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Group Title: Apalachicola times
Title: The Apalachicola times
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00100380/00034
 Material Information
Title: The Apalachicola times
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: H.W. Johnston
Place of Publication: Apalachicola, Fla.
Publication Date: July 9, 2009
Copyright Date: 2008
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Newspapers -- Apalachicola (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Franklin County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola
Coordinates: 29.725278 x -84.9925 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1885.
General Note: Description based on: New ser. vol. 15, no. 14 (July 14, 1900).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00100380
Volume ID: VID00034
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 32911693
lccn - sn 95026907
 Related Items
Preceded by: Apalachicola tribune
Preceded by: Apalachicola herald

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Thursday, JULY 9, 2009 www.apalachtimes.com 50(




Marine's mom:'Ho died with honor'


~e Z~/adam,



WVHOPPER


I


YOUR HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER FOR MORE THAN 120 YEARS


VOL. 124 ISSUE 11


By David Adlerstein
Times City Editor
In living up to the Marine
Corps motto "First to Fight,"
Lance Cpl. Charles Seth Sharp
was the first to die.
On July 2, in the opening
hours of Operation Strike of
the Sword into the Taliban-con-
trolled heartland of southern
Afghanistan, the 20-year-old for-
mer Alligator Point resident be-
came its first casualty.
A member of Company E of
the 2nd Battalion, 8th Marine


Regiment, 2nd Marine Division,
II Marine Expeditionary Force,
Seth, as he was known, suf-
fered a fatal gunshot wound to
the neck as his unit pushed into
Garmsir district, the northern
point of a 75-mile stretch of the
Helmand River valley south of
Lashkar Gah.
The assault is the largest mil-
itary operation in Afghanistan
since the fall of Taliban govern-
ment in 2001.
Sharp's mother, Angela
Sharp Preston, learned of his
death that afternoon, after she


returned home from picking up
her 15-month-old son Alexander
from day care in Sopchoppy.
"I pulled up and I saw there
was a strange van parked across
the road from our house. My
initial reaction was somebody
might be robbing our house.
I pulled on in, and I could see
somebody in front of the van with
a military hat," she said. "I knew
right then."
The half-dozen men in the
van approached her, and asked
if she was the mother of Charles
S. Sharp.


"The last person was in all-
white, and I knew that person
was the chaplain. They asked
if we could go inside and talk,"
said Preston. "I couldn't move.
I thought 'how am I going to get
out of this car?"'
The entourage entered her
637 Pine Street home. "We sat
down and they asked if they could
talk to me about something," she
said. "The one person who was
speaking he introduced himself,
but I don't remember his name.

See 'HONOR' AS


LANCE CPL. CHARLES SHARP


The combined value of
Franklin County property
declined for the second
consecutive year, although
by less than county officials
had earlier feared.
According to Property
Appraiser Doris Pend-
leton, the county's pre-
liminary certified taxable
value for the 2009-10 bud-
get year will be a little less
than $2.79 billion, nearly 20
percent below last year's
valuation of $3.45 billion.
This drop of nearly $670
million in property valua-
tion, or about 19.4 percent,
brings the county's tax
base down to a level last
seen five years ago.
But the decline is not as
severe as the 30 percent
drop Pendleton forecast
earlier this year.
"Whenever we went
though our data and actu-
ally did all this looking at


al tereods, uher wer

county that we could hang
our hat on their values,"
said Pendleton.
"We had quite afew sales
that were not foreclosures,
that were arms length, and
the state picked up on the
same thing," she said.
Because this is Frank-
lin County's year to have
an in-depth audit of its
appraisals by the Florida
Department of Revenue,
Pendleton and her staff
have been working closely
with outside appraisers
throughout the process.
"This is something the
Department of Revenue
does every three years,"
she said. "They take ran-
dom samples of proper-
ties throughout the county,
contract out appraisers
and go into counties and
pull records and do their
analysis. We sit down and
See TAX BASE A6


By Lois Swoboda
Times Staff Reporter

As debate intensifies,
county commissioners
have scheduled a
Juen2 w rsthop t
primary health care
in Carrabelle.
At Tuesday
morning's meet-
ing, Clerk of Courts
Marcia Johnson de-
fended her stance MA
that a cost-effective JOH
solution needs to be
reached regarding
county-supported
primary health care
in Carrabelle.
County com-
missioners, led by
Cheryl Sanders and
Bevin Putnal, reit-
erated their posi- CH
tion that the county SAN
health department's
clinic must remain open.
During a heated ex-
change, Johnson expand-
ed on June 16 statement
that it makes better fiscal
sense to locate the pro-


posed urgent care facility
in the existing health de-
partment annex than for
Weems to build anew facil-
ity next door with revenue
from the one-cent
sales th Imad

my remarks, they
were with the un-
derstanding that
the health depart-
ment was closing its
operation and the
building would be
RCA vacant. I am com-
NSON mitted to all the citi-
zens of this county
and I care about
the people of Carra-
belle," she said.
"I sad the adlI
standsb it n nw,atnhat
-speaking from a fi-
nancial standpoint,
it would be more
ERYL feasible to use that
IDERS empty building to
house the Weems
Ur ent Care facility than
to construct a new building
next door," Johnson said.
"The health department
See CAR RABELLE Al


COURTESY OF BAY CITY LODGE
Pictured with their enormous Warsaw grouper, hanging from a backhoe, are, from left,
Clint Haley Shawn Daniels, who landed the fish, Billy Daniels and Ken Debrick.


Behemoth grouper could have been a record


By David Adlerstein
Times City Editor


It would been among the biggest
groupers ever landed.
And it certainly should been weighed.
Four men fishing out of Bay City Lodge the
morning of June 25 landed a leviathan-size
Warsaw grouper that arguably eclipsed the
world record of 436 pounds, 12 ounces, set by
Capt. Steve Haeusler, fishing out of Destin on
Dec. 22, 1985.
Based on its length of 82" long and
girth of 66 inches, and using one of several
conventional formulas designed to estimate
weight, the behemoth grouper might well have
tipped the scales at about 446 pounds had they
tried to ascertain its poundage.
"No, we didn't weigh it," said the group's
leader, Billy Daniels, from Moody, Ala. "We


wanted to go back out fishing."
The magnificent specimen of Epinephelus
nigritus was landed about 15 miles southeast
of St. George Island, off the artificial reef made
from remnants of the old Apalachicola Bridge.
The four men were all aboard Daniels' 23-
foot Polar Bay boat they had driven down from
Birmingham on one of their twice-yearly trip
to the legendary fish camp. "This is about our
third year," said Daniels. "The last week of
June we come down to Bay City for seven or
eight days "
The men, Daniels' son-in-law Clint Haley
and friend Ken Debrick, both from Paola, Kan.,
son Shawn Daniels, from Stanley, Kan.; and
Billy Daniels had come prepared to outsmart
the giant-sized groupers that bedeviled them
in the past.
The men had fretted how they kept getting
their lines snagged in the reef. "We kept
See WHOPPER AS


Phone: 850-653-8868
Web site: apalachtimes.com
E-mail: timesnews~,starfl.com
Fax: 850-653-8036


DEADLINES FOR NEXT WEEK:

Casrifedd Dirpa idr a day aill1a.mn.
Classified Line Ad Monday ai5 p.mn.


TABLE OF C
Opinion .............. .... ......... A4
Sheriff's Report. ................... ... B4
Church News......................... B3


Apalachicola

Carrabelle


(rewlrKS


phaa WAd


& ~e (ur &

LIFE TIMES|I B1


County's tox base



drops 20 percent


County looks for

health care answers


for Carrabelle


:ONTENTS
SocietyNews.. .....2 FREEDOM .. B
Tide Chart ................... ........ A6 F PARS NERCT
Classifieds ................... ..... B6-B7


-















































































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www.ca rra bel lecoastalI.com
201 W. 8th Street, Carrabelle, FL
(850) 697-5444
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IJan Stoutamire
Realtor/Broker


TheTALLAHASSEE MEMORIAL NEUROSCIENCE CENTER (850) 528-2225
Is an accredited Stroke Center and designated Brain & Spinal Cord Injury Acute Care Center.


Thursday, July 9, 2009


A2 | The Times


Local


.. --~





Oi. .


where you want to quit,
you think about all of the
sound sets you've ever
been on and how much fun
they were."
Bendeck said the group
had a budget of less than
$3,000 to make the film.
Several members of the
crew spent the week at the
M rngs bum mos of ohe
Tallahassee and received
compensation for their
gas.
He said that FSU
differs from most film
schools because it
provides equipment to
students free of charge.
Other universities require
student film crews to
rent gear. Much of the
equipment available to the
students is state of the art.
The film "Forgotten
Coast" will eventually air
on public TV


Story and photos by Lois Swoboda
Times StaffWriter


Mart became a
little piece of tin-
sel town just for
the day on July 3.
A group of 15 students
from the Florida State
University film school
descended on the village
to shoot portion of
"Forgotten Coast,"
the story of a runaway
who finds happiness in
Carrabelle.
Producer Mark
Bendeck said the film,
a joint senior thesis
project for director
David Leatherwood and
production director Jason
Ambler, is the culmination
of over six months of
planning and preparation.
Ambler and Leatherwood


-~~~ C
Production director Jason Ambler calibrates a camera. The equipment is provided to the student film crew
by FSU. At right, Fran Weeks, manager of the Village Mart, right, and film producer Mark Bendeck, share a
smile during the filming of "Forgotten Coast."


collaborated on the script.
The production crew
was in the county from
July 2 through 7. Other
scenes were shot on
Carrabelle Beach and at
Harry's Bar in Carrabelle.
The team used several
locals as extras.
Fran Weeks, manager
of the Lanark Mart, was
on the set Friday. She


watched as the students
shifted shelves and
crammed the tight space
inside the store with high
tech equipment.
"It doesn't really look
too different from the
beginning of scallop
season on a weekend,
or maybe it's more like
a rainstorm when the
tarpon fishermen are


out and they converge
in here to stay dry," she
said.
Bendeck said the
company has enjoyed
working in the county.
"People are almost always
willing to help but we've
never seen anything like
Carrabelle," he said.
"There's such a network.
Everybody knows


everybody."
He smiled broadly
as the film crew bustled
about preparing for the
shoot. "This is what
makes it all worthwhile.
We all work together
many, many times in or
out of school, so it's sort
of like a family. There are
very intense friendships
that hopefully will last


By David Adlerstein
Times Staff Writer

He's been shot through
the gut in a Western and
accidently shot himself
through the top of the head
as a 19th century Russian
general.
He's been drowned and
he's died of a drug overdose.
He's veteran Apalachicola
actor Ed Tiley, and in the
last two years his comic


timing and dramatic
acting skills have been
in great demand by both
film and communication
students at Florida State
University.
Ever since he
began working with
students in the school
of communications
in 2007, Tiley has
appeared in more
than 20 FSU student
films, most made
by film department
students.
"They're a serious
bunch of kids who
appreciate the fact I'm
really easy to work
with," he said. "I really


like it because it's very
different from live
performance, although
you don't necessarily get
the immediate audience
reaction,
"It's a highly
collaborative way of
working that seems to
produce good results,"
he said.
Tiley has nothing
but respect for the
work of the young
filmmakers. "These kids
are serious," he said.
"There's almost never a
faculty member on set.
They may visit once or
twice."
The young people


work well together
in part because they
exchange roles in one
another's' projects,
with no one always
the top dog. "The one
directing today is likely
to be on your crew
tomorrow," said Tiley.
"I've never seen anyone
act up, act out, flake off,
not do their job."
While Tiley's acting
contribution to FSU
filmmaking is entirely
voluntary, with no
monetary compensation,
he did note one perk for
his performances.
"They feed you good,"
he said.


Ed Tiley played a Russian general in the film "The
Great One," made by a FSU graduate student.


Gina Millender
Realtor
(850) 228-9982


Rusty Barfield
Realtor
(850) 528-3850


Patty Lee
Realtor
(850) 545-2872


~ ~'e~/~hZ~iLd~/~:~(i~d/L~/
forever. It's so much fun.
~~1~~ When you get to the point


Tiley acting mentor to FSU moviemakers




































































OS- 44~ Toll Free: (888) 831-6754

Franklin County: (850) 670-5555

tO AL~IC~ Leon County: (850) 926-9602

Helping Hands Make The Difference


IV


Thursday, July 9, 2009


Local


The Times | A3


By Lojs Swoboda
Times Staff Writer

The new Eastpoint
Library building is up but
progress has stalled on
completing the building.
The metal building that
will house the Eastpoint
branch and administrative
offices for the Franklin
County system is done, but
Joyce Estes, chair of the
board of the Friends of the
Franklin County Library,
said an additional $150,000
is needed to complete the
interior and outfit it with


furniture, and finish the
parking lot.
The project has already
received $100,000 in grant
money to buy the land and
a $5,000 grant from the
Northwest Florida Water
Management District to
clear the property.
"We've hit an impasse
and nobody has gotten
onboard to help," she said.
"We've had a tremendous
amount of in-kind
donations. Preble Rish and
C.W. Roberts alone have
donated at least $100,000
each in services."


Estes said the
project had lost two
major supporters whose
contributions would have
totaled $100,000.
She said the project
started with pledged funds
amounting to $300,000 but
wound up with only about
$200,000 to work with. "I'm
hoping that, when they see
what we've accomplished,
they'll come back
onboard," Estes said.
A meeting to discuss
additional funding options
for the new Eastpoint
branch of the Franklin


County library is planned
for Wednesday, July 15.
Author Ellen Ashdown
of St. George Island is
organizing the meeting.
She and artist Neil Smith-
Willow have prepared
a brochure explaining
exactly what is needed to
complete the library.
The "inside
brainstorming team" will
meet at Estes' home in
Eastpoint. If you would
like to attend the meeting
or contribute ideas or help
in any form, please contact
Estes at 899-0866.


JOYCE ESTES | Special to The Times
The interior of the new library building needs to be
finished and furnished.


By[)gyjd Adlestejn
Times City Editor

Apalachicola City Ad-
ministrator Betty Taylor-
Webb said Tuesday that
despite delays, the city is
moving forward with plans
to relocate the police and
fire station, at a cost of
more than $900,000.
But Apalachicola fire-
fighters are expressing
concern that funding con-
straints will prevent the
city from following through
on a $600,000 grant to buy a
new pumper truck.
George Watkins, an offi-
cer with the volunteer fire
department, appeared at
Tuesday evening's meeting
to ask what happened to a
fire truck approved for pur-
chase earlier in the year.
"We do not need to let
our pumper trucks get
behind," he said. "That's
scary to be down to one
truck."
City officials said follow-
ing through on the $600,000
grant for the truck has been
put on hold until later in the
month, after the monthly
costs are determined for
repaying a low-interest
loan of $506,500 earmarked
to buy the new fire station.
Taylor-Webb said a pur-
chase agreement with the
owner of the lots on Av-
enue E, across from the
Piggly Wiggly in the former


tions and connections.
Repayment is planned
using the receipts from
MSBU (Municipal Service
Benefit Units) collection,
and from law enforcement
fines and forfeitures, Tay-
lor-Webb said.
Mayor Van Johnson told
Watkins that tough choices
will have to be made. "I'm
telling you, as straight as I
can, you can't afford both,"
he said, adding his view that
private fundraising might
he necessary to supplement
government dollars.
"You need to help us
help you," said the mayor.
"You can not expect the
government to do it all for
you."
Taylor-Webb noted that
the financing picture be-
came complicated after cit-
izens opposed putting the
new station on city-owned
property, prompting the
land purchase.


The state has issued
1,409 oyster harvesting li-
censes, a record number,
for the upcoming season.
Joe Shields, environ-
mental administrator for
the division of aquaculture
of the Florida Department
of Agriculture and Con-
sumer Services, said the
number is about 300 more
than last year.
"This follows a couple
1,100-plus years," he said.
"There are many
theories as to why," said
Shields. "I would venture
to say that based on the
current economic down-
turn that folks are buy-
ing them as a potential
backup, if their current lo-
cation goes south. I know
people buy them just to
have them."


Shields said his office
issued more than 250 new
licenses, to individuals
who have never had one
before.
"These are folks who
are new to the game, so
to speak," he said. "That
probably contributed to
the total number we got
this year."
Shields said there is
not too much concern
about overharvesting.
"From our perspective
we're looking for trends
on a given reef," he said.
"Oystering itself is
self-limiting; oystermen
are not going to hang
out on bars that aren't
producing. When they do
move it gives that par-
ticular reef that time to
recover."


Family Dollar store, ex-
pired July 1, but a 120-day
extension has been signed
that will run to the end of
October.
The last piece of the
funding puzzle was an-
nounced last week, when
Congressman Allen Boyd
(D-North Florida) said
Apalachicola is scheduled
to receive $656,500 in feder-
al stimulus dollars to help
combine the city's police
and fire stations into the
new location. Funding was
made available under the
American Recovery and


Reinvestment Act, recently
signed into law with Boyd's
support.
Apalachicola will re-
ceive a stimulus grant of
$150,000 and a low-interest
loan of $506,500 to begin the
project. In addition, a Com-
munity Development Block
Grant of $250,000 will go to
fund the project, which in-
cludes making the building
handicap accessible and
compliant with the Ameri-
cans with Disabilities Act,
building a three-garage
bay for parking trucks and
doing additional renova-


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Brainstorming to buy bookcases for Eastpoint library


State issues record


number of oyster licenses


Stimulus dollars to complete fire station


GEORGE WATKINIS


















Energy bill a bid to secure economic prosperity, energy independence


Thursday, July 9, 2009


A4 | The Times


I approach the energy
debate with the basic ,
assumption that our
current energy policy
is not working. Nothing
illustrated this more
than the energy crisis of
last summer when gas
prices in Florida climbed REI
to more than $4 a gallon.
This spike in energy
prices was one of the
major contributing factors of
the current recession, making
it clear that our dependence on
foreign oil is inextricably linked
to our economic future.
We are dangerously
dependent on foreign sources
of energy, and this dependence
is expensive. Our country sends
more than $440 billion overseas
each year to buy crude oil from
foreign countries. If we continue
this practice, we will forever be
beholden to foreign countries
for our energy needs and our
economic well-being will be at
risk. Now is the time to move to
American-made energy.
To chart this path to energy
independence, a new, balanced
energy policy is needed one
that keeps costs low for North
Florida families, invests in
renewable and alternative
energy sources, and promotes


innovative energy
create new American
jobs. I gave a lot of
thought to the energy
bill that the House of
Representatives passed
last week, and Iam
P.ALN convinced that this
BOD bill does all of those
things and is essential
to our region's and our
country's economic future.
One of the biggest
misconceptions about the energy
bill is that it would impose
thousands of dollars in costs on
the average household. This is
simply not true. The nonpartisan
Congressional Budget Office
analyzed the bill and concluded
it would cost 48 cents a day for
families at its height in 2020,
around the cost of a postage
stamp per day. These estimates
did not even include the savings
that would come from upgrades
to the energy grid, more efficient
homes, and advanced appliance
efficiency standards.
Many also complain about
the costs associated with the cap
and trade program in the bill that
addresses carbon emissions.
Those who do not believe in
climate change or that the world
population is affecting climate


change will disagree with me,
but I believe that failure to begin
reducing carbon emissions
will leave a diminished,
economically vulnerable world
for our grandchildren. What is
indisputable is that our future
on the current path leaves us
with zero control over energy
prices. American-made energy
will be critical to our country's
economic future, to controlling
energy costs, and to maintaining
our quality of life.
The cap and trade program
would require utility companies
to reduce carbon emissions
by 17 percent by 2020. Under
this program, companies
would be required to reduce
their emissions or purchase
allowances in order to exceed
these caps. This will incentivize
large utility companies to shift
toward clean coal technologies
and other renewable sources
of energy. Rural electric
cooperatives (co-ops) in North
Florida would receive free
allowances to help offset energy
costs and keep prices affordable.
Another key component of the
energy bill is the establishment
of a reasonable new standard
for utility companies. Under
the bill, the major Florida utility
providers would be required


to generate 20 percent of their
energy from renewable sources
by the year 2020, while co-
ops, which serve many North
Floridians, would be exempt
from meeting this standard. The
state of Florida could also lower
the 20 percent threshold on large
utility companies by requesting
that 8 percent of the standard
be met through conservation
measures, such as energy
efficiency improvements. These
standards are designed so that
the consumer benefits from the
gradual incorporation of locally-
derived energy and reasonable,
corresponding rates.
For utility companies to
meet the remaining 12 percent
renewable energy requirement,
the energy bill expands biomass
and nuclear programs both
critical aspects of Florida's
energy capabilities. I fought hard
to make sure that biomass and
nuclear programs were included
and promoted in the energy bill.
This is a significant win for our
state and a large reason for my
support of the bill. Both biomass
and nuclear energy are a vital
part of Florida's energy future,
and investments in these areas
will create new jobs and new
industry in our state.
In addition to biomass and


nuclear, the energy bill invests
in clean coal. Our country has
approximately 27 percent of
the world's coal supply. Any
workable energy policy must
recognize the substantial role
that coal will play in creating
new jobs and making our
country energy independent,
and the energy bill does this by
investing in technologies that
will help make coal cleaner.
We are a long way from
enacting a new, national energy
policy into law. The Senate also
must draft an energy bill, and
then the differences between
the House and Senate bills must
be reconciled. While the House-
passed energy bill may not be
perfect, it reflects our long-term
energy needs and responds to
our collective responsibility to
ensure a better world for future
generations.
As Congress continues to
move forward and develop a
national energy policy, I will
be looking for a final bill that
works for our state and sets the
stage for long-term economic
prosperity and a secure nation
that is energy independent.

