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Group Title: Apalachicola times
Title: The Apalachicola times
ALL ISSUES CITATION PDF VIEWER THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100380/00038
 Material Information
Title: The Apalachicola times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: H.W. Johnston
Place of Publication: Apalachicola Fla
Apalachicola Fla
Publication Date: August 6, 2009
Copyright Date: 2008
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States of America -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1885.
General Note: Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00100380
Volume ID: VID00038
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 32911693
lccn - sn 95026907
 Related Items
Preceded by: Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by: Apalachicola herald

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Thursday, AUGUST 6, 2009 ww w .apalach times .com 50(




Parents to have say in sparing the rod


I


YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER FOR MORE THAN 120 YEARS


VOL. 124 ISSUE 15


By David Adlerstein
Times City Editor
The Franklin County School
Board has decided to give par-
ents of elementary school aged
students a say in whether their
child is subject to corporal pun-
ishment.
In approving several revisions
to the entire 2009-10 code of con-


duct, board members defeated
an attempt by Board Member
David Hinton that would have
not required the school principal,
or his designee, to have a consent
form signed by the parent before
administering corporal punish-
ment.
"We ought to allow teachers
to do what state law allows them
to do," said Hinton, at the work-


shop on the code of conduct held
last month. "Conservative values
lead to corporal punishment.
"If the law says we can do it,
why should we have to have it
signed by the parent?" said Hin-
ton, adding that he was not op-
posed to a principal's decision to
forego paddling, just against the
board going further than state
law requires in the code.


"I feel the subject in the State
of Florida has been addressed
and the state has come up with
a statute that they feel is fair and
right," he said. "I am sure there
are a percentage of people who
want to water it (rules allowing
corporal punishment) down. I
want to stay right with the stat-
ute, just exactly what it says.
"I'm not trying to say I want


everybody to work on kids," he
said.
Brenda Wilson, director of
school improvement and spe-
cial programs, revised the code
of conduct based on input from
teachers, administrators and the
board. "They would have a form
to show they agree to corporal
See PARENTS AS


By David Adlerstein
Times City Editor

Because of a glitch in
the computer software, the
property appraiser's office
has been forced to revise
downward the combined
value of Franklin County
property.
On Friday, the Florida
Department of Revenue
approved the county's tax
roll for the 2009-10 budget
year at nearly $2.78 billion'
about 19.4 percent below
last year's valuation of


$3.45 billion.
Property Appraiser Doris
Pendleton said the revisal
downward from preliminary
property value numbers sub-
mitted in early July was con-
nected with the computer
software company's ability
to handle the last phase of
implementation of Amend-
ment 1 for about 29 Florida
counties. That phase places
a 10 percent limitation on
property value increases
for all property that is not
homestead exempted and
See TAX BASE AS


Allen Feifer, left, representing the Concerned Citizens
of Franklin County, shares a laugh with Property
Appraiser Doris Pendleton at the July 23 county
budget workshop.


Sheriffcandidate's

wife embroiled in

Okaloosa case


By Toni Mclaughlin
end Andrew Gent
Florida Freedom Newspapers
The estranged wife of
Bruce Barnes, Republi-
can candidate for
Franklin County
sheriff in 2004 and
2008, is one of six .
individuals charged .
last week in a wide-
ranging indictment r
alleging a "crimi-
nal enterprise" by
former Okaloosa SAB
County Sherriff THORI
Charlie Morris and
five of his staffers.
Morris and four mem-
bers of his administrative
staff face state racketeer-
ing charges for their roles.
A sixth, Sabra Thornton,
Barnes' wife, is identified
as Morris' mistress, and
has been charged with
grand theft.
In a detailed charging


12FREEDO1
0 1 PA ERS NTER CT


document made public
July 30, state prosecutors
said the Okaloosa County
Sheriff's Office (OCSO)
from 2006 to 2009 operated
as a criminal enterprise at


its highest levels,
with the sheriff us-
ing public money
to buy gifts and pay
off thousands of
dollars in debt for
a top female em-
ployee, Thornton,
his former chief of
staff.
The other four
are accused of help-
ing keep it quiet.


Thornton drew a large
salary from the Sheriff's
Office even though "there
was no evidence that (she)
performed any work," the
charging document said.
"This is a tragedy that
is very significant, because
See OKALOOSA AS

DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK:

VE Casifiedd Dirpa idr a day aill1a.mn.
Classified Line Ad Monday ai5 p.mn.


DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times


Phone: 850-653-8868
Web site: apalachtimes.com
E-mail: timesnews~,starfl.com
Fax: 850-653-8036


Letters to the Editor. ....... ... A4
Sheriff's Report. .......... ... B5
ChurchNews......................... B3


SocietyNews .......... .....
Tide Chart ................... ....... Al
Classifieds ................... ..... B6-li


Apalachicola

Carrabelle


S


Send-off

to summer

LIFE TIMES|I B1


County's tax base


dronsfurther


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TABLE OF CONTENTS


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Thursday, August 6, 2009


A2 | The Times


Local


consumers during the pro-
ceedings.
Two members of the
five-member PSC, Lisa Po-
lack Edgar and Katrina J.
McMurrian, were on hand,
while a third PSC commis-
sioner, Nancy Argenziano,
attended by phone.
This was the last in a
series of nine hearings
held across the state to al-
low the PSC to hear public
response to a rate hike re-
quested by Progress En-
ergy in May.
Utility rates are set by
the PSC. Progress has
asked to increase its basic
electric rates by approxi-
mately $500 million annu-
ally. For a residential cus-
tomer using the base rate
of 1,000 Kwh per month,
Progress' proposal will re-
sult in an increase of $13.83
per month, or a 31.5 percent
above current rates.
Customer bills are cal-
culated based upon a com-
bination of basic rates and
fuel charges. Only the base
rate portion of a custom-
er's power bill, which now
amounts to approximately


Gander said that the
consolidated school paid
$270,000 in electric bills
during the last school yer
He warned that increased
power costs might lead to
cuts to in the classroom
and layoffs of teachers and
Other school staff.
'Does Progress Energy
have anything in place for
the people who cannot pay
this?" Webb asked.
Florida's Public Coun-
sel, Florida's Attorney
General, the Florida Indus-
trial Power User's Group,
the Florida Retail Federa-
tion and others have inter-
vened in the case before
the PSC and are expected
to oppose many, if not all, of
the company's numerous
proposals.
Schef Wright, attorney
for the Florida Retail Fed-
eration was also at the
meeting, and said his orga-
nization, which represents
firms like Publix, WalMart
and Target, opposed the
rate hike.


Why pay for the
p ant up front?

Progress plans to build
two additional nuclear
power plants in Florida and
wants to raise money for
the construction by raising
its rates. Many consumers
said this was greedy and
unfair.
"How can a big com-
pany like this ask its cus-
tomers to pay for a capital
investment?" asked Phil
Calandra, of St. George Is-
land. "They have no risk or
cost of sales. Their capital
facilities are predictable.
They should have planned
ahead to purchase the
plants out of operation in-
come. We have no guaran-
tee that the plant will ever
be built."
Ned Pooser, of Och-
locknee Bay, said Prog-
ress should not need to
increase the burden on its
customers. He pointed out
that Progress is a Fortune
500 company with $9 billion
in earnings annually.
"Do you know how long
itwould take to spend $9 bil-
lion?" he asked. "If you had
started spending $10,000 a
day when Christ walked the
Earth, you would still have
to keep spending $10,000
for another 460 years from
now. There is no financial
justification for this. It's
monopolistic greed."
Donald Rozhon a re-
tired employee of Peoples
Energy in Chicago and now
of Eastpoint, asked "Why
should we have to pay for
this plant up front?"
He pointed out that
Progress is in robust fi-
nancial health, noting that
Progress' rate of quarterly
revenue growth was 18.2
percent compared to the
industry average of 6.5
percent. Quarterly reve-
nue growth is the increase
of a company's sales when
compared to a previous
quarter's revenue perfor-
mance.
Many speakers ex-
pressed concerns about
peoples' ability to pay high-
er bills.
Karen Foley, of East-
point, said she cleans
houses on the island for
a living. She said she was
afraid that higher power
bills would mean fewer va-
cationers.
Beth Moseley, of East-
point, spoke on behalf of
the First Baptist Church
of St. George Island. She
said that the increases had
already affected many el-
derly people in the commu-
nity. "It hurts them to have
to ask for help," she said.
Ronald Page, of Apala-
chicola, past president of
the Franklin County Sea-
food Workers Association
Complained that Progress
is, "bleeding the county
dry."
Ken LaPaz, owner of Hog
Wild in Carrabelle said he
saw a 60 percent increase in


his power bill between Jan,
2008 and Jan. 2009. "The
trickle-down effect is going

See PROGRESS Al 0


DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times
County Commissioner Bevin Putnal appeals to the Public Service Commission not to raise Progress Energy
rates.


44 percent of the total bill,
would go up.
Thel and other miscel-
laneous charges comprise
about 56 percent of custom-
er bills and are adjusted
each January based on the


actual cost of fuel and oth-
er charges that Progress
projects for the coming
year. Since the proposed
increase affects only the
base rate, a consumer that
now pays $127.31 would pay


$135.79 if the rate i
passes.
Glenn spoke ear
proceedings. He
the PSC for the opp
to speak and ackno
that, "There is no ge


increase to ask for an increased
rate. Nobody wants to pay
ly in the more for electric power or
thanked any thing else."
lortunity He said that the rate
wledged increase was necessary to
ood time maintain the infrastruc-
ture of Progress pointing
out that the company had
just spent $300 million
to "replace the guts" of
the nuclear power plant
at Crystal River. He that
money was needed to ex-
pand Progress' power pro-
ducing capacity to meet
future demands.


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PROGRESS from paoe Al


need to know
what you think"

Rehwinkel said Prog-
ress was asking for an un-
reasonable rate increase.
He said the hearings would
decide, "The difference
between what Progress
Energy wants and what is
fair."
He said that, compared
to the 10.3 percent average
profit allowance for elec-
tric companies nationwide,
the 12.5 percent requested
by Progress was exces-
sive and unfair. He also de-
manded that $700 in depre-
ciation funds he said had
been overcollected from
customers be returned.
Depreciation charges are
among miscellaneous fees
utility companies can col-
lect from customers, and
are meant to defer the
cost of replacing old equip-
ment.
After the opposing at-
torneys spoke, Bradley
told the audience, "It's
important that as many of
you as possible testify. In
order to represent you at
these hearings, we need to
know what you think."
County Commissioners
Pinki Jackel, Bevin Putnal,
Smokey Parrish and Cher-
yl Sanders were present.
Apalachicola Commission-
ers Frank Cook and Valen-
tina Webb attended, as did
School Board Chairman
Jimmy Gander and Tax
Collector Jimmy Harris.
Each of the local officials
made a short statement at
the beginning of the pro-
ceedings.
'All of the people I have
spoken to in Franklin
County are opposed to this
rate hike," Parrish told the
PSC as the opening speak-
er. "A lot of people in this
county can't afford a rate
increase."
He displayed a $600
electric bill received by an
81-year-old on a fixed in-
come. He also presented
the PSC with a letter from
the county commission
officially opposing the in-
creased rates.
Parrish asked the audi-
ence to raise their hands if
they opposed the rate hike
and the entire assembly
stood with hands raised.
The gesture was later re-
peated by several speak-
ers.
"People will suffer and
some may die because of
this," Putnal told the PSC,
"It's that serious."
Cook said that an in-
crease in energy fees had
a multiplying effect, since
the increased costs to busi-
nesses were passed on to
Consumers.





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Former St. George Island Bombing Range


The Department of Defense (DoD) conducted live-fire training and testing of weapon systems

at active and former military installations throughout the United States to ensure force readiness

and defend our nation. As directed by the U.S. Congress, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

manages the Military Munitions Response Program (MMRP) for the DoD. Under that program,
the Corps assigns priorities to defense sites containing suspected ordnance, discarded military

munitions and/or munitions constituents, based on various factors relating to the potential for

public safety and environmental hazards.


The Corps' Jacksonville District is in the process of investigating the former St. George Island

Bombing Range, Franklin County, Florida. This site was used for training combat aircrews from

1942 through 1946.



The Corps recently completed a site inspection at the former St. George Island Bombing Range.

The evaluation criteria, including types of munitions that may be present, ease of access to the

site and number of people living near the site, will be available for public review at the U.S.

Army Corps of Engineers, 701 San Marco Blvd., Jacksonville, FL 32207.



As part of our ongoing investigation, we are seeking additional information from the public
about the former St. George Island Bombing Range (located approximately eight miles south

of the city of Apalachicola, Florida). If you have information, please send it to: Charles Fales,

Project Manager, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, 701 San Marco Blvd., Jacksonville, FL 32207

or by email to:
PublicMail.CESAJ-CC @saj02.usace.army.mil.



For further information, please contact the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Corporate Communi-
cation Office at 904-232-1576.


IV


Thursday, August 6, 2009


Local


The Times | A3


By Lois Swoboda
Times Staff Writer

At their Aug 4 meeting,
county commissioners
voted 3-to-2 to purchase 50
acres of land at the Apala-
chicola Regional Airport to
act as a buffer zone for the
primary runway.
The purchase has been
hotly contested over sev-
eral months. Three earlier
commission votes were in-
conclusive, as Commission
Chairman Smokey Parrish
recused himself, because
the land in question was
the property of a partner-
ship, DSW Holdings, whose
principals include his em-
ployer.


The other four commis-
sioners continued to split,
with Bevin Putnal and
Noah Lockley in favor, and
Cheryl Sanders and Pinki
Jackel opposed.
On July 25, Parrish ap-
peared before the Florida
Commission on Ethics at
his own request to address
questions about whether
his vote on the land pur-
chase constituted a conflict
of interest.
In the published adviso-
ry opinion of the commis-
sion, no conflict of interest
existed because the sale
would not "inure to the spe-
cial private gain or loss" of
Parrish. "Regarding the
seafood company for which


(Parrish) works, the facts
presented do not indicate
that it would be directly
affected by any sale/lack
of sale of the land," they
wrote.
On 'lI~esday, Parrish
joined the majority in buy-
ing the property from Dan
Garlick, who had since
bought the land from DSW.
The commission pur-
chased the land for $9,000
an acre, contingent on
funds being available. They
also agreed to provide
Garlick with a letter which
would allow him to take a
possible charitable dona-
tion deduction on the sale.
The land will be used for
Phases I and II of a project


to create a buffer zone at
the end of runway 13-31,
the airport's principal run-
way.
Jackel has consistently
questioned the land's ap-
praised value, which has
ranged from $9,038 to
$12,749 per acre. The origi-
nal asking price had been
lowered by $1,000 an acre.
At Tuesday's meeting,
the purchase came up for a
fourth vote. Initially, Sand-
ers moved that the com-
mission purchase the land
for $7,500 per acre. Jackel
seconded the motion.
Putnal asked Garlick if
he would sell the land at
that price. Garlick said he
could not sell the land for


less than he paid for it.
"I can't vote for this be-
cause he said he won't sell
it for that," said Putnal.
Parrish said he believed
that purchasing the land
for anything less than the
appraised price constituted
a "taking."
"I think we should pay
the appraised market
value,' he said. "When we
purchased the property for
the clinic in Carrabelle and
the Lombardi property, we
paid fair market value. We
normally deal in apprais-
als."
Sanders said, "I have a
problem with the charita-
ble deduction and I have a
problem with the price."
Putnal said, "Do you
know where the money for
this is coming from if we
lose the grant? The taxpay-
ers, or we lose the airport."
Jackel asked Garlick
why he recently resigned
from the Airport's Board of
Advisors.
Garlick said he resigned


July 25 because he foresaw
possible conflicts of inter-
est on upcoming engineer-
ing projects.
"My focus all along was
the welfare of the airport
and the county. I saw the
original owners about to
walk away. I bought it for
$9,000," he said. I'm not
making a penny on this.
You have a chance to pro-
tect the airport, wetlands
and uplands and control
runoff into the bay. What
more can you ask?"
The purchase will be
jointly funded by the Feder-
al Aviation Authority, which
provided 95 percent of the
grant and the Federal De-
partment of 11~ansportation
(DOT), which provided the
other 5 percent. Because
the county is eligible for
economic development
funding, it was not required
to provide any matching
funds for the purchase.
The FAA also paid for clos-
ing costs, surveys and ap-
praisals.


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County splits in buy of airport buffer land


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Summertime, and the school year is nearing


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* 'Y


A4 | The Times


Thursday, August 6, 2009


There are people who think
teachers have a sweet deal. Our
official work day is only 7.25
hours. We get the same breaks
as the kids and 10 additional paid
sick or personal leave days.
We also have more than
two months in summer with
no students.
Some take that
opportunity .
to travel, visit
relatives or even
get a second
job. They have ..
to make difficult
choices because
the summer RED WHITE
is chock-full of AND ROUX
professional Denise Roux
development
training workshops. We are
paid to attend, and if we don't,
there is no retribution. The
administration realizes that
people make vacation plans and
have lives outside school.
However, if we want to hit
the ground running on the first
day of classes, the knowledge
from the summer training
opportunities is essential.
These are not abstract


educational theory classes. Most
often we are learning some new
technology or taking a crash
course on a recently purchased,
privately produced curriculum
we have to teach next year.
I recently received
instruction on how to use a
new student database called
Dashboard. It promises to be a
fantastic resource for student
performance records and parent
contact information. I look
forward to using it.
Then, last week I attended
two days of classes on how to
teach "Language." This is a
scripted program designed
for struggling readers. It was
created by a company named
Sopris West. From my brief
exposure, I liked it, although
my learning curve on how to
implement it daily will be fairly
steep. Some of our teachers
used it last year. Previously,
intensive reading classes used
Scholastic's Read 180. That
amazingly expensive program
provided only mixed success.
School districts everywhere
are pushing to find ways to meet
the mandates of No Child Left


Representatives from his office
were a regular presence at
school last year, and even though
we improved a letter grade, we
expect them again this year. We
all gotta meet that AYP (annual
yearly progress) mandated by
NCLB.
We are holding our collective
breaths until we hear what kind
of oversight and requirements
the Department of Education
will impose.
Plus, I have a writing
workshop in Chipley on Friday,
Aug. 14. I think I know how
to teach kids to write, but
I'm always open to learning
something new.
This is the most stressful
time of year for me. I have spent
the summer searching for lesson
plans, designing a syllabus for
my Speech class (no textbooks,
no materials) and worrying. I
think I'm looking at four different
class preparations.
Add into the mix the new
buzz words differentiated
instruction, or DI. I couldn't
attend those training because
I promised to help out with
summer school. It seems that


we are to customize teaching
according to the individual
student's needs. Desks in a
row are verboten. Whole class
instruction is only part of the
picture.
I'm trying to keep an open
mind. A certain amount of DI
already occurs in my classroom.
Because I missed the training,
I've spent hours on the
Internet getting advice from
Other teachers and ideas for
implementation.
Just to recap, I have a new
data retrieval system, a new
intensive reading curriculum,
a push for differentiated
instruction and oversight
from the state Department of
Education,
Do you still think teaching is a
sweet deal?
I do. I get to spend every
day with my kids, and I know I
am doing a little bit of good out
there.

Denise Roux is a regular
columnist for the Apalachicola
and Carrabelle Times. 'lb reach
her e-mail her at rouxwhit@
mchsi.com.


Behind (NCLB). Private industry
has stepped up, providing
numerous programs promising
success if the protocol of their
carefully crafted, scientifically
designed curriculum is strictly
followed. We'll see.
There is a data analysis
workshop on Friday, Aug. 7.
Teachers are supposed to go
back to school a week ahead
of the kids on Monday, Aug. 17.
The reality is that we go back on
Monday, Aug. 10 for training with
the Department of Education.
Nikolai Vitti, deputy chancellor
of school improvement and
student achievement, is the
point man for these meetings.


Carrabelle should
be disappointed
in OfficialS
According to The
Florida League of
Cities' definition and
guidelines, the roles and
responsibilities of the
members of the elected
body include...
Constituent
Representative: As
with all representative
democracies, the
mayor or council
members (also called
commissioners) are the
direct representative
of the citizens and
are responsible to the
citizenry. This may
include interceding
for a citizen on a
service matter to any
governmental entity
or carrying forward
a citizen's position on
issues...
*Advocate: Whether
for the council member's
own goals for the city,
or in representing the
municipality before the
county, school board,
state, regional and
national governments,
and public-private
ventures, the elected
officials also serve as
advocates.

As I understand the
primary role of an elected
official, it is to "represent"
the people who elected
them, and indeed to
"represent" all of their
constituency in important
public matters.


