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Group Title: Apalachicola times
Title: The Apalachicola times
ALL ISSUES CITATION PDF VIEWER THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100380/00047
 Material Information
Title: The Apalachicola times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: H.W. Johnston
Place of Publication: Apalachicola Fla
Apalachicola Fla
Publication Date: October 8, 2009
Copyright Date: 2008
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1885.
General Note: Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00100380
Volume ID: VID00047
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 32911693
lccn - sn 95026907
 Related Items
Preceded by: Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by: Apalachicola herald

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Table of Contents
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Thursday, 0CTOBER 8, 2009 ww w .apalach times .com 50(




(arrabelle workers get 3 percent pay hike


I


YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER FOR MORE THAN 120 YEARS


VOL. 121 ISSUE 24


By Lois Swoboda
Times Staff Writer
Carrabelle city workers will
receive a 3 percent pay raise for
the 2009-10 fiscal year.
At the second and final bud-
get hearing held at the municipal
complex on Sept. 17, Carrabelle's
leaders signed off on the $2.94 mil-
lion budget for the 2009-2010 fis-
cal year, with the biggest change
an across-the-board raise for 19
city workers.
The city commissioners kept
the millage rate unchanged at 5.5
mils, which means the city will
have approximately $348,074 less


in ad valorem tax revenue next
year than it did in the 2008-09 fis-
cal year.
According to Property Ap-
praiser Doris Pendleton's office,
the city's combined property
values dropped this past year by
20.4 percent, from $275.1 million
to $219 million.
Next year's budget will raise
about $1.17 million in property
taxes, compared with the $1.52
million raised this fiscal year.
Adding about $153,000 in rev-
enue from other governmental
sources, about $80,000 from fran-
chise fees and the rest from a
variety of fees and taxes, the city


will have about $1.64 million to
spend during the upcoming fiscal
year.
The city plans to spend about
$195,000 for the road department,
and about a half-million dollars
each for City Hall and for the po-
lice department, leaving about
$458,000 in reserves.
I~mding the water and sew-
er department will cost about
$1 million, with all those costs com-
ing out of utility billings. This will
leave about $300,000 in reserve in
this special revenue fund.
City Administrator Courtney
Millender said the pay increases
were possible partly because ad-


ministrative salaries have been
reduced by around $18,000, due in
part to City Manager John McIn-
nis' retirement last year.
City Clerk Keisha Smith
said that the commission also
changed its policy on charitable
contributions this year. In the
past, the city has earmarked 1
percent of the ad valorem taxes
for charity. Commissioners now
have the discretion to donate as
much as they deem appropriate
to charitable causes,
ElderCare Services will not
receive a contribution this year.
Smith said the commission decid-
ed that, because administration


for the organization was moving
to Tallahassee, it was uncertain if
donated money would be used lo-
cally, so they did not contribute.
Commissioners earmarked
an additional $5,600 for the Car-
rabelle Food Pantry this year,
bringing the total contribution to
$11,200.
"That money will feed a lot of
local people," Smith said.
She said the commission also
set aside $4,000 for future con-
tributions to charity that crop up
from time to time during the year.
"We want to have money avail-
able for things like Little League
if it's needed," Smith said.


By David Ad erstein pro te
Times City Editor Elliott
Works
Two city commission- ell Bar
ers were sworn in, and Deparl
Apalachicola Mayor Van with a
Johnson reshuffled who the ma
oversees what, at
Tuesday evening's
meeting.
Newcomer Bren-
da Ash replaced Val-
entina Webb on the
commission, with -
her predecessor
attending the meet- BRENIDA ASH
ing from the audi-
ence to wish her well. Also Joh
sworn in was Frank Cook, league
to his first full term on the report
commission. Both were revivin
victors in last month's city that hr
elections. "I wou
Johnson got unanimous of that
support for his plan to re- Atl1
tain Commissioner Jimmy
Elliott to serve as mayor See Al


m. He also moved
to oversee Public
and placed Mitch-
-tley over the Street
tment, in keeping
In earlier role that
lyor said Bartley had
performed well.
Cookwaspicked
to oversee the Fire
Department, while
Ash was placed
over finances, in
keeping with her
background as a
mortgage loan of-
ficer.
nson urged his col-
Is to provide monthly
s to the commission,
Ig a former practice
as gradually eroded.
lid like to see more
," he said.
ast month's meeting,

PALACHICOLA AS


Mary Lou Short


Gayle Dodds


Gail Riegelmayer


Gordon Adkins Photos by LOIS SWOBODA|IThe Times


The Superior Bank branch in CarrablOSWBO Thoedi as



Superior Bank closes

CrTrabelle lOcation


By Lojs Swoboda
Times Staff Writer
On Tuesday morning, the
county commission put aside the
recommendation of the Planning
and Building Board and voted
unanimously to approve a request
by Olivier Monod to construct a
grocery store on St. George Is-
land.
On Sept. 29, the planning board
voted 5-2 against recommend-
ing that a 6,700-square-foot gro-
cery store be built on Franklin
Boulevard, beside the St. George
Inn and behind the existing St.
George Island Trading Post on
Gulf Beach Drive.
An additional 1,300 square feet
would house Monod's real estate
firm, Anchor Realty.
But commissioners decided
against the recommendation af-
ter being advised by the county
planner and the county attorney


that Monod's plans were in com-
pliance with the building code.
The commissioners were visi-
bly uncomfortable about having to
make a decision on the construc-
tion project, which has attracted
strong opposition among island
residents and environmentalists.
Mark Curenton, assistant
county planner, read a set of notes
prepared by County Planner Alan
Pierce, who was absent from the
meeting. The notes detailed why
Pierce believed that Monod's
plans, which have been revised
twice over the last two months,
were in compliance.
In its recommendation not to
approve, the planning board cited
potential violations of zoning reg-
ulations relating to parking and
loading. Pierce contended that
no violations existed in Monod's
plans.
See GROCERY A6


By Dovid Ad erstein
Times City Editor

.In a sign of the finan-
cial woes plaguing the
banking industry, Superior
Bank closed its Carrabelle
branch as of Sept. 30.
In addition, the bank,
headquartered in Birming-
ham, Ala., also shuttered
its Mexico Beach office,
part of a consolidation that
also prompted the closure
of a third branch in Siesta
Key.
David Biliter, Superior's
retail banking executive for
the state of Florida, said
closure of the Carrabelle
and Mexico Beach offices
affected eight employees,


four at each branch.
Carrabelle's banking op-
erations were merged into
the Apalachicola office,
and Mexico Beach's into
the Port St. Joe location,
Biliter said, with nearly all
of the eight employees los-
ing their jobs with the com-
pany.
"Unfortunately we were
able to retain just one of the
eight, in Port St. Joe," said
Biliter. "Our commitment
was to try to find them jobs
if there were openings. Un-
fortunately, if you have a
job, you keep it. There was
no turnover we experienced
over the last five months."
See BANK A6


Phone: 850-653-8868
Web site: apalachtimes.com
E-mail: timesnews~,starfl.com
Fax: 850-653-8036


DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK:

Legal Ad Friday aill1a.mn
Classified Display Ad Friday ai11 a.mn.
Classified Line Ad Monday ai5 p.mn.


Letter to the Editor .. ..... ... A4
Church News............ B3
Sheriff's Report. ................... ... B4


SocietyNews.. ............. 2
Classifieds ......... .. B6-B7
Tide Chart ................... ........ BS


Apa lachicola

Carrabelle


OBJECTIONS OVERRULED


Aaladuicola



greets new faces


C3t~



Ir
r"~ I'


Island to get new grocery


COUnty rejects Planning Board County ta bles


advice on proposed building


moratorium


pro osa l

County commissioners Tues-
day morning took no action on a
recommendation from the Plan-
ning and Building Board to freeze
commercial development on the
island until all wastewater treat-
ment issues are resolved.
Andy Smith, attorney for the
Apalachicola Riverkeeper, has
asked the planning board to rec-
ommend the county "institute a
moratorium on new commercial
construction requiring wastewa-
ter treatment permits in 'down-
town' (3rd to 3rd) St. George Is-
land until the issues related to
beach advisories, onsite wastewa-
ter treatment system non-compli-
ance, and centralized wastewater
treatment are resolved."

See MORATORIUM AS


TABLE OF CONTENTS


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Thursday, October 8, 2009


A2 | The Times


Local


By Lois Swoboda
Times Staff Writer

Earl Morrogh, of
Quincy, will make a
solitary trip by kayak
from Chattahoochee
to Apalachicola to
raise money for the
Apalachicola Riverkeeper.
When Morrogh penned
his environmental novel,
"Meanwhile Back on
Planet Earth," he was
thinking of the natural
wond s opf thel Pnhandle

River.
After paddling twice
down the river on
trips sponsored by the
Apalachicola Riverkeeper
and the Apalachicola
Maritime Museum,
Morrogh realized some
of his best memories of
the trips were times when
he paddled alone. That
gave him the inspiration
to plan his current solo
trek from Chattahoochee
south.
At 8 a.m. Thursday
morning, Oct. 8, Morrogh
launched his kayak from
a peaceful spot just below
the old Liberty Bridge
and headed south. He


was to camp that night
in Alum Bluff and in
the morning to set out
for his second stop at
Estiffanulga, in Liberty
County.
He will be met at
that campsite by a
volunteer who will bring
provisions for the next
leg of his journey. He will
spend his third night in
Wewahitchka and his
fourth on Owl Creek at
Hickory Landing. All told,
Morr chsplans to paddle

Volunteers will visit
him at several points
along the way. "I plan
to make every night a
celebration," he said.
In fact, the whole trip
is a celebration, both of
Morrogh's 60th birthday
that he will mark Oct. 15,
and of the river.
In addition to
celebrating the river,
Morrogh will use his
trip to support it and the
Riverkeeper that watches
over it. A board member
of the Riverkeeper, he
retired from Florida
State University in 2006
where he worked as
an information design


professional and
visiting instructor
in the College of
Information.
Sponsors can
contribute to the
Riverkeepers by
supporting the trip. "You
can contribute a dollar a
mile, $20 a day or $100 for
the entire trip," he said.
"We've already raised
around $3,000."
Corporate sponsors
are Planet Gumbo,

New Leaf dakt in
Tallahassee.
Kayd Selden. a
spokeswoman for
the Riverkeeper, said
Morrogh already had
about 25 individual
sponsors as of Monday.
To contribute, visit
Morrogh's Web site www.
Rivertrek-2009.org
You can also track his
trip online at the site. He
will be carrying a Spot
Personal Satellite Tracker
that will communicate
directly with Google
maps. The signal will
renew his position about
every 10 minutes.
Happy birthday and
happy trails to you, Earl.


LOIS SWOBODA | The Times
Earl Morrogh sits in his kayak on the Apalachicola River,


'MYRDaWhile, Back on Planet Earth'


The following is a
short synopsis from
Kirkcus Discoveries of
author Earl Morrogh's
2007 novel, "M~eanwhile,
Back on Planet Earth,"
about how an astronaut
commits a bold act of
insubordination to help
advance his message of
conservation. M~orrogh
is also the author of the
2002 textbook "Informa-
tion Architecture: An
Emerging 21st Century
Profession," published
by Prentice-Hall.
"During a 24-hour
lull in a space mission,
shuttle astronaut Rodney
Thibodeaux takes a care-
fully controlled dose of
the drug Ecstasy, partly
to combat the ennui that
has crept into his life over
time. While under the in-
fluence, he sees the Earth


in all its glory, and comes
to the conclusion that the
planet is speaking to him,
warning of the dire conse-
quences of humankind's
irresponsible treatment of
the environment.
"He decides he must
do something dramatic
to capture the attention
of the human race, so he
initiates an unscheduled
and unsanctioned re-en-
try. This act makes him
an instant celebrity, and
the resulting headlines
catch the eye of chicken
baron Will Brighton, who
uses his considerable for-
tune to help Thibodeaux
advance his message to
humanity. They form a
pro-Earth foundation and
secular "church," dedicat-
ed to raising awareness
of what Thibodeaux sees
as an impending environ-


mental crisis.
Unfortunately, Rodney
and Will's advocacy also
catches the attention of
a fundamentalist militia
member, who sets out to
disrupt their plans. And
when Rodney and Will
decide to promote their
cause through a Russian-
sponsored tourist trip to
the moon, they're caught
in the center of a raging
political firestorm.
"As self-described
"eco-fiction," this book
has a clear agenda, which
it pushes without coming
across as preachy. The
prose here is simple but
solid, and the plot arcs
gracefully for much of the
book, although its climax
is lacking in real dramatic
tension. A lecture-fr~ee
and entertaining pro-con-
servation message."


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Thursday, October 8, 2009


Local


The Times | A3


By (aty Greene
Special to the Times
Patrons numbered
around 800 with over
400 computer users.
Documented volunteer
hours approximately 90
in the library, there are
probably a lot more.
The Fall Program
began on Saturday,
Sept 19 called "Fall Into
Books@Your Library"
We have had three weeks
of Children's Storytimes.
At the completion of this
program will begin a
Teen Read Week, Oct 19
to 24 entitled "Go Beyond


Reality@Your Library".
The culmination of Teen
Read Week will be a
program called "Java
Makes Me Jump" on
Saturday at 4 p.m., which
is a "coffee house" at the
library, the inspiration of
Carrie Kienzle.
The Library Board
has been negotiating
with the Apalachicola
Area Historical Society to
transfer the Apalachicola
Times archives from the
Society to the Library.
They are owned by the
Freedom Newspapers,
and currently on loan. The
expectation is that they


will be more accessible to
users in the Library. Final
approval will be voted on
by the Library Board next
month, after they receive a
letter from the newspaper
company confirming their
willingness to see the
archives transferred.
I have been talking to
Gulf State Community
Bank and the city about
trying to secure a better
interest rate for the
Key account, which is
essential to the book
purchase budget. GSCB
has offered a 12 month CD,
with no penalty for early
withdrawal, at 1.75 percent.


Finally, the Library
Board did not meet
yesterday, Oct 5 due to
a lack of aquorum.On
August 31, the board
approved to request funds
from the Key account.
They are pleased to have
received approval from
the city commission for
release of $35,000 for
capital improvements,
including replacing the
AC unit, which failed for a
couple of days last week.
Caty Greene is
librarian for the
Apalachicola M~unicipal
Library. 'lb reach her call
653-8436.


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LOIS SWOBODA | The Times
Kathy Robinson of Apalachicola said she was pleased with the turnout for Saturday's Community Yard Sale.


Attendance down at Community Yard Sale


By Lois Swobodla
Times StaffWriter

Results were mixed
on this year's Commu-
nity Yard Sale held Satur-
day but the consensus in
Apalachicola was that at-
tendance was down.
Once again the flea mar-
ket stretched from Alliga-
tor Point to Mexico Beach.
But Saturday's yard sale
competed with the Apala-
chicola National Estuarine
Research Reserve's Bay
Day Benefit in Gulf Coun-
ty and Panacea's Mighty
Mullet Festival in Wakulla.
A birding walk also sched-
uled for last weekend was
cancelled due to lack of in-
terest.
The plethora of recre-

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national opportunities may
have reduced the number
of shoppers who browsed
the contents of garages
and attics in search of
treasure.
Yard sales on the east
end of the county were
pleased to report about 100
visitors.
"It's been great," said
Barbara Lashley, of La-
nark Village, who helped
with the sale at Sacred
Heart Catholic Church on
US 98. "We weren't even
open on Friday and we sold
over $150 worth of stuff.
Some entrepreneurs
used clever tactics to snag
shoppers. Chillas Hall in
Lanark advertised their
sale with a sign on US 98
that promised a sale and a


"potty break."
Mike Rundel, organizer
of the first ever Gumbo
Cook off to benefit Lanark
Village's volunteer fire de-
partment said he believed
the cook off benefited from
the many shoppers travel-
ing along the highway to
shop for bargains.
Some merchants in
Apalachicola were less
pleased. Jeanine Slagle,
owner of That's A Mo-
ray, has sold grilled hot
dogs and sausage during
the sale for the last three
years.
'The first year I sold
$400 worth of food. That
dropped to $200 last year
and this year I cleared
about $150," she said.
Another downtown


Apalachicola merchant
commented that, while
participation was up, the
number of customers was
down.
Kathy Robinson, of
Robinson Real Estate and
Robinson Brothers Char-
ter Service, was more
upbeat. She sold donated
clothing and yarn to raise
money to neuter down-
town feral cats.
"We made enough mon-
ey to send a cat to college,"
she quipped.
One Apalachicola
resident reported selling
$1,200 worth of tools over
Saturday and Sunday.
"I sold $500 worth of
stuff and I don't miss any
of it," said Joel Reed, of St.
Joe Beach.


