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Group Title: Apalachicola times
Title: The Apalachicola times
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100380/00055
 Material Information
Title: The Apalachicola times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: H.W. Johnston
Place of Publication: Apalachicola Fla
Apalachicola Fla
Publication Date: December 3, 2009
Copyright Date: 2008
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1885.
General Note: Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00100380
Volume ID: VID00055
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 32911693
lccn - sn 95026907
 Related Items
Preceded by: Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by: Apalachicola herald

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Table of Contents
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    Section B
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Thursday, DECEMBER 3, 2009 w w w apalach times com 50<




Busy Thanksgiving buoys hope for holidays


I


YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER FOR MORE THAN 120 YEARS


VOL. 124 ISSUE 32


By David Adlerstein
TimesCityEditor
A large number of tourist visi-
tors to the county last week is lifting
hopes among area business people
that this year's Christmas season
will be a marked improvement over
last year.
The ample flow of families kept
lodging sites full and restaurants
and shops booming and couldn't
have come at a better time for the
beleaguered economy.
"WehadagreatgreatFridayvery,
very good," said Tom Daly, who works
at the Tin Shed in downtown Apala-
chicola. "It was a wonderful crowd
of people. I was impressed with how
many people were downtown."
Anita Grove, director of the


Before the
|arge crowd
gathered to
see Santa
Pam Nobles
dances a
Christmas
merry-go-
round dance
with young
students
from her
downtown
9alachicola
studio.
DAVID ADLERSTEIN
The Times


Photos by DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times


By David Adlerstein
Times City Editor
Minus State Sen. Al Lawson (D-Tal-
lahassee), who was called away at the
11th hour to prepare for Thursday's
special session of the Florida Legisla-
ture, Franklin County's two state repre-
sentatives got a surprise visitor Monday
afternoon at the legislative delegation
hearing.
Charles Bronson, commissioner of
the Florida Department of Agriculture
and Consumer Services, made an un-
expected trip to the annual hearing to
outline steps his agency has taken in its
fight to prevent the Food and Drug Ad-
ministration from enacting a ban on the
sale of raw Gulf of Mexico oysters dur-
ing summer months.
"I've never backed away from the
oyster industry. I'm there with you,"
Bronson said. "We're going to work
these issues out.,,
Bronson, a Central Florida cattle
farmer who plans to retire from politi-
cal life when he leaves office next year
after nearly a decade as commissioner,
opened his remarks by telling the court-
room annex audience he wanted to
personally address "not-substantiated
rumors."
There has been murmuring in the
local oyster industry that Bronson and
his staff had been too willing to seek ac-
commodation with the FDA regarding a
policy to mandate post-harvest process-
ing of oysters.
"I want everybody to hear from me,
from my standpoint," he said.
Bronson said that after hearing from


risks of consuming raw oysters.
"We have made sure those many
signs are up in restaurants," he said,
noting that warnings on cigarette pack-
aging, but no outright ban, is the extent
to which the FDA has gone to address
that health risk.
Bronson said he told the FDA that
Florida would be willing to work with
them to tailor policies to further reduce
illnesses caused by Vibrio vulnificus,
"but to totally ban oysters from May to
October was not an option, in my opin-
ion."
Both State Rep. Leonard Bembry
(D-Greenville), whose district includes
the county east of the Apalachicola Riv-
er, and State Rep. Jimmy Patronis (R-
Panama City), whose district includes
Apalachicola, voiced support for the
widespread opposition that prompted
the FDA to back off the ban.
"They have to know there's a real
live chord they struck down here," said
Bembry, noting that the health risks to
some individuals from eating raw oys-
ters "is a serious problem and is a prob-
lem we need to continue to work on."
Patrons noted that warnings are on
all menus at Captain Anderson's restau-
rant in Panama City, which his family
owns.
"Eggs kill a heck of a lot more people
than oysters do," he said, describing the
FDA's proposed ban as "an unreason-
able approach."
Bronson said that while he expected
the other Gulf states to "hang with us"
against FDA, he worried about more
See HEARING A8


Charles Bronson, state agriculture
commissioner.
Michael Taylor, the FDA official who
first announced the proposal to enforce
a summertime raw oyster ban begin-
ning in 2011, he signaled his response.
"I let him know right quick he would
be getting an official letter from me,"
Bronson said. "I did not want us to over-
react to 15 deaths a year.
"We can not legislate personal re-
sponsibility," he said. "I'm sorry, it's not
going to work that way."
Bronson said he listened to FDA
concerns and reiterated to the agency,
which has since agreed to delay action
on the ban, steps Florida had taken to
notify pregnant women and people with
chronic illnesses of the possible health


Phone: 850-227-1845


DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK:


Letters to the Editor. .................. A4


Classifieds ................... ..... B6-7


Apa lachicola


COMING UP
Saturday, Dec. 5
Holiday Fresh Market,
downtown Apalachicola
Saturday, Dec. 12
Holiday on the Harbor
and Boat Parade of Lights,
Carrabelle

Apalachicola Bay Chamber of Com-
merce, said her informal survey of
the city's shopkeepers revealed a
big thumbs-up.
"Most everybody I spoke to did
better than they did last year," she
said.
See HOLIDAYS A6


A On GmGfgGS OS


seafood wor kers'


benefactor

By Lois Swoboda
Times Staff Writer
Disclosures surrounding a review of fi-
nancial transactions for the Franklin Coun-
ty Seafood Workers Association (FCSWA)
show that Eastpoint businessman Bob Al-
len has played a pivotal role in funding the
group.
Allen, 72, owner of the Sportsman's Lodge
Motel and the White Eagle Restaurant in
Eastpoint, has lived in Franklin County since
1974, where his two children, two grandchil-
dren and one on the way now live.
The former Marine is also an important
figure in the seafood workers' funding.
"Without Bob Allen, a lot of the funds in
question would not have been available to
the Seafood Workers Association," said Mark
Friedman at the FCSWA's Nov. 12 meeting,
when he shared his findings from an infor-
mal review of the association's records.
"Why did he do this? We don't know. May-
be it was to get on the good side of the sea-
food workers association," he said. "I'm not
h bn2 tB At
in benefit what he put in."
Friedman, of Roberson and Friedman of
Port St. Joe, reviewed the financial records
of a two-year period from Aug. 1, 2007, to
Aug. 31, 2009, when FCSWA President John-
ny Richards and then-Secretary Linda Raf-
field had exclusive possession of, and were
authorized co-signers of, the association's
checkbook.
At the Nov. 12 meeting, Friedman told
FCSWA members there is no paper trail to
document how thousands of dollars in asso-
ciation money were spent.
See ALLEN Al


DELEGATION HEARING


.. .


BOB ALLEN


TABLE OF CONTENTS


~FREEDOM


-





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Thursday, December 3, 2009


A2 | The Times


Local


Special to The Times
On Tuesday, Nov. 17,
the Gulf Coast Workforce
Board held its annual
meeting and luncheon
at the Callaway Arts and
Conference Center.
At the meeting, Execu-
tive Director Kim Bodine
announced that out of
the 24 workforce regions
around the state, the Gulf
Coast Workforce Board
has been the top perform-
ing board for the past six
years. According to data
released by Workforce
Florida Inc, the Gulf Coast
Workforce is on track to be
the top performing board
again for the 2008-09 pro-
gram year with top rank-
ings in key performance
measures for job seekers
and disadvantaged cus-
tomers.
"We owe our great per-
formance to our hardwork-
ing staff, our dedicated
volunteer board members
and our service provid-
ers," Bodine said.
The service provid-
ers for the Gulf Coast
Workforce Board include
Bay District Schools, Bay
STARS; Haney Workforce
Training Center; Friends
of the Franklin County Li-
brary, TIGERS Program;
Gulf Coast Community
College, Workforce Cen-
ter; Gulf Coast Commu-
nity College, Workforce
Training Center; and
Royal American Manage-
ment.
Individuals from each
of the service providers


along with their case man-
ager were recognized for
successfully completing
their workforce program.
From Franklin County
both Patrick Jones and
Bri'anna Gordon were
honored for their partici-
pation in the Friends of
the Franklin County Li-
brary TIGERS Program.
At the meeting the
board also voted on a
new slate of officers for
2010. Alisa Kinsaul, senior
communications special-
ist for Applied Research
Associates was reap-
pointed to serve a second
term as chairman of the
board.
Other board members
elected as officers were
Vice-Chair Gary Ross
(Gulf County); Past Chair
Ted Mosteller (Franklin
County), and Executive
Committee Members Lisa
Thompson (Bay Coun-
ty), Ruth Phillips (Gulf
County) and Betty Croom
(Franklin County).
The Gulf Coast Work-
force Board is a pub-
lic/private partnership
chartered by the State
of Florida to administer
workforce development
programs in Bay, Gulf, and
Franklin counties. Their
mission is to provide lead-
ership, oversight, guid-
ance and assistance to
institutions and agencies
delivering training and
workforce services in or-
der to meet the economic
development and employ-
ment needs of the three
counties.


Sacred Heart Health System
invites you to attend a Career Fair

Saturday, December 5th
10 a.m. ~ 2 p.m.
Gulf Coast Conununity College
3800 Garrison Avenue
Port St. Joe, FL
Learn about current openings, flexible benefits
packages, the Sacred Heart culture, and more. Bring
a copy of your resume, and take advantage of the
computer lab to apply online during the event.
Volunteer Opportunities
Are you interested in volunteering at the new
hospital? Visit the Volunteer section of the career
fair to learn about available volunteer shifts and
the many benefits of volunteering!
For more information, call (850) 278-3062 or
VISit if it'It'.sacredheartonthegulforg. A ,


RECRUITING FOR THESE
HOSPITAL DEPARTMENTS
5 Administration
5 Admitting
5 Education & Development
5 Emergency Department
5 Food Services
5 Human Resources
5 Laboratory
5 Medical Records
5 Medical/Surgical Department
5 Mission & Pastoral Care
5 Perioperative & Surgical Services
5 Quality & Risk Management
5 Radiology Department
5 Rehabilitation Department
5 Respiratory Therapy


Always Online


Gulf Coast Workforce Board state's top performer


as
Ted Mosteller Betty Croom Bri'anna Gordon Patrick JoneS


'- Sacred Heart Hospital on the Gulf







































Clinic Location: 155 Avenue E, Apalachicola, FI 32320
Clinic Location: 106 NE 5th Street, Carrabelle, FL 32322
* WHO WE WILL VACCINATE: The Franklin County Health Department is
offering the 2009 H1N1 Influenza (Swine Flu) vaccinations as long as supplies
permit at two locations: Apalachicola and Carrabelle. Clinics are on a walk-in basis
- no appointment necessary. The vaccine is free of charge. You do not need to
bring any documentation with you. We are currently offering the vaccine to:
Pregnant women
Children 6 months through 24 years
Household contacts & caregivers for infants less than 6 months of age
Healthcare workers & emergency personnel with direct patient contact
People with chronic health conditions ages 25 to 64 years
* Beginning November 30, 2009, H1N1 Vaccine will be available to the general
public during regular clinic hours.
* LOCATION: Franklin County Health Department
155 Avenue E, Apalachicola, FL 32320
* CLINIC DATES/HOURS:
o Regular Clinic Hours are Monday-Friday, 9:00 A.M. 4:00 RM.
o A Special H1N1 Clinic will be offered on Saturday, December 5th
from 8 A.M. 12 RM.
* LOCATION: Franklin County Health Department
106 NE 5th Street, Carrabelle, FL 32322
* CLINIC DATES/HOURS:
o Regular Clinic Hours are Monday-Thursday, 9:00 A.M. 4:00 RM.
and Friday 9:00 A.M. 12 R M.
o A Special H1N1 Clinic will be offered in Carrabelle on Friday,
December 11th from 1 RM. 4 RM.
CONTACT INFO: For more information about the clinics, call 850-653-2111 or
697-4121.
Dates for vaccination clinics to provide the second dose of H1N1 in the
Franklin County School District will be announced in the near future.


Thursday, December 3, 2009


The Times I A3


FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF
HEALT


Tobacco Free


1


Franklin County Health Department





Always On line | www.APALACHTIMES.COM


Thursday, December 3, 2009


A4 | The Times


"gift" we put to
your holiday en
another event i
thread of wonde
unities,
Special than
group for your s
openness and c
and the constant
of creativity...th
was learning to
wave Spanish m
one minute to u
"tinsel" on the t
Ziploc bag, plea
See you in D
and Happy Holi
all.


Pit bull S
East po
neighborhood


gather for the past few months two
joyment, other of my cats have dis-
n our appeared. One of those
rful com- cats was 10 years old and
the other cat belonged
ks to this to my daughter, who has
pirit of Down's syndrome. She
curiosity, is very upset to have lost
t stream her pet of two years.
e best One of my neighbors
micro- had been charged by a
oss for pit bull and one neighbor
se as had been nipped by a pit
ree! (In a bull. Animal control has
se) investigated the situation
december, and notified me that for
days to them to step in to have
a problem dog removed
Jan Thomas from a property or "put
down," the dog would
k have had to been involved
MO 0 in at least two incidents.
int At that point there were
d unsafe thns H>uHs an hTehird.


ings would take place in
my once safe little neigh-
borhood here in East-
point. Across the street
on the other corner, there
is a small child who rides
his tricycle sometimes
(accompanied by an
adult) but after witness-
ing the killing of my cat
by one of these pit bulls I
know that child isn't safe.
Does an innocent child or
more beloved pets have
to fall prey to one of the
four pit bulls? Who will
sort through which of the
tied-up pit bulls got loose
and attacked another in-
nocent?
These pit bulls and
their owners seem to
have more rights than
th other fo s and their


pit I 1smdoo loen in
a res d ntialhaerea, mhu h

can be done to protect life
and property? Evidently
not much, until we can
fPorove tttlone ofTthhesie
ur p on ir
Street has attacked and
injured or killed another
beloved pet or person.
. I read Lois' article
in the hard copy of the
Times. What more can be
done at this point besides
making us aware of this
dangerous situation?
Something, I hope, before
this becomes even more
of a tragedy.
Sincerely,
Cynthia Rhew


experieMCO

..::.7 adh -
lightful Christmas experi-
ence I'd like to share with
Times readers.
A small group of
women with no money or
agenda, took a little time
and tossed around some,,
holiday ideas...the "flow
began, and...
Welcome to the spon-
taneity of Christmas
at the Orman House! .
Please come and visit in
the month of December
(open Thursday through
Monday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.,

withM wp king arwit.
ever your schedule is,
don't miss the gorgeous
natural cedar Christmas
tree that touches the
14-foot ceiling in the liv-
ing room. I'm hoping
children and your out-of-
town guests will declare
it the most beautiful
"real" tree in the county!
Drive north from the
blinking light in down-
town Apalachicola, and
we're on the left hand
side of the road, opposite
of Water Street Hotel and
Scipio Creek Marina. Not
only the house, but the
roses are blooming, the
kumquats are numer-
ous, and the greens look
luscious in the vegetable
garden. Let us know what
you think of this new


I live at 6 Third Street
in Eastpoint.
On June 23, 2009 I
witnessed a pit bull kill,
in my yard, one of my
precious cats that I'd
had for 10 years. The dog
had broken loose and
jumped over my fence.
Animal control came and
removed the pit bull from
my property. However
the owner of the dog paid
a fine and took the dog
home with him, which is
at a property on the cor-
ner of Third Street and
US 98 next to my home.
I spoke with some of
my neighbors and dis-
covered a small dog in
the neighborhood had
been killed by an unde-
termined animal. Also in


A week or so ago a
fourth pit bull was in-
troduced to the same
property. I was reading
the Apalachicola Times
online and saw an article
Lois Swoboda had writ-
ten regarding a pit bull in
Eastpoint that had killed
someone's pet dog. The
article said the pit bull
had been relocated at a
house on the corner of
Highway 98 and Third
Street in Eastpoint. I was
already very disturbed
about the recent addition
of a fourth pit bull that is
tied up to a live oak tree
next to my home.
When I read Lois' ar-
ticle online not only was I
disturbed, I became fear-
ful that even more kill-


Special to the Times
The bear safety tip I
would like to share with you
today concerns the question
"Feeding bears doesn't hurt
the bear or anyone else, so
what's the big problem?"
Well, unfortunately it does
hurt the bear and could


they regularly walk through
our yards to get their meals
from us, either by being fed
directly or from our unse-
cured trash can.
The more the bear sees
us as providers of food, the
less fear and respect they
have for us. That is why it
is so important that no one


ter chance of getting hit by cars,
illegally shot or euthanized by our
biologists because of safety con-
cerns. So never ever feed a Florida
black bear.
For more information on Florida
black bears go to myfwc.com, or for
a complete bear presentation with
safety tips and more, e-mail me at
mariafwc@gmail.com.

A seventh-generation Northwest
Florida native, Maria Williams is
an outreach specialist for the Flor-
ida Fish and Wildlife Conservation
Commission's Bear Management
Program. Having grown up in
black bear country, she genuinely
cares about you, your child and
your pet and wants to provide
the very best information on how
to live safely near Florida black
bears.


