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Group Title: Apalachicola times
Title: The Apalachicola times
ALL ISSUES CITATION PDF VIEWER THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100380/00050
 Material Information
Title: The Apalachicola times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: H.W. Johnston
Place of Publication: Apalachicola Fla
Apalachicola Fla
Publication Date: October 29, 2009
Copyright Date: 2008
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1885.
General Note: Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00100380
Volume ID: VID00050
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 32911693
lccn - sn 95026907
 Related Items
Preceded by: Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by: Apalachicola herald

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Thursday, 0CTOBER 29, 2009 ww w .apalach times .com 50(




(ape St. George Light to be lit Halloween night


I


YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER FOR MORE THAN 120 YEARS


VOL. 124 ISSUE 27


The Cape St. George Light on St.
George Island will be lighted at midnight
on Saturday, Oct. 31 for the first time
since the lighthouse was decommis-
sioned in 1994.
The public is invited to participate in
the historic lighting at St. George Light-
house Park.
The United States Coast Guard has
designated the lighthouse a Private
Aid to Navigation in its new location at
the center of St. George Island. The St.
George Lighthouse Association has pur-
chased a VLB-44 LED beacon from Vega
Industries Limited in New Zealand, a fre-
quent supplier of optics for the USCG.
The five-tier white VLB-44 has a 13
nautical mile range and 2.5 degree verti-
cal divergence, and will flash for a frac-
tion of a second every six seconds. The
light will be shielded on the north side to
accommodate Coast Guard concern the
beacon could interfere with traffic cross-
ing the bridge to the island. It is estimat-
ed that the focal plane of the light at 76
feet is approximately the same height as


the "big hump" of the bridge.
The modern optic replaces the third
order Fresnel lens which was removed
from the lighthouse when it was auto-
mated in 1949. While it is thought the
lens was taken to a Coast Guard facility
in New Orleans, the current disposition
of the Cape St. George lens has yet to be
proven.
"We hope that one day we will find
the magnificent Fresnel lens that once
illuminated our lighthouse," said Den-
nis Barnell, president of the St. George
Lighthouse Association. "However, it is
unlikely that we would ever install it in
the lantern room because of its size and
value. But it would be a wonderful addi-
tion to our Keeper's House Museum."
The small size of the new optic will
not interfere with visitors who climb the
lighthouse to enjoy the view from the
lantern room. More than 17,000 people
have climbed the lighthouse since it was
reconstructed by the St. George Light-

See LIGHTHOUSE A6


RUSTY AMOS | Special to the Times
More than 17,000 people have climbed the lighthouse on St. George Island
since it was reconstructed and opened to the public Dec. 1, 2008.


(0UNTERPUNCH






"I I~~~~~~~ U ~ 1 -



















DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times (
: Oysterman Kendall Schoelles harvests oysters for 13 Mile Seafood in the Miles area of :
S Apalachicola Bay. I

ByDoi AlrtiTimes City Editor .Ihyrecmn teria, Vibrio vulnificus is more .

: on the backC door prevalent during the summer
Franklin County, epicenter .in the warm Gulf of Mexico wa-
of Florida's oyster industry, be- tlytng CO ters. Vibrio can cause disease
gan mapping a multi-pronged im le zet th "~ and even death in people with
strategy 'lIesday morning to weakened immune systems
address the aftershocks of a or otherwise impaired health,
sudden announcement by the Smokey Parrish including those with chronic
federal government last week Choimn F nklin Cot diseases such as AIDS, cancer,
of a policy change that could aimn o ony kidney disease, diabetes and
threaten its survival. Commission alcohol abuse.
At a special two-hour emer- The FDA said that in gen-
gency meeting, county com- eral, 15 deaths per year nation-
missioners listened to reports We knew nothing until two days wide are due to ingesting raw
:from local oyster dealers and prior to the conference. We had oysters.
seafood workers alike on last no time to prepare for it," said The vibrio can be completely
:week's Interstate Shellfish Grady Leavins, an Apalachico- eliminated in the cooking pro-
: Sanitation Conference (ISSC) la seafood dealer long active in cess, or by post-harvest pro-
in Manchester, New Hamp- the ISSC. cessing methods that include
shire. FDA representatives told individual quick freezing with:
At the opening of the ISSC, the ISSC that because of an in- frozen storage, high hydrostat-
the Food and Dug Administra- ability of the industry to reduce ic pressure, mild heat and low
tion (FDA) shared details of deaths from Vibrio vulnificus, dose gamma irradiation.
its plan to ban the commercial the government planned to The FDA plans to use chang-
harvest and sale of raw oys- require post-harvest process- es to Hazard Analysis and Crit-
ters during summer months, ing for all oysters from the Gulf ical Control Point (HACCP)
at least five months of the year states beginning in 2011. guidelines to enforce the ban,
and possibly more, in an effort "The time has come for a which would require all oysters
to reduce illness. new approach," said Michael sold between May and October :
"This one issue dominated R. Taylor, senior advisor to undergo post-harvest process- I
the conference," said Chair- FDA Commissioner Peggy ing. I
man Smokey Parrish. Hamburg, in remarks deliv-
"It was a total shock to us. ered Oct. 17. See OYSTERS A6


The Northwest Florida
Water Management District
has awarded a $100,000 grant
to the City of Carrabelle to
help the city develop a po-
table water system intercon-
nection with the Alligator
Point Water Resources Dis-
trict.
The District's Governing
Board approved the grant
award on Thursday, Oct. 22.
The work will include
evaluation of the current
water systems, a hydraulic
analysis for the proposed in-
terconnection and an analy-
sis of funding needs. The
end product is expected to
include identification of con-
struction alternatives and
funding requirements.
"The demands on the Al-
ligator Point system are sea-
sonal and have approached
the capacity of the system
during summer and holiday
weekends," said Paul Thor-


pe, director of the district's
resource planning section.
"Resource constraints limit
substantial additional devel-
opment of water resources
in the immediate area. Com-
pleting an interconnected
system with Carrabelle,
however, would provide a
solution with the dependabil-
ity and reliability required to
meet long-term water supply
needs."
Additionally, the project
will include a water rate
study that supports enact-
ment of a conservation rate
structure within the City of
Carrabelle.
"Together with conserva-
tion measures enacted by
the Alligator Point Water Re-
sources District, this will en-
sure that the affected water
supply systems are operated
in a manner that ensures re-
source sustainability," Thor-
pe said.


Phone: 850-653-8868
Web site: apalachtimes.com
E-mail: timesnews~,starfl.com
Fax: 850-653-8036


DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK:

Legal Ad Friday aill1a.mn
Classified Display Ad Friday ai11 a.mn.
Classified Line Ad Monday ai5 p.mn.


Letter to the Editor .. ...... ...A4
Shrf' epot ................... ... .
ChurchNews......................... B3


SocietyNews.. ............. 2
sp rs..........................A- 1
Classifieds ................... ..... B5-B7


Apa lachicola

Carrabelle


DA^LoGH

SAVING TIME


1-


Carrabelle, Alligator

Point may connect

water s stems


A PE(K F OR LILY'S LIPS
















DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times
As part of Friday's Senior Night, Sherriff Skip
Shiver was the lucky winner of a school fundraising
promotion to have the distinct honor of kissing Lily,
Pam Shiver's prized pot-bellied pig. Lily was all
decked out in a big red bow for the occasion, and
the sheriff donned a pair of wax lips to enhance
the romance, as the three took part in the fun. AII
proceed support Project Gra uation 2010.


TABLE OF CONTENTS


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I


Thursday, October 29, 2009


A2 | The Times


Local


published in the Nov.
5 and 12 issues of The
Times.

Taxable value
decrease in county
On Oct. 20 Clerk
of Courts Marcia
Johnson informed the
commission that the
property appraiser's
Certification of Final
Taxable Value showed a
1 percent decrease from
the poerty values used
to p epre the 2009-10
budget
"As a result, at the
millage rate you've
adopted, we'll collect
less ad valorem, and that
difference is $114, 768,"

Joh' h iss te third year
in a row the values have
showed a decrease," said
Commissioner Cheryl
Sanders. "We're going to
reach a point where the
county commission can't
absorb it. Let's find out if
other counties have this
problem and how they
deal with it,

GUlf State Bank to
hOst "Sred It ay
A Community Shred
it" Theft Prevention Day
will be held Saturday,
Nov. 14 from 9 a.m.
to noon, at Gulf State
Community Bank in
Eastpoint..
Limit is three copier
size boxes of shred per
family. For each box bring
a food item for our food
pantries
The event is sponsored
by Gulf State Community


Bank, the Franklin
County Sheriffs Dept.
and the Apalachicola
and Carrabelle police
departments.

F WC seeks comment
00 Imperiled
species list rules
The Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation
Commission (FWC)
encourages the public to
view draft rules for the
state's imperiled species
listing process and make
comments by Nov. 6.
The FWC will review
comments and use them
to revise draft rules
before presenting them
to commissioners at the
D1ecemtber meeting in
The goal of the new
draft rules is to provide
a comprehensive and
cohesive approach to
managing species so they
will thrive, rather than
become extinct. The draft
rules focus on improving
the management system
and listing process for
Florida's imperiled
species and link species
protection to science,
while using a balanced
approach through
collaboration and
partnerships.
The imperiled species
listing team worked
with stakeholders and
the public during the
process of developing
the draft rules, which are
a streamlined process
that avoids duplication
with the federal listing
process and provides
for the highest level of


conservation for species
through management
plans. As the FWC
continues to work on the
draft rules, stakeholder
and public meetings will
continue.
"The input received so
far has been invaluable,
and as a result, we've
made significant changes
to the original draft after
working with the public
and stakeholders," said
Dr. Elsa Haubold, leader
of the FWC's imperiled
species listing team.
"This process has been
an excellent example of
partners coming together
and working on the
issues, which will ensure
a Florida where no
s eie ghor e tinct and

The draft rules are
available for review and
comment at MyFWC.com/
ImperiledSpecies.
Public comments
on the draft rules may
be sent to imperiled@
MyFWC.com no later
than Nov. 6 at 5 p.m. EST.

Stone crab

The commercial and
recreational harvest
season for stone crab
claws in Florida opens
on Thursday, Oct. 15. The
season will remain open
through May 15.
Stone crab claws must
be at least two and three
quarters inches in length
to be harvested legally,
and claws may not be
taken from egg-bearing
female stone crabs.
Recreational harvesters


are allowed to use up to
five stone crab traps, and
there is a daily bag limit
of one gallon of claws per
person or two gallons per
vessel, whichever is less.
More information
regarding the
recreational harvest
of stone crab claws
is available online at
MyFWC.com/Rules (click
on "Fishing Saltwater").
Commercial stone
crab regulations and
licensing information is
also available online at
the same location.

Sports fields
treated for fire ants
Cun y Prs and
VR reoal sn D r red
with Aloha Bugs
Pest Mngmente o
Kendrick Park and
Carrabelle, Vrooman
Park in Eastpoint and
Donnie Wilson Park
in Apalachicola for
infestations of red
imported fire ants after
parents reported children
were being attacked
during sports events.
Aloha provided
pesticide to the county
at cost and charged a
$300 consultation fee.
An initial treatment was
completed on Oct. 25 and
a spokesperson for Aloha
said that a follow-up
treatment will be carried
out this winter while the
fields are not in use.
The secondary treatment
with a granular pesticide
should last for roughly a
year.
"I worked with the


county on this project
because I felt it was an
emergency situation,
The fields were heavily
infested, especially
Vrooman. In the future,
the commission will need
to budget for annual
treatments if they wish
to keep the fields free of
ants," said Aloha CEO
Lois Swoboda.
She said estimated
cost of future treatments
is $5,000 to $7,000
annually.

OaStel master
to lecture
Internationally
acclaimed pastel and oil
artist Jack Pardue will

acrwoaksp aNov e t
6. Pardue is the past
president of the Maryland
Pastel Society and gives
workshops throughout
the US and Italy.
Workshop participants
will receive daily
demonstrations by
Pardue and the class
will visit a variety of
locations-marshes, rustic
buildings, boatyards,
coastal landscapes and
historic vistas.
A special kick-off
lecture will be held
on Sunday, Nov. 1, at
the Historic Cotton
Warehouse on Water
Street in downtown
Apalachicola. The public
is welcome.
Contact Lynn Wilson
for further details at 305-
588 5885. Sponsored by
the Apalachicola Pastel
Artists Association and
the Coombs House Inn.


Grant Peeples and the New 76ers will open up
the 2009-10 season for Apalachicola's Dixie Theatre
when they hit the state together on Friday, Oct. 30 at
8 p.m.
The New 76ers, a crowd favorite at a recent semi-
annual Bob Nite, will open the show with a Bob Dylan
Tribute performance. They will then join Peeples,
just in from a five date Texas tour, for a performance
of his original music. His May release, "PawnShop"
is currently on the Americana Music Chart. Kelly
Goddard, lead vocalist for the New 76ers, sang on
the "PawnShop" record, and lately the group has
been joining Peeples in some of his shows. The trio is
a brother-sister-husband trio that has been making big
inroads into the Tallahassee music scene this year.
Tickets are $15. For ticket info call 653-3200


ailin~n ~5 ~i~

(i~OD ~ 111111)

~L~D~M1~I~B~~ Baoi~;
~00 ~ ~13)I:


A PANHANDLE PLAYERS' TRUE & TRAGIC TALE FROM 1767


SUBMITTED TO THE TIMEs


FUNDED IN PART BY FRANKLIN CO. TOURIST DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL


News BRIEFS


Tf0HSportation
00ardinating Board
to meet Wednesday
The Apalachee
Regional Planning
Council announces a
public meeting to which
all prsonsnar invited.

County Transportation
Disadvantaged
Coordinating Board will
meet on Wednesday'
Nov. 4 at 10 a.m., at
the Franklin County
Courthouse Annex
Courtroom, 33 Market
Street, Apalachicola.
In addition to its
regular business, the
agenda will include
the annual coordinator
evaluation and the 2010
me tingdscit 1 '

information, o f
you require special
accommodations at the
meeting because of a
disability or physical
impairment, contact
Vanita Anderson at the
Apalachee Regional
Planning Council, 20776
Central Avenue East,
Suite 1, Blountstown,
Florida 32424 at least
three working days prior
to the meeting date.

Date of Seafood
Workers meeting
c ange
The Franklin County
Seafood Workers
Association meeting
on the financial and
administrative audit will
be on Thursday Nov. 12,
not 19. A notice will be


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Thursday, October 29, 2009


Local


The Times | A3


I~III;CCII L1 ~` r -LILIII1IIIII~ I ~J~ j~! C;-l ~-~lrr~FI1~-~l' I IEIFL~I'"~


The Library will be sell-
ing books at the Seafood
Festival, Friday and Satur-
day Nov. 6 & 7. Volunteers
are desperately needed to
man (woman) the booth.
You do not have to be famil-
iar with the books offered
and the pricing will be very
simple. Please consider of-
fering us a couple of hours
of your time. The proceeds
will greatly benefit the Li-
brary.
Many of you who use the
Library regularly know that
funding to buy books has
been a problem sometimes,
and I am afraid to say this is
one of those times. In Janu-
ary, the Library Board voted
to use interest only from our
"Key Account" for the pur-
chase of books. At that time
the account was producing
several hundred dollars per
month in interest. However,
the dramatic changes in
the national economy have


finally reached the Apala-
chicola Municipal Library
and the interest generated
has dropped to one quarter
of its value since April. The
Library is working with the
city to improve this, but it
may take time, and some
help from the economy.
Thanks to a generous
donation from the Read-
Me-A-Book Franklin spon-
sors at the end of the sum-
mer, we were able to buy
a number of Children's,
Junior Fiction and Young
Adults books to fill in series
for which we had a spotty
collection. These include a
full set of Dr. Seuss books
and other favorites.
Adult titles ordered have
included bestsellers, re-
quests and other books of
interest. The Library has
been trying to fill in con-
temporary authors who
might not be as well know
as James Patterson or


Clive Cussler. Unfortunate-
ly, until we get our legacy
account back at a higher
interest rate, some of these
purchases may need to be
postponed.
In the meantime, many
patrons have generously
donated very good books.
Authors include Ace Atkins,
who writes historical fic-
tion about places like Phe-
nix City, Ala. in the 1950's
(Wicked City, 2008). Atkins
first came to our notice
when Denise Roux of our
Library Board wrote about
him in her column, "Red
White and Roux." We now
have three titles by this au-
thor all donated.
Another author, a Sha-
mus Award winner (Mys-
tery) is Peter Speigelman,
Three books by him includ-
ing has award-winning
Black Maps were donated.
I would suggest you check
him out.


LOIS SWOBODA | Times
Carcass disposal containers have been placed around the county in
preparation for hunting season. The disposal containers are located at
the intersection of Airport and Brownsville roads in Apalachicola; at Bear
Creek off of US 65 in Eastpoint, at Gully Branch off of US 67 in Carrabelle
and at Cypress Slough in Carrabelle. Remember, it is unlawful to dispose
of carcasses on the public right-of-way or on public lands except in a
designated container.



libraryy of Congress 110sts veterans' history workshop


By Lois Swoboda
Times StaffWriter

On Thursday after-
noon, the Carrabelle Boys
and Girls Club celebrated
after-school programs.
Each student enrolled
in the after-school pro-
gram decorated the fence
in front of the Carrabelle
municipal complex with
light bulbs they had deco-
rated.
Afterwards, they en-
joyed snacks and heard
speeches by director Cher-
ry Rankin, Mayor Curley
Messer and others.
"Every light bulb in the
fence represents a kid who
is able to attend an after-
school program," Rankin
said. "This is an extension
of our regular programs.
It's a nationwide event. We
want to honor our mayor


Rankin introduced
Kevin Ward, director of the
county's Boys and Girls
Clubs and Franklin Coun-
ty School Principal George
Oehlert, and thanked Car-
rabelle officials and citi-
zens for their support.
"I want to thank David
Butler for his community
support and (Deputy Po-
lice Chief), Joe Hamm,"
she said. "I call Joe my fire
extinguisher. He puts out
problems before they get
out of hand."
She also thanked the
health department for pro-
viding participants in the
after-school program with
a daily snack.
Rankin said the Carra-
belle Boys and Girls Club
is looking for volunteers to
help with the program. If
you want to help, call 697-
4433.


The Veterans History
Project of the Library
of Congress American
Folklife Center will host
an Oral History Workshop
this Saturday, Oct. 31 at 10
a.m. at the Camp Gordon
Johnston World War II
Museum in Carrabelle.
Attendees will learn
about oral history, the ef-


fort to preserve the re-
membrances of North
Florida's veterans, and
how to conduct interviews
for The Library of Con-
gress permanent collec-
tions.
Attendance is free. Ad-
vance registration pre-
ferred.
If possible, attendees


are asked to briefly review
in advance the Veterans
History Project (VHP)
Field Kit, accessible online
at www.loc.gov/vets (click
on "How to Participate").
Please contact VHP
representative Jessica
Souva at Jessicaejsouva.
com to register. Or call her
at 202-486-1840.


LOIl WUBUDA | the lmes
Jesse Ray of Carrabelle
lights up for after-school
fun and learning.

and city council for their
funding and other contri-
butions.
"Eighty to 120 kids at-
tend Boys and Girls Club
every day. Attendance has
increased since we now
have a bus," she said.


Franklin County's third
Community Conversation
will take place this Thurs-
day, Oct. 29 from 5 to 7 p.m.
in the school cafeteria.
The focus will be on
school funding and student
achievement. The program
is sponsored by the Frank-


lin County Teachers Asso-
ciation and Education Sup-
port Professionals Associa-
tion and the entire commu-
nity is welcome to attend
and invited to come discuss
how education is funded in
Franklin County.
A free dinner will be


served at 5 p.m. Please
call 670-2810 to RSVP for
dinner, conversation, and
entertainment by our stu-
dents.
At 7 p.m. the group will
join the Homecoming Bon-
fire Celebration in front of
the school.


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Thursday, Oct. 29, 2009


Growth, as


we residents



want it for our



communities


of waterfront,
repeated down the
beach shoreline?
Million dollar-


pressures.
Is politics-
for-profit in
play? Recent,


THOUGHTS FOR
THE TIMES
Mel Kelly


plus residences
unsold or unoccupied?
Thousands of acres
platted, approved and
unbuilt? Subdivisions
dominating previously
rural countryside? Empty,
deteriorating strip malls
and vacant office spaces?
How many citizens
really want such
development?
Seventy-four percent
of Americans want NO
NEW DEVELOPMENT
crowding out their town,
according to the national
Saint Index poll taken in
late 2008, which tracks
attitudes toward real
estate development
projects and tracks the
politics of land use.
Such statistics clearly
demonstrate the need
to approve the Florida
Hometown Democracy
Amendment 4 on the
bNo ember 2010 statewide
blo.
Have our community
voices been heard
throughout Florida when
major development
decisions would clearly
impact and change the
nature of a county or
a town? Seventy-two
percent nationwide would
grade their community C
or worse when it comes
to deciding what does
and does not get built, the
Saint Index Poll reveals.
The percentage might
well be much higher in
Florida, where there is
widespread awareness
of overdevelopment and
the political corruption
behind it.
According to Tom
Palmer in the Lakeland
Ledger, local officials
were handing out
building permits as fast
as developers submitted
them.
Community
comprehensive land-use
plans, which are written
for a 20-year framework
using public input, and
which are also prioritized
and approved according
to that public input, are


upper-level
growth decisions seem
to keep a greedy eye
toward campaign
contributors rather than
good statewide future
planning. Corruption of
publicly elected officials
has recently been proven,
investigated or suspected
within numerous growth
projects throughout
Florida. Gov. Crist said
an apparent culture of
corruption calls for a
statewide grand jury to
take a sweeping look at
honesty-in-government in
Florida.
Again, the poll reveals,
69 percent believe the
relationship between
developers and elected
officials makes the land-
use approval process
unfair.
Who is influencing the
growth decisions made by
elected officials in YOUR
town .
Amendment 4 is
a new and important
ballot opportunity that
mandates local public
input on community
growth plans. It grew
upward in the best
grassroots style from
petitions signed and
collected by Florida's
resident-taxpayers.
Hometown Democracy's
Amendment 4 offers
exactly what its hopeful
name promises. Yes,
votes for Amendment 4
will help guarantee the
opportunity for people in
their own town to have a
ballot-box say about the
future growth someone
else is proposing for that
hometown. Amendment
4 requires that growth-
directed changes to
the comprehensive
land-use plans of local
governments must be
approved by the voters
as well as by local elected
officials. Citizens will then
be heard on the future of
their own communities.