Congressman Allen Boyd is
a Democrat representing the
Second Congressional District.


"If it sounds too
good to be true, it
probably is."
How many
times have
you heard that
expression?
Even in favorable
economic times,J
otherwise cautious ALD
people can be
duped by get-rich-quick
schemes or investments
that promise unrealistic
returns. But when times
get hard, folks increasingly
fall for these scams in their
quest to make ends meet.
Many people, feeling
overwhelmed by the
complexity of the subject
matter, hire a financial
planning professional for
advice. However, as recent
headlines have shown,
even highly regarded
investment experts
sometimes turn out to be
con artists simply peddling
the latest Ponzi scheme.
So how can you protect
and grow your assets and
plan for your financial
future?
First, educate yourself.
There's a wealth of
information available
online, at libraries,
bookstores or your local
community college. Get
grounded in basic financial
concepts such as the
importance of saving for
short- and long-term goals,
managing debt, creating


and living within
a budget, how
banking, credit and
loan products work,
why credit scores
are so important
and planning for
unexpected events
ONHelpful
:MANI resource include:
MyMoney.gov,
the U.S. government's Web
site dedicated to teaching
the basics about financial
education
*JumpStart Coalition
for Personal Financial
Literacy, a clearinghouse
of materials designed
for children (www.
jumpstartclearinghouse.
org).
*AARP which advises
and advocates for people
over 50 in all aspects of
their personal and financial
lives (www.aarp.org)
Don't go it alone.
Why not form a book
club/discussion group
where you can share
financial fears, missteps
and success stories with
mutually supportive
friends? It's sometimes
easier to digest
information and make
action plans together. A
good place to start is by
reading "The Difference:
How Anyone Can Prosper
in Even the Toughest
Times," by best-selling
author and "Today Show"
finance editor Jean


Chatzky.
Finally, don't rule
out consulting with a
financial planner. Even if
you can't afford ongoing
money-management
services, consider hiring
a third party temporarily
to help you crystallize
your financial goals and
trouble-shoot areas where
you may be lacking, such
as retirement savings,
estate planning or having
adequate insurance
protection.
Many types of
professionals call
themselves financial
planners but they
don't all have the same
training or specialties.
Different groups that
certify planners have
their own credentialing
requirements, regulators
and ethical guidelines, but
education and experience
requirements vary.
If necessary, interview
several candidates until
you find someone you
trust, who asks pertinent
questions about your
situation, and who won't
try to sell you unneeded
products or services.
Jason Alderman
directs Visa's financial
education programs.
'lb sign up for a free
monthly personal~fnance
e-Newsletter; go to www.
practicalmoneyskcills. com/
newsletter


On June 30, Governor
Charlie Crist signed Senate
Bill 2080, relating to water
resources, into law. Although
the bill is not perfect, it is my
firm belief a belief that I
expressed to the Governor
- that this bill should be signed
for the many benefits it provides
to both to the environment and


to receive compensation
to local governments. This
provision puts into Florida law
a commitment of the South
Florida Water Management
District to ensure the smaller
Glades communities are not
adversely impacted by the U.S.
Sugar land acquisition.
*Streamlines


MKCHAEL W.
SOLE


the people of Florida.
Although the new law requires the
governing boards of the state's five
water management districts to delegate
authority to approve permits to their
executive directors, each of the water
management districts have been and
will continue to be committed to
open government and transparency.
The simple fact is nothing in Senate
Bill 2080 diminishes, alters, or limits
the ability of the public from inquiring
or obtaining information about a
permit application or objecting to an
application.
While much attention has focused on
delegation, many other aspects of the
bill offer greater protection for Florida's
water resources that have gone largely
unnoticed.
However, these changes will help
ensure the protection and conservation
of Florida's water resources. They
include:
*Changes to Florida law
regarding environmentally-friendly
landscaping. The use of Florida-friendly
landscaping and other measures by
homeowners is an effort to conserve
Florida's water resources, which is in
the best interest of all Floridians.
*Expands lands eligible


government and saves
taxpayer dollars allowing meetings
to be conducted via technology and
authorizing the use of certain long-term
permits.
*Provides fiscally sound policies
that ensure the water management
districts do not overextend their
financial commitments.
Every drop of water makes a
difference to Florida's future, and we
must continue to protect and wisely
manage our water resources. There is
no doubt that Florida's environment is
better protected when all stakeholders
are involved in the decision-making
process.
As a result, I am committed
to preserving the public process
throughout this next year. I will
continue working with the executive
directors of the state's five water
management districts to ensure
openness and transparency. In addition,
I look forward to working with the 2010
Legislature to develop a process that
sustains transparency and stakeholder
participation.

M~ichael W. Sole is the secretary
of the Florida Department of
Environmental Protection.


By Rebecco Hurley
In his first Presidential speech
broaching the topic of education, Pres-
ident Obama said, "Despite resources
that are unmatched anywhere in the
world, we've let our grades slip, our
schools crumble, our teacher quality
fall short, and other nations outpace
us... What's at stake is nothing less
than the American dream."
He wasn't exaggerating in 2006,
the Program for International Student
Assessment found that 15-year-old
American students place 25th out 30
developed nations in mathematics, lit-
eracy, and problem-solving.
Many find comfort in the knowl-
edge that $1 billion from the economic
stimulus package has been allocated
to education, and that even in the
midst of the economic downturn edu-
cation is nothbeing overlooked. Indeed,
lack of funding and resources has long
been used as an excuse for failing
school systems. But more dollars can't
buy the reform our schools need.
If money were the solution, then
the Washington D.C. school system
should far surpass most other public
school systems in the nation. Dur-
ing this past year, DC schools spent
$13,848 per student, the third highest
in the United States and more than


$4,000 above the national average.
The result was that only 14 percent of
fourth graders scored at or above pro-
ficiency in mathematics and reading
according to the National Assessment
of Educational Progress (NAEP).
In contrast, Minnesota spends
$9,180 per pupil, slightly less than the
national average, but produced the
best results of any state.
The results for all 50 states were
analyzed in the American Legislative
Exchange Council's (ALEC) publica-
tion, Report Card on American Edu-
cation, which for 15 years has ranked
states on test results, financial inputs,
and other factors. This report also
considers the correlations between
student performance and such factors
as teacher-pupil ratio and teacher sal-
ary. The result is that there is no con-
sistent relationshiphbetween per-pupil
expenditure, class size, or teacher sal-
ary and students actually being able to
read or do math at grade level.
What does appear to produce re-
sults is parent involvement, teacher
dedication, and school-by-school au-
tonomy in setting curricula. Consider
the American Indian Public Charter
School (AIPCS). Once among the
worst schools in Oakland, CA, it is now
the highest-scoring middle school in


the city under the leadership of Ben
Chavis. The transformation occurred
despite spending $2,000 less per pupil
than the district (and no computers for
the students). Charter schools, such
as AIPCS, are free to select their own
staff and are given more autonomy
to tailor their style and curriculum to
meet the needs of their students.
Subscribing to what has been
coined the "money myth," the belief
that more money will lead to better
education, is a costly mistake. Taxpay-
ers are forced to pay for something
with little to no results. What is worse
is that other solutions are avoided
despite their promising potential.
We cannot afford to keep overlooking
these options while dumping more
and more money into the current edu-
cation system.
President Obama has clearly stated
his support for greater accountability
and flexibility, and called on states to
open new, innovative charter schools.
There is hope that our schools will
take up this challenge. After all, it is
the American dream that is at stake.

Rebecca Hurley is a research as-
sociate at the American Legislative
Exchange Council in Washington,
D.C.


POSTMASTER:
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received for such advertisement,

Thoueu so er word is giveoksen wtetin ahes pise er d word
thoroughly convinces. The spoken word is lost; the printed word remains.


O~in *


Protedting your money


Water management districts


COmmit to transparency


RE


Involvement, dedication keys to fixing education


.4pala7c-h ic ola
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IV


Thursday, July 9, 2009


Local


The Times | AS


He said 'I am sorry to in-
form you that you son has
suffered a serious injury in
Afghanistan.'
"Just for a brief moment
I felt a joy come over me,
because he said injury. I'm
thinking 'OK, we can han-
dle whatever it take s,"' said
Preston. "Seconds later,
he said your son has suc-
cumbed to the injuries.
"I said 'You know this
could be a mistake, there
was a lot of young men out
there, they look alike," she
said. "He said 'No ma'am,
it's not a mistake."
Preston asked if he
could go over the details
again. Seth had suffered a
serious gunshot wound and
they tried to treat him at the
scene but weren't getting a
response. They put him on
a military helicopter to the
nearest triage and he died
en route.
At the same time De-
partment of Defense repre-
sentatives were visiting the
Alligator Point home of An-
gela and Gus Preston, oth-
ers were visiting Seth's dad
and stepmom, Rick and Tif-
fany Sharp, in his boyhood
hometown of Adairsville,
Ga.
"Something Seth's dad
told me, when finally came
out and asked him 'I want
to know what happened.'
Apparently they had told
him that 'Let me assure
you, the person or persons
who did this, are no longer
here to talk about it,"' said
Preston.
Seth's large extended
family, however, is around
to talk about the boy, the
young man, the friend, they
loved, as they prepare for
his final flight Thursday
from Dover Air Force Base
to Tom B. David Airport in
Calhoun, Ga, the viewing
at Dudley Barton & Son
Rmneral Home on Friday
evening, and funeral ser-
vices Saturday afternoon
at Northpoint Church in
Adairsville and burial at
East View Cemetery.
Several hundred people
are expected for the fu-
neral, which is bringing in
family from Alaska, Ari-
zona, Florida, Tennessee,
Alabama and California.

"He was a great kid"

As per the family's re-
quest, no photographs were


about everything, real easy
going," said Dolan.
The two worked for a
time for Thad Brett, who
has a heavy equipment op-
erations company on Alli-
gator Point. "Thad had dif-
ferent projects and things
and he would take the two
boys with him," said Pres-
ton.
"It was tough yesterday
when I saw Chris get out
of the car and Seth wasn't
with him," she said. "We
used to kid the boys how
the car wouldn't go into
drive unless both of those
boys were in it."
Seth Sharp had missed
a lot of days of school at
Wakulla, said his mom,
and so when graduation
neared, it looked like he
wouldn't have the credits
to graduate.
"And when he got so
discouraged that he wasn't
going to get to graduate, he
went back to his dad briefly
and that is when he came
up with the idea of joining
the Marines," said Pres-
ton. "His big dream was
always to be an architect
and that was my dream for
him also."
Rick Sharp told his
hometown newspaper
that it wasn't easy giving
his son permission to join
the Marines at age 17. "We
talked about it and talked
about it and then I prayed
about it," he said. "I always
want to support my kids,
and I knew he'd join when
he turned 18 if I didn't sign


for him.
"But I asked him, 'Why
the Marine Corps?' He
said, 'Because it's the
toughest, and I want to see
if I can make it.' He told
me he wanted to fight for
those who couldn't fight for
themselves," said his dad.
Preston has serious
reservations about her
son's decision. "I guess my
strong opinion was I knew
what would happen if he
joined. It was going to be a
given thing he was going to
Iraq," she said. "That was
definitely not what I want-
ed to happen.
"Seth really loved the
water and the beach. I said
'You love the water. How
about the Coast Guard?"
she recalled. "He was kind
of headstrong about the
Marine division."
With Preston's pleas
powerless against the
Marine recruiter's per-
sistence back in Georgia,
she resigned herself to her
son's choice.
"I tried to be support-
ive because I love Seth
that much. If he asked for
the moon I would have
given it to him," she said.
"I tried not to be too up-
set in front of him, and
show how bad I did not
support that decision. I
didn't want him to feel
like he couldn't talk to his
mom if he knew how she
really felt about it."
Preston drove together

See HONOR A6


h~ds'd
SPECIAL TO THE TIMES


Seth Sharp in happier times, with his fiancee, Katie McMahan.


allowed when Seth Sharp's
body arrived on U.S. soil
at 3:22 p.m. into Dover Air
Force base on the Fourth of
July.
"I told them no. I don't
mind if we see a picture of
him with us but not that
way," said Preston, who is
collaborating closely with
her ex-husband on details
of their son's memorial.
"We still remain very
good friends. That's very
helpful during this time,"
she said.
Preston is keeping a
brave, stoic face, the same
face she tried her best
to show her son when he
chose to become a Marine,
despite her serious misgiv-
ings.
Without question, there
is no hiding her pride,
the same pride she felt
when she named her son,
Charles, after her grandfa-
ther, aWorld WarlI veteran,
who died of a heart attack
when she was six months
pr gnant with her son,
"He was so excited for
me," she said.
Preston's father, Viet-
nam veteran David Story,
came down this week to
help his daughter with ar-
rangements, but it turned
out the support flowed both
ways.
"He's lived through this,
he's been there," she said.
"Dad is 65, a big, gruff per-
son and he never shows
emotion. I've never seen a
man in that shape before.


It was kind of like two lost
souls trying to make a de-
cision and nobody was any
stronger than the other
one.
"I don't think there's re-
ally words to describe it, an
emotional roller coaster.
Some minutes you think
you're going to be fine and
the next minute you're not,"
Preston said. "You never
expect to lose a child. It's
pain you can't describe."
Over the weekend, while
the entire nation celebrated
America's birthday in joy-
ous abandon, Preston was
having "a why day. Why
my son? Why now? Those
questions I'll probably
never be able to answer.
Seth would not talk about
that stuff to me, knowing I
would be upset.
"Ever since when he
left, it was much, much
harder," she said. "I had
a bad, bad feeling, a night
and day, constant feeling
that something was gomng
to happen.
"You try to shake your-
self and say 'What's the
worst thing that could hap-
pen?"' Preston said. "And
the worse thing that could
happen happened."
Seth Sharp's family
back in Dalton, GA., where
he spent his boyhood, have
shared memories of the
young man, their feelings
of pride at his toughness,
compassion and willing-
ness to sacrifice his life for
another.


His father told the
Rome News-Tribune of
how his son asked for col-
oring books and crayons
for Christmas, during his
earlier nine-month deploy-
ment in Iraq.
"It wasn't a moment
later that he said it wasn't
for him, but for the children
he'd met in Iraq," Rick
Sharp said. "Something
that seems so simple here
is a luxury for them, and
I made sure the coloring
books got to him. He was
just that kind of kid.
"He was proud to be
a Marine and be called a
Marine," he said. "It was a
challenge that he wanted to
face and see if he could suc-
ceed at.
"He was a great kid, and
he was a hero, and we want
everyone to know the sacri-
fices he laid out his life for,"
said his dad.

"I got him
the dress blues

When Seth was still in
middle school, he came to
Alligator Point to stay with
his mom, and later attend-
ed Wakulla High School, as
many students in that area
often do.
His best friend was
Chris Dolan, and the two
spent a lot of time together,
"always running around,
messing with things.
"He was a great guy, a
good friend, always positive


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IV


Thursday, July 9, 2009


A6 | The Times


Local


wth hh ei uban ato
ate from Parris Island. "I
was proud of him for go-
ing through it," she said.
"It was a grueling process.
He was so thin. They work
them really hard."
Seth was in the top of
his class in marksman-
ship, which came as no
surprise to his mom. She
knew the skills he had
learned from his fam-
ily hunting in the hills of
Georgia, and that she wit-
nessed as his Cub Scout
leader growing up.
"He was so proud and
I was proud for him," said
Preston. "I asked him 'Son,
you just let me know what
you want for a gift for your
hard work and effort."
Soon after, Seth had an
answer for his mom. "I'm
thinking he wants a motor-
cycle," Preston said. "But
he said 'Momma, I know
what I want. I would re-
ally like to have my dress
blues.
"Son, are you sure that's
what you want?" Preston
asked him. He was sure.
"I got him the dress
blues," she said. "He's got
his pictures made with it
on. When I talked to his
dad yesterday, I told him I
wanted him to be buried in
it."


<778 06T pTOud Seth did ~whct


Seth felt he nLeeded to do '

Angela Sharp Preston
0101hef Of Seth Sharp


sa". Especill if ft hahe
favorite."
Preston's protective
feelings prompted her to
want to step in and stop her
son from going, a son she
still called "Little Bubby"
a name his younger sister,
Jessica, coined.
"There's this kid bigger
than I am and I still re-
ferred to him as my 'little
bubby' and he answered to
that," said Preston.
His mom sensed her
son's fears and concerns,
as only moms can, but he
wouldn't indulge them or
let them sway him. He had
a job to do and he was go-
ing to do it. And she did her
best to cope with her feel-
ings.
"I'm still very proud,"
said Preston. "I'm proud
that he served his country
and there's a lot of other
parents that lost their chil-
dren and probably look
back and wish it hadn't
been their choice.
"I'm very proud Seth did
what Seth felt he needed to
do," she said. "He died with
honor."
Perhaps the depths of
Seth's commitment can be
illustrated by a story mom
recalled after seeing a large
tattoo of the Marine motto
"Semper Fi" that he had


from Afghanistan Dec. 15.
"I'll only have four or
five more months in my
contract after that," he told
his mom, a realtor by pro-
fession. "I want you to help
me find a house and go to
school.
"He was really excited.
He talked about either
going to Florida State or
Daytona. At that point his
fiance was going to trans-
fer here and start going
to college here also," said
Preston,
A month ago, Angela
and Gus Preston opened
Preston's Eatery, in Pana-
cea, and the family had
even talked about opening
a branch on St. George Is-
land.
"Seth, if you want to and
we do that, you can manage
the restaurant," Preston
told her son, but then add-
ed "Well, I don't know about
that. You might eat all the
profits.
"That kid could eat," she


Seth Sharp nailed a Stingray on one of his last
fishing trips off Alligator Point.


emblazoned on his calf.
"Don't you know that's
permanent?" said Preston,


exasperated.
"Momma, I'm perma-
nent," Seth replied.


discuss the values."
The sharpest decline of
evaluation in the county will
be felt in Alligator Point,
where the combined valu-
ation dropped from about
$253 million to $191 million,
a decline of nearly $52 mil-
lion, or about 24.4 percent.
The next steepest de-
cline will be felt on Dog Is-
land, where property valua-
tions dropped by nearly $16
million, from $79.6 million
to about $63.6 million, or
nearly 20.1 percent.
Apalachicola'svaluation,
which includes all property
within the city limits, tum-
bled by 19.7 percent, from
nearly $210 million last
year to slightly more than
$168.5 million this year.
"I was pleasantly sur-
prised we had 27 houses
sold in Apalachicola from
Jan, 2008 to Dec. 2008," said
Pendleton. "And they were
not bank foreclosures, they
were actual sales."
State law does not al-
low property appraisers to
factor in transactions that
are not considered "arms
length," such as foreclo-
sures and short sales.
Carrabelle's decline was
less severe, with that city's
property values dropping
by 15.2 percent, from $275.1
million to $233.2 million.
One reason Carrabelle's
tax base is larger than
Apalachicola's is that the
city has annexed numerous


pieces of adjacent proper-
ties in large subdivisions.
The Eastpoint portion of
the county, which is defined
by properties within the
Eastpoint Water and Sewer
District, declined in value
by about 15.1 percent, from
$111.5 million last year to
$94.6 million for the upcom-
ing budget year.
Because there are vari-
ations with the county as
to the extent of allowable
exemptions, the two other
countywide taxing authori-
ties, the school district and
the Northwest Florida Wa-
ter Management District,
will draw on slightly differ-
ent tax bases.
The water management
district does not factor in
an additional senior exemp-
tion that county and both
cites adopted. The exemp-
tion allows for an additional
$50,000 off the taxable valu-
ation of property for those
seniors whose incomes fall
below $24,000.
The water management
district's combined valu-
ation is about $2.2 million
more than the counties, not
enough to make a substan-
tial difference in the tax
base.
But the school district,
which is not affected by the
changes instituted with the
passage of Amendment 1
or by the senior exemption,
will see a valuation of $2.84
billion, or about $50 million


more than the county. This
represents a decline of
about $669 million over last
year, or a drop of about 19.1
percent.

