essay Con-
test. Check with the high
school guidance office, go
to Florida Realtors' Media
Center website http://me-
dia.flondarealtors.org to
download the matenals or
contact the Realtor Asso-
ciation of Franklin & Gulf
Counties at 653-3322.
Flonda Realtors, for-
merly known as the Flori-
da Association of Realtors,
serves as the voice for real
estate in Flonda. Go to
http://media.floridareal-
tors.org.


S By lotythe enepecia to Imes
It's official the
Christmas season is upon
us. The Apalachicola
Municipal Library is
pulling out its children's
Holiday books. Going
through the collection,
there are many colorful
selections. A number of
books are new this year
or last.
"The Dolls' Christmas"
by Tasha Tudor, was
originally published
in 1950. I immediately
recognized the familiar
illustrations as those
of one of my favorite
childhood books, "A
is for Annabelle," an
alphabet book about
Grandmother's doll,
published in 1953. Tudor
received a Caldecott
Honor in 1957 for "1 is
One." The American
Library Association
presents the Caldecott
Award.
"A Christmas Memory"
by Truman Capote, with
illustrations by Beth Peck.
Originally published in
Mademoiselle Magazine
in 1958, the story is
about a 7-year-old and
an elderly cousin baking
fruitcakes another
of my favorite holiday
topics.
The classic "The
Night Before Christmas"
with colorful modern
illustrations by Max
Grover, is ready for a
Christmas eve read-
aloud.
"The 12 Bugs of
Christmas"_a pop-up
counting book features
Twelve Angel Bugs a-
rising ... Eight Popcorn
Bugs a-popping ... Six
Tinsel Bugs a-tangling ...
and a Fruitcake Bug in a


Pe Tr
lija s Angel" by
Michael Rosen tells the
story of a young Jewish
boy and an elderly Black
barber. The barber is
a real person, Elijah
Pierce, who was also a
renowned woodcarver for
Ohio
"Christmas in the Big
House, Christmas in the
Quarters" by Patricia
and Frederick McKissack
offers time travel to a
Virginia plantation along
the James River, in 1859.
The Coretta Scott King
Award-winning authors
compare and contrast
how Christmas was
celebrated in the big
plantation house and
the slave quarters in the
period just before the
Civil War.
"Christmas with Teddy
Bear" is a sturdy board
book for young ones.
The First United
Methodist Church
has already come by
and checked out an
old favorite, "Frosty
The Snowman," to
use for their holiday
performances at
Chapman Auditorium,
Friday and Saturday, Dec
11 & 12 at 6 p.m. Tickets
are available at the
church.
The Apalachicola
Municipal Library
wishes everyone in the
community a joyous
holiday. Come by and
check out some of these
books and share the
season by reading
aloud, a memory I
certainly have from my
childhood.
Caty Greene is
librarian for the
Apalachicola Municipal
Library. To reach her,
call 653-8436.


n@nx%\ s


liaVe Grimler Will Tra
Stump and Root Grinding.
Reduced to chips.
No job too small or large.
CalliCI C aede
697-2562


DON WILLSON'S
SESPET CVITCAENK
Serving all of Franklin
county see'ri '
Septic Tanks&
Grease Traps Pumped
Call day or night


The Franklin County
Public Library Eastpoint
and the Carrabelle
branch will finish out
the year with several
more outstanding free
computer class offerings.
Sign up for Resume
Writing/Job Career
Resources at the
Eastpoint Library,
Thursday, Dec. 10, from
10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Learn
the fundamentals of
resume writing, and
leave the library with a
completed resume.
On Friday, Dec.
11, from 2 to 5 p.m.,
computer instructor
Charles Sawyer will
be teaching Computer
Basics III at the
Eastpoint Library.
If Santa is thinking
of giving you a digital
camera for Christmas,
then you need to
attend the free digital
photography class at


the Carrabelle Library,
Saturday, Dec. 12, from
10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Call the Carrabelle
Branch at 697-2366
to register or call the
Eastpoint Library at 670-
8151.
New DVDs are
arriving each week, so
take one or two home
to view. The check-out
length for DVDs is one
week, plenty of time to
enjoy a family movie
night. Traveling this
holiday season? Check
out the library's large
selection of audio books
(books on tape or CD) to
listen to while driving tO
Grandma's.
Need a quick
inexpensive stocking
stuffer? The library has
a big selection of new
and used hardbacks
and paperback books.
The inventory is always
changing!


ROBERTS APPLIANCE
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Pressure Washing Additions Vinyl Siding
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RCOO66499
P.O. Box 439 RGOO65255
Carrabelle, FL 32322
697-2783 or Mobile 566-2603


\OTORIS & 4
Q 04
Michael & Anthony
O State Certified Electrician ESI2000204
& Finish Carpentry RG006883
Building Supplies 850-229-6751 850-227-
& Auto Repair
Carrabelle 697-3333 ,
We Deliver Anywhere
Hardware and VisaDiscoverand
American Express
Humane 88101 000161 Part=, nee restore


(hildr en's holiday


Florida Realtors offer $28,000 in scholarship awards


I


* ito


itental Chmnc Ir





WE'RE AVAILABLE 24 7


| 1100
Apalachicola, Florida, at
11:00 a.m., on the 30th
day of December 2009,
the following described
property:
Parcel l
Begin at a point 565 feet
East and 71 feet South
from the Northwest corner
of Section 32, Township 8
South, Range 6 West. Run
thence South 36 degrees
East two hundred (200)
feet to U.S. Highway No.
319 and continue South

a chss slaid H hPw yNtTost
BEGINNING and continue
this line South to St.
George Sound. Thence
North 54 degrees East
ngceshore ih36 5d g
West to the Southern
boundary of said Highway,
thence along the Southern
boundary of said Highway
to the Point of Beginning,
thus forming a Tract fifty
a a dS e wean

Parcel 2
That certain parcel of land
in the N.W 1/4 of Frac-
tional Section 32, 18S,
R.6W lying between
boundary lines, If ex-
tended, of the 50 feet,
Second Street" between
the 100 feet Highway (U.S.
9e r atSeoNnoci, d d
ther described as follows:
From a point 637 feet due
East of the N.W corner of
said Section 32 (Con.Mon)

beonS. 360tfd dsE
to a POINT FOR BEGIN-
NING: Run thence S. 54
degrees W along highway
feet theCerg 3S60
thence alongaSo nd nort3h6

deg. E. of the beginning
point; thence N. 36 deg.
W to the point of beginn-
Ing.
WITNESS MY HAND and
tNhe se rof25ths00C90urt on
**AMERICANS WITH DIS-
ABILITIES ACT (ADA) NO-
TICE

IBNLD S1LESED TGHA -
SONABLE ACCOMMODA-
TION TO PARTICIPATE IN
IOSULD C NO G
COURT ADMINISTRA-
RSOFSFBELEASSOON
PHONE: 1-800-955-8770;
OA REW H OR}9N5G-8 1
(TDD); OR 1-800-955-8770
ERVAE.FLORIDA RELAY
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Michele Maxwell