See GROWTH AS


At one of the cooking classes at Dolores' Sweet Shop are (back row, from left) Direek Farmer, Zachary Jones
and Rahkeim Pierce; (front row, from left) Adreenah Wynn, Dolores Roux, Carol Barfield, LaTresa Carr,
Teresa Carr and D'Andre Robinson.




Lifesj lssos lerne




.a.on ice al


Would you invite a dozen or more teens into
your kitchen to make dinner knowing that some
have never even cracked an egg? Could you
assign tasks, oversee the entire operation and .
have a proper meal on the table in an hour or .
so? The dinner would not be a bufft, but rather .
a sit-down meal with cutlery in correct places.
Could you then model suitable conversation and RE[
encourage the young people to do the same?
I couldn't, even though I like a lot of cooks ANl
in the kitchen. In my family, we often share D
space and responsibilities while preparing food
together. We are experienced and settle into an easy
rhythm of work and play that results in a feast.
My aunt Dolores Roux is a master cook, local
historian and, now, a teacher. She takes kitchen
cooperation to a new level.
As part of a teen community outreach program
administered by the Franklin County Library, she
designed and implemented a series of twice-weekly
cooking and life-skills classes. The program lasted for
four weeks, and plans are in the making for another go
round.
"Oh, I love Miss D," said LaTresa Carr, one of my
English II students. One day in class, she and her twin,
Teresa, asked if I was kin to Dolores.
"Oh yes," I said, "My daddy and her husband were
brothers."
They went on to describe what they did two nights
a week in the kitchen at Dolores' Sweet Shop. Dolores
had the plan and the ingredients. She assigned tasks
and dispensed common-sense advice about food and
life while the kids listened and worked. The reward? A
sit-down dinner at a table correctly set by the children.
Young men pulled out chairs for young ladies. Good
table manners required, acceptable conversation a
must, no cell phones. Afterward, everyone participated
in cleanup.
Carol Barfield, program specialist for the


Apalachicola site of the Franklin County Public
.'Library, said: "We are trying to equip these
young people with the necessary tools they need.
Mama is not going to be here all the time, and we
aren't going to be here all the time. They have to
learn how to provide for themselves and for their
families."
HITE With Dolores as the teacher, they learned
to enjoy foods they had not eaten before.
ROUX Hummingbird cake was a big winner. They
Rox swooned over homemade garlic bread. Frittata
was a huge success. One night, Dolores pulled
together Roma tomatoes, shrimp and grits for a dish
that had no name but illustrated a life skill. "We don't
waste food in this kitchen. We look around at what we
have, and we make something good from it."
Talking to Carol, Dolores, and the students were
moments of serendipity for me. I had spent the summer
pondering how to teach manners to young people.
I thought eating together would be a great way to
start, but I couldn't imagine how to do it in the regular
classroom.
Making and sharing food is sustenance in the truest
sense of the word. Conviviality, not confrontation, is
the order of the day. Many of life's lessons are learned
around the dinner table, and so few of us have time for
that necessary luxury anymore.
My thanks goes out to the people who find and fight
for the grant money that makes programs like these
possible. My utmost respect goes out to such people as
Carol and Dolores, who take an idea and make it their
own.
Social skills are necessary to succeed, and they must
be taught. Our children are ready to learn; they just
need teachers.

Denise Roux is a regular columnist for the
Apalachicola and Carrabelle Times. E-mail her at
rouxwhit~mchsi.com.


D W
D RI
nise


Maybe somebody
at the Food and Drug
Administration had a bad
episode with an oyster
or had some Oysters
Rockefeller that didn't go
down well over some fancy
lunch at a Washington
eatery, but the agency has
hit new heights in hubris
this past week.
The proposed federal
ban on raw in-the-shell
Gulf Coast oysters during
the summer months, to
be imposed beginning in
2011, is a misguided and
inappropriate intervention
by the government into
what is essentially an issue
of personal accountability.
FDA officials say
the Gulf oyster ban is
necessary to protect
public health because
a naturally occurring
bacteria sickens about
30 people each year. The
bacteria, Vibrio vulnificus,
can be deadly for people
with pre-existing medical
conditions, such as liver
damage.
So can alcohol, but
there are no proposed


bans on selling
liquor to folks with
liver disease or a
proposal to ban
cigarette sales ,
to those with
lung disease or
emphysema. TIM C
In fact, the Tie
case s of the Tms
bacteria found
in raw oysters hurting
healthy people are all but
non-existent.
According to the FDA
there are an estimated
76 million cases of food-
borne illness annually,
which results in 325,000
hospitalizations and 5,000
deaths.
But the Vibrio
vulnificus bacteria that
the oyster ban is supposed
to address is responsible
for only one-tenth of 1
percent of food-related
deaths (about15 per
year are traced to Gulf
Coast states) and an
even smaller percentage
of illness, according to
Center for Disease Control
estimates.
So, stated slightly


diffrently, 99.9
percent of illnesses
occur in other foods.
Yet the FDA has a
bee in its bonnet
about raw oysters?
Consider this in
ROFT another light. For a
Edtr parent, would it be
Edtr more dangerous to
your child for you to
have a gun or swimming
pool around the house?
The answer is a
swimming pool.
A child is far more likely
to drown in a swimming
pool than they are to die
by being shot by a gun in
the house, yet there is far
more in the media about
guns and kids than about
swimming pools and kids.
For gun control
enthusiasts, the argument
is a strong one: Save our
kids. But there is yet to
emerge a swimming pool
control movement of a
similar kind despite the
statistics.
To further the inanity
of its case, FDA officials
acknowledge that they
have not analyzed the


economic impact on the
industry of such a ban, and
the industry ripples from
oystermen to wholesalers
to retailers to restaurants.
In efect, this ban
would wipe out a seafood
industry that is already
struggling, an industry
that, at least in Florida,
has been kicked around by
restrictions, passed into
law, on how and when men
and women who make
their living on the water
can actually scrimp up
sustenance, if it can be
called that.
The industry has been
kicked around by the
development upstream
of the Apalachicola River
which threatens the very
life of the river and bay
and, in turn, an industry.
The seafood industry is
on life-support. This ban
would pull the plug, at a
time when jobs count.
After all, an eight-
month ban might as well
be year-round; not a lot of
folks survive working four
Ce IllATTER'ikid4 AT


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received for such advertisement.

The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is
thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word
thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains,


A4 | The Times O~n o


IkeVboard K LAT TE RIN GS


Something they ate


apalachicola (|
OCn ~ C rrbelle6 hI




USPS 027-600
Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St.
Apalachicola, FL 32329
VP/Publisher: Karen Hanes
Editor: Tim Croft
Circulation: James Meadors





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Thursday, October 29, 2009


Local


The Times | AS


When I ran successfully for Mayor of the City of
Carrabelle, local voters agreed with my campaign
slogan: "The City Should Plan for Development,
Developers Shouldn't Plan the City."
Small- and big-business interests, developers,
realtors, big-time political contributors and lobbyists are
shaping the Florida of tomorrow. Such decisions made
about Florida's growth too often favor special interests.
(I urge you to notice who is speak loudly against the
Hometown Democracy Amendment. Could such
organized voices have the most to fear if local voters are
allowed to decide about development projects proposed
for their own towns?)
Your YES vote for Amendment 4 will guarantee
residents of your city and county the right to making


KLATTE RINGS from page A4
months a year.
And the oystermen of Florida will likely not be
receiving much in the way of support from their state
representatives.
Gov Charlie Crist has, in action and word, been
a consistent antagonist toward the seafood industry
since he was the legislative sponsor of what fishermen
commonly call the net ban, though there is a nice
bow of legal language wrapping up that constitutional
amendment.
And the misguided notion put forth by the FDA that
pasteurized or otherwise treated oysters would be a
replacement for the real thing on a half shell will be a
tough sell to the hundreds of thousands of consumers
for whom the half-shelled oyster is manna from heaven.
But there are two aspects that are most troubling
about the FDA's proposed ban.
One is, how does the FDA arrive at such a proposal to
begin with and where does it stop?
This is, after all, the agency that brought us Vioxx,
one of the many drugs fast-tracked to market only to
discover that they have serious side effects. More people
died of heart conditions linked to Vioxx than have died in


the decisions determining the future of local growth.
Passage of Amendment 4 will help to assure that within
communities in the Panhandle, the Atlantic and Gulf
Coast, as well as the inland cities of our state, local
residents can choose what growth will best fit their area.
For my Carrabelle, and for all the beautiful Florida areas
where you live, our YES vote for Florida Hometown
Democracy's Amendment 4 will assure that the future
decisions about growth through local development will
he in our hands!
Isn't that what the idea of Hometown Democracy
really means?

Mel Kelly was the proud mayor of the City of
Carrabelle from 2005 to 2007.


Q. I have
three small
children, and
I rely on child I
support from s
their father to
provide for them.
Unfortunately,
he is not always YU
prompt in getting TU
the money to me. Marcia ][
Is there anything Cekf
I can do to
ensure that Iget support
payments on time?

A. According toFS.
61.13016, at the request
of the custodial parent
the Clerk of the Court
may suspend a non-
custodial parent's Florida
driver's license when
child support payments
become delinquent.
The Clerk's office can
only request license
suspension on Private
Cases; the Department of
Revenue (DOR) handles
IV-D cases.
IV-D refers to state-
run child support
enforcement programs
which are funded through
grants provided for by
the Social Security Act
of 1975. Title IV of the
Social Security Act covers
grants to states for the
purpose of providing aid
and services to needy
families with children and
for child-welfare services.
Part "D" of that law
covers child support.
In the matter of
Private Cases not
handled through the
DOR, for the custodial
parent to request a
Florida driver's license
suspension, he or she
must have:
1. An order for child
support in the State of
Florida payable in your
county.
2. He or she must
NOT be under contract
with the Department of
Revenue.
3. The non-custodial
parent must be at least 15
days delinquent.
4. The non-custodial
parent must have a valid
Florida driver's license.

The custodial parent
must provide the
following information
regarding the non-
custodial parent to the


Clerk's office in
order to perform
this enforcement
action-
*Date of birth
Social Security
number
*Last known
address
*A written
request asking for
the license to be


PUBLIC
TEE
ohnson
Courts


suspended due to
delinquency.


will th seer saoP tice
of Intent to Suspend
Driver's License "
through the United States
postal service, to the non-
custodial parent. Upon
receiving the notice, the
non-custodial parent has
three options in order
to avoid the license
suspension:
1. Pay the delinquency
in full.
2. Enter into a
written agreement for
the repayment of the
delinquency with the
custodial parent.
3. File a "Notice to
Contest Driver's License
Suspension" if there is a
disagreement regarding
the amount or if there is a
claim of mistaken identity.

If the non-custodial
parent does not respond
and 20 days have passed
from the date of the
notice, the Clerk's office
will mail a request to
the Florida Department
of Highway Safety
and Motor Vehicles
to suspend the non-
custodial parent's driver's
license. The license
cannothbe reinstated until
the custodial and non-
custodial parents enter
into a written agreement
or the delinquency, with
applicable fees, is paid in
full.

Ifyou have any
questions or comments
about this column,
please forward them
to Marcia Johnson,
Clerkc of the Court, 33
AMarcect Street, Ste.3203,0
or e-mail mmjohnson@
frankinnclerkccom.
Visit the Clerkc's
Web site at www.
frankinnclerkccom.


the past 10 years eating raw oysters.
And why not peanut butter? Allergic reactions to
ingesting peanuts annually outnumber the cases of
bacterial poisoning from raw oysters.
Why not red meat? Consumption of red meat has
long been found to be detrimental to health. Or how
about dairy products, which are also considered by
many to be unhealthy for a human body?
When does 1984 end for the FDA?
But more pointedly, what is the government doing at
the dinner table?
This is just another way in which the government
attempts to dictate behavior, behavior that hurts no one
but the individual in this case, one choosing to eat a
raw oyster.
Maybe a raw oyster is not everybody's cup of tea,
if you will, but it is certainly the right of every person
to determine for himself or herself what constitutes a
danger when sitting down for a meal.
At a time when jobs are difficult enough to find and
hold, it seems the government should be going out of.
its way to maintain jobs, rather than eliminate an entire
industry through an act of bureaucratic cowardice.


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S MAKE SME N IE

You might have noticed a motorcade
passing through hA alachicola's historic --
district Saturday or heard a cacophony I CdCEBt3~/
of horns and sirens and wondered what
was up. The display was a publicity
event staged to draw awareness to the
problem of domestic violence in the
county.
About 15 vehicles and dozens of
passengers traveled from the Chapman p
Administration Building to Lafayette 2/.:::
Park, where Refuge House Director Linda
Gibson led a series of speakers who
urged people to "Make Some Noise and .
Speak Up," about domestic violence. .
The motorcade featured sheriff's vehicles a
and a Weems Memorial Hospital ..
ambulance. L -

heal ng ic n tT bi ," ikbesjntsua d. "As --
a county united, let us support victims in
an effort to end the violence." In photo, Jhaki Davis, left, and Gibson worked with other local women
to organize the county's first event highlighting Domestic Violence Awareness Month.


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Thursday, October 29, 2009



industry


A6 | The Times


Local


By David Adlerstein
Times City Editor

Representatives of the
Food and Dug Adminis-
tration told the Interstate
Shellfish Conference
Commission that "a new
approach" was needed
because of the industry's
inability to show gains in
reducing deaths from Vib-
rio vulnificus.
In remarks delivered
Oct. 17 by Michael R.
Taylor, senior advisor
to FDA Commissioner
Peggy Hamburg, the FDA
commended the ISSC for
taking steps to improve
shellfish safety in recent
years, but said it was not
enough.
More prevalent dur-
ing the summer's warm
Gulf of Mexico waters,
vibrio can cause disease
and even death in people
with weakened immune
systems or otherwise im-
paired health, including
people with chronic dis-
eases such as AIDS, can-
cer, kidney disease, diabe-
tes, and alcohol abuse.
The vibrio is complete-
ly eliminated in the cook-
ing process, or by post-
harvest processing (PHP)
methods that include indi-


vidual quick freezing with
frozen storage, high hy-
drostatic pressure, mild
heat, and low dose gamma
irradiation.
"Reaching members
of these high risk groups
and persuading them to
change their behavior with
respect to shellfish con-
sumption or other risk fac-
tors has proven extremely
difficult, especially be-
cause many of the individ-
uals are not even aware
that they have a chronic
disease," said Taylor. "In
fact, of the nearly 24 mil-
lion people with diabetes,
almost 6 million are not yet
diagnosed. And another 57
million people have pre-
diabetes. And when those
with liver disease due to
heavy drinking need to re-
ceive the message, educa-
tion is that much harder.
"It is thus not surpris-
ing that education aimed
at behavior change has
not achieved the 60 per-
cent reduction in vibrio
cases to which the ISSC
has aspired," he said.
Taylor said the public
health data showed no
significant decline in the
number of Vibrio cases
nationwide between 2001
and 2008, despite the in-


when the hazard posed by
Vibrio vulnificus is rea-
sonably likely to occur,"
he said. "We also welcome
evidence and dialogue
with the ISSC and with
industry members with
respect to the availabil-
ity of alternatives to post-
harvest processing that
are equally effective in re-
ducing risk, ways in which
the impact of new control
measures on small busi-
ness can be mitigated -
such as through technical
assistance, organization
of co-ops, or other ways
to facilitate economically
sustainable access to
processing facilities, and
how the public can be-
come aware of and value
the safety enhancement
gained through post-har-
vest processing."
In his remarks Tues-
day to the county commis-
sion, Apalachicola oyster
dealer Grady Leavins said
the reason Vibrio deaths
have not been eliminated
is in large part due to a re-
fusal by alcoholics to heed
warnings.
"We've worked dili-
gently to inform patients
who are the really at-risk
people, and the alcoholics,
that's who is really being
affected by this. Alcohol-
ism is the problem and
has been and there's data
to prove that," he said. "I
can't defend a death at all,
but 90 percent are alcohol-
ics. Have you ever tried to
reason with a drunk? It's
impossible to do that."


DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times
Apalachicola oyster dealer Grady Leavins presents his post-harvest processed
frosted oysters. PHP oysters would be allowed for sale as raw oysters during the
summer months under the FDA's proposed new regulations.


dustry's efforts.
"Rarely in public health
are the data so incontro-
vertible," he said. "Even
under the most optimistic
analysis, only a 35 percent
decline in rates was re-
ported in these states dur-
ing this time, but much of
this is attributable to Cal-
ifornia's decision to ban
the sale of all Gulf Coast
oysters harvested during
the summer that are not
processed post harvest."
The ISSC's work to
speed up refrigeration of
oysters sooner after har-
vest "may have resulted
in some decline in cases
of Vibrio infection, but the


decline has been mini-
mal," said Taylor.
He cited data from Cal-
ifornia that indicated that
while between 1991 and
2001, 40 deaths had oc-
curred in the state due to
Vibrio, the numbers had
dropped to zero once PHP
was required.
Taylor estimated that
15 percent of Gulf Coast
oysters already are pro-
cessed using PHP tech-
nologies, and that pro-
cessing capacity in the
Gulf Coast states is ade-
quate to handle the entire
production.
"We no longer believe
that measures which re-


duce the hazard, but fall
well short of eliminating
it, such as improvements
in refrigeration, are suffi-
cient to meet the purpose
of the regulation, given
the severity of the haz-
ard and the availability of
post-harvest processing
technologies," he said.
Taylor left open a small
window of possibility for
negotiations on the plan
to require PHP for all Gulf
oysters processed during
the summer, beginning in
2011.
"We are open to re-
ceiving new evidence and
having further dialogue to
clarify or refine where and


"They're coming in the
back door trying to imple-
ment this," said Parrish.
Leavins said the FDA
had hoped to pit the East
and West Coast oyster in-
dustries against the Gulf
Coast industry by easing
off plans to curtail raw
oyster harvest in these
two other major harvest-
ing regions of the coun-

"In my opinion what
they did was set out to
divide and conquer. They
also had thrown vibrio
parahaemolyticus in the
mix, Vibrio parahaemo-
lyticus does not have
substantial impact on the
Gulf States, it has a great-
er impact on the East
Coast and West Coast,"


"Idon't want peodle to die
I'7# nOt weith that '

but I'm~ not weith~ FDA sholinlg it
down~r our throats.

ifyOzcM TCSick and you eat the

WT!~Ong th~ing, you die.
T1 hat's partofltfe."


Apalachicola seafood
dealer Tommy Ward, who
sits on the ISSC's execu-
tive board, said the ISSC
stood firm in rejecting the
FDA's proposal, particu-
larly after the sudden an-
nouncement "extremely
infuriated the regulatory
agencies from around the
country."

hea s upthe cou ty's yhso
ter and seafood task force,
said it is not entirely clear
what steps the FDA could
take regarding interstate
shipment of raw oysters.
"Technically, HACCP
guidelines are not rules,
but the FDA has so much


See OYSTERS Al


No00 IIockle
Franklin County Commissionef


said Leavins. "FDA with-
drew this from the mix so
they could get the East
and West coasts' support.


It didn't work. It isn't go-
ing to work politically.
We're standing together
for whatever it's worth."


house Association and opened to the
public on Dec. 1, 2008.
The Cape St. George Light was
originally built on what is now Little
St. George Island in 1833. At that
time it was outfitted with a Lewis
Lamp comprised of 13 lamps in 13-
inch reflectors. When the lighthouse
was rebuilt in 1848, the lamp was in-
creased to 15 lamps in 16-inch reflec-
tors.
The lighthouse was rebuilt for
the third time in 1852, and in 1857
it was outfitted with the third order
fixed white Fresnel lens. The Fres-
nel lens, developed by French physi-
cist Augustin-Jean Fresnel, was the
most advanced technology for the
transmission of light over long dis-


tances at the time. The lens utilized
multiple glass prisms set in a metal
framework, and transmitted the
light from Cape St. George 14 nauti-
cal miles out to sea.
The original lens, manufactured
by L. Sautter and Co. of Paris, was
removed during the Civil War and
re-installed in 1866. Having appar-
ently suffered some damage during
the war years, it was replaced with
another third order lens in 1889. The
manufacturer of the second lens has
not been verified. When the Fresnel
lens was removed, the nightmark of
the lighthouse was changed from
fixed to flashing, and the new optic
will also preserve the most recent
flash characteristic.


While the location of the Fresnel
lens itself remains unresolved, the
lens pedestal and the metal label
identifying the manufacturer as "L.
Sautter et Cie., Constructeurs, a
Paris" were recovered after the col-
lapse of the lighthouse in October
2005. The metal label is currently on
display at the St. George Island Visi-
tor Center & Lighthouse Museum.
The pedestal components have been
preserved via a desalinization pro-
cess at the State Preservation Labo-
ratory in Tallahassee, and will be
displayed in the new Keeper's House
Museum when it is completed.
For more information contact
Terry Kemp with the St. George
Lighthouse Association at 927-2000.