Glenn l
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RN Vice ~a~
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i~ttsn t~og Ta


The News Her~al~d invites yOu

grades 4 12, to creatli lC





* 'Y


Thursday, October 8, 2009


A4 | The Times


ask me. Yes, I went to the recent
dinner that Sacred Heart had at Port
St. Joe. Others were there, including
Dr. Miniat.
Yes, I work sometimes in
Pensacola, I occasionally work in an
ER there, at West Baptist hospital,
a rival of Sacred Heart. I also do
post-deployment military physical,
occasionally in Pensacola. I believe
Ms. Dodds means well and feels
her facts to be accurate, but next
time, please check, I have pay stubs
from Baptist hospital and LHI (the
company that does these military
physical) .
Oh well, wanting to help outside
my paid employer is not enough, the
hospital board also has to want you
there. After all, they are not a social
goepianl a m~prowingd ,urahos it .
a great job. Weems has improved
greatly over the past year; the board
sh dan to .dep hve an idea for a
mobile, free weekend clinic. We will
need a physician, a board, bylaws
and help, I believe that the Franklin
County Seafood Workers may help.
Anyone interested, call me at 653-1635
or 850-567-1589
Lorry App eee, PA-1
Apalachicola

PreServing competition
Shl0Ud be county's motive
The recent ruling by the county
commission to delay indefinitely
permitting the proposed new grocery
store on St. George Island leaves me
with the following question: What is
the real reason?
Mary Lou Short (member of
Planning & Zoning) raised many
objections to the building. Maybe
Ms. Short should recuse herself from
P & Z for this project. To the best
of my knowledge Ms. Short owns a
souvenir shop next to the existing
market place grocery store. The
n gocaryas ore i bit wil rdrc
market place store which will in turn
draw business away from Ms. Short's
business. Is this her real reason
for her opposition? I also read that
Ms. Short opposed the new owners
because "they might be from Israel."
This reeks of anti-Semitism and could
lead to a civil rights law suit if the new
building is permits are denied.
Yes, these business owners want
a commercial building moratorium
on the island. Why allow competition
when Ms. Short already has her
building! If Ms. Short was looking
out for the best interest of Franklin
County, she would welcome the
increased property tax, sales tax,
and employment that a new business


on the island would bring. The main
group opposing this new business is
the small band of business owners on
the island, including Ms. Short who
don't believe in competition and free
enterprise, and are only motivated by
their own self interest.
If the new building is denied
permitting for no legitimate reason,
the developer will sue the county
and probably win. Allen Pierce is
already on record stating he sees no
problem with this project. The county
commissioners should look out for
the best interest of Franklin County
as a whole, not a small band of island
business owners.
John Strickland
St George Island


Cheap alnimal souvenirs
send Wr0Hg mOS~age
First, I'd like to compliment your
excellence in serving the community;
freedom of the press lives here in
Apalachicola.
This is a special town and I have
enjoyed visiting here over many
years. I own a home on St. George
Island and frequently shop and dine
in Apalachicola. "Apalach" has come
a long way in the last decade.
That said, a recent visit to your
town left me saddened, particularly
with my background as a marine
scientist and love of this living planet.
This, from seeing in a number of
downtown stores pedaling coral,
dried baby alligator heads, shark
jaws and other dead marine life that
was one an integral part of fragile
ecosystems Today coral reefs are
dying throughout the world, while
shark species border on extinction
(a recent national geographic story
detailed this demise).
And though the alligator heads
are likely lopped off farmed gators,
what message does this send to our
children with the objectification of
animals as cheap souvenirs?
This is not just happening in
Apalach but throughout the world on
a massive scale animals ripped
from the sea ultimately to become
landfill in a throwaway society.
I asked one shopkeeper whose
bins spilled over with coral and
starfish and other sea "objects" why
he sold such things, He said they
were "farm raised" and also were
"byproducts" from food sources
in Third World countries. This, of
course, is ridiculous.
Apalachicola, you are better than
this. l urge your merchants to respect
this marvelous living world we all
share.
Dr. Benjamin 1-1stings
Washington, DC


Animal abuse and

"eglectis intolerable
I would like to commend your
paper for highlighting two cases of
animal abuse and neglect on page
One of the Sept. 24 issue. While the
photos were hard to look at and the
attached stories were difficult to read,
the citizens of this county need to
know what has been going on here.
And they need to stand up and say
that it will not be tolerated anymore.
If any citizen knows of dog
fighting, pig fighting, abuse and
neglect of any animal, they need to
call not only the Sheriff 's Office and
Animal Control, but they need to also
call the Humane Society, the press
and their county commissioners. We
atdn to p teilab r eon no n,
but they will be charged, arrested
and prosecuted, starting with Ms.
Kerkvliet and Mr. Duncan. Not only
should they be prevented from
ohwningbanihmals in the future but they
souldbt go tojai .
This "animal friendly" community
'ashn longer going tob 1 erte hsars
our most defenseless victims. Every
member of the Franklin County
Community needs to stand up and
say "No More Not in Our County!"
Sincere X
Susan Kearney, president
Franklin County Humane Society


Setting the record straight 00
10spital tieS
Ijust need to clear the air. Today
at the county commission meeting,
Ms. Dodds gave out some false
information. It took me aback and
since she did not use my name I did
not defend myself at the time. After
some thought, I believe I need to set
the record straight.
First, I am very proud of Franklin
Countysand our c mmssio0ndersm Ms.

especially proud and humble. The
way they fought for my placement to
the board was amazing.
Yes I did nominate myself for the
hospital board, why not? My mother
taught me that if I want something I
need to go after it. How else would I
have such a beautiful wife?
Yes, I am analytical, I make
hundreds of decisions a day as a
physician assistant. Ms. Dodds
alluded that I could not make
complex decisions.
I do not have any ties with Sacred
Heart. Ms. Dodds innocently put false
information out in public. She should
not go by rumor, she should check
her facts. At the very least, she should


By Joson Alderman
Special to the Times

You've probably already
thought about how you'd
like to share your assets
with relatives, friends and
favorite charities when
you're gone, whether it's
money you've saved, your
home, or family heirlooms
you want to pass along to
the next generation,
But you needn't wait to
begin making a difference
in people's lwvs Plus, you

advantages by distributing a
portion of your assets
now.
First, make sure
you're on track
to fund your own
retirement, have
adequate health
insurance, can pay
off your mortgage
and are otherwise
debt-fr~ee. YouADE
wouldn't want to
deplete your resources and
then become a financial
burden on others.
If your finances are in
good shape, consider these
options:
Avoid gift tax. You
can give cash or property
worth up to $13,000 a year,
per individual, before the
federal gift tax kicks in.
This limit doesn't apply if
you're paying someone's
tuition or medical expenses,
or for gifts to your spouse,
charities or political
organizations. Read
Publication 950 at www.irs.
govfor more details.
Pay for education. If
college is still far off for your
children, grandchildren or
Others, consider funding 529
Qualified State 'Illition Plans
for them. Account interest
earned is not subject to
federal (and in most cases,
state) income taxes; plus,
many states offer tax
deductions for contributions
made to their own 529 Plans.
To learn more about the
intricacies of 529 Plans, read
FinAid's comprehensive
overview at www.finaid.
org/savings/529plans.phtml.
Another good resource for
information on the different
types of financial aid, grants
and loans available to
college students is Practical
Money Skills for Life, Visa
Inc.'s free personal financial
management program


(www.practicalmoneyskills.
com/college) .
Roth IRAs for kids.
If your minor children or
grandchildren earn income,
you may fund a Roth IRA on
their behalf up to the lesser
of $5,000 or the amount of
their taxable earnings. You
contribute on an after-tax
basis, but the earnings grow,
tax-fr~ee, until the account is
tapped at retirement.
For young people, these
earnings can compound
eremen ouslyuovea tmnlyFor
one-time $1,000 contribution
for your 16-year-old
granddaughter, at
six percent interest
the account would be
worth nearly $20,000
tax-fr~ee at age
66. If she contributed
an additional $50
a month going
forward, it would
EMN grow to more than
$210,000 at66.
Fund someone's
benefits. Many people
cannot afford health
insurance and so forego
coverage, putting
themselves just one serious
illness or accident away
from financial disaster,
Many also cannot afford to
fully fund their 401(k) plan or
IRA. Consider applying your
tax-exempt gifts mentioned
above to help loved ones pay
for these critical benefits,
greatly increasing their
financial self-sufficiency.
Charitable
contributions. If you're
planning to leave money or
property to charities in your
will, consider beginning to
share those assets now, if
you can afford to. You'll be
able to enjoy watching your
contributions at work and
deduct them from your
income taxes. Read IRS
Publication 526 for details
(www.irs.gov) .
Before taking any of
these actions, consult your
financial advisor to make
sure your own bases are
covered. If you don't have
an advisor, visit www.
fpaforfinancialplanning.org
for help locating one.
Jason Alderman directs
Visa's financial education
programs. 'lb sign up for
a free monthlypersonal
finance e-Newslette?; go to
www.prracticalmoneyskcils.
com/newsletter


I imagine every school in the
nation has a cell phone policy. At
Franklin County schools we are
supposed to confiscate
phones that we see.
Picture this: A child is
texting and the teacher
approaches with hand
outstretched. The look of
complete and absolute
horror on the student's
face seems way out of
proportion to the disciplinary RED
action. They will argue ANID
and beg. Some even curse Denis
and become extremely
confrontational. Most of the
time I just shake my head, frown
and tell them to put it away and out
of sight. That way I lose very little
instructional time.
some teachers actually enforce
the Code of Conduct and take the
phones. I respect them.
I have been pondering the
extreme reactions on the part of the
children, so I posed a question to
my speech class where I encourage
meaningful conversation. "How do
you feel emotionally when you are
away from your phone?"
OMG! The responses I received.
"I feel naked, cutoff, alone, desperate,
like a part of my body is missing."
"Uhh, why?"
"I don't know what is going on."
"I'm away from all of my friends."
One child told me that her phone
had been taken away for a few days
as punishment. Her father had it,
She slept on the living room couch
instead of her bedroom just so she
could be closer to her phone. She
acknowledged that her behavior was
a bit extreme.
My kids also told me they
text more than talk. I was really
surprised. It is probably simpler and
more likely to fly under the radar in


school. They can text with their eyes
closed, relying only on the sense of
touch. And this from kids who can't
pass FCAT Reading.
I only use the keys on
my phone for letters when
I am entering names and
numbers into my address
-book. I usually end up
with something that looks
--like this: Sucel#. Okay, I
know what it means, but
IHITE I embarrass myselfwhen
LOUX I text. I have reached the
Roux boundaries of how I use my
phone. I like not having it,
and I certainly don't feel
anxious when I leave it home.
One of my students showed me
a phone the other day intended as
a toy for toddlers. I do not doubt the
little ones will be able to text as soon
as they learn to read.
But what are they reading? There
is a new language out there that is a
mish-mash of letters and acronyms.
As a person fascinated with
linguistics, I make no judgment.
I will tell you that this
phenomenon is affecting both
written and spoken Standard English
which is the accepted language of
academia and the business world.
First of all, I have students who
actually say, "OMG!" That means
that the text world has found a
place in the spoken language. Other
writing examples abound. Students
routinely use UR for "you're," and
the ampersand (&) for "and."
Writing manually with a pencil or
pen is laborious for them.Printing
rules the day; cursive is too difficult,
and most of them can't read it at all.
In addition, understanding time from
a clock-face takes concentration;
they are too used to digital display.
The same goes for monthly
calendars. The children don't get the


columns of numbers and the weekly
arrangement of Sunday to Saturday.
Communication is reduced to a
shorthand that frequently results in
unintentional communication. The
children tell me they often send a
message that is taken in the wrong
way by the receiver. Well, duh. If
the words are not precise, and the
message is supposed to be a joke,
how many times will it be received
the wrong way?
I try to separate their personal
communication styles from what
is required in Standard English.
I try to teach the proper use of
apostrophes. It is difficult when
newspapers, magazines, billboards,
and restaurant menus propagate
incorrect usages. I try to teach the
proper use of adverbs. I am fighting
a losing battle.
The language is organic, growing,
changing, and I like that. I can't
help but feel we are losing some
exactness of thought and expression
as we text quickly and skim over all
of the errors. We value the speed of
the transaction over the structure.
A problem only occurs when we
translate the lazy habits of texting
into the world of serious writing.
These children will have to write
papers in college. Next they will have
to write memos and presentations
for the workplace. Will this digital
communication world hamper them?
Probably not among their peers.
The older bosses will require an
exactness of language they do not
possess. Older editors will improve
and structure their writing.
But when today's young are the
bosses, none of this will matter.
I wonder what will happen then.
Denise Roux is a regular
columnist for the Apalachicola and
Carrabelle T~imes. 'lb reach hes
email her at rouxwhit~mchsi.com


In last week's story in
the Oct. 1 Times on the
Kingfish Shootout, tourna-
ment winner Blake Gard-
ner was described as a
"novice" fisherman mak-
ing his "first foray into
competitive fishing." This


was in error. The Panacea
resident has fished for 25
years and has entered the
Kingfish Shootout for the
last five years. He is also
preparing to start a char-
ter fishing business. The
Times regrets the error.


WN


apala chicola ([
OCn~ CarrabelleF 1 I i ~




USPS 027-600
Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St.
Apalachicola, FL 32329
VP/Publisher: Karen Hanes
Editor: Tim Croft
Circulation: James Meadors


POSTMASTER:
Send address change to:
The Apalachicola Times
P.O. Box 820
Apalachicola, FL 32329
Phone 850-653-8868


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POSTAGE PAID AT
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TO ALL ADVERTISERS
In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers
do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount
received for such advertisement,

The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is
thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word
thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains.


O~in *


Share with others while



y0ur U 0Sti I 0f 0Und


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OM*LI UR g 0IngL 10 0 W we DUL t IS


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113 U U a ~~~[

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COMPLETE SITE: DEVELOPMENT
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OFFICE ODIE CELL JIMMIE CELL


GED CLASSES


MONDAY AND TUESDAY
OF EACH WEEK
4:00-7:00 PM


AT
FRANKLIN COUNTY SCHOOL
Room 1103

Building 1100 -Vocational Building


Come to school to register during the above hours.


Conceptual drawing of future Weems Medical Center East Urgent Care Clinic


You are Invited

to Weems Medical Center East Urgent Care Clinic's
Groundbreaking Ceremony


105 NE 5th Street, Carrabelle, Florida
(next to the Franklin County Health Department Annex)
Tuesday, October 13 at 5:00 p.m.
Join us for refreshments immediately following the ceremony.


Thursday, October 8, 2009


Local


The Times | AS


Dieter Ambos, a retired the money "will make a
research professor from big dent" in the problem.
the Washington "Twelve inch-
University School es of rain was un-
of Medicine in St. precedented for
Louis, became the 24~ Apalachicola,"
newest member of si ono.
the Apalachicola "We're on your
Planning and Zon- iF side," the mayor
ing Board. He was toldWalker."We're
appointed to re- DIETER AMBOS in the ocean, and
place Bruce Hall, we're in the same


who retired.
The commission did
manage to make a little
money Tuesday, when
they sold off five surplus
vehicles. Offering $2,000
for all five, Raymond
James Mayfield was the
highest bidder to buy a
1996 Crown Victoria, two
2002 Crown Victorias, a
2002 Ford Expedition and
a 1999 Ford F150.
The commission, how-
ever, will have to expend
$25,000 from reserves
on stormwater improve-
ments, after hearing a
detailed appeal from Ken
Schroder, and remarks
from O.H. Walker, on
the effects of the recent
heavy rains.
City Administrator
Betty Taylor-Webb said
that costs have not yet
been detailed, but that


boat together."
The commission will
now take on the chal-
lenge of selecting one
or more city architects,
after receiving nine bids
for a recent request for
proposal. A committee
made up of Webb, as well
as Cook and Leon Blood-
worth, from Planning and
Zoning, will review the
RFPs.
Submitting proposals
were five Tallahassee
firms, Johnson Peterson
Architects, Clemons-
Rutherford, 4M Design
Group, EMO Architects
and MLD Architects; two
Panama City firms, JRA
Architects and Associ-
ates LLC Architects; and
two Apalachicola firms,
George Coon and Frank
Lucas, and Willoughby
Marshall.


Above: Volunteer fireman
Courtney G more,
Of Lanark Village,
announced the winners
from her perch atop the
ladder truck. Shown here
is the Eastpoint team, from
left, Jan and Van Mathis,
"Gumbo Specialist"
Richard Radford and Fire
Chief George Pruett.
Left: Mercedes Updyke,
of Lanark Village, gets
an impromptu lesson in
cast netting from Richard
Radford at the gumbo
cook-off.
Photos by LOIS SWOBODA | The Times

"We thought it was ter-
rific," he said. "I can't say
enough about the three
contestants. They were
great."


The planning board voted
6-1 last month to support
the moratorium, with
Jean Ulrich dissenting.
"I think we very much
need a commercial de-
velopment plan for St.
George Island, and I'm
going to ask the attorney
to work with me and be-
come part of a group that
will come up with a vi-
sioning plan," said Com-
missioner Pinki Jackel,
who said she is planning
a town hall meeting at
the St. George Island fire
house.
Commissioner Noah
Lockley said he had a
problem with a visioning
plan for just one section
of the county.
"Can we even do that?
There are commercial


districts all over the
county, and I think every-
body ought to have a say
if they're all going to be
affected," he said.
Olivier Monod, who
secured the OK Tues-
day for a controversial
grocery store develop-
ment on the island, said,
"If there's going to be a
moratorium, it ought to
be on building on the en-
tire island, because the
commercial district has
the least impact. There
are houses in the Planta-
tion that are bigger than
either of these stores. I
think I am doing the right
thing and they are doing
the wrong thing."


By Lois Swoboda


event to benefit his depart-
ment, which has suffered
from financial woes during
the past year.
On Sunday he was still


tallying earnings from the
cook-off but said he was
very pleased with the turn-
out and is already planning
for next year.


APALACHICOLA from page A1 T0510 l)Ud5 tinal tLnr ub eei


V V


$slanders finish

10 fir81 p oce

By Lois Swoboda
Times StaffWriter
The first ever Lanark
Village Gumbo Cook-off
was both a culinary and
monetary success.
Three teams squared
off Saturday at the Lanark
Boat Club to vie for the
title of Franklin County
Gumbo King, and the visi-
tors to the cook-off were
the winners.
The Franklin County
Sheriff's Office took on
the volunteer fire depart-
ments from Eastpoint and
St. George Island. Sausage
was chopped and sim-
mered with fresh shrimp,
crab, spices and okra.
The three offerings
were surprisingly differ-
ent, and each was unique-
ly delicious. The Eastpoint
gumbo was tomato-based
and, appropriately, added
oysters to the other ingre-
dients. St. George Island
offered up a denser, meat-
ier product that was long
on texture, featuring two
kmnds of sausage.
The sheriff's dish was
mesp can haxc nti nalb
ly fragrant with a complex
flavor. Could the secret in-
gredient have been curry?
The contestants sold
cups of their confections
through the day, and vol-
unteers served about
100 bowls of chicken and
shrimp gumbo inside the
boat club. All proceeds go
to the St. James Island-
Lanark Village Volunteer
Fire Department.
When the steam had
cleared, there was an
award for each entry. The
islanders finished first,
Eastpoint second and the
sheriff's office third. The
judges agreed that it was a
very tough decision.
"We're winners just by
being here," said Sheriff
Skip Shiver.
Mike Rundel, Lanark's
fire chief, organized the


MO RATO RIUM from pane Al





IV


Thursday, October 8, 2009


SPECIAL TO THE TIMES


The site plan for the proposed grocery store on Franklin Avenue.