The citizens of
Carrabelle should be
very disappointed, and
perhaps even justly
angry that none of the
elected City of Carrabelle
officials raised their
voice on behalf of
Carrabelle citizens at
the public hearing on
July 30 before the Public
Service Commission in
Apalachicola. There was
no one present in an
official role to "represent"
Carrabelle constituents.
(To the contrary, the
City of Apalachicola had
several City Commission
representatives present
to speak on behalf of their
own citizens.)
Although two of the
current City of Carrabelle
commissioners have full
time jobs, and may have
been unable to appear due
to their work schedules,
and possible conflict
of interest concerns,
it is sad that the other
three commissioners
(including the Mayor)
decided it was not
necessary for them to
"represent" the citizens
of the City of Carrabelle
at that important public
meeting.
The subject
of the Progress
Energy hearing was a
proposed 31.5 percent
rate increase scheduled
to begin in January 2010.
(The impact on customers
using 1000 KWH is
estimated to be $13.83
per month, a 31.5 percent
increase in the base
charges. Most customers


use much more than 1,000
KWH per month.)
Fortunately,
many private citizens
joined with other Franklin
County elected officials
to speak against the
large proposed raise in
rates. But the citizens
of Carrabelle remained
officially voiceless. Their
representativesve' were
absent.
What should an
electorate expect from
their elected officials?
As City of Carrabelle
mayor, I regularly
attended county
commission meetings. I
attended public hearings
and often spoke on behalf
of the City of Carrabelle
issues, residents and
visitors. It was my
privilege to do so.
As an elected
public official, I believed
the citizens of Carrabelle
deserved to be well-
represented at all times.
I served proudly as the
city's representative at
local, regional and state
levels.
How sad for Carrabelle
that such official elected
representation was
missing on behalf of all its
citizens during this very
important July 30 local
Progress Energy public
hearing. The citizens of
Carrabelle, who elected
their current public
officials, deserved real
representation from those
same elected officials at
that public hearing. But
not one elected city official
raised their voice
to "represent" the City of
Carrabelle or the hard-
earned monies of their
constituents.
How sad for the city
electors that a proposed
31.5 percent utility
rate increase was left
unchallenged by any
elected Carrabelle official
on behalf of the citizens
he represents.


Is this the kind of
representation you want
or expect from your
elected officials?
Sincere thanks to
all those who did make
the effort to appear and
to speak against this
utility raise on behalf
of their constituents
and neighbors. Some
citizens had their
voices represented by
their elected public
officials. The citizens of
Carrabelle were not so
fortunate.
Mel Kelly
Proud Carrabelle mayor,
2005-07


BOSt-kept secret
in Faoln COUnty
If you've never been
to the Franklin County
Health Department, then
you have missed out.
Even though I have
really good health
insurance, I chose to go
to our Health Department
because the folks there
are tremendous and the
treatment superior. They
always try to help and
accommodate you in every
way possible. The facility
is clean, clean, clean and
efficient.
Hats off to all of you;
Vanessa, Elaine, Dana,
Sherry, Sissy, Dedee,
Crystal, Ms. Chambers,
the Doctors, the list is
endless. Here's to you
and all the others that
never stop caring for us
here in Franklin County.
And while we really miss
Helen, we know she isn't
far at the wonderful new
women's clinic in Gulf
County. We are so lucky
to have such a fabulous
facility here.
Thanks bunch to
all of you who make it
work so beautifully here
in Apalachicola and
Carrabelle.
Dixie Partington


Like many
folks, I recently
had an awkward
encounter with a
debt collector.
Someone had
stolen my credit
card number
and used it toJA
charge a hotel ALD~
stay. Thanks to my
card's zero liability policy,
the charges were quickly
reversed, and I didn't
have to pay anything.
But unbeknownst to me,
the thief had booked an
additional reservation, so
my cancelled card was
later charged a no-show
fee.
Long story short: After
trying to collect the $350
bill from the thief's non-
existent address, the hotel
turned the claim over
to a collection agency.
Fortunately, I was able
to unravel the mess and
got the unpaid collection
removed from my credit
report.
Not everyone is so
lucky, however. Although
the vast majority of
debt collectors operate
reputably, the Federal
Trade Commission
receives tens of thousands
of complaints each
year about overzealous
collectors overstepping
their legal bounds.
Here are a few
precautions you can take:
First, recognize that you
are responsible to pay off
legitimately incurred debt.
If you realize you might
have difficulty paying a
bill, however, proactively
contact the lender to
work out a payment plan.
Don't wait for them to
contact you and certainly
don't ignore their calls or
correspondence; that cud
harm your credit rating.
You have certain
rights whenever dealing
with debt collectors. For
exampbn lunde rbhr c s
Act, they cannot harass
you by:
*Using abusive
language or threatening
arrest.
*Calling before 8 a.m.
or after 9 p.m.
*Contacting you at
work if you tell them your
employer disapproves.
*Contacting others,
except to verify where you
live and work.
*Revealing to others
that you owe money.
Once a debt collector
contacts you:
*Get the names of the


person calling and
his/her agency, its
address and phone
number.
*Take detailed
notes of all
conversations,
correspondence
ONand pre-recorded
IMANI calls, noting
names, dates and
times.
*You may request that
all subsequent contact
be handled by mail. Send
this request and all
further correspondence
by certified mail, return
receipt requested.
*Request that all
conversations be followed-
up in writing.
*Document any
false, misleading or
harassing statements
and include them in your
correspondence.
*Ask for full details
about any debts the
collector claims you owe,
including dates, amounts,
lender's name, etc.
*Instruct that you be
the only person contacted,
unless you wish an
attorney to be involved.
*Retain all records
indefinitely in case of
future disputes.
*Have all agreed-to
repayment plan terms
verified in writing,
including promises to
remove or adjust reports
to your credit history.
If you feel you've been
targeted in error, tell
the collection agency, in
writing, that it has the
wrong party and to stop
contacting you. If they
can't provide proof, by law
they must cease collection
efforts.
And finally, don't pay
bills you don't owe just
to make the collector go
away; that's considered
acknowledgement that you
are responsible.
The Privacy Rights
CloT nghouse's"Dsht
When Hardball Tactics
Go Too Far," offers great
tips on navigating the
debt-collection process,
including your privacy
rights, sample letters and
where to turn for help
(www.privacyrights.org/fs/
fs27-debtcoll.htm) .

Jason Alderman
directs Visa's financial
education programs.
'lb sign up for a free
monthly personal finance
e-Newslettel; go to www.
practicalmoneyskills. com/
newsletter


apa lachicola ([
OC Carrabelle


THE RE

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Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St.
Apalachicola, FL 32329
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Circulation: James Meadors


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Local


The Times | AS


punishment," she said. "In
the past they just notified
the parent."
Chairman Jimmy Gan-
der led the opposition to
Hinton's move, noting that
"there are people out there
who don't paddle or whip
their children. I can only
wish I had that kind.
"That's their right as a
parent," he said. "Each per-
son to their own belief."
The rule, which eventu-
ally passed with only Hinton
voting no, requires an adult
be present, and that parents
be given a written explana-
tion as to the reason for the
punishment and the name
of the adult who was pres-
ent.
Hinton elaborated on his


opposition
to the con-
sent form,
I ~asking what
other forms
of school
punish-
ment might
BRENDA parents
WILSON have a right
to decide
upon. "WYhat
about Saturday School?" he
asked. "Statutes and laws
are made to abide by. It (pa-
rental consent) shouldn't
be mandatory. Getting per-
mission is a goodwill thing.
Sometimes we have to put
our foot down and say 'this
is how we're going to run
OUr school system."'"
Wilson drew praise from


the board for her revised,
easy-to-follow system of
classification for all four
classes of disciplinary ac-
tions. Teachers in the lan-
guage arts classes plan to
review details of the revised
code of conduct during the
first two weeks of school,
which begins Monday, Aug.
24.
Among the revisions,
many made to conform to or
expand on revisions to state
law, are policies that empow-
er the principal to conduct a
canine search of a student's
vehicle or locker if he has a
reasonable suspicion that
illegal drugs or other items
may be present.
The revised school rules
also specify that any stu-


dent adjudicated guilty of a
felony, or a delinquent act
that would have been a fel-
ony had an adult committed
it, is no longer permitted to
take part in interscholastic
extracurricular activities for
the rest of the school year.
This rule is to be enforced
regardless of whether adju-
dication has been withheld
by the courts.
In terms of attendance,
parents will now receive
written notice if a student
has three days of excused or
unexcused absences within
a nine-week grading period
and no valid reason is found
for the nonattendance. The
rule had been four days.
While the school's ad-
visory committee decided


not to pursue an expansion
of the school uniform policy,
the revised rule addresses
more specifics. Holes in
pants or shorts are now
forbidden, and a school uni-
form shirt must be worn un-
der any jackets, overshirts,
sweaters or sweatshirts,
which must open or zip all
the way down the fr~ont.
In addition, all facial fea-
tures, particularlyeyes, nose
or mouth, must be visible at
all times and not concealed
by hair, hooded sweatshirts
or jackets.
Students who are as-
signed to the learning cen-
ter are now explicitly pro-
hibited from taking part in
extracurricular activities,
including club meetings,


sports, graduation exer-
cises, field trips band and
marching performances,
school sponsored senior
trip, dances and proms.
The new rules go into
considerable detail as to the
school's zero tolerance poli-
cy for school-related violent
crimes, and in compliance
with the Gun-Free School
Act. Among these modifi-
cations are a victimization
of students policy that en-
sures offenders not be able
to attend the same school,
or ride the same school bus,
as a victim or sibling of the
victim.
The code also outlines
how parents can be pre-
pared for and handle a pan-
demic influenza outbreak.


that had fewer than 10 units
per parcel.
The revision due to the
software problem will have
no significant effect on
the valuation of property
countywide for the purpos-
es of school district taxa-
tion. The schools are not
affected by the changes in-
stituted with the passage of
Amendment 1 or by an ad-
ditional senior exemption
that the county and both
cites adopted. That exemp-
tion allows for an additional
$50,000 off the taxable valu-
ation of property for those
seniors whose incomes fall
below $24,000.
The schools will see a
valuation of about $2.82 bil-
lion, or about $40 million
more than the county. This


represents a decline of
about $680 million over last
year, also a drop of about
19.4 percent.
Taxation for the North-
west Florida Water Man-
agement District's com-
bined valuation is about $2.2
million more than the coun-
ty's, not enough to make
a substantial difference in
the tax base, which is about
$2.78 billion.
The sharpest decline
of evaluation in the county
will be felt in Alligator Point,
where the combined valu-
ation dropped from about
$253 million to $185.2 mil-
lion, a decline of nearly
$67.8 million, or about 26.8
percent.
The next steepest de-
cline will be felt on Dog Is-


land, where property valua-
tions dropped by nearly $18
million, from $79.6 million to
about $61.7 million, or 22.5
percent.
Carrabelle's decline was
slightly less severe, with
that city's property values
dropping by 20.4 percent,
from $275.1 million to $219
million.
Apalachicola's valuation,
which includes all property
within the city limits, tum-
bled by 19.9 percent, from
nearly $210 million last year
to slightly more than $168.3
million this year.
The Eastpoint portion of
the county, which is defined
by properties within the
Eastpoint Water and Sewer
District, declined in value
by about 19.4 percent, from


$111.5 million last year to
$89.9 million for the upcom-
ing budget year.
In addition to finalize im-
plantation of Amendment
1, this is the county's year
to have an in-depth audit of
its appraisals by the Florida
Department of Revenue, so
Pendleton and her staff are
pleased to have cleared this
most recent hurdle with the
state.
"This is probably the
most difficult tax roll ap-
proval year since I've been
here, for the past 19 years,"
said Rhonda Skipper, dep-
uty appraiser. "It's really
a great achievement that
we've jumped through all
the counties and been ap-
proved."
Skipper said the TRIM


(Truth in Millage) notices
will be mailed Aug. 17, and
then property owners will
have 25 days to file peti-
tions to adjust their valu-
ations. "All hearing dates
are posted (on the TRIM
notices) if they want to
attend. Also they have 30
days if they have anything
to petition concerning
their homestead exemp-
tion."
Skipper said anyone who
has questions or concerns to
call and speak to someone
in the property appraiser's
office. "That's what we're
here for," she said.
Telephone numbers are
653-9236, or toll free from
the eastern end of the coun-
ty, 697-2112.
Pendleton said she could


not predict what effect the
Value Adjustment Board's
decision will have on the
county's tax base, but said
she was confident any fur-
ther reductions won't be
as sharp as in the last two
years.
"That is what the TRIM
process of all about," she
said. "I know they (county
commissioners) are going
to be upset when there is
more changes. It's not my
doings; it s a state mandat-
ed process.
"Hoopefully, they will not
be very extensive because
of the 10 percent limitation
and the homestead ex-
emption," Pendleton said.
"We're certainly hoping not
and I don't think that it will
be."


the people must have trust
in the officials that they've
chosen to enforce the laws
of the state of Florida,"
State Attorney Bill Eddins
said of the charges.
Morris, Teresa Adams,
Mike Coup, David Yacks
and Sandra Norris will be
charged with racketeer-
ing a crime that implies
participation in a criminal
enterprise when they turn
themselves in to Okaloosa
County authorities this
week.
The maximum penalty
upon conviction is 30 years.
Morris hired Thornton
in March 2008, prosecutors
said, and "immediately,
OCSO employees noticed
an undue familiarity be-
tween them."
"...On several occasions
employees saw Morris's car
at her Okaloosa residence,
at night, backed in the
drive," the affidavit said.
In October 2008, Morris
fired Thornton, but rehired
her that December after a
dinner meeting in Tallahas-
see, where a '"financially
distressed" Thornton told


Morris she needed help.
"Morris expressed re-
gret he had fired her, and
agreed to pay Thornton's
personal bills and to 'rehire'
her" despite the fact she
lived in Tallahassee and
worked for a law enforce-
ment academy in Quincy,
the document charged.
The personal bills, she
said, included $40,000 on
credit cards and $8,400 on a
condominium lease.
From then on, Mor-
ris apparently showered
Thornton with benefits. At
county expense, he provid-
ed her two vehicles, a fuel
card and a pistol. He used
Sheriff's Office funds to buy
her birthday, Christmas
and Valentine's Day gifts, a
monogrammed briefcase,
golf clubs, jewelry and cloth-
ing.
"During this time, there
is, however, no evidence
that Thornton performed
any work for the OCSO,
even though she was paid a
salary between $70,000 and
$83,000," the charging docu-
ment said.
In February 2009, "they


attended the annual FSA
(Forida Sheriffs Associa-
tion) conference together
in Sandestin, where they
publicly engaged in physical
contact with each other," it
added.
Morris was being in-
stalled as president of the
state association at the
time.
By March, he had been
arrested.
Reached July 30 via tele-
phone, Thornton said, "I'm
fine," and hung up.
Previous to going to
work for the Okaloosa sher-
iff's office, Thornton served
as chief of staff for Col. Julie
Jones, who directed the law
enforcement division of the
Florida Wildlife Conserva-
tion Commission.
Thornton was not impli-
cated among a select group
of Sheriff's Office employ-
ees Eddins said cooperated
to orchestrate the bonus
scheme.
Adams was Morris' ad-
ministrative director and,
like him, already faces 85
years in federal prison. Both
pleaded guilty to six charges


brought by the FBI following
that agency's independent
investigation of the same
kickback scheme.
The affidavit of probable
cause accused Adams of fa-
cilitating it.
Under her direction, it
said, Sheriff's Office em-
ployees between 2006 and
2009 kicked back bonus
money for "persons in need,
when, in fact, (Adams) knew
it was for the personal use of
Morris and others, including
herself."
She "obstructed or pre-
vented communication"
that would have revealed
the scheme, prosecutors
said.
Coup, Morris' former
chief deputy, knew of and
benefited from the scheme,
and alerted Morris when
employees questioned it,
"which led Morris and Coup
to pressure employees to
keep quiet," according to
the affidavit.
He turned himself in
early Thursday afternoon
and was released after post-
ing a $7,500 bond.
Norris allegedly calcu-


lated bonuses and oversaw
transfers of funds. She is
accused of concealing or
falsifying payroll records by
listing the illegal payments
as legitimate bonuses.
Yacks, Adams' brother,
purchased plane tickets,
made dinner reservations
and otherwise arranged
trips to Las Vegas, where
Morris ultimately was ar-
rested with thousands of
dollars in his possession,
In three years, Yacks
grossed $149,000 in bonuses.
In 2008, he grossed more in
bonuses than in salary.
"The kickbacks in-
creased each year, involving
more and more OCSO em-
ployees, to cover increased
expenses of the Sheriff and
his accomplices," prosecu-
tors said.
Audits conducted after
his arrest found that about
half, or $686,404, of the bo-
nuses awarded from 2004
to 2009 were given to seven
management employees.
Some employees, Ed-
dins said, were helpful in the
state's investigation.
"There are cooperating


witnesses, some of whom
caused this scheme to come
crashing down," he said.
In deciding who would
face charges, prosecutors
considered bonus amounts,
Sheriff's Office roles and
initial cooperation with the
feds.
Asked if cooperative em-
ployees would have been
arrested otherwise, Eddins
said his office "evaluated
the overall situation as it
came to us" and witnesses
"are to be commended for
turning the sheriff in, so to
speak."
The full results of the in-
vestigation were provided to
Sheriff Ed Spooner "in the
event he believes further ad-
ministrative action should
be taken," Eddins said.
Spooner said he does not
expect to take any further
action related to the prior
administration.
All six suspects were to
be granted bond ranging
from $5,000 to $10,000.
"Because these people
are public figures, we do not
believe they're flight risks,"
Eddins said.


Date :


August 14, 2009


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Thursday, August 6, 2009


A6 | The Times


Local


Lois Swoboda
Times Staff Writer

Shelley Stiaes, an 11
year veteran of the US
Fish and Wildlife Service
has been appointed as new
manager of St. Vincent
National Wildlife Refuge.
Shelley came to St. Vincent
after spending the majority
of her career at Southeast


Louisiana
Refuges
where she
managed
Bayou
Sauvage,
Breton
and Delta
SHELLEY National
STIAES Wildlife
Refuges.
Stiaes has also managed


Bogue Chitto and Big
Branch National Wildlife
Refuges, also located
in southeast Louisiana.
Prior to working for the
Fish and Wildlife Service,
she worked for the Lake
Pontchartrain Basin
Foundation and the Mayor's
Office of Environmental
Affairs where she conducted
environmental education


programs to New Orleans
students and various city
environmental projects.
Stiaes holds a bachelor's
in biology from Southern
University in New Orleans.
She joined the service in
1998 as a co-op student
after several years of
volunteering as a canoe
guide and a one year
internship conducting moist


soil management.
Stiaes said she is
especially interested in
education and outreach and
plans to partner with St.
Marks refuge to reach out to
local school systems.
"I came from New
Orleans. There we did
environmental education
three days a week to groups
of 60 school kids," she said.


News Br g(9

place a birdhouse from
AvenumEore info, call
653-9419.

Where is Mediacom'S
channel 73?
At the July 21
meeting of the
county commission,
Commissioner Noah
Lockley directed
Alan Pierce, director
of administrative
services, to write a
letter to Mediacom, the
county cable provider,
protesting the removal
o heannell 73 from the
Lockley said the
station aired religious
programming. "Many of
the elderly people are
housebound and can't
get to church. They like
to watch that station," he
said.


"There are lots of teachers
who like to work something
like that into lesson plans."
Stiaes said, although she
is a biologist, she will have
limited time to devote to
research and monitoring the
ecosystem of the refuge.
"Just managing the
refuge is a huge job. I can
assist a biologist, but I can't
do both," she said.


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Mary Milton (850)245-5935 or
Julie Prevatt(850) 921-5554


New Orleanian new director for St. Vincent's


COMMUnity GardenS
ilolds photo contest
City Square
Community Garden
has announced
a Summertime
Photography Contest.
Subject matter can be
any flora or fauna, with
submissions between
now until Sept. 5.
Photos willthbe
on dIsplay at te
Apalachicola Bay
Chamber of Commerce
office. Pick up the
contest rules and entry
form at the Chamber
Sfc tat 122 Commerce
First place will win a
weekend at a St. George
Island home. Second
place will win a $50 gift
certificate from The
Grill. Third place will win
framing of your photo by
Lane and Co., and fourth


SHIP takes

alpplications for new
homebuyers
The Franklin County
Board of County
Commissioners, through
the Franklin County
S.H.I.P! Program, will be
accepting applications
starting on Sept.1,
2009 for the Florida
Homebuyer Opportunity
Program.
SHIP (State Housing
Initiative Program) will
provide down payment
assistance loans to
first-time homebuyers
wn ran lel gbe eur ce
Homebuyer Tax Credit.
For more information
please call Lori Switzer at
653-8199 or come by the
office at 78-11th Street,
Apalachicola. Assistance
for this program is based
on funding ability.









Franklin County: (850) 670-5555
w Leon County: (850) 926-9602
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IV


Thursday, August 6, 2009


Local


The Times | A7


LOIS SWOBODA | The Times
Mayor Van Johnson, left, and City Attorney Pat Floyd answered questions at a
local forum on the Apalachicola water wars.