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Franklin County Tourist
Development Council
2009 PUBLIC MEETING SCHEDULE



Nh eber 2, 2009 10:00 AM, Administrative Committee Meeting
Carrabelle City Offices (old Carrabelle High School)

November 3, 2009 3:00 PM, Council Meeting
Carrabelle City Offices (old Carrabelle High School)

Novmbe 17 209 -k nMCCounmty CthMue nThird Floor Grand Jury Room 303

December 1, 2009 3:00 PM, Council Meeting
Franklin County Courthouse Annex

Change:
December 15, 2009 1:30 PM, Committee Meeting
Carrabelle City Offices (old Carrabelle High School)
3:00 PM, TDC Plan, Council Joint Workshop with FCBOC
Carrabelle City Offices (old Carrabelle High School)

Any further changes will be published in the TIMES.
This is a public meeting and two or more County Commissioners may attend.


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Thursday, October 29, 2009


Local


The Times | A7


power they tend to scare
industries into compli-
ance," he said. "The FDA
could seize tractors that
cross state lines."
Leavins said there
were doubts as to whether
FDA could enact the ban
without going through a
lengthy rulemaking pro-
cess.
"Where will FDA stand
after everyone reshuffles
the paperwork in their
briefcase and goes home?
Can FDA do it without go-
ing through rulemaking?"
he said. "I think that's
questionable."

Greater ouster
industry
COMlilance Uraed
Bolstered by a unified
letter of support sent this
week by Rep. Allen Boyd
and Sen. Bill Nelson to the
FDA commissioner, coun-
ty commissioners took
steps Tuesday to map out
a comprehensive strategy
to fight the proposed ban,
which would likely put
thousands of Gulf Coast
fishermen and shuckers
out of work.
"This could be the end
of our way of life," said
Ward.
Leavins said David
Heil, who directs the
state's aquaculture regu-
latory program, has begun
scheduling workshops in
the county between now
and the end of the year,
to better educate oyster-
men on the importance of
adhering strictly to exist-
ing Florida Department of
Agriculture and Consum-
er Services' regulations
while working on the bay.
These rules call for
oystermen to be out on the
water during the summer
no later than 11 a.m., and
to ensure oysters can be
brought down in tempera-
ture to 55 degrees within


an eight-hour period.
Sandra Powell, who ac-
companied her daughter,
Franklin County Seafood
Workers Treasurer Taunya
James, said the ISSC pro-
vided valuable information
on how to handle oysters
in the safest possible way.
"I see how easy it would be
to fix," she said.
James' husband, Jo-
seph, said the recent con-
ference showed him how
fishermen in the North-
east are using transpon-
ders on their boats that
keep their presence con-
tinuously monitored. He
said such items could en-
sure oystermen adhere to
time and geography con-
straints when they go out
harvesting.
"The FDA seemed aw-
ful powerful to use," he
said. "They are really seri-
ous about what they want
to do. They're not going to
give us a second chance."
Parrish stressed that
local oystermen need to
be vigilant in following the
existing rules if there is
any hope of defeating the
proposed ban. "If we don't
do our part, it gives them
more credibility in going
forward with their plan,"
he said.
Apalachicola oyster
dealer Steve Nash urged
the commissioners to
act swiftly, or "these two
towns are going to be
ghost towns."

COMMISSIOHFS

promise to fight to
keep jo s
The commission also
heard a show of support
from the Tourist Devel-
opment Council, whose
chairman said the oppor-
tunity to enjoy raw oysters
is a major reason some
tourists frequent Franklin
County.
"We support you in


die, I'm not with that, but
I'm not with FDA shoving
it down our throats," he
said. "If you're sick and
you eat the wrong thing,
you die. That's part of
life."
Parrish urged the com-
mission to look into part-
nering with other Gulf
Coast states before em-
barking on what could be
a long and costly lawsuit.
"You need to have staying
power," he said. "If we're
going to enter into litiga-
tion, we need to do it as a
five-state organization."
By unanimous consent,
the commission passed
a motion to have County
Attorney Michael Shuler
look into the possibility
of a suit, and particularly
whether an injunction that
would thwart implementa-
tion of the FDA's plans was
a possibility.
The commissioner also
unanimously passed a mo-
tion made by Lockley to
write letters to Florida's
senators and Boyd against
the proposed ban. In ad-
dition, Lockley stressed
that a letter be provided
to these officials that they
could hand deliver to Pres-
ident Obama.
"I want to invite him
down here, to see the im-
pact of this," said Lockley.


Jackel mentioned that
Boyd had been pictured
with Speaker of the House
Nancy Pelosi, and other
leading Democrats, in re-
cent weeks, and said he
could use his influence to
undo this ban.
"It's beyond the state
of Florida," said Leavins.
"It's going to take sena-
tors and congressmen to
stop this,."
Commissioner Bevin
Putnal urged the oyster
and seafood task force to
begin compiling data, facts
and figures on the eco-
nomic impact of this ban,
that can be used to bolster
the industry's case.
He said this recent
move is one more move
along a pattern of actions,
beginning with the net
ban, to put the commer-
cial fishing industry out of
business.
"Now the only thing left
is the poor oystermen, and
(they're thinking) we're
going to get them out of
the way," Putnal said.
"They're going to find a
reason."
But Leavins, a member
of the Gulf Oyster Industry
Council's board, said there
was reason for hope. "If
we go down, we'll go down
fighting," he said. "Very,
very hard."


DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times
Tau nya James

trying to get rid of this
ban 100 percent," said
Helen Spohrer. "We have
the means of getting the
message out, of reaching
people around the country
who come here.
"The economic impact
of this is huge," she said.
"It goes way beyond the
oyster industry."
Spohrer met Monday
with Begos, who already
has been asked to head a
committee of the Gulf Oys-
ter Industry Council to re-
spond to the proposed raw
oyster ban.
All those who attended
the ISSC said Begos, who
wrote and disseminated
a lengthy press release
within days of the FDA an-
nouncement, was instru-
mental in articulating the
local industry's views.
"We need to turn Begos
loose and start attacking,"
said Nash. "He's like a
bulldog." '
While funded in the
past, the seafood and oys-
ter task force remains a
voluntary collection of
representatives of all as-
pects of the local industry,
and Begos is unpaid.
Parrish asked Apala-
chicola seafood dealer Ot-
tice Amison, who chairs
the task force, to prepare
a funding request by the
Nov. 3 county commis-
sion meeting. An emer-


DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times
Tommy Ward

agency meeting of the task
force's voting members
was planned for Wednes-
day.
By unanimous consent
the board approved a mo-
tion made by Commis-
sioner Pinki Jackel to join
the Gulf Oyster Industry
Council, and to rally sup-
port for opposing the ban.
"It would be pretty stu-
pid to sit here and twiddle
our thumbs after we have
fought so hard to keep our
oyster bars alive," said
Commissioner Cheryl
Sanders.
Commissioner Noah
Lockley pushed hard for
their county to sue the
FDA over the proposed
action.
"I don't want people to


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Community CALENDAR


2009 TAX ROLLS OPEN FOR



Notice is hereby given that the certified Tax Roll for the year 2009 has
been delivered to Franklin County Tax Collector James A. Harris, Jr.,
CFC by Franklin County Property Appraiser Honorable Doris Barber
Pendleton, for collection. The tax rolls will be open for payment
November 1st, for the 2009Ad Valorem, Personal Property and Centrally
Assessed properties for:


Franklin County
Franklin County School Board
City of Apalachicola
C1ty of Carrabelle
Eastpoint Water & Sewer District
Dog Island Conservation District
Alligator Point Water Resource District
Northwest Florida Water Management Distnict


Payments may be made at the Franklin County Court House 33 Market
Street, Suite #202, Apalachicola, Florida or at the Carrabelle Branch
Office located at 1647 Highway 98 (Old D.O.T Building) Carrabelle,
Florida. Office Hours are Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. until 4:30
pm


Payments may be mailed to: James A. Harris, Jr., CFC
Franklin County Tax Collector P.O. Drawer 188 Apalachicola, Flonida
32329.


SCHEDULE OF PAYMENTS IS AS FOLLOWS


4% DISCOUNT NOVEMBER 01 THRU NOVEMBER 30, 2009
3% DISCOUNT DECEMBER 01 THRU DECEMBER 31, 2009
2% DISCOUNT JANUARY 01 THRU JANUARY 31, 2010
1% DISCOUNT FEBRUARY 01 THRU FEBRUARY 28, 2010
NET AMOUNT DUE MARCH 1, 2010
PENALTIES BEGIN APRIL 1, 2010


Statements will be mailed to all property owners or their agents at the
last known address on or before November 1, 2009. If you do not receive
your tax bill notice, please contact this office at (850) 653-9323 or (850)
653-8384 between the hours of 8:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. Monday thru
Friday or write to Franklin County Tax Collector Post Office Drawer
188 Apalachicola, Flonida 32329.

Write to / E-Mail
James A. Harris, Jr., CFC Franklin County Tax Collector
P.O. Drawer 188 Apalachicola, FL 32329
Telefax: (850) 653-2529
fetch eotcom.net


TIDE TABLES
MONTHLY AVERAGES
ro find the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times
rom those given for APALACHI OLA: Lw
=at Point MinusO:40 Minus 1:17
East Pass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27a
ro find the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times
rom those given for CARRABE LE: Lw
Said Point Minus 9:15 Minus 0:03

APALACHICOLA


CARRAB ELL E


SOLU NAR
m = Minor M = Major add 1 hour for daylight savings
Date Day AM PM Rise/Set Moon
10/29 Thu m 1:05 m 1:20 6:11AM O
M 7:05 M 7:25 5:16PM
10/30 Fri m 1:40 m 1:55 6:12AM O
M 7:45 M 8:05 5:15PM
10/31 Sat m 2:20 m 2:35 6:13AM O
M 8:25 M 8:45 5:14PM
11/01 Sun m 3:00 m 3:15 6:13AM O
M 9:05 M 9:30 5:13PM
11/02 Mon m 3:45 m 4:00 6:14AM
M 9:50 M 10:15 5:13PM
11/03 Tue m 4:30 m 5:05 6:13AM O
M 10:55 M 11:20 5:12PM
11/04 Wed m 5:35 m 6:05 6:16AM O
M 11:50 M 6:16AM


IV


Thursday, October 29, 2009


Local


By [015 Swoboda
Times Staff Writer

On Thursday afternoon,
Carrabelle's first city his-
toric marker was mounted
on the Bragdon Building
located on US 98.
The sign is the culmi-
nation of a recent project
to identify and evaluate
archaeological sites, build-
ings and structures con-
structed before 1959 in
Carrabelle. During
the study, Beth LaCivita,
president of Historic Flor-
ida Consulting, system-
atically recorded, mapped
and photographed 121
buildings.
Built in the late 1930's,
the Bragdon Building was
owned and operated as a
hardware store and gas sta-
tion by Alva Bragdon, who
served as mayor of Car-
rabelle from 1953 through
1961. His term spanned
many important years for
the city and he made many
significant contributions.
He hired the first city clerk
and dedicated the new Post
Office. He also traveled to
Washington D.C. to seek
assistance for Carrabelle.


In the late 1950's, Brag-
don brought his oldest
son, John David Bragdon,
into the business, and he
started a TV sales and re-
pair shop on one side of the
building. In 1963, Bragdon
brought his youngest son,
Alva Lamar "Sonny Boy"
Bragdon, into the business,
and he converted the other
side of the Bragdon build-
ing into an auto, diesel
engine and heavy truck re-
pair shop and later a truck-
ing company.
In 1966, John David
moved to Lakeland to pur-
sue another career. Sonny
Boy continued his business
in this building until the
late 1970's when the build-
ing was sold. It has been
sold several times since
then.
Alva Bragdon passed
away in 1966. John David
Bragdon passed away in
2002 and Alva "Sonny Boy"
Bragdon in 2006.
Jimmie Crowder, who
currently owns the build-
ing, rents it to "Marine
Systems." He was gracious
enough to allow the historic
marker sign to be mounted
at the peak of the roof of


band's memory.
"I used to work here
with my husband in the
60's. He would be so proud
of me," she said. "I went
forward with placing this
sign because it was a pri-
vately-owned building and
I wanted to be sure it got
a plaque to commemorate
the Bragdon family's con-
tributions to Carrabelle."
The historic documen-
tation project was funded
by a $50,000 grant from
the Florida Department of
State, Division of Histori-
cal Resources, assisted
by the Florida Historical
Commission. The grant
was awarded in partner-
ship to the Carrabelle Wa-
terfront Partnership and
the Carrabelle Historical
Society, who collaborated
with LaCivita during the
survey.
The survey is on file
at the Carrabelle History
Museum in Old City Hall.
The Historical Society has
plans to publish the docu-
ment as a CD that will be
available for the public at
the museum.
For more information
please call 697-2141.


LOIS SWOBODA | The Times
Tim Phillips, above, and Romelo Sanchez, of Sign De-Sign in Eastpoint, below,
mount the first Carrabelle historic building sign on the Bragdon building.


this historical building.
The Carrabelle Histori-
cal Society hopes this will
he the first of many signs


to recognize the historic
buildings in the city. The
sign was constructed and
installed by Sign Design in


Eastpoint.
Pat Bragdon, wife of
"Sonny Boy" had the sign
installed to honor her hus-


Thursday. Oct. 29
Apalachicola Area His-
torical Society presents
Beverly Mount-Dodds au-
thor of the soon-to-be pub-
lished book "Apalachicola"
in Arcadia Publishing's
"Images of America" se-
ries. Free. 5:30 p.m. at Ca-
mellia Hall, 80 Fifth Street
in Apalachicola. For more
information call 370-6201.
M/icrosoft Word I at


Eastpoint Library from 9
a.m. to noon. For more in-
formation, call 670-8151.
M/icrosoft Excel 1 at
Eastpoint Library from 1
to 4 p.m. For more informa-
tion, call 670-8151.
Yoga at Carrabelle li-
brary from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m.
For more information, call
697-2366.
Wandering Star Quilt-
ing Club. Chillas Hall La-


nark Village. 1 to 3 p.m. Call
Christine Hinton 697-2551.
Community Luncheon
and Informationrmation
Specials at the Franklin
County Senior Center in
Carrabelle. Noon. $3 dona-
tion. Call 697-3760.
Friday. Oct. 30
Individual and group
computer instruction at
Eastpoint library from 10
a.m. to noon. For more in-
formation, call 670-8151.
Parent-child reads at
Eastpoint library at 2:15
p.m. for infant to 4-years-
old. For more information,
call 670-8151.
Story Hour at East-


point library at 3:30 p.m.
for ages 5 to 8. For more in-
formation, call 670-8151.
Exercise class at Chill-
as Hall in Lanark Village. 9
to 10 a.m. Open to all and
free.
Carrabelle History
Museum, Old City Hall, 106
SE Avenue B in downtown
Carrabelle, is open 10 a.m.
to 4 p.m. today and Satur-
day. Free. For more infor-
mationrmation, contact
Tamara Allen at 697-2141.
Saturday. Oct. 31
Crooked River Light-
house Lantern Fest will
be held from 6 to 10 p.m.
Fee is $1 and includes lec-


ture, banjo music, tales of a
lighthouse keeper, a world
premier performance of
"Disaster on Dog Island,"
fun adventures and spooky
happenings. For more in-
formation, call 697-2585.
Monday. Nov. 2
Apalachicola Library
Board will meet at 5 p.m. at
the Apalachicola Municipal
Library. For more informa-
tion call 653-9310.
Yoga at Carrabelle li-
brary from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m.
For more information, call
697-2366.
Yarn Junkies will meet
at 7 to 9 p.m. The newly
formed group is for knit-


ters, crocheters and oth-
ers addicted to yarn. The
group will meet each Mon-
day evening at an alternate
location. For information-
rmation, call Kathy Robin-
son at 653-7196.
Exercise class at Chill-
as Hall in Lanark Village. 9
to 10 a.m. Open to all and
free.
Al-Anon meets at 5:30
p.m. at Trinity Episcopal
Church's Benedict Hall,
at Sixth Street and Ave. D.
For more information, call
850-222-2294.
Bingo at the Franklin
County Senior Center in
Carrabelle. Early bird at
6 p.m., regular bingo at
7 p.m. Cards begin at $4.
Call 697-3760.
Th~esday. Nov. 3
Franklin County Com-
mission will meet at 9 a.m.
at the courthouse annex.
For more information call
653-8861 ext. 100.
Apalachicola City
Commission will meet at
6 p.m. at City Hall. Agenda
includes first reading of
Water Supply Plan Ordi-
nance. For more informa-
tion call 653-9319.
Kids Wii at Carrabelle
Library from 5 to 6 p.m.
For more information, call
697-2366.
Breakfast at the Frank-
lin County Senior Center
in Carrabelle. Coffee at
7:30 a.m., meal at 8 a.m. $2
suggested donation. Call
697-3760.
Bingo 7 p.m. St. George
Island Fire Dp.1i25 cents

come. Proceeds go to St.
George Island Civic Club.
Call 927-4654.
Carrabelle Lighthouse
Association will meet at
Keeper's House Museum,
at Crooked River Light-
house Park, at 5:30 p.m.
For more information call
697.2732.
Wednesday. Nov. 4
Adult Wii at Carra-
belle Library from 9 to 11
a.m. For more information,
call 697-2366.

as Hal n Lanr V IllaCe 1
to 10 a.m. Open to all and
free.
Turs av. Nov. 5
Carrabelle City Com-
mission will meet at 6:30
p.m. at the municipal city
complex on Grey Avenue.
For more information call

Yoga at Carrabelle li-
brary from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m.
For n are information, call

Wandering Star Quilt-
ing Club. Chillas Hall La-
nar Viillag 1 to 3 p.m.5Call
Community Luncheon
and Informationrmation
Specials at the Franklin
C unty Sen Centeri
Carrabelle. Noon. $3 dona-
tion. Call 697-3760.


Temperature
High
830
830
830
800
770
740
740


Date
Thu, Oct 29
Fri, Oct 30
Sat, Oct 31
Sun, Nov 01
Mon, Nov 02
Tue, Nov 03
Wed, Nov 04


Low % Precip
710 30%
710 10%
630 20%
640 30%
590 30%
590 0%
610 0%


10/29 Thu 01:22AM
01:42PM
10/30 Fri 01:41AM
02:57PM
10/31 Sat 01:58AM

11/01 Sun 1106 MM
04:01PM
11/02 Mon 01 MM M

11/03 Tue 02:02AM
05:56PM
11/04 Wed 02:33AM
06:56PM


08:01AM 0.7
07:53PM 0.7
08:44AM 0.5
08:30PM 0.9
09:22AM 0.2


08:36PM 1.2
0:3AMM -0 1
10:11AM -0.2
09:36PM 1.4
10:53AM -0.3
10:05PM 1.5


10/29 Thu 05:48AM
05:40PM
10/30 Fri 12:16AM
01:32PM
10/31 Sat 12:33AM
02:37PM
11/01 Sun 12:51AM

11/02 Mon 13261AMM
03:33PM
11/03 Tue 12:37AM
04:31PM
11/04 Wed 01:08AM
05:31PM


2.2 H


06:31AM 0.8
06:17PM 1.4
07:09AM 0.3
06:51PM 1.6
06:45AM 0.0

0:0AM -0 2
06:54PM 2.1
07:58AM -0.3
07:23PM 2.2
08:40AM -0.5
07:52PM 2.4


A8 | The Times


Bragdons help install Carrabelle's first historical marker


1.1 L 12:17PM














Thursday, October 29, 2009 w w w. a pala ch ti m es co0m Page 9


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AC( IHI ~L
STAT E BANK* 1897
A Division of Coastal CommunitV Bank

Apalachicola Carrabelle Eastpoint ISt. George Island
22 Avenue E 612 N Avenue A 5 Jefferson Street 1200 Franklin Blvd
653-8805 697-4500 670-8501 927-2561


*Traditional
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OToa i~l **State of the Art
Equipment
"'~~~LL~-~Ci *Digital X-rays


By Christy Thompson
Special to the Times
The Lady Seahawks wrapped up the
season with back to back wins against Tay-
lor County at home. This was also the time
that we chose to recognize our seniors for
the 2009 volleyball season.
Joy Carrino, Monet Moron and Cecillia
James have been a part of the Seahawk
family since our first year of consolidation,
I have seen some outstanding volleyball
play from these seniors over the course of
the past three seasons.
Joy has been the setter for the team all
three years and dominated the boards with
her serving ability. She totaled 95 serving


points on the season, with 44 of those be-
ing aces. She accumulated 28 kills, 25 digs,
three blocks and 148 assists during the
season. Joy is a tremendous team leader.
The enthusiasm and effort that she has
consistently displayed while playing for
the Seahawks will surely be missed.
Monet finished the season with 56 serv-
ing points, of which 31 were aces. She has
been seen as the defensive specialist on
the team. She has been great with defend-
ing serves and making passes to the set-
ter all season long. She recorded 63 digs
to support her title, followed by 25 kills, 41
assists and one block on the year.
See FAREWELL Al0


PHOTOS BY DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times
LEFT: Mr. and Ms. Franklin County, Chase Richards and Kendyl Hardy, smile
despite the beginning of rain during Friday's half time ceremony. RIGHT:
Seahawks senior Eric Hicks, left, and his dad, Mitchell Hicks, take part in
Friday's pre-game Senior Night ceremony.