"It is possible and even
likely that parts of park-
ing spaces will be driven
over by trucks," Pierce
said, referring to planning
board member Mary Lou
Short's contention that
nine parking spaces would
be infringed on by delivery
trucks, which is unlawful.
But Pierce added that
this would not be the case
if the spaces were occu-
pied and that there was
adequate room for trucks
to maneuver without in-
fringing on parking.
Following Pierce's
notes, County Attorney
Michael Shuler told com-
missioners he concurred
with the county planner.
"I think he has made
the correct legal and code
conclusions," he said.
Commissioner Pinki
Jackel, whose district in-
cludes the island, spoke
directly to Monod before
the vote.
"You have made my life
very difficult and given me
a considerable amount of
heartburn. Since this has
started, there has been
controversy, some fair
and some not. I have had
numerous e-mails, phone
calls and visits. I have
spent many hours consid-
ering the issue," she said.
"It's been about 50-50.
When the board votes on
this, there are going to be
some unhappy people. We
have been advised by the
attorney that this project
meets code," Jackel said.
"Even so I have concerns.
I will have my eye on you."
Commissioner Cheryl
Sanders said that she had
received more e-mails fa-
vorable to the project than
opposed to it, and that cur-
rent economic conditions


had prompted positive
comments.
"Business is business,"
Commissioner Noah Lock-
ley said. "If a person comes
in and they meet the code,
we can't deny it. They
meet the code. I don't see
anything else we can do."
Commissioners ques-
tioned Monod closely on
the project. He assured
them that local people
would be employed to build
and run the store, and that
the construction phase
would last six months and
employ 20 workers.
"Riley Palmer has
made arrangements with
local subcontractors," he
promised.
He also said 30 county
residents would be em-
ployed in the finished
store.
"I have a verbal agree-
ment from the tenant,"
Monod said. "I made it
clear that employment of
a Franklin County work-
force was not optional. It
was a must."
Following the project's
approval, Charlotte Bach-
er, owner of the island's
Some Like It Hotter,
warned commissioners
that the new store would
take away jobs as well. She
said the project would af-
fect 22 island businesses
and their employees.
"What will you say to
the 126 employees who will
be affected?" she asked.
Monod also assured the
board that from now on,
lighting in the windows of
the Trading Post will be
dimmed or extinguished
at night so as to be turtle-
friendly. He said the needs
of nesting sea turtles and
hatchlings will be taken
into consideration when


the new store is construct-
ed adjacent to the Trading
Post.
Shuler assured the
commission that before a
building permit is issued,
all of the land used in the
project will be joined in a
restrictive covenant, re-
ducing title of the various
parcels to a single entity.
Monod said he has a 15-
year lease with a tenant to
operate the space as a gro-
cery store.
About 80 people were
present when the com-
missioners' decision was
made, and most left imme-
diately afterward.
Following Tuesday's
meeting, Short came for-
ward during the citizen
comments and tendered
her resignation from Plan-
ning and Building. Gayle
Dodds had resigned at the
end of the Sept. 29 plan-
ning board.
"Two more may follow
me," Short told commis-
sioners. "Planning and
Building feels there is no
need for them. The attor-
ney told the board we were
not to hear the public at
our meeting. We have been
in the practice of letting
everyone speak. Explain
that to me. I think Alan
(Pierce) owes the (Plan-
ning and Building) board
an explanation. This is the
same code we have ap-
plied to other businesses.
How it this different?"
Short said both Island
Adventures and Island
Outfitters were required
to make changes to out-
door displays because
equipment encroached
on parking spaces. Jackel
said she was unaware this
had happened.
"Look at the building


code and see what the
planner should be doing."
Short said. "His project
should have required a
complete review. You have
set a precedent. We looked
at this as a total project,
three buildings. Now 22, 000
square feet now filter into
an aerobic septic system."


Planning 800ft
Labored long
in itS reVIOW
Tuesday's approval
followed multiple delays,
and a heated controversy,
in the review process for
the structure. Businesses
on the island circulated
a petition protesting the
construction of a "big box"
structure, and angry e-
mails surfaced about the
store and its developers.
Rumors, since debunked,
circulated that the St.
George Inn would be torn
down.
At the planning board's
Sept 29 meeting, Jim Wad-
dell of Inovia Consulting
Group presented a site
plan slightly altered from
when it appeared on the
planning board's agenda
Aug. 10. The new plan
shows a walkway connect-
ing the Trading Post and
the proposed store.
Monod said the con-
nection was requested by
Nissim Afuta, who leas-
es the existing Trading
Post building and would
also lease retail space in
the grocery store. Other
changes were the addition
of parking in front of the
complex and to the east,
and a further small reduc-
tion in the footprint of the
proposed store.
Angry islanders ex-


pressed strong opposition
to the construction of a
second large retail build-
ing and demanded details
about parking, trash dis-
posal and future contin-
gencies should the con-
nected buildings change
ownership.
Short, who owns a
beach shop on the island,
recused herself at the
August meeting, but was
seated with the board on
Sept. 29 after Shuler ex-
plained why there was no
conflict of interest.
"You (Short) are not in
business this applicant,"
he said. "You're not related
to him, and, for the record,
you don't stand to gain any
business benefit."
In her opposition to
parking on the right-of-
way and encroachment
on parking spaces by de-
livery trucks, Short joined
Other island residents who
insisted Trading Post cus-
tomers' parking is already
a problem.
Pierce said that the big-
gest problem with both the
existing business and the
proposed plan is that "it
doesn't keep people on his
property," when parking,
but that landscaping and
barriers had been worked
into the proposed plan to
discourage parking on the
right-of-way.
Short, Dodds and resi-
dent Gail Riegelmayer ar-
gued it was unsafe to have
delivery trucks in proxim-
ity to parking areas and
pedestrians. Waddell said
Afuta would negotiate with
vendors for deliveries dur-
ing off-peak hours when
parking spaces would not
be needed.
Chuck Caruthers, own-
er of the Market Place, an


existing grocery store on
East Pine Street, warned
that delivery trucks would
cause traffic jams.
"My store is much
smaller than the proposed
grocery store," he said.
"I have 23 tractor-trailers
and box trucks that deliver
to my store. ITwelve come
once a week, the others
twice or more. They often
arrive three or four at a
time and they are lined up
in the alley. They are all on
regular routes. They de-
liver between 8 a.m. and
3 p.m. There is no after-
hours delivery."
Riegelmayer produced
photos of trash around two
grocery stores in Apala-
chicola and said that simi-
lar litter would be gener-
ated by the new store in
the most prominent area
of the island.
"Our code doesn't cover
Dumpsters," said Pierce.
"By having this building
set back, I think it will soft-
en the effect."
Vice Chairman Larry
Perryman said that there
were other concerns be-
sides the building code.
"You don't need seven
people on a board to deter-
mine if a building meets
code," he said. "What is
the purpose of this board if
not the human factor?"
Gordon Adkins, a real-
tor for Weichert Realty,
said, "I have paid taxes
here since 1978. I love
the island. I am very sup-
portive of this plan and of
property rights. We need
employment, and we need
good development."
The planning board
voted 5-2 against the proj-
ect, with only Dakie Ward
and Steve Davis dissent-
ing.


BANK from page Al

Biliter said each of the em-
ployees who lost his or her job
received a severance package
from the company.
"No one had any more heart-
burn than me," he said. "And it's
tough. You pray they'll find new
jobs."
Biliter said the closure was
prompted by the general eco-
nomic conditions besetting the
country.
"We're a large bank, with 75
offices even after the closures,"
he said, noting that the bank has
203 employees in Florida, and
about 600 in Alabama, the two
states in which it operates.
"The questions are 'How do
we increase capital?' and 'How
to we reduce expenses?' and
those feed each other," said Bili-
ter. "By cutting out expenses, it
helps build capital reserves,
"Fortunately we have been


able to enjoy a very high capital
level historically and still main-
tain a high level," he said.
The bank, with about $3.1 bil-
lion in assets, is owned by Su-
perior Bancorp Inc., which was
one of 120 of the nation's finan-
cial institutions to first receive
money from the federal govern-
ment's Troubled Asset Relief
Program (TARP) program.
In December, Superior Ban-
corp completed the sale of
$69 million in Preferred Stock
and Warrants to the U.S. Depart-
ment of the Treasury as part of
its Voluntary Capital Purchase
Program.
The bank's non-accruing
loans, defined as loans that are
more than 60 days past due with
no payments being made, and
that have stopped accruing in-
terest, nearly tripled from June
2008 to June 2009, from about


$37 million to $105 million.
In addition, the bank corpora-
tion nearly tripled its volume of
"other real estate owned," from
$12 million to nearly $35 million.
This was due to foreclosures
and other acquisitions of prop-
erties that now remain largely
unsold.
As a result of these loan and
foreclosure woes, the Superior
Bank's troubled asset ratio,
according to a report on the
nation's banks by the American
University School of Communi-
cations and based on filings with
the federal government, is about
four times the national median.
The report said Superior
Bank lost about $4.5 million as
of June 2009, compared with a
profit of about $1.6 million the
year before.
Still, compared with many
of Florida' troubled banks, Su-


perior remains in relatively
good shape, with capital grow-
ing between 2008 and 2009 from
$211 million to $265 million.
"We've enjoyed a better expe-
rience than many of our peers,
which is why it's a natural
logic to what can we do to help
strengthen during a difficult
time and minimize the impact
to a customer or a community,"
said Biliter.
He acknowledged that the
Carrabelle closure would be an
inconvenience to area custom-
ers, but said that maintaining
the Apalachicola and Port St.
Joe branches will lessen the
problem.
"We tried to make decisions
to create cost reductions and not
have a dramatic impact to our
customer service relationship,"
he said. "Between our Apala-
chicola and Carrabelle offices,


we have had a very healthy re-
lationship with the county, and
with city government, and we
work very diligently to sustain
that and be a good citizen in the
community.
"We, like any other business
or institution, are faced with the
economy that has been dealt
us," Biliter said.
Superior continues to own
the land and building where the
Carrabelle branch stood, Biliter
said, and the company plans to
keep it in good shape as it seeks
a buyer.
"We have been approached
by a couple of interested par-
ties, but nothing's definite," he
said. "We continue to maintain
it and will, and don't want to do
anything that will create a less
than desirable physical facade
until we are successful in find-
ing a buyer."


A6 | The Times


Local


GROCERY from page Al















Thursday, October 8, 2009 w w w. a pala ch t i mes co0m Page 7


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Sophomore Oneika Lockley has played extremely
well for the Seahawks and will continue to get
stronger and more dominant over the next two
years. She is exciting to watch when her game is
turned up full strength. Oneika could take it to
the next level if she continues to work hard in the
off season on volleyball skills. She has improved so
much since last season and has been fun to watch
grow as an athlete. Oneika struck a total of 11
C~C~CC~:kills down onto the opponents' side of the court
this week, including a new personal best with nine
in one game against Wewa. She served a total of
10 points, with five being aces, and also recorded
seven digs, 11 assists, and one block on the week.




SPECIAL RATES FOR NEW CUSTOMERS!


I e


By Christy Thompson
Special to the Times

The Lady Seahawks
played two district rivals
last week at home and
came up short on the first
match. Fortunately for the
Seahawks, this loss will not
count on the district record
because it was just an add-
on to the schedule due to a
lack of games.
The girls just weren't
playing good volleyball as
a team against the Wewa
Gators. Maybe this was be-
cause, in their minds, the
match didn't count. Never-
theless, we let the Gators
come in and take us down in
our on gym. It was an emo-
tional loss for our seniors
Joy Carrino and Monet Mo-
ron. I think that they have
come to realize the impact
of high school memories
and just how short of time
there is to make them.
As a team, there were
just way too many missed
serving points. A couple of
our key players just didn't
bring the heat that we
needed against the Gators.
It seemed like they got bet-
ter as the matches played
on and we got strategically
worse.
After falling 24-26, the Se-
ahawks came back during
the second match to record
a 25-22 win, but followed up
with back-to-back losses,
25-23 and 25-18, to finish the
game. The girls played hard,
but just made too many er-
rors during the night to give
the Gators the edge.
Moron played her heart
out with superb digs for
the crew, but it just wasn't
enough to make up for all of
the missed serving oppor-
tunities by the Seahawks.
Carrino served a total of
30 points on the evening,
making this a personal best


Photos by DAVID ADLERSTEIN
I The Times
Freshman Chena Segree
had nine serving points
in the win over West
Gadsden.


,ra- dsl



Lady Seahawks Desirae Cummings leaps to the net
while Brooke Harper waits at right in action against
West Gadsden.


for the season. Sophomore
Oneika Lockley brought
the volleyball down for
nine kills on the Gators.
I'm pretty sure that this is
a season personal best for
her, as well.
We made great plays and
gave tremendous effort for
the most part; it just didn't
make up for the points we
gave away on serving as a
team. Thank goodness we
have a chance to keep our
record clean with the Ga-
tors in district play, as this
one didn't really count. I
think the girls will be ready
to take it to the next level
when the Gators visit our
gym once again Thursday,
Oct. 8.
The second game of the
week against West Gadsden
was nothing more than a


light scrimmage for the Se-
ahawks. It was a stress-free
volleyball game and allowed
an opportunity for Coach
David Walker to try different
approaches with some of the
players. It really was quite
the opposite of the previous
game against Wewa.
The serving dominated
as Carrino and Moron
served 19 aces between
the two of them. Freshmen
Chena Segree followed up
with nine serving points
herself to easily put this one
away for the Seahawks. We
won in three straight sets
with scores of 25-15, 25-15
and 25-5.

Christy Thompson is
assistant coach of the Lady
Seahawks, coached by Da-
vid Walker.


Senior Joy Carrino has played outstanding thus
far in the season and couldn't be more of a leader,
giving 150 percent on that court each and every
game. She has a great attitude and strives to keep
her team positive on the court. The setter for the
Lady Seahawks, Joy has the ability to play any
position on the court, except maybe to block. She
is just over 5' tall, but this hasn't stopped her from
dominating on the court and giving her absolute
best every game. Joy recorded an astonishing
total of 45 serving points on the week, 20 of which
were aces. She accumulated 25 assists, five kills,
and four digs as well against the Wewa and West
Gadsden district challenges.


CA RRA BE L LE APA LA CH ICO LA


A
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Thursday, October 8, 2009 w w w. ap ala ch ti me s. co0m Page 1


B
Section


En


C


By David Adlerstein
Times City Editor
Those who think the Christian faith
is a somber affair all about keeping
a serious demeanor and minding your
manners didn't attend the "Reveille
Presents" dinner theatre in the high
school cafetorium last month.
In front of a full house, comprised of
an audience of at least 275, members
of Reveille, the drama ministry team
from Eastpoint Church of God, pre-
sented an exuberant, passionate and
at times hilarious dinner theatre that
refused to allow itself to be uptight or
stuffy.
Pastor Casey Smith, who emceed
the theatre, held Sunday evening,
Sept. 27, made it clear from the outset
that the evening would be full of sur-
prises.
Firstly, there was no cutlery, not
even plastic forks.
"Everything you eat, you have to do
it with your hands," said Pam Shiver,
the church's drama coordinator, ex-
plaining that the concept was modeled
after the Dixie Stampede, a popular
entertainment venue that features a
variety of acts enjoyed by diners, seat-
ed in the round.
"There, while you're eating with
your hands, you stomp with your feet,"
she said. "It's just something fun,
something different."
About 40 volunteers from the
church did everything under the sun
to make the event a success, includ-


ing cooking the succulent half-chicken
dinners, providing child care, serv-
ing up the meals, coordinating ticket
sales, costuming, constructing the
lighting and sound and managing the
stage production.
"This is our third dinner theater
but in other times we've had it at the
church. We did several shows in times
past, but it was too much," said Shiver.
"We decided we'd try to find a bigger
venue and just do one show. It was
perfect."
The focus of the evening was on the
21 Drama Team members, ranging in
age from 13 to 19, who performed ev-
erything from comedy skits and musi-
cal performances to expressive dance,
all while servers made sure all the din-
ers were catered to.
"Our goal too was to be able to min-
ister to as many people as possible,"
said Shiver. "In these difficult econom-
ic times the stress of everyday life can
take the joy from hardworking people
and our goal through this dinner the-
ater was to provide a night of light-
hearted family-oriented fun, while giv-
ing the drama team an opportunity to
exploit the talents they have cultivated
through countless hours of hard work
and dedication."
Reveille came up with some origi-
nal pieces, as well as performed dra-
matic and comic sketches that they
had gleaned from other groups. "We
try to appeal to every age group," said
Shiver.
While they were funny on the sur-


face, the skits dealt with
serious subjects, just from
a fresh angle. One was on
"How to Pray," in which play-
ers explored different ways of
praying earnestly, sincerely
and from the heart, and anoth-
er was on "Wrong Ways to Wit-
ness," using satire to explore
how best to reach people, and
how not to turn them off.
"Lord, Ithank you for the air,
and I thank you for the bacteria
in the air," said one actor. "Lord,
I thank you for this new way of
praying."
As Pastor Smith put it while on
stage. "it's all about relationship and
that begins with simple communica-
tion."
There were traditional gospel
songs, performed by Chase Richards,
Garrett Creamer and Youth Minister
Scott Shiver. There was audience par-
ticipation and light-hearted comedy,
all leading to a dramatic and moving
expressive dance performance of the
last three days of Jesus' life on Earth,
Working behind the scenes with
Pam Shiver were Jason Register, as-
sistant director, and Shawna Martina,
with drama team support.
Members of Reveille include Levi
Odom, Brittany Hunnings, Kruiz Dick-
erson, Morgan Golden, Jared Mock,
Morgan Newell, Austin Larkin, Mor-
gan Mock, Austin Martina, Kristin
Putnal, Cody Lyston, Anny Wharrie,
Masan Crosby, Abbie Wharrie, Jason


Chase Richards performs on guitar.

Thompson, Kayle Causey, Mallorie
Jones, Allison Odom, Katie Maxwell,
Leannne Lyston and Alex Causey, who
is currently out with an injury.
Reveille is a part of the Eastpoint
Church of God Frontline Youth Minis-
try, which continues to provide a plat-
form for the arts to include music, the-
ater, and dance to several generations
of youth. The ministry has mentored
and supported young people and posi-
tively channeled their energy while
encouraging them to remain account-
able in behavior to each other and to
the program.
"Through various ministries within
the youth group we have seen behav-
iors modified through self control,
self-esteems boosted, youth become
goal-oriented, and also learn the im-
portance of levels of authority," said
Pam Shiver.


~Li~i~


PHOTOS BY DAVID ADLERSTEIN
Appearing in a performance of "David and Goliath," are, Kalye Performing a comic skit are Levi
Causey (crying in blue), Jason Thompson, kneeling, and Levi Odom, kneeling, right, and Jared
Odom. Mock.


Kelson Smith overcomes his stage fright as
he takes part in the audience participation
portion of "Reveille Presents."


In the dramatic closing number, Levi Odom portrayed Jesus, while
Jared Mock is standing at right, and Cody Lyston is kneeling at
right. At Jesus' feet are Morgan Golden, Brittany Hunnings and
Anny Wharrie, all dressed entirely in black.


Sissy Smith, at left, gives an enthusiastic
demonstration during the audience
participation portion while Tonner Segree
listens.