MARIA
WILLIAMS


cause harm to you, your
property, or even someone you may
have never met.
A wild bear that sees you, me, or
even a child will typically turn tail
and run because it is not used to
seeing people every day. Wild bears
are naturally afraid of people, and
they make their living eating food in
the forest. A bear that is being fed
by people quickly loses its fear and
respect for people. Those bears have
gotten used to seeing us because


ever feeds a Florida black
bear. Remember, an adult male bear
typically roams more than 65 square
miles. A bear that has been fed could
walk up to anyone in its range and
demand food. If they don't get it, they
might get frustrated and slap some-
one, or worse. I would not want that
to happen to anyone, and I know you
wouldn't either.
And remember, bears that hang
around people don't live as long as
wild bears because they have a bet-


Special to the Times
No one takes the deci- 4=:
sion to declare bankruptcy
lightly. Besides being an
expensive, time-consuming 1
and awkward process, bank-
ruptcy can have serious and
long-lasting impacts on your JA
credit score, which in turn ALDE
may affect your ability to
borrow money, rent an apartment
or even get a job.
Whether you are emerging from
bankruptcy, paying off accumulated
debt or just starting out finan-
cially and looking to avoid future
mishaps, there are several steps
you can take to build or rebuild
- stronger credit:
Monitor your credit. Negative
information such as late payments,
tax liens and foreclosures can
remain on your credit reports for
many years up to 10 years for
bankruptcy. On the other hand,
once you reestablish sound credit
habits, such as paying bills on time
and lowering balances owed, your
credit score should start rising
within months.
To ensure your improved credit
behavior is being reported prop-
erly, periodically review your credit
reports from the three major credit
bureaus: Equifax (www.equifax.
com), Experian (www.experian,
com) and TransUnion (www.tran-
sunion.com). You can order one


free report a year from
each bureau through www.
annualereditreport.com.
Reestablish creditwor-
thiness. One way to demon-
strate your ability to repay
debt properly (thereby later
qualifying for more favor-
SON able lending terms) is to
RMAN open a secured credit card
linked to a savings account
you maintain. Typically, you can
only charge up to the amount on
deposit, which prevents you from
charging more than you can afford.
Look for a secured card:
That will convert to an unse-
cured (regular) credit card with
more favorable terms after you've
made several on-time payments
That has zero or low annual
and application fees and a low in-
terest rate
Whose lender will consider
reporting your payment history to
all three credit bureaus
Be mindful of monthly usage
fees and other charges that can de-
plete your balance. Try your credit
union or go to Web sites such as
www.bankrate.com, www.cardrat-
ings.com or www.indexcreditcards.
com to compare rates and terms.
Secured loans from a credit
union or bank work in a similar
manner: You take out a loan backed
by a savings account. Your loan's
interest rate will be higher than
the savings account earns, but suc-


cessfully paying it off should boost
your credit score.
Pay on time. The single most
important thing you can do to im-
prove your credit is to always pay
at least the minimum due on all
bills on time. Consider signing up
for automatic payments from your
checking, savings or credit card ac-
count if this is a recurring problem.
Curtail amounts owed. An-
other major credit-scoring factor is
credit utilization, which measures
how much of each account's credit
limit you tap, as well as how much
you've borrowed as a percentage of
your total available credit. Aim for
30 percent utilization or less, even
if you pay off balances each month.
Educate yourself. Often credi-
tors will refer customers experi-
encing debt problems to financial
education courses like Money
Choices, an online program spon-
sored by Visa Inc. (www.money-
choices.com), where they can learn
step-by-step how credit works,
budgeting, credit repair tips, debt
collectors, financial hardship
planning, and much more. Money
Choices is free, self-paced and can
be accessed by anyone.

Jason Alderman directs Visa's
financial education programs.
To sign up for a free monthly per-
sonal finance e-Newsletter, go to
www.practicalmoneyskills.com/
newsletter


POSTMASTER:
Send address change to:
The Apalachicola Times
P.O. Box 820
Apalachicola, FL 32329
Phone 850-653-8868


PERIODICAL RATE


SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
IN COUNTY
$24.15 year $15.75 six months
OUT OF COUNTY
$34.65 year $21 six months


TO ALL ADVERTISERS
In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers
do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount
received for such advertisement,
The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is
thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word
thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains.


* *


Time for making


1 f Or man House offers
ess er ec delightful Christmas


h 1* 1 *
O Klay memories

I had a
glorious
Thanksgiving ,
and that got me
thinking about
the composition
of a great
holiday.
When I was
younger, it
had to do with
familiar food
and structure.
I remember
one ofmy first /
Thanksgiving

home. I was
living in
Blacksburg
Virginia. Some
old friends from
Tallahassee
had moved to
Richmond and invited us over,
They tried. But, as skinny people, they didn't get the
largesse thing. The stuffing was made of white bread
and dried fruit. I cried myself to sleep
that night. Where was the cornbread
dressing?
? Now, it is not about the food. It is about
the people. I find myself looking for the
oldest folks in the room. I want to ask
them questions and hear what they have
to say. This fixation may come from some
kind of orphan syndrome. Most of my
RED WHITE friends' parents are gone, but some are
AND ROUX still around. I want to know everything
Denise Roux they can share. I want them to tell me
what they did during the big war, and
tell me how they fell in love. I want their memories and
their recipes. I can feel their personal histories slipping
away too quickly. Everyday heroes of that era will soon
be T Thanksgivinglhadtheopportunitytotalktoan
engineer who worked with NASA in the very early days, a
World War II Merchant Marine, and the widow of a state
senator from the Sixties. How cool is that?
All I had to do was show some interest and ask a few
questions. The anecdotes flowed. I didn't take notes; I
just listened, and I am the richer for it,
Now, as we head into the frenzy of the holidays, I am
redefining what is important.
In the past I worked to create the perfect atmosphere
and the requisite Aha! moments on Christmas morning.
I went into debt and strung myself out so that others
would have a lifelong memory. Somewhere along the way
joy gave way to obligation, and the smiles of the holiday
were filtered through a fugue of fatigue.
No more. I am not putting up a tree this year. I will
not unpack the boxes of heirloom ornaments. The paper
chains from my son's primary school years. The glass
globes from Mama and Daddy's first tree. Or the many
first this" and "first that" moments memorialized in
decorations.
I will take my clippers and walk around my yard
gathering green leaves and branches. I will cut holly with
red berries, loquat with blossoms, magnolia branches,
cedar, and whatever that stuff is that grows on the corner
of my home.
I will gather together four or five large cheap vases,
and I will spend a Saturday clipping and arranging to my
heart's content. I will place the arrangements all around
the house and breathe a sigh of contentment that I have
done my part to acknowledge the season and the holiday.
I will not be tired.
I will be joyously thankful for peace of mind and
thankful for the memories of those who precede me.

Denise Roux is a regular columnist for the
Apalachicola and Carrabelle Times. 'lb reach her email
her at rouxwhit@mchsi.com.


Apalachicola
I arrabelle


T HE

SPS 02U 7-
Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St.
Apalachicola, FL 32329
VP/Publisher: Karen Hanes
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Thursday, December 3, 2009


Local


The Times | AS


Medal of Honor


By Lois Swoboda
Times StaffWriter
At 'lliesday morning's
meeting, county commis-
sioners voted to promote
Latonia Granger to the post
of manager at the Carra-
belle Branch of the Franklin
County Library.
Library Board Chairman
Denise Butler and County
Librarian Glenda Ondracek
appeared before commis-
sioners to request permis-
sion to advertise in the news-
paper to find a replacement
for former branch manager
Carolyn Sparks, who passed
away last month.
"If there's someone al-
ready working in the library
who does a good job and is
devoted to her work, can't we
go ahead and hire her and
advertise for an assistant
to work under her?" asked
Commissioner Bevin Putnal.
Butler told the commis-
sioners the library board
generally prefers to adver-
tise for job openings in the


Sea Oats Garden Club
members met on Nov 18 at
the Crooked River Light-
house Museum.
President Harriett
Beach reviewed the budget
for the rose garden plant-
ing that was completed at
the Carrabelle Welcome
Park. The planting includes
lantana plants raised by
Garden Club members.
William Massey, the City
of Carrabelle's grounds su-
pervisor, and Lee Norris,
board member of the Sar-
racenia Chapter of the Na-
tive Plant Society, helped
prepare the Welcome Park
flower bed.


Garden Club members
also plan to provide a gar-
den for the Franklin County
Public Library Branch at
Carrabelle and a Habitat
for Humanity house.
The December meeting
will be a Christmas dinner
at the Lanark Boat Club on
Wednesday, Dec. 16 at 5:30
p.m. Call Lafeise at 697-8062
or Harriett at 697-8571 for
information regarding the
December dinner meeting.
Garden Club members
toured the Crooked River
LighthouseKeeper'sHouse
Museum and grounds after
the November business
meeting.


eter-


The county's v
ans are all invited
Veterans Appreci
Dinner, hosted by A
ican Legion Post 1
be held Thursday
evening, Dec. 3 at
the Fort Coombs
Armory in Apala-
chicola.
The dinner
starts at 6 p.m.
Guest speaker is
retired Marine
Corps General
James Livings-
ton, a recipient of
the Medal of Honor
He entered the
rine Corps April
1968. In Viet Nam,
ing a desperate s
of battles where he
wounded three ti
he led his decim
company on a d


and successful rescue


06, to tions that day earned
him the Medal
of Honor. In ad-
dition, he is also
the recipient of
the Silver Star,
the Bronze Star
and numerous
Purple Hearts.
Since retire-
GEN. JIM ment he has
LIVINGSTON been very active
in supporting the
. National D-Day Mu-
Ma- seum in New Orleans,
30, and the Medal of Honor
dur- Museum near Charles-
eries ton, S.C.
was For additional infor-
mes, nation, contact Larry
ated Hale at 653 5817 or Al
aring Mirabella at 653-5838.


GLENDA0NDRACEK(LEFT)
AND DENISE BUTLER
local newspapers.
"It gives whoever wins
the position the pride of
knowing they were chosen
and helps us be sure that
everyone who is qualified is
considered," she said.
Commissioners voted
unanimously to appoint
Granger to the position and
advertise for an assistant.
The commissioners also
votedunanimouslytoappoint
Sondra RIrbee, of Apala-
chicola, Rhonda Swords, of
Carrabelle, and Harrette
Kennedy, of Eastpoint, to the
Franklin County Library ad-
visory board.


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eWS SB RIE FN


Seniors to host dance
There will be a free dance
held this Saturday evening,
D at the Carrabelle Se-
The dance starts at 7 p.m.
and will feature classic Big
Band dance tunes and mel-
low pop hits presented by lo-
cal disc jockey Ron Vice.
The Senior Center is lo-
cated at 201 Avenue F on
the corner of 1st Street and
Avenue F in downtown Car-
rabelle.
For more information, go


to www.CarrabelleSenior-
Center.com
.
( inic 101ds shoe drive
The Coastal Foot and
Ankle Clinic is holding its
ninth annual shoe drive. Dr.
Tamara Marsh said folks
can drop off shoes that are in
reasonable condition at her
podiatryofficeat221Avenue
E in Apalachicola.
There is a bin in the lobby,
and outside if the office is
closed. Call 653-3338 for
information.


Free computer classes
continue at the Carrabelle
Library and the Eastpoint
Library.
Want to build a website?
AttendtheBuildingWebsites

Dre c 7e em Pa
to 1 p.m. at the Carrabelle
Library. Build a test website
using Adobe Dreamweaver
and then take home the
skills necessary to develop
personal sites of your own.
Call the Carrabelle Library
at 697-2366 to sign up.
Ever buy from EBay, and
nowyouwanttoearnmoney
selling your items? Learn
how to select, sell, and set up
eBay accounts at the Intro-
duction to EBay computer
class. This free exciting,
informative class will be of-
fe red 'lliesday, Dec. 8, from
1 p.m. to 4 p.m. at the Car-
rabelle Library. Learn how
to set-up PayPal accounts,


how to handle price setting
and shipping charges. Call
the Carrabelle Library at
697-2366 to register.
Looking for a job and
needto update that resume?
ttendba d Rounm Writ-

source Workshop at the
Eastpoint Library, Thurs-
day, Dec 10, from 10 a.m. to
1 p.m. Learn resume styles,
techniques, and create a re-
sume using Microsoft Word.
Call the Eastpoint Library at
670-8151 to register,
The Franklin County
Public Library just keeps
getting better and better!
New books, audio books and
DVDs are now in a separate
collection near the front
desk. Look for the pink dots
to denote a 2009 addition.
For more information
about the Franklin County
Public Library systems, call
either library branch.


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1 _


Thursday, December 3, 2009


A6 | The Times


Local


Grove said it appeared
tourists came earlier in the
week and didn't wait until
Black Friday to pay a visit
to downtown shops and
restaurants.
"We had a good shopping
week in general. It was a
very busy Wednesday," she
said. "They had good sales
during the week, and on
Black Friday, most all did
better than last year."
While sales numbers are
kept close to the vest, busi-
ness people told Grove they
liked what they saw.
"They'llgo,'Manthey're
great' or 'I'm not sure, I've
got to look at my totals,' "
she said. "It depends on
what they're selling."
With city workers hav-
ing put up Christmas lights
earlier in the month, and
nearly all the downtown
shops illuminated for the
holidays, the stage was set
to greet visitors all week.
Even the somber-looking
fencing that ringed the va-
cant downtown lot where
the Apalachicola State
Bank plans to rebuild was
taken down before the


"The more oeoole
I I
shop locally,
the more people
SHppOTC OUT
BCOHOWy.
Anita Grove
Mg 0Cilil0 0 BOy 010mber
0 COmmerce director

week began.
The largest crowd ap-
peared to be on Friday af-
ternoon, when a queue of
locals and tourists extend-
ed the length of Riverfront
Park for an opportunity
to spend time with Santa
Claus. With the help of his
longtime assistant Alex
Moody and a bevy of elves,
Santa patiently listened to
children's wishes before
handing them a stuffed ani-
mal, gathered all year from
thrift shops by Moody and
his wife, Laura.
"There were cars
parked way up north of the
downtown," Grove said. "It
exceeded the boundaries of
the normal parking areas.
It felt like a good crowd."
The Bay Community
School, which sold hot
chocolate and glow neck-
lacesacrossfromthepark,
reported brisk sales as
well, Grove said.
Daly said he found that
visitors hailed from vari-
ous places throughout the
reg n.nresidents came
into town from the island,"
he said. "There were a lot
from Tallahassee, Panama
City, Thomasville, Ga., and
surrounding areas who
seemed to be in town for
shopping. It was appealing
for a regional crowd."
Grovesaidthathecause
the first two weekends of
December tend to be a
slower time for shopping
and tourism, downtown
merchants are hosting the


Photos by DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times


TOP LEFT: Olivia Carroll, 1, daughter of Jason and
Mindy Carroll of Carrabelle, is all bundled up in
the arms of Karen Smith. TOP RIGHT: Laney Whiting
points out that she's 3 years old as she waits to see
Santa with dad Matt Whiting, from Atlanta. BOTTOM
LEFT: With a festive bow in her hair, Katie Ortiz, 17
months, smiles with her mom, Sarah Ortiz, from
Anderson, S.C., as they await Santa. BOTTOM RIGHT:
JathanPage,5-month-oldsonofDanielPageand
.
C t Smeth ofnApalrachifi Cr mm es as he


Media Center.


annual Holiday Fresh Mar-
ket all day this Saturday,
Dec. 5, to give locals and
visitorsachancetoperuse
handmade holiday items
and other Christmas spe-
cialties.
"It's to draw people to
the area, maybe for an-
other weekend stay or a
day visit, during a normally
slow time," Grove said.
In addition, Carrabelle


is preparing for its big day
on Saturday, Dec. 12, when
it hosts the annual Holiday
ontheHarborandBoatPa-
rade of Lights celebration.
"The merchants in town
depend on both locals and
tourists," Grove said. "If
the locals go to Wal-Mart,
there's big economic leak-
age. The more people shop
locally, the more people
support our economy."


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Thursday, December 3, 2009


Local


The Times | A7


Allen, who was not at the
meeting, said he has never
attended an FCSWA meet-
ing.
"Everything I paid out in
that time, I did for the work-
ing people, not for Vince or
Linda (Raffield)," said Al-
len, who along with his wife,
Edda, has owned the Sports-
man's Lodge for the past 35
years. "Linda would come to
me and say, 'So-and-so has
a $1,000 hospital bill,' and I
would write a check."
Allen said he provided
the FCSWA a house at 17
Washington St., renovated
andfurnisheditandpaidfor
utilities in an effort to provide
the association with needed
resources to operate.
"I thought it was going to
be an office for the seafood
workers. It cost me about
$1,000 a month, and I had a
sign made for the office," he
said. "I was told by Linda
that the FCSWA was a non-
profit organization and my
donations would be tax-de-
ductible. At the same time I
first met with Linda, Bruce
Rotella (vice president of
the FCSWA) was there,
and he had collected some
money on the island. I think
he believed the money was
deductible, too, but that was
not the case."
Allen said that after
meeting Linda's husband,
Vince, who is confined to a
wheelchair, he realized that
it would be difficult for him
to make the trip from Apala-
chicola to Eastpoint regu-
larly.
"So I had a special show-
er and a bed installed at 17
Washington St. so he didn't
have to travel every day,"
he said. "I provided the
Raffields with a car so they
would have transportation
to the office.
"That's what led to them
moving in. In the end, I had
to have legal help to get
them out," he said.
Linda Raffield declined
to comment on any of Allen's
assertions.


and one of them said, 'Let's
build the seafood workers a
computer.'" Allen said. "I do-
nated $3,000 and said, 'Let's
build them the finest one we
can.' It was like four comput-
ers in one."
The custom-built com-
puter and a camera are
mentioned in a letter from
Allen to Raffield dated Oct.
30, 2008.
According to Andy Smith,
attorney for the Apalachicola
Riverkeeper, Raffield said all
of the computers purchased
by Allen were damaged by
lightning. Smith said some of
the data off the hard drives
was recovered and placed
on compact discs, which the
Riverkeeper now has.
In addition to the use of
17 Washington St., Allen lent
the association two boats,
one a motor launch embla-
zoned with the FCSWA's
name and logo, used to take
journalists and other visitors
out on the bay, and the other
a houseboat Allen said he
intended for use as an office
for the association.
Allen, who wrote checks
to repair the launch while
it was in the FCSWA's pos-
session, said he believes the
launch was used only once,
presumably during a July
2008 visit by Gen. Joseph
Schroedel and Col. Byron
Jorns of the Army Corps of
Engineers.
Both boats are now in Al-
len's possession. He said the
houseboat was never used
and both are now for sale.
Allen issued a short-term
$20,000 loan to the associa-
tion for oyster relay wages
so that the workers would
not have to wait for the state
toissueacheckbeforebeing
paid. Allen was reimbursed
for that check.
IRmds for boat repairs
provided by Allen were dis-
cussed at both the Nov 12
meeting and a September
FCSWA meeting.
Friedman said Allen
gave the FCSWA a check
for $1,500 for launch repairs


on May 28, 2008, and a check
for that amount was imme-
diately issued to John Sapp,
of Apalachicola, who did the
repair work.
On Aug. 12, 2008, Allen
provided an additional $3,000
earmarked for boat repairs,
a day after Raffield wrote
herself a $3,000 check for
"boat motor parts and re-
pair reimbursement." This
expense was presumably for
additional repairs, but Fried-
man found no documenta-
tion that further repair work
was completed.