(Ity lawsuit against



the Cor ps continues


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By Lois Swoboda
Times Staff Writer

At a forum on the
Apalachicola water wars
held July 29, Apalachicola
Mayor Van Johnson and
City Attorney Pat Floyd
ex rssd cn ern that
Apaahcl wl o
receive fair compensation
for damage to the bay.
About 25 people
gathered in the
Apalachicola Art Museum
to hear an update on
the city's legal action
against the Army Corps
of Engineers demanding
stepped-up release
of water from Lake
Lanier. On display were
photographs of North
Georgia waterfalls at
the headwaters to what
eventually becomes the
Apalachicola River.
Floyd said he was
thankful to the city
commission and Johnson
for pushing on with the


lawsuit.
"We need to be
thankful for the river and
the bay that we are the
guardians of. Everybody
that has an interest
in them needs to be
protected," he said.
Johnson said the
current situation
reminded him of a saying
he heard as a child,
"Whiskey's for drinking
and water's for fighting."
He said the city
has continued with
the suit in spite of the
favorable court decision
announced last week,
because it isimportant
for Apalachicola to have
a place at the table when
negotiations resume.
"I fear that any money
that should come here
to solve the problems
created by low water
flow will go to Atlanta to
solve their drinking water
problem," Johnson said.
Floyd said it was
important Atlanta not


appear to be the only
victim of the conflict.
Andy Smith, attorney
for the Apalachicola
Riverkeeper, said his
organization fears that
Georgia will now attempt
to divert the water to
small municipal and
county reservoirs which
are not governed by the
federal ruling.
Floyd said Georgia
has already applied to
the Corps for a permit
to build a reservoir in
Glades, just north of Lake
Lanier. He said he is
monitoring the proposed
project.
"It is unfortunate that
Georgia doesn't want to
deal with the unbridled
growth that has caused
this problem," Johnson
said.
Marie Marshall
thanked Johnson and
Floyd for holding the
meeting. "We are proud
of the city," she told
them.


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Thursday, August 6, 2009


Local


By David Adlerstein
Times City Editor

With some exceptions,
the 2009-10 budgets for
county departments and
non-governmental organi-
zations will stay roughly at
this year's levels.
County commission-
ers granted tentative ap-
proval at the July 23 public
workshop to most all these
departments, and then ad-
dressed the rest at the July
31 follow-up.
Friday's second work-
shopopenedonadownnote
as Alan Pierce, director of
administrative services, in-
formed the commissioners
that the combined property
valuation for the county,
upon which the millage rate
is based, had dropped since
the July 23 workshop.
Because of errors by the
software company in calcu-
lating the effect of Amend-
ment 1 (see related story),
recalculations by Property
Appraiser Doris Pendleton
had led to a countywide val-
uation of $2.78 billion, about
$36 million less than was
first thought.
This translates to a loss
of expected tax revenue of
about $132,000.
"Well, that's just great


news to start out the new
year," said Commissioner
Pinki Jackel.
"The good news is 'bet-
ter now than later'," replied
Pierce.
He told commissioners
that Pendleton was optimis-
tic the Value Adjustment
Board hearings in the fall
would not result in a sharp
drop in property valuations.
"She said she didn't know
of any changes coming
down the line," he said. "But
for the benefit of the board,
the reduction in the tax
base has happened twice
in previous years after the
budget's done, and you are
then forced to deal with that
without any reserves, and
that's very expensive.
"This year at least you're
finding out about it before
you finish up," he said.
Erin Griffith, the coun-
ty's assistant finance direc-
tor, said the proposed mill-
age rate for 2009-10, after
factoring in the change in
property values and further
reductions in the sheriff's
budget, is 3.6753.
This is about an 11 per-
cent increase in the millage
rate, over last year's 3.3149-
mil rate. But, due to the
more than 19 percent drop
in property values county-


"With this grant that will al-
low us to pay for these air
cards right on site," he said,
referring to wireless trans-
mission communications.
"I think that will save a lot
of fuel."
Pierce noted that neither
the sheriff's office, nor any
of the other departments,
are factoring in a possible
30 percent increase in util-
ity costs. Progress Energy
is seeking a rate hike of that
size from the Public Service
Commission.
"If they do increase it, it
will affect us dramatically,
because we're working
24/7," said Shiver. "It will
really be a great issue with
us.,,
Commissioner Bevin
Putnal reiterated what had
been said at Thursday's
customer service hearing
in Apalachicola, that the
rate hikes would be devas-
tating. "You can't do these
meetings in the dark," he
quipped. "Because we have
a Sunshine Law."
The commissioners
agreed that citizens needed
to write the Public Service
Commission, or their state
senator or state representa-
tive, and voice their opinion
against the rate increase
It was then that Jackel
steered the discussion back
to the matter at hand.
"While we're working
hard to save on electricity
bills, we're going to save the
citizens money on that, but
they're going to get a tax in-
crease if we don't do some-
thing about these numbers,"
she said. "So while we're all
on board with cutting Prog-
ress and keeping our utility
rates down, we're all sitting
here looking at tax increas-
es.
"One thing is going to
nullify another. They may
not get an increase in their
Progress Energy bill but
when they get our bill from
the county government, it's
going to be going up," she
said. "It's one thing for us to
be united and say we don't
wan up ts tdc ie thlsd fo

us t' neunite and ssayo w


Commissioner Cheryl
Sanders reiterated her
earlier statement that she
wanted further cuts. "If the
millage rate doesn't go down
to where I feel comfortable,
I'm going to be voting no on
this budget. I'm not going
to be sitting up here like a
hypocrite," she said.
Jackel stressed that the
Progress Energy hearing
brought out a large group
of people, many on fixed
incomes or facing medical
bills, facing economic hard-
ship. She also reminded
her fellow commissioners
that while Franklin has the
state's second best jobless
rate, it is a misleading sta-
tistic, since seafood worked
are self-employed and un-
able to file for unemploy-
ment compensation, which
is the basis upon which the
jobless rate is calculated.
"Our unemployment
numbers do not reflect the
true condition of our coun-
ty," she said. "Our numbers
are probably off by 50 per-
cent."
Commissioner Noah
Lockley agreed, noting that
once a worker stops collect-
ing unemployment compen-
sation, they are no longer
counted as jobless. "It's
never been right," he said.
"They drop them on paper
but they're still not work-
ing.
None of the commis-
sioners voiced opposition
to tentative approval of the
sheriff's revised budget.
"I think he's tried," said
Putnal.
"I think he's done what
we asked him to do," said
Parrish.

PLANNING AND
ZONING: 0.19

percent decrease
County Planner Alan


Pierce said he does not
provide overtime, and had
granted no additional com-
pensation last year as he


put forth a $137,039 budget
for next year, a drop of 0,19
percent over the current
budget year.
Because the recently ap-
proved bid for the county's
legal advertising will bring
rates down for next year,
Jackel asked Pierce wheth-
er he had budgeted for the
drop. Pierce said he had
relied on the department's
average expenditure for the
past two years in setting
that line item.

BUI ING
DEPARTMENT: 0.06

percent decrease
Pierce said the build-
ing department's budget
would drop by 0.06 percent
next year, from $235,713 to
$235,560.
Speaking on behalf of
the Concerned Citizens
of Franklin County, Allen
Feifer pressed Pierce on the
number of housing starts
this year. Pierce said the de-
partment has done 20 new
home permits so far this
year, and is on track to do 30
in 2008. This compares to a
recent high of 180 new hous-
ing s ars in 2003.
Referring to the depart-
ms ts si remlo els,n FIfr
it be before these employees
are utilized again?"
Pierce noted that the de-
partment has shrunk by two
employees since the hous-
ing boom.
He said he also has shift-
ed one of the department's
workers to courthouse
maintenance, and that the

bgn helpn e orswohk e
Weems Memorial Hospital,
and will soon assume duties
as Carrabelle's building in-

sp ey work," Lockley
told Feifer.
"It's sim ly a fact that
construction and develop-
ment are non-existent in
this county," replied Feifer.





percent decrease
Pierce, who serves as
the county's director of ad-
ministrative services, said
the department's budget
would decline 0.02 percent
next year, from $194,372 to
$194,337.
Sanders said she would
like to see County Engineer
Dan Rothwell utilized to a
greater extent on other tasks
throughout the county. "I'm
not undermining what he's
does," she said. "He does a
good job. I think we can use
him more efficiently."
Jackel pressed her re-
quest to add the cost of an
activity tracking software to
the budget. She said such a
software could be updated
daily, used to e-mail prog-
ress reports every Friday
and would cut down on the
volume of telephone calls
between county staff and
commissioners.
Jackel asked that $3,500
be added to this budget for
the software, also she said
the cost would likely be less
than that. "I believe we can
offset the cost of this pro-
gram with revenue we'll be
receiving from Carrabelle,"
she said. "Any information
tool will improve efficien-
cy."
The department plans to
look into whether they can
adapt a task tracking soft-
ware now being used by the
road department for admin-
istrative purposes.

CO DTI-1 l
MAINTENANCE: 3.94


Pierce submitted a bud-
get for courthouse main-
tenance that dropped 3.94
percent, from $267,864 to
$257,322. About $160,000 of
this will be spend on direct
costs for maintaining all the
county buildings, including
the 80-year-old courthouse,
with the rest on personnel


costs.
Stay tuned next week
for more on the county
budget!


UVIUYVAULOLEalIN | 110 11mes
UndersheriffJoel Norred, left, and sheriff's finance
officer Ginger Creamer, speak at the July 23 county
budget workshop.


wide, this increased millage
will generate about $10.21
million, about $1.71 million
less than last year's ad va-
lorem tax proceeds of $11.93
million.
Commission Chairman
Smokey Parrish noted that
the county's property tax
proceeds have dropped
steadily since 2006-07 when
they were at a high of $15.8
million with a millage rate of
just a tad more what it will
be next year. Since then they
will have declined in three
consecutive years, he said,
with next year's $10.2 mil-
lion in countywide tax pro-


ceeds representing a drop
of more than $5 million from
three years ago.
"We still have the county
budget moving in the right
direction, which is a de-
crease in a time we're facing
today's recession," he said.

SHERIFF: 1.25

percent decrease
Friday's workshop
opened with an appearance
by Sheriff Skip Shiver, whose
department was asked to re-
turn with possible cuts from
its initially proposed $5.01
million budget, which was
a 0.78 percent increase over
last year's. The sheriff's
budget is by far the largest
of the five constitutional of-
ficers, and consumes about
half of the total property tax
revenue brought in every
year.
Shiver told commission-
ers he had found an addi-
tional $100,969 in cuts, made
up primarily of an $88,469
drop in money for personal
services. This was achieved
through a $43,469 savings
in reduced salary and ben-
efits for an unfilled dispatch
position, and a $45,000 say-
ings due to the school board
agreeing to partially fund
two school resource officer
posi ions.
The sheriff said he also
made an additional $5,000
:'dhund tihe nraning, travnd

an ":"', ct :"ombonds an
e-mail from the insurance
company notifying the sher-
iff's office of a decrease in
premiums.
Shiver said these latest
cutbacks followed $74,082
in cuts made to the origi-
nal budget and announced
last week. These included
a $32,221 cut from the com-
munication, postage and
freight line item, a $20,000
slice from the allocation for
specialty units, a $20,000 de-
crease in monies budgeted
for fuel and a $1,872 de-
crease in money for rentals
and leases.
In all the sheriff said, a
total of $175,051 had been
cut from the original $5 mil-
lion budget, but that some
of the effect of this was ne-
gated by a $110,780 mandat-
ed increase in food service,
insurance and retirement
costs. This broke down to a
$57,780 hike in retirement
costs, a $28,000 increase in
the cost of inmate meals,
and a $25,000 rise in the
costs of bonds and insur-
ance.
"It seems like every
time we cut here, cut there,
something else is added,"
said Shiver. "That's part of
the game I guess."
The department's to-
tal overall decrease was
$62,266, and amounted to
a $4.91 million budget, rep-
ree omg .215aspercent
$4.97 million budget.
Commissioner Noah
Lockley pressed Shiver as
to whether the fuel budget
would be sufficient.
"I'm not going to say I'm
going to be able to do with-
out. We don't know what the
future brings," said Shiver.
"That's a very unpredict-
able item. I'm sure I can
always come back to you if
I need it."
The sheriff said he
is working on getting a
$439,000 grant that will en-
able deputies to complete
their reports in the field
without having to return to
the Eastpoint headquarters.


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Thursday, August 6, 2009 w w w. a pala ch ti m es co0m Page 9


St. James to host charity golf tourney


AW M(HK. LA
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Apalachicola Carrabelle Eastpoint S.George Island
22 Avenue E 612 N Avenue A 5 Jefferson Street 1200 Franklin Blvd
653-8805 697-4500 670-8501 927-2561


Sports BRIEFS

Carrabelle Youth League
to hold banquet
The Carrabelle Youth
League is inviting the entire
community to the 2009 Dixie
Youth League softball, baseball
and T-Ball sports banquet on
Friday, August 7 at 7 p.m.
The event will be held at the
Carrabelle City Hall (Old Carra-
belle High School) auditorium.
Everyone is invited includ-
ing players, sponsors, family,
and friends.

Carrabelle Beach Resort
hosts shark tourney
The Carrabelle Beach RV
Resort will host its second an-
nual shark tournament from
Friday Aug. 14 through Sunday,

The tournament pays four
placeshrbased on pa~rintpeadon-
sociation will receive 30 per-
cent of the proceeds, with half
the remaining money going to
the fishermen who captures
the largest shark, 25 percent to
the runner-up, 15 percent to the
third place finisher and 10 per-
cent for fourth place.
Lines in the water at 7 p.m.
on Aug. 14. Weigh-in will be on
Aug. 15 from 5 to 7 p.m., and on
Aug. 16 at 3 p.m. with awards
shortly afterwards. All events
will be at the resort, at 1843 U.S.
98 West in Carrabelle.
This is an individual fish-
ing tournament, and the fee is
$50.00 per person for all ages.
Only shark species and meth-
ods, which are legal to harvest
according to local, state and
federal laws and regulations
are permitted. One exception is
that nurse sharks are excluded
from this tournament.
For more info, call 697-2638.

Carrabelle Beach Resort
plans youth tourney
There will be a free Youth
Fishing Tournament ob Satur-
day, Sept. 5 at the Carrabelle

Bheah Ro~u nnt is for youth
to age 15, and is limited to river
and bay fishing only, with fish-
ermen not allowed past Dog
Island.
A fishing clinic will be held
on site on Friday, Sept. 4 at 7
p.m.
Registration will be held up

frstt 10 meg st aon winll he
ceive a rod and reel and tackle.
Awards will got to the first
three places in each category;
onl oon awr dpne cid. F
the tournament weigh-in on
site at 4 p.m. Categories
are5 flhou~nd speckled inr uh'
croaker Spdan sh mackerel, blue

For more info, call 697-2638.


At left, Kristin Bodie, of Crawfordville, caught the tournament's largest fish, a 5.58-pound Spanish mackerel.
Photo courtesy of Mary Lawhon. At right, Carrabelle Mayor Curley Messer, right, presented trophies to the
winners. Photo courtesy of Mary Lawhon.




G one fis hm g

YOUth fl0(k to (-Quarters fishing tourney
About200young people, from age Curley Messer~\t galeut the tro- -
3 to 15, took part in the fifth annual phies. Designa~t~l tedl 101- ~ Lnier and a\
C-Quarters Marina Youth Fishing fishing only, the tolurne.1 teatured **
Tournament, held July 25. the categonesd at sptckiledc t -olut.
Under the watchful eyes of dock- flounder, catfish. b~lacki sea
master Millard Collins, and weigh- bass, pinfish. SpaLnish
master Tommy Lawhon, 199 youth mackerel, croakert~
fished the waters from the Carra- and pigfish Theret
belle River out to Dog Island. are three places~ In
Taking part were local children, each categol?-
as well as kids from as far away as "C-Quarters \\as a lsr
Georgia, Texas and Louisiana. a sponsor and Jcot
On Friday on the marina, at 501 support frocm the\
St. James Ave. in Carrabelle, Col- cityof Carrabetlle the Sf
lins provided the young fishermen churches, ttnends
instructions on how to tie knots, tie and family a~nd
on hooks, and overall safety while local busl-
fishing. Each child then received a nesses,".
rod and reel combination, donated Mrsaid
by www.fishflorida.org. Mr
There were plenty of shirts, hats, Lawhon. .! ?
and hot dog dinners for the youth "They're
and their families on Saturday, whomadeit
topped off when Carrabelle Mayor possible." ,I


IG TOURNEY V1
SECOND PLACE
Zack Libby 1.86 Ibs


Speckled Trout
Flounder
Catfish
Sea Bass
Croaker
Spanish Mackerel
Pin Fish


C-GUARTERS I
FIRST PLACE
Lett Smith 2.12 Ibs


THIRD PLACE
Marissa Taylor 1.70 Ibs
Ryan Eister I.00 Ibs
Sage Brannan 4.94 Ibs.
Lea Venable .58 Ibs
Lee Cumbie I.00 Ibs.
Mailorie Guthrie 2.62 Ibs.
Landis Lamberson .30 Ibs.


Marcie Musgrove 2.26 Ibs Sara Pouncy 1.18 Ibs


Joshua Greer 5.56 Ibs


Tyler Gilbert 5.30 Ibs


Gunnar Gronholm .78 Ibs Dawson Bodie .62 Ibs
Mason Kyle Ray 1.14 Ibs Jacob Thompson 1.02 Ibs.


Kristin Bodie 5.58 Ibs.

Blakely Curry .34 Ibs


Kyle Hathcox 3.44 Ibs
Tressie Edwards .30 Ibs


A Golf by the Sea charity golf
tournament is being planned by
Rock By The Sea, a not-for-profit
that plans and produces music
festivals and events to assist de-
serving charities.
Organizers said Rock By The
Sea enables agencies to gain ex-
posure with the public and facili-
tate donations through concerts,


silent auctions, merchandising.
Supported 2009 charities in-
clude the University of Florida
Pediatric Brain Tumor Program,
the Franklin County Humane So-
ciety and Lyrics for Life, a non-
profit that fights against pediat-
ric cancer.
The tournament will be held
at St. James Bay Golf Course on


Friday, Sept.18 at 10 a.m.
Cost will be $150 per player
and includes cart, green fees,
amenities bag, and lunch.
The format for play will be a
Florida Scramble, played with
four-player teams. Each player
on the team tees off from the
tee box. The team members se-
lect the best tee shot of the four,


and all golfers except the golfer
whose shot is selected then play
their second shot from that loca-
tion. On each following shot the
golfer whose shot is chosen sits
out the next shot.
Contact Tournament Director
David Allen at dmjjal 700@egmail.
com or at 927-2883 for complete
details.


The Franklin County
Sheriff's Office will inaugu-
rate its first ever Inshore
Saltwater Tournament this
Saturday, with all proceeds
going to support youth pro-
grams.
The event, slated to be-
come an annual affair, will
be held Saturday, Aug. 8,
with two fishing tourna-
ments.
The main tournament
has an entry fee of $50, for
boat teams of two persons.
All participants that win
will be awarded with cash
prizes and trophies. It is
open to anyone 12 years of
age or older.
There will be a separate
youth tournament that is
free to enter. Kids ages 5 to
12 will be eligible to enter
and various prizes and fish-
ing gear will be awarded.
Boats can enter the wa-
ter at 6 a.m., and fish all
inshore waters from Apala-
chicola Bay to Alligator


Point. Tournament weigh
in, which begins at 3 p.m.,
will be located at Battery
Park in Apalachicola, un-
der the bridge.
Beginning at 11:30 a.m.,
staff will be serving the de-
partment's prize winning
chicken dinners for $6 a
plate, with all proceeds go-
ing to the Franklin County
Sheriff's Office youth pro-
grams.
Targeted fish species
for the main tournament
will be redfish, speckled
trout, and tripletail, with
the youth tournament fo-
cusing on various saltwa-
ter fish species. Legal limit
for non-resident licensed
fishermen or women for
two-person team are 10
trout, two redfish and four
tripletail.
A $ 500 cash prize will be
awarded to the team with
the highest total weight of
all three fish species.
Trophies will be awarded


to all three top finishers for
each of the three species. A
cash prize of $150 will go to
each of the first place win-
ners.
There will be a $50 cash
prize for the largest trash
fish. Biggest fish prizes will
be awarded with the purse
determined by participa-
tion. The pool will draw on
$10 per angler per fish spe-
cies, with the winner taking
80 percent of total money
raised for each fish spe-
cies.
Registration can be
dropped off at the Frank-
lin County Sheriff's Office.
Late registration is on
August 8 from 7 to 9 a.m.
at Fisherman's Choice in
Eastpoint or Battery Park
in Apalachicola.
Visit www.franklinsher-
iff.com or e-mail FCSO@
franklinsheriff.com for info.
For questions, call Ryan
Sandoval at 370-6185 or
John Solomon at 370-6602.