COUnty faces flat
funding future

Pendleton said two fac-
tors have combined to fur-
ther whittle down the tax
base.
The rules ofAmendment
1 will enable homeowners to
exempt a larger amount of
their property values from
taxation. As has been the
case since Florida's Save
Our Homes law went into
effect in 1992, each prop-
erty owners will be able to
exempt the first $25,000of
their home's value.
All property owners will
have to pay taxes on the
next $25,000, or portion
thereof, of their home's
value, but the next $25,000
in value would be exempt
from taxation.
In addition, for those
who qualify for homestead
exemptions, the Save Our
Homes amendment places
a cap of up to 3 percent, or
the consumer price index
(CPI), whichever is lower,
on how much a person's
property value can increase
from one year to the next.
Complicating the de-
cline in housing prices has
been a sharp drop in the


CPI, which over the last
15 years has run between
1.6 and 4.1 percent annu-
ally, and usually in the 2 to
3 percent range.
But, in 2009, the CPI will
be a miniscule one-tenth
of 1 percent, which will
dampen any increase in
taxable value on those with
a homestead exemption.
"This increase (in the
CPI), no matter how large
or how small, has still add-
ed value to the rolls each
year as the amendment
states that the taxable
'shall' increase 3 percent,
or the CPI, until the ap-
praised value and the as-
sessed value equal," said
Pendleton.
Last year, when the CPI
was 4.1 percent, and the
maximum 3 percent cap
was used, nearly $120 mil-
lion in value was added to
the 2008 tax rolls.
Once Pendleton's ap-
praisal is approved by the
Florida Department of
Revenue, county taxpayers
will receive the proposed
valuations and millage
rates, when the TRIM no-
tices go out the third week
of August.
Pendleton noted that
Amendment One also calls
for a 10 percent limitation
on tax increases to non-
homestead property, pro-
vided there are less than

See TAX BASE AS


Temperature
High
890
900
920
920
930
930
930


Date
Thu, July 9
Fri, July 10
Sat, July 11
Sun,July12
Mon, July 13
Tue,July 14
Wed, July 15


Low % Precip
770 40 %
780 40 %
790 30%
800 30%
790 10%
800 10%
800 10%


07/09 Thu 12:20AM
11:50AM
07/10 Fri 12:41AM
12:32PM
07/11 Sat 12:59AM
01:18PM
07/12 Sun 0 :10 MM

07/13 Mon 01:41AM
03:03PM
07/14 Tue AMM 5A

07/15 Wed 02:29AM
05:24PM


-0.1
1.2
0.0
1.1
0.1
1.0
0 8
0.4
0.7


0.8
0.3


07:26AM
04:48PM
07:40AM
05:34PM
07:54AM
06:24PM
0: 0AMM
08:29AM
08:33PM
AMM 1A
09:16AM


07/09 Thu 06:01AM
03:23PM
07/10 Fri 06:15AM
04:09PM
07/11 Sat 06:29AM
04:59PM
07/12 Sun 06:45AM
05:57PM
07/13 Mon 07:04AM
07:08PM
07/14 Tue 07:26AM
08:42PM
07/15 Wed 12:16AM
03:11PM


09:37AM
10:28PM
10:19AM
10:46PM
11:05AM
11:05PM
11:54AM
11:28PM
12:50PM
11:52PM
01:56PM


07:51AM 2.7 H
10:58PM 1.8 H


'HONOR' from page As


" ,m still very roud"

Preston said sending
her son off to Iraq was not
nearly so difficult as his de-
ployment to Afghanistan,
which began less than two
months ago.
There had been a mo-
ments of joy and happiness
right before that. Seth had
returned from Iraq safely,
and his mother had, to her
surprise and amazement,
given birth to a second
son as she neared her 40th
birthday.
"I guess it's kind of
strange," she said. "We've
been together 10 years and
we just assumed we could
not have children and I
found out I was pregnant
when Seth was in Iraq."
Seth and his fiance
Katie McMahan, a cheer-
leader for the University
of Georgia, had come down
to visit, and seen his new
brother and outlined plans
for when Seth would return


TAX BASE from page Al


E ~! L I L


Doesn't Have To Be Expensive











NOTICE OF TRANMITTAL OF

COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AMENDMENTS

NOTICE OF LAND USE CHANGE

The Franklin County Board of County Commissioners will hold a public hearing, pursuant to
Section 163.3184, Florida Statutes, to consider transmitting proposed changes to the Franklin
County Comprehensive Plan and the Future Land Use Map Series to the Florida Department
of Community Affairs for review. The proposed changes include:

Delete Policy 2.2(n) of the Future Land Use Element: Marttintta Villae ~ent-r:Theinen o


llwble VII YUses withi thebI Marin VIage Center landI VUUIe IIhall belmte to (1)


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AIVllowabl UsesJ WIhInI the~ C-arrabelloj LEast Villagej land~ UJe Jlhall bej limitedj~ to (1)


DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times
NEW EXERCISE CRAZE IN TOWN: Zumba, the innovative and energetic dance
and workout program sweeping the nation, has landed in Apalachicola.
Led by certified instructor Jeannette Taylor, at left, Zumba combines dance
and fitness, done to music, to help promote physical, mental and social
balance. Zumba is free, and is held Tuesdays and Thursdays, from 6:30 to
7:30 p.m. at the Fort Combos Armory at Sixth Street. Participants should
wear comfortable clothing. The session is sponsored by Friends of the
Franklin County Public Library. For more info, call 653-2784.


Residential lingle-family, (2) Residential Multi-family, (3) Retail Commerc

s


'UVU ,V ,VIVI UI II VI UIIIU / YI I IUV IIIU \ /
of Worship.




Th efuac tnad o h aaeleEs ilg aduectgr e
CrssRsietilDesiy 1 dlrosaceM xiu NnReienia ntnit f 2
Flor re Rti (FR) Cmmrcal ndDanes arkInenit: 25 lor re Rti
(FA ),Miimm om on pe Sac -25EMinmu Cvi Oac 0', ndoterAp
plcbl roiiosofteFrdinCunyZoig oe
The Caael Eas Vil la no, hl b ul atradeacv


6tu open space.ee


sex, no magnate r as Co......


A Jltormwaterl mlanlagement~l JyJLtel Will bej deSignedj to comply WIthI the~ JLtandardsl


Amend the Future Land Use Map for the following two parcels:

Parcel 1: Change 1000 acres on Ochlockonee Bay in Sections 13, 14, 15, 16, 21, 22 and 23,
Township 6 South, Range 2 West, as shown in the attached map, from Marina Village Center
to Agricultural.

Parcel 2: Change 200 acres east of Carrabelle in Sections 16, 21 and 28, Township 7 South,
Range 4 West, as shown in the attached map, from Carrabelle East Village to Agricultural.

A public hearing on the proposed changes will be held on Tuesday, July 21st at 10: 00 A.M.
at the County Commission Meeting Room in the Courthouse Annex at 34 Forbes Street in
Apalachicola. More information can be obtained and the proposed changes may be inspected
at the Franklin County Planning Department, 34 Forbes Street, Suite 1, Apalachicola, Florida
(telephone 850-653-9783).

Persons wishing to comment may do so in person at the public hearing or in writing to the
Franklin County Board of County Commissioners, 33 Market Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola,
Florida 32320. Transactions of this public hearing will not be recorded. Persons who may
wish to appeal any action resulting from this hearing should make the necessary arrangements
to assure that a verbatim record is made, including testimony and evidence, if any, upon which
the appeal is to be based.

If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to partici-
pate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assis-
tance. Please contact Marcia Johnson, Clerk, Franklin County, Apalachicola, Florida 32320
or (850)653-8861, extension 100, within 2 working days of your receipt of this notice, if you
are hearing impaired, call 1-800-955-8771


NOTICE OF INTENDED ACTION

FRANKLIN DISTRICT SCHOOL BOARD

Purpose and Effect: The Franklin District School Board proposes to amend
and adopt polices, as provided in the Administrative Procedures Act for the
purpose of bringing said policies into compliance with Florida Statutes and
State Board of Education Rules.

Summary: The following is a brief description of each proposal change:

Franklin County School District
*Student Progression Plan
*Code of Conduct
*School Board Policy Manual


Statutory Authority: Section 230.22(2), Florida Statutes

These proposed rules will be considered by the Franklin County School
Board at a meeting publicly advertised and held in the Franklin County Willie
Speed School Board meeting room at 85 School Road, Suite One, Eastpoint,
Florida no earlier than 28 days after the original date of this notice.

The above Policy Manual, Code of Conduct and Student Progression Plan
may be reviewed at the Franklin County School Board District Office, located
at 85 School Road, Suite One, Eastpoint, Florida during the hours of 7:30 AM
until 5:00 PM, Monday Thursday.


IV


Thursday, July 9, 2009


could be allocated several
rooms to offer services
which they perform that
Weems doesn't.
"My suggestion would
save the county money
while allowing the health
department to continue to
provide services to Carra-
belle," she said. "I can't see
allocating additional funds
to subsidize a non-county,
state- operated facility at
this time."
At the June 16 commis-
sion meeting, Wesley Tice,
who oversees the county
health department, said
budget constraints might
force the department to
shut down its Carrabelle
primary care clinic, which
has served the east end of
the county for the last two
years.
Sanders insisted the
commission had promised
Carrabelle a new building
for the urgent care facility,
and that she was commit-
ted to getting Carrabelle
a new building even if the
money had to come out of
the general fund.
"It seems like any time
the budget gets cut, it's
cut in Carrabelle," she
said. "It's not the county's
responsibility to do this,
but we do a lot of things
we don't have to that are
needed."
Putnal said the clinic is
"needed as badly as any-
thing in this county." He
said it has served 2,000
people so far this year, of all
ages and from every part of
the county including Apala-
chicola.
In Johnson's prepared
remarks, she said the state,
not the county, was primar-
ily responsible for funding
the health department.
She pointed out the
county already budgets
$126,000 to the health de-
partment, or $10 per citizen


annually, well in excess of
neighboring counties. Lib-
erty County budgets only
about $5.70 per person
for its health department,
while Gulf is around $7.70,
Gadsden about $2 and
Wakulla nothing at all, she
said.
Johnson contended
county money should be
used to support Weems
Memorial Hospital, which
it owns and operates, and
that Crooms Transporta-
tion, which receives a sti-
pend from the commission,
could transport patients
from the eastern end to the
Apalachicola clinic, if need
be.
"I wasn't trying to cre-
ate an east-west issue or
diminish the needs for the
citizens of the Carrabelle
area," she said.
County Attorney Mi-
chael Shuler reported that
the county had received a
letter of concern from Car-
rabelle over the proposed
shutdown of the clinic. In
the letter, Carrabelle City
Attorney Dan Hartman
said Carrabelle "would vig-
orously oppose" closure of
the health department's
clinic.
"Alone the Weems clinic
is not adequate to serve the
entire eastern part of the
county. We must exhaust all
efforts to keep the county
facility in operation," he
wrote.
The commissioners in-
vited the city of Carrabelle
to send representatives to
the workshop, which they
voted unanimously to hold
at 1:30 p.m. at the court-
house annex June 21.
At that time they plan
to discuss providing health
care for Carrabelle and the
east end of the county, and
the Weems Hospital govern-
ing board, officials from the
county health department,


Shuler and Johnson will all
be instructed to attend.
Sanders and Johnson
differed 'lIesday as to the
meaning of statements of
support made by an a De-
partment of Health official
in Tallahassee.
Sanders said she spoke
to a state official in the de-
partment and he told her
"whatever the board wants
they can have. They said
we didn't have to provide
any funding. Marcia, we ap-
preciate your getting this
information (on health de-
partment funding) but we
didn't ask you to get it."
But Johnson persisted
in questioning where future
funding would come from
and whether commission-
ers were willing to raise
millage for such a need.
"Are you going to cut county
departments to fund some-
thing you aren't mandated
to do?" she asked.
"You will have to answer
to the county employees.
You are the decision mak-
ers. You've got to live with
the decisions," Johnson
said. "Who's going to pay
for it?"
She said funding the
clinic at the Carrabelle
annex would be "a persis-
tent expense" and that she
feared other state agencies
would soon come to the
commission complaining of
shortfalls.
Commissioner Noah
Lockley emerged as a calm-
ing force amidst the heated
give-and-take.
He said that after talk-
ing to Weems CEO Chuck
Colvert, he believed that
Weems could take care of
both primary and urgent
care needs for the Carra-
belle community.
"Some of these issues
can be worked out but we
have to sit down and negoti-
ate," he said.


Local


The Times | A7


ZUMBA SWEEPS THE NATION







































































TsAX BMPE Ifom page A6


CITY OF APALACHICOLA

MAYOR'S ELECTION PROCLAM\/ATION


I, the undersigned, VAN W. JOHNSON, SR., Mayor of the
City of Apalachicola, by authority of law and pursuant to City Ordi-
nance No. 91-4, do hereby proclaim that on Tuesday, September 8,
2009 an election will be held to fill the offices as follows: City Com-
missioner for Seat 3 for a term of four years and City Commissioner
for Seat 4 for a term of four years, and a Run-Off Election, if neces-
sary, will be held on Tuesday, September 22, 2009.

Candidates wishing to qualify may do so at the City Office
from 12 Noon Monday, July 20, 2009 until 12 Noon Friday, July 24,
2009. City Office is located at #1 Bay Avenue, and regular office
hours are from 8:00 AM to 4:00 PM, Monday-Friday. Each Candidate
must pay to the City Clerk at the time of qualifying a qualifying fee of
4.5% of the first year's salary, must be a resident of the City of Apala-
chicola, and must also be a qualified voter of the State of Florida,
County of Franklin, and the City of Apalachicola.

All persons not previously registered to vote may register to
vote anytime from now up to 4:30 PM on Monday, August 10, 2009
for the General Election, and Monday, August 24, 2009 for the Run-
Off Election at the Office of the Franklin County Su ervisor of Elec-
tions located at 47 Avenue F, Apalachicola, Florida, hours 8:30 AM to
4:30 PM, Monday Friday.

The polling place will be at the National Guard Armory located
at 66 4th Street in the City of Apalachicola and will be open at 7:00
AM and will close at 7:00 PM. Absentee ballots may be obtained by
contacting the Office of the Franklin County Supervisor of Elections
at place and time noted previously. Only qualified electors will be per-
mitted to vote. Early voting will be conducted from August 31, 2009
to September 4, 2009 (5 days only) at the Supervisor of Elections Of-
fice, 47 Avenue F, Apalachicola, Florida from 8:30 AM to 4:30 PM.

All residents of the City of Apalachicola not currently regis-
tered to vote are urged to register and take part in this election.

Van W. Johnson, Sr., Mavor
City of Apalachicola, Florida


Plus, you'II have:
H Phone service that can bring help to your door in a 911 emergency
M A phone line that works when the power goes outi

Don't miss out on this great opportunity!
Call 877.342.7097 now. 'a g
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(02009 Fair Point Communicationr, Inc. All rightr rerervel 674AT/5TAR


Thursday, July 9, 2009


A8 | The Times


Local


getting hung up, do two
cranks on the reel and it
would stop," he said. "We
got back to Bay City and
they told us 'You're not
getting hung up. You're
feeding the groupers."
So Daniels studied up
on how these huge reef
fish would watch to see
the littler guys snagged
on a hook, and then
snack on them as they
struggled against the tug.
"This year I bought
a real big pole just for
that," said Daniels.
The crew outfitted the
100-pound rod, custom
made in Texas, with an
Okuma Titus Silver 50
Wide 2-Speed Trolling
Reel, and 200-lb. Momoi
Diamond monofilament
leader.
"It's one of the best
lines you can buy," said
Daniels, noting the line
has a tensile strength of
up to twice that of stated
line tests.
On the end was a 16/0
circle hook, among the
largest out there, baited
with croaker caught
by Haley, the crew's
"gruntmaster."
The crew got to the
reef about 8 a.m., and got
the anchor set about 8:20
a.m. They were ready.
"The day before we
hooked another fish, my
son fought the fish, and
it had a 20-inch grouper
unharmed in its mouth,"
said Daniels. "You put a
really good tug on it and
he tries to spit it out."
First to come up that
Thursday morning was
"a nice cobia" and then
came the big one.
Shawn Daniels then
caught "a nice black
snapper," weighing
about 10 pounds, with a
different rod.
It was time for the big
one.
Daniels said it took his
son only about 15 minutes
to bring the Warsaw to
the surface from about 80
feet of water. "When we
saw that thing coming up,
I thought 'My goodness,
that can't be real,"' he
said.
Daniels said the
crew at first prepared
to release their catch,
thinking it was a goliath
grouper, the so-called
jewfish, which is a
prohibited species.
"You can't keep those,"


he said, recalling how
he and his wife caught
and released a 50-pound
goliath grouper at Sikes
Cut over Memorial Day
weekend..
"But it's a complete
different looking fish,"
Daniels said. "(Warsaw)
has a square tail and
doesn't have a banded
stripe."
Once they got over
their amazement, the
men took another 15
minutes to figure out how
to get the enormous fish
into the boat.
"We all got to a corner
of the back of boat, and
once we got his head on
to the boat, the boat kind
of leaned over and we
backed up and pulled him
back in," said Daniels.
"There was no way we
can lift him, we just had
to slide him."
Whatever it was that
attracted the attention
of the Warsaw's appetite
will never be known. "The
hook was in his lip but
whatever was on there
was gone," said Daniels.
"We don't know."
With the fish crowding
them on the 23-foot boat,
the crew headed back to
Bay City, and pulled in a
little before 10:30 a.m.
"I went into the office
and I said 'We got a
problem. We have a fish
we can't get out of the
boat,"' Daniels said.
When Bay City
manager Buddy Renfro
went out to see it, he
was flabbergasted. "He
thought I was joking with
him," said Daniels.
"It had eight big old
hooks in its mouth," said
Renfro.
He said the men told
him, before realizing it
was a Warsaw, "the
first thing they were
fixing to let him go.
They done unhooked
him and they gaffed him
back."
Renfro's son got a
backhoe to lift the fish
out of the boat, and then
suspended it overhead as
the men posed with their
catch.
Unable to find a
suitable scale, and
unwilling to transport
it to a second location
to have it weighed, the
men proceeded to clean
it right on the Bay City
dock.


"It took about three-
and-a-half hours," said
Daniels. "There was
about 20 people who
came over and looked at
it."
The fish yielded six
five-gallon buckets of
filleted meat, which was
then vacuum-packed.
"They took about 80
pounds of meat back to
Kansas City," aid Daniels.
"We took the rest back to
Birmingham."
A vice president of
engineering for Precision
Husky, a Leeds, Ala.
firm that specializes
in building heavy
equipment, Daniels
was off the next week
to Vancouver, British
Columbia.
He had high hopes,
but a radiator leak on a
track machine that grinds
material for biomass,
forced cancellation of
Daniels' plans to fish for
trout in one of glorious
Canadian lakes nearby.
Meanwhile, a digital
picture of his crew now
graces the walls of Bay
City, near the black-
and-white snapshots of
decades ago, when Milton
Houseman, Louis
Roux and other local
fishermen can be seen
with massive catches of
their own.
"I figure that fish
was about 25 years old,"
said Roux, adding what
may be a world-record
understatement:
"They're kind of rare,"
he said. "You don't catch
them every day."
Bay City owner Jimmy
Mosconis, who was
out fishing the morning
the fish came in, said
in 35 years as the fish
camp's owner "I have
never seen a fish that
was remotely close to
that size."
Haeusler, the world
record holder, said
he heard rumors of a
Louisiana fish that may
have rivaled that state's
359-pound record, and of
the Bay City catch. He
said he didn't recall the
dimensions of his 436-
pound record breaker, but
that "when it laid in the
back of a pickup, it filled
it up.
"I wish they had
weighed it," he said.
"That's a pretty good fish
right there."