'|{ WO COM SGIVOge
th II,
any ing at a
Allen said his final argu-
ment with Raffield began
over money to lease from
Bruno Kolb a boat ramp at
516 U.S. Highway 98, adja-
cent to the old Steamer's
Restaurant.
Allen said Kolb was his
friend and had leased the
property to the FCSWA with
an option to buy. Allen said
he then paid the FCSWA
$7,200 in advance to cover
six months' rent for the boat
ramp.
"I believed that over that
period of time, Kolb could be
convinced to either donate
the boat ramp or sell it to
the oystermen at a reason-


able price," Allen said.
According to Allen, Kolb
received $4,800 and then the
payments stopped. He said
that when he questioned
Raffield about the remain-
ing $2,400, she said she
needed the money for other
things.
"I told her you can't do
that," Allen said. "And that's
when I walked away from
her.
"If we can salvage any-
thing at all, I would like to
salvage that property for the
seafood workers. It's one of
the best pieces of property
for the seafood workers in
the Two-Mile area. It's ready.
All you have to do is put the
boats in and tie up. It's got
the zoning for the seafood
workers, and it's an asset for
Apalachicola because it's a
protected landing. This is a
very serious situation for the
seafood workers right now.
That property could take the
heat off of a lot of people."
Kolb said Allen ap-
proached him two years ago
and said the seafood work-
ers would like to temporar-
ily lease the property and
eventually buy it as a launch
site. Allen told him he be-
lieved the association could
get a grant to purchase the
boat ramp.
Kolb leased the asso-


citation the property for six
months at $1,200 a month,
but only received two checks
for $2,400 each. He said that
when he asked Raffield for
the rest of the money, she
cried and told him the asso-
ciation did not have enough
money to pay rent on the
boat ramp and that the oys-
termen could not afford to
pay even a small sum daily
for use of the ramp.
Kolb said he told her the
oystermen could continue to
use his property as long as
they kept the area clean. He
said he still wants to sell the
property and that as far as
he is aware, the launch site
is still in use by the seafood
workers.
"This is personal to me
because I'm the one that sold
ittohim,"Allensaid."It'snot
right that he wasn't paid the
balance of the rent."
Allen said he has not
removed the sign from the
old offices of the FCSWA at
17 Washington St. and that
once new officers are elect-
ed, he will consider allow-
ing the FCSWA to continue
using the house as a base of
operations.
"The money that I've put
in there, let's not let it go to
waste," Allen said. "There's
more to this life than money.
Let's move on."


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Many donations,
10an of t we boats
On numerous occa-
sions, Allen donated to
the FCSWA, totaling al-
most $24,000, according to
Friedman's report. His do-
nations covered expenses
that included $1,000 used to
pay Mamie Richards' $700
water bill, $500 to cover an
overdrawn FCSWA bank ac-
count, $1,000 for 501c3 filing
charges, $3,000 for "advertis-
ing, computer and website,"
and $7,200 to lease a boat
ramp for use by oystermen
and money for T-shirts and
signs.
Friedman reported that
about $3,800 was spent on
T-shirts but that the ultimate
fate of all the T-shirts is un-
known. Friedman reported
that many are unaccounted
for and some might have
been sold or given away at
the White Eagle Restaurant
where Allen employed Linda
Raffield for a time.
"I don't know anything
about the T-shirts," Allen
said. "Yes, they were in the
restaurant, but I don't know
who paid for them or what
happened to money from
any sales."
Lots of computer equip-
ment passed through the
Washington Street property,
and Allen paid for some of it.
Friedman found that Linda
Raffield bought a laptop
computer online for $1,000
and paid with a personal
check.
Allen said he had pur-
chased a laptop computer
for $1,200 and a camera for
$600 at Sam's Club and that
Raffield took possession
of the equipment for the
FCSWA. He paid to have a
custom computer built for
the FCSWA.
"The computers they
had were obsolete. We had
visitors at the lodge who
knew about building com-
puters. They spent time with
Vince and Linda over at the
Washington Street property,


. ,
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1
in 4 .
* *
* *
While enjoying the Holiday Fresh Market, please join St.
* George Island artisan Dee Grinenko for a demonstration
*
and sale of hand-woven brown ash baskets.
* .
LA 17 ILl 11 /
* : &ClJOT
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A Full Service Real Estate Company




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T/DE TABLES
MONTHLY AVERAGES
ro find the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times
:rom those given for APALACHICOLA:
HigH Low
"at Point Minuso:40 Minus 1:17
East Pass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27a
fo find the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times
rom those given for CARRABELLE:
HigH Low
Bald Point Minus 9:15 Minus 0:03
APALACHICOLA


SO LUNAR
m= Minor M= Major add 1 hour for daylight savings
Date Day AM PM Rise/Set Moon
12/03 Thu m 5:20 m 5:45 7:18am
M 11:35 M 5:40pm
12/04 Fri m 6:25 m 7:00 7:19am
M 12:15 M 12:45 5:40pm
12/05 Sat m 7:30 m 8:05 7:20am
M 1:20 M 1:50 5:40pm
12/06 Sun m 8:30 m 9:10 7:21am
M 2:20 M 2:50 5:40pm
12/07 Mon m 9:35 m 10:00 7:21am
M 3:25 M 3:45 5:40pm
12/08 Tue m 10:25 m 10:55 7:22am
M 4:15 M 4:40 5:40pm
12/09 Wed m 11:15 m 11:45 7:23am
M 5:05 M 5:30 5:40pm


IV


Thursday, December 3, 2009


Local


stringent water qual-
ity standards now coming
down from Washington
that could add millions of
dollars in expenses to mu-
nicipalities to ensure com-
pliance.
"Nobody's going to be
able to meet these stan-
dards if they go overboard,"
he said.

NO MOH0y 10f
Ocal projects
Both state representa-
tives said money would
be tight for the upcoming
2010-11 budget. Speaker of
the House Larry Cretul (R-
Ocala) has announced that
no local funding requestS
are being accepted for the
upcoming session.
In his opening remarks,
Patrons said Lawson, mi-
nority leader of Florida
House Democrats, planned
to attend Monday's hear-
ing but was called away at
the last minute to prepare
for a special legislative ses-
sion called for by Cretul on
Monday afternoon. That
session will focus on how
the state can take advan-
tage of federal stimulus
money that may be flow-
ing into the state on behalf
of the SunRail and 11i-Rail
transportation infrastruc-
ture serving Central and
South Florida.
Bembry said his focus in
the regular session will be
on issues regarding water
and water uses, particular-
ly since there has been talk
of plans by other parts of
the state to seek access to
North Florida's relatively
ample water supplies.
"Just because water is a
little more portable doesn't
make it any less of a natu-
ral resource," he said.
Smokey Parrish, chair-


the local Take Stock in Chil-
dren scholarship program,
asked the state reps to back
continued funding in light
of a drop in state funding
from $4.7 million to $3 mil-
lion over the past year. He
said the district now has
17 students enrolled in the
scholarship program and
may be able to add two or
three more in the spring.
Lockley and Jackel both
urged the elected officials
to back a firm stance on be-
half of the oyster industry.
Jacket asked the state
reps to keep their eyes on
all funding matters that
impact small counties,
specifically mentioning de-
creased spending on librar-
ies and increases in licens-
ingfees"whichaffectthose
on fixed incomes and fixed
budgets."
She said that while
the county has received
$353,000 in federal stimulus
money for sidewalks, "we
need more than sidewalks.
We are not seeing (the
amount of stimulus money)
to the degree we thought
we would."
Jacket also noted that
the county opposed any at-
tempt to reroute U.S. High-
way 98 through "the back-
side of Franklin County."
MarciaJohnsonthanked
the representatives for
their support for restor-
ing funding for local clerks
of court that had been di-
minished last year, which
Patrons promised to back
next spring. Elliott asked
that the men back a pro-
posal, supported by county
supervisors of elections, to
postpone until 2016 mea-
sures to implement new
handicap-accessible voting
machines.
Flanked by city com-
missioner Brenda Ash, Van
Johnson outlined a compli-
cated proposal being lob-
bied for on the state level
by the city's consultant, Bill
McCartney. The proposal is
based on the city being des-
ignated an Area of Critical
State Concern in 1985 and
calls for $4.4 million for
wastewater improvements
tothecity'sinfrastructure.
Of this, $3 million would be
added to the escrow ac-
count, which provides debt
service to the city's funding
from the state's revolving
loan fund.
"We are not asking for
new money, but a shift in
agency funding priorities,"
the mayor stressed.
Also speaking out was
Allen, who asked that the
State reps give SeriOUS COn-
sideration to offshore drill-
Ing, avoiding the "ultra-en-
vironmentalist" or "drill,
babydrill"positions.
Somewhere in there
there has to be a scien-
tific answer to those prob-
lems," he said, noting that
since Carrabelle has one of
the state's few deepwater
ports, growth in offshore
drilling would contribute to
the city's economy.
Accompanied by oyster-
man Billy Dalton, Kevin
Begos, who heads the
county's oyster task force,
asked legislators to consid-

i"esma" tiusinteosses wh n

'eDAtohn th s mpao so
upcoming changes.
"We don't want to forget
the individual fishermen,"
he said. "We want to help
people keep their jobs and
help reduce illnesses."
The Rev. John Sink
asked the state reps to re-
store money for affordable
housing that had been lost
in last year's budget.
Patrons and Bembry
closed the meeting by voic-
ing concerns over next
year's volatile session.
"You are reality," Patro-
nis said, addressing those
in the audience. "And Tal-
lahassee is definitely fan-
tasy land. Even though the
hurricane season is over,
there's going to be one this
coming spring."
Bembry said tough
choices lie ahead. "We can't


sustain the funding level we
have," he said. "Our state
has to be willing to take that
same sober attitude to the
way it approaches politics."


UAVIU AULLKSillN | 111e 11mes


man of the county com-
mission, addressed the
hearing first, outlining five
items the county wanted
the delegation to focus on
in the spring.
Topping the list was
preserving funds allocated
in 2008 for construction of
a work camp annex to the
FranklinCorrectionallnsti-
tution outside Carrabelle.
Bembry said he has
stayed close to the issue,
since his district includes
eight correctional institu-
tions with 4,073 Depart-
ment of Corrections em-
ployees and an average of
11,165 inmates.
He said the DOC facili-
ties account for almost $15
million per year in annual
spending, which is esti-
mated to inject about $60
million per year into the re-
gional economy.
Bembry said that be-
cause engineering and
bonding had been complet-
ed on the proposed work


camp, the project was se-
cure.
"Once you bond, that
money is protected," he
said.
Later in
1 the hear-
ing, Duffie
Harrison,
FCI's war-
den, spoke
out, concur-
a ring with
DUFFIE Bembry's
HARRISON point about
bonding. He
also noted that he was in
the process of moving into
a new home in Eastpoint.
Parrish urged the rep-
resentatives to stand firm
against any attempt to
remove water from the
Apalachicola River system,
in light of "transference of
water between drainage
basins" being discussed in
other parts of the state.
"It's going to put us right
back in the same boat we
were in," Parrish said.
Bembry said usage
studies by water manage-
ment districts in the region
indicate that the Panhan-
dle aquifer's water line has
moved 32 miles west in re-
cent years.
"If you displace water, it
creates a problem for the
spring system," he said.
"When I was a kid, you
jumped in the springs and
floated out to the river."


Patrons said he has
heard concerns from for-
mer Speaker of the House
Allan Bense about discus-
sion of water transfers by
the Council of 100, of which
Bense is a member.
"It makes me ner-
yous," he said. "We need
to make sure the viable
water supplies we have for
Northwest Florida stays to
meet Northwest Florida's
needs."
Patrons said he is inter-
ested in a septic tank bill
now being submitted that
could provide funding for
retrofitting or converting
those systems.
"It would construct a
government fund where
even folks with a failed sys-
tem can use money to ret-
rof it, or tap into city sewer,"
he said.
In addition to support
for standing up to the FDA,
Parrish sought backing
from the representatives
for moves that would give
cities and counties more lo-
cal control over their cable
franchises. Patrons voiced
his willingness to set up a
meeting with the cable in-
dustry to discuss local con-
cerns.
Lastly, Parrish urged
the representatives to seek
assistance for local vol-
unteer fire departments
that now face financial dif-
ficulties given dwindling


resources and stepped-up
training mandates. He said
the county's seven volun-
teer departments face a
combined annual deficit of
$2 million.
"It's a major problem
for us that's come up," he
said.

Sdiools seek help for
Jr. ROTC, science lab
The state reps heard
a series of brief presenta-
tions from elected officials,
including County Commis-
sioners Noah Lockley and
Pinki Jackel, Schools Su-
perintendent Nina Marks,
Clerk of Courts Marcia
Johnson, Supervisor of
Elections Ida Elliott, Apala-
chicola Mayor Van Johnson
and Carrabelle City Com-
missioner Cal Allen.
Marks' comments were
the most extensive, as
she sought support for the
school district's current ap-
plication to create a Junior
ROTC program at the high
school. She said the district
also plans to seek federal
money from the Race to the
Top grants for innovative
educational programs and
is on the verge of beginning
construction for a new out-
door science lab to be built
on the Apalachicola Bay
notfarfromtheentrance
to the school.
Roy Carroll, who directs


Temperature
High Low
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640 510
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670 590
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Date
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Sat, Dec 05
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TueDec08
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% Precip
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20%
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12/03 Thu 02:08AM
07:07PM
12/04 Fri 02:59AM
07:47PM
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12/07 Mon 01:03AM
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10:58AM -0.7
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01:24PM -0.4


06:05AM
09:12PM
07:27AM
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CARRABELLE
MM H AMM
1:34AM 2.9 H 09:33AM
6:22PM 2.1 H 08:33PM
2:30AM 2.7 H 10:22AM
6:55PM 2.1 H 09:33PM
3:31AM 2.6 H 11:11AM
7:23PM 1.9 H 10:50PM
4:40AM 2.2 H 11:58AM


7:47PM
2:19AM
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1:50AM
1:28PM


12/03 Thu
12/04 Fri 0
0
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12/08 Tue 1
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0


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Franklin County loses opener downs Wewa


a

STATE BAN K 1897
A Division of Coastal Community Bank

Apalachicola Carrabelle Eastpoint St. George Island
22 Avenue E 612 NAvenue A 5 Jefferson Street 200 Franklin Blvd
653-8805 697-4500 670-8501 927-2561


By David Ad erstein
Times City Editor
The Franklin County Se-
ahawks are vowing to avenge a
rare opening season loss when
they face off against the Wakulla
War Eagles on Friday evening in
Crawfordville.
With two of their top starters
on the bench due to parental dis-
ciplinary action, the Seahawks
suffered a rare loss in a season
home opener Nov. 24, falling to
the Wakulla War Eagles 72-59.
The loss was the first regular
season defeat for the Seahawks
since they fell 45-40 at Maclay on
Jan.23,2009.
Bu the Seahawks regained
their composure on Tuesday eve-
ning, traveling to Wewahitchka
to secure a 74-41 district victory
over the Gators.
"The parents made that deci-
sion, said Coach Fred Drake, af-
ter learning not long before game
time that sophomore forward
Carlos Morris, who had been
nursing a foot injury, and senior
guard Austin O'Neal, wouldn't be
playing against Wakulla.
"They had issues at home
with their parents," said Drake.
"That threw everything off, that
wasn't what we practiced for and
prepared for. We just couldn't get
over that hump. We didn't have
any offense.
"Mentally, the game was prob-
ably lost before it even started,"
he said. "It was a psychological
effect that threw everything off.
It was just an embarrassment,
nothing was together for that
game."
Scoreless until junior forward
Dalin Modican hit a free throw
with 5:10 left in the first quarter,
the Seahawks trailed 15-3 before
going on a seven-point run to


and 1-of-3 treys, snaring a hand-
ful of steal and pulling down 13
rebounds. He led all scorers with
23 points.
Morris, who has seen limited
action due to a toe injury, added
21 points, hitting 5-of-14 from
two-point range, 3-of-10 from
long-range, and 2-of-4 foul shots.
He also had seven rebounds and
four blocked shots.
"It really was his first game,"
said Drake. "He was rusty, and
still limping a little bit. He was
probably 70 percent."
A trio of players, Prince, Allen
and Modican, each added seven
points. Prince was 3-of-9 from
the field, hit 1-of-2 free throws,
and snared four rebounds.
Allen was 3-of-8 from the
field, and 1-of-4 from the char-
ity stripe, while grabbing six
rebounds. Modican was 2-of-3
from the field, and 3-of-4 from
the foul line, while grabbing four
rebounds.
Joseph added six points, 2-of-
4 from the field, and 2-of-4 free
throws, and grabbed three re-
bounds. Turrell hit his only field
goal for two points, and Jones
was 1-of-2 from the foul line,
while grabbing three rebounds.
"We played good aggressive
defense," said Drake. "We're a
totally different team with Aus-
tin and Carlos playing and that
was the difference.
"The kids fed off them playing
this game and the level of con-
fidence was there. There was a
trust factor," he said. "We have
to have those three guys, Austin,
Carlos and Arron, if were going
to win districts and make a run
for Lakeland."
The Seahawks return home
Thursday, Dec. 10 for a district
match-up against Liberty Coun-
ty


