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Group Title: Apalachicola times
Title: The Apalachicola times
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100380/00046
 Material Information
Title: The Apalachicola times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: H.W. Johnston
Place of Publication: Apalachicola Fla
Apalachicola Fla
Publication Date: October 1, 2009
Copyright Date: 2008
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1885.
General Note: Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00100380
Volume ID: VID00046
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 32911693
lccn - sn 95026907
 Related Items
Preceded by: Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by: Apalachicola herald

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Reported crimes and arrests up, but why?


I'


APALACHICOLA SOLDIER SERVES IN IRAQ

Dan Burke, 43, of Apalachicola, a
supervising attorney for the 14th Judicial
Circuit Guardian ad Litem program in
.~ ;C~' Q Panama City, has been busy serving in
r. Iraq since last spring. A member of the
~Tallahassee-based 53rd Infantry Brigade,
3rd Battalion, 124th Infantry Regiment
.E of the Florida Army National Guard, he
.EL~ l J- ~ L~3 was called backed into service earlier
:i~j- JL~;~~~ -i~l this year and has been attached to the
2nd Battalion of the 198th Armored
SRegiment of the Mississippi National
Guard. In early August, during his service
~in northern Iraq, Burke had a chance to
V~ meet some Iraqi youth and swim with
them around the Tigris, above. He has a
two-week leave in November and plans
to make a visit back to Apalachicola.
Photo courtesy of DAN BURKE


I


YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER FOR MORE THAN 120 YEARS


VOL. 121 ISSUE 23


By David Adlerstein
Times City Editor
The number of reported crime
in Franklin County and the num-
her of arrests rose sharply dur-
ing the first half of the year, but it
is not clear what that indicates.
According to 2009 Semi-An-
nual Uniform Crime Report data
released last week by the Florida
Department of Law Enforce-
ment, the county saw a 55 per-
cent increase in its total crime in-
dex for the first six months of the
year. This contrasts sharply with
a 7.9 percent decrease in crime
throughout the state.
What this means is that among


the seven major crime categories
tracked murder, forcible rape,
robbery, aggravated assault, bur-
glary, larceny and motor vehicle
theft the number of offenses in
the county rose from 110 during
the first half of 2008 to 171 dur-
ing the first half of this year. The
statistics compare the first six
months of the year with the first
six months of the previous year.
There were no murders in the
first half of either year, and rob-
beries went from none in 2008 to
one in 2009.
The bulk of the change oc-
curred with forcible rapes, which
went from none last year to five
in 2009; aggravated assaults,


which rose from 11 last year to
23 in 2009; burglaries, which went
from 25 in 2008 to 42 this year;
larcenies, which rose from 64
last year to 95 this year; and mo-
tor vehicle thefts, which dropped
from 10 in 2008 to five in the first
half of this year.
Arrests also rose sharply dur-
ing the first half of the year com-
pared with the same period last
year. Total arrests for all crimes
increased from 385 to 522, or by
about 36percent.
The biggest increase for ar-
rests occurred with aggravated
assaults, which went from three
last year to 11 in 2009; burglaries,
which went from none in 2008 to


six in 2009; larceny, which went
from two in 2008 to 23 in 2009;
simple assaults, which went from
10 in 2008 to 29 in 2009; and DUls,
which rose from 28 in 2008 to 38
in 2009.
The number of drug arrests
dropped slightly, from 122 in 2008
to 112 in 2009, while juvenile ar-
rests declined from 15 in 2008 to
eight in 2009.
With the sheriff 's office respon-
sible for handling the lion's share
of offenses, and for making most
of the arrests, officials are exam-
ining why the county has seen a
rise in these categories, especially
when compared with neighboring
counties, which all saw declines.


Changes in managing
data reports
Undersheriff Joel Norred said
much of the increase in offenses
being tallied can be attributed to
a change in the way the sheriff's
office manages its data reporting
system.
"There's probably not an in-
Crease in crime, but an increase
in the reports of crime," he said.
The department continues to
use the same public safety soft-
ware to manage its data as the
previous sheriff did. The software
consists of three databases from
See CR IME A9


KRISTEN ARTZ | Office of the New York City Mayor
Emily Thomas, 24, got ca led away from a visit to her grandmother Sue Cronkite, of Apalachicola, on Sept. 10 for
a special assignment. The flautist, who earned a master's in music from The Juilliard School in 2008, had just started
home to Birmingham, Ala., when she got a call to play at New York City's 9/1 1 ceremony at Ground Zero. So she
flew out of Tallahassee and arrived there in time to play J.S. Bach's Four Sonatas, BWV 1 034 and 1 035 for flute
and Basso continue and BWV 1030 and 1032 for flute and obbligato harpsichord, at the ceremony.


By David Ad erstein
Times City Editor
An 18-year-old Carrabelle man is recu-
perating from a head injury he sustained
Saturday night while boating on the Car-
rabelle River.
According to Stan Kirkland, spokes-
man for the Florida Fish and Wildlife Con-
servation Commission, David Brian Keith
Jr. was driving his 15-foot, 25-horsepower
Monarch boat about 7:41 p.m. when the
mishap occurred about 1%/ miles west of
the Carrabelle Bridge, near 905 Sunset
Circle.
Kirkland said Keith was towing a


kneeboarder, Gary LeBlanc, also of Car-
rabelle, when LeBlanc circled the boat in
the river and made a big sweep.
Keith apparently was looking back at
LeBlanc when he drove beneath a boat lift
and a dock. The kneeboarder tried unsuc-
cessfully to warn Keith, but his head struck
the stringer, the lower bottom support of
the dock, and he lost consciousness.
"We think he tried to throw his head
back, and that's what saved him," Kirk-
land said.
A nearby resident ran to the boat,
while her husband called 911. After the
Weems ambulance arrived, paramedics
worked on Keith and then transported


him a short distance before he was taken
by Life Flight to Tallahassee Memorial
Hospital.
Keith was discharged from the hospi-
tal by Tuesday morning after receiving
treatment.
Kirkland said Keith could face possible
charges of towing without an observer on
board or rear-view mirror, and boating
under the influence. Kirkland said there
were beer cans in the boat, and officers
are awaiting a blood alcohol-level test re-
sult.
A charge of driving without an obsery-
er or rear-view mirror could result in a
fine of about $68.


Phone: 850-653-8868 TABLE OF CONTENTS
Web site: apalachtimes.com Opinion ................... ....... A4-A5 SocietyNews.. ............ 2
E-mil tmesew~,tarl~om Spot .............. .... ........... 1 lsiid ................... ..... B6B
Fax: 850-653-8036 Church News......................... B3 Tide Chart ................... ........ BS


DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK:

Legal Ad Friday aill1a.mn
Classified Display Ad Friday ai11 a.mn.
Classified Line Ad Monday ai5 p.mn.


Apa lachicola

Carrabelle


Kingfish Shootout
A2


County OKs


smaller budget,


higher millage
By David Adlerstein
Times City Editor
For the first time in recent years, the
county commission split 3-2 in approving its
annual budget, with two commissioners vot-
ing no at Monday night's final budget hear-
mng.
Commissioners Pinki Jackel and Cheryl
Sanders voiced opposition to approving the
$47.4 million budget, arguing that the county
should keep the millage at the 2008-09 rate
of 3.315 mils.
With Commissioners Smokey Parrish,
Bevin Putnal and Noah Lockley in favor,
the commission voted to increase millage
to 3.675 mils, which marks an 11 percent in-
crease in the tax rate.
But even with the higher millage, the
county will raise only about $10.21 million in
ad valorem tax money next year, about $1.72
million less than last year's $11.93 million in
ad valorem taxation.
toT'his dro is due to lower property aunak
to $2.78 billion, about 19.4 percent below last
year's combined valuation of $3.45 billion.
To raise the same amount of revenue as
last year, commissioners would have had to
go with a "rollback" rate of 4.143 mils, which
would have meant a hike in the millage rate
of 25percent.
In voting no, Jackel contended that "it
wouldn't take much," just an additional $1.3
million in budget cuts, to enable the county
to keep its millage rate from increasing.
"I don't believe this is the time we need
to be increasing our taxes," she said. "This a
toug e hom nded the city of Carrabelle
and Alligator Point Water Management Dis-
trict for "belt-tightening" by keeping their
millage rates unchanged.
She said she preferred to see the county
draw on its existing reserves and keep the
millage rate unchanged.
"I believe we could come up with reserves
when pressed," she said.
Sanders echoed Jackel's views, noting
that she has consistently opposed any move
to increase the millage rate.
"People can't take it no more," she said.
"I'm one of those people who can't."

Venable, Osborne speak out
The commissioners heard stark opposi-
::,ntoF kh posed bude pfro mw i
Osborne, of Alligator Point.
"I have had the opportunity, really the
requirement, to come out of 12 years of re-
tirement when I realized my retirement se-
curity was no more," Venable said. "I have
gone into business in order to pay property
taxes, and not entirely by choice."
He said he has been forced by economics
to cut back from three employees to one.
"Any government needs to be run like a
business, and that includes Franklin Coun-
ty," Venable said. "When you have to reduce,
you reduce.
"I am really concerned about our
elected leaders who vote for the benefit

See BUDGET A3


9/11 AT GROUND ZERO


Carrabelle man injured in boating mishap


~FREEDOM
NEWSPAPERS*INTERACTIVE


0





Secondly, to my volunteers, I'm humbled and encouraged
by your friendship and hard work throughout the campaign.
Together, we went door-to-door, passed out flyers, posted
yab tdsigns, mavdeerneleephone calls, and counted votes, all for a


In addition, manythanks to myadvisors and to those individuals
who contributed financially to the Brenda Ash campaign for
Apalachicola City Commissioner, Seat 4. Together, we won
the race, with 66% of the vote!

Lastly, thanks to City Commissioner Valentina Webb, for 4-
years of dedicated and faithful service to the Apalachicola
-omniy

Now that the campaign is over, I'm committed to using this
same unified approach to advocate for lower property taxes
and better governmental services for all.

There's so much to do... and I'm ready to start working with
our mayor and my fellow commissioners to build a better
future for all citizens of Apalachicola.

Again, my sincere gratitude to all for your generosity, advice,
friendship, and hard work, without each of you, this day would
not have been possible.

Sincerely,

Brenda Ash
Apalachicola City Commissioner-elect, Seat 4


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Thursday, October 1, 2009


A2 | The Times


Local


By Lois Swoboda
Times StaffWriter

A group of novice con-
tenders stole the show last
weekend at the seventh
annual Kingfish Shootout
with a 50-pound fish.
Team Reel Smoker won
$10,000 for their 50 pound
kingfish on Saturday and
the joke was on them.
The Panacea crew had
purchased their boat on
Thursday and Saturday's
tournament was Captain
Blake Gardener's first
foray into competitive fish-
mng.
Their fish was a cool 18
pounds heavier than the
second place winner land-
ed by Team Smooth Drag,
of Crawfordville.
This year, for the first
time, the Shootout includ-
ed a competition for the
largest grouper as well as
kingfish.
Team Green Banana, of
Warner Robbins, GA, won
first place for a grouper
weighing in at just under
15 pounds and took home a
$3,000 prize.
Carrabelle Captain Max
Lawhorn, aboard the Yes
Dear, won $900 for the fifth
place entry in the kingfish
category.
The Shootout, which has
become a much anticipat-
ed competition each year,
is held at the C-Quarters
Marina on US 98 in down-
town Carrabelle. It is a cel-
ebration of the life of Lisa
Crowder Jackson, who fell
victim to leukemia.
The Carrabelle commu-
nity pitched in to welcome
contestants and a group
of local youngsters acted
as volunteer dockmas-
ters helping to unload and
weigh the fish.
All proceeds from the
tournament benefit the
Leukemia Research Foun-
dation. On Sunday, the


LOIS SWOBODA | The Times
Aaargh! Blackbeard (also known as Robert
Campbell of Havana) went into the drink
at the Shootout attempting to rescue a Penn
International fishing rod. Campbell fished with
Team Skybox. On emerging from the watery
deep, he commented, "A Sunday afternoon
with cold beer and fine women; what more
could you ask?" At left, Team Reel Smoker
of Panacea with their $10,000 fish. Below,
Volunteer dockmasters Claudia Gref and
Nicholas Barnes, both of Carrabelle, look on as
dockmaster Cole Wheeler, also of Carrabelle,
attempts to reel in a big one.


C-QUARTERS MARINA|ISpecial to The Times
KINGFISH WINNERS
1. $10,000 Reel Smoker Captain Blake Gardner Panacea (50.4 Ibs.)
2. $5,000 Smooth Drag Capt. Bobbie Moore Crawfordville
3. $2,500 Hooked Again Capt. Jeff Baldree Adel, GA
4. $1,000 Green Banana Capt. Josh Bloodworth Warner Robbins, GA
5. $900 Yes Dear Capt. Max Lawhon Carrabelle
6. $800 Back Draft Ca t. Bobbie S ar 0, Jr. Leesbur GA
7. $700 R. E. Bass Construction Capt. Robert Bass Tallahassee
8. $550 Two Seas Capt. Allen Cloer Edgewater
9. $450 Seminole Trusses Capt. Chase Barineau Tallahassee
10. $350 Blue Water Predator Capt. Michael Lodge Sharpsburg, GA

GROUPER
1. $3,000 Green Banana Capt. Josh Bloodworth Warner Robins, GA (15.8
Ibs.)
2. $2,000 GoodAssltGits Capt. Todd Welch Crawfordville
3. $1,500 Rezone Capt. Brandon Poole Tallahassee
4. $1,000 Old Charter Capt. Gary Brown Tallahassee
5. $500 Seament Capt. Sam Pickenpaugh Sharpsburg, GA


LOIS SWOBODA|IThe Times


organizers announced
the Shootout has raised
$555,000 over the last six
years. Master of Ceremo-
nies Jon Hill said C-Quar-
ters hopes to round the
figure up to $600,000 with
this year's earnings.
The Shootout is unique
in another sense. The
tournament begins with


a flare shot fired from the
deck of the "Lady Lisa" by
Jimmie Crowder, founder
of the contest and patri-
arch of the Crowder Jack-
son family. At the sound
of the gun, the boats race
to their chosen fishing
ground. Crowder and Mil-
lard Collins, C-Quarter's
dockmaster, are guardian


angels of the competition,
working tirelessly behind
the scenes.
Scot Raw of the Atlanta
Saltwater Sportsman's
Club distributed raffle
prizes while the judges
tallied results. "This
tournament is singularly
unique in that they don't
waste money so there's


more to contribute for leu-
kemia research," he told
the crowd. "Much of the
funding comes from vol-
unteers."
Over 70 teams from
across the Southeast
competed and almost
$26,000 in prize money
was awarded. Each team
paid $400 to compete in


the Shootout. In addition,
there was a raffle and a si-
lent auction.
During the tourna-
ment, free screening for
skin cancer was available
at C-Quarters. For more
information about early
detection of skin cancer
visit wwwlIsItAKorOK.
com


Want to take this opportunity to
thank each of you for your vote and
support during my quest for a seat
on the Apalachicola Board of City
Commissioners.

First, a special thanks to all of you who
took time out of your busy schedules to
exercise your right to vote, regardless
of who you voted for I thank you for
showing up.


Surprise win f or local team at Kingf ish Shootout


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Thursday, October 1, 2009


Local


The Times | A3


of government and not for
the people who put you in
office. If you feel the gov-
ernment is more important
than the people, then you'll
vote for this budget," he
said.
Venable praised both
Sanders and Jackel "for
having the courage to vote
for the people" and was
sharply critical of the oth-
er three commissioners.
"That means you're voting
for bigger government con-
tinually," he said.
Venable singled out
Sanders for showing "back-
bone" in the move earlier
this year to rescind prior
approval of comprehensive
plan amendments that had
been granted to The St. Joe
Company to build large-
scale housing develop-
ments on St. James Island.
Venable said St. Joe cur-
rently pays an average of


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69 cents in taxes per year
per acre for its holdings in
the county.
"If you took that 69 cents
and made it $10 per acre, it
would equal $2 million," he
said. "It's worth consider-
ing if you have to have an
increase."
Osborne, who spoke on
behalf of the Concerned
Citizens of Franklin Coun-
ty, said he believed "there
is plenty of reserves in this
county to bring the millage
back" to last year's rate.
"I keep hearing of how
much we have reduced," he
said. "You have just trans-
ferred the tax elsewhere.
He cited the recently en-
acted two-cent bed tax and
one-cent hospital sales tax
as examples of this shift,
as well as the gasoline tax
that helps fund road pay-
ing. Osborne said some of
this shifted the tax burden


to tourists, but added that
"a lot of it comes from the
folks here."
He said that the beach
renourishment project in
Alligator Point was slated
to be allocated $1 million
and that "all of a sudden
the road tax went to that
hospital," referring to
Weems Memorial. He said
funds had been moved to
cover the cost of upgrading
the fishing pier as well.
"It's time this county
openly opened its books
and answered in a straight-
forward way, what are the
reserves? What are you sit-
ting on?" Osborne said.
He also contended that
the departments under the
county commission's direct
control, such as roads and
solid waste, have taken the
brunt of employee cuts,

See BUDGET A9


LOIS SWOBODA | The Times
The wiring in Carrabelle Beach Park was damaged last week after a lightning
strike. The park was shut down this weekend for repairs. County Planner
Alan Pierce said the lights were burned out and most of the wiring had to be
replaced. He said the park would reopen no later than Sept. 30.

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DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times
Martha Pearl Ward holds up one of the new city of Apalachicola mugs,
part of a fundraising effort instituted by Tom Brocato, from Apalachicola
Wellness and Physical Therapy. The mugs sell for $3 and flags for $30 or
$50, depending on size. There are keychains and stickers, as well. Brocato
recently presented a check for $300 to the city commission, all the profits so
far from this city pride effort.


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LIGHTNING STRIKE (LOSES PARK


BUDGET from page Al


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Security abounds at Little Miss Peanut crowning


* 'Y


Thursday, October 1, 2009


A4 | The Times


Saturday mornings I
like to spend a couple of
hours on the computer. I
read and answer email,
visit my favorite
news sites, and
watch clips of video
on YouTube. I was
disturbed by a
recent image, and
it brought back
very unpleasant -:
memories.
The setting RI
was a little girl
beauty pageant.
The camera moved


unforgettable, and not in a
good way.
Before I arrived at
my hotel, I was briefed
on the security
measures. Under
no circumstances
was I to reveal my
Mission to anyone.
,JMy identity would
be protected from
._stage mothers. I
wanted to laugh,
HITE but everyone
OX involved was deadly
serious.
Rox I checked in
and dressed in my
power suit for a luncheon
with festival movers and
shakers. It was all quite
lovely until I broke out
into a cold sweat and the
room started spinning.
I had been hit hard by
some unknown virulent
bug. There was no way I
could eat even a bite, so
I moved the food around
on my plate and took tiny
sips of iced tea. I spent
most of the time in the
ladies' room. The press
took pictures after the
luncheon. I pasted a smile
on my face and prayed that
I could remain vertical
throughout the shoot.
As soon as I was back in
my hotel room I called the
pageant organizer and told
her of my extreme illness.
Opting out as a judge was
not to be considered. She
was really concerned that
I would appear shaky at
the event, and that some
people might think I was
drunk. It seems that had


been plastered everywhere
in the media. I had little
idea what to expect.
It was not pretty.
Although the images are
commonplace now, they
weren't then. Little girls
with big hair sported false
eyelashes and performed
sexually provocative dance
moves that made me blush.
It got worse. Evidently
one child didn't get the
memo. Instead of a
custom-made pageant
dress with flounces and
sequins, she had on her
Sunday best. Her straight
hair was cleaned and
brushed. She had on no
makeup. I couldn't keep my
eyes off her miserable little
face. What life lesson did
she learn that night?
The judges deliberated.
Prizes were awarded.
Little Miss Peanut was
crowned. Once again
security guards protected
us from mothers and got
us safely to our vehicles.
I collapsed into bed and
stayed at the hotel an
extra day (on my dime) to
recover enough to make
the drive home.
After I told my story, the
guys at the agency had a
good laugh. Not one part of
it seemed funny to me.
It was distasteful and
gut-wrenching. I did my job,
and I am not proud of it.
Denise Roux is a
regular columnist for
the Apalachicola and
Carrabelle Times. 'lb
reach her email her at
rouxwhit~mchsi.com


ED W
NED RI
Denise


back and forth
between a child and her
father. She was dancing
for her talent routine. He
was standing in front of
the stage, his eyes riveted
on her, making the exact
same moves. I found it
exceedingly disturbing,
and I was reminded of the
time I was dragged kicking
and screaming into that
world of competition.
Back in the mid-
Eighties I worked for an
advertising agency. My
one and only client was the
Wen-South Corporation
based in Dothan, Ala. They
owned 20 Wendy's stores
in North Florida and
Alabama. I did a great deal
of traveling.
Wendy's was a
participant in the huge
annual Peanut Festival
in Dothan. I was asked to
be one of the judges for
the Little Miss Peanut
pageant. I resisted.
My boss insisted.
The experience was


Winners of the 2003-04 Little Miss National Peanut Festival.


been a problem at a prior
pageant.
I called the front
desk at the hotel and
got directions to a walk-
in clinic. Somehow I
managed to get myself
there.
Once in to see the
doctor I broke all pageant
protocol. I spilled the
details about what I had
to do that night. "I have
only a few hours before
I have to be upright and
completely presentable.
Evidently this is a high-


pressure situation. Please
do whatever you have to. I
need a miracle."
I was given anti-nausea
medication and stayed
supine in the clinic until
I had to leave and get
dressed for the pageant.
I was warned to stay
hydrated.
I felt better. By sheer
force of will and the drugs,
I believed I would make
it through the evening. I
was protected by security
guards as I arrived at
a back entrance to the


auditorium. The lady in
charge wanted to take
my water bottle away.
Perhaps it would give the
impression I had brought
my own cocktail. I was
starting to feel like Alice in
Wonderland.
The night became even
more surreal. Remember,
this was over 20 years
ago before a real public
awareness of this aspect of
childhood had become so
widespread. It was before
the photos of JonBenet
Ramsey in full makeup had


Michael Lister is one of
a kind, a Renaissance man
and wordsmith that make
him a regional asset.
A series of mystery
novels, screenplays, plays,
short stories and essays,
Lister not only writes in
those genres, he excels,
providing for readers
words that engage, words
that offer a reader a
glimpse into their own
world.
And Lister is generous
with his talent.
Last year, as economic
times toughened, Lister
donated some 1,000
copies of his books to any
interested reader.
His Tupelo Theater
offers a showcase for local
talent and films, such as
tonight when the theater
will host an environmental
film festival. He also
holds an annual writing
workshop to promote and
engage local writers.
This is a man who
follows a muse, yes, but


also his
heart, in
his writing
and in his
actions.
Last
month, he
TIM CROFT officially
Keyboard Klatering launched
his new
book,
Double Exposure, which
represents a significant
departure from his John
Jordan mystery series.
Lister calls the book his
best to date.
And he will be donating
all poi from the book
to conservation efforts in
the area.
There is a reason.
Double Exposure
is primarily set in the
swamps of North Florida,
where the protagonist
has, after life events,
most particularly the
death of his father, altered
his course, returned to
an early love, wildlife
photography.