At Weems Memorial
Hospital's open house last
November, hospital staff
took visitors by Weems'
own CSI-like area: its clin-
ical laboratory.
Charles McDearis, de-
partment manager of the
laboratory, gave each one
who stopped by the lab a
printed list of over 60 dif-
ferent tests the lab can
perform. And, if anyone
engaged him in further
conversation, he was sure
to tell how he considers
his work as a medical
technologist for the last
45 years like the work of a
detective helping a phy-
sician scout out clues for
a patient's diagnosis.
"Physicians request a
medical technologist to
perform a large volume
of varied tests on blood
and other substances,
and we give them the re-
sults to tell them what to
suspect is going on with a
patient," McDearis said,
adding that "they want
the results right now!"
Clearly, he relishes his
role as a medical sleuth,
a field relatively unknown
to most people.
At one time the field
was very unfamiliar even
to him. McDearis was a
high school teacher in
Georgia when one of his
students who was explor-
ing careers came to him
to ask what a medical
technologist did. He says
he told the student he had
no idea, but he would re-
search it.


After a
trip to the
nearby Vet-
erans Ad-
ministra-
tionhospital
and some
library ex-
CHARLES ploration,
McDERIS he was able
to describe
the profes-
sion to the student. Within
two years, McDearis him-
self was in medical tech-
nology school.
McDearis already
had earned a master's
at the University of Flor-
ida when he discovered
medical technology. After
completing his medical
training at Georgia Bap-
tist Hospital, he had to
obtain state and national
licenses to practice as a
medical technologist, and
he is registered with the
American Society of Clini-
cal Pathologists.
A hospital's medical
technologist must be as-
sociated with a clinical pa-
thologist. Dr. Steven Saul,
out of Panama City, is the
clinical pathologist who is
associated with Weems.
McDearis has been at
Weems for 15 years, with
a short break from 2000
to 2002. He has seen the
lab evolve into one with
unexpected capabilities
for the hospital's size. He
says when he first came
to Weems, only six chemi-
cal tests, such as finding
the levels of glucose, so-
dium, and potassium in


a patient's blood, were
performed. He knew the
hospital needed more di-
agnostic tools for its phy-
sicians.
Today, with the capabil-
ity to perform many more
chemical tests as well
as tests under the head-
ings of hematology, co-
agulation, and urinalysis -
McDearis says Weems far
exceeds what other rural
hospitals and many big-
ger city hospitals can do.
But, he admits, a lot of
area residents don't know
about the lab. One fam-
ily, winter visitors to the
area, came to the Novem-
her Open House and dis-
covered they could have
a test done at Weems that
they had been driving
each month to Panama
City to do.
"When people find
they can have certain
laboratory tests run here,
they are surprised," said
McDearis.
Three other staffers
help McDearis in the de-
partment: Meloney Cham-
bers, Carol Jean Roberts,
and Donna Taratoot.
Outpatient laboratory
hours are 8 a.m. to 6 p.m.
If you are unsure ifWeems
can perform the labora-
tory test you need, please
call the lab at 653-8853,
but don't be surprised if
it can.
And, if you are think-
ing about a new career,
Charles McDearis is al-
ways glad to tell you about
his.


nine units per parcel and
there are no changes to the
land's status.
Since valuations held
steady or went down,
this provision won't have
much effect this year,
she said. "But it sets the
benchmark on what each
taxing district has to face
(in years to come)," said
Pendleton.


Last year's county mill-
age of 3.3149 mills brought
in about $11.4 million. If
there is no increase or
decrease in millage rate,
then the county will collect
more than $2 million less,
or about $9.25 million in ad
valorem tax revenue.
Pendleton's chief
deputy, Rhonda Skipper,
reminded property own-


ers that "they can come
in and talk with us and if
they have any evidence
they can present to us
that we were unaware of,
then that can change the
appraisal. If they have any
questions or concerns,
call us right away."
The property apprais-
er's office can be reached
at 653-9236.


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McDearis relishes role















Thursday, July 9, 2009 w ww. a pala ch ti m es com Page 9


*World fams~ousi~ock Walk & jat Show 5 P.M.
*Live Entertainment PlaturHinEge~- eak~c lobster 6 P.M.
& Nashville's rising star Joanna Smith 10 P.MI.
"Tasfte of the Town, Artist Colony, & Tournament Vilf~age.
*Firing of the Cannon leading to the boat parade 9:30 P.M.

I~~l~r~n.
* The AI Hubbard Kids Fishing Experience 11:30 A.M 6:00 P.M.
Boat Shoth &h~'~estival p~n the Docks 5 P.M.
Wejjt~ing begin with the new 40/40 Shootout
asi well as the Invitational weigh-in! 6 P.M.
* Kids come out and meet Patrick from Sponge Bob LIVE presented by Knology


. visi t he Tournament Village ar~d get ready for THE BIG SHOW!
;*Live Weigh-Ins for thle Invitakional Fleet and
'he return of Big B~lue! 6 P.M.
* Kids come out and meet Patrick from Sponge Bob LIVE presented by Knology


SEAHAWKS NAMED TO ALL-STATE HOOP SQUADS






































Two Seahawks from the 2008-09 varsity squad have earned AII-State
honors for Class 2A, as compiled from votes by Florida sportswriters and
members of the Florida Association of Basketball Coaches.
Named to the first team was 6-foot-4-inch senior Deshaun Winfield, above
left. He was joined on the first team by Jacksonville Arlington Country Day
seniors Wallace Judge and Rodney McGruder, Jacksonville Providence
Christian senior J.P Kuhlman and Melbourne Florida Air Academy junior
Kuamaie t ~tbhe thrd team was 6-foot-6-inch freshman Carlos Morris, above
right, the only freshman to be named to any Class 2A AII-State squad.


26th Annual Bay Point
SInVita~tional Billfish Tournament
2,July 16-19, 2009 5 P.M. 11 P.M.
Hosted By the ST. JOE Company and Bay Point Marina


Sizzlingf at the SIZZLER
The following are the 59) Larry Miller, Carra- Apalachicola, 47 27:10
times, ages and overall fin- belle, 64, 25:35 134) Shaun Donahoe,
ishes for the local runners 73) Kelsey Kilinski, St. Apalachicola, 65, 32:05
who ran in the St. George Is- Marks, 23, 26:34 153) Tress Anderson,
land Sizzler SK on June 27. 80) John Shelby, East- Carrabelle, 33, 34:42
37) Michael Shuler, point, 55, 26:59 194) Barbara Sanders
Apalachicola, 44, 23:44 81) J. Gordon Shuler, Eastpoint, 54, 43:34 '







STAT E BA N K 1897
A Division of Coastal Commnunity Bank

Apalachicola Carrabelle Eastpoint ISt. George Island
22 Avenue E 612 N Avenue A 5 Jefferson Street 1200 Franklin Blvd
653-8805 697-4500 670-8501 927-2561


The St. Joe Company

Bay Point Marriott
Galati Yacht Sales & Viking Yachts
Ample Energy
Yamaha & Century Boals
Hart's Marine
Local Edge
Panama City Beach CVB
Phillips Oill Fill Ups Convenience
Coastal Marina Management
Miller & Coors
MTU & Florida Detroil Diesel


Clear Channel Radio
Knology
The News Herald
WJHG & My 7


Anchorage Children s Home
Boys & Girls Club of Bay County
Gulf Coast Children's Advocacy
Center


Guy Harvey's Island GrIll
Hammerhead Fred's
Hollie Hawgs BBO
Shipwreck Island





The Franklin County schools are look-
ing for volunteer middle school coaches
for some of the sports for the upcoming
year.
Athletic Director Mike Todd said indi-
viduals who wish to be a volunteer mid-
dle school coach must have themselves
fingerprinted and pass a background
check.


In addition, they must either take and
pass the Athletic Coaching Test given by
the Florida Department of Education or
take and pass three online courses given
by PAEC (Panhandle Area Education
Consortium) .
Anyone who is interested can contact
Todd at 227-6557, or Coach Josh Wright at
850-303-9038 for more information.


Dixie Youth Majors Baseball is going to the State Championship Tournament
in Mulberry on Saturday, July 18. Top row, from left, are coaches Gene
McLeod, Fred Babb and Michael Gilbert. Middle row, from left, are Tyler
Cash, Jared Zingarelli, Nicholas Barnes, Kaden Crum, Logan McLeod and
Ryan Babb. Front row, from left, are Marcus Lattimore, Jonny Riley, James
Harris, Ricky Smith, Lett Smith and Matt Murray.



Shoreline anglers license deadline Aug.


Florida's resident salt-
water anglers who fish
from shore or a structure
affixed to shore will need
to buy a $7.50 (plus admin-
istrative and handling fees)
shoreline fishing license by
Aug. 1 unless they have a
regular resident saltwater
fishing license.
The new license applies
only to Florida residents.
Resident anglers may pre-
fer to purchase the regu-
lar recreational saltwater
license that covers them
no matter where they fish
for saltwater species in
Florida.
Florida has always re-
quired nonresidents to


have a license when fish-
ing from shore, and they
will still need to purchase
a regular nonresident salt-
water fishing license.
The new shoreline salt-
water fishing license for
residents goes on sale July
15. It provides all of the
same exemptions as a regu-
lar license, including senior
citizens, children, disabled
people who meet certain
qualifications, active-duty
military personnel while
home on leave and anglers
who fish from a licensed
pier. The shoreline license
requirement also includes
two new exemptions: an-
glers drawing food stamps,


temporary cash assistance
or Medicaid; and anglers
fishing in their home coun-
ties who use cane poles or
Other gear that does not
depend on mechanical re-
trieval.
At the request of the
Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission,
the Florida Legislature
passed the new license re-
quirement to head off a fed-
eral license requirement
that will go into effect Jan.
1, 2010, and will have a $15-
$25 fee beginning in 2011.
Florida's new shoreline li-
cense exempts this state's
anglers from the federal
license requirement.


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* Fantastic Music

* Boat Show


CA RRA BE L LE APA LA CH ICO LA


A
Section


Schools seek volunteer



middle school coaches


ALL-STARS HEAD TO MULBERRY































































































































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Thursday, July 9, 2009


Local


wilhe ghMUthStrikers
opening of the City of
Apalachicola Recreation
and Community Service
Complex on Friday, July
17. The park opens at 3
p.m. and will feature a
water slide, games, prizes
contests, basketball, kara-
oke, art activities, music
and more. Following free
food at 5 p.m. the Strik-
ers, the premiere dance
organization of Florida
Agricultural & Mechani-
cal University, will take
the stage at 6 p.m.
Founded on Feb. 25,
1989 on the campus of
Florida A&M University
by Shepiro Hardemon,
the Strikers are de-


The Strikers were founded on Feb. 25, 1989 on
the campus of Florida A&M University to unite and
uplift brotherhood to African-American males.


and uplift brotherhood to
African-American males,
while promoting self-con-
fidence and a positive
image through dance
and comedy routines.
The group has toured
throughout the U.S. and
in 2007, was invited to
travel abroad for a 10-day
tour in Japan.
The Strikers have dis-
played their eclectic style
of dancing on every major
television network. At the


2006 Grammy awards,
five of the 16 perform-
ers with Jamie Foxx and
Kanye West were Strik-
ers. With their passion
and precision, they have
utterly reached perfec-
tion, from having "stand-
ing room only" concerts,
to being the most re-
quested dancers in the
South,
The event is sponsored
in collaboration with Proj-
ect Impact, the City of
Apalachicola, the Anti-To-
bacco Program, and
the county health


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Al 0 1 The Times


Striker sto highlight



complex grand opening









Thursday, July 9, 2009 w ww. a pala ch t i me s. com Page l

A CE LEB RA T I ON O F


B
Section


UC~r l~iSln i F'.am, pe 'Z:-rra e by Nil e -l I.lt-lW .IkI::: --,
waves from the St. George Island Independence
Day parade. Below, Clerk of Courts Marcia
Johnson, left, grand marshal of the St. George
Island Independence Day parade, rides along
with Kim Davis, president of the island's business
association.


Abe:...e parade paracipar.Is ...mar red ....has and blue At lell Co....r.ry
CC:-mmissue:.reer $.me:.key Parrsh ar'le:.ys the parade .....rh ....ie Angle


LIFE


TI~ES


THOMAS GRANING | Special to the Times
Alixandlcral Da.*..se::r. M1ss lbelry 2009l~l, helps to lead the St.
Gee::rgi Islandlc Independenr-cl;ri Day~ pra~lde from high atop a fire
Iruc:k









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B2 | The Times


Society


Dolores Marie Marcum
and Ernest Marco Paul
are the proud parents of
Emmanuel "Eman" Lewis
James Marcum (Paul),
who turned 2 years old on
Thursday, April 23, 2009.
Grandparents are
Rena Kay Enfinger, of
Apalachicola; Rush Farly


Marcum, of Carrabelle;
Ernest "Buddy" Paul and
the late Francise Paul, of
Apalachicola; and Deanna
and Wally Nevarez, of
Texas.
Great grandparents
are Henrietta L."Boots"
Cassell and Thomas J.
Chumney, of Eastpoint.

DIrth


Master Sergeant Lorene
Christopher "Chris" Lane
Sr. retired from the U.S.
Army on March 31, 2009,
after completing 22 years
of military active duty
service.
He is the grandson of
the late Willie and Freeda
Lane, of Apalachicola.
Chris has served a total
of 39 months in combat
operations, where he has


received several awards
including two Bronze
Stars, and two Meritorious
Service medals for
exceptionally meritorious
service. .
He resides in
Columbus, GA, where he
will retire and join the
team of Lockheed Martin
Information Technologies
as a senior network data
communications analyst.


Hope Nicole Salter
turned 3 on Tuesday,
June 30, 2009.
She is the daughter
of Britany and Albert


"BoBaby" Salter, Jr., and
the little sister of Braydon.
Happy birthday, Little
Miss Coconut.
We love you!

Shower

It's a girl!
A baby shower
will be held for
Ashley Creamer
on Saturday,
July 11.
The shower will
be held at 4 p.m. at
the Apalachicola
Masonic Lodge
#76, at 1 Center
Street, located
behind the Red
Top restaurant.
All family and
friends are invited.


S- 1

Lacey
Lacey, a 4 1/2 month old chocolate lab mix, arrived
at the Adoption Center two months ago. She and her sister
Daisy are sweet, playful, adorable girls waiting patiently
for a loving home. They are current on their shots, on
heartworm prevention and have been spayed.
Call Kam at .."'I -.-xl! for more details or visit the
Franklin County Humane Society at 244 State Route
65 in Eastpoint. You may log onto the website at www
forgottenpets.org to see more of our adoptable pets.
We would like to extend a special thank you to Miss
Karen's Adventure Kamp for Kids for their visit last week.
All the kids brought donations and treats and toys for the
animals. All the attention the cats and dogs received that
day was priceless. Thank you so much for jleinkinlg of us.


When Mary Lou
and Bill Bassett of St.
George Island stopped
for lemonade at a stand
in Eastpoint, near the
intersection of U.S. 98
and Island drive, they
were charmed by a sign
announcing the business
was "Kid Owned and
Operated."
Bill Bassett asked the
young entrepreneur if
the lemonade was also
"kid made," and the boy
responded that it was
canned because the
health department had
a rule against preparing
beverages on site.
"What would Norman
Rockwell say to all this
'progress'?" thought
Bassett.


Could it be true that kids
can't ply this all-American
trade the old-fashioned
way? Not according to the
Franklin County Health
Department.
"Generally speaking, we
don't regulate lemonade
stands, and we certainly
don't drive around looking
for kids to shut down," said
Beth Robertson, staffer
with the environmental
health division.
She said a stand on
pubhec property, say, at a
school, might be subject to
regulation. Robertson said
it was possible the young
businessman had gotten
the wrong impression after
asking general questions
about food service.
By Lois Swoboda


DAVID ADLERSTEIN | The Times
Sara Ward, the 2008 Florida Seafood Festival
queen, waves from her convertible at the St. George
Island Fourth of July parade.


Sefood Festival pln 90

pageant~ metn


The Florida Seafood
Festival board of directors
is seeking all young ladies
interested in vying for the
prestigious title of Ms.
Florida Seafood 2009-10.
Contestants must meet
the following criteria: A
Franklin County resident,
age 16-18, a junior or se-
nior for the 2009-10 school
year, never been married
and have no children nor


be pregnant.
Please go to www.
floridaseafo odfe stival.co m
under "Royalty" for a pag-
eant application. A pageant
meeting will be held on Fri-
day, July 17, at Pam Nobles
Studios in Apalachicola to
begin pageant preparation.
For more information,
please contact Monica
Moron at 850-323-0099 or
monicalane65@yahoo.com.


?Jtlei ~e~tLe~z~!


Emmanuel Marcum turns 2


Lane completes 22 years of Army active duty


Daddy's Cutie turns 3


Ryan Hutchins born
Cynthia Renae
Hutchins and Joseph
Adam Fuller would like to
announce the birth of their
son, Ryan Adam Landon
Hutchins, born 'Illesday,
April 14, 2009, at 10:42 p.m.
He weighed 8 lbs. 9 ozs.
and was 20.9 inches.
Grandparent is
Rena Kay Enfinger, of
Apalachicola. Great-
grandparents are
Henrietta L. Cassell and
Thomas J. Chumney, of
Eastpoint.