"FF
-
The Seahawks' Arron Prince
drives on Wakulla guard
Antonio Kilpatrick in hoop
action Nov. 24.
with Allen and Joseph adding
eight each.
The coach vowed to have his
team ready for Friday night's re-
match. "We're definitely looking
forward to it. That's a revenge
thing," he said, noting that the
Wakulla players have angered
the Seahawks by bragging about
their upset victory against state-
ranked Franklin County.
"We're going to try to run
the score on them," said Drake.
Now that we have our full squad,
they're going to see what we re-
ally got."
Both Morris and O'Neal were
back in action in their Region 1,
District 3 opener at Wewahitchka
'lbesday as the Seahawks rolled
to victory.
Ahead 18-9 after the first
stanza, and 35-15 at the half, the
Seahawks outscored the Gators
39-26 in the second half to secure
the win.
O'Neal was on fire all game,
nailing 11-of-14 from the field,


PHOTOS BY DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times


make it 15-10 at the end of the
period.
Behind 32-26 at the start of the
second half, the Seahawks' senior
center Zach Jones twice cut the
margin to six when he put back
rebounds underneath for scores.
The Seahawks then narrowed
the gap to four points, 45-41, with
two minutes left in the third, af-
ter senior guard Arron Prince
hit three straight buckets under-
neath.
But that's as close as it would
get, as Wakulla's freshman guard
Johnny Robinson, who led all
scorers with 19 points, and soph-
omore forward Takia Knight, who
finished with 14, kept the game
out of reach the rest of the way.
"We were using our press to


get us ahead on offense. But with
the kids not knowing the right as-
signments, we live by it and we
died it," said Drake.
Prince finished with 17 points,
with Seahawks junior forward
Marcus Allen adding 12 before
fouling out near the end of the
fourth period. Junior forward
Adam Joseph kicked in 11 and
Modican 10. Jones added seven
points and sophomore Trekale
Turrell a bucket.
As a team, the Seahawks shot
under 33 percent from the field,
nailing 19-of-60, and 1-for-eight
from the three-point line. From
the charity stripe, the team was
18-of-40,
Modican and Jones led the
team with nine rebounds each,


By Kelli Maggio
Special to the Times
The Lady Seahawks
only made a few defensive
errors in a 2-0 loss to the
Lady Eagles of Wakulla,
but the errors proved to
be the difference.
Playing without the top
goal scorer Megan New-
ell, out due to illness, the
Lady Seahawks improved
in many areas from their
last game, but had a tough
time putting the ball in the
net. Emily Hatfield and
the defense played sound-
ly behind nine goalkeeper
saves, but two misplayed


balls and a set -
of missed scor-
ing opportunities
contributed to
our loss.
The Lady Se-
ahawks' efforts
in the second half
MEG
left them in con-
W
trol of the contest, NE
but where just un-
able to finish.
We are proud of the
gains we are making, and
totally understand that
our young program is still
in the wing clipping pro-
cess. We have improved in
many areas, but still need
to develop a better un-


" understanding of the
game itself. There
is a need to not
only play at a high
level, but to study
the game at a high
level as well. As a
whole, we need to
AN
improve our abil-
ELL ity to get to the
ball more quickly
and not wait on the ball
to come to us. This was a
contributing factor in to-
night's defeat. Touch and
control will come with ex-
perience and repetitions.
We are encouraged by
the steps we are taking,
but understand that many


steps are left to be taken travel to Port St. Joe for
with this motivated group our first of two rivalry
of young ladies. matches this season.
We are in action again Kelli Maggio, a mem-
Thursday, Dec. 3 as we ber of the University of


Mobile Lady Rams un-
defeated 1997 national
champion soccer team,
is coach of the Lady Se-
chawks soccer team.


By Joe Aje|ds -
Special to the Times
On Nov. 20, the
Seahawks boys
varsity soccer
team ran into one
of the goliath soc-
L
cer programs of WI
the district. The S
Wakulla War Ea-
gles men's soccer team
defended their home pitch
with conviction, in a 4- 0 vic-
tory over the Seahawks.
The speed and pro-
ficiency with which the
Wakulla team executed
their offense caught the
Seahawks off guard and
two goals were scored
by Wakulla within the
first three minutes of the
game.
However, once the
Seahawks settled down,
they played outstanding
defense for the remainder
of the game allowing only
one more goal at the end
of the half and only one
goal throughout the entire
second half. Daniel "Bam-
Bam" Carrino, goalkeeper,
had 22 saves and coupled


7 with the defensive
effort from the rest
of the team, was in-
strumental in not
allowing Wakulla
to run away with
the game.
Additionally, the
LIAM second half surge
APP of Seahawks' de-
fense allowed
multiple attacks to be
built "from the back" and
allowed for seven shots
on goal by the Seahawks.
Although thwarted by
the Wakulla defense, the
seven shots on goal at-
tempted by the Seahawks
was the most so far this
season.
William "Maximus"
Sapp led the Seahawks
with three attempted shots
on goal. With each game,
the Seahawks boys varsity
soccer team improves by
leaps and bounds. Their
next scheduled match is
ThursdayDec.3,inPortSt.
Joe. Please come out and
support the Seahawks.
Joe Shields is the coach
of the Seahawks soccer
team.


Boys Basketball
Senior Arron Prince had 17 points to lead
the Seahawks against Wakulla Nov. 24, and
scored seven against Wewa Tuesday night,
while snaring four rebounds.


Boys Soccer
Freshman Daniel "Bam-Bam" Carrino made
22 saves against Wakulla Nov. 20. Despite the
4-0 loss, Bam-Bam and the Seahawks defense
strengthened over the course of the game to limit
Wakulla to a single goal in the second half. This
defense boosted the total number of shots on
9soea who bC rnIa II eeaNhsaewdku alite
with a 0.50 goals against average (GAA).


CA RRA BE L LE APA LA CH ICO LA


A


Lady Seahawks soccer falls 2-0 to Wakulla


Wakulla blanks


09

































































































CRAME~R


Alwys nlie |www.APALACHTIMES.COM


Thursday, December 3, 2009


Al 0 1 The Times


Local


Of course we had a good
Thanksgiving at the Hall! All
that good food, and friends and
neighbors to visit with. It was a
nice afternoon. When I got back
home, I had a big plate of food
waiting for me from the Legion.
Thank you so much.
One thing we should be
thankful for is that the 2009


until next month, on Thursday,
Dec. 10, a lunch at the senior
center will be hosted by the staff
and workers from the prison. Join
us at the senior center; serving
begins at noon.
The annual Boat Parade of
Lights will be held on Saturday,
Dec. 12 at the Carrabelle
River. Food will be served at


LANIARK NEWS


hurricane season ahs come and
gone peacefully!
Went to the Hall Saturday for some
chili and to look around at the arts and
crafts for sale. Hope you got over to enjoy
the soup or chili, and found something you
couldn't live without.
This Saturday, at the Hall, there will
be a variety show, starting at 1 p.m. You
make a donation at the door. Popcorn
and soda will be available, along with
other munchies. Some members from the
fiddlers, and Not-Quite-Ready band, along
with others, will be on hand to strut their
stuff. Come join us for a fun afternoon.
Although the lunches will not be held


5 p.m., parade at 7 p.m. and
fireworks at 8 p.m. Come down
and be a part of it!
Don't forget about our monthly
meeting for members of the Lanark
Village Association. Hope we have a
nice crowd at the Hall on Monday, Dec.
7. Gavel falls at 7 p.m. and we have the
election of officers for 2010. Hope to see
you there!
Be kind to one another, and check in on
the sick and housebound and keep Christ
in Christmas.
Until next time, God Bless America,
Our troops, the poor, homeless, and
hungry.


Semiors host community Christmas dinner


Recently, two anonymous and gener-
ous donors expressed concern that all
people in Franklin County be assured of
a bountiful Christmas dinner.
With that encouragement the Frank-
lin County Senior Center in Carrabelle
will host a Christmas dinner on Thurs-
day Dec. 10 at noon.


This dinner will be provided and
served by staff and facility of the Frank-
lin County Corrections System.
There will be music, games and
a movie in the game room. The commu-
nity of Franklin County is warmly wel-
comed.
For information call 697-3760.


.Bl, HAMrflNUTY


Lanark NEWS


HAVE YOU SEEN ME?
.
A Jack
Russell
terrier,
white with
brown
spots, has
been lost
around
141 Av-
enue H in
Apalachic-
ola as of
Thanksgiv-
ing Day.
The dog
answers to
the name
"Chop-
er
you
have him,
or know
his where-
abouts
call Leroy
King at
653-
9739.
-=*


Thousands of family & iq

aregare at-risk of g ng to
.e : -eempty-ha . on Cl


IMES THE BR














Thursday, December 3, 2009 w w w. apalach times com Page 1







Orman House lights up for holidays

Eager to show off a series his wife, Eugenia, assisted him. pletely restored, with all new
of improvements, the Orman The Rutzs, from Dunellen, glass globes. The 220-volt, 125- *, .
House State Park threw open stay for nine months of the year watt sodium bulbs have been ^
its doors Friday evening to a in the area, and volunteer to replaced with 110-volt, 100-watt
steady stream of visitors eager handle a variety of tasks, from compact fluorescent bulbs.
to take in the 19th century his- mowing grass and yardwork to The parks are in the process ,
toric home. greeting visitors to the home. of creating a butterfly garden .
Volunteers Judy and John Originally from Virginia, and examining ways to incor-
Rutz greeted the passers-by in Judy Rutz is a distant grand- pirate the many plants and ,
19th century attire, while rang- daughter, at least four genera- flowers studied by the great I
er Mike Kinnett showed people tions removed, from Jefferson 19th century botanist of South-
around the brightly-lit home, Davis, president of the Confed- ern flora, Dr. Alvan Wentworth
built in 1838 by Thomas Orman, eracy. She personally created a Chapman,
a cotton merchant and busi- series of floral decorations that Donations
newsman in Apalachicola from adorn the wooden mantelpieces provided by the
1840 to the 1870s. The house for the holidays. nearly 200 visi-
features details of both federal Thanks to an investment tors who came
and Greek revival styles with from the Florida Park Service, by Friday eve- .
molded plaster cornices, and the Orman House grounds are ning will ben-
wide heart-pine floorboards. now smoothly linked to the efit the Friends
Kinnett, District 1 Interpret- Three Soldiers Detail Statue lo- of Franklin
er of the Year for Florida State cated directly in front. County State
Parks, showed off a dining room The street has been closed Parks.
table impeccably decorated for off and new sidewalks, and a For more
a festive holiday meal. The park new parking lot right off Fifth information,
also served cookies and hot ci- and Market streets, have been visit www.flor- PhotosbyDAVIDADLERSTEIN|TheTimes
der punch to the many people added for visitors. In addition idastateparks.
who stopped by, with the help of there is now plenty of green org. Or call Above, volunteer Judy Rutz shows off the canopy
volunteer Fred Dermitt. space in front of the Chapman 653-1209. ':1 found in one of the first floor bedrooms of the
In the room next door, adja- Botanical Gardens. ----- Orman House. At left, the holiday place settings
cent to a 14-foot Christmas tree, The many streetlamps that -By on the Orman House dining room table include
Bedford Watkins played piano illuminate the gardens' walk- David china engraved "JFC Griggs Jan. 14, 1892" in
throughout the evening, while ing trails have now been com- Adlerstein L:::.r..:::.r of the wedding of Sarah Sadie Orman to Mr.
Griggs on that date. It was donated by Ruth Young.


B


SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Taking part in the Carrabelle Boys and Girls Club's Thanksgiving dinner
outreach are, kneeling, from left, teen director Suzanne Lewis and parent Dot
Moore. Standing, from left, are club director Cherry Rankin, parent Dorothy
Couch, parent Debra Cooper, recreation leader Granville Croom, parent
Tomasina Lattimore, parent liaison Rachel Benjamin, educational leader Louise
Chipman, restaurateur Linda La Paz, church member Pearlie Mae Clark, and
Hog Wild owner Ken La Paz.


Reaching families for the holidays


Several Carrabelle area families had
their Thanksgiving table enriched last
week, through a special outreach be-
tween a local restaurant and the Carra-
belle Boys and Girls Clubs.
Ken and Linda La Paz, owners ofHog
Wild Bar B-Q outside Carrabelle, each
year at Thanksgiving and at Christmas
donate meals to afamilyfrom eachof the
nine Carrabelle churches, and one from
the high school.
But thanks to a sizeable donation
from Rhonda Saunders, the La Pazs also
were able to help six families from the
Boys and Girls Clubs and so right before
Thanksgiving they gave out complete
meals, enough to feed eight, of baked
turkey, green bean casserole, sweet po-
tato casserole, creamed corn, dressing


and giblet gravy, cranberry sauce, dinner
rolls and apple pie.
Cherry Rankin, site director for the
Carrabelle club, gave the La Pazs a list
of recipients, all parents of young people
in the club, including the Dot Moore,
Josephine Sapp, Debra Cooper, Bambi
Keever, Tomasina Lattimore and Doro-
thy Couch families.
"We would like to try to get some more
people in the community to donate, and
we could hopefully help alot more people
at Christmas," said Ken La Paz.
Rankin said the club has already be-
gun its food drive for Christmas, notify-
ing people that they can drop off canned
items at the Carrabelle IGA, or the Car-
rabelle Boys and Girls Club site, from
now until Saturday, Dec. 19.


Chef Cassie Gary, above, samples leftovers after serving up Thanksgiving
dinner f or 60 shut-ins in cooperation with Franklin County Meals on Wheels.
Gary, her mother Susan Gary and Rex Humphries, co-owners of the Owl Cafe,
have provided the holiday meal for the last 13 years. Providing holiday meals
for seniors has long been a tradition in the county. Other restaurants that have
given of their time and talent include Caroline's on the River and Chef Eddie's
Magnolia Grille. Susan Gary said the meal count was down by about 40 from
.
last year and worried that the loss of Bert Ivey, former director of Eldercare
Services in the county, had led seniors to slip through the cracks.

.
Lib101y SIUdeHIS Share Than ksg wing blessing s


Students enrolled in
the Friends of the Frank-
lin County Public Library
TIGEsR rundde nTdptr
meaning of Thanksgiving
last week as they worked
for, gathered, packaged,
assembled, and distribut-
ed 51 lovely fruit platters
to individuals and families
in need of a special bless-
zgg
The project began with
two days of "bagging for
bucks" at the Gulfside
IGA in Apalachicola by
Project Coordinator Carol
Barfield and her enthusi-
astic group. They followed
their work by spending a
good portion of Thanks-
giving Day wrapping and
inserting a beautiful hand-
made greeting card.
The card read "The
Friends of the Franklin
County Public Library
Youth Programs (TIGERS
and KIT) wanted you to
know how well you are
thought of in this commu-
nity, and to show you our
appreciation we made this
fruit platter for you and we


CAROL BARFIELD | Special to the Times


hope you enjoy it. For all
the times you have shown
kindness to us and for all
the laughter you have
given us Be Blessed and
Thank You."
The group then took
the time and effort to lov-
ingly deliver their special
platters and well wishes.
Participants included:
Bri'Anna Gordon, Tydron
Wynn, Latresa Carr, Zach-
ary Jones, Teresa Carr,


Kamilah Hand, Dyquon
Gordon, Shaquana Weav-
er, and Adreenah Wynn.
Additional donations
were received from Kim
Creamer, Gulfside IGA,
and Rich Leonard, Buy
Rite Pharmacist. The TI-
GERS and KIT Program
students appreciate all
of the assistance and the
generosity of others in
making this project pos-
sible.


Mailing Address


Telephone


E-mail address


LIFE


TI~ES


BRINGING THANKSGIVING TO LIFE FOR SHUT-INS


Carrabelle announces decorating contest
It's time to untangle the lights, bring out the staple gun and let your imagination
and decorating talents run wild.
The Carrabelle Area Chamber of Commerce announces their annual holiday decorat-
ing contest for area homes and businesses. Residents from St. James Bay Golf Course to
Lighthouse Estates, plus local businesses, should fill out the application below.
Drop the application off at the Carrabelle Chamber at 105 St. James Avenue, or
mail to Carrabelle Chamber of Commerce, PO Drawer DD, Carrabelle, FL 32322.
Judging will be the night of Monday, Dec. 21. Winners will be announced the fol-
lowing day on Oyster Radio and in the next edition of the Apalachicola/Carrabelle
Times. Deadline for signing up is Friday, Dec. 18. Please contact the Chamber at 697-
2585 or e-mail chamber@nettally.com for further information.
Cash prizes for homes and public recognition signage for businesses. Please help
lightupourcity!
Application
Name/Business
Contact Person

Physical Address
















































































I (


PET OFTHE
WEEK
.
& Sophia
Sophia, a 1-year old
cocker spaniel mix
arrived at the Ado tiol'
Center a month ago.
Her owner was moving
and could not take
;4 her with him. She is
a sweet, adorable girl
waiting for a loving
1 me ohphiadsoupatnd

has been spayed.
Volunteers are desperately needed to socialize
Sophia and all of the other dogs and cats. Any time you
can spare would be greatly appreciated.
Call Kam at 670-8417 for more details or visit the
Franklin County Humane Society at 244 State Route
65 in Eastpoint. You may log onto the website at www
forgottenpets.org to see more of our adoptable pets.
Remember, when you adopt a friend for life, you
not only save the life of that pet, you make room for us
to save the life of one more abandoned dog or cat!