In doing so, the main
character becomes
enmeshed in a murder
mystery, but more
importantly he finds
himself facing his own
mortality and pondering
life and all its meaning.
"It's a literary thriller,"
Lister said. "It is not
your traditional murder
mystery, but it also deals
with the mysteries of life."
But this slim
volume of just over 200
pages represents an
achievement for the
author that will pay
off handsomely for the
reader.
Photography, the
snapshots of time, feed
the prose, which, in short
bursts, fills in the blanks
of Remington James' life,
world, mind and soul.
The succinct prose,
the absence of much
punctuation calls to
mind several prominent
authors, including Cormac
McCarthy.
"That is a high
compliment," Lister said.
"I didn't necessarily want
the prose to be spare, but
I wanted the punctuation
to be spare," he added,
noting it was a product
of the writing style he
adopted for his latest book


and the look of the printed
story on the page.
That style is one of the
reasons that Lister labels
Double Exposure his best,
which will be published by
Ty~rus Books of Madison,
WI.
"I'm really pleased with
the stylistic achievement,"
Lister said. "It is the
next step for me. The
subject matter lent itself
to the style. It is almost
impressionism through
content."
The story jumps from
third person narration to
first person flashbacks
of James' time on earth,
his contemplation of what
this life is all about, his
memories and how the
world and the events in
his life have shaped him.
"It says a lot of things
I wanted to say, about
the meaning of life,
meditation, how events
shape lives," Lister said.
Lister said the book
started with a simple
image.
"That image was
this ghastly image
of those green-hued
photographs that a wildlife
photographer would
capture, particularly at
night or around dusk," he
said.


From there it was a
matter of decoding a story
in his mind and on paper
and adopting a style that
would fit that image.
Those often ghostly
images of wildlife
permeate the story, and
some frames that James
captures ultimately
set in motion a murder
mystery which threads
its way through James'
meditations on his life in
the novel.
Those frames bring
danger and lead to the
circumstances in which
James must take stock
of himself while saving
himself.
While Lister perceives
the book as a literary
evolution of sorts,
and Double Exposure
is a unique writing
achievement, he somehow
pulls off a story that is also
an action adventure.
"I try to tell an
entertaining and
suspenseful story that
will leave the reader
thinking," Lister said.
In January, after the
book had already been
submitted to his publisher,
Lister had a brainstorm
while preparing lunch in
his kitchen.
Recalling the


Christmas book giveaway,
Lister wanted to donate
the profits from Double
Exposure to conserving
the very lands that
provide the setting for the
novel, the Apalachicola
River basin and its
swamps and sloughs.
His protagonist is
fighting to survive in the
book; Lister is trying to
ensure the landscape
surrounding James for
much of the novel also
survives.
His editor agreed to the
idea, the publisher was on
board and Lister's agent
made it unanimous.
"This whole thing is
just unique," Lister said.
The local signing
will be held from 1 to
3 p.m. this Saturday,
Oct. 3 on the porch of
Apalachicola Riverkeeper,
232 Water Street. This
event is co-sponsored
by the Riverkeeper
and Downtown Books.
Lister hopes the book
will ultimately help
conserve the river by
donating money to efforts
in Franklin County to do
just that. This Saturday's
signing will also include
an exhibit of photography
from area river swamps
where the book is set.


aalachicola (I
T n Carrabelle6 hI




USPS 027-600
Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St.
Apalachicola, FL 32329
VP/Publisher: Karen Hanes
Editor: Tim Croft
Circulation: James Meadors


By Kendyl Hardy and (ecillia James
Special to the Times

Every year in October schools
around the country are being filled
with an air of excitement. Football
players are practicing until the
grssis nothing butodirt, ex dthe
tenge girl ar ppmng fr"
perfect dress," classmates are
enthusiastically building floats, and
entire families are looking forward
to two things; Homecoming and the
Homecoming Parade.
The two fit together like peanut
butter and jelly. One cannot go
without the other. They go hand in
hand and work together to evoke
the magic tradition of Homecoming.
As a child each one of us was
twitching with excitement as the


Homecoming Parade went by. The
masculine football players riding on
top of the fire truck, the gorgeous
homecoming representatives from
each grade, the floats radiating
school spirit, and every school
supporter were present.
It is something that ties everyone
together. The Homecoming Parade
is not just a parade. It is an event
that promotes unity within the
school and the community.
'Two high schools also believed
this from around the area;
Apalachicola High School and
Carrabelle High School. Once
the two were rivals, but as a
consolidated school we are now
one. The Homecoming Parade was
a tradition passed down for years
at each high school. Last year, we
adopted the Homecoming Parade


as a tradition of our own for years to
come.
The parade not only builds unity,
but a strong sense of school pride.
Everyone is pouring out the love
they feel for their school and how
happy they are to be a part of it.
Sure it is like that at football games
and pep rallies, but in the parade
it is magnified to an even greater
extent. When participating in a
public event, such as a parade down
the middle of Highway 98, it's saying
to the world "I'm a Franklin County
Seahawk and proud of it!" The
parade leaves the entire community
pumped for the Homecoming
game and not only that; it has
the community pumped to be a
Seahawk in general.

See HOMECOMING AS


POSTMASTER:
Send address change to:
The Apalachicola Times
P.O. Box 820
Apalachicola, FL 32329
Phone 850-653-8868


PERIODICAL RATE
POSTAGE PAID AT
APALACHICOLA, FL 32329
WEEKLY PUBLISHING


SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
IN COUNTY
$24. 15 year $15.75 six months
OUT OF COUNTY
$34.65 year $21 six months


TO ALL ADVERTISERS
In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers
do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount
received for such advertisement,

The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is
thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word
thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains


O~in *


Writer's generosity to benefit conservation


Homecoming promotes tradition, pride and unity

































H OME COMING from page A4


THE 4THANNUAL, 2009


























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Thursday, October 1, 2009


Local


The Times | AS


During the 2009
Legislative Session,
the Florida Legislature
struggled with a
large budget shortfall
in the state budget.
Lawmakers, including
State Representative
Leonard Bembry, pushed
for tax reform and
greater budget increase
restraints. Unfortunately,
the majority of lawmakers
instead voted to increase
taxes to meet state needs
by raising fees associated
with basic vehicle


understand
the
financial
struggles
that many
LEONARDof you are
facing
BEMBRY asyu
maintain
your homes, farms and
small businesses during
the current recession and
I am deeply concerned
that fee increases will
have a very negative


effect on our efforts to
financially recover and
grow our economy," said
Bembry.
Lawmakers who
supported the fee
increases argued that
some fees haven't been
increased in many years.
While that may be the
case, increases they
approved are sudden
and sharp. The cost of a
Florida driver's license
has doubled, and is now
set at $48. It will also cost
$25 more each year to


renew the registration on
a medium-sized vehicle,
bringing those costs to
nearly $72.
Bembry is also
concerned about calls
he has received from
constituents who were
unable to renew their
tags or licenses within the
short timeframe allowed
by the legislation.
There were many
frustrated people in line
at our local motor vehicle
and tax collectors offices.
It's truly unfortunate that


the Legislature gave such
a very narrow window of
time for people to prepare
for this costly new burden.
"I will continue to work
in Tallahassee to remove
waste and inefficiencies
from the budget. I will
support prioritized
spending and adequate
funding for the basic
needs and services of the
citizens of our state" said
Bembry.
Bembry signed
House Bill 99 on Sept.
9. Under a letter sent


by Representative
Ron Saunders, D-Key
West, the legislation
would "revert vehicle
registration and title fees
and driver's license fee
back to what they were
before the passage of
Senate Bill 1778."
Please do not
hesitate to contact one
of Bembry's legislative
offices in Madison,
Chiefland or Tallahassee
if you have any questions
or concerns.


The Homecoming
Parade is such a positive
event. It's a ton of fun and
there is not another thing
like it around. People of
all ages drive for miles to
experience our school's
Homecoming Parade, and
it has a great influence on
individuals.
I remember watching
the parade as a child. I
barely stood behind the
white lines of the road,
and I watched everything
through eyes widened
with wonder. It was so
magical to me. I looked up
to the beautiful girls riding
on top of the cars and
thought to myself "I want
to do that one day."
I am now Ms. FCHS. I
finally have that chance
to live out that childhood
dream.
When thinking about
my own feelings, I
cannot help but take
into consideration
the Homecoming
representatives' feelings.
In this parade we all
share in their glory.
For these girls it is a
close-up and personal
experience with the
crowds of people gathered
around them. Being truly
noticed as a homecoming
representative is a feeling


is possible.
Franklin County
School's Homecoming is
such a wonderful time
of the year. There is
not another time more
anticipated by everyone.
The Homecoming
Parade is such a huge
part of Homecoming,
our traditions, and our
community. It promotes
unity, pride, friendship,
work ethic, and the drive
to follow your dreams.
I urge each individual
to think back on
your Homecoming
experiences. Think
about the Homecoming
Parade. Think of the way
it felt, what happened,
and the excitement it
caused. Ponder on all
the memories that were
made, and come join
Franklin County School
this year as we make our
own.
Kendyl Hardy is Ms.
FCHS, and Cecillia
James is president of
the Student Government
Association at Franklin
County High School. The
Homecoming Parade will
be held Friday afternoon,
Oct. 30 in Eastpoint,
prior to the homecoming
game that pits Franklin
County vs. Blountstown.


and memory that they
will cherish for the rest
of their lives. Each and
every individual dreams
for their own five minutes
of fame. These girls also
have a chance to live out
their dream.
The parade also
allows classmates a
chance to bond. When
each grade works on


their homecoming float,
the individual present
spend a great deal of
time with one another.
This gives each person
a chance to get to know
each other better and
builds friendship. From
experience I can say
that people you do not
expect to participate in
floatbuilding actually


show up. Unlikely
friendships are formed
that may not have been
Otherwise. Floatbuilding,
like the Homecoming
Parade, is a tradition.
It's a great time for
students and it promotes
good work ethic. Each
grade is drive to win
first place for the best
float, and is prepared


to work as hard as they
can to achieve their
goal. Teenagers pour
their blood, sweat, and
even tears into these
floats. When they see
the finished product in
the Homecoming Parade
it induces a sense of
accomplishment and
proves that through hard
work anything


Bembry sponsors bill to eliminate vehicle fee hikes









CL1N'Ca R~ ~ (888) 831-6754Tl re
Franklin County:
(850) 670-5555
O > Leon County:
ME M Epo (850) 926-9602
Helping Hands Make The Difference


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2802 Unit C Hwv 98
MexiCO Beach, FL 32410
1850) 648-5861




M.D. Billing

Solutions, LLC


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* Medical Billing and Certified
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(850) 785-0581
www. MDBillingSolutions.net
Email: MDBillingSolutions ecomcast. net


Offering works
from masters of
the past as well as
contemporary works
by some of the areaS
best artistS.


^F~ I Hours:
t.Friday & Saturday
10am 4pm
.8 Sunday Thursday
v by appointment

409 Tallahassee St.
? ~Carrabelle, FL
. 850-697-2476
or 850-653-7201
"Rachael Hides Her Fathers Gods"
Marc Chagall


Thursday, October 1, 2009


A6 | The Times


Local


Evan Protsman and Meghan Williams pitched in on the Apalachicola causeway on Coastal
Cleanup Day.


Coastal Cleanup stashes the trash


By Lois Swoboda
Times StaffWriter
Attendance is reported to
have been a little down across
the county at this year's Coastal
Cleanup Saturday, but a healthy
amount of garbage was rounded
up anyway.
On St. George Island
volunteers collected 1,941
pounds, almost a ton, of trash
and a half-ton of recyclables.
Carrabelle collected 2,800


pounds of trash, most gathered
at the pavilion but some from
Crooked River Lighthouse,
and 100 pounds of recyclables,
including nine tires.
Eastpoint yielded 1,160
pounds of trash and 280 pounds
of recyclable refuse, all gathered
at Millender Park.
Apalachicola volunteers
collected about 1,200 pounds of
refuse, mainly from around Ten
Foot Hole, but about 300 pounds
from Abercrombie Landing.


Workers at Bald Point
State Park collected over 700
pounds of garbage and another
700 pounds was collected at
Alligator Point. The Ochlocknee
Bay Boat Ramp yielded up over
500 pounds of trash.
County totals reported by
the Apalachicola Riverkeepers
were over 8,400 pounds of
trash and about 2,100 pounds
of recyclables. Volunteers say
they found all kinds of debris in
places, including a space heater.


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apalachtimes.com

BILL MILLER REALTY
850-697-3751 (3310) 570-0658
SACRIFICE
1.16 AC. LOT GULFVIEW & ACCESS LANARK BCH.
$27,5000"
FORECLOSURE
60'X100' LOT 2 BLKS. 70 BANK 4BR/1.5BA HOME AT CTY.
APPR.$579,500" 1/3 DWN
BEACH COTTAGE 50'WHITE SAND $199,0000 ZONED C1
3BDR-2BA-3 CORNER LOTS
FENCED-HUGE WORKSHOP-LARGE SCREENED
BREEZEWAY & PORCH- GARDEN TU B W/SHOWER
ISLAND KIT.-DINING- HEATER FIRE/PL-ONLY $79,500
2400 S/F CONVENIENCE STORE
100'X 175'ON
98 W/G ULF VIEW. MAKE US AN OFFER.
COMM. BLDG AT U.S.98
2 CRNR LOTS-1,400 S/F $159,500


~f
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iS;

~6' )


3993


Come out and support Florida Wild Mammal Association
All Proceeds to benefit injured and orphaned wildlife.
Harvey Young Farm
196 Harvey Young Farm Rd. Crawfordville FL.








Sp'onsored B : Pr~ogress Enierg! Hark\e -Younlg Farmn Cone~
Distributors Shir~les 11ise & .Associa7tes \\r1akllar Park'l & Rec


Thursday, October 1, 2009


Local


The Times | A7


Event a first

for the county


This Saturday at the Lanark
Village Boat Club and Marina,
Lanark firefighters will host the first
ever gumbo cookoff in an effort to
raise money for their firefighting
efforts .
The Lanark-St. James Island
Volunteer Fire Department will host
techarity cook-off beginning at 11 a.m. this
Saturday, Oct. 3, and running until 3 p.m. at the
Boat Club and Marina 2364 US 98 in Lanark Village.
Teams will pay a $50 entry fee, and prizes will be
ribbons for the top three contestants and bragging rights.
Organizers are hoping to fill the 10 available spaces for
teams, and are hoping that the public will come out and
savor the delicious gumbo.
Rules require that the soup or stew must contain okra
and that a minimum of two quarts be prepared in one pot,
to be submitted for judging. The Franklin County Health
Department will be on hand to inspect food booths and
issue temporary permits.
Monies raised from the event will go towards funding
the fire department, which has been operating on savings
for the past two years.
A slew of expenses, including for truck maintenance on
a 1996 vehicle, has been draining funds, said Chief Mike
Rundel. "Everything that breaks on a truck is expensive,"
he said.
For more info, call Rundel at 370-6576.


Gr~eat Mlusic Featur~ing:
C'oon Bottoml Crleek
TuIpelo Ralilr~oad
Sw~ingin' Har~poon Blues Band
Tra~ffon Harv~ey
Andc A'Iloe!


Food. Dr~ink alnd Beer
Hor~se Patt- Raf~le
Silent Auction
Phioto C'ontest
Local Ar~tists
And Vlendors


H m


WANNA GO?
The Gumbo
Cookoff, hosted
by the Lanark-
St. James Island
Volunteer Fire
Department, will
be help Saturday,
Oct. 3, from
1 1 a.m. to 3 p.m.

MORE
INFORMATION
Contact Chief
Mike Rundel at
370-6576
























































Fall Into Books @Yo ur Libra y

Join the Apalachicola Municipal Lirbrary

This Fall for Children's and Teen Programs


~ Children's Story times ~
S4 more Saturdays

September 26 & October 3, 10, 17

*Pr0-SCh001 age 3 5 Years Old
10 AM to 10:30 AM Bring your favorite adult to share in stories and
aCliVitieS
K thru 2nd Grade
11 to 11:30 AM Storytime featuring award winning picture bookS
3rd thru 6th Grade
Noon to l:00 PM The Mysterious Benedict Society
Teen Programs
Go Beyond Reality@Your Library

TeenRea Week October 19 thru 24

Check with teachers, school librarians and your
public librarian for program details




Washington County Chamber of Commerce


Mail-in or Drop-off Entry Form
One recipe submission per family is free, two or more entries, $5.00. (Up to five entries per
family allowed.) Make checks payable to: The News Herald. Mail or drop off at 501 W.11th St.
P.O. Box 1940 Panama City, FI 32402 Deadline: Monday, October 19th by noon (cst).
Recipes must be typed.


PIeaSe check the category you wish your recipe to be entered in:
OCakes OMain Courses OPies And Other Desserts OSoups & Chowders

OAppetizers & Hors d'oeuvres OAccompaniments (Vegetables and Side Dishes)
For przes per category v st the contest page at www newsherald corn.
Top 10 entres per category wl be published in The Holiday's Best Cookbook


Sat. & Sun., Nov. 2'1-22, 2009

Washing ton County Ag ricultura I Center
Chipley, Florida



Register now for booth space at the 2009 Outdoor Expo
and Gun & Knife Show in Washington County, Fla.
Share your sport and recreation products and services
with thousands of sports enthusiasts in North Florida
and the surrounding area.

The 2009 Outdoor Expo is the host site for the
area's premier Gun & Knife Show.

Multi-media Expo promotion will reach more than 92,000
consumers in an 8-county area. All exhibitors also receive
F RE E advertising in the official 2009 Outdoor Expo
Program, with 12,000-plus distribution in Washington and
Holmes counties.