LIFE


TI~ES


dl


Reveille delights full house with dinner theatre


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Thursday, October 8, 2009


B2 | The Times


Local


The pirates have landed!
More than 20, ages 5 months to 10
years old, appeared at the pavilion at
the St. George Island State Park this
past Saturday.
The pirates enjoyed digging for
gold, walking the plank, throwing
cannon balls, and reading pirate
tales. All the fun was sponsored by
the Franklin County Public Library
and the Florida State Parks, in
recognition of Florida Literacy
Month.
The Carrabelle branch of the
Franklin County Public Library will
host writer Patti Byers, author of
the book, "Separate Foundations,"
on Thursday, Oct. 8, at 5:30 p.m. The
public is invited to meet this special
author and pick up a signed copy of
her novel.


Free computer classes will be
offered by the library in Eastpoint
during the months of October and
November.
Dates and class offerings are
just now being firmed up. Call the
Eastpoint library at 670-8151 to
register.
Story Time with Miss Dany is
every Friday afternoon at 3:30 p.m.
at the Eastpoint Library. Children
age 5 to 10 are invited to listen along.
Each week, outstanding children's
literature is shared, along with
the chance to participate in crafts,
games, and snacks.
For more information about the
Franklin County Public Library and
any of its programs, contact the
Carrabelle Branch at 697-2366 or the
Eastpoint library at 670-8151.


This portrait of
Katie Jane and
Josh standing on
1950s Main Street,
is one of four 12-
foot square murals
by artist Shannon
Lake in Jonesboro,
Geor ia that shove
scenes from the
historical novel,
"Separate Fountains"
by Jonesboro native
Patti Byars, who
will speak at the
Carrabelle library
Oct. 8.


COURTESY OF PATTI BYARS


Lindsey Gray turns 7
Lindsey Gray will celebrate
her seventh birthday on Thurs-
day. Oct. 8.
She is the daughter of Tracy
and Rick Gray, of Alamogordo,
N.M.
Paternal grandparents are
Betty and Jake Gray, of Amarillo,
Texas. Maternal grandparents
are Helene and Joe Square, of
Eastpoint.





Emily Devlin born
gmifEly JeanetteLDevlin,na
SBeth Devlin, of Fountain, was
Born at Bay Medical Center
on Monday, Sept. 7, 2009.
She weighed 8 lbs. 13 oZs.
and was 22 inches long.
Emily was welcomed
home by her sister, Isaiah,
and her brother, Larry III.
Proud grandparents are
Larry Sr. and Diane Devlin,
of New Gretna, N.J. ang
Mike and Jeanette Malone,
of Eastpoint.


-~Lli


,


The Miss Franklin
County and the Miss
Florida Forgotten Coast
Christmas pageant will
be held Saturday, Nov.
14 at the former Carra-
belle High School, to be
followed by the Franklin
County Talent Show.


Entry deadline is Nov.
4, with no exceptions.
The Miss Forgotten
Coast Christmas Pageant
will be open to partici-
pants from all counties,
Scholarships will be avail-
able for seniors.
Early entrants will re-


ceive a crown (for the first
10 paid contestants).
Beauty entry is $75 for
one pageant, or $140 for
both. Mother-and-daugh-
ter entry is $80.
Talent entry is $50,
with winner receiving a
half-jackpot.
Natural beauty entry,
which features no pageant
attire, "Sunday Best" only
and natural photo is $75.
Admission at the door
is $10 for adults and $5
for children ages 12 and
under. Many door prizes
and drawings will be con-
ducted.
The pageant for ages
birth to 4 years old will
begin at 10:30 a.m. and
ages 5 and older will be-
gin at 2:30 p.m. The talent
competition begins at 4
p.m. and is open to every-
one.
"We need all ages,
women, girls and boys,"
said Georgette Colson,
pageant director. "Please
try to support all the
brave contestants. They
all need you. Many thanks
to everyone who gave
their support in 2008. I
am looking for a greater
turnout in 2009."
Please call or e-mail
Colson, director and own-
er, at 653-7634 or info@
A1BeachPhotography.
com for all questions and
entry forms.


APALACHTIMES.COM


Library HAPPENINGS


Births and BIRTHDAYS


HELPING STRENGTHEN FAMILY BONDS









~~* ?









PHOTO BY CAROL BARFIELD
In a special collaboration with the Friends of the Franklin County Public Library's TIGERS and
KIT Programs, Guiding Good Choices conducted a five-session parenting workshop series at
the Program's Youth Center in Apalachicola during the month of September. Guiding Good
Choices is a prevention program, sponsored by the Florida Center for Prevention Research at
F orida State University, and designed for parents who want to strengthen family bonds and
reduce the risk factors associated with substance abuse.
Twenty-two caregivers and youth program workers attended the parenting workshop that was
conducted by Jennifer Travieso from DISC Village, in partnership with Big Bend Community
Based Care. She is shown above, at left, with Katy Williams, seated, and Patricia Jones.
Seven participants completed the entire program. Guiding Good Choices has been offered
throughout the country and has been honored with several citations of excellence including
Model Program (the highest possible achievement) from the Substance Abuse and Mental
Health Services Administration.



M Pageants slated for Nov. 14 in Carrobelle


Always

Online





.......... ......... ......... ......... ........*


Local BRIEFS


First Pentecostal Holiness Church
379 Brownsville Road Apalachicola


Sunday School 9:45 am
Sunday Morning Worship 10:45 am
Sunday Evening Service 6:00 pm
Monday, Youth Group 6:30 pm
Wednesday, Royal Rangers, G.A.P. 7:00 pm
Wednesday Worship & Word 7:30 pm
Nursery Provided during regular church services



The United Methodist Churches

SOf Franklin County Welcome You

First United Methodist Church of Apalachicola
Worship ServiceSH1:00 a.m. erey Sunday

75 5" St. Apalachicola 653-9530 fumcapalach@gtcom.net
Pastor: Rev. Them Patriotis
Carrabelle United Methodist Church
Worship Services 10:45 a.m. Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
"Celebrate Recovery" Mondays 7-9 p.m.
Healing service first Tuesday each month-7 p.m.
102 NE Ae. B Canabelle 697-3672

Eastpoint United Methodist Church
Worship Service 10:00 a.m. every Sunday
Prayer 9:15 a.m. Waffles & Wisdom 11:15 a.m.
Healing Service every first Fridays of the Month at 6:30 p.m.
317 Patton Dr. (corner of David St.) -670-8825
Pastor: Rev. Beth White
St. George Island United Methodist Church
9:00 a.m. Worship Service
10:00 a.m. Fellowship Hour
201 E. Gulf Beach Dr. 927- 4635 www.sgiumc.org
Pastor: Rev. Them Patriotis


St. Patrick Catholic Church
Ave C & Sixth Street in Apalachicola, FL32329 or
The Islander (Across from the Blue Parrot)
on St. George Island, FL 32328
(850) 653 -9453 Email: stpatcath efairpoint. net
PASTOR: FATHER ROGER LATOSYNSKI
www. stpatricksmass. com
APALACHICOLA MASS SCHEDULE
SATURDAY................. ................5 PM
SUNDAY ................ .................... 10 AM
ST. GEORGE ISLAND MASS SCHEDULE
SUNDAY ................ .................8:30. AM


IV


Thursday, October 8, 2009


Local


The Times | B3


Thank you, Jesus! The
rain didn't reach us and
we had a great day for the
98 Yard Sales. Looked like
everyone had shoppers.
Looking forward to next
year.
Had breakfast at Chillas
and while I was there I
picked up one of the new
area phone books. Kathy
Swaggerty and Aline
Benson put it together from


the membership list. No ads served at Chillas Hall this


potatoes, gravy, green
beans, corn-in-the-husk,
dessert and coffee. Your
donation will be collected
at the bar. Spend the
afternoon watching your
favorite college football
team on one of the three big
screen TVs. Public always
welcome.
While you're getting your
mail, or just out walking,
stop in at Chillas Hall for


a cup of coffee or two, and
maybe some of Jo Ann's
homemade baked goods.
Coffee is 30 cents a cup.
Can't beat that with a stick!
Be kind to one another
and check in on the sick
and housebound. Don't take
an wooden nickels.
Until next time, God
Bless America, our troops,
the poor, homeless, and
hungry.


are in the book.
Don't forget about
Hamburger Night Friday.
Serving begins at 5 p.m.
Always something to do.
Play pool and shuffleboard,
bar bingo, enjoy the music,
or just have your favorite
beverage and visit
with your friends and
neighbors.
Breakfast will be


Saturday, Oct. 10. Members
of the Lanark Village Golf
Club will be glad to fix you
a plate. Your donation of $5
will be greatly appreciated.
See ya there!
At dinner time on
Saturday, beginning at
2 p.m. (not the usually 5
p.m.), come on down to
the Legion and pig out on
grilled Boston butt, mashed


LANARKILNWS
Jim Welsh


United Bantist to mark
ilomecoming Sunday
Pastor Bobby Shiver and The
United Baptist Church, 37 Brian
Street, in Eastpoint will be celebrat-
ing their 27th annual Homecom-
ing on Sunday, Oct. 11
Guest speaker will be Brother
Monroe Register from Fellowship
Baptist Church, in Apalachicola.
The schedule of events
begins with Sunday School at 10
a.m., followed by morning worship


(C Sh h BR IE FC
at 11 a.m.
Lunch will be served immediate-
ly following morning service and a
Gospel Sing will follow lunch. Local
singers will be featured.
Come worship and enjoy fellow-
ship with us.
For more information, call Sheila
Chambers at 899-3740.

( ggy 1 Of G0d to present
y0Utli musical Sunday
On Sunday evening, Oct 11 at 6


p.m., the Eastpoint Church of God
will present a children's musical
production called "Down By the
Creek Bank."
The performance will feature
songs and drama by the church's el-
ementary school aged youth.
The curtain goes up at 6 p.m. at
the church's main sanctuary, at 379
Avenue A in Eastpoint. This is part
of the Sunday evening service and
there is no charge,
For more information, call the
church office at 670-8704.


THE
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
WELCOMES YOU


.......... ......... ......... ......... .........

(ARD OF THANKS


THE

EPIHSUCROCPAL


like to thank Tim Sember and Tony Rizzo for their
musical performance. Ingrid Matlock designed
and sewed our beautifully made banners. Thanks,
Ingrid! We especially appreciate the folks that took
the time to attend our fundraiser and support our
church. Thank you!
For updates regarding church happenings
visit our website at www.1utheransonline.com/
trinityofwakulla. For more information call 926-
7808 or email trinityofwakullaeyahoo.com.
Join us at Trinity Lutheran Church, 3254
Coastal Highway, for Sunday school and worship
each Sunday morning at 9 and 10 a.m. respectively.
We have two entrances: one directly across
Highway 98 from Wakulla High School and the
other just south of Eden Springs on Crawfordville
Highway (Highway 319).


Ti ni ty
EST. 1836

Hwy. 98 & 6th St.
Apalachicola
SUNDAY: 8:00 AM 10:30 AM
LIBRARY HOURS:
SUNDAY 12:00 2:00 PM
MONDAY 11:00 AM 1:00 PM
WEDNESDAY 12:00 2:00 PM
THURSDAY 3:30 5:30 PM


and Barbara Sanders are
organizing an ongoing
trash pick-up in the Gulf
Beaches area of St. George
Island. They are seeking
volunteers who will be as-
signed a specific clean up
area.
The idea is to take own-
ership of the condition
of a selected "neighbor-
hood" by picking up trash
as needed on an ongoing
basis. Citizens can do this
as part of their daily rou-
tine when they walk a pet
or take a morning con-
stitutional. Why not bend
and stretch while you get
your aerobic workout in?
Participating might have
Other benefits as well.
There is a rumor that
official T-shirts are in the
works. If you want to help
or have any other ideas
about good ways to keep


the island clean, please
contact Long at 927-3776
or adalongeuab.edu.

Casting callI set for
'Seeing StarS 10

Auditions for "Seeing
Stars in Dixie," by Ron
Osborne, will be held at
the Eastpoint Firehouse,
Tuesday and Wednesday,
Oct. 27 and 28, at 7 p.m.
The action in this Pan-
handle Players produc-
tion to be performed in
late January 2010, centers
around Clemmie's Tea
Room, which is all abuzz
with the news that Holly-
wood is coming to film a
Civil War Romance in Nat-
chez, Mississippi.
It's 1956 and Elizabeth
Taylor and Montgomery


Clift will be walking the
streets of their town, may-
be even coming to have
tea.
The best and the worst
of Clemmie's zany friends
and patrons are revealed
as they vie for a small
role in the movie. Clem-
mie herself, the widowed
proprietor with a fascina-
tion for movies, longs for a
moment of fame. Will petty
competition ruin relation-
ships or will goodness
prevail? 'Twists, turns, and
revelations promise to en-
tertain in this hilarious,
heartwarming, Southern
comedy.
During the Oct. 27 and
28 auditions, director Mar-
gy Oehlert will be seeking
players for four female
roles and one male role.
Contact Margy at 670-8874
for more information'


Lanark NEWS


Weems East Urgent

Care Chmnc reschedules


grOundbreakiing for Oct. 13
The groundbreaking ceremony at the future site of
Weems Medical Center East Urgent Care Clinic has been
rescheduled for Tuesday, Oct. 13 after rain canceled plans
for gathering Aug. 27.
The ceremony will take place at 5 p.m. at the clinic
site, next to the Franklin County Health Department An-
nex on NE 5th Street in Carrabelle.
"We invite all citizens of Franklin County to the cer-
emony," said Weems CEO Chuck Colvert. "On that after-
noon, county commissioners, Carrabelle city commis-
sioners and members of the hospital's governing body
will officially dedicate the land for the new clinic."
The clinic will replace Weems' temporary clinic now
open three-and-one-half days a week in Carrabelle's Mu-
nicipal Complex. Construction is not expected to be com-
pleted until sometime in 2010.
Clemons, Rutherford & Associates, Inc. of Tallahas-
see is designing a single-story building just under 5,000
square feet, with a section for primary/urgent care on
one side and spaces for subspecialty physicians rotating
into the county from Tallahassee Memorial Healthcare
on the other side. A middle pod area will house laboratory
and radiology equipment servicing both sides.
Refreshments will follow the ceremony.


BLESS THE BEASTS AND THE FAITHFUL


An e cnn IP Blesei~n ofathe
afternoon at Trinity Episcopal
Church in A alachicola. About
a dozen pet parents gathered
to receive benediction from the
Rev. Kay Wheeler, Father Roger
;~'-~R-rt~Latosynski and Sister Jeanne
Drea. Music was provided by a
troupe of Celtic players.
Among the celebrants were
Adele and Newt Colston of St.
George Island. In this picture
the Colstons were devoutly '
following the service but their
two Australian Shepherds, Cash
in front and Zoe in the rear,
were focused on something
other than the prayers.
By Lois Swoboda


Always On line

\N\\*APALACHTIMES.COM


Octoberfest
Trinity Lutheran Church in Crawfordville
held an Oktoberfest fundraiser Saturday. The
day turned out beautifully with sunny skies and
a cooling breeze. Visitors enjoyed a pancake
breakfast, baked goods, and fabulous yard sale
items. Many folks returned for lunch, which
consisted of grilled Bratwurst, kielbasa, hot dogs,
sauerkraut, authentic homemade German potato
salad, coleslaw and German chocolate cake. The
fundraiser was quite a success and because of this,
Thrivent Financial for Lutherans will contribute
a substantial amount of matching funds to Trinity
Lutheran Church.
Many thanks go to the Carrabelle IGA,
Wal-Mart and Winn Dixie for their generous
contributions to our fundraiser. We would also


WELCOMES YOU



Of the.

As cension
101 NE First Street
Carrabelle
SUNDAY
10:00 AIM


ABC School to hold

open house
The Apalachicola Bay
Charter School will host
a community Open House
and reception on Thurs-
day, Oct. 15 from 6 to 7:15

mFrom 6 to 6:30 p.m.
there will be a tour of
classrooms and build-
ing, from 6:30 to 7 p.m.
a meeting of the School

Andt r eTSafeo mn Lin
for Learning and from 7
to 7:15 p.m. there will be a
welcome address by Prin-
cipal Don Hungerford and
refreshments.


Help keep St. George
ISland clean
Ada Long, Bob Pruitt,





IV


Thursday, October 8, 2009


Local


suspect identified and an arrest
warrant issued.
Apalachicola Police Chief
Bobby Varnes expressed thanks
to those responsible for solving
this crime.

TWO ilUnt camos alvailable
in Tate's Hell
The hunt camps located at
Doyle Creek and Rake Creek
in Tate's Hell State Forest are
available for the season,
A drawing for the leases will
be held on Wednesday, Oct. 14 at
1 p.m. at Tate's Hell Division of
Forestry headquarters on Air-
port Road in Carrabelle To be
qualified you must have a valid
hunting license and fill out a
stub at the Tate's Hell office of-
fice.
You may enter on the day of
the drawing. You must be pres-
ent at the drawing to win. Les-
sees pay $100 a year for the use


of the camp.
For more information, call
697-3734.

Tf00 ers to conduct
Vehicle INSpections
Members in Troop H, Quincy
district, of the Florida Highway
Patrol plan to conduct driver li-
cense/vehicle inspection check-
points this month during day-
light hours at the following loca-
tions in Franklin County:
Thursday, Oct. 1 through Sat-
urday, Oct. 31: State Route 30,
SR 30A, SR 65, SR 384, SR 67, SR
377, SR 385, County Road 370,
CR 157, CR 59, CR 374, CR 30A
and SR 300 (St. George Island
Causeway) .
All personnel participating in
the checkpoints will be responsi-
ble for following the procedures
outlined in Chapter 17.12 of the
Florida Highway Patrol Policy
Manual regarding driver license


and vehicle inspection check-
points, said Lt. Mark Brown.

AARP to offer driver
Safety program
The AARP will offer a two-
day driver safety program next
month at the Senior Center in
Port St. Joe, 120 Library Drive,
across from the Gulf County
complex.
Instructor Richard Schafer
will teach the two-day, eight-
hour course, which will be held
from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Tuesday,
Oct. 27, and from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
on Wednesday, Oct. 28. Partici-
pants must attend both days.
Cost is $12 for AARP mem-
bers, and $14 for non-members.
Upon completion certificates
will be issued and they can be
used for auto insurance dis-
counts.
For more info, or to register,
call Schafer at 227-8719.