Seahawk loss dampens


impressive S enior Night


By David Adler stein
Times City Editor
Franklin County fans
watched a king and queen
crowned, a group of seniors
applauded and a pig kissed
Friday night at the Mikel
Clark Sports Complex.
Unfortunately, they didn't
see a Seahawk victory.
Liberty County kept
their hopes alive for a Dis-
trict 2-1A championship as
they dominated Franklin
County 51-13, using a fierce
ground game to score
from their opening drive
on through to the last play
of the game, when junior
quarterback Nolan Brown
ran it in from 47 yards out
with 30 seconds remaining.
"Our full intention was
to get to their potential Di-
vision I quarterback senior
Terrance Evans before he
got going. We tried to cheat
the defense a little bit, but
as they say,'Cheaters ney-


er win,' said coach Josh
Wright. "Our inability to
stop the option game, and
getting out of position on
the counter play, kept us
from keeping them out of
the end zone.
"In hindsight, which
tends to be very clear
(sometimes even 20/20), we
may have been better off
playing more of our base
defense with bigger bodies
on their wings and assign-
ing more than one person
to their shifty quarterback.
Their wings, though often
cut blocking and holding,
were very effective against
our smaller but quick
ends," Wright said.
Evans led the team with
127 yards on nine carries,
tallying his first touchdown
with 6:04 in the first quar-
ter when he ran it in from
two yards out. He scored
less than two minutes later
on a 23-yard keeper up the
middle, and added his third


and last score, with 7:57 left
in the half, when he con-
verted a fourth-and-inches
at midfield into a 50-yard
touchdown sprint.
Senior Kevin McCray
tallied 107 yards on seven
carries, followed by junior
Stedman Williams, who
ran the ball eight times for
78 yards and scored the
Bulldogs' sixth touchdown
midway in the third quar-
ter, when he took it in from
eight yards out.
Senior Mike Lohse nailed
six of his seven extra-point
tries, as well as a 29-yard
field goal seconds after the
start of the second quarter.
Bulldog senior Keith Mc-
Cray contributed a 12-yard
touchdown run with 4:30
left in the first half. Senior
Chase Bradley added the
Bulldogs' only defensive
score when he scooped up
a Seahawk fumble on the
See SEA HAWKS Al0


Sophomore tailback Trekale Turrell
had 158 all-purpose yards, including a
95-yard kickoff return for a touchdown,
in Friday night's game against Liberty
County


Defensive rPlayer
















Senior lineman Chase Richards had 12
solo tackles and one assist in Friday
night's game against Liberty County.


CA RRA BE L LE APA LA CH ICO LA


A
Section


Lady Seahawks bid farewell to seniors


I NTERN ET +PHON E+ 1PTV



just per month


t '
I


Offensive P~layer


ER 0F T'E~








































































































































~ 'I ) C1I
r


Thursday, October 29, 2009


FAREWELL

Ifrm page A9
Cecillia didn't play much
for us this year because of in-
juries, but she still supported
the team all season long. She
helped us with scorekeeping
and is responsible for most
of the video footage we have
covering the season.
The team had some great
moments over the season but
just didn't play to their full po-
tential. Next year should be
a groundbreaking season for
the volleyball team at Frank-
lin County High School. We
have some pretty good ath-
letes at this school, and hope-
fully these girls will comesout
ready to put teir sil o
work.
I expect freshman Chena
Segree to make a bigger im-
pact for us next year. She fin-
ished third on the team, with
75 total serving points and 33
being aces. Chena put down
more spikes than anyone on
the team. She had the most
consistency this year and
recorded 81 kills for the Se-
ahawks. She also had 44 digs,
31 blocks and 45 assists to
complete her freshman year.
Sophomore Oneika Lock-
ley was also a big contributor
for us this year and is expect-
ed to be more of a threat next
year as well. She finished
second, with serving points
totaling 91 and 42 being aces.
Oneika accumulated 60 kills,
which put her just behind
Chena. These two should be
the big hitters for us next
year. She also had 35 digs, 41
assists and 11 blocks to close
out the year.
We have a great group of
girls coming back next sea-
son, and I hope we take the
positive lessons learned from
our seniors with us and tuck
the negative ones far away
from view. Coach Walker, the
team and I all wish Joy, Mon-
et and Ce-Ce the best of luck.
We will miss you guys, and go,
Seahawks!
Chrisfy Thompson is as-
sistant coach of the Lady Se-
ahawks, coached by David
Walkcer


Sports


three-yard line and ran it in with
9:53 left in the first half, to put the
Bulldogs up 24-0.
The fumble was one of three
turnovers that gave the Bulldogs'
great field position, although
Wright was irked the touchdown
was tallied even though the Lib-
erty County player failed to gain
possession.
"The TD signal had already
been issued for the visitors," he
said. "Where is the instant replay
booth when you really need it?
On the ensuing kickoff, sopho-
more Trekale Turrell provided
Seahawk fans an electrifying mo-
ment when he bobbled the return
and then ran it back 95 yards for
the score. Freshman Elton Olvera
nailed the extra point.
Turrell contributed 109 return
yards on the night, plus a 40-yard
pass reception, and nine yards on
three carries.
Senior Arron Prince added
67 return yards, plus two rushes
for two yards, including the Se-
ahawks' second touchdown with
3:12 left in the game he ran it in
from two yards out.
Senior quarterback Dalin Modi-
can carried the ball five times for 19
yards, returned a kickoff 44 yards,
and was 3-of-6 in the air for 75 yards,
hitting junior C.J. Barnes one for
30 yards and junior Adam Joseph
once for five yards. Senior Dale
Butler added a one-yard rush.
"Our offensive production was
thwarted by a stingy Bulldogs'


Seahawk band.
The halftime show featured a
visiting band performance by Lib-
erty County, a varsity cheerleader
"Thriller" dance routine, and a
ceremonial kissing of Pam Shiv-
er's prize pig Lily to raise money
for Project Graduation (See front
page photo).
The halftime events were con-
cluded with a middle school foot-
ball players and cheerleaders
introduction and a formal intro-
duction of Mr. and Ms. Franklin
County that showcased Chase
Richards and Kendyl Hardy. Last
year's honoree, Jared Mock, han-
dled the coronation, which goes
to two seniors who "embody all
that is good, integrity, disposition
moral values and academic excel-
lence."
This Friday night's Homecom-
ing features a contest against
Blountstown, with kickoff set for
7:30 p.m. The Homecoming pa-
rade in Eastpoint begins that af-
ternoon at 1 p.m., with Homecom-
ing Court and winners announced
at halftime.
"We challenge the community
to come out and support the pro-
gram and show your Seahawk
pride, as the Homecoming match-
up against the visiting Tigers will
be an opportunity for us to show
that we have what it takes to
bounce back from a disappoint-
ing defeat and reach the ever
constant goal of Pride, Class and
Win!," Wright said.


~li~i6~


DAVID AULCKSlklN|IThe lmes
Sea hawks senior DJ Lane runs for daylight in action Friday night
against Liberty County.


defense that had multiple blitzes
coming from multiple angles,"
Wright said.
On defense, senior Chase Rich-
ards led the team with 12 tackles
and one assist, while sophomore
Chris Granger had nine tackles, se-
nior Taylor Hires eight tackles and
one assist, and Prince six tackles.
Before the start of the night's
contest, a dozen seniors, accom-
panied by family members, were
introduced to the fans. Players
honored with roses and a 5-by-7-
inch picture frame to commemo-
rate a photo of the occasion includ-
ed Eric Hicks and dad, Mitchell
Hicks; A.J. Arnold and dad, Andy
Arnold; Gary Larsen and friends;
Jason Thompson and parents,


George and Donna Thompson;
Ty~Sdron Wynn and parents, Sparky
and Olivia Wynn; Kruiz Dickerson
and mom, Margie Stefanko, and
guardians Pam and Scott Shiver;
Dustin Putnal and parents, Rusty
and Sharon Putnal; Taylor Hires
and parents, Larry and Heather
Riley; DJ Lane and grandmother
Rose Tolliver and uncle Freddie
Brown; Chase Richards and par-
ents, John and Pam Richards;
Arron Prince and mom, Barbara
Brown; and drum major Damien
Davis and parents, Robert and
Jhaki Davis.
The pregame was concluded
with entertaining productions
by both the Pam Nobles Dance
Studio group and Karl Lester's


Al 0 1 The Times


SEAHAWKS from page A9


RIVERSIDE WINS CHAMBERR GOLF TOURNEY

Riverside Construction took top honors in the
Apalachicola Bay Chamber of Commerce golf
rlf~,. tournament at St. James Bay golf course on Oct. 14.
Riesdpcue ee icuefo et ut
Daniel, Bill Barnes, Mike Keller and Dan Anderson.
rlWith a score of 55, they finished just ahead of the
Tallahassee Regional Airport team of Walter Davis,
1 Robert Bechtol and Richard Wright, which also shot a
55. In third was Preble-Rish with 60, consisting of Clay
: Smallwood, Warren Yeager, Zach Childs and Michael
Hammond. Special awards for Closest to the Pin went
i to Tom Nobles (Hole No. 2), Zach Childs (Hole No. 6),
Mike Keller (Hole No. 1 1) and Thomas Irvin, (Hole No.
17) and Longest Drive to John Hosford (Hole No. 1 8).
me .. . -- ANITA GROVE | Special to the Times
















Thursday, October 29, 2009 w w w. a pala ch t i mes co0m Page 1


* 'Y


B
Section


By Despina Williams
Florida Freedom Newspapers

Beverly Mount-Douds
daydreams about elegant tea
parties hosted by "Sunshine"
Gibson.
She envisions Minnie Bare-
field roaming the streets of
Apalachicola, collecting rent
money in her syrup bucket.
And she wishes she'd had
the pleasure of meeting Mar-
garet Key, a fellow author, his-
torian and genealogist.
As the first edition of her
photographic history book,
Apalachicola, rolls off the
presses, Mount-Douds can't
stop thinking about the black
and white images of Apala-
chicolians past.
"I feel likelIknow them,"
said Mount-Douds, flipping
through her latest book, part of
Arcadia's "Images of America"
series.
"They've come to be like
live people in mind because
I've read so many stories. It
brings them alive to me."
Mount-Douds, a Highland
View resident, knew little
about Apalachicola when she
first began researching the
historic city two years ago.
As a research assistant for
a Florida State University proj-
ect aimed at identifying his-
toric landmarks for an online
and print publication, Mount-
Doudshbecame intrigued by
Apalachicola's rich history.
Having previously com-
pleted a photographic history
of Gulf County and a chronicle
of area lighthouse keepers,
Mount-Douds knew she'd
found her next project.
"A light bulb went off in
my head," recalled Mount-
Douds. "'Why not do one on
Apalach?"'"
In collecting historical
photographs of Apalachicola,
Mount-Douds found invaluable
guides in Sweet Shoppe propri-
etor Dolores Roux and former
librarian Ann Sizemore.
Roux introduced Mount-
Douds to members of Apala-
chicola's prominent families
and Sizemore made available
the library's photographic col-
lections.
After a year of collecting
and cataloguing photographs,
Mount-Douds organized her
book into seven sections.
Chapters are devoted to
people, industry, recreation,
celebrations, the historic
Chapman High School, homes
and landmarks.
Regular attendees of the
Florida Seafood Festival may
be surprised to learn that the
event began as a Mardi Gras
festival around 1915.
The book's 1916 cover shot
depicts a sharply dressed


Before there was ever a seafood festival, Apalachicola
hosted a well-attended Mardi Gras Festival, portrayed here
in 1 91 6.


Though she did not discover
this handsomely dressed
gentleman's name, Beverly
Mount-Douds included this
classic photograph in her
book.


Born in Ireland in 1851,
Patrick Nedley was a
fisherman, sailor and city
policeman,


Apalachicola once had a prominent sponge industry. By the
1900s, a U.S. Commission of Fisheries report indicated that
64 local men were employed in the sponge industry.


Homer Oliver driving Mardi
Gras queen Genevieve Pierce
and maid of honor Dorothy
Sawyer in a 1915 Buick.
The festival evolved into
the Harbor Day festival in the
1960s, then the Apalachicola
Seafood Festival in the 1970s,
and now the Florida Seafood
Festival.
The seafood industry is well
depicted in the book, with im-
ages of the Standard Fish and
Oyster Company, Taranto's
Seafood and the C.H. Lind
Oyster and Fish House.
No book on Apalachicola is
complete without its famous
export, the oyster,
The book showcases the
seafood festival's first oyster-
shucking champion, Zora Lee
Alford (50 oysters in 2 minutes,
48 seconds) and Edward Phi-
lyaw, slurping a raw one down
at age 5.
Other images depict
Apalachicola's once prominent
sponge industry, steamboats
sailing the Apalachicola River
and the Coombs Lumber Com-
pany, one of the most success-
ful sawmills of its day.
Sprinkled among prominent
historical figures like botanist
Dr. Alvan Wentworth Chap-
man, and ice machine inventor
Dr. John Gorrie are lesser
known figures like Barefield,


a mixed-race woman with an
interesting past.
Barefield's boyfriend, lum-
berman Charles Dobson, built
her a stately home using the
same blueprint as the historic
Coombs house.
Though the census de-
scribed Barefield as a board-
ing house owner, those in the
know note that she operated
"Minnie's Palace of Plea-
sures," a brothel.
In a poetic twist of fate, the
brothel later became a convent
for nuns with the Holy Family
School. It was purchased and
relocated to 11 mile by Eldon
and Ruth Schoelles in the
1970s.
Mount-Douds most enjoyed
researching the lives of for-
mer Apalachicola residents
like Gibson, who operated the
Gibson Inn with her sister, An-
nie and "had more clothes and
outfits" than anyone Mount-
Douds has ever seen.
In sorting through Key's
collection of writings in the
Apalachicola library, Mount-
Douds felt a kinship with the
former author and wife of nov-
elist Alexander Key.
"She loved genealogy, she
loved history and she loved
collecting it, compiling it and
sharing it with the world," said
Mount-Douds, who gleaned


Apalachicola is Beverly
Mount-Douds' third book.
She previously published a
photo rahic history of Gulf
County.
many little-known facts by
reading Key's marginal notes.
"You learn so much looking
at her scribbles," she said.
Though she has completed
her book, Mount-Douds said
she is keeping her folders
open.
She hopes to begin work
on a photographic history of
Franklin County in five years.
The project will allow her
to research some of her unan-
swered questions, chiefly the
identity of an African-Ameri-
can woman called "Aunt Bell."
Mount-Douds found what
she described as a "classic"
photograph of Bell in Key's
collection. Lacking any further
information, she did not in-
clude the image in her book.
"The picture of her sitting
on that front porch with that
scalloped lacing around the
bonnet, it was so classic," said
Mount-Douds. "It just spoke
to me:'Find my story, find out
about me."'"
Just give her five years.


No book on Apalachicola
would be complete without
the city's most famous export,
the oyster. 1973 Miss Florida
Seafood Elizabeth Zingarelli
shows off the tasty bivalve.


U KOMing B00k


*Oct. 29 (5:30 p.m.)
Coombs House Inn's Ca-
mellia Hall, hosted by
Apalachicola Area Histori-
cal Society
*Nov. 6-7 Florida Sea-
food Festival
*Nov. 14 (4-6 p.m.)Palm
Tree Books, Port St. Joe
*Nov. 21 (2-5 p.m.) Dolo-
res' Sweet Shoppe, Apala-
chicola
*Nov. 27 (5 p.m.-until)
Raney House, Apalachicola
*Nov. 30 (4-6 p.m.) Port
St. Joe Public Library
*Dec. 12 (1-3 p.m.) Down-
town Books, Apalachicola
To pre-order Apalachic-
ola, contact Beverly Mount
Douds at 850-229-1094 or e-
mail bmdouds2002@yahooo
com.


LIFE


TI~ES











































......---- ----


PET OF TH E
W \EEK


GCCC to present stage

version of new Lister novel














DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times
Author Michael Lister, left, chats with Sally Crown,
of Apalachicola, at an Oct. 3 booksigning for his
new novel, "Double Exposure" at the Apalachicola
River ee per o fice.


;... y %

Lacey and Hutch
Lacey and Hutch, 3-month-old terrier mixes, arrived at
the Adoption Center a month ago. They are smart, adorable,
sweet puppies waiting :.' .llll1j for a loving home.
VOLUNTEERS are desperately needed to socialize Lacey,
Hutch and all of the dogs and cats. Anytime you can spare would
be .-:.oll appreciated.
Call Kam at 670-8417 for more details or visit the Franklin
County Humane Society at 244 State Route 65 in Eastpoint. You
may log onto the website at www forgottenpets.org to see more
of our adoptable pets.
Remember, when you adopt a friend for life, you not only
save the life of that pet, you make room for us to save the life of
one more abandoned dog or cat!











DOH'T PAIY TOO MUCH!

$50 Quarterly
RaVeS 8y YOU $100 ya!
for residential accounts

Aloha Bulsg Post Management
Frank C un ys ONC OA Pes 0 ntrol cop ny


DUVall family iloldS
FOURion in Panama City
The family of Ella and Jeff Duval, Sr., former res-
idents of Franklin County, gathered at the Golden
Corral in Panama City on Saturday, Oct. 24, 2009.
Five generations were in attendance.
Avril Duval McKenzie was the eldest at 86 years
and Ella Morse, the great-granddaughter of Peggy
Duval Kent was the youngest at five months. Tray-
eling the furthest distance was Billie Duval-Branch
and Shirley Ann Torres, daughter of Jeff Duval Jr.,
both from Texas.
A great time was had by all.


Thursday, October 29, 2009


B2 | The Times


Society


Franklin County High School teacher Eli-
nor Mount-Simmons received the Florida
Education Association Service Award at the
organization's annual Delegate Assembly in
Orlando.
Mount-Simmons received the FEA Ser-
vice Award, one of four awards given each
year by the statewide organization's Human
and Civil Rights Committee. The FEA Ser-
vice Award is presented to the FEA member
who has advanced the cause of human and
civil rights.
Members of FEA's Human and Civil
Rights Committee believed that Mount-Sim-
mons certainly fit the bill. She was recog-
nized for the Academic Recovery Program, a
dropout prevention program she created for
the Franklin County Schools.
"Often I must peel away layers and layer
of apathy and negativity to reach their core,"
Mount-Simmons said of the students in her
program. "Then, using the uplifting prin-
ciples of the Academic Recovery Program,
begin their rebuilding process, adding new
layers of optimism and hope."
Mount-Simmons created the First Friday
Forum, which is an opportunity for people to


share their stories of overcoming adversity
and how they met life's challenges and over-
came them. She said these real-world exam-
ples are designed to motivate her students
to continue on in pursuit of their high school
diploma and beyond.
In recommending her for the award,
School Superintendent Nina Marks wrote:
"Elinor Mount-Simmons is an asset to this
community and to the Franklin County
School system. ... She is always creating
projects to enhance the lives of our youth."
Mount-Simmons received her award at a
banquet Oct. 16 at the Rosen Centre Hotel
in Orlando during the FEA's annual conven-
tion. She is an active member of the Frank-
lin County Teachers Association, the local
teacher affiliate of the statewide Florida
Education Association.
The Florida Education Association is the
state's largest association of professional
employees, with more than 140,000 mem-
bers. FEA represents pre K-12 teachers,
higher education faculty, educational sup-
port professionals, students at our colleges
and universities preparing to become teach-
ers and retired education employees.


BRITANNY SIMMONS|ISpecial to the Times
Elinor Mount-Simmons, center, is flanked by FEA President Andy Ford,
right, and FEA Vice President Joanne McCall after receiving her service
awa rd.


Who me, turning 5?
Kyera Shatwain will cel-
ebrate her fifth birthday on
Friday Oct. 30.
Kyera is the daughter of
Aja Vanandel, of Tallahassee.
Her brother is Donate,
and grandmother is Sharon
Rochelle, ofApalachicola.
Maternal great-grandpar-
ents are Jimmie and Mary
Rochelle, of Apalachicola.
Paternal grandparents
are Mr. and Mrs. Robert
Dockett, of Tallahassee.
Godmother is Ms. Josie
Kellogg, also of Apalachicola.
Happy B-day Kyera!
Love always,
GiGI and Poppie


: _


D~ ,


Happy birthday,
(ilena and Morgan
Happy birthday,
Chena Segree and Mor-
gan Kelly.
Chena is the daugh-
ter of Brad and Teresa
Segree. Morgan is the
daughter of Matt and
Mindy Kelly.
They are both cel-
ebrating their 15th
birthdays this week,
and they are the best of
friends.


Tickets have gone on
sale for GCCC's latest the-
atre production, "Double
Exposure," the world pre-
mier stage adaptation of lo-
cal author Michael Lister's
newest novel.
"Double Exposure" is a
suspenseful tale of life and
death set in the swamps of
the Apalachicola River Ba-
sin.
The performances will
take place in the GCCC
Theatre Lab, also known
as the black box, which is
extremely popular with lo-
cal audiences. However,
due to limited seating, ad-
vance purchase of tickets is
strongly recommended.
"Double Exposure" will
show from Wednesday, Nov.
18, through Saturday, Nov.
21, at 7:30 p.m. On Saturday
and Sunday, Nov. 21 and 22,
there will be matinee shows
at 2:30 p.m.
Please be advised that
this production is for ma-


ture audiences only. Tickets
can be purchased at the
GCCC Visual and Perform-
ing Arts office in the Amelia
G. Tapper Center. Box office
hours are Monday through
Friday from 9 to 11:30 a.m.
and from 12:30 p.m. to 4 p.m.
until all tickets are sold out.
Any remaining seats will
be sold at the door. Doors
open 30 minutes prior to
curtain time and no one will
be admitted once the per-
formance starts.
Tickets are on sale for
$10. Gulf Coast Community
College students, retirees,
faculty, staff and dual-en-
rolled students may pick up
their free ticket at the Visu-
al and Performing Arts Di-
vision office (ID required).
Alumni get a 50 percent
discount when presenting
their alumni membership
card.
For more information,
call Sherri Renfroe at 872-
3886.