For Exhibitor Application, as well as information on
rl~llathe show and program advertising:

C~ambe visit: www.wcexpo.org
18E Ofemail: info@wcexpo.org
county Call 850.638.4157 ,

For additional advertising information in the official program of the E W S
2009 Outdoor Expo contact Washington County News at 850-638-0212. E~



One South N~ H i ORANGE HILL

S- BANK c'CA EXPRESS


Thursday, October 1, 2009


Local


By Lois Swoboda
Times StaffWriter

At an age when most
people are settling in
to relax, Bob Kipp is
preparing for the journey
of a lifetime. At 82, he
plans to become the
oldest person to sail solo
around the world.
If you visited the
marina at Ten Foot Hole
this week you may have
encountered a long, lank
shaggy-headed fellow
working on his trimaran
or relaxing on the old-
timers bench. That was
Bob Kipp, of Labelle,
who passed through
Apalachicola this week
on his way home from
Waterloo, Iowa aboard his
34-foot "The Class of '45,
named for his graduating
class at St. Mary's High
School.
Kipp constructed
the three-bowed in his
home town of Waterloo
and rode her through
the streets during the
Waterloo Days parade.
He trailered the boat
to Harper's Ferry and
sailed the lady 1,800
miles on his way to his


Photos by LOIS SWOBODA | The Times
Bob Kipp stands with his violin aboard the Class of '45. At right, The 34-foot trimaran was built in Waterloo, lowa.


home base in Labelle
where he lives on a
40-foot trimaran. He
stopped for a brief rest in
Apalachicola, and plans
to transfer the rigging


and equipment off of his
boat docked in Labelle
onto the new vessel. He
hopes to depart Labelle
on Dec. 5 sailing for the
Panama Canal.


"I wanted to
circumnavigate the
globe in a boat built in
my home town," Kipp
said. "When I finish the
trip, the Class of '45 will
go on display along the
Riverfront in Waterloo."
Kipp said he circled
the globe in the l970s
accompanied by his
partner and companion,
Trudy Spielberger. She
will not be along for this
epic journey but will
fly out to meet Kipp at
several stops along the
way.

Where iS

Captain Bob?
To pass the time
during his voyage, Kipp
plans to study the violin
by receiving instruction
over the Internet from


LouAnn Flaherty, an
instructor for West
Music. He will appear
on the website for West
Music practicing and
plans to stop at music
schools scattered along
the way to study with
local students mainly
between the ages of 6
and 10.
"I'm looking forward
to having the kids play
Where is Captain Bob?"
he said. "I want to show
children around the
world how the other little
students do it."
There will be two
video cameras mounted
on the boat; one to film
inside the cabin and one
to scan the sails and the
boat's surroundings.
Not a newcomer
to sailing, Kipp spent
three decades on the
waves working as an


architectural model
builder. He always built
his own boats but said
sailing was not his
passion in those days.
"I wasn't interested
in sailing then. It was
more like I sailed to
work," he said. "It was
a convenient way to go
between islands."
Kipp worked in
South Africa, Australia,
Fiji, and the Marshall
Islands during his
career. He said he and
Spielberger spent a lot
of time on Maui. South
Africa was his favorite
port of call.
Kipp plans to post
his journal and photos
of his trip on a webpage
Once he is underway. His
adventures will be linked
to websites for the City
of Waterloo and West
Music.


PANAMA CITY
NE~7 HER LD


Recipes must be received no later than Monday, October 19, noon (cst).
The top lo dishes in each category will be judged
Monday, November 2, at the Martin Theatre


1. Recipes must be typed on a separate piece of paper,
and include: entrant's name, address, email and phone
number. All entries must include entry form or a
reasonable reproduction. One recipe submission is free,
two or more entries per family $5.00. (Up to five entries
allowed.)
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Online: www.newsherald.com/cookingcontest
Mail to: NIE COOKING CONTEST, The News Herald, PO.
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3. You must identify one category your recipe is to be
judged under: Cakes, Pies and Other Desserts, Soups
& Ch owde rs, Mai n C ou rses, Accompani ments an d
Appetizers & Hors D'0euvres.
4. Pre- udg n:
Recipes will be pre-judged to select the Top 10 recipes in
each category. The Top 10 recipes in each category will
be notified no later than October 30th.


5. : ....I~~ Round Judging:
Top 10 recipes MUST prepare their dish and bring it
ready to serve at the Martin Theatre between 4-6 p.m. on
Monday, November 2 for our professional and celebrity
judging panel. Judging for all entries all In~-onal promptly
at 6:30 p.m. *Please note there are no
heating facilities available. however you
may bring a warmer of your own.

of winners between 7:15 and 7:45 p.m.0Only those
individuals who brought a food item, plus one other
member of their family, will be allowed to participate in
the tasting, while food is available.
7. All containers must be picked up by 7:45 p.m. The
News Herald is not responsible for broken or lost dishes.
8. All entrants, by the act of entering the contest, gives
The News Herald the right to publish all recipes accepted
with the name of the person submitting the recipe.
9. News Herald associates and their immediate families
are not eligible to participate.


Recipe Name:
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A8 | The Times


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Thursday, October 1, 2009


Local


The Times | A9


with the constitutional offi-
cers being spared the cut-
backs.
"Why do you take all
the guff, and why do your
employees have to take all
the cuts?" Osborne asked,
likening the constitutional
officers to the Florida State
football program, which is
generally spared cuts that
other university depart-
ments must endure.
"You andyouremployees,
you are directly responsible
for the cuts," he said. "It's
time you sent the budget
to the governor if you can't
get cooperation there (from
constitutional officers)."

COMMISSIOners defend
leaner budget
Prodded by Venable to
answer for their yea votes,
Putnal, Parrish and Lock-
ley did not shy away from
defending their stances.
"I'm not voting against
the people," Putnal said. "I'm
voting for a budget to have
services for the people."
He outlined scenarios,
such as when a road blows
out because of a storm or a
homeowner is the victim of
a crime, when citizens turn
to the county for help.
"You've got to have ser-
vices, and it costs money to
pay for those services. You
reach a point when there
may be something to cut,
but you're going to have to
cut services to do it," Put-
nal said.
Lockley said further
cuts would prompt "a flood
of phone calls" from angry
residents, and criticized
those commissioners who
vote against county spend-
ing and then turn around
and seek to secure funds
for their pet projects.
"I won't straddle that
fence that way," he said.
Parrish spoke directly
to Venable's criticism, not-
ing the county budget has
seen a steady decrease in


size from 2006-07, when
property taxes raised $15.8
million, with a millage rate
of 3.84 mils.
Since that time, the
county has steadily raised
fewer dollars from property
taxes about $14.2 million
in 2007-2008 and $11.9 mil-
lion last year. In addition, the
millage rate dropped steadi-
ly since 2004-2005, from 4.87
mils to 3.31 mils last year.
"I have to pay these
taxes, too," Parrish said.
"I also have property that's
not homesteaded, too. As
long as I see the ad valor-
em go down by $6 million in
three years, it's moving in
the right direction.
"It didn't come up in one
year, and it's not going to
fall down in one year," he
said.
Parrish also took issue
with Venable's claim that
the county commission has
trampled on the will of the
people, citing the one-cent
sales tax as an example.
"This board didn't im-
pose that tax," he said. "You
may not agree with that, but
the people voted for it."

P Onnin 0fo fUrtlier
downturn in revenue
At the end of the hear-
ing, Sanders and Jackel
questioned Finance Direc-
tor Linda Phillips about the
extent of reserves available
for contingencies. She said
the county had about $1.28
million in reserves and an-
other $335,000 in unused
department funds from the
current budget year.
Jackel said she would
like to set a period of at
least six months with the
same millage rate.
"We could at least see
where we're at, at that
point," she said. "I think
there are alternatives that
do not extinguish county
services."
Lockley stressed that
last November, after the


Value Adjustment Board
met, the county saw about
a half-million dollars in ex-
pected revenues disappear.
"We weren't anticipating
that," he said. "November's
coming again."
Phillips said that if the
drop in revenue projec-
tions falls below a certain
threshold, the county com-
mission could increase
the millage rate to accom-
modate the shortfall, but
that such a move, after the
initial TRIM notices were
sent out, would not be wel-
comed by taxpayers.
She said that the Value
Adjustment Board process
would cut into some an-
ticipated revenue, but that
she didn't expect it to be as
drastic as last year's half-
million dollars. Property
Appraiser Doris Pendleton
has said she expects that
a more exacting appraisal
process this year, overseen
by the state, will mean few-
er challenges to the adjust-
ment board.
In the end, the commis-
sioners felt that it was more
prudent to keep a sufficient
cushion built into the bud-
get now than to risk being
caught with little leeway in
the event of a further down-
turn in revenue.
With only about $10.21
million of the $47.4 million
budget coming from prop-
erty taxes, the remaining
$37 million includes a vari-
ety of grants, trust funds,
state and federal funding,
and other taxes, including
nearly $9 million for the
Weems Memorial Hospital
operating fund, $6 million
from grants, gas tax reve-
nues and previous property
tax contributions for road
paying, $2.26 million from
health care tax proceeds,
$1.8 million in airport grants
and other revenues, $1.65
million for the fishing pier
maintenance fund and $1.14
million in tourist develop-
ment funds


Emergitech Inc., out of Co-
lumbus, Ohio, which are
INTERCad, for computer-
aided dispatching; INTER-
Badge, for crime records
management; and INTER-
Slam, a jail management
system.
"Previous to us coming
into office, the system they
used to report crimes is
not the same as the system
we're using, that is the man-
ner in which it's reported
and collected," he said. "We
have the same software
system, but the information
was not being put into the
system as it's being put into
the system now.
"It's a new reporting
situation, in other words,"
Norred said. "The report-
ing management system
was not being utilized in
the way it was designed
when we initiated the pro-
cedures for collecting the
information,
"We are now pulling
the incidents regardless of
whether there's an arrest
to be made," Norred said.
"It is my understanding
that the way the system
was set up prior to us, be-
ing here a case number
was not pulled unless there
was going to be an arrest
made.
"The more case num-
hers pulled, the more
incidents you have," he
said. "The way we capture
what's being reported to
us may not be the same as
past years."
Chuck Brady, marketing
director of EmergiTech,
said departments in the 18
states his company serves
are becoming more adept
at making maximum use of
the software programs.
"The way reporting is
being done is changing," he
said.
"'lk~aditionally in the
past, those additional
crimes, depending on what
they were, were not tallied.
Now we have a more accu-
rate picture," Brady said.
"Some of the agencies are
just getting around to do-
ing it. It's a different way of
looking at crime."
Norredrecentlyreturned
from week of training with
EmergiTech in Ohio. He
spent a week there, and this


month the company plans
to send down instructors
to provide refresher train-
ing on all three systems to
county staff.
Norred said a clear pic-
ture of crime in the county
will emerge after several
months of comparing the
results under the newly
managed reporting system.
"Next year you'll be able
to determine if things are
consistent," he said. "We
don't have a crystal ball, and
we can't determine how it's
going to be, but what you're
going to get is an accurate
report of crimes."

Apalachicola to better
maag tlarn ca
Neither Apalachicola
nor Carrabelle employ the
Emergitech public safety
software programs, and
the number of offenses in
their cities both showed be-
tween a 28 and 33 percent
decrease in the first half of
the year.
ApalachicolaChiefBobby
Varnes acknowledged that
his department's reporting
system has its drawbacks
because so much depends
on the ability of officers and
office workers to input the
data on a timely and thor-
ough basis.
He saidthis explains why
the department has only a
23.1 percent clearance rate
of cases, less than half that
of Carrabelle's 47.8 percent
rate, and well below the
county's 43.4 percent rate.
"It's really not 100 per-
cent accurate," Varnes said,
noting that while the proper
paperwork may be turned
in initially, an officer might
fail to go back and show
that the case was solved,
and thus it will linger on as
not being cleared.
"They don't go back and
turn in (the reports)," Var-
nes said. "That's partly my
fault, and I'm trying to get
it corrected and trying to
come up with a better way
to correct that. Now we're
trying to make an honest
effort to put the right num-
bers in."
He said that in trying to
he a good steward of the
county's money, he cannot
justify spending the $17,000


to $20,000 for new computer
software.
"We're trying to get on
it, but right now, we're not
budgeted to do it," the chief
said. "It's not that we don't
want to be on that system,
but it will cost quite a bit of
money."
Norred said there may
be some increases in differ-
ent areas of crime, but in
order to determine specif-
ics, officers would have to
search the data manually.
He said that unlike of-
fenses, the rise in arrests
is not dependent on varia-
tions in reporting.
"Maybe we're just being
more aggressive," he said.
"Arrests are as they are.
There's no difference in re-
porting. Ifyou are arrested,
then it's reported. It comes
through booking.
"The facts speak for
themselves," he said. "If
we're making more ar-
rests, then we're investi-
gating things that require
arrests."
Varnes said he believes
officers are doing a good
job of tackling crime head-
on, noting that the depart-
ment has solved several
crimes lately.
"The guys I've got work-
ing under me do a good
job in trying to get cases
solved," Varnes said. "I've
got some good guys who re-
ally work hard on the case,
and they put forth efforts to
get them solved.
"It seems we're solv-
ing more than we used to
solve," he said, noting that
the creation of a Neighbor-
hood Watch Program is a
response to a boost in com-
plaints from citizens.
"There seems to be an
increase in drugs right now.
We're getting complaints
from the citizens that's it's
up being sold," he said.
"We're in a bad time right
now, and crime is going to
a little higher."
Varnes said that al-
though the sheriff has a
drug task force devoted to
tackling the problem, all the
departments cooperate.
"We all try to work to-
gether and help each other
out," he said. "If the coun-
ty's failing, we're failing too
and vice versa."


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Thursday, October 1, 2009 w ww. apalach times com Page to


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A
Section


~li~L~SB~i~


By David Adlerstein
Times City Editor

The Franklin County Seahawks
have a bye week this Friday, but
don't expect them to be licking their
wounds from a 26-0 defeat Friday at
the hands of the Graceville Tigers.
"The advantage is we get more
time to get good at what we're doing,"
said Coach Josh Wright. "There re-
ally is no relaxed down time in a bye
week. It's just as much pressure to
get in what you got to get in."
Beginning Oct. 9at Port St. Joe, the
Seahawks will rattle off five straight
district games, at Wewahitchka, home
against Liberty County, home against
Blountstown for homecoming and
away against West Gadsden.
"We're looking at it as 0-0 right
now, and the season is brand new, and
it's on," said Wright.
"Physically, we have nobody in-
jured, but it's a matter of getting after
it," he said. "We're not blocking well;
we definitely didn't tackle well the
other night."


DANA WHALEY | The Times
Seahawks junior quarterback Dalin Modican runs against Graceville
while freshman Chase Golden prepares to block.
Coming off back-to-back wins, the back Jacky Miles behind center, and
Seahawks knew they would be up he engineered the Tigers' Veer attack
against a formidable opponent, a for- and their first win of the season.
mer state runner-up, in Graceville.
Graceville put freshman quarter- See SEAHAWKS Al 1


By Christy Thompson game against the top
Special to the Times seeded Bulldogs; how-
ever, we did win. The girls
The Lady Seahawks displayed outstanding
traveled to Liberty County teamwork and determina-
on Sept. 24 and played the tion to take the first game
most excited volleyball 26-24 from the opponent.
match of the season. The gymnasium had a
The Seahawks weren't different feel than what
supposed to win the first was expected after the


defense of the Seahawks
shut down the district ri-
val.
Freshman Chena Seg-
ree and sophomore Oneika
Lockley had a total of five
key blocks to secure the
win. During the second and
third game, the Seahawks
seemed to take a slight


break. The Bulldogs came
out playing some hardcore
volleyball and gave our
girls a tremendous game.
After losing two straight,
25-10 and 25-9, I thought
the girls would have just
conceded to the fact that

See VOLLEYBALL Al1


CA RRA BE L LE APA LA CH ICO LA


Sea hawks regroup after



foln to Grcvle2


AHS to host Three-
P0int Shootout Oct. 3
There will be a Three-
point Shoot-out Basketball
tournament on Saturday,
Oct. 3 at the former
Apalachicola High School
gym.
The double elimination
tourney gets under way
at 10 a.m. at the gym.
There are no more than
two players per team, with
a trophy awarded to the
first-place winners.
Registration fee is
$10 per team, with all
monies going to the
tourney sponsors, Parents
Support Group (PSG),
which plans to help the
Seahawks basketball team.
Refreshments will also be
sold. .
For more information,
call Granville Croom at
653-7643.

Chamber to host golf
tourney Oct. 4
Apalachicola Bay
Chamber of Commerce
will host its sixth
annual Invitational
Golf Tournament on

We sudpa Olch ness
members from around the
Franklin, Gulf, Leon and
Wakulla County areas at
the afternoon tournament
on the beautiful St. James
Bay Golf Course east of
Carrabelle. Well-known
golf course designer
Robert Walker created

See BRIEFS Al I


couny

readies






Under the guidance of
volunteer coach David Cox,
now in his second year,
Franklin County is prepar-
ing for its most explosive
soccer season ever,
Currently, there
are 14 Lady Seahawks and
16 Seahawks. Although of-
ficial practices do not be-
gin until next week, the
players are divided into
two teams, and our scrim-
maging is on Saturdays at
10 a.m. at the high school.
"Though the players are
mostly eighth-graders,
freshmen and sophomores,
the years of soccer experi-
ence is greater than last
year," said Cox.
Lady Seahawks include
juniors Kayla Carter and
Maggie Langston; sopho-
mores Megan Newell, Bri-
anna Whittington, Emerald
Norris, Jessica Dempsey,
Carla Lewis and Haley
Mathes; freshmen Roxana
Shattuck, Whitney Vause
:rsdh Jsiea sockyer on
Dempsey, Gracyn Kirvin,
Jessica Shields and Laura
Gallegos.
Seahawks include se-
niors Derick Rhodes and
Frank Gerking; junior Wil-
liam Sapp; sophomores
Andrew Waller, Javeion
Winfield, JJ Golden and

See SOCCER Al1


Seahawk spikers play tough vs. Liberty


































































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Senior wide receiver Arron Prince
played like a captain, with four
catches for 96 yards, plus 26-yard and
9-yard returns, for 131 all-purpose
yards against Graceville.




SPECIAL RATES FOR NEW CUSTOMERS!


Thursday, October 1, 2009


Local


"It was kind of what we
expected," said Wright.
"They were very savvy They
had a good plan, and we
knew it was coming. It was
'flavor of the week' as far as
formations went. They threw
some wrinkles at us.
"They had two weeks
to get ready for us," said
Wright, saluting the Tigers'
freshman quarterback.
"He ran the offense like
a champ, and I tip my hat
to their staff for getting the
most out of their guys," he
said. "Our guys played hard;
they never quit. They played
more as a team than they did
the week before."
Graceville (1-2) also
used 230-pound fullback Le-
ron Hoover to its advantage
while ending Franklin Coun-
ty's (2-2) modest two-game
winning streak.
Seahawks quarterback
Dalin Modican passed for 84
of his 101 yards in the first
half. In all, he was 8-of-15
from the air and rushed for
63 yards.
The only time Franklin
County threatened, however,
ended in a "questionable"
lost fumble inside the 10
and turning the ball over on
downs at the 4.
"(Dalin) Modican was
twisting and turning, and he
went down, and they said the
ball came out before he was
down," said Wright. "The
other time he didn't get be-


were not intercepted and
had only one fumble.
"Graceville fumbled and
recovered so we didn't win
the battle of turnovers," he
said. "The defensive plan
was about as good as we
could get. But we had some
breakdowns in execution,
and it cost us. We should
have walked away with 21
points to be honest.
"This is the biggest front
we play against," he said.
"We're setting ourselves up
for success down the line."
Modican led rushers with
seven carries for 63 yards,
with senior DJ Lane run-
ning three times for 21yards,
sophomore 'lk~akel 'lI~rrell
rushing four times for 16
yards, Prince twice for six
yards and junior James Win-
field once for 1 yard.
Senior Dustin Putnal had
one catch for six yards.
The Seahawks' leading
tackler was senior lineback-
er Chase Richards, with 11.
He also played every step of
the way on both offense and
special teams.
"We got a wakeup call. My
ninth-grader Cole Lee got a
real taste of what it's like"
as he lined up against a top-
notch college prospect who
was larger and stronger, said
Wright.
"Now we've seen them,
and I'll know what to expect
when we play Graceville, I'll
tell you that," he said.


we would lose a third and go home.
Our girls gave the Bulldogs some stiff
competition. We earned respect from
their players, coaches and fans on that
day. Junior Desirae Cummings com-
pletely owned the net up front for the Se-
ahawks. She blocked six strong attacks
from the opponents and kept us in this
game. She also had three kills to aid in
the tough performance of the team.
Segree followed up with three blocks
and also had three awesome kills dur-
ing the fourth game. Despite incredible
efforts made by each and every team
member, we fell 25-22 to the Bulldogs.
Senior Joy Carrino played outstanding
as usual for the Seahawks, serving a to-
tal of 13 points on the evening and accu-
mulated 14 assists.
This was a great volleyball series, and it
brought out the best in our girls. Our next
three matches are with district rivals. I be-
lieve we can make a strong finish with the
play witnessed at Liberty County.