TilUfsday, Oct. 8
Individual computer instruction at Carrabelle
Library from 10 a.m. to noon. For more info, call
697-2366.
Yoga at Eastpoint Library from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m.
For more info, call 670-8151.
Wandering Star Quilting Club. Chillas Hall La-
nark Village. 1 to 3 p.m. Call Christine Hinton 697-
2551.
Community Luncheon and Information Spe-
cials at the Franklin County Senior Center in Car-
rabelle. Noon. $3 donation. Call 697-3760.
Friday, Oct. 9
Story hour at Carrabelle Library for ages 5 to 8,
from 3:30 to 4:30 p.m. For more info, call 697-2366.
Exercise class at Chillas Hall in Lanark Village.
9 to 10 a.m. Open to all and free.
Carrabelle History Museum, Old City Hall, 106
SE Avenue B in downtown Carrabelle, is open 10
a.m. to 4 p.m. today and Saturday. Free. For more
information, contact Tamara Allen at 697-2141.
Monday Oct. 12
Joint workshop with the Apalachicola City
Commission and Planning and Zoning board at
City Hall at 5 p.m. to discuss Apalachicola Water
Supply Plan. For more info, call 653-9319.
Apalachicola Planning and Zoning will hold a 6
p.m. regular meeting at City Hall. Agenda to include
approval of Apalachicola Water Supply Plan and
transmittal to City Commission for hearing/adop-
tion process. For more info, call 653-9319.
Yarn Junkies will meet at 7 to 9 p.m. at the
home of Kathy Robinson in Apalachicola. The newly
formed group is for knitters, crocheters and others
addicted to yarn. The group will meet each Monday
evening at an alternate location. For information,
call Robinson at 653-7196.
Harmonica at Eastpoint Library at 10 a.m. For
more info, call 670-8151.
Yoga at Eastpoint Library from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m.
For more info, call 670-8151.
Exercise class at Chillas Hall in Lanark Village.
9 to 10 a.m. Open to all and free.
Al-Anon meets at 5:30 p.m. at Trinity Episcopal
Church's Benedict Hall, at Sixth Street and Ave. D.
For more info, call 850-222-2294.
Bingo at the Franklin County Senior Center in
Carrabelle. Early bird at 6 p.m., regular bingo at 7
p.m. Cards begin at $4. Call 697-3760.
Franklin Cultural Arts Council invites
those interested to join in the formation of a
group to enhance the cultural environment and
economy of Franklin County through develop-
ment and promotion of the arts and cultural tour-
ism at 6 p.m. at the Carrabelle City Hall Complex
1001 Gray Ave. Contact Joe Taylor at palm2blue@
yahoo.com.
TUeSday, Oct. 13
Apalachicola Community Gardens will meet at
5 p.m. at Seafood Grill Restaurant. For more info,
call 653-9319.
Apalachicola CRA (Community Redevelop-
ment Agency) will meet at 5:15 p.m. at City Hall. For
more info, call 653-9319.
Kids Wii at Eastpoint Library from 5 to 6 p.m.
For more info, call 670-8151.
Breakfast at the Franklin County Senior Center
in Carrabelle. Coffee at 7:30 a.m., meal at 8 a.m. $2
suggested donation. Call 697-3760.
Bingo 7 p.m. St. George Island Fire Dept. 25
cents per card. Families welcome. Proceeds go to
St. George Island Civic Club. Call 927-4654.
Carrabelle Historical Society meets to share
stories about growing up in Carrabelle at 6 p.m. at
the Carrabelle Library. The event is free. Call 850-
697-2141 or e-mail Tamara Allen at thallenegtcom.
net'
Wednesday, Oct. I 4
Adult Wii at Eastpoint Library from 9 to 11 a.m.
For more info, call 670-8151.
Exercise class at Chillas Hall in Lanark Village.
9 to 10 a.m. Open to all and free.
T1UfSday, Oct. 15
Individual computer instruction at Carrabelle
Library from 10 a.m. to noon. For more info, call
697-2366.
Yoga at Eastpoint Library from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m.
For more info, call 670-8151.
Wandering Star Quilting Club. Chillas Hall La-
nark Village. 1 to 3 p.m. Call Christine Hinton 697-
2551.
Community Luncheon and Information Spe-
cials at the Franklin County Senior Center in Car-
rabelle. Noon. $3 donation. Call 697-3760.


CONTRIBUTED BY FRANKLIN COUNTY SHERIFF'S OFFICE
Bags of evi ence suggesting a marijuana growing operation were
seized from Douglas Topham's Eastpoint residence.




mnron ln n. r naus n rnte

l aiulla UMo in M 10 VVI lu l


On Friday, Oct. 2, members of
the Franklin County Sheriff's Office
executed a search warrant on the
residence of Douglas J. Topham, at
135 Daisey Street in Eastpoint.
Law enforcement officials said
Topham was using two rooms of his
mobile home as a marijuana grow-
ing operation. Deputies seized a
large quantity of marijuana, opium
seed pods, morphine and Xanax
medication.
One of the rooms was concealed
by a false wall designed and con-
structed for the sole purpose of


growing and cultivating marijuana.
Lighting and watering equipment,
bedding material, fertilizers and nu-
trients, and documentation on how
to grow marijuana were also seized.
Topham is charged with pos-
session of marijuana with intent to
distribute, possession of more than
20 grams of marijuana, possession
of Xanax, possession of morphine
and cultivation of marijuana. More
charges are pending further inves-
tigation. The street value of the
marijuana seized is estimated at
$14,000.


Three of the world's most recogniz-
able commercial fishing personalities
are helping Flonida mark National Sea-
food Month in October, and will soon be
featured in a public awareness campaign
promoting Flonida seafood products and
the "working waterfronts" where the
state's fishing heritage is preserved and
cultivated.
Captains Sig Hansen and Johnathan
and Andy Hillstrand well known to
viewers of the Discovery Channel's wildly
popular "Deadliest Catch" series about
Alaskan crab fishing in the Bering Sea
- will appear in television spots and
other media promoting Flonida's fishing
industry.
Flonida Agriculture Commissioner
Charles H. Bronson, whose department
promotes the state's agriculture and sea-
food industries and helps administer the
state's Working Waterfronts Program,
said he appreciates the popular fish-
ing celebrities' willingness to assist with
Florida's efforts.
"Whether fishing in subfreezing tem-
peratures in the Bering Sea or in balmy
waters off the Florida coast, America's
commercial fishermen understand the
hard work that goes into bringing in their
catch," Bronson said. "I'm delighted that
Sig, Johnathan and Andy are lending
their status as internationally known fish-
ing captains to help us raise public aware-
ness of the important contributions that
Florida's fishermen make to our state
and nation."
Bronson said that Florida's fishing in-


dustry has faced numerous challenges in
recent years. He hopes that as the public
learns more about Flonida fishermen and
the struggles they face to supply consum-
ers with quality products, the more they
will ask for domestically harvested sea-
food when shopping or dining out.
"In recent years, hurricanes have
damaged fishing fleets, equipment and
processing infrastructure, cheap sea-
food imports have flooded U.S. markets'
and soaring fuel prices have drastically
increased our fishermen's cost of do-
ing business," Bronson said. "But, even
when faced with this 'perfect storm' of
adversity, our state's fishermen perse-
vere. Consumers can help by always
asking for Florida-harvested seafood
products."
Florida's commercial fishermen annu-
ally harvest more than 83 million pounds
of quality seafood and fishery products
with a dockside value of more than $168
million. Florida leads the U.S. in the num-
ber of seafood processing businesses
with 500. Another 800 businesses buy
and sell seafood as dockside fish buyers,
wholesale brokers, importers or export-
ers. Retail and restaurant sales of Florida
products total $24 billion annually.
The television public service an-
nouncements featuring the three fish-
ing captains are expected to start airing
statewide in December. Images of Han-
sen, captain of the "Northwestern," and
the Hillstrand brothers, co-captains of
the "Time Bandit," will also appear in
print and web-based media.


Sheriff's

R EPOR T

Thefollowing reportispro-
vided by the Franklin County
Sheriff's Offece. Arrests are
made by officers from the fol-
lowing city, county, and state
law enforcement agencies:
Apalachicola (APD), Carra-

I tolC DH) Franci g un
tU Sheriff's Offece (FCSO),
Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission
(FWC), Florida De artment
of Environmental Protection
uFEP) cFloi Dw isonnod
Florida Department of Agri-
culture and Consumer Ser-
vices (FLDOACS)
All defendants are consid-
ered innocent until proven
guilty in a court of law.

Sept. 30
Chad Fish, 30, Melbourne,
reckless driving (CPD)

Oct. 1
James C. Garrett, 52,
Nashville, TN, felony driving
while license suspended or
revoked (FCSO)
Terry G. Hackett, 34, Nash-
ville, TN, grand theft of a mo-
tor vehicle (FCSO)
Sherry J. Bearden, 47,
Chunchula, AL, DUI (FCSO)
Jermaine Fedd, 34, Apala-
chicola, Calhoun County
warrant for failure to appear
(FCSO)
Daniel E. Moore, 20, Car-
rabelle, violation of probation

(CRhonda M. Banks, 36,
Apalachicola, violation of pro-
bation (FCSO)

Oct. 2
James Fenn, 49, Tallahas-
see, violation of probation
(FCSO)
Robert A. Hill, 19, Apala-
chicola, three counts grand
theft, four counts burglary of
a conveyance, petit theft and
criminal mischief over $200
(APD)
Timothy S. Ward, 27,
Apalachicola, criminal mis-
chief over $1,000 and throwing
deadly missile into a vehicle
(FCSO)
Douglas J. Topham, 54,
Eastpoint, possession of can-
nabis with intent to distribute,
possession of more than 20
grams of cannabis, posses-
sion of controlled substance
Xanax, possession of con-
trolled substance morphine
and cultivation of cannabis
(FCSO)

Oct. 3
John E. Evans, 42, Car-
rabelle, driving while license
suspended or revoked, resist-
ing arrest without violence
and disorderly intoxication
(CPD)
Jimmy L. Lolley, 18, Bris-
tol, resisting arrest without
violence (FCSO)
Francis E. Kahn, 70, Apala-
chicola, indecent exposure
and grand theft (APD)
Brittney E. Shiver, 22, East-
point, driving while licenses
suspended or revoked, and
fleeing or eluding law at high
speed (FCSO)

Oct. 4
Kristen Edgecomb, 28,
Crawfordville, two counts of
possession of controlled sub-
stance with intent to sell or
deliver (FCSO)
Denise Barwick, 47, East-
point, domestic battery
(FCSO)
James D. Barwick, 38,
Eastpoint, domestic battery
(FCSO)

Oct. 5
Horace A. Harris, 35, East-
point, criminal mischief and
violation of probation (FCSO)
Lance Echols, 38, Salmon,
ID, Walton County warrant
for failure to appear (FCSO)
Jason D. Keith, 28, Car-
rabelle, lewd and lascivious
conduct and sexual battery
(FCSO)


Mark A. Smith, 45, East-
point, two counts failure to
appear (FCSO)
Henry A. Shiver, 27, East-
point, violation of probation
(FCSO)
Michael L. Hendels, 24,
Apalachicola, violation of pro-
bation (FCSO)


B4 | The Times


Law BRIEFS


A alachicola police nah
aUto burglary suspect
Apalachicola police arrested
a 19-year-old Apalachicola man
Friday who they believe was
responsible for the burglary of
three vehicles late this summer
in the vicinity of Ellis Van Vliet
Street.
Apalachicola Officer Timmy
Davis served the warrant Fri-
day to arrest Robert Allen Hill
II, of 17th Street, on charges of
burglary of a conveyance, grand
theft third degree, criminal mis-
chief over $200 and petit theft.
On Aug. 29, at about 11 a.m.
Apalachicola Sgt. Chet Turner
had responded to a call in ref-
erence to a burglary of three
vehicles. An investigation, with
the assistance of Investigator
Brett Johnson, from the sher-
iff's office, and Brock Johnson,
from the Florida Department of
Corrections, was conducted, a


Community

CALENDAR


HOME GROWN


'Deadhiest Catch' cantamns


ITTOmote Sealooa monto
















































































































Remodel


con tewation
`Fam ily

Owned&

Ow..: iense
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Plumbing New Construction Roofing
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P.O. Box 439RO655
Carrabelle, FL 32322
697-2783 or Mobile 566-2603








Dentistry

DENTURE
LAB ON PR EM ISES
Same Day Service on Repairs and Relines


Woodstork to


benefit injured and


orphaned wildlife
The Florida Wild Mammal Association will present
Woodstork, its second annual music festival and silent
auction, this Saturday, Oct. 10 in Crawfordville.
All proceeds will be used to benefit injured and or-
phaned wildlife.
Woodstork begins at 11 a.m. and runs until 5 p.m. at
the Harvey-Young Farm, 196 Harvey Young Farm Rd., in
Crawfordville.
The event will feature great music, from such acts as
Coon Bottom Creek, Tupelo Railroad, Swingin' Harpoon
Blues Band and Trafton Harvey. There'll be plenty of
food, drink and beer, a "Horse Patty" raffle, silent auc-
tion, photo contest, local artists and vendors.
Tickets are $10 per car, with eight seathelted persons
maximum per car. Sponsors include Progress Energy,
Harvey-Young Farm, Cone Distributors, Shirley Wise and
Associates and Wakulla Parks and Recreation.
For more info, go to www.wakullawildlife.org

"6FHA REVERSE
IVORTGAGE"~
Refinance or Purchase
Helping Seniors Every Day

No PaymentS On the 10805 1
No 18XeS, No inCOme Required (8 ol )52bee78
(877)-422-9667
*No We DO NOT own your home, you do
No YOUf home DOES NOT have to be paid for
No ROSridtioRS On the 00001y ou feCeiVB
-I sBo Daz.WLasSR. Loan Ors*ECER
ToL.I FREE: 877-422-9667
You must be 62 or over to qualify for this offer LNE


I
12761 Pea Ridge Road Bristol, Florida 32321
TELEPHONE (850) 643-5417


IV


Thursday, October 8, 2009


Local


The Times | B5


Birding tri planned
to replace weekend
The Big Bend Bird-
ing Weekend, originally
scheduled for Oct. 9 and
10, failed to attract enough
participants this year and
had to be cancelled.
The weekend had been
planned for the area to
include a lecture on bird
identification and migra-
tion, an overnight stay in
dormitories at the Florida
State University Coastal

aow counr loca safodoa
boil.
Dr. Todd Engstrom
associate director of the
marine lab, has planned
a day-long birding trip to
those enthusiasts who
want to take in prime
time fall migration here in
Franklin County.
The group birding trip
is set for Saturday, Oct. 10
beginning in Tallahassee
at the Publix parking lot
at 777 SW Capital Circle.
The birders will drive to
St. George Island, Bald
Point State Park and, pos-
sibly, St. Marks National
Wildlife Refuge. It will be
bring-your-own-lunch,
and will return by 5 p.m.
to the Publix parking lot.
The cost is $29 per per-
son, which covers the cost
of the van at $9 per person,
with the rest a donation to
our scholarship fund.
A minimum of 10 par-
ticipants is needed to con-
duct the trip. Those inter-
ested in this birding day
trip, please call Sharon
Thoman at the marine
lab at 697-4120, as soon as
possible.


Nei o lIaFS
Meig .o sh
grassroots solution
to Water War

be heldu Wdnmsa gaf I
noon, Oct. 14 to discuss
the Apalachicola-Chatta-
hoochee-Flint Stakeholder
(ACFS) organization now
being formed throughout
the ACF Basin.
The meeting will be held
at the courthouse annex in
Apalachicola from 4 to 6
p.m. The new organization
will work for resolution co-
operatively among citizens
from all stakeholder inter-
ests.
The ACFS will be a
501(3)(c) organization with
the mission to change the
operations and manage-
ment of the ACF Basin to
achieve equitable solu-
tions among stakeholders
that balance economic,
ecological, and social val-
ues; and viable solutions
that ensure that the entire
ACF Basin is a sustainable
resource for current and
future generations.
Learn how you can ac-
tively play a part in meet-
ing the challenges and
opportunities of achiev-
ing resolution of the 18-
year conflict over water
in the Apalachicola-Chat-
tahoochee-Flint river sys-
tem.
For more information,
call the Riverkeeper at
653-8936.

Sdiool board
meetings rescheduled
The regular October
meeting of the Frank-


lin County School Board
has been rescheduled to
Thursday, Oct. 15 at 6 p.m.
in the Willie Speed Board
Room at the former Brown
Elementary School in
Eastpoint.
The regular Novem-
ber meeting of the school
board has been resched-
uled to Thursday, Nov. 12
at 6 p.m., also in the Willie
Speed Board Room.
For more information,
call 670-2810.

DOdds to leave
county planning

At the end of the special
meeting of the Planning
and Building Board held
on Sept. 29, Gayle Dodds
announced her resigna-
tion from the board.
"I have served since
1993 and I am tired," she
told the board members.


The Coastal & Marine Conser-
vation Lecture Series will pres-
ent "The Florida Panhandle: A
National Ecological Treasure &
Biodiversity Hotspot" on Thurs-
day, Oct. 8 from 7 to 9 p.m.
The lecture series, free and
open to the public, occurs on the
second Thursday of each month
at 7 p.m. in the Florida State Uni- KI
versity Coastal and Marine Lab
auditorium, at 3618 Coastal Highway 98,
in St. Teresa
Speaking will be Gary Knight, direc-
tor of the Florida Natural Areas Inven-
tory, a state-based research program
that collects, interprets, and dissemi-
nates ecological information critical to
the conservation of Florida's biodiver-
sity.
Holder of a graduate degree in bota-
ny from FSU, Knight will address some


Sof the many rare and imperiled
species of the Panhandle (with
a special emphasis on plants),
Their habitats, and the status of
--conservation efforts in the re-
Sgion. He will also consider the in-
formation necessary for effective
AY conservation planning and ac-
tion, and will offer those attend-
NIGHT ing the talk information on some
cool web tools and sources of in-
formation for conservation planning.
The marine lab, in association with
Second Harvest of the Big Bend, part of
"The Nation's Food Bank Network," is
collecting non-perishable food items at
each monthly lecture. If you plan to at-
tend a lecture, please bring an item or
two and help solve the hunger crisis in
our community.
For more info, call the lab at 697-
4120.


Offering works
from masters of
the past as well as
contemporary works
by some of the areas
best artists.