Franklin County's source of news for more than a century


| 1100
Act of 1990, persons need-
ing special accommoda-
tion to participate in this
proceeding should contact
the Clerk of the Court not
later than five business
days prior to the proceed-
ing at the Franklin County
Courthouse. Telephone
850-653-8861 or
1-800-955-8770 via Florida
Relay Service.
1183-74787
December 3, 10, 2009
4997T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OlFRCTHTE 2NNDAJUDDI AL
FRANKLIN COUNTY
FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION

MANCTMORTGAGE, LLC,
VS
ALBERT J. TISI, ETAL
DEFENDANTS)

N SISTER TAVCE OENRVICE
TO: ALBERT J. TISI AND
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
ALBERT J. TISI
.
wnh e esnhceethis ub
living; and if he/she/they
be dead, the unknown de-
fendants who may be
spouses heirsade 1
lienors, creditors, trustees,
and all parties claiming an
interest by through, under
o gamstnthekDefendantse
dead or alive, and all

h t e d
ascribed in the mortgage
being foreclosed herein.

EDt tEa RtoBnYtoN
c a mor e on the

LOTS 7, 8, 9, AND THE
NORTHERLY 20.00 FEET
OF 10, BLOCK 242" OF
OELAC SUOBFDI OLANC -
PER MAP OR PLAT IN
COMMON USE ON FILE
AT THE CLERK OF THE
RACNU IN OFFICCOEUN
FLORIDA AND BEING
MEOSRCERIBEPDART ULAFROLY
LOWS:
BEING AT RE-ROD
INMARKTEHDE #4N261R)THMEAARSKT
CORNER OF LOT 7,
BLFOCAK2 FTOHLEACITA
SUBDIVISION AS PER
MTN OURSEP TN ILCOAMT
THE CLERK OF THE CIR-
CIUIT COOF CTE INFLFO ND
SAID POINT ALSO LYING
pNGHT-TFEWAYWEBSOT


| 1100
ARY OF 24TH AVENUE
FROM SAID POINT OF
BEGINNING RUN SOUTH
00 DEGREES 10 MINUTES
59 SECONDS EAST
ALONG SAID WESTERLY
RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUND-
ARY 110.00 FEET TO A
RE-ROD (MARKED
#4261), THENCE LEAV-
ING SAID WESTERLY
RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUND-
ARY RUN SOUTH 89 DE-
GREES 48 MINUTES 56
SECONDS WEST 100.00
FEET TO A RE-ROD

NGARK EWA4Y 1ABSOTL RN
ARY OF A 10.00 FOOT
WIDE ALLEY THENCE
RUN NORTH 00 DE-
GREES 11 MINUTES 00
CONDS WESETASALEORN3
RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUND-
ARY 110.00 FEET TO A
RE-ROD (MARKED
#4261). THENCE LEAV-
ING SAID EASTERLY
RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUND-

RCE UDN4S8N TT8
FEET TO THE POINT OF
BEGINNING CONTAINING
0.25 ACRES MORE OR
LESS.
has been filed against you
and you are required to
serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any to it,
on DAVID J. STERN, ESQ.
sisatt n utwhP e
Island Road #400, Planta-
tion, FL 33324-3920 no
later than 30 days from the
date of the first publication

trhk eo it e
before service on Plaintifs
attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a de-

aag nstw u boe theent
cle n rd etitti c m-
herein.
WITNESS my hand and
the seal of this Court at
FRAN IN0t dua ofFNor-
vember 2009.
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT
COURT
BY: Michele Maxwell
DEPUTY CLERK

HEACACMOER NCSE
DISABILITIES ACT per
sons with disabilities need-
na sp laccommno
COURT ADMINISTRA-
TIONtyatC rthFRANKLIN
850-653-8861 ext 100,
-995555-88777701 DF1rid
Relay Service.

LASWTEORFNFICES OF DAVID
Attorney for Plaintiff
900 SOUTH PINE ISLAND


| 1100
Albertelli Law
Attorney for Plaintif
PO. Box 23028
Tampa, FL 33623
(813) 221-4743
08-08321
December 10, 17, 2009
5022T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OlFALTHCEIRSCECTONIN AUN
FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY
FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION

TMHEELLBOANNK OF FNOEWMYEORR
KNOWNASTHEBANKOF
NEW YORK AS
SUCCESSOR TRUSTEE
TO JPMORGAN CHASE

TC TIONFONRATIO
CERTIFICATEHOLDERS
OF STRUCTURED ASSET
MORT GAGE
INVESTMENTS II INC
BEAR STEARNS ALT-A


5 F ATT RO
Plaintid,
vs.
ROBERT NEIL POOLE
A/K/A ROBERT N. POOLE
et al
De@dant(s)
CASE NO.:
19-2009-CA-000065
DIVISION:

NOS SCHEDULED SALE


e al g FEaRneEc
sure Sale dated November
23, 2009, and entered in
Case No. 19-2009-CA-
000h065SoftheCi CoC

tunty, ridfor inFran h
The Bank of New York
Mellon formerly known as
The Bank of New York as
successor Trustee to
N AsC tioE3anaks
Trustee for the Certifi-
cateholders of Structured
Asset Mortgage Invest-
ALeT rnu tBeaMShans
Pass- Through Certificates
resd20ROo5 disN
a/k/a Robert N. Poole,
Branch Bankingaa ITMust
bd visi fenAdsase atiio3
sell to the highest and best
n uncashlor a
on the 30th day of Decem-
scr b d9,pthe follow gt
forth in said Final Judg-
ment of Foreclosure:
LOT 11, OF CASA DEL
MHAARSE l, ACSCUOBRDMSIOTNO


| 1100
CORPORATION,
Plaintiff,
vs.
GENE LERNER, Ill, et al.,
Defendants)
CASE NO.:
19-2008-CA-000463
DIVISION:
NOTICE OF SALE PUR-
SUANT TO CHAPTER 45
NOTICE IS HEREBY

d pursuant e3ca
and entered in Case No.
19-2008-CA-000463of the
Circuit Court of the Sec-
ond Judicial Circuit in and
Frank icCou h ra

MortgageCorporationis
the Plaintiff and Gene Ler-
ner Ill, are defendants, I
will sell to the highest and
best bidder for cash in/on
Franklin County Florida at

ch b0309 te a osw
forth in said Final Judg-
ment of Foreclosure:
LOT 36, CARRABELLE
LANDING, ACCORDING
TO THE PLAT THEREOF
RECORDED IN THE PUB-
LIC RECORDS OF FRANK-
LIN COUNTY FLORIDA,
IN PLAT BOOK 8, PAGE
47.
A/K/A LOT 36,
CARRABELLE LANDING,
CARRABELLE, FLORIDA
32322

Any nrse claim ga
the sale, if any other than
the property owner as of
the date of the Lis Pend-
sdmus tacl mewithin
Dated in Franklin County,
Florida this 25th day of No-
vember 2009.
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Franklicnh unt rida

Deputy Clerk
In accordance with the
Americans with Disabilities
Act, persons needing spe-
clal accommodation to

ha dnCt sr cee
M. Johnson, 33 Market
Street, Suite 203 Apalach-
mab L 0, 3-p8h806ne
not later than seven (7)
slfprioru ehisp e
voice impaired, please call
50 s577-p41400.eToc t
Franklin County Clerk of
0333 A ra ic 0
653-8861; Fax: (850)
653-9339.


