• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Section A
 Section B














Group Title: Apalachicola times
Title: The Apalachicola times
ALL ISSUES CITATION PDF VIEWER THUMBNAILS ZOOMABLE PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100380/00036
 Material Information
Title: The Apalachicola times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: H.W. Johnston
Place of Publication: Apalachicola, Fla.
Publication Date: July 23, 2009
Copyright Date: 2008
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola
Coordinates: 29.725278 x -84.9925 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1885.
General Note: Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00100380
Volume ID: VID00036
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 32911693
lccn - sn 95026907
 Related Items
Preceded by: Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by: Apalachicola herald

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:

PDF ( 39 MBs ) ( PDF )


Table of Contents
    Section A
        Page A 1
        Page A 2
        Page A 3
        Page A 4
        Page A 5
        Page A 6
        Page A 7
        Page A 8
        Page A 9
        Page A 10
    Section B
        Page B 1
        Page B 2
        Page B 3
        Page B 4
        Page B 5
        Page B 6
        Page B 7
        Page B 8
        Page B 9
        Page B 10
Full Text



















Commission races heat up in city elections


I


YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER FOR MORE THAN 120 YEARS


VOL. 124 ISSUE 13


Rankin, Allen expected to run in Carrabelle
By Lois Swoboda for two seats on the Car- forfilingin Carrabelle with
Times Staff Writer rabelle city commission. City Clerk Keisha Smith,
Cherry Rankin and Cal for the at-large seats. The
With commissioner Allen both are expected top two votegetters at the
Ray Tyre deciding not to to file this week, after this Sept. 8 election will be de-
run for another term, and week's candidacy window cleared the winners.
incumbent Richard Sands opened at noon Monday. "I feel I've served my
expected to run again, More candidates may tour of duty," said Tyre, a
two challengers have so emerge this week. Noon
far emerged in the race on Friday is the deadline See CARRABELLE A6


By [)avid Adlerstein
Times City Editor
Apalachicola business-
man Jerry Hall has filed
to challenge incumbent
Frank Cook in the race for
Apalachicola commission
seat #3, one of two seats
up for grabs at the Sept. 8


ballot box.
The other seat, com-
mission seat #4, is held
by incumbent Valentina
Webb. Both she, and for-
mer Apalachicola police
chief Anderson Williams
and Gulf State Community
Bank staffer Brenda Ash,
have signaled their inter-


est in running, but had not
filed as of press time.
Deadline for filing with
City Clerk Lee Mathes
ends at noon Friday. The
qualifying fee is $226.80.
If more than two candi-
dates run for either of the
See APALACHICOLA A6


Phone: 850-653-8868


DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK:


Red, White and Roux. ................. A4


Tid~e~hart.......................... 10


Apalachicola


NW~ toot


Hall to challenge Cook in Apalachicola race


WATER WARS


Federal


judge hands

IF . .
OF100 Win

Apalachicola
asks Obama for
restoration money

By Lois Swoboda
Times Staff Writer

Apalachicola officials are work-
ing overtime to capitalize on a
ruling Friday by a federal judge
that the Army Corps of Engineers
wrongly diverted
ON THE NET water from the
Apalachicola River
Apalachic-
for use in Georgia.
t ntitrhe US District Judge
Presidentcan Paul A. Magnuson
be viewed ruled in favor of Flor-
online at ida and Alabama in
apalach- the epic battle over
times.com. rights to the water
- in the Apalachicola/
Chattahoochee/
Flint River system (ACF).
"This has to be called a complete
success for Apalachicola, Florida
and Alabama," said City Attorney
Pat Floyd.
Together with Mayor Van John-
son, Floyd worked throughout the
weekend to compose a letter to
President Barack Obama detail-
ing the major points of the judge's
opinion and asking for funding to
aid in the restoration of the bay.
They are seeking funds for local
workers to help repair damage to
the ecosystem of the Apalachicola
Bay caused by decades of reduced
water flows.
"Because of the damage caused
by the increased salinity levels
from the Corps reduction in the
freshwater flows down the ACF sys-
tem, monetary support is required
to revive and rehabilitate this Na-
tional Estuarine Sanctuary," reads
the letter. "Until the river and bay
recover, perhaps the seafood and
water related workers can be paid
from this monetary support to par-
ticipate in the work to replant and
rehabilitate the estuary."
The letter was mailed to the
President on Monday and a hard
copy will follow. Floyd said the re-
quest may be the city's best hope
of obtaining aid for the embattled
seafood industry.

Judge gives Georgia
three-year grace period
Alabama, Florida and Georgia
have been battling in federal court
over water from the ACF since
1990.
In a 97-page ruling, Magnuson
said the Corps violated federal law
See WATER A6


TABLE OF CONTENTS


~FREEDOM


-






































































Op.an93Days a Wook11am- Close)
803]Highwa 98, Mexico Beack


St. Joe Rent All


Thursday, July 23, 2009


A2 | The Times


Local


The "Waterfalls of North Georgia" exhib-
it, which has been hanging in the Apalachic-
ola Museum of Art at 96 Fifth Street, will be
the inspiration for a roundtable discussion
on the "Water Wars" on Wednesday, July 29,
at 6 p.m.
The photographic images displayed de-
pict the headwaters of the Chattahoochee,
waters that eventually become part of the
Apalachicola River, which flows into the
Bay.
The discussion will be led by Mayor Van
Johnson and City Attorney Patrick Floyd,
who filed a lawsuit on behalf of the city,
seeking protection for these waters, which
are the soul of the people and economy of
Franklin County.
The public is welcome, and will also be
able to enjoy artwork created by students
during the City's Project Impact summer
program. The student art exhibit will be
held from 3:30 to 4:30 p.m.
The photography exhibit continues
WednesdaythroughSundayfrom1to4p.m.,
closed Mondays and Tuesdays. The exhibit
is free to the public, with donations accept-
ed. TheexhibitclosesAug.1.
For more information, call 653-9692.


TRACY LAWRENCE


PHOTO BY JACK ANTHONY
The falls at Amicalola Fall State Park in Georgia cascade down
600 feet to a reflecting pool and are the highest cascading falls
in the eastern U.S. A photo exhibit on the "Waterfalls of North
Georgia" continues at the Apalachicola Museum of Art through
Aug. 1.


LOIS SWOBODA | The Times
At a public hearing Tuesday
afternoon, County Health Department
Administrator Wesley Tice, left,
announced that Carrabelle clinic
will remain open at least through
the end of the 2009-10 fiscal year.
Last month, Tice informed county
commissioners the clinic would close
at the end of July. He said since
that meeting, he has been able to
find additional funds but asked
the commission for $60,000 in
supplementary funding. Numerous
Carrabelle residents attended the
hearing, and Mayor Curley Messer,
rig ht, displayed a petition with 800
signatures supporting the health
department clinic.


Art museum to host


T tYf 0( 0 f On(6 OW

f fl d
tP 0 500 00 OS OY IV
The 2009 Florida Seafood Festival has announced
thatcountymusicsuperstar'lkacyLawrencewillbethe
featured attraction at this year's festival, Nov. 6 and 7.
Lawrence will take the stage at 8 p.m. Saturday night.
"The last few years we've been trying to get a big-
8:"sidnednth r star a hdi a "rsdeJohntS loomont
the best person we could for the people coming to the
festival."
Local talent, such as Tafton Harvey from Wakulla
County, will perform prior to Lawrence's appearance.
With a new album "The Rock" that came out June 9,
Lawrence is one of the premier voices of his genera-
tion, a sensitive and intelligent singer whose dedication
to honesty and respect for tradition have enabled him
to build one of the most respected careers in recent
country history.
Along the way, he has posted more No. 1 Billboard
country singles than greats like Glen Campbell, Keith
Whitley, Ernest 'llibb, Wynonna or Barbara Mandrell,
to name just a few; more Top 5's than Shania Twain'
Faith Hill or The Judds; and more Top 10's than Ricky
Skaggs, Charlie Rich, John Michael Montgomery or
Dwight Yoakam.
Solomon said no major changes have been planned
for this year's festival, with admission free on Friday
and $5 on Saturday. He said 10 young ladies have shown
an interest in the Miss Florida Seafood pageant, to be
held later this summer.


(ARRABELLE (LINK( TO REMAIN OPEN





a m 11 n non o^ 1 rme
v 1011 r BC: (000) 051-0 /34

Franklin County: (850) 670-5555


0 Leon County: (850) 926-9602
MS MEDIC
*
Helping Hands Make The Difference




Tallahassee Memorial




A serr ice of the coinprehensit e Tallahassee Memorial NeuroScience Center


























































The TALLAHASSEE MEMORIAL NEUROSCIENCE CENTER
Is an accredited Stroke Center and designated Brain & Spinal Cord Injury Acute Care Center.


Thursday, July 23, 2009


Local


The Times | A3


By Bjs Swoboda
Times StaffWriter
Scoutmaster Larry Hale
recently voiced concern
about the dental health of
some youngsters he has
worked with in the county,
questioning why none of the
water suppliers add fluoride
to drinking water.
Effective for preventing
cavities, water with fluoride
in it operates on tooth sur-
faces, reducing the rate at
which the enamel breaks
down and increasing the
rate at which teeth naturally
repair themselves in the ear-
ly stages of decay.
Typically, a fluoridated
compound is added to drink-
ing water, a process that
costs an average of about 94
cents per person per year in
the U.S. And defluoridation
is needed when the naturally
occurring fluoride level ex-
ceeds recommended limits
because higher levels can
cause mottling of teeth and
other side effects.
One reason why no
Franklin County water dis-
trict adds fluoride to drink-
ing water is that fluoride is
already present in some lo-
cal water supplies.
Janelle Paul, a utilities
clerk for Apalachicola, said
the city's drinking water con-
tains 0.5 milligrams perliter,
Carrabelle's drinking water
contains 0.4 milligrams per
liter.
This is still lower than the
ideal level of 0.7 to 1.0 milli-
grams per liter, but Paul said
the state does not recom-
mend that additional fluoride
be added.
According to recently re-
leased state water quality
tests, Eastpoint's water does
not contain naturally occur-
ring fluoride.
Apalachicola dentist Dr.
James Padgett said fluoride
works in two ways. When
a growing child consumes
fluoride, it is incorporated
into the bones, including
teeth, and when an adult
consumes it, it helps rebuild
eroded enamel. He said lev-
els of fluoride in local water


varies with the source.
"I don't have fluoride
in the water from my well.
When my kids were growing
up, I gave them fluoride vita-
mins, and their teeth were
verygood."hesaid.
Padgett said another
reason he chose to give his
children a fluoride supple-
ment in the form of a pill is
that children drink very little
plain water and that com-
monly consumed beverages,
such as fruit juice and milk,
normally don't contain fluo-
ride. Most bottled water con-
tains no fluoride, although
some fluoridated bottled wa-
ter is available.
For those who want more
exposure to fluoride, other
therapies also are effective
in preventing tooth decay.
They include fluoride tooth-
paste, mouthwash, gel and
varnish, and fluoridation of
salt and milk. Dental seal-
ants containing no fluoride
are effective, as well.
Fluoride toothpaste is the
most widely used and best
tested fluoride treatment,
with its introduction in the
early 1970s considered the
main reason for the decline
in tooth decay in industrial-
ized countries. Toothpaste
is the only realistic fluoride
treatment in many low-
income countries, where
water or salt fluoridation is
impossible or too costly. Un-
fortunately, use of toothpaste
is less likely among the poor
because they might not be
educated in dental hygiene.
Fluoride toothpaste pre-
vents about 25 percent of
cavities in young permanent
teeth. Fluoride mouthwash
and gel are about as effective
as fluoride toothpaste; fluo-
ride varnish prevents about
45 percent of cavities.
The effectiveness of salt
fluoridation is about the
same as water fluoridation.
Jamaica fluoridated all salt
starting in 1987, resulting in a
notabledeclineincavities.In
France and Germany, fluori-
dated salt is widely used, but
plain salt is also available,
giving consumers choice.
Milk fluoridation is prac-


ticed in some parts of Bul-
garia, Chile, Peru, Russia,
ThailandandtheUK. A2005
study concluded fluoridated
milk benefits children, espe-
cially the formation of their
permanentteeth.
Other public-health strat-
egies to control tooth decay,
such as education to change
behavior and diet, have
lacked impressive results.
Although fluoride is the only
substance proven to reduce
cavities, adding calcium to
the water might reduce de-
cay further. Antibacterials
and the substitution of arti-
ficial sweeteners for sugar
might also help prevent
tooth decay.
Florida KidCare, a pro-
gram sponsored by the
state, subsidizes children's
dental care and will pay for
preventive treatments, such
as tooth sealants.
To qualify for assistance,
a child must be younger than
19 and uninsured. The family
must meet income eligibil-
ity requirements. The child
must be a U.S. citizen or
qualified non-citizen and not
be eligible for Medicaid or
be the dependent of a state
employee eligible for health
insurance.
State law also requires
the guardian to provide in-
formation about a child's
access to employer health
insurance.
There is no charge for
Medicaid for children (Kid-
Care Medicaid), for other
Florida KidCare programs,
monthly premiums depend
on the household's size and
income. Most families pay
$15 or $20 a month. You might
have to pay small charges or
co-payments for some ser-
vices.
A child who is a member
of a federally recognized
American Indian, Alaskan
Native or Canadian India
tribe might qualify for no-
cost Florida KidCare cover-
age. Parents or grandpar-
ents may register a child for
KidCare.
For more information
about KidCare, call 888-540-
5437.


By David Adlerstein
TimesCityEditor
Franklin County's unemployment
rate continued to climb in June, although
it remained tied for second best among
the state's 67 counties.
According to preliminary labor mar-
ket statistics released Friday by the Flor-
ida Agency for Workforce Innovation, the
county's overall jobless rate inched up-
wards to 6.6 percent in May, as 326 people
out of a labor force of 4,906 were without
work.
The jobless rate was three-tenths of
a percentage point higher than in May,
when it stood at 6.3 percent, with 308 peo-
ple looking for employment out of a labor
force of 4,851.
One year ago, Franklin's jobless rate
was 4.0 percent, with 198 jobless out of a
larger workforce of 4,972.
Despite the rise, Franklin's numbers
tied with Monroe County as second best
among the state's 67 counties, behind
only Liberty County, at 5.5 percent.
The unemployment rate in the Gulf
Coast Workforce Region (Bay, Franklin
and Gulf counties) was 8.8 percent in
June 2009, 4.0 percentage points higher
than the region's year ago rate and 2.0
percentage points lower than the state
rate of 10.8 percent
June 2009 unemployment rates in Bay


County were 8.9 percent and Gulf County
at 8.8 percent. The region's June unem-
ployment rate was the highest June rate
in the current series, which started in
1990.
"The region had 180 initial unemploy-
ment compensation claims related to ed-
ucation during the month of June," said
Kim Bodine, executive director for the
Gulf Coast Workforce Board. "Franklin
County's initial unemployment claims in
June was the second highest of the year,
behind January. We were hoping for a
rate drop, but the fact that we didn't get it
indicates that our economy hasn't made
the turn for the better quite yet."
Florida's seasonally adjusted unem-
ployment rate for June 2009 is 10.6 per-
cent, up 0.3 percentage points than the
revised May rate of 10.3 percent and up
4.6 percentage points from the June 2008
rate.
The state's current unemployment
rate is 1.1 percentage points higher than
the national unemployment rate of 9.5
percent. The last time the unemploy-
ment rate was higher than June 2009 was
October 1975 when it was 11.0 percent.
The June 2009 job loss continues the
trend of annual declines that began in
August 2007. The downturn started with
declines in construction jobs but has now
spread to almost all other major indus-
tries.


5 Unlimited nationwide calling that connects you even during power outrages'
5 Voice mail, caller ID and call waiting plus 5 additional calling features
5 Standard high-speed Internet with a dedicated connection
5 IPTV Expanded (includes Basic), HD Free Tier with supporting
set top box equipment


5
5


SSave every day with a low bundled price!





Start saving now! Call 877.954.8510 to ask about


this and other bundle offers.


(0 Unty jo MOSS r010


KidCare provides alternative











.


Thursday, July 23, 2009


I have never been one
to be too introspective
about my age, but when
your daughter turns 30, the
bones do ache.
Somehow when I
celebrated a birthday
recently I felt no
difference, but the closer to
July 28 it gets the walk is a
little less lithe -not that
I was ever going
on Dancing with -
the Stars anyway
- and the hair
looks a little less
lush and much
more gray.
Even after
being prematurely
gray-this might KEYB
he traced to the KLATT
daughter if one Tim
pondersitenough
- in my early 30s.
But 30 is also a good
number for the monthof
July.
Not long ago l received
ane-mailwhichoffered
a solution outof the
economic mess others
have made for us to clean
up.
They, paraphrasing,
suggested that instead
ofbailing out the banks,
everyone should get $1
million.
That money had to be
used to bring up to date or
even pay off any delinquent
mortgage, providing an
influx of cash to the banks
and lending institutions.
And all those receiving
the bailout would have to
buy a new vehicle, made in
the U.S.A., and that would
bail out the auto industry.
Sounded too simple and
too much like common
sense, so there is no
chance of it happening, but
I am reminded of it by an

Ivoreh etl dda
where Florida Freedom
newspapers are read.
On July 30 visit a local
business and spend $30.
There is a constant
refrain heard in the county
about buying local, how
buying local supports the
small businesses who
attempt to survive in a
small town and a harsh
economy.
There is no sense
looking to government,
geesh, elected officials
have their own problems,
sort of like kleptomaniacs,
of taking other people's
money and spending it
pell-mell without a sense
of how it may impact the
community.
There is nothing like
somebody else's Gold Card
to lessen the spending
inhibitions of some of even
the best of us.
And there should be,
and usually is, in all of
us a sense of personal
responsibility, of taking
the bull by the horns and
riding it for all its worth if it


will make the community
better,
One can not consider
the work of those on
the board of groups as
disparate as Franklin's
Promise and the Seahawks
Athletic Boosters or
the county's many civic
organizations and not get
a sense that these are
folks generally
- volunteering their
time and effort to
see things happen
at all levels of the
commune .
So we need to
be the ones who
lead the charge
OARD to provide little
RINGS jump to the local
roft economy.
OnJuly30,
which falls on
next Thursday, plan on
getting haircut, get
aspatreatmentvisit
a restaurant or pick
upsomethingatthe
convenience store.
Browse the shops
along Market Street
in Apalachicolaor
Tallahassee Street in
Carrabelle, or anywhere
nearby, with $30 in your
hand to burn and given the
choices there is sure to
be something to tickle the
fancy.
Shop at the local
grocery store, maybe itis
time for a new fishing pole.
Maybe there is something
at the local pawn shops
that might be worth the
money, but most of all
let us all make it a point
to inject $30 apiece into
the local economy next
Thursday, July 30.
No, it will not be a make
or break for most of the
businesses, but consider it

thisT bythermhmbers.
11,000 people in the county
and let's subtract the 1,100
or so students who attend
schools in the county.
That leaves roughly
9,900 people and if they
spend $30 a piece next
Thursday at local stores
they will have helped
inject nearly $297,000 into
the local economy.
Of course, this equation
does not factor those
who are housebound,
on assistance or a fixed
income, but still those
numbers are pretty
substantial.
Will they solve the woes
of local small businesses?
Assuredly not.
But will it help put
people in the mind-set that
we all have a substantial
stake in the solution to our
current economic woes?
And that we all have it
within our power, for one
day, to make a difference?
Yes.
Thirty dollars on the
30th there is a certain
ring to it,