Hours :
Friday & Saturday
10am 4pm
Sunday Thursday
by appointment

409 Tallah s eeLSt.

850-697-2476
or 850-653-7201


~aBan WOnrfaper, 9 9 ~

lOniCa WOnrfaper, 9 9 1


"Rachael Hides Her Fathers Gods"
Marc Chagall


Knight to lecture on


Panhndl bid eri


CA~LL
to get your ad in
'Irl-mles &L Services
850-653-8869


'U





YOUR"-F RBIDA FREEDOM CLASSIFIED CONNECTION I
















WE IE


for all of your buying ands


Franklin County's source of news for more than a century


1


|1100
and entered In Case No.
08-000509-CA of the Cir-
cult Court of the Second
, a Judicial Circuit In and for
Franklin County, Florida
ANNGNCEMN~s wherein SUNTRUST
110 Legal Advertising MORTGAGE, INC., plaintif
1110 Classified Notices and JEFFREY S. GALLO-
1120 -Public Notices/ WAY et, al., are defend-
Announcements ants, I will sell to the high-
1125 Carpools & est bidder and best bidder
1130 R peare for cash at the front of the
1140 -Happy Ads Courthouse steps at 33
1150 -Personals Market Street, Apalachl-
1160 -Lost cola, FL 32320, at 11:00
1170 -Found A.M. on November 17,
2009, the following de-
* scribed property as set
1100 forth In said order or final
judgment, to-wit:
4062T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT Commence at the South-
OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL west corner of fractional
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR Section 19, Township 8
FRANKLIN COUNTYr South, Range 6 West,
FLORIDA Franklin County, Florida,
said point also lying on the
SUNTRUST MORTGAGE, Northwest right-of-way
INC., boundary of North Bay
Plaintiff, Shore Drive, thence run
Southeasterly, Northeast-
vs. erly and Northwesterly
along said right-of-way
JEFFREY S. GALLOWAY, boundary the following five
et. al., (5) courses, South 89 de-
Defenants.grees 32 minutes 40 sec-
onds East 810.30 feet,
CASE NO: 07-00405CA North 30 degrees 07 mn-
utes 00 seconds East
NOTICE OF SALE 2006.20 feet, North 59 de-
PU NT TOgrees 53 minutes 00 sec-
CHAPTR 45onds West 80.00 feet,
North 30 degrees 07 mn-
NOTICE IS HEREBY utes 00 seconds East
GIVEN pursuant to a final 690.00 feet, North 89 de-
judgment of foreclosure grees 53 minutes 00 sec-
datdedentLust 11, 200@, nds West783.27feet to a
-00405CA of th Circuit. point lying on Intersection
07-040CA f he ircitwith the Southeasterly
Court of the SeconddJudl- right-of-way boundary of
Ircuitin an North Bay Shore Drive and

wherl AC ul NT S eht-of-way Southuste o
and JAEE SN., GALnLO- East Bay Drive, thence
WAY Jet.R al. Garedeen- leaving said right-of-way
WAY t, l.,aredefnd-boundary run North 02 de-
at wll well to th eb2h grees 55 minutes 00 sec-
for cashe atd thefot ofde te nds East 126.28 feet to a
Cour c those srt sf at33 point lying on the North-
Corhueseps t3 westerly right-of-way
Market Street, Apalachl- boundary of said Easy Bay
cola, FL 32320, at 11:00 Drive, thence run North 31
A.M. on November 17, degrees 34 minutes 30
r edthe following te seconds East along said
srb property asstright-of-way boundary
forth Innsaid adder or final 61.70 feet to a concrete
judgment, t-i: mon~umentarkingt d

O GE BlockAE Do ST of Beginning. From said
BEAHESUNI NO 3 c-Point of Beginning and
BEACES UIT N. 3,ac-leaving said right-of-way
cho mlg tothe mdapd or pltboundary run North 59 de-
Boo 2,Pa 16 Pulicgrees 44 minutes 30 sec-
Record f, Frank6 Plin onds West 518.64 feet to
County, Florida th h wapte Ie fteApama n -
commnly now as 156cola Bay, thence run North
Womol Gnorr Drve St5 10 degrees 57 minutes 08

Ge~or8.e Island, Florida seonsh t g d

Dated at Apalachicola, u 1d08fet, 5 ehnae 0
Forida this August 11, runuS0sut315secod sEas3
2009.554.26 feet to an Iron rod

Mr CIA O N O tyin c Idn th e certhdh e t rl

As: DleptClerkxwl Soush 331 degrees 34 mn


mearcccraonc I wsilti t unndars d9.4rgeet to t
Act, persons In need of a Pito einn.
special accommodation to commonly known as 347
particpheI t sa proced East Bay Drive, Eastpoint'
able time prior to any pro-Flrd328.
ceeding, contact the ADA Dated at Apalachicola Flor-
coordinato at ch lMark~eL Ida this August 11, 2009.


806053-8 61 nec l nee s l r ut
than five businesses days Frankln r ouny Felorlda



Attorneys for Plaintiff In accordance with the
980 N. Federal Hwy, Americans with Disabllties
Sulte 412Act, persons In need of a
Boca Raton, FL 33432 special accommodation to
561-362-6699 participate In this proceed-
October 1, 8,2009 ang sha withinoaareason


FNTHHEECIRNCDUITUCDOCURT g tcronaact theaA A

RACNUIN IN A70U FR Sret Apalachtleola F


OUN RST MORTGAGE, h orouc hp oe din .

IP antiff, MINERLEY & FEIN, PL
Attorneys for Plaintiff
vs. 980eN. Federal Hwy

JEFFREY S. GALLOWAY Boca Raton, FL 33432
e ,t al. 561-362-6699
Defendants. October 1, 8, 2009

CASE NO: 08-000509-CA O7TOTCE OF ACTION

NOTICE OF SALE BEFORE THE BOARD OF
PURSUANT TO ARCHITECTURE AND IN-
CHAPTER 45 TERIOR DESIGN

NO ICE urs ntHEaRE RE: The Practice of Archl-


dua m tug st forec tectuonrB. Carroll


|1100
of 87.33 feet; thence North
49 degrees 33 minutes 00
seconds East, a distance
of 118.20 feet; thence
North 18 degrees 47 mn-
utes 46 seconds East, a
distance of 57.48 feet;
thence North 11 degrees
42 minutes 24 seconds
West, a distance of 76.19
feet; thence North 47 de-
grees 41 minutes 59 sec-
onds West, a distance of
16.48 feet; thence North 83
degrees 02 minutes 17
seconds West, a distance
of 135.91 feet; thence
North 58 degrees 25 mn-
utes 13 seconds West, a
distance of 72.40 feet;
thence North 70 degrees
46 minutes 58 seconds
West, a distance of 68.43
feet; thence North 30 de-
grees 43 minutes 07 sec-
ands West, a distance of
98.64 feet; thence North 26
degrees 25 minutes 41
seconds West, a distance
of 50.51 feet; thence North
40 degrees 54 minutes 3 8
seconds West, a distance
of 48.00 feet; thence North
06 degrees 50 minutes 37
seconds West, a distance
of 156.71 feet; thence
North 12 degrees 02 mn-
utes 28 seconds West, a
distance of 93.28 feet;
thence North 14 degrees
35 minutes 44 seconds
West, a distance of 116.69
feet; thence North 21 de-
grees 09 minutes 47 sec-
ands East, a distance of
83.61 feet; thence North 06
degrees 56 minutes 02
seconds East, a distance
of 170.46 feet; thence
North 07 degrees 14 mn-
utes 21 seconds East, a
ttnacnece oor hn.5d2egfeetd
14 minutes 05 seconds
East, a distance of 114.93
feet; thence North 68 de-
grees 17 minutes 16 sec-
onds East, a distance of
97.41 feet; thence North 40
degrees 39 minutes 59
seconds East, a distance
of 114.11 feet; thence
North 65 degrees 52 mn-
utes 54 seconds East, a
distance of 32.79 feet;
thence North 27 degrees

Estman dssanice Sn 950
feet; thence North 16 de-
grees 01 minutes 45 sec-
ands East, a distance of
86.30 feet; thence North 01
degrees 37 minutes 37
seconds East, a distance
of07d7. feet; thec tNso
seconds West, a distance
of 76.33 feet; thence North
12d rsees 07 mindte n

of09d3.3feet thec tNso

23 degrees 53 minutes 45

01hnd 2W est, a d sa c


of7.2feet; thence North79d-
ne desres snilnut09se 4
of129.29 feet; thence Nrh
dot rs egees 29 mind -

of8.5fe;thence North 6 ers
c4 mnts We scnd n



o13.0feet; thence Nr 7 e
North 32 degrees 109 mc-
uts2 eonds West, a ditneo
disane o 4.7 feet; tec oh
thne oth1 degrees 29mnts2
sesnlnu Wst a e c62n e

cf Wa65ft thanchst N lof


44d rsees 39 mindte n
of 713.82 feet; thence Not
Ntah32 degre O5sminate 1
distance of 112.90 feet.
of5.4fe;thence North44dres

fer sthenrels2mn tedsh sd
aecnds East, a distanceof
o 33.72 feet; tecNoth 37
Not degrees 40 minuts 8


secnsEst, a distance o 21
ofee; hieg e 5ot~he0 ne

ensac3e~so, hn Enea o


|1100
52 minutes 53 seconds
East, a distance of 87.53
feet; thence North 60 de-
grees 24 minutes 39 sec-
onds East, a distance of
302.26 feet to a point
marking the Intersection of
said approximate normal
waters edge with the
Northerly boundary lne of
Section 23, Township 3
North, Range 1 West,
Gadsden County, Florida;
thence leaving said water-
Ilne run along said bound-
ary lne and a projection
thereof North 89 degrees
55 minutes 52 seconds
West a distance of
5,016.06 feet to a concrete
monument lying on the
Westerly boundary lne of
the East Half of the East
Half of said Section 22;
thence leaving the North-
erly boundary lne of said
Section 22 run along said
Westerlyboundary lne
South 00 degrees 02 mln-
utes 18 seconds East, a
distance of 3,525.66 feet to
the Point of Beginning,
387.62 acres, more or less.

TOGETHER WITH THE
F OL LOW WN G
INGRESS/EGRESS &
UTILITY EASEMENTS:

A 35 foot wide
Ingress/egress and utility
easement lying 17.50 feet
either side of the following
described lne: Commence
at a St. Joe Paper Com-
pany concrete monument
marking the Southeast
Corner of the Southwest
Quarter of Section 15
Township 3 North, Range
1 West, Gadsden County,
tF rida uthhenenr u oang
lne of said Section 15
North 89 degrees 49 mln-
utes 46 seconds West
82.84 feet to the P01NT OF
BEGINNING; thence from
said POINT OF BEGINN-
ING run thence South 30
degrees 41 minutes 33
seconds East, a distance
of 29.26 feet; thence South
47 degrees 57 minutes 31
seconds East, a distance
of 27.17 feet; thence South

sc TssEast, nd tn
of 39.76 feet; thence South
78 degrees 22 minutes 22
seconds East, a distance
of 84.20 feet; thence South
75 degrees 32 minutes 47
seconds East, a distance

South 82 gees 3t9emnce
utes 48 seconds East, a
distance of 101.30 feet;
4h~enc nSoush 84 sde o e

fat taechst~ancoeutof 9d93

n ses sn ilnut 24 se -
119.40 feet; thence South
82dges 45mndte h



itsanc oln3 3.3 eta t
tbhee IhT sOFeTERMIN S
as recorded In Official Rec-
ord~s Boohke M2,11 Pge
ords of Gadsden County,
Florida.

And also:

Access over and across

tentc as scribe tn Dc
Book 632, Page 37,o h



Parcel 2:

Lot 6, Block "B BALD
POINT ESTATES, ac-
cho dng theomdapd or lt

roo sPage(s) 43 r li
County Florida


trs n uh sanlu rho

ted poe y tnlesr ns o
ens, must file a claim
whthi Isixty (60) days after

DATED: September 8
2009


ClrH Of thS CrcuitACourt
By: Pam K. Carter
Deputy Clerk

Garvin B. Bowden, Esq

rddsn rth & owdene r

Talhb lee, 0ld 308


Case No.: 2007-026416
License No.: Unllcensed

The Board of Architecture
and Interior Design Issued
a Notice and Order to
Cease and Desist and filed
an Administrative Com-
plaint against you. A copy
may be obtained by con-
tacting, David K. Mlnaccl,
Esquire, Smith, Thomp-
son, Shaw & Manausa,
PA., 3520 Thomasville
Road, Tallahassee, FL
32309-3469, (850)
402-1 570.

If no response Is received
from you regarding the
above-referenced matter
by November 19, 2009, an
Informal hearing may be
scheduled before the
Board of Architecture and
Interior Design, pursuant
to Chapter 120, Florida
Statutes.

In accordance with the
Americans with Disabllties
Act, persons needing a
special accommodation to
participate In this proceed-
Ing should contact the In-
dividual or agency sending
notice not later than seven
days prior to the pro-
ceeding at the address
given on notice. Tele-
phone: (850) 257-6067;
1-800-955-8771 (TDD) or
1-800-955-8770 (v), via
Florida Relay Service.
October, 8, 15, 22, 2009




RMTER CIRUIT CC RT
FLORIDA.
CIVIL DIVISION

AURORA LOAN SER-
VICES, LLC
Plaintiff '

vs.

CYeDE OUIVER; et al.,

CASE NO
192008CA000001XXXXXX

RE-NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAP-
TER 45

NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN pursuant to an Or-

Jdgroent ou omr clo ur
dated June 23, 2008 and
an Order Resetting Sale

20 andS meed rn Cased
XXXX192008CA000001

Cut Inad for wrhaenr
Aurora Loan Services, LLC



I llt a CL TAMINADV
100293-0000063-5;
ONE CHAICRLESTON

KNTOWN SYTENANT NO.1;




MSE NMN F PI
SORS INTRES IN THE

PROPERTY HOEREINDE-
ASOCRIBED, are. Defndat,

I; wll sell toth iges nd
bATest bidder N fo as t t








LotE 43, Block 10(West

St.ID Gerge Island Gulf
Beachl es, Unt 1, hgh aSudiv-
bslo as per Mapor Plshat a
Bh Fook 2, ag 7 of the
blRcrd fFranklin ConyCut


SUPaLUSlcl FRO THE2 a
S100ALE, IF ANY OTHE d
THANoebr THE 9 PRO ERY

Solwn dEHR rb ISLF NCE3


In accordance with the
Americans with Disabillties
Act of 1990, persons need-
Ing special accommoda-
tion to participate In this
proceeding should contact
the Clerk of the Court not
later than five business
days prior to the proceed-
Ing at the Franklin County
Courthouse. Telephone
850-653-8861 or
1-800-955-8770 via Florida
Relay Service.

DATED at Apalachicola,
Florida, on September 17,
2009.

Marcla M. Johnson
As Clerk, Circult Court
By: Michele Maxwell
As Deputy Clerk

SMITH, HIATT & DIAZ,
PA.
Attorneys for Plaintif
PO BOX 11438
Fort Lauderdale, FL
33339-1438
Telephone: (954) 564-0071
October, 8, 2009


4095T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT

OlFALTHCEIRSCECTONIN AUN
FOR GADSDEN COUNT
FLORIDA

FARM CREDIT OF
NORTHWEST FLORIDA
Plaintiff,

vs

FRKEDA FWEH E-MWOI E
MOOA RE AKA FRED M.
MOORE A/K/A FREDA M.

WTHAITTE,BAAPAL CHCOOWA
TENANT(S) (Gadsden
County) and UNKNOWN
TENANT(S) (Franklin
County)
Defendants.

CASE NO. 09-388-CA

NOTICE OF SALE PUR-
SUANT TO CHAPTER 45

NOTICE Is given pursuant
to a Final Judgment of
tFeorec osure2 dted Sepe
No. 09-388-CA, of the Cir-
cult Court of the Second

Guadse nCoutnty drl r d
In which FARM CREDIT
OF NORTHWEST FLOR-
IDACA, Is the FP an l

WHE-M WORTE MOAOKR

FIIAFRREDDA M. MWO R
and APALACHICOLA



eas at tse fot ho o
tC urthdsdem Qolunty

Gta de~na .unty,OFcorid
15, 2009, the property set
forth In the Final Judgment
of Frecloue dInclu igh
Gadsden County, Florida
and Franklin County, Flor-
cda dd IIr pricularly

Parcel i


Commec Crr cnc e

East Quarter of Section 22,
Township 3 North, Range
1 West, Gadsden County
Florida. Thence run North
00 degrees 01 minutes 15


umet Oli dp~oin bE

INO Tthen~ceBGro NIa



t pi li o t e ap
proximate normal waters
edge of the Ochlockonee
River; thence run along
said waterline as follows:
North 01 degrees 24 mln-
utes 35 seconds East, a
distance of 21.95 feet;
thence North 25 degrees
st manu tan se~c n

ondst Ea stanc ditac of .

30.87 feet; thence South
81 degrees 29 minutes 35
seconds East, a distance

fc5d2 6 4sefu ; thenc so t


NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that pursuant to the
Summary Final Judgment
dated February 23, 2009,
and subsequent Order
dated September 14, 2009
and entered In Case No.
19 2008 CA 000467, of the
Circuit Court of the 2nd Ju-
dlclal Circuit In and for
Franklin County, Florida,
wherein WACHOVIA
BANK, NATIONAL ASSO-
CIATION, Is Plaintiff and
MARVIN J. DAVIDSON
A/K/A MARVIN JACK DA-
VIDSON, ET AL. are the
Defendants, I will sell to
the highest and best bid-
der for cash at ON THE
FRONT STEPS OF THE
COURTHOUSE., at 11:00
A.M., on the 4th day of No-
vember, 2009 the following
described property as set
forth In said Order or Final
Judgment, to wit:

LOT 17, DRIFTW/OOD, AC-
CORDING TO THE PLAT
THEREOF, AS RE-
CORDED IN PLAT BOOK
6, PAGES 42-44, OF THE
PUBLIC RECORDS OF
FRANKLIN COUNTY
FLORIDA.

Street Address: LOT 17
DRIFTWOOD, (2750 US
HIGHWAY)
TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA
32312

Any person claiming an In-
terest In the surplus from
the sale, If any, other than
the property owner as of
tehnesdate of la Is pend-
within sixty (60) days after
the sale.

DATED at Franklin County,
Florida, on this 17th day of
September, 2009.

Marcla M. Johnson
Clerk of Court
BY: Michele Maxwell
DEPUTY CLERK

SCOTT E. SIMOWITZ,

MSKOWITZ, MANDELL,
SALIM &SIMOWITZ, PA.
800 Corporate Drive, Sulte
500
Fort Lauderdale, Florida
33334
October 8, 15, 2009

4N16ME CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE SECOND JUDI-
CIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FORRIFDRANKLIN COUNTYr
CIVILACTION

TE BANK OO NEW YORK
AS SUCCESSOR TO

B NGNA.NAS TRUS SEE


vs.