Christy Thompson is assistant coach
of the Lady Seahawks, coached by Da-
vid Walkcer.


u. '.1;.1"


DANA WHALEY | The Times
Sea hawks freshman
tackle Cole Lee rests after
a tough confrontation
against Graceville.

hind his pads on a fourth
down run. He learned from
it."
Senior wide receiver
Arron Prince snaredfour
catches for 96 yards, plus
26-yard and 9-yard returns,
for 131 all-purpose yards, but
he too learned that you have
to give it all you got every
chance you get.
"He caught a pass and he
decided to make a cutback,
but he ended up getting
tackled," said Wright, noting
that the play still put the Se-
ahawks on the 25-yard-line.
"In hindsight, he wished he
poured on the juice."
Wright said that "we took
care of the football" in the
sense that the Seahawks


DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times
Senior Joy Carrino served a total of 1 3
Points on the evening and accumulated
14 assists against Liberty County.


Jordan King; freshmen
Josh Reeder, Zack Howze,
Casey Sapp, Daniel Car-
rino, David Langston, Eli-
sha Patriotis and Griffin
Kahn; and eighth-graders
Graham Kirvin and James
Newell.
Joe Shields and Cox will
share responsibility for
both teams, with Shields
serving as the men's team
coach and Cox as Lady Se-


ahawks' coach.
"We welcome any stu-
dent interested in being
involved as a men's team
manager, a field player or a
goal keeper. A major need
on both the men and wom-
en's team is finding some-
one willing to train as a
goalkeeper," said Cox.
Interested students and/
or parents can call Shields
at 697-9257 or Cox at 927-


"One of our objectives is
to build a first-class Frank-
lin County High School soc-
cer program that not only
enhances the school expe-
rience of the players, but
also enhances the activ-
ity options of the Franklin
County community," said
Cox.
The first game is Tues-
day, Nov. 10, at Wakulla.


B RIE F Sfrom page A10
this perfectly manicured 18-hole
championship course that creates a
challenge for even the most skillful golfer,
yet is still a course golfers of all abilities
will love.
Tee-time is 1 p.m. for the tournament,
which will be a flighted four-man
scramble; low score wins with prizes
for the top three teams. Scores will
be totaled and prizes awarded at a


reception following the tournament.
Cost per team is $400, $100 per player.
Fees include range balls and golf carts
equipped with the latest color GPS
system.
Tournament proceeds will go toward
the chamber's building fund. For more
information, contact the Apalachicola Bay
Chamber at 653-9419 or email to info@
apalachicolabay.org.


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M


The Seahawks' leading tackler against
Graceville was senior linebacker Chase
Richards, with 11 tackles. He also
played every step of the way on both
offense and special teams.


The Times | Al 1


SEAHAWKS from paae A10


VOLLEYBALL from page A10O


SOCCER from pone A10O


Mr~tant
communications


Defensive Player


offensive Blayer


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Unit C 3 BR/3 BA, 2,315 + SF B4-200
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Local


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* 6 Condos with Boat Slips Large Heated Pool & Hot Tub
* The first 3 will be sold ABSOLUTE Only One Block from the Beach
(Units: B3-103, B3-105, B4-202) Deeded boat slips located directly out back
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Al 2 | The Times


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Thursday, October 1, 2009 w ww. apalach times com Page I


ELEMENTARY
CLASSROOM POSTER
WINNERS
Pre-K, Kindergarten
and Ist Grade
1st) "It's In Our Hands-
Keep It Clean," Mrs. Moses
1st grade at ABC School
2nd) "By the Light of the
Moon," Miss Tonya and Miss
Meghan's pre-Kindergarten
at En Comunity School
:n It Our Choice."


B
Section


and 47 frm Fraklin County
High School. Awrds for bumper
--~7 ~sticker contest were provided
by the Franklin County Tourist
Development Council. First place
PHOTO BY LOIS SWOBODA winners won $40, while second
Kayl Ros, ofApaac hico a, is place won $20 and third place $10.
meserzedbya bingo game In the poster contest, the
feaurng atrysub ects like winning classroom teams in each
ocan, is ad seaweed. age group won $60.
There was a hotdog sale to
benefit environmental educator
Alan noth whois recovering from a recent illness.
Inadtothere were :36 door prizes given away, made possible by 20
busiess ponsrs.
MVany people may not realize this annual celebration is part of Coast
Wees, naional commemoration of coastal habitats.
NainlEstuaries Day, established in 1988, is an inspiration for all of
hoeholove and care for our nation's estuaries. The purpose of National
Estuaries Day is to promote the importance of estuaries and the need to
protect them.
It is also the occasion for a public-awareness campaign to inform people
from coast to coast about their connection to these beautiful places and
how they can encourage good stewardship of these important resources.
Here in Franklin County we feel a special bond to the land where the
river meets the sea. By joining with people all over the world in celebrating
National Estuaries Day we help others understand that bond. We are
connected and we all share one ocean, with our fate inextricably tied to the
future health of our estuaries and wetlands.


PHOTO BY LOIS
SWOBODA


The winning poster b rs.t Gay's fifth
Fra nkl in CutSeolwas calild i"it's
- Keep It Clean." i, ~n~,


Franklin County senior Joy Carrino won first place with
her bumper sticker that read "Does the Bay Have A Say?"


Sin theEstuary No Fish, ~
-m Fid for other B~ay ~
Animals," Ameli~a Newa
6th gmde,aFranhklin County
James Harris, 8th grade,
Franklin County

High School Winners
< st) "DeBes the Bay Have
a Say?" J~oy Carrino, 12th
grade, Frainklin County


2 -ltng' le> "Sr vipthe '
Bay, One Turtle at a Timet
Breanna Lachelle Cook, 11th
gr2dnedFra klinCounty
End to Endangering "
Lanek Rbetst tl2th grade,
3rd) "Keep Pollution
Away from the Bay," Heather
Kemper, 12th grade, Franklin
County


Herrin~cngto d gad at Ist) "Tr~easue Beneath
ABC": the Bay, Ms. Gay's 5th
ot2hd Et y,"Th ABC' graudne, Class 1, at Franklin
Blackburn's 2nd gradet 2nd> ""Let's Work Hand in
Franklin Ctgt Hand," Mrs. Gays 5th grade,
3rd> "Estuaries are Class 3 at Franklin Conty
Nurseries for Baby 3 ~vr.4Mie of Life," Mrs.


LIFE


TI~ES


2009 Estuaries Day Art Contest


Crea~ge," Mrs. Shil Bock~Sman's4hga t
3rd grde at Fakit B'
i;* it


CONTEST
Middle School Winners

Wetlands," SashaCr~t; 7tliB
grade, Franklin County
2nd) "Novefshing l











































































































Wyatt
Wyatt, a 3 1/2 month old kitten, arrived at the Adoption Center
two months ago with his three brothers. He is an adorable, playful
boy waiting patiently for a loving home. Wyatt is up to date on his
shots and has been neutered.
Call Kam at 'II-1-11' for more details or visit the Franklin
County Humane Society at 244 State Route 65 in Eastpoint. You
may log onto the website at r\\ an 1~ri I..s.Iasp l. '' to see more of our
adoptable pets.
Remember, when you adopt a friend for life, you not only save
the life of that pet, you make room for us to save the life of one more
abandoned dog or cat!

..









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TATE'S HELL BLUES BAND DELIGHTS FANS





~,


















While the Tate's Hell Blues Band did not appear at the Labor
Day fundraiser for the Eastpoint Library (as the Times incorrectly
reported) the three piece group based in Franklin County is slated
to make an appearance at the Florida Seafood Festival. Playing a
potent mix of original material and select covers, the band brings
high-energy, very dance friendly, low-down swamp groove to the
state.
Pictured from left, are guitarist and vocalist C.S. Holt, a genuine
Blues stylist whose rich vocals and intense, stinging guitar style has
thrilled audiences for more than 30 years; drummer and vocalist
Royce Johns, with a powerful, in-the-pocket style that has been a
force in the Pan an le music scene for more tan 20 years; and
bass player and vocalist Miles Creamer, a fixture in the Panhandle
music scene who brings mastery of American Roots music, energy,
and a great personality to the mix. Recent concerts and venues
include The Dixie Theatre, The Blue Parrot Oceanfront Cafe, Triple
Tails and the 2009 Tallahassee Festival of Books.
For information call 850-273-0282 or go to http://www.
reverbnation.com/thetateshellbluesband.


Thursday, October 1, 2009


B2 | The Times


Society


Jessie Doyle and Wal-
ter Muecke would like to
announce their upcoming
wedding on Saturday, Oct.
10, 2009.
Jessie is the daughter
of James and Kay Henson,
of Jasper, Ga., and Wal-
ter is the son of Theresa
Price, of Tallahassee, and
the late Walter Muecke, of
Pensacola.
We would love for our
friends and neighbors to
be a part of our celebra-
tion.
Where the waves crash
upon the beach, and dol-
phins frolic in the ocean,
please join us as we create
new dreams and memo-
ries together.


The sunset wedding
celebration will be at 7 p.m.
at 1336 Azalea Drive on St.
George Island. Reception
and retro party to follow.


E-mail jessie.doyle@
pfizer.com or call 927-4170
to RSVP name and num-
her in party for entrance at
the Plantation gate.


b


1


Miclael Snuare to turn 6
Michael Square will celebrate his
sixth birthday on Saturday, October 3,
2009. He will be joined by his brothers
Joe and Jimmy and sister Becca with a
'lk~ansformer Party.
He is the son of Philip Square, of
Carrabelle, and Kami Kearse, of Car-
rabelle.
Maternal grandparents are Jea-
nette and the late Fred Kearse. Pater-
nal grandparents are Joe and Helene
Square, of Eastpoint.


Shirahs celebrate
fifSt wedtling anniversary
On Sunday, Sept. 20, Bill and Vanessa Shi-
rah, of Apalachicola, celebrated their first an-
niversary.
SWith the love you have for each other, there
will no doubt be many more.
We love you,
Kim and Dod


PHOTOS COURTESY OF KRISTIN ANDERSON


Apalachicolajeweler Kristin Ander-
son has been invited to show her work
in a juried enamel exhibition to be held
in San Diego Oct. 2 through 25.
Entries will be judged by Linda
Darty, professor of metalwork and
enameling at East Carolina University
in North Carolina, an internationally
recognized metalworker. The show,
entitled "Radiance," is hosted by Gal-
lery 21 inBalboa Park.
Anderson has had two pieces ac-
cepted into this exhibition, "Green
Flash" and "'It~iskellion with Year's
Colors."
Anderson is a highly praised and
widely recognized metalworker and


The Green Flash.


enamellist. She works in 18 karat gold
and sterling silver. All her pieces are
signed, hallmarked, dated, and copy-
righted
Her pieces are created using a
technique known ad champleve. Ac-
cording to Enamel Magazine, "Cham-
pleve means "raised field", referring
to raised areas of metal in a field of
enamel. The technique differs from
cloisonne, which uses thin cloison
wires to separate areas of enamel.
The champleve technique allows for
greater variation in the width of lines
or areas of metal in the surface of the
enamel. Combining areas of reflec-
tive metal with glowing enamel colors


gives effects of illusionistic depth."
Anderson brings a spirituality to
her creations reflected in their airy,
almost ephemeral quality. On her
webpage, she wrote, "Beautiful jew-
elry, finely made, connects you to his-
tory, the maker, the giver, to ideas and
beliefs that you want to have grow in
your life. I believe that we are here
on this planet, in this reality, to come
to certain realizations, and to live in
harmony with our environment and
each other. I intend for the pieces
that I make, my works, to express
the awareness that has come to me
through study and practice."
By Lois Swoboda


World Hab itat Day begins Carrabelle construct ion

Monday, Oct. 5 is World Habitat Day, a call to action
for individuals and organizations to change the real-
ity of poverty housing. In recognition of World Habi-
tat Day 2009, Habitat for Humanity, Franklin County
is preparing to start construction of a new house in
Carrabelle for the Kenny Griswold family, of Carra-
belle, who will have the chance to purchase the new
home. In the photo at right, from left, are Skip Frink,
president of the county chapter of Habitat for Human-
ity;, Jill Archer, secretary of Habitat; and Kenny and
Becky Griswold, with their grandson Joshua Greer.
"Habitat works hard with volunteers and donors
who invest time and money into the partnership so
that families in need of housing can help build, then
buy, their own house on terms they can afford," said
Frink. "At Habitat for Humanity we know that we
alone cannot end poverty housing. We need the sup-
port of everyone. With the help of the community we
can change the reality for future generations."
Visit the website www.habitatfranklin.org or call
653-3113 to see how to help Habitat for Humanity's
local effort.


Jessie Doyle and Walter Muecke to marry


PET OF TEHKE1 Kristin Anderson to compete in San Diego












(ARD 0F THANKS



Pansy Br aswell Family
The family of Pansy Massey Braswell would like to express our
thanks to a wonderful and loving community. We would also like to
thank everyone for their thoughtfulness, words of encouragement,
generosity and prayers during our time of loss. A special thanks goes
Out to our mother's hospice nurse, Vallerie, and Covenant Hospice for
their service.
Thank you from our hearts and may the Lord continue to bless each
and everyone of you.
Sonia Buffkin, Elaine Loszlo and Dwayne Bruswell
Tommy Jack Massey and Anna Keith Sun born




Edward Smith Family
The family of Edward F. Smith would like to express their gratitude
to their Carrabelle United Methodist Church family, friends, Franklin
County School Board coworkers and neighbors for their outpouring
of love and sympathy in the time of our great sorrow. We also
appreciated the generosity of the Franklin County School Food Prep
Class, Hog Wild Barbecue and Hometown BP.
Charlotte Smith and Family


Church BRIEFS


SSt. Patrick Catholic Church
Ave C & Sixth Street in Apalachicola, FL32329 or
The Islander (Across from the Blue Parrot)

(850) 653 9 53G Eail:s pacah fi point. net
PASTOR: FATHER ROGER LATOSYNSKI
www. stpatricksmass. com
APALACHICOLA MASS SCHEDULE
SATURDAY................. ................5 PM
SUNDAY .....................10AM
ST. GEORGE ISLAND MASS SCHEDULE
SUNDAY ................ .................8:30. AM



First Pentecostal Holiness Church
379 Brownsville Road Apalachicola


Sunday School 9:45 am
Sunday Morning Worship 10:45 am
Sunday Evening Service 6:00 pm
Monday, Youth Group 6:30 pm
Wednesday, Royal Rangers, G.A.P. 7:00 pm
Wednesday Worship & Word 7:30 pm
NreyProvided during regular church services


.rnt tea nc rc


The United Methodist Churches

Sof Franklin County Welcome Yot1

First United Methodist Church of Apalachicola
Worship Service 11:00 a.m. every Sunday
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
75 5" St. Apalachicola 653-9530 fumcapalach@gtcom.net
Pastor: Rev. Them Patriotis
Carrabelle United Methodist Church
Worship Services 10:45 a.m. Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
"Celebrate Recovery" Mondays 7-9 p.m.
Healing service first Tuesday each month-7 p.m.
102 NE Ave. B Carrabelle -697-3672
Pastor: Julie Stephens
Eastpoint United Methodist Church
Worship Service 10:00 a.m. every Sunday
Prayer 9:15 a.m. Waffles & Wisdom 11:15 a.m.
Healing Service every first Fridays of the Month at 6:30 p.m.
317 Patton Dr. (corner of David St.) -670-8825
Pastor: Rev. Beth White
St. George Ishind Un~ite Me hodist Church
10:00 a.m. Fellowship Hour
201 E. Gulf Beach Dr. 927- 4635 www.sgiumc.org
Pastor: Rev. Them Patriotis


I __ _
IV


Thursday, October 1, 2009


Local


The Times | B3


First thing: Our Sunday
covered dish is on the third
Sunday of each month at
Chillas Hall.
See, I told you that we
never know what is in store
for us at the Thursday lunch
at the Senior Center in
Carrabelle. LANIA
Last Thursday, we helped Jim
Marie Denrah Gray celebrate
her 93rd birthday with her
and her children. Her son, Harry
Gray, is from Tampa, daughter
Mayme Gray Millender, from
Carrabelle, and stepdaughter Maxie
Gray Carroll, of Eastpoint. Marie
might not be able to pull up the
weeds in the front yard anymore, but
sure enjoys birthday party -and
we do, too. Hang in there, Marie!
Members of The Ladies Guild
of Sacred Heart Church will be
serving coffee and pastry at the sale
Saturday, Oct. 3. Stop by the church
hall, browse, and enjoy your coffee
with the ladies.
Members of the Lanark Village
Association will have breakfast
at Chillas Hall in the village on
Saturday, Oct. 3, with sale tables
inside the hall, and outside in
the parking lot across the street.
Donations for the bake sale will be
greatly appreciated. Enjoy! Lunch
will be at The Lanark Village Boat


Club. Members will serve
seafood gumbo and members
of the Lanark Village
Association will serve hot
dogs and hamburgers.
On your October calendar,
you need to mark Monday,
Oct. 5, for the membership
NIEWS meeting of The Lanark
elsh Village Association. Gavel
falls at 7 p.m. at Chillas Hall.
Hope you can make it-and
bring a friend.
On Wednesday, Oct. 7, Bingo for
the Bus will be at Chillas Hall. Doors
open at 5 p.m. and bingo starts at
6:30 p.m. Coffee, soft drinks, and
homemade cookies are available.
Come join us!
The new village and area phone
books will be on sale at the Yard
Sale this Saturday. The book covers
The Village, Beach area, Gulf
Terrace, and St. James. The books
are $5 each. Be sure to support
the advertisers. And thanks to
Carol Daddona and Ailene Benson,
who worked hard to put the book
together.
Be kind to one another and check
in on the sick and housebound.
Contrary to popular opinion, God's
last name is not damn!
Until next time, God bless
America, our troops, the poor,
homeless, and hungry.


WI


vey. The site will feature
a new survey each week
and individuals must take
the survey to be entered
to win that week's draw-
ing. Five random winners
will be chosen each week
to receive a free Christian
book.
ChristianBookVideo.
com's book giveaway be-
gins this week. The web-
site will feature a new
survey and different book
giveaways each week.
The book giveaway each
week will be as follows:
Week of Sept. 27: "How
Can I Run a Tight Ship
When I'm Surrounded by
Loose Cannons?" (Kathi
Macias, New Hope Pub-
lishers)
Week of Oct. 4: "Be-
lieve That You Can" (Jen-
tezen Franklin, Charisma
House)
Week of Oct.11: "Cash-
Ineos BiBl oopt ecy Eo
Financial Order" (Mark
Hitchcock, Harvest House
Publishers)
Week of Oct. 18: "The
Ten Testaments: Lessons
from the Greatest Teacher
of all Time (Scott Camp-
bell, WinePress Publish-
ing)
Week of Oct. 25: "Fic-
tion title from publisher,
Sheaf House, to be deter-
mined.
ChristianBookVideos.
com is the one-stop view-
ing place for Christian
book videos on the Inter-
net. Launched in Febru-
ary 2009 by Marketing


Christian Books Inc., of
Charlotte, N.C., Christian-
BookVideos.com is rapidly
becoming the premiere
viewing place for Christian
book trailers.
Publishers and authors
can submit their book vid-
eos to ChristianBookVid-
eos.com for free. Advertis-
ing opportunities are also
available.
To enter to win a free
book each week, take
the survey on Christian-
BookVideos.com's Web
site at www.christian-
bookvideos.com.

UMC Bible study
addreSSOS

'Wling on Wter'
A new Bible study "If
You Want To Walk On Wa-
ter, You've Got To Get Out
Of The Boat" will begin

Me hodistk hu chU teed
tions in Franklin County.
At the St. George Island
church, beginning Monday,
Oct. 5, the study will run
for six sessions, on Mon-
day evenings from 6:30 to
8:30 p.m. The study will be-
gin with a meal at 6:30 p.m.
followed by seminar-style
small group Bible study.
At the Apalachicola
church, beginningWednes-
day, Oct. 7, the study will
run for six sessions, on
Wednesday morning from
10:30 a.m. to noon.
This six-week series
will focus on the events
during a stormy night on


the Sea of Galilee, center-
ing on Matthew's account
of Peter's "walking on wa-
ter" and how this relates to
our lives today. Walking on
water means facing your
fears and choosing not to
let fear have the last word,
discovering and embrac-
ing the unique calling of
God on your life, and expe-
riencing the power of God
to accomplish what you
would not be capable of
doing on your own. We will
also look at what it means
to transcend fear, manage
failure and trust in God.
Contact Pastor Themo
or Missy Miller at the
church office for more info
or to sign up.