\\'hen I ceat married~c for~ the


husband a check or some cash
His pockets were bulging by
night s end
- Inthemeantime.
. there \\as lowly food
prepared b.1 my mother-
in-law and her next door
neighbor litaskept busy
smiline schmooz ine, and
shownieartm.1 Southern
accent I remember there
HITE \ a itondertul dessert -
OUX baked merineues with ice
*** cream I know there \\as
much more, but we reall.1
didn't hale time to eat
B.1 the time the soiree \\as
cler: ite were starting Onti
one thing to do, accoqling to m.1
mate white Castle' He made
the gut-buster run, and armal
with a huee bae at mini-burgers
retired to our hotel room
He emptied his bulging
pockets, throwing dozens at
\t here ent elopes on the bed we


iC


culturalexpenence Al,\
husband had a Jewish
mother: a Lithuanian
Roman Catholic
rather:a Jewish aunt,
and an Italia n Roman
Catholic uncle The
Catholic uncle \\as
also a local politician
in Glen Cole. Lone
Island The aunt and
uncle threw us able
part.\ celebrating our
niarnage (.an \ou


go
?
"'


RED W
ANDR
l'


set tled
inwithour
slider burgers, eagerly
counting up our stash of
cash He were ecstatic He
had food' He had mone\'
Ali current mate is also
trom Neil York and sets
the occasional cratine for
.hite Castle The Southern
equilalent is E11stal Their
nilm-burger seems to be
identical to white Castle's
Linfortunately. Kn stal
tenues seem to be rather
scarce in these parts
So, I embarked on

See ROUX AS


just imagine the scene
I \\as only 10 and the
experience for this Southern
girl \\as quite exotic He
had cocktails, dinner:
and dancing There were
\er.\ te\\ actual, tangible
wedding glits The local
tradition \\as for the man
at the tamil.\ to slip m.1


By Libby Fair hurst
Specialty the Times

A study of oyster
reefs in a once-pristine
California coastal estuary
found them devastated
by invasive Atlantic
Coast crabs and snails,
providing new evidence of
the consequences when
human activities move
species beyond their natural
borders.
Led by marine biologist
David L. Kimbro, now
of The Florida State
University Coastal and
Marine Laboratory, the
study shows that in Tomales
Bay, half the population of
California's native Olympia
oyster has perished because
its habitat has fallen
victim to the dysfunctional
relationship between native
species and non-native ones
accidentally introduced.
The work of Kimbro, a
postdoctoral associate at
the FSU lab, and colleagues
fromtheUniversityof
California-Davisandits
BodegaMarineLaboratory
hasmagnifiedconcerns
thatpredator-prey
mismatcheshetweennative

andd oc cloesss ay
criticalhabitatsthatsupport
marinebiodiversityand
ecosystems.
"WhatDavidKimbro's
researchrevealsabout
California's Olympia

a is se icia
Coleman, director of the
FSU Coastal and Marine
Laboratory.
'First, our state has
a remarkably productive
native oyster population

a3t risk ihn th Apal hicola
oysters are sustainable
harvested and provide
critically important
settlement habitat for an

aon azing arra of species,
devastate
'
. Second, we know that
in Florida's benign climate'
exotic species are pretty
easily established. One need
only follow the trajectories
of lionfish, Australian


D.KMR pcilt h ie


Bay in which cages were used to
either include or exclude invasive
predators from oysters. Big shades
(black-top cages) were also created
to see if oyster mortality was indeed
caused by invasive whelks or by
warmer temperatures. The experiment
was conducted simultaneously at an
invaded beach, where invasive whelks
caused the high oyster mortality, and
at an uninvaded beach, where only
the inclusion of invasive snails lead
to higher oyster mortality. The snails
would wipe out the remaining oyster
reefs in the middle bay if they weren't
Prevented by native crabs.


POSTMASTER:
Send address change to:
The Apalachicola Times
P.O. Box 820
Apalachicola, FL 32329
Phone 850-653-8868


PERIODICAL RATE


pine, Brazilian pepper and
Burmese python for a grim
view through the looking
glass," Coleman said.
Kimbro and colleagues
describe their findings in
a paper ("Invasive species
cause large-scale loss of
native California oyster
habitat by disrupting
trophic cascades") that was
recently published in the
online and print editions of
the peer-reviewed journal
Oecologia
Their study is
expected to help guide
habitat management


and conservation efforts,
including plans now being
drawn up along the West
Coast to restore native
oysters.
"We've identified what
my California colleagues
call 'an important
restoration bottleneck,'
the attack on oysters by
invasive species, which
must be dealt with prior
to undertaking oyster
population enhancement
and the rebuilding of
remnant reefs," Kimbro
said.
In California, said


Kimbro, the artificial
predator-prey mismatch
has allowed high numbers
of invasive snails to destroy
the biological diversity of
Tomales Bay, a coastal
estuary about 40 miles
northwest of San Francisco,
by consuming and
eliminating oyster habitat.
As an example, he
points to the invasive
European green crab
from the Atlantic Coast
(inadvertently introduced
from Europe, so an exotic

See FAIR HURST AS


SUBSCRIPTIONS PAYABLE IN ADVANCE
IN COUNTY
$24.15 year $15.75 six months
OUT OF COUNTY
$34.65 year $21 six months


TO ALL ADVERTISERS
In case of error or omissions in advertisements, the publishers
do not hold themselves liable for damage further than the amount
received for such advertisement.
The spoken word is given scant attention; the printed word is
thoughtfully weighed. The spoken word barely asserts; the printed word
thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains


*



A4 | The Times D1 8 1 0 H


Heal thyself


we~eciuL4 zig~*


LOSSORS le0med When inVOSiV6 Species attack oysters


Apalachicola
inabelle


TH

USPS 027-600
Published every Thursday at 129 Commerce St.
Apalachicola, FL 32329
VP/Publisher: Karen Hanes
Editor: Tim Croft
Circulation: James Meadors


,
;,
.."





.
DAVID KIMBRO












































































Personal & Business

Bankruptcy

38 Years Legal Experience



850-670-3030

Office located at: Point Mall, Eastpoint, FL

"We are a debt relief agency. We can help people file
bankruptcy relief under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code."
"The hiring of a lawyer is an important decision that
Should not be based solely upon advertisements.
Before you decide, ask us to send you free written
infOrmation about our qualifications and experience."


Are You Leaving your

Company?






we'llgok


ChrisHudsonCRPC.
""?""',
"ne
chnstopherhudson@wradvisors.com
InvestmentandlnsuranceProducts: >NOTFDI(Insured >NOBankGuarantee >MAYLoseValue
Mo r Member SIPC is a registered broker dealer and a separate non bank afthte of Welk Fargo & Company




BEAUTIFUL

DESIGN
Doesn't Have To Be Expensive


Let our professional & affordable design service I
by a former Ethan Allen Designer
can transform your home
into a work of beauty & function.

Visit our showroom at:
20720 Panama City Beach Parkway
PANAMA CITY BEACH
Convenient to 30A/Rosemary Beach
850.249.7666
Thursday Monday 10:00 5:30, Sunday 1:00 4:00
Manhattan Style Boutique Located Within


IV


Thursday, July 23, 2009


Local


The Times | AS


TDC decides grantS
The Franklin County Tourist
Development Council (FCTDC)
will meet in full committee Tues-
day, Aug. 4 at 3 p.m. at the Car-
rabelle City Office located in the
former Carrabelle High School
facility on Grey Avenue.
Individual committee meet-
ings of the FCTDC will be held on
Tuesday, Aug. 18 at the Franklin
County Courthouse in the third
floor Grand Jury room.. It is the
Aug. 18 meeting in which the
FCTDC will begin reviewing the
2009-2010 grant applications.
August is an important month
for all nonprofit groups inter-
ested in applying for grant funds
from the FCTDC. Prospective
grant recipients must turn in

ROUX from page A4


their 2009-2010 grant applica-
tions to the FCTDC office by 5
p.m. Aug. 3 in order to be consid-
ered for FCTDC grant funding.
The FCTDC grant committee
will review the applications on
Aug. 18 and present their rec-
ommendations to the full coun-
cil during its Sept. 1 meeting.
If you have questions, please
call the FCTDC administrative
offices at 653-8678.

Workshop planned for
relocating county offices
After receiving a letter from
Chief Judge Charles Frances,
the county commission is plan-
ning a workshop on reorganiz-
ing the housing of county offices,
but no date has been set.


News BRIEFS
Frances wrote that the court-
houseis,"primarilyacourthouse
and its primary use should be
for the courts."
The county already plans to
move some offices to the former
Chapman High School building
at 12th Street and US 98, which
was recently handed over to the
countybytheschoolboard.Com-
missioners suggested Property
Appraiser and Tax Collectors'
offices might be housed at that
location.
Clerk of Courts Marcia John-
son said the Supervisor ofElec-
tions office should also be moved
because it is currently housed in
a rented building.
"We don't need to be paying
rent on a building when we have
county property at our dispos-


al," said County Planner Alan
Pierce.
Commissioner Noah Lockley
said it was important that the
workshop be held before the
July 23 and 31 budget hearings
so that the difference in cost
could be reflected in the new
budget.
Johnson said the workshop
will be arranged for the earliest
possible date.
C hdl
TO SC 0 U 0 C OHgeS
Tuesday, Sept. 1 at 3 p.n.
Franklin County Courthouse
Annex, All council
Tuesday, Sept. 15 at 1:30 p.m.
Water Street Hotel Scipio Room,
Individual committees meet
Tuesday, Oct. 6 at 3 p.m.


Franklin County Courthouse
Annex, All council
Tuesday, Oct. 20 at 1:30 p.m.
Franklin County Courthouse,
Third Floor Grand Jury Room,
Individual committees meet
Tuesday, Nov. 3 at 3 p.m. Car-
rabelle City Offices (old Carra-
belle High School), All council
Tuesday, Nov. 17 at 1:30 p.m.
Franklin County Courthouse,
Third Floor Grand Jury Room,
Individual committees meet
Tuesday, Dec. 1 at 3 p.m.
Franklin County Courthouse
Annex, All council
Tuesday, Dec 15 at 1:30 p.m.
Water Street Hotel Scipio Room,
Individual committees meet
These are public meetings
and two or more county com-
missioners may attend.


an Internet quest for
information on how to
create a White Castle
burger at home. I know
what you are thinking.
Why not just buy them
from the freezer section
at the local grocery?
Forty-five seconds in the
microwave and you have
a reasonable facsimile of
the real thing.
I wanted more.
Evidently, so do others.
I discovered countless
Internet sites with recipes
and techniques to create
the perfect slider. Let
me explain. The burger
is small and square,
steamed not charred.
The only condiment is
chopped onion. The white
bread bun is the size of
the burger. I eat two, but
guys with big appetites
can consume six or more.
They slide into the gut,
hence the nicknames.
The Internet is rife
with rules about how
to recreate these gems
at home. I ignored the
recipes that contained
beef baby food and dried
onions. I took all of my
collected data and we
attempted a reasonable


duplicate. It was a grand
experiment and lots of
fun.
We put a pound and a
half of ground chuck on
a sheet pan and rolled it
out to a layer about one
quarter of an inch thick.
We scored the meat into
rectangles and poked five
holes in each portion like
the shape of holes on a
die. Then we put the meat
in the freezer.
In the meantime we
chopped several onions
into a fine dice. First in
the frying pan went the
onions, then we laid on the
frozen-firm beef patties.
We added a few spoons of
water, covered the skillet,
and steamed the beef and
onions together. After that
combo cooked a bit, we
put the top half of the bun
(I used Sunbeam dinner
rolls) on top of the beef.
We put the bottom half
of the bun on top of that.
Then we covered the pan
again.
When the beef was
done, we removed the
bottom half of the bun
from the top and placed
it on a plate. Then we
scooped up the onions,


beef, and remaining bun
top. This was carefully
placed on the bottom half
of the bun.
Most of a Sunday
afternoon was spent on
this cooking experiment.
We were elated with the
outcome. We gorged until
our guts were busting.
Our homemade sliders
were deliciously mushy
and bland, just the way
we remembered. They
satisfied our craving.
We had fun, and it sure
dredged up numerous
recollections for both of
us.
The accompanying
dialogue alone was
worth all the silly effort
of trying to mimic a fast
food memory. We relished
being serious about
something so frivolous.
Think collaborative
cooking at its best.
Many times it is not
about the food. It's about
the conversation.

Denise Roux is a
regular columnist for
the Apalachicola and
Carrabelle Times. Tb
reach her e-mail her at
rouxwhit(@mchsi.com.


species even there.)
Smaller than California's
native crab, it is less
effective at controlling the
snail population because
it uses only brute force to
kill its prey unlike its
native counterpart, which
is capable both of crushing
the snails and using its
claws like a can opener to
peel open hard-to-crush
larger shells.
Ecological consequences
are profound when the
species most affected by a
predator-prey mismatch
is a "foundation species"
that supports biodiversity
by creating extensive
habitat, such as California's
native Olympia oyster
(Ostreola conchaphila),
which provides critical
nursery habitat for a suite
of species including crabs,
anemones and fishes.
Although Olympia
oyster reefs are normally
preyed upon by native
predatory snails, said
Kimbro, they are
somewhat protected by
the presence of native rock
crabs that both consume
native snails and force all
others to spend more time
hiding from crabs rather


than eating the oysters.
But when Atlantic snails
and crabs invade, the
whole dynamic changes.
"You'd think similar-
looking invasive and native
species could be swapped
in a system without
adverse effects," he said.
"But we have shown that,
functionally, this is not the
case."
In Tomales Bay, the
exotic species occupy
its inner reaches, where
saline levels are lower.
However, native predators
cannot tolerate the inner
bay's lower salinity, so they
can't help to check the
invasive snail population
proliferating there. The
invasive crabs are stuck in
the inner bay because the
natives hold the middle,
with its higher salinity.
Once upon a time, native
oysters enjoyed a release
from predation in the inner
bay that is, until the
invasive species moved in.
"While native predator-
prey interactions that
benefit oyster reefs are
intricate and took a long
time to develop, the
invasive crab and snail
don't have the historical


exposure necessary to
recreate these important
interactions," Kimbro
said. "A fellow researcher
likened the native crabs
and snails to a long-
married couple who have
learned to coexist, leaving
oyster populations intact.
But the lack of experience
the invasive crabs and
snails have with each other
has led to the destruction
of parts of the oyster
population, much as an
incompatible couple might
destroy an entire family."
In addition to principal
investigator David L.
Kimbro of The Florida
State University Coastal
and Marine Laboratory,
co-authors of the paper
in Oecologia are Edwin
Grosholz, Adam Baukus,
Sarikka Attoe, and
Caitlin Coleman-Hulbert
(University of California-
Davis), and Nicholas
Nesbitt and Nicole
Travis (Bodega Marine
Laboratory, Sonoma
County, Calif.).

Libby Fairhurst is a
writer for the Florida State
University News and
Public Affairs Office.


FAIR HU RST from page A4

















































CARRABELLE from page Al


NOTICE OF

PROPOSED TAX INCREASE


The Franklin County School District will soon

consider a measure to increase its property tax

levy.


Last year's property tax levy

A. Initially proposed tax levy .....$13,759,551

B. Less tax deductions due tO

Value Adjustment Board and

other assessment changes....... $(536,603.21)

C. Actual property tax levy.........$13,192,948

This years proposed tax levy.......$13,034,765



A portion of the tax levy is required under state
law in order for the school board to receive

$1,887,882 in state education grants.


The required portion has increased by 12.61

percent, and represents approximately five tenths
of the total proposed taxes.


The remainder of the taxes is proposed solely at

the discretion of the school board.


All concerned citizens are invited to a public

hearing on the tax increase to be held on Monday,

July 27, 2009 at 5:01 P.M. at the Willie Speed
Board Room, Eastpoint, Florida.


A DECISION on the proposed tax increase and

the budget will be made at this hearing.


NOTICE OF TAX FOR SCHOOL
CAPITAL OUTLAY

The Franklin County School District will soon consider a measure to
continue to impose a 1.00 mill property tax for the capital outlay projects
listed herein.

This tax is in addition to the school board's proposed tax of 3.550 mills for
operating expenses and is proposed solely at the discretion of the school
board.

The capital outlay tax will generate approximately $2,721,544 to be used
for the following projects:

CONSTRUCTIONANDREMODELING
One (1) New Bus Garage & School Classroom and


MAINTENANCE, RENOVATION, AND REPAIR
School Maintenance Projects Repair/Replace Fire Alarm
Renovate District Offices at BES System
Painting and Repairs Transfer to Gen. Op. for minor
Replace Locks, Doors, Windows mant./Repair Proj. and
Roof Replacements Associated salaries.
Board Room/Rest Rooms at New Transfer to ABC for Chapman
District Office Site Maint., Renov., & Repair
MOTOR VEHICLE PURCHASE
Purchase of Two (2) School Buses
NEW AND REPLACEMENT EQUIPMENT
School Furniture and Equipment
Purchase/Installation of School Food Service
Equipment
PAYMENTS FOR EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES AND SITES DUE
UNDER A LEASE-PURCHASE AGREEMENT
HVAC Maintenance Agreements at FCS
One (1) New K-12 School
PAYMENTS OF COSTS OF COMPLIANCE WITH
ENVIRONMENTAL STATUTES AND REGULATIONS
Removal of Hazardous Waste or Materials
PAYMENTS OF PREMIUMS FOR PROPERTY AND CASUALTY
INSURANCE NECESSARY TO INSURE THE EDUCATIONAL &
ANCILLARY PLANTS OF THE SCHOOL DISTRICT PAYMENT
OF COST OF LEASING RELOCATABLE EDUCATIONAL

FARC 1 Se Classrooms

All concerned citizens are invited to a public hearing to be held on Monday,
July 27,2009 at 5:01 P.M. at the Willie Speed Board Room, Eastpoint,
Florida.

A DECISION on the proposed CAPITAL OUTLAY TAXES will be made
at this hearing.