ANNouncqulgNTs
1100 Legal Advertiong
1110 Classified Notices
1120 Public Notices/
Announcements
1125 Carpools &
1130 R a
1140 Happy Ads
1150 Personals
1160 Lost
1170 Found


1100
4950T
IN THE SECOND JUDI-
CINALCOCIRNCTUITF FDR4NK
SUPERIORBANK
Plaintiff
vs.


SSNAACS E
LIN COUNTY INC
Defendant s.
CASENO.09-419-CA
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO
M EE ,a MES
BRISAS HOMEOWNERS,
ASSOCIATION OF FRANK-
LIN COUNTY INC., and all
ohthesrs having an interest in
bject property


ac otNo s
property in Franklin
County, Florida
a S StA rea

asa 1d5,in k
Records of Franklin
County, Florida
has been filed against you
we7uco cre dwr
ten defenses if any to it
on Frank A. Baker
plaintiffs attorney, whose
address r 3nlaLaf tt
32446, on or before 30
bsic ntheadateil t
original with the clerk of
s wi o n f'sb ore
er;orothm at ydt r
will be entered against you
rtherel tdemandedin
e comp .

DA0T9ED this November 11

AsO MkAR JOHdNSON
By: Michele Maxwell
cme Ok 2009


1100
THE PLAT THEREOF AS
RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK 6, PAGE 2, OF THE
PUBLIC RECORDS OF
FRANKLIN COUNTY
FLORIDA.
A/K/A 2202 SAILFISH
DRIVE, ST GEORGE
ISLAND, FL 32328

Any person claiming an in-
terest in the surplus from
the sale, if any, other than
the property owner as of
the date of the Lis Pend-
sdmustafNe ta cl me.within
Dated in Franklin County,
Floridathis25thdayof No-
vember 2009.
erk of tChe C rcultl Curt

By:MicheleMaxwell
Deputy Clerk
In accordance with the
Americans with Disabilities
Act, persons needing spe-
rtic c nmh a eed
Clerk of the Courts, Marcia
M. Johnson, 33 Market
Street, Suite 203, Apalach-
icola, FL 32320; telephone
number (850) 653-8861,
not later than seven (7)
days prior to this proceed-
ing. If you are hearing or
voice impaired, please call
(850) 577-4400. To file re-
spo Cpoeua conkta
Court, 33 Market Street,
Suite 203, Apalachicola FL
32320, Tel: (850)
653-8861; Fax: (850)

be Law
Attorney for Plaintif
PO. Box 23028
Tampa, FL 33623
81322511049743

Dec1rnber 10, 17, 2009
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
SECOND JUDICIAL CIR-
CUIT IN AND FOR
FRANKLIN COUNTY
FLORIDA
CITIZENS BANK
WAKULLA d/b/a AMERIS
BANK
PLAINTIFF
vs.
MICHAEL C. KELLER, et
al.
DEFENDANTSS.
CASE NO.: 09-000137-CA
NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURESALE
NOTICE IS HERBEY
GIVEN unsu tdtomae u%
Foreclosure entered
that lbw d rthoe
cash in the lobby of the
Franidin33C t St


SB The Times Thursday, December 10, 2009


COEIN ITO O PLCHCL


Find & Post


job related items:

> resumes & career opportunities <

relevant to the Florida panhandle


To place an ad, call 850. 747.5020/800.345. 8688


1100
4969T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY
FLORIDA.
CIVIL DIVISION

THE BANK OF NEW YORK
MELLON FKA THE BANK
OF NEW YORK, AS TRUS-
TEE FOR THE BENEFIT
OF CWALT INC., ALTER-
NATIVE LOAN TRUST
2007-19 MORTGAGE
PASS-THROUGH CERTIFl-
CATES, SERIES 2007-19

Psaintif
EDWARD STEPHAN
DACHTERA; et al,
Defendants
Case No
192009CA000624XXXXXX
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: EDWARD STEPHAN
DACHTERA Last Known

EAALL AT304R6 DR.
Current Residence is Un-
known
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action to foreclose a
mortgage on the following
described property in
Franklin County Florida:
LOT NUMBER 5 IN ALLl-
GI OONR IN AACT
SECTION 3 AND A PART
OF FRACTIONAL SEC-
TION 2. TOWNSHIP 7
SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST
S IT GEPR FB
1, AT PAGES 25 TO 28
INCLUSIVE, OF THE PUB-
LIC RECORDS OF AND
TGUATEINLYINGFRAANND
COUNTY FLORIDA.
has been filed against you
and you are required to
serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it
SM a tiHf tt r
vvh4o3se dress e FX
33339-1438, (954)
564-0071, within 30 days
from first date of publica-
tion, and file the original

ff t rn
immediately thereafter; other-
wise a default will be en-
te eci agea nst dyou ar e
complaint or petition.
DATEDonNovemberl7,
2009.
Marcia M. Johnson
ClerkofCourt
DTerry ECClreamer
In accordance with the
Americans with Disabilities


1100
ROAD, SUITE 400
PLANTATION, FL
33324-3920 09-25194
GMAP
December 3, 10. 2009
5019T
IN THE SECOND JUDI-
CIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY
FLORIDA
SUPERIOR BANK
Plainti
vs
E M MOMOORNEGaOk/a
ERY a/k/a FREDA M.
WHITEandCATHERINE
E. BANKS
Defendants.
CASE NO.: 09-00067-CA
NOTICEOFSALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN pursuant to a Final
Judgment of Foreclosure

n Oe C o
ond Judicial Circuit in and
for Franklin County Flor-
ida wherein the artles
RIe tB NKlaint ,thSeU
pendants, FREDA M.
MOORE, a/k/a FREDA M.
MONTGOMERY a/k/a
Et he igW ndl b
bidder for cash, at 11:00
a.m. (Eastern Time) on the
7th day of January 2010
ratnhkeinfro steps Co e
house, Apalachicola, Flor

pwhg-described rte
said Final Judgment of
Foreclosure:

ofN d9PI B ctkdh
ofounCar Franklin
The successful bidder at
the sale will be required to
place the requisite state
tdocum a stamps on
DATED this 25th day of
November 2009.
Hon. MARCIA JOHNSON
Clerk of the Court
Franklkih unt rida
As Deputy Clerk
FRANK A. BAKER
310LRa yet StTet
Marianna, FL 32446
December10,17,2009
5021T
F TTHHEE RETONDC
CIAL CIRCUIT IN AND