Education Association honors Mount-Simmons' service


Bir-thdays

Emily Crosby to turn 11
Emily Crosby will celebrate
her 11th birthday on Friday, Oct.
30, 2009
Emily is the daughter of Den-
nis and Deedee Crosby, of Apala-
chicola, and sister to Casey Cros-
by and Ronnie Custer,
Her maternal grandparents
are the late Joel and Sally Gain-
ous, of Port St. Joe.
Herpaternal grandparents are
Nonie Schoelles, of St. Joe Beach
and the late Roland Schoelles, of
Apalachicola; and Bill and Louise
Crosby, of Senoia, Ga.
Emily's maternal great-
grandmother is the late Maude
Gainous, of Apalachicola.
Her godparents are Chris and
Vonnie Hendels, of Apalachicola.


Kelisia Peterson turns 1
Kelisia Akirien Peterson cel-
ebrates his first birthday on
Thursday, Oct. 29, 2009.
She is the daughter of Kamilah
Hand, of Apalachicola, and Anto-
nio Peterson, of Port St. Joe.
Her maternal grandparents
are Trina Ford, of Apalachicola,
and Bobby Hand, of Tallahassee.
Paternal grandparents are
Carla Peterson, of Port St. Joe,
and Tony Clemons, of Port St.
Joe.
Kelisia's maternal great-
grandmothers are Rosa Tolliver
and Annie Hand, both of Apala-
chicola.
Her very special godmother is
Myrtis A. Wynn-Williams, of Au-
gusta, Ga.


lhandler Sanders
turns 4
Karen and George
Sanders, of Eastpoint, are
proud to announce the
fourth birthday of their
son, Chandler Sanders.
Chandler turned 4 on
Tuesday, Oct. 27, 2009. He
is brother to Kristy Lara-
more.
His maternal grand-
mother is Jo Ann Branch,
ofApalachicola.
Love,
Meme, Pope and Sissy


A erar


IrVinS to mark
30th we ding

Thomas and
Gina Irvin, of La-
nark Village, will
celebrate their
30th wedding an-
niversary on Sun-
day, Nov. 1.
The couple
was married Nov.
1, 1979 in Thom-
asville, Ga.










Obituaries


First Pentecostal Holiness Church
379 Brownsville Road Apalachicola


Sunday School 9:45 am
Sunday Morning Worship 10:45 am
Sunday Evening Service 6:00 pm
Monday, Youth Group 6:30 pm
Wednesday, Royal Rangers, G.A.P. 7:00 pm
Wednesday Worship & Word 7:30 pm
Nursery Provided during regular church services


The United Methodist Churches

SOf Franklin County Welcome You

First United Methodist Church of Apalachicola
Worship Service 11:00 a.m. every Sunday
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
75 5" St. Apalachicola 653-9530 fumcapalach@gtcom.net
Pastor: Rev. Them Patriotis
Carrabelle United Methodist Church
Worship Servi etse10:45 a m. S nda School 9:30 a.m.

Healing service first Tuesday each month-7 p.m.
102 NE Ae. B Calabell n6s97-3672

Eastpoint United Methodist Church
Worship Service 10:00 a.m. every Sunday
Prayer 9:15 a.m. Waffles & Wisdom 11:15 a.m.
Healing Service every first Fridays of the Month at 6:30 p.m.
317 Patton Dr. (corner of David St.) -670-8825
Pastor: Rev. Beth White
St. George Island United Methodist Church
9:00 a.m. Worship Service
10:00 a.m. Fellowship Hour
201 E. Gulf Beach Dr. 927- 4635 www.sgiumc.org
Pastor: Rev. Them Patriotis


1-~',~T 1 j;L





d ekSibr 'u~ we 7:oo P~M

:l~c 1N ; tho c AM \

:1/1! l~ "ll v C1B Co r 77:
wwwlvcnemnsre~o


St. Patrick Catholic Church
Ave C & Sixth Street in Apalachicola, FL 32329 or
The Islander (Across from the Blue Parrot)
on St. George Island, FL 32328
(850) 653-9453 Email: stpatcathefairpoint. net
PASTOR: FATHER ROGER LATOSYNSKI
www. stpatricksmass. com
APALACHICOLA MASS SCHEDULE
SATURDAY 5............... PM
SUNDAY ................. ................... 10 AM
ST. GEORGE ISLAND MASS SCHEDULE
SUNDAY ............................ .........83AM


IV


Thursday, October 29, 2009


Local


The Times | B3


Born in Mathews Coun-
ty, Virginia on Dec, 23, 1923,
son of Eugene Frederick
Barnes, Jr. and Madeline
Elliot Barnes, Robert W.
"Bob" Barnes attended *
Christ Church School in
Christ Church, Virginia.
He proudly served in
the army in World War II BAI
in the South Pacific. He
returned home to complete
his undergraduate degree at VPI,
now known as Virginia Tech. He
continued his education at Columbia
University in New York City.
He worked for the United States
Bureau of Mines in Pittsburgh, Pa.
and used this experience to set up
his own company, Safety Develop-
ment Co. The company concen-
trated on fire protection and created
many forms of fire safety, including
extinguishing fires with foam.
Walter Kidde & Co, of Bellville,
New Jersey bought out his company
and Bob moved with his family to
New Jersey.. He continued to work
for Walter Kidde until his retirement
.He concluded his career in fire pro-
tection, working as a consultant to
many firms in New Jersey, Pennsyl-
vania, and Florida.
Bob was an active spelunker
in his younger days. He explored



Paul Dennis Tillman, 83, of Ft.
Gaines, Ga., died on Thursday, Oct. 22,
2009 at Ft. Gaines Health Care.
Graveside services were held on
Monday afternoon, Oct. 26 in New
Park Cemetery in Ft. Gaines with the
Rev. Randy Stokes officiating.
Mr. Tillman was born Sept. 7, 1926
in Plant City, son of the late James
Tillman and Neva English Tillman,


Robert W. Barnes
Mammoth Caves in Ken-
tucky and is credited with
the discovery of several
rooms.
Bob retired to Apala-
chicola about 15 years
ago. He felt Apalachicola
reminded him of his child-
hood home, in Mathews,
RNIES Va. with the sea, oysters
and sea birds. For many
years you could see his
sailboat, "Serenity" docked at the
marina .His whole life he was an
avid sailor and was happiest when
he was sailing or near the sea. He
was a volunteer captain on the
Governor Stone and served as an
auxiliary Coast Guard member for
several years.
Bob was a member of Trinity
Episcopal Church and a faithful lay
reader for many years. He could
always be counted on when asked
to help out. Bob had many interests.
Friends and family continue to enjoy
his beautifully made American Colo-
nial furniture. His love of woodwork-
ing afforded him the opportunity to
do remodeling in some of the kitch-
ens in our community with his ex-
cellent craftsmanship, cabinetwork
and furniture making skills.
He loved to see things grow and
always had a garden in his backyard

POUl TilmOn
He was a lifelong supervisor of the
Phosphate Industries. He was a World
War II veteran of the U.S. Navy and a
member of Mt. Gilead Baptist Church.
He was preceded in death by his
wife, Marilyn Gay Tillman; one broth-
er and two sisters.
Survivors include a son, Dan Till-
man (Linda) of Brandon; two daugh-
ters, Shayla Nail (Delton) of Stuart,


with vegetables and herbs to share.
He enjoyed painting seascapes and
other natural scenes.
He worked hard during the last
election to get President Obama
elected, and many of our friends
and neighbors will remember him
campaigning and his delight when
The Times placed a picture on the
front page of Bob and his wife wear-
ing Obama tee-shirts at one of the
local meetings. Bob received thanks
and recognition from both President
Obama and Vice President Biden
for his efforts and was appointed a
member of the President's Honor-
ary Kitchen Cabinet, an historical
group of unofficial advisors to the
head of government since the times
of President Andrew Jackson.
Bob fought and won a year long
battle with cancer, but after all of
the extensive chemotherapy and
radiation treatments, his heart gave
out Sunday, Oct 18 while he was
snuggled in his bed at home watch-
ing a football game.
Bob was loved by many and will
be sorely missed. Surviving him
are his wife Peggy, three sons, two
daughters, nine grandchildren and
four great-granddaughters.
Memorial services will be held at
Trinity Episcopal Church on Sunday,
Nov. 1 at 4 p.m.



and Gail Lolly (Jerry) of Eastpoint;
six grandchildren, Jamie Nail of Stu-
art, Brian Nail of Scotland, Mathew
Tillman of Brandon, David Finney of
Midway, Ga., April Vogel of Gibsonton
and Michael Loker of Canada; four
great-grandchildren; and a number of
nieces and nephews.
Lunsford Ekneral Home was in
charge of arrangements.



Church BRIEFS


Eastpoint Church of God
hosts fall festival
The Eastpoint Church of God will
host its fall festival this Saturday,
Oct. 31 from 6 to 8 p.m.
There will be free food, games and
prizes, new activities, candy, age-ap-
propriate haunted house, music and
much more!
Immediately following the festi-
val, there will be a free concert fea-
turing "Julian Drive!" Festival is for
youth and young at heart. Concert
will begin promptly at 8 p.m.
For more info, call 670-8704

Methodist church to hold

pancake breakfast Nov. 7
The First United Methodist
Church of Apalachicola will be serv-
ing n ancake breafs on Stnurda
the Florida Seafood Festival.
Doors will open at 7 a.m. The
meal will include pancakes, country
sausage, coffee, juice or milk for $6
for adults and children $3.
The church is located on US 98 at
5th Street, across from Marks Insur-
ance Agency. Tickets may be pur-
chased from church members, or at
the door.
For more information, call the
church office at 653-9530.


Kindly elves needed to make
Christmas special
The Franklin County Children's
Toy Project is a newly formed co-
alition of Apalachicola city govern-
ment, county health department,
sheriff 's office, schools, churches;
Emergency Medical Services and
the volunteer fire departments. The
group is collecting toys, clothing and
shoes for deserving children. Cash
donations are also welcome.
Donation boxes are located at lo-
cal businesses around the county.
Applications for aid are available at
schools, churches, health depart-
ment, sheriff 's office and City Hall.
Deadline to place an application is
Dec. 4.
For more information call 370-0970
or 653-9550. Distribution will take place
Dec. 17 and 18. This year toys will dis-
tributed at the Armory in Apalachic-
ola, the Eastpoint Fire Department
and Carrabelle EMS offices.


Mr. Alsey El (Al) Aston,
83, of Port St. Joe and for-
merly of Eastpoint, entered
his heavenly home Satur-
day, Oct. 10, 2009 at The
Bridge at Bay St. Joe in
Port St. Joe.
He was born on October
13, 1925 in Slick, Okla. He
was in Special Services
during World War II. After
21 years of service with
Western Greyhound, he
and Farris retired to live
in northwest Arkansas,
where Al enjoyed hunting
and fishing.
Later they moved to
Eastpoint where Al found
a new hobby of woodwork-
ing, until limited by health
issues, and enjoyed helping
others. He was a member
of the First Presbyterian
Church in Port St. Joe,
Greyhound Retirees Club
and a former member of
the Eastpoint Lions Club
and the Eastpoint Volun-
teer Fire Department.
Al was preceded in
death by his parents James
and Edna Aston; brother,
James Aston; sisters,
Elizabeth Davis and Mable
Shamas and a daughter
Mary Ferguson.
He is survived by his
loving wife of 37 years, Far-
ris Aston, of Port St. Joe
son: James R. Aston and
his wife, Joan and family of
K~lamath Falls, Ore.; four
daughters: Eve Toedtli and

THE
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
WELCOMES YOU


her husband, Howard and
family of Commerce City,
Colo., Sharon Contreras
and family of Stockton,
Calif, Theresa Aston and
family of Jackson, Calif.,
and Linda Hert and family
of Guerneville, Calif.; step-
daughter: Janice Mason
and her husband, Steve
and family of Antioch, Ca-
lif.; stepson Bill Carter and
his wife, Dianne and family
of Panama City; sister: Ev-
elyn Ballard and family of
Ardmore, Okla.; 16 grand-
children; 12 great-grand-
children; as well as numer-
ous nieces and nephews:
A memorial services
will be held Sunday, Nov. 1
at 3 p.m. EST at The First
Presbyterian Church in
Port St. Joe, located at 508
16th Street with Rever-
ends Ruth Hempel, Reid
Cameron and Joe Eckstine
officiating.
A special thanks to
Covenant Hospice and the
staff at The Bridge at Bay
St. Joe for making his final
time on Earth as comfort-
able as possible. In lieu of
flowers the family requests
donations be made to First
Presbyterian Church,
508 16th St., Port St. Joe,
FL 32456, or to Covenant
Hospice, 107 West 19th St.,
Panama City, FI 32405.
Arrangements by Peavy
General Home, Blount-
stown.


THE
EPISCOPAL
CHURCH


Boo! Have a safe and
fun Halloween. When you
get back from the parties,
don't forget to move your
clock back one hour.
Check the batteries in
your smoke alarm while
you're at it, too.
Next weekend, Nov. LANIA
6 and 7, is the Florida Jim
Seafood Festival
in Battery Park in
Apalachicola. Lots of food, crafts,
rides, music, and fun, fun, fun!
The parade will be on Saturday,
step off at 10 a.m. Get out there
and enjoy yourself.
Keep Saturday, Dec. 5 open;
there will be a variety show at
Chillas Hall in Lanark Village for
local talent. More on this later.
A big thank-you, and a round
of applause, for the folks who
voutn r their time at the ofod
building adjacent to the United
Methodist Church, entrance from
Tallahassee Street. Stop by and
say, hey! Donations are greatly
appreciated. You also see the
volunteers at Thursday lunch at
the Senior Center. They arrive


after noon, after they close
the pantry.
We also need to
thank and applaud the
volunteers at the Senior
Center, who work the
Thursday breakfast and
Thursday lunch. They
RK NEWS could use your help in the
WVelsh kitchen on Tuesdays and
Thursday. Donations
greatly appreciated.
Oh, all your folks who walk
your pets in the village. The sign,
which has our pet ordinance
posted on it, says all pets will be
on a leash, and you will carry a
plastic or paper bag, and paper
towels, to clean up after your pet.
Let's pay attention out there! It's
not cricket to walk your pet from
your yard over to your neighbor's
yard to do their doody, and
especially when you don't clean

Be kind to one another, check
in on the sick and housebound,
and don't forget: Volunteers Make
It Happen, Become One Today!
Until next time, God Bless
America, our troops, the poor,
homeless, and hungry.


EST. 1836

Hwy. 98 & 6th St.
Apalachicola
SUNDAY: 8:00 AM 10:30 AM
LIBRARY HOURS:
SUNDAY 12:00 2:00 PM
MONDAY 11:00 AM 1:00 PM
WEDNESDAY 12:00 2:00 PM
THURSDAY 3:30 5:30 PM


Free computer classes contin-
ue at the Franklin County Public
Library, Eastpoint. On Thursday,
Oct. 29, at 9 a.m., instructor Deana
Ramsey of the Wilderness Coast
Public Library will teach Microsoft
Word 1. Participants will learn to
create, edit, save and print docu-
ments in Microsoft Word.
At 1 p.m. that same day Deanna
will offer Microsoft Excel 1. Partici-
pants will learn how to create a cus-
tom worksheet and understand how
to be more proficient using features
such as: Auto Correct/Auto Fill, Cus-
tom List and Keyboard Shortcuts.
November will bring even more
free computer classes to both the
Eastpoint Library and the Carra-
belle Branch.
Call 670-8151 in Eastpoint or 697-
2366 in Carrabelle to register or re-
ceive more information.
Yeah! Our winter volunteers have
returned to the library. They, along
with our year-round volunteers, in-
crease the number of library indi-
viduals available to assist patrons
with book selections, office duties,


and computer help.
On Tuesday Dr. Lois Catlin and
Rita Culbertson volunteer, Wednes-
day you will see Hannah Boatwright
or Jackie Bell. Thursday Denise
Williams and Ruth Stanton can as-
sist you, and on Fridays Donna But-
terfield and Adele Colston can check
out books and hand out computer
guest passes.
That is not all they do, our library
volunteers serve as ambassadors to
good reading, offering suggestions
on best sellers and the classics.
For thrills and chills visit the
haunted children's library, Friday,
Oct. 29, from 5 to 7 p.m. A $1 dona-
tion allows you if you dare, the oppor-
tunity to walk through the haunted
book cemetery, visit the refrigerator
of a mad scientist, listen to haunting
tales and experience other scary
surprises. All monies collected ben-
efit children's book purchases.
For more information about the
programs mentioned in this article
or library questions in general,
phone 670-8151 in Eastpoint or 697-
2366 in Carrabelle.


Alsey P. Aston


Lanark NEWS


WELCOMES YOU
II Pch




101 NE First Street
Carrabelle
SUNDAY
10:00 AIM


Library H APP ENIN GS













































































Always Online| APALACHTIMES.COM


PUBLIC NOTICE

THE FRANKLIN COUNTY ADVISORY BOARD OF
ADJUSTMENT WILL HOLD A PUBLIC HEARING ON
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 2009, AT 9:00 A.M., IN THE
COUNTY COMMISSION MEETING ROOM OF THE
FRANKLIN COUNTY COURTHOUSE ANNEX TO CONSIDER
THE FOLLOWING VARIANCES, APPEALS AND SPECIAL
EXCEPTIONS:


1. CONSIDERATION OF A REQUEST FOR A VARIANCE
TO CONSTRUCT A RIP RAP REVETMENT WITHIN THE
CRITICAL HABITAT ZONE ON THE CARRABELLE RIVER
ON PROPERTY DESCRIBED AS LYING IN SECTION
18, TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH, RANGE 4 WEST, NORTH OF
CARRABELLE, FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA. REQUEST
SUBMITTED BY WADE BROWN, AGENT FOR TIMOTHY C.
AND ALICE CHRISTINA SAUNDERS, OWNERS.
2. CONSIDERATION OF A REQUEST FOR A VARIANCE TO
CONSTRUCT A PUBLIC REST ROOM 8 FEET BELOW THE 12
FT ELEVATION REQUIREMENT AS DETERMINED BY THE
FLOOD INSURANCE RATE MAPS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY,
ON PROPERTY DESCRIBED AS LOMBARDI BOAT RAMP
LYING IN SECTION 11, T9S, R8W, OWNED BY FRANKLIN
COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS.
REQUEST SUBMITTED BY ALAN PIERCE, DIRECTOR OF
ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES, AS AGENT.

THE BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS ACTING AS
THE BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT WILL CONSIDER THESE
RECOMMENDATIONS ON NOVEMBER 17, 2009.


*Persons wishing to comment may do so in person or in writing to the
Franklin County Planning and Zoning Department, 34 Forbes Street,
Suite 1, Apalachicola, Florida 32320. Transactions of this hearing will
110t be recorded, persons wishing to record the proceedings must make
the necessary arrangements for recording.


*After promotional period, standard rates for high-speed lnternetservice apply.0Offer availableto newcustomers only, fora limitedtime. FairPoint phone
service required. **FairPoint delivers a dedicated connection to your home from our central office. Speed and uninterrupted service are not guaran-
teed.Taxes and additional charges mayapply. Not all services available in all areas. Services subjectto change. 02009 FairPointCommunications, Inc.
All rights reserved. 674AT/5TAR


Thursday, October 29, 2009


Local


The following report is
provided by the Frankclin
County Sheriff's Offece.
Arrests are made by of-
~ficers from the following
city, county, and state
law enforcement ae-
cies: Apalachicola(AD,
Carrabelle (CPD), Florida
Highway Patrol (FHP>,
Franklin County Sheriff's
O~f~fee (FCSO), Florida
Fish and Wildlife Con-
servation Commission
(FWC), Florida Depart-
ment of Environmental
Protection (FDEP), Flori-


da Division of Insurance
Fraud (DIF) and Florida
Department of Agricul-
ture and Consumer Ser-
vices (FLDOACS).
All defendants are con-
sidered innocent until
proven guilty in a court
of law.
Oct. 20
Richard Sowell Jr., 36,
Apalachicola, withholding
child support (FCSO)
Preston Hurd, 32,
Apalachicola, failure to ap-
pear (FCSO)
Randy Brooks, 31,


Apalachicola, violation of
probation (FCSO)
Cody Harrell, 18, East-
point, battery and criminal
mischief (FCSO)
Oct. 21

laGary Capps,th5et Tala
motor vehicle (CPD)
Fredrick L. Cum-
mings, 41, Apalachicola,
two counts sale of a con-
trolled substance within
1,000 feet of a park (FCSO)
Harvey S. Barrack, 27,
Carrabelle, withholding
child support (FCSO)


Christopher Buzbee,
39, Apalachicola, dealing
in stolen property, theft of
copper wire, burglary of
a conveyance and grand
theft (APD)
William Switzer, 24,
Apalachicola, theft of cop-
per wire, burglary of a con-
v yance and grand th

Oct. 22
M/ax K. Kirkland, 46,
Georgia, driving while
license suspended or re-
voked and resisting arrest
without violence (CPD)


Allison C. Wray, 27,
Apalachicola, grand theft
(FCSO)
Jeramy Davis, 30,
Apalachicola, failure to ap-
pear (FCSO)
Shayla M/axwell, 29,
Port St. Joe, driving while
license suspended or re-
voked (FCSO)
Donald Dempsey, 28,
Carrabelle, dealing in sto-
len property and violation
of probation (CPD)
Danielle M/cCullough,
21, Carrabelle, dealing in
stolen property (CPD)


On Oct. 21 at approximatelylagquniyocperwe.
7:52 a.m, Apalachicola Police Of- Davis contacted the Dothan
ficer Timmy Davis responded to a Police Department and explained
call regarding stolen copper wire the situation to them. Dothan po-
from the Progress Energy substa- lice arrived and detained the two
tion and maintenance yard. men until Apalachicola police
On arrival Davis spoke with a could arrive to transport the sub-
Progress Energy employee who jects back to Franklin County.
said approximately 800 feel of cop- HITOER Apalachicola Police Officer An-
per wire belonging to the company BUZBEE thony Croom, Jr. transported Buz-
had been stolen. bee, of Apalachicola, and William
Davis began calling salvage Joseph Switzer, of Apalachicola, to
yards in and around Panama City the county jail and charged both
and Dothan, Alabama and in- men with theft of copper wire,
formed them to watch for a large dealing in stolen property, grand
quantity of copper attempting to theft of over $300 and burglary of
he sold. a conveyance.
At approximately 12:15 p.m. The stolen copper values at ap-
that same day, Davis received a WLIM proximately $3,000 and was recov-
call from Schnitzer Southeast in ered.
Dothan, who claimed that a man JOEH Chief Bobby Varnes and the
named Christopher Buzbee, with SWITZER Apalachicola Police Department
an Apalachicola address, together with wish to thank the officers of the Dothan
another white male in a light colored Police Department for their assistance in
truck, were there attempting to sell a this arrest.