CA RRA BE L LE APA LA CH ICO LA


A
Section


Franklin County Sheriff's office


hosts fishing tourney Saturday



























LOIS SWOBODA | The Times
Attorney Alex Glenn, left, represented Progress
Energy at the PSC hearing, while attorney Cecelia
Bradley, of the Office of Public Counsel, spoke for
consumer interests.


Sunrise Constructi ;

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APALACHICOLA


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m = Minor M = Major add 1 hour for daylight savings
Date Day AM PM Rise/Set Moon
08/06 Thu m 4:50 m 5:05 5:22AM
M 10:55 M 11:15 6:49PM
08/07 Fri m 5:30 m 5:50 5:23AM O
M 11:40 M 6:48PM
08/08 Sat m 6:15 m 6:40 5:24AM O
M 12:05 M 12:25 6:47PM O
08/09 Sun m 7:00 m 7:25 5:24AM O
M 12:50 M 1:10 6:47PM
08/10 Mon m 7:45 m 8:15 5:25AM O
M 1:35 M 2:00 6:46PM
08/11 Tue m 8:35 m 9:00 5:25AM
M 2:25 M 2:45 6:45PM
08/12 Wed m 9:5m 9:4505 26AM


LOIS SWOBODA | The Times
FRESH START: Perseverance by county commissioners, led by Pinki Jackel, has paid off. Chambers Bank
of North Arkansas has agreed to pay for demolition of dilapidated properties on the eastern end of
the waterfront in Eastpoint, whose deterioration dates back to Hurricane Dennis. The 30 lots had been
slated for the residential and commercial development called Porthaven, but the bank foreclosed on the
project.


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Thursday, August 6, 2009


Local


DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times
The audience raises their hands against Progress Energy's rate hike as County Commissioner Smokey Parrish
speaks.


to come to a stop, and it's
going to be an explosion," he
said.
Derrick Crum of Talla-
hassee said his company,
Jackson-Cook Crane, had
set telephone poles for
Florida Power, and later
Progress, for 40 years.
He said he received a
call from Progress telling
him they could no longer
do business with him. A
panel of Progress ex-
ecutives had picked out a
group of regional vendors
to provide crane services
and Jackson-Cook, based
in Sopchoppy, was not cho-

senNow, if Progress
needs a pole set, the crew
has to come from Valdo-
sta or Ocala. That costs
around $3,000 compared
tO $600 to $1,000 Jackson-
Cook charges. They told
mostwe'r tr ing todcu
care if I never do another
dollar's worth of business
with them. What's right is
right." .
In a telephone interview,
Crum said time and money
will be lost because rental
equipment like lights must
now come from regional
vendors as well in the event
of an emergency.

"A lot more like me
OUt there"

In addition to accusa-
tions of greed, the PSC
heard complaints about
poor service.
Putnal demanded to
know why all but one ser-
viceman had been trans-
ferred out of the county, al-
luding to a recent incident
in which an car accident
victim could not be tended
to until a Progress truck
arrived from a neighboring
county.
"We pay the same that
everybody else does. We


*No PaymentS On the 1080


DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times


both the Public Counsel's
Office and the power com-
pany said the hearing was
pretty much a repeat of
the eight others that pre-
ceded it in other parts of
the state.
"We knew what to ex-
pect," said one Progress
employee.
"It was a slam dunk,"
beamed Earl Poucher,
from the Office of Public
Counsel. "This was the
best meeting yet."
Formal hearings will
be conducted by the FPSC
starting Sept. 21, 2009. A
final decision is expected
by Dec. 1. If approved, the
new rates would go into ef-
feet on Jan. 1, 2010.
Consumers can still
comment by mail to the
Florida Public Service
Commission, Division of
the Commission Clerk and
Administrative Services,
2540 Shumard Oaks Bou-
levard, Tallahassee, FL
32399-0850, or by fax to 800-
511-0809.


Public Service Commissioner Lisa Edgar.


deserve the same service,"
he said.
"I am disabled and live
on Social Security," said
Gary Shiver, of Apalachic-
ola, who was granted an
opportunity to become the
first citizen to speak. "I get
$296 a month and my light
bill is $306. I'm baring my
soul. This is a lot of money
to me and there are a lot
more like me out there.
The service is worse than
we ever had from Florida
Power. You want a rate
hike? What for? Someone
please tell me."
Bobby Miller, of Apala-
chicola, said, "The prob-
lem is with administration
somewhere along the line.
We have no problem with
the guys with boots on the
ground. They are doing
their best."
Terry Brewer, owner of
Harry A's, ended the meet-
ing with a bang when he
slammed a burnt power
meter on the table in front
of the PSC.


"There sits living
proof," he said. "This is
the electric meter from
my restaurant. The trans-
former went out on Mon-
day night. This is the
third transformer in three
years. When the last trans-
former went out, I had to
have a new panel and new
wiring. This morning, the
crew that replaced my
meter set fire to my res-
taurant. I spent the morn-
ing walking around my
business with an electri-
cian trying to figure out
what's wrong."
In a telephone inter-
view, Tim Leljedal, a
spokesman for Progress,
said the investigation of
the problem at Brewer's
business is ongoing. "We
are working with Mr.
Brewer and his electri-
cian to see to it he has
safe reliable service," he
said.
When the dust had
cleared and the crowd
dispersed, spokesmen for


Temperature
High Low
910 780
910 780
910 790
920 780
910 780
910 780
890 770


Date
Thu, Aug 06
Fri, Aug 07
Sat, Aug 08
Sun, Aug 09
Mon, Aug 10
Tue,Aug 11
Wed, Aug 12


% Precip
30%
30%
30%
30%
40 %
30%
60 %


08/06 Thu 06:10AM
04:11PM
08/07 Fri 06:20AM
04:55PM
08/08 Sat 12:04AM
12:09PM
08/09 Sun 12:19AM
12:45PM
08/10 Mon 12:37AM
01:26PM
08/11 Tue 12:58AM
02:14PM
08/12 Wed 01:19AM
03:16PM


10:57AM
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06:29AM
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1.1 L
0.2 L
1.0 L


08/06 Thu 04:45AM
02:46PM
08/07 Fri 04:55AM
03:30PM
08/08 Sat 05:04AM
04:17PM
08/09 Sun 05:16AM
05:08PM
08/10 Mon 05:32AM
06:07PM
08/11 Tue 05:51AM
07:21PM
08/12 Wed 06:16AM
09:04PM


08:44AM
09:35PM
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>U WITH ALL YOUR PARTY NEEDS
TABLES WEDDING ARCHES
CHAIRS CANDELABRAS
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BEACH WHEELCHAIR CHAMPAGNE FOUNTAIN


?Jtlei~f etez!


Al 0 1 The Times


PROGRESS from pane A2


LET US H


HIHCHAIRS
TENTS















Thursday, August 6, 2009 w w w. ap ala ch ti me s. co0m Page 1


B
Section


Photos by CINDY SUMMERHILL Photos by LOIS SWOBODA
Dorothy, played by Morgan Martin, right, listens to a song by Addaperle, Myah Hunnings, 9, was one of 48 students to devote 600 minutes to
played by Jazmine Rhodes, in Project Impact's The Wiz. reading this summer. She is seen here with her backpack full of loot and
Usher brother, Jared, 10, who attended the party but not the program.

'The Wiz' steals the show Youn rae ew dd


I & .. R I


Students in the Project
Impact program at the
Apalachicola Municipal
Complex staged a boffo
adaptation July 29 of "The
Wiz," the Tony Award-
winning musical based on
"The Wizard of Oz."
Director Temolynn
Wintons, who had seen
the show on Broadway
earlier this summer, had
pared down the running
time from 1:40 to about 90
minutes.
"It was a little bit
abridged. We cut out a few
scenes," she said.
Other than that, the
show was true to form,
complete with a magnifi-
cent stage design by resi-
dent artist Leslie Coon
and exquisite costuming
by Barbara Lockley. Jes-
sica Ammons handled
stage crew duties while
Raevyn Jefferson served
as stage manager,
With some exceptions,
the performers sang
their roles to a recorded
soundtrack, prepared by
Bobby Wintons.
The cast included Mor-
gan Martin as Dorothy,
Jathan Martin as Scare-
crow, Bria Walker as the
TinWoman, and Umstead
Sanders as the Lion.
Evilene, the Wicked
Witch of the West, was
played by Cheyenne Mar-
tin, with Addaperle, the
Good Witch of the North,
portrayed by Jazmine
Rhodes, and Glinda, the
Good Witch of the South,
by Shameika Lake.
Kenneth Wilson played
The Wiz, with Selena
Kahn, Brooke Parker and
Kalahan Kent as the Tor-
nado ballet dancers.


On July 28 the Apalachicola Munici-
pal Library wound up its summer read-
ing club with a gala celebration. At the
end of the day, 48 young-
sters who had read for
600 minutes this summer
earned backpacks stuffed .
with school supplies.
Among all those who
had earned golden tickets
for their reading efforts,
a drawing was held to
award a pair of bicycles,
donated by Ace Hardware /
and the Green Door. Win- I
ners were Levi Rowland,
7, of Eastpoint, and Kaylin
Weiler, 10, of Apalachico-
la.


and George Washington Carver, and
cured society's ills with Jane Addams,
just to name a few favorite topics."
Clementson said she
was back at it this sum-
mer, visiting the library
every day. "But this time
I had a lot of other boys
and girls to share my
love of reading and books
with, and that was my
immense privilege," she
said. "The library has had
programs in the past, but
this one was the biggest,
and reached the most
children."
Carrie Kienzle had
rez, 10, of donated many of the
a, read five children's books used in
h earned the reading program and
c kful of was deeply involved in the
a reading camp. "I intended
ies, to do this (donate
3 her book collec-
L tion) for at least 10
years before I actu-
ally did it. You can't
give this kind of gift
tP without instruc-
tions, I found," she
... .said. "Then came

how do we get the
children in the li-
Sbrary?"
Kienzle sug-
Kay in Weiler gested summer
f reading program
nners oaand helped recruit
icycles donated twolibraryexperts
ding program. from Texas to de-
sign and instate
the program. "This library said yes, not
knowing how or that the faith of that
little library community was mighty,"
she said.
Library leaders said this is first of
many reading programs, with plans
underway for an initiative to engage
teens.
Lois Swoboda


Apalachicol
books which
hsber a backp
school suppl


Susan Clementson, of
the Patrons of the Librar
(PALS), said the summer
club program was a won-
derful success,
with 110 young
people attending
and participants
checking out 80 to
100 books week.
"As a child
growing up in
Apalachicola, one
of my greatest
pleasures was to
hop on my bike and
ride to the library
for a book and a
visit with Miss Vir-Lei
Rei
gle, the librarian'
she said. "The were
library was in a draw
small white frame to the


The Wiz, played by Kenneth Wilson, steps from
behind the giant mural of the The Wizard of
Oz, made by Leslie Coon and her fellow Project
I pat artistmpcs.


The Munchkins were
played by Shadimon
Lane, Shine Pearson,
Beyla Walker, Ryah Da-
vis and Jada Rhodes,
with Walker, Davis and
Rhodes also appearing
as the Crows, and Lane,
Pearson, Machaela Tur-
rell and Tanaya Harris as
the Rinky Monkeys.
The Yellow Brick Road
was brought to life by
Marshall Sweet, Ty~ler
Howard, Johnny Jones
and 'Itey Sanders. The
Poppies were the work
of Evangelina Ducker,
Jamela Ray. Kourtney
Henson, Tanaya Har-


ris, Mercedes Jones and
Hannah Sweet.
Machaela Turrell
played the Field Mouse,
with Marshall Sweet as
the Winkies, and Trey
Sanders as the Messen-
ger.
Also appearing in the
company were Jaffa Frye,
Jamal Robinson, Saunti
Turrell, Kimberly 'Itirrell,
Jayden Justice, Jayden
Trice, Jarvis 'Itirrell, Dar-
ius Johnson, 'lk~avorius
Gudger and Dexter Har-
ris. Chanelle Ducker and
Alexus Jones served as
stage crew.
[)0vid Ad of Stein


lowland and
the luck y wir
ing for two b
Summer rea


building where
the Gorrie Museum stands today, but
it did not seem small or inadequate to
me. Worlds were opened up as I read
my way through the juvenile books. I
solved mysteries with Nancy Drew, ex-
plored the Swiss Alps with Heidi, "came
of age" with Anne of Green Gables and
helped solve many of the world's prob-
lems with the inventions of Eli Whitney


Project Impact's summer arts
program wrapped up July 29 with
a special exhibit at the Apalachic-
ola Museum of Art.
The elegant and historic facil-
ity hosted a showing of tile mosa-
ics, clay sculpture, paintings and
other fine arts created by the
many young people who attended
the summer program at the new-
ly-dedicated Apalachicola Civic
Center. The work was neatly dis-
played on tables, or mounted and
hung on the bright, white walls.
Bob and Deanna McLaurin,
an older couple from Apalachico-
la, were among the many adults
who came by to view the exhibit
and they marveled at the work.
In addition, the children had
catered the affair with their own
favorite brand of hors d'oeuvres,


SABC School
*i second-grader
Kour tnee Henson
admires art
w th her father,
,John Henson,
Sas ABC School
.seventh-g rader
Selina Kahn,
behind, looks at
some of her own
paintings.
coach; Barbara and Cydell Lock-
ley, paraprofessionals; and site
coordinator, Temolynnn Wintons
and her daughter, Raevyn Jef-
ferson, who had earlier in the day
been busy with the musical pro-
duction of"The Wiz."
[)gyjd Adlerstein


such as popcorn, chips and dev-
iled eggs.
Overseeing the exhibit was the
program's art instructor, Leslie
Coon. Also on hand as hosts were
Paye Johnson, the program's di-
rector; Nadine Kahn, assistant
director; Jesse Ammons, reading


Photos by DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times
Tallahassee third-grader Shadimon Lane, right,
shows her artistic creation together with some of the
other students whose works were on display at the
Apalachicola Museum of Art exhibit July 29.


LIFE


TI~ES


Sen -off to


summer


Budding artists show at museum


































































Gt\ ..9R Franklin County: (850) 670-5555


- L~eon County: (850) 926-9602

~t~o~~:"T~Oll Free* (888) 831 -6754

E M EDS Htelping H-ands Make The Difference


NOTICE OF PUBLIC
HEARINGS FOR A LARGE
SCALE AMENDMENT
TO THE CITY OF
CARRABELLE
COSAMPREHEN IVE PL N

The Planning Commission of the City of Carrabelle will
conduct a public hearing in the Council Chambers, Carrabelle
City Hall, 1001 Gray Avenue, Carrabelle, Florida, on August
20, 2009 at 4:30 p.m. or as soon thereafter as the issues
may be heard to consider a recommendation concerning the
transmittal of a large scale amendment 09-03 of the City of
Carrabelle Comprehensive Plan relating thereto, the title of
which is set forth below.

The City Council of the City of Carrabelle will conduct a
public hearing in the Council Chambers, Carrabelle City Hall,
1001 Gray Ave, Carrabelle, Florida, on September 3, 2009 at
6:30 p.m. or as soon thereafter as the issue may be heard to
consider the adoption of large scale amendment 09-03 of the
City of Carrabelle Com rehensive Plan relating thereto, the
title of which are set forth below.

The purpose of the Public Hearings is to receive comments
and make decisions regarding the above matters.

Large Scale Amendment 09-03
The amendment to the Comprehensive Plan will be
accomplished by adoption of an Ordinance set forth by title
as follows:

ORDINANCE NO. 440

AN ORDINANCE AMENDING THE COMPREHENSIVE
PLAN OF THE CITY OF CARRABELLE, SPECIFICALLY
TO UPDATE AND REVISE THE FUTURE LAND USE
ELEMENT, THE PUBLIC FACILITIES ELEMENT,
THE CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS ELEMENT, THE
INTERGOVERNMENTAL COORDINATION ELEMENT,
AND THE CONSERVATION ELEMENT; PROVIDING
FOR SEVERABILITY; REPEALING ALL ORDINANCES
IN CONFLICT HEREWITH AND PROVIDING FOR AN
EFFECTIVE DATE

All interested parties are invited to attend the public
hearings and comment upon the proposed comprehensive
plan amendment or submit their comments in writing to
the Planning Commission or the City Council, respectively.
Further information concerning the proposed amendment can
be obtained from the City Clerk at City Hall, at 1001 Gray
Avenue, Carrabelle, Florida, 32322, or by calling (850) 697-
2727, between the hours of 8:00 A.M. and 4:30 EM., Monday
through Friday, excluding holidays.

Please be advised that if a person decides to appeal any
decision made with respect to any matter considered at these
hearings, such person will need a record of the proceedings,
and for this purpose such person may need to ensure that a
verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record
includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal
is based. The City of Carrabelle does not provide or prepare
such record pursuant to E S. Section 286.0105.

In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act,
persons with disabilities needing a special accommodation to
participate in these proceedings should contact the City Clerk
at City Hall, at 1001 Gray Avenue, Carrabelle, Florida, 32322,
or tbhecalling (5 697-2727, no later than three (3) days prior


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARINGS
FOR LARGE SCALE AMENDMENTS
TO THE CITY OF CARRABELLE
COMPREHENSIVE PLAN
The Planning Commission of the City of Carrabelle will conduct
a public hearing in the Council Chambers, Carrabelle City Hall,
1001 Gray Avenue, Carrabelle, Florida, on August 20, 2009 at 4:30
p.m. or as soon thereafter as the issues may be heard to consider a
recommendation concerning the transmittal of large scale amendment
t0h9- lo whthe Cist hfCrelb IComprehensive Plan relating thereto,

herin in t Con uil Ch bes, Ca raabbllee iltly 1al 1t0 1ra
Ave., Carrabelle, Florida, on September 3, 2009 at 6:30 p.m. or as
soon thereafter as the issue may be heard to consider the adoption of
large scale amendment 09-02 of the City of Carrabelle Comprehensive
Plan relating thereto, the title of which is set forth below.
The purpose of these Public Hearing is to receive comments and
make decisions regarding the above matter. The plan amendment
inolde hex vPange tto uh roa n ansaege ae Elemn 5 lhe
16. A copy of the Maps as amended is attached to this notice, below.
ORDINANCE NO.: 439
AN ORDINANCEAMENDING THE COMPREHENSIVE PLAN OF
THE CITY OF CARRABELLE, SPECIFICALLY CITY-INITIATED
TEXT AMENDMENTS TO 7.G.2 POLICY 1.1.1 AND THE
DEFINITION OF "COASTAL HIGH HAZARD AREAS" FOUND
IN SECTION 10 OF THE COASTAL MANAGEMENT ELEMENT;
AND THE AMENDMENT OF FUTURE LAND USE MAP
SERIES, MAP I-14, I-15 AND I-16, OF THE COMPREHENSIVE
PLAN TO CONFORM TO STATE STATUTE; PROVIDING FOR
SEVERABILITY; REPEALINGALLORDINANCES IN CONFLICT
HEREWITH AND PROVIDING FORAN EFFECTIVE DATE.
A copy of the Ordinance is available for inspection at City Hall.
Members of the public are encouraged to attend the hearings and be
heard on this matter.
At these hearings, the Planning Commission and City Commission
will accept public testimony and will consider the adoption of
Comprehensive Plan Amendment 09-02.
All interested parties are invited to attend the public hearings and
comment upon the proposed comprehensive plan amendment or
submit their comments in writing to the Planning Commission or
t Ctp psdm il rsets 1 taiFunth in fhoernettonleconace nngH lhe
at 1001 Gray Avenue, Carrabelle, Florida, 32322, or by calling (850)
697-2727, between the hours of 8:00 A.M. and 4:30 P.M., Monday
through Friday, excluding holidays.
Please be advised that if a person decides to appeal any decision made
with respect to any matter considered at these hearings, such person
will need a record of the proceedings, and for this purpose such person
may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made,
which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the
appeal is based. The City of Carrabelle does not provide or prepare
such record pursuant to ES. Section 286.0105.
In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons with
disabilities needing a special accommodation to participate in these
proceedings should contact the City Clerk at City Hall, at 1001 Gray
Avenue, Carrabelle, Florida, 32322, or by calling (850) 697-2727, no
later than three (3) days prior to the proceedings.
Keisha Smith
City Clerk




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Thursday, August 6, 2009


Society


Jayden is 4 and Jole is l!

Happy birthday to Jayden and Jole Nichols. Proud
parents are Cole and Glynis Nichols of Apalachicola.
Paternal grandparents are Debbie and Charles
Nichols of Eastpoint. Maternal grandparents are Julie
and Morgan Simmons of Cottondale. Happy birthday,
boys. We all love you so much!

Happy anniversary, Mom and Dad,

Love, Jayden and Jole


One is the happiest number ...
Averie Elisabeth Johnson celebrated her first
birthday on Saturday, July 18, with family and friends.
She is the daughter of Brett and Carrie Johnson of
Apalachicola.
Averie was born on July 22, 2008. Her grandparents
are Robbie and Marcia Johnson of Apalachicola, and
Beckie Jones, also of Apalachicola, and the late Scott
McDaniel of Columbus, Ga.
We are so proud of our little princess!