VR AANKLIN COUNTY
WACHOVIA MORTGAGE





The Times Thursday, D icember 10, 2009 7B


4100 | 6110 | 6140
3 br, Apt in Lanark Village 1, br
w/ porch & sml yard, wil alachicola, FL
consider rent to own $500 CAapl 850-643-7740.
Bookkeeping mo + $250 dep. 509-2460
Bookkeeper 2br, 2ba, 2nd story w/ bal- 7
Guest Relations, cony in historic downtown
AR/AR QUICK BOOKS, re- Apalachicola. W/D Incl, 3 br, 2 ba, house for rent
sume.WaterSt.Hotel furn, or unfurn, $900mo. In Apalachicola. Cntrl air
il 323- cIty dep., idrepcehaWy ncdD yarud


POSTA41300 T JOB OB d 62m7 0 dk
INFO FOR SALE? Eastpoint Apartments Eo town Apabich. LarrT
Accepting application for last & sec. Ref s Req. Avail
Caution 1, 2, & 3 bedroom Dec 1st. Call 653-1675
handicap & non-handicap
units. Rental assistance is Eastpoint On the Bay 3 br,
You NEVER have to pay available to qualified 2 ba, CHA, DW, Mature
for Information about applicants. 45 Begonia Couple $750 mo + dep.
federal or postal jobs. If Street, Eastpoint, FL No smoking or pets
you see a job 32328. Call 850-670-4024, 850-670-8266
guaranteecontactthe TDD/TTY 711. Equal
FTC. Housing Opportunity. Eastpoint, 2br, 2ba, study
The Federal Trade offlb-eDI VVhd ering P11 s
Is Am mams sc umer Heritaar Villas mo, Call 678-64T- 810
protection agency. 2BR handicap unit now Waterfront
www.ftc.gov/jobscams available. Some rental as- Rental
1-877-FTC-HELP distance may be available. 3br, 2ba Carrabelle. Qulet
HUD vouchers accepted. Neighborhood with Great
A public service Call 850-653-9277. TDD/ View of Dog Island. Fur-
message from the FTC TTY 711. Equal Housing nished. Call for more Info.
andTheNewsHerald Opportunity. 850-443-.2216
ClassifiedAdvertising
Department

I enro
Lanark Village
1 br 1 ba, Renovated/ fur-
nished end unit, new
kitchen & bath, minimum 4
meon hnolesasekI emoon- 2dbrC2rr e WWoodd
sidered. (850) 653-3838 shed, trash pick up
., gn5c ed6 00 mo. +dep.
6100 nmeesr1ial I Lanark Villaheed 1W/ 1
6110 Apartments | C/H/A, yard $450 mo, I *
6120 Beach Rentals 1st & last. Ask for Jim
in own use a a 2 br, 2 ba, Mobile Home

08- nommpfRW ted 318 Woodill Rd. Furnished,
6170 Mo Home/Lot Large Studio $600 deposit $600 month
6180 Out-of-Town Rentals Near downtown, Big pn- 850-697-8440
6190 -Timeshare Rentals vate, fenced backyard. 43 Bayshore Dr. Apalachl-
6200 -Vacation Rentals Pets ok, $500/mo plus utill- cola. Really nice 2 br, with
ties. 850 228 7942 hirlpool bath et
neighborhood. Uqntr-
ozoo | Small Studio Apt. for nished. $550 mo 1st & last
mature, single person, mo rent + dep. 653-4293
For Lease $500 Includes all utilities after 4 pm.
Commercial Unfurnished, 850-697-8623
or 545-6904
Building
Approx 1100 sq ft. Southern Villas
Available now corner
of Hwy98 & 12th Street Apartments
850-653-9788 or Immediate opening on 2
850 615 0058 BR HC & non-HC acces-
sible units. Rental units.
, entalcissgce5
TDD/TTY 711. Equal Hous- 7100 Homes
For Rent Ing Oppurtunity n House
2 months free Office/ Studio Apt. Pmpmly
Retail 2nd floor Mont- mdm house
gomery Building 29 Furnished 7140 Farms & Hanches
Ave E $175 per month Upstairs studio 7150 Lots and AcreaGe
call 305-588-5885 Qulet location water & 7160 Mobile Homes/Lots
electric Incld. Walk to 7 tt
, downtown. $700 mo. plus Properly
Opult4875107 9a l6 or 7190 I-oE-Town
For Rent 7200 Timeshare
Histo I bu dplo eCor

5-5E8858 mmerce VneqC caeb Iler a rtment Modular701000me, Ex
excellent condition 2br, 2ba,
nished, patio, carport' All appliances, ceiling
must see to appreciate' fans, custom deck, New
$750 month, includes dish CH&A, guaranteed for 10
network & all util. $300 de- years. You move it.
posit, Minimum of 6 mo. $30,000 obo 850-653-8122
580 97-3r2e4q6uired. Call or 850-653-9118


esso | a serimiman
-RECRE41 L
:E ue& Colledibles
8120 Spoits utility Vehicles
8130 Trucks
2 br, 2 ba, 1200sf Twnhm, 8140 -Vans
C r0abe e I ge deck a 0 Commercial
Avaltla e0- 2w499all for an 8170 Au c ories
ap 8210 Boats
8220 Personal Watercraft
O ab aM8arine

esso I 8245 BSouapt il s & Docks
8310 Aircraft/Aviation
8320 ArV/Dif Road Vehicles
O aomp ro8m raHen
itbh t ta, DOWni e te
and Jacuzzl, secluded on
1.5 acres, v2 mile from I atoo
public beach, between Suzuki 2006 Katana-600
Carrabelle & Apalachicola. CC, excellent condition,
Newly Renovated, $575 50-60 miles per gallon. 2k
mo, neg. 1st & sec. Call miles. $4200 OBO must
954-816-7004 sell Call 850-866-0890





Janalyn Dowden
108 S. E. Ave. A
Carrabelle, Florida 32322.

2 BR 2 B u h D I w
e enwDdoonal2ewot redecorated ... $600.00
Fenced, large lot $800.00
3 BR 1 B I)uplex
Unfurnished, Fenced Back Yard ... ... $650.00
2 BR 1 B Du lex
Remodeled, enced Back Yard ......... $600.00
3 BR 1 B End Unit Apt
Front & Back Porch ... ... $525.00
3 BR 3 B Condo
Unfurnished Pool........................... $750.00
u Ris3hedC ..........................$500.00 wk
2 BR End Unit Apt
Furnished Car ort... ... $525.00
1 BR Interior pt
Furnished Redecorated ... ... $500.00
2 BR 1 BAt
Unfurnished Apt................................ $500.00
3 BR 1 B Furnished Apt (3 Day i5 .00 wk
2 BR 1 B Water Front House
Beautiful View................................... $900.00
Beachhfront hou)sne with win r rates.