Crawfordville
Lutheran Church
h0sts Oktoberfest
The Trimity Lutheran


Church in Crawfordville
will host an Oktoberfest
fundraiser on Saturday,
Oct. 3. The day will be-
gin at 8 a.m. with a pan-
cake breakfast, the sale
of baked goods and yard
sale items.
An Oktoberfest lunch
will consist of grilled brat-
wurst, kielbasa, hot dogs,
sauerkraut, German
potato salad, coleslaw
and German chocolate
cake.
This year Trinity is
adding two new activi-
ties. Anyone that would
like to sell large items at
the celebration may do so
for a 10 percent contribu-
tion to the church. Sale
items may be appliances,
RVs, boats, cars, trucks,
golf carts, ATVs, garden
tractors, and other large
items.


Trinity is also invit-
ing area vendors to rent
booth space. The church
has avery large property
with access from Craw-
fordville Highway (High-
way 319) and Coastal
Highway (U.S. 98).
Vendors will be allowed
to set up along the road
front on Coastal Highway,
out in the open fields, and
near the church and pre-
school. Booths are 12-by-
12 inches and modestly
priced at $10 without
electricity and $15 with
electricity.
For updates on the Ok-
toberfest visit the Trinity
website at www.1uther-
ansonline .com/trinityof-
wakulla.
For more information
call the church at 926-
7808 or e-mail trinityof-
wakullaeyahoo.com.


THE
EPISCOPAL
CHURCH


will host an


Good food, visiting with f
Will guarantee a g(
For updates on the Oktoberfe~
WWW.1lutheransonline. com/trinj
Email tonysusie eyahoo.com.
Join us at Trinity Lutheran Church,
3254 Coastal Highway,
across from Wakulla High School or
behind Eden Springs, off Hwy. 319
for a day of fun!


ir
o
;ts
it


EST. 1836

Hwy. 98 & 6th St.
Apalachicola
SUNDAY: 8:00 AM 10:30 AM
LIBRARY HOURS.
SUNDAY 12:00 2:00PM
MONDAY 11:00 AM 1:00 PM
WEDNESDAY 12:00 2:00 PM
THURSDAY 3:30 5:30 PM


Lanark NEWS


Big Bend HospicO
VOlUnteers staff
Saturday cfe
During the Franklin
County Community Yard
Sale on Saturday, Oct. 3,
Big Bend Hospice volun-
teers will host a Caf6 and
offer coffee and donuts to
shoppers. Money raised at
the Cafe will help care for
Hospice patients in Frank-
lin County.
Last year the Hospice
Caf6 was a big hit, selling
over 25 dozen donuts and
gallons of coffee. "We re-
ally appreciated the com-
munity support," said Pam
Raker Allbritton, commu-
nity resource coordina-
tor for Big Bend Hospice.
"People seemed to enjoy
sitting and relaxing after a
morning of shopping."
Members of the Frank-
lin C tty AdC sran Cu

the servers. "This is a fun
day of activities and we are
so happy to be part of it,"
said Beverly Hewitt, Coun-
cil member. "We hope
visitors and community
members will come by and
show their support to our
hometown Hospice. The
money we raise stays right
here in Franklin County."
For more information
contact Allbritton at 508-
8749.

Christian Book
Vit00s.com to give
away books
ChristianBookVideos.
com will give away five
Christian books each week
for the next five weeks.
Each week, five individuals
will be chosen to receive a
free book.
To be eligible to win a
free Christian book from
ChristianBookVideos.
com, individuals must visit
ChristianBookVideo .com's
website and take a short
three to four question sur-

THE
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
WELCOMES YOU


WECO ES YOU

Church

Of the

Ascen1.o
101 NE First Street
Carrabelle
SUNDAY
10:00 AIM


Oktobe~t


lends and music all day
od time for all.
visit the TLC websiteat
yofwakulla.





NOTICE OF ADOPTION OF

CITY ORDINANCE


The City Commission of the City of Apalachicola will
hold a public hearing for the purpose of receiving citizen's
comments on the following proposed ordinance:


ORDINANCE NO. 2009-01


AN ORDINANCE BY THE CITY COMMISSION
OF THE CITY OF APALACHICOLA, FLORIDA,
ADOPTING RULES AND PROCEDURES TO


CITY OF APALACHICOLA

NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING

The City Commission of the City of
Apalachicola will hold a Public Meeting
on October 6th, 2009 at 5:00 PM at the
Apalachicola City Hall/Community Center
located at 1 Bay Avenue, for purposes
of discussing possible intersection and
pedestrian safety improvements at Avenue
E & Market Street, and improvements
along the SW side of Market Street from
Avenue E to Avenue D, including sidewalk
replacement work, pedestrian safety and
street crossing areas, and improved traffic
control provisions. Members of the Franklin
County Community Traffic Safety Team and
representatives from FDOT will be at the
meeting to answer questions and provide
recommendations for consideration. All
citizens are encouraged to mark their
calendar and plan to attend this very
important meeting that may affect our


Florida, beginning at 6:00 PM on Tuesday, October 6,
2009. All interested parties are encouraged to appear and
be heard with respect to this proposed ordinance.


SHistoric Downtown. I


Thursday, October 1, 2009


Local


Thursday, Oct. 1
Individual computer
instruction at Carrabelle
Library from 10 a.m. to
noon. For more info, call
697-2366.
Yoga at Eastpoint Li-
brary from 4:30-5:30 p.m.
For more info, call 670-
8151.
Wandering Star Quilt-
ing Club. Chillas Hall La-
nark Village. 1-3 p.m. Call
Christine Hinton 697-2551.
Community Luncheon
and Information Specials
at the Franklin County Se-
nior Center in Carrabelle.
Noon. $3 donation. Call 697-
3760.
Friday Oct. 2
Story hour at Carra-
belle Library for ages 5 to
8, from 3:30 -4:30 p.m. For
more info, call 697-2366.
Exercise class at Chill-
as Hall in Lanark Village.
9-10 a.m. Open to all and
free.
Carrabelle History
Museum, Old City Hall, 106
SE Avenue B in downtown
Carrabelle, is open 10 a.m.-
4 p.m. today and Saturday.
Free. For more informa-
tion, contact Tamara Allen
at 697-2141.
Saturday, Oct. 3
A multi-county yard
sale along U.S. 98 and the
Big Bend Scenic Byway will
be held all day, from Mexi-
co Beach to Panacea. For
more info, call 653-9419.
Monday, Oct. 5
Apalachicola Library
Board will meet at 5 p.m. at
the Apalachicola Municipal
Library. For more info, call
653-8436.
Harmonica at East-
point Library at 10 a.m. For
more info, call 670-8151.
Yoga at Eastpoint Li-
brary from 4:30-5:30 p.m.
For more info, call 670-
8151.
Exercise class at Chill-
as Hall in Lanark Village.
9-10 a.m. Open to all and
free.
Al-Anon meets at 5:30
p.m. at Trinity Episcopal
Church's Benedict Hall,
at Sixth Street and Ave. D.
For more info, call 850-222-
2294.
Bingo at the Franklin
County Senior Center in
Carrabelle. Early bird at 6
p.m., regular bingo at 7 p.m.


Cards begin at $4. Call 697-
3760.
TUeSday, Oct. 6
Franklin County Com-
mission will meet at 9 a.m.
the courthouse annex in
Apalachicola. For more
info, call 653-8861 extension
100.
Apalachicola City Com-
mission will meet at 6 p.m.
at the City Hall in Battery
Park. For more info, call
653-9319.
Carrabelle Lighthouse
Association will meet at
5:30 p.m. at the Keeper's
House Museum, Crooked
River Lighthouse Park.
Everyone is welcome to
attend. The CLA is seek-
ing volunteers to help with
the museum gift shop and
other projects. For more
info call 697-2732 or e-mail
to sea Ighteyahoo.com
Kids Wii at Eastpoint
Library from 5 to 6 p.m. For
more info, call 670-8151.
Breakfast at the Frank-
lin County Senior Center in
Carrabelle. Coffee at 7:30
a.m., meal at 8 a.m. $2 sug-
gested donation. Call 697-
3760.
Bingo 7 p.m. St. George
Island Fire Dept. 25 cents
per card. Families wel-
come. Proceeds go to St.
George Island Civic Club.
Call 927-4654.
Wednesday, Oct. 7
Adult Wii at Eastpoint
Library from 9-11 a.m. For
more info, call 670-8151.
Exercise class at Chill-
as Hall in Lanark Village.
9-10 a.m. Open to all and
free
eTh rday Oct. 8
Carrabelle City Com-
mission will meet at 6:30
p.m. at 1005 Gray Avenue,
Carrabelle. For more info,
call 697-2727.
Individual computer in-
struction at Carrabelle Li-
brary from 10 a.m. to noon.
For more info, call 697-2366.
Yoga at Eastpoint Li-
brary from 4:30-5:30 p.m.
For more info, call 670-8151.
Wandering Star Quilt-
ing Club. Chillas Hall La-
nark Village. 1-3 p.m. Call
Christine Hinton 697-2551.
Community Luncheon
and Information Specials
at the Franklin County Se-
nior Center in Carrabelle.
Noon. $3 donation. Call 697-
3760.


Apalachicola hosts

S Neighborhood I
Watch Meeting
MOn day

1 The Apalachicola Police De- a
Apartment will host a Neighbor- I
hood Watch Meeting on Monday, I
Oct. 5, at 6 p.m. at the 6th Street a
SRecreation Center. I
I AII residents are invited to at- 1
Tend and join this important neigh- I
Iborhood community organization. I
S Take a Stand Join Neigh- I
borhood Watch!
I For more information, contact g
I City Hall at 653-8222 I




Sheriff's REPORT


the winter oyster bars.
The detail targeted the
harvest of undersized oysters.
During the detail, 134 vessels
were boarded and inspected.
The inspections resulted in 23
citations issued for possession
of undersized oysters, 12 cita-
tions for no saltwater products
license and no Apalachicola
Bay oyster harvest permit,
three citations for expired ves-
sel registration, one citation
for failure to deliver oysters
to a dealer within six hours,
and 47 written warnings for
various resource and boating
safety violations.
Because of the high number
of undersized oyster violations,
the detail will be continuing.


The following report
is provided by the Frank-
lin County Sheriff's Of-
fice. Arrests are made
by officers from the fol-
lowing city, county, and
state law enforcement
agencies: Apalachicola
(APD), Carrabelle (CPD),
Florida Highway Patrol
(FHP), Franklin County


Sheriff's Office (FCSO),
Florida Fish and Wild-
life Conservation Com-
mission (FWC), Florida
Department of Envi-
ronmental Protection
(FDEP), Florida Divi-
sion of Insurance Fraud
(DIF) and Florida De-
partment of Agriculture
and Consumer Services


(FLDOACS).
All defendants are
considered innocent
until proven guilty in a
court of law.
Sept. 21
Gary M/. Barineau, 36,
Apalachicola, violation of
probation (FCSO)
Sept. 23


Willie L. M/elton, 48,
Carrabelle, grand theft of
a motor vehicle (FCSO)
Sept. 24
Christopher S.
Thompson, 36, Eastpoint,
DUI (FHP)
Shawn E. Ailiff, 24,
Carrabelle, arrested on
Kentucky warrant for non


support (FCSO)
Sept. 25
Danny ns, Johns 51
Eastpoint, aggravated
chil abuse byC malicious
Rebecca L. Glass, 43,
Eastpoint, DUI (FCSO)
Sept. 27
Terrence E. Brewer,


58, St. George Island,
driving while license
suspended or revoked
(FDEP)

Sept. 28
Daniel Page, 32, Apala-
chicola, domestic battery
and violation of probation
(APD)


B
















O


-






O


REQUESTS
DURING


SPECIAL


EVENTS ;


Community Center, #1


Bay Avenue, Apalachicola,


B4 | The Times


Community CALENDAR


HALE

SF ELL W

WELL-MET





These two wel
dressed fellows were
photographed on St.
Vincent Island. Do
you recognize them?
The gentleman on
the right seems to be
giving a thumbs up
over the shoulder of
his friend on the left.
By Lois Swo-
boda


FWVC REPORT


FWC officers focus on
winter oystering
Officers from the Florida
Fish and Wildlife Conservation
Commission's Division of Law
Enforcement have been active
in policing the opening of the
winter oyster bars.
From Sept. 1 to 18, Of-
ficers Percy Cook, Carmon
Brownell, Steven Cook, Travis
Huckeba, John Allen, Chasen
Yarborough, Jason Carroll,
Nick Barnard, Mike Fish, and
Shon Brower; and Lieuten-
ants Harry Parker and Charlie
Wood, along with Capt. Donald
Duval, executed a commercial
oyster detail in Apalachicola
Bay to address the opening of


REGULATE
CLOSINGS


FOR ROADWAY


PROVIDING FOR THE REPEAL OF ALL
ORDINANCES IN CONFLICT HEREWITH; AND
PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE.


The Public Hearing will be held in the Apalachicola


































































to get your ad inr
Trame~les cdL S~ervic s
85 0-653 -88 69

Mike Parrish, G. C.
Phone: 850-653-3613 Cell: 850-370-6038
www;7mik~eparrishge.com New Historic Restorations
Remodeling Additions
Mantels. ookcases
Small Jobs too Custom Cabinetry
Coffered Ceilings
r Raised Panel Walls
Licensed & Insured
License # RG0056820





Building Supplies
& Auto Repair
Carrabelle 697-3333
We Dehiver Anywhere

gIC Hardware and wr .v.
Hard are 810 00081 artclaitor e stores


Don Lively General Contractors
LICENSED AND INSURED 20 YEARS EXPERIENCE
Plumbing New Construction Roofing
PreSsure Washing Additions *Vinyl Siding
Painting and More No Job Too Small

P.O. Box 439RO655
Carrabelle, FL 32322
697-2783 or Mobile 566-2603











DENTURE

LAB ON PR EM ISES
Same Day Service on Repairs and Relines


IR6Ran BOnrfager, 9 92

3LOniCa On trag 8, 9 91




12761 Pea Ridge Road Bristol, Florida 32321

TE LEP HON E (850) 643-5417


. .
-


M. .. ..


I~5~u


Thursday, October 1, 2009


Local


The Times | B5


More than 500,000 women,
infants, and children partici-
pating in the Florida Depart-
ment of Health's WIC (Women,
Infant, Children) program will
receive the new, nationally re-
vised WIC food package begin-
ning Oct. 1.
This is the first change to
the WIC food package in nearly
three decades.
"The new food package helps
reinforce key nutrition messag-
es such as eat more fruits and
vegetables, decrease saturated
fat and cholesterol intake, and
increase whole grains and fi-
her," said Annette Phelps,
ARNP MSN, director for the
Division of Family Health Ser-
vices. "We are thrilled to pro-
vide WIC participants with a
greater variety of nutritious
foods."
Based on the 2005 Dietary
Guidelines for Americans, the


new food choices will allow the
Florida WIC program increased
flexibility in prescribing cultur-
ally appropriate foods to WIC's
diverse population. Some of
the changes include the addi-
tion of fruits, vegetables, and
whole grains for mothers and
1- to 5-year-old children, the
addition of baby food fruits and
vegetables for all infants ages 6
to 12 months, the amount of for-
mula for infants is now variable
based on the age and breast-
feeding regime of the infant,
and the requirement that milk
for women and children 2 years
of age and older be 1-percent
low fat or fat free
The new package also
strengthens WIC's breastfeed-
ing promotion and support
messages by providing strong
incentive sfor continued breast-
feeding, including additional
quantities and types of foods


for breastfeeding mothers and
their infants.
Eligible women and chil-
dren participating in the WIC
program receive food checks
that specify which nutritious
food items can be purchased;
these WIC food checks can be
redeemed at any of the 2,000-
plus authorized grocery stores
in Florida.
In addition to offering sup-
plemental healthy foods, WIC
provides the following addi-
tional services at no cost: nutri-
tion education and counseling,
breastfeeding support, and re-
ferrals for health care.
To be eligible for WIC the
Special Supplemental Nutri-
tion Program for Women, In-
fants, and Children you must
be a pregnant or breastfeeding
woman, a woman who has re-
cently been pregnant, an infant,
or a child under age 5. In addi-


Emphasis is also placed on
reaching the migrant popula-
tion, as well as reaching and en-
rolling eligible women in their
early months of pregnancy so
that WIC's benefits can begin
as early as possible.
Florida WIC is administered
through the Florida Depart-
ment of Health and its services
are available in all 67 counties
at over 200 WIC clinic sites
statewide.
Anyone interested in WIC
services should call the toll-
free number at 1-800-342-3556
or should contact their local
county health department to
see if they are eligible.
For more information about
DOH programs, visit the DOH
Web site at www.doh.state.fl.us.
To learn more about the Florida
WIC program or about the new
WIC food package, go to www.
FloridaWIC.org.


tion, the applicant must have a
low or moderate income, live in
Florida, and have a nutrition
need that can be helped by WIC
foods and nutrition counseling.
Another way applicants can
be income-eligible for WIC is
if they are currently receiving
Medicaid, Temporary Cash As-
sistance, or food stamps. Ap-
plicants do not have to be on a
public assistance program to
qualify for WIC.


News BRIEFS


will be sold.
The hop is sponsored
by PS.G., a parent support
group dedicated to invest-
ing in the community's
youth.
If you have any ques-
tions please contact Gran-
ville Croom at 653-7643.

Road project
between Ealstpoint
and Carrabelle now

complete
Driving between East-
point and Carrabelle
should be quicker and saf-
er now that the year long
project to restore Highway
98 is complete. The Florida
Department of Transpor-
tation accepted the com-
pl ted project Sept. 23.Tuhe

2008 and ran along U.S. 98
between School Road in
Eastpoint and the Carra-
belle Beach Wayside Park.
Phoenix Construction
Services, Inc. of Lynn Ha-
ven was the prime contrac-
tor. The $34.7 million con-
struction project included
installation of bulkhead
panels, sheet piling, articu-
lating block, guardrails,
asphalt and performance
turf along the south side
of U.S. 98 to repair damage
from Hurricane Dennis
and protect the highway
from future storms


Carrabelle Senior
Center hosts
Saturday night dance
There will be a free
dance held on Saturday
evening, Oct. 3, at the Car-
rabelle Senior Center.
The dance starts at 7
p.m. and will feature clas-
sic Big Band dance tunes
and mellow pop hits pro-
vided by local disc jockey
Ron Vice. Come to dance
the night away or just to
listen and have fun on Sat-
urday night!
The Senior Center is
located at 201 Avenue F
on the corner of 1st Street
and Avenue F in downtown
Carrabelle.
For more information
on the dance and other ac-
tivitie at the Senior Ce -

leSeniorCenter~com.

Former Hgym
hosts Saturday night

The old Apalachicola
High School gymnasium
will be the site of "A Satur-
day Night Hop" this Satur-
day, Oct. 3 from 8:30 p.m.
'till midnight.
Children from age 12 on
up are welcome, for a $1
donation
Music by Hi-Fi Enter-
tainment; refreshments


Have Grinder Will Travel
Stum~panudc Ro nding.
No job too small or large.
Calli('I enc Dwaede

FREE ESTIMATES


DON WILLSON'S
SEPTIC TANK
SERVICE
Se vng ae df Frat lln
commerical
Septic Tanks &
Grease Traps Pumped
Call day or night
653-9406


ROBERTS APPLIANCE
REPAIR
-ALL MAJOR BRANDS -


"Never give up hope -
together, we'll get through
tough times" was the spirit
in the air as United Way
of the Big Bend (UWBB)
and dozens of partners
launched the HELP &
HOPE project during a
media conference at the
Tallahassee-Leon County
Civic Center Sept. 17.
Hundreds, perhaps
thousands, of Big Bend
residents have for the first
time in their lives experi-
enced economic crisis, and
the HELP & HOPE project
aims to meet the challenge
head on.
"The HELP & HOPE
project won't be successful
because of our United Way
- success will depend on
the community embracing
the idea," said Ken Arm-
strong, UWBB president.
"Everyone knows that
times are hard. For the
UWBB Board to step up
and commit $20,000 from
reserves to get HELP &
HOPE off the ground is a
powerful statement."
How does the Big Bend
keep individuals who until
2008 "were doing just fine,
thank you" from falling so
deep into distress that they
can't recover when the
economy does? The com-
munity must reach out to
them in an extraordinary
way.HELP & HOPE's mis-
sion is to connect those
experiencing crisis due to
the current economic re-
cessions eihexistin dand

hasten their return to eco-


nomic independence.
"I am convinced this is
the way the country is go-
ing to be able to come out
of this economic distress,"
said Bob Feagin, Holland
& Knight partner. "Instead
of focusing on who is to
blame for these problems,
I believe it is imperative to
give support to the victims
of these problems. And, be-
cause HELP & HOPE will
be addressing these issues
in this manner, I have seen
nothing but a positive re-
sponse.
"I didn't know anybody
Other than the UWBB who
could better give a good
assessment on how our
community is doing during
these tough times. They
have the best connections
in the Big Bend community
with service providers, as
well as private and public
organizations that support
service providers who lead
this effort," HE SAID.
HELP & HOPE is a
project initiated by UWBB
with the assistance of
many caring individuals
and partners. The belief is
that all across these eight
counties are individuals,
businesses, churches, ser-
vice clubs, civic organiza-
tions, and nonprofit groups
who would be willing to
do something very special
- if they knew what was
needed and how to step
forward. .
For more information
enhrow tho req estt help Ind
pandhope.info.