Robin Darnall, an
elderly recluse lining
on his boat in the
Apalachicola River,
relaxes in the cabin,
minding his own
business ... until a chance
encounter with a runaway
changed everything.
The boy, hungry and
despondent, was wary
of the man, but grateful
for any help he could get.
And Robin was equally
cautious about involving
himself with a youngster,
a petty thief who, for all
he knew, may be involved
in something much more
sinister.
Robin planned to sail
to Clearwater the next
day. In spite of misgivings,
he invited the boy to
come along. That was the


beginning of an adventure
that led them to islands
in the Caribbean,
encounters with had guys,
and eventually a family
who adopted the lad and
provided the love and
security he so desperately
needed.
The author, Robert
Beard, sailed extensively
in the Caribbean, and
docked his 57' schooner in
Apalachicola on several
occasions. "I fell in love
with the city, its history,
its charm, and the beauty
of its old homes," he said.
The book "The
Runaway" is available
at Downtown Books in
Apalachicola, as well as
online at Amazon, Barnes
& Noble, and other
bookstores.


B2 | The Times


Happy BI RTH DAY


THE RUNAWAY


Author sets novel



in Apalachicola


Averie Johnson is I










Obituaries


(ARD OF THANKS



Summer Rea ing Cluo


First Pentecostal Holiness Church
379 Brownsville Road Apalachicola


Sunday School 9:45 am
Sunday Morning Worship 10:45 am
Sunday Evening Service 6:00 pm
Monday, Youth Group 6:30 pm
Wednesday, Royal Rangers, G.A.P. 7:00 pm
Wednesday Worship & Word 7:30 pm
NreyProvided during regular church services



The United Methodist Churches

SOf Franklin County Welcome Youl

First United Methodist Church of Apalachicola
Worship Service 11:00 a.m. every Sunday
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
75 5" St. Apalachicola 653-9530 fumcapalach@gtcom~net
Pastor: Rev. Them Patriotis
Carrabelle United Methodist Church
Worship Services 10:45 a.m. Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
"Celebrate Recovery" Mondays 7-9 p.m.
Healing service first Tuesday each month-7 p.m.
102 NE Ave. B Ca abelle 697-3672

Eastpoint United Methodist Church
Worship Service 10:00 a.m. every Sunday
Prayer 9:15 a.m. Waffles & Wisdom 11:15 a.m.
Healing Service every first Fridays of the Month at 6:30 p.m.
317 Patton Dr. (corner of David St.) -670-8825
Pastor: Rev. Beth White
St. George Island United Methodist Church
9:00 a.m. Worship Service
10:00 a.m. Fellowship Hour
201 E. Gulf Beach Dr. 927- 4635 www.sgiumc.org
Pastor: Rev. Them Patriotis


St. Patrick Catholic Church
Ave C & Sixth Street in Apalachicola, FL 32329 or
The Islander (Across from the Blue Parrot)
on St. George Island, FL 32328
(850) 653-9453 Email: stpatcathefairpoint.net
PASTOR: FATHER ROGER LATOSYNSKI
www. stpatricksmass. com
APALACHICOLA MASS SCHEDULE
SATURDAY................. ................ PM
SUNDAY ................ .................... 10 AM
ST. GEORGE ISLAND MASS SCHEDULE
SUNDAY ................ .................8:30. AM


IV


Thursday, August 6, 2009


Church/Obituaries


The Times | B3


Now that you have flipped
the calendars to the last full
month of summer vacation, I
have some dates you should
mark.
Let's start with Monday,
Aug. 10. Talked to Carol
Daldona last Sunday. She is
Ways & Means chairperson LANIA
for Chillas Hall. She has Jim
called a meeting for Monday
at 7 p.m. for all Lanark
Village associates and members
interested in taking part in The
Forgotten Coast Yard Sale. Although
the sale isn't until October, this will
give you time to get your stuff ready.
On Saturday, Aug. 15, we will
gather at Chillas Hall for the
monthly breakfast. Carol is planning
to have waffles and scrambled


eggs, juice and coffee.
Your donation of $5 will be
collected at the door. Serving
is from 8-10 a.m. See you
there!
Also on Saturday, Aug. 15,
is the August Birthday Bash
at the Legion. Party starts at
NEEWS 6 p.m.; fun begins when you
lelsh walk in the room!
Of course, every Friday
night is Hamburger Night,
with our very own Chuck Spicer
spinning the records and doing the
trivia questions. Come and have a
huge hamburger with fries, and a
fun evening. Starts at 5 p.m. Your
$5 donation will be taken by Don
Ellison.
Zelma Bailey called the other day.
She wanted to see how I was and


let me know she was in Tally and
getting along OK. She said Jackie
Gura got bitten twice by a grass
rattler but is doing OK.
The Forgotten Coast Yard Sale
will be held on the first Saturday
in October, Oct. 3. The countywide
sale runs from Summer Camp along
Highway 98 to Apalachicola. Fun-fun-
fun!
Sunday, Aug. 16, is the monthly
covered dish lunch at Chillas. Bring
a donation and a dish to share;
serving will begin after the blessing
at 1 p.m.
Be kind to one another and check
in on the sick and housebound. And
always remember The Golden Rule.
Until next time, God Bless
America, our troops and the poor,
homeless and hungry.


Joann Neely
Deibel, born in
Damascus, Va., on
May 7, 1938, died
in Atlanta, Ga., on
Thursday, July 30,
2009.
Joann grew JA
up in Damascus,
obtained her DEI
nursing degree,
graduated from Florida
State University and
obtained her master's from
Emory University. She
taught at Duke University
and later worked until
her retirement in the
psychology department
at the Atlanta Veterans
Administration Medical
Center,
Joann was a certified
Florida Master Gardener
and loved playing in the
dirt. She was also an avid
member of the Red Hat
Society. She was a board
member of the Franklin
County Library.
Joann also became
an accomplished world
traveler, having been to all
of the seven continents.
She was a friend to all
and willing to help all,


including rescuing
and releasing sea
turtles.
She is survived
by her husband,
Robert, of Alligator
Point and Decatur,
NEY Ga.; son Eric
Gronberg, of
BEL Decatur; brothers
Joe and Jack
Neely; sister-in-law
Kathleen; brother and
sister-in-law Jim Deibel
and Judy Swinehart;
numerous aunts, uncles,
nieces and nephews; and
many friends.
Memorial services will
be held Saturday, Aug. 8 at
3 p.m., with refreshments
and fellowship after,
at Ochlockonee Bay
Methodist Church, 2780
Surf Road, Panacea, FL
32346. For information, call
Kevin Hall at (850) 984-
0127.
Memorial services will
also be held in Atlanta and
Damascus, Va. Details
will be announced at a
later date. Cremation
Society of the South in
Marietta is in charge of the
arrangements.


RKR
WV


Mamie Lula Mizener
Richards, 85, of Eastpoint,
passed away in Port St. Joe
on Sunday, Aug. 2, 2009.
She was born Dec. 4,
1923, in Fitzgerald, Ga.,
to Albert Lorenzo and
Lenora Van Horn Mizener.
She was a retired
beautician and member of
the Eastern Star.
She was preceded in
death by her parents; sister
Ethel; brother Thomas;
husband Harley Richards;
two sons, Albert "Corky"
and George "Skeeter"
Richards; grandson
Clinton "Buddy" Richards;

THE
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
WELCOMES YOU


a great-granddaughter;
and special niece Dorothy
Taylor.
She is survived by
her loving daughter-in-
law, Margaret Richards;
grandchildren Gayle Pace,
Rodney Richards and
Cindy (Hatch) Wefing;
10 great-grandchildren;
and five great-great-
grandchildren. Also
surviving are a large
extended family, nieces,
nephews, in-laws, and
special friend and sister-in-
law, Nellie Richards.
Services were held
Aug. 5.


Sara Ward, the 2008 Miss Florida Seafood.
* *

iS t i f r Mi


THE

EPCHSUCROCPAL


chiol wil osta Living in the Supernatu-
ral" seminar with internationally known pro-
phetic evangelist Kathie Walters on Friday
and Saturday, Aug. 14 and 15.
Registration cost for the seminar is $30
and will begin at 6 p.m., with the service start-
ing at 7 p.m. Aug. 14.
For more information, please call Pas-
tor David and/or Harolyn Walker at 850-228
-9252.


Six young women will be
vying for the title of Miss Flor-
ida Seafood at this year's pag-
eant, set for Saturday, Aug.
15, at 7 p.m. at the Franklin
County Schools cafetorium.
Royce Rolstad and the 2008
queen, Sara Ward, will host this
year's pageant, which will fea-


ture local entertainment.
Tickets will be sold at the door,
with all proceeds to benefit Pam
Nobles Studios.
Participating in the pageant
this year are Emily Kembro,
Isabelle Pateritsas, Jessica Gal-
loway, Madelin Zambrano, Mal-
lorie Jones and Shelby Shiver.


Hwy. 98 & 6th St.
Apalachicola
SUNDAY: 8:00 AM10:30 AM
LIBRARY HOURS:
SUNDAY 12:00 2:00 PM
.--SDHY1:002AM :0PM
THURSDAY 3:30 5:30 PM


It's been a magical summer
at the Apalachicola Municipal
Library. Thanks to the diligence
and determination of Carrie
Kienzle, the library has just
completed a very successful five-
week Summer Reading Club. Mrs.
Kienzle's brainchild was created by
her Texas award-winning library
colleagues, Karen Kessel and
Mary Pruitt, and was sponsored
by the library's Friends' group, the
PALS, with a generous monetary
donation from the Rotary Club
and use of the physical facilities of
11tinity Episcopal Church. Trinity
also purchased snacks for all 10
sessions.
This fun adventure would
not have been possible without
the participation of MANY local
businesses and citizens. The
library board and staff and the
more than 100 children who
benefitted
would like to thank all of you!
Thanks to PALS Inc.; Rotary
Club; Martha Harris, rector,


Trinity Episcopal Church; Mark
Willis, Ace Hardware bicycle;
Amy Friedman, The Green Door
- bicycle; Lee McLemore, Piggly
Wiggly Grand Celebration party;
Apalachicola State Bank; Riverlily;
Oystercatcher; Unique Nails;
Stacy's Hair Design; Daybreak
Massage; Scissor's Palace and Day
Spa; Le Debut; The Soda Fountain;
George Watkins; Apalachicola
and St. George Island volunteer
fire departments; and City of
Apalachicola
dump truck.
Backpack sponsors include
Karen Kessel, Mary Pruitt,
Candace Springer, Frank and
Frances Cook, June and Dick
Dosik, Paulette Moss, Susan
Clementson, Carrie and Charley
Kienzle, Lynn Wilson and Bill
Spohrer, Evelyn Ogilvie, Beth Blair,
Patti McCartney, C.T. and Myra
Ponder, Drew and Nita Morgan,
Sue Cronkite, and Cliff and Denise
Butler.
Project Impact transported


students on Tuesdays and assisted
in many ways. We especially thank
Faye Johnson, Nadine Kahn, Susan
Bachrach and LeeAnn Fleming.
A special thank-you goes to
those who gave their time to
read and to help with crafts and
refreshments; Kay Wheeler and
Martha Harris, who were there
every week, and to Evelyn Ogilvie,
Julie O'Malley, Patti McCartney,
Sharon Carlson, June Dosik, Laura
Baney, Jordan Peters, Charley
Kienzle, David Rybecki, Paulette
Moss, Joel Williams, Kathy Willis,
"T" McLain, Candace Springer,
Kamilah Hand, Nai'Kychia
Mitchell, Cheyenne, Morgan and
"Tiny."
Caty Greene, our new librarian,
was wonderful, and we couldn't
have done without our library
assistant, Cynthia Taylor, and
our Tuesday library volunteers,
Barbara Holmes and Dick Dosik.
Thank you again for a Magical
Summer!
Library Board and Staff


Yard sale, birthday bash ahead


Joann Neely Deibel


I

I


Parents s ills




Guiding Good Choices, a five-week inter-
active workshop for parents, is set to begin
next month.
The workshop will be held at 6 p.m. at the
Carrabelle Boys and Girls Club on Tuesday,
Sept. 1, and the following four Tuesday eve-
nings.
Participants will learn and practice skills
for setting clear family guidelines, strength-
ening family bonds, helping children develop
healthy behaviors, developing strategies to
help your children avoid drug use and other
adolescent problem behaviors, and increas-
ing your children's involvement in the family.
Kate Jensen LCSW, a clinical social worker
based in Panacea, will serve as the workshop
facilitator.
Families who complete the five-week
workshop will receive a certificate of comple-
tion and are eligible for a $25 incentive check
from the Florida State University Center for
Prevention Research.
Guiding Good Choices has been of-
fered throughout the country and has been
honored with several citations of excellence,
including "Model Program" from the Sub-
stance Abuse and Mental Health Services
Administration.
For more information, contact Cherry
Rankin, club director, at 519-5370 or Kate Jen-
sen, workshop facilitator, at 566-5283.



Covenant Word hosts


Mamie Richards


/ * x o ve o ss
Living in Supernatural

Covenant Word Christian Center in Apala- Florida Seafood title


Trimity
EST. 1836


WELCOMES YOU

Church

Of the.

Ascension
101 NE First Street
Carrabelle
SUNDAY
10:00 A1M










--- ----- ~~dA"T~I


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Thursday, August 6, 2009


Local


2 packs of index cards 3x5
One pair of scissors, blunted
end
3 single subject spiral notebook
Storage box, plastic to hold
personal supplies
Items to share:
3 packs wide ruled loose leaf
notebook paper

a ortgleeo xGer hand
sanitizer, no liquid soaps please
Item not to have:
Please do not buy mechanical
pencils, pencil sharpeners or
staplers

FOUrth Grade
4 packs loose leaf notebook
paper
#2 pencils/erasers
2 red pens
4 pocket folders 3 clips
inside
2 large spiral notebooks-red
and green
Colored pencils or crayons


1 highlighter
Glue sticks
Pencil box
Scissors
Ruler
1 box of Tissues
1 box of Baby Wipes
1 bottle hand sanitizer gel
Pocket dictionary
2 reams of copy paper

Fifth Grade
Pencils
Pens blue or black
Highlighters
3 composition books not
spiral notebooks
Colored pencils or crayons
Glue stick
Notebook paper and binder
Scissors
Germ-X
1 box tissues
Baby wipes
2 reams of copy paper -
to be used for Accelerated
Math


5 spiral notebooks 2 must
be red and 1 must be green
Special items for Language
Arts: Post-it notes, red pen,
thesaurus and pocket folder
with prongs
Special items for Math: 1
red pocket folder

FOUrth and Fifth grades ESE
Mrs. Parish
Loose leaf notebook paper
No.2 pencils
Ink pens
Glue stick
Crayons or colored pencils
1 box tissues
1 container Clorox wipes
Spiral bound notebooks 5
if fulltime ESE or one for each
subject taken in ESE
Optional: Prize box items:
small toys, stickers, candy (in
individual wrappers) or school
supplies. (Sugar free candy if
your child is not allowed to have
sugar)


Second Grade
Pencil box
Red pens
Pencils/erasers
Paper -2 packs
Crayons-24 count
Scissors
Markers

Cnt ucc on paper pack
Baby wipes 2
I~eenex --2 boxes
Hand sanitizer 1 bottle
Index cards --2 packs
Ziplock storage bags --1 any
size
1 pack of white copy paper-boys
1 pack of color copy paper-girls
Folders-red, green, and blue
plastic-no paper or prongs

Third Grade
1 doz. wooden pencils
Box ofecrayons or colored
pencils not larger than 24 count
6 rectangular erasers


First Grade
Crayon box
Backpack (please no rolling
backpacks)
2 boxes of crayola crayons
2 bottles of school glue
2 glue sticks
40 No. 2 pencils
2 flat pink pearl erasers
Fiskar scissors
1 pack of markers
1 pack of colored pencils
4 pocket folders
4 wide ruled spiral
notebooks for journals
1 pack of wide-ruled filler
paper
1 pack of index cards
1 box of Ziploc bags
1 box of Kleenex
1 container of wet wipes/
baby wipes
1 container of Germ-x
*Please put your child's
name on all school supplies


Thursday, Aug. 6
Carrabelle City
Commission meets at
6:30 p.m. at 1005 Gray
Avenue, Carrabelle. For
more info, call 697-3618.
Franklin County School
Board will meet at 6 p.m.

inte le = Se Bad

Eastpoint Public
Library offers Story Hour
at 10 a.m., and individual
computer instruction from
10 a.m. to noon. For more
info, call 670-8151.
Wandering Star
Quilting Club. Chillas Hall
Lanark Village. 1 to 3 p.m.
Call Christine Hinton 697-
2551.
Community Luncheon
and Information
Secitals atn te Fanklin
in Carrabelle. Noon. $3
donation. Call 697-3760.

Friday, Aug. 7

Chilla Hle l n Lnrk
Village. 9 to 10 a.m. Open
to amer fading at
East point and Caarabele

noon.


Mondai oAug. ig
and Zoning will meet at 6
p.m. at City Hall. For info'
raHF5n931n9Cultural Arts
Council will meet at 6 p.m.
at the Carrabelle City Hall
Complex, 1001 Gray Ave.
Carrabelle.

Chilla Hale cn Lnrk
Village. 9 to 10 a.m. Open
to all and free.
Al-Anon meets at 5:30
h~m.rath ernt tpscoplal
at Sixth Street and Ave. D.
For more info, call (850)
222-2294.

iig a te6 Faki

6 p.m., regular bingo at
7 p.m. Cards begin at $4.
Call 697-3760.

Tuesday, Aug. 11
Apalachicola
CRA (Community
Redevelopment Authority)
will meet for a special
meeting at 9 a.m. at City
Hall. For more info, call
653-9319.
Carrabelle Historical
Society will meet at


6 p.m. at the Carrabelle
Branch of the Franklin
County Public Library,
at 311 St. James Street.
Beth LaCivita, president
of Historic Florida
Consulting, has completed
the Historic Preservation
Plan and Survey and
wil nha ea h er amzn

2141.
Apalachicola City
Commission will hold a
Budget Workshop at 6 p.m.
at City Hall. For more info,
call 653-9319.
Apalachicola
Community Gardens
will meet at 5 p.m. at
the Apalachicola Bay
Chamber of Commerce.
For more info, call 653-
9419.

Lib ar ashor He ubat 2
p.m. For more info, call
697-2366.

Frankri a taty Snior

Cfe 7 3a0r H~.meal
at 8 a.m. $2 suggested
donation. Call 697-3760.
Bingo 7 p.m. St. George

cndsp r card. Families
welcome. Proceeds go to
St. GeorgelIsland Civic
Club. Call 927-4654.

Wednesday, Aug. 12

Chilla Hle l n Lnrk
Village. 9 to 10 a.m. Open
to all and free.

Lilrr aob Irs mov or
oidrsm ei ionmo,9 11 9a.m.
2366.

Thursday, Aug. I 3
Carrabelle Public
Library, 311 St. James Ave.
offers Adults Wii from 9 to
11 a.m. Yoga at 4:30 p.m.
For more info, call 697-
2366.

Lib ar poo ts Sto Hour
at 10 a.m., and individual
computer instruction from
10 a.m. to noon. For more

now I ein star
Quilting Club. Chillas Hall
Lanark Village. 1 to 3 p.m.
Call Christine Hinton 697-
2551.
Community Luncheon
and Information
Specials at the Franklin
County Senior Center
in Carrabelle. Noon. $3
donation. Call 697-3760.


.


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Phone: (850) 653-8122
Cell: (850) 653-7654


B4 | The Times


County CALENDAR


-d


$ ~F)$~
































CITY ELECTION INFORMATION

The cities of Apalachicola and Carrabelle will be holding a municipal
election on the following date:

September 8, 2009

VOTER REGISTRATION DEADLINE

August 10, 2009

ABSENTEE VOTING
If you need to have an absentee ballot mailed to you please contact the
Franklin County Supervisor of Elections at 653-9520 or 697-0503. The
elections office is located at 47 Avenue F, Apalachicola, Florida.

EARLY VOTING
Early Voting will be conducted for both elections
August 31, 2009 September 4, 2009

Apalachicola Election Franklin County Elections Office 8:30 am-4:30pm
Monday-Friday

Carrabelle Elections Franklin County Annex Office 8:30am 4:30pm
Alonday-Friday

For further information please contact the elections office at 653-9520 or
697-0503

REMEMBER FLORIDA LAWS REQUIRES YOU TO HAVE PHOTO
SIGNATURE ID TO VOTE OR YOU MUST VOTE A PROVISIONAL
BALLOT


ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS

Sealed Bids will be received by the City of Apalachicola, Community
Center 1 Bay Avenue, Apalachicola, Florida, 32320 until two o'clock
p.m. (2:00) September 1, 2009 at which time and place all Bids will be
publicly opened and read aloud, for the construction of:

REUSE WATER AND LAND APPLICATION SYSTEM

Any Bids received after closing time will be returned unopened.