ROEMNd t.ASTON, et al.


CASE NO:: 2007-0067-CA
DIVISION:

NOTICE OF RESCHED-
ULED FORECLOSURE
SALE

NOTINEpr nttHEREBY

tIe7 pus u n t n 2Sa


cult Court of the SECOND
Judicial Circuit In and for
FRANKLIN County, Florida
wherein THE BANK OF
NEW YORK TRUST COM-
PN~R: N.A. AS SUCCEASN

CRHUASTEEEBIl theN.Paintf
dYARNODBIAN LL N WO




DEFENDANTS) WHO ARE
NOT KNOWN TO BE
DEAD OR ALIVE,
WHETHER SAID UN-
KNOWN PARTIES MAY
CLAIM AN INTEREST AS
SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVI-
SEES, GRANTEES, OR
OHE fCLaAIMANTS 1r

tbod e higchaesst atndRbs
DOOR OF THE FRANKLIN
COUNTY COURTHOUSE,
33 MARKET STREET, AP-
ALACHICOLA, FLORIDA at

11:0AMd r th t eay of


vs.

RONALD BRAFFORD; UN-
KNOWN SPOUSE OF
RONALD BRAFFORD;
JEFFREY SWANK; UN-
KNOWN SPOUSE OF JEF-
FREY SWANK; RESORT
VILLAGE AUTHORITY
INC.; UNKNOWN
PERSONS) IN POSSES-
SION OF THE SUBJECT
PROPERTY;
Defendants.

CASE NO.
19-2009-CA-000309

NOTICE OF ACTION


To the
Defendant(s):


following


JEFFREY SWANK
(RESIDENCE UNKNOWN)
UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
JEFFREY SWANK
(RESIDENCE UNKNOWN)

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action for Foreclosure
of Mortgage on the follow-
Ing described property:

LOT 28, RESORT VIL-
LAGE, A SUBDIVISION AS
PER MAP OR PLAT
THEREOF RECORDED IN
PLAT BOOK 9, PAGES 8
AND 9, PUBLIC RECORDS
OF FRANKLIN COUNTY,
FLORIDA.

a/k/a 1484 RESORT VIL-
LAGE LN, EASTPOINT,
FLORIDA 32328-

has been filed against you
and you are required to
serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, If any, to It,
on Kahane & Associates,
PA., Attorney for Plaintff,
whose address Is 8201 Pe-
ters Road, Ste. 3000, Plan-
tation, FLORIDA 33324 a
date which Is within thirty
(30) days after the first
publication of this Notice
In the THE APALACHI-
COLA TIMES and file the
to ignalotitthettheCerCI o
service on Plaintiff's attor-
ney or Immediately there-
after; otherwise a default
will be entered against you
for the relief demanded In
the complaint.

This notice Is provided
pursuant to Administrative
Order No. 2.065.

In accordance with the
Americans wath Dasablhltl s

wnth a dlsabllty who needs

der to participate In this

srceig f u sr eni


Cukdt Adm nsator otat2033

Ap aec Nol(904) 533-8 61
Extension 106 within 2
workingofd s of toue r -

pleading; If you are hear-
170-951m~paired,(TDca l
you are volce Impaired,
cala 1F-800-95 -70 S )
vices).

WEEN SS my h2n and



Marcla M. Johnson
Clerk of Court
By Michele Maxwell
As Deputy Clerk

KahneP& Associataes, P .

Pa~ntation, FL 33324
aeehcose 1(954) 382- 48

Octo3er 8, 15, 2009

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
FRANKLIN COUNTY,
FLORIDA

WACHOVIA BANK, NA-
TIONAL ASSOCIATION,
Plaintiff,

vs.

MARVIN J. DAVIDSON
A/K/A MARVIN JACK DA-
VIDSON, ET AL.
Defendants.


CAS4E7 NO. 19


2008 CA


SB The Times Thursday, October 8, 2009


COVERING MILTON,-


ICOLA


=lr


|1100 |1 1100
Carroll Holdings, LLC WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER
Apalachicola, FL THE SALE.


|1100
4153T
NOTICE OF
PUBLIC SALE

Under Florida Statutes
"Self Service Storage Fa-
clhlty Act" 83.802-83.809
FS. Gulf Coast Storage
LLC will sell, for cash, to
the highest bidder(s) or
may opt to retain the con-
tents of the following stor-
age units-names:

#107 Bldg C Margenell
Jones
#2 Bldg A Tommy Gaskll
#59 Bldg B Tim Ryan
#137 Bldg C Karl Lucy

The public sale will be
conducted at the facility,
241 Patton Dr, Eastpoint,
Florida at 9:00 am, Octo-
ber 24, 2009. The parties
may redeem their contents
prior to sale time at full
amount owed, cash only
Contents may be sold Indl-
vidually, as a whole unit or
retained by facility In leu
of payment.
October, 8, 2009
4156T
ITED C RCUFTRACNOKUL

G N LFLOJUR SADICTION
DIVISION

RBC CENTURY BANK
N/K/A RBC BANK (USA)
PLAINTIFF

VS.

BRENDA P HOUGH
DEFENDANTS

CASE NO: 09 152 CA

N TICSEALOEF FORECLO-

NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVENF p rsuaut go ea D

Foreclosure dated Sep-
tember 14, 2009 entered In
Civil Case NO: 09 152 CA
of the Circuit Court of the
Judicial Circuit In and for
Fd IKLINel Cuhn IgFlort

tahned best bidder ao cash aF
THE FRANKLIN COUNTY

OTURSTTROET EA LAMCAH
COLA, FLORIDA, at 11:00

oe betr,200 h the fo -
lowing described property
as set forth In sad Default
Final Judgment, to-wit:

LOT 8 BLOCK 6 ADDITION
TO MAGNOLIA BLUFFS
ACTO IENRGEOTOA TRHEE

SCORED ON FLT BO 2

RCRDUT FORIFARANKLIN




the date, so Iny pte m


wlhin 60 days after the


Dated this 14th day of
September, 2009

By Michele Maxwell
Deputy Clerk

THE LAW OFFICES OF
BKALAR & TOPOUZIS


AT TOERNNEOY AFROKR AA

HOLLYWOOD, FL. 33021
(954) 965-9101

If you are a person with a
disabllty who needs any

tao pripam e Inisorpd
ceechng ost ar uentitlteh

tpar jleoofecertain as e -




celpt of this Notice of Sale;
1-800-955-8771 (TDD) for
hearing Impaired or
1-800-955-8770, via Florida
Relay Service.
October, 8, 2009

415 TE CIRCUIT COURT
OFRCTHTE 2NNDANUDDICOAR
FRANKLIN COUNTY :
FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION

CTIBANFKRN.A. AS ERI A



SMOOTEGMARG BAG)KO


| 1100 | 1100
PASS-THROUGH CERTIFl-
CATES, SERIES 2006-3 NOTICE OF SALE PUR-
Plaintiff, SUANT TO CHAPTER 45





The Times Thursday, October 8, 2009 7B


THE STAR


Ple~as eppl In rson

IS N L Abetwee 9a-p k andys



IsAWAY A


Innkeeping and


classified ad Housekeeping oiios
full/part time.
FAX resume
the -Y (850) 653-2785
APALACHIC flMES Tel
& CRAE (305) 588-5885


MEDICAL ASE
,Numbers Now! Needed for Me
E astpe
Clinical experien
850-747-5020 computer sk
80034586o Great interpersol
800-35-000Phlebotomy certi

850-747-5044 Must have gradL
program or have c
th esta r@pen h.com IIISend re

thetimes@penh.com EOE/D


~B~i~i~Apalachicola 3 br, 2 ba,
1,700sf Large ousd "
S deck. By week or month. | 8110
* Call 850-323-0368
BUNE5 IAN IA Carrabelle 3 br, 1 ba, 11996 Buick Regal 1996
51oo Business completely remodeled, $495 down $3500 total 0%
Opportunities large private yard $800 Interest 215-1769 Daylight
5110 Money to Lend month 210 NE 1st St Auto Financing 9am/9pm
404-266-0067
- -Carrabelle Pontiac Grand Am 1998
$475 down $3200 total 0%
| 5100 | 4 br 2 baw/FF ap l- Interest 215-1769 Daylight
ances, poo w/ srvce in l, Auto Financing 9am/9pm
Associates Needed. hot tub, sauna + guest apt
$1000 or More Per Day Po- wt I ull bath $1200 dmo,, crPnicGrn m20
tetall. Ro eturing. Phoneo chck & ref req, Nonsmkrs. $995 down $6900 total 0%
Callsn. No Sellin. No Col Call David at 850-228-6091 Interest 215-1769 Daylight


/ ~6170 1

~Gl~t| 8120
Ford Explorer 1998 $695
3 br, 2 ba Db| Wide, nice down $3200 total 0% Inter-
on neighborhood In Apalach. est 215-1769 Daylight Auto
* End of dead end road. Financing 9am/9pm
~5REA SAEFRRN $750 mo + $500 dep. Call
850-653-9652
6100 Business/omrca
8110- mrtm Il
6120 Beach Rentals |t 8130
aso Condol~ownhouse
also House Rentals ; Ford F150 x/cab 1998
6150 Roommate Wanted $1295 down $5900 total
67 oie aoeLt 0% Interest 215-1769 Day-
6180 Out-of-Town Rentals we light Auto Financing
6100 -Timeshare Rentals 9am/9pm
6200 Vacation Rentals RE AL ESTATE FQR NS
7100 -Homes Ford Ran er 1994 $425
7105 Open House down $2900 total 0% Inter
~7110 -Beach Home/
Property est 215-1769 Daylight Auto
| 6100 |7o Comril Financing 9am/9pm
7130 Condo/Townhouse
For Lease 714 gms (LRn.hees
Commercial 7160 Mobile Homes/Lots *
Buildi 77-werrn' I s a
Approx1100 sq ft. Property
Available now corner 7190 Fator Tomm
of Hwy 98&812th Street 72oo -Timeshare i5
850-653-9788 or
850 15 058 41972 30 foot full screen
' travel trailer In good condl-
7100 |tlon, $5900 or best offer.
- BANDNEW OME Call (850) 251-3605
REDUCED $7000
|6110 | I 902 NE6th Street,
Carrabelle
Lanark Village, 1 br Cre o nTe I ) (~
lapt. unfurnished, W/D, Avenues at Keough s COMPLETE PACKAGES
IC/H/A, yard $550 mo,l eedng-Ca IIle' FROM






one, ~ t Arch er85052-504

seE/ rnkeerIluiumBot
Stet ml hmonrsfeal staeN O



www-5 senc9 esJil ww~trmeinucom s~
W10nth-o-monh 3Bero lBt
Unfurnishe Ap. EdUnt.........$500

dtepost. Teal afInso d2D 1 x................600
(305) 8-85 unse Mobile50 Home Bay View. $800


deposit. Tel Unfurmished house on 1/2 acre .......... $1000.00
3 Bedroom 3 Balth
(3dical585 Prcic u nihe ptl Enduni, Bay view.. $500.00
t L Bedroom 2Bt
oin Furnished Apte End Unit Bay vew... $5000.00
2 Bedroom 3Bt
ceSN an prfiint UFurnished Ap, nd Unit, Caport........ $525.00
ills equied. Bedroom lBt
edicl Pactie I I Furnished Apt, Wkly/ dnt ay minw...$6500.00w
nal~ ~ ~~ silnedd 1Bedroom
ifictio reuied Furnished Ap t............................$500.00
3 Bedroom Bt
I ated from aint MAurnished Co, ndo ool................$500.00 W

uretcrification rqie. Ufurn sohedApt.................................. $500.00

sume to: III Beach front houses with winter rates.
670-8582 Short & Long term rentals.
:WP/M-F OERA85EO- OL044 FR R5E T .0


I~ ~_ I


Franklin County's source of news for more than a century


| 100 1100 | iO 110 | i 110| 1100 3220
as set forth In said Final ALONG SAID within 60 days after the 4235T proposed agency action
Judgment: RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUND- sale. IN THE CIRCUIT COURT regarding the
ARY 110.75 FEET, OF THE SECOND JUDI- application(s) by writing to
LOT 10, SHELL HAR- THENCE LEAVING SAID Dated this 31stday ofAu- CIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND the Division of
BOUR, SUBDIVISION AS RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUND- gust, 2009. FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY Resource Regulation of PE ceaORdoom Sraet.
PER MAP OR PLAT ARY RUN SOUTH 40DE- FLORIDA the Northwest Florida $499, delivery available
THEREOF AS RECORDED GREES 56 MINUTES 32 Marcla M. Johnson Water Management Dis- 222-7783
IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE SECONDS WEST 113.54 Clerk of Court GULF STATE COMMU- trict, attention Terrl Peter-
25 AND26, PUBLIC REC- FEET, THENCE RUN By: Michele Maxwell NITY BANK, son, 152 Water
ORDS OF FRANKLIN SOUTH 40DEGREES 58 Deputy Clerk Plaintiff, Management Drive, Ha- ,,
COUNTYr FLORIDA. MINUTES 16 SECONDS vana, Florida 32333-9700,
WEST 17.92 FEET, IN ACCORDANCE WITH vs but such comments or re-
A/K/A 1717 East Gulf THENCE RUN NORTH 89 THE AMERICANS WITH quests must be received$10Qenmtrsst.
Drive, Eastpoint, FL 32328 DEGREES 31MINUTES 55 DISABILITIES ACT, per- WILLIAM REID HICKS and by 5o clockBrn NE npatc
SECONDS WEST 24.59 sons with disabilities need- STEPHANIE MICHELLE p.m. on October 22, 2009. w/warranty. Can deliver.
Any person claiming an In- FEET, THENCE RUN Ing a special accommoda- HICKS, husband and wife; 4-12
terest In the surplus from NORTH 100.00 FEET TO tron should contact CAPITAL ONE BANK; and No further public notice
the sale, If any, other than THE POINT OF BEGINN- COURT ADMINISTRA- UNITED STATES OF will be provided regarding
the property owner as of ING TION, at the FRANKLIN AMERICA; ST JAMES this (these) application(s).
the date of the Lls Pend- County Courthouse at BAY PROPERTY OWNERS Publication of this notice
ens must file aclaim within has been filed against you ( 8 5 0 ) 6 5 3 -8 8 6 1 ASSOCIATION, INC., constitutes constructive Bedroom Set Rich Cherry.
sixty (60) days after the and you are required to 1-800-955-8771 (TDD) or Defendant(s). notice of this permit appll- $399. Brand NEW, Still In
sale. serve a copy of your writ- 1-800-955-8770, via Florida cation to all substantially boxes. Can deliver.
ten defenses within 30 Relay Service. CASE NO.: 09-000351-CA affected persons. A copy 222-7783
Marcla M. Johnson days after the first publica- of the staff reports) must I
Clerk of the Circuit Court tlon, If any, on Florida De- THE LAW OFFICES OF NOTICE OF SALE be requested In order to
By: Michele Maxwell fault Law Group, PL., DAVID J. STERN, PA., remain advised of further
Deputy Clerk Plaintiff's attorney, whose AttorneyforPlaintiff NOTICE Is hereby given proceedings and any pub-
address 9119 Corporate 900 South Pine Island that, pursuant to the Order Ilc hearing date. Substan- Cherry
Florida Default Law Group, Lake Drive, Sulte 300, Road Sulte 400 of Final Smmary Judgment tlally affected persons are SLDWO lihBd
PL. Tampa, Florida 33634, and Plantation, FL 33324-3920 of Foreclosure In this entitled to request an ad- $249. NEW In box
PO. Box 25018 file the original with this (954)233-8000 cause, In the Circuit Court ministrative hearing re- 850-425-8374
Tampa, Florida Court either before service 08-83680(NCM)(FNM) of the Franklin County, garding the proposed
33622-5018 on Plaintiff's attorney or October 8,2009 Florida, I will sell to the agency action by submit-
FO7002904 Imediately thereafter; oth- property situated In Frank- ting a written request ac-
October 8, 15, 2009 erwise a default will be en- nCutFoda e-crngothpovsns
414Ttered against you for the 43Tscribed as: of 28-601.201, Florida Ad- 3230