Eastpoint entrepreneur impresses










Lanark News


Obituaries


Elde Cae SeiceAre you:
Elde Car Serice Age 60 and older?
of Franklin County Bus a iien om elis
Improving the Quality of Life for Interested in becoming active and
"""'"'g ~ ~isonke Coiyo 85u yeou 5 unity 20


St. Patrick Cathohic Church
Ave & Sixth Street in A alchicola, FI 323290or

on St. George Island, FL 32328
(850) 653-9453 Email: stpatcathefairpoint. net
PASTOR: FATHER ROGER LATOSYNSKI
www. stpatricksmas s. com
APALACHICOLA MASS SCHEDULE
SATURDAY................. ................ PM
SUNDAY ................. ................... 10 AM
ST. GEORGE ISLAND MASS SCHEDULE
SUNDAY ................. .................8:30. AM


The United Methodist Churches

Sof Franklin County Welcome You

First United Methodist Church of Apalachicola
Worship Service 11:00 a.m. every Sunday
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
75 5" St. Apalachicola 653-9530 fumcapalach@gtcom.net
Pastor: Rev. Them Patriotis
Carrabelle United Methodist Church
Worship Services 10:45 a.m. Sunday School 9:30 a.m.
"Celebrate Recovery" Mondays 7-9 p.m.
Healing service first Tuesday each month-7 p.m.
102 NE Ave. B Carrabelle 697-3672
Pastor: Julie Stephens
Eastpoint United Methodist Church
PrWorshi Serviceal e0s0 am every 1Sunda .m
Healing Service every first Fridays of the Month at 6:30 p.m.
317 Patton Dr. (corner of David St.) 670-8825
Pastor: Rev. Beth White
St. George Island United Methodist Church
9:00 a.m. Worship Service
10:00 a.m. Fellowship Hour
201 E. Gulf Beach Dr. 927- 4635 www.sgiumc.org
Pastor: Rev. Them Patriotis


ElderCare ervie Are you: Age 60 and older; on a limited income (must meet income


of F ankln Co ntyBenefits: receive a tax-free stipend (hourly pay not counted aS
qfl~ankln Co ntyinCOme); assistance with first physical examination; transportation
reimbursement; and the opportunity to serve your community.
Improving the Quality of Life for Seniors in For more information please call
Franklin County Mary Milton (850)245-5935 or Julie Prevatt (850) 921-5554


I : & ..: First Pentecostal Holiness Church
1 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ I 7 00 sz 379 Brownsville Road Apalachicola

rsW Sunday School 9:45 am
Sunday Morning Worship 10:45 am
d k ib sui wed 7:oo PM ) 1II Sunday Evening Service 6:00 pm
[i 111'zr~ :06 AM \1 I Monday, Youth Group 6:30 pm
y e oob 9:30~a ~ 1 I Wednesday, Royal Rangers, G.A.P. 7:00 pm
1 or 7 7:Wednesdy Worsip & Word 7:30 pm
S wwwieeetemntregoNusr Provided during regular church services


IV


Thursday, July 9, 2009


Local


The Times | B3


Was talking with Vivian
Armistead last week,
and she told me she had
received a scam call. The
man said she had won a
million and a half dollars.
He told her they would
bring the money, but would
also have a person from the
FBI with them. He would
need to get a check from
Vivian for $20 to pay the
FBI person.
Well, in the first place,


if anyone Vivian and I didn't think
came with cell numbers were public


Carrabelle, on 'Itlesday
mornings, for breakfast. You
can enjoy a full breakfast
and fellowship from 8 to 10
a.m., for a donation of $3. On
Thursday, lunch is served
at noon for a donation of $3.
See ya there!
Be kind to one another
and check in on the sick
and housebound. Until next
time, God Bless Americ4
our troops, the poor,
homeless and hungry


them, it
would be
someone
from the
IRS, and
1lsecondly,
LANIARK NEWS how did
Jim Welsh this person
get her cell
number?
Blessed are those of us who
have a telemarketing block.


records.
Did you have a great
weekend? Great fireworks
display, all that food, and
fun, fun, fun.
Congrats to E.B. Jordan
for winning the car at the
Legion. Everyone had a
good time, the place was
packed!
Come on down to
the Senior Center, in


Jane Power Marshall,
92, of Pensacola, passed
away on Thursday, June
18, 2009.
One of 10 children, she
was born in Columbus, GA
on Dec. 26, 1916 to John
and Haddie Power. As a
teenager, she moved with
her family to Apalachicola,
where she met her future
husband of 67 years, Earl
Rudolph Marshall.
They raised their family
in Pensacola, running
the family business,
Marshall Boat Works and
the Anchorage Marina
on Bayou Chico. Mrs.
Marshall was very active
in the life of St. John's
Episcopal Church, being
Altar Guild chair for many
years.
She is preceded in
death by her parents, eight
siblings, and her beloved
husband Earl.
Jane is survived by
one son, Earl Rudolph
Marshall, Jr. and his wife
Jannette; three daughters,
Beverly and her husband
Don Beaumont, Carolyn


and her husband
Patrick Byrne, and Judy
Lenderman and her
friend Dan Malinsky; her
sister, Julia Anthony, of
Apalachicola; her sister-
in-law, Margie Keith,
of Tallahassee; eight
grandchildren and seven
great-grandchildren.
General services were
Wednesday morning, June
24 at St. John's Episcopal
Church in Warrington, the
Reverend David Powell
officiating, assisted by the
Rev. Thomas K. Frizzell,
Jr. and Rev. Michael
Moore. Interment followed
at Barrancas National
Cemetery.
Pallbearers were Jim
Beaumont, Greg Daniel,
Donald Beaumont, Jr.,
Earl R. Marshall III,
Ronald Stafford, and
Robert Barrington.
In lieu of flowers the
family requests memorials
he made to the Memorial
Elnd of St. John's
Episcopal Church. Oak
Lawn Elneral Home was
in charge of arrangements.


St. Paul AME to host
Women's Day
The St. Paul A.M.E.
Church, at 81 Avenue I
in Apalachicola, will host
its annual Woman's Day
program on Sunday, July
12 at 4 p.m.
Please come join us in
celebrating this occasion.
For more information,
call 653-9164 or 653-9454.

Hos ice hosts
clergy gathering
Big Bend Hospice
Chaplains invite area
clergy to attend a special
luncheon at noon on
Thursday, July 23 at
Big Bend Hospice, 1723
Mahan Center Blvd.,
Tallahassee. Come enjoy
a complimentary meal
and fellowship with
community clergy.
"We have planned
a very special time for
our clergy to gather,
fellowship and to discuss
issues that impact them
in ministering to those
who are dying," said Rev.
Candace McKibben, Big
Bend Hospice Pastoral
Care Manager. "At
this quarterly meeting
Jennifer Haskins, MT-BC,


Big Bend Hospice music
therapy department
manager, will share
information about the
power of music in spiritual
healing."
The meeting is open
to all clergy in Leon,
Jefferson, Madison,
Taylor, Wakulla, Franklin,
Liberty and Gadsden
counties. Please RSVP
to McKibben if possible
by July 21 at 878-5310,
X250 or candace@
bighendhospice.org. One
CEU will be offered.

FifSt Baptist hosts
revive in aos poin
First Baptist Church of
East point will host revival
services from Friday, July
24 through Sunday, July
26 at the church at 447
Avenue A in Eastpoint.
Everyone is invited to
come and hear Dr. Jerry
Moore, a dynamic 78-year-
old evangelist who retired
from the pulpit last year
after a 60-year career in
ministry and 31 years with
Northside Baptist Church
in Panama City. Moore will
speak nightly at 6 p.m..
Moore's successful
career came despite
facing blindness at age 8,


and five years of missing
schooling because of
hospitalizations. At age
13, Moore moved from his
native Birmingham to the
Alabama School for the
Blind in Talladega, where
he learned Braille.
Moore first sensed
God's calling to preach in
Talladega when he was
17 and began sharing
God's Word with his fellow
students. Eventually,
Moore accepted his
blindness, and made his
peace with God on the
issue.
When Moore was
18, God "miraculously
restored" his sight in a
sudden and instantaneous
act. Preparation for
ministry at Samford
University in Birmingham
and at Southwestern
Baptist Theological
Seminary in Fort Worth,
Texas, was made easier
with good vision,
He also was able to
see the sights of Europe
and North America while
serving as an evangelist.
For 19 years, Moore served
as the staff evangelist at
Northside Baptist.
He and his wife, Amy,
maintain a home base
in Lynn Haven within


driving distance of their
daughters in Montgomery
and Birmingham, Ala.,
and their son in Bay
County, and their six
grandchildren and eight
great grandchildren.
For more information,
call Pastor Gerry W. Kent
at 670-8468.

I.0Ve Center debutS
HOW Social TIMO
Love Center
Ministries offers friendly
companionship, food
and fellowship and a
great chance to socialize
at its new Social Time
activity, on Tuesday and
Thursday.
Coffee time begins at
7:30 a.m., with breakfast at
8:30 a.m., through 10 a.m.
Following Bible study at
10:15 a.m., there will be a
great chance to connect
with friends throughout
the morning.
Lunch will be featured
from noon to 2 p.m.,
followed by such activities
as bingo, movies, sing-
alongs and more. The
day's activities will close
at 4 p.m.
Donations are
accepted. For more info,
call 653-2203.


Arvilla Irene Tillman,
born Feb. 12, 1920, passed
away on Monday, June 29,
2009.
One of Jehovah's
Witnesses since 1935,
Arvilla was a familiar face
to many, having been a
Kingdom Proclaimer in
her door-to-door ministry
for 74 years, 34 of them in
Franklin County.
As a Christian, the
ministry was foremost in
her life. Out of her love


for Jehovah God and her
neighbors she wanted
all to know about his
purpose in restoring man
to perfection on a paradise
earth following His Great
Day of Armageddon.
Arvilla is survived by a
niece living in Seattle and
two sisters in Kansas.
A memorial service
was held Monday evening,
July 6. at the Kingdom
Hall, located at 2501 Bluff
Rd, Apalachicola.


The Bay Medical Blood
Center would like to say
a special thank you to ev-
eryone who donated blood
June 29 in Apalachicola
and July 1 in Carrabelle.
We signed in 68 people and
received 65 units in Apala-
chicola, and we saw 27 and
collected 25 units in Car-
rabelle, which ties our best
ever day there.
Thanks to Susan Rich-
ardson for collecting gifts
from the local merchants
and for her countless hours
getting the word out and
rounding up donors.
Three dozen fresh
Subway cookies were de-
voured by donors during


this enormously success-
ful drive and the fish bowl
is empty. Please contact
Susan to restock the fish-
bowl for our next blood
drive Sept. 16.
We would also like to
thank Beverly Connors
for her e-mails; 42 people
donated in honor of Wal-
lace Hill. Best wishes once
again for a full and speedy
recovery, Wallace.
As always we could like
to thank the Natural Medi-
cine Shoppe for providing
health snacks and allowing
us to use their parking lot,
Michael Allen, at Oyster
Radio, and Royce Rolstad,
at Forgotten Coast TV for


helping to get the word
out, and Lois Swoboda for
writing such great articles
in the Times about blood
donation.
Thanks again to the lo-
cal businesses who gener-
ously donated thank you
gifts: Ace Hardware, All
that Jazz, Apalachicola Bay
Chamber of Commerce,
Apalachicola Fitness Cen-
ter, Apalachicola River-
keeper, Apalachicola State
Bank, Artemis Gallery, Av-
enue E, Blue, Burger King,
CVS, Caf6 Con Leche, Caf6
Momi, Debbie Hooper
Photography, Downtown
Books, Forgotten Coast
Outfitters, Frame Shop,


Gardens, Inc., Grady Mar-
ket, The Grill, Harry A's,
Honey Hole Liquors, IGA,
Island Adventures, Iva-
nova's Pizzaria, Lane and
Company, Lifeline Screen-
ings, Magnolia Grill, Natu-
ral Medicine Shoppe, Oa-
sis, Persnickety, Pesky Pel-
ican, Piggly Wiggly, Retsyo,
Richard Bickel Photogra-
phy, River City 'lk~ading,
Riverlily, Seahorse Gifts
& Florist, Soothing Souls
Massage Therapy, Stuffed
Owl, Subway, Tamara's,
That's a Moray, That Place
in Apalach, Up The Creek
Raw Bar, Veranda's, Wind-
catcher Charters and Dr.
Zoe Segree.


THE
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
WELCOMES YOU


THE
EPISCOPAL
CHURCH


Trnmty
EST. 1836

Hwy. 98 & 6th St.
Apalachicola
SUNDAY: 8:00 AM 10:30 AM
LIBRARY HOURS:
SUNDAY 12:00 2:00 PM
MONDAY 11:00 AM 1:00 PM
WEDNESDAY 12:00 2:00 PM
THURSDAY 3:30 5:30 PM


Card of Thanks Dorothy Brown families

We would like to thank everyone who played an important part during the passing of Dorothy Brown. Thank you for
all the food, flowers, prayers, cards, words of encouragement, and monetary gifts that you gave us in our time of need.
Thank you from our hearts and may the Lord continue to bless you.
The Robinson and Brown Families


Emergency management seeks ham radio enthusiasts


Franklin County Emer-
gency Management, in
conjunction with the Ameri-
can Radio Relay League,
is looking for individuals
interested in ham radio op-
erations.
No matter your age, we
are seriously looking for
those who don't have a li-
cense, but who would like to
study and obtain one; who


presently hold a license and
wish to upgrade or renew
it; or who hold a General
license or better who wish
to instruct and train new
students.
We also invite any "old
timers" who would be will-
ing to share their time,
knowledge and experience
with a new generation of
amateur radio operators.


Hams range in age from
6 to more than 100 years old.
While some are technically
skilled, holding positions as
scientists or technicians,
all walks of life are repre-
sented on the airwaves.
Musicians such as country
music superstar Patti Love-
less, Eagles guitarist Joe
Walsh, retired major league
outfielder and MVP Joe


Rudi, and more are all ham
radio enthusiasts.
It's not only a fun hobby,
but when the chips are
down, ham radio is looked
to for emergency communi-
cations and public service.
Anyone interested
should contact Mike Rundel
or Ron Page at the Franklin
County Emergency Opera-
tions Center at 653-8977.


J000 Power Marshall


Church B -0


Ar villa Irene Tillman


Card of Thanks Bay Medical Blood Center


WELCOMES YOU

Church

Of the.

As cension
101 NE First Street
Carrabelle
SUNDAY
10:00 AIM










Sheriff's Report


NOTICE TO BIDDERS
CORPORATE HANGAR DEVELOPMENT
AARL4CHICOL4 REGIONALAIRPORT
FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA
Notice is herby given that the Franklin County Board of County Commissioners will receive
sealed bids at the Franklin County Office of the Clerk of Court, 33 Market Street, Suite 203,
Apalachicola, Florida 32320 (office: 850-653-8861) until 3:00 Phi local time on Monday. August
3_ 2009, for the Corporate Hangar Development project at Apalachicola Regional Airport. All
bids will be publicly opened and read aloud in the regularly scheduled meeting of the Board
of County Commissioners on Tuesday, August 4, 2009. Bids must be submitted in a sealed
envelope clearly marked "BID ENCLOSED: CORPORATE HANGAR DEVELOPMENT,
Apalachicola Regional Airport."
The project generally includes, but is not necessarily limited to: furnishing and installing a
dans,xm ch pralel~enc rie{ ame pu bing i 1T mne sd neesar knplet tes,1iit Tir
accordance with the project specifications. The project will include the development of paved
access drive and parking facility as well as associated drainage improvements. If beneficial to
the Owner, the project may include a small office space or a commercial-use ("shamrock" style)
paint booth insert with mnner dimensions of 60 ft width x 60 ft depth x 18 ft height. The paint
booth will include two make-up air units providing 100% replacement air and a double-skinned,
18 gauge steel product door equipped with filter racks and an airtight seal. The facility will be
equipped with one restroom and a water-sprinkler fire protection system.
Beginning on Wednesday. July 8, .2009, drawings, specifications, and bidding documents
may be examined at the Franklin County Office of Administrative Services, 34 Forbes Street,
Apalachicola, Florida 32329 (office: 850-653-9783). Copies of the above documents may be
obtained from the offices of AVCON, INC., 320 Bayshore Drive, Suite A, Niceville, Florida
32578 (office: 850-678-0050) upon payment of a non-refundable fee of One-Hundred dollars
($100.00) payable to AVCON, INC. for each set of bidding documents obtained. Questions
relating to the Bid Documents shall be submitted to the Engineer.
Bid security in the amount of at least five percent (5%) of the total bid must be submitted with
the bid. The bid security may be either a certified check or a proposal guaranty bond executed
by a surety company authorized to do business in the State of Florida. Bid security shall be
made payable to the Franklin County Board of County Commissioners. The successful bidder
must be able to furnish a 100% Performance Bond and a 100% Labor and Materials Payment
Bond, and begin execution of this contract within five (5) calendar days follow ing the date of
the Notice to Proceed.
Franklin County has established a Disadvantaged Business Enterprise (DBE) goal for this project
that the successful bidder mst comply w ith. The DBE participation goal for this project is 6.96%
and compliance requirements are listed in the bidding documents.
A Mandatory Pre-Bid Conference will be conducted at the Franklin County Annex at 34
Forbes Street, Apalachicola, Florida 32320 on Monday. July 20 at 4:00 pm local time (EDT).
Questions related to the Bid Documents will be answered at that time. Attendance by prime
contractors is required.
OWNER'S CONTACT:
Alan Pierce, Director
Administrative Services
Franklin County
33 Market Street
Apalachicola, Florida 32329
Tel: 850-653-9783
Fax: 850-653-9799
ENGINEER'S CONTACT
Virgil C. "Lee" Lewis, PE.
Regional Manager
AVCON, INC.
320 Bayshore Drive, Suite "A"
Niceville, Florida 32578
Tel: 850-678-0050
Fax: 850-678-0040
All bids shall be sealed and shall be addressed as follow s:
"Franklin County Office of the Clerk of Court
33 Market Street, Suite 203
Apalachicola, Florida 32329
BID ENCLOSED: CORPORATE HANGAR DEVELOPMENT,
Apalachicola Regional airport" '
Funding for this project is being provided by the Florida Department of Transportation. Franklin
County reserves the right to reject any and all bids, to waive any technical or legal deficiencies
and to accept any bid that it may deem to be in the best interest of the Authority. No bidder may
withdraw his/her bid for a period os 120 calendar days follow ing the bid opening.


How to live in hear country
A guest lecture on "Living in Bear
Country" will be presented 'lIesday, July
14 from 7 to 8 p.m. at the Apalachicola
National Estuarine Research Reserve, 261
7th Street, in Apalachicola.
Maria Williams with the Florida Fish &
Wildlife Conservation Commission's Bear
Management Program invites you to come
learn about bear safety and management.
4 Since 1980 the black bear population
.4 ;has been steadily expanding in Flonida
. -- along with the human population. As a
result bears and humans are encountering
', 4 0one another more than ever.
There are benefits to living in harmony
with bears. Natural areas that support
,bears are home to many other animal
species. Learn how to prevent conflicts
with bears. These same steps help to
prevent other animals from becoming
problems.
The talk is free and open to the public.
For more information contact the reserve
at 653-8063.



FRANKLIN COUNTY

BO ARD OF COUNT Y

CO MMIS SIONER SREQ UE ST

F OR PR OP OSALS


The Franklin County Board of County Commissioners
requests proposals from qualified, licensed professionals
fOr constructing restrooms and a handicapped ramp, and
TCTOofino an existing building at the Franklin County
Seafood Landing Park (Lombardi's) located at 628
Highway 98, Apalachicola. There will be a mandatory
pre-bid meeting on Monday, July 20, 2009 at 9:30 a.m. at
the Franklin County Seafood Landing Park to discuss the
prDOject. Further information can be obtained by contacting
Nikki Millender, Community Program Coordinator, at
(850) 653-8277 or fax (850) 653-8279.


Funding is presently available for construction of the
TCStrooms and handicapped ramp only. Persons responding
to this advertisement shall submit two proposals. One
prOposal shall be for the construction of the restrooms and
handicapped ramp only. The second proposal shall be for
the construction of the restrooms, handicapped ramp and
TCTOofing an existing building.


Proposals will be accepted until 4:30 p.m. on Monday,
August 3, 2009, at the County Clerk's Office, 33 Market
Street, Suite 203, Apalachicola, Florida 32320. The
proposals will be opened at the County Commission
meeting on Tuesday, August 4, 2009, at 9:45 a.m.


Frankhin County is an Equal Opportunity Employer and a
Drug-Free Workplace.


Frankhin County reserves the right to reject any and all
prOposals. Frankhin County also reserves the right to
award all, none, or part, of the proposal for construction
of the restrooms, handicapped ramp and reroofing an
eXisting building.


Thursday, July 9, 2009


The following report
is provided by the
Franklin County Sheriff's
Office. Arrests are made
by officers from the
following city, county, and
state law enforcement
agencies: Apalachicola
(APD), Carrabelle
(CPD), Florida Highway
Patrol (FHP), Franklin
County Sheriff's Office
(FCSO), Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation
Commission (FWC),
Florida Department of
Environmental Protection
(FDEP), Florida Division
of Insurance Fraud (DIF)
and Florida Department of
Agriculture and Consumer
Services (FLDOACS).
All defendants are
considered innocent until
proven guilty in a court
of law.

(Jn 2
Alvin Glenn Martina,
Jr., 25, Apalachicola,
violation of probation
(FCSO)
Tracey L. Carroll, 39,
Eastpoint, driving while


licenses suspended or
revoked (FDEP)

JUne 30
Jewayne M. O'Neal,
31, Apalachicola, criminal
mischief, violation of
injunction, aggravated
assault with a deadly
weapon and violation of
probation (FCSO)

Jul
Andrea D. McCoy, 25 '
LanarbkaVillae,C vol~ation
Christopher G. Proctor,
23, Apalachicola, violation
of probation (FCSO)

JU J 2
Alex Fl Ramirez, 20,
Apalachicola, DUI and
no valid driver's license
(FCSO)
James K. Golden,
30, Carrabelle, Calhoun
County warrant for failure
to appear (CPD)

JUI 3
Vincent E. Workman,


43, Knoxville, TN, driving
while license suspended
or revoked (FDEP)

JUIy 4
David D. Childress,
47, Port St. Joe, leaving
the scene of an accident
(APD); and DUI and
introduction of contraband
into a correctional facility
(FCSO)


July 5
Marvin B. Campbell,
49, Apalachicola, battery
by an inmate (FCSO)
Celestino Moralez, 26,
Apalachicola, no valid
drivers license, reckless
driving and giving false
name or identification to
a law enforcement officer
(APD)

July 6
David B. Coppedge,
34, Tallahassee, failure to
appear (FCSO)
Alex Blas, 21,
Tallahassee, failure to
appear (FCSO)


The Florida Wildlife
Federation has honored a
Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission
law enforcement officer for
his conservation efforts.
The federation, meeting
for its 72nd annual conser-
vation awards banquet and
benefit in St. Augustine, an-
nounced its awards June
20.
The federation chose
FWC Investigator Steven
E. Thomas as its Fish and
Wildlife Enforcement Offi-
cer of the Year.
Thomas, who has been
a conservation-related law
enforcement officer since
1992, works in Franklin
County. He focuses on cas-
es involving commercial-
ization of wildlife and fish,
boating fatalities, under-
cover operations and long-
term investigations.
The federation also hon-
ored two FWC commission-
ers with Wildlife Conserva-
tionist of the Year awards.