A mandatory pre-bid meeting will be held on August 18 2009 at 10:00
a.m. at the offices of the City of Apalachicola, Community Center, 1 Bay
Avenue, Apalachicola, Florida, 32320.

Contract documents, including drawings and specifications relative
thereto may be inspected at the Dodge Plan Room at 201 South F Street,
Pensacola, Florida, and the office of the Consultant, Baskerville-Donovan'
Inc., 22219 Panama City Beach Pkwy, Suite 200, Panama City Beach,
Florida or 449 West Main Street, Pensacola, Florida, and at the City of
Apalachicola, Community Center, 1 Bay Avenue, Apalachicola, Florida,
32320. Paper copies of the plans and specifications may be secured from
the Consultant at a cost of $250.00 per set, which is non-refundable.

Questions regarding plans and specifications can be addressed to the
Consultant via fax, e-mail or US mail at the following address:

Baskerville-Donovan, Inc.
Attn: Richard Delp, CSI, CDT
449 West Main Street
Pensacola, FL 32502
Phone: 850-438-9661 ext 4314
Fax: 850-433-6761
E-mail: rdelp7@baskervilledonovan .com

No questions will be entertained after 2:00 p.m. on August 25, 2009.

Each Bid shall be submitted on the form supplied by the Engineer. Each
Bid must be accompanied by certified check or Bid Bond in the amount of
five percent (5%) of the Base Bid as guarantee that the Bidder, if awarded
the Contract will within ten (10) consecutive calendar days after written
notice being given or such award, enter into a written contract with the
Owner in accordance with the accepted Bid, and give a one hundred
percent (100%) Performance Bond and one hundred percent (100%)
labor and material Payment Bond satisfactory to the Owner. No Bids
may be withdrawn after the scheduled closing time for receipt of Bids for
a period of forty-five (45) days.

The Owner reserves the right to waive formalities in bidding and reject
any and all Bids.


LOIS SWOBODA | The Times

Fundraising for fire protection

Apalachicola firefighter and first responder Charma Buckhalter takes part
in recent fundraising activities in downtown Apalachicola on behalf of the
department. Local firefighters have followed up on Mayor Van Johnson's
request for private fundraising by passing the hat downtown, and have so
far raised more than $1,000.



Sheriff's REPORT


FRANKLIN COUNTY BOARD OF
C COUNTY C OMMI/I SSIO NE RS
NOTICE OF SOLICITATION REQUEST
FOR QUALIFICATIONS
foI.
3 IDE WALK IM/P ROV EME NT
PROJECTS CEI SERVICES

Notice is hereby given that the Franklin County Board of County Commissioners is
seeking Proposals of Qualification for Construction Engineering & Inspection Services
for 3 Sidewalk Improvement Projects in Franklin County, Flonida. Locations are (a)
St. George Island, FPID No., 426681-1-58-01; (b) C.R. 384, Bluff Road, Apalachicola,
FPID No. 426623-1-58-01, and; (c) S.R. 300, Franklin Blvd., St. George Island, FPID
No 426633-1-58-01

RFQ details are on file at the Franklin County Courthouse Annex located at 34 Forbes
Street, Suite 1 in Apalachicola, Hlorida 32320. and on the County's website at www.
franklincountyflonida.com.

Proposals of Qualification will be evaluated by the Franklin County Board of County
Commissioner's Director of Administrative Services and the County Commission.
The County retains the right to reject any or all proposals.

Please submit Three (3) copies to:
Franklin County Board of County Commissioners,
34 Forbes Street, Suite 1,
Apalachicola, FL 32320

All Submissions must be clearly marked "3 Sidewalk Improvement Projects CEI
Services "and submitted to Alan Pierce, Director of Administrative Services, Franklin
County Board of County Commissioners, 34 Forbes Street, Suite 1, Apalachicola, FL
by 4:00 pm EST on Friday August 14, 2009.


Thursday, August 6, 2009


Local


The Times | B5


The president of Utilco,
a Tifton, Ga., company
specializing in repaired
railroad tracks, engines
and beds after accidents,
has taken the World War II
)UKW owned by the Camp
Gordon Johnston (CGJ)
museum and completed
the final restoration of this
amphibious truck.
Buddy Bryan, the presi-
lent of Utilco, is also a
board member of the CGJ
association and is donating
all the labor and materials
needed for the restoration.


Buddy was a personal
friend of Anthony Falotico,
a Tifton businessman, and
is dedicating his company's
efforts to the memory of
Mr. Falotico. Tony Falotico
was sent to Camp Gordon
Johnston in 1943 and met,
and married, his wife Hel-
en while stationed there.
Helen was a secretary at
the main camp motor pool.
After serving in the
Pacific Tony and Helen
settled in Tifton and raised
their family. Tony and
Helen attended CGJ Days


reunions and often visited
the museum. Tony passed
away three years ago but
is survived by and son and
daughter as well as Helen.
Helen, now in her nineties,
will give a talk at the dedi-
cation ceremony on Friday,
Aug. 7, at 1 p.m.
The public is invited to
come see and hear a bit of
Franklin County history.
The CGJA is deeply grate-
ful to have the support of
members and well wishers
such as the Falotico family
and Utilco corporation.


The following report is
provided by the Franklin
County Sheriff's Office.
Arrests are made by of-
ficers from the following
city, county, and state law
enforcement agencies:
Apalachicola (APD), Car-
rabelle (CPD), Florida
Highway Patrol (FHP) '
Franklin County Sheriff's
Office (FCSO), Florida
Fish and Wildlife Conser-
vation Commission (FWC),
Florida Department of En-
vironmental Protection
(FDEP), Florida Division
of Insurance Fraud (DIF)
and Florida Department of
Agriculture and Consumer
Services (FLDOACS).
All defendants are con-
sidered innocent until prov-
en guilty in a court of law.


UJul gg
David A. Gloner 28
Apalachicola, indecent ex-
posure (FCSO)

Jul 29
Donald G. Dempsey, 27,
Carrabelle, driving while
license suspended or re-
voked (CPD)

July 31
George O. Bailey, Jr., 45,
Apalachicola, DUI (FCSO)
Jason M. Rucker, 34,
Eastpoint, scheming to de-
fraud (FCSO)

Aug 1
James C. Yon, 43,
Eastpoint, trespass after


warning (FCSO)
Kit C. Mashburn III, 26,
Apalachicola, felony-bat-
tery (FCSO)
George D. Power III,
26, Apalachicola, DUI
(APD)

AUg.
Joseph Green, Jr., 22,
Havana, possession of par-
aphernalia and reckless
driving (FCSO)

Au 4
James E. West, 48,
Apalachicola, domestic
battery (APD)
Esmeralda Dominguez,
41, Apalachicola, trespass
on property after warning
(APD)


Camp Gordon Johnston

to dedicate restored vehicle





Franklin County's source of news for more than a century


| zzo |
forth In said Final Judg-
ment, to wit:

LOTS 15 AND 16, BLOCK
177 (2) KEOUGH'S FIRST
ADDITION, SECTION 20,
TOWNSHIP 7 SOUTH,
RANGE 4 WEST AND
BLOCK 2 (177) LOT 16,
KEOUGH'S FIRST CITY
OF CARRABELLE.

ANY PERSON CLAIMING
AN INTEREST IN THE
SURPLUS FROM THE
SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY
OWNER AS OF THE DATE
OF THE LIS PENDENS
MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER
THE SALE.

In accordance with the
Americans with Disabilities
Act (ADA), disabled per-
sons who, because of their
disabilities, need special
accommodation to particl-
pate In this proceeding
should contact the ADA
Coordinator at 33 Market
Street, Sulte 203, Apalachl-
cola, FL 32320 or Tele-
phone Volce/TDD (904)
653-8861 prior to such
proceeding.

Dated this 21st day of July
2009.

Marcla Johnson
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Terry E. Creamer
Deputy Clerk

Law Office of Marshall C.
Watson
1800 NW 49th Street, Suite
120
Fort Lauderdale, Florida
33309
Telephone: (954) 453-0365
Facsimile: (954) 771-6052
Toll Free: 1-800-441-2438
August 6, 13, 2009

3N2 TE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 2nd JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR FRANKLIN
COUNTY

N co 17ss at n Bank
Plaintiff

-vs.-

John R. Moody; Washing-
ton Wultuatl B~ank;


1-0 8-CA-000091
Division #:
UNC:


N ENCE ODF SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY

GIV)EN pursuan tof cl or

2009 entered In Civil Case

t~he Cicui rt t~h~e 2nod
Judicial Circuit In and for
Franklin County, Florida,
wherein JPMorgan Chase
Bank, National Assocla-
tlon, Plaintiff and John R.
Moody are defendantss, I
wilsell tc the higchaesst a d

THE WEST FRONT DOOR


OOCUANEO UHW N98

APAbdHOLA 009 e

set forth In said Final Judg-
ment, to-wit:

LOT 10, BLOCK A, SEA
DUNE VILLAGE AS PER
MAPOORRDEPAT ITNHERPEL

BHOEOKPUBALTCPARGEEC201R

OFORFIRANKLIN COUNTY



OBHEIGEMRAND O A-

TCE TDHET ERTOORA
ALL TENEMENTS, HERE-
DIETAMSENTS, AMP OE
NANCES, RIGHTS, EASE-
MENTS, LICENSES, BEN-

SOYTRH E NO GELNG
PERTAINING HEREINAF-
TER TO THE "PROPERTY

ANY PERSON CLAIMING
AN INTEREST IN THE
SURPLUS FROM THE
SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY
OWNER AS OF THE DATE
OF THE LIS PENDENS
MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER
THE SALE.

DATED at Apalachicola,
Florida, this 16th day of
July, 2009.

Marcla M. Johnson
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT
COURT
Franklin County, Florida
By: Michele Maxwell
Deputy Clerk

ATTORNEY FOR PLAIN-
TIFF:
SHAPIRO & FISHMAN,
LLP
10004 N. Dale Mabry High-
way, Sulte 112
Tampa, FL 33618
(813) 880-8888
08-090954
August 6, 13, 2009

3N2T7HTE CIRCUIT COURT
SCONDANDUFDICIAL CN -
LIN COUNTY, FLORIDA

A ALACHaCOd 18 STATE

COASTAL COMMUNITY
BNptra oFlorida Banking
Plaintiff.

vs.


COASTAL DREAM
HOMES, LLC; STEVE R.


| 1100 |
MACCHIARELLA, DARRYL
ODOM, and ST. JAMES
BAY PROPERTY OWNERS
ASSOCIATION, INC.,
Defendants.

CIVIL ACTION NO.
09-000073-CA

NOTICE OF ACTION

TO: Steve R. Macchlarella
1605 German Town Park-
way
Memphis, TN 38101

Coastal Dream Homes,
LLC
c/o Steve R. Macchlarella
1605 German Town Park-
way
Memphis, TN 38101

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that a
complaint for foreclosure
on the following real prop-
erty:

Parcel 1:
Lot 5, Block H of ST.
JAMES BAY SUBDIVI-
SION, according to the
Plat thereof as recorded In
Plat Book 7, Pages 39-46,
of the Public Records of
Franklin County, Florida.

Parcel 2:
Lot 8, Block H of ST.
JAMES BAY SUBDIVI-
SION, according to the
Plat thereof as recorded In
Plat Book 7, Pages 39-46,
of the Public Records of
Frankin County, Florida.

has been filed against you
and you are required to
serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, If any, on
Mitch Dever, plaintiffs at-
torney, whose address Is
PO. Box 9811, Panama
City Beach, Florida 32417,
30 days from first date of
publication, and file the
original with the clerk of
this court either before
service on plaintiff's attor-
ney or Immediately there-
after, otherwise a default
will be entered against you
for the relief demanded In
the complaint.

WITNESS my hand and
the seal of this court on the
10th day of July, 2009.

Clerk of the Circuit Court
Sreacnokni Cuoiia t a

Dy:Michtle eMaxwell
July 30, August 6, 2009

3298T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE SECOND JUDI-

ARL F RNCKULI OU TY

VOLRIADCATION

WASHINGTON MUTUAL
BANK F/K/A WASHING-
aNntMUTUAL BANK, F.A.,

vs

KAREN BETH MIL-
LENDER, et al,
Defendant(s).

CSSEONO.: 2008-CA-0191


NES CHEEDULED SALE


Ne NCE St HEREBo

sure Sale dated July 13,
2009, and entered In Case
No. 2008-CA-0191 of the
Circuit Court of the Sec-
ondFJud cal Circut In and

td In hc fWk sohin
Ington Mutual bank, FA.,

BetthheM I nd r, deanta #
n/k/a Nickl Kilby, Tenant
ed dka Rnbr w t ln


dru tr caFh rnn tFran e n
3rd day of September,
d09,thpr fotwinas t

fot I Fai clu : Judg-


TRR CBS CUNI G OF
ONE, ACCORDING TO

BOR3 DTGHE EO OF TLAA
PUBLIC RECORDS OF
FRANKLIN COUNTY
FLORIDA.

A/K/A 139 APALACHEE
STREET, CARABELLE, FL
32322

Any perso eclainingsan In-
the sale, If any, other than
the property owner as of

tehnes mut til alIm wti
60 days after the sale.

Dated In Franklin County
Florida this 16th day of
July, 2009.

Clerk of the Circuit Court
Franklin County, Florida
By: Michele Maxwell
Deputy Clerk

In accordance with the
Americans with Disabllties
Act, persons needing spe-
clal accommodation to
participate In this proceed-

I erk ofT C the Cut Mrl

Street, Snust 2033 Apal h
Icoma, L 230: eep~ho0nle
not later than seven (7)
days prior to this proceed-

noic I ir d, peaae call
(850) 577-4400.

Albertelll Law
Attorney for Plaintiff

Oama xF2L3303623
08813)5521-4743
August 6, 13, 2009.


| zzoo |
3311T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE SECOND JUDI-
CIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY
FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION

THE BANK OF NEWYORK
MELLON FORMERLY
KNOWN AS THE BANK OF
NEW YORK AS SUCCES-
SOR TRUSTEE TO JP
MORGAN CHASE BANK
N.A. AS TRUSTEE,
Plaintff,

VS.

SHELLY GALLOWAY et al,
Defendant(s).

CASE NO.:
19-2008-CA-000532
DIVISION:

NOTICE OF ACTION

TO:
THE UNKNOWN TRUSTEE
OF THE SHELLEYM.GAA L-
LOWAY REVOCABLE LIV-
ING TRUST DATED APRIL
7, 2008

LAST KNOWN ADDRESS:
UNKNOWN

CURRENT ADDRESS:
UNKNOWN

THE UNKNOWN BENEFl-
CIARIES OF THE SHEL-
LEY M. GALLOWAY REVO-
CABLE LIVING TRUST
DATED APRIL 7, 2008

LAST KNOWN ADDRESS:
UNKNOWN

CURRENT ADDRESS:
UNKNOWN

ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN
PARTIES CLAIMING BY
THROUGH, UNDER, AND
AGAINST THE HEREIN
NAMED INDIVIDUAL
DEFENDANTS) WHO ARE
NOT KNOWN TO BE
DEAD OR ALIVE,
WHETHER SAID UN-
KNOWN PARTIES MAY
CLAIM AN INTEREST AS
SPOUSE, HEIRS, DEVI-
SEES, GRANTEES, OR
OTHER CLAIMANTS

LAST KNOWN ADDRESS:
UNKNOWN

CURRENT ADDRESS:
UNKNOWN

YOU ARE tNOTclrIEDsthaa

mortgage on the following
property In FRANKLIN
County, Florida:

LOT 6, BLOCK A, THREE
UDERED ATCEAONR M

ORTH LD DTNERE F
BOOK 5, PAGE 26, OF

OER PUA ILCNR CO


has been filed a ainst you
and you are re ulred to
serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses within 30
days after the first publica-
tor, If aonrF lorlda D~e-

Plaintiffs attorney, whose
dress s 919SCorpo te


Pae DrvSie30


mediately thereafter; other-
wise a default will be en-
tered against you for the
relief demanded In the
Complaint or petition.

Ths d trc shl e pb
two consecutive weeks In
tTe eThe Apalachicola



t Sdaloaf hsh a rt a0

Marcla M. Johnson
Clerk of the Court
Dy:Terry E. CCamer

Florida Default Law Group,
PL.

Oamp~a Flr 8
33622-5018

Auus 6,3, 2009
3314T
IN THE SECOND JUDI-
CIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY
FLORIDA

BAYSIDE SAVINGS BANK,
Plaintiff

vs.

LISA M. MACOY f/k/a
LISA HOPPER,
Defendant.

CASE NO. 08-000562-CA

NOTICE OF SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN pursuant to a Final
Judgment of Foreclosure
dated July 27, 2009, and
enteredIn Civil Action No.
08-000562-CA of the Cir-
cult Court of the Second
Judicial Circuit In and for
Franklin County, Florida,
wherein the parties were
the Plaintiff, BAYSIDE SAV-
INGS BANK, and the De-
fendant, LISA M. MACOY
toi LS hHPPtEa dlbwil
b d er, fo ecash te 1 :


2009, at the front steps of
the Franklin County Court-
h usethApalachiccla, Fdor-
scribed real prope ty as
set forth Insald mia Judg-


Lotbd3,Palmettop Vl ae, a

pla tBeefa reac d~ed I


|1100
Plaintiff,

-vs.-

Seong S. Cho; Metro City
Bank;
Defendant(s).

Case #: 2009-CA-000140
Division #:
UNC:

NOTICE OF SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN pursuant to an Or-
der of Final Judgment of
Foreclosure dated July 27,
2009, entered In Civil Case
No. 2009-CA-000140 of the
Circuit Court of the 2nd Ju-
dlclal Circuit In and for
Franklin County, Florida,
wherein JPMorgan Chase
Bank, National
Association,Plaintiff and
Seong S. Cho are
defendantss, I will sell to
the highest and best bid-
der for cash, AT THE
WEST FRONT DOOR OF
THE FRANKLIN COUNTY
COURTHOUSE, LOCATED
ON HWY 98, IN APALACH-
ICOLA, FLORIDA, AT
11:00 A.M. on September
10, 2009 the following de-
scribed property as set
forth In said Final Judg-
ment, to-wit:

LOT 18, UNRECORDED:
COMMENCE AT A TERRA
COTTA CONCRETE MON-
UMENT MARKING THE
NORTHEAST CORNER OF
SECTION 3, TOWNSHIP 8
SOUTH, RANGE 5 WEST,
FRANKLIN COUNTY,
FLORIDA, AND RUN
SOUTH 00 DEGREES 34
MINUTES 20 SECONDS
WEST 793.17 FEET TO
THE NORTHERLY
RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUND-
ARY OF U.S. HIGHWAY
NO. 98, THENCE RUN
SOUTH 59 DEGREES 40
MINUTES 00 SECONDS
WEST ALONG SAID
RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUND-
ARY 937.89 FEET TO A
CONCRETE MONUMENT
(MARKED #4261) MARK-
ING THE POINT OF BE-
GINNING. FROM SAID
POINT OF BEGINNING

ANBDHT-OLEAV GBOUSNA
ARY RUN NORTH 29 DE-



DGREES 40 MINUTES 00
SECONDS WES 10.1
400FEET TO A CONCRT
02NUME ENCMEARRK


(MARKED #4261 LYIN

N.9 THENCE RUN SUH5
NOT DEGREES 40 MNTS0


MINUTES 00 SECONDS
EAST ALONGFEET SAI

RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUND-
POIN OF BEGINNING.W


NRTH5 RERE S O E


MUST FILEN ACAIM
WIGTHIN 60 AYS AFTER
THE10.1 SA E. TT H




PARTICIPTER IN THIS

TOCLEEDDIFNG, NOUC E
TO OU T THE PROVI-T


M0NTC FFL N CSOI


WIHINOF0 DY20URWRERCEP
T S LETSONIEHAR
INGO IMAIRED CALL:S
1-R8009V505187711ITFY DH



PCEaDIG tahti Apacco
JuTly, 2009. COS

CLOEURRKTOF THE CIRCUIT

Frankliakln CountyFlrd



004 Nrthoe Dal Mabrye
Hwyee, Sulte 120 Aa
Tampcoa, Flord 33618

WINTHE ICI T COURTI
OF THES 2NDJUICIALF
CIRCUI IN ANRD FORL
FRANKLIN8771 COUNTY


LASALLOE BMANK NA
TIOALL ASSOCIATION,7



ASTRUSE OFO THE ICT
C-BSS MOTGG

LCOT IFCAAS BSACR

0TOR F2F PLIN



MHAICHLL K. HICS:ANY
AN LL CUNKN N PB


THRUGHs UNDER AND

AG TlENDST JDIHVEDRU


DEOFTENANOTWSNWTHOOAE


the Public Records of
Franklin County, Florida

The successful bidder at
the sale will be required to
place the requisite state
documentary stamps on
the Certificate of Title.