DON'T PAY TOO MUCH!
$50 Quarterly
Saves YOU $100 a year!
for residential accounts

AIoha BulsPost Management
FranklinCount/s0NLYLOCALPestcontrol company
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~:?~?~~?-~?~~;;~;r m mm ~;


Thursday, December 3, 2009


B2 | The Times


Local


Special to The Times
Through the Junior Miss
program held Oct. 17, the Junior
Service League of Port St. Joe
awarded nearly $6,000 in college
scholarship money to graduat-
ing Port St. Joe seniors.
Sara Ward, of Apalachicola,
was selected as the new Port
St. Joe Junior Miss. As over-
all winner, she won $1,500 and
the privilege to represent Port
St. Joe in the statewide Junior
Miss program in Winter Garden
in spring of 2010. The state win-
ner will then compete in Mobile,
Ala. at the national competi-
tion.
Ten Port St. Joe High School
seniors participated in the
event, competing in the areas
of scholarship, interview, self
expression, talent, and physical
fitness.
First runner-up was Chellsey
O'Neill, earning $1,250. Ra-


ven Harris was second run-
ner and received a scholarship
for $1,000. Kasie Thompsonwas
third runner-up and won $750.
The individual category
owners each received a $250
scholarship. Ward won two cat-
egories, scholastic and physi-
cal fitness. Savannah Steiger,
also of Apalachicola, won talent.
Thompson won the interview
phase, and Harris took the prize
for self expression,
The final scholarship, won
by Rebecca Fbrr, was the Sprit
of Junior Miss, a special award
chosen by the women partici-
pating in the event.
Organized by Amy Ouellette
of the Junior Service League,
emcees for the program were
Neysa Wilkins and Clay Peels.
The theme of the event was
"On Broadway." The partici-
pants entered to "One" from
A Chorus Line and performed
their physical fitness routine to


"Footloose."
The Junior Service League
is a non-profit organization of
women, which helps local chil-
dren. Their premier project
is Jam Packs, which provides
Gulf County elementary stu-
dents with a backpack stuffed
with school supplies. In another
project, 50 elementary students
receive a set of winter clothes,
thanks to a partnership among
the Junior Service League, The
Tapper Foundation and Sears.
The League also sponsors a
mentoring program of middle
school girls and a community
Easter Egg Hunt, and is com-
mitted to raising money for the
community. In addition to the
League's $10,000 pledge to the
Sacred Heart Foundation, the
League will award local high
school seniors with nearly $8,000
in scholarships this year. All
proceeds from League events
go to League projects.


DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times


s eries


Special to The Times
The Ilse Newell Phnd for
the Performing Arts concert
series will begin its 2009-10
season with a Christmas
concert on Sunday after-
noon, Dec. 13, at 4 p.m. in the
sanctuary of 'Itinity Episco-
pal Church.
Highlighting the concert
will be a performance of the
Christmas portion of the
"Messiah" oratorio, a popu-
lar work by the 18th century
composer George Frederic
Handel.
The Bay Area Choral
Society of 35 voices will per-
form, under the direction of
Merel Young, with piano ac-
companiment by R. Bedford
Watkins along with area so-
loists.
Part I of "Messiah" has
thechorusesof"ForuntoUs
a Child Is Born," "O, Thou
That Tellest Glad Tidings to
Zion," and "And the Glory of
the Lord." Soloists will sing
such songs as "Every Valley
Shall Be Exalted," "He Shall
Feed His Flock" and "Re-
joice Greatly."
Soloists will be Scott
Kinkead, Gordon Ad-
kins, Tamara Marsh,
Don West, Leslie Coon,
Sharon Philyaw, Virginia
Harrison, Megan Lamb and


DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times
Tamara Marsh will be
among nine featured
soloists when the Bay
Area Choral Society
of 35 voices performs
the Christmas portion
of Handel's"Messiah"
Oratorio on Dec. 1 3.
CarlaMay
The Ilse Newell And is
funded primarily by the gen-
erous contributions of com-
mitted sponsors, patrons,
associates and friends. A
suggested donation of $3
is asked of concertgoers to
support the series, admin-
istered by The Apalachicola
Area Historical Society, a
not-for-profit organization
dedicated to preserving the
rich history of Apalachicola
and the surrounding area.


SPECIAL TO THE TIMES


By I)espina Williams
FloridaFreedomNewspapers
One day, when Debbie Hooper re-
flects on her illustrious photography
career, she will pay respects to one
shadowy Costa Rican lizard.
For that lizard, spotted last year
on vacation, helped Hooper earn a
second place finish in the juried fine
art photography exhibition, Pho-
tofest2009.
The exhibition, part of the Art
in Public Places Program, was co-
ordinated by the Tallahassee/Leon
County Council on Culture and Arts
(COCA).
The COCA Arts Advisory Com-
mittee selected 46 entries out of 183
works by Big Bend photographers to
hang in the Tallahassee Regional Air-
port ArtPort Gallery.
Hooper, who exhibited two works,
"Blue Mist" and "Pelican Duo" in the
2005 Photofest, received an invitation
to display her photograph, entitled
"What Lizard?!"
She snapped the photograph in
Costa Rica's Manuel Antonio Nation-


SEE MORE HOOPER
Debbie Hooper's award winning photograph, "What Lizardl" will be
on display at the Tallahassee Regional Airport ArtPort Gallery until Jan.
15.
The Apalachicola Museum of Art, located on 96 5th Street, will be
exhibiting six of Hooper's framed nature prints and four gallery wrapped
canvas prints through Jan. 15.
The works recently traveled with Michael Lister's Double Exposure book
tour.
The Studio on 4th, located at 521 4th Street in Port St. Joe, will also be
showing Hooper's work the weekends of Dec. 4-5 and Dec. 11-12.
To view more of Hooper's photography, visit www.joebay.com.


al Park, one of several stops enjoyed
by Hooper and husband, Jon, on their
35thweddinganniversary.
The Hoopers' tour guide demon-
strated an uncanny ability to spot all
manner of creatures, both big and
small.
When he pointed out the shadow
cast by a lizard on the underside of a
large green leaf, Debbie Hooper rec-
ognized a photo opportunity, if not im-
mediately a lizard.
"What lizard?," Hooper's reaction
to the tour guide's announcement,
seemed a fitting name for the strik-


ing and mysterious photograph.
As the COCA committee an-
nounced six honorable mention re-
cipients at the Nov. 19 airport recep-
tion, Hooper muttered something
ever so faintly under her breath: "I
don't want an honorable mention. I
want a prize."
Hooper got just that a glossy
red ribbon and a $75 check.
To cap off the eventful night,
Hooper, husband, Jon, daughter Kelly
Kingon and son-in-law Dale Kingon,
both of Carrabelle, feasted on sushi
at a Tallahassee eatery.


Ashton Brannan turns 2
Ashton E Brannan celebrated his
second birthday on Sunday, Nov. 29.
He is the son of Aaron Brannan, of
Carrabelle, and Jessa Brannan Lan-
phere, of Tallahassee.
His birthday was celebrated with
family at the home of his great-great-
grandma Merle Brannan.
Ashton is the grandson of Law-
rence and Renee Brannan, of East-
point, and great-grandson of Thomas
Lee and Suzanne Brannan, of Carra-
belle.


James Padgett IV born
Jackii Hefner and Padge Padgett
are proud to announce the birth of
their son, James Ashley Padgett IV
He was born Monday, Oct. 5, 2009
and weighed 6 pounds, 4 ounces and
measured 19 inches long.
Maternal grandparents are Hazel
and Buddy Hefner, of Eastpoint.
Paternal grandparents are
Dr. James and Andrea Padgett, of
Eastpoint, and Peggy Lewis, of Port
St. Joe.


DUggafS mark 45th
anniversary
Congratulations on the 45th wed-
ding anniversary of Earl and Patricia
Duggar, of Apalachicola.
The couple was married Nov. 27,
1964 at St. Patrick's Catholic Church
in Apalachicola.
We love you.
Sabrina, Dewitt, Ashley, Shelby,
Corbin, Krista and Dawson


Sara Ward chosen Port St. Joe Junior Miss


Christmas oratorio to Hoe isbgwt itelzr


open Ilse Newell


Anniversaries, Births and BIRTHDAYS














































































(ARD OF THANKS TERRY SHEDDAN FAMILY


The United Methodist Churches

Sof Frankhin County Welcome You

First United Methodist Church of Apalachicola
Worship Service 11:00 a.m. every Sunday
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
75 5" St. Apalachicola 653-9530 fumcapalach@gtcom.net
Pastor: Rev. Them Patriotis
Carrabelle United Methodist Church
Worship Services 10:45 a.m. Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
"Celebrate Recovery" Mondays 7-9 p.m.
Healing service first Tuesday each month-7 p.m.
102 NE A e. B Calabell n6s97-3672

Eastpoint United Methodist Church
Worship Service 10:00 a.m. every Sunday
Prayer 9:15 a.m. Waffles & Wisdom 11:15 a.m.
Healing Service every first Fridays of the Month at 6:30 p.m.
317 Patton Dr. (corner of David St.) -670-8825
Pastor: Rev. Beth White
St. George Island United Methodist Church
9:00 a.m. Worship Service
10:00 a.m. Fellowship Hour
201 E. Gulf Beach Dr. 927- 4635 www.sgiumc.org
Pastor: Rev. Them Patriotis


St. Patrick Catholic Church
Ave C & Sixth Street in Apalachicola, FL32329 or
The Islander (Across from the Blue Parrot)
on St. George Island, FL 32328
(850) 653-9453 Email: stpatcath@fairpoint.net
PASTOR: FATHER ROGER LATOSYNSKI
www.stpatricksmass.com
APALACHICOLA MASS SCHEDULE
SATURDAY................. .................5 PM
SUNDAY ................ ................ 10 AM
ST. GEORGE ISLAND MASS SCHEDULE
SUNDAY ................ .................8:30 AM


First Pentecostal Holiness Church
379 Brownsville Road Apalachicola


Sunday School 9:45 am
Sunday Morning Worship 10:45 am
Sunday Evening Service 6:00 pm
Monday, Youth Group 6:30 pm
Wednesday, Royal Rangers, G.A.P. 7:00 pm
Wednesday Worship & Word 7:30 pm
Nursery Provided during regular church services


Thursday, December 3, 2009


Local


The Times | B3


By David Adlerstein
Times City Editor
Beside the still waters
of the Apalachicola River,
about two dozen people
took time out from the
joyous holiday season to
spend time Sunday after-
noon to remember their
loved ones.
Gathering at Riverfront
Park for the annual Ser-
vice of Remembrance, the
small congregation quietly
shared their grief, listen-
ing to music and inspiring
words as they examined
the lives that have gone
before them, and left them
feeling empty and alone.
"We don't know what to
expect when we are griev-
ing," said Melanie Lach-
lan, a grief therapist with
Big Bend Hospice, which
organized and coordinated
the service.
"We don't know what
we're feeling, we don't
know what we need. Should
we cry? Should we keep
busy?" she said. "We live
in an uncharted territory
without a guide."
Lachman's remarks,
which preceded her light-
ing a candle of grief,
stressed that "there is not
a right way or a wrong way
to grieve. There is your
way. We are trying to learn


to figure out how to rein-
vent ourselves and rein-
vent each day."
"Grief is a measure of
love, that's true," she said.
"But so also is living."
She asked that the audi-
ence remember their loved
ones, "what they taught us
and how they shaped us"
and likened those who have
passed on to stars that dot
the heavens.
"Remember too, stars
are eternal and countless
in number, guideposts and
symbols of hope," she said.
"They're always there,
whether we see them or
not."
"We are always work-
ing through our grief," she
said. "Grief enables us to
own our sorrow."
Offering prayers and
words of hope was the Rev.
Karen Pellett, chaplain of
Big Bend Hospice. "Learn
the gifts darkness has for
us," she said. "Learn to
live in the darkness."
Jessica Jaworski, mu-
sic therapist with Big
Bend Hospice, played gui-
tar as gathering music,
with Regina Compton, the
hospice's team manager,
offering opening words of
welcome.
Apalachicola Mayor Van
Johnson offered a welcome
to the city of Apalachicola,


with Beverly Hewitt and
Sandra Smith, both mem-
bers of the county's ad-
visory council, offering a
short reading following
Pellett's opening prayer.
Scott Kinkead, direc-
tor of creative ministries
for the Apalachicola and
St. George Island United
Methodist Churches, sang
"When You Wish Upon A
Star."
Joanne Thomason.
RN, who works with hos-
pice patients, offered her
own personal history of
grief, losing her daugh-
ter Joellen Whaley, just a
few months after she had
given birth to a baby boy.
Thomason also recounted
the death of her husband
earlier this year.
After reciting Psalm
26, and a letter from the
Thomason family, Thoma-


son sat down and her cous-
in Jeri Turner completed
the reading.
Pellett led the audi-
ence in a ceremony of the
shells, in which those in
attendance were able to
place a shell or shells in
a large glass vase as they
spoke aloud, or kept in
their hearts, the name of
their loved ones.
Sharon Philyaw sang
"Wind Beneath My Wings,"
followed by Lachman's
words of comfort and her
lighting of the candle of
grief. Deanna Murphy,
LPN, who works with hos-
pice, lit the candle of hope.
Jaworski then sang and
played guitar to a musi-
cal meditation "Memories
Pathway," written by the
musical therapy depart-
ment of Big Bend Hospice.
Comptonofferedclosing


words, and Pellet a closing
prayer, with refreshments
provided afterwards.
On Nov. 16, in honor of
National Hospice Month,
the county commissioners
proclaimed November Big
Bend Hospice Month in
Franklin County.
The proclamation was
presented by Big Bend
Hospice Franklin Advisory
Council members Beverly
Hewitt and Sandi Hengle,
and made official with the
signature of Chairman
Smokey Parrish and Clerk
of Courts Marcia Johnson.
Big Bend Hospice
marked its 26th anniversa-
ry last month, joining the
nation's hospices to raise
awareness of the avail-
ability of hospice care, and
to enhance public under-
standing of hospice ser-
vices. Big Bend Hospice


provides physical, emo-
tional, spiritual and prac-
tical care to individuals
with a life-limiting illness,
with care tailored for each
family.
Together with the
patient's physician; the
hospice physician, team
of nurses, social work-
ers, hospice aides, music
therapists, chaplains and
volunteers provide pain
and symptom control. Big
Bend Hospice remains
with each family for up to
a year following the death
of their loved one to pro-
vide support through the
grieving process. There
are grief support pro-
grams for adults, children
and teens open to every-
one in the community, re-
gardless of whether or not
they have utilized hospice
services.


We'd like to take this
moment to send everyone
our sincere Thanks for
their outpouring of love
and sympathy they showed
us during our loss. There
are too many to thank
individually, which shows
the extent of friends and
family who loved Mama
and were there for her
family when we needed
you most. Your gifts -
from kind words and hugs,
to cards with monetary
gifts and preparations
of foods showed her
family you loved her
deeply also. Everyone
gave a part of themselves
in loving thought and


Bobby Shiver for the words
each gave at her service;
Chase Richards and
Maranda Moses for playing
and singing the lovely
songs "You didn't only play
and sing for us... Granny
was so pleased;" Brock's
Home Town IRmeral Home
for their beautiful work;
Donnie and Toni Raffield
for putting a memorable
video slide together; Terri
Tipton for playing the
piano so beautifully; and
Loving Waters for opening
their doors.
God bless each one of
you and thanks again.
The family of
Lula Mae Richards


IVe the gift
0 0 00 OC. lif D 3
The Bay Medical/
Southeastern Community
Bloodmobile will be at
the Natural Medicine
Shoppe in Apalachicola on
Thursday, Dec. 3 from 9
a.m. to 6 p.m.
All donors will be
entered into a weekly
drawing to win a $50 gift
card and can draw from
the fishbowl for gifts from
local merchants. .
For more information'
call 850-747-6570.

Raffle to benefit


670-8372 or 653-7041.

?|111000 (IUb
hOsts Christmas
pf0gram Dec. 10
The Phil Wo 's
Club 11hoa h man I
Chris as musie annual
Trinity Episcopal Church
on Thursday, Dec. 10 at 4
p.m.
This is a community
affair. Everyone is invited.
Refreshments will be
served after the concert
at a reception in Benedict
Hall.
For more information
call 670-8088.


adults and $5 for children
12 and under, and on
sale at the Chamber
of Commerce office in
Apalachicola. Tickets
may also be purchased at
the Methodist churches
during office hours and
after Sunday services.