Commissioner Brian
Yablonski of Tallahassee
was cited for his role in
leading efforts to place
Amendment 4 on the 2008
ballot and helping to en-
sure its passage by Florida
voters last November.
Amendment 4 provides
property tax incentives for
land and wildlife conserva-
tion. "Private land steward-
ship is the next frontier for
preserving critical wildlife
habitats," Yablonski said.
"Amendment 4 moves
Florida into a national lead-
ership position on state
incentives for private land
conservation. My sincerest
gratitude to the federation,
not only for this recognition,
but for its leadership in this
important endeavor."
Commissioner Dick
Corbett of Tampa also took
home an award from the
event for his contributions
to Amendment 4 passage.
The event's program
noted that Corbett earned


the award for his continu-
ous efforts on behalf of
Florida's environment,
traditional recreation and
natural-resource protec-
tion, and especially for his
superlative assistance on
Amendment 4.
The commissioners'
work is not over. Corbett
said he and the six other
FWC commissioners' new
high priority is introducing
children to their natural
heritage.
"We want to establish a
network of youth conserva-
tion centers similar to
the Beau TurnerYouth Con-
servation Center near Mon-
ticello across the state,"
Corbett said. "We are going
to create a national model
for other states to follow to
get youths back out into the
wild, on the water and on
land. That's critical to the
conservation of natural re-
sources for generations to
come, all across the coun-
try."


(0 SIZed a stermen

An officer with the Flonida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation Commission 's
Division of Law Enforcement helped
rescue five oystermenfromApalachicola
Bay last week
Officer 11~avis Huckeba responded to
a capsized commercial oyster vessel just
south of the Apalachicola Bay Bridge. He
arrived on scene to find the five occupants
of the vessel all clinging to the side of the
overturned vessel. Huckeba, along with
another commercial harvester, helped
retrieve the individuals from the water.
According to the operator of the
capsized vessel, he attempted to leave
the oyster bar before the approach
of a thunderstorm but the vessel was
swamped by waves causing it to sink
and eventually capsize.
No one was injured as a result of the
accident and the commercial oyster
vessel was recovered.


B4 | The Times


Law Enforcement


Florida W~ildlife Federation


honr OHO TS O Ce


FWC officer helps rescue | Mlovies in the Park


COntinue July 9

The Franklin County Sheniff's Office's
S.A.EE. Program (Student And Family
Events) would like to invite all students and
families to come and enjoy "Movies in the
Park."
Enjoy a FREE family movie on our 12-
foot movie screen. We will also be serving
FREE popcorn.
The following is the schedule, with
all events beginning at 8:30 p.m.
*Thursday, July 9 at Lighthouse
Park on St. George Island,
will feature "WALL-E," a 2008 I
computer-animated science fiction
film produced by Pixar Animation
Studios.
*Thursday, July 30 at Kendrick Field
in Carrabelle
*'lI~esday, Aug. 4 National Night Out at
Vrooman Park in Eastpoint









County Calendar


$'5MWCH HA BBOB
ELECTRIC

SUPPLY
NOJ%10 si 31 W. HWY 8,
Apalachicola
Joe A 370-911 50-653-3232
50% to 70% DISCOUNT
UILLSON'S IHave Grinder Will Travel FROM HE TAIL PHICE
IC TANK Stump and Root Grinding.
RVICENo jo~betduc sl o a ge. ALL IN-S TORE LIGHTING FIXTURE
all of Franklin Call Clarence Dewade CELN FA S LGH BU S
.Residential/ In Lanark Village ELN A S IH U B .
mmerical FEE E IMTE INDOOR AND OUTDOOR FIXTURES
ic Tanksneia &REETIAE

"ras Pmpe Don Lively General Contractors
3-9406LICENSED AND INSURED 20 YEARS EXPERIENCE

E APPIAN Plumbing New Construction Roofing
JOR BRANDS I rOSSure Washing Additions Vinyl Siding
.. Painting and More No Job Too Small

P.O. Box 439RO655
Carrabelle, FL 32322
697-2783 or Mobile 566-2603


Builders By The Sea, Inc.


NOTICE OF PUBLIC
HEARING
APALACHICOLA BOARD
OF ADJUSTMENT BOARD

The Apalachicola Board of Adjustment will
hold a public hearing on Monday July 20,
2009 at 6:00 PM at the Community Center, 1
Bay Avenue, Apalachicola, FI to discuss the
following variance request.

The Property owner of Block 67 Lot 1 (101
Avenue H) is requesting a variance on the front
and rear setbacks and to exceed the allowable
40% lot coverage. The Apalachicola Land
Development Code allows for the granting
of a variance if adhering to the current
codes and regulations will result in an undue
hardship upon the property owners and after
proper public notice and public hearing. Any
questions should be directed to Cindi Giametta
at Apalachicola City Hall, 1 Bay Avenue,
Apalachicola Florida.


Family





DENTURE
LAB ON PREMISES
Same Day Service on Repairs and Relines


Iahan BOntrager, DND ~

3~Onica Bontrager, DND1



12761 Pea Ridge Road Bristol, Florida 32321
TELEPHONE (850) 643-5417


IV


Thursday, July 9, 2009


Local


The Times | B5


T iUf Sday, July 9
Apalachicola Business
After Hours from 5:30 to
7 p.m. at the Water Street
Hotel4 Fbr more info call

Apalachicola Library
summer reading program,
from 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. For
more info, call 653-8436.
Carrabelle Public
Library, 311 St. James Ave.
offers film from 9 to 11 a.m.
Yoga at 4:30 p.m. For more
info, call 697-2366.
Eastpoint Public Library
offers Story Hour at 10 a.m.,
and individual computer
instruction from 10 a.m. to
noon. For more info, call
670-8151.
Wandering Star Quilting
Club. Chillas Hall Lanark
Village. 1 to 3 p.m. Call
Christine Hinton 697-2551.
Community Luncheon
and Information Specials at
the Franklin County Senior
Center in Carrabelle. Noon,


$3 donation. Call 697-3760.

Friday, July I0
Aalachicola History
Culture and Arts board will

Hall. For more mnfo, call
653-8715.
Exercise class at Chillas
Hall in Lanark Village. 9 to
10 a.m. Open to all and fr~ee.
Summer reading at
Eastpoint and Carrabelle
libraries, from 10 a.m. to
noon.
The new Carrabelle
History Museum, at 106
B Street, SE (Old City
Hall) will be open 10 a.m.
to 4 p.m. For more info,
call Tamara Allen at the
Carrabelle Historical
Society 697-2141.

Saturday, July 11
The new Carrabelle
History Museum, at 106 B
Street, SE (Old City Hall)
will be open from 10 a.m. to


4 p.m. For more info contact
Tamara Allen at 697- 2141.

Monday, July 3
dA al chicola Platn m.
at City Hall. For more info,
call 653-8715.
Franklin Cultural Arts
Council will meet at 6 p.m.
at the Carrabelle City Hall
Complex
1001 Gray Ave.. Come
join us in forming the
Franklin Cultural Arts
Council to enhance
the county's cultural
environment and economy
through development and
promotion of the arts and
cultural tourism.
Exercise class at Chillas
Hall in Lanark Village. 9 to
10 a.m. Open to all and fr~ee.
Carrabelle Public
Library yoga at 4:30 p.m.
For more info, call 697-2366.
Bingo at the Franklin
County Senior Center in


Carrabelle. Early bird at
6 p.m., regular bingo at 7
p.m. Cards begin at $4. Call
697-3760.

TUeSday, July 4
Apalachicola
Community Gardens
will meet at 5 p.m. at the
Apalachicola Bay Chamber
of Commerce. For more
info, call 653-9419.
Apalachicola Library
summer reading program,
from 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. For
more info, call 653-8436.
Carrabelle Historical
Society will meet at 6 p.m.
at the Carrabelle Library.
Public is welcome. Come
listen to friends and
neighbors share stories
about growing up in
Carrabelle. For info, call
697-2141
Carrabelle Public
Library story time at 2 p.m.
For more info, call 697-2366.
Breakfast at the


Franklin County Senior
Center in Carrabelle. Coffee
at 7:30 a.m., meal at 8 a.m.
$2 suggested donation. Call
697-3760
Is ire I pm. St.George
cents per card. Families
1ecoe Pro eds goto St
we comg Iland eii Cub '
Call 9-4654 iic.
Wed edo July 15
Apalachicola 'lk~affic
Safety committee will meet
at noon at City Hall. For
more info, call 653-8715.
Sea Oats Garden Club
will meet at 11:30 a.m. at
the Carrabelle Library. For
more info, call 697-9790.
Exercise class at
Chillas Hall in Lanark
Village. 9 to 10 a.m. Open
to all and free.
Carrabelle Public
Library offers Kids Wii
from 9 to 11 a.m. For more
info, call 697-2366.


T"iUrSday July 16
Franklin County School
Board regular monthly
meeting at 6 p.m. in the
WIi pe board r om

Eastpoint. Call 670-2810.
Apalachicola Community
Pride will meet at 6 p.m. at
City Hall. Call 653-8715.
Carrabelle Public
Library, 311 St. James Ave.
offers Adults Wii from 9 to
11 a.m. Yoga at 4:30 p.m. For
more info, call 697-2366.
Eastpoint Public Library
offers Story Hour at 10 a.m.,
and individual computer
instruction from 10 a.m. to
noon. Call 670-8151.
Wandering Star Quilting
Club. Chillas Hall Lanark
Village. 1 to 3 p.m. Call
Christine Hinton 697-2551.
Community Luncheon
and Information Specials at
the Franklin County Senior
Center in Carrabelle. Noon.
$3 donation. Call 697-3760.


LMS prior to being submit-
ted to the State of Florida
Department of Community
Affairs for their review and
approval.
Over the past few
months Franklin County in
coordination with the City
of Apalachicola, the City of
Carrabelle and other mem-
hers of the LMS Task Force
have been working to review
and up-date the county's
strategy to meet the current
guidelines as set forth by the
Federal Emergency Man-
agement Agency.
If you are unable to par-
ticipate in the Public Hear-
ing the general public can
still access, review and com-
ment on the strategy by ac-
cessing the following web
site www.drc-group.com/
Ims/florida/fr~anklin

Agents launch Back-

-Se hlrid Ads o ation
af nslur nne Aetosle ~A
year of SmartStart4Kids, a
1ot lng,r sttwde ba

school supplies for students
in need.
Throughout the drive,
from July 1 to August 1, in-
surance agents and agency
offices across the state will
collect and accept donations
at various drop-off locations.
In the Tallahassee area,
Unied Wa nof t Bi gBend

be the local donation recipi-
ent.
Local donations can be
dropped off at Cook Insur-
ance Agency, Inc., 205 NW
Avenue A,in Carrabelle, and
at 2190 Crawfordville Hwwy,
Crawfordville.
SmartStart4Kids is a
program of FAIA's Young
Agents Council, a commu-
nity for young agents that
provides leadership tools
and resources, such as par-
ticipation in legislative is-
sues and training for sales
and management needs.
For more information,
visit www.faia.com.


Remodel
Repair
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Family


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to get your ad in
Trmies aL Service.

850-653-8869


18 Shadow Lane
Apalachicola, FL 32320
Phone: (850) 653-8122
Cell: (850) 653-7654


Building Supplies
& Auto Repair
Carrabelle 697-3333
We Deliver Anywhere

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111 11(


News Briefs


Second ouster relay
postponed
Due to the possibility of
Red Tide moving in the area,
and the testing of waters to
make certain the red tide is
not already here, the Florida
Department of Aquaculture,
Shellfish Center, has advised
the Franklin County Seafood
Workers that it would be bet-
ter to continue the Oyster
Relay on July 17.
While there is no positive
proof at this time that Red
Tide has entered Apalachic-
ola Bay, an orange water
has been reported in Gulf
County and in a precaution-
ary measure the FCSWA, in
cooperation with the depart-
ment, has agreed to delay
the relay until July 17.
JoForR mr norm Hionncall
FCSWA, at 370-6243

Sdiools seek input on

":h Unknnr policy
Schools Code of Conduct
Comndittee iblapkropo in
pants, shorts, or skirts (no
jeans) to the school uniform
for the 2009-210 school year.
Pants and shorts mustbe
worn with a belt. Shorts and
skirts must note more than
3 inches above the knee. The
committee is seeking input
from parents regarding this

proY almay contact Mr.
George Oehlert, principal,
Franklin County School, by
mailing gjoehlertefirn.edu
to provide input.

Task force to hold
public hearing
The Franklin County
Local Mitigation Strategy
(LMS) Task Force will hold
a public hearing beginning
at 6 p.m. on Monday, July 20
at the Eastpoint Volunteer
Fire Department located at
24 6th Street in Eastpoint.
The purpose of this meet-
ing is to gain public input re-
garding the Franklin County


~U~I~P1

*a~


'rle c~l


Gar Batl tt





;II(


| 1100 |
VICTORIA H. HALEY, Man-
aging Member and Individ-
ually; and FLORIDA DE-
PARTMENT OF REVENUE,
Defendant(s)

CASE NO.: 09-000072-CA

NOTICE OF SALE

NOTICE Is hereby given
that, pursuant to the Order
of Final Summary Judg-
ment of Foreclosurein this
cause, In the Circuit Court
of Franklin County, Florida,
I will sell the property situ-
ated In Franklin County,
Florida described as:

EXHIBIT 'X

Commence at the North-
west corner of the South
half of Section 12; Town-
ship 7 South, Range 4
West, Franklin County,
Florida and extend a lne
South along the West lne
of said Section 12 for a
distance of 2200 feet; then
turn 129 degrees 30 mln-
utes 00 seconds left for
253.04 feet; then turn 07
degrees 19 minutes 00
seconds left for 601.35
feet; then turn 98 degrees
58 minutes 30 seconds
right for 1279.62 feet; then
turn 90 degrees 00 mln-
utes 00 seconds left for
30.00 feet to a concrete
monument on the South-
ern right-of-way lne of
U.S. Highway No. 98-319
for a POINT OF BEGINN-
ING. From this POINT OF
BEGINNING turn right 08
degrees 52 minutes 00
seconds and extend a lne
North 61 degrees 00 mln-
utes 40 seconds East
magnetic along the South-
ern right-of-way lne of
U.S. Highway No. 98-319
for 150.0 feet; then turn
right 81 degrees 08 mln-
utes 00 seconds and ex-
tend a lne South 37 de-
grees 51 minutes 20 sec-
ands East for 78.60 feet;
then turn right 97 degrees
23 minutes 00 seconds
and extend a lne South 59
degrees 32 minutes 00
seconds West for 149.49
feet; then turn right 82 de-
grees 37 minutes 00 sec-
onds and extend a lne
North 37 degrees 51 mln-


2F B5E0G NIGtseW

This parcel of land Is In
Section 1 Townshl s7

Franklin County, Florida.


Lnrk23Village hw or9 a
32323

at Public Sale, to the high-
etst bsdd r, for cashrat t

h latyCo house, 1 Oa-
a.m. on Au ust 6, 2009

Any person claiming an In-
terest In the surplus from
the sale, If any, other than
the property owner as of
the date of the Ils pend-
ens, must file a claim
within 60 days after the
sale.

WITNESS my hand and
the seal of this Court this
26th day of June, 2009.

CLEURKT OF THE CIRCUIT
By: Michele Maxwell
Deputy Clerk

Stev e) Watkins, Ill
41 Commerce Street
Apalachicola, FL 32320
(850) 653-1949
July 9, 16, 2009
2917T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
SECOND JUDICIAL CIR-
CUIT OF THE STATE OF
FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
FRANKLIN COUNTY

PEOPLES FIRST COMMU-
NITY BANK,
Plaintiff,

vs.


| zzo |
the property set forth In the
Final Judgment of Foreclo-
sure, Including property lo-
cated In both Franklin
County, Florida and Lib-
erty County, Florida, and
more particularly de-
scribed as follows:

Lot 14: Commence at a
rod and cap marking the
Southwest corner of Block
"34" of the Town of Suma-
tra lying In Section 30,
Township 5 South, Range
7 West, Liberty County,
Florida, said point also ly-
Ing on the Northerly right
of way of State Road Num-
ber 22 (right of way var-
les); thence run South 05
degrees 08 minutes 10
seconds East 80.00 feet to
a point lying on the South-
erly right of way of said
State Road Number 22;
thence run along said right
of way as follows: North 84
degrees 51 minutes 50
seconds East 1900.00 feet;
thence South 05 degrees
08 minutes 10 seconds
East 92.00 feet; thence
North 84 degrees 51 mln-
utes 50 seconds East
978.49 feet; thence South
00 degrees 54 minutes 18
seconds West 3.88 feet to
concrete monument:
thence South 00 degrees
47 minutes 50 seconds
West 268.96 feet to a point
lying on the centerline of a
60 foot wide roadway and
utility easement; thence
run along centerline as fol-
lows: South 76 degrees 47
minutes 49 seconds West
142.63 feet; thence leaving
said centerline run North
05 degrees 08 minutes 10
seconds West 30.30 feet to
a point lying on the North-
erly right of way of said 60
foot wide roadway and util-
Ity easement; thence run
along said right of way as
follows; South 76 degrees
47 minutes 49 seconds
West 5.18 feet; thence
South 73 degrees 06 mln-
utes 50 seconds West
148.06 feet; thence South
70 degrees 15 minutes 40
seconds West 465.78 feet;
thence South 76 degrees
59 minutes 59 seconds
West 65.26 feet; thence
South 76 degrees 59 mln-
utes 59 seconds West
3.4 fe et thner S ue


to a point lying on the cen-
terline of a 60 foot wide
roadway easement; tence

run along said centerline
South 05 degrees 15 mln-

67 23 fet;sthehce leavas
said centerline run North
84 de rees 51 minutes 50
seconds East 420 feet to a
rod and nap fohretnhee Pon

sai hPoint ofBegisnning run
utes 46 seconds West
210.00 feet to a rod and
cap lying on the centerline
of a 60 foot wide roadway
easement; thence run
along said centerline North
84 degrees 51 minutes 50
seconds East 210.00 feet;
thence leaving said center-
lne run South 05 degrees
15 minutes 46 seconds
East 210.00 feet to a rod
and cap; thence South 84
degrees 51 minutes 50
seconds West 210.00 feet
to the Point of Beginning.

Subject to a roadway and

an aosm te Nno thoer y
30 feet described thereof.

Lot 9, Block B, MAGNOLIA
RIDGE, PHASE I, accord-
Ing to the map or plat
thereof as recorded In Plat
Book 7, Page(s) 26, Public
Records of Franklin
County, Florida

AND

Lot 4, Block "A, MAGNO-
LIA RIDGE, PHASE I, ac-
cording to the map or plat
ther as secrded b l

County, Florida.


| zzo |

VISION BANK,
Plaintff,

vs.

KAY W. EUBANKS, STE-
PHEN K. MCDANIEL AS
PERSONAL REPRESENT-
ATIVE OF THE ESTATE
OF CLAYTON T.
EUBANKS, LINDA L.
PALMER, RYLAND
PALMER MUSlK,
EUBANKS-SANDERS
MUSlK, NW FL LAND DE-
VELOPMENT, LLC, JEF-
FREY SCOTT SANDERS,
and DUANE PANKRATZ,
Defendants.