Thursday, July 23, 2009


A6 | The Times


Local


by allowing water with-
drawals that were not au-
thorized by Congress after
Buford Dam was built to
establish Lake Lanier in
the 1950s.
According to Floyd,
Magnuson's ruling con-
tended that in the absence
of Congressional authori-
zation, the Corps reallocat-
ed nearly a quarter of Lake
Lanier's conservation
storage to supply water to
Atlanta and communities
surrounding the lake.
The Corps' decision
to supply Georgia cities
with water was in viola-
tion of the original autho-
rized uses of the dams
on the ACF, which Floyd
described as "a bait and


switch maneuver."
The Corps convinced
communities downstream
to agree to construction
of the dams by promising
them nothing but benefits
in the form of hydroelectric
power, flood control and
a nine-foot deep naviga-
tional channel to improve
trade, Floyd said.
It soon became appar-
ent that the nine-foot chan-
nelcouldnothemaintained
andthatfacetoftheproject
was abandoned. Then, in
the 1970s, Atlanta's grow-
ing thirst overshadowed
all of the original purposes
of the project and energy
production was sacrificed
to water supply.
Floyd said people in


Franklin County were slow
to recognize the relation-
ship of decreased water
flows to the decline of the
seafood industry, but, now
that the relationship is
known, the seafood indus-
try should be helped to re-
store the estuary.
Under Magnuson's rul-
ing, Gainesville and Bu-
ford are the only Georgia
cities allowed to withdraw
water from the lake, since
theyweredoingsopriorto
the dam's construction,
Atlanta and the commu-
nities surrounding Lake
Lanier must find another
source of drinking water.
This means withdrawals
would drop to the 1970 ley-
el of 10 million gallons per


day, less than a tenth of the
current withdrawal.
During a three-year
grace period allowed by
the judge, the Corps may
continue to withdraw wa-
ter to supply the cities at
the current rate but with-
drawals can only be in-
creased with permission
from all parties to the dis-
pute, including the city of
Apalachicola.
Floyd and Johnson said
one reason they decided
to continue the city's suit,
despite the favorable court
ruling, is to be in a position
to maintain some control
of river flows. Apalachicola
can block increased with-
drawals even if Florida
agrees to them.


a power reserved to one
branch may not be usurped
by another."
He also criticizes the
ponderous pace at which
the Corps updated its oper-
ating manual for the dam.
"It is beyond compre-
hension that the current
operating manual for the
Buford Dam is more than
50 years old. The uncertain-
ty created by the Corps's
alarmingly slow pace only
adds to the frustration of
all parties involved in this
litigation," he said.
Magnuson did not place
all of the blame on the
Corps but warned that de-
velopment and the distri-
See WATER AS


two seats, then a run-off
between the top two finish-
ers for the respective seat
will be held Sept. 22.
"I'm asking the voters of
Apalachicola to give me a
chance," said Hall, 62, of52
7th Street. A downtown busi-
nessman, active in civic af-
fairs, Hall first ran for the
commission, unsuccess-
fully, over a decade ago.
"My main thrust is going


to be I don't think we have
adequate representation
on the city commission by
anybody with a solid busi-
ness background and busi-
ness interests," he said. "I
know these are exciting and
challenging times for the
city and many good things
are happening. I want to
make sure that we put the
horse before the cart and
talk about the needs of the


business community be-
fore these things happen,
instead of after they've al-
ready happened."
Hall said he plans to
address the needs of city
residents as well, noting
that many of them depend
on the success of city busi-
nesses for their livelihoods.
"Your very job is impacted
by what the city commis-
sion does every day," he


said. "If the climate is good
for the employer it follows
that it's good for the em-
ployee."
Cook, 71, of52 13th street,
was appointed two years
ago to fill the remainder
of Apalachicola Commis-
sioner Van Johnson's term,
after he was elected mayor.
Cook filed on Monday to
seek election to his first full
term.


"I'm running on con-
tinuing the upgrading of
the city and both the exter-
nal and internal conditions
of the city," said Cook, who
is retired from the Navy. "I
think we have a good re-
cord going as far as bring-
ing new programs and up-
grading the services."
Cook said in light of un-
certainty about the econo-
my, he plans to scrutinize


carefully the upcoming
budget picture for the 2009-
10 fiscal year.
"I don't know how that's
going to come out," he
said. "We're looking at all
aspects to be able to keep
village rate as low as we
can. I don't want to go into
the city's reserves. Those
may be needed even fur-
ther down the line if the
economy doesn't recover."


Progress Energy employ-
ee, in announcing his deci-
sion not to seek reelection.
"I hope some good people
run."
On Monday, Rankin, site
manager of the Carrabelle
Boys and Girls Club, con-
firmed her plans to run, cit-
ing her priorities.
"I work with the future
>f the city of Carrabelle
and I hear their concerns
everyday. I want to be their
liaison with the city. (They)
save nowhere to go and
lothingtodooncethe(Boys
and Girls) club is closed,"
:he said. "If elected, I will


try to get grants and money
in for a community center.
We have the space; we just
need to put a lot of things
in place to give our youth a
safe place to go on Friday
and Saturday night.
"If you look at statis-
tics, by the time our youth
are 16 years old either they
lose their zeal for going to
school or they are getting
into trouble. I want them to
have a place to skateboard,
to go bowling or just hang
out with their friends and
be properly supervised,"
Rankin said. "Parents and
people in the community


are already starting to get
more involved with the
youth and we want to con-
tinue that and keep it go-
ing."
Rankin said she is aware
of other concerns such as
the future of the waterfront
and space for people to dock
their boats
"I cannot make prom
ises," she said. "I am a ver;
tenacious person but I an
only one vote. It's going t<
take somebody going ou.
and talking to people. To si .
downwithourlocalstate
and federal government t<
see what's going on so we


won't be blindsided."
In announcing his candi-
dacy, and filing the required
$82.40 fee on Monday, Al-
len, retired from customer
service with the Internal
Revenue Service, said pre-
serving the waterfront, and
encouraging development
of waterfront businesses
including commercial sea-
food harvesting, are impor-
tant to him.
Allen wants to assure
Carrabelle follows its com-
prehensive plan, "which is
liketheConstitutionof the
US," he said.
"It is the law that gov-


erns how the city grows
and develops," Allen said.
He stressed that the plan
was devised by citizen in-
put at public workshops
and should not be changed
without their input.
"I want to preserve the
character, beauty and na-
ture of Carrabelle because
it truly is a Florida trea-
sure," he said.
Tyre sounded a note of
support for Allen on Mon-
day. "Among the candidates
I know of, I support Cal Al-
len,"hesaid."Heisagood
man."
Rankin moved quickly


to dispel any concerns Car-
rabelle residents had about
her candidacy. She said a
seated city commissioner
came to her and told her
calls had come into the city
to ask if it was legal for her
to run for city office.
Rankin stressed that she
is not a city employee in her
capacity working for the
Boys and Girls Club. Lead-
ership of the not-for-profit
Boys and Girls Clubs of the
Big Bend are responsible
for securing funding and
decision-makingwiththe
city responsible for provid-
ing space.


Fueling Facility


Restroom Facilities


WALTER from paae Al


Sympathy with Corps,
.
critical of communities

Magnuson scolded the
Corps for ignoring the fed-
eral system of checks and
balances. He states that
by failing to seek approval
from Congress, the Corps,
a part of the executive
branch, took on the duties
of the legislative branch.
"The Water Supply
Act does not provide that
changes shall be made only
upon the approval of Con-
gress unless it is inconve-
nient to do so," he wrote.
"As we all learned in grade
school, the separation of
powers is fundamental to
our federal government:


APALAC HICOLA from paneAl





BU )GET ALL FUNDS

GENERAL SPECIAL DEBT CAPITAL

OPERATING REVENUE SERVICE PROJECTS TOTAL

160,000 2,755,320 2,915,320

State Sources 1,773,491 12,163 306,000 88,091 2,179,745

Local Sources 9,771,482 86,319 2,721,544 12,579,345

TOTAL REVENUE 11,704,973 2,853,802 306,000 2,809,635 17,674,410

Transfers In 624,667 40,000 1,537,740 2,202,407

Fund Balance July 1, 2009 800,000 34,943 1,087 6,893,502 7,729,533

TOTAL REVENUE AND BALANCES 13,129,640 2,928,745 1,844,827 9,703,137 27,606,350



EXPENDITURES

Instructional 7,138,944 1,605,161 8,744,105

Pupil Personnel Services 309,988 222,555 532,543

Instructional Media Services 145,693 145,693

Instructional and Curriculum Services 42,198 42, 198

Instructional Staff Training 0 74,983 74,983

Instruction Related Technolog 68,503 3,652 72, 155

Board of Education 355,470 355,470

General Administration 236,477 55,909 292,386

School Administration 453,760 0 453,760

Facilities Acquisition and Construction 25,000 1,068,091 1,093,091

Fiscal Services 409,464 409,464

Food Services 755,245 755,245

Central Services 324, 171 10,799 334,970

Pupil Transportation Services 785,905 57,476 843,381

Operation of Plant 827, 152 2,600 829,752

Maintenance of Plant 207,746 207,746

Administrative Technology Services 0 0

Community Services 0

Debt Service 1,537,740 1,537,740

TOTAL EXPENDITURES 11,263,273 2,855,578 1,537,740 1,068,091 16,724,682

Transfers Out 40,000 300,000 1,862,407 2,202,407

Fund Balance June 30, 2010 1,826,367 73,167 7,087 6,772,639 8,679,261

TOTAL EXPENDITURES, TRANSFERS
& FUND BALANCES 13,129,640 2,928,745 1,844,827 9,703,137 27,606,350
THE TENTATIVE, ADOPTED, AND/OR FINAL BUDGETS Alm ON FILE IN TI E OFFICE OF THE ABOVE MENTIONED TAXING
AUTHORITY AS A PUBLIC RECORD


Total of General and Special Revenue Funds


306,247306,300


1,4ggweighted FTE Students


12,079.5071


IV


Thursday, July 23, 2009


Local


The Times | A7


SCHOOL BOARD OF FRANKLIN COUNTY

Budget Summary Notice
FY 2009-2010

THE PROPOSED OPERATED BUDGET EXPENDITURES OF THE FRANKLIN
COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT ARE 2.15 PERCENT MORE THAN LAST YEAR'S
TOTAL OPERATING EXPENDITURES


Proposed Millage Levy
Operating
Local Required 2.0520
Discretionary 0.7480
Critical Operating 0.2500
Capital Outlay 1.0000
Additional 0.5000
Torni 4 sson


Historical summary of financial and Demographic Data


Total Revenue


15,000,000

11,250,000

7,500,000

3,750,000

o



310,000

-
309,000

-
308,000

-
307,000


-
19,000,000
-
16,500,000
-
14,000,000
-
11,500,000
-
9,000,000



-
5,000,000

-
3,750,000

"
2,500,000

.
1,250,000

-
0


Total Capital Projects Revenue


091 101


306,000


Total Current Operating Revenues Per UWFTE


*
1,500


-
1,125


*
750


-
375


13,000.0


11,062.5


*
9,125.0


*
7,187.5


5,250.0

-
120 -


90 *
-


-
60 -


-
30 *


1,201.2


8,007.0013


6,102.4371


Instructional Employees


Total Eq Ioyees






















































News Briefs


WATER from page A6


Local governments allow
unchecked growth because
it increases tax revenue,
but these same govern-
ments do not sufficiently
plan for the resources such
unchecked growth will re-
quire. Nor do individual cit-
izens consider frequently
enough their consumption
of our scarce resources, ab-
sent a crisis situation such
as that experienced in the
ACF basin in the last few
years," wrote the judge.
"The problems faced in
the ACF basin will continue
to be repeated throughout
this country, as the popula-
tion grows and more unde-


Cars Fixed Right!
850-763-0555
- JanleS Auto Center
1301 E. 11* St. Panama City, FL 32401

www.jamesautocenter.com
website coupons




"FHA REVERSE
IMORTGAGE"
Ref finance or Purchase
Helping Seniors Every Day

* No PaymentS On the 1080 5 (850) 522-4078
* No18X0S, NO inCOme Required or Toll Free
(877)-422-9667
* No We DO NOT own your home, you do
* No YOUf hOme DOES NOT have to be paid f0f
* No ROSkidiORS On the 00001yOU feC01VB
. Bon Dams.ns, SR. Loan OETECER _
- | | -. Toss. FREE: 877-422-9667
You must be 62 or over to qualify for this offer


_ _


- -_11 -_ -


BILL 2A- MILLER RELTY

1.16 A. LOT GUFVE &H GACCESS -U LANAWRKBH
ISAN KT.DIIN- E$27,500"-NL $9,0
F40S/ ORVNIE CLOSUR
60'X100'LOT 2 BLS 70 BA NK-4R15AHMATCY
APPR.$79,500" ENTMAEDU $650 MTHE.


IV


Thursday, July 23, 2009


Local


Any monies secured
would be added to an exist-
ing $250,000 Florida Fish
and Wildlife Conservation
Commission grant, ear-
marked towards a haul out
slip, that must be spent by
year's end.
Ballister reviewed a se-
ries of recommendations
compiled by the Scipio
Creek Advisory Commit-
tee, together with the
Working Waterfronts com-
mittee, The latter commit-
tee evolved from a Water-
fronts Florida partnership
grant that the city received
under the administration
of Mayor Alan Pierce.
Led by the Apalachic-
ola Bay Chamber of Com-
merce, the committee
worked over two years to
address issues of presery-


ing the working waterfront,
including commissioning
a 2006 feasibility study for
the city.
That study recommend-
ed installation of a haul
out lift and fueling station,
icehouse, unloading dock
and open air market where
fishermen could sell their
catch straight off the boats.
Ballister detailed to this
month's hearing the steps
he planned to take to meet
grant requirements, that
require that at least half
of the beneficiaries of the
project be from low to mod-
erate income households.
Cindi Giametta, the
city's grant writer, said sur-
veys are underway among
the 68 people who dock
vessels at Scipio Creek to
determine their income


TOPSY-TURVY


levels. "We're going to
show they are going to be
the target beneficiaries of
it, and we're going to show
they need it the most," she
said.
Ballister said that since
the EDA is in the business
of job retention, securing
those monies will call for
enumerating the number
of jobs retained in the com-
mercial fleet and seafood
processing plants, and any
new ones created. He said
the project could qualify for
80percentfunding.
While engineering costs
are not considered an al-
lowable expense for the
grant, the county's Tourist
Development Council has
earmarked $65,000 to cover
upfront engineering costs
for the haul out slip, costs


not counted towards the
city's match. The existing
FWC funds might be used
towards the match.
With only three major
seafood companies left
along the Apalachicola
waterfront, the challenge
for the project is meet the
most urgent priorities, to
create a repair yard, build
a workable dock for offload-
ing to trucks, complete in-
frastructureimprovements
to the dock, pilings and util-
ity lines, and install a public
restroom.
Ballisterestimatesit will
cost about $756,000 for the
repair yard, complete with
a 60-ton boat lift; $350,000
for dock offloading, with
concrete dock and oyster
shell on limerick base sur-
face; $168,000 for piling and


dock repair; and $68,000 for
water, sewer and electrical
repair.
The public restroom
would likely be part of
seafood market facil-
ity, estimated to cost about
$435,000 to complete.
The seafood market has
been given a medium prior-
ity by the advisory commit-
tee, together with creating
additional dockage capac-
ity and installing a method
of making ice and loading it
to boats.
Giventhelowestpriority
was installing afuel storage
and dispensing location,
renovating the harbormas-
ter's house to transform it
into a maritime heritage
center, and dredging the
basin and channel.
Giametta stressed that

School Briefs
apply for a VPK certificate.
Prekindergarten students
will need a copy of their birth
certificate, social security
card, shot record, current
physical exam.
A VKP certificate is re-
quired for enrollment in pre-
kindergarten. Parents will
need proof of address and
parent identification. We will
have an interpreter onside to
help with Spanish speaking
families.
Please remember this
may be the only date to sign
up for a VPK Certificate in


an icemaking facility will
only be installed if it does
not threaten the liveli-
hood of existing providers,
and that both it and fuel
storage are "way in the
future. We're not going to
go in competition with any-
body."
She said four derelict
vessels have been removed
from Scipio Creek in the
last two years, thanks to a
$150,000 FWC grant. She
said one vessel remains to
be removed, after it washed
up during Hurricane Den-
nis.
The city hopes to hold its
second public hearing after
Ballister completes his re-
port, likely within the next
several weeks, in advance
of the Sept. 1 deadline for
applying for grants.


Franklin County, otherwise
you may have to sign up in
Panama City at the Early
Childhood Coalition Office.
For more information
please call the Learning
Center 670-8458.

Sdiool Advisory
(0Uncil to meet
School Advisory Coun-
cil will have a meeting on
Tuesday July 28.
It will be held at the
Franklin County High School
media center at 6 p.m.


Pre-K Round-up
to be held July 30
Theprekindergartenreg-
istration will be held Thurs-
day, July 30 from 9 a.m. until
3 p.m. at the Learning Cen-
ter, 85 School Road, in East-
point, the site of the former
Brown Elementary School.
The Early Childhood
Coalition will be on site to
help complete paperwork
for a voluntary pre-Kinder-
garten (VPK) certificate.
Children who are 4 years old
by Sept.1, 2009 are eligible to


Construction beginS
at Indian Creek Park
Construction on the In-
dian Creek Park in East-
point will begin on Friday,
July 24
Portions of the park, at
97 North Bayshore Drive
will be closed to the public
during the construction,
which is anticipated to last
two to three weeks. The
boat ramps will remain
open throughout the con-
struction.
The construction is


funded by a National Fish
and Wildlife Foundation
grant to the Apalachicola
Riverkeeper, and is a joint
community project with
FranklinCounty.
Work will include con-
struction of a breakwater,
and restoration of 300' of
the shoreline vegetation.
Greenpoint Construction,
Coastline Construction and
Luberto's Sand and Stone
are donating a significant
portion of their services to
help complete the project.
For more information,


call the Apalachicola River-
keeper at 653-8936.

80re bridge
pjingS reMOVed
AttheJuly7countycom-
mission meeting, County
Planner Alan Pierce told
commissioners that the
Florida Department of
'lkansportationhasremoved
five more pilings from the
old St. George Bridge align-
ment and has marked where
other pilings remain.


DAVIDADLERSTEIN|TheTimes
An accident Wednesday morning at Ave. F and 8th Street in Apalachicola
did serious damage to the vehicles involved, but no one was hurt seriously.
A 2002 Honda driven by Ronald Binns, 41, of Gainesville, ran a stop sign
around 8:46 a.m. and hit a 2005 Cadillac Escalade driven by Josie Kellogg,
33, of Apalachicola. The Honda then slammed into a utility pole while the
Escalade overturned. Kellogg sustained minor injuries and was checked out
at Weems Memorial Hospital. Binns was cited for careless driving and failure
to obey a traffic control device, said Officer Anthony Croom.


eloped land is developed.
Only by cooperating, plan-
ning, and conserving can
we avoid the situations
that gave rise to this litiga-
tion," Magnuson said, in
his conclusion.

80yd pushes for
comprehensive water
study
. .
'Clearly this is a vic-
tory for us, said Cong.
Alan Boyd, in a telephone
interview Monday. "I don't
think it's a solution, but it
validates what we have
been saying all along, that
the Corps didn't have the
authorization to take wa-
ter from the system.
"I think the solution lies
with the three states. All
We Want is a level playing


field. Our (the state's) in-
te rest is Apalachicola Bay.
I consider this a great vic-
tory for the state of Florida
and Ilookforward to Geor-
gia and Alabama coming
back to the table to negoti-
ate," he said.
Boyd is continuing to
push for a comprehensive
study of the ACF river sys-
tem by including language
in the Energy and Water
Development Appropria-
tions Act. The language
was included in the bill for
Fiscal Year 2010, which
passed in the House of
Representatives Friday,
and directs the Corps to
identify the needs, autho-
rization, and additional
funding necessary to initi-
ate a comprehensive study
of the ACF system.
If approved by the Sen-
ate, the Corps would have


to come up with an outline
of a study based on a recent
National Research Council
(NRC) report that resulted
from an April workshop
that included participants
from Florida, Georgia, and
Alabama.
"We may be experienc-
ing a lot of rain now, but
one thing is for sure: an-
other drought will come,
and we have to have a
system-wide water man-
agement plan in place that
takes into account the real
water needs of the ripar-
ian communities along the
ACF system," said Boyd.
"This language will help
us better understand the
tools that the Corps needs
to implement a more thor-
ough, scientific study of
the system."
Earlier this year, Boyd
and Senator Bill Nelson


reintroduced legislation
that would require the
Corps to enter into an
agreement with the NRC
of the National Academies
to conduct a basin-wide
assessment of the ACF
system. The Corps will
have 90 days after the en-
actment of this legislation
to provide estimates of
funding needs as well as
additional authorization
requirements to execute
this study.
"I think this is great but
it's not a total victory," said
Andy Smith, attorney for
the Apalachicola River-
keeper. "They have three
years to get congressional
approval. In the interim,
we need to assess the ca-
pacity of water that must
be maintained in the ACF
system to sustain ecologi-
cal integrity."


button of natural resources
should be an orderly, con-
sidered process.
"The Court is sympa-
thetic to the plight of the
Corps, which is faced with
competing and legitimate
claims to a finite resource.
Neither the Corps nor the
Court can make more wa-
ter. The blame for the cur-
rent situation cannot be
placed solely on the Corps's
shoulders, however," he
wrote.
"Too often, state, local,
and even national govern-
ment actors do not con-
sider the long-term conse-
quences of their decisions.


a
77 6 M/4/C O////NT////
J > a
Natural Sponge & Soaps
Nationally Acclaimed Business
(We help Apalach to be a place where
people come to visit.)
16 Ave E
Apalachicola FL. 32320
850-653-3550
www apalachspongecompany com


U OY WITH ALL YOU


R PARTY NEEDS
WEDDING ARCHES
CANDELABRAS
PuncH Bowls
CHAMPAGNE FOUNTAIN


TABLES


CJ




su

142 N Hwy 71
Wewahitchka, FL 32465
639-2929


Hours: Mon Sat 9:30am 7pm
Appt or Walk In Welcome
,-------------- --------------
(COUPON )
1 I
I I
.