1F TTHE EC CCNDC JUI opl ltmo pde lonn th A HC R t 3, B ok T St. Jame ofPooed A enc es
ARLFR NLNONTCIN AND ESo Ishand an FORRIFDRANKI ON arsbdvsp t farspoe ma pror uwho have filed Overstreet/MexicoBeach
CIVIL ACTIONthis 17th day of Septem- GL TE OM Plat Book 8, pages 23-29, October 8, 2009 32 iha 8 4mls
ber, 2009. GL STECOM-Public Records of Franklin from Hwy 98) Sat. Oct. 10
CHASE HOME FINANCE NITY BANK, Cony lrd.9 am Eastern/8 am Central
LL UCESO Y acl onsn Plaintiff, FLEA MARKET &
M G -FANTMOR GAE As Deputy Clerk vs. at Public Sale, to the high- O ITCE OF INTENT To YARD SALE
CORPORATION' ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ es FodaDfutLwGupsand tbests siddr fhoeREITRFCTOU Auction Hall, 3320 Hwy
Plaintiff, PL TMTH E EVANS; Franklin County Court- NMS36 ie f 8 pcs
vs. O o 51 lrd E eAahclnFo-Notice Is hereby given that arersl0 r
33622-5018 SGES CRDT Svember 4, 2009. Palge Flynn, Post Office Ing full of bargains, an-
TRAY CCLINA//AFO9013902 LIENORS, TRUSTEES, Box 748, Eastpoint, Frank- tiques, furniture, glass,
TRACY MATTHEW TIMOTHY LEE EVANS; ln County, FL 32328 In- pottery, lamps, etc. Next
MCCAIN etal, October 8, 15, 2009 TH NNW PUEAny person claiming an In- tnsoreserheflw-auction Is 10/17/08. Call
Defendant(s). 4198T OFTMOHLEEVN; es tal tfe nuropt ha ngFcius Naesinac 227-8631 to consign or re-
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IF LIVING, INCLUDING t sl ay he a cordance with Chapter serve flea market space.
CASE NO.: OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL ANY UNKNOWN SPOUSE dheprape ty tnlesr nso 865.09, Florida Statutes:
19-209-C-00078 IRCUT I ANDFOROF SAID DEFENDANT(S), enmust file a claim
DIVISION: FRANKLIN COUNTY, IF REMARRIED, AND IF wihn 0dysate h TIFFIN PRODUCTS
FLORIDA DECEASED, THE RE- saln6 dy ferteae. TIFFIN KNIFE WORKS ~ i ~
AMENDED NOTICE OF GENERAL JURISDICTION SPECTIVE UNKNOWN TIFFIN ART Yard Sale
ACTION DIVISION CREDITORS, LIENORS, WITNESS my hand and TFI OSGMN Carrabelle. Friday Oct 9
TO: NATIONAL CITY MORT- DTETRPR EONS LANC Lthe thsCurhs3t Dated this 1st day of Octo-SIhtu0R C l2s
GAEADIISO O N-ING BY THROUGH, UN- ber, 2009.bk d la
TRACY M. MCCLAIN A/K/A TIONAL CITY BANK DER OR AGAINST THE CEKO H ICI coe ,20 r w t s
TRACY MATTHEW PLAINTIFF NAMED DEFENDAT(S), p s, j very
MCCLAIN Defendant(s) B lhe COURT l lhairge dog cage, dnette
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: VS.BYMchlMawlcarscoptrdk,
312 EARL KING STREET CASE NO.: 09-000165-CA Deputy Clerk and chair
APALACHICOLA, FL RHONDA A. WALLEY UN- SeeM aknIl /
323200000 KNOWN SPOUSE OF NOTICE FACTION OFFB:0996
CURRENT ADDRESS: UN- RHONDA A. WALLEY IF FORECLOSURE
KNOWN ANY: ANY AND ALL UN- 4 omreSre 20 |
KNOWN PARTIES CLAIM- T:AL UKONApalachicola, FL 32320
ANGELA MARIE MCCLAIN ING BY, THROUGH, UN- HIS EIES (850) 653-1949 so a ; <
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: DRANAGISTH GRTESASGESOctober 8, 15, 2009
312 EARL KING STREET HEREIN NAMED INDIVID- CREDITORS, LIENORS, 4242T MRHNIE
APALACHICOLA, FL UAL DEFENDANTS) WHO AND TRUSTEES, AND ALL NOTICE OF APPLICA- 3100 -Antiques All You Can Eat
323200000 ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE OTHER PERSONS CLAIM- TION FOR WATER USE 3110-Appliances *SNOW CRABS*
CURRENT ADDRESS: UN- DEAD OR ALIVE, ING BY THROUGH, UN- PERMIT 3120 -Arts & Crafts 1.9a PTECEK
KNOWN WHETHER SAID UN- DER OR AGAINST THE 3130-Auctions $59 tU H RE
KNOWN PARTIES MAY NAMED DEFENDANT: Notice Is hereby given that 3140 Baby Items RAW BAR Starting at 5:00
ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN CLAIM AN INTEREST AS pursuant to Chapter 373, 3150 -Building Supplies every Monday In Apalachl-
PARTIES CLAIMING BY, SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVI- YOU ARE NOTIFIED that Florida Statutes, the fol- 310 usiness cola at525 3130 WraterS.
THROUGH, UNDER, AND SEES, GRANTEES OR an action has been filed lowing application(s) for 3170 C Iecmi es 85-5322. 10 Dat
AGAINST THE HEREIN OTHER CLAIMANTS; against you In the Circuit water use permit(s) has 3180 -Computers Be.
NAMED INDIVIDUAL JOHN DOE AND JANE Court of the Second Judl- (have) been received by 3190 -Electronics
DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE DOE AS UNKNOWN TEN- clal Circult, In and for the Northwest Florida -20 eTreaosdsiOn
NOT KNOWN TO BE ANTS IN POSSESSION Franklin County, Florida, Water Management Dis- 3220 -Furniture
DEAD OR ALIVE, DEFENDANT(S) and you are required to trict: 320-Grg/adSls3300

NWHOTNERPARIST MUA CASE NO: 08-000400-CA tn defaensoes to It anwrIt- Application number -20Go Things to EatLadcprflyeer-
CLAIM AN INTEREST AS the above proceeding with I 07067 filed 09/22/2009 3250 -Health & Fitness ence, selective pruning,
SPOUSE, HEIRS, DEVI- NOTICE OF the Clerk of this Court, at Department of Correc- M20eea r /Clothing we rang &pla k/ng R a
SEES, GRANTEES, OR FORECLOSURE SALE the Franklin County Court- tlans, Franklin Correctional Equipment training partner Bike rides
OTHER CLAIMANTS house, 33 Market Street, Institute, 2601 Blairstone 3290 Medical Equipment 25-100 miles, walks 5 to 10
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: NOTICE IS HEREBY Apalachicola, Florida, and Road, Tallahassee, FL 3300 -Miscellaneous miles, ocean swimming.
UNKNOWN GIVEN pursuant to a Sum- serve a copy thereof upon 32399-2500 3310 Musicalinstmments Nosuoahe.Cll
CURRENT ADDRESS: UN- mary Final Judgment of the Plaintiff's attorney, at Requesting a maximum 3320 -Plants &Shrubs/ 850-p47-069 atlt.Cl
KNOWN Foreclosure dated August 41 Commerce Street, Apa- withdrawal of 1,600,000 330- uplersnt/Hotel 6
31, 2009 entered In Civil lachicola, Florida 32320, gallons per day from the 3340 Sporting Goods
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that Case No. 08-000400-CA of within thirty days of the Floridan Aqulfer System 3350 Tickets (Buy &Sell)
an action to foreclose a the Circuit Court of the first publication of this No- for Heat Pump Supply use
mortgage on the following 2ND Judicial Circuit In and twice, the nature of this pro- by existng and proposed
property In FRANKLIN for FRANKLIN County, AP- ceeding begin a sult for facllties.
County, Florida: ALACHICOLA, Florida, I foreclosure of mortgage General withdrawal 1
will sell to the highest and against the following de- location(s) In Franklin | 3 70.-
COMMENCE AT THE best bidder for cash at on scribed property, to-wit:. County: TO7S, RO4W, o e
NORTHWEST CORNER the FRONT STEPS of the Sec. 16A, 16D
OF BLOCK 226 OF THE Courthouse at the FRANK- Lot 9, Block 5, Lanark Vil- I,.EP
CITY OF APALACHICOLA, LIN County Courthouse lo- lage Unit One, according Interested persons may 4100 Help Wanted
A SUBDIVISION AS PER cated at 33 MARKET to the Plat thereof, re- object to or comment Logaberger basket collec- 4130 -Employment
MAP OR PLAT ON FILE STREET In APALACHI- corded In Plat Book 2, upon the applications or tran. Please call (850) Information
ON FILE IN COMMON COLA, Florida, at 11:00 Page 14, of the Public submit a written request 251-3605 for more Infor-
USE AT THE CLERK OF a.m. on the 14th day of Records of Franklin for a copy of the matron
THE CIRCUIT OFFICE IN October, 2009 the follow- County, Florida. staff reports) containing
FRANKLIN COUNTYr Ing described property as| 4100
FLORIDA, SAID POINT set forth In said Summary a/k/a 3 Newman Drive, Prga
ALSO LYING ON THE IN- Final Judgment, to-wit: Lanark Village, FL. P~rm
TERSECTION OF THE )COOrdinator
S OUT H ER L Y LOTS ONE (1) AND TWO Ifyou fall to serveyour an- Lheadaency fo Mteal nuon
RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUND- (2), BLOCK TWO HUN- swer or written defenses In Wel te unin
ARY OF 15TH STREET DRED TWENTY-NINE the above proceeding, on services In Franklin County
WITH THE EASTERLY (229), OF GREATER APA- Plaintiff's attorney, may re- D Is seeking a Motivated, &
RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUND- LACHICOLA, IN THE CITY sult In a default will be en- Caring Individual w/ excel-
ARY OF 21ST AVENUE, OF APALACHICOLA, tered against you for the lent organization, commu-
AND THENCE RUN COUNTY OF FRANKLIN relief demanded In the nicaion & omutrskll.
SOUTH 89 DEGREES 31 AND STATE OF FLORIDA Complaint orPetition. Bachelor or Associate De-
MINUTES 55 SECONDS ACCORDING TO THE gree, & exp In related field
EAST ALONG SAID MAP OR PLAT OF SAID WITNESS my hand and High School Diploma at desired. Job description,
S OUT H ER L Y CITY IN GENERAL USE. Seal of this Court on 29th Home. 6-8 Wks. Low tul- Application, & Salary Infor-
RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUND- day of September, 2009. tnFeBrcuePa-Free Foreclosure Listngs matron Is avail by calling
ARY 180.00 FEET TO THE Any person claiming an In- ment Plan Please call 400,000++ Proeles NalEle Cr S ervceat
POINT OF BEGINNING. terest In the surplus from Marcla M. Johnson 1 -8 00 -2 64 -8 3 3 0 .towd Clo. 850-921-5554, or eal
FROM SAID POINT OF the sale, If any, other than As Clerk of the Court ww ilmfohm~o800-668-1071 Hesterm@ecsbigbend.org
BEGINNING RUN SOUTH the property owner as of By Michele Maxwell
89 DEGREES 31 MINUTES the date of the Ils pend- As Deputy Clerk m Rsarnio Sv
55 SECONDS EAST ens, must file a claim October 8,15, 2009 Res uSRER


4100 |6110 7100
Independent Southern Villas 2b,1hBikhmI
Contractors Apartments Sumeatra. Furnished, 1
FL Fish and Wildlife Immediate opening on 2 acre fenced yard. Call
Conservation Commission BR HC & non-HC acces- Ricky 850-653-6758
Is looking for 1-2 Individu- slble units. Rental units.
als to serve as independ- Rental assistance availa-
ent contractors working ble. Call 850-653-9277.
agency's FL Bear Re- Ing Oppurtunity | 7150
sponse Agent Program In
Franklin County. Individu- JcsnC ut
als will help educate the 757 Acres@$1,500/ac
public as well as assist IiN. Panama City
with relocation efforts and Studio Apt. Near Compass Lake
carcass disposal. Must Furnished Nice Timber, Creeks
have their own vehicle ca- Rolling Hills, No Clearcut
pable of hauling a small Upstairs studio Call Kane 850-509-8817
trailer and bear carcasses, Qulet location, water &
and be willing to assist electric Incl'd. Walk to
members of the public In a downtown. $700 mo. plus Noth Hstoric Duistriclt.
professional manner. If In- deposit 850-653-9116 or 4h5,00 reetB bu nX 1100
terested, please send re- 850-774-7178for appt. Corner lot. Brokers
sume and 3 references by rtce.442807
either e-mail to: :rtctd 40-180
Susan.Carroll@MyFWC.com '
or mail to: FL Fish and | 6120
Wildlife Conservation \
Commission, Northwest StGere I 7 o
Region, Attn: Susan Car- ISland
roll, 3911 Highway 2321, $160 wk, elec, Satellite, For Sale
Panama City, FL 32409. Gabe nldd ol
Deadline for applications table. 12X65' deckpwith 100 ace nceepwo welle
to be received Is October Batflve.Cl 00FetodMbl
15, 2009. 850-653-5114al Home, 16x80 3br, 2ba,
15, 009.850653-114nice home and beautiful
lawn, trees, and flowers,
Nrthl efCasrr bell and

| ~ ~ ~ ~ se 4 0StGere aoowner finnecsngoI
POSTAL & GOYPT JOB I Sland large enough down pay-
INFO FOR SALE? 1 2 br, 1 ba, bar, satellite, IIment. Owner must hold
util Incl. 12 x 50' deck. IIfirst trust deed.
.$250/wk, 850-653-5114 11850-697-4473
Caution

You NEVER have to pay 116130
er rm I jabbs Carrabelle, P~ool side H 3
yeelou psee al jobs.I r a 50sfwo
guaranee onat h floors throughoutill! $950 8s
FgaaTC ecntc h Furnished 562-1478 or
The Federal Trade 85-1602:s .
Commission IILanark Village, Carlton St. loM N
Is America's consumer 1#5, 1 br 1 ba, all tile,
protection agency. Iwalk-In closet, landlord t u & ollctile
pays some utllties. 8120 -SportsUtilityvlehicles
www.ftc.gov/jobscams 1$450/mo + $300/dep. 130 Trucks
1-877-FTC-HELP IPlease call 850-927-2838 8140- Vans
or 864-356-5949 8150 Commercial
A public service Mtorase
me sa~ge ems rh dC 820 A cessories
Classified Advertising 116140 8220 Personal Watercraft
Department 8230 -Sailboats
3, br 8240 no at Marine
Apalachicola, FL. Supplies
Call 850-643-7740. 8245 Boat Slips &L Docks
82 TVM oa dVeojoles
/3 8330 campers & Trailers
8340 Motorhomes


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Temperature
Date High Low % Precip
Tu, Oct 8 860 740 10%
Fri, Oct 9 870 750 10%
Sat, Oct 10 860 730 30 %
Sun,Octl1 840 660 40%
Mon, Oct 12 830 610 30 %
Tue, Oct l3 800 650 20%
WeOct 14 790 650 0%
T/DE TABLES
MONTHLY AVERAGES
o find the tides of the following areas. subtract the indicated times
rmthose given for APALACHICOLA:
HigH Low
atPoint Minus0:40 Minus 1:17
atPass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27a
o find the tides of the following areas subtract the indicated times
rmthose given for CARRABELLE.
HigH Low
aId Point Minus 9:15 Minus 0:03
APALACH ICOLA


CARRAB ELLE
10/08 Thu 03:57AM 3.2 H 11:19AM 0.2 L
08:31PM 2.6 H 09:58PM 2.4 L
10/09 Fri 04:37AM 3.2 H 12:29PM 0.2 L


SO LU NAR
m = Minor M = Major add 1 hour for daylight savings
Date Day AM PM Rise/Set Moon
10/08 Thu m 7:50 m 8:25 5:57AM
M 1:40 M 2:10 5:38PM
10/09 Fri m 8:55 m 9:30 5:58AM
M 2:45 M 3:15 5:36PM
10/10 Sat m 10:00 m 10:35 5:58AM
M 3:50 M 4:20 5:35PM
10/11 Sun m 11:05 m 11:40 5:59AM
M 4:50 M 5:20 5:34PM
10/12 Mon m 11:55 m 6:00AM
M 5:45 M 6:10 5:33PM
10/13 Tue ml2:25 ml2:45 6:00AM
M 6:35 M 7:00 5:32PM
10/14 Wed m 1:15 m 1:30 6:01AM
M 7:20 M 7:45 5:31PM


For more local news and sports coverage ...

WWWN\.APALACHTIMES.COM


'1fS#236575 $1,900,000 St. George Isln

II AMAZING

BEACH
a -- FRONT
HOME



Beautifully decorated, 5 BR, 5 V/2 BA,upcl
kitchen with granite, elevator, travertine tl
throughout, spacious living, dining, kitchen are
2nd LR with wet bar, large private pool, all on
one acre with 100 ft of Gulf frontage. Outstanding
rental income! Foreclosure.


'it.Georgesland '


1850-227-12781


Thursday, October 8, 2009


Local


10/08 Thu 05:22AM
09:56PM
10/09 Fri 12:11AM
02:42PM
10/10 Sat 06:52AM


01:32PM 0.1


06:02AM 2.0 H

04:11PM 0.2 L


PHOTO BY SUSAN BULL | Special to The Times
Twelve local beauties posed "in the buff" for the Forgotten Coast Classics 2009 calendar. Sales from the
calendar provided funding for Weems Memorial Hospital's free mammogram program.


fWeems program offers free mammograms


10/11 Sun 7:58AM 1.9 H 05:36PM 0.2 L


10/12 Mon 01:53AM
09:33AM
10/13 Tue 02:06AM

10/14 Wed 0:2 AMM
01:17PM


04:53AM
06:47PM
06:41AM

0:9AMM
08:33PM


By Lois Swoboda
Times StaffWriter

Free mammograms are available
at Weems Memorial Hospital for
women without insurance.
As part of its breast cancer
awareness and prevention program,
Franklin Needs, Inc. will pay for a
mammogram for any woman age 35
to 64 years of age who is a Franklin
County resident and has no health
insurance.
Franklin Needs founder Elaine
Kozlowsky, of Eastpoint, said there
is $50,000 available to fund the pro-
gram.
To participate in the program
women must obtain a mammogram
order from their physician, the Car-
rabelle Clinic, the Eastpoint Medical
Center or the county health depart-
ment, and then call Weems Memo-
rial Hospital at 653-8853, ext. 119 to
set up an appointment.
Last year, Kozlowsky spearhead-


ed a highly successful fundraiser
when she convinced 11 local beau-
ties to pose with her tastefully and
appropriately "in the buff" for the
Forgotten Coast Classics 2009 calen-
dar. Money from the calendar, com-
bined with donations, sales of "Titty
Tacks" jewelry designed by Kristin
Anderson and proceeds from the
Calendar Girls Cabaret variety show
last November provided funding for
the mammogram program.
"The Calendar Girls want to
thank Franklin County again for
raising $50,000 and now we want to
give it back," said Kozlowsky. "Sadly,
in over 46 percent of Franklin Coun-
ty women diagnosed with breast
cancer, the disease has begun to
spread.
"The radiologists at Weems have
given us an excellent price," she
said. "We can do a lot of mammo-
grams for $50,000."
A mammogram is a low intensity
x-ray used to help screen for or de-


tect breast cancer. Many small tu-
mors can be seen on a mammogram
before they can be felt by a woman
or her health professional.
Cancer is most easily treated and
cured when it is discovered at an
early stage.
Mammograms do not prevent
breast cancer or reduce a woman's
risk of developing cancer. But regu-
lar mammograms can reduce a
woman's risk of dying from breast
cancer by detecting a cancer when
it is more easily treated.
Experts have different recom-
mendations for how often you should
have a mammogram.
Women older than 40 should have
a mammogram every one or two
years. A health professional may
recommend te sting more often when
there are risk factors for breast can-
cer. Any woman with a personal or
family history of breast cancer is
recommended to have yearly mam-
mograms.


10/10 Sat 05:27AM 3.2

10/11 Sun 06:33AM 3.0

10/12 Mon 12:28AM 2.6
08:08AM 2.7
10/13 Tue 12:41AM 2.4
10:03AM 2.6
10/14 Wed 12:57AM 2.4
11:52AM 2.6


H 01:58PM 0.3 L

H 03:23PM 0.3 L


02:40AM
04:34PM
04:28AM
05:32PM
05:36AM
06:20PM


B8 | The Times


(ALENDAR GIRLS FUNDRAISING PAYS OFF


Our local real estate experts have identified what they feel are

the best values around and are offering them to you in Real Estate

Picks! (In this section), Discover the best real estate values in Mexico

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THE 4TH ANNUAL, 2009


~tet~s~nt ~ '
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~?5:ak ~ I Recentlly urpclatedl n/
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