Case No. 08-404-CA

NOTICE OF SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the under-
signed Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Franklin County,
pursuant to a Final Judg-
ment entered In this cause,
will on the 6th day If Au-
gust, 2009, at 11:00
o'clock A.M., at the front
steps of the Franklin
County Courthouse, offer
for sale and sell at public
outcry to the highest and
best bidder for cash, the
following described prop-
erty located In Franklin
County, Florida:

Lots 8, 9, and 10, In Block
77, of the City of Apa-
lachicola, Florida, accord-
Ing to the map thereof on
record In the Office of the
Clerk of the Circult CourtIn
and for Frankln County
Florida.

Together with all the ap-
purtenances thereto be-
longing and appertaining.

Any person claiming an In-
terest In the surplus from
the sale, If any, other than
the property owner as of
the date of the Ils pendens
must file a claim within 60
days after the sale.

MARICA M. JOHNSON
CLERK
Michel Maxwell
As Deputy Clerk

Jeffrey P Whitton
PO. Box 195C61tFoa


2924T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
IN AND FOR FRANKLIN
COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION

FIRST CHARTER BANK,
as assignee of Homebanc
Mortgage Corporation,
Plaintff,



JAMES F. HUGGINS a/k/a
James F Huggins, II, AN-
GELA D. HUGGINS: COVE
BUILDING & DESIGN,
INC., a Florida corporation
and JOHN/JANE DOE, Flc-
titious names representing
tenants In possession,
Defendants.

Case No.
2008-CA-0284-CAXXXX

AMENDED NOTICE OF
SALE PURSUANT TO
CHAPTER 45

Notice Is give that pursu-
ant to a Consent Final
Judgment of Foreclosure
dated April 30, 2009 and
an Order Rescheduling
Foreclosure Sale dated
June 22, 2009, entered In

2008-CA-000284-CA-XXXX
of the Circuit Court of the
Second Judicial Circuit In
and for Franklin County.
Florida, In which FIFTH
THIRD BANK, NATIONAL
ASSOCIATION, successor
by merger to First Charter
Bank, as assignee of
Homebanc Mortgage Cor-
poration, Is the Plaintiff,
and JAMES F HUGGINS
a/k/a J mes F. HuGgl nI

COVE BUILDING & DE-
SIGN, INC., a Florida cor-


Franklin County's source of news for more than a century


| zzo |
41erly Is presently In the cus-
tody of the Sheriff of
Franklin County.
trar a
An. Order finding probable
ANNOUNEMENFS cause and Directing Claim-
1100- LegalAdvertising ant to Respond has been
1110 -Classifiedl Notices Issued by the Court. You
1120 Public Notices/ are required to file a copy
Announcements of your written defenses
A10 doptions WIth the Clerk of Court and
1150 -Persaonals to serve a copy of your
1160 Lost Wnitten defenses on or be-
1170 Found fore 30 days from the first
Date of publication, on J.
so Patrick Floyd, Esquire,
1100 Counsel for Franklin
County Sheriff's Office, 20
2853T Avenue D, Apalachicola,
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT Florida 32320. Failure to
OF THE SECOND JUDI- file your defenses will re-
CIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND sult In a default judgment
FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, being entered against you.
FLORIDA
WITNESS my hand and
GULF STATE COMMU- the Seal of the Court this
NITY BANK, 14th day of May, 2009.
Plaintiff, Marcla Johnson
Clerk of the Circuit Court
vs. By: Michele Maxwell
Deputy Clerk
THOMAS L. BRANNAN July 2, 9, 2009
and IDA RENEE
BRANNAN, husband and 2N8 TE EODJD-
wifenats CIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
Defendnt~s).FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY
CASE NO.: 09-000148-CA FLORIDA

NOTIE OFSALE SUPERIOR BANK
NOTIE OFSALE Plaintiff
NOTICE Is hereby givenvs
that, pursuant to the Order V
of Final summary Judg- O E ULSad
ment of Foreclosure In this CHARLOTE S.MULLIS, a
cause, In the Circuit Court CALT S U I,
of Franklin County, Florida, Defendants.
I will sell the property situ- CS O 9000-A
ated In Franklin County, CAEN.0-009C
Florida described as: NOIEFSAE

Lots Fourteen (14) FifteenNOIE S HRBY
(15) an Sxeven (16), of GIVEN pursuant to a Final
Block Seven (7) (NewH' Jud ment of Foreclosure
BlCock 191),of KOUGH dated June 22, 2009, and
SECON ADDTION entered In Civil Action No
aiki 312NE venu H,09-000009-CA, of the Clr
Ca/k/able 312 NE Aveu cult Court of the Second
Carraelle Floida. Judicial Circuit In and for
at Pbli Sae, o te hgh-Franklin County, Florida
est bidder for cash, at the wel t pri ee
steps of the Franklin Bh NPlaint ff, tSUPDE OdR
County Courthouse, Apa- ants, O.d LEE MULIS nd
lachicola, Florida, at 11:00 CARt,.LOTE S MULLIS, I
a~m.on Agust6, 209. will sell to the highest and
Any ersn climig anIn-best bidder, for cash, at
terest In the surplus from 110 ~.(atr ie
the sale, If any, other than 09 hea6thhedy ofs psus

Ih pra est d ne as of l09at hfohnot Ctp o

I ays following-described real
s e. property as set forth In
WITNESS my hand and said Final Judgment of
the seal of this Court this Foreclosure:
22nd day of June, 2009. Thtctanodmnum

CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT unit of Water Street Hotel
COURT a hotel condominium
By: Michele Maxwell composed of Unit Number
Deputy Clerk 303, and the undivided
1/30 Interest In the com-
Steve M. Watkins, Ill mon elements appurtenant
FBN: 0794996 thereto, In accordance with
41 Commerce Street and subject to the Declara-
Apalachicola, FL 32320 tron of Condominlum es-
(850) 653-1949 tablishing of Water Street
July 2, 9, 2009 Hotel, A Hotel Condomin-
lum, recorded In Official
2858T Records Vol. 943, pp.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT 84-233, public records of
OF THE SECOND JUDI- Franklin County, Florida.
CIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, The successful bidder at
FLORIDA the sale will be required to
place the requisite state
IN RE: FORFEITURE of documentary stamps on
1996 Suzuki SUV the Certificate of Title.
#2S3TAO2C9T6402906
DATED this 23rd day of
NOTICE OF FORFEITURE June, 2009.
PROCEEDINGS
Hon. MARCIA JOHNSON
TO: JESSICA M. VANDER- Clerk of the Court
FORD, and any other per- Franklin County, Florida
son claiming an Interest In By: Michele Maxwell
the described property: As Deputy Clerk
July 2, 9, 2009
The Sheriff of Franklin
County has filed a Com- 2913T
plaint of Judgment of For- IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
felture with the Clerk of OF THE SECOND JUDI-
Court In Franklin County, CIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND
Florida, seeking forfeiture FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY
of the following property: FLORIDA

1996uzulSU(Gren) GULF STATE COMMU-
Tag No. 636JZP PlIntif BN
#2S3TAO2C9T6402906 Panif

The Franklin County vs
Shrfsp rfie s ize t eRKAENS
24, 2009, In Franklin ARABHPISMn
County, Florida. The prop- Vgn Hebe anK Idv


|1100
ALLIGATOR BAY, WHICH
POINT IS POINT OF BE-
GINNING OF THE LAND
HEREIN CONVEYED:
FROM SAID POINT OF
BEGINNING RUN NORTH-
EASTERLY AT ARIGHT
ANGLE TO THE ALLIGA-
TOR POINT ROAD TO A
POINT ON THE SOUTH
BOUNDARY OF THE 100
FOOT RIGHT OF WAY OF
SAID ROAD, THENCE
RUN NORTHWESTERLY
ALONG SAID RIGHT OF
WAY BOUNDARY 80
FEET THENCE RUN
SOUTHWESTERLY AT A
RIGHT ANGLE TO SAID
ROAD TO THE SHORE OF
ALLIGATOR BAY, THENCE
RUN SOUTHEASTERLY
ALONG THE SHORE LINE
OF SAID ALLIGATOR BAY
TO THE POINT OF BEGIN-
NING, SAID LANDS BE-
ING LOT NO. 3 OF UNRE-
CORDED PLAT OF PROP-
ERTY OF R.E.KESTNER
LOCATED IN SECTION 32,
TOWNSHIP 6 SOUTH,
RANGE 1 WEST, AND IN
SECTION 5, TOWNSHIP 7
SOUTH, RANGE 1 WEST,
IN FRANKLIN COUNTY,
FLORIDA, PREPARED BY
L.G. FLANAGAN OF DATE,
OF APRIL 17, 1953. SAID
LAND BEING RE-
STRICTED TO RESIDEN-
TIAL PURPOSES ONLY

A/K/A LOT 3 RE KESTNER
SUBDIVI, ALLIGATOR
POINT FL 32346

Any person claiming an In-
terest In the surplus from
the sale,1f any, other than
the property owner as of
the date of the Lls Pend-
ens must file a claim within
sixty (60) days after the
sake.

WITNESS MY HAND and
the seal of this Court on
June 25, 3009.

Marcla M. Johnson
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Michele Maxwell
Deputy Clerk
Florida Default Law Group,
PL.
PO. Box25018
Tampa, Florida
33622-5018
F08057309
July 9, 16, 2009


2NF2 TTHEE RE ONDCJDI
CIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION

HSBC BANK USA, NA-
TIONAL ASSOCIATION,
AS TRUSTEE FOR
WFMBS 2007-011,
Plaintiff,

vs.

JEAN G. MCMILLAN, et al,
Defendant(s).

CASE NO.
19-2008-CA-000439
DIVISION

NOTICE OF FORECLO-
SURE SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN pursuant to a Final
Judgment of Foreclosure
dated June 22, 2009 and
entered In Case No.
19-2008-CA-000439 of the
Circuit Court of the SEC-
OND Judicial Circuit In and
for FRANKLIN County,
Florida wherein HSBC
BANK USA, NATIONAL
ASSOCIATION, AS TRUS-
TEE FOR WFMBS
2007-011, Is the Plaintiff
and JEAN G. MCMILLAN:
are the Defendants, I will
sell to the highest and best
bidder for cash at FRONT
DOOR OF THE FRANKLIN
COUNTY COURTHOUSE,
33 MARKET STREET, AP-
ALACHICOLA, FLORIDAat
11:00 AM, on the 6th day
of August, 2009, the fol-
lowing described property
as set forth In said Final
Judgment:

LOT 11, BLOCK 69, ST.
GEORGE ISLAND, UNIT
NO. 5, ACCORDING TO


| 1zoo |
JOHN A. SCHRADER,
CRAIG A. ROBERTSON,
and KAREN ROBERTSON,
Defendants.

CASE NO. 07-418CA

NOTICE OF SALE

NOTICE Is hereby given
pursuant to a Final Judg-
ment of Foreclosure dated
June 23, 3009, entered In
Case Number 07-CA-418
of the Circuit Court of the
Second Judicial Circuit In
and for Franklin County,
Florida, wherein PEOPLES
FIRST COMMUNITY BANK
Is the Plaintiff and JOHN A.
SCHRADER, CRAIG A.
ROBERTSON and KAREN
ROBERTSON, are the De-
fendants, I will sell to the
highest and best bidder for
cash at the Franklin
County Courthouse, 33
Market Street, Apalachl-
cola, Florida, Franklin
County, at 11:00 a.m.
Eastern Time, on the 6th
day of August, 2009, the
following described prop-
erty situated In Franklin
County, Florida, and set
forth In the Order or Final
Judgement, to-wit:

Lot 3, THE BLUFFS Phase
1, a subdivision as per
map or plat thereof re-
corded In Plat Book 5 at
Page 42 of the Public Rec-
ords of Franklin County,
Florida

In accordance with the
Americans With Disabilities
Act, persons needing a
special accommodation to
participate In this proceed-
Ing should contact the
Court Administrator's Of-
flce no later than seven (7)
days prior to the proceed-
Ing at 300 East Fourth
Street, Panama City, Flor-
Ida 32401; Telephone:
(850) 763-9061, ext. 327;
1-800-955-8771 (TDD); or
1-800-955-8770 (V), via
Florida Relay Service.

Any person claiming an In-
terest In the surplus from
the sale, If any, other than
the property owner as of
the date of the Ils pendens
must file a claim within 60
days after the sale.


tE ofci smal ofh d Haon
orable Court, on this 25th
day of June, 2009.

MARCIA M. JOHNSON
CLERK OF CIRCUIT
COURT
FRANKLleNeCMOaU

Deputy Clerk
July 9, 16, 2009
2918T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE SECOND JUDI-
CIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY
FLORIDA

CAPITAL CITY BANK,
Plaintff,

VS.

LEE W. GLASSER, MELA-
NIE K. GLASSER F/K/A
MELANIE KELL, ET AL.,
Defendants.

CASE NO. 09-000019-CA

NOTICE OF SALE
PURSUANT TO
CHAPTER 45

NOTICE Is given pursuant
to a Final Judgment of
Foreclosure dated June 1,
2009, In Case No.
09-000019-CA, of the Cir-
cult Court of the Second
Judicial Circult, In and for
Franklin County, Florida, In
which CAPITAL, CITY
BANK, Is the Plaintiff and
LEE W. GLASSER, MELA-
NIE K. GLASSER F/K/A
MELANIE KELL, ET AL. are
the Defendants, I will sell
to the highest and best
bidder for cash at the front
door of the Franklin
CoyCaourthouseran Ap-
County, Florida at 11:00
a.m. on August 6, 2009,


| 1100 |
Any person claiming an In-
terest In the surplus from
the sale, If any, other than
the property owner as of
the date of the Ils pend-
ens, must file a claim
within sixty (60) days after
the sale.

DATED: June 25, 2009

MARCIA M. JOHNSON
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Michele Maxwell
Deputy Clerk

Garvin B. Bowden, Esq,
Gardner, Blst, Wlener,
Wadsworth & Bowden PA.
1300 Thomaswood Drive
Tallahassee, Florida 32308
July 9, 16, 2009

291T E CIRCUIT COURT
IN AND FOR FRANKLIN

GNENRALF JRllICTION
DIVISION

RBC CENTURY BANK
PLAINTIFF

VS.

DEBORAH L. VAN ZANT
ET AL
DEFENDANTS

CASE NO: 08-000483-CA

N TICSEALOEF FORECLO-

NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN pursuant to a Sum-
mary Final Judgment of
re, u0 entrdr In n vi

tas INc: 10 -o0u03-nCdA
FRANKLIN County, Flor-
Ida, I will sell to the highest
and best bidder for cash at
FRONT STEPS OF THE
FRANKLIN COUNTY
COURTHOUSE, 33 MAR-
KET STREET, APALACHI-
COLA, FLORIDA, at 11:00
a.m. on the 6th day of Au-
gust, 2009 the following
described property as set
noat Jugs dntStummary FI-

LOT 42 OF BLOCK S, ST.
JAMES BAY SUBDIVI-
SION, PHASE II, A
SUBDIVISION AS PER
MAPOORRDELAT THERPEL


PBO KC NREACGOE O 3N
FLORIDA

Dated this 23rd day of
June, 2009.

Any person claiming an In-
terest In the surplus from
the sale, If any, other than
the property owner as of
the date of the Ils pendens
must file a claim within
sixty (60) days after the
sale.

Marcla M. Johnson
Clerk of Court
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Michele Maxwell
Deputy Clerk

THE LAW OFFICES OF
BAKALAR & TOUPOUZIS,
PA.
ATTORNEY FOR PLAIN-
TIFF
450 N. PARK ROAD,
SUITE 410
HOLLYWOOD, FL. 33021
(954) 965-9101

If you are a person with a
disabllty who needs any
accommodation In order
to participate In this pro-
ceeding you are entitled,
at no cost to you, to the
provision of certain assis-
tance. Please contact the
office of the Court Admin-
Istrator, FRANKLIN County
Courthouse, at within two
(2) working days of your
receipt of this Notice of
Sale; 1-800-955-8771
(TDD) for hearing Impaired
or 1-800-955-8770, via
Florida Relay Service.
July 9, 16, 2009
2921T

IN T CRHUCIIS CO R

FO IDL INOUANND FOR


| zzo |
poration, and ST JAMES
BAY PROPERTY OWN-
ERS' ASSOCIATION, INC.,
are the Defendants, I will
sell to the highest and best
bidder on the courthouse
steps of the Franklin
County Courthouse, 33
Market Street, Apalachl-
cola, Florida, at 11:00 a.m.
on the 6th day of August,
2009, the
following-described prop-
erty set forth In said Con-
sent Final Judgment of
Foreclosure:

Lot 21, Block E, ST.
JAMES BAY SUBDIVI-
SION, PHASE II, a
subdivision as per map or
plat thereof recorded In
Plat Book 8, Pp. 23-29,
Public Records of Franklin
County, Florida.

Dated this 24th day of
June, 2009.

MARCIA M. JOHNSON
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Michele Maxwell

ANY PERSON CLAIMING
AN INTEREST IN THE
SURPLUS FROM THE
SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY
OWNER AS OF THE DATE
OF THE LIS PENDENS
MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS.
July 9, 16, 2009
2925T
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE SECOND JUDI-
CARL F RNCKULT O ND

CVTI A TION

BANK OF AMERICA, N.A ,
Plaintiff

vs.

NOLAN M. LASSITER, et
al,
Defendant(s).

CASE NO. 192008 CA
103S N

NOTICE OF FORECLO-
SURE SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN pursuant Mo a Fia


2orC s de date 0 un

000350 of the Circuit Court
of the SECOND Judicial
Circuit In and for FRANK-
LIN County, Florida
w~herel ABANKthOeF MEtRff
and NOLAN M. LASSITER;
MELINDA B. LASSITER;
are Defendants, I will sell
to the highest and best
bidder for cash at FRONT
DOOR OF THE FRANKLIN
COUNTY COURTHOUSE,
33 MARKET STREET, AP-
ALACHICOLA, FLORIDA at
11:00AM, on the 6th day of
August, 2009, the following
described property as set
forth In said Final Judg-
ment:

COMMENCE AT THE
NORTHEAST CORNER OF
SECTION 5, TOWNSHIP
78 SOUTH RANGE 1
WEST RUN THENCE
SOUTH ALONG THE SEC-
TION LINE 1320 FEET
THENCE WEST PARALLEL
TO THE NORTH LINE OF
SAID SECTION 5 A DIS-
TANCE O 2503 FEET TO
THE POINT WHERE SUCH
LINE INTERSECTS THE
SHORE OF ALLIGATOR
BAY, THENCE NORTH-
WESTERLY ALONG SAID
SHORE LINE 118.3 FEET
THENCE RUN NORTH-
EASTERLY AT A RIGHT
ANGLE TO THE ALLIGA-
TOR POINT ROAD A DIS-
TANCE OF 320.6 FEET TO
A POINT ON THE SOUTH
BOUNDARY OF THE 100
FOOT RIGHT OF WAY OF
SAID ROAD, THENCE
RUN NORTHWESTERLY
ALONG SAID RIGHT OF
WAY BOUNDARY 160