FHil 8018Hil ED
Spa Pollicure Combo Must present Coupon .
Offer expires 8/12/09


A8 | The Times


MILL POND from paoeA1


LET US HELP
CRIBS
HIGH CHAIRS
TENTs
DINNERWARE


-
%

4





















FW( probes possible grou per blooper


ALL-STAR SALUTE


LOIS SWOBODA | Carrabelle & Apalachicola Times
The county commission presented plaques Tuesday morning to members of the Franklin County AII-Stars Dixie
Belles girls softball team. The team, for ages 13-15, won a district championship in Marianna and took part in the
state tourney in Brooksville. The trophy for the 2009 District 2 Dixie Softball Belles Championship will be displayed
in the county's trophy cases. Coaches include Jim and Pat Mcwhinnie, Link Carroll and Barbara Mathis. Players are
Ashley Carroll, Devon Young, Marlyn LeeJece Hatfield, Savannah Boone, Haleigh Ming, Christina Collins, Anna
Lee, Bailey Lee, Rebecca Prickett, Ashley Moore and Meagan McClain.
Coach Link Carroll said the girls had a chance to enjoy a July 2 banquet at the Hernando County Fairground
and then played in the double-elimination tournament at Tom Varn Park in Brooksville. The girls fell to BelIview and
Desoto County but had a great experience facing tough competition among the seven teams in their age division.
"We raised right at $9,000 in less than six days, and the county really came together, the city of Apalachicola
and the county and all the businesses," Carroll said. "If it had not have been for them, we could not have went. The
girls were disappointed that they lost, but it was a great experience. They went right back to practicing and look
forward to next season."


APAACHIC LA
STATE BANK*1897
A Division of Coastal Community Bank

Apalachicola Carrabelle Eastpoint St. George Island
22 Avenue E 612 N Avenue A 5 Jefferson Street 200 Franklin Blvd
653-8805 697-4500 670-8501 927-2561


By David Adlerstein
Carrabelle & Apalachicola Times
State wildlife officials are look-
ing into whether there's some-
thing fishy about a record-size
grouper caught late last month
off St. George Island.
Was it a permissible War-
saw grouper, worthy of bragging
rights, or a protected goliath
grouper, deserving of a misde-
meanor citation, or even a felony
arrest?
Capt. David Duval, area su-
pervisor of the Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation Commis-
sion's North West Region, con-
firmed Monday an investigation
has begun regarding the fish,
landed June 25 off an artificial
reef about 15 miles southeast of
the island.
Duval said FWC received
several calls complaining of the
fish's identity after a photograph
of the nearly 7-foot-long leviathan
with a 66-inch waistline appeared
in the Apalachicola Times.
If the fish, filleted on the dock
of Bay City Lodge and toted back,
vacuum-packed, to kitchen tables
in Kansas and Alabama, turns
out to be a goliath, then it could
subject the four men who caught
it to second-degree misdemean-
ors, punishable by up to 60 days


in jail and a fine ofup to $500.
After their dramatic decline
in the 1970s and 1980s, goliath
grouper became protected in
1990. State law requires the fish
be "immediately returned to the
water free, alive and unharmed,"
although temporary possession
for measuring purposes is al-
lowed.
Duval said it is also conceiv-
able the men could be prosecut-
ed under the Lacey Act, a fed-
eral law that makes it a felony to
transport illegally harvested fish
across state lines.
Billy Daniels, the Birmingham
businessman who led the fishing
expedition, said he was contacted
Tuesday by the FWC and is co-
operating, but declined further
comment.
"I think it's just too early," he
said.
Daniels said that his son,
Shawn Daniels, caught the fish
in about 80 feet of water and that
the men examined it carefully be-
fore determining they could haul
it into their 23-foot boat.
"Anybody who can see the car-
cass can figure it out easily," said
Lou Bullock, a fisheries biologist
with FWC's Fish and Wildlife
Research Institute in St. Peters-
burg.
The number and lengths of


oratory in St. Teresa, said he has
studied the picture and believes
the fish was legal.
"If I were to bet, I would bet on
a Warsaw, but it's very unusual to
catch them that shallow," he said,
noting that the fish is typically
found on the shelf slope in 300- to
400-foot deep water.
"When I've talked to the old-
timers, the fishers in the '30s and
'40s, they said they commonly
caught Warsaw in shallow water,"
Koenig said.
He said that along with defini-
tive proof, an examination of the
carcass would possibly yield the
fish's otolith, or ear bone, whose
rings would reveal, like the rings
of a tree, the age of the fish and
its growth patterns.
Because so many Warsaw
grouper die, even when released,
after being hauled up from deep
waters, Koenig said it is more dif-
ficult to protect them than it is
the goliath,
"An old fat fish is a lot better
breeder than a young lean one,"
he said. "I think it's a bad idea to
take those fish."
Still, he is not prepared to
point the finger of blame at the
four fishermen. "My bet would be
it is a Warsaw grouper, not a goli-
ath," Koenig said. "I'm 90 percent
sure it's a Warsaw."


Photo courtesy of BAY GITY LODGE


the spines on the dorsal fin eas-
ily distinguish the two species of
fish, he said.
"The color looked more like
a goliath," Bullock said. "Usu-
ally the Warsaw is a more darker
grey, and this was kind of a yel-
lowish green. The Warsaw has a
truncated tail that's cut straight
off, and the goliath a rounded
petal-shaped tail. The goliath has


real small eyes and the top of its
head is kind of flattened."
In addition, the comparatively
shallow waters where the fish
was caught had Bullock, tenta-
tively leaning toward a conclu-
sion of goliath.
But Dr. Christopher C. Koenig,
an expert on goliath grouper who
teaches at the Florida State Uni-
versity Coastal and Marine Labo-


Carrabelle backs C-Quarters
youth fishing tourney
At their July 2 meeting, Carrabelle com-
missioners voted to donate $250 to support
the fifth annual C-Quarters Youth Fishing
Tournament to be held Saturday, July25. The
donation was requested by Mary Lawhon.
The tournament is open to anyone 16 or
younger. Last year, approximately 150 kids
fished the tournament, with some traveling
as far away as Louisiana. This year C-Quar-
ters expects about 200 kids to join the fun
and fishing activities.
Friday evening, July 24, all contestants in
the tournament must attend a fishing clinic
taught by the Dock Master of C-Quarters
Marina, Millard Collins. At completion of
the clinic, each youngster receives a rod and
reel, a T-shirt, a hat and bait. Rod and reels
are furnished by FishFloridatag.org.

Schools seek volunteer
Mitltile Stil001 CO GileS
The Franklin County schools are look-
ing for volunteer middle school coaches for
some of the sports for the upcoming year.
AthleticDirectorMikeToddsaidindividu-
alswhowishtobeavolunteermiddleschool
coach must have themselves fingerprinted
andpassaboa k ounm ether take and
pass the Athletic Coaching Test given by the
FloridaDepartmentofEducationortakeand
pass three online courses givenby the PAEC
(Panhandle Area Education Consortium).
Anyone who is interested may contact
Todd at 227-6557 or Coach Josh Wright at
850-303-9038 for more information.


At the 2009 Florida Police and
Fire Games held June 21 through
27 in Port St. Lucie, former Florida
Department of Corrections Warden
Tim Whitehead, of Eastpoint, set a
new state record in the bench press
competition.
Whitehead surpassed the exist-
ing 12-year-old record by bench-
pressing 505 pounds at 228-pound
body weight. In winning the gold
medal for men over age 50, he easily
outdistanced silver medalist George
Mathis, also retired from the DOC,
who bench pressed 370 pounds.
Whitehead said at age 51 this was
his personal best, considering age
and body weight. Whitehead retired
in 2005 after 30 years with the DOC
and currently works and trains at
the Apalachicola Fitness Center.
The purpose of the Florida Police
and Fire Games is to build a stron-
ger bond among law enforcement
officers via sports programs. Ap-
proximately 4,000 officers compete
annually.


LOIS SWOBODA | Carrabelle & Apalachicola Times


CA RRA BE L LE APA LA CH ICO LA


A


Sports BRIEFS


Eastpoint weightlifter


































































































































Behvioal ealh entr |Bixer megeny Cnte |Cancer Center |Daee etr|Hat&Vsua etr|Nuocec etr


Thursday, July 23, 2009


Local


By Lois Swoboda
Times StaffWriter
About 100 youngsters
enjoyed reading, crafts
and a look at some heavy
equipment on July 14
when the Apalachicola
Municipal Library held a
Tiaras and Trucks party.
June Dosik, decked
in pearls and finery, read
"Fancy Nancy" by June
O'Conner to a covey of
captivated princesses,
Then the ladies adjourned
to create bejeweled ti-
aras.
Meanwhile the boys
heard "Smash Crash" by
John Scieszka and cre-
ated a demolition derby in
miniature with toy trucks
and paper cups.
The two factions broke
and shared a snack of
"Wheels and Jiffy Juice"
(Oreos and punch).
After snack time, ev-
eryone went outside for
a firsthand look at some
of the county's biggest
trucks. The St. George
Island Volunteer Fire De-
partment brought their
ladder truck and Chief
Jay Abbott was on board
to show kids the ropes of
the red giant.
George Watkins
brought one of Apala-
chicola's big red trucks
and kids got to sound the
siren and set the lights
flashing.
Apalachicolaemployee
Greg Harris brought a big
dump truck to the do and
demonstrated how the
bed goes up and down as
the children looked on in
awe.
In between other ac-
tivities, the children took


turns going into the li-
brary to check out read-
ing material.
Librarian Caty Greene
wants to remind everyone
in the summer reading
program to return their
books next week and turn
in their hours of read-
ing time for the summer.
Youngsters who read for
120 minutes or more will
receive a free book and
get to grab a goodie from
the magic pot.
On Tuesday, July 28 at
10 a.m., the reading pro-
gram will celebrate the
end of another summer of
fun with games and treats.
At the end of program
party, the library will hold
a drawing for a bicycle
donated by Apalachicola
Ace Hardware. Children
who read for 600 minutes
or more over the summer
will receive a backpack
full of school supplies.
Library board member
Susan Clementson said
several kids are actively
pursuing the prize and
she expects a dozen or
more packs to be award-
ed.
The Tiaras and Trucks
program was suggested
by visiting Texas librar-
ians Karen Kessel, of
Austin, and Mary Pruitt,
of Dallas. The two women
visited Apalachicola ear-
lier this year to offer sug-
gestions for the modern-
ization and revitalization
of the library.
Clementson said the
library wished to thank
Abbot, Watkins, Apala-
chicola and both volun-
teer fire departments for
their help in staging the
event.


Faith Cooper, of Apalachicola, models her


Devon Daniels, of Carrabelle, got up close and personal


Erin Cooper, of Apalachicola, displayed a healthy


June Dosik donned a flowered hat, pearls


Library

HAPPENINGS

Get ready to hip hop,
dance, wiggle, and boogie
at the Eastpoint and Carra-
belle libraries as the sum-
mer reading program con-
tinues with special guest
artist, Ellen Ashdown, lo-
cal writer and former New
York City studio dancer.
This week's theme is
"Dance and Move." Partici-
pants will have the oppor-
tunity to learn or relearn
the Chicken Dance, the
Macarena, and other popu-
lar fun dances.
Ages 5 to 12 are invited
to attend the Friday pro-
gram from 10 a.m. to noon
at the Eastpoint or Carra-
belle library. The final week
of summer reading will end
July 31.
Don't forget to regis-
ter for the free computer
classes being offered at the
Carrabelle branch, on Fri-
day, Aug. 14, from 3-5 p.m.
Friday's class is Digital
Photography I with Charles
Sawyer, followed on Satur-
day, Aug. 15, at 10 a.m. with
Windows Vista for the Web
and e-mail.
At 12:30 p.m. the same
day, Microsoft Publisher
2007 will be presented, de-
signed for computer users
already familiar with word
processing and Web brows-
mg.
All computer classes
and training and some
equipment are made pos-
sible by a Library Service
and Technology Act (LST)
grant administered by the
State Library of Florida.
For more informa-
tion about the Carrabelle
branch computer classes
call 697-2366.
The Franklin County
Public Library is now pre-
senting patrons with key
cards in lieu of the green
membership wallet cards.
Any new or returning
patron is eligible for a key
card which easily attaches
to your car keys and is then
handy for checking out
books, tapes or DVDs. Keep
on reading and we will see
you at the library.

www.apalachtimes.com


Al 0 1 The Times


Tiaras and Trucks inspires young readers













ThursdayJuly 23, 2009 wwuw.apalachtimes.com Page l


B


A view of one of the


The FAMU Strikers were the big hit of Friday's dedication,


Story and photos by David Adlerstein
Times City Editor
A performance by the Florida A &
M University Strikers highlighted the
dedication Friday of Apalachicola's new
recreation and community services complex.
Located on the site of the former
Apalachicola High School, the complex is in
the process of being deeded over to the city
by the Franklin County School District.
With free food on hand, the complex
spread open its doors to show all the
changes that have taken place in the old
high school. Much of the work was done to
house the Project Impact facility, with the
Library's TIGERS program shoring up a
portion of the former field house.
In the center of the former cafetorium
is a bounce house, provided courtesy of
the mayor, with the connecting rooms all
outfitted for different purposes.
Leslie Coon is the artist-in-residence
and she oversees a newly expanded,
multifaceted art facility for use by the 60-
plus Project Impact students who take part
each day this summer. "It's like the Phoenix
coming up because the kids have made such
a neat room out of it," said Faye Johnson,
who directs the Project Impact program on
behalf of the city.


Paraprofessional Barbara Lockley
oversees the crafts room, which also has
been expanded to take advantage of student
creativity.
The Project Impact art students are
planning an exhibit of their work on
Wednesday, July 29 from 3:30 to 4:30 p.m.
at the Apalachicola Museum of Art on Fifth
Street.
The art exhibit is part of Arts and Culture
Day, which will begin that day at noon, when
the Project Impact Theatre will present
"the Wiz" at the Apalachicola City complex,
in the former Apalachicola High School
auditorium. For more information, call 653-
1325.
Site manager Temolynn Wintons will
direct the production, with the art students
working on building the scenery.
Wintons also is in charge of the fully
equipped video studio for teens, located
adjacent to the auditorium,. Students there
are busy producing an anti-tobacco public
service announcement, using video cameras
and software mixing.
The former high school gymnasium,
where the Sharks basketball team worked
its magic, is now the site of an active
physical education program, under the
direction of Cydell Lockley.
Project Junior, a reading enhancement


program, is also administered by Project
Impact in the main building, under the
oversight of Orlando elementary school
teacher and Apalachicola native Jessie
Ammons.
The former hand room and chorus
room have been taking over by teens and
turned into lounge and a cyber caf6, run by
Apalachicola native Raevyn Jefferson, who
has graduated college and embarked on a
business career.
Nadine Kahn, Project Impact's assistant
director, coordinates field trips and offsite
activities, which include swimming lessons
at Rancho Inn, hands-on education from
scientists at the estuary, a reading program
at the Apalachicola Municipal Library and
bookmobile from Wilderness Coast library,
and student safety program offered by
Apalachicola police officer Pam Lewis.
Paid student assistants Tydron Wynn and
Brand Pridgen have assisted all summer
at the complex. Project Impact also offers
a program this summer at the ABC School
under the direction of Leann Fleming, for
about 60 students, and a credit recovery
program for about 45 students at the high
school, under the direction of Marilyn
Reynolds.
"They're just having a ball," said
Johnson. "We've had a great summer."


Loiresa Corr rushi Ic:-Ir.s Ir. a Z...rnba
clerne:.r.51rolle:.r. Encle 6.erienci of Ihe
Apolachice:.la cc:.rnrn...rnry ser..ace cc:.rnplex
as ir.sir...cic:-r Jeanr.erre Tayle:.r lell reaches
a clarce Al reshi Officer 5.ha.....r, Cheshc:.Irn
from rhe Franklin Correcilonal Insillullon in
Carrabelle, shows off bloodhound "Jamie
Leigh." At left, Ryah Davis, a fourth grader in Maclenny, shows off a clay
sculpture she made during the Project Impact summer session. Davis is the
daughter of the former Ryan Hopps, a 1996 Apalachicola High School
graduate, who was in town over the summer with her husband, Trenard
McGee. Top left, Willoughby Marshall tosses a soft drink can into one of the
cardboard recycling containers on the grounds


LIFE


TI~ES


68~pQ


~S~)J


61~ s't~o~L


Apalachicola christens new civic complex









Engfagements


Birthdays


Maleah {room turns 2
Maleah A'mya Croom celebrated her second birthday
on Monday, July 20, 2009. She is the daughter of Tanicia
Pugh and Lowery Croom, Jr., of Apalachicola.
Maternal grandparents are James and Alma Pugh, of
Apalachicola. Paternal grandparents are Lowery Croom,
Sr., of Miami, and Freda Williams, of Port St. Joe.
Godparents and Shirley and Harold Byrd, Elinor
Mount-Simmons and Jeremy Williams.
Maleah celebrated her birthday at a pool party with
her brother Jamal and her friends and family.


DON'T PAY TOO MUCH! I r
$50 Quarterly LOOK I(
Saves YOU $100 a year! a
for residential accounts
AIoha BulsPost Manatement -
Franklin County s ONLY LOCALPest control company
Call Lois at (850) 653-5857


.
A aylen McNair turns 1
Ajaylen McNair will celebrate his first birthday on Fri-
day, July 24, 2009. He is the son of Jasmine Lewis.
Maternal grandparents are Trina Ford and Freddie
and Candye Lewis. Maternal great-grandparents are
Marion Greene and Rosa Tolliver,
Godparents are Evelyn and Freddie Williams.


Anniversaries


~PET OWF TEH E


Thursday, July 23, 2009


B2 | The Times


Society


Layton, would like to invite
all family and friends to the
wedding of Cheree' Whid-
don and Wade Blevins on
Saturday, Aug. 1, 2009.
The wedding ceremony
will be at 4 p.m. at the Car-
rabelle Christian Center on
River Road, with reception
immediately following.
There is also a "Pamily
Style" wedding shower on
SundayJuly26atl2:30p.m.
at the Carrabelle Christian
Center. Family and friends
are invited!