Carrabelle Love
Center holds outil
rally Dec. I 3
The Carrabelle Love
Center will hold a Youth
Rally on Sunday, Dec. 13
at 3 p.m.
Participating
churches include the
youth ministries of the
Love & Worship Center
Church, Covenant Word,
and Mount Zion, all
in Apalachicola; and
Eastpoint Church of
God.
Guest speaker will be
Jr. Minister R. Damien
J. Davis, of the Love &
Worship Center Church.
Guest vocalists will be
Eric Comer and Joyce
Dixson, of Panama City.
The church is
located on U.S. 98 East
in Carrabelle. Bishop
Robert L. Davis is host
pastor and Apostle
Shirley C. White is
general overseer.
For more information
call 653.5089 or email at
chellelovecenter@aol.
com

FifSt Pentecostal
hosts 'Liberated
Wailing Wall'
Come here the
Liberated Wailing
Wall of Jews for Jesus
on Wednesday, Dec.
16 at 7:30 p.m. at the
Apalachicola First
Pentecostal Holiness
Church, located at 379
Brownsville Road.
The Liberated Wailing
Wall will tell the story of
Jews coming to believe
in Jesus through music,
drama and personal
testimony.
For more information,
please call 653-8690 or
653-9372-


remembrances, no matter
how great or small.
We would like to say
a special Thank You to
Pastors Lois Long and


Resort Vacation
Properties is sponsoring a
raffle drawing for a three-
day, two-night stay on St.
George Island. Tickets
will be sold at Resort
Vacation Properties,
check-in center and are
one ticket for $5 and six
for $20.
Monies raised will be
used to purchase toys
for Franklin County Toy
Connection, for children
right here in Franklin
County. Distribution
of the toys will take
place on Dec. 17 and
18 at the Eastpoint and
Carrabelle firehouses and
Benedict Hall at Trinity in
Apalachicola.

ChriStmas arade
through Eaptpoint
Dec. 5
The Eastpoint
Christmas parade will be
held Saturday morning,
Dec. 5.
The lineup begins at 10
a.m. at Novell Street, with
the parade starting at 11
a.m. The parade heads
east on U.S. 98 to First
Street.
Following the parade,
Santa will head to Avenue
A to the First Baptist
Church parsonage to hand
out goody bags.
Anyone who wants to
he in the parade, please
call Pam Watson at


The family of James
Terry Sheddan is deeply
touched by the support
of friends during our


Elder care Services
*
illfe5 Bigel0W


us in your thoughts



THE
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
WELCOMES YOU


sorrow.


UF RS Dec. 1 1 and 12
The third annual
Christmas program
presented by the
Methodist Churches
of Apalachicola and St.
George Island will be
on Friday, Dec. 11 and
Saturday, Dec. 12 at the
Chapman Auditorium in
Apalachicola.
The performance of
"The Christmas Gift,"
begins at 7 p.m. each
evening.
Traditional, country
and modern Christmas
music has been woven
into the show written
and directed by Scott
Kinkead, the churches'
director of creative
ministries, and April
Patriots. The story

sses tohnety hooradioall-
in show and discuss

ntmas with their
Members of the two
church choirs, along
with singers from the
community, will make up
the chorus. Highlights
include songs featuring
The Divas of Country
Music, a children's
chorus, the Bay Area
Choral Society and
numerous solos. Area
children will be featured
in several numbers
throughout the evening,
especially the Frosty the
Snowman scene.
Tickets are $10 for


THE


LOIS SWOBODA | The Times
Rod Bigelow of
Tallahassee has
been named new

("oo ,2.12 Sde ts
for Franklin County
Bigelow, who resides
Part-time with his
mother, Joyce Timmons,
in Eastpoint, worked
for three years as a
senior case manager
for the elderly and
disabled with Franklin
County Senior Center.
He also taught middle
school reading here
and was a county
probation officer in the
early 1990s. He holds
a degree in business
education from Florida
A and M University.


Hwy. 98 & 6th St.
Apalachicola
SUNDAY: 8:00 AM 10:30 AM
LIBRARY HOURS:
SUNDAY 12:00 2:00 PM
MONDAY 11:00 AM 1:00 PM
WEDNESDAY 12:00 2:00 PM
THURSDAY 3:30 5:30 PM


Hospice remembrance:'Grief is a measure of love'


Church BRIEFS


(ARD OF THANKS LULA RK(HARDS FAMILY


Franklin County TO


m

1nmty
EST. 1836


WELCOMES YOU
IIP
Ul

* .
As cension
101 NE First Street
Carrabelle
SUNDAY
10:00 AM





NO TICE OF INTENDED
AC OTI N
FRANKLIN DISTRICT
SC OO O AH LB RD

Purpose and Effect: The Franklin District School Board
proposes to amend and adopt pohces, as provided m the
Administrative Procedures Act for the purpose of bringing said
policies into comphance with Florida Statutes and State Board
of Education Rules.

Summary: The following is a brief description of each proposal
change
Franklin County School District
* Code of Conduct (Amend dress code and use of electronic
devices)
* School Board Policy Manual (Athletics Policy)

Statutory Authority: Section 230.22(2), Florida Statutes
These proposed rules will be considered by the Franklin County
School Board at a meeting publicly advertised and held in the
Franklin County Willie Speed School Board meeting room at
85 School Road, Suite One, Eastpoint, Florida no earlier than
January 07, 2010.
The above Policy Manual and/or Code of Conduct may be
reviewed at the Franklin County School Board District Office,
located at 85 School Road, Suite One, Eastpoint, Florida during
the hours of 8:00 AM until 4:00 PM, Monday Friday.


NOTICE OF ADOPTION OF
COMPREHENSIVE PLAN
AMENDMENT S
NOTICE OF LAND USE
CHANGE
The Franklin County Boad of County Commissioners will hold a public hearing, pursuantto Section
163 3184, Honda Statutes, to consider adopting pmposed changes to the Franklin County Comprehensive Plan
andtheFuturelandUseMap Senes Thepmposedchangesinclude
Delete Whcy 2 2(n) of the Future Land Use Element C













Delete Whcy 2 2(0) of the Future Land Use Element
-
















Amend the Future Land Use Map for the following two parcels
"A'"is'st'"":"s:" ::konmBa mS sonsD 1 n c2u nd23,Township6South,
.!""C"::pmento rmb lk nSubons 0 He n was reauthRange4Westa
ApublichearingonthepmposedchangeswillbeheldonTuesdayDecemberl5,2009,at615pmatthe
Carrabelle City Hall at 1001 Gray Avenue in Carrabelle More information can be obtained and the pmposed
y b nsps a85 6Fan9k718n Gunty Planning Department, 34 Fbrbes Street, Suite 1, Apala

ymmmmentma so onat hp b01 hea 0 ,w a OFm kl ac of
i'.buhche nh Hn tb ramonM Rm nswkm awvsbora pealoa abo r andmmitm hard
evidence, if any, upon which the appeal is to be bas"
If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in onler to participate in this pmeeeding,
you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the pmvision of certain assistance Please contact Marcia Johnson, Clerk,
Frankhn County, Apalachicola, Honda 32320 or (850)653-8861, extension 100, within 2 working days of your
'"eiptof this notice, if you are hearing impaired, call 1-800-955 8771




--
--


NOTICE OF ADOPTION OF CITY
ORDINANCE


The City Conunission of the City of Apalachicola will hold a
public hearing for the purpose of receiving citizen's conunentS
.
on the following proposed ordinance:


ORDINANCE NO. 2009-04


AN ORDINANCE BY THE CITY COMMISSION OF THE
CITY OF APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA ADOPTING THE
CITY OF APALACHICOLA WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES
WORK PLAN (WORK PLAN); AUTHORIZING THE WORK
PLAN TO BE INCORPORATED AS AN AMENDMENT
TO THE APALACHICOLA COMPREHENSIVE PLAN, AS
ADOPTED PURSUANT TO ORDINANCE NUMBER 91-
7 AND ALL S UB SEQUENT AMENDMENT S THEREOF;
PROVIDING FOR THE REPEAL OF ALL ORDINANCES
IN CONFLICT HEREWITH; AND PROVIDING FOR AN
EFFECTIVE DATE.


The public hearing will be held in theApalachicola Conununity
Center, #1 Bay AvenueApalachicola, Florida, beginning
at 6:00 PM on Tuesday, December 8, 2009. All interested
parties are encouraged to appear and be heard with respect to
this proposed ordinance.


IV


Thursday, December 3, 2009


Local


The following reports
provided by the Franklin
County Sheriffs Office.
Arrests are made by of-
ficers from the following
city, county, and state
law enforcement agen-
cies: Apalachicola (APD),
Carrabelle (CPD), Flori-
daHighwayPatrol(FHP),
Franklin County Sheriffs
Office (FCSO), Florida
Fish and Wildlife Con-
servation Commission
(FWC), Florida Depart-
ment of Environmental
Protection (FDEP), Flori-
da Division of Insurance
Fraud (DIF) and Florida
Department of Agricul-
ture and Consumer Ser-
vices (FLDOACS).
All defendants are con-
sidered innocent until
proven guilty in a court
of law.


Thursday Dec. 3
Individual and group
computer instruction at
Eastpoint library from 10
a.m. to noon. For more info,
call 670-8151.
Yoga at Carrabelle li-
brary from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m.
For more info, call 697-2366.
Wandering Star Quilt-
ing Club. Chills Hall La-
nark Village. 1 to 3 p.m. Call
Christine Hinton 697-2551.
Community Luncheon
and Information Specials
at the Franklin County Se-
nior Center in Carrabelle.
Noon. $3 donation. Call 697-
3760.
Friday Dec. 4
Individual and group
computer instruction at
Eastpoint library from 10
a.m. to noon. For more info,
call 670-8151.
Parent-child reads at
Eastpoint library at 2:15
p.m. for infant to 4-years-
old. For more info, call 670-
8151.
Story Hour at East-
point library at 3:30 p.m. for
ages 5 to 8. For more info,
caHE670-r8c Se class at Chillas
Hall in Lanark Village. 9 to
10 a.m. Open to all and free.
Alcoholics Anonymous
will meet at 7:30 p.m. at the
Church of the Ascension,
101 NE First Street, in Car-
rabelle. For more info, call
697-2837.
Carrabelle History Mu-
Seum, Old City Hall, 106 SE
Avenue B in downtown Car-
rabelle, is open 10 a.m. to
4 p.m. today and Saturday.


Free. For more information,
contact Tamara Allen at
697-2141.
Saturday Dec. 5
7'
Holiday Fresh Market
in Apalachicola. All day
For more info, call 653-9419.
Second Annual Kayak
Fishing 'Iburnament.
Expeditions in Tate's Hell
is hosting, with cash and
prizes awarded. Registra-
tion and Entry Fee re ired.
Early registration and pay-
ment of entry fee in full will
receive a discount. Catch/
phot/release for Reds and
Wout. Captain's Meeting 8
a.m., with fishing directly af-
terward. All fishermen must
return with their photos by 2
p.m. on Sunday, Dec. 6. Par-
tial proceeds going to Toys
for Tots. For more info call
697-2434 '
M0ntiay, DO(. 7
Building Web sites with
Dreamweaver Part 1, 10
a.m. to 1 p.m. at Carrabelle
library. For more info call
697-2366.
Apalachicola Library
Board will meet at 5 p.m. at

lib3ra8ry Fbr more info, call
Harmonica at Carra-
belle library at 10 a.m.. For
more info, call 697-2366.
Yoga at Carrabelle li-
brary from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m.
For more info, call 697-2366.
Yarn Junkies will meet
at 7 to 9 p.m. The newly
formed group is for knitters,
crocheters and others ad-
dicted to yarn. The group
will meet each Monday
evening at an alternate loca-


tion. For information, call
Kathy Robinson at 653-7196.
Exercise class at Chillas
Hall in Lanark Village. 9 to
10 a.m. Open to all and free.
Al-Anon meets at 5:30
p.m. at Winity Episcopal
Church's Benedict Hall
at Sixth Street and Ave/D.
For more info, call (850)
222-2294 -
Bingo at the Franklin
County Senior Center in
Carrabelle. Early bird at 6
p.m reg i OCa 7 p.m.
3760'
TU0St Gy, DOC. 8
Apalachicola City Com-
mission meets at 6 p.m.
at the City Hall in Battery
Park. Agenda includes sec-
ond reading and adoption
of Water S Plan Ordi
upply
nance. For more info, call
653-9319.
. Apalachicola Commu-
naty Gardens will meet at
5 p.m. at Seafood Grill res-
taurant. For more info call
653-9419.
Carrabelle Historical
Society will meet at 6 p.m.

ad mCr if I 2%1
Harmonica at Carra-
belle library at 10 a.m.. For
more info, call 697-2366.
eBay Buying Guide at
Carrabelle library from 1 to
4 p.m.. For more info, call
697-2366.
Breakfast at the Frank-
lin County Senior Center
in Carrabelle. Coffee at
7:30 a.m., meal at 8 a.m. $2
suggested donation. Call
697-3760.


Bingo 7 p.m. St. George
Island Fire Dept.25 cents
per card. Families welcome.
Proceeds go to St. George
Island Civic Club. Call 927-
4654.
Alcoholics Anonymous
will meet at 7:30 p.m. at the
Church of the Ascension,
101 NE First Street, in Car-
rabelle. For more info, call
697-2837.
Wednesday, Dec. 9
Adult Wii at Carrabelle
library. 9 to 11 a.m. For
more info call 697-2366.
lilUfSda Dec. 10
The Local Department
of Juvenile Justice Coun-
cil will meet from 11:30 a.m.
until 12:15 p.m. at Eastpoint
Church of God. If you have
any questions please con-
tact Carol Barfield at 653-
2784
The Franklin County
Community Partnership
for Children and Youth will
meet from 12:30 until 2 p.m.
at the Eastpoint Church of
God.Ifyou have any ques-
tions please contact Carol
Barfield at 653-2784.

andue r es t
Eastpoint library from 10
a.m. to 1 p.m.. For more info,
Call 670-8151.
Wandering Star Quilt-
ing Club. Chills Hall La-
nark Village. 1 to 3 p.m. Call
Christine Hinton 697-2551.
Community Luncheon
and Information Specials
at the Franklin County Se-
nior Center in Carrabelle.
Noon. $3 donation. Call 697-
3760.


a Holidays in the Garden
and Nature photography
contest.
Photos must use plant
life, such as foliage, flower-
ing plants, vegetables or


fruits, to express a holiday
sentiment, or a general gar-
den landscape.
Photos may address any
recognized holiday that falls
between Oct. 1 and Jan.20.


Submission must be made
between Jan. 2 and 8, at the
Apalachicola Bay Chamber
of Commerce, 122 Com-
merce Street in Apalachic-
ola. Judging will take place
on Monday, Jan. 18.
FOr details visit the City
SquareCommunityGarden
Facebookpage.

Tobacco Free Franklin
Partnership to meet
The Tobacco Free
Franklin Partnership
Meeting willbe held on
Wednesday, Dec. 9 at 5:30
p.m. at the Franklin Coun-
ty Health Department in
Apalachicola.
If you are interested
injoiningthepartnership
or attending the meeting,
please contact David Walk-
er at 653-2111, ext. 119.

Wilderness Coast

Twiboard sto meet
PublicLibraries'(WILD)
Governing Board will meet
on Monday, Dec. 14 at 1:30
p.m. at the Wakulla County
Public Librarypublicmeet-
ing FOom in Crawfordville at
4330 Crawfordville Highway.
The meeting is open to
the public.
For more information,
pleasecall850-997-7400.


B4 | The Times


Sheriff's


KAISER F {I'S OFFICER OF THE MONTH

Franklin Correctional Institution
selected Ronald Keiser as its officer
of the month for November 2009.
Em 10 ed with the Florida
DeparPment of Corrections for
6 years, Officer Keiser has been
assigned to FCI since 2005. His
previous assignments were at Union
C.I. and Wakulla C.I. He is currently
assigned to the day shift, with a
special assignment to assist with the
key and lock department.
In nominating Keiser, Sgt.
Gerald Messer wrote that Keiser is
"dedicated to his job and the state
of Florida. Officer Keiser's health
has declined lately but that has not
stopped him from doing his job."
Keiser resides in Carrabelle with
Ronald Keiser his wife, Gail.


NOv. 24
Zachary J. Paul, 23,
Apalachicola, violation of
probationCand failure to
Cruz T. Griggs 20
Apalachicola, Bay Coun-
ty violation of probation
(FCSO)

NOV. 30
Larry M. Cummings
II, 22, Panama City, three
counts violation of proba-
tion (FCSO)
Yolanda E. Bristol,
28, Tallahassee, passing
worthless bank checks
(FCSO)
James E. Pilotti, 23,
Apalachicola, false report
to law enforcement offi-
cer, no saltwater products
license and no harvest li-
cense (FWC)


COmmunity CALENDAR


NeWS BRIEFS


Community Garden
holds holiday photO
contest
The City Square Com-
munity Garden is holding









STANDING FIRM AGAINST SMOKING


IORIS & 4
O\O 04
Michael & Anthony
O State Certified Electrician ESI2000204
& Finish Carpentry RG006883 .
850-229-6751 850-227-5666


Always Online | APALACHTIMES.COM


.






*
Building Supplies
& Auto Repair
Carrabelle 697-3333
We Deliver Anywhere


Don L~!vely General Contractors


LAB N PREMIES


g


School hosts GED testing Dec. 7 antI 8


Regitraion willbe to.


IV


Thursday, December 3, 2009


Local


The Times | B5


The Carrabelle Boys & Girls Clubs hosted a festive event Nov. 19 to celebrate the Great American Smoke Out 2009, a day set aside for people to end
the cigarette habit that is taking days off their lives and costing them money. Site director Cherry Rankin, who also serves as an advisor to SWAT (Students
Working Against Tobacco) hosted the event, which featured walls lined with the results of a poster contest by club members. In photo at left, the contest
winners were from left, first place Brooklyn Turner, second place Isaiah Barber, and third place Trinity Barron. In photo at right, the superhero Underdog is
shown by one of the students defeating the evil powers of cigarettes.