SOTUHWTEHSTETN YA N
RIGHT ANGLE TO SAID
ROAD TO THE SHORE OF


SB The Times Thursday, July 9, 2009


d





The Times Thursday, July 9, 2009 7B


LIN CUUUN l Y 3100 Antiques er Available L1bU-22/-Y/d2
3110 -Appliances
SUNTRUST BANK, 3120 -Arts & Crafts You NEVER have to pay | 6 2
Plaintiff, et al., 3130 Auctions for Information about Beach*
vs. i plis D tteew chr araopo ot RnasSls Rent to On! 2 br MH cm
JORGE LUIS 3170 -Collectibles Sllnboe.2278 ThFeeaTrd Vst-Bchatyet down $400 mo. Call
RODRIGUEZ; UNKNOWN 3180 -Computers .e850-509-2460
SPOUSE OF JORGE LUIS 3190 -Electronics CAn deliver. Commission S.G og
RODRIGUEZ; SUNTRUST 30 ie Poands tO Is America s consumer Iln
BANK; UNKNOWN TEN- 3220 -Furniture prtcinaec. $160 wk, elec, Satellite,
ANT #1; UNKNOWN TEN- 3230 -Garage/Yard Sales abg nld. o 8 2
ANT #2, 3240 -Guns 3230 www.ftc.gov/jobscams Gabg nlddpol8 2
Defendants. 3250- Good Things to Eat 1-877-FTC-HELP table. 12 X65' deck with
3260 Health & Fiiness Beautiful Vlew. Call Jeep Grand Cherokee
CAS NO 0800334CA 270- ewery/lotin A public service 850-653-5114 .1995 $595 down $3900 to-
3280 EMachinery/ message from the FTC o tal 0% Interest Daylight
NOTCEOF ORCLO 390 Meiulnquipment Apalachicl Irota hp ch and The News Herald RA SAEFRSL uoFnnig21
SURE SALE 3300 Miscellaneous Y lsiidAvriigHwy 98 9am/9pm
3310 Musical Instmments to 3pm. Boat/marine stuff, Department710-oms8-2576
NOTICE IS HEREBY 3320 -Plants &Shrubs/ ts ls, ladp II motorc a S.Gere 7110 Beach Home/
GIVEN pursuant to an Or- 3330 -Restaurant/Hotel Pulson chainsaw, Ilve-well, |Sland 7120 Co mrcial
der Rescheduling Foreclo- 3340 Sporting Goods lots of stuff. 237 8th St. 7130 Condefrownhouse
sure dated June 8th, and 3350 -Tickets (Buy &Sell) 1.. I I-, bar, satellite, 7140 Farms & Ranches
entered In Case No. \ ***,,:1 b250/wk, Call 7150 Lots and Acreage
08-000334 CA, of the Cir- Yard Sale E 14 7160 IVobile Homos/Lots
cult Court of the Four- 1049 Cypress St Sat. Sam 7170 Waterfront
tenh uica irut n| 3110 |Until. 7180 Investment
and for FRANKLIN County, Used Washers $15000 ..* 01 uof rTow

FI US BA~herel P~se CD -65 030 0REALESTAT FORRENT 2 br, 2 ba 12300sf Twnhm, 70 i e
Plaintiff and JORGE LUIS 3300 eloBusinessi Carrabelle, large deck
RODRIGUEZ; UNKNOWN STEEL BUILDINGS Commercial $650 mo. $650 dep. *
SPOSEOFJOGE UI 3 20 Summer Specials! m1o- ea seals Available 08/01/09 Call for 7100
RODRIGUEZ; SUNTRUST Wholesale Prices on 613 Condollownhouse an appt. 850-562-4996.
#1;UUNNKKNNOOWWNN30 6Fat30 rO 45x72, 610HousmemRent ante Laar Vilae1b 1 ba, 2d 1 k lw y remod-
ANT #2 are the Defend- Deliveryl Call Nowl 6160-RoomsforRent landlord pays utllties. vinyl sidldng, Lot In
ants. I will sell to the high- 2 Piece Living Room Set. 1-800-462-7930 Ext. 55 6170 Mobile Home/Lot $500/mo+ $300/dep. Pelogla Hosford C/H&A -
est and best bidder for Newhadwodfondtin nno -on Rentals 864-356-5949 $67,000 Call 570-4212 | 8 3

hdy 2 d09, te flw- fce m649(e war ny sacal 620vaaio ntle.s Fy In Go m nit Dodge Ram 2001 $1295
set for I ald Fnapel judg 222-9879 |adi33a10 Grnd 6140ssible5 by32pane pa down $700 totd 0% Inter-
Ideal for church or home. 610o 1, 2, & 3, br ner $625K for allobo. Call Ing 2816 W Hwy 98
LOT 2, BLOCK K, ST $3600. Living Waters As- Apalachicola, FL. (706)453-6521 or 9am/9pm 850-215-1769
GEORE ILAN GUF $49 Qeenmatres se. smblyof od n Aalahl-Call 850-643-7740. dogislandforsale@yahoo.
BECHS UI N.3,ABrand New In plastic coa al6381 r257 Prado, 3 br, 2 ba,
SUBIVIIONAS ERw/warranty. Can Deliver 32-29Very clean 3 br, 1 ba, 2 W/S/G Incl., $850 month,
MEOORD A I[HRPL 545-7112 Icreened po ches ok 850- 0067deposit, Call

BOOKPU2 PAGREC RD mo Lanarkd VIl now! C II Eastpoint New 3 bed- WyRn
OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, Ph. 850- 926-2032. room, 2 ba, $850 mo + When You Can
FLORIDA 100% Leather Living dep. No smoking or pets Own A Brand
Room Set. New, hardwood 850-670-8266
Any prsemeclarmnmusan In- foundation w/lifetime war- H U EST R TENe wHoumse? tGM Sira19 4x
the sale, If any, other than (ellery aal) 22-9876949 EPQMN 6110 NEEDED! KEOUGH's LANDING. 495res downgh 900tota 0%-
te dprt opetyheowne enadsen 4100 Help Wanton 257 Prado 1 br, 1 ba, apt Local resident plans 1-2GrecetfdanHO nncg286W wy9
must ile clampwih 604130 Employment W/S/G Incl. $575 month, + year absence from luxury approved. Affordable Lwv- 9am/9pm 850-215-1769
day after the sale Ifrain $0 eoi.Cl / a-rn eiec in ng m on the For ottenost
ays ~~~~~850-653-6735 Magnolla Ridge. Extremely 3br,2bt oe
$289- Brand new Pil- reasonable rent for home ranging from 1250-2000
MARCIA M. JOHNSON lowtop King Mattress Set. & property maintenance. sqft in Carrabelle's Newest
As Clerk of the Court Still In plastic w/. Warranty. | 4100 HeiaeVillaS References required. Con- Subdivision only %/ mile
Dy:Michtle eMaxwell 425-8374 Can deliver Installation/Maint/Repair A atet tact Karen Anders at from the Carrabelle River
(800)766-0310 or
Date thi 9thday f Jue Mantennce Aocep ing 3Apdp iations knders@wildfireaftermar- Pricingfromtthe $100 000s
2009. PerSOn &~ Non HC accessible Choose Your Model.
In ccrdncewih he 5pc Pub Set HV & SV of units. Some rental assis- Only 8 lots left!
mar athews ll wo~n~rnde ew Apalachicola tan em uch availa C) 656-Com8pnIc
Acprso e noedi a 5245-11 amn eeir A patent e d E al s8 653- ru hprvdhue 8210

aroce mige shaud ano htts per wxek Rwt bene Opportunity $6oup ngard elect. i ~ ~ ~ ~-t

the 3Coourt' dls50blt y7clol AL tNEW SFu1 Orth eic electrical, andr carpe te 1 banrk a t/fu- 5k r bLa Lhurs Open
PO. BOFXL30 3AP LACHI Plasticeliv1r94 5-W ranty. workplacetrVals dor I- tlhe &ebnadh fitim w rowgwt$rl t0G lfo te E Fiherm nBa

I m~p ir t contact re u r d o e travel m th lea e 45m k n 3 5 -580 8 1 hlTiot age n v e DI to l Den

Atre f Pani Beautiful 6 piece Q~ueen aces r a / 13 Trucks tr(e) ulcbn
eya&or an Solid Wood Bedroom Set Studio Apt. florida room, tiled floors, 8140- vme~ans Galley, lTfrim TasBath
2901 Stirling Road, w/dovetail drawers. Still In PeKTahr Furnished blinds, curtains, new s o wntr ylai Station, Platform with
Sulte 300 boxes. $2400 value, must Teacher need for Bay kitchen, carport, laundry B170 -Auto Pats ldeBto n
For Ludrdle Fordasacrifice $799 222-9879. Community School in Apa- Upstairs studio room with washer ad & Accessories ZInc's good. Runs
33312 ~~~Can Deliver lachicola. Full time posl- Qulet location, water & dryer, screened fish clean- 8210 -BoatsGo! ilTadlAk
Telphoe: 305 70-400 lonavalale taringinelectric Incl'd. Walk to In hd ag euiul 220 Personal Wateroraft Ig$900OOA
Fax: (305) 653-2329 August 2009. Interested? downtown. $700 mo. plus landscaped yard. Lanark 84 Bart& marine Panam City Marina slip0
July 9, 16, 2009 Please call (850) 323-0385 deposit 850-653-9116 or on 98. $850 mo, Includes Supplies 6r803.all850-819300
to set up an Interview. 850-774-7178 for appt. water/septic. $500 secu- 8310 Aircraft/Aviation or802-96
Bedroom Set rity Available 06/01. Call 8320 -ATW/OffRoadvehicles
Fill Dirt """':," 95 m" 7N""" PA R T T IM E 697-3115 day or night. 83 ao ersa railerss
New 2 br, 2 ba and office,
Fng Sgal GENERAL MAINTENANCE hardwood and tile floors, 81
II Um UM~wTECH POSITION FOR 32 UNIT stainless appliances, W/D 8 1 COMPLETE PACKAGES
APARTMENT COMPLEX IN siso ce fln ihFord Escort 1998 $495 FROM9
Bookhelc ofe ~lR CARRABELLE. MUST HAVE OWN verypondst, ry5 efolen an down $3900 total 0% Inter- 9
set. All Br pnd new In box. TOOLS AND PASS BACKGROUND dep. Call 370-6863 et gWuoFnac- All Welded, AllAluminum
g a $9951 e"a. set. 545-7112 Can AND) DUNG TEST. GEIN ER A~L Ing 21 wy 9
05 -5 -05 deliver 850-222-7783 KNOWLEDGE OF HVAC, K* 808ism 80-1-76 ts
PLUMBING, & ELECTRICAL 2Bsdr 2 Ba upper apartment. BOAT SHOW
Very large, clean, bright.
REQUIRED. Washer, dryer, stove, refrigerator FRI. & SAT.
APPLY AT 807 GRAY AVE. #33 ,,,it Icd,,,t d~epos nh) 800/fay RFloida
.(1 Cherry Solid MONDAY-THURSDAY need tobe quiet, clean and
Wood SlelghbBed. $224590 9:00AM TO 2:00PM (0)3-r soonr 5e. www.xtremeindustries.com
~425w8374n x PHONE 850-697-2017 Apalachicola


Franklin County's source of news for more than a century


| 110 | 1100 |
THE PLAT THEREOF, RE- THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
CORDED IN PLAT BOOK
3, PAGE(S) 16-17, PUBLIC Any person entitled to ex-
RECORDS OF FRANKLIN empt property Is required
COUNTY, FLORIDA to file a petition for deter-
A/K/A 708 WEST mlnation of exempt prop-
BAYSHORE DRIVE, ST erty with this Court WITHIN
GEORGE ISLAND, FL THE LATER OF FOUR
32328 MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUB-

th ae ny ohusr than TOO RNOW THE D
the property owner as of OF TERMINATION OF
the date of the Lls Pend- ANY PROCEEDING IN-
ens must file aclaim wthin VOLVING THE CON-
sixty (60) days after the STRUCTION, ADMISSION
sale. TO PROBATE, OR VALID-
ITY OF THE WILL OR IN-
WITNESS MY HAND and VOLVING ANY OTHER
the seal of this Court on MATTER AFFECTING ANY
June 23, 2009. PART OF THE ESTATE
SUBJECT TO SECTION
Marcla M. Johnson 732.402. FLORIDA STAT-
Clerk of the Circuit Court UTES.
By: Michele Maxwell
Deputy Clerk A surviving spouse seek-
Ing an elective share must
Florida Default Law group, file an election to take
PL. elective share within the
PO. Box 25018 time provided by law.
Tampa, Florida
33622-5018 All other creditors of the
F08071290 decedent and persons
July 9, 16, 2009 having claims or demands
2928T against the decedent's es-
NOTNCFEOOFW LIUSAEtateh m st fleo telr claims
PERMITTHREE MONTHS AFTER
THE DATE OF THE FIRST
Notice Is hereby given that B ATIONOFTHS
pursuant to Chapter 373, .
ornia lo f ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS
water use permit(s) has AN ILD OBECIONSB NOT
(have) been received by SO FILRED. WILL BEOR-
the Northwest Florida EE ARD h ae
Water Management Dis-thsteofrtsucan0f

Applcatin nuber: Personal representative:
I 07038 filed 06/24/2009 18AvneE
Flcklng ad CopanyApalachicola, Florida
nte,57 OMulb~eary Street 32320
31202 THOMAS M. SHULER of
Requesting a maximum SHULERAND S HLR
withdrawal of 4,9 mal PstOOff c~e rawer 850
ca gsmusoeApdlachicola, Florida
by a proposed facility (850)d 653-9226 r
General withdrawalFlrd Ba Nubr
location(s) In Franklin 0481
Couny: O9S ROW, ec.Attorney for Personal Rep-
29 July 9 16, 2009
Interested persons may
object to or comment
upon the applications or I
submit a written request
for a copy of the staff
reports) containing pro- 2970T
posed agency action re- IN THE SECOND JUDI-
garding the application(s) CIAL CIRCUIT IN AND
by writing tothe Division of FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY
tResou o thRe ulat ridof FLORIDA
Water Management Dis- SUPERIOR BANK,
trict, attention Terrl Peter- Plaintiff,
smoen~t 1D~rveW Hvanan alr vs.
crda 23-7 b ue mc c ve f Nd~ RMBS and BRAD
d'c ck p.m. on July 22 CS O0-2-A

No further public notice NOTICE OFSALE
wil bbe provide t ) d Ng dNEusn H
co stit tes ronsructiv Juadg den ef 21 cls

affected persons. A copy 08-524-CA of the Circuit
of the staff reports) must Court of the Second Judl-
be requested In order to clal Circuit In and for
remain advised of further Franklin County, Florida
proceedings and any pub- wherein the parties were
110 hearing date. Substan- the Plaintiff, SUPERIOR
tlally affected persons are BANK, and the Defend-
entitled to request an ad- ants, ROBIN COMBS and
ministrative hearing re- BRAD HEARD, JR., I will
garding the proposed sell to the highest and best
agency action by submit- bidder, for cash, at 11:00
tln d gwetthe repqres oan- am.Eastern Tine) onthal
of 28-601.201, Florida Ad- the front steps of the
ministrative Code. Notices Franklin County Court-
of Proposed Agency Ac- house, Apalachicola, Flor-
tlon will be malled only to lda, the
prors uws. have filed followmng- escribed real
July 9, 2009 said Final Judgment of
2956T Foreclosure:
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE SECOND JUDI- Lst) 2 V3ll 9 &10)
CIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND ae o
FOR FRANKLIN COUNTY, Carrabelle, according to
FLORIDA te pdas filed In there Pbi
PROBAEDIVSION County, Florida, In Plat
IN RE: ESTATE OF Book 10, page 19; TO-
JD [1D Blair, Sr., GETHER CWoTHbala rigt aod
Heard, Jr., under that as-
File Number 09-28-PR signment recorded Febru-
ary 26, 2007, at OR Book
NOTICE OF 928, page 789, and that
ADMIISTRTION non-exclusive easement
recorded February 26,
The administration of the 2007, at OR Book 928,
estate of John D. Blair, de- page 795, each In the pub-
cased, Cs pdendingrInn ouctsrda rnI

Market Sturet Sut 23orso Franklin County, lrd;adsb

eony lrd t Poat eTh dasauce fulebce r t

repesetatve Atorny DTED this 25th dda ofeb
are setn fothe b delow Jue 00

which Is theBy Michelen M'2,07axwell
Conotic is srveho hae, Jul 92, pae716, 2009 c
objketon Sthaet, challenge rd fFrnln
the alidity ofa the wlln h

ndie sate ns tsiatheo esd T scefu i
thisat Courth ar lI u-teslewle required to 29T
filetheir195 objetions with e PUBLI NOqisTIE t
this Courtcat WIHI THEl
LATER OFrsnttv THEENotcshrbygvnta
MOTH S AFER THEa meigoTeNrh
DATreEOF THvE' FIRSTy PUB-D wet Flord Transporta


SERVICE OFA OPY F EDT oae nGl
THISNTIC ON THEM. County atheEmrgenc

oOperations Center Build-n
All creiditor of the dite-ng50bendteRet
oal rersnai,
venue, M Adminltlo tr


navng lams r emas u ldig locae ies 1
against decedent's estate Cecil G. Costin Sr. Blvd.,
on whom e doy owitthh s ote odsA
thr onthpa cthedat accommodations to partic-
tchismnsot ethmusts ileCtei spak odIete hieetingo I
WITHIN THE LATER OF dor Authority at least 48
T R M NN H EA F TE h urs nr o o 2ne m tie
NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS or by email at
ATRCETOEADCATE Ammber.Perr~yman@hdrinc.


HE LP IS ON LY A



A. PH ONE CA LL


THE CTAR


~f9


""


AHrAY


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& CARRABELL'~


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i;





I'


Thursday, July 9, 2009


Local


By Lois Swoboda
Times Staff Writer

July 4 in Carrabelle was
marked by a series of celebra-
tions as local government and
not-for-profits gave back to the
community.
On Saturday, Carrabelle cel-
ebrated not only Independence
Day, but also the 10th anniver-
sary of the founding of the Car-
rabelle Lighthouse Society. The
lighthouse was open in the after-
noon to the public at no charge.
Society President Arlene
Oehler said people were lined
up waiting to get into both the
lighthouse and the gift shop
when they opened for business.
The lighthouse raised nearly
$600 in donations and gift shop
sales on Saturday afternoon,
she said.
"We allowed people to go up
five at a time, and it was con-
stant all day long. There was no
lull," Oehler said.
Lighthouse enthusiasts
also enjoyed a 10th anniver-
sary cake and low country boil
prepared by Gus and Ruth
Winchester, authors of a sea-
food cookbook available at the
gift shop.
Society founders Barbara
Revel and Mary Ann Shields
were on hand as volunteers for
the big day along with about a
dozen other helpers.
"It was a marvelous 10th an-
niversary celebration. We could
not have had better community
participation," said Oehler.
The new Carrabelle His-
tory Museum also was open all
day on the Fourth, and hostess
Tamara Allen said many local
people visited it for the first
time.
Later in the afternoon, locals
gathered at Tilly Miller Park for
a home town celebration featur-
ing games and goodies. A cake
walk and pie contest raised
nearly $100 for the Franklin
County Senior Center.
Librarian Annie Birchwell's
apple pie took first place.
The city treated residents
to 30 free watermelons to the
delight of young and old. Later
there were relay races and
a water balloon contest with
prizes donated by local busi-
nesses,
Allen said about 100 people
attended. "For a first-time
event, we feel it was very suc-
cessful," she said.
A traditional fireworks dis-
play marked the perfect end of
a perfect day in the best little
city in Florida.


PHOTO BY ROD GASCHE
At top, youngsters and oldsters alike joined in the
relay races at Tilly Miller Park on Saturday afternoon,
Above, picnic organizer Steve Allen portioned out
watermelons donated by the city at Carrabelle's
Independence Day celebration in Tilly Miller Park.
Above left, President Arlene Oehler and friends
enjoy the view from the top of the Crooked River
Light at the 10Oth anniversary celebration. At left,
Gus Winchester and wife, Ruth, prepared a low
country boil at the Carrabelle Lighthouse Society's
July 4 celebration.


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B8 | The Times


Carrabelle sparkles on Independence Day


HAPPENIING

Free computer class-
es resume Friday, July
17, at the Carrabelle
branch from 3 to 5 p.m.
Instructor Charles Saw-
yer will be teaching Mi-
crosoft PowerPoint 2007.
Students will learn how
to create professional
presentations, using
text, clipart, pictures
and other strategies.
On Saturday, July 18,
from 10 a.m. to noon,
Sawyer will teach Com-
puter Basics II. Students
will learn to search,
manage and organize
files using Windows Ex-
plorer. This class is for
intermediate computer
users.
Three more computer
sessions will be offered
in August; to take ad-
vantage of each and ev-
ery computer class, call
the Carrabelle library at
697-2366 to sign up.
Being Creative @
Your Public Library, a
summer reading pro-
gram, continues each
Friday from 10 a.m. to
noon at the Carrabelle
and Eastpoint Library
until Friday, July 31. This
week's theme is Color-
ful Science, with games,
science demonstrations
and stories.
Check out the great
beach reads at both li-
braries. This summer's
bestselling authors have
published a wide variety
of literature, including
mystery, romance, ac-
tion adventure and more.
If your favorite selection
is already checked out,
we can place a hold for
you in person or over the
phone. Don't miss out
on this summer's great
reads.
For more information
about any library pro-
gram, contact the Carra-
belle branch at 697-2366
or the Eastpoint branch
at 670-8151.


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