Eastpoint man's truck over turns in Liberty County


2 0 inma te swith GE Ds






. .


A 24-year-old Eastpoint man escaped
serious injury Saturday morning when his
truck overturned in Liberty County.
According to a report preparer by
Florida Highway Patrol Trooper Ronny
Snipes. Chaseon Bruce Millender was
driving a 2006 Ford pick-up westbound on
Forest Road 123 when the accident hap-
pened about 5:15 a.m.
Millender was about two-tenths of a
mile west of County Road 379 when he
lost control of the truck and it began to ro-


tate in a counter-clockwise direction. The
truck traveled into the south shoulder and
overturned.
Both Millender and a passenger, Rob-
ert New, 35, of Bloomington, Ind., were
transported to Tallahassee Memorial
Hospital with minor injuries.
Snipes wrote that he believed the mis-
hap was alcohol related. Both men were
wearing their seatbelts.
Charges are pending completion of the
investigation.


SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Shown with the latest GED graduating class at FCI are teacher Melonie Inzetta
and teacher's aide Joyce Isetts.


Franklin Correctional Institution re-
cently held graduation ceremonies for
20 inmates who successfully completed
the GED program and received their
high school diplomas.
The program is overseen by the pris-
on's education department and teacher
Melonie Inzetta and teacher's aide
Joyce Isetts.
During the last two years, 112 inmates
received their high school diplomas, and
140 inmates completed the Vocational
Plumbing Program at Franklin Correc-
tional (FCI) and received their plumb-
ing certificates. The plumbing program
is supervised by Dewey Smith,
These programs are part of the Flor-
ida Department of Corrections' ongo-


ing re-entry initiative to reduce inmate
recidivism rates. Statistics have shown
that inmates who receive their GED
while in prison are 7.9 percent less likely
to return to prison. Inmates who receive
a vocational certificate, such as the
plumbing certificate offered at FCI, are
14 percent less likely return to prison.
"FCI administration and staff are
committed to the re-entry initiative as
we know it helps make our communities
safer," said Ricky Cloud, assistant war-
den of programs at FCI.
If you would like more information
about the programs at Franklin Correc-
tional or would like to visit a program,
please contact Office of Public Affairs at
850-488-0420.


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B4 | The Times


Sheriff's REPORT


Oct. 23
Carlos A. M/orris, 28,
Tallahassee, arrested on
Leon County Warrant
(FCSO)
Oct. 24
Alexis Ramirez, 20,
Apalachicola, disorderly
intoxication and indecent
exposure (APD)
Jaime Godinez, 23,
Apalachicola, battery on
a law enforcement officer,
resisting arrest with vio-
lence and disorderly intox-
ication (APD)


Apolachicolo cop noils copper wire crooks Franklin Correctional graduates





Paggg _
communications
www.FairPoint.com





Toll F~ree: (888) 831-6754
Franklin County: (850) 670-5555
Leon County: (850) 926-9602






Helping Hands Make
The Difference


J


2009-2010 Gold Card Officers and Committee Members
Sissy Godwin, President
Valerie Clayton, Secretary-Treasurer
Selena Baumgardner
Sabrina Burke
Catherine Godwin
Jennie Lake

If you would like to contribute to the Gulf County Gold Card and help
to award academic excellence, please mail checks to:


Gulf County Gold Card Club
P.O. Box 1051
Port St. Joe, Florida 32457


Thursday, October 29, 2009


Local


The Star | B5


Roux introduced Mount-
Douds to members of
Apalachicola's prominent
families, and Sizemore made
available the library's photo-
graphic collections.
After a year of collect-
ing and cataloguing photo-
graphs, Mount-Douds orga-
nized her book into seven
sections.
Chapters are devoted
to people, industry, recre-
ation, celebrations, the his-
toric Chapman High School,
homes and landmarks.
Regular attendees of the
FloridaSeafoodlkstivalmight
be surprised to learn that the
event began as a Mardi Gras
festival around 1915.
The book's 1916 cover
shot depicts a sharply
dressed Homer Oliver driv-
ing Mardi Gras queen Gen-
evieve Pierce and maid of
honor Dorothy Sawyer in a
1915 Buick.
The festival evolved into
the Harbor Day festival in the
1960s, then the Apalachicola
Seafood Festival in thel1970s,
and now the Florida Seafood
Festival,
The seafood industry is
well depicted in the book,
with images of the Standard
Fish and Oyster Company,
Taranto's Seafood and the
C.H. Lind Oyster and Fish
House.
No book on Apalachicola
is complete without its fa-
mous export, the oyster.
The book showcases the
seafood festival's first oys-
ter-shucking champion, Zora
Lee Alford (50 oysters in 2
minutes, 48 seconds), and
Edward Philyaw, slurping a
raw one down at age 5.
Other images depict
Apalachicola's once promi-
nent sponge industry, steam-
boats sailing the Apalachicola
River and the Coombs Lum-
ber Company, one of the most
successful sawmills of its day.
Sprinkled among promi-
nenthistorical figures, such as
botanist Dr. Alvan Wentworth
Chapman and ice machine
inventor Dr. John Gorrie, are
lesser known figures, such as
Barefield, a mixed-race wom-
an with an interesting past
Barefield's boyfriend,
lumberman Charles Dob-
son, built her a stately home
using the same blueprint as
the historic Coombs house.
Although the census de-
scribed Barefield as a board-
ing house owner, those in the
know note that she operated
"Minnie's Palace of Plea-
sures," a brothel.


Aove, beore tere
was ever a seafood
festival, Apalachicola
hosted a well-attended
Mardi Gras Festival,
portrayed here in
1916. At left, born
in Ireland in 1851,
Patrick Nedley was a
fisherman, sailor and
city policeman,


Above, no book on
Apalachicola would
becomp ete wit out
the city's most famous
export, the oyster.
1973 Miss Florida
Seafood Elizabeth
Zingarelli shows off the
tasty bivalve. At left,
"Apalachicola" is Beverly
Mount-Douds' third book.
She previously published
a photographic history of
Gulf County.

ing at her scribbles," she
said.
Although she has com-
pleted her book, Mount-
Douds said she is keeping
her folders open.
She hopes to begin work
on a photographic history
of Franklin County in five
years.
The project will allow her
to research some of her un-
answered questions, chiefly
the identity of an African-
American woman called
"Aunt Bell."
Mount-Douds found what
she described as a "classic"
photograph of Bell in Key's
collection. Lacking any fur-
ther information, she did
not include the image in her
book.
"The picture of her sitting
on that front porch with that
scalloped lacing around the
bonnet, it was so classic,"
said Mount-Douds. "It just
spoke to me: 'Find my story;
find out about me."'
Just give her five years.


-1-- ~Hosted by: r~


GtitLF COrN TYr RE PULIG CAN PARTY

- Tar nL Join the Republican Party of
Florida's 2nd Amendment Chairman
~S~C~for the state of Florida. Bill Bunting
and your Gulf County neighbors
as we take part in one of our basic
civil rights. self defense and the
right to bear arms. This is the first
step to getting your concealed weapons permit to carry in
approximately 32 states. The rest of the paperwork and criteria
will be given to you in the class.

Date: Saturday November 14th, 2009
Time: 9:00 am 3:00 pm EST (8:30 reg istration)
Classroom training: 1151 Industrial Road, Port St Joe
(GAC Contractors meeting room)
Range Time: Gulf Rifle Club on Hwy 71 in Port Saint Joe
Cost: $65


In a poetic twist of fate,
the brothel later became a
convent for nuns with the
Holy Family School. It was
purchased and relocated to
11 mile by Eldon and Ruth
Schoelles in the l970s.
Mount-Douds most en-
joyed researching the lives
of former Apalachicola resi-
dents, such as Gibson, who
operated the Gibson Inn with
her sister, Annie, and "had
more clothes and outfits"
than anyone Mount-Douds
has ever seen.
In sorting through Key's
collection of writings in the
Apalachicola library, Mount-
Douds felt a kinship with the
former author and wife of
novelist Alexander Key.
"She loved genealogy; she
loved history; and she loved
collecting it, compiling it and
sharing it with the world,"
said Mount-Douds, who
gleaned many little-known
facts by reading Key's mar-
ginal notes.
"You learn so much look-


," The Gulf County Gold Card Club "'

Says,




As a result of your generous contributions, some $2000.00 will be
distributed to Gulf County students in the form of semester academic
incentive checks (grades 3-12) and scholarships to 2010 graduating
seniors. Thank you for supporting the students of Gulf County!

2009-2010 Soonsors


Bay side Savings Bank
Bell Foundation Company
Bo Knows Pest Control, Inc.
Boyd and Paula Pickett
Captain's Cove/Danny Raffield
Chuck and Sue Gannon
Clayton Concrete, Inc.
David and Marjorie May
Frank D. May, DMD
Emerald Coast Federal Credit Union
Gaskin-Grady Ins. Agency, Inc.
Gulf Coast Electric Cooperative, Inc.
Hannon Insurance Agency


John and Linda Wright
Mike and Becky Lacour
Mize Plumbing and Services & Supply, Inc
Norman and Ellen Allemore
St. Joe Rent-All/Nursey Supply
St. Joseph's Bay Country Club
Scott' s Quality Electric
Stephen Shoaf
Steve and Becky Norris
Troy and Chris Williams
Vision Bank
Whitfield Timber Co.


PICTURES from page B1





SB The Times Thursday, October 29, 2009


Franklin County's source of news for more than a century


I soo |
DEGREES 25 MINUTES 58
SECONDS WEST 27.71
FEET THENCE LEAVING
SAID MEAN HIGH WATER
LINE RUN SOUTH 00
DEGREES 42 MINUTES 42
SECONDS WEST 10.82
FEET TO A 6 INCH PIPE
FILLED WITH CONCRETE,
THENCE RUN SOUTH 00
DEGREES 13 MINUTES 10
SECONDS WEST 231.24
FEET TO A CONCRETE
MONUMENT THENCE
RUN SOUTH 01
DEGREES 35 MINUTES 23
SECONDS WEST 156.63
FEET TO A CONCRETE
MONUMENT LYING ON
THE NORTHERLY
RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUND-
ARY OF HARBOR CIRCLE,
THENCE RUN SOUTH 78
DEGREES 01 MINUTES 31
SECONDS EAST ALONG
SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY
BOUNDARY 153.28 FEET
TO A CONCRETE MONU-
MENT (MARKED #2244)
LYING ON THE EASTERLY
RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUND-
ARY OF SAID HARBOR
CIRCLE, THENCE RUN
SOUTH 00 DEGREES 00
MINUTES 54 SECONDS
WEST ALONG SAID
RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUND-
ARY 692.38 FEET TO A
RE-ROD (MARKED #7160)
LYING ON THE INTER-
SECTION OF THE EAST-
ERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY
BOUNDARY OF HARBOR
CIRCLE WITH THE
NORTHWESTER LY
RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUND-
ARY OF STATE ROAD NO
370 SAID POINT ALSO LY-
ING ON A CURVE CON-
CAVE TO THE NORTH-
WESTERLY, THENCE
RUIN NORTHEASTERLY
ALONG THE
NORTHWESTER LY
RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUND-
ARY OF SAID STATE
ROAD NO: 370 AND SAID
CURVE HAVING A RA-
DIUS OF 1096.28 FEET
THROUGH A CENTRAL
ANGLE OF 16 DEGREES
01 MINUTES 34 SEC-
ONDS FOR AN ARC DIS-
TANCE OF 306.64 FEET
CHORD BEING NORTH 76
DEGREES 53 MINUTES 29
SECONDS EAST 305.64
FEET TO A RE-ROD
(MARKED #7160),
THENCE RUN NORTH 68
DEGREES 52 MINUTES 42
SECONDS EAST ALONG
SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY
BOUNDARY 523.58 FEET
TO A CONCRETE MONU-
MENT (MARKED #2244),
THENCE LEAVING SAID
RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUND-
ARY RUN NORTH 08 DE-
GREES 32 MINUTES 14
SECONDS WEST 105.11
FEET TO THE POINT OF
BEGINNING.

LESS AND EXCEPT:

COMMENCE AT THE
SOUTHEAST CORNER OF
LOT 5, BLOCK "H" OF AL-

GA UDHVASO TASUPNE
MAP OR PLAT THEREOF
RECORDED IN PLAT

A KK INPRAEGCEO7RCOSF



EGAKLN E 51MOURTTEHS
CLONDSH ECST 13
NORTH 77 DEGREES 55
MINUTES 30 SECONDS

WHEENTCE 4UNONORT FE8T
DEGREES 03 MINUTES 30
SECONDS WEST 168.00

NOERH OTOHDNEGREESRU0N
MINUTES 50 SECONDS
WEST 114.67 FEET





NUTHESO72E ENN NR 8
SEAST 37.4 EET TO 0

FETTHENCE RUNNOT-
EATRYNORTHW0 EREST 0
ERLYE AND SEOUTH-
WESTEL ALONG7 SAID
APPCEROXIAT MEANH






DEG EES S01 MNHUTES 2
SECONDS WEST 24.19
FEET THNORT 67
NOT DEGREES 46MNTE 9

GREES 52 MINUTES 28
SECNS 148 WEST 4874

O EGEES N90 NHUTES
FETNORTH 42 DGE 1
DEGREES 58 MICNUTS39
FEET NORTH9 23 E- T
GREES 59MOINUTES 1

FHENE T NORTH 83

FEASET NORTH 60
MGREE ADSS5WOUT -


FEURET NORTH 69 E-


REET NOTDH2 N EENUL


RD EED SSUMHTU 4


FEET THENCE RUN
SOUTH 00 DEGREES 13
MINUTES 10 SECONDS
WEST 231.24 FEET
THENCE RUN SOUTH 01
DEGREES 35 MINUTES 23
SECONDS WEST 156.63
FEET TO A POINT LYING
ON THE NORTHEAST-
ERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY
BOUCNDARYHO HEAR N
SOUTH 78 DEGREES 01
MINUTES 31 SECONDS


| zoo |
AGREEMENT SERIES
ITF INDX 2005-AR11, Is the
Plaintiff and JUDITH S.
WHALEY THE UNKNOWN
SPOUSE OF JUDITH S.
WHALEY N/K/A R. MI-
CHAEL WHALEY: ST
GEORGE PLANTATION
OWNERS' ASSOCIATION,
INC., F/K/A ST GEORGE
ISLAND HOMEOWNERS'
ASSOCIATION, INC.; TEN-
ANT #1 N/K/A MICHAEL
WHALEY: TENANT #2
N/K/A LORETTA WHALEY:
are the Defendants, I will
sell to the highest and best
bidder for cash at FRONT
DOOR OF THE FRANKLIN
COUNTY COURTHOUSE,
33 MARKET STREET
APLACHICOLA, FLORIDA
at 11:00AM, on the 17th
day of November, 2009,
the following described
property as set forth In
said Final Judgment:

WEST OF LOT 4 AND ALL
OF LOT 5, IN BLOCK 14
WEST OF ST GEORGE
ISLAND BEACHES UNIT
NO. 1, ACCORDING TO
THE PLAT THEREOF, AS
RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK 2, AT PAGE 7, OF
THE PUBLIC RECORDS
OF FRANKLIN COUNTY
FLORIDA.

A/K/A 1324 WEST
BAYSHORE STREET, ST
GEORGE ISLAND, FL
32328

Any person claiming an In-
terest In the surplus from
the sale, If any, other than
the property owner as of
the date of the Lls Pend-
ens must file a claim within
sixty (60) days after the
sale.

WITNESS MY HAND and
the seal of this Court on
October 2, 2009.

Marcla M. Johnson
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Michele Maxwell
Deputy Clerk

Florida Default Law Group,
PL.
PO. Box 25018
Tampa, Florida
33622-5018
FO7027406
October 29, Novemebr 5,
2009
4526T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE SECOND JUDI-
CIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY
FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION

WELLS FARGO BANK, NA
Plaintiff, '

vs

DALE C. ANDERSON, et

Defendant(s).

CASE NO.-
19208 CA-000245


NOTICE OF

DOELSU D SALE


NTCE ISt HSEReEBoY


berC29e 2009 ad20e~nter d
000245 of the Circuit Court
of the SECOND Judicial
Circuit In and for FFrANd
wherein WELLS FARGO
BANK, NA, Is the Plaintiff
and DALE C. ANDERSON:
WVETGENOARGANDPELRASNO
TION OWNERS' ASSOCIA
TION, INC.; are the De-




fedhae s 11 mbd sclt bhe
property as bset forth in r
cs aid Final Jdgment
LTH 38, PELICN BEACH

COHETREOF EOARTDE, 33
12OFTH PUBICREC-
OR TY IOLAFOR NLOIN



A/K/ 2032 PELICAN BEC



GED WIESSLANDSAINT


32328


Aes In th u ps ha m


t dae of thoewLl Pn
ens mu~s file a clai wit i

sale.

WITNESS MY HAND and
the seal of this Court on
October5,2009.

Marcla M. Johnson
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Michele Maxwell
Deputy Clerk

Florida Default Law Group,
PL.
PO. Box 25018
Tampa, Florida
33622-5018
FO8032878
October 29, Novemebr 5,
2009
4527T

OF THHE RECC NDC JD
CIAL CIRCUIT IN AND

VORI AANKLIN COUNTY


zzoo |
Judgment of Mortgage
Foreclosure dated Sep-
tember 30, 2009 and en-
tered In Case No.
2007-150-CA of the Circuit
Court of the SECOND Ju-
dlclal Circuit In and for
FRANKLIN County, Florida
wherein WELLS FARGO
BANK, N.A., Is the Plaintiff
and STEVEN L.
FURGERSON: TERESA L.
FURGERSON: ANY AND
ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES
CLAIMING BYTHROUGH,
UNDER, AND AGAINST
THE HEREIN NAMED IN-
DIVIDUAL DEFENDANTS)
WHO ARE NOT KNOWN
TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE,
WHETHER SAID UN-
KNOWN PARTIES MAY
CLAIM AN INTEREST AS
SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVI-
SEES, GRANTEES, OR
OTHER CLAIMANTS:
WELLS FARGO BANK,
N.A.; are the Defendants, I
will sell to the highest and
best bidder for cash at
FRONT DOOR OF THE
FRANKLIN COUNTY
COURTHOUSE, 33 MAR-
KET STREET
APLACHICOLA, FLORIDA
at 11:00AM, on the 24th
day of November, 2009,
the following described
property as set forth In
said Final Judgment:

LOT 8, BLOCK I, ST
GEORGE ISLAND GULF
BEACHES, UNIT NO. 2, A
SUBDIVISION AS PER
MAP OR PLAT THEREOF
RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK 2, PAGE 15, OF
THE PUBLIC RECORDS
OF FRANKLIN COUNTY
FLORIDA.

A/K/A 956 GULF BEACH
DRIVE E, SAINT GEORGE
ISLAND, FL 32328

Any person claiming an In-
terest In the surplus from
the sale, If any, other than
the property owner as of
the date of the Lls Pend-
ens must file a claim within
sixty (60) days after the
sale.

WITNESS MY HAND and
the seal of this Court on
October 1, 2009.

Marcla M. Johnson
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Michele Maxwell
Deputy Clerk

Florida Default Law Group,
PL.
PO. Box 25018
Tampa, Florida
33622-5018
FO7011089
October 29, Novemebr 5,
2009
4528T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE SECOND JUDI-

AORLFR NTNCINUNAND
CIVIL ACTION

ablK OF AMERICA, N.A.,

vs.

AAE F HGRDOW TTRRUSS


U/AID MAYs)15, 2008, et al,

19-2009 CA-000534


NOTICE OF ACTION

TO:
THE UNKNOWN BENIFIC
IARIES OF THE DWG
TRUST, U/A/D, MAY 15,

LAT KNOWN ADDRESS:
UNKNOWN
CURRENT ADDRESS: UN-




KN D NOOR AIBE
WHETHER SAID UN- O
KONPARTIES MAIIN Y
SP1MSAN, HNTEDER -

LAGNSKTNKNOWNADRESS:
CURRENT ADRSS: UN- A
N KNOWN TOB

YNOUN ARENTIFED that


Count, Flrda:TES O



RREOMAPRECORNADRDEDL

OF FRNKLIN CON




ten defeonse wihi 30es a
dotays afte the firt uloica-
tlont fay, Fon Forda e-
falt La Gr Boup PL.,
PlIOntif attorneywhose A

FLake Drive, Sute 30
Tapa FlorKIda 33634Y,ad

ha enfiled thrgainalwth this
Cn out aeithrbefored sevie
onrv Painf attrny of or wr
terws defaults will e n- 3
tered agarth inst you fourth
pln Iay to pdelonnd the

NESlo ma hadup, and

Marlatf' M. Johnson wh



As Dpualtyf' Cleork o


Florida Default Law Group,
PL.
PO. Box25018
Tampa, Florida
33622-5018
FO90091478
October 29, November 5
2009

INTE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE SECOND JUDI-
CIAL CIRCUIT IN AND


| sto
TO EXCEED $506,500
CITY OF APALACHICOLA,
FLORIDA CAPITAL IM-
PROVEMENT REVENUE
BONDS AND BOND AN-
TICIPATION NOTES


tran.