Cheree' Whiddon,
Wade Blevins to wed

Fairy tales aren't al-
ways make-believe.
This fairytale begins
with our love,
beginning at forever
and ending at never
Cheree' Whiddon and
Wade Blevins are soon to
begin their fairytale.
Missy and Lee Jones,
and Jean and Robert


Bobby and Anna Fincher,
all of Apalachicola.
Gabe and Renae will
unite as one on Wednes-
day, July 29, in honor of
their friend, Rond FLIrr.
A ceremony will be
held on Saturday, Aug. 1,
2009 at 11 a.m. at Lafay-
ette Park for friends and
family.


Renae Fincher, Gabe
Ordon to wed
Matthew, Brooklyn
and Gaven are pleased to
announce the wedding of
their parents, Gabe Gor-
don and Renae Fincher.
Gabe is the son of Rolf
and Linda Gordon, and
Renae is the daughter of


Alonna Brown is turning 3 Becky and Perry Floyd mark anniversary
Alonna Brown celebrated her third birthday on Becky and Perry Floyd, of Apalachicola, will celebrate
Wednesday, July 22, 2009. She is the daughter of Shawn their 17th wedding anniversary on Saturday, July 25, 2009.
Brown and Santana Myers. The late Bishop Daniel White, from the Love and Wor-
Grandparents are Garry and Loretta Myers, and ship Center, officiated at the ceremony July 25, 1992 in
Darlene (Walter) Pugh. Great-grandmother is Irestine Lafayette Park that united in marriage the former Becky
Bouie. Mathis and Perry Floyd. They were among the first cou-
Godparents are Sonny and Bobbie Turrell. ples to be married at that scenic location.


Holly
Holly, a 10-month-old black and white cat,
arrived at the Adoption Center last November She
is a sweet, affectionate girl in desperate need of a
loving home. Holly has been spayed, she is up-to-
date on her shots and her adoption fee reduced.
Call Kam at 670-8417 for more details or
visit the Franklin County Humane Society at 244
State Route 65 in Eastpoint. You may log onto the
website at www.forgottenpets.org to see more of
our adoptable pets.
Remember, when you adopt a friend for life,
you not only save the life of that pet, you make
room for us to save the life of one more abandoned
dog or cat!


























Church BRIEFS


Card of Thanks THE HAND FAMILY

With all our hearts, we would like to thank everyone who stopped by the yard sale in Apalachicola on
July 4 and bought something, donated money, or both. As most of you know, our house in Greenville burned
to the ground on June 26. We lost all our possessions. Thankfully, no humans were home at the time, but
we had left our precious dogs inside so they could enjoy the air conditioning. They all perished in the fire,
which sadden us greatly.
But we praise God anyway, and we are so thankful to our families who put on the yard sale and to all who
contributed so graciously. We love you all!

Francis and Judy Hand
Former longtime residents of Eastpoint


First Pentecostal Holiness Church
379 Brownsville Road Apalachicola


Sunday School 9:45 am
Sunday Morning Worship 10:45 am
Sunday Evening Service 6:00 pm
Monday, Youth Group 6:30 pm
Wednesday, Royal Rangers, G.A.P. 7:00 pm
Wednesday Worship & Word 7:30 pm
Nursery Provided during regular church services


St. Patrick Catholic Church
Ave C & Sixth Street in Apalachicola, FL 32329 or
The Islander (Across from the Blue Parrot)
on St. George Island, FL32328
(850) 653-9453 Email: stpatcath@fairpoint.net
PASTOR: FATHER ROGER LATOSYNSKI
www.stpatricksmass.com
APALACHICOLA MASS SCHEDULE
SATURDAY................. .................5 PM
SUNDAY ................ ................ 10 AM
ST. GEORGE ISLAND MASS SCHEDULE
SUNDAY ................ .................8:30 AM
a e

The United Methodist Churches
.
Of Frankhn County Welcome You

First United Methodist Church of Apalachicola
Worship Service 11:00 a.m. every Sunday
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
75 56 St. Apalachicola 653-9530 fumcapalach@gtcom.net
Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis
Carrabelle United Methodist Church
Worship Services 10:45 a.m. Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
"Celebrate Recovery" Mondays 7-9 p.m.
Healing service first Tuesday each month-? p.m.
102 NE Ave. B Carrabelle 697-3672
Pastor: Julie Stephens
Eastpoint United Methodist Church
Worship Service 10:00 a.m. every Sunday
Prayer 9:15 a.m. Waffles & Wisdom 11:15 a.m.
Healing Service every first Fridays of the Month at 6:30 p.m.
317 Patton Dr. (corner of David St.) 670-8825
Pastor: Rev. Beth White
St. George Island United Methodist Church
9:00 a.m. Worship Service
10:00 a.m. Fellowship Hour
201 E. Gulf Beach Dr. 927- 4635 www.sgiumc.org
Pastor: Rev. Themo Patriotis


Are you Age 60 and older, on a limited Income (must meet Income
Elder Care Se race guidelines) and Interested m chommgpactwe and Involved in your
of Franklin County Benefits receive a tax-free stipend (hourly pay not counted as
income), assistance with first physical examination, transportation
reimbursement, and the opportunity to serve your community
Improving the Quality ofLife for Seniors in For more Information please call
Franklin County Mary Milton (850)245-5935 or Julle Prevatt (850) 921-5554


0 1 . .


IV


Thursday, July 23, 2009


Local


The Times | B3


THE
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
WELCOMES YOU


THE


Well, you really missed
it last Thursday at lunch!
For dessert we have Miss
Merle's world famous pies
- coconut cream, lemon,
and chocolate. Yum, yum.
Thank you. Wish you
would join us at the Senior
Center in Carrabelle, at
noon for the home cooked
meal, fellowship, and fun.
Lunch is served after
Pastor Mark led us in The
Pledge and Prayer. See ya!
Doesn't the park look


great! The
former Dr.
George
Sands ball
field has
had a total
makeover.
Get out
LANARK NEWS there and
]im Welsh enjoy this
park, Tillie
Miller
Park, across from the
Senior Center, and the Will
Kendrick Sports Complex,


on Ken Cope Drive.
We need to keep Bob
Smith and his family in
our prayers. Bob passed
away last Saturday
afternoon. He was a
longtime friend, and
Brother Knight. Pray for
his eternal rest and for
strength for his family.
Also, keep Ron
Meloche and his family
in your prayers. Ron
passed away last Saturday
evening. Pray for his


eternal rest and for
strength for his family.
Ron was also a longtime
friend, and a fellow
member of the American
Legion Post 82 here in the
village.
Be kind to one another
and check in on the sick
and housebound. Smile
Jesus loves you!
Until next time, God
Bless America, our troops,
the poor, homeless, and
hungry.


.
Trail tT T
1 111110
EST. 1836


HwAyb98&6thSt.
SUNDAY: 8:00 AM 10:30 AM
LIBRARY HOURS:
SUNDAY 12:00 2:00 PM
MONDAY 11:00 AM 1:00 PM
WEDNESDAY 12:00 2:00 PM
THURSDAY 3:30 5:30 PM


'gce i bl t 1
voice and humble spirit
allows the Holy Spirit to
move and prepare hearts
for the message. His wife
Dana is a minister with a
gift of encouragement. She
accompanies her husband
in song and worship and
has an enthusiastic but
down-to-earth preaching
style.
Alvin and Dana, who
live in Georgia, have shared
their ministry in various
churches, jails, prisons, pre-
release centers, community
events and nursing homes.


ple Arhidth qlue ionsh
office at 697-3672.

pgggy gypgggy 10sts
FOVIVal in East point
First Baptist Church of
Eastpoint will host revival
services from Friday, July
24 through Sunday, July 26
at the church at 447 Avenue
A in Eastpoint.
Everyone is invited to
come and hear Dr. Jerry
Moore, who will speak
nightly at 6 p.m. For more
information, call Pastor
Gerry W Kent at 670-8468.


COvenant Word hosts
Pf0phetic Sunday
Pastors David and
Harolyn Walker will host
-
Christian International
Prophetic Teams from
Christian International
Family Church in Santa
Rosa on Sunday, July 26, at
10 a.m.
Come and receive a
"Word from the Lord" at
Covenant Word Christian
Center, 139 12 Street, in
Apalachicola. All attendees
will receive prayer
prophetically.


Clarence Russell, born


Viewing was held before
the funeral service at
United Baptist Church in
Eastpoint.


David Smith (Lee) of
Westminster, SC and
Matthew Smith (Maureen)
of Suwanee, GA, two
daughters, Jan Marie
Akers (Ron) of Cape
Coral, and Julie Ann Geier
(Mitch) of Tarpon Springs;
13 grandchildren and 11
great-grandchildren.
The family would
like to express a special
appreciation to Dr. Nancy
Chorba, and to Big Bend
Hospice staff, especially
Dianne Flynn, Deanna
Murphy, and Michelle
Sanders.
Mass was held July 22,
at St. Patrick's Catholic
Church, followed by burial
at Magnolia Cemetery.
Ceremony was conducted
by Fr. Roger Latosynski.
In lieu of flowers,
donations may be made
to Big Bend Hospice
if desired. Kelley
Flineral Home handled
arrangements.


Robert L. "Bob" Smith
passed away Saturday
afternoon, July 18, 2009, at
his home in Apalachicola,
surrounded by his family.
Bob was preceded in
death by his father, Walter
Bates, and his mother,
Helen Polka Smith, and
his stepfather, Fern Lee
Smith.
He was born in
Houston, Texas on July
17, 1927. He graduated
from San Jacinto High
School in Houston, Texas
in 1944. On Nov. 16, 1946
he married Leatrice Mary
(Pat) Sneigr Smith. Bob
served in the US Navy
during World War II and
was a recipient of the
Purple Heart.
He graduated from
Texas A&M University
in 1958 with a degree in
meteorology. Bob did
extensive research on
the use of Doppler radar
in measuring the winds


inside a tornado, resulting
in him being the first man
to measure these winds
using the Doppler radar.
After being stationed
by the US Weather
Service to various
stations in Texas and
Louisiana, Bob and
his family moved from
Washington, D.C. to
Apalachicola in 1959
where he and his family
lived until his death.
He was a member of St.
Patrick's Catholic Church,
Knights of Columbus, and
the American Legion.
After his retirement
from the US Weather
Service, he worked as a
bailiff for the Franklin
County Court, and taught
meteorology at Gulf Coast
Community College for a
time.
Now he is survived
by his wife of 62 years,
Leatrice Mary (Pat)
Smith, two sons, John


Death leaves a feeling
that nothing can heal,
But love leaves a feeling
that no one can steal.

It's now been a year
since
You've been gone;
But as much as we miSS
you,
Life still must go on.

You taught us to be
honest,
To work hard, and be
stone ove you and miss


youSo we'll see you before
long.
Life is not measured
by the breaths we take in
a day;
But by the moments
we're given'
That take our breath
away.
So if you're reading
these words,

pleJust remember that
'Cause we're all just a
telephone
Call from our knees.

In loving memory
of Jesse Rodger Flowers,
son, husband, father,
brother, uncle and friend


First Pentecostal of Apalachicola,
Sends Special Thanks,
to our VBS sponsors:

Ace Hardware
Collins Vacation Rentals
Resort Vacation Rentals
J.V. Gander, Distributors, Inc.
Pinki Jackel
Water Street Seafood
Gulfszde IGA
Sign De-sign
The Hut Restaurant
Willson's Septic Services
Red Top Cafe

We would also like to thank everyone,
who made a private donation.
May you all, be abundantly blessed!
FPHC


Big Bend Hospice was there for us during my
Mother s illness, then after her death they guided us
through our grief, providing support for over a year.


When you need us, Big Bend Hospice is..


a

a

Call us for rnore information.
850/878-5310
850/772-5862


Lanark NEWS


WELCOMES YOU
Church

Of the

As cension
101 NE First Street
Carrabelle
SUNDAY
10:00 AM


Simply His to
minister at Carrabelle
Metliotlist
Alvin and Dana
Stephens will be bringing
their gifts of Christ-
centered music and
evangelistic preaching
to the Carrabelle United
Methodist Church on
Sunday, Monday and
'lliesday evenings, July 26,
27 and 28.
Services will begin at
7 p.m.
Alvin has been
recognized for his gifted


In Loving

M
emory

ayne ampbel
I961-2006

Everyday that goes by
is another day without you.
We love you and miss
you so much.
Love,
Your wife, Sandra,
and son, Charlie C.


Obituaries

Clarence Russell
held at United Baptist
Church in Eastpoint. on
Monday, July20 with burial
in Eastpoint Cemetery.


Robert L. Smith


.leSSO Fl0WOFS







































































JIMMIE CROWDED EXCAVATING & LAND CLEARING, INC.
COMPLETE SITE DEVELOPMENT
RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL INDUSTRIAL
ASPHALT GRADING & PAVING LOT CLEARING
DEMOLITION WORK UTILITY CONTRACTOR
PILL DIRT TOP SOIL GRAVEL MASON SAND DELIVERED
POND BUILDING
C & D DEBRIS ROIL OFF CONTAINERS
FULLY LICENSED & INSURED
SERVING YOU SINCE 1964

850-897-8403 850-528-6933 850-528-5122
L OFFICE ODIE CELL JIMMIE CELL J


Bring a Friend for a

B ot tom Job

LA you ano your triena

Each receive 10% off

& BOttom Job*

Offer effective August 1, 2009 thru August 31, 2009
*Applies to Bottom Painting Only,
Previously scheduled Jobs excluded, and
Reservations are Required as Space for this offer is Limited
OJ 5
77 C' T



(850) 697-3337
www.docksidecarrabelle.com


Thursday, July 23, 2009


Local


By David Adlerstein
Times City Editor

Fishing enthusiasts who
cast their lines off the rem-
nants of the old St. George
Island bridge can now rest
easy that if and when an
emergency happens, they'll
be a quick response.
Members of the St.
George Island volunteer
fire department's first
responder unit are in the
process of purchasing an
$8,400 four-wheeler, fully
equipped with necessary
medical devices, to be
used to reach those in
need on the lengthy fish-
ing bridge.
Helping fund the buy
is Preble-Rish, which de-
signed the boat ramp, and
later oversaw construction
of a walkway to make the
fishing bridge handicap ac-
cessible.
Clay Kennedy, Preble-
Rish's project manager
for the county project,
presented a $5,000 check
on July 9 to Jay Abbott,
the St. George Island fire
chief, and County Commis-
sioner Pinki Jackel, whose
district encompasses both
Eastpoint and St. George
Island.
"This is one way we
can give back to the com-
munity," said Kennedy, in
presenting a giant card-
board check on the sunny
afternoon, the funds going
to help cover the cost of the
rescue vehicle.
Abbott said need for the
vehicle arose after the boat
ramp was initially complet-
ed and rescue vehicles no
longer had accessibility to


Accepting a $5,000 donation from Preble-Rish's Clay Kennedy, left, earmarked for a rescue vehicle on St. George Island, are County


the fishing bridge because
of the steep stairs.
"That's a long walk," he
saidnotinghisdepartment
has had to handle about a
half-dozen emergencies
on the bridge, mainly due
to the leading health is-
sues of heat stroke, heart
attacks and strokes.
Preble-Rish later over-


saw construction of a
handicapped ramp by Lar-
ry Joe Colson, whose rails
were modified on Abbott's
recommendation to enable
a four-wheeler, often called
a "mule," to navigate the
90-degree turn.
Abbott turned to Jackel
for help in funding a res-
cue vehicle, complete with


a gurney, capable of navi-
gating the walkway, and
traversing the six-tenths-
of-a-mile bridge length.
The county commis-
sioner turned to Preble-
Rish for help, and the
company decided to lend a
financial hand.
"They do a lot of busi-
ness with the county. They
partner with us," said
Jacket. "They've become
a stakeholder in our coun-
ty."
Abbott said he's seen
the numbers of fishers on
the bridge increase, and


listened to their devotion
to angling. One woman,
suffering from the effects
of the heat, declined re-
cently to be transported
off the bridge. "No matter
what, I'm going to fish,"
she told first responders.
"It's going to really aid
us in getting out there," he
said.
The new mule will aug-
ment the department's
other tools, which include
a jet ski that proved in-
strumental in a water res-
cue on July 7 about two
miles from the boat ramp,


when a boat carrying a fa-
ther and his two children
capsized.
Jacket said she is eying
further improvements to
the boat ramp site, includ-
ing an upcoming repay-
ing enhancement by C.W.
Roberts. Next year, the
Florida Department of
Transportation has plans
to modify the shape of the
entrance road to the boat
ramp site.
"This is a real asset
here, she said. There
are some things we can do
to make it nicer."


Trankc Sh~ow & Sidewalkc Sale


2mE~ ~30-8. WatebR. STREET


Fiber Artist Sidney Brand will be at
.
The Pearlon Water Street with her complete 1me
of unique ancl useful bass & purses. Each bag is
a one-of-a-kind creation!

Meet the Artist Parts
Friday July 24, 4-7 p.m.

Sidewalk Show
Saturday July 25,11a.m.-0 p.m.
Cznon, ouknowyouneeclanewhag!


.


Travis Stanley


Kin Dav i75


850.653.5772


R --"'""' I | EP ill
SUPER AFFORDABLE EASTPOINT New LOWER PRICE! 4BR/4.5BA OVER FIVE ACRES in Carrabelle!
home! 2BR/1BA with new roof, Bright airy Gulf view home on St. One mile north of town on Hwy
wiring, foundation, vinyl siding. Pneeor em is aupodpa ad 67. If you are looking for privacy
Enjoy the evenings on your rental! Heated and landscaped and plenty of room, this is the deal!
screen ympe tchassistEng le 11 y ur m ening ff But still convenient to town and the
for details! decks! MLS#236210.................$75,000
MLS#236356..................$99,000 MLS#207288................$599,000
.


BANK OWNED! USDA LOAN Historic Apalach 3BR/2Bath Apalachicola 3BR/2BA home with
ELIGIBLE! 3 BR/ 1 Bath energy totally renovated cottage w/ all the many upgrades, new porch, roof,
efficienthomew/manyextrafeatures, best of the original features; high vinyl siding, cabinets, hardwood
custom cabinets, marble counters, ceilings, crown moulding, all heart floors large kitchen with plenty
crown molding, hardboard siding, pine floors, walls and ceilings.
double pane windows Convenient Lovely front porch and back patio of counter space! Ready to move
location to townI w/ shed! in!
MLS # 235726................$97,500 MLS# 235898...............$199,000 MLS# 235714...............$169,000
Please call us for a complete selection of properties for


St. GlelolnF nldB.28


sale in the Apalachicola Bay area!