PLEASE CALL JOANN 850-697-9604
OR 850-323-0444 FOR RENTALS.


a : a
s -
| 7160
| 6120

St. George '
ISland
Apalachicola, 14x66, 2 br,
Gla a I ob Satel 2 ba moble hom ty
table. 12X65 deck with tric, furnished on lot
Beautiful view. Call 121ftx75ft. Welding shop
850-653-5114 with tools and equipment.

I St. G I -6 35- 1232 Thomas
eorae


Franklin Countys source of news for more than a century


| 1100 | 1100 || 1100 | 3230 4100 4100
Deputy Clerk TANCE OF 320.6 FEET TO KNOWN PARTIES MAY
A POINT ON THE SOUTH CLAIM AN INTEREST AS ,
DALE G. WRESTLING, SR., BOUNDARY OF THE 100 SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVI-
ESQUIRE FEET RIGHT OF WAY OF SEES, GRANTEES OR
331 East Union Street SAID ROAD, THENCE OTHER CLAIMANTS Carrabelle, 228 River Rd
Jacksonalle, FL 32202 RUN NORTHWESTERLY Defendants. Frl & Sat Dec. 11th & 12th.
Telephone: 904/356-2341 ALONG SAID RIGHT OF 9 am 3pm, Educat Nutrition
December 10, 17, 2009 WAY BOUNDARY 240 Case No. 09-000133-CA Garage" Sale lon
5032T FEET THENCE RUN TanningbedLadlessmall Pf0gram
SNECTEDCIRUCDUI IACLO R GAHDTH H T RTA CELOSURESALE ts ml ys, Car trailer Matnht a uru taorPpser Assistant/Driver