18 Shadow Lane
Apalachicola, FL 32320
Phone: (850) 653-8122
Cell: (850) 653-7654


























(d i


Changes to WIC program start this month


United Way and partners

launch 'HELP & HOPE'





Franklin County's source of news for more than a century


| 1zoo |

In accordance with the
Americans with Disabilities
Act, persons needing a
reasonable accommoda-
tion to participate In this
proceeding should, no
later than seven (7) days
prior, contact the Clerk of
the Court's disability coor-
dinator at 8506972112.
PO). Box 340, APALACHI-
CO)LA, FL 32320. If hearing
Impaired, contact (TDD)
800-955-8771, via Florida
Relay System.

Ben-Ezra & Katz, PA.
Attorneys for Plaintiff
2901 Stirling Road,
Sulte 300
Fort Lauderdale, Florida
33312
Telephone: (305) 770-4100
Fax: (305) 653-2329
September 24, October 1,
2009
4017T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE SECOND JUDI-

ARL F RNCKUlTN COUA Y
FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION

HISOBNCALBAN SO, TNA-

FMST2ROUSTOEE FOR
Plaintiff

vs

JEAN G. MCMILLAN, et al
Defendant(s).

CASE NO.
19208NCA-000439

NOTICE OF
RESCHEDULED
FORECLOSURE SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY

E R~esch aln gtoarnec o
sure Sale dated Septem-
ber 1, 2009 and entered In

19208-CA-00043h9eof th

OND Judicial Circuit In and
Fo riFRA NKIn CounBC
BANK USA, NATIONAL


S070C1|AF Nsthe W B ti
and JEAN G. MCMILLAN:
are the Defendants, I will
Idl rto thl hest and best
DOOR OF THE FRANKLIN
COUMNATYKECTOSUTRTEHEOTU

0 00 thLFeLOhReDA at


foalowdngO 0ecie the



ETOR E B LANKD6 SUL
BEACHES, UNIT NO. 5
ACTORDN RE TRHEE

OPRADGEEDS 16-17, P BL
RECORDS OFRIFRANKLIN


A/K/A 708 WEST
BAYSHORE DRIVE, ST
GEORGE ISLAND, FL
32328

Any person claiming an In-
terest In the surplus from
the sale, If any, other than
the property owner as of
date of the Lls Pendens
must file a claim within
sixty (60) days after the
sale.

WITNESS MY HAND and
the seal of this Court on
September 2, 2009.

Marcla M. Johnson
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Michele Maxwell
Deputy Clerk

Florida Default Law Group,
PL.
PO. Box25018
Tampa, Florida
33622-5018
FO8071290
September 24, October 1,
2009
4062T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
FRANKLIN COUNTY :
FLORIDA

SUNTRUST MORTGAGE
INC ,
Plaintiff,

vs

JEFFREY S. GALLOWAY
et. al.
Defendants.

CASE NO: 07-00405CA

NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO
CHAPTER 45

NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN pursuant to a final
judgment of foreclosure
dated Au ust 11, 2009
ad0 entrd InCts rNu
Court of the Second Judl-
clal Circuit In and for
Franklin County, Florida
wherein SUNTRUST
MORTGAGE, 1NC., plaintiff
and JEFFREY S. GALLO-
WAY et. al., are defend-
ants, I will sell to the high-
est bidder and best bidder
for cash at the front of the
Courthouse steps at 33
Market Street, Apalachl-
cola, FL 32320, at 11:00
A., oe N vmer 1
scribed property as set
fort mn said order or final


GO GEBI kA D oGUSL
BEACHES UNIT NO. 3, ac-


| 11oo |
re-rod marking the POINT
OF BEGINNING. From
said POINT OF BEGINN-
ING continue North 89 de-
grees 30 minutes 25 sec-
onds West 132.00 feet to a
re-rod and cap (marked
#6475), thence leaving
said Southerly right-of-way
boundary run South 00 de-
grees 28 minutes 05 sec-
onds West 330.02 feet to a
re-rod and cap (marked
#6475), thence run South
89 degrees 30 minutes 37
seconds East 132.00 feet
to a re-rod and cap
(marked #7160), thence
run North 00 degrees 28
minutes 05 seconds East
330.01 feet to the POINT
OF BEGINNING.

has been filed against you
and you are required to
serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, If any, to It,
on Marshall C. Watson,
PA., Attorney for Plaintff,
whose address Is 1800
NW 49TH STREET, SUITE
120, FT LAUDERDALE, FL
33309 within thirty (30)
days after the first publica-
tlon of this Notice In the
THE APALACHICOLA
TIMES and file the original
with the Clerk of this Court
either before service on
Plaintiffs attorney or Imme-
diately thereafter; other-
wise a default will be en-
tered against you for the
relief demanded In the
complaint.

In accordance with the
Americans with Disabillties
Act (ADA), disabled per-
sons who, because of their
disabilities, need special
accommodation to particl-
pate In this proceeding
should contact the ADA
Coordinator at 33 Market
Street, Sulte 203, Apalachl-
cola, FL 32320 or Tele-
phone Volce/TDD (904)
6 611ng1 prior to such

WITNESS my hand and
the seal of this Court this
1st day of September,
2009.


as lrk of e Cor
As Deputy Clerk
September 24, October 1,

37T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FORRIFDRAANKLIN COUNTY :
PROBATE DIVISION


CHAE DdIDATKELLOYFM-


Fie0 Omb r

NOTICE TO CREDITORS

The administration of the
es tae ofd MICHaE DAw

2aeo det was nDde m-
the Circuit Court for Frank-
Iln County, Florida, Pro-
bate Division under pro-
bate file #: 09-000042-CR
the address of which Is 33
Market Street, Apalachl-
cola, Florida 32320. The
names and addresses of
the personal representa-
tive and the personal
representative's attorney
are set forth below.

All creditors of the dece-
dent and other persons
having claims or demands
against decedent's estate
on whom a copy of this
notice Is required to be
served must file their
claims with this court
WITHIN THE LATER OF 3
MONTHS AFTER THE
TIME OF THE FIRST PUB-
LICATION OF THIS NO-
TICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER
THE DATE OF SERVICE
OF A COPY OF THIS NO-
TICE ON THEM.

All other creditors of the
decedent and other per-
sons having claims or de-
mands against decedent's
estate must file their claims
with this court WITHIN 3
MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE.

ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED
WITHIN THE TIME PERl-
ODS SET FORTH IN SEC-
TION 733.702 OF THE
FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.

NOTWITHSTANDING THE
TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY
CLAIM FILED TWlO YEARS
OR MORE AFTER THE
DECEDENT'S DATE OF
DEATH IS BARRED.

The date of the first publl-
cation of this notice Is Sep-
tember 24, 2009.

Attorney for Personal Rep-
resentative
I Buckingham Bird, Esq.
PO. Box 247
Monticello, Florida 32345
(850) 997-3503
Personal Representative
Katherine Kelly Cun-
ningham
3710 Langley Oaks Place
Marleta, Georgla 300067
September 24, October 1,
2009
3990T
FN TTHHE CSR NDTCO R
CIAL CIRCUIT OF FLOR-
IDNA INOUANND FOR FRANK-

SN RUST BANK


| 1 zo |
By: Michele Maxwell
As Deputy Clerk

In accordance with the
Americans with Disabllties
Act, persons In need of a
special accommodation to
participate In this proceed-
Ing, shall, within a reason-
able time prior to any pro-
ceeding, contact the ADA
coordinator at 33 Market
Street, Apalachicola, FL
32320 or telephone
850-653-8861 not later
than five (5) business days
prior to such proceeding.

MINERLEY & FEIN, PL.
Attorneys for Plaintiff
980 N. Federal Hwy,
Sulte 412
BocaRaton, FL33432
561-362-6699
October 1, 8,2009
4065T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
FRANKLIN COUNTY
FLORIDA

BRANCH BANKING AND
TRUST COMPANY
Plaintff,

vs

CRAIG L. CHOWN AND
AMY B. CHOWN, et ux., et
Defendant .

CASE NO. 09-000260-CA

NOTICE OF ACTION


CAIG L. CHOWN AND

An~d or dea~d his th 181 nie_
known heirs, devisees, leg-
atees or grantees and all
persons or parties claim-
Ing by, through, under or
agist hirns(t kmn)w.


YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an Action for foreFlsr o


C unty pFeonda:

A PARCEL OF LAND IN
FRACTIONAL SECTION

NUTGO SHI DOSEOUTT

CARRABELLE RIVER, IN
FRANKLIN COUNTY
FLO A DESCRIBED AS


CMMENEN ATENATEPROI T

STATNEG GHWAGYH 3


319 EABHBULTSTTHOEHE AEH

WESTIBE LER H


ERLY DIRECTION ALONG

SAED SCTEATERIG WAY 3
A DISATANPC O 1TOHOFNEC

TUTRHN OANTGHLE RIFG
DEGREES AND RUN 50
FEET TO A CONCRETE
MONUMENT ON THE
WE ST ER L Y
RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF
SAID HIGHWAY, THENCE
TURN TO THE LEFT WITH
AN ANGLE OF 90 DE-
GREES AND RUN IN A
SOUTHWESTERLY DI-
RECTION ALONG THE
WESTERLY BOUNDARY
LINE OF SAID ROAD
RIGHT-OF-WAY FOR A
DISTANCE OF 351.9 FEET
TO A CONCRETE MONU-
MENT, THENCE TURN TO
THE RIGHT WITH AN AN-
GLE OF 81 DEGREES 08
MINUTES AND RUN
ALONG THE NORTHERLY
BOUNDARY LINE OF THE
80 FOOT RIGHT OF WAY
OF STATE ROAD S-379 A
DISTANCE OF 769.4 FEET
TO AN IRON STAKE, CALL
THIS THE PLACE OF BE-
GINNING NOW IN THE
SAME DIRECTION GO A
DISTANCE OF 111 FEET
TO A CONCRETE MONU-
MENT, THENCE TURN AN
ANGLE OF 90 DEGREES
TO THE RIGHT AND GO
TO THE WATERS EDGE
OF THE WESTERLY BANK
OF THE CARRABELLE
RIVER (CALL THIS LINE
THE WESTERLY BOUND-
ARY LINE OF THIS DE-
SCRIBED PROPERTY),
THENCE IN AN EASTERLY
DIRECTION MEANDER
ALONG THE WATERS
EDGE OF SAID RIVER
BANK TO A POINT WHICH
IS ON A LINE PARALLEL
TO AND 111 FEET DIS-
TANCE FROM THE
ABOVE MENTIONED
WESTERLY BOUNDARY
LINE OF THE DESCRIBED
PROPERTY, NOW PRO-
CEED IN A SOUTHERLY
DIRECTION ALONG THIS
LINE TO THE PLACE OF
BEGINNING.

AND BEING MORE RE-
CENTLY DESCRIBED BY
A RECENTLY DESCRIBED
BY A RECENT SURVEY
PREPARED BY JAMES
THURMAN "
RODDENBURY DATED
SEPTEMBER 23, 1991,
JOB #91-316, DE-
SCRIBED AS FOLLOWS

COMMENCE AT A CON-
CRETE MONUMENT
MARKING THE INTER-
SECTION OF THE WEST-
ERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY

ON A80 30W SHT T

SOUTH BOUNDARY OF
SECTION 19, TOWNSHIP
7 SOUTH, RANGE 4

WOE TY, FLORFD ANKD
THENCE RUN EAST 52.88


| 11oo |
FEET TO THE CENTER-
LINE OF SAID STATE
ROAD NO. 30, THENCE
RUN NORTH 21 DE-
GREES 57 MINUTES 00
SECONDS EAST ALONG
SAID CENTERLINE AND A
PROTECTION OF SAID
CENTERLINE 1505.69
FEET THENCE RUN
NORTH 79 DEGREES 49
MINUTES 10 SECONDS
WEST ALONG THE PRO-
JECTION OF THE CEN-
TERLINE OF STATE ROAD
S-379 AND THE CEN-
TERLINE OF STATE ROAD
S-379, 783.81 FEET
THENCE LEAVING SAID
CENTERLINE OF STATE
ROAD S-379 RUN NORTH
13 DEGREES O9 MINUTES
04 SECONDS EAST 40.00
FEET TO AN IRON PIPE
LYING ON THE NORTH-
ERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY OF
SAID STATE ROAD S-379
AND THE POINT OF BE-
GINNING, 162.01 FEET
THE POINT OF BEGINN-
ING FROM SAID POINT
OF BEGINNING CON-
TINUE NORTH 13 DE-
GREES 09 MINUTES 04
SECONDS EAST 162.01
FEET TO THE APPROXI-
MATE MEAN HIGH
WATER LINE OF THE
CARRABELLE RIVER,
THENCE RUN ALONG
SAID MEAN HIGH WATER
LINE THE FOLLOWING
THREE COURSES NORTH
89 DEGREES 37 MINUTES
59 SECONDS WEST 48.96
FEET, NORTH 17 DE-
GREES 09 MINUTES 51
SECONDS WEST 11.66
FEET NORTH 82
DEGREES 05 MINUTES 54
SECONDS WEST 57.45
FEET THENCE LEAVING
SAID MEAN HIGH WATER
LINE RUN SOUTH 13 DE-
GREES 09 MINUTES 04
SECONDS WEST 155.92
FEET TO A CONCRETE
MONUMENT (FOUND) LY
IRNG OTNOTHWE NORTH RL

STHNECE RRUONADSOUT H77
DEGREES 49 MINUTES 10
SECONDS EAST 110.81
FEET TO THE POINT OF
BEGINNING.


da by un fed ag ntd y
serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, If any, to It
mn SPAt Re & HOFFMA ,
dress Is 9700 South Dixie
High rid Su 156610,(3M -

6ml 2t rsd p356 nb|tinaos
n7-29,w ahn EC oh s


rftr tedfiaat fuiautio r
esnotiere aganstyou fore the
prgnl wtmo Pde on ter o
WhITNS C t eism eo n Id

8teh09da of SEPTEMBR


Clherkof a eourt wilb


Aselerof thesCourt onti



By: Michele Maxwell

Sp ebrlerk 4,October 1,
2009
4070T
NOTICE OF ACTION

BEFORE THE BOARD OF
ARCHITECTURE AND IN-
TERIOR DESIGN

RE: The Practice of Archl-
tecture

John B. Carroll
Carroll Holdings, LLC
Apalachicola, FL

Case No.: 2007-026416
License No.: Unllcensed

The Board of Architecture
and Interior Design Issued
a Notice and Order to
Cease and Desist and filed
an Administrative Com-
plaint against you. A copy
may be obtained by con-
tacting, David K. Mlnaccl,
Esquire, Smith, Thomp-
son, Shaw & Manausa,
PA., 3520 Thomasville
Road, Tallahassee, FL
32309-3469, (850)
402-1 570.

If no response Is received
from you regarding the
above-referenced matter
by November 19, 2009, an
Informal hearing may be
scheduled before the
Board of Architecture and
Interior Design, pursuant
to Chapter 120, Florida
Statutes.

In accordance with the
Americans with Disabllties
Act, persons needing a
special accommodation to
participate In this proceed-
Ing should contact the In-
dividual or agency sending
notice not later than seven
days prior to the pro-
ceeding at the address
given on notice. Tele-
phone: (850) 257-6067;
1-800-955-8771 (TDD) or
1-800-955-8770 (v), via
Florida Relay Service.
October, 8, 15, 22, 2009
4082T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY
FLORIDA.
CIVIL DIVISION

AUCRORLALC LOAN SER-
Plaintiff

vs.

C YDE OUIVER; et al.,


|11oo |
CASE NO.
192008CA000001XXXXXX

RE-NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO CHAP-
TER 45

NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN pursuant to an Or-
der or Summary Final
Judgment of foreclosure
dated June 23, 2008 and
an Order Resetting Sale
dated September 15,
2009, and entered In Case
No. 192008CA000001
XXXXXX of the Circuit
Court In and for Franklin
County, Florida, wherein
Aurora Loan Services, LLC
Is Plaintiff and CLYDE OLl-
VER; KENNETH
FRIENDLY: MORTGAGE
ELECTRONIC REGIS-
TRATION SYSTEMS, INC.
AS NOMINEE FOR PRI-
MARY CAPITAL ADVI-
SORS, LC, MIN NO.
1002293-3000020639-5;
ONE CHARLESTON
PLACE HOMEOWNERS'
ASSOCIATION, INC.; UN-
KNOWN TENANT NO. 1;
UNKNOWN TENANT NO.
2; and ALL UNKNOWN
PARTIES CLAIMING IN-
TERESTS BY THROUGH,
UNDER OR AGAINST A
NAMED DEFENDANT TO
THIS ACTION, OR HAV-
ING OR CLAIMING TO
HAVE ANY RIGHT, TITLE
OR INTEREST IN THE
PROPERTY HEREIN DE-
SCRIBED, are Defendants,
I will sell to the highest and
best bidder for cash at at
the Front Door of the
Franklin County Court-
house, 33 Market Street,
Apalachicola, FL 32320 at
Franklin County, Florida, at
11:00 a.m. on the 4th day
of November, 2009, the
following described prop-
erty as set forth In said Or-
der or Final Judgment,
to-wit:

Lot 43, Block 10 (West),
ac.Georget 11sland ubG
slan as per Map or Plat
Thereof Recorded In Plat
Book 2, Page 7, of the
Public Records of Franklin

unty FlRonN CLAIMING

AN INTEREST IN THE
SURPLUS FROM THE
SLEN IFHEANYROOTEHRER
OWNER AS OF THE DATE
OF THEFILIS PENCDENS

WTEI NA60 DAYS AFTER



c nd0 a s wih Dsblte



the Clerk of the Court not


I at the F an in eouen
850u hu~s8. 1elephon
1-800- 55-8770 via Florida
Reay Sec.

DATED at Apalachicola,
Florida, on September 17,
2009


Msa Ilark, Clochunts urt
By: Michele Maxwell
As Deputy Clerk

SMITH, HIATT & DIAZ,
PA
Attorney sfor Plaintiff
PO BOX 11438
Fort Lauderdale, FL
33339-1438
Teopbheorne:8(9 ) 564-0071

4095T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE SECOND JUDI-
CIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR GADSDEN COUNTY :
FLORIDA

FARM CREDIT OF
NORTHWEST FLORIDA,
ACA
Plaintiff

vs.

FREDA WHITE-MOORE
A/K/A FREDA WHITE
MOORE A/K/A FREDA M.
MOORE A/K/A FREDA M.
WHITE, APALACHICOLA
STATE BANK, UNKNOWN
TENANT(S) (Gadsden
County) and UNKNOWN
TENANT(S) (Franklin
County)
Defendants.

CASE NO. 09-388-CA

NOTICE OF SALE PUR-
SUANT TO CHAPTER 45

NOTICE Is given pursuant
to a Final Judgment of
Foreclosure dated Sep-
tember 4, 2009, In Case
No. 09-388-CA, of the Cir-
cult Court of the Second
Judicial Circult, In and for
Gadsden County, Florida
In which FARM CREDIT
OF NORTHWEST FLOR-
IDA, ACA, Is the Plaintiff
and FREDA
WHITE-MOORE A/K/A
FREDA WHITE MOORE
A/K/A FREDA M. MOORE
A/K/A FREDA M. WHITE
and APALACHICOLA
STATE BANK are the De-
fendants, I will sell to the
highest and best bidder for
cash at the front door of
the Gadsden County
Courthouse In Qulncy
Gadsden County, Florida

15, 009, the pr py s t

of Foreclosure, Including
property located In both
Gadsden County, Florida
adnad ornklnCoanty u o
desenibed as follows:


| 1oo |
cording to the map or plat
thereof as recorded In Plat
Book 2, Page 16, Public
Records of Franklin
County, Florida

commonly known as 1156
W. Gorrie Drive, St.
George Island, Florida
32328.

Dated at Apalachicola,
Florida this August 11,
2009.

MARCIA JOHNSON
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Franklin County, Florida
By: Michele Maxwell
As Deputy Clerk

In accordance with the
Americans with Disabllties
Act, persons In need of a
special accommodation to
participate In this proceed-
Ing, shall, within a reason-
able time prior to any pro-
ceeding, contact the ADA
coordinator at 33 Market
Street, Apalachicola, FL
32320 or telephone
850-653-8861 not later
than five (5) business days
prior to such proceeding.