Apalachicola Bay Char-
ter School would like to
announce their honor roll
for the middle school's frst
nine-week grading period
of the 2009-10 school year
Sixth Grade
All Rs: Riley Brown,
Celesta Creamer, Adriane
Elliott, Amber Henning,
Skylah Obee, Lael Parker,
Joshua Patriotis and Myah
Wise.
A/B: Maya Blitch, Gabby
Bond, Vailan Gibbs, Kaleigh
Hardy, Glory Miller, Brooke
Moore, Christian Page,
Brooke Parker, Corrine
Piccirillo, Haley Pouncey,
Dallas Shiver, Milford Shiv-
er, Xuripha Tiller and John
White.
Perfect Attendance:
Alyssa Creamer, Brooke
Moore, Umstead Sanders,


Milford Shiver, Amber Hen-
ning and Spencer Strick-
land.

seventh Grade
All Rs: Brooke Frye
A/B: Amanda Anthony,
Corey Bratton, Tyler Cash,
Era Cooper, Kaitlin Griner,
Selina Kahn, 'lkiana Lock-
ley, Jake Richards, Katie
Seger, Kelsey Shuler, Chase
Taranto and Alyssa Varnes
Perfect Attendance:
Amanda Anthony, Corey
Bratton, Magen Creamer,
Austin Rowland, Katie
Seger and Alyssa Varnes
Eighth Grade
All Rs: Gracyn Kirvin
A/B: James Bailey,
Savannah Cook, Antonio
Croom, Graham Kirvin,
James Newell, Tevis Page
and Malachi Parker


I


SHardware and


The following is the
Honor Roll for Franklin
County middle and high
schools for the frst nine-
weeks grading period.

Sixth Grade
AllRs:AmeliaNewman
A/B: Bradley Gordie,
Hunter Segree, Anna Ri-
ISehy, Chnshtin Hdlton, Hollie
iver, ea ers, es-
tiny Stovall, Kendall Meyer,
Krista Martina, Jared King
and Richard Millender

Seventh Grade
All Rs: Grant Smith,
Aaliyah West, Samantha
Marxsen and Mikael Lewis
A/B: Morgan Martin,
Tressie Buffkin, Macey
Hunt and Marlyn Lee'

Eighth Grade
All Rs: Ryan Babb and
Laura Gallegos
A/B: Lenny Ward, Logan
McLeod, Jathan Martin,
Kevin Flanagan, Deborah
Dempsey, Kristina Boyd,
Ally Millender, Josie Turn-
er, Jessica Shields, Kristen
PHutnal,0d ooakndP itrmaan,
Reeder

Ninth Grade
All Rs: Christa Robison
and Carla Lewis
A/B: Cheyenne Mar-
tin, Morgan Walker, Emily
CashbDavidKRutleSan 0
Elisha Patriotis, Elton Ol-
vera and Stephanie Marx-


sen
loth Grade
All Rs: Deanna Quick
A/B: Adreenah Wynn,
Jessica Dempsey and Carli
Klink

11th Grade
AllRs:KaylaCarter
A/B: Brice Carlson,
Jessica Galloway, Morgan
Golden, Tiffany Carroll, Vic-
toria Parker, Jimmy Gog-
gins, Robbie Butler, Isabel
Pateritsas and Lenanya
Morris

12th Grade
All Rs: Kendyl Hardy,
Natalie Shiver and Robert
Henry
A/B: Heather Kem-

mTsdornn S aos:
ing, Katie Brannan, Garry
Larsen, Lindsey Carter'
Russell Simmons and Jac-
queline Nabors

The following are ad-
ditions to the honor roll

PFr n inlasouw kElorm
tary School for the frst
nine-week grading period
for 2009-10
Kindergarten
All Rs: Trinity Cassell,
Kadin Swiney

First Grade
A/B: Charles Win-
chester


CAg..g..
850-653-8869
to get your
ad in
"H1-andes sit
asce-viocs

Have Grimler Will Travel
StumRpanudcRo nding.
No job too small or large.
Call Clarence Dewade
in Lanark Village
FREE E IMTE8
DON WILLSON'S
SEPTIC TANK
SERVICE

v.=:.ed IT
commercial
Septic Tanks &
Grease Traps Pumped
Call day or night
653-9406

ROBERTS APPLIANCE
REPAIR
ALL MAJOR BRANDS -


Plumbing New Construction Roofing


RCOO66499


P.O. Box 439


The following is the
First Baptist Christian
middle and high school
honor roll for the frst nine-
week grading period:

seventh Grade
A/B: Ryan Dobson


Ninth Grade
A/B: Dakota Richeaux

11th Grade
A/B: Emily Kembro

12th Grade
All Rs: Terry Griner


The General Edu-
cational Development
(GED) test will be held
Monday and Tuesday,
Dec. 7 and 8 at the Frank-
lin County School in the
Media Center.


held daily until test date.
Testing will begin prompt-
ly at 6 p.m. each day.
Contact Nick
O'Grady at 670-2810 or
Maxine Creamer at 670-
4481 for more informa-


B~ tndsreag SOY9~owt SlhC;e


Honor ROLLS


APALACHICOLA BAY CHARTER SCHOOL


FRANKLIN COUNTY


wr ..
Honon Shres


oflStol


Dental Clmnic


IR6Ran BORLtrger, 9 9 ~


FIRST BAPTIST CHRISTIAN SCHOOL





SB The Times Thursday, December 3, 2009


| 1100
J. STERN
AttorneyforPlaintiff
900 SOUTH PINE ISLAND
ROAD, SUITE 400
PLANTATION, FL
33324-3920 09-25194
GMAP
December 3, 10. 2009
4969T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FORFRANKLINCOUNTY
FLORIDA.
CIVIL DIVISION

THE BANK OF NEW YORK
MELLON FKA THE BANK
OF NEW YORK, AS TRUS-
TEE FOR THE BENEFIT
OF CWALT INC., ALTER-
NATIVE LOAN TRUST
2007-19 MORTGAGE
PASS-THROUGH CERTIFl-
CATES, SERIES 2007-19,
Plaintiff,
vs
EDWARD STEPHAN
DACHTERA; et al,
Defendants
Case No
192009CA000624XXXXXX
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: EDWARD STEPHAN
DACHTERA Last Known
Address
1559 ALLIGATOR DR.
PANACEA, FL 32346
Current Residence is Un-
known
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action to foreclose a
mortgage on the following
described property in
Franklin County, Florida:


ANNOUNCEMENT5
1100 Legal Advertising
1110 Classified Notices
1120 Public Notices/
1125 nouncements
Rideshare
1130-Adoptions
1140 Happy Ads
1150 Personals
1160 Lost
1170 Found

s -
1100
4887T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FORFRANKLIN.COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
IN RE: ESTATE OF PANSY
MASSEY BRASWELL
FILE NO. 09-53-CP
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the
estate of Pansy Massey
Braswell, deceased,
whose date of death was
September 17, 2009; is
pending in the Circuit
Court for Franklin County
Florida, Probate Division:
File Number 09-53-CP; the
address of which is The
Franklin County Court-
house, Apalachicola,
Franklin County, Florida
32320. The names and ad-
dresses of the personal
representative and the per-
sonal representative's at-
torney are set forth below
All creditors of the dece-
dent and other persons,


Franklin County's source of news for more than a century


i


?aam


-


1100
who have claims or de-
mands against decedents
estate, including unma-
tured, contingent or unliq-
Uldated claims, and who
have been served a copy
Of this notice, must file
their claims with this court
WITHIN THE LATER OF
THREE (3) MONTHS AF-
TER THE DATE OF THE
FIRSTPUBLICATIONOF
THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY
(30) DAYS AFTER THE
DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE
ON THEM.
All other creditors of the
decedent and other per-
sons who have claims or
demands against the
decedents estate, includ-
ing unmatured, contingent
or unliquidated claims,
must file their claims with
this court WITHIN THREE
(3) MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUB-
LICATION OF THIS NO-
TICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE
TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY
CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER
THE DECEDENT'S DATE
OF DEATH IS BARRED.
THE DATE OF FIRST PUB-
LICATION OF THIS NO-
TICE IS:
Personal Representative:
Tressie E. Laszlo
PO. Box 226
Carrabelle, Florida 32322
Attorney for Personal


| 1100
Representative:
Charles A. Curran, Florida
Bar No. 274380
PO. Box 549
Carrabelle, Florida 32322
(850)697-5333
Fax: (850)697-5558
November 26,
December 3, 2009
4948T
NOTICEOFFRANKLIN
COUNTY'S INTENT TO
ENACT AN ORDINANCE
REGULATING PUBLIC
BOAT RAMPS
Notice is hereby given that
on December 15, 2009 at
5:30 o'clock p.m. (ET), at
1001 Gray Avenue,
Carrabelle, Florida, the
Franklin County Board of
County Commissioners
shall hold a public meeting
to consider adopting an
ordinance regulating pub-
lic boat ramps. Interested
parties may appear at the
meeting and be heard with
respect to the proposed
ordinance.


BEING AT RE-ROD
(MARKED #4261) MARK-
ING THE NORTHEAST
CORNER OF LOT 7,
BLOCK 242 OF THE CITY
OF APALACHICOLA, A
SUBDIVISION AS PER
MAP OR PLAT IN COM-
MONUSEONFILEAT
THE CLERK OF THE CIR-
CUlT OFFICE IN FRANK-
LIN COUNTY FLORIDA
SAID POINT ALSO LYING
ON THE WESTERLY
RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUND-
ARY OF 24TH AVENUE,
FROM SAID POINT OF
BEGINNING RUN SOUTH
00 DEGREES 10 MINUTES
59 SECONDS EAST
ALONG SAID WESTERLY
RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUND-
ARY 110.00 FEET TO A
RE-ROD (MARKED
#4261), THENCE LEAV-
ING SAID WESTERLY
RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUND-
ARY RUN SOUTH 89 DE-
GREES 48 MINUTES 56
SECONDS WEST 100.00
FEET TO A RE-ROD
(MARKED #4261) LYING
ON THE EASTERLY
RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUND-
ARY OF A 10.00 FOOT
WIDE ALLEY THENCE
RUN NORTH 00 DE-
GREES 11 MINUTES 00
SECONDS WEST ALONG
SAID EASTERLY
RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUND-
ARY 110.00 FEET TO A
RE-ROD (MARKED
#4261). THENCE LEAV-
ING SAID EASTERLY
RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUND-
ARY RUN NORTH 89 DE-
GREES 48 MINUTES 56
SECONDS EAST 100.00
FEET TO THE POINT OF


has been filed against you
and you are required to
serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it,
on DAVID J. STERN, ESQ.
Plaintiffs attorney, whose
address is 900 South Pine
IslandRoad#400,Planta-
tion, FL 33324-3920 no
later than 30 days from the
date of the first publication
of this notice of action, and
file the original with the
clerk of this court either
before service on Plaintiffs
attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a de-
fault will be entered
against you for the relief
demanded in the com-
plaint or petition filed
herein.
WITNESS my hand and
the seal of this Court at
FRANKLIN County, Flor-
ida, this 10th day of No-
vember 2009.
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT
COURT
BY: Michele Maxwell
DEPUTY CLERK
IN ACCORDANCE WITH
THE AMERICANS WITH
DISABILITIES ACT per-
sons with disabilities need-
ing a special accommoda-
tion should contact
COURT ADMINISTRA-
TION, at the FRANKLIN
County Courthouse at
850-653-8861 ext 100,
1-800-955-8771 (TDD) or
1-800-955-8770, via Florida
Relay Service.
LAW OFFICES OF DAVID


YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action to foreclose a
mortgage on the following
property in Franklin
County, Florida:
Lot400fLASBRISASac-
cording to the Plat thereof,
as recorded in Plat Book
6, at page 15, of the Public
Records of Franklin
County, Florida;
has been filed against you
and you are required to
serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it
on Frank A. Baker,
plaintiff s attorney, whose
address is 4431 Lafayette
Street, Marianna, Florida,
32446, on or before 30
days from the date of first
publication, and file the
original with the clerk of
this court either before
service on Plaintiffs attor-
ney or immediately there-
after; otherwise a default
will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in
the complaint.
DATED this November 11,
2009.
HON. MARCIA JOHNSON
As Clerk of the Court
By: Michele Maxwell
As Deputy Clerk
December, 10, 2009
4997T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
FRANKLIN COUNTY
FLORIDA


If a person decides to ap-
peal any decision by the
Board with respect to this
proposed ordinance, they
will need a record of the
proceedingsandthatfor
such purpose, they may
need to ensure that a ver-
batim record of the pro-
ceedings is made.
Any person requiring spe-
cial accommodations to
attend the meeting shall
call the Clerk of Court at
850-653-8861 at least three
business days in advance
of the meeting to make
such arrangements.
December 3, 2009.
4950T
IN THE SECOND JUDI-
CIAL CIRCUIT IN FRANK-
LIN COUNTY FLORIDA


ALBERT J. TISI, ET AL.,
DEFENDANTS)
NOTICEOFACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
TO: ALBERT J. TISI AND
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
ALBERT J. TISI
whose residence is un-
known if he/she/they be
living; and if he/she/they
be dead, the unknown de-
fendants who may be
spouses, heirs, devisees,
grantees, assignees,
lienors, creditors, trustees,
and all parties claiming an
interest by through, under
or against the Defendants,
who are not known to be
dead or alive, and all par-
ties having or claiming to
have any right, title or in-
terest in the property de-
scribed in the mortgage
being foreclosed herein.
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action to fore-
close a mortgage on the
following property:
LOTS 7, 8, 9, AND THE
NORTHERLY 20.00 FEET
OF 10, BLOCK 242 OF
THE CITY OF APALACHI-
COLA, A SUBDIVISION AS
PER MAP OR PLAT IN
COMMON USE ON FILE
AT THE CLERK OF THE
CIRCUIT OFFICE IN
FRANKLIN COUNTY
FLORIDA AND BEING
MORE PARTICULARLY


SUPERIOR BANK,


vs
JOHN L. MILLER, Ill, ME-
LISSA P MILLER, and LAS
BRISAS HOMEOWNERS'
ASSOCIATION OF FRANK-
LIN COUNTY INC.
Defendants.
CASE NO. 09-419-CA
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO:
JOHN L. MILLER, Ill, ME-
LISSA P MILLER, and LAS
RRISAS HOMFowNFps


AN ORDINANCE REGU-
LATING PUBLIC BOAT
RAMPS WITHIN THE UN-
INCORPORATED AREA
OF FRANKLIN COUNTY
FLORIDA; AUTHORIZING
REMOVAL OF AUTOMO-
BILE, BOATS AND TRAIL-
ERS IN VIOLATION OF
THIS ORDINANCE: PRO-
VIDING FOR PENALTIES:
PROVIDING FOR SEVER-
ABILITY AND AN EFFEC-
TIVE DATE.
A copy of the proposed or-
dinance is on file with the


cOVERING MILTON TO APALACHICOLA


08
YOUR FLORIDA FREEDOM CLASSIFIED CONNECTION


WE'RE IAVEl..ALE 24 /7'


TO PLACE AN AD


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Visit Us Online:


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| 1100 | 1100 | 1100 | 1100 | 1100
Clerk of Court, 33 Market ASSOCIATION OF FRANK GENERAL JURISDICTION DESCRIBED AS FOL BEGINNING CONTAINING
Street, Apalachicola, Flor- LIN COUNTY INC., and all DIVISION LOWS: 0.25 ACRES MORE OR
a di and the public may in- others having an interest in LESS.


sapebctitthsesre during regu- the subject property~~ GLMACMRTGAGE, LLC,





I _


| 1too | | 1too | | 1100 | | 3220 4100 | 6110
LOT NUMBER 5 IN ALLl- OCEAN MILE, PHASE 2 gi
GATOR POINT A SUBDI- ACCORDING TO THE p Ic t mtmeodC uonnts Medical/Health Lanark Village
VISION OF FRACTIONAL PLAT THEREOF AS RE- Clerks Office, telephone / 1 br 1 ba, Renovated/ fur
SECTION 3 AND A PART CORDED IN PLAT BOOK 653-8861 (TDY 653-22270r . Care Giver/Cna nished end unit, new
ONFRACTI LSHISPE )U GE( E OROF T t1 u 7d ysatprioeast 5 Piece 100% Mcrofibel EMPLOYMENT ExApe nc ndCare kitchtehn & bath, r nlmuom 4
SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST FRANKLIN COUNTY the meeting. LI feRmab ts mpdt9e 4100 Help Wanted sumeto: dep., no smoking, pet con-
ACCORDING TO THE FLORIDA. December 3 2009 wLL NEW In boxes. Delly- 4130 Employment drafterty@careminders.com sidered. (850) 653-3838
PLATS THEREOF RE- Information or call anytime (850)
CORTDEPDA SP TTTO8K d beeun ed aeqaunstd 0-425-8374 available. 248-22730rfax 248-2275. Lanark Village
INCLUSIVE OF THE PUB- serve a copy of your writ- | 11so Rental's
LIC RECORDS OF AND ten defenses, If any to J. 4100 2br, 1ba, W/D Incl. utilities,

OG T NR NDKBI o 6y eE n BookBe skkeeper asso emmoe22d 1ba 0
has been filed against you tEff wNhosePaddressC N1T2E nRusse a rsw $160 Brand name queen AGuPe ulRKe Ot sn PO ALFOG T JOB 850-509-3535
and you are required to DRIVE, SUITE #110 Chopper Snub ta I please mattress set, unused in Water St. Hotel
serveacopyofyourwrit- DEERFIELD BEACH, FL call850-653-9739 sealed plastic with war- sume. .Lanark Village, 1 br*g
ten defenses, If any, to It 33442 within thirty (30) ranty 222-7783 a t. unfurnished, W/D
on SMITH, HIATT & DIAZ days after the first publica- Food Services/Hospitality Caution eyH/A d $450
PA., Plaintiff s attorneys tion of this Notice in the Line Cooks & 1st & las Ask for m


0 I Ider30 ed fe s w Eox e -6 63 5 Call uerNB/ER hsayn t bpla 85 6 7-2 88. .
from first date of publica- Plaintl s attorney or imme- 100% LEATHER Lwing you see a job Large Studio


f rn ee Ig al ddt a athe Rm St Uf ero Log FTuarha tFe rcasonotactethe Nea n4o
mediately thereafter; other complaint. 3130 is America s consumer


8100 -Antique& Collectibles
8110 Cars
8120 Spoits utility Vehicles

msmercial
8160 Motorcycles
8170 Auto Parts

wiaetsercraft

so jame
8245 Boat Slips & Docks
8310-Aircraft/Aviation
8320 ArV/DifRoadVehicles
8330 Campers & Trailers
8340 Motorhomes


Franklin County's source of news for more than a century


5 uDn
g wy
215-1769 9am to 9pm.
Dodge Durango $1295 Dn
/o eTotal 2P811ce $6,90
W Daylight Auto Financ-
Ing 215-1769 9am to 9pm.
Dodge Durango 1999,
5HDwoa n 21
9am to 9pm.
Jeep Wrangler 1994
$1,295 Down 0% Interest,
2816 Hwy 98 W Daylight
Auto Financing 215-1769
9am to 9pm.


| 8130
Chevy Silverado $1495
DN 1999, Total Price
$6,900 0% Interest, Day-
Ilght Auto Financing 2816
Hwy 98 W 215-1769 9am
to 9pm.
Dodge Ram 1996 $795
Down 0% Interest, Daylight
Auto Financing 2816 Hwy
98 W 215-1769 9am to
9pm.
Dodge Ram 1998 $1195
DN, 1500 X cab. Total

H 9 oo nier t

Dod 2001, 1500

1 Hh uo 1
9am to 9pm
Ford Ranger 1995, $795
Down. 0% Interest, 2816
Hwy 98 W Daylight Auto
Financing 215-1769 9am
to9pm.


| 6140

1, br
Apalachicola, FL.
Call 850-643-7740.