DATED this 27th day of
July, 2009.

Hon. MARCIA JOHNSON
Clerk of the Court
Franklin County, Florida
By: Michele Maxwell
As Deputy Clerk

FRANK A. BAKER, ATTOR-
NEY ATLAW
4431 Lafayette Street
Marianna, FL 32446
August 6, 13, 2009
3340T

ATAERTOFT ORFA ENVI-
RONMENTAL PROTEC-


NOT CEAOFON

The De artment an-
nounces receipt of an ap-
plication for permit from
Grace Bay Property
Owner's Association, Inc.
c/o Garlick Environmental
PO. Box 385, Apalachl-
cola, FL 32329, File No.
19-0296384-001-DF, to
csrc dackmu ti nrn l
of a 420 foot by 4 foot
walkway, a 26 foot by 6
foot terminus, six 20 foot
by 12 foot boat slips, and
two 20 foot by 2 foot finger
plers. The proposed proj-
ect will be located In St.
George Sound, St. George
Island; Section 29, Town-
ship 9 South, Range 6
West, Franklin County.

This application Is being
p ocesse andeIstavail bl
f pubi Ispeto dr
Ing normal business hours
8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Monday through Friday
except legal holidays, at
the Northwest District

aapntcah Crccee N rth6 st3
Tallahassee, Florida
32301.
August 6, 2009
3353T

ONF TTHHE RECC NDC JD

ARL FRANCKULl CNOUANN
FLORIDA

GULF STATE COMMU-
NITY BANK,
Plaintiff,



WILLIAM M. CAWLEY and
RbEaSnA aM WTRUBILLA
Defendant(s)

CASE NO.: 08-000545-CA

NOTICE OF SALE

NOTICE Is hereby given
that, pursuant to the Order
of Final Summary Judg-
ment of Foreclosure In this
Fae In nth~eoCri ICrodua
I will sell the property situ-
atd de Fsrnb d aCounty,

Lot 1 Hreon Bay Vleage


Plat Book 5, at Pages 20
and 21 of the public rec-
ords of Franklin County
Florida.

at Public Sale, to the high-
es bbsdd for cash, r te
County Courthouse, Apa-
lachicola, F~lcmda, t 11:0

2009.

Any pelrsoeclaimn anusa

te sae ef anywaotherasha

the date of the Ils pend-
ertsinmustd si aftclim
sale.

WITNESS my hand and

t3h0eh da fJly, 209. hs


CER heFe MHE CIRCUIT

Deputy Clerk

Steve M. Watkins, Ill

N1Commn7c Street
Apalachicola, FL 32320
A8u50) 53- 94909

3354T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE SECOND JUDI-
CIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR FDRAANKLIN COUNTY

GULF STATE COMMU-
NITY BANK,
Plaintiff,



GREG EARL TOMBLINE
and DARLENE A. LONG
Husband and Wife
Def endant(s)

CASE NO.: 08-000163-CA

NOTICE OF SALE

NOTICE Is hereby given
that, pusuaut rohe Or e

m e ~n t nof F e u r e I n t

I will sell the property situ-
ated In Franklin County,
Florida described as:

Commence at the South-
tehaest tonr fLot 53 ran
Lot 45 of Southland, a sub-
dlvso s cperdmap or Pp a

Pulc Rec~ods o F ane


County, Florida and run
South 58 degrees 30 mln-
utes 00 seconds West
along the Northwesterly
right-of-way boundary of
Squires Road 132.00 feet
to a re-rod and cap
(marked #7160) marking
the POINT OF BEGINN-
ING. From said POINT OF
BEGINNING continue
South 58 degrees 30 mln-
utes 00 seconds West
along said right-of-way
boundary 132.00 feet to a
re-rod and cap (marked
#7160), thence leaving
said right-of-way boundary
run North 31 degrees 33
minutes 29 seconds West
330.00 feet to a re-rod and
cap (marked #7160),
thence run North 58 de-
grees 30 minutes 00 sec-
onds East 132.00 feet to a
re-rod and cap (marked
#7160), thence run South
31 degrees 33 minutes 29
seconds East 330.00 feet
to the POINT OF BEGINN-
ING containing 1.00 acres,
more or less.

at Public Sale, to the high-
est bidder, for cash, at the
steps of the Franklin
County Courthouse, Apa-
lachicola, Florida, at 11:00
a.m. on September 10,
2009.

Any person claiming an In-
terest In the surplus from
the sale, If any, other than
the property owner as of
the date of the Ils pend-
ens, must file a claim
within 60 days after the
sale.

WITNESS my hand and
the seal of this Court this
30th day of July, 2009.

CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT
COURT
By: Michele Maxwell
Deputy Clerk

Steve M. Watkins, Ill
FBN: 0794996
41 Commerce Street
Apalachicola, FL 32320
(850) 653-1949
August 6, 13, 2009
3359T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY
FLORIDA


ST LE TDENAOLFD RAIN-
WATER a/k/a STANLEY D.
RAINWATdER


File No. 09-00030CP
Division Probate

NOTICE TO CREDITORS

The administration of the
Lstte ofANLE DOd

death was September 26,
2008000 s pe r mber
the Circuit Court for Frank-
Iln County, Florida, Pro-
bate Division; the address
of which Is 33 Market
Street, Apalachicola, Flor-
Ida 32320. The names and
aedpeessesn tcf th dpt sn
sonal representative s at-

tolncy r Itrsetofot ebelew





notice Is required to be
served must file their
claims with this court
WITHIN THE LATER OF 3
MONTHS AFTER THE
TMAETOFNTHOEFFIRHS PU -

TCEEO 30 DAYS ARFTE

NOTI ECOONTHOF THIS



don taing cls or d
mands agalns tedh r as

with this court WITHIN 3

MAOT OHFSTHE FT TPTUHE
LOCATION OF THIS NO-
TICE.


WTHCN S NIOTE PE C
ODS SET FORTH IN SEC-

F OID7A PR7 ATOEFCT
WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.

NOTWITHSTANDING THE
TIME PERIODS SET
FORTH ABOVE, ANY
CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER
THE DECEDENT'S DATE
OF DEATH IS BARRED.

The date of the first publl-
cation of this notice Is Au-
gust 6, 2009.

Personal Representative:
JOHN MICHAEL RAINWA-
TER
23C Gurley Drive
Rome, Georgla 30165
Attorneys for Personal
Representative:
GEORGE H. GWYNN
Florida Bar No. 0357537
WILLIAMS, GAUTIER,
GWYNN, DELOACH &
SORENSON, PA.
Post Office Box 4128
Tallahassee, FL
32315-4128
Telephone: (850) 386-3300
August 6, 13, 2009

6NT E CIRCUIT COURT
OFALTHERSCECONID JUDI-
FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY
FLORIDA

GULF STATE COMMU-
NITY BANK,
Plaintiff,

vs.

ELLIOTT FANN and

Cn~dR We UNTNEDHSu TE
OF AMERICA,


Defendants.

CASE NO. 09-00071-CA

NOTICE OF SALE

NOTICE Is hereby given
that, pursuant to the Order
of Final Summary Judg-
ment of Foreclosure In this
cause, In the Circuit Court
of the Franklin County,
Florida, I will sell the prop-
erty situated In Franklin
County, Florida described
as:

Lot 11, Block O, according
to that certain plat known
as St. George Island Gulf
County Beaches, Unit 2, A
Subdivision as per plat
thereof recorded In Plat
Book 2, Page 15, of the
Public Records of Franklin
County, Florida.

a/k/a 120 11th Street, St.
George Island, Florida.

at public Sale, to the high-
est and best bidder for
cash, at the steps of the
Franklin County Court-
house, Apalachicola, Flor-
Ida, at 11:00 a.m. on Au-
gust 20, 2009.

Any person claiming an In-
terest In the surplus from
the sale, If any, other than
the property owner as of
the date of the Ils pend-
ens, must file a claim
within 60 days after the
sale.

WITNESS my hand and
the seal of this Court this
22nd day of June, 2009.

CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT
COURT
BY: MICHELE MAXWELL
Deputy Clerk

Steve M. Watkins, Ill
FBN: 0794996
41 Commerce Street
Apalachicola, FL 32320
(850) 653-1949
August 6, 13, 2009
3371T
TAHNED C RCUFTRACNOKUL
COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION

RBC CENTURY BANK
PLAINTIFF

VS.

BRYAN L. SANFORD, ET
AL.
DEFENDANTS

CASE NO: 08-371-CA


NOO CLOSURE SALE

NOTINCEur ntI- EREBY
mary Final Judgment of
Frclosureddated IvulyC2 ,

No. 08-371-CA of the Cir-
cult Court In and for
FRANKLIN County, Flor-
Ida, I will sell to the highest
and best bidder for cash at
FRONT STEPS OF THE

OAUNR NUSE, C30UMNATR
KET STREET, APALACHI-



s~m 11 t e dot peday o




LOT 14 OF ANGLERS
HARBOR, ACCORDING
TO THE PLAT THEREOF
AS RECORDED IN PLAT
BO8 PTAHGAET8 ARS RIEN

REAPTLABTOORKECOMDED 31N

DFTHEOPUBICANRE -
COUNTY, FLORIDA

JDuye 0 .s 28th day of

Any person claiming an In-
terest In the surplus from
t sae ef anyw rteratshaon
the date of the Ils pendens
must file a claim within
sxte (60) days after the

Marcla M. Johnson
Clrk of th Cicult Court

Deputy Clerk

If you are a person with a
disabllty who needs any
accommodation In order
to participate In this pro-
ceeding you are entitled,
at no cost to you, to the
provision of certain assis-
tance. Please contact the
office of the Court Admin-
Istrator, FRANKLIN County
Courthouse, at within two
()c workmngt day cyo r
Sale; 1-800-955-8771
(TDD) for hearing Impaired
or 1-800-955-8770, via
Florida Relay Service.

THE LAW OFFICES OF
BAKALAR & TOPOUZIS,
PA.
ATTORNEY FOR PLAIN-
TIFF
450 N. PARK ROAD,
SUITE 410
HOLLYWOOD, FL. 33021
(954)965-9101
August 6, 13, 2009

7NTHE CIRCUIT COURT

CIALTHCEIRSCECTONIN AUN
FOR FDRAANKLIN COUNTY

CAPITAL CITY BANK
Plaintiff

vs.

JONG CHO, SEONG CHO
A/K/A SEONG S. CHO,

ERYOWN IS ASSPORCO
INOO NITNECNAan~d UN-
Defendants.


CASE NO. 09-149-CA

NOTICE OF SALE PUR-
SUANT TO CHAPTER 45

NOTICE Is given pursuant
to a Final Judgment of
Foreclosure dated July 27,
2009, In Case No.
09-149-CA, of the Circuit
Court of the Second Judl-
clal Circult, In and for
Franklin County, Florida, In
which CAPITAL CITY
BANK Is the Plaintiff and
JONG CHO, SEONG CHO
A/K/ASEONG S. CHO and
LAKE PRISTINE PROP-
ERTY OWNERS ASSOCIA-
TION, INC. are the Defend-
ants, I will sell to the high-
est and best bidder for
cash at the Front Door of
the Franklin County Court-
house In Apalachicola,
Franklin County, Florida at
11:00 a.m. on September
10, 2009, the property set
forth In the Final Judgment
of Foreclosure and more
particularly described as
follows:

LOT 3 OF LAKE PRISTINE,
PHASE 1. ACCORDING
TO THE PLAT THEREOF
AS RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK 8, PAGE 2, OF THE
PUBLIC RECORDS OF
FRANKLIN COUNTY
FLORIDA.

Any person claiming an In-
terest In the surplus from
the sale, If any, other than
the property owner as of
the date of the Ils pend-
ens, must file a claim
within sixty (60) days after
the sale.

DATED: July 27, 2009

MARCIA M. JOHNSON
Clerk of the Circuit Court
BY Michele Maxwell
Deputy Clerk

Garvin B. Bowden, sq.
Gardner, Blst, Wlener,
Wadsworth & Bowden,
PA.
1300 Thomaswood Drive
Tallahassee, Florida 32308
August 6, 13, 2009
3374T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT

CIALTHCEIRSCECTONIN AUN
FOR FDRAANKLIN COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION

BANK OF AMERICA, N.A.,
Plaintiff

VS.

JONATHAN ADAMS, et al,
Defendant(s).


19-2 O A-000284

NOTICE OF ACTION

TO:
THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE
OF JONATHAN ADAMS .
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS.
LOT 167, FIREFLY CIRCLE
ST TERESA, FL 32358

CURRENT ADDRESS:
UNKNOWN

RN ENSD ACLLLAUMNNGOW


UDAISDGAHE UH DRA

NOT KNOWN TO BE
DEAD OR ALIVE,
WHETHER SAID UN-
KNOWN PARTIES MAY
CLAIM AN INTEREST AS
SOUSEGR ITRESESDEO
OTHER CLAIMANTS

LANSKTNKONWONWNADDRESS:


CREONWTNADDRESS:


aO acto tNO frc Iseh
mortgage on the following
p~roupnt FlondaFRANKLIN

LOT 167, SUMMERCAMP
CES PANE E1FAOAANDR B

CORDED IN PLAT BOOK
9,PANGCELSS E ORFOU E
PUBLIC RECORDS OF
FRANKLIN COUNTY
FLORIDA

has been filed against you
and you are required to
serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses within 30
days after the first publica-
tlon, If any, on Florida De-
fault Law Group, PL.,
Plaintiffs attorney, whose
address Is 9119 Corporate

rkepa,D aS3id 364,3a~n
file the original with this
Court either before service
on Plaintiffs attorney or Im-
mediately thereafter; other-
wise a default will be en-
tered against you for the
relief demanded In the
Complaint or petition.

WITNESS my hand and
the seal of this Court on
this 28th day of July, 2009.

Marcla M. Johnson
Clerk of the Court
By: Michele Maxwell
As Deputy Clerk

Florida Default Law Group,


LO Ba, F 8 id
33622-5018
F08100028
August 6, 13, 2009
3379T
IONF T EC2RnCdUITUCDOCU
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
ANDN FOR FRANKLIN

JPMorgan Chase Bank,
National Association,


1100 -Legal Advertising
1110 Classified Notices
1120 Public Notices/
Announcements
1125 e ols

1130 Adoptions
1140 HappyAds
1150 -Personals
1160 -Lost
1170- Found


| 1100 |
3225T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE SECOND JUDI-
CIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY
FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION

IN RE: ESTATE OF
ALBERT PERVIS WHALEY
JR.,
Deceased.


Number:09-000020-CP

NOTICE TO CREDITORS

The administration of the
estate of Albert Perls
Whaley, Jr., deceased, File
Number 09-000020-CP Is
pending In the Circuit
Court for Franklin County,
Florida, Probate Division,
the address of which Is
Franklin County Court-
house, 33 Market Street,
Sulte 203, Apalachicola,
Florida 32320. The estate
Is testate and the date of
the will Is August 8, 2007.
The names and addresses
of the personal representa-
tive and the personal rep-
resentative's attorney are
set forth below.

All creditors of the dece-
dent and other persons
having claims or demands
against decedent's estate,
Including unmatured, con-
tingent or unliquidated
claims, on whom a copy of
hsnt ircec Is srve hm
court WITHIN THE LATER

TOHFE 3DAMEO HTSHEAFFI R
PUB IA ION YS THIS

TER THE DATE OF SERV-
INCE OFEAONCORM OF THIS

All other creditors of the
decedent and other per

smoanndsa nga na deed n'
es ae,contcludint orun a


t er al aims wTh s cor

TER THE DATE OF THE
FlHRSTN PUlBLEICATION OF

ALL CLAIMS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.

The date of first publica-
tlo200f this Notice August


C I o a p R ep r s ative:


PO.cc Drawer CC
206 W. 6thn Street
Carrabelle, FL 32322
Telephntae:85-9555
August 6, 13x, 2009


POlFCT DANDDIIOA



TaRUSTElE, F 22
Painutiff, 1 20


DAID L.E JONES:T ME

KOW H ND SPUSE OF

OIR SPPUT, SANEL NFOU
SPOUS O ATICA

PTINAL; JSOHITN DOE:

TONAOTS)T OEES-
PROPERTY
Deenans.

CASED NO.: 07-0046

RENOTIC SOFS O

FOORECLOURE SALE

JNOTICOEIAS HEREBY
GIENATS pusunt to aFnal


ruar, 209,and ntrd n
Case No.: 07-00466, fte



JudicalCicut in and flosr


Franklin County, Florida,
wherein WELLS FARGO
BANK, NATIONAL ASSO-
CIATION TRUSTEE Is the
Plaintiff and DAVID L.
JONES: MELISSA A.
JONES A/K/A MELISSA
JONES: UNKNOWN
SPOUSE OF BEVIN
OFTAL E NKN W

PANTKRNCOWNPUSL USOH
DOE; JNANEDENANT )U

POSSESSION OF THE
SUBJECT PROPERTY are
def clans I wil selld rtfhe

cash at the ON FRONT
STEPS OFrCOURTHC StE

Courthouse In Apalachl-
cola, I drda, at 11 0e0p am

scr2b0e0d9, the followlse


SB The Times Thursday, August 6, 2009





The Times Thursday, August 6, 2009 7B


DY F YOU RECCEE RthebfmcsI FooCSe~rvaesiHo Italty Aaelachicoleaoef np Wanted! 1 naV6wWehritealCamao

ING IMPAIRED CALL: take great care of your 5 CPbSt** *Staff eluded. $550 mo. Call Hos o u! n lton, cords, nAng
1-80-9558771 IF YOUE apeits, wal, bath keepvet Solid wod BRAND New Experienced, Cooks Shift 653-1675 On south side of Apa- beautiful carl $3p000 OBO
CARE: VOICE55-7 IMARE poin tem aents nd gve $249 wooC del vew r. Is evenings 850-653-6375 lachicola. Fixer upper? call 850-927-3076
CALL 1-00-55-770 longer cae whn yu an ver 100- H WatedFor Rent: Lrge 1 br canal Possible owner finance?