REQUEST FOR RELEASE
OF FUNDS
On or about November 16,
2009, Franklin County will
submit a request to the
Florida Department of
Community Affairs for the
release of Community De-
velopment Block Grant
funds under Title I of the
Housing and Community
Development Act, as
amended, to undertake the
wastewater and potable
water system extension
project to serve Eastpoint
residents as described
above. Funding Includes
$700,000 In CDBG funds,
as well as additional funds
from the U. S. Department
of Agriculture. USDA funds
will also be used simulta-
neously for water and
wastewater Improvements
In other Eastpoint loca-
tians, which have under-
gone a separate environ-
mental review process.

FINDING OF NO SIGNIFI-
CANT IMPACT
Franklin County has deter-
mined that the project will
have no significant Impact
on the human environ-
ment. Therefore, an Envl-
ronmental Impact State-
ment under the National
Environmental Policy Act
of 1969 (NEPA) Is not re-
quired. Additional project
Information Is contained In
the Environmental Review
Record (ERR) on file at 34
Forbes Street, Apalachl-
cola, FL 32320 and may
be examined or copied
weekdays 8:30 a.m. to
noon and 1:00 to 4:30
p~m.

PUBLIC COMMENTS
Any Individual, group, or
agency may submit written
comments on the ERR to
the location stated above.
All comments must be re-
ceived by November 13,
2009. Comments will be
considered prior to Frank-
ln County requesting a re-
lease of funds. Comments
should specify which no-
tice (floodplain, finding of
no significant Impact, re-
lease of funds) they are
addressing.

RELEASE OF FUNDS
Franklin County certifies to
the Florida Department of
Community Affairs and
HUD that the Board of
County Commissioners
Chairman, In his official ca-
pacity, consents to accept
the jurisdiction of the Fed-
eral Courts If an action Is
brought to enforce respon-
slbllties In relation to the
environmental review proc-
ess and that these respon-
sebdlltle h atebseeanP st-
of the certification satisfes
Its responsiblities under

Nn~dPaut ortierse neddal ow
Franklin County to use the
CDBG funds.

OBJSECTIFOFNUSN TO RE-


oUDwill a celt ojc in

esdkll Conts loedatl c


eas acu(l rce rof thhtre
only If they are on one of
the following bases: (a) the
cet fcatotnhewas noting e

ficer of the local govern-
ment; (b) the local govern-

fied som d a a dcso
or finding required by HUD
regulations at 24 CFR part




5 ( th R rart 04nh en

Obhas ojsuttebdelunp re I
corredanc wth nth reuihred
procedure 24 CFR Part 5 e
58, Sec. 5876 and shall; o
be) addresed o h Flor-

mitda Department of Com-
muni tye Afarocs, CDBGPro-


tactor Markm Cure ntpontovr


ofevi onmental Cerltfying

Objctiobe2s20 ms pe


IN THuEs CIRUI COURT P



CuIVIL ACTaION CDGPo

TIONleAL TRUST COM- ,
PANYid AS9-0 TRU TEE N-
DERl obeTHE PhOOLN AoND






JUDITHS WAEYe a.


OtSSElONO.: 2007-8-A

INO CHEEDIRULED CO

FLORECOSRESAE



NOTVICEISG HEREBY N


GIVEN pursuant to an Or-
der Rescheduling Foreclo-
sure Sale dated Septem-
ber 29, 2009 and entered
In Case NO. 2007-286-CA
of the Circuit Court of the
SECOND Judicial Circuit
In and for FRANKLIN
County, Florida wherein
DEOUNTASLCHERUBSATNKCON
PANY AS TRUSTEE UN-
DER TRHEVPOOLINIG NANG


ORDER
CAUSE


TO SHOW


vs.

CLIFFORD WILLIAM
MILAM A/K/A CLIFFORD
MILAM, et al,
Defendant(s).

CASE NO.:
19 2008 CA000349
DIVISION

NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN pursuant to a Final
Judgment of Mortgage
Foreclosure dated Sep-
tember 30, 2009 and en-
tered In Case No. 19 2008
CA 000349 of the Circuit
Court of the SECOND Ju-
dlclal Circuit In and for
FRANKLIN County, Florida
wherein BANK OF AMER-
ICA, N.A., Is the Plaintiff
and CLIFFORD WILLIAM
MILAM A/K/A CLIFFORD
MILAM; are the Defend-
ants, I will sell to the high-
est and best bidder for
cash at FRONT DOOR OF
THE FRANKLIN COUNTY
COURTHOUSE, 33 MAR-
KET STREET, APLACHI
COLA, FLORIDA at
11:00AM, on the 24th day
of November, 2009, the
following described prop-
erty as set forth In said FI-
nal Judgment:

LOT 51 OF TREASURE
BEACH VILLAGE, AC-
CORDING TO THE PLAT
THEREOF AS RECORDED
IN LAT BOOK 5, PAGE(S)
25, OF THE PUBLIC REC-
ORDS OF FRANKLIN
COUNTY FLORIDA.

A/K/A 1860 LEISURE
LANE, SAINT GEORGE IS-
LAND, FL 32328

Any person claiming an In-
terest In the surplus from
the sale, If any, other than
the property owner as of
the date of the Lls Pend-
ens must file a claim within
sixty (60) days after the
sale.

WITNESS MY HAND and
the seal of this Court on
October 1, 2009.

Marcla M. Johnson
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Michele Maxwell
Deputy Clerk

Florida Default Law Group
PL.
PO. Box 25018
Tampa, Florida
33622-5018

Otb 299, Novemebr 5,
2009


O ITCE UNDER FICTI-
TIOUS NAME LAW PUR-
SUANT TO SECTION
86T5 09, FLORIDA STAT-






ad naer h n ct1siress
"George E. Weems Memo-
nial Hospital.
October 29, 2009

4547T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL

FRACNUNIN ACDU T
FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION





V.S. BAKNTOA S

UNNON BL SOU SE F


DERT NDAGAINSTN THE
HEREIN NME NDVI-

UA EFEN DANT(MS)WHO
ARENOTKNOWN TPO BE O
HAE DTHEORMSAIDAIUV

ANOWN ANTRTTE1 STAM
SPOUSESHERSUG, DEV-




TENANTS AINS POSES-
SRION NM IDV-
U DEFENDANTS) WH

ARE-NOTIC KOFN TO
FORECLSRE SALE UN
KNOTIC PRIES HEREY
GLIVEAN pursuant toanr-

daedS OcAtoerS 12209




Florida IN will N selto te
shhTZ d C bhtrbdste







mAent to-t: 08000C

LE-OTC 3,BOCK2 ET
FOF SGOSRGE ISLAND

TO THE PLA THEREOF
AS RECREIN PLATan toa r

BOedOKtbe 2,PGEs OF 9



OLOENLIN C OUNTY, Aplclo


Any person claiming an In-


Dated this 15th day of Oc-
tober, 2009.

Marcla M. Johnson
Clerk of the Circult Court
By: Michele Maxwell
Deputy Clerk

IN ACCORDANCE WITH
THE AMERICANS WITH
DISABILITIES ACT, per-
sons with disabilities need-
Ing a special accommoda-
tion should contact
COURT ADMINISTRA-
TION, at the FRANKLIN
County Courthouse at
9 04 -6 53 -8 8 61 ,
1-800-955-8771 (TDD) or
1-800-955-8770, via Florida
Relay Service.

LAW OFFICES OF DAVID
J. STERN, PA.
900 SOUTH PINE ISLAND
ROAD, SUITE 400
PLANTATION, FL
33324-3920
(954)233-8000
October 29, November 5,
2009



4549T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE SECOND JUDI-
CIAL CIRCUIT OF FLOR-
IDA IN AND FOR FRANK-
LIN COUNTY

SUNTRUST BANK, SUC-
CESOR BY MERGER TO
SUN BANK/SOUTH FLOR-
IDA, NATIONAL ASSOCIA-
TION, Plaintiff

vs.

WISDOM MINISTRIES:
NASIR K. SADDIKl; UN-
KNOWN SPOUSE OF
NASIR K. SADDIKl; SUN-
SET BEACH OWNERS,
ASSOCIATION, INC.
SUNTRUST BANK.
UNKNWON TENANT #1.
UNKNOWN TENANT#2
Defendants.

CASENO.08000425CA

NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN pursuant to a Final
Judgment of Foreclosure
dated April 27, 2009 and
entered In Case No.
08000425CA, of the Circuit
Court of the Second Judl-
clal Circuit In and for
FRANKLIN County, Flor-
Ida, wherein SUNTRUST
BANK SUCCESSOR BY
MERGER TO SUN
BN INSAOLU SFCLOR DA
Is a Plaintiff and WISDOM
MINISTRIES, NASIR K.

SPDO KS OF UNAKSNRWKN
SADDIKl; SUNSET BEACH
OWNERS' ASSOCIATION,

INNC SUNNTRTUESNTAANBANK;



are 2Uthe Dfolowants. t w



forth In said Final Judg-
ment, to wit.

LOT 34, SUNSET BEACH,
PHASE 2, A SUBDIVISION
AS PER MAP OR PLAT
THETREBOF RE60ARDEPDd
17 OF THE PUBLIC REC-
ORDS OF FRANKLIN
COUNTY FLORIDA





Manyrs claM.Jonso an I
AsterkofInthe ourtlsfo
By M chle, Maxwtell t
Ase Doeputy Clnerk as
t Dateds91tda of Oc- It edn

Int il accrance within the

dAe afe rsemsac e nda
tiona M t onopatcae nths
psClrocedin sheouldno

rs thantas tlehn edky

Dtedaou ths s5h ab6 -2lo1
P X AP hLAC


95S 877 vianc Florida


t eysforal a tiff da

Sulteedn 300 ld n
FortLuerdalnseen Florida

Telephone: (35)70-49-100
FOax (305 63-2329. I ern
Octobrer2, November 5, D



2ut 009






ScTATEr OF eme FLRD ,IN



COUNTRY SEODJ


CIVIL DIVISION

AMERI N HOME IMORT-
GAESRIIG, IN.
Plaintiff,





A/K/A ELGI SIZEMORE:
ANITA A.GI SIZEMORE: N-
UKNOWN SPOUSE OF


ANITA A. SIZEMORE: IF
LIVING, INCLUDING ANY
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
SAID DEFENDANTSS, IF
REMARRIED, AND IF DE-
CEASED, THE RESPEC-
TIVE UNKNOWN HEIRS,
DEVSEllS, CGRRADN ES
LIENORS, AND TRUS-


TEES. AND ALL OTHER


TO: THE STATE OF FLOR-
IDA, THROUGH THE
STATE ATTORNEY FOR
THE SECOND JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA,
AND TO THE SEVERAL
TAXPAYERS, PROPERTY
OWNERS, CITIZENS OF
THE CITY OF APALACHI-
COLA, FLORIDA, INCLUD-
ING NON-RESIDENTS
OWNING PROPERTY OR
SUBJECT TO TAXATION
THEREIN, AND ALL
OTHERS HAVING OR
CLAIMING ANY RIGHT, TI-
TLE OR INTEREST IN
PROPERTY TO BE AF-
FECTED BY THE ISSU-
ANCE OF THE CITY OF
APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA
CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT
REVENUE BONDS AND
BOND ANTICIPATION
NOTES HEREINAFTER
MORE PARTICULARLY
DESCRIBED, OR TO BE
AFFECTED IN ANY WAY
THEREBY:

The above cause coming
on to be heard upon the
Complaint this day filed
herein by the City of Apa-
lachicola, Florida, seeking
to determine the authority
of the City of Apalachicola,
Florida, to Issue Its not to
exceed $506,500 City of
Apalachicola, Florida Capl-
tal Improvement Revenue
Bonds (the "Bonds") and
not to exceed $506,500
City of Apalachicola, Flor-
Ida Capital Improvement
Revenue Bond Anticipation
Notes (the "Bond Anticipa-
tlon Notes"), a more par-
ticular description of such
obligations being con-
tained In the Complaint
filed In these proceedings,
to determine the legality of
the proceedings had and
taken In connection there-
with, and the legality of the
provisions, covenants and
agreements contained
therein and the revenues
pledged to the payment
thereof, and seeking a
judgment of this Court to
validate the proceedings
for said Bonds and Bond
Anticipation Notes, the rev-
enues pledged for the pay-
ment thereof, and said ob-
Ilgations when Issued pur-
suant thereto, and said
Complaint now having
been presented to this
Court, for entry of an Order
to Show Cause pursuant
to Chapter 75, Florida Stat-
utes, and the Court being
sulyadvised In the prem-

IT IS ORDERED AND AD-
oaGE thtrh gthhe that o
Attorney of the Second Ju-
dlclal Circuit of Florida,
a teh svera taxpyers




lahloa mgtoer cairn stnyld

poet sbecte af teda
afeted thereby, b and alohr


they are each hereby re-
q ired to appear and how

fore this Court on the 25th
day of November, 2009, at
415H nm ran te Chaemsbers
Hankinson at the Franklin
County Courthouse In the





Idwhy en sdehe praeu fs
t ompan sh uld eatp m
drated and confirmed as
thereing poraye id. Bn

ORDEREnD AND clAD-o
JUDGED tatd thi Bs Ordert

Second 75.06, Florid Stat-
ehen r Ir su purun
thredd.I Fanklie evnCunty


UNlbDGE to th bay s

Claty of Apaulachicaevl ud
non-esdeants cowningd
tloren thraeinad alohr


CityRE of Aplcioalo-
Uda or the taxabl property
eho naff c athe plsesdu
ancte of aide Bonrds and
Bod nicption N50,Ford tes o

tobeafeed inFanln aont
thereb, rth aldtya

suchE Bodsand Bon An-h
ticipcation No tes or of an
ment thxaereo, or ofte ro-
cweedns authortizing ofthe
issunc of splcloaid Bonds
andon-sd Anticipation

letion, beri and al they re


A cg tticm ex o ntthaesm tnoa t



chamer at Apalachicola, lr
Fhrankin Cou ntay Floprida
thise 26eth day of October


Honorntlable n James C.

Othrb obr 29, Nvembert 5,
2009odsad od n


| zzo |
EAST ALONG SAID
RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUND-
ARY 153.28 FEET
THENCE RUN SOUTH 00
DEGREES 00 MINUTES 54
SECONDS WEST ALONG
SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY
BOUNDARY 25.30 FEET
THENCE LEAVING SAID
RIGHT T -OF -WA Y
BOUNDARY RUN SOUTH
77 DEGREES 04 MINUTES
19 SECONDS EAST
139.89 FEET TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING.

Also Less and Except:

LOTS 7, 8, 9, 10, 11 AND
12, BLOCK "G", AND LOTS
6, 7, 8, 9, 10 AND 11,
BLOCK "H", OF ALLIGA-
TOR HARBOR, UNIT NO.
2, AS PER MAP OR PLAT
THEREOF AS RECORDED
IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE 7
OF THE PUBLIC REC-
ORDS OF FRANKLIN
COUrNT FLORIDA

Any person claiming an In-
terest In the surplus from
the sale, If any, other than
the property owner as of
the date of the Lls Pend-
ens must file a claim within
sixty (60) days after the
sale.

WITNESS MY HAND and
the seal of this Court on
October 8, 2009.

Marcla Johnson
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Michele Maxwell
Deputy Clerk
October 29, November 5,
2009
4506T
CONCURRENT NOTICE
NOTICE AND PUBLIC
EXPLANATION OF A
PROPOSED ACTIVITY IN
THE 100-YEAR
FLOODPLAIN AND
WETLAND, NOTICE OF
FINDING OF NO
SIGNIFICANT IMPACT
AND NOTICE OF INTENT
TO REQUEST RELEASE
OF FUNDS

Date of Notice.
October 29, 2009
Name of Responsible En-
tity t Franklin Count Board
of County Crnmissio sd-

St eete Aalach41colacarb
32320
Telephone Number.
850-653-9783 attn: Mark
Curenton

To: All Interested A en-
cles, Groups and lndlvid-
uals

These notices shall satisfy
three s karate but related
proceed ral requirements
for activities to be under-
taken by the Franklin
ssnt Bads of County

The Franklin County Board
ofCcou rCtommissionerse
Eastpoint Water and
Sewer District, Intends to

fuded da am Flrd m


cpet nlc Ga t

dw rr cllC ctonR a ds po

provide service connec-
tions to eligible house-
hlse toe serve nbyc t
struct a wastewater vac-
uum station near 5th Street
In Eastpoint.

Existing septic tanks and
wells are falling In the serv-
Ice area, and the waste-




dae vakm u n ca eo t
muthe projctThre ise t here-

cee d withteork olm. Al
Isug actiitml ctavnet o


lingeexesn and sea rvie
conne cton trctonstrucio I
loat~e conf ted tow exsa
currvently cleared resdn-


Overtae I alny there area d
bno d efitaf mh rsoea
dh rinking wther. Falluhre to
proivecot ses ta o po
ture contamntno the wok
ground surface wil aters,
alndwllsand lmack of sut-
abe dirinkingae for th olw
service aeadn residents.
AdI eteniona agencies in-
volved ion this projct in-
clud the Florfindat Depat-
mlenrdrgt of Comuiy Af-
fairstl theed U.. epatent
ofa Hosings and Urb an De-

pnartmedlant of Agriclture
and possibly o the Flrida d
D epoarten of sEnvirotn-



uona r naC ts an d r s
rent a il ordncat 4ho H f

Se Io de there throe p
Inthe floodpmlailn and t
wtand wlls have a on the -


environment. The pro-
posed Improvements con-
form to applicable
floodplalinwetland protec-
tion standards. The pro-
posed action will not affect
natural or beneficial
floodplalinwetland values,
and residents ofthe com-

project. Applicable permits
thaa been rortowillo tr


izoo |
PERSONS CLAIMING BY
THROUGH, UNDER OR
AGAINST THE NAMED
DEFENDANTSS; UN-
KNOWN TENANT #1;
UNKNOWN TENANT #2;
Defendant(s)

CASE NO. 07-CA-424

NOTICE OF SALE

Notice Is hereby given
that, pursuant to a Final
Summary Judgment of
Foreclosure entered In the
above-styled cause, In the
Circuit Court of Franklin
County, Florida, I will sell
the property situate In
Franklin County, Florida,
described as:

A PARCEL OF LAND IN
SECTION 1. TOWNSHIP 9
SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST
WITHIN THE CORPORATE
LIMITS OF THE CITY OF
APALACHICOLA, COUNTY
OF FRANKLIN AND STATE
OF FLORIDA, DESCRIBED
AS FOLLOWS:

COMMENCE AT THE
POINT WHERE THE
SOUTH LINE OF SECTION
1, TOWNSHIP 9 SOUTH,
RANGE 8 WEST, INTER-
SECTS THE WESTERLY
SIDE OF BLOCK 115 OF
THE CITY OF APALACHI-
COLA, AND THENCE RUN
NORTHWESTER LY
ALONG THE WESTERLY
SIDE OF SAID BLOCK 115
TO THE SOUTHERLY
SIDE OF AVENUE F (OR
CHERRY STREET) OF
THE CITY OF APALACHI-
COLA, THENCE RUN
WESTERLY A DISTANCE
OF 95 FEET TO A POINT
ON 6TH STREET MARKED
BY AN IRON PIN, THENCE
RUN WEST ON 6TH
STREET A DISTANCE OF
15 FEET TO A POINT
WHICH IS THE POINT OF
BEGINNING OF THE
LAND TO BE DESCRIBED
AND CONVEYED: FROM
SAID POINT OF BEGINN-
ING RUN WEST ON 6TH
STREET A DISTANCE OF
95 FEET THENCE RUN
SOUTH A DISTANCE OF
174.4 FEET TO THE
SOUTH LINE OF SAID
SECTION1i, TOWNSHIP 9
SOUTH, RANGE 8 WEST
THENCE RUN EAST
ALONG THE SOUTH LINE
OF SAID SECTION 1, A
DISTANCE OF 95 FEET
THENCE RUN NORTH A
DISTANCE OF 174.4 FEET
TO 6TH STREET AND THE
POINT OF BEGINNING.
BEING A PARCEL OF
LAND FRONTING 95 FEET
ON SAID 6TH STREET
AND RUNNING BACK THE
SAME WIDTH, A
DISTANCE OF 174.4 FEET
TO THE SOUTH LINE OF
AIlD 9SESCOTN 1 TNOGW
WEST

FS LTCEKE2A6S4T 25FFTEH
MAP OF GREATER APA-
LACHICOLA, A SUBDIVI-



6IO O THCE PAT O


APALACHICOLA, FL 32320
aOUt~ pulc DA sae thehg-


cash, OFrn step of the



Apalachicola, FL 32320at
11:0 pbi AM, on the 24h day




wah rnt 60 das afte the

CLRaKll COFn CuRCUT


In lachcordanceL wth0 the
1: Americn wthe Diabltie d

Actof190 personscamia Inee-
Inges ant specilu accomm-
dtion to particpt ine ths o
ph acee gsof dh ontac ped


haearn mardpes




cIF8 acodRne Sit t

sCmffices oft Dlaniel C.

m4g InF 6meia ac8
Phocedne:813-915-8660
Octoer 29,n Novembe 5,) d

2al(009 9587 TD



OiaFlrd THEl SECOD UI-



FLORIDA FL3691




INTHE CITY OF APLCHI-



COLA, FLORIDA, a munic-
Ipal corporation and public
body corporate and politic
of the State of Florida
Pl intiff,



vr3


t~heo hac aof terCidCy of

dmnig property or sujcs
to taxation therein, and


others having or claiming
any right, title or Interest In
property to be affected by
the Issuance of the Bonds
and Bond Anticipation
Notes herein described, or
to be affected In any way
thereby
Defendants.