MINERLEY & FEIN, PL.
Attorneys for Plaintiff
980 N. Federal Hwy
Sulte 412
Boca Raton, FL 33432
561-362-6699
October 1, 8, 2009
4063T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
ORARNKIN COUNTY

SUNTRUST MORTGAGE,
INC.,
Plaintiff,

vs.

JEFFREY S. GALLOWAY
et. al.,
Defendants.

CASE NO: 08-000509-CA

NOTICE OF SALE
PU SUNT TO



GVE Nepturso nt o cs fi
dated August 10, 2009,
and entered In Case No.
08-t000509-CAo th cCr-
Judicial Circuit In and for
Frankdin County N on d

MOR FAFGRElNC., Gp an i
WAY ede a. r end




rns ilsl edhpofwna th hi
ns nsa-wder or bs final
Commces at the Sroutoth-

Sourthos Ranep 6 et, 3
FrlanlnCut, Floia 322,a 10
sad, pnth aolso ling onte
Northwest prigt-fwy a e
bout ndaryd ofe Nort Biay
Shore Div, thenc run

erly ande Nothwesoterly
along sad rgt-ofwayh 8
boundary the folwn fie t
(5)kll cuss ounth, 89 rde-
ges 32 moinuteaso n 40 she-
Northws 30 dgrees07 m-
2006.20 ofet North 59 e-
ghree 53ve mnthes 0 ec r
North 30 degrees 07 mms-
uesl 00d seondsEast rl

690.0 freet, North 89 de-
grees 53 minutes 00 sec-
ands West 783.27 feet t a
poite lying ond Inerseton
with.2 ethe Southeasterly
rgtof-swayt boundar of
North Bay Shore Drive and
uthe 0 Seoutheastery

boundar runt North 02 de-
grees 55 minutes 00 sec-
onds East 126.28 feet to a
point lying on Ithe North-
wet h otesterlyrgh-fwy
rih-fwyboundary of si ayBy
Dorivthence Shrun North 31
shecod Esot ealogsaid
right-of-way boundary o

#1266) mayrking thePont

leaving said right-of-way
boundary run North 59 de-
grees 44 minutes 30 sec-
onds West 518.64 feet to a
hoighwte line of h Apalahl-

cola Ba thence run North 3
10degrees 57 minutes 308
seconds East along said
mea hihtoa water lne


554.26 feet to an ron rod
aond a marke #7160)
ly6),mring o the norhwetery

levn adright-of-waybonayf
Southar 31n degrees 34 m-
ge 4 iutes 30 seconsWet
boundar 69t1.47 feet to te
PoinhwterI of Beginning.
commonly, khnow n as 347
a0 dea 3Dnes Eastponutes
Daeods Eat A alaciol a Flr-
Ida this h Augute 11209.

MsAi elAn JCgr I Nurt I


Frakin; County Floridar o


Parcel 1:

Commence at a concrete
monument marking the
Southwest Corner of the
East Quarter of Section 22,
Township 3 North, Range
1 West, Gadsden County,
Florida. Thence run North
00 degrees 01 minutes 15
seconds East 1762.75 feet
to a broken concrete mon-
ument, said point being
the POINT OF BEGINN-
ING: thence from said
POINT OF BEGINNING,
run South 89 degrees 38
minutes 09 seconds East,
a distance of 4,834.80 feet
to a point lying on the ap-
proximate normal waters
edge of the Ochlockonee
River; thence run along
said waterline as follows:
North 01 degrees 24 mln-
utes 35 seconds East, a
distance of 21.95 feet;
thence North 25 degrees
14 minutes 35 seconds
East, a distance of 124.70
feet; thence North 42 de-
grees 00 minutes 40 sec-
onds East, a distance of
30.87 feet; thence South
81 degrees 29 minutes 35
seconds East, a distance
of 52.64 feet; thence North
78 degrees 46 minutes 43
seconds East, a distance
of 87.33 feet; thence North
49 degrees 33 minutes 00
seconds East, a distance
of 118.20 feet; thence
North 18 degrees 47 mln-
utes 46 seconds East, a
distance of 57.48 feet;
thence North 11 degrees
42 minutes 24 seconds
West, a distance of 76.19
feet; thence North 47 de-
grees 41 minutes 59 sec-
ands West, a distance of
16.48 feet; thence North 83
degrees 02 minutes 17
seconds West, a distance
of 135.91 feet; thence
North 58 degrees 25 mln-
uts 33 seconds 4Vet et

t~henc n oth 70 sdgoree
West, a distance of 68.43
feet; thence North 30 de-
grees 43 minutes 07 sec-
onds West, a distance of

of 5.51 feet; thence North 2
40degrees 54 minutes 3 8
sec4Onds Westh an dsta
06 degrees 50 minutes 378
secoln~d~s7este a distance
06 ert28 de gredes 5 0 2mn esm na


seco d e e s ah 3028 nee

8315.61 feet; thence Nrh0

North 07 degree 14 mlna


tsta tan second et
fe;thence North 68 de-re
ree 1 minutes 16 sec-nd
ondst Ea st anc distance o
g1feest;3thence North 2 e
seonds East, a distance o
of11.11 feet; thence Nrh0
Noth65derees 52 mln-s 0
utes 4ecnds East, a dsac
ditac of 32.7 feet tec
thneNorth 27 de rees mn
minutes 15 seconds at
Es distance of 9535.00et
fe;thence North 16 de-re
greds Esilnute 45 seod
8.0feet; thence North 01de
dgree E37 mln les 37 ec

c7.36 feetstthance Not e0
00de ees 40 minutes 23
seconds West, a distance
of 764.33 feet; thenceNot

20th6 de rees 51 minutes
ue seconds West, a dsac
of7.2fe;thence North 2 ere
23 ees5 minutes 45scod
secodsWst, a distance o 50
o14.4feet; thence Nrh1 e
utees 09 sec nds West, a
onsEsadistance of 6.9fe
8. fe thence North 69d re
54 minues 30 siueconds
Wecn Est, a distanceof180
of7.6feet; thence North 7 e
0 erees 25 minutes 09 ec
scnds West, a distance o
1297.29 feet; thence North
47 de rees 29 minutes 29
seconds West, a distance
of 81.65 feet; thence North
44 de rees 08 minutes 33
seconds West, a distance
of 71.79 feet; thence North
56 de rees 55 minutes 13
seconds West, a distance
of 151.24 feet; thenceNot
29rt de dgees 126 minte0
ue seconds West, a dsac
ditneof 136.80 feet; tec
Nothec 32derees 10 mln-e
5 iutes 25 secondsWeta

West, a distance of 6218.0
feet; thence North 03 de-
grees 38 minutes 09 sec-
onds West, a distance of
879.87feet; thence North6
47de rees 38 minutes 34
se onds East, a distance
of 75.49 feet; thence North
43 degrees 39 minutes 34
seconds East, a distance
of 713.82 feet; thence ot
Noth3 degrees OQ mln-e 1
ue02seconds East, a dsac
tf512 tncee tnce h12.degeth
54deres1 minutes 53scod
sEaos taest ano of5454d39

ne 13.0 funun st 0e3c
Not degrees 40 minutes


| 1100 |
vs.

JORGE LUIS
RODRIGUEZ; UNKNOWN
SPOUSE OF JORGE LUIS
RODRIGUEZ; SUNTRUST
BANK, UNKNOWN TEN-
ANT #1; UNKNOWN TEN-
ANT #2,
Defendants.

NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN pursuant to a Final
Judgment of Foreclosure
dated August 31, 2009,
and entered In Case No.
08-000334 CA, of the Cir-
cult Court of the Second
Judicial Circuit In and for
FRANKLIN County, Flor-
Ida, wherein SUNTRUST
BANK, Is a Plaintiff and
JORGE LUIS
RODRIGUEZ; UNKNOWN
SPOUSE OF JORGE LUIS
RODRIGUEZ; SUNTRUST
BANK; UNKNOWN TEN-
ANT #1; UNKNOWN TEN-
ANT #2 are the Defend-
ants. I will sell to the high-
est and best bidder for
cash at 11:00 a.m. on Oc-
tober 14, 2009, the follow-
Ing described property as
set forth In said Final Judg-
ment, to-wit:

LOT 2, BLOCK K, ST
GEORGE ISLAND GULF
BEACHES, UNIT NO. 3, A
SUBDIVISION AS PER
MAP OR PLAT THEREOF
RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK 2, PAGE 16, OF
THE PUBLIC RECORDS
OF FRANKLIN COUNTY
FLORIDA.

Any person claiming an In-
terest In the surplus from
the sale, If any, other than
the property owner as of
the date of the hre pendens
must file a claim within 60
days after the sale.

MARCIA M. JOHNSON

B:C feethMeaxw I
As Deputy Clerk

Dated this 1st day of Sep-
tember, 2009.


marcccans wi Dws hblltlhe
Act, persons needing a
reasonable accommoda-
tio c dparticipt ul this
later than seven (7) days
thnmrCotc h bil erk o

at.Brox 340, A AAH



oOA in 322.I ern



2901 St rl ng Road

Fot Laderdale, Florida

aelep(oe 65305)3 70-4100

September 24, October 1,

3995T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE SECOND JUDI-
CIAL CIRCUIT OF FLOR-
IDA IN AND FOR FRANK-
LIN COUNTY

SUNTRUST BANK D/B/A
SUNTRUST MORTGAGE,
INC.
Plaintiff,

vs.

WISDOM MINISTRIES,
INC.; NASIR K. SIDDIKl;
SUNTRUST MORTGAGE,
INC.; SUNSET BEACH
OWNERS ASSOCIATION,
INC.; UNKNOWN TENANT
#1; UNKNOWN TENANT
#2,
Defendants.

CASE NO.: 08000518CA

NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN pursuant to a Final
Judgment of Foreclosure
dated August 31, 2009
and entered In Case No.:
08000518CA, of the Circuit
Court of the Second Judl-
clal Circuit In and for
FRANKLIN County, Flor-
Ida, wherein SUNTRUST
BANK d/b/a SUNTRUST
MORTGAGE, INC., Is a
Plaintiff and WISDOM MIN-
ISTRIES, INC.; NASIR K.
SIDDIKl; SUNTRUST
MORTGAGE, INC.; SUN-
SET BEACH OWNERS AS-
SOCIATION, INC.; UN-
KNOWN TENANT #1;
UNKNOWN TENANT #2
are the Defendants. I will
sell to the highest and best
bidder for cash, at 11:00
a.m. on October 14, 2009
the following described
property as set forth In
said Final Judgment, to
wit:

LOT 34, SUNSET BEACH,
PHASE 2, A SUBDIVISION
AS PER MAP OR PLAT
THEREOF, RECORDED IN
PLAT BOOK 6 AT PAGE
17 OF THE PUBLIC REC-
ORDS OF FRANKLIN
COUNTY FLORIDA.

Any person claiming an In-
terest In the surplus from
the sale, If any, other than
the property owner as of
the date of the Ils pendens
must file a claim within 60
days after the sal SON


As Clerk of the Court
By: Michele Maxwell
As Deputy Clerk

Dated this 1st day of
September, 2009.


1100 -Legal Adveruising
1110 Classified Notices
1120 Public Notices/
Announcements
1125 -Carpools &

1130 R eios re
114 Happy Ads
1150-Personals
1160 -Lost
1170- Found


|1100
3929T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
FRANKLIN COUNTY :
FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION

BAC HOME LOANS SERV-
ICING, L.P F/K/A COUN-
TRYWIDE HOME LOANS
aERVICING, L.P.

vs.

KATIE I THORNHILL, et

Defendants.

CASE NO.:
19-2009-CA-000429

NOTICE OF ACTION

TO.
KATIE I THORNHILL
Last Known Address: 204
TnLak 32 Road,
Eatpoint, F 28
Als A~ttmphteDrt:S 25 W
Ea tolnt, FL 32328 and
839 Reach Crest, Birming-
ham, AL 35242
Other Address: PO. Box
143, 4 nta Rosa Beach,
Current Residence Un-
known

UKANTKEWNO SO E OF
Last Known Address: 204
point Lak 32 Road,
Also Attempted At: 235 W.

EspR nc hFCL t22 an)
ham, AL35242 -
Other Address: PO. Box
143, 4 nta Rosa Beach.
Current Residence Un-
known

UNKNOWN S EUSEN/OF


OSIEnWORAF3FAPLDde:



Aaachinola, FLR3 nce

CUacet nNrOFEsicer



o ongged d rthe folow-

Lot 4 (unrecorded)

Commence at the North-
east corner of Section 30,
Township 8 South, Range
6 West, Franklin County,
Florida an run South 00
degrees 45 minutes 08
seconds West 659.56 feet
to a re-rod and cap
(marked #5826) lying on
the Southerly right-of-way
boundary of Twin Lakes
Road, thence run along
said Southerly right-of-way
boundary the following
three (3) courses: North 89
degrees 31 minutes 29
seconds West 1316.61 feet
to an Iron pipe, North 89
degrees 30 minutes 19
seconds West 329.24 feet
to a re-rod and cap
(marked #6475), North 89
degrees 30 minutes 25
seconds West 528.04 feet
to a re-rod marking the
POINT OF BEGINNING
From said POINT OF BE-
GINNING continue North
89 degrees 30 minutes 25
seconds West 132.00 feet
to a re-rod and cap
(marked #6475), thence
leaving said Southerly
right-of-way boundary run
South 00 degrees 28 mln-
utes 05 seconds West
330.02 feel to a re-rod and
cap (marked #6475),
thence run South 89 de-
grees 30 minutes 37 sec-
onds East 132.00 feet to a
re-rod and cap (marked
#7160), thence run North
00 degrees 28 minutes 05
seconds East 330.01 feet
to the POINT OF BEGINN-
ING.

Subject Property being
more particularly de-
scribed by survey by
Thurman Roddenberry &
Associates, Inc., dated
02/13/03, Job Number:
03-078 as follows:

Lot 4 (unrecorded)

Commence at the North-
east corner of Section 30,
Township 8 South, Range
6 West, Franklin County,
Florida and run South 00
degrees 45 minutes 08
seconds West 659.56 feet
to a re-rod and cap
(marked #5826) lying on
the Southerly right-of-way
boundary of Twin Lakes
Road, thence run along
said Southerly right-of-way
boundary the following
three (3) courses: North 89

sc ond st 136. fe t
degrees 30pipmnutes 19
seconds West 329.24 feet
to a re-rod and cap
(ak #647) N rthse8

onds West 396.04 feet to a


SB The Times Thursday, October 1, 2009







Franklin County's source of news for more than a century The Times Thursday, October 1, 2009 7B


| 10 || 1o 10 ||1100 | | 320 3230 3 64
seconds East, a disance tents of the following stor- Filing Date: Apalach & Carrabelle: 710 *3, br
of 118.25 feet; thence age units-names: October 1, 2009 Pald Distribution Outside Hwy 98, Sat & Sun 3&4th, Apalachicola, FL.
North 29 degrees 51 mln- Issue Frequency the Malls Including Sales Community Yard Salel An- Call 850-643-7740.
utes 30 seconds East, a #107 Bldg C Margenell Weekly (Thursday Morn- Through Dealers and Car- tiques, collectlbbles,*
distance of 83.66 feet; Jones Ing) rlers, Street Vendors, 6 Piece Bedroom junque. Plaza 98. Carrabelle 3 br, 1 ba,
thence North 32 degrees #2 Bldg A Tommy Gaskill Published Annually: Counter Sales, and Other Set, all NEW In boxes. completely remodeled,
52 minutes 53 seconds #59 Bldg B Tim Ryan 52 Weeks Pald Distribution Outside MERCHANDISE Sacrifice $550. 545-7112 Carrabelle 902 NW Ave. D 1o Buneslarge private yard $800
East, a distance of 87.53 #137 Bldg C Karl Lucy Annual Subscription Price: USPS: Saud r a- Opportunities month 210 NE 1st St
feet; thence North 60 de- $24.15 In County Average: 1696 3100 Antiques s P 511 Money to Lend 404-266-0067
grees 24 minutes 39 sec- The public sale will be $34.65 Out ofCounty Actual: 1435 3110 -Appliances Furniture, rugs, pictures,
hands East, a distance of conducted at the facility, 3 0Arcts n~rfs Ineslaphu wrs. -C rb le
302.26 feet to a point 241 Patton Dr, Eastpoint, Contact Person: Pald Disribution by Other 3140 -Baby Items --.- 4 br 2 ba w/FFR appll-
marking the Intersection of Florida at 9:00 am, Octo- Mellssa Halre Classes of Mall Through 3150 Building Supplies $175 Queen Pillow-Top | 5 0 nepo /sveIcd
said approximate normal ber 24, 2009. The parties (850) 747-5050 the USPS: 3160 Business Mattress Set. New In hot tub, sauna + guest apt
waters edge with the may redeem their contents Average: 0 Equipment sealed plastic w/warranty. 330w/ full bath $1200 mo, +
Northerly boundary lne of prior to sale time at full Complete Malling Address Actual: 0 10 Collect bles 22-89 eieyAal adcprflyepr- Build Wealth utils, 1 yr Ise, sec dep, cr
Section 23, Township 3 amount owed, cash only. of Known Office of Publica- 39 lcrnc lcld hk&rfrq osks
North, Range 1 West, Contents may be sold Indl- tron and General Business Total Pald Disribution: 3200 Firewood wednce s vaent punng, ea Han gg Call David at 850-228-6091
Gadsden County, Florida; vidually, as a whole unit or Office of Publisher: Average: 2628 3210 Free Pass it On weIg n.e-H at
thence leaving said water- retained by facility In Ileu PO. Box 1940 Actual: 2346 3220 Furniture sonable rates. Looking for
lne run along said bound- of payment. Panama City, FL 32402 30 asage/Yard Sales 0rin prn eds walke nches Looknng for more
ary lne and a projection October 1, 8, 2009 Total Free or Nominal Rate 35 -GodTigtoEt Couch/Chair, BRAND mieoensimn. Vsit:bulldwealthbetter | 6170
t~hereo nlolih5T eges 4N156 E ICUTCOR b ihHes: g 06un: 20 He thry Ftns 2 879Ine Avx Nopsuo tlee Cl health.com Carrabelle Large MH. 2
West a distance of PO. Box 1940, Actual: 6 3280 Machinery/ ble 804709 r a /ve frvr
5,016.06 feet to a concrete IANFOFRKLNPanama City, FL 32402 Equipment$60m+$30dp
moumn lig nth O R L FLOUR SADITO Total Dtbun M dic I Eqeuipment 850-545-8813 or 510-2888
Westel Ist dauf InhEa DIISO Editor: Aerage: 256234 31 Muadcal n~strmments F
Half of said Section 22; RB ETR AK129 Commerce St. Supplies
thence leaving the North- N/K/A RBC BANK (USA) Apalachicola, FL 32320 Coples not Distributed: 3330 Restaurant/Hotel SOLID WOOD
Sectibo un ar1ono sad PANIFManaging Editor: ecua:284426 3 Tickt (B odall) e h5 b1 ~49. new, IN s o a
Westerlyboundary lne VS. N/A *-.
South 00 degrees 02 mln- Total: EMPQMNT RAETATE FREl
utes 18 seconds East, a Owner: Average: 3060 Aak AOtt AOtheyl L
distance 0f 3,52 .6 fetntgo DFNDAPNHOUG Fbridac Freedom Newspa- Actual: 5198 Wo e fteWrdi ekn il iatso rilRA qAEFRSL
38762aces mreorles.CASE NO: 09 152 CA (a Florida Corporation) Percent Pald: representatives in the Apalachicola area. Generous intermation 610 prmn as 70- on ose
R O. Box 1940 Average: 99.7% COmmiSSIOn plus bonus opportunities and 6130 Condoffewnhouse 7110 Beach Homel
TOGETHER WITH THE NOIEO OEL-Panama City, FL 32402 Actual: 99.7% eXceptional benefits for those who qualify. Training 6140 House Rentals Properly
FOLO W NGSURE SALE and professional sales tools provided. Must be 4106150 Roommate Wanted 710-omeca
INGRESS/EGRESS & Freedom Newspapers, Inc. Publication of Statement of dicilied prfssoa andm hve het desir to He tot r hous