DATED at Apalachicola, 80559-234b4eDayor gther 54-112 4130 Em loyment POSTA LFOG JOB utlle egrouned, fr6ap all Grg80 875 Pontiac Grand Prix 1995
Florida, this 27th day of I nomto NOFRSL? yr lease, $825 mo $500 $425 Down $2,900 Total


Mrlao0 Johnson d14 Iue Mattlress s~ Caution derLanar e65 tge7/u Dr~ y / s utesetezan

Clrk nf Cunty FBrCUI 0 E 4 1Cn Deliver ueri r4n0at ne bpia tshe 8bsa, heo d mur W~hw ennA o2ra6nan tHwy 98 215-1769

ByEPMIl ehEMnaxwell DISa uaran os pocotacttbs I de r, no sokng, pet con. H -ume tE

ATTORNEY FOR 3100 -Antiques $289 BRAND NEW pil- FThe Federal Trade L ap naurk isahee, 1WOUGH fle LANDHNOG.
PLANTFF Aplin~es lowtop King Mattress Set. Commission I C/H/A, yard $550 mo, eenprved Affordable Lwv-
SHAIR &FIHMN,3130 -Autios &Cat Still In plastic w Warranty. Is America's consumer 1st & last. Ask for Jim appong, the For otten Coast
LLP 34-Bbytes 425-8374. Can deliver prtcinaec. 850-697-2788 bdrm, 2 bath homes
10004 North Dale Mabry 3150 Building Supplies ragn ..o ..0-00 ... ..
or1361 ce wwT~f tc Fo iob cams S~tuudio hAepd bf n Carrbl' Nwst

August 6, 13, 2009 o10-Eem trni 100% LEATHER LIVING A public service Upstairs studio frmte arbll ier | 8 2
3200 Firewood ROOM SET New, hard- message from the FTC Qulet location, water & Pricing from the $100,000s Jeep Cherokee 1996
3210 Free Pass it On wood foundation w/llfetime and The News Herald electric Incl'd. Walk to Pick your Lot. $ 5 9 5
3384T 0- ard Sales warranty, sacrifice $649. Classified Advertising downtown. $700 mo. plus Choose Your Model. down. $4,900 Includes tax,
INTH CRUI CUT 3240 -Guns/Yr~ae (deliver avall). 222-9879 Department deposit 850-653-9116 or Only 8 lots left! doc stamps, Ilc fees, NO
IN AND FOR FRANKLIN 3250 Good Things to Eat 807477 o pt BEC & Company, Inc. Extras! 0% Interest also
ONRY FLFRD ICTIO Health Ftns Sales/Business Dev. Vreeaprb l (850) 656-2608 layligh HA to98Fanancn


3EEA UIDCIN 3280 Pacbnts&Srub/ ,, .., Work from home, FT eee orcs Ph 80-92-232
Suplie PT. a F rih mo e I onfo call f.valow! in *

VS. 3330 -Restaurant/Hotel 1-800-341-9810 :
3340 -Sporting GoodsWe d3052
MICHAEL FORSLUND, ET, 3350 Tickets (Buy &Sell) | 120
AL. A Ba Blr
DEFENDANT .. Beautiful 6 piece QUEENBec
Solid Wood Bedroom Set IIMMEDIATE Rentals-Sales HU E Nsa ahid~18
CASE NO: 08-376-CA | 3110 w/ dovetail drawers. Still In OPENING BY OWNER H U E Nsa ahidr18
boxes. $2,400 value, must Vli echelye $395 Down $2,900 Total.
NOTICE OF Used Washers $150.00 sacrifice $799 222-9879. FOR Vs Bahelyn Saturday Aug 8th Price Includes tax, doc
FORECLOSURE SALE Used Dryers $100.00 Can deliver 10a-2p stmp, lcfesN
NOIC I HREYPlease Call 850-653-5307 A SSA T ELESA 0 9 eNAE 6tnhu reet Etas! 0% utnte~r stn Ilso
GWVEN purlsuandgto ae? BUSNES mon ..,S.Gereoug' L {tino m86tW9Hwy 98 215-1769-
Foreclosure dated July | 2oBedroom Set OFFICE Cs o jo"""'c Ilad Keller Willams
CaeN:08-36C of t 6 piece. $599. Brand IMANYAGER 8120 ec ent ue2br a br aelie Town & Countr Realty
Circuit Court In and for Newil Can deliver 10 HueRnas ulIc.$2/wCl .
FRANKLIN County, Flor- 85-22-78 65 Roommate Wanted 806351

Id a I w I he l o she 2NahEs e1 6 roo ro m i s

COURTHOUSE, 33 MAR- 222-7783 Bookshelf or TV/VCR 2 br, 2 ba, 1200sf Twnhm Bo 6,Lt 21
KET STREET, APALACHI- 1 stand, 3 pc coffee table Carrabelle, large deck $000o a iie
COLA, FLORIDA, at 11:00 set. ALL Brand new In box $650 mo. $650 dep. Nice0 orvatene hborhood
a.m. on the 10th Day of pi p $99 ea. set. 545-7112 1 1 6100 Available 08/01/09 Call for Nic prvt 9ihoh
September, 2009 the fol- FrLae an appt. 850-562-4996. -rdS.6389 r| 8 3
lowing described property 2o Piece Liin oo et Cey ull 19 $9
as set forth In said Sum- NE.10 ir ie ~m ril,,down $4,900 Includes tax,
mary Final Judgement, to $a499,d dlvery available. Building Not~strcitr ict docn sxtramps, Inc eres. NlO
wit: 2-78 Cherry SOLID Approx 1100 sq ft. Lanark Village, Carlton lth$45,0S0t0e bo. 6bud Exr sl0%ineesas
LOT 7 OF BLOCK 1, ST WOOD Slelgh Bed. $249. Available now Corner St., 1 br 1 ba, all tile, Cornerh ltBrkspo- 1 HAut 098 ncln
JAMS AY SBDII- Fil D rt NEW In box $50of Hwy 98 & 12th Street wakI lst adodtce.Cl 0-1-07 9am to 9pm
SION AS PER MAP OR 425-8374 806398or pays some utilities.
PLAT THEREOF RE- F CS I 850 6150058 $525/mo + $300/dep. g. - ., w- $ i-
CORDED IN PLAT BOOK F~ a e,706-717-0055 or U.S.
pUB CAE 3-6,ROF T 8435-9 Treasury Dept
FRANLIN RCOUNTY CEI Comfortable Recliner. 610,Public Auction
FLORIDA. Brand new, 100% Micro- Wed. Aug 12th, 10am
Datd tis sthdayof 50.53.619 fiber $199. 222-9879 Delly- I rX i~ m~~r I1 br, 1 ba, 2nd story w/ | 6140 11 .67 acre residential
Datd tis 8thdayof 50-53-610 ery Available balcony In hisoric down- 1 br house In Carrabelle, II land, 2327 Magnolla
July, 2009 town Apalachicola. W/D newly remodeled, $550 Dr.Panama City Beach
APPLY IN PERSONY Incl, furn, or unfurn, $700 mo. (850) 697-4080 or Zoned, single family
Any person claiming an In- 220 9TH STREET, mo 1st, last, & security, (850) 228-3717 residence. Ford 1995 F-150 $595
terest In the surplus from PORT ST JOE, FL Call 850-323-0599 Located In Magnolla Es- Down $3,900 total. Price
the sale, If any, other than or FAX RESUIME TO 1, 2, & 3, br states w/ private paved Includes tax, doc stamps,
the property owner a s of Dinette Set sso-229-n129 1 br, apt., all util Included, Apalachicola, FL. I driveway, dock w/ sea Il Ic fees. NO Extra's! 0% In-
the date of the Ils pendens w/4 chairs $199, NEW EOE/ Small pets ok, Furnished, Call 850-643-7740. I wall along canal, Open terest also. Daylight Auto
must file a claim within SOI OD tl n DRUGFRLEEWORKPIACE Walk to grocery & shopp- Tue Aug 11th from Financing 2816 W. Hwy 98
sixty ~ ~ ~ ~ SOI days. after th ae *bxs.2278 Ing, call 653-6375 2 br, 2 ba, Located In East 1-4pm, Deposit; $10k 215-1769 9am to 9pm
Point, Bay View kitchen Cashler Check, paid to:
Marcla M Johnson completely furnished.$750 EG & G Tech Services
Clerk of Court month. Call 850-323-0072 wwtesav
Clerk of the Circuit Court a 3 br, 1.5 ba. St. George Is- acinirauvr
Michele Maxwell land. Deck. Short awalk to (703) 273-7373
Deputy Clerk Bay $800 mo. $400 dep. Sale# 0966901
THE LW OFICESOF 4850-510-2888or 545-8813 lc # CWSau2056
BAKALAR & TOPOUZIS,
ATORNEY FOR PLAIN-

FOF N. PARK ROAD, Become a Hospital Central Service Techn ician 3 F bc, choousen Ior ret3br aDO it m

9 )LE 910 F301 In a year Of leSSI flreplcse, aW/DD IW du poeea ts Weorch 5t

If you are a person with a In response to local health care industry needs, Gulf Coast Community College has CMO0rmoda 50s~e~cOdep. 706CC Land Rd,Dog192VnMrl

aco owhoioneedsorany developed a new program for the Health Sciences Division called the Central Service 3 br, 2 ba. Gulfview. OBO c1850L87 1646 6000 saers K200 o
to participate In this pro- Technology (CST). Beach access. Carrabelle. Call850-653-8121
ceeding you are entitled, $600 mo. $300 dep.
at no cost to you, to the 850-510-2888or 545-8813 $65Dodge Coaraan 199,2
provision of certain assis- CentralI Services (alIso referred to as sterile processing) Tech nicia ns provide support to $695down Totaal, $5,20
toffce of tehaee Contatr the patient cafe Services in hospitalIs, outpatient surgery centers, and other facilities by C3 e r A h oaoomp b nesnld txOd
Istrator, FRANKLIN County decontaminating, cleaning, processing, assembling, sterilizing, storing and distributing Indian Pass spa all"' elecric furnihe trams!0 Interest alo. Day
Courthouse, at within two between Apalachicola on lot 121ftx75ft. Welding lght Auto Financing 2816
(2) working days of your medical equipment and supplies. and Port St. Joe shop with tools and equip- W. Hwy 98. 215-1769
receipt of this Notice of 1 bedroom, 1 bath, en- ment. All for $75K. 32
S(ale ) orhi8r -955-87 This is a 500-hour (just 2 semesters!), part-time program for those with no central clsed pato newn ren IThomas Dr. 850-653-8121
DD or 1-80-95-870 vmpiae Sevc eholg xeine.Teporminldscasro tednehnso n, $515 ufurn back-
Florida Relay Service. ground/credit check.
August 6, 13, 2009 lab practice and clinical experiences. There is also a web-based program specifically -


...i-ome. i8m'mereash
715 Oe Hus 85 -Comecal a~hro lot t exrs Ne
7110 Beach Home/ 8160 Motorcycles electronics, Everything
Property 8170 Auto Parts works, In good condition,
712 Commercial & Accessories $7,500 850-247-9995
7130 CondojTowlnhouse 8210 Boats
7150 :E ("".ir~ecahe 820-saibon aterra Shrimp boat 22 ft fiber-
7160 -Mobile Homes/Lots 240 Boat &Marine glass, 88 hp Johnson mo-
7170 -Waterfront Supplies tor, fully rigged, double
7180 Investment 8245 Boat Slips & Ducks wench, $6,500 Call Rich-
no r$op rtown 10 Aicraf iateo~cn ard 774-0467/234-3209
Real Estate 8330 Campers & Trailers
7200-Timeshare 8340 -Motorhomes


A as COMPLETE PACKAGES


Re41l Es~te.. 11 '4,995
Janalyn Dowden IIAllWelded,AllAluminum
850-251-3432 Bo sats
108 S. E. Ave. A I BOAT SHOW
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WWW.Seacrestre.com I Bonifay Rlotida
3 Beroom 2 bthwww.xtremeindustries.com
House on 1/2 acre............ 1200.00 1
3 Bedroom, 2 bath,
Mobile Home ........... ...650.00
2 Bedroom, 1 Bath I1 saao
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1 Bedroom, 1 Bath utility trailer, single axel,
Apartment ........................ 500.00 arel,, sttred et s, to
1 Bedroom, 1 Bath many to list. $3,000
Apartment, incl. water.......550.00 802799
3 Bedroom, 2 Bath 5~
River Front,w/ Dock .......1200.00'
2 Bedroom, 1 Bath 27ft Airstream, Travel
Apartment ........... .....650.00 trailer, pull behind, air,
frldge, & stove works
Call about our Beach front and great. Solid floors, new
Condo w/ pool vacation rentals 167l 31rs$5,000 Call


of news for more than a century


BASS
TOURNAMENT
What: Apalachicola River
Delta Military Salute
When: 15 August/Safelight
Where: Abercromble
Landing/Apalachicola
Contact: Sherman Alford
850-653-6304 for more
Info.





f -




2100 -Pet
2110 ts: Free to

22 et Su~pnjieas/
Supplies
2140 Peat /ivestock
2150 Pet Memorials









High School Diploma at
Home. 6-8 Wks. Low tul-
atrn Free Brochure o
24-8330. www.diploma


Franklin County's sours




HA ED E RO AR S DA L UV A

CLAIM AN INTEREST AS
SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVI-
SEES, GRANTEES OR
OTHER CLAIMANTS;
DOENASDUONEKNA N TAENNE
ANTS IN POSSESSION

NAENDO: T8(-00411-CA

NO ECCLOSURE SALE

NOTI Eur nttHEREBY

mo eclosr ded t umyt2 ,
2009 entered In Civil Case
No. 08-000411-CA of the
Circuit Court of the 2ND
Judicial Circuit In and for

s CICOA h5 ri b I wl
bidder for cash at FRONT
STEPS at the FRANKLIN
County Courthouse lo-
ETRat In33APM ACK
COLA, Florida, at 11:00
am the 10th da of

lwneg db cr b d9 prhoa r
as set fFI I In sad Sm


LOT 31, WHISPERING
PINES SUBDIVISION
PHASE 3AND 4ACCORD-
ING TO THE PLAT
THEREOF, RECORDED IN
PLAT BOOK 7, PAGE 32
OF THE PUBLIC REC1
ORDS OF FRANKLIN
COUNTY, FLORIDA.

Any person claiming an In-
t al If any rotlhur thoam
thd ra ery towne as o
ens, must file a claim
w thin 60 days after the
s le.

Dated this 28th day of July

M mca M Johnson

Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Michelle Maxwell
Deputy Clerk
IN ACCORDANCE WITH
THE AMERICANS WITH
DISABILITIES ACT, per-
sonswith disabllties need-
Ing a special accommoda-
COURTso ADMIN n RA
TION, at the FRANKLIN
County Courthouse at
850-653-8861 ext. 100
1-800-955-8771 (TDD) o
1-800-955-8770, via Florida

Aug st 6,13 2009
3383T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR FRANKLIN
COUNTY

Wells Fargo Bank, Na-
tlonal Association, as Trus-
tee, under Pooling and
Servicing Agreement,
dated as of Septemberl,
2006, Securitized Asset
Backed Receivables, LLC.
Trust, 2006-HE2 Mortgage
Pass-Through Certificates,
Series 2006-HE2,
Plaintiff
vs

Robert Winchester and
SelaaWnVVc ster, Hus-


Cae#n 29-CA-000087
UNC:

NOTICE OF SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN pursuant to an Or-
der of Final Judgment of
Frclosturee cted ICy2 ,
No. 2009-CA-000087 of the
Circuit Court of the 2nd Ju-
dlclal Circuit In and for
Franklin County, Florida,
thrl IWell Far a Bana
Trustee, under Pooling
and Servicing Agreement,
dated as of September 1,
2006, Securitized Asset
Backed Receivables, LLC.
Trus 20-E Mo~rtga e

a Rbrt Wnchester

Husband and Wife are
defendantss, I will sell to
tdher h hest ad bst T d
WEST FRNOKNTND OR O
COURTHOUSE, LOCATED
ON HWY 98, IN APALACH-
ICOLA, FLORIDA, AT

10 2009 te olono gd 1
scribed property as set
forth In said Final Judg-
ment, to-wit:

LOT NUMBER EIGHT (8),
AND THE NORTH
ONE-HALF (1/2) OF LOT
NUMBER NINE (9), OF
BLOCK NUMBER ONE
HUNDRED FORTH (140),
ACCORDING TO THE
PLAT MAP NOW IN USE,
THE SAME BEING IN
BLOCK (F), RANGE EIGHT
(8), ACCORDING TO
URIEL BLOUNT'S MAP OF
1913, IN THE CITY OF
CARRABELLE, FRANKLIN
COUNTY, FLORIDA.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING
RPN ITRES ON TH

TA HEANPYRO E R
OWNER AS OF THE DATE
OF THE_ US PENCDLEANS

WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER
THE SALE


IF YOU ARE A PERSON
TEHDSA DSABICIC MWMHOO
DATION IN ORDER TO
PARTICIPATE IN THIs
PROCEEDING, YOU ARE
ENTITLED, AT NO COST
TO YOU, TO THE PROVI-
SIONNCOF CERTI NA N S
TACT Franklin County
Courthouse, 33 Market
Street, Sulte 203, Apa-
c aI 2 FWOR 13N


|8210
1998 24' Carrable, Off
shore boat, 225 HP
Vaaha trckep wi~ndlass


11111111111~1~* I[



*m *i ^ ^


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I


Thursday, August 6, 2009


Local


from Ocala,
psesofn
pictures of
his great-
grandfather
David
Greenway
Raney, in
the house
he built in
1838.
DAVID
ADLERSTEIN |
The Times


George P.


By David Adlerstein
Times City Editor
Several members of the
Raney family are spending this
week on St. George Island, re-
turning to the area where their
historic forebears made the
family's first mark on Florida
history.
George Pettus Raney III, 80,
and his wife, Mary Nell, paid
a visit to the Raney House on
Saturday afternoon, going for a
tour led by docent Joe Terrell.
Raney, retired after 52 years
in the truck terminal and deal-
ership business in Ocala, is the
great grandson of David Green-
way Raney, who built the house
in 1838.
Raney recounted the family
genealogy from his great grand-


father down to the present day.
David Greenway Raney had
three daughters, Mary Porter,
Virginia and Francis Raney,
and three sons, David G., Ed-
ward J. and George El Raney,
the Ocala man's grandfather.
George El Raney was born in
Apalachicola in 1845, served in
the Confederate artillery and
lived here until 1911. He had
four children, two daughters,
Sarah B. and Clyde, and two
sons, George El and Thompson
Lamar Raney, the Ocala man's
father.
Thompson Lamar Raney
was born in Tallahassee in
1896, several years after his
older brother, and lived most of
his life in Fresno, Calif. He died
in 1979.
Thompson Lamar Raney


had four children, Thompson
Lamar, Joseph Bartlett, Sarah
Francis and George El Raney,
who is the last to survive.
"I'm the last of the Mohi-
cans," he said.
Raney and his wife have
four children, George El Raney,
Donna Lynn Nedelisky, Mike
Lamar Raney and Mark Stew-
art Raney, all who live in Ocala.
The couple has 11 grandchil-
dren and two great-grandchil-
dren.
In addition to the Raney
blood and the legacy, George
Pettus Raney also has a gold
watch, given to his great-
grandfather by a Confederate
general.
The extended Raney family
will be renting a house on St.
George Island all week.


Franklin County, home of two
of Florida's historic lighthouses,
has recorded more sales per cap-
ita of the Visit Our Lights light-
house specialty license plate than
any other county in the state.
Florida Lighthouse Associa-
tion President Stan Farnham,
speaking at an FLA board of di-
rectors meeting in Lakeland ear-
lier this month, commended the
citizens of Franklin County for
their record support of Florida's
lighthouses.
"Tiny Franklin County has
produced sales of lighthouse tags
that rank right up there with the
largest counties in the state," he
said.
Both the Cape St. George Light
and the Crooked River Light-
house are in Franklin County.
With a population hovering
around 11,000, Franklin County is
65th out of 67 counties in Florida.
Yet Franklin County ranks 11th in
number of lighthouse tags sold,
with 27 tags sold through June of
2009.
"Visit Our Lights" is the fourth
most popular specialty license
plate in the county, after Florida
State University, Sea Turtles and
the University of Florida.
Statewide the most popular
tag is the University of Florida
plate, with 57,772 sold this year.
While sales of Lighthouse tags in
2009 totalling 875 through June,
the Florida Lighthouse Associa-
tion is confident that the mini-
mum requirement of 1,000 tags
that must be sold in the calendar
year will be met.


Members of the Board of Directors of the St. George Lighthouse Association proudly display Visit Our Lights specialty license plates
on their vehicles. Top row from left are directors Richard Saucer, Phyllis Vitale-Lewis and Bud Hayes. Bottom row from left are
treasurer Jim Kemp, secretary Terry Kemp and president Dennis Barnel .


"The people of Franklin Coun-
ty are devoted to their historic
lighthouses," said St. George
Lighthouse Association Presi-
dent Dennis Barnell. "The same
sense of commitment that helped
us rebuild the Cape St. George
Light extends to support for pre-
serving the lighthouses that are
so much a part of the maritime
heritage of this area."
Farnham noted that if the


rate at which Franklin County
residents purchased Lighthouse
tags during the first half of 2009
could be applied to the popula-
tion of the entire state, more than
80,000 Lighthouse tags would be
sold this year.
The proceeds of Lighthouse
tag sales are administered by the
Florida Lighthouse Association
on a grant basis to any of the 29
remaining Florida lighthouses in


need of preservation assistance.
FLA has committed to dedicat-
ing 90 percent of tag proceeds
to lighthouse grants, with the re-
maining 10 percent used for mar-
keting the tag.
With state budget cuts ex-
pected to continue over the com-
ing years, Farnham said that the
revenues from the specialty plate
are the best sustainable source of
funding for lighthouse preserva-


tion in the state.
"So when it's time to pur-
chase a new tag or renew one
of your existing tags, please
consider a Visit Our Lights spe-
cialty license plate," Barnell
said. "And help protect the light-
houses that protected us for so
many years."
The Lighthouse tag costs an
additional $25, plus a state pro-
cessing fee of $2.


fiCfLS# 208461


$994,875 St. George Islan~r


BEACH FRONT
"SEA DREAM"


1998 3 br/2 ba, 28X(68 Cavalier MH
on 100x142 lot Living room, separate family
room w/stone fireplace. Kitchen and dining
room have wood floors

sss,ooo for more
information
call (aso) ass-2o83 or


Bedrooms
Gulf front


3 Master
opening to


porches, 3 baths,
widows walk, roll


a

d .


* Home on 60 x 100 lot in historic
Apalachicola
* 1410 square feet heated and cooled
* 3 bedroom, 2 bath
* 26 guage galvanized metal roof
* Low maintenance Hardy siding
* Upgraded trim package
* 9 ft ceilings


* Solid oak hardwood flooring
* Tile in bathrooms and utility room
* Custom alder cabinets
* Solid surface granite countertops
* Stainless Steel appliances
* City water and sewer tap included
* Sodded yard

Mailing address:
First Choice Builders

Apaatitl, A n 3H23201


II


BS | The Times


Raney descendants return to roots


Raney Ill and wife tour historic house


County commended for support of lighthouse tags


a.


Florida Gulf Coast lot
Pinewood Shores #3
Carrabelle Beach
Franklin County


$349,000.00

1.07 acre beach front lot,
80-feet white sandy beach,
wooded, private. Deep lot
off Hwy 98. Convenient to
nearby Apalachicola on the
Forgotten Coast. By owner.
Only 6-hours from Atlanta,
1 hour from Tallahassee,
minutes from St. George
Island. Your own paradise.


404-634-3576,
dtulis@mindspring.com




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