B4 | The Times


Preble-Rish helps fund island rescue vehicle


A FulSrice RelEtt opany


SAVINGS






















































































~I


Plus, you'II have:
M Phone service that can bring help to your door in a 911 emergency
HA phone line that works when the power goes out'

Don't miss out on this great opportunity!
Call 877.342.7097 now.
............................................... communications
HIGH-SPEED INTERNET 5 PHONE 5 TELEVISION www.FairPoint.com
Offer requires FairPoint local phone service.After promotional peruxi, stantiani rate for high-speed Internet applies. For IImital time only. Limital to Stantiard wr-
vice. FairPoint delivers a dedicated clinnection to your home from (>ur high-speed Internet network. linfortunately, cable Internet service can share a clinnec-
thin with other cable modem customers in the neighbothtxxi. tonly phones that (it) not require electricity work during power outages. HIGH-5PEED INTERNET:
Speed anti uninterruptal service are not quaranteed. Taxes anti aritiltltinal charges may apply. Not all services available in all areas. Services subject to change.
(02009 Fair Point Communications, Inc.All rights reserval 674AT/5TAR


Thursday, July 23, 2009


Local


The Times | B5


By Mr. Bi||
Special to the Times

After moving here from
Dallas in a '55 Pontiac with
the driver's door smashed
in, and a 5' x 8' U-Haul
with a motorcycle in the
middle, and whatever else
we owned packed around
it (Didn't hear the last of
that for a while), the kids
were age 7, 5, and 2 and
wanted a dog.
So we adopted a black-
and-white Llewellin setter
and named it "Pepsi."
She was a great dog and
lasted about four or five
years before the lure of
98 got her. Next was a
cute little black-and-tan
puppy (unknown origin at
the time) that grew up to
be a 15.5-pound hound we
had named "Limbo." He
liked to travel and terrified
residents from the village,
who called often. He
never bit anyone. He soon
discovered the Village IGA
and did his marketing here,
carrying home a whole leg
bone which some believed
was human. Some rotten
SOB poisoned him while I
was working.
In pulpwood we found
many baby squirrels and
I brought them home and
bottle fed them. Built a
big cage in front of the
antique shop for them
after they ran us out of
the house. Left the door
open for them and they
would go or stay 'till they
found a girlfriend. Jerdan
Smith had the Lanark
Amoco Station at the time
and had a pet coon named
"Charlie" and folks would
give him a piece of ice
which he promptly put in
the water to wash. Then
he would look for it. Well,
the kids all wanted a pet
coon and the dogs put five


economy getting cages
built. Now the front of
the store looks like "Wild
Kingdom." Bill finally got
a collar on the devil, but all
he would do was hiss and
dig in all four feet. I started
raising beagles which also
went down with the "red
mange," but a man told
me how to get rid of it with
a copper pipe collar. It was
awesome.
Next a barber in town
named Bill gave me his
pet skunk (de-gassed). He
escapedsomehow.Couldn't
get used to the smell, I
guess.NowHatchMooney,
another pulpwooder, had a
pet bear. We all hung out at
Barney's Tavern down the
street. Hatch would bring
the bear and pretty soon
he was liking beer as good
or better than Hatch. One
night, when neither one
could drive, his wife Polly
came, put them in back of
the truck and went home
and turned the hose on
'em.
My son drug home
every other imaginable
creature, an owl he called
"Hooty." An injured crow
that I had to put down
because someone told him
that he could talk if you
split his tongue. Believe
me, he is not a surgeon!
My wife, Gloria, who even
is into animals, had an
old pelican, who hung out
at the boat basin, got fed,
then came every evening
for a handout. If she didn't
have anything to give him,
she would go to Mike's and
buy baitfish for him. His
name was "Heathcliff"
(Red Skelton)
Along with all the
snakes, spiders, bugs,
rats, stray dogs, cats, oh
yeah! bats too, I am a poor
man's "Marlin Perkins."
Mr Bills thepenname
ofBillMiller


)YrtuAL lu Int I Ima


of them up in a 90' pine tree.


them four big ones, and one


caught three big-uns and the


Got FairPoint phone? Get 3 months of Internet
for $9.95 a month!
HA dedicated connection that's not shared with
your neighbors as cable can be
a FREE self-installation and 24/7 tech support
a FREE security package with anti-virus and
firewall ($50 value)
H 100MB of email storage
a Support for email files up to 25MB
(great for photos and music)
H FREE activation and use of modem
a FREE monthly eNewsletter
a No contract to sign


REFLECTIONS

































































PUBLIC HEARING
MSBU Fire Assessment Meeting

Resolution to Amend the Municipal Service
Benefit Unit Ordinance 87-2.

Date: Tuesday, August 4, 2009
Time: 10:30 A.M.
Location: Franklin County Courthouse Annex
Board Room
34 Forbes Street
Apalachicola, FL 32320

For further information please contact: Jay Abbott,
St. George Island Fire Chief at (850) 927-2753.

PUBLISH DATES: July 23, 2009 & July 30 2009
FRANKLIN COUNTY BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS



NOTICE OF GENERAL ELECTION

CITY OF CARRABELLE, FLORIDA

DATE: SEPTEMBER 8, 2009

POLLING PLACE FRANKLIN COUNTY SENIOR CITIZENS CENTER
103 AVENUE F
POLLS OPEN AT 7:00 AM AND CLOSE 7:00 PM

VOTE FOR: CITY CONIlllmlONER (TERM 4 YRS)
CITY CONIlllmlONER (TERM 4 YRS)

CANDIDATES MAY QUALIFY BEGINNING 12:00 NOON, JULY
20, 2009 UNTIL NOON JULY 24, 2009 (MONDAY THRU FRIDAY
DURING REGULAR WORKING HOURS). QUALIFYING FEES IS
$45.00 PLUS 1% OF ANNUAL SALARY.

ONLY PERSONS REGISTERED TO VOTE IN PRECINCT NO.5
OF FRANKLIN COUNTY AND WHO RESIDE WITHIN THE
CITY LIMITS OF THE CITY OF CARRABELLE WILL BE
RECOGNIZED AS QUALIFIED ELECTORS AND ALLOWED TO
VOTE OR QUALIFY FOR CANDIDACY FOR MAYOR OR CITY
COMMISSIONER.

CITY OF CARRABELLE, FLORIDA
WILBURN MESSIER
MAYOR


Thursday, July 23, 2009


Law Enforcement


The following report is provided by
the Franklin County Sheriff's Office. Ar-
rests are made by officers from the fol-
lowing city, countyandstatelawenforce-
ment agencies: Apalachicola (APD),
Carrabelle (CPD), Florida Highway
Patrol (FHP), Franklin County Sheriff's
Office (FCSO), Florida Fish and Wild-
life Conservation Commission (FWC),
Florida Department of Environmental
Protection (FDEP), Florida Division of
Insurance Fraud (DIF) and Florida De-
partment of Agriculture and Consumer
Services(FLDOACS).
All defendants are considered in-
nocent until proven guilty in a court of
law

July I4
Justin McAlpin, 20, Eastpoint, viola-

Da no te 2CS4 arrabelle, bat-
'

July I 6
Herman L. Foxworth, 77, Bristol,
sexual battery victim mentally defec-
tive (FCSO).
Toni L. Lashley, 29, Apalachicola,
failure to appear (FCSO).
Donnie H. Thompson, 52, Apalachic-


ola, grad theft and violation of probation
(FCSO).


Dustin Shahan, 19, Carrabelle,
burglary of a structure and petit theft
(FCSO).
John W. Nowling, 36, Eastpoint, bat-
tery (FCSO).
Austin Coursey, 28, Apalachicola,
DUI (FCSO).

JUly 20
Dawn M. Clarke, 36, Apalachicola,
disorderly intoxl a sn29F p lachicola,
disorderly intoxication (FCSO).
Chester Timmons, 44, Eastpoint,
dm ic battery and elderly abuse

publ cmneusdiidoorCer,063, Alligator Point,
Paula Lowery, 27, Panama City, vio-
lation of probation (FCSO).
Robert K. Leonard, 31, Panama City,
violation of probation (FCSO).
Cynthia Heafey, 45, Lanark Village,
driving while license suspended or re-
voked (CPD).
Harry J. Hall, 30, Apalachicola, re-
tail theft (FCSO).


The All-Veterans cookout will be held
on Saturday, Sept. 12, 2009, at Battery Park
in Apalachicola.
Hosted by the Franklin County Viet-
nam Veterans, the annual event is open
to all military veterans and their families.
Under the direction of founders Charles
Wilson and the late Frank Page, the cook-
out traditionally was held in the middle of

eryb y ik th s odleer"
id Wi men y deec ty ra

September.
For more information, call Scott at 653-
8096.

Movies in the Park
COH HUSti Jul 30
The Franklin County Sheriff's Office's
S.A.EE. Program (Student And Family
Events) would like to invite all students
and families to come and enjoy "Movies in
the Park."
Enjoy a free family movie on our 12-foot
movie screen. We also will be serving free


popcorn.
The following is the schedule, with both
events beginning at 8:30 p.m.: Thursday,
July 30, at Kendrick Field in Carrabelle;
andTuesdayAug.4,NationalNightOutat
Vrooman Park in Eastpoint.

If 00pers to conduct
V6 lid9 inS sections
P
of MhemNor oohpwH, QP n
oi ver cens e e nsdpaec ohn
hours at the following locations in Frank-
lin County:
Saturday, Aug. 1, through Sunday, Aug.
30: State Route 30, SR 30A, SR 65, SR 384,
SR 67, SR 377, SR 385, County Road 370,
CR 157, CR 59, CR 374, CR 30A and SR 300
(St. George Island Causeway).
All personnel participating in the
checkpoints will be responsible for fol-
lowing the procedures outlined in Chap-
ter 17.12 of the Florida Highway Patrol
Policy Manual regarding driver license
and vehicle inspection checkpoints, said
Lt. Mark Brown.


By [015 Swoboda
Times Staff writer
Two houseboats
burned on East River,
and the state is offering
a reward for information
about the fire.
According to the state
fire marshal's office,
sometime between sun-
set on July 1 and sunrise
on July 2, two houseboats
belonging to oysterman
Jimmy Wayne Lashley, of
Apalachicola, burned.
The boats were just
south of the East River
cutoff on the Little St.


Marks River. The owner
said he visited the site
July 1, and everything was
in order when he left.
The larger of the two
boats was 24' by 40' and
valuedat$40,000 to $50,000.
The smaller boat was built
on a 24' foot fiberglass hull
and was for sale at the
time of the fire for an ask-
ing price of $800. Lashley
said the boats were not
insured at the time of the
fire.
Lashley said he worked
for more than two years
on the big boat and val-
ued the work at more than


$60,000.
Jason Roberts, an in-
vestigator for the fire mar-
shal's office, said because
there was no electrical
power at the site and no
reported lightning on the
night of the fire, it is under
investigation as possible
arson.
The Florida Advisory
Committee on Arson has
offered a reward of up
to $2,500 for information
leading to an arrest in the
case. If you have informa-
tion about this event, then
please call 850-662-7766 to
make a report.


A Carrabelle area hom-
eowner is offering a $2,500
reward in connection to a
burglary of his residence.
Mike Robulock Sr., 61, is
offering the reward leading
to the arrest and convic-
tion of persons related to
the thievery at his home on


River Road in Carrabelle.
Robulock reported to
the sheriff's office that
multiple rifles, ammuni-
tion, keys, chainsaw,
generator, night scope,
Q-beam spotlight, 42-inch
Sony television and miscel-
laneous items were taken


from the home sometime
in June.
He said the items were
valued at about $10,000.
Individuals with infor-
mation related to this case
are asked to call Lt. Ron
Crum at the sheriff's office
at 670-8500.


Elde Cae Seice Are you:
ElderCareServce *Age 60 and older?
ofFranklin County n sa Imite iconmmuelie)
Improving the Quality of Life for Interested in becoming active and
Senirs n Frnkln Conty involved in your community 20
Senirs i Frnkii Couty ours per wee .
(850)245-5935 or (850) 921-5554



NOTICE TO ALL


B6 | The Times


CO O PU 12 tS hl


Sheriff's REPORT


WRTGar OIICTOG In possible


Reward offered in Carrabelle robbery
































































Rental Houses Offices & Business
PriVate Homes Construction CleanS
Call 850-745-1344 or 850-870-1575


50% to 70% DISCOUNT
FROM HE TAIL PHICE
ALL IN-STORE LIGHTING FIXTURES
: CE/L/NG FANS: LIGHT BULBS:
INDOOR AND OUTDOOR FIXTURES


Plumbing New Construction Roofing
PreSsure Washing Additions Vinyl Siding
Painting and More No Job Too Small


8198% BOntrager, DND1

3~Onica Bontrag er, DND1



12761 Pea Ridge Road Bristol, Florida 32321
TELEPHONE (850) 643-5417


Senting allo Fraklin
Commerical
Septic Tanks &
Grease Traps P mped

653-9406
ROBERTS APPLIANCE
REPAIR
-ALL MAJOR BRANDS -





18 Shadow Lane
Apalachicola, FL 32320
Phone: (850) 653-8122
Cell: (850) 653-7654
Have Grinder Will Travel
Stump and Root Grinding.
Reduced to chips.
No job too small or large.
calliI Cece Dwaede
697-2562
FREE ESTIMATES


Toll Free: (888) 831-6754
Franklin County: (850) 670-5555
Leon on : ( 5 ) 9 -9602








O e at 0


Helping Hands Make
The Difference


I


JACKSON'S
Building Supplies
& Auto Repair
Carrabelle 697-3333
We Deliver Anywhere

g Hardware and
Paint center ParticipatingAcestores


IV


Thursday, July 23, 2009


Local


The Times | BY


By Tim Croff
Florida Freedom Newspapers
Last week was not a
good one for the county in
the battle against the H1N1
virus, commonly referred
to as the swine flu.
The Florida Department
of Health has confirmed
two cases of the swine flu
in Gulf County.
And the county is spar-
ing no time in becoming
prepared for more in the
event that situation should
arise.
Executive director of
the Gulf County Health
Department said he had
been cleared to identify the
patient as Randy Raffield,
in his 40s and co-owner
of Raffield Fisheries, who
first presented symptoms
Saturday, July 11.
Permission to identify
the patient can only come
from the patient.
Raffield came into the
Gulf County Health De-
partment on Monday, July
13, according to Kent, and
preliminary tests came
back positive for the H1N1
virus.
Blood was sent to the
state and Thursday morn-
ing, July 16 the state con-
firmed it is H1N1.
Kent said thus far treat-
ment with Tamiflu has
been effective and Raffield
will continue treatment for
at least seven days after
symptoms present, or until
July 20.
Reportedly Raffield was


back at work and feeling
fine on Monday, the Tami-
flu having proved effective.
Kent said he believed
Raffield had recent con-
tact with an individual or
individuals from out of the
country.
Kent said there is no
reason to panic and that
the Health Department
will provide education for
employees of Raffield Fish-
eries.
The second case in-
volves a 17-year-old Port
St. Joe boy who had been
attending an education
camp in Tallahassee. The
camp included some 500
attendees and within the
boys' group there were
several individuals sick,
Kent said, adding some
eventually ended up in the
hospital.
The boy arrived at the
health department Friday
morning and by the end
of the day the state labo-
ratory had confirmed his
illness to be caused by the
H1N1 virus.
He was also treated with
Tamiflu and is "doing fine,"
Kent said. "It seems Tami-
flu is an effective preemp-
tor medicine for this."
On Friday, the Gulf
County Health Department
held an already-scheduled
Point of Distribution ex-
ercise as preparation for
the potential of a mass out-
break of the H1N1 virus.
Using the parking loop
in front of Port St. Joe Ele-
mentary School, the health


department set up a series
of tables for "patients" to
travel through, on foot on
this day but under a case of
mass inoculations, by car.
"Patients" registered,
were asked a series of med-
ical questions at the next
table as part of a screening
process and then advanced
to tables for inoculation of
adults or another table for
children.
All the health workers
wore face masks and EMS
units were on hand as well
as the county's emergency
management official, who
had just returned from an
exercise in Marianna in
which folks were trained on
the outcome of an incident
involving mass casualties.
Some 40 volunteers
lined up for the "real-life"
practice run, though the
Health Department is not


contemplating mass inocu-
lations at this time.
"It will help us work out
the kinks in case we do
have to perform mass in-
oculations," Kent said.
Kent also has a work-
shop scheduled with the
School Board the first week
of August so everybody is
"on the same page" and
to receive input regard-
ing the potential use of the
circular driveways at both
high schools and both ele-
mentary schools as poten-
tial staging areas for mass
inoculations.
Using such staging ar-
eas would prevent people
from even leaving their car
in the event of mass inocu-
lations.
Kent said that state
health officials had hoped
the H1N1 virus would be "a
quiet" virus and dissipate


as most flu viruses do in
the heat of the summer.
What health officials
have found, however, is
that there are hot spots
emerging around the state
that seemed to be centered
in areas where summer
camps or similar gather-
ings of children or adults
have taken place, particu-
larly in South and Central
Florida.
Kent said research thus
faralsoindicatesthatthere
is a different risk group for
the H1N1.
"The risk group seems
to be young people, it
seems like it is affecting
people up to 25 years of
age," Kent said. "There
seems to some immunity
in older people because of
something from our past,"
he added, saying that 75
percent of cases the state


lab has handled thus far in-
volve people 25 or younger.
That could mean a busy
flu season in the fall when
schools open their doors
again.
"I think this season peo-
ple are going to have to be
very careful about check-
ing their symptoms," Kent
said. "We need to very vigi-
lant about this one."
Kent emphasized that
with what appears to be the
age demographics of those
most at risk and the con-
tagious nature of any flu,
parents should keep their
children home if they pres-
ent symptoms of the flu.
He also urged business-
es to be more lenient with
sick leave policies.
"If you are sick, stay
home, if your child is sick,
keep them home," Kent
said.


T vn2t3 com-
mission budget hearing
at 9 a.m. at the courthouse
annex in Apalachicola. For
info, call 653-8861.
Apalachicola Library
summer reading program,

i la 6053- 4 Ar
Carrabelle Public Li-
brary, 311 St. James Ave. of-
fers film from 9-11 a.m. Yoga
at 4:30 p.m. For more info,
call 697-2366.
Eastpoint Public Li-
brary offers Story Hour at
10 a.m., and individual com-
puter instruction from 10
a .6t700noon. For more info,
Wandering Star Quilt-
ing Club. Chills Hall La-
nark Village. 1-3 p.m. Call
Christine Hinton 697-2551.
Community Luncheon
and Information Specials
at the Franklin County Se-
nior Center in Carrabelle.
Noon. $3 donation. Call 697-
3760.
Friday. July 24
Exercise class at Chillas
Hall in Lanark Village. 9-10
a.m. Open to all and free.
Summer reading at
Eastpoint and Carrabelle
libraries, from 10 a.m. to
noon.
Monday. Julv 27
School board budget
hearing at 5 p.m. at the
Willie Speed board room at
district offices, at former
Brown Elementary School
in Eastpoint. For info, call
670-2810.
Exercise class at Chillas
Hall in Lanark Village. 9-10
a.m. Open to all and free.
Carrabelle Public Li-
brary yoga at 4:30 p.m. For
more info, call 697-2366.
Bingo at the Franklin
County Senior Center in
Carrabelle. Early bird at 6
p.m., regular bingo at 7 p.m.


Cards begin at $4. Call 697-
Thesday. July 28
Apalachicola Commu-
nity Gardens meeting at 5
p.m. at the Apalachicola Bay
Chamber of Commerce. For
info call 653-9419.
sum aigp bram"
from 9:30-10:30 a.m. For
more info, call 653-8436.
Carrabelle Public Li-
brary story time at 2 p.m.
For more info, call 697-2366.
Breakfast at the Frank-
lin County Senior Center in
Carrabelle. Coffee at 7:30
a.m., meal at 8 a.m. $2 sug-
sted donation. Call 697-

Bingo 7 p.m. St. George
Island Fire Dept. 25 cents
percard.Familieswelcome.
Proceeds go to St. George
Island Civic Club. Call 927-
4654.
Wednesday. July 29
Exercise class at Chillas
Hall in Lanark Village. 9-10
a.m. Open to all and free.
Carrabelle Public Li-
brary offers Kids Wii from
9-11 a.m. For more info, call
697-2366.
Thursday. July 30
Carrabelle Public Li-
brary, 311 St. James Ave.
offers Adults Wii from 9-11
a.m. Yoga at 4:30 p.m. For
more info, call 697-2366.
Eastpoint Public Li-
brary offers Story Hour at
10 a.m., and individual com-
puter instruction from 10
a.m. to noon. For more info,
Call 670-8151.
Wandering Star Quilt-
ing Club. Chills Hall La-
nark Village. 1-3 p.m. Call
Christine Hinton 697-2551.
Community Luncheon
and Information Specials
at the Franklin County Se-
nior Center in Carrabelle.
Noon. $3 donation. Call 697-
3760.