3 br 2 ba, DW 1600 sq. ft.
with utility room, fireplace
and jacuzzl, secluded on
u5bllacmsea m t eoem
Carrabelle & Apalachicola.
Newly Renovated, $575
m5d-8n 701st & sec. Call

Carrabelle
4 br 2 ba w/FP appll-
ances, pool w/ srvce Incld,
hot tub, sauna + guest apt
w/ full bath $1200 mo, +
c 1&
3f osk


mearcccaon I Dws illti
Act, If you are a person
with a disability who needs
any accommodation in or-
der to participate in this
oceedingcCtutoareen
provision of certain assis-
tance. Please contact the
Court Administrator at Cir-
cult Civil Division, 33 Mar-
ket St., Ste. 203 Apalachl-
A# F(904326 88 o :
100 within 2 working days
t ey rpIreeacdn .of this no-


e
JOHNSON MARCIA
CLERK OF COURT
By Michele Maxwell
AsDesputerClerkDecember
3, 2009
5015T


R SCING NFD B
The Franklin County Board
of County Commissioners
will conduct a
stakeholders meeting to
obtain comments or sug-
s fCor aG groaposs
recovery. The public, as
well as representatives of
the City of Carrabelle and
the City of Apalachicola,
are Invited to attend.

p te% 3 95
for reconstruction of af-
fordable rental housing
damaged by Hurricane
Gustav/Tropical Storm
Fay Interested rental prop-
erty owners should contact
Alan Pierce, Director of Ad-

6 aSemiceasra

Thle5meeting w bmbheld at
90 nta r I

tions should be directed to
Deborah Belcher tele _
phone 850-893-0694. Any
disabled person wishing to
attend the meeting and re-
qulring an Interpreter or


wise a default will be en-
t ed a amnstndeodu r e
complaint or petition.
DATED on November 17,
2009.
MarclaM.Johnson
Clerk of Court
By: Terry E Creamer
As Deputy Clerk
In accordance with the
Americia 0 ersDis
Ing special accommoda-

c ed a he oc n


th s f)e bu hne
850-653-8861 or
1-800-955-8770 via Florida
Relay Service.
e b 73,10,2009
4409T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE SECOND JUDI-

LRIF RNCKULllTN CNOU
BANKUNITED, FSB,
Plaintif
vs.
LUCIA A. GLEATON: JER-
EMY7%EATON JR; et al,
CASE NO. 19 2009 CA
000404
NOTICE OF ACTION

fenda (s): following
Lucia Gleaton. (CURRENT
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN)
Last known address: 1720
Magnolia Rd., SAINT
GEO8RGE ISLAND, FL


NUKRNROENNT eS18NC
Laas known aRddckess 20
GEO8RGE ISLAND, FL
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FlED that an action for
Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property: LOT 8, BLOCK I
OF THREE HUNDRED


HELP IS ONLY A



PHONE CALL


AM 9 AWAY


n oitcetorp agency.

wT8ft7ceFo obs ms
A public service
message from the FTc
and The News Herald
ClassifiedAdvertising
Department










re ial
0120 Beach Rentals
6130 Condollownhouse
6140 House Rentals

Roob m emWantted
6180 Out-of-Town Rentals
6190 Timeshare Rentals
6200 vacation Rentals




For Lease
COmmercial
Building
Approx 1100 sq ft.
Available now Correr

850 6150058


| 6110
3 br, Apt in Lanark Village
w/ porch & sml yard, will
consider rent to own $500
mo + $250 dep. 509-2460

r, 2bnah2s rlst ww/t n
Apalachicola. W/D Incl
f unfur5nbr 00mo



Heritaar Villas

2BR handicap unit now
available. Some rental as-
sistance may be available.
HUD vouchers accepted.
Call 850-653-9277. TDD/
TTY 711. Equal Housing
Opportunity


Chevy Monte Carlo

t oewn 6 h L e 1 2
9am to 9pm.
Chrysler Labaron 1994
D ghDtownut0%Flln rc
2816 Hwy 98 West
Eastpoint On the Bay 3 br 215-1769 9am to 9pm.
2 ba, CHA, DW Mature Pontiac Grand Am $695
Couple $750 mo + dep. Dnl997, Total Price $3,500
N500-6mo2k6n3g or pets 0%lnterestDaylightAuto
Financing 2816 Hwy 98 W
215-1769 9am to 9pm.
Eastpoint, 2br, 2ba, Pontiac Sunfire $895 DN,
study/ofice/br Whispering 2002, 0% Interest, Daylight
Pines Sub-Div db| gar Auto Financing 2816 Hwy
$1050 mo, 678-640-4810 M West 215-1769 9am to


Boat Capt ian
W the5n0etedne s d
lachicola Maritime Mu-
seum call 850-653-2500 or
send resume
to:Admin@ApalachicolaMa
ritmeMuseum.com
Web Id 34065942

Sales/Bus. Development

Sales Position
Port St. Joe Star
Florida Freedom News
aopkers/Interactm tivat



tude ellent sal
d exc es
Ills custom vesewis
tchos beknhoewle
you. We will train you in
new er advertisIn
spap
sales. This position


I Is s t em s
nleand resources ae
a successful sales
leader on our team.
This position
oM oTrhStS e.
Florida Freedom ofers
a competitive benefit
package Including med-
Ical, dental, vision, and
Ilfe Insurance, 401(k)
plan, vacation and sick
leave nd paid holl-

Candidates are hired
pending a background
check and drug screen
To apply
send resume to:

PanaP Cy 02402
You m li atapply
www.emeraldcoast.com/


FREEDOM
171 FLonz on
"'"""^ems..amm

Drug-free workplace.
EOE


Estate Auction
Saturday Dec. 5
10 am
6910 Coe Road Bayou
George, viewing at 8:30
am. Take 231N to 2301.
Right on Cole Rd. Follow
signs. Antique commode
w/ mirrors, 2 antique sec-
e Ca netlegoctab
bles antique game table
old victrollr lesea



bO
toy wagon with wood
wheels, Eastlake chair
Hall tree quilts. Waterfall
bedrooma et, elwood
Kerosene lamps, ship and
carriage lamps, Lg to small
bird cages, 3 old violins
(one Stratovarous) old car

ta rm Ig3snsews r
mugs delft blue, bosson
heads cookie jars butter
churn decanters R m-
reels Pachinco game
Ooh J n n m

sB1 ne 5 n 6 s rr
shelves scroll & table &
band. Concrete, Radlal
arm saws, drills, lots of
hand tools, 1970 Opal car
18ft M.FG. Fiberglass
boat & Johnson moton -
Sears 30-30, old 7.52 army
Rugger Enfleld 1910, Win-
chester 9430 Rifles, 20+12
gauge, 410, Brazilian sin-
gle shot, Smith & Wesson,
CwHHagens 1Mar naub9
actions, and more. Old
swordoco cto Pocesls


rFeocuonrt n, pH nn edsacu
S HSSL
urday sale will resume
Sunday afternoon at 2pm.
10% Buyers Premium. Bay
Co. Auction Ser AB964.
Auctioneer Larry Bayles
AUl384. 850-722-9483 or
819-0773


Very nice 1 br aprment













St.s Goge
$160 wk, elec, Satellite
Garbage Included. pool
t be. 12'X65' deck wt
850-653-5114




St. George
ISland
2 br, 1 ba, bar, satellite,
util Incl. 12 x 50' deck.
$250/wk, 850-653-5114


Waterfront

e

850-443-.2216



6170
2 br, 2 ba MH Wood II
e W/D e



2 br, 2 ba, Mobile Home
318 Woodill Rd. Furnished,
$600 deposit $600 month
850-697-8440

43 Bayshore Dr. Apalachl-
cola. Really nice 2 br with
whirlpool bath, quiet
neighborhood. Unfur-
nished. $600 mo 1st & last
mo rent + dep. 653-4293
after 4 pm.


g. . - -

I Modular 70 4000me, Ex
excellent condition 2br 2ba
All appliances, ceiling
Canabelle 3bn2baTH fans, custom deck, New
pool side, 1500 sq. ft. 1 CH&A, guaranteed for 10
1 Wood floors throughout! I years. You move it.
$950 Furnishedll! | $30,000 obo 850-653-8122
562-1478/251-6082 or 850-653-9118


The Times Thursday, December 3, 2009 7B


Studio A pt.
Furnished
Upstairs studio
Qulet location, water &
electric incl'd. Walk to
downtown. $700 mo. plus
deposit 850-653-9116 or
850-774-7178 for appt.


'

A NEW Queen Luxury
Thick Mattress set in
sealedS $2 .VVar-
dael er 222-7783 an






Fn 01
rs- IA 2 -7 es




3230

PSJ-2103 Long Ave. Frl &
Sat. Dec. 4th & 5th 8a-1 p
Multi Family

natke t31 h cde
linens, kitchen, ladles plus
size clothes. Lots of misc.
Items.RainorShine!








All You Can Eat
wSNOW CRABS*
$15.99 at UP THE CREEK
RAW BAR Starting at 5:00
every Monday in Apalachl-
cola at 313 Water St.
850-653-2525. $1.00 Draft
Been




| 3300

Landscsae tifully reux
weeding. & planting. Rea-
sonable rates. Looking for
training partner Bike rides
25-100 miles, walks 5 to 10
miles, ocean swimming.
No pseudo athlete. Call
850-447-0691


To Place


Your Classified ad


AA Ic,~p~~rMES


TH.


TAR


Call Our New Numbers Now!r


Call:


850-747-5020


Toll Free:


Fax:


Email:


thestar@penh .com





Thursday, December 3, 2009


Local


By Persist Granger
Special to the Times

Guests at The St. George
Island Writers' Retreat be-
gan trickling home Sunday
afternoon. Nov. 15, with the
last exiting Monday morn-
mg.
They had come from as
far away as Tampa, The
Villages, Gainesville, Talla-
hassee and Bessemer, Ala.
Others came from nearby
Apalachicola and Panacea.
Although from different re-
gions and from divergent
backgrounds, the group
wasunitedbyaloveofwrit-
ing, the need to tell a story
and the desire to learn
more.
Our mentor, Adrian
Fogelin, two-time winner
of the Florida Book Award,
whose novels have won
places on numerous state
reading lists, won our ad-
miration as she deftly led
us to stronger writing and
more engaging tale-telling.
From the least to the most
experienced among the 10
women participating, we
progressed on our projects
and took home new tools
with which to continue the
ob
We loved our time on St.
George Island, and our day
insApa i paD Tr
ity Episcopal Church and
Authors' Night at Down-
town Books.
Workshops were taught
by Fogelin, Dawn Evans
Radford and Mary Lois
Sanders. Fogelin taught
"There's Someone I'd like
You to Meet A novel
approach to building be-
lievable characters;" Rad-
ford taught "Writing What
You Know;" and Sanders
taught "Manuscript Nuts
& Bolts: Preparing Your


St. George
Island
Writers'
Retreat
participants
break for
silliness
on their
last da of
. ?
Intensive
writing
at the
Buccaneer
Inn.


PERKY GRANGER
SpecialtotheTimes
Nancy Petrucka holds
a pair of boots that
will serve as a prompt
for Adrian Fogelin's
workshop teaching
character creation in
fiction.


PERKY GRANGER | Special to the Times


gg
PERKY GRANGER
Special to the Times
Dawn Evans Radford
reads from "Ovster
Flats," her novel set in
Apalachicola, during
Authors' Night at
Downtown Books.

tear ourselves away, but
we consoled ourselves with
promises to return to your
beautiful and hospitable re-
gion next November, again
the week of Veterans' Day.

Persist Granger is the
organizer of the St. George
Island Writers' Retreat,
held Nov. 12 to 15. For more
information, visit www.
PersisGrangencom or per-
sisgrangerblogspot.com


SPECIAL TO THE TIMES


Adrian Fogelin entertains with an animated reading


year. Last winter she was
diagnosed with a terminal
brain tumor, and she opted
to forego treatment and
spend the time she had en-
joying her family.
During her illness three
members of the past re-
treat and Joan's daugh-
ters hatched a plan to get
Joan's memoir into print -
hopefully before her death,
We didn't make it, but a few
days before her death she
was thrilled to hear the last


two chapters read to her,
and to know that her dream
of publication was going to
be implemented by her
children. The daughters
are finalizing the manu-
script now for submission
to a publisher.
All that, coupled with
Hurricane Ida's decision to
leave the Panhandle the day
before the Fiction Among
Friends gang convened,
made for an experience to
be savored. It was hard to


MS for Publication." Lunch
was served by Mrs. Cheryl
Creek's Franklin County
High School Culinary Op-
erations class.
The evening readings
featured these three au-
thors as well as Susan
Womble, this year's Florida
Book Award winner for
"Newt's World," Eastpoint's
Richard Edward Noble,
who authored "Hobo-ing
America," "Summer with
Charlie" and "The East


Pointer," Wanda Tucker
Goodwin, co-author of "The
Last Roll Call;" and myself.
Works by all of the retreat
authors are available at
Downtown Books.
The readings were high-
lighted by reading from,
and the launching of, Joan
Harrell's memoir "A Bridge
to France." Joan was work-
ing on her memoir the two
years she attended the St.
George Island Retreat,
and intended to return this


Works of art by Alice Jean Gibbs


Special to The Times
At the Apalachicola Mu-
seum of Art during the holi-
day season you can view 135
works created by artists of
the Forgotten Coast and fea-
turing the art of Alice Jean
Gibbs.
Gibbs was honored at
an opening reception at the
museum on Nov 14 which
also featured memorabilia
of her years as a Coca Cola
model. An accomplished art-
ist, Gibbs, still active in her
90s, now serves as a mentor
for young artists through
her regular instructional


Wallace, Deene Cook, Betty
Roberts, Shirley Cox, Josep-
ha Kotzman, Kristin Ander-
son, and Mary Alice Butler
Cullifer.
The Apalachicola Muse-
um of Art, owned and oper-
ated by the Historic Apala-
chicola Foundation Inc., is
located at 96 Fifth Street in
Apalachicola and is open to
the public from Wednesday
to Sunday from 1 to 4 p.m. ,
closed on Monday and 'llies-
day and Christmas and New
Year'sdays.
The Museum, which re-
ceived a 2008 Preservation
award from the Secretary


of State's Division of His-
toric Resources, is a circa
1845 Greek Revival struc-
ture. It was restored by the
Foundation under the direc-
tion of Architect Willoughby
Marshall of Apalachicola,
with the assistance of fund-
ing from the State's Historic
Resources Division as well
as the Trust for Public Land
and the Alfred I. DuPont
Foundation, Inc.
It functions with the sup-
port of the community, in-
cluding the staff of docent
volunteers. It also serves
community seminar func-
tions, such as last summer's
discussion ofthe Apalachico-
la River's legal case and the
Bring Me A Book Founda-
tion Inc.'s training program
to encourage reading in the
lives of children 0-5.
It is available for rent
for social functions as well,
and since its opening in Nov
2006, has attempted to serve
its original purpose as a
center for the arts, inspiring
and showcasing those who
enrich and are enriched by
art in all its forms.
For more info, call 653-
2090.


courses.
The exhibit is the re-
cipient of funding from the
Franklin County Tourist De-
yelopment Council.
The show, which features
all media, also includes the
work of: Ed Tiley, Neal Smith
Willow, Debbie Hooper, Mary
Ann Shields, Ed Springer,
Shirley Adams, Evelyn Baer-
man, Terry Birchwell, Lynn
Wilson, Carol Harris, Barba-
ra Berkheiser, Joe Kotzman,
Mary B. Brown, PL. Moore,
Vivian Sherlock, Penny An-
derson, Jeana Crozier, Faye
Johnson, Susan Richardson,
Mary Clare Lovell, Leslie


Always


BS | The Times


Women authors flock to annual writers' retreat


Museum hosts art exhibit of Alice Jean and friends


Ouida Sack -Owner
(850)670-1073. Home (850)670-8375. *
Cell (850)228-2220
Located at 994 CC Land Road. Eastpoint. FL 32328




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