IdN ANDOU ANT RG O F uOV I aEpursuSu g eEnRF a oa Fr T+ 1B8u er du srs FPea n

FIRUSST STATE BANK & D; HEFRREIN CO reclosu OdateedntNr em- o 8amf Iture, dishes $5a /creditorhn Ostatis csI hrs a week) to tassis t
PLAINilFE POINT OF BEGINNING Case No. 08-000133-CA of pots and pans, etc Fllled. Contact Math Divi- on Wheels and other nutrl-
RUN NORTHEASTERLY the Circuit Court of the slon @ 872-3852 or tlon programs in Apalachl-
AT A RIGHT ANGLE TO Second Judicial Circuit in 747-3229. Additional Info: cola. Must have a depend-
vs. THE ALLIGATOR POINT and for Franklin County, ' http://www.gulfcoast.edu/hr able vehicle and a good
ROAD TO A POINT ON Florida, wherein WAKULLA /employment.htm GCCC driving record. Good or-
ELLIOTT W FANN, et al. THE SOUTH BOUNDARY BANK, a Florida banking | 3250 Is an EA/EO/M/F/Vet em- ganizational and computer
DEFENDANT(S). OF THE 100 FOOT RIGHT corporation, is the Plaintiff, player. skills a plus. Criminal
OF WAY OF SAID ROAD, and PAUL D. OSTERBYE All You Can Eat check and drug test re-
CASENO.: THENCERUNNORTH-andLORNAOSTERBYE,*SNOWCRABS* 0 GulfCH quired.Applicationavaila-
2009-CA-000028 WESTERLY ALONG SAID AS TRUSTEES OF THE $15.99 at UP THE CREEK communnycolingo ble from Elder Care Ser-
NOTICE OF RIGHT OF WAY BOUND- OSTERBYE LOVING RAW BAR Starting at 5:00 vices at 850-921-5554 or
FORECLOSURE SALE Y 800FUEEHT ETSHTEENRCE TCUS51CRHEADR SHMI L every Monda InWApedac Web Id 34067074 h term@e bigbene-mail
NOTICE IS HERBEY IDA R HTD AqLET LCAE RUCMLUTH Sd 850-653-2525. $1.00 Draft
GIVEN pursuant to a Sum- SHORE OF ALLIGATOR MARTHA RUSSELL, AND een
mary Final Judgment of BAY TO THE POINT OF ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES
Foreclosure entered BEGINNING, SAID LANDS CLAIMING BY THROUGH, .
herein, that I will sell to the BEING LOT NO. 4 OF UN- UNDER, AND AGAINST outdoor destinations
highest and best bidder for RECORDED PLAT OF THE HEREIN NAMED IN- | 3260 Where Vocations Come Naturally
cash in the lobby of the PROPERTY OF R.E. INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANTS
Franklin County Court- KESTNER LOCATED IN WHO ARE NOT KNOWN
h3c3olMarF tridS ee SECSTIOUNTHS2, NWGNESHIP TWOHEBTE DREADSAIRDALIUV3 Pf0perty Manager: Carrabelle,
id:000fa@ceonnbehe2 9h WEST AND IN SECTION KNOWN PARTIES MAY Chuck Norris, Total Body Franklin County, Florida:
5, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, CLAIM AN INTEREST AS GymXL, Originally paid
the following described RANGE 1 WEST IN SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVI- $1900 will sell for $1400
property: FRANKLIN COUNTY SEES, GRANTEES OR Exc Xmas present. RVC Outdoor Destinations (rvcoutdoors.
LOT 5 OF KINJA BAY FLORIDA, PREPARED BY OTHER CLAIMANTS, are 850-653-6102 COm) is seeking an experienced, full-
SUBDIVISION, ACCORD- dG L 7 50F DATE ts n t teeu line managOf 10 100k after its significant
ING TO THE PLAT THE- est and best bidder for Ownership and operational interest in
R TFB OKRPOARGDEED 19 %SOETAHSETF LOWINGOF tcha Fr n eo ty oru | saoo I The Carrabelle Boat Club. The manager
ORDTHEOPUB CANRK N LOT NO. 5 OF AN UNRE- house, 33 Market Street, Kitchen & Bathroom cabl- Will be based in Carrabelle and will be
COUNTY FLORIDA CORDED PLAT OF PROP- Ste. 33, Apalachicola, Flor- nets, selling for half price FOSponsible for:
ERTY OF R.E. KESTNER Ida, at 11:00 clock a.m. $3,400, brand new $6,800,
WITNESS MY HAND and A NDABPYR{ F 5 foonlDecemb 3 2009rthe 229-6859 Maintaining RVC's condominium
the seal of this Court on AND BEING MORE PAR- erty as set forth in said Fl- Landscaper fully experl- Ownersh of its boat-sli s
November 25, 2009. TICULARLY DESCRIBED nal Judgment, to-wit: ence, selective pruning,
AS FOLLOWS; COM- weeding, & planting. Rea-
AMERICANS WITH DIS- MENCE AT THE NORTH- Lots 18, 19, 20, and 21, to- sonable rates. Looking for Marketing and sales liaison with the
AIBILITIES ACT (ADA) NO- EAST CORNER OF SEC- gather with and subject to training partner Bike rides FOal-OState brokerage firm, including
TION 5, TOWNSHIP 7 the easement over the 25-100 miles, walks 5 to 10
INDIVIDUALS WITH DISA- SOUTH, RANGE 1 WEST Northern 20 feet of Lot 20, miles, ocean swimming. CUStOmer communications and the
BILITIES NEEDING A REA- FRANKLIN COUNTY Block X LANARK No pseudo athlete. Call administration of boat-slip sales. I
SONABLE ACCOMMODA- FLOIRDA AND RUN BEACH, UNIT NO. 1, a 850-447-0691
TION TO PARTICIPATE IN SOUTH ALONG THE EAST subdivision as per map or
THIS PROCEEDING BOUNDARY OF SAID plat thereof recorded in Marketing event planning, budgeting and
SHOULD CONTACT THE SECTION 1320 FEET; Plat Book 2, Page 13 of 6X6CUti00.
COURT ADMINISTRA- THENCE RUN WEST PAR- the Public Records of
TORS OFFICE AS SOON ALLEL TO THE NORTH Franklin County, Florida.
AS POSSIBLE TELE- BOUNDARY OF SAID COmmunication with the Carrabelle Boat
PHONE: 1-800-955-8770. SECTION 2503 FEET TO Any person claiming an In- Club Association's management firm.
OR, IF HEARING IM THE SHORELINE OF ALLl- terest in the surplus from
PAIRED, 1-800-955-8771 GATOR BAY; THENCE the sale, If any, other than * *
(TDD); OR 1-800-955-8770 RUN NORTHWESTERLY the property owner as of EMPLOYMENr The ability to communicate with potential
(V), VIA FLORIDA RELAY Al NGE THSEHNOCREE N s e cl hicle 4100 Help Wanted purchasers, liaise well with operational
SERVICE. NORTH 34 DEGREES 45 days after sale. 4130 Employment Staff and take financial responsibility
Clerkof the Circuit Court MINUTES 06 SECONDS Information Will be the manager's priorities. A solid
By: Michele Maxwell ENACSHT 3 N FPE TFOLLAED Dbthl20 th day of knowledge of the boating and real-estate
Deputy Clerk WITH CONCRETE ON 410o markets in Franklin County will be most
THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT MARCIA M. JOHNSON helpful
DALE G. WESTLING, SR.' OF WAY BOUNDARY OF As Clerk of said Court Logistics/transportation -
ESQUIRE THE ALLIGATOR POINT By: Michele Maxwell
3 k v onLS3 2 ROAD; THENCE NORTH Deputy Clerk Boat Captain Please respond by sending your letter
Telephone: 904/356-2341 55 DEGREES 14 MINUTES December 10, 17, 2009 N1th 50 ton licence and Of application and resume to spina@
December 10, 17, 2009 ONSESAINDRIGHWE Mate needed PT/F Apa- EVC0utdoors.com and to doneill@
5060T WAY 319.39 FEET TO A a3cuhmcolall 8MO t -2500M fVC0utdoors.com.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT SET IRON ROAD AND
OlFRCTUHE 2NDAJUDDICIAL P TLBd01 EGONRNITNHGE 1 nada OTM ItAdmins@
FRANKLIN COUNTY FLO- OMN SNAGD POINNTTN dm34065942
GENERAL JURISDICTION NORTH 55 DEGREES 14
DIVISION MINUTES 00 SECONDS
WEST 24.92 FEET TO A ,
THE BANK OF NEW YORK 1-1/2 INCH IRON PIPE;
MELLON F/K/A THE BANK THENCE LEAVING SAID 2100 -Pets
OF NEW YORK AS SUC- RIGHT OF WAY RUN 2110 Pets: Free to
CESSOR TRUSTEE TO SOUTH 34 DEGREES 48 2120 t1uHpop s
JPMORGAN CHASE MINUTES 11 SECONDS 2130 Farm Animals/
BANK, N.A. AS TRUSTEE WEST 318.14 FEET TO A Supplies
FOR STRUCTURED AS- 2 INCH IRON PIPE ON 2140 Pets/1.ivestock
SET MORTGAGE INVEST THE APPROXIMATE HIGH wanted
ME1NTMO FTRAUGSET P2A0SO W ER LBE OF ALELNGCAE 2150-Petmemorials Become a Certified Nursing Assistant
THROUGH CERTIFICATE SOUTH 47 DEGREES 08 In a War Of leSSI
ES SERIES 2005-AR1 MINUTES 08 SECONDS J *
PLAINTIFF EAST ALONG THE AP- | 2100
VS. PIROXIMATE HIEGEHTWATER Boston Terrier Pups will NUFSing Assistants help care for physically or mentally ill, injured, disab
SET IRON ROAD AND hold for Xmas, with H/c individuals in hospitals, nursing care facilities, mental health settings a
NOLAN MADDOX LASSI- CAP (LB 7017); THENCE Guarantee $300
TER A/K/A NOLAN M. LAS- LEAVING SAID HIGH 850-547-9351 or 625-8756 patients'homes or residential care facilities. Specific tasks vary, with ass
AMNEYLINN AL WE ELI M OURTEHS many BSpects of a patient's care. They often help patients to eat, dres
s
KNOWN PARTIES CLAIM- SECONDS EAST 321.69 a 50 anSWef Ca 5 f0r help, deliver messages, serve meals, make beds, an
IDNEGR, BAY THARGOUNGSH TUHNE N dHEOPNOTIA INOF NUFSing Assistants sometimes are responsible for taking a patient's tem
HEREIN NAMED INDIVID- 0.18 ACRES, MORE OR < rate, respiration rate, or blood pressure.
UAL DEFENDANTS) WHO LESS.
ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE
DEAD OR ALIVE, Any person claiming an In- The CNA certiicate program is designed to provide the education and sk
WHETHER SAID UN- terest in the surplus from
KNOWN PARTIES MAY the sale, If any, other than M 10 qualify for the state Certihed Nursing Assistant exam. The two course
CLAIM AN INTEREST AS the property owner as of 3100 Antiques (165 clock hours) are available only at the Gulf Franklin Center. The co
OUSEdRAHN RE SDEV the date of las pend- Ap li nCcr us are Offered as hybrid or distance education courses.
OTHER CLAIMANTS; within 60 days after the 3130 Auctions
MORTGAGE ELECTRO- sale 3140 Baby Items
NIC REGISTRATION SYS- 3150 Building Supplies The CNA program is a selective admission, limited enrollment program
TEMS, INC.; WAKULLA Dated this 25th day of No- 3160 p esnt
BAANNEK;D8HN UDNOKENOAND member, 2009. Ilect les Admission Requirements:
TENANTS IN POSSES- Marcla M. Johnson 3190 Electronics A ly to Gulf Coast Community Colle
SION Clerk of Court 3200 Firewood PP 9 *
DEFENDANT(S) By: MichC erkMaxwell i 8ea it On Pf0vide high school and college transcripts.
CASE NO: eputy 0 asge/Yard Sales Submit an application to the CNA program at the Gulf/Franklin cam
p
19-2008-CA-000416 IN ACCORDANCE WITH 3250 Good Things to Eat
THE AMERICANS WITH 3260 Health & Fitness Submit active, satisfactory scores on the TABE examination or equiva
NOO CCELOSURE SALE T sSabi tCe nepee JMea irny/clothing TABE tests are given at the Gulf/Franklin Center.
NOTICE IS HEREBY Ing a sp laccommo@t aE ud ed FOr more information about GCCC's Certihed Nursing Assistant program,
GIVEN pursuant to a Sum- COURT ADMINISTRA- 3310 Musicallnstmments
mary Final Judgment of TION, at the FRANKLIN 3320 Plants & Shrubs/ WWW.gulfl0ast.edu or call Craig at 850.913.3311.
Foreclosure dated Novem- County Courthouse at Supplies
ber 23, 2009 entered in (850)653-8861, 1-800-955- 3330 Restaurant/Hotel
Civil Case No. 19-2008- 8771 (TDD) or 1-800-955- ipck Bo
CA-000416 of the Circuit 8770, via Florida Relay Complete any of these programs in one year or less:
Court of the 2ND Judicial Service.
Circuit in and for FRANK- Central Service Technology
LIN County, APALACHI- THE LAW OFFICES OF
COLA, Florida, I will sell to DAVID J. STERN, PA., | 3130 Dental Assistant
the highest and best bid- AttorneyforPlaintiff
der for cash at on the 900 South Pine Island E Medical Tech
FRONT STEPS of the Road Sulte 400 emergency nician
Courthouse at the FRANK- Plantation, FL 33324-3920
LIN County Courthouse lo- (954)233-8000 Estate Auction Paramedic (for licensed EMT's only)
cated at 33 MARKET December 10, 17, 2009
STREET In APALACHI- 5076T Saturday Dec. 12 Surgical Technology
COiLA F 23 ha 00 F TTHHEEC NDC 6910 C 1e0 RoTd Bayou ..ilenSed Practical Nurse (only available at GFC*)

low g d cribed prope ARL FRTNCK I OUAND GeorgT eviewing tert2 031 Certihed Nursing Assistant (only available at GFC*)
as set forth in said Sum- FLORIDA Right on Coe Rd. Follow
mary Final Judgment, signs. Collectibles, tools, Magneth RESOnance Imaging (Advanced Certificate for approved imagine
to-wit: WAKULLA BANK, a Florida guns, and more. Not all
banking corporation, Items sold last week. More
COMMENCE AT THE Plaintiff, Items added. Something
NORTHEAST CORNER OF for everyone. Buyers Pre- All the programs listed above are limited access. Request an information
SECTION 5, TOWNSHIP 7 mlum. Bay Co. Auction
SOUTH, RANGE 1 WEST Ser. AB964. AUl384 WWW.gU fl0ast.edu or contact Craig Wise at 850.913.3311.
RUN THENCE SOUTH PAUL D. OSTERBYE and 850-722-9483 or 819-0773
ONG THE SEC


EN 1320 FEET; HE TAEEOSSTEMYE, T *Gulf/Franklin Center (GFC) is located in Port St. Joe, Florida. Call 850.227.9670 for more infor
WEST PARALLEL TO THE OSTERBYE LOVING
NORTH LINE OF SAID TRUST; REDFISH LANE
SECTION 5 A DISTANCE LLC; RICHARD MILLER 3230
OF 2503 FEET TO THE a
POINT WHERE SUCH PAULA CARUTHERS, w e
LINE INTERSECTS THE BRUCE RUSSELL, AND ,
SHORE OF ALLIGATOR ALRTUHNAKNROU ELPLAR * .
E TETRHENCEONNGO CLAIMING BY THROUGH, Carabelle:2722 HWY 98
SHORE LINE 118.3 FEET UNDER, AND AGAINST West Dec 11 & 12 Fishing
ECRELY RATN ANORG HT T6ED ARREINEONAMFO N su Ile c. dr srve
ANGLE TO THE ALLIGA- TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, or ood. werlydrant I I I
TOR POINT ROAD A DIS- WHETHER SAID UN- Washer & dr
yer Golf clubs


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visit
















































.& 9 Tree of 2009

member ance



Apalachicola: Apalachicola State Bank
Gulf State Community Bank
Carrabelle: Coastal community Bank
Gulf State Community Bank
Eastpoint: Gulf State Community Bank
207 SE AVENUE 8
Bi Bend CARRABELLE, FLORIDA 32322
H spice 850.697.2074 800.772.5862
-----=*,, WWW.BIGBENDHOSPICE.ORG








Temperature


News BRIEFS


TIDE TABLES
MONTHLY AVERAGES
To find the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times


CARRABELLE
12/10 Thu 03:11AM 0.3 L 10:08AM 1.4 H
02:13PM 1.1 L 08:56PM 2.1 H
12/11 Fri 04:18AM -0.2 L 12:37PM 1.6 H
03:02PM 1.4 L 09:23PM 2.2 H
12/12 Sat 05:15AM -0.5 L 02:14PM 1.8 H
03:58PM 1.6 L 09:54PM 2.2 H
12/13 Sun 06:06AM -0.8 L 03:12PM 1.9 H
04:57PM 1.8 L 10:30PM 2.4 H
12/14 Mon 06:51AM -1.0 L 03:51PM 1.9 H
05:51PM 1.8 L 11:11PM 2.4 H
12/15 Tue 07:34AM -1.0 L 04:21PM 2.1 H
06:37PM 1.9 L 11:55PM 2.4 H
12/16 Wed 08:12AM -1.0 L 04:46PM 1.9 H
07:18PM 1.8 L

SOLUNAR
m= Minor M = Major add 1 hour for daylight savings
Date Day AM PM Rise/Set Moon
12/10 Thu m m 6:57am
M M 5:28pm
12/11 Fri m am

12/12 Sat n m 6:59am
M -'O M 5:28pm
12/13 Sun m m 6:59am
M pM 5:29pm
12/14 Mon m 7:00am
M 5:29pm
12/15 Tue m 7:00am
M M 5:29pm
12/16 Wed m m 7:01am
M M 5:30pm


I


Thursday, December 10, 2009


Local


"Christmas In Sopchoppy"
will be presented in downtown
Sopchoppy this Saturday, Dec.
12, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., featur-
ing free activities for children
of all ages, including arts and
crafts, holiday-related relay
races, game booths, an old-
fashioned carol sing, and a
hayride around town with com-
plimentary cocoa and cookies
afterward.
The newly restored Sop-
choppy Train Depot will open
to the public for viewing, and
Santa Claus will appear at 11
a.m. on his human reindeer-
drawn carriage to sit in his
Santa chair in the train depot.
Santa will then greet children
until 2 p.m.
A receptacle for a canned
food drive will be set up to re-
ceive donations of food items
for the Ochlockonee Bay United
Methodist Church food bank,
which benefits families in need
during the holidays.
Live music, featuring holiday
and Celtic favorites, is planned
in the Depot from 2 to 4 p.m. for
more holiday cheer. Volunteers


in the Depot will hand out a
survey to visitors interested in
sharing input regarding future
plans to open the restored his-
torical landmark to the public.
Local area merchants are
extending business hours for
shopping, and more than 30
vendors are expected to set up
downtown with craft and food
items for sale.
This event has been a col-
lective effort by SPIA (the
Sopchoppy Preservation and
Improvement Association), the
city of Sopchoppy, local mer-
chants, private citizens, and
the Sopchoppy and Ochlock-
onee Bay United Methodist
churches.
There is still time to get a
vendor's application submit-
ted to set up a booth during the
Christmas event. Interested
parties may contact Bill Lowrie
at962-4138ore-mailbilllowrie@
embarqmail.com For informa-
tion regarding children's activi-
ties or other events throughout
the day, contact Debbie Dix at
528-5838 or e-mail poshfaery@
yahoo.com.


- - ... .. -
.

.* -
a .

A view of the fun at last year's Christmas In Sopchoppy celebration.


SPECIAL TO THE TIMES


Carrabelle Senior Center hosts
Dec. 12 flea market
There will be a flea market on
Saturday, Dec. 12, from 9 a.m. until
2 p.m. at the Carrabelle Senior
Center.
Everyone is welcome to come
hunt for bargains or to set up a
table and sell their own items. The
Senior Center is at 201 Ave. F on the
corner of First Street and Avenue F
in downtown Carrabelle.
For more information, call
Caroline Smith at 850-323-0713 or
go to www.CarrabelleSeniorCenter.
com.

Lanark Village golfers host
DOC. 12 IUHCil000
The Lanark Village Golf Club will
host a luncheon on Saturday, Dec. 12,
at Chills Hall.
Serving begins at noon and
features homemade Italian food
with dessert and drink. Takeout is
available.
For more information, call Joe
Manzanares at 697-5146.
*
County wide voting activists
to meet Dec. I4
The Franklin County Voters
Countrywide Voting Political Action
Committee Inc. will meet Monday,
Dec. 14, at 5 p.m. at Dolores' Sweet
Shoppe in Apalachicola.
The purpose of the meeting is
to recruit volunteers to sign up
registered voters to place a binding
referendum on the November 2010
election ballot.
The committee is a grassroots
organization whose mission is
to return Franklin County to
countrywide voting. According to


state records, its four directors are
Van Johnson, Dolores Roux and
Cora Russ, all of Apalachicola, and
Ken Osborne, of Alligator Point.
Please come and bring all your
friends and acquaintances. For
more information, call Russ at 653-
8486.

(ggy 10HC0 10r books
before Christmas
Beverly Mount-Douds will be at
Downtown Books at 67 Commerce
St. on Saturday, Dec. 12, from 1
to 3 p.m. to sign her newest book,
"Apalachicola."
Now is the time to get
down there to get yourself an
autographed copy. Also, this book
makes a Christmas present. Get
your copy now.
If you miss this signing, then
the next and the last signing before
Christmas is Saturday, Dec. 19, at
the Raney House from noon until 5
p.m. Don't miss these dates.
For more information, call
Beverly at 850-229-1094 or e-mail
her at bmdouds2002@yahoo.com.
Or call Downtown Books at 653-
1290.

Clam farming workshop
in Carrabelle Dec. 17
The Franklin UF/IFAS
Extension Program and the Florida
Department of Agriculture and
Consumer Services' Bureau of
Aquaculture Development will host a
Clam Farming Feasibility Workshop
at 6 p.m., Thursday, Dec. 17, at the
Carrabelle City Complex.
The educational workshop is to
review the current state of the clam
farming industry in the county, to
discuss current/future opportunities


for the industry and to determine
if there is a need to conduct a state
submerged lands bottom survey
to identify potential new clam
aquaculture areas in the county.
Clam farming began in Franklin
County with the approval of 46 clam
aquaculture leases in Alligator
Harbor in January 2002. Since then,
as with any new industry, the clam
farmers have worked hard to stay in
business through such challenges
as hurricanes, red tide, developing a
market for their clams, and the ups
and downs of the economy.
For additional information about
the workshop, please contact Bill
Mahan, county extension agent, at
653-9337 or 697-2112, ext.360.

(0Unty literacy hosts Dec. 17
dStmas open ouse
Franklin County Literacy, along
with the Franklin County Public
Library, will host a Christmas Open
House on Thursday, Dec. 17, from 10
a.m. to 2 p.m.
Please stop by 35 Island Drive in
Eastpoint and enjoy refreshments
and celebrate the grand opening of
the library and literacy center's new
computer lab.
vor more information, call 670-
4481.

Lanark villagers to share
Dec. 20 Christmas dinner
The Lanark Village Association's
Christmas dinner will be Sunday
afternoon, Dec. 20, at Chillas Hall,
with serving to begin at 1 p.m.
The baked ham will be furnished,
with tea and coffee. Bring a dish to
share, or pay $5 to cover costs.
For more information, call 697-
9626 or 697-9018.


Date
Thu, Dec 10
Fri, Dec 11
Sat, Dec 12
Sun, Dec 13
Mon, Dec 14
Tue, Dec 15
Wed, Dec 16


High
550
560
720
700
690
680
640


Low
430
510
580
550
550
500
450


% Precip
30%
30%
40%
20%
60%
60%
60%


12/10 Thu 05:24AM
04:26PM
12/11 Fri 06:31AM
05:15PM
12/12 Sat 07:28AM
06:11PM
12/13 Sun 08:19AM
07:10PM
12/14 Mon 09:04AM
08:04PM
12/15 Tue 12:36AM
05:46PM
12/16 Wed 01:20AM
06:11PM


0.2
0.7
-0.1
0.9
-0.3
1.0
-0.5
1.1
-0.6
1.1
1.5
1.3
1.5
1.2


11:33AM
10:21PM
02:02PM
10:48PM
03:39PM
11:19PM
04:37PM
11:55PM
05:16PM


09:47AM -0.6


t -tMWWamilM current building
codes. New kitchen cabinets, appliances,
ceramic tile, 1,500 h/c sq. ft. (1,932 s.f.
total), 3 BR, 2 BA. Furnished. Screened
porch. Landscaped, circular driveway.
Lots of under house storage. Easy beach
access. 709 East Gulf Beach Drive


161 Sklmmer Dr. Carrabelle
,C2o trPu obno Bestopr e in St. James Bay.
1,500 Sq Ft. overlooks pond and 8th fairway.
Community amenities include golf, tennis,
swimming, fitness, picnic area, and dock on
bay PLUS restaurant. $269,000.


B8 | The Times


Santa (laus coming to Sopchoppy




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