RCOO66499


P.O. Bo 439


Additions


Ph. 850-927-3628


Gulf County confirms two cases of swine flu


/ j,\ ELECTRIC
NO Oh BIg

)all Joe At 370-8911 83 PHPWYL 8

11Rpith IRigadOR IRStallad0R ApaladliC018
_ _ 850-653-3232


Community CALENDAR


DO WLLONS


Don Live General Contr,~actors


CALL 850-653-8869
to get your ad in Trades & Services





;1IIII


| 1100
for public Inspection dur-
Ing normal business hours,
8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.,
Monday through Friday,
except legal holidays, at
Department of Environ-
mental Protection, 160
Governmental Center,
Sulte 201, Pensacola, Flor-
Ida 32502.
July 23, 2009
3133T
In The Circuit Court Of The
Second Judicial Circuit In
and For Franklin Count ,
Florida

Superior Bank, a federal
savings bank, successor
by merger to The bank, as
Alabama banking corpora-

Plaintif,

vs.
Michael A. Pancake and
wife, Pauline S. Pancake
St. James ba Pro
y perty
Owners Association, Inc.,
and John Doe and Jane
Doe,
Defendants.

Case No.: 07-3899-CA

NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE Is hereb ven
y gl
tohaF\npaurs m deed

cnas ewj apr e

ouual t Flor a, de rnbk

30, Block B, St. James
13ay SubdivisionbA su t
thereof recorded in Plat
Book 7, PP 39-46, Public
Records of Franklin

Co tb cF aledato the high-
est and best bidder for
cash, at the front door of
the Franklin County Court-
house, In Apalachicola,
Florida, at 11:00 AM on
August6,2009.

Arnop rsonotherdhan e
date of the Ils pendens

clalpmm ran Int est Inuan
with the clerk of court
within 60 days from the
date of the sale.

DATED this 25th day of
June, 2009.
CLERK OF COURT
By: Michele Maxwell
Deputy Clerk
July 23, 30, 2009
3185T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT

RB ND 181COUNTY

IN RE: ESTATE OF JO-
PHHENRYWHITESELL


sNo 2BCAPE


Nh aCdEmTnOstCaREDIToORhSe
estate of JOSEPH HENRY
WHITESELL, deceased,
whose date of death was
May 11, 2009, is pending
in the Circuit Court for

Fd NPKoL teC vc nF re





t es


madmother ersor havin
decedent s estate on
whom a cc p of is notice

must file their claims with
this court WITHIN THE
TETR HOEF 31MONTHSTAHFE


Franklin County's source of news for more than a century


| zzoo |
FEETTO THE MEAN HIGH
WATER LINE OF THE
GULF OF MEXICO;
aa a THENCE RUN SOUTH
77007'56" WEST ALONG
ANNOUNCEMENTS SAID MEAN HIGH WATER
1100 Legal Advertising LINE 96.53 FEET;
1110 Classified Notices THENCE LEAVING SAID
1120 Public Notices/ MEAN HIGH WATER LINE
Announcements RUN NORTH 22003'52"
Adoptions WEST 563.18 FEET TO
1150 Perpaponals THE POINT OF BEGINN-
1160 Lost ING.
1170 Found
SUBJECT TO AN IN-
so GRESS AND EGRESS
1100 EASEMENT BEING MORE
PARTICULARLY DE-
2920T ASCRIBED AS FOLLOWS:
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL COMMENCE AT THE
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR MOST EASTERLY COR-
FRANKLIN COUNTY NER OF ST. GEORGE IS-
FLORIDA LAND GULF BEACHES,
CIVIL DIVISION UNIT 2, A SUBDIVISION
RECORDED IN PLAT
SUNTRUST BANK, BOOK 2, PAGE 15 OF THE
Plaintiff, PUBLIC RECORDS OF
FRANKLIN COUNTY
vs. FLORIDA AND RUN
NORTH 18037'19" WEST
FREDERICK S. WHITE; 150.00 FEET; THENCE
UNITED STATES OF RUN SOUTH 71022'41"
AMERICA DEPARTMENT WEST 20.00 FEET;
OF TREASURY; MARCIA THENCE RUN NORTH
WHITE; JOHN DOE; JANE 18037'19" WEST 410.00
DOE AS UNKNOWN FEET TO A POINT LYING
TENANTS) IN POSSES- ON THE CENTERLINE OF
SION OF THE SUBJECT STATE ROAD NO. 300;
PROPERTY are defend- THENCE RUN NORTH-
ants. I will sell to the high- EASTERLY ALONG SAID
est and best bidder for CENTERLINE AS FOL

sEhPSMO COONTHRO E TS:41N608R9 EE1To2T2'4

our o FranklinAp aucnh R OWI RVERADT
wh lot 01 uga A8N EEDbFF R


frh ndsa oF ly as set NO9RTH 7F4 28 ORA
71022'16" EAST 2778.72
PARCEL C : FEET TO A POINT OF
CURVE TO THE LEFT

RM NS ETGEER RG O C9 51 RC O OS9R35
LAND GULF BEACHES, FEET, CHORD BEING
UNIT 2, A SUBDIVISION NORTH 72041'44" EAST
RECORDED IN PLAT 934.07 FEET, NORTH
BOOK2, PAGE 15 OF THE 68001'12" EAST 2142.69
PUBLIC RECORDS OF FEET; THENCE LEAVING
FRANKLIN COUNTY SAIDCENTERLINERUN

OOT A oE3 H ES S000U0 E a5T804 ERAO
RUN SOUTH 71022 41 ROD AND CAP (MARKED

CE 2b ST N4 0 R NR 0
FEET TO A POINT LYING THENCE RUN NORT
ON THE CENTERLINE OF 68001'12 EAST ALONG
STATE ROAD NO. 300; SAID RIGHT OF WAY

STNECRELYRAULNONNO BOUANND1YN R.3 FAEN
TERLINE AS FOLLOWS: CAP (MARKED #7160)
NORTH 71022'41" EAST MARKING THE POINT OF
416.89 FEET TO A POINT BEGINNING. FROM SAID
OF CURVE TO THE RIGHT POINT OF BEGINNING
WITH A RADIUS OF CONTINUE NORTH
5729.58 FEET, FOR AN 68001'12" EAST 37.57
ARC DISTANCE OF 599.31 FEET; THENCE RUN
FEET CHORD BEING SOUTH 04022'57" EAST


EE 7F4 08N E8ETP T FF2TEO3
CURVE TO THE LEFT ING.

29H58AFE DIFUOSR TaxlD.
ARC DISTANCE OF 935.11 290906731700000212

9NEO4 TH C7 E D44 SGT ANY I TCEIM G

0 1C NE Cl 2E1A 69 SUR L HEAFN TEHRE

SOU EHE21058'M EASTO50 OWNER AS OF THE DATE
OF THE LIS PENDENS
ROD AND CAP (MARKED MUST FILE A CLAIM

U6T1E TNEGRLYONRI E WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER
OF WAY BOUNDARY OF THE SALE.
STATE ROAD NO. 300; In accordance with the








ON1P1 G ASTO LOOW FLVo3 20Dor

BOUNDARY 94.37 FEET 653-8861 prior to such

NATCTOHNECNRCEETELEM proceeding.
SAID RIGHT OF WAY Dated this 24th day of
BOUNDARY RUN SOUTH June, 2009.
22007'32" EAST 578.47 Marcla Johnson


| 1100 |
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Michele Maxwell
Deputy Clerk
Law Office of Marshall C.
Watson
1800 NW 49th Street
Sulte 120
Fort Lauderdale, Florida
33309
Telephone: (954) 453-0365
Facsimile: (954) 771-6052
Toll Free: 1-800-441-2438
07-20891
July 16, 23, 2009
3000T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY
FLORIDA

BRRANCHOBMAPNAK G AND
Plaintif '

vs.
GOLDEN COAST DEVEL-
OPMENT, LLC, A FLORIDA
LIMITED LIABILITY COM-
PANY ET AL.'
Defendants.

Case No. 08 312-CA

CLERK'S NOTICE OF
SALE UNDER ES. CHAP-
TER 45
NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in
cordanceowitFho osinae

dhaeedb e-sty d eIn

st1|dtdoe fer t d


ns p la t
ut l61, 09 eEf a
Ing described property:
Commence at the North-

ast esc rn aof Sec n 9
Florida and run South 02
degrees 18 minutes 00
seconds West 2640.00
feet. thence run South 85
degrees 53 minutes 00
secondsWest4571.83feet

aec hePOm0po r
54 minutes 00 seconds

tdonm 4h5ed Su hTe
right-of-way boundary of
State Road No. 30-S for
the POINT OF BEGINN-

IBNE IFrom aidnPdO av
said right-of-way boundary
continue South 00 degrees
54 minutes 00 seconds
West 730.82 feet to the ap-
proximate mean high
water line of St. Vincent
Sound, thence run South-
westerly along said mean


nd 7 fsee
South 57 degrees 09 mln-

7els7 etseScoou s47W t
grees 14 minutes 20 sec-
sh 3 eecr s8185 feet


ed eat 1 46sede

Stoush 75 dseegrees41
41.20 feet, South 87 de-

grnedess 56 Franu s 34 see
South 44 degrees 23 mln-
utes 00 seconds West









e e Su sh0 Wd
47.36 feet, South 02

s smmutesfeet
South 12 degrees 30 mln-
utes 25 seconds East
44.08 feet. thence leaving


| zzoo |
said mean high water line
run North 83 degrees 08
minutes 50 seconds West
113.74 feet to a concrete
monument (marked
U.S.G.S.) thence run North
16 degrees 18 minutes 10
seconds West 217.59 feet
to a re-rod (marked
#4261), thence run South
77 degrees 33 minutes 18
seconds West 42.00 feet to
a re-rod; thence run North
12 degrees 47 minutes 01
seconds West 710.43 feet
to a re-rod (marked
#0340) lying on the South-
erly right-of-way boundary
of State Road No. 30-S,
thence run North 68 de-
grees 37 minutes 17 sec-
onds East along said
right-of-way boundary
889.42 feet to the POINT
OF BEGINNING containing
14.01 acres, more or less.

Any person claiming an In-
terest in the surplus from
the sale, If any, other than
the property owner as of
the date of the Ils pendens
must file a claim within 60
days after the sale.
Dated: June 24, 2009.

HONORABLE MARCIA M.
JOHNSON
Clerk of Court
By: Michele Maxwell
Deputy Clerk
July 16, 23, 2009

3N01T6HTE CIRCUIT OF THE

FAFNLKO N ACN TO

JPMorgan Chase Bank,
National Association,
Plaintiff,


-vong-Cheol Cho and
Seong Cho, Husband and
WIfe;
Defendantss.
Case #: 2008-CA-000484
Division#:

NO CEOFSALE


e EFp Ilu tdtgHIBEB
Foreclosure dated June
23, 2009, entered in Civil
Case No.2008-CA-000484

n eu rcultCCourt of d
for Franklin County, Flor-
Ida, wherein JPMorgan
Chase Bank, National As-
sociation, Plaintiff, and
Jong-Cheol Cho and
Seong Cho, Husband and
WIfe are defendantss, I will
sell to the highest and best


LOCRA
ON HWY98, INAPALACH-

11CO A.MFLo u ustA6
2009 the following de-

smc e odp alasu t

T53 IN BLO

MBEDSVllSILOANND APSARKER
MAP OR PLAT THEREOF

AS ORKECORDEDGIEN P
THE PUBLIC RECORDS
OF FRANKLIN COUNTY







A N

TEH L DAYSAFTER

ITHOA SEABALIPERSON
NEEDS ANY ACCOMMO-
DATION IN ORDER TO
PARTICIPATE IN THIS


IF YOU ARE A PERSON
WITH A DISABILITY WHO
NEEDS ANY ACCOMMO-
DATION IN ORDER TO
PARTICIPATE IN THIS
PROCEEDING, YOU ARE
ENTITLED, AT NO COST
TO YOU, TO THE PROVI-
SION OF CERTAIN ASSIS-
TANCE. PLEASE CON-
TACT Franklin County
Courthouse, 33 Market
Street, Sulte 203, Apa-
lachicola, FL 32320
WITHIN 2 WORKING
DAYS OF YOUR RECElPT
OF THIS NOTICE OF
SALE: IF YOU ARE HEAR-
ING IMPAIRED CALL:
1-800-955-8771; IF YOU
ARE VOICE IMPAIRED
CALL: 1-800-955-8770
DATED at Apalachicola,
Florida, this 25th Day of
June, 2009.
Marcla M. Johnson
Clerk of Court
Franklin County, Florida
BY Michele Maxwell
DEPUTY CLERK

ATTORNEY FOR PLAIN-
TIFF:
SHAPIRO & FISHMAN,
LLP
10004 North Dale Mabry
Hwy, Sulte 112
Tarn dllorlda 33618

July 16, 23, 2009


E RTO F OR7FA ENVI-

RIONMENTAL PROTEC-

NOTICE OF INTENT
TO ISSUE PERMIT

This Intent tFolessue a pNe

09-0264697-001-DF) to
Boss Oyster, Inc., c/o Gar-
Ilck Environmental Assocl-
ates, P O. Box 385, Apa-
lachicola, Florida 32329'
requesting sovereignty

tsmuobdhmecra ca durrl
ownership at the Boss

AO ar R aran m
lachicola River for the pur-
pose of reconfiguring a
12-slip commercial marina

dn 100fa repromp
hereby granted unless a
su#1clent petition for an ad-
ministration hearing is
timely filed under sections
120.569 and 120.57 of the
Florida Statutes as pro-
vided velow. The proce-
dures for petitioning for a
he r gba e6St 0 nA


Apalachicola River, Class
I WaterOutsta engStFo

Ida Waters, near the Apa-
he motla ohA ueat Pr

of SS cn noue
TN Lo t

County, Florida.

A person whose substan-
tlal Interests are affected
by the Department s action






t

DepawtmatBu3e9v d II
Station 35, Tallahassee,
Florida 32399-3000.


(b) The name, address,
and telephone number of
the petitioner; the name,
address, and telephone
number of the petitioners
representative, If any,
which shall be the address
for service purposes dur-
Ing the course of the pro-
ceeding; and an explana-
tlon of how the petitioner's
substantial Interests are or
will be affected by the
agency determination;

(c) A statement of when
and how the petitioner re-
ceived notice of the
agency decision;

(d) A statement of all dis-
puted Issues of material
fact. If there are none, the
petition must so Indicate;

(e) A concise statement of
the ultimate facts alleged,
Including the specific facts
that the petitioner con-
tends warrant reversal or
modification of the
agency proposed action;
and

(f) A statement of the spe-
clic rules or statutes that
the petitioner contends re-
quires reversal or modifl-
cation of the agency pro-
posed action;

>) A state ofpte er

tstahngeprecisdyn e
ectdto tthenagency s pro-

A petition that does not
dispute the material facts
on wNcsh uh eD


dispute and otherwise
shall contain the same In-
formation as set forth
above, as required by rule
28-106.301. Under sec-
tlonsl20.569(2)(c)and(d)

ett nF ldad I tiva
hearing must be dismissed


e ahre
fled

This action is final and ef-
fe vteheonCle odat e eed
apartment unless a petition
Is filed in accordance with
the above. Upon the timely
filing of petition, this order
will not be effective until
further order of the De-
partment.



a se fl
the order under section
120.68y llFloridaaStat

tice of appeal nder rule
9 110p fet Flo6rdamRd



partentn coat s Bc
vard, Mall Station 35, Tal-
lahassee, Florida,
32399-3000; andbyfilinga
copy of the notice of the
appeal accompanied by
ch atp Ilcaap a te ss







ord

hm ssSecretaryof e
on the Department within

he fin Imrd relsd
with the Clerk of the De-
partment.
The application is available


Because the adminisrative


88 The Times Thursday, July 23, 2009


| zzoo |
PROCEEDING, YOU ARE
ENTITLED, AT NO COST
TO YOU, TO THE PROVI-
SION OF CERTAIN ASSIS-
TANCE. PLEASE CON-
TACT Franklin County
Courthouse, 33 Market
Street, Sulte 203, Apalachl-
cola, FL 32320 WITHIN 2
WORKING DAYS OF
YOUR RECElPT OF THIS
NOTICE OF SALE: IF YOU
ARE HEARING IMPAIRED
CALL: 1-800-955-8771; IF
YOU ARE VOICE IM-
PAIRED CALL:
1-800-955-8770

DATED at Apalachicola,
Florida, this 23rd day of
June, 2009.
Marcla M. Johnson
Clerk of Court
Franklin County, Florida
BY: Michele Maxwell
DEPUTY CLERK

ATTORNEY FOR PLAIN-
TIFF:
SHAPIRO & FISHMAN,
LLP
10004 North Dale Mabry
Hwy, Sulte 112
Tampa, Florida 33618
July 16, 23, 2009
3017T
dTHEUQRCAUITCCTU7

FAFNLKOLRNDA NAND FOR

JPMorgan Chase Bank,

NIahotnal Association'

-vs.-


gCChheol UO.kn wn
ties in Possession #1; Un-
known Partles in Posses-
slan #2; If Ilving, and all

nowtn P tiesnd
Defendants) who are not
known to be dead or alive,
whether said Unknown
Parties may claim an Inter-
est as Spouse, Helrs, Devl-
seesGranteesorOther
em st(s).

Case #: 2008-CA-000493
on #:

NOTICE OF SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY

dG EON Fp luatdtom t
Foreclosure dated June
23, 2009, entered in Civil
Case No. 2008-CA-000493
of the Circuit Court of the
2nd Judicial Circuit in and
for Franklin County, Flor-
Ida, wherein JPMorgan
Chase Bank, National As-


f ntahnt(s eland
the highest and best bid-

ESprFR N DATORT
THE FRANKLIN COUNTY
COUHRA O SE LDPOCATCEAD

0 A gustd


ro t, tno- td Final Judg-
DTS 2 AND 3 LES UATNHD

WEST 25 FEET BY 75
FEET OF LOT 2, BLOCK 1,









YI TCEIM G
SURPLUS FROM THE

LEN, IFHEANPY OTEHRE1
OWNER AS OF THE DATE
IF THE LIS PENDENS
MUST FILE A CLAIM


| zzoo |
agency action on the ap-
plication, the filing of a pe-
tition for an administrative
hearing may result in a
modification of the permit
and lease, or even a demal
of the application. Accord-
Ingly, the applicant is ad-
vised not to commence
construction or other activ-
Itles under this
permit/lease until the
deadlines below for filing a
petition for an administra-
tive hearing, or request for
an extension of time have
expired.
Under rule 62-110.106(4)
of the Florida Administra-
tive Code, a person whose
substantial Interests are af-
fected by the Department's
action may also request an
extension of time to file a
petition for an administra-
tive hearing. The Depart-
ment may, for good cause
shown, grant the request
for an extension of time.
Requests for extension of
time must be filed with the
OHice of General Counsel
of the Department at 3900
Commonwealth Boule-
vard, Mall Station 35, Tal-
lahassee, Florida
32399-3000, before the ap-
plicable deadline. Atimely
request for extension of
time shall toll the running
time period for filing a petl-

taoneduntl th ar t
fled latt} antDepalmena


hl the eqtuhesti
teh odninofwtamtehebefore
of excusable neglect.