CIVIL ACTION NO:
09-000606-CA

VALIDATION OF THE NOT


WELLS

Plitiff,


FARGO BANK


vs

STEVEN L. FURGERSON,
et al,
Defendant(s).

CASE NO.: 2007-150-CA
DIVISION.

NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN pursuant to a Final


| iO IIo | zoo
FOR FRANKLIN COUNTYr terest In the surplus from
FLORIDA the sale, If any, other than
CIVILACTION the property owner as of
the date of the Ils pend-
BANK F AMERICA, N.A., ens, must file a claim
Plaintiff, within 60 days after the





4552T 3br, apt In Lanark Village,
PBINOIEMedical Health nw d prhrentsmrloyard w Spe Hus

A PUBLIC NOTICE, on Oc- Bedroom Set King Size ' Auditing mo + $250 dep. 509-2460 2aura br 1 a brsaelte 0a-p
tobe 15c, 2009 Oyte Rpla- Sldr s Nwood doeailed EMPLOYMENT For lease or rent ,50s f p ui Icl 12 x 50 deck. 90am2 N tSre
dioe Inc, filed an applica- Sldrawers. New s il d inpc-Seils 1 ae t plcioaLanark Village, 1 br $250/wk, 850-653-5114 C0 E6h tetarrabelle
tlon with the Federal Com- aging. Worth $2600, give 4100 -Help Wanted Responsible for auditing 61o Business/ on the River. Boat slips I apt. unfurnished, W/D, The Avenues at
munications Commission away $1,100. Can deliver 4130 -Employment and reviewing Insurance Commercial available for rent. Call IC/H/A, yard $550 mo, Keough s Landing
requesting a construction 222-7783 Information payments and contracts hlnAprm als Gwen 850-653-6279 1 st & last. Ask for Jim JIl Archer, Realtor
permit to build and oper- In order to Identify po- 610-CnefwhueL5 -697-2 88 6130 1 Keller Willilams
ate a new FM radlo station .tential underpayments 6140 -House Rentals on&CutyRat
T sr Esplt lrd.he station will operate | 4100 have Intermediate com- 6160-Roomsfolrent Suhr ilsTw CutyRat
with 6000 watts on the fre- puter and math skills, 6170 -Mobile Home/Lot Apartments
10.5FM Te n-Cherry sleigh Bed, Solid also the ability to read 6180 Out-of-Town Rentals | 6110 Immediate opening on 2 Carrabelle, Pool side 3 br,
auny145 M h n wo 2codo n ver used, still In a un ertand man Imshr Ren is 1oH brs l2nak ee/ fur 150 uq st tca 30
Stret, a spnt FLl Intlato/antRpi tingte exeiec isx bene- Cihded nt e be al85-5-27
32328. Thoe maiunstdo lo- 85-2587 iil --kthn&bth iiu DDTY71 qa Hu-.NrhHitrcDsrc
cation ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 60 wilbea 5 sad eeueRcvey | 610 |mot eae$95m Ingal Oppurunit -hogo $ 5thSre uliglt
Claird D. Plsine Istegol trs esili lsic Imdaeoeig 0 ery of unde rpaid Isu- Fora Leae urishanedaala 3,nsh! br-7 protce.442807
solee vtin stockolder, of- /arny 27 r e kw benefits. anc e l Ims. Requies plcoaL
flc8 Te and die tudor lofse 22-773 a deliver Exeiec inh plumbing exeln commnica C m eria Upstair studio Callh 850-643-7740.
Radlo, nc SRl pea 5Ilnaintinngeetia tlon~ u skils, aily tont BidnLeanar Village au ln ocautiont wate Stetbiligl

aaar & apenry w bneeded. sedlnhoronteRna' elcrcnld.Wkto Apalachicola 3b, 2 ba

A complete copy of the ap- .Drug free work place. phone, and basic com- Approx 1100sq ft. downls eton. $700 m. plus 1,70s Ap Laia rge outside
plication, any amendments | 3250 Valid DR. Ilcense & puter skills. Healthcare Available noW Corner 2br, 1ba, W/D Incl. utllties, deositon 85 00-6391 or dc. Bys1,0s week or oth.d
and rlatled matr pbials ae All Y Cn E transportation required. call center experience of Hwy 98 & 12th Street m tda /D807477 o pt al803306
avalabe fr pbli Inpec Y~ Ca Eat Some travel req. Equal preferred. 850-653-9788 or 850697222 d orae cal araele r,1 a
tlon Monday through Frl- *S NOW CRABS* Opportunity Employer Please mail resumes 850 615 0058 850-509-3535 ~3~~completely remodeled,
day during regular busl- $15.99 at UP THE CREEK Applications available at to: large private yard $800 *
neshours 9am-5pm at RA A triga :0 Eastpoint Apartments, HealthCheck month 210 NE 1st St AMMIitME
35 slndDrveUnt 6'every Monday in Apalachl- 45 Begonia Street,ll Incorporated Stat0 Of Florida-Franklin Very nice 1 br apartment 404-266-0067
Eastpoint. cola at 313 Water St. Eastpoint, FL 32328. RO. Box 14165 In Carrabelle, fully fur- 810000-Antique& Collectibles
October 29, November 5' 850-653-2525. $1.00 Draft Call 850-670-4024, MexicoBeach, County Health Department Job nished, patio, carport, Carrabelle ano0-car.
12,200 BeerTDD/TY711.Olymp ~rendt Announcement must se hol l reeclits% 4ncers2p w/ eapots utility vehicles
@hcaudit.com network & all util. $300 de- hot tub, sauna + guest apt also Commercial
~ C~g ~ Medlali~althHealth Check Incorpo- I**nternal Agency Only Current DOH posit, Minimum of 6 mo. w/ full bath $1200 mo, + 8160 -Motorcycles
MedcalHeathrated (HCI) Is an Employees May Apply*** lease required. Call utl,1y sscdp r8170 Auto Parts
| 3300 ~Industry-leading man- 850-697-3246 chc &rfeqNosk. 10-BA essaries
iLandscaper fully experl- CNA/HHA aged care auditing firm. Environmental Specialist I .Call David at 850-228-6091 8220 Personal Watercraft
in ~ Imdit elcanlu need oIr a tre l'aapp POSition number 64045760 Eastpoint ,o Bot& Marine
sonable rates. Looking for Home care. Live In & provide an attractive Annual Salary Range: $30,988.62 I 1o I Single Family Supplies
MERC ~training partner Bike rides hulshfsaa.Sed compensation and b n- $51,489.88 Indian Pass, trailerr on the House For Rent ,25-Bat il/AitE Doocks
25-100 miles, walks 5to 10 resume to: drfet@ eed pac ag daor qu l- g~i ae 10/9beach", Long term rental, 3 br, 2 ba, 12 8th Street, 8320 AVDiftRoadVehicles
310 Atqus ies oea wlmig crei ders ffcomycall can iats, In- Clsn 9 e:1/60 2br, 2ba, Nicely furnished. furnished $850 mo + $500 8330 Campers & Trailers

ii0-A Csrafs N500-44p 091 atlt.Cl 4-27 rFX4-25 euadth and dena Inssur This is professional level-work with an impor- Inga $80 mo ea tres soP ts! 8Ut0[ n icl aau- otrhm
3140 -Baby temns ance, I Insurance and tant role in the mission of the Franklin County 678-378-1917
310-Bidning Supplies FRANKLIN COUNTI SCHOOL BOARD40Kanlerre Health Department (FCHD). The position will fitF so
317 I cmi OITO: DretrfFiaca Service nurtion to aoin involve environmental compliance inspections Sts qe'I a o
3180 Compuctbers LOCATION: iEastpoint, Flornidal andice ,,,,,Team a and investigations, record keeping and resolu- Lanark,,,, 2 br, 1b, w/Ig Buick LaSabre 1998 $595
3190 Electronics SALARY: Administrative Salary Schedule tion of public inquiry in support of standard $160ag wk, lue, Satellten, fcd y epraed p LRg &sr Down.gh 0%t FInterest
32 oao-da It On CONTRACT: 2009-10 Fiscal Year pctesopulcnvomntlhlh.Te t agle. 1 5'udedk pwi den, covered. pk 29& cK- Daylgh Ato Financing76
-22 ard Sales DEADLINE: November 3, 2009, 4:00 p.m. standard qualification for consideration as a auttulilvew.Cal Idakeve 850-528-0716 9mt p.2516
ns~~~zThings to Eat Applications may be obtained from the Franklin ***candidate for this position is the completion of Waterfront
3260 Health & Fitness County School Board Finance Office or on-line at I aao a four-year degree from an accredited college Rental Chevy Cavaliner 200,
320-Je irny/Clothing www.f ran kl incou ntysch ools.org. POTL OTJBor university. EEO employer, fingerprinting, 3br, 2ba Carrabelle. Qulet D ylghtownut0%Fnlnrcin
3290 EMe binceEy uipment Miiu Qulfctos heo' erei N O \P FO SLE background screening, emergency duties, and : Ne ghborhoods d.t Gr~eat 9am to 9pm. 215-1769
3300 Miscellaneous Accounting, Finance, or Business Administration. vlddie' ies eurd fe or n ihd alfrmr no
sl0lical n nnamene Master's Degree preferred. Certified Public weein "kend work my be required as necessary. 850-44-2216 Chrysler Sebring Con-
Su0-ppliets Sm Accountant preferred, Five years experience in Ca to etbe 98 85Dw
3330 Restaurant/Hotel governmental accounting or auditing preferably inPlsechoenefteflowgfosu-0ItrstDalhtAo
34 ping Bod O& ll anCil ard hrosamcostx acunnteng and pepoart Yoru NEVER hve to pa mitting youratp lctoplfrtmylrd Montgomery esso n1-79g a o9m
or reviewing GASB compliant annual financial federal or postal jobs. If co/oo~t~fyusol aeBuilding, corner Woasekrntln
statements. Experience in preparing or reviewing you see job C~/oo~t fyusol aeNorth Bayshore Dr Water-
| 322 school district budgets according to DOE and "guarantee", contact the problems with the online system, please Avenue E/Market front. Eastpoint. Will also Ford Escort 1998, $495
TRM rnedqu rem ns. Knnowlee ge of 0 ria Scol FTCh eea rd yr t 89562 22 S d 5 u 91rn9 s bb 8oo ao po 015 Itrcs

facilities budgeting is a plus. Franklin County School 's America s consumer Address the fax cover letter to: People $15 29,6099
2 Piece Living Rm Set, Board is an Equal opportunity Employer. protection agency. First Staffing -Attn: Data Entry Write Large $595 mo. Ford Mustang 1993 $595

ec t ~ ~~Please return applications to: "fftc7 C HE L ms thethfoI w ov Ithter: ommn eosition M nht-ot now snensDalgh
usdIncats.45-37.Franklin County School Board 3 br, 2 ba Db| Wide, nice 9pm. 215-1769
Delivery Avall. Sam Carnley A public service #64045760. Please, post to People n0 security no neighborhood In Apalach.
Director of Financial Services message from the FTc First Web site. de osit. Tel End0 mof+$0 de d end road.Pnia rn A
85 School Road, Suite 1 and The NewsHerald 3. Mail your application to People First $750 mo + $500 dep. Cal onta rnd Am 1998,e
Eastpoint, FL 32328 Class Aeddvertising Staffing Administration, PO Box 44058 (305) 588-5885. 80ly eD.Aaah-D g~w0
$169 Queen Pilllowtop Jacksonville, FL 32231. cola Realy ne 2 r, with 9am- 9m2516
mattress & box. Manufac- oa el nc r i 9mp 2516
turer wrapped, with war- FRANKLIN COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD wh Ihphoo bath, Uquletl
ranty. 222-7783 Del. Avall- 85 School Road, Suite 1 neisheohd. $60mo1t as oticSubrd19
able. IIEastpoint, FL 32328 amo rent + dep. 653-4293 $495 Down 0% Interest,
(850) 670-2810 after 4 pm. Daylight Auto Financing
9am to 9pm. 215-1769
ANNOUNCEMENT OF POSITIONS g g g aac wbshmed
$600/mth +$600deposit Chevy Lumina 1993 $395
Beautiful Sofa/Loveseat IPOSITIONS(S): Instructional: 318 Woodill Rd Carrabelle down 0% Interest, Daylight
Microfiber set. $499. Still In Reading Coach (1) Beach 850-697-8440 Auto Financing 9am to
crate, never used. Factory Spanish Teacher (1) IIII9pm. 215-1769
warranty, solid oak
foundation. Can deliver
545-71 12 ILOCATION: Fran kli n Cou nty School

M SAARY: FCSB Salary Schedule
PI 1 '1 CONTRACT: Through 2009-10 School YearChvPikU195$5
D1I I ~(I 1I1:R~ptDown. 0% Interest,
DEDIN: November 3, 2009 12:00 (noon) Daylight Auto Financing
\ 7100 Homes 9am to 9pm. 215-1769
Description and application may be obtained 70 pn Houstee
frmthe Franklin County School Board Office. Property
Application must include (1) a high school 7120 Commercial Ford X Cab 2001, $995
Ba Cuny ipom,(2) college transcripts if applicable, and Cn4 owamsIRnchwnntrestt inng9Daayltho
Asphalt () three letters of recommendation. Successful 7150 Lots and Acreage 9pm. 215-1769
Free Est. pliat must agree to a criminal history cek7160 Mobile Homes/Lots
Spcaizn n icudes FDLE processing fee) & pre-employerment i rnt
parking lots & drgscreening. -:Property Toyota Tundra, 2006, 4
roadways. 7190 Oul-of-Town door crew cab, 4x4, White
t vsa sn eturn a lcpatic s tto the attention of Morn 7200 Ri tesae k/ n s,1eather ntelntor,
& Commercial. *esne pcait bedliner, New tires,
850-532-4752 $19,750. Call 227-3453
Franklin County School Board is an Equal 7100
Opportunity Employer. r BAN NW OM
REDUCED $7000

FRANKLIN COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY ill aVe yOU OVer COnsidered a career in Ca N tSrraelet
Corner lot In The
COMMISIONERS JOB ANNOUNCEMENT t a h ng? Avenues at Keoughs CMLTPCAE
eac nLanding -Carabelle's FROM
only "Green-Certified" $4 995
Position Title: Inmate Supervisor NON-DC /Equipment Community, 3bd/2ba,
Operator I IIIIf you already have a 4-year college degree in any area, you can begin 1980Csq, fta (nderdroof) All Welded,
Closing Date: November 12, 2009 working toward teacher certification with the 8-month Educator Preparation sewer an oAl Ouium asE
Annual Salary: $21 ,700 hoeownersfees.na OPENHOUS
Contact Person: Hubert W. Chipman Institute (EPI). This is a "transition-to-teaching" program that puts you Gtnaddit naym$800 THURS. & FRI.
Road Department IIIon the path towa rd teacher certification a nd possible employment in K-1 2 assistance If you buy (Closed Saturday)
before November 30. 8017ifay Florida
376 State Road 65 1 schools. Call Barney Crutchfleld wwwxtmmindustries.com
Eastpoint, FL 32328 850-528-22990or JIll
Phone: (850) 670-8640 11IDo the majority of the cou rse work online with one face-to-face Saturday Ace 5-2-84


'Rearl estatee.
Janalyn Dowden
108 S. E. Ave. A
Carrabelle, Florida 32322.
3 erovww.sene 'estre.com
Ununosed Apt.,End Unit.............. $550.00
Unfurnished Duplex .......................... $650.00
3 Bedroom 2 Bath
Furnsho mM~obB hHome, Bay View $850.00

Lnunos n d h use on 1/2 acre ....... $1000.00
Unfurnished Condo with pool........... $750.00
Funshe Apt, End unit, Bay view... $500.00
2 Bedroom
Furnshed Apt, End Unit, Bay view.. $500.00
Furnished A t, End Unit, Carport..... $525.00
3 Bedroom Bath
Furnished Apt, Wkly/3 day min...$650.00 wk
Fu nshe m t.................................... ssoo.oo
3 Bedroom Bath
F"inilshed Cnd iool ................$500.00 Wk
Unfurnished Apt................................ $500.00
Beach front houses with winter rates.
Short & Long term rentals.
PLEASE CALL JOANN 850-697-9604
OR 850-323-0444 FOR RENTALS.


The Franklin Counly Board of Commissioners is an Equal
Opportunity/Affirmaiive Action/Drug Free Workplace Employer

Knowledge, SkillsandAbilities: AN EMPLOYEE INTHIS POSITION
WILL SUPERVISE T HE WORK OF STATE INMATES. OPERATE
VARIOUS SPECIAL HEAWY EQUIPMENT, PERFORMING TASKS
ASSOCIATED WITH THE ROAD DEPARTMENT OPERATIONS,
OPERATES FRONT END LOADER TO LOAD ROAD MATERIAL
OR DEBRIS FOR DUMP TRUCKS, BACK HOE TO DIG OUT
DITCHES AND A VARIETY OF TRACTORS. OPERATES VARIOUS
EQUIPMENT SUCH AS CHAINSAWS, BLOWERS, WEED EATERS,
PUSH MOWERS, AND ETC. OTHER DUTIES AS REQUIRED.
BACKGROUND INVESTIGATION AND DRUG SCREENING WILL
BE COMPLETED ON SELECTED APPLICANT.

Minimum Qualifications: Requires a high school diploma or an
equivalent. Requires knowledge of Florida traffic laws. Requires
basic understanding of safety procedures; the abil ity to drive and
operate the above mentioned equipment. Must possess a valid
Florida Commercial Class A Driver's License with a favorable
driving record. Must have the ability to meet the Department of
Corrections criteria for a certification as an NON-DC Supervisor
of State Inmates. Newly hired employees shall obtain such
certification within 90 days of hiring.


Franklin County's source of news for more than a century


| 100 3220


The Times Thursday, October 29, 2009 7B


6120 | 105


There's never been a better time to teach!

If you'd like to lea rn more, please attend the EPI Com mu nity Forum.

* Tuesday, November 17, 5:30 p.m. 6:30 p.m.

* Professional Development Center, Room 107


Want to know more? Call Teresa Salter at 850.769.1551 ext. 3393 or visit
www.gulfcoast.edu/epi.

The application deadline is November 25 .


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By Lojs Swoboda
Times StaffWriter

Works by two Franklin
County artists will appear
in the first exhibit at a new
museum in Deland.
The Florida Museum
for Women Artists is the
only venue in the state,
and the Southeast, to dis-
play art exclusively by
women artists. The 17,300-
square-foot museum will
open Nov. 14.
Out of hundreds of ap-
plicants, Kristin Andersen,
of Apalachicola, and Beth
Appleton, of St. George
Island, have been chosen
to display work in the first
ever Florida Museum of
Women Artists Inaugural
Juried Exhibition. Only 40
artists will be represented
in the show.
"This exhibition will
make the visitor fully
aware of the great expres-
sive strength in the art
by contemporary Florida
women artists," said Da-
vid C. Swoyer, museum
services Consultant said,
Andersen is a jeweler
who creates glowing, mys-
tical visions of nature us-
ing the champlev6 process
of enamel application. The
technique consists of cut-
ting away troughs or cells
in a metal plate and filling
the depressions with pul-
verized vitreous enamel.
The raised metal lines
between the cutout areas
form the design outline.
Two of Anderson's
works will be displayed in
the exhibit; "Dawn Beach
Walk" and "Water Wars,"
a vista of the Apalachicola
River with Atlanta's sky-
line on the horizon.
Appleton works in water
colors and creates unique
cut paper assemblages
highlighting Florida's nat-
ural world. She will display
a cut paper assemblage
entitled "Hurricane Den-
nis" in Deland, one of a se-
ries of hurricane themed
pieces.
Dennis affected Apple-
ton very personally. "The
studio got creamed," she
said. "We were lucky be-


cause we had evacuated
the original art. The ta-
bles floated and then they
tipped so we lost all of the
supplies."
Appleton and her hus-
band and business man-
ager, David, moved to the
island in 1990.
"We always came here
to get away. We primitive
camped in St. George Is-
land State Park and skated
around the rattlesnakes
and no-see-ums for a
chance to camp with the
ospreys. We were traveling
from show to show and de-
cided that we might as well
be based in a place where
you felt like you were on
vacation. We looked for a
place on the island for a
long time. We came down
to tell the realtor we were
giving up on finding a
piece of property when we
found our current home,"
she said.
Andersen moved to the
county in 1985 and opened
Long Dream Gallery at the
corner of Avenue D and US
98 in Apalachicola.
"I intended to use
this as a base to travel to
shows, but in 1985, a hur-
ricane took the roof off of
my building and I was too
busy to travel," Anderson
said. "It was the best thing
that could have happened.
My business took off like a
rocket."
Both women said the
museum and the show
have been a long time
coming. They agree that
being a woman can be a
handicap even in the world
of art.
"I used to sign my art
work 'B. Appleton' so peo-
ple wouldn't know who
they were buying," said
Appleton.
"I got radicalized when
I was about 8 and realized
the collective pronoun was
always male," said Ander-
son. "I think it's the coolest
thing that our little county
has two artists in this ex-
hibit."
Both Appleton and An-
dersen said they will travel
to Deland for the opening
of the exhibit.


Kristin Andersen was born in Ann Arbor, Michigan .
and received her bachelor's from Oregon's Portland LOIS SWOBODA|IThe Times
State College and master's from the University of Beth Appleton was born in Ocala and attended
Wisconsin. Florida State University.


4
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697-2783 or Mobile 566-2603
II


SPECIAL TO THE TIMES


Hurricane Dennis by Beth Appleton.


Dawn Beach
nakby
Andersen is
currently on
display in
the lobby of
the Gibson
|nn.







water wars
by Kristen
Andersen.


SPECIAL TO THE TIMES


SPECIAL TO THE TIMES


BS | The Times


Women artists se ected for statewide competition


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