UIIngress/egreNssn utility Faour clfssoa arle Jav gmen ofir Kare E.7 Hae Omahae Nebraska Indpenen vianm a..men
a m e nt ly i ntg el O w e t b a 9 e d K o w1 4 B n h l r M o /p bb sehr 5, 2 0 0 9 S u n e ol es : o t c t26 1 hEd n A p l C t o l C o n r a c o r oi s a 6T w
decrbe lneC mm nce oftheCirui Cour ofB the Hold aer Ownngor Htold- I certhify that al Information AIn -lm nR sore .., FL Fs ad Wllie6 0 7200 TimshandAreag
at St. J oe Pap erCm Irvng, 1 A Percen orr Moreme of funihe onrl this formanc isiey 69 -. Conservatio CommissionMoil Hme
pan cncrtemonme t Ju ic al Ciruit in nd ofo Total Amountio ofnal Bonds tru an om lt. n O al(i )7 -2 loin o 12Idiiu
magrksing tes Soduthes R Ll hb-Mrgaeo the Sec- ertnd tha anyoes wh rlxs me h 10 als to snerve andepnd- For0 Leasesme
Cornerlsur ofte the- Sotws nls unihsfle rmsed- 8e7r0letcntatr orig7 0
Quarter fScto 5 net bidder for5 cash at w Freedom ewpaers, Acr- Ving Infoermatione on thi with FWC ton imleen Cota thes C19mmercial
eTown ship 3 Noth, Ralownge CiTi CaE RNKLSEOSUN quisitiongs, Inc te forit etm or who mits material PART, TIM agency FL BihadWllea Re-l Builing
1 estbe Gadsen Coumnty COURTOUSE 33in MAR 17666 Fitch, or Inorat aInonrequetedn sponse Agent Programe in Appox 110 sqft
tFriSthenr u oaj KET STREEit APLCH-t Irvne CA964oe o rmy tu GNRLMINEAC rvankin hCounyuhidheAaial oWCre 2b,1ba rc hmI
lino sad St o ae cton- 15 dcl OLA, ui FOIDA atdfr'g en 11:0 Freedo Comnia (rnclued ng fins andm Imrs- EHPSTO FOR 32185161 UNI puloicgo as 2 we dll sassto w 9 2hStetSmeta urihd
Ntrha de cocetes 49Wmen mTon thed04tt fo ti I tc tr nd cunor cwlesea n o APATMN COMPLEX IN "alsth arveloat ortspan 8O65 80m r ar d-6d Cl
82.8 fet t the P01NThe OFRAKI owndecrbdpopety, Irvie CAr 921 is)CARBLE US AEON haeteron eil a
BEGINNING;~ ~ ~ ~ ~~~Mrtags thnc fromr nale- sawtfulcoersn 1,a 2009n TOL N AS AKRUD al fhuln ml
sdne POI henO S~ouhEs d wl e t Nh Pugs ccatles Iurtle: Carrbell AND DRUGad TEST. GENERALV aebendw cota carcsseski
degee 41miute 3 LT 8 BLOCK 6TP ADTON Tiedme KNOWLEDGEs OF- HVAC PLUMBINGio memer oftepblcI RNDNWHM
s ensEst, Gadistance C INOLATOLUT Issue Dateh for Crcul action 4191Tte AN LCRCLRQIE. proesonal manne r Ifa In- REDUCED $7000 55


seons as, dstneT COUN ETY F PLOAHIng 12Mnh;AtalN.UE HNEA 850-697-2017 a Wildl fel Cnervatio 85-9-28 ny GenCetfe
of3976fe t S the nce SouthCoie f inl Iss ec Co misn Northwest Com uniy, bd/ba
78 ~ ~ COA degees22minte 22 Publshe Nearest to Filin NOIC ISs HEEB Regon Attn Sua Carh 1980e sqmftr. (urnider rof

Ileof 153.4 fet hne wthn 0 ay afte th e do Actual:ca 2959 Gorrie Drean In ps theH CountyO 15, 2009 an o lae 50/o I ow amn
distance ~ a~m of1130fe; ae this 14th day of Mle usd-ony 338 ned orgse alBre rthll
thncSouth 84 degrees Setmbr 2009 PaldSbcptons, State thadnament wnith thei DI- Applicationsorsan 8065-98 o ar for.e 85-58229rd Jall
stantsn e 3ByiceeMaxwel eg0 rtl341 vol oPloofdaC oO E tas fs Exerene Hous Progra Souther Vas Ace850-528-65804
fter stena nS sh Wst Depty6er A lctul:6 StteTlo nlahasseeFloridna. e pe / n Keepers Le d e rOsa so m eda @e s
8.4etond at, a d OIstanc lof T E LW O FIES O Mallede In-County Sub-E Dated atV Aplahcoa Wheel & Ot her o n utnti one sll nts etlunt.7 5
4ere eu ALA TOOZS srpiens:tte nP bthis20 h day offl Apply Wihi "'eekni ra nraC n ass e loHttn~src
BEGIhINd S dhtane TFREYFR LAA e e35 Octoberl1,2009 (850) 653919 (AS nngrnzcuw n ulyqulou-t OB6 X
utsai 49IN seond BEast,- Fa luget o : SUITEao 410e Brachelr on er cArssocae De

Ingc heeOK6 DIT melchcl M&a narbl A~ cnat na Salln y Funihe 7160s
oerde 1 iuesBo 632 Pages I blareF ahprsndit aLM mElders Carte Servics, at Upsair studioW OM
1931,ofd Eathe a PublincRe accom odato neen soruato 85092-554 orD emalCA Qult octio, atr
ordsCORIN of Gadde Conyt priiat ntispoesterm pesbigbend orgeecti Inld. ~ Walk to6hSte
Forida.2 ceedin younc are aa etmer3 09 NTC NERFCI PL T80 RYAE#3 sm enited donon $700ece mo. plusa Forage Sarele


tntegranscr0 coasd s3 toRDDNLTOK tseU dmM Lrai 10R become a CorrectionsD Ofcr Reste So an Te d
632,Ps age37, h itne workingn dayseo ofcu yourT re- *COOKSN 6120A Sot LibertyY County. Wlll t
PulcRcrsof Gads-ft ceptofths otc ofut Satle; Avrae you ropead for09 aLRD areer change? Do you0P wan to rai for aL caree wth an~~a8s *HOST sell to hninghs ofe Cat op-
67denre Coun Florida 1-800-55-877 (TDRD) for h tions ofigPee-UE HN 5-6721 idie Cnevt ownly"eer.Tlferm ps
Padercels2 mns 2 1-800-955-8770,iain Fodan BLUE PARROT larg enoghdonay
Relay Service. d Nrrettiollnal 0fIcer Basi Standards course, atth GlfFnk enter HIRIN $16 wk0 elec Saelte e t. Owner mut old
Lot ~ers 6,Bok"BBL O tober 1, rlu 8, o 2009 Poleas applHwy in 21 peso arbge Incuded pol frst wtrus aded
PeOINT EaSTAE, a ac- 4159Td beginsn Octbe 27 ewen9-p dy al. 2X5dekwt 506747
cording tole the map, orhe plat NAMEm UNDER FITI a9 week@n Beuiu ve.Cl
Bok 5.2 Pagets) 43,nc Publi SUAN TOin SECTIO St. Georges IslandonBgpr- hmewes es
Records ofpet Frankli 8650 FLOID STAT-in *o A UntedStaes itien
75~ ~ ~ 19re 2 iue 4 a ymears of agpes torsnm olde SIL TEt.,fne akad e Georgeditonl$80
An e rsond t ca imingan I-N TC I EEY| 41 0 |Iln
tees in.4 fethe surplus from GENtht thle uner .li -veagea higscoo dipHlomate or GED 2 br, 1 ba, beeie satellte
th alI ay thrtan sgnd esrn t n age al POSTA &5 OYT. J OB u itilIncl $250/wk, 12x iIDqivARN
theprpetyowerasofin business under the fit- *G505g0 orale chrac, nther INFO FOR SALE 50 te dek 50-653511 RECREw pl0NAL
Sothe 8 da e o te Is pemnd- tosal nfFameln nh oft LIHT 8100-Aantiqe&Collctble
withinsxt (60 dayo s Eat adCruafter VICES locatedan, loi atw POep in Boxs utlltes 85 28 812 0 ber SpotstliyVe hie s
dithsale 1, nte Cont of.3 *et Baled ablse Cuto pass 8 a bckrond t investigton Aphyical in afdu0 ,1 ,al ,ane 810 rucks le
Frankly tin Inthe Cty of Apa- . 8140 Vans
DThED: Septh 4dgemer 8,lciclFlrd, 22 Sbamipin Satio ad the Floid a Ba s ich Abliie Test Yo NVE hv t py 6 3 |ila -rhe omm85652-
2009 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~~vso Intnd toprain reitrtesi orIfrainaot 10-At a
NIHOAS TOMS perw nshen Divl onldoa Interaestd Please clomiDpletme th advnc prga ppiainfdrlor postajobs 8210- & essrie
ferko t Circui Court 8 spsa D epyl ri aState, Talla- ia ca i rtiin assisane, mlriay lob via lt u lfe caat" otc i nw
oD eputyler Datednc at Aplcioale appilnt S. Therederal Arade ('arrabellebPs o sidew od B Is Docks
Garvin B.t Bowene Esqt Floridas this 25th Frd day of1 isy Ameic sp l consume floors"d Re thruhuil $950n c 8310a AiltrlcratAv ind
GardnrBstWenrSetmere 200 Gette state today Contac Lon ros t8077323o i proection agMtiaeny& Furnished 56-592-178 orh 8320e -Arilf odveicgle
Wacodsworsth & Boden,, P TONYFO LI-A.eae:5 October09 80)65-19 ar 1,iida 200 850e-25D~Y71-68 833~os $50 O Camer & Trale
Ta ahbass ee F ord; 32308e ST WA cu l:3 3ln M ENTP OFion 1 8 7 F C-HELP Lana~p rk Vi lage C al o rn er lt
4153T MAAGMET Apubicsevc St. ln br0 1. baK allD tileon | 8110e sil
PUBLI4 sCod at SALE 1 Bandhelo NesHrad py someutilties $1,19 poetdow $6,9100 tta
Publiation Copet nyo these3 proram in one yea or less Classifeddvfertsn 40m $0/e.0 ners 1-79Dy

c~~lltyq~ Act 83.028380 129di ComeceSt
the hinghe stm bderas) o Pblcaio Number:ion & Iar Ir Interest 215169 alih
may p teo retaIn thiia e c- 027-600 Eregec Medica Tehica e stt.,AtoFnacng9m/p
PaaedcfrlcnsdM'ny Janaly Dode Po natia Gr coqa {9095ptar sudo p
108, S.g E.de Ave. Aevs Ineet25179Dyih
193, f te ubic ec acourgicalI ode Technology4 Carraemlle Fue oridatn 32322. AuoFnnina/p
ords of Gadsden County, Heste wwwesbgendo elestrecIc'.com k t
Licensed Prctca Nurseit (onl avaiabl atGC* Bdoo Bt
ceeen fille ar1n Assistant do..nlyn v.0 nesol plu FoC I 3Bedoo
Unurise Duplex......................... $650.00 Ford F150 X/cab 199
,, ~ poiso .. Magnnasl- C eeti Roancare Imaing (Advancd s Certifiateforapprove imgn prfesinas u sImMh ile Hoe ayVe.$800 / ton25,9769D
3ha Bedroom 20 Bath lihtAuo nncn


Unfurnished house on 1/2 acre ....... $1000.00 9am/9pm
Household Help r Candace All the programs listed above are limited access. Request an information packet today. Visit 3 Bedroom 3 Bath
Reliable mature lady w/ 1 I Unfurnished Condo with pool........... $750.00
references. To take care of Canadian Beauty I www.gulfcoast.edu or contact Craig Wise at 850.913.3311. 1Bedroom
children, elderly & animals. 784-8188 Furnished Apt, End unit, Bay view... $500.00
Some errands, drive to * * * * *Gulf/Franklin Center(GFC) is located in Port St.Joe, Florida. Call 850.227.9670for more information. 2 Bedroom
pa pts. shopping etc. Light r - - - *g Furmshed Apt, End Unit, Bay view.. $500.00 COMPLETE PACKAGES


housekeeping, cooking If I VIISty I
necessary. Day & nights. Hot Young Blonde!
Call 850-459 0497. 769-2299 I



Brazilian Bambi ,
Is Back on the Free Foreclosure Listngs
7 ba~cO0 1 400 000++ P oertleN Nal
76-.4 ........... 80-68101


I


111111111 IIL1l


2 Bedroom FROM
Furnished Apt, End~n Unit, Carport..... $525.00 $4,9
3 Bedroom 1 Bath4 9 5
Furnished Apt, Wkly/3 day min...$650.00 wk
1 Bedroom All Welded,
Furnished Apt... ................. $500.00 All Aluminum Boats
3 Bedroom 3Bath
Furnished Condo/Pool ....... ....$500.00 Wk OPEN HOUSE
2 Bedroom 1 Bath HP FI
Unfurnished Apt................................ $500.00* *
Beach front houses with witer rates. Coe aody

PLEASE CALL JOANN 850-697-9604 www.xtremeindustries.com
OR 850-323-0444 FOR RENTALS.










WWW.APALAC TIME S.COM








Temperature
Date High Low % Precip
Tu,0ct 1 820 660 09'
Fri, Oct 2 830 720 20%
Sat, Oct 3 820 690 40%
Sun, Oct 4 840 710 209'
Mon, Oct 5 840 710 10%
Tue, Oct 6 840 720 10%
WeOct 7 840 720 30%
T/DE TABLES
MONTHLY AVERAGES
o find the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times
rmthose given for APALACHICOLA:
HigH Low
atPoint Minus0:40 Minus 1:17
atPass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27a
o find the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times
rmthose given for CARRABELLE:
HigH Low
aId Point Minus 9:15 Minus 0:03

APALACHICOLA


1998 3 br/2 ba, 28X68 Cavalier MH
on 100x142 lot Living room, separate family
room w/stone fireplace. Kitchen and dining
room have wood floors

$79,000 for more
information
call (aso) ass-2oss or
(850) 323-0107
ask for Sam.


-61 8 210'
428 Ave A in Eastpoint, FL 32323
'00
Mobile Home Pad Cooking Area &
Table, Large Oak Trees, Fully Fenced
Yard, Power. 1 Block From The Bay.


10/01 Thu 01:44AM 2.6 H 06:54AM 1.4 L
01:24PM 2.7 H 07:20PM 1.1 L
10/02 Fri 01:57AM 2.7 H 07:31AM 1.1 L
02:19PM 2.7 H 07:46PM 1.3 L
10/03 Sat 02:09AM 2.7 H 08:05AM 0.8 L
03:12PM 2.7 H 08:09PM 1.6 L
10/04 Sun 02:21AM 2.9 H 08:37AM 0.6 L
04:04PM 2.7 H 08:31PM 1.8 L
10/05 Mon 02:37AM 2.9 H 09:09AM 0.3 L
04:58PM 2.7 H 08:53PM 1.9 L
10/06 Tue 02:58AM 3.0 H 09:44AM 0.2 L
05:57PM 2.7 H 09:15PM 2.2 L
10/07 Wed 03:24AM 3.2 H 10:26AM 0.2 L
07:05PM 2.6 H 09:38PM 2.4 L

SO LUNAR
m = Minor M = Major add 1 hour for daylight savings
Date Day AM PM Rise/Set Moon
10/01 Thu m 2:20 m 2:35 5:53AM
M 8:25 M 8:45 5:46PM
10/02 Fri m 3:00 m 3:15 5:54AM
M 9:05 M 9:25 5:45PM
10/03 Sat m 3:40 m 3:50 5:54AM
M 9:40 M 10:05 5:43PM
10/04 Sun m 4:20 m 4:30 5:55AM
M 10:20 M 10:45 5:42PM
10/05 Mon m 5:00 m 5:25 5:55AM
M 11:15 M 11:45 5:41 PM
10/06 Tue m 6:00 m 6:30 5:56AM
M M 12:10 5:40PM
10/07 Wed m 6:50 m 7:20 5:57AM
M 12:40 M 1:05 5:39PM


Our local real estate experts

have identified what they feel
are the best values around

and are offering them to

you in Real Estate Picks! (In
this section), Discover the

best real estate values in

Mexico Beach, Port St. Joe,

Apalachicola, Cape San Blas,
St. George Island, Carrabelle

and surrounding areas.


___


CANAL FRONT
LOT


Deep water with
dock, this .42 acre
lotiseasilytraversed
with a few pines and grasses, water frontage is 35
feet & road frontage is 90 feet, irregular shape,
big boats use this waterway, 3 feet at low tide, this
natural inlet leads to the Apalachicola Bay. Lot is
accessible on West Sawyer but canal is at the end
of 12 Street by the Plantation. Owner Financing
Available.


Ille Avenues at lIeougli 3 Landing
Carrallelle's newest "Green-Certifiell" sulilivision
3BR/2BA 1980 sil. ft. brand new home w/garage. Open floor plan
with Vaulted and Trey ceilings. Master Both has Double Vanity
Sinks, Separate Shower and Whirlpool Tub. Custom Cabinetry and
Stainless Steel Appliance Package Included.
For more information, call (850) 656-2608

o: r emiinflie : "h-c~c

homesites still available


S Ge~oge Islan \


Thursday, October 1, 2009


Local


10/01 Thu 03:09AM
02:49PM
10/02 Fri 03:22AM
03:44PM
10/03 Sat 03:34AM
04:37PM
10/04 Sun 03:46AM
05:29PM
10/05 Mon 04:02AM
06:23PM
10/06 Tue 04:23AM
07:22PM
10/07 Wed 04:49AM
08:30PM


09:07AM
09:33PM
09:44AM
09:59PM
10:18AM
10:22PM
10:50AM
10:44PM
11:22AM
11:06PM
11:57AM
11:28PM
12:39PM
11:51PM


genus Asclepias. From
these plants they acquire
and store toxins that help
protect them from preda-
tors. Although these
plants may have other in-
sect problems, remember
that using insecticides on
them will harm the cater-
pillar.
Another way to help
this amazing creature is
to get involved in mon-
arch migration research.
A tagging program was
initiated by E A. Urquhart
of the Royal Ontario Mu-
seum in the 1950s and is
continued to this day. It
allows scientists to deter-
mine the migration path
of monarchs.
To learn more about
tagging and the mon-
arch's migratory journey,
visit the Panhandle But-
terfly House's 3rd An-
nual Monarch Madness
Festival in Navarre on
Oct. 9-11. You will be able
to stroll through a mon-
arch waystation and a
limited number of tags
will be available for chil-
dren to apply.
For more information,
visit their Web site at
www.panhandlebutterfly-
house.org


By Theresa Iriday

Every fall, a magical
event takes place in the
animal world. A small, yet
amazing, creature may be
traveling over your own
head right now or visiting
your backyard on a mys-
tical journey home. The
annual monarch butterfly
migration to Mexico is un-
der way.
In the entire world, no
butterflies migrate like
the monarchs of North
America. They travel
much farther than all oth-
er tropical butterflies, up
to three thousand miles.
They are the only butter-
flies to make such a long,
two way migration every
year. Amazingly, they fly
in masses to the same
winter roosts, often to the
exact same trees,
Their migration is
more the type we expect
from birds or whales.
However, unlike birds and
whales, individual mon-
archs make only a part
of the trip. It is their chil-
dren's grandchildren that
return south the following
fall.
By instinct alone, the
butterflies go to the same


born knowing everything
they need to survive.
But, reports from the
experts say that it is al-
ready clear that the 2009
migration will be smaller
than any seen since the
fall of 2004, a migration
that resulted mn an all-
time low overwintering
population in Mexico.
The overwintering
population this winter will
be affected by a long term
drought that has per-
sisted in much of Texas
and northeastern Mexico.
Monarchs are highly de-
pendent on nectar and
sources of water to fuel
the migration through
this region in October and
November. If the drought
persists and nectar re-
sources are scarce dur-
ing the migration period,
the number of monarchs
reaching the overwinter-
ing sites will be reduced.
Plant nectar is the
fuel for the butterflies'
fat which is critical to
their survival for the win-


monarchs stop to feed on
plant nectar, and they ac-
tually gain weight during
the trip!
How can you help this
beautiful butterfly? You
can create, conserve and
protect monarch habitats.
It's really very easy to cre-
ate a monarch waystation
- a resting and feeding
area along their migra-
tory route. The first step
is to learn about butter-
fly gardening. There are
many references to help
you including the Uni-
versity of Florida online
publication on Butterfly
Gardening at http://edis.
ifas.ufl.edu/UW057.
One of the most im-
portant plants in your
monarch waystation is
milkweed. Adults feed on
nectar from all varieties
of milkweeds. They will
also visit other flowers
including goldenrod, iron-
weed and tickseed sun-
flower. The caterpillars,
on the other hand, feed
only on milkweeds of the


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If
,: Eilil1


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(MLS#233569


$299,900 St. George Islan;F


B8 | The Times


Fridav's GARDEN


Monarch migration is under way


mountains that their an- ter. This fat not only fu-
cestors left the previous els their long flight, but
spring. Somehow, they must last until the next
find a place in Mexico that spring when they begin
they've never seen before. the flight back north. As
Monarch butterflies are they migrate southwards,


John Shelby, Broker Lea A ~ uu~ay *

"""' 1850-227-1278
WWW.sgirealty.coml I




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