In the event that a timely

andalsuicle t fno
whose substantial Interests
will be affected by the out-
come of the administrative
process have the right to
petition to Intervene in the
proceeding.Intervention
wil e Ipr i edjf

upon the filing of a motion
n8 p nceC w

In accordance with rules
28-106.111(2) and
62-.110.106(3)(a)(4), petl-
ticms ior a tahdem Istrailve

must be filed within 14
days of receipt of this writ-
ten notice. Petitions filed
by any persons other than
the applicant, and other
than those entitled to writ-
ten notice under section
120.60(3) of the Florida

d


gardless of the date of
publication.
Under section 120.60(3) of

tah eqao debStatutes how

dotce olpuagency lo2n
gardless of the date of
publication.

The petitioner shall mail a
copy of the petition to the
and tae ao eat ahdedtre





h h a

A et nthatodr

Department s action is
boal angmuf r tntain the





The Times Thursday, July 23, 2009 OB


7100 | 8110
Dog Island Gulf Front
Home. Fly in community VW Jetta l997 $895 Down
Accessible by plane or $6,900 Total 0% Interest
Daylight Auto Financing


maemenhghwtr ie 425-8374. Dlvr sPh. 850- 926-2032. (0)5-51 o
of heGuf f exco possible. ee/ I Temporarydoslnfraeyh -gg -
thence rn in a Nrtheast-Teller I e r o
pr lror highh Bo ca( 6110 2%2L~ae ~jc
Mexico orth 67degrees Co lete5 Bedr (4 to 6 months only) Ap-copelyfrshd$70 4B2BAM 70mo+7 5
00 mnuts Est 10 fet, mplt pc cerom alachicola, FL. seeks. ot.Cl 5-2-02 scdpCl 212350 iylt nAaahcl
thece un ort 26de-Set. Brand new In boxes. Temporary Teller. Per-Blc 26 Lt 1-5
gres 0 intesWet 00 $479. Can deliver forms teller duties Mon- 1b,1b fiinyi ett w!2b Ho 9,0 rcndvd
fd ree 00truS t 222-7783 daPFdArcn al ccola quit 2 bls e~/prt ok tengh 9~o

BEG N~~~~c~~o e b Q~~~ua mlctlans r6 months la &deo .Pes II 3b,2baAp n Iuz Amg 195$ 5
als dscibd s ot68of Entertainment quired. homes available.Thog ut CvedDwn0%IersTta
thecetan ureoredVCrRTV Center $99 MUST TemporaW oc,$0 o.+$0 290DalgtAt l
Guf eahe, ni N. ,545-7112 (4to 6 months onl -(5)2758 t Sre ulig lt 9m9m802516
as~ ~ ~ EL herlnaov reere to, (4y OO 6 10 Crerlt
sad lt atd March for sTelle, teL MPer babc 1 bna,h2s rstor wi rkrspoete.Cl
1948, andle prepare byn 404-218-0077oic ow
L.G. Flanagan, Land Sur- day thru Friday from 8 town Apalachicola. W/D C-0n a EL TAEO SL
veor fr alaaseeAl-PUB Table & 4 uphol- A -onP Quflctns incl, fumn, st unfursnec 00 Id a a s v....
craft ~Ne Corporation nh L soli w princ reued Call 850-323-0599 btenAaahcl 10-BahHm/7 6
atPuli Sle t te ig-Take $449 (can deliver) Pese-alrum to Apalachicola eff apt avall- adPr t o 10-Cm eca
est bidder, for cash, at thed e ndafin cbfl oridaiom able. Over looking b 1bdom 1bte- 710-CnoTonos
stps o te Franklin adndctpotonfr Water, cable, Inter et clsdptonwrn- 10-Frm ace
Ca laC rthouse,1 Oa- (1 Ip n~ ~~en luded. $550 mo. Cl 5 8~fun hid Lt plcioa1x6 b epGran rk~
a~~m~~on August 13, 2009. "H~,,,,,I~: I : I ,Oppor- 653-1675 gon/rdtcek rnt 2bau Ic o r rcd Itrs oa 590Dy


e~~ ~ tai th surplus frmRa :S Chapman HUESTE 20me sr80 2802516

5 h S h d d NT SHERVS S co~xo tn ar n2 eecl

p ~ ~ ~ 40 C-r~rae 4100 bat ta naOSp nrprn Reer esxt req retho W ntd Nrisaeio oetl


July23 0,2009 positions I use ncosmmoain k5 Cetcn h etDdg 92VnMrl
POSTAL&GOYTJOB on ..il Laar 5 r3ba age W e Y uC n us 80m
#Regitered INF FLPROR AE LanrkVlages 806321 b oew ra ufve. Ow rn al806382
410 NIS /Anfrnshad0W/ apl 4n 8811300 motl New55 Homte? -

Franklinlu terot ... Laar 1*g KO sUGH si o LANDN .Don % nees oa
have ~ ~ ~ St current 1:1.:d :I Ill L a eoatd - .1hcoa Ne r b n fic re ertfe an HP 80 ntqe&Cll als 490 Dylgt At
MERCHANDISE~~~nlhe Mlnmu o u nishe siso ce fln ih Igon thle Fownrgottn Cast83 Tuks9m9p 5-2516
3100 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ kice Antique Ir-aen t i. i. : pt irss udi 2 ponds veyefiin ad3 bn 52 b 5-02 0meca
3140He lt -ar Babyh Items $49.im I : :: 1:. . .: lfo h arbleRvr 81 ot

3170 ~ ~ P st n -13 Ce. I ctibles, deros Pie.Frtmot ikyurLt 20- ot&Mrn
i arses it On a I ri A puble searce Bde e ach 950227973 (80)66-68 34 Mtrhme 8
Garage/ard ale + H spie mSTALGefom n ~c Rnal-ae 19 4'Crabe f
325 oodThngso Et istrde ana FRPIE rnear Vew ala ,, $ hr oa,25 H
327 -Jewir/Clthng ul-time po .:~.I, Dea rtment l Iniit 2 19 $9 ncolosofetas e
3290 -E~e i l~ntuipment tes Miiurr ., l'~:I- : ill g o eetDyih uo F- ok, odcniin

RearntHtl cuag nde .~r ,i-i: 108di S.E.Av.
3350 Tickts (uy & ell) patient/ae nL1 .~ il .~i .I: .:1~1 a r be l ,F o i a 2 2 .s


inuace, and reliabl 01001~ -- Buinss d 3 Be ro m 2 ah pr iedieu ae



Interse ca nddae 0160~~~~~ Room for Rent1 .- B d oo at

Sut CCrwo rdville 0190e~ ~ Timeshar Rentals 2br 2ba 10 sfTnm 1Bero ,1 atCOPEEAKAS
or by faing a~~:~ resume 60 o $5 dp A atm n ............. 5 00
to: laira~ 850 32-20 r vilbe080/9 alfo ed o m 1B t
Aw bbe iecso | 61 0anapt80-6-49. p rt e ticl atr....5 000 TyoaCar 19 $9 AleleAlluiu
5~~~ ~ Pic irfie iig o es W3Bdom, ahteos D0htP 0t
Rm Set: $649, ALL NEW I -oe= C~ mmercial 2 d,2B ppraatet. R v rF o t~/D c ....2 00 acig21 wy9 O T S O
9 7Deivey vaiab e. i Be nd Building~l watIc: eos"'i rtr 2B d oo ,1B t atop 5-1-76 R .& S T




draers Solidd Woods'LI






$2,400, value, muste sellerto
$999it 425-8374 Delivery)
Available.e


Franklin County's source of news for more than a century


| 1100 |
conveyed, and from said
POINT OF BEGINNING
run thence South 26 de-


$160 Que brand name,
sealed plastic with war-
b222-7783 DIelvery



100 Rm
t hfet e3 warr on

anc e$699 545-7112.



An at-
tress set in sealed plastic.
NcEeW F OwarrantydSacrl-
222-7783




w,
Ca5 12. Canw eranty.




Brand New In box $119
222-9879

Fill Dirt
gagg @gga
g 5pl Osgitp



850-653-5610



.


| 1100 |
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30
DAYS AFTER THE DATE
OF SERVICE OF A COPY
OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.
All other creditors of the
decedent and other per
smons hav cladms30red
estate must file their claims
with this court WITHIN 3
MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUB-
UCATION OF THIS NO-


TH NLA S NIOTE FP D
ODS SET FORTH IN SEC-
TION 733.702 OF THE
FLORIDA PROBATE CODE
WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED. NOTWITH-
STANDING THE TIME PE-
RIODS SET FORTH
ABOVEANYCLAIMFILED
TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE
AF R THFE D E NT
BARRED.
The date of first publica-
t n2ofhisnoticeisJuly
Attorney for Personal Rep-
resentative:
sty BranchPBanksWhite-

a B1ar Nao. 5171Fbrida


ep 6(850)2 0-1255
Personal Representative:

rh s a 32308
July 23, 30, 2009
8 E CIRCUIT COURT
FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY
OOR TAEDIVISION

IGNL IA TNEESFES
Deceased.
File No. 09-31CP
Division Probate
NOTICE TO CREDITORS

teatadminGst EtAhe
ESTES, deceased, whose
date of death was May 1,
2009, is pending in the Cir
cult Court for FRANKLIN

v 3 h adbe
alachicola FL 32320. The
tnhaem era aladr per nt
tive and the personal
representative s attorney
t forth bel
are se ow.
All creditors of the dece-
nga 11 rr dp
against decedent s estate
tlweMsm ra corpd of th
served must file their
sN Tw L ER Fu
TMMFOHFSTHAFF PTUH
LOCATION OF THIS NO-
TICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER
THE DATE OF SERVICE
NOTI ECOPTHEOMF THIS
All other creditors of the
decedent and other per-
sons having claims or de-
mands against decedent s
estate must file their claims
witOhNtThHsSco TWRTHITNHE
AETIO)FNTHEFFIRHPNB
TICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED
WITHIN THE TIME PERl-
TSNS F700R2TH STEHCE
FLIORIDABPEROB OER O
BARRED. NOTWITH-
STANDING THE TIME PE-
RIODS SET FORTH
ABOVEANYCLAIMFILED
TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE
AFTER THE DECEDENTS
DATE OF DEATH IS
BARRED.
The date of first publica-
tlon of this notice is July
23, 2009.
Attorney for Personal Rep-
reent h Banks
Attorney for Charlotte


A B1arNao.5171Fbrida
Tehp 6(850)2 0-1255
Pers I Reopsraentative:
10195 SW Blueberry Road
Bristol Florida 32321


DC
CIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
OR FRANKLIN COUNTY
DI VENTURES, LLC, a Lim-
It L billtyECoCmHpAaNnCE, a



marneddaman,

CASE NO: 09-000031-CA


NO CEEOsFhSe Ey given
that, pursuant to the Order
of Final Summary Judg-
ment of Foreclosure in this
cause, In the Circuit Court
offran11nh opunt on:
ated in Franklin County
Florida described as:


Commence at a point on
the East boundary of Frac-
tlonal Section 11, Town-
t,8Do a dr klli
County, Florida, 395.98
feet South of the Northeast
corner of said Fractional
Section 11, and run thence
North 67 degrees 00 mm-
N F4B G It the
the lands hereby given


Very clean 3 br, 1 ba, 2
screened porches, yard, 1 br house in Carrabelle
driveway, W/D hookup newly remodeled, $550
mo. (850) 697-4080 or


THEW STAR


I


O


in


HELP IS ONLY A


PHONE CALL


To Place Your Classified ad


AYt IIM E


Call Our New Numbers Now!r


'
1


a

-s


Call:


850-747-5020


Fax:


850-747-5044

























TIDE TABLES
MONTHLY AVERAGES
To find the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times
from those given for APALACHICOLA:
Cat Point Hiits0:40 Minus 1:1L7m
East Pass Minus 0:27 Minus 0:27a
To find the tides of the following areas, subtract the indicated times
from those given for CARRABELLE:
HigH Low
Bald Point Minus 9:15 Minus 0:03
APALACHICOLA


CARRABE LLE


WWW.APALACHTIMES.COM |


I'


Thursday, July 23, 2009


Local


remperator.
High
o
890
890
890
890
900


Date
lu y243
Sat, July 25
Sun, July 26
Mon, July 27
TueJuly28
Wed, July 29


Low % Precip
a
760 30%
770 30%
770 60%
780 60%
780 40%


07/23 Thu 12:05AM
11:17AM
07/24 Fri 12:41AM
12:13PM
07/25 Sat 01:13AM
01:11PM
07/26 Sun 01:40AM
02:14PM
07/27 Mon 06:43AM
07/28 Tue 0AMM
03:24PM
07/29 Wed 02:18AM
04:40PM


-0.3
1.2
-0.1
1.0
0.1
0.8
0.4
0.6
2.7
7
0.5
0.9
0.4


07:11AM
04:44PM
07:24AM
05:45PM
07:36AM
06:49PM
07:51AM
08:00PM
01:11PM
08:08AM
09:25PM
08:30AM
11:26PM


.
Bill Hartley, right, and his wife
Shirley, founders of the Riverkeeper
attended Saturday's gala event.
At right, Dan Tonsmeier explains
the hydrology of the Apalachicola
River to Mollie Fenlon, of Atlanta
Leigh Brooks, of Chattahoochee,'
lent a hand by displaying a maP
as a visual aid. Below, Jim "Breeze
Graham, left, Bill Harris and Gage
Blevins, right, provided mood music

fort eefou0rthdi n %seaApca ecbhri an
Riverkeeper.


07/23 Thu 05:46AM
03:19PM
07/24 Fri 05:59AM
04:20PM
07/25 Sat 06:11AM
05:24PM
07/26 Sun 06:26AM
06:35PM
07/27 Mon 06:43AM
08:00PM
07/28 Tue 12:05AM
02:27PM
07/29 Wed 12:08AM
03:45PM


09:04AM
10:28PM
10:00AM
11:00PM
10:58AM
11:27PM
12:01PM
11:49PM
01:11PM
07:05AM
10:01PM
07:34AM


SOL
m= Minor M = Major ad
Date Day AM
07/23 Thu m 5:45
M -
07/24 Fri m 6:45
M 12:35
07/25 Sat m 7:40
M 1:30
07/26 Sun m 8:35
M 2:25
07/27 Mon m 9:25
M 3:15
07/28 Tue m 10:20
M 4:10
07/29 Wed m 11:05
M 4:55


UNAR
d 1 hour for daylight savings
PM Rise/Set Moo
m 6:15 5:14AM
M 12:00 6:59PM


n


m 7:20
M 1:05
m 8:10
M 1:55
m 9:00
M 2:45
m 9:55
M 3:40
m 10:45
M 4:30
m 11:35
M 5:20


5:15AM
6:58PM
5:15AM
6:57PM
5:16AM
6:57PM
5:16AM
6:56PM
5:17AM
6:56PM
5:18AM
6:55PM


To celebrate the vic-
tory and the anniversary,
there was food and a jam
session with both local and
out-of-town musicians. Bill
Harris, of Apalachicola,
recruited several local
musicians, including Gary
Blevins, of Apalachicola,
and Jim "Breeze" Gra-
ham, of Port St. Joe, who


performed throughout the
evening.
Whatley Fenlon, of At-
lanta, performed "Apala-
chicola Bay," a song he
composed to raise aware-
ness of water-related prob-
lems. Tonsmeire guided
trips up the river in a 24'
motor launch provided by
Wefing's Marine Supply, of


Eastpoint.
Patty McCartney, of
Apalachicola, organized
refreshments. Apalachic-
ola's Gulfside IGA, Harry
A's, Caf6 Floridita, Mara-
beth Farmer, Pam Mahr,
That's A Moray and the
Marketplace on St. George
Island all contributed food
or drinks.


granitecountertops
el appliances
dsewertapincluded


nsear.ss:
oice Builders

A nT3H2320


$199 000*Solidsurface
) Stainless Ste
Turn Key :ideateran
pleasecontact: mala
Bryce Ward First Ch

853-8702 Apal i


(MLS# 233897


$350,000 S.Gog sa


1st tier lot is
walking distance
to Plantation air
-
strip. This one acre
building site is next
to beach boardwalk at end of cul-de-sac
in Nicks Hole. Panoramic views of Gulf
-
& open green space toward bay. This
high & dry lot is in the gated community
of the St George Plantation.


John Shelby, Broker


B10 1 The Times


WATER WVAR RIO RS


Riverkeeper

celebrates

10 years of
advocacy

Story and photos by Lois Swoboda
Times StaffWriter

Over 100 people gath-
ered Saturday night to
celebrate the 10th anniver-
sary of the founding of the
Apalachicola Riverkeeper.
The offices of the Apala-
chicola Bay and Riverkeep-
er on Water Street rang
with laughter and music
as a crowd gathered to cel-
ebrate service to the com-
munity and the estuary.
The event was made
doubly joyful by the an-
nouncement Friday that
Federal District Court
Judge Paul Magnuson had
issued an opinion declar-
ing current Army Corps of
Engineers allocation of wa-
ter from the Apalachicola
River contrary to the Water
Supply Act.
The Riverkeeper, in the
forefront of the fight to
maintain normal water lev-
elsintheriverwasfounded
ma\99e8ybyhBilthaenndr i
S G rge hilnaend. They
Bill Hartley said he was
delighted with what the
Riverkeeper has become.
"It was really started by
Andy (Smith), myself and
Susan Anderson, who used
to work for the Department
of Environmental Protec-
tion," he said. "We read
Kennedy's book about the
Riverkeepers (The River-
keepers, 1997 by Robert E
Kennedy, Jr.).
"Susan and I met at a
meeting about the pollu-
tion in the river, and then
we had lunch with Andy at
Bahn Thai in Tallahassee,"
Hartley said. "We all shook
hands and said let's do
something about it. That's
how it all started."
Hartley said when he
was involved; the River-
keeper was a "very local
thing." He said he is im-
pressed by how substan-
tial the organization has
become and gave credit
to Smith, Riverkeeper
Dan Tonsmeire and Dave
McLain.


'Old Florida Style Home"
New custom built in a great neighborhood
Home on 60 x 100 lot in historic
Apalachicola
1410 square feet heated and cooled
3 bedroom, 2 bath
*26guagegalvanizedmetalroof
Low maintenance Hardy siding

:y;:di srimpackage
Solid oak hardwood flooring
Asking *Tileinbathroomsandutilityroom
otsuC* m alder cabinets


a e
Our local real estate experts have identiSed

what they feel are the best values around
*
and are offering them to you in Real Estate

Picks! (In this section), Discover the best

real estate values in Mexico Beach, Port St.

Joe, Apalachicola, Cape San Blas, St.George

island, Carrabelle and surrounding areas.


Florida Gulf Coast lot
Pinewood Shores #3
Carrabelle Beach '
Franklin County

$349,000.00
1.07 acre beach front lot,
80-feet white sandy beach,
wooded, private. Deep lot
off Hwy 98. Convenient to
nearby Apalachicola on the
Forgotten Coast. By owner.
Only 6-hours from Atlanta,
1 hour from Tallahassee,
minutes from st. George
Island. Your own paradise.

404-634-3576,
dtulis@mindspring.com n


ATTENTION


s
.deorge Island
Realty-




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs